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Sample records for neck carcinoma diagnostics

  1. Molecular diagnostic alterations in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck and potential diagnostic applications.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hunt, J.L.; Barnes, L.; Lewis Jr, J.S.; Mahfouz, M.E.; Slootweg, P.J.; Thompson, L.D.; Cardesa, A.; Devaney, K.O.; Gnepp, D.R.; Westra, W.H.; Rodrigo, J.P.; Woolgar, J.A.; Rinaldo, A.; Triantafyllou, A.; Takes, R.P.; Ferlito, A.

    2014-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is a common malignancy that continues to be difficult to treat and cure. In many organ systems and tumor types, there have been significant advances in the understanding of the molecular basis for tumorigenesis, disease progression and genetic

  2. Diagnostic value of magnetic resonance lymphography in preoperative staging of clinically negative necks in squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity: A pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wensing, B.M.; Deserno, W.M.L.L.G.; Bondt, R.B. de; Marres, H.A.M.; Merkx, M.A.W.; Barentsz, J.O.; Hoogen, F.J. van den

    2011-01-01

    Pilot study evaluating the diagnostic value of magnetic resonance lymphography (MRL) compared with conventional imaging techniques in the preoperative staging of the clinically (palpable) negative neck (cN0) in squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity (SCCOC). Patients with SCCOC without clinical

  3. Jugular neck dissection for NO neck supraglottic carcinoma

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    Petrović Željko

    2004-01-01

    metastases. The incidence of occult metastases was directly related to the degree of the local spread of the tumor in the supraglottis excluding the epilarynx (Table 1. Occult metastases were usually ipsilateral, like the palpable ones. In medially localized tumors bilateral netastases were possible. Ipsilateral metastases were more frequent than both bilateral and contralateral ones. The possibility of contraiateral and bilateral occult metastases necessitated bilateral neck dissection. Postoperative radiotherapy (60 Gy was given to all patients with verified occult metastases. Only in two patients (1% of the total did metastases develop subsequently, indicating the effectiveness of planned postoperatrive radiotherapy. DISCUSSION Controversies in application of jugular, selective neck dissection are presently since it has been in use, because of the unclear role wich regional lymph tissue play in antitumor immune response. Jugular, selective neck dissection was advocated in all patients with a primary supraglottic laryngeal carcinomas. It was suggested that selective neck dissection was needed only in advanced (T3 and T4 tumors. Selective dissection is believed to be needed only when tumor has spread into the vallecula, the base of the tongue, or the medial wall of the piriform sinus. The idea of selective neck dissection has been opposed since the protective role of the cervical lymph tissue has been stressed. Ultrasound and computerized tomography of the neck cannot detect occult metastases. Today, only removal and histological examination of the lymph tissue can determine occult metastasis. The importance of selective neck dissection is considered in diagnostic biopsy procedure by wich occult metastatic spread in the neck region is established. CONCLUSION Due to the tendency of supraglottic carcinoma resulting in occult cervical metastases, early detection is imperative in order to apply the appropriate therapy. Occult cervical metastases are usually ipsilateral, but

  4. Cancer/testis antigens: A prospective reagent as diagnostic and immunotherapeutic targets for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

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    Shohei Domae

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Numerous tumor antigens have so far been identified from various tumors using the serological identification of antigens by recombinant expression cloning (SEREX method. Among them, cancer/testis (CT antigens are considered promising target molecules for immunotherapy for patients with various cancers. We performed several SEREX analyses of various cancers to identify CT antigens, including gastric adenocarcinoma, lung adenocarcinoma, and colon cancer, and consequently identified additional CT antigens, such as XAGE-1, CCDC62-2, GKAP1, and TEKT5. However, although SEREX analysis of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC has been performed several times, only a few CT or HNSCC specific antigens have yet been isolated. Compared with other tumors, a small number of studies have been reported on the antigen proteins specific to HNSCC. We here reported the expression of selected CT antigens and their immunogenicity in patients with HNSCC. The results obtained suggested that CCDC62-2, GKAP1, and TEKT5 are immunogenic in HNSCC and also demonstrated their potencies as diagnostic markers for patients with HNSCC in combination with other CT antigens such as NY-ESO-1, MAGE-A3, and MAGE-A4.

  5. DNA methylation in tumour and normal mucosal tissue of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients: new diagnostic approaches and treatment.

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    Laytragoon-Lewin, Nongnit; Rutqvist, Lars Erik; Lewin, Freddi

    2013-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is the sixth most common malignancy worldwide. Long-term survival of this patient group has been marginally improved during the last 30 years. This is due to the high recurrence rate of local primary or development of second primary tumours in the patients. We found that normal-appearing surgical margins and distant mucosal tissue of HNSCC patients contained tumour suppressor genes DNA methylation. These cells might be the progenitors of the tumour recurrences. Such molecular abnormalities in the normal-appearing mucosa tissue were not possible to detect in the clinic or by standard histopathologically analysis. To improve clinical outcome, the convenient and cost-effective molecular analysis such as methylation-specific PCR should be added to the pathological diagnosis armamentarium for HNSCC patients. The beneficial effect of antimethylating agents as additional treatment or for cancer chemoprevention, in this high-risk patient group, warrants further investigation.

  6. The Diagnostic Value of Cervical Lymph Node Metastasis in Head and Neck Squamous Carcinoma by Using Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Computed Tomography Perfusion

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    Jin Zhong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The aim of this study was to compare diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI with computed tomography perfusion (CTP for preoperative detection of metastases to lymph nodes (LNs in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (SCC. Methods. Between May 2010 and April 2012, 30 patients with head and neck SCC underwent preoperative DWI and CTP. Two radiologists measured apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC values and CTP parameters independently. Surgery and histopathologic examinations were performed on all patients. Results. On DWI, 65 LNs were detected in 30 patients. The mean ADC value of metastatic nodes was lower than benign nodes and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05. On CTP images, the mean value in metastatic nodes of blood flow (BF and blood volume (BV was higher than that in benign nodes, and mean transit time (MTT in metastatic nodes was lower than that in benign nodes. There were significant differences in BF and MTT values between metastatic and benign LNs (P<0.05. There were significant differences between the AUCs of DWI and CTP (Z=4.612, P<0.001. Conclusion. DWI with ADC value measurements may be more accurate than CTP for the preoperative diagnosis of cervical LN metastases.

  7. Genetic alterations in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas

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    Nagai M.A.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The genetic alterations observed in head and neck cancer are mainly due to oncogene activation (gain of function mutations and tumor suppressor gene inactivation (loss of function mutations, leading to deregulation of cell proliferation and death. These genetic alterations include gene amplification and overexpression of oncogenes such as myc, erbB-2, EGFR and cyclinD1 and mutations, deletions and hypermethylation leading to p16 and TP53 tumor suppressor gene inactivation. In addition, loss of heterozygosity in several chromosomal regions is frequently observed, suggesting that other tumor suppressor genes not yet identified could be involved in the tumorigenic process of head and neck cancers. The exact temporal sequence of the genetic alterations during head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC development and progression has not yet been defined and their diagnostic or prognostic significance is controversial. Advances in the understanding of the molecular basis of head and neck cancer should help in the identification of new markers that could be used for the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of the disease.

  8. Transoral robotic surgery for the management of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma of unknown primary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Channir, Hani Ibrahim; Rubek, Niclas; Nielsen, Hans Ulrik

    2015-01-01

    CONCLUSION: The addition of transoral robotic surgery (TORS) in the diagnostic management of patients classified with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma of unknown primary (SCCUP) is promising and appears to improve detection rates of the primary tumour. The approach presented in this first...

  9. Current philosophy in the surgical management of neck metastases for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coskun, H.H.; Medina, J.E.; Robbins, K.T.; Silver, C.E.; Strojan, P.; Teymoortash, A.; Pellitteri, P.K.; Rodrigo, J.P.; Stoeckli, S.J.; Shaha, A.R.; Suarez, C.; Hartl, D.M.; Bree, R. de; Takes, R.P.; Hamoir, M.; Pitman, K.T.; Rinaldo, A.; Ferlito, A.

    2015-01-01

    Neck dissection is an important treatment for metastases from upper aerodigestive carcinoma; an event that markedly reduces survival. Since its inception, the philosophy of the procedure has undergone significant change from one of radicalism to the current conservative approach. Furthermore,

  10. Elective Neck Dissection in Patients With Head and Neck Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amit, Moran; Na'ara, Shorook; Sharma, Kanika

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) accounts for 3-5 % of all head and neck malignancies. Investigations of outcomes from elective neck dissection (END) for patients with ACC are sparse. This study aimed to assess the impact of END on the survival of patients with ACC. METHODS: This retros......BACKGROUND: Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) accounts for 3-5 % of all head and neck malignancies. Investigations of outcomes from elective neck dissection (END) for patients with ACC are sparse. This study aimed to assess the impact of END on the survival of patients with ACC. METHODS......: This retrospective multicentered study investigated 270 patients who underwent neck dissection. A multivariate analysis assessed associations of clinical and histopathologic characteristics with survival outcomes. RESULTS: The primary tumor sites included the oral cavity in 250 patients (55 %), the major salivary...

  11. Incidental cervical metastases from thyroid carcinoma during neck dissection.

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    Périé, S; Torti, F; Lefevre, M; Chabbert-Buffet, N; Jafari, A; Lacau St Guily, J

    2016-12-01

    To quantify and discuss the prevalence of unsuspected thyroid lymph node metastases discovered in specimens from neck dissection for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and discuss the impact on patient management. Retrospective study between May 2004 and January 2007. University hospital. Pathological analysis of cervical lymph node dissection performed during surgery for HNSCC in a total of 349 neck dissections in 266 consecutive patients. Twenty-one patients showed metastatic lymph nodes from thyroid cancer (prevalence 7.9%): 13 cases were metastatic from a papillary thyroid carcinoma and 8 cases from a follicular carcinoma. In 5 of the 21 patients, classical dissection was associated to recurrent nerve dissection and unilateral lobectomy; no thyroid carcinoma was found. Thirteen patients received radiotherapy for HNSCC. Follow-up comprised annual ultrasonographic examination of the neck and thyroid in these 21 patients. Total thyroidectomy was decided on in 5, with discovery of 3 micro-papillary thyroid carcinomas, in a single patient (complementary (131)I treatment). No thyroid carcinomas were found for the other 4 patients. No patients died from thyroid carcinoma during follow-up (mean: 41 months). The prevalence of lymph node metastasis from thyroid carcinoma in cervical lymph node dissection during treatment of HNSCC seems higher (7.9%) than rates reported in the literature (0.3 to 1.6%). This may be due to the histopathological methods employed. Management of patients should be discussed in the light of thyroid ultrasonography and prognosis of HNSCC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Genetic susceptibility to head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lacko, M.; Braakhuis, B.J.M.; Sturgis, E.M.; Boedeker, C.C.; Suarez, C.; Rinaldo, A.; Ferlito, A.; Takes, R.P.

    2014-01-01

    Head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is the sixth most common cancer worldwide, and its incidence is growing. Although environmental carcinogens and carcinogenic viruses are the main etiologic factors, genetic predisposition obviously plays a risk-modulating role, given that not all individ

  13. Contemporary management of lymph node metastases from an unknown primary to the neck : I. A review of diagnostic approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strojan, Primoz; Ferlito, Alfio; Medina, Jesus E.; Woolgar, Julia A.; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Robbins, K. Thomas; Fagan, Johannes J.; Mendenhall, William M.; Paleri, Vinidh; Silver, Carl E.; Olsen, Kerry D.; Corry, June; Suarez, Carlos; Rodrigo, Juan P.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Devaney, Kenneth O.; Kowalski, Luiz P.; Hartl, Dana M.; Haigentz, Missak; Werner, Jochen A.; Pellitteri, Phillip K.; de Bree, Remco; Wolf, Gregory T.; Takes, Robert P.; Genden, Eric M.; Hinni, Michael L.; Mondin, Vanni; Shaha, Ashok R.; Barnes, Leon

    2013-01-01

    In an era of advanced diagnostics, metastasis to cervical lymph nodes from an occult primary tumor is a rare clinical entity and accounts for approximately 3% of head and neck malignancies. Histologically, two thirds of cases are squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs), with other tissue types less common i

  14. Contemporary management of lymph node metastases from an unknown primary to the neck: I. A review of diagnostic approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strojan, P.; Ferlito, A.; Medina, J.E.; Woolgar, J.A.; Rinaldo, A.; Robbins, K.T.; Fagan, J.J.; Mendenhall, W.M.; Paleri, V.; Silver, C.E.; Olsen, K.D.; Corry, J.; Suarez, C.; Rodrigo, J.P.; Langendijk, J.A.; Devaney, K.O.; Kowalski, L.P.; Hartl, D.M.; Haigentz Jr., M.; Werner, J.A.; Pellitteri, P.K.; Bree, R. de; Wolf, G.T.; Takes, R.P.; Genden, E.M.; Hinni, M.L.; Mondin, V.; Shaha, A.R.; Barnes, L.

    2013-01-01

    In an era of advanced diagnostics, metastasis to cervical lymph nodes from an occult primary tumor is a rare clinical entity and accounts for approximately 3% of head and neck malignancies. Histologically, two thirds of cases are squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs), with other tissue types less common i

  15. Contemporary management of lymph node metastases from an unknown primary to the neck: I. A review of diagnostic approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strojan, P.; Ferlito, A.; Medina, J.E.; Woolgar, J.A.; Rinaldo, A.; Robbins, K.T.; Fagan, J.J.; Mendenhall, W.M.; Paleri, V.; Silver, C.E.; Olsen, K.D.; Corry, J.; Suarez, C.; Rodrigo, J.P.; Langendijk, J.A.; Devaney, K.O.; Kowalski, L.P.; Hartl, D.M.; Haigentz Jr., M.; Werner, J.A.; Pellitteri, P.K.; Bree, R. de; Wolf, G.T.; Takes, R.P.; Genden, E.M.; Hinni, M.L.; Mondin, V.; Shaha, A.R.; Barnes, L.

    2013-01-01

    In an era of advanced diagnostics, metastasis to cervical lymph nodes from an occult primary tumor is a rare clinical entity and accounts for approximately 3% of head and neck malignancies. Histologically, two thirds of cases are squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs), with other tissue types less common i

  16. The role of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cancer stem cells in tumorigenesis, metastasis, and treatment failure

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is the sixth most common cancer worldwide. Despite advances in diagnostic and therapeutic methods, survival of HNSCC remains unchanged over the last 30 years with treatment failure and metastases being the strongest indicators of poor outcome. Cancer stem cells (CSC) have been identified in multiple other solid tumors, including breast, prostate, and pancreatic carcinoma. Recently, a subpopulation of tumor cells has been identified in HNSCC based ...

  17. UNILATERAL BIG HOCKEY STICK INCISION FOR NECK DISSECTION IN HEAD AND NECK CARCINOMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘宝国; 赵振生; 李明强; 陈荣鋭; 王建军; 张乃嵩

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate for the feasibility and advantages performed by the unilateral big hockey stick incision (BHSI) in head and neck carcinoma. Methods: Neck dissection by using the unilateral big hockey stick incision (BHSI) was performed on 93 patients with head and neck carcinoma. Results: The big hockey stick incision has a cosmetic scar and not scar contraction and is barely visible and easily covered in hair and clothing; sufficient exposure of the operation field; a small area of marginal necrosis was occasionally seen at the apex of the skin flap due to having preoperative radiotherapy. Conclusion: The unilateral big hockey stick incision has adequate surgical access, good healing of skin flaps, and a good cosmetic result.

  18. Prediction of Neck Dissection Requirement After Definitive Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

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    Thariat, Juliette [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology/IBDC CNRS UMR, Cancer Center Antoine-Lacassagne, University Nice Sophia-Antipolis, Nice, Cedex 2 (France); Ang, K. Kian; Allen, Pamela K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Ahamad, Anesa [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); University of the West Indies, St. Augustine (Trinidad and Tobago); Williams, Michelle D. [Department of Pathology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Myers, Jeffrey N. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Department of Cancer Biology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); El-Naggar, Adel K. [Department of Pathology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Ginsberg, Lawrence E. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Rosenthal, David I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Glisson, Bonnie S. [Department of Thoracic/Head and Neck Medicine, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Morrison, William H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Weber, Randal S. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Garden, Adam S., E-mail: agarden@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Background: This analysis was undertaken to assess the need for planned neck dissection in patients with a complete response (CR) of involved nodes after irradiation and to determine the benefit of a neck dissection in those with less than CR by tumor site. Methods: Our cohort included 880 patients with T1-4, N1-3M0 squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx, larynx, or hypopharynx who received treatment between 1994 and 2004. Survival curves were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier Method, comparisons of rates with the log-rank test and prognostic factors by Cox's proportional hazard model. Results: Nodal CR occurred in 377 (43%) patients, of whom 365 patients did not undergo nodal dissection. The 5-year actuarial regional control rate of patients with CR was 92%. Two hundred sixty-eight of the remaining patients (53%) underwent neck dissections. The 5-year actuarial regional control rate for patients without a CR was 84%. Those who had a neck dissection fared better with 5-year actuarial regional control rates of 90% and 76% for those operated and those not operated (p < 0.001). Variables associated with poorer regional control rates included higher T and N stage, non-oropharynx cancers, non-CR, both clinical and pathological. Conclusions: With 92% 5-year neck control rate without neck dissection after CR, there is little justification for systematic neck dissection. The addition of a neck dissection resulted in higher neck control after partial response though patients with viable tumor on pathology specimens had poorer outcomes. The identification of that subgroup that benefits from additional treatment remains a challenge.

  19. Extruded highly proliferative benign mucous neck cells: a peculiar histologic mimic of poorly cohesive gastric carcinoma.

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    Arnason, Thomas; Lauwers, Gregory Y

    2014-10-01

    Histologic mimics of poorly cohesive gastric carcinoma are uncommon but are important for pathologists to recognize. Here we report 2 cases of a novel histologic pattern mimicking poorly cohesive gastric carcinoma. In both cases, light microscopy revealed sheets of discohesive epithelial cells with prominent mitoses that have high proliferative activity, with a Ki67 proliferation index greater than 70%. One case was diagnosed as poorly cohesive carcinoma at an outside hospital and the other was referred in consultation as atypia of undetermined significance. Reexamination of the hematoxylin-eosin slides revealed morphologic clues that these sheets of discohesive cells represent artifactual extrusion of the highly proliferative neck zone from the surrounding benign mucosa. In contrast to poorly cohesive cancer, this artifact lacks all of the following diagnostic features: nuclear atypia, signet ring cell morphology, and intercellular stroma with infiltrating single cells between glands. Eight and 14 months later, both patients remain cancer free. © The Author(s) 2013.

  20. Neck masses: diagnostic analysis of 630 cases in Turkish population.

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    Balikci, H H; Gurdal, M M; Ozkul, M H; Karakas, M; Uvacin, O; Kara, N; Alp, A; Ozbay, I

    2013-11-01

    Neck masses can be classified into three main categories: congenital, inflammatory and neoplastic. Our aim was to determine the distribution of diagnosis in patients who were followed-up for a neck mass and had undergone surgery for diagnostic indications. Six hundred and thirty cases referred to the Otorhinolaryngology and Head Neck Surgery Department of Haseki Research and Training Hospital between January 2005 and February 2012 with a neck mass who underwent excisional or incisional biopsy to establish a histopathologic diagnosis were retrospectively evaluated. Patients with a diagnosis of upper aerodigestive tract malignancy were excluded from the study. As well as the patients with thyroid masses were excluded. Only unknown primary neck masses were included in the study. The neck masses were categorized as inflammatory (33.49 %), congenital (18.9 %) or neoplastic (47.6 %). Neoplastic masses were either benign (51 %) or malignant (49 %) tumors. The most common causes were tuberculous lymphadenitis (40.28 %) among inflammatory masses, thyroglossal duct cysts (32.77 %) among congenital masses, pleomorphic adenoma (22.33 %) among benign neoplastic masses, and lymphoma (20 %) among malignant neoplastic masses. The most common types of mass were congenital in the 0-20 year age group, benign neoplastic in 21-40-year-old and malignant neoplastic in the >40-year group. Any neck mass, especially in an elderly patient, should be managed with caution as a considerable proportion may be malignant. In children and adolescents, a neck mass requiring surgery is most likely to be congenital. Tuberculosis should be considered as a cause of a neck mass due to a long-term inflammatory process in a developing country.

  1. Cutaneous metastases from head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

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    Poovaneswaran, Sangeetha; Paleri, Vinidh; Charlton, Fraser; Dobrowsky, Werner; Kelly, Charles

    2012-08-01

    The presence of cutaneous metastases in squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck (SCCHN) is rare and associated with a dismal prognosis. It is vital to distinguish these lesions from direct invasion of the skin by SCCHN or primary cutaneous malignancies as the prognosis is vastly different and so is the management. In this case report, we present four cases of cutaneous metastases and also briefly review the literature pertaining to this phenomenon.

  2. Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma in a Branchial Cleft Cyst without a Thyroid Primary: Navigating a Diagnostic Dilemma

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    Douglas S. Ruhl

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare case of papillary thyroid carcinoma incidentally found within a branchial cleft cyst. Only four other cases have been described in the literature. A total thyroidectomy and selective neck dissection was performed, and no evidence of occult primary disease was found after review of fine sections. Branchial cleft cysts are the most common lateral neck masses. Ectopic thyroid tissue within a branchial cleft cyst is an unusual phenomenon, and papillary thyroid carcinoma arising from this tissue is extremely rare. Clinicians are left with a diagnostic dilemma when presented with thyroid tissue neoplasm within a neck cyst in the absence of a thyroid primary—is this a case of metastatic disease with a missed primary or rather carcinoma arising in ectopic thyroid tissue? A thorough discussion of the etiologies of these lateral neck masses is reviewed including the embryogenesis of thyroid tissue in a branchial cleft cyst. The prognosis of patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma in lateral neck cysts without a primary site identified appears to be good following excision of the cyst and total thyroidectomy. Other management recommendations regarding these unique lateral neck malignancies are also presented.

  3. ADAM8 in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck: a retrospective study

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    Zielinski Valerie

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAMs have been associated with multiple malignancies. ADAMs are involved in cell fusion, cell migration, membrane protein shedding and proteolysis. ADAM8 has been found to be overexpressed in squamous cell carcinomas of the lung. A new study showed that ADAM8 is significantly overexpressed in metastasis of squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck (HNSCC. Methods We determined ADAM8 levels in the serum of 79 HNSCC patients at the time of diagnosis, in 35 patients 3 months after treatment and in 10 patients 1 year after therapy and compared the results to the sera of 31 healthy volunteers. We also constructed tissue microarrays to detect ADAM8 immunohistochemically in 100 patients. The results were correlated with the survival data of the patients to determine the diagnostic and prognostic value. Results The data demonstrated that patients with high ADAM8 expression in the tumor have worse survival rates. We found that high ADAM8 serum levels correlated with high ADAM8 expression in tumor samples. Soluble ADAM8 levels did not show any prognostic or diagnostic properties. Conclusion In summary ADAM8 expression is a prognostic factor for survival of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

  4. Adenylyl Cyclase-Associated Protein 1 in the Development of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinomas.

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    Kakurina, G V; Kondakova, I V; Cheremisina, O V; Shishkin, D A; Choinzonov, E L

    2016-03-01

    We compared the content of adenylyl cyclase-associated protein 1 (CAP1) in the blood and tissues of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (with and without regional metastases), patients with chronic inflammatory diseases aggravated by laryngeal and laryngopharyngeal dysplasia, and healthy individuals. The data suggest that serum CAP1 concentration correlated with the depth of primary tumor invasion and the presence of regional metastases. In cancer patients, the serum level of CAP1 was lower than in patients with laryngeal and laryngopharyngeal dysplasia, which can be of importance for differential and timely diagnostics of malignant tumors.

  5. (123)I-interleukin-2 uptake in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loose, David; Signore, Alberto; Staelens, Ludovicus; Bulcke, Katia Vanden; Vermeersch, Hubert; Dierckx, Rudi Andre; Bonanno, Elena; de Wiele, Christophe Van

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Information obtained on the IL-2 receptor status of tumour infiltrating lymphocytes in patients suffering from squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SSCHN) before and after IL-2 treatment may lead to a better understanding of the immunological changes and related kinetics induce

  6. Perforating oesophageal carcinoma presenting as necrotizing fasciitis of the neck.

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    Francque, S M; Van Laer, C; Struyf, N; Vermeulen, P; Corthouts, B; Jorens, P G

    2001-10-01

    A patient with a history of schizophrenia was admitted to our hospital in an already severe stage of necrotizing fasciitis of the neck, complicated with mediastinitis and gangrene. Later on, he also developed a vena cava superior syndrome and sepsis. In the few cases and small series described in the literature, necrotizing fasciitis of the neck is usually associated with surgery or trauma. Less frequently, an orodental or pharyngeal infection, often innocuous, is the underlying cause. None of these causes could be identified in our patient. Initially, on computer-assisted tomography (CT) scan, a tracheal rupture was suspected, but this diagnosis could not be confirmed on bronchoscopic examination. On gastroscopy, a stenotic oesophageal segment was discovered. Biopsy of this segment showed a poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma. The patient died in sepsis. Autopsy confirmed the presence of a large proximal oesophageal tumour with perforation. As far as we know, no case of a necrotizing fasciitis of the neck caused by perforation of a formerly unknown oesophageal carcinoma has been reported. Even mediastinitis, with or without gangrene, is rarely associated with oesophageal cancer, and in the few cases reported it is always due to fistulization after surgery.

  7. Adrenocortical carcinoma in pregnancy: A diagnostic dilemma

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma is a rare disease. Additionally, in the case of coexisting pregnancy, there are diagnostic difficulties due to associated physiological hormonal changes as well as imaging limitations. Cushing's syndrome and virilization during pregnancy is a rare entity with few cases reported in the literature. Misdiagnosis is common as the syndrome may be easily confused with preeclampsia or gestational diabetes. We present the case of a 31-year-old pregnant woman with rapidly deve...

  8. Adrenocortical carcinoma in pregnancy: A diagnostic dilemma.

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    Jairath, Ankush; Aulakh, Baldev S

    2014-07-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma is a rare disease. Additionally, in the case of coexisting pregnancy, there are diagnostic difficulties due to associated physiological hormonal changes as well as imaging limitations. Cushing's syndrome and virilization during pregnancy is a rare entity with few cases reported in the literature. Misdiagnosis is common as the syndrome may be easily confused with preeclampsia or gestational diabetes. We present the case of a 31-year-old pregnant woman with rapidly developing symptoms related to hormonally active adrenocortical cancer.

  9. A Phase I Study of LJM716 in Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Head and Neck, or HER2+ Breast Cancer or Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-21

    HER2 + Breast Cancer, HER2 + Gastric Cancer, Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Head and Neck, Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; HER2 + Breast Cancer; HER2 + Gastric Cancer; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Head and Neck; Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  10. The Role of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cancer Stem Cells in Tumorigenesis, Metastasis and Treatment Failure

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) is the 6th most common cancer worldwide. Despite advances in diagnostic and therapeutic methods, survival of HNSCC remains unchanged over the last 30 years with treatment failure and metastases being the strongest indicators of poor outcome. Cancer stem cells (CSC) have been identified in multiple other solid tumors, including breast, prostate and pancreatic carcinoma. Recently, a subpopulation of tumor cells has been identified in HNSCC based on the...

  11. Targeted sequencing reveals TP53 as a potential diagnostic biomarker in the post-treatment surveillance of head and neck cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ginkel, Joost H.; de Leng, Wendy W J; de Bree, Remco; van Es, Robert J J; Willems, Stefan M.

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) form a large heterogeneous group of tumors and have a relatively poor outcome in advanced cases. Revealing the underlying genetic mutations in HNSCC facilitates the development of diagnostic biomarkers, which might lead to improved diagnosis and post tr

  12. 18F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography in diagnosis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohde, Max; Dyrvig, Anne-Kirstine; Johansen, Jørgen;

    2014-01-01

    18F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography-scan (PET/CT) is used increasingly for detection of cancer. Precise diagnostic assessment of tumour extension in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is of critical importance for ensuring that patients receive...

  13. Genetic Susceptibility to Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacko, Martin [Department of Otorhinolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); Braakhuis, Boudewijn J.M. [Department of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Sturgis, Erich M. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery and Department of Epidemiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Boedeker, Carsten C. [Department of Otorhinolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, Albert-Ludwigs-University, Freiburg, Germany and Department of Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, HELIOS Hanseklinikum Stralsund, Stralsund (Germany); Suárez, Carlos [Department of Otolaryngology, Hospital Universitario Central de Asturias, Oviedo (Spain); Instituto Universitario de Oncología del Principado de Asturias, Oviedo (Spain); Rinaldo, Alessandra; Ferlito, Alfio [ENT Clinic, University of Udine, Udine (Italy); Takes, Robert P., E-mail: robert.takes@radboudumc.nl [Department of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2014-05-01

    Head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is the sixth most common cancer worldwide, and its incidence is growing. Although environmental carcinogens and carcinogenic viruses are the main etiologic factors, genetic predisposition obviously plays a risk-modulating role, given that not all individuals exposed to these carcinogens experience the disease. This review highlights some aspects of genetic susceptibility to HNSCC: among others, genetic polymorphisms in biotransformation enzymes, DNA repair pathway, apoptotic pathway, human papillomavirus-related pathways, mitochondrial polymorphisms, and polymorphism related to the bilirubin-metabolized pathway. Furthermore, epigenetic variations, familial forms of HNSCC, functional assays for HNSCC risk assessment, and the implications and perspectives of research on genetic susceptibility in HNSCC are discussed.

  14. [Functional surgery for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janot, François; Julieron, Morbize

    2002-12-01

    Surgery for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma can alter speech, swallowing, and cosmoses. Recent tendency is to avoid mutilating surgery unless the tumour is aggressive or resistant to chemotherapy and or radiotherapy. Functional surgery is being widely employed, and for example it may vary between conventional partial surgery and endoscopic laser surgery for small sized vocal cord cancers. Various new reconstructive procedures have been developed to help early functional restoration. Loco-regional flaps can be used to replace gums and avoid dental extractions. Free flaps with micro-vascular anastomosis can be employed for immediate reconstruction of extensive surgical defects involving pharyngeal wall, tongue, mandible and mid-face to restore better function and cosmoses. Few recently developed techniques can be also employed in selected cases of laryngo-pharyngeal cancers to avoid permanent laryngeal mutilation. Another goal of functional surgery is to decrease the postoperative radiotherapy or chemo-radiotherapy sequelae, and obtain successful postoperative functional rehabilitation.

  15. Mammary carcinoma diagnostics and therapy; Diagnostik und Therapie des Mammakarzinoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Uwe; Baum, Friedemann (eds.) [Diagnostisches Brustzentrum Goettingen BZG, Goettingen(Germany)

    2014-11-01

    The book on mammary carcinoma diagnostics and therapy covers the following issues: development, anatomy and physiology of the mammary glands, pathology of benign and malign mammary gland changes, non-imaging diagnostics; mammography; ultrasonic mammography; magnetic resonance tomography of the mammary glands; imaging diagnostics findings; mammary interventions; examination concepts; operative therapy of the mammary carcinoma; chemotherapy of the mammary carcinoma; radio-oncological therapy of the mammary carcinoma; logistics in a medical center for mammary gland diseases; logistics in an interdisciplinary center for mammary diseases; dialogue conduction and psycho-social attendance.

  16. Incidence of Etiologic Factors in Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Head and Neck in Ahvaz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soheila Nikakhlagh

    2011-01-01

     Conclusion: According to this study, tobacco smoking was the most important etiologic factor and had a strong effect on risk of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Other factors are also important and need more research study.

  17. Distant metastases from head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Part III. Treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haigentz, Missak; Hartl, Dana M.; Silver, Carl E.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Strojan, Primoz; Paleri, Vinidh; de Bree, Remco; Machiels, Jean-Pascal; Hamoir, Marc; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Paccagnella, Daniela; Shaha, Ashok R.; Takes, Robert P.; Ferlito, Alfio

    2012-01-01

    Distant metastases from head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), though rare at initial presentation, remain an important manifestation of cancer recurrence and mortality. Although generally considered incurable with a dismal prognosis despite palliative therapy, highly selected patients with

  18. Application of a cervical low incision in the functional neck dissection of thyroid papillary carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Jiajie; Chen, Chao; Zheng,ChuanMing; Wang, Kejing; Shang, Jinbiao; FANG, XIANHUA; Ge, Minghua; TAN, ZHUO

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to discuss the advantage of the application of a cervical low incision for functional neck dissection in patients with thyroid papillary carcinoma. The study was a retrospective analysis of 87 thyroid papillary carcinoma patients; cervical low incision in the functional neck dissection was applied for 47 cases and the classic ‘L’ incision was applied for 40 cases. The different integrity, surgical time, blood loss and the aesthetic property of the incision were compare...

  19. Novel Immunotherapeutic Approaches for Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darrin V. Bann

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The immune system plays a key role in preventing tumor formation by recognizing and destroying malignant cells. For over a century, researchers have attempted to harness the immune response as a cancer treatment, although this approach has only recently achieved clinical success. Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC is the sixth most common cancer worldwide and is associated with cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, betel nut use, and human papillomavirus infection. Unfortunately, worldwide mortality from HNSCC remains high, partially due to limits on therapy secondary to the significant morbidity associated with current treatments. Therefore, immunotherapeutic approaches to HNSCC treatment are attractive for their potential to reduce morbidity while improving survival. However, the application of immunotherapies to this disease has been challenging because HNSCC is profoundly immunosuppressive, resulting in decreased absolute lymphocyte counts, impaired natural killer cell function, reduced antigen-presenting cell function, and a tumor-permissive cytokine profile. Despite these challenges, numerous clinical trials testing the safety and efficacy of immunotherapeutic approaches to HNSCC treatment are currently underway, many of which have produced promising results. This review will summarize immunotherapeutic approaches to HNSCC that are currently undergoing clinical trials.

  20. Sorafenib Tosylate, Cisplatin, and Docetaxel in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary

  1. Diffuse sclerosing variant of thyroid papillary carcinoma: diagnostic challenges occur with Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien-Chin; Chen, Wen-Chung; Peng, Shu-Ling; Huang, Shih-Ming

    2013-06-01

    Diffuse sclerosing papillary thyroid carcinoma (DSPTC) is a relatively rare variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma with distinct histological features, radiological characteristics, and biological aggressiveness. Compared with conventional papillary thyroid carcinoma, DSPTC is characterized by scattered microscopic tumor islands, diffuse fibrosis, calcification, and abundant lymphocytic aggregation. A preoperative diagnosis is challenging in the absence of nodules and scanty fine needle aspiration cytology samples. We describe a unique DSPTC patient, an 18-year-old woman who presented with a neck mass that grew slowly for 2 years. The palpable neck mass was nontender, well defined, firm, and unmovable. Laboratory studies showed normal thyroid function and positive autoimmune markers: antithyroglobulin antibody = 1:1600 and antimicrosomal antibody = 1:1600. A neck ultrasound showed diffusely prominent microcalcifications with one small vague nodule. Hashimoto's thyroiditis with an accompanying malignancy was suspected. Based on the result of intraoperative pathology reports, the patient was given a total thyroidectomy. Lymph node dissection and histological analysis revealed bilateral DSPTC in addition to lymphocytic thyroiditis in nonmalignant areas of the thyroid. Clinical and histological diagnostic challenges usually occur when DSPTC presents with a diffuse thyroid enlargement, dispersed microscopic tumor islands (frequently without mass formation), extensive fibrosis, and abundant lymphocytic infiltration mimicking thyroiditis.

  2. Chemotherapy With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-11

    Recurrent Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma in the Neck With Occult Primary; Recurrent Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Squamous Cell Carcinoma Metastatic in the Neck With Occult Primary; Stage IV Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IV Major Salivary Gland Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVA Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IVA Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IVA Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVA Major Salivary Gland Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVA Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IVB Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IVB Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IVB Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVB Major Salivary Gland Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVB Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IVC Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IVC Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IVC Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVC Major Salivary Gland Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVC Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IVC Oral Cavity Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVC Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Tongue Carcinoma; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma to Neck With Occult Primary

  3. Role of CT Perfusion in Monitoring and Prediction of Response to Therapy of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preda, Lorenzo; Moscatelli, Marco Elvio Manlio; Cossu Rocca, Maria

    2014-01-01

    This review aims to summarize the technique and clinical applications of CT perfusion (CTp) of head and neck cancer. The most common pathologic type (90%) of head and neck cancer is squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC): its diagnostic workup relies on CT and MRI, as they provide an accurate staging for the disease by determining tumour volume, assessing its extension, and detecting of lymph node metastases. Compared with conventional CT and MRI, CTp allows for obtaining measures of tumour vascular physiology and functional behaviour, and it has been demonstrated to be a feasible and useful tool in predicting local outcomes in patients undergoing radiation therapy and chemotherapy and may help monitor both treatments. PMID:25140324

  4. Role of CT Perfusion in Monitoring and Prediction of Response to Therapy of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Preda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This review aims to summarize the technique and clinical applications of CT perfusion (CTp of head and neck cancer. The most common pathologic type (90% of head and neck cancer is squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC: its diagnostic workup relies on CT and MRI, as they provide an accurate staging for the disease by determining tumour volume, assessing its extension, and detecting of lymph node metastases. Compared with conventional CT and MRI, CTp allows for obtaining measures of tumour vascular physiology and functional behaviour, and it has been demonstrated to be a feasible and useful tool in predicting local outcomes in patients undergoing radiation therapy and chemotherapy and may help monitor both treatments.

  5. Hürthle cell carcinoma: diagnostic and therapeutic implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igali Laszlo

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hürthle cell carcinoma is a variant of follicular cell carcinoma of thyroid. It may present as a low-grade tumour or as a more aggressive type. Prognosis depends upon the age of the patient, tumour size, extent of invasion and initial nodal or distant metastasis. Patient and methods The case of Hürthle cell carcinoma is reported in a 79-year-old man who presented with a rapidly increasing lump on the left side of his neck, having had a right hemithyroidectomy for colloid goitre 24-years-ago. Fine needle aspiration cytology confirmed the presence of Hürthle cells, raising the possibility of a Hürthle cell neoplasm. The patient underwent staging and surgery. Histology showed Hürthle cell carcinoma and the patient underwent adjuvant therapy. The literature on Hürthle cell neoplasms is reviewed. Conclusions Fine needle aspiration cytology may recognise Hürthle cell lesion but final diagnosis of carcinoma depends upon histological confirmation of vascular or capsular invasion. Staging and surgery in Hürthle cell carcinoma are similar to follicular carcinoma of thyroid with favourable outcome despite the controversy regarding the histological classification and adjuvant therapy. Elderly patients with Hürthle cell carcinoma need to be made aware of their poorer prognosis and should be offered more radical treatment.

  6. Mucinous carcinoma of breast: A diagnostic pitfall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalene KF, Sapna M, Jeevaraj TR

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Mucinous carcinoma is also known as mucoid carcinoma, colloid carcinoma, gelatinous carcinoma and mucin producing carcinoma. They are uncommon neoplasms of the breast and the reported incidence varies from 1-4%. Most of the mucinous carcinomas occur in older age group. FNAC can aid in diagnosis of mucinous carcinoma with only a few FNAC studies documented in literature. We present here a 56year old lady with a huge ulcerated breast mass clinically diagnosed as Malignant Phyllodes tumor. An FNAC was done which showed epithelial cell clusters with mild atypia in a background of both bluish violet and pink extracellular material. Spindle shaped cells were noted in the ground substance which led to a diagnosis of a phyllodes tumor with extensive myxoid change. Mastectomy was performed and the histopathological features confirmed a diagnosis of mucinous carcinoma. The tumor had areas showing thick collagenized fibrous septae separating tumor cell clusters and also areas of fibrosis. The pitfall in FNAC diagnosis may be due to the sampling from such an area.

  7. Deep-neck space infections - a diagnostic dilemma!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Shraddha; Kumar, Sunil; Kumar, Nishant; Puttewar, M P; Nagpure, P S

    2008-12-01

    Deep Neck Space Infections (DNI) are a potentially life threatening condition. This paper highlights the importance of their early diagnosis and early intervention. The deep-neck space infections may be odontogenic in origin. The severe airway compromise caused by them may make diagnosis difficult. Suspicion of simultaneous occurrence of tetanus and retropharyngeal space infection in a child can further increase the dilemma.

  8. Pemetrexed disodium in recurrent locally advanced or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    OpenAIRE

    Pivot, X; Raymond, E; Laguerre, B.; Degardin, M; Cals, L; Armand, J P; Lefebvre, J L; Gedouin, D; Ripoche, V; Kayitalire, L; Niyikiza, C; Johnson, R.; Latz, J.; Schneider, M.

    2001-01-01

    This phase II study determined response rate of patients with locally advanced or metastatic head and neck cancer treated with pemetrexed disodium, a new multitargeted antifolate that inhibits thymidylate synthase, dihydrofolate reductase and glycinamide ribonucleotide formyl transferase. 35 patients with local or metastatic relapse of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (31 male, 4 female; median age 53 years) were treated with pemetrexed 500 mg m2 administered as a 10-minute infusi...

  9. The diagnostic utility of the minimal carcinoma triple stain in breast carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Dara S; Liu, Yi-Fang; Pipa, Jennifer; Shin, Sandra J

    2013-01-01

    Pathologists are expected to accurately diagnose increasingly smaller breast carcinomas. Correct classification (ie, lobular vs ductal or in situ vs invasive) directly affects subsequent management, especially when the focus is near a surgical margin or present in a needle core biopsy and is further challenging if the lesion is morphologically ambiguous. We assessed the diagnostic utility of a multiplex, trichromogen immunostain of 3 commonly employed antibodies (CK7, p63, and E-cadherin) developed in our laboratory to evaluate these small lesions. Of the 147 specimens containing minimal (defined as ≤3 mm in size) invasive carcinoma, 81 also contained in situ carcinoma. In each case, the Minimal Carcinoma Triple Stain was prepared with a parallel H&E-stained slide. Observations of staining characteristics in the focus of interest were recorded. The Minimal Carcinoma Triple Stain was diagnostically useful in all but 1 case. In a case of invasive lobular carcinoma in an excisional biopsy, the Minimal Carcinoma Triple Stain stained only the surrounding breast tissue (appropriately) and not the focus of interest. Also, a subset of 29 of 81 excisional biopsies had minimal invasive carcinoma located 2 mm or less from the inked surgical margin, in which in all cases the Minimal Carcinoma Triple Stain was fully interpretable despite morphologic distortion due to concomitant cautery artifact and tissue disruption in some cases. The Minimal Carcinoma Triple Stain offers an accurate and tissue-conserving method to diagnose small, morphologically problematic foci of breast carcinoma while ideally leaving more tissue for additional adjunctive studies.

  10. Frozen Section Evaluation of Margin Status in Primary Squamous Cell Carcinomas of the Head and Neck: A Correlation Study of Frozen Section and Final Diagnoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layfield, Eleanor M; Schmidt, Robert L; Esebua, Magda; Layfield, Lester J

    2017-08-23

    Frozen section is routinely used for intraoperative margin evaluation in carcinomas of the head and neck. We studied a series of frozen sections performed for margin status of head and neck tumors to determine diagnostic accuracy. All frozen sections for margin control of squamous carcinomas of the head and neck were studied from a 66 month period. Frozen and permanent section diagnoses were classified as negative or malignant. Correlation of diagnoses was performed to determine accuracy. One thousand seven hundred and ninety-six pairs of frozen section and corresponding permanent section diagnoses were obtained. Discordances were found in 55 (3.1%) pairs. In 35 pairs (1.9%), frozen section was reported as benign, but permanent sections disclosed carcinoma. In 21 cases, the discrepancy was due to sampling and in the remaining cases it was an interpretive error. In 20 cases (1.1%), frozen section was malignant, but the permanent section was interpreted as negative. Frozen section is an accurate method for evaluation of operative margins for head and neck carcinomas with concordance between frozen and permanent results of 97%. Most errors are false negative results with the majority of these being due to sampling issues.

  11. (18)F-Fluorodeoxyglucose-Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography in Malignancies of the Thyroid and in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Jeppe Kiilerich; Rohde, Max; Thomassen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) is a valuable diagnostic tool in a spectrum of malignant and benign conditions, because of a high sensitivity to detect even very small lesions with increased metabolism. This review focuses on the use of FDG-PET......-PET/CT in malignancies of the thyroid gland and in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma....

  12. Gingival squamous cell carcinoma: A diagnostic impediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koduganti, Rekha Rani; Sehrawat, Sangeeta; Reddy, P. Veerendra Nath

    2012-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinomas represent 3% of cancers in men and 2% of cancers in women. More than 90% of oral cancer occurs in people older than 45 years Lesions of gingiva account for approximately 10% of the oral squamous cell carcinomas and may present clinically as an area of ulceration, exophytic mass, or red/white speckled patches. The proximity to the underlying periosteum may invite early bone invasion. Carcinoma of gingiva constitutes an extremely important group of neoplasms as the lesion frequently mimics the reactive and inflammatory conditions affecting the periodontium, delaying the diagnosis and making the prognosis of the patient poorer. A rare case of gingival squamous cell carcinoma has been reported here, in a 40 Year old male patient. Careful recording of the case history and results of clinical examination, radiographic, and laboratory investigations, along with a critical review of similar conditions led to the diagnosis, and treatment was initiated. PMID:22628973

  13. Differentiated thyroid carcinoma : diagnostic and therapeutic studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Ying-ying

    2006-01-01

    Differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) has favorable prognosis with high cure rate under treatment of thyroidectomy followed by radiotherapy. However, therapeutic efficiency decreases when dedifferentiation occurs. One of the purposes in this study is to use pharmaceuticals intervention to promote t

  14. Safety and efficacy of quadrapeutics versus chemoradiation in head and neck carcinoma xenograft model

    OpenAIRE

    Lukianova-Hleb, Ekaterina Y; Kim, Yoo-Shin; Aryasomayajula, Bhawani; Boulikas, Teni; Phan, Jack; Hung, Mien-Chie; Torchilin, Vladimir P.; O’Neill, Brian E.; Lapotko, Dmitri O.

    2015-01-01

    Chemoradiation is the strongest anti-tumor therapy but in resistant unresectable cancers it often lacks safety and efficacy. We compared our recently developed cell-level combination approach, quadrapeutics, to chemoradiation therapy to establish pre-clinical data for its biodistribution, safety and efficacy in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), as a clinically challenging aggressive and resistant cancer. In vitro and in vivo models of four carcinomas were treated with standard ch...

  15. Contralateral contiguous tuberculous lymphadenitis in a case of right breast carcinoma - Diagnostic dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanmoy Mukhopadhyay

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Coexistence of tuberculosis (TB in the breast or axillary lymph nodes with breast carcinoma though rare is not unknown. A 55-year-old woman presented with right axillary and left supraclavicular lymphadenopathies with no detectable lesion in either breasts or left axilla. Right axillary lymph node excision biopsy revealed metastatic adenocarcinoma. Diagnostic workup showed intense fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-avid lymph nodes on the left side neck at level V, supraclavicular, axillary, subpectoral and para-aortic regions, and low FDG activity in the right breast. Core biopsy of right breast lesion was reported as invasive ductal carcinoma and cytology of multiple left axillary lymphadenopathies as reactive hyperplasia. Excision biopsy of the supraclavicular lymph nodes unveiled the diagnosis of TB. She underwent right-modified radical mastectomy followed by external beam radiotherapy, has completed antituberculous treatment and is on follow-up. Extrapulmonary TB though uncommon; may be found in certain cases. Clinicians must be aware of its existence.

  16. Radiation Therapy With or Without Cisplatin in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck Who Have Undergone Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-07

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Spindle Cell Variant; Stage III Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage III Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage III Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  17. Elective neck management for squamous cell carcinoma metastatic to the parotid area lymph nodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Michael P; Amdur, Robert J; Werning, John W; Dziegielewski, Peter; Morris, Christopher G; Mendenhall, William M

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this study is to determine if radiotherapy (RT) alone to the cervical lymphatics is a suitable alternative to elective neck dissection (END) in patients who undergo parotidectomy and postoperative RT for squamous cell carcinoma metastatic to the parotid area lymph nodes (PALN). We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 107 patients consecutively treated from November 1969 to March 2012 for cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma metastatic to the PALN with a clinically node-negative neck. Primary therapy consisted of parotidectomy in all cases. We compared regional (cervical) control in two subgroups: 42 patients treated with END and RT and 65 patients treated with elective neck irradiation (ENI) alone. The median time of follow-up was 5.5 years (range 0.3-30 years) for all patients and 11 years for living patients (range 1.8-26 years). There was 1 neck recurrence in each subgroup: END and RT, 1/42 (2 %); and ENI alone, 1/65 (1.5 %). No patient experienced a complication related to neck RT. ENI to a dose of approximately 50-60 Gy is a suitable alternative to END and postoperative RT in patients with squamous cell carcinoma metastatic to the PALN.

  18. Use of next generation sequencing in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tabatabaeifar, Siavosh; Kruse, Torben A; Thomassen, Mads

    2014-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) can primarily be attributed to alcohol consumption, tobacco use and infection with human papilloma virus. The heterogeneous nature of HNSCC has exposed a lack of tools for clinicians to provide more accurate prognosis. There is a need for biomarkers...

  19. Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinomas Do Not Express EGFRvIII

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melchers, Lieuwe J; Clausen, Martijn J A M; Mastik, Mirjam F; Slagter-Menkema, Lorian; Langendijk, Johannes A; van der Laan, Bernard F A M; van der Wal, Jacqueline E; van der Vegt, Bert; Roodenburg, Jan L N; Schuuring, Ed

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the prevalence of EGFRvIII, a specific variant of EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor), in 3 well-defined cohorts of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods and Materials: Immunohistochemistry for the specific detection of EGFRvIII using the L8A4 antibody was opt

  20. Illness cognitions in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: Predicting quality of life outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Scharloo (Margreet); R.J.B. de Jong; T.P.M. Langeveld (ton); E. van Velzen-Verkaik (Els); M.M. den Doorn-op den Akker (Margreet); A.A. Kaptein (Adrian)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractGoals of work: This paper presents an observational study of the longitudinal effects of cancer treatment on quality of life (QoL) in patients treated for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), and evaluated the contribution of patients' baseline illness cognitions to the predict

  1. Cutaneous head and neck basal and squamous cell carcinomas with perineural invasion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mendenhall, W.M.; Ferlito, A.; Takes, R.P.; Bradford, C.R.; Corry, J.; Fagan, J.J.; Rinaldo, A.; Strojan, P.; Rodrigo, J.P.

    2012-01-01

    Perineural invasion (PNI) occurs in 2% to 6% of cutaneous head and neck basal and squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) and is associated with mid-face location, recurrent tumors, high histologic grade, and increasing tumor size. Patients may be asymptomatic with PNI appreciated on pathologic examination

  2. Cutaneous head and neck basal and squamous cell carcinomas with perineural invasion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mendenhall, W.M.; Ferlito, A.; Takes, R.P.; Bradford, C.R.; Corry, J.; Fagan, J.J.; Rinaldo, A.; Strojan, P.; Rodrigo, J.P.

    2012-01-01

    Perineural invasion (PNI) occurs in 2% to 6% of cutaneous head and neck basal and squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) and is associated with mid-face location, recurrent tumors, high histologic grade, and increasing tumor size. Patients may be asymptomatic with PNI appreciated on pathologic examination

  3. VX-970, Cisplatin, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced HPV-Negative Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-14

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  4. Involvement of the FGFR4 Arg388 allele in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streit, Sylvia; Bange, Johannes; Fichtner, Alexander; Ihrler, Stephan; Issing, Wolfgang; Ullrich, Axel

    2004-08-20

    Fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) have been implicated in various forms of human hyperproliferative disorders such as cancers of the cervix and bladder. We investigated the expression pattern of FGFR4 and the clinical significance of the recently identified Gly/Arg polymorphism (388) in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs) of the oral cavity and the oropharynx. Sections from 104 paraffin-embedded tumors were analyzed by a restriction fragment length polymorphism-based method to determine the FGFR4 genotypes. Protein expression was investigated immunohistochemically and graded into a low, intermediate, or high degree of staining. FGFR4 expression was scored as high in 17, as intermediate in 59 and as low in 28 cases. The FGFR4 Arg388 allele was found in 59 tumors, 46 of them having heterozygous and 13 homozygous genotypes. High expression of the FGFR4 Arg388 allele was significantly associated with reduced overall survival (p = 0.032) and with an advanced tumor stage (p = 0.023), whereas expression of the FGFR4 Gly388 had no impact on disease progression. Our findings indicate that high expression of FGFR4 in connection with the Arg388 allele is associated with poor clinical outcome and support the significance of FGFR4 as a diagnostic marker and a target for therapeutic intervention in human HNSCC.

  5. Carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma originating from ectopic salivary gland in the neck region: case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vayısoğlu, Yusuf; Arpaci, Rabia Bozdogan; Eti, Can; Pütürgeli, Tuğçe; Gorur, Kemal; Ozcan, Cengiz

    2015-01-01

    Carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma (CEPA) is the malignant salivary gland tumor originating from primary (de novo) or recurrent pleomorphic adenoma. Although parotid gland is the most common site, it can also be seen in submandibular gland or minor salivary glands. It can be seen rarely in head and neck region, such as oral cavity, trachea, nasal cavity and lacrimal gland. Although pleomorphic adenoma cases originating from ectopic salivary gland tissue in the neck region are present in the English literature, there is no published pleomorphic adenoma ex carcinoma case. In this case report we presented a CEPA as a 7.5 cm long neck mass in a 72-year-old woman originating from the submandibular region apart from submandibular gland. Difficulties in diagnosis and way to appropriate treatment are discussed with current literature. PMID:26645012

  6. Elective neck dissection in oral squamous cell carcinoma of the upper maxilla:necessary?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Manuel Moreno-Sánchez

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Surgical treatment of clinically negative neck in maxillary squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the upper jaw is controversial. The purpose of this systematic review was to define the incidence of cervical metastasis and to assess if elective neck dissection is justified when the neck is not primarily affected.Methods: An electronic literature search was conducted in several databases, including MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Central databases, for articles written in English. Results: Twenty-eight articles were included in the review. The overall cervical metastases rate was 33% and the total initial cervical metastases rate was 16%. Interestingly, the author found that 71% of patients with cervical metastases from maxillary SCC carcinoma were T3/T4 stage. Conclusion:This review shows the need for a change in the management of the N0 neck in SCC arising in the maxillary alveolus and hard palate. Elective neck dissection should be performed in patients with T3/T4 tumours with clinic or radiographic negative necks (N0c).

  7. PET-CT imaging fusion in the assessment of head and neck carcinoma; Fusao de imagens PET-TC na avaliacao do carcinoma espinocelular de cabeca e pescoco

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Denise Takehana dos [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Odontologia; Chojniak, Rubens [Hospital do Cancer A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Imagem; Lima, Eduardo Nobrega Pereira [Hospital do Cancer A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Medicina Nuclear; Cavalcanti, Marcelo Gusmao Paraiso [Universidade de Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Odontologia. Dept. de Estomatologia]. E-mail: mgpcaval@usp.br

    2006-11-15

    Objective: The authors have established a methodological approach to evaluate head and neck squamous cell carcinoma aiming at identifying and distinguishing high metabolic activity inside the lesion, combining in a single examination, functional, metabolic and morphological data simultaneously acquired by means of different non-dedicated positron emission tomography (PET)-computed tomography (CT) device. Materials and Methods: The study population included 17 patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma submitted to a non-dedicated {sup 18} F-FDG-PET imaging at Department of Diagnostic Imaging of Hospital do Cancer, Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil. CT and {sup 18} F-FDG-PET images were simultaneously acquired in a non-dedicated device. The original data were transferred to an independent workstation by means of the Entegra 2 NT software to generate PET-CT imaging fusion. Results: The findings were defined as positive in the presence of a well defined focal area of increased radiopharmaceutical uptake in regions not related with the normal biodistribution of the tracer. Conclusion: The fusion of simultaneously acquired images in a single examination ({sup 18}F-FDGPET and CT) has allowed the topographic-metabolic mapping of the lesion as well as the localization of high metabolic activity areas inside the tumor, indicating recidivation or metastasis and widening the array of alternatives for radiotherapy or surgical planning. (author)

  8. Otitis media and a neck lump--current diagnostic challenges for Paragonimus-like trematode infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, H; Agada, F O; Anderson, A R; Jackson, R S; Blair, D; McGann, H; Kelly, G

    2007-02-01

    A 29 year-old Nigerian studying in the UK presented with a neck lump and otitis media. Paragonimus-like trematode eggs were found in the neck lump aspirate. Morphologically these eggs resembled Paragonimus uterobilateralis or Achillurbainia congolensis. We favoured the diagnosis of achillurbainiasis over extrapulmonary paragonimiasis on the basis of clinical features and because we could not amplify DNA sequences using PCR primers specific for Paragonimus species. We discuss current diagnostic challenges for this rare parasitic infection.

  9. Effectiveness of the supraomohyoid neck dissection in clinically N0 neck patients with squamous cell carcinoma of buccal mucosa and gingivobuccal sulcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahamthulla, S A K Uroof; Priya, P Vani; Hussain, S M D Javeed; Nasyam, Fazil Arshad; Akifuddin, Syed; Srinivas, Velpula Sasidhar

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of the supraomohyoid neck dissection in clinically N0 neck patients with squamous cell carcinoma of buccal mucosa and gingivobuccal sulcus. This was a prospective study of five patients with squamous cell carcinoma of gingivobuccal mucosa of oral cavity with clinically N0 neck, conducted over a period of 2 years from July 2007 to Oct 2009 in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Narayana Dental College and Hospital. The study was conducted in patients irrespective of age, sex, size, thickness, and type of differentiation of the lesion. All patients have clinically non-palpable lymphnodes (N0 neck), while patients with palpable lymphnodes, patients with previous surgery, and patients with previous radiotherapy were excluded from the study. Level I was the commonest site of neck metastasis in our study. Among the five patients, two (40%) patients (case 2 and 3) had occult cervical metastasis (level IB nodes are histopathologically positive nodes) and the remaining three patients (60%) had no occult cervical metastasis. The recurrence rate was 20% for patients who received postoperative radiotherapy. There was no morbidity and postoperative dysfunction and the mortality rate was only 20% in our study. Supraomohyoid neck dissection is the therapeutic procedure in clinically N0 neck patients with squamous cell carcinoma of buccal mucosa and gingivobuccal sulcus of mandible. Supraomohyoid neck dissection, when indicated, contributes to the concept of less-invasive surgery and offers functional and aesthetic advantages without compromising the clearance with minimal morbidity.

  10. Elective neck dissection in oral carcinoma: a critical review of the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, L P; Sanabria, A

    2007-06-01

    More than 50% of patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity have lymph node metastases and histological confirmation of metastatic disease is the most important prognostic factor. Among patients with a clinically negative neck, the incidence of occult metastases varies with the site, size and thickness of the primary tumour. The high incidence rate of occult cervical metastases (> 20%) in tumours of the lower part of the oral cavity is the main argument in favour of elective treatment of the neck. The usual treatment of patients with clinically palpable metastatic lymph nodes has been radical neck dissection. This classical surgical procedure involves not only resection of level I to V lymph nodes of the neck but also the tail of the parotid, submandibular gland, sternocleidomastoid muscle, internal jugular vein and spinal accessory nerve. It is a safe oncological surgical procedure that significantly reduces the risk of regional recurrences, however it produces significant post-operative morbidity, mainly shoulder dysfunction. Aiming to reduce morbidity, Ward and Roben described a modification of the procedure sparing the spinal accessory nerve to prevent post-operative shoulder morbidity. Several clinical and pathological studies have demonstrated that the pattern of metastatic lymph node metastases occurs in a predictable fashion in patients with oral and oropharyngeal carcinoma. The use of selective supraomohyoid neck dissection as the elective treatment of the neck, in oral cancer patients, is now well established. However, its role in the treatment of clinically positive neck patients is controversial. Some Authors advocate this type of selective neck dissection in patients with limited neck disease at the upper levels of the neck, without jeopardizing neck control. The main factors supporting this approach are the usually good prognosis in patients with single levels I or II metastasis independent of the extent of neck dissection, and the low

  11. A best-evidence review of diagnostic procedures for neck and low-back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, Sidney M; van Tulder, Maurits

    2008-06-01

    This chapter aims to present an overview of the best available evidence on diagnostic procedures for neck and low-back pain. Relatively little is known about the accuracy of such procedures. Although most spinal conditions are benign and self-limiting, the real challenge to the clinician is to distinguish serious spinal pathology or nerve-root pain from non-specific neck and low-back pain. The use of valid procedures can assist the clinician in this aim. A search was conducted in PubMed to identify relevant systematic reviews and primary studies on diagnostic procedures for the neck and low back. A systematic review was included if at least two independent reviewers were used; a systematic procedure was followed for identifying the literature; and a methodological assessment was conducted. In the absence of systematic reviews, primary studies are reported. Systematic reviews were identified which evaluated evidence for diagnostic procedures in the following categories: history, physical examination, and special studies, including diagnostic imaging, diagnostic blocks, and facet and sacroiliac joint injections. In general, there is much more evidence on diagnostic procedures for the low back than there is for the neck. With regard to the history, a number of factors can be identified which can assist the clinician in identifying sciatica due to disc herniation or serious pathology. With regard to the physical examination, the straight-leg raise is the only sign consistently reported to be sensitive for sciatica due to disc herniation, but is limited by its low specificity. The diagnostic accuracy of other neurological signs and tests is unclear. Orthopaedic tests of the neck, such as Spurling's or the upper-limb tension test, are useful to rule a radiculopathy in or rule out, respectively. In patients 50 years of age or older, plain spinal radiography together with standard laboratory tests are highly accurate in identifying underlying systemic disease; however

  12. Sunitinib, Cetuximab, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary

  13. Chromoendoscopy to detect early synchronous second primary esophageal carcinoma in patients with squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komínek, Pavel; Vítek, Petr; Urban, Ondřej; Zeleník, Karol; Halamka, Magdaléna; Feltl, David; Cvek, Jakub; Matoušek, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the use of flexible esophagoscopy and chromoendoscopy with Lugol's solution in the detection of early esophageal carcinomas (second primary carcinomas) in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC). Methods. All patients with newly diagnosed HNSCC underwent office-based Lugol's chromoendoscopy. After flexible esophagoscopy with white light, 3.0% Lugol's iodine solution was sprayed over the entire esophageal mucosa. Areas with less-intense staining (LVLs) were evaluated and biopsies taken. Results. 132 patients with HNSCC were enrolled in this study. The most frequent primary tumors were oropharyngeal (49/132), tumors of the oral cavity (36/132), and larynx (35/132). The majority of subjects (107/132 patients, 81.1%) had advanced HNSCC carcinomas (stages III and IV). Multiple LVLs were discovered in 24 subjects (18.2%) and no LVLs in 108 (81.8%) subjects. Fifty-five LVL biopsy specimens were obtained and assessed. Squamous cell carcinomas were detected in two patients, peptic esophagitis in 11 patients, gastric heterotopic mucosa in two patients, hyperplasia in two patients, and low- and high-grade dysplasia in three patients. Conclusion. Although only two patients with synchronous primary carcinomas were found among the patients, esophagoscopy should be recommended after detection of HNSCC to exclude secondary esophageal carcinoma or dysplasia.

  14. Chromoendoscopy to Detect Early Synchronous Second Primary Esophageal Carcinoma in Patients with Squamous Cell Carcinomas of the Head and Neck?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Komínek

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the use of flexible esophagoscopy and chromoendoscopy with Lugol’s solution in the detection of early esophageal carcinomas (second primary carcinomas in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC. Methods. All patients with newly diagnosed HNSCC underwent office-based Lugol's chromoendoscopy. After flexible esophagoscopy with white light, 3.0% Lugol's iodine solution was sprayed over the entire esophageal mucosa. Areas with less-intense staining (LVLs were evaluated and biopsies taken. Results. 132 patients with HNSCC were enrolled in this study. The most frequent primary tumors were oropharyngeal (49/132, tumors of the oral cavity (36/132, and larynx (35/132. The majority of subjects (107/132 patients, 81.1% had advanced HNSCC carcinomas (stages III and IV. Multiple LVLs were discovered in 24 subjects (18.2% and no LVLs in 108 (81.8% subjects. Fifty-five LVL biopsy specimens were obtained and assessed. Squamous cell carcinomas were detected in two patients, peptic esophagitis in 11 patients, gastric heterotopic mucosa in two patients, hyperplasia in two patients, and low- and high-grade dysplasia in three patients. Conclusion. Although only two patients with synchronous primary carcinomas were found among the patients, esophagoscopy should be recommended after detection of HNSCC to exclude secondary esophageal carcinoma or dysplasia.

  15. Clear cell odontogenic carcinoma of maxilla: A diagnostic challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fouzia Siraj

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Clear cell odontogenic carcinoma (CCOC is a rare odontogenic tumor which occurs mostly in the mandible. It is primarily seen in fifth to seventh decades with a female predilection. We report a case of CCOC in the maxillary arch of a 66-year-old woman. Morphologic examination along with histochemical and immunohistochemical markers led to the establishment of the diagnosis. It is important to diagnose this entity and differentiate it from other clear cell tumors in the head and neck region as it is a locally aggressive tumor with a propensity for regional, nodal, and distant metastasis.

  16. Thyroid papillary carcinoma arising in ectopic thyroid tissue within a neck branchial cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Fiore Agnese

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thyroid gland derives from one median anlage at the base of the tongue, and from the two fourth branchial pouches. A number of anomalies may occur during their migration. These can be in form of ectopic tissues, which are frequently found along the course of thyroglossal duct and rarely in other sites, many of these may develop same diseases as the thyroid gland. Case presentation A 36-years-old female presented with a 3 month history of left side neck mass. The mass disappeared following aspiration of brown colored fluid, which on cytological examination showed cells with nuclear irregularities that warranted the resection of the lesion. The histology demonstrated a thyroid papillary carcinoma arising within the branchial cyst. Thereafter, the patient underwent a total thyroidectomy with central lymph nodes dissection. Histology showed a multifocal papillary carcinoma with central lymph nodes metastases. Only four cases of primary thyroid carcinomas in neck branchial cyst have been described so far. Conclusion In a lateral cystic neck mass, although rare, occurrence of ectopic thyroid tissue and presence of a papillary thyroid carcinoma should be kept in mind.

  17. Diagnostic sensitivity of ¹⁸fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography for detecting synchronous multiple primary cancers in head and neck cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Norio; Tsukuda, Mamoru; Nishimura, Goshi

    2012-05-01

    We assessed the sensitivity of positron emission tomography (PET) for detecting synchronous multiple primary cancers, particularly synchronous esophageal cancers in head and neck cancer patients. We retrospectively reviewed 230 head and neck cancer patients. All the patients routinely underwent the following examinations: urinalysis, occult blood, tumor marker detection [squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), cytokeratin fragment (CYFRA), and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)], esophagogastroduodenoscopy, colonoscopy (when CEA was high or occult blood was positive), abdominal ultrasonography, plain chest computed tomography (CT), and PET. Bronchoscopy was performed when CT revealed lung shadow of central region. Synchronous multiple primary cancers were detected in 42 (18.2%) patients. The diagnostic sensitivity of PET for synchronous primary cancers was as follows: esophagus, 7.6% (1/13); stomach, 25.0% (2/8); lung, 66.7% (4/6); head and neck, 75.0% (3/4); colon, 0% (0/1); kidney, 0% (0/1); and subcutaneous, 100% (1/1). The sensitivity of PET for detecting synchronous esophageal cancers is low because these are early-stage cancers (almost stage 0-I). Therefore, it is necessary to perform esophagogastroduodenoscopy for detecting synchronous esophageal cancers. PET is an important additional tool for detecting synchronous multiple primary cancers because the diagnostic sensitivity of PET in synchronous head and neck cancer and lung cancer is high. But PET has the limitation of sensitivity for synchronous multiple primary cancers because the diagnostic sensitivity of PET in synchronous esophageal cancer is very low.

  18. Genetics Home Reference: head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... several of the genes associated with HNSCC, including TP53 , NOTCH1 , and CDKN2A , function as tumor suppressors, which ... cell carcinoma CDKN2A FAT1 HRAS NOTCH1 PIK3CA PTEN TP53 Related Information What is a gene? What is ...

  19. Hypothyroidism after primary radiotherapy for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: Normal tissue complication probability modeling with latent time correction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønjom, Marianne Feen; Brink, Carsten; Bentzen, Søren

    2013-01-01

    To develop a normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model of radiation-induced biochemical hypothyroidism (HT) after primary radiotherapy for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) with adjustment for latency and clinical risk factors.......To develop a normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model of radiation-induced biochemical hypothyroidism (HT) after primary radiotherapy for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) with adjustment for latency and clinical risk factors....

  20. Non-functional parathyroid gland carcinoma, a rare malignant tumor of the head and neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotromanović, Zeljko; Birtić, Darija; Vceva, Andrijana; Medić, Darija; Zubcić, Zeljko; Mihalj, Hrvoje; Kotromanović, Zdenka; Erić, Suzana; Dmitrović, Branko; Stefanić, Mario

    2012-11-01

    Carcinoma of the parathyroid gland is a very rare tumor of the head and neck. The largest number of carcinomas are discovered by chance. (intraoperatively, during surgery removal of the parathyroid gland are adenomas). Around 1% of the primary parathyreoidism is caused by the cancer of parathyroid glands. Only 10% of these rare tumors make up dysfunctional cancer of parathyroid glands. There have been 24 cases reported of this disease in the literature. The focus of our study is to present a case of this disease and to review the published literature to date.

  1. THE UNILATERAL BIG HOCKEY STICK INCISION FOR NECK DISSECTION IN THYROID CARCINOMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘宝国; 刘伟; 顾晋

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the feasibility and advantages of the unilateral big hockey stick incision in thyroid carcinoma. Method: Neck dissection using the unilateral big hockey stick incision was performed on 23 patients with thyroid carcinoma. Results: The big hockey stick incision results in a cosmetic scar which is barely visible and easily covered by hair or clothing, while it provides sufficient exposure of the operation field. A small area of marginal necrosis is occasionally seen at the apex of the skin flap due to preoperative radiotherapy. Conclusion: The unilateral big hockey stick incision has adequate surgical access, good healing of skin flaps, and a good cosmetic result.

  2. Cutaneous metastasis of prostate carcinoma to neck and upper chest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin Abrol

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate adenocarcinoma is the most common urologic malignant neoplasm in men. Metastasis to skin is rarely reported and usually occurs late. The incidence and appearance of cutaneous metastasis are not well established in patients with prostate adenocarcinoma and their recognition remains poor among practicing urologists. Their clinical appearance may mimic other common dermatologic disorders. Definitive diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion. Immunohistochemical staining helps in establishing the diagnosis. We report a case of prostate adenocarcinoma presenting with widespread metastasis, including those to dermis and subcutaneous tissue of neck and upper chest.

  3. Bimodal ex vivo expansion of T cells from patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junker, Niels; Andersen, Mads Hald; Wenandy, Lynn

    2011-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) has proven effective in metastatic melanoma and should therefore be explored in other types of cancer. The aim of this study was to examine the feasibility of potentially expanding clinically relevant quantities of tumor-specific T-cell...... cultures from TIL from patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) using a more rapid expansion procedure compared with previous HNSCC studies....

  4. Elective neck dissection in oral carcinoma: a critical review of the evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Kowalski, LP; Sanabria, A

    2007-01-01

    More than 50% of patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity have lymph node metastases and histological confirmation of metastatic disease is the most important prognostic factor. Among patients with a clinically negative neck, the incidence of occult metastases varies with the site, size and thickness of the primary tumour. The high incidence rate of occult cervical metastases (> 20%) in tumours of the lower part of the oral cavity is the main argument in favour of elective tre...

  5. Decitabine Rescues Cisplatin Resistance in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Viet, Chi T.; Dongmin Dang; Stacy Achdjian; Yi Ye; Katz, Samuel G.; Schmidt, Brian L.

    2014-01-01

    Cisplatin resistance in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) reduces survival. In this study we hypothesized that methylation of key genes mediates cisplatin resistance. We determined whether a demethylating drug, decitabine, could augment the anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects of cisplatin on SCC-25/CP, a cisplatin-resistant tongue SCC cell line. We showed that decitabine treatment restored cisplatin sensitivity in SCC-25/CP and significantly reduced the cisplatin dose require...

  6. Soft Tissue Myoepithelial Carcinoma Metastatic to the Cecum: Highlighting an Unusual Metastatic Pattern and the Need for Diagnostic Awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourtzoukou, Despoina; Zaidi, Shane; Jones, Robin L; Fisher, Cyril; Thway, Khin

    2016-03-21

    Myoepithelial neoplasms of the soft tissues are a rare, heterogeneous group of tumors for which classification continues to evolve. While well defined within salivary glands, they can also arise in viscera and soft tissues, where diagnosis is challenging due to the lack of clinical and pathological familiarity. We present the case of a 36 year old man with myoepithelial carcinoma arising as a primary tumor within the soft tissues of the neck, which metastasized to the cecum, causing intussusception. This spindle cell neoplasm showed the classic S100 protein, smooth muscle actin and pancytokeratin-positive immunoprofile. Metastasis of myoepithelial carcinoma to the cecum has not been previously described, and coupled with the spindle cell morphology, may cause significant diagnostic difficulty in the absence of clinical familiarity, particularly as there is morphologic overlap with spindle cell neoplasms arising more commonly in gastrointestinal sites, including gastrointestinal stromal tumor, leiomyosarcoma and sarcomatoid carcinoma.

  7. Comparative study of lymph node metastasis from squamous cell carcinoma and non-squamous cell carcinoma on neck CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyoung Nam; Han, Jong Kyu; Kim, Hyung Hwan; Shin, Hyeong Cheol; Kim, Il Yong; Jou, Sung Shik [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University Cheonan Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    To assess the differential imaging findings of metastatic lymph nodes in squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and non-squamous cell carcinoma (non-SCC) on neck CT and to facilitate the identification of primary focus before performing a biopsy. We retrospectively analyzed 46 patients with SCC and 50 patients with non-SCC who underwent neck CT from January 2006 to January 2011. Patients were divided into two groups; SCC and non-SCC. The total number of lymph nodes was 204 in the SCC group and 530 in the non-SCC group. Two observers were asked to assess the characteristics of abnormal lymph nodes (number, margin types, enhancement patterns, size, bilaterality, calcification, fat infiltration, conglomeration, invasion of adjacent tissue, and nodal distribution). Nodal distribution was evaluated by imaging-based nodal classification on neck CT. Between the SCC group and the non-Succ group except for cases of thyroid cancer, the number of lymph nodes and the number of lymph nodes smaller than 3 cm in the non-Succ group except for cases of thyroid cancer were significantly greater than those in the Succ group (p < 0.05). The number of lymph nodes, the number of lymph nodes smaller than 3 cm, and nodal distribution are helpful in differential diagnosis between Succ and non-Succ before performing a biopsy.

  8. Impact of middle and lower jugular neck dissection on supraclavicular lymph node metastasis from endometrial carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Supraclavicular lymph node metastasis from endometrial carcinoma is considerably rarer than metastasis from uterine cervical cancer. To date, there have been no reported cases regarding systematic neck dissection as a salvage treatment. In this report, we describe the neck dissection procedure carried out on a 74-year-old woman with supraclavicular lymph node metastasis. Our objective was to histologically determine the origin of the metastasis while simultaneously providing appropriate treatment. The patient’s past medical history included two prior cases of cancer: rectal cancer 7 years earlier and endometrial adenocarcinoma 4 years earlier. We determined that middle and lower jugular neck dissection was appropriate in treating this case based on the results of our preoperative FDG-PET and tumor markers. This surgery provided histological evidence that metastasis occurred from endometrial carcinoma. Middle and lower jugular neck dissection was expected to improve the patient’s prognosis without impacting the patient’s active daily life. We have continued to monitor the patient closely over an extended period. PMID:22788987

  9. Impact of genetic targets on therapy in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaikhoutdinov, Irina; Goldenberg, David

    2013-01-01

    Despite advances in surgical technique, radiation therapy and chemotherapy, the mortality from head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) has not improved significantly. Squamous cell carcinoma is caused by tobacco use, alcohol consumption and infection with high-risk types of human papillomavirus. It is the 6th most common cancer in the world, with upwards of 45,000 new cases reported yearly in the United States alone.In recent years, there has been a significant increase in the understanding of the molecular and genetic pathogenesis of head and neck cancer, shedding light on the unexpected heterogeneity of the disease. Genetic analysis has led to new classification schemes for HNSCC, with different subgroups exhibiting different prognoses. In addition, multiple targets in aberrant signaling pathways have been identified using increasingly sophisticated bio-informatics tools. Advances in technology have allowed for novel delivery mechanisms to introduce genetic material into cells to produce a therapeutic effect by targeting cancer cells via a number of different approaches.A pressing need to develop novel therapies to augment current treatment modalities has led to a number of translational studies involving gene therapy in the treatment of HNSCC. This article will focus on a review of the most recent developments in molecular biology of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma in regards to possible targets for gene therapy, as well as the array of novel therapeutic strategies directed at these targets.

  10. Diagnostic imaging of benign and malignant neck masses in children—a pictorial review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harave, Srikrishna

    2016-01-01

    Neck masses are frequently encountered in pediatric medicine, and can present a diagnostic dilemma for the clinicians involved. There are several means by which neck masses in children can be subdivided, for example by age at presentation, anatomical location including compartments and fascia of the neck, their classical appearance when imaged, or by etiology. When imaging children the clinicians must be mindful of radiation exposure and as such ultrasound (US) is often attempted first. Cross sectional imaging can be helpful for problem solving with CT being particularly useful for assessing the patient in more acute scenarios, for example when there is airway compromise. Nuclear medicine scintigraphy has a role in specific circumstances and can aid in staging in the presence of malignancy. If required, additional acquisition by means of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) can be considered. This pictorial review describe the diagnostic imaging of (I) congenital and Developmental Pathologies, including thyroglossal duct cyst, branchial cleft cyst, cystic hygroma, dermoid cyst, thymic cyst and ectopic thymus; (II) neoplastic lesions, including hemangiomas and vascular malformations, pilomatrixoma, neurofibroma, neuroblastoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, papillary thyroid cancer, lymphoma & leukemia; (III) neck masses of Infective causes, including lymphadenitis, retropharyngeal and peritonsilar abscess, salivary gland inflammation; and (IV) other miscellaneous lesions, including ranula, sternocleidomastoid fibromatosis coli, and goiter. Neck masses are common in the pediatric population with a broad and varied differential; malignant etiologies are less frequently encountered when compared with adults but an awareness of its potential is important when reviewing imaging. PMID:27942480

  11. Adenoid cystic carcinoma of the head and neck; Les carcinomes adenoides kystiques de la tete et du cou

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haddad, H.; Riahi, H.; Chekrine, T.; Benchakroun, N.; Jouhadi, H.; Tawfiq, N.; Sahraoui, S.; Benider, A. [Centre d' oncologie Ibn-Rochd, Casablanca, (Morocco)

    2007-11-15

    The adenoid cystic carcinoma or cylindroma develop principally from salivary glands. It is the most frequently at the level of head and neck. The aim of this work is to analyse the therapy data and to determine the prognostic factors of adenoid cystic carcinomas through a retrospective study. (N.C.)

  12. Impact of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus on Survival in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman, Andrew; Lee, Daniel J; McMullen, Caitlin; de Almeida, John; Muhanna, Nidal; Gama, Ricardo Ribeiro; Giuliani, Meredith; Liu, Geoffrey; Bratman, Scott V; Huang, Shao Hui; O'Sullivan, Brian; Song, Yuyao; Xu, Wei; Goldstein, David P

    2017-08-01

    Objective To identify any association between type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and survival outcomes for mucosal squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. An association has been demonstrated between T2DM and cancer outcomes at numerous sites, but data for the head and neck are limited. Improving our understanding of the impact that diabetes has on head and neck cancer survival is relevant for making treatment decisions and counseling patients regarding prognosis. Study Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Academic tertiary referral head and neck cancer center. Subjects and Methods By accessing data retrospectively from prospectively collected databases at the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, patients were studied who were treated for mucosal head and neck squamous cell cancer between January 2005 and December 2011. Collection of clinical, pathologic, and survival data was completed with an emphasis on T2DM. Results Of 2498 patients identified in the study period, 319 (12.8%) had T2DM. Five-year overall survival was not different between the diabetic (64%, 95% CI = 58%-71%) and nondiabetic (67%, 95% CI = 65%-69%; P = .078) groups. Furthermore, cause-specific survival did not demonstrate a statistically significant difference between groups (diabetic: 84%, 95% CI = 79%-88%, vs nondiabetic: 84%, 95% CI = 82%-86%; P = .67). Conclusion Despite contradictory evidence at other cancer sites, the presence of T2DM alone does not appear to adversely affect cancer survival outcomes in head and neck squamous cell cancer. This is encouraging for the diabetic patients with head and neck squamous cell cancer, and it provides guidance for the multidisciplinary team that treats them.

  13. Diagnostic and Prognostic Biomarkers of Adrenal Cortical Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mete, Ozgur; Gucer, Hasan; Kefeli, Mehmet; Asa, Sylvia L

    2017-09-04

    The diagnosis of low-grade adrenal cortical carcinoma (ACC) confined to the adrenal gland can be challenging. Although there are diagnostic and prognostic molecular tests for ACC, they remain largely unutilized. We examined the diagnostic and prognostic value of altered reticulin framework and the immunoprofile of biomarkers including IGF-2, proteins involved in cell proliferation and mitotic spindle regulation (Ki67, p53, BUB1B, HURP, NEK2), DNA damage repair (PBK, γ-H2AX), telomere regulation (DAX, ATRX), wnt-signaling pathway (beta-catenin) and PI3K signaling pathway (PTEN, phospho-mTOR) in a tissue microarray of 50 adenomas and 43 carcinomas that were characterized for angioinvasion as defined by strict criteria, Weiss score, and mitotic rate-based tumor grade. IGF-2 and proteins involved in cell proliferation and mitotic spindle regulation (Ki67, p53, BUB1B, HURP, NEK2), DNA damage proteins (PBK, γ-H2AX), regulators of telomeres (DAXX, ATRX), and beta-catenin revealed characteristic expression profiles enabling the distinction of carcinomas from adenomas. Not all biomarkers were informative in all carcinomas. IGF-2 was the most useful biomarker of malignancy irrespective of tumor grade and cytomorphologic features, as juxtanuclear Golgi-pattern IGF-2 reactivity optimized for high specificity was identified in up to 80% of carcinomas and in no adenomas. Loss rather than qualitative alterations of the reticulin framework yielded statistical difference between carcinoma and adenoma. Angioinvasion defined as tumor cells invading through a vessel wall and intravascular tumor cells admixed with thrombus proved to be the best prognostic parameter, predicting adverse outcome in the entire cohort as well as within low-grade ACCs. Low mitotic tumor grade, Weiss score, global loss of DAXX expression, and high phospho-mTOR expression correlated with disease-free survival, but Weiss score and biomarkers failed to predict adverse outcome in low-grade disease. Our results

  14. Diagnostic utility of hepatocyte nuclear factor 1-beta immunoreactivity in endometrial carcinomas: lack of specificity for endometrial clear cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadare, Oluwole; Liang, Sharon X

    2012-12-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor 1-beta (HNF1β) has recently emerged as a relatively sensitive and specific marker for ovarian clear cell carcinoma. The purpose of this study is to assess the diagnostic utility of this marker for endometrial clear cell carcinoma. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed on 75 endometrial tissues using a goat polyclonal antibody raised against a peptide mapping at the C-terminus of human HNF1β protein. The 75 cases included 15 clear cell carcinomas, 20 endometrioid carcinomas, 15 endometrial serous carcinomas/uterine papillary serous carcinomas, 20 cases of normal endometrium, 2 cases of clear cell metaplasia, and 3 cases of Arias Stella reaction. Staining interpretations were based on a semiquantitative scoring system, a 0 to 12+ continuous numerical scale that was derived by multiplying the extent of staining (0 to 4+ scale) by the intensity of staining (0 to 3+ scale) for each case. HNF1β expression was found to be present in a wide spectrum of tissues. Twenty-seven (54%) of the 50 carcinomas displayed at least focal nuclear HNF1β expression, including 11 (73%) of 15, 9 (60%) of 15, and 7 (35%) of 20 clear cell, serous, and endometrioid carcinomas, respectively. The average nuclear staining scores for clear cell carcinomas, endometrioid carcinomas, and serous carcinomas were 5.2, 1.4, and 4.1, respectively. Clear cell carcinomas and endometrioid carcinomas displayed statistically significant differences regarding their nuclear staining scores (P = 0.0027), but clear cell carcinomas and endometrial serous carcinomas did not (P = 0.45). The calculated sensitivity of any nuclear HNF1β expression in classifying a carcinoma as being of the clear cell histotype was 73%, whereas the specificity was 54%. Nineteen of 20 normal endometrium samples displayed at least focal nuclear expression of HNF1β, and this expression was often diffuse. The 5 cases of benign histologic mimics of clear cell carcinomas (Arias Stella reaction and clear

  15. Advancements in the Management of HPV-Associated Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross Zeitlin

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Head and neck carcinomas have long been linked to alcohol and tobacco abuse; however, within the last two decades, the human papillomavirus (HPV has emerged as a third etiology and is specifically associated with head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC. In this anatomical region, the oncogenic HPV-16 mediates transformation and immortalization of epithelium, most commonly in the oropharynx. Nevertheless, the recent identification of novel HPV mechanisms thought to be specific to oropharyngeal carcinogenesis has coincided with observations that HPV-associated HNSCC has differing clinical behavior—in terms of natural history, therapeutic response, and prognosis—than HPV-negative head and neck tumors. Taken together with the growing incidence of HPV transmission in younger populations, these discoveries have sparked a rapid expansion in both laboratory and clinical studies on the infection and disease. Herein, we review the clinical characteristics of HPV-associated HNSCC, with particular emphasis on recent advancements in our understanding of the management of this infectious malignancy.

  16. [Development of a thyroid carcinoma after irradiation of the head/neck region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grobholz, R; Bittinger, A; Gerdes, B; Rothmund, M

    1997-03-21

    A 73-year-old woman was hospitalised because of increasing dyspnoea and hoarseness after a bout of acute tracheobronchitis. She had been receiving levothyroxine for a growing grade III nodular goitre. At the ages of 26 and 29 she had been treated for cervical lymph node tuberculosis with local excision and percutaneous radiotherapy of 8 Gy each time. On examination she was found to have a bulging neck profile and a hard, practically immobile node in the left lobe of the thyroid. Laboratory tests showed a euthyroid metabolic state, while ultrasound demonstrated a mass. 40 mm in diameter, scintigraphically a cold nodule. A fine-needle biopsy was cytologically highly suspicious of neoplasm. Surgical exploration of the neck and mediastinum revealed an insular follicular carcinoma (10 cm in diameter), involving the right recurrent laryngeal nerve and surrounding the brachiocephalic trunk. The latter had to be removed and a Gore-Tex graft was interposed. Postoperative radiotherapy was given (150 mCurie I131). An enlarging nodular goitre, occurring after a latent period of years following radiotherapy to the neck region for benign and (or) malignant disease, especially when it had been administered in childhood or young adulthood, should raise the suspicion of a radiogenic thyroid carcinoma. Definitive diagnosis by fine-needle biopsy is essential.

  17. Anti-tumor effects of metformin on head and neck carcinoma cell lines: A systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rêgo, Daniela Fortunato; Elias, Silvia Taveira; Amato, AngéLica Amorim; Canto, Graziela De Luca; Guerra, Eliete Neves Silva

    2017-01-01

    Metformin is commonly used for treating type 2 diabetes, and may also reduce cancer risk. Previous studies have demonstrated the association between metformin use and a decreased risk of head and neck cancer. Therefore, the aim of the present systematic review was to summarize the available literature on the in vitro anti-tumor effects of metformin on head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Research studies were obtained from Cochrane Library, Embase, LILACS, MEDLINE and PubMed databases, without time or language restrictions. Only in vitro studies analyzing the effects of metformin on HNSCC cell lines were included. The authors methodically appraised all the selected studies according to the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation method to make a judgment of the evidence quality. Of the 388 identified reports, 11 studies met the inclusion criteria and were used for qualitative analysis. These studies demonstrated that metformin is important in inhibiting cell proliferation, inducing G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, and in regulating proteins involved in carcinogenesis pathways, which corroborates its potential in vitro anti-tumor effects. The present systematic review highlights the biological mechanisms of metformin used alone or together with traditional therapies for cancer. Though very limited, currently available preclinical evidence shows that metformin exerts a potential effect on head and neck carcinoma. PMID:28356929

  18. Ductal carcinoma in a multiple fibroadenoma: diagnostic inaccuracies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Shalinee; Latha, P Suvarna; Ravi, A; Thanka, J

    2010-01-01

    We present the diagnostic inaccuracies encountered in a case of multiple fibroadenoma with malignant transformation. A 30-year-old lady presented with lump in the right breast of one month duration which on clinical examination, X-ray mammogram, sonomammogram were suggestive of multiple fibroadenomas. Fine needle aspiration cytology of the largest lump revealed features of malignancy and a core biopsy showed pleomorphic cells that could not be categorized. Due to the clinical, radiological and pathological diagnostic ambiguity, lumpectomy was performed and frozen section showed features of only conventional fibroadenoma. Representative bits on routine processing showed only features of fibroadenoma. Hence, complete submission of all lumps was done, which revealed fibroadenoma with invasive ductal carcinoma in one. Patient underwent modified radical mastectomy which showed multiple fibroadenomas, focal fibrocystic disease with a focus of residual invasive tumor and metastatic deposit in one axillary lymph node. This case report highlights the diagnostic challenges in detecting malignancy in fibroadenoma and a need for extensive tissue sampling in multiple fibroadenomas to detect the rare occurrence of carcinoma.

  19. Ductal carcinoma in a multiple fibroadenoma: Diagnostic inaccuracies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rao Shalinee

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the diagnostic inaccuracies encountered in a case of multiple fibroadenoma with malignant transformation. A 30-year-old lady presented with lump in the right breast of one month duration which on clinical examination, X-ray mammogram, sonomammogram were suggestive of multiple fibroadenomas. Fine needle aspiration cytology of the largest lump revealed features of malignancy and a core biopsy showed pleomorphic cells that could not be categorized. Due to the clinical, radiological and pathological diagnostic ambiguity, lumpectomy was performed and frozen section showed features of only conventional fibroadenoma. Representative bits on routine processing showed only features of fibroadenoma. Hence, complete submission of all lumps was done, which revealed fibroadenoma with invasive ductal carcinoma in one. Patient underwent modified radical mastectomy which showed multiple fibroadenomas, focal fibrocystic disease with a focus of residual invasive tumor and metastatic deposit in one axillary lymph node. This case report highlights the diagnostic challenges in detecting malignancy in fibroadenoma and a need for extensive tissue sampling in multiple fibroadenomas to detect the rare occurrence of carcinoma.

  20. Clinical values for abnormal {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in the head and neck region of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hwan Seo [Department of Otolaryngology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae Seung [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Roh, Jong-Lyel, E-mail: rohjl@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Otolaryngology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Seung-Ho; Nam, Soon Yuhl [Department of Otolaryngology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang Yoon [Department of Otolaryngology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Biomedical Research Institute, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Abnormal {sup 18}F-FDG uptakes in the head and neck (HN) region can be carefully interpreted as being index primary, second primary cancer (SP) or benign. • {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT identified 91.9% primary HN squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC). • The specificity and negative predictive value of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT for identification of SP were as high as 98.7% and 99.3%, respectively. • Proper detection of primary tumors and SP in the HN region may promote appropriate therapeutic planning of HNSCC patients. - Abstract: Purpose: Fluorine 18-fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) is used to identify index or second primary cancer (SP) of the head and neck (HN) through changes in {sup 18}F-FDG uptake. However, both physiologic and abnormal lesions increase {sup 18}F-FDG uptake. Therefore, we evaluated {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in the HN region to determine clinical values of abnormal tracer uptake. Methods: A prospective study approved by the institutional review board was conducted in 314 patients with newly diagnosed HN squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and informed consent was obtained from all enrolled patients. The patients received initial staging workups including {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and biopsies. All lesions with abnormal HN {sup 18}F-FDG uptake were recorded and most of those were confirmed by biopsies. Diagnostic values for abnormal {sup 18}F-FDG uptake were calculated. Results: Abnormal {sup 18}F-FDG uptake was identified in primary tumors from 285 (91.9%) patients. False-negative results were obtained for 22.3% (23/103) T1 tumors and 2.2% (2/93) T2 tumors (P < 0.001). Thirty-eight regions of abnormal {sup 18}F-FDG uptake were identified in 36 (11.5%) patients: the thyroid (n = 13), maxillary sinus (n = 7), palatine tonsil (n = 6), nasopharynx (n = 5), parotid gland (n = 2) and others (n = 5). Synchronous SP of the HN was identified in eight (2.5%) patients: the thyroid (n = 5), palatine

  1. A systematic review of the diagnostic accuracy of provocative tests of the neck for diagnosing cervical radiculopathy

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Clinical provocative tests of the neck, which position the neck and arm inorder to aggravate or relieve arm symptoms, are commonly used in clinical practice in patients with a suspected cervical radiculopathy. Their diagnostic accuracy, however, has never been examined in a systematic review. A comprehensive search was conducted in order to identify all possible studies fulfilling the inclusion criteria. A study was included if: (1) any provocative test of the neck for diagnosing cervical rad...

  2. Prevalence of human papillomaviruses in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma in Lithuania and Belarus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudleviciene, Zivile; Didziapetriene, Janina; Mackeviciene, Irina; Cicenas, Saulius; Smolyakova, Raisa; Zhukavetc, Aliaksandr; Zivile, Gudleviciene; Janina, Didziapetriene; Irina, Mackeviciene; Saulius, Cicenas; Raisa, Smolyakova; Aliaksandr, Zhukavetc

    2014-03-01

    Overall, head and neck sqamous cell carcinoma accounts for more than 550,000 cases annually worldwide. It is well known that human papillomavirus (HPV) is the main risk factor for cervical cancer development. As the incidence and the mortality of cervical cancer are closely related to the HPV prevalence, we hypothesized that there is the same association between HPV prevalence and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Therefore we performed the study aiming to compare the level of HPV infection and HPV type distribution between two groups of Lithuanian and Belarusian patients with head and neck sqamous cell carcinoma. One hundred ninety head and neck sqamous cell carcinoma patients were included in the study, 75 from Lithuania and 115 from Belarus. PCR was used for HPV detection and typing. The distribution of HPV infection among head and neck sqamous cell carcinoma patients was similar in the Lithuanian (20.0%) and Belarusian (18.3%) patient groups, however differences were found in the distribution of HPV types.

  3. Cooccurrence of Metastatic Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma and Salmonella Induced Neck Abscess in a Cervical Lymph Node

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Myung; Jung, Eun Jung; Song, Eun Jin; Kim, Dong Chul; Jeong, Chi-Young; Ju, Young-Tae; Lee, Young-Joon; Hong, Soon-Chan; Choi, Sang-Kyung; Ha, Woo-Song

    2017-01-01

    Cervical lymph node metastasis is common in patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). Salmonella species are rarely reported as causative agents in focal infections of the head and neck. The cooccurrence of lymph node metastasis from PTC and a bacterial infection is rare. This report describes a 76-year-old woman with a cervical lymph node metastasis from PTC and Salmonella infection of the same lymph node. The patient presented with painful swelling in her left lateral neck region for 15 days, and neck ultrasonography and computed tomography showed a cystic mass along left levels II–IV. The cystic mass was suspected of being a metastatic lymph node; modified radical neck dissection was performed. Histopathological examination confirmed the presence of PTC in the resected node and laboratory examination of the combined abscess cavity confirmed the presence of Salmonella Typhi. Following antibiotic sensitivity testing of the cultured Salmonella Typhi, she was treated with proper antibiotics. Cystic lesions in lymph nodes with metastatic cancer may indicate the presence of cooccurring bacterial infection. Thus, culturing of specimen can be option to make accurate diagnosis and to provide proper postoperative management. PMID:28261270

  4. MicroRNA as a Novel Modulator in Head and Neck Squamous Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Hsin Chen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs have emerged as important regulators of cell proliferation, development, cancer formation, stress responses, cell death, and other physiological conditions in the past decade. On the other hand, head and neck cancer is one of the top ten most common cancers worldwide. Recent advances in microRNAs have revealed their prominent role in regulating gene expression and provided new aspects of applications in diagnosis, prognosis, and therapeutic strategies in head and neck squamous carcinoma. In the present paper, we focus on microRNAs showing significant differences between normal and tumor cells or between cells with differential ability of metastasis. We also emphasize specific microRNAs that could modulate tumor cell properties, such as apoptosis, metastasis, and proliferation. These microRNAs possess the potential to be applied on clinical therapy in the future.

  5. Docetaxel in the treatment of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Rapidis

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Alexander Rapidis1, Nicholas Sarlis2, Jean-Louis Lefebvre3, Merrill Kies41Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, Greek Anticancer Institute, Saint Savvas Hospital, Athens, Greece; 2Department of Medical Affairs, Oncology – US Sanofi-Aventis, Bridgewater, NJ, USA; 3Head and Neck Department, Centre Régional de Lutte Contre le Cancer de Lille, Lille, France; 4Department of Thoracic/Head and Neck Medical Oncology, The University of Texas – M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USAAbstract: Squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN presents at a locally advanced (LA stage in many patients. Chemotherapy has been successfully integrated into first-line treatment programs, either during or prior to radiotherapy (RT – the cornerstone modality for local disease control of inoperable disease or when organ preservation is desired. Concomitant chemoradiotherapy (CCRT provides an absolute survival benefit when compared with other types of locoregional therapy that exclude chemotherapy. Nonetheless, distant metastases still represent the most common cause of treatment failure. Consequently, adding induction chemotherapy (ICT to definitive non-surgical local therapies with a curative intent has been vigorously explored in LA SCCHN. Recently, it has been shown that ICT using the combination of the taxane docetaxel with cisplatin–5-fluorouracil provides significant survival benefit over cisplatin–5-FU, when used before either definitive RT (TAX323 trial or carboplatin-based CCRT (TAX324 trial. Docetaxel is also being investigated in metastatic or recurrent (M/R disease, with promising initial results. It is very likely that the future management strategies of SCCHN will incorporate biologic agents as an add-on to docetaxel-containing schemas, administered either as ICT prior to CCRT in the LA setting or for the management of M/R disease.Keywords: chemoradiotherapy, chemotherapy, docetaxel, head and neck carcinoma, induction, locally

  6. Alteration of serum lipid profile and its prognostic value in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Da, Mingjie; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Heming; Ye, Jinhai; Chen, Jie; Ma, Lu; Gu, Ning; Wu, Yunong; Song, Xiaomeng

    2016-03-01

    Several serum lipid components have been implicated in the development of cancer. However, the prognostic significance of serum lipid components in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma is unknown. Here, we investigated the predictive value of serum lipid profile at diagnosis and in the overall survival of the patients. The study population consists of 136 pathologically confirmed head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cases diagnosed between years 2009 and 2014 at a tertiary medical center. Levels of preoperative serum lipid component's total cholesterol, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein, low-density lipoprotein, apolipoprotein A, apolipoprotein B, and lipoprotein (a) were compared between patients and normal controls matched for age and gender. Serum lipid profiles and their association with clinical parameters were analyzed. The effects of the serum lipid components on survival were examined using the proportional hazards regression model to estimate hazard ratio. Significant lower levels of cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, apolipoprotein A, and apolipoprotein B were found in patients with oral cancer (P < 0.0001). However, a significantly higher level of lipoprotein (a) was found in the cancer group (P < 0.0001). Patients with higher lipoprotein (a) had significantly shorter overall survival than those with lower lipoprotein (a) (P = 0.0042). Multivariate analysis showed that both higher lipoprotein (a) and lymph node metastasis are independent prognostic factors in the patient population (P < 0.01). A higher lipoprotein (a) was associated with poorer prognosis and might be a novel marker in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Papillary carcinoma of the breast: diagnostic agreement and management implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakha, Emad A; Ahmed, Mohamed A; Ellis, Ian O

    2016-11-01

    Papillary carcinoma (PC), which is a rare type of breast cancer, comprises a heterogeneous group of tumours. The diagnostic categorization of PC as in-situ and invasive disease remains a matter of debate with respect to interpretation of its overlapping histological features, and with respect to the uncertainty in clinical behaviour that this dilemma raises. The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic agreement regarding PC among reporting breast pathologists. Six cases of PC included in the UK National Health Service Breast Screening Programme breast pathology interpretive external quality assurance scheme in the last 10 years were reviewed. In this scheme, one representative haematoxylin and eosin-stained slide from each case is circulated to an average of 600 participants. Data on diagnostic categories were collected and slides were reviewed according to the World Health Organization (WHO) diagnostic criteria. The number of final diagnoses of malignancy (in situ or invasive) was highest for invasive PC (99% of the participants diagnosed it as malignant), followed by solid PC (94% and 95%, respectively), encapsulated PC (92% and 92%, respectively), and papillary ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) (88%). Most cases of papillary DCIS were correctly classified as in-situ disease (77%), but 28% of the participants classified invasive PC cases as in-situ disease. Of the participants, 24% reported encapsulated PC as invasive disease. Of the two solid PC cases, one showed some features consistent with the WHO description of invasive solid PC, whereas the other showed features of classic (non-invasive) solid PC. Both cases were reported as invasive by 75% and 77% of participants, respectively. Breast specialists more frequently classified PC as an in-situ carcinoma than did non-specialist participants, and the difference was significant (P = 0.013). Recognition of PC as a malignant entity (in situ or invasive) is high, but concordance of its classification into in

  8. Secondary oesophageal or gastric cancer in patients treated for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenlund Andersen, Anja; Bjerring, Ole Steen; Godballe, Christian

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) are at an elevated risk of developing second primary malignancies (SPM). Our objectives were to estimate the excess risk of oesophageal and gastric SPMs in patients with malignancies of the pharynx or larynx and, additionally...... SPM. CONCLUSION: In this study, we confirm that there is an elevated risk of developing oesophageal and gastric cancer in the Danish population of patients with a cancer in the supraglottic or hypopharyngeal region. Therefore, we recommend close follow-up of these patients and a low threshold...

  9. The prognostic importance of parotid involvement by head and neck squamous cell carcinoma - Case report*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouveia, Bruna Melhoranse; Barbosa, Maria Helena de Magalhães; Carneiro, Leonardo Hoehl; Hadj, Luzia Abrao El; Fernandes, Nurimar Conceição

    2016-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the second-most common malignant cutaneous cancer, with 60% occurring in the head and neck region. Metastases are uncommon and imply a more conservative prognosis. This report describes a case of parotid-invasive, facial squamous cell carcinoma, highlighting the importance of its prognostic and therapeutic management. The patient is an 81-year-old female, exhibiting extensive tumoral lesions in the pre-auricular region, affecting the parotid parenchyma and implying the metastatic involvement of the intra-parotid lymph node. Parotid involvement caused by SCC in specificity tumors is discussed herein. Parotid invasion is currently recognized as an isolated variable. It affects survival rates and determines certain changes in case management, such as the broadening of resection areas and adjuvant radiotherapy. PMID:27438204

  10. Tumor and Stromal-Based Contributions to Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markwell, Steven M.; Weed, Scott A., E-mail: scweed@hsc.wvu.edu [Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy, Program in Cancer Cell Biology, Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)

    2015-02-27

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is typically diagnosed at advanced stages with evident loco-regional and/or distal metastases. The prevalence of metastatic lesions directly correlates with poor patient outcome, resulting in high patient mortality rates following metastatic development. The progression to metastatic disease requires changes not only in the carcinoma cells, but also in the surrounding stromal cells and tumor microenvironment. Within the microenvironment, acellular contributions from the surrounding extracellular matrix, along with contributions from various infiltrating immune cells, tumor associated fibroblasts, and endothelial cells facilitate the spread of tumor cells from the primary site to the rest of the body. Thus far, most attempts to limit metastatic spread through therapeutic intervention have failed to show patient benefit in clinic trails. The goal of this review is highlight the complexity of invasion-promoting interactions in the HNSCC tumor microenvironment, focusing on contributions from tumor and stromal cells in order to assist future therapeutic development and patient treatment.

  11. High-Risk Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Veness

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonmelanoma skin cancers (squamous cell and basal cell carcinomas occur at an epidemic rate in many countries with the worldwide incidence increasing. The sun-exposed head and neck are the most frequent sites for these cancers to arise and in most patients diagnosed with a cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma, local treatment is usually curative. However, a subset is diagnosed with a high-risk cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma. High-risk factors include size (> 2 cm, thickness/depth of invasion (> 4 mm, recurrent lesions, the presence of perineural invasion, location near the parotid gland, and immunosuppression. These patients have a higher risk (> 10–20% of developing metastases to regional lymph nodes (often parotid nodes, and in some cases also of experiencing local morbidity (perineural invasion, based on unfavourable primary lesion and patient factors. Despite treatment, many patients developing metastatic cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma experience mortality and morbidity usually as a consequence of uncontrolled metastatic nodal disease. It is therefore important that clinicians treating nonmelanoma skin cancers have an understanding and awareness of these high-risk patients. The aim of this article is to discuss the factors that define a high-risk patient and to present some of the issues pertinent to their management.

  12. Can neck irradiation be an alternative to neck dissection in early stage carcinoma oral tongue operated for primary alone? Experience from a single institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushmita Ghoshal

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To study pattern of failure, locoregional control rates (LCR and disease free survival (DFS in post-operative patients of carcinoma oral tongue, and to study the impact of nodal dissection on DFS in stage I and II patients.Methods: 102 patients of carcinoma oral tongue treated between January 2009 and December 2013 were analyzed. All patients were operated for primary disease, but neck dissection was done in 78 (76.5% patients only. However, radiation to primary site along with neck region was received by all patients. Pattern of failure, LCR and DFS were estimated.Results: At median follow up of 12 months, 10.8% patients failed locally, 10.8% in nodal region, 2.9% both at local and nodal site, and 5.9% patients failed distally. 2 year LCR and DFS was 71.2%, 90.9%, 79.5%, 0% and 55.2%, 64.4%, 57.8%, 0% in stage I, II, III, IV respectively. 2 year DFS in stage I patients, who underwent nodal dissection and post-operative radiation (14 patients was 64.3% and in whom only neck irradiation was done (15 patients, it was 45.8%, however difference was not significant (p = 0.5. But in stage II patients, 33 patients who underwent nodal dissection and post-operative radiation, 2 year DFS was 85.4% and it was 21.4% in 7 patients who underwent neck radiation only, and difference showed trend towards significance (p = 0.05. 2 or more positive lymph nodes post dissection was the only poor prognostic factor that correlated with DFS (p = 0.02Conclusion: While in stage I, neck irradiation alone can be a possible alternative to neck dissection and post-operative radiation; for stage II, neck dissection is mandatory.

  13. Diagnostic Accuracy of the Neck Tornado Test as a New Screening Test in Cervical Radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Juyeon; Park, Woo Young; Hong, Seungbae; An, Jiwon; Koh, Jae Chul; Lee, Youn-Woo; Kim, Yong Chan; Choi, Jong Bum

    2017-01-01

    The Spurling test, although a highly specific provocative test of the cervical spine in cervical radiculopathy (CR), has low to moderate sensitivity. Thus, we introduced the neck tornado test (NTT) to examine the neck and the cervical spine in CR. The aim of this study was to introduce a new provocative test, the NTT, and compare the diagnostic accuracy with a widely accepted provocative test, the Spurling test. Retrospective study. Medical records of 135 subjects with neck pain (CR, n = 67; without CR, n = 68) who had undergone cervical spine magnetic resonance imaging and been referred to the pain clinic between September 2014 and August 2015 were reviewed. Both the Spurling test and NTT were performed in all patients by expert examiners. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were compared for both the Spurling test and the NTT. The sensitivity of the Spurling test and the NTT was 55.22% and 85.07% (P < 0.0001); specificity, 98.53% and 86.76% (P = 0.0026); accuracy, 77.04% and 85.93% (P = 0.0423), respectively. The NTT is more sensitive with superior diagnostic accuracy for CR diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging than the Spurling test.

  14. Apigenin induces apoptosis and impairs head and neck carcinomas EGFR/ErbB2 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuelli, Laura; Marzocchella, Laura; Quaranta, Alessandro; Palumbo, Camilla; Pompa, Giorgio; Izzi, Valerio; Canini, Antonella; Modesti, Andrea; Galvano, Fabio; Bei, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    The development of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs) is a multistep process progressing from precancerous lesions to highly malignant tumors. A critical role in HNSCCs development and progression is played by EGFR family members including EGFR and ErbB2. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of apigenin, a low molecular weight flavonoid contained in fruits and vegetables, on growth and survival and on EGFR/ErbB2 signaling in cell lines derived from HNSCCs of the tongue (CAL-27, SCC-15) or pharynx (FaDu). Using sulforhodamine B assay, FACS analysis and activated caspase-3 detection by immunofluorescence, we here demonstrate that apigenin dose-dependently inhibits survival and induces apoptosis of HNSCC cells. Further, by performing western blotting with antibodies specific for phosphorylated EGFR, ErbB2, Erk1/2 and Akt we demonstrate that apigenin reduces ligand-induced phosphorylation of EGFR and ErbB2 and impairs their downstream signaling. On the whole, our results suggest that apigenin properties might be exploited for chemoprevention and/or therapy of head and neck carcinomas.

  15. Safety and efficacy of quadrapeutics versus chemoradiation in head and neck carcinoma xenograft model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukianova-Hleb, Ekaterina Y; Kim, Yoo-Shin; Aryasomayajula, Bhawani; Boulikas, Teni; Phan, Jack; Hung, Mien-Chie; Torchilin, Vladimir P; O'Neill, Brian E; Lapotko, Dmitri O

    2015-01-01

    Chemoradiation is the strongest anti-tumor therapy but in resistant unresectable cancers it often lacks safety and efficacy. We compared our recently developed cell-level combination approach, quadrapeutics, to chemoradiation therapy to establish pre-clinical data for its biodistribution, safety and efficacy in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), as a clinically challenging aggressive and resistant cancer. In vitro and in vivo models of four carcinomas were treated with standard chemoradiation and quadrapeutics using identical drug and radiation doses. We applied liposomal cisplatin or doxorubicin, colloidal gold, near-infrared laser pulses and radiation, all at low safe doses. The final evaluation used a xenograft model of HNSCC. Quadrapeutics enhanced standard chemoradiation in vitro by reducing head and neck cancer cell proliferation by 1000-fold, inhibiting tumor growth in vivo by 34-fold and improving animal survival by 5-fold, and reducing the side effects to a negligible level. In quadrapeutics, we observed an "inversion" of the drug efficacy of two standard drugs: doxorubicin, a low efficacy drug for the cancers studied, was two times more efficient than cisplatin, the first choice drug in clinic for HNSCC. The radical therapeutic gain of quadrapeutics resulted from the intracellular synergy of the four components employed which we administered in a specific sequence, while the reduction in the toxicity was due to the low doses of all four components. The biodistribution, safety and efficacy data for quadrapeutics in HNSCC ensure its high translational potential and justify the possibility of clinical trials.

  16. Classical and molecular cytogenetic analysis in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas

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    Luciana CS Veiga

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Head and neck carcinomas represent the sixth most frequent type of cancer in the world, and 90% are derived from squamous cells (HNSCC. In this study of 15 HNSCC cases, extensive aneuploidy was detected by G banding in most tumors. The most frequently observed numerical changes involved gain of a chromosome 22, and loss of chromosomes Y, 10, 17, and 19. The most frequent structural alteration was del(22(q13.1. As compared to G-banding, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH proved to be an effective technique for detecting aneuploidy. Interphase FISH with a chromosome 17 centromere probe disclosed a high frequency of monosomy for chromosome 17, in contrast with G-banding, by which clonal monosomy 17 was detected in only three of the tumors. Painting probes for chromosomes 5 and 16 were used to evaluate a selected series of HNSCC in which G-banding analysis had shown marker chromosomes. FISH analysis failed to confirm the origin of the marker chromosomes, but four out of five cases showed a significant loss of chromosomes 5. This difference between FISH and G-banding results may reflect the smaller number of metaphase analyzed as well as the criteria adopted for sorting these metaphases. Therefore results obtained solely by G-banding analysis should be considered with caution. Our data confirmed the involvement of chromosome 17 in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas.

  17. Selective versus comprehensive neck dissection in the treatment of patients with a pathologically node-positive neck with or without microscopic extracapsular spread in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Z; Gao, Y; Niu, L X; Peng, X; Guo, C B

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the prognosis and complications between selective neck dissection (SND) and comprehensive neck dissection (CND) for patients with a pathologically node-positive neck in squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue and the floor of the mouth. This was a retrospective cohort study. There was no significant difference between the SND group and the CND group in 3-year neck control rate (86.2% vs. 85.9%, P=0.797) or disease-specific survival (DSS) rate (64.6% vs. 61.9%, P=0.646). Further analyses of the respective 3-year DSS rates in the SND and CND subgroups were as follows: pN1 without extracapsular spread (ECS), 67.7% vs. 72.2%, P=0.851; pN2b without ECS, 64.7% vs. 68.8%, P=0.797; and pN+ with ECS, 57.1% vs. 60.0%, P=0.939. Of note, there were significantly fewer complications in the SND group compared with the CND group (7.3% vs. 20.0%, P=0.032). Multivariate analysis showed that the modality of neck treatment, pN+ status, and microscopic ECS did not serve as independent prognostic factors. SND plus adjuvant radiotherapy is a management strategy of high efficiency and minor morbidity for selected oral cancer patients with a pN+ neck with or without microscopic ECS.

  18. Promising Druggable Target in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Wnt Signaling

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    Amnani Aminuddin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Canonical Wnt signaling pathway, also known as Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, is a crucial mechanism for cellular maintenance and development. It regulates cell cycle progression, apoptosis, proliferation, migration and differentiation. Dysregulation of this pathway correlates with oncogenesis in various tissues including breast, colon, pancreatic as well as head and neck cancers. Furthermore, the canonical Wnt signaling pathway has also been described as one of the critical signaling pathways for regulation of normal stem cells as well as cancer cells with stem cell-like features, termed cancer stem cells. In this review, we will briefly describe the basic mechanisms of Wnt signaling pathway and its crucial roles in normal regulation of cellular processes as well as in the development of cancer. Next, we will highlight the roles of canonical Wnt signaling pathway in the regulation of cancer stem cell properties namely self-renewal, differentiation, metastasis and drug resistance abilities, particularly in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Finally, we will examine the findings of several recent studies which explore druggable targets in the canonical Wnt signaling pathway which could be valuable to improve the treatment outcome for head and neck cancer.

  19. Concomitant Radiotherapy and Chemotherapy for High-Risk Nonmelanoma Skin Carcinomas of the Head and Neck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Apisarnthanarax

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. To report on the use and feasibility of a multimodality approach using concomitant radiotherapy and chemotherapy in patients with high-risk nonmelanoma skin carcinoma (NMSC of the head and neck. Methods. Records of patients with NMSC of the head and neck who received concomitant CRT at the University of North Carolina between 2001 and 2007 were reviewed. Results. Fifteen identified patients had at least one of the following high-risk factors: T4 disease (93%, unresectability (60%, regional nodal involvement (40%, and/or recurrence (47%. Ten patients were treated in the definitive setting and five in the postoperative setting. Platinum based chemotherapy was given in 14 (93% patients. Ten of fifteen (67% patients completed all planned chemotherapy treatments, and thirteen patients (87% completed at least 80% of planned chemotherapy. Mild radiation dermatitis occurred in all patients and reached grade 3 in 13% of patients. No patients experienced grade 4 or 5 toxicity. With a median followup of 31 months in surviving patients, the 2-year actuarial locoregional control and relapse-free survival were 79% and 49%, respectively. Conclusions. Definitive or postoperative chemoradiotherapy for patients with locally advanced or regionally metastasized NMSC of the head and neck appears feasible with acceptable toxicities and favorable locoregional control.

  20. Prognostic value of FDG PET/CT in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas

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    Dequanter D

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available D Dequanter,1,2 M Shahla,2 C Aubert,2 Y Deniz,2 P Lothaire2 1Department of Oncology, Laboratory of Experimental Radiotherapy, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium; 2Head and Neck Department, Hôpital André Vésale, CHU de Charleroi, Montigny le Tilleul, Belgium Introduction: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT to identify the presence of cervical lymph nodes metastases and extracapsular spread with histologic correlations in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.Methods: The medical records of 54 patients who underwent 18F-FDG PET/CT for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma before surgery were reviewed. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC analysis was performed to differentiate patients with cervical lymph node metastasis from those without lymph node metastasis. The same statistical analysis was done to differentiate cervical lymph nodes with extracapsular spread from those without extracapsular spread.Results: Metastatic disease was diagnosed histologically in 49% (26 of 54 of the patients. Extracapsular spread was present in ten of the 54 patients (19%. When ROC curve analysis and maximum standardized uptake (SUVmax values were used to detect cervical lymph node metastasis, the area under the ROC curve was 0.96 and the optimal cutoff value for SUVmax was 4.05 based on ROC curve analysis. The sensitivity and specificity of SUVmax for the detection of cervical lymph node metastasis using this cutoff point were 92% and 88%, respectively. When ROC curve analysis and SUVmax values were used in order to detect extracapsular spread, the area under the ROC curve was 0.86, and the optimal cutoff value for SUVmax was 4.15 based on ROC curve analysis. Using this cutoff value, the sensitivity and specificity of SUVmax for the detection of extracapsular spread were 83% and 88%, respectively.Conclusion: In our study, a median 18F-FDG PET/CT SUVmax cutoff

  1. Radiological detection of extracapsular spread in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cervical metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Url, C., E-mail: christoph.url@i-med.ac.at [Department of Otorhinolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck (Austria); Schartinger, V.H.; Riechelmann, H.; Glückert, R. [Department of Otorhinolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck (Austria); Maier, H. [Department of Pathology, Medical University Innsbruck (Austria); Trumpp, M.; Widmann, G. [Department of Radiology, Medical University Innsbruck (Austria)

    2013-10-01

    Background: Extracapsular spread of cervical lymph nodes deteriorates the prognosis of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Postoperative radiochemotherapy is superior to postoperative radiotherapy alone in patients with histologically proven extracapsular spread. If extracapsular spread can be detected preoperatively, patients may favor primary radiochemotherapy instead of primary surgery plus postoperative radiochemotherapy. Methods: Computed tomography (CT) scans of nodal positive head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients treated between 2008 and 2010 with comprehensive neck dissection as part of first line surgical treatment were retrospectively scanned for extracapsular spread by two blinded radiologists. If a positive lymph node was identified by the pathologist, CT scans were assessed for extracapsular spread retrospectively. CT criteria for Extracapsular spread were apparent fat and soft tissue infiltration or infiltration of sternocleidomastoid muscle, internal jugular vein or carotid artery. Radiologic judgment was compared with histological evidence of extracapsular spread and specificity and sensitivity of CT detection was calculated. Results: Forty-nine patients with histologically proven positive lymph nodes (pN+) were included. Extracapsular spread was histologically proven in 17 cases; the number of all affected lymph nodes was not listed. Radiologist 1 found extracapsular spread in CT scans of 15/49 patients and radiologist 2 in 16/49 patients (Cohen's kappa = 0.86; p < 0.01). Sensitivity of radiologic extracapsular spread detection was 73% (95% confidential index (CI): 44.0–89.7%) and specificity 91% (75.0–98.0%). Conclusion: Extracapsular spread depicted on computed tomography using strict criteria has high specificity.

  2. MAGEB2 is activated by promoter demethylation in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavita M Pattani

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Although promoter hypermethylation has been an accepted means of tumor suppressor gene inactivation, activation of otherwise normally repressed proto-oncogenes by promoter demethylation has been infrequently documented. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: In this study we performed an integrative, whole-genome analysis for discovery of epigenetically activated proto-oncogenes in head and neck cancer tumors. We used the 47K GeneChip U133 Plus 2.0 Affymetrix expression microarray platform to obtain re-expression data from 5-aza treated normal cell line and expression data from primary head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC tumor tissues and normal mucosa tissues. We then investigated candidate genes by screening promoter regions for CpG islands and bisulfite sequencing followed by QUMSP and RT PCR for the best candidate genes. Finally, functional studies were performed on the top candidate gene. RESULTS: From the top 178 screened candidates 96 had CpG islands in their promoter region. Seven candidate genes showed promoter region methylation in normal mucosa samples and promoter demethylation in a small cohort of primary HNSCC tissues. We then studied the demethylation of the top 3 candidate genes in an expanded cohort of 76 HNSCC tissue samples and 17 normal mucosa samples. We identified MAGEB2 as having significant promoter demethylation in primary head and neck squamous cell carcinoma tissues. We then found significantly higher expression of MAGEB2 in tumors in a separate cohort of 73 primary HNSCC tissues and 31 normal tissues. Finally, we found that MAGEB2 has growth promoting effects on minimally transformed oral keratinocyte cell lines but not a definite effect on HNSCC cell lines. CONCLUSION: In conclusion, we identified MAGEB2 as activated by promoter demethylation in HNSCCand demonstrates growth promoting effects in a minimally transformed oral keratinocyte cell line. More studies are needed to evaluate MAGBE2's exact role in HNSCC.

  3. Diagnostic performance of CT angiography in neck vessel trauma: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Uribe, Carlos; Ramírez, Ana; Suarez-Poveda, Tatiana; Ortiz, Margarita; Sanabria, Alvaro

    2016-10-01

    This study was conducted in order to define the diagnostic performance of CT angiography for vascular injuries compared with angiography in patients with neck trauma. CT angiography is the cornerstone of diagnosis for hemodynamically stable patients with wounds suspicious of vascular trauma in the limbs, chest, or abdomen. Available evidence for the use of CT angiography in neck vascular trauma comes from small case series and few randomized controlled trials, and high-quality information does not exist regarding its performance. A protocol using the recommendations of the Cochrane Collaboration was designed. A systematic search of diagnostic studies without limits on language or time was carried out to December 2014. Studies including patients with neck trauma with retrospective or prospective data collection that assessed CT angiography compared with other methods were selected. Methodological quality was assessed using the QUADAS-2 tool. A hierarchical model ROC curve and a bivariate random effects model were used for the pooled analysis. Sixteen studies were selected and reviewed, and nine studies with 693 patients were included in this review. The overall sensitivity was 97 % (95 % CI 0.77-1.00; I (2) = 65.7 % (41.4-90.0)), while the overall specificity was 99 % (95 % CI 0.93-1.00; I (2) = 0). The hierarchic ROC curve showed an area under the curve of 0.99. Publication bias was not identified in this study. CT angiography can be stated as the gold standard for diagnosing vascular injuries in hemodynamically stable patients with neck trauma.

  4. Accessible or Inaccessible? Diagnostic Efficacy of CT-Guided Core Biopsies of Head and Neck Masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunningham, Jane D., E-mail: janecunningham0708@gmail.com; McCusker, Mark W.; Power, Sarah; PearlyTi, Joanna; Thornton, John; Brennan, Paul; Lee, Michael J.; O’Hare, Alan; Looby, Seamus [Beaumont Hospital, Department of Radiology (Ireland)

    2015-04-15

    PurposeTissue sampling of lesions in the head and neck is challenging due to complex regional anatomy and sometimes necessitates open surgical biopsy. However, many patients are poor surgical candidates due to comorbidity. Thus, we evaluated the use of CT guidance for establishing histopathological diagnosis of head and neck masses.MethodsAll consecutive patients (n = 22) who underwent CT-guided core biopsy of head or neck masses between April 2009 and August 2012 were retrospectively reviewed using the departmental CT interventional procedures database. The indication for each biopsy performed was to establish or exclude a diagnosis of neoplasia in patients with suspicious head or neck lesions found on clinical examination or imaging studies. Patients received conscious sedation and 18 G, semiautomated core needle biopsies were performed by experienced neuroradiologists using 16-slice multidetector row CT imaging guidance (Somatom Definition Siemens Medical Solutions, Germany). Histopathology results of each biopsy were analysed.ResultsSixteen of 22 biopsies that were performed (73 %) yielded a pathological diagnosis. Anatomic locations biopsied included: masticator (n = 7), parapharyngeal (n = 3), parotid (n = 3), carotid (n = 3), perivertebral (n = 3), pharyngeal (n = 2), and retropharyngeal (n = 1) spaces. Six biopsies (27 %) were nondiagnostic due to inadequate tissue sampling, particularly small biopsy sample size and failure to biopsy the true sampling site due to extensive necrosis. No major complications were encountered.ConclusionsThe use of CT guidance to perform core biopsies of head and neck masses is an effective means of establishing histopathological diagnosis and reduces the need for diagnostic open surgical biopsy and general anaesthesia.

  5. Kinematic Measures during a Clinical Diagnostic Technique for Human Neck Disorder: Inter- and Intraexaminer Comparisons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Vorro

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Diagnoses of human musculoskeletal dysfunction of the cervical spine are indicated by palpable clues of a patient’s structural compliance/noncompliance as this body segment responds to diagnostic motion demands applied by a clinician. This process includes assessments of motion range, motion performance, and changes in tissue responses. However, biomechanical quantification of these diagnostic actions and their reproducible components is lacking. As a result, this study sought to use objective kinematic measures to capture aspects of the diagnostic process to compare inter- and intraexaminer motion behaviors when performing a specific clinical diagnostic protocol. Pain-free volunteers and a group determined to be symptomatic based on a psychometric pain score were examined by two clinicians while three-dimensional kinematic data were collected. Intraexaminer diagnostic motion ranges of cervical lateral flexion and secondary rotations were consistent for each examiner and for each subject group. However, interexaminer comparisons for motion range, secondary rotations, and average velocities yielded consistently larger measures for one examiner for both subject groups (P<0.05. This research demonstrates that fundamental aspects of the clinical diagnostic process for human neck disorders can be identified and measured using kinematic parameters. Further, these objective data have the potential to be linked to clinical decision making.

  6. Metastatic head and neck carcinoma to a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelson, Robert Todd; Ducic, Yadranko

    2005-04-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube placement is a safe and widely accepted alternate route for enteral alimentation in the head and neck cancer patient population. Cancer metastatic to a PEG tube exit site is a rare but serious complication of this procedure. We sought to determine the route of spread responsible for PEG site metastases such that we may prevent further occurrences of this highly morbid condition. We also report a case of PEG site metastasis at our institution. We performed a MEDLINE search for the years 1962 to 2002 and conducted a review of the literature. In the case at our institution, a 63-year-old man was referred to our institution with recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the right base of tongue; he also had a 1.5-cm left apical lung nodule. He underwent PEG tube placement at the time of staging panendoscopy. Six months after the original tube placement, he had an ulcerated mass develop at the PEG site; biopsy of the mass revealed squamous cell carcinoma histologically identical to the base of tongue tumor. He also had recurrent lung cancer and four hepatic lesions develop. In our MEDLINE search, of the five patients diagnosed with PEG site disease >10 months after PEG placement, all five (100%) had synchronous distant metastatic disease. In the group of patients diagnosed with PEG site metastases cancer, and he died 4 months after detection of the PEG site metastasis. PEG site metastases are iatrogenic complications of PEG tube placement in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the upper aerodigestive tract. The use of laparoscopic, open, or the "push" technique of PEG tube placement in patients with head and neck cancer may prevent direct implantation of malignant cells into an enteral access site.

  7. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy as a diagnostic modality for carcinoma thyroid

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    Gupta, Nikhil [Department of Surgery, Maulana Azad Medical College, Lok Nayak Hospital, New Delhi (India)], E-mail: nikhil_ms26@yahoo.co.in; Kakar, Arun K. [Department of Surgery, Maulana Azad Medical College, Lok Nayak Hospital, New Delhi (India); Chowdhury, Veena [Department of Radiodiagnosis, Maulana Azad Medical College, Lok Nayak Hospital, New Delhi (India); Gulati, Praveen [MR Centre, A-23 Green Park, New Delhi (India); Shankar, L. Ravi [Department of Radioiodine Uptake and Imaging, Institute of Nucler Medicine and Allied Sciences (INMAS), Timarpur, New Delhi (India); Vindal, Anubhav [Department of Surgery, Maulana Azad Medical College, Lok Nayak Hospital, New Delhi (India)

    2007-12-15

    Aim: The aim of this study was to observe the findings of magnetic resonance spectroscopy of solitary thyroid nodules and its correlation with histopathology. Materials and methods: In this study, magnetic resonance spectroscopy was carried out on 26 patients having solitary thyroid nodules. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was performed on a 1.5 T super conductive system with gradient strength of 33 mTs. Fine needle aspiration cytology was done after MRS. All 26 patients underwent surgery either because of cytopathologically proven malignancy or because of cosmetic reasons. Findings of magnetic resonance spectroscopy were compared with histopathology of thyroid specimens. Results and conclusion: It was seen that presence or absence of choline peak correlates very well with presence or absence of malignant foci with in the nodule (sensitivity = 100%; specificity = 88.88%). These results indicate that magnetic resonance spectroscopy may prove to be an useful diagnostic modality for carcinoma thyroid.

  8. LASSO NTCP predictors for the incidence of xerostomia in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma and nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tsair-Fwu; Liou, Ming-Hsiang; Huang, Yu-Jie; Chao, Pei-Ju; Ting, Hui-Min; Lee, Hsiao-Yi; Fang, Fu-Min

    2014-08-28

    To predict the incidence of moderate-to-severe patient-reported xerostomia among head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Multivariable normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models were developed by using quality of life questionnaire datasets from 152 patients with HNSCC and 84 patients with NPC. The primary endpoint was defined as moderate-to-severe xerostomia after IMRT. The numbers of predictive factors for a multivariable logistic regression model were determined using the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) with bootstrapping technique. Four predictive models were achieved by LASSO with the smallest number of factors while preserving predictive value with higher AUC performance. For all models, the dosimetric factors for the mean dose given to the contralateral and ipsilateral parotid gland were selected as the most significant predictors. Followed by the different clinical and socio-economic factors being selected, namely age, financial status, T stage, and education for different models were chosen. The predicted incidence of xerostomia for HNSCC and NPC patients can be improved by using multivariable logistic regression models with LASSO technique. The predictive model developed in HNSCC cannot be generalized to NPC cohort treated with IMRT without validation and vice versa.

  9. Antibody Arrays Identify Potential Diagnostic Markers of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

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    Brian J. Peter

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is the third leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Effective treatment of HCC patients is hampered by the lack of sensitive and specific diagnostic markers of HCC. Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP, the currently used HCC marker, misses 30%–50% of HCC patients, who therefore remain undiagnosed and untreated. In order to identify novel diagnostic markers that can be used individually or in combination with AFP, we used an antibody array platform to detect the levels of candidate proteins in the plasma of HCC patients (n = 48 and patients with chronic hepatitis B or C viral infections (n = 19 (both of which are the major risk factors of HCC. We identified 7 proteins that significantly differentiate HCC patients from hepatitis patients (p < 0.05 (AFP, CTNNB, CSF1, SELL, IGFBP6, IL6R, and VCAM1.Importantly, we also identified 8 proteins that significantly differentiate HCC patients with ‘normal’ levels of AFP (<20 ng/ml from hepatitis patients (p < 0.05 (IL1RN, IFNG, CDKN1A, RETN, CXCL14, CTNNB, FGF2, and SELL. These markers are potentially important complementary markers to AFP. Using an independent immunoassay method in an independent group of 23 HCC patients and 22 hepatitis patients, we validated that plasma levels of CTNNB were significantly higher in the HCC group (p = 0.020. In conclusion, we used an antibody array platform to identify potential circulating diagnostic markers of HCC, some of which may be valuable when used in combination with AFP. The clinical utility of these newly identified HCC diagnostic markers needs to be systematically evaluated.

  10. Verrucous carcinomas of the head and neck, including those with associated squamous cell carcinoma, lack transcriptionally active high-risk human papillomavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Kalyani R; Chernock, Rebecca D; Zhang, Tian R; Wang, Xiaowei; El-Mofty, Samir K; Lewis, James S

    2013-11-01

    Most oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) and histologic variants harbor transcriptionally active human papillomavirus (HPV). While HPV DNA can be found in many non-oropharyngeal head and neck carcinomas, transcriptionally active HPV is rare. Verrucous carcinoma is a variant with bland cytology, warty appearance, locally destructive growth, and lack of metastasis when lacking a frankly invasive carcinoma component. Studies have shown variable rates of HPV DNA and p16 protein expression in such tumors but still have not clearly addressed if the virus has biological activity or clinical relevance in the positive cases. Department files were searched for verrucous neoplasms, including pure verrucous carcinoma, verrucous carcinoma with dysplasia or minimal invasion, and SCC arising in verrucous carcinoma (ie, having a major component of frankly invasive carcinoma). p16 immunohistochemistry, HPV DNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and E6/E7 mRNA reverse transcription PCR for high-risk HPV types were performed. Of the 49 cases, 6 (12.2%) showed strong (>50%) staining for p16. HPV DNA was detected in 7/49 (14.3%) cases, but only one case was positive for both p16, and HPV DNA. A total of 36 cases yielded sufficient RNA for RT-PCR (18 verrucous carcinomas, 13 atypical verrucous carcinomas, and 5 SCC arising in verrucous carcinoma). All 36 were negative, including the four p16-positive and three HPV DNA-positive tumors tested. Although a minority of verrucous carcinoma lesions are p16 and HPV DNA positive, transcriptionally active high-risk HPV is uniformly absent. These findings argue that verrucous carcinoma and its related squamous cell carcinomas are not HPV-driven tumors.

  11. FGFR1 is a potential prognostic biomarker and therapeutic target in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koole, Koos; Brunen, Diede; Van Kempen, Pauline M W; Noorlag, Rob; De Bree, Remco; Lieftink, Cor; Van Es, Robert J J; Bernards, Rene; Willems, Stefan M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: FGFR1 is a promising therapeutic target in multiple types of solid tumors, including head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). FGFR inhibitors have shown great therapeutic value in preclinical models. However, resistance remains a major setback. In this study, we have investigated the

  12. mTHPC mediated photodynamic therapy (PDT) of squamous cell carcinoma in the head and neck : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Visscher, S. A. H. J.; Dijkstra, P. U.; Tan, I. B.; Roodenburg, J. L. N.; Witjes, M. J. H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is used in curative and palliative treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). To evaluate available evidence on the use of mTHPC (Foscan (R)) mediated PDT, we conducted a review of the literature. Materials and methods: A systematic review was p

  13. Loss of Y-chromosome does not correlate with age at onset of head and neck carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veiga, L C Silva; Bérgamo, N A; Reis, P P

    2012-01-01

    Loss of Y-chromosome has been correlated with older age in males. Furthermore, current evidence indicates that Y-chromosome loss also occurs in several human tumors, including head and neck carcinomas. However, the association between Y nullisomy and the occurrence of neoplasias in elderly men ha...

  14. Expression and prognostic significance of a panel of tissue hypoxia markers in head-and-neck squamous cell carcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le, Quynh-Thu; Kong, Christina; Lavori, Phillip W;

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the expression pattern of hypoxia-induced proteins identified as being involved in malignant progression of head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and to determine their relationship to tumor pO(2) and prognosis. METHODS AND MATERIALS: We performed immunohistochemical...

  15. The head and neck metastases from clear cell carcinoma of the kidney; Przerzut raka jasnokomorkowego nerki do glowy i szyi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szlenk, Z.; Osuch-Wojcikiewicz, E.; Janczewski, G. [Akademia Medyczna, Warsaw (Poland)

    1994-12-31

    The kidney carcinoma is the commonest tumor to metastasize to the head and neck. The majority of renal metastases occur in the nose and paranasal sinuses. This paper presents 4 cases of metastatic tumor in the nasal cavities, paranasal sinuses, frontal bone and piriform fossa. The difficulties in diagnosis and management was also presented. (author)

  16. Treatments and costs for recurrent and/or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Linden, Naomi; Buter, Jan; Pescott, Chris P.; Lalisang, Roy I.; de Boer, Jan Paul; de Graeff, Alexander; van Herpen, Carla M L; Baatenburg de Jong, Robert J.; Uyl-de Groot, Carin A.

    2016-01-01

    For patients with recurrent and/or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (R/M SCCHN), chemotherapy can prolong life and alleviate symptoms. However, expected gains may be small, not necessarily outweighing considerable toxicity and high costs. Treatment choice is to a large extent

  17. Treatments and costs for recurrent and/or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. van der Linden (Naomi); J. Buter (Jan); C.P. Pescott; R.I. Lalisang (Roy I.); J.P. De Boer (Jan Paul); A. de Graeff (A.); C.M.L. Herpen, C.M.L. (Carla); R.J. Baatenburg de Jong (Robert Jan); C.A. Uyl-de Groot (Carin)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ For patients with recurrent and/or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (R/M SCCHN), chemotherapy can prolong life and alleviate symptoms. However, expected gains may be small, not necessarily outweighing considerable toxicity and high costs. Treatmen

  18. Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck metastasizing to the parotid gland-A review of current recommendations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O'Hara, J.; Ferlito, A.; Takes, R.P.; Rinaldo, A.; Strojan, P.; Shaha, A.R.; Rodrigo, J.P.; Paleri, V.

    2011-01-01

    Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the head and neck may metastasize in up to 5% of patients, with the parotid lymph nodes the most frequent site for spread. Metastases frequently show delayed presentation after the primary cancer had been treated. The optimum treatment should be surgery

  19. Follow-up strategies in head and neck cancer other than upper aerodigestive tract squamous cell carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Digonnet, A.; Hamoir, M.; Andry, G.; Poorten, V. Van der; Haigentz Jr., M.; Langendijk, J.A.; Bree, R. de; Hinni, M.L.; Mendenhall, W.M.; Paleri, V.; Rinaldo, A.; Werner, J.A.; Takes, R.P.; Ferlito, A.

    2013-01-01

    Post-therapy follow-up for patients with head and neck cancer other than upper aerodigestive tract squamous cell carcinoma should meet several objectives: to detect both local, regional or distant recurrences, to evaluate acute and long-term treatment-related side effects, to guide the

  20. Full-field OCT for fast diagnostic of head and neck cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Leeuw, Frederic; Casiraghi, Odile; Ben Lakhdar, Aïcha; Abbaci, Muriel; Laplace-Builhé, Corinne

    2015-02-01

    Full-Field OCT (FFOCT) produces optical slices of tissue using white light interferometry providing in-depth 2D images, with an isotropic resolution around 1 micrometer. These optical biopsy images are similar to those obtained with established histological procedures, but without tissue preparation and within few minutes. This technology could be useful when diagnosing a lesion or at the time of its surgical management. Here we evaluate the clinical value of FFOCT imaging in the management of patients with Head and Neck cancers by assessing the accuracy of the diagnosis done on FFOCT images from resected specimen. FFOCT images from Head and Neck samples were first compared to the gold standard (HES-conventional histology). An image atlas dedicated to the training of pathologists was built and diagnosis criteria were identified. Then, we performed a morphological correlative study: both healthy and cancerous samples from patients who undergo Head and Neck surgery of oral cavity, pharynx, and larynx were imaged. Images were interpreted in a random way by two pathologists and the FFOCT based diagnostics were compared with HES (gold standard) of the same samples. Here we present preliminary results showing that FFOCT provides a quick assessment of tissue architecture at microscopic level that could guide surgeons for tumor margin delineation during intraoperative procedure.

  1. Diagnostic and therapeutic application of noncoding RNAsfor hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chikako Shibata; Motoyuki Otsuka; Takahiro Kishikawa; Motoko Ohno; Takeshi Yoshikawa; Akemi Takata; Kazuhiko Koike

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, noncoding RNA moleculesthat regulate gene expression posttranscriptionally,targeting thousands of messenger RNAs. Long noncodingRNAs (lncRNAs), another class of noncodingRNAs, have been determined to be also involved intranscription regulation and translation of target genes.Since deregulated expression levels or functions ofmiRNAs and lncRNAs in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)are frequently observed, clinical use of noncodingRNAs for novel diagnostic and therapeutic applicationsin the management of HCCs is highly and emergentlyexpected. Here, we summarize recent findingsregarding deregulated miRNAs and lncRNAs for theirpotential clinical use as diagnostic and prognosticbiomarkers of HCC. Specifically, we emphasize thederegulated expression levels of such noncoding RNAsin patients' sera as noninvasive biomarkers, a field thatrequires urgent improvement in the clinical surveillanceof HCC. Since nucleotide-based strategies are beingapplied to clinical therapeutics, we further summarizeclinical and preclinical trials using oligonucleotidesinvolving the use of miRNAs and small interfering RNAsagainst HCC as novel therapeutics. Finally, we discusscurrent open questions, which must be clarified in thenear future for realistic clinical applications of thesenew strategies.

  2. Ultrasonographic features of medullary thyroid carcinoma and their diagnostic values

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Sheng; JIANG Yu-xin; LIU He; LI Wen-bo; OUYANG Yun-shu; ZHANG Bo; LI Peng; WANG Xue-lian; ZHANG Xiao-yan; LI Jian-chu

    2010-01-01

    Background Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is a rare malignant tumour and usually difficult to diagnose with ultrasound. The aim of the study is to summarize the sonographic features of MTC and evaluate their diagnostic values.Methods We analyzed the sonographic features of 35 MTCs and 50 benign nodules with respect to nodular size,echogenecity, internal content, shape, height/width, border, peripheral halo, calcifications and colour flow pattern. The ratio of long to short axis, echogenecity, internal content and calcifications were also assessed in cervical lymph nodes.The differences in sonographic features between MTCs and benign nodules were analyzed with Chi square test. The diagnostic efficiency of each sonographic feature was determined.Results The main sonographic features of MTC were hypoechogenicity (including marked hypoechogenicity) (n=34,97%), internal solid content (n=29, 83%), taller than wide (n=34, 97%), well defined border (n=24, 69%),microcalcifications or macrocalcifications (n=23, 66%). The echogenicity, internal content, shape, peripheral halo and calcifications were significantly different between these two groups, while the tall/wide, border, and pednodular and intranodular vascularisation were not significantly different. Among all the individual sonographic features, irregular shape had the highest diagnostic efficiency with a sensitivity of 51% and specificity of 92%. The combination of marked hypoechogenicity, microcalcifications, and irregular shape yielded a sensitivity of 77% and specificity of 86%.Conclusions The typical sonographic features of MTC are hypoechogenicity, predominantly solid, irregularly shaped with intranodular micro- or macro-calcifications. The combination of multiple sonographic features is helpful, but not definitive, for the diagnosis of MTC.

  3. Role of Phosphatidylinositol-3-Kinase Pathway in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Du

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Activation of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K pathway is one of the most frequently observed molecular alterations in many human malignancies, including head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC. A growing body of evidence demonstrates the prime importance of the PI3K pathway at each stage of tumorigenesis, that is, tumor initiation, progression, recurrence, and metastasis. Expectedly, targeting the PI3K pathway yields some promising results in both preclinical studies and clinical trials for certain cancer patients. However, there are still many questions that need to be answered, given the complexity of this pathway and the existence of its multiple feedback loops and interactions with other signaling pathways. In this paper, we will summarize recent advances in the understanding of the PI3K pathway role in human malignancies, with an emphasis on HNSCC, and discuss the clinical applications and future direction of this field.

  4. Diagnosis and Management of Merkel Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck: Current Trends and Controversies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swanson, Mark S.; Sinha, Uttam K., E-mail: sinha@med.usc.edu [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Southern California, 1520 San Pablo St, Suite 4600, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States)

    2014-06-27

    Merkel cell carcinoma is an aggressive neuroendocrine cutaneous malignancy with a predilection for regional and distant metastasis. This malignancy presents most commonly on the head and neck of elderly Caucasian males, with a higher prevalence in the immunosuppressed. A high index of suspicion must be maintained due to the often asymptomatic presentation. Lip tumors, scalp tumors, local invasion, nodal metastasis, distant metastasis, and lymphovascular invasion are poor prognostic factors. Up to 8.7% of patients present with distant metastasis, and PET-CT is an accurate staging tool with a 90% sensitivity. Combined aggressive surgical resection with adjuvant radiotherapy affords the best regional control rates. The regional lymphatics must be addressed with either sentinel lymph node biopsy, surgery, or elective radiation due to the risk of occult metastasis. Addition of chemotherapy has no proven benefit in locoregional control.

  5. Berberine-induced anticancer activities in FaDu head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Yo-Seob; Yim, Min-Ji; Kim, Bok-Hee; Kang, Kyung-Rok; Lee, Sook-Young; Oh, Ji-Su; You, Jae-Seek; Kim, Su-Gwan; Yu, Sang-Joun; Lee, Gyeong-Je; Kim, Do Kyung; Kim, Chun Sung; Kim, Jin-Soo; Kim, Jae-Sung

    2015-12-01

    In the present study, we investigated berberine‑induced apoptosis and the signaling pathways underlying its activity in FaDu head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells. Berberine did not affect the viability of primary human normal oral keratinocytes. In contrast, the cytotoxicity of berberine was significantly increased in FaDu cells stimulated with berberine for 24 h. Furthermore, berberine increased nuclear condensation and apoptosis rates in FaDu cells than those in untreated control cells. Berberine also induced the upregulation of apoptotic ligands, such as FasL and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand, and triggered the activation of caspase-8, -7 and -3, and poly(ADP ribose) polymerase, characteristic of death receptor-dependent extrinsic apoptosis. Moreover, berberine activated the mitochondria‑dependent apoptotic signaling pathway by upregulating pro-apoptotic factors, such as Bax, Bad, Apaf-1, and the active form of caspase-9, and downregulating anti-apoptotic factors, such as Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL. In addition, berberine increased the expression of the tumor suppressor p53 in FaDu cells. The pan-caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-fmk suppressed the activation of caspase-3 and prevented cytotoxicity in FaDu cells treated with berberine. Interestingly, berberine suppressed cell migration through downregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, and MMP-9. Moreover, the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) and p38, components of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway that are associated with the expression of MMP and VEGF, was suppressed in FaDu cells treated with berberine for 24 h. Therefore, these data suggested that berberine exerted anticancer effects in FaDu cells through induction of apoptosis and suppression of migration. Berberine may have potential applications as a chemotherapeutic agent for the management of head and neck squamous carcinoma.

  6. Rapid hyperfractionated radiotherapy. Clinical results in 178 advanced squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, T.D.; Demange, L.; Froissart, D.; Panis, X.; Loirette, M.

    1985-07-01

    The authors present a series of 178 patients with Stage III or IV squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck treated by rapid irradiation using multiple and small fractions per day. An initial group of 91 patients (G1) received a total dose of 72 Gy in 80 sessions and 10 days, according to the following split course schedule: J1 to J5, 36 Gy in 40 sessions, eight daily fractions of .9 Gy separated by 2 hours; J6 to J20, rest period; J21 to J25, same as in J1 except that the spinal cord was shielded. This protocol was altered for the following 87 patients (G2) by lessening the total dose to 60 to 66 Gy and the number of fractions to 60. The rest period was lengthened to 4 weeks. All patients but five completed the whole program and the minimal follow-up period was 24 months. At the end of irradiation, 121 patients achieved a total remission, but local recurrences occurred in 56%. Moreover, acute intolerance was considered as severe in 34% of G1 patients, and included extensive mucosal necrosis and bleeding. Although this rate was significantly reduced in G2 patients, late complications were observed in 20 of the 25 survivors, and included trismus, cervical sclerosis, and recurrent laryngeal edema. The crude survival rate is 13% at 2 years. Although this study was not randomized, this particular type of accelerated and hyperfractionated combination of irradiation did not really improve the clinical results in advanced carcinoma of the head and neck. Other schedules and probably other tumors, less extended, should be tested.

  7. Predictive factors of occult neck metastasis in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Fortes Bittar

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: It is well established that cervical lymph node metastasis is the most important prognostic factor in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma of the upper aerodigestive tract. The definition of parameters and classifications that could separate patients in groups of low, intermediate and high-risk is being attempted for several years. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to determine possible predictive factors related to the occurrence of occult cervical lymph node metastasis through the analysis of histopathological reports of surgical specimens obtained after oral squamous cell carcinoma resection and selective neck dissections of patients initially classified as N0. METHODS: This was a primary, retrospective, observational, case-control study. Histopathological reports were reviewed to determine if some findings were related to the occurrence of occult lymph node metastasis. The events analyzed were oral cavity subsites, pT-stage, muscular infiltration, desmoplasia, vascular emboli, perineural infiltration, tumor thickness and compromised margins. RESULTS: Occult cervical metastasis accounted for 19.10 percent of the cases. Desmoplasia, perineural infiltration, tumor thickness and pT4a stage are predictive factors of occult neck metastasis (p-value = 0.0488, 0.0326, 0.0395, 0.0488, respectively. CONCLUSION: The accurate definition of predictive factors of occult cervical metastasis may guide the selection of patients that should be referred to radiotherapy, avoiding the unnecessary exposure of low-risk patients to radiation and allowing a better regional control of the disease in those of moderate or high risk.

  8. A diagnostic Meta-analysis: sentinel lymph node biopsy for neck metastasis in patients with early oral squamous cell carcinoma%前哨淋巴结活检对早期口腔鳞状细胞癌颈淋巴结转移诊断的Meta分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘欣; 白晓峰; 黄绍辉

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the value of sentinel lymph node biopsy in diagnosis of cervical metastasis in patients with early oral squamous cell carcinoma.Methods Cochrane library,evidence-based medicine( EBM),PubMed,China national knowledge internet (CNKI) were searched for 2001-2011 literatures on sentinel lymph node biopsy in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma as early diagnosis of cervical metastasis.The results were analysed by using Meta-analysis software Metadisc1.4.Results There were 12 studies in which,a total of 793 patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma were involved in Meta-analysis.The combined sensitivity and specificity were 0.86(95% CI:0.81- 0.90)and 0.99(95% CI:O.98-1.00) respectively.Conclusions For early oral cancer patients,the sensitivity and specificity of sentinel lymph node biopsy are relatively high.The sentinel lymph node biopsy could be used to select which patients need neck dissection.%目的 系统评价前哨淋巴结活检用于口腔鳞状细胞癌早期颈部转移诊断的临床价值.方法 检索Cochrane图书馆(cochrane library,CL)对照试验注册资料库、循证医学数据库、PubMed数据库、中国知网2001-2011年国内外关于前哨淋巴结活榆确定早期口腔鳞状细胞癌患者颈淋巴转移的文献共42篇.筛选出文献12篇,记录数据,用Meta分析的相关软件Metadisc 1.4进行统计学分析.结果 12项研究的患者共793例,最后合并的早期口腔鳞状细胞癌患者前哨淋巴结活检敏感度和特异度分别为0.86(95%可信区间:0.81 ~0.90)和0.99(95%可信区间:0.98~1.00).结论 对于早期口腔鳞状细胞癌患者前哨淋巴结活检的敏感度和特异度较高、准确率高,可以判定颈部淋巴结是否转移,以及是否需要行颈淋巴结清扫术.

  9. Sialic acids in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela Bronikowska

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Altered glycosylation is a universal characteristic of cancer cells, and various types of glycan structures are well‑known markers of tumor progression and invasion. The present article discusses this aspect of the role of sialic acid, biosynthesis of sialylglycoconjugates and the genetic basis of its disorder, as well as the effects and the correlation between altered sialylation and clinical prognosis in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC.Only a few studies concerning the level of sialic acid in head and neck tumors have been conducted so far. The conclusions of the published reports dedicated to that problem confirm the presence of elevated levels of total sialic acid in these tumors. The authors do not always agree with the level of free or associated form of sialic acid correlated with tumor size, severity of the condition, and lymph nodes. Comparing the progress that has been made in the diagnosis and treatment of other cancers thanks to extensive work on the role of sialic acids, we come to the conclusion that only further detailed studies of this subject in relation to HNSCC are able to answer the question whether the extent of glycoforms of sialic acid may act as a tumor marker or target of immunotherapy.

  10. Novel insight into mutational landscape of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria A Gaykalova

    Full Text Available Development of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC is characterized by accumulation of mutations in several oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. We have formerly described the mutation pattern of HNSCC and described NOTCH signaling pathway alterations. Given the complexity of the HNSCC, here we extend the previous study to understand the overall HNSCC mutation context and to discover additional genetic alterations. We performed high depth targeted exon sequencing of 51 highly actionable cancer-related genes with a high frequency of mutation across many cancer types, including head and neck. DNA from primary tumor tissues and matched normal tissues was analyzed for 37 HNSCC patients. We identified 26 non-synonymous or stop-gained mutations targeting 11 of 51 selected genes. These genes were mutated in 17 out of 37 (46% studied HNSCC patients. Smokers harbored 3.2-fold more mutations than non-smokers. Importantly, TP53 was mutated in 30%, NOTCH1 in 8% and FGFR3 in 5% of HNSCC. HPV negative patients harbored 4-fold more TP53 mutations than HPV positive patients. These data confirm prior reports of the HNSCC mutational profile. Additionally, we detected mutations in two new genes, CEBPA and FES, which have not been previously reported in HNSCC. These data extend the spectrum of HNSCC mutations and define novel mutation targets in HNSCC carcinogenesis, especially for smokers and HNSCC without HPV infection.

  11. Increase of bcl-2 Protein Expression in Aggressive Basal Cell Carcinoma of Head and Neck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia CAZAL

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to verify the bcl-2 protein expression in 22 cutaneous basal cell carcinomas (BCC of the head and neck, and to compare it with its aggressive behavior. Method: Tumors were histologically classified in non-aggressive (BCC 1 and aggressive (BCC 2 and then submitted to the immunohistochemistry technique with the streptavidin-biotin peroxidase method using the anti-bcl-2 antibody. Results: After proceeding to morphological analysis, sixteen tumors (72.7% were considered aggressive and six (27.3% non-aggressive. Immunohistochemistry analysis showed that thirteen (59.1% lesions were positive staining and nine (40.9% were negative to the bcl-2 protein. Considering the positive lesions, 12 (92.3% were aggressive and one (7.7% non-aggressive. The relation between bcl-2 protein staining and the tumor aggressiveness was statistically significant (p<0.05 - Fisher's exact Test. Conclusion: The results suggest a relationship between the bcl-2 protein expression and the histological aggressiveness grade in the BCC of the head and neck group studied may exist.

  12. Expression signature in peripheral blood cells for molecular diagnosis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braakhuis, B J M; Graveland, A P; Dijk, F; Ylstra, B; van Wieringen, W N; Leemans, C R; Brakenhoff, R H

    2013-07-01

    Patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) have a poor prognosis due to the development of locoregional recurrences, distant metastases, and second primary tumors. There is an urgent need for biomarkers that enable detection and monitoring of the disease to provide adequate therapeutic strategies. In this study, we have investigated markers in peripheral blood cells (PBC) of 28 HNSCC patients who underwent surgery by means of expression profiling. Our hypothesis is that nucleated blood cells circulate continuously, also pass the tumor, and change their expression profile in response to tumor cell factors. For comparison, we enrolled a control group of 11 patients who underwent surgery in the head and neck region for non-HNSCC reasons. A set of 2949 genes was found to be statistically different between the groups (P < 0.05, false discovery rate-corrected) and the most prominently different pathways were EIF2, EIF4, and mTOR signaling. These preliminary results are promising and warrant further studies on the definitive role of PBC gene expression as a biomarker for HNSCC detection and monitoring.

  13. miRNAs Signature in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Metastasis: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irani, Soussan

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Head and neck cancers include epithelial tumors arising in the oral cavity, pharynx, larynx, paranasal sinuses, and nasal cavity. Metastasis is a hallmark of cancer. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous small non-coding RNAs involved in cell proliferation, development, differentiation and metastasis. It is believed that miRNA alterations correlate with initiation and progression of cancer cell proliferation or inhibition of tumorigenesis. Moreover, miRNAs have different roles in development, progression, and metastasis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Altered expression of miRNAs could be novel molecular biomarkers for the definite diagnosis of cancer, metastatic site, cancer stage, and its progression. Purpose The purpose of this review was to provide a comprehensive literature review of the role of miRNAs in head and neck cancer metastasis. Search strategy A relevant English literature search in PubMed, ScienceDirect, and Google Scholar was performed. The keywords ‘miRNA’, ‘head and neck’, and ‘cancer’ were searched in title and abstract of publications; limited from 1990 to 2015. The inclusion criterion was the role of miRNAs in cancer metastasis. The exclusion criterion was the other functions of miRNAs in cancers. Out of 15221 articles, the full texts of 442 articles were retrieved and only 133 articles met the inclusion criteria. Conclusion Despite the advances in cancer treatment, the mortality rate of HNSCC is still high. The potential application of miRNAs for cancer therapy has been demonstrated in many studies; miRNAs function as either tumor suppressor or oncogene. The recognition of metastamir and their targets may lead to better understanding of HNSCC oncogenesis, and consequently, development of new therapeutic strategies which is a necessity in cancer treatment. Development of therapeutic agents based on miRNAs is a promising target. PMID:27284551

  14. Verrucous carcinoma of the head and neck - not a human papillomavirus-related tumour?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odar, Katarina; Kocjan, Boštjan J; Hošnjak, Lea; Gale, Nina; Poljak, Mario; Zidar, Nina

    2014-04-01

    Association between verrucous carcinoma (VC) of the head and neck and human papillomaviruses (HPV) is highly controversial. Previous prevalence studies focused mostly on α-PV, while little is known about other PV genera. Our aim was to investigate the prevalence of a broad spectrum of HPV in VC of the head and neck using sensitive and specific molecular assays. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples of 30 VC and 30 location-matched normal tissue samples were analysed, by using six different polymerase chain reaction-based methods targeting DNA of at least 87 HPV types from α-PV, β-PV, γ-PV and μ-PV genera, and immunohistochemistry against p16 protein. α-PV, γ-PV and μ-PV were not detected. β-PV DNA was detected in 5/30 VC (16.7%) and in 18/30 normal tissue samples (60.0%): HPV-19, -24 and -36 were identified in VC, and HPV-5, -9, -12, -23, -24, -38, -47, -49 and -96 in normal tissue, whereas HPV type was not determined in 2/5 cases of VC and in 6/18 normal tissue samples. p16 expression was detected in a subset of samples and was higher in VC than in normal tissue. However, the reaction was predominantly cytoplasmic and only occasionally nuclear, and the extent of staining did not exceed 75%. Our results indicate that α-PV, γ-PV and μ-PV are not associated with aetiopathogenesis of VC of the head and neck. β-PV DNA in a subset of VC and normal tissue might reflect incidental colonization, but its potential biological significance needs further investigation. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  15. Verrucous carcinoma of the head and neck – not a human papillomavirus-related tumour?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odar, Katarina; Kocjan, Boštjan J; Hošnjak, Lea; Gale, Nina; Poljak, Mario; Zidar, Nina

    2014-01-01

    Association between verrucous carcinoma (VC) of the head and neck and human papillomaviruses (HPV) is highly controversial. Previous prevalence studies focused mostly on α-PV, while little is known about other PV genera. Our aim was to investigate the prevalence of a broad spectrum of HPV in VC of the head and neck using sensitive and specific molecular assays. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples of 30 VC and 30 location-matched normal tissue samples were analysed, by using six different polymerase chain reaction-based methods targeting DNA of at least 87 HPV types from α-PV, β-PV, γ-PV and μ-PV genera, and immunohistochemistry against p16 protein. α-PV, γ-PV and μ-PV were not detected. β-PV DNA was detected in 5/30 VC (16.7%) and in 18/30 normal tissue samples (60.0%): HPV-19, -24 and -36 were identified in VC, and HPV-5, -9, -12, -23, -24, -38, -47, -49 and -96 in normal tissue, whereas HPV type was not determined in 2/5 cases of VC and in 6/18 normal tissue samples. p16 expression was detected in a subset of samples and was higher in VC than in normal tissue. However, the reaction was predominantly cytoplasmic and only occasionally nuclear, and the extent of staining did not exceed 75%. Our results indicate that α-PV, γ-PV and μ-PV are not associated with aetiopathogenesis of VC of the head and neck. β-PV DNA in a subset of VC and normal tissue might reflect incidental colonization, but its potential biological significance needs further investigation. PMID:24350715

  16. Carcinoma of the larynx: the Dutch national guideline for diagnostics, treatment, supportive care and rehabilitation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaanders, J.H.A.M.; Hordijk, G.J.

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: This evidence based guideline aims to facilitate proper management and to prevent diverging views concerning diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of carcinoma of the larynx between the major referral centers for head and neck cancer in The Netherlands. METHOD: A multidisciplinary committee wa

  17. Carcinoma of the larynx: the Dutch national guideline for diagnostics, treatment, supportive care and rehabilitation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaanders, J.H.A.M.; Hordijk, G.J.

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: This evidence based guideline aims to facilitate proper management and to prevent diverging views concerning diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of carcinoma of the larynx between the major referral centers for head and neck cancer in The Netherlands. METHOD: A multidisciplinary committee

  18. Management in non-traumatic arm, neck and shoulder complaints: differences between diagnostic groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feleus, Anita; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M A; Miedema, Harald S; Verhaar, Jan A N; Koes, Bart W

    2008-09-01

    Arm, neck and/or shoulder complaints are common in western societies. In the Netherlands, general practice guidelines are issued on shoulder pain and epicondylitis only. Little is known about actual management of the total range of diagnoses. The objectives of the study are: to determine management in patients consulting the GP with a new episode of non-traumatic arm neck and shoulder complaints up to 6 months after the first consultation. To evaluate differences in management between patients with specific diagnoses versus non-specific diagnoses and between specific diagnostic groups. In a prospective cohort study in general practice. We recruited 682 eligible patients. Data on diagnosis, management, patient- and complaint-characteristics were collected. Co-occurrence of treatment options was presented in scaled rectangles. After 6 months, additional diagnostic tests had been performed in 18% of the patients, mainly radiographic examination (14%). Further, 49% had been referred for physiotherapy and 12% to the medical specialist. Patients with specific diagnoses were more frequently referred for specialist treatment, and patients with non-specific diagnoses for physiotherapy. Corticosteroid injections (17%) were mainly applied specific diagnoses (e.g. impingement syndrome, frozen shoulder, carpal tunnel and M. Quervain). Frequencies of prescribed medication (51%) did not differ between specific and non-specific diagnoses. In 19% of the patients no referral, prescribed analgesics or injection was applied. Braces (4%) were mainly prescribed in epicondylitis. Overall, management most frequently consisted of prescribed analgesics and referral for physiotherapy. Specific and non-specific diagnostic subgroups differed in the frequency corticosteroid injections were applied, and referrals to physiotherapy and to a medical specialist.

  19. Surgical management of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, N J; Webb, A A; Macpherson, D

    2001-04-01

    A retrospective audit was made of histological records and hospital case notes of patients who had cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas excised from the head and neck region at the Maxillofacial Units at St Richard's Hospital, Chichester and Southlands Hospital, Shoreham-By-Sea, UK. A total of 227 lesions were excised from 183 patients over a 5-year period between 1990 and 1995. The local recurrence rate was 4% (9/227) and 12 (7%) of the patients presented with or developed regional nodal metastases. Of the 183 patients, 177 (97%) were cured. These rates compare favourably with those of other published series of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma managed by surgical techniques that did not follow the micrographical technique of Mohs. Certain characteristics may aid in the prediction of those cancers that may be more aggressive. It is important to evaluate each case in terms of histological grade and site and to design management plans to deal with each lesion in the most appropriate way.

  20. Mechanisms of cyst formation in metastatic lymph nodes of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokhtari Sepideh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cystic change in metastatic lymph nodes occurs in certain types of tumors and mostly in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. In the majority of cases, psuedocystic change is the mechanism of cyst formation. However, sometimes a true cyst cavity is formed. This occurrence is unexplained and some theories are introduced to explain it. In this paper, related articles and introduced concepts are reviewed and the best conclusions of present hypotheses are provided. Cystic SCC in cervical lymph node is now considered as a typical presentation of metastatic SCC arising in the oro/nasopharynx. True cystic cavities have eosinophilic fluid content and present active transport mechanism across the epithelium; Cytokeratin7 is also expressed in the lining of these cysts, which is an accepted marker of ductal differentiation. These are all strong evidences that show salivary gland type cells are present among tumor cells. In fact, some squamous cell carcinomas, especially those arising in Waldeyer's ring, originate from minor salivary glands. The other probability is that these tumors are cancers of transitional type and arise from transformed keratinocytes, which have intrinsic property for cyst formation. These malignant cells in lymph nodes, rather than primary sites, found the opportunity to express their parental property. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/6838476096250792.

  1. Biomarkers for hepatocellular carcinoma: diagnostic and therapeutic utility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrín G

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Gustavo Ferrín,1,2 Patricia Aguilar-Melero,1 Manuel Rodríguez-Perálvarez,1,2 José Luis Montero-Álvarez,1,2 Manuel de la Mata1,2 1Liver Unit, Instituto Maimónides de Investigación Biomédica de Córdoba (IMIBIC, Hospital Universitario Reina Sofía, Córdoba, Spain; 2Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red (CIBER, Enfermedades Hepáticas y Digestivas, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid, Spain Abstract: Because of the high prevalence and associated-mortality of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, early diagnosis of the disease is vital for patient survival. In this regard, tumor size is one of the two main prognostic factors for surgical resection, which constitutes the only curative treatment for HCC along with liver transplantation. However, techniques for HCC surveillance and diagnosis that are currently used in clinical practice have certain limitations that may be inherent to the tumor development. Thus, it is important to continue efforts in the search for biomarkers that increase diagnostic accuracy for HCC. In this review, we focus on different biological sources of candidate biomarkers for HCC diagnosis. Although those biomarkers identified from biological samples obtained by noninvasive methods have greater diagnostic value, we have also considered those obtained from liver tissue because of their potential therapeutic value. To date, sorafenib is the only US Food and Drug Administration-approved antineoplastic for HCC. However, this therapeutic agent shows very low tumor response rates and frequently causes acquired resistance in HCC patients. We discuss the use of HCC biomarkers as therapeutic targets themselves, or as targets to increase sensitivity to sorafenib treatment. Keywords: diagnosis, sorafenib, therapy

  2. Shear wave elastography in medullary thyroid carcinoma diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Dobruch-Sobczak

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Shear wave elastography (SWE is a modern method for the assessment of tissue stiffness. There has been a growing interest in the use of this technique for characterizing thyroid focal lesions, including preoperative diagnostics. Aim: The aim of the study was to assess the clinical usefulness of SWE in medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC diagnostics. Materials and methods: A total of 169 focal lesions were identifi ed in the study group (139 patients, including 6 MTCs in 4 patients (mean age: 45 years. B-mode ultrasound and SWE were performed using Aixplorer (SuperSonic, Aix-en-Provence, with a 4–15 MHz linear probe. The ultrasound was performed to assess the echogenicity and echostructure of the lesions, their margin, the halo sign, the height/width ratio (H/W ratio, the presence of calcifi cations and the vascularization pattern. This was followed by an analysis of maximum and mean Young’s (E modulus values for MTC (EmaxLR, EmeanLR and the surrounding thyroid tissues (EmaxSR, EmeanSR, as well as mean E-values (EmeanLRz for 2 mm region of interest in the stiffest zone of the lesion. The lesions were subject to pathological and/or cytological evaluation. Results: The B-mode assessment showed that all MTCs were hypoechogenic, with no halo sign, and they contained micro- and/ or macrocalcifi cations. Ill-defi ned lesion margin were found in 4 out of 6 cancers; 4 out of 6 cancers had a H/W ratio > 1. Heterogeneous echostructure and type III vascularity were found in 5 out of 6 lesions. In the SWE, the mean value of EmaxLR for all of the MTCs was 89.5 kPa and (the mean value of EmaxSR for all surrounding tissues was 39.7 kPa Mean values of EmeanLR and EmeanSR were 34.7 kPa and 24.4 kPa, respectively. The mean value of EmeanLRz was 49.2 kPa. Conclusions: SWE showed MTCs as stiffer lesions compared to the surrounding tissues. The lesions were qualifi ed for fi ne needle aspiration biopsy based on B-mode assessment. However, the diagnostic algorithm

  3. Diagnostic Value of Multidetector Computed Tomography in Radial Head or Neck Fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Hyun Hae; Hwang, Ji Young; Lee, Sun Wha; Shin, Sang Jin [School of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, Mokdong Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) in radial head or neck fracture, and to evaluate factors that affect MDCT image quality. Sixty-six radial fractures in 65 patients, who underwent both radiography and MDCT, were included. Detection of fracture and classification of types were recorded for each modality. Patients were divided into the good (A) and poor (B) image quality groups, and recorded the factors, such as arm positioning, flexion angle, and cancellous bone density. The detection rate of fracture showed no significant difference between the two modalities. However, classification of the fracture type was significantly accurate by MDCT (p < 0.0001). Eight cases were only detected on MDCT and three cases were only detected on radiography. Fracture type was discordant in 11 cases. MDCT scanning with raising arm (p < 0.0001), with lesser flexion angle (p = 0.004), and higher cancellous bone density (p 0.010) showed better image quality. Radiography is a good primary tool for detecting radial head or neck fracture. However, MDCT can be an additional tool for classifying the fracture type and cases with negative radiographic findings. Arm positioning, flexion angle, and cancellous bone density affect MDCT image quality.

  4. Indications and extent of elective neck dissection in patients with early stage oral and oropharyngeal carcinoma: nationwide survey in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bree, R.; van der Waal, I.; Doornaert, P.; Werner, J.A.; Castelijns, J.A.; Leemans, C.R.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Different strategies are available for the management of patients with early (i.e. tumour stage one or two) oral or oropharyngeal carcinoma and a clinically negative neck. Material and methods: In 2006, a questionnaire was sent to the eight head and neck cancer centres of the Dutch Head

  5. Cancer Stem Cells Accountability in Progression of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: The Most Recent Trends!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samapika Routray

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells (CSCs play a major role in local recurrence and metastatic spread in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC. Evidence suggests that cancer stem cells are resistant to conventional therapy. So the emerging concepts of the role of cancer stem cells in the pathobiology of HNSCC should be understood carefully to be able to create new paradigms in treatment plans.

  6. Afatinib efficacy against squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck cell lines in vitro and in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Young, Natalie R.; Soneru, Christian; Liu, Jing; Grushko, Tatyana A.; Hardeman, Ashley; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Baum, Anke; Solca, Flavio; Cohen, Ezra E. W.

    2015-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors have demonstrated efficacy in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). In addition to EGFR, other ErbB family members are expressed and activated in SCCHN. Afatinib is an ErbB family blocker that has been approved for treating patients with EGFR-mutated nonsmall cell lung cancer. We sought to determine the efficacy of afatinib in preclinical models and compare this to other EGFR-targeted agents. Afatinib efficacy was characterize...

  7. Concurrent Chemoradiation with Low-Dose Weekly Cisplatin in Locally Advanced Stage IV Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Myoung Hee; Kang, Jung Hun; Song, Haa-Na; Jeong, Bae Kwon; Chai, Gyu Young; Kang, Kimun; Woo, Seung Hoon; Park, Jung Je; Kim, Jin Pyeong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Concurrent chemoradiation (CRT) with 3-weekly doses of cisplatin is a standard treatment for loco-regionally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). However, treatment with 3-weekly doses of cisplatin is often associated with several adverse events. Therefore, we conducted this retrospective analysis to determine the efficacy and tolerance of CRT with a low weekly dose of cisplatin in stage IV HNSCC patients. Materials and Methods Medical records of patients who were d...

  8. Predictive factors of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patient tolerance to high-dose cisplatin in concurrent chemoradiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Nakano, Kenji; SATO, YASUYOSHI; TOSHIYASU, TAKASHI; SATO, YUKIKO; INAGAKI, LINA; Tomomatsu, Junichi; Sasaki, Toru; SHIMBASHI, WATARU; FUKUSHIMA, HIROFUMI; YONEKAWA, HIROYUKI; Mitani,Hiroki; Kawabata, Kazuyoshi; Takahashi, Shunji

    2015-01-01

    Although high-dose cisplatin is the standard regimen of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) for locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), varying levels of patient tolerance towards cisplatin have been reported, and the predictive factors of cisplatin tolerance remain to be elucidated. The present study retrospectively reviewed newly diagnosed HNSCC patients who received CCRT. Cisplatin (80 mg/m2) was administered every 3 weeks. The proportion of high-dose cisplatin-tole...

  9. The utility of p16 immunostaining in fine needle aspiration in p16-positive head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bin; Ghossein, Ronald; Lane, Jason; Lin, Oscar; Katabi, Nora

    2016-08-01

    Many patients with human papillomavirus (HPV)-related head and neck squamous cell carcinoma present initially with cervical nodal metastasis. Fine needle aspiration (FNA) of the nodal disease might be the only diagnostic material available for p16 immunohistochemistry (IHC) and HPV testing. The current study aims to evaluate p16 IHC in FNA and establish guidelines for its interpretation. The percentage and intensity of p16 IHC staining were examined in 60 matched FNA and surgical cases. Cytomorphologic features were included in the analysis. p16 IHC staining was correlated with the results seen in the surgical specimens and with HPV in situ hybridization (ISH). Analysis of different thresholds demonstrated that the threshold of 10% p16 tumor cell positivity had the best overall concordance rate with surgical p16 IHC (κ = 0.650) and with FNA HPV-ISH (κ = 0.714). Applying the recommended p16 positivity threshold for surgical specimens (70%) on FNA materials resulted in low sensitivity (39%) and low negative predictive value (26%). In comparison with p16 IHC in surgical specimens, 6/46 FNA cases (13%) were falsely negative for p16. All 6 cases were associated with necrotic background, two (33%) lacked large tumor clusters, and one (17%) had low cellularity. The recommended threshold for p16 IHC on surgical specimens should not be used in cytology materials. The cutoff value for p16 immunostain in FNA specimens showing best results in our series is 10%. When p16 IHC is negative in FNA specimens, a repeat stain on a surgical specimen is recommended to avoid a false-negative diagnosis.

  10. Staging papillary carcinoma of the thyroid: Magnetic resonance imaging vs ultrasound of the neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, A.D.; Ahuja, A.T.; To, E.W.H.; Tse, G.M.K.; Metreweli, C

    2000-03-01

    AIM: To evaluate the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for staging local disease and lymph node metastases in papillary carcinoma of the thyroid by comparing MRI with ultrasound (US) of the neck. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fourteen patients with papillary carcinoma underwent MRI and US. The images were prospectively reviewed for (1) identification of the primary lesion; (2) presence of multifocal thyroid disease; (3) extracapsular extension; (4) invasion into the trachea, oesophagus and major vessels; and (5) presence of lymph node metastases. Correlation was made with the surgical findings. RESULTS: The site of the primary lesion was correctly identified by US in 14 of 14 (100%) and by MRI in 13 of 14 (93%) of patients. Multifocal thyroid tumour was correctly identified by US in two of two patients (100%) and by MRI in zero of two (0%). Extracapsular extension (n = 9), oesophageal invasion (n = 1) and tracheal invasion (n = 2) were identified by MRI in seven, zero, and one, and by US in six, zero and zero patients, respectively. Invasion of the major vessels was not seen. Metastatic cervical nodes were present in 19 nodal groups in 10 patients involving the internal jugular chain (n = 10), posterior triangle (n = 4) supraclavicular fossa (n = 1) and central group (n = 4). Both MRI and US failed to identify metastatic nodes in the central group but correctly identified 14 of the 15 nodal groups outside the central group. CONCLUSION: Ultrasound should be used as the first line of investigation for detecting the primary lesion, multifocal disease and cervical lymphadenopathy. In cases where the primary tumour is not surrounded by normal thyroid tissue MR imaging should be added to assess extracapsular spread, especially into the trachea. King, A.D. (2000)

  11. Lymph Node Thyroglobulin Measurement in Diagnosis of Neck Metastases of Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Giovanella

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Enlarged cervical lymph nodes (LNs in patients with thyroid cancer are usually assessed by fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC. Thyroglobulin (Tg is frequently elevated in malignant FNAC needle wash specimens (FNAC-Tg. The objectives of the study were to (1 determine an appropriate diagnostic cut-off for FNAC-Tg levels (2 compare FNAC and FNAC-Tg results in a group of 108 patients affected by differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC. Methods. A total of 126 consecutive FNACs were performed on enlarged LNs and the final diagnosis was confirmed by surgical pathology examination or clinical follow-up. The best FNAC-Tg cut-off level was selected by receiver operating curve analysis, and diagnostic performances of FNAC and FNAC-Tg were compared. Results. The rate of FNAC samples adequate for cytological examination was 77% in contrast FNAC-Tg available in 100% of aspirates (<.01. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of FNAC were 71%, 80%, 74%, 100%, 80%, and 94%, respectively. The most appropriate cut-off value for the diagnosis of thyroid cancer metastatic LN was 1.1 ng/mL (sensitivity 100%, specificity 100%. Conclusions. The diagnostic performance of needle washout FNAC-Tg measurement with a cut-off of 1.1 ng/mL compared favorably with cytology in detecting DTC node metastases.

  12. p16 expression in cutaneous squamous carcinomas with neck metastases: a potential pitfall in identifying unknown primaries of the head and neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beadle, Beth M; William, William N; McLemore, Michael S; Sturgis, Erich M; Williams, Michelle D

    2013-11-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) positivity (+) has been used to identify oropharyngeal squamous carcinomas (SCCs) presenting as unknown primaries in the neck. p16 overexpression correlates with HPV+ in the oropharynx; however, the use of p16 alone as a surrogate marker of oropharyngeal HPV+ tumors has not been validated. We immunohistochemically analyzed p16 expression in surgically resected aggressive cutaneous head and neck SCC primaries and their nodal metastases from 24 patients to determine the potential overlap of p16 expression outside of the oropharynx. Five of 24 primary tumors (20.8%) and 3 lymph node metastases (12.5%) in levels II, III, and V, and the periparotid region diffusely expressed p16. HPV (high-risk types by in situ hybridization) was negative. p16 expression is relatively common in lymph node-positive cutaneous head and neck SCCs; thus, p16 expression as an independent biomarker and mechanism to determine the oropharyngeal source of an unknown primary is not advised. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. CT120A Acts as an Oncogene in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltaci, Elif; Ekizoglu, Seda; Sari, Elif; Karaman, Emin; Ulutin, Turgut; Buyru, Nur

    2015-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC) is among the most frequent cancers worldwide. The etiology and pathogenesis of HNSCC are influenced by multiple genetic factors in addition to environmental and lifestyle-related factors. However, the mechanism underlying the HNSCC is still far from clear. The membrane associated gene CT120 was previously identified from chromosome 17p13.3 as a lung cancer-associated gene. Its function as an activator of the Erk and Akt signaling pathways in human lung cancer cell lines suggested that CT120 has an oncogenic function. However, there is no data in the literature on the role of CT120 in any other cancer type. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the expression rate and probable function of CT120 in HNSCC. Tumor tissues from 50 patients were analyzed by real-time quantitative RT-PCR to investigate the expression rate and by direct sequencing to differentiate the CT120A and CT120B variants. CT120 overexpression was observed in 58% of tumors compared to non-cancerous tissue samples and this up-regulation was directly associated with the upregulation of the CT120A variant and with the stage of the disease (p=0.001). Our results indicate that the CT120 gene may function in the development of HNSCC. PMID:26535067

  14. Effect of ionizing radiation on the physical biology of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker-Groberg, Sandra M; Bornstein, Sophia; Zilberman-Rudenko, Jevgenia; Schmidt, Mark; Tormoen, Garth W; Kernan, Casey; Thomas, Charles R; Wong, Melissa H; Phillips, Kevin G; McCarty, Owen J T

    2015-09-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is the sixth leading cause of cancer worldwide. Although there are numerous treatment options for HNSCC, such as surgery, cytotoxic chemotherapy, molecularly targeted systemic therapeutics, and radiotherapy, overall survival has not significantly improved in the last 50 years. This suggests a need for a better understanding of how these cancer cells respond to current treatments in order to improve treatment paradigms. Ionizing radiation (IR) promotes cancer cell death through the creation of cytotoxic DNA lesions, including single strand breaks, base damage, crosslinks, and double strand breaks (DSBs). As unrepaired DSBs are the most cytotoxic DNA lesion, defining the downstream cellular responses to DSBs are critical for understanding the mechanisms of tumor cell responses to IR. The effects of experimental IR on HNSCC cells beyond DNA damage in vitro are ill-defined. Here we combined label-free, quantitative phase and fluorescent microscopy to define the effects of IR on the dry mass and volume of the HNSCC cell line, UM-SCC-22A. We quantified nuclear and cytoplasmic subcellular density alterations resulting from 8 Gy X-ray IR and correlated these signatures with DNA and γ-H2AX expression patterns. This study utilizes a synergistic imaging approach to study both biophysical and biochemical alterations in cells following radiation damage and will aid in future understanding of cellular responses to radiation therapy.

  15. Toward the use of precision medicine for the treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Wang; Xiao, Yandi; Wei, Zihao; Yuan, Yao; Qiu, Min; Sun, Chongkui; Zeng, Xin; Liang, Xinhua; Feng, Mingye; Chen, Qianming

    2017-01-10

    Precision medicine is a new strategy that aims at preventing and treating human diseases by focusing on individual variations in people's genes, environment and lifestyle. Precision medicine has been used for cancer diagnosis and treatment and shows evident clinical efficacy. Rapid developments in molecular biology, genetics and sequencing technologies, as well as computational technology, has enabled the establishment of "big data", such as the Human Genome Project, which provides a basis for precision medicine. Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is an aggressive cancer with a high incidence rate and low survival rate. Current therapies are often aggressive and carry considerable side effects. Much research now indicates that precision medicine can be used for HNSCC and may achieve improved results. From this perspective, we present an overview of the current status, potential strategies, and challenges of precision medicine in HNSCC. We focus on targeted therapy based on cell the surface signaling receptors epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2), and on the PI3K/AKT/mTOR, JAK/STAT3 and RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK cellular signaling pathways. Gene therapy for the treatment of HNSCC is also discussed.

  16. Polymorphisms in human DNA repair genes and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rim Khlifi; Ahmed Rebai; Amel Hamza-Chaffai

    2012-12-01

    Genetic polymorphisms in some DNA repair proteins are associated with a number of malignant transformations like head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Xeroderma pigmentosum group D (XPD) and X-ray repair cross-complementing proteins 1 (XRCC1) and 3 (XRCC3) genes are involved in DNA repair and were found to be associated with HNSCC in numerous studies. To establish our overall understanding of possible relationships between DNA repair gene polymorphisms and development of HNSCC, we surveyed the literature on epidemiological studies that assessed potential associations with HNSCC risk in terms of gene–environment interactions, genotype-induced functional defects in enzyme activity and/or protein expression, and the influence of ethnic origin on these associations.We conclude that large, well-designed studies of common polymorphisms in DNA repair genes are needed. Such studies may benefit from analysis of multiple genes or polymorphisms and from the consideration of relevant exposures that may influence the likelihood of HNSCC when DNA repair capacity is reduced.

  17. Antiepidermal Growth Factor Receptor Therapy in Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walid Shaib

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck (SCCHN is the most common neoplasm of the upper aerodigestive tract. In this paper, we attempt to summarize the role and applications of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR inhibitors monoclonal antibodies (moAbs and tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs locally advanced as well as metastatic SCCHN. Targeted therapy in SCCHN is now incorporated in the first-line regimes for advanced disease. Novel targeted agents, including the EGFR antibody, cetuximab, have been approved for use as single agents or in combination with radiation therapy or chemotherapy in treatment of recurrent metastatic or locally advanced SCCHN. Refractory mechanisms that bypass the pathway of EGFR inhibitors activity are identified explaining resistance to targeted therapy. Strategies of cotargeting EGFR and other pathways are under investigation. Examples of targeted therapy being used include mammalian target of rapamycin (mtor inhibitors, antivascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF moAb, and other inhibitors. We will be focusing our paper on the preclinical and clinical aspects of EGFR inhibition in SCCHN and touch upon other targeted therapies in application.

  18. Sulindac Induces Apoptosis and Inhibits Tumor Growth In Vivo in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A. Scheper

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Sulindac has antineoplastic effects on various cancer cell lines; consequently, we assessed sulindac's effects on laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC cells in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, SCC (HEP-2 cells treated with various cyclooxygenase inhibitors or transfected with constitutively active signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3 or survivin vectors were analyzed using Western blot analysis, annexin V assay, and cell proliferation assay. In parallel, nude mice injected subcutaneously with HEP-2 cells were either treated intraperitoneally with sulindac or left untreated, and analyzed for tumor weight, survivin expression, and tyrosine-phosphorylated Stat3 expression. In vitro studies confirmed the selective antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects of sulindac, which also downregulated Stat3 and survivin protein expression. Stat3 or survivin forced expression partially rescued the antiproliferative effects of sulindac. In vivo studies showed significant repression of HEP-2 xenograft growth in sulindactreated mice versus controls, with near-complete resolution at 10 days. Additionally, tumor specimens treated with sulindac showed downregulation of phosphorylated tyrosine-705 Stat3 and survivin expression. Taken together, our data suggest, for the first time, a specific inhibitory effect of sulindac on tumor growth and survivin expression in laryngeal cancer, both in vitro and in vivo, in a Stat3-dependent manner, suggesting a novel therapeutic approach to head and neck cancer.

  19. Altered expression of SIRT gene family in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chi-Chih; Lin, Pai-Mei; Lin, Sheng-Fung; Hsu, Cheng-Hsien; Lin, Hsin-Ching; Hu, Ming-Luen; Hsu, Cheng-Ming; Yang, Ming-Yu

    2013-06-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) include a group of malignant neoplasms that arise from the upper aerodigestive tract and represent the seventh most common cause of cancer-related death. The overall 5-year survival rates have not significantly improved for decades in spite of the advances in the field of oncology and surgery, encouraging further research on factors that might modify disease prognosis. The silent information regulator (SIR) genes (Sirtuins) play key roles in cellular stress and are associated with aging-related diseases including cancer. Currently, seven human sirtuin (SIRT1-7) genes have been identified, but the roles of SIRT genes in HNSCC are still uncertain. Therefore, in this study, we used real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction to investigate the expressions of the seven SIRT genes in human HNSCC tissues to assess the changes in cancerous and noncancerous parts and the correlation with different tumor behaviors. Our results demonstrated that the expression levels of SIRT1, SIRT2, SIRT3, SIRT5, SIRT6, and SIRT7 were significantly downregulated in cancerous tissues compared with noncancerous tissues (all pSIRT1, SIRT2, SIRT3, SIRT5, and SIRT7 showed downregulation in advanced stages in respect to early stages (pSIRT genes expression may contribute to the development of cancer and trigger the neoplastic disease to more advanced stages. Our study indicates that SIRT genes expression could help in the diagnosis and represent a prognostic biomarker in HNSCC.

  20. Canine spontaneous head and neck squamous cell carcinomas represent their human counterparts at the molecular level.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deli Liu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous canine head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC represents an excellent model of human HNSCC but is greatly understudied. To better understand and utilize this valuable resource, we performed a pilot study that represents its first genome-wide characterization by investigating 12 canine HNSCC cases, of which 9 are oral, via high density array comparative genomic hybridization and RNA-seq. The analyses reveal that these canine cancers recapitulate many molecular features of human HNSCC. These include analogous genomic copy number abnormality landscapes and sequence mutation patterns, recurrent alteration of known HNSCC genes and pathways (e.g., cell cycle, PI3K/AKT signaling, and comparably extensive heterogeneity. Amplification or overexpression of protein kinase genes, matrix metalloproteinase genes, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition genes TWIST1 and SNAI1 are also prominent in these canine tumors. This pilot study, along with a rapidly growing body of literature on canine cancer, reemphasizes the potential value of spontaneous canine cancers in HNSCC basic and translational research.

  1. Radiotherapy combined with small doses of CDDP and THP for head and neck squamous cell carcinomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyaguchi, Mamoru; Sakai, Shunichi; Takashima, Hitoshi; Hosokawa, Atsuyuki [Kagawa Medical School, Miki (Japan)

    1995-02-01

    From February 1992 through June 1993, 19 cases of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas were treated with radiotherapy combined with administration of small doses of CDDP and THP. Radiation was administered in a dose of 2 Gy given five times a week combined with CDDP in a dose of 10 mg on day 1 and 3, and THP in a dose of 10 mg on day 5 of each treatment week. Survival was 63 percent at one year and 58 percent at two years. Incidence of the acute complications severer than grade 2 were myelosuppression 12/19 (63%), stomatitis 11/19 (58%), appetite loss 9/19 (47%), and nausea 4/19 (21%). Myelosuppression with grade 3 occurred in 5 patients and could be treated with granulocyte colony stimulating factor. Stomatitis with grade 3 occurred in two patients and they needed a nasogastric feeding tube. The result of this combination therapy with radiation, CDDP and THP was good. However, a new treatment regimen should be necessary to avoid severe stomatitis. (author).

  2. The Benefits and Risks of Prophylactic Central Neck Dissection for Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma: Prospective Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doh Young Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. This study evaluated the benefits of performing prophylactic central neck dissection (CND with total thyroidectomy (TT in management of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC patients who were clinically node-negative at presentation. Methods. A total of 257 patients with stage T1 or T2 PTC and without preoperative evidence of lymph node involvement (N0 were enrolled in this prospective study. The patients were randomly assigned to two groups: (1 a total thyroidectomy (TT group (n=104 or (2 a TT plus CND group (n=153. The two groups were compared for their perioperative data, complication rates, disease recurrence rates, and clinical outcomes. Results. The two groups of patients were similar in age, sex ratio, follow-up duration, and tumor size (P=0.227, 0.359, 0.214, and 0.878, resp.. The two groups showed similar rates of disease recurrence (3.9% in the TT group versus 3.3% in the TT plus CND group; however, complications occurred more frequently in the TT plus CND group; especially transient hypocalcemia (P=0.043. Conclusions. Patients treated with TT plus CND had a higher rate of complications with similar recurrence rate. We believe that CND may not be routinely recommended when treating patients with PTC.

  3. The Benefits and Risks of Prophylactic Central Neck Dissection for Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma: Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Doh Young; Oh, Kyoung Ho; Cho, Jae-Gu; Kwon, Soon-Young; Woo, Jeong-Soo; Baek, Seung-Kuk; Jung, Kwang-Yoon

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. This study evaluated the benefits of performing prophylactic central neck dissection (CND) with total thyroidectomy (TT) in management of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) patients who were clinically node-negative at presentation. Methods. A total of 257 patients with stage T1 or T2 PTC and without preoperative evidence of lymph node involvement (N0) were enrolled in this prospective study. The patients were randomly assigned to two groups: (1) a total thyroidectomy (TT) group (n = 104) or (2) a TT plus CND group (n = 153). The two groups were compared for their perioperative data, complication rates, disease recurrence rates, and clinical outcomes. Results. The two groups of patients were similar in age, sex ratio, follow-up duration, and tumor size (P = 0.227, 0.359, 0.214, and 0.878, resp.). The two groups showed similar rates of disease recurrence (3.9% in the TT group versus 3.3% in the TT plus CND group); however, complications occurred more frequently in the TT plus CND group; especially transient hypocalcemia (P = 0.043). Conclusions. Patients treated with TT plus CND had a higher rate of complications with similar recurrence rate. We believe that CND may not be routinely recommended when treating patients with PTC.

  4. Soluble guanylate cyclase stimulators increase sensitivity to cisplatin in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, Traci R; Takiar, Vinita; Kumar, Bhavna; Kumar, Pawan; Ben-Jonathan, Nira

    2017-03-28

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is an aggressive and often fatal disease. Cisplatin is the most common chemotherapeutic drug in the treatment of HNSCC, but intrinsic and acquired resistance are frequent, and severe side effects occur at high doses. The second messenger cyclic GMP (cGMP) is produced by soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC). We previously reported that activation of the cGMP signaling cascade caused apoptosis in HNSCC cells, while others found that this pathway enhances cisplatin efficacy in some cell types. Here we found that sGC stimulators reduced HNSCC cell viability synergistically with cisplatin, and enhanced apoptosis by cisplatin. Moreover, the sGC stimulators effectively reduced viability in cells with acquired cisplatin resistance, and were synergistic with cisplatin. The sGC stimulator BAY 41-2272 reduced expression of the survival proteins EGFR and β-catenin, and increased pro-apoptotic Bax, suggesting a potential mechanism for the anti-tumorigenic effects of these drugs. The sGC stimulator Riociguat is FDA-approved to treat pulmonary hypertension, and others are being studied for therapeutic use in several diseases. These drugs could provide valuable addition or alternative to cisplatin in the treatment of HNSCC.

  5. Tyrosine kinase domain mutations of EGFR gene in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatte, Chittibabu; Al Amri, Ali M; Cyrus, Cyril; Chathoth, Shahanas; Acharya, Sadananda; Hashim, Tariq Mohammad; Al Ali, Zhara; Alshreadah, Saleh Tawfeeq; Alsayyah, Ahmed; Al-Ali, Amein K

    2017-01-01

    Background Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a commonly altered gene that is identified in various cancers, including head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Therefore, EGFR is a promising molecular marker targeted by monoclonal antibodies and small molecule inhibitors targeting the tyrosine kinase (TK) domain. Objective The objective of this study was to investigate the spectrum of mutations in exons 18, 19, 20, and 21 of the EGFR gene in HNSCC patients. Materials and methods This retrospective study included 47 confirmed HNSCC cases. Mutations in the TK domain, exons 18, 19, 20, and 21 of the EGFR gene, were detected by Scorpion® chemistry and ARMS® technologies on Rotor-Gene Q real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results The tumors exhibited EGFR-TK domain mutations in 57% of cases. Four cases of T790M mutations were reported for the first time among HNSCC patients. Out of the total mutations, L861Q (exon 21), exon 20 insertions and deletions of exon 19 accounted for the majority of mutations (21%, 19%, and 17%, respectively). EGFR mutation status was correlated with the higher grade (P=0.026) and advanced stage (P=0.034) of HNSCC tumors. Conclusion Higher frequency of EGFR-TK domain mutations together with the presence of the T790M mutation suggests that identification of these mutations might streamline the therapy and provide a better prognosis in HNSCC cases. PMID:28352186

  6. Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinomas Do Not Express EGFRvIII

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    Melchers, Lieuwe J., E-mail: l.j.melchers@umcg.nl [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Pathology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Clausen, Martijn J.A.M. [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Pathology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Mastik, Mirjam F. [Department of Pathology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Slagter-Menkema, Lorian [Department of Pathology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Otorhinolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Langendijk, Johannes A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Laan, Bernard F.A.M. van der [Department of Otorhinolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Wal, Jacqueline E. van der; Vegt, Bert van der [Department of Pathology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Roodenburg, Jan L.N. [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Schuuring, Ed [Department of Pathology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: To assess the prevalence of EGFRvIII, a specific variant of EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor), in 3 well-defined cohorts of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods and Materials: Immunohistochemistry for the specific detection of EGFRvIII using the L8A4 antibody was optimized on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue using glioblastoma tissue. It was compared with EGFR and EGFRvIII RNA expression using a specific reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction also optimized for formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue. Tissue microarrays including 531 HNSCCs of various stages with complete clinicopathologic and follow-up data were tested for the presence of EGFRvIII. Results: None of the 531 cases showed EGFRvIII protein expression. Using an immunohistochemistry protocol reported by others revealed cytoplasmic staining in 8% of cases. Reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction for the EGFRvIII transcript of the 28 highest cytoplasmic staining cases, as well as 69 negative cases, did not show expression in any of the tested cases, suggesting aspecific staining by a nonoptimal protocol. Conclusions: The EGFRvIII mutation is not present in HNSCC. Therefore, EGFRvIII does not influence treatment response in HNSCC and is not a usable clinical prognostic marker.

  7. Current prognosis and quality of life following surgical treatment for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cristina Hernández-Vila

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is one of the most common cancers in the world with a close relation with some risk factor like, tobacco, alcohol consumption and more recently, with human papilloma virus infection. A review of the literature about actual prognosis and quality of life in HNSCC has been done analysing the results of surgical treatment and their impact on the quality of life of patients. Despite the elevated incidence of HNSCC, the survival rate has increased considerably over the last years thanks to the development of new surgical techniques, such as, microvascular reconstruction or transoral robotic surgery and the most accurate adjuvant radiochemotherapy. Even in bad prognosis cases, there are many options to take into account not only with curative expectation, even, keeping in mind the preservation of the quality of life of patients. Due to the improvement of the prognosis, the interest of surgeons has been focused on preserve the aesthetics, functional and psychosocial aspect of patients without a worsening of the main objective which is the curative result. Although prognosis of HNSCC has improved, further studies are necessary to understand the behaviour in every case and determine how the impact on the quality of life can be a useful tool to individualize the therapies.

  8. Decitabine rescues cisplatin resistance in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi T Viet

    Full Text Available Cisplatin resistance in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC reduces survival. In this study we hypothesized that methylation of key genes mediates cisplatin resistance. We determined whether a demethylating drug, decitabine, could augment the anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects of cisplatin on SCC-25/CP, a cisplatin-resistant tongue SCC cell line. We showed that decitabine treatment restored cisplatin sensitivity in SCC-25/CP and significantly reduced the cisplatin dose required to induce apoptosis. We then created a xenograft model with SCC-25/CP and determined that decitabine and cisplatin combination treatment resulted in significantly reduced tumor growth and mechanical allodynia compared to control. To establish a gene classifier we quantified methylation in cancer tissue of cisplatin-sensitive and cisplatin-resistant HNSCC patients. Cisplatin-sensitive and cisplatin-resistant patient tumors had distinct methylation profiles. When we quantified methylation and expression of genes in the classifier in HNSCC cells in vitro, we showed that decitabine treatment of cisplatin-resistant HNSCC cells reversed methylation and gene expression toward a cisplatin-sensitive profile. The study provides direct evidence that decitabine restores cisplatin sensitivity in in vitro and in vivo models of HNSCC. Combination treatment of cisplatin and decitabine significantly reduces HNSCC growth and HNSCC pain. Furthermore, gene methylation could be used as a biomarker of cisplatin-resistance.

  9. Deguelin induces both apoptosis and autophagy in cultured head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells.

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    Yan-li Yang

    Full Text Available Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC represents more than 5% of all cancers diagnosed annually in United States and around the world. Despite advances in the management of patients with this disease, the survival has not been significantly improved, and the search for potential alternative therapies is encouraging. Here we demonstrate that deguelin administration causes a significant HNSCC cell death. Deguelin induces both cell apoptosis and autophagy by modulating multiple signaling pathways in cultured HNSCC cells. Deguelin inhibits Akt signaling, and down-regulates survivin and cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (Cdk4 expressions, by disrupting their association with heat shock protein-90 (Hsp-90. Deguelin induces ceramide production through de novo synthase pathway to promote HNSCC cell death. Importantly, increased ceramide level activates AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK, which then directly phosphorylates Ulk1 and eventually leads to cell autophagy. We found that a low dose of deguelin sensitized HNSCC cells to 5-FU. Finally, using a nude mice Hep-2 xenograft model, we also showed a significant anti-tumor ability of deguelin in vivo. Together, we suggest that deguelin may represent a novel and effective chemo-agent against HNSCC.

  10. Personalized therapy in locally advanced head and neck squamous-cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sánchez-Escribano R

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients (LAHNSCC represents a truly heterogeneous population with differences in comorbidities, primary tumor location and etiology. These are key factors in optimal treatment selection. Material and methods: An extensive literature review was made in order to identify the most relevant factor in the therapeutic decision, with special interest in induction chemotherapy as the latest and most debatable option. Results: In the therapeutic decision we have to take into account factors related to the patient, age and performance status are the most important, and others related to the tumor as stage, site of origin and etiology, between this ones l, viral subtypes (EBV and HPV are becoming relevant in the later decades. Chemoradiotherapy is considered the gold standard treatment, supported by several randomized trials and metaanalysis. Induction chemotherapy is one of the later options appeared in the therapeutic arena, improving results in organ preservation and survival. Although a substantial increase in toxicities and lack of prospective comparisons with the standard concurrent chemoradioterapy, warrants a cautious use. Conclusions: Therapeutic choice in the LAHNSCC patient is a complex and multidimensional process, that should be carried in a specialized and multidisciplinary team that can assure the highest efficiency and security for the patient

  11. Identification and Characterization of Cancer Stem Cells from Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Pozzi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC ranks sixth worldwide for tumor-related mortality. A subpopulation of tumor cells, termed cancer stem cells (CSCs, has the ability to support cancer growth. Therefore, profiling CSC-enriched populations could be a reliable tool to study cancer biology. Methods: We performed phenotypic characterization of 7 HNSCC cell lines and evaluated the presence of CSCs. CSCs from Hep-2 cell line and HNSCC primary cultures were enriched through sphere formation and sphere-forming cells have been characterized both in vitro and in vivo. In addition, we investigated the expression levels of Nicotinamide N-methyltransferase (NNMT, an enzyme overexpressed in several malignancies. Results: CSC markers were markedly expressed in Hep-2 cell line, which was found to be highly tumorigenic. CSC-enriched populations displayed increased expression of CSC markers and a strong capability to form tumors in vivo. We also found an overexpression of CSC markers in tumor formed by CSC-enriched populations. Interestingly, NNMT levels were significantly higher in CSC-enriched populations compared with parental cells. Conclusion: Our study provides an useful procedure for CSC identification and enrichment in HNSCC. Moreover, results obtained seem to suggest that CSCs may represent a promising target for an anticancer therapy.

  12. Vascular Injuries to the Neck After Penetrating Trauma: Diagnostic Performance of 40- and 64-MDCT Angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodanapally, Uttam K; Dreizin, David; Sliker, Clint W; Boscak, Alexis R; Reddy, Ramachandra P

    2015-10-01

    The purposes of this study were to assess the diagnostic performance of 40- and 64-MDCT angiography with digital subtraction angiography as the reference standard in the detection of arterial injuries in patients at high risk after penetrating neck trauma and to perform a separate analysis of injuries to the external carotid artery. In a retrospective evaluation of 53 sets of angiograms from 51 patients with penetrating neck injury, three reviewers unaware of the digital subtraction angiographic findings reviewed the CT angiographic (CTA) images to discern the presence or absence of arterial injuries. Sensitivity and specificity of CTA were calculated per injury, and a separate analysis of external carotid artery injuries was performed. Sensitivity of CTA for detecting arterial injuries ranged from 75.7% (95% CI, 62.3-86.9%) to 82.2% (95% CI, 69.5-92.1%). Specificity ranged from 96.4% (95% CI, 94.0-98.4%) to 98.4% (95% CI, 96.0-100%). CTA was highly sensitive for detection of the subgroup of injuries involving the large-caliber vessels that contribute to cerebral circulation. These sensitivities ranged from 92.8% (95% CI, 66-98.8%) to 100% (95% CI, 76.6-100%) for internal carotid artery injuries and from 88.9% (95% CI, 65.2-98.3%) to 94.4% (95% CI, 72.6-99.0%) for vertebral artery injuries. In contrast, sensitivity of CTA was limited for external carotid artery injuries, ranging from 63.4% (95% CI, 45.5-79.5%) to 70.0% (95% CI, 52.0-85.0%). CTA can be used for initial evaluation and may help guide management decisions if an external carotid artery injury is detected. Negative findings should not preclude close clinical follow-up, repeat CTA evaluation, or, in the presence of high suspicion of arterial injury due to clinical findings or wound trajectory, evaluation with digital subtraction angiography.

  13. [Differential diagnostics of acute inflammatory diseases and tumors of the neck].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuĭtsik, N B; Butkevich, A Ts; Kuntsevich, G I; Zemlianoĭ, A B

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the investigation was to assess the clinical significance of ultrasonography for differential diagnostics between acute inflammatory and tumorous lesions of the neck. One hundred and eighty-six patients with soft-tissue lesions of the neck aged 18 to 74 (mean age 31.45 +/- 8.39 years), 95 (51%) males and 91 (49%) females were examined. Basing on clinical and ultrasonographic examination, the patients were divided into two groups: 149 or 80% patients with acute inflammatory lesions (Group 1), and 37 or 20% patients with tumorous lesions (Group 2). Thirty-four of the 149 Group 1 patients (22.82%) had lymphadenitis, 30 (20.13%) had soft tissue infiltrates, 13 (8.72%) had abscesses, 19 (12.72%) had phlegmons, 32 (21.48%) had acute inflammatory changes in the major salivary glands, 3 (2.01%) had teratomas with signs of inflammation, and 17 (11.41%) patients had inflammatory changes in the tumors. Of 37 patients with tumorous lesions, 16 (43.2%) had salivary gland tumors, 12 (32.4%) had metastases in the lymphatic nodes, and 9 (24.3%) had neurofibromatosis. Soft tissue ultrasonography was performed using Sonos-5500 and Image-Point ultrasound scanners with 7.5 MHz sensors (Hewlett-Packard, USA), Logio-pro, Uoluson-730 Expert (General Electric, USA), and Premium Edition (ACUSON Antares, Siemens, Germany) with 5 to 13 MHz wide-frequency sensors. Visualization was performed in B-modes using tissue harmonics, color duplex scanning, Sie Scape panoramic visualization, contrast visualization and Sight 4D and 3D-Scape modes. The results of ultrasonography were analyzed taking into account additional methods such as computed and magnetic resonance tomography, intraoperative findings, the results of puncture biopsy, histological, morphological, and bacteriological studies. The study demonstrates that ultrasonography is the method of choice, which is in some cases enough to establish a diagnosis of an acute inflammatory disease or a tumorous formation of various

  14. Self-report and subjective history in the diagnosis of painful neck conditions: A systematic review of diagnostic accuracy studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizer, Adam; Bachmann, Alexa; Gibson, Jessie; Donaldson, Megan Burrowbridge

    2017-10-01

    Rising healthcare costs and inherent risks with over-utilizing diagnostic imaging require a quality subjective examination to improve effectiveness and time management of physical examinations. This systematic review investigates the diagnostic accuracy of subjective history and self-report items to determine if there is significant alteration in the probability of identifying specific painful neck conditions. Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines were followed. 1) Written in the English language 2) Cervical pain with/without referred upper extremity or head pain 3) Subjective history or self-report items 4) Study designs that reported diagnostic statistics or allowed calculation of sensitivities, specificities, diagnostic odds ratios, and likelihood ratios 5) used a reference standard that has a sensitivity or specificity ≥75% or a diagnostic tool that is strongly supported in the literature where this data is not available. Quality Assessment of Studies of Diagnostic Accuracy II was performed to evaluate risk of bias. Five studies with 830 total patients met the inclusion criteria. Conditions commonly reported in the literature included: cervical radiculopathy, cervical myelopathy, degenerative joint disease, and cervicogenic headache. Individual history questions show minimal diagnostic value in identifying cervical conditions without the physical examination. The value of the subjective history report is important and requires further investigation for specific neck conditions. Clustering symptoms may provide more insight than individual history items in future studies. The diagnostic value of history for neck conditions may be underrepresented due to the lack of studies that isolate subjective examination from the physical examination. 3a. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Secretory carcinoma of breast mimicking an abscess: A diagnostic dilemma

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    K Bharathi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Secretory carcinoma is a rare type of breast carcinoma usually seen in the young females, and it is also called as "Juvenile carcinoma." We report here a case of secretory carcinoma in an elderly female with an unusual clinical presentation. She had a painful swelling in left breast of 6 cm × 5 cm size for the past 6 months. Skin over the swelling was inflamed and ulcerated. Mammogram findings favored a chronic infected hematoma/abscess. Fine needle aspirate (FNA is a murky fluid admixed with blood and was reported as acute inflammatory lesion. 2 weeks later she developed nipple retraction and an increase in size of the swelling. Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC was repeated again from firm areas and in multiple points of swelling. To our surprise, FNA smears revealed dysplastic ductal epithelial cells with minimal atypia. Modified radical mastectomy was planned. Histopathological examination confirmed the mass as secretory carcinoma, a rare variant of ductal carcinoma of the breast. Postoperative chemotherapy and radiotherapy was started. We report this case to emphasize that FNAC can be repeated in suspicious cases and should be correlated clinico-radiologically to give a preoperative diagnosis.

  16. Correlation between egfr expression and accelerated proliferation during radiotherapy of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

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    Pedicini Piernicola

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To investigate the correlation between the expression of Epidermal Growth Factor receptor (EGFr and the reduction of the effective doubling time (TD during radiotherapy treatment and also to determine the dose per fraction to be taken into account when the overall treatment time (OTT is reduced in accelerated radiotherapy of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC. Methods A survey of the published papers comparing 3-years of local regional control rate (LCR for a total of 2162 patients treated with conventional and accelerated radiotherapy and with a pretreatment assessment of EGFr expression, was made. Different values of TD were obtained by a model incorporating the overall time corrected biologically effective dose (BED and a 3-year clinical LCR for high and low EGFr groups of patients (HEGFr and LEGFr, respectively. By obtaining the TD from the above analysis and the sub-sites’ potential doubling time (Tpot from flow cytometry and immunohistochemical methods, we were able to estimate the average TD for each sub-site included in the analysis. Moreover, the dose that would be required to offset the modified proliferation occurring in one day (Dprolif, was estimated. Results The averages of TD were 77 (27-9095% days in LEGFr and 8.8 (7.3-11.095% days in HEGFr, if an onset of accelerated proliferation TK at day 21 was assumed. The correspondent HEGFr sub-sites’ TD were 5.9 (6.6, 5.9 (6.6, 4.6 (6.1, 14.3 (12.9 days, with respect to literature immunohistochemical (flow cytometry data of Tpot for Oral-Cavity, Oro-pharynx, Hypo-pharynx, and Larynx respectively. The Dprolif for the HEGFr groups were 0.33 (0.29, 0.33 (0.29, 0.42 (0.31, 0.14 (0.15 Gy/day if α = 0.3 Gy-1 and α/β = 10 Gy were assumed. Conclusions A higher expression of the EGFr leads to enhanced proliferation. This study allowed to quantify the extent of the effect which EGFr expression has in terms of reduced TD and Dprolif for each head and neck

  17. Effect of the coffee ingredient cafestol on head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotowski, Ulana; Heiduschka, Gregor; Eckl-Dorna, Julia; Kranebitter, Veronika; Stanisz, Isabella; Brunner, Markus; Lill, Claudia; Thurnher, Dietmar [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Vienna (Austria); Seemann, Rudolf [Medical University of Vienna, Departement of Cranio-, Maxillofacial- and Oral Surgery, Vienna (Austria); Schmid, Rainer [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiotherapy, Vienna (Austria)

    2015-01-10

    Cafestol is a diterpene molecule found in coffee beans and has anticarcinogenic properties. The aim of the study was to examine the effects of cafestol in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cells. Three HNSCC cell lines (SCC25, CAL27 and FaDu) were treated with increasing doses of cafestol. Then combination experiments with cisplatin and irradiation were carried out. Drug interactions and possible synergy were calculated using the combination index analysis. Clonogenic assays were performed after irradiation with 2, 4, 6 and 8 Gy, respectively, and the rate of apoptosis was measured with flow cytometry. Treatment of HNSCC cells with cafestol leads to a dose-dependent reduction of cell viability and to induction of apoptosis. Combination with irradiation shows a reduction of clonogenic survival compared to each treatment method alone. In two of the cell lines a significant additive effect was observed. Cafestol is a naturally occurring effective compound with growth-inhibiting properties in head and neck cancer cells. Moreover, it leads to a significant inhibition of colony formation. (orig.) [German] Cafestol ist ein Diterpen, das in der Kaffeebohne vorkommt und antikanzerogene Eigenschaften besitzt. Ziel der Studie war, die Wirkung von Cafestol auf Kopf-Hals-Tumorzelllinien zu untersuchen. Drei Kopf-Hals-Tumorzelllinien (SCC25, CAL27 und FaDu) wurden mit steigenden Cafestol-Dosen behandelt. Anschliessend fanden Kombinationsexperimente mit Cisplatin und Bestrahlung statt. Die Wechselwirkung zwischen den Substanzen und moegliche synergistische Wirkungen wurden mit dem Combination-Index analysiert. Koloniebildungstests wurden nach Bestrahlung mit 2, 4, 6 und 8 Gy durchgefuehrt. Apoptose wurde mittels Durchflusszytometrie gemessen. Die Behandlung der Kopf-Hals-Tumorzelllinien mit Cafestol fuehrt zu einer dosisabhaengigen Abnahme des Zellueberlebens und zur Induktion von Apoptose. Die Kombination von Cafestol mit Bestrahlung zeigt eine geringere

  18. Upper Tract Urothelial Carcinomas in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease: Relationship with Diagnostic Challenge

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    Li-Jen Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease and upper tract urothelial carcinomas display a bidirectional relationship. Review of the literature indicates that early diagnosis and correct localization of upper tract urothelial carcinomas in dialysis patients and kidney transplant recipients are important but problematic. Urine cytology and cystoscopy have limited sensitivity for the diagnosis of upper tract urothelial carcinomas in dialysis patients. Enhanced computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging could prove useful for the detection and staging of upper tract urothelial carcinomas in dialysis patients. Renal ultrasound can detect hydronephrosis caused by upper tract urothelial carcinomas in kidney transplant recipients but cannot visualize the carcinomas themselves. High detection rates for upper tract urothelial carcinomas in kidney transplant recipients have recently been demonstrated using computed tomography urography, which appears to be a promising tool. To detect carcinomas in dialysis patients and kidney transplant recipients as early as possible, regular screening in asymptomatic patients and diagnostic work-up in symptomatic patients should be performed using a combination of urological and imaging methods. Careful assessment of subsequent recurrence within the contralateral upper urinary tract and the urinary bladder is necessary for dialysis patients and kidney transplant recipients with upper tract urothelial carcinomas.

  19. Upper tract urothelial carcinomas in patients with chronic kidney disease: relationship with diagnostic challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Jen; Lee, Shen-Yang; Teh, Bin Tean; Chuang, Cheng-Keng; Nortier, Joëlle

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease and upper tract urothelial carcinomas display a bidirectional relationship. Review of the literature indicates that early diagnosis and correct localization of upper tract urothelial carcinomas in dialysis patients and kidney transplant recipients are important but problematic. Urine cytology and cystoscopy have limited sensitivity for the diagnosis of upper tract urothelial carcinomas in dialysis patients. Enhanced computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging could prove useful for the detection and staging of upper tract urothelial carcinomas in dialysis patients. Renal ultrasound can detect hydronephrosis caused by upper tract urothelial carcinomas in kidney transplant recipients but cannot visualize the carcinomas themselves. High detection rates for upper tract urothelial carcinomas in kidney transplant recipients have recently been demonstrated using computed tomography urography, which appears to be a promising tool. To detect carcinomas in dialysis patients and kidney transplant recipients as early as possible, regular screening in asymptomatic patients and diagnostic work-up in symptomatic patients should be performed using a combination of urological and imaging methods. Careful assessment of subsequent recurrence within the contralateral upper urinary tract and the urinary bladder is necessary for dialysis patients and kidney transplant recipients with upper tract urothelial carcinomas.

  20. Assessment of preoperative ultrasonography of the neck and elective neck dissection in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wensing, B.M.; Merkx, M.A.W.; Wilde, P.C.M. de; Marres, H.A.M.; Hoogen, F.J.A. van den

    2010-01-01

    Estimating the value of our preoperative workup in the treatment of patients with clinically N0 (cN0) squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity. Retrospective analysis. Results of preoperative palpation, ultrasound (US) and ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) were compared to t

  1. CD147 and AGR2 expression promote cellular proliferation and metastasis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

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    Sweeny, Larissa, E-mail: larissasweeny@gmail.com [Department of Surgery, University of Alabama, Division of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, 1670 University Boulevard, Volker Hall G082, Birmingham, Alabama (United States); Liu, Zhiyong; Bush, Benjamin D.; Hartman, Yolanda [Department of Surgery, University of Alabama, Division of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, 1670 University Boulevard, Volker Hall G082, Birmingham, Alabama (United States); Zhou, Tong [Department of Medicine, Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, 1825 University Boulevard, Shelby Biomedical Research Building 302, Birmingham, Alabama (United States); Rosenthal, Eben L., E-mail: oto@uab.edu [Department of Surgery, University of Alabama, Division of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, 1670 University Boulevard, Volker Hall G082, Birmingham, Alabama (United States)

    2012-08-15

    The signaling pathways facilitating metastasis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cells are not fully understood. CD147 is a transmembrane glycoprotein known to induce cell migration and invasion. AGR2 is a secreted peptide also known to promote cell metastasis. Here we describe their importance in the migration and invasion of HNSCC cells (FADU and OSC-19) in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, knockdown of CD147 or AGR2 decreased cellular proliferation, migration and invasion. In vivo, knockdown of CD147 or AGR2 expression decreased primary tumor growth as well as regional and distant metastasis. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated AGR2 in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma for the first time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We explored the relationship between AGR2 and CD147 for the first time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AGR2 and CD147 appear to co-localize in head and squamous cell carcinoma samples. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knockdown of both AGR2 and CD147 reduced migration and invasion in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knockdown of both AGR2 and CD147 decreased metastasis in vivo.

  2. The Effects of GLUT1 on the Survival of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengjiao Li

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Cancer cells require increased nutrient uptake to support a high rate of proliferation, and the overexpression of glucose transporters, in particular GLUT1, is a common characteristic of human malignancies. Here, we investigated the relationship between the expression of GLUT1 and cell viability, colony forming ability and apoptosis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC in vitro and in a xenograft mouse model in vivo. Methods: Lentiviral mediated overexpression and knock-down of GLUT1 was performed in two oral cancer cell lines (CAL27 and SCC25. QRT-PCR and Western blot analysis were used to detect the mRNA and protein expression of GLUT1 and nuclear factor-kappa B (NFκB p65 subunit. Cell viability and apoptosis were assessed by MTT and flow cytometry analyses, respectively. Colony formation assays were performed by staining with 0.5% crystal violet. The role of GLUT1 in HNSCC was examined in vivo through the generation of a CAL27 (or CAL27 with different transfections nude mice xenograft model of HNSCC. Results: GLUT1 overexpression promoted cell viability and colony formation whereas GLUT1 silencing had the opposite effect. GLUT1 knock-down significantly increased the number of Annexin V positive cells in both cell lines and GLUT1 overexpression had the opposite effect, indicating that GLUT1 modulates apoptosis. Xenograft mouse models of GLUT1 knockdown and overexpression showed that GLUT1 expression was associated with poor survival and increased tumor growth. GLUT1 overexpression significantly upregulated the expression of NFκB-p65, and this effect was reversed by inhibition of GLUT1 expression. Conclusions: GLUT1 expression plays an important role in the survival of HNSCC, and its effects may be associated with the activation of the NFκB pathway.

  3. Endoscopic surveillance of head and neck cancer in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Minoru; Ishihara, Ryu; Hamada, Kenta; Tonai, Yusuke; Yamasaki, Yasushi; Matsuura, Noriko; Kanesaka, Takashi; Yamamoto, Sachiko; Akasaka, Tomofumi; Hanaoka, Noboru; Takeuchi, Yoji; Higashino, Koji; Uedo, Noriya; Iishi, Hiroyasu

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Multiple squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) frequently arise in the upper aerodigestive tract, referred to as the field cancerization phenomenon. The aim of this study was to elucidate the detailed clinical features of second primary head and neck (H&N) SCCs arising in patients with esophageal SCC. Patients and methods: A total of 818 patients underwent endoscopic resection for superficial esophageal cancer between January 2006 and December 2013. Of these, 439 patients met our inclusion criteria, and we retrospectively investigated the incidence, primary sites, and stages of second primary H&N SCCs in these patients. Results: A total of 53 metachronous H&N SCCs developed in 40 patients after a median follow-up period of 46 months (range 9 – 109). The cumulative incidence rates of metachronous H&N SCCs at 3, 5, and 7 years were 5.3 %, 9.7 %, and 17.2 %, respectively. These lesions were frequently located at pyriform sinus or in the posterior wall of the pharynx (70 %, 37/53 lesions). Most of the lesions were detected at an early stage, though 4 lesions were associated with lymph node metastasis when their primary sites were detected (1 postcricoid area, 2 posterior wall of hypopharynx, and 1 lateral wall of oropharynx). Conclusions: Patients with esophageal SCC should undergo careful inspection of the pyriform sinus and posterior wall of the pharynx for detection of H&N SCCs. Methods to open the hypopharyngeal space, such as the Valsalva maneuver, should be included in the surveillance program. PMID:27556090

  4. Distinct effects of alcohol consumption and smoking on genetic alterations in head and neck carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urashima, Mitsuyoshi; Hama, Takanori; Suda, Toshihito; Suzuki, Yutaka; Ikegami, Masahiro; Sakanashi, Chikako; Akutsu, Taisuke; Amagaya, Suguru; Horiuchi, Kazuhumi; Imai, Yu; Mezawa, Hidetoshi; Noya, Miki; Nakashima, Akio; Mafune, Aki; Kato, Takakuni; Kojima, Hiromi

    2013-01-01

    Tobacco and alcohol consumption are risk factors for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Recently, whole-exome sequencing clarified that smoking increased TP53 and other mutations in HNSCC; however, the effects of alcohol consumption on these genetic alterations remain unknown. We explored the association between alcohol consumption and somatic copy-number alterations (SCNAs) across the whole genome in human papillomavirus (HPV)-negative HNSCCs, and compared with the effects of smoking on genetic alterations. SCNA and TP53 mutations in tumor samples were examined by high-resolution comparative genomic hybridization microarray 180K and by direct sequencing, respectively, and statistically analyzed for associations with alcohol consumption and smoking during the 20 years preceding diagnosis of HNSCC. Probes with a corrected p-value (=q-value) less than 0.05 and fold change greater than 1.2 or less than -1.2 were considered statistically significant. A total of 248 patients with HNSCC were enrolled. In the HPV-negative patients (n=221), heavy alcohol consumption was significantly associated with SCNAs of oncogenes/oncosuppressors that were previously reported to occur frequently in HNSCCs: CDKN2A (q=0.005), FHIT (q=0.005), 11q13 region including CCND1, FADD and CTTN (q=0.005), ERBB2 (HER2) (q=0.009), 3q25-qter including CCNL1, TP63, DCUN1D1 and PIK3CA (q=0.014), and CSMD1 (q=0.019). But, TP53 mutations were not affected. In contrast, smoking was associated with increased risk of TP53 mutations, but did not induce any significant SCNAs of oncogenes/oncosuppressors. These results suggest that both alcohol consumption and smoking had distinct effects on genetic alterations in HNSCCs. Heavy alcohol consumption may trigger previously known and unknown SCNAs, but may not induce TP53 mutation. In contrast, smoking may induce TP53 mutation, but may not trigger any SCNAs.

  5. Cold atmospheric plasma treatment selectively targets head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Preston, Rafael; Ogawa, Takenori; Uemura, Mamoru; Shumulinsky, Gary; Valle, Blanca L; Pirini, Francesca; Ravi, Rajani; Sidransky, David; Keidar, Michael; Trink, Barry

    2014-10-01

    The treatment of locoregional recurrence (LRR) of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) often requires a combination of surgery, radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy. Survival outcomes are poor and the treatment outcomes are morbid. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) is an ionized gas produced at room temperature under laboratory conditions. We have previously demonstrated that treatment with a CAP jet device selectively targets cancer cells using in vitro melanoma and in vivo bladder cancer models. In the present study, we wished to examine CAP selectivity in HNSCC in vitro models, and to explore its potential for use as a minimally invasive surgical approach that allows for specific cancer cell or tumor tissue ablation without affecting the surrounding healthy cells and tissues. Four HNSCC cell lines (JHU-022, JHU-028, JHU-029, SCC25) and 2 normal oral cavity epithelial cell lines (OKF6 and NOKsi) were subjected to cold plasma treatment for durations of 10, 30 and 45 sec, and a helium flow of 20 l/min-1 for 10 sec was used as a positive treatment control. We showed that cold plasma selectively diminished HNSCC cell viability in a dose-response manner, as evidenced by MTT assays; the viability of the OKF6 cells was not affected by the cold plasma. The results of colony formation assays also revealed a cell-specific response to cold plasma application. Western blot analysis did not provide evidence that the cleavage of PARP occurred following cold plasma treatment. In conclusion, our results suggest that cold plasma application selectively impairs HNSCC cell lines through non-apoptotic mechanisms, while having a minimal effect on normal oral cavity epithelial cell lines.

  6. Optical metabolic imaging of treatment response in human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy T Shah

    Full Text Available Optical metabolic imaging measures fluorescence intensity and lifetimes from metabolic cofactors nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD. These molecular level measurements provide unique biomarkers for early cellular responses to cancer treatments. Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC is an attractive target for optical imaging because of easy access to the site using fiber optic probes. Two HNSCC cell lines, SCC25 and SCC61, were treated with Cetuximab (anti-EGFR antibody, BGT226 (PI3K/mTOR inhibitor, or cisplatin (chemotherapy for 24 hours. Results show increased redox ratio, NADH α1 (contribution from free NADH, and FAD α1 (contribution from protein-bound FAD for malignant cells compared with the nonmalignant cell line OKF6 (p<0.05. In SCC25 and SCC61 cells, the redox ratio is unaffected by cetuximab treatment and decreases with BGT226 and cisplatin treatment (p<0.05, and these results agree with standard measurements of proliferation rates after treatment. For SCC25, NADH α1 is reduced with BGT226 and cisplatin treatment. For SCC61, NADH α1 is reduced with cetuximab, BGT226, and cisplatin treatment. Trends in NADH α1 are statistically similar to changes in standard measurements of glycolytic rates after treatment. FAD α1 is reduced with cisplatin treatment (p<0.05. These shifts in optical endpoints reflect early metabolic changes induced by drug treatment. Overall, these results indicate that optical metabolic imaging has potential to detect early response to cancer treatment in HNSCC, enabling optimal treatment regimens and improved patient outcomes.

  7. Apoptotic Capacity and Risk of Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhensheng; Liu, Hongliang; Han, Peng; Gao, Fengqin; Dahlstrom, Kristina R.; Li, Guojun; Owzar, Kouros; Zevallos, Jose P.; Sturgis, Erich M.; Wei, Qingyi

    2017-01-01

    Background Tobacco smoke and alcohol drinking are the major risk factors for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Smoking and drinking cause DNA damage leading to apoptosis, and insufficient apoptotic capacity may favor development of cancer because of the dysfunction of removing damaged cells. In the present study, we investigated the association between camptothecin (CPT)-induced apoptotic capacity and risk of SCCHN in a North American population. Methods In a case-control study of 708 SCCHN patients and 685 matched cancer-free controls, we measured apoptotic capacity in cultured peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) in response to in vitro exposure to CPT by using the flow cytometry-based method. Results We found that the mean level of apoptotic capacity in the cases (45.9±23.3%) was significantly lower than that in the controls (49.0±23.1%) (P = 0.002). When we used the median level of apoptotic capacity in the controls as the cutoff value for calculating adjusted odds ratios (ORs), subjects with a reduced apoptotic capacity had an increased risk (adjusted OR = 1.42, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.13–1.78, P = 0.002), especially for those who were age ≥57 (1.73, 1.25–2.38, 0.0009), men (1.76, 1.36–2.27, < 0.0001) and ever drinkers (1.67, 1.27–2.21, 0.0003), and these variables significantly interacted with apoptotic capacity (Pinteraction = 0.015, 0.005 and 0.009, respectively). A further fitted prediction model suggested that the inclusion of apoptotic capacity significantly improved in the prediction of SCCHN risk. Conclusion Individuals with a reduced CPT-induced apoptotic capacity may be at an increased risk of developing SCCHN, and apoptotic capacity may be a biomarker for susceptibility to SCCHN. PMID:28033527

  8. Autophagy induction contributes to GDC-0349 resistance in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Yajuan; Peng, Yi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hubei Cancer Hospital, Wuhan (China); Tang, Hao [Department of Pathology, Hubei Cancer Hospital, Wuhan 430071 (China); He, Xiaojun; Wang, Zhaohua [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hubei Cancer Hospital, Wuhan (China); Hu, Desheng, E-mail: hudeshengvvip@sina.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hubei Cancer Hospital, Wuhan (China); Zhou, Xiaoyi, E-mail: zhouxy1218@126.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hubei Cancer Hospital, Wuhan (China)

    2016-08-19

    Dysregulation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling contributes to head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) tumorigenesis and progression. In the current study, we tested the anti-HNSCC cell activity by GDC-0349, a selective ATP-competitive inhibitor of mTOR. We showed that GDC-0349 inhibited proliferation of established and primary human HNSCC cells bearing high-level of p-AKT/p-S6K. Further, it induced caspase-dependent apoptosis in the HNSCC cells. GDC-0349 blocked mTORC1 and mTORC2 activation, yet it simultaneously induced autophagy activation in HNSCC cells. The latter was evidenced by induction of LC3B-II, Beclin-1 and Autophagy-related (ATG)-7, as well as downregulation of p62. Autophagy inhibitors (3-methyladenine and bafilomycin A1) or ATG-7 siRNA dramatically potentiated GDC-0349’s cytotoxicity against HNSCC cells. Intriguingly, we showed that ceramide (C14), a pro-apoptotic sphingolipid, also induced ATG-7 degradation, and sensitized HNSCC cells to GDC-0349. Collectively, the preclinical study provided evidences to support GDC-0349 as a promising anti-HNSCC agent. GDC-0349 sensitization may be achieved via autophagy inhibition. - Highlights: • GDC-0349 inhibits proliferation of HNSCC cells bearing high-level of p-AKT/p-S6K. • GDC-0349 activates caspase-dependent apoptosis in HNSCC cells. • Simultaneous blockage of mTORC1/2 by GDC-0349 induces autophagy activation. • Autophagy inhibitor or ATG-7 siRNA potentiates GDC-0349’s cytotoxicity. • C14 ceramide downregulates ATG-7 and sensitizes HNSCC cells to GDC-0349.

  9. Targeting DDR2 in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma with dasatinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Mässenhausen, Anne; Sanders, Christine; Brägelmann, Johannes; Konantz, Martina; Queisser, Angela; Vogel, Wenzel; Kristiansen, Glen; Duensing, Stefan; Schröck, Andreas; Bootz, Friedrich; Brossart, Peter; Kirfel, Jutta; Lengerke, Claudia; Perner, Sven

    2016-11-15

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC) is the tenth most common tumor entity in men worldwide. Nevertheless therapeutic options are mostly limited to surgery and radio-chemotherapy resulting in 5-year survival rates of around 50%. Therefore new therapeutic options are urgently needed. During the last years, targeting of receptor tyrosine kinases has emerged as a promising strategy that can complement standard therapeutical approaches. Here, we aimed at investigating if the receptor tyrosine kinase DDR2 is a targetable structure in HNSCC. DDR2 expression was assessed on a large HNSCC cohort (554 patients) including primary tumors, lymph node metastases and recurrences and normal mucosa as control. Subsequently, DDR2 was stably overexpressed in two different cell lines (FaDu and HSC-3) using lentiviral technology. Different tumorigenic properties such as proliferation, migration, invasion, adhesion and anchorage independent growth were assessed with and without dasatinib treatment using in-vitro cell models and in-vivo zebrafish xenografts. DDR2 was overexpressed in all tumor tissues when compared to normal mucosa. DDR2 overexpression led to increased migration, invasion, adhesion and anchorage independent growth whereas proliferation remained unaltered. Upon dasatinib treatment migration, invasion and adhesion could be inhibited in-vitro and in-vivo whereas proliferation was unchanged. Our data suggest treatment with dasatinib as a promising new therapeutic option for patients suffering from DDR2 overexpressing HNSCC. Since dasatinib is already FDA-approved we propose to test this drug in clinical trials so that patients could directly benefit from this new treatment option.

  10. Diagnostic dilemma of FNA diagnosis of secretory carcinoma of breast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archana C Buch

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Secretory carcinoma (SC is one of the least common types of breast carcinoma. The tumor has distinctive histologic features with prominent secretory activity similar to lactational change and minimal nuclear atypia. As the cytomorphologic features of SC overlaps benign breast lesions with lactational change and apocrine change, the initial diagnosis of SC may be missed on cytology in some cases. A 29-year-old woman presented with a lump in the left breast since 9 months. The fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC suggested proliferative breast disease without atypia. Excision biopsy showed secretory carcinoma. The case is presented to highlight the cytologic features of SC, which may overlap with lactational change and apocrine change.

  11. Diagnostic performance of post-treatment FDG PET or FDG PET/CT imaging in head and neck cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Tejpal [Tata Memorial Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Kharghar, Navi Mumbai (India); Tata Memorial Centre, Epidemiology Clinical Trials Unit-Clinical Research Secretariat, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer (ACTREC), Kharghar, Navi Mumbai (India); Master, Zubin; Murthy, Vedang [Tata Memorial Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Kharghar, Navi Mumbai (India); Kannan, Sadhana [Tata Memorial Centre, Epidemiology Clinical Trials Unit-Clinical Research Secretariat, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer (ACTREC), Kharghar, Navi Mumbai (India); Agarwal, Jai Prakash; Ghsoh-Laskar, Sarbani; Budrukkar, Ashwini [Tata Memorial Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Mumbai (India); Rangarajan, Venkatesh [Tata Memorial Hospital, Bio-Imaging Unit, Mumbai (India)

    2011-11-15

    Our objective was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies assessing the diagnostic performance of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) with or without computed tomography (CT) in post-treatment response assessment and/or surveillance imaging of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). A systematic search of the indexed medical literature was done using appropriate keywords to identify relevant studies. Metrics of diagnostic test accuracy, viz. sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) were extracted from individual studies and combined using a random effects model to yield weighted mean pooled estimates with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). The impact of timing of post-treatment scan, study quality and advancements in PET technology was explored through meta-regression. A total of 51 studies involving 2,335 patients were included in the meta-analysis. The weighted mean (95% CI) pooled sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV of post-treatment FDG PET(CT) for the primary site was 79.9% (73.7-85.2%), 87.5% (85.2-89.5%), 58.6% (52.6-64.5%) and 95.1% (93.5-96.5%), respectively. Similar estimates for the neck were 72.7% (66.6-78.2%), 87.6% (85.7-89.3%), 52.1% (46.6-57.6%) and 94.5% (93.1-95.7%), respectively. Scans done {>=}12 weeks after completion of definitive therapy had moderately higher diagnostic accuracy on meta-regression analysis using time as a covariate. The overall diagnostic performance of post-treatment FDG PET(CT) for response assessment and surveillance imaging of HNSCC is good, but its PPV is somewhat suboptimal. Its NPV remains exceptionally high and a negative post-treatment scan is highly suggestive of absence of viable disease that can guide therapeutic decision-making. Timing of post-treatment imaging has a significant, though moderate impact on diagnostic accuracy. (orig.)

  12. Targeted sequencing reveals TP53 as a potential diagnostic biomarker in the post-treatment surveillance of head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ginkel, Joost H; de Leng, Wendy W J; de Bree, Remco; van Es, Robert J J; Willems, Stefan M

    2016-09-20

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) form a large heterogeneous group of tumors and have a relatively poor outcome in advanced cases. Revealing the underlying genetic mutations in HNSCC facilitates the development of diagnostic biomarkers, which might lead to improved diagnosis and post treatment surveillance. We retrospectively analyzed mutational hotspots using targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) of 239 HNSCC tumor samples in order to examine the mutational profile of HNSCC. Furthermore, we assessed prevalence, co-occurrence, and synonymy of gene mutations in (matched) tumor samples. TP53 was found mutated the most frequent with mutation rates of up to 83% in all tumors, compared to mutation rates of between 0 and 21% of CDKN2A, PIK3CA, HRAS, CDK4, FBXW7 and RB1. Mutational co-occurrence predominantly existed between TP53 and PIK3CA, TP53 and CDKN2A, and HRAS and PIK3CA. Mutational synonymy between primary tumor and associated metastasis and recurrence was present in respectively 88% and 89%. TP53 mutations were concordantly mutated in 95% of metastases and in 91% of recurrences. This indicates TP53 mutations to be highly prevalent and concordant in primary tumors and associated locoregional metastases and recurrences. In turn, this provides ground for further investigating the use of TP53 mutations as diagnostic biomarkers in HNSCC patients.

  13. Histogram analysis of apparent diffusion coefficient maps for the differentiation between lymphoma and metastatic lymph nodes of squamous cell carcinoma in head and neck region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan-Jun; Xu, Xiao-Quan; Hu, Hao; Su, Guo-Yi; Shen, Jie; Shi, Hai-Bin; Wu, Fei-Yun

    2017-01-01

    Background To clarify the nature of cervical malignant lymphadenopathy is highly important for the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of head and neck tumors. Purpose To investigate the role of first-order apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) histogram analysis for differentiating lymphoma from metastatic lymph nodes of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in the head and neck region. Material and Methods Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) data of 67 patients (lymphoma, n = 20; SCC, n = 47) with malignant lymphadenopathy were retrospectively analyzed. The SCC group was divided into nasopharyngeal SCC and non-nasopharyngeal SCC groups. The ADC histogram features (ADC10, ADC25, ADCmean, ADCmedian, ADC75, ADC90, skewness, and kurtosis) were derived and then compared by independent-samples t-test and one-way analysis of variance test, respectively. Receiver operating characteristic curve analyses were employed to investigate diagnostic performance of the significant parameters. Results Lymphoma showed significantly lower ADCmean, ADCmedian, ADC75, and ADC90 than SCC (all P  0.05). Lymphoma showed significantly lower ADC25, ADCmean, ADCmedian, ADC75, and ADC90 than non-nasopharyngeal SCC (all P < 0.05). Optimal diagnostic performance (AUC = 0.847, sensitivity = 86.7%, specificity = 80.0%) could be achieved when setting ADC90 = 0.943 × 10(-3 )mm(2)/s as the threshold value. Conclusion Given its limitations, our study has shown that first-order ADC histogram analysis is capable of differentiating lymphoma from metastatic lymph nodes of SCC, especially those of non-nasopharyngeal SCC.

  14. Nonconventional papillary thyroid carcinomas with pleomorphic tumor giant cells: a diagnostic pitfall with anaplastic carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hommell-Fontaine, Juliette; Borda, Angela; Ragage, Florence; Berger, Nicole; Decaussin-Petrucci, Myriam

    2010-06-01

    The presence of pleomorphic tumor giant cells in thyroid carcinomas of follicular cell origin is always worrisome for the pathologist as they first of all refer to anaplastic carcinoma, one of the most aggressive human malignancies. However, non-anaplastic pleomorphic giant cells are well described in other thyroid diseases, most often benign. In this paper, we describe four cases of papillary thyroid carcinoma displaying pleomorphic tumor giant cells with features that differ from those of anaplastic carcinoma. Pleomorphic giant cells were admixed with the underlying thyroid carcinoma and constituted from 5% to 25% of the tumor. Cytologically, they had an abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm with large and irregular nuclei. Compared to pleomorphic giant cells of anaplastic carcinoma, they reproduced the growth pattern of the underlying carcinoma, had a low mitotic index without necrosis or inflammation, and were reactive with thyroglobulin and thyroid-specific transcription factor-1 and strongly and diffusely positive for cytokeratin AE1/AE3. After 16-84 months of follow-up, patients are relapse-free and still alive. These cases show that pleomorphic tumor giant cells arising in papillary thyroid carcinomas do not always represent dedifferentiation and progression to anaplastic carcinoma. Distinction among these processes is critical as their treatment and prognosis are very different.

  15. Diagnostic evaluation of neck torsion test in objective examination in patients with vertigo and/or hearing-impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niewiadomski, Piotr; Bielińska, Marzena; Pietkiewicz, Piotr; Olszewski, Jurek

    2017-06-30

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the neck torsion test in objective examinations of patients with vertigo and/or hearing loss. The study was conducted in 100 patients, including 54 women and 46 men aged 17-79 years, who were divided into two groups: I - 50 patients, including 30 women and 20 men aged 17-79 years (mean age 49.92 years) with dizziness and/or hearing impairments, and confirmed asymmetry of intracranial vessels, II - 50 patients - control group, including 24 women and 26 men aged 20-71 years without dizziness and/or hearing disorders and without disturbance in the construction of intracranial vessels. For each patient, the following tests were carried out: subjective, objective otorhinolaryngological, Doppler ultrasound specifying diameter of vertebral and carotid arteries and the velocity of blood flow in these vessels, audiological diagnostics, including the examination of latency of waves I, III, V of the auditory evoked potentials of the brain stem, otoneurological diagnostics with used the neck torsion test. It appears from the analysis of the material presented that the application of the neck torsion test in the Doppler ultrasound results in the fact that the difference in the mean systolic velocity of blood flow in vertebral artery is higher on the side opposite to the turning of the neck, and the increase in the average diastolic blood flow velocity in the vertebral artery on the side of the test being performed and its reduction on the opposite side in the study group, when compared to the control group. The value of the wave I, II, V latency in the ABR test during the neck torsion test is extended more in the study group than in the controls, on the side of the performed test. The performed neck torsion test in the VNG test increases the occurrence of both, square waves and nystagmus (much higher in the study group than in the controls). Conclussion. The application of the neck torsion test in the Doppler ultrasound, ABR and VNG test in

  16. Diagnostic value of serum squamous cell carcinoma antigen for hepatocellular carcinoma: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jing; Wang, Zhao-Juan; Chen, Long-Hua; Dong, Wen-Zhu

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to ascertain the diagnostic value of serum squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCCA) and SCCA-IgM for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). After a comprehensive search of PubMed and Web of Science databases, we identified eligible studies on the diagnostic value serum SCCAs for HCC. The quality of the eligible studies was assessed using the revised Quality Assessment for Studies of Diagnostic Accuracy (QUADAS-2) tool. The overall diagnostic value of SCCAs for HCC was pooled using a bivariate model. Twelve studies were included in this systematic review and meta-analysis. The pooled sensitivities for SCCA and SCCA-IgM were 0.61 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.37-0.81) and 0.70 (95% CI, 0.55-0.82), respectively. The corresponding specificities were 0.80 (95% CI, 0.52-0.94) and 0.62 (95% CI, 0.51-0.72), respectively. The areas under summary receiver operating characteristic (sROC) curves for SCCA and SCCA-IgM were 0.76 (95% CI, 0.72-0.80) and 0.70 (95% CI, 0.66-0.74), respectively. Major design deficiencies of the included studies were two-gate design and partial verification bias. Therefore, we concluded that both serum SCCA and SCCA-IgM have a fair diagnostic value for HCC.

  17. Change of FDG uptake according to radiation dose on squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Wook; Kim, Jae Seung; Im, Ki Chun [College of Medicine, University of Ulsan, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2004-06-15

    To evaluate whether positron emission tomography (PET) with 2-[F-18]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) can be used to predict of early response to definitive aim radiotherapy (RT) in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck using response rate and locoregional control as study endpoints. Twenty-two patients with head and neck caner underwent a FDG-PET study before RT, after a first dose of 46 Gy, and after a second dose of more than 70 Gy. Standard uptake value (SUV) was calculated for primary tumor (n=22) and neck lymph node (n=10). Attenuation corrected PET scans acquired 60 min after tracer injection were used for evaluation of FDG uptake in tumors. A quantitative FDG uptake index was expressed as SUVlean (corrected for lean body mass). The follow-up time was at least 5 months (range 5-15 months). A total of 22 primary tumors and 10 metastatic lymph nodes were analyzed in FDG-PET. In the first PET study the mean SUV in the primary tumors and nodes were 6.4 (SD, 2.6) and 4.6 (SD, 2.3), respectively. In the second PET, study performed after 46 Gy RT the mean SUV in primary tumor and node decreased to 2.9 (SD, 1.9, {rho} < 0.001) and 1.7 (SD, 1.3) respectively. In the third PET study performed at the full dose (more than 70 Gy), RT the mean SUV in the primary tumors and nodes decreased to 2.3 (SD, 1.5, {rho} < 0.001) and 1.5 (SD, 1.1) respectively. FDG uptake in tumors showed a significant decrease after the 46 Gy and more than 70 Gy of RT for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Reduction of metabolic activity after 46 Gy of radiotherapy is closely correlated with radiation response.

  18. Human papillomavirus in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma of unknown primary is a common event and a strong predictor of survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Hebbelstrup Jensen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma of unknown primary (CUP. METHODS: All patients diagnosed with and treated for CUP between January 1, 2000, and June 1, 2011, at two Danish medical centers were included. All patients received a thorough diagnostic work-up, including FDG-PET, before being diagnosed as CUP. We determined the HPV status in all patients using a combination of HPV DNA PCR and p16 stain. In addition, clinical information on the study patients was retrieved from clinical records. RESULTS: Of the identified 60 patients with CUP, 13 were shown to be positive for HPV DNA, amounting to 22% of the study population. In addition, we were able to show a clear disease-free and overall-survival benefit in the HPV-positive group, with a hazard ratio of 0.16 (95% CI: 0.038-0.67 for over-all survival. This survival benefit was also apparent when adjusted for advanced age in a multivariate Cox regression analysis. CONCLUSION: A fairly large percentage of CUP cases are HPV-related, and because this is related to both the location and prognosis, we recommend HPV testing as part of the diagnostic work-up.

  19. Myoepithelial carcinoma of the stomach: a diagnostic pitfall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Chih-En; Hsieh, Yu-Hsi; Wei, Chang-Kuo; Huang, Hsuan-Ying; Chi, Chen-Lin

    2015-04-14

    Myoepithelioma/myoepithelial carcinomas are not commonly found in soft tissues and are especially rare at visceral sites. This report describes a case of a rare low-grade myoepithelial carcinoma of the stomach. A 61-year-old female patient presented with postprandial abdominal discomfort. Endoscopy revealed a 1.1 cm submucosal lesion. Local excision was performed after malignancy was confirmed by biopsy. The resection margin is free of tumor and she received no adjuvant therapy. The tumor was characterized by multinodular growth with biphasic epithelioid and spindle components. Infiltrative margin and nuclear pleomorphism are seen. Tumor cells were positive for both epithelial and myoepithelial markers. Evidence of epithelial differentiation was confirmed by electron microscopy. No EWSR1 rearrangement was detected. The final diagnosis was low-grade myoepithelial gastric carcinoma. The patient is currently well, and no evidence of recurrence or metastasis was found after ten-month of follow-up. Myoepithelial carcinoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a biphasic gastric tumor.

  20. Distinct regions of loss of heterozygosity on 22q in different sites of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    dos Reis, Patricia Pintor; Poli-Frederico, Regina Célia; dos Santos, Rodrigo Mattos

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Frequent loss of heterozygosity (LOH) has been reported in many types of cancer, including head and neck carcinomas. Somatic deletions involving specific chromosomal regions are strongly associated with inactivation of the allele of a tumor suppressor gene located within the deleted...... on 22q and its relationship to clinicopathological parameters at the three major sites of HNSCC: oral cavity, larynx and pharynx. MATERIAL/METHODS: LOH and microsatellite instability (MSI) were studied using seven polymorphic microsatellite markers mapped to the 22q11-q13.3 region in 37 oral, 32...

  1. A systematic review of the diagnostic accuracy of provocative tests of the neck for diagnosing cervical radiculopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pool, Jan J. M.; van Tulder, Maurits W.; Riphagen, Ingrid I.; de Vet, Henrica C. W.

    2006-01-01

    Clinical provocative tests of the neck, which position the neck and arm inorder to aggravate or relieve arm symptoms, are commonly used in clinical practice in patients with a suspected cervical radiculopathy. Their diagnostic accuracy, however, has never been examined in a systematic review. A comprehensive search was conducted in order to identify all possible studies fulfilling the inclusion criteria. A study was included if: (1) any provocative test of the neck for diagnosing cervical radiculopathy was identified; (2) any reference standard was used; (3) sensitivity and specificity were reported or could be (re-)calculated; and, (4) the publication was a full report. Two reviewers independently selected studies, and assessed methodological quality. Only six studies met the inclusion criteria, which evaluated five provocative tests. In general, Spurling’s test demonstrated low to moderate sensitivity and high specificity, as did traction/neck distraction, and Valsalva’s maneuver. The upper limb tension test (ULTT) demonstrated high sensitivity and low specificity, while the shoulder abduction test demonstrated low to moderate sensitivity and moderate to high specificity. Common methodological flaws included lack of an optimal reference standard, disease progression bias, spectrum bias, and review bias. Limitations include few primary studies, substantial heterogeneity, and numerous methodological flaws among the studies; therefore, a meta-analysis was not conducted. This review suggests that, when consistent with the history and other physical findings, a positive Spurling’s, traction/neck distraction, and Valsalva’s might be indicative of a cervical radiculopathy, while a negative ULTT might be used to rule it out. However, the lack of evidence precludes any firm conclusions regarding their diagnostic value, especially when used in primary care. More high quality studies are necessary in order to resolve this issue. PMID:17013656

  2. FOXM1 induces a global methylation signature that mimics the cancer epigenome in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muy-Teck Teh

    Full Text Available The oncogene FOXM1 has been implicated in all major types of human cancer. We recently showed that aberrant FOXM1 expression causes stem cell compartment expansion resulting in the initiation of hyperplasia. We have previously shown that FOXM1 regulates HELLS, a SNF2/helicase involved in DNA methylation, implicating FOXM1 in epigenetic regulation. Here, we have demonstrated using primary normal human oral keratinocytes (NOK that upregulation of FOXM1 suppressed the tumour suppressor gene p16(INK4A (CDKN2A through promoter hypermethylation. Knockdown of HELLS using siRNA re-activated the mRNA expression of p16(INK4A and concomitant downregulation of two DNA methyltransferases DNMT1 and DNMT3B. The dose-dependent upregulation of endogenous FOXM1 (isoform B expression during tumour progression across a panel of normal primary NOK strains (n = 8, dysplasias (n = 5 and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC cell lines (n = 11 correlated positively with endogenous expressions of HELLS, BMI1, DNMT1 and DNMT3B and negatively with p16(INK4A and involucrin. Bisulfite modification and methylation-specific promoter analysis using absolute quantitative PCR (MS-qPCR showed that upregulation of FOXM1 significantly induced p16(INK4A promoter hypermethylation (10-fold, P<0.05 in primary NOK cells. Using a non-bias genome-wide promoter methylation microarray profiling method, we revealed that aberrant FOXM1 expression in primary NOK induced a global hypomethylation pattern similar to that found in an HNSCC (SCC15 cell line. Following validation experiments using absolute qPCR, we have identified a set of differentially methylated genes, found to be inversely correlated with in vivo mRNA expression levels of clinical HNSCC tumour biopsy samples. This study provided the first evidence, using primary normal human cells and tumour tissues, that aberrant upregulation of FOXM1 orchestrated a DNA methylation signature that mimics the cancer methylome

  3. Non-invasive diagnostic techniques in the diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warszawik-Hendzel, Olga; Olszewska, Małgorzata; Maj, Małgorzata; Rakowska, Adriana; Czuwara, Joanna; Rudnicka, Lidia

    2015-12-31

    Squamous cell carcinoma is the second most common cutaneous malignancy after basal cell carcinoma. Although the gold standard of diagnosis for squamous cell carcinoma is biopsy followed by histopathology evaluation, optical non-invasive diagnostic tools have obtained increased attention. Dermoscopy has become one of the basic diagnostic methods in clinical practice. The most common dermoscopic features of squamous cell carcinoma include clustered vascular pattern, glomerular vessels and hyperkeratosis. Under reflectance confocal microscopy, squamous cell carcinoma shows an atypical honeycomb or disarranged pattern of the spinous-granular layer of the epidermis, round nucleated bright cells in the epidermis and round vessels in the dermis. High frequency ultrasound and optical coherence tomography may be helpful in predominantly in pre-surgical evaluation of tumor size. Emerging non-invasive or minimal invasive techniques with possible application in the diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma of the skin, lip, oral mucosa, vulva or other tissues include high-definition optical coherence tomography, in vivo multiphoton tomography, direct oral microscopy, electrical impedance spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, elastic scattering spectroscopy, differential path-length spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and angle-resolved low coherence interferometry.

  4. Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) - detection of synchronous primaries with {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strobel, Klaus; Schrank, Madeleine; Soyka, Jan D.; Veit-Haibach, Patrick; Hany, Thomas F. [University Hospital Zurich, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Medical Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Haerle, Stephan K.; Stoeckli, Sandro J. [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2009-06-15

    The aim of the study was to evaluate {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT for the detection of synchronous primaries at initial staging of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). FDG-PET/CT images acquired between March 2001 and October 2007 in 589 consecutive patients (147 women, 442 men; mean age 61.5 years, age range 32-97 years) with proven HNSCC were reviewed for the presence of synchronous primaries. Cytology, histology and/or clinical and imaging follow-up served as reference standard. FDG-PET/CT showed 69 suspected synchronous primaries in 62 patients of which 56 were finally confirmed in 44 patients. Of the 56 second cancers, 46 (82%) were found in the aerodigestive tract in the following locations: lung (26, 46%), head and neck (15, 17%), oesophagus (5, 9%). Ten second cancers (18%) were located outside the aerodigestive tract (colon, five; stomach, lymphoma, breast, thymus and kidney, one each). Six patients had three synchronous primaries and three patients had four synchronous cancers. Nine synchronous cancers were not detected by PET/CT (four head and neck, two lung, two oesophageal, one gastric). False-positive PET/CT findings were mainly related to benign FDG uptake in the intestine due to benign or precancerous polyps or physiological FDG uptake in other head and neck regions. Overall the prevalence of synchronous second primaries according to the reference standard was 9.5%, of which 84% were detected with FDG-PET/CT. In 80% of the patients, therapy was changed because of the detection of a synchronous primary. FDG-PET/CT detects a considerable number of synchronous primaries (8.0% prevalence) at initial staging of patients with HNSCC. Synchronous cancers were predominantly located in the aerodigestive tract, primarily in the lung, head and neck and oesophagus. Detection of second primaries has an important impact on therapy. PET/CT should be performed before panendoscopy. (orig.)

  5. Urine steroid metabolomics as a novel diagnostic tool for early detection of recurrence in adrenocortical carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chortis, Vasileios; Bancos, Irina; Lang, Katharina; Hughes, Beverly A.; O'Neil, Donna M.; Taylor, Angela E.; Fassnacht, Martin; Bertherat, Jerome; Beuschlein, Felix; Quinkler, Marcus; Vassiliadi, Dimitri; Conall Dennedy, M; Mannelli, Massimo; Biehl, Michael; Arlt, Wiebke

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is an aggressive malignancy with a high rate of recurrence. Regular post-operative follow-up imaging is necessary, but associated with high radiation exposure and frequent diagnostic ambiguity. Urine steroid metabolomics has recently been introduced as a

  6. Cerebral metastases of endometrial carcinoma. Diagnostic and neurosurgical aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Sevyan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Central nervous system (CNS involvement by endometrial carcinoma is uncommon. Among 1710 patients registered for brain metastases at our institution between 1990 and 2012, 3 (0.18 % developed brain metastases. All lesions (1 multiple, 2 single were contrast enhancing on com- puted tomography scans, and were located in the cerebrum (lobus occipitalis in 2 cases. The CNS was the only site of detectable disease in 1 patient with recurrent disease. One patient received radiotherapy (survival, 3 months and two underwent surgical resection of solitary metas- tasis followed by radiotherapy (survival = 3 and 5 months and alive to the present. Prognosis of patients with CNS metastases from endometrial carcinoma appears poor; however, in a selected group of patients early diagnosis followed by multimodal treatment may result in a palliation of the disease.

  7. METASTATIC BREAST CARCINOMA WITH MULTIPLE OSTEOLYTIC LESIONS - A DIAGNOSTIC DILEMMA

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    Aruna

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Bone is one of the common sites for distant metastasis from breast cancer. About 6% - 10% of breast carcinomas have already spread to distant sites at the time of initial diagnosis. Presence of bone metastasis affects patient’s prognosis and the planning of treatment. We report a case of 32year old female who presented with a subtrochanteric fracture left femur and multiple osteolytic lesions throughout the axial skeleton leading to clinical suspicion of multiple myeloma. Hematological work up suggested a met astatic deposit. Subsequent detailed examination revealed a breast lump in right breast. On core biopsy it was diagnosed as duct cell carcinoma. This report addresses the role of bone marrow examination in arriving at a diagnosis in multiple osteolytic les ions which pose wide differential diagnoses

  8. Clinical Application of {sup 18}F-FDG PET in Head and Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Seung; Bae, Jin Ho [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    Head and neck cancer is the sixth most common type of human cancer worldwide. Squamous cell carcinoma is the most common cancer of the head and neck. Since {sup 18}F-FDG PET is very sensitive to detecting squamous cell carcinoma, it has been widely used in patients with head and neck cancers for initial staging, management of recurrent cancers, and therapeutic monitoring. According to clinical research data, {sup 18}F-FDG PET is expected to be a very helpful diagnostic tool in the management of head and neck cancer.

  9. Multiple primary melanomas versus single melanoma of the head and neck: a comparison of genetic, diagnostic, and therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollio, Annamaria; Tomasi, Aldo; Pellacani, Giovanni; Ruini, Cristel; Mandel, Victor D; Fortuna, Giulio; Seidenari, Stefania; Ponti, Giovanni

    2014-06-01

    Single primary and multiple primary melanomas (MPMs) of the head and neck region may be confused at first glance because of the common clinical and dermoscopic patterns. An inaccurate diagnosis may lead the clinician to a wrong diagnostic and therapeutic pathway because MPMs occurring in familial or sporadic settings are often involved in individual cancer susceptibility. We investigated the clinical, demographic, histological, and survival differences between MPMs and single melanoma occurring in the head and neck region. A retrospective analysis of medical and histologic records from 217 melanomas of the head and neck region was carried out. Malignant neoplasms affecting MPMs patients were also reported. Mutational analysis of specific genes was carried out when clinical data and family history were suggestive for a familial/hereditary setting. Two hundred and five out of 217 (94.5%) patients were affected by single primary melanoma and 12 (5.5%) by MPMs of the head and neck region. Individuals affected by MPMs were distinguished by a significantly higher mutation frequency and a higher prevalence of malignant neoplasms such as renal cancer. Genetic testing showed germline mutations affecting MITF E318K, CDKN2A genes. Our data highlight the importance of strict cancer surveillance in individuals with MPMs and the role of appropriate genetic counseling and testing in selected patients. Finally, personalized clinical and instrumental screening and follow-up strategies should also be based on mutational status. A heightened level of suspicion is required in the clinical management of mutation carriers.

  10. Distant Metastases in Head-and-Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao Min, E-mail: min.yao@uhhospitals.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States); Lu Minggen [School of Public Health, University of Nevada at Reno, Reno, NV (United States); Savvides, Panayiotis S. [Department of Medicine, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States); Rezaee, Rod; Zender, Chad A.; Lavertu, Pierre [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States); Buatti, John M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Machtay, Mitchell [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the pattern and risk factors for distant metastases in head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) after curative treatment with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective study of 284 HNSCC patients treated in a single institution with IMRT. Sites included were oropharynx (125), oral cavity (70), larynx (55), hypopharynx (17), and unknown primary (17). American Joint Committee on Cancer stage distribution includes I (3), II (19), III (42), and IV (203). There were 224 males and 60 females with a median age of 57. One hundred eighty-six patients were treated with definitive IMRT and 98 postoperative IMRT. One hundred forty-nine patients also received concurrent cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Results: The median follow-up for all patients was 22.8 months (range, 0.07-77.3 months) and 29.5 months (4.23-77.3 months) for living patients. The 3-year local recurrence-free survival, regional recurrence-free survival, locoregional recurrence-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, and overall survival were 94.6%, 96.4%, 92.5%, 84.1%, and 68.95%, respectively. There were 45 patients with distant metastasis. In multivariate analysis, distant metastasis was strongly associated with N stage (p = 0.046), T stage (p < 0.0001), and pretreatment maximum standardized uptake value of the lymph node (p = 0.006), but not associated with age, gender, disease sites, pretreatment standardized uptake value of the primary tumor, or locoregional control. The freedom from distant metastasis at 3 years was 98.1% for no factors, 88.6% for one factor, 68.3% for two factors, and 41.7% for three factors (p < 0.0001 by log-rank test). Conclusion: With advanced radiation techniques and concurrent chemotherapy, the failure pattern has changed with more patients failing distantly. The majority of patients with distant metastases had no local or regional failures, indicating that these patients might have microscopic distant

  11. Tyrosine kinase domain mutations of EGFR gene in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vatte C

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Chittibabu Vatte,1 Ali M Al Amri,2 Cyril Cyrus,1 Shahanas Chathoth,1 Sadananda Acharya,3 Tariq Mohammad Hashim,4 Zhara Al Ali,2 Saleh Tawfeeq Alshreadah,2 Ahmed Alsayyah,4 Amein K Al-Ali5 1Department of Genetic Research, Institute for Research and Medical Consultation, University of Dammam, Dammam, 2Department of Internal Medicine, King Fahd Hospital of the University, University of Dammam, Al-Khobar, 3Department of Stemcell Research, Institute for Research and Medical Consultation, 4Department of Pathology, King Fahd Hospital of the University, University of Dammam, Al-Khobar, 5Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, University of Dammam, Dammam, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Background: Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR is a commonly altered gene that is identified in various cancers, including head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC. Therefore, EGFR is a promising molecular marker targeted by monoclonal antibodies and small molecule inhibitors targeting the tyrosine kinase (TK domain. Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate the spectrum of mutations in exons 18, 19, 20, and 21 of the EGFR gene in HNSCC patients. Materials and methods: This retrospective study included 47 confirmed HNSCC cases. Mutations in the TK domain, exons 18, 19, 20, and 21 of the EGFR gene, were detected by Scorpion® chemistry and ARMS® technologies on Rotor-Gene Q real-time polymerase chain reaction.Results: The tumors exhibited EGFR-TK domain mutations in 57% of cases. Four cases of T790M mutations were reported for the first time among HNSCC patients. Out of the total mutations, L861Q (exon 21, exon 20 insertions and deletions of exon 19 accounted for the majority of mutations (21%, 19%, and 17%, respectively. EGFR mutation status was correlated with the higher grade (P=0.026 and advanced stage (P=0.034 of HNSCC tumors.Conclusion: Higher frequency of EGFR-TK domain mutations together with the presence of the T790M mutation suggests

  12. Treatment of Elderly Patients with Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Szturz

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The demographics of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN is marked by a growing number of patients aged 65 and over, which is in line with global projections for other cancer types. In developed countries, more than half of new SCCHN cases are diagnosed in older people and in 15 years from now, the proportion is expected to rise by more than 10%. Still, a high-level evidence-based consensus to guide the clinical decision process is strikingly lacking. The available data from retrospective studies and subset analyses of prospective trials suffer from a considerable underrepresentation of senior participants. The situation is even more challenging in the recurrent and/or metastatic setting, where usually only palliative measures are employed. Nevertheless, it is becoming clear that if treated irrespective of chronological age, fit elderly patients in a good general condition and with a low burden of comorbidities may derive a similar survival advantage as their younger counterparts. Despite that, under-treatment represents a widespread phenomenon and together with competing non-cancer mortality is suggested to be an important cause of the worse treatment outcomes observed in this population. Due to physiological changes in drug metabolism occurring with advancing age, the major concerns relate to chemotherapy administration. In locally advanced SCCHN, concurrent chemoradiotherapy in patients over 70 years remains a point of controversy owing to its possibly higher toxicity and questionable benefit. However, accumulating evidence suggests that it should, indeed, be considered in selected cases when biological age is taken into account. Results from a randomised trial conducted in lung cancer showed that treatment selection based on a comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA significantly reduced toxicity. However, a CGA is time-consuming and not necessary for all patients. To overcome this hurdle, geriatric screening tools have been

  13. Distinct effects of alcohol consumption and smoking on genetic alterations in head and neck carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuyoshi Urashima

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tobacco and alcohol consumption are risk factors for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC. Recently, whole-exome sequencing clarified that smoking increased TP53 and other mutations in HNSCC; however, the effects of alcohol consumption on these genetic alterations remain unknown. We explored the association between alcohol consumption and somatic copy-number alterations (SCNAs across the whole genome in human papillomavirus (HPV-negative HNSCCs, and compared with the effects of smoking on genetic alterations. METHODS: SCNA and TP53 mutations in tumor samples were examined by high-resolution comparative genomic hybridization microarray 180K and by direct sequencing, respectively, and statistically analyzed for associations with alcohol consumption and smoking during the 20 years preceding diagnosis of HNSCC. Probes with a corrected p-value (=q-value less than 0.05 and fold change greater than 1.2 or less than -1.2 were considered statistically significant. RESULTS: A total of 248 patients with HNSCC were enrolled. In the HPV-negative patients (n=221, heavy alcohol consumption was significantly associated with SCNAs of oncogenes/oncosuppressors that were previously reported to occur frequently in HNSCCs: CDKN2A (q=0.005, FHIT (q=0.005, 11q13 region including CCND1, FADD and CTTN (q=0.005, ERBB2 (HER2 (q=0.009, 3q25-qter including CCNL1, TP63, DCUN1D1 and PIK3CA (q=0.014, and CSMD1 (q=0.019. But, TP53 mutations were not affected. In contrast, smoking was associated with increased risk of TP53 mutations, but did not induce any significant SCNAs of oncogenes/oncosuppressors. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that both alcohol consumption and smoking had distinct effects on genetic alterations in HNSCCs. Heavy alcohol consumption may trigger previously known and unknown SCNAs, but may not induce TP53 mutation. In contrast, smoking may induce TP53 mutation, but may not trigger any SCNAs.

  14. The optimal use of granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor in radiation induced mucositis in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patni Nidhi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Evaluation of response of granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF on acute radiation toxicity profile in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Thirty three patients with proven stage I or II head & neck carcinoma received conventional external beam radiation therapy. Out of these, six patients received postoperative adjuvant therapy while remaining 27 received definitive RT. Patients were given 100 mcg GM-CSF subcutaneously per day along with radiation after they developed grade 2 mucositis and /or grade 2 dysphagia and / or complained of moderate pain. GM-CSF was administered till there was a subjective relief or objective response. Patients were evaluated for oral ulceration, swallowing status, pain and weight loss. Response to the treatment and patient outcome was assessed. Results: There was a decreased severity of mucositis and dysphagia in the evaluated patients. None of the patients suffered severe pain or required opioids. The mean weight loss was only 1.94%. Minimal side effects were experienced with GM-CSF. Conclusions: GM-CSF reduces the severity of acute side effects of radiation therapy thereby allowing completion of the treatment without interruption. Its remarkable response needs to be evaluated further in large randomized trials. The time of initiation and cessation of GM-CSF during radiation therapy and the required dose needs to be established.

  15. A phase II study of concomitant boost radiation plus concurrent weekly cisplatin for locally advanced unresectable head and neck carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, José Antonio; Rueda, Antonio; de Pasos, Antonio Sacchetti; Contreras, Jorge; Cobo, Manuel; Moreno, Paloma; Benavides, Manuel; Villanueva, Asunción; Alba, Emilio

    2006-04-01

    This phase II study evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of weekly cisplatin along with concomitant boost accelerated radiation regimen in patients with locally advanced unresectable head and neck carcinoma. A total of 94 patients (median age, 58 years) with UICC stage III (n = 19) and IV (n = 75) cancer of the oropharynx, larynx, hypopharynx and oral cavity were included. Patients received radiotherapy with a concomitant boost scheme (1.8 Gy on days 1-40 and 1.5 Gy boost on days 25-40 with a total dose of 72 Gy) and concurrent cisplatin, 40 mg/m(2) weekly, for the first 4 weeks. Most patients (95%) received both radiation and chemotherapy according to protocol. Toxicity was manageable with grade III mucositis and pharyngeal-oesophageal toxicity in 85 and 50% of patients, respectively. Haematological toxicity was mild. Four patients (4%) died due to complications. With a median follow of 41 months, median overall survival and time to progression were 27 and 25 months, respectively. The estimated overall survival at 4 years was 41%. Concomitant boost accelerated radiation plus concurrent weekly cisplatin is a feasible schedule in patients with locally advanced unresectable head and neck carcinoma, with acceptable toxicity and survival data.

  16. Definitive radiotherapy for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: update and perspectives on the basis of EBM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodaira, Takeshi; Nishimura, Yasumasa; Kagami, Yoshikazu; Ito, Yoshinori; Shikama, Naoto; Ishikura, Satoshi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2015-03-01

    Radiotherapy plays an essential role in the management of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Radiotherapy has a distinct advantage over surgical procedures in that it could achieve organ and function preservation with an efficacy similar to that of surgical series. To improve the clinical outcomes achievable by radiotherapy, altered fractionated radiotherapy has been prospectively tested for early and intermediate risk diseases, and was previously shown to be beneficial for local control and survival. Radiotherapy alone is insufficient for locally advanced disease; therefore, concurrent chemoradiotherapy is typically performed and plays an important role. A meta-analysis (Level Ia) revealed that the concurrent use of platinum agents appeared to improve tumor control and survival; however, this was accompanied by increases in the rates of both acute and late toxicities. Regarding radiation techniques, intensity modulated radiotherapy evolved in the 1990s, and has been globally used to treat head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients. Intensity modulated radiotherapy reduces the exposure of normal tissue to radiation while preserving excellent dose coverage to the target volume; therefore, the rate of late toxicities especially xerostomia is minimized. Small size randomized studies and a meta-analysis have provided evidence to support the benefits of intensity modulated radiotherapy over two-dimensional or three-dimensional radiation therapy. Intensity modulated radiotherapy can also preserve quality of life following definitive chemoradiotherapy. Further improvements using intensity modulated proton therapy are warranted. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Tumour-specific PI3K inhibition via nanoparticle-targeted delivery in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizrachi, Aviram; Shamay, Yosi; Shah, Janki; Brook, Samuel; Soong, Joanne; Rajasekhar, Vinagolu K.; Humm, John L.; Healey, John H.; Powell, Simon N.; Baselga, José; Heller, Daniel A.; Haimovitz-Friedman, Adriana; Scaltriti, Maurizio

    2017-01-01

    Alterations in PIK3CA, the gene encoding the p110α subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3Kα), are frequent in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. Inhibitors of PI3Kα show promising activity in various cancer types, but their use is curtailed by dose-limiting side effects such as hyperglycaemia. In the present study, we explore the efficacy, specificity and safety of the targeted delivery of BYL719, a PI3Kα inhibitor currently in clinical development in solid tumours. By encapsulating BYL719 into P-selectin-targeted nanoparticles, we achieve specific accumulation of BYL719 in the tumour milieu. This results in tumour growth inhibition and radiosensitization despite the use of a sevenfold lower dose of BYL719 compared with oral administration. Furthermore, the nanoparticles abrogate acute and chronic metabolic side effects normally observed after BYL719 treatment. These findings offer a novel strategy that could potentially enhance the efficacy of PI3Kα inhibitors while mitigating dose-limiting toxicity in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. PMID:28194032

  18. E-cadherin expression and prognosis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: evidence from 19 published investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ren X

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Xusheng Ren,1,2 Jianning Wang,2 Xuefen Lin,1,3 Xuxia Wang1,3 1Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Stomatological Hospital of Shandong University, 2Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Jinan Stomatological Hospital, 3Shandong Province Key Laboratory of Oral Tissue Regeneration, Stomatological Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong Province, People’s Republic of China Objective: The objective of this study was to review the published literature and investigate whether E-cadherin gene is a prognostic factor in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma by conducting a meta-analysis.Methods: Studies were identified from the databases Embase, Medline, and Cochrane Library by using the keywords “E-cadherin gene” and “head and neck cancer”. Overall survival (OS and disease-free survival (DFS were the primary outcome measurements.Results: Our literature review identified 1,458 articles; 19 studies with a total number of 2,012 cases were eligible for inclusion in the meta-analysis. The hazard ratio (HR for OS of patients with decreased expression of E-cadherin gene was 0.57 (95% CI =0.37, 0.89; P=0.000. However, statistical heterogeneity was unacceptably high (I2=74.5%, P=0.000. After sensitivity analysis, heterogeneity became acceptable, and the effect measure was still significant (I2=7.0%; HR =0.52; 95% CI =0.40, 0.66; P=0.000. The HR for DFS was 0.53 (95% CI =0.42, 0.67; P=0.000.Conclusion: This meta-analysis showed clear evidence that high E-cadherin gene expression is a positive prognostic factor of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, resulting in better OS and DFS. However, this conclusion must be interpreted with caution due to a few limitations. Keywords: E-cadherin gene, prognosis, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, immunohistochemistry 

  19. Diagnostic Biomarkers in Oral Verrucous Carcinoma: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinpour, Sepanta; Mashhadiabbas, Fatemeh; Ahsaie, Mitra Ghazizadeh

    2017-01-01

    Oral verrucous carcinoma (OVC), a low-grade variant of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), is most frequently seen in the oral cavity. No clear etiology has been found for this lesion, but human papilloma virus, chewing betel nuts, and ultraviolet radiation are suggested as probable causes. Differential diagnosis of OVC is challenging for oral pathologists. The aim of this study was to review the molecular-based approaches for differential diagnosis of OVC. An electronic search was conducted in Medline and Scopus from January 2004 to July 2015 limited to English language publications. Published papers on verrucous carcinoma (VC) were found according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria and analyzed qualitatively. Data extraction were performed according to PRISMA statement. A total of 423 articles were reviewed; out of which, 26 articles completely fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Most of the included studies investigated proliferative and apoptotic biomarkers such as p53 and Ki67. No definite conclusion was drawn for cytoskeletal biomarkers due to variability of factors and lack of significant expression. However, it seems that cytokeratin10 (CK 10) can be useful for differentiation of OVC and benign squamous lesions. Among cell surface and extracellular matrix biomarkers tissue biomarkers, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, -9, CD31 and CD68 seem to be useful for differentiation of OVC and OSCC and glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1) can help in differentiation of OVC from oral epithelial dysplasia. Differences among OVC, OSCC and normal epithelium in expression profiles of the investigated biomarkers help in their differential diagnosis; although, clinicohistopathological similarities among verrucous hyperplasia, noninvasive OVC and invasive well-differentiated OSCC make the diagnosis difficult. Further studies are required to better differentiate these oral lesions.

  20. Enhanced skin toxicity with concomitant cetuximab and radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bujor, L.; Grillo, I.M.; Pimentel, N. [Hospital Santa Maria, Radioterapia, Lisboa (Portugal); Macor, C.; Catarina, M. [Hospital Santa Maria, ORL, Lisboa (Portugal); Ribeiro, L. [Hospital Santa Maria, Oncologia, Lisboa (Portugal)

    2009-10-15

    Purpose: When associated with radiotherapy the monoclonal antibodies such as cetuximab might be exacerbate skin toxicity. The aim of this study was to retrospectively analyze acute dermatological toxicity in ten consecutive patients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma treated from march 2008 to May 2009 according to Bonner protocol. Patients and methods: We have treated with radiotherapy and cetuximab ten patients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx, hypopharynx, larynx or oral cavity, stage 3-4B and non metastatic. All our patients were 3D planned and scheduled for conventional fractionation 70 Gy/35 fractions over 47 days, five days weekly. Uninvolved neck received 50 Gy and gross nodal disease received 70 Gy as the primary tumor. Cetuximab was administered one week before radiotherapy at a loading dose of 400 mg per square meter of body surface area over 120 minutes, followed by weekly 60 minutes infusions at 250 mg per square meter for the duration of radiotherapy. Results: In eight patients (80%) grade 3 radiation dermatitis occurred as early as with 28 Gy at a median dose of 42 Gy (range 28-60 Gy). the median radiotherapy dose was 6 Gy with an overall treatment time of 57.7 days (range 41-70 days). were administered 78 cycles of cetuximab, one patient discontinued after five cycles due to infusion reactions. There was no correlation between toxicity and acne-like rash due to cetuximab. Conclusion: Our results albeit in disagreement with the original study are rather similar with the experience of other European centers that encounter grade 3-4 radiation dermatitis in 49% of their patients or Australian centers that reported 79% of same degree of toxicity. (authors)

  1. CELECOXIB - Chemoradiation therapy for reducing mucositis and other acute side effects in advance head and neck carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izadi Sh

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Chemo-radiotherapy-induced oral mucositis represents a therapeutic challenge frequently encountered in cancer patients. This side effect causes significant morbidity and may delay or interruption of treatment plan, cyclo-oxygenase 2 (COX2 is an inducible enzyme primarily expressed in inflamed and tumoral tissues. COX-2 inhibitors have shown promise to reduce chemoradiation induce toxicities. We conducted a phase III, randomized double blind clinical trial to evaluate the toxicity and efficacy of celecoxib, a selective COX2 inhibitor, administered concurrently with chemoradiation for locally advanced head and neck cancer. Here in we report the first report about the role of COX-2 inhibitor in acute toxicicities. "nMethods: Patients with stage III/IV (locally advance head and neck carcinoma who referred to department of radiation-oncology were eligible. Patients were treated with chemotherapy with cisplatin concurrently with radiation (60-70Gy. Celecoxib (100mg qid was started at the first day of radiotherapy and was given for a total of 8 weeks. Acute toxicities were evaluated every week by WHO scale. "nResults: One hundred twenty two patients were enrolled into the study, (61 patients for each group. In repeated mesurment analysis of variance there is a significant difference in the time of onset of grade II acute toxicities between the two groups; The mucositis, dysphagia, epidermitis and oral pain score changed significantly over the typical five weeks in two groups but these changes were more sever in placebo group (p=0.0001. In the analysis of the overall changes in the following laboratory parame-ters: WBC, hemoglobin and platelet showed that these parameters decreased over time in both groups without a significant difference between groups. "nConclusion: The results of these study showed that the use of a COX-2 inhibitor (celecoxib that is a safe and inexpensive drug may reduce acute toxicities of chemoradiation specially

  2. Human papillomavirus, p16, and epidermal growth factor receptor biomarkers and CT perfusion values in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoefling, N L; McHugh, J B; Light, E; Kumar, B; Walline, H; Prince, M; Bradford, C; Carey, T E; Mukherji, S K

    2013-05-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma tumors positive for laboratory biomarkers hrHPV and p16 and negative for EGFR often respond better to nonsurgical organ-preservation therapy than hrHPV-negative, p16-negative, and EGFR overexpressing tumors. CTP has been shown to distinguish which locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinomas will respond to induction chemotherapy or chemoradiation. Our purpose was to determine whether a relationship exists between CTP measures and the expression of these laboratory biomarkers, because both appear to separate head and neck squamous cell carcinoma tumors into similar groups. We conducted an institutional review board-approved, Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant retrospective review of head and neck CTP in 25 patients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma who had signed informed consent. Eight women and 17 men, 41-80 years of age, constituted a pretreatment group of 18 patients and a palliative group of 7 patients. Tumor biopsy samples were analyzed for overexpression of hrHPV, p16, and EGFR. The hrHPV, p16, and EGFR status of the tumors was correlated with CTP parameters (MTT, BV, BF, CP) by using the Wilcoxon evaluation and Fischer exact test. There were significantly lower CP values in pretreatment tumors overexpressing EGFR (P = .04). CP values ≤17.23 were significantly correlated with EGFR overexpression (P = .015). A trend toward higher CP values was present in hrHPV-positive and p16-overexpressing pretreatment tumors (P = .14). A significant correlation exists between CTP measures and EGFR overexpression in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas, suggesting an association between certain imaging findings and molecular biomarkers. These results may be related to a tumor cell survival mechanism linking perfusion and biomarker expression.

  3. Management in non-traumatic arm, neck and shoulder complaints: differences between diagnostic groups

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    textabstractArm, neck and/or shoulder complaints are common in western societies. In the Netherlands, general practice guidelines are issued on shoulder pain and epicondylitis only. Little is known about actual management of the total range of diagnoses. The objectives of the study are: to determine management in patients consulting the GP with a new episode of non-traumatic arm neck and shoulder complaints up to 6 months after the first consultation. To evaluate differences in management bet...

  4. Cisplatin, Radiation Therapy, and Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-16

    Stage III Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  5. Metal concentrations in hair of patients with various head and neck cancers as a diagnostic aid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozniak, Anna; Napierala, Marta; Golasik, Magdalena; Herman, Małgorzata; Walas, Stanisław; Piekoszewski, Wojciech; Szyfter, Witold; Szyfter, Krzysztof; Golusinski, Wojciech; Baralkiewicz, Danuta; Florek, Ewa

    2016-02-01

    Head and neck cancers are one of the most frequent cancers worldwide. This paper attempts to evaluate disturbances of homeostasis of the necessary elements (calcium, magnesium, zinc, copper, iron, manganese) and changes in the levels of toxic metals (lead, cadmium, cobalt, chromium VI) in hair of patients with head and neck cancers, as well as people without a diagnosed neoplastic disease. In order to quantify the necessary elements and toxic metals, a method using ICP-MS and ICP-OES techniques had been developed and validated. The studies have shown that patients with head and neck cancer used to drink alcohol and smoked much more frequently than healthy individuals, both in the past and presently. Statistically significant differences in concentrations of average metal content in the group of patients with head and neck cancers compared to the control group were confirmed. Significant differences in metal content between the group of patients with head and neck cancers and healthy individuals were found which enabled distinguishing between the study groups. To this end, a more advanced statistical tool, i.e. chemometrics, was used. The conducted research analyses and the use of advanced statistical techniques confirm the benefits of using alternative material to distinguish the patients with head and neck cancers from the healthy individuals.

  6. Indication of lower neck irradiation in nasopharyngeal carcinoma without nodal metastasis: the potential impact of tumor volume

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Jie; ZHOU Jia-yin; Vincent FH CHONG; James BK Khoo

    2013-01-01

    Background Elective radiation of lower neck is controversial for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) without lymph node metastasis (N0 disease).Tumor volume is an important prognostic indicator.The objective of this study is to explore the potential impact of tumor volume on the indication of the lower neck irradiation for N0-NPC,by a qualitative evaluation of the relationship between tumor volume and nodal metastasis.Methods Magnetic resonance (MR) images of 99 consecutive patients with NPC who underwent treatment were retrospectively reviewed.Primary tumor volumes of NPC were semi-automatically measured,nodal metastases were N-classified and neck level involvements were examined.Distributions of tumor volumes among N-category-based groups and distributions of N-categories among tumor volume-based groups were analyzed,respectively.Results The numbers of patients with N0 to N3 disease were 12,39,32,and 16,respectively.The volumes of primary tumor were from 3.3 to 89.6 ml,with a median of 17.1 ml.For patients with nodal metastasis,tumor volume did not increase significantly with the advancing of N-category (P >0.05).No significant difference was found for the distribution of N1,N2,and N3 categories among tumor volume-based groups (P >0.05).Nevertheless patients with nodal metastasis had significantly larger tumor volumes than those without metastasis (P <0.05).Patients with larger tumor volumes were associated with an increased incidence of nodal metastasis.Conclusions Certain positive correlations existed between tumor volume and the presence of nodal metastasis.The tumor volume (>10 ml) is a potential indicator for the lower neck irradiation for N0-NPC.

  7. Diagnostic Consideration for Sinonasal Wegener's Granulomatosis Clinically Mistaken for Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Rosa, Cristina; Emmanuele, Carmela; Tranchina, Maria Grazia; Ippolito, Massimo; Cosentino, Sebastiano; Saita, Vincenzo; Fraggetta, Filippo

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of Wegener's granulomatosis clinically mistaken for carcinoma in a 21-year-old girl presenting with an ulcerated mass of the nasopharynx associated with enlarged laterocervical nodes. The lesion was clinically suspected as malignant on the basis of clinical and radiological findings (namely, computed tomography scan and positron emission tomography). However, multiple biopsies were not conclusive for malignancy showing histological change suggestive of Wegener's granulomatosis. A serum determination of cANCA supported the diagnosis of Wegener's granulomatosis. Clinical findings and image studies suggested an erroneous diagnosis of malignancy whereas a definitive diagnosis of Wegener's granulomatosis was achieved only after repeated biopsies thus leading to a correct therapeutic approach. The Wegener granulomatosis must be added to the list of the differential diagnoses of the masses of the nasopharynx associated with or without enlarged laterocervical nodes. PMID:24106630

  8. A "package solution" fast track program can reduce the diagnostic waiting time in head and neck cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jesper Roed; Johansen, Jørgen; Gano, Lars;

    2014-01-01

    In 2007, a fast track program for patients with suspicion of head and neck cancer (HNC) was introduced in Denmark to reduce unnecessary waiting time. The program was based on so called "package solutions" including pre-booked slots for outpatient evaluation, imaging, and diagnostic surgical...... the introduction, and the third interval represents the current situation. The median time from referral to first consultation was reduced from eight calendar days in group 1 to only one day in groups 2 and 3 (p ...

  9. SALL4 represents fetal gut differentiation of gastric cancer, and is diagnostically useful in distinguishing hepatoid gastric carcinoma from hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushiku, Tetsuo; Shinozaki, Aya; Shibahara, Junji; Iwasaki, Yoshiaki; Tateishi, Yoko; Funata, Nobuaki; Fukayama, Masashi

    2010-04-01

    The novel stem cell marker SALL4 has been identified as a diagnostic marker of germ cell tumors, especially yolk sac tumors, in gonadal organs. To clarify the significance of SALL4 as an oncofetal protein, we investigated SALL4 expression by immunohistochemistry in non-neoplastic stomach and gastric carcinoma with particular emphasis on á-fetoprotein (AFP)-producing gastric carcinoma, as AFP-producing gastric carcinoma shares expression of AFP and glypican 3 (GPC3) with yolk sac tumors and hepatic neoplasms. A total of 338 gastric carcinomas, 60 hepatocellular carcinomas, and 48 cholangiocellular carcinomas were studied by immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays. In addition, more detailed whole tissue section immunohistochemistry was performed on non-neoplastic gastric tissue from 5 adult and 8 fetal specimens, 6 hepatoblastomas, and 31 cases of AFP-producing gastric carcinomas. SALL4 expression was observed in the neofetal stomach in gestational week 9 and disappeared thereafter. It was also identified by tissue microarray study in a fraction of gastric carcinomas (51 of 338, 15%), associated with older age (P=0.0001), male sex (P=0.0033), intestinal-type histology (P=0.0001), and synchronous liver metastasis (P=0.0047). AFP and GPC3 were closely associated with SALL4 expression in gastric carcinoma (both, Pgastric carcinoma with diffuse staining in 24 cases (78%). Diffuse SALL4 expression was observed in the histologic patterns of hepatoid (89%), glandular (57%), and clear cell (39%) AFP-producing gastric carcinoma. In addition, SALL4 expression was completely negative in hepatoblastoma (n=6) and hepatocellular carcinoma (n=60). SALL4 is an oncofetal protein similar to AFP and GPC3, but it represents fetal gut differentiation in gastric carcinoma. SALL4 is a sensitive marker for AFP-producing gastric carcinoma and is especially useful to distinguish hepatoid gastric carcinoma from hepatocellular carcinoma.

  10. Correlation of human papillomavirus status with apparent diffusion coefficient of diffusion-weighted MRI in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, Juliette P; van Bemmel, Xander; van Kempen, Pauline M. W.; Janssen, Luuk M; Terhaard, Chris H J; Pameijer, Frank A; Willems, Stefan M.; Stegeman, Inge; Grolman, Wilko; Philippens, Marielle E P

    2016-01-01

    Background Identification of prognostic patient characteristics in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is of great importance. Human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive HNSCCs have favorable response to (chemo)radiotherapy. Apparent diffusion coefficient, derived from diffusion-weighted MRI, has

  11. Risk-group definition by recursive partitioning analysis of patients with squamous cell head and neck carcinoma treated with surgery and postoperative radiotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langendijk, JA; Slotman, BJ; van der Waal, [No Value; Doornaert, P; Berkof, J; Leemans, CR

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND. The objective of this study was to define different prognostic groups with regard to locoregional control (LRC) derived from recursive partitioning analysis (RPA). METHODS. Eight hundred one patients with squamous cell head and neck carcinoma underwent with primary surgery and received p

  12. FAZA PET/CT hypoxia imaging in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck treated with radiotherapy: Results from the DAHANCA 24 trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Lise Saksø; Johansen, Jørgen; Kallehauge, Jesper Folsted

    2012-01-01

    Hypoxia is a cause of resistance to radiotherapy, especially in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). The purpose of this study was to evaluate (18)F-fluoroazomycin arabinoside (FAZA) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) hypoxia imaging as a prognostic...

  13. Bronchial Brushing Increases the Diagnostic Yield of Fiberoptic Bronchoscopy in Bronchogenic Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Recep Bedir

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The importance of rapid and accurate cytopathological diagnosis in bronchial cancers is increasing due to advances in treatment modalities.Aims: We evaluated the diagnostic methods and cytologic subtypes of bronchial cancers to determine the diagnostic reliability of different bronchoscopic techniques.Material and methods: Retrospective data were obtained from the hospital files and pathological specimens of the patients with diagnosis of primary lung cancer from a period of 36 months. Cytological tumor typing was determined using histopathology of bronchoscopic forceps biopsy (FB, bronchial-bronchoalveolar lavage (BL, bronchial brushing (BB, transbronchial fine-needle biopsy. Computed tomography or ultrasonography guided transthoracic biopsy and surgical biopsies were used where the other interventional methods were inadequate for diagnosis.Results: A total of 124 patients were diagnosed during study period. 119 (96% of them were male. The median age was 68, ranging between 36 and 88 years. Histopathologic subtypes were determined as non-small cell carcinoma (NSCC in 104 (83.9%, squamous cell carcinoma in 64 (51.6%, adenocarcinoma in 16 (12.9%, NSCC not otherwise specified in 24 (19.3% and small cell carcinoma in 20 (16.1% patients. The combination of FB, BL and BB established the diagnosis of bronchogenic carcinoma in most of the cases (92.6%.Conclusions: Lung cancer is seen commonly in elderly male patients with smoking history and squamous cell carcinoma is the most common cytologic type. High diagnostic accuracy can be achieved by a combination of bronchoscopic FB, BB and BL procedures. Keywords: Bronchoscopy; Lung cancer; Bronchial brushing

  14. Prognostic microRNA signatures derived from The Cancer Genome Atlas for head and neck squamous cell carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Nathan; Khwaja, Shariq S; Baker, Callie M; Gay, Hiram A; Thorstad, Wade L; Daly, Mackenzie D; Lewis, James S; Wang, Xiaowei

    2016-07-01

    Identification of novel prognostic biomarkers typically requires a large dataset which provides sufficient statistical power for discovery research. To this end, we took advantage of the high-throughput data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) to identify a set of prognostic biomarkers in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) including oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) and other subtypes. In this study, we analyzed miRNA-seq data obtained from TCGA patients to identify prognostic biomarkers for OPSCC. The identified miRNAs were further tested with an independent cohort. miRNA-seq data from TCGA was also analyzed to identify prognostic miRNAs in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC). Our study identified that miR-193b-3p and miR-455-5p were positively associated with survival, and miR-92a-3p and miR-497-5p were negatively associated with survival in OPSCC. A combined expression signature of these four miRNAs was prognostic of overall survival in OPSCC, and more importantly, this signature was validated in an independent OPSCC cohort. Furthermore, we identified four miRNAs each in OSCC and LSCC that were prognostic of survival, and combined signatures were specific for subtypes of HNSCC. A robust 4-miRNA prognostic signature in OPSCC, as well as prognostic signatures in other subtypes of HNSCC, was developed using sequencing data from TCGA as the primary source. This demonstrates the power of using TCGA as a potential resource to develop prognostic tools for improving individualized patient care. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Diagnostic laparoscopy and laparoscopic ultrasonography with local anesthesia in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mariano Gómez-Rubio; Mercedes Moya-Valdés; Jesús García

    2005-01-01

    Diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), a common digestive malignancy, remains a challenge. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of performing laparoscopy and laparoscopic ultrasound with local anesthesia as a diagnostic procedure in HCC. Laparoscopy and laparoscopic ultrasound with local anesthesia was performed in the gastrointestinal endoscopy unit in three patients diagnosed of HCC. Endoscopy staged diffuse liver disease. Laparoscopic ultrasonography identified all liver tumors not visible during endoscopy and guided needle biopsy in one case. No complications happened. In conclusion, laparoscopy and laparoscopic ultrasound,performed as a minimally invasive diagnostic procedure can be a safe and very promising tool in planning therapy of HCC.

  16. Recent advances of novel targeted therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jed A. Katzel

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Targeted therapies have proven beneficial for patients suffering from a number of different malignancies, including cancers of the head and neck. Cetuximab, a monoclonal antibody targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor has shown benefit in combination with radiation for untreated patients or as a single agent for patients with platinum resistant disease. Cetuximab is the only targeted agent currently approved by the Federal Drug Administration for the treatment of head and neck cancer. A number of other agents have shown promising initial results including intracellular tyrosine kinase inhibitors, agents targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, as well as other classes of novel therapies. Some of the data supporting the use of targeted therapy, including agents not yet approved in head and neck cancer, will be presented in this review. As our understanding of the cancer cell signaling pathways and novel targeted agents increases, the potential for treatment with reduced toxicity and improved clinical outcomes will become a reality.

  17. [Preoperative MRI diagnostics of the topographic features of neck arteries in the patients presenting with chronic tonsillitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryukov, A I; Tsarapkin, G Yu; Ivanchikov, A A; Tovmasyan, A S; Kolbanova, I G; Arzamazov, S G; Panasov, S A; Gorovaya, E V; Kakorin, A S

    The objective of the present study was to determine the frequency of abnormalities of the major neck vessels and elucidate the specific features of blood supply of palatine tonsil based on the results of MRI performed in the vasculature-targeting regimen. A total of 109 patients presenting with chronic tonsillitis (including 64 women and 45 men at the age varying from 15 to 54 years) were available for the examination. All the patients underwent the MRI diagnostic study of the neck vessels by way of the preliminary evaluation of their condition at the pre-hospital stage. Abnormalities in the internal carotid artery were documented in 11.9% of the cases (including C- and S-shaped tortuosity of internal carotid artery in 6.88%, kinking and coiling of internal carotid artery in 4.13% and 0.92% of the patients, respectively). The majority of the detected abnormalities were located above the upper pole of the palatine tonsil which allowed to avoid the risk of the injury to the main neck vessels and prevented possible hemorrhage. One patient (0.46%) presented with kinking of the right internal carotid artery located in the immediate proximity to the capsule of the palatine tonsil close to its mid-third portion. There was no evidence that the present study gave rise to any malformation of the internal carotid artery and internal jugular vein. The proposed diagnostic method makes it possible to detect a rare anatomical feature of the development of the internal carotid artery discovered in a single patient (0.04%) out of the 2398 operated ones. This finding is of clinical significance and needs to be borne in mind when preparing the planned surgical intervention for the treatment of chronic tonsillitis. The results of the present study should be taken into consideration when prescribing the surgical treatment to the patients suffering not only from chronic tonsillitis but also from other ENT diseases, in the first place pharyngotympanic tube pathology.

  18. Optimised PET reconstruction of the head and neck area: improved diagnostic accuracy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogel, W.V.; Wensing, B.M.; Dalen, J.A. van; Krabbe, P.F.M.; Hoogen, F.J.A. van den; Oyen, W.J.G.

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: Reconstruction parameters are an important factor in PET image quality. In the head and neck area, where the level of photon attenuation is relatively low, standard whole-body reconstruction (SWR) parameters may lead to suboptimal results. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impac

  19. Optimised PET reconstruction of the head and neck area : improved diagnostic accuracy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogel, Wouter V; Wensing, Bart M; van Dalen, Jorn A; Krabbe, Paul F M; van den Hoogen, Frank J A; Oyen, Wim J G

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: Reconstruction parameters are an important factor in PET image quality. In the head and neck area, where the level of photon attenuation is relatively low, standard whole-body reconstruction (SWR) parameters may lead to suboptimal results. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impac

  20. [Chondrosarcoma of the femur neck simulating a normal variant. A difficult diagnostic pitfall].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerais, J M; Baudrillard, J C; Hulin, P H; Laredo, J D; Devillebichot, C

    1991-05-01

    We report a case of chondrosarcoma of the femoral neck wrongly considered as a normal variant during a long time due to the initial aspect on the plain films and its location. Precise radiological criteria must allow the differential diagnosis and will be detailed.

  1. Management in non-traumatic arm, neck and shoulder complaints: differences between diagnostic groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Feleus (Anita); S.M. Bierma-Zeinstra (Sita); H.S. Miedema (Harald); J.A.N. Verhaar (Jan); B.W. Koes (Bart)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractArm, neck and/or shoulder complaints are common in western societies. In the Netherlands, general practice guidelines are issued on shoulder pain and epicondylitis only. Little is known about actual management of the total range of diagnoses. The objectives of the study are: to determine

  2. Management in non-traumatic arm, neck and shoulder complaints: differences between diagnostic groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Feleus (Anita); S.M. Bierma-Zeinstra (Sita); H.S. Miedema (Harald); J.A.N. Verhaar (Jan); B.W. Koes (Bart)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractArm, neck and/or shoulder complaints are common in western societies. In the Netherlands, general practice guidelines are issued on shoulder pain and epicondylitis only. Little is known about actual management of the total range of diagnoses. The objectives of the study are: to determine

  3. Phase II clinical trial of cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil, and ifosfamide as treatment for advanced locoregional head and neck carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Parra, M; Churruca, C; Paredes, A; Lacasta, A; López de Argumedo, G; Alvárez, I; Abad, T; Egana, L; Guimón, E; Piera, J M

    1999-02-01

    The association of ifosfamide with cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil for the management of advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck was assessed in this trial. Ifosfamide was given initially to 12 patients in combination with standard fixed doses of cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil, at 1,000 mg/m2 daily on days 2, 3, and 4. Two patients died of neutropenia and severe infection, and the authors recruited seven more patients who were treated with a lower dose of ifosfamide, 800 mg/m2 daily on days 2, 3, and 4. One of the seven patients died of neutropenia and severe infection. Three complete remission were observed in 18 patients evaluable for efficacy. The study was closed early because of the severe toxicity profile demonstrated by this scheme and because of no clear advantage in efficacy versus cisplatin plus 5-fluorouracil combinations.

  4. Target genes of microsatellite sequences in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: mononucleotide repeats are not detected.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yimin; Liu, Xuejuan; Li, Yulin

    2012-09-10

    Microsatellite instability (MSI) is detected in a wide variety of tumors. It is thought that mismatch repair gene mutation or inactivation is the major cause of MSI. Microsatellite sequences are predominantly distributed in intergenic or intronic DNA. However, MSI is found in the exonic sequences of some genes, causing their inactivation. In this report, we searched GenBank for candidate genes containing potential MSI sequences in exonic regions. Twenty seven target genes were selected for MSI analysis. Instability was found in 70% of these genes (14/20) with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Interestingly, no instability was detected in mononucleotide repeats in genes or in intergenic sequences. We conclude that instability of mononucleotide repeats is a rare event in HNSCC. High MSI phenotype in young HNSCC patients is limited to noncoding regions only. MSI percentage in HNSCC tumor is closely related to the repeat type, repeat location and patient's age.

  5. Expression of p27Kip1 and E-cadherin in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Indonesian Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    E I, Auerkari; V, Joewono; D R, Handjari; A T, Sarwono; A W, Suhartono; K, Eto; M A, Ikeda

    2014-01-01

    Cancer cells exhibit characteristic damage of DNA and its expression. The expression of the tumor suppressors E-cadherin and p27(Kip1) has been tested on 57 head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) of Indonesian subjects. HNSCC tumor samples including both primary and (unrelated) nodal cases were obtained from the archives of Indonesian hospitals, in accordance with acknowledged ethical requirements. Only modest correlation was found between reduced expression of E-cadherin or p27(Kip1) with increased malignancy of primary and nodal growth. The observed strong correlation regardless of malignancy between the expressed levels of E-cadherin and p27(Kip1) suggests that also in combination these would not help to better predict the outcome of HNSCC.

  6. ING Genes Work as Tumor Suppressor Genes in the Carcinogenesis of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaohan; Kikuchi, Keiji; Takano, Yasuo

    2011-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is the sixth most common cancer in the world. The evolution and progression of HNSCC are considered to result from multiple stepwise alterations of cellular and molecular pathways in squamous epithelium. Recently, inhibitor of growth gene (ING) family consisting of five genes, ING1 to ING5, was identified as a new tumor suppressor gene family that was implicated in the downregulation of cell cycle and chromatin remodeling. In contrast, it has been shown that ING1 and ING2 play an oncogenic role in some cancers, this situation being similar to TGF-β. In HNSCC, the ING family has been reported to be downregulated, and ING translocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm may be a critical event for carcinogenesis. In this paper, we describe our recent results and briefly summarize current knowledge regarding the biologic functions of ING in HNSCC.

  7. C6-pyridinium ceramide sensitizes SCC17B human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells to photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boppana, Nithin B; Stochaj, Ursula; Kodiha, Mohamed; Bielawska, Alicja; Bielawski, Jacek; Pierce, Jason S; Korbelik, Mladen; Separovic, Duska

    2015-02-01

    Combining photodynamic therapy (PDT) with another anticancer treatment modality is an important strategy for improved efficacy. PDT with Pc4, a silicon phthalocyanine photosensitizer, was combined with C6-pyridinium ceramide (LCL29) to determine their potential to promote death of SCC17B human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells. PDT+LCL29-induced enhanced cell death was inhibited by zVAD-fmk, a pan-caspase inhibitor, and fumonisin B1 (FB), a ceramide synthase inhibitor. Quantitative confocal microscopy showed that combining PDT with LCL29 enhanced FB-sensitive ceramide accumulation in the mitochondria. Furthermore, PDT+LCL29 induced enhanced FB-sensitive redistribution of cytochrome c and caspase-3 activation. Overall, the data indicate that PDT+LCL29 enhanced cell death via FB-sensitive, mitochondrial ceramide accumulation and apoptosis.

  8. Characterization and radiosensitivity of fibroblasts derived from squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck, and the surrounding oral mucosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stausboel-Groen, B.; Moeller Bentzen, S. [Danish Cancer Society, Aarhus (Denmark). Dept. of Experimental Clinical Oncology; Overgaard, J. [Danish Cancer Society, Aarhus (Denmark). Dept. of Experimental Clinical Oncology]|[Danish Cancer Society, Aarhus (Denmark). Dept. of Oncology

    1998-12-31

    Recently, extensive stromal fibroblast contamination has been reported in the modified Courtenay-Mills soft agar clonogenic assay for cellular in vitro radiosensitivity in tumour biopsies. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the hypothesis that an immunocytochemical analysis added to the modified Courtenay-Mills soft agar clonogenic assay provides a measure of both fibroblast and tumour cell radiosensitivity. Therefore, fibroblast derived from squamos cell carcinomas of the head and neck, and from the surrounding oral mucosa were compared for immunocytochemistry, DNA ploidy, plating efficiency and surviving fraction of cells after a radiation dose of 2 Gy. The results of our study suggest that the stromal fibroblast derived from tumour biopsies are representative of normal fibroblasts with respect to the characteristics examined using mucosal fibroblasts as normal controls. (orig.)

  9. Distinct population of highly malignant cells in a head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell line established by xenograft model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Chia-Ing

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The progression and metastasis of solid tumors, including head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC, have been related to the behavior of a small subpopulation of cancer stem cells. Here, we have established a highly malignant HNSCC cell line, SASVO3, from primary tumors using three sequential rounds of xenotransplantation. SASVO3 possesses enhanced tumorigenic ability both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, SASVO3 exhibits properties of cancer stem cells, including that increased the abilities of sphere-forming, the number of side population cells, the potential of transplanted tumor growth and elevated expression of the stem cell marker Bmi1. Injection of SASVO3 into the tail vein of nude mice resulted in lung metastases. These results are consistent with the postulate that the malignant and/or metastasis potential of HNSCC cells may reside in a stem-like subpopulation.

  10. Instantaneous helical axis estimation from 3-D video data in neck kinematics for whiplash diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woltring, H J; Long, K; Osterbauer, P J; Fuhr, A W

    1994-12-01

    To date, the diagnosis of whiplash injuries has been very difficult and largely based on subjective, clinical assessment. The work by Winters and Peles Multiple Muscle Systems--Biomechanics and Movement Organization. Springer, New York (1990) suggests that the use of finite helical axes (FHAs) in the neck may provide an objective assessment tool for neck mobility. Thus, the position of the FHA describing head-trunk motion may allow discrimination between normal and pathological cases such as decreased mobility in particular cervical joints. For noisy, unsmoothed data, the FHAs must be taken over rather large angular intervals if the FHAs are to be reconstructed with sufficient accuracy; in the Winters and Peles study, these intervals were approximately 10 degrees. in order to study the movements' microstructure, the present investigation uses instantaneous helical axes (IHAs) estimated from low-pass smoothed video data. Here, the small-step noise sensitivity of the FHA no longer applies, and proper low-pass filtering allows estimation of the IHA even for small rotation velocity omega of the moving neck. For marker clusters mounted on the head and trunk, technical system validation showed that the IHAs direction dispersions were on the order of one degree, while their position dispersions were on the order of 1 mm, for low-pass cut-off frequencies of a few Hz (the dispersions were calculated from omega-weighted errors, in order to account for the adverse effects of vanishing omega). Various simple, planar models relating the instantaneous, 2-D centre of rotation with the geometry and kinematics of a multi-joint neck model are derived, in order to gauge the utility of the FHA and IHA approaches. Some preliminary results on asymptomatic and pathological subjects are provided, in terms of the 'ruled surface' formed by sampled IHAs and of their piercing points through the mid-sagittal plane during a prescribed flexion-extension movement of the neck.

  11. Gastric Carcinoma: Recent Trends in Diagnostic Biomarkers and Molecular Targeted Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majeed, Wafa; Iftikhar, Asra; Khaliq, Tanweer; Aslam, Bilal; Muzaffar, Humaira; Atta, Komal; Mahmood, Aisha; Waris, Shahid

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is generally associated with poor survival rates and accounts for a remarkable proportion of global cancer mortality. The prevalence of gastric carcinoma varies in different regions of world and across teh various ethnic groups. On the basis of pathological assessment, gastric cancer can be categorized as intestinal and diffuse carcinomas. The etiology is diverse, including chemical carcinogen exposure, and high salt intake Helicobacter pylori also plays a vital role in the pathogenesis of certain gastric carcinomas. The development of gastric cancer involves various alterations in mRNAs, genes (GOLPH3, MTA2) and proteins (Coronins). miRNAs, Hsamir135b, MiR21, miR106b, miR17, miR18a, MiR21, miR106b, miR17, miR18a and MiRNA375, miRNA1955p are the latest diagnostic biomarkers which can facilitate the early diagnosis of gastric carcinomas. Recent development in the treatment strategies for gastric carcinoma include the introduction of monoclonal antibodies, TKI inhibitors, inhibitors of PDGFR β, VEGFR1, VEGFR2, AntiEGFR and antiHER2 agents which can be applied along with conventional therapies.

  12. Comparison of Acute Toxicities in Two Primary Chemoradiation Regimens in the Treatment of Advanced Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Katherine Y.; Gogineni, Hrishikesh; Zaboli, David; Lake, Spencer; Zahurak, Marianna L.; Best, Simon R.; Levine, Marshall A.; Tang, Mei; Zinreich, Eva S.; Saunders, John R.; Califano, Joseph A.; Blanco, Ray G.; Pai, Sara I.; Messing, Barbara; Ha, Patrick K.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The optimal dosage and frequency of platinum-based chemoradiotherapy (CRT) regimen for treating advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma remains unresolved. This study aims to compare the toxicity and efficacy of weekly versus more dose-intensive cisplatin-based CRTs. Methods We reviewed 155 stage III/IV head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients with no evidence of distant metastasis treated with one of two CRT regimens from 2000 to 2010 at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. Twice-daily radiation was provided as a split course over a 45-day period. Regimen A consisted of concomitant cisplatin (30 mg/m2/1 h) weekly for 6 cycles; regimen B consisted of concomitant cisplatin (12 mg/m2/1 h) and 5-fluorouracil (600 mg/m2/20 h) on days 1 through 5 and days 29 through 33. Main outcome measures included acute toxicities (myelosuppression, neurotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, gastrointestinal dysfunction), unplanned hospitalizations, and disease control at 12 months. Results Patients on regimen A were much less likely to experience ototoxicity due to their treatment (0% vs. 9.8%, P = 0.04). They were more likely to experience thrombocytopenia acutely (46% vs. 26%, P = 0.02), but the toxicity was not limiting (grade 1–2). No significant differences exist in the incidence of other toxicities or unplanned hospitalizations. At 1 year, 97% of patients on A vs. 86% of patients on regimen B were free of disease (P = 0.11). Conclusions With concurrent radiotherapy, low-dose, single-agent, weekly cisplatin is less likely than higher-dose daily cisplatin plus 5-fluorouracil provided at the beginning and end of treatment to be associated with ototoxicity. The preliminary data suggest at least equivalent efficacy, but longer follow-up is required. PMID:22290566

  13. Markers of Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition in Association with Survival in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma (HNSCC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pectasides, Eirini; Rampias, Theodoros; Sasaki, Clarence; Perisanidis, Christos; Kouloulias, Vassilis; Burtness, Barbara; Zaramboukas, Thomas; Rimm, David; Fountzilas, George; Psyrri, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    Background Elucidating the molecular phenotype of cancers with high metastatic potential will facilitate the development of novel therapeutic approaches to the disease. Gene expression profiles link epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) phenotype with high-risk HNSCC. We sought to determine the role of protein biomarkers of EMT in head and neck squamous carcinoma (HNSC) prognosis. Methods Protein expression analysis of EGFR, β-catenin and E-cadherin was performed on a cohort of 102 patients with HNSCC recruited between 1992 and 2005 using automated quantitative protein analysis (AQUA). We evaluated associations with clinicopathological parameters and prognosis. Results There were 67 patients with primary squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck in this cohort who met inclusion criteria and for whom we had complete E-cadherin, beta-catenin and EGFR expression data. High E-cadherin expressers had longer 5-year progression-free survival (PFS) compared to those with low E-cadherin (59.7% versus 40.6%, p = 0.04) and overall survival (OS) (69.6% versus 44.3%, p  = 0.05). Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that patients with low beta-catenin-expressing tumors trended toward worse 5-year PFS (p = 0.057). High EGFR expressers had inferior OS compared to low EGFR expressers (27.7% vs. 54%, p = 0.029). In the multivariable analysis context, E-cadherin remained an independent predictor of improved OS (HR = 0.204, 95% CI 0.043 to 0.972, p = 0.046) while EGFR trended towards significance for OS. Conclusions The putative markers of EMT defined within a panel of HNSCC using AQUA are associated with tumors of poor prognosis. PMID:24722213

  14. Markers of epithelial to mesenchymal transition in association with survival in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eirini Pectasides

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Elucidating the molecular phenotype of cancers with high metastatic potential will facilitate the development of novel therapeutic approaches to the disease. Gene expression profiles link epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT phenotype with high-risk HNSCC. We sought to determine the role of protein biomarkers of EMT in head and neck squamous carcinoma (HNSC prognosis. METHODS: Protein expression analysis of EGFR, β-catenin and E-cadherin was performed on a cohort of 102 patients with HNSCC recruited between 1992 and 2005 using automated quantitative protein analysis (AQUA. We evaluated associations with clinicopathological parameters and prognosis. RESULTS: There were 67 patients with primary squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck in this cohort who met inclusion criteria and for whom we had complete E-cadherin, beta-catenin and EGFR expression data. High E-cadherin expressers had longer 5-year progression-free survival (PFS compared to those with low E-cadherin (59.7% versus 40.6%, p = 0.04 and overall survival (OS (69.6% versus 44.3%, p  = 0.05. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that patients with low beta-catenin-expressing tumors trended toward worse 5-year PFS (p = 0.057. High EGFR expressers had inferior OS compared to low EGFR expressers (27.7% vs. 54%, p = 0.029. In the multivariable analysis context, E-cadherin remained an independent predictor of improved OS (HR = 0.204, 95% CI 0.043 to 0.972, p = 0.046 while EGFR trended towards significance for OS. CONCLUSIONS: The putative markers of EMT defined within a panel of HNSCC using AQUA are associated with tumors of poor prognosis.

  15. Anti EGFR therapy in the treatment of non-metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: The current evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rony Benson

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC accounts for a large oncologic burden in the developing countries. In patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer multimodality treatment is warranted. Radiation therapy with concurrent chemotherapy has long been considered the standard for patients with disease involving the oropharynx, larynx and hypopharynx. However, addition of chemotherapy to radiotherapy increases treatment related toxicity by many folds and compliance rates decrease. In this context a systemic therapy, which when used concurrent with radiation with favorable toxicity profile is of great importance for improving disease control in locally advanced HNSCC. Anti-epithelial growth factor receptor targeted therapy emerged as a potential treatment option. In recent years many trials were conducted to find the optimum treatment option with the combination of these targeted agents. The initial trials showed excellent results with minimal morbidity and led to great enthusiasm across the globe to incorporate these regimens as a standard of care. However, subsequently many trials failed to maintain such results and now there is little agreement to the initial results achieved with these drugs. Based on the current evidence we cannot recommend the replacement of cisplatin with targeted therapy in concurrent setting. It may be considered in patients with altered renal parameters, hypersensitivity or intolerance to cisplatin. The addition of targeted therapy in addition to chemotherapy in the concurrent setting can’t also be recommended as the benefit is doubtful and is associated with a significant increase in toxicity.

  16. The cyclic GMP/protein kinase G pathway as a therapeutic target in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, Traci R; Mierzwa, Michelle L; Wells, Susanne I; Fox, Sejal R; Ben-Jonathan, Nira

    2016-01-28

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is an aggressive disease with high mortality. Treatments, which can result in significant morbidity, have not substantially changed in three decades. The second messenger cyclic GMP (cGMP), which targets protein kinase G (PKG), is generated by guanylate cyclases (GCs), and is rapidly hydrolyzed by phosphodiesterases (PDEs). Activation of the cGMP/PKG pathway is antineoplastic in several cancer types, but its impact on HNSCC has not been fully exploited. We found differential expression of critical components of this pathway in four HNSCC cell lines. Several activators of soluble GC (sGC), as well as inhibitors of PDE5, increased intracellular cGMP, reduced cell viability, and induced apoptosis in HNSCC cells. The apoptotic effects of the sGC activator BAY 41-2272 and the PDE5 inhibitor Tadalafil (Cialis) were mediated by PKG. Furthermore, Tadalafil substantially reduced the growth of CAL27-derived tumors in athymic mice. Several drugs which either activate sGC or inhibit PDE5 are approved for treatment of nonmalignant conditions. These drugs could be repurposed as novel and effective therapeutics in patients with head and neck cancer.

  17. Expression of the CXCL12/CXCR4 chemokine axis predicts regional control in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León, Xavier; Diez, Santiago; García, Jacinto; Lop, Joan; Sumarroca, Anna; Quer, Miquel; Camacho, Mercedes

    2016-12-01

    Expression of the CXCL12/CXCR4 chemokine axis has been related with the appearance of metastatic recurrence survival, including regional and distant recurrence, in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). RT-PCR was used to determine mRNA expression levels of CXCL12 and CXCR4 in biopsy tumor samples in 111 patients with HNSCC. Five-year regional recurrence-free survival for patients with low CXCR4 expression (n = 39, 31.5 %) was 97.4 %, for patients with high CXCR4/high CXCL12 expression (n = 22, 19.8 %) it was 94.7 %, and for patients with high CXCR4/low CXCL12 expression (n = 50, 45.0 %) it was 63.3 %. We found significant differences in the regional recurrence-free survival according to CXCR4/CXCL12 expression values (P = 0.001). HNSCC patients with high CXCR4 and low CXCL12 expression values had a significantly higher risk of regional recurrence and could benefit from a more intense treatment of lymph node areas in the neck.

  18. 64-row MDCT perfusion of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: technical feasibility and quantitative analysis of perfusion parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faggioni, Lorenzo; Neri, Emanuele; Cerri, Francesca; Picano, Eugenia; Bartolozzi, Carlo [University of Pisa, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Pisa (Italy); Seccia, Veronica; Muscatello, Luca; Franceschini, Stefano Sellari [University of Pisa, Division of Otorhinolaryngology, Pisa (Italy)

    2011-01-15

    To evaluate the technical feasibility of 64-row computed tomography (CT) quantitative perfusion imaging of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Twenty-nine patients with a total of 29 pathologically proven SCC underwent a cine-mode CT perfusion acquisition covering the lesion site. The acquisition started 10 s after intravenous injection of iodinated contrast material and lasted 50 s. On a dedicated workstation, regions of interest (ROI) were traced within the SCC, on a healthy portion of tissue (H), and on the ipsilateral sternocleidomastoid muscle (M). Blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV), mean transit time (MTT) and permeability-surface product (PS) were calculated. In SCC, BF, BV and PS were higher compared with H (p < 0.0001, p = 0.002 and p = 0.004, respectively) and M (p < 0.0001). Conversely, MTT was lower in SCC than in H (p = 0.0009) and M (p = 0.0003). All datasets were free from substantial motion artefacts and ROI misregistration phenomena. No substantial discomfort or adverse events were experienced by any of the patients. 64-row CT quantitative perfusion imaging allows head and neck SCC to be distinguished from normal tissues. (orig.)

  19. Expression profile analysis of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas using data from The Cancer Genome Atlas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Li; Zhan, Cheng; Wu, Jihong; Wang, Shengzi

    2016-05-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is the major histological type of head and neck cancer and no curative treatments are currently available. Using advanced sequencing technologies, The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) has produced large‑scale sequencing data, which provide unprecedented opportunities to reveal molecular mechanisms of cancer. The present study analyzed the mRNA and micro (mi)RNA expression data of HNSCC and normal control tissues released by the TCGA database using a bioinformatics approach to explore underlying molecular mechanisms. The mRNA and miRNA expression data were downloaded from the TCGA database and differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and miRNAs (DEMs) between HNSCC and normal head and neck tissues were identified using TwoClassDif. Subsequently, the gene functions and pathways which are significantly altered in HNSCC were identified using Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway enrichment analysis. Regulatory networks among DEGs and DEMs were then constructed, and transcription factors (TFs) potentially regulating the DEGs and DEMs were determined and a TF ‑ miRNA ‑ gene network was established. A total of 2,594 significant DEGs (1,087 upregulated and 1,507 downregulated), and 25 DEMs (8 upregulated and 17 downregulated) were identified in HNSCC compared with normal control samples. These DEGs were significantly enriched in GOs and KEGG pathways such as mitosis, cell cycle, Wnt, JAK/STAT and TLR signaling pathway. CPBP, NF‑AT1 and miR‑1 were situated in the central hub of the TF ‑ miRNA ‑ gene network, underlining their central roles in regulatory processes specific for HNSCC. The present study enhanced the current understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying HNSCC and may offer novel strategies for its prevention, diagnosis and treatment.

  20. Osteoradionecrosis of the subaxial cervical spine following treatment for head and neck carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorsandi, A S; Su, H K; Mourad, W F; Urken, M L; Persky, M S; Lazarus, C L; Jacobson, A S

    2015-01-01

    To study MRI and positron emission tomography (PET)/CT imaging of osteoradionecrosis (ORN) of the subaxial cervical spine, a serious long-term complication of radiation therapy (RT) for head and neck cancers that can lead to pain, vertebral instability, myelopathy and cord compression. This is a single-institution retrospective review of patients diagnosed and treated for ORN of the subaxial cervical spine following surgery and radiation for head and neck cancer. We report PET/CT imaging and MRI for four patients, each with extensive treatment for recurrent head and neck cancer. Osteomyelitis (OM) and discitis are the end-stage manifestations of ORN of the subaxial spine. ORN of the subaxial spine has variable imaging appearance and needs to be differentiated from recurrent or metastatic disease. Surgical violation of the posterior pharyngeal wall on top of the compromised vasculature in patients treated heavily with RT may pre-dispose the subaxial cervical vertebrae to ORN, with possible resultant OM and discitis. MRI and PET/CT imaging are complimentary in this setting. PET/CT images may be misinterpreted in view of the history of head and neck cancer. MRI should be utilized for definitive diagnosis of OM and discitis in view of its imaging specificity. We identify the end-stage manifestation of ORN in the sub-axial spine on PET/CT and MRI to facilitate its correct diagnosis.

  1. Interstitial Photodynamic Therapy in Treating Patients With Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-11

    Recurrent Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma in the Neck With Occult Primary; Recurrent Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Tongue Carcinoma

  2. Cancer cachexia update in head and neck cancer: Definitions and diagnostic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couch, Marion E; Dittus, Kim; Toth, Michael J; Willis, Monte S; Guttridge, Denis C; George, Jonathan R; Barnes, Christie A; Gourin, Christine G; Der-Torossian, Hirak

    2015-04-01

    Cachexia is a profoundly debilitating wasting syndrome that affects patients with head and neck cancer and often contributes to their demise. A comprehensive literature search was performed up to April 2013 using PubMed, the Cochrane Library, CINAHL, and the Google search engine. For the meta-analyses, pooled prevalence estimates were calculated with a confidence interval of 95% (95% CI) by using random effects modeling. In this review, we outlined the unique challenges of cancer cachexia among patients with head and neck cancer by reviewing its impacts on quality of life (QOL), morbidity, and mortality. We explored the prevalence of different clinical markers of cachexia at the time of diagnosis and before and after treatment. Finally, we present updates regarding the diagnosis of cancer cachexia and recent findings, such as cardiac dysfunction that warrant clinical attention to more carefully identify patients at risk and potentially lead to better outcomes.

  3. Expression and clinical significance of the Kv3.4 potassium channel subunit in the development and progression of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menéndez, Sofía Tirados; Rodrigo, Juan P; Allonca, Eva; García-Carracedo, Darío; Alvarez-Alija, Gustavo; Casado-Zapico, Sara; Fresno, Manuel F; Rodríguez, Carmen; Suárez, Carlos; García-Pedrero, Juana M

    2010-08-01

    The concept of ion channels as membrane therapeutic targets and diagnostic/prognostic biomarkers has attracted growing attention. We therefore investigated the expression pattern and clinical significance of the Kv3.4 potassium channel subunit during the development and progression of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs). KCNC4 mRNA levels were determined by real-time RT-PCR in both HNSCC tissue specimens and derived cell lines. Kv3.4 protein expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry in paraffin-embedded tissue specimens from 84 patients with laryngeal/pharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas and 67 patients with laryngeal dysplasias. Molecular alterations were correlated with clinicopathological parameters and patient outcome. Increased KCNC4 mRNA levels were found in 15 (54%) of 28 tumours, compared to the corresponding normal epithelia and varied mRNA levels were detected in 12 HNSCC-derived cell lines analysed. Increased Kv3.4 protein expression was observed in 34 (40%) of 84 carcinomas and also at early stages of HNSCC tumourigenesis. Thus, 35 (52%) of 67 laryngeal lesions displayed Kv3.4-positive staining in the dysplastic areas, whereas both stromal cells and normal adjacent epithelia exhibited negligible expression. No significant correlations were found between Kv3.4-positive expression in HNSCC and clinical data; however, Kv3.4 expression tended to diminish in advanced-stage tumours. Interestingly, patients carrying Kv3.4-positive dysplasias experienced a significantly higher laryngeal cancer incidence than did those with negative lesions (p = 0.0209). In addition, functional studies using HNSCC cells revealed that inhibition of Kv3.4 expression by siRNA leads to the inhibition of cell proliferation via selective cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase without affecting apoptosis. Collectively, these data demonstrate for the first time that Kv3.4 expression is frequently increased during HNSCC tumourigenesis and correlated significantly with a

  4. Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma in chronic areca nut chewing Indian women: Case series and review of literature

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    Sidramesh Shivanand Muttagi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC is an important public health problem in India. Several risk factors such as tobacco, human papilloma virus, alcohol, areca nut usage have been extensively studied as causative agents. Though Areca nut chewing is known cause of oral cancer, its association with hypopharynx cancer has not been previously reported. Since areca nut is mostly consumed along with tobacco, it is uncommon to find patients who consume the areca nut alone. Materials and Methods: This is a prospective case series of ten women who presented to us with HNSCC with history of chewing of areca nut alone for several years. We have excluded all those cases where areca nut was consumed along with tobacco in any form. The data were prospectively collected with regard to clinical parameters, duration and frequency of areca nut usage, the socio-economic status and education level. Results: All ten females had varying degree of submucous fibrosis and coexisting squamous cell carcinoma either in the oral cavity or hypopharynx. Submucous fibrosis was characterized by burning mouth, unhealthy oral mucosa, buried third molars, trismus, poor oral hygiene, etc. The disease presented in an advanced stage in majority of the cases. All patients were unaware of areca nut′s deleterious effects. Conclusion: Areca nut chewing is an important risk factor for HNSCC in females. Despite plethora of information, little importance is given to areca nut control in cancer prevention campaigns in India.

  5. Head and neck basal cell carcinoma prevalence in individuals submitted to childhood X-ray epilation for tinea capitis treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boaventura, Paula; Oliveira, Rosa; Pereira, Dina; Soares, Paula; Teixeira-Gomes, José

    2012-01-01

    A higher prevalence for basal cell carcinoma (BCC) has been associated with radiation, namely with tinea capitis epilation treatment. To evaluate the prevalence of head and neck basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and to identify the major risk factors for BCC in individuals irradiated in childhood for tinea capitis treatment. We clinically observed 1,308 individuals from an original cohort of 5,356 irradiated between 1950 and 1963, registering previous skin lesions excisions and proposing for surgery all the suspicious lesions detected. In 585 participants, 47 with BCC, the skin pigmentation was measured. The overall prevalence of BCC was 8.0% and of multiple BCC was 2.4%. Both total (14.7%) and multiple BCC (6.6%) were significantly more common in the individuals who had received a higher radiation dose. Multiple BCC was more prevalent (3.7%) in younger irradiated individuals and total BCC (9.4%) in women. Participants with BCC and without BCC presented similar skin pigmentation. Younger age at irradiation, higher dose and female gender increased the risk of developing BCC in these irradiated individuals.

  6. Genomic profiling identifies common HPV-associated chromosomal alterations in squamous cell carcinomas of cervix and head and neck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leemans C René

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is well known that a persistent infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV is causally involved in the development of squamous cell carcinomas of the uterine cervix (CxSCCs and a subset of SCCs of the head and neck (HNSCCs. The latter differ from hrHPV-negative HNSCCs at the clinical and molecular level. Methods To determine whether hrHPV-associated SCCs arising from different organs have specific chromosomal alterations in common, we compared genome-wide chromosomal profiles of 10 CxSCCs (all hrHPV-positive with 12 hrHPV-positive HNSCCs and 30 hrHPV-negative HNSCCs. Potential organ-specific alterations and alterations shared by SCCs in general were investigated as well. Results Unsupervised hierarchical clustering resulted in one mainly hrHPV-positive and one mainly hrHPV-negative cluster. Interestingly, loss at 13q and gain at 20q were frequent in HPV-positive carcinomas of both origins, but uncommon in hrHPV-negative HNSCCs, indicating that these alterations are associated with hrHPV-mediated carcinogenesis. Within the group of hrHPV-positive carcinomas, HNSCCs more frequently showed gains of multiple regions at 8q whereas CxSCCs more often showed loss at 17p. Finally, gains at 3q24-29 and losses at 11q22.3-25 were frequent (>50% in all sample groups. Conclusion In this study hrHPV-specific, organ-specific, and pan-SCC chromosomal alterations were identified. The existence of hrHPV-specific alterations in SCCs of different anatomical origin, suggests that these alterations are crucial for hrHPV-mediated carcinogenesis.

  7. Basosquamous Carcinoma of the Head and Neck: Clinical and Histologic Characteristics and Their Impact on Disease Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Wermker

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Basosquamous carcinoma (BSC is a rare tumor entity, and the most common onset is in the head and neck region (BSC-HN. The data on diagnosis, treatment, and especially risk assessment concerning disease course and outcome are deficient or inconsistent. This study aimed to evaluate risk factors for local relapse (LR and lymph node metastasis (LNM and their impact on progression-free survival (PFS. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In a retrospective monocentric study, patients with BSC-HN treated between 1999 and 2011 were analyzed regarding clinical and histologic characteristics. Prognostic parameters for LR, LNM, and PFS were evaluated. In total, 89 patients (55 male, 34 female, mean age of 71.8 years with a mean follow-up time of 47.7 months (range 12-112 were included. RESULTS: LR occurred in four patients (4.5%, LNM occurred in five patients (5.6%. Patients with LNM had a significantly shorter PFS time (16.1 months compared with patients without LNM (154.2 months; P < .001. Tumor depth and size (T classification, incomplete resection, localization at the ear, deep maximal vertical infiltration, muscle and vessel invasion all showed significant (P < .05 associations with LR, LNM, and shorter PFS time. BSC showed more histologic features of basal cell carcinoma (BCC, especially with regard to BerEP4 expression. CONCLUSION: While histology shows some typical characteristics of BCC, the biologic behavior and aggressiveness of BSC are similar to those of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma. This is the first study to show that LR and, especially, LNM indicate a higher risk of an unfavorable outcome.

  8. Comparative genomic hybridization analysis detects frequent over-representation of DNA sequences at 3q, 7p, 8q and 18q in head and neck carcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergamo, N A; Rogatto, S R; Poli-Frederico, R C;

    2000-01-01

    Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) was used to identify chromosomal imbalances in 19 samples of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC). The chromosome arms most often over-represented were 3q (48%), 8q (42%), and 7p (32%); in many cases, these changes were observed at high copy...... and 2q material were detected in patients exhibiting a clinical history of recurrence and/or metastasis followed by terminal disease. This association suggests that gain of 1q and 2q may be a new marker of head and neck tumors with a refractory clinical response....

  9. Evaluation of biologic markers in squamous cell carcinoma biopsy samples of the tongue and correlation with neck lymph node metastasis

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    Madani Kermani Z

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Neck lymph node metastasis has the prognostic role in SCC of the tongue and the importance of the biologic markers in tumor invasion and metastasis has been stated in the medical literature. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between two biomarkers, p53 and EGFR (which had the main role in cell proliferation and two other biomarkers, CD44 and E-cadherin, in lymph node metastasis."n"nMethods: In an analytic descriptive study fifty three patients with SCC (Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the tongue who underwent the resection of tumor and dissection of neck lymph nodes were assessed during the year of 2002-2009. Histological samples from 53 patients were immunohistochemically stained and the analysis of these markers were performed due to clinicopathological variable and metastasis of the neck lymph nodes."n"nResults: The result showed that among the clinicopathological factors, the relationship between Age (p=0.01, history of having risk factors (p=0.002, clinical lymphadenopathy (p=0.002, the size of the tumor (p=0.001, decreasing of CD44 (p=0.02 and lymph node metastasis of the neck were statistically significant. No significant relationship were found between sex and other biomarkers

  10. Oral squamous cell carcinoma and a clinically negative neck : the value of follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wensing, Bart M; Merkx, Matthias A W; Krabbe, Paul F M; Marres, Henri A M; Van den Hoogen, Frank J A

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity (SCCOC), regular follow-up comprises 5 years of prescheduled visits, irrespective of tumor stage/classification and/or treatment. We analyzed our standard treatment and follow-up protocol in patients with a preoperative clinically negative ne

  11. Oral squamous cell carcinoma and a clinically negative neck: the value of follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wensing, B.M.; Merkx, M.A.W.; Krabbe, P.F.M.; Marres, H.A.M.; Hoogen, F.J.A. van den

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity (SCCOC), regular follow-up comprises 5 years of prescheduled visits, irrespective of tumor stage/classification and/or treatment. We analyzed our standard treatment and follow-up protocol in patients with a preoperative clinically negative ne

  12. [Diagnostic value of multi-slice spiral computerized tomographic fistulography in congenital fistula of neck].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, H; Ye, Q; Wang, X Y; Zheng, X H; Yang, X Q; Chen, Y; Jiang, Y; Li, R Y

    2017-08-07

    Objective: To investigate the usefulness and effectiveness of multi-slice spiral computerized tomographic fistulography (MSCTF) in the diagnosis and treatment of congenital fistula of neck. Methods: Thirty-four patients with thyroglossal fistulasor branchial cleft fistulas who were initial treated from July 2008 to August 2015 in Fujian Provincial Hospital were retrospectively analyses. Thirteen males and 21 females patients aging from 3 to 46 years old with a median age of 37 were included. There were thyroglossal fistula in 6 cases, the first branchialcleft fistula in 9 cases, the second branchialcleft fistula in 3 cases, the third branchialcleft fistula in 9 cases, and the fourth branchialcleft fistula in 7 cases. All the patients underwent preopeative MSCTF and the diagnoses were finally confirmed with surgery and histopathology. Multiplanar reconstruction(MPR), maximumintensity projection(MIP)and volume rendering(VR) were completed with AW Volume Share 4.2 image processing software after initial CT scanning.The internal openings, distribution, and neighboring relationship of the fistulas showed by MSCTF were analyzed and the surgical strategies were subsequently made. Results: Except 2 cases, 32 patients had obtained successfully MSCTF image. The presence and location of the fistulas could be showed clearly on MSCTF. Based on the results of MSCTF examination, the surgical planes to treat the fistulas were made. The fistulas in all cases were successfully found and excised. Three cases underwent selective neck dissection. Postoperative infection occurred in 1 case. Unilateral vocal fold paralysis due to surgery recovered 3 months after surgery with follow-up. One case lost follow-up, the remaining 33 cases were followed up for 13-97 months with no the fistula recurrence. Conclusions: MSCTF could provide valuable information and benefit surgical planning by demonstrating the coursesof congenital fistulas of neck in detail.

  13. Venous malformations of the head and neck: a diagnostic approach and a proposed management approach based on clinical, radiological, and histopathology findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboelatta, Yasser Abdallah; Nagy, Eman; Shaker, Mohamed; Massoud, Karim Samir

    2014-07-01

    There is no easy road map for venous malformations (VMs) of the head and neck according to which treatment modality can be chosen. The purpose of this study was to identify different types of VMs of the head and neck based on clinical, histopathology, MRI, and venography findings that help in specification of different treatment modalities. Sixty-nine patients with VMs of the head and neck were included in this study. Our results proposed a diagnostic approach for VMs of the head and neck. MRI, venography, and clinical examination had important impact in decision-making, whereas histopathology had no impact. A management approach has been suggested for each type and its subtypes. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. [The clinical value of sentinel lymph node detection in laryngeal and hypopharyngeal carcinoma patients with clinically negative neck by methylene blue method and radiolabeled tracer method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin; Xiao, Dajiang; Ni, Jianming; Zhu, Guochen; Yuan, Yuan; Xu, Ting; Zhang, Yongsheng

    2014-11-01

    To investigate the clinical value of sentinel lymph node (SLN) detection in laryngeal and hypopharyngeal carcinoma patients with clinically negative neck (cN0) by methylene blue method, radiolabeled tracer method and combination of these two methods. Thirty-three patients with cN0 laryngeal carcinoma and six patients with cN0 hypopharyngeal carcinoma underwent SLN detection using both of methylene blue and radiolabeled tracer method. All these patients were accepted received the injection of radioactive isotope 99 Tc(m)-sulfur colloid (SC) and methylene blue into the carcinoma before surgery, then all these patients underwent intraopertive lymphatic mapping with a handheld gamma-detecting probe and blue-dyed SLN. After the mapping of SLN, selected neck dissections and tumor resections were peformed. The results of SLN detection by radiolabeled tracer, dye and combination of both methods were compared. The detection rate of SLN by radiolabeled tracer, methylene blue and combined method were 89.7%, 79.5%, 92.3% respectively. The number of detected SLN was significantly different between radiolabeled tracer method and combined method, and also between methylene blue method and combined method. The detection rate of methylene blue and radiolabeled tracer method were significantly different from combined method (P methylene blue can improve the detection rate and accuracy of sentinel lymph node detection. Furthermore, sentinel lymph node detection can accurately represent the cervical lymph node status in cN0 laryngeal and hypopharyngeal carcinoma.

  15. Papillary thyroid carcinoma, a diagnostic approach in fine needle aspiration: Review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirish S Chandanwale

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite well-defined cytology features of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC in fine needle aspiration (FNA, diagnostic difficulties do exist while making decision in respect to papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC cases. Aims: The aim of this study is to clarify diagnostic significance of various cytology features of PTC and to identify possible diagnostic pitfalls. Materials and Methods: FNA cytology (FNAC features and clinical findings of 17 PTC cases diagnosed on histology were retrieved. A retrospective review of these cases was performed. Results: The frequency and number of papillary formations, intranuclear cytoplasmic inclusions (INCI, and nuclear grooves (NG was more in PTC cases as compared to suggestive/suspicious of (S/O and rule out (R/O PTC cases. Cyst macrophages forming clusters were seen in six cases. Multinucleated giant cells (MGC were seen in seven cases. Large MGC with dense cytoplasm and more nuclei were seen in four PTC and one S/O PTC cases. Conclusion: FNAC features of PTC in FNA smears are neither constant nor specific. All the cytology features of PTC should be reported in proper context which allows endocrine specialist to treat and urgent histological verification.

  16. Diagnostic Value of CT for the Detection of Cervical Lymph Node Metastases in Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Kyu Ri [Boramae Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Na, Dong Gyu; Chang, Kee Hyun [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-06-15

    To determine the diagnostic accuracy of CT for the detection of cervical lymph node metastases in patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). Two hundred twelve consecutive patients with surgically proven PTC were included in this study. CT images were retrospectively evaluated to determine the presence of a node metastasis using morphologic CT criteria (at least one of the following: strong nodal enhancement without hilar vessel enhancement, heterogeneous enhancement, calcification, and cystic change). The diagnostic accuracy of CT for the diagnosis of a metastatic lymph node was assessed using a level-bylevel analysis. The accuracy of the CT finding for strong nodal enhancement was greater than the other morphologic CT criteria (81.6% and 74.5-78.5%, respectively). The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 64.4%, 91.4%, and 84.3% by the morphologic CT criteria, and were 34.6%, 93.9%, and 78.2% by size criteria, respectively. The morphologic CT criteria are more accurate than the size criteria in the detection of cervical lymph node metastases in patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma; and, strong nodal enhancement on a CT scan is the most important factor for its diagnostic accuracy.

  17. Esvaziamento cervical no carcinoma epidermoide de laringe: indicação de esvaziamento eletivo contralateral Neck dissection in squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx: indication of elective contralateral neck dissection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Amar

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available O planejamento terapêutico dos tumores da laringe inclui a possibilidade de esvaziamento cervical uni ou bilateral. OBJETIVO: Avaliar a prevalência e localização de metástases linfonodais bilaterais ou contralaterais nos tumores de laringe. CASUÍSTICA E MÉTODO: Estudo longitudinal retrospectivo de 272 prontuários de pacientes com carcinoma epidermoide de laringe tratados entre 1996 e 2004, selecionados 104 submetidos à cirurgia com esvaziamento cervical. Avaliada a incidência de metástases bilaterais ou contralaterais, de acordo com a localização e extensão do tumor primário, considerando os subsítios anatômicos e a linha mediana. RESULTADOS: A prevalência de metástases contralaterais nos tumores lateralizados foi de 3,5% nas lesões glóticas e 26% nas lesões supraglóticas. As metástases contralaterais foram infrequentes nos casos N0. Tanto no esvaziamento eletivo como no terapêutico, os níveis linfonodais IIa e III foram os mais acometidos. CONCLUSÃO: Nas lesões glóticas lateralizadas, mesmo nos tumores transglóticos, não há necessidade de esvaziamento contralateral eletivo. Nas lesões da supraglote sem metástases ipsilaterais, a incidência de metástases ocultas não justifica o esvaziamento eletivo contralateral. A linha mediana não é um indicador fidedigno do risco de metástases contralaterais nos tumores da laringe.Unilateral or bilateral neck dissection must be considered in the treatment of laryngeal cancer AIM: To evaluate the prevalence of contralateral metastases in larynx cancer and distribution of these metastases according to lymph node levels in the neck. METHOD: Retrospective longitudinal study of 272 charts from patients with squamous cell cancer of the larynx treated between 1996 and 2004; and we selected 104 surgical cases submitted to neck dissection. We evaluated the incidence of bilateral or contralateral metastases, according to the location and extension of the primary tumor

  18. Does Tumor Depth Affect Nodal Upstaging in Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkureishi, Lee; Ross, Gary; Shoaib, Taimur

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE:: The aim of this study was to determine whether tumor depth affects upstaging of the clinically node-negative neck, as determined by sentinel lymph node biopsy with full pathologic evaluation of harvested nodes including step-serial sectioning (SSS) and immunohistochemistry (IHC). PATIENTS......-eosin staining, SSS, and IHC. Patients upstaged by SSS/IHC were denoted pN1mi. RESULTS:: One hundred one of 172 patients were staged pN0, with 71 (41%) patients upstaged. Increasing tumor depth was associated with higher likelihood of upstaging (P

  19. DIAGNOSTIC ACCURACY OF VARIOUS METHODS TO DETECT LYMPH NODE METASTASES IN ORAL SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study was undertaken with the purpose to compare the sensitivity of various methods for detection of lymph node metastases:Intra-operative frozen sections H & E staining, Conventional H & E staining on formalin fixed tissue, Serial –step sectioning by conventional H&E staining & Immunohistochemical staining by Pancytokeratin antibody. METHOD: The study included 80 consecutive cases of oral squamous cell carcinoma, who underwent radical neck dissection. The various level of lymph nodes in these cases were checked for metastases by 4 techniques i.e. intra-operative frozen sections H&E staining, conventional H&E staining on formalin fixed tissue, serial –step sectioning by conventional H & E staining &immunohistochemical staining by Pancytokeratin antibody. RESULTS: Considering IHC as a gold standard, we observed highest sensitivity & specificity for serial sectioning at 53.7%, & 98.9% when compared to intraoperative frozen section and conventional H&E which were 32.5%, 97.1% & 44.7%, 98.2% respectively. CONCLUSION: Thus we conclude that the most sensitive method to detect lymph node metastasis in case of Oral Squamous cell carcinoma is step serial section when considering IHC as a gold standard.

  20. The Evolution of and Risk Factors for Neck Muscle Atrophy and Weakness in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Lu-lu; Mao, Yan-Ping; Zhou, Guan-Qun; Tang, Ling-Long; Qi, Zhen-Yu; Lin, Li; Yao, Ji-Jin; Ma, Jun; Lin, Ai-Hua; Sun, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to investigate the evolution of sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM) atrophy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients following intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and the relationship between SCM atrophy and neck weakness. Data were retrospectively analyzed from 223 biopsy-proven NPC patients with no distant metastasis who underwent IMRT with or without chemotherapy. The volume of SCM was measured on pretreatment magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and MRI...

  1. LIMD1 is more frequently altered than RB1 in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: clinical and prognostic implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy Anup

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction To understand the role of two interacting proteins LIMD1 and pRB in development of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC, alterations of these genes were analyzed in 25 dysplastic head and neck lesions, 58 primary HNSCC samples and two HNSCC cell lines. Methods Deletions of LIMD1 and RB1 were analyzed along with mutation and promoter methylation analysis of LIMD1. The genotyping of LIMD1 linked microsatellite marker, hmlimD1, was done to find out any risk allele. The mRNA expression of LIMD1 and RB1 were analyzed by Q-PCR. Immunohistochemical analysis of RB1 was performed. Alterations of these genes were correlated with different clinicopathological parameters. Results High frequency [94% (78/83] of LIMD1 alterations was observed in the samples studied. Compare to frequent deletion and methylation, mutation of LIMD1 was increased during tumor progression (P = 0.007. Six novel mutations in exon1 and one novel intron4/exon5 splice-junction mutation were detected in LIMD1 along with a susceptible hmlimD1 (CA20 allele. Some of these mutations [42% (14/33] produced non-functional proteins. RB1 deletion was infrequent (27%. Highly reduced mRNA expression of LIMD1 (25.1 ± 19.04 was seen than RB1 (3.8 ± 8.09, concordant to their molecular alterations. The pRB expression supported this data. Tumors with LIMD1 alterations in tobacco addicted patients without HPV infection showed poor prognosis. Co-alterations of these genes led the worse patients' outcome. Conclusions Our study suggests LIMD1 inactivation as primary event than inactivation of RB1 in HNSCC development.

  2. AMACR is not applicable as a diagnostic tool in hepatocellular carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willemoe, Gro Linno; Vainer, Ben

    2010-01-01

    Alpha-methylacyl coenzyme A racemase (AMACR or P504S) is a mitochondrial and peroxisomal protein present in a variety of human cells. Demonstration of increased expression is used diagnostically in prostatic adenocarcinoma. AMACR is also produced by normal hepatocytes and it has been postulated...... that the demonstration of AMACR expression or its pattern of distribution is useful in the diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) (Jiang et al., Hum Pathol 2003;34, Guzman et al., Appl Immunohistochem Mol Morphol 2006;14, Li et al., J Exp Clin Cancer Res 2008;27). The aim of the present study was to evaluate...

  3. Primary myoepithelial carcinoma of rib bone: Morphology, immunohistochemical evaluation and diagnostic dilemma in an unusual case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biradar, Pramod; Menon, Santosh; Patil, Asawari; Karimundakal, George; Jambhekar, Nirmala

    2015-01-01

    Myoepithelial tumors are most commonly seen as salivary gland tumors. Tumors of similar morphology and nomenclature are also seen rarely in soft tissue, skin, lungs and breast. Bone is an uncommon anatomical site for occurrence of myoepithelial tumors. Histologically, they have variable admixture of epithelial elements in a gamut of patterns with myxoid matricial background. Most of these are benign with very anecdotal reports of malignant counterpart, myoepithelial carcinoma. Herein we describe an extremely rare case of a malignant myoepithelial tumor arising from the rib which owing to unusual location and immunohistochemical profile was diagnostically challenging.

  4. Diagnostic sensitivity of imaging modalities for hepatocellular carcinoma smaller than 2 cm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Keiji; Mita; Soo; Ryang; Kim; Masatoshi; Kudo; Susumu; Imoto; Taisuke; Nakajima; Kenji; Ando; Katsumi; Fukuda; Toshiyuki; Matsuoka; Yoko; Maekawa; Yoshitake; Hayashi

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To compare the imaging results with histology and to evaluate the diagnostic sensitivity of imaging modalities for hepatocellular carcinoma(HCC)smaller than 2 cm.METHODS:Nodules smaller than 2 cm(n=34)revealed by ultrasonography(US)in 29 patients with liver cirrhosis were analyzed.Histological diagnosis of HCC was performed by ultrasonographic guidance:moderately-differentiated HCC(n=24);well-differentiated HCC(n=10).The patterns disclosed by the four imaging modalities defined the conclusive diagnosis ...

  5. High b-Value Diffusion MRI to Differentiate Recurrent Tumors from Posttreatment Changes in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: A Single Center Prospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Acampora

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently DW-MR Imaging has shown promising results in distinguishing between recurrent tumors and posttreatment changes in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma (HNSSC. Aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic performances of DWI at high b-value (b = 2000 s/mm2 compared to standard b-value (b = 1000 s/mm2 and ADCratio values (ADCratio=ADC2000/ADC1000×100 to differentiate recurrent tumors from posttreatment changes after treatment of HSNCC. 20 patients (16 M, 4 F underwent MR Imaging between 2 and 16 months (mean 7 after treatment. Besides morphological sequences, we performed single-shot echo-planar DWI at b = 1000 s/mm2 and b = 2000 s/mm2, and corresponding ADC maps were generated (ADC1000 and ADC2000, resp.. By considering contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images as references, ROIs were drawn in order to evaluate mean ADC1000, ADC2000, and ADCratio. The mean ADC1000 and ADC2000 in recurrent tumors were significantly lower than those in posttreatment changes (P=0.001 and P=0.016, resp.. Moreover, the mean ADCratio between the two groups showed a statistically significant difference (P=0.002. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of ADCratio were 82.0%, 100%, and 90%, respectively, by considering an optimal cutoff value of 65.5%. ADCratio is a promising value to differentiate between recurrent tumors and posttreatment changes in HNSCC and may be more useful than ADC1000 and ADC2000.

  6. High b-Value Diffusion MRI to Differentiate Recurrent Tumors from Posttreatment Changes in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: A Single Center Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acampora, Angela; Manzo, Gaetana; Fenza, Giacomo; Busto, Giuseppina; Serino, Antonietta; Manto, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Recently DW-MR Imaging has shown promising results in distinguishing between recurrent tumors and posttreatment changes in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma (HNSSC). Aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic performances of DWI at high b-value (b = 2000 s/mm(2)) compared to standard b-value (b = 1000 s/mm(2)) and ADCratio values (ADCratio = ADC2000/ADC1000 × 100) to differentiate recurrent tumors from posttreatment changes after treatment of HSNCC. 20 patients (16 M, 4 F) underwent MR Imaging between 2 and 16 months (mean 7) after treatment. Besides morphological sequences, we performed single-shot echo-planar DWI at b = 1000 s/mm(2) and b = 2000 s/mm(2), and corresponding ADC maps were generated (ADC1000 and ADC2000, resp.). By considering contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images as references, ROIs were drawn in order to evaluate mean ADC1000, ADC2000, and ADCratio. The mean ADC1000 and ADC2000 in recurrent tumors were significantly lower than those in posttreatment changes (P = 0.001 and P = 0.016, resp.). Moreover, the mean ADCratio between the two groups showed a statistically significant difference (P = 0.002). Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of ADCratio were 82.0%, 100%, and 90%, respectively, by considering an optimal cutoff value of 65.5%. ADCratio is a promising value to differentiate between recurrent tumors and posttreatment changes in HNSCC and may be more useful than ADC1000 and ADC2000.

  7. Targeted treatment of head and neck squamous-cell carcinoma: potential of lapatinib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gandhi MD

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Mitul D Gandhi, Mark Agulnik Division of Hematology and Oncology, Robert H Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA Abstract: Squamous-cell cancer of the head and neck is a heterogeneous malignancy with treatment predicated on a multimodality therapy involving surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation. However, this approach results in durable responses in only a subset of patients, and is associated with significant toxicity. In advanced disease, multi-agent platinum-based chemotherapy produces only modest improvements in survival. Increased insight into tumor biology has demonstrated several critical oncogenic pathways offering prospects for targeted therapy that may improve upon the existing treatment strategies. The epidermal growth factor receptor is one such target, and directed therapy with the monoclonal antibody cetuximab has been extensively studied. Lapatinib is an oral agent that targets multiple transmembrane receptors within the epidermal growth factor receptor family, and offers a promising new approach to treatment. This paper reviews the rationale for and clinical activity of lapatinib in squamous-cell cancer of the head and neck. Keywords: epidermal growth factor receptor, targeted therapy, oral cavity, pharynx, larynx

  8. IMRT With Simultaneous Integrated Boost and Concurrent Chemotherapy for Locoregionally Advanced Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montejo, Michael E.; Shrieve, Dennis C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Huntsman Cancer Hospital, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Bentz, Brandon G.; Hunt, Jason P.; Buchman, Luke O. [Division of Otolaryngology-Head Neck Surgery, Department of Surgery, Huntsman Cancer Hospital, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Agarwal, Neeraj [Department of Internal Medicine, Oncology Division, Huntsman Cancer Hospital, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Hitchcock, Ying J., E-mail: ying.hitchcock@hci.utah.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Huntsman Cancer Hospital, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of accelerated radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy in advanced head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Between April 2003 and May 2008, 43 consecutive patients with advanced head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma received accelerated chemoradiation with concurrent cisplatin or cetuximab. The doses for intensity-modulated radiotherapy with simultaneous integrated boost were 67.5, 60.0, and 54 Gy in 30 daily fractions of 2.25, 2.0, and 1.8 Gy to the planning target volumes for gross disease, high-risk nodes, and low-risk nodes, respectively. Results: Of the patients, 90.7% completed chemoradiotherapy as prescribed. The median treatment duration was 43 days (range, 38-55 days). The complete response rate was 74.4%. With median follow-up of 36.7 months (range, 16.8-78.1 months) in living patients, the estimated 1-, 2-, and 5-year locoregional control, overall survival, and disease-free survival rates were 82%, 82%, and 82%; 73%, 65%, and 61%; and 73%, 73%, and 70%, respectively. One treatment-related death occurred from renal failure. Grade 3 mucositis and dermatitis occurred in 13 patients (30.2%) and 3 patients (6.9%), respectively. Grade 2 xerostomia occurred in 12 patients (27.9%). In patients with adequate follow-up, 82% were feeding tube free by 6 months after therapy; 13% remained feeding tube dependent at 1 year. Grade 3 soft-tissue fibrosis, esophageal stricture, osteoradionecrosis, and trismus occurred in 3 patients (6.9%), 5 patients (11.6%), 1 patient (2.3%), and 3 patients (6.9%), respectively. Conclusions: Our results show that intensity-modulated radiotherapy with simultaneous integrated boost with concurrent chemotherapy improved local and regional control. Acute and late toxicities were tolerable and acceptable. A prospective trial of this fractionation regimen is necessary for further assessment of its efficacy and toxicity compared with other approaches.

  9. Loss of Y-chromosome does not correlate with age at onset of head and neck carcinoma: a case-control study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva Veiga, L.C. [Departamento de Genética, Instituto de Biociências, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Botucatu, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Clínica Médica, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Bérgamo, N.A. [Departamento de Biologia Geral, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Goiás, Goiânia, GO (Brazil); Reis, P.P. [Departamento de Cirurgia e Ortopedia, Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Botucatu, SP (Brazil); Kowalski, L.P. [Departamento de Cirurgia de Cabeça e Pescoço e Otorrinolaringologia, Hospital A.C. Camargo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Rogatto, S.R. [Laboratório NeoGene, Departamento de Urologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Botucatu, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Pesquisa, Hospital A.C. Camargo,Fundação Antônio Prudente, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-01-20

    Loss of Y-chromosome has been correlated with older age in males. Furthermore, current evidence indicates that Y-chromosome loss also occurs in several human tumors, including head and neck carcinomas. However, the association between Y nullisomy and the occurrence of neoplasias in elderly men has not been well established. In the present study, the association between Y-chromosome loss and head and neck carcinomas was evaluated by comparison to cells from peripheral blood lymphocytes and normal mucosa of cancer-free individuals matched for age using dual-color fluorescence in situ hybridization. Twenty-one patients ranging in age from 28 to 68 years were divided into five-year groups for comparison with 16 cancer-free individuals matched for age. The medical records of all patients were examined to obtain clinical and histopathological data. None of the patients had undergone radiotherapy or chemotherapy before surgery. In all groups, the frequency of Y-chromosome loss was higher among patients than among normal reference subjects (P < 0.0001) and was not age-dependent. These data suggest that Y-chromosome loss is a tumor-specific alteration not associated with advanced age in head and neck carcinomas.

  10. PDGF-AA mediates mesenchymal stromal cell chemotaxis to the head and neck squamous cell carcinoma tumor microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Tammara L; Cui, Ruwen; Szaniszlo, Peter; Resto, Vicente A; Powell, Don W; Pinchuk, Irina V

    2016-12-08

    The robust desmoplasia associated with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) suggests that the tumor microenvironment may be an important component in the pathophysiology of this cancer. Moreover, the high recurrence rate and poor clinical response to chemotherapy and radiation treatment further underscores that the non-cancerous cells of the microenvironment, such as mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs), and pericytes, may be important in the pathophysiology of HNSCC. Confocal microscopy and immunohistomchemistry approaches were used to identify MSCs tumor microenvironment from patients with oral cavity and oral pharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). In vitro Boyden chamber assays and multiplex magnetic bead assays were used to measure MSC chemotaxis and to identify the chemokines secreted by JHU-011, -012, -019, three cells lines derived from patients with oral pharyngeal SCC. We show here that MSCs reside in the tumor microenvironment of patients with oral cavity and oral pharyngeal SCC and are recruited via paracrine mediated tumor cell secretion of (platelet derived growth factor) PDGF-AA. The MSC markers CD90(+), CD105(+), and gremlin-1(+) were found to co-localize on cells within the tumor microenvironment in oral cavity SCC specimens distinct from α-smooth muscle actin staining CAFs. The conditioned media from JHU-011, -012, and -019 caused a significant increase in MSC migration (>60%) and invasion (>50%; p microenvironment expression of PDGFR-α has been shown to correlate with a worse prognosis in patients with prostate, breast, ovarian, non-small cell lung cancer and osteosarcoma. This is the first evidence that a similar signaling paradigm may be present in HNSCC. PDGFR-α inhibitors have not been studied as adjunctive treatment options in the management of HNSCC and may prove to be an important driver of the malignant phenotype in this setting.

  11. Methods for estimating the site of origin of locoregional recurrence in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Due, A.K.; Vogelius, I.R.; Berthelsen, A.K.; Kristensen, C.A.; Specht, L. [Copenhagen Univ. (Denmark). Dept. of Radiation Oncology Section 3994; Aznar, M.C. [Copenhagen Univ. (Denmark). Dept. of Radiation Oncology Section 3994; Copenhagen Univ. (Denmark). Niels Bohr Institute; Bentzen, S.M. [Copenhagen Univ. (Denmark). Dept. of Radiation Oncology Section 3994; Wisconsin Univ., MD (United States). Depts. of Human Oncology and Medical Physics; Korreman, S.S. [Copenhagen Univ. (Denmark). Niels Bohr Institute; Roskilde Univ. (Denmark). Dept. of Science, Systems, and Models

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: Methods to estimate the likely origin of recurrences after radiation therapy for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma are compared. Methods and materials: A total of 25 patients meeting the following inclusion criteria were randomly selected: curatively intended intensity-modulated radiotherapy planned on a positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/CT) scan during the period 2005-2009; squamous cell carcinoma in the oral cavity, pharynx or larynx; complete clinical response followed by locoregional recurrence; and a CT scan at recurrence before any salvage therapy. Exclusion criteria were previous cancer in the area, surgery prior to radiotherapy, or a synchronous cancer. Three methods of estimating focal points of recurrence origin and two volume overlap methods assigning the recurrences to the most central target volumes encompassing at least 50% or 95% of the recurrence volumes were tested. Treatment planning and recurrence scans were rigid and deformable co-registered in order to transfer focal points to the treatment planning scan. Double determinations of all volumes, points, and co-registrations were made. Results: The volume overlap methods assigned the recurrences to significantly more peripheral target volumes than focal methods (p < 0.0001 for all comparisons of 95% overlap vs. focal methods, p < 0.028 for all comparisons of 50% overlap vs. focal methods). Repeated registrations of the same point had higher reproducibility with deformable registration than with rigid registration (median distance 0.31 vs. 0.35 cm, p = 0.015). No significant differences were observed among the focal methods. Conclusion: Significant differences between methods were found which may affect strategies to improve radiotherapy based on pattern of failure analyses. (orig.)

  12. Enhanced expression of ANO1 in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma causes cell migration and correlates with poor prognosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Ruiz

    Full Text Available Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC has the potential for early metastasis and is associated with poor survival. Ano1 (Dog1 is an established and sensitive marker for the diagnosis of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST and has recently been identified as a Ca(2+ activated Cl(- channel. Although the ANO1 gene is located on the 11q13 locus, a region which is known to be amplified in different types of human carcinomas, a detailed analysis of Ano1 amplification and expression in HNSCC has not been performed. It is thus still unclear how Ano1 contributes to malignancy in HNSCC. We analyzed genomic amplification of the 11q13 locus and Ano1 together with Ano1-protein expression in a large collection of HNSCC samples. We detected a highly significant correlation between amplification and expression of Ano1 and showed that HNSCC patients with Ano1 protein expression have a poor overall survival. We further analyzed the expression of the Ano1 protein in more than 4'000 human samples from 80 different tumor types and 76 normal tissue types and detected that besides HNSCC and GISTs, Ano1 was rarely expressed in other tumor samples or healthy human tissues. In HNSCC cell lines, expression of Ano1 caused Ca(2+ activated Cl(- currents, which induced cell motility and cell migration in wound healing and in real time migration assays, respectively. In contrast, knockdown of Ano1 did not affect intracellular Ca(2+ signaling and surprisingly did not reduce cell proliferation in BHY cells. Further, expression and activity of Ano1 strongly correlated with the ability of HNSCC cells to regulate their volume. Thus, poor survival in HNSCC patients is correlated with the presence of Ano1. Our results further suggest that Ano1 facilitates regulation of the cell volume and causes cell migration, which both can contribute to metastatic progression in HNSCC.

  13. Prognostic value of CXCL12 and CXCR4 in inoperable head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rave-Fraenk, Margret; Tehrany, Narges; Leu, Martin; Weber, Hanne Elisabeth; Wolff, Hendrik Andreas [University Medical Center Goettingen, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Goettingen (Germany); Kitz, Julia [University Medical Center Goettingen, Department of Pathology, Goettingen (Germany); Burfeind, Peter [University Medical Center Goettingen, Department of Human Genetics, Goettingen (Germany); Schliephake, Henning [University Medical Center Goettingen, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Goettingen (Germany); Canis, Martin [University Medical Center Goettingen, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Goettingen (Germany); Beissbarth, Tim [University Medical Center Goettingen, Institute of Medical Statistics, Goettingen (Germany); Reichardt, Holger Michael [University Medical Center Goettingen, Institute for Cellular and Molecular Immunology, Goettingen (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    The chemokine CXCL12 and its receptor CXCR4 can affect tumor growth, recurrence, and metastasis. We tested the hypothesis that the CXCL12 and CXCR4 expression influences the prognosis of patients with inoperable head and neck cancer treated with definite radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded pretreatment tumor tissue from 233 patients with known HPV/p16{sup INK4A} status was analyzed. CXCL12 and CXCR4 expressions were correlated with pretreatment parameters and survival data by univariate and multivariate Cox regression. CXCL12 was expressed in 43.3 % and CXCR4 in 66.1 % of the samples and both were correlated with HPV/p16{sup INK4A} positivity. A high CXCL12 expression was associated with increased overall survival (p = 0.036), while a high CXCR4 expression was associated with decreased metastasis-free survival (p = 0.034). A high CXCR4 expression could be regarded as a negative prognostic factor in head and neck cancer because it may foster metastatic spread. This may recommend CXCR4 as therapeutic target for combating head and neck cancer metastasis. (orig.) [German] Das Chemokin CXCL12 und sein Rezeptor CXCR4 beeinflussen Tumorwachstum, Auftreten von Rezidiven und Metastasierung. Es wurde die Hypothese geprueft, dass ein Zusammenhang der CXCL12- und CXCR4-Expression mit der Prognose von Patienten bestehe, die wegen eines inoperablen Kopf-Hals-Tumors eine primaere Radio- oder Radiochemotherapie erhielten. Dabei wurde auch der HPV-Status der Patienten beruecksichtigt. Formalinfixierte Proben aus unbehandelten Tumoren von 233 Patienten mit bekanntem HPV/p16{sup INK4A}-Status wurden ausgewertet. Die CXCL12- und CXCR4-Expression wurde mit klinischen Parametern und Ueberlebensdaten mittels uni- und multivariater Cox Regression analysiert. CXCL12 wurde von 43,3 %, CXCR4 von 66,1 % der Tumoren exprimiert, und beide Marker korrelierten mit einer HPV/p16{sup INK4A}-Expression. Eine hohe CXCL12-Expression war mit einem verbesserten

  14. The role of human papillomavirus in the pathogenesis of head & neck squamous cell carcinoma: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lo Muzio Lorenzo

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cancer statistics report an increased incidence of OSCC and OPSCC around the world. Though improvements in screening and early diagnosis have dramatically reduced the incidence of this neoplasm in recent years, the 5-year-disease-free survival, is still poor, specially for oropharyngeal cancer, despite the great scientific and financial efforts. Recently, several papers showed that HPV may be involved at least in the pathogenesis of a subgroup of oral and cervical SCC, leading to distinct molecular characteristics compared with HPV-negative ones. Nevertheless, OPSCCs associated with HPV infection seem to show a better prognosis and affect younger patients ( Comparing findings reported in the recent literature, the data of this state of the art about HPV might add useful informations concerning oropharyngeal carcinogenesis. Moreover, our review would be useful in order to define novel perspectives of treatment choice for Head & Neck cancer patients, by combining well known chemotherapeutical drugs with new molecular "target" therapy.

  15. Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy With Cisplatin Versus Cetuximab for Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaz, Nadeem; Sherman, Eric; Koutcher, Lawrence; Shapiro, Lauren; Katabi, Nora; Zhang, Zhigang; Shi, Weiji; Fury, Mathew; Wong, Richard; Wolden, Suzanne; Rao, Shyam; Lee, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We previously reported inferior outcomes for locally advanced head and neck cancer treated with cetuximab (C225) versus cisplatin (CDDP). We now examine if this difference persists when accounting for HPV status and update outcomes on the entire cohort. Materials and Methods From 3/106 to 4/1/08, 174 locally advanced head and neck cancer patients received definitive treatment with RT and CDDP (n = 125) or RT and C225 (n = 49). Of these, 62 patients had tissue available for HPV analysis. Results The median follow-up was 47 months. The 3-year loco-regional failure, disease-free survival, and overall survival for CDDP versus C225 were 5.7% versus 40.2% (P < 0.0001), 85.1% versus 35.4% (P < 0.0001), and 90.0% versus 56.6% (P < 0.0001), respectively. In the subset with tissue, there was no difference in rates of HPV or p16 positivity between the 2 groups. In this subset, the 3-year loco-regional failure, disease-free survival, and overall survival for CDDP versus C225 were 5.3% versus 32.0% (P = 0.01), 86.8% versus 43.2% (P = 0.002), and 86.7% versus 76.9% (P = 0.09), respectively. Multivariate analysis continued to show a benefit for CDDP. Conclusions With longer follow-up and the inclusion of HPV and p16 status for about one third of patients where tissue was available, we continued to find superior outcomes with concurrent CDDP versus C225. PMID:24401670

  16. Immunohistochemical biomarkers and FDG uptake on PET/CT in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Gregers Brünnich; Vogelius, Ivan R.; Rasmussen, Jacob H;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is an exciting complementarity between the spatial resolution provided by molecular imaging of a single, often unspecific, biomarker on one hand and the more detailed biological profile achievable from a diagnostic biopsy using a panel of immunohistochemical (IHC) markers on the...

  17. The cancer pain related factors affected by celecoxib together with cetuximab in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yaqiong; Yan, Jia; Huang, Yan; Xu, Hui; Zhang, Ying; Hu, Rong; Jiang, Jue; Chen, Zhifeng; Jiang, Hong

    2015-03-01

    Pain is the most disruptive influence on the quality of prognosis among head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients. The development of pain is closely associated with tumor growth and inflammation in the cancer patients. Notably, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is an important mediator during inflammation. Celecoxib, a selective inhibitor of COX-2, was hailed as a promising chemopreventive agent for HNSCC. Dose-dependent cardiac toxicity limits long-term use of celecoxib. However, the toxicity can be diminished by lowering the dosage. In this study, we hypothesized that a combinatory strategy to reduce cancer pain via two distinct pathways, tumor grown inhibition and inflammation blockade, which would enhance analgesia effect induced by HNSCC. We found that treatment of cetuximab (C225), a monoclonal anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibody, with low-dose celecoxib results in a more pronounced anticancer effect in HNSCC than either agent alone. More noticeably, the combination could downregulate the phosphorylation of constitutively active extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) in CAL-27 and Fadu cells. Furthermore, combination therapy enhancing S phase arrest and downregulating cyclin D1 was observed in Fadu cells. The COX-2 expression was significantly blocked by celecoxib combined with C225, and other cancer pain related factors, such as ET-1 and NGF, was also downregulated by combination treatment. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that combination of celecoxib with C225 holds potential as a new therapy strategy in developing cancer pain treatment in HNSCC.

  18. Tinospora crispa extract inhibits MMP-13 and migration of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hataipan; Phienwej; Ih-si; Swasdichira; Surattana; Amnuoypol; Prasit; Pavasant; Piyamas; Sumrejkanchanakij

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of Tinospora crispa(T. crispa) extract on matrix metalloproteinase 13(MMP-13) expression and cell migration. Methods: The cytotoxicity of T. crispa extract was examined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay on head and neck squamous cell carcinoma(HNSCC) cell lines. The effect on expression of MMP-13 was analysed by RT-PCR and ELISA. The migration was assessed by wound healing assay. Results: MMP-13 m RNA was highly expressed in the metastatic human HNSCC cell lines, HN22 and HSC-3. T. crispa extract at a concentration of 100.0 μg/m L caused about 50% reduction of cell survival. T. crispa extract at a non-toxic concentration of 12.5, 25.0 and 50.0 μg/m L signii cantly suppressed MMP-13 m RNA expression and secreted MMP-13 in both HN22 and HSC-3. The expression of tissue inhibitors of metalloprotease by HSC-3 cells was attenuated by 25.0 and 50.0 μg/m L of T. crispa extract. Addition of the extract to cells in a wound healing assay showed inhibition of cell migration by HN22 cells. Conclusions: These data suggest that T. crispa could be considered as a potential therapeutic drug to prevent metastasis of HNSCC.

  19. Tinospora crispa extract inhibits MMP-13 and migration of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hataipan Phienwej; Ih-si Swasdichira; Surattana Amnuoypol; Prasit Pavasant; Piyamas Sumrejkanchanakij

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effect of Tinospora crispa (T. crispa) extract on matrix metalloproteinase 13 (MMP-13) expression and cell migration. Methods: The cytotoxicity of T. crispa extract was examined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay on head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cell lines. The effect on expression of MMP-13 was analysed by RT-PCR and ELISA. The migration was assessed by wound healing assay. Results: MMP-13 mRNA was highly expressed in the metastatic human HNSCC cell lines, HN22 and HSC-3. T. crispa extract at a concentration of 100.0 µg/mL caused about 50% reduction of cell survival. T. crispa extract at a non-toxic concentration of 12.5, 25.0 and 50.0 µg/mL significantly suppressed MMP-13 mRNA expression and secreted MMP-13 in both HN22 and HSC-3. The expression of tissue inhibitors of metalloprotease by HSC-3 cells was attenuated by 25.0 and 50.0 µg/mL of T. crispa extract. Addition of the extract to cells in a wound healing assay showed inhibition of cell migration by HN22 cells. Conclusions: These data suggest that T. crispa could be considered as a potential therapeutic drug to prevent metastasis of HNSCC.

  20. Identification, expansion and characterization of cancer cells with stem cell properties from head and neck squamous cell carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaseb, Hatem O; Fohrer-Ting, Helene; Lewis, Dale W; Lagasse, Eric; Gollin, Susanne M

    2016-10-15

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is a major public health concern. Recent data indicate the presence of cancer stem cells (CSC) in many solid tumors, including HNSCC. Here, we assessed the stem cell (SC) characteristics, including cell surface markers, radioresistance, chromosomal instability, and in vivo tumorigenic capacity of CSC isolated from HNSCC patient specimens. We show that spheroid enrichment of CSC from early and short-term HNSCC cell cultures was associated with increased expression of CD44, CD133, SOX2 and BMI1 compared with normal oral epithelial cells. On immunophenotyping, five of 12 SC/CSC markers were homogenously expressed in all tumor cultures, while one of 12 was negative, four of 12 showed variable expression, and two of the 12 were expressed heterogeneously. We showed that irradiated CSCs survived and retained their self-renewal capacity across different ionizing radiation (IR) regimens. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses of parental and clonally-derived tumor cells revealed different chromosome copy numbers from cell to cell, suggesting the presence of chromosomal instability in HNSCC CSC. Further, our in vitro and in vivo mouse engraftment studies suggest that CD44+/CD66- is a promising, consistent biomarker combination for HNSCC CSC. Overall, our findings add further evidence to the proposed role of HNSCC CSCs in therapeutic resistance.

  1. Adenoid cystic carcinoma of head and neck: A single institutional analysis of 66 patients treated with multi-modality approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajeet Kumar Gandhi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC accounts for 1% of all head and neck (HN cancers. Materials and Methods: Demographic, clinical, treatment, and survival details of 66 patients were collected (1995-2011 and analyzed. Disease-free survival (DFS was estimated by Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Primary disease sites were sinonasal (n = 27, salivary gland (n = 30, and others (n = 9. Median follow-up was 23 months (range: 12-211 months. Estimated DFS at 2- and 5-year were 75% and 67.2%, respectively. On univariate analysis, intra-cranial extension (ICE (hazard ratio [HR]: 3.59, P = 0.0071, lymph node involvement (HR: 4.05, P = 0.0065, treatment modality (others vs. surgery plus adjuvant radiotherapy, HR: 2.39, P = 0.0286 and T stage (T3/4 vs. T1/2, HR: 3.27, P = 0.007 had significant impact on DFS. Lymph node involvement (P = 0.038 and ICE (P = 0.038 continued to have significant impact on DFS on multivariate analysis. Conclusion: Surgery followed by adjuvant radiotherapy remains the treatment of choice for HN ACC. Lymph node involvement and ICE confer poor prognosis.

  2. Pathologic features of metastatic lymph nodes identified from prophylactic central neck dissection in patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyoung Shin; Park, Chanwoo; Kim, Sung Won; Noh, Woong Jae; Lim, Soo Jin; Chun, Bong Kwon; Kim, Beom Su; Hong, Jong Chul; Lee, Kang Dae

    2016-10-01

    The importance of pathologic features of metastatic lymph nodes (LNs), such as size, number, and extranodal extension, has been recently emphasized in patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). We evaluated the characteristics of metastatic LNs identified after prophylactic central neck dissection (CND) in patients with PTC. We performed a retrospective review of 1,046 patients who underwent unilateral or bilateral thyroidectomy with ipsilateral prophylactic CND. We reviewed the characteristics of the metastatic LNs and analyzed their correlation to the clinicopathologic characteristics of the primary tumor. Cervical LN metastasis after prophylactic CND was identified in 280 out of 1046 patients (26.8 %). The size of metastatic foci (≥2 mm) was independently correlated with primary tumor size (≥1 cm) (p = 0.016, OR = 1.88). Primary tumor size (≥1 cm) was also correlated to the number of metastatic LNs (≥5) (p = 0.004, OR = 3.14) and extranodal extension (p = 0.021, OR = 2.41) in univariate analysis. The size of the primary tumor affects pathologic features of subclinical LN metastasis in patients with PTC. Patients with primary tumors ≥1 cm have an increased risk of larger LN metastases (≥2 mm), an increased number of LN metastases (≥5), and a higher incidence of ENE, which should be considered in decision for prophylactic CND.

  3. Review of the Clinical and Biologic Aspects of Human Papillomavirus-Positive Squamous Cell Carcinomas of the Head and Neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blitzer, Grace C.; Smith, Molly A. [Department of Human Oncology, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Harris, Stephen L. [Radiation Oncology Associates, Manchester, New Hampshire (United States); Kimple, Randall J., E-mail: rkimple@humonc.wisc.edu [Department of Human Oncology, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Human papillomavirus (HPV), a known etiology of a subset of head-and-neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNCs), causes numerous alterations in normal cellular functions. This article reviews the biology, detection, and treatment of HPV-positive HNC. The role of HPV oncoproteins in tumor development, the natural history of HPV infection, and risk factors for and prevention of transmission of oral HPV are considered. Commonly used methods for detecting HPV infection, including limitations of these methods, are discussed to aid the practicing clinician in using these tests in their clinical practice. Clinical characteristics of HPV-positive HNC, including potential explanations for the improved outcomes seen in patients with HPV-positive HNC, are assessed. Ongoing clinical trials specific for patients with HPV-positive HNC are described, and areas in need of additional research are summarized. Until the results of ongoing trials are known, treatment of HPV-positive HNC should not differ in clinical practice from treatment of similar non-HPV related cancers.

  4. Afatinib efficacy against squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck cell lines in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Natalie R; Soneru, Christian; Liu, Jing; Grushko, Tatyana A; Hardeman, Ashley; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Baum, Anke; Solca, Flavio; Cohen, Ezra E W

    2015-12-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors have demonstrated efficacy in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). In addition to EGFR, other ErbB family members are expressed and activated in SCCHN. Afatinib is an ErbB family blocker that has been approved for treating patients with EGFR-mutated nonsmall cell lung cancer. We sought to determine the efficacy of afatinib in preclinical models and compare this to other EGFR-targeted agents. Afatinib efficacy was characterized in a panel of ten SCCHN cell lines and found to be most effective against cell lines amplified for EGFR. Afatinib had lower IC(50) values than did gefitinib against the same panel. Two EGFR-amplified cell lines that are resistant to gefitinib are sensitive to afatinib. Cetuximab was not found to have a synergistic effect with afatinib either in vitro or in vivo. Both afatinib and cetuximab were effective in tumor xenograft model. Afatinib is an effective agent in SCCHN especially in models with EGFR amplification.

  5. Novel anti-tumor mechanism of galanin receptor type 2 in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uehara, Takayuki; Kanazawa, Takeharu; Mizukami, Hiroaki; Uchibori, Ryosuke; Tsukahara, Tomonori; Urabe, Masashi; Kume, Akihiro; Misawa, Kiyoshi; Carey, Thomas E; Suzuki, Mikio; Ichimura, Keiichi; Ozawa, Keiya

    2014-01-01

    Galanin and its receptors, GALR1 and GALR2, are known tumor suppressors and potential therapeutic targets in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Previously, we demonstrated that, in GALR1-expressing HNSCC cells, the addition of galanin suppressed tumor proliferation via upregulation of ERK1/2 and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, whereas, in GALR2-expressing cells, the addition of galanin not only suppressed proliferation, but also induced apoptosis. In this study, we first transduced HEp-2 and KB cell lines using a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-green fluorescent protein (GFP) vector and confirmed a high GFP expression rate (>90%) in both cell lines at the standard vector dose. Next, we demonstrated that GALR2 expression in the presence of galanin suppressed cell viability to 40-60% after 72 h in both cell lines. Additionally, the annexin V-positive rate and sub-G0/G1 phase population were significantly elevated in HEp-2 cells (mock vs GALR2: 12.3 vs 25.0% (P Bim. These results illustrate that transient GALR2 expression in the presence of galanin induces apoptosis via diverse pathways and serves as a platform for suicide gene therapy against HNSCC. © 2013 The Authors. Cancer Science published by Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  6. Receptor-type Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase β Regulates Met Phosphorylation and Function in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiru Xu

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC is the sixth most common cancer and has a high rate of mortality. Emerging evidence indicates that hepatocyte growth factor receptor (or Met pathway plays a pivotal role in HNSCC metastasis and resistance to chemotherapy. Met function is dependent on tyrosine phosphorylation that is under direct control by receptor-type protein tyrosine phosphatase β (RPTP-β. We report here that RPTP-β expression is significantly downregulated in HNSCC cells derived from metastatic tumors compared to subject-matched cells from primary tumors. Knockdown of endogenous RPTP-β in HNSCC cells from primary tumor potentiated Met tyrosine phosphorylation, downstream mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinase pathway activation, cell migration, and invasion. Conversely, restoration of RPTP-β expression in cells from matched metastatic tumor decreased Met tyrosine phosphorylation and downstream functions. Furthermore, we observed that six of eight HNSCC tumors had reduced levels of RPTP-β protein in comparison with normal oral tissues. Collectively, the results demonstrate the importance of RPTP-β in tumor biology of HNSCC through direct dephosphorylation of Met and regulation of downstream signal transduction pathways. Reduced RPTP-β levels, with or without Met overexpression, could promote Met activation in HNSCC tumors.

  7. Detection of somatic mutations and HPV in the saliva and plasma of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuxuan; Springer, Simeon; Mulvey, Carolyn L; Silliman, Natalie; Schaefer, Joy; Sausen, Mark; James, Nathan; Rettig, Eleni M; Guo, Theresa; Pickering, Curtis R; Bishop, Justin A; Chung, Christine H; Califano, Joseph A; Eisele, David W; Fakhry, Carole; Gourin, Christine G; Ha, Patrick K; Kang, Hyunseok; Kiess, Ana; Koch, Wayne M; Myers, Jeffrey N; Quon, Harry; Richmon, Jeremy D; Sidransky, David; Tufano, Ralph P; Westra, William H; Bettegowda, Chetan; Diaz, Luis A; Papadopoulos, Nickolas; Kinzler, Kenneth W; Vogelstein, Bert; Agrawal, Nishant

    2015-06-24

    To explore the potential of tumor-specific DNA as a biomarker for head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC), we queried DNA from saliva or plasma of 93 HNSCC patients. We searched for somatic mutations or human papillomavirus genes, collectively referred to as tumor DNA. When both plasma and saliva were tested, tumor DNA was detected in 96% of 47 patients. The fractions of patients with detectable tumor DNA in early- and late-stage disease were 100% (n = 10) and 95% (n = 37), respectively. When segregated by site, tumor DNA was detected in 100% (n = 15), 91% (n = 22), 100% (n = 7), and 100% (n = 3) of patients with tumors of the oral cavity, oropharynx, larynx, and hypopharynx, respectively. In saliva, tumor DNA was found in 100% of patients with oral cavity cancers and in 47 to 70% of patients with cancers of the other sites. In plasma, tumor DNA was found in 80% of patients with oral cavity cancers, and in 86 to 100% of patients with cancers of the other sites. Thus, saliva is preferentially enriched for tumor DNA from the oral cavity, whereas plasma is preferentially enriched for tumor DNA from the other sites. Tumor DNA in saliva was found postsurgically in three patients before clinical diagnosis of recurrence, but in none of the five patients without recurrence. Tumor DNA in the saliva and plasma appears to be a potentially valuable biomarker for detection of HNSCC.

  8. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy of cisplatin and fluorouracil regimen in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: a meta-analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU Yu-xiong; ZHENG Jia-wei; ZHENG Guang-sen; LIAO Gui-qing; ZHANG Zhi-yuan

    2008-01-01

    Background The benefit of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in the management of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) still remains controversial. The aim of this meta-analysis is to evaluate the role of the neoadjuvant chemotherapy with the cisplatin and fluororacil (PF) regimen in enhancing the overall survival of and decreasing locoregional relapse and distant metastasis in HNSCC patients.Methods Medline and manual searches were performed to identify all published randomized controlled trials (RCTs) investigating the efficacy of the neoadjuvant chemotherapy with the PF regimen. Outcomes assessed by meta-analysis included Iocoregional relapse, distant metastasis, and overall survival. The odds ratio was the principle measurement of effect, which was calculated as the treatment group (chemotherapy plus Iocoregional treatment) versus the control group (Iocoregional treatment alone) and was presented as a point estimate with 95% confidence intervals (Cl).Results Eight RCTs were adopted for analysis. The meta-analysis showed that the odds ratio for the Iocoregional relapse was 0.92 (0.70-1.22, 95%Cl), which was not statistically significant. The odds ratios for distant metastasis and overall survival were 0.47 (0.33-0.68, 95% Cl) and 1.28 (1.01-1.62, 95% Cl) respectively, which were both statistically significant.Conclusions Neoadjuvant chemotherapy with the PF regimen in HNSCC patients has no effect on Iocoregional relapse. However, it shows a small but significant benefit in reducing distant metastasis and improving the overall survival.

  9. Resveratrol potentiates the in vitro and in vivo anti-tumoral effects of curcumin in head and neck carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuelli, Laura; Di Stefano, Enrica; Fantini, Massimo; Mattera, Rosanna; Benvenuto, Monica; Marzocchella, Laura; Sacchetti, Pamela; Focaccetti, Chiara; Bernardini, Roberta; Tresoldi, Ilaria; Izzi, Valerio; Mattei, Maurizio; Frajese, Giovanni Vanni; Lista, Florigio; Modesti, Andrea; Bei, Roberto

    2014-11-15

    The survival rate of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) patients has not considerably changed over the last two decades. Polyphenols inhibit the growth of cancer cells. We determined whether the combination of Resveratrol (RES) and Curcumin (CUR) enhanced their in vitro and in vivo antitumor activities on HNSCC cell lines compared to the single compounds. We provide evidence that RES potentiated the apoptotic effect and reduced the IC50 of CUR on HNSCC cell lines. The model of compounds interaction indicated the onset of an additive effect of the two compounds compared to the single treatment after decrease of their concentrations. RES+CUR compared to CUR increased the PARP-1 cleavage, the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, the inhibition of ERK1 and ERK2 phosphorylation, and the expression of LC3 II simultaneously with the formation of autophagic vacuoles. RES and CUR induced cytoplasmic NF-κB accumulation. RES+CUR administrations were safe in BALB/c mice and reduced the growth of transplanted salivary gland cancer cells (SALTO) more efficiently than CUR. Overall, combinations of CUR and RES was more effective in inhibiting in vivo and in vitro cancer growth than the treatment with CUR. Additional studies will be needed to define the therapeutic potential of these compounds in combination.

  10. A dual specificity kinase, DYRK1A, as a potential therapeutic target for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Aneesha; Nanjappa, Vishalakshi; Raja, Remya; Sathe, Gajanan; Puttamallesh, Vinuth N.; Jain, Ankit P.; Pinto, Sneha M.; Balaji, Sai A.; Chavan, Sandip; Sahasrabuddhe, Nandini A.; Mathur, Premendu P.; Kumar, Mahesh M.; Prasad, T. S. Keshava; Santosh, Vani; Sukumar, Geethanjali; Califano, Joseph A.; Rangarajan, Annapoorni; Sidransky, David; Pandey, Akhilesh; Gowda, Harsha; Chatterjee, Aditi

    2016-01-01

    Despite advances in clinical management, 5-year survival rate in patients with late-stage head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) has not improved significantly over the past decade. Targeted therapies have emerged as one of the most promising approaches to treat several malignancies. Though tyrosine phosphorylation accounts for a minority of total phosphorylation, it is critical for activation of signaling pathways and plays a significant role in driving cancers. To identify activated tyrosine kinase signaling pathways in HNSCC, we compared the phosphotyrosine profiles of a panel of HNSCC cell lines to a normal oral keratinocyte cell line. Dual-specificity tyrosine-(Y)-phosphorylation regulated kinase 1A (DYRK1A) was one of the kinases hyperphosphorylated at Tyr-321 in all HNSCC cell lines. Inhibition of DYRK1A resulted in an increased apoptosis and decrease in invasion and colony formation ability of HNSCC cell lines. Further, administration of the small molecular inhibitor against DYRK1A in mice bearing HNSCC xenograft tumors induced regression of tumor growth. Immunohistochemical labeling of DYRK1A in primary tumor tissues using tissue microarrays revealed strong to moderate staining of DYRK1A in 97.5% (39/40) of HNSCC tissues analyzed. Taken together our results suggest that DYRK1A could be a novel therapeutic target in HNSCC. PMID:27796319

  11. Targeting cellular and molecular drivers of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: current options and emerging perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ausoni, Simonetta; Boscolo-Rizzo, Paolo; Singh, Bhuvanesh; Da Mosto, Maria Cristina; Spinato, Giacomo; Tirelli, Giancarlo; Spinato, Roberto; Azzarello, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    Despite improvements in functional outcomes attributable to advances in radiotherapy, chemotherapy, surgical techniques, and imaging techniques, survival in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients has improved only marginally during the last couple of decades, and optimal therapy has yet to be devised. Genomic complexity and intratumoral genetic heterogeneity may contribute to treatment resistance and the propensity for locoregional recurrence. Countering this, it demands a significant effort from both basic and clinical scientists in the search for more effective targeted therapies. Recent genomewide studies have provided valuable insights into the genetic basis of HNSCC, uncovering potential new therapeutic opportunities. In addition, several studies have elucidated how inflammatory, immune, and stromal cells contribute to the particular properties of these neoplasms. In the present review, we introduce recent findings on genomic aberrations resulting from whole-genome sequencing of HNSCC, we discuss how the particular microenvironment affects the pathogenesis of this disease, and we describe clinical trials exploring new perspectives on the use of combined genetic and cellular targeted therapies.

  12. Overexpression of DDR2 contributes to cell invasion and migration in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jinke; Lu, Wei; Zhang, Senlin; Zhu, Chuchao; Ren, Tingting; Zhu, Tong; Zhao, Hu; Liu, Yanpu; Su, Jin

    2014-05-01

    Background Discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) is a unique receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) that is activated by fibrillar collagens. Although DDR2 contributes to the metastasis of some tumors, its role in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) remains unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression level, clinical and pathological significance, and biologic function of DDR2 in HNSCC. Methods Real-time quantitative PCR, western blot, and immunohistochemical staining were employed to assess the expression levels of DDR2 in HNSCC specimens. Adenovirus-mediated overexpression of DDR2 was used to evaluate its consequences on cell proliferation, invasion, migration, and the process of hypoxia-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Then nude mouse xenograft and tail vein metastasis models were utilized to validate the in vitro results. Results DDR2 was highly expressed in high grade HNSCC tissues and lowly expressed in low grade HNSCC tissues, but absent or rarely expressed in cancer-associated normal tissues. Both the frequency and expression intensity of DDR2 were significantly associated with tumor pathologic stage and lymph node metastasis. In vitro, DDR2 overexpression in HNSCC cells failed to alter cell proliferation but markedly accelerates cell invasion and migration as well as hypoxia-induced EMT. In vivo, elevated expression of DDR2 speeds up the metastasis of HNSCC cells to the lung. Conclusion DDR2 plays an important role in HNSCC metastasis, and might be a promising target for future therapies in this type of cancer.

  13. Diagnostic value of fine needle aspiration biopsy in non-thyroidal head and neck lesions: a retrospective study of 866 aspiration materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göret, Ceren Canbey; Göret, Nuri Emrah; Özdemir, Zeynep Tuğba; Özkan, Esra Akyüz; Doğan, Meryem; Yanık, Serdar; Gümrükçü, Gülistan; Aker, Figen Vardar

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the diagnostic value of fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) and compared our FNAB results of non-thyroidal head and neck lesions with excisional biopsy results. A total of 866 aspiration material taken from different parts of head and neck region out of thyroid were evaluated at Haydarpasa Numune Training and Research Hospital Pathology Laboratory, between January 2002 and May 2013 and 248 of which has histopathologic response were included in the study. Patients depending on origin of the masses were divided into three categories as; salivary gland, lymph nodes and soft tissue/cystic lesions. The sensitivity, specificity, diagnostic accuracy values of fine needle aspiration biopsies have been investigated for all the series and individually for each category. Diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value and negative predictive values of non-thyroidal head and neck masses were respectively; For all of the series; 94.6%, 97.9%, 96.7%, 95.9%, 97.2%, Salivary gland: 88.9%, 100%, 98.8%, 100%, 98.7%, Lymph nodes: 94.7%, 89.3%, 92.9%, 94.7%, 89.2%, Soft tissue/cystic lesions: 100%, 100%, 100%, 100%, 100%. For all of the series; there were 4 false negative (FN) cases; and 3 false positive (FP) cases. FNAB in the diagnosis of head and neck masses; it is an easy, cheap and usefull procedure.

  14. Detection and Typing of Human Papilloma Virus DNA by PCR in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma in E.N.T. Ward of Ahwaz Imam Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Nikakhlagh

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Nowadays, epidemiological and experimental evidences in western countries consistently support an etiological role for human papillomavirus (HPV in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (SCC. The role of HPV in the etiology of head and neck SCC in developing countries such as Iran has not been investigated. The purpose of the present study was to investigate HPV DNA in the head and neck cancer by polymerase chain reaction (PCR in patients referred to Imam Khomeini Hospital Ahwaz.Materials & Methods: In this prospective cross sectional study 176 patients with SCC of head and neck who admitted in Ahwaz Imam Khomeini Hospital were evaluated with PCR for HPV DNA and compared to 176 control samples with benign pathology. Results: In this study 7 specimens (3.97% of the case group were positive for HPV DNA that include HPV 16(3 cases ,18(2 cases ,57(1 case, 33 (1case and only 1 specimen (0.57% of the control group was positive that include HPV 6 ( P value<0.001Conclusion: This study demonstrates the presence of HPVs in the SCC of head and neck. Further studies are needed to evaluate larger population in Ahwaz for the presence and types of HPV.

  15. Imaging Characteristics and Prevalence of Pancreatic Carcinoma in Kosovo During 2011-2015 - Diagnostic Method as Choice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedushi, Kreshnike; Kabashi, Serbeze; Mucaj, Sefedin; Hasbahta, Gazmed; Ramadani, Naser; Hoxhaj, Astrit

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Pancreatic cancer is the 10thmost common malignancy and the 4thlargest cancer killer in adults. Aim: The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the number of cases presented with pancreatic carcinoma during the years 2011-2015, our experience of the imaging characteristics of pancreatic carcinoma. We evaluated prevalence of the pancreatic cancers, distant metastases and other local infiltration signs among the total cases of the pancreatic cancers diagnosed in the University Clinical Center of Kosovo, with the aim to compare these research findings to similar studies made in the developed countries. This is a retrospective research study done during the period of 2011-2015. Materials and Methodology: This retrospective research study includes 362 patients recently diagnosed with pancreatic cancer, examined in the period of 2011-2015 at the University Clinical Center of Kosovo. The imaging diagnostics are performed with MSCT Sensation 64 Siemens, MSCT Emotion 6 Siemens, and 1.5T MRI Symphony Siemens, biopsy guide with MSCT Sensation 64 Siemens in the Radiologic Clinic of UCCK; while the histopathology diagnostics has been performed in Clinic of Pathology at UCCK and prevalence is taken from the number of cases Reported at the Institute of Oncology Institute of Statistics and NIPH (National Institute of Public Health of Kosovo). Results: Out of a total of the 362 patients diagnosed with pancreas cancer, results is female 39.5% (n=143) and male 61.5% (n=219), report M: F (1: 1.6), 286 cases resulted in head and neck 79 % (n=286), 76 cases resulted in body and tail cancers (21%), distant metastases in first imaging modality were found in(n=155) patients 43 %, local infiltration was found in patients: gastric infiltration 15 % (n=54), duodenal and papilla infiltration 26% (n=94), local infiltration spleen 16% (n=57), local infiltration mesentery 43 % (n= 155), dilated biliary tree 34 % (n=123), regional lymph node infiltration 83 % (n= 300). Out of a total

  16. Diagnostic value of multiple tumor markers for patients with esophageal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Zhu, Zhenli; Liu, Yan; Jin, Xueyuan; Xu, Zhiwei; Yu, Qiuyan; Li, Ke

    2015-01-01

    Various studies assessing the diagnostic value of serum tumor markers in patients with esophageal cancer remain controversial. This study aims to comprehensively and quantitatively summarize the potential diagnostic value of 5 serum tumour markers in esophageal cancer. We systematically searched PubMed, Embase, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) and Chinese Biomedical Database (CBM), through February 28, 2013, without language restriction. Studies were assessed for quality using QUADAS (quality assessment of studies of diagnostic accuracy). The positive likelihood ratio (PLR) and negative likelihood ratio (NLR) were pooled separately and compared with overall accuracy measures using diagnostic odds ratios (DORs) and symmetric summary receiver operating characteristic (SROC) curves. Of 4391 studies initially identified, 44 eligible studies including five tumor markers met the inclusion criteria for the meta-analysis, while meta-analysis could not be conducted for 12 other tumor markers. Approximately 79.55% (35/44) of the included studies were of relatively high quality (QUADAS score≥7). The summary estimates of the positive likelihood ratio (PLR), negative likelihood ratio (NLR) and diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) for diagnosing EC were as follows: CEA, 5.94/0.76/9.26; Cyfra21-1, 12.110.59/22.27; p53 antibody, 6.71/0.75/9.60; SCC-Ag, 7.66/0.68/12.41; and VEGF-C, 0.74/0.37/8.12. The estimated summary receiver operating characteristic curves showed that the performance of all five tumor markers was reasonable. The current evidence suggests that CEA, Cyfra21-1, p53, SCC-Ag and VEGF-C have a potential diagnostic value for esophageal carcinoma.

  17. Primary transoral robotic surgery with concurrent neck dissection for early stage oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma implemented at a Danish head and neck cancer center

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rubek, Niclas; Channir, Hani Ibrahim; Charabi, Birgitte Wittenborg

    2017-01-01

    (RT) with or without concomitant chemotherapy. This is the first study in Scandinavia from a head and neck cancer centre that aims to demonstrate the feasibility of performing primary transoral robotic surgery (TORS) and concurrent neck dissection for patients with early stage OPSCC. Between September...... bilateral neck dissection. Due to an upstaging following surgery, 13 patients were referred to adjuvant therapy. Four of these patients received RT and two patients received concomitant chemo-radiation (CCR) therapy. Seven patients declined the recommended adjuvant therapy one of whom later developed an N......-site recurrence and received salvage surgery with postoperative RT. In summary, 43% of the patients were referred to adjuvant therapy following primary surgery which was mainly due to N-site stage migration and ECE. Primary TORS and concurrent neck dissection is a safe and feasible procedure that may...

  18. Locoregional tumour evaluation of squamous cell carcinoma in the head and neck area: a comparison between MRI, PET/CT and integrated PET/MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaarschmidt, Benedikt Michael [University Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Duesseldorf (Germany); University Duisburg-Essen, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); Heusch, Philipp; Buchbender, Christian; Antoch, Gerald [University Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Duesseldorf (Germany); Ruhlmann, Marcus; Ruhlmann, Verena [University Duisburg-Essen, Medical Faculty, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Essen (Germany); Bergmann, Christoph [University Hospital Essen, Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Essen (Germany); Schlamann, Marc [University Duisburg-Essen, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); University Hospital Giessen, Department of Neuroradiology, Marburg (Germany); Forsting, Michael; Wetter, Axel [University Duisburg-Essen, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    To evaluate the accuracy of integrated {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MR imaging for locoregional tumour evaluation compared to {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and MR imaging in initial tumour and recurrence diagnosis in histopathologically confirmed head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and integrated {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MR imaging were performed for initial tumour staging or recurrence diagnosis in 25 patients with HNSCC. MR, fused {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and fused {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MR images were analysed by two independent readers in separate sessions in random order. In initial tumour staging, T and N staging was performed while individual lesions were analysed in patients with suspected cancer recurrence. In T and N staging, histopathological results after tumour resection served as the reference standard while histopathological sampling as well as cross-sectional and clinical follow-up were accepted in cancer recurrence diagnosis. The diagnostic accuracy of each modality was calculated separately for T and N staging as well as for tumour recurrence, and compared using McNemar's test. Values of p <0.017 were considered statistically significant after Bonferroni correction. In 12 patients undergoing {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MR for initial tumour staging, T staging was accurate in 50 % with MRI, in 59 % with PET/CT and in 75 % with PET/MR while N staging was accurate in 75 % with MRI, in 77 % with PET/CT and in 71 % with PET/MR in relation to the reference standard. No significant differences were observed in T and N staging among the three modalities (p > 0.017). In 13 patients undergoing hybrid imaging for cancer recurrence diagnosis, diagnostic accuracy was 57 % with MRI and in 72 % with {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MR, respectively. Again, no significant differences were found among the three modalities (p > 0.017). In this initial study, no significant differences were found among {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MR, {sup 18}F

  19. Economic analysis of FDG-PET-guided management of the neck after primary chemoradiotherapy for node-positive head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryor, David I; Porceddu, Sandro V; Scuffham, Paul A; Whitty, Jennifer A; Thomas, Paul A; Burmeister, Bryan H

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this economic analysis was to model different strategies using pre-treatment nodal stage or nodal response assessment with CT or positron emission tomography (PET)/CT to determine the need for neck dissection. A cost-minimization analysis was developed on the basis of probability data from a prospective study of PET-guided management of the neck in patients achieving a complete response at the primary site. Costs were derived from our institution's activity-based clinical costing system. The effect of uncertainty was tested with sensitivity and scenario analyses including nationally representative cost data. Strategies incorporating PET had a 7% rate for neck dissection compared with 44% for CT-guided and 90% for planned neck dissection. The cost per patient was A$16,502 for planned neck dissection, A$8014 for CT-guided, and A$2573 for PET-guided. A policy with PET used only for incomplete response on CT was the least-cost strategy (A$2111). Policies incorporating PET remained the most efficient for all sensitivity/scenario analyses. The incorporation of PET/CT into nodal response assessment significantly reduced the number of unnecessary neck dissections and generated considerable cost savings in our cohort. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Diagnostic value of multidetector computed tomography for renal sinus fat invasion in renal cell carcinoma patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Cherry, E-mail: cherrykim0505@gmail.com; Choi, Hyuck Jae, E-mail: choihj@amc.seoul.kr; Cho, Kyoung-Sik, E-mail: kscho@amc.seoul.kr

    2014-06-15

    Objective: Although renal sinus fat invasion has prognostic significance in patients with renal cell carcinomas (RCCs), there are no previous studies about the value of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) about this issue in the current literature. Materials and methods: A total of 863 consecutive patients (renal sinus fat invasion in 110 patients (12.7%)) from single institutions with surgically-confirmed renal cell carcinoma who underwent MDCT between 2010 and 2012 were included in this study. The area under the curves (AUCs) of the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to compare diagnostic performance. Reference standard was pathologic examination. Weighted κ statistics were used to measure the level of interobserver agreement. Multivariate logistic regression model was used to find the predictors for renal sinus fat invasion. Image analysis was first performed with axial-only CT images. A second analysis was then performed with both axial and coronal CT images. A qualitative analysis was then conducted by two reviewers who reached consensus regarding tumor size, decreased perfusion, tumor margin, vessel displacement, and lymph node metastasis. The reference standard was pathologic evaluation. Results: The AUCs of the ROC analysis were 0.881 and 0.922 for axial-only images and 0.889 and 0.902 for combined images in both readers. The AUC of tumor size was 0.884, a similar value to that of the reviewers. In multivariate analysis, tumor size, a linear-nodular or nodular type of fat infiltration, and an irregular tumor margin were independent predicting factors for perinephric fat invasion. Conclusion: MDCT shows relatively high diagnostic performance in detecting perinephric fat invasion of RCC but suffers from a relatively low PPV related to low prevalence of renal sinus fat invasion. Applying tumor size alone we could get similar diagnostic performance to those of radiologists. Tumor size, fat infiltration with a nodular appearance, and

  1. [Atypical fractionation in advanced squamous-cell carcinomas of the head-neck area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrowsky, W; Naudé, J; Millesi, W; Grasl, M; Köhler, W; Kautzky, M; Pavelka, R; Toth, M; Dobrowsky, E

    1992-12-01

    From May 1990 to May 1991, 23 patients with advanced, inoperable squamous cell cancers, clinically staged as III or IV, were treated by unconventional fractionation radiotherapy. Treatment consisted of a continuous hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy, delivering a total dose of 55.3 Gy within 17 consecutive days. In ten patients radiation therapy was combined with chemotherapy; 20 mg mitomycin C/m2, administered by intravenous bolus injection on day 5 of treatment. Apart from a confluent mucositis, treatment tolerance was good. Haematological toxicity from mitomycin C was minor and did not require any specific therapy. The mucosal reaction lasted six weeks (median duration) and was not thought to be increased by additional chemotherapy. In twelve of 23 patients a complete remission of the primary tumour was seen, in patients with lymph node metastases there was a complete response in 14 out of 20 patients. After a median follow-up of 18 months, ten of 23 patients have survived (8/23 without evidence of disease). Eleven patients have died due to local tumour progression and one patient died with distant metastases, being without evidence of local tumour. The advantage of this unconventional fractionation, which takes the described short potential tumour doubling time for head and neck cancers into account, is discussed.

  2. Postoperative elective nodal irradiation for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck : outcome and prognostic factors for regional recurrence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vergeer, M. R.; Doornaert, P. A. H.; de Bree, R.; Leemans, C. R.; Slotman, B. J.; Langendijk, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: This study describes the results of elective irradiation in the N0 neck and tries to identify prognostic factors for regional recurrence. Materials and methods: Between 1985 and 2000, 785 cN0 or pN0 necks were treated with elective nodal irradiation in 619 head and neck squamous cell

  3. Computed tomography and NMR imaging for diagnostic evaluation of tumors of the head and neck. Computertomographie und Kernspintomographie bei Kopf-Hals-Tumoren; Methoden, Leitkriterien, Differentialdiagnosen und klinische Ergebnisse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenz, M. (Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Roentgendiagnostik)

    1992-01-01

    After a brief characterization of the two methods, CT and MRI, and the standard techniques for diagnostic evaluation of the head and neck region, the book presents comprehensive, detailed information on the various clinical applications of these methods, arranged by the various partial regions of the head and neck under the subject headings: paranasal sinuses and hypopharynx; orofacial region (oral cavity, oropharynx, floor of the mouth); hypopharynx and larynx; soft tissue of the neck. Each of these chapters starts with a general introduction and continues with a description of problems and diagnostic tasks, discussing the anatomic aspects and the diagnostic imaging techniques available for detecting epithelioma. (UWA). 212 figs., 28 tabs.

  4. The effect of cilengitide in combination with irradiation and chemotherapy in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiduschka, G. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Clinical Pharmacology, Vienna (Austria); Lill, C.; Schneider, S.; Kotowski, U.; Thurnher, D. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Vienna (Austria); Seemann, R. [Medical University of Vienna, Craniomaxillofacial and Oral Surgery, Vienna (Austria); Kornek, G. [Medical University of Vienna, Internal Medicine, Vienna (Austria); Schmid, R. [Medical University of Vienna, Radiotherapy and Radiobiology, Vienna (Austria)

    2014-05-15

    Integrins are highly attractive targets in oncology due to their involvement in angiogenesis in a wide spectrum of cancer entities. Among several integrin inhibitors under clinical evaluation, cilengitide is the most promising compound. However, little is known about the cellular processes induced during cilengitide therapy in combination with irradiation and cisplatin in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). The cytostatic effect of cilengitide was assessed by proliferation assay in the three HNSCC cell lines SCC25, FaDu and CAL27. Combination experiments with cisplatin and irradiation were performed. Possible synergistic effects were calculated in combination index (CI) analyses. Colony forming inhibition was investigated in clonogenic assays. Real-time PCR arrays were used to evaluate target protein gene expression patterns. Flow cytometry was used to detect apoptosis. Used alone, cilengitide has only minor cytotoxic effects in HNSCC cell lines. However, combination with cisplatin resulted in synergistic growth inhibition in all three cell lines. Irradiation showed synergism in short-term experiments and in colony forming assays, an additive effect was detected. Real-time PCR assay detected downregulation of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 after exposure of cells to cilengitide. Cilengitide in combination with cisplatin and irradiation may be a feasible option for the treatment of patients with head and neck cancer. However, further investigations are required to understand the exact mechanism that leads to synergistic cytotoxicity. (orig.) [German] Durch ihre Rolle bei der Angiogenese sind Integrine ein attraktives Ziel in der onkologischen Forschung. Der derzeit vielversprechendste Inhibitor dieser Molekuele ist Cilengitide, welches bereits in klinischen Studien getestet wird. Dennoch ist erst wenig ueber die zellulaeren Vorgaenge bekannt, welche durch Cilengitide in Kopf-Hals-Karzinomen (HNSCC) insbesondere in Kombination mit Strahlentherapie und

  5. In situ preservation of the inferior parathyroid gland during central neck dissection for papillary thyroid carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J B; Wu, K; Shi, L H; Sun, Y Y; Li, F B; Xie, L

    2017-10-01

    Postoperative hypocalcaemia due to dysfunction of the parathyroid glands is the most common complication after total thyroidectomy plus central neck dissection (CND). There is a lack of surgical techniques described to help preserve the inferior parathyroid gland in situ during CND. The objective of this study was to introduce the 'TBP layer' (layer of thymus-blood vessel-inferior parathyroid gland) concept for preserving the inferior parathyroid gland in situ during CND, and to evaluate its effectiveness. The study group included patients with primary papillary thyroid cancer who underwent total thyroidectomy with CND using the new surgical concept between January and December 2014. The control group included sex- and age-matched patients who underwent conventional total thyroidectomy with CND between January 2012 and December 2013. The proportion of inferior parathyroid glands preserved in situ and postoperative hypoparathyroidism rates in the two groups were compared. There were 181 patients in the study group and 306 in the control group. There were no significant differences between the groups in tumour size, multifocality, extrathyroidal extension, and number of harvested and metastatic central lymph nodes. The rate of inferior parathyroid gland preservation in situ was significantly improved from 37·9 to 76·3 per cent on the left side (P < 0·001), and from 52·0 to 77·9 per cent on the right side (P < 0·001), in the study group compared with the control group. The incidence of transient hypoparathyroidism decreased significantly from 35·0 to 7·2 per cent (P < 0·001). Applying the proposed surgical concept improved the rate of inferior parathyroid gland preservation in situ and decreased the incidence of transient postoperative hypoparathyroidism. © 2017 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Hepatocellular carcinoma and microRNA: new perspectives on therapeutics and diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ningning; Ekanem, Nsikak R; Sakyi, Clement A; Ray, Sidhartha D

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains one of the most lethal forms of cancer in the world. In this arena, utilities of microRNA (miRNA) as a sophisticated tool, in therapeutics and diagnostics, remains a prime focus among the leading researchers. It is well known that viral hepatitis, chronic alcoholism and metabolic syndrome are the prime causes of HCCs. Nevertheless, HCCs are usually diagnosed at late stages by using current serum biomarkers. Most epidemiological studies have found the survival rate in HCC cases to be relatively low. Therefore, development of effective noninvasive biomarkers for early detention of HCC and new strategies for HCC treatment remains a high priority research area on the shoulders of liver oncologists. Accumulating evidence in cancer diagnostics and therapeutics indicates that miRNAs involve in HCC progression, which may serve as sensitive biomarkers for detecting carcinogenesis and monitoring therapies of HCC. This review focuses on the role of miRNAs in the diagnostics and therapeutics of HCC.

  7. 2014 KLCSG-NCC Korea Practice Guidelines for the management of hepatocellular carcinoma: HCC diagnostic algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong Min; Park, Joong-Won; Choi, Byung Ihn

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most commonly occurring cancer in Korea and typically has a poor prognosis with a 5-year survival rate of only 28.6%. Therefore, it is of paramount importance to achieve the earliest possible diagnosis of HCC and to recommend the most up-to-date optimal treatment strategy in order to increase the survival rate of patients who develop this disease. After the establishment of the Korean Liver Cancer Study Group (KLCSG) and the National Cancer Center (NCC), Korea jointly produced for the first time the Clinical Practice Guidelines for HCC in 2003, revised them in 2009, and published the newest revision of the guidelines in 2014, including changes in the diagnostic criteria of HCC and incorporating the most recent medical advances over the past 5 years. In this review, we will address the noninvasive diagnostic criteria and diagnostic algorithm of HCC included in the newly established KLCSG-NCC guidelines in 2014, and review the differences in the criteria for a diagnosis of HCC between the KLCSG-NCC guidelines and the most recent imaging guidelines endorsed by the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC), the Liver Imaging Reporting and Data System (LI-RADS), the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network (OPTN) system, the Asian Pacific Association for the Study of the Liver (APASL) and the Japan Society of Hepatology (JSH).

  8. Genomic instability in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, J K

    1996-01-01

    The role of genomic instability in the development of squamous cell carcinoma (SCCHN) has become apparent with the publication of three major allelotype analysis of this disease, as well as many publications which have concentrated on specific target regions. The measurement of accumulated genetic alterations or fractional allele loss, as determined by allelotype analysis, provides a useful molecular indicator of tumour behaviour. In one major study, a positive correlation was found between FAL > median value and lymph node metastasis and also with a poor clinical outcome. In addition the recognition of microsatellite instability as a marker of DNA repair defects has provided a further molecular marker of the disease process and that loss of heterozygosity analysis and microsatellite instability appear to be independent genetic events in the development of SCCHN. Furthermore, the recognition of a number of novel target regions in SCCHN on chromosome arms, 1 p, 3p, 8p, 9p, 13q, 17p and 18q and our understanding of the role of certain oncogenes and tumour suppressor genes and their interaction with human papillomavirus has provided further elucidation of the neoplastic process. Even though this review describes a number of molecular events in SCCHN, the sequence of events still eludes the scientific community at present.

  9. Impact of apigenin and kaempferol on human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Hollie I.; Choi, Eun-Young; Helton, W. Brian; Gairola, C. Gary; Valentino, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Objective Apigenin and kaempferol are plant flavonoids with reported chemopreventive activities. This study aimed to determine the effect of apigenin and kaempferol on cell viability in cultured cells derived from the pharynx (FaDu cell line), an oral cavity carcinoma (PCI-13 cell line), and a metastatic lymph node (PCI-15B cell line) and in explanted FaDu cells. Study Design The in vitro viability of FaDu, PCI-13, and PCI-15B cells treated with apigenin and kaempferol was determined. Tumor growth of FaDu explants was evaluated in athymic mice that were gavaged with either apigenin or kaempferol. Results Although apigenin and kaempferol treatment decreased viability of cells in vitro, cell-type-dependent differences in responsiveness were observed. In vivo apigenin treatment significantly increased the tumor size of FaDu explants. Results obtained using kaempferol were similar. Conclusions The in vitro decrease in FaDu cell viability by apigenin and kaempferol was not observed in in vivo tumor explants using the conditions described in this study. PMID:24439916

  10. The feasibility of contralateral lower neck sparing intensity modulation radiated therapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients with unilateral cervical lymph node involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ling-Long; Tang, Xin-Ran; Li, Wen-Fei; Chen, Lei; Tian, Li; Lin, Ai-Hua; Sun, Ying; Ma, Jun

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the feasibility of contralateral lower neck sparing intensity modulation radiated therapy (IMRT) for nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients (NPC) with unilateral cervical lymph node metastasis. Retrospective review of 546 patients with unilateral cervical lymph node metastasis treated between November 2009 and February 2012 at one institution. All patients were staged using magnetic resonance imaging and received radical IMRT. Patients were classified into two groups: the inferior border of the negative neck irradiation field only covered Levels III to Va in Group 1; the inferior border covered entire neck down to Levels IV to Vb in Group 2. Median follow-up was 49.9months (range, 1.3-69.2months). Four-year overall survival (OS:89.3% vs. 88.9%, P=0.91), disease-free survival (DFS:81.7% vs. 81.0%, P=0.91), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS:88.2% vs. 87.9%, P=0.95), local relapse-free survival (LRFS:96.7% vs. 94.7%, P=0.70) and nodal relapse-free survival (NRFS: 96.1% vs. 95.9%, P=0.94) were not significantly different between Group 1 and Group 2. Twenty-two patients developed cervical lymph node relapse; of whom 20/22 (91.0%) developed unilateral relapse within pretreatment positive neck. Only one patient developed out-of-field relapse, though this patient also relapsed within the neck irradiation field (Level II). No clinicopathological feature tested had significant prognostic value for NRFS in multivariate analysis. In the IMRT and MRI era, contralateral lower neck sparing IMRT seems to be feasible for NPC patients with unilateral cervical lymph node metastasis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Retrospective Study of Palliative Radiotherapy in Newly Diagnosed Head and Neck Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, Christiaan M.; Huang Shaohui [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, and University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Fung, Sharon [Department of Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, ON (Canada); Bayley, Andrew J.; Cho, John B.; Cummings, Bernard J.; Dawson, Laura A.; Hope, Andrew J.; Kim, John J.; O' Sullivan, Brian; Waldron, John N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, and University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Ringash, Jolie, E-mail: jolie.ringash@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, and University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To examine the patterns of care, outcomes, and prognostic factors for patients with head-and-neck cancer (HNC) treated with palliative radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: An institutional HNC anthology and electronic patient records were used to identify patients with previously untreated HNC of mucosal or salivary gland origin who underwent palliative RT at our institution between July 2003 and June 2008. Overall survival was determined from the start date of RT to either the date of death or the date of last follow-up for living patients. The data were censored if the subject was either lost to follow-up or had not been seen for follow-up at our institution for {>=}4 months. Results: We identified 148 eligible patients. The median age was 72 years (range, 19-94). Of the 148 patients, 12 had Stage II-III, 39 Stage IVA, 36 Stage IVB, and 54 Stage IVC; for 7 patients, the stage was unknown. Oropharyngeal primary cancer (40) was the most common primary site. The Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status was 0 in 15, 1 in 69, 2 in 40, 3 in 19, and 4 in 5 patients. The Adult Co-morbidity Evaluation-27 scale was 0 in 33, 1 in 47, 2 in 44, and 3 in 21. The median radiation dose was 50 Gy (range, 2-70), the median fraction number was 20 (range, 1-40), and the median total treatment time (including breaks) was 29 days (range, 1-80). At analysis, 108 patients (73%) had died, 20 (13.5%) were alive, and 20 (13.5%) had been censored. The median follow-up was 4.8 months, and the median survival time was 5.2 months. Information on the treatment response was available for 103 patients (70%). On multivariate analysis, the radiation dose was an independent predictor of both overall survival (hazard ratio 0.97, 95% confidence interval 0.96-0.99, p <.01) and treatment response (odds ratio 1.05, 95% confidence interval 1.01-1.08, p <.01). Conclusion: For patients considered unsuitable for curative RT, the radiation dose might be an independent predictive

  12. Clusterin is a Gene Specific Target of MicroRNA-21 in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mydlarz, Wojciech; Uemura, Mamoru; Ahn, Sun; Hennessey, Patrick; Chang, Steven; Demokan, Semra; Sun, Wenyue; Shao, Chunbo; Bishop, Justin; Krosting, Julie; Mambo, Elizabeth; Westra, William; Ha, Patrick; Sidransky, David; Califano, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: MicroRNA-21 (miRNA-21) has proto-oncogenic properties, though no miRNA-21 specific targets have been found in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Further study of miRNA-21 and its specific targets is essential to understanding HNSCC biology. Experimental Design: miRNA expression profiles of 10 HNSCC and 10 normal mucosa samples were investigated using a custom miRNA microarray. 13 HNSCC and 5 normal mucosa primary tissue specimens underwent mRNA expression microarray analysis. To identify miRNA-21 downstream targets, oral keratinocyte cells were subjected to microarray analysis after miRNA-21 transient transfection. miRNA and mRNA expression were validated by RT-qPCR in a separate cohort of 16 HNSCC and 15 normal mucosal samples. Microarray and bioinformatics analyses were integrated to identify potential gene targets. In vitro assays looked at the function and interaction of miRNA-21 and its specific gene targets. Results: miRNA-21 was upregulated in HNSCC and stimulated cell growth. Integrated analyses identified Clusterin (CLU) as a potential miRNA-21 gene target. CLU was downregulated after forced expression of miRNA-21 in normal and HNSCC cell lines. The activity of a luciferase construct containing the 3’UTR of CLU was repressed by the ectopic expression of miRNA-21. CLU was also downregulated in primary HNSCC and correlated with miRNA-21 over-expression. CLU variant 1 (CLU-1) was the predominant splice variant in HNSCC, and showed growth suppression function that was reversed by miRNA-21 over-expression. Conclusions: CLU is a specific, functional target of oncogenic miRNA-21 in HNSCC. CLU-1 isoform is the predominant growth suppressive variant targeted by miRNA-21. PMID:24327270

  13. Low prevalence of human papillomavirus in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma in the northwest region of the Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzinger, Dana; Salvador, Christianne; Orosa, Jose; Racelis, Sheryl; Leaño, Modesty; Sanchez, Danilo; Angeles, Lara Mae; Halec, Gordana; Schmitt, Markus; Ramos, John Donnie; Pawlita, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Background Geographic heterogeneity of human papillomavirus (HPV) involvement in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) has been observed over the last few years. This trend has not been evaluated in the Philippines. Hence, this study aims to provide for the first time a data on the prevalence of HPV in HNSCC in the northwestern region of the Philippines. Methods Two hundred one (201) biopsy samples (179 formalin fixed paraffin embedded and 22 fresh frozen) from 163 Filipino HNSCC cases (oral cavity = 88; larynx = 60; oropharynx = 15) diagnosed between 2003 to 2013 were initially included in this study. HPV DNA was detected by two methods: (1) BSGP5+/6+-PCR/ multiplex human papillomavirus genotyping and (2) TaqMan probes-based real-time qPCR. Presence of HPV type-specific transcripts were also analyzed by reverse transcription-PCR with subsequent hybridization to oligonucleotide probes coupled to Luminex beads. Co-amplification of the β-globin and ubiquitin C genes served as internal positive controls for DNA and RNA analyses, respectively. Results and conclusions Of the 163, 82 (50.3%) cases had at least one tissue sample that was valid for molecular analysis. Only two of the DNA valid cases (2.4%) were HPV DNA-positive (HPV11 and HPV33). All HPV mRNA assays rendered negative results except for HPV11 transcripts. Results of this study may indicate that there is probably very low prevalence of HPV-associated HNSCC among Filipino adults living in a rural region of the Philippines. This study could serve as a benchmark for designing follow-up studies that would assess possible changes in trends of HNSCC among Filipinos in different ethnic regions of the country, especially urban areas in which the population is expected to adapt Western style sexual behavior. A prospective sampling of fresh frozen tissue is also highly recommended to ensure better molecular analyses. PMID:28199413

  14. Predictors of IMRT and Conformal Radiotherapy Use in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: A SEER-Medicare Analysis

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    Sher, David J., E-mail: dsher@lroc.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Center for Outcomes and Policy Research, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Neville, Bridget A. [Center for Outcomes and Policy Research, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Chen, Aileen B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Center for Outcomes and Policy Research, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Schrag, Deborah [Center for Outcomes and Policy Research, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The extent to which new techniques for the delivery of radiotherapy for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) have diffused into clinical practice is unclear, including the use of 3-dimensional conformal RT (3D-RT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare linked database, we identified 2,495 Medicare patients with Stage I-IVB HNSCC diagnosed at age 65 years or older between 2000 and 2005 and treated with either definitive (80%) or adjuvant (20%) radiotherapy. Our primary aim was to analyze the trends and predictors of IMRT use over this time, and the secondary aim was a similar description of the trends and predictors of conformal radiotherapy (CRT) use, defined as treatment with either 3D-RT or IMRT. Results: Three hundred sixty-four (15%) patients were treated with IMRT, and 1,190 patients (48%) were treated with 3D-RT. Claims for IMRT and CRT rose from 0% to 33% and 39% to 86%, respectively, between 2000 and 2005. On multivariable analysis, IMRT use was associated with SEER region (West 18%; Northeast 11%; South 12%; Midwest 13%), advanced stage (advanced, 21%; early, 9%), non-larynx site (non-larynx, 23%; larynx, 7%), higher median census tract income (highest vs. lowest quartile, 18% vs. 10%), treatment year (2003-2005, 31%; 2000-2002, 6%), use of chemotherapy (26% with; 9% without), and higher radiation oncologist treatment volume (highest vs. lowest tertile, 23% vs. 8%). With CRT as the outcome, only SEER region, treatment year, use of chemotherapy, and increasing radiation oncologist HNSCC volume were significant on multivariable analysis. Conclusions: The use of IMRT and CRT by Medicare beneficiaries with HNSCC rose significantly between 2000 and 2005 and was associated with both clinical and non-clinical factors, with treatment era and radiation oncologist HNSCC treatment volume serving as the strongest predictors of IMRT use.

  15. CCR7 regulates cell migration and invasion through MAPKs in metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fa-Yu; Safdar, Jawad; Li, Zhen-Ning; Fang, Qi-Gen; Zhang, Xu; Xu, Zhong-Fei; Sun, Chang-Fu

    2014-12-01

    Migration and invasion of tumor cells are essential prerequisites for the formation of metastasis in malignant diseases. Previously, we have reported that CC chemokine receptor 7 (CCR7) regulates the mobility of squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck (SCCHN) cells through several pathways, such as integrin and cdc42. In this study, we investigated the connection between CCR7 and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family members, and their influence on cell invasion and migration in metastatic SCCHN cells. Western blotting, immunostaining and fluorescence microcopy were used to detect the protein expression and distribution of MAPKs, and the Migration assay, Matrigel invasion assay and wound-healing assay to detect the role of MAPKs in CCR7 regulating cell mobility. To analyze the correlation between CCR7 and MAPK activity and clinicopathological factors immunohistochemical staining was emplyed. The results showed stimulation of CCL19 and the activation of CCR7 could induce ERK1/2 and JNK phosphorylation, while it had no efect on p38. After activation, ERK1/2 and JNK promoted E-cadherin low expression and Vimentin high expression. The MAPK pathway not only mediated CCR7 induced cell migration, but also mediated invasion speed. The immunohistochemistry results showed that CCR7 was correlated with the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and JNK in SCCHN, and these molecules were all associated with lymph node metastasis. Therefore, our study demonstrates that MAPK members (ERK1/2 and JNK) play a key role in CCR7 regulating SCCHN metastasis.

  16. Expression of IL-1α correlates with distant metastasis in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    León, Xavier; Bothe, Carolina; García, Jacinto; Parreño, Matilde; Alcolea, Sonia; Quer, Miquel

    2015-01-01

    The presence of IL-1 in human cancers is associated with aggressive tumor biology but its prognostic value is unknown. We studied whether IL-1α expression is a prognostic marker of distant metastasis in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). IL-1α mRNA and protein levels were determined in tumor samples and cancer cell lines using RT-PCR and ELISA. The effects of constitutive IL-1α expression by tumor lines were characterized. IL-1α mRNA and protein secretion were higher in tumor samples from patients who later developed distant metastasis than in patients who did not. By using distant metastasis as a dependent variable, patients were classified into two categories of IL-1α transcript-levels. The high-IL-1α group had a significantly lower five-year distant metastasis-free survival than the low-IL-1α group [70.0% (CI 95%: 55.9-84.1%) vs 94.7% (CI 95%:90.2-99.2%)]. When IL-1α transcript-levels were combined with clinical factors related to tumor metastasis, the predictive power of the model increased significantly. Additionally, transcript levels of IL-1α correlated significantly with those of the IL-1 family genes and genes related to the metastatic process. IL-1 treatment of microvascular endothelial cells increased adhesion of HNSCC cells but no differences were found based on constitutive IL-1α expression by tumor cells. Nevertheless, IL-1α produced by tumor cells effectively increased their transmigration across the endothelium. We found a significant relationship between IL-1α expression and development of distant metastasis in HNSCC patients. IL-1α expression could help to define a subset of patients at high risk of distant metastasis who could benefit from adjuvant treatment. PMID:26460957

  17. Prognostic Value of Cancer Stem Cell Markers in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: a Meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhaona; Li, Mianxiang; Chen, Xiaobing; Wang, Juan; Liang, Xueyi; Wang, Hongfei; Wang, Zhi; Cheng, Bin; Xia, Juan

    2017-01-01

    Bmi-1, CD133, Nanog and Oct-4 have been reported as cancer stem cell (CSC) markers in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). However, the prognostic value of them in HNSCC remains controversial. Hence, this meta-analysis was conducted to access the association between the four CSC markers and survival outcome of HNSCC patients. A total of 22 articles with 27 studies met the inclusion criteria and the combined hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated. Data analysis showed that high expression of CSC markers was associated with poor overall survival (OS) (HR = 1.93; 95% CI: 1.46–2.55, P < 0.001) and disease free survival (DFS) (HR = 4.78; 95% CI: 2.95–7.75, P < 0.001) but not disease specific survival (DSS) (HR = 1.17; 95% CI: 0.74–1.84, P = 0.50) of HNSCC patients. Subgroup analysis indicted that high expression of CD133 (HR = 2.33, 95%CI: 1.42–3.83, P < 0.001), Oct-4(HR = 2.10, 95%CI: 1.36–3.22, P = 0.007) and Nanog (HR = 2.49, 95%CI: 1.66–3.72, P < 0.001) could predict poor OS in HNSCC patients respectively whereas overexpression of Bmi-1 was not related to the reduced OS in HNSCC patients (HR = 1.32, 95%CI: 0.66–2.65, P = 0.43). Therefore, we concluded that CSC markers, especially CD133, Nanog and Oct-4, might be predictive factors in HNSCC patients. PMID:28220856

  18. Combined cetuximab and reirradiation for locoregional recurrent and inoperable squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balermpas, Panagiotis; Roedel, Claus; Weiss, Christian [Dept. of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, Goethe Univ., Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Hambek, Markus [Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology, Goethe Univ., Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Seitz, Oliver [Dept. of Oral Maxillofacial and Plastic Facial Surgery, Goethe Univ., Frankfurt/Main (Germany)

    2009-12-15

    Purpose: to investigate the feasibility, toxicity, and efficacy of external-beam reirradiation (Re-RT) combined with cetuximab for patients with inoperable and recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Patients and methods: seven patients with inoperable recurrence of SCCHN after adjuvant or definitive radiotherapy (RT) and simultaneous or sequential cisplatin-based chemotherapy for primary SCCHN were treated between August and December 2008 with Re-RT (1.8 Gy/fraction to 50.4 Gy) and cetuximab (400 mg/m{sup 2} initial dose in the 1st week, and then 250 mg/m{sup 2} once weekly). Recurrence had to be located at least {>=} 50% in the preirradiated field. Long term toxicity from previous treatment was recorded before Re-RT as a baseline value. Acute and late toxicity derived from the experimental regimen were recorded every week during RT, and then every 3 months. Efficacy was assessed with repeated imaging using response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (RECIST) and clinical examinations 8-12 weeks after end of the treatment and every 3 months thereafter (Tables 1 and 2). Results: only mild localized mucositis occurred in all patients. Two patients developed a grade 3 acneiform rash related to cetuximab. After treatment one patient developed a grade 2 trismus, another showed grade 3 abacterial salivary gland inflammation with severe pain requiring opioid medication. Two patients achieved a complete response after 7 months, one remained stable, three progressed, and one died from pneumonia without having restaging magnetic resonance imaging. Conclusion: A second course of RT combined with cetuximab in patients with inoperable, recurrent HNSCC proved to be feasible with mild or moderate toxicity and encouraging response to treatment. (orig.)

  19. Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma for fluorescence-guided surgery (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Lindsay; Warram, Jason M.; de Boer, Esther; Carroll, William R.; Morlandt, Anthony; Withrow, Kirk P.; Rosenthal, Eben L.

    2016-03-01

    During fluorescence-guided surgery, a cancer-specific optical probe is injected and visualized using a compatible device intraoperatively to provide visual contrast between diseased and normal tissues to maximize resection of cancer and minimize the resection of precious adjacent normal tissues. Six patients with squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck region (oral cavity (n=4) or cutaneous (n=2)) were injected with an EGFR-targeting antibody (Cetuximab) conjugated to a near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent dye (IRDye800) 3, 4, or 7 days prior to surgical resection of the cancer. Each patient's tumor was then imaged using a commercially available, open-field NIR fluorescence imaging device each day prior to surgery, intraoperatively, and post-operatively. The mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) of the tumor was calculated for each specimen at each imaging time point. Adjacent normal tissue served as an internal anatomic control for each patient to establish a patient-matched "background" fluorescence. Resected tissues were also imaged using a closed-field NIR imaging device. Tumor to background ratios (TBRs) were calculated for each patient using both devices. Fluorescence histology was correlated with traditional pathology assessment to verify the specificity of antibody-dye conjugate binding. Peak TBRs using the open-field device ranged from 2.2 to 11.3, with an average TBR of 4.9. Peak TBRs were achieved between days 1 and 4. This study demonstrated that a commercially available NIR imaging device suited for intraoperative and clinical use can successfully be used with a fluorescently-labeled dye to delineate between diseased and normal tissue in this single cohort human study, illuminated the potential for its use in fluoresence-guided surgery.

  20. Association between single nucleotide polymorphisms in ERCC4 and risk of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongping Yu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Excision repair cross-complementation group 4 gene (ERCC4/XPF plays an important role in nucleotide excision repair and participates in removal of DNA interstrand cross-links and DNA double-strand breaks. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in ERCC4 may impact repair capacity and affect cancer susceptibility. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this case-control study, we evaluated associations of four selected potentially functional SNPs in ERCC4 with risk of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN in 1,040 non-Hispanic white patients with SCCHN and 1,046 cancer-free matched controls. We found that the variant GG genotype of rs2276466 was significantly associated with a decreased risk of SCCHN (OR = 0.69, 95% CI 0.50-0.96, and that the variant TT genotype of rs3136038 showed a borderline significant decreased risk with SCCHN (OR = 0.76, 95% CI: 0.58-1.01 in the recessive model. Such protective effects were more evident in oropharyngeal cancer (OR = 0.61, 95% CI: 0.40-0.92 for rs2276466; OR = 0.69, 95% CI: 0.48-0.98 for rs3136038. No significant associations were found for the other two SNPs (rs1800067 and rs1799798. In addition, individuals with the rs2276466 GG or with the rs3136038 TT genotypes had higher levels of ERCC4 mRNA expression than those with the corresponding wild-type genotypes in 90 Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from Caucasians. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that these two SNPs (rs2276466 and rs3136038 in ERCC4 may be functional and contribute to SCCHN susceptibility. However, our findings need to be replicated in further large epidemiological and functional studies.

  1. Clinically significant copy number alterations and complex rearrangements of MYB and NFIB in head and neck adenoid cystic carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Marta; Andrén, Ywonne; Moskaluk, Christopher A; Frierson, Henry F; Cooke, Susanna L; Futreal, Philip Andrew; Kling, Teresia; Nelander, Sven; Nordkvist, Anders; Persson, Fredrik; Stenman, Göran

    2012-08-01

    Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) of the head and neck is a malignant tumor with poor long-term prognosis. Besides the recently identified MYB-NFIB fusion oncogene generated by a t(6;9) translocation, little is known about other genetic alterations in ACC. Using high-resolution, array-based comparative genomic hybridization, and massively paired-end sequencing, we explored genomic alterations in 40 frozen ACCs. Eighty-six percent of the tumors expressed MYB-NFIB fusion transcripts and 97% overexpressed MYB mRNA, indicating that MYB activation is a hallmark of ACC. Thirty-five recurrent copy number alterations (CNAs) were detected, including losses involving 12q, 6q, 9p, 11q, 14q, 1p, and 5q and gains involving 1q, 9p, and 22q. Grade III tumors had on average a significantly higher number of CNAs/tumor compared to Grade I and II tumors (P = 0.007). Losses of 1p, 6q, and 15q were associated with high-grade tumors, whereas losses of 14q were exclusively seen in Grade I tumors. The t(6;9) rearrangements were associated with a complex pattern of breakpoints, deletions, insertions, inversions, and for 9p also gains. Analyses of fusion-negative ACCs using high-resolution arrays and massively paired-end sequencing revealed that MYB may also be deregulated by other mechanisms in addition to gene fusion. Our studies also identified several down-regulated candidate tumor suppressor genes (CTNNBIP1, CASP9, PRDM2, and SFN) in 1p36.33-p35.3 that may be of clinical significance in high-grade tumors. Further, studies of these and other potential target genes may lead to the identification of novel driver genes in ACC.

  2. Expression microarray analysis reveals alternative splicing of LAMA3 and DST genes in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Li

    Full Text Available Prior studies have demonstrated tumor-specific alternative splicing events in various solid tumor types. The role of alternative splicing in the development and progression of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC is unclear. Our study queried exon-level expression to implicate splice variants in HNSCC tumors.We performed a comparative genome-wide analysis of 44 HNSCC tumors and 25 uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP tissue samples at an exon expression level. In our comparison we ranked genes based upon a novel score-the Maximum-Minimum Exon Score (MMES--designed to predict the likelihood of an alternative splicing event occurring. We validated predicted alternative splicing events using quantitative RT-PCR on an independent cohort.After MMES scoring of 17,422 genes, the top 900 genes with the highest scores underwent additional manual inspection of expression patterns in a graphical analysis. The genes LAMA3, DST, VEGFC, SDHA, RASIP1, and TP63 were selected for further validation studies because of a high frequency of alternative splicing suggested in our graphical analysis, and literature review showing their biological relevance and known splicing patterns. We confirmed TP63 as having dominant expression of the short DeltaNp63 isoform in HNSCC tumor samples, consistent with prior reports. Two of the six genes (LAMA3 and DST validated by quantitative RT-PCR for tumor-specific alternative splicing events (Student's t test, P<0.001.Alternative splicing events of oncologically relevant proteins occur in HNSCC. The number of genes expressing tumor-specific splice variants needs further elucidation, as does the functional significance of selective isoform expression.

  3. Opposing function of MYBBP1A in proliferation and migration of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Acuña Sanhueza Gustavo A

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC is one of the most prevalent and lethal cancers worldwide and mortality mostly results from loco-regional recurrence and metastasis. Despite its significance, our knowledge on molecular, cellular and environmental mechanisms that drive disease pathogenesis remains largely elusive, and there are limited therapeutic options, with only negligible clinical benefit. Methods We applied global gene expression profiling with samples derived from a recently established mouse model for oral cancer recurrence and identified a list of genes with differential expression between primary and recurrent tumors. Results One differentially expressed gene codes for Myb-binding protein 1a (MYBBP1A, which is known as a transcriptional co-regulator that physically interacts with nuclear transcription factors, such as NFκB and p53. We confirmed significantly reduced MYBBP1A protein levels on tissue sections of recurrent mouse tumors compared to primary tumors by immunohistochemistry, and found aberrant MYBBP1A protein levels also in tumor samples of HNSCC patients. Interestingly, silencing of MYBBP1A expression in murine SCC7 and in human HNSCC cell lines elicited increased migration but decreased cell growth. Conclusion We provide experimental evidence that MYBBP1A is an important molecular switch in the regulation of tumor cell proliferation versus migration in HNSCC and it will be a major challenge for the future to proof the concept whether regulation MYBBP1A expression and/or function could serve as a novel option for anti-cancer therapy.

  4. Degradation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mediates Dasatinib-Induced Apoptosis in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chin Lin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR is an important oncoprotein that promotes cell growth and proliferation. Dasatinib, a bcr-abl inhibitor, has been approved clinically for the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia and demonstrated to be effective against solid tumors in vitro through Src inhibition. Here, we disclose that EGFR degradation mediated dasatinib-induced apoptosis in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC cells. HNSCC cells, including Ca9-22, FaDu, HSC3, SAS, SCC-25, and UMSCC1, were treated with dasatinib, and cell viability, apoptosis, and underlying signal transduction were evaluated. Dasatinib exhibited differential sensitivities against HNSCC cells. Growth inhibition and apoptosis were correlated with its inhibition on Akt, Erk, and Bcl-2, irrespective of Src inhibition. Accordingly, we found that down-regulation of EGFR was a determinant of dasatinib sensitivity. Lysosome inhibitor reversed dasatinib-induced EGFR down-regulation, and c-cbl activity was increased by dasatinib, indicating that dasatinib-induced EGFR down-regulation might be through c-cbl-mediated lysosome degradation. Increased EGFR activation by ligand administration rescued cells from dasatinib-induced apoptosis, whereas inhibition of EGFR enhanced its apoptotic effect. Estrogen receptor α (ERα was demonstrated to play a role in Bcl-2 expression, and dasatinib inhibited ERα at the pretranslational level. ERα was associated with EGFR in dasatinib-treated HNSCC cells. Furthermore, the xenograft model showed that dasatinib inhibited HSC3 tumor growth through in vivo down-regulation of EGFR and ERα. In conclusion, degradation of EGFR is a novel mechanism responsible for dasatinib-induced apoptosis in HNSCC cells.

  5. Quantitative assessment of the influence of CYP1B1 polymorphisms and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ming; Hu, Yuan-Yuan; Hu, Yu-Kun; Xie, Long-Chuan; Xu, Xiao-Ming; Wu, Ming-Yue; Niu, Yu-Ming

    2014-04-01

    The associations between CYP1B1 polymorphisms and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) risk have been conflicting. We therefore performed a meta-analysis to derive a more precise relationship. Six published case-control studies were collected; odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence interval (CI) were used to assess the association between CYP1B1 Leu432Val, Asn453Ser polymorphisms, and HNSCC risk. The Sensitivity analysis and publication bias also were performed to guarantee the statistical power. Overall, the pooled OR with 95% CIs indicated that CYP1B1 Leu432Val polymorphism was significantly related with HNSCC risk (for Val vs. Leu: OR = 1.13, 95% CI = 1.03-1.25, P = 0.014, P(heterogeneity) = 0.141; for Val/Val vs. Leu/Leu: OR = 1.30, 95% CI = 1.06-1.60, P = 0.013, P heterogeneity = 0.253; for Val/Val vs. Leu/Leu + Leu/Val: OR = 1.23, 95% CI = 1.05-1.46, P = 0.013, P(heterogeneity) = 0.456). The similar results were also been found in succeeding analysis of HWE and stratified analysis of Caucasian population. Furthermore, no significant association between CYP1B1 Asn453Ser polymorphism and HNSCC risk was found in this meta-analysis. In conclusion, our meta-analysis demonstrates that CYP1B1 Leu432Val polymorphism may be a risk factor for developing HNSCC.

  6. FDG-PET AS A ROUTINE SURVEILLANCE TOOL IN HEAD AND NECK CARCINOMA SIX MONTHS AFTER TREATMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Ya-nan; Sophie Périé; WANG Jia-dong

    2009-01-01

    Objective To evaluate prospectively the impact of fluorodeoxyglucose-fluorine-18 positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in the detection of recurrence, second primary cancers, and distant metastases in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) 6 months after treatment. Methods A total of 41 patients without any clinical element for recurrence, second primary cancer, or distant metastases received a whole-body FDG-PET as a routine surveillance tool 6 months after initial combined curative therapy for HNSCC. Results There were 35 negative PET results and 6 positive. One patient with abnormal FDG-PET did not have recurrent HNSCC (false positive). Five had true positive results: proven recurrence in 2 patients, second primary cancer in 2, and distant metastasis in 1. The sensitivity and specificity of FDG-PET for the diagnosis of HNSCC recurrence, second tumor, and distant metastases were 100% (5/5) and 97.2% (35/36), respectively. The positive predictive value was 83.3% (5/6). The negative predictive value was 100% (35/35). The overall accuracy was 97.6% (40/41). FDG-PET had a therapeutic impact in 5 of 41 patients (12.2%). There was no impact of FDG-PET on management in other 36 patients. Conclusion FDG-PET is useful as primary method for detecting nodal recurrence and distant metastases in HNSCC as well as second cancer in subclinical patients as it had a high effectiveness. But systematic FDG-PET performed at 6 months in patients without any clinical suspicion of local recurrence was scarcely useful.

  7. Economic Analyses in Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck: A Review of the Literature From a Clinical Perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Jonas A. de, E-mail: jdesouza@medicine.bsd.uchicago.edu [The University of Chicago Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Santana, Iuri A.; Castro, Gilberto de [Instituto do Câncer do Estado de São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil); Lima Lopes, Gilberto de [Johns Hopkins Singapore International Medical Centre (Singapore); Tina Shih, Ya-Chen [The University of Chicago Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this review was to describe cost-effectiveness and cost analysis studies across treatment modalities for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN), while placing their results in context of the current clinical practice. We performed a literature search in PubMed for English-language studies addressing economic analyses of treatment modalities for SCCHN published from January 2000 to March 2013. We also performed an additional search for related studies published by the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence in the United Kingdom. Identified articles were classified into 3 clinical approaches (organ preservation, radiation therapy modalities, and chemotherapy regimens) and into 2 types of economic studies (cost analysis and cost-effectiveness/cost-utility studies). All cost estimates were normalized to US dollars, year 2013 values. Our search yielded 23 articles: 13 related to organ preservation approaches, 5 to radiation therapy modalities, and 5 to chemotherapy regimens. In general, studies analyzed different questions and modalities, making it difficult to reach a conclusion. Even when restricted to comparisons of modalities within the same clinical approach, studies often yielded conflicting findings. The heterogeneity across economic studies of SCCHN should be carefully understood in light of the modeling assumptions and limitations of each study and placed in context with relevant settings of clinical practices and study perspectives. Furthermore, the scarcity of comparative effectiveness and quality-of-life data poses unique challenges for conducting economic analyses for a resource-intensive disease, such as SCCHN, that requires a multimodal care. Future research is needed to better understand how to compare the costs and cost-effectiveness of different modalities for SCCHN.

  8. Elevated Na(+)/H(+) exchanger-1 expression enhances the metastatic collective migration of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminota, Teppei; Yano, Hajime; Shiota, Kohei; Nomura, Noriko; Yaguchi, Haruna; Kirino, Yui; Ohara, Kentaro; Tetsumura, Issei; Sanada, Tomoyoshi; Ugumori, Toru; Tanaka, Junya; Hato, Naohito

    2017-04-22

    Cancer cells can migrate as collectives during invasion and/or metastasis; however, the precise molecular mechanisms of this form of migration are less clear compared with single cell migration following epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Elevated Na(+)/H(+) exchanger1 (NHE1) expression has been suggested to have malignant roles in a number of cancer cell lines and in vivo tumor models. Furthermore, a metastatic human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cell line (SASL1m) that was isolated based on its increased metastatic potential also exhibited higher NHE1 expression than its parental line SAS. Time-lapse video recordings indicated that both cell lines migrate as collectives, although with different features, e.g., SASL1m was much more active and changed the direction of migration more frequently than SAS cells, whereas locomotive activities were comparable. SASL1m cells also exhibited higher invasive activity than SAS in Matrigel invasion assays. shRNA-mediated NHE1 knockdown in SASL1m led to reduced locomotive and invasive activities, suggesting a critical role for NHE1 in the collective migration of SASL1m cells. SASL1m cells also exhibited a higher metastatic rate than SAS cells in a mouse lymph node metastasis model, while NHE1 knockdown suppressed in vivo SASL1m metastasis. Finally, elevated NHE1 expression was observed in human HNSCC tissue, and Cariporide, a specific NHE1 inhibitor, reduced the invasive activity of SASL1m cells, implying NHE1 could be a target for anti-invasion/metastasis therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of salinomycin and CGP37157 on head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell lines in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherzed, Agmal; Hackenberg, Stephan; Froelich, Katrin; Rak, Kristen; Ginzkey, Christian; Hagen, Rudolf; Schendzielorz, Philipp; Kleinsasser, Norbert

    2015-09-01

    Surgery, radiation, chemotherapy or a combinations of these are all accepted modalities for the treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Despite this, 40‑60% of patients suffering from HNSCC develop loco‑regional failure and/or distant metastases. Salinomycin has been demonstrated to be >100‑fold more effective than paclitaxel at causing cancer stem cell death, therefore, it may offer an important improvement in cancer therapy. However, the toxicity of salinomycin is of concern. A possible solution may be the administration of additive drugs, which reduce the toxicity. By inhibiting the mitochondrial Na+/Ca2+ exchanger using the benzodiazepine derivate, CGP37157 (CGP), a significant reduction in salinomycin neuronal toxicity has been observed. This raises the question of whether CGP also inhibits the tumor toxicity of salinomycin. In the present study, the FaDu and HLaC79 C1 HNSCC cell lines were treated with salinomycin with or without CGP. Comparative viability assessments were performed using microscopy, a fluorescein diacetate assay, an MTT assay, a clonogenic assay and annexin V‑propidium iodide staining. The expression levels of MDR‑1 were monitored using reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Salinomycin alone, and in combination with CGP, achieved a significant attenuation of cell viability and increased apoptosis in a dose‑dependent manner. However, the tumor toxicity of salinomycin was not inhibited by CGP. The HLaC79 C1 cells were more sensitive to salinomycin, compared with the FaDu cells, with this sensitivity being due to high expression levels of MDR‑1 by the HLaC79 C1 cells. In conclusion, CGP did not counteract the tumor toxicity of salinomycin in vitro and may be a promising drug in future anticancer therapy. The results of the present study encourages further investigation of the toxicological aspects of salinomycin, particularly in human cells and animal models.

  10. Paired-agent imaging for resection during surgery (PAIRS) of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Tichauer, Kenneth M.; Chen, Eunice; Gunn, Jason R.; Hoopes, P. Jack; Wells, Wendy A.; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2016-03-01

    Ninety percent of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) have overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which is correlated with poor prognosis. Complete surgical resection of HNSCC tumors has a large impact on patient survival, where detection of tumor at or close to surgical margins increases the risk of death at 5-years by 90%. In addition, large surgical margins can greatly increase the morbidity experienced by the patient due to functional and cosmetic damage of oral and facial structures. Single fluorescence targeting agents are often used for tumor detection in in vivo pre-clinical imaging; however, the arising signal is qualitative at best because it is a complex mixture of vascular perfusion, vascular leakage, inhibited lymphatic clearance, and receptor binding. In vivo ratiometric receptor concentration imaging (RCI) allows quantification of receptor expression (hence identification of cancerous tissue) by utilizing co-administered paired-agents consisting of a targeted agent and non-targeted perfusion agent to reference the plasma delivery and leakage. A panel of HNSCC tumors with varying levels of EGFR expression (SCC-15 >SCC-25 > SCC-09) have been imaged using ABY-029, a clinically relevant anti-EGFR affibody labeled with IRDye 800CW, and affibody control imaging agent labeled with IRDye 680RD. RCI maps of in vivo tissue have been created and are spatially correlated with EGFR and CD31 immunohistochemistry and basic H and E staining. The RCI threshold parameters for distinguishing tumor from normal tissues (skin and muscle) and the accuracy of margin detection in these tumors will be presented. RCI surgical resection will be further developed using a novel multi-channel, gated fluorescence-guided surgery (FGS) imaging system that is capable of performing RCI in normal room light.

  11. Inhibition of Bcl-2 potentiates AZD-2014-induced anti-head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yi; Cui, Jiang-Tao, E-mail: cuijingtaopaper@126.com

    2016-09-02

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a therapeutic target for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Here, we evaluated the activity of AZD-2014, a potent mTOR complex 1/2 (mTORC1/2) dual inhibitor, against HNSCC cells. We showed that AZD-2014 blocked mTORC1/2 activation in established and primary human HNSCC cells, where it was anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic. Yet, AZD-2014 was non-cytotoxic to the human oral epithelial cells with low basal mTORC1/2 activation. In an effect to identify possible AZD-2014 resistance factors, we showed that the anti-apoptosis protein Bcl-2 was upregulated in AZD-2014-resistant SQ20B HNSCC cells. Inhibition of Bcl-2 by ABT-737 (a known Bcl-2 inhibitor) or Bcl-2 shRNA dramatically potentiated AZD-2014 lethality against HNSCC cells. On the other hand, exogenous overexpression of Bcl-2 largely attenuated AZD-2014’s activity against HNSCC cells. For the in vivo studies, we showed that oral gavage of AZD-2014 suppressed SQ20B xenograft growth in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. It also significantly improved mice survival. Importantly, AZD-2014’s anti-HNSCC activity in vivo was potentiated with co-administration of ABT-737. The preclinical results of this study suggest that AZD-2014 could be further tested as a valuable anti-HNSCC agent, either alone or in combination with Bcl-2 inhibitors. - Highlights: • AZD-2014 blocks mTORC1/2 activation in HNSCC cells. • AZD-2014 suppresses HNSCC cell proliferation. • AZD-2014 activates caspase-3 and apoptosis in HNSCC cells. • Bcl-2 is the key resistance factor of AZD-2014 in HNSCC cells. • ABT-737 sensitizes AZD-2014-induced anti-HNSCC activity in vivo.

  12. The dual pathway inhibitor rigosertib is effective in direct patient tumor xenografts of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Ryan T; Keysar, Stephen B; Bowles, Daniel W; Glogowska, Magdalena J; Astling, David P; Morton, J Jason; Le, Phuong; Umpierrez, Adrian; Eagles-Soukup, Justin; Gan, Gregory N; Vogler, Brian W; Sehrt, Daniel; Takimoto, Sarah M; Aisner, Dara L; Wilhelm, Francois; Frederick, Barbara A; Varella-Garcia, Marileila; Tan, Aik-Choon; Jimeno, Antonio

    2013-10-01

    The dual pathway inhibitor rigosertib inhibits phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway activation as well as polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) activity across a broad spectrum of cancer cell lines. The importance of PIK3CA alterations in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC) has raised interest in exploring agents targeting PI3K, the product of PIK3CA. The genetic and molecular basis of rigosertib treatment response was investigated in a panel of 16 HNSCC cell lines, and direct patient tumor xenografts from eight patients with HNSCC [four HPV-serotype16 (HPV16)-positive]. HNSCC cell lines and xenografts were characterized by pathway enrichment gene expression analysis, exon sequencing, gene copy number, Western blotting, and immunohistochemistry (IHC). Rigosertib had potent antiproliferative effects on 11 of 16 HPV(-) HNSCC cell lines. Treatment sensitivity was confirmed in two cell lines using an orthotopic in vivo xenograft model. Growth reduction after rigosertib treatment was observed in three of eight HNSCC direct patient tumor lines. The responsive tumor lines carried a combination of a PI3KCA-activating event (amplification or mutation) and a p53-inactivating event (either HPV16- or mutation-mediated TP53 inactivation). In this study, we evaluated the in vitro and in vivo efficacy of rigosertib in both HPV(+) and HPV(-) HNSCCs, focusing on inhibition of the PI3K pathway. Although consistent inhibition of the PI3K pathway was not evident in HNSCC, we identified a combination of PI3K/TP53 events necessary, but not sufficient, for rigosertib sensitivity.

  13. Squamous cell carcinoma of dogs and cats: an ideal test system for human head and neck PDT protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucroy, Michael D.

    2006-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is ideally suited for the treatment of head and neck cancer (HNC) in humans. Developing useful PDT protocols for HNC is challenging due to the expense of Phase I and II clinical trials. Moreover, the often-poor predictive value of murine models means that photosensitizers may proceed far into development before problems are noted. Dogs and cats with spontaneous oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) share striking similarities with humans affected with oral SCC. These similarities include viral and environmental tobacco smoke as risk factors, location-dependent prognoses, and relative resistance to chemotherapy. The relatively large oral cancers encountered in veterinary patients allow for light and drug dosimetry that are directly applicable to humans. The irregular shape of oral SCC allows a rigorous evaluation of novel photodynamic therapy protocols under field conditions. Because spontaneous tumors in dogs and cats arise in an outbred animal population it is possible to observe an intact host response to PDT. The shorter lifespan of dogs and cats allows rapid accrual of endpoint data. External beam radiation therapy and chemotherapy are commonplace in veterinary medicine, making dogs and cats with spontaneous SCC a useful resource to study the interactions with PDT and other cancer treatment modalities. Our preliminary results demonstrate that PDT is well-tolerated by dogs with oral cancer, and a Phase II clinical trial of zinc-phthalocyanine-based photodynamic therapy is underway in dogs with oral SCC. The usefulness of 5-aminolevulinic acid methyl ester-based PDT is being investigated in cats with oral SCC.

  14. Prediction of treatment response in head and neck carcinomas using IVIM-DWI: Evaluation of lymph node metastasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauser, Thomas, E-mail: Thomas.Hauser@klinikum-augsburg.de [Department of Radiology (E010), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum Augsburg, Augsburg (Germany); Essig, Marco [Department of Radiology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg (Canada); Jensen, Alexandra [Department of Radiation Therapy, Ruprecht-Karls University, Heidelberg (Germany); Laun, Frederik B. [Quantitative imaging based disease characterization (E011), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Medical Physics in Radiology (E020), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Münter, Marc [Department of Radiation Therapy, Ruprecht-Karls University, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiation Therapy, Katharinenhospital, Stuttgart (Germany); Maier-Hein, Klaus H. [Quantitative imaging based disease characterization (E011), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Division of Medical and Biological Informatics, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Stieltjes, Bram [Quantitative imaging based disease characterization (E011), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: To obtain diffusion and microperfusion measures in lymph node metastases of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) using intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) imaging. The obtained IVIM parameters were used to characterize lymph nodes in the staging phase and longitudinal follow-up was performed to evaluate the potential predictive value of these parameters considering therapy response. Methods: Fifteen patients with lymph node metastases of histologically confirmed locally advanced HNSCC were examined using diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) before a nonsurgical organ preserving therapy. DWI imaging was performed at 3 T using eight different b-values ranging from 0 to 800 s/mm{sup 2}. Using the IVIM-approach, the perfusion fraction f and the diffusion coefficient D were extracted using a biexponential fit. A follow-up period of 13.5 months was available for all patients. One patient with a macroscopically necrotic lymph node was excluded from analyses. A region of interest (ROI)-analysis was performed in all patients. Results: Locoregional failure (LRF) was present in 3 of 15 patients within 13.5 months follow-up. The initial f-value was significantly higher (p = 0.01) in patients with LRF (14.5 ± 0.6% vs. 7.7 ± 2.6%) compared to patients with locoregional control (LRC). The initial diffusion coefficient D did not differ significantly (p = 0.30) between the two groups (0.97 ± 0.15 × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s vs. 0.88 ± 0.13 × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s). Conclusions: Our results indicate that a high initial perfusion fraction f in lymph nodes may predict poor treatment response in patients with HNSCC due to locoregional failure.

  15. MART-10, a newly synthesized vitamin D analog, represses metastatic potential of head and neck squamous carcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang SW

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Shih-Wei Yang,1,* Chi-Ying Tsai,2,* Yi-Chun Pan,3 Chun-Nan Yeh,4 Jong-Hwei S Pang,5 Masashi Takano,6 Atsushi Kittaka,6 Horng-Heng Juang,7 Tai C Chen,8 Kun-Chun Chiang4,9 1Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Keelung, 2Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, 3Department of General Dentistry, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University, Keelung, 4General Surgery Department, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Keelung, 5Graduate Institute of Clinical Medical Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan, Republic of China; 6Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Teikyo University, Tokyo, Japan; 7Department of Anatomy, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan, Republic of China; 8Endocrine Core Laboratory, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA; 9Zebrafish Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Keelung, Taiwan, Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Even with multidisciplinary treatment, the prognosis and quality of life of patients diagnosed with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC are still not satisfactory. Previously, 19-Nor-2α-(3-hydroxypropyl-1α,25(OH2D3 (MART-10, the new brand 1α,25(OH2D3 analog, has been demonstrated to be an effective drug to inhibit HNSCC growth in vitro. Since most cancer patients die of metastasis, in this study, the antimetastatic effect of MART-10 on HNSCC was investigated. Our results reveal that both 1α,25(OH2D3 and MART-10 effectively repressed the migration and invasion of HNSCC cells, with MART-10 being much more potent than 1α,25(OH2D3. The antimetastatic effect of 1α,25(OH2D3 and MART-10 was mediated by attenuation of epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT, which was supported by the finding that the expression of EMT-inducing transcriptional factors, Sail and Twist, was inhibited by 1α,25(OH2D3 and MART

  16. The Evolution of and Risk Factors for Neck Muscle Atrophy and Weakness in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu-Lu; Mao, Yan-Ping; Zhou, Guan-Qun; Tang, Ling-Long; Qi, Zhen-Yu; Lin, Li; Yao, Ji-Jin; Ma, Jun; Lin, Ai-Hua; Sun, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to investigate the evolution of sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM) atrophy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients following intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and the relationship between SCM atrophy and neck weakness. Data were retrospectively analyzed from 223 biopsy-proven NPC patients with no distant metastasis who underwent IMRT with or without chemotherapy. The volume of SCM was measured on pretreatment magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and MRIs were conducted 1, 2, and 3 years after the completion of IMRT. Change in SCM volume was calculated and classified using the late effects of normal tissues–subjective, objective, management, and analytic system. The grade of neck muscle weakness, classified by the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events V 3.0, was measured 3 years after the completion of IMRT. The average SCM atrophy ratio was −10.97%, −18.65%, and −22.25% at 1, 2, and 3 years postirradiation, respectively. Multivariate analysis indicated N stage and the length of time after IMRT were independent prognostic variables. There were significant associations between the degree of SCM atrophy and neck weakness. Radical IMRT can cause significant SCM atrophy in NPC patients. A more advanced N stage was associated with more severe SCM atrophy, but no difference was observed between N2 and N3. SCM atrophy progresses over time during the 3 years following IMRT. Grade of SCM atrophy is significantly associated with neck weakness. PMID:26252307

  17. The Evolution of and Risk Factors for Neck Muscle Atrophy and Weakness in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy: A Retrospective Study in an Endemic Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu-Lu; Mao, Yan-Ping; Zhou, Guan-Qun; Tang, Ling-Long; Qi, Zhen-Yu; Lin, Li; Yao, Ji-Jin; Ma, Jun; Lin, Ai-Hua; Sun, Ying

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the evolution of sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM) atrophy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients following intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and the relationship between SCM atrophy and neck weakness.Data were retrospectively analyzed from 223 biopsy-proven NPC patients with no distant metastasis who underwent IMRT with or without chemotherapy. The volume of SCM was measured on pretreatment magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and MRIs were conducted 1, 2, and 3 years after the completion of IMRT. Change in SCM volume was calculated and classified using the late effects of normal tissues-subjective, objective, management, and analytic system. The grade of neck muscle weakness, classified by the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events V 3.0, was measured 3 years after the completion of IMRT.The average SCM atrophy ratio was -10.97%, -18.65%, and -22.25% at 1, 2, and 3 years postirradiation, respectively. Multivariate analysis indicated N stage and the length of time after IMRT were independent prognostic variables. There were significant associations between the degree of SCM atrophy and neck weakness.Radical IMRT can cause significant SCM atrophy in NPC patients. A more advanced N stage was associated with more severe SCM atrophy, but no difference was observed between N2 and N3. SCM atrophy progresses over time during the 3 years following IMRT. Grade of SCM atrophy is significantly associated with neck weakness.

  18. Pancreatic metastasis in a case of small cell lung carcinoma: Diagnostic role of fine-needle aspiration cytology and immunocytochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilip K Das

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Small cell lung carcinoma represents a group of highly malignant tumors giving rise to early and widespread metastasis at the time of diagnosis. However, the pancreas is a relatively infrequent site of metastasis by this neoplasm, and there are only occasional reports on its fine needle aspiration (FNA cytology diagnosis. A 66-year-old man presented with extensive mediastinal lymphadenopathy and a mass in the pancreatic tail. Ultrasound-guided FNA smears from the pancreatic mass contained small, round tumor cells with extensive nuclear molding. The cytodiagnosis was metastatic small cell carcinoma. Immunocytochemical staining showed that a variable number of neoplastic cell were positive for cytokeratin, chromogranin A, neurone-specific enolase and synaptophysin but negative for leukocyte common antigen. The trans-bronchial needle aspiration was non-diagnostic, but biopsy was suspicious of a small cell carcinoma. This case represents a rare metastatic lesion in the pancreas from small cell lung carcinoma, diagnosed by FNA cytology.

  19. Immune humanization of immunodeficient mice using diagnostic bone marrow aspirates from carcinoma patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Werner-Klein

    Full Text Available Tumor xenografts in immunodeficient mice, while routinely used in cancer research, preclude studying interactions of immune and cancer cells or, if humanized by allogeneic immune cells, are of limited use for tumor-immunological questions. Here, we explore a novel way to generate cancer models with an autologous humanized immune system. We demonstrate that hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs from bone marrow aspirates of non-metastasized carcinoma patients, which are taken at specialized centers for diagnostic purposes, can be used to generate a human immune system in NOD-scid IL2rγ(null (NSG and HLA-I expressing NSG mice (NSG-HLA-A2/HHD comprising both, lymphoid and myeloid cell lineages. Using NSG-HLA-A2/HHD mice, we show that responsive and self-tolerant human T cells develop and human antigen presenting cells can activate human T cells. As critical factors we identified the low potential of bone marrow HSPCs to engraft, generally low HSPC numbers in patient-derived bone marrow samples, cryopreservation and routes of cell administration. We provide here an optimized protocol that uses a minimum number of HSPCs, preselects high-quality bone marrow samples defined by the number of initially isolated leukocytes and intra-femoral or intra-venous injection. In conclusion, the use of diagnostic bone marrow aspirates from non-metastasized carcinoma patients for the immunological humanization of immunodeficient mice is feasible and opens the chance for individualized analyses of anti-tumoral T cell responses.

  20. Phase II trial of cisplatin and tegafur (Ftorafur) as initial therapy in squamous-cell carcinoma of the head and neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Baron, M; Vicente, J; Tomas, M; Martin, G; Martorell, V; Garcia-Giron, C; Garrido, P; Gavilan, J; Zamora, P

    1990-08-01

    Cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil infusion combination produces a high response rate in squamous-cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Tegafur (Ftorafur) is an analog of 5-fluorouracil, and its oral form is well absorbed. This agent has a moderate toxicity. We report a study to determine the efficacy of the cisplatin (100 mg/m2, day 1) and tegafur (1,000 mg/m2 daily for 21 days) combination. Thirty-nine patients entered the study; 36 were evaluable for response. Overall response was 94%, with a 22% complete response. Toxicity was moderate. We conclude that the cisplatin and tegafur combination is active in untreated patients with head and neck cancer.

  1. Effect of reduced z-axis scan coverage on diagnostic performance and radiation dose of neck computed tomography in patients with suspected cervical abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Jakob; Maurer, Michael; Ketelsen, Dominik; Notohamiprodjo, Mike; Zinsser, Dominik; Wichmann, Julian L; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Bamberg, Fabian; Othman, Ahmed E

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of reduced z-axis scan coverage on diagnostic performance and radiation dose of neck CT in patients with suspected cervical abscess. Fifty-one patients with suspected cervical abscess were included and underwent contrast-enhanced neck CT on a 2nd or 3rd generation dual-source CT system. Image acquisition ranged from the aortic arch to the upper roof of the frontal sinuses (CTstd). Subsequently, series with reduced z-axis coverage (CTred) were reconstructed starting at the aortic arch up to the orbital floor. CTstd and CTred were independently assessed by two radiologists for the presence/absence of cervical abscesses and for incidental and alternative findings. In addition, diagnostic accuracy for the depiction of the cervical abscesses was calculated for both readers. Furthermore, DLP (dose-length-product), effective dose (ED) and organ doses were calculated and compared for CTred and CTstd, using a commercially available dose management platform. A total of 41 abscesses and 3 incidental/alternative findings were identified in CTstd. All abscesses and incidental/alternative findings could also be detected on CTred resulting in a sensitivity and specificity of 1.0 for both readers. DLP, ED and organ doses of the brain, the eye lenses, the red bone marrow and the salivary glands of CTred were significantly lower than for CTstd (pz-axis coverage of neck CT allows for a significant reduction of effective dose and organ doses at similar diagnostic performance as compared to CTstd.

  2. Diagnosis and Treatment of a Neck Node Swelling Suspicious for a Malignancy: An Algorithmic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. M. Balm

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To present an up-to-date algorithm incorporating recent advances regarding its diagnosis and treatment. Method. A Medline/Pubmed search was performed to identify relevant studies published in English from 1990 until 2008. Only clinical studies were identified and were used as basis for the diagnostic algorithm. Results. The eligible literature provided only observational evidence. The vast majority of neck nodes from occult primaries (>90% represent SCC with a high incidence among middle aged man. Smoking and alcohol abuse are important risk factors. Asiatic and North African patients with neck node metastases are at risk of harbouring an occult nasopharyngeal carcinoma. The remainder are adenocarcinoma, undifferentiated carcinoma, melanoma, thyroid carcinoma and Merkel cell carcinoma. Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC reaches sensitivity and specificity percentages of 81% and 100%, respectively and plays an important role as the second diagnostic step after routine ENT mirror and/or endoscopic examination. FDG-PET/CT has proven to be helpful in identifying occult primary carcinomas of the head and neck, especially when applied as a guiding tool prior to panendoscopy, and may induce treatment related clinical decisions in up to 60% of cases. Conclusion. Although reports on the diagnostic process offer mainly descriptive studies, current information seems sufficient to formulate a diagnostic algorithm to contribute to a more systematic diagnostic approach preventing unnecessary steps.

  3. Immunohistochemical biomarkers and FDG uptake on PET/CT in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Gregers Brünnich; Vogelius, Ivan R.; Rasmussen, Jacob H

    2015-01-01

    ). MATERIAL AND METHODS: IHC staining for Bcl-2, β-tubulin-1 and 2, p53, EGFR, Ki-67, glutathione-S-transferase-π and p16 was performed on formalin-fixed paraffin embedded diagnostic biopsies from 102 HNSCC cases treated at Rigshospitalet during 2005-2009. The proportion of positive cells was used...... for analyses, except p16, which was scored according to EORTC guidelines. In all cases, maximal FDG standardized uptake value (SUV) metrics were extracted for the primary tumor, TSUVmax. Univariate linear regression and multiple linear regression of TSUVmax versus IHC markers were performed. RESULTS......: In univariate analyses, TSUVmax showed negative associations with Bcl-2 (p = 0.002) and p16 (p = 0.005) indices and positive association with β-tubulin-1 index (p = 0.003). On multivariate analysis, TSUVmax remained associated with β-tubulin-1 (p = 0.009), Bcl-2 (p = 0.03) and p16 (p = 0.03). All correlations...

  4. The gene expression profile of inflammatory, hypoxic and metabolic genes predicts the metastatic spread of human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clatot, Florian; Gouérant, Sophie; Mareschal, Sylvain; Cornic, Marie; Berghian, Anca; Choussy, Olivier; El Ouakif, Faissal; François, Arnaud; Bénard, Magalie; Ruminy, Philippe; Picquenot, Jean-Michel; Jardin, Fabrice

    2014-03-01

    To assess the prognostic value of the expression profile of the main genes implicated in hypoxia, glucose and lactate metabolism, inflammation, angiogenesis and extracellular matrix interactions for the metastatic spread of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Using a high-throughput qRT-PCR, we performed an unsupervised clustering analysis based on the expression of 42 genes for 61 patients. Usual prognostic factors and clustering analysis results were related to metastasis free survival. With a median follow-up of 48months, 19 patients died from a metastatic evolution of their head and neck squamous cell carcinoma and one from a local recurrence. The unsupervised clustering analysis distinguished two groups of genes that were related to metastatic evolution. A capsular rupture (p=0.005) and the "cluster CXCL12 low" (p=0.002) were found to be independent prognostic factors for metastasis free survival. Using a Linear Predictive Score methodology, we established a 9-gene model (VHL, PTGER4, HK1, SLC16A4, DLL4, CXCL12, CXCR4, PTGER3 and CA9) that was capable of classifying the samples into the 2 clusters with 90% accuracy. In this cohort, our clustering analysis underlined the independent prognostic value of the expression of a panel of genes involved in hypoxia and tumor environment. It allowed us to define a 9-gene model which can be applied routinely to classify newly diagnosed head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. If confirmed by an independent prospective study, this approach may help future clinical management of these aggressive tumors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Molecular pathways of human adrenocortical carcinoma - translating cell signalling knowledge into diagnostic and treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szyszka, Paulina; Grossman, Ashley B; Diaz-Cano, Salvador; Sworczak, Krzysztof; Dworakowska, Dorota

    2016-01-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma is associated with a low cure rate and a high recurrence rate. The prognosis is poor, and at diagnosis 30-40% of cases are already metastatic. The current therapeutic options (surgical resection, followed by adjuvant mitotane treatment +/- chemotherapy) are limited, and the results remain unsatisfactory. Key molecular events that contribute to formation of adrenocortical cancer are IGF2 overexpression, TP53-inactivating mutations, and constitutive activation of the Wnt/b-catenin signalling pathway via activating mutations of the b-catenin gene. The underlying genetic causes of inherited tumour syndromes have provided insights into molecular pathogenesis. The increased occurrence of adrenocortical tumours in Li-Fraumeni and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndromes, and Carney complex, has highlighted the roles of specific susceptibility genes: TP53, IGF2, and PRKAR1A, respectively. Further studies have confirmed that these genes are also involved in sporadic tumour cases. Crucially, transcriptome-wide studies have determined the differences between malignant and benign adrenocortical tumours, providing potential diagnostic tools. In conclusion, enhancing our understanding of the molecular events of adrenocortical tumourigenesis, especially with regard to the signalling pathways that may be disrupted, will greatly contribute to improving a range of available diagnostic, prognostic, and treatment approaches. (Endokrynol Pol 2016; 67 (4): 427-440).

  6. Urothelial carcinoma with oncocytic features: an extremely rare case presenting a diagnostic challenge in urine cytology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajima, Shogo

    2015-01-01

    Recognizing histological variants in urothelial carcinoma (UC) is important because some may be associated with different clinical outcomes and/or therapeutic approaches; being aware of unusual histological variants may also be crucial in preventing diagnostic misinterpretations. Histological variants based on cytoplasmic features, such as clear-cell, plasmacytoid, rhabdoid, and lipoid-rich variants, are described in invasive UC; however, these cytoplasmic features are not formally defined and not usually encountered in non-invasive UC. Oncocytic cytoplasm has not been well described in either invasive or non-invasive UC. Herein, we report an exceedingly rare case of UC with oncocytic features arising in the right renal pelvis, which presented a diagnostic challenge in urine cytology due to the relatively low nuclear-to-cytoplasmic ratio; however, it could definitively be diagnosed using histological specimens. UC diagnosis is based on the presence of papillary architecture and widespread p53 nuclear accumulation, suggesting malignancy. An oncocytic tumor is generally considered to be not actively dividing, as shown by the low Ki-67 labeling index in this case. In spite of the low proliferative activity, the possibility of intravesicle recurrence (IVR) should be considered since positive preoperative cytology of upper tract UC is a risk factor for IVR after nephroureterectomy.

  7. Diagnostic value of CD-10 marker in differentiating of papillary thyroid carcinoma from benign thyroid lesions

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    Mojgan Mokhtari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Using of CD10 in accordance with clinical and histological features of thyroid lesions could be used as both diagnostic and prognostic tool, which consequently influence the management and their prognosis for survival of patients with thyroid neoplasms especially papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC. The aim of this study was to determine its expression in PTC and different benign thyroid lesions. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive-analytic, cross-sectional study, paraffin-embedded tissues of patients with definitive pathologic diagnosis of different benign thyroid lesions and PTC were retrieved. Immunostained sections of each slides was performed using immunohistochemistry methods and expression of CD10 was compared in two groups of benign thyroid lesions and PTC. Results: From selected cases 134 sections studied in two groups of PTC (n = 67 and benign thyroid lesions (n = 67. CD10 were immunohistochemically positive in 29.9% of PTC cases, but in none of the thyroid benign lesions (0% (P 0.05. Conclusion: The results of the current study indicate that due to the higher expression of CD10 in PTC than benign thyroid lesions it might be used for differentiating mentioned lesions. But for using it as a diagnostic tool further studies with larger sample size and determination of its sensitivity, specificity and cut-off point is necessary.

  8. Diagnostic Performance of Des-γ-carboxy Prothrombin for Hepatocellular Carcinoma: A Meta-Analysis

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    Rong Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. There have been many reports on des-γ-carboxy prothrombin (DCP as a promising serum marker in the diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC; however, the results are inconsistent and even conflicting. Methods. This meta-analysis was performed to investigate the performance of DCP in the diagnosis of HCC. Following a systematic review of relevant studies, Meta-DiSc 1.4 software was used to extract data and to calculate the overall sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio (PLR, negative likelihood ratio (NLR, and diagnostic odds ratio (DOR. Data are presented as forest plots and summary receiver operating characteristic curve (SROC analysis was used to summarize the overall test performance. Results. Twelve studies were included in our meta-analysis. The overall sensitivity, specificity, PLR, and NLR of DCP for the detection of HCC in the studies included were 71% (95%CI: 68%–73%, 84% (95%CI: 83%–86%, 6.48 (95%CI: 4.22–9.93, and 0.33 (95%CI: 0.25–0.43, respectively. The area under the SROC curve was 0.8930 and the Q index was 0.8238. Significant heterogeneity was found. Conclusion. This meta-analysis indicated that DCP had moderate diagnostic accuracy in HCC. Further studies with rigorous design, large sample size, and mmultiregional cooperation are needed in the future.

  9. Autoantibodies against MMP-7 as a novel diagnostic biomarker in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing-Hua Zhou; Bin Zhang; Kemp H Kernstine; Li Zhong

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the diagnostic values of serum autoantibodies against matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP-7) in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). METHODS: The MMP-7 cDNA was cloned from ESCC tissues, and MMP-7 was expressed and purified from a prokaryotic system. MMP-7 autoantibodies were then measured in sera from 50 patients with primary ESCC and 58 risk-matched controls, using a reverse capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in which autoantibodies to MMP-7 bound to the purified MMP-7 proteins. In addition, MMP-7 autoantibody levels in sera from 38 gastric cancer patients and from control serum samples were also tested. RESULTS: The optimum conditions for recombinant MMP-7 protein expression were determined as 0.04 mmol/L Isopropyl-β-D-Thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) induction at 37℃ for four hours. The levels of serum autoantibodies against MMP-7 were significantly higher in patients with ESCC than in the matched-control samples (OD450 = 1.69 ± 0.08 vs OD450 = 1.55 ± 0.10, P < 0.001). The area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was 0.87. The sensitivity and specificity for detection of ESCC were 78.0% and 81.0%, respectively, when the OD450 value was greater than 1.65. Although the levels of autoantibodies against MMP-7 were also significantly higher in patients with gastric cancer compared to control samples (OD450 = 1.62 ± 0.06 vs OD450 = 1.55 ± 0.10, P < 0.001), the diagnostic accuracy was less significant than in ESCC patients. The area of ROC curve was 0.75, whereas the sensitivity and specificity were 60.5% and 71.7%, respectively, when the cut-off value of OD450 was set at 1.60. CONCLUSION: Serum autoantibody levels of MMP-7 may be a good diagnostic biomarker for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

  10. Diagnostic value of serum GP73 and AFP in hepatocellular carcinoma: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-hui TANG

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the diagnostic value of serum Golgi protein 73 (GP73 and alpha fetoprotein (AFP in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Methods The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, PubMed, EMBase, Web of Science, Nature, Science, Springer link, Chinese Journal Full-Text Database (CNKI, Database for Chinese Technical Periodical (VIP, Wanfang Digital Journal Full-text Database (before October 2012 were retrieved to collect relevant literature in which the diagnostic value of serum GP73 and AFP in patients with HCC was evaluated. The statistical information and scientific quality were assessed and classified. The data were analyzed using Meta-Disc 1.4 software. The diagnostic value of serum GP73 and AFP in HCC was evaluated by the statistical indicators as pooled sensitivity, pooled specificity, pooled likelihood ratio and summary receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC curve. Results Eighteen articles were collected and 5279 cases were included in the study (2075 HCC and 3204 NHCC patients. After heterogeneity test, the data were analyzed by random-effect model. The results showed that, the pooled sensitivity, specificity of the serum GP73 and AFP were 0.78(0.76-0.79 and 0.55(0.53-0.57, 0.84(0.83-0.86 and 0.80(0.78-0.81, respectively. The pooled positive likelihood ratio and negative likelihood ratio was 5.60(4.05-7.74 and 2.92(2.04-4.17, 0.28(0.24-0.32 and 0.58(0.51-0.67, respectively. The ROC area under the curve (AUC was 0.8849 and 0.6827, and Z test showed that the difference was statistically significant (P<0.01. Conclusion The serum GP73 has a higher sensitivity and specificity than AFP in the diagnosis of HCC, and it can be regarded as one of the valuable reference tests in patients with HCC.

  11. Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor Family Members as Prognostic Biomarkers in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma : A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ipenburg, Norbertus A.; Koole, Koos; Liem, K. Seng; van Kempen, Pauline M W; Koole, Ron; van Diest, Paul J.; van Es, Robert J. J.; Willems, Stefan M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Since head and neck cancer is characterized by poor survival rates, there is a demand for novel therapeutic targets and prognostic biomarkers. An upcoming therapeutic target is the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) family. However, their prognostic role in head and neck cancer rem

  12. Effectiveness of FDG-PET/CT for evaluating early response to induction chemotherapy in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Anjos, Renata Fockink; dos Anjos, Dalton Alexandre; Vieira, Danielle Leal; Leite, André Ferreira; Figueiredo, Paulo Tadeu de Souza; de Melo, Nilce Santos

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: 18F-Fluoro-Deoxy-Glucose Positron Emission Tomography with Computed Tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) may be a powerful tool to predict treatment outcome. We aimed to review the effectiveness of 18F-FDG PET/CT in the assessment of early response to induction chemotherapy (IC) in patients with advanced Head and Neck Squamous Cell Cancer (HNSCC) without previous treatment. Methods: PubMed, Cochrane Library, Science Direct and Web of Science were searched to May 2016. Reference lists of the included articles and additional studies identified by one nuclear medicine expert were screened for potential relevant studies that investigated the effectiveness of 18F-FDG PET/CT performed before and after IC. Three authors independently screened all retrieved articles, selected studies that met inclusion criteria and extracted data. The methodology of the selected studies was evaluated by using the risk of bias checklist of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). Results: Seven out of 170 eligible studies met our inclusion criteria. A total of 207 advanced HNSCC patients were evaluated with 18F-FDG PET/CT at baseline and after IC in the selected articles. Six from seven studies concluded that 18F-FDG PET/CT allowed early evaluation response to IC and predicted survival outcomes. Conclusion: The present systematic review confirms the potential value of 18F-FDG PET/CT as a diagnostic tool for early IV response assessment in HNSCC patients. However, the lack of standard definitions for response criteria and heterogeneous IC protocols indicate the need to further studies in order to better define the role of 18F-FDG PET/CT in these patients. PMID:27512861

  13. Prognostic Value of Drinking Status and Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 2 Polymorphism in Patients With Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

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    Daisuke Kawakita

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The association between alcohol drinking, aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2 polymorphism, and survival in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC remains unclear. Methods: We performed a retrospective cohort study of 267 HNSCC patients at Aichi Cancer Center. Of these, 65 patients (24% were non-drinkers, 104 (39% were light drinkers (ethanol <46 g or <5 days/week, 46 (17% were moderate drinkers (ethanol intake 46–68 g/day and ≥5 days/week, and 52 (20% were heavy drinkers (ethanol intake ≥69 g and ≥5 days/week. The prognostic value of pre-treatment drinking status and ALDH2 polymorphism was investigated using multivariate proportional hazard models. Results: Drinking status was associated with disease-free survival (DFS in HNSCC patients, with marginal statistical significance (5-year DFS: 67.9% [95% confidence interval {CI}, 53.8–78.4%] for non-drinkers, 57.6% [95% CI, 47.4–66.6%] for light drinkers, 46.1% [95% CI, 30.8–60.1%] for moderate drinkers, and 43.5% [95% CI, 29.3–56.9%] for heavy drinkers; P = 0.088. However, this association lost significance when multivariate analyses were adjusted for established prognostic factors. ALDH2 genotype was not significantly associated with DFS in HNSCC patients (5-year DFS: 85.7% [95% CI, 53.9–96.2%] for Lys/Lys, 56.2% [95% CI, 47.4–64.1%] for Glu/Lys, and 50.5% [95% CI, 40.3–59.7%] for Glu/Glu; P = 0.154. After stratification by ALDH2 genotype, we observed a significant positive dose-response relationship between drinking status and DFS in HNSCC patients with ALDH2 Glu/Glu (Ptrend = 0.029. Conclusions: In this study, we identified a significant positive dose-response relationship between pre-treatment drinking status and DFS in HNSCC patients with ALDH2 Glu/Glu. To confirm this association, further study is warranted.

  14. Evidence for epithelial-mesenchymal transition in cancer stem cells of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

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    Chao Chen

    Full Text Available Initiation, growth, recurrence, and metastasis of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC have been related to the behavior of cancer stem cells (CSC that can be identified by their aldehyde-dehydrogenase-isoform-1 (ALDH1 activity. We quantified and enriched ALDH1(+ cells within HNSCC cell lines and subsequently characterized their phenotypical and functional properties like invasion capacity and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT. Spheroid culture enriched CSC from five HNSCC cell lines by up to 5-fold. In spheroid-derived cells (SDC and the parental monolayer-derived cell line ALDH1, CD44, CD24, E-Cadherin, α-SMA, and Vimentin expression was compared by flow-cytometry and immunofluorescence together with proliferation and cell cycle analysis. Invasion activity was evaluated by Matrigel assay and expression of stemness-related transcription factors (TF Nanog, Oct3/4, Sox2 and EMT-related genes Snail1 and 2, and Twist by real-time PCR. All cell lines formed spheroids that could self-renew and be serially re-passaged. ALDH1 expression was significantly higher in SDC. ALDH1(+ cells showed increased colony-formation. The proportion of cells with a putative CSC marker constellation of CD44(+/CD24(- was highly variable (0.5% to 96% in monolayer and spheroid cultures and overlapped in 0%-33% with the CD44(+/CD24(-/ALDH1(+ cell subset. SDC had significantly higher invading activity. mRNA of the stemness-related genes Sox2, Nanog, and Oct3/4 was significantly increased in SDC of all cell lines. Twist was significantly increased in two while Snail2 showed a significant increase in one and a significant decrease in SDC of two cell lines. SDC had a higher G0 phase proportion, showed high-level expression of α-SMA and Vimentin, but significantly decreased E-Cadherin expression. HNSCC-lines harbor potential CSC, characterized by ALDH1 and stemness marker TF expression as well as properties like invasiveness, quiescence, and EMT. CSC can be

  15. The Effects of Pulsed Radiation Therapy on Tumor Oxygenation in 2 Murine Models of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

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    Wobb, Jessica; Krueger, Sarah A.; Kane, Jonathan L.; Galoforo, Sandra; Grills, Inga S.; Wilson, George D.; Marples, Brian, E-mail: brian.marples@beaumont.edu

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of low-dose pulsed radiation therapy (PRT) in 2 head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) xenografts and to investigate the mechanism of action of PRT compared with standard radiation therapy (SRT). Methods and Materials: Subcutaneous radiosensitive UT-SCC-14 and radioresistant UT-SCC-15 xenografts were established in athymic NIH III HO female mice. Tumors were irradiated with 2 Gy/day by continuous standard delivery (SRT: 2 Gy) or discontinuous low-dose pulsed delivery (PRT: 0.2 Gy × 10 with 3-min pulse interval) to total doses of 20 Gy (UT14) or 40 Gy (UT15) using a clinical 5-day on/2-day off schedule. Treatment response was assessed by changes in tumor volume, {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) (tumor metabolism), and {sup 18}F-fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) (hypoxia) positron emission tomography (PET) imaging before, at midpoint, and after treatment. Tumor hypoxia using pimonidazole staining and vascular density (CD34 staining) were assessed by quantitative histopathology. Results: UT15 and UT14 tumors responded similarly in terms of growth delay to either SRT or PRT. When compared with UT14 tumors, UT15 tumors demonstrated significantly lower uptake of FDG at all time points after irradiation. UT14 tumors demonstrated higher levels of tumor hypoxia after SRT when compared with PRT as measured by {sup 18}F-FMISO PET. By contrast, no differences were seen in {sup 18}F-FMISO PET imaging between SRT and PRT for UT15 tumors. Histologic analysis of pimonidazole staining mimicked the {sup 18}F-FMISO PET imaging data, showing an increase in hypoxia in SRT-treated UT14 tumors but not PRT-treated tumors. Conclusions: Differences in {sup 18}F-FMISO uptake for UT14 tumors after radiation therapy between PRT and SRT were measurable despite the similar tumor growth delay responses. In UT15 tumors, both SRT and PRT were equally effective at reducing tumor hypoxia to a significant level as measured by {sup 18}F-FMISO and pimonidazole.

  16. Comparative analysis of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in head and neck cancer and carcinoma cervix during concurrent chemoradiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puneet Kumar Bagri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cisplatin is widely used as radio sensitizer in head and neck cancer (HNC and carcinoma cervix (CaCx. This study aims to see comparative nephrotoxicity of cisplatin in HNC and in CaCx without obstructive uropathy treated by concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT. Materials and Methods: Fifty patients of HNC and 50 patients of CaCx stage II/III without obstructive uropathy were included in this study. Cisplatin 50 mg intravenous weekly was given before EBRT with adequate hydration and premedication in both groups. Before chemotherapy; blood urea, serum creatinine, and glomerular filtration rate (GFR were measured. GFR was measured using 99m Tc diethylene triamine pentacaetic acid (DTPA renogram study. Results: At the end of 4 th week, blood urea level 41-45 mg% was in 40 and 4% in HNC and CaCx, respectively (P = 0.018. At the end of 3 rd and 4 th week, blood urea level >45 mg% was 10 and 6% in HNC cases, respectively. At the end of 4 th week, serum creatinine level 1.1-1.5 mg% was 50 and 8% in HNC and CaCx, respectively (P = 0.047. Serum creatinine level >1.5 mg% was 6, 8, and 22% in HNC at the end of 2 nd , 3 rd , and 4 th week, respectively. GFR <80 ml/min at the end of 4 th week was 14% in HNC and only 2% in CaCx. GFR <100ml/min was significant at the end of 4 th week (P = 0.04. Univariate analysis showed significant relation between reduced oral fluid intake and reduced GFR (P < 0.001. Conclusion: In HNC, during concurrent chemoradiation, as the 3 rd -4 th week is reached, oral mucosal reactions increase and affect oral intake which further add to the cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. In CaCx without obstructive uropathy, renal function impairment is less severe as oral intake of water and liquid is not much impaired.

  17. Evidence-Based Treatment Options in Recurrent and/or Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

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    Athanassios Argiris

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The major development of the past decade in the first-line treatment of recurrent and/or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (R/M SCCHN was the introduction of cetuximab in combination with platinum plus 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy (CT, followed by maintenance cetuximab (the “EXTREME” regimen. This regimen is supported by a phase 3 randomized trial and subsequent observational studies, and it confers well-documented survival benefits, with median survival ranging between approximately 10 and 14 months, overall response rates between 36 and 44%, and disease control rates of over 80%. Furthermore, as indicated by patient-reported outcome measures, the addition of cetuximab to platinum-based CT leads to a significant reduction in pain and problems with social eating and speech. Conversely, until very recently, there has been a lack of evidence-based second-line treatment options, and the therapies that have been available have shown low response rates and poor survival outcomes. Presently, a promising new treatment option in R/M SCCHN has emerged: immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs, which have demonstrated favorable results in second-line clinical trials. Nivolumab and pembrolizumab are the first two ICIs that were approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. We note that the trials that showed benefit with ICIs included not only patients who previously received ≥1 platinum-based regimens for R/M SCCHN but also patients who experienced recurrence within 6 months after combined modality therapy with a platinum agent for locally advanced disease. In this review, we outline the available clinical and observational evidence for the EXTREME regimen and the initial results from clinical trials for ICIs in patients with R/M SCCHN. We propose that these treatment options can be integrated into a new continuum of care paradigm, with first-line EXTREME regimen followed by second-line ICIs. A number of ongoing clinical trials

  18. Expression and clinical significance of MAGE and NY-ESO-1 cancer-testis antigens in adenoid cystic carcinoma of the head and neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veit, Johannes A; Heine, Daniela; Thierauf, Julia; Lennerz, Jochen; Shetty, Subasch; Schuler, Patrick J; Whiteside, Theresa; Beutner, Dirk; Meyer, Moritz; Grünewald, Inga; Ritter, Gerd; Gnjatic, Sacha; Sikora, Andrew G; Hoffmann, Thomas K; Laban, Simon

    2016-07-01

    Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) of the head and neck is a rare but highly malignant tumor. Cancer-testis antigens (CTAs) represent an immunogenic family of cancer-specific proteins and thus represent an attractive target for immunotherapy. Eighty-four cases of ACC were identified, the CTAs pan-Melanoma antigen (pan-MAGE; M3H67) and New York esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (NY-ESO-1; E978) were detected immunohistochemically (IHC) and correlated with clinical data. Expression of NY-ESO-1 was found in 48 of 84 patients (57.1%) and of pan-MAGE in 28 of 84 patients (31.2%). Median overall survival (OS) in NY-ESO-1 positive versus negative patients was 130.8 and 282.0 months (p = .223), respectively. OS in pan-MAGE positive versus negative patients was 105.3 and 190.5 months, respectively (p = .096). Patients expressing both NY-ESO-1 and pan-MAGE simultaneously had significantly reduced OS with a median of 90.5 months compared with 282.0 months in negative patients (p = .047). A significant fraction of patients with ACC show expression of the CTAs NY-ESO-1 and/or pan-MAGE with promising immunotherapeutic implications. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 38: 1008-1016, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Cediranib Maleate in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Newly Diagnosed Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-14

    Recurrent Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma in the Neck With Occult Primary; Recurrent Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Keratinizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Squamous Cell Carcinoma Metastatic in the Neck With Occult Primary; Stage IV Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IV Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IV Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Nasopharyngeal Keratinizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IV Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Tongue Carcinoma; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma to Neck With Occult Primary

  20. [Conservative treatment of chyle fistula of the neck following a reintervention of cervical bilateral lymphectomy for medullary carcinoma of the thyroid. Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giove, Eleonora; Merlicco, Domenico; Nacchiero, Eleonora; Marzaioli, Rinaldo

    2010-01-01

    Chyle fistula is an uncommon serious complication of neck surgery, occurring in 1-3% of radical neck dissections. An untreated chyle leak is a potentially dangerous condition that may rarely lead to hypovolemia, hyponatremia, hypochloremia, hypoproteinemia and lymphopenia. Anatomic variants of the terminal portion of the thoracic duct and suction drainage in the neck wound play a primary role in causing this kind of lesion. Poor is the literature concerning chyle fistula, due to its rarity, and mostly case reports; still debated--prevalently empiric--is the management of this disease. The Authors report a case of chyle fistula following a reintervention of cervical bilateral lymphectomy for medullary carcinoma of the thyroid in a 75 years old female. In the reported case the chyle fistula was successfully treated conservatively, in early post-operative period with a low-fat diet and total parenteral nutrition, definitely followed by sclerosant therapy. The injection of a sclerosant agent (4 g of sterile medical talc diluted in isotonic sodium chloride solution) into the supraclavicular wound bed, through the drainage tube (clamped for 2 hours), determined rapid decline in fistula output, hence obviating surgical intervention.

  1. Association between FAT1 mutation and overall survival in patients with human papillomavirus–negative head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki Tae; Kim, Bo‐Sung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to characterize the mutation profile of FAT atypical cadherin 1 (FAT1) and determine the prognostic significance of FAT1 mutation for overall survival in patients with human papillomavirus (HPV)‐negative head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods Data were downloaded from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC) data portals and used as discovery and validation sets. FAT1 mutational status was determined in 234 and 37 patients with HPV‐negative HNSCC, respectively, and overall survival analysis was performed. For comparison, HPV‐positive patients were also analyzed for overall survival. Results Most of the identified nonsynonymous somatic FAT1 mutations were loss‐of‐function mutations. FAT1 mutation was significantly associated with better overall survival in HPV‐negative patients from both the TCGA cohort (p = .026) and the ICGC cohort (p = .047), but not in HPV‐positive patients. Conclusion FAT1 mutational status is a strong independent prognostic factor in patients with HPV‐negative HNSCC. © 2016 The Authors Head & Neck Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 38: E2021–E2029, 2016 PMID:26876381

  2. Chemoradiotherapy in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: focus on targeted therapies; La chimioradiotherapie des carcinomes epidermoides des voies aerodigestives superieures: point sur les therapeutiques ciblees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bozec, A. [Centre Antoine-Lacassagne, Dept. de Chirurgie, Institut Universitaire de la Face et du Cou, 06 - Nice (France); Thariat, J.; Bensadoun, R.J. [Centre Antoine-Lacassagne, Dept. de Radiotherapie, Institut Universitaire de la Face et du Cou, 06 - Nice (France); Milano, G. [Centre Antoine-Lacassagne, Unite d' Oncopharmacologie, Institut Universitaire de la Face et du Cou, 06 - Nice (France)

    2008-01-15

    Radiotherapy is an essential treatment for many patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Its association with molecular targeted therapies represents a real progress. Among the recent advances in the molecular targeted therapy of cancer, the applications centred on E.G.F.R. are currently the most promising and the most advanced at clinical level. Considering the set of therapeutic tools targeting E.G.F.R., there are at present two well-identified emerging categories of drugs with monoclonal antibodies, on the one hand, and tyrosine kinase inhibitors, on the other. In many preclinical studies, the combination of anti-E.G.F.R. drugs with irradiation has led to additive or supra-additive cytotoxic effects. Furthermore, anti-angiogenic agents have shown promising results in association with anti-E.G.F.R. drugs and radiotherapy. This research effort has recently produced encouraging clinical results in advanced head and neck cancer with combination of cetuximab (an anti-E.G.F.R. monoclonal antibody) with irradiation with a significant impact on patient survival. Active and efficient clinical research is currently ongoing to determine the place of molecular targeted therapies in the treatment of head and neck cancer, particularly in association with radiotherapy. (authors)

  3. Clinical impact of cervical lymph node involvement and central neck dissection in patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma: a retrospective analysis of 368 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozec, Alexandre; Dassonville, Olivier; Chamorey, Emmanuel; Poissonnet, Gilles; Sudaka, Anne; Peyrottes, Isabelle; Ettore, Francette; Haudebourg, Juliette; Bussière, Françoise; Benisvy, Danielle; Marcy, Pierre-Yves; Sadoul, Jean Louis; Hofman, Paul; Lassale, Sandra; Vallicioni, Jacques; Demard, François; Santini, José

    2011-08-01

    The impact of cervical lymph node metastases and the optimal surgical management of the neck in patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) remain controversial. The objectives of this retrospective study were to determine, in patients with PTC, the predictive factors and the impact on tumor recurrence rate of cervical lymph node involvement, and to evaluate the oncologic results and the morbidity of central neck dissection (CND). We reviewed the records of patients who had undergone surgical treatment for PTC at our institution between 1990 and 2000. A total of 368 patients (86 men and 282 women) were included in this study. Young age (p = 0.02), tumor size (p = 0.001) and extrathyroidal tumor extension (p = 0.003) were significant predictive factors of cervical lymph node metastatic involvement (multivariate analysis). Initial metastatic cervical lymph node involvement was identified as an independent risk factor of tumor recurrence (multivariate analysis, p = 0.01). Metastatic lymph node(s) were found in prophylactic CND specimens in 31% of the patients. CND increased the risk of postoperative hypocalcemia (p = 0.008) and of permanent hypoparathyroidism (p = 0.002). In conclusion, cervical lymph node metastatic involvement at the time of initial surgery is an independent risk factor of tumor recurrence. CND provided an up-staging of more than 30% of patients with a clinically N0 neck, but was associated with significant morbidity regarding parathyroid function.

  4. Concurrent use of cisplatin or cetuximab with definitive radiotherapy for locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinomas

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    Levy, Antonin; Blanchard, Pierre; Bellefqih, Sara; Brahimi, Nacera; Deutsch, Eric; Daly-Schveitzer, Nicolas; Tao, Yungan [Gustave Roussy, Department of Radiation Oncology, Villejuif (France); Guigay, Joel [Gustave Roussy, Department of Medical Oncology, Villejuif (France); Janot, Francois; Temam, Stephane [Gustave Roussy, Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Villejuif (France); Bourhis, Jean [Gustave Roussy, Department of Radiation Oncology, Villejuif (France); University Hospital Lausanne, Department of Radiation Oncology, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2014-09-15

    The goal of the present work was to compare outcomes of definitive concurrent cisplatin-based chemoradiotherapy (CRT) with cetuximab-based bioradiotherapy (BRT) in locally advanced head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Between 2006 and 2012, 265 patients with locally advanced HNSCC were treated at our institution with CRT (n = 194; 73 %) with three cycles of cisplatin (100 mg/m{sup 2}, every 3 weeks) or BRT (n = 71; 27 %) with weekly cetuximab. Patients receiving BRT had more pre-existing conditions (Charlson index ≥ 2) than the CRT group (p = 0.005). Median follow-up was 29 months. In all, 56 % of patients treated with CRT received the planned three cycles (92 % at least two cycles) and 79 % patients treated with BRT received six cycles or more. The 2-year actuarial overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were 72 % and 61 %, respectively. In the multivariate analysis (MVA), T4 stage, N2-3 stage, smoking status (current smoker as compared with never smoker), and non-oropharyngeal locations predicted for OS, whereas BRT association with OS was of borderline significance (p = 0.054). The 2-year actuarial locoregional control (LRC) and distant control (DC) rates were 73 and 79 %, respectively. CRT was independently associated with an improved LRC (2-year LRC: 76 % for CRT vs. 61 % for BRT) and DC (2-year LRC: 81 % for CRT vs. 68 % for BRT) in comparison with BRT (p < 0.001 and p = 0.01 in the MVA). Subgroup analyses showed that T4 patients benefited significantly from CRT (vs. BRT) in LRC, while T1-3 did not. BRT patients had more G3-4 skin complications (p < 0.001) and CRT patients had higher rates of feeding tube placement (p = 0.006) and G3-4 gastrointestinal toxicities (p < 0.001). This retrospective analysis showed a better LRC in locally advanced HNSCC treated by cisplatin-based CRT than cetuximab-based BRT, and a nonsignificant trend towards an improved OS. (orig.) [German] Die Therapieeffektivitaet mit Platin

  5. Head and neck cancers masquerading as deep neck abscesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soon, Sue Rene; Kanagalingam, Jeevendra; Johari, Shirish; Yuen, Heng Wai

    2012-12-01

    Deep neck space abscesses are common otolaryngological emergencies, and prompt incision and drainage is the treatment of choice. Head and neck cancers often present with cervical metastases that may become secondarily infected. Clinical presentation is similar to a deep neck abscess. Surgical drainage of such collections has implications on subsequent treatment. In this case series, we describe six cases with this unusual presentation that were subsequently found to have a head and neck malignancy, and where three patients had their abscesses treated surgically. We aim to raise awareness of this unusual presentation of a head and neck carcinoma, and to avoid a potential pitfall in the management of deep neck abscess.

  6. Diagnostic Value of Liquid-Based Cytology in Urothelial Carcinoma Diagnosis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You Luo

    Full Text Available To evaluate the value of liquid-based cytology (LBC in the diagnosis of urothelial carcinoma.Diagnostic studies were searched for the diagnostic value of LBC in urothelial carcinoma in PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, CBM and CNKI. The latest retrieval date was September 2014. The data were extracted and the quality of the included studies was independently assessed by 2 reviewers. Stata 13 software was used to perform the statistical analysis. The research was conducted in compliance with the PRISMA statement.Nineteen studies, which included 8293 patients, were evaluated. The results of the meta-analysis showed that the pooled sensitivity and specificity of LBC were 0.58 (0.51-0.65 and 0.96 (0.93-0.98, respectively. The diagnostic odds ratio (DOR was 31 (18-56 and the area under the curve (AUC of summary receiver operating characteristic (SROC was 0.83 (0.80-0.86. The post-test probability was 80% when a positive diagnosis was made. Compared with high grade urothelial carcinoma (HGUC, the sensitivity of detecting low-grade urothelial carcinoma (LGUC was significantly lower, risk ratio of sensitivity was 0.54 (0.43-0.66, P<0.001. However, no significant sensitivity improvement was observed with LBC when compared with traditional cytospin cytology, risk ratio was 1.03 (0.94-1.14, P = 0.524.Despite LBC having a pooled 58% positive rate for urothelial carcinoma diagnosis in our meta-analysis, no significant improvement in sensitivity was observed based on the studies evaluated. Further research is needed to validate these findings.

  7. Diagnostic Value of Liquid-Based Cytology in Urothelial Carcinoma Diagnosis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, You; She, Dong-Li; Xiong, Hu; Yang, Li; Fu, Sheng-Jun

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the value of liquid-based cytology (LBC) in the diagnosis of urothelial carcinoma. Diagnostic studies were searched for the diagnostic value of LBC in urothelial carcinoma in PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, CBM and CNKI. The latest retrieval date was September 2014. The data were extracted and the quality of the included studies was independently assessed by 2 reviewers. Stata 13 software was used to perform the statistical analysis. The research was conducted in compliance with the PRISMA statement. Nineteen studies, which included 8293 patients, were evaluated. The results of the meta-analysis showed that the pooled sensitivity and specificity of LBC were 0.58 (0.51-0.65) and 0.96 (0.93-0.98), respectively. The diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) was 31 (18-56) and the area under the curve (AUC) of summary receiver operating characteristic (SROC) was 0.83 (0.80-0.86). The post-test probability was 80% when a positive diagnosis was made. Compared with high grade urothelial carcinoma (HGUC), the sensitivity of detecting low-grade urothelial carcinoma (LGUC) was significantly lower, risk ratio of sensitivity was 0.54 (0.43-0.66), Pcytology, risk ratio was 1.03 (0.94-1.14), P = 0.524. Despite LBC having a pooled 58% positive rate for urothelial carcinoma diagnosis in our meta-analysis, no significant improvement in sensitivity was observed based on the studies evaluated. Further research is needed to validate these findings.

  8. Diagnostic and therapeutic relevance of NY-ESO-1 expression in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ries, Jutta; Mollaoglu, Nur; Vairaktaris, Eleftherios; Neukam, Friedrich W; Nkenke, Emeka

    2009-12-01

    Cancer/testis antigen 1B (NY-ESO-1) is exclusively expressed in various types of tumor but not in healthy normal tissue, except testis, and induces strong cellular and humoral immune responses. Therefore, it represents an ideal target for diagnostic and immunotherapeutic applications. The aim of the study was to investigate the expression of NY-ESO-1 in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) to determine its impact as a diagnostic parameter or a therapeutic target for oral cancer. A total of 65 OSCC and 20 normal oral mucosal samples of otherwise healthy volunteers were included in this study. Expression of NY-ESO-1 was determined using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The results were correlated to diagnosis and clinicopathological parameters. NY-ESO-1 was expressed in 27.7% of the investigated tumor samples, but not in normal oral mucosal. The correlation between NY-ESO-1 expression and malignancy was significant (p=0.008). The prevalence of NY-ESO-1 expression was significantly associated with tumor size (p=0.033), but not with histological grading, positive lymph node status or clinical stage of disease. NY-ESO-1 expression is restricted to OSCC, clearly indicating malignancy. However, the expression rate of this antigen is too low for clinical application but it might be a useful additional biomarker within a multiple marker system for the diagnosis of OSCC. In addition, NY-ESO-1 might be a candidate for immunotherapy and polyvaccination in patients suffering from OSCC.

  9. Circulating microRNA-200 Family as Diagnostic Marker in Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

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    Sameer A Dhayat

    Full Text Available In this clinical study, we aimed to evaluate the role of circulating microRNA-200 family as a non-invasive tool to identify patients with cirrhosis-associated hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC.Prognosis of HCC remains poor with increasing incidence worldwide, mainly related to liver cirrhosis. So far, no reliable molecular targets exist for early detection of HCC at surgically manageable stages. Recently, we identified members of the microRNA-200 family as potential diagnostic markers of cirrhosis-associated HCC in patient tissue samples. Their value as circulating biomarkers for HCC remained undefined.Blood samples and clinicopathological data of consecutive patients with liver diseases were collected prospectively. Expression of the microRNA-200 family was investigated by qRT-PCR in blood serum samples of 22 HCC patients with and without cirrhosis. Serum samples of patients with non-cancerous chronic liver cirrhosis (n = 22 and of healthy volunteers (n = 15 served as controls.MicroRNA-141 and microRNA-200a were significantly downregulated in blood serum of patients with HCC compared to liver cirrhosis (p<0.007 and healthy controls (p<0.002. MicroRNA-141 and microRNA-200a could well discriminate patients with cirrhosis-associated HCC from healthy volunteers with area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC values of 0.85 and 0.82, respectively. Additionally, both microRNAs could differentiate between HCC and non-cancerous liver cirrhosis with a fair accuracy.Circulating microRNA-200 family members are significantly deregulated in patients with HCC and liver cirrhosis. Further studies are necessary to confirm the diagnostic value of the microRNA-200 family as accurate serum marker for cirrhosis-associated HCC.

  10. Preoperative (18)F-FDG-PET/CT vs Contrast-Enhanced CT to Identify Regional Nodal Metastasis among Patients with Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Joshua K; Ow, Thomas J; Lee, Andrew Y; Smith, Richard V; Schlecht, Nicolas F; Schiff, Bradley A; Tassler, Andrew B; Lin, Juan; Moadel, Renee M; Valdivia, Ana; Abraham, Tony; Gulko, Edwin; Neimark, Matthew; Ustun, Berrin; Bello, Jacqueline A; Shifteh, Keivan

    2017-09-01

    Objective Our objective was to compare the accuracy of preoperative positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) and contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) in detecting cervical nodal metastases in patients treated with neck dissection and to scrutinize the ability of each modality to determine nodal stage. Study Design Case series with chart review. Setting Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York. Subjects and Methods Patients who underwent neck dissection at our institution for primary treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and had received preoperative PET/CT and CECT were included in this study. Imaging studies were reinterpreted by 3 specialists within the field and compared for interreader agreement. Concordance between radiology and histopathology was measured using neck levels and sides, along with patient nodal stage. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and agreement coefficients were calculated. Results Seventy-three patients were included in the study. Sensitivity was 0.69 and 0.94 (level and side) for PET/CT vs 0.53 and 0.66 for CECT ( P = .056, P = .001). Specificity was 0.86 and 0.56 for PET/CT vs 0.91 and 0.76 for CECT ( P = .014, P = .024). No significant difference was found in overall accuracy ( P = .33, P = .88). The overall agreement percentages between N stage called by imaging modality and pathology were 52% and 55% for PET/CT and CECT, respectively. Conclusion No significant difference in sensitivity was found between PET/CT and CECT. CECT was found to have superior specificity compared with PET/CT. The information gleaned from each modality in the pretreatment evaluation of HNSCC appears to be complementary.

  11. Diagnostic delay in oral squamous cell carcinoma: the role of cognitive and psychological variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzarella, Vera; Pizzo, Giuseppe; Calvino, Francesco; Compilato, Domenico; Colella, Giuseppe; Campisi, Giuseppina

    2014-03-01

    This retrospective study investigated, in two cohorts of subjects living in Southern Italy and awaiting treatment for oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), the variables related to diagnostic delay ascribable to the patient, with particular reference to the cognitive and psychological ones. A total of 156 patients with OSCC (mean age: 62 years, M/F: 2.39∶1) were recruited at the Universities of Palermo and Naples. Risk factors related to patient delay included: sociodemographic, health-related, cognitive and psychological variables. The analysis was conducted by considering two different delay ranges: dichotomous (≤1 month vs. >1 month) and polytomous (3 months) delay. Data were investigated by univariate and multivariate analyses and a P value ≤0.05 was considered statistically significant. For both delay measurements, the most relevant variables were: 'Personal experience of cancer' (dichotomous delay: P=0.05, odds ratio (OR)=0.33, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.11-0.99; polytomous delay: P=0.006, Chi-square=10.224) and 'Unawareness' (dichotomous delay: Pdichotomous and for polytomous categorization of delay, respectively. The findings of this study indicated that, in the investigated cohorts, the knowledge about cancer issues is strongly linked to the patient delay. Educational interventions on the Mediterranean population are necessary in order to increase the patient awareness and to emphasize his/her key role in early diagnosis of OSCC.

  12. KRAS, BRAF, and TP53 deep sequencing for colorectal carcinoma patient diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rechsteiner, Markus; von Teichman, Adriana; Rüschoff, Jan H; Fankhauser, Niklaus; Pestalozzi, Bernhard; Schraml, Peter; Weber, Achim; Wild, Peter; Zimmermann, Dieter; Moch, Holger

    2013-05-01

    In colorectal carcinoma, KRAS (alias Ki-ras) and BRAF mutations have emerged as predictors of resistance to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor antibody treatment and worse patient outcome, respectively. In this study, we aimed to establish a high-throughput deep sequencing workflow according to 454 pyrosequencing technology to cope with the increasing demand for sequence information at medical institutions. A cohort of 81 patients with known KRAS mutation status detected by Sanger sequencing was chosen for deep sequencing. The workflow allowed us to analyze seven amplicons (one BRAF, two KRAS, and four TP53 exons) of nine patients in parallel in one deep sequencing run. Target amplification and variant calling showed reproducible results with input DNA derived from FFPE tissue that ranged from 0.4 to 50 ng with the use of different targets and multiplex identifiers. Equimolar pooling of each amplicon in a deep sequencing run was necessary to counterbalance differences in patient tissue quality. Five BRAF and 49 TP53 mutations with functional consequences were detected. The lowest mutation frequency detected in a patient tumor population was 5% in TP53 exon 5. This low-frequency mutation was successfully verified in a second PCR and deep sequencing run. In summary, our workflow allows us to process 315 targets a week and provides the quality, flexibility, and speed needed to be integrated as standard procedure for mutational analysis in diagnostics.

  13. Correlation of immunohistochemical staining p63 and TTF-1 with EGFR and K-ras mutational spectrum and diagnostic reproducibility in non small cell lung carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thunnissen, Erik; Boers, Evan; Heideman, Danielle A. M.; Grunberg, Katrien; Kuik, Dirk J.; Noorduin, Arnold; van Oosterhout, Matthijs; Pronk, Divera; Seldenrijk, Cees; Sietsma, Hannie; Smit, Egbert F.; van Suylen, Robertjan; von der Thusen, Jan; Vrugt, Bart; Wiersma, Anne; Witte, Birgit I.; den Bakker, Michael

    2012-01-01

    For treatment purposes, distinction between squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma is important. The aim of this study is to examine the diagnostic accuracy on lung cancer small biopsies for the distinction between adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma and relate these to immunohistochemica

  14. Diagnostic utility of narrow-band imaging endoscopy for pharyngeal superficial carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Noboru Yoshimura; Kenichi Goda; Hisao Tajiri; Yukinaga Yoshida; Takakuni Kato; Yoichi Seino; Masahiro Ikegami; Mitsuyoshi Urashima

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the endoscopic features of pha-ryngeal superficial carcinoma and evaluate the utility of narrow-band imaging (NBI) for this disease.METHODS: In the present prospective study, 335 patients underwent conventional white light (CWL) en-doscopy and non-magnified/magnified NBI endoscopy, followed by an endoscopic biopsy, for 445 superficial lesions in the oropharynx and hypopharynx. The macroscopic appearance of superficial lesions was categorized as either elevated (< 5 mm in height), flat, or depressed (not ulcerous). Superficial carcinoma (SC) was defined as a superficial lesion showing high-grade dysplasia or squamous cell carcinoma on histology. The color, delineation, and macroscopic appearances of the lesions were evaluated by CWL endoscopy. The ratio of the brownish area/intervascular brownish epithelium (IBE), as well as microvascular proliferation, dilation, and irregularities, was determined by non-magnified/ magnified NBI endoscopy. An experienced pathologist who was unaware of the endoscopic findings made the histological diagnoses. By comparing endoscopic findings with histology, we determined the endoscopic features of SC and evaluated the diagnostic utility of NBI.RESULTS: The 445 lesions were divided histologically into two groups: a non-SC group, including non-neo-plasia and low-grade dysplasia cases, and an SC group. Of the 445 lesions examined, 333 were classified as non-SC and 112 were classified as SC. There were no significant differences in age, gender, or the location of the lesions between the patients in the two groups. The mean diameter of the SC lesions was significantly greater than that of non-SC lesions (11.0 7.6 mm vs 4.6 3.6 mm, respectively, P < 0.001). Comparisons of CWL endoscopy findings for SC and non-SC lesions by univariate analysis revealed that the incidence of redness (72% vs 41%, respectively, P< 0.001) and a flat or depressed type of lesion (58% vs 44%, respectively, P = 0.013) was significantly higher in

  15. Pure primary small cell carcinoma of urinary bladder: A rare diagnostic entity

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    Sonia Gon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Small cell carcinoma of the bladder is a rare, aggressive, poorly differentiated neuroendocrine neoplasm accounting for only 0.3-0.7% of all bladder tumors. Since the tumor is very rare, pathogenesis is uncertain. Small cell carcinomas of the urinary bladder are mixed with classic urothelial carcinomas or adenocarcinomas of the bladder in 68% cases, making pure primary small cell carcinoma even a rarer entity. The unknown etiology and natural history of small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder represent a challenge both to the pathologist and urologists for its diagnosis and treatment, respectively.

  16. Activity of the Vascular-Disrupting Agent 5,6-Dimethylxanthenone-4-Acetic Acid against Human Head and Neck Carcinoma Xenografts

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    Mukund Seshadri

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC constitute a majority of the tumors of the upper aerodigestive tract and continue to present a significant therapeutic challenge. To explore the potential of vascular-targeted therapy in HNSCC, we investigated the antivascular, antitumor activity of the potent vascular-disrupting agent (VDA 5,6-dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic acid (DMXAA against two HNSCC xenografts with markedly different morphologic and vascular characteristics. Athymic nude mice bearing subcutaneous FaDu (human pharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma and A253 (human submaxillary gland epidermoid carcinoma tumors were administered a single dose of DMXAA (30 mg/kg, i.p. Changes in vascular function were evaluated 24 hours after treatment using contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and immunohistochemistry (CD31. Signal enhancement (E and change in longitudinal relaxation rates (ΔR1 were calculated to measure alterations in vascular perfusion. MRI showed a 78% and 49% reduction in vascular perfusion in FaDu and A253 xenografts, respectively. CD31-immunostaining of tumor sections revealed three-fold (FaDu and two-fold (A253 reductions in microvessel density (MVD 24 hours after treatment. DMXAA was equally effective against both xenograffs, with significant tumor growth inhibition observed 30 days after treatment. These results indicate that DMXAA may be beneficial in the management of HNSCC, alone or in combination with other treatments.

  17. Prediction of treatment outcome by cisplatin-DNA adduct formation in patients with stage III/IV head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, treated by concurrent cisplatin-radiation (RADPLAT).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoebers, F.J.; Pluim, D.; Verheij, M.; Balm, A.J.M.; Bartelink, H.; Schellens, J.H.M.; Begg, A.C.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to test the predictive value of cisplatin-DNA adduct levels in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients treated with cisplatin-radiation. Patients with advanced-stage HNSCC were treated within a randomized trial, investigating the optimal route of cisplatin

  18. Expression characteristics and diagnostic value of annexin A2 in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Jian Zhang; Deng-Fu Yao; Min Yao; Hua Huang; Wei Wu; Mei-Juan Yan; Xiao-Di Yan; Jie Chen

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the characteristics and diagnostic value of annexin A2 (ANXA2) expression in cancerous tissues and sera of patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).METHODS:Levels of liver ANXA2 gene transcription or protein expression were analyzed in HCC-,their self-controlled precancerous-,and distant cancerous-tissues from 30 HCC.Serum levels of ANXA2 expression in 115 patients with HCC,25 with metastatic liver cancer,35 with chronic hepatitis,28 with acute hepatitis,38 with cirrhosis,and 30 healthy controls were determined.Clinicopathological characteristics of circulating ANXA2 expression were analyzed,and its diagnostic efficiency and clinical values in HCC were evaluated.RESULTS:ANXA2 expression was localized in both cell membrane and cytoplasm in HCC tissue,mainly in the cytoplasm of matched adjacent cancerous tissue,and there was almost no positive staining in matched distant cancerous tissue.Abnormal expression of liver ANXA2 was present in HCC tissues compared with self-controlled adjacent-and distant-cancerous tissues at prorein or mRNA level.Circulating ANXA2 in HCC patients was significantly higher than that of other liver diseases (P < 0.01) except metastatic liver cancer.If the diagnostic cutoff value of ANXA2 level was more than 18 ng/mL,the incidence of serum ANXA2 was 86.96% in the HCC group,80% in the metastatic liver cancer group,31.58% in the liver cirrhosis group,none in the chronic hepatitis or acute hepatitis or normal control group,respectively.Serum ANXA2 expression in HCC patients was correlated with HBV infection (27.38 ± 5.67 ng/mL vs 18.58 ± 7.83 ng/mL,P < 0.01),extrahepatic metastasis (26.11 ± 5.43 ng/mL vs 22.79 ± 5.64 ng/mL,P <0.01),and portal vein thrombus (26.03 ± 5.99 ng/mL vs 23.06 ± 5.03 ng/mL,P < 0.01),and was significantly higher (P < 0.01) in the moderately-(26.19 ± 5.34 ng/mL) or the poorly-differentiated group (27.05 ± 5.13ng/mL) than in the well

  19. Protein expression and promoter methylation of the candidate biomarker TCF21 in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Daniel; Stockmann, Christian; Schrödter, Katrin; Rudack, Claudia

    2013-06-01

    Epigenetic alterations of the transcription factor 21 (TCF21) gene have been associated with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and other tumor entities. So far, however, no reports have appeared in the literature on TCF21 protein expression in HNSCC and its relevance as a putative biomarker. TCF21 protein expression was assessed in 74 HNSCCs and 31 benign tonsils by immunohistochemistry. Methylation analyses of the corresponding gene promoter were performed in 45 HNSCCs and 31 benign tonsils. The TCF21 expression levels in the tumors and controls were compared with each other and within each group and, in addition, with the TCF21 promoter methylation status and various clinicopathological characteristics. Overall, both the expression levels and methylation frequencies of TCF21 were significantly higher in the HNSCCs than in the benign controls (p promoter hypermethylation resulted in a reduced protein expression in a subgroup of the HNSCCs (p = 0.038), but not in the tonsils. In the tonsils, TCF21 protein expression positively correlated with that of CD31 (p = 0.039), a marker for blood vessels. Also, in the tonsils the TCF21 protein methylation frequency showed a positive correlation with age (p = 0.008). The HNSCCs of patients with a positive history for alcohol and nicotine abuse showed higher TCF21 protein expression levels than their respective counterparts (p = 0.028 and p = 0.062, respectively). The same was observed in human papilloma virus (HPV)-negative tumors (p = 0.042), tumors located in the oral cavity (p = 0.016) and early-stage tumors (p = 0.025). Interestingly, expression rates in tumors of the oropharynx, where HPV-positive tumors were most frequently found, tended to be lower (p = 0.065). The methylation frequencies of TCF21 were found to be significantly higher in tumors of patients without nicotine abuse (p = 0.030), in HPV-positive tumors (p = 0.014) and in tumors exhibiting over

  20. Functional imaging in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: correlation of PET/CT and diffusion-weighted imaging at 3 Tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fruehwald-Pallamar, Julia; Czerny, Christian; Mayerhoefer, Marius E.; Weber, Michael; Fruehwald, Laura; Herneth, Andreas M. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Halpern, Benjamin S. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Harvard Medical School, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Eder-Czembirek, Christina [Medical University of Vienna, University Hospital for Cranio, Maxillofacial and Oral Surgery, Vienna (Austria); Brunner, Markus [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Vienna (Austria); Schuetz, Matthias [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Vienna (Austria)

    2011-06-15

    The purposes of this study were: (a) to prospectively assess the correlation between apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values and maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax) in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (SCC); and (b) to assess ADC and SUVmax values in relation to different tumour grades and stages in our patient population. The study group comprised 31 consecutive patients with biopsy-proven head and neck squamous cell carcinoma who were examined using a 3T MRI scanner with a 16-channel head and neck coil. In addition to routine sequences, axial (DWIBS) and sagittal (DW-EPI) diffusion-weighted sequences were obtained using b-values of 0 mm{sup 2}/s and 800 mm{sup 2}/s. The ADC maps were calculated automatically. The ADC values of the tumours were measured with three regions of interest (ROIs) of standard size, and an ROI covering the entire tumour. In all patients, contrast-enhanced, whole-body {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT was performed within 2 weeks of the MRI examination. SUVmax was measured for every tumour using a 3-D freehand ROI that covered the entire tumour. Two-way repeated measures ANOVA was used for group comparisons. The Spearman rank correlation test was performed for ADC values. Mean ADC values in the 31 SCC were 0.902 ({+-}0.134) with a ROI of standard size, and 0.928 ({+-}0.160) with the large ROI measurements on the axial DWIBS sequence. The ADC values of the tumours were significantly higher when measured with the sagittal DW-EPI sequence: 1.051 ({+-}0.211) and 1.082 ({+-}0.208). We observed no significant differences in ADC values and SUVmax between the various T stages or histological grades of the tumours. SUVmax values (26.5{+-}12) did not correlate with ADC values on DWIBS or EPI. There is no correlation between the FDG uptake and the ADC value in head and neck SCC. The three different tumour grades and four tumour stages present in our study population could not be differentiated based on ADC values or SUV. (orig.)

  1. Diagnostic performance of the urinary canine calgranulins in dogs with lower urinary or urogenital tract carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilmann, Romy M; McNiel, Elizabeth A; Grützner, Niels; Lanerie, David J; Suchodolski, Jan S; Steiner, Jörg M

    2017-04-21

    Onset of canine transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) and prostatic carcinoma (PCA) is usually insidious with dogs presenting at an advanced stage of the disease. A biomarker that can facilitate early detection of TCC/PCA and improve patient survival would be useful. S100A8/A9 (calgranulin A/B or calprotectin) and S100A12 (calgranulin C) are expressed by cells of the innate immune system and are associated with several inflammatory disorders. S100A8/A9 is also expressed by epithelial cells after malignant transformation and is involved in the regulation of cell proliferation and metastasis. S100A8/A9 is up-regulated in human PCA and TCC, whereas the results for S100A12 have been ambiguous. Also, the urine S100A8/A9-to-S100A12 ratio (uCalR) may have potential as a marker for canine TCC/PCA. Aim of the study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the urinary S100/calgranulins to detect TCC/PCA in dogs by using data and urine samples from 164 dogs with TCC/PCA, non-neoplastic urinary tract disease, other neoplasms, or urinary tract infections, and 75 healthy controls (nested case-control study). Urine S100A8/A9 and S100A12 (measured by species-specific radioimmunoassays and normalized against urine specific gravity [S100A8/A9USG; S100A12USG], urine creatinine concentration, and urine protein concentration and the uCalR were compared among the groups of dogs. S100A8/A9USG had the highest sensitivity (96%) and specificity (66%) to detect TCC/PCA, with specificity reaching 75% after excluding dogs with a urinary tract infection. The uCalR best distinguished dogs with TCC/PCA from dogs with a urinary tract infection (sensitivity: 91%, specificity: 60%). Using a S100A8/A9USG ≥ 109.9 to screen dogs ≥6 years of age for TCC/PCA yielded a negative predictive value of 100%. S100A8/A9USG and uCalR may have utility for diagnosing TCC/PCA in dogs, and S100A8/A9USG may be a good screening test for canine TCC/PCA.

  2. Anatomic pathology of hepatocellular carcinoma: histopathology using classic and new diagnostic tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittman, Meredith E; Brunt, Elizabeth M

    2015-05-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma can be diagnosed on a needle biopsy of the liver; however, uncertainty may arise because of the inherent complexity of liver histology. This article aims to provide practicing pathologists with tools for the approach to mass-directed liver biopsies clinically concerning for hepatocellular carcinoma. The examination of routine hematoxylin-eosin stains and the use of ancillary histochemical and immunohistochemical stains are discussed. Sections reviewing liver carcinoma with biphenotypic differentiation and the challenge of dysplastic nodules are included.

  3. The Diagnostic and Prognostic Value of Tumor Markers (CEA, SCC, CYFRA 21-1, TPS) in Head and Neck Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barak, Vivian; Meirovitz, Amichay; Leibovici, Vera; Rachmut, Jacob; Peretz, Tamar; Eliashar, Ron; Gross, Menachem

    2015-10-01

    Establishing prognostic factors is very important in the management of cancer patients. Our aim was to evaluate the clinical significance of a panel of tumor markers, including CEA (Carcino Embryonic Antigen), SCC (Squamous Cell Carcinoma Antigen), TPS (Tissue Polypeptide Specific Antigen) and CYFRA 21-1 in head and neck cancer patients, for assessing treatment response and prognosis of patients. We evaluated 312 blood samples from 143 head and neck cancer patients, from several sub-groups: 82 Larynx Carcinoma pre- and 38 post-therapy, 46 Oral Cavity pre and 29 post-therapy, 12 nasopharynx, 16 parotid and other salivary gland patients. Blood tumor markers levels were evaluated by conventional ELISA assays. Correlations of marker levels to stage of disease, lymph node involvement and therapy, were performed. Serum levels of all four tumor markers were higher before therapy and decreased thereafter in all patients. The decrease in TPS level following therapy was significant (p=0.03). Significantly higher levels of TPS and similarly higher levels of the other tumor markers were demonstrated in advanced disease (stages III and IV) patients, as opposed to early disease (stages I and II) patients (p=0.012). Node positive patients had significantly higher TPS levels as compared to node negative (p=0.02). The same trend was shown by the other markers as well, but did not reach statistical significance. TPS was best correlated to survival of patients; those having low levels had the best clinical outcome and longer survival. CEA, SCC, TPS and CYFRA 21-1 can all serve as useful tumor markers in HNC patients. They assessed response to therapy and were prognostic for recurrence. TPS proved to be the most sensitive predictor of advanced disease and poor prognosis. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  4. Diagnostic accuracy of lugol chromoendoscopy in the oesophagus in patients with head and neck cancer Seguridad diagnóstica de la cromoendoscopia con lugol en el esófago de pacientes con cáncer de cabeza y cuello

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    Rita Carvalho

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and aim: patients with head and neck squamous cell malignancies have a higher risk of oesophageal squamous cell carcinomas. Lugol chromoendoscopy in oesophagus is a simple technique with a high diagnostic yield in premalignant lesions. The objective was to analyze its diagnostic accuracy in dysplasia and carcinoma of the oesophagus in high-risk patients. Methods: prospective study from April/2008 to January/2012 using lugol chromoendoscopy with biopsies of suspicious lugol voiding areas ≥ 5 mm. Patients with head and neck malignancies were included, except the ones with iodine allergy, oesophageal varices and contra-indications to standard endoscopy. The reference method was histopathology. Results: 89 patients were enrolled (mean age 62.8 ± 13.3 years, 87 % men. Primary tumour was located in oropharynx in 37 (41.6 %, in oral cavity in 29 (32.6 % and in the larynx in 23 (25.8 % cases. 40.4 % patients had previous treatments and 87 % reported alcohol or tobacco addition. All exams performed without anaesthesia or complications. Nine suspicious lugol voiding areas were observed and biopsied. Histopathological analysis revealed high-grade dysplasia in 2 (2.2 % and inflammation or normal findings in the others. The sensitivity and specificity for detecting high-grade dysplasia were 100 % and 92 % (95 % CI: 87-97, respectively. Diagnostic accuracy of the test was 92 % (95 % CI: 86-98. Conclusion: lugol staining of the oesophagus during endoscopy seems to be a feasible, safe and justified procedure in high-risk population as it enhances the detection of premalignant lesions.

  5. Touch imprint cytology: a rapid diagnostic tool for oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geetha, L; Astekar, M; Ashok, K N; Sowmya, G V

    2015-07-01

    Techniques for intraoperative pathologic examination of oral squamous cell carcinoma are rare in the literature. We evaluated the advantages and limitations of touch imprint cytology for intraoperative diagnosis of oral squamous cell carcinoma. We used 30 incisional biopsies of clinically diagnosed oral squamous cell carcinoma and compared touch imprint cytology to histopathological sections. Touch imprint cytology showed 24 specimens positive for malignancy, two suspicious for malignancy and four inadequate specimens. The accuracy of the test was 93.2%. Touch imprint cytology is an accurate, simple, rapid and cost-effective method that aids diagnosis of oral squamous cell carcinoma during operation, but it does not replace incisional biopsy.

  6. Diagnostic biopsy does not commonly induce intratumoral CD8 T cell infiltration in Merkel cell carcinoma.

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    Shinichi Koba

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Merkel cell carcinoma is a polyomavirus-associated cancer that is strongly linked with T lymphocyte immune suppression in epidemiologic studies. CD8+ T cell infiltration into MCC tumors (intratumoral has recently been shown to be strongly predictive of improved survival. In contrast, the presence of CD8+ T cells at the border of the tumor (peritumoral had no independent prognostic value. Spontaneous regression has been reported for MCC approximately one thousand times more often than would be expected given the frequency of this cancer. Many of these events began shortly after biopsy, and in some cases lymphocytic infiltration was described. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To determine whether CD8+ lymphocyte infiltration in MCC tumors is commonly altered by biopsy.33 MCC patients who had microscopic confirmation of MCC on both an initial biopsy and a re-excision specimen were included in this study. Intratumoral and peritumoral CD8 lymphocyte infiltration was quantitated using immunohistochemistry and compared using the paired t-test in biopsy versus re-excision samples. There was a trend toward increased CD8 infiltration after biopsy in a peritumoral ('stalled' pattern (p = 0.08, however, biopsy was not associated with a significant increase in CD8 T cells in the clinically more important intratumoral location (p = 0.58. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The initial diagnostic biopsy for MCC does not commonly alter intratumoral CD8+ T cell infiltration, suggesting it does not directly induce immunologic recognition of this cancer. Because CD8 infiltration is typically stable after biopsy, this parameter may be useful to assess the efficacy of future immune therapies for this virus-associated, immunogenic, often-lethal cancer.

  7. Diagnostic value for extrahepatic metastases of hepatocellular carcinoma in positron emission tomography/computed tomography scan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji Eun Lee; Jae Young Jang; Soung Won Jeong; Sae Hwan Lee; Sang Gyune Kim; Sang-Woo Cha; Young Seok Kim

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To evaluated the value of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) scan in diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and extrahepatic metastases.METHODS:A total of 138 patients with HCC who had both conventional imaging modalities and 18F-FDG PET/CT scan done between November 2006 and March 2011 were enrolled.Diagnostic value of each imaging modality for detection of extrahepatic metastases was evaluated.Clinical factors and tumor characteristics including PET imaging were analyzed as indicative factors for metastases by univariate and multivariate methods.RESULTS:The accuracy of chest CT was significantly superior compared with the accuracy of PET imaging for detecting lung metastases.The detection rate of metastatic pulmonary nodule ≥ 1 cm was 12/13(92.3%),when < 1 cm was 2/10 (20%) in PET imaging.The accuracy of PET imaging was significantly superior compared with the accuracy of bone scan for detecting bone metastases.In multivariate analysis,increased tumor size (≥ 5 cm) (P =0.042) and increased average standardized uptake value (SUV)uptake (P =0.028) were predictive factors for extrahepatic metastases.Isometabolic HCC in PET imaging was inversely correlated in multivariate analysis (P =0.035).According to the receiver operating characteristic curve,the optimal cutoff of average SUV to predict extrahepatic metastases was 3.4.CONCLUSION:18F-FDG PET/CT scan is invaluable for detection of lung metastases larger than 1 cm and bone metastases.Primary HCC having larger than 5 cm and increased average SUV uptake more than 3.4should be considered for extrahepatic metastases.

  8. Exosomal proteins as potential diagnostic markers in advanced non-small cell lung carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristine R. Jakobsen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lung cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death. At the time of diagnosis, more than half of the patients will have disseminated disease and, yet, diagnosing can be challenging. New methods are desired to improve the diagnostic work-up. Exosomes are cell-derived vesicles displaying various proteins on their membrane surfaces. In addition, they are readily available in blood samples where they constitute potential biomarkers of human diseases, such as cancer. Here, we examine the potential of distinguishing non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC patients from control subjects based on the differential display of exosomal protein markers. Methods: Plasma was isolated from 109 NSCLC patients with advanced stage (IIIa–IV disease and 110 matched control subjects initially suspected of having cancer, but diagnosed to be cancer free. The Extracellular Vesicle Array (EV Array was used to phenotype exosomes directly from the plasma samples. The array contained 37 antibodies targeting lung cancer-related proteins and was used to capture exosomes, which were visualised with a cocktail of biotin-conjugated CD9, CD63 and CD81 antibodies. Results: The EV Array analysis was capable of detecting and phenotyping exosomes in all samples from only 10 µL of unpurified plasma. Multivariate analysis using the Random Forests method produced a combined 30-marker model separating the two patient groups with an area under the curve of 0.83, CI: 0.77–0.90. The 30-marker model has a sensitivity of 0.75 and a specificity of 0.76, and it classifies patients with 75.3% accuracy. Conclusion: The EV Array technique is a simple, minimal-invasive tool with potential to identify lung cancer patients.

  9. Diagnostic delay in oral squamous cell carcinoma:the role of cognitive and psychological variables

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vera Panzarella; Giuseppe Pizzo; Francesco Calvino; Domenico Compilato; Giuseppe Colella; Giuseppina Campisi

    2014-01-01

    This retrospective study investigated, in two cohorts of subjects living in Southern Italy and awaiting treatment for oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), the variables related to diagnostic delay ascribable to the patient, with particular reference to the cognitive and psychological ones. A total of 156 patients with OSCC (mean age:62 years, M/F:2.39:1) were recruited at the Universities of Palermo and Naples. Risk factors related to patient delay included:sociodemographic, health-related, cognitive and psychological variables. The analysis was conducted by considering two different delay ranges:dichotomous (f1 month vs. .1 month) and polytomous (,1 month, 1-3 months, .3 months) delay. Data were investigated by univariate and multivariate analyses and a P value f0.05 was considered statistically significant. For both delay measurements, the most relevant variables were:‘Personal experience of cancer’ (dichotomous delay:P50.05, odds ratio (OR)50.33, 95%confidence interval (CI)50.11-0.99;polytomous delay:P50.006, Chi-square510.224) and‘Unawareness’ (dichotomous delay:P,0.01, OR54.96, 95%CI52.16-11.37;polytomous delay:P50.087, Chi-square54.77). Also‘Denial’ (P,0.01, OR56.84, 95%CI52.31-20.24) and‘Knowledge of cancer’ (P50.079, Chi-square58.359) were found to be statistically significant both for dichotomous and for polytomous categorization of delay, respectively. The findings of this study indicated that, in the investigated cohorts, the knowledge about cancer issues is strongly linked to the patient delay. Educational interventions on the Mediterranean population are necessary in order to increase the patient awareness and to emphasize his/her key role in early diagnosis of OSCC.

  10. Multiparametric Evaluation of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Using a Single-Source Dual-Energy CT with Fast kVp Switching: State of the Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Lam

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available There is an increasing body of evidence establishing the advantages of dual-energy CT (DECT for evaluation of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC. Focusing on a single-source DECT system with fast kVp switching, we will review the principles behind DECT and associated post-processing steps that make this technology especially suitable for HNSCC evaluation and staging. The article will review current applications of DECT for evaluation of HNSCC including use of different reconstructions to improve tumor conspicuity, tumor-normal soft tissue interface, accuracy of invasion of critical structures such as thyroid cartilage, and reduce dental artifact. We will provide a practical approach for DECT implementation into routine clinical use and a multi-parametric approach for scan interpretation based on the experience at our institution. The article will conclude with a brief overview of potential future applications of the technique.

  11. H19-DMR allele-specific methylation analysis reveals epigenetic heterogeneity of CTCF binding site 6 but not of site 5 in head-and-neck carcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Castro Valente Esteves, Leda Isabel; De Karla Cervigne, Nilva; Do Carmo Javaroni, Afonso

    2006-01-01

    Aberrant methylation of seven potential binding sites of the CTCF factor in the differentially methylated region upstream of the H19 gene (H19-DMR) has been suggested as critical for the regulation of IGF2 and H19 imprinted genes. In this study, we analyzed the allele-specific methylation pattern...... of CTCF binding sites 5 and 6 using methylation-sensitive restriction enzyme PCR followed by RFLP analysis in matched tumoral and lymphocyte DNA from head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients, as well as in lymphocyte DNA from control individuals who were cancer-free. The monoallelic...... methylation pattern was maintained in CTCF binding site 5 in 22 heterozygous out of 91 samples analyzed. Nevertheless, a biallelic methylation pattern was detected in CTCF binding site 6 in a subgroup of HNSCC patients as a somatic acquired feature of tumor cells. An atypical biallelic methylation was also...

  12. International collaborative validation of intraneural invasion as a prognostic marker in adenoid cystic carcinoma of the head and neck

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amit, Moran; Binenbaum, Yoav; Trejo-Leider, Leonor;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to characterize the incidence, pattern of spread, and prognostic correlation of nerve invasion in patients with adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC). METHODS: Using 3 different pathological categories of perineural invasion, intraneural invasion, and perineural...

  13. Detection of residual head and neck squamous cell carcinoma after (chemo)radiotherapy: a pilot study assessing the value of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging as an adjunct to PET-CT using (18)F-FDG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noij, Daniel P; Jagesar, Viresh A; de Graaf, Pim; de Jong, Marcus C; Hoekstra, Otto S; de Bree, Remco; Castelijns, Jonas A

    2017-09-01

    Diagnosing residual malignancy after (chemo)radiotherapy presents a diagnostic challenge because of overlapping symptoms and imaging characteristics. We assessed the added diagnostic value of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) to positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography (PET-CT) in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) with residual fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) uptake at the primary tumor site 3 months after (chemo)radiotherapy. For this retrospective study from January 2010 to June 2012, 22 cases (median patient age of 61 years; range 41-77 years) were included for analysis. Both PET-CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), including DWI, were performed as part of the institutional protocol and were qualitatively assessed for the presence of residual malignancy at the primary tumor site. The sensitivity and specificity of PET-CT were 100% and 47%, respectively. For DWI, sensitivity and specificity were 80% and 82%, respectively. When DWI was added to PET-CT with residual (18)F-FDG uptake, and only a positive read on both PET-CT and DWI was considered to be overall positive, sensitivity remained 80% (95% confidence interval [CI] 28%-99%), and specificity was 88% (95% CI 64%-99%). In this pilot study of the selected patients with residual (18)F-FDG uptake at the primary tumor site 3 months after (chemo)radiotherapy, we demonstrated that the addition of DWI to PET-CT has the potential to increase the specificity of the response evaluation with limited decrease in sensitivity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging as a Predictor of Outcome in Head-and-Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Patients With Nodal Metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukla-Dave, Amita, E-mail: davea@mskcc.org [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Lee, Nancy Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Jansen, Jacobus F.A. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Thaler, Howard T. [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Stambuk, Hilda E. [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Fury, Matthew G. [Department of Medical Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Patel, Snehal G. [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Moreira, Andre L. [Department of Pathology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Sherman, Eric [Department of Medical Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Karimi, Sasan [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Wang, Ya [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Kraus, Dennis; Shah, Jatin P. [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Pfister, David G. [Department of Medical Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); and others

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) can provide information regarding tumor perfusion and permeability and has shown prognostic value in certain tumors types. The goal of this study was to assess the prognostic value of pretreatment DCE-MRI in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients with nodal disease undergoing chemoradiation therapy or surgery. Methods and Materials: Seventy-four patients with histologically proven squamous cell carcinoma and neck nodal metastases were eligible for the study. Pretreatment DCE-MRI was performed on a 1.5T MRI. Clinical follow-up was a minimum of 12 months. DCE-MRI data were analyzed using the Tofts model. DCE-MRI parameters were related to treatment outcome (progression-free survival [PFS] and overall survival [OS]). Patients were grouped as no evidence of disease (NED), alive with disease (AWD), dead with disease (DOD), or dead of other causes (DOC). Prognostic significance was assessed using the log-rank test for single variables and Cox proportional hazards regression for combinations of variables. Results: At last clinical follow-up, for Stage III, all 12 patients were NED. For Stage IV, 43 patients were NED, 4 were AWD, 11 were DOD, and 4 were DOC. K{sup trans} is volume transfer constant. In a stepwise Cox regression, skewness of K{sup trans} (volume transfer constant) was the strongest predictor for Stage IV patients (PFS and OS: p <0.001). Conclusion: Our study shows that skewness of K{sup trans} was the strongest predictor of PFS and OS in Stage IV HNSCC patients with nodal disease. This study suggests an important role for pretreatment DCE-MRI parameter K{sup trans} as a predictor of outcome in these patients.

  15. The association between CBS 844ins68 polymorphism and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma risk - a case-control analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbiatti, Ana L S; Ruiz, Mariangela T; Raposo, Luis S; Maniglia, José V; Pavarino-Bertelli, Erika C; Goloni-Bertollo, Eny M

    2010-10-01

    Susceptibility to head and neck squamous cell carcinoma may be modified by functional polymorphisms in genes involved in the folate pathway, such as cystathionine beta-synthase (CBS). The CBS 844ins68 polymorphism is associated with DNA methylation changes and cancer development. A case-control retrospective study was conducted in 322 patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma and in 531 control subjects without cancer. The polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism technique was used to genotype the polymorphism. For statistical analysis, χ(2) test was conducted to examine whether the genotypic frequency of CBS 844ins68 was in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and multiple logistic regression was used for comparisons between groups, and for interactions between the polymorphism and risk factors and clinical histopathological parameters. No significant difference in CBS 844ins68 genotypic distribution was observed between the groups. Age > 50 years, male gender and tobacco consumption were predictors of the disease with increased risk of 7.89 (95% CI: 5.56-11.21), 2.49 (95% CI: 1.72-3.62), 6.44 (95% CI: 4.63-8.96) and 2.29 times (95% CI: 1.71-3.06) respectively. There was no association between the distribution of the CBS 844ins68 genotype and risk factors for this disease. According to clinical histopathological parameters, CBS 884ins68 polymorphism presented high frequency in oral cavity (p CBS 844ins68 polymorphism is not associated with HNSCC risk and there is increased risk of this disease in male gender individuals smokers aged over 50 years. In adittion, the polymorphism is more frequent in patients with oral cavity as primary site and in patients with less survival time.

  16. L-DOPA decarboxylase mRNA expression is associated with tumor stage and size in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: a retrospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geomela Panagiota-Aikaterini

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC represents one of the most commonly diagnosed malignancies worldwide. The DDC gene encodes L-DOPA decarboxylase, an enzyme catalyzing the decarboxylation of L-DOPA to dopamine. We have recently shown that DDC mRNA is a significant predictor of patients’ prognosis in colorectal adenocarcinoma and prostate cancer. The aim of the current study was to analyze the DDC mRNA expression in HNSCC patients. Methods 53 malignant tumors were resected from the larynx, pharynx, tongue, buccal mucosa, parotid glands, and nasal cavity, as well as from 34 adjacent non-cancerous tissues of HNSCC patients, and were homogenized. Total RNA was isolated and converted into first-strand cDNA. An ultrasensitive real-time PCR method based on the SYBR Green chemistry was used for DDC mRNA quantification in head and neck tissue specimens. Relative quantification was performed using the comparative Ct (2-ddCt method. Results DDC mRNA levels were lower in squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs of the larynx and tongue than in adjacent non-cancerous tissue specimens. Furthermore, low DDC mRNA expression was noticed in laryngeal and tongue tumors of advanced TNM stage or bigger size, compared to early-stage or smaller tumors, respectively. No statistically significant differences were observed between SCCs resected from pharynx, buccal mucosa, or nasal cavity, and their normal counterparts. Conclusion This is the first study examining the DDC mRNA expression in HNSCC. According to our results, DDC mRNA expression may constitute a potential prognostic biomarker in tongue and/or larynx SCCs, which principally represent the overwhelming majority of HNSCC cases.

  17. ProEx C as Diagnostic Marker for Detection of Urothelial Carcinoma in Urinary Samples: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botti, Gerardo; Malzone, Maria Gabriella; La Mantia, Elvira; Montanari, Micaela; Vanacore, Daniela; Rossetti, Sabrina; Quagliariello, Vincenzo; Cavaliere, Carla; Di Franco, Rossella; Castaldo, Luigi; Ametrano, Gianluca; Cappuccio, Francesca; Romano, Francesco Jacopo; Piscitelli, Raffaele; Pepe, Maria Filomena; D'Aniello, Carmine; Facchini, Gaetano

    2017-01-01

    The gold standard for the detection of urothelial carcinoma is represented by urethro-cystoscopy and biopsy. Both procedures are invasive and expensive and therefore cytology is often used as first approach to investigate on a possible neoplasia, being a safe and cost-effective diagnostic modality of evaluation. Because cytology alone is not highly sensitive for detection of low grade urothelial carcinoma and recurrence of the disease, several adjunct markers and urine based tests for urothelial carcinoma have been developed, which can help in the final diagnosis. In particular, ProEx C is an immunohistochemical cocktail containing antibodies direct against topoisomerase IIα (TOP2A) and minichromosome maintenance 2 (MCM2) proteins. It proved to be a valid biomarker especially in detecting squamous intraepithelial lesions in cervical liquid-based samples and in discerning these lesions from their mimickers, as well as in ovarian, endometrial, vulvar, primary and metastatic melanomas, breast, pancreatic and renal cell carcinomas. This brief review covers the effective utility of ProEx C as adjunct tool in assessing the urothelial lesions in urine cytology, also providing prognostic and therapeutic information to help in clinical decisions.

  18. Microarray Analysis of Serum mRNA in Patients with Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma at Whole-Genome Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markéta Čapková

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With the increasing demand for noninvasive approaches in monitoring head and neck cancer, circulating nucleic acids have been shown to be a promising tool. We focused on the global transcriptome of serum samples of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC patients in comparison with healthy individuals. We compared gene expression patterns of 36 samples. Twenty-four participants including 16 HNSCC patients (from 12 patients we obtained blood samples 1 year posttreatment and 8 control subjects were recruited. The Illumina HumanWG-6 v3 Expression BeadChip was used to profile and identify the differences in serum mRNA transcriptomes. We found 159 genes to be significantly changed (Storey’s P value <0.05 between normal and cancer serum specimens regardless of factors including p53 and B-cell lymphoma family members (Bcl-2, Bcl-XL. In contrast, there was no difference in gene expression between samples obtained before and after surgery in cancer patients. We suggest that microarray analysis of serum cRNA in patients with HNSCC should be suitable for refinement of early stage diagnosis of disease that can be important for development of new personalized strategies in diagnosis and treatment of tumours but is not suitable for monitoring further development of disease.

  19. The rotamase Pin1 is up-regulated, hypophosphorylated and required for cell cycle progression in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegand, Susanne; Dakic, Branka; Rath, Ariane F E; Makarova, Galina; Sterz, Carolina; Meissner, Wolfgang; Bette, Michael; Adamkiewicz, Jürgen; Müller-Brüsselbach, Sabine; Müller, Rolf; Werner, Jochen A; Mandic, Robert

    2009-10-01

    The peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase Pin1 has been implicated in malignant transformation in multiple studies, however, little is known about its potential impact in head and neck cancer. This study evaluates the role of Pin1 in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs). Pin1 expression and level of phosphorylation was evaluated by Western blot analysis and 2D-gel-electrophoresis. Pin1 was inhibited with juglone (5-hydroxy-1,4-naphthalenedione) or Pin1 specific siRNA and its influence on cell cycle checkpoint distribution was assessed by FACS analysis. Pin1 overexpression was found in HNSCC tissues and cell lines. 2D-gel-electrophoresis data pointed to Pin1 being hypophosphorylated in HNSCC cells which is consistent with overactivation of this rotamase. Inhibition of HNSCC cells with juglone or Pin1 siRNA induced the cell cycle inhibitor p21(WAF1/Cip1) with a concomitant reduction of cells in G2/M and an increased fraction of cells with fragmented DNA. Cell death did not correlate with significant levels of apoptosis in Pin1 depleted HNSCC cells. In summary, the data shows that Pin1 is overexpressed and hypophosphorylated in HNSCC, and that inhibition of Pin1 blocks cell cycle progression and triggers tumor cell death. Pin1 therefore could represent a new target for the development of improved HNSCC targeting drugs.

  20. Correlation of human papillomavirus status with apparent diffusion coefficient of diffusion-weighted MRI in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driessen, Juliette P; van Bemmel, Alexander J M; van Kempen, Pauline M W; Janssen, Luuk M; Terhaard, Chris H J; Pameijer, Frank A; Willems, Stefan M; Stegeman, Inge; Grolman, Wilko; Philippens, Marielle E P

    2016-04-01

    Identification of prognostic patient characteristics in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is of great importance. Human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive HNSCCs have favorable response to (chemo)radiotherapy. Apparent diffusion coefficient, derived from diffusion-weighted MRI, has also shown to predict treatment response. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the correlation between HPV status and apparent diffusion coefficient. Seventy-three patients with histologically proven HNSCC were retrospectively analyzed. Mean pretreatment apparent diffusion coefficient was calculated by delineation of total tumor volume on diffusion-weighted MRI. HPV status was analyzed and correlated to apparent diffusion coefficient. Six HNSCCs were HPV-positive. HPV-positive HNSCC showed significantly lower apparent diffusion coefficient compared to HPV-negative. This correlation was independent of other patient characteristics. In HNSCC, positive HPV status correlates with low mean apparent diffusion coefficient. The favorable prognostic value of low pretreatment apparent diffusion coefficient might be partially attributed to patients with a positive HPV status. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 38: E613-E618, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Radiochemotherapy including cisplatin alone versus cisplatin + 5-fluorouracil for locally advanced unresectable stage IV squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

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    Tribius, Silke; Kilic, Yasemin [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Kronemann, Stefanie [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck (Germany); Schroeder, Ursula [Dept. of Head and Neck Surgery, Univ. Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck (Germany); Hakim, Samer [Dept. of Oro-Maxillo-Facial Surgery, Univ. Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck (Germany); Schild, Steven E. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Rades, Dirk [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck (Germany)

    2009-10-15

    Background and purpose: the optimal radiochemotherapy regimen for advanced head-and-neck cancer is still debated. This nonrandomized study compares two cisplatin-based radiochemotherapy regimens in 128 patients with locally advanced unresectable stage IV squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Patients and methods: concurrent chemotherapy consisted of either two courses cisplatin (20 mg/m{sup 2}/d1-5 + 29-33; n = 54) or two courses cisplatin (20 mg/m{sup 2}/d1-5 + 29-33) + 5-fluorouracil (5-FU; 600 mg/m{sup 2}/d1-5 + 29-33; n = 74). Results: at least one grade 3 toxicity occurred in 25 of 54 patients (46%) receiving cisplatin alone and in 52 of 74 patients (70%) receiving cisplatin + 5-FU. The latter regimen was particularly associated with increased rates of mucositis (p = 0.027) and acute skin toxicity (p = 0.001). Seven of 54 (13%) and 20 of 74 patients (27%) received only one chemotherapy course due to treatment-related acute toxicity. Late toxicity in terms of xerostomia, neck fibrosis, skin toxicity, and lymphedema was not significantly different. The 2-year locoregional control rates were 67% after cisplatin alone and 52% after cisplatin + 5-FU (p = 0.35). The metastases-free survival rates were 79% and 69%, respectively (p = 0.65), and the overall survival rates 70% and 51%, respectively (p = 0.10). On multivariate analysis, outcome was significantly associated with performance status, T-category, N-category, hemoglobin level prior to radiotherapy, and radiotherapy break > 1 week. Conclusion: two courses of fractionated cisplatin (20 mg/m{sup 2}/day) alone appear preferable, as this regimen resulted in similar outcome and late toxicity as two courses of cisplatin + 5-FU, but in significantly less acute toxicity. (orig.)

  2. Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck Region: A Retrospective Analysis of Completely Excised 331 Cases

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    Duriye Deniz Demirseren

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to analyze all completely excised BCCs in the head and neck region with regard to age, sex, personal and familial history, skin type, tumor localization and size, histopathological subtype of tumor, reconstruction method, and recurrence rates. Incompletely excised BCCs were not included in this study since incomplete excision is the most important preventable risk factor for recurrence. In 320 patients, 331 lesions were retrospectively evaluated by dividing into the following 8 subunits: scalp, frontotemporal, orbital, nose, cheek, auricula, perioral, and chin-neck area. Most of the patients were in 60–70 age group (34.7%. The nose (32.3% was the most common site of presentation. Clinically, all lesions and, histopathologically, most of the lesions (42.2% presented were of the nodular type. All cases of recurrence after complete excision (n=9, 2.7% were located in the median parts of the head and neck region and were mainly diagnosed histopathologically as sclerotic and micronodular. Even though completely excised, head and neck region BCCs, especially which are more prone to recurrence due to anatomical and histopathological properties, should be more closely monitored in order to decrease morbidity and health care costs.

  3. Value of MR and CT Imaging for Assessment of Internal Carotid Artery Encasement in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

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    W. L. Lodder

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study was conducted to assess the value of CT and MR imaging in the preoperative evaluation of ICA encasement. Methods. Based upon three patient groups this study was performed. Retrospective analysis of 260 neck dissection reports from 2001 to 2010 was performed to determine unexpected peroperative-diagnosed encasement. Two experienced head and neck radiologists reviewed 12 scans for encasement. Results. In four out of 260 (1.5% patients undergoing neck dissection, preoperative imaging was false negative as there was peroperative encasement of the ICA. Of 380 patients undergoing preoperative imaging, the radiologist reported encasement of the ICA in 25 cases. In 342 cases no encasement was described, 125 of these underwent neck dissection, and 2 had encasement peroperatively. The interobserver variation kappa varied from 0.273 to 1 for the different characteristics studied. Conclusion. These retrospectively studied cohorts demonstrate that preoperative assessment of encasement of the ICA using MRI and/or CT was of value in evaluation of ICA encasement and therefore contributively in selecting operable patients (without ICA encasement, since in only 1.5% encasement was missed. However, observer variation affects the reliability of this feature.

  4. Diagnostic accuracy of endoscopic gastrobiopsy in carcinoma of the stomach. A histopathological review of 101 cases

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    Vyberg, Mogens; Hougen, H P; Tønnesen

    1983-01-01

    negatives and histological type. The rate of false negatives was significantly higher in cases, where the number of biopsies taken was below seven. The rate of histopathological misinterpretations was significantly higher in cases, where the number of actually positive biopsies was below four. Attempts......101 gastrobioptic series from 93 consecutive patients with a final diagnosis of carcinoma of the stomach were reviewed. 20 false negative cases were found. Of these, ten cases were missed because of erroneous histopathological interpretation, two because of too few sections, and eight because...... carcinoma was not represented in the biopsies. The frequency of false negatives was slightly larger in ulcerating carcinomas than in polypoid and diffusely spreading carcinomas, mainly due to seven cases of ulcerating carcinoma being missed by the pathologist. There was no correlation between false...

  5. The diagnostic value of xero-mammography in clinically occult breast carcinoma.

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    Kambouris, T; Kotoulas, K; Pontifex, G

    1984-05-01

    Seventy-four clinically occult breast carcinomas were detected in 7535 patients who were examined clinically and by xeromammography. The criteria by which a diagnosis of clinically occult breast carcinoma was established are described in detail. The most frequent finding of a clinically occult breast carcinoma in the xeromammogram was an irregular mass density 1 cm in diameter or less with microcalcifications. Axillary lymph node metastases were present in 29.7% of the total group of patients, which is much fewer than what might have been expected if the carcinomas had been discovered by palpation during the clinical examination or by the patient herself. This means a better prognosis and a lower death rate from breast carcinoma. Screening xeromammography is encouraged for all women after the age of 40, especially for those who belong to the high-risk group, even though they are quite asymptomatic, as there is hope of detecting cancers before they become palpable.

  6. Basaloid squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. A clinicopathologic and immunohistochemical study of 40 cases.

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    Banks, E R; Frierson, H F; Mills, S E; George, E; Zarbo, R J; Swanson, P E

    1992-10-01

    In this study of 40 cases of basaloid squamous cell carcinoma, 83% arose in the pyriform sinus, base of tongue, tonsil, and larynx. The 35 men and five women ranged in age from 27 to 88 years (median 62). In patients for whom social habits were recorded, 24 of 26 patients were smokers and 22 of 25 drank ethanol. Most presented with stage III or IV disease. Twenty-seven patients had regional metastases at the time of presentation and 15 developed distant metastases. Seventeen patients died with disease (median survival 18 months). The tumors were composed of moderately pleomorphic basaloid cells forming nests, cords, and frequent cribriform patterns. Squamous dysplasia of surface mucosa, focal squamous differentiation within invasive basaloid squamous cell carcinoma, or foci of conventional squamous cell carcinoma were present, alone or in combination. All studied neoplasms were immunohistochemically positive for keratins with the 34 beta E12 antibody. Approximately 80% were immunoreactive using AE1/AE3 or CAM 5.2. Epithelial membrane antigen, carcinoembryonic antigen, and S100 protein were found in 83%, 53%, and 39%, respectively, of the cases. Diffuse, weak immunoreactivity for neuron-specific enolase was seen in 75% of tumors. Synaptophysin, chromogranin, muscle-specific actin, and glial fibrillary acidic protein were absent. Basaloid squamous cell carcinoma has been confused with adenoid cystic carcinoma and small cell undifferentiated carcinoma, but is usually distinguishable in routine hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections, or, in rare problematic cases, with the aid of immunohistochemical studies. Distinction is warranted because the biologic behavior of basaloid squamous cell carcinoma differs from that of both of these lesions.

  7. Treatment of locally advanced carcinomas of head and neck with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT in combination with cetuximab and chemotherapy: the REACH protocol

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    Simon Christian

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary treatment of carcinoma of the oro-/hypopharynx or larynx may consist of combined platinum-containing chemoradiotherapy. In order to improve clinical outcome (i.e. local control/overall survival, combined therapy is intensified by the addition of the EGFR inhibitor cetuximab (Erbitux®. Radiation therapy (RT is carried out as intensity-modulated RT (IMRT to avoid higher grade acute and late toxicity by sparing of surrounding normal tissues. Methods/Design The REACH study is a prospective phase II study combining chemoradiotherapy with carboplatin/5-Fluorouracil (5-FU and the monoclonal epidermal growth factor-receptor (EGFR antibody cetuximab (Erbitux® as intensity-modulated radiation therapy in patients with locally advanced squamous-cell carcinomas of oropharynx, hypopharynx or larynx. Patients receive weekly chemotherapy infusions in the 1st and 5th week of RT. Additionally, cetuximab is administered weekly throughout the treatment course. IMRT is delivered as in a classical concomitant boost concept (bid from fraction 16 to a total dose of 69,9 Gy. Discussion Primary endpoint of the trial is local-regional control (LRC. Disease-free survival, progression-free survival, overall survival, toxicity, proteomic and genomic analyses are secondary endpoints. The aim is to explore the efficacy as well as the safety and feasibility of this combined radioimmunchemotherapy in order to improve the outcome of patients with advanced head and neck cancer. Trial registration ISRCTN87356938

  8. Comparison of chi-squared automatic interaction detection classification trees vs TNM classification for patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

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    Avilés-Jurado, F Xavier; Terra, Ximena; Figuerola, Enric; Quer, Miquel; León, Xavier

    2012-03-01

    To compare chi-squared automatic interaction detection (CHAID) classification trees vs the seventh edition of the TNM classification for patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma and to assess whether CHAID classification trees might improve results obtained with the TNM classification. Patient disease was classified according to CHAID classification trees and the TNM classification, and the results were compared. Academic research. A total of 3373 patients with carcinoma of the oral cavity, oropharynx, hypopharynx, or larynx. The 2 classification methods were evaluated objectively, measuring intrastage homogeneity (hazard consistency), interstage heterogeneity (hazard discrimination), and disease stage distribution among patients (balance). In addition, to assess agreement between CHAID classification trees and the TNM classification, we calculated the κ statistic, weighted linearly and quadratically. Objective evaluation of the quality of the classification methods indicated that CHAID classification trees performed better than the TNM classification in terms of hazard consistency (2.51 for CHAID and 3.01 for TNM) and hazard discrimination (70.9% for CHAID and 52.7% for TNM) but not balance (-31.7% for CHAID and -15.5% for TNM). Analysis of concordance between the classification methods showed that the quadratic κ statistic was 0.77 (95% CI, 0.76-0.78) and the linear κ statistic was 0.59 (95% CI, 0.57-0.60) (P TNM classification and offer potential inclusion of new prognostic factors.

  9. Elevated ZNF703 Protein Expression Is an Independent Unfavorable Prognostic Factor for Survival of the Patients with Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

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    Hang Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA show that the ZNF703 gene amplifies and overexpresses in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC. However, the clinical relevance of this observation in HNSCC is unclear. The purpose of this study was to clarify the expression of ZNF703 protein and its prognostic effect on HNSCC. Methods. Two hundred ten HNSCC patients from Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center with complete survival follow-up were included in this study. Tumor samples from primary sites were collected. The expression of the ZNF703 protein was tested by immunohistochemistry (IHC. Results. The high expression of ZNF703 in HNSCC tumor tissues was significantly higher than that of the matched noncancerous tissues (48.6% versus 11.6%, P<0.001. ZNF703 overexpression was correlated with tumor position (laryngeal carcinoma and recurrence (all P<0.05. Multivariate analysis revealed that ZNF703 protein overexpression was an independent prognostic factor (P=0.022, hazard ratio = 1.635, 95% CI 1.073–2.493 in HNSCC patients. Conclusion. ZNF703 overexpression is associated with adverse prognosis in HNSCC, which might be a novel biomarker of HNSCC.

  10. Rapid on-site evaluation has high diagnostic yield differentiating adenocarcinoma vs squamous cell carcinoma of non-small cell lung carcinoma, not otherwise specified subgroup.

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    Celik, Betul; Khoor, Andras; Bulut, Tangul; Nassar, Aziza

    2015-01-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the diagnostic yield of rapid on-site evaluation (ROSE) on the differential diagnosis of non-small cell lung carcinoma, not otherwise specified (NSCLC-NOS). Biopsied cases diagnosed as NSCLC-NOS with ROSE during 2004 through 2008 were retrieved. Diagnostic confirmation was done with immunohistochemistry (IHC) involving thyroid transcription factor-1 and p63 immunostains. For the study, 106 cases were available. The final diagnoses rendered were squamous cell carcinoma (SqCC) (n = 39) and adenocarcinoma (AC) (n = 67). Cytologic, histologic, and IHC concordance for these diagnoses occurred in 75 cases (70.8 %), of which 56 (52.8%) were AC and 19 (17.9%) were SqCC. Cytologic, histologic, and IHC discordance was found in 31 cases (29.2%). Of these 31 cases, 11 NSCLC-NOS diagnoses histologically corresponded to 1 SqCC plus 4 ACs, and 4 favor SqCC plus 2 ACs; the former 5 NSCLC-NOS cases classified correctly through cytology, as well as IHC. However, IHC was not available for the latter 6 NSCLC-NOS cases that were also classified correctly through cytology. In addition, only 3 NSCLC-NOS diagnoses cytologically corresponded to 3 favor SqCC histologically, in which IHC was not available, and for 2 cases that both corresponded to favor SqCC and favor AC histologically and cytologically. In the other 15 cases, histology labeled 4 cases NSCLC-NOS and misclassified 2 cases; cytology labeled 1 case NSCLC-NOS and misclassified 13 cases. ROSE has high diagnostic yield over subclassification of NSCLC-NOS. We recommend allocating a cytotechnologist for specimen adequacy and a cytopathologist for cytologic diagnosis.

  11. Re-irradiation with cetuximab or cisplatin-based chemotherapy for recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

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    Dornoff, Nicolas; Weiss, Christian; Roedel, Franz [J. W. Goethe University, Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Frankfurt a. M. (Germany); Wagenblast, Jens [J. W. Goethe University, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Frankfurt a. M. (Germany); Ghanaati, Shahram [J. W. Goethe University, Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, Frankfurt a. M. (Germany); Atefeh, Nateghian; Roedel, Claus; Balermpas, Panagiotis [J. W. Goethe University, Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Frankfurt a. M. (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Consortium (DKTK) partner site: Frankfurt, Frankfurt a. M. (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    Locoregional recurrence remains the main pattern of failure after primary combined modality treatment of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). We compared the efficacy and toxicity of either cisplatin or cetuximab in combination with re-irradiation (ReRT) for recurrent unresectable SCCHN. Various clinicopathological factors were investigated to establish a prognostic score. Between 2007 and 2014, 66 patients with recurrent SCCHN originating in a previously irradiated area received cetuximab (n = 33) or cisplatin-based chemotherapy (n = 33) concomitant with ReRT. Toxicity was evaluated weekly and at every follow-up visit. Physical examination, endoscopy, CT or MRI scans were used to evaluate response and disease control. With a mean follow-up of 18.3 months, the 1-year overall survival (OS) rates for Re-RT with cetuximab and cisplatin-based chemotherapy were 44.4 and 45.5 % (p = 0.352), respectively. At 1 year, local control rates (LCR) were 46.4 and 54.2 % (p = 0.625), freedom from metastases (FFM) rates 73.6 and 81 % (p = 0.842), respectively. Haematological toxicity ≥ grade 3 occurred more often in the cisplatin group (p < 0.001), pain ≥ grade 3 was increased in the cetuximab group (p = 0.034). A physiological haemoglobin level and a longer interval between primary RT and ReRT, proved to be significant prognostic factors for OS (multivariate: p = 0.003, p = 0.002, respectively). Site of the recurrence and gross target volume (GTV) did not show a significant impact on OS in multivariate analysis (p = 0.160, p = 0.167, respectively). A prognostic-score (1-4 points) based on these four variables identified significantly different subgroups: 1-year OS for 0/1/2/3/4 prognostic points: 10, 38, 76, 80 and 100 %, respectively (p < 0.001). Both cetuximab- and cisplatin-based ReRT of SCCHN recurrences are feasible and effective treatment options with comparable results in terms of tumour control and survival. Acute adverse events may differ slightly

  12. {sup 18}F-FLT uptake kinetics in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: A PET imaging study

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    Liu, Dan, E-mail: dan.liu@oncology.ox.ac.uk; Fenwick, John D. [Department of Oncology, University of Oxford, Old Road Campus Research Building, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7DQ (United Kingdom); Chalkidou, Anastasia; Landau, David B.; Marsden, Paul K. [Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, King' s College London, St Thomas' Hospital, Westminster Bridge Road, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: To analyze the kinetics of 3{sup ′}-deoxy-3{sup ′}-[F-18]-fluorothymidine (18F-FLT) uptake by head and neck squamous cell carcinomas and involved nodes imaged using positron emission tomography (PET). Methods: Two- and three-tissue compartment models were fitted to 12 tumor time-activity-curves (TACs) obtained for 6 structures (tumors or involved nodes) imaged in ten dynamic PET studies of 1 h duration, carried out for five patients. The ability of the models to describe the data was assessed using a runs test, the Akaike information criterion (AIC) and leave-one-out cross-validation. To generate parametric maps the models were also fitted to TACs of individual voxels. Correlations between maps of different parameters were characterized using Pearson'sr coefficient; in particular the phosphorylation rate-constants k{sub 3-2tiss} and k{sub 5} of the two- and three-tissue models were studied alongside the flux parameters K{sub FLT-2tiss} and K{sub FLT} of these models, and standardized uptake values (SUV). A methodology based on expectation-maximization clustering and the Bayesian information criterion (“EM-BIC clustering”) was used to distil the information from noisy parametric images. Results: Fits of two-tissue models 2C3K and 2C4K and three-tissue models 3C5K and 3C6K comprising three, four, five, and six rate-constants, respectively, pass the runs test for 4, 8, 10, and 11 of 12 tumor TACs. The three-tissue models have lower AIC and cross-validation scores for nine of the 12 tumors. Overall the 3C6K model has the lowest AIC and cross-validation scores and its fitted parameter values are of the same orders of magnitude as literature estimates. Maps ofK{sub FLT} and K{sub FLT-2tiss} are strongly correlated (r = 0.85) and also correlate closely with SUV maps (r = 0.72 for K{sub FLT-2tiss}, 0.64 for K{sub FLT}). Phosphorylation rate-constant maps are moderately correlated with flux maps (r = 0.48 for k{sub 3-2tiss} vs K{sub FLT-2tiss} and r

  13. Clinicopathological correlates of pediatric head and neck cancer

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    Sengupta Subhabrata

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : The spectrum of head and neck tumors in children continues to be the cause of diverse, diagnostically challenging issues. Aims : To demonstrate and compare the unique clinicopathological features in our study population and their correlations with the final histopathological diagnosis. Methods : Fifty-three children with head and neck cancer were examined thoroughly at the Otorhinolaryngology department in a tertiary care teaching hospital followed by histopathological studies. Results : Lymphomas were the most common malignant lesions seen followed by rhabdomyosarcomas, nasopharyngeal carcinomas, and others like thyroid carcinomas and eosinophilic granulomas. In the neck, the commonest cause of primary malignant disease was lymphoma; however, the most frequent lesion was reactive lymphadenitis. In the sinonasal region, the commonest malignancy was rhabdomyosarcoma, which often had extension to the orbit and the face. Recurrent epistaxis was found universally in the malignant cases of this region. In the facial region, disfiguring swelling with proptosis was mainly caused by rhabdomyosarcoma. The only case of tonsillar malignancy was due to non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The duration of disease was less than 1 year. Conclusion : The most common manifestation of the malignant lesions in the pediatric age group was with a history of an enlarging, painless neck swelling. Still, an insignificant lump in the neck or recurrent bleeding from nose may be the manifestation of an underlying cancer.

  14. Diagnostic value of cancer-testis antigen mRNA in peripheral blood from hepatocellular carcinoma patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate the diagnostic value of cancer-testis antigen(CTA) mRNA in peripheral blood samples from hepatocellular carcinoma(HCC) patients.METHODS:Peripheral blood samples were taken from 90 patients with HCC before operation.Expression of melanoma antigen-1(MAGE-1),synovial sarcoma X breakpoint-1(SSX-1),and cancer-testis-associated protein of 11 kDa(CTp11) mRNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells(PBMC) was tested by nested reverse transcriptspolymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR).Serum α-fetoprotein(AFP)...

  15. The absence of Harvey ras mutations during development and progression of squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck.

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    Clark, L J; Edington, K; Swan, I R; McLay, K A; Newlands, W J; Wills, L C; Young, H A; Johnston, P W; Mitchell, R; Robertson, G

    1993-09-01

    We have examined the incidence of Harvey ras mutations in human squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) of the upper aerodigestive tract using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by direct sequencing. No mutations were detected at codons 12, 13, 59 or 61 of this gene in any of six papillomas, five erythroplakias, 56 squamous cell carcinomas, and 16 SCC cell lines. Some of the SCC were lymph node metastases (three) or tumours which had recurred following radiotherapy (seven). We conclude that Harvey ras mutations are not a common event in the pathogenesis or recurrence of SCCs from Caucasian subjects, in contrast to the situation with Indian populations (Saranath et al., 1991).

  16. A contemporary review of indications for primary surgical care of patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.

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    Gourin, Christine G; Johnson, Jonas T

    2009-11-01

    The success of organ preservation protocols in laryngeal cancer has led to an increase in the use of primary chemoradiation in both laryngeal and extralaryngeal sites, despite a paucity of randomized controlled clinical trial data comparing nonoperative treatment to the gold standard of surgery followed by postoperative radiation for adverse pathologic features for head and neck cancer, and an increasing recognition that the high surgical salvage rates enjoyed by laryngeal cancer patients do not translate to extralaryngeal sites. These data suggest that there is a need to apply more rigorous standards to the use of organ preservation strategies and offer an opportunity to review the role of primary surgery in head and neck cancer.

  17. Serum chromogranin-A in hepatocellular carcinoma: Diagnostic utility and limits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aldo Spadaro; Santi Turiano; Oscar Ferraù; Maria Antonietta Freni; Antonino Ajello; Carmela Morace; Agata Zirilli; Graziella D'arrigo; Carmelo Luigiano; Francesco Martino; Anna Bene; Domenico Migliorato

    2005-01-01

    AIM: The utility of serum alpha-fetoprotein (α-FP) for the detection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is questionable.High serum levels of chromogranin-A (CgA) have recently been reported in HCC. Impaired hepatic, renal, and heart functions influence circulating CgA. The aim of this study was to assess sensitivity and specificity of serum CgA as a marker of HCC in patients with liver cirrhosis (LC).METHODS: Serum CgA levels were measured by RIA in 339 patients of which 54 HCC, 132 LC, 45 chronic hepatitis (CH), 27 chronic heart failure (CHF), 36 chronic renal failure (CRF), 45 chronic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)as disease controls and in 75 healthy controls. Patients with liver disease or IBD and concomitant renal and/or heart failure were excluded. Pearson correlation, nonparametric combination test and confidence interval analysis were used for statistical analysis.RESULTS: Serum CgA above normal values (100 ng/mL)were found in 83% of HCC patients, in 48% of LC patients,in 20% of CH patients, in 33% of IBD patients, in 92% of CRF patients, in 100% of CHF patients, and in none of the healthy controls. The mean CgA values in HCC (769±1 046), in LC (249±369), in CH (87±94), in CRF (1 390±1 401), in CHF (577±539), in IBD (146±287) were significantly higher than those in healthy controls (48±18).HCC patients had higher CgA values (P<0.01) than LC,CH, and IBD patients but did not differ from those with CRF or CHF. The 95% CI for the mean (250-1 289 ng/mL)in HCC patients was selected as a CgA range and the lower value of such range was assumed as cut-off.Sensitivity and specificity of CgA, calculated in relation to the cut-off in patients with cirrhosis and HCC, were respectively 61% (CI 48-73%) and 82% (CI 75-88%).Serum α-FP values were >200 ng/mL in 21% of the HCC patients and in none of the LC patients. No significant correlation was found between α-FP and CgA in patients with HCC and in patients with cirrhosis.CONCLUSION: When HCC is suspected

  18. Loss of imprinting and loss of heterozygosity on 11p15.5 in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rainho, C A; Kowalski, L P; Rogatto, S R

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: IGF2 and H19 are reciprocal imprinted genes with paternal and maternal monoallelic expression, respectively. This is interesting, because IGF2 is known as a growth factor, and H19 encodes a RNA with putative tumor suppressor action. Furthermore, IGF2 and H19 are linked genes located...... involved in head and neck carcinogenesis. Furthermore, our data showed that genetic and epigenetic changes at 11p15.5 could lead to abnormal expression of imprinted genes in HNSCC....

  19. Computed tomography image characteristics of metastatic lymph nodes in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.

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    Hung, Shih-Han; Lin, Chien-Yu; Lee, Jui-Ying; Tseng, How

    2012-12-01

    Metastatic neck nodes are commonly described as "heterogenous" or "inhomogenous" on computed tomographic (CT) images, and this remains a highly subjective issue. The purpose of this study is to justify classical criteria and to develop novel supplemental methods for diagnosing a positive neck node on CT scans. Fifty-four patients with H&N SCC were separated into two groups according to their neck nodal status. CT scan digital images were used and the lymph node borders were selected by a radiologist. Lymph node images from the pathologically proven N- (negative for cervical metastases) group were compared to the N+ (positive for cervical metastases) group. Image-analysis software, ImageJ, was used to record and compare various characteristics collected from the images. The image-analysis comparisons shows, the area (size) of the lymph node in the N+ group is much larger than the N- group (474.02 VS.81.55mm(2)) (Placunarity, a parameter used to describe gappiness or inhomogeneity, of the N+ group was significantly higher than the N- group (P=0.026). While size of the lymph node remains an important facto