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Sample records for nebramycin aminoglycoside profiles

  1. Aminoglycoside resistance profile and structural architecture of the aminoglycoside acetyltransferase AAC(6')-Im.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Clyde A; Bhattacharya, Monolekha; Toth, Marta; Stewart, Nichole K; Vakulenko, Sergei B

    2017-11-09

    Aminoglycoside 6'-acetyltransferase-Im (AAC(6')-Im) is the closest monofunctional homolog of the AAC(6')-Ie acetyltransferase of the bifunctional enzyme AAC(6')-Ie/APH(2")-Ia. The AAC(6')-Im acetyltransferase confers 4- to 64-fold higher MICs to 4,6-disubstituted aminoglycosides and the 4,5-disubstituted aminoglycoside neomycin than AAC(6')-Ie, yet unlike AAC(6')-Ie, the AAC(6')-Im enzyme does not confer resistance to the atypical aminoglycoside fortimicin. The structure of the kanamycin A complex of AAC(6')-Im shows that the substrate binds in a shallow positively-charged pocket, with the N6' amino group positioned appropriately for an efficient nucleophilic attack on an acetyl-CoA cofactor. The AAC(6')-Ie enzyme binds kanamycin A in a sufficiently different manner to position the N6' group less efficiently, thereby reducing the activity of this enzyme towards the 4,6-disubstituted aminoglycosides. Conversely, docking studies with fortimicin in both acetyltransferases suggest that the atypical aminoglycoside might bind less productively in AAC(6')-Im, thus explaining the lack of resistance to this molecule.

  2. Glomerular nephrotoxicity of aminoglycosides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez-Salgado, Carlos; Lopez-Hernandez, Francisco J.; Lopez-Novoa, Jose M.

    2007-01-01

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics are the most commonly used antibiotics worldwide in the treatment of Gram-negative bacterial infections. However, aminoglycosides induce nephrotoxicity in 10-20% of therapeutic courses. Aminoglycoside-induced nephrotoxicity is characterized by slow rises in serum creatinine, tubular necrosis and marked decreases in glomerular filtration rate and in the ultrafiltration coefficient. Regulation of the ultrafiltration coefficient depends on the activity of intraglomerular mesangial cells. The mechanisms responsible for tubular nephrotoxicity of aminoglycosides have been intensively reviewed previously, but glomerular toxicity has received less attention. The purpose of this review is to critically assess the published literature regarding the toxic mechanisms of action of aminoglycosides on renal glomeruli and mesangial cells. The main goal of this review is to provide an actualized and mechanistic vision of pathways involved in glomerular toxic effects of aminoglycosides

  3. In vitro bactericidal activity of aminoglycosides, including the next-generation drug plazomicin, against Brucella spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plazomicin is a next-generation aminoglycoside with a potentially improved safety profile compared to other aminoglycosides. This study assessed plazomicin MICs and MBCs in four Brucella spp. reference strains. Like other aminoglycosides and aminocyclitols, plazomicin MBC values equaled MIC values ...

  4. Evaluation on the Use of β-Lactamase and Aminoglycoside Modifying Enzyme Gene Sequences as Markers for the Early Detection of Antibiotic Resistance Profile of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor A. Doss

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the major causes of infections including the hospital acquired (Nosocomial infections. Detection of them and their antibiotic resistance profile by conventional method takes about three days. Recently, DNA based diagnostic methods are being used for the identification of the pathogens. Hence we have tested a rapid and sensitive method using DNA sequences as markers for detecting the presence of three genes coding for the enzymes that inactivate the two most commonly used Anti-pseudomonadal drugs such as β-lactam antibiotics (Penicillin, and its derivatives and Aminoglycosides such as Gentamicin, Tobramycin, Amikacin, Streptomycin. The internal region of these genes were used for designing and synthesizing primers and these primers were used in Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR to screen for the presence of these genes in the clinical isolates and to label them non-radioactively with Biotin. They in turn were used to detect the presence of the antibiotic resistance genes in the clinical isolates by hybridization. The specificity (ratio of positive results obtained in both methods and the sensitivity (the minimum amount of sample DNA and the labeled probe required for the tests were evaluated.

  5. Revisiting the Nucleotide and Aminoglycoside Substrate Specificity of the Bifunctional Aminoglycoside Acetyltransferase(6′)-Ie/Aminoglycoside Phosphotransferase(2″)-Ia Enzyme*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frase, Hilary; Toth, Marta; Vakulenko, Sergei B.

    2012-01-01

    The bifunctional aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme aminoglycoside acetyltransferase(6′)-Ie/aminoglycoside phosphotransferase(2″)-Ia, or AAC(6′)-Ie/APH(2″)-Ia, is the major source of aminoglycoside resistance in Gram-positive bacterial pathogens. In previous studies, using ATP as the cosubstrate, it was reported that the APH(2″)-Ia domain of this enzyme is unique among aminoglycoside phosphotransferases, having the ability to inactivate an unusually broad spectrum of aminoglycosides, including 4,6- and 4,5-disubstituted and atypical. We recently demonstrated that GTP, and not ATP, is the preferred cosubstrate of this enzyme. We now show, using competition assays between ATP and GTP, that GTP is the exclusive phosphate donor at intracellular nucleotide levels. In light of these findings, we reevaluated the substrate profile of the phosphotransferase domain of this clinically important enzyme. Steady-state kinetic characterization using the phosphate donor GTP demonstrates that AAC(6′)-Ie/APH(2″)-Ia phosphorylates 4,6-disubstituted aminoglycosides with high efficiency (kcat/Km = 105-107 m−1 s−1). Despite this proficiency, no resistance is conferred to some of these antibiotics by the enzyme in vivo. We now show that phosphorylation of 4,5-disubstituted and atypical aminoglycosides are negligible and thus these antibiotics are not substrates. Instead, these aminoglycosides tend to stimulate an intrinsic GTPase activity of the enzyme. Taken together, our data show that the bifunctional enzyme efficiently phosphorylates only 4,6-disubstituted antibiotics; however, phosphorylation does not necessarily result in bacterial resistance. Hence, the APH(2″)-Ia domain of the bifunctional AAC(6′)-Ie/APH(2″)-Ia enzyme is a bona fide GTP-dependent kinase with a narrow substrate profile, including only 4,6-disubstituted aminoglycosides. PMID:23115238

  6. Protective effect of rasagiline in aminoglycoside ototoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polony, G; Humli, V; Andó, R; Aller, M; Horváth, T; Harnos, A; Tamás, L; Vizi, E S; Zelles, T

    2014-04-18

    Sensorineural hearing losses (SNHLs; e.g., ototoxicant- and noise-induced hearing loss or presbycusis) are among the most frequent sensory deficits, but they lack effective drug therapies. The majority of recent therapeutic approaches focused on the trials of antioxidants and reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavengers in SNHLs. The rationale for these studies was the prominent role of disturbed redox homeostasis and the consequent ROS elevation. Although the antioxidant therapies in several animal studies seemed to be promising, clinical trials have failed to fulfill expectations. We investigated the potential of rasagiline, an FDA-approved monomanine oxidase type B inhibitor (MAO-B) inhibitor type anti-parkinsonian drug, as an otoprotectant. We showed a dose-dependent alleviation of the kanamycin-induced threshold shifts measured by auditory brainstem response (ABR) in an ototoxicant aminoglycoside antibiotic-based hearing loss model in mice. This effect proved to be statistically significant at a 6-mg/kg (s.c.) dose. The most prominent effect appeared at 16kHz, which is the hearing sensitivity optimum for mice. The neuroprotective, antiapoptotic and antioxidant effects of rasagiline in animal models, all targeting a specific mechanism of aminoglycoside injury, may explain this otoprotection. The dopaminergic neurotransmission enhancer effect of rasagiline might also contribute to the protection. Dopamine (DA), released from lateral olivocochlear (LOC) fibers, was shown to exert a protective action against excitotoxicity, a pathological factor in the aminoglycoside-induced SNHL. We have shown that rasagiline enhanced the electric stimulation-evoked release of DA from an acute mouse cochlea preparation in a dose-dependent manner. Using inhibitors of voltage-gated Na(+)-, Ca(2+) channels and DA transporters, we revealed that rasagiline potentiated the action potential-evoked release of DA by inhibiting the reuptake. The complex, multifactorial pathomechanism of SNHLs

  7. Aminoglycoside induced ototoxicity associated with mitochondrial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . Joseph Foster II, Mustafa Tekin. Abstract. Despite the risk of permanent ototoxic effects, aminoglycosides remain commonly utilized antibiotics worldwide due to low cost and efficiency in treating severe infections. Over the last two decades, ...

  8. Megalin-targeted enhanced transfection efficiency in cultured human HK-2 renal tubular proximal cells using aminoglycoside-carboxyalkyl- polyethylenimine -containing nanoplexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oroojalian, Fatemeh; Rezayan, Ali Hossein; Shier, Wayne Thomas; Abnous, Khalil; Ramezani, Mohammad

    2017-05-15

    Non-viral vectors are of interest as therapeutic gene delivery agents in gene therapy, because they are simple to prepare, easy to modify and have definable safety profiles compared to viral vectors. The potential of gene therapy in the treatment of renal diseases is limited by a lack of effective kidney-targeted gene delivery systems. Aminoglycoside antibiotics gentamicin and neomycin were connected by amide linkages to carboxyl groups on carboxyalkylated-PEI 25 (25kDa PEI) or carboxyalkylated-PEI 10 (10kDa PEI). Aminoglycoside-carboxyalkylated-PEI conjugates were characterized with respect to size, surface charge density, DNA condensation ability, and buffering capacity. Polyplexes prepared by electrostatic interaction between aminoglycoside-carboxyalkylated-PEIs and enhanced green fluorescent protein-expressing (EGFP) plasmid DNA had appropriate nano-scale size (143-173nm). Their targeting potential was investigated in cultured HK-2 immortalized human cortex/proximal tubule kidney epithelial cells, which expresses megalin, a scavenger receptor that mediates endocytosis of a diverse group of ligands, including aminoglycoside antibiotics. Aminoglycoside-carboxyalkylated-PEIs significantly increased EGFP gene transfection efficiency in HK-2 cells by ∼13-fold for aminoglycoside-carboxyalkylated-PEI 25 and ∼7-fold increase for aminoglycoside-carboxyalkylated-PEI 10 relative to the corresponding PEIs without aminoglycosides. The transfection efficiency of polyplexes was dependent on the weight ratio of aminoglycoside-containing ligand in the carrier. In the presence of a range of concentrations of human serum albumin, which competes for megalin binding, aminoglycoside-carboxyalkylated-PEI-mediated transfection was reduced to background levels. These results suggest that aminoglycoside-carboxyalkylated-PEI polyplexes can target megalin-expressing kidney-derived cells in vitro resulting in improved transfection efficiency with low cytotoxicity. Copyright © 2017

  9. Extracellular DNA Shields against Aminoglycosides in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiang, Wen-Chi; Nilsson, Martin; Jensen, Peter Østrup

    2013-01-01

    provide evidence that extracellular DNA shields against aminoglycosides in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. We show that exogenously supplemented DNA integrates into P. aeruginosa biofilms and increases their tolerance toward aminoglycosides. We provide evidence that biofilms formed by a DNA release...

  10. Analysis of Aminoglycoside Modifying Enzyme Genes Responsible for High-Level Aminoglycoside Resistance among Enterococcal Isolates

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    Vishal Shete

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Enzymatic modification results in high-level resistance to aminoglycoside (HLAR, which eliminates the synergistic bactericidal effect of combined exposure to a cell wall-active agent and an aminoglycoside. So aim of the study was to determine prevalence of HLAR enterococcal isolate and to study distribution of aminoglycoside modifying enzyme genes in them. A total of 100 nonrepeat isolates of enterococci from various clinical samples were analyzed. As per Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines enterococci were screened for HLAR by Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. Minimum inhibitory concentration of all isolates for gentamicin and streptomycin was determined by E-test. Multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR was carried out for HLAR enterococcal isolates to identify aminoglycoside modifying enzymes genes responsible for resistance. 60% isolates were found to be high-level gentamicin resistant (HLGR whereas 45% isolates were found to be high-level streptomycin resistant (HLSR. By multiplex PCR 80% HLGR isolates carried bifunctional aminoglycoside modifying enzyme gene aac(6′-Ie-aph(2′′-Ia whereas 18 out of 45 high-level streptomycin resistant, that is, 40%, isolates carried aph(3′-IIIa. However, aph(2′′-Ib, aph(2′′-Ic, aph(2′′-Id, and ant(4′-Ia genes which encode other aminoglycosides modifying enzymes were not detected. Bifunctional aminoglycoside modifying enzyme gene aac(6′-Ie-aph(2′′-Ia is the predominant gene responsible for HLAR.

  11. Rapid Aminoglycoside NP Test for Rapid Detection of Multiple Aminoglycoside Resistance in Enterobacteriaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordmann, Patrice; Jayol, Aurélie; Dobias, Jan; Poirel, Laurent

    2017-04-01

    The rapid aminoglycoside NP (Nordmann/Poirel) test was developed to rapidly identify multiple aminoglycoside (AG) resistance in Enterobacteriaceae It is based on the detection of the glucose metabolism related to enterobacterial growth in the presence of a defined concentration of amikacin plus gentamicin. Formation of acid metabolites was evidenced by a color change (orange to yellow) of the red phenol pH indicator. The rapid aminoglycoside NP test was evaluated by using bacterial colonies of 18 AG-resistant isolates producing 16S rRNA methylases, 20 AG-resistant isolates expressing AG-modifying enzymes (acetyl-, adenyl-, and phosphotransferases), and 10 isolates susceptible to AG. Its sensitivity and specificity were 100% and 97%, respectively, compared to the broth dilution method, which was taken as the gold standard for determining aminoglycoside resistance. The test is inexpensive, rapid (<2 h), and implementable worldwide. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  12. DNA-Aptamers Binding Aminoglycoside Antibiotics

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    Nadia Nikolaus

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Aptamers are short, single stranded DNA or RNA oligonucleotides that are able to bind specifically and with high affinity to their non-nucleic acid target molecules. This binding reaction enables their application as biorecognition elements in biosensors and assays. As antibiotic residues pose a problem contributing to the emergence of antibiotic-resistant pathogens and thereby reducing the effectiveness of the drug to fight human infections, we selected aptamers targeted against the aminoglycoside antibiotic kanamycin A with the aim of constructing a robust and functional assay that can be used for water analysis. With this work we show that aptamers that were derived from a Capture-SELEX procedure targeting against kanamycin A also display binding to related aminoglycoside antibiotics. The binding patterns differ among all tested aptamers so that there are highly substance specific aptamers and more group specific aptamers binding to a different variety of aminoglycoside antibiotics. Also the region of the aminoglycoside antibiotics responsible for aptamer binding can be estimated. Affinities of the different aptamers for their target substance, kanamycin A, are measured with different approaches and are in the micromolar range. Finally, the proof of principle of an assay for detection of kanamycin A in a real water sample is given.

  13. Synergistic ototoxicity due to noise exposure and aminoglycoside antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongzhe; Steyger, Peter S

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic exposure to high intensity and/or prolonged noise causes temporary or permanent threshold shifts in auditory perception, reflected by reversible or irreversible damage in the cochlea. Aminoglycoside antibiotics, used for treating or preventing life-threatening bacterial infections, also induce cytotoxicity in the cochlea. Combined noise and aminoglycoside exposure, particularly in neonatal intensive care units, can lead to auditory threshold shifts greater than simple summation of the two insults. The synergistic toxicity of acoustic exposure and aminoglycoside antibiotics is not limited to simultaneous exposures. Prior acoustic insult which does not result in permanent threshold shifts potentiates aminoglycoside ototoxicity. In addition, exposure to subdamaging doses of aminoglycosides aggravates noise-induced cochlear damage. The mechanisms by which aminoglycosides cause auditory dysfunction are still being unraveled, but likely include the following: 1) penetration into the endolymphatic fluid of the scala media, 2) permeation of nonselective cation channels on the apical surface of hair cells, and 3) generation of toxic reactive oxygen species and interference with other cellular pathways. Here we discuss the effect of combined noise and aminoglycoside exposure to identify pivotal synergistic events that can potentiate ototoxicity, in addition to a current understanding of aminoglycoside trafficking within the cochlea. Preventing the ototoxic synergy of noise and aminoglycosides is best achieved by using non-ototoxic bactericidal drugs, and by attenuating perceived noise intensity when life-saving aminoglycoside therapy is required.

  14. Aminoglycoside antibiotics and autism: a speculative hypothesis

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    Manev Hari

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, it has been suspected that there is a relationship between therapy with some antibiotics and the onset of autism; but even more curious, some children benefited transiently from a subsequent treatment with a different antibiotic. Here, we speculate how aminoglycoside antibiotics might be associated with autism. Presentation We hypothesize that aminoglycoside antibiotics could a trigger the autism syndrome in susceptible infants by causing the stop codon readthrough, i.e., a misreading of the genetic code of a hypothetical critical gene, and/or b improve autism symptoms by correcting the premature stop codon mutation in a hypothetical polymorphic gene linked to autism. Testing Investigate, retrospectively, whether a link exists between aminoglycoside use (which is not extensive in children and the onset of autism symptoms (hypothesis "a", or between amino glycoside use and improvement of these symptoms (hypothesis "b". Whereas a prospective study to test hypothesis "a" is not ethically justifiable, a study could be designed to test hypothesis "b". Implications It should be stressed that at this stage no direct evidence supports our speculative hypothesis and that its main purpose is to initiate development of new ideas that, eventually, would improve our understanding of the pathobiology of autism.

  15. Overcoming Aminoglycoside Enzymatic Resistance: Design of Novel Antibiotics and Inhibitors

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    Sandra G. Zárate

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics has had a profound impact on clinical practice. Despite their powerful bactericidal activity, aminoglycosides were one of the first groups of antibiotics to meet the challenge of resistance. The most prevalent source of clinically relevant resistance against these therapeutics is conferred by the enzymatic modification of the antibiotic. Therefore, a deeper knowledge of the aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes and their interactions with the antibiotics and solvent is of paramount importance in order to facilitate the design of more effective and potent inhibitors and/or novel semisynthetic aminoglycosides that are not susceptible to modifying enzymes.

  16. AMINOGLYCOSIDE RESISTANCE GENES IN Pseudomonas aeruginosa ISOLATES FROM CUMANA, VENEZUELA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Bertinellys; Rodulfo, Hectorina; Carreño, Numirin; Guzmán, Militza; Salazar, Elsa; De Donato, Marcos

    2016-01-01

    The enzymatic modification of aminoglycosides by aminoglycoside-acetyltransferases (AAC), aminoglycoside-adenyltransferases (AAD), and aminoglycoside-phosphotransferases (APH), is the most common resistance mechanism in P. aeruginosa and these enzymes can be coded on mobile genetic elements that contribute to their dispersion. One hundred and thirty seven P. aeruginosa isolates from the University Hospital, Cumana, Venezuela (HUAPA) were evaluated. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by the disk diffusion method and theaac, aadB and aph genes were detected by PCR. Most of the P. aeruginosa isolates (33/137) were identified from the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), mainly from discharges (96/137). The frequency of resistant P. aeruginosaisolates was found to be higher for the aminoglycosides tobramycin and amikacin (30.7 and 29.9%, respectively). Phenotype VI, resistant to these antibiotics, was the most frequent (14/49), followed by phenotype I, resistant to all the aminoglycosides tested (12/49). The aac(6´)-Ib,aphA1 and aadB genes were the most frequently detected, and the simultaneous presence of several resistance genes in the same isolate was demonstrated. Aminoglycoside resistance in isolates ofP. aeruginosa at the HUAPA is partly due to the presence of the aac(6´)-Ib, aphA1 andaadB genes, but the high rates of antimicrobial resistance suggest the existence of several mechanisms acting together. This is the first report of aminoglycoside resistance genes in Venezuela and one of the few in Latin America.

  17. Occurrence of aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes genes (aac(6 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Background: Enzymatic modification of aminoglycosides is the primary mechanism of resistance by Pseudomonas aerug- inosa. Obejectives: We investigated the occurrence and mechanism of aminoglycosides resistance in P. aeruginosa isolates from hospitals in SouthWest Nigeria. Methods: A total of 54 ...

  18. MexY-promoted aminoglycoside resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa: involvement of a putative proximal binding pocket in aminoglycoside recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Calvin Ho-Fung; Hughes, Daniel; Poole, Keith

    2014-04-22

    The resistance-nodulation-division (RND) family multidrug efflux system MexXY-OprM is a major determinant of aminoglycoside resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, although the details of aminoglycoside recognition and export by MexY, the substrate-binding RND component of this efflux system, have not been elucidated. To identify regions/residues of MexY important for aminoglycoside resistance, plasmid-borne mexY was mutagenized and mutations that impaired MexY-promoted aminoglycoside (streptomycin) resistance were identified in a ΔmexY strain of P. aeruginosa. Sixty-one streptomycin-sensitive mexY mutants were recovered; among these, 7 unique mutations that yielded wild-type levels of MexY expression were identified. These mutations compromised resistance to additional aminoglycosides and to other antimicrobials and occurred in both the transmembrane and periplasmic regions of the protein. Mapping of the mutated residues onto a 3-dimensional structure of MexY modeled on Escherichia coli AcrB revealed that these tended to occur in regions implicated in general pump operation (transmembrane domain) and MexY trimer assembly (docking domain) and, thus, did not provide insights into aminoglycoside recognition. A region corresponding to a proximal binding pocket connected to a periplasm-linked cleft, part of a drug export pathway of AcrB, was identified in MexY and proposed to play a role in aminoglycoside recognition. To test this, selected residues (K79, D133, and Y613) within this pocket were mutagenized and the impact on aminoglycoside resistance was assessed. Mutations of D133 and Y613 compromised aminoglycoside resistance, while, surprisingly, the K79 mutation enhanced aminoglycoside resistance, confirming a role for this putative proximal binding pocket in aminoglycoside recognition and export. IMPORTANCE Bacterial RND pumps do not typically accommodate highly hydrophilic agents such as aminoglycosides, and it is unclear how those, such as MexY, which accommodate

  19. Real-time examination of aminoglycoside activity towards bacterial mimetic membranes using Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation monitoring (QCM-D).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Tanmaya; Voo, Zhi Xiang; Graham, Bim; Spiccia, Leone; Martin, Lisandra L

    2015-02-01

    The rapid increase in multi-drug resistant bacteria has resulted in previously discontinued treatments being revisited. Aminoglycosides are effective "old" antibacterial agents that fall within this category. Despite extensive usage and understanding of their intracellular targets, there is limited mechanistic knowledge regarding how aminoglycosides penetrate bacterial membranes. Thus, the activity of two well-known aminoglycosides, kanamycin A and neomycin B, towards a bacterial mimetic membrane (DMPC:DMPG (4:1)) was examined using a Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). The macroscopic effect of increasing the aminoglycoside concentration showed that kanamycin A exerts a threshold response, switching from binding to the membrane to disruption of the surface. Neomycin B, however, disrupted the membrane at all concentrations examined. At concentrations above the threshold value observed for kanamycin A, both aminoglycosides revealed similar mechanistic details. That is, they both inserted into the bacterial mimetic lipid bilayer, prior to disruption via loss of materials, presumably aminoglycoside-membrane composites. Depth profile analysis of this membrane interaction was achieved using the overtones of the quartz crystal sensor. The measured data is consistent with a two-stage process in which insertion of the aminoglycoside precedes the 'detergent-like' removal of membranes from the sensor. The results of this study contribute to the insight required for aminoglycosides to be reconsidered as active antimicrobial agents/co-agents by providing details of activity at the bacterial membrane. Kanamycin and neomycin still offer potential as antimicrobial therapeutics for the future and the QCM-D method illustrates great promise for screening new antibacterial or antiviral drug candidates. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. In vitro activity of aminoglycosides against clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii complex and other nonfermentative Gram-negative bacilli causing healthcare-associated bloodstream infections in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jyh-You; Wang, Fu-Der; Ho, Mao-Wang; Lee, Chen-Hsiang; Liu, Jien-Wei; Wang, Jann-Tay; Sheng, Wang-Huei; Hseuh, Po-Ren; Chang, Shan-Chwen

    2016-12-01

    Aminoglycosides possess in vitro activity against aerobic and facultative Gram-negative bacilli. However, nationwide surveillance on susceptibility data of Acinetobacter baumannii complex and Pseudomonas aeruginosa to aminoglycosides was limited, and aminoglycoside resistance has emerged in the past decade. We study the in vitro susceptibility of A. baumannii complex and other nonfermentative Gram-negative bacilli (NFGNB) to aminoglycosides. A total of 378 NFGNB blood isolates causing healthcare-associated bloodstream infections during 2008 and 2013 at four medical centers in Taiwan were tested for their susceptibilities to four aminoglycosides using the agar dilution method (gentamicin, amikacin, tobramycin, and isepamicin) and disc diffusion method (isepamicin). A. baumannii was highly resistant to all four aminoglycosides (range of susceptibility, 0-4%), whereas >80% of Acinetobacter nosocomialis and Acinetobacter pittii blood isolates were susceptible to amikacin (susceptibility: 96% and 91%, respectively), tobramycin (susceptibility: 92% and 80%, respectively), and isepamicin (susceptibility: 96% and 80%, respectively). All aminoglycosides except gentamicin possessed good in vitro activity (>94%) against P. aeruginosa. Amikacin has the best in vitro activity against P. aeruginosa (susceptibility, 98%), followed by A. nosocomialis (96%), and A. pittii (91%), whereas tobramycin and isepamicin were less potent against A. pittii (both 80%). Aminoglycoside resistances were prevalent in Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and Burkholderia cepacia complex blood isolates in Taiwan. Genospecies among the A. baumannii complex had heterogeneous susceptibility profiles to aminoglycosides. Aminoglycosides, except gentamicin, remained good in vitro antimicrobial activity against P. aeruginosa. Further in vivo clinical data and continuous resistance monitoring are warranted for clinical practice guidance. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Preventing Ototoxic Synergy of Prior Noise Trauma During Aminoglycoside Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Johns Hopkins University. 212 p (2007). 9. Liao S, et al. Noise Exposure in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit : A Prospective Study. American Academy...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-14-1-0006 TITLE: Preventing Ototoxic Synergy Of Prior Noise Trauma During Aminoglycoside Therapy ...Dec 2014 - 30 Nov 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Preventing Ototoxic Synergy Of Prior Noise Trauma During Aminoglycoside Therapy

  2. AMINOGLYCOSIDE RESISTANCE GENES IN Pseudomonas aeruginosa ISOLATES FROM CUMANA, VENEZUELA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertinellys TEIXEIRA

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The enzymatic modification of aminoglycosides by aminoglycoside-acetyltransferases (AAC, aminoglycoside-adenyltransferases (AAD, and aminoglycoside-phosphotransferases (APH, is the most common resistance mechanism in P. aeruginosa and these enzymes can be coded on mobile genetic elements that contribute to their dispersion. One hundred and thirty seven P. aeruginosa isolates from the University Hospital, Cumana, Venezuela (HUAPA were evaluated. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by the disk diffusion method and theaac, aadB and aph genes were detected by PCR. Most of the P. aeruginosa isolates (33/137 were identified from the Intensive Care Unit (ICU, mainly from discharges (96/137. The frequency of resistant P. aeruginosaisolates was found to be higher for the aminoglycosides tobramycin and amikacin (30.7 and 29.9%, respectively. Phenotype VI, resistant to these antibiotics, was the most frequent (14/49, followed by phenotype I, resistant to all the aminoglycosides tested (12/49. The aac(6´-Ib,aphA1 and aadB genes were the most frequently detected, and the simultaneous presence of several resistance genes in the same isolate was demonstrated. Aminoglycoside resistance in isolates ofP. aeruginosa at the HUAPA is partly due to the presence of the aac(6´-Ib, aphA1 andaadB genes, but the high rates of antimicrobial resistance suggest the existence of several mechanisms acting together. This is the first report of aminoglycoside resistance genes in Venezuela and one of the few in Latin America.

  3. Aminoglycoside interactions and impacts on the eukaryotic ribosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokhorova, Irina; Altman, Roger B.; Djumagulov, Muminjon; Shrestha, Jaya P.; Urzhumtsev, Alexandre; Ferguson, Angelica; Chang, Cheng-Wei Tom; Yusupov, Marat; Blanchard, Scott C.; Yusupova, Gulnara

    2017-01-01

    Aminoglycosides are chemically diverse, broad-spectrum antibiotics that target functional centers within the bacterial ribosome to impact all four principle stages (initiation, elongation, termination, and recycling) of the translation mechanism. The propensity of aminoglycosides to induce miscoding errors that suppress the termination of protein synthesis supports their potential as therapeutic interventions in human diseases associated with premature termination codons (PTCs). However, the sites of interaction of aminoglycosides with the eukaryotic ribosome and their modes of action in eukaryotic translation remain largely unexplored. Here, we use the combination of X-ray crystallography and single-molecule FRET analysis to reveal the interactions of distinct classes of aminoglycosides with the 80S eukaryotic ribosome. Crystal structures of the 80S ribosome in complex with paromomycin, geneticin (G418), gentamicin, and TC007, solved at 3.3- to 3.7-Å resolution, reveal multiple aminoglycoside-binding sites within the large and small subunits, wherein the 6′-hydroxyl substituent in ring I serves as a key determinant of binding to the canonical eukaryotic ribosomal decoding center. Multivalent binding interactions with the human ribosome are also evidenced through their capacity to affect large-scale conformational dynamics within the pretranslocation complex that contribute to multiple aspects of the translation mechanism. The distinct impacts of the aminoglycosides examined suggest that their chemical composition and distinct modes of interaction with the ribosome influence PTC read-through efficiency. These findings provide structural and functional insights into aminoglycoside-induced impacts on the eukaryotic ribosome and implicate pleiotropic mechanisms of action beyond decoding. PMID:29208708

  4. Genetic basis of enzymatic resistance of E. coli to aminoglycosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojdana, Dominika; Sieńko, Anna; Sacha, Paweł; Majewski, Piotr; Wieczorek, Piotr; Wieczorek, Anna; Tryniszewska, Elżbieta

    2017-07-29

    Over the past years, an increase in resistance to aminoglycosides has been observed among Enterobacteriaceae rods. This resistance development reduces therapeutic options for infections caused by multidrug-resistance organisms. Because of the changing epidemiology of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) and resistance to aminoglycosides, we investigated the prevalence of the aac(3)-Ia, aac(6')-Ib, ant(4')-IIa, ant(2")-Ia, and aph(3")-Ib genes encoding aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AMEs) in ESBL-producing Escherichia coli as well as ESBL-non-producing isolates. To understand bacterial resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics, we estimated resistance phenotypes and the presence of genes responsible for this resistance. The study was conducted on 44 E.coli strains originated from patients hospitalized at University Hospital of Bialystok. MIC values were obtained for gentamicin, amikacin, netilmicin, and tobramycin. Isolates were tested for the presence of the aac(3)-Ia, aac(6')-Ib, ant(4')-IIa, ant(2")-Ia, and aph(3")-Ib genes with the use of the PCR technique. Resistance to aminoglycosides was found in 79.5% of the isolates. The highest percentages of resistance were observed for tobramycin (70,5%) and gentamicin (59%), followed by netilmicin (43.2%) and amikacin (11.4%). PCR assays revealed the presence of aac(6')-Ib among 26 (59.2%) strains, aph(3")-Ib among 16 (36.2%), aac(3)-Ia among 7 (15.9%), and ant(2")-Ia among 2 (4.6%) strains. The enzymatic resistance against aminoglycosides in northeastern Poland among clinical isolates of E. coli is predominantly caused by aac(6')-Ib and aph(3")-Ib. Amikacin may be used for therapy of infections caused by ESBL-producing E. coli, because of the low rates of resistance. Copyright © 2017 Medical University of Bialystok. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Radioimmunoassay and radioenzymatic assay of a new aminoglycoside antibiotic, netilmicin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broughton, A.; Strong, J.E.; Pickering, L.K.; Knight, J.; Bodey, G.P.

    1978-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay and a radioenzymatic assay for netilmicin, a new aminoglycoside, were developed in our laboratories to assist in the study of the pharmacology of the drug and establish values for use in its monitoring. The assays are sensitive, precise, and rapid, giving results that correlate (r = 0.90) with each other and with those of a microbiological assay in which Klebsiella pneumoniae is used as the test organism. Preliminary pharmacological studies show the drug to have a biological half-life of 135 min, which is comparable to that for other aminoglycosides

  6. Thermodynamics of aminoglycoside and acyl-coenzyme A binding to the Salmonella enterica AAC(6')-Iy aminoglycoside N-acetyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Subray S; Dam, Tarun K; Brewer, C Fred; Blanchard, John S

    2002-06-11

    Kinetic and mechanistic studies on the chromosomally encoded aminoglycoside 6'-N-acetyltransferase, AAC(6')-Iy, of Salmonella enterica that confers resistance toward aminoglycosides have been previously reported [Magnet et al. (2001) Biochemistry 40, 3700-3709]. In the present study, equilibrium binding and the thermodynamic parameters of binding of aminoglycosides and acyl-coenzyme A derivatives to AAC(6')-Iy and of two mutants, C109A and the C109A/C70A double mutant, have been studied using fluorescence spectroscopy and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Association constants for different aminoglycosides varied greatly (4 x 10(4)-150 x 10(4)) while the association constants of several acyl-coenzyme A derivatives were similar (3.2 x 10(4)-4.5 x 10(4)). The association constants and van't Hoff enthalpy changes derived from intrinsic protein fluorescence changes were in agreement with independently measured values from isothermal titration calorimetry studies. Binding of both aminoglycosides and acyl-coenzyme A derivatives is strongly enthalpically driven and revealed opposing negative entropy changes, resulting in enthalpy-entropy compensation. The acetyltransferase exhibited a temperature-dependent binding of tobramycin with a negative heat capacity value of 410 cal mol(-1) K(-1). Isothermal titration studies of acetyl-coenzyme A and tobramycin binding to mutant forms of the enzyme indicated that completely conserved C109 does not play any direct role in the binding of either of the substrates, while C70 is directly involved in aminoglycoside binding. These results are discussed and compared with previous steady-state kinetic studies of the enzyme.

  7. Early transcriptional response to aminoglycoside antibiotic suggests alternate pathways leading to apoptosis of sensory hair cells in the mouse inner ear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil eSegil

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Aminoglycoside antibiotics are the drug of choice for treating many bacterial infections, but their administration results in hearing loss in nearly one fourth of the patients who receive them. Several biochemical pathways have been implicated in aminoglycoside antibiotic ototoxicity; however, little is known about how hair cells respond to aminoglycoside antibiotics at the transcriptome level. Here we have investigated the genome-wide response to the aminoglycoside antibiotic gentamicin. Using organotypic cultures of the perinatal organ of Corti, we performed RNA sequencing using cDNA libraries obtained from FACS-purified hair cells. Within 3 hours of gentamicin treatment, the messenger RNA level of more than three thousand genes in hair cells changed significantly. Bioinformatic analysis of these changes highlighted several known signal transduction pathways, including the JNK pathway and the NF-κB pathway, in addition to genes involved in the stress response, apoptosis, cell cycle control, and DNA damage repair. In contrast, only 698 genes, mainly involved in cell cycle and metabolite biosynthetic processes, were significantly affected in the non-hair cell population. The gene expression profiles of hair cells in response to gentamicin share a considerable similarity with those previously observed in gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity. Our findings suggest that previously observed early responses to gentamicin in hair cells in specific signaling pathways are reflected in changes in gene expression. Additionally, the observed changes in gene expression of cell cycle regulatory genes indicate a disruption of the postmitotic state, which may suggest an alternative pathway regulating gentamicin-induced hair cell death. This work provides a more comprehensive view of aminoglycoside antibiotic ototoxicity, and thus contribute to identifying potential pathways or therapeutic targets to alleviate this important side effect of aminoglycoside

  8. In vitro studies with UK-18,892, a new aminoglycoside antibiotic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jevons, S; Cheeseman, H E; Brammer, K W

    1978-09-01

    The antibacterial activity of UK-18,892, a new semisynthetic aminoglycoside, was examined against aminoglycoside-susceptible and aminoglycoside-resistant clinical isolates of gram-negative bacilli and Staphylococcus aureus. UK-18,892 had a similar degree of activity to those of amikacin and kanamycin A against aminoglycoside-susceptible bacteria but was less potent than gentamicin against all isolates except Providencia spp. UK-18,892 was highly active against aminoglycoside-resistant bacteria, inhibiting 93% of the 268 isolates examined at 12.5 mug/ml. Amikacin was similarly active, whereas gentamicin inhibited only 14% of these isolates at 12.5 mug/ml.

  9. Appropriateness of aminoglycoside prescriptions in a French university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, A; Leroy, J; Patry, I; Hénon, T; Hocquet, D; Chirouze, C; Bertrand, X

    2016-09-01

    Aminoglycosides are a major class of antibiotics. Their use is particularly interesting in the treatment of severe infections but their toxicity is well known. They are mostly prescribed combined with other agents and as first-line treatments. We aimed to assess the appropriateness of aminoglycoside prescriptions in a French university hospital on the basis of the latest French recommendations published in 2011. We conducted a prospective study between January 17th and February 4th, 2014 to assess prescription modalities of aminoglycosides on the basis of the following criteria: indication, duration of treatment, dosing schedule, administration modalities, and drug level monitoring. Prescriptions were then compared to the 2011 national guidelines. A total of 68 consecutive prescriptions were analyzed and only 47.8% complied with guidelines. Most physicians complied with recommendations, particularly with the indication for severe infections (95.6%), the administration of a single daily dose (92.6%), and the slow intravenous infusion (30minutes) administration (84%). However, physicians tended to prescribe lower doses than recommended (40.3%), especially to patients presenting with renal insufficiency, and drug level monitoring was not optimal. Although new and accurate national recommendations were recently published, aminoglycoside prescription is still not optimal, in particular for dosing and plasma concentration monitoring. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. In vitro effect of aminoglycosides and fluoroquinolones on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A viable isolate of coagulase positive and pigment forming Staphylococcus aureus obtained from conjunctival swabs used in the study was treated with aminoglycosides (gentamicin, 0.3%, and tobramycin bramycin, 0.3%, ophthalmic solution) and fluoroquinolones (gatifloxacin 0.3% and moxifloxacin, 0.3% ophthalmic ...

  11. The risks of concurrent treatment with tenofovir and aminoglycosides ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The risks of concurrent treatment with tenofovir and aminoglycosides in patients with HIV-associated tuberculosis. C Kenyon, N Wearne, R Burton, G Meintjes. Abstract. The South African public sector antiretroviral treatment (ART) guidelines have recently been changed to include tenofovir in the first-line regimen.1 ...

  12. High Level Aminoglycoside Resistance and Distribution of Aminoglycoside Resistant Genes among Clinical Isolates of Enterococcus Species in Chennai, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elango Padmasini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Enterococci are nosocomial pathogen with multiple-drug resistance by intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms. Aminoglycosides along with cell wall inhibitors are given clinically for treating enterococcal infections. 178 enterococcal isolates were analyzed in this study. E. faecalis is identified to be the predominant Enterococcus species, along with E. faecium, E. avium, E. hirae, E. durans, E. dispar and E. gallinarum. High level aminoglycoside resistance (HLAR by MIC for gentamicin (GM, streptomycin (SM and both (GM + SM antibiotics was found to be 42.7%, 29.8%, and 21.9%, respectively. Detection of aminoglycoside modifying enzyme encoding genes (AME in enterococci was identified by multiplex PCR for aac(6′-Ie-aph(2′′-Ia; aph(2′′-Ib; aph(2′′-Ic; aph(2′′-Id and aph(3′-IIIa genes. 38.2% isolates carried aac(6′-Ie-aph(2′′-Ia gene and 40.4% isolates carried aph(3′-IIIa gene. aph(2′′-Ib; aph(2′′-Ic; aph(2′′-Id were not detected among our study isolates. aac(6′-Ie-aph(2′′-Ia and aph(3′-IIIa genes were also observed in HLAR E. durans, E. avium, E. hirae, and E. gallinarum isolates. This indicates that high level aminoglycoside resistance genes are widely disseminated among isolates of enterococci from Chennai.

  13. Ligand promiscuity through the eyes of the aminoglycoside N3 acetyltransferase IIa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Adrianne L; Serpersu, Engin H

    2013-07-01

    Aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AGMEs) are expressed in many pathogenic bacteria and cause resistance to aminoglycoside (AG) antibiotics. Remarkably, the substrate promiscuity of AGMEs is quite variable. The molecular basis for such ligand promiscuity is largely unknown as there is not an obvious link between amino acid sequence or structure and the antibiotic profiles of AGMEs. To address this issue, this article presents the first kinetic and thermodynamic characterization of one of the least promiscuous AGMEs, the AG N3 acetyltransferase-IIa (AAC-IIa) and its comparison to two highly promiscuous AGMEs, the AG N3-acetyltransferase-IIIb (AAC-IIIb) and the AG phosphotransferase(3')-IIIa (APH). Despite having similar antibiotic selectivities, AAC-IIIb and APH catalyze different reactions and share no homology to one another. AAC-IIa and AAC-IIIb catalyze the same reaction and are very similar in both amino acid sequence and structure. However, they demonstrate strong differences in their substrate profiles and kinetic and thermodynamic properties. AAC-IIa and APH are also polar opposites in terms of ligand promiscuity but share no sequence or apparent structural homology. However, they both are highly dynamic and may even contain disordered segments and both adopt well-defined conformations when AGs are bound. Contrary to this AAC-IIIb maintains a well-defined structure even in apo form. Data presented herein suggest that the antibiotic promiscuity of AGMEs may be determined neither by the flexibility of the protein nor the size of the active site cavity alone but strongly modulated or controlled by the effects of the cosubstrate on the dynamic and thermodynamic properties of the enzyme. Copyright Copyright © 2013 The Protein Society.

  14. The Sensitivity to Aminoglycosides and Heavy Metals of Isolates of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eighty-two clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains were tested for their sensitivity to aminoglycosides by an agar diffusion method and to heavy metals by a dilution technique on tri –buffered mineral salt agar containing 10 – 100mg/L CdCl2.H20, CoCl2.6H20, ZnCl2, AgNO3 and HgCl2. All the strains tested ...

  15. Multifunctional hyperbranched glycoconjugated polymers based on natural aminoglycosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mingsheng; Hu, Mei; Wang, Dali; Wang, Guojian; Zhu, Xinyuan; Yan, Deyue; Sun, Jian

    2012-06-20

    Multifunctional gene vectors with high transfection, low cytotoxicity, and good antitumor and antibacterial activities were prepared from natural aminoglycosides. Through the Michael-addition polymerization of gentamycin and N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide, cationic hyperbranched glycoconjugated polymers were synthesized, and their physical and chemical properties were analyzed by FTIR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, GPC, ζ-potential, and acid-base titration techniques. The cytotoxicity of these hyperbranched glycoconjugated polycations was low because of the hydrolysis of degradable glycosidic and amide linkages in acid conditions. Owing to the presence of various primary, secondary, and tertiary amines in the polymers, hyperbranched glycoconjugated polymers showed high buffering capacity and strong DNA condensation ability, resulting in the high transfection efficiency. In the meantime, due to the introduction of natural aminoglycosides into the polymeric backbone, the resultant hyperbranched glycoconjugated polymers inhibited the growth of cancer cells and bacteria efficiently. Combining the gene transfection, antitumor, and antibacterial abilities together, the multifunctional hyperbranched glycoconjugated polymers based on natural aminoglycosides may play an important role in protecting cancer patients from bacterial infections.

  16. Aminoglycoside-derived amphiphilic nanoparticles for molecular delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miryala, Bhavani; Godeshala, Sudhakar; Grandhi, Taraka Sai Pavan; Christensen, Matthew D; Tian, Yanqing; Rege, Kaushal

    2016-10-01

    The development of effective drug carriers can lead to improved outcomes in a variety of disease conditions. Aminoglycosides have been used as antibacterial therapeutics, and are attractive as monomers for the development of polymeric materials in various applications. Here, we describe the development of novel aminoglycoside-derived amphiphilic nanoparticles for drug delivery, with an eye towards ablation of cancer cells. The aminoglycoside paromomycin was first cross-linked with resorcinol diglycidyl ether leading to the formation of a poly (amino ether), PAE. PAE molecules were further derivatized with methoxy-terminated poly(ethylene glycol) or mPEG resulting in the formation of mPEG-PAE polymer, which self-assembled to form nanoparticles. Formation of the mPEG-PAE amphiphile was characterized using (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and FTIR spectroscopy. Self-assembly of the polymer into nanoparticles was characterized using dynamic light scattering, zeta potential analyses, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and the pyrene fluorescence assay. mPEG-PAE nanoparticles were able to carry significant amounts of doxorubicin (DOX), presumably by means of hydrophobic interactions between the drug and the core. Cell-based studies indicated that mPEG-PAE nanoparticles, loaded with doxorubicin, were able to induce significant loss in viabilities of PC3 human prostate cancer, MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer, and MB49 murine bladder cancer cells; empty nanoparticles resulted in negligible losses of cell viability under the conditions investigated. Taken together, our results indicate that the mPEG-PAE nanoparticle platform is attractive for drug delivery in different applications, including cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Hearing loss and nephrotoxicity treatment in patients with in long-term aminoglycoside tuberculosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Altena, R

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the ototoxic and nephrotoxic effects of long-term use of aminoglycosides. DESIGN: Patients treated for tuberculosis with aminoglycosides were evaluated for hearing loss and nephrotoxicity for a minimum of 14 days. RESULTS: Hearing loss of 15 decibels (dB) at two or more

  18. Identification of aminotransferase genes for biosynthesis of aminoglycoside antibiotics from soil DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaya, Atsushi; Takeyama, Satoko; Tamegai, Hideyuki

    2005-07-01

    Aminoglycoside has been known as a clinically important antibiotic for a long time, but genetic information for the biosynthesis of aminoglycoside is still insufficient. In this study, we tried to clone aminoglycoside-biosynthetic genes from soil DNA for accumulation of genetic information. We chose the genes encoding L-glutamine:(2-deoxy-)scyllo-inosose aminotransferase as the target, because it is specific for all types of aminoglycoside biosynthesis. By degenerate PCR, we obtained 33 individual clones that were homologous with aminotransferase genes in aminoglycoside biosynthesis. Phylogenetic analysis and alignment of these genes showed that horizontal gene transfer has occurred in the soil. Among these, several quite interesting genes were obtained. Some genes probably originated from non-actinomycetes, and some were far from the known homologs. These genes can be useful markers for the isolation of entire gene clusters and originating organisms.

  19. Coenzyme Q10 protects hair cells against aminoglycoside.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuma Sugahara

    Full Text Available It is well known that the production of free radicals is associated with sensory cell death induced by an aminoglycoside. Many researchers have reported that antioxidant reagents protect sensory cells in the inner ear, and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 is an antioxidant that is consumed as a health food in many countries. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of CoQ10 in mammalian vestibular hair cell death induced by aminoglycoside. Cultured utricles of CBA/CaN mice were divided into three groups (control group, neomycin group, and neomycin + CoQ10 group. In the neomycin group, utricles were cultured with neomycin (1 mM to induce hair cell death. In the neomycin + CoQ10 group, utricles were cultured with neomycin and water-soluble CoQ10 (30-0.3 µM. Twenty-four hours after exposure to neomycin, the cultured tissues were fixed, and vestibular hair cells were labeled using an anti-calmodulin antibody. Significantly more hair cells survived in the neomycin + CoQ10 group than in the neomycin group. These data indicate that CoQ10 protects sensory hair cells against neomycin-induced death in the mammalian vestibular epithelium; therefore, CoQ10 may be useful as a protective drug in the inner ear.

  20. [Investigation of molecular mechanisms of aminoglycoside resistance in Salmonella].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubritskiĭ, A V; Il'ina, E N; Strel'chenko, S A; Malakhova, M V; Lenev, S V; Skliarov, O D; Panin, A N; Govorun, V M

    2011-01-01

    The spread of aminoglycoside resistance phenotype and respective genetic resistance determinants was evaluated in 243 Salmonella strains isolated within 1948-2010 and stored in the Culture Collection of the Russian State Research Institute for Control, Standardization and Certification of Veterinary Preparations (Moscow). The Salmonella strains showed resistance to streptomycin and gentamicin in 3.7% (n = 9) and 0.8% (n = 2) of the isolates respectively. Intermediate resistance to streptomycin was recorded in 9.9% (n = 24) of the isolates. To detect the genes responsible for the aminoglycoside resistance, primers for aadA1, aadA2, aadB, aphA1, aphA3, sat, strA, strB, aphA, aacC, rmtB, armA and rpsL genes amplification and sequencing were designed. The strains with lower susceptibility to streptomycin harbored aadA1, aadA2, strA, strB resistance genes encoding enzymes for aminoglicoside modification and rpsL mutant allele (K42N, G91D). Genetic mechanisms able to explain the gentamicin resistance development were not detected. Some strains carried genetic markers of streptomycine resistance but had no clinically sufficient resistance to it. In this regard, genetic testing is essential for prevention of drug resistance spreading due to horizontal transfer of genes in microbial population.

  1. The Impact of Aminoglycosides on the Dynamics of Translation Elongation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Tsai

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Inferring antibiotic mechanisms on translation through static structures has been challenging, as biological systems are highly dynamic. Dynamic single-molecule methods are also limited to few simultaneously measurable parameters. We have circumvented these limitations with a multifaceted approach to investigate three structurally distinct aminoglycosides that bind to the aminoacyl-transfer RNA site (A site in the prokaryotic 30S ribosomal subunit: apramycin, paromomycin, and gentamicin. Using several single-molecule fluorescence measurements combined with structural and biochemical techniques, we observed distinct changes to translational dynamics for each aminoglycoside. While all three drugs effectively inhibit translation elongation, their actions are structurally and mechanistically distinct. Apramycin does not displace A1492 and A1493 at the decoding center, as demonstrated by a solution nuclear magnetic resonance structure, causing only limited miscoding; instead, it primarily blocks translocation. Paromomycin and gentamicin, which displace A1492 and A1493, cause significant miscoding, block intersubunit rotation, and inhibit translocation. Our results show the power of combined dynamics, structural, and biochemical approaches to elucidate the complex mechanisms underlying translation and its inhibition.

  2. The impact of aminoglycosides on the dynamics of translation elongation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Albert; Uemura, Sotaro; Johansson, Magnus; Puglisi, Elisabetta Viani; Marshall, R. Andrew; Aitken, Colin Echeverría; Korlach, Jonas; Ehrenberg, Måns; Puglisi, Joseph D.

    2013-01-01

    Inferring antibiotic mechanisms on translation through static structures has been challenging as biological systems are highly dynamic. Dynamic single-molecule methods are also limited to few simultaneously-measurable parameters. We have circumvented these limitations with a multifaceted approach to investigate three structurally-distinct aminoglycosides that bind to the aminoacyl-tRNA site (A site) in the prokaryotic 30S ribosomal subunit: apramycin, paromomycin, and gentamicin. Using several single-molecule fluorescence measurements combined with structural and biochemical techniques, we observed distinct changes to translational dynamics for each aminoglycoside. While all three drugs effectively inhibit translation elongation, their actions are structurally and mechanistically distinct. Apramycin does not displace A1492 and A1493 at the decoding center, as demonstrated by a solution NMR structure, causing only limited miscoding; instead it primarily blocks translocation. Paromomycin and gentamicin, which displace A1492 and A1493, cause significant miscoding, block intersubunit rotation, and inhibit translocation. Our results show the power of combined dynamics, structural, and biochemical approaches to elucidate the complex mechanisms underlying translation and its inhibition. PMID:23416053

  3. Molecular identification of aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes in clinical isolates of Escherichia coli resistant to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid isolated in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Martínez, Marta; Miró, Elisenda; Ortega, Adriana; Bou, Germán; González-López, Juan José; Oliver, Antonio; Pascual, Alvaro; Cercenado, Emilia; Oteo, Jesús; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Navarro, Ferran

    2015-08-01

    The activity of eight aminoglycosides (amikacin, apramycin, arbekacin, gentamicin, kanamycin, neomycin, netilmicin and tobramycin) against a collection of 257 amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (AMC)-resistant Escherichia coli isolates was determined by microdilution. Aminoglycoside resistance rates, the prevalence of aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme (AME) genes, the relationship between AME gene detection and resistance phenotype to aminoglycosides, and the association of AME genes with mechanisms of AMC resistance in E. coli isolates in Spain were investigated. Aminoglycoside-resistant isolates were screened for the presence of genes encoding common AMEs [aac(3)-Ia, aac(3)-IIa, aac(3)-IVa, aac(6')-Ib, ant(2″)-Ia, ant(4')-IIa and aph(3')-Ia] or 16S rRNA methylases (armA, rmtB, rmtC and npmA). In total, 105 isolates (40.9%) were resistant to at least one of the aminoglycosides tested. Amikacin, apramycin and arbekacin showed better activity, with MIC90 values of 2mg/L (arbekacin) and 8mg/L (amikacin and apramycin). Kanamycin presented the highest MIC90 (128mg/L). The most common AME gene was aac(6')-Ib (36 strains; 34.3%), followed by aph(3')-Ia (31 strains; 29.5%), ant(2″)-Ia (29 strains; 27.6%) and aac(3)-IIa (23 strains; 21.9%). aac(3)-Ia, aac(3)-IVa, ant(4')-IIa and the four methylases were not detected. The ant(2″)-Ia gene was usually associated with OXA-1 [21/30; 70%], whilst 23/25 (92%) strains producing CTX-M-15 had the aac(6')-Ib gene. The most prevalent AME gene was aac(6')-Ib (18/41; 44%) in nosocomial isolates, whilst ant(2″)-Ia and aph(3')-Ia genes (20/64; 31%) were more frequent in strains of community origin. In 64.6% isolates the phenotypic profile correlated with the presence of commonly encountered AMEs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  4. Profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Profiles is a synthetic overview of more than 100 national energy markets in the world, providing insightful facts and key energy statistics. A Profile is structured around 6 main items and completed by key statistics: Ministries, public agencies, energy policy are concerned; main companies in the oil, gas, electricity and coal sectors, status, shareholders; reserve, production, imports and exports, electricity and refining capacities; deregulation of prices, subsidies, taxes; consumption trends by sector, energy market shares; main energy projects, production and consumption prospects. Statistical Profiles are present in about 3 pages the main data and indicators on oil, gas, coal and electricity. (A.L.B.)

  5. Complex pollution of antibiotic resistance genes due to beta-lactam and aminoglycoside use in aquaculture farming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Baowei; Lin, Lan; Fang, Ling; Yang, Ying; Chen, Enzhong; Yuan, Ke; Zou, Shichun; Wang, Xiaowei; Luan, Tiangang

    2018-05-01

    The prevalence of antibiotic resistance in the modern world has raised global concerns for public health. Establishing relationships between antibiotic use and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) is essential to understanding the dissemination and accumulation of ARGs in a human-impacted environment. In this study, ARG profiles in the sediments from a bullfrog farm, where penicillin and amoxicillin (beta-lactams) and gentamicin (aminoglycoside) were used for prophylactic purposes, were analyzed using metagenomic approaches. Analysis of both extracellular and intracellular DNA (eDNA and iDNA) demonstrated that use of the above-mentioned antibiotics led to complex pollution of ARGs not only related to beta-lactams and aminoglycoside but also to sulfonamides, tetracyclines, and macrolides. Most of the ARGs in the sediments from the bullfrog farm were likely carried by plasmids. A significant correlation was observed between the total abundance of ARG-related plasmids and that of plasmid-carrying ARGs. Approximately 85% of the plasmids likely present in the sediment from the bullfrog farm possessed at least 3 ARG subtypes, which conferred the resistance of bacterial hosts to different antibiotic categories. Our results suggest that antibiotics could lead to complex pollution of ARGs unrelated to those administered due to the concurrence of ARGs in the plasmids. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. UK-18,892: resistance to modification by aminoglycoside-inactivating enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, R J; Brammer, K W; Cheeseman, H E; Jevons, S

    1978-12-01

    UK-18,892, a new semisynthetic aminoglycoside, was active against bacteria possessing aminoglycoside-inactivating enzymes, with the exception of some known to possess AAC(6') or AAD(4') enzymes. This activity has been rationalized by using cell-free extracts of bacteria containing known inactivating enzymes, where it was shown that UK-18,892 was not a substrate for the APH(3'), AAD(2''), AAC(3), and AAC(2') enzymes. It was also demonstrated that UK-18,892 protected mice against lethal infections caused by organisms possessing aminoglycoside-inactivating enzymes.

  7. Cloning, overexpression, and purification of aminoglycoside antibiotic nucleotidyltransferase (2'')-Ia: conformational studies with bound substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekman, D R; DiGiammarino, E L; Wright, E; Witter, E D; Serpersu, E H

    2001-06-19

    Aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferase (2'')-Ia [ANT (2'')-Ia] was cloned from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and purified from overexpressing Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) cells. The first enzyme-bound conformation of an aminoglycoside antibiotic in the active site of an aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferase was determined using the purified aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferase (2' ')-Ia. The conformation of the aminoglycoside antibiotic isepamicin, a psuedo-trisaccharide, bound to aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferase (2' ')-Ia has been determined using NMR spectroscopy. Molecular modeling, employing experimentally determined interproton distances, resulted in two different enzyme-bound conformations (conformer 1 and conformer 2) of isepamicin. Conformer 1 was by far the major conformer defined by the following average glycosidic dihedral angles: PhiBC = -65.26 +/- 1.63 degrees and PsiBC = -54.76 +/- 4.64 degrees. Conformer 1 was further subdivided into one major (conformer 1a) and two minor components (conformers 1b and 1c) based on the comparison of glycosidic dihedral angles PhiAB and PsiAB. The arrangement of substrates in the enzyme.metal-ATP.isepamicin complex was determined on the basis of the measured effect of the paramagnetic substrate analogue Cr(H2O)4ATP on the relaxation rates of substrate protons which were used to determine relative distances of isepamicin protons to the Cr3+. Both conformers of isepamicin yielded arrangements that satisfied the NOE restraints and the observed paramagnetic effects of Cr(H2O)4ATP. It has been suggested that aminoglycosides use both electrostatic interactions and hydrogen bonds in binding to RNA and that the contacts made by the A and B rings to RNA are the most important for binding [Fourmy, D., Recht, M. I., Blanchard, S. C., and Puglisi, J. D. (1996) Science 274, 1367-1371]. Comparisons based on the determined conformations of enzyme-bound aminoglycoside antibiotics also suggested that interactions of rings A and B with

  8. Deciphering the details of RNA aminoglycoside interactions: from atomistic models to biotechnological applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilgu, Muslum [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    A detailed study was done of the neomycin-B RNA aptamer for determining its selectivity and binding ability to both neomycin– and kanamycin-class aminoglycosides. A novel method to increase drug concentrations in cells for more efficiently killing is described. To test the method, a bacterial model system was adopted and several small RNA molecules interacting with aminoglycosides were cloned downstream of T7 RNA polymerase promoter in an expression vector. Then, the growth analysis of E. coli expressing aptamers was observed for 12-hour period. Our analysis indicated that aptamers helped to increase the intracellular concentration of aminoglycosides thereby increasing their efficacy.

  9. Antifungal amphiphilic aminoglycoside K20: bioactivities and mechanism of action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjib K. Shrestha

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available K20 is a novel amphiphilic antifungal aminoglycoside that is synthetically derived from the antibiotic kanamycin A. Reported here are investigations of K20’s antimicrobial activities, cytotoxicity, and fungicidal mechanism of action. In vitro growth inhibitory activities against a variety of human and plant pathogenic yeasts, filamentous fungi, and bacteria were determined using microbroth dilution assays and time-kill curve analyses, and hemolytic and animal cell cytotoxic activities were determined. Effects on Cryptococcus neoformans H-99 infectivity were determined with a preventive murine lung infection model. The antifungal mechanism of action was studied using intact fungal cells, yeast lipid mutants, and small unilamellar lipid vesicles. K20 exhibited broad-spectrum in vitro antifungal activities but not antibacterial activities. Pulmonary, single dose-administration of K20 reduced C. neoformans lung infection rates 4-fold compared to controls. Hemolysis and half-maximal cytotoxicities of mammalian cells occurred at concentrations that were 10 to 32-fold higher than fungicidal MICs. With fluorescein isothiocyanate, 20 to 25 mg/L K20 caused staining of >95% of C. neoformans and Fusarium graminearum cells and at 31.3 mg/L caused rapid leakage (30 to 80% in 15 min of calcein from preloaded small unilamellar lipid vesicles. K20 appears to be a broad-spectrum fungicide, capable of reducing the infectivity of C. neoformans, and exhibits low hemolytic activity and mammalian cell toxicity. It perturbs the plasma membrane by mechanisms that are lipid modulated. K20 is a novel amphiphilic aminoglycoside amenable to scalable production and a potential lead antifungal for therapeutic and crop protection applications.

  10. Enzymatic method for inactivation of aminoglycosides during measurement of postantibiotic effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.G. den Hollander (Jan); J.W. Mouton (Johan); I.A.J.M. Bakker-Woudenberg (Irma); F.P. Vleggaar (Frank); M.P.J. van Goor (Marie-Louise); H.A. Verbrugh (Henri)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractTo determine the postantibiotic effect of aminoglycosides, two methods are currently being used to remove the test drug: repeated washing and dilution. An enzymatic inactivation method of removing gentamicin and tobramycin was developed and compared with the dilution

  11. novel 6'-n-aminoglycoside acetyltransferase AAC(6')-Iaj from a clinical isolate of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Tatsuya; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; Shimada, Kayo; Shimojima, Masahiro; Kirikae, Teruo

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa NCGM1588 has a novel chromosomal class 1 integron, In151, which includes the aac(6')-Iaj gene. The encoded protein, AAC(6')-Iaj, was found to consist of 184 amino acids, with 70% identity to AAC(6')-Ia. Escherichia coli transformed with a plasmid containing the aac(6')-Iaj gene acquired resistance to all aminoglycosides tested except gentamicin. Of note, aac(6')-Iaj contributed to the resistance to arbekacin. Thin-layer chromatography revealed that AAC(6')-Iaj acetylated all aminoglycosides tested except gentamicin. These findings indicated that AAC(6')-Iaj is a functional acetyltransferase that modifies the amino groups at the 6' positions of aminoglycosides and contributes to aminoglycoside resistance of P. aeruginosa NCGM1588, including arbekacin.

  12. OCCURRENCE OF HIGH-LEVEL AMINOGLYCOSIDE RESISTANCE IN ENVIRONMENTAL ISOLATES OF ENTEROCOCCI

    Science.gov (United States)

    High-level resistance fo aminoglycosides was observed in environmental isolates of enterococci. Various aquatic habitats, including agricultural runoff, creeks, rivers, wastewater, and wells, were analyzed. Strains of Enterococcus faecalis, e.faecium, E. gallinarum, and other Ent...

  13. Aminoglycosides in septic shock: an overview, with specific consideration given to their nephrotoxic risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Alexandre; Gruson, Didier; Bouchet, Stéphane; Clouzeau, Benjamin; Hoang-Nam, Bui; Vargas, Frédéric; Gilles, Hilbert; Molimard, Mathieu; Rogues, Anne-Marie; Moore, Nicholas

    2013-04-01

    Aminoglycoside nephrotoxicity has been reported in patients with sepsis, and several risk factors have been described. Once-daily dosing and shorter treatment have reduced nephrotoxicity risk, and simplified aminoglycoside monitoring. This review focuses on nephrotoxicity associated with aminoglycosides in the subset of patients with septic shock or severe sepsis. These patients are radically different from those with less severe sepsis. They may have, for instance, renal impairment due to the shock per se, sepsis-related acute kidney injury, frequent association with pre-existing risk factors for renal failure such as diabetes, dehydration and other nephrotoxic treatments. In this category of patients, these risk factors might modify substantially the benefit-risk ratio of aminoglycosides. In addition, aminoglycoside administration in critically ill patients with sepsis is complicated by an extreme inter- and intra-individual variability in drug pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic characteristics: the volume of distribution (Vd) is frequently increased while the elimination constant can be either increased or decreased. Consequently, and although its effect on nephrotoxicity has not been explored, a different administration schedule, i.e. a high-dose once daily (HDOD), and several therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) options have been proposed in these patients. This review describes the historical perspective of these different options, including those applying to subsets of patients in which aminoglycoside administration is even more complex (obese intensive care unit [ICU] patients, patients needing continuous or discontinuous renal replacement therapy [CRRT/DRRT]). A simple linear dose adjustment according to aminoglycoside serum concentration can be classified as low-intensity TDM. Nomograms have also been proposed, based on the maximum (peak) plasma concentration (Cmax) objectives, weight and creatinine clearance. The Sawchuk and Zaske method (based on the

  14. Chaperonins fight aminoglycoside-induced protein misfolding and promote short-term tolerance in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goltermann, Lise; Good, Liam; Bentin, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    For almost half of a century, we have known that aminoglycoside antibiotics corrupt ribosomes, causing translational misreading, yet it remains unclear whether or not misreading triggers protein misfolding, and possible effects of chaperone action on drug susceptibilities are poorly understood...... as measured by reduced minimum inhibitory concentrations, whereas GroEL/GroES overexpression did not increase minimum inhibitory concentrations. Our observations establish misfolding of cytosolic proteins as an effect of aminoglycoside action and reveal that chaperones, chaperonins in particular, help...

  15. Identification of aac(2')-I type b aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme genes in resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, T; Tang, C G; Li, Q H; Ji, J; Ge, H Y; Zhang, X Y; Sun, H P

    2015-03-13

    The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanism underlying the drug resistance of Acinetobacter baumannii toward aminoglycosides. A total of 32 A. baumannii strains were identified by molecular identification and subsequently isolated. The isolates were then amplified by polymerase chain reaction to analyze the 9 aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme genes and 7 16S rRNA methylase genes. Five types of aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme genes and 1 type of 16S rRNA methylase gene were detected in the 32 drug-resistant A. baumannii strains. Positive genes included 7 detection modes, of which the all-6-gene-positive mode aac(2')-Ib+aac(3)-I+aac(6')-Ib+ant(3'')-I+aph(3')-I+armA exhibited the largest number of strains (12, 37.5%). The resistance of A. baumannii against aminoglycosides resulted from the presence of 5 types of aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme genes and the 16S rRNA methylase gene armA. This study is the first to isolate the aac(2')-Ib aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme gene from A. baumannii in a domestic clinical setting.

  16. Accuracy of genetic code translation and its orthogonal corruption by aminoglycosides and Mg2+ ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingji; Pavlov, Michael Y; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2018-02-16

    We studied the effects of aminoglycosides and changing Mg2+ ion concentration on the accuracy of initial codon selection by aminoacyl-tRNA in ternary complex with elongation factor Tu and GTP (T3) on mRNA programmed ribosomes. Aminoglycosides decrease the accuracy by changing the equilibrium constants of 'monitoring bases' A1492, A1493 and G530 in 16S rRNA in favor of their 'activated' state by large, aminoglycoside-specific factors, which are the same for cognate and near-cognate codons. Increasing Mg2+ concentration decreases the accuracy by slowing dissociation of T3 from its initial codon- and aminoglycoside-independent binding state on the ribosome. The distinct accuracy-corrupting mechanisms for aminoglycosides and Mg2+ ions prompted us to re-interpret previous biochemical experiments and functional implications of existing high resolution ribosome structures. We estimate the upper thermodynamic limit to the accuracy, the 'intrinsic selectivity' of the ribosome. We conclude that aminoglycosides do not alter the intrinsic selectivity but reduce the fraction of it that is expressed as the accuracy of initial selection. We suggest that induced fit increases the accuracy and speed of codon reading at unaltered intrinsic selectivity of the ribosome.

  17. Functional characterization of MexXY and OpmG in aminoglycoside efflux in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuanchuen, Rungtip; Wannaprasat, Wechsiri; Schweizer, Herbert P

    2008-01-01

    MexXY is an active efflux system that contributes to intrinsic resistance to aminoglycosides in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. MexXY can function in combination with OprM in aminoglycoside efflux but may also functionally associate with another as yet unidentified outer membrane channel. The possible role of OpmG as a third component of MexXY in aminoglycoside efflux was investigated by construction of unmarked opmG mutants. Loss of OpmG did not have any impact on minimum inhibitory concentrations for aminoglycosides regardless of the presence of oprM, indicating that MexXY does not interact with OpmG in aminoglycoside efflux. In a clinical isolate PAJ010, (mexXY) enhanced streptomycin susceptibility but neither oprM nor opmG could, suggesting that MexXY functionally associates with an unidentified outer membrane protein for aminoglycoside efflux. Expression of an opmG-lacZ transcriptional fusion revealed that OpmG expression was neither constitutive nor inducible by gentamicin. Growth rates of wildtype P. aeruginosa and opmG mutant derivatives were not different, indicating that expression of opmG is not essential for P. aeruginosa growth.

  18. Effect of mutations in the A site of 16 S rRNA on aminoglycoside antibiotic-ribosome interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Recht, M I; Douthwaite, S; Dahlquist, K D

    1999-01-01

    antibiotics, which also interact with this region of rRNA. Mutations of certain nucleotides in rRNA reduce aminoglycoside binding affinity, as previously demonstrated using a model RNA oligonucleotide system. Here, predictions from the oligonucleotide system were tested in the ribosome by mutation...... for the aminoglycoside paromomycin, whereas no discernible reduction in affinity was observed with 1406 mutant ribosomes. These data are consistent with prior NMR structural determination of aminoglycoside interaction with the decoding region, and further our understanding of how aminoglycoside resistance can...

  19. Entry of aminoglycosides into renal tubular epithelial cells via endocytosis-dependent and endocytosis-independent pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Junya; Takano, Mikihisa

    2014-08-15

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics such as gentamicin and amikacin are well recognized as a clinically important antibiotic class because of their reliable efficacy and low cost. However, the clinical use of aminoglycosides is limited by their nephrotoxicity and ototoxicity. Nephrotoxicity is induced mainly due to high accumulation of the antibiotics in renal proximal tubular cells. Therefore, a lot of studies on characterization of the renal transport system for aminoglycosides so far reported involved various in-vivo and in-vitro techniques. Early studies revealed that aminoglycosides are taken up through adsorptive endocytosis in renal epithelial cells. Subsequently, it was found that megalin, a multiligand endocytic receptor abundantly expressed on the apical side of renal proximal tubular cells, can bind aminoglycosides and that megalin-mediated endocytosis plays a crucial role in renal accumulation of aminoglycosides. Therefore, megalin has been suggested to be a promising molecular target for the prevention of aminoglycoside-induced nephrotoxicity. On the other hand, recently, some reports have indicated that aminoglycosides are transported via a pathway that does not require endocytosis, such as non-selective cation channel-mediated entry, in cultured renal tubular cells as well as cochlear outer hair cells. In this commentary article, we review the cellular transport of aminoglycosides in renal epithelial cells, focusing on endocytosis-dependent and -independent pathways. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Chitosan conjugation enables intracellular bacteria susceptible to aminoglycoside antibiotic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Haibo; Niu, Hong; Wang, Dongdong; Sun, Feifei; Sun, Yuelin; Duan, Jinyou

    2016-11-01

    Most chronic infections are difficult to eradicate because bacteria capable of surviving in host-infected cells may be protected from the killing actions of antibiotics, leading to therapy failures and disease relapses. Here we demonstrated that covalent-coupling chitosan to streptomycin significantly improved intracellular bactericidal capacity towards multiple organisms within phagocytic or nonphagocytic cells. Structure-activity relationship investigations indicated that antibiotic contents, molecular size and positive charges of the conjugate were the key to retain this intracellular bactericidal activity. Mechanistic insight demonstrated the conjugate was capable to target and eliminate endocytic or endosomal escaped bacteria through facilitating the direct contact between the antibiotic and intracellular organism. In vivo acute infection models indicated that compared to equal dose of the antibiotic, chitosan-streptomycin (C-S) conjugate and especially the human serum album binding chitosan-streptomycin conjugate (HCS) complex formed by human serum album and C-S conjugate greatly decreased the bacteria burden in the spleen and liver in both wild type and immuno-suppressive mice. Furthermore, the HCS complex remarkably reduced mortality of infected TLR2 deficient mice, mimicking immune-compromised persons who were more susceptible to bacterial infections. These findings might open up a new avenue to combat intracellular bacterial infection by aminoglycosides antibiotics at a lower effective dose. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Functional hair cell mechanotransducer channels are required for aminoglycoside ototoxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelrahman Alharazneh

    Full Text Available Aminoglycosides (AG are commonly prescribed antibiotics with potent bactericidal activities. One main side effect is permanent sensorineural hearing loss, induced by selective inner ear sensory hair cell death. Much work has focused on AG's initiating cell death processes, however, fewer studies exist defining mechanisms of AG uptake by hair cells. The current study investigated two proposed mechanisms of AG transport in mammalian hair cells: mechanotransducer (MET channels and endocytosis. To study these two mechanisms, rat cochlear explants were cultured as whole organs in gentamicin-containing media. Two-photon imaging of Texas Red conjugated gentamicin (GTTR uptake into live hair cells was rapid and selective. Hypocalcemia, which increases the open probability of MET channels, increased AG entry into hair cells. Three blockers of MET channels (curare, quinine, and amiloride significantly reduced GTTR uptake, whereas the endocytosis inhibitor concanavalin A did not. Dynosore quenched the fluorescence of GTTR and could not be tested. Pharmacologic blockade of MET channels with curare or quinine, but not concanavalin A or dynosore, prevented hair cell loss when challenged with gentamicin for up to 96 hours. Taken together, data indicate that the patency of MET channels mediated AG entry into hair cells and its toxicity. Results suggest that limiting permeation of AGs through MET channel or preventing their entry into endolymph are potential therapeutic targets for preventing hair cell death and hearing loss.

  2. rRNA chemical groups required for aminoglycoside binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, S C; Fourmy, D; Eason, R G; Puglisi, J D

    1998-05-26

    Through an affinity chromatography based modification-interference assay, we have identified chemical groups within Escherichia coli 16S ribosomal RNA sequence that are required for binding the aminoglycoside antibiotic paromomycin. Paromomycin was covalently linked to solid support via a nine atom spacer from the 6"'-amine of ring IV, and chemical modifications to an A-site oligonucleotide that disrupted binding were identified. Positions in the RNA oligonucleotide that correspond to G1405(N7), G1491(N7), G1494(N7), A1408(N7), A1493(N7), A1408(N1), A1492(N1), and A1493(N1), as well as the pro-R phosphate oxygens of A1492 and A1493 in 16S rRNA are chemical groups that are essential for a high-affinity RNA-paromomycin interaction. These data are consistent with genetic, biochemical, and structural studies related to neomycin-class antibiotics and provide additional information for establishing an exact model for their interaction with the ribosome.

  3. Chaperonin GroEL/GroES Over-Expression Promotes Aminoglycoside Resistance and Reduces Drug Susceptibilities in Escherichia coli Following Exposure to Sublethal Aminoglycoside Doses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goltermann, Lise; Sarusie, Menachem V; Bentin, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is an increasing challenge to modern healthcare. Aminoglycoside antibiotics cause translation corruption and protein misfolding and aggregation in Escherichia coli. We previously showed that chaperonin GroEL/GroES depletion and over-expression sensitize and promote short...

  4. Aminoglycoside Concentrations Required for Synergy with Carbapenems against Pseudomonas aeruginosa Determined via Mechanistic Studies and Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Rajbharan; Bulitta, Jürgen B; Schneider, Elena K; Shin, Beom Soo; Velkov, Tony; Nation, Roger L; Landersdorfer, Cornelia B

    2017-12-01

    This study aimed to systematically identify the aminoglycoside concentrations required for synergy with a carbapenem and characterize the permeabilizing effect of aminoglycosides on the outer membrane of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Monotherapies and combinations of four aminoglycosides and three carbapenems were studied for activity against P. aeruginosa strain AH298-GFP in 48-h static-concentration time-kill studies (SCTK) (inoculum: 10 7.6 CFU/ml). The outer membrane-permeabilizing effect of tobramycin alone and in combination with imipenem was characterized via electron microscopy, confocal imaging, and the nitrocefin assay. A mechanism-based model (MBM) was developed to simultaneously describe the time course of bacterial killing and prevention of regrowth by imipenem combined with each of the four aminoglycosides. Notably, 0.25 mg/liter of tobramycin, which was inactive in monotherapy, achieved synergy (i.e., ≥2-log 10 more killing than the most active monotherapy at 24 h) combined with imipenem. Electron micrographs, confocal image analyses, and the nitrocefin uptake data showed distinct outer membrane damage by tobramycin, which was more extensive for the combination with imipenem. The MBM indicated that aminoglycosides enhanced the imipenem target site concentration up to 4.27-fold. Tobramycin was the most potent aminoglycoside to permeabilize the outer membrane; tobramycin (0.216 mg/liter), gentamicin (0.739 mg/liter), amikacin (1.70 mg/liter), or streptomycin (5.19 mg/liter) was required for half-maximal permeabilization. In summary, our SCTK, mechanistic studies and MBM indicated that tobramycin was highly synergistic and displayed the maximum outer membrane disruption potential among the tested aminoglycosides. These findings support the optimization of highly promising antibiotic combination dosage regimens for critically ill patients. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  5. Local mechanisms for loud sound-enhanced aminoglycoside entry into outer hair cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongzhe; Kachelmeier, Allan; Furness, David N; Steyger, Peter S

    2015-01-01

    Loud sound exposure exacerbates aminoglycoside ototoxicity, increasing the risk of permanent hearing loss and degrading the quality of life in affected individuals. We previously reported that loud sound exposure induces temporary threshold shifts (TTS) and enhances uptake of aminoglycosides, like gentamicin, by cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs). Here, we explore mechanisms by which loud sound exposure and TTS could increase aminoglycoside uptake by OHCs that may underlie this form of ototoxic synergy. Mice were exposed to loud sound levels to induce TTS, and received fluorescently-tagged gentamicin (GTTR) for 30 min prior to fixation. The degree of TTS was assessed by comparing auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) before and after loud sound exposure. The number of tip links, which gate the GTTR-permeant mechanoelectrical transducer (MET) channels, was determined in OHC bundles, with or without exposure to loud sound, using scanning electron microscopy. We found wide-band noise (WBN) levels that induce TTS also enhance OHC uptake of GTTR compared to OHCs in control cochleae. In cochlear regions with TTS, the increase in OHC uptake of GTTR was significantly greater than in adjacent pillar cells. In control mice, we identified stereociliary tip links at ~50% of potential positions in OHC bundles. However, the number of OHC tip links was significantly reduced in mice that received WBN at levels capable of inducing TTS. These data suggest that GTTR uptake by OHCs during TTS occurs by increased permeation of surviving, mechanically-gated MET channels, and/or non-MET aminoglycoside-permeant channels activated following loud sound exposure. Loss of tip links would hyperpolarize hair cells and potentially increase drug uptake via aminoglycoside-permeant channels expressed by hair cells. The effect of TTS on aminoglycoside-permeant channel kinetics will shed new light on the mechanisms of loud sound-enhanced aminoglycoside uptake, and consequently on ototoxic synergy.

  6. Local Mechanisms for Loud Sound-Enhanced Aminoglycoside Entry into Outer Hair Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongzhe eLi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Loud sound exposure exacerbates aminoglycoside ototoxicity, increasing the risk of permanent hearing loss and degrading the quality of life in affected individuals. We previously reported that loud sound exposure induces temporary threshold shifts (TTS and enhances uptake of aminoglycosides, like gentamicin, by cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs. Here, we explore mechanisms by which loud sound exposure and TTS could increase aminoglycoside uptake by OHCs that may underlie this form of ototoxic synergy.Mice were exposed to loud sound levels to induce TTS, and received fluorescently-tagged gentamicin (GTTR for 30 minutes prior to fixation. The degree of TTS was assessed by comparing auditory brainstem responses before and after loud sound exposure. The number of tip links, which gate the GTTR-permeant mechanoelectrical transducer (MET channels, was determined in OHC bundles, with or without exposure to loud sound, using scanning electron microscopy.We found wide-band noise (WBN levels that induce TTS also enhance OHC uptake of GTTR compared to OHCs in control cochleae. In cochlear regions with TTS, the increase in OHC uptake of GTTR was significantly greater than in adjacent pillar cells. In control mice, we identified stereociliary tip links at ~50% of potential positions in OHC bundles. However, the number of OHC tip links was significantly reduced in mice that received WBN at levels capable of inducing TTS.These data suggest that GTTR uptake by OHCs during TTS occurs by increased permeation of surviving, mechanically-gated MET channels, and/or non-MET aminoglycoside-permeant channels activated following loud sound exposure. Loss of tip links would hyperpolarize hair cells and potentially increase drug uptake via aminoglycoside-permeant channels expressed by hair cells. The effect of TTS on aminoglycoside-permeant channel kinetics will shed new light on the mechanisms of loud sound-enhanced aminoglycoside uptake, and consequently on ototoxic

  7. Clinical Pharmacokinetics of Penicillins, Cephalosporins and Aminoglycosides in the Neonate: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gian Maria Pacifici

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial infections are common in the neonates and are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Sixty percent of preterm infants admitted to neonatal intensive care units received at least one antibiotic during the first week of life. Penicillins, aminoglycosides and cephalosporins comprised 53, 43 and 16%, respectively. Kinetic parameters such as the half-life (t1/2, clearance (Cl, and volume of distribution (Vd change with development, so the kinetics of penicillins, cephalosporins and aminoglycosides need to be studied in order to optimise therapy with these drugs. The aim of this study is to review the pharmacokinetics of penicillins, cephalosporins and aminoglycosides in the neonate in a single article in order to provide a critical analysis of the literature and thus provide a useful tool in the hands of physicians. The bibliographic search was performed electronically using PubMed, as the search engine, until February 2nd, 2010. Medline search terms were as follows: pharmacokinetics AND (penicillins OR cephalosporins OR aminoglycosides AND infant, newborn, limiting to humans. Penicillins, cephalosporins and aminoglycosides are fairly water soluble and are mainly eliminated by the kidneys. The maturation of the kidneys governs the pharmacokinetics of penicillins, cephalosporins and aminoglycosides in the neonate. The renal excretory function is reduced in preterms compared to term infants and Cl of these drugs is reduced in premature infants. Gestational and postnatal ages are important factors in the maturation of the neonate and, as these ages proceed, Cl of penicillins, cephalosporins and aminoglycosides increases. Cl and t1/2 are influenced by development and this must be taken into consideration when planning a dosage regimen with these drugs. More pharmacokinetic studies are required to ensure that the dose recommended for the treatment of sepsis in the neonate is evidence based.

  8. Involvement of aph(3‘-IIa in the formation of mosaic aminoglycoside resistance genes in natural environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus eWoegerbauer

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Intragenic recombination leading to mosaic gene formation is known to alter resistance profiles for particular genes and bacterial species. Few studies have examined to what extent aminoglycoside resistance genes undergo intragenic recombination.We screened the GenBank database for mosaic gene formation in homologs of the aph(3’-IIa (nptII gene. APH(3’-IIa inactivates important aminoglycoside antibiotics. The gene is widely used as a selectable marker in biotechnology and enters the environment via laboratory discharges and the release of transgenic organisms. Such releases may provide opportunities for recombination in competent environmental bacteria.The retrieved GenBank sequences were grouped in 3 datasets comprising river water samples, duck pathogens and full-length variants from various bacterial genomes and plasmids. Analysis for recombination in these datasets was performed with the Recombination Detection Program, RDP4, and the Genetic Algorithm for Recombination Detection, GARD.From a total of 89 homologous sequences, 83% showed 99% - 100% sequence identity with aph(3’-IIa originally described as part of transposon Tn5. Fifty one were unique sequence variants eligible for recombination analysis. Only a single recombination event was identified with high confidence and indicated the involvement of aph(3’-IIa in the formation of a mosaic gene located on a plasmid of environmental origin in the multi-resistant isolate Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA96. The available data suggest that aph(3’-IIa is not an archetypical mosaic gene as the divergence between the described sequence variants and the number of detectable recombination events is low. This is in contrast to the numerous mosaic alleles reported for certain penicillin or tetracycline resistance determinants.

  9. Assessment of aminoglycoside-induced hearing impairment in hospitalized neonates by TEOAE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeimi, Mohammad; Maamouri, Gholamali; Boskabadi, Hassan; Golparvar, Sadegh; Taleh, Mohamadreza; Esmaeeli, Habib; Khademi, Javad

    2009-12-01

    Aminoglycosides, as potent bactericidal antibiotics against aerobic gram-negative infections, is still widely used, especially in NICU patients, despite their known potential ototoxic effects. To evaluate the potential of transient evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAEs) in early identification of decreased hearing sensitivity in hospitalized neonates receiving aminoglycosides for severe gram-negative infections. Fifty (50) neonates treated with intravenous gentamicin (5 mg/kg/day) or amikacin (15 mg/kg/day) were tested with TEOAE in the beginning and the end of aminoglycoside therapeutic course. There were 23 males and 27 females, ranging from 29 to 40 weeks (mean: 36 weeks). The treatment duration was 3-30 days (in 26 neonates up to 7 days - group A, and in 24 neonates higher than 7 days - group B). In group A, no statistically significant difference in the mean response level was found between the onset and the end of treatment course (p > 0.001). In group B, a statistically significant difference in the mean response level was found between the onset and the end of treatment course, especially at high frequency region (p < 0.001). TEOAE is sensitive enough to detect early aminoglycoside ototoxicity. As this test is simple to perform, non-invasive and reliable, so we suggest that TEOAE test should be performed in NICU as routine for monitoring cochlear function to prevent permanent hearing loss especially in those who are receiving aminoglycoside for more than 7 days.

  10. Triclosan-Induced Aminoglycoside-Tolerant Listeria monocytogenes Isolates Can Appear as Small-Colony Variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastbjerg, Vicky Gaedt; Hein-Kristensen, Line; Gram, Lone

    2014-01-01

    Exposure of the human food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes to sublethal concentrations of triclosan can cause resistance to several aminoglycosides. Aminoglycoside-resistant isolates exhibit two colony morphologies: normal-size and pinpoint colonies. The purposes of the present study were...... to characterize the small colonies of L. monocytogenes and to determine if specific genetic changes could explain the triclosan-induced aminoglycoside resistance in both pinpoint and normal-size isolates. Isolates from the pinpoint colonies grew poorly under aerated conditions, but growth was restored by addition......I and that exposure to triclosan can cause resistance to antibiotics that enters the cell via active transport. Further studies are needed to elucidate if L. monocytogenes pinpoint isolates could have any clinical impact, e.g., in persistent infections....

  11. Oxidative stress induction of the MexXY multidrug efflux genes and promotion of aminoglycoside resistance development in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraud, Sebastien; Poole, Keith

    2011-03-01

    Exposure to reactive oxygen species (ROS) (e.g., peroxide) was shown to induce expression of the PA5471 gene, which was previously shown to be required for antimicrobial induction of the MexXY components of the MexXY-OprM multidrug efflux system and aminoglycoside resistance determinant in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. mexXY was also induced by peroxide exposure, and this too was PA5471 dependent. The prospect of ROS promoting mexXY expression and aminoglycoside resistance recalls P. aeruginosa infection of the chronically inflamed lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, where the organism is exposed to ROS and where MexXY-OprM predominates as the mechanism of aminoglycoside resistance. While ROS did not enhance aminoglycoside resistance in vitro, long-term (8-day) exposure of P. aeruginosa to peroxide (mimicking chronic in vivo ROS exposure) increased aminoglycoside resistance frequency, dependent upon PA5471 and mexXY. This enhanced resistance frequency was also seen in a mutant strain overexpressing PA5471, in the absence of peroxide, suggesting that induction of PA5471 by peroxide was key to peroxide enhancement of aminoglycoside resistance frequency. Resistant mutants selected following peroxide exposure were typically pan-aminoglycoside-resistant, with mexXY generally required for this resistance. Moreover, PA5471 was required for mexXY expression and aminoglycoside resistance in these as well as several CF isolates examined.

  12. Characterization of Aminoglycoside Resistance and Virulence Genes among Enterococcus spp. Isolated from a Hospital in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanxiang Li

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the aminoglycoside resistance phenotypes and genotypes, as well as the prevalence of virulence genes, in Enterococcus species isolated from clinical patients in China. A total of 160 enterococcal isolates from various clinical samples collected from September 2013 to July 2014 were identified to the species level using the VITEK-2 COMPACT system. The antimicrobial susceptibilities of the identified Enterococcus strains were determined by the Kirby-Bauer (K-B disc diffusion method. PCR-based assays were used to detect the aminoglycoside resistance and virulence genes in all enterococcal isolates. Of 160 Enterococcus isolates, 105 were identified as E. faecium, 35 as E. faecalis, and 20 isolates were classified as “other” Enterococcus species. High-level aminoglycoside resistance (HLAR for gentamicin, streptomycin, and both antibiotics was identified in 58.8, 50, and 34.4% of strains, respectively. The most common virulence gene (50.6% of isolates was efaA, followed by asa1 (28.8%. The most prevalent aminoglycoside resistance genes were aac(6'-Ie-aph(2'', aph(2'-Id, aph(3'-IIIa, and ant(6'-Ia, present in 49.4%, 1.3%, 48.8% and 31.3% of strains, respectively. Overall, E. faecium and E. faecalis were most frequently associated with hospital-acquired enterococcal infections in Zhejiang Province. All aminoglycoside resistance genes, except aph(2''-Id, were significantly more prevalent in HLAR strains than amongst high level aminoglycoside susceptible (HLAS strains, while there was no significant difference between HLAR and HLAS strains in regard to the prevalence of virulence genes, apart from esp, therefore, measures should be taken to manage infections caused by multi-drug resistant Enterococcus species.

  13. Characterization of Aminoglycoside Resistance and Virulence Genes among Enterococcus spp. Isolated from a Hospital in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wanxiang; Li, Jing; Wei, Quhao; Hu, Qingfeng; Lin, Xiaowei; Chen, Mengquan; Ye, Renji; Lv, Huoyang

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the aminoglycoside resistance phenotypes and genotypes, as well as the prevalence of virulence genes, in Enterococcus species isolated from clinical patients in China. A total of 160 enterococcal isolates from various clinical samples collected from September 2013 to July 2014 were identified to the species level using the VITEK-2 COMPACT system. The antimicrobial susceptibilities of the identified Enterococcus strains were determined by the Kirby-Bauer (K-B) disc diffusion method. PCR-based assays were used to detect the aminoglycoside resistance and virulence genes in all enterococcal isolates. Of 160 Enterococcus isolates, 105 were identified as E. faecium, 35 as E. faecalis, and 20 isolates were classified as “other” Enterococcus species. High-level aminoglycoside resistance (HLAR) for gentamicin, streptomycin, and both antibiotics was identified in 58.8, 50, and 34.4% of strains, respectively. The most common virulence gene (50.6% of isolates) was efaA, followed by asa1 (28.8%). The most prevalent aminoglycoside resistance genes were aac(6')-Ie-aph(2''), aph(2')-Id, aph(3')-IIIa, and ant(6')-Ia, present in 49.4%, 1.3%, 48.8% and 31.3% of strains, respectively. Overall, E. faecium and E. faecalis were most frequently associated with hospital-acquired enterococcal infections in Zhejiang Province. All aminoglycoside resistance genes, except aph(2'')-Id, were significantly more prevalent in HLAR strains than amongst high level aminoglycoside susceptible (HLAS) strains, while there was no significant difference between HLAR and HLAS strains in regard to the prevalence of virulence genes, apart from esp, therefore, measures should be taken to manage infections caused by multi-drug resistant Enterococcus species. PMID:25768240

  14. Role of the MexXY multidrug efflux pump in moderate aminoglycoside resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from Pseudomonas mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuanchuen, Rungtip; Wannaprasat, Wechsiri; Ajariyakhajorn, Kittisak; Schweizer, Herbert P

    2008-08-01

    The contribution of the MexXY multidrug efflux system to aminoglycoside resistance was investigated in 18 clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa obtained from dairy cows with Pseudomonas mastitis. All of the isolates expressed MexXY as determined by reverse transcription-PCR. The loss of mexXY resulted in increased susceptibility (two- to 16-fold decline in MIC) to aminoglycosides, confirming the contribution of this system in aminoglycoside resistance in these strains. As the impact of DeltamexXY varied, overexpression of MexXY alone is not sufficient for aminoglycoside resistance. Expression of mexXY also varied and did not strictly correlate with aminoglycoside insusceptibility. Transcription levels of mexY were independent on mutations in mexZ, suggesting the existence of additional regulatory mechanisms other than mexZ.

  15. Clonal origin of aminoglycoside-resistant Citrobacter freundii isolates in a Danish county

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norskov-Lauritsen, N.; Sandvang, Dorthe; Hedegaard, J.

    2001-01-01

    During 1997, attention was drawn to an increased frequency of aminoglycoside-resistant Citrobacter freundii in a Danish county, when a total of 24 resistant C. freundii isolates was detected. In this study, 15 such isolates were typed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, riboprinting and partial...... sequencing of the gene encoding translation initiation factor 2. Fourteen of the 15 isolates were identical, as evaluated by their antibiograms and by all these typing methods, This epidemic strain harboured the aminoglycoside resistance genes aac(3)-II and ant(3")-I, with the latter located in tandem...

  16. A minimum structure of aminoglycosides that causes an initiation shift of trans-translation

    OpenAIRE

    Konno, Takayuki; Takahashi, Toshiharu; Kurita, Daisuke; Muto, Akira; Himeno, Hyouta

    2004-01-01

    Trans-translation is an unusual translation in which transfer-messenger RNA plays a dual function—as a tRNA and an mRNA—to relieve the stalled translation on the ribosome. It has been shown that paromomycin, a typical member of a 4,5-disubstituted class of aminoglycosides, causes a shift of the translation-resuming point on the tmRNA by −1 during trans-translation. To address the molecular basis of this novel effect, we examined the effects of various aminoglycosides that can bind around the ...

  17. Kinetic and Structural Analysis of Bisubstrate Inhibition of the Salmonella enterica Aminoglycoside 6′-N-Acetyltransferase†,‡

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, Maria L. B.; Vetting, Matthew W.; Gao, Feng; Freiburger, Lee; Auclair, Karine; Blanchard, John S.

    2011-01-01

    Aminoglycosides are antibacterial compounds that act by binding to the A site of the small 30S bacterial ribosomal subunit and inhibiting protein translation. Clinical resistance to aminoglycosides is generally the result of the expression of enzymes that covalently modify the antibiotic, including phosphorylation, adenylylation, and acetylation. Bisubstrate analogs for the aminoglycoside N-acetyl-transferases are nanomolar inhibitors of Enterococcus faecium AAC(6′)-Ii. However, in the case of the Salmonella enterica aac(6′)-Iy-encoded aminoglycoside N-acetyltransferase, we demonstrate that a series of bisubstrate analogs are only micromolar inhibitors. In contrast to studies with AAC(6′)-Ii, the inhibition constants toward AAC(6′)-Iy are essentially independent of both the identity of the aminoglycoside component of the bisubstrate and the number of carbon atoms that are used to link the CoA and aminoglycoside components. The patterns of inhibition suggest that the CoA portion of the bisubstrate analog can bind to the enzyme–aminoglycoside substrate complex and that the aminoglycoside portion can bind to the enzyme–CoA product complex. However, at the high concentrations of bisubstrate analog used in crystallization experiments, we could crystallize and solve the three-dimensional structure of the enzyme–bisubstrate complex. The structure reveals that both the CoA and aminoglycoside portions bind in essentially the same positions as those previously observed for the enzyme–CoA–ribostamycin complex, with only a modest adjustment to accommodate the “linker”. These results are compared to previous studies of the interaction of similar bisubstrate analogs with other aminoglycoside N-acetyltransferases. PMID:18095712

  18. Why are ototopical aminoglycosides still first-line therapy for chronic suppurative otitis media? A systematic review and discussion of aminoglycosides versus quinolones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, A S; Elhassan, H A; Flook, E P

    2016-01-01

    This systematic review aimed to establish that quinolones are as effective as aminoglycosides when used to treat chronic suppurative otitis media. The review included good quality, randomised, controlled trials on human subjects, published in English, that compared topical aminoglycosides with topical quinolones for the treatment of chronic suppurative otitis media. Nine trials met the criteria. Two studies showed a higher clinical cure rate in the quinolone group (93 per cent vs 71 per cent, p = 0.04, and 76 per cent vs 52 per cent, p = 0.009). Four studies showed no statistically significant difference in clinical outcome. A significant difference in microbiological clearance in favour of quinolones was shown in two studies (88 per cent vs 30 per cent, p otitis media and when used as prophylaxis post-myringotomy. Topical quinolones should be considered a first-line treatment for these patients.

  19. Rapid determination of bacterial aminoglycoside resistance in environmental samples using membrane electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Liusheng; Ke, Ming; Yuan, Min; Pu, Ji; Li, Juan; Lu, Jinxing; Xu, Jianguo; Zhang, Mei; Xu, Wei

    2016-08-01

    Antibiotic resistance in pathogenic bacteria is becoming a global public health problem, such as aminoglycoside resistance encoded by the armA gene. Although many methods have been reported, rapid analysis of environmental samples is still challenging. A rapid analytical method was developed in this study to determine bacterial aminoglycoside resistance using membrane electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (MESI-MS). Precursor/product-ion pairs of ArmA unique peptides were detected with minimal sample preparation. Standard peptides were synthesized and used for developing and validating the methodology, and then the method was verified by both ArmA positive and ArmA negative simulated environmental samples. A rapid method for determination of bacterial aminoglycoside resistance was developed using MESI-MS/MS. The bacterial cultural time was optimized to 2 hours, and the precision, accuracy and recovery of this method were investigated. The peptide IHSSTNER (IR-8) unique to ArmA in simulated environmental samples can be successfully identified within 3 hours. The novel assay offered a rapid method to determine bacterial aminoglycoside resistance with high sensitivity, accuracy and precision in simulated environmental samples. This method could also be applied to identify other drug-resistance proteins in clinical/environmental samples. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Therapeutic drug monitoring by radioimmunoassay: Determination of aminoglycoside antibiotics and vancomycin in plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glaubitt, D.; Drechsler, H.J.; Knoch, K.; Siafarikas, K.

    1984-01-01

    Radioimmunoassay of aminoglycoside antibiotics (gentamicin, tobramycin, netilmicin) or vancomycin in plasma may considerably aid to assess their appropriate dosage and, if necessary, to rapidly adjust it to the assumed requirement. Thus the dosage of the antibiotic is kept large enough as to lead to the desired therapeutic result but not as high as to cause side effects. (orig.)

  1. Natural bizbenzoquinoline derivatives protect zebrafish lateral line sensory hair cells from aminoglycoside toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew eKruger

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Moderate to severe hearing loss affects 360 million people worldwide and most often results from damage to sensory hair cells. Hair cell damage can result from aging, genetic mutations, excess noise exposure, and certain medications including aminoglycoside antibiotics. Aminoglycosides are effective at treating infections associated with cystic fibrosis and other life-threatening conditions such as sepsis, but cause hearing loss in 20-30% of patients. It is therefore imperative to develop new therapies to combat hearing loss and allow safe use of these potent antibiotics. We approach this drug discovery question using the larval zebrafish lateral line because zebrafish hair cells are structurally and functionally similar to mammalian inner ear hair cells and respond similarly to toxins. We screened a library of 502 natural compounds in order to identify novel hair cell protectants. Our screen identified four bisbenzylisoquinoline derivatives: berbamine, E6 berbamine, hernandezine, and isotetrandrine, each of which robustly protected hair cells from aminoglycoside-induced damage. Using fluorescence microscopy and electrophysiology, we demonstrated that the natural compounds confer protection by reducing antibiotic uptake into hair cells and showed that hair cells remain functional during and after incubation in E6 berbamine. We also determined that these natural compounds do not reduce antibiotic efficacy. Together, these natural compounds represent a novel source of possible otoprotective drugs that may offer therapeutic options for patients receiving aminoglycoside treatment.

  2. Aminoglycoside-induced hearing loss in HIV-positive and HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Of 115 patients who were genetically screened, none had MT-RNR1 mutations. Conclusion. Ototoxic hearing loss is common in MDR-TB patients treated with aminoglycosides. HIV-positive patients are at increased risk of ototoxicity. Auditory monitoring and auditory rehabilitation should be an integral part of the package of ...

  3. 21 CFR 173.170 - Aminoglycoside 3′-phospho-trans-ferase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... development of genetically modified cotton, oilseed rape, and tomatoes in accordance with the following... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Aminoglycoside 3â²-phospho-trans-ferase II. 173.170 Section 173.170 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...

  4. 21 CFR 573.130 - Aminoglycoside 3′-phospho- transferase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... genetically modified cotton, oilseed rape, and tomatoes in accordance with the following prescribed conditions... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aminoglycoside 3â²-phospho- transferase II. 573.130 Section 573.130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  5. Involvement of an active efflux system in the natural resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to aminoglycosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aires, J R; Köhler, T; Nikaido, H; Plésiat, P

    1999-11-01

    A mutant, named 11B, hypersusceptible to aminoglycosides, tetracycline, and erythromycin was isolated after Tn501 insertion mutagenesis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. Cloning and sequencing experiments showed that 11B was deficient in an, at that time, unknown active efflux system that contains homologs of MexAB. This locus also contained a putative regulatory gene, mexZ, transcribed divergently from the efflux operon. Introduction of a recombinant plasmid that carries the genes of the efflux system restored the resistance of 11B to parental levels, whereas overexpression of these genes strongly increased the MICs of substrate antibiotics for the PAO1 host. Antibiotic accumulation studies confirmed that this new system is an energy-dependent active efflux system that pumps out aminoglycosides. Furthermore, this system appeared to function with an outer membrane protein, OprM. While the present paper was being written and reviewed, genes with a sequence identical to our pump genes, mexXY of P. aeruginosa, have been reported to increase resistance to erythromycin, fluoroquinolones, and organic cations in Escherichia coli hosts, although efflux of aminoglycosides was not examined (Mine et al., Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 43:415-417, 1999). Our study thus shows that the MexXY system plays an important role in the intrinsic resistance of P. aeruginosa to aminoglycosides. Although overexpression of MexXY increased the level of resistance to fluoroquinolones, disruption of the mexXY operon in P. aeruginosa had no detectable effect on susceptibility to these agents.

  6. Clonal origin of aminoglycoside-resistant Citrobacter freundii isolates in a Danish county

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norskov-Lauritsen, N.; Sandvang, Dorthe; Hedegaard, J.

    2001-01-01

    sequencing of the gene encoding translation initiation factor 2. Fourteen of the 15 isolates were identical, as evaluated by their antibiograms and by all these typing methods, This epidemic strain harboured the aminoglycoside resistance genes aac(3)-II and ant(3")-I, with the latter located in tandem...

  7. A minimum structure of aminoglycosides that causes an initiation shift of trans-translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konno, Takayuki; Takahashi, Toshiharu; Kurita, Daisuke; Muto, Akira; Himeno, Hyouta

    2004-01-01

    Trans-translation is an unusual translation in which transfer-messenger RNA plays a dual function--as a tRNA and an mRNA--to relieve the stalled translation on the ribosome. It has been shown that paromomycin, a typical member of a 4,5-disubstituted class of aminoglycosides, causes a shift of the translation-resuming point on the tmRNA by -1 during trans-translation. To address the molecular basis of this novel effect, we examined the effects of various aminoglycosides that can bind around the A site of the small subunit of the ribosome on trans-translation in vitro. Tobramycin and gentamicin, belonging to the 4,6-disubstituted class of aminoglycosides having rings I and II similar to those in the 4,5-disubstituted class, possess similar effects. Neamine, which has only rings I and II, a common structure shared by 4,5- and 4,6-disubstituted classes of aminoglycosides, was sufficient to cause an initiation shift of trans-translation. In contrast, streptomycin or hygromycin B, lacking ring I, did not cause an initiation shift. The effect of each aminoglycoside on trans-translation coincides with that on conformational change in the A site of the small subunit of the ribosome revealed by recent structural studies: paromomycin, tobramycin and geneticin which is categorized into the gentamicin subclass, but not streptomycin and hygromycin B, flip out two conserved adenine bases at 1492 and 1493 from the A site helix. The pattern of initiation shifts by paromomycin fluctuates with variation of mutations introduced into a region upstream of the initiation point.

  8. Chromosomal mechanisms of aminoglycoside resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from cystic fibrosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, S; Oh, H; Jalal, S; Karpati, F; Ciofu, O; Høiby, N; Wretlind, B

    2009-01-01

    In total, 40 Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients were included in this study. Twenty of these were collected in 1994 and 1997, from six CF patients, and the rest were collected from different CF patients in 2000 and 2001. The relative expression of mRNA for the efflux pump protein MexY was determined by real-time PCR and correlated with susceptibilities to amikacin and tobramycin. The chromosomal genes mexZ, rplY, galU, PA5471 and nuoG, which were found to have a role in the gradual increase in MICs of aminoglycoside antibiotics in laboratory mutants of P. aeruginosa, were analysed. MexY mRNA overproduction was found in 17/20 isolates collected in 1994 and 1997, and was correlated with decreased susceptibility to aminoglycosides. Alteration of the MexXY-OprM efflux system has been the main mechanism of resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics in CF P. aeruginosa isolates over the 3-year period. In several isolates, expression of the PA5471 gene product might have some effect on elevated MICs of aminoglycosides. Inactivation of rplY, galU and/or nuoG may explain the gradual increase in MICs of aminoglycosides in laboratory mutants but probably not in the CF environment, as rplY and galU were unaltered in all isolates, and nuoG was not expressed in only one isolate. No 16S rRNA A-site mutations were found in any of the four copies of the gene in 13 investigated isolates.

  9. Evaluation of automated systems for aminoglycosides and fluoroquinolones susceptibility testing for Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhichang Zhao

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Automated systems (MicroScan WalkAway 96 Plus, Phoenix 100, and Vitek 2 Compact are widely used in clinical laboratories nowadays. The aim of this study is to evaluate the performance of these three systems for susceptibility testing of aminoglycosides and fluoroquinolones against Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE. Methods A total of 75 CRE isolates were used in this study. Quinolone resistance determinants (QRDs (qnrA, qnrB, qnrC, qnrD, qnrS, aac(6′-Ib-cr, oqxAB and qepA and aminoglycoside resistance determinants (ARDs (aac(6′-Ib, armA, npmA, rmtA, rmtB, rmtC, rmtD and rmtE of these CRE were screened by PCR. The MICs of aminoglycosides (gentamicin and amikacin and fluoroquinolones (ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin to CRE obtained with the automated systems were compared with the reference method (agar dilution method. Results Totally, 97.3% (73/75 of CRE harbored QRDs. The qnr gene was the most common QRD determinant identified in 68 (96.7%, followed by aac (6′-Ib-cr in 56 (74.7%, oqxAB in 23 (30.7%, and qepA in 2 (2.7%, respectively. 22.7% (17/75 of CRE harbored ARD determinants. rmtA, rmtB and npmA were identified among these isolates in 6 (8.0%, 6 (8.0% and 5 (6.7%, respectively. A total of 900 results were obtained in this study. Overall, the total error rate was 9.89%. Twenty-eight very major errors (3.11%, 22 major errors (2.44% and 39 minor errors (4.33% were identified against agar dilution method. The very major errors were almost evenly distributed between results for fluoroquinolones (2.89% and aminoglycosides (3.33%, while the major errors and minor errors were more commonly found in the results of fluoroquinolones (3.11% and 6.44%, respectively than aminoglycosides (1.78% and 2.22%, respectively. Conclusions Our study shows that testing difficulties in susceptibility testing do exist in automated systems. We suggest clinical laboratories using automated systems should consider using a second

  10. Novel 6′-N-Aminoglycoside Acetyltransferase AAC(6′)-Iaj from a Clinical Isolate of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Tatsuya; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; Shimada, Kayo; Shimojima, Masahiro

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa NCGM1588 has a novel chromosomal class 1 integron, In151, which includes the aac(6′)-Iaj gene. The encoded protein, AAC(6′)-Iaj, was found to consist of 184 amino acids, with 70% identity to AAC(6′)-Ia. Escherichia coli transformed with a plasmid containing the aac(6′)-Iaj gene acquired resistance to all aminoglycosides tested except gentamicin. Of note, aac(6′)-Iaj contributed to the resistance to arbekacin. Thin-layer chromatography revealed that AAC(6′)-Iaj acetylated all aminoglycosides tested except gentamicin. These findings indicated that AAC(6′)-Iaj is a functional acetyltransferase that modifies the amino groups at the 6′ positions of aminoglycosides and contributes to aminoglycoside resistance of P. aeruginosa NCGM1588, including arbekacin. PMID:23070167

  11. A Novel 6'-N-Aminoglycoside Acetyltransferase, AAC(6')-Ial, from a Clinical Isolate of Serratia marcescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Tatsuya; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; Shimada, Kayo; Dahal, Rajan K; Mishra, Shyam K; Ohara, Hiroshi; Kirikae, Teruo; Pokhrel, Bharat M

    2016-03-01

    Serratia marcescens IOMTU115 has a novel 6'-N-aminoglycoside acetyltransferase-encoding gene, aac(6')-Ial. The encoded protein AAC(6')-Ial has 146 amino acids, with 91.8% identity to the amino acid sequence of AAC(6')-Ic in S. marcescens SM16 and 97.3% identity to the amino acid sequence of AAC(6')-Iap in S. marcescens WW4. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of aminoglycosides for Escherichia coli expressing AAC(6')-Ial were similar to those for E. coli expressing AAC(6')-Ic or AAC(6')-Iap. Thin-layer chromatography showed that AAC(6')-Ial, AAC(6')-Ic, or AAC(6')-Iap acetylated all the aminoglycosides tested, except for apramycin, gentamicin, and lividomycin. Kinetics assays revealed that AAC(6')-Ial is a functional acetyltransferase against aminoglycosides. The aac(6')-Ial gene was located on chromosomal DNA.

  12. Fitness cost and interference of Arm/Rmt aminoglycoside resistance with the RsmF housekeeping methyltransferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Belen; Escudero, Jose A; San Millan, Alvaro; Hidalgo, Laura; Carrilero, Laura; Ovejero, Cristina M; Santos-Lopez, Alfonso; Thomas-Lopez, Daniel; Gonzalez-Zorn, Bruno

    2012-05-01

    Arm/Rmt methyltransferases have emerged recently in pathogenic bacteria as enzymes that confer high-level resistance to 4,6-disubstituted aminoglycosides through methylation of the G1405 residue in the 16S rRNA (like ArmA and RmtA to -E). In prokaryotes, nucleotide methylations are the most common type of rRNA modification, and they are introduced posttranscriptionally by a variety of site-specific housekeeping enzymes to optimize ribosomal function. Here we show that while the aminoglycoside resistance methyltransferase RmtC methylates G1405, it impedes methylation of the housekeeping methyltransferase RsmF at position C1407, a nucleotide that, like G1405, forms part of the aminoglycoside binding pocket of the 16S rRNA. To understand the origin and consequences of this phenomenon, we constructed a series of in-frame knockout and knock-in mutants of Escherichia coli, corresponding to the genotypes rsmF(+), ΔrsmF, rsmF(+) rmtC(+), and ΔrsmF rmtC(+). When analyzed for the antimicrobial resistance pattern, the ΔrsmF bacteria had a decreased susceptibility to aminoglycosides, including 4,6- and 4,5-deoxystreptamine aminoglycosides, showing that the housekeeping methylation at C1407 is involved in intrinsic aminoglycoside susceptibility in E. coli. Competition experiments between the isogenic E. coli strains showed that, contrary to expectation, acquisition of rmtC does not entail a fitness cost for the bacterium. Finally, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry allowed us to determine that RmtC methylates the G1405 residue not only in presence but also in the absence of aminoglycoside antibiotics. Thus, the coupling between housekeeping and acquired methyltransferases subverts the methylation architecture of the 16S rRNA but elicits Arm/Rmt methyltransferases to be selected and retained, posing an important threat to the usefulness of aminoglycosides worldwide.

  13. Structure of AadA from Salmonella enterica: a monomeric aminoglycoside (3′′)(9) adenyltransferase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yang [Uppsala University, Biomedical Center, Box 596, SE-751 24 Uppsala (Sweden); Näsvall, Joakim [Uppsala University, Biomedical Center, Box 582, SE-751 23 Uppsala (Sweden); Wu, Shiying [Uppsala University, Biomedical Center, Box 596, SE-751 24 Uppsala (Sweden); Andersson, Dan I. [Uppsala University, Biomedical Center, Box 582, SE-751 23 Uppsala (Sweden); Selmer, Maria, E-mail: maria.selmer@icm.uu.se [Uppsala University, Biomedical Center, Box 596, SE-751 24 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2015-10-31

    The crystal structure of the aminoglycoside-adenylating enzyme AadA is reported together with functional experiments providing insights into its oligomeric state, ligand binding and catalysis. Aminoglycoside resistance is commonly conferred by enzymatic modification of drugs by aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes such as aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferases (ANTs). Here, the first crystal structure of an ANT(3′′)(9) adenyltransferase, AadA from Salmonella enterica, is presented. AadA catalyses the magnesium-dependent transfer of adenosine monophosphate from ATP to the two chemically dissimilar drugs streptomycin and spectinomycin. The structure was solved using selenium SAD phasing and refined to 2.5 Å resolution. AadA consists of a nucleotidyltransferase domain and an α-helical bundle domain. AadA crystallizes as a monomer and is a monomer in solution as confirmed by small-angle X-ray scattering, in contrast to structurally similar homodimeric adenylating enzymes such as kanamycin nucleotidyltransferase. Isothermal titration calorimetry experiments show that ATP binding has to occur before binding of the aminoglycoside substrate, and structure analysis suggests that ATP binding repositions the two domains for aminoglycoside binding in the interdomain cleft. Candidate residues for ligand binding and catalysis were subjected to site-directed mutagenesis. In vivo resistance and in vitro binding assays support the role of Glu87 as the catalytic base in adenylation, while Arg192 and Lys205 are shown to be critical for ATP binding.

  14. Berberine Is a Novel Type Efflux Inhibitor Which Attenuates the MexXY-Mediated Aminoglycoside Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Yuji; Nakashima, Ken-Ichi; Nishino, Kunihiko; Kotani, Kenta; Tomida, Junko; Inoue, Makoto; Kawamura, Yoshiaki

    2016-01-01

    The emergence and spread of multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa infections is of great concern, as very few agents are effective against strains of this species. Methanolic extracts from the Coptidis Rhizoma (the rhizomes of Coptis japonica var. major Satake) or Phellodendri Cortex (the bark of Phellodendron chinense Schneider) markedly reduced resistance to anti-pseudomonal aminoglycosides (e.g., amikacin) in multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa strains. Berberine, the most abundant benzylisoquinoline alkaloid in the two extracts, reduced aminoglycoside resistance of P. aeruginosa via a mechanism that required the MexXY multidrug efflux system; berberine also reduced aminoglycoside MICs in Achromobacter xylosoxidans and Burkholderia cepacia, two species that harbor intrinsic multidrug efflux systems very similar to the MexXY. Furthermore this compound inhibited MexXY-dependent antibiotic resistance of other classes including cephalosporins (cefepime), macrolides (erythromycin), and lincosamides (lincomycin) demonstrated using a pseudomonad lacking the four other major Mex pumps. Although phenylalanine-arginine beta-naphthylamide (PAβN), a well-known efflux inhibitor, antagonized aminoglycoside in a MexXY-dependent manner, a lower concentration of berberine was sufficient to reduce amikacin resistance of P. aeruginosa in the presence of PAβN. Moreover, berberine enhanced the synergistic effects of amikacin and piperacillin (and vice versa) in multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa strains. Thus, berberine appears to be a novel type inhibitor of the MexXY-dependent aminoglycoside efflux in P. aeruginosa. As aminoglycosides are molecules of choice to treat severe infections the clinical impact is potentially important.

  15. Heterologous Expression of Chaperones from Hyperthermophilic Archaea Inhibits Aminoglycoside-Induced Protein Misfolding in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, S; Chu, Z; Lu, J; Li, D; Wang, Y; Yang, S; Zhang, Y

    2017-10-01

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics affect protein translation fidelity and lead to protein aggregation and an increase in intracellular oxidative stress level as well. The overexpression of the chaperonin GroEL/GroES system promotes short-term tolerance to aminoglycosides in Escherichia coli. Here, we demonstrated that the coexpression of prefoldin or Hsp60 originating from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus in E. coli cells can rescue cell growth and inhibit protein aggregation induced by streptomycin exposure. The results of our study show that hyperthermophilic chaperones endow E. coli with a higher tolerance to streptomycin than the GroEL/GroES system, and that they exert better effects on the reduction of intracellular protein misfolding, indicating that these chaperones have unique features and functions.

  16. Chromosomal mechanisms of aminoglycoside resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, S; Oh, H; Jalal, S

    2009-01-01

    In total, 40 Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients were included in this study. Twenty of these were collected in 1994 and 1997, from six CF patients, and the rest were collected from different CF patients in 2000 and 2001. The relative expression of mRNA for the efflux....... aeruginosa, were analysed. MexY mRNA overproduction was found in 17/20 isolates collected in 1994 and 1997, and was correlated with decreased susceptibility to aminoglycosides. Alteration of the MexXY-OprM efflux system has been the main mechanism of resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics in CF P...... not in the CF environment, as rplY and galU were unaltered in all isolates, and nuoG was not expressed in only one isolate. No 16S rRNA A-site mutations were found in any of the four copies of the gene in 13 investigated isolates....

  17. Intracellular polyamine pools, oligopeptide-binding protein A expression, and resistance to aminoglycosides in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria BR Acosta

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The role of intracellular free polyamine (putrescine and spermidine pools in multiple resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics was investigated among in vitro selected kanamycin-resistant Escherichia coli J53 mutants expressing diminished oligopeptide-binding protein (OppA levels and/or defective ornithine decarboxylase (ODC activity. The results suggest that diminished OppA content, but not defective ODC activity expression, increased the relative concentration of free spermidine as compared to the wild type strain. Moreover, by adding exogenous polyamines or polyamine synthesis inhibitors to cultures with different mutant strains, a direct relationship between the intracellular OppA levels and resistance to kanamycin was revealed. Collectively these results further suggest a complex relation among OppA expression, aminoglycoside resistance and polyamine metabolism.

  18. Aminoglycoside Antibiotics: New Insights into the Biosynthetic Machinery of Old Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Fumitaka; Eguchi, Tadashi

    2016-02-01

    2-Deoxystreptamine (2DOS) is the unique chemically stable aminocyclitol scaffold of clinically important aminoglycoside antibiotics such as neomycin, kanamycin, and gentamicin, which are produced by Actinomycetes. The 2DOS core can be decorated with various deoxyaminosugars to make structurally diverse pseudo-oligosaccharides. After the discovery of biosynthetic gene clusters for 2DOS-containing aminoglycoside antibiotics, the function of each biosynthetic enzyme has been extensively elucidated. The common biosynthetic intermediates 2DOS, paromamine and ribostamycin are constructed by conserved enzymes encoded in the gene clusters. The biosynthetic intermediates are then converted to characteristic architectures by unique enzymes encoded in each biosynthetic gene cluster. In this Personal Account, we summarize both common biosynthetic pathways and the pathways used for structural diversification. © 2015 The Chemical Society of Japan & Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Novel 3-N-Aminoglycoside Acetyltransferase Gene, aac(3)-Ic, from a Pseudomonas aeruginosa Integron

    OpenAIRE

    Riccio, Maria Letizia; Docquier, Jean-Denis; Dell'Amico, Emanuela; Luzzaro, Francesco; Amicosante, Gianfranco; Rossolini, Gian Maria

    2003-01-01

    A novel gene, aac(3)-Ic, encoding an AAC(3)-I aminoglycoside 3-N-acetyltransferase, was identified on a gene cassette inserted into a Pseudomonas aeruginosa integron that also carries a blaVIM-2 and a cmlA7 gene cassette. The aac(3)-Ic gene product is 59 and 57% identical to AAC(3)-Ia and AAC(3)-Ib, respectively, and confers resistance to gentamicin and sisomicin.

  20. Misread protein creates membrane channels: an essential step in the bactericidal action of aminoglycosides.

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, B D; Chen, L L; Tai, P C

    1986-01-01

    Among the pleiotropic effects of aminoglycosides, their irreversible uptake and their blockade of initiating ribosomes have appeared to explain their bactericidal action, while the contributions of translational misreading and membrane damage and the mechanism of that damage have remained uncertain. We now present evidence that incorporation of misread proteins into the membrane can account for the membrane damage. The bactericidal action thus appears to result from the following sequence, in...

  1. Triclosan-Induced Aminoglycoside-Tolerant Listeria monocytogenes Isolates Can Appear as Small-Colony Variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastbjerg, Vicky G.; Hein-Kristensen, Line

    2014-01-01

    Exposure of the human food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes to sublethal concentrations of triclosan can cause resistance to several aminoglycosides. Aminoglycoside-resistant isolates exhibit two colony morphologies: normal-size and pinpoint colonies. The purposes of the present study were to characterize the small colonies of L. monocytogenes and to determine if specific genetic changes could explain the triclosan-induced aminoglycoside resistance in both pinpoint and normal-size isolates. Isolates from the pinpoint colonies grew poorly under aerated conditions, but growth was restored by addition of antibiotics. Pinpoint isolates had decreased hemolytic activity under stagnant conditions and a changed spectrum of carbohydrate utilization compared to the wild type and isolates from normal-size colonies. Genome sequence comparison revealed that all seven pinpoint isolates had a mutation in a heme gene, and addition of heme caused the pinpoint isolates to revert to normal colony size. Triclosan-induced gentamicin-resistant isolates had mutations in several different genes, and it cannot be directly concluded how the different mutations caused gentamicin resistance. However, since many of the mutations affected proteins involved in respiration, it seems likely that the mutations affected the active transport of the antibiotic and thereby caused resistance by decreasing the amount of aminoglycoside that enters the bacterial cell. Our study emphasizes that triclosan likely has more targets than just fabI and that exposure to triclosan can cause resistance to antibiotics that enters the cell via active transport. Further studies are needed to elucidate if L. monocytogenes pinpoint isolates could have any clinical impact, e.g., in persistent infections. PMID:24637686

  2. Two unusual cases of severe recalcitrant hypocalcemia due to aminoglycoside-induced hypomagnesemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, Tarun; Saini, Ashish; Panchani, Roopal; Gupta, Nitin R.

    2013-01-01

    Aminoglycoside (AMG)-induced renal toxicity is well-known and may manifest with non-oliguric renal failure or renal tubular dysfunction like Fanconi-like syndrome, Barter syndrome-like syndrome or distal renal tubular acidosis (RTA). These phenomena have been described with Gentamycin and Amikacin though rarely with Kanamycin. We present two cases of pulmonary tuberculosis that were treated with Kanamycin and during the course of treatment, developed severe recalcitrant hypocalcemia along with hypomagnesemia. PMID:24251160

  3. Identification of Genes Coding Aminoglycoside Modifying Enzymes in E. coli of UTI Patients in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir, Abdul Rouf; Bashir, Yasir; Dar, Firdous Ahmad; Sekhar, M

    This study is to probe the pattern of antibiotic resistance against aminoglycosides and its mechanism in E. coli obtained from patients from Chennai, India. Isolation and identification of pathogens were done on MacConkey agar. Antimicrobial sensitivity testing was done by disc diffusion test. The identification of genes encoding aminoglycoside modifying enzymes was done by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). Out of 98 isolates, 71 (72.45%) isolates were identified as E. coli and the remaining 27 (27.55%) as other bacteria. Disc diffusion method results showed a resistance level of 72.15% for streptomycin, 73.4% for gentamicin, 63.26% for neomycin, 57.14% for tobramycin, 47.9% for netilmicin, and 8.16% for amikacin in E. coli. PCR screening showed the presence of four genes, namely, rrs, aacC2, aacA-aphD, and aphA3, in their plasmid DNA. The results point towards the novel mechanism of drug resistance in E. coli from UTI patients in India as they confirm the presence of genes encoding enzymes that cause resistance to aminoglycoside drugs. This could be an alarm for drug prescription to UTI patients.

  4. Rise and dissemination of aminoglycoside resistance: the aac(6′)-Ib paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, María S.; Nikolaidis, Nikolas; Tolmasky, Marcelo E.

    2013-01-01

    Enzymatic modification is a prevalent mechanism by which bacteria defeat the action of antibiotics. Aminoglycosides are often inactivated by aminoglycoside modifying enzymes encoded by genes present in the chromosome, plasmids, and other genetic elements. The AAC(6′)-Ib (aminoglycoside 6′-N-acetyltransferase type Ib) is an enzyme of clinical importance found in a wide variety of gram-negative pathogens. The AAC(6′)-Ib enzyme is of interest not only because of his ubiquity but also because of other characteristics, it presents significant microheterogeneity at the N-termini and the aac(6′)-Ib gene is often present in integrons, transposons, plasmids, genomic islands, and other genetic structures. Excluding the highly heterogeneous N-termini, there are 45 non-identical AAC(6′)-Ib related entries in the NCBI database, 32 of which have identical name in spite of not having identical amino acid sequence. While some variants conserved similar properties, others show dramatic differences in specificity, including the case of AAC(6′)-Ib-cr that mediates acetylation of ciprofloxacin representing a rare case where a resistance enzyme acquires the ability to utilize an antibiotic of a different class as substrate. Efforts to utilize antisense technologies to turn off expression of the gene or to identify enzymatic inhibitors to induce phenotypic conversion to susceptibility are under way. PMID:23730301

  5. Rise and dissemination of aminoglycoside resistance: the aac(6')-Ib paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, María S; Nikolaidis, Nikolas; Tolmasky, Marcelo E

    2013-01-01

    Enzymatic modification is a prevalent mechanism by which bacteria defeat the action of antibiotics. Aminoglycosides are often inactivated by aminoglycoside modifying enzymes encoded by genes present in the chromosome, plasmids, and other genetic elements. The AAC(6')-Ib (aminoglycoside 6'-N-acetyltransferase type Ib) is an enzyme of clinical importance found in a wide variety of gram-negative pathogens. The AAC(6')-Ib enzyme is of interest not only because of his ubiquity but also because of other characteristics, it presents significant microheterogeneity at the N-termini and the aac(6')-Ib gene is often present in integrons, transposons, plasmids, genomic islands, and other genetic structures. Excluding the highly heterogeneous N-termini, there are 45 non-identical AAC(6')-Ib related entries in the NCBI database, 32 of which have identical name in spite of not having identical amino acid sequence. While some variants conserved similar properties, others show dramatic differences in specificity, including the case of AAC(6')-Ib-cr that mediates acetylation of ciprofloxacin representing a rare case where a resistance enzyme acquires the ability to utilize an antibiotic of a different class as substrate. Efforts to utilize antisense technologies to turn off expression of the gene or to identify enzymatic inhibitors to induce phenotypic conversion to susceptibility are under way.

  6. Molecular detection of aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme genes in Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidary, Mohsen; Salimi Chirani, Alireza; Khoshnood, Saeed; Eslami, Gita; Atyabi, Seyyed Mohammad; Nazem, Habibollah; Fazilati, Mohammad; Hashemi, Ali; Soleimani, Saleh

    2017-06-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a major opportunistic pathogen in healthcare settings worldwide. In Iran, there are only few reports on the prevalence of aminoglycoside resistance genes among A. baumannii isolates. The aim of this study was to investigate the existence of aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme (AME) genes from A. baumannii strains collected at a university teaching hospital in Iran. One hundred A. baumannii strains were collected between 2014 and 2015 from hospitalized patients at Loghman Hakim Hospital, Tehran, Iran. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by disk diffusion method according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute recommendations. The DNA was extracted using a kit obtained from Bioneer Co. (Korea) and was used as a template for polymerase chain reaction. The most active antimicrobial agent against these strains was colistin. The rate of extended-spectrum cephalosporin resistance was 97%. The aadA1, aadB, aac(6')-Ib, and aac(3)-IIa genes were found in 85%, 77%, 72%, and 68% of A. baumannii isolates, respectively. This study showed a high prevalence rate of AME genes in A. baumannii. This prevalence rate has explained that further aminoglycoside resistance genes may have role in the resistance of clinical isolates of A. baumannii. Therefore, control and treatment of serious infections caused by this opportunistic pathogen should be given more consideration.

  7. Identification of Genes Coding Aminoglycoside Modifying Enzymes in E. coli of UTI Patients in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Rouf Mir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is to probe the pattern of antibiotic resistance against aminoglycosides and its mechanism in E. coli obtained from patients from Chennai, India. Isolation and identification of pathogens were done on MacConkey agar. Antimicrobial sensitivity testing was done by disc diffusion test. The identification of genes encoding aminoglycoside modifying enzymes was done by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR. Out of 98 isolates, 71 (72.45% isolates were identified as E. coli and the remaining 27 (27.55% as other bacteria. Disc diffusion method results showed a resistance level of 72.15% for streptomycin, 73.4% for gentamicin, 63.26% for neomycin, 57.14% for tobramycin, 47.9% for netilmicin, and 8.16% for amikacin in E. coli. PCR screening showed the presence of four genes, namely, rrs, aacC2, aacA-aphD, and aphA3, in their plasmid DNA. The results point towards the novel mechanism of drug resistance in E. coli from UTI patients in India as they confirm the presence of genes encoding enzymes that cause resistance to aminoglycoside drugs. This could be an alarm for drug prescription to UTI patients.

  8. Aminoglycosides resistance in clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus from a University Hospital in Bialystok, Poland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Kaczyńska

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus obtained from a University Hospital in Poland were characterized in relation to resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics and the distribution of the genes encoding the most clinically relevant aminoglycoside modifying enzymes (AMEs. Of a total of 118 S. aureus, 45 (38.1% isolates were found to be resistant to at least one of the tested antibiotics. All aminoglycoside resistant isolates except one 44 (97.8% were resistant to kanamycin. The majority of strains 37 (82.2% and 32 (71.1% expressed resistance to neomycin and tobramycin, respectively. Eleven strains (24.4% were resistant to gentamicin or amikacin. All S. aureus strains were sensitive to netilmicin. The most prevalent resistance gene was aac(6'-Ie+aph(2' found in 13 (28.9% strains and 12 (26.7% isolates carried ant(4'-Ia gene, whilst aph(3'-IIIa gene was detected in only 7 (15.6% isolates. Additionally, the ant(6-Ia and str genes were detected in 14 (31.1% and 2 (4.4% strains, respectively. Ten (22.2% strains resistant to amikacin, tobramycin, kanamycin or neomycin did not harbor any of the above-noted genes.

  9. A rapid method for detection of five known mutations associated with aminoglycoside-induced deafness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardien, Soraya; Human, Hannique; Harris, Tashneem; Hefke, Gwynneth; Veikondis, Rene; Schaaf, H Simon; van der Merwe, Lize; Greinwald, John H; Fagan, Johan; de Jong, Greetje

    2009-01-01

    Background South Africa has one of the highest incidences of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) in the world. Concomitantly, aminoglycosides are commonly used in this country as a treatment against MDR-TB. To date, at least five mutations are known to confer susceptibility to aminoglycoside-induced hearing loss. The aim of the present study was to develop a rapid screening method to determine whether these mutations are present in the South African population. Methods A multiplex method using the SNaPshot technique was used to screen for five mutations in the MT-RNR1 gene: A1555G, C1494T, T1095C, 961delT+C(n) and A827G. A total of 204 South African control samples, comprising 98 Mixed ancestry and 106 Black individuals were screened for the presence of the five mutations. Results A robust, cost-effective method was developed that detected the presence of all five sequence variants simultaneously. In this pilot study, the A1555G mutation was identified at a frequency of 0.9% in the Black control samples. The 961delT+C(n) variant was present in 6.6% of the Black controls and 2% of the Mixed ancestry controls. The T1095C, C1494T and A827G variants were not identified in any of the study participants. Conclusion The frequency of 0.9% for the A1555G mutation in the Black population in South Africa is of concern given the high incidence of MDR-TB in this particular ethnic group. Future larger studies are warranted to determine the true frequencies of the aminoglycoside deafness mutations in the general South African population. The high frequencies of the 961delT+C(n) variant observed in the controls suggest that this change is a common non-pathogenic polymorphism. This genetic method facilitates the identification of individuals at high risk of developing hearing loss prior to the start of aminoglycoside therapy. This is important in a low-resource country like South Africa where, despite their adverse side-effects, aminoglycosides will continue to be used

  10. A rapid method for detection of five known mutations associated with aminoglycoside-induced deafness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greinwald John H

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background South Africa has one of the highest incidences of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB in the world. Concomitantly, aminoglycosides are commonly used in this country as a treatment against MDR-TB. To date, at least five mutations are known to confer susceptibility to aminoglycoside-induced hearing loss. The aim of the present study was to develop a rapid screening method to determine whether these mutations are present in the South African population. Methods A multiplex method using the SNaPshot technique was used to screen for five mutations in the MT-RNR1 gene: A1555G, C1494T, T1095C, 961delT+C(n and A827G. A total of 204 South African control samples, comprising 98 Mixed ancestry and 106 Black individuals were screened for the presence of the five mutations. Results A robust, cost-effective method was developed that detected the presence of all five sequence variants simultaneously. In this pilot study, the A1555G mutation was identified at a frequency of 0.9% in the Black control samples. The 961delT+C(n variant was present in 6.6% of the Black controls and 2% of the Mixed ancestry controls. The T1095C, C1494T and A827G variants were not identified in any of the study participants. Conclusion The frequency of 0.9% for the A1555G mutation in the Black population in South Africa is of concern given the high incidence of MDR-TB in this particular ethnic group. Future larger studies are warranted to determine the true frequencies of the aminoglycoside deafness mutations in the general South African population. The high frequencies of the 961delT+C(n variant observed in the controls suggest that this change is a common non-pathogenic polymorphism. This genetic method facilitates the identification of individuals at high risk of developing hearing loss prior to the start of aminoglycoside therapy. This is important in a low-resource country like South Africa where, despite their adverse side-effects, aminoglycosides will

  11. Comprehensive study to investigate the role of various aminoglycoside resistance mechanisms in clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikhalizadeh, Vajihe; Hasani, Alka; Ahangarzadeh Rezaee, Mohammad; Rahmati-Yamchi, Mohammad; Hasani, Akbar; Ghotaslou, Reza; Goli, Hamid Reza

    2017-02-01

    Therapeutic resistance towards most of the current treatment regime by Acinetobacter baumannii has reduced the prescribing antibiotic pattern and option is being re-shifted towards more toxic agents including aminoglycosides. The present investigation aimed at to study various mechanisms towards aminoglycoside non-susceptibility in clinical isolates of A. baumannii. The bacteria were subjected to genetic basis assessment for the presence of aminoglycoside modifying enzymes (AME), 16S rRNA methylase encoding genes and relative expression of AdeABC and AbeM efflux pumps in relation to their susceptibility to five aminoglycosides. When isolates were subjected to typing by repetitive extragenic palindromic (REP) PCR, isolates could be separated into thirteen definite clones. The majority of isolates (94%) were positive for AME encoding genes. Possession of ant(2')-Ia correlated with non-susceptibility towards gentamicin, amikacin, kanamycin, tobramycin; while, presence of aph(3')-VIa attributed to resistance towards amikacin, kanamycin; possession of aac(3')-Ia allied with non-susceptibility to amikacin, tobramycin and presence of aac(3')IIa correlated with kanamycin non-susceptibility. Presence of armA was detected in 34.4%, 34.2%, 29.2%, 40.3%, and 64.2% of isolates showing non-susceptibility to gentamicin, amikacin, kanamycin, tobramycin and netilmicin, respectively. No isolates were found to carry rmtB or rmtC. Amikacin non-susceptibility in comparison to other aminoglycosides correlated with over production of adeB. Overall, the results represented a definitive correlation between presence of AME encoding genes as well as armA and resistance of A. baumannii towards aminoglycosides. On the other hand, the up-regulation of AdeABC and AbeM systems was found to have only the partial role in development of aminoglycoside resistance. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All

  12. Kinetic and mutagenic characterization of the chromosomally encoded Salmonella enterica AAC(6')-Iy aminoglycoside N-acetyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnet, S; Lambert, T; Courvalin, P; Blanchard, J S

    2001-03-27

    The chromosomally encoded aminoglycoside N-acetyltransferase, AAC(6')-Iy, from Salmonella enterica confers resistance toward a number of aminoglycoside antibiotics. The structural gene was cloned and expressed and the purified enzyme existed in solution as a dimer of ca. 17 000 Da monomers. Acetyl-CoA was the preferred acyl donor, and most therapeutically important aminoglycosides were substrates for acetylation. Exceptions are those aminoglycosides that possess a 6'-hydroxyl substituent (e.g., lividomycin). Thus, the enzyme exhibited regioselective and exclusive acetyltransferase activity to 6'-amine-containing aminoglycosides. The enzyme exhibited Michaelis-Menten kinetics for some aminoglycoside substrates but "substrate activation" with others. Kinetic studies supported a random kinetic mechanism for the enzyme. The enzyme was inactivated by iodoacetamide in a biphasic manner, with half of the activity being lost rapidly and the other half more slowly. Tobramycin, but not acetyl-CoA, protected against inactivation. Each of the three cysteine residues (C70, C109, C145) in the wild-type enzyme were carboxamidomethylated by iodoacetamide. Cysteine 109 in AAC(6')-Iy is conserved in 12 AAC(6') enzyme sequences of the major class I subfamily. Surprisingly, mutation of this residue to alanine neither abolished activity nor altered the biphasic inactivation by iodoacetamide. The maximum velocity and V/K values for a number of aminoglycosides were elevated in this single mutant, and the kinetic behavior of substrates exhibiting linear vs nonlinear kinetics was reversed. Cysteine 70 in AAC(6')-Iy is either a cysteine or a threonine residue in all 12 AAC(6') enzymes of the major class I subfamily. The double mutant, C109A/C70A, was not inactivated by iodoacetamide. The double mutant exhibited large increases in the K(m) values for both acetyl-CoA and aminoglycoside substrates, and all aminoglycoside substrates exhibited Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Solvent kinetic isotope

  13. Structural characterization of the novel aminoglycoside phosphotransferase AphVIII from Streptomyces rimosus with enzymatic activity modulated by phosphorylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyko, Konstantin M., E-mail: kmb@inbi.ras.ru [Bach Institute of Biochemistry, Federal Research Centre of Biotechnology of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninsky Prospekt. 33, Bld. 2, 119071, Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, Kurchatov Complex of NBICS-technologies, Akad. Kurchatova sqr., 1, Moscow, 123182 (Russian Federation); Gorbacheva, Marina A.; Korzhenevskiy, Dmitry A. [National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, Kurchatov Complex of NBICS-technologies, Akad. Kurchatova sqr., 1, Moscow, 123182 (Russian Federation); Alekseeva, Maria G.; Mavletova, Dilara A.; Zakharevich, Natalia V.; Elizarov, Sergey M.; Rudakova, Natalia N.; Danilenko, Valery N. [Vavilov Institute of General Genetics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Gubkina str. 3, Moscow, 119333 (Russian Federation); Popov, Vladimir O. [Bach Institute of Biochemistry, Federal Research Centre of Biotechnology of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninsky Prospekt. 33, Bld. 2, 119071, Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, Kurchatov Complex of NBICS-technologies, Akad. Kurchatova sqr., 1, Moscow, 123182 (Russian Federation)

    2016-09-02

    Aminoglycoside phosphotransferases represent a broad class of enzymes that promote bacterial resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics via the phosphorylation of hydroxyl groups in the latter. Here we report the spatial structure of the 3′-aminoglycoside phosphotransferase of novel VIII class (AphVIII) solved by X-ray diffraction method with a resolution of 2.15 Å. Deep analysis of APHVIII structure and its comparison with known structures of aminoglycoside phosphotransferases of various types reveals that AphVIII has a typical two-domain fold and, however, possesses some unique characteristics that distinguish the enzyme from its known homologues. The most important difference is the presence of the activation loop with unique Ser146 residue. We demonstrate that in the apo-state of the enzyme the activation loop does not interact with other parts of the enzyme and seems to adopt catalytically competent state only after substrate binding. - Highlights: • 3D structure of the novel aminoglycoside phosphotransferase AphVIII was obtained. • AphVIII activation loop is clearly identified in the electron density. • AphVIII has some unique structural features in its substrate C-ring binding pocket.

  14. Mechanism of Enhanced Activity of Liposome-Entrapped Aminoglycosides against Resistant Strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugabe, Clement; Halwani, Majed; Azghani, Ali O.; Lafrenie, Robert M.; Omri, Abdelwahab

    2006-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is inherently resistant to most conventional antibiotics. The mechanism of resistance of this bacterium is mainly associated with the low permeability of its outer membrane to these agents. We sought to assess the bactericidal efficacy of liposome-entrapped aminoglycosides against resistant clinical strains of P. aeruginosa and to define the mechanism of liposome-bacterium interactions. Aminoglycosides were incorporated into liposomes, and the bactericidal efficacies of both free and liposomal drugs were evaluated. To define the mechanism of liposome-bacterium interactions, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), flow cytometry, lipid mixing assay, and immunocytochemistry were employed. Encapsulation of aminoglycosides into liposomes significantly increased their antibacterial activity against the resistant strains used in this study (MICs of ≥32 versus ≤8 μg/ml). TEM observations showed that liposomes interact intimately with the outer membrane of P. aeruginosa, leading to the membrane deformation. The flow cytometry and lipid mixing assays confirmed liposome-bacterial membrane fusion, which increased as a function of incubation time. The maximum fusion rate was 54.3% ± 1.5% for an antibiotic-sensitive strain of P. aeruginosa and 57.8% ± 1.9% for a drug-resistant strain. The fusion between liposomes and P. aeruginosa significantly enhanced the antibiotics' penetration into the bacterial cells (3.2 ± 2.3 versus 24.2 ± 6.2 gold particles/bacterium, P ≤ 0.001). Our data suggest that liposome-entrapped antibiotics could successfully resolve infections caused by antibiotic-resistant P. aeruginosa through an enhanced mechanism of drug entry into the bacterial cells. PMID:16723560

  15. Collateral sensitivity between aminoglycosides and beta-lactam antibiotics depends on active proton pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azimi, Leila; Rastegar Lari, Abdolaziz

    2017-11-01

    Selection inversion is the hypothesis for antibiotic resistant inhabitation in bacteria and collateral sensitivity is one of the proposed phenomena for achievement of this hypothesis. The presence of collateral sensitivity associated with the proton motivation pump between the aminoglycosides and beta-lactam group of antibiotics is one of the examples of collateral sensitivity in some studies. The aim of this study was to demonstrate that collateral sensitivity between aminoglycosides and beta-lactam antibiotics associated with proton motivation pump may not be true in all cases. In this study, 100 Pseudomonas aeruginosa were surveyed. Gentamicin and imipenem-resistant strains were confirmed by disc diffusion method and MIC. Active proton motivation pumps were screened by pumps inhibitor. Semi-quantitative Real-Time PCR assay was used to confirm gene overexpression. Seventy-six and 79 out of 100 strains were resistant to gentamicin and imipenem, respectively. Seventy-five strains were resistant to both gentamicin and imipenem. The results of proton pump inhibitor test showed the involvement of active proton motivation pump in 22 of 75 imipenem- and gentamicin-resistant strains. According to Real - Time PCR assay, mexX efflux gene was overexpressed in the majority of isolates tested. The collateral sensitivity effect cannot explain the involvement of active proton motivation pumps in both imipenem and gentamicin-resistant strains simultaneously. Active and/or inactive proton pump in gentamicin-sensitive and/or resistant strains cannot be a suitable example for explanation of collateral sensitivity between aminoglycosides and beta-lactam antibiotics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of an aminoglycoside kinase from Legionella pneumophila

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemke, Christopher T.; Hwang, Jiyoung; Xiong, Bing; Cianciotto, Nicholas P.; Berghuis, Albert M.

    2005-01-01

    Two crystal forms of the antibiotic resistance enzyme APH(9)-Ia from L. pneumophila are reported. 9-Aminoglycoside phosphotransferase type Ia [APH(9)-Ia] is a resistance factor in Legionella pneuemophila, the causative agent of legionnaires’ disease. It is responsible for providing intrinsic resistance to the antibiotic spectinomycin. APH(9)-Ia phosphorylates one of the hydroxyl moieties of spectinomycin in an ATP-dependent manner, abolishing the antibiotic properties of this drug. Here, the crystallization and preliminary X-ray studies of this enzyme in two crystal forms is reported. One of the these crystal forms provides diffraction data to a resolution of 1.7 Å

  17. Berberine is a novel type efflux inhibitor which attenuates the MexXY-mediated aminoglycoside resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Morita

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The emergence and spread of multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa infections is of great concern, as very few agents are effective against strains of this species. Methanolic extracts from the Coptidis Rhizoma (the rhizomes of Coptis japonica var. major Satake or Phellodendri Cortex (the bark of Phellodendron chinense Schneider markedly reduced resistance to anti-pseudomonal aminoglycosides (e.g. amikacin in multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa strains. Berberine, the most abundant benzylisoquinoline alkaloid in the two extracts, reduced aminoglycoside resistance of P. aeruginosa via a mechanism that required the MexXY multidrug efflux system; berberine also reduced aminoglycoside MICs in Achromobacter xylosoxidans and Burkholderia cepacia, two species that harbor intrinsic multidrug efflux systems very similar to the MexXY. Furthermore this compound inhibited MexXY-dependent antibiotic resistance of other classes including cephalosporins (cefepime, macrolides (erythromycin, and lincosamides (lincomycin demonstrated using a pseudomonad lacking the 4 other major Mex pumps. Although phenylalanine-arginine beta-naphthylamide (PAβN, a well-known efflux inhibitor, antagonized aminoglycoside in a MexXY-dependent manner, a lower concentration of berberine was sufficient to reduce amikacin resistance of P. aeruginosa in the presence of PAβN. Moreover, berberine enhanced the synergistic effects of amikacin and piperacillin (and vice versa in multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa strains. Thus, berberine appears to be a novel type inhibitor of the MexXY-dependent aminoglycoside efflux in P. aeruginosa. As aminoglycosides are molecules of choice to treat severe infections the clinical impact is potentially important.

  18. Mutational activation of the AmgRS two-component system in aminoglycoside-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Calvin Ho-Fung; Fraud, Sebastien; Jones, Marcus; Peterson, Scott N; Poole, Keith

    2013-05-01

    The amgRS operon encodes a presumed membrane stress-responsive two-component system linked to intrinsic aminoglycoside resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Genome sequencing of a lab isolate showing modest pan-aminoglycoside resistance, strain K2979, revealed a number of mutations, including a substitution in amgS that produced an R182C change in the AmgS sensor kinase product of this gene. Introduction of this mutation into an otherwise wild-type strain recapitulated the resistance phenotype, while correcting the mutation in the resistant mutant abrogated the resistant phenotype, confirming that the amgS mutation is responsible for the aminoglycoside resistance of strain K2979. The amgSR182 mutation promoted an AmgR-dependent, 2- to 3-fold increase in expression of the AmgRS target genes htpX and PA5528, mirroring the impact of aminoglycoside exposure of wild-type cells on htpX and PA5528 expression. This suggests that amgSR182 is a gain-of-function mutation that activates AmgS and the AmgRS two-component system in promoting modest resistance to aminoglycosides. Screening of several pan-aminoglycoside-resistant clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa revealed three that showed elevated htpX and PA5528 expression and harbored single amino acid-altering mutations in amgS (V121G or D106N) and no mutations in amgR. Introduction of the amgSV121G mutation into wild-type P. aeruginosa generated a resistance phenotype reminiscent of the amgSR182 mutant and produced a 2- to 3-fold increase in htpX and PA5528 expression, confirming that it, too, is a gain-of-function aminoglycoside resistance-promoting mutation. These results highlight the contribution of amgS mutations and activation of the AmgRS two-component system to acquired aminoglycoside resistance in lab and clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa.

  19. Structural and molecular basis for resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics by the adenylyltransferase ANT(2″)-Ia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Georgina; Stogios, Peter J; Savchenko, Alexei; Wright, Gerard D

    2015-01-06

    The aminoglycosides are highly effective broad-spectrum antimicrobial agents. However, their efficacy is diminished due to enzyme-mediated covalent modification, which reduces affinity of the drug for the target ribosome. One of the most prevalent aminoglycoside resistance enzymes in Gram-negative pathogens is the adenylyltransferase ANT(2″)-Ia, which confers resistance to gentamicin, tobramycin, and kanamycin. Despite the importance of this enzyme in drug resistance, its structure and molecular mechanism have been elusive. This study describes the structural and mechanistic basis for adenylylation of aminoglycosides by the ANT(2″)-Ia enzyme. ANT(2″)-Ia confers resistance by magnesium-dependent transfer of a nucleoside monophosphate (AMP) to the 2″-hydroxyl of aminoglycoside substrates containing a 2-deoxystreptamine core. The catalyzed reaction follows a direct AMP transfer mechanism from ATP to the substrate antibiotic. Central to catalysis is the coordination of two Mg(2+) ions, positioning of the modifiable substrate ring, and the presence of a catalytic base (Asp86). Comparative structural analysis revealed that ANT(2″)-Ia has a two-domain structure with an N-terminal active-site architecture that is conserved among other antibiotic nucleotidyltransferases, including Lnu(A), LinB, ANT(4')-Ia, ANT(4″)-Ib, and ANT(6)-Ia. There is also similarity between the nucleotidyltransferase fold of ANT(2″)-Ia and DNA polymerase β. This similarity is consistent with evolution from a common ancestor, with the nucleotidyltransferase fold having adapted for activity against chemically distinct molecules. IMPORTANCE  : To successfully manage the threat associated with multidrug-resistant infectious diseases, innovative therapeutic strategies need to be developed. One such approach involves the enhancement or potentiation of existing antibiotics against resistant strains of bacteria. The reduction in clinical usefulness of the aminoglycosides is a particular

  20. Genotypic and phenotypic characteristics of aminoglycoside-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates in Latvia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauskenieks, Matiss; Pole, Ilva; Skenders, Girts; Jansone, Inta; Broka, Lonija; Nodieva, Anda; Ozere, Iveta; Kalvisa, Adrija; Ranka, Renate; Baumanis, Viesturs

    2015-03-01

    Mutations causing resistance to aminoglycosides, such as kanamycin (KAN), amikacin (AMK), and streptomycin, are not completely understood. In this study, polymorphisms of aminoglycoside resistance influencing genes such as rrs, eis, rpsL, and gidB in 41 drug-resistant and 17 pan-sensitive Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates in Latvia were analyzed. Mutation A1400G in rrs gene was detected in 92% isolates with high resistance level to KAN and diverse MIC level to AMK. Mutations in promoter region of eis were detected in 80% isolates with low-level MIC of KAN. The association of K43R mutation in rpsL gene, a mutation in the rrs gene at position 513, and various polymorphisms in gidB gene with distinct genetic lineages of M. tuberculosis was observed. The results of this study suggest that association of different controversial mutations of M. tuberculosis genes to the drug resistance phenotype should be done in respect to genetic lineages. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Origin in Acinetobacter gyllenbergii and dissemination of aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme AAC(6′)-Ih

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Eun-Jeong; Goussard, Sylvie; Nemec, Alexandr; Lambert, Thierry; Courvalin, Patrice; Grillot-Courvalin, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aac(6′)-Ih gene encoding aminoglycoside 6′-N-acetyltransferase type I subtype h [AAC(6′)-Ih] is plasmid-borne in Acinetobacter baumannii where it confers high-level amikacin resistance, but its origin remains unknown. We searched for the gene in the genomes of a collection of 133 Acinetobacter spp. and studied its species specificity, expression and dissemination. Methods Gene copy number was determined by quantitative PCR, expression by quantitative RT–PCR, MIC by microdilution and transfer by plasmid mobilization. Results The aac(6′)-Ih gene was present in the chromosome of the two Acinetobacter gyllenbergii of the collection and was detected in all seven A. gyllenbergii clinical isolates. They had indistinguishable flanking regions indicating that the gene was intrinsic to this species. A. baumannii PISAba23 promoters were provided by insertion of ISAba23, which disrupted the Pnative promoter in A. gyllenbergii. Both types of promoters were similarly potent in Escherichia coli and A. baumannii. Aminoglycoside MICs for A. baumannii harbouring pIP1858 were higher than for A. gyllenbergii due to gene dosage. The non-self-transferable plasmid could be mobilized to other A. baumannii cells by the broad host range plasmid RP4. Conclusions We have found the origin of aac(6′)-Ih in A. gyllenbergii, a species isolated, although rarely, in humans, and documented that dissemination of this gene is restricted to the Acinetobacter genus. PMID:26645270

  2. Protein aggregation caused by aminoglycoside action is prevented by a hydrogen peroxide scavenger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Jiqiang; Cho, Chris; Guo, Li-Tao; Aerni, Hans R; Rinehart, Jesse; Söll, Dieter

    2012-12-14

    Protein mistranslation causes growth arrest in bacteria, mitochondrial dysfunction in yeast, and neurodegeneration in mammals. It remains poorly understood how mistranslated proteins cause such cellular defects. Here we demonstrate that streptomycin, a bactericidal aminoglycoside that increases ribosomal mistranslation, induces transient protein aggregation in wild-type Escherichia coli. We further determined the aggregated proteome using label-free quantitative mass spectrometry. To identify genes that reduce cellular mistranslation toxicity, we selected from an overexpression library protein products that increased resistance against streptomycin and kanamycin. The selected proteins were significantly enriched in members of the oxidation-reduction pathway. Overexpressing one of these proteins, alkyl hydroperoxide reductase subunit F (a protein defending bacteria against hydrogen peroxide), but not its inactive mutant suppressed aggregated protein formation upon streptomycin treatment and increased aminoglycoside resistance. This work provides in-depth analyses of an aggregated proteome caused by streptomycin and suggests that cellular defense against hydrogen peroxide lowers the toxicity of mistranslation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Once-daily versus multiple-daily dosing with intravenous aminoglycosides for cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, Alan R; Bhatt, Jayesh; Nevitt, Sarah J

    2017-03-27

    People with cystic fibrosis, who are chronically colonised with the organism Pseudomonas aeruginosa, often require multiple courses of intravenous aminoglycoside antibiotics for the management of pulmonary exacerbations. The properties of aminoglycosides suggest that they could be given in higher doses less often. This is an update of a previously published review. To assess the effectiveness and safety of once-daily versus multiple-daily dosing of intravenous aminoglycoside antibiotics for the management of pulmonary exacerbations in cystic fibrosis. We searched the Cystic Fibrosis Specialist Register held at the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group's editorial base, comprising references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches, handsearching relevant journals and handsearching abstract books of conference proceedings.Date of the most recent search: 24 June 2016. All randomised controlled trials, whether published or unpublished, in which once-daily dosing of aminoglycosides has been compared with multiple-daily dosing in terms of efficacy or toxicity or both, in people with cystic fibrosis. The two authors independently selected the studies to be included in the review and assessed the risk of bias of each study; authors also assessed the quality of the evidence using the GRADE criteria. Data were independently extracted by each author. Authors of the included studies were contacted for further information. As yet unpublished data were obtained for one of the included studies. Fifteen studies were identified for possible inclusion in the review. Four studies reporting results from a total of 328 participants (aged 5 to 50 years) were included in this review. All studies compared once-daily dosing with thrice-daily dosing. One study had a low risk of bias for all criteria assessed; the remaining three included studies had a high risk of bias from blinding, but for other criteria were judged to have either an unclear or a low risk

  4. Audiologic monitoring of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis patients on aminoglycoside treatment with long term follow-up

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    Sarkar Malay

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multi-drug resistant tuberculosis has emerged as a significant problem with the resurfacing of tuberculosis and thus the need to use the second line drugs with the resultant increased incidence of adverse effects. We discuss the effect of second line aminoglycoside anti-tubercular drugs on the hearing status of MDR-TB patients. Methods Sixty four patients were put on second line aminoglycoside anti-TB drugs. These were divided into three groups: group I, 34 patients using amikacin, group II, 26 patients using kanamycin and group III, 4 patients using capreomycin. Results Of these, 18.75% of the patients developed sensorineural hearing loss involving higher frequencies while 6.25% had involvement of speech frequencies also. All patients were seen again approximately one year after aminoglycoside discontinuation and all hearing losses were permanent with no threshold improvement. Conclusion Aminoglycosides used in MDR-TB patients may result in irreversible hearing loss involving higher frequencies and can become a hearing handicap as speech frequencies are also involved in some of the patients thus underlining the need for regular audiologic evaluation in patients of MDR-TB during the treatment.

  5. In vitro antimicrobial activity of the aminoglycoside arbekacin tested against oxacillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolated in Brazilian hospitals

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    Julio C. R. Cordeiro

    Full Text Available Arbekacin is an aminoglycoside used in Japan for treating infections caused by gentamicin and oxacillin-resistant S. aureus (ORSA. The objective of this study was to determine the in vitro antimicrobial activity of arbekacin against 454 clinical isolates of ORSA. The isolates were consecutively collected between January and July, 2000, from patients hospitalized in 8 Brazilian medical centers. The antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed by disk diffusion method according to NCCLS recommendations. The vast majority of the isolates, 453 strains (99.8%, were considered susceptible to arbekacin based on the criteria proposed by the Requirements for Antibiotic Products of Japan. Only 1 isolate (0.2% was classified as resistant. On the other hand, high rates of resistance were demonstrated for other aminoglycosides, such as gentamicin (97.6% resistance and amikacin (97.0% resistance. Resistance rate was also high for ciprofloxacin (98.0%. All isolates were considered susceptible to vancomycin. The excellent in vitro antimicrobial activity of arbekacin demonstrated in this study indicates that this antimicrobial agent may play an important role in the treatment of severe ORSA infections, especially those that show poor clinical response with vancomycin monotherapy. Since the aminoglycosides should not be used as monotherapy to treat Gram positive infections, further studies evaluating in vitro and in vivo synergistic activity of arbekacin combinations are necessary to clarify the clinical role of this aminoglycoside.

  6. In vitro antimicrobial activity of the aminoglycoside arbekacin tested against oxacillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolated in Brazilian hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cordeiro Julio C. R.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Arbekacin is an aminoglycoside used in Japan for treating infections caused by gentamicin and oxacillin-resistant S. aureus (ORSA. The objective of this study was to determine the in vitro antimicrobial activity of arbekacin against 454 clinical isolates of ORSA. The isolates were consecutively collected between January and July, 2000, from patients hospitalized in 8 Brazilian medical centers. The antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed by disk diffusion method according to NCCLS recommendations. The vast majority of the isolates, 453 strains (99.8%, were considered susceptible to arbekacin based on the criteria proposed by the Requirements for Antibiotic Products of Japan. Only 1 isolate (0.2% was classified as resistant. On the other hand, high rates of resistance were demonstrated for other aminoglycosides, such as gentamicin (97.6% resistance and amikacin (97.0% resistance. Resistance rate was also high for ciprofloxacin (98.0%. All isolates were considered susceptible to vancomycin. The excellent in vitro antimicrobial activity of arbekacin demonstrated in this study indicates that this antimicrobial agent may play an important role in the treatment of severe ORSA infections, especially those that show poor clinical response with vancomycin monotherapy. Since the aminoglycosides should not be used as monotherapy to treat Gram positive infections, further studies evaluating in vitro and in vivo synergistic activity of arbekacin combinations are necessary to clarify the clinical role of this aminoglycoside.

  7. Mitochondrial 12S rRNA A827G mutation is involved in the genetic susceptibility to aminoglycoside ototoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing Guangqian; Chen Zhibin; Wei Qinjun; Tian Huiqin; Li Xiaolu; Zhou Aidong; Bu Xingkuan; Cao Xin

    2006-01-01

    We have analyzed the clinical and molecular characterization of a Chinese family with aminoglycoside-induced and non-syndromic hearing impairment. Clinical evaluations revealed that only those family members who had a history of exposure to aminoglycoside antibiotics subsequently developed hearing loss, suggesting mitochondrial genome involvement. Sequence analysis of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA and tRNA Ser(UCN) genes led to the identification of a homoplasmic A827G mutation in all maternal relatives, a mutation that was identified previously in a few sporadic patients and in another Chinese family with non-syndromic deafness. The pathogenicity of the A827G mutation is strongly supported by the occurrence of the same mutation in two independent families and several genetically unrelated subjects. The A827G mutation is located at the A-site of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene which is highly conserved in mammals. It is possible that the alteration of the tertiary or quaternary structure of this rRNA by the A827G mutation may lead to mitochondrial dysfunction, thereby playing a role in the pathogenesis of hearing loss and aminoglycoside hypersensitivity. However, incomplete penetrance of hearing impairment indicates that the A827G mutation itself is not sufficient to produce clinical phenotype but requires the involvement of modifier factors for the phenotypic expression. Indeed, aminoglycosides may contribute to the phenotypic manifestation of the A827G mutation in this family. In contrast with the congenital or early-onset hearing impairment in another Chinese family carrying the A827G mutation, three patients in this pedigree developed hearing loss only after use of aminoglycosides. This discrepancy likely reflects the difference of genetic backgrounds, either mitochondrial haplotypes or nuclear modifier genes, between two families

  8. Chaperonin GroEL/GroES over-expression promotes multi-drug resistance in E. coli following exposure to aminoglycoside antibiotics

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    Lise eGoltermann

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance is an increasing challenge to modern healthcare. Aminoglycoside antiobiotics cause translation corruption and protein misfolding and aggregation in Escherichia coli. We previously showed that chaperonin GroEL/GroES depletion and overexpression sensitize and promote short-term tolerance, respectively, to this drug class. Here we show that chaperonin GroEL/GroES over-expression accelerates acquisition of aminoglycoside resistance and multi-drug resistance following sub-lethal aminoglycoside antibiotic exposure. Chaperonin buffering could provide a novel mechanism for antibiotic resistance and multi-drug resistance development.

  9. Study of the Interference between Plectranthus Species Essential Oils from Brazil and Aminoglycosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvão Rodrigues, Fabíola Fernandes; Costa, José Galberto Martins; Rodrigues, Fábio Fernandes Galvao; Campos, Adriana Rolim

    2013-01-01

    Plectranthus is one of the most representative genera of Lamiaceae family. In this study, the essential oils from Plectranthus amboinicus, Plectranthus ornatus, and Plectranthus barbatus were investigated for their chemical composition and antimicrobial and modulatory activities. The major components found were carvacrol (54.4%-P. amboinicus) and eugenol (22.9%-P. ornatus e 25.1%-P. barbatus). In vitro antimicrobial activity was conducted against Escherichia coli, Proteus vulgaris, Bacillus cereus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Staphylococcus aureus (multiresistant) using microdilution method. The results of bioassay showed that all strains were sensitive to the oils, except P. aeruginosa that was resistant to P. amboinicus and P. ornatus. A synergistic effect of all essential oils combined with the aminoglycosides was demonstrated. These results show that P. amboinicus, P. ornatus, and P. barbatus inhibit the growth of pathogenic microorganism, and besides this they present antibiotic modifying activity, providing a new perspective against the problem of bacterial resistance to antibiotics.

  10. Parallel pathways in the biosynthesis of aminoglycoside antibiotics [version 1; referees: 2 approved

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    Yi Yu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Despite their inherent toxicity and the global spread of bacterial resistance, aminoglycosides (AGs, an old class of microbial drugs, remain a valuable component of the antibiotic arsenal. Recent studies have continued to reveal the fascinating biochemistry of AG biosynthesis and the rich potential in their pathway engineering. In particular, parallel pathways have been shown to be common and widespread in AG biosynthesis, highlighting nature’s ingenuity in accessing diverse natural products from a limited set of genes. In this review, we discuss the parallel biosynthetic pathways of three representative AG antibiotics—kanamycin, gentamicin, and apramycin—as well as future directions towards the discovery and development of novel AGs.

  11. Distribution of genes encoding aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes among clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant staphylococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perumal, N; Murugesan, S; Krishnan, P

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the distribution of genes encoding aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AMEs) and staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) elements among clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant staphylococci (MRS). Antibiotic susceptibility test was done using Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. The presence of SCCmec types and AME genes, namely, aac (6')-Ie-aph (2''), aph (3')-IIIa and ant (4')-Ia was determined using two different multiplex polymerase chain reaction. The most encountered AME genes were aac (6')-Ie-aph (2'') (55.4%) followed by aph (3')-IIIa (32.3%) and ant (4')-Ia gene (9%). SCCmec type I (34%) was predominant in this study. In conclusion, the aac (6')-Ie-aph (2'') was the most common AME gene and SCCmec type I was most predominant among the MRS isolates.

  12. Investigation into complexing of phthalexone S with praseodymium ions and some aminoglycoside antibiotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alykov, N.M.

    1981-01-01

    Complex formation of phthalexone S (Phth) with praseodymium ion and some aminoglycoside antibiotics (Ab) in aqueous ethanol solutions (1:1) has been examined photometrically at 619 mm. It has been shown that compounds with the ratios of Ab:Pr:Phth=1:2:8, 1:1:4, 1:1:3 are formed depending on the number of amino groups and structure of the antibiotics. The molar absorptivities and solubility products for the complexes have been calculated. The complex formation scheme is given. A procedure has been developed of determining 0.01-10 μg of antibiotics in 1 ml of a biological material with a relative error of less than 10% [ru

  13. In vitro susceptibility pattern of acinetobacter species to commonly used cephalosporins, quinolones, and aminoglycosides

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    Prashanth K

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Acinetobacter spp. is an emerging important nosocomial pathogen. Clinical isolates of this genus are often resistant to many antibiotics. The in vitro susceptibility of Acinetobacter isolates obtained from patients were tested for currently used antibiotics. In addition, the study aimed at biotyping of Acinetobacter baumannii. METHODS: A total of 66 isolates were phenotypically characterised through a large panel of 25 carbon assimilation tests and susceptibility through disc diffusion method with 10 antimicrobial agents were tested. MICs were determined only for second line broad-spectrum drugs such as cefotaxime, ceftazidime, amikacin, ciprofloxacin, and ofloxacin using NCCLS guidelines. RESULTS: Multiple drug resistance (MDR was only witnessed in A. baumannii and not in other Acinetobacter species. Aminoglycosides such as amikacin, netilmicin were most active against the MDR isolates tested (60% susceptibility. Ceftazidime was more active than cefotaxime. MDR A. baumannii strains were susceptible only to amikacin, netilmicin and ceftadizime. Ciprofloxacin had poor activity irrespective of isolates belonging to different DNA groups tested (58% resistance overall, 79% among A. baumannii. Strains of Biotypes 6 and 19 of A. baumannii showed broader resistance than those of biotype 10 and others. CONCLUSIONS: Strains of A. baumannii from patients in our hospital, were generally more resistant to quinolones, -lactam antibiotics, first and second generation cephalosporins and partially resistant to third generation cephalosporins and aminoglycosides. The strains belonging to other DNA groups of Acinetobacter were comparatively less resistant than A.baumannii, except ciprofloxacin. This study suggests that, a combination therapy, using a third generation cephalosporin and amikacin, would be best choice for treating Acinetobacter infections.

  14. Origin in Acinetobacter gyllenbergii and dissemination of aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme AAC(6')-Ih.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Eun-Jeong; Goussard, Sylvie; Nemec, Alexandr; Lambert, Thierry; Courvalin, Patrice; Grillot-Courvalin, Catherine

    2016-03-01

    The aac(6')-Ih gene encoding aminoglycoside 6'-N-acetyltransferase type I subtype h [AAC(6')-Ih] is plasmid-borne in Acinetobacter baumannii where it confers high-level amikacin resistance, but its origin remains unknown. We searched for the gene in the genomes of a collection of 133 Acinetobacter spp. and studied its species specificity, expression and dissemination. Gene copy number was determined by quantitative PCR, expression by quantitative RT-PCR, MIC by microdilution and transfer by plasmid mobilization. The aac(6')-Ih gene was present in the chromosome of the two Acinetobacter gyllenbergii of the collection and was detected in all seven A. gyllenbergii clinical isolates. They had indistinguishable flanking regions indicating that the gene was intrinsic to this species. A. baumannii PIS Aba23 promoters were provided by insertion of ISAba23, which disrupted the Pnative promoter in A. gyllenbergii. Both types of promoters were similarly potent in Escherichia coli and A. baumannii. Aminoglycoside MICs for A. baumannii harbouring pIP1858 were higher than for A. gyllenbergii due to gene dosage. The non-self-transferable plasmid could be mobilized to other A. baumannii cells by the broad host range plasmid RP4. We have found the origin of aac(6')-Ih in A. gyllenbergii, a species isolated, although rarely, in humans, and documented that dissemination of this gene is restricted to the Acinetobacter genus. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Azobenzene-aminoglycoside: Self-assembled smart amphiphilic nanostructures for drug delivery.

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    Deka, Smriti Rekha; Yadav, Santosh; Mahato, Manohar; Sharma, Ashwani Kumar

    2015-11-01

    Here, we have designed and synthesized a novel cationic amphiphilic stimuli-responsive azobenzene-aminoglycoside (a small molecule) conjugate, Azo-AG 5, and characterized it by UV and FTIR. Light responsive nature of Azo-AG 5 was assessed under UV-vis light. Self- assembly of Azo-AG 5 in aqueous solutions into nanostructures and their ability to act as drug carrier were also investigated. The nanostructures of Azo-AG 5 showed average hydrodynamic diameter of ∼ 255 nm with aminoglycoside moiety (neomycin) and 4-dimethylaminoazobenzene forming hydrophilic shell and hydrophobic core, respectively. In the hydrophobic core, eosin and aspirin were successfully encapsulated. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements demonstrated that the nanoassemblies showed expansion and contraction on successive UV and visible light irradiations exhibiting reversible on-off switch for controlling the drug release behavior. Similar behavior was observed when these nanostructures were subjected to pH-change. In vitro drug release studies showed a difference in UV and visible light-mediated release pattern. It was observed that the release rate under UV irradiation was comparatively higher than that observed under visible light. Further, azoreductase-mediated cleavage of the azo moiety in Azo-AG 5 nanoassemblies resulted in the dismantling of the structures into aggregated microstructures. Azo-AG 5 nanostructures having positive surface charge (+9.74 mV) successfully interacted with pDNA and retarded its mobility on agarose gel. Stimuli responsiveness of nanostructures and their on-off switch like behavior ensure the great potential as controlled drug delivery systems and in other biomedical applications such as colon-specific delivery and gene delivery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Sublethal Triclosan Exposure Decreases Susceptibility to Gentamicin and Other Aminoglycosides in Listeria monocytogenes▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Ellen G.; Gram, Lone; Kastbjerg, Vicky G.

    2011-01-01

    The human food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes is capable of persisting in food processing plants despite cleaning and sanitation and is likely exposed to sublethal biocide concentrations. This could potentially affect susceptibility of the bacterium to biocides and other antimicrobial agents. The purpose of the present study was to determine if sublethal biocide concentrations affected antibiotic susceptibility in L. monocytogenes. Exposure of L. monocytogenes strains EGD and N53-1 to sublethal concentrations of Incimaxx DES (containing peroxy acids and hydrogen peroxide) and Triquart Super (containing quaternary ammonium compound) in four consecutive cultures did not alter the frequency of antibiotic-tolerant isolates, as determined by plating on 2× the MIC for a range of antibiotics. Exposure of eight strains of L. monocytogenes to 1 and 4 μg/ml triclosan did not alter triclosan sensitivity. However, all eight strains became resistant to gentamicin (up to 16-fold increase in MIC) after exposure to sublethal triclosan concentrations. Gentamicin-resistant isolates of strains N53-1 and 4446 were also resistant to other aminoglycosides, such as kanamycin, streptomycin, and tobramycin. Gentamicin resistance remained at a high level also after five subcultures without triclosan or gentamicin. Aminoglycoside resistance can be caused by mutations in the target site, the 16S rRNA gene. However, such mutations were not detected in the N53-1-resistant isolates. A combination of gentamicin and ampicillin is commonly used in listeriosis treatment. The triclosan-induced resistance is, hence, of great concern. Further investigations are needed to determine the molecular mechanisms underlying the effect of triclosan. PMID:21746948

  17. A Simple Model for Inducing Optimal Increase of SDF-1 with Aminoglycoside Ototoxicity

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    Hyun Mi Ju

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. As a homing factor of stem cell, stromal derived factor-1 (SDF-1 is important for the regenerative research in ototoxicity. Mice models with aminoglycoside ototoxicity have been widely used to study the regeneration capacity of MSCs in repair of cochlear injury. We developed a mouse model with maximal increase in SDF-1 levels in the inner ear, according to the “one-shot” doses of kanamycin and furosemide. Methods. C57BL/6 mice had kanamycin (420, 550, and 600 mg/kg dissolved in PBS, followed by an intraperitoneal injection of furosemide (130 mg/kg. The injuries of inner ear were measured with hearing thresholds, histology, and outer hair cell counts at 0, 3, 5, 7, 10, and 14 days before the sacrifice. The levels of SDF-1 in the inner ear were tested by real-time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Results. There were a significant reduction in hearing thresholds and a maximal increase of SDF-1 levels in the furosemide 130 mg/kg + kanamycin 550 mg/kg group, but severe hearing deterioration over time was observed in the furosemide 130 mg/kg + kanamycin 600 mg/kg group and four mice were dead. SDF-1 was detected mostly in the stria vascularis and organ of Corti showing the highest increase in expression. Conclusion. We observed optimal induction of the stem cell homing factor in the newly generated aminoglycoside-induced ototoxicity mouse model using a “one-shot” protocol. This study regarding high SDF-1 levels in our mouse model of ototoxicity would play a major role in the development of therapeutic agents using MSC homing.

  18. Effects of the aminoglycoside antibiotics, streptomycin and neomycin, on neuromuscular transmission. I. Presynaptic considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiekers, J F

    1983-06-01

    The effects of two aminoglycoside antibiotics, streptomycin and neomycin, were studied in voltage-clamped transected twitch fibers of the costocutaneous muscles of garter snakes (species Thamnophis). The concentration-dependent effects of each antibiotic were quantitated by measuring miniature end-plate currents (mepcs) and evoked end-plate currents (epcs) in a single fiber before and in the presence of a wide range of concentrations of each antibiotic. The amplitude and the kinetics of these currents were studied and estimates of the quantal content of evoked transmitter release determined by the direct method of mean ratios, epc/mepc. A distinct separation was obtained between the concentrations of each antibiotic which demonstrated either pre- or postsynaptic actions. Both streptomycin and neomycin produced a concentration-dependent reduction in epc amplitude at concentrations which did not reduce mepc amplitude. Thus, the primary site of action for these antibiotics was considered of presynaptic origin. Streptomycin was approximately one-tenth as active as neomycin in reducing quantal release of acetylcholine. The marked depression in epc amplitude and quantal content produced by high concentrations of each antibiotic were reversed by elevating the external calcium concentration. Double logarithmic plots of the relationship between external calcium concentration and epc amplitude yielded a slope of approximately 3.8 in control physiological solution. In the presence of blocking concentrations of each antibiotic, increasing the external calcium concentration caused a parallel shift to the right of this relationship. These results suggest that the major mechanism for the neuromuscular depression produced by these aminoglycoside antibiotics is a competitive antagonism with calcium for a common presynaptic site required for evoked transmitter release.

  19. Occurrence of aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes among isolates of Escherichia coli exhibiting high levels of aminoglycoside resistance isolated from Korean cattle farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belaynehe, Kuastros Mekonnen; Shin, Seung Won; Hong-Tae, Park; Yoo, Han Sang

    2017-08-01

    This study investigated 247 Escherichia coli isolates collected from four cattle farms to characterize aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme (AME) genes, their plasmid replicons and transferability. Out of 247 isolates a high number of isolates (total 202; 81.78%) were found to be resistant to various antibiotics by disc diffusion. Of the 247 strains, 139 (56.3%) were resistant to streptomycin, and other antibiotic resistances followed as tetracycline (12.15%), ampicillin (7%), chloramphenicol (5.7%) and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (0.8%). Among 247 isolates B1 was the predominant phylogenetic group identified comprising 151 isolates (61.1%), followed by groups A (27.9%), D (7%) and B2 (4%). Out of 139 isolates investigated for AME, 130 (93.5%) isolates carried at least one AME gene. aph3″-1a and aph3″-1b (46%) were the principal genes detected, followed by aac3-IVa (34.5%). ant2″-1a was the least detected gene (2.2%). Nine (6.5%) strains carried no AME genes. Twelve (63.2%) among 19 isolates transferred an AME gene to a recipient and aph3΄-1a was the dominant transferred gene. Transferability mainly occurred via the IncFIB replicon type (52.6%). Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis typing demonstrated a higher degree of diversity with 14 distinct cluster types. This result suggests that commensal microflora from food-producing animals has a tremendous ability to harbor and transfer AME genes, and poses a potential risk by dissemination of resistance to humans through the food chain. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Occurrence of aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes genes (aac(6')-I and ant(2″)-I) in clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from Southwest Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odumosu, Bamidele Tolulope; Adeniyi, Bolanle A; Chandra, Ram

    2015-12-01

    Enzymatic modification of aminoglycosides is the primary mechanism of resistance by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We investigated the occurrence and mechanism of aminoglycosides resistance in P. aeruginosa isolates from hospitals in SouthWest Nigeria. A total of 54 consecutive, non-duplicate clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa were studied for the presence of aminoglycosides -modifying enzymes (AMEs) by PCR amplification and sequencing of genes encoding AMEs. Two types of AME genes [aac (6') - I and ant (2″) - I] were found in 12 isolates out of 54. Seven strains harboured one or more types of enzymes of which aac (6') - I was the most frequently found gene (10/54 isolates, 18.5%). None of the isolates investigated in this study were positive for aph, aac (3) and aac (6″) - II genes. Prevalence of P. aeruginosa producing AME genes in this study may suggest aminoglycosides use in Nigeria. This study highlights need for functional antimicrobial surveillance system in Nigeria.

  1. Domain Dissection and Characterization of the Aminoglycoside Resistance Enzyme ANT(3″)-Ii/AAC(6′)-IId from Serratia marcescens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Keith D.; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie

    2013-01-01

    Aminoglycosides (AGs) are broad-spectrum antibiotics whose constant use and presence in growth environment has led bacteria to develop resistance mechanisms to aid in their survival. A common mechanism of resistance to AGs is their chemical modification (nucleotidylation, phosphorylation, or acetylation) by AG-modifying enzymes (AMEs). Through evolution, fusion of two AME-encoding genes has resulted in bifunctional enzymes with broader spectrum of activity. Serratia marcescens, a human enteropathogen, contains such a bifunctional enzyme, ANT(3″)-Ii/AAC(6′)-IId. To gain insight into the role, effect, and importance of the union of ANT(3″)-Ii and AAC(6′)-IId in this bifunctional enzyme, we separated the two domains and compared their activity to that of the full-length enzyme. We performed a thorough comparison of the substrate and cosubstrate profiles as well as kinetic characterization of the bifunctional ANT(3″)-Ii/AAC(6′)-IId and its individually expressed components. PMID:23485681

  2. Ribosomal Protein S12 and Aminoglycoside Antibiotics Modulate A-site mRNA Cleavage and Transfer-Messenger RNA Activity in Escherichia coli*

    OpenAIRE

    Holberger, Laura E.; Hayes, Christopher S.

    2009-01-01

    Translational pausing in Escherichia coli can lead to mRNA cleavage within the ribosomal A-site. A-site mRNA cleavage is thought to facilitate transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA)·SmpB- mediated recycling of stalled ribosome complexes. Here, we demonstrate that the aminoglycosides paromomycin and streptomycin inhibit A-site cleavage of stop codons during inefficient translation termination. Aminoglycosides also induced stop codon read-through, suggesting that these antibiotics alleviate ribosome pa...

  3. Structure of the phosphotransferase domain of the bifunctional aminoglycoside-resistance enzyme AAC(6')-Ie-APH(2'')-Ia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Clyde A; Toth, Marta; Bhattacharya, Monolekha; Frase, Hilary; Vakulenko, Sergei B

    2014-06-01

    The bifunctional acetyltransferase(6')-Ie-phosphotransferase(2'')-Ia [AAC(6')-Ie-APH(2'')-Ia] is the most important aminoglycoside-resistance enzyme in Gram-positive bacteria, conferring resistance to almost all known aminoglycoside antibiotics in clinical use. Owing to its importance, this enzyme has been the focus of intensive research since its isolation in the mid-1980s but, despite much effort, structural details of AAC(6')-Ie-APH(2'')-Ia have remained elusive. The structure of the Mg2GDP complex of the APH(2'')-Ia domain of the bifunctional enzyme has now been determined at 2.3 Å resolution. The structure of APH(2'')-Ia is reminiscent of the structures of other aminoglycoside phosphotransferases, having a two-domain architecture with the nucleotide-binding site located at the junction of the two domains. Unlike the previously characterized APH(2'')-IIa and APH(2'')-IVa enzymes, which are capable of utilizing both ATP and GTP as the phosphate donors, APH(2'')-Ia uses GTP exclusively in the phosphorylation of the aminoglycoside antibiotics, and in this regard closely resembles the GTP-dependent APH(2'')-IIIa enzyme. In APH(2'')-Ia this GTP selectivity is governed by the presence of a `gatekeeper' residue, Tyr100, the side chain of which projects into the active site and effectively blocks access to the adenine-binding template. Mutation of this tyrosine residue to a less bulky phenylalanine provides better access for ATP to the NTP-binding template and converts APH(2'')-Ia into a dual-specificity enzyme.

  4. Novel Aminoglycoside Resistance Transposons and Transposon-Derived Circular Forms Detected in Carbapenem-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Clinical Isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwibedi, Chinmay Kumar; Sjöström, Karin; Edquist, Petra; Wai, Sun Nyunt; Uhlin, Bernt Eric

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as an important opportunistic pathogen equipped with a growing number of antibiotic resistance genes. Our study investigated the molecular epidemiology and antibiotic resistance features of 28 consecutive carbapenem-resistant clinical isolates of A. baumannii collected throughout Sweden in 2012 and 2013. The isolates mainly belonged to clonal complexes (CCs) with an extensive international distribution, such as CC2 (n = 16) and CC25 (n = 7). Resistance to carbapenems was related to blaOXA-23 (20 isolates), blaOXA-24/40-like (6 isolates), blaOXA-467 (1 isolate), and ISAba1-blaOXA-69 (1 isolate). Ceftazidime resistance was associated with blaPER-7 in the CC25 isolates. Two classical point mutations were responsible for resistance to quinolones in all the isolates. Isolates with high levels of resistance to aminoglycosides carried the 16S rRNA methylase armA gene. The isolates also carried a variety of genes encoding aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes. Several novel structures involved in aminoglycoside resistance were identified, including Tn6279, ΔTn6279, Ab-ST3-aadB, and different assemblies of Tn6020 and TnaphA6. Importantly, a number of circular forms related to the IS26 or ISAba125 composite transposons were detected. The frequent occurrence of these circular forms in the populations of several isolates indicates a potential role of these circular forms in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes. PMID:26824943

  5. Determination of 14 aminoglycosides by LC-MS/MS using molecularly imprinted polymer solid phase extraction for clean-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savoy, Marie-Claude; Woo, Pei Mun; Ulrich, Pauline; Tarres, Adrienne; Mottier, Pascal; Desmarchelier, Aurélien

    2018-04-01

    An LC-MS/MS method for screening 14 aminoglycosides in foodstuffs of animal origin is presented. Its scope includes raw materials and processed ingredients but also finished products composed of milk, meat, fish, egg or fat. Aminoglycosides are extracted in an acidic aqueous solution, which is first recovered after centrifugation, then diluted with a basic buffer and finally purified by molecularly imprinted polymer-solid phase extraction (MIP-SPE). Analytes are detected within 8 min by ion-pair reversed phase LC-MS/MS. Due to the large range of foodstuffs involved, the variability of matrix effects led to significant MS signal variations. This was circumvented by systematically extracting each sample twice, i.e. 'unspiked' and 'spiked' at the screening target concentration of 50 µg kg -1 . The method was validated according to the European Community Reference Laboratories Residues Guidelines giving false-negative and false-positive rates ≤3% for all compounds. Ruggedness of the method was further demonstrated in quality control operations by a second laboratory. The 14 aminoglycosides in water-based standard solutions were stable for up to 6 months when stored at either -80°C, -20°C or at 4°C storage temperatures.

  6. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid enhances the activities of aminoglycosides against methicillin- sensitive and resistant Staphylococcus aureus in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward eCunningham-Oakes

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Infections caused by methicillin-sensitive (MSSA and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA are prevalent. MRSA infections are difficult to treat and there are no new classes of antibiotics produced to the market to treat infections caused by the resistant bacteria. Therefore, using antibiotic enhancers to rescue existing classes of antibiotics is an attractive strategy. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA is an antioxidant compound found in extracts from plant Larrea Tridentata. It exhibits antimicrobial activity and may target bacterial cell membrane. Combination efficacies of NDGA with many classes of antibiotics were examined by chequerboard method against 200 clinical isolates of MRSA and MSSA. NDGA in combination with gentamicin, neomycin and tobramycin was examined by time-kill assays. The synergistic combinations of NDGA and aminoglycosides were tested in vivo using a murine skin infection model. Calculations of the fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI showed that NDGA when combined with gentamicin, neomycin or tobramycin displayed synergistic activities in more than 97% of MSSA and MRSA, respectively. Time kill analysis demonstrated that NDGA significantly augmented the activities of these aminoglycosides against MRSA and MSSA in vitro and in murine skin infection model. The enhanced activity of NDGA resides on its ability to damage bacterial cell membrane leading to accumulation of the antibiotics inside bacterial cells. We demonstrated that NDGA strongly revived the therapeutic potencies of aminoglycosides in vitro and in vivo. This combinational strategy could contribute major clinical implications to treat antibiotic resistant bacterial infections.

  7. Increased prevalence of aminoglycoside resistance in clinical isolates of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp. in Norway is associated with the acquisition of AAC(3)-II and AAC(6')-Ib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldorsen, Bjørg C; Simonsen, Gunnar Skov; Sundsfjord, Arnfinn; Samuelsen, Orjan

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we show that the increasing prevalence of aminoglycoside resistance observed in Norway among clinical Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp. isolates is mainly due to the presence of the aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes AAC(3)-II and AAC(6')-Ib. A frequent co-association of aminoglycoside resistance with Cefotaximase-München group 1 extended-spectrum β-lactamases was also observed. © 2013.

  8. Study of the Interference between Plectranthus Species Essential Oils from Brazil and Aminoglycosides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabíola Fernandes Galvão Rodrigues

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Plectranthus is one of the most representative genera of Lamiaceae family. In this study, the essential oils from Plectranthus amboinicus, Plectranthus ornatus, and Plectranthus barbatus were investigated for their chemical composition and antimicrobial and modulatory activities. The major components found were carvacrol (54.4%—P. amboinicus and eugenol (22.9%—P. ornatus e 25.1%—P. barbatus. In vitro antimicrobial activity was conducted against Escherichia coli, Proteus vulgaris, Bacillus cereus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Staphylococcus aureus (multiresistant using microdilution method. The results of bioassay showed that all strains were sensitive to the oils, except P. aeruginosa that was resistant to P. amboinicus and P. ornatus. A synergistic effect of all essential oils combined with the aminoglycosides was demonstrated. These results show that P. amboinicus, P. ornatus, and P. barbatus inhibit the growth of pathogenic microorganism, and besides this they present antibiotic modifying activity, providing a new perspective against the problem of bacterial resistance to antibiotics.

  9. Effects of salicylates and aminoglycosides on spontaneous otoacoustic emissions in the Tokay gecko.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, C E; Hudspeth, A J

    2000-01-04

    The high sensitivity and sharp frequency discrimination of hearing depend on mechanical amplification in the cochlea. To explore the basis of this active process, we examined the pharmacological sensitivity of spontaneous otoacoustic emissions (SOAEs) in a lizard, the Tokay gecko. In a quiet environment, each ear produced a complex but stable pattern of emissions. These SOAEs were reversibly modulated by drugs that affect mammalian otoacoustic emissions, the salicylates and the aminoglycoside antibiotics. The effect of a single i.p. injection of sodium salicylate depended on the initial power of the emissions: ears with strong control SOAEs displayed suppression at all frequencies, whereas those with weak control emissions showed enhancement. Repeated oral administration of acetylsalicylic acid reduced all emissions. Single i.p. doses of gentamicin or kanamycin suppressed SOAEs below 2.6 kHz, while modulating those above 2.6 kHz in either of two ways. For ears whose emission power at 2.6-5.2 kHz encompassed more than half of the total, individual emissions displayed facilitation as great as 35-fold. For the remaining ears, emissions dropped to as little as one-sixth of their initial values. The similarity of the responses of reptilian and mammalian cochleas to pharmacological intervention provides further evidence for a common mechanism of cochlear amplification.

  10. Andrographolide: A potent antituberculosis compound that targets Aminoglycoside 2'-N-acetyltransferase in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabu, Amudha; Hassan, Sameer; Prabuseenivasan; Shainaba, A S; Hanna, L E; Kumar, Vanaja

    2015-09-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) still remains a major challenging infectious disease. The increased rate of emergence of multi-drug resistant and extensively-drug resistant strains of the organism has further complicated the situation, resulting in an urgent need for new anti-TB drugs. Antimycobacterial activity of Andrographis paniculata was evaluated using a rapid LRP assay and the probable targets were identified by docking analysis. The methanolic extract of A. paniculata showed maximum antimycobacterial activity at 250μg/ml against all the tested strains of M. tuberculosis (H37Rv, MDR, and drug sensitive). Based on bioassay guided fractionation, andrographolide was identified as the potent molecule. With the docking analysis, both ICDH (Isocitrate Dehydrogenase) and AAC (Aminoglycoside 2'-N-acetyltransferase) were predicted as targets of andrographolide in M. tuberculosis. Molecular simulation revealed that, ICDH showed low binding affinity to andrographolide. However, for AAC, the andrographolide was observed to be well within the active site after 10ns of molecular simulation. This suggests that ACC (PDB ID 1M4I) could be the probable target for andrographolide. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Hair cell regeneration in the bullfrog vestibular otolith organs following aminoglycoside toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Richard A.; Torres, M. A.; Schuff, N. R.

    1994-01-01

    Adult bullfrogs were given single intraotic injections of the aminoglycoside antibiotic gentamicin sulfate and sacrificed at postinjection times ranging from 0.5 to 9 days. The saccular and utricular maculae of normal and injected animals were examined in wholemount and cross-section. Intraotic 200 (mu) M gentamicin concentrations resulted in the uniform destruction of the hair bundles and, at later times, the cell bodies of saccular hair cells. In the utriculus, striolar hair cells were selectively damaged while extrastriolar hair cells were relatively unaffected. Regenerating hair cells, identified in sectioned material by their small cell bodies and short, well-formed hair bundles, were seen in the saccular and utricular maculae as early as 24-48 h postinjection. Immature versions of mature hair cell types in both otolith organs were recognized by the presence of absence of a bulbed kinocilia and the relative lengths of their kinocilia and longest sterocilia. Utricular hair cell types with kinocilia longer than their longest stereocilia were observed at earlier times than hair cell types with shorter kinocilia. In the same sacculus, the hair bundles of gentamicin-treated animals, even at 9 days postinjection, were significantly smaller than those of normal animals. The hair bundles of utricular hair cells, on the other hand, reached full maturity within the same time period.

  12. Pure tone audiograms and possible aminoglycoside-induced hearing loss in belugas (Delphinapterus leucas)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finneran, James J.; Carder, Donald A.; Dear, Randall; Belting, Traci; McBain, Jim; Dalton, Les; Ridgway, Sam H.

    2005-06-01

    A behavioral response paradigm was used to measure pure-tone hearing sensitivities in two belugas (Delphinapterus leucas). Tests were conducted over a 20-month period at the Point Defiance Zoo and Aquarium, in Tacoma, WA. Subjects were two males, aged 8-10 and 9-11 during the course of the study. Subjects were born in an oceanarium and had been housed together for all of their lives. Hearing thresholds were measured using a modified up/down staircase procedure and acoustic response paradigm where subjects were trained to produce audible responses to test tones and to remain quiet otherwise. Test frequencies ranged from approximately 2 to 130 kHz. Best sensitivities ranged from approximately 40 to 50 dB re 1 μPa at 50-80 kHz and 30-35 kHz for the two subjects. Although both subjects possessed traditional ``U-shaped'' mammalian audiograms, one subject exhibited significant high-frequency hearing loss above 37 kHz compared to previously published data for belugas. Hearing loss in this subject was estimated to approach 90 dB for frequencies above 50 kHz. Similar ages, ancestry, and environmental conditions between subjects, but a history of ototoxic drug administration in only one subject, suggest that the observed hearing loss was a result of the aminoglycoside antibiotic amikacin. .

  13. Highly stable, protein capped gold nanoparticles as effective drug delivery vehicles for amino-glycosidic antibiotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rastogi, Lori; Kora, Aruna Jyothi; Arunachalam, J.

    2012-01-01

    A method for the production of highly stable gold nanoparticles (Au NP) was optimized using sodium borohydride as reducing agent and bovine serum albumin as capping agent. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized using UV–visible spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X‐ray diffraction (XRD) and dynamic light scattering techniques. The formation of gold nanoparticles was confirmed from the appearance of pink colour and an absorption maximum at 532 nm. These protein capped nanoparticles exhibited excellent stability towards pH modification and electrolyte addition. The produced nanoparticles were found to be spherical in shape, nearly monodispersed and with an average particle size of 7.8 ± 1.7 nm. Crystalline nature of the nanoparticles in face centered cubic structure is confirmed from the selected‐area electron diffraction and XRD patterns. The nanoparticles were functionalized with various amino-glycosidic antibiotics for utilizing them as drug delivery vehicles. Using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, the possible functional groups of antibiotics bound to the nanoparticle surface have been examined. These drug loaded nanoparticle solutions were tested for their antibacterial activity against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial strains, by well diffusion assay. The antibiotic conjugated Au NP exhibited enhanced antibacterial activity, compared to pure antibiotic at the same concentration. Being protein capped and highly stable, these gold nanoparticles can act as effective carriers for drugs and might have considerable applications in the field of infection prevention and therapeutics. - Highlights: ► Method for NaBH 4 reduced and BSA capped gold nanoparticle was standardized. ► Nanoparticles were spherical and nearly monodispersed with a size of 7.8 nm. ► Nanoparticles are extremely stable towards pH modification and electrolyte addition. ► Antibiotic conjugated nanoparticles exhibited enhanced antibacterial activity

  14. Aminoglycoside resistance mechanisms in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from non-cystic fibrosis patients in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poonsuk, Kanchana; Tribuddharat, Chanwit; Chuanchuen, Rungtip

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to examine aminoglycosides (AMGs) resistance mechanisms, including the AMG-modifying enzyme genes, mexXY, rplY, nuoG, and galU, in the Pseudomonas aeruginosa non-cystic fibrosis (CF) isolates in Thailand. One hundred P. aeruginosa isolates from non-CF patients were examined for susceptibility to AMGs and for the presence of 10 AMG-modifying enzyme genes. Thirty randomly selected isolates were tested for transcription of mexXY and nuoG and mutations in rplY and galU. All the P. aeruginosa isolates exhibited simultaneous resistance to at least 4 AMGs. High resistance rates to amikacin (92%), gentamicin (95%), streptomycin (99%), and tobramycin (96%) were observed, and all isolates were resistant to kanamycin, neomycin, and spectinomycin. Nine AMG-modifying enzyme genes were detected, including aadA1 (84%), aadB (84%), aadA2 (67%), ant(2″)-Ia (72%), strA-strB (70%), aph(3')-IIb (57%), aac(3')-Ia (40%), and aac(6')-IIa (27%). None of the isolates harbored aac(6')-IIb. Of 30 isolates tested, all but 1 isolate expressed MexXY. Two isolates did not express nuoG. Six isolates carried an amino acid change in RplY, but none of the isolates harbored mutation in galU. The results indicated that the AMG-modifying enzyme genes were widespread among the P. aeruginosa non-CF isolates. The MexXY efflux pump and inactivation for rplY played a role in AMG resistance but disruption of nuoG or galU did not.

  15. Integrity and regeneration of mechanotransduction machinery regulate aminoglycoside entry and sensory cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew A Vu

    Full Text Available Sound perception requires functional hair cell mechanotransduction (MET machinery, including the MET channels and tip-link proteins. Prior work showed that uptake of ototoxic aminoglycosides (AG into hair cells requires functional MET channels. In this study, we examined whether tip-link proteins, including Cadherin 23 (Cdh23, regulate AG entry into hair cells. Using time-lapse microscopy on cochlear explants, we found rapid uptake of gentamicin-conjugated Texas Red (GTTR into hair cells from three-day-old Cdh23(+/+ and Cdh23(v2J/+ mice, but failed to detect GTTR uptake in Cdh23(v2J/v2J hair cells. Pre-treatment of wildtype cochleae with the calcium chelator 1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA to disrupt tip-links also effectively reduced GTTR uptake into hair cells. Both Cdh23(v2J/v2J and BAPTA-treated hair cells were protected from degeneration caused by gentamicin. Six hours after BAPTA treatment, GTTR uptake remained reduced in comparison to controls; by 24 hours, drug uptake was comparable between untreated and BAPTA-treated hair cells, which again became susceptible to cell death induced by gentamicin. Together, these results provide genetic and pharmacologic evidence that tip-links are required for AG uptake and toxicity in hair cells. Because tip-links can spontaneously regenerate, their temporary breakage offers a limited time window when hair cells are protected from AG toxicity.

  16. Highly stable, protein capped gold nanoparticles as effective drug delivery vehicles for amino-glycosidic antibiotics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rastogi, Lori; Kora, Aruna Jyothi; Arunachalam, J., E-mail: aruncccm@gmail.com

    2012-08-01

    A method for the production of highly stable gold nanoparticles (Au NP) was optimized using sodium borohydride as reducing agent and bovine serum albumin as capping agent. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized using UV-visible spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and dynamic light scattering techniques. The formation of gold nanoparticles was confirmed from the appearance of pink colour and an absorption maximum at 532 nm. These protein capped nanoparticles exhibited excellent stability towards pH modification and electrolyte addition. The produced nanoparticles were found to be spherical in shape, nearly monodispersed and with an average particle size of 7.8 {+-} 1.7 nm. Crystalline nature of the nanoparticles in face centered cubic structure is confirmed from the selected-area electron diffraction and XRD patterns. The nanoparticles were functionalized with various amino-glycosidic antibiotics for utilizing them as drug delivery vehicles. Using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, the possible functional groups of antibiotics bound to the nanoparticle surface have been examined. These drug loaded nanoparticle solutions were tested for their antibacterial activity against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial strains, by well diffusion assay. The antibiotic conjugated Au NP exhibited enhanced antibacterial activity, compared to pure antibiotic at the same concentration. Being protein capped and highly stable, these gold nanoparticles can act as effective carriers for drugs and might have considerable applications in the field of infection prevention and therapeutics. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Method for NaBH{sub 4} reduced and BSA capped gold nanoparticle was standardized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoparticles were spherical and nearly monodispersed with a size of 7.8 nm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoparticles are extremely stable towards pH modification and electrolyte addition. Black

  17. Aminoglycoside exposure and renal function before lung transplantation in adult cystic fibrosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novel-Catin, Etienne; Pelletier, Solenne; Reynaud, Quitterie; Nove-Josserand, Raphaele; Durupt, Stephane; Dubourg, Laurence; Durieu, Isabelle; Fouque, Denis

    2018-04-18

    Patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) are at risk of kidney injury even before undergoing lung transplantation, because of prolonged exposure to aminoglycosides (AGs), chronic dehydration and complications of diabetes mellitus. The usual equations estimating the glomerular filtration rate (GFR), such as Cockcroft-Gault and Modification of Diet in Renal Disease, are not adapted to the CF population due to patients' low body weight and reduced muscle mass. The aim of this study was to precisely measure GFR in adult CF patients and to see whether repeated AG treatment would impair renal function before lung transplantation. Inulin or iohexol clearances were performed in 25 adult CF patients when they entered the lung transplant waiting list. No patient was treated with AGs at the time of GFR measurement. Body mass index (BMI), history of diabetes mellitus and blood pressure were recorded. Exposure to intravenous (IV) AGs within 5 years prior to the GFR measurement was obtained from the patient's medical files. Urine samples were collected to check for albuminuria and proteinuria. The population was predominantly female (67%). The mean age was 32 years, the mean BMI was 19 kg/m2 and 28% had CF-related diabetes. Median exposure to IV AG within 5 years before GFR measurement was 155 days with a mean dosage of 7.7mg/kg/day. The mean measured GFR was 106 mL/min/1.73 m2 and the mean estimated GFR according to the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration formula was 124 mL/min/1.73 m2. Despite prolonged exposure to high-dose IV AG, no decline in GFR was observed in these patients.

  18. Effect of basic amino acids and aminoglycosides on 3H-gentamicin uptake in cortical slices of rat and human kindney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, W.M.; Plamp, C.E.; Elliott, W.C.; Parker, R.A.; Porter, G.A.

    1982-01-01

    The uptake of 3 H-gentamicin was assessed in renal cortical slices of Fischer 344 male rats and four human cadaver kidneys not utilized for renal transplantation. In both species the uptake was maximal at 90 min and maintained a steady state therafter. The characteristics of the energy-dependent component of 3 H-gentamicin uptake were not altered by various basic amino acids, but competitive inhibition was induced by other aminoglycosides in a dose-dependent fashion. Thus aminoglycosides appear to share a transport process that is distinct from those of organic bases or other cationic substances. In addition, under the experimental conditions employed, the basolateral membranes of the tubular cell is capable of energy-dependent uptake of gentamicin. The role of this route of cellular uptake of aminoglycoside in clinical nephrotoxicity is speculative

  19. Synergy of aminoglycoside antibiotics by 3-Benzylchroman derivatives from the Chinese drug Caesalpinia sappan against clinical methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, G Y; Han, Z Q; Hao, X Y; Han, J; Li, Z S; Wang, G C

    2014-06-15

    The in vitro antimicrobial activities of three 3-Benzylchroman derivatives, i.e. Brazilin (1), Brazilein (2) and Sappanone B (3) from Caesalpinia sappan L. (Leguminosae) were assayed, which mainly dealt with synergistic evaluation of aminoglycoside and other type of antibiotics against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) by the three compounds through the Chequerboard and Time-kill curve methods. The results showed that Compounds 1-3 alone exhibited moderate to weak activity against methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) and other standard strains by MICs/MBCs ranged from 32/64 to >1024/>1024 μg/ml, with the order of activity as 1>2>3. Chequerboard method showed significant anti-MRSA synergy of 1/Aminoglycosides (Gentamicin, Amikacin, Etimicin and Streptomycin) combinations with (FICIs)50 at 0.375-0.5. The combined (MICs)50 values (μg/ml) reduced from 32-128/16-64 to 4-8/4-16, respectively. The percent of reduction by MICs ranged from 50% to 87.5%, with a maximum of 93.8% (1/16 of the alone MIC). Combinations of 2 and 3 with Aminoglycosides and the other antibiotics showed less potency of synergy. The dynamic Time-killing experiment further demonstrated that the combinations of 1/aminoglycoside were synergistically bactericidal against MRSA. The anti-MRSA synergy results of the bacteriostatic (Chequerboard method) and bactericidal (time-kill method) efficiencies of 1/Aminoglycoside combinations was in good consistency, which made the resistance reversed by CLSI guidelines. We concluded that the 3-Benzylchroman derivative Brazilin (1) showed in vitro synergy of bactericidal activities against MRSA when combined with Aminoglycosides, which might be beneficial for combinatory therapy of MRSA infection. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  20. Intrinsic resistance to aminoglycosides in Enterococcus faecium is conferred by the 16S rRNA m5C1404-specific methyltransferase EfmM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galimand, Marc; Schmitt, Emmanuelle; Panvert, Michel

    2011-01-01

    methyltransferase, as well as by the previously characterized aac(6')-Ii that encodes a 6'-N-aminoglycoside acetyltransferase. Inactivation of efmM in E. faecium increases susceptibility to the aminoglycosides kanamycin and tobramycin, and, conversely, expression of a recombinant version of efmM in Escherichia coli...... confers resistance to these drugs. The EfmM protein shows significant sequence similarity to E. coli RsmF (previously called YebU), which is a 5-methylcytidine (m(5)C) methyltransferase modifying 16S rRNA nucleotide C1407. The target for EfmM is shown by mass spectrometry to be a neighboring 16S r...

  1. A new subclass of intrinsic aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferases, ANT(3")-II, is horizontally transferred among Acinetobacter spp. by homologous recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gang; Leclercq, Sébastien Olivier; Tian, Jingjing; Wang, Chao; Ai, Guomin; Liu, Shuangjiang

    2017-01-01

    The emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance among Acinetobacter spp. have been investigated extensively. Most studies focused on the multiple antibiotic resistance genes located on plasmids or genomic resistance islands. On the other hand, the mechanisms controlling intrinsic resistance are still not well understood. In this study, we identified the novel subclass of aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferase ANT(3")-II in Acinetobacter spp., which comprised numerous variants distributed among three main clades. All members of this subclass can inactivate streptomycin and spectinomycin. The three ant(3")-II genes, encoding for the three ANT(3")-II clades, are widely distributed in the genus Acinetobacter and always located in the same conserved genomic region. According to their prevalence, these genes are intrinsic in Acinetobacter baumannii, Acinetobacter pittii, and Acinetobacter gyllenbergii. We also demonstrated that the ant(3")-II genes are located in a homologous recombination hotspot and were recurrently transferred among Acinetobacter species. In conclusion, our findings demonstrated a novel mechanism of natural resistance in Acinetobacter spp., identified a novel subclass of aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferase and provided new insight into the evolutionary history of intrinsic resistance genes. PMID:28152054

  2. Aminoglucósidos: mirada actual desde su historia Aminoglycosides: a present look based on their history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Aliño Santiago

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Se refiere la historia, mecanismos de acción y eficacia de los aminoglucósidos en los pacientes pediátricos, así como las limitaciones de su utilidad por el surgimiento de resistencias bacterianas originadas por empleo abusivo. Se presenta la estrategia de administración de monodosis, como alternativa frente al método tradicional de dosis fraccionadas, y también las complicaciones más frecuentes y graves de los aminoglucósidos y su sinergismo con otras familias de antimicrobianos. Y se citan investigaciones realizadas en el país en materia de terapia antibiótica.We referred to history, mechanisms of action and efficacy of aminoglycosides in pediatric patients as well as limitations in their use because of the emergence of bacterial resistance caused by overuse. The one-dose administration strategy as an alternative to the traditional methods of fractioned doses, the most frequent and serious complictions of aminoglycosides and their sinergism with other antimicrobial families were presented. We quoted research studies on antibiotic therapy made in the country.

  3. Application of protein typing in molecular epidemiological investigation of nosocomial infection outbreak of aminoglycoside-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Min; Tang, Min; Ding, Yinghuan; Wu, Zecai; Xiang, Chengyu; Yang, Kui; Zhang, Zhang; Li, Baolin; Deng, Zhenghua; Liu, Jinbo

    2017-12-16

    Pseudomonas aeruginosan has emerged as an important pathogen elated to serious infections and nosocomial outbreaks worldwide. This study was conducted to understand the prevalence of aminoglycoside (AMG)-resistant P. aeruginosa in our hospital and to provide a scientific basis for control measures against nosocomial infections. Eighty-two strains of P. aeruginosa were isolated from clinical departments and divided into AMG-resistant strains and AMG-sensitive strains based on susceptibility test results. AMG-resistant strains were typed by drug resistance gene typing (DRGT) and protein typing. Five kinds of aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme (AME) genes were detected in the AMG-resistant group. AMG-resistant P. aeruginosa strains were classified into three types and six subtypes by DRGT. Four protein peaks, namely, 9900.02, 7600.04, 9101.25 and 10,372.87 Da, were significantly and differentially expressed between the two groups. AMG-resistant P. aeruginosa strains were also categorised into three types and six subtypes at the distance level of 10 by protein typing. AMG-resistant P. aeruginosa was cloned spread in our hospital; the timely implementation of nosocomial infection prevention and control strategies were needed in preventing outbreaks and epidemic of AMG-resistant P. aeruginosa. SELDI-TOF MS technology can be used for bacterial typing, which provides a new method of clinical epidemiological survey and nosocomial infection control.

  4. d-Tubocurarine and Berbamine: Alkaloids That Are Permeant Blockers of the Hair Cell's Mechano-Electrical Transducer Channel and Protect from Aminoglycoside Toxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirkwood, Nerissa K.; Derudas, Marco; Kenyon, Emma J; Huckvale, Rosemary; van Netten, Sietse; Ward, Simon; Richardson, Guy P; Kros, Corne J

    2017-01-01

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics are widely used for the treatment of life-threatening bacterial infections, but cause permanent hearing loss in a substantial proportion of treated patients. The sensory hair cells of the inner ear are damaged following entry of these antibiotics via the mechano-electrical

  5. Antibiotic stress-induced modulation of the endoribonucleolytic activity of RNase III and RNase G confers resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wooseok; Kim, Yong-Hak; Sim, Se-Hoon; Hwang, Soonhye; Lee, Jung-Hyun; Lee, Younghoon; Bae, Jeehyeon; Hwang, Jihwan; Lee, Kangseok

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report a resistance mechanism that is induced through the modulation of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) processing on the exposure of Escherichia coli cells to aminoglycoside antibiotics. We observed decreased expression levels of RNase G associated with increased RNase III activity on rng mRNA in a subgroup of E. coli isolates that transiently acquired resistance to low levels of kanamycin or streptomycin. Analyses of 16S rRNA from the aminoglycoside-resistant E. coli cells, in addition to mutagenesis studies, demonstrated that the accumulation of 16S rRNA precursors containing 3–8 extra nucleotides at the 5’ terminus, which results from incomplete processing by RNase G, is responsible for the observed aminoglycoside resistance. Chemical protection, mass spectrometry analysis and cell-free translation assays revealed that the ribosomes from rng-deleted E. coli have decreased binding capacity for, and diminished sensitivity to, streptomycin and neomycin, compared with wild-type cells. It was observed that the deletion of rng had similar effects in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain SL1344. Our findings suggest that modulation of the endoribonucleolytic activity of RNase III and RNase G constitutes a previously uncharacterized regulatory pathway for adaptive resistance in E. coli and related gram-negative bacteria to aminoglycoside antibiotics. PMID:24489121

  6. Clinical evaluation and mitochondrial DNA sequence analysis in two Chinese families with aminoglycoside-induced and non-syndromic hearing loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Lidong; Wang Qiuju; Qian Yaping; Li Ronghua; Cao Juayng; Hart, Laura Christine; Zhai Suoqiang; Han Dongyi; Young Wieyen; Guan Minxin

    2005-01-01

    We report here the clinical, genetic, and molecular characterization of two Chinese pedigrees with aminoglycoside-induced and non-syndromic hearing impairment. Clinical evaluation revealed the variable phenotype of hearing impairment including audiometric configuration in these subjects. Penetrances of hearing loss in BJ105 and BJ106 pedigrees are 67% and 33%, respectively. In particular, three of 10 affected matrilineal relatives of BJ105 pedigree had aminoglycoside-induced hearing loss, while seven affected matrilineal relatives in BJ105 pedigree and six affected matrilineal relatives in BJ106 pedigree did not have a history of exposure to aminoglycosides. Sequence analysis of the complete mitochondrial genomes in these pedigrees showed the identical homoplasmic A1555G mutation and distinct sets of mtDNA variants belonging to haplogroups F3 and M7b. These variants showed no evolutionary conservation, implying that mitochondrial haplotype may not play a significant role in the phenotypic expression of the A1555G mutation in these Chinese pedigrees. However, aminoglycosides and nuclear backgrounds appear to be major modifier factors for the phenotypic manifestation of the A1555G mutation in these Chinese families

  7. The relationship between the use of flucloxacillin, vancomycin, aminoglycosides and ciprofloxacin and the susceptibility patterns of coagulase-negative staphylococci recovered from blood cultures.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, JG; Kosterink, JGW; Degener, JE

    1997-01-01

    Antibiotic use is a cause of selection of multiresistant bacterial strains. Over three years (1990-1992) we studied the relation between the use of flucloxacillin, vancomycin, aminoglycosides and ciprofloxacin and the susceptibility of coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) recovered from blood

  8. Antibiotic stress-induced modulation of the endoribonucleolytic activity of RNase III and RNase G confers resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wooseok; Kim, Yong-Hak; Sim, Se-Hoon; Hwang, Soonhye; Lee, Jung-Hyun; Lee, Younghoon; Bae, Jeehyeon; Hwang, Jihwan; Lee, Kangseok

    2014-04-01

    Here, we report a resistance mechanism that is induced through the modulation of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) processing on the exposure of Escherichia coli cells to aminoglycoside antibiotics. We observed decreased expression levels of RNase G associated with increased RNase III activity on rng mRNA in a subgroup of E. coli isolates that transiently acquired resistance to low levels of kanamycin or streptomycin. Analyses of 16S rRNA from the aminoglycoside-resistant E. coli cells, in addition to mutagenesis studies, demonstrated that the accumulation of 16S rRNA precursors containing 3-8 extra nucleotides at the 5' terminus, which results from incomplete processing by RNase G, is responsible for the observed aminoglycoside resistance. Chemical protection, mass spectrometry analysis and cell-free translation assays revealed that the ribosomes from rng-deleted E. coli have decreased binding capacity for, and diminished sensitivity to, streptomycin and neomycin, compared with wild-type cells. It was observed that the deletion of rng had similar effects in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain SL1344. Our findings suggest that modulation of the endoribonucleolytic activity of RNase III and RNase G constitutes a previously uncharacterized regulatory pathway for adaptive resistance in E. coli and related gram-negative bacteria to aminoglycoside antibiotics.

  9. Sulfonamide-Based Inhibitors of Aminoglycoside Acetyltransferase Eis Abolish Resistance to Kanamycin in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garzan, Atefeh; Willby, Melisa J.; Green, Keith D.; Gajadeera, Chathurada S.; Hou, Caixia; Tsodikov, Oleg V.; Posey, James E.; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie

    2016-12-08

    A two-drug combination therapy where one drug targets an offending cell and the other targets a resistance mechanism to the first drug is a time-tested, yet underexploited approach to combat or prevent drug resistance. By high-throughput screening, we identified a sulfonamide scaffold that served as a pharmacophore to generate inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis acetyltransferase Eis, whose upregulation causes resistance to the aminoglycoside (AG) antibiotic kanamycin A (KAN) in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Rational systematic derivatization of this scaffold to maximize Eis inhibition and abolish the Eis-mediated KAN resistance of M. tuberculosis yielded several highly potent agents. A crystal structure of Eis in complex with one of the most potent inhibitors revealed that the inhibitor bound Eis in the AG-binding pocket held by a conformationally malleable region of Eis (residues 28–37) bearing key hydrophobic residues. These Eis inhibitors are promising leads for preclinical development of innovative AG combination therapies against resistant TB.

  10. MexXY efflux pump overexpression and aminoglycoside resistance in cystic fibrosis isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from chronic infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manu; Yau, Yvonne C W; Wang, Shirley; Waters, Valerie; Kumar, Ayush

    2017-12-01

    In this study, we analyzed 15 multidrug-resistant cystic fibrosis isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from chronic lung infections for expression of 4 different multidrug efflux systems (MexAB-OprM, MexCD-OprJ, MexEF-OprN, and MexXY), using quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR. Overexpression of MexXY pump was observed in all of the isolates tested. Analysis of regulatory genes that control the expression of these 4 efflux pumps revealed a number of previously uncharacterized mutations. Our work shows that MexXY pump overexpression is common in cystic fibrosis isolates and could be contributing to their reduced aminoglycoside susceptibility. Further, we also identified novel mutations in the regulatory genes of the 4 abovementioned Resistance-Nodulation-Division superfamily pumps that may be involved in the overexpression of these pumps.

  11. Prevalence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance and aminoglycoside resistance determinants among carbapeneme non-susceptible Enterobacter cloacae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shifeng Huang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Simultaneous resistance to aminoglycosides and fluoroquinolones in carbapeneme non-susceptible (CNS isolates will inevitably create problems. The present study was performed to characterize the prevalence of the plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinants (QRDs and aminoglycoside resistance determinants (ARDs among the CNS Enterobacter cloacae (E. cloacae isolates in a Chinese teaching hospital, and to acquire their molecular epidemiological characteristics. METHODS: The β-lactamases genes (including class A carbapenemase genes bla(KPC and bla(SME, metallo-β-lactamase genes (MBLs bla(IMP, bla(VIM and bla(NDM, and extended spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs,bla(CTX-M, bla(TEM and bla(SHV, QRDs (including qnrA, qnrB, qnrS and aac(6'-Ib-cr and ARDs (including aac(6'-Ib, armA and rmtB of these 35 isolates were determined by PCR and sequenced bidirectionally. The clonal relatedness was investigated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE. RESULTS: Of the 35 isolates, 9 (25.7% harbored a carbapenemase gene; 23 (65.7% carried ESBLs; 24 (68.6% were QRD positive; and 27 (77.1% were ARD positive. Among the 5 bla(IMP-8 positive strains, 4 (80% contained both ESBL and QRD genes, and all the 5 (100% harbored ARD genes. Of the 23 ESBLs positive isolates, 6 (26.1% were carbapenemase positive, 14 (60.9% were QRD positive, and 18 (78.3% were ARD positive. PFGE revealed genetic diversity among the 35 isolates, indicating that the high prevalence of CNS E. cloacae isolates was not caused by clonal dissemination. CONCLUSION: QRD and ARD genes were highly prevalent among the CNS E. cloacae isolates. Multiple resistant genes were co-expressed in the same isolates. The CNS E. cloacae isolate co-expressing bla(NDM-1, bla(IMP-26, qnrA1 and qnrS1 was first reported.

  12. Subcellular mechanisms involved in apoptosis induced by aminoglycoside antibiotics: Insights on p53, proteasome and endoplasmic reticulum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denamur, Sophie; Boland, Lidvine; Beyaert, Maxime; Verstraeten, Sandrine L.; Fillet, Marianne; Tulkens, Paul M.; Bontemps, Françoise; Mingeot-Leclercq, Marie-Paule

    2016-01-01

    Gentamicin, an aminoglycoside used to treat severe bacterial infections, may cause acute renal failure. In the renal cell line LLC-PK1, gentamicin accumulates in lysosomes, induces alterations of their permeability, and triggers the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis via activation of caspase-9 and -3 and changes in Bcl-2 family proteins. Early ROS production in lysosomes has been associated with gentamicin induced lysosomal membrane permeabilization. In order to better understand the multiple interconnected pathways of gentamicin-induced apoptosis and ensuing renal cell toxicity, we investigated the effect of gentamicin on p53 and p21 levels. We also studied the potential effect of gentamicin on proteasome by measuring the chymotrypsin-, trypsin- and caspase-like activities, and on endoplasmic reticulum by determining phopho-eIF2α, caspase-12 activation and GRP78 and 94. We observed an increase in p53 levels, which was dependent on ROS production. Accumulation of p53 resulted in accumulation of p21 and of phospho-eIF2α. These effects could be related to an impairment of proteasome as we demonstrated an inhibition of trypsin-and caspase-like activities. Moderate endoplasmic reticulum stress could also participate to cellular toxicity induced by gentamicin, with activation of caspase-12 without change in GRP74 and GRP98. All together, these data provide new mechanistic insights into the apoptosis induced by aminoglycoside antibiotics on renal cell lines. - Highlights: • Gentamicin induces apoptosis through p53 pathway. • Gentamicin inhibits proteosomal activity. • Gentamicin activates caspase-12.

  13. Impairing methylations at ribosome RNA, a point mutation-dependent strategy for aminoglycoside resistance: the rsmG case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benítez-Páez, Alfonso; Cárdenas-Brito, Sonia; Corredor, Mauricio; Villarroya, Magda; Armengod, María Eugenia

    2014-04-01

    Aminoglycosides like streptomycin are well-known for binding at specific regions of ribosome RNA and then acting as translation inhibitors. Nowadays, several pathogens have been detected to acquire an undefined strategy involving mutation at non structural ribosome genes like those acting as RNA methylases. rsmG is one of those genes which encodes an AdoMet-dependent methyltransferase responsible for the synthesis of m 7 G527 in the 530 loop of bacterial 16S rRNA. This loop is universally conserved, plays a key role in ribosomal accuracy, and is a target for streptomycin binding. Loss of the m 7 G527 modification confers low-level streptomycin resistance and may affect ribosomal functioning. After taking into account genetic information indicating that some clinical isolates of human pathogens show streptomycin resistance associated with mutations at rsmG , we decided to explore new hot spots for mutation capable of impairing the RsmG in vivo function and of promoting low-level streptomycin resistance. To gain insights into the molecular and genetic mechanism of acquiring this aminoglycoside resistance phenotype and the emergence of high-level streptomycin resistance in rsmG mutants, we mutated Escherichia coli rsmG and also performed a genotyping study on rpsL from several isolates showing the ability to grow at higher streptomycin concentrations than parental strains. We found that the mutations at rpsL were preferentially present in these mutants, and we observed a clear synergy between rsmG and rpsL genes to induce streptomycin resistance. We contribute to understand a common mechanism that is probably transferable to other ribosome RNA methylase genes responsible for modifications at central sites for ribosome function.

  14. The major aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme AAC(3)-II found in Escherichia coli determines a significant disparity in its resistance to gentamicin and amikacin in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yonghong; Hu, Yunjian

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes in Escherichia coli in different areas of China and to explore the relationship between pandemic enzyme type and bacterial resistance to antimicrobial agents in China. Gentamicin- or etimicin-resistant clinical isolates of E. coli were collected from different areas of China, and the in vitro antibacterial activity of 11 aminoglycoside agents was determined using standard (Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute) agar dilution methods. Twelve aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme genes were detected by PCR and confirmed by DNA sequencing. A total of 205 E. coli strains were collected from nine hospitals in seven cities. All strains were highly resistant to gentamicin or etimicin, whereas resistance to tobramycin, netilmicin, and kanamycin was slightly lower. However, less than 15% of isolates were resistant to amikacin and isepamicin. Of the gentamicin-resistant strains, 88.2% and 86.7% were sensitive to isepamicin and amikacin, respectively. Five aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme genes were detected in 191 strains, whereas the remaining 14 strains were negative. The most common gene type was aac(3)-II (162 strains), followed by aac(6')-I (50 strains), ant(3″)-I (28 strains), aph(3')-II (20 strains), and ant(2″)-I (20 strains). Ninety-five strains yielded aac(3)-II only, whereas the others contained two or three genes. The three main gene combinations were aac(6')-I/aac(3)-II (28 strains), aac(3)-II/ant(3″)-I (11 strains), and aac(3)-II/aac(6')-I (10 strains). Regional bacterial resistance and enzyme distribution were roughly similar, although minor differences were found in Guangzhou, Jinan, and Dalian, which were the sources of most of the amikacin- or isepamicin-resistant strains. Chinese clinical isolates of E. coli remain highly resistant to gentamicin and etimicin, but are susceptible to amikacin and isepamicin. The dominant type of aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme

  15. Looking for new preparations for antibacterial therapy. IV. New antimicrobial agents from the aminoglycoside, macrolide and tetracycline groups in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpiuk, Izabela; Tyski, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    This paper is the fourth in a series on the search for new antibacterial therapies, and covers new compounds belonging to the aminoglycoside, macrolide and tetracycline groups of antibiotics. The article describes eight new substances at the clinical trial stage of development. One of them is an aminoglycoside (plazomicin), four are macrolides, collectively known as ketolides (cethromycin, solithromycin, EDP-420 and EDP-788), and the remaining three are members of the tetracycline group (omadacycline, eravacycline, sarecycline). Despite the long-term and very expensive process of collecting documentation proving the efficacy of antimicrobial drugs, there is a possibility, that particular compounds find use as active ingredients of medicinal products allowing for the triumph over the clinically relevant, dangerous bacteria.

  16. Simple measurement of isepamicin, a new aminoglycoside antibiotic, in guinea pig and human plasma, using high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dionisotti, S.; Bamonte, F.; Scaglione, F.; Ongini, E.

    1991-01-01

    Isepamicin, the 1-N-(S-alpha-hydroxy-beta-aminopropionyl) derivative of gentamicin B, is a new aminoglycoside antibiotic, which not only has most of the properties of amikacin but also is effective against several amikacin-resistant strains of bacteria. The drug was assayed in guinea-pig and human plasma with a high-performance liquid chromatographic procedure using precolumn derivatization with 1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene and ultraviolet detection. Linearity was established over the range 0.5-40 micrograms/ml using 50 microliters of plasma. Accuracy has a mean relative error of less than 3% and precision a mean coefficient of variation of 5%. Isepamicin was determined without interference from plasma constituents or other drugs commonly prescribed during aminoglycoside therapy. This procedure correlates well with radioimmunoassay and can be used either in experimental studies or therapeutic monitoring of plasma levels

  17. Simple measurement of isepamicin, a new aminoglycoside antibiotic, in guinea pig and human plasma, using high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dionisotti, S.; Bamonte, F.; Scaglione, F.; Ongini, E. (Research Lab., Schering-Plough S.P.A., Comazzo, Milan (Italy))

    1991-01-01

    Isepamicin, the 1-N-(S-alpha-hydroxy-beta-aminopropionyl) derivative of gentamicin B, is a new aminoglycoside antibiotic, which not only has most of the properties of amikacin but also is effective against several amikacin-resistant strains of bacteria. The drug was assayed in guinea-pig and human plasma with a high-performance liquid chromatographic procedure using precolumn derivatization with 1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene and ultraviolet detection. Linearity was established over the range 0.5-40 micrograms/ml using 50 microliters of plasma. Accuracy has a mean relative error of less than 3% and precision a mean coefficient of variation of 5%. Isepamicin was determined without interference from plasma constituents or other drugs commonly prescribed during aminoglycoside therapy. This procedure correlates well with radioimmunoassay and can be used either in experimental studies or therapeutic monitoring of plasma levels.

  18. Emergence of ArmA, a 16S rRNA methylase in highly aminoglycoside-resistant clinical isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Klebsiella oxytoca in Okinawa, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uechi, Kohei; Tada, Tatsuya; Shimada, Kayo; Nakasone, Isamu; Sonozaki, Tetsu; Kirikae, Teruo; Fujita, Jiro

    2018-01-01

    This study describes highly aminoglycoside-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae and Klebsiella oxytoca clinical isolates obtained from an inpatient in Okinawa, Japan, with no known record of traveling overseas. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of amikacin and arbekacin against these strains were >1024 μg/ml. Whole-genome sequencing analysis revealed that these isolates harbored armA, which encodes a 16S rRNA methylase, ArmA, that confers pan-aminoglycoside resistance. This is the second report of K. pneumoniae harboring armA and the first report of K. oxytoca harboring a 16S rRNA methylase encoding gene in Japan. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Structure of the phosphotransferase domain of the bifunctional aminoglycoside-resistance enzyme AAC(6′)-Ie-APH(2′′)-Ia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Clyde A.; Toth, Marta; Bhattacharya, Monolekha; Frase, Hilary; Vakulenko, Sergei B.

    2014-01-01

    The bifunctional acetyltransferase(6′)-Ie-phosphotransfer­ase(2′′)-Ia [AAC(6′)-Ie-APH(2′′)-Ia] is the most important aminoglycoside-resistance enzyme in Gram-positive bacteria, conferring resistance to almost all known aminoglycoside antibiotics in clinical use. Owing to its importance, this enzyme has been the focus of intensive research since its isolation in the mid-1980s but, despite much effort, structural details of AAC(6′)-Ie-APH(2′′)-Ia have remained elusive. The structure of the Mg2GDP complex of the APH(2′′)-Ia domain of the bifunctional enzyme has now been determined at 2.3 Å resolution. The structure of APH(2′′)-Ia is reminiscent of the structures of other aminoglycoside phosphotransferases, having a two-domain architecture with the nucleotide-binding site located at the junction of the two domains. Unlike the previously characterized APH(2′′)-IIa and APH(2′′)-IVa enzymes, which are capable of utilizing both ATP and GTP as the phosphate donors, APH(2′′)-Ia uses GTP exclusively in the phosphorylation of the aminoglycoside antibiotics, and in this regard closely resembles the GTP-dependent APH(2′′)-IIIa enzyme. In APH(2′′)-Ia this GTP selectivity is governed by the presence of a ‘gatekeeper’ residue, Tyr100, the side chain of which projects into the active site and effectively blocks access to the adenine-binding template. Mutation of this tyrosine residue to a less bulky phenylalanine provides better access for ATP to the NTP-binding template and converts APH(2′′)-Ia into a dual-specificity enzyme. PMID:24914967

  20. Increasing Prevalence of Aminoglycoside-Resistant Enterococcus faecalis Isolates Due to the aac(6')-aph(2") Gene: A Therapeutic Problem in Kermanshah, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khani, Mitra; Fatollahzade, Mahdie; Pajavand, Hamid; Bakhtiari, Somaye; Abiri, Ramin

    2016-03-01

    Enterococci are important pathogens in nosocomial infections. Various types of antibiotics, such as aminoglycosides, are used for treatment of these infections. Enterococci can acquire resistant traits, which can lead to therapeutic problems with aminoglycosides. This study was designed to identify the prevalence of, and to compare, the aac(6')-aph(2") and aph(3)-IIIa genes and their antimicrobial resistance patterns among Enterococcus faecalis and E. faecium isolates from patients at Imam Reza hospital in Kermanshah in 2011 - 2012. One hundred thirty-eight clinical specimens collected from different wards of Imam Reza hospital were identified to the species level by biochemical tests. Antimicrobial susceptibility tests against kanamycin, teicoplanin, streptomycin, imipenem, ciprofloxacin, and ampicillin were performed by the disk diffusion method. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of gentamicin, streptomycin, kanamycin, and amikacin were evaluated with the microbroth dilution method. The aminoglycoside resistance genes aac(6')-aph(2") and aph(3")-IIIa were analyzed with multiplex PCR. The prevalence of isolates was 33 (24.1%) for E. faecium and 63 (46%) for E. faecalis. Eighty-nine percent of the isolates were high-level gentamicin resistant (HLGR), and 32.8% of E. faecium isolates and 67.2% of E. faecalis isolates carried aac(6')-aph(2"). The prevalence of aph(3")-IIIa among the E. faecalis and E. faecium isolates was 22.7% and 77.3%, respectively. Remarkably increased incidence of aac(6')-aph(2") among HLGR isolates explains the relationship between this gene and the high level of resistance to aminoglycosides. As the resistant gene among enterococci can be transferred, the use of new-generation antibiotics is necessary.

  1. Association of the novel aminoglycoside resistance determinant RmtF with NDM carbapenemase in Enterobacteriaceae isolated in India and the UK

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hidalgo, Laura; Hopkins, Katie L; Gutierrez, Belen

    2013-01-01

    16S rRNA methyltransferases are an emerging mechanism conferring high-level resistance to clinically relevant aminoglycosides and have been associated with important mechanisms such as NDM-1. We sought genes encoding these enzymes in isolates highly resistant (MIC >200 mg/L) to gentamicin and ami...... and amikacin from an Indian hospital and we additionally screened for the novel RmtF enzyme in 132 UK isolates containing NDM....

  2. Identification of a small molecule inhibitor of the aminoglycoside 6'-N-acetyltransferase type ib [AAC(6')-ib] using mixture-based combinatorial libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Tung; Chiem, Kevin; Jani, Saumya; Arivett, Brock A; Lin, David L; Lad, Rupali; Jimenez, Verónica; Farone, Mary B; Debevec, Ginamarie; Santos, Radleigh; Giulianotti, Marc; Pinilla, Clemencia; Tolmasky, Marcelo E

    2018-02-01

    The aminoglycoside 6'-N-acetyltransferase type Ib [AAC(6')-Ib] is the most widely distributed enzyme among AAC(6')-I-producing Gram-negative pathogens and confers resistance to clinically relevant aminoglycosides including amikacin. This enzyme is therefore ideal to target with enzymatic inhibitors that could overcome resistance to aminoglycosides. The search for inhibitors was carried out using mixture-based combinatorial libraries, the scaffold ranking approach, and the positional scanning strategy. A library with high inhibitory activity had pyrrolidine pentamine scaffold and was selected for further analysis. This library contained 738,192 compounds with functionalities derived from 26 different amino acids (R1, R2 and R3) and 42 different carboxylic acids (R4) in four R group functionalities. The most active compounds all contained S-phenyl (R1 and R3) and S-hydromethyl (R2) functionalities at three locations and differed at the R4 position. The compound containing 3-phenylbutyl at R4 (compound 206) was a robust enzymatic inhibitor in vitro, in combination with amikacin potentiated the inhibition of growth of three resistant bacteria in culture, and improved survival when used as treatment of Galleria mellonella infected with aac(6')-Ib-harboring Klebsiella pneumoniae and Acinetobacter baumannii strains. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  3. Purification, Crystallization And Preliminary X-Ray Analysis of Aminoglycoside-2 ''-Phosphotransferase-Ic [APH(2 '')-Ic] From Enterococcus Gallinarum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byrnes, L.J.; /SLAC, SSRL; Badarau, A.; Vakulenko, S.B.; /Notre Dame U.; Smith, C.A.; /SLAC, SSRL

    2009-04-30

    Bacterial resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics is primarily the result of deactivation of the drugs. Three families of enzymes are responsible for this activity, with one such family being the aminoglycoside phosphotransferases (APHs). The gene encoding one of these enzymes, aminoglycoside-2{double_prime}-phosphotransferase-Ic [APH(2{double_prime})-Ic] from Enterococcus gallinarum, has been cloned and the wild-type protein (comprising 308 amino-acid residues) and three mutants that showed elevated minimum inhibitory concentrations towards gentamicin (F108L, H258L and a double mutant F108L/H258L) were expressed in Escherichia coli and subsequently purified. All APH(2{double_prime})-Ic variants were crystallized in the presence of 14-20%(w/v) PEG 4000, 0.25 M MgCl{sub 2}, 0.1 M Tris-HCl pH 8.5 and 1 mM Mg{sub 2}GTP. The crystals belong to the monoclinic space group C2, with one molecule in the asymmetric unit. The approximate unit-cell parameters are a = 82.4, b = 54.2, c = 77.0 {angstrom}, {beta} = 108.8{sup o}. X-ray diffraction data were collected to approximately 2.15 {angstrom} resolution from an F108L crystal at beamline BL9-2 at SSRL, Stanford, California, USA.

  4. A two-component regulatory system interconnects resistance to polymyxins, aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones, and β-lactams in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Cédric; Plésiat, Patrick; Jeannot, Katy

    2011-03-01

    Constitutive overexpression of the active efflux system MexXY/OprM is a major cause of resistance to aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones, and cefepime in clinical strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Upregulation of this pump often results from mutations occurring in mexZ, the local repressor gene of the mexXY operon. In this study, analysis of MexXY-overproducing mutants selected in vitro from reference strain PAO1Bes on amikacin (at a concentration 1.5-fold higher than the MIC) led to identification of a new class of mutants harboring an intact mexZ gene and exhibiting increased resistance to colistin and imipenem in addition to aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones, and cefepime. Reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) experiments on a selected clone named PAOW2 demonstrated that mexXY overexpression was independent of mexZ and the PA5471 gene, which is required for drug-dependent induction of mexXY. Furthermore, the transcript levels of the oprD gene, which encodes the carbapenem-selective porin OprD, were found to be reduced drastically in PAOW2. Whole-genome sequencing revealed a single mutation resulting in an M59I substitution in the ParR protein, the response regulator of the ParRS two-component regulatory system (with ParS being the sensor kinase), which is required for adaptive resistance of P. aeruginosa to polycationic peptides such as colistin. The multidrug resistance phenotype was suppressed in PAOW2 by deletion of the parS and parRS genes and conferred to PAO1Bes by chromosomal insertion of the mutated parRS locus from PAOW2. As shown by transcriptomic analysis, only a very small number of genes were expressed differentially between PAOW2 and PAO1Bes, including the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) modification operon arnBCADTEF-ugd, responsible for resistance to polycationic agents. Exposure of wild-type PAO1Bes to different polycationic peptides, including colistin, was shown to result in increased mexY and repressed oprD expression via Par

  5. Biochemical and Structural Analysis of an Eis Family Aminoglycoside Acetyltransferase from Bacillus anthracis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Keith D.; Biswas, Tapan; Chang, Changsoo; Wu, Ruiying; Chen, Wenjing; Janes, Brian K.; Chalupska, Dominika; Gornicki, Piotr; Hanna, Philip C.; Tsodikov, Oleg V.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie

    2015-05-26

    Proteins from the enhanced intracellular survival (Eis) family are versatile acetyltransferases that acetylate amines at multiple positions of several aminoglycosides (AGs). Their upregulation confers drug resistance. Homologues of Eis are present in diverse bacteria, including many pathogens. Eis from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Eis_Mtb) has been well characterized. In this study, we explored the AG specificity and catalytic efficiency of the Eis family protein from Bacillus anthracis (Eis_Ban). Kinetic analysis of specificity and catalytic efficiency of acetylation of six AGs indicates that Eis_Ban displays significant differences from Eis_Mtb in both substrate binding and catalytic efficiency. The number of acetylated amines was also different for several AGs, indicating a distinct regiospecificity of Eis_Ban. Furthermore, most recently identified inhibitors of Eis_Mtb did not inhibit Eis_Ban, underscoring the differences between these two enzymes. To explain these differences, we determined an Eis_Ban crystal structure. The comparison of the crystal structures of Eis_Ban and Eis_Mtb demonstrates that critical residues lining their respective substrate binding pockets differ substantially, explaining their distinct specificities. Our results suggest that acetyltransferases of the Eis family evolved divergently to garner distinct specificities while conserving catalytic efficiency, possibly to counter distinct chemical challenges. The unique specificity features of these enzymes can be utilized as tools for developing AGs with novel modifications and help guide specific AG treatments to avoid Eis-mediated resistance.

  6. tmRNA decreases the bactericidal activity of aminoglycosides and the susceptibility to inhibitors of cell wall synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luidalepp, Hannes; Hallier, Marc; Felden, Brice; Tenson, Tanel

    2005-04-01

    Trans-translation is a process that recycles ribosomes stalled on problematic mRNAs. tmRNA, coded by the DeltassrA gene, is a major component of trans-translation. Bacteria lacking tmRNA are more sensitive to several inhibitors of protein synthesis when compared to a wild type strain. We measured bacterial growth of the DeltassrA and wild type strains in Escherichia coli in the presence of 14 antibiotics including some that do not target protein synthesis. Both the optical density of the bacterial cultures and the number of viable cells were monitored. For the ribosome-targeted antibiotics, sensitization was observed on erythromycin, chloramphenicol, kanamycin, puromycin and streptomycin. Minor or no effects were observed with clindamycin, tetracycline and spectinomycin. Surprisingly, the DeltassrA strain is more sensitive than wild type to inhibitors of cell wall synthesis: fosfomycin and ampicillin. No growth difference was observed on drugs with other target sites: ofloxacin, norfloxacin, rifampicin and trimethoprim. Sensitization to antibiotics having target sites other than the ribosome suggests that trans-translation could influence antibiotic-induced stress responses. In trans-translation-deficient bacteria, cell death is significantly enhanced by the two aminoglycosides that induce translational misreading, streptomycin and kanamycin.

  7. Rapid identification of aminoglycoside-induced deafness gene mutations using multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shasha; Xiang, Guangxin; Kang, Dongyang; Wang, Chen; Kong, Yanling; Zhang, Xun; Liang, Shujian; Mitchelson, Keith; Xing, Wanli; Dai, Pu

    2015-07-01

    Exposure to aminoglycoside antibiotics can induce ototoxicity in genetically susceptible individuals carrying certain mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations (C1494T and A1555G), resulting in hearing loss. So, a rapid diagnostic approach is needed to accurately identify subjects carrying such gene mutations. In the present study, we describe a rapid and reliable four-color, real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay for simultaneously detecting two mtDNA 12S rRNA gene variants, A1555G and C1494T, which are prevalent in the Han Chinese population. This multiplex assay incorporates three allele-specific TaqMan probes labeled with different fluorophores in a single reaction, providing high genotyping accuracy for clinical blood samples. Tests with C1494T, A1555G and wild-type DNA exhibited high sensitivity, specificity, reproducibility and accuracy of discriminating mutations from wild-type. This study shows that this simple and inexpensive method can be used for routine molecular diagnostics and potentially for large-scale genetic screening. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  8. Activation of the cryptic aac(6')-Iy aminoglycoside resistance gene of Salmonella by a chromosomal deletion generating a transcriptional fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnet, S; Courvalin, P; Lambert, T

    1999-11-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotype Enteritidis BM4361 and BM4362 were isolated from the same patient. BM4361 was susceptible to aminoglycosides, whereas BM4362 was resistant to tobramycin owing to synthesis of a 6'-N-acetyltransferase type I [AAC(6')-I]. Comparative analysis of nucleotide sequences, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns, and Southern hybridizations indicated that the chromosomal aac(6')-Iy genes for the enzyme in both strains were identical and that BM4362 derived from BM4361 following a ca. 60-kb deletion that occurred 1.5 kb upstream from the resistance gene. Northern hybridizations showed that aac(6')-Iy was silent in BM4361 and highly expressed in BM4362 due to a transcriptional fusion. Primer extension mapping identified the transcriptional start site for aac(6')-Iy in BM4362: 5 bp downstream from the promoter of the nmpC gene. Study of the distribution of aac(6')-Iy by PCR and Southern hybridization with a specific probe indicated that the gene, although not found in S. enterica subsp. arizonae, was specific for Salmonella. In this bacterial genus, aac(6')-Iy was located downstream from a cluster of seven open reading frames analogous to an Escherichia coli locus that encodes enzymes putatively involved in carbohydrate transport or metabolism. This genomic environment suggests a role in the catabolism of a specific sugar for AAC(6')-Iy in Salmonella.

  9. Aminoglycoside resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis results from convergent evolution in the mexZ gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prickett, Michelle H; Hauser, Alan R; McColley, Susanna A; Cullina, Joanne; Potter, Eileen; Powers, Cathy; Jain, Manu

    2017-01-01

    Aminoglycoside (AG) resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis (CF) is associated with poorer clinical outcomes and is usually due to overexpression of the efflux pump MexXY. MexXY is regulated by mexZ, one of the most commonly mutated genes in CF P. aeruginosa isolates. Little is known about the evolutionary relationship between AG resistance, MexXY expression and mexZ mutations. To test the hypothesis that AG resistance in P. aeruginosa develops in parallel with higher MexXY expression and mexZ mutations. CF P. aeruginosa isolates were compared for chronically infected (CI) adults, CI children and children with new infection. One P. aeruginosa isolate from each patient was analysed for mexZ mutations, mexY mRNA expression and amikacin resistance. 56 patients with CF were enrolled: 21 children with new P. aeruginosa infection, 18 CI children and 17 CI adults. Amikacin resistance and mexY mRNA expression were higher in cohorts with longer P. aeruginosa infection. The prevalence of non-conservative mexZ mutations was 0%, 33% and 65% in children with new infection, CI children and CI adults, respectively. The same trend was seen in the ratio of non-conservative to non-synonymous mexZ mutations. Of isolates with non-conservative mexZ mutations, 59% were amikacin-resistant compared with 18% of isolates with non-synonymous mutations. The doubling rate of amikacin resistance and non-conservative mexZ mutations was approximately 5 years. P. aeruginosa mexZ mutations undergo positive selection resulting in increased mexY mRNA expression and amikacin resistance and likely play a role in bacterial adaption in the CF lung. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  10. Reduced Chance of Hearing Loss Associated with Therapeutic Drug Monitoring of Aminoglycosides in the Treatment of Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Altena, R; Dijkstra, J A; van der Meer, M E; Borjas Howard, J F; Kosterink, J G W; van Soolingen, D; van der Werf, T S; Alffenaar, J W C

    2017-03-01

    Hearing loss and nephrotoxicity are associated with prolonged treatment duration and higher dosage of amikacin and kanamycin. In our tuberculosis center, we used therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) targeting preset pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) surrogate endpoints in an attempt to maintain efficacy while preventing (oto)toxicity. To evaluate this strategy, we retrospectively evaluated medical charts of tuberculosis (TB) patients treated with amikacin or kanamycin in the period from 2000 to 2012. Patients with culture-confirmed multiresistant or extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR/XDR-TB) receiving amikacin or kanamycin as part of their TB treatment for at least 3 days were eligible for inclusion in this retrospective study. Clinical data, including maximum concentration ( C max ), C min , and audiometry data, were extracted from the patients' medical charts. A total of 80 patients met the inclusion criteria. The mean weighted C max /MIC ratios obtained from 57 patients were 31.2 for amikacin and 12.3 for kanamycin. The extent of hearing loss was limited and correlated with the cumulative drug dose per kg of body weight during daily administration. At follow-up, 35 (67.3%) of all patients had successful outcome; there were no relapses. At a median dose of 6.5 mg/kg, a correlation was found between the dose per kg of body weight during daily dosing and the extent of hearing loss in dB at 8,000 Hz. These findings suggest that the efficacy at this lower dosage is maintained with limited toxicity. A randomized controlled trial should provide final proof of the safety and efficacy of TDM-guided use of aminoglycosides in MDR-TB treatment. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  11. Robustness analysis of culturing perturbations on Escherichia coli colony biofilm beta-lactam and aminoglycoside antibiotic tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimenez-Taracido Lourdes

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biofilms are ubiquitous. For instance, the majority of medical infections are thought to involve biofilms. However even after decades of investigation, the in vivo efficacy of many antimicrobial strategies is still debated suggesting there is a need for better understanding of biofilm antimicrobial tolerances. The current study's goal is to characterize the robustness of biofilm antibiotic tolerance to medically and industrially relevant culturing perturbations. By definition, robust systems will return similar, predictable responses when perturbed while non-robust systems will return very different and potentially unpredictable responses. The predictability of an antibiotic tolerance response is essential to developing, testing, and employing antimicrobial strategies. Results The antibiotic tolerance of Escherichia coli colony biofilms was tested against beta-lactam and aminoglycoside class antibiotics. Control scenario tolerances were compared to tolerances under culturing perturbations including 1 different nutritional environments 2 different temperatures 3 interruption of cellular quorum sensing and 4 different biofilm culture ages. Here, antibiotic tolerance was defined in terms of culturable biofilm cells recovered after a twenty four hour antibiotic treatment. Colony biofilm antibiotic tolerances were not robust to perturbations. Altering basic culturing parameters like nutritional environment or temperature resulted in very different, non-intuitive antibiotic tolerance responses. Some minor perturbations like increasing the glucose concentration from 0.1 to 1 g/L caused a ten million fold difference in culturable cells over a twenty four hour antibiotic treatment. Conclusions The current study presents a basis for robustness analysis of biofilm antibiotic tolerance. Biofilm antibiotic tolerance can vary in unpredictable manners based on modest changes in culturing conditions. Common antimicrobial testing methods

  12. High Prevalence and Predominance of the aph(2″)-If Gene Conferring Aminoglycoside Resistance in Campylobacter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Hong; Liu, Dejun; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Qijing; Shen, Zhangqi

    2017-05-01

    Campylobacter is a major foodborne pathogen, and previous studies revealed that Campylobacter isolates from food-producing animals are increasingly resistant to gentamicin in China. The molecular epidemiology and genetic mechanisms responsible for gentamicin resistance in China have not been well understood. In this study, 607 Campylobacter isolates of chicken and swine origins collected in 2014 were analyzed, revealing that 15.6% (25/160) of the Campylobacter jejuni isolates and 79.9% (357/447) of the Campylobacter coli isolates were resistant to gentamicin. PCR detection of the gentamicin resistance genes indicated that aph(2″)-If was more prevalent than the previously identified aacA/aphD gene and has become the dominant gentamicin resistance determinant in Campylobacter Transformation and whole-genome sequencing as well as long-range PCR discovered that aph(2″)-If was located on a chromosomal segment inserted between two conserved genes, Cj0299 and panB Cloning of aph(2″)-If into gentamicin-susceptible C. jejuni NCTC 11168 confirmed its function in conferring high-level resistance to gentamicin and kanamycin. Molecular typing by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis suggested that both regional expansion of a particular clone and horizontal transmission were involved in the dissemination of the aph(2″)-If gene in Campylobacter To our knowledge, this is the first report describing the high prevalence of a chromosomally encoded aph(2″)-If gene in Campylobacter The high prevalence and predominance of this gene might be driven by the use of aminoglycoside antibiotics in food animal production in China and potentially compromise the usefulness of gentamicin as a therapeutic agent for Campylobacter -associated systemic infection. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  13. Meropenem potentiation of aminoglycoside activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa: involvement of the MexXY-OprM multidrug efflux system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Keith; Gilmour, Christie; Farha, Maya A; Parkins, Michael D; Klinoski, Rachael; Brown, Eric D

    2018-02-06

    To assess the ability of meropenem to potentiate aminoglycoside (AG) activity against laboratory and AG-resistant cystic fibrosis (CF) isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and to elucidate its mechanism of action. AG resistance gene deletions were engineered into P. aeruginosa laboratory and CF isolates using standard gene replacement technology. Susceptibility to AGs ± meropenem (at ½ MIC) was assessed using a serial 2-fold dilution assay. mexXY expression and MexXY-OprM efflux activity were quantified using quantitative PCR and an ethidium bromide accumulation assay, respectively. A screen for agents that rendered WT P. aeruginosa susceptible to a sub-MIC concentration of the AG paromomycin identified the carbapenem meropenem, which potentiated several additional AGs. Meropenem potentiation of AG activity was largely lost in a mutant lacking the MexXY-OprM multidrug efflux system, an indication that it was targeting this efflux system in enhancing P. aeruginosa susceptibility to AGs. Meropenem failed to block AG induction of mexXY expression or MexXY-OprM efflux activity, suggesting that it may be interfering with some MexXY-dependent process linked to AG susceptibility. Meropenem potentiated AG activity versus AG-resistant CF isolates, enhancing susceptibility to at least one AG in all isolates and susceptibility to all tested AGs in 50% of the isolates. Notably, meropenem potentiation of AG activity was linked to MexXY in some but not all CF isolates in which this was examined. Meropenem potentiates AG activity against laboratory and CF strains of P. aeruginosa, both dependent on and independent of MexXY, highlighting the complexity of AG resistance in this organism. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Combinations of β-Lactam or Aminoglycoside Antibiotics with Plectasin Are Synergistic against Methicillin-Sensitive and Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yanmin; Liu, Alexander; Vaudrey, James; Vaiciunaite, Brigita; Moigboi, Christiana; McTavish, Sharla M.; Kearns, Angela; Coates, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial infections remain the leading killer worldwide which is worsened by the continuous emergence of antibiotic resistance. In particular, methicillin-sensitive (MSSA) and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are prevalent and the latter can be difficult to treat. The traditional strategy of novel therapeutic drug development inevitably leads to emergence of resistant strains, rendering the new drugs ineffective. Therefore, rejuvenating the therapeutic potentials of existing antibiotics offers an attractive novel strategy. Plectasin, a defensin antimicrobial peptide, potentiates the activities of other antibiotics such as β-lactams, aminoglycosides and glycopeptides against MSSA and MRSA. We performed in vitro and in vivo investigations to test against genetically diverse clinical isolates of MSSA (n = 101) and MRSA (n = 115). Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) were determined by the broth microdilution method. The effects of combining plectasin with β-lactams, aminoglycosides and glycopeptides were examined using the chequerboard method and time kill curves. A murine neutropenic thigh model and a murine peritoneal infection model were used to test the effect of combination in vivo. Determined by factional inhibitory concentration index (FICI), plectasin in combination with aminoglycosides (gentamicin, neomycin or amikacin) displayed synergistic effects in 76-78% of MSSA and MRSA. A similar synergistic response was observed when plectasin was combined with β-lactams (penicillin, amoxicillin or flucloxacillin) in 87–89% of MSSA and MRSA. Interestingly, no such interaction was observed when plectasin was paired with vancomycin. Time kill analysis also demonstrated significant synergistic activities when plectasin was combined with amoxicillin, gentamicin or neomycin. In the murine models, plectasin at doses as low as 8 mg/kg augmented the activities of amoxicillin and gentamicin in successful treatment of MSSA and MRSA infections. We

  15. Ex vivo treatment with a novel synthetic aminoglycoside NB54 in primary fibroblasts from Rett syndrome patients suppresses MECP2 nonsense mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Vecsler

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nonsense mutations in the X-linked methyl CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2 comprise a significant proportion of causative MECP2 mutations in Rett syndrome (RTT. Naturally occurring aminoglycosides, such as gentamicin, have been shown to enable partial suppression of nonsense mutations related to several human genetic disorders, however, their clinical applicability has been compromised by parallel findings of severe toxic effects. Recently developed synthetic NB aminoglycosides have demonstrated significantly improved effects compared to gentamicin evident in substantially higher suppression and reduced acute toxicity in vitro. RESULTS: We performed comparative study of suppression effects of the novel NB54 and gentamicin on three MECP2 nonsense mutations (R294X, R270X and R168X common in RTT, using ex vivo treatment of primary fibroblasts from RTT patients harboring these mutations and testing for the C-terminal containing full-length MeCP2. We observed that NB54 induces dose-dependent suppression of MECP2 nonsense mutations more efficiently than gentamicin, which was evident at concentrations as low as 50 µg/ml. NB54 read-through activity was mutation specific, with maximal full-length MeCP2 recovery in R168X (38%, R270X (27% and R294X (18%. In addition, the recovered MeCP2 was translocated to the cell nucleus and moreover led to parallel increase in one of the most important MeCP2 downstream effectors, the brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that NB54 may induce restoration of the potentially functional MeCP2 in primary RTT fibroblasts and encourage further studies of NB54 and other rationally designed aminoglycoside derivatives as potential therapeutic agents for nonsense MECP2 mutations in RTT.

  16. Identification of a Novel 6′-N-Aminoglycoside Acetyltransferase, AAC(6′)-Iak, from a Multidrug-Resistant Clinical Isolate of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Tatsuya; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; Dahal, Rajan K.; Mishra, Shyam K.; Shimada, Kayo; Ohara, Hiroshi; Pokhrel, Bharat M.

    2014-01-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia IOMTU250 has a novel 6′-N-aminoglycoside acetyltransferase-encoding gene, aac(6′)-Iak. The encoded protein, AAC(6′)-Iak, consists of 153 amino acids and has 86.3% identity to AAC(6′)-Iz. Escherichia coli transformed with a plasmid containing aac(6′)-Iak exhibited decreased susceptibility to arbekacin, dibekacin, neomycin, netilmicin, sisomicin, and tobramycin. Thin-layer chromatography showed that AAC(6′)-Iak acetylated amikacin, arbekacin, dibekacin, isepamicin, kanamycin, neomycin, netilmicin, sisomicin, and tobramycin but not apramycin, gentamicin, or lividomycin. PMID:25092711

  17. Identification of a novel 6'-N-aminoglycoside acetyltransferase, AAC(6')-Iak, from a multidrug-resistant clinical isolate of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Tatsuya; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; Dahal, Rajan K; Mishra, Shyam K; Shimada, Kayo; Ohara, Hiroshi; Kirikae, Teruo; Pokhrel, Bharat M

    2014-10-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia IOMTU250 has a novel 6'-N-aminoglycoside acetyltransferase-encoding gene, aac(6')-Iak. The encoded protein, AAC(6')-Iak, consists of 153 amino acids and has 86.3% identity to AAC(6')-Iz. Escherichia coli transformed with a plasmid containing aac(6')-Iak exhibited decreased susceptibility to arbekacin, dibekacin, neomycin, netilmicin, sisomicin, and tobramycin. Thin-layer chromatography showed that AAC(6')-Iak acetylated amikacin, arbekacin, dibekacin, isepamicin, kanamycin, neomycin, netilmicin, sisomicin, and tobramycin but not apramycin, gentamicin, or lividomycin. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. External validation of aminoglycoside models used in web calculators and clinical decision support systems after laboratory conversion to serum creatinine isotope dilution mass spectrometry assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolowich, William R; Steinberg, Jennifer G

    2012-04-01

    Models to predict gentamicin t(½) from serum creatinine (SCr) estimated creatinine clearance (CrCl) are currently being incorporated into smart-device applications and clinical decision support modules without external validation. The aim of this study was to determine whether such models remain viable after conversion to isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) SCr assay. This study analyzed data from retrospective reviews of the medical records of nonobese adults receiving the aminoglycoside gentamicin and having ≥2 evaluable serum gentamicin concentrations after laboratory IDMS SCr conversion, from January 2008 to August 2009, at a tertiary care hospital in Florida. A literature search found a number of cited aminoglycoside models. This group of models was classified as group 1. The World Wide Web was also searched for the term aminoglycoside dosing calculators, with 6 models found and referred to as group 2. Predictive performance measures were used to compare the model results with the t(½) calculated from gentamicin concentrations using the Nelder-Mead algorithm. The records of 39 patients met the inclusion criteria (23 men, 16 women; age range, 18-86 years; range of estimated CrCl, 55-115 mL/min) and provided the "gold standard" aminoglycoside t(½). A gentamicin t(½) was predicted from several published models (group 1) and from other models used in online smart-device applications (group 2) and clinical decision modules. The median (interquartile range) root mean square errors were 0.48 (0.44 to 0.65) and 0.48 (0.45 to 0.70) hours from group-1 and -2 models, respectively. The median mean relative prediction errors were 9% (-14% to +13%) and 11% (+1% to +21%) from groups 1 and 2. The median mean absolute prediction errors were 21% (19% to 28%) and 21% (20% to 30%) from groups 1 and 2. Adjusting SCr by +20% improved the predictive ability in 3 of 12 cited models and in 5 of 6 models used in applications. Models to predict gentamicin t(½) should be

  19. Lipid Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Known As Coronary Risk Panel Formal Name Lipid Profile This article was last reviewed on June 29, ... phospholipid molecules. The particles measured with a lipid profile are classified by their density into high-density ...

  20. Data Profiling

    OpenAIRE

    Hladíková, Radka

    2010-01-01

    Title: Data Profiling Author: Radka Hladíková Department: Department of Software Engineering Supervisor: Ing. Vladimír Kyjonka Supervisor's e-mail address: Abstract: This thesis puts mind on problems with data quality and data profiling. This Work analyses and summarizes problems of data quality, data defects, process of data quality, data quality assessment and data profiling. The main topic is data profiling as a process of researching data available in existing...

  1. The BpeAB-OprB efflux pump of Burkholderia pseudomallei 1026b does not play a role in quorum sensing, virulence factor production, or extrusion of aminoglycosides but is a broad-spectrum drug efflux system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mima, Takehiko; Schweizer, Herbert P

    2010-08-01

    Most Burkholderia pseudomallei strains are intrinsically aminoglycoside resistant, mainly due to AmrAB-OprA-mediated efflux. Rare naturally occurring or genetically engineered mutants lacking this pump are aminoglycoside susceptible despite the fact that they also encode and express BpeAB-OprB, which was reported to mediate efflux of aminoglycosides in the Singapore strain KHW. To reassess the role of BpeAB-OprB in B. pseudomallei aminoglycoside resistance, we used mutants overexpressing or lacking this pump in either AmrAB-OprA-proficient or -deficient strain 1026b backgrounds. Our data show that BpeAB-OprB does not mediate efflux of aminoglycosides but is a multidrug efflux system which extrudes macrolides, fluoroquinolones, tetracyclines, acriflavine, and, to a lesser extent, chloramphenicol. Phylogenetically, BpeAB-OprB is closely related to Pseudomonas aeruginosa MexAB-OprM, which has a similar substrate spectrum. AmrAB-OprA is most closely related to MexXY, the only P. aeruginosa efflux pump known to extrude aminoglycosides. Since BpeAB-OprB in strain KHW was also implicated in playing a major role in export of acylated homoserine lactone (AHL) quorum-sensing molecules and in expression of diverse virulence factors, we explored whether this was also true in the strain 1026b background. The results showed that BpeAB-OprB was not required for AHL export, and mutants lacking this efflux system exhibited normal swimming motility and siderophore production, which were severely impaired in KHW bpeAB-oprB mutants. Biofilm formation was impaired in 1026b Delta(amrRAB-oprA) and Delta(amrRAB-oprA) Delta(bpeAB-oprB) mutants. At present, we do not know why our BpeAB-OprB susceptibility and virulence factor expression results with 1026b and its derivatives are different from those previously published for Singapore strain KHW.

  2. Karolinske psychodynamic profile (KAPP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Birgit Bork; Søgaard, Ulf

    2006-01-01

    psykologiske testmetoder, assesment, Karolinska psychodynamic profile (KAPP), psykodynamisk profil......psykologiske testmetoder, assesment, Karolinska psychodynamic profile (KAPP), psykodynamisk profil...

  3. Analysis of Triclosan-Selected Salmonella enterica Mutants of Eight Serovars Revealed Increased Aminoglycoside Susceptibility and Reduced Growth Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rensch, Ulrike; Klein, Guenter; Kehrenberg, Corinna

    2013-01-01

    The biocide triclosan (TRC) is used in a wide range of household, personal care, veterinary, industrial and medical products to control microbial growth. This extended use raises concerns about a possible association between the application of triclosan and the development of antibiotic resistance. In the present study we determined triclosan mutant prevention concentrations (MPC) for Salmonella enterica isolates of eight serovars and investigated selected mutants for their mechanisms mediating decreased susceptibility to triclosan. MPCTRC values were 8 - 64-fold higher than MIC values and ranged between 1 - 16 µg/ml. The frequencies at which mutants were selected varied between 1.3 x 10-10 - 9.9 x 10-11. Even if MIC values of mutants decreased by 3-7 dilution steps in the presence of the efflux pump inhibitor Phe-Arg-β-naphtylamide, only minor changes were observed in the expression of genes encoding efflux components or regulators, indicating that neither the major multidrug efflux pump AcrAB-TolC nor AcrEF are up-regulated in triclosan-selected mutants. Nucleotide sequence comparisons confirmed the absence of alterations in the regulatory regions acrRA, soxRS, marORAB, acrSE and ramRA of selected mutants. Single bp and deduced Gly93→Val amino acid exchanges were present in fabI, the target gene of triclosan, starting from a concentration of 1 µg/ml TRC used for MPC determinations. The fabI genes were up to 12.4-fold up-regulated. Complementation experiments confirmed the contribution of Gly93→Val exchanges and fabI overexpression to decreased triclosan susceptibility. MIC values of mutants compared to parent strains were even equal or resulted in a more susceptible phenotype (1-2 dilution steps) for the aminoglycoside antibiotics kanamycin and gentamicin as well as for the biocide chlorhexidine. Growth rates of selected mutants were significantly lower and hence, might partly explain the rare occurrence of Salmonella field isolates exhibiting decreased

  4. Synthesis of magnetic graphene/mesoporous silica composites with boronic acid-functionalized pore-walls for selective and efficient residue analysis of aminoglycosides in milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jianan; She, Xiaojian; He, Xinying; Zhu, Jinglin; Li, Yan; Deng, Chunhui

    2018-01-15

    In this study, magnetic graphene/mesoporous silica composites with boronic acid-functionalized pore-walls were synthesized for the first time by a two-step post-graft method. The obtained nano-composites were proven to hold many attractive features such as large specific surface area, uniform mesopores, high magnetic responsibility, and boronic acid-functionalized inner pore-walls. Aminoglycoside residues in milk were extracted using MG@mSiO 2 -APB composites as restricted access matrix dispersive solid phase extraction adsorbents through the interaction between boronic acid groups and glucoside structures. Extraction conditions were optimized by studying the SPE parameters. Limits of detection of the method were as low as 5ngmL -1 for streptomycin) and 2ngmL -1 for dihydrostreptomycin. Finally, magnetic graphene/mesoporous silica composites with boronic acid-functionalized pore-walls were successfully applied to residue analysis in milk samples. Compared to the traditional extraction methods, using this nano-composites for aminoglycoside residues analysis in milk is more sensitive, effective and convenient. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of Enterococcus faecium aminoglycoside-2′′-phosphotransferase-Ib [APH(2′′)-Ib

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walanj, Rupa; Young, Paul; Baker, Heather M.; Baker, Edward N.; Metcalf, Peter [Laboratory of Structural Biology, School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland, Auckland (New Zealand); Chow, Joseph W.; Lerner, Stephen [Division of Infectious Diseases, Wayne State University School of Medicine and VA Medical Center, Detroit, Michigan 48201 (United States); Vakulenko, Sergei [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Smith, Clyde A., E-mail: csmith@slac.stanford.edu [Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, Stanford University, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Laboratory of Structural Biology, School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland, Auckland (New Zealand)

    2005-04-01

    APH(2′′)-Ib is an enzyme responsible for high-level gentamicin resistance in E. faecium isolates. Native crystals of this enzyme have been prepared and preliminary X-ray diffraction experiments have been undertaken. Bacterial resistance to the aminoglycoside antibiotics is primarily the result of deactivation of the drugs. Three families of enzymes are responsible for this activity, with one such family being the aminoglycoside phosphotransferases (APHs). The gene encoding one of these enzymes, APH(2′′)-Ib, has been cloned and the protein (comprising 299 amino-acid residues) expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized in the presence of 16%(w/v) PEG 3350 and gentamicin. The crystals belong to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with approximate unit-cell parameters a = 79.7, b = 58.8, c = 81.4 Å, β = 98.4°, and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis is consistent with the presence of two molecules in the asymmetric unit. Synchrotron diffraction data to approximately 2.65 Å resolution were collected from a native APH(2′′)-Ib crystal at beamline BL9-2 at SSRL (Stanford, CA, USA). Selenium-substituted crystals have also been produced and structure determination is proceeding.

  6. [Prevalence of Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium with high resistance to aminoglycosides in the cities of Resistencia and Corrientes, Republic of Argentina].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronconi, M C; Merino, L A

    2000-02-01

    The objective of this study was characterize the prevalence of high-level aminoglycosides resistance (HLRA) in Enterococcus faecalis and E. faecium, determine the relationship between high-level gentamicin resistance (HLGR) and other aminoglycosides, and their distribution according clinical samples (blood, urine and others). A total of 177 strain (157 E. faecalis and 20 E. faecium) isolated from 1996 to 1998 were studied. They were identified by using classic methods. Their susceptibility to gentamicin, streptomycin, and kanamycin was tested by the disk diffusion technique using high-level disks in agar Müller Hinton. E. faecalis showed HLRG of 28.7%, streptomycin 28.7% and kanamycin 37.6%, E. faecium showed 50%, 40%, and 60% respectively. The strains with HLRA have a tendency to high-level resistances to streptomycin and kanamycin (p < 0.0005). Statistical analysis demonstrated significative differences among strains with HLRA isolated from blood, urine and other clinical samples (p < 0.0005 to gentamicin and streptomycin and 0.004 < p < 0.007 to kanamycin). The prevalence of HLRA enterococci found in the area os this study, justify its detection, particularity in cases of serious infections.

  7. Clinical and molecular analysis of a four-generation Chinese family with aminoglycoside-induced and nonsyndromic hearing loss associated with the mitochondrial 12S rRNA C1494T mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Qiuju; Li Qingzhong; Han Dongyi; Zhao Yali; Zhao Lidong; Qian Yaping; Yuan Hu; Li Ronghua; Zhai Suoqiang; Young Wieyen; Guan Minxin

    2006-01-01

    We report here the clinical, genetic, and molecular characterization of a four-generation Chinese family with aminoglycoside-induced and nonsyndromic hearing loss. Five of nine matrilineal relatives had aminoglycoside-induced hearing loss. These matrilineal relatives exhibited variable severity and audiometric configuration of hearing impairment, despite sharing some common features: being bilateral and having sensorineural hearing impairment. Sequence analysis of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in the pedigree identified 16 variants and the homoplasmic 12S rRNA C1494T mutation, which was associated with hearing loss in the other large Chinese family. In fact, the occurrence of the C1494T mutation in these genetically unrelated pedigrees affected by hearing impairment strongly indicated that this mutation is involved in the pathogenesis of aminoglycoside-induced and nonsyndromic hearing loss. However, incomplete penetrance of hearing loss indicated that the C1494T mutation itself is not sufficient to produce a clinical phenotype but requires the involvement of modifier factors for the phenotypic expression. Those mtDNA variants, showing no evolutional conservation, may not have a potential modifying role in the pathogenesis of the C1494T mutation. However, nuclear background seems to contribute to the phenotypic variability of matrilineal relatives in this family. Furthermore, aminoglycosides modulate the expressivity and penetrance of deafness associated with the C1494T mutation in this family

  8. d-Tubocurarine and Berbamine: Alkaloids That Are Permeant Blockers of the Hair Cell's Mechano-Electrical Transducer Channel and Protect from Aminoglycoside Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nerissa K. Kirkwood

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Aminoglycoside antibiotics are widely used for the treatment of life-threatening bacterial infections, but cause permanent hearing loss in a substantial proportion of treated patients. The sensory hair cells of the inner ear are damaged following entry of these antibiotics via the mechano-electrical transducer (MET channels located at the tips of the hair cell's stereocilia. d-Tubocurarine (dTC is a MET channel blocker that reduces the loading of gentamicin-Texas Red (GTTR into rat cochlear hair cells and protects them from gentamicin treatment. Berbamine is a structurally related alkaloid that reduces GTTR labeling of zebrafish lateral-line hair cells and protects them from aminoglycoside-induced cell death. Both compounds are thought to reduce aminoglycoside entry into hair cells through the MET channels. Here we show that dTC (≥6.25 μM or berbamine (≥1.55 μM protect zebrafish hair cells in vivo from neomycin (6.25 μM, 1 h. Protection of zebrafish hair cells against gentamicin (10 μM, 6 h was provided by ≥25 μM dTC or ≥12.5 μM berbamine. Hair cells in mouse cochlear cultures are protected from longer-term exposure to gentamicin (5 μM, 48 h by 20 μM berbamine or 25 μM dTC. Berbamine is, however, highly toxic to mouse cochlear hair cells at higher concentrations (≥30 μM whilst dTC is not. The absence of toxicity in the zebrafish assays prompts caution in extrapolating results from zebrafish neuromasts to mammalian cochlear hair cells. MET current recordings from mouse outer hair cells (OHCs show that both compounds are permeant open-channel blockers, rapidly and reversibly blocking the MET channel with half-blocking concentrations of 2.2 μM (dTC and 2.8 μM (berbamine in the presence of 1.3 mM Ca2+ at −104 mV. Berbamine, but not dTC, also blocks the hair cell's basolateral K+ current, IK,neo, and modeling studies indicate that berbamine permeates the MET channel more readily than dTC. These studies reveal key properties of

  9. Brief communication: detection of clinical Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates from China containing transferable quinolone resistance determinants exhibiting resistance to both aminoglycoside and β-lactams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Xinying; Pan, Lei; Zhang, Naxin; Liu, Yuxia; Luo, Yanping; Zhou, Guang; Guan, Xizhou

    2014-01-01

    Though aminoglycosides are routinely used clinically as antimicrobial agents for the treatment of severe infections due to Klebsiella pneumoniae, resistance to the same is an increasing problem. One such resistance mechanism is the production of 16S rRNA methylases. The objective of the current study was to investigate the prevalence and molecular epidemology of 16S rRNA methylase genes among 43 K. pneumoniae isolates (each of which had at least one PQMR gene and ciprofloxacin minimum inhibitory concentration greater than 0.25) recovered from nine tertiary hospitals in China. Our results suggest great genetic variation in terms of 16S rRNA methylase gene of K. pneumoniae hosts containing at least one PQMR gene. This further reinforces the clinical and systemic urgency required to characterize and block their transmission routes.

  10. A rapid SPE-based analytical method for UPLC/MS/MS determination of aminoglycoside antibiotic residues in bovine milk, muscle, and kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Michael S; van Tran, Kim; Goh, Evelyn; Shia, Jeremy C

    2014-01-01

    An SPE-based cleanup protocol was developed for ultra-performance LC (UPLC)/MS/MS determination of residues of the common aminoglycoside antibiotics streptomycin, dihydrostreptomycin, neomycin, and gentamicin in bovine milk, kidney, and muscle. Recoveries for all compounds except neomycin ranged from 80 to 104% for all matrixes studied; recoveries for neomycin ranged from 71 to 84%. Intraday and interday precision data were under 15% for all sample matrixes. Compared with other recently reported cleanup methods, less sample is required, the use of potentially dangerous reagents is minimized, and fewer manipulations are required by the analyst. A high throughput 96-well plate format was used for SPE cleanup and UPLC/MS analysis.

  11. Nuclear modifier MTO2 modulates the aminoglycoside-sensitivity of mitochondrial 15S rRNA C1477G mutation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangyu He

    Full Text Available The phenotypic manifestations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA mutations are modulated by mitochondrial DNA haplotypes, nuclear modifier genes and environmental factors. The yeast mitochondrial 15S rRNA C1477G (P(R or P(R 454 mutation corresponds to the human 12S rRNA C1494T and A1555G mutations, which are well known as primary factors for aminoglycoside-induced nonsyndromic deafness. Here we report that the deletion of the nuclear modifier gene MTO2 suppressed the aminoglycoside-sensitivity of mitochondrial 15S rRNA C1477G mutation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. First, the strain with a single mtDNA C1477G mutation exhibited hypersensitivity to neomycin. Functional assays indicated that the steady-state transcription level of mitochondrial DNA, the mitochondrial respiratory rate, and the membrane potential decreased significantly after neomycin treatment. The impaired mitochondria could not produce sufficient energy to maintain cell viability. Second, when the mto2 null and the mitochondrial C1477G mutations co-existed (mto2(P(R, the oxygen consumption rate in the double mutant decreased markedly compared to that of the control strains (MTO2(P(S, mto2(P(S and MTO2(P(R. The expression levels of the key glycolytic genes HXK2, PFK1 and PYK1 in the mto2(P(R strain were stimulated by neomycin and up-regulated by 89%, 112% and 55%, respectively. The enhanced glycolysis compensated for the respiratory energy deficits, and could be inhibited by the glycolytic enzyme inhibitor. Our findings in yeast will provide a new insight into the pathogenesis of human deafness.

  12. Structure of the bifunctional aminoglycoside-resistance enzyme AAC(6')-Ie-APH(2'')-Ia revealed by crystallographic and small-angle X-ray scattering analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Clyde A; Toth, Marta; Weiss, Thomas M; Frase, Hilary; Vakulenko, Sergei B

    2014-10-01

    Broad-spectrum resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics in clinically important Gram-positive staphylococcal and enterococcal pathogens is primarily conferred by the bifunctional enzyme AAC(6')-Ie-APH(2'')-Ia. This enzyme possesses an N-terminal coenzyme A-dependent acetyltransferase domain [AAC(6')-Ie] and a C-terminal GTP-dependent phosphotransferase domain [APH(2'')-Ia], and together they produce resistance to almost all known aminoglycosides in clinical use. Despite considerable effort over the last two or more decades, structural details of AAC(6')-Ie-APH(2'')-Ia have remained elusive. In a recent breakthrough, the structure of the isolated C-terminal APH(2'')-Ia enzyme was determined as the binary Mg2GDP complex. Here, the high-resolution structure of the N-terminal AAC(6')-Ie enzyme is reported as a ternary kanamycin/coenzyme A abortive complex. The structure of the full-length bifunctional enzyme has subsequently been elucidated based upon small-angle X-ray scattering data using the two crystallographic models. The AAC(6')-Ie enzyme is joined to APH(2'')-Ia by a short, predominantly rigid linker at the N-terminal end of a long α-helix. This α-helix is in turn intrinsically associated with the N-terminus of APH(2'')-Ia. This structural arrangement supports earlier observations that the presence of the intact α-helix is essential to the activity of both functionalities of the full-length AAC(6')-Ie-APH(2'')-Ia enzyme.

  13. Ribosomal Protein S12 and Aminoglycoside Antibiotics Modulate A-site mRNA Cleavage and Transfer-Messenger RNA Activity in Escherichia coli*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holberger, Laura E.; Hayes, Christopher S.

    2009-01-01

    Translational pausing in Escherichia coli can lead to mRNA cleavage within the ribosomal A-site. A-site mRNA cleavage is thought to facilitate transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA)·SmpB- mediated recycling of stalled ribosome complexes. Here, we demonstrate that the aminoglycosides paromomycin and streptomycin inhibit A-site cleavage of stop codons during inefficient translation termination. Aminoglycosides also induced stop codon read-through, suggesting that these antibiotics alleviate ribosome pausing during termination. Streptomycin did not inhibit A-site cleavage in rpsL mutants, which express streptomycin-resistant variants of ribosomal protein S12. However, rpsL strains exhibited reduced A-site mRNA cleavage compared with rpsL+ cells. Additionally, tmRNA·SmpB-mediated SsrA peptide tagging was significantly reduced in several rpsL strains but could be fully restored in a subset of mutants when treated with streptomycin. The streptomycin-dependent rpsL(P90K) mutant also showed significantly lower levels of A-site cleavage and tmRNA·SmpB activity. Mutations in rpsD (encoding ribosomal protein S4), which suppressed streptomycin dependence, were able to partially restore A-site cleavage to rpsL(P90K) cells but failed to increase tmRNA·SmpB activity. Taken together, these results show that perturbations to A-site structure and function modulate A-site mRNA cleavage and tmRNA·SmpB activity. We propose that tmRNA·SmpB binds to streptomycin-resistant rpsL ribosomes less efficiently, leading to a partial loss of ribosome rescue function in these mutants. PMID:19776006

  14. Ribosomal protein S12 and aminoglycoside antibiotics modulate A-site mRNA cleavage and transfer-messenger RNA activity in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holberger, Laura E; Hayes, Christopher S

    2009-11-13

    Translational pausing in Escherichia coli can lead to mRNA cleavage within the ribosomal A-site. A-site mRNA cleavage is thought to facilitate transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA).SmpB- mediated recycling of stalled ribosome complexes. Here, we demonstrate that the aminoglycosides paromomycin and streptomycin inhibit A-site cleavage of stop codons during inefficient translation termination. Aminoglycosides also induced stop codon read-through, suggesting that these antibiotics alleviate ribosome pausing during termination. Streptomycin did not inhibit A-site cleavage in rpsL mutants, which express streptomycin-resistant variants of ribosomal protein S12. However, rpsL strains exhibited reduced A-site mRNA cleavage compared with rpsL(+) cells. Additionally, tmRNA.SmpB-mediated SsrA peptide tagging was significantly reduced in several rpsL strains but could be fully restored in a subset of mutants when treated with streptomycin. The streptomycin-dependent rpsL(P90K) mutant also showed significantly lower levels of A-site cleavage and tmRNA.SmpB activity. Mutations in rpsD (encoding ribosomal protein S4), which suppressed streptomycin dependence, were able to partially restore A-site cleavage to rpsL(P90K) cells but failed to increase tmRNA.SmpB activity. Taken together, these results show that perturbations to A-site structure and function modulate A-site mRNA cleavage and tmRNA.SmpB activity. We propose that tmRNA.SmpB binds to streptomycin-resistant rpsL ribosomes less efficiently, leading to a partial loss of ribosome rescue function in these mutants.

  15. Biophysical Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and pregnancy High-risk pregnancy Biophysical profile About Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  16. Profiling cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciro, Marco; Bracken, Adrian P; Helin, Kristian

    2003-01-01

    In the past couple of years, several very exciting studies have demonstrated the enormous power of gene-expression profiling for cancer classification and prediction of patient survival. In addition to promising a more accurate classification of cancer and therefore better treatment of patients......, gene-expression profiling can result in the identification of novel potential targets for cancer therapy and a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms leading to cancer....

  17. Profile of urinary tract infections in paediatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palak Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: This cross-sectional study was conducted at a tertiary care centre in Puducherry, south India, with the aim of finding the profile of the paediatric urinary tract infection (UTI, bacterial pathogens involved, and also to observe vesicoureteric reflux (VUR and renal scarring in these patients. Methods: A total of 524 paediatric patients ≤13 yr, suspected to have UTI, were included in the study. Urine samples were collected, processed for uropathogen isolation and antibiotic susceptibility test was performed as per the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI guidelines. Thirty two culture proven children with UTI underwent micturating cysto-urethrography (MCU and dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA scanning was done for 69 children. Results: o0 f the 524 children, 186 (35.4% had culture proven UTI with 105 (56.4% being infants, 50 (27.4% between 1-5 yr, 30 (16.12% between 5-13 yr and 129 (69.35% males. Posterior urethral valve (PUV was noted in three, hydronephrosis in one, VUR in 18 and renal scarring in 33. VUR as well as renal scarring were more in males >1 yr of age. A significant association (P=0.0054 was noted with a combined sensitivity and specificity of these investigations being 83 and 90 per cent, respectively of the MCU and DMSA scans for detecting VUR. Escherichia coli was the most common pathogen isolated, sensitive to nitrofurantoin, followed by cefoperazone-sulbactam, aminoglycosides and meropenem. Interpretation & conclusions: Our results indicate that UTI varies with age and gender and extensive evaluation is required in boys under one year of age with UTI. This study also highlights the better efficacy of aminoglycosides, cefoperazone-sulbactam and nitrofurantoin in vitro compared with meropenem in Gram-negative uropathogens.

  18. Fellow Profile

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1977 Section: Animal Sciences. Nair, Prof. Narayana Balakrishnan Ph.D and D.Sc. (Madras), D.Sc. (h.c.), FNA, FNASc, FNAAS, FTWAS. Date of birth: 6 July 1927. Date of death: 21 April 2010. Specialization: Aquatic Biology & Fisheries and Ecology Last known address: Swathi, ...

  19. Fellow Profile

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1977 Section: Animal Sciences. Nair, Prof. Narayana Balakrishnan Ph.D and D.Sc. (Madras), D.Sc. (h.c.), FNA, FNASc, FNAAS, FTWAS. Date of birth: 6 July 1927. Date of death: 21 April 2010. Specialization: Aquatic Biology & Fisheries and Ecology Last known address: Swathi, Residency Road, ...

  20. Fellow Profile

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1974 Section: Earth & Planetary Sciences. Koteswaram, Prof. Pancheti D.Sc. (Madras), FNA. Date of birth: 25 March 1915. Date of death: 11 January 1997. Specialization: Atmospheric Physics Meteorology and Hydrology Last known address: 'Varsha', 8-1-11, University Road, Waltair Uplands, ...

  1. Fellow Profile

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1957 Section: Earth & Planetary Sciences. Rao, Mr Mandagere Bharadwaj Ramachandra M.Sc. (Mysore). Date of birth: 5 August 1906. Date of death: 4 September 1992. Specialization: Geology and Exploration Geophysics Last known address: 669, Third Block, Rajajinagar, Bengaluru 560 010.

  2. Coexistence of mitochondrial 12S rRNA C1494T and CO1/tRNASer(UCN) G7444A mutations in two Han Chinese pedigrees with aminoglycoside-induced and non-syndromic hearing loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Huijun; Chen Jing; Liu Xin; Cheng Jing; Wang Xinjian; Yang Li; Yang Shuzhi; Cao Juyang; Kang Dongyang; Dai Pu; Zha, Suoqiang; Han Dongyi; Young Wieyen; Guan Minxin

    2007-01-01

    Mutations in mitochondrial DNA are one of the important causes of hearing loss. We report here the clinical, genetic, and molecular characterization of two Han Chinese pedigrees with maternally transmitted aminoglycoside-induced and nonsyndromic bilateral hearing loss. Clinical evaluation revealed the wide range of severity, age-at-onset, and audiometric configuration of hearing impairment in matrilineal relatives in these families. The penetrances of hearing loss in these pedigrees were 20% and 18%, when aminoglycoside-induced deafness was included. When the effect of aminoglycosides was excluded, the penetrances of hearing loss in these seven pedigrees were 10% and 15%. Sequence analysis of the complete mitochondrial genomes in these pedigrees showed the presence of the deafness-associated 12S rRNA C1494T and CO1/tRNA Ser(UCN) G7444A mutations. Their distinct sets of mtDNA polymorphism belonged to Eastern Asian haplogroup C4a1, while other previously identified six Chinese mitochondrial genomes harboring the C1494T mutation belong to haplogroups D5a2, D, R, and F1, respectively. This suggested that the C1494T or G7444A mutation occurred sporadically and multiplied through evolution of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). The absence of functionally significant mutations in tRNA and rRNAs or secondary LHON mutations in their mtDNA suggest that these mtDNA haplogroup-specific variants may not play an important role in the phenotypic expression of the 12S rRNA C1494T and CO1/tRNA Ser(UCN) G7444A mutations in those Chinese families. However, aminoglycosides and other nuclear modifier genes play a modifying role in the phenotypic manifestation of the C1494T mutation in these Chinese families

  3. Antibiotic resistance profile of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from aquaculture and abattoir environments in urban communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isoken Henrietta Igbinosa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To characterize multiple antibiotic resistance profile of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from aquaculture and abattoir environments. Methods: Wastewater samples were obtained from the abattoir and aquaculture environments between May 2016 and July 2016 and analysed using standard phenotypic, biochemical and PCR-based methods. Results: The mean pseudomonads count ranged from (4 × 102 ± 1.01 to (2 × 104 ± 0.10 colony-forming unit/mL in the aquaculture environment and (3 × 103 ± 0.00 to (1 × 105 ± 1.00 colony-forming unit/mL in the abattoir environment. A total of 96 isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa confirmed by PCR were thereafter selected from both aquaculture and abattoir environments and further characterized for their antimicrobial susceptibility profile by adopting the disc diffusion method. High level of resistance was observed against the aminoglycosides [gentamycin 64/96 (66.67% and kanamycin 52/96 (54.17%], monobactams [aztreonam 76/96 (79.17%], carbapenems [meropenem 52/96 (54.17%], tetracyclines [tetracycline 72/96 (75.00%] and cephems [ceftazidime 72/96 (75.00% and cefuroxime 48/96 (50.00%]. Multiple antibiotic resistant index of the respective isolates ranged from 0.4 to 0.8 while multidrug resistant profile of the isolates revealed that 28 of the respective isolates were resistant to ceftazidime, cefuroxime, gentamycin, kanamycin, aztreonam which belongs to cephems, aminoglycosides and monobactam class of antimicrobials. Conclusions: Findings from the present study therefore underscores the need for effective monitoring of the abattoir and aquaculture environments as they could be the significant source for spreading antibiotic resistant bacteria within the environment.

  4. Aminoglycoside-induced and non-syndromic hearing loss is associated with the G7444A mutation in the mitochondrial COI/tRNASer(UCN) genes in two Chinese families

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Yi; Qian Yaping; Tang Xiaowen; Wang Jindan; Yang Li; Liao Zhisu; Li Ronghua; Ji Jinzhang; Li Zhiyuan; Chen Jianfu; Choo, Daniel I.; Lu Jianxin; Guan Minxin

    2006-01-01

    We report here the clinical, genetic, and molecular characterization of two Chinese families with aminoglycoside induced and non-syndromic hearing impairment. Clinical and genetic evaluations revealed the variable severity and age-of-onset in hearing impairment in these families. Strikingly, there were extremely low penetrances of hearing impairment in these Chinese families. Sequence analysis of the complete mitochondrial genomes in these pedigrees showed the distinct sets of mtDNA polymorphism, in addition to the identical G7444A mutation associated with hearing loss. Indeed, the G7444A mutation in the CO1 gene and the precursor of tRNA Ser(UCN) gene is present in homoplasmy only in the maternal lineage of those pedigrees but not other members of these families and 164 Chinese controls. Their mitochondrial genomes belong to the Eastern Asian haplogroups C5a and D4a, respectively. In fact, the occurrence of the G7444A mutation in these several genetically unrelated subjects affected by hearing impairment strongly indicates that this mutation is involved in the pathogenesis of hearing impairment. However, there was the absence of other functionally significant mtDNA mutations in two Chinese pedigrees carrying the G7444A mutation. Therefore, nuclear modifier gene(s) or aminoglycoside(s) may play a role in the phenotypic expression of the deafness-associated G7444A mutation in these Chinese pedigrees

  5. Aminoglycoside detection using a universal ELISA binding procedure onto polystyrene microtiter plates in comparison with HPLC analysis and microbiological agar-diffusion assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachetelli, S; Beaulac, C; Lagacé, J

    1998-01-08

    The use of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the detection of aminoglycosides has been hindered due to low molecular weight compound adsorption to solid phases. Here, we describe an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay based on the treatment of polystyrene microtiter plates with Alcian blue prepared in acetic acid prior to coating with the antibiotic. Whereas no detection of tobramycin was possible on commercially treated or untreated enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay plates, the Alcian blue treatment permitted detection of 0.025 and 0.05 microg ml(-1) of tobramycin respectively using 0.05 and 0.1% of Alcian blue with a coefficient of variation of 1.85 and 7.69%, respectively. Comparative studies of five tobramycin samples of unknown quantity using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and high-performance liquid chromatography gave equivalent results while those done via microbiological agar-diffusion assay were an overestimation of the actual quantity. The use of the Alcian blue pretreatment enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay procedure has permitted, in previous studies, the measure of antibodies against synthetic peptides and phospholipids. Subsequently, our demonstration of the sensitivity and reliability of this method in the quantification of tobramycin strongly suggests that the use of Alcian blue pretreatment in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay can be applied universally to avert molecule immobilization problems on solid phases.

  6. Activation of the Cryptic aac(6′)-Iy Aminoglycoside Resistance Gene of Salmonella by a Chromosomal Deletion Generating a Transcriptional Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnet, Sophie; Courvalin, Patrice; Lambert, Thierry

    1999-01-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotype Enteritidis BM4361 and BM4362 were isolated from the same patient. BM4361 was susceptible to aminoglycosides, whereas BM4362 was resistant to tobramycin owing to synthesis of a 6′-N-acetyltransferase type I [AAC(6′)-I]. Comparative analysis of nucleotide sequences, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns, and Southern hybridizations indicated that the chromosomal aac(6′)-Iy genes for the enzyme in both strains were identical and that BM4362 derived from BM4361 following a ca. 60-kb deletion that occurred 1.5 kb upstream from the resistance gene. Northern hybridizations showed that aac(6′)-Iy was silent in BM4361 and highly expressed in BM4362 due to a transcriptional fusion. Primer extension mapping identified the transcriptional start site for aac(6′)-Iy in BM4362: 5 bp downstream from the promoter of the nmpC gene. Study of the distribution of aac(6′)-Iy by PCR and Southern hybridization with a specific probe indicated that the gene, although not found in S. enterica subsp. arizonae, was specific for Salmonella. In this bacterial genus, aac(6′)-Iy was located downstream from a cluster of seven open reading frames analogous to an Escherichia coli locus that encodes enzymes putatively involved in carbohydrate transport or metabolism. This genomic environment suggests a role in the catabolism of a specific sugar for AAC(6′)-Iy in Salmonella. PMID:10542165

  7. High-level aminoglycoside resistance in Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium causing invasive infection: Twelve-year surveillance in the Minami Ibaraki Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osuka, Hanako; Nakajima, Jun; Oishi, Tsuyoshi; Funayama, Yasunori; Ebihara, Tsugio; Ishikawa, Hiroichi; Saito, Kazuto; Koganemaru, Hiroshi; Hitomi, Shigemi

    2016-01-01

    We examined prevalence of high-level aminoglycoside resistance (HLAR) in Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium causing invasive infection in the Minami Ibaraki Area. Ten strains of both species each, recovered from the blood or the cerebrospinal fluid between 2003 and 2014, were randomly selected every year. High-level resistance to gentamicin (HLR-GM) and streptomycin (HLR-SM) was detected in 34% (41 of 120 strains) and 18% (21) of E. faecalis and 9% (11) and 39% (48) of E. faecium, respectively. In comparisons of the proportions among three four-year periods, HLR-SM among E. faecium was significantly lower in the 2011-2014 period. All strains with HLR-GM were positive for the aac(6')-Ie-aph(2″)-Ia gene. The ant(6')-Ia gene was detected in all with HLR-SM except for one E. faecalis strain. The present study showed that prevalence of HLR-GM among E. faecalis and E. faecium causing invasive infection in this area was nearly equivalent to that described in previous studies in Japan and that proportions of strains with HLAR did not vary during the study period except for that of HLR-SM among E. faecium. Copyright © 2015 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. In-vivo impact of the MexXY efflux system on aminoglycoside efficacy in an experimental model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia treated with tobramycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martha, B; Croisier, D; Durand, D; Hocquet, D; Plesiat, P; Piroth, L; Portier, H; Chavanet, P

    2006-05-01

    Aminoglycosides are of major importance in treating Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia (PAP). However, their efficacy may be compromised by low-level resistance caused by the inducible MexXY multidrug efflux pump. In the present study, the impact of the MexXY efflux pump was investigated in vivo in an experimental model of PAP in rabbits treated with intravenous tobramycin. Three strains were used to induce PAP in rabbits: PAO1 (wild-type strain; MIC 1 mg/L), mutant 11B (mexX::Tn501; no expression of MexXY; MIC 0.5 mg/L) and mutant MutGR1 (MexZ null; constitutive expression of MexXY; MIC 2 mg/L). Five hours after inoculation, treatment with tobramycin (10 mg/kg) was implemented (peak serum concentration 30 mg/L). The animals were killed humanely 48 h after inoculation, and the residual pulmonary bacterial concentration was determined. Selection of bacteria expressing MexXY was determined by plating lung homogenates on agar plates containing antibiotic. Mean bacterial counts (log(10) CFU/g) for treated vs. untreated rabbits were 6.26 and 8.13 (p system to this low level of tobramycin efficacy is modest. Finally, this model appears to be suitable for the investigation of new anti-pseudomonal therapeutic strategies.

  9. Role of the multidrug efflux system MexXY in the emergence of moderate resistance to aminoglycosides among Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from patients with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogne, Christelle; Aires, Julio Ramos; Bailly, Christiane; Hocquet, Didier; Plésiat, Patrick

    2004-05-01

    This study investigates the role of active efflux system MexXY in the emergence of aminoglycoside (AG) resistance among cystic fibrosis (CF) isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Three genotypically related susceptible and resistant (S/R) bacterial pairs and three other AG-resistant CF strains were compared to four non-CF strains moderately resistant to AGs. As demonstrated by immunoblot experiments, pump MexY was strongly overproduced in all of the resistant bacteria. This MexXY upregulation was associated with a 2- to 16-fold increase in the MICs of AGs in the S/R pairs and lower intracellular accumulation of dihydrostreptomycin. Alterations in mexZ, the repressor gene of operon mexXY, were found in all of the AG-resistant CF isolates and in one non-CF strain. Complementation of these bacteria with a plasmid-borne mexZ gene dramatically reduced the MICs of AGs, thus highlighting the role played by MexXY in the development of moderate resistance in CF patients. In contrast, complementation of the three non-CF strains showing wild-type mexZ genes left residual levels of resistance to AGs. These data indicate that a locus different from mexZ may be involved in overproduction of MexXY and that other nonenzymatic mechanisms contribute to AG resistance in P. aeruginosa.

  10. Antibiotic susceptibility profile of Aeromonas spp. isolates from food in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awan, Mohammad Bashir; Maqbool, Ahmed; Bari, Abdul; Krovacek, Karel

    2009-01-01

    A total of 57 Aeromonas isolates from food samples such as fresh and frozen chicken, game birds, pasteurized milk, baby food, bakery products, fruit and vegetables, fish, and water from Abu Dahbi, UAE were investigated for antibiotic susceptibility profile. Most strains were resistant to penicillins (ticarcillin, mezlocillin, oxacillin, piperacillin), sulfamethoxazole, trimethoprim and macrolides (erythromycin, vancomycin, clindamycin) but sensitive to tetracycline, chloramphenicol, nitrofurantoin, aminoglycosides (amikacin, gentamicin, tobramycin), cephalosporins (cefuroxime, ceftrioxone, cefazolin, cephalexin, cephalothin, cefoxitin, cefotaxime), quinolone (ciprofloxacin), colistin sulphate and SXT (trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole). On the other hand, many antibiotics showed excellent inhibitory activity (>75% strains were sensitive to them) against all the strains tested. These include cefuroxime, ceftrioxone, ciprofloxacin, colistin, amikacin, gentamicin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, nitrofurantoin, cefotaxime and tobramycin. In conclusion, the results show a detailed pattern of sensitivity of the various Aeromonas spp. isolates to a variety of antibiotics and provide useful information in the context of selective isolation and phenotypic identification of the aeromonads from food.

  11. Exploring the possibilities of capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detection in combination with liquid chromatography for the analysis of polar compounds using aminoglycosides as test case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankovics, Péter; Chopra, Shruti; El-Attug, Mohamed N; Cabooter, Deirdre; Wolfs, Kris; Noszál, Béla; Van Schepdael, Ann; Adams, Erwin

    2015-08-10

    The analysis of highly polar (often charged) compounds which lack a strong UV absorbing chromophore is really challenging. Despite the numerous analytical methods published, the demand for a simple, robust and cheap technique for their analysis still persists. Here, reversed phase (RP) liquid chromatography (LC) with capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detection (C(4)D) was explored for the first time as a possible method for separation and detection of various aminoglycoside (AMG) antibiotics which were taken as typical test compounds: tobramycin (TOB), spectinomycin, streptomycin, amikacin, kanamycin A and kanamycin B. C(4)D was performed using a commercially available as well as a laboratory made cell. As ion-pairing reagents (IPR) four perfluorinated carboxylic acids were used: pentafluoropropionic acid, heptafluorobutyric acid, nonafluoropentanoic acid (NFPA) and pentadecafluorooctanoic acid (PDFOA). 0.125 mM NFPA-acetonitrile (ACN) (90:10) or 0.125 mM PDFOA-ACN (70:30) as mobile phases were suitable to detect TOB with reasonable retention times. However, NFPA was preferred for practical reasons. Its applicable concentration range in the mobile phase was strongly restricted by loss of chromatographic performance at lower levels and excessive background conductivity at higher levels. Overall repeatability and robustness of the method were rather poor which was explained by the relatively low IPR levels. Selectivity between the tested AMGs was mainly influenced by the number of protonated amino groups per molecule making it impossible to separate compounds of equal net charges. Problems encountered with gradient elution, hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) and separation at high pH without IPRs are also discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. New plasmid-mediated aminoglycoside 6'-N-acetyltransferase, AAC(6')-Ian, and ESBL, TLA-3, from a Serratia marcescens clinical isolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Wanchun; Wachino, Jun-Ichi; Kimura, Kouji; Yamada, Keiko; Arakawa, Yoshichika

    2015-05-01

    Enterobacteriaceae clinical isolates showing amikacin resistance (MIC 64 to >256 mg/L) in the absence of 16S rRNA methyltransferase (MTase) genes were found. The aim of this study was to clarify the molecular mechanisms underlying amikacin resistance in Enterobacteriaceae clinical isolates that do not produce 16S rRNA MTases. PCR was performed to detect already-known amikacin resistance determinants. Cloning experiments and sequence analyses were performed to characterize unknown amikacin resistance determinants. Transfer of amikacin resistance determinants was performed by conjugation and transformation. The complete nucleotide sequence of the plasmids was determined by next-generation sequencing technology. Amikacin resistance enzymes were purified with a column chromatography system. The enzymatic function of the purified protein was investigated by thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and HPLC. Among the 14 isolates, 9 were found to carry already-known amikacin resistance determinants such as aac(6')-Ia and aac(6')-Ib. Genetic analyses revealed the presence of a new amikacin acetyltransferase gene, named aac(6')-Ian, located on a 169 829 bp transferable plasmid (p11663) of the Serratia marcescens strain NUBL-11663, one of the five strains negative for known aac(6') genes by PCR. Plasmid p11663 also carried a novel ESBL gene, named blaTLA-3. HPLC and TLC analyses demonstrated that AAC(6')-Ian catalysed the transfer of an acetyl group from acetyl coenzyme A onto an amine at the 6'-position of various aminoglycosides. We identified aac(6')-Ian as a novel amikacin resistance determinant together with a new ESBL gene, blaTLA-3, on a transferable plasmid of a S. marcescens clinical isolate. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Heterologous production of kasugamycin, an aminoglycoside antibiotic from Streptomyces kasugaensis, in Streptomyces lividans and Rhodococcus erythropolis L-88 by constitutive expression of the biosynthetic gene cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasuga, Kano; Sasaki, Akira; Matsuo, Takashi; Yamamoto, Chika; Minato, Yuiko; Kuwahara, Naoya; Fujii, Chikako; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Agematu, Hitosi; Tamura, Tomohiro; Komatsu, Mamoru; Ishikawa, Jun; Ikeda, Haruo; Kojima, Ikuo

    2017-05-01

    Kasugamycin (KSM), an aminoglycoside antibiotic isolated from Streptomyces kasugaensis cultures, has been used against rice blast disease for more than 50 years. We cloned the KSM biosynthetic gene (KBG) cluster from S. kasugaensis MB273-C4 and constructed three KBG cassettes (i.e., cassettes I-III) to enable heterologous production of KSM in many actinomycetes by constitutive expression of KBGs. Cassette I comprised all putative transcriptional units in the cluster, but it was placed under the control of the P neo promoter from Tn5. It was not maintained stably in Streptomyces lividans and did not transform Rhodococcus erythropolis. Cassette II retained the original arrangement of KBGs, except that the promoter of kasT, the specific activator gene for KBG, was replaced with P rpsJ , the constitutive promoter of rpsJ from Streptomyces avermitilis. To enhance the intracellular concentration of myo-inositol, an expression cassette of ino1 encoding the inositol-1-phosphate synthase from S. avermitilis was inserted into cassette II to generate cassette III. These two cassettes showed stable maintenance in S. lividans and R. erythropolis to produce KSM. Particularly, the transformants of S. lividans induced KSM production up to the same levels as those produced by S. kasugaensis. Furthermore, cassette III induced more KSM accumulation than cassette II in R. erythropolis, suggesting an exogenous supply of myo-inositol by the ino1 expression in the host. Cassettes II and III appear to be useful for heterologous KSM production in actinomycetes. Rhodococcus exhibiting a spherical form in liquid cultivation is also a promising heterologous host for antibiotic fermentation.

  14. Potentiation of Aminoglycoside Activity in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by Targeting the AmgRS Envelope Stress-Responsive Two-Component System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Keith; Gilmour, Christie; Farha, Maya A; Mullen, Erin; Lau, Calvin Ho-Fung; Brown, Eric D

    2016-06-01

    A screen for agents that potentiated the activity of paromomycin (PAR), a 4,5-linked aminoglycoside (AG), against wild-type Pseudomonas aeruginosa identified the RNA polymerase inhibitor rifampin (RIF). RIF potentiated additional 4,5-linked AGs, such as neomycin and ribostamycin, but not the clinically important 4,6-linked AGs amikacin and gentamicin. Potentiation was absent in a mutant lacking the AmgRS envelope stress response two-component system (TCS), which protects the organism from AG-generated membrane-damaging aberrant polypeptides and, thus, promotes AG resistance, an indication that RIF was acting via this TCS in potentiating 4,5-linked AG activity. Potentiation was also absent in a RIF-resistant RNA polymerase mutant, consistent with its potentiation of AG activity being dependent on RNA polymerase perturbation. PAR-inducible expression of the AmgRS-dependent genes htpX and yccA was reduced by RIF, suggesting that AG activation of this TCS was compromised by this agent. Still, RIF did not compromise the membrane-protective activity of AmgRS, an indication that it impacted some other function of this TCS. RIF potentiated the activities of 4,5-linked AGs against several AG-resistant clinical isolates, in two cases also potentiating the activity of the 4,6-linked AGs. These cases were, in one instance, explained by an observed AmgRS-dependent expression of the MexXY multidrug efflux system, which accommodates a range of AGs, with RIF targeting of AmgRS undermining mexXY expression and its promotion of resistance to 4,5- and 4,6-linked AGs. Given this link between AmgRS, MexXY expression, and pan-AG resistance in P. aeruginosa, RIF might be a useful adjuvant in the AG treatment of P. aeruginosa infections. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Beneficial antimicrobial effect of the addition of an aminoglycoside to a β-lactam antibiotic in an E. coli porcine intensive care severe sepsis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skorup, Paul; Maudsdotter, Lisa; Lipcsey, Miklós; Castegren, Markus; Larsson, Anders; Jonsson, Ann-Beth; Sjölin, Jan

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to determine whether the addition of an aminoglycoside to a ß-lactam antibiotic increases the antimicrobial effect during the early phase of Gram-negative severe sepsis/septic shock. A porcine model was selected that considered each animal's individual blood bactericidal capacity. Escherichia coli, susceptible to both antibiotics, was given to healthy pigs intravenously during 3 h. At 2 h, the animals were randomized to a 20-min infusion with either cefuroxime alone (n = 9), a combination of cefuroxime+tobramycin (n = 9), or saline (control, n = 9). Blood samples were collected hourly for cultures and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Bacterial growth in the organs after 6 h was chosen as the primary endpoint. A blood sample was obtained at baseline before start of bacterial infusion for ex vivo investigation of the blood bactericidal capacity. At 1 h after the administration of the antibiotics, a second blood sample was taken for ex vivo investigation of the antibiotic-induced blood killing activity. All animals developed severe sepsis/septic shock. Blood cultures and PCR rapidly became negative after completed bacterial infusion. Antibiotic-induced blood killing activity was significantly greater in the combination group than in the cefuroxime group (pantibiotic groups compared with the controls (pantibiotic groups. Bacterial growth in the liver was significantly less in the combination group than in the cefuroxime group (pantibiotic-induced blood killing activity and less bacteria in the liver than cefuroxime alone. Individual blood bactericidal capacity may have a significant effect on antimicrobial outcome.

  16. Profiling and Racial Profiling: An Interactive Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semple, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Racial Profiling has been recognized as a serious problem that affects many segments of our society and is especially notable in law enforcement. Governments and police services have pronounced that racial profiling is not acceptable and will not be tolerated. They have gone to great lengths in trying to eradicate racial profiling through…

  17. Association between the Presence of Aminoglycoside-Modifying Enzymes and In Vitro Activity of Gentamicin, Tobramycin, Amikacin, and Plazomicin against Klebsiella pneumoniae Carbapenemase- and Extended-Spectrum-β-Lactamase-Producing Enterobacter Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haidar, Ghady; Alkroud, Ammar; Cheng, Shaoji; Churilla, Travis M; Churilla, Bryce M; Shields, Ryan K; Doi, Yohei; Clancy, Cornelius J; Nguyen, M Hong

    2016-09-01

    We compared the in vitro activities of gentamicin (GEN), tobramycin (TOB), amikacin (AMK), and plazomicin (PLZ) against 13 Enterobacter isolates possessing both Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase and extended-spectrum β-lactamase (KPC+/ESBL+) with activity against 8 KPC+/ESBL-, 6 KPC-/ESBL+, and 38 KPC-/ESBL- isolates. The rates of resistance to GEN and TOB were higher for KPC+/ESBL+ (100% for both) than for KPC+/ESBL- (25% and 38%, respectively), KPC-/ESBL+ (50% and 17%, respectively), and KPC-/ESBL- (0% and 3%, respectively) isolates. KPC+/ESBL+ isolates were more likely than others to possess an aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme (AME) (100% versus 38%, 67%, and 5%; P = 0.007, 0.06, and 1 AME than with ≤1 AME. The presence of at least 2/3 of KPC, SHV, and TEM predicted the presence of AMEs. PLZ MICs against all isolates were ≤4 μg/ml, regardless of KPC/ESBL pattern or the presence of AMEs. In conclusion, GEN and TOB are limited as treatment options against KPC+ and ESBL+ Enterobacter PLZ may represent a valuable addition to the antimicrobial armamentarium. A full understanding of AMEs and other aminoglycoside resistance mechanisms will allow clinicians to incorporate PLZ rationally into treatment regimens. The development of molecular assays that accurately and rapidly predict antimicrobial responses among KPC- and ESBL-producing Enterobacter spp. should be a top research priority. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Reinforced aerodynamic profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention relates to the prevention of deformations in an aerodynamic profile caused by lack of resistance to the bending moment forces that are created when such a profile is loaded in operation. More specifically, the invention relates to a reinforcing element inside an aerodynamic...... profile and a method for the construction thereof. The profile is intended for, but not limited to, useas a wind turbine blade, an aerofoil device or as a wing profile used in the aeronautical industry....

  19. Determination of aminoglycoside residues in milk and muscle based on a simple and fast extraction procedure followed by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry and time of flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsand, Juliana Bazzan; Jank, Louíse; Martins, Magda Targa; Hoff, Rodrigo Barcellos; Barreto, Fabiano; Pizzolato, Tânia Mara; Sirtori, Carla

    2016-07-01

    Antibiotics are widely used in veterinary medicine mainly for treatment and prevention of diseases. The aminoglycosides are one of the antibiotics classes that have been extensively employed in animal husbandry for the treatment of bacterial infections, but also as growth promotion. The European Union has issued strict Maximum Residue Levels (MRLs) for aminoglycosides in several animal origin products including bovine milk, bovine, swine and poultry muscle. This paper describes a fast and simple analytical method for the determination of ten aminoglycosides (spectinomycin, tobramycin, gentamicin, kanamycin, hygromycin, apramycin, streptomycin, dihydrostreptomycin, amikacin and neomycin) in bovine milk and bovine, swine and poultry muscle. For sample preparation, an extraction method was developed using trichloroacetic acid and clean up with low temperature precipitation and C18 bulk. Liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was used to carry out quantitative analysis and liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time of flight-mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF-MS) was used to screening purposes. Both methods were validated according to the European Union Commission Directive 2002/657/EC. Good performance characteristics were obtained for recovery, precision, calibration curve, specificity, decision limits (CCα) and detection capabilities (CCβ) in all matrices evaluated. The detection limit (LOD) and quantification limit (LOQ) were ranging from 5 to 100ngg(-1) and 12.5 to 250ngg(-1), respectively. Good linearity (r)-above 0.99-was achieved in concentrations ranging from 0.0 to 2.0×MRL. Recoveries ranged from 36.8% to 98.0% and the coefficient of variation from 0.9 to 20.2%, noting that all curves have been made into their own matrices in order to minimize the matrix effects. The CCβ values obtained in qualitative method were between 25 and 250ngg(-1). The proposed method showed to be simple, easy, and adequate for high-throughput analysis of a large

  20. Structure of the bifunctional aminoglycoside-resistance enzyme AAC(6′)-Ie-APH(2′′)-Ia revealed by crystallographic and small-angle X-ray scattering analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Clyde A.; Toth, Marta; Weiss, Thomas M.; Frase, Hilary; Vakulenko, Sergei B.

    2014-01-01

    Broad-spectrum resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics in clinically important Gram-positive staphylococcal and entero­coccal pathogens is primarily conferred by the bifunctional enzyme AAC(6′)-Ie-APH(2′′)-Ia. This enzyme possesses an N-terminal coenzyme A-dependent acetyltransferase domain [AAC(6′)-Ie] and a C-terminal GTP-dependent phosphotransferase domain [APH(2′′)-Ia], and together they produce resistance to almost all known aminoglycosides in clinical use. Despite considerable effort over the last two or more decades, structural details of AAC(6′)-Ie-APH(2′′)-Ia have remained elusive. In a recent breakthrough, the structure of the isolated C-terminal APH(2′′)-Ia enzyme was determined as the binary Mg2GDP complex. Here, the high-resolution structure of the N-terminal AAC(6′)-Ie enzyme is reported as a ternary kanamycin/coenzyme A abortive complex. The structure of the full-length bifunctional enzyme has subsequently been elucidated based upon small-angle X-ray scattering data using the two crystallographic models. The AAC(6′)-Ie enzyme is joined to APH(2′′)-Ia by a short, predominantly rigid linker at the N-terminal end of a long α-helix. This α-helix is in turn intrinsically associated with the N-terminus of APH(2′′)-Ia. This structural arrangement supports earlier observations that the presence of the intact α-helix is essential to the activity of both functionalities of the full-length AAC(6′)-Ie-APH(2′′)-Ia enzyme. PMID:25286858

  1. HOPWA Performance Profiles

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — HOPWA Performance Profiles are generated quarterly for all agencies receiving HOPWA formula or competitive grants. Performance Profiles are available at the national...

  2. Profile consistency on TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fredrickson, E.D.; McGuire, K.M.; Goldston, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    Electron heat transport on TFTR and other tokamaks is several orders of magnitude larger than neoclassical calculations predict. Despite considerable effort, there is still no clear theoretical understanding of this anomalous transport. The electron temperature profile, T e (r), has shown a marked consistency on many machines for a wide range of plasma parameters and heating profiles. This could be an important clue as to the process responsible for this enhanced thermal transport. In the first section of the paper the result is presented that TFTR electron temperature profile shapes are even more constrained than previous models of profile consistency suggested. The profile shapes, T e (r)/T e (a/2), are found to be invariant (for r>0.4 a) for a wide range of parameters, including q(a). In the second section, an experiment is discussed which uses a fast current ramp to transiently decouple the current density profile, J(r), and the T e (r) profiles. From this experiment, it has been determined that the J(r) profile can be strongly modified with no measureable effect on the electron temperature profile shape. Thus, while the electron temperature profile is apparently constrained, the current profile is not. (author). Letter-to-the-editor. 25 refs, 9 figs

  3. Pasteurellaceae bacteria from the oral cavity of Tasmanian devils (Sarcophilus Harrisii) show high minimum inhibitory concentration values towards aminoglycosides and clindamycin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gutman, N.; Hansen, Mie Johanne; Bertelsen, M. F.

    2016-01-01

    of the oral microbiota. In medical management of such bite wounds, antimicrobial susceptibility profiles are crucial. Prior to this investigation, no available data on minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values existed. A total of 26 isolates obtained from the oral cavity of 26 healthy Tasmanian devils...... for antimicrobial therapy against bite wound infections caused by Pasteurellaceae originating from the oral cavity of Tasmanian devils....

  4. Criminal Psychological Profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-10-18

    landmark report became known to the general population. Dr. Langer’s profile broke new ground. While the practice of psychoanalysis was not new, this marked...school or college dropout. Suspect is probably suffering from one or more forms of paranoid psychosis .6 Perpetrator: Based on this profile, the police

  5. Chemical profiling of explosives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brust, G.M.H.

    2014-01-01

    The primary goal of this thesis is to develop analytical methods for the chemical profiling of explosives. Current methodologies for the forensic analysis of explosives focus on identification of the explosive material. However, chemical profiling of explosives becomes increasingly important, as

  6. Household electricity demand profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marszal, Anna Joanna; Heiselberg, Per Kvols; Larsen, Olena Kalyanova

    2016-01-01

    Highlights •A 1-min resolution household electricity load model is presented. •Model adapts a bottom-up approach with single appliance as the main building block. •Load profiles are used to analyse the flexibility potential of household appliances. •Load profiles can be applied in other domains, e...

  7. Profile of antibiotic consumption, sensitivity and resistance in an urban area of Andhra Pradesh, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peripi, Sunita Bhargavi; Thadepalli, Venu Gopala Rao; Khagga, Mukkanti; Tripuraribhatla, Prasanna Krishna; Bharadwaj, Dinesh Kumar

    2012-04-01

    Antibiotics are an important category of drugs in which indiscriminate use can affect the susceptibility patterns among infectious organisms, resulting in antibiotic resistance. Data on antibiotic usage and susceptibility patterns were collected from public and private health centres in Vijayawada, Andhra Pradesh, India, through the use of questionnaires. The data collected were then coded, tabulated, computed and evaluated using statistical analysis. The consumption profile of the different categories of drugs used in public and private hospitals was as follows: nutrition and metabolism products 19.0%; gastrointestinal disorder-related drugs 18.5%; antibiotics 16.8%; anti-pyretics and anti-analgesics 20.6%. These drugs were found to be in high demand. Among the antibiotics, aminoglycosides (amikacin), quinolones (ofloxacin, ciprofloxacin), tetracyclines (doxycycline), penicillin (ampicillin) and sulphonamides (co-trimoxazole) were the most commonly prescribed drugs for antibiotic therapy. 46% of the culture laboratory reports were positive with the following organism profile: Escherichia coli (36%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (16%), Staphylococcus aureus (29%), Enterococcus faecalis (9%) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (10%). In terms of the sensitivity profile of antibacterials, amikacin (66.9%) was the only antibiotic showing sensitivity patterns, while the majority of antibiotics, such as cotrimoxazole, nalidixic acid, amoxicillin, gentamycin and norfloxacin, had acquired a resistance rate of 55.1%-80.6%. The results of this study suggest that indiscriminate prescription and consumption of new broad-spectrum antibiotics against sensitive organisms results in the development of antimicrobial resistance. Therefore, there is an urgent need to curb the excessive use of antibiotics in local hospitals in order to control the trend of increasing antimicrobial resistance to antibiotics.

  8. Bacteriological Profile of Blood Culture Positive Sepsis in Newborn at BPKIHS, Dharan Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piush Kanodia

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Neonatal infections currently cause about 1.6 million deaths annually in developing countries. Sepsis and meningitis is responsible for most of these deaths. This study was undertaken to determine the bacteriological profiles and antibiotic sensitivity patterns of isolates from blood cultures of neonates admitted in a tertiary care hospital in Eastern Nepal.Materials & Methods: A retrospective study was conducted at pediatric department from January, 2014 to December 2014. Total 1009 newborns blood sample with suspected and clinical sepsis were cultured by using standard microbiological technique and antibiotic sensitivity patterns were studied. Results: The positive blood culture was 32.4% (327/1009. Gram positive bacteria were more common 231(71% than gram negative bacteria 96(29%. Staphylococcus aureus 174 (53.2% and acinetobacter 46(14.1% were the commonest isolates in blood culture. Most of the organisms showed sensitivity with aminoglycosides (gentamicin and amikacin and third generation cephalosporins.Conclusion: Staphylococcus aureus, Acinetobacter and Klebsiella species remain the principal organisms causing neonatal sepsis and antibiotics like amino glycosides should be first choice of drugs.

  9. Bacteriological profile of neonatal septicemia in a tertiary care hospital from Western India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vrishali Avinash Muley

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal septicemia is an important cause of morbidity and mortality. The present study was undertaken to determine the bacteriological profile and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of prevalent pathogens isolated from the blood of septicemic neonates from Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU. A total of 180 blood samples of septicemic neonates were studied bacteriologically. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was done by the Kirby Bauer disc diffusion method in accordance to Clinical Laboratory Standards Institutes (CLSI guidelines. 26.6% (48 out of 180 cases of septicemia could be confirmed by blood culture. Of these, 66.7% cases were of early onset septicemia (EOS and 33.3% were of late onset septicemia (LOS. Klebsiella pneumoniae was the predominant pathogen (35.4% among the Gram-negative pathogens and Staphylococcus aureus (22.9% was the predominant Gram-positive pathogen. 28% of K. pneumoniae and E. coli isolates were extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL producers. 18.1% of the Staphylococcus isolates were methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA. Multi-drug-resistance pattern was observed with all the isolates. Ciprofloxacin and aminoglycosides were the most effective drugs against Gram-positive and Gram-negative isolates. This study highlights the predominance of Gram-negative organisms in causing neonatal sepsis and emergence of multi-drug-resistant strains in our set up.

  10. Profiling the Mobile Customer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Pernille Wegener; King, Nancy J.

    2010-01-01

    Mobile customers are increasingly being tracked and profiled by behavioural advertisers to enhance delivery of personalized advertising. This type of profiling relies on automated processes that mine databases containing personally-identifying or anonymous consumer data, and it raises a host...... of significant concerns about privacy and data protection. This second article in a two part series on "Profiling the Mobile Customer" explores how to best protect consumers' privacy and personal data through available mechanisms that include industry self-regulation, privacy-enhancing technologies...

  11. Risk factors for colonization with ampicillin and high-level aminoglycoside-resistant enterococci during hospitalization in the ICU and the impact of prior antimicrobial exposure definition: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srovin, Tina Plankar; Seme, Katja; Blagus, Rok; Tomazin, Rok; Cižman, Milan

    2014-02-01

    The aim of our prospective cohort study was to determine the incidence, genetic relatedness and risk factors for colonization with ampicillin and high-level aminoglycoside-resistant enterococci (ARHLARE) among patients hospitalized in the intensive care unit. During 15-month period, we included 105 patients. The only independent risk factor for ARHLARE colonization was days of cefotaxime/ceftriaxone therapy [odds ratio (OR): 1.13; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.10-1.27; P  =  0.045]. Patients with higher total use of antibiotics, patients on prolonged mechanical ventilation, and patients with urinary tract infection (UTI), were also found to be at increased risk to become colonized with ARHLARE. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis suggested multifocal origin of the majority of the colonizing strains. Our results show that an increase in total antibiotic consumption for 10 defined daily doses (DDD)/patient increased the odds of colonization with ARHLARE for 36%. Further efforts to optimize antimicrobial use in high risk patients are proposed.

  12. Fishing fleet profiling methodology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ferraris, Jocelyne

    2002-01-01

    A fishing fleet profile aims tho assist in understanding the complexity and structure of fisheries from a technical and socio-economic point of view, or from the point of view of fishing strategies...

  13. Beach Profile Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — Beaches are commonly characterized by cross-shore surveys. The resulting profiles represent the elevation of the beach surface and nearshore seabed from the back of...

  14. Fishing Community Profiles

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To enable fisheries managers to comply with National Standard 8 (NS8), NMFS social scientists around the nation are preparing fishing community profiles that present...

  15. Prescription Drug Profiles PUF

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This release contains the Prescription Drug Profiles Public Use Files (PUFs) drawn from Medicare prescription drug claims for the year of the date on which the...

  16. Wind Profiling Radar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Clutter present in radar return signals as used for wind profiling is substantially removed by carrying out a Daubechies wavelet transformation on a time series of...

  17. Beach Profile Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Beaches are commonly characterized by cross-shore surveys. The resulting profiles represent the elevation of the beach surface and nearshore seabed from the back of...

  18. Equilibrium shoreface profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Troels; Hughes, Michael G

    2017-01-01

    Large-scale coastal behaviour models use the shoreface profile of equilibrium as a fundamental morphological unit that is translated in space to simulate coastal response to, for example, sea level oscillations and variability in sediment supply. Despite a longstanding focus on the shoreface...... profile and its relevance to predicting coastal response to changing environmental conditions, the processes and dynamics involved in shoreface equilibrium are still not fully understood. Here, we apply a process-based empirical sediment transport model, combined with morphodynamic principles to provide...... new insight into equilibrium shoreface profile development and shape. The quantitative model is based on field measurements and shows that a balance between onshore sediment transport due to oscillatory wave motion, and offshore sediment transport due to gravity, produces profile shapes...

  19. Susceptibility-resistance profile of micro-organisms isolated from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    were sensitive to the fluoroquinolones (ciprofloxacin, 85.3%, norfloxacin 93.3%) and the aminoglycosides (streptomycin 90%, gentamycin 89.3%). However, the isolates demonstrated significant resistance to common antibiotics like penicillins (augmentin [amoxycillin-cavulanic acid combination] 80%, cloxacillin 88.3%, ...

  20. Susceptibility-resistance profile of micro-organisms isolated from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-12-17

    Dec 17, 2007 ... were sensitive to the fluoroquinolones (ciprofloxacin, 85.3%, norfloxacin 93.3%) and the aminoglycosides (streptomycin 90% ... of pathogenic spoilage organisms from product to consumers (Grigo, 1976; Mendie et al., 1993). ...... The booming US Botanical Market. A new overview. Herbalgram 44: 33-36.

  1. Laquinimod Safety Profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Per Soelberg; Comi, Giancarlo; Vollmer, Timothy L

    2017-01-01

    the safety profile of laquinimod versus placebo. Adverse events (AEs), laboratory value changes, and potential risks identified in preclinical studies were evaluated in participants in ALLEGRO and BRAVO treated with at least one dose of laquinimod or matching placebo (1:1 random assignment). RESULTS...... laquinimod studies demonstrate a safety profile comprising benign or manageable AEs and asymptomatic laboratory findings with a clear temporal pattern. Potential risks noted in preclinical studies were not observed....

  2. Country nuclear power profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-03-01

    The preparation of Country Nuclear Power Profiles was initiated within the framework of the IAEA's programme for nuclear power plant performance assessment and feedback. It responded to a need for a database and a technical document containing a description of the energy and economic situation and the primary organizations involved in nuclear power in IAEA Member States. The task was included in the IAEA's programmes for 1993/1994 and 1995/1996. In March 1993, the IAEA organized a Technical Committee meeting to discuss the establishment of country data ''profiles'', to define the information to be included in the profiles and to review the information already available in the IAEA. Two expert meetings were convened in November 1994 to provide guidance to the IAEA on the establishment of the country nuclear profiles, on the structure and content of the profiles, and on the preparation of the publication and the electronic database. In June 1995, an Advisory Group meeting provided the IAEA with comprehensive guidance on the establishment and dissemination of an information package on industrial and organizational aspects of nuclear power to be included in the profiles. The group of experts recommended that the profiles focus on the overall economic, energy and electricity situation in the country and on its nuclear power industrial structure and organizational framework. In its first release, the compilation would cover all countries with operating power plants by the end of 1995. It was also recommended to further promote information exchange on the lessons learned from the countries engaged in nuclear programmes. For the preparation of this publication, the IAEA received contributions from the 29 countries operating nuclear power plants and Italy. A database has been implemented and the profiles are supporting programmatic needs within the IAEA; it is expected that the database will be publicly accessible in the future

  3. Canonical profiles in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dnestrovskij, Yu.N.

    2002-01-01

    We consider the problem of the canonical profiles for tokamak plasma with arbitrary cross-section, taking into account two principles: 1) the free plasma energy minimum with the constraint of total current conservation and 2) the profile consistency. We deduce the Euler differential equation for the canonical profile of μ=1/q with two types of the boundary conditions: soft and stiff. The soft conditions correspond to the Kadomtsev solution for the circular cylinder. The stiff conditions describe a fast response of the plasma over the whole cross-section on the edge impact. Using the canonical profile of the current density, we calculate the critical gradients for the temperature, and create the transport model for the electron and ion temperatures and density. We show that, when the aspect ratio is diminished, or when the elongation increases, the canonical profiles become flatten. The similar tendency for the real profiles of the electron temperature was found in analysis of JET and START experiments. The obtained critical gradients were used to analysis of the experiments in tokamaks with moderate and tight aspect ratios. (author)

  4. Accelerated Profile HMM Searches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean R Eddy

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Profile hidden Markov models (profile HMMs and probabilistic inference methods have made important contributions to the theory of sequence database homology search. However, practical use of profile HMM methods has been hindered by the computational expense of existing software implementations. Here I describe an acceleration heuristic for profile HMMs, the "multiple segment Viterbi" (MSV algorithm. The MSV algorithm computes an optimal sum of multiple ungapped local alignment segments using a striped vector-parallel approach previously described for fast Smith/Waterman alignment. MSV scores follow the same statistical distribution as gapped optimal local alignment scores, allowing rapid evaluation of significance of an MSV score and thus facilitating its use as a heuristic filter. I also describe a 20-fold acceleration of the standard profile HMM Forward/Backward algorithms using a method I call "sparse rescaling". These methods are assembled in a pipeline in which high-scoring MSV hits are passed on for reanalysis with the full HMM Forward/Backward algorithm. This accelerated pipeline is implemented in the freely available HMMER3 software package. Performance benchmarks show that the use of the heuristic MSV filter sacrifices negligible sensitivity compared to unaccelerated profile HMM searches. HMMER3 is substantially more sensitive and 100- to 1000-fold faster than HMMER2. HMMER3 is now about as fast as BLAST for protein searches.

  5. Comparison of genospecies and antimicrobial resistance profiles of isolates in the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii complex from various clinical specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tien, Ni; You, Bang-Jau; Chang, Hui-Lan; Lin, Hsiu-Shen; Lee, Chin-Yi; Chung, Tung-Ching; Lu, Jang-Jih; Chang, Chao-Chin

    2012-12-01

    This study was conducted to compare the prevalences of antimicrobial resistance profiles of clinical isolates in the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii complex from sterile and nonsterile sites and to further study the relationship of antimicrobial resistance profiles and genospecies by amplified rRNA gene restriction analysis (ARDRA). A total of 1,381 isolates were tested with 12 different antibiotics to show their antimicrobial susceptibility profiles. A total of 205 clinical isolates were further analyzed by ARDRA of the intergenic spacer (ITS) region of the 16S-23S rRNA gene. It was found that the overall percentage of isolates from nonsterile sites (urine, sputum, pus, or catheter tip) that were resistant to the 12 antibiotics tested was significantly higher than that of isolates from sterile sites (cerebrospinal fluid [CSF], ascites fluid, and bloodstream) (46% versus 22%; P calcoaceticus (5%). Furthermore, as 91% (10/11) of the isolates from CSF were susceptible to all antibiotics tested, the A. calcoaceticus-A. baumannii complex isolates with multidrug resistance could be less invasive than the more susceptible isolates. This study also indicated current emergence of carbapenem-, fluoroquinolone-, aminoglycoside-, and cephalosporin-resistant A. calcoaceticus-A. baumannii complex isolates in Taiwan.

  6. Convolution based profile fitting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kern, A.; Coelho, A.A.; Cheary, R.W.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: In convolution based profile fitting, profiles are generated by convoluting functions together to form the observed profile shape. For a convolution of 'n' functions this process can be written as, Y(2θ)=F 1 (2θ)x F 2 (2θ)x... x F i (2θ)x....xF n (2θ). In powder diffractometry the functions F i (2θ) can be interpreted as the aberration functions of the diffractometer, but in general any combination of appropriate functions for F i (2θ) may be used in this context. Most direct convolution fitting methods are restricted to combinations of F i (2θ) that can be convoluted analytically (e.g. GSAS) such as Lorentzians, Gaussians, the hat (impulse) function and the exponential function. However, software such as TOPAS is now available that can accurately convolute and refine a wide variety of profile shapes numerically, including user defined profiles, without the need to convolute analytically. Some of the most important advantages of modern convolution based profile fitting are: 1) virtually any peak shape and angle dependence can normally be described using minimal profile parameters in laboratory and synchrotron X-ray data as well as in CW and TOF neutron data. This is possible because numerical convolution and numerical differentiation is used within the refinement procedure so that a wide range of functions can easily be incorporated into the convolution equation; 2) it can use physically based diffractometer models by convoluting the instrument aberration functions. This can be done for most laboratory based X-ray powder diffractometer configurations including conventional divergent beam instruments, parallel beam instruments, and diffractometers used for asymmetric diffraction. It can also accommodate various optical elements (e.g. multilayers and monochromators) and detector systems (e.g. point and position sensitive detectors) and has already been applied to neutron powder diffraction systems (e.g. ANSTO) as well as synchrotron based

  7. Ribosome Profiling in Maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chotewutmontri, Prakitchai; Stiffler, Nicholas; Watkins, Kenneth P; Barkan, Alice

    2018-01-01

    Ribosome profiling (also known as Ribo-seq) provides a genome-wide, high-resolution, and quantitative accounting of mRNA segments that are occupied by ribosomes in vivo. The method has been used to address numerous questions in bacteria, yeast, and metazoa, but its application to questions in plant biology is just beginning. This chapter provides a detailed protocol for profiling ribosomes in plant leaf tissue. The method was developed and optimized with maize, but it has been used successfully with Arabidopsis and tobacco as well. The method captures ribosome footprints from the chloroplast and cytosol in the same preparation, but it is not optimal for detecting the footprints of mitochondrial ribosomes. The protocol is robust and simpler than many of the methods reported previously for ribosome profiling in plants.

  8. Detonation Wave Profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menikoff, Ralph [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2015-12-14

    The Zel’dovich-von Neumann-Doering (ZND) profile of a detonation wave is derived. Two basic assumptions are required: i. An equation of state (EOS) for a partly burned explosive; P(V, e, λ). ii. A burn rate for the reaction progress variable; d/dt λ = R(V, e, λ). For a steady planar detonation wave the reactive flow PDEs can be reduced to ODEs. The detonation wave profile can be determined from an ODE plus algebraic equations for points on the partly burned detonation loci with a specified wave speed. Furthermore, for the CJ detonation speed the end of the reaction zone is sonic. A solution to the reactive flow equations can be constructed with a rarefaction wave following the detonation wave profile. This corresponds to an underdriven detonation wave, and the rarefaction is know as a Taylor wave.

  9. Country profile: Hungary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-09-01

    Country Profile: Hungary has been prepared as a background document for use by US Government agencies and US businesses interested in becoming involved with the new democracies of Eastern Europe as they pursue sustainable economic development. The focus of the Profile is on energy and highlights information on Hungary's energy supply, demand, and utilization. It identifies patterns of energy usage in the important economic sectors, especially industry, and provides a preliminary assessment for opportunities to improve efficiencies in energy production, distribution and use by introducing more efficient technologies. The use of more efficient technologies would have the added benefit of reducing the environmental impact which, although is not the focus of the report, is an issue that effects energy choices. The Profile also presents considerable economic information, primarily in the context of how economic restructuring may affect energy supply, demand, and the introduction of more efficient technologies.

  10. Country profile: Hungary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-09-01

    Country Profile: Hungary has been prepared as a background document for use by US Government agencies and US businesses interested in becoming involved with the new democracies of Eastern Europe as they pursue sustainable economic development. The focus of the Profile is on energy and highlights information on Hungary`s energy supply, demand, and utilization. It identifies patterns of energy usage in the important economic sectors, especially industry, and provides a preliminary assessment for opportunities to improve efficiencies in energy production, distribution and use by introducing more efficient technologies. The use of more efficient technologies would have the added benefit of reducing the environmental impact which, although is not the focus of the report, is an issue that effects energy choices. The Profile also presents considerable economic information, primarily in the context of how economic restructuring may affect energy supply, demand, and the introduction of more efficient technologies.

  11. Constructing Data Curation Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Witt

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a brief literature review and then introduces the methods, design, and construction of the Data Curation Profile, an instrument that can be used to provide detailed information on particular data forms that might be curated by an academic library. These data forms are presented in the context of the related sub-disciplinary research area, and they provide the flow of the research process from which these data are generated. The profiles also represent the needs for data curation from the perspective of the data producers, using their own language. As such, they support the exploration of data curation across different research domains in real and practical terms. With the sponsorship of the Institute of Museum and Library Services, investigators from Purdue University and the University of Illinois interviewed 19 faculty subjects to identify needs for discovery, access, preservation, and reuse of their research data. For each subject, a profile was constructed that includes information about his or her general research, data forms and stages, value of data, data ingest, intellectual property, organization and description of data, tools, interoperability, impact and prestige, data management, and preservation. Each profile also presents a specific dataset supplied by the subject to serve as a concrete example. The Data Curation Profiles are being published to a public wiki for questions and discussion, and a blank template will be disseminated with guidelines for others to create and share their own profiles. This study was conducted primarily from the viewpoint of librarians interacting with faculty researchers; however, it is expected that these findings will complement a wide variety of data curation research and practice outside of librarianship and the university environment.

  12. Differential activity profiles of translation inhibitors in whole-cell and cell-free approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidlich, M; Klammt, C; Bernhard, F; Karas, M; Stein, T

    2008-02-01

    Evaluation of the activity profiles of standard prokaryotic translation inhibitors with different physicochemical properties under whole-cell and cell-free conditions. The minimal inhibitory concentration values (cell-free/whole-cell microg ml(-1)) for three aminoglycosides (neomycin, 0.01/6.92; paromomycin, 0.7/1.96; streptomycin 1.45/1.57), three macrolides (erythromycin, 1.53/56.9; josamycin, 1.61/87.7; oleandomycin, 5.12/565.9), chloramphenicol (11.9/3.04), and two tetracyclines (tetracycline hydrochloride, not determined/0.63; minocycline hydrochloride, 2.53/1.09), towards Escherichia coli A19 cells were determined with a microtitre plate-based broth dilution method and compared with values determined in a coupled transcription/translation system based on a S30 extract of the same E. coli strain (cell-free) for the production of the green fluorescent protein. The analysed prokaryotic translation inhibitors showed substance-specific activity profiles under cell-free vs whole-cell conditions that are explainable by the physicochemical properties of the molecules. This study shows the advantages and limits of cell- free transcription/translation (CFTT) experiments for the discovery of novel antimicrobials. The main advantage is the direct access of the target structures (ribosomes) for the inhibitors, and our results provide an estimation of the concentration necessary to detect new agents. The main limitations are that the inhibitory properties of different agents in CFTT experiments do not necessarily reflect their growth inhibition activity in cell cultures.

  13. Economy Profile of Hungary

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank Group

    2017-01-01

    Doing Business 2018 is the 15th in a series of annual reports investigating the regulations that enhance business activity and those that constrain it. This economy profile presents the Doing Business indicators for Hungary. Doing Business presents quantitative indicators on business regulation and the protection of property rights that can be compared across 190 economies; for 2018 Hungary ...

  14. Country Profiles, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardee, J. Gilbert; Satterthwaite, Adaline P.

    A profile of Pakistan is sketched in this paper. Emphasis is placed on the nature, scope, and accomplishments of population activities in the country. Topics and sub-topics include: location and description of the country; population (size, growth patterns, age structure, urban/rural distribution, ethnic and religious composition, migration,…

  15. A Danish Profiling System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosholm, Michael; Staghøj, Jonas; Svarer, Michael

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the statistical model used for profiling new unemployed workers in Denmark. When a worker – during his or her first six months in unemployment – enters the employment office for the first time, this model predicts whether or not he or she will be unemployed for more than six...

  16. Beam profile monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krausse, G.J.; Gram, P.A.M.

    1978-05-01

    A system used to monitor secondary beam profiles at the LAMPF Linac for channel tune-up and diagnostics is described. The multiwire proportional chamber design is discussed, and descriptions and drawings of the gate card, the amplifier/multiplexer card, the output amplifier card, and the overall system are given

  17. Country Profiles, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzuki, Ariffin Bin; Peng, J. Y.

    A profile of Malaysia is sketched in this paper. Emphasis is placed on the nature, scope, and accomplishments of population activities in the country. Topics and sub-topics include: location and description of the country; population (size, growth patterns, age structure, urban/rural distribution, ethnic and religious composition, migration,…

  18. Country Profiles, The Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concepcion, Mercedes B.

    A profile of the Philippines is sketched in this paper. Emphasis is placed on the nature, scope, and accomplishments of population activities in the country. Topics and sub-topics include: location and description of the country; population (size, growth patterns, age structure, urban/rural distribution, ethnic and religious composition,…

  19. Economy Profile of Australia

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank Group

    2017-01-01

    Doing Business 2018 is the 15th in a series of annual reports investigating the regulations that enhance business activity and those that constrain it. This economy profile presents the Doing Business indicators for Australia. Doing Business presents quantitative indicators on business regulation and the protection of property rights that can be compared across 190 economies; for 2018 Aust...

  20. A temperature profiler

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Peshwe, V.B.; Desa, E.

    An instrument developed for measuring temperature profiles at sea in depth or time scales is described. PC-based programming offers flexibility in setting up the instrument for the mode of operation prior to each cast. A real time clock built...

  1. Polysome Profile Analysis - Yeast

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pospíšek, M.; Valášek, Leoš Shivaya

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 530, č. 2013 (2013), s. 173-181 ISSN 0076-6879 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : grow yeast cultures * polysome profile analysis * sucrose density gradient centrifugation Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.194, year: 2013

  2. Rural Incubator Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Mark L.

    This profile summarizes the responses of 20 managers of rural business incubators, reporting on their operations, entry and exit policies, facility promotion, service arrangements and economic development outcomes. Incubators assist small businesses in the early stages of growth by providing them with rental space, shared services, management and…

  3. Speaker Profiles and Abstracts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-11-05

    Nov 5, 2016 ... a polarised fashion. Their work thus illuminates how Cas1-2 complex and IHF coordinate bring about the preferential integration of protospacer into the leader proximal end. Speaker's Profile. B Anand, IIT ... has a realization formula where a Hilbert space makes a natural appearance. Agler in 1990 found a ...

  4. [Safety profile of dolutegravir].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero, Antonio; Domingo, Pere

    2015-03-01

    Integrase inhibitors are the latest drug family to be added to the therapeutic arsenal against human immunodeficiency virus infection. Drugs in this family that do not require pharmacological boosting are characterized by a very good safety profile. The latest integrase inhibitor to be approved for use is dolutegravir. In clinical trials, dolutegravir has shown an excellent tolerability profile, both in antiretroviral-naïve and previously treated patients. Discontinuation rates due to adverse effects were 2% and 3%, respectively. The most frequent adverse effects were nausea, headache, diarrhea and sleep disturbance. A severe hypersensitivity reaction has been reported in only one patient. In patients coinfected with hepatropic viruses, the safety profile is similar to that in patients without coinfection. The lipid profile of dolutegravir is similar to that of raltegravir and superior to those of Atripla® and darunavir/ritonavir. Dolutegravir induces an early, predictable and non-progressive increase in serum creatinine of around 10% of baseline values in treatment-naïve patients and of 14% in treatment-experienced patients. This increase is due to inhibition of tubular creatinine secretion through the OCT2 receptor and does not lead to a real decrease in estimated glomerular filtration rate with algorithms that include serum creatinine. The effect of the combination of dolutegravir plus Kivexa(®) on biomarkers of bone remodeling is lower than that of Atripla(®). Dolutegravir has an excellent tolerability profile with no current evidence of long-term adverse effects. Its use is accompanied by an early and non-progressive increase in serum creatinine due to OCT2 receptor inhibition. In combination with abacavir/lamivudine, dolutegravir has a lower impact than enofovir/emtricitabine/efavirenz on bone remodelling markers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Spiking the expectancy profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Niels Chr.; Loui, Psyche; Vuust, Peter

    Melodic expectations have long been quantified using expectedness ratings. Motivated by statistical learning and sharper key profiles in musicians, we model musical learning as a process of reducing the relative entropy between listeners' prior expectancy profiles and probability distributions...... of a given musical style or of stimuli used in short-term experiments. Five previous probe-tone experiments with musicians and non-musicians are revisited. Exp. 1-2 used jazz, classical and hymn melodies. Exp. 3-5 collected ratings before and after exposure to 5, 15 or 400 novel melodies generated from...... a finite-state grammar using the Bohlen-Pierce scale. We find group differences in entropy corresponding to degree and relevance of musical training and within-participant decreases after short-term exposure. Thus, whereas inexperienced listeners make high-entropy predictions by default, statistical...

  6. Spiking the expectancy profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Niels Chr.; Loui, Psyche; Vuust, Peter

    Melodic expectations are generated with different degrees of certainty. Given distributions of expectedness ratings for multiple continuations of each context, as obtained with the probe-tone paradigm, this certainty can be quantified in terms of Shannon entropy. Because expectations arise from...... statistical learning, causing comparatively sharper key profiles in musicians, we hypothesised that musical learning can be modelled as a process of entropy reduction through experience. Specifically, implicit learning of statistical regularities allows reduction in the relative entropy (i.e. symmetrised...... Kullback-Leibler or Jensen-Shannon Divergence) between listeners’ prior expectancy profiles and probability distributions of a musical style or of stimuli used in short-term experiments. Five previous probe-tone experiments with musicians and non-musicians were revisited. In Experiments 1-2 participants...

  7. Profile of success

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlgaard, Jens Jørn; Nørgaard, Anders; Jakobsen, Søren

    1998-01-01

    What management skills must Europe's business leaders improve to achieve business excellence? Which country's leaders are best placed for success? Does the next generation have what it takes to compete? In the second half of their study of the leadership styles that drive business excellence, Jens...... Dahlgaard, Anders Nørgaard and Søren Jakobsen describe an excellent leadership profile that provides the answers....

  8. Temperature profile detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokarz, Richard D.

    1983-01-01

    Temperature profiles at elevated temperature conditions are monitored by use of an elongated device having two conductors spaced by the minimum distance required to normally maintain an open circuit between them. The melting point of one conductor is selected at the elevated temperature being detected, while the melting point of the other is higher. As the preselected temperature is reached, liquid metal will flow between the conductors, creating short circuits which are detectable as to location.

  9. Temperature-profile detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Not Available

    1981-01-29

    Temperature profiles at elevated temperature conditions are monitored by use of an elongated device having two conductors spaced by the minimum distance required to normally maintain an open circuit between them. The melting point of one conductor is selected at the elevated temperature being detected, while the melting point of the other is higher. As the preselected temperature is reached, liquid metal will flow between the conductors creating short circuits which are detectable as to location.

  10. Global gas company profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    This report provides a detailed assessment of 60 of the top gas companies form around the world, analysing them according to their internal dynamics and in relation to their competitors. It devotes each chapter to an individual company, providing invaluable insight into the organisation's operational background, financial performance and strategic goals. Using the most up-to-date information available, Global Gas Company Profiles allows you to make detailed analysis of each company's performance and future direction. (author)

  11. Surface profiling interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takacs, Peter Z.; Qian, Shi-Nan

    1989-01-01

    The design of a long-trace surface profiler for the non-contact measurement of surface profile, slope error and curvature on cylindrical synchrotron radiation (SR) mirrors. The optical system is based upon the concept of a pencil-beam interferometer with an inherent large depth-of-field. The key feature of the optical system is the zero-path-difference beam splitter, which separates the laser beam into two colinear, variable-separation probe beams. A linear array detector is used to record the interference fringe in the image, and analysis of the fringe location as a function of scan position allows one to reconstruct the surface profile. The optical head is mounted on an air bearing slide with the capability to measure long aspheric optics, typical of those encountered in SR applications. A novel feature of the optical system is the use of a transverse "outrigger" beam which provides information on the relative alignment of the scan axis to the cylinder optic symmetry axis.

  12. Bacteriological Profile and Drug Resistance Patterns of Blood Culture Isolates in a Tertiary Care Nephrourology Teaching Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpesh Gohel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Blood stream infections can lead to life threatening sepsis and require rapid antimicrobial treatment. The organisms implicated in these infections vary with the geographical alteration. Infections caused by MDR organisms are more likely to increase the risk of death in these patients. The present study was aimed to study the profile of organisms causing bacteremia and understand antibiotic resistance patterns in our hospital. 1440 blood samples collected over a year from clinically suspected cases of bacteremia were studied. The isolates were identified by standard biochemical tests and antimicrobial resistance patterns were determined by CLSI guidelines. Positive blood cultures were obtained in 9.2% of cases of which Gram-positive bacteria accounted for 58.3% of cases with staph aureus predominance; gram negative bacteria accounted for 40.2% with enterobactereciea predominence; and 1.5% were fungal isolates. The most sensitive drugs for Gram-positive isolates were vancomycin, teicoplanin, daptomycin, linezolid, and tigecycline and for Gram-negative were carbapenems, colistin, aminoglycosides, and tigecycline. The prevalence of MRSA and vancomycin resistance was 70.6% and 21.6%, respectively. ESBL prevalence was 39.6%. Overall low positive rates of blood culture were observed.

  13. GHGRP Minerals Sector Industrial Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program periodically produces detailed profiles of the various industries that report under the program. The profiles available for download below contain detailed analyses for the Minerals industry.

  14. Statistical Profile of Older Hispanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    A Statistical Profile of Older Hispanic Americans INTRODUCTION In 2014, there were 46.2 million Americans aged 65 and over and ... were Hispanic. Principal sources of data for this Profile are the most current information available from the ...

  15. [Systemic Antimicrobials Consumption and Expenditures in Departments of Surgery of Multi-Profile Hospitals in the Russian Federation and the Republic of Belarus: Results of Multicentre Pharmacoepidemiological Study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkova, Yu A; Rachina, S A; Kozlov, R S; Mishchenko, V M; Pavlukov, R A; Abubakirova, A I; Berezhanskiy, B V; Eliseeva, E V; Zubareva, N A; Karpov, I A; Kopylova, I A; Palyutin, Sh Kh; Portnyagina, U S; Pribytkova, O V; Samuylo, E K

    2016-01-01

    The results of the systemic antimicrobials (AM) consumption and expenditures assessment in the departments of surgery of multi-profile hospitals in different regions of the Russian Federation and the Republic of Belarus in 2009-2010 based on retrospective collection and analysis of the data from the hospital expenditure notes using ATC/DDD methodology are presented. The average AM consumption and expenditure rates in the above mentioned departments varied from 24.9 DDD/100 bed-days to 61.7 DDD/100 bed-days depending on the department profile, with beta-lactams (cephalosporins and penicillins) share in the consumption being as high as 70-90%, followed by fluoroquinolones and aminoglycosides. Only 55-70% of the consumed AM belonged to the drugs of choice, whereas the improper AM consumption and expenditure rates amounted up to 10-18%. The study outputs can be used for the budget allocation and AM distribution improvement in the departments of surgery, as well as for the development and efficacy control of the local antimicrobial stewardship programs.

  16. Competitive Cooperation: The Iceberg Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Jerry L.

    Competitive athletes' scores on the Profile of Mood States (POMS) test create an iceberg-like pattern known as the "Iceberg Profile." Their scores for tension, depression, anger, fatigue, and confusion are low while their scores on vigor juts upward creating the "Iceberg Profile." Persons in a cooperative relationship are often…

  17. Qualitative Value Profiling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duus, Henrik Johannsen; Bjerre, Mogens

    2015-01-01

    for deeper analysis of all involved factors. This paper presents the method and compares and contrasts it with other similar methods like the PESTELE method known from corporate strategy, the STEEPAL method known from scenario analysis, and the Politics-Institutions-Economy (PIE) framework known from......Qualitative value profiling (QVP) is a relatively unknown method of strategic analysis for companies in international business-to-business settings. The purpose of QVP is to reduce the information complexity that is faced by international companies in dealing with business partners. The QVP method...

  18. Sensing the wind profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena Diaz, Alfredo

    This thesis consists of two parts. The first is a synopsis of the theoretical progress of the study that is based on a number of journal papers. The papers, which constitute the second part of the report, aim to analyze, measure, and model the wind prole in and beyond the surface layer by combining...... measurements are averaged for several stability conditions and compare well with the surface-layer wind profile. At Høvsøre, it is sufficient to scale the wind speed with the surface friction velocity, whereas at Horns Rev a new scaling is added, due to the variant roughness length. This new scaling is coupled...

  19. Deflagration Wave Profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menikoff, Ralph [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-04-03

    Shock initiation in a plastic-bonded explosives (PBX) is due to hot spots. Current reactive burn models are based, at least heuristically, on the ignition and growth concept. The ignition phase occurs when a small localized region of high temperature (or hot spot) burns on a fast time scale. This is followed by a growth phase in which a reactive front spreads out from the hot spot. Propagating reactive fronts are deflagration waves. A key question is the deflagration speed in a PBX compressed and heated by a shock wave that generated the hot spot. Here, the ODEs for a steady deflagration wave profile in a compressible fluid are derived, along with the needed thermodynamic quantities of realistic equations of state corresponding to the reactants and products of a PBX. The properties of the wave profile equations are analyzed and an algorithm is derived for computing the deflagration speed. As an illustrative example, the algorithm is applied to compute the deflagration speed in shock compressed PBX 9501 as a function of shock pressure. The calculated deflagration speed, even at the CJ pressure, is low compared to the detonation speed. The implication of this are briefly discussed.

  20. Scanner image quality profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Chengwu

    2009-01-01

    When using a document scanner, scan image quality is often unknown to the end user of the scanned image. Document scanners may employ different imaging technologies that can result in different image characteristics. Variability of scanner parts and the manufacturing process may also create variability of the scanned image quality from machine to machine. Image quality of the same scanner may also change as it ages and becomes contaminated. If the scanned image is used for human viewing, the resulting image quality variability may not be mission critical other than being a visual annoyance because the human visual system has superb adaptation and segmentation capability. However, if the scanned image is used for machine recognition or for printing, the image quality variability may become important and even mission critical. Here we propose a framework to profile the scanner image quality and tag the scanned image with the IQ profile. We review the potential quantified aspects of scan image quality and propose a method of characterization with examples.

  1. Autoantibody profiling in APS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roggenbuck, D; Somma, V; Schierack, P; Borghi, M O; Meroni, P L

    2014-10-01

    The international consensus for the classification of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) requires clinical and laboratory criteria to be considered at an equal level for diagnosing APS. Thus, detection of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) being a hallmark of APS has been the object of intensive investigation over the past 40 years. However, appropriate detection of aPL still remains a laboratory challenge due to their heterogeneity comprising autoantibodies reactive to different phospholipid-binding plasma proteins, such as beta-2 glycoprotein I (β2GPI) and prothrombin. The relevance of aPL interacting with phospholipids other than cardiolipin (CL, diphosphatidylglycerol), such as phosphatidylserine (PS), remains elusive with regard to the diagnosis of APS. Recently, the concept of aPL profiling has been introduced to assess the risk of thrombotic complications in patients with APS. New assay techniques, apart from enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) recommended by the international consensus for the classification of APS, have been proposed for multiplexing of aPL testing. Line immunoassays (LIAs) employing a novel hydrophobic solid phase for the simultaneous detection of different aPL seem to be an intriguing alternative. We evaluated a novel multiplex LIA employing a hydrophobic membrane coated with different phospholipid (PL)-binding proteins or PLs. The performance characteristics of this new multiplexing assay technique demonstrated its usefulness for aPL profiling. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  2. Profile detectors of GANIL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tribouillard, C.

    1997-01-01

    In the design phase of GANIL, which started in 1977, one of the priorities of the project management was equipping the beam lines with a fast and efficient system for visualizing the beam position, thus making possible adjustment of the beam transport lines optics and facilitating beam control. The implantation of some thirty detectors was foreseen in the initial design. The profile detectors are unavoidable tools in displaying the GANIL beams for adaptation and adjustment of the beam line optics. The installed detector assembly (about 190) proves the advantages of these detectors for displaying all the beams extracted from GANIL: transfer and transport lines, beams extracted from SISSI, very high intensity beams (VHIB), secondary ion beams emitted by LISE and SPEG spectrometers targets, different lines of SPIRAL project (HE, BE, ME): This detector assembly must meet the following standard requirements: flange diameter (DN 160) with a standard booster for all the sensors; identical analog electronics for all the detectors with networking; unique visualization system. The new micro-channel plate non-interceptive detectors (the beam profile and ion packet length allow an in-line control of the beam quality and accelerator stability

  3. Safety profile of levetiracetam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo, Santiago; Crawford, Pamela

    2003-05-01

    A good balance between safety and tolerability is necessary for an antiepileptic drug (AED) to be successful in the management of patients with epilepsy. Levetiracetam is one of the new generation of AEDs licensed as an add-on therapy for the treatment of patients with partial-onset seizures. Leveti-racetam's mechanisms of action are not fully understood. Controlled clinical trials, open-label studies, and postmarketing surveillance indicate that leveti-racetam has a favorable safety profile characterized by little effect on vital signs or clinical laboratory values, reported adverse events that are mild to moderate, and no known drug-drug interactions. The tolerability of levetiracetam may extend to both pediatric and elderly patients based on analyses of small numbers of patients. Tolerability is maintained over the long term. Levetirac-etam does not appear to have a different safety profile in learning-disabled patients. Levetiracetam appears to have a good balance between tolerability and efficacy in the treatment of a wide variety of patients with partial epilepsy.

  4. Profile analysis of microparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konarski, P.; Iwanejko, I.; Mierzejewska, A.

    2001-01-01

    Depth resolved analyses of several types of microparticles are presented. Particles for secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) depth profile analysis were collected in the working environment of glass plant, steelworks and welding station using eight-stage cascade impactor with particle size range of 0.3 μm to 15 μm. Ion beam sputtering and sample rotation technique allowed to describe morphology i.e. the elemental structure of collected sub-micrometer particles. Also model particles Iriodin 221 (Merck) were depth profiled. The core-shell structure is found for all types of investigated particles. Steelworks particles consist mainly of iron and manganese cores. At the shells of these microparticles: lead, chlorine and fluorine are found. The particles collected in the glass-works consist mainly of lead-zirconium glass cores covered by carbon and copper. Stainless-steel welding particles compose of iron, manganese and chromium cores covered by a shell rich in carbon, chlorine and fluorine. Sample rotation technique applied in SIMS appears to be an effective tool for environmental microparticle morphology studies

  5. Transcriptome profiling identifies genes/pathways associated with experimental resistance to paromomycin in Leishmania donovani

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditya Verma

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Widespread resistance towards antimony and reports of relapses following miltefosine treatment has severely affected the management of visceral leishmaniasis (VL in the Indian subcontinent. Paromomycin (PMM, an aminoglycoside antibiotic, has been licensed for VL treatment in India in 2007. Although its use is still restricted in the field, unraveling the molecular mechanism of resistance towards PMM is the key to preserve the drug. In this study, PMM resistant lines were selected up to 100 μM of PMM in three distinct field isolates of Leishmania donovani at promastigote stage. The resistance induced at promastigote level was also evident in amastigotes which showed 6 fold decreases in PMM susceptibility. Comparative transcriptome profiling of PMM resistant (PMM-R and the corresponding PMM sensitive (PMM-S parasites revealed modulated expression of 500 genes (1.5 fold cut off in PMM-R parasites. Selected genes were validated for their modulated expression by quantitative real-time PCR. Functional classification and pathway analysis of modulated genes indicated probable adaptations in drug resistant lines which included a reduced oxidative phosphorylation; b increased glycosomal succinate fermentation and substrate level phosphorylation; c dependency on lipids and amino acids for energy generation; d reduced DNA synthesis and increased DNA damage repair and e decreased protein synthesis and degradation. Interestingly, PMM-R parasites showed a marked increase in PMM susceptibility in presence of verapamil and amlodipine, antagonists of Ca2+ channel that are also modulators of ABC transporters. Moreover, infection of macrophages by PMM-R parasites led to modulated nitric oxide (NO levels while reactive oxygen species (ROS level remained unaltered. The present study highlights the putative mechanisms of PMM resistance in Leishmania. Keywords: Leishmania donovani, Drug resistance, Paromomycin, Transcriptome, ABC transporters, Nitric oxide

  6. Pathogens Causing Blood Stream Infections and their Drug Susceptibility Profile in Immunocompromised Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayyaz, M.; Mirza, I.A.; Ikram, A.; Hussain, A.; Ghafoor, T.; Shujat, U.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the types of pathogens causing blood stream infections and their drug susceptibility profile in immunocompromised patients. Study Design: Cross-sectional, observational study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Microbiology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Rawalpindi, from January to September 2012. Methodology: Blood culture bottles received from immunocompromised patients were dealt by two methods, brain heart infusion (BHI) broth based manual method and automated BACTEC system. The samples yielding positive growth from either of two methods were further analyzed. The identification of isolates was done with the help of biochemical reactions and rapid tests. Antimicrobial susceptibility of the isolates was carried out as per recommendations of Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). Results: Out of the 938 blood culture specimens received from immunocompromised patients, 188 (20%) yielded positive growth. Out of these, 89 (47.3%) isolates were Gram positive and Gram negative each, while 10 (5.3%) isolates were fungi (Candida spp.). In case of Gram positive isolates, 75 (84.3%) were Staphylococcus spp. and 51 (67%) were Methicillin resistant. Amongst Gram negative group 49 (55.1%) isolates were of enterobacteriaceae family, while 40 (44.9%) were non-lactose fermenters (NLF). In vitro antimicrobial susceptibility of Staphylococci revealed 100% susceptibility to vancomycin and linezolid. The enterobacteriaceae isolates had better susceptibility against amikacin 85.7% compared to tigecycline 61.2% and imipenem 59.2%. For NLF, the in vitro efficacy of aminoglycosides was 72.5%. Conclusion: The frequency of Gram positive and Gram negative organisms causing blood stream infections in immunocompromised patients was equal. Vancomycin in case of Gram positive and amikacin for Gram negative organisms revealed better in vitro efficacy as compared to other antibiotics. (author)

  7. Profile constraining mechanism for Te profile invariance in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, G.

    1993-03-01

    A new model for the electron temperature profile resilience in the outer half of tokamak plasmas is proposed and investigated. It is shown that introducing a negative feedback term into the scaling of the electron heat diffusivity χ e (r) = χ ee (r)(1-αa 2 /T eo d 2 T e /dr 2 ) with α > or ∼ 3 results in the observed T e profile stiffness against variations of the density and heating profiles. In addition, the feedback by itself yields the measured approximately linear T e (r) shape for r/a > or ∼ 0.5 in contrast to previous profile constraining models. (orig.). 6 figs

  8. DOBRE-2 WARR profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Starostenko, V.; Janik, T.; Stephenson, R.

    2016-01-01

    (the easternmost part of Crimea) and the northern East Black Sea Basin, thus traversing the entire Crimea–Caucasus compressional zone centred on the Kerch Peninsula. The DOBRE-2 profile recorded a mix of onshore explosive sources as well as airguns at sea. A variety of single-component recorders were...... rocks. A narrow unit as shallow as about 5 km and characterized by velocities typical of the crystalline basement bounds the metasedimentary succession on its southern margin and also marks the northern margin of the northern foredeep and the underlying successions of the Crimea–Caucasus compressional...... zone in the southern part of the Azov Sea. A broader and somewhat deeper basement unit (about 11 km) with an antiformal shape lies beneath the northern East Black Sea Basin and forms the southern margin of the Crimea–Caucasus compressional zone. The depth of the underlying Moho discontinuity increases...

  9. Cohort Profile Update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Omland, Lars Haukali; Ahlström, Magnus Glindvad; Obel, Niels

    2014-01-01

    of Causes of Death, the Danish National Prescription Registry, the Attainment Register and the Integrated Database for Labour Market Research to get information on vital status, migration, cancer, hospital contacts, causes of death, dispensed prescriptions, education and employment. Using this design, rates......The DHCS is a cohort of all HIV-infected individuals seen in one of the eight Danish HIV centres after 31 December 1994. Here we update the 2009 cohort profile emphasizing the development of the cohort. Every 12-24 months, DHCS is linked with the Danish Civil Registration System (CRS) in order...... to extract an age- and sex-matched comparison cohort from the general population, as well as cohorts of family members of the HIV-infected patients and of the comparison cohort. The combined cohort is linked with CRS, the Danish Cancer Registry, the Danish National Hospital Registry, the Danish Registry...

  10. Lebanon: country profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marfleet, P

    1988-05-01

    A brief profile of Lebanon's economy, people, health, culture and political situation is presented. Lebanon has an estimated 3.5 million people, with a Maronite Christian elite, a Muslim Shiite majority, and Muslim Sunnis and Druze groups. The infant mortality is estimated at 41/1000; literacy is 69% among women and 86% among men; life expectancy was 66 years, 10 years ago. The economy, previously thriving on banking, manufacturing and agriculture, is now decimated, and Lebanon's once active tourist industry, based on elegant facilities in Beirut and neighboring beaches and ski slopes, is the victim of 15 years of civil strife. Israel has invaded, supporting Maronite Christians, Syria has invaded in support Muslim and Druze militias, and Iran has aggressively supported Shiite factions.

  11. Aminoglycoside induced ototoxicity associated with mitochondrial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Joseph Foster II

    2016-06-16

    Jun 16, 2016 ... one such modifier, as a missense mutation in TRMU was shown to compromise tRNA metabolism. Reduction of tRNA metabolism in combination with the reduction of accurate pro- tein synthesis ..... A limited number of studies have characterized variations .... Genetic analysis of interactions with eukaryotic.

  12. Patient Profile in Dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esra Adışen

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Skin diseases are among the most prevalent problems in medical practice. Dermatologists have become active, not only in treatment of skin diseases, but also for the cosmetic and surgical procedures. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the profiles of patients visiting outpatient dermatology clinic of an university hospital and a private dermatologist’s office located in Ankara. Material and Method: The study comprised 5952 patients in each group. Age, gender, diagnosis, and the places they live, were all recorded. Results: There were 3778 women and 2174 men with a mean age of 37.8±15.9 years (6 months-81 years in private visit group, and 3570 women and 2382 men with a mean age of 37.9±18.6 years (1-100 years in hospital visit group. The most common cause for visiting dermatologist’s office was acne. It was fungal diseases for hospital visits. Women with fungal disease, alopecia, nail disorders, urticaria, psychocutaneous dermatoses, bacterial infections, and men with fungal disease, acne, alopecia, urticaria, nail disorders, preferred hospitals over private offices. Both women and men with benign and malignant tumors, nevi, pigmentation disorders, preferred private office over hospital. Men with syphilis, genital herpes, anogenital verruca preferred mainly private offices. Visits to dermatologist’s office for cosmetic procedures constituted only 4% of overall visits.Conclusion: Our finding underscores the fact that medical or clinical dermatology continues to be the focus of most dermatology practices. Apart from cosmetic procedures, the main difference between patient profiles visiting private offices and hospitals is observed in sexually transmitted diseases. (Turkderm 2008; 42: 82-6

  13. Three dimensional energy profile:

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowsari, Reza; Zerriffi, Hisham

    2011-01-01

    The provision of adequate, reliable, and affordable energy has been considered as a cornerstone of development. More than one-third of the world's population has a very limited access to modern energy services and suffers from its various negative consequences. Researchers have been exploring various dimensions of household energy use in order to design strategies to provide secure access to modern energy services. However, despite more than three decades of effort, our understanding of household energy use patterns is very limited, particularly in the context of rural regions of the developing world. Through this paper, the past and the current trends in the field of energy analysis are investigated. The literature on rural energy and energy transition in developing world has been explored and the factors affecting households' decisions on energy use are listed. The and the factors affecting households' decisions on energy use are listed. The gaps identified in the literature on rural household energy analysis provide a basis for developing an alternative model that can create a more realistic view of household energy use. The three dimensional energy profile is presented as a new conceptual model for assessment of household energy use. This framework acts as a basis for building new theoretical and empirical models of rural household energy use. - Highlights: ► Reviews literature on household energy, energy transitions and decision-making in developing countries. ► Identifies gaps in rural household energy analysis and develops a new conceptual framework. ► The 3-d energy profile provides a holistic view of household energy system characteristics. ► Illustrates the use of the framework for understanding household energy transitions.

  14. Nutrient profiling for regulatory purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayner, Mike

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, I first provide definitions of nutrient profiling and of a nutrient profile model. I set out the purposes of nutrient profiling: both general and specific. I give two examples of nutrient profile models that have been developed for regulatory purposes by the Food Standards Agency (FSA) in the UK and the WHO for its European Region - the UK FSA/Ofcom and the WHO-Euro models - and compare the way the models are constructed and function, how they have been developed, the extent to which they have been tested and validated and their use in regulation. Finally I draw some conclusions about the future use of nutrient profiling for regulatory purposes. I argue that its full potential has yet to be realised and give some reasons why. I pose some urgent research questions with respect to nutrient profiling.

  15. Creating User Profiles Using Wikipedia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, Krishnan; Kapoor, Komal

    Creating user profiles is an important step in personalization. Many methods for user profile creation have been developed to date using different representations such as term vectors and concepts from an ontology like DMOZ. In this paper, we propose and evaluate different methods for creating user profiles using Wikipedia as the representation. The key idea in our approach is to map documents to Wikipedia concepts at different levels of resolution: words, key phrases, sentences, paragraphs, the document summary and the entire document itself. We suggest a method for evaluating profile recall by pooling the relevant results from the different methods and evaluate our results for both precision and recall. We also suggest a novel method for profile evaluation by assessing the recall over a known ontological profile drawn from DMOZ.

  16. Racial Profiling as Collective Definition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevor G. Gardner

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Economists and other interested academics have committed significant time and effort to developing a set of circumstances under which an intelligent and circumspect form of racial profiling can serve as an effective tool in crime finding–the specific objective of finding criminal activity afoot. In turn, anti-profiling advocates tend to focus on the immediate efficacy of the practice, the morality of the practice, and/or the legality of the practice. However, the tenor of this opposition invites racial profiling proponents to develop more surgical profiling techniques to employ in crime finding. In the article, I review the literature on group distinction to discern its relevance to the practice and study of racial profiling. I argue that the costs of racial profiling extend beyond inefficient policing and the humiliation of law-abiding minority pedestrians and drivers. Racial profiling is simultaneously a process of perception and articulation of relative human characteristics (both positive and negative; it binds and reifies the concepts of race and criminality, fixing them into the subconscious of the profiled, the profiler, and society at large.

  17. 3D Terahertz Beam Profiling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Pernille Klarskov; Strikwerda, Andrew; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2013-01-01

    We present a characterization of THz beams generated in both a two-color air plasma and in a LiNbO3 crystal. Using a commercial THz camera, we record intensity images as a function of distance through the beam waist, from which we extract 2D beam profiles and visualize our measurements into 3D beam...... profiles. For the two-color air-plasma, we measure a conical beam profile that is focused to a bell-shape at the beam waist, whereas we observe a Gaussian beam profile for the THz beam generated from the LiNbO3 crystal....

  18. Sensing the wind profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pena, A.

    2009-03-15

    This thesis consists of two parts. The first is a synopsis of the theoretical progress of the study that is based on a number of journal papers. The papers, which constitute the second part of the report, aim to analyze, measure, and model the wind prole in and beyond the surface layer by combining observations from cup anemometers with lidars. The lidar is necessary to extend the measurements on masts at the Horns Rev offshore wind farm and over at land at Hoevsoere, Denmark. Both sensing techniques show a high degree of agreement for wind speed measurements performed at either sites. The wind speed measurements are averaged for several stability conditions and compare well with the surface-layer wind profile. At Hoevsoere, it is sufficient to scale the wind speed with the surface friction velocity, whereas at Horns Rev a new scaling is added, due to the variant roughness length. This new scaling is coupled to wind prole models derived for flow over the sea and tested against the wind proles up to 160 m at Horns Rev. The models, which account for the boundary-layer height in stable conditions, show better agreement with the measurements than compared to the traditional theory. Mixing-length parameterizations for the neutral wind prole compare well with length-scale measurements up to 300 m at Hoevsoere and 950 m at Leipzig. The mixing-length-derived wind proles strongly deviate from the logarithmic wind prole, but agree better with the wind speed measurements. The length-scale measurements are compared to the length scale derived from a spectral analysis performed up to 160 m at Hoevsoere showing high agreement. Mixing-length parameterizations are corrected to account for stability and used to derive wind prole models. These compared better to wind speed measurements up to 300 m at Hoevsoere than the surface-layer wind prole. The boundary-layer height is derived in nearneutral and stable conditions based on turbulent momentum uxes only and in unstable conditions

  19. Ethnosocial profile of Tuvans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeriya S. Kan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the ethnosocial profile of contemporary Tuvans, with a focus on the dynamics of population change, human environment, self-consciousness, interethnic relations and language command. Our study was based on the official data of the Federal Census and the current statistics we obtained from Tuva territorial branch of the Federal State Statistics Service, as well as on the outcomes of the opinion polls held by a team lead by the author in 2008-2015. Due to traditionally high birth rate, the Tuvan population of Russia continues to grow (243422 in 2002, 263934 in 2010. This is also true for their share in the total population of Russia (0.17% in 2002, 0.19% in 2010. The main features of Tuvan human environment are their compact settlement within the Republic of Tuva (249299, or 95% of overall population, as well as living largely in a monoethnic environment, low level of ethnocultural and linguistic diversity and prevalence of rural population. The share of indigenous population in the region has been steadily increasing (64% in 1989, 77% in 2002, 82% in 2002, while those of other groups have been decreasing over time. The net migration remains negative due to ethnic Russians leaving the socially and economically dysfunctional region. Tuvans account for 92% of rural population, and 73% of the urban. The rural-urban balance in Tuva is shifting towards the latter slower than in the national average. Interethnic relations in the region can be described as stable, with a slight degree of tension. Problems mainly happen on the level of day-to-day communication. The sub-ethnicity of Tojin Tuvans is decreasing in numbers (4435 people in 2002, and 1856 in 2010. We believe the reason lies in the change of self-consciousness which accompanied the complete abandonment of nomadic lifestyle. In the article, we also define and describe the factors which contribute to the reproduction of Tuvan ethnicity, including the policy of the regional

  20. USGIN ISO metadata profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, S. M.

    2011-12-01

    The USGIN project has drafted and is using a specification for use of ISO 19115/19/39 metadata, recommendations for simple metadata content, and a proposal for a URI scheme to identify resources using resolvable http URI's(see http://lab.usgin.org/usgin-profiles). The principal target use case is a catalog in which resources can be registered and described by data providers for discovery by users. We are currently using the ESRI Geoportal (Open Source), with configuration files for the USGIN profile. The metadata offered by the catalog must provide sufficient content to guide search engines to locate requested resources, to describe the resource content, provenance, and quality so users can determine if the resource will serve for intended usage, and finally to enable human users and sofware clients to obtain or access the resource. In order to achieve an operational federated catalog system, provisions in the ISO specification must be restricted and usage clarified to reduce the heterogeneity of 'standard' metadata and service implementations such that a single client can search against different catalogs, and the metadata returned by catalogs can be parsed reliably to locate required information. Usage of the complex ISO 19139 XML schema allows for a great deal of structured metadata content, but the heterogenity in approaches to content encoding has hampered development of sophisticated client software that can take advantage of the rich metadata; the lack of such clients in turn reduces motivation for metadata producers to produce content-rich metadata. If the only significant use of the detailed, structured metadata is to format into text for people to read, then the detailed information could be put in free text elements and be just as useful. In order for complex metadata encoding and content to be useful, there must be clear and unambiguous conventions on the encoding that are utilized by the community that wishes to take advantage of advanced metadata

  1. GANIL beam profile detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tribouillard, C.

    1997-01-01

    In the design phase of GANIL which started in 1977, one of the priorities of the project management was equipping the beamlines with a fast and efficient system for visualizing the beam position, thus making possible adjustment of the beam transport lines optics and facilitating beam control. The implantation of some thirty detectors was foreseen in the initial design. The assembly of installed detectors (around 190) proves the advantages of these detectors for displaying all the beams extracted from GANIL: transfer and transport lines, beam extracted from SISSI, very high intensity beam, secondary ion beams from the production target of the LISE and SPEG spectrometers, different SPIRAL project lines. All of these detectors are based on standard characteristics: - standard flange diameter (DN 160) with a standard booster for all the sensors; - identical analog electronics for all the detectors, with networking; - unique display system. The new micro-channel plate non-interceptive detectors (beam profile and ion packet lengths) make possible in-line control of the beam quality and accelerator stability. (author)

  2. Aliskiren: a clinical profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland E Schmieder

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Aliskiren is a novel oral antihypertensive agent, and the first in the new class of direct renin inhibitors. Here we review the key criteria that a new antihypertensive drug should possess, notably effective blood pressure lowering as monotherapy and combination therapy, 24-hour blood pressure control, safety and tolerability, end-organ protective effects, minimal drug interaction and efficacy during long-term use.Aliskiren fulfils key criteria for a new antihypertensive agent.The drug demonstrates effective blood lowering in a number of studies as monotherapy and in combination with a thiazide diuretic (hydrochlorothiazide, an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ramipril and a calcium channel blocker (amlodipine. Other studies applying ambulatory blood pressure monitoring show that aliskiren maintains blood pressure control for more than 24 hours. Aliskiren, 150 mg and 300 mg have demonstrated a placebo-like safety and tolerability profile, with no interactions with a wide range of commonly used drugs. Three studies (AVOID, ALOFT and ALLAY are ongoing properties. with aliskiren to assess end-organ protective properties.

  3. Aliskiren: A clinical profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland E Schmieder

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Aliskiren is a novel oral antihypertensive agent, and the first in the new class of direct renin inhibitors. Here we review the key criteria that a new antihypertensive drug should possess, notably effective blood pressure lowering as monotherapy and combination therapy, 24-hour blood pressure control, safety and tolerability end-organ protective effects, minimal drug interaction and efficacy during long-term use. Aliskiren fulfils key criteria for a new antihypertensive agent. The drug demonstrates effective blood lowering in a number of studies as monotherapy and in combination with a thiazide diuretic (hydrochlorothiazide, an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ramipril and a calcium channel blocker (amlodipine. Other studies applying ambulatory blood pressure monitoring show that aliskiren maintains blood pressure control for more than 24 hours. Aliskiren, 150 mg and 300 mg have demonstrated a placebo-like safety and tolerability profile with no interactions with a wide range of commonly used drugs. Three studies (AVOID, ALOFT and ALLAY are ongoing with aliskiren to assess end-organ protective properties.

  4. A channel profile analyser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gobbur, S.G.

    1983-01-01

    It is well understood that due to the wide band noise present in a nuclear analog-to-digital converter, events at the boundaries of adjacent channels are shared. It is a difficult and laborious process to exactly find out the shape of the channels at the boundaries. A simple scheme has been developed for the direct display of channel shape of any type of ADC on a cathode ray oscilliscope display. This has been accomplished by sequentially incrementing the reference voltage of a precision pulse generator by a fraction of a channel and storing ADC data in alternative memory locations of a multichannel pulse height analyser. Alternative channels are needed due to the sharing at the boundaries of channels. In the flat region of the profile alternate memory locations are channels with zero counts and channels with the full scale counts. At the boundaries all memory locations will have counts. The shape of this is a direct display of the channel boundaries. (orig.)

  5. Low-Profile Diffuser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Michael A.; Nettles, Mindy

    2015-01-01

    The propellant tanks used in liquid rockets require pressurization gases in order to maintain tank pressure while the tanks are being drained during engine operation. The pressurization gas, which is typically much warmer than the relatively cold propellants in the tank, must be introduced into the empty ullage space at the top of the tank. The purpose of the diffuser is to control the flow of the gas into the tank in order to prevent direct impingement of the gas on the liquid surface and/or the tank walls. If the diffuser did not perform those tasks, the warm gas can create excess heat transfer causing an increase in the amount of pressurization mass required. Typical diffusers are long vertical cylinders that create a large exit area in order to minimize gas velocities. However, long vertical cylinders limit the amount of liquid that can be loaded into the tank in order not to have the liquid surface near the diffuser. A design goal for a pressurization diffuser is to create uniform flow in order to prevent jets that can impact the liquid surface and/or tank walls. The purpose of the task was to create a diffuser design that had a lower vertical profile (in order to be able to raise the liquid surface) while still maintaining uniform flow.

  6. Linguistic Profiling of Language Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karanth, Prathibha

    2010-01-01

    The history of the evolution of language assessments for children and adults with language disorders is described briefly. This is followed by a discussion on language assessment of the clinical population with an emphasis on linguistic profiling, illustrated through the Linguistic Profile Test. Discourse analysis, in particular, is highlighted…

  7. Steel Energy and Environmental Profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2000-08-01

    Major steelmaking processes (from ironmaking through fabrication and forming) and their associated energy requirements have been profiled in this 2001 report (PDF 582 KB). This profile by Energetics, Inc. also describes the waste streams generated by each process and estimates annual emissions of CO2 and criteria pollutants.

  8. Steroid profiling in doping analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkhof, Daniël Henri van de

    2001-01-01

    Profiling androgens in urine samples is used in doping analysis for the detection of abused steroids of endogenous origin. These profiling techniques were originally developed for the analysis of testosterone, mostly by means of the ratio of testosterone to epitestosterone (T/E ratio). A study was

  9. Agricultural Pilot's Audiological Profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foltz, Lucas

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The agricultural airplane pilot are daily exposed to intense noises, being susceptible to the noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL and its auditory and extra auditory effects. Objective: To analyze the audiological profile of this population, verifying the work's influence on its hearing. Method: It was realized a retrospective, individual, observational, and cross-sectional study through the data obtained by means of a questionnaire and audiometric thresholds of 41 agricultural pilots. To the statistical analysis were utilized the chi-square, Spearman, and Wilcoxon tests with significance level of 5%. Results: It was verified that 95,1% of the pilots use PPE ( personal protective equipment during flight and 58,5% have contact with pesticides. More than half of individuals referred to feel auditory and extra auditory symptoms, being the buzz the more frequent (29,1%. It has the occurrence of 29,3% of NIHL suggestive hearing loss and 68,3% of normality, taking this presence of unilateral notch in 24,4% and bilateral notch in 31,7%. It was found correlation statistically significant in the associations between time of service and the average of the acute frequencies in the right ear (p=0038, and in the left ear (p=0,010. It has a statistical tendency in the association between audiometric configuration and contact with pesticides (p=0,088. Conclusion: The hearing loss prevalence in this study was showed high. More than half of the sample has normal audiometric thresholds with notch configuration. Such data lead to the conclusion that the agricultural pilots, even with PPE use, they still suffer with the damages caused by noise, needing best proposals of hearing loss prevention.

  10. Character profiles and life satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hwanjin; Suh, Byung Seong; Kim, Won Sool; Lee, Hye-Kyung; Park, Seon-Cheol; Lee, Kounseok

    2015-04-01

    There is a surge of interest in subjective well-being (SWB), which concerns how individuals feel about their happiness. Life satisfaction tends to be influenced by individual psychological traits and external social factors. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between individual character and SWB. Data from 3522 university students were analyzed in this study. Character profiles were evaluated using the Temperament and Character Inventory-Revised Short version (TCI-RS). Life satisfaction was assessed using the Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS). All statistical tests regarding the correlations between each character profile and life satisfaction were conducted using ANOVAs, t-tests, multiple linear regression models and correlation analyses. The creative (SCT) profile was associated with the highest levels of life satisfaction, whereas the depressive (sct) profile was associated with the lowest levels of life satisfaction. Additionally, high self-directedness, self-transcendence and cooperation were associated with high life satisfaction. The results of gender-adjusted multiple regression analysis showed that the effects of self-directedness were the strongest in the assessment of one's quality of life, followed by self-transcendence and cooperativeness, in that order. All of the three-character profiles were significantly correlated with one's quality of life, and the character profiles of TCI-RS explained 27.6% of life satisfaction in total. Among the three-character profiles, the self-directedness profile was most associated with life satisfaction. Our study was cross-sectional, and self-reported data from students at a single university were analyzed. The results of this study showed that, among the character profiles, the effects of self-directedness were the strongest for predicting life satisfaction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. CDBG Performance Profiles - PY12

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — These profiles significantly increase the amount of information that is available about the performance of CDBG grantees. It is important that our grantees, all our...

  12. Distinguishing Ichthyoses by Protein Profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Robert H.; Bradshaw, Katie M.; Durbin-Johnson, Blythe P.; Rocke, David M.; Eigenheer, Richard A.; Phinney, Brett S.; Schmuth, Matthias; Gruber, Robert

    2013-01-01

    To explore the usefulness of protein profiling for characterization of ichthyoses, we here determined the profile of human epidermal stratum corneum by shotgun proteomics. Samples were analyzed after collection on tape circles from six anatomic sites (forearm, palm, lower leg, forehead, abdomen, upper back), demonstrating site-specific differences in profiles. Additional samples were collected from the forearms of subjects with ichthyosis vulgaris (filaggrin (FLG) deficiency), recessive X-linked ichthyosis (steroid sulfatase (STS) deficiency) and autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis type lamellar ichthyosis (transglutaminase 1 (TGM1) deficiency). The ichthyosis protein expression patterns were readily distinguishable from each other and from phenotypically normal epidermis. In general, the degree of departure from normal was lower from ichthyosis vulgaris than from lamellar ichthyosis, parallel to the severity of the phenotype. Analysis of samples from families with ichthyosis vulgaris and concomitant modifying gene mutations (STS deficiency, GJB2 deficiency) permitted correlation of alterations in protein profile with more complex genetic constellations. PMID:24130705

  13. Profile of organic food consumers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kranjac Mirjana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to prove that profile of organic food consumers is dependent on their socio-demographic characteristics as well as to shape universal organic food consumer profile. The survey included 398 consumers in Serbia. Results indicate existence of typical consumer's profile. The findings could be generalized proving that socio-demographic profiles in a larger population are strictly related to the decision to utilize organic food. The study finally contributes to the stakeholders in general, since the knowledge of the attributes can help all of them to play more active role in this supply chain. It should stimulate the personalized approach to the particular groups of consumers based on socio-demographic characteristics in order to intensify consumption of organic food and to create different marketing plans dependent on the particular countries or areas.

  14. Monitor of SC beam profiles

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1977-01-01

    A high-resolution secondary emission grid for the measurement of SC beam profiles. Modern techniques of metal-ceramic bonding, developed for micro-electronics, have been used in its construction. (See Annual Report 1977 p. 105 Fig. 12.)

  15. Profile Viewer (ProVu) -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — ProVu is a viewer which allows Federal, State, and private industry users to electronically analyze standard motor carrier safety profile reports available from the...

  16. SPLC Sustainable Purchasing Guidance Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    To help you find the resource that is right for your organization, EPA conducted a scan of the landscape and developed summary profiles of some of the leading sources of sustainable purchasing guidance around the globe.

  17. State Cancer Profiles Web site

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The State Cancer Profiles (SCP) web site provides statistics to help guide and prioritize cancer control activities at the state and local levels. SCP is a...

  18. Smartphone laser beam spatial profiler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Md Arafat; Canning, John; Cook, Kevin; Jamalipour, Abbas

    2015-11-15

    A simple, low-cost, portable, smartphone-based laser beam profiler for characterizing laser beam profiles is reported. The beam profiler utilizes a phosphor silica glass plate to convert UV light into visible (green) light that can be directly imaged onto an existing smartphone CMOS chip and analyzed using a customized app. 3D printing enables the ready fabrication of the instrument package. The beam's diameter, shape, divergence, beam quality factor, and output power are measured for two UV lasers: a CW 244 nm frequency-doubled Ar ion laser and a pulsed 193 nm ArF exciplex laser. The availability of specialized phosphor converters can extend the instrument from the UV to the near infrared and beyond, and the smartphone platform extends the Internet of Things to map laser beam profiles simultaneously in different locations.

  19. Automotive Refinishing Industry: Isocyanates Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    The isocyanates profile document is part of the DfE Auto Refinishing Shop Project and is intended to provide information on refinishing, control technologies, and regulatory status regarding isocyanate compounds

  20. On the Escarpment Wind Profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Niels Otto; Peterson, E. W.

    1978-01-01

    It is shown that miscellaneous theories for flow over low ridges give results consistent with each other and that these results can be used to quantify certain observed features of the wind profile downwind from an escarpment...

  1. Global Soil Profile Data (ISRIC-WISE)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The ISRIC-WISE International soil profile data set consists of a homogenized, global set of 1,125 soil profiles for use by global modelers. These profiles provided...

  2. Racial Profiling as Collective Definition

    OpenAIRE

    Trevor G. Gardner

    2014-01-01

    Economists and other interested academics have committed significant time and effort to developing a set of circumstances under which an intelligent and circumspect form of racial profiling can serve as an effective tool in crime finding-the specific objective of finding criminal activity afoot. In turn, anti-profiling advocates tend to focus on the immediate efficacy of the practice, the morality of the practice, and/or the legality of the practice. However, the tenor of this opposition invi...

  3. Individual Profiling Using Text Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-15

    for author profiling techniques, many of which give rise to deep ethical considerations. A company or organisation could use an author profiling tool...characteristics. Law enforcement could potentially use such a system to link on-line criminal behaviour with individuals. Studies have already investigated the...positive demeanour [17]. Conversational elements have also been shown to be useful [16, 14, 15]. It is also possible to code for behaviour in online media

  4. On the Escarpment Wind Profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Niels Otto; Peterson, E. W.

    1978-01-01

    It is shown that miscellaneous theories for flow over low ridges give results consistent with each other and that these results can be used to quantify certain observed features of the wind profile downwind from an escarpment......It is shown that miscellaneous theories for flow over low ridges give results consistent with each other and that these results can be used to quantify certain observed features of the wind profile downwind from an escarpment...

  5. Metropolitan Lima: area profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakkert, R

    1986-11-01

    This profile of metropolitan Lima, Peru, covers administrative divisions; population growth; age distribution; ethnicity and religion; housing and households; education and health care; economic activity, income, and consumption; transport and communication; and sources of information. Nearly 30% of Peru's entire population and 42% of its urban population live in Lima. The trend continues, yet Lima's urban primacy is waning due to the growth of some regional centers like Trujillo and Chimbote. Lima is still almost 10 times as large as the country's next ranking cities, Trujillo on the northern coast and Arequipa in the south. Peru's main administrative divisions are the 24 departments, of which the Department of Lima is one. These departments are further divided into 156 provinces. Greater Lima consists of 2 such provinces, the province of Lima and the constitutional province of Callao. Although the population of Lima continues to grow, its rate of growth slowed from about 5.5% during the 1960s to about 3.9% in the 1970s. Current projections estimate a metropolitan population of 6.7 million by 1990. On the whole, Lima's age structure is somewhat older than that of the rest of Peru. The median age of the population is 22.3 years, compared to a national figure of 20.4. The proportion of persons over age 65 is only 3.6%, lower than the national average of 4.1%, due to the tendency of in-migration to concentrate people of intermediate ages in the cities. Almost 400,000 inhabitants of greater Lima are bilingual in Spanish and an indigenous language. As elsewhere in Peru, the dominant religion is Roman Catholicism. Lima is a spread out city with few high rise buildings due to the danger of earthquakes. Only 12% of Lima's households are found in apartment buildings. As in other cities of Latin America, the formal housing market is beyond the reach of a major segment of the population. Consequently, much of the urban settlement has occurred through informal self

  6. HPLC profiling of Phellinus linteus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Kazuo; Ogihara, Yukio; Sakai, Yoshimichi; Mizukami, Hajime; Nagatsu, Akito

    2008-10-01

    HPLC chromatograms of MeOH extracts from a fruit body of the wild-grown P. linteus (natural fruit body), from cultivated fungus (cultivated fruit body), and from the cultured mycelia were compared. The extract prepared from the natural fruit bodies revealed a typical HPLC profile referred to as type 1 with a major peak corresponding to meshimakobnol A (1) together with two minor peaks of hypholomine B (3) and inoscavin A (4); the cultivated fruit bodies exhibited a profile referred to as type 2 with major peaks corresponding to 3 and 4 and a minor peak of 1, and the cultured mycelia showed a profile referred to as type 3 without any of these peaks. We also analyzed HPLC chromatograms of commercial products of P. linteus obtained in the markets. Most of the products claimed to be natural fruit bodies exhibited type 1 profiles, except for one product having an intermediate HPLC profile between type 1 and type 2. The products claimed to be cultivated fruit bodies and cultured mycelia revealed type 2 and type 3 profiles, respectively. The present results indicate that the HPLC chromatogram of the methanol extract of P. linteus can be used as a fingerprint to identify whether the product is from natural fruit bodies, cultivated fruit bodies, or cultured mycelia.

  7. Profile shape parameterization of JET electron temperature and density profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schunke, B.

    1997-01-01

    The temperature and density profiles of the Joint European Torus (JET) are parametrized using log additive models in the control variables. Predictive error criteria are used to determine which terms in the log linear model to include. The density and temperature profiles are normalized to their line averages (n-bar and T-bar). The normalized ohmic density shape depends primarily on the parameter n-bar/B t , where B t is the toroidal magnetic field. Both the low mode (L mode) and the edge localized mode-free (ELM-free) high mode (H mode) temperature profiles shapes depend strongly on the type of heating power, with ion cyclotron resonant heating (ICRH) producing a more peaked profile than neutral beam injection (NBI). Given the heating type dependence, the L mode temperature shape is nearly independent of the other control variables. The H mode temperature shape broadens as the effective charge, Z eff , increases. The line average L mode temperature scales as B 0.96 t (power per particle) 0.385 . The L mode normalized density shape depends primarily on the ratio of line average density, n-bar, to the edge safety factor, q 95 . As n-bar/q 95 increases, the profile shape broadens. The current, I p , is the most important control variable for the normalized H mode density. As the current increases, the profile broadens and the gradient at the edge sharpens. Increasing the heating power, especially ICRH, or decreasing the average density, peaks the H mode density profile slightly. (author). 15 refs, 12 figs, 10 tabs

  8. Bacteriological profile and antibiotic sensitivity pattern of neonatal septicaemia in a rural tertiary care hospital in North India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Thakur

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is not much published literature on neonatal septicemia available for the Sub-Himalayan region of North India. Hence, we undertook this study to find out the bacteriological profile and antibiotic sensitivity pattern of neonatal septicemia in the neonatal Intensive Care Unit. Material and Methods: Blood cultures were performed for all clinically suspected neonatal septicemia cases for 1-year. Identification of all pathogenic isolates was followed by antibiotic sensitivity testing. Results: We did blood cultures for 450 neonates and 42% were culture positive. Early onset sepsis were 92 (49% and 96 (51% were late onset sepsis. Gram-positive isolates were 60% and 40% were Gram-negative. Staphylococcus aureus (40%, coagulase negative Staphylococcus species (16%, non-fermenter group of organisms (NFGOs (15%, and Klebsiella pneumoniae (10% were the main isolates. Nasal cannula 101 (54%, birth asphyxia 91 (48%, and prematurity 73 (38% were the prominent risk factors associated with septicemia. Gram-positive organisms were highly resistant to penicillin (87% whereas Gram-negative isolates showed high resistance to third generation cephalosporins (53–89% and aminoglycosides (50–67%. The S. aureus isolates were methicillin-resistant in 41% whereas extended spectrum beta lactamase production was seen in 48% Gram-negative isolates.Conclusion: Our study highlights the recent emergence of Gram-positive organisms as predominant cause of neonatal septicemia in this part of Sub-Himalayan region, along with the review of literature which shows similar results from North India and rest of the world too. Though Gram-negative bacteria still remain the main cause of mortality in neonatal septicemia, we want to dispel the common notion among practitioners that they are the predominant isolates in neonatal septicemia.

  9. [Aspects of the antimicrobial resistence profile in infections with Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae in diabetic patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovici, Cristina G; Dorobăţ, Carmen; Matei, Mioara; Teodor, Andra; Luca, V; Miftode, Egidia

    2011-01-01

    Infections in diabetic patient remains an important cause of morbidity and mortality, triggering and maintaining a prolonged metabolic imbalance. Emergence of extented spectrum beta-lactmase (ESBL) in Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae is a major concern, because of the atypical manner infection acts in this group of imunodepressed patients and also for the limited therapeutic solutions. For this reason we have evaluated the profile of antimicrobial resistance of these pathogens in both diabetic and non diabetic patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate, in a retrospective case control study, the antibiotic susceptibility pattern in isolates of E. coli and Klebsiella spp. from different biological products in 49 diabetics and 150 non-diabetics admitted in The Clinical Hospital of Infectious Diseases Iaşi over a period of two years. Most of strains of E. coli and Klebsiella spp. ESBL positive were found in uroculture. Significant differences in E. coli resistance rate between diabetics and nondiabetics were noted for amoxicillin-clavulanic acid and ciprofloxacin (31,4% vs.13,98%, p=0,04, respectively 52,9% vs. 24,46%, p=0,004). More isolates of ESBL positive K. pneumoniae were found in diabetic patients (50% vs. 24%). Ciprofloxacin resistance of K. pneumoniae was significantly higher in diabetics (75% vs 39%; p=0,05). There was no resistance in E. coli and K. pneumoniae isolates to imipenem in the diabetic group. The high resistance rate to quinolones and 3rd generation cefalosporins limits their use for the treatment of Escherichia coli and K. pneumoniae infections. Other alternatives for empiric therapy in community and nosocomial-acquired infections in diabetic patient remains carbapenems, aminoglycosides and colimycin.

  10. An appraisal profile of nostalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tilburg, Wijnand A P; Bruder, Martin; Wildschut, Tim; Sedikides, Constantine; Göritz, Anja S

    2018-03-05

    The authors aimed to (a) identify the cognitive appraisals underlying nostalgia and (b) compare nostalgia with other emotions in terms of its appraisal profile. In Study 1, participants (N = 1,125) generated narratives. Next, they reported the level of nostalgia and 31 other emotions that these narratives elicited. Subsequently, participants evaluated the narrative events on several cognitive appraisals. Events that elicited nostalgia were pleasant, involved an irretrievable loss, felt psychologically distant, and were unique-an appraisal profile that differed from all other emotions. In Study 2 (N = 1,261), the authors experimentally varied these appraisals in a vignette paradigm and measured anticipated nostalgia and 10 other emotions. Participants anticipated most nostalgia when events were pleasant, involved irretrievable loss, were distant, and were unique-a profile shared only with longing. In Study 3 (N = 994), the authors used a guided autobiographical recall procedure in which they manipulated appraisals and measured the resultant emotions. Corroborating Studies 1-2, nostalgia was most intense for events that were pleasant, irretrievably lost, temporally distant, and unique. This appraisal profile was not shared by other emotions. The findings delineate the distinguishing cognitive appraisal profile of nostalgia. Nostalgia occupies a special place in the pantheon of emotions. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. Personalization and User Profile Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francoise Petersen

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Personalization and effective user profile management will be critical to meet the individual users’ needs and for achieving e-Inclusion and e-Accessibility. This paper outlines means to achieve the goal of the new ICT era where services and devices can be personalized by the users in order to meet their needs and preferences, in various situations. Behind every instance of personalization is a profile that stores the user preferences, context of use and other information that can be used to deliver a user experience tailored to their individual needs and preferences. Next Generation Networks (NGN and the convergence between telephony and Internet services offer a wide range of new terminal and service definition possibilities, and a much wider range of application in society. This paper describes the personalization and profile management activities at European Telecommunications Standards Institute (ETSI Technical Committee Human Factors, together with relevant experimentations in recent European research projects.

  12. The value of sports profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, J A

    1984-01-01

    In his presidential presentation to the American Orthopedic Association in 1975, Inman said, "Man is a machine that moves . . . and expends energy." He was all too ahead of his time. Profiling, by recognizing that the body is a machine with links, studies the biophysical, biochemical, and biomechanical links of the body's systems. These studies, carried out on athletes and potential athletes of all ages, yield data with useful clinical and research applications. The continued use and study of profiling data will certainly enhance performance, increase enjoyment of athletes for years to come, and, we believe, prevent injury.

  13. Circadian profile of systemic hemodynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veerman, D. P.; Imholz, B. P.; Wieling, W.; Wesseling, K. H.; van Montfrans, G. A.

    1995-01-01

    We determined the continuous 24-hour profile of mean arterial pressure, heart rate, stroke volume, cardiac output, and total peripheral resistance in eight healthy ambulatory volunteers. Beat-to-beat intra-arterial blood pressure was recorded with the Oxford system; subjects were ambulant during

  14. Renewable Energy Country Profiles. Caribbean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-09-15

    IRENA Renewable Energy Country Profiles take stock of the latest developments in the field of renewables at country level around the world. Each profile combines analysis by IRENA's specialists with the latest available country data and additional information from a wide array of sources. The resulting reports provide a brief yet comprehensive picture of the situation with regard to renewable energy, including energy supply, electrical generation and grid capacity, and access. Energy policies, targets and projects are also considered, along with each country's investment climate and endowment with renewable energy resources. The energy statistics presented here span the period from 2009 until 2012, reflecting varying timelines in the source material. Since data availability differs from country to country, wider regional comparisons are possible only for the latest year with figures available for every country included. Despite the time lag in some cases, the evident differences and disparities between countries and regions around the world remain striking. The current package of country profiles is just a starting point. The geographic scope will continue to expand, and existing profiles will be enhanced with new indicators, with the whole series maintained as a live product on the IRENA website (www.irena.org)

  15. Cognitive Profile of Turner Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, David; Kent, Jamie Scaletta; Kesler, Shelli

    2009-01-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is a relatively common neurogenetic disorder characterized by complete or partial monosomy-X in a phenotypic female. TS is associated with a cognitive profile that typically includes intact intellectual function and verbal abilities with relative weaknesses in visual-spatial, executive, and social cognitive domains. In this…

  16. Ohio Special Education Profile, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio Coalition for the Education of Children with Disabilities, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This report provides a brief, but substantive, profile of the special needs student population in Ohio, including academic performance and graduation trends and an overview of special education funding and related policy issues. The report's central message is that investments in students with special educational needs produce substantial results…

  17. Racial Profiling and Criminal Justice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryberg, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    According to the main argument in favour of the practice of racial profiling as a low enforcement tactic, the use of race as a targeting factor helps the police to apprehend more criminals. In the following, this argument is challenged. It is argued that, given the assumption that criminals are c...

  18. Genome Trees from Conservation Profiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The concept of the genome tree depends on the potential evolutionary significance in the clustering of species according to similarities in the gene content of their genomes. In this respect, genome trees have often been identified with species trees. With the rapid expansion of genome sequence data it becomes of increasing importance to develop accurate methods for grasping global trends for the phylogenetic signals that mutually link the various genomes. We therefore derive here the methodological concept of genome trees based on protein conservation profiles in multiple species. The basic idea in this derivation is that the multi-component "presence-absence" protein conservation profiles permit tracking of common evolutionary histories of genes across multiple genomes. We show that a significant reduction in informational redundancy is achieved by considering only the subset of distinct conservation profiles. Beyond these basic ideas, we point out various pitfalls and limitations associated with the data handling, paving the way for further improvements. As an illustration for the methods, we analyze a genome tree based on the above principles, along with a series of other trees derived from the same data and based on pair-wise comparisons (ancestral duplication-conservation and shared orthologs. In all trees we observe a sharp discrimination between the three primary domains of life: Bacteria, Archaea, and Eukarya. The new genome tree, based on conservation profiles, displays a significant correspondence with classically recognized taxonomical groupings, along with a series of departures from such conventional clusterings.

  19. Country Energy Profile, South Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    This country energy profile provides energy and economic information about South Africa. Areas covered include: Economics, demographics, and environment; Energy situation; Energy structure; Energy investment opportunities; Department of Energy (DOE) programs in South Africa; and a listing of International aid to South Africa.

  20. English Language Teaching Profile: Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    British Council, London (England). English-Teaching Information Centre.

    A profile of English language teaching in Poland is provided in outline form. The following topics are dealt with: the role of English in the country, teaching hours per week in English at each educational level, English language versus English literature, public examinations, syllabuses and textbooks, specialized English programs, adult English…

  1. On bifurcations of temperature profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachmann, P.; Suender, D.; Wobig, H.

    1998-01-01

    Multiple stationary solutions of the one-dimensional heat conduction equation and bifurcation phenomena are known to be caused by the non-monotonic dependence of the impurity radiation function on the temperature, and the non-linearity of the heat flux in the high-recycling regime in front of the divertor target plates. In this paper we report on bifurcation and time evolution of temperature profiles along the magnetic field lines between two target plates owing to localized heat sources and energy loss due to the radiation of different impurities which are described by simple model functions. The main result is that depending on the number of different impurity species and their densities there may exist multiple stationary profiles. A linear stability analysis of stationary temperature profiles leads to a Schroedinger-type equation for the temperature perturbation. Then the fully time-dependent problem is solved. For the case of two different impurity species there is a maximum of seven steady temperature profiles with four of them proved to be stable. (orig.)

  2. Teachers' Entrepreneurial Profile: Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stettiner, Caio Flavio; Formigoni, Alexandre; Filho, Mário Pereira Roque; de Camargo, Mauricio Ortiz; Moia, Roberto Padilha

    2015-01-01

    This article was prepared in order to investigate whether the teachers working in a Business Administration BA degree have an entrepreneurial profile, with the aim of finding whether such teachers are able to support the Pedagogical Proposal of the Institution to which they belong to in what concerns the requirement of the course and also the…

  3. Metabolic Profiles of Brain Metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tone F. Bathen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastasis to the brain is a feared complication of systemic cancer, associated with significant morbidity and poor prognosis. A better understanding of the tumor metabolism might help us meet the challenges in controlling brain metastases. The study aims to characterize the metabolic profile of brain metastases of different origin using high resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS to correlate the metabolic profiles to clinical and pathological information. Biopsy samples of human brain metastases (n = 49 were investigated. A significant correlation between lipid signals and necrosis in brain metastases was observed (p < 0.01, irrespective of their primary origin. The principal component analysis (PCA showed that brain metastases from malignant melanomas cluster together, while lung carcinomas were metabolically heterogeneous and overlap with other subtypes. Metastatic melanomas have higher amounts of glycerophosphocholine than other brain metastases. A significant correlation between microscopically visible lipid droplets estimated by Nile Red staining and MR visible lipid signals was observed in metastatic lung carcinomas (p = 0.01, indicating that the proton MR visible lipid signals arise from cytoplasmic lipid droplets. MRS-based metabolomic profiling is a useful tool for exploring the metabolic profiles of metastatic brain tumors.

  4. English Language Teaching Profile: Cyprus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    British Council, London (England). English-Teaching Information Centre.

    This profile in outline form of the English language teaching situation in Cyprus discusses the role of English within the Greek Cypriot community and within the educational system. Areas covered include English language requirements and English within the curriculum, teaching personnel and teacher training, instructional materials, English…

  5. Country Energy Profile, South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-08-01

    This country energy profile provides energy and economic information about South Africa. Areas covered include: Economics, demographics, and environment; Energy situation; Energy structure; Energy investment opportunities; Department of Energy (DOE) programs in South Africa; and a listing of International aid to South Africa

  6. A Ravenscar-Java profile implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Bent; Ravn, Anders Peter; Søndergaard, Hans

    2006-01-01

    , since we want to investigate if the Ravenscar-Java profile, implemented on a Java processor, is efficient for real applications. During the implementation some ambiguities and weaknesses of the profile were uncovered. However, test examples indicate that the profile is suitable for development......This paper presents an implementation of the Ravenscar-Java profile. While most implementations of the profile are reference-implementations showing that it is possible to implement the profile, our implementation is aimed at industrial applications. It uses a dedicated real-time Java processor...... of realistic real-time programs....

  7. A Ravenscar-Java Profile Implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Hans; Thomsen, Bent; Ravn, Anders P.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents an implementation of the Ravenscar-Java profile. While most implementations of the profile are reference-implementations showing that it is possible to implement the profile, our implementation is aimed at industrial applications. It uses a dedicated real-time Java processor......, since we want to investigate if the Ravenscar-Java profile, implemented on a Java processor, is efficient for real applications. During the implementation some ambiguities and weaknesses of the profile were uncovered. However, test examples indicate that the profile is suitable for development...... of realistic real-time programs....

  8. Electron Density Profile Data Contains Virtual Height/Frequency Pairs from a Profile or Profiles (Composite Months) of Ionograms

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Electron Density Profile, N(h), data set contains both individual profiles and composite months. The data consist of virtual height/frequency pairs from a...

  9. Wind profiler installed in Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsley, B. B.; Carey, J.; Woodman, R. F.; Sarango, M.; Urbina, J.; Rodriguez, R.; Ragaini, E.

    A VHF (50 MHz) wind profiler was installed in Antarctica at the Peruvian Base “Machu Picchu” on King George Island from January 21 to 26. The wind profiler will provide a first look at atmospheric dynamics over the region.The profiler—the first of its kind in Antarctica—is a National Science Foundationsponsored cooperative project of the University of Colorado, the Geophysical Institute of Peru, the University of Piura (Peru), and the Peruvian Navy. This venture was also greatly facilitated by Peru's Comision Nacional de Asuntos Antartidos and Consejo Nacional de Ciencias y Tecnologia, with additional logis tics support provided by the Argentinean Navy and the Uruguayan Air Force.

  10. LCA profiles for building components:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsh, Rob

    2016-01-01

    , a new approach explores how environmental information on building components can be simplified for strategic use early in the design process in a Danish context. In this paper, life cycle assessments (LCAs) are undertaken for several hundred typical external wall solutions, based on relevant standards....... A full bivariate linear regression analysis is performed, showing statistically significant correlations with strong direct relationships between environmental impact categories. A simplified LCA profile consisting of total primary energy, global warming potential and acidification potential is developed....... This simplified LCA profile presents environmental data in a more understandable way, creating a strategic overview that can be easily used by non-technical clients and construction professionals in the early design stages. This has a scientific and statistical validity generated by environmental assessment...

  11. Molecular profiling of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliveira, Douglas V N P; Zhang, Shanshan; Chen, Xin

    2017-01-01

    . Areas covered: The present review article outlines the main studies and resulting discoveries on the molecular profiling of iCCA, with a special emphasis on the different techniques used for this purpose, the diagnostic and prognostic markers identified, as well as the genes and pathways that could......INTRODUCTION: Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (iCCA) is the second most frequent primary tumor of the liver and a highly lethal disease. Therapeutic options for advanced iCCA are limited and ineffective due to the largely incomplete understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of this deadly tumor...... be potentially targeted with innovative therapies. Expert commentary: Molecular profiling has led to the identification of distinct iCCA subtypes, characterized by peculiar genetic alterations and transcriptomic features. Targeted therapies against some of the identified genes are ongoing and hold great promise...

  12. Learning profiles of Master students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sprogøe, Jonas; Hemmingsen, Lis

    2005-01-01

    at DPU in 2001 several evaluations and research have been carried out on several topics relating to form, content, and didactics, but one important focus is missing: the research about the psychological profile and learning style of the master student. Knowledge is lacking on how teaching methods...... and programme designs relate to and support the learning profiles and learning styles of the master students. In other words: What are the consequences of the students' learning styles in terms of planning and teaching in the master programme?......Master education as a part of lifelong learning/education has over the last years increased in Denmark. Danish Universities now offer more than110 different programmes. One of the characteristics of the master education is that the students get credits for their prior learning and practical work...

  13. TECHNOLOGICAL ENTREPRENEUR`S PROFILE

    OpenAIRE

    NACU Cosmin-Mihai; AVASILCAI Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Entrepreneurship is a subject of great interest, a process in which more and more people want to take part. The main character of entrepreneurial process is the entrepreneur. He is motivated by various factors and, with certain abilities, competences, attitudes and skills he can develop a sustainable business. In this study, the author aims to develop a profile of technological entrepreneur, starting from a variety of entrepreneurs’ characteristics, identified in literatu...

  14. Psychological profile of Slovene bodybuilders

    OpenAIRE

    Faganel, Manca; Tušak, Matej

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the research was to determine personality profile of Slovene bodybuilders. In this study we compared a group of 31 Slovene bodybuilders (31.6 %), a group of 36 Slovene elite individual athletes (36.7 %) and a group of 31 non-athletes (31.6 %). The following inventories were used: Personality questionnaire FPI 114, Tennessee scale of self-image and Athletic Identity Measurement Scale. Some significant differences were found among these participants. Bodybuilders scored lower on depr...

  15. ROMANIAN ENTREPRENEUR PROFILE AND BEHAVIOR

    OpenAIRE

    Lavinia Mirabela JIANU (BORCOS); Oana Mihaela BARA

    2014-01-01

    Due to major contribution of the entrepreneurs to the economic and social development, the knowledge of their main characteristics has a special significance The paper presents the results of a economic research conducted in April and May 2014 and offers an exhaustive approach on the characteristics and behavior of the Romanian entrepreneur, a lot of aspects being analyzed which are not present in other researches.According to this research, the Romanian entrepreneur’s profile is the followin...

  16. OMANIAN ENTREPRENEUR PROFILE AND BEHAVIOR

    OpenAIRE

    Lavinia Mirabela JIANU (BORCOS); Oana Mihaela BARA

    2014-01-01

    Due to major contribution of the entrepreneurs to the economic and social development, the knowledge of their main characteristics has a special significance The paper presents the results of a economic research conducted in April and May 2014 and offers an exhaustive approach on the characteristics and behavior of the Romanian entrepreneur, a lot of aspects being analyzed which are not present in other researches.According to this research, the Romanian entrepreneur’s profile is the followin...

  17. Rotating scanning polarization profile monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soukup, J.; Green, P.W.; Holm, L.; Korkmaz, E.; Mullin, S.; Roy, G.; Stocki, a.T. [Dept. of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2N5 (Canada); Berdoz, A.R.; Birchal, J.; Campbell, J.R.; Hamian, A.A.; Page, S.A.; Ramsay, W.D.; Reitzner, S.D.; Sekulovich, A.M.; van Oers, a.W.T.H. [Dept. of Physics, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2N2 (Canada); Bowman, J.D.; Mischke, R.E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Davis, C.A.; Healey, D.C.; Helmer, R.; Levy, C.D.P.; Schmor, a.P.W. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2A3 (Canada); Titov, N.A.; Zelenskii, A.N. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, SU 117312 (Russian Federation)

    1995-05-05

    A polarimeter capable of determining transverse component polarization profile of the 222 MeV proton beam both in horizontal ({ital x}) and vertical ({ital y}) directions with faster than 1 Hz scanning frequency has been developed and built as part of the preparations in the TRIUMF Experiment 497 measuring the flavour conserving hadronic weak interaction (parity violation measurement). The design features and test performance results are presented. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  18. Profile updating for information systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrantes, J.F.

    1983-02-01

    Profiles updating methods were analysed. A method suitable to the characteristics of the system used in the research (SDI/CIN/CNEN) that uses as the selection criterio the threshold and weights criterion, was determined. Relevance weighting theory was described and experiments to verify precision were carried out. The improvements obtained were good nevertheless more significant tests are required to attain more reliable results. (Author) [pt

  19. Applications of positron depth profiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakvoort, R.A.

    1993-01-01

    In this thesis some contributions of the positron-depth profiling technique to materials science have been described. Following studies are carried out: Positron-annihilation measurements on neon-implanted steel; Void creation in silicon by helium implantation; Density of vacancy-type defects present in amorphous silicon prepared by ion implantation; Measurements of other types of amorphous silicon; Epitaxial cobalt disilicide prepared by cobalt outdiffusion. Positron-annihilation experiments on low-pressure CVD silicon-nitride films. (orig./MM)

  20. Compton profile of calcium fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayakumar, R.; Rajasekaran, L.; Ramamurthy, N.; Shivaramu

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The Compton profile of polycrystalline calcium fluoride is measured using 661.6 keV γ- radiation from a 137 Cs source. The experimental data are compared with HF-LCAO model calculation computed using CRYSTAL98 program, Hartree-Fock free atom theoretical values and with the other available experimental data. Experimental results are found to be in good agreement with the HF-LCAO model calculations and in qualitative agreement with Hartree-Fock free atom theoretical values

  1. Ion temperature profiles in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellermann, M. von; Mandl, W.; Summers, H.P.; Weisen, H.

    1989-01-01

    The results presented in this paper have shown some extreme cases of ion temperature profiles illustrating the different operation modes of the JET tokamak. In the three examples of low-density high temperature, high-density moderates and high-density high-confinement plasmas comparable values of a maximum fusion product n d T i τ E in the order of 10 20 keV m -3 sec are achieved. (author) 1 ref., 7 figs

  2. Applications of positron depth profiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakvoort, R.A.

    1993-12-23

    In this thesis some contributions of the positron-depth profiling technique to materials science have been described. Following studies are carried out: Positron-annihilation measurements on neon-implanted steel; Void creation in silicon by helium implantation; Density of vacancy-type defects present in amorphous silicon prepared by ion implantation; Measurements of other types of amorphous silicon; Epitaxial cobalt disilicide prepared by cobalt outdiffusion. Positron-annihilation experiments on low-pressure CVD silicon-nitride films. (orig./MM).

  3. Renewable Energy Country Profiles. Pacific

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-09-15

    The IRENA Renewable Energy Country Profiles take stock of the latest development of renewable energy in two regions where renewable energy can make a significant contribution to combat climate change and bring modern energy services to everyone: Africa and the Pacific. These two regions are presented separately in this volume and its sister publication. The country profiles combine elements of IRENA analysis with the latest information available from a vast array of sources in order to give a brief yet comprehensive and up-to-date picture of the situation of renewable energy that includes energy supply, electrical capacity, energy access, policies, targets, investment climate, projects and endowment in renewable energy resources. Because of the different timelines of these sources, data presented here refer to years between 2008 and 2012. Data availability also differs from country to country, which makes comparison with a wider regional group possible only for the year for which figures are available for all the members of the group; while this may not be the most recent year, the differences between countries, regions and the world remain striking. The current country profiles are just a starting point; they will be extended upon with new indicators to make them more informative, and maintained as a live product on the IRENA website as a key source of information on renewable energy.

  4. Kinetic Profiles in NSTX Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.E. Bell; B.P. LeBlanc; C. Bourdelle; D.R. Ernst; E.D. Fredrickson; D.A. Gates; J.C. Hosea; D.W. Johnson; S.M. Kaye; R. Maingi; S. Medley; J.E. Menard; D. Mueller; M. Ono; F. Paoletti; M. Peng; S.A. Sabbagh; D. Stutman; D.W. Swain; E.J. Synakowski; and J.R. Wilson

    2001-07-10

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is a low aspect ratio (R/a approximately 1.3) device with auxiliary heating from neutral-beam injection (NBI) and high-harmonic fast-wave heating (HHFW). Typical NSTX parameters are R(subscript ''0'') = 85 cm, a = 67 cm, I(subscript ''p'') = 0.7-1.4 MA, B(subscript ''phi'') = 0.25-0.45 T. Three co-directed deuterium neutral-beam sources have injected P(subscript ''NB'') less than or equal to 4.7 MW. HHFW plasmas typically have delivered P(subscript ''RF'') less than or equal to 3 MW. Important to the understanding of NSTX confinement are the new kinetic profile diagnostics: a multi-pulse Thomson scattering system (MPTS) and a charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy (CHERS) system. The MPTS diagnostic currently measures electron density and temperature profiles at 30 Hz at ten spatial locations. The CHERS system has recently become available to measure carbon ion temperature and toroidal flow at 17 radial positions spanning the outer half of the minor radius with 20 msec time resolution during NBI. Experiments conducted during the last year have produced a wide range of kinetic profiles in NSTX. Some interesting examples are presented below.

  5. Phytohormone Profiling across the Bryophytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka Záveská Drábková

    Full Text Available Bryophytes represent a very diverse group of non-vascular plants such as mosses, liverworts and hornworts and the oldest extant lineage of land plants. Determination of endogenous phytohormone profiles in bryophytes can provide substantial information about early land plant evolution. In this study, we screened thirty bryophyte species including six liverworts and twenty-four mosses for their phytohormone profiles in order to relate the hormonome with phylogeny in the plant kingdom.Samples belonging to nine orders (Pelliales, Jungermanniales, Porellales, Sphagnales, Tetraphidales, Polytrichales, Dicranales, Bryales, Hypnales were collected in Central and Northern Bohemia. The phytohormone content was analysed with a high performance liquid chromatography electrospray tandem-mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS.As revealed for growth hormones, some common traits such as weak conjugation of both cytokinins and auxins, intensive production of cisZ-type cytokinins and strong oxidative degradation of auxins with abundance of a major primary catabolite 2-oxindole-3-acetic acid were pronounced in all bryophytes. Whereas apparent dissimilarities in growth hormones profiles between liverworts and mosses were evident, no obvious trends in stress hormone levels (abscisic acid, jasmonic acid, salicylic acid were found with respect to the phylogeny.The apparent differences in conjugation and/or degradation strategies of growth hormones between liverworts and mosses might potentially show a hidden link between vascular plants and liverworts. On the other hand, the complement of stress hormones in bryophytes probably correlate rather with prevailing environmental conditions and plant survival strategy than with plant evolution.

  6. Phytohormone Profiling across the Bryophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Záveská Drábková, Lenka; Dobrev, Petre I; Motyka, Václav

    2015-01-01

    Bryophytes represent a very diverse group of non-vascular plants such as mosses, liverworts and hornworts and the oldest extant lineage of land plants. Determination of endogenous phytohormone profiles in bryophytes can provide substantial information about early land plant evolution. In this study, we screened thirty bryophyte species including six liverworts and twenty-four mosses for their phytohormone profiles in order to relate the hormonome with phylogeny in the plant kingdom. Samples belonging to nine orders (Pelliales, Jungermanniales, Porellales, Sphagnales, Tetraphidales, Polytrichales, Dicranales, Bryales, Hypnales) were collected in Central and Northern Bohemia. The phytohormone content was analysed with a high performance liquid chromatography electrospray tandem-mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS). As revealed for growth hormones, some common traits such as weak conjugation of both cytokinins and auxins, intensive production of cisZ-type cytokinins and strong oxidative degradation of auxins with abundance of a major primary catabolite 2-oxindole-3-acetic acid were pronounced in all bryophytes. Whereas apparent dissimilarities in growth hormones profiles between liverworts and mosses were evident, no obvious trends in stress hormone levels (abscisic acid, jasmonic acid, salicylic acid) were found with respect to the phylogeny. The apparent differences in conjugation and/or degradation strategies of growth hormones between liverworts and mosses might potentially show a hidden link between vascular plants and liverworts. On the other hand, the complement of stress hormones in bryophytes probably correlate rather with prevailing environmental conditions and plant survival strategy than with plant evolution.

  7. Developing the CUAHSI Metadata Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piasecki, M.; Bermudez, L.; Islam, S.; Beran, B.

    2004-12-01

    The Hydrologic Information System (HIS), of the Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Science Inc., (CUAHSI), has as one of its goals to improve access to large volume, high quality, and heterogeneous hydrologic data sets. This will be attained in part by adopting a community metadata profile to achieve consistent descriptions that will facilitate data discovery. However, common standards are quite general in nature and typically lack domain specific vocabularies, complicating the adoption of standards for specific communities. We will show and demonstrate the problems encountered in the process of adopting ISO standards to create a CUAHSI metadata profile. The final schema is expressed in a simple metadata format, Metadata Template File (MTF), to leverage metadata annotations/viewer tools already developed by the San Diego Super Computer Center. The steps performed to create an MTF starting from ISO 19115:2003 are the following: 1) creation of ontologies using the Web Ontology Language (OWL) for ISO:19115 2003 and related ISO/TC 211 documents; 2) conceptualization in OWL of related hydrologic vocabularies such as NASA's Global Change Master Directory and units from the Hydrologic Handbook; 3) definition of CUAHSI profile by importing and extending the previous ontologies; 4) explicit creation of CUAHSI core set 5) export of the core set to MTF); 6) definition of metadata blocks for arbitrary digital objects (e.g. time series vs static-spatial data) using ISO's methodology for feature cataloguing; and 7) export of metadata blocks to MTF.

  8. Renewable Energy Country Profiles. Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-02-15

    The IRENA Renewable Energy Country Profiles take stock of the latest development of renewable energy in two regions where renewable energy can make a significant contribution to combat climate change and bring modern energy services to everyone: Africa and the Pacific. These two regions are presented separately in this volume and its sister publication. The country profiles combine elements of IRENA analysis with the latest information available from a vast array of sources in order to give a brief yet comprehensive and up-to-date picture of the situation of renewable energy that includes energy supply, electrical capacity, energy access, policies, targets, investment climate, projects and endowment in renewable energy resources. Because of the different timelines of these sources, data presented here refer to years between 2008 and 2012. Data availability also differs from country to country, which makes comparison with a wider regional group possible only for the year for which figures are available for all the members of the group; while this may not be the most recent year, the differences between countries, regions and the world remain striking. The current country profiles are just a starting point; they will be extended upon with new indicators to make them more informative, and maintained as a live product on the IRENA website as a key source of information on renewable energy.

  9. On Active Current Selection for Lagrangian Profilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Jouffroy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Autonomous Lagrangian profilers are now widely used as measurement and monitoring platforms, notably in observation programs as Argo. In a typical mode of operation, the profilers drift passively at their parking depthbefore making a vertical profile to go back to the surface. This paperpresents simple and computationally-efficient control strategies to activelyselect and use ocean currents so that a profiler can autonomously reach adesired destination. After briefly presenting a typical profiler andpossible mechanical modifications for a coastal environment, we introducesimple mathematical models for the profiler and the currents it will use. Wethen present simple feedback controllers that, using the direction of thecurrents and taking into account the configuration of the environment(coastal or deep-sea, is able to steer the profiler to any desiredhorizontal location. To illustrate the approach, a few results are presentedusing both simulated currents and real current velocity profiles from theNorth Sea.

  10. Urban logistics profile – Yogyakarta city, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Sri Asih Anna

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, more rural areas are becoming urban areas accompanied by escalation of logistics activities. Unlike passenger transport, the planning, policy and control of freight transport in developing countries have not been integrated into a reliable and efficient logistics system. Therefore, generating city logistics profile is necessary in order to support the planning of urban logistics system. This study aims to establish a logistics profile of Yogyakarta city, Indonesia, by dividing urban zones into several homogeneous groups, judging from several aspects, including city area features, product characteristics and agents/delivery profile. Logistics profile variables were calculated based on administrative boundaries, resulting in 45 areas to be investigated. Profiles were matched in groups of homogeneous stores (A, large commercial stores (C and residential areas with local trade (D,with one overlapping profile, i.e. profile A and profile D, in some locations in the middle of the city.

  11. The MMPI Profile of Prisoners of War

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klonoff, Harry; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Examines the profiles of Canadian prisoners of war who were interned in Japanese and German camps during World War II in order to determine whether the MMPI yielded a profile characteristic of internees. (Author)

  12. GHGRP Pulp and Paper Sector Industrial Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program periodically produces detailed profiles of the various industries that report under the program. The profiles available for download below contain detailed analyses for the Pulp and Paper industry.

  13. Salmonella Typhimurium transcription profiles in space flight

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Salmonella transcription profiles were obtained from samples flown on space shuttle mission STS-115 and compared to profiles from Salmonella grown under identical...

  14. Temperature Profile of the Duracell Test Strip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viiri, Jouni; Kettunen, Lasse

    1996-01-01

    Presents the temperature profile of the Duracell Test Strip obtained using a Inframetrics 740 thermal imaging radiometer and ThermaGRAM95 software and compares this to the theoretical profile derived by Clark and Bonicamp. (JRH)

  15. Acquisition and display of beam profilers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, L.; Duneau, P.; Lecorche, E.; Lermine, P.; Vila, J.; Maugeais, C.; Ulrich, M.

    1995-01-01

    The ion beam adjustment requires the knowledge of its shape (its profile). A new electronic interface has been developed for the older multiwire profiles, while an other electronic equipment has been developed for the gas profiles and the microchannel plates. The data from these interfaces are computed to get numerical values and profile shapes, then transmitted by the network to the main control room to be displayed (shapes and data) on every workstation, by different beam tuning programs. (author)

  16. Computer Profiling Based Model for Investigation

    OpenAIRE

    Neeraj Choudhary; Nikhil Kumar Singh; Parmalik Singh

    2011-01-01

    Computer profiling is used for computer forensic analysis, and proposes and elaborates on a novel model for use in computer profiling, the computer profiling object model. The computer profiling object model is an information model which models a computer as objects with various attributes and inter-relationships. These together provide the information necessary for a human investigator or an automated reasoning engine to make judgments as to the probable usage and evidentiary value of a comp...

  17. Wechsler Intelligence Scale Profile for Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrini, Bonnie C.; Pedrini, D. T.

    Teachers need more help from school counselors, school psychologists, and testing programs. Summary profiles are an excellent way to quickly and pithily communicate information. The profile included is applicable to Wechsler Scales: WISC, WBI, WBII, and WAIS. In part, the profile is also applicable to the WPPSI. (Author)

  18. Smoothing waves in array CGH tumor profiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Wiel, Mark A.; Brosens, Rebecca; Eilers, Paul H. C.; Kumps, Candy; Meijer, Gerrit A.; Menten, Bjorn; Sistermans, Erik; Speleman, Frank; Timmerman, Marieke E.; Ylstra, Bauke

    2009-01-01

    Motivation: Many high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization tumor profiles contain a wave bias, which makes accurate detection of breakpoints in such profiles more difficult. Results: An efficient and highly effective algorithm that largely removes the wave bias from tumor profiles by

  19. Characterization of weathering profile in granites and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In granitic rocks, various models of weathering profile have been proposed, but never for the hard rocks of West Africa. Besides, in the literature there is no description of the weathering profile in volcanosed- imentrary rocks. Therefore, we propose three models describing the weathering profiles in granites, metasediments ...

  20. 24 CFR 985.102 - SEMAP profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false SEMAP profile. 985.102 Section 985... SECTION 8 MANAGEMENT ASSESSMENT PROGRAM (SEMAP) Program Operation § 985.102 SEMAP profile. Upon receipt of... accordance with § 985.3. HUD will then prepare a SEMAP profile for each PHA which shows the rating for each...

  1. The gait profile score and movement analysis profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Richard; McGinley, Jennifer L; Schwartz, Michael H; Beynon, Sarah; Rozumalski, Adam; Graham, H Kerr; Tirosh, Oren

    2009-10-01

    The Gait Deviation Index (GDI) has been proposed as an index of overall gait pathology. This study proposes an interpretation of the difference measure upon which the GDI is based, which naturally leads to the definition of a similar index, the Gait Profile Score (GPS). The GPS can be calculated independently of the feature analysis upon which the GDI is based. Understanding what the underlying difference measure represents also suggests that reporting a raw score, as the GPS does, may have advantages over the logarithmic transformation and z-scaling incorporated in the GDI. It also leads to the concept of a Movement Analysis Profile (MAP) to summarise much of the information contained within kinematic data. A validation study on all children attending a paediatric gait analysis service over 3 years (407 children) provides evidence to support the use of the GPS through analysis of its frequency distribution across different Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) and Gillette Functional Assessment Questionnaire (FAQ) categories, investigation of intra-session variability, and correlation with the square root of GGI. Correlation with GDI confirms the strong relationship between the two measures. The study concludes that GDI and GPS are alternative and closely related measures. The GDI has prior art and is particularly useful in applications arising out of feature analysis such as cluster analysis or subject matching. The GPS will be easier to calculate for new models where a large reference dataset is not available and in association with applications using the MAP.

  2. Profiling property criminals in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Içli, Tülin Günsen; Seydioğullari, Ibrahim; Tatlidil, Hüseyin; Coban, Sevgi; Sever, Hanifi; Süeroğlu, Unal

    2010-08-01

    The main aim of this research is to develop a profile of a thief. Through a comprehensive survey of property crime suspects arrested in the city of Ankara between 2004 and 2005, the authors have attempted to determine the socioeconomic qualities of those involved in these forms of property crimes. Results of the study show that property crimes are a consequence of low education, lack of occupational skills, and alcohol and drug addiction on the part of the offenders. Because of these factors, theft becomes a way of life for offenders after their first act of property crime.

  3. Chemical profiling of gaharu oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mat Rasol Awang; Mohd Fajri Osman; Ahsanulkhaliqin Abd Wahab; Khairuddin Abdul Rahim; Shaiful Azuar Mohamad

    2006-01-01

    Gaharu oil from Aquilaria agallocha and Aquilaria malaccensis Lamk has been reported to contain different phytochemicals components (Ishihara et al., 1993). There are also differences reported by gaharu oil suppliers. The differences suggested they originate from varied of sources of gaharu wood, oleoresin maturity and extraction technology employed. In this study, gaharu oil purchased from different sources were initially analysed and later cross-examined against chemical components of oil extracted from wood sources systematically graded. The gaharu oil components obtained from this work will be presented and discussed. Initiative to profile oil provides impetus to database development and standardisation of gaharu oil. (Author)

  4. UNDERSTANDING CUSTOMERS - PROFILING AND SEGMENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mircea Andrei SCRIDON

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In any industry, the first step to finding and creating profitable customers isdetermining what drives profitability. This leads to better prospecting andmore successful customer relationship management. Any company cansegment and profile their customer base to uncover those profit drivers usingthe knowledge of their customers, products, and markets. Or they can usedata-driven techniques to find natural clusters in their customer or prospectbase. Whatever the method, the process will lead to knowledge andunderstanding that is critical to maintaining a competitive edge

  5. OMANIAN ENTREPRENEUR PROFILE AND BEHAVIOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavinia Mirabela JIANU (BORCOS

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Due to major contribution of the entrepreneurs to the economic and social development, the knowledge of their main characteristics has a special significance The paper presents the results of a economic research conducted in April and May 2014 and offers an exhaustive approach on the characteristics and behavior of the Romanian entrepreneur, a lot of aspects being analyzed which are not present in other researches.According to this research, the Romanian entrepreneur’s profile is the following: a mature individual, holding an economical background, of male sex, married, with children, with high education.

  6. Profiles in congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freed, M.D.; Keane, J.F.

    1986-01-01

    Pediatric cardiology has made great strides in the diagnosis, management, and correction of complex congenital malformations in the past two decades. The foundation of these advances is a more precise understanding of the physiology and anatomy of complex lesions that has been obtained from cardiac catheterization and angiography. The techniques for catheterization of infants and children have been discussed in another paper. This chapter focuses on brief profiles of some of the more important congenital abnormalities. The incidence cited in the discussion of each abnormality pertains to a population comprises of children and adults referred to The Children's Hospital Medical Center and Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, respectively, for evaluation of congenital heart disease

  7. New dynamic NNORSY ozone profile climatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaifel, A. K.; Felder, M.; Declercq, C.; Lambert, J.-C.

    2012-01-01

    Climatological ozone profile data are widely used as a-priori information for total ozone using DOAS type retrievals as well as for ozone profile retrieval using optimal estimation, for data assimilation or evaluation of 3-D chemistry-transport models and a lot of other applications in atmospheric sciences and remote sensing. For most applications it is important that the climatology represents not only long term mean values but also the links between ozone and dynamic input parameters. These dynamic input parameters should be easily accessible from auxiliary datasets or easily measureable, and obviously should have a high correlation with ozone. For ozone profile these parameters are mainly total ozone column and temperature profile data. This was the outcome of a user consultation carried out in the framework of developing a new, dynamic ozone profile climatology. The new ozone profile climatology is based on the Neural Network Ozone Retrieval System (NNORSY) widely used for ozone profile retrieval from UV and IR satellite sounder data. NNORSY allows implicit modelling of any non-linear correspondence between input parameters (predictors) and ozone profile target vector. This paper presents the approach, setup and validation of a new family of ozone profile climatologies with static as well as dynamic input parameters (total ozone and temperature profile). The neural network training relies on ozone profile measurement data of well known quality provided by ground based (ozonesondes) and satellite based (SAGE II, HALOE, and POAM-III) measurements over the years 1995-2007. In total, four different combinations (modes) for input parameters (date, geolocation, total ozone column and temperature profile) are available. The geophysical validation spans from pole to pole using independent ozonesonde, lidar and satellite data (ACE-FTS, AURA-MLS) for individual and time series comparisons as well as for analysing the vertical and meridian structure of different modes of

  8. Psychological profile of laryngectomized patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Popescu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Larynx cancer is one of the most susceptible form of cancer susceptible to induce alteration of the patient’s psychological profile due to the social role that the larynx has in communication. Oral communication is severely impaired even after voice rehabilitation of the laryngectomized patients, so that the social rehabilitation is somewhat not only a medical but also a social problem. The psychological profile of these patients is altered in a way that dealing with the disease is sometimes neglected and the interaction with the outside world in terms of oral communication is totally abandoned. The starting point for depression in these cases is the acknowledgement of the disease and is, in some cases, the entire medical environment. Facial scarring, the inability to verbally interact with other human, as well as the presence of the tracheostoma, are all deciding factors in the presence of a low self-esteem for these particular patients. Psychological counseling is a mandatory approach for laryngectomized patients, in order to improve their ability to cope with cancer and providing better recovery chances.

  9. Ayurvedic Profiling of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredesen, Dale E; Rao, Rammohan V

    2017-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-associated, progressive neurodegenerative disease that is characterized by severe memory loss, personality changes, and an overall decline in cognitive function. The cause of AD is not yet completely defined and efforts to find a cure for it have so far been disappointing. AD is one of the most significant health care problems nationally and globally. Recently, we described a personalized therapeutic approach called metabolic enhancement for neurodegeneration (MEND) that successfully reversed the cognitive decline in patients with early AD. The magnitude of the improvement was exceptional, providing testimony to the fact that a personalized and programmatic approach to cognitive decline is highly effective. Ayurveda is a personalized system of traditional medicine native to India and the Indian subcontinent. Although a direct reference to AD in the ancient Ayurvedic literature is missing, concepts including forgetfulness, memory loss, and brain cell loss have been described. Using the clinical information and the metabolic profiling of AD individuals we recently reported using the MEND program, we now describe in this commentary, 3 subtypes of AD based on the Ayurvedic interpretation. Ayurvedic profiling of patients with AD reveals 3 readily distinguishable subtypes, namely Vata, Pitta, and Krimi, which will prove useful in patients with cognitive decline and those at risk for such decline from the standpoint of specific subtype-based Ayurvedic intervention.

  10. Incidence and Antimicrobial Sensitivity Profiles of Normal Conjunctiva Bacterial Flora in the Central Area of China: A Hospital-Based Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Tao

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the distribution and patterns of resistance to antimicrobial agents of normal conjunctival bacteria.Materials and Methods: Conjunctival specimens were collected from 8,224 patients and then cultured, which underwent antimicrobial susceptibility test following standard methods. Patients with infectious symptoms such as erythema or oedema and those using systemic or topical antibiotics within 1 month were excluded.Results: In this study, the incidence of isolated bacteria was 24.2%. The middle aged group of 41–65 years presented the lowest rate of bacterial isolation which was 19.4%, while the highest isolation rate (83.1% was found in patients in the age range of 0–6 years. In every age group, the incidence of bacterial isolation in men was higher than that in women. The top 3 most commonly isolated micro-organisms were Staphylococcus epidermidis (39.7%, Streptococcus pneumoniae (4.5%, and Staphylococcus aureus (2.7%, of which about 83.1% S. aureus were isolated in the group of 0-6 years. We found that coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CONS were more resistant to penicillin, macrolides, clindamycin and sulfonamides with the rate ranging from 57.9 to 90.8%, which were highly susceptible to vancomycin, linezolid, rifampin, tetracyclines, and aminoglycosides. Contrasting to CONS, the general resistance rate of S. aureus was significantly lower. Additionally, Streptococcus was susceptible well to the majority of antimicrobial agents, while highly resistant to macrolides and tetracyclines with the rate >80%.Conclusions: In conclusion, our study revealed the incidence and antimicrobial sensitivity profiles of normal conjunctiva bacterial flora in the central area of China, which could be useful in the prevention of ocular infections. Importantly, our data could be used to guide the selection of appropriate prophylactic agents.

  11. THE BEHAVIORAL PROFILE OF HARVESTER OPERATORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Millana Burger Pagnussat

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study aims to characterize the behavioral profile of harvester operators, with the goal of assisting forest managers in selecting and training new teams of employees. A forest company located in central-western Brazil was examined from a sample of 20 harvester operators that did not have experience carrying out the functions of their industry. A behavioral profile evaluation tool was used, consisting of a management system that creates a profile based on behavioral competencies; it was initially used to develop a profile of a high-performing harvester operator; or rather, a reference profile. Next, the behavioral profile of the operators were grouped into distinct classes and compared with the reference profile to identify traits that could positively or negatively affect an operators' performance. An optimal profile had the following qualities: attentive to details, meets deadlines and follows rules, technically-oriented, patient with repetitive tasks, the ability to avoid conflicts, and being an introvert. An improper profile included aspects such as aggressiveness, being argumentative, being persuasive, explosive, and tense at work. The behavioral profile evaluation tool can support the process of choosing forest machine operators; however, it is important to also consider skills and work experience.

  12. Binocular combination of luminance profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jian; Levi, Dennis M

    2017-11-01

    We develop and test a new two-dimensional model for binocular combination of the two eyes' luminance profiles. For first-order stimuli, the model assumes that one eye's luminance profile first goes through a luminance compressor, receives gain-control and gain-enhancement from the other eye, and then linearly combines the other eye's output profile. For second-order stimuli, rectification is added in the signal path of the model before the binocular combination site. Both the total contrast and luminance energies, weighted sums over both the space and spatial-frequency domains, were used in the interocular gain-control, while only the total contrast energy was used in the interocular gain-enhancement. To challenge the model, we performed a binocular brightness matching experiment over a large range of background and target luminances. The target stimulus was a dichoptic disc with a sharp edge that has an increment or decrement luminance from its background. The disk's interocular luminance ratio varied from trial to trial. To refine the model we tested three luminance compressors, five nested binocular combination models (including the Ding-Sperling and the DSKL models), and examined the presence or absence of total luminance energy in the model. We found that (1) installing a luminance compressor, either a logarithmic luminance function or luminance gain-control, (2) including both contrast and luminance energies, and (3) adding interocular gain-enhancement (the DSKL model) to a combined model significantly improved its performance. The combined model provides a systematic account of binocular luminance summation over a large range of luminance input levels. It gives a unified explanation of Fechner's paradox observed on a dark background, and a winner-take-all phenomenon observed on a light background. To further test the model, we conducted two additional experiments: luminance summation of discs with asymmetric contour information (Experiment 2), similar to

  13. Bulgaria mental health country profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomov, Toma; Mladenova, Maya; Lazarova, Irina; Sotirov, Vladimir; Okoliyski, Mihail

    2004-01-01

    The mental health profile of Bulgaria has been compiled and following analysis of both the factual findings and the process of data collection a report has been prepared. The subject of discussion in the paper concerns several major findings: the discrepancy between what the policy documents state and the actual situation in mental health; the organizational culture, which alienates; and the peculiarities of the process of change and how it is driven under political pressure from outside the country. Analysis extends to encompass the influence of the general health reform on the mental health sector, the deficits of the leadership and how they impact on the effectiveness of the system, and the interdependence between the country's economy and the health sector. A conclusion is made about the need to consolidate the public health approach using the lever of international collaboration in the field of mental health.

  14. Single Pass Optical Profile Monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Jung, R; Hutchins, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    Beam profiles are acquired in transfer lines to monitor extracted beams and compute their emittance. Measurements performed on the first revolutions of a ring will evaluate the matching of a chain of accelerators. Depending on the particle type and energy, these measurements are in general performed with screens, making either use of Luminescence or Optical Transition Radiation [OTR], and the generated beam images are acquired with sensors of various types. Sometimes the beam position is also measured this way. The principle, advantages and disadvantages of both families of screens will be discussed in relation with the detectors used. Test results with beam and a possible evaluation method for luminescent screens will be presented. Finally other optical methods used will be mentioned for completeness.

  15. Q-profiles in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gill, R.D.; Edwards, A.W.; Keegan, B.; Lazzaro, E.; O'Rourke, J.; Weller, A.; Zasche, D.

    1989-01-01

    Tokamak q-profiles play a central role in the determination of plasma stability and q(r) towards the plasma centre is particularly important for the sawtooth instability. On JET, q(r) has been determined from magnetic measurements and Faraday rotation. Further information about the position of the q=1 surface has been found from the sawtooth inversion radius, the position of the snake and the resonance effect observed on visible light and X-ray emission during pellet injection. In addition the shear at the q=1 surface has been measured from pellet ablation. This result is supported by the movement of the snake caused by a sawtooth crash. A summary of these data will be made after presenting the new results from pellet ablation. (author) 5 refs., 8 figs

  16. Hydrogen depth profiling at IRMM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, L.; Hult, M.; Giorginis, G.; Crametz, A.

    1997-02-01

    At the Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM) a facility for hydrogen profiling has been implemented. Two techniques are being used; Nuclear Resonant Reaction Analysis (NRRA) using the 1H(15N,αγ)12C reaction and Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis (ERDA) using a He+ ion beam. The ERDA chamber is a common type of scattering chamber with a load lock system for quick changing of the samples. NRRA is performed in a UHV chamber in which the samples can be cooled to liquid nitrogen temperature and sputter cleaned with a 5 kV ion gun. The 4.43 MeV γ rays are detected using a 4 in.×4 in. BGO detector. Using only passive shielding a detection limit of hydrogen in silicon of 5×1018atoms/cm3 has been achieved. Experimental results which exemplify the major features of the facility are presented.

  17. Free sugar profile in cycads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marler, Thomas E.; Lindström, Anders J.

    2014-01-01

    The sugars fructose, glucose, maltose, and sucrose were quantified in seven tissues of Zamia muricata Willd. to determine their distribution throughout various organs of a model cycad species, and in lateral structural roots of 18 cycad species to determine the variation in sugar concentration and composition among species representing every cycad genus. Taproot and lateral structural roots contained more sugars than leaf, stem, female strobilus, or coralloid roots. For example, taproot sugar concentration was 6.4-fold greater than stem sugar concentration. The dominant root sugars were glucose and fructose, and the only detected stem sugar was sucrose. Sucrose also dominated the sugar profile for leaflet and coralloid root tissue, and fructose was the dominant sugar in female strobilus tissue. Maltose was a minor constituent of taproot, leaflet, and female strobilus tissue, but absent in other tissues. The concentration of total free sugars and each of the four sugars did not differ among genera or families. Stoichiometric relationships among the sugars, such as the quotient hexoses/disaccharides, differed among organs and families. Although anecdotal reports on cycad starch have been abundant due to its historical use as human food and the voluminous medical research invested into cycad neurotoxins, this is the first report on the sugar component of the non-structural carbohydrate profile of cycads. Fructose, glucose, and sucrose are abundant in cycad tissues, with their relative abundance highly contrasting among organs. Their importance as forms of carbon storage, messengers of information, or regulators of cycad metabolism have not been determined to date. PMID:25339967

  18. Free Sugar Profile in Cycads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Edward Marler

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The sugars fructose, glucose, maltose, and sucrose were quantified in seven tissues of Zamia muricata Willd. to determine their distribution throughout various organs of a model cycad species, and in lateral structural roots of 18 cycad species to determine the variation in sugar concentration and composition among species representing every cycad genus. Taproot and lateral structural roots contained more sugars than leaf, stem, female strobilus, or coralloid roots. For example, taproot sugar concentration was 6.4-fold greater than stem sugar concentration. The dominant root sugars were glucose and fructose, and the only detected stem sugar was sucrose. Sucrose also dominated the sugar profile for leaflet and coralloid root tissue, and fructose was the dominant sugar in female strobilus tissue. Maltose was a minor constituent of taproot, leaflet, and female strobilus tissue, but absent in other tissues. The concentration of total free sugars and each of the four sugars did not differ among genera or families. Stoichiometric relationships among the sugars, such as the quotient hexoses/disaccharides, differed among organs and families. Although anecdotal reports on cycad starch have been abundant due to its historical use as human food and the voluminous medical research invested into cycad neurotoxins, this is the first report on the sugar component of the non-structural carbohydrate profile of cycads. Fructose, glucose, and sucrose are abundant in cycad tissues, with their relative abundance highly contrasting among organs. Their importance as forms of carbon storage, messengers of information, or regulators of cycad metabolism have not been determined to date.

  19. Sociodemographic profile of transsexual patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duisin, Dragana; Nikolić-Balkoski, Gordana; Batinić, Borjanka

    2009-06-01

    Gender identity disorder is a rare entity in psychiatry which affects deep instincts and personal identity. A review of the recent literature has shown that research of socio-demographic characteristics of transsexual patients is sporadic. There are very few investigations which consider the socio-demographic characteristics in individuals with disharmonized sex and gender identity. This kind of research has not been done in Serbia until now. The objective of this research was to evaluate and analyze socio-demographic data of transsexual persons with a homosexual orientation. The paper presents the mentioned characteristics on sample of 30 gender dysphoric persons. The patients were examined by The Belgrade team for gender identity. The transsexuals were in a stage of preparation for the sex-reassignment surgery (SRS), and transsexualism was diagnosed and guided within this program (used criteria were keeping with ICD X, DSM IV and Diagnostic schedule recommended by Standards of Care for Dysphoric Persons of the Harry Benjamin International Gender Dysphoria Association). We have examined the following socio-demographic characteristics: sex, age, place of residence, educational level, employment and religion. Results and analysis of obtained data have shown that the socio-demographic profile of transsexual patients included in the research is: predominantly males (male/female sex ratio 3:2); refer for psychiatric help in younger age (frequently before 26); most of them with high school education; live in urban communities; mostly Orthodox religion; equally employed and unemployed. Gathering and analysis of sociodemographic data is important for elucidating the transsexual patient's profile. It facilitates better understanding, timely recognition and choice of appropriate treatment for these patients.

  20. Somatic symptom profiles in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eliasen, Marie; Jørgensen, Torben; Schröder, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to identify and describe somatic symptom profiles in the general adult population in order to enable further epidemiological research within multiple somatic symptoms. METHODS: Information on 19 self-reported common somatic symptoms was achieved from a population....... The profiles were further described by their association with age, sex, chronic disease, and self-perceived health. RESULTS: We identified 10 different somatic symptom profiles defined by number, type, and site of the symptoms. The majority of the population (74.0%) had a profile characterized......, and self-perceived health. CONCLUSION: The identified somatic symptom profiles could be distinguished by number, type, and site of the symptoms. The profiles have the potential to be used in further epidemiological studies on risk factors and prognosis of somatic symptoms but should be confirmed in other...

  1. Density profile of terminally attached polymer chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venema, P.; Odijk, T.

    1992-01-01

    Scaling theory hypothesizes a step-function profile for the segment density of polymer chains terminally attached to a planar wall. Using a self-consistent-field theory we give a perturbation analysis of the first-order correction to the step-function profile in order to gauge the impact of a possible tail. The new profile decays smoothly to zero without a discontinuity in the derivative (except near the wall). The segment density profile as scaled by the amplitude of the step-function profile has a tail that decays essentially as 1/βz*2, with β a dimensionless parameter and z* the distance from the wall scaled by the step length of the step-function profile. A scaling analysis would yield z*-4/3. 13 refs., 4 figs

  2. Functional association prediction by community profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Dazhi; Han, Wontack; Ye, Yuzhen

    2017-10-01

    Recent years have witnessed unprecedented accumulation of DNA sequences and therefore protein sequences (predicted from DNA sequences), due to the advances of sequencing technology. One of the major sources of the hypothetical proteins is the metagenomics research. Current annotation of metagenomes (collections of short metagenomic sequences or assemblies) relies on similarity searches against known gene/protein families, based on which functional profiles of microbial communities can be built. This practice, however, leaves out the hypothetical proteins, which may outnumber the known proteins for many microbial communities. On the other hand, we may ask: what can we gain from the large number of metagenomes made available by the metagenomic studies, for the annotation of metagenomic sequences as well as functional annotation of hypothetical proteins in general? Here we propose a community profiling approach for predicting functional associations between proteins: two proteins are predicted to be associated if they share similar presence and absence profiles (called community profiles) across microbial communities. Community profiling is conceptually similar to the phylogenetic profiling approach to functional prediction, however with fundamental differences. We tested different profile construction methods, the selection of reference metagenomes, and correlation metrics, among others, to optimize the performance of this new approach. We demonstrated that the community profiling approach alone slightly outperforms the phylogenetic profiling approach for associating proteins in species that are well represented by sequenced genomes, and combining phylogenetic and community profiling further improves (though only marginally) the prediction of functional association. Further we showed that community profiling method significantly outperforms phylogenetic profiling, revealing more functional associations, when applied to a more recently sequenced bacterial genome

  3. Furnace profile effects on glass shell formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Holleran, T.P.; Downs, R.L.; Homyk, B.D.

    1981-01-01

    In the course of blowing glass shells in a furnace drop tower it has been observed that furnace temperature profile affects shell aspect ratio. Wall uniformity appears less sensitive to temperature profile as long as some minimum-time/temperature history is achieved for a given glass composition. Quantitative results will be reported from experiments wherein the furnace temperature profile is systematically varied and the resultant shells are statistically analyzed for aspect ratio and wall uniformity

  4. Socioekonomický profil parkouristů

    OpenAIRE

    Kulda, Lukáš

    2017-01-01

    Title: Socio-economic profile of a parkour runner Goals: Goal of this bachelor thesis is to specify socio-economic profile of a parkour runner in Czech Republic Methods: Socio-economic profile of parkour runners (traceurs) was created by polling using questionnaires (both printed and electronic). Participants answered 23 questions. Majority (20) questions were of closed type, 3 were open questions. Collected data were quantified as frequency or stated as percentage. Microsoft Excel was used t...

  5. Correction of unevenness in recycler beam profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crisp, J.; Hu, M.; Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2006-05-01

    A beam confined between two rf barriers in the Fermilab Recycler Ring exhibits very uneven longitudinal profile. This leads to the consequence that the momentum-mined antiproton bunches will have an intolerable variation in bunch intensity. The observed profile unevenness is the result of a tiny amount of rf imperfection and rf beam-loading. The profile unevenness can be flattened by feeding back the uneven rf fan-back gap voltage to the low-level rf.

  6. On active current selection for Lagrangian profilers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jouffroy, Jerome; Zhou, Qiuyang; Zielinski, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    simple and computationally-efficient control strategies to actively select and use ocean currents so that a profiler can autonomously reach a desired destination. After briefly presenting a typical profiler and possible mechanical modifications for a coastal environment, we introduce simple mathematical...... models for the profiler and the currents it will use. We then present simple feedback controllers that, using the direction of the currents and taking into account the configuration of the environment (coastal or deep-sea), is able to steer the profiler to any desired horizontal location. To illustrate...

  7. A statistical approach to plasma profile analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kardaun, O.J.W.F.; McCarthy, P.J.; Lackner, K.; Riedel, K.S.

    1990-05-01

    A general statistical approach to the parameterisation and analysis of tokamak profiles is presented. The modelling of the profile dependence on both the radius and the plasma parameters is discussed, and pertinent, classical as well as robust, methods of estimation are reviewed. Special attention is given to statistical tests for discriminating between the various models, and to the construction of confidence intervals for the parameterised profiles and the associated global quantities. The statistical approach is shown to provide a rigorous approach to the empirical testing of plasma profile invariance. (orig.)

  8. Profiles of Loneliness in the Caregiving Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayalon, Liat

    2016-04-01

    The study evaluated profiles (a typology) of loneliness within the caregiving unit, which was composed of an older care recipient with functional impairment, a family member, and a home care worker. Overall, 223 complete caregiving units completed the 3-item Revised-University of California San Francisco Loneliness scale. Latent profile analysis was used to identify profiles of loneliness within the caregiving unit. Subsequently, latent profile membership was used as a between-subject variable to examine correlates of the latent profiles. A 2-profile solution was deemed most plausible. This classification consisted of a large (174 caregiving units; 78%) more favorable profile in terms of loneliness and a smaller (49 caregiving units; 22%) lonelier profile. Profile classification was associated with a variety of quality of life, well-being, social relations, and sociodemographic indicators of the 3 members of the caregiving unit. The study provides a needed recognition of the potential interdependence among members of the caregiving unit and calls for research and practice that go beyond the individual level. The assessment of loneliness at the caregiving unit can provide valuable information about at-risk units as well as about the potential effectiveness of interventions that target the entire caregiving unit. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Profile control by local ECRH in LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubo, S.; Shimozuma, T.; Yoshimura, Y.

    2008-10-01

    The specific and the important feature of electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) in magnetic fusion experiments is the well defined deposition profile and its controllability. This feature is realized and utilized for the electron temperature profile control, investigating the transport properties and current profile control in LHD. Temporally and spatially high resolution diagnostics, motional Stark effect (MSE), heavy ion beam probe (HIBP) as well as Thomson scattering, electron cyclotron emission (ECE) are applied to such locally heated or current driven plasma in LHD. The relations between the ECRH induced flux or current and the formation of the potential and density or induced current profile structure are clearly shown experimentally for the first time. These detailed diagnostics confirmed that the ECRH power deposition profile is well localized and controlled by steering the antenna and adjusting the magnetic field configuration. The experimental set up with the verification of the beam alignment procedure is described in section 2 . In relation to the deposition profile, the high energy electrons production and its effect on the deposition profile is discussed in section 3. As an application of local power deposition, density profile control experiment (section 4) current profile control experiment (section 5) are described followed by conclusions. (author)

  10. Lipid profile, hyperglycaemia, systemic inflammation and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lipid profile, hyperglycaemia, systemic inflammation and anthropometry as cardiovascular risk factors and their association with dietary intakes in children from rural Cofimvaba, Eastern Cape, South Africa.

  11. Comparative gut microbiota and resistome profiling of intensive care patients receiving selective digestive tract decontamination and healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buelow, Elena; Bello González, Teresita D J; Fuentes, Susana; de Steenhuijsen Piters, Wouter A A; Lahti, Leo; Bayjanov, Jumamurat R; Majoor, Eline A M; Braat, Johanna C; van Mourik, Maaike S M; Oostdijk, Evelien A N; Willems, Rob J L; Bonten, Marc J M; van Passel, Mark W J; Smidt, Hauke; van Schaik, Willem

    2017-08-14

    The gut microbiota is a reservoir of opportunistic pathogens that can cause life-threatening infections in critically ill patients during their stay in an intensive care unit (ICU). To suppress gut colonization with opportunistic pathogens, a prophylactic antibiotic regimen, termed "selective decontamination of the digestive tract" (SDD), is used in some countries where it improves clinical outcome in ICU patients. Yet, the impact of ICU hospitalization and SDD on the gut microbiota remains largely unknown. Here, we characterize the composition of the gut microbiota and its antimicrobial resistance genes ("the resistome") of ICU patients during SDD and of healthy subjects. From ten patients that were acutely admitted to the ICU, 30 fecal samples were collected during ICU stay. Additionally, feces were collected from five of these patients after transfer to a medium-care ward and cessation of SDD. Feces from ten healthy subjects were collected twice, with a 1-year interval. Gut microbiota and resistome composition were determined using 16S rRNA gene phylogenetic profiling and nanolitre-scale quantitative PCRs. The microbiota of the ICU patients differed from the microbiota of healthy subjects and was characterized by lower microbial diversity, decreased levels of Escherichia coli and of anaerobic Gram-positive, butyrate-producing bacteria of the Clostridium clusters IV and XIVa, and an increased abundance of Bacteroidetes and enterococci. Four resistance genes (aac(6')-Ii, ermC, qacA, tetQ), providing resistance to aminoglycosides, macrolides, disinfectants, and tetracyclines, respectively, were significantly more abundant among ICU patients than in healthy subjects, while a chloramphenicol resistance gene (catA) and a tetracycline resistance gene (tetW) were more abundant in healthy subjects. The gut microbiota of SDD-treated ICU patients deviated strongly from the gut microbiota of healthy subjects. The negative effects on the resistome were limited to selection

  12. Using Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling (PAMS) to identify core profiles from the WMS-III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisby, Craig L; Kim, Se-Kang

    2008-03-01

    Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling (PAMS) is a procedure for extracting latent core profiles in a multitest data set. The PAMS procedure offers several advantages compared with other profile analysis procedures. Most notably, PAMS estimates individual profile weights that reflect the degree to which an individual's observed profile approximates the shape and scatter of latent core profiles. The PAMS procedure was applied to index scores of nonreplicated participants from the standardization sample (N = 1,033) for the Wechsler Memory Scale--Third Edition (D. Tulsky, J. Zhu, & M. F. Ledbetter, 2002). PAMS extracted discrepant visual memory and auditory memory versus working memory core profiles for the complete 16- to 89-year-old sample and discrepant working memory and auditory memory versus working memory core profiles for the 75- to 89-year-old cohort. Implications for use of PAMS in future research are discussed.

  13. Age profiles of sport participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eime, Rochelle M; Harvey, Jack T; Charity, Melanie J; Casey, Meghan M; Westerbeek, Hans; Payne, Warren R

    2016-01-01

    Participation in sport has many health benefits, and is popular amongst children. However participation decreases with age. While the membership records of peak sports organisations have improved markedly in recent years, there has been little research into sport participation trends across the lifespan. This study investigates age profiles of participation in sport and compares these trends between genders and residential locations. De-identified 2011 participant registration data for seven popular Australian sports (Australian Football, Basketball, Cricket, Hockey, Lawn Bowls, Netball and Tennis) were obtained and analysed according to age, gender and geographical location (metropolitan v non-metropolitan) within the state of Victoria, Australia. All data were integrated and sports were analysed collectively to produce broadly based participation profiles while maintaining confidentiality of membership data for individual sports. The total number of registered participants included in the data set for 2011 was 520,102. Most participants (64.1 %) were aged less than 20 years. Nearly one third (27.6 %) of all participants were aged 10-14 years, followed by the 5-9 year age group (19.9 %). Participation declined rapidly during adolescence. A higher proportion of males than female participants were young children (4-7 years) or young adults 18-29 years; this pattern was reversed among 8-17 year-olds. A higher proportion of metropolitan participants were engaged between the ages of 4-13 and 19-29, whereas a higher proportion of non-metropolitan participants played during adolescence (14-18 years) and throughout mature adulthood (30+ years). Increasing participation in sport is an objective for both government and sporting organisations. In order to have both mass population-based participation, from a health policy and elite performance perspective, we need to further explore the findings arising from the analysis of this extensive data set. Such an examination

  14. Clinicopathologic Profile of Bronchogenic Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SG Shrestha

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Bronchogenic carcinoma is the most common cancer in the world. It can present in many ways. Accurate diagnosis and categorization into different types is important because of its effect on prognosis and management. We conducted this study to find out the frequency of various histological types of bronchogenic carcinoma and correlate with their clinicopathologic profile. METHODS: This is a retrospective study conducted in 174 histopathologically proven cases of bronchogenic carcinoma that were referred from different parts of the country to a private hospital in Kathmandu over a period of 4 years. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients developing bronchogenic carcinoma was 64 years. Squamous cell carcinoma was the commonest histologic subtype followed by small cell carcinoma. Adenocarcinoma was more common in females. Clinical history was available in 133 cases. Among them, almost all patients had a history of smoking, the average number of pack years being 39.99. Most of the patients consulted doctor for chief complaint of cough and shortness of breath, the average duration of symptoms being 117.53 days. CONCLUSIONS: The lung cancer must be ruled out in all patients who have persistent signs and symptoms of pulmonary disease with a history of smoking. KEYWORDS: bronchogenic, histopathology, smoking.

  15. [Epidemiological profile of ovarian cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas-Corchado, Luz María; González-Geroniz, Manuel; Hernández-Herrera, Ricardo Jorge

    2011-09-01

    In Mexico, ovarian cancer represents 5.3% of cancer diagnoses in all age groups and 21% of gynecologic cancers. The states with the highest incidence of this disease Nuevo León, Mexico State and Federal District. To determine the epidemiological profile of ovarian cancer. A retrospective cross-sectional study that included all patients with complete records, diagnosed with ovarian cancer treated at the Oncology department UMAE Monterrey No. 23, January 2009 to 31 December 2009. We identified 40 patients with ovarian cancer. The average age of menarche was 12.7 years, 40% were of reproductive age, 25% were nulliparous, 15% had a pregnancy and 37.5% had two pregnancies. Of the total patients, 17% had a history of breast cancer, 40% used a contraceptive method, 37% used oral contraceptives. The tumor marker CA 125 was found in 40% of patients, 63.1% had ultrasound markers for cancer. The most frequent clinical stage 1A in which they found 32% of cases. Papillary serous adenocarcinoma was diagnosed in 25% of patients, endometroid adenocarcinoma and mucinous tumor of low malignant potential was diagnosed borderline at 20%, poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma in 18% tumor granulosa cells in 7% and papillary adenocarcinoma ring cell adenocarcinoma in 5%. In total, 43% of patients received chemotherapy. The majority of cases tenia50 years or more. The background was the most frequent hereditary breast cancer. There were no deaths during the study.

  16. Motivational profile quality players handball

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Martínez Moreno

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In the sport context, elite category, it is necessary to know all the factors, which in one way or another, affect the athletes throughout the different competitions. The object of study is to know the motivational profile of elite handball players. The sample consisted of 495 players, of whom 47.8% were boys and 52.2% girls, their ages ranged from 12 to 16 years, with an average of 13.8 years (dt = 1.0. Descriptive statistical analyzes of the sample, absolute and relative frequencies were performed for the qualitative variables and for the quantitative values minimum, maximum, mean, standard deviation, Cronbach's alpha. Correlation between variables, with the Pearson correlation coefficient. The MANCOVA test was performed to determine if there were differences between the dimensions of the questionnaire, according to age and years of practice. The results reveal that handball players elite category of the sample object of study have mainly intrinsic motivation, achieving high scores on general motivation, motivation achievement and motivation stimulation. In addition to moderately high values in introjected regulation and very low values in demotivation.

  17. Profiling Metacognition in Gambling Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spada, Marcantonio M; Giustina, Lucia; Rolandi, Silvia; Fernie, Bruce A; Caselli, Gabriele

    2015-09-01

    Preliminary research has indicated that general facets of metacognition are associated with problem gambling. In the present study we aimed to investigate whether specific facets of metacognition play a role in explaining gambling initiation and perseveration in individuals presenting with gambling disorder. To investigate: (1) the presence of metacognitive beliefs about gambling; (2) the goal of gambling, and its start and stop signals; and (3) the perceived impact of gambling on self-consciousness. Ten individuals with a diagnosis of gambling disorder were assessed using metacognitive profiling, a semi-structured interview. Findings indicated that all participants endorsed both positive and negative metacognitive beliefs about gambling. The primary goal of gambling was to relieve economic hardship and improve cognitive-emotional state. All participants reported that they did not know when this goal was achieved. Start signals for gambling included the ideas and feelings that gambling could solve problems and sensations that it might be the right time to win. The stop signal for gambling, for all participants, was running out of money. All participants also reported a perceived reduction in self-consciousness during a gambling episode. These findings provide preliminary evidence that specific facets of metacognition play a role in gambling disorder.

  18. Language profiles in ASD, SLI and ADHD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, H.M.; Embrechts, M.

    2008-01-01

    Developmental disorders might differ in their language profiles when using parent reports. The first study indicated that school aged children with ASD have similar language profiles as children with ADHD. Both groups had relatively more difficulties with pragmatics than with structural language

  19. Language profiles in ASD, SLI, and ADHD.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, H.M.; Embrechts, M.

    2008-01-01

    Developmental disorders might differ in their language profiles when using parent reports. The first study indicated that school aged children with ASD have similar language profiles as children with ADHD. Both groups had relatively more difficulties with pragmatics than with structural language

  20. Refactoring Real-Time Java Profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Hans; Thomsen, Bent; Ravn, Anders P.

    2011-01-01

    Just like other software, Java profiles benefits from refactoring when they have been used and have evolved for some time. This paper presents a refactoring of the Real-Time Specification for Java (RTSJ) and the Safety Critical Java (SCJ) profile (JSR-302). It highlights core concepts and makes...

  1. Wind profiles for Space Shuttle loads analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelfang, S. I.

    1978-01-01

    The small scale wind velocity perturbations in vertical wind profiles at Cape Kennedy, Florida were analyzed in order to derive information for simulations of space shuttle ascent through the perturbed atmosphere. The available statistical data does not permit specification of various aspects of idealized singularities and wavelike perturbations with a reasonable degree of confidence. The information developed as a result of the analysis described in Section 3 of this report is suitable for the further development of idealized models. The term perturbation is used instead of the more common term, gust. According to the conventional approach, a gust profile is calculated by applying a high pass digital filter to a Jimsphere profile; all the speeds in the filtered profile are defined as gusts. The high pass filtered profile is defined as a residual profile and the maximum residual in the vicinity of a specified reference height is defined as the gust. Gusts defined in this manner represent the perturbation peaks. A detailed discussion of the calculation of residual profiles and gusts is given. The meteorological coordinate system, the data sample, and Jimsphere profiles are also described. Recommendations and conclusions are presented.

  2. Demographic profile of patients diagnosed with intracranial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Meningiomas are common brain tumours and display gender, racial and ethnic differences in their demographic profile. The demographic profile of our patients diagnosed with intracranial meningiomas is presented and compared with the literature. Objectives: To determine the age, gender, racial and ethnic ...

  3. Educational and Demographic Profile: Contra Costa County.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California Postsecondary Education Commission, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This profile uniquely presents a variety of educational and socioeconomic information for Contra Costa County, nearby counties, and the state. The profile highlights the relationship between various factors that affect the economic well-being of individuals and communities. This presentation of information provides a framework for enhanced…

  4. Characterization of weathering profile in granites and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Therefore, we propose three models describing the weathering profiles in granites, metasediments, and volcanic rocks for hard rock formations located in West Africa. For each of these models proposed for granitic and volcano sedimentary rocks of the Dimbokro catchment, vertical layered weathering profiles are described, ...

  5. Educational and Demographic Profile: Mariposa County.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California Postsecondary Education Commission, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This profile uniquely presents a variety of educational and socioeconomic information for Mariposa County, nearby counties, and the state. The profile highlights the relationship between various factors that affect the economic well-being of individuals and communities. This presentation of information provides a framework for enhanced…

  6. Profile in Action: Linking Admission and Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, Carla M.

    2013-01-01

    A profile-oriented retention strategy embraces the admission process as a powerful lever in improving retention and completion rates and recognizes that the student profile can be shaped by changes in admission policies or priorities--even within the current market position of the institution. In addition, the student body can be oriented toward…

  7. Current density profile evolution in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stubberfield, P.M.; Balet, B.; Campbell, D.; Challis, C.D.; Cordey, J.G.; O'Rourke, J.; Hammett, G.; Schmidt, G.L.

    1989-01-01

    Simulation studies have been made of the current density profile evolution in discharges where the bootstrap current is expected to be significant. The changes predicted in the total current profile have been confirmed by comparison with experimental results. (author) 8 refs., 6 figs

  8. Toxicological profiles of commercial herbal preparation, Jobelyn ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    illnesses. Despite its wide use, there is limited report on its toxicological profile. This study examined the acute and shortterm chronic toxicity profiles of the product with emphasis on the LD50, gross morphological and histopathological effects. METHODS: Albino mice (mean weight: 16.45±3.14g) were used in this study.

  9. Profile and Trends of FTA and Foresight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Per Dannemand; Alkærsig, Lars

    2016-01-01

    This chapter presents the profile and trends of the academic discipline of Future-oriented Technology Assessment (FTA) and its approaches. This chapter presents the profile and trends of the academic discipline of FTA and its approaches. This is achieved through analyses of the development, focus...

  10. Educational and Demographic Profile: Merced County

    Science.gov (United States)

    California Postsecondary Education Commission, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This profile uniquely presents a variety of educational and socioeconomic information for Merced County, nearby counties, and the state. The profile highlights the relationship between various factors that affect the economic well-being of individuals and communities. This presentation of information provides a framework for enhanced communication…

  11. Plasma profile recovery by function parameterisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, P.J.; Sexton, M.C.

    1986-11-01

    The use of Function Parameterisation for the recovery of plasma profiles as a function of flux surface area from spatial point data directly combined with external magnetic measurements is demonstrated in the case of ASDEX electron temperature and density profiles. The extrapolated temperature on the magnetic axis is shown to be more reliable than that obtained from a conventional fitting procedure. (orig.)

  12. Social and economic profile technical guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    David Seesholtz; Denise Wickwar; John C. Russell

    2006-01-01

    A social and economic profile is a key element of a social assessment. A social and economic assessment or profile is used by line officers, planning staff social scientists, and others to inform both forest planning activities and project-level work. It is important to discover how planning and management decisions made by National Forest System staff will affect...

  13. Refactoring Real-Time Java Profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Hans; Thomsen, Bent; Ravn, Anders Peter

    2011-01-01

    Just like other software, Java profiles benefits from refactoring when they have been used and have evolved for some time. This paper presents a refactoring of the Real-Time Specification for Java (RTSJ) and the Safety Critical Java (SCJ) profile (JSR-302). It highlights core concepts and makes...... to comprehend and use for application developers and students....

  14. EPro Non-contact erosion profiling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meinert, Palle

    EPro is a profiler controlled by software, which is constructed to measure the same surface or work piece multiple times and track changes due to erosion.......EPro is a profiler controlled by software, which is constructed to measure the same surface or work piece multiple times and track changes due to erosion....

  15. MicroRNA profiling: approaches and considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, Colin C.; Cheng, Heather H.; Tewari, Muneesh

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small RNAs (~22 nt long) that post-transcriptionally regulate the expression of thousands of genes in a broad range of organisms, in both normal physiologic and disease contexts. MiRNA expression profiling is gaining popularity because miRNAs, as key regulators in gene expression networks, can influence many biological processes and have also shown promise as biomarkers for disease. Technological advances have enabled the development of various platforms for miRNA profiling, and an understanding of the strengths and pitfalls of different approaches can aid in the effective use of miRNA profiling for diverse applications. We review here the major considerations for carrying out and interpreting results of miRNA profiling studies, as well as current and emerging applications of miRNA profiling. PMID:22510765

  16. Profile of Public Health Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Ruth Gaskins; Greer, Annette; Clay, Maria; McFadden, Cheryl

    2016-01-01

    Public health leaders play pivotal roles in ensuring the population health for our nation. Since 2000, the number of schools of public health has almost doubled. The scholarly credentials for leaders of public health in academic and practice are important, as they make decisions that shape the future public health workforce and important public health policies. This research brief describes the educational degrees of deans of schools of public health and state health directors, as well as their demographic profiles, providing important information for future public health leadership planning. Data were extracted from a database containing information obtained from multiple Web sites including academic institution Web sites and state government Web sites. Variables describe 2 sets of public health leaders: academic deans of schools of public health and state health directors. Deans of schools of public health were 73% males and 27% females; the PhD degree was held by 40% deans, and the MD degree by 33% deans. Seventy percent of deans obtained their terminal degree more than 35 years ago. State health directors were 60% males and 40% females. Sixty percent of state health directors had an MD degree, 4% a PhD degree, and 26% no terminal degree at all. Sixty-four percent of state health directors received their terminal degree more than 25 years ago. In addition to terminal degrees, 56% of deans and 40% of state health directors held MPH degrees. The findings call into question competencies needed by future public health professionals and leadership and the need to clarify further the level of public health training and degree type that should be required for leadership qualifications in public health.

  17. Importance Profiles for Water Vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapes, Brian; Chandra, Arunchandra S.; Kuang, Zhiming; Zuidema, Paquita

    2017-11-01

    Motivated by the scientific desire to align observations with quantities of physical interest, we survey how scalar importance functions depend on vertically resolved water vapor. Definitions of importance begin from familiar examples of water mass I m and TOA clear-sky outgoing longwave flux I OLR, in order to establish notation and illustrate graphically how the sensitivity profile or "kernel" depends on whether specific humidity S, relative humidity R, or ln( R) are used as measures of vapor. Then, new results on the sensitivity of convective activity I con to vapor (with implied knock-on effects such as weather prediction skill) are presented. In radiative-convective equilibrium, organized (line-like) convection is much more sensitive to moisture than scattered isotropic convection, but it exists in a drier mean state. The lesson for natural convection may be that organized convection is less susceptible to dryness and can survive and propagate into regions unfavorable for disorganized convection. This counterintuitive interpretive conclusion, with respect to the narrow numerical result behind it, highlights the importance of clarity about what is held constant at what values in sensitivity or susceptibility kernels. Finally, the sensitivities of observable radiance signals I sig for passive remote sensing are considered. While the accuracy of R in the lower free troposphere is crucial for the physical importance scalars, this layer is unfortunately the most difficult to isolate with passive remote sensing: In high emissivity channels, water vapor signals come from too high in the atmosphere (for satellites) or too low (for surface radiometers), while low emissivity channels have poor altitude discrimination and (in the case of satellites) are contaminated by surface emissions. For these reasons, active ranging (LiDAR) is the preferred observing strategy.

  18. Lipid profiling in sewage sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Fenfen; Wu, Xuemin; Zhao, Luyao; Liu, Xiaohui; Qi, Juanjuan; Wang, Xueying; Wang, Jiawei

    2017-06-01

    High value-added reutilization of sewage sludge from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) is essential in sustainable development in WWTPs. However, despite the advantage of high value reutilization, this process must be based on a detailed study of organics in sludge. We used the methods employed in life sciences to determine the profile of lipids (cellular lipids, free fatty acids (FFAs), and wax/gum) in five sludge samples obtained from three typical WWTPs in Beijing; these samples include one sludge sample from a primary sedimentation tank, two activated sludge samples from two Anaerobic-Anoxic-Oxic (A2/O) tanks, and two activated sludge samples from two membrane bioreactor tanks. The percentage of total raw lipids varied from 2.90% to 12.3%. Sludge from the primary sedimentation tank showed the highest concentrations of lipid, FFA, and wax/gum and the second highest concentration of cellular lipids. All activated sludge contained an abundance of cellular lipids (>54%). Cells in sludge can from plants, animals, microbes and so on in wastewater. Approximately 14 species of cellular lipids were identified, including considerable high value-potential ceramide (9567-38774 mg/kg), coenzyme (937-3897 mg/kg), and some phosphatidylcholine (75-548 mg/kg). The presence of those lipid constituents would thus require a wider range of recovery methods for sludge. Both cellular lipids and FFAs contain an abundance of C16-C18 lipids at high saturation level, and they serve as good resources for biodiesel production. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. State electricity profiles, March 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    Due to the role electricity plays in the Nation`s economic and social well-being, interested parties have been following the electric power industry`s transition by keeping abreast of the restructuring and deregulation events that are taking place almost daily. Much of the attention centers around the States and how they are restructuring the business of electricity supply within their respective jurisdictions. This report is designed to profile each State and the District of Columbia regarding not only their current restructuring activities, but also their electricity generation and concomitant statistics from 1986 through 1996. Included are data on a number of subject areas including generating capability, generation, revenues, fuel use, capacity factor for nuclear plants, retail sales, and pollutant emissions. Although the Energy Information Administration (EIA) publishes this type of information, there is a lack of a uniform overview for each individual State. This report is intended to help fill that gap and also to serve as a framework for more detailed studies. In addition to basic statistics in tables and graphs, a textual section is provided for each State, discussing some of the points relative to electricity production that are noteworthy in, or unique to, that particular State. Also, each State is ranked according to the place it holds, as compared to the rest of the states, in various relevant areas, such as its average price of electricity per kilowatthour, its population, and its emissions of certain atmospheric pollutants. The final chapter covers the Nation as a whole. 451 figs., 520 tabs.

  20. Study on Rail Profile Optimization Based on the Nonlinear Relationship between Profile and Wear Rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianxi Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a rail profile optimization method that takes account of wear rate within design cycle so as to minimize rail wear at the curve in heavy haul railway and extend the service life of rail. Taking rail wear rate as the object function, the vertical coordinate of rail profile at range optimization as independent variable, and the geometric characteristics and grinding depth of rail profile as constraint conditions, the support vector machine regression theory was used to fit the nonlinear relationship between rail profile and its wear rate. Then, the profile optimization model was built. Based on the optimization principle of genetic algorithm, the profile optimization model was solved to achieve the optimal rail profile. A multibody dynamics model was used to check the dynamic performance of carriage running on optimal rail profile. The result showed that the average relative error of support vector machine regression model remained less than 10% after a number of training processes. The dynamic performance of carriage running on optimized rail profile met the requirements on safety index and stability. The wear rate of optimized profile was lower than that of standard profile by 5.8%; the allowable carrying gross weight increased by 12.7%.

  1. Parent Prevention Communication Profiles and Adolescent Substance Use: A Latent Profile Analysis and Growth Curve Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hye Jeong; Miller-Day, Michelle; Shin, YoungJu; Hecht, Michael L.; Pettigrew, Jonathan; Krieger, Janice L.; Lee, JeongKyu; Graham, John W.

    2017-01-01

    This current study identifies distinct parent prevention communication profiles and examines whether youth with different parental communication profiles have varying substance use trajectories over time. Eleven schools in two rural school districts in the Midwestern United States were selected, and 784 students were surveyed at three time points from the beginning of 7th grade to the end of 8th grade. A series of latent profile analyses were performed to identify discrete profiles/subgroups of substance-specific prevention communication (SSPC). The results revealed a 4-profile model of SSPC: Active-Open, Passive-Open, Active-Silent, and Passive-Silent. A growth curve model revealed different rates of lifetime substance use depending on the youth’s SSPC profile. These findings have implications for parenting interventions and tailoring messages for parents to fit specific SSPC profiles. PMID:29056872

  2. Geophysical validation of SCIAMACHY Limb Ozone Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. J. Brinksma

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the quality of the two available SCIAMACHY limb ozone profile products. They were retrieved with the University of Bremen IFE's algorithm version 1.61 (hereafter IFE, and the official ESA offline algorithm (hereafter OL versions 2.4 and 2.5. The ozone profiles were compared to a suite of correlative measurements from ground-based lidar and microwave, sondes, SAGE II and SAGE III (Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment. To correct for the expected Envisat pointing errors, which have not been corrected implicitly in either of the algorithms, we applied a constant altitude shift of -1.5 km to the SCIAMACHY ozone profiles. The IFE ozone profile data between 16 and 40 km are biased low by 3-6%. The average difference profiles have a typical standard deviation of 10% between 20 and 35 km. We show that more than 20% of the SCIAMACHY official ESA offline (OL ozone profiles version 2.4 and 2.5 have unrealistic ozone values, most of these are north of 15° S. The remaining OL profiles compare well to correlative instruments above 24 km. Between 20 and 24 km, they underestimate ozone by 15±5%.

  3. Profiles and Context for Structured Text Retrieval

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koolen, Marijn; Bogers, Toine

    2017-01-01

    The combination of structured information retrieval with user profile information represents the scenario where systems search with an explicit statement of the information need—a search query—as well as a profile of a user, which can contain information about previous interactions, search history......, user demographics, or other relevant information about the user’s preferences. The relation between the profile and the information need is implicit and may contain many irrelevant signals. The task of the system then is to model both the current information need and the background user preferences...

  4. A predictable Java profile - rationale and implementations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Hans; Bøgholm, Thomas; Hansen, Rene Rydhof

    A Java profile suitable for development of high integrity embedded systems is presented. It is based on event handlers which are grouped in missions and equipped with respectively private handler memory and shared mission memory. This is a result of our previous work on developing a Java profile......, and is directly inspired by interactions with the Open Group on their on-going work on a safety critical Java profile (JSR-302). The main contribution is an arrangement of the class hierarchy such that the proposal is a generalization of Real-Time Specification for Java (RTSJ). A further contribution...

  5. Overview of progesterone profiles in dairy cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blavy, P.; Derks, M.; Martin, O.

    2016-01-01

    from 1009 lactations, was obtained from the Danish Cattle Research Centre in Foulum, Denmark. Milk samples were analyzed daily using a Ridgeway ELISA-kit. Oestrus cycles with less than ten data points or shorter than four days were discarded, after which 1006 cycles remained in the analysis. A median...... to classify progesterone profiles without recourse to an a priori set of rules, which arbitrarily segment the natural variability in these profiles. Using data-derived profile shapes may allow a more accurate assessment of the effects of for example nutritional management or breeding system on progesterone...

  6. A prototype ionization profile monitor for RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connolly, R.; Cameron, P.; Ryan, W.

    1997-01-01

    Transverse beam profiles in the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) will be measured with ionization profile monitors (IPM's). Each IPM collects and measures the distribution of electrons in the beamline resulting from residual gas ionization during bunch passage. The electrons are swept transversely from the beamline and collected on strip anodes oriented parallel to the beam axis. At each bunch passage the charge pulses are amplified, integrated, and digitized for display as a profile histogram. A prototype detector was tested in the injection line during the RHIC Sextant Test. This paper describes the detector and gives results from the beam tests

  7. Load profiles analysis for electricity market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu Porumb

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In the wake of electric power system transition towards smart grids, and the adoption of the electric market schemes, electric utilities are facing the need of a better load profiles understanding for their customers. In this work, some key objectives were addresses, such as definition of the mathematical model for calculating the hourly energy specific, identification of the three target groups for users who have developed consumer profiles, definition of the two types of significant load and assessment of the impact of using consumer profiles on users.

  8. A Profile for Safety Critical Java

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoeberl, Martin; Søndergaard, Hans; Thomsen, Bent

    2007-01-01

    We propose a new, minimal specification for real-time Java for safety critical applications. The intention is to provide a profile that supports programming of applications that can be validated against safety critical standards such as DO-178B [15]. The proposed profile is in line with the Java...... specification request JSR-302: Safety Critical Java Technology, which is still under discussion. In contrast to the current direction of the expert group for the JSR-302 we do not subset the rather complex Real-Time Specification for Java (RTSJ). Nevertheless, our profile can be implemented on top of an RTSJ...

  9. A prototype ionization profile monitor for RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connolly, R.; Cameron, P.; Ryan, W. [and others

    1997-07-01

    Transverse beam profiles in the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) will be measured with ionization profile monitors (IPM`s). Each IPM collects and measures the distribution of electrons in the beamline resulting from residual gas ionization during bunch passage. The electrons are swept transversely from the beamline and collected on strip anodes oriented parallel to the beam axis. At each bunch passage the charge pulses are amplified, integrated, and digitized for display as a profile histogram. A prototype detector was tested in the injection line during the RHIC Sextant Test. This paper describes the detector and gives results from the beam tests.

  10. Design of control system for profile gauge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Yibin; Zhang Yu'ai

    2013-01-01

    The profile gauge can on-line get the cross section in the steel strip, so it has been widely used in hot continuous rolling production-line. The structure of profile gauge and its distributed hardware structure based on PLC and software design of its control subsystem were introduced. The method of temperature and humidity measurement was analyzed. The time response of X-ray machine control based on RS232 communication was researched. It is proved that the control system meets the requirements of the profile gauge system. (authors)

  11. Aerodynamics profile not in stationary flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А.А. Загорулько

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available  Consider the question about influence of unsteady flight on the size of drag and lift coefficients of theaerodynamic profile. Distinctive features of this investigation are obtaining data about aerodynamic drag chancing in process unsteady on high angle at attack and oscillation profile in subsonic and transonic flight. Given analysis of oscillation profile show, that dynamic loops accompany change of lift and dray force. The researches show that it is necessary to clarity the mathematic model of the airplane flight dynamics by introducing numbers, with take into account unsteady effects.

  12. Modelling of the urban wind profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gryning, Sven-Erik; Batchvarova, Ekaterina

    2008-01-01

    Analysis of meteorological measurements from tall masts in rural and urban areas show that the height of the boundary layer influences the wind profile even in the lowest hundreds of meters. A parameterization of the wind profile for the entire boundary layer is formulated with emphasis...... on the lowest 200-300 m and presented here. Results are shown from applying the parameterization of the wind profile on independent measurements from an urban experimental campaign that was carried out in Sofia, Bulgaria in 2003....

  13. Parametric dependencies of JET electron temperature profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schunke, B. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Imre, K.; Riedel, K. [New York Univ., NY (United States)

    1994-07-01

    The JET Ohmic, L-Mode and H-Mode electron temperature profiles obtained from the LIDAR Thomson Scattering Diagnostic are parameterized in terms of the normalized flux parameter and a set of the engineering parameters like plasma current, toroidal field, line averages electron density... It is shown that the electron temperature profiles fit a log-additive model well. It is intended to use the same model to predict the profile shape for D-T discharges in JET and in ITER. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  14. haematological, lipid profile and other biochemical parameters

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2006-01-01

    Jan 1, 2006 ... HAEMATOLOGICAL, LIPID PROFILE AND OTHER BIOCHEMICAL PARAMETERS IN NORMAL AND HYPERTENSIVE SUBJECTS AMONG THE ... Hypertensive individuals had significantly higher serum sodium, chloride and calcium levels but a .... exposed to urbanisation and associated changes in diet,.

  15. A Community Profile of Pittsburgh Neighborhoods, 1974

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — These data include four historical datasets that were transcribed from the Community Profiles of Pittsburgh reports, which were published in 1974. The Community...

  16. Fractal Analysis of Rock Joint Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audy, Ondřej; Ficker, Tomáš

    2017-10-01

    Surface reliefs of rock joints are analyzed in geotechnics when shear strength of rocky slopes is estimated. The rock joint profiles actually are self-affine fractal curves and computations of their fractal dimensions require special methods. Many papers devoted to the fractal properties of these profiles were published in the past but only a few of those papers employed a convenient computational method that would have guaranteed a sound value of that dimension. As a consequence, anomalously low dimensions were presented. This contribution deals with two computational modifications that lead to sound fractal dimensions of the self-affine rock joint profiles. These are the modified box-counting method and the modified yard-stick method sometimes called the compass method. Both these methods are frequently applied to self-similar fractal curves but the self-affine profile curves due to their self-affine nature require modified computational procedures implemented in computer programs.

  17. State Profiles: FY 2013 Public Libraries Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    Institute of Museum and Library Services — Pull up a state's profile to find state-level totals on key data such as numbers of libraries and librarians, revenue and expenditure, and collection sizes.These...

  18. Hudson River Sub-Bottom Profile Points

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Hudson River Estuary Shallow Water Surveys. Subbottom Profile Points. Subbottom data was collected November 5 to December 15, 2009, in the estuary north from...

  19. Profile of Vietnam War Veterans (2015).

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Profile of Vietnam War Veterans uses the 2015 ACS to provide a view into the demographic characteristics and socioeconomic conditions of the Vietnam War Veteran...

  20. Metabolite profiles of common Stemphylium species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Birgitte; Solfrizzo, Michelle; Visconti, Angelo

    1995-01-01

    Thirty-three isolates of Stemphylium spp. have been analysed for their metabolite profiles. Five metabolites, stemphylin, stemphyloxin II, stemphyperylenol, stemphol and a stemphol related compound, have been detected by high-performance liquid chromatography and thin-layer chromatography...

  1. RNA PROFILES OF EJACULATED HUMAN SPERMATOZOA

    Science.gov (United States)

    RNA Profiles of Ejaculated Human SpermatozoaKary E. Thompson, Wenjun Bao, Sally D. Perreault, Hongzu Ren, John C. Rockett, Judith E. Schmid, Lillian F. Strader, David J. DixReproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory...

  2. C-FERST Environmental Issue Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page provides links to the 45 issue profiles for C-FERST users, organized with tabs to show issues related to pollutants, environmental media, health effects, other community issues, and all issues.

  3. Tribal-FERST Environmental Issue Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page provides links to the 45 issue profiles for Tribal-FERST users, organized with tabs to show issues related to pollutants, environmental media, health effects, other community issues, and all issues.

  4. Advancing Profiling Sensors with a Wireless Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvis, Alex; Russomanno, David J.

    2012-01-01

    The notion of a profiling sensor was first realized by a Near-Infrared (N-IR) retro-reflective prototype consisting of a vertical column of wired sparse detectors. This paper extends that prior work and presents a wireless version of a profiling sensor as a collection of sensor nodes. The sensor incorporates wireless sensing elements, a distributed data collection and aggregation scheme, and an enhanced classification technique. In this novel approach, a base station pre-processes the data collected from the sensor nodes and performs data re-alignment. A back-propagation neural network was also developed for the wireless version of the N-IR profiling sensor that classifies objects into the broad categories of human, animal or vehicle with an accuracy of approximately 94%. These enhancements improve deployment options as compared with the first generation of wired profiling sensors, possibly increasing the application scenarios for such sensors, including intelligent fence applications. PMID:23443371

  5. Generic methodology for calibrating profiling nacelle lidars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borraccino, Antoine; Courtney, Michael; Wagner, Rozenn

    Improving power performance assessment by measuring at different heights has been demonstrated using ground-based profiling LIDARs. More recently, nacelle-mounted lidars studies have shown promising capabilities to assess power performance. Using nacelle lidars avoids the erection of expensive...... meteorology masts, especially offshore. A new generation of commercially developed profiling nacelle lidars has sophisticated measurement capabilities. As for any other measuring system, lidars measurements have uncertainties. Their estimation is the ultimate goal of a calibration. Field calibration...... procedures have been developed for non-profiling nacelle lidars. However, their specificity to one type of lidar or another highlights the need for developing generic calibration procedures. Such procedures should be applicable to any type of existing and upcoming lidar technology. Profiling nacelle lidars...

  6. Temperature profiles in the Harwell boreholes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robins, N.S.

    1983-03-01

    Heat flow at Harwell is estimated at 45 mWm -2 (milli Watt per metre squared is the unit of heat flow). Thermal conductivity values for the formations penetrated range from 1.0 to 4.6 Wm -1 K -1 . The temperature profiles recorded in the boreholes enable the vertical groundwater flow patterns within two poorly permeable mudrock units to be evaluated. The two mudrock units act as leaky barriers each separating a pair of aquifer units which induce a vertical hydraulic gradient across the mudrocks. The flow velocity results for the upper mudrock units derived from the temperature profile are compatible with values for groundwater potential derived from hydraulic data (10 -9 ms -1 from the temperature profile and 10 -12 ms -1 from the hydraulic observations). The results from the lower mudrock sequence are incompatible and this may be due to some other overiding influence upon the temperature profile. (author)

  7. The first decade of MALDI protein profiling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrethsen, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    MALDI protein profiling has identified several important challenges in omics-based biomarker research. First, research into the analytical performance of a novel omics-platform of potential diagnostic impact must be carried out in a critical manner and according to common guidelines. Evaluation...... studies should be performed at an early time and preferably before massive advancement into explorative biomarker research. In particular, MALDI profiling underscores the need for an adequate understanding of the causal relationship between molecular abundance and the quantitative measure in multivariate...... biomarker research. Secondly, MALDI profiling has raised awareness of the significant risk of false-discovery in biomarker research due to several confounding factors, including sample processing and unspecific host-response to disease. Here, the experience from MALDI profiling supports that a central...

  8. European Union Sustainable Purchasing Guidance Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    To help you find the resource that is right for your organization, EPA conducted a scan of the landscape and developed summary profiles of some of the leading sources of sustainable purchasing guidance around the globe.

  9. Responsible Purchasing Network - Sustainable Purchasing Guidance Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    To help you find the resource that is right for your organization, EPA conducted a scan of the landscape and developed summary profiles of some of the leading sources of sustainable purchasing guidance around the globe.

  10. International Green Purchasing Network - Sustainable Purchasing Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    To help you find the resource that is right for your organization, EPA conducted a scan of the landscape and developed summary profiles of some of the leading sources of sustainable purchasing guidance around the globe.

  11. Theoretical studies of hollow electron temperature profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werkoff, F.; Mercier, C.; Cissoko, G.

    1978-06-01

    The basic mechanisms of experimentally obtained hollow profiles of electron temperature have been investigated. These hollow profiles are obviously related to radiative losses at the center of the plasma, losses that are greater than Joule heating. Hollow profiles were numerically and analytically shown to be instable of the MHD point of view, when the heat diffusion coefficient of electrons is too small. Taking Ksub(e) high enough to satisfy the stability criterion, steady states were obtained in agreement with experimental results. The impurities at the center of the plasma were also shown to be far from the coronal equilibrium. Accoding to neo-classical laws, this discrepancy entails the impurity accumulation at the plasma center, in correlation with an adequately hollow Tsub(e) profile. It was also proved that, at least in a certain range of parameters, the initial conditions can be chosen so as to obtain either a steady peaked state or a steady hollow state [fr

  12. Effects of fueling profiles on plasma transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houlberg, W.A.; Mense, A.T.; Attenberger, S.E.; Milora, S.L.

    1978-01-01

    The effects of cold particle fueling profiles on particle and energy transport in an ignition sized tokamak plasma are investigated in this study with a one-dimensional, multifluid transport model. A density gradient driven trapped particle microinstability model for plasma transport is used to demonstrate potential effects of fueling profiles on ignition requirements. Important criteria for the development of improved transport models under the conditions of shallow particle fueling profiles are outlined. A discrete pellet fueling model indicates that large fluctuations in density and temperature may occur in the outer regions of the plasma with large, shallowly penetrating pellets, but fluctuations in the pressure profile are small. The hot central core of the plasma remains unaffected by the large fluctuations near the plasma edge

  13. Airborne Surface Profiling of Alaskan Glaciers

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set consists of glacier outline, laser altimetry profile, and surface elevation change data for 46 glaciers in Alaska and British Columbia, Canada,...

  14. Relationship between some selected Socio Demographic Profiles ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. This study assesses the relationship between some selected demographic profiles and methicillin resistant. Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) amongst 384 apparently healthy residents in Ekpoma, Edo, Nigeria. Following standard protocol, nasal swab samples were subjected to bacteriological investigation and ...

  15. The spatial profiles and metabolic capabilities of microbial populations impact the growth of antibiotic-resistant mutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Karishma S.; Ratnayeke, Nalin; Katira, Parag; Gordon, Vernita D.

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance adversely affects clinical and public health on a global scale. Using the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, we show that increasing the number density of bacteria, on agar containing aminoglycoside antibiotics, can non-monotonically impact the survival of antibiotic-resistant mutants. Notably, at high cell densities, mutant survival is inhibited. A wide range of bacterial species can inhibit antibiotic-resistant mutants. Inhibition results from the metabolic breakdown of amino acids, which results in alkaline by-products. The consequent increase in pH acts in conjunction with aminoglycosides to mediate inhibition. Our work raises the possibility that the manipulation of microbial population structure and nutrient environment in conjunction with existing antibiotics could provide therapeutic approaches to combat antibiotic resistance. PMID:25972434

  16. Immunoglobulin profile of Nigerian children with Plasmodium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The immunoglobulin profiles of 126 Nigerian children infected with Plasmodium falciparum in their peripheral blood were investigated. The mean malarial parasitaemia was 4699.17 ± 3695.2 ìl. The mean immunoglobulin profile of these infected children were 2.68 ± 0.019 mg/dl for IgA, 0.031 ± 0.01 mg/dl for IgD, 1358.29 ...

  17. Retransformation bias in a stem profile model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond L. Czaplewski; David Bruce

    1990-01-01

    An unbiased profile model, fit to diameter divided by diameter at breast height, overestimated volume of 5.3-m log sections by 0.5 to 3.5%. Another unbiased profile model, fit to squared diameter divided by squared diameter at breast height, underestimated bole diameters by 0.2 to 2.1%. These biases are caused by retransformation of the predicted dependent variable;...

  18. Personalizing Web Search based on User Profile

    OpenAIRE

    Utage, Sharyu; Ahire, Vijaya

    2016-01-01

    Web Search engine is most widely used for information retrieval from World Wide Web. These Web Search engines help user to find most useful information. When different users Searches for same information, search engine provide same result without understanding who is submitted that query. Personalized web search it is search technique for proving useful result. This paper models preference of users as hierarchical user profiles. a framework is proposed called UPS. It generalizes profile and m...

  19. Quadric Resistive Sheet Profile for Wideband Antennas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Raida

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available A new type of a nonreflecting resistive dipole antenna with quadric continuous resistivity profile is presented in this paper. The antenna is mathematically described and compared with the antenna originally proposed by Wu and King. The verification of a proposed theory and the comparison between Wu-King and quadric profile are carried out by simulation models that were designed for this purpose. The attention is turned to the proper attenuation of a wave excited on the resistive sheet, especially.

  20. Employability profile of the Peruvian public accountant

    OpenAIRE

    Tarazona, Silvia; Docente de postgrado de la Universidad Ricardo Palma, Lima, Perú; Maisch, Elena; Docente de postgrado de la Universidad Ricardo Palma, Lima, Perú; Arias, Hernán; Docente de postgrado de la Universidad Ricardo Palma, Lima, Perú

    2014-01-01

    The traditional perspective on the Public Accountant's professional services is running out of time and, although such services are still valuable for enterprises, the survival of the latter demands a more open and aggressive professional attitude in this field (Lebrija, 1998). Employability profiles respond to this demand by acknowledging the new abilities required of the labor force, which go beyond professional competencies. It is also these profiles which will allow coping with employment...