WorldWideScience

Sample records for nearshore marine sediments

  1. Formation, Fate, and Impacts of Microscopic and Macroscopic Oil-Sediment Residues in Nearshore Marine Environments: A Critical Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustitus, Sarah A.; Clement, T. Prabhakar

    2017-12-01

    Crude oil that is spilled in marine environments often interacts with suspended sediments to form residues that can impact the recovery of the affected nearshore ecosystems. When spilled oil and sediment interact, they can form either small microscopic aggregates, commonly referred to as oil-particle aggregates, or large macroscopic agglomerates, referred to as sediment-oil agglomerates or sediment-oil mats. Although these different sized oil-sediment residues have similar compositions, they are formed under different conditions and have different fates in nearshore environments; the goal of this review is to synthesize our current understanding of these two types of residues. We believe that researchers who focus solely on studying either microscopic aggregates or macroscopic agglomerates could benefit from understanding the research findings available in the other field. In this study, we compare and contrast various processes that control the formation, fate, and impacts of these two types of residues in nearshore environments and point out some of the knowledge gaps in this field. Additionally, these residues have been referred to by many names in the past, leading to confusion and misconceptions at times. In this effort, we recommend a uniform nomenclature to distinguish them based on their physical size. Our overall aim is to bridge the gap between microscopic and macroscopic oil-sediment residue literature to foster a robust exchange of ideas, which we believe can lead to the development of efficient strategies for managing oil spills that affect nearshore environments.

  2. Nearshore sediment thickness, Fire Island, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locker, Stanley D.; Miselis, Jennifer L.; Buster, Noreen A.; Hapke, Cheryl J.; Wadman, Heidi M.; McNinch, Jesse E.; Forde, Arnell S.; Stalk, Chelsea A.

    2017-04-03

    Investigations of coastal change at Fire Island, New York (N.Y.), sought to characterize sediment budgets and determine geologic framework controls on coastal processes. Nearshore sediment thickness is critical for assessing coastal system sediment availability, but it is largely unquantified due to the difficulty of conducting geological or geophysical surveys across the nearshore. This study used an amphibious vessel to acquire chirp subbottom profiles. These profiles were used to characterize nearshore geology and provide an assessment of nearshore sediment volume. Two resulting sediment-thickness maps are provided: total Holocene sediment thickness and the thickness of the active shoreface. The Holocene sediment section represents deposition above the maximum flooding surface that is related to the most recent marine transgression. The active shoreface section is the uppermost Holocene sediment, which is interpreted to represent the portion of the shoreface thought to contribute to present and future coastal behavior. The sediment distribution patterns correspond to previously defined zones of erosion, accretion, and stability along the island, demonstrating the importance of sediment availability in the coastal response to storms and seasonal variability. The eastern zone has a thin nearshore sediment thickness, except for an ebb-tidal deposit at the wilderness breach caused by Hurricane Sandy. Thicker sediment is found along a central zone that includes shoreface-attached sand ridges, which is consistent with a stable or accretional coastline in this area. The thickest overall Holocene section is found in the western zone of the study, where a thicker lower section of Holocene sediment appears related to the westward migration of Fire Island Inlet over several hundred years.

  3. Hydrothermal influence on nearshore sediments of Kos Island, Aegean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megalovasilis, Pavlos; Godelitsas, Athanasios

    2015-04-01

    The Kos-Nisyros volcanic centre is a long-active, Plio-Pleistocene magmatic system in the subduction zone along the easternmost edge of the active Hellenic volcanic arc in the Aegean Sea. Although today there are signs of relative quiescence in volcanic activity, active onshore fumaroles and shallow-sea hydrothermal vents persist on, amongst others, the island of Kos. The present study explores the large-scale imprint of hydrothermally sourced heavy metals and nutrients on the island's coastal marine environment, based on geochemical data collected in September 2007 from hydrothermal waters and surficial nearshore sediments (measurement period on 15-16 September 2007. Confirming earlier work, hydrothermal waters had higher levels of F, Ca and Sr, and lower levels of Na, Mg and SO4 compared with ambient seawater. Moreover, there was novel evidence of strong, widespread Zn and also Mn enhancement. Cluster and factor analyses of surficial sediment data from the Bros Thermi vents (fine (mud) fractions, metallic sulphide deposits of hydrothermal origin at depth beneath Kos.

  4. Physical and elastic properties of marine sediments off Bombay, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    SubbaRaju, L.V.; Ramana, Y.V.

    Keeping in view the paucity of information as to the nature of the marine sediments from the continental shelf adjoining the Indian subcontinent, a number of shallow seismic surveys were carried out, nearshore and offshore Bombay between 18 degrees...

  5. California coast nearshore processes study. [nearshore currents, sediment transport, estuaries, and river discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirie, D. M.; Steller, D. D. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Large scale sediment plumes from intermittent streams and rivers form detectable seasonal patterns on ERTS-1 imagery. The ocean current systems, as plotted from three California coast ERTS mosaics, were identified. Offshore patterns of sediment in areas such as the Santa Barbara Channel are traceable. These patterns extend offshore to heretofore unanticipated ranges as shown on the ERTS-1 imagery. Flying spot scanner enhancements of NASA tapes resulted in details of subtle and often invisible (to the eye) nearshore features. The suspended sediments off San Francisco and in Monterey Bay are emphasized in detail. These are areas of extremely changeable offshore sediment transport patterns. Computer generated contouring of radiance levels resulted in maps that can be used in determining surface and nearsurface suspended sediment distribution. Tentative calibrations of ERTS-1 spectral brightness against sediment load have been made using shipboard measurements. Information from the combined enhancement and interpretation techniques is applicable to operational coastal engineering programs.

  6. Chemistry of marine sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yen, T.F.

    1977-01-01

    Some topics considered are as follows: characterization of sediments in the vicinity of offshore petroleum production; thermal alteration experiments on organic matter in recent marine sediments as a model for petroleum genesis; composition of polluted bottom sediments in Great Lakes harbors; distribution of heavy metals in sediment fractions; recent deposition of lead off the coast of southern California; release of trace constituents from sediments resuspended during dredging operations; and migration of chemical constituents in sediment-seawater interfaces

  7. Increased sediment load during a large-scale dam removal changes nearshore subtidal communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Stephen P.; Miller, Ian M.; Foley, Melissa M.; Berry, Helen D.; Duda, Jeffrey J.; Hudson, Benjamin; Elder, Nancy E.; Beirne, Matthew M.; Warrick, Jonathan; McHenry, Michael L.; Stevens, Andrew; Eidam, Emily; Ogston, Andrea; Gelfenbaum, Guy R.; Pedersen, Rob

    2017-01-01

    The coastal marine ecosystem near the Elwha River was altered by a massive sediment influx—over 10 million tonnes—during the staged three-year removal of two hydropower dams. We used time series of bathymetry, substrate grain size, remotely sensed turbidity, scuba dive surveys, and towed video observations collected before and during dam removal to assess responses of the nearshore subtidal community (3 m to 17 m depth). Biological changes were primarily driven by sediment deposition and elevated suspended sediment concentrations. Macroalgae, predominantly kelp and foliose red algae, were abundant before dam removal with combined cover levels greater than 50%. Where persistent sediment deposits formed, macroalgae decreased greatly or were eliminated. In areas lacking deposition, macroalgae cover decreased inversely to suspended sediment concentration, suggesting impacts from light reduction or scour. Densities of most invertebrate and fish taxa decreased in areas with persistent sediment deposition; however, bivalve densities increased where mud deposited over sand, and flatfish and Pacific sand lance densities increased where sand deposited over gravel. In areas without sediment deposition, most invertebrate and fish taxa were unaffected by increased suspended sediment or the loss of algae cover associated with it; however, densities of tubeworms and flatfish, and primary cover of sessile invertebrates increased suggesting benefits of increased particulate matter or relaxed competition with macroalgae for space. As dam removal neared completion, we saw evidence of macroalgal recovery that likely owed to water column clearing, indicating that long-term recovery from dam removal effects may be starting. Our results are relevant to future dam removal projects in coastal areas and more generally to understanding effects of increased sedimentation on nearshore subtidal benthic communities.

  8. Increased sediment load during a large-scale dam removal changes nearshore subtidal communities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen P Rubin

    Full Text Available The coastal marine ecosystem near the Elwha River was altered by a massive sediment influx-over 10 million tonnes-during the staged three-year removal of two hydropower dams. We used time series of bathymetry, substrate grain size, remotely sensed turbidity, scuba dive surveys, and towed video observations collected before and during dam removal to assess responses of the nearshore subtidal community (3 m to 17 m depth. Biological changes were primarily driven by sediment deposition and elevated suspended sediment concentrations. Macroalgae, predominantly kelp and foliose red algae, were abundant before dam removal with combined cover levels greater than 50%. Where persistent sediment deposits formed, macroalgae decreased greatly or were eliminated. In areas lacking deposition, macroalgae cover decreased inversely to suspended sediment concentration, suggesting impacts from light reduction or scour. Densities of most invertebrate and fish taxa decreased in areas with persistent sediment deposition; however, bivalve densities increased where mud deposited over sand, and flatfish and Pacific sand lance densities increased where sand deposited over gravel. In areas without sediment deposition, most invertebrate and fish taxa were unaffected by increased suspended sediment or the loss of algae cover associated with it; however, densities of tubeworms and flatfish, and primary cover of sessile invertebrates increased suggesting benefits of increased particulate matter or relaxed competition with macroalgae for space. As dam removal neared completion, we saw evidence of macroalgal recovery that likely owed to water column clearing, indicating that long-term recovery from dam removal effects may be starting. Our results are relevant to future dam removal projects in coastal areas and more generally to understanding effects of increased sedimentation on nearshore subtidal benthic communities.

  9. Predominant Nearshore Sediment Dispersal Patterns in Manila Bay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Siringan

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available Net nearshore sediment drift patterns in Manila Bay were determined by combining the coastal geomorphology depicted in 1 : 50,000scale topographic maps and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR images, with changes in shoreline position and predominant longshore current directions derived from the interaction of locally generated waves and bay morphology.Manila Bay is fringed by a variety of coastal subenvironments that reflect changing balances of fluvial, wave, and tidal processes. Along the northern coast, a broad tidal-river delta plain stretching from Bataan to Bulacan indicates the importance of tides, where the lateral extent of tidal influences is amplified by the very gentle coastal gradients. In contrast, along the Cavite coast sandy strandplains, spits, and wave-dominated deltas attest to the geomorphic importance of waves that enter the bay from the South China Sea.The estimates of net sediment drift derived from geomorphological, shoreline-change, and meteorological information are generally in good agreement. Sediment drift directions are predominantly to the northeast along Cavite, to the northwest along Manila and Bulacan, and to the north along Bataan. Wave refraction and eddy formation at the tip of the Cavite Spit cause southwestward sediment drift along the coast from Zapote to Kawit. Geomorphology indicates that onshore-offshore sediment transport is probably more important than alongshore transport along the coast fronting the tidal delta plain of northern Manila Bay. Disagreements between the geomorphic-derived and predicted net sediment drift directions may be due to interactions of wave-generated longshore currents with wind- and tide-generated currents.

  10. Nearshore morphology and late Quaternary geologic framework of the northern Monterey Bay Marine Sanctuary, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anima, R.J.; Eittreim, S.L.; Edwards, B.D.; Stevenson, A.J.

    2002-01-01

    A combination of side-scanning sonar and high-resolution seismic reflection data image seafloor bedrock exposures and erosional features across the nearshore shelf. Sediment-filled troughs incise the inner shelf rock exposures and tie directly to modern coastal streams. The resulting bedrock geometry can be related to its resistance to erosion. Comparison of the depth of the transgressive erosional surface to recently developed sea level curves suggests a period of slow sea level rise during the early stages of post-interglacial marine transgression. The slow rise of sea level suggests an erosional episode that limited the preservation of buried paleo-channels beyond 70 m water depth. Seafloor features suggest that localized faulting in the area may have influenced the morphology of bedrock exposures and the coastline. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Experimental study of sediment fluxes on Barcelona's nearshore

    OpenAIRE

    Armengou Gallardo, Carla

    2011-01-01

    The presence of suspended sediment in marine waters has several impacts, such as a degradation of the coastal ecosystem, pollution or a damaging effect on the tourism-oriented economies. FIELD_AC is a European project that aims to provide an improved operational service for coastal areas and generate added value for GMES predictions. This is achieved by the analysis of field cases. In this context, this minor thesis is based on the study of the information obtained in a field campaign car...

  12. Massive marine methane emissions from near-shore shallow coastal areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Alberto V; Champenois, Willy; Gypens, Nathalie; Delille, Bruno; Harlay, Jérôme

    2016-06-10

    Methane is the second most important greenhouse gas contributing to climate warming. The open ocean is a minor source of methane to the atmosphere. We report intense methane emissions from the near-shore southern region of the North Sea characterized by the presence of extensive areas with gassy sediments. The average flux intensities (~130 μmol m(-2) d(-1)) are one order of magnitude higher than values characteristic of continental shelves (~30 μmol m(-2) d(-1)) and three orders of magnitude higher than values characteristic of the open ocean (~0.4 μmol m(-2) d(-1)). The high methane concentrations (up to 1,128 nmol L(-1)) that sustain these fluxes are related to the shallow and well-mixed water column that allows an efficient transfer of methane from the seafloor to surface waters. This differs from deeper and stratified seep areas where there is a large decrease of methane between bottom and surface by microbial oxidation or physical transport. Shallow well-mixed continental shelves represent about 33% of the total continental shelf area, so that marine coastal methane emissions are probably under-estimated. Near-shore and shallow seep areas are hot spots of methane emission, and our data also suggest that emissions could increase in response to warming of surface waters.

  13. Marine palynology and its use for studying nearshore environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vernal, A de

    2009-01-01

    Palynology is the study of microfossils composed of highly resistant organic matter called palynomorphs. In the sediments of neritic environments, palynomorphs may include cysts of dinoflagellates, phycoma of prasinophytes, organic linings of benthic foraminifers and thecamoebians, in addition to inputs from the terrestrial vegetation (pollen grains and spores) or the freshwater biota (chlorococcales). Marine palynology is thus used for characterizing the type of sedimentary environment, identifying the source of organic matter in the sediment, and weighting the relative importance of fluvial and pelagic inputs. Among marine palynomorphs, dinoflagellate cysts or dinocysts usually dominate the assemblages. Dinocysts comprise phototrophic and heterotrophic taxa and occur in almost all aquatic environments. Along the continental margins, assemblages are usually characterized by high species diversity and cyst concentrations reaching up to 10 5 cysts cm -3 . The distribution of dinocyst assemblages in sediments shows latitudinal patterns in addition to onshore to offshore gradients. Multivariate analyses illustrate close relationships between dinocyst assemblages and sea-surface parameters such as sea-ice cover, salinity, temperature, seasonality and productivity. Transfer functions developed from dinocysts permit the reconstruction of sea-surface temperature and salinity and the evaluation of past productivity, with applications dealing with climate changes and eutrophication. Dinocysts are also used for the study of harmful algal blooms since a few taxa relate to toxic species.

  14. Marine palynology and its use for studying nearshore environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vernal, A de [GEOTOP, Universite du Quebec a Montreal, PO Box 8888, succursale ' centre ville' Montreal, Qc, H3C 3P8 (Canada)], E-mail: devernal.anne@uqam.ca

    2009-01-01

    Palynology is the study of microfossils composed of highly resistant organic matter called palynomorphs. In the sediments of neritic environments, palynomorphs may include cysts of dinoflagellates, phycoma of prasinophytes, organic linings of benthic foraminifers and thecamoebians, in addition to inputs from the terrestrial vegetation (pollen grains and spores) or the freshwater biota (chlorococcales). Marine palynology is thus used for characterizing the type of sedimentary environment, identifying the source of organic matter in the sediment, and weighting the relative importance of fluvial and pelagic inputs. Among marine palynomorphs, dinoflagellate cysts or dinocysts usually dominate the assemblages. Dinocysts comprise phototrophic and heterotrophic taxa and occur in almost all aquatic environments. Along the continental margins, assemblages are usually characterized by high species diversity and cyst concentrations reaching up to 10{sup 5} cysts cm{sup -3}. The distribution of dinocyst assemblages in sediments shows latitudinal patterns in addition to onshore to offshore gradients. Multivariate analyses illustrate close relationships between dinocyst assemblages and sea-surface parameters such as sea-ice cover, salinity, temperature, seasonality and productivity. Transfer functions developed from dinocysts permit the reconstruction of sea-surface temperature and salinity and the evaluation of past productivity, with applications dealing with climate changes and eutrophication. Dinocysts are also used for the study of harmful algal blooms since a few taxa relate to toxic species.

  15. Nearshore Carbon and Sediment Dynamics of an Eroding Permafrost Coast: Herschel Island, Yukon Territory, Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Radosavljevic, Boris; Lantuit, Hugues; Fritz, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The study presented herein seeks to determine the fate of sediment and carbon supplied into the nearshore zone by coastal erosion and thermokarst in permafrost landscapes. To accomplish this, the sediment and carbon sources and sinks will be identified and quantified using remotely sensed imagery, bathymetric and sidescan surveys, shallow seismic profiles, and the interpretation of sediment cores. Coastal dynamics on arctic coasts are characterized by a seasonal dichotomy. Sea ice and land...

  16. Report on data from the Nearshore Sediment Transport Study experiment at Leadbetter Beach, Santa Barbara, California, January-February 1980 (NODC Accession 8200080)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — THIS DATA SET CONSISTS OF THE RESULTS OF THE NEARSHORE SEDIMENT Nearshore Sediment Transport Study at Leadbetter Beach, Santa Barbara, California. These data from 28...

  17. Marine geology and bathymetry of nearshore shelf of Chukchi Sea, Ogotoruk Creek area, northwest Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholl, D. W.; Sainsbury, C.L.

    1960-01-01

    During July and August 1958 the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a study in behalf of the Atomic Energy Commission of the oceanography, bathymetry, and marine geology of the nearshore shelf of the Chukchi Sea off the Ogotoruk Creek area, northwest Alaska. Ogotoruk Creek enters the Chukchi Sea about 32 miles southeast of the large cuapate spit of Point Hope at long 165 degrees 4446 W. and lat 68 degrees 0551 N. The Ogotoruk Creek area extends approximately 10 miles west and 7 miles east of the creek mouth. Knowledge of the marine geology and oceanography is confined primarily to the nearshore shelf, which includes about 70 square miles of the shelf and is defined as the sea floor lying shoreward of the 50-foot submarine contour. The 50-foot contour generally lies from 2 to 4 miles from shore. Submarine topography was studied to a distance of 15 miles from shore over an area of approximately 340 square miles. A northwest coastal current flows past the Ogotoruk Creek area and during July and August averaged 0.5 mile per hour. Persistent northerly winds cause general upwelling near shore and at times of pronounced upwelling the coastal current was reversed or appreciably reduced in speed. Longshore currents shoreward of the breaker zone averaged 0.3 mile per hour and moved to the east for the greater part of the time of the study. The overall seaward slope of the inner 15 miles of the Chukchi shelf from a depth of 40 to 135 feet is approximately 0 degrees 04, or about 6 feet per mile. Slopes near shore to depths of 15-20 feet are steep and average 2 degrees 30. Beyond these depths they increase gradually out to a depth of 40-45 feet. Seaward of this point the shelf is flattest and slopes are as low as 0 degree 01. This terrace or flat part of the nearshore shelf is about 2 miles wide and descends to a depth of 50-55 feet beyond which the gradient increases to about 0 degree 06. At depths greater than 85 feet the submarine declivity gradually decreases to 0 degree 03 at

  18. Sources and sinks of microplastics in Canadian Lake Ontario nearshore, tributary and beach sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballent, Anika; Corcoran, Patricia L; Madden, Odile; Helm, Paul A; Longstaffe, Fred J

    2016-09-15

    Microplastics contamination of Lake Ontario sediments is investigated with the aim of identifying distribution patterns and hotspots in nearshore, tributary and beach depositional environments. Microplastics are concentrated in nearshore sediments in the vicinity of urban and industrial regions. In Humber Bay and Toronto Harbour microplastic concentrations were consistently >500 particles per kg dry sediment. Maximum concentrations of ~28,000 particles per kg dry sediment were determined in Etobicoke Creek. The microplastic particles were primarily fibres and fragments microplastics in terms of how and where to implement preventative measures to reduce the contaminant influx. Although the impacts of microplastics contamination on ecosystem health and functioning is uncertain, understanding, monitoring and preventing further microplastics contamination in Lake Ontario and the other Great Lakes is crucial. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Nearshore marine benthic invertebrates moving north along the U.S. Atlantic coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numerous species have shifted their ranges north in response to global warming. We examined 21 years (1990-2010) of marine benthic invertebrate data from the National Coastal Assessment’s monitoring of nearshore waters along the US Atlantic coast. Data came from three bioge...

  20. Abiotic proxies for predictive mapping of nearshore benthic assemblages: implications for marine spatial planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHenry, Jennifer; Steneck, Robert S; Brady, Damian C

    2017-03-01

    Marine spatial planning (MSP) should assist managers in guiding human activities toward sustainable practices and in minimizing user conflicts in our oceans. A necessary first step is to quantify spatial patterns of marine assemblages in order to understand the ecosystem's structure, function, and services. However, the large spatial scale, high economic value, and density of human activities in nearshore habitats often makes quantifying this component of marine ecosystems especially daunting. To address this challenge, we developed an assessment method that employs abiotic proxies to rapidly characterize marine assemblages in nearshore benthic environments with relatively high resolution. We evaluated this assessment method along 300 km of the State of Maine's coastal shelf (GIS layers for abiotic conditions allowed us to scale up important assemblage attributes to define key foundational ecological principles of MSP and to find priority regions where some bottom-disturbing activities would have minimal impact to benthic assemblages. We conclude that abiotic proxies can be strong forcing functions for the assembly of marine communities and therefore useful tools for spatial extrapolations of marine assemblages in congested (heavily used) nearshore habitats. © 2016 by the Ecological Society of America.

  1. World wide intercomparison of trace element measurements in marine sediments SD-M-2/TM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mee, L.D.; Oregioni, B.

    1991-09-01

    The accurate and precise determination of trace elements in marine sediments is an important aspect of geochemical studies of the marine environment and for assessing the levels and pathways of marine pollutants. Past intercomparison studies conducted by the Marine Environment Laboratory of IAEA (formerly the International Laboratory of Marine Radioactivity) have focussed upon near-shore marine sediments where trace metal contamination is frequently observed. The present exercise was designed to study a typical oxidised deep-sea sediment characterized by a preponderance of fine particle clays. Analysis of such material is a routine matter for most geochemists but represents a ''baseline sample'' for marine pollution chemists. The present exercise represented a unique opportunity for chemists worldwide to intercompare their analytical methodologies for deep-sea sediments. By statistically examining the data from this study, the material can be certified for future use as a reference material - apparently the only one of its kind available throughout the world. 6 refs, figs and tabs

  2. Riverine dominance of a nearshore marine demersal food web ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to determine (i) the importance of riverine and marine organic matter for the Thukela Bank food web; and (ii) whether there are seasonal changes in the Thukela River stable isotope values, and, if so, whether these are reflected in the isotope values of demersal organisms. Estuarine organic matter ...

  3. Data Summary for the Near-Shore Sediment Characterization Task of the Clinch River Environmental Restoration Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levine, D.A.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of the Near-Shore Sediment Characterization Task of the Clinch River Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) was to quantify potential human health risks associated with Department of Energy (DOE)-related contamination of surface sediments in Watts Bar Reservoir (WBR). An estimated 700 Ci of 137 Cs and 325 Ci of 60 Co were released from White Oak Lake into the Clinch River between 1949 and 1992 (DOE, 1988). A number of previous studies have documented sediment contamination in the deep-water sediments but no study specifically targeted the near-shore environment, which has the most potential for exposure to humans

  4. Landing Marine-derived Renewable Energy: Optimising Power Cable Routing in the Nearshore Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Rosalind, ,, Dr.; Keane, Tom; Mullins, Brian; Phipps, Peter

    2010-05-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated that a vast unexploited source of energy can be derived from the marine environment. Recent evolution of the energy market and looming EU renewable energy uptake targets for 2020 have driven a huge explosion of interest in exploiting this resource, triggering both governments and industry to move forward in undertaking feasibility assessments and demonstration projects for wave, tidal and offshore wind farms across coastlines. The locations which naturally lend themselves to high yield energy capture, are by definition, exposed and may be remote, located far from the end user of the electricity generated. A fundamental constraint to successfully exploiting these resources will be whether electricity generated in high energy, variable and constantly evolving environments can be brought safely and reliably to shore without the need for constant monitoring and maintenance of the subsea cables and landfall sites. In the case of riverine cable crossings superficial sediments would typically be used to trench and bury the cable. High energy coastal environments may be stripped of soft sediments. Any superficial sediments present at the site may be highly mobile and subject to re-suspension throughout the tidal cycle or under stormy conditions. EirGrid Plc. and Mott MacDonald Ireland Ltd. have been investigating the potential for routing a cable across the exposed Shannon estuary in Ireland. Information regarding the geological ground model, meteo-oceanographic and archaeological conditions of the proposed site was limited, necessitating a clear investigation strategy. The investigation included gathering site information on currents, bathymetry and geology through desk studies, hydrographic and geophysical surveys, an intrusive ground investigation and coastal erosion assessments at the landfall sites. The study identified a number of difficulties for trenching and protecting a cable through an exposed environment such as the Shannon

  5. Pb-210 and Pu-239,240 in nearshore Gulf of Mexico sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotter, R.J.

    1985-05-01

    Pb-210, Ra-226, and Pu-239,240 activities were measured in nearshore Gulf of Mexico sediments. Sediment cores were collected from the Mississippi delta, and the western Gulf of Mexico shelf. Mississippi delta cores which exhibit significantly higher sedimentation rates show larger inventories of Pb-210. The measured Pu levels from the western shelf are lower than from the delta at comparable depths. In three of the western shelf cores, the observed Pu inventory is considerably less than predicted from atmospheric flux. Therefore, Pu is not being removed to the sediment, or is being released following deposition. A key difference between these isotopes is that Pu exists in a less particle-reactive state. The ratio of excess Pb-210 to Pu levels increases with water depth in the delta and the western shelf. Water depth acts as an integrator of depth-sensitive processes. Pu scavenging is more sensitive to these processes. A sub-surface Pu maximum has been observed. Excess Pb-210 and Pu levels correlate well with sedimentation rates. This suggests that particle flux is important in removal of Pb-210 and Pu to the sediment. The flux of Mn out of the sediment is correlated with inventory data, suggesting that redox cycling of Mn may play a role in increasing Pb-210 and Pu sediment inventories. It is unclear whether the effects of increased sedimentation rates and increased Mn fluxes can be evaluated independently. Mixing of surface sediment correlates with inventory data. Increased sediment mixing allows for additional scavenging of Pb-210 and Pu from overlying waters. Mixing of sediment at depths below the mixed surface layer may play a role in increasing sediment inventories of Pb-210 and Pu

  6. The Influence of Submarine Groundwater Discharge on Nearshore Marine Dissolved Organic Carbon Reactivity, Concentration Dynamics, and Offshore Export

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodridge, B.

    2017-12-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is the largest pool of reduced carbon in the oceans, with a reservoir equivalent to atmospheric CO2. In nearshore marine regions, DOC sources include primary production, terrestrial DOC delivered by river discharge, and/or terrestrial and marine DOC delivered via submarine groundwater discharge (SGD). While the importance of SGD to coastal carbon cycling has been implicated, the actual influence of this process on nearshore carbon dynamics and offshore export has not been explicitly identified. This study, conducted at a predominantly marine-influenced intertidal beach-nearshore ocean system along the Santa Barbara, California coastline, aimed to address this knowledge gap. I coupled dark, temperature-controlled laboratory incubations, radioisotopic (Rn-222) SGD estimates, and a DOC box model to identify the influence of pore water mixing with seawater on nearshore DOC reactivity, concentration dynamics, and offshore export. Even with a relatively low volumetric contribution, SGD pore water mixing altered nearshore DOC reactivity, and elevated the nearshore DOC concentration by 0.9 to 5.6 µmol L-1 over nearshore seawater residence times ranging from 1 to 6 days. These elevated DOC concentrations were equivalent to 1.2 to 7.5% of the mean offshore DOC concentration taken during the summer months in the Santa Barbara Channel, when the coastal water column is highly thermally stratified. Despite the challenge of assessing carbon dynamics in physically and biogeochemically complex nearshore marine regions, this study demonstrates the need for future investigations to assess and account for SGD as a non-trivial component of coastal marine carbon cycles.

  7. Data summary for the near-shore sediment characterization task of the Clinch River Environmental Restoration Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levine, D.A.; Hargrove, W.W.; Campbell, K.R.; Wood, M.A.; Rash, C.D.

    1994-10-01

    This report presents the results of the Near-Shore Sediment Characterization Task of the Clinch River Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP). The goals of the task were to (1) determine the extent to which near-shore surface sediments are contaminated by releases from the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and (2) provide data for the Watts Bar Reservoir Interagency Permitting Group (WBRIPG) to evaluate the human health risks from exposure to sediments during and following dredging operations. The data collected for this task are also to be used in the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RLTS) for the CR-ERP operable units (Lower Watts Bar and Clinch River) to characterize the human health risk associated with exposure to near-shore sediments throughout the Watts Bar Reservoir

  8. Effects of Changing Weather, Oceanographic Conditions, and Land Uses on Spatio-Temporal Variation of Sedimentation Dynamics along Near-Shore Coral Reefs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abimarie Otaño-Cruz

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Sedimentation is a critical threat to coral reefs worldwide. Major land use alteration at steep, highly erodible semi-arid islands accelerates the potential of soil erosion, runoff, and sedimentation stress to nearshore coral reefs during extreme rainfall events. The goal of this study was to assess spatio-temporal variation of sedimentation dynamics across nearshore coral reefs as a function of land use patterns, weather and oceanographic dynamics, to identify marine ecosystem conservation strategies. Sediment was collected at a distance gradient from shore at Bahia Tamarindo (BTA and Punta Soldado (PSO coral reefs at Culebra Island, Puerto Rico. Sediment texture and composition were analyzed by dry sieving and loss-on-ignition techniques, and were contrasted with environmental variables for the research period (February 2014 to April 2015. Rainfall and oceanographic data were analyzed to address their potential role on affecting sediment distribution with BEST BIO-ENV, RELATE correlation, and linear regression analysis. A significant difference in sedimentation rate was observed by time and distance from shore (PERMANOVA, p < 0.0100, mostly attributed to higher sediment exposure at reef zones closer to shore due to strong relationships with coastal runoff. Sedimentation rate positively correlated with strong rainfall events (Rho = 0.301, p = 0.0400 associated with storms and rainfall intensity exceeding 15 mm/h. At BTA, sediment deposited were mostly composed of sand, suggesting a potential influence of resuspension produced by waves and swells. In contrast, PSO sediments were mostly composed of silt-clay and terrigenous material, mainly attributed to a deforestation event that occurred at adjacent steep sub-watershed during the study period. Spatial and temporal variation of sedimentation pulses and terrigenous sediment input implies that coral reefs exposure to sediment stress is determined by local land use patterns, weather, and

  9. Terrestrial and marine trophic pathways support young-of-year growth in a nearshore Arctic fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Biela, Vanessa R.; Zimmerman, Christian E.; Cohn, Brian R.; Welker, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    River discharge supplies nearshore communities with a terrestrial carbon source that is often reflected in invertebrate and fish consumers. Recent studies in the Beaufort Sea have documented widespread terrestrial carbon use among invertebrates, but only limited use among nearshore fish consumers. Here, we examine the carbon source and diet of rapidly growing young-of-year Arctic cisco (Coregonus autumnalis) using stable isotope values (δ13C and δ15N) from muscle and diet analysis (stomach contents) during a critical and previously unsampled life stage. Stable isotope values (δ15N and δ13C) may differentiate between terrestrial and marine sources and integrate over longer time frames (weeks). Diet analysis provides species-specific information, but only from recent foraging (days). Average δ13C for all individuals was −25.7 ‰, with the smallest individuals possessing significantly depleted δ13C values indicative of a stronger reliance of terrestrial carbon sources as compared to larger individuals. Average δ15N for all individuals was 10.4 ‰, with little variation among individuals. As fish length increased, the proportion of offshore Calanus prey and neritic Mysis prey increased. Rapid young-of-year growth in Arctic cisco appears to use terrestrial carbon sources obtained by consuming a mixture of neritic and offshore zooplankton. Shifts in the magnitude or phenology of river discharge and the delivery of terrestrial carbon may alter the ecology of nearshore fish consumers.

  10. Nearshore waves and longshore sediment transport along Rameshwaram Island off the east coast of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajamanickam Gowthaman

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Wave-induced Longshore Sediment Transport (LST play an important role in the dynamics of the Dhanushkodi sandspit located southeast of Rameshwaram. The LST along the Dhanushkodi coast is studied based on data collected simultaneously in Gulf of Mannar (GoM and Palk Bay (PB using directional waverider buoys. The numerical model REF/DIF1 was used to calculate the nearshore waves and the LST rate was estimated using three different formulae. The model validation was done based on the measured nearshore waves using InterOcean S4DW. Numerical model LITPACK was also used for simulating non-cohesive sediment transport and the LITLINE module was used to study the shoreline evolution over 5 years. Low net annual LST along PB (~0.01 × 106 m3 compared to the GoM region (0.3 × 106 m3 were due to the weak waves. Accretion in the region led to growth of the Dhanushkodi sandspit by 65 m during the period 2010-2015.

  11. Radionuclide interactions with marine sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgo, J.J.W.

    1987-09-01

    A critical review of the literature on the subject of the interactions of radionuclides with marine sediments has been carried out. On the basis of the information available, an attempt has been made to give ranges and 'best estimates' for the distribution ratios between seawater and sediments. These estimates have been based on an understanding of the sediment seawater system and the porewater chemistry and mineralogy. Field measurements, laboratory measurements and estimates based on stable-element geochemical data are all taken into account. Laboratory measurements include distribution-ratio and diffusion-coefficient determinations. The elements reviewed are carbon, chlorine, calcium, nickel, selenium, strontium, zirconium, niobium, technetium, tin, iodine, caesium, lead, radium, actinium, thorium, protactinium, uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium and curium. (author)

  12. Distribution and sources of organic matter in size-fractionated nearshore sediments off the Barcelona city (NW Mediterranean)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirós-Collazos, Lucía; Pedrosa-Pàmies, Rut; Sanchez-Vidal, Anna; Guillén, Jorge; Duran, Ruth; Cabelloa, Patricia

    2017-04-01

    Continental shelves are recognized to play a key role in the biogeochemical cycle of carbon, linking terrestrial and marine carbon reservoirs. In this study we investigate the physical and biogeochemical processes that control the source, transport and fate of organic carbon (OC) in the continental shelf off Barcelona city, in the NW Mediterranean Sea. Surface sediment samples were collected from depths of 10-40 m during late summer and autumn 2012. Grain size and biogeochemical parameters such as OC, its stable isotope δ13C, total nitrogen (TN) and OC/TN ratios were analysed in size-fractionated sediments. The influence of environmental factors over the study area was determined using hydrological and oceanographic time series, together with video images of the Barcelona coast line and nearshore region. We have found a wide range of OC contents, from 0.13 to 8.68%, depending on water depth and sediment particle size. The highest OC concentration was always found in the clay fraction (63 μm) that contained terrestrial plant debris. Wave activity, discharge of the Besòs River and the "Espigó" de Ginebra; outfall were the main mechanisms controlling the sorting of sediments by their grain size and thus the distribution of OC in the inner shelf off Barcelona. In addition, we observed that the organic matter in clay particles was progressively degraded seawards, probably because these particles remain suspended in the water column much more time compared to those that are heavier and, therefore, they are exposed for longer time periods to oxygenated conditions. Both OC/TN ratios and δ13C values found suggest that the organic matter preserved was predominantly land supplied.

  13. Preliminary Nearshore Sedimentation Rate Analysis of the Tuungane Project Northern Mahale Conservation Area, Lake Tanganyika (Tanzania)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smiley, R. A.; McGlue, M. M.; Yeager, K. M.; Soreghan, M. J.; Lucas, J.; Kimirei, I.; Mbonde, A.; Limbu, P.; Apse, C.

    2017-12-01

    The combined effects of climate change, overfishing, and sediment pollution are altering Lake Tanganyika's littoral fisheries in profoundly negative ways. One method for conserving critical fish resources and safeguarding biodiversity in Lake Tanganyika is by establishing small-scale nearshore protected zones, which can be administrated by lakeshore villagers organized into beach management units (BMUs). Each BMU endeavors to manage offshore "no-catch" protected zones, prohibit the use of illegal fishing gear, and promote sustainable agriculture that abates erosion in the lake watershed, in order to mitigate sediment pollution in the lake. We adopted a limnogeological approach to assist in characterizing the littoral zone associated with BMUs in the northern Mahale region of Lake Tanganyika (Tanzania), a critical conservation area for the Nature Conservancy's Tuungane Project (https://www.nature.org/ourinitiatives/regions/africa/wherewework/tuungane-project.xml). We hypothesized that BMUs with heavy onshore agricultural activity would experience relatively high offshore sedimentation rates, due to enhanced sediment-laden runoff in the wet season. Such changes are predicted to alter benthic substrates and degrade habitat available for fish spawning. We mapped bathymetry and sediment types along a 29 km2 area of the littoral zone using high-resolution geophysical tools, and assessed short-term sedimentation rates using sediment cores and radionuclide geochronology (210Pb). Initial results from 210Pb analyses show that sedimentation rates at the mud-line ( 85-100 m water depth) are relatively slow but spatially variable in the northern Mahale area. Offshore of the Kalilani village BMU, linear sedimentation rates are 0.50 mm/yr. By contrast, sedimentation rates offshore from the Igualula village BMU are 0.90-1.30 mm/yr. Higher sedimentation rates near Igualula are consistent with greater sediment inputs from the nearby Lagosa River and its watershed, which has been

  14. Parameterization of Time-Averaged Suspended Sediment Concentration in the Nearshore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Doug Yoon

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available To quantify the effect of wave breaking turbulence on sediment transport in the nearshore, the vertical distribution of time-averaged suspended sediment concentration (SSC in the surf zone was parameterized in terms of the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE at different cross-shore locations, including the bar crest, bar trough, and inner surf zone. Using data from a large-scale laboratory experiment, a simple relationship was developed between the time-averaged SSC and the time-averaged TKE. The vertical variation of the time-averaged SSC was fitted to an equation analogous to the turbulent dissipation rate term. At the bar crest, the proposed equation was slightly modified to incorporate the effect of near-bed sediment processes and yielded reasonable agreement. This parameterization yielded the best agreement at the bar trough, with a coefficient of determination R2 ≥ 0.72 above the bottom boundary layer. The time-averaged SSC in the inner surf zone showed good agreement near the bed but poor agreement near the water surface, suggesting that there is a different sedimentation mechanism that controls the SSC in the inner surf zone.

  15. Oil in nearshore subtidal sediments of Saudi Arabia from the Gulf War spill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michel, J.; Hayes, M.O.; Keenan, R.S.; Jensen, J.R.; Narumalani, S.

    1993-01-01

    Detailed sedimentological and dynamic-process studies of the shallow, subtidal habitats of Dawhats ad Dafi and al Mussallamiyah and the bays at Tanaqib on the Saudi Arabian coast were carried out one year after the Gulf War oil spill. These studies were part of Leg II of the NOAA ship Mt. Mitchell cruise. Satellite imagery and space shuttle photography were used extensively to develop detailed study plans. Work accomplished during the study included deployment of three current meters, a tide gauge, and suspended sediment traps (at seven locations). Bathymetric surveys were conducted along 14 transects, and 197 bottom observation dives were carried out. More than 170 bottom sediment samples were collected for chemical and/or textural analysis. Sediment hydrocarbon screening by HPLC fluorescence was conducted on board to verify and refine the sampling plan. The results to date show no evidence of large-scale sinking of oil as a result of the spill. Subtidal oil, as sparse tar balls, was visually observed by divers at three locations, all of which were associated with the erosion of oiled sand from outer beaches. On-board chemical results showed that subtidal sediments have been contaminated at levels ranging from 20 to 2,000 mg petroleum hydrocarbons/kg, with the highest contamination up in the sheltered, muddy basins. However, the oil initially stranded in the intertidal zone does not appear to be accumulating in the nearshore subtidal region in significant quantities one year later

  16. Organic Geochemistry of Sediments in Nearshore Areas of the Mississippi and Atchafalaya Rivers: I. General Organic Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orem, William H.; Rosenbauer, Robert J.; Swarzenski, Peter W.; Lerch, Harry E.; Corum, Margo D.; Bates, Anne L.

    2007-01-01

    This report presents results on the general organic characteristics of sediment cores collected from the coastal zone of the Mississippi River system, including distributions of the important nutrient elements (C, N, P, and S). This was part of a larger study conducted from 2001-2005 to examine the delivery of sediment-associated contaminants to the Gulf of Mexico by the Mississippi River system, funded by the USGS Coastal and Marine Geology Program. Companion reports emphasize organic contaminants (Rosenbauer and others, 2006), and metals (Swarzenski and others, 2006). The level of contamination within the deltaic system of the Mississippi River system was determined through the collection of sediment cores from interdistributary bays, and offshore in the Gulf of Mexico, including the zone of hypoxia. Results provide the basis for reconstructing contaminant inventories from which to develop historic perspectives on nutrient loading and hypoxia, and to better understand how sediment-hosted contaminants either directly or indirectly move through biota and ultimately affect ecosystem health. Concentrations of C, N, P, and S in sediments varied by a factor of 10 between sites, and in down core profiles. Nearshore cores collected in 2001 proved to have erratic downcore C, N, P, and S profiles and sediment deposition rates, suggesting a high energy regime controlled more by variability in river flow rather than by geochemical processes and reactions within the system. These results focused further coring activities further offshore. Atomic C/N ratios suggest that organic matter deposited at all sites is a mix of microbial (algal) and terrestrial (vascular plant) remains, but with algal material dominant. Concentrations of total sulfur in sediments from cores in the zone of hypoxia were often higher than those in nearby zones with oxic water columns. Corresponding atomic C/S ratios were typically lower in sediments from sites in the zone of hypoxia compared to nearby

  17. Neutrophilic iron-oxidizing "zetaproteobacteria" and mild steel corrosion in nearshore marine environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBeth, Joyce M; Little, Brenda J; Ray, Richard I; Farrar, Katherine M; Emerson, David

    2011-02-01

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) of mild steel in seawater is an expensive and enduring problem. Little attention has been paid to the role of neutrophilic, lithotrophic, iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) in MIC. The goal of this study was to determine if marine FeOB related to Mariprofundus are involved in this process. To examine this, field incubations and laboratory microcosm experiments were conducted. Mild steel samples incubated in nearshore environments were colonized by marine FeOB, as evidenced by the presence of helical iron-encrusted stalks diagnostic of the FeOB Mariprofundus ferrooxydans, a member of the candidate class "Zetaproteobacteria." Furthermore, Mariprofundus-like cells were enriched from MIC biofilms. The presence of Zetaproteobacteria was confirmed using a Zetaproteobacteria-specific small-subunit (SSU) rRNA gene primer set to amplify sequences related to M. ferrooxydans from both enrichments and in situ samples of MIC biofilms. Temporal in situ incubation studies showed a qualitative increase in stalk distribution on mild steel, suggesting progressive colonization by stalk-forming FeOB. We also isolated a novel FeOB, designated Mariprofundus sp. strain GSB2, from an iron oxide mat in a salt marsh. Strain GSB2 enhanced uniform corrosion from mild steel in laboratory microcosm experiments conducted over 4 days. Iron concentrations (including precipitates) in the medium were used as a measure of corrosion. The corrosion in biotic samples (7.4 ± 0.1 mM) was significantly higher than that in abiotic controls (5.0 ± 0.1 mM). These results have important implications for the role of FeOB in corrosion of steel in nearshore and estuarine environments. In addition, this work shows that the global distribution of Zetaproteobacteria is far greater than previously thought.

  18. Trophic dynamics in marine nearshore systems of the Alaskan high arctic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunton, K.H.

    1985-01-01

    This dissertation describes two ecological studies in the arctic Alaskan nearshore zone: the productivity and growth strategies of arctic kelp and the use of natural carbon isotope abundances to examine food web structure and energy flow in the marine ecosystem. Linear growth of the kelp, Laminaria solidungula is greatest in winter and early spring when nutrients are available for new tissue growth. Since over 90% of this growth occurs in complete darkness beneath a turbid ice canopy, the plant draws on stored food reserves and is in a carbon deficit during the ice covered period. Annual productivity of L. solidungula under these conditions is about 6 g C m -2 compared to about 10 g c m -2 if light penetrates the ice canopy. Carbon isotope abundances were used to assess food web structure and energy flow in the Boulder Patch, an isolated kelp bed community, and in the Alaskan Beaufort Sea fauna. Isotopic analyses of the resident fauna of the Boulder Patch revealed that kelp carbon contributes significantly to the diet of many benthic animals, including suspension feeders. Across the shelf of the Alaskan Beaufort Sea, a distinct gradient in the isotopic composition of marine zooplankton and benthic fauna was related to the intrusion of the Bering Sea water and upwelling in the eastern Beaufort Sea near Barter Island. The 13 C depletion in fauna of the eastern Beaufort Sea is presumed due to the cycling of 13 C depleted inorganic carbon into the euphotic zone

  19. Dispersion of Sound in Marine Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    sound sources deployed in the SW06 experiment. The signal ranges were ~5 and ~7 km, and the data were received on the MPL vertical array moored at...1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Dispersion of Sound in Marine Sediments N. Ross...our understanding of the interaction of sound with the ocean bottom is the frequency dependence of sound speed and attenuation in marine sediments

  20. The Scientific and Societal Need for Accurate Global Remote Sensing of Marine Suspended Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acker, James G.

    2006-01-01

    Population pressure, commercial development, and climate change are expected to cause continuing alteration of the vital oceanic coastal zone environment. These pressures will influence both the geology and biology of the littoral, nearshore, and continental shelf regions. A pressing need for global observation of coastal change processes is an accurate remotely-sensed data product for marine suspended sediments. The concentration, delivery, transport, and deposition of sediments is strongly relevant to coastal primary production, inland and coastal hydrology, coastal erosion, and loss of fragile wetland and island habitats. Sediment transport and deposition is also related to anthropogenic activities including agriculture, fisheries, aquaculture, harbor and port commerce, and military operations. Because accurate estimation of marine suspended sediment concentrations requires advanced ocean optical analysis, a focused collaborative program of algorithm development and assessment is recommended, following the successful experience of data refinement for remotely-sensed global ocean chlorophyll concentrations.

  1. Acoustic and satellite remote sensing of shallow nearshore marine habitats in the Gwaii Haanas National Marine Conservation Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshitnyk, Luba Yvanka

    The ability to map nearshore habitat (i.e. submerged aquatic vegetation) is an integral component of marine conservation. The main goal of this thesis was to examine the ability of high resolution, multispectral satellite imagery and a single-beam acoustic ground discrimination system to map the location of marine habitats in Bag Harbour, found in the Gwaii Haanas National Marine Conservation Area Reserve. To meet this goal, two objectives were addressed: (1) Using the QTC View V sing-beam acoustic ground discrimination system, identify which frequency (50 kHz or 200 kHz) is best suited for mapping marine habitat; (2) evaluate the ability to map nearshore marine habitat using WorldView-2 high resolution, multispectral satellite imagery and compare the results of marine habitat maps derived from the acoustic and satellite datasets. Ground-truth data for both acoustic and satellite data were collected via towed underwater video camera on June 3rd and 4th, 2012. Acoustic data (50 and 200 kHz) were collected on June 23rd and 24 th, 2012, respectively. The results of this study are organized into two papers. The first paper focuses on objective 1 where the QTC View V single-beam acoustic ground discrimination system was used to map nearshore habitat at a site within the Gwaii Haanas National Marine Conservation Area using two survey frequencies -- 50 kHz and 200 kHz. The results show that the 200 kHz data outperformed the 50 kHz data set in both thematic and spatial accuracy. The 200 kHz dataset was able to identify two species of submerged aquatic vegetation, eelgrass ( Zostera marina) and a red algae (Chondrocanthus exasperatus ) while the 50 kHz dataset was only able to detect the distribution of eelgrass. The best overall accuracy achieved with the 200 kHz dataset was 86% for a habitat map with three classes (dense eelgrass, dense red algae and unvegetated substrate) compared to the 50 kHz habitat classification with two classes (dense eelgrass and unvegetated

  2. Temperature, productivity and sediment characteristics as drivers of seasonal and spatial variations of dissolved methane in the near-shore coastal areas (Belgian coastal zone, North Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Alberto V.; Speeckaert, Gaëlle; Champenois, Willy; Scranton, Mary I.; Gypens, Nathalie

    2017-04-01

    replete sediments. In the off-shore stations with permeable sediments with a low OM content, the seasonal cycle of dissolved CH4 concentration showed a yearly peak following the chlorophyll-a spring peak. This suggests that in these OM poor sediments, methanogenesis depended on the delivery to the sediments of freshly produced OM. In both types of sediments, the seasonal cycle of dissolved CH4 concentrations was unrelated the seasonal cycles of DMS, and DMSP, despite the fact that these quantities were very high during the spring Phaeocystis globosa bloom. This suggests that in this shallow coastal environment CH4 production is overwhelmingly related to benthic processes and unrelated to DMS(P) transformations in the water column as recently suggested in several open ocean regions. The annual average CH4 emission was 41 mmol m-2 yr-1 in the most near-shore stations ( 4 km from the coast) and 10 mmol m-2 yr-1 in the most off-shore stations ( 23 km from the coast), 410-100 times higher than the average value in the open ocean (0.1 mmol m-2 yr-1). The strong control of CH4 concentrations by sediment OM content and by temperature suggests that marine coastal CH4 emissions, in particular shallow coastal areas, should respond in future to eutrophication and warming of climate. This is confirmed by the comparison of CH4 concentrations at five stations obtained in March in years 1990 and 2016, showing a decreasing trend consistent with alleviation of eutrophication in the area.

  3. Spatio-temporal scaling effects on longshore sediment transport pattern along the nearshore zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorram, Saeed; Ergil, Mustafa

    2018-03-01

    A measure of uncertainties, entropy has been employed in such different applications as coastal engineering probability inferences. Entropy sediment transport integration theories present novel visions in coastal analyses/modeling the application and development of which are still far-reaching. Effort has been made in the present paper to propose a method that needs an entropy-power index for spatio-temporal patterns analyses. Results have shown that the index is suitable for marine/hydrological ecosystem components analyses based on a beach area case study. The method makes use of six Makran Coastal monthly data (1970-2015) and studies variables such as spatio-temporal patterns, LSTR (long-shore sediment transport rate), wind speed, and wave height all of which are time-dependent and play considerable roles in terrestrial coastal investigations; the mentioned variables show meaningful spatio-temporal variability most of the time, but explanation of their combined performance is not easy. Accordingly, the use of an entropy-power index can show considerable signals that facilitate the evaluation of water resources and will provide an insight regarding hydrological parameters' interactions at scales as large as beach areas. Results have revealed that an STDDPI (entropy based spatio-temporal disorder dynamics power index) can simulate wave, long-shore sediment transport rate, and wind when granulometry, concentration, and flow conditions vary.

  4. Potential Impacts of PCBs on Sediment Microbiomes in a Tropical Marine Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James S. Klaus

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Within the tropical marine study site of Guánica Bay, Puerto Rico, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs are subjected to coastal and oceanic currents coupled with marine microbial and geochemical processes. To evaluate these processes a hydrodynamic model was developed to simulate the transport of PCBs within nearshore and offshore marine areas of Guánica Bay. Material transport and circulation information from the model were matched with measurements from samples collected from within the bay. These samples, consisting of both intertidal and submerged sediments, were analyzed for physical characteristics (organic carbon, grain size, and mineralogy, microbial characteristics (target bacteria levels and microbial community analyses, presence of PCBs, and PCB-degrading enzymes. Results show that the bay geometry and bathymetry limit the mixing of the extremely high levels of PCBs observed in the eastern portion of the bay. Bay bottom sediments showed the highest levels of PCBs and these sediments were characterized by high organic carbon content and finer grain size. Detectable levels of PCBs were also observed within sediments found along the shore. Microbes from the bay bottom sediments showed a greater relative abundance of microbes from the Chloroflexi, phylum with close phylogenetic associations with known anaerobic PCB-degrading organisms. Based on quantitative PCR measurement of the biphenyl dioxygenase gene, the intertidal sediments showed the greatest potential for aerobic PCB degradation. These results elucidate particular mechanisms of PCB’s fate and transport in coastal, tropical marine environments.

  5. Coupling of fog and marine microbial content in the near-shore coastal environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. E. Dueker

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Microbes in the atmosphere (microbial aerosols play an important role in climate and provide an ecological and biogeochemical connection between oceanic, atmospheric, and terrestrial environments. However, the sources and environmental factors controlling the concentration, diversity, transport, and viability of microbial aerosols are poorly understood. This study examined culturable microbial aerosols from a coastal environment in Maine (USA and determined the effect of onshore wind speed and fog presence on deposition rate, source, and community composition. During fog events with low onshore winds (<2 m s−1 the near-shore deposition of microbial aerosols (microbial fallout decreased with increasing wind speeds, whereas microbial fallout rates under clear conditions and comparable low wind speeds showed no wind speed dependence. Mean aerosol particle size also increased with onshore wind speed when fog was present, indicating increased shoreward transport of larger aerosol particles. 16S rRNA sequencing of culturable ocean surface bacteria and microbial aerosols deposited onshore resulted in the detection of 31 bacterial genera, with 5 dominant genera (Vibrio, Bacillus, Pseudoalteromonas, Psychrobacter, Salinibacterium making up 66 % of all sequences. The sequence library from microbial aerosol isolates, as with libraries found in other coastal/marine aerosol studies, was dominated at the phylum level by Proteobacteria, with additional representation from Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes. Seventy-five percent of the culturable microbial aerosols falling out under foggy conditions were most similar to GenBank-published sequences detected in marine environments. Using a 97 % similarity cut-off, sequence libraries from ocean surface and fog isolates shared eight operational taxonomic units (OTU's in total, three of which were the most dominant OTU's in the library, representing large fractions of the ocean (28

  6. Sampling marine sediments for radionuclide monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papucci, C.

    1997-01-01

    A description of the most common devices used for sampling marine sediments are reported. The systems are compared to evidence their intrinsic usefulness, for collecting samples in different environmental conditions or with different scientific objectives. Perturbations and artifacts introduced during the various steps of the sampling procedure are also reviewed, and suggestions are proposed for obtaining and preserving, as much as possible, the representativeness of the sediment samples. (author)

  7. Charleston Harbor, SC, Regional Sediment Management Study; Beneficial Use of Dredged Material through Nearshore Placement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Beneficial Use of Dredged Material through Nearshore Placement Co as ta l a nd H yd ra ul ic s La bo ra to ry Layla R. Kashlan, Sara A. Brown, and...Management Study; Beneficial Use of Dredged Material through Nearshore Placement Layla R. Kashlan U.S. Army Engineer District, Wilmington P.O. Box...Entrance Channel from -47 feet (ft) mean lower low water (mllw) to -54 ft mllw. The dredged material is estimated to be 80% sand and does not meet

  8. Charleston Harbor, SC, Regional Sediment Management Study: Beneficial Use of Dredged Material through Nearshore Placement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Beneficial Use of Dredged Material through Nearshore Placement Co as ta l a nd H yd ra ul ic s La bo ra to ry Layla R. Kashlan, Sara A. Brown, and...Management Study; Beneficial Use of Dredged Material through Nearshore Placement Layla R. Kashlan U.S. Army Engineer District, Wilmington P.O. Box...Entrance Channel from -47 feet (ft) mean lower low water (mllw) to -54 ft mllw. The dredged material is estimated to be 80% sand and does not meet

  9. Evidence of bottom-up limitations in nearshore marine systems based on otolith proxies of fish growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Biela, Vanessa R.; Kruse, Gordon H.; Mueter, Franz J.; Black, Bryan A.; Douglas, David C.; Helser, Thomas E.; Zimmerman, Christian E.

    2015-01-01

    Fish otolith growth increments were used as indices of annual production at nine nearshore sites within the Alaska Coastal Current (downwelling region) and California Current (upwelling region) systems (~36–60°N). Black rockfish (Sebastes melanops) and kelp greenling (Hexagrammos decagrammus) were identified as useful indicators in pelagic and benthic nearshore food webs, respectively. To examine the support for bottom-up limitations, common oceanographic indices of production [sea surface temperature (SST), upwelling, and chlorophyll-a concentration] during summer (April–September) were compared to spatial and temporal differences in fish growth using linear mixed models. The relationship between pelagic black rockfish growth and SST was positive in the cooler Alaska Coastal Current and negative in the warmer California Current. These contrasting growth responses to SST among current systems are consistent with the optimal stability window hypothesis in which pelagic production is maximized at intermediate levels of water column stability. Increased growth rates of black rockfish were associated with higher chlorophyll concentrations in the California Current only, but black rockfish growth was unrelated to the upwelling index in either current system. Benthic kelp greenling growth rates were positively associated with warmer temperatures and relaxation of downwelling (upwelling index near zero) in the Alaska Coastal Current, while none of the oceanographic indices were related to their growth in the California Current. Overall, our results are consistent with bottom-up forcing of nearshore marine ecosystems—light and nutrients constrain primary production in pelagic food webs, and temperature constrains benthic food webs.

  10. Super(210) Pb based trace element fluxes in the nearshore and estuarine sediments off Bombay, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sharma, P.; Borole, D.V.; Zingde, M.D.

    , suggested that the majority of the anthropogenic metals were either exported beyond the creek and nearshore region thus making the THC a passive link between the land and the sea for trace metals or largely removed prior to their entering the THC proper...

  11. Design of a marine sediment trap and accessories

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Janakiraman, G.; Fernando, V.; Venkatesan, R.; Rajaraman, V.S.

    The marine sediment trap and the mooring accessories were developed indigenously and were used successfully for the collection of settling sediments in the Arabian Sea The experience gained in using sediment trap and further improvements...

  12. Mercury in dated Greenland marine sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmund, G.; Nielsen, S.P.

    2000-01-01

    Twenty marine sediment cores from Greenland were analysed for mercury, and dated by the lead-210 method. In general the cores exhibit a mercury profile with higher mercury concentrations in the upper centimetres of the core. The cores were studied by linear regression of In Hg vs, age...... of the sediment for the youngest 100 years. As a rule the mercury decreased with depth in the sediment with various degrees of significance. The increase of the mercury flux during the last 100 years is roughly a doubling. The increase may be of anthropogenic origin as it is restricted to the last 100 years....... In four cores the concentration of manganese was found also to increase in the top layers indicating diagenesis. In the other cases the higher concentrations were not accompanied by higher manganese concentrations. The mercury flux to the sediment surface was generally proportional to the Pb-210 flux...

  13. Uranium and plutonium in marine sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ordonez R, E.; Almazan T, M. G.; Ruiz F, A. C.

    2011-11-01

    The marine sediments contain uranium concentrations that are considered normal, since the seawater contains dissolved natural uranium that is deposited in the bed sea in form of sediments by physical-chemistry and bio-genetics processes. Since the natural uranium is constituted of several isotopes, the analysis of the isotopic relationship 234 U/ 238 U are an indicator of the oceanic activity that goes accumulating slowly leaving a historical registration of the marine events through the profile of the marine soil. But the uranium is not the only radioelement present in the marine sediments. In the most superficial strata the presence of the 239+140 Pu has been detected that it is an alpha emitter and that recently it has been detected with more frequency in some coasts of the world. The Mexican coast has not been the exception to this phenomenon and in this work the presence of 239-140 Pu is shown in the more superficial layers of an exploring coming from the Gulf of Tehuantepec. (Author)

  14. Evaluating spatial patterns of dioxins in sediments to aid determination of potential implications for marine reptiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermanussen, S.; Gaus, C. [National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology, Brisbane (Australia); Limpus, C.J. [Queensland Environmental Protection Agency, Brisbane (Australia); Paepke, O. [ERGO Forschungsgesellschaft mbH, Hamburg (Germany); Blanshard, W. [Sea World, Gold Coast (Australia); Connell, D. [School of Public Health, Griffith Univ., Brisbane (Australia)

    2004-09-15

    Recent investigations have identified elevated concentrations of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (dioxins) in marine sediments and wildlife of Queensland, Australia. While it has been demonstrated that the contamination is widespread and predominantly land-based, limited information exists on the pathways and fate of these compounds within the near-shore marine system. This environment supports unique and threatened species including green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas). Adult green turtles are predominantly herbivorous, feeding on seagrass and algae. Apart from initial migration to feeding grounds (at {proportional_to}10 years of age) and intermittent migrations to breeding grounds (at {proportional_to}30-50 years and thereafter), green turtles remain and feed within relatively small home ranges. Long life-span (50 years or more), near-shore feeding grounds and highly specialized food requirements render green turtles potentially vulnerable to contaminant exposure. Recent studies have shown a relationship between PCDD/F concentrations found in herbivorous marine wildlife and concentrations in sediments of their habitats. Hence, the spatial evaluation of sediment PCDD/F distribution may assist the assessment of green turtle exposure and its potential implications. The present study provides baseline information on green turtle PCDD/F concentrations in Queensland, Australia and investigates exposure pathways. In addition, spatial distribution of PCDD/Fs in sediments from known green turtle feeding regions is assessed using geographic information systems. This represents the first stage of a large scale investigation into the exposure and sensitivity of marine reptiles to dioxins and dioxin-like compounds and to evaluate whether poor health status observed in some populations may be related to contaminant exposure.

  15. Diversity, Persistence and Evolution in Marine Sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Starnawski, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    on the marine sediments communities was reviewed, it became apparent that there are some global trends in these populations ob- served in deep and shallow, organic rich and poor sediments. We have observed the same, often uncultured, organisms with very similar relative abundance profiles in reviewed sites....... In order to better understand this pattern we’ve reviewed the assembly processes that may lead to such situations, keeping in mind the limitations imposed by the environment.We’ve concluded, that due to low energy fluxes, and consequently low number of pos- sible cell divisions, selective survival of pre...

  16. Biodegradation of crude oil in different types of marine sediment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hii, Y.S.; Law, A.T.

    1999-01-01

    An active oil-oxidizing bacterium, named Nap C was isolated from the sediment sample of Port Dickson coastal area for this study. Nap C is a gram negative, rod shape marine bacterium. It forms spore when the condition is not favorable. Three different types of treated marine sediment; sand, silt and clay were used in this study. The degradation of Malaysian Tapis A crude oil in the different types of marine sediment were assessed. Silt type of marine sediment was found to sustain highest biodegradation compared to clay type and sand type. 8.6.67% of the Malaysian Tapis A crude oil was degraded in silt type of marine sediment within 10 days of incubation. Where as there were only 60% and 73% of the Malaysian Tapis A crude oil was degraded in sand and clay type of marine sediment respectively. Microbial biomass estimation in the sediment was estimated by indirect phospholipid enumeration technique. (author)

  17. Applying the Coastal and Marine Ecological Classification Standard (CMECS to Nearshore Habitats in the Northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Kingon

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Many countries have classification standards for their environmental resources including criteria for classifying coastal and marine ecosystems. Until 2012, the United States just had a nationwide protocol for classifying terrestrial and aquatic habitats with no national standard for marine and most coastal habitats. In 2012 the Coastal and Marine Ecological Classification Standard (CMECS was implemented to address this need. In the past, coastal and marine classifications were developed at the regional or local level. Since its inception, the CMECS has not been applied in many geographic areas. My study was one of the first to apply the CMECS to the benthic habitats in the nearshore Northeastern Gulf of Mexico. Sidescan sonar mapping and dive surveys were completed at 33 sites at depths 10–23 m. Hardbottom and sand habitats characterized the study area, and the underwater surveys revealed hard corals, sponges, and macroalgae as the dominant taxa on the hardbottom. The CMECS was applied to the overall study area rather than each individual site or groups of similar sites because habitat and environmental characteristics, primarily outside the context of the CMECS, appeared to influence the distribution of taxa across sites more than the CMECS geoform, substrate, and water column components. The CMECS worked well for classifying the entire study area, but was not adequate for classifying the complex fine-scale habitats and temporal variations observed; modifications to the CMECS could help resolve these issues.

  18. Characterization of marine sediments using analytical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Rosales, G.; Longoria-Gandara, L.C.

    2011-01-01

    This study deals with the characterization of a marine sediments profile from the Gulf of Tehuantepec, Mexico. Ten sediment samples obtained from a core of 18.3 m of length were analysed. Although there have been numerous marine sediments studies carried out in Mexico, more are needed to better understand the sea floor formation. Crystallographic, morphologic, physical, chemical and gamma ray activity analysis were carried out on the samples. The analysis results showed a decrease in organic matter content as a function of sea depth; this value is related to the specific surface area. Some hazardous materials as Cr, Mn, Ni, Sr and Hg were also identified by PIXE in some samples, probably due to anthropogenic activity. The presence of uranium a naturally occurring element was found in all the samples, suggesting a migration through all materials of strata, radioactive elements such as 226 Ra, 235 U, 212 Pb, 214 Pb, 228 Ac, 208 Ti, 214 Bi, 228 Ac and 40 K were detected. (author)

  19. The microbial control of phosphorus fluxes in marine sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenbergh, A.K.

    2012-01-01

    This thesis explores how microorganisms affect the release of the key nutrient phosphorus from marine sediments. A detailed understanding of the controls on regeneration of phosphorus from sediments is important because phosphorus availability in surface waters can regulate primary productivity.

  20. Copper isotope signatures in modern marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Susan H.; Vance, Derek; McManus, James; Severmann, Silke; Lyons, Timothy W.

    2017-09-01

    The development of metal stable isotopes as tools in paleoceanography requires a thorough understanding of their modern marine cycling. To date, no Cu isotope data has been published for modern sediments deposited under low oxygen conditions. We present data encompassing a broad spectrum of hydrographic and redox regimes, including continental margin and euxinic (sulphide-containing) settings. Taken together with previously published data from oxic settings, these data indicate that the modern oceanic sink for Cu has a surprisingly homogeneous isotopic composition of about +0.3‰ (δ65Cu, relative to NIST SRM976). We suggest that this signature reflects one of two specific water-column processes: (1) an equilibrium isotope fractionation between soluble, isotopically heavy, Cu complexed to strong organic ligands and an isotopically light pool sorbed to particles that deliver Cu to the sediment, or (2) an equilibrium isotope fractionation between the same isotopically heavy ligand-bound pool and the particle reactive free Cu2+ species, with the latter being scavenged by particulates and thereby delivered to the sediment. An output flux of about +0.3‰ into sediments is isotopically light relative to the known inputs to the ocean (at around +0.6‰) and the seawater value of +0.6 to +0.9‰, suggesting the presence of an as yet unidentified isotopically light source of Cu to the oceans. We hypothesize that this source may be hydrothermal, or may result from the partial dissolution of continentally derived particles.

  1. Sediment Burial Intolerance of Marine Macroinvertebrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicki J Hendrick

    Full Text Available The marine environment contains suspended particulate matter which originates from natural and anthropogenic sources. Settlement of this material can leave benthic organisms susceptible to smothering, especially if burial is sudden i.e. following storms or activities such as dredging. Their survival will depend on their tolerance to, and their ability to escape from burial. Here we present data from a multi-factorial experiment measuring burial responses incorporating duration, sediment fraction and depth. Six macroinvertebrates commonly found in sediment rich environments were selected for their commercial and/or conservation importance. Assessments revealed that the brittle star (Ophiura ophiura, the queen scallop (Aequipecten opercularis and the sea squirt (Ciona intestinalis were all highly intolerant to burial whilst the green urchin (Psammichinus miliaris and the anemone (Sagartiogeton laceratus, showed intermediate and low intolerance respectively, to burial. The least intolerant, with very high survival was the Ross worm (Sabellaria spinulosa. With the exception of C. intestinalis, increasing duration and depth of burial with finer sediment fractions resulted in increased mortality for all species assessed. For C. intestinalis depth of burial and sediment fraction were found to be inconsequential since there was complete mortality of all specimens buried for more than one day. When burial emergence was assessed O. ophiura emerged most frequently, followed by P. miliaris. The former emerged most frequently from the medium and fine sediments whereas P. miliaris emerged more frequently from coarse sediment. Both A. opercularis and S. laceratus showed similar emergence responses over time, with A. opercularis emerging more frequently under coarse sediments. The frequency of emergence of S. laceratus increased with progressively finer sediment and C. intestinalis did not emerge from burial irrespective of sediment fraction or depth. Finally

  2. Sediment Burial Intolerance of Marine Macroinvertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrick, Vicki J; Hutchison, Zoë L; Last, Kim S

    2016-01-01

    The marine environment contains suspended particulate matter which originates from natural and anthropogenic sources. Settlement of this material can leave benthic organisms susceptible to smothering, especially if burial is sudden i.e. following storms or activities such as dredging. Their survival will depend on their tolerance to, and their ability to escape from burial. Here we present data from a multi-factorial experiment measuring burial responses incorporating duration, sediment fraction and depth. Six macroinvertebrates commonly found in sediment rich environments were selected for their commercial and/or conservation importance. Assessments revealed that the brittle star (Ophiura ophiura), the queen scallop (Aequipecten opercularis) and the sea squirt (Ciona intestinalis) were all highly intolerant to burial whilst the green urchin (Psammichinus miliaris) and the anemone (Sagartiogeton laceratus), showed intermediate and low intolerance respectively, to burial. The least intolerant, with very high survival was the Ross worm (Sabellaria spinulosa). With the exception of C. intestinalis, increasing duration and depth of burial with finer sediment fractions resulted in increased mortality for all species assessed. For C. intestinalis depth of burial and sediment fraction were found to be inconsequential since there was complete mortality of all specimens buried for more than one day. When burial emergence was assessed O. ophiura emerged most frequently, followed by P. miliaris. The former emerged most frequently from the medium and fine sediments whereas P. miliaris emerged more frequently from coarse sediment. Both A. opercularis and S. laceratus showed similar emergence responses over time, with A. opercularis emerging more frequently under coarse sediments. The frequency of emergence of S. laceratus increased with progressively finer sediment and C. intestinalis did not emerge from burial irrespective of sediment fraction or depth. Finally, and perhaps

  3. Distribution and source of heavy metals in the surface sediments from the near-shore area, north Jiangsu Province, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Gang; Liu, Jian; Pei, Shaofeng; Kong, Xianghuai; Hu, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The sediment source controls the distribution of the heavy metals. • There is no Cu, Pb, Zn and As pollution instead of slight Cd pollution. • Cu, Pb and Zn are lithogenic while Cd and As are mixed in origin. • Cd in polluted stations showed obvious anthropogenic origin. - Abstract: Samples of surface sediment and vibrocore were collected in the near-shore area of north Jiangsu Province for grain size, elements, 210 Pb excess and 137 Cs analyses. In our study area, the diversity of metal concentration was controlled not by the grain size, but by the source. The element content of the old Yellow River Delta was used as baseline for our study area. Geoaccumulation indexes indicate that no station was polluted by Cu, Pb, Zn and As, but the I geo values of As were close to zero in some stations. Slight pollution caused by Cd was observed in some stations. Correlation and enrichment factors suggest that Cu, Pb and Zn are lithogenic in origin, while As and Cd are mixed in origin. Especially, in some polluted stations Cd was obviously anthropogenic in origin

  4. Trace metal levels in nearshore sediments close to industrial discharges off Cuddalore (Bay of Bengal)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Joseph, T.; Balachandran, K.K.; Nair, M.; Das, V.K.; Nair, K.K.C.; Paimpillii, J.S.

    Trace metals in the sediment and in the overlying water column along with texture characteristics in the vicinity of industrial discharges at Cuddallore were analyzed, covering the seasonal changes to identify probable anthropogenic influence...

  5. Nearshore waves and longshore sediment transport along Rameshwaram Island off the east coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gowthaman, R.; SanilKumar, V.; Dwarakish, G.S.; Shanas, P.R.; Jena, B.K.; Singh, J.

    Wave-induced Longshore Sediment Transport (LST) play an important role in the dynamics of the Dhanushkodi sandspit located southeast of Rameshwaram. The LST along the Dhanushkodi coast is studied based on data collected simultaneously in Gulf...

  6. Impacts of Cyclone Yasi on nearshore, terrigenous sediment-dominated reefs of the central Great Barrier Reef, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, C. T.; Smithers, S. G.; Kench, P. S.; Pears, B.

    2014-10-01

    Tropical Cyclone (TC) Yasi (Category 5) was a large (~ 700 km across) cyclone that crossed Australia's Queensland coast on the 3rd of February 2011. TC Yasi was one of the region's most powerful recorded cyclones, with winds gusting to 290 km/h and wave heights exceeding 7 m. Here we describe the impacts of TC Yasi on a number of nearshore, turbid-zone coral reefs, that include several in the immediate vicinity of the cyclone's landfall path (King Reef, Lugger Shoal and Dunk Island), as well as a more distally located reef (Paluma Shoals) ~ 150 km to the south in Halifax Bay. These reefs were the focus of recent (between 2006 and 2009) pre-Yasi studies into their geomorphology, sedimentology and community structure, and here we discuss data from a recent (August 2011) post-Yasi re-assessment. This provided a unique opportunity to identify and describe the impacts of an intense tropical cyclone on nearshore reefs, which are often assumed to be vulnerable to physical disturbance and reworking due to their poorly lithified framework. Observed impacts of TC Yasi were site specific and spatially highly heterogeneous, but appear to have been strongly influenced by the contemporary evolutionary stage and ecological make-up of the individual reefs, with site setting (i.e. exposure to prevailing wave action) apparently more important than proximity to the landfall path. The most significant ecological impacts occurred at King Reef (probably a result of freshwater bleaching) and at Paluma Shoals, where widespread physical destruction of branched Acropora occurred. New coral recruits are, however, common at all sites and colony re-growth clearly evident at King Reef. Only localised geomorphic change was evident, mainly in the form of coral fracturing, rubble deposition, and sediment movement, but again these impacts were highly site specific. The dominant impact at Paluma Shoals was localised storm ridge/shingle sheet deposition, at Lugger Shoal major offshore fine sediment

  7. Degradation of Herbicides in the Tropical Marine Environment: Influence of Light and Sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercurio, Philip; Mueller, Jochen F; Eaglesham, Geoff; O'Brien, Jake; Flores, Florita; Negri, Andrew P

    2016-01-01

    Widespread contamination of nearshore marine systems, including the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) lagoon, with agricultural herbicides has long been recognised. The fate of these contaminants in the marine environment is poorly understood but the detection of photosystem II (PSII) herbicides in the GBR year-round suggests very slow degradation rates. Here, we evaluated the persistence of a range of commonly detected herbicides in marine water under field-relevant concentrations and conditions. Twelve-month degradation experiments were conducted in large open tanks, under different light scenarios and in the presence and absence of natural sediments. All PSII herbicides were persistent under control conditions (dark, no sediments) with half-lives of 300 d for atrazine, 499 d diuron, 1994 d hexazinone, 1766 d tebuthiuron, while the non-PSII herbicides were less persistent at 147 d for metolachlor and 59 d for 2,4-D. The degradation of herbicides was 2-10 fold more rapid in the presence of a diurnal light cycle and coastal sediments; apart from 2,4-D which degraded more slowly in the presence of light. Despite the more rapid degradation observed for most herbicides in the presence of light and sediments, the half-lives remained > 100 d for the PS II herbicides. The effects of light and sediments on herbicide persistence were likely due to their influence on microbial community composition and its ability to utilise the herbicides as a carbon source. These results help explain the year-round presence of PSII herbicides in marine systems, including the GBR, but more research on the transport, degradation and toxicity on a wider range of pesticides and their transformation products is needed to improve their regulation in sensitive environments.

  8. Distribution of phosphorus and organic carbon in the nearshore sediments of Goa

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rajamanickam, G.V.; Setty, M.G.A.P.

    . As the colour, texture and lithology of the sediment varies considerably from north to south, so also the degree of concentration of organic carbon and phosphorus varies suggesting that they are in direct relationship with each other. Organic carbon is low (0...

  9. Neutrophilic Iron-Oxidizing Zetaproteobacteria and Mild Steel Corrosion in Nearshore Marine Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-16

    their biology that could be used to tease out the potential influence of these bacteria on MIC. Microaerobic, lithotrophic FeOB require redox...vents, and to date, almost all reports of marine FeOB have been associated with venting, primarily at volcanic seamounts in the deep ocean (5, 7, 13...proteobacteria, Mariprofundus ferrooxydans, from an iron mat at Loihi Seamount , provided phylogenctic confirmation of the uniqueness of

  10. Thatcher Bay, Washington, Nearshore Restoration Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breems, Joel; Wyllie-Echeverria, Sandy; Grossman, Eric E.; Elliott, Joel

    2009-01-01

    The San Juan Archipelago, located at the confluence of the Puget Sound, the Straits of Juan de Fuca in Washington State, and the Straits of Georgia, British Columbia, Canada, provides essential nearshore habitat for diverse salmonid, forage fish, and bird populations. With 408 miles of coastline, the San Juan Islands provide a significant portion of the available nearshore habitat for the greater Puget Sound and are an essential part of the regional efforts to restore Puget Sound (Puget Sound Shared Strategy 2005). The nearshore areas of the San Juan Islands provide a critical link between the terrestrial and marine environments. For this reason the focus on restoration and conservation of nearshore habitat in the San Juan Islands is of paramount importance. Wood-waste was a common by-product of historical lumber-milling operations. To date, relatively little attention has been given to the impact of historical lumber-milling operations in the San Juan Archipelago. Thatcher Bay, on Blakely Island, located near the east edge of the archipelago, is presented here as a case study on the restoration potential for a wood-waste contaminated nearshore area. Case study components include (1) a brief discussion of the history of milling operations. (2) an estimate of the location and amount of the current distribution of wood-waste at the site, (3) a preliminary examination of the impacts of wood-waste on benthic flora and fauna at the site, and (4) the presentation of several restoration alternatives for the site. The history of milling activity in Thatcher Bay began in 1879 with the construction of a mill in the southeastern part of the bay. Milling activity continued for more than 60 years, until the mill closed in 1942. Currently, the primary evidence of the historical milling operations is the presence of approximately 5,000 yd3 of wood-waste contaminated sediments. The distribution and thickness of residual wood-waste at the site was determined by using sediment

  11. Coupling of fog and marine microbial content in the near-shore coastal environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dueker, M. E.; O'Mullan, G. D.; Weathers, K. C.; Juhl, A. R.; Uriarte, M.

    2012-02-01

    Microbes in the atmosphere (microbial aerosols) play an important role in climate and provide an ecological and biogeochemical connection between oceanic, atmospheric, and terrestrial environments. However, the sources and environmental factors controlling the concentration, diversity, transport, and viability of microbial aerosols are poorly understood. This study examined culturable microbial aerosols from a coastal environment in Maine (USA) and determined the effect of onshore wind speed and fog presence on deposition rate, source, and community composition. During fog events with low onshore winds (sequencing of culturable ocean surface bacteria and microbial aerosols deposited onshore resulted in the detection of 31 bacterial genera, with 5 dominant genera (Vibrio, Bacillus, Pseudoalteromonas, Psychrobacter, Salinibacterium) making up 66 % of all sequences. The sequence library from microbial aerosol isolates, as with libraries found in other coastal/marine aerosol studies, was dominated at the phylum level by Proteobacteria, with additional representation from Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes. Seventy-five percent of the culturable microbial aerosols falling out under foggy conditions were most similar to GenBank-published sequences detected in marine environments. Using a 97 % similarity cut-off, sequence libraries from ocean surface and fog isolates shared eight operational taxonomic units (OTU's) in total, three of which were the most dominant OTU's in the library, representing large fractions of the ocean (28 %) and fog (21 %) libraries. The fog and ocean surface libraries were significantly more similar in microbial community composition than clear (non-foggy) and ocean surface libraries, according to both Jaccard and Sorenson indices. These findings provide the first evidence of a difference in community composition and microbial culturability of aerosols associated with fog compared to clear conditions. The data support a dual role for fog

  12. Occurrence and sorption properties of arsenicals in marine sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fauser, Patrik; Sanderson, Hans; Hedegaard, Rikke Susanne Vingborg

    2013-01-01

    with depth, dissolved oxygen (DO), salinity and sediment classification; for depths 9 mg/L and sand/silt/clay sediments the Kd was 118 ± 76 L/kg DM and for depths >70 m, salinity >11 %, DO ... in marine sediments when conditions are similar to the Baltic Sea. At locations with significant anthropogenic point sources or where the local geology contains volcanic rock and sulphide mineral deposits, there may be significantly elevated arsenic concentrations, and it is recommended to determine on...

  13. Nonlinear acoustics of water-saturated marine sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Leif Bjørnø

    1976-01-01

    available for fluids to a few being used for a determination of the nonlinear acoustic parameters of water-saturated marine sediments. These test methods, comprising static, thermodynamic and finite-amplitude wave distortion and absorption methods, aiming at a determination of B/A for marine sediments...... and are compared with nonlinear acoustic qualities determined through small-scale explosion tests performed in the sediments. Sources leading to possible deviations between test results arising from prospective in situ measurements and from measurements carried out under laboratory conditions are discussed....

  14. Bioavailability of sediment-bound contaminants to marine organisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, B. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)]|[Colby Coll., Waterville, ME (United States); Neff, J. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)]|[Battelle Ocean Sciences, Duxbury, MA (United States)

    1993-09-01

    The bioavailability of sediment-bound contaminants to marine organisms indicates that there exists a potential for transfer of these contaminants through marine food webs to commercial fisheries products consumed by humans. However, there has been relatively little effort to combine and synthesize data on chemical/biological interactions between benthic animals and seagrasses and the sediments in which they reside on the one hand, and on the chemistry of bioaccumulation on the other. This report provides a conceptual basis for an approach to bioavailability and biomagnification of sediment-bound contaminants that reviews biological and chemical approaches.

  15. Microbial diversity and stratification of South Pacific abyssal marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durbin, Alan M; Teske, Andreas

    2011-12-01

    Abyssal marine sediments cover a large proportion of the ocean floor, but linkages between their microbial community structure and redox stratification have remained poorly constrained. This study compares the downcore gradients in microbial community composition to porewater oxygen and nitrate concentration profiles in an abyssal marine sediment column in the South Pacific Ocean. Archaeal 16S rRNA clone libraries showed a stratified archaeal community that changed from Marine Group I Archaea in the aerobic and nitrate-reducing upper sediment column towards deeply branching, uncultured crenarchaeotal and euryarchaeotal lineages in nitrate-depleted, anaerobic sediment horizons. Bacterial 16S rRNA clone libraries revealed a similar shift on the phylum and subphylum level within the bacteria, from a complex community of Alpha-, Gamma- and Deltaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Gemmatimonadetes in oxic surface sediments towards uncultured Chloroflexi and Planctomycetes in the anaerobic sediment column. The distinct stratification of largely uncultured bacterial and archaeal groups within the oxic and nitrate-reducing marine sediment column provides initial constraints for their microbial habitat preferences. © 2011 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Factors Effecting Adsorption of 137 Cs in Marine Sediment Samples in Marine Sediment Samples from the Upper Gulf of Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saengkul, C.; Sawangwong, P.; Pakkong, P.

    2014-01-01

    Contamination of 137 Cs in sediment is a far more serious problem than in water because sediment is a main transport factor of 137 Cs to the aquatic environmental. Most of 137 Cs in water could be accumulated in sediment which has direct effect to benthos. This study focused on factors effecting the adsorption of 137Cs in marine sediment samples collected from four different estuary sites to assess the transfer direction of 137 Cs from water to sediment that the study method by treat 137 Cs into seawater and mixed with different sediment samples for 4 days. The result indicated that properties of marine sediment (cation exchange capacity (CEC), organic matter, clay content, texture, type of clay mineral and size of soil particle) had effects on 137 Cs adsorption. CEC and clay content correlated positively with the accumulation of 137 Cs in the marine sediment samples. On the other hand, organic matter in sediment correlated negatively with the accumulation of 137 Cs in samples. The study of environmental effects (pH and potassium) found that the 137 Cs adsorption decreased when concentration of potassium increased. The pH effect is still unclear in this study because the differentiation of pH levels (6, 7, 8.3) did not have effects on 137 Cs adsorption in the samples.

  17. Bacterial communities in sediment of a Mediterranean marine protected area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catania, Valentina; Sarà, Gianluca; Settanni, Luca; Quatrini, Paola

    2017-04-01

    Biodiversity is crucial in preservation of ecosystems, and bacterial communities play an indispensable role for the functioning of marine ecosystems. The Mediterranean marine protected area (MPA) "Capo Gallo-Isola delle Femmine" was instituted to preserve marine biodiversity. The bacterial diversity associated with MPA sediment was compared with that from sediment of an adjacent harbour exposed to intense nautical traffic. The MPA sediment showed higher diversity with respect to the impacted site. A 16S rDNA clone library of the MPA sediment allowed the identification of 7 phyla: Proteobacteria (78%), Firmicutes (11%), Acidobacteria (3%), Actinobacteria (3%), Bacteroidetes (2%), Planctomycetes (2%), and Cyanobacteria (1%). Analysis of the hydrocarbon (HC)-degrading bacteria was performed using enrichment cultures. Most of the MPA sediment isolates were affiliated with Gram-positive G+C rich bacteria, whereas the majority of taxa in the harbour sediment clustered with Alpha- and Gammaproteobacteria; no Gram-positive HC degraders were isolated from the harbour sediment. Our results show that protection probably has an influence on bacterial diversity, and suggest the importance of monitoring the effects of protection at microbial level as well. This study creates a baseline of data that can be used to assess changes over time in bacterial communities associated with a Mediterranean MPA.

  18. A model for microbial phosphorus cycling in bioturbated marine sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dale, Andrew W.; Boyle, R. A.; Lenton, Timothy M.

    2016-01-01

    A diagenetic model is used to simulate the diagenesis and burial of particulate organic carbon (Corg) and phosphorus (P) in marine sediments underlying anoxic versus oxic bottom waters. The latter are physically mixed by animals moving through the surface sediment (bioturbation) and ventilated...... P pump) allows preferential mineralization of the bulk Porg pool relative to Corg during both aerobic and anaerobic respiration and is consistent with the database. Results with this model show that P burial is strongly enhanced in sediments hosting fauna. Animals mix highly labile Porg away from....... The results also help to explain Corg:Porg ratios in the geological record and the persistence of Porg in ancient marine sediments. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd....

  19. Quaternary magnetic excursions recorded in marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Channell, J. E. T.

    2017-12-01

    This year is the golden (50th) anniversary of the first documentation of a magnetic excursion, the Laschamp excursion in volcanics from the Chaine des Puys (Bonhommet and Babkine, 1967). The first recording of an excursion in sediments was from the Blake Outer Ridge (Smith and Foster, 1969). Magnetic excursions are directional aberrations of the geomagnetic field apparently involving short-lived reversal of the main dipole field. They have durations of a few kyrs, and are therefore rarely recorded in sediments with mean sedimentation rates control, is progressively strengthening our knowledge of the excursion inventory in the Quaternary, and enhancing the importance of excursions and RPI in Quaternary stratigraphy.

  20. Radionuclides in marine sediments - Distribution and processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudjord, A.L. [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, Oesteraas (Norway); Oughton, D. [Agricultural Univ., Aas (Norway); Bergan, T.D.; Christensen, G. [IFE, Kjeller (Norway)

    2001-04-01

    The NO-1 part of EKO-1 involved both laboratory and field studies. The laboratory studies have been discribed earlier in this report. The following is a summary of the field studies. At station 26 (Norwegian Sea) the sediments seem to be influenced by radiocesium from the Chernobyl accident. This may be due to direct fallout deposition to the sea surface and followed by a rapid sinking and sedimentation. At station 16 (North Sea) some influence from Sellafield plutonium is suggested, as the plutonium ratio is significantly higher (0.07-0.09) than would be expected from global fallout (0.03). Sedimentation rates based on analysis of {sup 210}Pb or {sup 210}Po varied between 0.03 cm/year - 0.25 cm/year. A surprisingly low sedimentation rate was found in the tenisey Bay (0.05 cm/year). It is possible that the dating method is less suited in this area, due to the long winter ice cover. In general, the rough estimates on K{sub d} values for {sup 137}Cs obtained empirically are highter than K{sub d} values obtained from the alboratory studies. This may be due to the fact that the 2 cm surface sediment in most cases has accumulated over many years, carrying contamination from the early eighties when levels of {sup 137}Cs in the sea water were higher. The {sup 137}Cs in the sediments it now fixed, or being remobilized only very slowly. Burial of the contamination by sedimentation may also make it unavailable for exchange with free water masses. (EHS)

  1. Benthic and fish population monitoring associated with a marine protected area in the nearshore waters of Grenada, Eastern Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Anderson

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Annual benthic and fish population surveys were completed at five locations in the nearshore waters along Grenada´s southwest coast during 2008-2010. Two survey sites are located in a newly launched Marine Protected Area (MPA. Photo Quadrat (PQ and Point Line Intercept (PLI surveys were used to determine substrate cover. Algae was the primary live cover increasing significantly from 45.9% in 2008 to 52.7% in 2010 (PLI. Algae was also predominant (61.0%-59.3% in the PQ surveys although annual variation was not significant. Hard coral cover ranged from 16.5% to 15.4% (PLI and 11.4% to12.0% (PQ with no significant differences between years. Branching and encrusting corals occurred more frequently than massive corals. In the three annual surveys neither algal cover nor hard coral varied significantly between MPA and non-protected areas (PLI. Relative abundance of fishes along 30x2m belt transects did not vary significantly among years however density of fishes decreased significantly across years for most major groups. Chromis spp. dominated the survey sites at 65.2% in 2008 and 49.8% in 2010, followed by territorial damselfish,11.1% and 15.5%, wrasse increased from 7.3% to 15.5%. Both the substrate cover and fish survey data analyses indicated a stable but degraded community. Annual surveys are planned at these sites for the foreseeable future. Existing and future data from this project will be valuable in determining the efficacy of MPA management, guiding resource management decisions and monitoring the health status of Grenada’s valuable reef systemsUn estudio sobre poblaciones bentónicas y de peces fue realizado en cinco localidades en la zona costera en el suroeste de Grenada entre 2008 y 2010. Dos sitios se ubicaron en una Área Marina Portegida (AMP recientemente creada. Para determinar la cobertura se utilizaron foto-cuadrantes (FQ y transectos de intersección de puntos (TIP. Las algas fueron el principal componente del bentos

  2. Solidification/stabilization of dredged marine sediments for road construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong Xing; Abriak, Nor Edine; Zentar, Rachid; Xu, WeiYa

    2012-01-01

    Cement/lime-based solidification is an environmentally sound solution for the management of dredged marine sediments, instead of traditional solutions such as immersion. Based on the mineralogical composition and physical characteristics of Dunkirk sediments, the effects of cement and lime are assessed through Atterberg limits, modified Proctor compaction, unconfined compressive strength and indirect tensile strength tests. The variation of Atterberg limits and the improvement in strength are discussed at different binder contents. The potential of sediments solidified with cement or lime for road construction is evaluated through a proposed methodology from two aspects: I-CBR value and material classification. The test results show the feasibility of solidified dredged sediments for beneficial use as a material in road construction. Cement is superior to lime in terms of strength improvement, and adding 6% cement is an economic and reasonable method to stabilize fine sediments.

  3. The onset of fabric development in deep marine sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maffione, Marco; Morris, Antony

    2017-01-01

    Post-depositional compaction is a key stage in the formation of sedimentary rocks that results in porosity reduction, grain realignment and the production of sedimentary fabrics. The progressive time-depth evolution of the onset of fabric development in deep marine sediments is poorly constrained

  4. Nearshoring Practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slepniov, Dmitrij; Brazinskas, Sigitas; Wæhrens, Brian Vejrum

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The principal objective of this paper is to unravel and assess current nearshoring practices and their outlook in the Baltic region. Design/methodology/approach: We draw on the offshoring and outsourcing literature and use mixed methods of enquiry, including case studies, survey techniques...... affected them. The survey results reveal the perspective of Lithuanian vendors regarding their relationships with Scandinavian partners. These findings are used in assessing the future prospects of nearshoring in the Baltic region. Practical implications: The study relates the key attributes...... and secondary statistical data. Part of the empirical base of the study is an examination of three Scandinavian firms that offshore their operations to vendors in the Baltics. To provide a more complete view of the practices and processes of offshoring in the region, we complement the case studies of Swedish...

  5. Contaminated marine sediments: assessment and remediation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    National Research Council (U.S.). Committee on Contaminated Marine Sediments

    1989-01-01

    ... Marine Board Commission on Engineering and Technical Systems National Research Council National Academy Press Washington, D.C. 1989 i Copyrighttrue Please breaks inserted. are Page files. accidentally typesetting been have may original from the errors not typographic original retained, and from the created cannot be files XML from howeve...

  6. Antarctic marine sediments as fingerprints of pollution migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waheed, S.; Ahmad, S.; Rahman, A.; Qureshi, I.H.

    2001-01-01

    Forty elements in 21 coastal marine sediment samples collected during the second Antarctic scientific expedition from 18 different sites of Brekilen area located at the coast of Antarctica were analysed by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) to detect eventual pollution. Radio-assay schemes for three sets of elements after neutron irradiation and cooling were evolved to avoid matrix effects. Data have been compared with those for sediments of various stations at Antarctica and two other regions in different continents. Lower concentration of certain elements in the Antarctic sediments reflects less environmental exposition. Enrichment factors (EF) were calculated for all the elements using the earth crust as reference matrix, based on elemental values by MASON, TAYLOR and WEDEPOHL which show a normal pattern near to unity expect for Ag and Br. The data obtained could also serve as a reference point from which changes in the global environment can be studied. The quality assurance of data was performed using standard reference materials (SRMs) of a similar matrix (IAEA Marine Sediment SD-M/TM and Chinese Marine Sediment GBW 07313). (author)

  7. Effect of nutrient availability on carbon and nitrogen incorporation and flows through benthic algae and bacteria in near-shore sandy sediment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cook, P.; Veuger, B.; Böer, S.; Middelburg, J.J.

    2007-01-01

    Carbon and nitrogen uptake in a microbial community comprising bacteria and microalgae in a sandy marine sediment under nutrient-limited and -replete conditions was studied using a mesocosm approach. After 2 wk of incubation, a pulse of H13CO3– and 15NH4+ was added to the mesocosms, and subsequent

  8. Mycodiversity in marine sediments contaminated by heavy metals: preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zotti, Mirca; Carbone, Cristina; Cecchi, Grazia; Consani, Sirio; Cutroneo, Laura; Di Piazza, Simone; Gabutto, Giacomo; Greco, Giuseppe; Vagge, Greta; Capello, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Fungi represent the main decomposers of woody and herbaceous substrates in the marine ecosystems. To date there is a gap in the knowledge about the global diversity and distribution of fungi in marine habitats. On the basis of their biological diversity and their role in ecosystem processes, marine fungi may be considered one of the most attractive groups of organisms in modern biotechnology, e.g. ecotoxic metal bioaccumulation. Here we report the data about the first mycological survey in the metal contaminated coastal sediments of the Gromolo Bay. The latter is located in Ligurian Sea (Eastern Liguria, Italy) and is characterized by an enrichment of heavy metals due to pollution of Gromolo Torrent by acidic processes that interest Fe-Cu sulphide mine. 24 samples of marine sediments were collected along a linear plot in front of the shoreline in July 2015. Each sample was separated into three aliquot for mineralogical, chemical analyses and fungal characterization. The sediment samples are characterised by clay fractions (illite and chlorite), minerals of ophiolitic rocks (mainly serpentine, pyroxene and plagioclase) and quartz and are enriched some chemical elements of environmental importance (such as Cu, Zn, Pb, Cd, As). For fungal characterisation the sediment samples were inoculated in Petri dishes on different culture media (Malt Extract Agar and Rose Bengal) prepared with sea water and added with antibiotics. The inoculated dishes were incubated at 20°C in the dark for 28 days. Every week fungal growth was monitored counting the number of colonies. Later, the colonies were isolated in axenic culture for further molecular analysis. The mycodiversity evaluate on the basis of Colony Forming Units (CFU) and microfungal-morphotype characterised by macro-and micro-morphology. Until now on the 72 Petri dishes inoculated 112 CFU of filamentous fungi were counted, among these about 50 morphotypes were characterized. The quantitative results show a mean value of 4

  9. Influence of macrobenthos on chemical diagenesis of marine sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aller, R.C.

    1977-05-01

    Diagenetic reactions involving the decomposition of organic matter and the dissolution, mobilization, and reprecipitation of metals sensitive to oxidation-reduction reactions, are most intense and rapid in the upper 1 m and especially the upper 10 cm of marine sediment. It is in this upper zone where most benthic organisms live and interact with sediments and where exchange rates of dissolved and particulate material between sediment and overlying water are largely determined. In Long Island Sound, U.S.A., both spatial and temporal trends in sediment chemistry and the flux of material out of the bottom demonstrate the control of diagenesis by bottom fauna. /sup 234/Th//sup 238/U disequilibrium studies demonstrate that particle reworking rates near the sediment-water interface vary both temporally and spatially in the Sound. The most rapid reworking occurs in protobranch-inhabited bottom areas as do the highest /sup 234/Th inventories. Excess /sup 234/Th profiles in the sediment allow determination of the rates of selected diagenetic reactions, such as Mn/sup + +/ production, near the sediment surface. Both the /sup 234/Th disequilibrium and flux measurements indicate that intra-estuarine redistribution of metals continually takes place.

  10. Hydrographic and suspended sediment measurements of the Mississippi River plume during the historic 2011 flood: a coupled satellite analysis and boat survey approach to determine an efficiency factor for sediment trapping in the nearshore zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcini, F.; Li, C.; D'Emidio, M.; Lutken, C.; Macelloni, L.; Salusti, A.; Jerolmack, D. J.

    2011-12-01

    During the 2011 Mississippi River (MR) flood, sediment carried to sea by the River had the potential to combat wetland loss in some areas. The movement and fate of river sediments is determined by a combination of river plume momentum, and coastal and offshore currents [Walker, 1996; Walker et al., 2005; Rego et al., 2010]. We therefore used a coupled satellite analysis and boat survey approach in order to track mixing and transport of MR plume sediments during one of the largest recorded floods in history. During the flood crest in June of 2010, MR discharge was held at a constant and large value for several weeks, providing a unique experiment that allowed us to study plume structure under steady flow conditions. Sea surface temperature, height, and color data from satellites were employed in order to quantify river plume dispersion, surface sediment concentration [Peckham, 2008; Shi and Wang, 2009] and sediment migration pathways in the nearshore zone for the Mississippi and Atchafalaya Rivers, for the duration of the flood. The boat survey measured current velocity, salinity, temperature and sediment concentration of the MR plume, during the peak of the flood. Although plumes emanating from the MR Delta should contribute significant sediment to the coastal zone [cf. Wright and Nittrouer, 1995; D'Sa and Ho, 2008], our investigation shows that the focused jet of the MR during the flood penetrated the coastal current and contributed little to the coastal sediment budget. Collected data allowed calculation of the hydrodynamic structure of the plume and thus its Potential Vorticity. We show that a novel PV, recently described by Falcini and Jerolmack [2010], works as an efficiency factor: the fraction of sediment emitted from each river plume that is trapped in the nearshore zone (and on marshes) is directly related to the PV of each river effluent. This relation may help to better understand and predict how future floods, or human-constructed river diversions, will

  11. Report on intercomparison IAEA/SD-N-2 of radionuclide measurements in marine sediment sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The material used in this exercise was a natural medium-grained marine sediment collected in a near-shore area of the North Sea in 1979. Concentrations of radionuclides are often at their detection thresholds in such samples which poses a considerable problem to analysts. In this report results of 238 Pu, 239 Pu, 240 Pu, 241 Am, 40 K, 137 Cs, 226 Ra, 228 Ra and 228 Th measurements submitted by the participants are presented and discussed. They constitute a data base from which reference values have been derived for the purpose of certification. The intercomparison has demonstrated that substantial progress has been made in low-level transuranic measurements in environmental materials. All reported results by gamma-spectroscopy were of high quality providing evidence that activity concentrations of a few millibecquerels per gram can be measured with no special problems if sufficient long counting time can be afforded. Other analytical techniques as alpha-spectrometry proved to yield reliable results when employed by experienced analysts

  12. Interactions of aquaculture, marine coastal ecosystems, and near-shore waters: A bibliography. Bibliographies and literature of agriculture (Final)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanfman, D.T.; Coleman, D.E.; Tibbitt, S.J.

    1991-01-01

    The bibliography contains selected literature citations on the interactions of aquaculture and marine coastal ecosystems. The focus is on aquaculture effluents and their impact on marine coastal ecosystems and waterways as well as the impact of pollutants on aquaculture development. Factors affecting these issues include domestic and industrial wastes, thermal discharges, acid rain, heavy metals, oil spills, and microbial contamination of marine waters and aquatic species. Coastal zone management, environmenal impact of aquaculture, and water quality issues are also included in the bibliography

  13. Distribution, community assembly and metabolic potential of sulfate-reducing microorganisms in marine sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochum, Lara

    2017-01-01

    could identify that the SRM community structure and size is most heavily influenced by bioturbation and the associated changes in the availability of organic carbon. Sulfate concentrations had less if any impact on the SRM community structure and therefore it was concluded that marine SRM can thrive......The marine sulfur and carbon cycles are coupled closely together by the activity of sulfate reducing microorganisms (SRM) in marine subsurface sediments. Here, they are responsible for oxidizing up to 50 % of the organic carbon contained in marine sediments. Marine sediments are characterized...... by decreasing availability of organic matter and sulfate with sediment depth. SRM are a taxonomically and metabolically diverse group and populate both surface and subsurface marine sediments. Large subgroups of environmental SRM are uncultured, particularly in marine subsurface sediments, and their physiology...

  14. The onset of fabric development in deep marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffione, Marco; Morris, Antony

    2017-09-01

    Post-depositional compaction is a key stage in the formation of sedimentary rocks that results in porosity reduction, grain realignment and the production of sedimentary fabrics. The progressive time-depth evolution of the onset of fabric development in deep marine sediments is poorly constrained due to the limited quantity and resolution of existing data. Here we present high-resolution anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) results from clay-rich deep marine sediments recovered at International Ocean Discovery Program Site U1438 (Philippine Sea). AMS is a petrofabric tool sensitive to the preferred orientation of grains in rocks. Down-section variations of AMS parameters, density, porosity and the inclination of magnetic remanences demonstrate that fabrics develop in response to compaction and dewatering but also that they do not develop progressively with depth below the mudline. Instead, a horizontal foliation first forms at 83 mbsf once the sediment load reaches an effective stress threshold for the onset of compaction and is then continuously enhanced down to 113 mbsf, defining a 30 m-thick 'initial compaction window'. The magnetostratigraphic age model for IODP Site U1438 indicates a delay of 5.7 Ma in initial fabric formation following sediment deposition, with strongly defined fabrics then taking an additional 6.5 Ma to develop.

  15. Succession of cable bacteria and electric currents in marine sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schauer, Regina; Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Kjeldsen, Kasper Urup

    2014-01-01

    Filamentous Desulfobulbaceae have been reported to conduct electrons over centimetre-long distances, thereby coupling oxygen reduction at the surface of marine sediment to sulphide oxidation in sub-surface layers. To understand how these /`cable bacteria/' establish and sustain electric...... conductivity, we followed a population for 53 days after exposing sulphidic sediment with initially no detectable filaments to oxygen. After 10 days, cable bacteria and electric currents were established throughout the top 15[thinsp]mm of the sediment, and after 21 days the filament density peaked with a total...... length of 2[thinsp]km[thinsp]cm-2. Cells elongated and divided at all depths with doubling times over the first 10 days of

  16. What drives nearshore sediment transport controls on the depletion of beach placers at Manavalakurichi, Southwest Coast of India?.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DineshKumar, P.K.; ManiMurali, R.; Babu, M.T.; Sudheesh, K.; Vethamony, P.; NaveenKumar, K.R.

    ,2008). However, the processes of sediment transport controls for this phenomenon are less explained and less understood. Numerical modelling of coastal processes, validated with field studies has great potential to assist with the understanding... with the prominent southward currents, owing to the lack of an effective physiographic feature to inhibit the southward movement of sediment. From the results obtained, it appears that numerical modeling of coastal processes has great potential to assist...

  17. Modeling nearshore dispersal of river-derived multi-class suspended sediments and radionuclides during a flood event around the mouth of Niida River, Fukushima, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Y.; Yamanishi, T.; Iwasaki, T.; Shimizu, Y.; Tsumune, D.; Misumi, K.; Onda, Y.

    2016-12-01

    A quadruple nested synoptic oceanic downscale modeling based on ROMS was carried out to investigate hydrodynamics, multi-class non-cohesive sediment transport and associated dispersal of suspended radionuclides (cesium-137; 137Cs) originated from the nuclear accident occurred at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Power Plant in March 2011. The innermost model has horizontal grid resolution of 50 m to marginally resolve the topography around the river mouth including the surf zone. The model is forced by the JCOPE2 oceanic reanalysis as the outermost boundary conditions, the GPV-MSM atmospheric reanalysis, and an in-house SWAN spectral wave hindcast embedded in the operational GPV-CWM wave reanalysis. A particular attention is paid to nearshore behaviors and inventory of the nuclides attached to terrestrial minerals with grain sizes ranging from 5 to 79 micrometers that have been occasionally discharged out to the coastal ocean through hydrological processes within the river basin even after several years since the accident. We examine oceanic dispersal of sediment and suspended 137Cs influxes from Niida River, Fukushima, evaluated with the iRIC-Nays2DH river model. Our focus is on the first flood event in late May of 2011 after the accident. Alongshore asymmetry in transport of suspended sediments and 137Cs is exhibited, comprising storm-driven southward transport confined in the shallow area due to shoreward Ekman transport associated with strong northerly wind, followed by northwestward wide-spread transport under mild southerly wind condition. About 70 % of the Niida River-derived suspended 137Cs remains near the mouth for 20 days after the flood event. Nevertheless, our model results as well as an observation suggest that the area is dominated by erosion as for high bed shear stress all the time, thus suspended radionuclides are redistributed to dissipate away in long term.

  18. V isotope composition in modern marine hydrothermal sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, F.; Owens, J. D.; Nielsen, S.; German, C. R.; Rachel, M.

    2017-12-01

    in the ocean. The fingerprint of δ51V between oxic sediments and hydrothermal flux are significantly different and should be easily discernible in the geologic record. Consequently, our results show that the removal of V from hydrothermal sediments has an important influence on the marine V cycle, which needs to be considered for future modern and paleoclimatic studies.

  19. Phylogenetic analysis of the bacterial communities in marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, J P; Herwig, R P

    1996-11-01

    For the phylogenetic analysis of microbial communities present in environmental samples microbial DNA can be extracted from the sample, 16S rDNA can be amplified with suitable primers and the PCR, and clonal libraries can be constructed. We report a protocol that can be used for efficient cell lysis and recovery of DNA from marine sediments. Key steps in this procedure include the use of a bead mill homogenizer for matrix disruption and uniform cell lysis and then purification of the released DNA by agarose gel electrophoresis. For sediments collected from two sites in Puget Sound, over 96% of the cells present were lysed. Our method yields high-molecular-weight DNA that is suitable for molecular studies, including amplification of 16S rRNA genes. The DNA yield was 47 micrograms per g (dry weight) for sediments collected from creosote-contaminated Eagle Harbor, Wash. Primers were selected for the PCR amplification of (eu)bacterial 16S rDNA that contained linkers with unique 8-base restriction sites for directional cloning. Examination of 22 16S rDNA clones showed that the surficial sediments in Eagle Harbor contained a phylogenetically diverse population of organisms from the Bacteria domain (G. J. Olsen, C. R. Woese, and R. Overbeek, J. Bacteriol. 176:1-6, 1994) with members of six major lineages represented: alpha, delta, and gamma Proteobacteria; the gram-positive high G+C content subdivision; clostridia and related organisms; and planctomyces and related organisms. None of the clones were identical to any representatives in the Ribosomal Database Project small subunit RNA database. The analysis of clonal representives in the first report using molecular techniques to determine the phylogenetic composition of the (eu)bacterial community present in coastal marine sediments.

  20. Diversity and novelty of actinobacteria in Arctic marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gaiyun; Cao, Tingfeng; Ying, Jianxi; Yang, Yanliu; Ma, Lingqi

    2014-04-01

    The actinobacterial diversity of Arctic marine sediments was investigated using culture-dependent and culture-independent approaches. A total of 152 strains were isolated from seven different media; 18 isolates were selected for phylogenetic analysis on the basis of their 16S rRNA gene sequences. Results showed that the 18 isolates belonged to a potential novel genus and 10 known genera including Actinotalea, Arthrobacter, Brachybacterium, Brevibacterium, Kocuria, Kytococcus, Microbacterium, Micrococcus, Mycobacterium, and Pseudonocardia. Subsequently, 172 rDNA clones were selected by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis from 692 positive clones within four actinobacteria-specific 16S rDNA libraries of Arctic marine sediments, and then these 172 clones were sequenced. In total, 67 phylotypes were clustered in 11 known genera of actinobacteria including Agrococcus, Cellulomonas, Demequina, Iamia, Ilumatobacter, Janibacter, Kocuria, Microbacterium, Phycicoccus, Propionibacterium, and Pseudonocardia, along with other, unidentified actinobacterial clones. Based on the detection of a substantial number of uncultured phylotypes showing low BLAST identities (<95 %), this study confirms that Arctic marine environments harbour highly diverse actinobacterial communities, many of which appear to be novel, uncultured species.

  1. Strategic Placement of Mixed Sediment in the Form of a Nearshore Berm along Fort Myers Beach, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-28

    funded by the USACE Coastal Inlets Research Program (CIRP) and Regional Sediment Management (RSM) Program, executed by the Engineer Research and...Development Center (ERDC), Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory (CHL). Additional funding was also provided by Engineering With Nature (EWN), executed by...several beach nourishment projects along three adjacent barrier islands, west-central Florida, USA. Coastal Engineering 7: 21–39. U.S. Army Corps of

  2. Surface sediment properties and heavy metal pollution assessment in the near-shore area, north Shandong Peninsula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Gang; Pei, Shaofeng; Liu, Jian; Gao, Maosheng; Hu, Gang; Kong, Xianghuai

    2015-06-15

    Samples of surface sediment were collected off the north Shandong Peninsula for grain size and element analyses. Based on the grain size analysis, the surface sediments were dominated by silt and sand, with a small portion of clay, and were probably from the coastal erosion of the Shandong Peninsula. The spatial distribution patterns of the heavy metals were primarily controlled by the sediment types. The geo-accumulation indexes suggest that there was no Cu, Zn and Cr pollution in the study area; Pb and Cd contaminations appeared only at a few stations, while As pollution was distributed widely. The enrichment factors indicated that Cu, Zn and Cr were primarily from terrigenous materials. By contrast, Cd, Pb and As, and especially Cd and As, were probably largely provided by anthropogenic sources. Due to the dilution of coarse-grained matters, there was no contamination at some of the stations at which the influence of human activities was obvious. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Geochemical association of plutonium in marine sediments from Palomares (Spain)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anton, M.P.; Gasco, C.; Sanchez-Cabeza, J.A.; Pujol, L.

    1994-01-01

    The geochemical association of plutonium in sediments from the marine ecosystem of Palomares has been studied. A sequential leaching technique using selective extractants has been employed to determine the percentages of Pu in the following forms: (a) readily available, (b) exchangeable and adsorbed to specific sites, (c) associated with organic matter, (d) sesquioxides, (e) residual. Plutonium was found to be associated mainly with phases (c), (d) and (e), and therefore, appears to be relatively immobile and not readily available to bottom feeding biota. The effect of different source terms on Pu distribution is also discussed. (orig.)

  4. Conspicuous veils formed by vibrioid bacteria on sulfidic marine sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thar, Roland Matthias; Kühl, Michael

    2002-01-01

    We describe the morphology and behavior of a hitherto unknown bacterial species that forms conspicuous veils (typical dimensions, 30 by 30 mm) on sulfidic marine sediment. The new bacteria were enriched on complex sulfidic medium within a benthic gradient chamber in oxygen-sulfide countergradients......, but the bacteria have so far not been isolated in pure culture, and a detailed characterization of their metabolism is still lacking. The bacteria are colorless, gram-negative, and vibrioid-shaped (1.3- to 2.5- by 4- to 10-µm) cells that multiply by binary division and contain several spherical inclusions of poly...

  5. Trace metal seasonal variations in Texas marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, C.W.

    1986-01-01

    Trace elements in coastal environments are derived from three major sources: (1) the bordering watershed; (2) the offshore marine environment; and (3) industrial and/or urban effluent. The site of deposition, however, is controlled by physical and chemical processes in the coastal zone. In many cases, these processes are controlled by climate and can vary seasonally. In the harbor at Corpus Christi, Texas, the summer climate creates an oxygen-poor environment in the water column near the sediment-water interface. This causes chalcophilic metals to precipitate from the water, resulting in high concentrations in the sediments near the source. During the winter, turbulence created by strong winds causes the entire water mass to become aerated and oxidizing, and remobilization of some metals results. In addition, this turbulence accelerates circulation which transports the metal-enriched waters from the harbor. On the outer continental shelf of south Texas, the infaunal activity varies seasonally with bottom water temperatures. As this infaunal activity has an effect on the chemical environment within the sediment near the sediment-water interface, the observed trace metal content at the interface also appears to change with the seasons. ?? 1986.

  6. Marine geoscientific surveys in ports and nearshore regions of the Arabian Sea off central west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    SubbaRaju, L.V.; Naidu, P.D; Almeida, F.

    , the thickness of clays varies from 2 to 10 m and they cover the underlying harder formations (rock/consolidated sediments). Sandbars, U-Shaped furrows and ridges, composed of loose and compact sands are also recorded at the river mouths considered to have been...

  7. Bacterial corrosion in marine sediments: influence of cathodic protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Therene, Martine

    1988-01-01

    In order to protect offshore structures from marine corrosion, cathodic protection is widely applied via sacrificial anodes (for example zinc or aluminium) or impressed current. In aerated seawater, steel is considered to be protected when a potential of -8050 mV/Cu.CuSO 4 is achieved. In many cases, however this potential must be lowered, due to the activity of microorganisms and more specially sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). SRB are obligate anaerobes using sulphate as electron acceptor with resultant production of sulphide. Some of them are also able to use hydrogen as energy source, causing cathodic depolarization of steel surfaces. An experiment was performed to analyze the relation between SRB activity and use of different cathodic potentials applied to mild steel samples in marine sediments. Analytical techniques employed included lipid bio-markers and electrochemical methods. Results indicated an evolution of the bacterial community structure both on the steel and in the sediment, as a function of time and potential. The results also show that cathodically produced hydrogen promotes the growth of SRB (author) [fr

  8. A method of harvesting gas hydrates from marine sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, H.Q.; Brill, J.P.; Sarica, C. [Tulsa Univ., Tulsa, OK (United States). Dept. of Petroleum Engineering

    2008-07-01

    Methane is known to exist in gas hydrates, but low productivity is expected for gas production from gas hydrates in marine sediments because of the shallow depths, low hydrate concentration, low permeability of the gas hydrate stability zone, lack of driving pressure and the slow melting process. This paper presented a newly developed methane harvesting method which aims to overcome technical barriers, maintain cost and energy efficiencies and minimize safety and environmental concerns. The method is based on the concept of capturing the gas released from hydrate dissociation in the sediments. The captured gases can reform hydrates inside and overhead receiver, which once full, can be lifted to shallow warm water for gas collection. This simple and open production system does not require high pressure and does not involve any flow assurance issues. As such, technical difficulties, safety issues and environmental concerns are minimized. The proposed gas harvesting method makes the best use of the nature of hydrates and the subsea pressure and temperature profiles. It combines many new concepts, including electrically adding heat inside the hydrate rich sediments to release gas, using an overhead receiver to capture the gas, allowing the gas to reform hydrates again in the overhead receiver, and lifting produced hydrates to warm water where it can be released and collected. It was concluded that this newly proposed production system enables the development of massive hydrate production fields on the sea bed with high production rates that are economically viable. 4 refs., 7 figs.

  9. A Multitracer Approach to Detecting Wastewater Plumes from Municipal Injection Wells in Nearshore Marine Waters at Kihei and Lahaina, Maui, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Charles D.; Rosa, Sarah N.

    2009-01-01

    Municipal wastewater plumes discharging from aquifer to ocean were detected by nearshore wading surveys at Kihei and Lahaina, on the island of Maui in Hawaii. Developed in cooperation with the Hawaii State Department of Health, the survey methodology included instrument trolling to detect submarine groundwater discharge, followed by analysis of water and macroalgae for a suite of chemical and isotopic constituents that constitute a 'multitracer' approach. Surveys were conducted May 6-28, 2008, during fair-weather conditions and included: (1) wading and kayak trolling with a multiparameter water-quality sonde, (2) marine water-column sampling, and (3) collection of benthic algae samples. Instrument trolling helped guide the water sampling strategy by providing dense, continuous transects of water properties on which groundwater discharge zones could be identified. Water and algae samples for costly chemical and isotopic laboratory analyses were last to be collected but were highly diagnostic of wastewater presence and nutrient origin because of low detection levels and confirmation across multiple tracers. Laboratory results confirmed the presence of wastewater constituents in marine water-column samples at both locales and showed evidence of modifying processes such as denitrification and mixing of effluent with surrounding groundwater and seawater. Carbamazepine was the most diagnostic pharmaceutical, detected in several marine water-column samples and effluent at both Kihei and Lahaina. Heavy nitrogen-isotope compositions in water and algae were highly diagnostic of effluent, particularly where enriched to even heavier values than effluent source compositions by denitrification. Algae provided an added advantage of time-integrating their nitrogen source during growth. The measured Kihei plume coincided almost exactly with prior model predictions, but the Lahaina plume was detected well south of the expected direct path from injection wells to shore and may be

  10. Evaluation of marine sediments as microbial sources for methane production from brown algae under high salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Toyokazu; Kita, Akihisa; Okamura, Yoshiko; Aki, Tsunehiro; Matsumura, Yukihiko; Tajima, Takahisa; Kato, Junichi; Nakashimada, Yutaka

    2014-10-01

    Various marine sediments were evaluated as promising microbial sources for methane fermentation of Saccharina japonica, a brown alga, at seawater salinity. All marine sediments tested produced mainly acetate among volatile fatty acids. One marine sediment completely converted the produced volatile fatty acids to methane in a short period. Archaeal community analysis revealed that acetoclastic methanogens belonging to the Methanosarcina genus dominated after cultivation. Measurement of the specific conversion rate at each step of methane production under saline conditions demonstrated that the marine sediments had higher conversion rates of butyrate and acetate than mesophilic methanogenic granules. These results clearly show that marine sediments can be used as microbial sources for methane production from algae under high-salt conditions without dilution. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Alternative procedure to determine radionuclide concentrations for marine sediment dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palacios, D; Sajo-Bohus, L.; Alfonso, J.; Perez, K.; Trujillo, M.

    2006-01-01

    The development of an alternative method to prepare and to measure marine sediment samples for dating purpose using high resolution gamma spectrometry is given. To calculate the 137 Cs and the supported and unsupported 210 Pb concentrations, cylindrical tablets subjected to different pressures were analyzed. Mass attenuation coefficients (MAC) were determined by our variant of the transmission method, the Bragg law (using MACs provided by the web program XCOM) and the method of average composition of the analyzed sediment samples. The differences between obtained results are smaller than the experimental error (10%). The influence of pressure and sediment mass on the MAC, mechanical stability of the sample, and self-absorption corrections for different gamma energies is studied. Optimal dimensions of the tablets were determined from considerations on the infinite thickness, minimum detectable activity, precision of results, radiation self-absorption and geometric efficiency. Based on the differential peak absorption analysis, through a relative efficiency curve, a new method to evaluate the existence of radioactive equilibrium between 226 Ra, 222 Rn and its progeny is given. Experimental error of the proposed methodology is evaluated, as well as accuracy, precision and detection limit. With the use of developed methodology, the 210 Pb, 226 Ra and 137 Cs activities in recent sediment samples from near shore of the Orinoco River Delta were determined. The results were comparable with the obtained by two of the most used methods, while precision is improved and radiation self-absorption in sample container is avoided since sample encapsulation is not required. (Full Text)

  12. Intercomparison of radionuclide measurements in marine sediment sample IAEA-135

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballestra, S.; Gastaud, J.; Lopez, J.J.; Parsi, P.; Vas, D.

    1993-08-01

    The results of an intercomparison exercise on a marine sediment from Irish Sea, IAEA-135, designed for the determination of artificial and natural radionuclides levels, are reported. The data from 151 laboratories representing 51 countries have been evaluated. The following are the recommended values, with confidence intervals, for 40 K, 60 Co, 134 Cs, 137 Cs, 154 Eu, 155 Eu, 226 Ra, 228 Ra, 232 Th, 238 Pu, 239+240 Pu (Reference date: 1 January 1992). Information values for 57 Co, 90 Sr, 106 Ru, 125 Sb, 210 Pb, 210 Po, 228 Th, 230 Th, 234 U, 235 U, 238 U and 241 Am are also reported. All values are expressed in Bq kg -1 dry weight. (author)

  13. Properties of bricks produced from Greenlandic marine sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Ida Maria Gieysztor; Belmonte, Louise Josefine; Chen, Wan

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the possibility of a local brick production from fine grained marine sediments (MS) near Sisimiut, Greenland. The assessment is based on the physical and mechanical properties of clay bricks concerning the resistance to the harsh, Arctic weather conditions, together...... with an identification of a suitable production method. Samples of MS were collected near Sisimiut, Greenland, and tested with respect to the geological properties, which revealed a fine grained, low plasticity silty clay with evenly distributed grain sizes. By a screening of the mineralogy of MS by X-ray diffraction...... were then prepared according to the optimal conditions and formed at a pressure of 20 MPa, fired at 1020 ºC for 3.5 days at the brickwork Wienerberger Tegl in Helsinge, Denmark. The durability properties such as porosity, water absorption, bulk density, linear shrinkage, and compressive strength (only...

  14. Properties of bricks produced from Greenlandic marine sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Ida Maria Gieysztor; Belmonte, Louise Josefine; Chen, Wan

    2015-01-01

    were then prepared according to the optimal conditions and formed at a pressure of 20 MPa, fired at 1020 ºC for 3.5 days at the brickwork Wienerberger Tegl in Helsinge, Denmark. The durability properties such as porosity, water absorption, bulk density, linear shrinkage, and compressive strength (only......This study investigated the possibility of a local brick production from fine grained marine sediments (MS) near Sisimiut, Greenland. The assessment is based on the physical and mechanical properties of clay bricks concerning the resistance to the harsh, Arctic weather conditions, together...... with an identification of a suitable production method. Samples of MS were collected near Sisimiut, Greenland, and tested with respect to the geological properties, which revealed a fine grained, low plasticity silty clay with evenly distributed grain sizes. By a screening of the mineralogy of MS by X-ray diffraction...

  15. Manganese and related elements in the interstitial water of marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presley, B J; Brooks, R R; Kaplan, I R

    1967-11-17

    Analyses for manganese, nickel, iron, cobalt, sodium, and lithium in the interstitial water of cores from the southern California borderland and six deep-sea cores in the area of the East Pacific Rise show great variation in concentration of trace elements. Oxidizing near-shore sediments showed a 50-fold enrichment in manganese in contrast to sulfide-rich reducing sediments, which showed no enrichment. Deep-sea sediments were variable in their concentration of the trace metals. All but one core showed a high enrichment in dissolved manganese, with a maximum of 6.6 parts per million. Two cores showed a 100-fold enrichment in nickel and cobalt. The manganese appears to be in solution either as Mn(2+) or as a complex. The results appear to support manganese nodule formation in deep-sea sediments through a diffusion of manganese from depth to the surface.

  16. The Totumo mud volcano and its near-shore marine sedimentological setting (North Colombia) - From sedimentary volcanism to epithermal mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dill, H. G.; Kaufhold, S.

    2018-04-01

    The Holocene mud volcano exposed at Totumo (younger than 4150 ± 50 yr BP) lines up together with some other landforms of its kind along the Caribbean Coast in northern Colombia. It currently vents a mud of the silicate-phosphate-bearing sulfur-sodium chloride type. The mud volcanoes evolved in an active continental margin setting of the South American Cordillera with high seismicity and affected by pervasive neotectonic structural disturbances. During the Neogene and Quaternary linear terrigenous shoreline sediments alternating with delta deposits evolved on this mobile crustal segment between the Andes and ancient Precambrian cratons. Meso- to microtidal sedimentary settings during transgression and progradation created meta- to instable sedimentary and petrophysical conditions (e.g. overpressure and gas-bearing bubble sands), favorable for the formation of mud volcanoes, whose lithofacies is subdivided into (1) footwall facies (detritus from metabasic, -pelitic source rocks), (2) mud volcano plus lateral facies (material from deep-seated hydrothermal sources, hydrocarbon plays, and brine reflux from the sea), (3) hanging wall facies, sand characterized by a strong longshore drift. The sedimentary volcanism in the area is characterized by different temperatures of formation: (1) pre-stage (formation, pH and Eh values. The mud volcano system of Totumo bridges the gap between sedimentary "volcanism" and epithermal hot spring deposits of intermediate to high sulfidation and forms a useful "guide" to hydrocarbon accumulation.

  17. 137Cs and excess 210Pb deposition patterns in estuarine and marine sediment in the central region of the Great Barrier Reef Lagoon, north-eastern Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfitzner, John; Brunskill, Gregg; Zagorskis, Irena

    2004-01-01

    This paper focuses on the distribution of 137 Cs and 210 Pb xs in 51 estuarine and marine sediment cores collected between the Upstart Bay and Rockingham Bay in the Great Barrier Reef Lagoon, north-eastern Australia. Historical records of 210 Pb xs and 137 Cs atmospheric deposition and present day terrestrial inventories in north-eastern Australia are presented. 210 Pb xs and 137 Cs fluxes measured on suspended sediments in the Burdekin River are considered to be a source of recent inputs of these nuclides to the nearshore region of this part of the Great Barrier Reef. Direct correlations between sediment nuclide inventories, maximum detectable depths, and sediment mass accumulation rates (MARs), calculated using both 137 Cs and 210 Pb xs , are explored. In relation to inventories of 210 Pb xs , 60% of atmospheric fallout 137 Cs appears to be missing from the sediments. The reasons for these differences in two tracers, primarily of atmospheric origin, are discussed in terms of the geochemical properties of these two nuclides. Evidence is presented to support the hypothesis that the 137 Cs distribution in these cores can be a useful independent tracer which provides confirmation of MARs calculated from the decay of 210 Pb xs

  18. Isolation of naphthalene-degrading bacteria from tropical marine sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuang, W.-Q.; Tay, J.-H.; Maszenan, A.M.; Tay, S.T.-L. [Nanyang Technological University, (Singapore). School of Civil and Structural Engineering, Environmental Engineering Research Center

    2003-07-01

    Oil pollution is a major environmental concern in many countries, and this has led to a concerted effort in studying the feasibility of using oil-degrading bacteria for bioremediation. Although many oil-degrading bacteria have been isolated from different environments, environmental conditions can impose a selection pressure on the types of bacteria that can reside in a particular environment. This study reports the successful isolation of two indigenous naphthalene-degrading bacteria from oil-contaminated tropical marine sediments by enrichment culture. Strains MN-005 and MN-006 were characterized using an extensive range of biochemical tests. The 16S ribosomal deoxyribonucleic acid (rDNA) sequence analysis was also performed for the two strains. Their naphthalene degradation capabilities were determined using gas chromatography and DAPI counting of bacterial cells. Strains MN-005 and MN-006 are phenotypically and phylogenetically different from each other, and belong to the genera Staphylococcus and Micrococcus, respectively. Strains MN-005 and MN-006 has maximal specific growth rates ({mu}{sub max}) of 0.082{+-}0.008 and 0.30{+-}0.02 per hour, respectively, and half-saturation constants (K{sub s}) of 0.79{+-}0.10 and 2.52{+-}0.32 mg per litre, respectively. These physiological and growth studies are useful in assessing the potential of these indigenous isolates for in situ or ex situ naphthalene pollutant bioremediation in tropical marine environments. (author)

  19. Bacterial diversity in oil-polluted marine coastal sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta-González, Alejandro; Marqués, Silvia

    2016-04-01

    Marine environments harbour a persistent microbial seed which can be shaped by changes of the environmental conditions such as contamination by petroleum components. Oil spills, together with small but continuous discharges of oil from transportation and recreational activities, are important sources of hydrocarbon pollution within the marine realm. Consequently, prokaryotic communities have become well pre-adapted toward oil pollution, and many microorganisms that are exposed to its presence develop an active degradative response. The natural attenuation of oil pollutants, as has been demonstrated in many sites, is modulated according to the intrinsic environmental properties such as the availability of terminal electron acceptors and elemental nutrients, together with the degree of pollution and the type of hydrocarbon fractions present. Whilst dynamics in the bacterial communities in the aerobic zones of coastal sediments are well characterized and the key players in hydrocarbon biodegradation have been identified, the subtidal ecology of the anaerobic community is still not well understood. However, current data suggest common patterns of response in these ecosystems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Isolation of naphthalene-degrading bacteria from tropical marine sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuang, W.-Q.; Tay, J.-H.; Maszenan, A.M.; Tay, S.T.-L.

    2003-01-01

    Oil pollution is a major environmental concern in many countries, and this has led to a concerted effort in studying the feasibility of using oil-degrading bacteria for bioremediation. Although many oil-degrading bacteria have been isolated from different environments, environmental conditions can impose a selection pressure on the types of bacteria that can reside in a particular environment. This study reports the successful isolation of two indigenous naphthalene-degrading bacteria from oil-contaminated tropical marine sediments by enrichment culture. Strains MN-005 and MN-006 were characterized using an extensive range of biochemical tests. The 16S ribosomal deoxyribonucleic acid (rDNA) sequence analysis was also performed for the two strains. Their naphthalene degradation capabilities were determined using gas chromatography and DAPI counting of bacterial cells. Strains MN-005 and MN-006 are phenotypically and phylogenetically different from each other, and belong to the genera Staphylococcus and Micrococcus, respectively. Strains MN-005 and MN-006 has maximal specific growth rates (μ max ) of 0.082±0.008 and 0.30±0.02 per hour, respectively, and half-saturation constants (K s ) of 0.79±0.10 and 2.52±0.32 mg per litre, respectively. These physiological and growth studies are useful in assessing the potential of these indigenous isolates for in situ or ex situ naphthalene pollutant bioremediation in tropical marine environments. (author)

  1. Marine Protected Area monitoring in the nearshore waters of Grenada, Eastern Caribbean: benthic cover and fish populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Anderson

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Grenada is highly dependent on coral reefs as a source of food and to support tourism. Local and global environmental stressors threaten these reefs. Legislation was created for this MPA in 2001, permanent mooring buoys were deployed in 2009 and enforcement of fishing restrictions began in 2010. Initiatives to address point and nonpoint source pollution from the land have recently begun, aimed at reducing stress on reef area. This study documents benthic cover and fish populations associated with reefs in a Marine Protected Area (MPA along Grenada’s southwest coast from 2008 through 2012. Both Point Line Intercept and Photo Quadrat methods were used to assess benthic cover along permanent 30m transects (8 in and 12 outside the area annually. Fish and Diadema antillarum urchin relative abundance were determined based on 2m wide belt surveys along the same transects. The predominant substrate cover was algae, ranging from 41% in 2009 to 74.2% in 2011. A general trend of increasing algal cover was noted. Combined annual survey results prior (2008-2010 and after controls were implemented (2011-2012 showed a significant increase in algal cover. The predominant algal form was macroalgae comprising 65.4% - 90.8% of total algae. Live hard coral percent cover ranged from 8.7% to 21.1%. Little annual variation was observed in percent live coral cover. Branching corals (34.1% - 52.3% of total living hard coral were the most common. Of the 19 living hard coral species identified, Porites porites (21%-23% and Porites astreoides (20% dominated percentage composition. Madracis mirabilis contributed 21% of total live hard coral outside the MPA but only 8.7% in the MPA. Of the 63 species of fish identified in the study areas Chromis spp. (71.5% - 46% was the dominant group. Wrasse had a significant increase from 6.9% in 2008 to 21.5% in 2010 inside the MPA with a similar increase peaking in 2011 outside the MPA. There was a noticeable (though not statistically

  2. Biosurfactant-induced remediation of contaminated marine sediments: Current knowledge and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell'Anno, F; Sansone, C; Ianora, A; Dell'Anno, A

    2018-03-27

    The contamination of marine sediments is widespread in coastal regions of the world and represents a major concern for the potential detrimental consequences on ecosystems' health and provision of goods and services for human wellbeing. Thus, there is an urgent need to find sustainable and eco-compatible solutions for the remediation of contaminated sediments. Bioremediation is a low cost and environmental-friendly strategy with a high potential for the remediation of contaminated marine sediments. Here we review the potential application of biosurfactants produced by microbial taxa for the remediation of contaminated marine sediments and we discuss future research needs to develop efficient and eco-sustainable biosurfactant-based strategies for the recovery of contaminated marine sediments, in view of large-scale applications. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparison of test specific sediment effect concentrations with marine sediment quality assessment guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, R.S.; Biedenbach, J.M.; MacDonald, D.D.

    1995-01-01

    As part of NOAA's National Status and Trends (NS and T) Bioeffects Assessment program and studies conducted by the National Biological Service, numerous sediment quality assessment surveys have recently been conducted along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of the US using the sea urchin (Arbacia punctulata) fertilization and embryological development tests with pore water. Additional toxicity tests were also conducted in conjunction with most of these studies. The areas that have been sampled include Boston harbor, Massachusetts; Charleston Harbor, Winyah Bay, and Savannah River, South Carolina; St. Simon Sound, Georgia; Biscayne Bay, Tampa Bay, Choctawhatchee Bay, Apalachicola Bay, St. Andrew Bay, and Pensacola Bay, Florida; Galveston Bay, Lavaca Bay, and Sabine Lake, Texas, and 200 stations in the vicinity of offshore oil and gas production platforms in the Gulf of Mexico. Sufficient data are now available from this series of surveys to calculate test specific sediment effect concentrations (SECs). Based on these recent studies, SECs were developed for the sea urchin porewater and amphipod tests and compared with existing marine sediment quality assessment guidelines

  4. Diversity and characterization of culturable fungi from marine sediment collected from St. Helena Bay, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouton, Marnel; Postma, Ferdinand; Wilsenach, Jac; Botha, Alfred

    2012-08-01

    Marine fungi are known to originate from a wide variety of habitats within the marine environment. Marine sediment represents one environmental niche, with most fungi occurring in these sediments being facultative marine fungi with terrestrial origins. It has not been proven whether these fungi merely survive the harsh environmental conditions presented by the ocean sediment, as opposed to playing an active role in this ecological niche. During this study, marine sediment was collected from St. Helena Bay, on the west coast of the Western Cape, South Africa. Using dilution, enrichment, and repetitive culturing techniques, 59 fungal isolates were obtained from marine sediments and identified to at least genus level using morphological and molecular methods. Moreover, a series of tests were performed to characterize the physical and physicochemical attributes of the isolates. Results showed that the isolates not only survived but also had the potential to grow in the natural conditions present in this environment. Extracellular cellulase was produced by the filamentous fungal isolates indicating their probable role in detrital decay processes and therefore the carbon cycle on the ocean bed. Also, denitrification patterns were observed when isolates were grown in liquid media amended with NaNO(2), NaNO(3), and (NH(4))SO(4), implicating that these fungi have the potential to play an active role in denitrification, co-denitrification, and ammonification phases of nitrogen cycles occurring in the marine sediments.

  5. Diversity and characterization of culturable fungi from marine sediment collected from St. Helena Bay, South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mouton, M

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available . Helena Bay, on the west coast of the Western Cape, South Africa. Using dilution, enrichment, and repetitive culturing techniques, 59 fungal isolates were obtained from marine sediments and identified to at least genus level using morphological...

  6. Marine and terrigenous lipids in southeast atlantic sediments (leg 175) as paleoenvironmental indicators: initial results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Schefuss, E.; Versteegh, G.J.M.; Jansen, J.H.F.

    2001-01-01

    Lipid compositions of sediments recovered during Ocean Drilling Program Leg 175 in the eastern South Atlantic reflect a variety of oceanographic and climatological environments. Most of the identified lipids can be ascribed to marine sources, notably haptophytes,

  7. Foraminiferal constituent in marine sediments - A parameter in some coastal engineering problems

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Setty, M.G.A.P.

    Foraminifera, among other microorganisms, form a major constituent of marine sediments and their composition is directly related to the nature of the substrate in which they are entombed. Past and the present data indicate that the size, test...

  8. Comportement des sédiments marins carbonatés Behaviour of Marine Carbonate Sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nauroy J. F.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Les sédiments carbonatés recouvrent les fonds marins de nombreuses zones d'activités pétrolières actuelles. La méconnaissance des caractéristiques mécaniques de ces sols explique en partie les difficultés rencontrées pour l'implantation de structures marines. Un important programme d'essais réalisés sur divers sédiments carbonatés a été effectué afin de préciser : - la définition d'une méthodologie d'identification de ces sédiments ; - l'influence de leurs caractéristiques physiques sur leur comportement mécanique. Le comportement des sédiments carbonatés, soumis à des sollicitations cycliques simulant l'action de la houle sur les fondations d'ouvrages en mer, a été longuement étudié à l'appareil triaxial et sur un modèle réduit de similitude de fondation de structure à embase poids en utilisant la technique de centrifugation. Les essais réalisés confirment l'importance du seuil caractéristique comme limite fondamentale dans l'étude des sables carbonatés sous chargement cyclique. Carbonate sediments cover the seabed of many areas where petroleum activities are now taking place. Incomplete understanding of the mechanical properties of such formations partly explains the difficulties encountered in installing offshore structures. An extensive testing program involving different carbonate sediments has been carried out for two reasons : (1 to define a methodology for identifying these sediments, and (2 to determine the influence of their physical properties on their mechanical behavior. The behavior of carbonate sediments subjected to cyclic loading, simulating wave action on offshore structures, foundations, has been intensively investigated, using a triaxial devise and with a scale model simulating the foundation of a gravity structure using the centrifuging technique. These tests confirm the importance of the characteristic threshold as the fundamental limit in investigating carbonate sands under cyclic

  9. Microbes of deep marine sediments as viewed by metagenomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biddle, J.

    2015-12-01

    Ten years after the first deep marine sediment metagenome was produced, questions still exist about the nucleic acid sequences we have retrieved. Current data sets, including the Peru Margin, Costa Rica Margin and Iberian Margin show that consistently, data forms larger assemblies at depth due to the reduced complexity of the microbial community. But are these organisms active or preserved? At SMTZs, a change in the assembly statistics is noted, as well as an increase in cell counts, suggesting that cells are truly active. As depth increases, genome sizes are consistently large, suggesting that much like soil microbes, sedimentary microbes may maintain a larger reportorie of genomic potential. Functional changes are seen with depth, but at many sites are not correlated to specific geochemistries. Individual genomes show changes with depth, which raises interesting questions on how the subsurface is settled and maintained. The subsurface does have a distinct genomic signature, including unusual microbial groups, which we are now able to analyze for total genomic content.

  10. Presence of uranium and plutonium in marine sediments from gulf of Tehuantepec, Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ordonez-Regil, E.; Almazan-Torres, M.G.; Sanchez-Cabeza, J.A.; Ruiz-Fernandez, A.C.

    2013-01-01

    Uranium and plutonium were determined in the Tehua II-21 sediment core collected from the Gulf of Tehuantepec, Mexico. The analyses were performed using radiochemical separation and alpha spectroscopy. Activity concentrations of alpha emitters in the sediment samples were from 2.56 to 43.1 Bq/kg for 238 U, from 3.15 to 43.1 Bq/kg for 234 U and from 0.69 to 2.95 Bq/Kg for 239+240 Pu. Uranium activity concentration in marine sediment studied is generally high compared with those found in sediments from other marine coastal areas in the world. The presence of relatively high concentrations of anthropogenic plutonium in the sediments from the Gulf of Tehuantepec suggests that anthropogenic radionuclides have been incorporated and dispersed into the global marine environment. (author)

  11. Experimental investigation on consistency limits of cement and lime-stabilized marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, DongXing; Zentar, Rachid; Abriak, Nor Edine; Xu, WeiYa

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents the effects of treatments with cement and lime on the consistency limits of marine sediments dredged from Dunkirk port. The Casagrande percussion test and the fall cone test were used to determine the liquid limits of raw sediments and treated marine sediments. For the evaluation of the plastic limits, the results of the fall cone test were compared with those obtained by the rolling test method. The relationship between the water contents and the penetration depths for the determination of the liquid limit and the plastic limit was explored. Liquid limits at 15.5 mm and plastic limits at 1.55 mm seem to be a more appropriate choice for the studied marine sediments compared with the limits determined by other used prediction methods. Finally, the effect of cement treatment and lime treatment on the Casagrande classification of the studied sediments was investigated according to the different prediction results.

  12. Effects of marine snow and muddy terrigenous sediments on the survival of hard coral recruits

    OpenAIRE

    Fabricius, K. E.; Wild, C.; Wolanski, E.; Abele, Doris

    2003-01-01

    Sedimentation is a major cause of mortality in scleractinian coralrecruits. In this study, we compared the effects of muddy coastalsediments, with and without enrichment by "marine snow" on thesurvivorship of recruits of the hard coral Acropora willisae. Transparentexopolymer particles (TEP) were measured as characteristiccomponents of marine snow using a staining method (Passow&Alldredge1995). Four-week old recruits were exposed to (i) muddy coastal sediments, (ii) TEP, (iii) TEP-enriched mu...

  13. Burrowing and avoidance behaviour in marine organisms exposed to pesticide-contaminated sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møhlenberg, Flemming; Kiørboe, Thomas

    1983-01-01

    Behavioural effects of marine sediment contaminated with pesticides (6000 ppm parathion, 200 ppm methyl parathion, 200 ppm malathion) were studied in a number of marine organisms in laboratory tests and in situ. The burrowing behaviour in Macoma baltica, Cerastoderma edule, Abra alba, Nereis dive...

  14. Burrowing and avoidance behaviour in marine organisms exposed to pesticide-contaminated sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møhlenberg, Flemming; Kiørboe, Thomas

    1983-01-01

    Behavioural effects of marine sediment contaminated with pesticides (6000 ppm parathion, 200 ppm methyl parathion, 200 ppm malathion) were studied in a number of marine organisms in laboratory tests and in situ. The burrowing behaviour in Macoma baltica, Cerastoderma edule, Abra alba, Nereis...

  15. USE OF ULVA LACTUCA TO DISTINGUISH PH DEPENDENT TOXICANTS IN MARINE WATERS AND SEDIMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulva lactuca (sea lettuce) is a cosmopolitan marine attached green seaweed capable of sequestering high environmental levels of ammonia. Ammonia can be acutely toxic to marine organisms and is often found in dredged sediments from highly industrial areas or from areas with high c...

  16. 78 FR 30873 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to a...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-23

    ... piles (including 18-in concrete and 36- to 48-in steel) would be installed and 109 piles would be... include impact driving fifty 18-in square concrete piles. After completion of the new fuel pier the Marine... sand for beneficial reuse in nearshore replenishment. Accordingly, the sediments would be transported...

  17. Pathways and Microbiology of Thiosulfate Transformations and Sulfate Reduction in a Marine Sediment (Kattegat, Denmark)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    JØRGENSEN, BB; BAK, F.

    1991-01-01

    Reductive and oxidative pathways of the sulfur cycle were studied in a marine sediment by parallel radiotracer experiments with (SO4(2-))-S-35, (H2S)-S-35, and (S2O3(2-))-S-35 injected into undisturbed sediment cores. The distributions of viable populations of sulfate- and thiosulfate-reducing ba...

  18. Role of chemolithoautotrophic microorganisms involved in nitrogen and sulfur cycling in coastal marine sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lipsewers, Y.A.

    2017-01-01

    SummaryThe role of chemolithoautotrophic microorganisms has been considered to be of minor importancein coastal marine sediments although it has not been investigated in depth. Additionally,the impact of seasonal hypoxic/anoxic conditions on microbial chemolithoautotrophy in coastalmarine sediments

  19. Origin and geochemical behavior of uranium in marine sediments. Utilization of the 234U/238U ratio in marine geochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organo, Catherine

    1997-01-01

    The first part of this thesis presents the current situation of knowledge of uranium in marine environment. The second part describes the methods of analysis as well as the material support of the study, i.e., the sediments and marine deposits investigated. The third part is dedicated to the study of uranium mobility in marine sediments characterized by detrital terrigenous composition (pelagic clays). This approach allowed quantifying the entering and leaving flux of uranium after the sediment settling and, to discuss, on this basis, the consequences on the uranium oceanic balance. In the third part the origin and behavior of uranium in zones of high surface productivity is studied. The uranium enrichments observed in the hemi-pelagic sediments of the EUMELI (J.G.O.F.S.-France) programme will constitute a material of study adequate for measuring the variations in the 234 U/2 38U ratio in solid phase, in response to the oxido-reducing characteristics of the sediment. Thus establishing the origin of the trapped uranium has been possible. Also, the nature of the sedimentary phases related to uranium in bio-genetic sediments in the Austral Ocean was determined. Thus a relationship between the variations in the 234 U/ 238 and the diagenetic transformations was possible to establish. Finally in the fifth part a study of the behavior of uranium in a polymetallic shell characteristic for deposits of hydrogenized origin

  20. Response of fermentation and sulfate reduction to experimental temperature changes in temperate and Arctic marine sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finke, Niko; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    2008-01-01

    coupling of the terminal oxidation to fermentation. We exposed marine sediments to extreme temperature perturbations to study the nature and robustness of this coupling. Bacterial sulfate reduction and its dependence on fermentation were studied experimentally over a broad temperature range of -0.3 to 40......) concentrations decreased again upon prolonged incubation to values typical for sulfate-depleted methanogenic sediments. This suggests that fermentative bacteria and methanogenic archaea in both sediments tolerated higher temperatures than the sulfate-reducing community....

  1. Contrasting sediment records of marine submersion events related to wave exposure, Southwest France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, J.; Chaumillon, E.; Schneider, J.-L.; Jorissen, F.; Sauriau, P.-G.; Richard, P.; Bonnin, J.; Schmidt, S.

    2017-05-01

    Sediment records of two contrasting backshore coastal marshes, extremely vulnerable to recent and historical marine flooding events, located on the SW coast of France, have been investigated using a multiproxy approach. The studied marshes are 30 km apart and have been flooded by similar storm events (7 marine floods in the last 250 years). One is located in a wave-exposed coast but isolated from the sea by a sediment barrier, whereas the other is located in a sheltered estuarine environment and isolated from the sea by a dike. One core was collected in each marsh and information on grain-size, foraminifera, shell contents and stable carbon isotopes was obtained along with an age model using 210Pb, 137Cs and 14C. Core data combined with historical maps give evidence of a typical estuarine backfilling, part of the Holocene regressive parasequence, including an intertidal mudflat at the base and a backshore environment at the top. Despite the absence of grain size anomalies, marine flood-related sedimentation in the backshore area of both marshes is identified by a mixture of marine and terrestrial features, including marine fauna, vegetation debris and variation in the δ13C signature of the organic fraction. Very low sedimentation rates between flood events and/or bioturbation prevents the identification of individual episodic marine floods in the sediment succession. Comparison of the two sedimentary successions shows that the foraminifera deposited by marine submersions are of two different types. Foraminifera are monospecific and originate from the upper tidal mudflat in the sheltered marsh; whereas in the backshore marsh located in a wave-exposed environment, they show higher diversity and originate from both shallow and deeper water marine environments. This study shows that wave exposure can control the faunal content of marine flood sediment records in coastal marshes.

  2. Molecular Approaches to Understanding C & N Dynamics in MArine Sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arturo Massol; James Tiedje; Jizhong Zhou; Allan Devol

    2007-05-16

    Continental margin sediments constitute only about 10% of the total sediment surface area in the world’s oceans, nevertheless they are the dominant sites of nitrogen (N) cycling. Recent studies suggest that the oceanic nitrogen budget is unbalanced, primarily due to a higher nitrogen removal rate in contrast to the fixation rate, and it has been suggested that denitrification activity contributes significantly to this imbalance. Although denitrification in marine environments has been studied intensively at the process level, little is known about the species abundance, composition, distribution, and functional differences of the denitrifying population. Understanding the diversity of microbial populations in marine environments, their responses to various environmental factors such as NO3-, and how this impact the rate of denitrification is critical to predict global N dynamics. Environmental Microbiology has the prompt to study the influence of each microbial population on a biogeochemical process within a given ecosystem. Culture-dependent and –independent techniques using nucleic acid probes can access the identity and activity of cultured and uncultured microorganisms. Nucleic acid probes can target distintict genes which set phylogenetic relationships, such as rDNA 16S, DNA gyrase (gyrB) and RNA polymerase sigma 70 factor (rpoD). In the other hand, the genetic capabilities and their expression could be tracked using probes that target several functional genes, such as nirS, nirK, nosZ, and nifH, which are genes involved in denitrification. Selective detection of cells actively expressing functional genes within a community using In Situ Reverse Transcription-PCR (ISRT-PCR) could become a powerful culture-independent technique in microbial ecology. Here we describe an approach to study the expression of nirS genes in denitrifying bacteria. Pure cultures of Pseudomonas stutzeri and Paracoccus denitrificans, as well as co-cultures with non

  3. The remedial investigation of marine sediment at the United Heckathorn Superfund site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, P.J.; Kohn, N.P.; Gardiner, W.W.; Word, J.Q. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1994-02-01

    The former United Heckathom site in Richmond, California, was used to process and package chlorinated pesticides from the 1940s to the mid-1960s. These activities resulted in the contamination of upland soils and marine sediment in the adjacent waterways. Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) was requested by USEPA to conduct a remedial investigation and feasibility study (RI/FS). of the marine portion of the site. The objectives of this RI are to determine the extent of pesticide contamination in inner Richmond Harbor, estimate the total volume of contaminated sediment, characterize the subsurface geology; characterize the biological effects of contaminated sediment; and characterize the quality of effluent derived from dewatered sediment through treatability testing. Sediment cores were collected from 53 stations. Vertical subsamples from each sediment core were analyzed for chlorinated pesticides. Sediment from selected cores was also analyzed for other contaminants. Younger Bay Mud (YBM) sediment from multiple stations was mixed to form composite samples representing various segments of the study area. These composites were used for solid-phase toxicity and bioaccumulation tests, and the preparation of liquid-phase samples for treatability testing. The probable quality of effluent produced by dewatering sediment was evaluated by chemical and toxicological testing of suspended-particulate-phase (SPP) and elutriate samples.

  4. Long distance electron transmission couples sulphur, iron, calcium and oxygen cycling in marine sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    Geochemical observations in marine sediment have recently documented that electric currents may intimately couple spatially separated biogeochemical processes (1). When marine sediment rich in iron sulphide was exposed to oxygen we observed how the electric currents resulted in significant...... sulfide oxidation leads to electric field formation, sulfide depletion and acidification of the upper centimeters of the sediment. This promoted ion migration and dissolution of carbonates and iron sulfides. Sulfide released from iron sulfides was the major e-donor in the system. Ferrous iron released...

  5. Remote Sensing Technique for Geoacoustic Characterization of Heterogeneous Marine Sediments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ivakin, Anatoliy N

    2006-01-01

    .... The specific scientific tasks of this project were: (1) to develop inversion algorithms for estimating the sediment grain size distribution of coarse fractions in sandy sediments based on a recently developed inclusion scattering" model, (2...

  6. Electric currents couple spatially separated biogeochemical processes in marine sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars Peter; Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Fossing, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    be coupled by electric currents in nature. Here we provide evidence that electric currents running through defaunated sediment couple oxygen consumption at the sediment surface to oxidation of hydrogen sulphide and organic carbon deep within the sediment. Altering the oxygen concentration in the sea water...

  7. Geochemistry of marine sediments of the Brazilian Northeastern continental shelf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Souza do Nascimento

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The marine sediment samples collected from the northeastern Brazilian continental shelf, at water depths between 20 and 80 m, consisted mainly of sands with an almost total absence of gravel and granules. Medium, coarse and very coarse sand grains are mostly composed of halimeda, lithothamnium, rodoliths and bioclastic sands with a carbonate content varying between 77 and 96 %. The chemistry in general shows a decreasing content of Ca (86.1 % >Si (6 % > Cl (3.6 % > Sr (0.8 % > K (0.66 % > S (0.62 % > Al (0.6 % > Na (0.55% > Mg (0.43 % > Fe (0.4 % > P (0.2 % > Br (0.04 % in the samples. There was no correlation between CaCO3 and chemical contents and grain size with depth and bio-components. With the exception of Sr of marine origin, all other elements (P, S, Br, Cl, Fe are of continental origin. The lithothamnium of some offshore samples shows higher CaCO3 content, while Mg and Na are present only in halimedas. Bioclastic sands contain no Br, and silt and clay fractions are rare and characterize samples closer to the coast. These marine bioclastic granulates are of very pure biogenic calcium carbonates and are thus highly to be recommended for economic purposes.Os granulados marinhos, da Plataforma Continental do nordeste brasileiro, coletados de profundidades entre 20 e 80 m, são predominantemente areias cascalhosas constituídas de halimedas, litotames, rodolitos e areias bioclásticas, cujos teores de carbonatos variam de 77 a 96 %. A concentração média geral de elementos químicos na ordem decrescente é Ca (86.1 % > Si (6 % > Cl (3.6 % > Sr (0.8 % > K (0.66 % > S (0.62 % > Al (0.6 % > Na (0.55 % > Mg (0.43 % > Fe (0.4 % > P (0.2 % > Br (0,04 %, independentemente da profundidade e tipo de bio-componente. Com exceção do Sr, que é de origem marinha, os demais elementos (P, S, Br, Cl, Fe são de origem continental. Elementos como Mg e Na foram restritos às halimedas em apenas duas amostras, enquanto Br não foi detectado nas areias

  8. Foraminiferal indicators of high OC content in marine sediments; a question of OC source?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Giudice Cappelli, Elena; Austin, William; Smith, Laura; Ward, Hannah; Clarke, Jess; Green, Jade; Smeaton, Craig

    2017-04-01

    West Shetland voes (sea inlets), on Scotland northern maritime periphery, represent a range of environmental and depositional settings in an area of coastal ocean which is characterised by a generally high organic carbon content in marine sediments. Possible sources of organic carbon are fish farms, as this region is experiencing a large expansion in marine aquaculture, and/or erosion of peatland. Twenty-one sites in six voes were sampled in August 2015 following an organic carbon gradient. The aims of this study are: 1) to establish the modern biogeography of benthic foraminifera in west Shetland voes, 2) to explore the use of these organisms as bio-indicators of high organic carbon content in marine sediments, and 3) to trace the source of organic carbon and its transportation between different habitats and pools (e.g.: terrestrial to marine; marine aquaculture to sediments). To achieve this, we paired together spatial variations in the composition of benthic foraminiferal assemblages (species abundance and diversity) with changes in the physical properties of marine sediments determined by carbon stable isotope measurements and loss on ignition analysis. Preliminary results show a positive relationship between high abundance of the agglutinated benthic foraminifera Eggerelloides scaber, high organic carbon content in the sediments and proximity to fish farms. Although aquaculture farming in these areas may be a contributing factor, radiocarbon dates demonstrate that organic enrichment in the sediments pre-dates the introduction of aquaculture, while carbon stable isotope measurements point to peat erosion as a more likely source of organic carbon in west Shetland voes. Therefore, peatland erosion is a significant source of organic carbon in marine sediments and may be an important contributor to the store of blue carbon in west Shetland voes and, more in general, in the coastal ocean.

  9. Nearshore Survey System Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    ER D C/ CH L TR -1 7- 19 Coastal Field Data Collection Program Nearshore Survey System Evaluation Co as ta l a nd H yd ra ul ic s La...Collection Program ERDC/CHL TR-17-19 December 2017 Nearshore Survey System Evaluation Michael F. Forte, William A. Birkemeier, and J. Robert Mitchell...No. 462585 ERDC/CHL TR-17-19 ii Abstract This report evaluates the accuracy of two systems for surveying the beach and nearshore zone. The 10

  10. The future of nearshore processes research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elko, Nicole A.; Feddersen, Falk; Foster, Diane; Hapke, Cheryl J.; McNinch, Jesse E.; Mulligan, Ryan P.; Tuba Ӧzkan-Haller, H.; Plant, Nathaniel G.; Raubenheimer, Britt

    2014-01-01

    The nearshore is the transition region between land and the continental shelf including (from onshore to offshore) coastal plains, wetlands, estuaries, coastal cliffs, dunes, beaches, surf zones (regions of wave breaking), and the inner shelf (Figure ES-1). Nearshore regions are vital to the national economy, security, commerce, and recreation. The nearshore is dynamically evolving, is often densely populated, and is under increasing threat from sea level rise, long-term erosion, extreme storms, and anthropogenic influences. Worldwide, almost one billion people live at elevations within 10 m of present sea level. Long-term erosion threatens communities, infrastructure, ecosystems, and habitat. Extreme storms can cause billions of dollars of damage. Degraded water quality impacts ecosystem and human health. Nearshore processes, the complex interactions between water, sediment, biota, and humans, must be understood and predicted to manage this often highly developed yet vulnerable nearshore environment. Over the past three decades, the understanding of nearshore processes has improved. However, societal needs are growing with increased coastal urbanization and threats of future climate change, and significant scientific challenges remain. To address these challenges, members of academia, industry, and federal agencies (USGS, USACE, NPS, NOAA, FEMA, ONR) met at the “The Past and Future of Nearshore Processes Research: Reflections on the Sallenger Years and a New Vision for the Future” workshop to develop a nearshore processes research vision where societal needs and science challenges intersect. The resulting vision is comprised of three broad research themes: Long-term coastal evolution due to natural and anthropogenic processes: As global climate change alters the rates of sea level rise and potentially storm patterns and coastal urbanization increases over the coming decades, an understanding of coastal evolution is critical. Improved knowledge of long

  11. Heavy metal concentrations in the surface marine sediments of Sfax Coast, Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargouri, Dorra; Azri, Chafai; Serbaji, Mohamed Moncef; Jedoui, Younes; Montacer, Mabrouk

    2011-04-01

    Sixty-seven surface marine sediment samples in the Sfax (Tunisia) were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry for seven heavy metals (Pb, Ni, Cu, Cr, Zn, Cd, and Fe). Metal concentrations were compared with natural values, marine sediment quality standards, and also with other results concerning sediments from several Mediterranean coasts. The study of their spatial distributions refined by complementary approaches including principal component analysis, enrichment factors, and geoaccumulation index showed a significant impact of multiple anthropogenic sources. These included industrial sources and municipal discharges of the urban Sfax and also non-controlled discharges in rural zones close to the coastline. Moderate pollution of sediments, especially by Pb, Zn, and Ni, was shown to exist in localized sites. Besides, it was shown that other sites, slightly to highly enriched in terms of Cu, Cr, and Cd, are characterized by a quality of sediments varying from unpolluted to moderately polluted.

  12. The Behaviour of 134Cs, 60Co, and 85Sr Radionuclides in Marine Environmental Sediment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nariman H.M. Kamel

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This work describes experimental investigations and modelling studies on the sorption of radionuclides 134Cs, 60Co, and 85Sr by certain marine sediments within Egypt. The chemical composition of the marine sediments was determined. The soluble salts were measured for the sediments and the concentrations of the released cations, Al3+, Fe3+, and Si4+, were measured for the sediment materials in 0.1 M NaClO4 aqueous solution at different hydrogen ion concentrations. The two main factors that control the uptake of the radionuclides onto the sediment are the pH and the exchangeable capacities of the sediment materials. Surface complex model was used to estimate the surface charge densities and the electric surface potential of the marine sediment materials. These two parameters were calculated at the surface capacity sites of the sediment materials. The desorption of the adsorbed cations was determined by means of selective consecutive extraction tests using different chemical reagents including (1 1 M MgCl2 (pH 7, (2 1 M ammonium oxalate (pH 3-5, (3 0.04 M NH2OH,HCl in 25% acetic acid (pH 3-4, (4 H2O2 in 5% HNO3(pH 2-3, and (5 digestion with nitric acid followed by hydrofluoric and perchloric acids (pH 2.

  13. The microbial nitrogen cycling potential in marine sediments is impacted by polyaromatic hydrocarbon pollution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole M Scott

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available During petroleum hydrocarbon exposure the composition and functional dynamics of marine microbial communities are altered, favoring bacteria that can utilize this rich carbon source. Initial exposure of high levels of hydrocarbons in aerobic surface sediments can enrich growth of heterotrophic microorganisms having hydrocarbon degradation capacity. As a result, there can be a localized reduction in oxygen potential, if the sediments are aerobic, within the surface layer of marine sediments resulting in anaerobic zones. We hypothesized that increasing exposure to elevated hydrocarbon concentrations would positively correlate with an increase in denitrification processes and the net accumulation of dinitrogen. This hypothesis was tested by comparing the relative abundance of genes associated with nitrogen metabolism and nitrogen cycling identified in 6 metagenomes from sediments contaminated by polyaromatic hydrocarbons from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, and 3 metagenomes from sediments associated with natural oil seeps in the Santa Barbara Channel. An additional 8 metagenomes from uncontaminated sediments from the Gulf of Mexico were analyzed for comparison. We predicted relative changes in metabolite turnover as a function of the differential microbial gene abundances, which showed predicted accumulation of metabolites associated with denitrification processes, including anammox, in the contaminated samples compared to uncontaminated sediments, with the magnitude of this change being positively correlated to the hydrocarbon concentration and exposure duration. These data highlight the potential impact of hydrocarbon inputs on N cycling processes in marine sediments and provide information relevant for system scale models of nitrogen metabolism in affected ecosystems.

  14. The Role of the Horizontal Gene Pool and Lateral Gene Transfer in Enhancing Microbial Activities in Marine Sediments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sobecky, Patricia A

    2006-01-01

    To better understand plasmid distribution, diversity and abundance in marine sediment microbial communities we developed a number of methodological approaches to advance the field during this project...

  15. Coupled anoxic nitrification/manganese reduction in marine sediments

    OpenAIRE

    Hulth, Stefan; Aller, Robert Curwood; Gilbert, Franck

    1999-01-01

    International audience; Pore water and solid phase distributions of oxygen, manganese, and nitrogen from hemipelagic and shelf sediments sometimes indicate a close coupling between the manganese and nitrogen redox cycles. Reaction coupling must be sustained in part by biological reworking of Mn-oxide-rich surface sediments into underlying anoxic zones. Surface sediment from Long Island Sound (USA) was used in laboratory experiments to simulate such intermittent natural mixing processes and su...

  16. Marinobacter sp. from marine sediments produce highly stable surface-active agents for combatting marine oil spills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raddadi, Noura; Giacomucci, Lucia; Totaro, Grazia; Fava, Fabio

    2017-11-02

    The application of chemical dispersants as a response to marine oil spills is raising concerns related to their potential toxicity also towards microbes involved in oil biodegradation. Hence, oil spills occurring under marine environments necessitate the application of biodispersants that are highly active, stable and effective under marine environment context. Biosurfactants from marine bacteria could be good candidates for the development of biodispersant formulations effective in marine environment. This study aimed at establishing a collection of marine bacteria able to produce surface-active compounds and evaluating the activity and stability of the produced compounds under conditions mimicking those found under marine environment context. A total of 43 different isolates were obtained from harbor sediments. Twenty-six of them produced mainly bioemulsifiers when glucose was used as carbon source and 16 were biosurfactant/bioemulsifiers producers after growth in the presence of soybean oil. Sequencing of 16S rRNA gene classified most isolates into the genus Marinobacter. The produced emulsions were shown to be stable up to 30 months monitoring period, in the presence of 300 g/l NaCl, at 4 °C and after high temperature treatment (120 °C for 20 min). The partially purified compounds obtained after growth on soybean oil-based media exhibited low toxicity towards V. fischeri and high capability to disperse crude oil on synthetic marine water. To the best of our knowledge, stability characterization of bioemulsifiers/biosurfactants from the non-pathogenic marine bacterium Marinobacter has not been previously reported. The produced compounds were shown to have potential for different applications including the environmental sector. Indeed, their high stability in the presence of high salt concentration and low temperature, conditions characterizing the marine environment, the capability to disperse crude oil and the low ecotoxicity makes them interesting for

  17. Global distribution of radiolytic H2 production in marine sediment and implications for subsurface life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauvage, J.; Flinders, A. F.; Spivack, A. J.; D'Hondt, S.

    2017-12-01

    We present the first global estimate of radiolytic H2production in marine sediment. Knowledge of microbial electron donor production rates is critical to understand the bioenergetics of Earth's subsurface ecosystems In marine sediment, radiolysis of water by radiation from naturally occurring radionuclides leads to production of reduced (H2) and oxidized (H2O2, O2) species. Water radiolysis is catalyzed by marine sediment. The magnitude of catalysis depends on sediment composition and radiation type. Deep-sea clay is especially effective at enhancing H2 yields, increasing yield by more than an order of magnitude relative to pure water. This previously unrecognized catalytic effect of geological materials on radiolytic H2 production is important for fueling microbial life in the subseafloor, especially in sediment with high catalytic power. Our estimate of radiolytic H2 production is based on spatially integrating a previously published model and uses (i) experimentally constrained radiolytic H2 yields for the principal marine sediment types, (ii) bulk sediment radioactive element content of sediment cores in three ocean basins (N. Atlantic, N. and S. Pacific), and global distributions of (iii) seafloor lithology, (iv) sediment porosity, and (v) sediment thickness. We calculate that global radiolytic H2 production in marine sediment is 1.6E+12 mol H2 yr-1. This production rate is small relative to the annual rate of photosynthetic organic-matter production in the surface ocean. The globally integrated ratio of radiolytic H2 production relative to photosynthetic primary production is 4.1E-4, based on electron equivalences. Although small relative to global photosynthetic biomass production, sediment-catalyzed production of radiolytic products is significant in the subseafloor. Our analysis of 9 sites in the N. Atlantic, N. and S. Pacific suggests that H2 is the primary microbial fuel in organic-poor sediment older than a few million years; at these sites, calculated

  18. High bacterial biodiversity increases degradation performance of hydrocarbons during bioremediation of contaminated harbor marine sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dell'Anno, Antonio; Beolchini, Francesca; Rocchetti, Laura; Luna, Gian Marco; Danovaro, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    We investigated changes of bacterial abundance and biodiversity during bioremediation experiments carried out on oxic and anoxic marine harbor sediments contaminated with hydrocarbons. Oxic sediments, supplied with inorganic nutrients, were incubated in aerobic conditions at 20 °C and 35 °C for 30 days, whereas anoxic sediments, amended with organic substrates, were incubated in anaerobic conditions at the same temperatures for 60 days. Results reported here indicate that temperature exerted the main effect on bacterial abundance, diversity and assemblage composition. At higher temperature bacterial diversity and evenness increased significantly in aerobic conditions, whilst decreased in anaerobic conditions. In both aerobic and anaerobic conditions, biodegradation efficiencies of hydrocarbons were significantly and positively related with bacterial richness and evenness. Overall results presented here suggest that bioremediation strategies, which can sustain high levels of bacterial diversity rather than the selection of specific taxa, may significantly increase the efficiency of hydrocarbon degradation in contaminated marine sediments. - Highlights: ► Bioremediation performance was investigated on hydrocarbon contaminated sediments. ► Major changes in bacterial diversity and assemblage composition were observed. ► Temperature exerted the major effect on bacterial assemblages. ► High bacterial diversity increased significantly biodegradation performance. ► This should be considered for sediment remediation by bio-treatments. - Bioremediation strategies which can sustain high levels of bacterial diversity may significantly increase the biodegradation of hydrocarbons in contaminated marine sediments.

  19. The use of ecocores to evaluate biodegradation in marine sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kurt; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Nielsen, Jef

    1988-01-01

    A laboratory sediment microcosm called the ecocore is described. It has been used to test the biodegradability of substances which predominantly enter the sediment. A new method for introducing hydrophobic test substances such as hydrocarbons to the test system is also described. In a series of t...

  20. Transformation of marine sediment to paddy soil: Primary marine, lacustrine, and land plant lipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller-Niggemann, Cornelia; Cao, Zhihong; Schwark, Lorenz

    2010-05-01

    More than fifty percent of the world's population feeds on rice. The continuous population increase and urban sprawl leads to an ever-increasing demand for new rice cultivation area, in particular China. For centuries suitable coastal areas in China have been exploited for land reclamation, i.e. conversion of coastal marine and lacustrine marshlands into rice paddy fields. Flooded rice paddies are considered one of the major biogenic sources of methane into the atmospheric. Methane is thought to be about 30 times more efficient as greenhouse gas, when compared to carbon dioxide. Overall, rice fields are assumed to contribute app. 10-25% to global CH4 production. It is thus paramount importance to study the effects of increasing rice cultivation and land reclamation in China. For global carbon cycle investigation, it is crucial whether paddy soils, due to their large extent and higher carbon turnover, serve as carbon (CO2) sinks or sources. Here we present results from a chronosequence study of paddy soils with different and well known starting dates of cultivation, in the Zhejiang province (Yangtze River delta) by land reclamation through the building of protective dikes over the past 2000 years. Two end members of natural sediments subjected to land reclamation, a marine tidal mudflat in the Yangtze delta and a coastal lake, represent the substrate on which the paddy soil evolution started. Dike systems were constructed 2000, 1000, 700, 300, 100, and 50 years before present. We are thus able to follow the evolution of rice paddy soils developed on marine sediments using eight well defined tie-points. This chronosequence is then used for assessing the relative proportion of primary marine or lacustrine organic matter preserved in present day soils and to identify the amount and composition of organic matter added since cultivation started. Paddy soil management introduces rice plants debris and exudates as well as rice-associated microbial biomass (covered in a

  1. Selective quantification of DOSS in marine sediment and sediment-trap solids by LC-QTOF-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Matt J; Joye, Samantha B; Field, Jennifer A

    2017-02-01

    At the onset of the 2010 Gulf oil spill, analytical methods for the quantification of the surfactants in Corexit did not exist in the peer-reviewed literature. To date, only a single study reports the presence of bis-(2-ethylhexyl) sodium sulfosuccinate (DOSS) in deep-sea Gulf sediment collected in 2010 from a single location. There are no data on the occurrence of DOSS in association with settling solids (i.e., sediment-trap solids). To address this data gap, DOSS was initially quantified by liquid chromatography tandem quadrupole mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in sediment and sediment-trap solids collected from multiple sites in the Gulf between 2010 and 2013. However, interferences confounded analyses using only a quadrupole (MS/MS) system; therefore, a LC-high mass accuracy quadruple time of flight mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF-MS) method was developed. The LC-QTOF method was validated and applied to eight representative samples of sediment and of sediment-trap solids. The presented method quantifies DOSS in solids of marine origin at concentrations above the limit of quantification of 0.23 μg kg -1 with recoveries of 97 ± 20 % (mean ± 95 CI). Gulf sediment and sediment-trap solids gave DOSS concentrations of Sediment core and sediment trap materials were collected in the Gulf and analyzed for DOSS by LCQTOF.

  2. Variability within nearshore ecosystems of the Gulf of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballachey, Brenda E.; Bodkin, James L.; Coletti, Heather A.; Dean, Thomas A; Esler, Daniel N.; Esslinger, George; Iken, Katrin; Kloecker, Kim; Konar, Brenda; Lindeberg, Mandy; Monson, Daniel; Shepherd, Marnie; Weitzman, Ben P.

    2015-01-01

    Nearshore marine habitats, which represent the interface among air, land and sea, form a critical component of the Gulf of Alaska (GOA) ecosystem. As an interface, the nearshore facilitates transfer of water, nutrients and biota between terrestrial and oceanic systems, creating zones of high productivity. The nearshore provides a variety of ecosystem services, including (1) nursery grounds for a wide variety of marine invertebrates and fishes (e.g., crabs, salmon, and herring), (2) nesting and pupping habitats for many pelagic marine predators (e.g., sea bird nesting colonies and pinniped rookeries), (3) important feeding habitats for high trophic level pelagic predators (e.g., killer whales), (4) habitat for resident nearshore species (including sea otters, harbor seals, shorebirds, sea ducks, nearshore fishes, and marine invertebrates), many of which are important sources of commercial and subsistence harvests, and (5) recreational, commercial and subsistence opportunities for human populations (Figure 1-1). The canopy forming kelps and eel grass beds found in the nearshore provide primary production and structure to nursery habitats, and also can dissipate wave energy thus reducing coastal erosion, and serve as a carbon “sink” capable of storing substantial amounts of atmospheric CO2 (Wilmers et al. 2012).

  3. Dynamic modeling of environmental risk associated with drilling discharges to marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durgut, İsmail; Rye, Henrik; Reed, Mark; Smit, Mathijs G D; Ditlevsen, May Kristin

    2015-10-15

    Drilling discharges are complex mixtures of base-fluids, chemicals and particulates, and may, after discharge to the marine environment, result in adverse effects on benthic communities. A numerical model was developed to estimate the fate of drilling discharges in the marine environment, and associated environmental risks. Environmental risk from deposited drilling waste in marine sediments is generally caused by four types of stressors: oxygen depletion, toxicity, burial and change of grain size. In order to properly model these stressors, natural burial, biodegradation and bioturbation processes were also included. Diagenetic equations provide the basis for quantifying environmental risk. These equations are solved numerically by an implicit-central differencing scheme. The sediment model described here is, together with a fate and risk model focusing on the water column, implemented in the DREAM and OSCAR models, both available within the Marine Environmental Modeling Workbench (MEMW) at SINTEF in Trondheim, Norway. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Thermophilic anaerobes in arctic marine sediments induced to mineralize complex organic matter at high temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hubert, Casey; Arnosti, Carol; Brüchert, Volker

    2010-01-01

    temperature-induced food chain mirrors sediment microbial processes occurring at cold in situ temperatures (near 0°C), yet it is catalysed by a completely different set of microorganisms. Using sulfate reduction rates (SRR) as a proxy for organic matter mineralization showed that differences in organic matter......Marine sediments harbour diverse populations of dormant thermophilic bacterial spores that become active in sediment incubation experiments at much higher than in situ temperature. This response was investigated in the presence of natural complex organic matter in sediments of two Arctic fjords...... enzymatic capacities for organic polymer degradation could allow specific heterotrophic populations like these to play a role in sustaining microbial metabolism in the deep, warm, marine biosphere....

  5. Formation of natural gas hydrates in marine sediments 1. Conceptual model of gas hydrate growth conditioned by host sediment properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clennell, M.B.; Hovland, M.; Booth, J.S.; Henry, P.; Winters, W.J.

    1999-01-01

    The stability of submarine gas hydrates is largely dictated by pressure and temperature, gas composition, and pore water salinity. However, the physical properties and surface chemistry of deep marine sediments may also affect the thermodynamic state, growth kinetics, spatial distributions, and growth forms of clathrates. Our conceptual model presumes that gas hydrate behaves in a way analogous to ice in a freezing soil. Hydrate growth is inhibited within fine-grained sediments by a combination of reduced pore water activity in the vicinity of hydrophilic mineral surfaces, and the excess internal energy of small crystals confined in pores. The excess energy can be thought of as a "capillary pressure" in the hydrate crystal, related to the pore size distribution and the state of stress in the sediment framework. The base of gas hydrate stability in a sequence of fine sediments is predicted by our model to occur at a lower temperature (nearer to the seabed) than would be calculated from bulk thermodynamic equilibrium. Capillary effects or a build up of salt in the system can expand the phase boundary between hydrate and free gas into a divariant field extending over a finite depth range dictated by total methane content and pore-size distribution. Hysteresis between the temperatures of crystallization and dissociation of the clathrate is also predicted. Growth forms commonly observed in hydrate samples recovered from marine sediments (nodules, and lenses in muds; cements in sands) can largely be explained by capillary effects, but kinetics of nucleation and growth are also important. The formation of concentrated gas hydrates in a partially closed system with respect to material transport, or where gas can flush through the system, may lead to water depletion in the host sediment. This "freeze-drying" may be detectable through physical changes to the sediment (low water content and overconsolidation) and/or chemical anomalies in the pore waters and metastable

  6. HEAVY METAL CONTENTS IN MARINE SEDIMENTS AND SEAWATER AT TOTOK BAY AREA, NORTH SULAWESI

    OpenAIRE

    Delyuzar Ilahude

    2017-01-01

    The study area is located in north-eastern part of Tomini Bay, approximately 80 km south of Manado city, North Sulawesi. This area is closed to submarine tailing disposal system in Buyat Bay. Five marine sediment samples and four water samples from seawater and dig wells have been used for heavy metals (Hg, As, CN) analyses by using Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (AAS). This study is a part of research conducted by Marine Geological Institute of Indonesia on morphological changes of seabed in...

  7. Hydrocarbon-degrading sulfate-reducing bacteria in marine hydrocarbon seep sediments

    OpenAIRE

    Kleindienst, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Microorganisms are key players in our biosphere because of their ability to degrade various organic compounds including a wide range of hydrocarbons. At marine hydrocarbon seeps, more than 90% of sulfate reduction (SR) is potentially coupled to non-methane hydrocarbon oxidation. Several hydrocarbon-degrading sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) were enriched or isolated from marine sediments. However, in situ active SRB remained largely unknown. In the present thesis, the global distribution and a...

  8. Impact of Varying Wave Conditions on the Mobility of Arsenic in a Nearshore Aquifer on the Great Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakhimbekova, S.; O'Carroll, D. M.; Robinson, C. E.

    2017-12-01

    Groundwater-coastal water interactions play an important role in controlling the behavior of inorganic chemicals in nearshore aquifers and the subsequent flux of these chemicals to receiving coastal waters. Previous studies have shown that dynamic groundwater flows and water exchange across the sediment-water interface can set up strong geochemical gradients and an important reaction zone in a nearshore aquifer that affect the fate of reactive chemicals. There is limited understanding of the impact of transient coastal forcing such as wave conditions on groundwater dynamics and geochemistry in a nearshore aquifer. The goal of this study was to assess the impact of intensified wave conditions on the behavior of arsenic in a nearshore aquifer and to determine the hydrological and geochemical factors controlling its fate and ultimate delivery to receiving coastal waters. Field investigations were conducted over the period of intensified wave conditions on a freshwater beach on Lake Erie, Canada. High spatial resolution aqueous and sediment sampling was conducted to characterize the subsurface distribution of inorganic species in the nearshore aquifer. Numerical groundwater flow and transport simulations were conducted to evaluate wave-induced perturbations in the flow dynamics including characterizing changes in the groundwater flow recirculations in the nearshore aquifer. The combination of field data and numerical simulations reveal that varying wave conditions alter groundwater flows and set up geochemical transition zones within the aquifer resulting in the release and sequestration of arsenic. Interactions between oxic surface water, mildly reducing shallow groundwater, and reducing sulfur- and iron-rich deep groundwater promote dynamic iron, sulfur and manganese cycling which control the mobility of arsenic in the aquifer. The findings of this study have potential implications for the fate and transport of other reactive chemicals (e.g. phosphorus, mercury) in

  9. Investigation into spore coat properties for the rapid identification of endospores in marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattray, J. E.; Chakraborty, A.; Bernard, B. B.; Brooks, J.; Hubert, C. R.

    2017-12-01

    Understanding the sediment biogeography of dormant marine thermophilic bacterial endospores (thermospores) has the potential to assist locating and characterising working petroleum systems. The presence of thermospores in cold ocean environments suggests that distribution occurs via hydrocarbon seepage from thermally active reservoirs. Low abundance and endospore coat physiology mean nucleic acid based techniques have limited success for in situ detection of thermospores. Alternative rapid analytical methods are needed so we investigated using the Schaeffer-Fulton (malachite green and safranin) and DAPI (4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole) staining techniques on thermospores from cultures and marine sediments. Sediment samples from 111 locations in the Eastern Gulf of Mexico (100 to 3300 m water depth; 6 to 600 km apart) were incubated at high temperature, followed by construction of 16S rRNA gene amplicon libraries (V3-V4 region; Illumina MiSeq) revealing enrichment of species-level thermospore OTUs. A sulfate reducing bacterium from site EGM080 was purified and classified based on its rRNA gene sequence as Desulfotomaculum geothermicum. Prior to thermospore staining the culture was kept in the death/ decline phase for 16 weeks to promote sporulation. Samples of D. geothermicum and the source marine sediment were fixed, stained then analysed using brightfield, phase contrast or fluorescence microscopy. Thermospores in pure culture were identified using phase contrast but were difficult to observe in the sediment sample due to particle aggregation. The Schaeffer-Fulton technique aided thermospore identification in a complex sediment sample matrix as thermospores were stained bright green, and also revealed that there were only spores and no (red stained) vegetative cells in the culture. Treatment with DAPI gave dull fluorescing cells but also provided insight into the behaviour of thermospores in sediment suspensions. Spores in the culture medium were free floating but

  10. Mechanical response of marine sediments resulting from isolation of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawson, P.R.

    1979-01-01

    Preliminary analyses of canister movement rsulting from thermally induced density gradients have been performed using a creeping viscoplastic flow model in conjunction with a creep equation evaluated from literature data for fine-grained clay. The stress levels predicted are quite low relative to the sediment quasi-static strength indicating that creep testing of marine sediments at very low stress is necessary. 4 figures

  11. Stratigraphy and Glacial-Marine Sediments of the Amerasian Basin, Central Arctic Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-02-01

    particles and conducting an electronic si/C analisis of the material that passed through the sieve A, using a I A 11 Coulter counter. I he (oulter...sized particles from suspension is similar for all of the deep-sea current with a velocity of 45 to 60 cm s would be required to cause sediments that...distribution of Arctic Ocean glacial-marine surface- relationship, the flow velocities required for erosion of incohesisc sediment types must be

  12. Ammonium Production in Sediments Inhibited with Molybdate: Implications for the Sources of Ammonium in Anoxic Marine Sediments

    OpenAIRE

    Jacobson, Myrna E.; Mackin, James E.; Capone, Douglas G.

    1987-01-01

    Ammonium production in the presence of specific inhibitors of sulfate reduction and methanogenesis was investigated in six marine sediments which differed in bulk properties and organic matter input. In all cases, little effect of the inhibitors on ammonium production was observed, although sulfate reduction was suppressed by molybdate. This gives evidence that the processes of fermentation and hydrolysis are of primary importance in ammonium generation at the sites studied. Although sulfate ...

  13. Molecular typing of Escherichia coli strains associated with threatened sea ducks and near-shore marine habitats of south-west Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollmén, Tuula E.; DebRoy, Chitrita; Flint, Paul L.; Safine, David E.; Schamber, Jason L.; Riddle, Ann E.; Trust, Kimberly A.

    2011-01-01

    In Alaska, sea ducks winter in coastal habitats at remote, non-industrialized areas, as well as in proximity to human communities and industrial activity. We evaluated prevalence and characteristics of Escherichia coli strains in faecal samples of Steller's eiders (Polysticta stelleri; n = 122) and harlequin ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus; n = 21) at an industrialized site and Steller's eiders (n = 48) at a reference site, and compared these strains with those isolated from water samples from near-shore habitats of ducks. The overall prevalence of E. coli was 16% and 67% in Steller's eiders and harlequin ducks, respectively, at the industrialized study site, and 2% in Steller's eiders at the reference site. Based on O and H antigen subtyping and genetic characterization by enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus polymerase chain reaction and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, we found evidence of avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC) strains associated with both species and detected E. coli strains carrying virulence genes associated with mammals in harlequin ducks. Steller's eiders that carried APEC had lower serum total protein and albumin concentrations, providing further evidence of pathogenicity. The genetic profile of two E. coli strains from water matched an isolate from a Steller's eider providing evidence of transmission between near-shore habitats and birds.

  14. Evaluation of the toxicity of organic matter in marine sediments

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarkar, A.

    . The variation of the inhibition of AChE is attributed to the presence of the residues of various neurotoxic substances in the sediment contaminatEd. by the river runoff as well industrial effluents and sewage....

  15. Evaluation of the toxicity of organic matter in marine sediments

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarkar, A.

    . The variation of the inhibition of AChE is attributed to the presence of the residues of various neurotoxic substances in the sediment contaminatEd. by the river runoff as well industrial effluents and sewage...

  16. Anaerobic Oxidation of Hydrocarbon Contaminants in Marine and Estuarine Sediments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lovley, Derek

    1999-01-01

    .... Pristine harbor sediments did not have a significant potential for anaerobic PAH oxidation, but could be adapted for PAH oxidation by exposure to PAhs or inoculation with PAH-oxidizing microrganisms...

  17. Reductive Dechlorination of Polychlorinated Biphenyls in Marine Sediments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sowers, Kevin

    1999-01-01

    ... Community by Comparative Sequence Analysis of Genes Coding for 16S rRNA, Microbial Reductive Dechlorination of Aroclor 1260 in Anaerobic Slurries of Estuarine Sediments, Differential RFLP patterns of PCR...

  18. Biogeochemistry of Dissolved Free Amino Acids in Marine Sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    ACCESSION NO: 11. RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER WWI -39~t I L9 (and Subtitle) S. TYPE OF REPORT A PERIOD COVERED OGEOCHEMISTRY OF DISSOLVED FREE AMINOACIDS IN... nutrition of benthic organisms via transepidermal uptake or to the formation of humic substances in sediments, if these levels are found outside cells...isolated organisms in aquaria, the rate of uptake in sediments and the signifi- cance ot this process to the overall nutrition of the organisms is uncertain

  19. Accumulation of heavy metals in sediments of marine environments along the southwest coast of India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manjunatha, B.R.; Yeats, P.A.; Smith, J.N.; Shankar, R.; Narayana, A.C.; Prakash, T.N.

    1999-01-01

    In order to estimate the rate of excessive sediment accumulation that causes navigational problems and the impacts of urban and industrial development on sediment quality, concentrations of Cu, Ni, Zn, Cr, Mn, Fe and Ca, and radioactivity levels of 210 Pb and 137 Cs have been measured in nineteen sediment cores from estuarine, lagoonal, marsh, backwater and inner shelf areas along the southwest coast of India. Sediment accumulation rates in estuarine, lagoonal, marshy areas of the Karnataka coast (ELMKC) and Cochin Backwaters (CBw) are three to six times higher than those in the adjacent inner shelf areas, consistent with the deposition of terrigenous sediments in the river-sea interaction zones. Hydrogen sulphide was detected in most of the samples; sediment colour varied from shades of gray to dark green. Sediments have lower elemental concentrations and element enrichment factors (EFs) particularly for redox sensitive elements such as Mn due to prevalence of reducing conditions in the sedimentary column. Sediments of ELMKC and CBw have a predominantly terrigenous source. They contain low Ca contents, characteristic of tropical river sediments. In contrast, a higher Ca content of inner shelf sediments off both Karnataka State (ISKS-1) and Kerala State (ISKS-2) implies the importance of additional sediment (CaCO 3 ) flux from the marine biota. Measured Cu, Ni and Zn concentrations are generally low, perhaps reflecting the pristine nature of sediments. However, higher concentrations of Cr at all stations and of Zn at CBw indicate the input of Cr enriched minerals like amphibole and pyroxene from the catchment as well as Zn from anthropogenic sources. Heavy metal accumulation rates are high in estuarine, lagoonal, marsh and backwater areas along the southwest coast of India. This is not only due to the proximity of sources, but also due to high sediment accumulation rates because of the reduction of river flow in river-sea interaction zones owing to particle

  20. A small-scale, portable method for extracting microplastics from marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppock, Rachel L; Cole, Matthew; Lindeque, Penelope K; Queirós, Ana M; Galloway, Tamara S

    2017-11-01

    Microplastics (plastic particles, 0.1 μm-5 mm in size) are widespread marine pollutants, accumulating in benthic sediments and shorelines the world over. To gain a clearer understanding of microplastic availability to marine life, and the risks they pose to the health of benthic communities, ecological processes and food security, it is important to obtain accurate measures of microplastic abundance in marine sediments. To date, methods for extracting microplastics from marine sediments have been disadvantaged by complexity, expense, low extraction efficiencies and incompatibility with very fine sediments. Here we present a new, portable method to separate microplastics from sediments of differing types, using the principle of density floatation. The Sediment-Microplastic Isolation (SMI) unit is a custom-built apparatus which consistently extracted microplastics from sediments in a single step, with a mean efficiency of 95.8% (±SE 1.6%; min 70%, max 100%). Zinc chloride, at a density of 1.5 g cm -3 , was deemed an effective and relatively inexpensive floatation media, allowing fine sediment to settle whilst simultaneously enabling floatation of dense polymers. The method was validated by artificially spiking sediment with low and high density microplastics, and its environmental relevance was further tested by extracting plastics present in natural sediment samples from sites ranging in sediment type; fine silt/clay (mean size 10.25 ± SD 3.02 μm) to coarse sand (mean size 149.3 ± SD 49.9 μm). The method presented here is cheap, reproducible and is easily portable, lending itself for use in the laboratory and in the field, eg. on board research vessels. By employing this method, accurate estimates of microplastic type, distribution and abundance in natural sediments can be achieved, with the potential to further our understanding of the availability of microplastics to benthic organisms. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All

  1. Electrophoretic Extraction and Proteomic Characterization of Proteins Buried in Marine Sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eli K. Moore

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Proteins are the largest defined molecular component of marine organic nitrogen, and hydrolysable amino acids, the building blocks of proteins, are important components of particulate nitrogen in marine sediments. In oceanic systems, the largest contributors are phytoplankton proteins, which have been tracked from newly produced bloom material through the water column to surface sediments in the Bering Sea, but it is not known if proteins buried deeper in sediment systems can be identified with confidence. Electrophoretic gel protein extraction methods followed by proteomic mass spectrometry and database searching were used as the methodology to identify buried phytoplankton proteins in sediments from the 8–10 cm section of a Bering Sea sediment core. More peptides and proteins were identified using an SDS-PAGE tube gel than a standard 1D flat gel or digesting the sediment directly with trypsin. The majority of proteins identified correlated to the marine diatom, Thalassiosira pseudonana, rather than bacterial protein sequences, indicating an algal source not only dominates the input, but also the preserved protein fraction. Abundant RuBisCO and fucoxanthin chlorophyll a/c binding proteins were identified, supporting algal sources of these proteins and reinforcing the proposed mechanisms that might protect proteins for long time periods. Some preserved peptides were identified in unexpected gel molecular weight ranges, indicating that some structural changes or charge alteration influenced the mobility of these products during electrophoresis isolation. Identifying buried photosystem proteins suggests that algal particulate matter is a significant fraction of the preserved organic carbon and nitrogen pools in marine sediments.

  2. Accumulation of polychlorinated organic contaminants from sediment by three benthic marine species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruell, R.J.; Rubinstein, N.I.; Taplin, B.K.; LiVolsi, J.A.; Bowen, R.D.

    1993-01-01

    A laboratory experiment was conducted to measure the accumulation of selected polychlorinated compounds by marine benthos exposed to environmentally contaminated sediment. Sandworms (Nereis virens), clams (Macoma nasuta), and grass shrimp (Palaemonetes pugio) were exposed to sediment collected from the Passaic River, New Jersey. All three species accumulated 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (2,3,7,8-TCDD), 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzofuran (2,3,7,8-TCDF) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from the sediment. In addition, a recently identified sulfur containing analog of tetrachlorinated dibenzofurans. The objectives of the study were to determine the relative bioavailability of 2,3,7,8-TCDD, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzofuran (2,3,7,8-TCDF) and selected PCB congeners from bottom sediments as well as to examine the relationship between contaminant concentrations in sediments and biota.

  3. Marine meiofauna, carbon and nitrogen mineralization in sandy and soft sediments of Disko Bay, West Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rysgaard, S.; Christensen, P.B.; Sørensen, Martin Vinther

    2000-01-01

    and a relatively deep O-2 penetration into the sediment at the deep-water stations ensured high denitrification activity, particularly as a result of an efficient coupling between nitrification and denitrification. Denitrification accounted for up to 33 % of total carbon mineralization in the deep-water sediment...... layers of the sediment. Algal photosynthetic activity and nitrogen uptake reduced nitrogen effluxes and denitrification rates. Sulfate reduction was the most important pathway for carbon mineralization in the sediments of the shallow-water station. In contrast, high bottom-water NO3- concentrations...... and was, together with organotrophic O-2 respiration, the most important pathway for carbon mineralization within these sediments. The obtained process rates were comparable to mineralization rates from much warmer localities, suggesting that benthic mineralization in arctic marine environments...

  4. Abiotic racemization kinetics of amino acids in marine sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steen, Andrew; Jørgensen, Bo Barker; Lomstein, Bente Aagaard

    2013-01-01

    Enantiomeric ratios of amino acids can be used to infer the sources and composition of sedimentary organic matter. Such inferences, however, rely on knowing the rates at which amino acids in sedimentary organic racemize abiotically. Based on a heating experiment, we report Arrhenius parameters...... for aspartic acid, glutamic acid, serine, and alanine in bulk sediment from Aarhus Bay, Denmark, taken from the surface, 30 cm, and 340 cm depth. Extrapolation to a typical cold deep sea sediment temperature of 3 °C suggests racemization rate constants of on the order of 10-5 yr-1 without evident differences...... between different amino acids or depths. These results can be used in conjunction with measurements of sediment age to predict the ratio of D:L amino acids due solely to abiotic racemization of the source material, deviations from which can indicate the abundance and turnover of active microbial...

  5. Using marine sediment archives to reconstruct past outlet glacier variability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Camilla Snowman; Straneo, Fiamma; Ribergaard, Mads

    2013-01-01

    Ice-rafted debris in fjord sediment cores provides information about outlet glacier activity beyond the instrumental time period. It tells us that the Helheim Glacier, Greenland’s third most productive glacier, responds rapidly to short-term (3 to 10 years) climate changes.......Ice-rafted debris in fjord sediment cores provides information about outlet glacier activity beyond the instrumental time period. It tells us that the Helheim Glacier, Greenland’s third most productive glacier, responds rapidly to short-term (3 to 10 years) climate changes....

  6. A new variety of Chainia olivacea from marine sediment off Gulf of Mannar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellaiah, P; Kalyan, D; Rao, V S; Rao, B V

    1997-01-01

    A new variety of Chainia olivacea was isolated from marine sediment off Gulf of Mannar. The morphological, cultural, physiological and biochemical characters were studied, compared to known species and identified as a new variety of Chainia olivacea. Antibiotic activity of the strain was tested against both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria as well as fungi and yeasts. Sodium chloride tolerance was also tested.

  7. Monitoring of the booster biocide dichlofluanid in water and marine sediment of Greek marinas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamwijk, C.; Schouten, A.; Foekema, E.M.; Ravenberg, J.C.; Collombon, M.T.; Schmidt, K.; Kugler, M.

    2005-01-01

    Dichlofluanid (N-dichlorofluoromethylthio-N¿-dimethyl-N-phenylsulphamide) is used as booster biocide in antifouling paints. The occurrence of dichlofluanid and its metabolite DMSA (N¿-dimethyl-N-phenyl-sulphamide) was monitored in seawater and marine sediment from three Greek marinas. Seawater and

  8. Quantitative analysis of anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) in marine sediments: a modeling perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Regnier, P.; Dale, A.W.; Arndt, S.; LaRowe, D.E.; Mogollon, J.M.; Van Cappellen, P.

    2011-01-01

    Recent developments in the quantitativemodeling of methane dynamics and anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) in marine sediments are critically reviewed. The first part of the review begins with a comparison of alternative kinetic models for AOM. The roles of bioenergetic limitations, intermediate

  9. Monitoring of the booster biocide dichlofluanid in water and marine sediment of Greek marinas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamwijk, C.; Schouten, A.; Foekema, E.M.; Ravensberg, J.C.; Collombon, M.T.; Schmidt, K.; Kugler, M.

    2005-01-01

    Dichlofluanid (N-dichlorofluoromethylthio-N′-dimethyl-N- phenylsulphamide) is used as booster biocide in antifouling paints. The occurrence of dichlofluanid and its metabolite DMSA (N′-dimethyl-N-phenyl- sulphamide) was monitored in seawater and marine sediment from three Greek marinas. Seawater and

  10. Anaerobic oxidation of methane and its impact on iron and phosphorus cycling in marine sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Egger, M.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/372629199

    2016-01-01

    Methane (CH4) represents one of the key compounds in the global carbon (C) cycle. A major proportion of the CH4 in the Earth system is produced in marine sediments by methanogenesis, the final step in the gradual fermentation of organic matter deposited on the seafloor. Once emitted to the

  11. Constraining denitrification in permeable wave-influenced marine sediment using linked hydrodynamic and biogeochemical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas, M. B.; Cook, P. L.; Jiang, H.; Traykovski, P.

    2009-12-01

    Permeable marine sediment are ubiquitous complex environments, the biogeochemistry of which are strongly coupled to hydrodynamic process above and within the sediment. The biogeochemical processes in these settings have global scale implications but are poorly understood and challenging to quantify. We present the first simulation of linked turbulent oscillatory flow of the water column, porous media flow, and solute transport in the sediment with oxygen consumption, nitrification, denitrification, and ammonification, informed by field- and/ or experimentally-derived parameters. Nitrification and denitrification were significantly impacted by advective pore water exchange between the sediment and the water column. Denitrification rates showed a maximum at intermediate permeabilities, and were negligible at high permeabilities. Denitrification rates were low, with only ~15% of total N mineralized being denitrified, although this may be increased temporarily following sediment resuspension events. Our model-estimated denitrification rates are about half of previous estimates which do not consider solute advection through the sediment. Given the critical role of sediment permeability, topography, and bottom currents in controlling denitrification rates, an improved knowledge of these factors is vital for obtaining better estimates of denitrification taking place on shelf sediment. Broad application of our approach to myriad conditions will lead to improved predictive capacity, better informed experimental and sampling design, and more holistic understanding of the biogeochemistry of permeable sediment.

  12. Partition of iodine ({sup 129}I and {sup 127}I) isotopes in soils and marine sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Violeta, E-mail: violeta.hansen@risoe.dk [Riso National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, NUK-202, Technical University of Denmark, Frederiksborgvej 399, P.O.B. 49, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Roos, Per [Riso National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, NUK-202, Technical University of Denmark, Frederiksborgvej 399, P.O.B. 49, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Aldahan, Ala [Department of Earth Science, Uppsala University, SE-758 36 Uppsala (Sweden); Department of Geology, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain (United Arab Emirates); Hou, Xiaolin [Riso National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, NUK-202, Technical University of Denmark, Frederiksborgvej 399, P.O.B. 49, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Possnert, Goeran [Tandem Laboratory, Uppsala University, SE-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2011-12-15

    Natural organic matter, such as humic and fulvic acids and humin, plays a key role in determining the fate and mobility of radioiodine in soil and sediments. The radioisotope {sup 129}I is continuously produced and released from nuclear fuel reprocessing plants, and as a biophilic element, its environmental mobility is strongly linked to organic matter. Due to its long half-life (15.7 million years), {sup 129}I builds up in the environment and can be traced since the beginning of the nuclear era in reservoirs such as soils and marine sediments. Nevertheless, partition of the isotope between the different types of organic matter in soil and sediment is rarely explored. Here we present a sequential extraction of {sup 129}I and {sup 127}I chemical forms encountered in a Danish soil, a soil reference material (IAEA-375), an anoxic marine sediment from Southern Norway and an oxic sediment from the Barents Sea. The different forms of iodine are related to water soluble, exchangeable, carbonates, oxides as well as iodine bound to humic acid, fulvic acid and to humin and minerals. This is the first study to identify {sup 129}I in humic and fulvic acid and humin. The results show that 30-56% of the total {sup 127}I and 42-60% of the total {sup 129}I are associated with organic matter in soil and sediment samples. At a soil/sediment pH below 5.0-5.5, {sup 127}I and {sup 129}I in the organic fraction associate primarily with the humic acid while at soil/sediment pH > 6 {sup 129}I was mostly found to be bound to fulvic acid. Anoxic conditions seem to increase the mobility and availability of iodine compared to oxic, while subaerial conditions (soils) reduces the availability of water soluble fraction compared to subaqueous (marine) conditions. - Highlights: > Chemical speciation of {sup 129}I and {sup 127}I in soil and sediment. > Association of {sup 129}I with humic substances in soil and marine sediments is reported. > Partition of iodine within the organic fraction depends

  13. Increased carbon uptake in marine sediment enabled by naturally occurring electrical conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, M. E.; Cahoon, D. P.; Girguis, P. R.

    2011-12-01

    Reduction-oxidation (redox) gradients are common across marine sediment-water interfaces and result from microbially-mediated reactions such as the oxidation of organic matter coupled to reduction of electron acceptors. Most microbes living in sediments do not have direct access to oxygen in their immediate environment, however it has recently been shown that sulfide-oxidizing microbes may employ extracellular electron transfer (EET) to couple the oxidation of sulfide in the anoxic zone to reduction of oxygen at the sediment-water interface located several centimeters away. However, no mechanisms for this observed phenomenon have been validated. Accordingly, we tested the hypothesis that conductive minerals in marine sediment (specifically pyrite) can couple spatially separated redox reactions such as anaerobic respiration and oxygen reduction. Marine sediment was amended with naturally occurring pyrite in varying concentrations (0, 2, 10 and 50 weight-percent) and then incubated with 10 μM 13C-labeled acetate. After six hours, the treatments with the greatest amount of added pyrite showed the greatest incorporation of acetate from the labeled pool. The fraction of labeled acetate incorporation more than doubled in the 10 and 50 weight-percent treatments compared to the control sediment. We also designed a circuit to investigate the electrical conductivity of the sediment treatments as a function of added pyrite. A potentiostat was used to establish a known voltage across a sediment column and current was measured. Resistance (the inverse of conductance) was calculated from a linear fit of current data over a range of voltages ranging from 0.5 to 1.0 V. The treatments with added pyrite had lower resistance than background sediment, with the lowest resistance corresponding to the 50% pyrite treatment. We also examined the effect of varying pyrite content on microbial community composition using massively parallel 16S rRNA sequencing. Microbial community analyses

  14. usSEABED: Database Efforts in Marine Surficial Sediments of the US EEZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, J. A.; Jenkins, C. J.; Field, M. E.; Gardner, J. V.; Zimmermann, M.; Box, C. E.; Kneeshaw, T. A.

    2001-12-01

    The USGS, in partnership with the University of Sydney, Australia and National Marine Fisheries Service, Seattle is constructing a unique marine surficial sediment database, usSEABED, for the United States EEZ. usSEABED maximizes the knowledge of the seafloor by combining sedimentological and biological information, verbal sample and photographic descriptions (through fuzzy set theory), chemical, and acoustic data, along with other seabed geologic characteristics, into a single standardized format. In this way, usSEABED is more than a compilation of known quantitative surficial sediment data but rather provides an integrated view of the seabed. Decades of marine sediment research by federal, state, local, academic, and private institutions has provided temporal and spatial snapshots of the ocean floor, either as focused, tightly gridded sampling efforts, or in the earliest days, more widely scattered efforts. As is, these datasets had disparate purposes with dissimilar sampling parameters, statistics, and data types. usSEABED filters these datasets, providing uniform parameters for quantitative sediment textural data, parsed verbal data (using fuzzy set theory), modeled data, and both geologic and biologic compositional parameters. Access to our efforts is through our website, available in the fall of 2001, which includes an explanation of the processing involved, sample maps, an interactive GIS site, and a data-download site. usSEABED is held in a comma-delimited, field-defined, tree-d structure that can be brought into most COTS relational databases or GIS. Focussed originally on the U.S. Pacific margin, recent work is widening the coverage to areas in Hawaii, Alaska, the Gulf of Mexico, the Great Lakes, and the U.S. Atlantic margin. usSEABED is an ongoing project, with expanding data inclusions and new data-filtering modules available, such as sediment true-color displays and marine mineral locations. We invite the additions of new sedimentological, biological

  15. Absorption of sediment-bound radionuclides through the digestive tract of marine demersal fishes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyanagi, Taku; Nakahara, Motokazu; Iimura, Mitsue

    1978-01-01

    Retention of 54 Mn, 59 Fe, 60 Co and 65 Zn by marine demersal fish, Ishigarei (Kareius bicoloratus) was observed by administering sediment-bound radioisotopes orally to the fishes to elucidate the contribution of sediment to the accumulation of radionuclides by marine benthic organisms. The sediment had high distribution coefficients for these radionuclides and from the result of leaching experiments with acidified seawater, considerable fractions of radioactive Mn, Co and Zn in the sediment were assumed to be leached in the stomach of the fishes. Retention patterns of the nuclides in the whole-body of the fishes were analyzed by peeling off method and two components were obtained for all the nuclides. The parameters which characterized the retention patterns suggested relatively high absorption efficiencies of the radionuclides except 59 Fe through the digestive tract of the fishes and the retention patterns of the slower component were supposed to be similar to those observed for the nuclides taken up from seawater or food by the dishes. Rapid and higher transfer of the absorbed radionuclides to the particular organs of the fishes suggested the important role of the sediment in the radioactive contamination of marine demersal fishes. (author)

  16. Microbial communities in marine sediments modify success of an invasive macrophyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribben, Paul E; Nielsen, Shaun; Seymour, Justin R; Bradley, Daniel J; West, Matthew N; Thomas, Torsten

    2017-08-29

    Invasive plants have extensive impacts on ecosystem function and biodiversity globally. Our inability to manage invasive species stems in part from a lack of understanding of the processes that control their successful establishment and spread. To date, studies have largely considered how above-ground processes control native/invasive plant interactions. Emerging research from terrestrial and wetland ecosystems demonstrates that below-ground processes under microbial control can determine the outcome of interactions between native and invasive plants. Whether sediment microbes modify the success of invasive macrophytes in marine ecosystems is untested, despite marine sediment microbes controlling many ecological processes (e.g. nutrient cycling) comparable to those in terrestrial ecosystems. We first show that sediment bacterial communities differ between the native seagrass Zostera capricorni and the invasive alga Caulerpa taxifolia and that those differences relate to functional changes in sulfur cycling between the macrophytes. Second, by experimentally manipulating the microbial communities we show that intact microbial communities in Z. capricorni sediments provide biotic resistance by reducing C. taxifolia fragment growth 119% compared to when they are inactive, and intact microbial communities in C. taxifolia sediments have positive feedbacks by increasing fragment growth 200%. Thus, similar to terrestrial ecosystems, microorganisms appear to indirectly control the success of invasive macrophytes in marine ecosystems.

  17. Ocean currents shape the microbiome of Arctic marine sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamdan, L.J.; Coffin, R.B.; Sikaroodi, M.; Greinert, J.; Treude, T.; Gillevet, P.M.

    2013-01-01

    Prokaryote communities were investigated on the seasonally stratified Alaska Beaufort Shelf (ABS). Water and sediment directly underlying water with origin in the Arctic, Pacific or Atlantic oceans were analyzed by pyrosequencing and length heterogeneity-PCR in conjunction with physicochemical and

  18. Algal and archaeal polyisoprenoids in a recent marine sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bian, L. Q.; Hinrichs, K. U.; Xie, T. M.

    2001-01-01

    the sediment section is indicated by significant concentrations of 2,6,10,15,19-pentamethylicosane (PMI) and of ether-bound phytane and biphytane. The PMI reaches a minimum delta value of -47 parts per thousand well below the transition zone. Its isotopic depletion could reflect either methanogenic...

  19. Notes on X-ray interpretation of marine sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouma, Arnold H.

    1964-01-01

    X-ray radiography is a technique recently introduced in the study of sediments. The method is very useful for analysing details of primary and secondary sedimentary structures or to detect their presence in unconsolidated as well as in consolidated deposits. Prints of radiographs made from vertical

  20. Mineralogical and geochemical aspects of the marine sediments off Goa

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Paropkari, A.L.

    of phosphorites authigenically by biological mediation. Higher concentration of A1 sub(2) 0 sub(3) and Ti02 in the inner shelf sediments compared to outer shelf and slope point out to their higher contribution by terrigenous influx. Titanium is mainly contributed...

  1. Concretization of high level radioactive source in marine sediment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, H.V.

    1987-01-01

    A method is described of forming a concretized coating which encapsulates a canister of heat producing materials and provides protection against corrosion by seawater when the canister is placed in an ocean floor-sediment environment. The method comprises: selecting a location on the ocean floor at such a depth that the proximate seawater thereat would be capable of reaching a temperature of at least 110 0 C. when in contact with the canister of heat producing materials. The seawater within the pores of the ocean floor sediment thereat contains sufficient amounts of calcium and sulfate to form, at the temperature, an anhydrite layer around the canister; placing the canister into the ocean floor sediment at the location; and storing the canister at the location for at least one month thereby allowing heat from the canister to raise the temperature of the seawater in the pores of the sediment proximate to the canister to at least 110 0 C. wherein anhydrite precipitates from the proximate seawater and forms a concretized layer on the exterior surfaces of the canister

  2. The importance of marine sediment biodiversity in ecosystem precesses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snelgrove, P.V.R.; Blackburn, T.H.; Hutchings, P.; Alongi, D.M.; Grassle, J.F.; Hummel, H.; King, G.; Koike, I.; Lambshead, P.J.D.; Ramsing, N.B.; Solis-Weiss, V.

    1997-01-01

    Sedimentary habitats cover most of the ocean bottom and therefore constitute the largest. single ecosystem on earth in spatial coverage, Although only a small fraction of the micro-, meio- and macroscopic benthic organisms that reside in and on sediments have been described and few estimates of

  3. Coupled anoxic nitrification/manganese reduction in marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulth, Stefan; Aller, Robert C.; Gilbert, Franck

    1999-01-01

    Pore water and solid phase distributions of oxygen, manganese, and nitrogen from hemipelagic and shelf sediments sometimes indicate a close coupling between the manganese and nitrogen redox cycles. Reaction coupling must be sustained in part by biological reworking of Mn-oxide-rich surface sediments into underlying anoxic zones. Surface sediment from Long Island Sound (USA) was used in laboratory experiments to simulate such intermittent natural mixing processes and subsequent reaction evolution. Mixed sediment was incubated anoxically under either diffusively open (plugs) or closed conditions (jars). In closed anoxic incubations, pore water NO 3- increased regularly to a maximum (up to 17 μM) after one to several days, and was subsequently depleted. Mn 2+ was produced simultaneously with NO 3-. NO 2- was also clearly produced and subsequently reduced, with a formation-depletion pattern consistent with coupled nitrification-denitrification in the anoxic sediment. Manipulative additions of Mn-oxides (5-10 μmol g -1 net) demonstrated that net anoxic NO 3- production correlated directly with initial Mn-oxide content. During initial net NO 3- production there was no evidence for SO 42- reduction. A direct correlation was also observed between anoxic nitrification rates and estimated sulfate reduction rates; the larger nitrification rates, the larger the eventual net sulfate reduction rates. Diffusively-open incubations using sediment plugs of four different thicknesses (2, 5, 10 and 20 mm) exposed to anoxic overlying water, also showed net production of pore water NO 3- (˜15-20 μM) despite the absence of NO 3- in the overlying water for at least five days. In general, higher nitrate concentrations were maintained in the open relative to the closed incubations, due most likely to lower concentrations of dissolved reductants for NO 3- in the open system. These experiments imply simultaneous coupling between the benthic nitrogen, manganese, and sulfur redox cycles

  4. Instrumental neutron activation analysis of marine sediment in-house reference material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazaratul Ashifa Abdullah Salim; Mohd Suhaimi Hamzah; Mohd Suhaimi Elias; Siong, W.B.; Shamsiah Abdul Rahman; Azian Hashim; Shakirah Abdul Shukor

    2013-01-01

    Reference materials play an important role in demonstrating the quality and reliability of analytical data. The advantage of using in-house reference materials is that they provide a relatively cheap option as compared to using commercially available certified reference material (CRM) and can closely resemble the laboratory routine test sample. A marine sediment sample was designed as an in-house reference material, in the framework of quality assurance and control (QA/QC) program of the Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) Laboratory at Nuclear Malaysia. The NAA technique was solely used for the homogeneity test of the marine sediment sample. The CRM of IAEA- Soil 7 and IAEA- SL1 (Lake Sediment) were applied in the analysis as compatible matrix based reference materials for QA purposes. (Author)

  5. Relevance of carbon stocks of marine sediments for national greenhouse gas inventories of maritime nations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avelar, Silvania; van der Voort, Tessa S; Eglinton, Timothy I

    2017-12-01

    Determining national carbon stocks is essential in the framework of ongoing climate change mitigation actions. Presently, assessment of carbon stocks in the context of greenhouse gas (GHG)-reporting on a nation-by-nation basis focuses on the terrestrial realm, i.e., carbon held in living plant biomass and soils, and on potential changes in these stocks in response to anthropogenic activities. However, while the ocean and underlying sediments store substantial quantities of carbon, this pool is presently not considered in the context of national inventories. The ongoing disturbances to both terrestrial and marine ecosystems as a consequence of food production, pollution, climate change and other factors, as well as alteration of linkages and C-exchange between continental and oceanic realms, highlight the need for a better understanding of the quantity and vulnerability of carbon stocks in both systems. We present a preliminary comparison of the stocks of organic carbon held in continental margin sediments within the Exclusive Economic Zone of maritime nations with those in their soils. Our study focuses on Namibia, where there is a wealth of marine sediment data, and draws comparisons with sediment data from two other countries with different characteristics, which are Pakistan and the United Kingdom. Results indicate that marine sediment carbon stocks in maritime nations can be similar in magnitude to those of soils. Therefore, if human activities in these areas are managed, carbon stocks in the oceanic realm-particularly over continental margins-could be considered as part of national GHG inventories. This study shows that marine sediment organic carbon stocks can be equal in size or exceed terrestrial carbon stocks of maritime nations. This provides motivation both for improved assessment of sedimentary carbon inventories and for reevaluation of the way that carbon stocks are assessed and valued. The latter carries potential implications for the management of

  6. Relevance of carbon stocks of marine sediments for national greenhouse gas inventories of maritime nations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvania Avelar

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Determining national carbon stocks is essential in the framework of ongoing climate change mitigation actions. Presently, assessment of carbon stocks in the context of greenhouse gas (GHG-reporting on a nation-by-nation basis focuses on the terrestrial realm, i.e., carbon held in living plant biomass and soils, and on potential changes in these stocks in response to anthropogenic activities. However, while the ocean and underlying sediments store substantial quantities of carbon, this pool is presently not considered in the context of national inventories. The ongoing disturbances to both terrestrial and marine ecosystems as a consequence of food production, pollution, climate change and other factors, as well as alteration of linkages and C-exchange between continental and oceanic realms, highlight the need for a better understanding of the quantity and vulnerability of carbon stocks in both systems. We present a preliminary comparison of the stocks of organic carbon held in continental margin sediments within the Exclusive Economic Zone of maritime nations with those in their soils. Our study focuses on Namibia, where there is a wealth of marine sediment data, and draws comparisons with sediment data from two other countries with different characteristics, which are Pakistan and the United Kingdom. Results Results indicate that marine sediment carbon stocks in maritime nations can be similar in magnitude to those of soils. Therefore, if human activities in these areas are managed, carbon stocks in the oceanic realm—particularly over continental margins—could be considered as part of national GHG inventories. Conclusions This study shows that marine sediment organic carbon stocks can be equal in size or exceed terrestrial carbon stocks of maritime nations. This provides motivation both for improved assessment of sedimentary carbon inventories and for reevaluation of the way that carbon stocks are assessed and valued. The

  7. Eukaryotic diversity in late Pleistocene marine sediments around a shallow methane hydrate deposit in the Japan Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouduka, M; Tanabe, A S; Yamamoto, S; Yanagawa, K; Nakamura, Y; Akiba, F; Tomaru, H; Toju, H; Suzuki, Y

    2017-09-01

    Marine sediments contain eukaryotic DNA deposited from overlying water columns. However, a large proportion of deposited eukaryotic DNA is aerobically biodegraded in shallow marine sediments. Cold seep sediments are often anaerobic near the sediment-water interface, so eukaryotic DNA in such sediments is expected to be preserved. We investigated deeply buried marine sediments in the Japan Sea, where a methane hydrate deposit is associated with cold seeps. Quantitative PCR analysis revealed the reproducible recovery of eukaryotic DNA in marine sediments at depths up to 31.0 m in the vicinity of the methane hydrate deposit. In contrast, the reproducible recovery of eukaryotic DNA was limited to a shallow depth (8.3 m) in marine sediments not adjacent to the methane hydrate deposit in the same area. Pyrosequencing of an 18S rRNA gene variable region generated 1,276-3,307 reads per sample, which was sufficient to cover the biodiversity based on rarefaction curves. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that most of the eukaryotic DNA originated from radiolarian genera of the class Chaunacanthida, which have SrSO 4 skeletons, the sea grass genus Zostera, and the seaweed genus Sargassum. Eukaryotic DNA originating from other planktonic fauna and land plants was also detected. Diatom sequences closely related to Thalassiosira spp., indicative of cold climates, were obtained from sediments deposited during the last glacial period (MIS-2). Plant sequences of the genera Alnus, Micromonas, and Ulmus were found in sediments deposited during the warm interstadial period (MIS-3). These results suggest the long-term persistence of eukaryotic DNA from terrestrial and aquatic sources in marine sediments associated with cold seeps, and that the genetic information from eukaryotic DNA from deeply buried marine sediments associated with cold seeps can be used to reconstruct environments and ecosystems from the past. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Petroleum hydrocarbon concentrations in marine sediments along Chennai Coast, Bay of Bengal, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatachalapathy, R; Veerasingam, S; Ramkumar, T

    2010-10-01

    The spatial and temporal distribution of petroleum hydrocarbons (PHC) in marine sediments along the Chennai coast, Bay of Bengal was quantified by Ultra-Violet Fluorescence (UVF) Spectroscopy. The concentration of PHC in surface sediments varied from 1.88 to 39.76 ppm. The highest values obtained in the northern part of the study area, where shipping activities and land-based waste waters disposed into sea through the rivers like Kuvam and Adayar. The Adayar (7.26-16.83 ppm) and Kuvam (5.5-39.72 ppm) cores reveal a clear horizon of increase in PHC above 50 and 35 cm respectively. PHC values showed a decreasing pattern with depth in all sediment cores suggesting the excess anthropogenic loading occurring in the recent past. The present study revealed that the PHC values of Chennai coastal sediments are lower than the values reported from selected costal areas including the sediment of the Mumbai coast (7.6-42.8 ppm), Arabian Sea. The results will be useful for pollution monitoring program along the coastal region and also to check the level of petroleum hydrocarbons in marine sediments.

  9. Marine coastal sediments microbial hydrocarbon degradation processes: contribution of experimental ecology in the omics'era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cravo-Laureau, Cristiana; Duran, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Coastal marine sediments, where important biological processes take place, supply essential ecosystem services. By their location, such ecosystems are particularly exposed to human activities as evidenced by the recent Deepwater Horizon disaster. This catastrophe revealed the importance to better understand the microbial processes involved on hydrocarbon degradation in marine sediments raising strong interests of the scientific community. During the last decade, several studies have shown the key role played by microorganisms in determining the fate of hydrocarbons in oil-polluted sediments but only few have taken into consideration the whole sediment's complexity. Marine coastal sediment ecosystems are characterized by remarkable heterogeneity, owning high biodiversity and are subjected to fluctuations in environmental conditions, especially to important oxygen oscillations due to tides. Thus, for understanding the fate of hydrocarbons in such environments, it is crucial to study microbial activities, taking into account sediment characteristics, physical-chemical factors (electron acceptors, temperature), nutrients, co-metabolites availability as well as sediment's reworking due to bioturbation activities. Key information could be collected from in situ studies, which provide an overview of microbial processes, but it is difficult to integrate all parameters involved. Microcosm experiments allow to dissect in-depth some mechanisms involved in hydrocarbon degradation but exclude environmental complexity. To overcome these lacks, strategies have been developed, by creating experiments as close as possible to environmental conditions, for studying natural microbial communities subjected to oil pollution. We present here a review of these approaches, their results and limitation, as well as the promising future of applying "omics" approaches to characterize in-depth microbial communities and metabolic networks involved in hydrocarbon degradation. In addition, we

  10. Determination of cofactors in marine sediments; Bestimmung von Kofaktoren im marinen Sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huschek, G.; Kayser, A.

    2002-12-01

    In respect to a sieving study of sediments in three different sediment locations (Wadden Sea (A), river Elbe-Aestuar (B), Baltic Sea (C)) a determination of selected organic compounds were carried out to study the influence of the sieving process on the variance of cofactors and analytical results. The organic pollutants PCB, Organochlorpesticides (OCP) and PAH were investigated in three fine sediment fractions <2 mm, > and < 63 {mu}m of the locations by accredited and standardised methods. At the same time the cofactor Organic Carbon (TOC) as well as Total Carbon (TC) and Total Nitrogen (TN) were determined in the fine sediment fractions. The endocrine disruptor Bisphenol A could be detected in the sediment locations B and C. The comparison of TOC, TC and TN average values by t-test showed significant differences between the fine fractions of location B and C. Because of low TOC values no signification was detectable in sediment A. The results show that the TOC values in fine sediments are affected by sieving. An enrichment of carbon was detected in the <63 {mu}m fraction in consideration of variance. A correlation between the cofactor TOC and the organic pollutant values could only be detected in the fine fractions of location B. The enrichment of pollutant values in the fine fractions was here analogue of TOC. For a comprehensive evaluation of the cofactor TOC no sufficient sieving sample materials were available in this study for location A and C. So a final statement regarding TOC in fine sediment fractions as a cofactor was not possible. The results show that a determination of organic contaminants in the fine sediment fraction <63 {mu}m make sense because of their enrichment in fine fractions in respect to the TOC values. (orig.)

  11. Determination of Baseline Conditions for Introduced Marine Species in Nearshore Waters of the Island of Kaho'olawe, Hawaii in January 1998 (NODC Accession 0000715)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A survey of the marine macroalgae and invertebrates in the intertidal and subtidal zones was conducted at seven sites around Kaho'olawe Island from January 12 to 14,...

  12. Determination of baseline conditions for introduced marine species in nearshore waters of the island of Kaho'olawe, Hawaii in January 1998 (NODC Accession 0000715)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A survey of the marine macroalgae and invertebrates in the intertidal and subtidal zones was conducted at seven sites around Kaho'olawe Island from January 12 to 14,...

  13. Modeling near-shore subsea permafrost degradation in the Laptev Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneier, F.; Langer, M.; Overduin, P. P.

    2012-12-01

    Most subsea permafrost in the Arctic Ocean shelf regions is relict terrestrial permafrost that was inundated by sea water by rising sea levels after the last glacial period. Permafrost usually degrades offshore under the influence of sea-bottom temperatures, salt infiltration and a wide range of near-shore coastal processes. Subsea permafrost instability has important potential implications due to the release of methane to the atmosphere and by increasing coastal erosion rates. Our objectives are to employ meso-scale numerical calculations (from meter to kilometer, 1000s of years) in connection with borehole data from the Laptev Sea to model the transition of permafrost from onshore to offshore conditions. The goal is to identify key processes driving permafrost degradation in the near-shore zone of the shelf. The heat transfer equation is solved numerically taking into account freeze-thaw processes in a three-phase heat capacity / conductivity model. Sediment composition and initial temperature profiles are derived from field and laboratory analysis of the borehole data. Our approach neglects some processes such as solute diffusion, but includes the effect of pore water salinity on phase state and thermal properties. Measured temperature profiles are compared to the modeled subsea soil temperature evolution over the course of the 2500 year transgression of the farthest offshore borehole in the transect. The degradation of the ice-bearing permafrost table or thaw depth is of special interest due to its direct relation to sediment stability and as the most readily discernible feature in the field observations. Temperature profiles generally agree well with model calculations reproducing the almost isothermal permafrost profiles currently observed, but show more variation potentially partially caused by drilling disturbances. The thaw depth is mainly driven by salt contamination and infiltration into deeper pore water with time. Complicating near-shore processes

  14. Sediment Contaminants and Infauna Associated with Recreational Boating Structures in a Multi-Use Marine Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Vivian X. Y.; Dafforn, Katherine A.; Simpson, Stuart L.; Kelaher, Brendan P.; Johnston, Emma L.

    2015-01-01

    Multi-use marine parks achieve conservation through spatial management of activities. Zoning of marine parks in New South Wales, Australia, includes high conservation areas and special purpose zones (SPZ) where maritime activities are concentrated. Although such measures geographically constrain anthropogenic impacts, we have limited understanding of potential ecological effects. We assessed sediment communities and contaminants adjacent to boating infrastructure (boat ramps, jetties and a marina) in a SPZ from the Clyde Estuary in Batemans Marine Park. Metal concentrations and fines content were elevated at boating structures compared to reference sites. Species richness was higher at sites with boating structures, where capitellid polychaetes and nematodes dominated the communities. Changes associated with boating structures were localised and did not extend beyond breakwalls or to reference sites outside the SPZ. The study highlights the benefits of appropriate zoning in a multi-use marine park and the potential to minimise stress on pristine areas through the application of spatial management. PMID:26086427

  15. GDR Hycar work on the origin, fate and consequences of hydrocarbons in marine sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doumenq, P.; Guiliano, M.; Beaulieu, J.L. de; Bertrand, J.C.

    2005-01-01

    This article reviews the experimental results achieved by GDR Hycar concerning the degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in marine deposits. The authors describe the experimental strategy that has been set up, in situ, in the Fos Gulf. 96 sediment pancakes, one cm thick and contaminated with a known quantity of petroleum have been installed on the sea bed, 5 meters below the water line. The aim was to follow the decay and migration of oil in deeper sediment layers underneath the pancakes. The experiment shows: -) a good decontamination of the pancake after 3 years, -) the presence of oil decay products in the 2-4 cm deep sediment layer, -) the presence of low-degraded oil (coming from the experiment and from previous contaminations of the site) in the 6 cm deep layer. The last result shows that the alteration process of oil slows down as it takes place deeper in the sediment layers. (A.C.)

  16. Biogeomorphological implications of microscale interactions between sediment geotechnics and marine benthos: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, John M. H.; Meadows, Azra; Meadows, Peter S.

    2002-09-01

    At the foundations of biogeomorphological processes in the sea lie interactions between the activities of marine benthic animals and the geotechnical properties of their sedimentary environments. The potential significance of these interactions, which take place at a microscale level of millimetres to metres, for the large-scale geomorphology of the seabed has rarely been appreciated. In the context of this review, large-scale is defined as greater than 50 m to hundreds of kilometres. The present review addresses this link, drawing examples from a wide range of marine environments, including estuaries, the intertidal zone, continental shelves and slopes, and the deep sea. It firstly considers sediment stabilisation, slope failure, sediment mixing, biodeposition, sediment compaction, and hydrodynamic effects. This is followed by a consideration of two extremes of the ecological pyramid—the effects of marine meiofauna and marine vertebrates. The final section draws attention to the central role of faunal mucus and extracellular polymeric material (ECPM) in many of the microscale interactions that we describe. The implications of these microscale biological processes and features are discussed in terms of their influence on and control of the large-scale geomorphology of the seabed.

  17. Uranium and plutonium in marine sediments; Uranio y plutonio en sedimentos marinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ordonez R, E.; Almazan T, M. G. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Ruiz F, A. C., E-mail: eduardo.ordonez@inin.gob.mx [UNAM, Instituto de Ciencias del Mar y Limnologia, Unidad Academica Mazatlan, Sinaloa (MX)

    2011-11-15

    The marine sediments contain uranium concentrations that are considered normal, since the seawater contains dissolved natural uranium that is deposited in the bed sea in form of sediments by physical-chemistry and bio-genetics processes. Since the natural uranium is constituted of several isotopes, the analysis of the isotopic relationship {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U are an indicator of the oceanic activity that goes accumulating slowly leaving a historical registration of the marine events through the profile of the marine soil. But the uranium is not the only radioelement present in the marine sediments. In the most superficial strata the presence of the {sup 239+140}Pu has been detected that it is an alpha emitter and that recently it has been detected with more frequency in some coasts of the world. The Mexican coast has not been the exception to this phenomenon and in this work the presence of {sup 239-140}Pu is shown in the more superficial layers of an exploring coming from the Gulf of Tehuantepec. (Author)

  18. Radiological assessment of coastal marine sediment and water samples, Karachi coast, Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qureshi, R.M.; Mashiatullah, A.; Akram, M.; Sajjad, M.I.; Shafiq, M.; Javed, T.; Aslam, M.

    1999-04-01

    Concentrations of selective natural radionuclides (/sup 226/Ra, /sup 228/Ra, /sup 40/K) in shallow marine coastal sediments and sea water off Karachi coast, Pakistan, were measured with a hyper pure germanium (HPGe) gamma spectrometer. Sediment and water samples were collected from polluted Layari and Malire River downstream (pre-out fall), Gizri Creek, Layari River out fall in Karachi harbor, Karachi Harbor/ Manora Channel Mains, as well as from open sea (South-East Coast and North-West Coast) within the 10m depth contour. No artificial radionuclides (e.g. /sup 60/Co, /sup 137/Cs and /sup 134/Cs were detected in both water and sediment samples at any of these locations. The activity of /sup 226/Ra in coastal river sediments is found below its limit of detection (<18.35 Bqkg/sup -1/). Activity of /sup 228/Ra in sediments off Karachi Coast ranges between 11.80 +- 3.60 to 37.27+- 4.31 Bqkg/sup -1/. The highest activity was found south of Nuclear Power Station (KANUPP) and the lowest activity was found in the vicinity of Oyster Rocks (open sea). The /sup 226/Ra activity ranges from 19.40+- 5.88 to 67.14 +- 10.02 Bqkg/sup -1/. The activity of /sup 228/Ra in sediments of Manora Channel, South-east Coast of Karachi and the North west coast of Karachi are also in agreement with the IAEA marine sediment standard namely: IAEA-135 (/sup 228/Ra = 36.7 +- 3 Bqkg/sup -1/). The activity of /sup 226/Ra for the South East Coast of Karachi and the North west coast of Karachi are also in agreement with the IAEA marine sediment standard namely: IAEA 135(/sup 226/Ra=23.9 +- 1.1 Bqkg/sup -1/) and Pacific Ocean sediment standard namely: IAEA-368 (/sup 226/Ra=21.4+- 1.1 Bqkg/sup -1/). The /sup 40/K activity in sea sediments varies from 197.7+- 44.24 to 941.90 +- 39.00 Bqkg-1). The highest activity is observed in the vicinity of Oyster Rocks (open sea) along the Clifton coast (South-East Cost of Karachi) and the lowest activity is found south of Nuclear Power Station (KANUPP) along the

  19. Acetate consumption in anoxic marine sediments: Identification of key players using mixed pure cultures and sediment incubations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Na, Hyunsoo

    . While we did not find methanogens to be involved in acetate consumption with sediment incubations, the results from co-culture experiments show that syntrophic growth may allow aceticlastic methanogens to co-exist with sulfate-reducing bacteria in anoxic, sulfate-rich marine environments....... are largely unknown. The main goal of my PhD project was to identify acetate consumers in sulfate-reducing sediments of Aarhus Bay, Denmark. More specifically, we addressed the hypothesis if sulfate-reducing bacteria and methanogenic archaea can oxidize acetate in syntrophy. First, we examined the changes...... at 10 mM acetate-2 mM (low) sulfate and lower (0.1 and 1 mM) acetate-high sulfate conditions, as revealed by Ion Torrent sequencing of 16S rRNA gene sequences. At 0.1 and 1 mM acetate concentrations, members of the phyla Firmicutes (Fusibacter-related), Fusobacteria, and Bacteroidetes were predominantly...

  20. The evolution of stenols and stanols in marine sediment core from Beibu Bay, the South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shanchun; Jia, Rongfen; Luan, Zuofeng

    1992-03-01

    Ten stenols and stanols were identified by TLC, GC and GC-MS-DS in a marine sediment core from Beibu Bay, the South China Sea. C27, C28 and C29 Δ5 stenols and 5α-stanols mainly come from zooplankton, algae and phytoplankton in marine environment. C29 24-ethylcholest-5-en-3β-ol is thought to indicate input of terrigenous organic matter. The increase of C27, C28 and C29 5α-stanol/Δ5 stenol ratios with sediment depth shows the evolution of stenols and stanols in the marine sediment core.

  1. Intercomparison of radionuclide measurements in marine sediment sample IAEA-368

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballestra, S.; Lopez, J.J.; Gastaud, J.; Parsi, P.; Vas, D.; Noshkin, V.

    1991-08-01

    The results of an intercomparison exercise on a Pacific Ocean sediment sample, IAEA-368, designed for the determination of artificial and natural radionuclides levels, are reported. The data from 89 laboratories representing 37 countries have been evaluated. The following are the recommended values, with confidence intervals, for 60 Co, 155 Eu, 210 7Pb, 226 Ra, 238 U, 238 Pu and 239+240 Pu (Reference date: 1 January 1990). Information values for 40 K, 90 Sr, 137 Cs, 228 Th, 230 Th, 232 Th, 234 U, 235 U and 241 Am are also reported. (author)

  2. Intercomparison of radionuclide measurements in marine sediment sample IAEA-367

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballestra, S.; Lopez, J.J.; Gastaud, J.; Vas, D.; Noshkin, V.

    1991-08-01

    The results of an intercomparison exercise on a Pacific Ocean sediment sample, IAEA-367, designed for the determination of artificial and natural radionuclides levels, are reported. The data from 81 laboratories representing 37 countries have been evaluated. The following are the recommended values, with confidence intervals, for 60 Co, 90 Sr, 137 Cs, 239+240 Pu (Reference date: 1 January 1990). Information values for 155 Eu, 238 Pu, 241 Am, and 241 Pu are reported. Information values for the following natural radionuclides 40 K, 226 Ra, 228 Th, 230 Th, 234 U, 235 U and 238 U are also reported. (author)

  3. Formation of natural gas hydrates in marine sediments. Gas hydrate growth and stability conditioned by host sediment properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clennell, M.B.; Henry, P.; Hovland, M.; Booth, J.S.; Winters, W.J.; Thomas, M.

    2000-01-01

    The stability conditions of submarine gas hydrates (methane clathrates) are largely dictated by pressure, temperature, gas composition, and pore water salinity. However, the physical properties and surface chemistry of the host sediments also affect the thermodynamic state, growth kinetics, spatial distributions, and growth forms of clathrates. Our model presumes that gas hydrate behaves in a way analogous to ice in the pores of a freezing soil, where capillary forces influence the energy balance. Hydrate growth is inhibited within fine-grained sediments because of the excess internal phase pressure of small crystals with high surface curvature that coexist with liquid water in small pores. Therefore, the base of gas hydrate stability in a sequence of fine sediments is predicted by our model to occur at a lower temperature, and so nearer to the seabed than would be calculated from bulk thermodynamic equilibrium. The growth forms commonly observed in hydrate samples recovered from marine sediments (nodules, sheets, and lenses in muds; cements in sand and ash layers) can be explained by a requirement to minimize the excess of mechanical and surface energy in the system.

  4. Reconstruction of late Quaternary marine and terrestrial environmental conditions of Northwest Africa and Southeast Australia : a multiple organic proxy study using marine sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alfama Lopes dos Santos, R.

    2012-01-01

    NW Africa and SE Australia are regions which are particularly vulnerable to climate change. In this thesis, organic proxies are used from marine sediment cores to reconstruct past environmental conditions from these areas. In sediments from NW Africa, the UK'37 showed an efficient proxy for sea

  5. Geochemical Screening of Contaminated Marine and Estuarine Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruge, M. A.

    2004-05-01

    Waterways near urban centers have been subject to pollution by human activities for centuries. This process greatly intensified with the advent of the Industrial Revolution and the attendant exponential population increase in coastal areas. The co-occurrence of port facilities for ocean-going vessels, large factories, major power generating stations, dense automotive transportation networks, and massive wastewater outfalls, all in compact geographical areas, has produced severe environmental stress. In recent decades, the growing awareness of the seriousness of coastal urban environmental degradation has inspired intensive efforts at pollution prevention and remediation. To better understand pollution dynamics over time in an aquatic urban setting, a program of intensive sampling and analysis leading to the creation of geographic information systems (GIS) would be desirable. Chemical evaluation of sediments for pollution remains a costly and time-consuming procedure, particularly for organic analysis. Pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS) offers a practical alternative for rapid, inexpensive molecular organic analysis, simply employing milligram quantities of dry, whole sediment. The compounds detected comprise an information-rich mixture of thermally extractable components and the products of the thermal decomposition of (bio)polymers present in the sample. These include PAHs, petroleum-derived hopanes, organonitrogen compounds, and linear alkylbenzenes, as illustrated with examples from Long Island Sound and the Passaic River (USA) and Barcelona harbor (Spain).

  6. Worldwide Interlaboratory Comparison on the Determination of Trace Elements in the IAEA-457 Marine Sediment Sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    The primary goal of the IAEA Environment Laboratories is to assist Member States in the use of both stable and radioisotope analytical techniques to understand, monitor and protect the environment. In this context, the major impact of large coastal cities on marine ecosystems is an issue of primary concern for the IAEA and the IAEA Environment Laboratories. The marine pollution assessments required to understand such impacts depend on accurate knowledge of contaminant concentrations in various environmental compartments. Through the IAEA Environment Laboratories, the IAEA has been assisting national laboratories and regional laboratory networks since the early 1970s through the provision of a reference material programme for the analysis of radionuclides, trace elements and organic compounds in marine samples. Quality assurance and quality control are two fundamental requirements to ensure the reliability of analytical results. Data that are not based on adequate quality assurance and quality control can be erroneous, and their misuse can lead to poor environmental management decisions. In this regard, the IAEA has a long history of organizing interlaboratory studies, which have evolved to include an increasing array of potential contaminants in the marine environment. Relevant activities comprise global interlaboratory comparison, regional proficiency tests, the production of marine reference materials and the development of reference methods for trace elements and organic pollutants analysis in marine samples. This publication summarizes the results of the IAEA-457 interlaboratory comparison on the determination of trace elements in a marine sediment sample

  7. Landslide-dammed paleolake perturbs marine sedimentation and drives genetic change in anadromous fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Benjamin H; Roering, Joshua J; Lamb, Michael P

    2011-11-22

    Large bedrock landslides have been shown to modulate rates and processes of river activity by forming dams, forcing upstream aggradation of water and sediment, and generating catastrophic outburst floods. Less apparent is the effect of large landslide dams on river ecosystems and marine sedimentation. Combining analyses of 1-m resolution topographic data (acquired via airborne laser mapping) and field investigation, we present evidence for a large, landslide-dammed paleolake along the Eel River, CA. The landslide mass initiated from a high-relief, resistant outcrop which failed catastrophically, blocking the Eel River with an approximately 130-m-tall dam. Support for the resulting 55-km-long, 1.3-km(3) lake includes subtle shorelines cut into bounding terrain, deltas, and lacustrine sediments radiocarbon dated to 22.5 ka. The landslide provides an explanation for the recent genetic divergence of local anadromous (ocean-run) steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) by blocking their migration route and causing gene flow between summer run and winter run reproductive ecotypes. Further, the dam arrested the prodigious flux of sediment down the Eel River; this cessation is recorded in marine sedimentary deposits as a 10-fold reduction in deposition rates of Eel-derived sediment and constitutes a rare example of a terrestrial event transmitted through the dispersal system and recorded offshore.

  8. Abundant Atribacteria in deep marine sediment from the Adélie Basin, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Ann Carr

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria belonging to the newly classified candidate phylum Atribacteria (formerly referred to as OP9 and JS1 are common in anoxic methane-rich sediments. However, the metabolic functions and biogeochemical role of these microorganisms in the subsurface remains unrealized due to the lack of pure culture representatives. In this study of deep sediment from Antarctica's Adélie Basin, collected during Expedition 318 of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP, Atribacteria-related sequences of the 16S rRNA gene were abundant (up to 51% of the sequences and steadily increased in relative abundance with depth throughout the methane-rich zones. To better understand the metabolic potential of Atribacteria within this environment, and to compare with phylogenetically distinct Atribacteria from non-deep-sea environments, individual cells were sorted for single cell genomics from sediment collected from 97.41 meters below the seafloor from IODP Hole U1357C. As observed for non-marine Atribacteria, a partial single cell genome suggests a heterotrophic metabolism, with Atribacteria potentially producing fermentation products such as acetate, ethanol and CO2. These products may in turn support methanogens within the sediment microbial community and explain the frequent occurrence of Atribacteria in anoxic methane-rich sediments. This first report of a single cell genome from deep sediment broadens the known diversity within the Atribacteria phylum and highlights the potential role of Atribacteria in carbon cycling in deep sediment.

  9. Microalgal Photosynthesis and Spectral Scalar Irradiance in Coastal Marine-Sediments of Limfjorden, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    LASSEN, C.; PLOUG, H.; JØRGENSEN, BB

    1992-01-01

    Scalar irradiance and oxygenic photosynthesis were measured simultaneously at 100-mum spatial resolution by a fiber-optic scalar irradiance microsensor and an oxygen microelectrode spaced 120 mum apart. Marine microbial mats on sandy sediments along the coast of Limfjorden, Denmark, were dominated...... higher than in the uppermost 0.0-0.6 mm of the sediment. The lower boundary of the euphotic zone (detectable gross photosynthesis) was at a mean light level of greater-than-or-equal-to 7.5 muEinst m-2 s-1....

  10. Sediment Ksub(d)s and concentration factors for radionuclides in the marine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    Both the biological and geochemical processes, which are dependent on the chemical form of the element in question, and the radioactive decay of the nuclide are important parameters in the models used for the calculation of dumping limits for radioactive wastes disposed of in the deep sea. The geochemical processes were not adequately represented in earlier models and only rough approximations of parameters were used in the calculations. This report provides an approach for the calculation of deep-sea sediment distribution coefficients and coastal sediment concentration factors for radionuclides in marine biological materials based, whenever possible, on field data

  11. Corrosion of carbon steel nuclear waste containers in marine sediment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, G.P.; Taylor, K.J.; Harker, A.H.

    1987-08-01

    The report describes a study of the corrosion of carbon steel nuclear waste containers in deep ocean sediments, which had the objective of estimating the metal allowance needed to ensure that the containers were not breached by corrosion for 1000 years. It was concluded that under such disposal conditions carbon steel would not be subject to localised corrosion or hydrogen embrittlement, and therefore the study concentrated on evaluating the rate of general attack. This was carried out by developing a mechanistically based mathematical model which was formulated on the conservative assumption that the corrosion would be under activation control, and would not be impeded by the formation of corrosion product layers. This model predicted that an allowance of 33 mm would be required for a 1000 year life. (author)

  12. Intercomparison of radionuclide measurements on marine sediment sample IAEA-300

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballestra, S.; Gastaud, J.; Lopez, J.J.; Parsi, P.; Vas, D.

    1994-09-01

    The results of an intercomparison exercise on a sediment from Baltic Sea, IAEA-300, designed for the determination of artificial and natural radionuclides' levels, are reported. The data from 159 laboratories representing 51 countries have been evaluated. The following are the recommended values, with confidence intervals, 40 K, 60 Co, 125 Sb, 134 Cs, 137 Cs, 155 Eu, 210 Pb, 210 Po, 228 Ra, 234 U, 238 U, 239+240 Pu and 241 Am. Information values for 54 Mn, 90 Sr, 226 Ra, 228 Th, 230 Th, 232 Th, 235 U and 238 Pu are also reported. All values are given on the reference date of 1 January 1993 and expressed in Bq kg -1 dry weight. (author)

  13. {sup 137}Cs in marine sediments of Admiralty Bay, King George Island, Antarctica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Paulo Alves de Lima [Instituto Oceanográfico, Universidade de São Paulo (IO-USP), Pça. do Oceanográfico, 191, Butantã, SP, 05508 900 (Brazil); Ribeiro, Andreza Portella, E-mail: andrezpr@usp.br [Instituto Oceanográfico, Universidade de São Paulo (IO-USP), Pça. do Oceanográfico, 191, Butantã, SP, 05508 900 (Brazil); Mestrado de Gestão Ambiental e Sustentabilidade, Universidade Nove de Julho (UNINOVE), Avenida Francisco Matarazzo, 612, prédio C, andar térreo, Água Branca, São Paulo, SP, 05001 100 (Brazil); Nascimento, Mylene Giseli do; Martins, Cesar de Castro [Centro de Estudos do Mar, Universidade Federal do Paraná (CEM-UFPR), Av. Beira-mar, no number, Balneário Pontal do Sul, Pontal do Paraná, PR, 83255 971 (Brazil); Mahiques, Michel Michaelovitch de; Montone, Rosalinda Carmelo; Figueira, Rubens Cesar Lopes [Instituto Oceanográfico, Universidade de São Paulo (IO-USP), Pça. do Oceanográfico, 191, Butantã, SP, 05508 900 (Brazil)

    2013-01-15

    The radionuclide cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) is produced exclusively by anthropogenic processes and primarily by nuclear explosions. This study determined the reference inventory that is {sup 137}Cs associated with the element's original input, and utilized the levels of activity of this radionuclide previously measured in five sediment profiles collected from Admiralty Bay, Antarctica, to investigate the mobility of this element in the environment. {sup 137}Cs has a half-life of 30 years. Because of this, it is environmentally persistent and has been shown to accumulate in marine organisms. The mean reference inventory of this radionuclide in Admiralty Bay sediments, determined using high resolution gamma ray spectrometry, was 20.23 ± 8.94 Bq m{sup −2}, and within the ambient {sup 137}Cs activity range. A model of {sup 137}Cs diffusion–convection was applied to data collected from 1 cm intervals in sediment cores with the aim of providing insights with respect to this element's behavior in sediments. Model results showed a significant correlation between measured and modeled values using the concentrations of {sup 137}Cs, and estimated input into the system from the global fallout of past nuclear tests and expected values based on local sedimentation rates. Results highlight the importance of accounting for the vertical diffusion of {sup 137}Cs in marine sediments when used as a tracer for environmental processes and for assessing potential bioavailability. - Highlights: ► Cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) is produced exclusively by anthropogenic processes. ► A model of diffusion–convection simulated {sup 137}Cs environmental behavior. ► This is important for assessing the bioavailability of this toxic element. ► In Antarctica ice cover influenced the input to the sediments.

  14. Quantitative research for pollution levels in marine sediments of Ha Long Bay by nuclear technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Quang Long; Tran Thi Tuyet Mai; Pham Ngoc Khai; Nguyen Trung Thanh; Nguyen Van Phuc; Doan Thuy Hau; Duong Van Thang; Ha Lan Anh; Vo Thi Anh; Nguyen Thi Thu Ha

    2013-01-01

    Under the theme of Quantitative study of pollution levels in marine sediments of Halong bay by nuclear techniques conducted from June 2011 to June 2013, the authors conducted monitoring, sediment samples collected in the bay below the sediment column at 8 locations, in which 7 columns located at the estuary near Tuan Chau Island and 1 column at the area near the harbor of Cam Pha. The column samples were taken to the laboratory, cut slices with a distance of 2 cm in the form of frozen and conduct tests of radioactive Pb-210 to determine the rate of sediment in the survey area. Evaluation results based on the method by determining 210 Pb, the sediment rate showed speed in the survey area ranged from 0.3 cm.a -1 to 1.2 cm.a -1 and an average of 1.0 cm.a -1 . The slices of sediment samples (110 samples) were analyzed heavy metals (KLN) and As elemental by ICP-MS method. These sediment sample also were analyzed for simultaneous determination of N and P and total organic carbon (TOC). Results showed that heavy metal concentrations and As is smaller than the value specified in the National Technical Regulation on Sediment Quality of Vietnam (QCVN), phosphorus concentration less than that can cause harmful effects, but the concentration of total nitrogen and organic carbon that may exceed be harmful as directed by Canadian standards (Persuad et al. 1992). The concentration data in the Halong bay sediment were processed by statistical software SPSS-18, results showed high correlation between the quality TOC, N, P, K and correlation the majority of KLN, this proves the origin of sediments is part of the natural soil components and parts (TOC, N, P, K) is due to the activity of human activity as well as by agricultural fertilizers. The average content of elements in sediments Halong be compared with other data published works of sediment Quang Ninh area, the results show the correlation figures are also high. However, the results of the analysis of KLN and As in Halong

  15. Evaluation of the presence of major anionic surfactants in marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantarero, S; Camino-Sánchez, F J; Zafra-Gómez, A; Ballesteros, O; Navalón, A; Vílchez, J L; Verge, C; Reis, M S; Saraiva, P M

    2012-03-01

    The contamination of aquatic environments has become the focus of increasing regulation and public concern due to their potential and unknown negative effects on the ecosystems. The present work develops a monitoring and statistical study, based on the analysis of variance test (ANOVA) and the multivariable analysis, both for insoluble soap and LAS in order to compare the behavior of different anionic surfactants in this environmental compartment. First, a novel and successfully validated methodology to analyze insoluble soap in these samples is developed. The matrix effect and the comparison of different extraction techniques were also performed. The optimized analytical methodologies were applied to 48 representative samples collected from the Almeria Coast (Spain) and then a statistical analysis to correlate anionic surfactant concentration and several variables associated with marine sediment samples was also developed. The results obtained showed relevant conclusions related to the environmental behavior of anionic surfactants in marine sediments. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Development of Marine Sediment Toxicity Data for Ordnance Compounds and Toxicity Identification Evaluation Studies at Select Naval Facilities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carr, R

    2000-01-01

    .... It included the generation of a toxicity database of ordnance compounds to marine organisms, and sediment toxicity and chemical analyses of 50 stations in the vicinity of the Jackson Park and Port...

  17. Bulk Sediment and Diatom Silica Carbon Isotope Composition from Coastal Marine Sediments off East Antarctica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, S.; Leng, M.J.; Kendrick, C.P.; Cremer, H.; Wagner, B.

    2013-01-01

    Organic carbon occluded in diatom silica is assumed to be protected from degradation in the sediment. δ13C from diatom carbon (δ13C(diatom)) therefore potentially provides a signal of conditions during diatom growth. However, there have been few studies based on δ13C(diatom). Numerous variables can

  18. Key geochemical factors regulating Mn(IV)-catalyzed anaerobic nitrification in coastal marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hui; Taillefert, Martial

    2014-05-01

    The reduction of Mn(IV) oxides coupled to the anaerobic oxidation of NH4+ has been proposed for more than a decade to contribute to the fixed nitrogen pool in marine sediments, yet the existence of this process is still under debate. In this study, surface sediments from an intertidal salt marsh were incubated with MnO2 in the presence of elevated concentrations of NH4+ to test the hypothesis that the reduction of Mn(IV) oxides catalyzes anaerobic NH4+ oxidation to NO2- or NO3-. Geochemical factors such as the ratio of Mn(IV) to NH4+, the type of Mn(IV) oxides (amorphous or colloidal MnO2), and the redox potential of the sediment significantly affect the activity of anaerobic nitrification. Incubations show that the net production of NO3- is stimulated under anaerobic conditions with external addition of colloidal but not amorphous MnO2 and is facilitated by the presence of high concentrations of NH4+. Mass balance calculations demonstrate that anaerobic NH4+ oxidation contributes to the net consumption of NH4+, providing another piece of evidence for the occurrence of Mn(IV)-catalyzed anaerobic nitrification in coastal marine sediments. Finally, anaerobic nitrification is stimulated by the amendment of small concentrations of NO3- or the absence of sulfate reduction, suggesting that moderately reducing conditions favor anaerobic NH4+ oxidation. Overall, these findings suggest that Mn(IV)-catalyzed anaerobic nitrification in suboxic sediments with high N/Mn concentration ratios and highly reactive manganese oxides may be an important source of NO2- and NO3- for subsequent marine nitrogen loss via denitrification or anammox.

  19. The Contribution of Siliceous Sponges to the Export of Biogenic Silica to Marine Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, M.; López-Acosta, M.; Sitjà, C.; García, M.

    2016-02-01

    The cycling of silicon (Si) in the various marine compartments plays a pivotal role in the complex biogeochemical network of the ocean. Major Si fluxes related to diatom populations haven been quantified and discussed over the last decades. Nevertheless, very little information is still available about the contribution that siliceous sponges might make to those Si fluxes. Because extensive, dense populations of highly silicified sponges are long known to be a common feature of many shelfs and slope areas of the ocean, the current gap in knowledge may be critical to improve current quantifications of both global and regional Si budgets. Here we present data about the relative contribution of sponge, diatom, and radiolarian silica to marine sediments, using cores collected from 9 different environments across the worlds' oceans, including the Antarctic Ocean. We also show that standard protocols based on wet alkaline digestions of marine sediments are little efficient to reliably retrieve the contribution of sponge silica. We discuss problems, uncertainties, and alternative approaches for estimating the silica in sediments.

  20. Methanococcus aeolicus sp. nov., a mesophilic, methanogenic archaeon from shallow and deep marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Melissa M; Liu, Yitai; Sieprawska-Lupa, Magdalena; Stetter, Karl O; Whitman, William B; Boone, David R

    2006-07-01

    Three strains of CO(2)-reducing methanogens were isolated from marine sediments. Strain PL-15/H(P) was isolated from marine sediments of the Lipari Islands, near Sicily and the other two strains, Nankai-2 and Nankai-3(T), were isolated from deep marine sediments of the Nankai Trough, about 50 km from the coast of Japan. Analysis of the cellular proteins and 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that these three strains represented a single novel species that formed a deep branch of the mesophilic methanococci. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the three strains were most closely related to Methanothermococcus okinawensis (95 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity). However, strains PL-15/H(P), Nankai-2 and Nankai-3(T) grew at temperatures that were more similar to those of recognized species within the genus Methanococcus. Strain Nankai-3(T) grew fastest at 46 degrees C. Results of physiological and biochemical tests allowed the genotypic and phenotypic differentiation of strains PL-15/H(P), Nankai-2 and Nankai-3(T) from closely related species. The name Methanococcus aeolicus sp. nov. is proposed, with strain Nankai-3(T) (=OCM 812(T)=DSM 17508(T)) as the type strain.

  1. Species richness and adaptation of marine fungi from deep-subseafloor sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rédou, Vanessa; Navarri, Marion; Meslet-Cladière, Laurence; Barbier, Georges; Burgaud, Gaëtan

    2015-05-15

    The fungal kingdom is replete with unique adaptive capacities that allow fungi to colonize a wide variety of habitats, ranging from marine habitats to freshwater and terrestrial habitats. The diversity, importance, and ecological roles of marine fungi have recently been highlighted in deep-subsurface sediments using molecular methods. Fungi in the deep-marine subsurface may be specifically adapted to life in the deep biosphere, but this can be demonstrated only using culture-based analyses. In this study, we investigated culturable fungal communities from a record-depth sediment core sampled from the Canterbury Basin (New Zealand) with the aim to reveal endemic or ubiquist adapted isolates playing a significant ecological role(s). About 200 filamentous fungi (68%) and yeasts (32%) were isolated. Fungal isolates were affiliated with the phyla Ascomycota and Basidiomycota, including 21 genera. Screening for genes involved in secondary metabolite synthesis also revealed their bioactive compound synthesis potential. Our results provide evidence that deep-subsurface fungal communities are able to survive, adapt, grow, and interact with other microbial communities and highlight that the deep-sediment habitat is another ecological niche for fungi. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Water storage in marine sediment and implications for inferences of past global ice volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrier, K.; Li, Q.; Pico, T.; Austermann, J.

    2017-12-01

    Changes in past sea level are of wide interest because they provide information on the sensitivity of ice sheets to climate change, and thus inform predictions of future sea-level change. Sea level changes are influenced by many processes, including the storage of water in sedimentary pore space. Here we use a recent extension of gravitationally self-consistent sea-level models to explore the effects of marine sedimentary water storage on the global seawater balance and inferences of past global ice volume. Our analysis suggests that sedimentary water storage can be a significant component of the global seawater budget over the 105-year timescales associated with glacial-interglacial cycles, and an even larger component over longer timescales. Estimates of global sediment fluxes to the oceans suggest that neglecting marine sedimentary water storage may produce meter-scale errors in estimates of peak global mean sea level equivalent (GMSL) during the Last Interglacial (LIG). These calculations show that marine sedimentary water storage can be a significant contributor to the overall effects of sediment redistribution on sea-level change, and that neglecting sedimentary water storage can lead to substantial errors in inferences of global ice volume at past interglacials. This highlights the importance of accounting for the influences of sediment fluxes and sedimentary water storage on sea-level change over glacial-interglacial timescales.

  3. [Impacts of pH and surfactants on adsorption behaviors of norfloxacin on marine sediments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Hui-Ling; Yang, Gui-Peng; Gao, Xian-Chi; Cao, Xiao-Yan

    2012-01-01

    The adsorption behaviors of norfloxacin (NOR) on marine sediments at different pH values and in the presence of four different surfactants were systematically investigated by a batch equilibrium method. The results indicated that Freundlich adsorption isotherms fitted the adsorption behavior of NOR on marine sediments very well at different pH values. The Freundlich constant K(F) and the equilibrium adsorption amount of NOR reduced with the increase of pH values, and the minimum appeared at pH 8.10. The results suggested that cation exchange was the main adsorption mechanism of NOR at pH 6.01, while Van der Waals' force, hydrophobic effects, electrostatic force were the major adsorption mechanism of NOR on marine sediments at pH 8.10. The adsorption process fitted well with pseudo-second-order kinetic equations with the addition of surfactants. Our study also indicated that the addition of surfactants had the significant influence on the saturated adsorption amount of adsorption of NOR. The equilibrium adsorption amount (Q(e)) of NOR exhibited the following sequence: Q(e) (Tween80) < Q(e) (Tween20)

  4. Plio-Pleistocene imprint of natural climate cycles in marine sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebreiro, S. M.

    2013-06-01

    The response of Earth to natural climate cyclicity is written in marine sediments. The Earth is a complex system, as is climate change determined by various modes, frequency of cycles, forcings, boundary conditions, thresholds, and tipping elements. Oceans act as climate change buffers, and marine sediments provide archives of climate conditions in the Earths history. To read climate records they must be well-dated, well-calibrated and analysed at high-resolution. Reconstructions of past climates are based on climate variables such as atmospheric composition, temperature, salinity, ocean productivity and wind, the nature and quality which are of the utmost importance. Once the palaeoclimate and palaeoceanographic proxy-variables of past events are well documented, the best results of modelling and validation, and future predictions can be obtained from climate models. Neither the mechanisms for abrupt climate changes at orbital, millennial and multi-decadal time scales nor the origin, rhythms and stability of cyclicity are as yet fully understood. Possible sources of cyclicity are either natural in the form of internal ocean-atmosphere-land interactions or external radioactive forcing such as solar irradiance and volcanic activity, or else anthropogenic. Coupling with stochastic resonance is also very probable. I provide here, an overview of the cyclicity affecting the Earth on various time scales focussing upon the Plio-Pleistocene and Holocene epochs, together with a compilation of some of the key questions under debate, and a number of representative works that illustrate cyclicity in marine sediments. (Author)

  5. Bacillus cellulasensis sp. nov., isolated from marine sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawlankar, Rahul; Thorat, Meghana N; Krishnamurthi, Srinivasan; Dastager, Syed G

    2016-01-01

    A novel bacterial strain NIO-1130(T) was isolated from sediment sample taken from Chorao Island, Goa Province, India, and subjected to a taxonomic investigation. The strain was Gram-positive, aerobic, and motile. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences placed the isolate within the genus Bacillus and strain NIO-1130(T) showed highest sequence similarity with Bacillus halosaccharovorans DSM 25387(T) (98.4%) and Bacillus niabensis CIP 109816(T) (98.1%), whereas other Bacillus species showed bacillus group. The major menaquinone was MK-7 and the predominant cellular fatty acids were iso-C15:0, anteiso-C15:0, iso-C17:0, and anteiso-C17:0. The strain showed a DNA G+C content of 39.9 mol%. DNA-DNA hybridization studies revealed that strain NIO-1130(T) exhibits 70% similarity with Bacillus halosaccharovorans DSM 25387(T) and Bacillus niabensis CIP 109816(T). On the basis of physiological, biochemical, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic analyses, we consider the isolate to represent a novel species of the genus Bacillus, for which the name Bacillus cellulasensis sp. nov., is proposed. The type strain is NIO-1130(T) (=NCIM 5461(T)=CCTCC AB 2011126(T)).

  6. Influences of marine sediment on the accumulation of radionuclides by green alga (Ulva pertusa)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Ryoichi; Suzuki, Yuzuru; Ueda, Taiji

    1975-01-01

    Distribution of radionuclides ( 60 Co, 137 Cs, 95 Zr- 95 Nb and 106 Ru- 106 Rh) among green alga (Ulva pertusa), sea water and marine sediment were examined by radioisotope tracer experiment in order to estimate the influence of sediment on the accumulation of radionuclides by the alga. By the application of the compartment model to the experimental results, exponential formulas of distributions were obtained. Through comparison of the transfer coefficients of radionuclides calculated from the exponential formulas, the influence of the sediment on the accumulation of the radionuclides by the green alga was determined to be the largest for 60 Co, followed by 95 Zr- 95 Nb, 106 Ru- 106 Rh and 137 Cs in this order. The activity ratios of 95 Zr- 95 Nb and 106 Ru- 106 Rh calculated from the transfer coefficients are larger for the alga than for the sediment, inversely those of 60 Co and 137 Cs show higher values for the sediment than for the alga. Especially, in the case of 60 Co, the activity ratio for the sediment is approximately 20 times greater than that for the alga. Biological half lives in green alga estimated from the transfer coefficients were 10 days for 60 Co, 7 days for 137 Cs, 26 days for 95 Zr- 95 Nb and 24 days for 106 Ru- 106 Rh. (auth.)

  7. Distribution of cadmium, chromium, copper, lead and zinc in marine sediments in Hong Kong waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, S. C.; Wai, Onyx W. H.; Choi, Thomas W. H.; Li, X. D.; Tsang, C. W.

    2006-11-01

    Partitioning of heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, Zn) in marine sediments collected from various sites in Hong Kong waters were determined using sequential extraction method. Sediments from Kellette Bank, located in Victoria Harbour, had higher metal concentrations especially Cu and Zn than most other sites. Slightly over 20% of total Cu and Cr existed as readily available forms in Peng Chau and Kellette Bank. At most sampling sites, over 15% of the Cu existed as the exchangeable form indicating that Cu could be readily released into the aqueous phase from sediments. A significantly higher percentage of Pb and Zn was associated with the three non-residual fractions. Hence, there is a greater environmental concern for remobilization of Pb and Zn compared with Cr. The high amount of residual Cd (>50%) and the relatively lower Cd content indicate that little environmental concern is warranted for the remobilization of Cd. Distribution of metals in sediments collected from different depth at Kellette Bank shows that metal concentrations decreased with profile depth. The levels of Pb and Zn associated with the two readily available fractions increased sharply in the surface sediment. These metals represented the pollutants, which were introduced into the area in the mid-eighties through early nineties as a result of rapid economic and industrial development in the territory. As significant portions of these metals were bound to the readily available phases in the surface sediments, metal remobilization could be a concern.

  8. Distributions of radionuclides among green alga (Ulva pertusa), sea water and marine sediment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Ryoichi; Suzuki, Yuzuru; Ueda, Taishi

    1976-01-01

    Distributions of radionuclides ( 60 Co, 137 Cs, 95 Zr- 95 Nb and 106 Ru- 106 Rh) among green alga (Ulva pertusa), sea water and marine sediment were examined by radioisotope tracer experiment in order to estimate the influence of sediment on the accumulation of radionuclides by the alga. By the application of the compartment model to the experimental results, exponential formulas of distributions were obtained. Through comparison of the transfer coefficients of radionuclides calculated from the exponential formulas, the influence of the sediment on the accumulation of the radionuclides by the green alga was determined to be the largest for 60 Co, followed by 95 Zr,- 95 Nb, 106 Ru- 106 Rh and 137 Cs in this order. The activity ratios of 95 Zr- 95 Nb and 106 Ru- 106 Rh calculated from the transfer coefficients are larger for the alga than for the sediment, inversely those of 60 Co and 137 Cs show higher values for the sediment than for the alga. Especially, in the case of 60 Co, the activity ratio for the sediment is approximately 20 times greater than that for the alga. Biological half lives in green alga estimated from the transfer coefficients were 10 days for 60 Co, 7 days for 137 Cs, 26 days for 95 Zr- 95 Nb and 24 days for 95 Zr- 95 Nb and 24 days for 106 Ru- 106 Rh. (auth.)

  9. MOLECULAR DIAGNOSTIC RATIOS TO ASSESS THE APPORTIONMENT OF PETROLEUM HYDROCARBONS CONTAMINANTION IN MARINE SEDIMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agung Dhamar Syakti

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available As maritime fulcrum nation, in Indonesia, marine environmental analytical chemistry field is still under developed. So that why, this review paper aims to provide basic understanding of the use some molecular diagnostic indices using n-alkanes indexes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs diagnostic ratios to estimate the source of apportionment of the hydrocarbons contamination and origin. The n-alkane chromatograms were then used to characterize the predominance of petrogenic or biogenic either terrestrial or aquatic. Furthermore, characterization allowed to discriminate riverine versus marine input. The occurrence of a broad unresolved complex mixture can be an evidence of biodegraded petroleum residues. For aromatic compounds, the prevalence of petrogenic, pyrolitic, and combustion-derived can be easily plotted by using isomers ratio calculation. This paper thus provides useful information on the hydrocarbon contamination origin, especially in marine sediments. Further researches should be undertaken in order to validate the use of molecular diagnostic ratio with isotopic approach.

  10. Thermophilic endospores associated with migrated thermogenic hydrocarbons in deep Gulf of Mexico marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Anirban; Ellefson, Emily; Li, Carmen; Gittins, Daniel; Brooks, James M; Bernard, Bernie B; Hubert, Casey R J

    2018-03-29

    Dormant endospores of thermophilic bacteria (thermospores) can be detected in cold marine sediments following high-temperature incubation. Thermospores in the cold seabed may be explained by a dispersal history originating in deep biosphere oil reservoir habitats where upward migration of petroleum fluids at hydrocarbon seeps transports viable cells into the overlying ocean. We assessed this deep-to-shallow dispersal hypothesis through geochemical and microbiological analyses of 111 marine sediments from the deep water Eastern Gulf of Mexico. GC-MS and fluorescence confirmed the unambiguous presence of thermogenic hydrocarbons in 71 of these locations, indicating seepage from deeply sourced petroleum in the subsurface. Heating each sediment to 50 °C followed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing revealed several thermospores with a cosmopolitan distribution throughout the study area, as well as thermospores that were more geographically restricted. Among the thermospores having a more limited distribution, 12 OTUs from eight different lineages were repeatedly detected in sediments containing thermogenic hydrocarbons. A subset of these were significantly correlated with hydrocarbons (p < 0.05) and most closely related to Clostridiales previously detected in oil reservoirs from around the world. This provides evidence of bacteria in the ocean being dispersed out of oil reservoirs, and suggests that specific thermospores may be used as model organisms for studying warm-to-cold transmigration in the deep sea.

  11. Long distance electron transport in marine sediments: Microbial and geochemical implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Larsen, Steffen; Pfeffer, Christian

    redox half-reactions in distant regions of the sediment leads to formation of electrical fields, which modifies ion transport. The local proton producing and proton consuming half reactions induces pH extremes that accelerate dissolution of iron sulphides and calcium carbonates in anoxic layers...... and promotes the formation of Mg-calcite and iron oxides in the oxic zone. Oxygen seems to be the major electron acceptor, and more than 40% of the oxygen consumption in sediments can be driven by long distance electron transfer from distant electron donors. The major e-donor is sulfide, which is oxidized......-structural properties suggesting that they are living electric micro cables. The mode of action of these organisms has major impacts on element cycling by redox processes, pH balances, mineral dissolution/precipitations, and electro migration of ions in marine sediment. The ability of Desulfubulbus filaments to bridge...

  12. Petroleum hydrocarbon concentrations in marine sediments along Nagapattinam - Pondicherry coastal waters, Southeast coast of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamalakannan, K; Balakrishnan, S; Sampathkumar, P

    2017-04-15

    In this present study, petroleum hydrocarbons were statistically analyzed in three different coastal sediment cores viz., (N1, P1 and P2) from the Southeast coast of Tamil Nadu, India to examine the viability of PHCs. The significant positive relationship between mud (silt+clay+sand) and PHC unveiled that high specific surface of area of mud content raise the level of PHCs. Cluster analysis was used to discriminate the sediment samples based on their degree of contamination. The present study shows that instead of expensive and destructive PHC chemical methods, magnetic susceptibility is found to be a suitable, cheap and rapid method for detailed study of PHC in marine sediments. This baseline PHCs data can be used for regular ecological monitoring and effective management for the mining and tourism related activities in the coastal ecosystem. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Petroleum hydrocarbons and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Hong Kong marine sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, G.J.; Richardson, B.J.

    1999-01-01

    A total of 20 surficial sediment samples, obtained from Hong Kong coastal waters, were analysed for petroleum hydrocarbons (PHCs) and a suite of 15 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The results indicate that Hong Kong coastal sediments are often seriously polluted with petroleum related hydrocarbons. This is especially so in heavily urbanised or industrialized localities, such as Kowloon Bay (Victoria Harbour), Tsing Yi North and Tolo Harbour. Petroleum hydrocarbon pollutants in marine sediments are believed to be mainly derived from the transportation of oil, shipping activities, spillages, and industrial, stormwater and waste wastewater discharge. The ratio of unresolved complex mixture (UCM) to n-alkanes, carbon preference index (CPI), and n-C 16 values indicate that the main contribution to petroleum hydrocarbon contamination is via oil and its products. Pollutant sources appear to be stable and continuing when compared with previous data. (author)

  14. Molecular tools to understand the bioremediation effect of plants and earthworms on contaminated marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Beatriz; Cañizares, Rosa; Macci, Cristina; Doni, Serena; Masciandaro, Grazia; Benitez, Emilio

    2015-12-30

    A meso-scale pilot plant was set up to test the efficiency of a bioremediation scheme applied to marine sediments contaminated by heavy metals and hydrocarbons. The experiment was implemented for three years in two stages using two remediation agents: plants (Paspalum vaginatum and Tamarix gallica) and earthworms (Eisenia fetida). DNA and RNA-based methodologies were applied to elucidate the dynamics of the bacterial population and were related to improving biological and chemical conditions of the sediments. Bioremediation strategies were successful in removing pollutants from the contaminated sediments and specialization within the bacterial community related to the type of contamination present was detected in the different stages of the process. The highest response of Gram-positive PAH-degraders to the contamination was detected at the beginning and after the first stage of the experiment, corresponding to the uppermost values of degradation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Phylogenetic Characterization of Marine Benthic Archaea in Organic-Poor Sediments of the Eastern Equatorial Pacific Ocean (ODP Site 1225

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antje Lauer

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Sequencing surveys of microbial communities in marine subsurface sediments have focused on organic-rich, continental margins; the database for organic-lean deep-sea sediments from mid-ocean regions is underdeveloped. The archaeal community in subsurface sediments of ODP Site 1225 in the eastern equatorial Pacific (3760 m water depth; 1.1 and 7.8 m sediment depth was analyzed by PCR, cloning and sequencing, and by denaturant gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE of 16S rRNA genes. Three uncultured archaeal lineages with different depth distributions were found: Marine Group I (MG-I within the Thaumarchaeota, its sister lineage Marine Benthic Group A (MBG-A, the phylum-level archaeal lineage Marine Benthic Group B (also known as Deep-Sea Archaeal Group or Lokiarchaeota, and the Deep-Sea Euryarchaeotal Group 3. The MG-I phylotypes included representatives of sediment clusters that are distinct from the pelagic members of this phylum. On the scale from fully oxidized, extremely organic carbon-depleted sediments (for example, those the South Pacific Gyre to fully reduced, organic carbon-rich marine subsurface sediments (such as those of the Peru Margin, Ocean Drilling Program (ODP Site 1225 falls into the non-extreme organic carbon-lean category, and harbors archaeal communities from both ends of the spectrum.

  16. Bacillus marinisedimentorum sp. nov., isolated from marine sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ling-Yun; Ling, Si-Kai; Li, Chang-Ming; Chen, Guan-Jun; Du, Zong-Jun

    2018-01-01

    A novel Gram-stain-positive, motile and facultatively anaerobic strain, designated NC2-31 T , was isolated from sediment from the coast of Weihai, PR China. Optimal growth occurred at 37 °C, pH 7.5 and with 2.0-3.0 % (w/v) NaCl. MK-7 was the major respiratory quinone. Meso-diaminopimelic acid was a diagnostic diamino acid in the peptidoglycan. The major polar lipids of NC2-31 T were diphosphatidylglycerol (DPG), phosphatidylglycerol (PG) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE). The genomic DNA G+C content of the strain was 46.3 mol%. The predominant cellular fatty acids (>10.0 %) of NC2-31 T were iso-C15 : 0 (18.9 %), anteiso-C15 : 0 (15.8 %), summed feature 3 (C16 : 1ω7c and/or iso-C15 : 0 2-OH) (15.3 %) and iso-C16 : 0 (10.3 %). Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that NC2-31 T should be classified as representing a member of the genus Bacillus. Based on data from the current polyphasic study, NC2-31 T represents a novel species within the genus Bacillus, for which the name Bacillusmarinisedimentorum sp. nov. is proposed with type strain NC2-31 T (=KCTC 33721 T =MCCC 1K01239 T ).

  17. Certification of Trace Elements and Methyl Mercury Mass Fractions in IAEA-456 Marine Sediment Samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    The primary goal of the IAEA Environment Laboratories is to assist Member States in the use of both stable and radioisotope analytical techniques to understand, monitor and protect the environment. In this context, the major impact of large coastal cities on marine ecosystems is an issue of prime concern for the IAEA and the IAEA Environment Laboratories. The marine pollution assessments required to understand such impacts depend on accurate knowledge of contaminant concentrations in various environmental compartments. The IAEA Environment Laboratories has been assisting national laboratories and regional laboratory networks since the early 1970s through the provision of a reference material programme for the analysis of radionuclides, trace elements and organic compounds in marine samples. Quality assurance, quality control and associated good laboratory practice are essential components of all marine environmental monitoring studies. Quality control procedures are commonly based on the analysis of certified reference materials and reference samples in order to validate analytical methods used in monitoring studies and to assess t h e reliability and comparability of measurement data. Data that are not based on adequate quality assurance and quality control can be erroneous, and their misuse can lead to poor environmental management decisions. A marine sediment sample with certified mass amount contents for aluminium, arsenic, cadmium chromium, cobalt, copper, iron, lead, mercury, methyl mercury, manganese, nickel, vanadium and zinc was recently produced by the IAEA Environment Laboratories. This publication presents the sample preparation methodology, including material homogeneity and the stability study, the selection of laboratories, the evaluation of results from the certification campaign, and the assignment of property values and their associated uncertainty. As a result, certified values for mass fractions and associated expanded uncertainty were

  18. Certification of Trace Element Mass Fractions in IAEA-457 Marine Sediment Sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The primary goal of the IAEA Environment Laboratories in Monaco (NAEL) is to help Member States understand, monitor and protect the marine environment. The major impact exerted by large coastal cities on marine ecosystems is therefore of great concern to the IAEA and its Environment Laboratories. Given that marine pollution assessments of such impacts depend on accurate knowledge of contaminant concentrations in various environmental compartments, the NAEL has assisted national laboratories and regional laboratory networks through its Reference Products for Environment and Trade programme since the early 1970s. Quality assurance (QA), quality control (QC) and associated good laboratory practice are essential components of all marine environmental monitoring studies. QC procedures are commonly based on the analysis of certified reference materials and reference samples in order to validate analytical methods used in monitoring studies and to assess reliability and comparability of measurement data. QA can be realized by participation in externally organized laboratory performance studies, also known as interlaboratory comparisons, which compare and evaluate analytical performance and measurement capabilities of participating laboratories. Data that are not based on adequate QA/QC can be erroneous and their misuse can lead to incorrect environmental management decisions. A marine sediment sample with certified mass fractions for Ag, Al, As, Cd, Cr, Co, Cu, Fe, Hg, Li, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sn, Sr, V and Zn was recently produced by the NAEL in the frame of a project between the IAEA and the Korea Institute of Ocean Science and Technology. This report describes the sample preparation methodology, the material homogeneity and stability study, the selection of laboratories, the evaluation of results from the certification campaign and the assignment of property values and their associated uncertainty. As a result, reference values for mass fractions and associated expanded

  19. Nitrogen isotopes in bulk marine sediment: linking seafloor observations with subseafloor records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-E. Tesdal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The stable isotopes of nitrogen offer a unique perspective on changes in the nitrogen cycle, past and present. However, the presence of multiple forms of nitrogen in marine sediments can complicate the interpretation of bulk nitrogen isotope measurements. Although the large-scale global patterns of seafloor δ15N have been shown to match process-based expectations, small-scale heterogeneity on the seafloor, or alterations of isotopic signals during translation into the subseafloor record, could obscure the primary signals. Here, a public database of nitrogen isotope measurements is described, including both seafloor and subseafloor sediment samples ranging in age from modern to the Pliocene, and used to assess these uncertainties. In general, good agreement is observed between neighbouring seafloor sites within a 100 km radius, with 85% showing differences of < 1‰. There is also a good correlation between the δ15N of the shallowest (< 5 ka subseafloor sediments and neighbouring seafloor sites within a 100 km radius (R2 = 0.83, which suggests a reliable translation of sediments into the buried sediment record. Meanwhile, gradual δ15N decreases over multiple glacial–interglacial cycles appear to reflect post-depositional alteration in records from the deep sea (below 2000 m. We suggest a simple conceptual model to explain these 100-kyr-timescale changes in well-oxygenated, slowly accumulating sediments, which calls on differential loss rates for pools of organic N with different δ15N. We conclude that bulk sedimentary nitrogen isotope records are reliable monitors of past changes in the marine nitrogen cycle at most locations, and could be further improved with a better understanding of systematic post-depositional alteration. Furthermore, geochemical or environmental criteria should be developed in order to effectively identify problematic locations and to account for

  20. Assessment of radionuclides and heavy metals in marine sediments along the Upper Gulf of Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khuntong, S.; Phaophang, C.; Sudprasert, W.

    2015-05-01

    Due to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster in 2011 and the development of nuclear power plant in neighboring countries such as Vietnam in the near future, radionuclide assessment in marine sediment during 2010 - 2011 may be useful as background levels for radiation protection in Thailand. Marine sediments (10 samples) were collected approximately 1 km away from the coastline along Chonburi to Pattaya, Chonburi Province. The sediments were ground and sieved through 2-mm test sieve after air drying. Radionuclides were measured with a gamma spectrometer equipped with a well-calibrated HPGe detector. The samples were prepared in the same geometry as the reference material. The optimal counting time was 60,000 - 80,000 s for statistical evaluation and uncertainties. No contamination of 137Cs as an artificial radionuclide was found. Naturally-occurring radionuclides including 238U, 232Th and 40K were found. The mean specific activities of 238U, 232Th and 40K were 44 ± 10, 59 ± 17 and 463 ± 94 Bq/kg in the rainy season (2010); 41 ± 6, 50 ± 9 and 484 ± 83 Bq/kg in the winter (2010), and 39 ± 6, 41 ± 7 and 472 ± 81 Bq/kg in the summer (2011), respectively. The mean specific activities were higher than the values in the UNSCEAR report of 35, 30 and 400 Bq/kg for 238U, 232Th and 40K, respectively. From the measured specific activities, the absorbed dose rate, radium equivalent activity, external hazard index and annual external effective dose rate were calculated in order to assess the health risk. No radiation hazards related to the radioactivity in the sediment were expected. The accumulation of radionuclides varied with the particle size and the organic matter content in the sediment. The accumulation of heavy metals showed similar results to that of the radionuclides in the sediment.

  1. Laboratory experiments on the transfer dynamics of plutonium from marine sediments to sea water and to marine organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mo, T.; Lowman, F.G.

    1975-01-01

    The leachability of 239 240 Pu from a fine contaminated calcareous sediment to aerated open sea water and to anoxic sea water was measured. The distribution coefficient for 239 240 Pu from sediment to sea water was 6.1 x 10 -5 for aerated water and 2.6 x 10 -6 for anoxic water. Experiments on the uptake of 239 240 Pu by the clams Donax denticulatus, and Lucina pectinata, were done in aquaria containing kilogram quantities of sediment from the Bravo Crater at Bikini Atoll. The concentration factor for 239 240 Pu by the soft parts of these clams was about 200. All the plutonium taken up in the soft parts was associated with the gill, mantle and siphon. No plutonium was detected in the adductor muscles or hepatopancreas. The smooth surfaces of the shells of the Donax did not show any detectable plutonium, but the rough shell surfaces of the Lucina concentrated plutonium by a factor of 1.10 x 10 4 over that in the sea water. Marine periphyton cultured on glass plates in an aquarium concentrated 239 240 Pu by a factor of about 7 x 10 3 over that in the sea water. (U.S.)

  2. Viability of microcomputed tomography to study tropical marine worm galleries in humid muddy sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennafirme, Simone F.; Machado, Alessandra S.; Lima, Inaya; Suzuki, Katia N.; Lopes, Ricardo T.

    2013-01-01

    Bioturbation is an ecological process driven by organisms, which transports nutrients and gases from air/water to sediment through their galleries, by the time they feed, burrow and/or construct galleries. This exchange is vital to the maintenance of micro and macrobenthic organisms, mainly in muddy flat environments. Species with distinct galleries could create levels of bioturbation, affecting the benthic interactions. In this sense, it is fundamental developing a non-destructive method that permits identifying/quantifying the properties of these galleries. The recent advances in micro-computed tomography are allowing the high resolution 3D images generation. However, once muddy sediments are rich in organic matter and interstitial water, these would lead to motion artifacts which could, in turn, decrease the accuracy of galleries identification/quantification. In this context, the aim of this study was to develop a protocol which combines laboratory experiments and microtomography analysis in order to generate accurate 3D images of the small marine worm's galleries within humid muddy sediments. The sediment was collected at both muddy flats of Surui's and Itaipu lagoon's mangroves (RJ-Brazil), sieved (0.5mm mesh) and introduced with one individual of the marine worm Laeonereis acuta (Nereididae, Polychaeta) in each acrylic corer holders (4.4cm of internal diameter). High energy microtomography scanner was used to obtain 3D images and the setup calibration was 130 kV and 61 mA. Each acquisition image time was among 4h and 6h. Several procedures of drying remained water inside the cores were performed aiming obtaining images without movement artifacts due to circulating water, and this issue was one of the main studied parameter. In order to investigate possible chemical effects, 2ml of formalin (35%) with menthol were added to the surface of the cores. The results show that although the drying time was appropriated, the chemicals created bubbles within the

  3. Viability of microcomputed tomography to study tropical marine worm galleries in humid muddy sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennafirme, Simone F., E-mail: sipennafirme@gmail.com [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Biologia. Dept. de Biologia Marinha; Machado, Alessandra S.; Lima, Inaya; Suzuki, Katia N.; Lopes, Ricardo T., E-mail: machado@lin.ufrj.br, E-mail: inaya@lin.ufrj.br, E-mail: norisuzuki6@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: ricardo@lin.ufj.br [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear

    2013-07-01

    Bioturbation is an ecological process driven by organisms, which transports nutrients and gases from air/water to sediment through their galleries, by the time they feed, burrow and/or construct galleries. This exchange is vital to the maintenance of micro and macrobenthic organisms, mainly in muddy flat environments. Species with distinct galleries could create levels of bioturbation, affecting the benthic interactions. In this sense, it is fundamental developing a non-destructive method that permits identifying/quantifying the properties of these galleries. The recent advances in micro-computed tomography are allowing the high resolution 3D images generation. However, once muddy sediments are rich in organic matter and interstitial water, these would lead to motion artifacts which could, in turn, decrease the accuracy of galleries identification/quantification. In this context, the aim of this study was to develop a protocol which combines laboratory experiments and microtomography analysis in order to generate accurate 3D images of the small marine worm's galleries within humid muddy sediments. The sediment was collected at both muddy flats of Surui's and Itaipu lagoon's mangroves (RJ-Brazil), sieved (0.5mm mesh) and introduced with one individual of the marine worm Laeonereis acuta (Nereididae, Polychaeta) in each acrylic corer holders (4.4cm of internal diameter). High energy microtomography scanner was used to obtain 3D images and the setup calibration was 130 kV and 61 mA. Each acquisition image time was among 4h and 6h. Several procedures of drying remained water inside the cores were performed aiming obtaining images without movement artifacts due to circulating water, and this issue was one of the main studied parameter. In order to investigate possible chemical effects, 2ml of formalin (35%) with menthol were added to the surface of the cores. The results show that although the drying time was appropriated, the chemicals created bubbles

  4. Mineralogy, early marine diagenesis, and the chemistry of shallow-water carbonate sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, J. A.; Blättler, C. L.; Lundstrom, E. A.; Santiago-Ramos, D. P.; Akhtar, A. A.; Crüger Ahm, A.-S.; Bialik, O.; Holmden, C.; Bradbury, H.; Murray, S. T.; Swart, P. K.

    2018-01-01

    Shallow-water carbonate sediments constitute the bulk of sedimentary carbonates in the geologic record and are widely used archives of Earth's chemical and climatic history. One of the main limitations in interpreting the geochemistry of ancient carbonate sediments is the potential for post-depositional diagenetic alteration. In this study, we use paired measurements of calcium (44Ca/40Ca or δ44Ca) and magnesium (26Mg/24Mg or δ26Mg) isotope ratios in sedimentary carbonates and associated pore-fluids as a tool to understand the mineralogical and diagenetic history of Neogene shallow-water carbonate sediments from the Bahamas and southwest Australia. We find that the Ca and Mg isotopic composition of bulk carbonate sediments at these sites exhibits systematic stratigraphic variability that is related to both mineralogy and early marine diagenesis. The observed variability in bulk sediment Ca isotopes is best explained by changes in the extent and style of early marine diagenesis from one where the composition of the diagenetic carbonate mineral is determined by the chemistry of the fluid (fluid-buffered) to one where the composition of the diagenetic carbonate mineral is determined by the chemistry of the precursor sediment (sediment-buffered). Our results indicate that this process, together with variations in carbonate mineralogy (aragonite, calcite, and dolomite), plays a fundamental and underappreciated role in determining the regional and global stratigraphic expressions of geochemical tracers (δ13C, δ18O, major, minor, and trace elements) in shallow-water carbonate sediments in the geologic record. Our results also provide evidence that a large shallow-water carbonate sink that is enriched in 44Ca can explain the mismatch between the δ44/40Ca value of rivers and deep-sea carbonate sediments and call into question the hypothesis that the δ44/40Ca value of seawater depends on the mineralogy of primary carbonate precipitations (e.g. 'aragonite seas' and

  5. Quantitative analysis of anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) in marine sediments: A modeling perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regnier, P.; Dale, A. W.; Arndt, S.; LaRowe, D. E.; Mogollón, J.; Van Cappellen, P.

    2011-05-01

    Recent developments in the quantitative modeling of methane dynamics and anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) in marine sediments are critically reviewed. The first part of the review begins with a comparison of alternative kinetic models for AOM. The roles of bioenergetic limitations, intermediate compounds and biomass growth are highlighted. Next, the key transport mechanisms in multi-phase sedimentary environments affecting AOM and methane fluxes are briefly treated, while attention is also given to additional controls on methane and sulfate turnover, including organic matter mineralization, sulfur cycling and methane phase transitions. In the second part of the review, the structure, forcing functions and parameterization of published models of AOM in sediments are analyzed. The six-orders-of-magnitude range in rate constants reported for the widely used bimolecular rate law for AOM emphasizes the limited transferability of this simple kinetic model and, hence, the need for more comprehensive descriptions of the AOM reaction system. The derivation and implementation of more complete reaction models, however, are limited by the availability of observational data. In this context, we attempt to rank the relative benefits of potential experimental measurements that should help to better constrain AOM models. The last part of the review presents a compilation of reported depth-integrated AOM rates (ΣAOM). These rates reveal the extreme variability of ΣAOM in marine sediments. The model results are further used to derive quantitative relationships between ΣAOM and the magnitude of externally impressed fluid flow, as well as between ΣAOM and the depth of the sulfate-methane transition zone (SMTZ). This review contributes to an improved understanding of the global significance of the AOM process, and helps identify outstanding questions and future directions in the modeling of methane cycling and AOM in marine sediments.

  6. Large Fraction of Dead and Inactive Bacteria in Coastal Marine Sediments: Comparison of Protocols for Determination and Ecological Significance

    OpenAIRE

    Luna, G. M.; Manini, E.; Danovaro, R.

    2002-01-01

    It is now universally recognized that only a portion of aquatic bacteria is actively growing, but quantitative information on the fraction of living versus dormant or dead bacteria in marine sediments is completely lacking. We compared different protocols for the determination of the dead, dormant, and active bacterial fractions in two different marine sediments and at different depths into the sediment core. Bacterial counts ranged between (1.5 ± 0.2) × 108 cells g−1 and (53.1 ± 16.0) × 108 ...

  7. Influence of enhancing electrolytes on the removal efficiency of heavy metals from Gabes marine sediments (Tunisia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missaoui, Amel; Said, Imen; Lafhaj, Zoubeir; Hamdi, Essaieb

    2016-12-15

    This study focused on the feasibility of the treatment of heavy metals-contaminated sediments from Gabes harbor (Tunisia) using enhanced electrokinetic process. It presented a laboratory short-time electrokinetic experiment. The enhancing agents, as citric, acetic acids and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) were used regarding their low environmental hazard. The electrokinetic cell was specially designed in order to elaborate two experiments at the same time. This paper is composed of three parts. The first part introduces the characterization of Gabes sediments. The second part describes the design of laboratory electrokinetic cell and the followed methods. The third part is dedicated to the results analysis. Treatment efficiency revealed that more than 80% of lead was removed from Gabes marine sediments. The reduction of cooper concentration, in sediments after treatment, ranged from 74 to 87%. Despite, the high removal of cadmium that ranged from 58 to 79%, treated sediments presented Cd concentration above the threshold limit. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Redox effects on the microbial degradation of refractory organic matter in marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimers, Clare E.; Alleau, Yvan; Bauer, James E.; Delaney, Jennifer; Girguis, Peter R.; Schrader, Paul S.; Stecher, Hilmar A.

    2013-11-01

    Microbially mediated reduction-oxidation (redox) reactions are often invoked as being the mechanisms by which redox state influences the degradation of sedimentary organic matter (OM) in the marine environment. To evaluate the effects of elevated, oscillating and reduced redox potentials on the fate of primarily aged, mineral-adsorbed OM contained in continental shelf sediments, we used microbial fuel cells to control redox state within and around marine sediments, without amending the sediments with reducing or oxidizing substances. We subsequently followed electron fluxes in the redox elevated and redox oscillating treatments, and related sediment chemical, isotopic and bacterial community changes to redox conditions over a 748-day experimental period. The electron fluxes of the elevated and oscillating redox cells were consistent with models of organic carbon (OC) oxidation with time-dependent first-order rate constants declining from 0.023 to 0.005 y-1, in agreement with rate constants derived from typical OC profiles and down core ages of offshore sediments, or from sulfate reduction rate measurements in similar sediments. Moreover, although cumulative electron fluxes were higher in the continuously elevated redox treatment, incremental rates of electron harvesting in the two treatments converged over the 2 year experiment. These similar rates were reflected in chemical indicators of OM metabolism such as dissolved OC and ammonia, and particulate OC concentrations, which were not significantly different among all treatments and controls over the experimental time-scale. In contrast, products of carbonate and opal dissolution and metal mobilization showed greater enrichments in sediments with elevated and oscillating redox states. Microbial community composition in anode biofilms and surrounding sediments was assessed via high-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing, and these analyses revealed that the elevated and oscillatory redox treatments led to the

  9. Unique actinomycetes from marine caves and coral reef sediments provide novel PKS and NRPS biosynthetic gene clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Tyler W; Slattery, Marc; Olson, Julie B

    2012-06-01

    In the ever-expanding search for novel bioactive molecules and enzymes, marine actinomycetes have proven to be a productive source. While open reef sediment and sponge-associated actinomycetes have been extensively examined, their marine cave counterparts remain unevaluated. Anchialine cave systems in the Bahamas offered an ideal setting to evaluate the occurrence and variation within sediment-associated actinomycete communities. While in close geographical proximity to open reef environments, these systems provide a specialized environmental niche devoid of light and direct exposure to nutrient input. In the present study, selective isolation techniques and molecular methods were used to test the hypothesis that variable distribution of actinomycetes and secondary metabolite gene clusters occur between open reef and marine cave systems. The results indicated that differences exist within the culturable sediment-associated actinomycete communities between marine caves and open reef systems, with members of the genus Streptomyces dominating cultures from open reef sediments and a more diverse suite of actinomycetes isolated from marine cave sediment samples. Within the cave isolates, members of the proposed genus Solwaraspora were the most represented. Based on PKS- and NRPS-gene-targeted PCR amplification and sequencing, geographic variation in the occurrence of these biosynthetic pathways was also observed. These findings indicate that marine cave systems are a lucrative source in the search for novel secondary metabolite producers with biotechnological applications and that environmental and geographic factors likely affect the occurrence of these biosynthetic pathways.

  10. Determination of multi-element in marine sediment samples collected in Angola by the k0-NAA technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teixeira, M.C.P.; Ho Manh Dung; Cao Dong Vu; Nguyen Thi Sy; Nguyen Thanh Binh; Vuong Huu Tan

    2006-01-01

    The marine sediment samples were designed to collect in Angola for marine environmental pollution study. The k 0 -standardization method of neutron activation analysis (k 0 -NAA) on Dalat research reactor has been developed to determine of multi-element in the Angola marine sediment samples. The samples were irradiated in cell 7-1 for short- and middle-lived nuclides and rotary specimen rack for long-lived nuclides. The irradiation facilities were characterized for neutron spectrum parameters and post-activated samples were measured on the calibrated gamma-ray spectrometers using HPGe detectors. The analytical results for 9 marine sediment samples with 27 elements: Al, As, Br, Ca, Ce,Cl, Co, Cs, Dy, Fe, Hf, I, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Rb, Sb, Sc, Se, Sm, Th, Ti, U, V and Zn in term of mean concentration, standard deviation and their content range are shown in the report. The analytical quality assurance was done by analysis of a Japan's certified reference material namely marine sediment NMIJ-CRM-7302a. These preliminary results revealed that the k 0 -NAA technique on the Dalat research reactor is a good analytical technique for determination of multi-element in the marine sediment samples. Some heavy metals and trace elements determined in this work possibly connected to the human activities at the sampling region. (author)

  11. Pleistocene reduction of polar ice caps: Evidence from Cariaco Basin marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poore, R.Z.; Dowsett, H.J.

    2001-01-01

    Sea level is projected to rise between 13 and 94 cm over the next 100 yr due to continued climate warming. The sea-level projections assume that polar ice sheets will remain stable or even increase on time scales of centuries, but controversial geologic evidence suggests that current polar ice sheets have been eliminated or greatly reduced during previous Pleistocene interglacials indicating that modern polar ice sheets have become unstable within the natural range of interglacial climates. Sea level may have been more than 20 m higher than today during a presumably very warm interglacial about 400 ka during marine isotope stage 11. Because of the implications for future sea level rise, additional study of the conflicting evidence for warmer conditions and higher sea level during marine isotope stage 11 is needed. Here we present microfossil and isotopic data from marine sediments of the Cariaco Basin supporting the interpretation that global sea level was 10-20 m higher than today during marine isotope stage 11. The increased sea level requires reduction in modern polar ice sheets and is consistent with the interpretation that the West Antarctic ice sheet and the Greenland ice sheet were absent or greatly reduced during marine isotope stage 11. Our results show a warm marine isotope stage 11 interglacial climate with sea level as high as or above modern sea level that lasted for 25 to 30 k.y. Variations in Earth's orbit around the sun (Milankovitch cycles) are considered to be a primary external force driving glacial-interglacial cycles. Current and marine isotope stage 11 Milankovitch forcing are very similar, suggesting that the present interglacial (Holocene) that began ca. 10 ka will continue for another 15 to 20 k.y. Therefore any anthropogenic climate warming will accelerate the natural process toward reduction in polar ice sheets. The potential for increased rates of sea level rise related to polar ice sheet decay should be considered as a potential natural

  12. The Link between Microbial Diversity and Nitrogen Cycling in Marine Sediments Is Modulated by Macrofaunal Bioturbation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Yazdani Foshtomi

    Full Text Available The marine benthic nitrogen cycle is affected by both the presence and activity of macrofauna and the diversity of N-cycling microbes. However, integrated research simultaneously investigating macrofauna, microbes and N-cycling is lacking. We investigated spatio-temporal patterns in microbial community composition and diversity, macrofaunal abundance and their sediment reworking activity, and N-cycling in seven subtidal stations in the Southern North Sea.Our results indicated that bacteria (total and β-AOB showed more spatio-temporal variation than archaea (total and AOA as sedimentation of organic matter and the subsequent changes in the environment had a stronger impact on their community composition and diversity indices in our study area. However, spatio-temporal patterns of total bacterial and β-AOB communities were different and related to the availability of ammonium for the autotrophic β-AOB. Highest bacterial richness and diversity were observed in June at the timing of the phytoplankton bloom deposition, while richness of β-AOB as well as AOA peaked in September. Total archaeal community showed no temporal variation in diversity indices.Distance based linear models revealed that, independent from the effect of grain size and the quality and quantity of sediment organic matter, nitrification and N-mineralization were affected by respectively the diversity of metabolically active β-AOB and AOA, and the total bacteria, near the sediment-water interface. Separate models demonstrated a significant and independent effect of macrofaunal activities on community composition and richness of total bacteria, and diversity indices of metabolically active AOA. Diversity of β-AOB was significantly affected by macrofaunal abundance. Our results support the link between microbial biodiversity and ecosystem functioning in marine sediments, and provided broad correlative support for the hypothesis that this relationship is modulated by macrofaunal

  13. Determination of sediment metal background concentrations and enrichment in marine environments - A critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, G F

    2017-02-15

    'Background' is the concentration of metals in pristine sediment, unaltered by human activity and 'enrichment' is the extent present-day sediment metal concentrations exceed pre-anthropogenic levels (the magnitude of human-induced change). Background and enrichment are becoming more frequently used for management measures to bring sediment and the environment back to near-pristine levels. Of the six empirical methods reviewed for determining background (global values, pristine marine and fluvial sediments, catchment soils and rocks), the use of sedimentary cores has the greatest advantage. Most of the eight statistical methods reviewed are adversely affected by the polymodality and an absence of normality or log-normality, however robust regression procedures are most commonly used. Sorption hypothesis techniques require further development. Indices used to determine enrichment incorporate background levels (enrichment indices) or do not (contamination indices). Of the 20 indices reviewed, the New Nemerow Index and the Mean Enrichment Quotient rate highly in performance, based on 5 beneficial attributes assessed: use of background and normalised data, provision of thresholds, a classification scheme, and inclusion of multiple metals. Variance in background metal concentrations determined in the 43 global projects reviewed is surprisingly moderate, however regional variability may be considerable due to local catchment mineralisation. Chemical analysis of sediment should not include metals bound in the mineral matrix and weak acid extractions are advisable. The use of appropriate and effective indicators of environmental condition are critical to the protection and restoration of marine regions and ensuring that human activities are carried out in a sustainable manner to promote safe, healthy and productive ecosystems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The accumulation of radiocesium in coarse marine sediment: Effects of mineralogy and organic matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yeongkyoo; Kim, Kangjoo; Kang, Hee-Dong; Kim, Wan; Doh, Si-Hong; Kim, Do-Sung; Kim, Byoung-Ki

    2007-01-01

    The controlling factors affecting the accumulation of 137 Cs in marine sediment have not been investigated in detail, especially in coarse grained sediment. Eighty eight coarse marine sediment samples near Wuljin, Korea, were characterized by quantitative X-ray-diffraction (XRD), gamma-ray, and total organic carbon (TOC) analysis. Those factors were then compared. The grain size was in the range of -0.48 to 3.6 Mdφ corresponding to sand grains. TOC content was in the range of 0.06-1.75%, and the concentration of 137 Cs was 137 Cs activity, which was first reported here, probably due to the weathered frayed edge site of biotite produced by a release of K. The samples with low TOC contents showed even better correlation between biotite content and 137 Cs activity. For the entire samples, however, the TOC content showed better correlation with 137 Cs activity than other single factors, indicating that biotite and organic carbon are the most important factors controlling 137 Cs fixation. The combined effect of biotite and TOC for 137 Cs fixation was also confirmed by multiple regression analysis ( 137 Cs activity = 1.712 . TOC (wt%) + 0.202 . biotite (wt%) - 0.097; R 2 = 0.819). The regressed slopes indicated that the 137 Cs-adsorption capacity of TOC was about 8.5 times higher than that of biotite. However, the amount of 137 Cs adsorbed onto biotite was 30% more than that adsorbed onto TOC due to much greater biotite content in the sediment. The role of biotite in fixing 137 Cs becomes more important in sediment with coarser grains, containing little TOC

  15. Toxicological and chemical assessment of ordnance compounds in marine sediments and porewaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nipper, M.; Carr, R.S.; Biedenbach, J.M.; Hooten, R.L.; Miller, K.

    2002-01-01

    Toxicological and chemical studies were performed with a silty and a sandy marine sediment spiked with 2,6-dinitrotoluene (2,6-DNT), 2,4,6-trinitrophenylmethylnitramine (tetryl), or 2,4,6-trinitrophenol (picric acid). Whole sediment toxicity was analyzed by the 10-day survival test with the amphipod Ampelisca abdita, and porewater toxicity tests assessed macro-algae (Ulva fasciata) zoospore germination and germling growth, sea urchin (Arbacia punctulata) embryological development, and polychaete (Dinophilus gyrociliatus) survival and reproduction. Whole sediments spiked with 2,6-DNT were not toxic to amphipods. The fine-grained sediment spiked with tetryl was also not acutely toxic. The tetryl and picric acid LC50 values in the sandy sediment were 3.24 and 144 mg/kg dry weight, respectively. The fine-grained sediment spiked with picric acid generated a U-shaped concentration-response curve in the amphipod test, with increased survival both in the lowest and highest concentration. Grain-size distribution and organic carbon content strongly influenced the behavior of ordnance compounds in spiked sediments. Very low concentrations were measured in some of the treatments and irreversible binding and biodegradation are suggested as the processes responsible for the low measurements. Porewater toxicity varied with its sedimentary origin and with ordnance compound. The sea urchin embryological development test tended to be the least sensitive. Tetryl was the most toxic chemical in all porewater tests, and picric acid the least toxic. Samples spiked with 2,6-DNT contained a degradation product identified as 2-methyl-3-nitroaniline (also known as 2-amino-6-nitrotoluene), and unidentified peaks, possibly degradation products, were also seen in some of the picric acid- and tetryl-spiked samples. Degradation products may have played a role in observed toxicity. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Geochemical Evidence for Recent Hydrothermal Alteration of Marine Sediments in Mid-Okinawa Trough, Southwest Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, A.; Abe, G.; Yamaguchi, K. E.

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies have shown that submarine hydrothermal system supports diverse microbial life. Bio-essential metals supporting such microbial communities were released from basalts by high-temperature water-rock interaction in deeper part of the oceanic crust and carried by submarine fluid flow. Its total quantity in global hydrothermal settings has been estimated to be on the order of ~1019 g/yr, which is surprisingly on the same order of the total river flows (Urabe et al., 2011). Therefore, it is important to explore how submarine river system works, i.e., to understand mechanism and extent of elemental transport, which should lead to understanding of the roles of hydrothermal circulation in oceanic crust in controlling elemental budget in the global ocean and geochemical conditions to support deep hot biosphere.  We performed REE analysis of marine sediments influenced by submarine hydrothermal activity in Mid-Okinawa Trough. The sediment samples used in this study are from IODP site at Iheya North region and JADE site at Izena region. The samples show alternation between volcanic and clastic sediments. Hydrothermal fluids of this area contain elevated concentrations of volatile components such as H2, CO2, CH4, NH4+, and H2S, supporting diverse chemoautotrophic microbial community (Nakagawa et al., 2005). The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of hydrothermal activity on the REE signature of the sediments. Chondrite-normalized REE patterns of the samples show relative enrichment of light over heavy REEs, weak positive Ce anomalies, and variable degrees of negative Eu anomalies. The REE patterns suggest the sediments source was mainly basalt, suggesting insignificant input of continental materials. Negative Eu anomalies found in the IODP site become more pronounced with increasing depth, suggesting progressive increase of hydrothermal alteration where Eu was reductively dissolved into fluids by decomposition of feldspars. Contrary, at the JADE site

  17. Cenozoic marine sedimentation and ice-volume variation on the East Antarctic craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, P. N.; Harwood, D. M.; McKelvey, B. C.; Mercer, J. H.; Stott, L. D.

    1984-05-01

    Recycled Cretaceous and Cenozoic marine microfossils have been recovered from samples of the Pliocene Sinus Formation. Samples were collected from outcrops in the Reedy, Beardmore, and Ferrar glacier areas of the Transantarctic Mountains between lat 77° and 86°S. The glaciogene sediments contained diatoms, foraminifera, calcareous nannoplankton, silicoflagellates, radiolarians, sponge spicules, palynomorphs, and ostracodes of Late Cretaceous, Paleocene, Eocene, late Oligocene, late Miocene, and Pliocene age. This suggests the presence of open marine basins on the East Antarctic craton during late Mesozoic and Cenozoic time. The apparent absence of early Oligocene and early through middle and earliest late Miocene assemblages suggests either that marine regression exposed the basin floors or that ice filled the basins during these times. The high-elevation setting of Sirius Formation outcrops suggests one of two hypotheses for their origin: (1) They are in situ Pliocene glaciomarine deposits that were uplifted 1,750 2,500 m with the Transantarctic Mountains to their present elevation; (2) the Sirius Formation deposits are a mixture of derived sediments stripped from sub-ice intracratonic basins and subsequently redeposited by ice flowing up the inland slope of the Transantarctic Mountains. We favor the second hypothesis, with transport to sites sometime within the past 3 m.y.

  18. PCB contamination of electro transformer station Zadar and sediment of near marine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picer, M.; Kovac, T.; Kodba Cencic, Z. [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Zagreb (Croatia)

    2004-09-15

    During the recent war, the karst area of Croatia has been jeopardized by hazardous waste and deserves particular attention because of its exceptional ecological sensitivity and unfortunately unscrupulous destruction of natural resources, infrastructure, homes and enterprises. During 1996 waste oil and soil samples near damaged transformer stations were collected in Delnice, Zadar, Sibenik, Split, and Dubrovnik area and analyzed on polychlorinated biphenyls. Results of the analysis of polychlorinated biphenyls in soil from four locations (on some locations, on two depths), indicate significant contamination of the investigated area TS 110/35 kV - Zadar. It was reason for thoroughly investigation this site for levels of PCBs in soil samples around damaged capacitor and near coastal zone of town Zadar. Results of soil analysis were presented in Dioxine 2003 conference which shown serious contamination of soil around damaged electro transformer station. Levels of PCBs in marine sediment and biota samples collected near coastal water have shown also relatively high values so it was reason about speculation of possibilities the inflow of PCBs from damaged ETS Zadar to near marine environment. Namely, town Zadar is situated on karstic ground and there are possibilities that PCBs could be transferred through such porous media to near sea. The scope of this paper is present the results of investigation PCBs pollution in deeper layer of soil samples collected inside ETS Zadar and sediment samples collected from the near Marine.

  19. Effects of Feeding Strategy, Sediment Characteristics, and Chemical Properties on Polychlorinated Biphenyl and Polybrominated Diphenyl Ether Bioaccumulation from Marine Sediments in Two Invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frouin, H; Jackman, P; Dangerfield, N D; Ross, P S

    2017-08-01

    Shellfish and sediment invertebrates have been widely used to assess pollution trends over space and time in coastal environments around the world. However, few studies have compared the bioaccumulation potential of different test species over a range of sediment-contaminant concentrations and profiles. The bioavailability of sediment-related contaminants was evaluated using sediments collected from sites (n = 12) throughout the Salish Sea, British Columbia, Canada. Two benthic marine invertebrates-the Baltic clam Macoma balthica and the polychaete worm Neanthes arenaceodentata-were exposed for 28 days in a controlled environment to these field-collected coastal sediments. The congener-specific uptake of legacy polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and emergent polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) was determined using high-resolution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry in sediments and in invertebrates after the experimental exposure. The polychaete Neanthes accumulated lower concentrations of PCBs but higher concentrations of PBDEs. The present study indicates that differences in bioaccumulation between these two invertebrates shape the accumulation of PCB and PBDE congeners, reflect differences in feeding strategies, and reveal the physicochemical properties of the contaminants and sediment properties. Because biota-sediment accumulation factor values are often calculated for environmental monitoring or site-specific impact assessments, our results provide insight into potentially confounding factors and the need for caution when selecting indicator species for coastal marine pollution.

  20. HEAVY METAL CONTENTS IN MARINE SEDIMENTS AND SEAWATER AT TOTOK BAY AREA, NORTH SULAWESI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delyuzar Ilahude

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The study area is located in north-eastern part of Tomini Bay, approximately 80 km south of Manado city, North Sulawesi. This area is closed to submarine tailing disposal system in Buyat Bay. Five marine sediment samples and four water samples from seawater and dig wells have been used for heavy metals (Hg, As, CN analyses by using Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (AAS. This study is a part of research conducted by Marine Geological Institute of Indonesia on morphological changes of seabed in the Totok Bay. The result shows that concentration of mercury (Hg in water samples taken from Ratatotok estuary is higher than standards stipulated Government Regulation (Peraturan Pemerintah/PP No. 82/2001. Meanwhile, concentration of arsenic (As is almost reaching its standard threshold, and conversely cyanide (CN concentration is low. This value of mercury (Hg concentration taken from Ratatotok estuary is much higher than water samples from of Buyat Bay estuary. Significant concentration of mercury (Hg analysed from those particular sampling sites indicated high mercury contamination. Therefore, further examination on ground water of dig wells is necessary, especially for mercury analysis (Hg. Furthermore, comparing the formerly obtained data of mercury concentration in the sediment, this particular study concludes that the sediments in the Totok Bay had contaminated by mercury from gold-processing of illegal mining.

  1. Microbial diversity in methane hydrate-bearing deep marine sediments core preserved in the original pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Y.; Hata, T.; Nishida, H.

    2017-12-01

    In normal coring of deep marine sediments, the sampled cores are exposed to the pressure of the atmosphere, which results in dissociation of gas-hydrates and might change microbial diversity. In this study, we analyzed microbial composition in methane hydrate-bearing sediment core sampled and preserved by Hybrid-PCS (Pressure Coring System). We sliced core into three layers; (i) outside layer, which were most affected by drilling fluids, (ii) middle layer, and (iii) inner layer, which were expected to be most preserved as the original state. From each layer, we directly extracted DNA, and amplified V3-V4 region of 16S rRNA gene. We determined at least 5000 of nucleotide sequences of the partial 16S rDNA from each layer by Miseq (Illumina). In the all layers, facultative anaerobes, which can grow with or without oxygen because they can metabolize energy aerobically or anaerobically, were detected as majority. However, the genera which are often detected anaerobic environment is abundant in the inner layer compared to the outside layer, indicating that condition of drilling and preservation affect the microbial composition in the deep marine sediment core. This study was conducted as a part of the activity of the Research Consortium for Methane Hydrate Resources in Japan [MH21 consortium], and supported by JOGMEC (Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corporation). The sample was provided by AIST (National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology).

  2. [Dynamics of 95Zr in simulated marine water-sediment-organisms system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunlin; Shi, Jianjun; Sun, Pingyue; Li, Mingyun

    2003-06-01

    To provide scientific evidence to evaluate the behavior of 95Zr in ocean ecosystem, the dynamic model of the transference, accumulation and disappearance of 95Zr among the simulated marine water, sediment and organisms was investigated using Nassarius semiplicatus and Boleophthalums pectinirostris as experimental stuffs. The result showed that 95Zr(Bq.g-1 or Bq.ml-1) in the marine water was decreased more than 90% in the first 4 h, and then descended gradually. 95Zr in sediment was increased in the peak in 48 h and then declined. The radioactivity percent of 95Zr in the shell and muslce of Nassarius semiplicatus was 68.7% and 31.30% respectively, while the radioactivity percent was 22.80%, 12.64%, 34.82%, 10.31%, 4.48%, 11.55% and 3.71%, respectively in the fill, fin, viscera, skull, skin, vertebra and muscle of Boleophthalmus pectinirostris. Nassarius semiplicatus had a greater concentrating capability of 95Zr than Boleophthalmus pectinirostris. The order of the 95Zr concentration was found to be sediment > Nassarius semiplicatus > water > Boleophthalmus pectinirostris. A dynamic model of closed four-compartment was constructed with exponent function.

  3. Diversity and distribution of fungal communities in the marine sediments of Kongsfjorden, Svalbard (High Arctic)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Fei Wang, Neng; Qin Zhang, Yu; Yu Liu, Hong; Yan Yu, Li

    2015-10-01

    This study assessed the diversity and distribution of fungal communities in eight marine sediments of Kongsfjorden (Svalbard, High Arctic) using 454 pyrosequencing with fungal-specific primers targeting the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the ribosomal rRNA gene. Sedimentary fungal communities showed high diversity with 42,219 reads belonging to 113 operational taxonomic units (OTUs). Of these OTUs, 62 belonged to the Ascomycota, 26 to Basidiomycota, 2 to Chytridiomycota, 1 to Zygomycota, 1 to Glomeromycota, and 21 to unknown fungi. The major known orders included Hypocreales and Saccharomycetales. The common fungal genera were Pichia, Fusarium, Alternaria, and Malassezia. Interestingly, most fungi occurring in these Arctic sediments may originate from the terrestrial habitats and different basins in Kongsfjorden (i.e., inner basin, central basin, and outer basin) harbor different sedimentary fungal communities. These results suggest the existence of diverse fungal communities in the Arctic marine sediments, which may serve as a useful community model for further ecological and evolutionary study of fungi in the Arctic.

  4. Multi-elemental analysis of marine sediments of Manila Bay using x-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosales, Colleen Marciel Fontelera

    2011-04-01

    An analysis of the marine sediments of Manila Bay was done by employing X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. The general trends observed in sediments are increasing (Ca and Sr), decreasing (Zr), or constant (Cl, Na, S, K) with respect to depth, sometimes, no trend can be observed. These trends are further explained by correlations present among these elements, plus all the other elements. The two X RF data analysis methods Auto Quantify and AXIL were also compared on the basis of the correlation plot obtained. AutoQuantify gave clearer correlations; thus, results from this method were used for constructing correlation plots. Correlations using Microsoft Excel and Stat graphics Centurion X V show that there are naturally occurring [lithogenic (Si, Ti, Al, Mg, Rb, Zn and Fe), biogenic (Ca, Mg), and conservative (Na, Cl)] and non-naturally occurring [mostly anthropogenic, brought to the bodies of water by aeolian or fluvial input (heavy metals Pb-Cu-Zn and Ni-Cr)] correlation present in the sediments. Moreover, pairs of elements that may coexist in a source and not coexist in another (Cr and Mg, Cr and Ni) have also been observed. The heavy metal enrichment was attributed to the burning of fossil fuels, iron and steel manufacturing (present in Valenzuela-Bulacan area), ferry and fishing services and other industrialization activities present in Manila Bay. Marine organisms are affected by the presence of these heavy metals by means of bioaccumulations, and may later on affect humans because of trophic transfer and bio magnification. (author)

  5. Exploring the diversity and metabolic potential of actinomycetes from temperate marine sediments from Newfoundland, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, K R; Haltli, B; Gill, K A; Correa, H; Berrué, F; Kerr, R G

    2015-01-01

    Marine sediments from Newfoundland, Canada were explored for biotechnologically promising Actinobacteria using culture-independent and culture-dependent approaches. Culture-independent pyrosequencing analyses uncovered significant actinobacterial diversity (H'-2.45 to 3.76), although the taxonomic diversity of biotechnologically important actinomycetes could not be fully elucidated due to limited sampling depth. Assessment of culturable actinomycete diversity resulted in the isolation of 360 actinomycetes representing 59 operational taxonomic units, the majority of which (94 %) were Streptomyces. The biotechnological potential of actinomycetes from NL sediments was assessed by bioactivity and metabolomics-based screening of 32 representative isolates. Bioactivity was exhibited by 41 % of isolates, while 11 % exhibited unique chemical signatures in metabolomics screening. Chemical analysis of two isolates resulted in the isolation of the cytotoxic metabolite 1-isopentadecanoyl-3β-D-glucopyranosyl-X-glycerol from Actinoalloteichus sp. 2L868 and sungsanpin from Streptomyces sp. 8LB7. These results demonstrate the potential for the discovery of novel bioactive metabolites from actinomycetes isolated from Atlantic Canadian marine sediments.

  6. Experimental Constraints on Microbial Liberation of Structural Iron from Common Clay Minerals in Marine Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, K. S.; Gaines, R. R.; Trang, J.; Scott, S. W.; Crane, E. J.; Lackey, J.; Prokopenko, M. G.; Berelson, W.

    2013-12-01

    Iron is a limiting nutrient in many marine settings. The marine Fe-cycle is complex because Fe may be used as an electron donor or acceptor and cycled many times before ultimate burial in sediments. Thus, the availability of iron plays a large role in the marine carbon cycle, influencing not only the extent of primary productivity but also the oxidation of organic matter in sediments. The primary constituents of marine sediments are clay minerals, which commonly contain lattice-bound Fe in octahedral sites. In marine settings, the pool of Fe bound within silicate mineral lattices has long been considered reactive only over long timescales, and thus non-bioavailable. In vitro experimental evidence has shown that lab cultures of Fe-reducing bacteria are able to utilize structurally-bound Fe (III) from the crystal lattice of nontronite, an uncommon but particularly Fe-rich (> 12 wt.%) smectite. Importantly, this process is capable of liberating Fe (II) to solution, where it is available to biotic processes as an electron donor. In order to constrain the capacity of naturally-occurring marine bacteria to liberate structurally-coordinated Fe from the lattices of common clay minerals, we exposed a suite of 16 different clay minerals (0.8-13.9 wt.% Fe) to lab cultures of known Fe-reducer S. onenidensis MR-1 and to a natural consortium of Fe-reducing microbes from the San Pedro and Santa Monica Basins over timescales ranging from 7-120 days. Clay minerals were treated with Na-dithionite to extract surface-bound Fe prior to exposure. Crystallographic data and direct measurements of Fe in solution demonstrate the release of structural Fe from all clay minerals analyzed. Neoformation of illite and amorphous quartz were observed. The array of clay minerals and microbes used in this experiment complement past findings and suggest that common clay minerals may represent a large and previously unrecognized pool of bioavailable Fe in the world ocean that contributes significantly

  7. Shear-wave velocity of marine sediments offshore Taiwan using ambient seismic noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Tse; Lin, Jing-Yi; Kuo-Chen, Hao; Yeh, Yi-Chin; Cheng, Win-Bin

    2017-04-01

    Seismic ambient noise technology has many advantages over the traditional two-station method. The most important one is that noise is happening all the time and it can be widely and evenly distributed. Thus, the Green's Function of any station pair can be obtained through the data cross-correlation process. Many related studies have been performed to estimate the velocity structures based on the inland area. Only a few studies were reported for the marine area due to the relatively shorter recording time of ocean bottom seismometers (OBS) deployment and the high cost of the marine experiment. However, the understanding about the shear-wave velocity (Vs) of the marine sediments is very crucial for the hazard assessment related to submarine landslides, particularly with the growing of submarine resources exploration. In this study, we applied the ambient noise technique to four OBS seismic networks located offshore Taiwan in the aim of getting more information about the noise sources and having the preliminary estimation for the Vs of the marine sediments. Two of the seismic networks were deployed in the NE part of Taiwan, near the Ryukyu subduction system, whereas the others were in the SW area, on the continental margin rich in gas hydrate. Generally, ambient seismic noise could be associated with wind, ocean waves, rock fracturing and anthropogenic activity. In the southwestern Taiwan, the cross-correlation function obtained from two seismic networks indicate similar direction, suggestion that the source from the south part of the network could be the origin of the noise. However, the two networks in the northeastern Taiwan show various source direction, which could be caused by the abrupt change of bathymetry or the volcanic degassing effect frequently observed by the marine geophysical method in the area. The Vs determined from the dispersion curve shows a relatively higher value for the networks in the Okinawa Trough (OT) off NE Taiwan than that in the

  8. Elucidating Microbial Species-Specific Effects on Organic Matter Transformation in Marine Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudi, N.; Enke, T. N.; Beaupre, S. R.; Teske, A.; Cordero, O. X.; Pearson, A.

    2017-12-01

    Microbial transformation and decomposition of organic matter in sediments constitutes one of the largest fluxes of carbon in marine environments. Mineralization of sedimentary organic matter by microorganisms results in selective degradation such that bioavailable or accessible compounds are rapidly metabolized while more recalcitrant, complex compounds are preserved and buried in sediment. Recent studies have found that the ability to use different carbon sources appears to vary among microorganisms, suggesting that the availability of certain pools of carbon can be specific to the taxa that utilize the pool. This implies that organic matter mineralization in marine environments may depend on the metabolic potential of the microbial populations that are present and active. The goal of our study was to investigate the extent to which organic matter availability and transformation may be species-specific using sediment from Guaymas Basin (Gulf of California). We carried out time-series incubations using bacterial isolates and sterilized sediment in the IsoCaRB system which allowed us to measure the production rates and natural isotopic signatures (δ13C and Δ14C) of microbially-respired CO2. Separate incubations using two different marine bacterial isolates (Vibrio sp. and Pseudoalteromonas sp.) and sterilized Guaymas Basin sediment under oxic conditions showed that the rate and total quantity of organic matter metabolized by these two species differs. Approximately twice as much CO2 was collected during the Vibrio sp. incubation compared to the Pseudoalteromonas sp. incubation. Moreover, the rate at which organic matter was metabolized by the Vibrio sp. was much higher than the Pseudoalteromonas sp. indicating the intrinsic availability of organic matter in sediments may depend on the species that is present and active. Isotopic analyses of microbially respired CO2 will be used to constrain the type and age of organic matter that is accessible to each species

  9. Identity, Abundance, and Reactivation Kinetics of Thermophilic Fermentative Endospores in Cold Marine Sediment and Seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpi, Marta; Lomstein, Bente Aa; Sichert, Andreas; Røy, Hans; Jørgensen, Bo B; Kjeldsen, Kasper U

    2017-01-01

    Cold marine sediments harbor endospores of fermentative and sulfate-reducing, thermophilic bacteria. These dormant populations of endospores are believed to accumulate in the seabed via passive dispersal by ocean currents followed by sedimentation from the water column. However, the magnitude of this process is poorly understood because the endospores present in seawater were so far not identified, and only the abundance of thermophilic sulfate-reducing endospores in the seabed has been quantified. We investigated the distribution of thermophilic fermentative endospores (TFEs) in water column and sediment of Aarhus Bay, Denmark, to test the role of suspended dispersal and determine the rate of endospore deposition and the endospore abundance in the sediment. We furthermore aimed to determine the time course of reactivation of the germinating TFEs. TFEs were induced to germinate and grow by incubating pasteurized sediment and water samples anaerobically at 50°C. We observed a sudden release of the endospore component dipicolinic acid immediately upon incubation suggesting fast endospore reactivation in response to heating. Volatile fatty acids (VFAs) and H 2 began to accumulate exponentially after 3.5 h of incubation showing that reactivation was followed by a short phase of outgrowth before germinated cells began to divide. Thermophilic fermenters were mainly present in the sediment as endospores because the rate of VFA accumulation was identical in pasteurized and non-pasteurized samples. Germinating TFEs were identified taxonomically by reverse transcription, PCR amplification and sequencing of 16S rRNA. The water column and sediment shared the same phylotypes, thereby confirming the potential for seawater dispersal. The abundance of TFEs was estimated by most probable number enumeration, rates of VFA production, and released amounts of dipicolinic acid during germination. The surface sediment contained ∼10 5 -10 6 inducible TFEs cm -3 . TFEs thus outnumber

  10. Metal pollutants in Indian continental coastal marine sediment along a 3700km transect: An electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alagarsamy, R; Hoon, S R

    2018-01-15

    We report the analysis and geographical distribution of anthropogenically impacted marine surficial sediments along a 3700km transect around the continental shelf of India. Sediments have been studied using a mixed analytical approach; high sensitivity electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), chemical analysis and environmental magnetism. Indian coastal marine deposits are heavily influenced by monsoon rains flushing sediment of geological and anthropogenic origin out of the subcontinental river systems. That is, climatic, hydro-, geo- and anthropogenic spheres couple strongly to determine the nature of Indian coastal sediments. Enrichment of Ni, Cu and Cr is observed in shelf sediments along both east and west coasts associated with industrialised activities in major urban areas. In the Gulf of Cambay and the Krishna and Visakhapatnam deltaic regions, levels of Ni and Cr pollutants (≥80 and ≥120ppm respectively) are observed, sufficient to cause at least medium adverse biological effects in the marine ecosystem. In these areas sediment EPR spectra differ in characteristic from those of less impacted ones. Modelling enables deconvolution of EPR spectra. In conjunction with environmental magnetism techniques, EPR has been used to characterise species composition in coastal depositional environments. Paramagnetic species can be identified and their relative concentrations determined. EPR g-values provide information about the chemical and magnetic environment of metals. We observe g-values of up to 5.5 and large g-shifts indicative of the presences of a number of para and ferrimagnetic impurities in the sediments. EPR has enabled the characterisation of species composition in coastal depositional environments, yielding marine sediment environmental 'fingerprints'. The approach demonstrates the potential of EPR spectroscopy in the mapping and evaluation of the concentration and chemical speciation in paramagnetic metals in sediments from marine shelf environments

  11. Dissolved inorganic carbon and alkalinity fluxes from coastal marine sediments: Model estimates for different shelf environments and sensitivity to global change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krumins, V.; Gehlen, M.; Arndt, S.; Van Cappellen, P.; Regnier, P.

    2013-01-01

    We present a one-dimensional reactive transport model to estimate benthic fluxes of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and alkalinity (AT) from coastal marine sediments. The model incorporates the transport processes of sediment accumulation, molecular diffusion, bioturbation and bioirrigation,

  12. DNA extraction replicates improve diversity and compositional dissimilarity in metabarcoding of eukaryotes in marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzén, Anders; Lekang, Katrine; Jonassen, Inge; Thompson, Eric M; Troedsson, Christofer

    2017-01-01

    Human impact on marine benthic communities has traditionally been assessed using visible morphological traits and has focused on the macrobenthos, whereas the ecologically important organisms of the meio- and microbenthos have received less attention. DNA metabarcoding offers an alternative to this approach and enables a larger fraction of the biodiversity in marine sediments to be monitored in a cost-efficient manner. Although this methodology remains poorly standardised and challenged by biases inherent to rRNA copy number variation, DNA extraction, PCR, and limitations related to taxonomic identification, it has been shown to be semi-quantitative and useful for comparing taxon abundances between samples. Here, we evaluate the effect of replicating genomic DNA extraction in order to counteract small scale spatial heterogeneity and improve diversity and community structure estimates in metabarcoding-based monitoring. For this purpose, we used ten technical replicates from three different marine sediment samples. The effect of sequence depth was also assessed, and in silico pooling of DNA extraction replicates carried out in order to maintain the number of reads constant. Our analyses demonstrated that both sequencing depth and DNA extraction replicates could improve diversity estimates as well as the ability to separate samples with different characteristics. We could not identify a "sufficient" replicate number or sequence depth, where further improvements had a less significant effect. Based on these results, we consider replication an attractive alternative to directly increasing the amount of sample used for DNA extraction and strongly recommend it for future metabarcoding studies and routine assessments of sediment biodiversity.

  13. Ice-proximal Marine Sedimentation in the Ross Sea during LGM: Ice-sheet and Ocean Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turetta, C.; Aghib, F. S.; Ferretti, P.; Barbante, C.

    2016-12-01

    We present preliminary results from a multi-proxy study of different cores from the Ross Sea, Antarctica. Thirty cores have been sampled at the Antarctic Marine Geology Research Facility (AMRF), Florida State University in order to discriminate different source areas and to reconstruct the depositional setting and related climate implications in a peculiar ice-proximal marine setting. Sediment characterizations, trace elements (TE) and rare earth elements (REEs) compositional analysis and evaluation about their source areas have been performed on sediment cores collected widespread in the Ross Sea area. Analysis of 72 samples from thirty cores was performed to determine total concentration of Li, Be, Mg, Al, K, Ca, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Rb, Sr, Ag, Cd, Cs, Ba, Tl, Pb, Bi, Th, U, Y and REEs. This extensive geochemical characterization of cores from several sites in the Ross Sea, will allow to better define the sedimentary processes, to understand the evolution of the ice-proximal marine setting, to evaluate areas with different geochemical features related to different provenances. In particular REEs allow us to discriminate different source areas and to better define the ocean input in the sediment composition. Moreover, 17 sediment cores from Coulman High area collected along two transects were characterized in order to constrain sediment bulk composition, biogenic vs non-biogenic components and the related depositional setting. Sediments from the two transects show a completely different bulk composition, those from the Northern transect mainly consist of fine-grained sediments containing well-preserved biogenic carbonate remains. Sediments from the Southern cores mainly consist of dark greenish diatomaceous sandy mud containing abundant diatoms in fragments. Sedimentation along the two transects seems to reflect the extent of the ice sheets in an ice-proximal marine setting. REEs compositional analyses have confirmed different source regions, a

  14. A marine to freshwater sediment succession from Kowhai Beach wetland, Northland : implications for Holocene sea level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hicks, H.; Nichol, S.L.

    2007-01-01

    An infilled wetland located behind coastal dunes in north-east Northland is used to reconstruct a local history of environmental change spanning early Holocene (c. 7000 yr BP) to modern time. Proxy indicators (sediment texture, diatoms and pollen) provide evidence for a transition from marginal marine- to brackish- to freshwater-conditions in the wetland. Radiocarbon ages constrain the chronology of this succession to 7880-7430 cal. yr BP for the early period of marine conditions, 3570-3210 cal. yr BP for the latter brackish phase and 1060-800 cal. yr BP for the change to freshwater conditions. Within this succession, the diatom record preserves a strong brackish signal at core depths above the limit of the modern tidal range. This is presented as preliminary evidence for a mid-Holocene sea level highstand for northern New Zealand of approximately 1.2 m above present mean sea level. (author). 40 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  15. Bioaccumulation and effect of sediment-associated silver in different forms in two marine deposit feeders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dai, Lina; Banta, Gary Thomas; Syberg, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    Due to wide spread applications of nanoparticles, including Ag, in our daily life, these novel particles are receiving increasing attention by risk assessors. Many studies have been performed to test the toxicity of nanoparticles at the subcellular level. Despite these findings, there is still...... limited information at the whole organism level as to whether metallo-nanoparticles differ in toxicity from the same metals added to the environment in ionic or bulk form. In the present study, two organisms (i.e., a marine polychaete, Capitella teleta and a marine bivalve, Macoma balthica) were exposed...... to sediment amended with Ag in various forms (ionic Ag(I), nano-sized Ag and micron-sized Ag), and toxic endpoints were assessed at the whole organism level. After exposure for several weeks, no significant toxic effects were detected (i.e., mortality, growth rate and condition index) at the whole organism...

  16. MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF THE ELECTRIC CURRENT GENERATION IN A MICROBIAL FUEL CELL INOCULATED WITH MARINE SEDIMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. T. Teleken

    Full Text Available Abstract Microbial fuel cells (MFC are electrochemical devices that utilize the ability of some microorganisms to oxidize organic matter and transfer electrons resulting from their metabolism to an insoluble acceptor. The goal of the present study was to model the kinetics of electrical current generation from an MFC inoculated with marine sediment. For this purpose, a differential equation system was used, including the Nernst-Monod relationship and Ohm's Law, to describe the microbial metabolism and the mechanism of extracellular electron transfer (EET, respectively. The experimental data obtained by cyclic voltammetry analysis were properly described by the model. It was concluded that marine microorganisms preferably use a direct mechanism of EET by means of nanowires to establish the electrochemical contact with the anode. The mathematical modeling could help understand MFC operation and, consequently, contribute to improving power generation from this source.

  17. Mapping of marine sediments on the Greenland West Coast: contributions of fishers’ ecological knowledge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensbye, Helle; Wegeberg, Susse

    2018-01-01

    The rapidly changing climate is pushing the Greenland fishing footprint northwards. With bottom fisheries moving into hitherto unmapped areas, large knowledge gaps regarding the environment in which the fishery takes place ensue. Mapping sediment in these areas is a time consuming and expensive...... this fishery is undertaken in a high technology environment on large trawlers, the long-time experience of the fishers can contribute to large scale knowledge of marine landscapes. These results are useful when mapping sediments in the future and can also provide a basis for further investigations of changing...... task. Recognizing that fishers have considerable local ecological knowledge can help bridge this knowledge gap. A workshop including ship masters and factory managers on factory trawlers was conducted in order to understand how their knowledge transpired when mapped. This knowledge was compared...

  18. Uptake of radioactivity by marine surface sediments collected in Ghazaouet, west coast of Algeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noureddine, A.; Baggoura, B.; Hocini, N.; Boulahdid, M.

    1998-01-01

    Samples of surface marine sediments of different grain sizes collected in Ghazaouet, a small bay on the western coast of Algeria, have been examined to measure concentrations of natural and artificial gamma-emitting radionuclides. The aim of this study is to determine the level of radioactivity and its repartition in the sedimentary area. The samples analyzed by direct counting gamma spectrometry, showed relatively high activities for natural radioactivity and revealed measurable quantities of 137 Cs, ranging from 0.66-8.47 Bq kg -1 dry weight. In addition, some of the samples of different nature were sieved in different grain-sizes, to study the uptake of radioactivity. It is found that the sediments of less than 100 μm grain-size have the highest level of uptake of radioactivity

  19. Uptake of radioactivity by marine surface sediments collected in Ghazaouet, west coast of Algeria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noureddine, A.; Baggoura, B. [Laboratoire d' Environnement, Centre de Radioprotection et de Surete (C.R.S.), Algiers (Algeria); Hocini, N. [Laboratoire de Sedimentologie, Centre de Developpement des Techniques Nucleaires (C.D.T.N.), Algiers (Algeria); Boulahdid, M. [Departement de la Pollution Chimique, Institut des Sciences de la Mer et de l' Amenagement du Littoral, Tipaza (Algeria)

    1998-12-01

    Samples of surface marine sediments of different grain sizes collected in Ghazaouet, a small bay on the western coast of Algeria, have been examined to measure concentrations of natural and artificial gamma-emitting radionuclides. The aim of this study is to determine the level of radioactivity and its repartition in the sedimentary area. The samples analyzed by direct counting gamma spectrometry, showed relatively high activities for natural radioactivity and revealed measurable quantities of {sup 137}Cs, ranging from 0.66-8.47 Bq kg{sup -1} dry weight. In addition, some of the samples of different nature were sieved in different grain-sizes, to study the uptake of radioactivity. It is found that the sediments of less than 100 {mu}m grain-size have the highest level of uptake of radioactivity.

  20. Microplastic pollution in the marine waters and sediments of Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Y Y; Mak, C W; Liebich, C; Lam, S W; Sze, E T-P; Chan, K M

    2017-02-15

    The presence of plastic waste with a diameter of less than 5mm ("microplastics") in marine environments has prompted increasing concern in recent years, both locally and globally. We conducted seasonal surveys of microplastic pollution in the surface waters and sediments from Deep Bay, Tolo Harbor, Tsing Yi, and Victoria Harbor in Hong Kong between June 2015 and March 2016. The average concentrations of microplastics in local coastal waters and sediments respectively ranged from 51 to 27,909particles per 100m 3 and 49 to 279particles per kilogram. Microplastics of different shapes (mainly fragments, lines, fibers, and pellets) were identified as polypropylene, low-density polyethylene, high-density polyethylene, a blend of polypropylene and ethylene propylene, and styrene acrylonitrile by means of Attenuated Total Reflectance - Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy. This is the first comprehensive study to assess the spatial and temporal variations of microplastic pollution in Hong Kong coastal regions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Acute marine sediment toxicity: a potential new test with the amphipod Gammarus locusta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, F O; Correia, A D; Costa, M H

    1998-01-01

    Although amphipod toxicity tests have been successfully used in the United States to assess coastal sediment toxicity, few tests have been developed with European species. The authors have been working with the amphipod Gammarus locusta, a widely spread species along European coastal areas that is particularly abundant in the Portuguese Sado estuary. This amphipod fulfills the most important requirements of a test species. It can be easily reproduced in laboratory and it is tolerant to a broad range of sediment types. A series of tests demonstrated its sensitivity to copper and gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane (lindane) in the sediment (LC50 = 6.8 mg Cu/dry kg, 0.9% total volatile solids; LC50 = 60.5 micrograms HCH/dry kg, 2% total volatile solids) and to some heavily contaminated field sediments. After assessment of the species sensitivity to several noncontaminant variables, an experimental protocol was designed to conduct acute sediment toxicity tests that are briefly described. Proposed is a 10-day static toxicity test at 15 degrees C and 33-34/1000 salinity, with laboratory-produced juveniles and mortality as the endpoint. General assay performance is identical to the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard for sediment toxicity tests with marine and estuarine amphipods. The results previously obtained revealed a strong potential for this amphipod to be used in toxicological testing. Considering the wide geographic distribution of this species and its amenability for culturing, it may be an alternative or complementary test for ecotoxicological studies in other European coastal systems where the existing tests cannot be applied or do not offer a definitive solution.

  2. Are Sediments a Source of Fukushima Radiocesium for Marine Fauna in Coastal Japan?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C.; Fisher, N. S.; Baumann, Z.

    2016-02-01

    The Fukushima nuclear power plant accident in 2011 resulted in the largest accidental release of artificial radionuclides into the world's oceans. Among the fission products released in large quantities, 137Cs has the greatest potential for long-term impacts on marine biota and human consumers of seafood. In particular, some species of bottom fish near Fukushima were very contaminated and had higher radiocesium (134Cs and 137Cs) levels than pelagic fish in the same area, sometimes exceeding Japanese safety limits >4 years after the accident. Benthic invertebrates, many being prey items for bottom fish, show the same slow decrease in radiocesium as sediments, suggesting that contaminated sediment could be a source of radiocesium for benthic fauna. We evaluated the binding of 137Cs to sediments (Kd found to be 44-60 ml g-1) and found that bioturbation by the polychaete Nereis succinea greatly increased the initial release rate of Cs to overlying seawater. We also assessed the bioavailability of dissolved and sediment-bound Cs for deposit-feeding polychaetes, and its subsequent transfer to crabs and fish, and measured the influence of water temperature on Cs accumulation in fish. Assimilation efficiency (AE) of ingested 137Cs ranged from 16% in polychaetes ingesting sediments to 79% in fish ingesting worms. Efflux rate constants ranged from 5% d-1 for killifish to 40% d-1 for polychaetes. Animal absorption and retention of dissolved 137Cs were also measured. These parameters are used to model radiocesium bioaccumulation and trophic transfer in benthic food chains. Our results are consistent with the idea that sediments can be an important source of Cs for benthic food chains and help explain why some species of bottom fish remained more contaminated than pelagic fish in Japanese coastal waters.

  3. Community size and metabolic rates of psychrophilic sulfate-reducing bacteria in Arctic marine sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knoblauch, C.; Jørgensen, BB; Harder, J.

    1999-01-01

    The numbers of sulfate reducers in two Arctic sediments within situ temperatures of 2.6 and -1.7 degrees C were determined. Most-probable-number counts were higher at 10 degrees C than at 20 degrees C, indicating the predominance of a psychrophilic community. Mean specific sulfate reduction rates...... of 19 isolated psychrophiles were compared to corresponding rates of 9 marine, mesophilic sulfate-reducing bacteria. The results indicate that, as a physiological adaptation to the permanently cold Arctic environment, psychrophilic sulfate reducers have considerably higher specific metabolic rates than...... their mesophilic counterparts at similarly low temperatures....

  4. Vertical activity distribution of dissimilatory nitrate reduction in coastal marine sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrendt, A.; de Beer, D.; Stief, P.

    2013-01-01

    reduction was clearly dominated by DEN (59-131% of the total NO3- reduced) rather than by DNRA, irrespective of the sedimentary inventories of electron donors such as organic carbon, sulfide, and iron. Highest ammonium production via DNRA, accounting for up to 8.9% of the total NO3- reduced, was found......The relative importance of two dissimilatory nitrate reduction pathways, denitrification (DEN) and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA), was investigated in intact sediment cores from five different coastal marine field sites (Dorum, Aarhus Bight, Mississippi Delta, Limfjord...

  5. Rock physics modeling of shallow marine sediments in the eastern continental margin of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Dewangan, P.; Sriram, G.; RamPrasad, T.

    for the intermediate porosity are calculated using lower Hashin-Shtrikman bound. The fluid-saturated moduli are estimated using Gassmann’s equation. The main limitation of this model is that it requires a lot of apriori information and is computationally involved... that are in a state of suspension, i.e. having no frame stiffness. The EMM model can be extended to estimate the hydrate and free gas concentration in marine sediments from porosity and velocity profiles (Helgerud, 1999). Lee (2006) showed that shear wave...

  6. Draft genome sequence of a denitrifying bacterium Paracoccus marcusii PAMC 22219 isolated from Arctic marine sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, In-Tae; Song, Eun-Ji; Seok, Yoon Ji; Lee, Hyunjin; Park, Inhye; Lee, Yoo Kyung; Roh, Seong Woon; Choi, Hak-Jong; Nam, Young-Do; Seo, Myung-Ji

    2015-06-01

    A denitrifying bacterium, Paracoccus marcusii PAMC 22219, was isolated from Arctic marine sediment in Svalbard, Norway. The obtained contigs were 265 with genome size of 4.0Mb and G+C content of 66.1%. This bacterial genome revealed that it had nitrate and nitrite ammonification genes involved in the denitrification process, suggesting that P. marcusii PAMC 22219 is a denitrifying bacterium. This is the first genome that has been sequenced in the genus Paracoccus, isolated from an Arctic environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Diffuser Design for Marine Outfalls in Areas with Strong Currents, High waves and Sediment Transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Torben

    1995-01-01

    The design of marine outfalls is often based on environmental criteria for a minimum initial dilution. Accordingly advanced diffuser arrangement are designed to fulfil these requirements. A large number of examples of malfunction and blocking in sea outfalls have occurred around the world...... as a result of this uncompromising consent to environmental demands. Two examples of unconventional design are given in this paper. Both cases involved risk of blockage of the diffuser section because of wave and current induced sediment transport The paper also discusses how acceptable far field dilution...

  8. Elemental Analysis on Marine Sediments Related to Depositional Environment of Bangka Strait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pungky Sampurno

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Study of elemental composition in sediment has been proven useful in interpreting the depositional environmental changes. Multi Sensor Core Logger (MSCL is a non-destructive analysis that measures several parameters in sediment core including magnetic susceptibility and elemental composition. Magnetic susceptibility and elemental analysis were measured in four selected marine sediment cores from western part of Bangka Strait (MBB-67. MBB-119, MBB-120 and MBB-173 by using magnetic susceptibility and X-ray Fluorescence (XRF sensors attached to the MSCL. The data was collected within 2 cm interval. Scatter plots of Y/Zr and Zr/Ti show singular trend demonstrated by sediments from MBB-173 and two groups that composed of MBB-67 (Group 1 and MBB-119 + MBB-120 (Group 2. MBB-67 that is located adjacent to Klabat Granite shows upward changes in mineralogy, slight increase of grain size and negligible change in Y concentration. Cores MBB-119 and MBB-120 are inferred to be deposited during regression that resulted in the accummulation of Y-bearing zircon in MBB-119 before the mineral could reach MBB-120. Core MBB-173 is interpreted to be the product of plagioclase weathering that is submerged by rising sea level. This core contains a horizon of rich Y-bearing zircon at 60 cm. Keywords: Multi Sensor Core Logger, X-Ray Fluorescence, magnetic susceptibility, depositional environment, Bangka Island

  9. Cadmium and zinc isotopes of organic-rich marine sediments during Oceanic Anoxic Event 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweere, T.; Dickson, A. J.; Jenkyns, H. C.; Porcelli, D.; Henderson, G. M.; van den Boorn, S.

    2017-12-01

    Mesozoic Oceanic Anoxic Events (OAEs) are characterized by widespread deposition of organic-rich sediments and the spread of low-oxygen marine environments. To drive and sustain unusually efficient carbon-burial during these events requires high export productivity rates, which has to be supported by an abundance of nutrients in the surface ocean. The presence of redox-sensitive bio-essential micronutrients may be particularly important, and potentially bio-limiting, during such events as they may be drawn down into sediment under low-oxygen conditions. Cadmium and zinc isotopes have potential as tracers for past (micro)nutrient dynamics considering their nutrient-like distribution in the modern ocean and isotope fractionation with uptake by primary producers. The modern deep ocean is generally well mixed for Cd and Zn while short-term cycling of these elements in the surface ocean imposes regional variation. Additional regional variation may be caused by sulfide formation and associated isotope fractionation in euxinic environments. The impact of such regional environmental conditions on the Cd- and Zn-isotope composition of the sediment therefore needs to be addressed in order to explore the use of these elements as a proxy for past nutrient conditions. Here we present an extensive dataset of cadmium- and zinc-isotope compositions of organic-rich marine sediments from different basins deposited during OAE 2 (Late Cretaceous). This comparison highlights regional differences in Cd- and Zn-isotope compositions. However, despite regional environmental controls, a correlation between δ114Cd and δ66Zn across the different sites is observed, which implies a largely similar control on the two isotope systems. When regional environmental controls are accounted for, the data may provide insight in the δ66Zn and δ114Cd evolution of global seawater during OAE 2 as well as information on the global cycling of redox-sensitive micronutrients during the event

  10. Radioactivity, radiological risk and metal pollution assessment in marine sediments from Calabrian selected areas, southern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caridi, F.; Messina, M.; Faggio, G.; Santangelo, S.; Messina, G.; Belmusto, G.

    2018-02-01

    The two most significant categories of physical and chemical pollutants in sediments (radionuclides and metals) were investigated in this article, in order to evaluate pollution levels in marine sediments from eight different selected sites of the Calabria region, south of Italy. In particular samples were analyzed to determine natural and anthropic radioactivity and metal concentrations, in order to assess any possible radiological hazard, the level of contamination and the possible anthropogenic impact in the investigated area. Activity concentrations of 226Ra, 232Th, 40K and 137Cs were measured by High Purity Germanium (HPGe) gamma spectrometry. The obtained results show that, for radium (in secular equilibrium with uranium), the specific activity ranges from ( 14 ± 1) Bq/kg dry weight (d.w.) to ( 54 ± 9) Bq/kg d.w.; for thorium, from ( 12 ± 1) Bq/kg d.w. to ( 83 ± 8) Bq/kg d.w.; for potassium, from ( 470 ± 20) Bq/kg d.w. to ( 1000 ± 70) Bq/kg d.w. and for cesium it is lower than the minimum detectable activity value. The absorbed gamma dose rate in air (D), the annual effective dose equivalent (AEDE) outdoor and the external hazard index ( H_ex) were calculated to evaluate any possible radiological risk, mainly due to the use of marine sediments for the beach nourishment. The results show low levels of radioactivity, thus discarding any significant radiological risk. Some metals (As, Cd, Cr tot, Hg, Ni, Pb, Cu, Zn, Mn and Fe), that could be released into the environment by both natural and anthropogenic sources, were investigated through inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) measurements and compared with the limits set by the Italian Legislation, to assess any possible contamination. Experimental results show that they are much lower than the contamination threshold value, thus excluding their presence as pollutants. The degree of sediment contaminations were quantified using enrichment factor ( EF) and geoaccumulation index ( I geo) for

  11. Stabilization / solidification of polluted marine dredged sediment of port en Bessin France, using hydraulic binders and silica fume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silitonga, Ernesto

    2017-09-01

    A large amount of sediment is dredged in France every year. Due to the increase of the amount of marine dredged sediments, environmentally reuse of dredged sediment is urgently needed in France. The first objective of this study is to find an application for reuse of marine dredged sediments materials, as new material for road construction. Hence, serial tests need to be realized to identify if marine dredged sediment could be utilized for road construction. The second goal is to enhance the physical, mechanical and chemical characteristics of the mix, by incorporating binders and sediments, and revealed the identification of the mechanical characteristics measured on the mixes is compatible with their use as a base course material. The results show that the treatment by hydraulics binders could satisfy the needed mechanical characteristics. The present of Silica Fume is aimed to reduce the pollution level, especially the heavy metal content. However, the proportion of hydraulics binders and silica fume needed to meet prescribed specification is important, so the reuse of the marine dredged sediments of Port-en-Bessin, France in road construction, as an alternative material could be achieved. After the geotechnical study in laboratory results shown as expected than the study to identify the chemical characteristic realized. To evaluate the environmental impacts of the used material, leaching test is performed. The leaching test was performed to verify the predicted release of pollutants based on total dissolution. And for the final part, the test results show that the polluted marine dredged sediments could be safely used (in term of environmental impact) as a new material in road construction.

  12. Plutonium behavior during the early diagenesis of marine sediments: applications to two marine environments labelled by radionuclides released from reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gouzy, A.

    2004-12-01

    The plutonium released into the English Channel and the Irish Sea by nuclear fuel reprocessing plants is mainly associated to sediments. Nevertheless, this association is partially reversible. This work combines a field study, carried out on the Cumbrian mud patch and the Esk estuary (Eastern Irish Sea), and laboratory experiments performed on carbonaceous coarse-grained sediments collected in the Central Channel. It presents new data on the plutonium solid partition in sediments and suggests realistic scenarios for describing its release from sediments to the water column. The role of reactive sulphides acting as temporary sink phases is shown in anoxic sediments; those sulphides are liable to release dissolved plutonium upon their oxidation. The plutonium is also bound to carbonates within the carbonaceous matrix and as carbonate surface complexes. Conceptual schemes of the behaviour of the plutonium in marine sediments are proposed; they highlight the strong remobilization potential of plutonium from marine sediments to the interstitial water. Its plutonium content can be injected into the overlying water column. (author)

  13. Biogeochemical Insights into B-Vitamins in the Coastal Marine Sediments of San Pedro Basin, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteverde, D.; Berelson, W.; Baronas, J. J.; Sanudo-Wilhelmy, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    Coastal marine sediments support a high abundance of mircoorganisms which play key roles in the cycling of nutrients, trace metals, and carbon, yet little is known about many of the cofactors essential for their growth, such as the B-vitamins. The suite of B-vitamins (B1, B2, B6, B7, B12) are essential across all domains of life for both primary and secondary metabolism. Therefore, studying sediment concentrations of B-vitamins can provide a biochemical link between microbial processes and sediment geochemistry. Here we present B-vitamin pore water concentrations from suboxic sediment cores collected in September 2014 from San Pedro Basin, a silled, low oxygen, ~900 m deep coastal basin in the California Borderlands. We compare the B-vitamin concentrations (measured via LCMS) to a set of geochemical profiles including dissolved Fe (65-160 μM), dissolved Mn (30-300 nM), TCO2, solid phase organic carbon, and δ13C. Our results show high concentrations (0.8-3nM) of biotin (B7), commonly used for CO2 fixation as a cofactor in carboxylase enzymes. Thiamin (B1) concentrations were elevated (20-700nM), consistent with previous pore water measurements showing sediments could be a source of B1 to the ocean. Cobalamin (B12), a cofactor required for methyl transfers in methanogens, was also detected in pore waters (~4-40pM). The flavins (riboflavin [B2] and flavin mononucleotide[FMN]), molecules utilized in external electron transfer, showed a distinct increase with depth (10-90nM). Interestingly, the flavin profiles showed an inverse trend to dissolved Fe (Fe decreases with depth) providing a potential link to culture experiments which have shown extracellular flavin release to be a common trait in some metal reducers. As some of the first B-vitamin measurements made in marine sediments, these results illustrate the complex interaction between the microbial community and surrounding geochemical environment and provide exciting avenues for future research.

  14. Data on nearshore wave process and surficial beach deposits, central Tamil Nadu coast, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joevivek, V; Chandrasekar, N

    2017-08-01

    The chronicles of nearshore morphology and surficial beach deposits provide valuable information about the nature of the beach condition and the depositional environment. It imparts an understanding about the spatial and temporal relationship of nearshore waves and its influence over the distribution of beach sediments. This article contains data about wave and sediment dynamics of the ten sandy beaches along the central Tamil Nadu coast, India. This present dataset comprises nearshore wave parameters, breaker wave type, beach morphodynamic state, grain size distribution and weight percentage of heavy and light mineral distribution. The dataset will figure out the beach morphology and hydrodynamic condition with respect to the different monsoonal season. This will act as a field reference to realize the coastal dynamics in an open sea condition. The nearshore entities were obtained from the intensive field survey between January 2011 and December 2011, while characteristics of beach sediments are examined by the chemical process in the laboratory environment.

  15. Data on nearshore wave process and surficial beach deposits, central Tamil Nadu coast, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Joevivek

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The chronicles of nearshore morphology and surficial beach deposits provide valuable information about the nature of the beach condition and the depositional environment. It imparts an understanding about the spatial and temporal relationship of nearshore waves and its influence over the distribution of beach sediments. This article contains data about wave and sediment dynamics of the ten sandy beaches along the central Tamil Nadu coast, India. This present dataset comprises nearshore wave parameters, breaker wave type, beach morphodynamic state, grain size distribution and weight percentage of heavy and light mineral distribution. The dataset will figure out the beach morphology and hydrodynamic condition with respect to the different monsoonal season. This will act as a field reference to realize the coastal dynamics in an open sea condition. The nearshore entities were obtained from the intensive field survey between January 2011 and December 2011, while characteristics of beach sediments are examined by the chemical process in the laboratory environment.

  16. Certification of Trace Element Mass Fractions in IAEA-458 Marine Sediment Sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The primary goal of the IAEA Environment Laboratories (NAEL) is to help Member States understand, monitor and protect the marine environment. The major impact exerted by large coastal cities on marine ecosystems is therefore of great concern to the IAEA and its Environment Laboratories. Given that marine pollution assessments of such impacts depend on accurate knowledge of contaminant concentrations in various environmental compartments, the NAEL has assisted national laboratories and regional laboratory networks through its Reference Products for Environment and Trade programme since the early 1970s. Quality assurance (QA), quality control (QC) and associated good laboratory practice are essential components of all marine environmental monitoring studies. QC procedures are commonly based on the analysis of certified reference materials and reference samples in order to validate analytical methods used in monitoring studies and to assess reliability and comparability of measurement data. QA can be realized by participation in externally organized laboratory performance studies, also known as interlaboratory comparisons, which compare and evaluate the analytical performance and measurement capabilities of participating laboratories. Data that are not based on adequate QA/QC can be erroneous, and their misuse can lead to incorrect environmental management decisions. This report describes the sample preparation methodology, material homogeneity and stability study, selection of laboratories, evaluation of results from the certification campaign and assignment of property values and their associated uncertainty. As a result, reference values for mass fractions and associated expanded uncertainty for 16 trace elements (Al, As, Cd, Cr, Co, Cu, Fe, Hg, Li, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sr, Sn, V and Zn) in marine sediment were established

  17. Wave-induced mass transport affects daily Escherichia coli fluctuations in nearshore water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Zhongfu; Whitman, Richard L.; Nevers, Meredith B.; Phanikumar, Mantha S.

    2012-01-01

    Characterization of diel variability of fecal indicator bacteria concentration in nearshore waters is of particular importance for development of water sampling standards and protection of public health. Significant nighttime increase in Escherichia coli (E. coli) concentration in beach water, previously observed at marine sites, has also been identified in summer 2000 from fixed locations in waist- and knee-deep waters at Chicago 63rd Street Beach, an embayed, tideless, freshwater beach with low currents at night (approximately 0.015 m s–1). A theoretical model using wave-induced mass transport velocity for advection was developed to assess the contribution of surface waves to the observed nighttime E. coli replenishment in the nearshore water. Using average wave conditions for the summer season of year 2000, the model predicted an amount of E. coli transported from water of intermediate depth, where sediment resuspension occurred intermittently, that would be sufficient to have elevated E. coli concentration in the surf and swash zones as observed. The nighttime replenishment of E. coli in the surf and swash zones revealed here is an important phase in the cycle of diel variations of E. coli concentration in nearshore water. According to previous findings in Ge et al. (Environ. Sci. Technol. 2010, 44, 6731–6737), enhanced current circulation in the embayment during the day tends to displace and deposit material offshore, which partially sets up the system by the early evening for a new period of nighttime onshore movement. This wave-induced mass transport effect, although facilitating a significant base supply of material shoreward, can be perturbed or significantly influenced by high currents (orders of magnitude larger than a typical wave-induced mass transport velocity), current-induced turbulence, and tidal forcing.

  18. Anaerobic degradation of cyclohexane by sulfate-reducing bacteria from hydrocarbon-contaminated marine sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike eJaekel

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The fate of cyclohexane, often used as a model compound for the biodegradation of cyclic alkanes due to its abundance in crude oils, in anoxic marine sediments has been poorly investigated. In the present study, we obtained an enrichment culture of cyclohexane-degrading sulfate-reducing bacteria from hydrocarbon-contaminated intertidal marine sediments. Microscopic analyses showed an apparent dominance by oval cells of 1.5×0.8 m. Analysis of a 16S rRNA gene library, followed by whole-cell hybridization with group- and sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes showed that these cells belonged to a single phylotype, and were accounting for more than 80% of the total cell number. The dominant phylotype, affiliated with the Desulfosarcina-Desulfococcus cluster of the Deltaproteobacteria, is proposed to be responsible for the degradation of cyclohexane. Quantitative growth experiments showed that cyclohexane degradation was coupled with the stoichiometric reduction of sulfate to sulfide. Substrate response tests corroborated with hybridization with a sequence-specific oligonucleotide probe suggested that the dominant phylotype apparently was able to degrade other cyclic and n-alkanes, including the gaseous alkanes propane and n-butane. Based on GC-MS analyses of culture extracts cyclohexylsuccinate was identified as a metabolite, indicating an activation of cyclohexane by addition to fumarate. Other metabolites detected were 3-cyclohexylpropionate and cyclohexanecarboxylate providing evidence that the overall degradation pathway of cyclohexane under anoxic conditions is analogous to that of n-alkanes.

  19. Distribution of uranium in marine sediments; Distribucion de uranio en sedimentos marinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ordonez R, E.; Ramirez T, J.J.; Lopez M, J.; Aspiazu, J. [ININ, 52750 La Marquesa, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Ruiz F, A.C. [U. Academica Mazatlan, ICML, UNAM (Mexico); Valero C, N. [CONALEP, 52000 Lerma, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2008-07-01

    The marine sediments obtained by means of a sampling nucleus in the Gulf of Tehuantepec, Mexico, they have been object of crystallographic and morphological characterization. The PIXE analysis of some samples in study is shown. The normal methodology to carry out the alpha spectroscopy indicates that the sample should be dissolved, but due to the nature of the marine sediments, it thinks about the necessity to make a fractional separation of the sample components. In each stratum of the profile it separates the organic part and the mineral to recover the uranium. It was observed that in the organic phase, the uranium is in two oxidation states (IV and Vl), being necessary the radiochemical separation with a liquid/liquid column chromatographic that uses the di-2-ethyl hexyl phosphoric acid as stationary phase. The uranium compounds extracts are electrodeposited in fine layers on stainless steel disks to carry out the analysis by alpha spectroscopy. The spectroscopic analysis of the uranium indicates us that for each stratum one has a difference marked in the quotient of activities of {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U that depends on the nature of the studied fraction. These results give us a clear idea about how it is presented the effect of the uranium migration and other radioelements in the biosphere, with what we can determine which are the conditions in that these have their maximum mobility and to know their diffusion patterns in the different media studied. (Author)

  20. Diversity and bioprospecting of culturable actinomycetes from marine sediment of the Yellow Sea, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Zhi-Qiang; Liu, Qiao-Xia; Pan, Zhao-Long; Zhao, Na; Feng, Zhi-Xiang; Wang, Yong

    2015-03-01

    Marine actinomycetes are a potential source of a wide variety of bioactive natural products. In this work, seven pretreatments, three selective isolation media, and five artificial seawater concentrations were used to isolate actinomycetes from the sediments collected from Yellow Sea, China. Statistical analysis showed that only the isolation medium strongly affected the total and bioactive numbers of actinomycete isolates. A total of 613 actinobacterial strains were isolated and screened for antimicrobial activities; 154 isolates showed activity against at least one of nine test drug-resistant microorganisms. Eighty-nine representatives with strong antimicrobial activity were identified phylogenetically based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing, which were assigned to five different actinomycete genera Streptomyces, Kocuria, Saccharomonospora, Micromonospora, and Nocardiopsis. Using PCR-based screening for six biosynthetic genes of secondary metabolites, all 45 isolates with acute activity have at least one biosynthetic gene, 28.8 % of which possess more than three biosynthetic genes. As a case, strain SMA-1 was selected for antimicrobial natural product discovery. Three diketopiperazine dimers including a new compound iso-naseseazine B (1) and two known compounds naseseazine B (2) and aspergilazine A (3) were isolated by bioassay-guided separation. These results suggested that actinomycetes from marine sediments are a potential resource of novel secondary metabolites and drugs.

  1. Marine Subsurface Microbial Community Shifts Across a Hydrothermal Gradient in Okinawa Trough Sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Leah D; House, Christopher H

    2016-01-01

    Sediments within the Okinawa back-arc basin overlay a subsurface hydrothermal network, creating intense temperature gradients with sediment depth and potential limits for microbial diversity. We investigated taxonomic changes across 45 m of recovered core with a temperature gradient of 3°C/m from the dynamic Iheya North Hydrothermal System. The interval transitions sharply from low-temperature marine mud to hydrothermally altered clay at 10 meters below seafloor (mbsf). Here, we present taxonomic results from an analysis of the 16S rRNA gene that support a conceptual model in which common marine subsurface taxa persist into the subsurface, while high temperature adapted archaeal taxa show localized peaks in abundances in the hydrothermal clay horizons. Specifically, the bacterial phylum Chloroflexi accounts for a major proportion of the total microbial community within the upper 10 mbsf, whereas high temperature archaea (Terrestrial Hot Spring Crenarchaeotic Group and methanotrophic archaea) appear in varying local abundances in deeper, hydrothermal clay horizons with higher in situ temperatures (up to 55°C, 15 mbsf). In addition, geochemical evidence suggests that methanotrophy may be occurring in various horizons. There is also relict DNA (i.e., DNA preserved after cell death) that persists in horizons where the conditions suitable for microbial communities have ceased.

  2. Late Neogene marine osmium isotopic records of the Mediterranean and Atlantic sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Junichiro; Jimenez-Espejo, Francisco J.; Nozaki, Tatsuo; Gennari, Rocco; Lugli, Stefano; Manzi, Vinicio; Roveri, Marco; Flecker, Rachel; Sierro, Francisco J.; Yoshimura, Toshihiro; Suzuki, Katsuhiko; Ohkouchi, Naohiko

    2017-04-01

    The Mediterranean Sea experienced a salinity crisis at Messinian, the end of Miocene (5.97 to 5.33 Ma) that resulted in the precipitation of thick evaporites (i.e., Mediterranean salt giant) in deep and marginal basins [1]. We report osmium isotopic records (187Os/188Os) of sediments from DSDP and ODP sites in the Mediterranean Sea: the Balearic Sea (Site 372), the Tyrrhenian Sea (Site 654), the Ionian Basin (Site 374) and the Florence Rise (Sites 375-376), as well as the Gulf of Cadiz, North Atlantic (IODP Site U1387) [2]. Pliocene-Pleistocene sediments from all sites show isotopic values close to that of the coeval ocean water, indicating that the Mediterranean was connected to the North Atlantic. Messinian evaporitic sediments deposited during the salinity crisis, however, have values significantly lower than the coeval ocean water value. This offset is attributed to a limited inflow from the North Atlantic during the salinity crisis. The unradiogenic osmium is likely to be supplied by weathering of ultramafic rocks (ophiolites) cropping out in the Mediterranean drainage area. A box model shows that the Atlantic-Mediterranean exchange rate dropped to about one twentieth. Osmium isotopic ratios of the pre-evaporite sediments in the western Mediterranean are nearly identical to that of the coeval ocean water. In contrast, equivalent sediments from the Florence Rise have significantly lower isotopic values. This offset could be attributed either to limited water exchange between eastern and western Mediterranean, or to a local effect such as exhumation of the Troodos ophiolite in Cyprus. [1] Roveri et al. (2014) Marine Geology 352, 25-58. [2] Kuroda et al. (2016) Paleoceanography 31, 148-166.

  3. Electrolysis-driven bioremediation of crude oil-contaminated marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellagamba, Marco; Cruz Viggi, Carolina; Ademollo, Nicoletta; Rossetti, Simona; Aulenta, Federico

    2017-09-25

    Bioremediation is an effective technology to tackle crude oil spill disasters, which takes advantage of the capacity of naturally occurring microorganisms to degrade petroleum hydrocarbons under a range of environmental conditions. The enzymatic process of breaking down oil is usually more rapid in the presence of oxygen. However, in contaminated sediments, oxygen levels are typically too low to sustain the rapid and complete biodegradation of buried hydrocarbons. Here, we explored the possibility to electrochemically manipulate the redox potential of a crude oil-contaminated marine sediment in order to establish, in situ, conditions that are conducive to contaminants biodegradation by autochthonous microbial communities. The proposed approach is based on the exploitation of low-voltage (2V) seawater electrolysis to drive oxygen generation (while minimizing chlorine evolution) on Dimensionally Stable Anodes (DSA) placed within the contaminated sediment. Results, based on a laboratory scale setup with chronically polluted sediments spiked with crude oil, showed an increased redox potential and a decreased pH in the vicinity of the anode of 'electrified' treatments, consistent with the occurrence of oxygen generation. Accordingly, hydrocarbons biodegradation was substantially accelerated (up to 3-times) compared to 'non-electrified' controls, while sulfate reduction was severely inhibited. Intermittent application of electrolysis proved to be an effective strategy to minimize the energy requirements of the process, without adversely affecting degradation performance. Taken as a whole, this study suggests that electrolysis-driven bioremediation could be a sustainable technology for the management of contaminated sediments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Contaminated Marine Sediments As a Source of Cesium Radioisotopes for Benthic Fauna near Fukushima.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cuiyu; Baumann, Zofia; Madigan, Daniel J; Fisher, Nicholas S

    2016-10-04

    Marine animals, seawater, and sediment near Fukushima, Japan have become contaminated with 134 Cs and 137 Cs released in March 2011 from the damaged Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant. Radiocesium concentrations in some benthic fauna declined more slowly than in pelagic fish in the same region. We tested the hypothesis that benthic fish remained more contaminated due to the bioavailability of radiocesium in sediments. Laboratory experiments demonstrated that the assimilation efficiency of 137 Cs was 16% in polychaetes ingesting Fukushima sediment, up to 55% in crabs ingesting polychaetes, and about 80% in fish ingesting worms. In addition, all animals acquired Cs directly from the aqueous phase, but this accounted for only 1.2-2.5% of their total body burden. Thus, diet accounted for nearly all of the total body burden of Cs in these animals. Rate constants of Cs loss from animal tissues were 20% d -1 for polychaetes, 10% d -1 for crabs, and 6% d -1 for fish after acquisition of Cs from water; rate constants following dietary uptake were 45% d -1 , 14% d -1 , and 5% d -1 for polychaetes, crabs, and fish, respectively. A bioaccumulation model indicated that the transfer factors of Cs from sediments and the trophic transfer factors from worms to predators were about 1. Overall, sediment-bound Cs is sufficiently bioavailable to deposit-feeding polychaetes, and macrofauna assimilate Cs from these polychaetes to account for >90% of their body burden. This helps to explain the longer retention of Cs in bottom-dwelling fish near Fukushima.

  5. The Oil-Spill Snorkel: an innovative bioelectrochemical approach to accelerate hydrocarbons biodegradation in marine sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina eCruz Viggi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the proof-of-concept of the Oil-Spill Snorkel: a novel bioelectrochemical approach to stimulate the oxidative biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in sediments. The Oil-Spill Snorkel consists of a single conductive material (the snorkel positioned suitably to create an electrochemical connection between the anoxic zone (the contaminated sediment and the oxic zone (the overlying O2-containing water. The segment of the electrode buried within the sediment plays a role of anode, accepting electrons deriving from the oxidation of contaminants. Electrons flow through the snorkel up to the part exposed to the aerobic environment (the cathode, where they reduce oxygen to form water. Here we report the results of lab-scale microcosms setup with marine sediments and spiked with crude oil. Microcosms containing 1 or 3 graphite snorkels and controls (snorkel-free and autoclaved were monitored for over 400 days. Collectively, the results of this study confirmed that the snorkels accelerate oxidative reactions taking place within the sediment, as documented by a significant 1.7-fold increase (p=0.023, two-tailed t-test in the cumulative oxygen uptake and 1.4-fold increase (p=0.040 in the cumulative CO2 evolution in the microcosms containing 3 snorkels compared to snorkel-free controls. Accordingly, the initial rate of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH degradation was also substantially enhanced. Indeed, while after 200 days of incubation a negligible degradation of TPH was noticed in snorkel-free controls, a significant reduction of 12±1% (p=0.004 and 21±1% (p=0.001 was observed in microcosms containing 1 and 3 snorkels, respectively. Although, the Oil-Spill Snorkel potentially represents a groundbreaking alternative to more expensive remediation options, further research efforts are needed to clarify factors and conditions affecting the snorkel-driven biodegradation processes and to identify suitable configurations for field

  6. Fossilization and degradation of archaeal intact polar tetraether lipids in deeply buried marine sediments (Peru Margin).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengger, Sabine K; Hopmans, Ellen C; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S; Schouten, Stefan

    2014-05-01

    Glycerol dibiphytanyl glycerol tetraether (GDGT) lipids are part of the cellular membranes of Thaumarchaeota, an archaeal phylum composed of aerobic ammonia oxidizers, and are used in the paleotemperature proxy TEX86 . GDGTs in live cells possess polar head groups and are called intact polar lipids (IPL-GDGTs). Their transformation to core lipids (CL) by cleavage of the head group was assumed to proceed rapidly after cell death, but it has been suggested that some of these IPL-GDGTs can, just like the CL-GDGTs, be preserved over geological timescales. Here, we examined IPL-GDGTs in deeply buried (0.2-186 mbsf, ~2.5 Myr) sediments from the Peru Margin. Direct measurements of the most abundant IPL-GDGT, IPL-crenarchaeol, specific for Thaumarchaeota, revealed depth profiles, which differed per head group. Shallow sediments (1 m) marine sediments, which only reported glycosidic and no phosphate-containing IPL-GDGTs. TEX86 values of CL-GDGTs did not markedly change with depth, and the TEX86 of IPL-derived GDGTs decreased only when the proportions of monohexose- to dihexose-GDGTs changed, likely due to the enhanced preservation of the monohexose GDGTs. Our results support the hypothesis that in situ GDGT production and differential IPL degradation in sediments is not substantially affecting TEX86 paleotemperature estimations based on CL-GDGTs and indicates that likely only a small amount of IPL-GDGTs present in deeply buried sediments is part of cell membranes of active archaea. The amount of archaeal biomass in the deep biosphere based on these IPLs may have been substantially overestimated. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Coupled LBM-DEM Three-phase Simulation on Gas Flux Seeping from Marine Sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kano, Y.; Sato, T.

    2014-12-01

    One of the main issues of the geological storage of CO2 under the seabed is a risk of CO2 leakage. Once CO2seeps into the ocean, it rises in water column dissolving into seawater, which results in the acidification of seawater and/or returning to the air. Its behaviour significantly depends on flow rate and bubble size (Kano et al., 2009; Dewar et al., 2013). As for porous media, bubble size is generally predicted through simple force balance based on flow rate, surface tension and channel size which is estimated by porosity and grain size. However, in shallow marine sediments, grains could be mobilised and displaced by buoyant gas flow, which causes distinctive phenomena such as blow-out or formation of gas flow conduit. As a result, effective gas flux into seawater can be intermissive, and/or concentrated in narrow area (QICS, 2012; Kawada, 2013). Bubble size is also affected by these phenomena. To predict effective gas flux and bubble size into seawater, three-phase behaviour of gas-water-sediment grains should be revealed. In this presentation, we will report the results of gas-liquid-solid three-phase simulations and their comparisons with experimental and observation data. Size of solid particles is based on grain size composing marine sediments at some CCS project sites. Fluid-particle interactions are solved using the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), while the particle-particle interactions are treated by coupling with the Discrete Element method (DEM). References: Dewar, M., Wei, W., McNeil, D., Chen, B., 2013. Small-scale modelling of the physiochemical impacts of CO2leaked from sub-seabed reservoirs or pipelines within the North Sea and surrounding waters. Marine Pollution Bulletin 73(2), 504-515. Kano, Y., Sato, T., Kita, J., Hirabayashi, S., Tabeta, S., 2009. Model prediction on the rise of pCO2 in uniform flows by leakage of CO2purposefully stored under the seabed. Int. J. Greenhouse Gas Control, Vol. 3(5), 617-625. Kawada, R. 2014. A study on the

  8. Morphology and Sediment Transport Dynamics of a Trough-Blowout Dune, Bodega Marine Reserve, Northern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgenson, D.; Dunleavy, C. J.; Smith, M. E.

    2014-12-01

    Blowout dunes are a primary mechanism for transporting sand within vegetated coastal dune systems. Understanding the fine-scale variation in sediment transport within these systems is critical to predicting their formation and migration. Previous investigations of a coastal dune system located at the Bodega Marine Reserve, on the Sonoma Coast of Northern California have indicated that aeolian sand flux in unvegetated sand is ~450x greater than in vegetated areas. To better understand sand flux and its relationship with wind speed, direction and precipitation, we deployed an array of 12 sand traps within a single blowout area adjacent to the BOON marine climatology station. The blowout is trough- shaped, approximately 50 meters long and 15 meters wide. Its main 'fairway' is 5-10 meters below the surrounding beach grass (Ammophila)-covered land surface. Surface sediment within the blowout is fine-grained to granule-sized lithic to sub-lithic sand, and is coarsest in the center. Dune sediment in the Bodega Marine Reserve has been transported by aeolian processes from Salmon Creek Beach to the NW. Within the blowout, typical bedforms include 15-25 cm-wavelength, ~10 cm high sinuous to lingoid ripples arranged perpendicularly to the dominant wind direction (~280 degrees). An 8-10 meter-high mound at the downwind end has accumulated due to the trapping of sand flux by vegetation. Sediment flux across the studied blowout was sampled monthly over a 10-month period of 2013-2014. Sand traps were constructed using modified PVC cylinders, and are 0.5 meter high and 0.3 meter in diameter, with a 0.74-micron mesh screen. Based on measured sand flux, the sites can be categorized into three groups-axial, medial, and peripheral. Rates increase downwind within the blowout. Inter-site sand flux variability within unvegetated locations of the blowout is greater than two orders of magnitude. Axial sites, which experience the greatest sand flux, occur on the edge of the blowout adjacent

  9. Ecotoxicological evaluation of harbour sediments using marine organisms from different trophic levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pane, L.; Giacco, E.; Mariottini, G.L. [Genova Univ. (Italy). Dept. of Biology; Corra, C.; Greco, G.; Faimali, M. [CNR - ISMAR-Marine Technology Section, Genova (Italy); Varisco, F. [Multiproject S.r.l., Gorizia (Italy)

    2008-04-15

    ) of whole sediment placed on multi-well plate bottoms. All end-points were evaluated after 96 h. Results. In general, the effects increased with the increasing of elutriate concentration up to 50%; the stimulation or inhibition of algal growth was statistically significant in comparison to the control. The inhibiting elutriates induced EC{sub 50} variations of algal growth ranging from 66.9% to 74.3%. The mortality of T. fulvus nauplii was always < 25% after treatment with 100% elutriates and < 10% after treatment with 50% dilution; no effect was shown up with 25% dilution; therefore LC{sub 50} was not calculable. The effect of elutriates was negligible on adult copepods and LC{sub 50} values were never calculable; percent mortality always resulted in < 10% after treatment with whole sediments. Discussion. Both experimental systems gave substantially similar results after exposition to whole sediments and elutriates. During the experiment with algal cells, the immobilization in Na-alginate and the employment of inserts which allowed the contact of organisms with sediments and their easy counting were particularly useful. Likewise, the employment of inserts of adequate mesh size in the tests with copepods allowed the contact of organisms with the sediment and made organism handling and counting easy, as well as the evaluation of mortality. The methodology here described and the utilization of the proposed test-species could have an importance also considering that the current trend in ecotoxicological research is towards finding the most appropriate organism for specific areas of concern by using indigenous species (Mariani et al. 2006) and towards the major significance of chronic and reproductive end-points. Conclusions. Based on the above results, it can be stated that the bioassay with Dunaliella tertiolecta could be a good estimation tool for the ecotoxicological assessment of marine sediments. The immobilization of algae in Na-alginate was seen to be useful to

  10. Assessment of 210Po in agricultural soils and marine sediments of the Atlantic and Pacific oceans of Guatemala

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Vela, A.G.

    1999-01-01

    A radiochemical method consisting of 210 Polonium extraction was made to measure radioactivity in samples of soil and marine sediments of Atlantic and Pacific Ocean. The solution of polonium it was treated to obtain the deposition of the metal over a zinc disc and was measured by alpha espectrometry system based on Planar Ion Planted Silice (PIPS) system. The concern about cultivated soils its consuption products from sea and soil come from these sources. The results shows that activity of 210 Polonium in agricultural soils and marine sediments are below of ALI recommended by international standards

  11. A multi-proxy study of anaerobic ammonium oxidation in marine sediments of the Gullmar Fjord, Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandsma, Joost; van de Vossenberg; Risgaard-Petersen, Nils

    2011-01-01

    bacteria in marine sediments of the Gullmar Fjord, and compared the results obtained with each technique. 15N labelling experiments showed that nitrogen removal through N(2) production was essentially limited to the upper 2 cm of the sediment, where anammox contributed 23-47% of the total production....... The presence of marine anammox bacteria belonging to the genus 'Candidatus Scalindua' was shown by 16S rRNA gene sequence comparison. FISH counts of anammox bacteria correlated well with anammox activity, while quantitative PCR may have underestimated the number of anammox bacterial 16S rRNA gene copies...

  12. Early Cretaceous marine sediments of the Lower Saxony Basin. The Gildehaus Sandstone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dellepiane, S.; Weiel, D. [Wintershall Holding GmbH, Barnstorf (Germany); Gerwert, D.; Mutterlose, J. [Bochum Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Geologie, Mineralogie und Geophysik

    2013-08-01

    During the Early Cretaceous (Berriasian - Aptian) the Lower Saxony Basin (LSB) formed the southernmost extension of the North Sea Basin. Sedimentation patterns of the LSB were controlled by divergent dextral shear movement causing differential subsidence related to early rifting in the North Sea. Up to 2000m of fine grained mudstones accumulated in the basin centre, while marginal marine, coarser grained siliciclastics were deposited along the western and southern margins of the LSB. The western marginal facies, outcropping along the Dutch-German border, is characterised by shallow marine sandstones of Valanginian - Hauterivian age. These units, which are separated by clay rich intervals, include the Bentheim Sdst., the Dichotomites Sdst., the Grenz Sdst., the Noricum Sdst. and the Gildehaus Sdst. These sandstones form a series of overall backstepping units, controlled by a main transgressive trend. Economically important are the Bentheim Sdst. and the Gildehaus Sdst., with a long oil producing history. The Bentheim Sdst. (early Valanginian) has been interpreted as an overall retrograding unit related to an incised valley infill with material mainly coming from the South. Tidal processes dominated the deposition of the Bentheim Sdst. The origin and genesis of the Gildehaus Sdst. (mid Hauterivian) is, however, less well understood. Here we present data from two wells drilled to the Gildehaus Sdst. (Emlichheim oil field) which provide evidence for a two fold subdivision of the unit. A well sorted massive quartz sandstone is followed by an interval composed of reworked coarse clastics of massflow origin. Micropalaeontological evidence suggests a fully marine, hemi-pelagic origin of the mud dominated matrix throughout the Gildehaus Sdst. These findings indicate a depositional environment quite different from that of the Bentheim Sdst. Short termed pulses of substantial input of clastic material from two different sources in the West to Southwest punctuated the overall

  13. Search for isotopic signatures of a supernova explosion close to the solar system in marine sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitoussi, Caroline

    2006-06-01

    The recent observation of a 60 Fe peak in a deep-sea ferro-manganese crust has been interpreted as due to a supernova explosion relatively close to the solar system 2.8 ± 0.4 Myr ago. To confirm this interpretation with better time-resolved measurements, and the simultaneous access, on the same sample, to other isotopes and geochemical phases, marine sediments seem to be a tool of choice. The objective of this work was to search for isotopic anomalies which would be characteristic for residues of this supernova. More specifically, 129 I, 60 Fe, and 26 Al have been investigated, being measured by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS). Quantifying these nuclides' fluxes would help constrain stellar nucleosynthesis models. These residues are isotopes initially produced during hydrostatic and/or explosive nucleosynthesis. The physical conditions during the explosion (temperature, neutron density) are such that supernovae are thought to be good candidates for the astrophysical site of the r-process. The 129 I study showed that measurement of pre-anthropogenic 129 I/ 127 I ratios need a very strict control of the various potential 129 I sources, especially when working with small quantities (micrograms) of iodine. This study revealed that the expected pre-anthropogenic 129 I/ 127 I ratio for pre-nuclear samples in the marine environment shows a large discrepancy between theoretical calculations and experimental measurements. 60 Fe and 26 Al measurements allow us to conclude that, in the authigenic phase of the marine sediments, there is no 60 Fe anomaly in the time interval defined by the signal found on the Fe-Mn crust (from 2.4 to 3.2 Myr), and no 26 Al anomaly from 2.6 to 3.2 Myr. (author)

  14. Integrative assessment of marine pollution in Galician estuaries using sediment chemistry, mussel bioaccumulation, and embryo-larval toxicity bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiras, R; Fernández, N; Bellas, J; Besada, V; González-Quijano, A; Nunes, T

    2003-08-01

    An integrative assessment of environmental quality was carried out in selected sites along the Galician coast (NW Iberian Peninsula) combining analytical chemistry of seawater and sediments, bioaccumulation in the marine mussel, and embryo-larval sediment toxicity bioassays, in order to link biological and chemical criteria for the assessment of coastal pollution. Maximum values of Hg and Cu in seawater, sediment and mussels, were found in the inner part of Ria of Pontevedra, while maximum levels of organics (polychlorinated biphenyls, hexachlorobenzene and aldrin) were found in mussels from A Coruña. Outstanding values of Cu, Pb and Zn have been found in seawater and sediment from a single site, P3, which also was the most toxic in the embryo-larval bioassays performed with four different phyla of marine organisms: mollusks, echinoderms, arthropods and chordates. Sediment quality effects range-median values provided a valuable reference to predict biological effects from sediment chemistry data, while effects range-low values were too conservative. Sediment toxicity could also be predicted by using a toxic-unit model based on published EC50 values for trace metals and mobilization factors independently obtained from measurements of metal contents in sediments and their elutriates. When chemical and toxicological data are independently used to arrange sampling sites by using non-metric multidimensional scaling, a remarkable degree of concordance between both types of configurations could be observed.

  15. Improved Separation of Pa from Th and U in Marine Sediments with TK400 Resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Süfke, Finn; Lippold, Jörg; Happel, Steffen

    2018-01-16

    Protactinium-231 is a radionuclide of broad interest in paleoceanography and paleoclimatology. This study describes an improved method for the purification and separation of Pa from marine sediment samples using the new TK400 resin by TrisKem International. The focus lies on the improvement of the separation of the abundant 232 Th from the Pa fraction of the sample, which would reduce the peak tailing from 232 Th on masses 231 and 233 during ICP-MS measurement. Furthermore, the reusability of TK400 has been tested. For this purpose, the conventional method using Dowex AG1X8 for the separation and purification of Pa has been compared to methods using the TK400 resin. A combination of a Dowex AG1X8 prior to a TK400 column has shown most convincing results. Based on our results we suggest a new efficient procedural method of analyzing 231 Pa from marine sediment samples using TK400. Chemical Pa yields for a Dowex-TK400 combination are highest compared to the Dowex only method. Furthermore, the 232 Th/ 231 Pa ratio of the Pa-fractions has been reduced by 1 order of magnitude compared to conventional methods with Dowex AG1X8. Additionally, the reusability of TK400 resin up to nine times has been proven. The usage of TK400 is only limited in the presence of samples with a high matrix load (e.g., Fe). Therefore, matrix from sediment samples needs to be removed (here using Dowex resin) before samples are loaded onto TK400. We also report a series of concentration measurements from standard reference materials (UREM-11, NIST 2702), which have been used for 233 Pa calibration.

  16. Cenozoic marine geochemistry of thallium deduced from isotopic studies of ferromanganese crusts and pelagic sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehkamper, M.; Frank, M.; Hein, J.R.; Halliday, A.

    2004-01-01

    Cenozoic records of Tl isotope compositions recorded by ferromanganese (Fe-Mn) crusts have been obtained. Such records are of interest because recent growth surfaces of Fe-Mn crusts display a nearly constant Tl isotope fractionation relative to seawater. The time-series data are complemented by results for bulk samples and leachates of various marine sediments. Oxic pelagic sediments and anoxic marine deposits can be distinguished by their Tl isotope compositions. Both pelagic clays and biogenic oozes are typically characterized by ??205Tl greater than +2.5, whereas anoxic sediments have ??205Tl of less than -1.5 (??205Tl is the deviation of the 205Tl/203Tl isotope ratio of a sample from NIST SRM 997 Tl in parts per 104). Leaching experiments indicate that the high ??205Tl values of oxic sediments probably reflect authigenic Fe-Mn oxyhydroxides. Time-resolved Tl isotope compositions were obtained from six Fe-Mn crusts from the Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific oceans and a number of observations indicate that these records were not biased by diagenetic alteration. Over the last 25 Myr, the data do not show isotopic variations that significantly exceed the range of Tl isotope compositions observed for surface layers of Fe-Mn crusts distributed globally (??205 Tl=+12.8??1.2). This indicates that variations in deep-ocean temperature were not recorded by Tl isotopes. The results most likely reflect a constant Tl isotope composition for seawater. The growth layers of three Fe-Mn crusts that are older than 25 Ma show a systematic increase of ??205Tl with decreasing age, from about +6 at 60-50 Ma to about +12 at 25 Ma. These trends are thought to be due to variations in the Tl isotope composition of seawater, which requires that the oceans of the early Cenozoic either had smaller output fluxes or received larger input fluxes of Tl with low ??205Tl. Larger inputs of isotopically light Tl may have been supplied by benthic fluxes from reducing sediments, rivers, and/or volcanic

  17. Influence of biogeochemical interactions on metal bioleaching performance in contaminated marine sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonti, Viviana; Dell'Anno, Antonio; Beolchini, Francesca

    2013-09-15

    Bioleaching strategies are still far from finding real applications in sediment clean-up, although metabolic mechanisms governing bioleaching processes have been deeply studied and can be considered well established. In this study, we carried out bioleaching experiments, using autotrophic and heterotrophic acidophilic bacteria strains, and worked with marine sediments characterized by different geochemical properties and metal concentrations and speciations. The solubilization efficiency of the metals was highly variable, with the highest for Zn (40%-76%) and the lowest for Pb (0%-7%). Our data suggest that the role of autotrophic Fe/S oxidizing bacteria is mainly associated with the production and re-cycling of leaching chemical species, mainly as protons and ferric ions. Metal solubilization appears to be more related to establishing environmental conditions that allow each metal or semimetal to remain stable in the solution phase. Thus, the maintenance of acid and oxidative conditions, the chemical behavior in aqueous environment of each metal species and the geochemical characteristics of sediment interact intimately to influence metal solubilization in site-specific and metal-specific way. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Historical Profiles of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Marine Sediment Cores from Northwest Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Fernández, Begoña; Viñas, Lucía; Bargiela, Jesica

    2016-11-01

    The northwest coast of Spain is characterized by an irregular coastline rich in marine life and with the highest mussel production in Europe. Taking this into account, the characterization of the pollution levels and the sources involved appear necessary. Not only were parent Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) analysed but also their alkylated homologues. In total, 35 compounds were analyzed in 5 sediment cores. Sediments were collected using a box core dredge and extracted by (Pressurized Liquid Extraction) whilst the quantification of PAHs was performed using gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The total concentration detected varied from 49.6 to 2489 ng g -1 dry weight (d.w.) of which parent PAHs ranged from 44.5 to 2254 ng g -1 d.w. and alkylated PAHs varied from 5.04 to 317 ng g -1 d.w. Temporal and spatial evolution were outlined and pollution sources were identified along with a possible correlation between this pollution and local history and industry. Most of the PAHs from the superficial samples have a biomass and coal combustion profile, and some specific, localized events are reflected in the total PAH concentration evolution. Moreover, the study of the deepest layers of the sampled cores provides a baseline to develop background concentration values that will help in future sediment quality assessment.

  19. Chemical composition of marine sediments in the Pacific Ocean from Sinaloa to Jalisco, Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, T.; Lartigue, J.; Ramos, A.; Navarrete, M.; Mulller, G.

    2014-01-01

    Marine sediments from Mexico's West coast in the Pacific Ocean from Sinaloa to Jalisco were analyzed by energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence technique. Ten sediment samples were collected in May, 2010 between 55.5 and 1264 m water depth with a Reinneck type box nucleate sampler. Sediments were dried and fractioned by granulometry. Their physical and chemical properties were determined in laboratory by standard methods, pH, and conductivity. Concentration and distribution of K, Ca, Ti Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Ga, Pb, Br and Sr were analyzed. In order to determine the status of the elements, enrichment factors were calculated. Total, organic carbon and CaCO 3 were also determined. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction show predominant groups of compounds. As quality-control method, Certified Reference Material was both processed and analyzed at even conditions. Enrichment factors for K, Ca, Ti, Mn Fe, Cu, Zn, Ga, Ni, and Sr show they are conservative elements having concentrations in the range of unpolluted sites giving a base data line for the sampling zone In spite of moderately enrichment factors -1 ) and enrichment factor show the influence of anthropogenic sources with values between lowest effect level and a third part of 250 μg g -1 value, which is considered to have severe effect levels for aquatic life. (author)

  20. Wave Glider Monitoring of Sediment Transport and Dredge Plumes in a Shallow Marine Sandbank Environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Van Lancker

    Full Text Available As human pressure on the marine environment increases, safeguarding healthy and productive seas increasingly necessitates integrated, time- and cost-effective environmental monitoring. Employment of a Wave Glider proved very useful for the study of sediment transport in a shallow sandbank area in the Belgian part of the North Sea. During 22 days, data on surface and water-column currents and turbidity were recorded along 39 loops around an aggregate-extraction site. Correlation with wave and tidal-amplitude data allowed the quantification of current- and wave-induced advection and resuspension, important background information to assess dredging impacts. Important anomalies in suspended particulate matter concentrations in the water column suggested dredging-induced overflow of sediments in the near field (i.e., dynamic plume, and settling of finer-grained material in the far field (i.e., passive plume. Capturing the latter is a successful outcome to this experiment, since the location of dispersion and settling of a passive plume is highly dependent on the ruling hydro-meteorological conditions and thus difficult to predict. Deposition of the observed sediment plumes may cause habitat changes in the long-term.

  1. Rare earth elements in core marine sediments of coastal East Malaysia by instrumental neutron activation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Ahmadreza; Saion, Elias; Gharibshahi, Elham; Mohamed Kamari, Halimah; Chee Kong, Yap; Suhaimi Hamzah, Mohd; Suhaimi Elias, Md

    2016-01-01

    A study was carried out on the concentration of REEs (Dy, Sm, Eu,Yb, Lu, La and Ce) that are present in the core marine sediments of East Malaysia from three locations at South China Sea and one location each at Sulu Sea and Sulawesi Sea. The sediment samples were collected at a depth of between 49 and 109 m, dried, and crushed to powdery form. The entire core sediments prepared for Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) were weighted approximately 0.0500 g to 0.1000 g for short irradiation and 0.1500 g to 0.2000 g for long irradiation. The samples were irradiated with a thermal neutron flux of 4.0×10(12) cm(-2) s(-1) in a TRIGA Mark II research reactor operated at 750 kW. Blank samples and standard reference materials SL-1 were also irradiated for calibration and quality control purposes. It was found that the concentration of REEs varies in the range from 0.11 to 36.84 mg/kg. The chondrite-normalized REEs for different stations suggest that all the REEs are from similar origins. There was no significant REEs contamination as the enrichment factors normalized for Fe fall in the range of 0.42-2.82. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Interactions between benthic copepods, bacteria and diatoms promote nitrogen retention in intertidal marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Willem; Heylen, Kim; Sabbe, Koen; Willems, Anne; De Troch, Marleen

    2014-01-01

    The present study aims at evaluating the impact of diatoms and copepods on microbial processes mediating nitrate removal in fine-grained intertidal sediments. More specifically, we studied the interactions between copepods, diatoms and bacteria in relation to their effects on nitrate reduction and denitrification. Microcosms containing defaunated marine sediments were subjected to different treatments: an excess of nitrate, copepods, diatoms (Navicula sp.), a combination of copepods and diatoms, and spent medium from copepods. The microcosms were incubated for seven and a half days, after which nutrient concentrations and denitrification potential were measured. Ammonium concentrations were highest in the treatments with copepods or their spent medium, whilst denitrification potential was lowest in these treatments, suggesting that copepods enhance dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium over denitrification. We hypothesize that this is an indirect effect, by providing extra carbon for the bacterial community through the copepods' excretion products, thus changing the C/N ratio in favour of dissimilatory nitrate reduction. Diatoms alone had no effect on the nitrogen fluxes, but they did enhance the effect of copepods, possibly by influencing the quantity and quality of the copepods' excretion products. Our results show that small-scale biological interactions between bacteria, copepods and diatoms can have an important impact on denitrification and hence sediment nitrogen fluxes.

  3. Uptake of PCBs contained in marine sediments by the green macroalga Ulva rigida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheney, Donald; Rajic, Ljiljana; Sly, Elizabeth; Meric, Dogus; Sheahan, Thomas

    2014-11-15

    The uptake of PCBs contained in marine sediments by the green macroalga Ulva rigida was investigated in both laboratory and field experiments. Under laboratory conditions, total PCBs (tPCBs) uptake was significantly greater in live vs dead plants. The concentration of tPCB taken up in live plants was greatest in the first 24h (1580 μg kg(-1) dry weight), and then increased at a lower rate from day 2 to 14. Dead plants had a significantly lower tPCB concentration after 24h (609 μg kg(-1) dry weight) and lower uptake rate through day 14. Lesser chlorinated PCB congeners (below 123) made up the majority of PCBs taken up. Congener composition in both laboratory and field experiments was correlated to congener logKow value and sediment content. Field experiments showed that Ulva plants could concentrate PCBs to 3.9 mg kg(-1) in 24h. Thus, U. rigida is capable of removing PCBs in sediments at a rapid rate. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Ca Isotope Geochemistry in Marine Deep Sea Sediments of the Eastern Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittke, A.; Gussone, N. C.; Derigs, D.; Schälling, M.; Teichert, B. M.

    2017-12-01

    Ca isotope ratio analysis (δ44/40Ca) is a powerful tool to investigate diagenetic reactions in marine sedimentary porewater systems, as it is sensitive to processes such as carbonate dissolution, precipitation, recrystallization, ion exchange and deep fluid sources, due to the isotopic difference between dissolved Ca and solid carbonate minerals (e.g. [1];[2]). We analyzed eight sediment cores of the (paleo-) Pacific equatorial age transect. Two sediment cores show decreasing Ca isotope profiles starting at the sediment/water interface with seawater-like values down to sediment-like values due to recrystallization and an increasing in the bottom part again to seawater-like values. The other studied cores show different degrees of flattening of this middle bulge. We interpret this pattern either as an effect of sediment composition and thickness, decreasing recrystallization rates and/or fluid flux or a combination of all of these factors at the respective sampling sites. Element concentration profiles and Sr-isotope variations on some of these sediment cores show a similar behavior, supporting our findings ([3]; [4]). Seawater influx at (inactive) seamounts is supposed to cause seawater-like values at the bottom of the sediment cores by fluids migrating through the oceanic basement (e.g. [5]). While [6] hypothesizes that two seamounts or bathymetric pits are connected, with a recharge and a discharge site [7] say that uptaken fluids could be released through the surrounding seafloor as well due to diffusive exchange with the underlying oceanic crust. Our Ca isotope results combined with a transport reaction model approach support the latter hypothesis. References: [1] Teichert B. M., Gussone N. and Torres M. E. (2009) [2] Ockert C., Gussone N., Kaufhold S. and Teichert B. (2013) [3] Pälike H., Lyle M., Nishi H., Raffi I., Gamage K. and Klaus A. (eds.) (2010) [4] Voigt J., Hathorne E. C., Frank M., Vollstaedt H. and Eisenhauer A. (2015) [5] Villinger H. W

  5. Microbial Diversity in Sulfate-Reducing Marine Sediment Enrichment Cultures Associated with Anaerobic Biotransformation of Coastal Stockpiled Phosphogypsum (Sfax, Tunisia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zouch, Hana; Karray, Fatma; Armougom, Fabrice; Chifflet, Sandrine; Hirschler-Réa, Agnès; Kharrat, Hanen; Kamoun, Lotfi; Ben Hania, Wajdi; Ollivier, Bernard; Sayadi, Sami; Quéméneur, Marianne

    2017-01-01

    Anaerobic biotechnology using sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) is a promising alternative for reducing long-term stockpiling of phosphogypsum (PG), an acidic (pH ~3) by-product of the phosphate fertilizer industries containing high amounts of sulfate. The main objective of this study was to evaluate, for the first time, the diversity and ability of anaerobic marine microorganisms to convert sulfate from PG into sulfide, in order to look for marine SRB of biotechnological interest. A series of sulfate-reducing enrichment cultures were performed using different electron donors (i.e., acetate, formate, or lactate) and sulfate sources (i.e., sodium sulfate or PG) as electron acceptors. Significant sulfide production was observed from enrichment cultures inoculated with marine sediments, collected near the effluent discharge point of a Tunisian fertilizer industry (Sfax, Tunisia). Sulfate sources impacted sulfide production rates from marine sediments as well as the diversity of SRB species belonging to Deltaproteobacteria . When PG was used as sulfate source, Desulfovibrio species dominated microbial communities of marine sediments, while Desulfobacter species were mainly detected using sodium sulfate. Sulfide production was also affected depending on the electron donor used, with the highest production obtained using formate. In contrast, low sulfide production (acetate-containing cultures) was associated with an increase in the population of Firmicutes . These results suggested that marine Desulfovibrio species, to be further isolated, are potential candidates for bioremediation of PG by immobilizing metals and metalloids thanks to sulfide production by these SRB.

  6. Microbial Diversity in Sulfate-Reducing Marine Sediment Enrichment Cultures Associated with Anaerobic Biotransformation of Coastal Stockpiled Phosphogypsum (Sfax, Tunisia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana Zouch

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic biotechnology using sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB is a promising alternative for reducing long-term stockpiling of phosphogypsum (PG, an acidic (pH ~3 by-product of the phosphate fertilizer industries containing high amounts of sulfate. The main objective of this study was to evaluate, for the first time, the diversity and ability of anaerobic marine microorganisms to convert sulfate from PG into sulfide, in order to look for marine SRB of biotechnological interest. A series of sulfate-reducing enrichment cultures were performed using different electron donors (i.e., acetate, formate, or lactate and sulfate sources (i.e., sodium sulfate or PG as electron acceptors. Significant sulfide production was observed from enrichment cultures inoculated with marine sediments, collected near the effluent discharge point of a Tunisian fertilizer industry (Sfax, Tunisia. Sulfate sources impacted sulfide production rates from marine sediments as well as the diversity of SRB species belonging to Deltaproteobacteria. When PG was used as sulfate source, Desulfovibrio species dominated microbial communities of marine sediments, while Desulfobacter species were mainly detected using sodium sulfate. Sulfide production was also affected depending on the electron donor used, with the highest production obtained using formate. In contrast, low sulfide production (acetate-containing cultures was associated with an increase in the population of Firmicutes. These results suggested that marine Desulfovibrio species, to be further isolated, are potential candidates for bioremediation of PG by immobilizing metals and metalloids thanks to sulfide production by these SRB.

  7. Time Matters: Increasing the Efficiency of Antarctic Marine Geology and Paleoceanography Expeditions by Providing Improved Sediment Chronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenheim, B. E.; Domack, E. W.; Shevenell, A.; Subt, C.

    2015-12-01

    To maximize the areal extent of Antarctic sedimentary records of past deglaciation, it is necessary to ensure more sediment cores can be adequately dated. Antarctic margin sediment is challenging to date due to the lack of preserved calcium carbonate, but the records contained in these sediments readily recount the history of deglaciation. Recent and continued development of new chronological methods for Antarctic margin sediments have allowed better use of the efforts of marine geological coring expeditions to the region. The development of Ramped PyrOx radiocarbon dating has allowed us to 1. improve dates in deglacial sediments where no carbonate is preserved, 2. date glacial sediments lying below the tills marking the last glaciation, and 3. compile core chronologies into a regional framework of ice shelf collapse that has eluded many marine geology campaigns over the last few decades. These advances in a fundamental aspect of geological sciences will put the U.S. and international community on a better foothold to interpret the past as it relates to our warming future. We will present these advances in chronology as well as the science that is enabled by them, while arguing that the future of Antarctic marine science also depends on investments in shore-based technologies that come at a relatively low cost.

  8. Currents connecting communities: nearshore community similarity and ocean circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, J R; Hays, C G; Raimondi, P T; Mitarai, S; Dong, C; McWilliams, J C; Blanchette, C A; Caselle, J E; Siegel, D A

    2011-06-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that create spatial heterogeneity in species distributions is fundamental to ecology. For nearshore marine systems, most species have a pelagic larval stage where dispersal is strongly influenced by patterns of ocean circulation. Concomitantly, nearshore habitats and the local environment are also influenced by ocean circulation. Because of the shared dependence on the seascape, distinguishing the relative importance of the local environment from regional patterns of dispersal for community structure remains a challenge. Here, we quantify the "oceanographic distance" and "oceanographic asymmetry" between nearshore sites using ocean circulation modeling results. These novel metrics quantify spatial separation based on realistic patterns of ocean circulation, and we explore their explanatory power for intertidal and subtidal community similarity in the Southern California Bight. We find that these metrics show significant correspondence with patterns of community similarity and that their combined explanatory power exceeds that of the thermal structure of the domain. Our approach identifies the unique influence of ocean circulation on community structure and provides evidence for oceanographically mediated dispersal limitation in nearshore marine communities.

  9. Organotin persistence in contaminated marine sediments and porewaters: In situ degradation study using species-specific stable isotopic tracers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furdek, Martina; Mikac, Nevenka [Division for Marine and Environmental Research, Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka 54, Zagreb (Croatia); Bueno, Maite; Tessier, Emmanuel; Cavalheiro, Joana [Laboratoire de Chimie Analytique Bio-inorganique et Environnement, Institut Pluridisciplinaire de Recherche sur l’Environnement et les Matériaux, CNRS UMR 5254, Université de Pau et des Pays de l’Adour, Hélioparc Pau Pyrénées, 2, Av. P. Angot, 64053 Pau Cedex 9 (France); Monperrus, Mathilde, E-mail: mathilde.monperrus@univ-pau.fr [Laboratoire de Chimie Analytique Bio-inorganique et Environnement, Institut Pluridisciplinaire de Recherche sur l’Environnement et les Matériaux, CNRS UMR 5254, Université de Pau et des Pays de l’Adour, Hélioparc Pau Pyrénées, 2, Av. P. Angot, 64053 Pau Cedex 9 (France)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Limiting step in OTC degradation in sediments is their desorption into porewater. • TBT persistence in contaminated sediments increases in sediments rich in organic matter. • DBT does not accumulate in sediments as degradation product of TBT. • TBT and DBT degradation in porewaters occurs with half-lives from 2.9 to 9.2 days. • PhTs degradation is slower than BuTs degradation in oxic porewaters. - Abstract: This paper provides a comprehensive study of the persistence of butyltins and phenyltins in contaminated marine sediments and presents the first data on their degradation potentials in porewaters. The study’s aim was to explain the different degradation efficiencies of organotin compounds (OTC) in contaminated sediments. The transformation processes of OTC in sediments and porewaters were investigated in a field experiment using species-specific, isotopically enriched organotin tracers. Sediment characteristics (organic carbon content and grain size) were determined to elucidate their influence on the degradation processes. The results of this study strongly suggest that a limiting step in OTC degradation in marine sediments is their desorption into porewaters because their degradation in porewaters occurs notably fast with half-lives of 9.2 days for tributyltin (TBT) in oxic porewaters and 2.9 ± 0.1 and 9.1 ± 0.9 days for dibutyltin (DBT) in oxic and anoxic porewaters, respectively. By controlling the desorption process, organic matter influences the TBT degradation efficiency and consequently defines its persistence in contaminated sediments, which thus increases in sediments rich in organic matter.

  10. Metal pollution and ecological risk assessment in marine sediments of Karachi Coast, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashiatullah, Azhar; Chaudhary, Muhammad Zaman; Ahmad, Nasir; Javed, Tariq; Ghaffar, Abdul

    2013-02-01

    Concentrations of 12 metals (Fe, Mn, Cr, Mo, Ni, Pb, Se, Sr, U, V, Zn, and Zr) in surface sediments of Karachi Coast, Pakistan were determined to evaluate their distribution and pollution assessment. The measured metals in the sediments were found to be in the range of Fe, 0.84-6.96 %; Mn, 300-1,300 μg/g; Cr, 12.0-319.84 μg/g; Mo, 0.49-2.03 μg/g; Ni, 1.53-58.86 μg/g; Pb, 9.0-49.46 μg/g; Se, 0.25-.86 μg/g; Sr, 192-1185 μg/g; U, 0.19-1.66 μg/g; V, 15.80-118.20 μg/g; Zn, 15.60-666.28 μg/g; and Zr, 44.02-175.26 μg/g. The mean contents of the metal studied were: Fe, 3.07 %, Mn, 0.05 %; Cr, 96.75 μg/g; Mo, 1.34 μg/g; Ni, 31.39 μg/g; Pb, 23.24 μg/g; Se, 0.61 μg/g; Sr, 374.83 μg/g; U, 0.64 μg/g; V, 61.75 μg/g; Zn, 204.75 μg/g; and Zr:76.27 μg/g, and arrangement of the metals from higher to lower mean content in this area is: Fe > Zn > Mn > Sr > Zn > Cr > Zr > V > Ni > Pb > Mo > U > Se. There is no significant correlation among most of these metals, indicating different anthropogenic and natural sources. To assess ecotoxic potential of marine sediments, Numerical Sediment Quality Guidelines were also applied. The concentration of Pb in all the sediments except one was lower than the threshold effect concentration (TECs) showing that there are no harmful effects to marine life from Pb. On the other hand, the concentrations of Cr, Ni, and Zn exceeded TEC in three stations, indicating their potential risk. The degree of pollution in sediments for metals was assessed by calculating enrichment factor (EF) and pollution load index (PLI). The results indicated that sediments of Layari River Mouth Area, Fish Harbour, and KPT Boat Building Area are highly enriched with Cr and Zn (EF > 5). Sediments of Layari River Outfall Zone were moderately enriched with Ni and Pb (EF > 2). The pollution load index was found in the range of 0.98 to 1.34. Lower values of PLI (≤ 1) at most of sampling locations imply no appreciable input from anthropogenic sources. However

  11. Macromolecular composition of terrestrial and marine organic matter in sediments across the East Siberian Arctic Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparkes, Robert B.; Doğrul Selver, Ayça; Gustafsson, Örjan; Semiletov, Igor P.; Haghipour, Negar; Wacker, Lukas; Eglinton, Timothy I.; Talbot, Helen M.; van Dongen, Bart E.

    2016-10-01

    Mobilisation of terrestrial organic carbon (terrOC) from permafrost environments in eastern Siberia has the potential to deliver significant amounts of carbon to the Arctic Ocean, via both fluvial and coastal erosion. Eroded terrOC can be degraded during offshore transport or deposited across the wide East Siberian Arctic Shelf (ESAS). Most studies of terrOC on the ESAS have concentrated on solvent-extractable organic matter, but this represents only a small proportion of the total terrOC load. In this study we have used pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (py-GCMS) to study all major groups of macromolecular components of the terrOC; this is the first time that this technique has been applied to the ESAS. This has shown that there is a strong offshore trend from terrestrial phenols, aromatics and cyclopentenones to marine pyridines. There is good agreement between proportion phenols measured using py-GCMS and independent quantification of lignin phenol concentrations (r2 = 0.67, p radiocarbon data for bulk OC (14COC) which, when coupled with previous measurements, allows us to produce the most comprehensive 14COC map of the ESAS to date. Combining the 14COC and py-GCMS data suggests that the aromatics group of compounds is likely sourced from old, aged terrOC, in contrast to the phenols group, which is likely sourced from modern woody material. We propose that an index of the relative proportions of phenols and pyridines can be used as a novel terrestrial vs. marine proxy measurement for macromolecular organic matter. Principal component analysis found that various terrestrial vs. marine proxies show different patterns across the ESAS, and it shows that multiple river-ocean transects of surface sediments transition from river-dominated to coastal-erosion-dominated to marine-dominated signatures.

  12. A review of strategies to monitor water and sediment quality for a sustainability assessment of marine environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoly Sany, Seyedeh Belin; Hashim, Rosli; Rezayi, Majid; Salleh, Aishah; Safari, Omid

    2014-01-01

    The basic aim of this work is (1) to review and present practically operational requirements for a sustainability assessment of marine environment, such as describing the monitoring process, research approaches, objectives, guidelines, and indicators and (2) to illustrate how physico-chemical and biological indicators can be practically applied, to assess water and sediment quality in marine and coastal environment. These indicators should meet defined criteria for practical usefulness, e.g. they should be simple to understand and apply to managers and scientists with different educational backgrounds. This review aimed to encapsulate that variability, recognizing that meaningful guidance should be flexible enough to accommodate the widely differing characteristics of marine ecosystems.

  13. Fungal diversity from deep marine subsurface sediments (IODP 317, Canterbury Basin, New Zealand)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redou, V.; Arzur, D.; Burgaud, G.; Barbier, G.

    2012-12-01

    Recent years have seen a growing interest regarding micro-eukaryotic communities in extreme environments as a third microbial domain after Bacteria and Archaea. However, knowledge is still scarce and the diversity of micro-eukaryotes in such environments remains hidden and their ecological role unknown. Our research program is based on the deep sedimentary layers of the Canterbury Basin in New Zealand (IODP 317) from the subsurface to the record depth of 1884 meters below seafloor. The objectives of our study are (i) to assess the genetic diversity of fungi in deep-sea sediments and (ii) identify the functional part in order to better understand the origin and the ecological role of fungal communities in this extreme ecosystem. Fingerprinting-based methods using capillary electrophoresis single-strand conformation polymorphism and denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography were used as a first step to raise our objectives. Molecular fungal diversity was assessed using amplification of ITS1 (Internal Transcribed Spacer 1) as a biomarker on 11 samples sediments from 3.76 to 1884 meters below seafloor. Fungal molecular signatures were detected throughout the sediment core. The phyla Ascomycota and Basidiomycota were revealed with DNA as well as cDNA. Most of the phylotypes are affiliated to environmental sequences and some to common fungal cultured species. The discovery of a present and metabolically active fungal component in this unique ecosystem allows some interesting first hypotheses that will be further combined to culture-based methods and deeper molecular methods (454 pyrosequencing) to highlight essential informations regarding physiology and ecological role of fungal communities in deep marine sediments.

  14. Quantification of microbial communities in subsurface marine sediments of the Black Sea and off Namibia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axel eSchippers

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Organic-rich subsurface marine sediments were taken by gravity coring up to a depth of 10 meters below seafloor at six stations from the anoxic Black Sea and the Benguela upwelling system off Namibia during the research cruises R/V Meteor 72/5 and 76/1, respectively. The quantitative microbial community composition at various sediment depths was analyzed using total cell counting, CARD-FISH and quantitative real-time PCR (Q-PCR. Total cell counts decreased with depths from 109 – 1010 cells /mL at the sediment surface to 107 – 109 cells /mL below one meter depth. Based on CARD-FISH and Q-PCR analysis overall similar proportions of Bacteria and Archaea were determined. The down core quantitative distribution of prokaryotic and eukaryotic small subunit ribosomal RNA genes as well as functional genes involved in different biogeochemical processes was successfully revealed by Q-PCR. Crenarchaeota and the bacterial candidate division JS-1 and the classes Anaerolineae and Caldilineae of the phylum Chloroflexi were as highly abundant as Archaea and Bacteria, respectively. Less abundant but detectable in most of the samples in high gene copy numbers were Eukarya and the Fe(III- and Mn(IV-reducing bacterial group Geobacteriaceae (off Namibia as well as the functional genes cbbL encoding for the large subunit of Rubisco, the functional genes dsrA and aprA of sulfate-reducers and the gene mcrA of methanogens. Overall the high organic carbon content of the sediments goes along with high cell counts and high gene copy numbers, as well as an equal abundance of Bacteria and Archaea.

  15. Marine Subsurface Microbial Communities Across a Hydrothermal Gradient in Okinawa Trough Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, L. D.; Hser Wah Saw, J.; Ettema, T.; House, C. H.

    2015-12-01

    IODP Expedition 331 to the Okinawa backarc basin provided an opportunity to study the microbial stratigraphy within the sediments surrounding a hydrothermal vent. The Okinawa backarc basin is a sedimented region of the seafloor located on a continental margin, and also hosts a hydrothermal network within the subsurface. Site C0014 within the Iheya North hydrothermal field is located 450 m east of the active vent and has a surface temperature of 5°C with no evidence of hydrothermal alteration within the top 10 meters below sea floor (mbsf). Temperature increases with depth at an estimated rate of 3°C/m and transitions from non-hydrothermal margin sediments to a hydrothermally altered regime below 10 mbsf. In this study, we utilized deep 16S rRNA sequencing of DNA from IODP Expedition 331 Site C0014 sediment horizons in order to assess diversity throughout the sediment column as well as determine the potential limits of the biosphere. Analysis of the amplicon data shows a shift over 15 mbsf from a heterogeneous community of cosmopolitan marine subsurface taxa toward an archaeal-dominated community in the deepest horizons of the predicted biosphere. Notably, the phylum Chloroflexi represents a substantial taxon through most horizons, where it appears to be replaced below 10 mbsf by punctuations of thermophilic and methanotrophic Archaea and Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotic Group abundances. DNA from the aforementioned transition horizons was further analyzed using metagenomic sequencing. Preliminary taxonomic analysis of the metagenomic data agrees well with amplicon data in capturing the shift in relative abundance of Archaea increasing with depth. Additionally, reverse gyrase, a gene found exclusively in hyperthermophilic microorganisms, was recovered only in the metagenome of the deepest horizon. A BLAST search of this protein sequence against the GenBank non-redudnant protein database produced top hits with reverse gyrase from Thermococcus and Pyrococcus, which are

  16. Nearshore marine fish assemblages in southern California

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish benthic trawls were completed by the Southern California Coastal Water Research Project (SCCWRP). Data from 425 fisheries independent trawls ranging from 2-215...

  17. Thiosulfate and Sulfite Distributions in Porewater of Marine-Sediments Related to Manganese, Iron, and Sulfur Geochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thamdrup, B; Finster, Kai; Fossing, Henrik

    1994-01-01

    Depth distributions of thiosulfate (S2O32-) and sulfite (SO32-) were measured in the porewaters of a Danish salt marsh and subtidal marine sediments by HPLC analysis after derivatization with DTNP [2,2'-dithiobis(5-nitropyridine)]. The distributions were compared to the redox zonation as indicate...

  18. Low-temperature partial magnetic self-reversal in marine sediments by magnetostatic interaction of titanomagnetite and titanohematite intergrowths

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garming, J.F.L.; Von Dobeneck, T.; Franke, C.; Bleil, U.

    2007-01-01

    With various low-temperature experiments performed on magnetic mineral extracts of marine sedimentary deposits from the Argentine continental slope near the Rio de la Plata estuary, a so far unreported style of partial magnetic self-reversal has been detected. In these sediments the sulphate-methane

  19. Nitrogen cycling and community structure of proteobacterial ß-subgroup ammonia-oxidizing bacteria within polluted marine fish farm sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McCaig, A.E.; Phillips, C.B.; Stephen, J.R.; Kowalchuk, G.A.; Harvey, S.M.; Herbert, R.A.; Embley, T.M.; Prosser, J.I.

    1999-01-01

    A multidisciplinary approach was used to study the effects of pollution from a marine fish farm on nitrification rates and on the community structure of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in the underlying sediment. Organic content, ammonium concentrations, nitrification rates, and ammonia oxidizer

  20. Can bathymetry be a discriminatory factor for the distribution of benthic foraminiferal morpho-groups in modern marine sediments?

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.; Khare, N.; Mayenkar, D.N.

    The foraminiferal content of one hundred eight modern marine sediment samples off Vengurla-Cochin sector (ranging in water depth from 30 to 1330 m). West Coast of India was studied. A total of two hundred four foraminiferal species (comprised of one...

  1. Effective bioremediation strategy for rapid in situ cleanup of anoxic marine sediments in mesocosm oil spill simulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria eGenovese

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of present study was the simulation of an oil spill accompanied by burial of significant amount of petroleum hydrocarbons (PHs in coastal sediments. Approximately 1,000 kg of sediments collected in Messina harbor were spiked with Bunker C furnace fuel oil (6,500 ppm. The rapid consumption of oxygen by aerobic heterotrophs created highly reduced conditions in the sediments with subsequent recession of biodegradation rates. As follows, after three months of ageing, the anaerobic sediments did not exhibit any significant levels of biodegradation and more than 80% of added Bunker C fuel oil remained buried. Anaerobic microbial community exhibited a strong enrichment in sulfate-reducing PHs-degrading and PHs-associated Deltaproteobacteria. As an effective bioremediation strategy to clean up these contaminated sediments, we applied a Modular Slurry System (MSS allowing the containment of sediments and their physical-chemical treatment, e.g. aeration. Aeration for three months has increased the removal of main PHs contaminants up to 98%. As revealed by CARD-FISH, qPCR and 16S rRNA gene clone library analyses, addition of Bunker C fuel oil initially affected the activity of autochthonous aerobic obligate marine hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria (OMHCB, and after one month more than the third of microbial population was represented by Alcanivorax-, Cycloclasticus- and Marinobacter-related organisms. In the end of the experiment, the microbial community composition has returned to a status typically observed in pristine marine ecosystems with no detectable OMHCB present. Eco-toxicological bioassay revealed that the toxicity of sediments after treatment was substantially decreased. Thus, our studies demonstrated that petroleum-contaminated anaerobic marine sediments could efficiently be cleaned through an in situ oxygenation which stimulates their self-cleaning potential due to reawakening of allochtonous aerobic OMHCB.

  2. Quicklime (CaO) Stabilization of fine-grained marine sediments in low temperature areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skels, Peteris; Ingeman-Nielsen, Thomas; Jørgensen, Anders Stuhr

    2011-01-01

    This study presents laboratory testing on quicklime (CaO) stabilization of fine-grained marine sediments in low temperature areas. The soil was sampled on the Fossil Plain in Kangerlussuaq, Greenland, and analyzed in the laboratory at Technical University of Denmark (DTU). The optimum CaO content...... curing temperatures, comparing stabilization effectiveness between low and normal soil temperature conditions....... in a soil-CaO mixture was determined using a number of laboratory methods, such as pH test, consistency limit analysis, degree of compaction, and short term California Bearing Ratio (CBR) values. The study also numerically demonstrates a long term strength development of the soil-CaO mixture at 1°C and 10°C...

  3. Development of a microscale NOx- biosensor for the study of nitrogen cycling in marine sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marzocchi, Ugo

    Nitrogen is a key element for life, it is an essential component of important biomolecules (e.g. amino acids) and because of its multiple oxidative states it has been widely selected during microbial evolution as a mediator for the redox processes that allow for energy transfer and conservation....... Nitrogen thus exerts an important control on biomass accumulation and on the rate of energy transfer in both artificial and natural systems. Because of their relative high solubility, the inorganic forms of nitrogen (NH4+, NO2- and NO3-) tend to accumulate in aquatic environments. Surficial marine...... sediments can be described as nitrogen bioreactors with several redox reactions affecting inorganic nitrogen species. Here, because of the relatively high organic matter concentration and bacterial density, nitrogen is recycled at high rates within micrometer to centimeter thick horizons. The narrow...

  4. Determination of trace and toxic elements in marine sediments collected from the strait of Malacca, Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wee Boon Siong; Abdul Khalik Hj. Wood

    2007-01-01

    The Strait of Malacca has been a major route for international trade with heavy traffic of large vessels navigating through the narrow waterway everyday. Beside, the Strait of Malacca has some natural ecosystem which requires proper protection from human activities. Therefore, the Malaysian government has initiated a project to monitor the pollution level at the Strait of Malacca. As a result, sampling expeditions had been conducted to collect marine samples to be analyzed for trace and toxic elements as well as organic pollutions and radionuclides. The focus of this report is to determine trace and toxic element concentration in surface sediment samples collected from 18 sampling locations at the Strait of Malacca was reported. (author)

  5. Feasibility studies for the treatment and reuse of contaminated marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonomoa, L; Careghini, A; Dastoli, S; De Propris, L; Ferrari, G; Gabellini, M; Saponaro, S

    2009-07-01

    This paper presents preliminary results of laboratory tests aimed at evaluating the easibility of the remediation of marine sediments, which are polluted by mercury and petroleum hydrocarbons, dredged at the bay of Augusta (SR, Italy). The treatment is composed of two sequential steps: in the first, a cement-based granular material is produced (based on a high performance concrete approach); then, the volatile and the semi-volatile compounds in the granular material are removed by a thermal desorption step. Treated materials could be reused or put into caissons, according to their mechanical properties and environmental compatibility. The experiments were focused on evaluating the effect of the process parameter values on: (i) the evolution of cement hydration reactions, (ii) thermal desorption removal efficiencies, (iii) leaching behaviour of the treated material.

  6. RETRACTED: Impacts of past climate variability on marine ecosystems: Lessons from sediment records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emeis, Kay-Christian; Finney, Bruce P.; Ganeshram, Raja; Gutiérrez, Dimitri; Poulsen, Bo; Struck, Ulrich

    2010-02-01

    This article has been retracted at the request of the Editor-in-Chief and Author. Please see Elsevier Policy on Article Withdrawal ( http://www.elsevier.com/locate/withdrawalpolicy). Reason: Paragraph 3.3 of this article contains text (verbatim) that had already appeared in a book chapter "Variability from scales in marine sediments and other historical records" by David B. Field, Tim R. Baumgartner, Vicente Ferreira, Dimitri Gutierrez, Hector Lozano-Montes, Renato Salvatteci and Andy Soutar. The book is entitled "Climate Change and Small Pelagic Fish", 2009, edited by Dave Checkley, Claude Roy, Jurgen Alheit, and Yoshioki Oozeki (Cambridge University Press; 2009).The authors would like to apologize for this administrative error on their part.

  7. Determination of 210Pb in marine sediment core- A comparison between alpha and gamma techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zal Uyun Wan Mahmood; Yii Mei Wo; Zaharudin Ahmad

    2010-01-01

    The most commonly used techniques of alpha and gamma spectrometry were performed to measure 210 Pb activity in marine sediment core as a comparison. Alpha analytical technique measured the activity of 210 Pb from its in-grow grand-daughter 210 Po after a chemical separation, assuming radioactive equilibrium between the two radionuclides. Meanwhile, gamma analysis technique allows direct measurement, non-destructive and no preliminary chemical separation. Through the comparison, it is found that both alpha and gamma analysis techniques were slightly difference. Overall, the results from alpha analytical technique were basically higher than those from the gamma analytical techniques. Some logical argument had been discussed to explain this situation. In routine analysis, the analytical technique used should be chosen carefully based on advantages and disadvantages of the each technique and analysis requirements. Therefore, it is recommended to determine exactly the needs and purpose of analysis and to know the sample history before decide the appropriate analytical technique. (author)

  8. Optimizing sample pretreatment for compound-specific stable carbon isotopic analysis of amino sugars in marine sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, R.; Lin, Y.-S.; Lipp, J. S.; Meador, T. B.; Hinrichs, K.-U.

    2014-09-01

    Amino sugars are quantitatively significant constituents of soil and marine sediment, but their sources and turnover in environmental samples remain poorly understood. The stable carbon isotopic composition of amino sugars can provide information on the lifestyles of their source organisms and can be monitored during incubations with labeled substrates to estimate the turnover rates of microbial populations. However, until now, such investigation has been carried out only with soil samples, partly because of the much lower abundance of amino sugars in marine environments. We therefore optimized a procedure for compound-specific isotopic analysis of amino sugars in marine sediment, employing gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The whole procedure consisted of hydrolysis, neutralization, enrichment, and derivatization of amino sugars. Except for the derivatization step, the protocol introduced negligible isotopic fractionation, and the minimum requirement of amino sugar for isotopic analysis was 20 ng, i.e., equivalent to ~8 ng of amino sugar carbon. Compound-specific stable carbon isotopic analysis of amino sugars obtained from marine sediment extracts indicated that glucosamine and galactosamine were mainly derived from organic detritus, whereas muramic acid showed isotopic imprints from indigenous bacterial activities. The δ13C analysis of amino sugars provides a valuable addition to the biomarker-based characterization of microbial metabolism in the deep marine biosphere, which so far has been lipid oriented and biased towards the detection of archaeal signals.

  9. Alcohol ethoxylate mixtures in marine sediment: Competition for adsorption sites affects the sorption behaviour of individual homologues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Droge, Steven T.J.; Hermens, Joop L.M.

    2010-01-01

    Mineral surfaces form the main sorption phase for alcohol ethoxylates (AEs) in marine sediment. Competition for adsorption sites is investigated for marine sediment and kaolinite clay using simple mixtures of AE homologues. For both sorbents, adsorption sites on mineral surfaces can be effectively blocked by an AE homologue with the strongest adsorption affinity. The strongly adsorbed AE, however, forms a second sorption phase to which weakly adsorbing AE will sorb, forming bilayers. An extended dual-mode model accounts for competition effects, while still based on sorption properties of individual compounds. Competition effects become apparent when total adsorbed concentrations reach ∼10% of the adsorption capacity. Deviations from individual sorption isotherms depend on affinity constants and dissolved homologue composition. Competition will not often occur in contaminated field sediments, with AEs concentrations usually far below the adsorption capacity, but will affect sorption studies, sediment toxicity tests or applications with nonionic surfactant mixtures. - Competition for adsorption sites on mineral surfaces in marine sediment is demonstrated and modeled for simple mixtures of nonionic surfactants

  10. Dispersed Ash in Marine Sediment: An Overview Towards Unraveling the 'Missing Volcanic Record'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, R. W.; Scudder, R.; Kutterolf, S.; Schindlbeck, J.

    2013-12-01

    Volcanic ash occurs in marine sediment both as discrete layers as well as isolated grains and shards dispersed throughout the bulk sediment, and with highly variable grain sizes. The study of this dispersed component has lagged behind the sophisticated petrographic, sedimentologic, geochemical, and isotopic assessment of the ash layer record. For example, while decades of smear-slide studies of bulk sediment in volcanic-rich regimes have presented visual estimations of the abundance of 'volcanic glass', 'shards', and/or other components, the quantitative importance of the dispersed ash and/or the cryptotephra component remains largely unconstrained on local, regional, and global scales. Chemical and isotopic characterization of this dispersed component has remained elusive. Building on earlier work, research in the 1970s began documenting the importance of dispersed ash and its alteration products. This dispersed ash is the result of the bioturbation of pre-existing discrete layers, the settling of airborne ash, distribution from subaqueous eruptions, and other mechanisms. Compared to the often visually stunning ash layer records, which in certain settings can leave single layers with thicknesses of 10s of cm, the dispersed ash component and cryptotephra layers are unable to be visually differentiated from detrital clay. Furthermore, its extremely fine grain size is an additional hindrance to quantification of its abundance and the identification of source. More completely characterizing the total ash inventory (that is, the dispersed ash in addition to the ash layers) will contribute significantly to studies of marine and terrestrial volcanism at many scales, geochemical mass balances, arc evolution, hydration of marine sediment during alteration, atmospheric circulation, putative relationships between volcanism and climate, and other key components of the earth-ocean-atmosphere system. Beginning with work in the Caribbean Sea and progressing to the northwest

  11. Paleoclimatic and paleoceanographic studies of estuarine and marine sediments using strontium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingram, B.L.

    1992-01-01

    Strontium isotopic ratio ( 87 Sr/ 86 Sr) measurements in fossil carbonates and phosphates are used to evaluate paleoceanographic and paleoclimatic environments in Quaternary, Pliocene-Pleistocene, and mid-Cretaceous estuarine and marine sediments. The use of 87 Sr/ 86 Sr measurements as an estuarine paleosalinity and paleoclimatic indicator is developed and applied to San Francisco Bay. 87 Sr/ 86 Sr measurements of foraminifer and molluscan fossils contained in estuarine sediments of late Pleistocene (ca 115 to 125 ka) and late Holocene (4.5 ka) age show cyclic variations indicating that salinity fluctuated with periods of several hundred years, probably reflecting wet-dry cycles associated with fluctuations in solar irradiance caused by sunspot cycles. The average salinity in San Pablo and Richardson bays was significantly lower (by 6 to 8%) over much of the past 4.5 ka than at present, reflecting a combination of decreased freshwater inflow at present associated with water diversion and wetter climatic conditions prior to 2000 years ago. Salinity data are converted to river discharge using salinity-delta flow relations derived from historical records for San Francisco Bay. The data indicate that annual freshwater inflow was at least twice the modern pre-diversion average between 2.5 and 3.0 Ka; this time period is also identified as one of wetter climatic conditions by lake level and treeline records from the Sierra Nevada. Strontium isotopic measurements of marine carbonate and fish teeth to middle Cretaceous age are used to increase the resolution of the existing seawater Sr isotope versus time curve and to assess models for global oceanic anoxic events. The new data using fish teeth show less scatter and variability than previous data. Negative excursions in the 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratio of 7-14 parts in 10 -5 during Aptian anoxic events suggest a link between increased submarine volcanism and oceanic anoxia

  12. Sources of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) pollution in marine sediment from Tuanku Abdul Rahman National Park, Sabah

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Suhaimi Elias; Abdul Khalid Wood; Zaleha Hashim; Mohd Suhaimi Hamzah; Shamsiah Abdul Rahman; Nazaratul Ashifa Abdullah Salim

    2011-01-01

    The concentrations of parent and alkyl Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) in marine sediment samples collected from Tuanku Abdul Rahman National Park, Sabah were determined by using GC-MS. The ratio of anthracene to anthracene plus phenanthrene, fluoranthene to fluoranthene plus pyrene, benz[a]anthracene to benz[a]anthracene plus chrysene and indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene to indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene plus benzo[g,h,i]perylene, compounds were used to identify the sources of PAHs pollution. The total concentration of parent and alkyl PAHs are ranged from 121.7 to 191.5 ng/ g dry weight. The concentrations of PAHs pollution in sediments were categorised as a moderate polluted. The ratio values of PAHs compound indicate the origin source of PAHs pollutions in marine sediment sample of Tuanku Abdul Rahman National Park were originated from fossil fuel combustion (pyrolytic). (author)

  13. Microbial colonization and degradation of polyethylene and biodegradable plastic bags in temperate fine-grained organic-rich marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nauendorf, Alice; Krause, Stefan; Bigalke, Nikolaus K; Gorb, Elena V; Gorb, Stanislav N; Haeckel, Matthias; Wahl, Martin; Treude, Tina

    2016-02-15

    To date, the longevity of plastic litter at the sea floor is poorly constrained. The present study compares colonization and biodegradation of plastic bags by aerobic and anaerobic benthic microbes in temperate fine-grained organic-rich marine sediments. Samples of polyethylene and biodegradable plastic carrier bags were incubated in natural oxic and anoxic sediments from Eckernförde Bay (Western Baltic Sea) for 98 days. Analyses included (1) microbial colonization rates on the bags, (2) examination of the surface structure, wettability, and chemistry, and (3) mass loss of the samples during incubation. On average, biodegradable plastic bags were colonized five times higher by aerobic and eight times higher by anaerobic microbes than polyethylene bags. Both types of bags showed no sign of biodegradation during this study. Therefore, marine sediment in temperate coastal zones may represent a long-term sink for plastic litter and also supposedly compostable material. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Inventory of artificial radionuclides in seawater and marine sediments from Southern coast of Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueira, Rubens Cesar Lopes

    2000-01-01

    In this work the levels and the inventory of Cs-137, Sr-90, Pu-238 and Pu-239+240 in seawater and sediment samples from Southern Brazilian coast, region between Cabo Frio, Rio de Janeiro and Santa Marta Grande, Santa Catarina are presented. The area was about 320.000 km 2 , involving the whole seaside, and from this one to the external continental shelf. As these radionuclides are presented in marine samples in low concentrations, analytical methodologies were developed to quantify Cs-137 and Pu-239+240. Precision and accuracy of the methods were verified by means of analysis of different reference materials. Marine sediment analysis was carried out after drying and grinding of 10 to 100 g of sample. Gamma spectrometry was used to determine Cs-137. Alpha spectrometry and beta counting were respectively employed to determine Pu-238, Pu-239+240 and Sr-90 after a radiochemical procedure. The levels ranged from 0.25 to 1.79 Bq.kg -1 for Cs-137, from 15 to 150 mBq.kg -1 for Pu-238, from 4 to 227 mBq.kg -1 for Pu-239+240 and from 0.5 to 5.4 Bq.kg -1 for Sr-90. Seawater analysis was carried out by submitting 60 L of sample to a radiochemical procedure. Pu-238, Pu-239+240, Cs-137 and Sr-90 levels were simultaneously quantified. The obtained values varied from 1.4 to 4.7 Bq.m -3 for Cs-137, from 1.3 to 13 mBq.m -3 for Pu-239+240 and from 2.0 to 8.6 Bq.m -3 for Sr-90. Pu-238 value reached 1.9 mBq.m -3 . It was also studied the correlation between the radionuclides, grain size and carbonate levels in the marine sediments. The radionuclides were mainly found in the muddy fraction (silt + clay) in the depth up to 60 m. Under this depth, carbonate levels were the responsible for radionuclide accumulation in the sediment. The rates between Pu-239+240/Cs-137, Pu-239+240/Sr-90, Cs-137/Sr-90 in the marine sediment samples are expected values for the South Hemisphere, a region contaminated by atmospheric fallout due to nuclear explosions. In respect to seawater, only the rate Cs-137

  15. Macromolecular composition of terrestrial and marine organic matter in sediments across the East Siberian Arctic Shelf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. B. Sparkes

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Mobilisation of terrestrial organic carbon (terrOC from permafrost environments in eastern Siberia has the potential to deliver significant amounts of carbon to the Arctic Ocean, via both fluvial and coastal erosion. Eroded terrOC can be degraded during offshore transport or deposited across the wide East Siberian Arctic Shelf (ESAS. Most studies of terrOC on the ESAS have concentrated on solvent-extractable organic matter, but this represents only a small proportion of the total terrOC load. In this study we have used pyrolysis–gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (py-GCMS to study all major groups of macromolecular components of the terrOC; this is the first time that this technique has been applied to the ESAS. This has shown that there is a strong offshore trend from terrestrial phenols, aromatics and cyclopentenones to marine pyridines. There is good agreement between proportion phenols measured using py-GCMS and independent quantification of lignin phenol concentrations (r2 = 0.67, p < 0.01, n = 24. Furfurals, thought to represent carbohydrates, show no offshore trend and are likely found in both marine and terrestrial organic matter. We have also collected new radiocarbon data for bulk OC (14COC which, when coupled with previous measurements, allows us to produce the most comprehensive 14COC map of the ESAS to date. Combining the 14COC and py-GCMS data suggests that the aromatics group of compounds is likely sourced from old, aged terrOC, in contrast to the phenols group, which is likely sourced from modern woody material. We propose that an index of the relative proportions of phenols and pyridines can be used as a novel terrestrial vs. marine proxy measurement for macromolecular organic matter. Principal component analysis found that various terrestrial vs. marine proxies show different patterns across the ESAS, and it shows that multiple river–ocean transects of surface sediments transition from river-dominated to

  16. Determination of methylmercury in marine sediment samples: Method validation and occurrence data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrasco, Luis; Vassileva, Emilia

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A method for MeHg determination at trace level in marine sediments is completely validated. • Validation is performed according to ISO-17025 and Eurachem guidelines. • The extraction efficiency of four sample preparation procedures is evaluated. • The uncertainty budget is used as a tool for evaluation of main uncertainty contributors. • Comparison with independent methods yields good agreement within stated uncertainty. - Abstract: The determination of methylmercury (MeHg) in sediment samples is a difficult task due to the extremely low MeHg/THg (total mercury) ratio and species interconversion. Here, we present the method validation of a cost-effective fit-for-purpose analytical procedure for the measurement of MeHg in sediments, which is based on aqueous phase ethylation, followed by purge and trap and hyphenated gas chromatography–pyrolysis–atomic fluorescence spectrometry (GC–Py–AFS) separation and detection. Four different extraction techniques, namely acid and alkaline leaching followed by solvent extraction and evaporation, microwave-assisted extraction with 2-mercaptoethanol, and acid leaching, solvent extraction and back extraction into sodium thiosulfate, were examined regarding their potential to selectively extract MeHg from estuarine sediment IAEA-405 certified reference material (CRM). The procedure based on acid leaching with HNO 3 /CuSO 4 , solvent extraction and back extraction into Na 2 S 2 O 3 yielded the highest extraction recovery, i.e., 94 ± 3% and offered the possibility to perform the extraction of a large number of samples in a short time, by eliminating the evaporation step. The artifact formation of MeHg was evaluated by high performance liquid chromatography coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC–ICP–MS), using isotopically enriched Me 201 Hg and 202 Hg and it was found to be nonexistent. A full validation approach in line with ISO 17025 and Eurachem guidelines was followed

  17. Saharan dust from a marine perspective: sediment-trap time series off Mauritania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friese, Carmen; Stuut, Jan-Berend; van der Does, Michelle; Fischer, Gerhard

    2014-05-01

    The particle size of mineral dust is often used as a tool to reconstruct paleoenvironmental conditions in the source of the dust. Both in on-land (loess), lacustrine, and in marine archives, the size of dust deposits is considered a proxy for paleo-wind intensity. However, next to wind strength, the particle size of aeolian deposits is also influenced by various other parameters such as source-to-sink distance, altitude at which the particles have been transported, and various other environmental conditions in the sources of the dust. To verify if we can quantify a relationship between the size of mineral dust particles and prevailing environmental conditions, we study "modern" dust. Here we present grain-size distributions of Saharan dust that was collected in a marine sediment trap, which is situated off Cape Blanc, ~400 km offshore the Mauritanian coast. In this trap, dust is collected that is sinking through the water column to the ocean floor. The temporal resolution of the trap is 1-2 weeks. The time series was started in the late 1980's and is still being continued.

  18. Multi-elemental analysis of marine sediments of Sorsogon Bay using x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzales, Ralph Roly A.; Quirit, Leni L.; Rosales, Colleen Marciel F.; Pabroa, Preciosa Corazon B.; Sta Maria, Efren J.

    2011-01-01

    Metal composition and nutrient loadings of our bodies of water, when uncontrolled, may cause harmful bacterial contamination and pose threats in aquatic and human life. Toxic and trace element inputs in Sorsogon Bay sediments were determined using nuclear analytical techniques, more specifically, x-ray fluorescence spectrometry, in this study. Pre-treated marine sediment samples from Sorsogon Bay were homogenized using SPEX # 8000 mixer/mill and agate mortar and pestle, pelletized into 31-mm flat discs using SPEX 3630 X-Press and analyzed using PAN Analytical Epsilon 5 EDX X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometer with the emission and transmission method using silver and germanium secondary targets. Spectrum fitting performed using AXIL (Analysis of X-ray Spectra by Iterative Least-Squares Fitting), a subprogram in Quantitative X-ray Analysis System developed by the International Atomic Energy Agency and Quantitative Analysis of Environmental Samples program, was used for quantification of results. Results indicate generally moderate to high metal enrichment, specifically manganese, lead, cadmium, zinc and copper. Mercury and iron level enrichment are found to be low, marking an improvement from previous studies indicating high enrichment of these metals. (author)

  19. Critical body residues in the marine amphipod Ampelisca abdita: Sediment exposures with nonionic organic contaminants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fay, A.A.; Brownawell, B.J.; Elskus, A.A.; McElroy, A.E.

    2000-04-01

    Body residues associated with acute toxicity were determined in the marine amphipod Ampelisca abdita exposed to spiked sediments. Nonylphenol and 2,2{prime},4,4{prime}-tetrachlorobiphenyl critical body residues (CBRs, body residue of contaminant at 50% mortality) were 1.1 {micro}mol/g wet tissue and 0.57 {micro}mol/g wet tissue, respectively, values near the low end of the CBR range expected for compounds acting via narcosis. The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons tested, benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) and benz[a]anthracene (BaA), were not acutely toxic at exposure concentrations of up to 43 and 1,280 {micro}g/g dry sediment for BaA and BaP respectively, and body burdens up to 1.2 {micro}mol/g wet tissue (for BaP). Neither polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) was significantly metabolized by A. abdita. The microextraction technique employed here allowed residue analysis of samples containing as few as three amphipods (0.33 mg dry wt). The CBR approach avoids confounding factors such as variations in bioavailability and uptake kinetics and could be employed to assess the relative contribution of specific contaminants or contaminant classes in mixtures to effects observed in toxicity tests with Ampelisca and other organisms.

  20. 226Ra, 228Ra and 228Ra/226Ra in surface marine sediment of Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mei-Wo Yii; Zal Uyun Wan-Mahmood

    2013-01-01

    Surface sediment samples were collected at the West (east coast and west coast of Peninsular Malaysia) and East (Sabah and Sarawak) Malaysia in several expeditions within August 2003 until June 2008 for determining the level of natural radium isotopes. Activity concentrations of 226 Ra and 228 Ra in surface marine sediment at 176 sampling stations were measured. The activity concentrations of both radionuclides in Malaysia (East and West Malaysia) display varied with the range from 9 to 158 Bq/kg dry wt. and 13 to 104 Bq/kg dry wt., respectively. Meanwhile, the ratio distributions of 228 Ra/ 226 Ra were ranged from 0.62 to 3.75. This indicated that the ratios were slightly high at west coast of Peninsular Malaysia compared to other regions (east coast of Peninsular Malaysia, Sabah and Sarawak). The variation of activity concentrations of 226 Ra and 228 Ra and its ratios were also supported by the statistical analyses of one-way ANOVA and t test at 95 % confidence level, whereby there were proved that the measured values were different between the regions. These different were strictly related to their half-life, potential input sources (included their parents, 238 U and 232 Th), parent's characteristic, the geological setting/formation of the study area, environment origin and behavior. (author)

  1. Effect of anaerobic contributions to the uranium content in marine sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ordonez R, E.; Ruiz F, A. C.; Jimenez D, E.; Guerrero J, M.

    2014-10-01

    In this work a sediment group obtained in the seabed near the mouth of the Santiago River, physical analyzes show that there is little activity of microscopic marine life, revealed by exoskeletons of foraminifera. Although the amount of organic matter occurs normally, around 20%, is assumed that this contribution is due to the large amount of organic waste scattered by the effluent of the river, causing an abnormally high anaerobic activity, clearly shown by the large amount of pyrite specific framboids found along the nucleus profile of 23 cm of sediment. In the analyzed fractions the uranium concentration and its isotope ratio was studied: which vary from 3.19 Bq/kg for the more superficial fractions down gradually to less than 1 Bq/kg for deeper fractions. An outstanding fact is that the surface fractions have an isotope ratio 234 U/ 238 U unusually low for fractions 1-4 cm of deep, close to 0.4, indicating a strong reaction of few years ago on the radiogenic descendants of 238 U, leaching essentially the 234 Th and causing this abnormal radioactive imbalance. The plutonium has become an element found commonly in the surface layers of the sea and coastlines, finding in the top layer an activity of 2.78 Bq/kg ( 239 Pu + 240 Pu). The high contamination of the mouth of Santiago River has changed the conditions of the micro fauna as well as of the chemical equilibrium of the natural elements. (Author)

  2. Evidence for re-distribution of 137Cs in Alaskan tundra, lake, and marine sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, L.W.; Grebmeier, J.M.; Larsen, I.L.; Solis, C.; Olsen, C.R.

    1994-01-01

    Tundra sampling conducted during 1989-1990 at Imnavait Creek, Alaska (68 o 37'N, 149 o 17'W) indicated that inventories of 137 Cs were close to expectations, based upon measured atmospheric deposition for this latitude band. Typically observed at a depth of 4-10 cm, peak accumulations of 137 Cs were associated with organic materials, above any mineral soil. Accumulated inventories of 137 Cs in tundra decreased by up to 50% along a transect to Prudhoe Bay (70 o 13'N, 148 o 30'W). Atmospheric deposition of 137 Cs decreased with latitude in the Arctic, but declines in deposition would have been relatively small over this distance (200 km). This finding suggests a recent loss of 137 Cs from tundra over the northern parts of the transect between Imnavait Creek and Prudhoe Bay. This hypothesis is supported by observations of maximum 137 Cs accumulations occurring in surface layers of the more northern tundra rather than at depth (as at Imnavait Creek), as well as by indications of higher 137 Cs accumulations in a lake inlet. On the other hand, marine sediments collected in the Bering Sea and Chukchi Seas, including the Yukon River delta region, show apparently lower inventories compared to tundra or lake sediments, although complete inventories are unavailable due to radiocesium buried to depths (>20 cm) beyond the sampling capabilities used

  3. Sources and fate of microplastics in marine and beach sediments of the Southern Baltic Sea-a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graca, Bożena; Szewc, Karolina; Zakrzewska, Danuta; Dołęga, Anna; Szczerbowska-Boruchowska, Magdalena

    2017-03-01

    Microplastics' (particles size ≤5 mm) sources and fate in marine bottom and beach sediments of the brackish are strongly polluted Baltic Sea have been investigated. Microplastics were extracted using sodium chloride (1.2 g cm -3 ). Their qualitative identification was conducted using micro-Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (μFT-IR). Concentration of microplastics varied from 25 particles kg -1 d.w. at the open sea beach to 53 particles kg -1  d.w. at beaches of strongly urbanized bay. In bottom sediments, microplastics concentration was visibly lower compared to beach sediments (0-27 particles kg -1  d.w.) and decreased from the shore to the open, deep-sea regions. The most frequent microplastics dimensions ranged from 0.1 to 2.0 mm, and transparent fibers were predominant. Polyester, which is a popular fabrics component, was the most common type of microplastic in both marine bottom (50%) and beach sediments (27%). Additionally, poly(vinyl acetate) used in shipbuilding as well as poly(ethylene-propylene) used for packaging were numerous in marine bottom (25% of all polymers) and beach sediments (18% of all polymers). Polymer density seems to be an important factor influencing microplastics circulation. Low density plastic debris probably recirculates between beach sediments and seawater in a greater extent than higher density debris. Therefore, their deposition is potentially limited and physical degradation is favored. Consequently, low density microplastics concentration may be underestimated using current methods due to too small size of the debris. This influences also the findings of qualitative research of microplastics which provide the basis for conclusions about the sources of microplastics in the marine environment.

  4. MOSAIC: An organic geochemical and sedimentological database for marine surface sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavagna, Maria Luisa; Usman, Muhammed; De Avelar, Silvania; Eglinton, Timothy

    2015-04-01

    Modern ocean sediments serve as the interface between the biosphere and the geosphere, play a key role in biogeochemical cycles and provide a window on how contemporary processes are written into the sedimentary record. Research over past decades has resulted in a wealth of information on the content and composition of organic matter in marine sediments, with ever-more sophisticated techniques continuing to yield information of greater detail and as an accelerating pace. However, there has been no attempt to synthesize this wealth of information. We are establishing a new database that incorporates information relevant to local, regional and global-scale assessment of the content, source and fate of organic materials accumulating in contemporary marine sediments. In the MOSAIC (Modern Ocean Sediment Archive and Inventory of Carbon) database, particular emphasis is placed on molecular and isotopic information, coupled with relevant contextual information (e.g., sedimentological properties) relevant to elucidating factors that influence the efficiency and nature of organic matter burial. The main features of MOSAIC include: (i) Emphasis on continental margin sediments as major loci of carbon burial, and as the interface between terrestrial and oceanic realms; (ii) Bulk to molecular-level organic geochemical properties and parameters, including concentration and isotopic compositions; (iii) Inclusion of extensive contextual data regarding the depositional setting, in particular with respect to sedimentological and redox characteristics. The ultimate goal is to create an open-access instrument, available on the web, to be utilized for research and education by the international community who can both contribute to, and interrogate the database. The submission will be accomplished by means of a pre-configured table available on the MOSAIC webpage. The information on the filled tables will be checked and eventually imported, via the Structural Query Language (SQL), into

  5. Origin and geochemical behavior of uranium in marine sediments. Utilization of the {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U ratio in marine geochemistry; Origine et comportement geochimique de l`uranium dans les sediments marins. Utilisation du rapport ({sup 234}U/{sup 238}U) en geochimie marine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Organo, Catherine [Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France)

    1997-01-20

    The first part of this thesis presents the current situation of knowledge of uranium in marine environment. The second part describes the methods of analysis as well as the material support of the study, i.e., the sediments and marine deposits investigated. The third part is dedicated to the study of uranium mobility in marine sediments characterized by detrital terrigenous composition (pelagic clays). This approach allowed quantifying the entering and leaving flux of uranium after the sediment settling and, to discuss, on this basis, the consequences on the uranium oceanic balance. In the third part the origin and behavior of uranium in zones of high surface productivity is studied. The uranium enrichments observed in the hemi-pelagic sediments of the EUMELI (J.G.O.F.S.-France) programme will constitute a material of study adequate for measuring the variations in the {sup 234}U/2{sup 38U} ratio in solid phase, in response to the oxido-reducing characteristics of the sediment. Thus establishing the origin of the trapped uranium has been possible. Also, the nature of the sedimentary phases related to uranium in bio-genetic sediments in the Austral Ocean was determined. Thus a relationship between the variations in the {sup 234}U/{sup 238} and the diagenetic transformations was possible to establish. Finally in the fifth part a study of the behavior of uranium in a polymetallic shell characteristic for deposits of hydrogenized origin 146 refs., 57 figs., 23 tabs.

  6. Nearshore Pipeline Installation Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-01

    to puncture FRP. Thermoplastics - made from plastic resins that can be reshaped by heating. Thermopla)stic pipe is made primarily by extrusion . There...hydrocarbons will permeate the pipe wall and reduce the hydrostatic strenjth, but they will not degrade the material itself. At elevated temperatures (140 0 F... Polypropylene . 4-46 Coal tar enamel and asphalt enamel coatings are the Most POP- ular and have proven their ability to withstand the marine en- vironment. These

  7. Biogenic habitat transitions influence facilitation in a marine soft-sediment ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohrer, Andrew M; Rodil, Iván F; Townsend, Michael; Chiaroni, Luca D; Hewitt, Judi E; Thrush, Simon F

    2013-01-01

    Habitats are often defined by the presence of key species and biogenic features. However, the ecological consequences of interactions among distinct habitat-forming species in transition zones where their habitats overlap remain poorly understood. We investigated transition zone interactions by conducting experiments at three locations in Mahurangi Harbour, New Zealand, where the abundance of two habitat-forming marine species naturally varied. The two key species differed in form and function: One was a sessile suspension-feeding bivalve that protruded from the sediment (Atrina zelandica; Pinnidae); the other was a mobile infaunal urchin that bioturbated sediment (Echinocardium cordatum; Spatangoida). The experimental treatments established at each site reflected the natural densities of the species across sites (Atrina only, Echinocardium only, Atrina and Echinocardium together, and plots with neither species present). We identified the individual and combined effects of the two key species on sediment characteristics and co-occurring macrofauna. After five months, we documented significant treatment effects, including the highest abundance of co-occurring macrofauna in the Atrina-only treatments. However, the facilitation of macrofauna by Atrina (relative to removal treatments) was entirely negated in the presence of Echinocardium at densities >10 individuals/m2. The transitional areas in Mahurangi Harbour composed of co-occurring Atrina and Echinocardium are currently widespread and are probably more common now than monospecific patches of either individual species, due to the thinning of dense Atrina patches into sparser mixed zones during the last 10-15 years. Thus, although some ecologists avoid ecotones and habitat edges when designing experiments, suspecting that it will skew the extrapolation of results, this study increased our understanding of benthic community dynamics across larger proportions of the seascape and provided insights into temporal

  8. Deep-Sea, Deep-Sequencing: Metabarcoding Extracellular DNA from Sediments of Marine Canyons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Guardiola

    Full Text Available Marine sediments are home to one of the richest species pools on Earth, but logistics and a dearth of taxonomic work-force hinders the knowledge of their biodiversity. We characterized α- and β-diversity of deep-sea assemblages from submarine canyons in the western Mediterranean using an environmental DNA metabarcoding. We used a new primer set targeting a short eukaryotic 18S sequence (ca. 110 bp. We applied a protocol designed to obtain extractions enriched in extracellular DNA from replicated sediment corers. With this strategy we captured information from DNA (local or deposited from the water column that persists adsorbed to inorganic particles and buffered short-term spatial and temporal heterogeneity. We analysed replicated samples from 20 localities including 2 deep-sea canyons, 1 shallower canal, and two open slopes (depth range 100-2,250 m. We identified 1,629 MOTUs, among which the dominant groups were Metazoa (with representatives of 19 phyla, Alveolata, Stramenopiles, and Rhizaria. There was a marked small-scale heterogeneity as shown by differences in replicates within corers and within localities. The spatial variability between canyons was significant, as was the depth component in one of the canyons where it was tested. Likewise, the composition of the first layer (1 cm of sediment was significantly different from deeper layers. We found that qualitative (presence-absence and quantitative (relative number of reads data showed consistent trends of differentiation between samples and geographic areas. The subset of exclusively benthic MOTUs showed similar patterns of β-diversity and community structure as the whole dataset. Separate analyses of the main metazoan phyla (in number of MOTUs showed some differences in distribution attributable to different lifestyles. Our results highlight the differentiation that can be found even between geographically close assemblages, and sets the ground for future monitoring and conservation

  9. Lead isotopes in marine surface sediments reveal historical use of leaded fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Martin M; Blusztajn, Jerzy S; Andersen, Ole; Dahllöf, Ingela

    2012-11-01

    Analyses of lead (Pb) isotopes have been performed in terrestrial and fresh water environments to estimate historical uses of leaded fuel, but so far this method has not been employed in studies of world-wide marine surface sediments. We analyzed Pb and its isotopes in 23 surface sediments from four continents collected during the Galathea 3 expedition in 2006-2007. To enhance the anthropogenic signal, a partial digestion using nitric acid was performed. The concentrations of Pb, Th, U and Al were determined with an ICP-Quadrupole MS, and Pb-isotope ratios with an ICP-multi-collector MS. The samples could be divided into three groups: Harbor areas in larger cities with concentrations of 150 to 265 mg kg(-1) dry weight, smaller towns with concentrations between 20 and 40 mg kg(-1) dry weight, and remotely located sites with concentrations below 15 mg kg(-1) dry weight. Pb-isotope ratios were compared to literature values for gasoline and local or geological background values, and the contribution of leaded-gasoline to total concentrations was calculated for contaminated sites using both a one-dimensional and a novel two-dimensional (vector) method. The North American sites had Pb-isotope ratios corresponding to the US leaded gasoline, with 24-88% of the Pb from leaded gasoline. Samples from Oceania showed Pb-isotope ratios corresponding to Australian gasoline, with 60% attributed to leaded gasoline in Sydney and 21% in Christchurch. Outside Cape Town, 15 to 46% of Pb in sediments was from leaded gasoline.

  10. The Deposition and Accumulation of Microplastics in Marine Sediments and Bottom Water from the Irish Continental Shelf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jake; Lusher, Amy; Thompson, Richard C; Morley, Audrey

    2017-09-07

    Microplastics are widely dispersed throughout the marine environment. An understanding of the distribution and accumulation of this form of pollution is crucial for gauging environmental risk. Presented here is the first record of plastic contamination, in the 5 mm-250 μm size range, of Irish continental shelf sediments. Sixty-two microplastics were recovered from 10 of 11 stations using box cores. 97% of recovered microplastics were found to reside shallower than 2.5 cm sediment depth, with the area of highest microplastic concentration being the water-sediment interface and top 0.5 cm of sediments (66%). Microplastics were not found deeper than 3.5 ± 0.5 cm. These findings demonstrate that microplastic contamination is ubiquitous within superficial sediments and bottom water along the western Irish continental shelf. Results highlight that cores need to be at least 4-5 cm deep to quantify the standing stock of microplastics within marine sediments. All recovered microplastics were classified as secondary microplastics as they appear to be remnants of larger items; fibres being the principal form of microplastic pollution (85%), followed by broken fragments (15%). The range of polymer types, colours and physical forms recovered suggests a variety of sources. Further research is needed to understand the mechanisms influencing microplastic transport, deposition, resuspension and subsequent interactions with biota.

  11. Origin and transport of (238)U and (226)Ra in riverine, estuarine and marine sediments of the Krka River, Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukrov, Neven; Mlakar, Marina; Cuculić, Vlado; Barisić, Delko

    2009-06-01

    Spatial distribution of (238)U and (226)Ra activities in sediment columns along the Krka River and estuary, were studied using gamma spectrometry. Markedly different (238)U and (226)Ra activities between riverine, estuarine and marine sediments were observed. Distribution of these radionuclides, as well as their anthropogenic and natural origin, was evaluated by activity measurements, taking into account sedimentation rates estimated by (137)Cs distribution in sediment columns. Naturally present (238)U and (226)Ra activities were highest in riverine and lowest in marine sediments. (238)U and (226)Ra activities in historic riverine sediments revealed anthropogenic influence from town of Knin, which diminished for 15-20% in 1990s due to warfare that caused stop of industrial, agricultural and transport activities. Drainage of the flysch material naturally elevates (238)U and (226)Ra activities in the vicinity of its inflow in the upper part of estuary. (238)U and (226)Ra from the phosphate ore discharge in the port of Sibenik did not spread further in estuary, which was also confirmed by (238)U and (226)Ra activities detected in Mytilus sp. mussels' tissue.

  12. STUDY OF THE SEDIMENTATION TREND IN THE PROSPECTIVE AREA OF PORT OF MARINE CENTER, CIREBON BASED ON REMOTE SENSING DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Undang Hernawan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A coastal zone is the interface between the land and water that influenced by both of them. Coastal dynamic is influenced by many factors from land and sea, such as sedimentation and current. In order to support marine facility, Marine Geological Institute of Indonesia (MGI plan to build a port. The prospective area is behind MGI office at Cirebon. This study use multi temporal remote sensing data in order to observe trend of coastline change around MGI. Based on the interpretation of the data, there are sedimentation around the MGI water and abrasion due to the presence of Kejawanan’s jetty and Kalijaga River. The result also shows that the current in this region is moving from southeast to northwest. The presence of the Kejawanan’s jetty stymies the movement of sediment. The sediment which is normally moving to the north of the jetty is then trapped on the south side of the structure, so that the sediment precipitates in this region and makes it as the active region of sedimentation and accretion. The presence mangrove conduces to support sedimentation speed and accretion at this region, because of his function as the catchment area. Abrasion occurs in the eastern part of MGI office at the Kalijaga river mouth within the bay. The Kalijaga River mouth is predicted to be the primary source of sedimentation in this area. The coastline change caused by sedimentation will be continuing as long as it is supplied by the sediment. The direction of the sedimentation is parallel to the jetty and it forms ellipsoid, with the sedimentation/accretion region is behind MGI office. The abrasion area is found in Kalijaga River mouth and a small area beside Kalijaga River. In order to build a port, we have to consider this sedimentation process. One of the alternatives to build the port is to make a quay pile model which gives way the current to pass through the other side of the port. Another alternative is to build the port as a pond model but

  13. ACOUSTICAL IMAGING AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF SOFT ROCK AND MARINE SEDIMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurman E. Scott, Jr., Ph.D.; Younane Abousleiman, Ph.D.; Musharraf Zaman, Ph.D., P.E.

    2001-07-01

    Mechanically weak formations, such as chalks, high porosity sandstones, and marine sediments, pose significant problems for oil and gas operators. Problems such as compaction, subsidence, and loss of permeability can affect reservoir production operations. For example, the unexpected subsidence of the Ekofisk chalk in the North Sea required over one billion dollars to re-engineer production facilities to account for losses created during that compaction (Sulak 1991). Another problem in weak formations is that of shallow water flows (SWF). Deep water drilling operations sometimes encounter cases where the marine sediments, at shallow depths just below the seafloor, begin to uncontrollably flow up and around the drill pipe. SWF problems created a loss of $150 million for the Ursa development project in the U.S. Gulf Coast SWF (Furlow 1998a,b; 1999a,b). The goal of this project is to provide a database on both the rock mechanical properties and the geophysical properties of weak rocks and sediments. These could be used by oil and gas companies to detect, evaluate, and alleviate potential production and drilling problems. The results will be useful in, for example, pre-drill detection of events such as SWF's by allowing a correlation of seismic data (such as hazard surveys) to rock mechanical properties. The data sets could also be useful for 4-D monitoring of the compaction and subsidence of an existing reservoir and imaging the zones of damage. During the second quarter of the project the research team has: (1) completed acoustic sensor construction, (2) conducted reconnaissance tests to map the deformational behaviors of the various rocks, (3) developed a sample assembly for the measurement of dynamic elastic and poroelastic parameters during triaxial testing, and (4) conducted a detailed review of the scientific literature and compiled a bibliography of that review. During the first quarter of the project the research team acquired several rock types for

  14. Combining contamination indexes, sediment quality guidelines and multivariate data analysis for metal pollution assessment in marine sediments of Cienfuegos Bay, Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Icart, Mirella; Pereira-Filho, Edenir Rodrigues; Lopes Fialho, Lucimar; Nóbrega, Joaquim A; Alonso-Hernández, Carlos; Bolaños-Alvarez, Yoelvis; Pomares-Alfonso, Mario S

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of the present work was to combine several tools for assessing metal pollution in marine sediments from Cienfuegos Bay. Fourteen surface sediments collected in 2013 were evaluated. Concentrations of As, Cu, Ni, Zn and V decreased respect to those previous reported. The metal contamination was spatially distributed in the north and south parts of the bay. According to the contamination factor (CF) enrichment factor (EF) and index of geoaccumulation (I geo ), Cd and Cu were classified in that order as the most contaminated elements in most sediment. Comparison of the total metal concentrations with the threshold (TELs) and probable (PELs) effect levels in sediment quality guidelines suggested a more worrisome situation for Cu, of which concentrations were occasional associated with adverse biological effects in thirteen sediments, followed by Ni in nine sediments; while adverse effects were rarely associated with Cd. Probably, Cu could be considered as the most dangerous in the whole bay because it was classified in the high contamination levels by all indexes and, simultaneously, associated to occasional adverse effects in most samples. Despite the bioavailability was partially evaluated with the HCl method, the low extraction of Ni (<3% in all samples) and Cu (<55%, except sample 3) and the relative high extraction of Cd (50% or more, except sample 14) could be considered as an attenuating (Ni and Cu) or increasing (Cd) factor in the risk assessment of those element. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Depth-related influences on biodegradation rates of phenanthrene in polluted marine sediments of Puget Sound, WA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Yinjie J. . E-mail yjtang@lbl.gov; Carpenter, Shelly D.; Deming, Jody W.; Krieger-Brockett, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    A whole-core injection method was used to determine depth-related rates of microbial mineralization of 14 C-phenanthrene added to both contaminated and clean marine sediments of Puget Sound, WA. For 26-day incubations under micro-aerobic conditions, conversions of 14 C-phenanthrene to 14 CO 2 in heavily PAH-contaminated sediments from two sites in Eagle Harbor were much higher (up to 30%) than those in clean sediments from nearby Blakely Harbor ( 14 C-phenanthrene degradation rates in the surface sediment horizons (0-3 cm) were more rapid (2-3 times) than in the deeper sediment horizons examined (>6 cm), especially in the most PAH polluted EH9 site. Differences in mineralization were associated with properties of the sediments as a function of sediment depth, including grain-size distribution, PAH concentration, total organic matter and total bacterial abundance. When strictly anaerobic incubations (in N 2 /H 2 /CO 2 atmosphere) were used, the phenanthrene biodegradation rates at all sediment depths were two times slower than under micro-aerobic conditions, with methanogenesis observed after 24 days. The main rate-limiting factor for phenanthrene degradation under anaerobic conditions appeared to be the availability of suitable electron acceptors. Addition of calcium sulfate enhanced the first order rate coefficient (k 1 increased from 0.003 to 0.006 day -1 ), whereas addition of soluble nitrate, even at very low concentration ( 1 up to 0.11 day -1 )

  16. Estimating sediment accumulation rates in Manila Bay, a marine pollution hot spot in the Seas of East Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sta Maria, E J; Siringan, F P; Bulos, A dM; Sombrito, E Z

    2009-01-01

    The GEF/UNDP/IMO/PEMSEA project identifies Manila Bay as among the marine pollution hot spots in the Seas of East Asia. (210)Pb dating of its sediment can provide a historical perspective of its pollution loading. However, the validity of (210)Pb dating in a complex dynamic coastal system of Manila Bay may come into question. Land-based sediment input can be high and physical and biological processes can possibly disturb the sediment layers. In this report, the (210)Pb profiles of sediment cores from different parts of the bay are presented. The linear sedimentation rates are shown to be higher in the recent past and are also variable across the bay. The largest change in sedimentation rate, coincided with the occurrence of a volcanic eruption in 1991 and is shown by applying a variant of the CIC model in sedimentation rate calculations. The data suggest that (210)Pb dating can be useful in estimating relative magnitudes of sedimentation rates, even in a complex dynamic coastal system like Manila Bay.

  17. Estimating Population Turnover Rates by Relative Quantification Methods Reveals Microbial Dynamics in Marine Sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevorkian, Richard; Bird, Jordan T; Shumaker, Alexander; Lloyd, Karen G

    2018-01-01

    The difficulty involved in quantifying biogeochemically significant microbes in marine sediments limits our ability to assess interspecific interactions, population turnover times, and niches of uncultured taxa. We incubated surface sediments from Cape Lookout Bight, North Carolina, USA, anoxically at 21°C for 122 days. Sulfate decreased until day 68, after which methane increased, with hydrogen concentrations consistent with the predicted values of an electron donor exerting thermodynamic control. We measured turnover times using two relative quantification methods, quantitative PCR (qPCR) and the product of 16S gene read abundance and total cell abundance (FRAxC, which stands for "fraction of read abundance times cells"), to estimate the population turnover rates of uncultured clades. Most 16S rRNA reads were from deeply branching uncultured groups, and ∼98% of 16S rRNA genes did not abruptly shift in relative abundance when sulfate reduction gave way to methanogenesis. Uncultured Methanomicrobiales and Methanosarcinales increased at the onset of methanogenesis with population turnover times estimated from qPCR at 9.7 ± 3.9 and 12.6 ± 4.1 days, respectively. These were consistent with FRAxC turnover times of 9.4 ± 5.8 and 9.2 ± 3.5 days, respectively. Uncultured Syntrophaceae , which are possibly fermentative syntrophs of methanogens, and uncultured Kazan-3A-21 archaea also increased at the onset of methanogenesis, with FRAxC turnover times of 14.7 ± 6.9 and 10.6 ± 3.6 days. Kazan-3A-21 may therefore either perform methanogenesis or form a fermentative syntrophy with methanogens. Three genera of sulfate-reducing bacteria, Desulfovibrio , Desulfobacter , and Desulfobacterium , increased in the first 19 days before declining rapidly during sulfate reduction. We conclude that population turnover times on the order of days can be measured robustly in organic-rich marine sediment, and the transition from sulfate-reducing to methanogenic conditions stimulates

  18. Modelling the cohesive sediment transport in the marine environment: the case of Thermaikos Gulf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. N. Krestenitis

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The transport of fine-grained sediments in the marine environment entails risks of pollutant intrusions from substances absorbed onto the cohesive flocks' surface, gradually released to the aquatic field. These substances include nutrients such as nitrate, phosphate and silicate compounds from drainage from fertilization of adjacent cultivated areas that enter the coastal areas through rivers and streams, or trace metals as remainders from urban and industrial activities. As a consequence, knowledge on the motion and distribution of sediment particles coming from a given pollutant source is expected to provide the 'bulk' information on pollutant distribution, necessary for determining the region of influence of the source and to estimate probable trophic levels of the seawater and potential environmental risks. In that aim a numerical model has been developed to predict the fate of the sediments introduced to the marine environment from different pollution sources, such as river outflows, erosion of the seabed, aeolian transported material and drainage systems. The proposed three-dimensional mathematical model is based on the particle tracking method, according to which matter concentration is expressed by particles, each representing a particular amount of sedimentary mass, passively advected and dispersed by the currents. The processes affecting characteristics and propagation of sedimentary material in the marine environment, incorporated in the parameterization, apart from advection and dispersion, include cohesive sediment and near-bed processes. The movement of the particles along with variations in sedimentary characteristics and state, carried by each particle as personal information, are traced with time. Specifically, concerning transport processes, the local seawater velocity and the particle's settling control advection, whereas the random Brownian motion due to turbulence simulates turbulent diffusion. The

  19. Survival Of Magnetic Paleoclimatic Signals From Shallow To Deep Water Marine Redoxomorphic Sediments Across The Northwest Iberian Continental Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed Falcon, K. J.; Rey, D.; Rubio, B.

    2013-05-01

    The magnetic properties of marine sediments on the North Atlantic Iberian continental Margin are strongly dependent on the organic matter input to the sediments and the onset of reductive diagenesis. An onshore-offshore gradient in the intensity of early diagenesis was recently described for the Ría de Vigo, matched by similar patterns in the adjacent rias of Pontevedra and Muros. In the ria environments of NW Iberia, early diagenetic dissolution of magnetic minerals can lead to magnetite half-lives of a few decades, and virtually obliterates any paleoenvironmental signal carried by magnetic minerals, rendering magnetic properties especially useful for the study of early diagenesis dynamics. Early diagenesis has also been identified in sediments of the adjacent continental shelf and deeper environments of the Galician Bank and Iberian Abyssal Plain. However, in these settings, slower dissolution of magnetic minerals allows the preservation of paleoclimatic signatures on different temporal scales. For instance, magnetic properties of continental shelf sediments reveal periods of enhanced rainfall and continental sediment input to the shelf, coincident with the Roman Warm Period and Medieval Climatic Optimum. On the contrary, cold periods are associated with less detrital input. Furthermore, levels of intensified diagenesis are also recorded during cold periods, which have been interpreted as periods of intensified coastal upwelling probably related to long-term North Atlantic Oscillation positive state. At the Galician Bank and Iberian Abyssal Plain sediments early diagenesis is also pervasive, although a paleoceanographic record of changes in the concentration of magnetic minerals transported by water masses flowing from the Portuguese Margin can still be identified. In addition to the progressive dissolution of magnetic minerals with depth, bulk magnetic properties in these deep marine settings show strong dependence on the pelagic carbonate sedimentation and low

  20. Plutonium behavior during the early diagenesis of marine sediments: applications to two marine environments labelled by radionuclides released from reprocessing plants; Etude du comportement du plutonium au cours de la diagenese precoce des sediments marins: applications a deux environnements marins marques par les rejets issus d'usines de retraitement de combustibles uses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gouzy, A

    2004-12-15

    The plutonium released into the English Channel and the Irish Sea by nuclear fuel reprocessing plants is mainly associated to sediments. Nevertheless, this association is partially reversible. This work combines a field study, carried out on the Cumbrian mud patch and the Esk estuary (Eastern Irish Sea), and laboratory experiments performed on carbonaceous coarse-grained sediments collected in the Central Channel. It presents new data on the plutonium solid partition in sediments and suggests realistic scenarios for describing its release from sediments to the water column. The role of reactive sulphides acting as temporary sink phases is shown in anoxic sediments; those sulphides are liable to release dissolved plutonium upon their oxidation. The plutonium is also bound to carbonates within the carbonaceous matrix and as carbonate surface complexes. Conceptual schemes of the behaviour of the plutonium in marine sediments are proposed; they highlight the strong remobilization potential of plutonium from marine sediments to the interstitial water. Its plutonium content can be injected into the overlying water column. (author)

  1. Setting limits for acceptable change in sediment particle size composition: testing a new approach to managing marine aggregate dredging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Keith M

    2013-08-15

    A baseline dataset from 2005 was used to identify the spatial distribution of macrofaunal assemblages across the eastern English Channel. The range of sediment composition found in association with each assemblage was used to define limits for acceptable change at ten licensed marine aggregate extraction areas. Sediment data acquired in 2010, 4 years after the onset of dredging, were used to assess whether conditions remained within the acceptable limits. Despite the observed changes in sediment composition, the composition of sediments in and around nine extraction areas remained within pre-defined acceptable limits. At the tenth site, some of the observed changes within the licence area were judged to have gone beyond the acceptable limits. Implications of the changes are discussed, and appropriate management measures identified. The approach taken in this study offers a simple, objective and cost-effective method for assessing the significance of change, and could simplify the existing monitoring regime. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Re-Defining the Subsurface Biosphere: Characterization of Fungal Populations from Energy Limited Deep Marine Subsurface Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, B. K.; Ariza, M.; St. Peter, C.; Hoffman, C.; Edwards, K. J.; Mills, H. J.

    2012-12-01

    The detection and characterization of metabolically active fungal populations within the deep marine subsurface will alter current ecosystem models that are limited to bacterial and archaeal populations. Although marine fungi have been studied for over fifty years, a detailed description of fungal populations within the deep subsurface is lacking. Fungi possess metabolic pathways capable of utilizing previously considered non-bioavailable energy reserves. Therefore, metabolically active fungi would occupy a unique niche within subsurface ecosystems, with the potential to provide an organic carbon source for heterotrophic prokaryotic populations not currently being considered in subsurface energy budgets. Sediments from the South Pacific Gyre subsurface, one of the most energy-limited environments on Earth, were collected during the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 329. Anaerobic and aerobic sediment slurry cultures using fresh sediment began directly following the completion of the Expedition (December 2010). From these cultures, multiple fungal lineages have been isolated on several media types that vary in carbon concentrations. Physical growth parameters of these subsurface fungal isolates were determined and compared to previously characterized lineages. Additionally, the overall diversity of metabolically active and dormant fungal populations was determined using high throughput sequencing of nucleic acids extracted from in situ cryopreserved South Pacific Gyre sediments. This project provides a robust step in determining the importance and impact of fungal populations within the marine subsurface biosphere.

  3. Occurrence, distribution and ecological risk assessment of multiple classes of UV filters in marine sediments in Hong Kong and Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Mirabelle M P; Leung, H W; Kwan, Billy K Y; Ng, Ka-Yan; Yamashita, Nobuyoshi; Taniyasu, Sachi; Lam, Paul K S; Murphy, Margaret B

    2015-07-15

    Organic ultraviolet (UV) filters are used widely in various personal care products and their ubiquitous occurrence in the aquatic environment has been reported in recent years. However, data on their fate and potential impacts in marine sediments is limited. This study reports the occurrence and risk assessment of eleven widely used organic UV filters in marine sediment collected in Hong Kong and Tokyo Bay. Seven of the 11 target UV filters were detected in all sediment samples (median concentrations: UV filter occurrence; this was likely due to their relatively higher octanol-water partition coefficients. Probabilistic ecological risk assessment showed that the likelihood of EHMC causing toxic effects on reproduction in snails was over 84% and 32% based on toxicity data for two species, respectively, suggesting potential risks of UV filters to benthic organisms and possible wider effects on the marine food web. However, more toxicity data for sediment organisms is necessary for better risk assessment of these compounds in benthic communities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Advective flow as an early diagenetic agent in coastal marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, Thomas; Lettmann, Karsten; Beck, Melanie; Schnetger, Bernhard; Brumsack, Hans-Jürgen

    2010-05-01

    Offshore intertidal sand and mud flats are subject to tidally forced ground water flow leading to circulation and subsequent discharge of ground waters to the coastal ocean. These waters have passed organic-rich, relatively young sediments that harbor active microbial communities. A number of biogeochemical processes alter the chemical composition of the circulating sea water of which the most prominent one is microbial sulphate reduction. As a result of these processes discharging ground waters are strongly enriched in certain trace metals (Mn, Ba, V), nutrients (Ammonia, Dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), Phosphate, Silicate) and depleted in others (such as Mo, U). Advective flow therefore drives a biogeochemical alteration of sea water. So far, pore water chemistry indicates that tidal creek margins, where advective flow is most significant, show stronger chemical gradients compared to sites from the central tidal flat, where diffusion appears to dominate. To investigate the role of advection we mapped the geochemistry down to 2.5 meters sediment depth along a transect from the creek to the central tidal flat using push-point samplers that allow almost artifact-free in-situ sampling of pore waters. Additionally a recently developed hydrogeological simulation of the creek margin was applied to calculate ages of the sampled pore waters. The simulation was calibrated by comparison of measured in-situ pressure heads with simulated ones. Sample ages obtained were used to quantify averaged production or depletion rates for trace metals, nutrients and sulphate. Our results demonstrate that sites dominated by advection generally show higher rates of turnover for almost all species investigated. Averaged production rates for Ba, Mn, ammonia or DIC appear to be 10 to more than 30 times higher when advection dominated the subsurface flow regime. Based on these findings we speculate whether advective ground water flow in marine sediments may be regarded as a geological agent

  5. Determination of radionuclides and trace elements in marine sediments and biota from the red sea coast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sirelkhatim, Dia Awad

    2002-09-01

    This study presents data on the concentration levels of natural ( 226 Ra, 210 Pb, 210 Po, 238 U, 234 Th and 40 K) and artificial ( 239+240 Pu, 238 Pu, 90 Sr, 137 Cs) radionuclides as well as trace metals (Pb, Sr, Cr, Ni, V, Ba, La, Ce, Rb, Zn, Nb, As, Ti, Mn, Y, Zr, Th, U, and Ga) in multicellular marine algae, molluscs, coral in surface marine sediments collected from the shallower waters of the fringing reefs area and Flamingo Bay near Port Sudan harbour. The analyses were performed using gamma spectrometry, alpha spectrometry, liquid scintillation counting technique, Cerenkov counting technique and X RF.Surface sediments from this coastal region are poor in their trace metals and radionuclide content compared to similar data reported from different coastal areas around the globe and no source of emission has appeared to make any significant contribution. Surface enrichment of 210 Pb and 210 Po with respect to their progenitor 226 Ra is evident from the activity ratios of 210 Pb/ 226 Ra (3.03±1.79) and 210 Po/ 226 Ra (2.23±1.56) indicating sources other than in situ decay of parent nuclide. Activity concentration ranges in mBq/Kg dry weight of the artificial radionuclides studied were found to be from 5.10 to 82 ( 239+240 Pu), from 0.89 to 8.63 ( 238 Pu),and from 29.6 to 389.5 ( 90 Sr). The ratio 239+240 Pu/ 238 Pu which is used for source term identification has confirmed that the origin of anthropogenic radioactivity in the studied area is mainly the global fall-out. 137 Cs was not detected in all samples analysed. Considering 238 U, 234 Th and 40 K, their activity concentration (Bq/Kg dry weight) ranges in sediments are 2.41-6.69, 27.3-79.4 and 462-656, respectively. 234 Th/ 238 U ratio was an order of magnitude higher than unity indicating that the sediments are from high productivity area with a high biogenic flux from the adjacent water. Among marine plants and animals investigated, the coral species, Favites, show substantial concentration of radium at

  6. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in continental shelf sediment of China: Implications for anthropogenic influences on coastal marine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Liangying; Wang Jizhong; Wei Gaoling; Guan Yufeng; Zeng, Eddy Y.

    2012-01-01

    Sediments collected from the continental shelf of China, embracing Yellow Sea, inner shelf of the East China Sea (ECS), and the South China Sea (SCS), were analyzed for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The concentrations of anthropogenic PAHs (Σ 18 PAH) were 27–224 ng/g dry weight, with an average of 82 ng/g. Sedimentary PAHs in the continental shelf off China were mainly derived from mixed residues of biomass, coal, and petroleum combustion. Fluvial transport and atmospheric deposition mainly accounted for sediment PAHs in the ECS inner shelf and Yellow Sea (and the SCS), respectively. Furthermore, statistically higher levels of Σ 18 PAH (28–224 ng/g; mean 110 ng/g) in the Yellow Sea sediment than in the SCS sediment (28–109 ng/g; mean 58 ng/g) were probably resulted from higher PAH emissions from coke industry and domestic coal combustion in North China than in South China. - Highlights: ► Coal and biomass combustion was the main origin of PAHs in coastal marine sediment of China. ► Fluvial transport was the main mode for transporting PAHs to the East China Sea inner shelf. ► Atmospheric deposition largely accounted for sediment PAHs in Yellow Sea and the South China Sea. ► Regional energy use pattern in China was responsible for the spatial distribution of PAHs in coastal marine sediment. - Sources, compositions and spatial distributions of PAHs in continental shelf sediments off China are analyzed to estimate anthropogenic influences.

  7. Sediment Transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Zhou

    Flow and sediment transport are important in relation to several engineering topics, e.g. erosion around structures, backfilling of dredged channels and nearshore morphological change. The purpose of the present book is to describe both the basic hydrodynamics and the basic sediment transport...... mechanics. Chapter 1 deals with fundamentals in fluid mechanics with emphasis on bed shear stress by currents, while chapter 3 discusses wave boundary layer theory. They are both written with a view to sediment transport. Sediment transport in rivers, cross-shore and longshore are dealt with in chapters 2...

  8. Marine Microbial Gene Abundance and Community Composition in Response to Ocean Acidification and Elevated Temperature in Two Contrasting Coastal Marine Sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashleigh R. Currie

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Marine ecosystems are exposed to a range of human-induced climate stressors, in particular changing carbonate chemistry and elevated sea surface temperatures as a consequence of climate change. More research effort is needed to reduce uncertainties about the effects of global-scale warming and acidification for benthic microbial communities, which drive sedimentary biogeochemical cycles. In this research, mesocosm experiments were set up using muddy and sandy coastal sediments to investigate the independent and interactive effects of elevated carbon dioxide concentrations (750 ppm CO2 and elevated temperature (ambient +4°C on the abundance of taxonomic and functional microbial genes. Specific quantitative PCR primers were used to target archaeal, bacterial, and cyanobacterial/chloroplast 16S rRNA in both sediment types. Nitrogen cycling genes archaeal and bacterial ammonia monooxygenase (amoA and bacterial nitrite reductase (nirS were specifically targeted to identify changes in microbial gene abundance and potential impacts on nitrogen cycling. In muddy sediment, microbial gene abundance, including amoA and nirS genes, increased under elevated temperature and reduced under elevated CO2 after 28 days, accompanied by shifts in community composition. In contrast, the combined stressor treatment showed a non-additive effect with lower microbial gene abundance throughout the experiment. The response of microbial communities in the sandy sediment was less pronounced, with the most noticeable response seen in the archaeal gene abundances in response to environmental stressors over time. 16S rRNA genes (amoA and nirS were lower in abundance in the combined stressor treatments in sandy sediments. Our results indicated that marine benthic microorganisms, especially in muddy sediments, are susceptible to changes in ocean carbonate chemistry and seawater temperature, which ultimately may have an impact upon key benthic biogeochemical cycles.

  9. Marine Microbial Gene Abundance and Community Composition in Response to Ocean Acidification and Elevated Temperature in Two Contrasting Coastal Marine Sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Ashleigh R; Tait, Karen; Parry, Helen; de Francisco-Mora, Beatriz; Hicks, Natalie; Osborn, A Mark; Widdicombe, Steve; Stahl, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    Marine ecosystems are exposed to a range of human-induced climate stressors, in particular changing carbonate chemistry and elevated sea surface temperatures as a consequence of climate change. More research effort is needed to reduce uncertainties about the effects of global-scale warming and acidification for benthic microbial communities, which drive sedimentary biogeochemical cycles. In this research, mesocosm experiments were set up using muddy and sandy coastal sediments to investigate the independent and interactive effects of elevated carbon dioxide concentrations (750 ppm CO 2 ) and elevated temperature (ambient +4°C) on the abundance of taxonomic and functional microbial genes. Specific quantitative PCR primers were used to target archaeal, bacterial, and cyanobacterial/chloroplast 16S rRNA in both sediment types. Nitrogen cycling genes archaeal and bacterial ammonia monooxygenase ( amoA ) and bacterial nitrite reductase ( nirS ) were specifically targeted to identify changes in microbial gene abundance and potential impacts on nitrogen cycling. In muddy sediment, microbial gene abundance, including amoA and nirS genes, increased under elevated temperature and reduced under elevated CO 2 after 28 days, accompanied by shifts in community composition. In contrast, the combined stressor treatment showed a non-additive effect with lower microbial gene abundance throughout the experiment. The response of microbial communities in the sandy sediment was less pronounced, with the most noticeable response seen in the archaeal gene abundances in response to environmental stressors over time. 16S rRNA genes ( amoA and nirS ) were lower in abundance in the combined stressor treatments in sandy sediments. Our results indicated that marine benthic microorganisms, especially in muddy sediments, are susceptible to changes in ocean carbonate chemistry and seawater temperature, which ultimately may have an impact upon key benthic biogeochemical cycles.

  10. Evaluation of Near-Surface Gases in Marine Sediments to Assess Subsurface Petroleum Gas Generation and Entrapment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Abrams

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Gases contained within near-surface marine sediments can be derived from multiple sources: shallow microbial activity, thermal cracking of organic matter and inorganic materials, or magmatic-mantle degassing. Each origin will display a distinctive hydrocarbon and non-hydrocarbon composition as well as compound-specific isotope signature and thus the interpretation of origin should be relatively straightforward. Unfortunately, this is not always the case due to in situ microbial alteration, non-equilibrium phase partitioning, mixing, and fractionation related to the gas extraction method. Sediment gases can reside in the interstitial spaces, bound to mineral or organic surfaces and/or entrapped in carbonate inclusions. The interstitial sediment gases are contained within the sediment pore space, either dissolved in the pore waters (solute or as free (vapour gas. The bound gases are believed to be attached to organic and/or mineral surfaces, entrapped in structured water or entrapped in authigenic carbonate inclusions. The purpose of this paper is to provide a review of the gas types found within shallow marine sediments and examine issues related to gas sampling and extraction. In addition, the paper will discuss how to recognise mixing, alteration and fractionation issues to best interpret the seabed geochemical results and determine gas origin to assess subsurface petroleum gas generation and entrapment.

  11. Measurement and modeling of polychlorinated biphenyl bioaccumulation from sediment for the marine polychaete neanthes arenaceodentata and response to sorbent amendment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, E.M.-L.; Croteau, M.-N.; Luoma, S.N.; Luthy, R.G.

    2010-01-01

    Bioaccumulation rates of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) for the marine polychaete Neanthes arenaceodentata were characterized, including PCB uptake rates from water and sediment, and the effect of sorbent amendment to the sediment on PCB bioavailability, organism growth, and lipid content. Physiological parameters were incorporated into a biodynamic model to predict contaminant uptake. The results indicate rapid PCB uptake from contaminated sediment and significant organism growth dilution during time-series exposure studies. PCB uptake from the aqueous phase accounted for less than 3% of the total uptake for this deposit-feeder. Proportional increase of gut residence time and assimilation efficiency as a consequence of the organism's growth was assessed by PCB uptake and a reactor theory model of gut architecture. Pulse-chase feeding and multilabeled stable isotope tracing techniques proved high sediment ingestion rates (i.e., 6?10 times of dry body weight per day) indicating that such deposit-feeders are promising biological indicators for sediment risk assessment. Activated carbon amendment reduced PCB uptake by 95% in laboratory experiments with no observed adverse growth effects on the marine polychaete. Biodynamic modeling explained the observed PCB body burdens for N. arenaceodentata, with and without sorbent amendment. ?? 2009 American Chemical Society.

  12. Radiochronology of marine sediments and its application to the knowledge of the process of environmental pollution in coastal Cuban ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso-Hernández, Carlos M.; Díaz-Asencio, Misael; Gómez-Batista, Miguel; Bolaños-Alvares, Yoelvis; Muñoz-Caravaca, Alain; Morera-Gómez, Yasser

    2016-01-01

    The results achieved in the implementation of the radiochronology of marine sediments for the reconstruction of databases and knowledge of the evolution of environmental pollution in four coastal ecosystems of national significance are presented in this paper Fluxes of selected heavy metals and persistent organic compounds are discussed for the Cienfuegos and Havana bays and Sagua and La Coloma estuaries. Finally, is showed the effectiveness of radiochronology of sediments as a useful tool for environmental management and knowledge of temporal processes of pollution in the aquatic environment. (author)

  13. The linkage between marine sediment records and changes in Holocene Saharan landscape: simulating the dust cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egerer, Sabine; Claussen, Martin; Reick, Christian; Stanelle, Tanja

    2016-04-01

    Marine sediment records reveal an abrupt and strong increase in dust deposition in the North Atlantic at the end of the African Humid Period about 4.9 ka to 5.5 ka ago (deMenocal et al., 2000; McGee et al., 2013). The change in dust flux has been attributed to varying Saharan land surface cover. Alternatively, the enhanced dust accumulation is linked to enhanced surface winds and a consequent intensification of coastal upwelling. We present simulation results from a recent sensitivity study, where we demonstrate for the first time the direct link between dust accumulation in marine cores and changes in Saharan land surface during the Holocene. We have simulated timeslices of he mid-Holocene (6 ka BP) and pre-industrial (1850 AD) dust cycle as a function of Saharan land surface cover and atmosphere-ocean conditions using the coupled atmosphere-aerosol model ECHAM6.1-HAM2.1. We prescribe mid-Holocene vegetation cover based on a vegetation reconstruction from pollen data (Hoelzmann et al., 1998) and mid-Holocene lake surface area is determined using a water routing and storage model (Tegen et al., 2002). In agreement with data from marine sediment cores, our simulations show that mid-Holocene dust deposition fluxes in the North Atlantic were two to three times lower compared with pre-industrial fluxes. We identify Saharan land surface characteristics to be the main control on dust transport from North Africa to the North Atlantic. We conclude that the variation in dust accumulation in marine cores is likely related to a transition of the Saharan landscape during the Holocene and not due to changes in atmospheric or ocean conditions alone. Reference: deMenocal, P., Ortiz, J., Guilderson, T., Adkins, J., Sarnthein, M., Baker, L., and Yarusinsky, M.: Abrupt onset and termination of the African Humid Period:: rapid climate responses to gradual insolation forcing, Quaternary Science Reviews, 19, 347-361, 2000. Hoelzmann, P., Jolly, D., Harrison, S. P., Laarif, F

  14. Can we apply the 10Be/9Be flux tracer to marine sediments along glaciated margins?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valletta, R. D.; Willenbring, J. K.; Passchier, S.; Elmi, C.

    2016-12-01

    Radioactive cosmogenic 10Be normalized to its stable isotope 9Be is proposed as a tracer of continental deposition into the marine basins throughout the Late Cenozoic. Close to glaciated margins, 10Be/9Be may reflect shifts in ice sheet dynamics whereby ice sheet retraction is accompanied by increases in freshwater discharge and terrestrial weathering, which may both increase 10Be and 9Be delivery to the continental shelf. However, this signal is complicated by boundary scavenging during periods of warmth and increased productivity. To disentangle the environmental and biological imprint on the 10Be/9Be isotope record, we sampled extensively characterized marine sedimentary packages offshore the Wilkes Subglacial Basin in an area where East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) retraction and advance is well-established (IODP U1361A). Combining this existing data with our new measurements creates a uniquely large, multi-proxy dataset for geochemical reconstructions along a glaciated margin. We measured 10Be, 9Be and a suite of bio-reactive transition metals from alternating diatom-rich and diatom-poor clay units 1) adsorbed to authigenic clays and 2) contained within diatom frustules, making this the first dataset of its kind. Diatom-rich clay sediments mark abrupt periods of Pliocene warming and a retracted EAIS. Beryllium co-varies with diatom-rich units: maximum 10Be ( 1.3 x 109 atoms g-1) and 9Be ( 300 ng g-1) peak during warmer intervals. These data mimic patterns observed in the nearby Ross Sea (Yokoyama et al., 2016), suggesting that interglacials are marked along glaciated margins by sudden pulses in Be delivery. By accounting for the Be inventory within diatoms, we have allowed for the exciting pairing of 10Be with 26Al to obtain 1) particle flux and 2) freshwater volume discharged from the EAIS during melting events. These values may offer an approach to constraining changes in two elusive parameters: subglacial erosion and ice sheet melt.

  15. Environmental Life Cycle Assessment of marine sediment decontamination by citric acid enhanced-microwave heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falciglia, Pietro P; Ingrao, Carlo; De Guidi, Guido; Catalfo, Alfio; Finocchiaro, Guglielmo; Farina, Marcello; Liali, Maria; Lorenzano, Giuseppe; Valastro, Gaetano; Vagliasindi, Federico G A

    2018-04-01

    The potential ability of microwave heating (MWH) for the remediation of marine sediments affected by severe hydrocarbon (HC) contamination was investigated. Decontamination effectiveness and environmental sustainability through a comparative Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) were addressed. Main results revealed that the application of a 650-W MWH treatment resulted in a rapid (15min) HC removal. A citric acid (CA) dose of 0.1M led to enhanced-HC removals of 76.9, 96.5 and 99.7% after 5, 10 and 15min of MW irradiation, respectively. The increase in CA dose to 0.2M resulted in a shorter successful remediation time of 10min. The exponential kinetic model adopted showed a good correlation with the experimental data with R 2 values in the 0.913-0.987 range. The nature of the MW treatment was shown to differently influence the HC fraction concentration after the irradiation process. Achieved HC removals in such a short remediation time are hardly possible by other clean-up techniques, making the studied treatment a potential excellent choice. Removal mechanisms, which allowed the enhanced-MWH to operate as a highly effective multi-step technique (pure thermal desorption+chemical washing), undoubtedly represent a key factor in the whole remediation process. The LCA highlighted that the MW technology is the most environmentally sustainable alternative for sediment decontamination applications, with a total damage, which was 75.74% lower than that associated with the EK (0.0503pt). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Distribution of branched GDGTs in surface sediments from the Colville River, Alaska: Implications for the MBT'/CBT paleothermometer in Arctic marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Andrea J. M.; Shanahan, Timothy M.; Allison, Mead A.

    2016-07-01

    Significant climate fluctuations in the Arctic over the recent past, and additional predicted future temperature changes, highlight the need for high-resolution Arctic paleoclimate records. Arctic coastal environments supplied with terrigenous sediment from Arctic rivers have the potential to provide annual to subdecadal resolution records of climate variability over the last few millennia. A potential tool for paleotemperature reconstructions in these marine sediments is the revised methylation index of branched tetraethers (MBT')/cyclization ratio of branched tetraethers (CBT) proxy based on branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (brGDGTs). In this study, we examine the source of brGDGTs in the Colville River, Alaska, and the adjacent Simpson Lagoon and reconstruct temperatures from Simpson Lagoon sediments to evaluate the applicability of this proxy in Arctic estuarine environments. The Colville catchment soils, fluvial sediments, and estuarine sediments contain statistically similar brGDGT distributions, indicating that the brGDGTs throughout the system are soil derived with little alteration from in situ brGDGT production in the river or coastal waters. Temperatures reconstructed from the MBT'/CBT indices for surface samples show good agreement with regional summer (June through September) temperatures, suggesting a seasonal bias in Arctic temperature reconstructions from the Colville system. In addition, we reconstruct paleotemperatures from an estuarine sediment core that spans the last 75 years, revealing an overall warming trend in the twentieth century that is consistent with trends observed in regional instrumental records. These results support the application of this brGDGT-based paleotemperature proxy for subdecadal-scale summer temperature reconstructions in Arctic estuaries containing organic material derived from sediment-laden, episodic rivers.

  17. Influence of chemical reactivities of lipids bound in different pools on their isotopic compositions during degradation in marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, M.; Pan, H.; Culp, R.

    2013-05-01

    Lipid biomarkers and associated compound specific stable carbon isotope compositions have been widely applied to study biogeochemical cycling of organic matter in natural environments. This experimental study was specifically designed to examine the influence of chemical reactivities of lipid compounds bound in different pools on their isotopic composition during microbial degradation in marine sediments. 13C-labeled (labeling at different carbon positions of fatty acid chains) and unlabeled tripalmitins were spiked and incubated in natural oxic (top 1 cm) and anoxic (> 10 cm) marine sediments. In anoxic sediments, neither naturally-occurred fatty acids nor tripalmitin-derived 16:0 fatty acid were apparently degraded within two months and hence no significant variation in stable carbon isotopic composition of 16:0 fatty acid was observed. However, in oxic sediments, both naturally-occurred fatty acids and spiked tripalmitin-derived 16:0 fatty acid were degraded by 26% - 95% during incubation. For natural fatty acids such as 14:0, 16:1, 18:1, 20:5/20:4, and >C20:0, degradation rates varied according to the following order: polyunsaturated > monounsaturated > short chain saturated > long chain saturated fatty acids, which reflects variable reactivities of natural lipid compounds from different sources. Tripalmitin-derived 16:0 fatty acid degraded at an at least 2-3× faster rate compared to naturally-occurred 16:0 in sediments. Meanwhile, isotopic compositions of 16:0 fatty acid in the oxic sediments shifted negatively during incubation. It appears that the isotopic shifts are dependent on the amount of 13C-labeled compound spiked into the sediments but not related to the labeling position of 13C in the molecular structure. The results from this study provide direct evidence that the relative reactivities of lipid compounds from different sources (or different pools) can cause alterations in molecular isotopic composition during microbial degradation in natural

  18. Rare earth elements determination and distribution patterns in sediments of a polluted marine environment by instrumental neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusof, A.M.

    2001-01-01

    Results obtained from the analysis of sediment core samples taken from a fairly polluted marine environment were analyzed for the REE contents to determine the concentrations of La, Ce, Sm, Eu, Tb, Dy and Yb using instrumental neutron activation analysis. Core samples were divided into strata of between 2 to 3 cm intervals and prepared in the powdered form before irradiating them in a neutron flux of about 5.0 x 10 12 n x cm -2 x s -1 in a Triga Mark II reactor. Down-core concentration profiles of La, Ce, Sm, Eu, Tb, Dy and Yb in 3 core sediments from three sites are obtained. The shale-normalized REE pattern from each site was examined and later used to explain the history of sedimentation by natural processes such as shoreline erosion and weathering products deposited on the seabed and furnishing some baseline data and/or pollution trend occurring within the study area. The shale-normalized REE patterns also showed that LREE in the sediment samples exhibit enrichment relative to HREE particularly, La and Sm showing enrichment compared to the ratios in shale. REE concentrations of 124 μg/g at the surface of sediment collected at two of the three sites were found to decrease to 58 and 95 μg/g, respectively. This was of particular interest when it is used to explain the anomalies occurring in the marine sediment as a result of geochemical processes over a long period of time. Changes in concentrations from surface to bottom of the sediments ratioed to Sm concentrations and the correlation between concentrations of Sm and these elements were also investigated and correlation coefficients were calculated for all REEs and sites. Validation of the method used was done using a Soil-7 SRM. (author)

  19. Effects of pollution on the geochemical properties of marine sediments across the fringing reef of Aqaba, Red Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rousan, Saber; Al-Taani, Ahmed A; Rashdan, Maen

    2016-09-15

    The Gulf of Aqaba is of significant strategic and economic value to all gulf-bordering states, particularly to Jordan, where it provides Jordan with its only marine outlet. The Gulf is subject to a variety of impacts posing imminent ecological risk to its unique marine ecosystem. We attempted to investigate the status of metal pollution in the coastal sediments of the Jordanian Gulf of Aqaba. The distribution of Cd, Cr, Zn, Cu, Pb, Al, Fe, and Mn concentrations were determined in trapped and bottom-surface sediments at three selected sites at different depths. In addition, monthly sedimentation rates at varying water depths were also estimated at each sampling site using sediment traps. The high concentrations of Cd, Cr, Zn were recorded at the Phosphate Loading Birth (PLB) site followed by the Industrial Complex (IC) site indicating their dominant anthropogenic source (i.e., the contribution of industrial activities). However, Fe, Al, and Mn contents were related to inputs from the terrigenous (crustal) origin. Except for Al, Fe and Mn at the PLB site, the concentrations of metals exhibited a decreasing trend with increasing water depth (distance from the shoreline). The PLB site also showed the highest sedimentation rate which decreased with increasing water depth. The Enrichment factors (EFs) showed that Cd was the most enriched element in the sediment (indicating that Cd pollution is widespread), whereas the least enriched metal in sediments was Cu. EF values suggested that the coastal area is impacted by a combination of human and natural sources of metals, where the anthropogenic sources are intense in the PLB site (north of Gulf of Aqaba). The MSS area is potentially the least polluted, consistent with being a marine reserve. The IC sediments have been found to be impacted by human activities but less intensely compared to the PLB area. These results suggested that there are two sources of metals in sediments; the primary source is likely closer to PLB

  20. Plastic litter in sediments from a marine area likely to become protected (Aeolian Archipelago's islands, Tyrrhenian sea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fastelli, Paolo; Blašković, Andrea; Bernardi, Giulia; Romeo, Teresa; Čižmek, Hrvoje; Andaloro, Franco; Russo, Giovanni F; Guerranti, Cristiana; Renzi, Monia

    2016-12-15

    This research aims to define for the first time levels and patterns of different litter groups (macro, meso and microplastics) in sediments from a marine area designed for the institution of a new marine protected area (Aeolian Archipelago, Italy). Microplastics resulted the principal group and found in all samples analyzed, with shape and colours variable between different sampling sites. MPs levels measured in this study are similar to values recorded in harbour sites and lower than reported in Adriatic Sea, while macroplastics levels are notably lower than in harbor sites. Sediment grain-size and island extent resulted not significant in determining levels and distribution of plastic debris among islands. In the future, following the establishment of the MPA in the study area, these basic data will be useful to check for potential protective effects on the levels and distribution of plastic debris. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Mechanisms and geoecological consequences of cryogenic landslides in the area of marine sedimentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibman, M.; Ukraintseva, N.

    2009-04-01

    , then re-vegetation starts the inverse process. Classification of cryogenic landslides suggested in this paper is summarizing a 21-year experience of field work in landslide-affected areas of Pleistocene marine sedimentation. Two main types of landslide process are subdivided according to the mechanism and geomorphic effect: cryogenic translational slides and earth/mud flows. Main landforms in the first case are landslide cirques, while in the second case these are thermodenudation cirques. Soils at a landslide shear surface in landslide cirques have better agrochemical properties compared to the stable surface. Willow shrubs are the main source of biological productivity. They provide long-lasting favorable conditions for the formation of increased biomass. Shear surface of earth/mud flows is renovated very often and vegetation is not restored to 100% coverage until the ice body is exhausted.

  2. A synthesis of marine sediment core δ13C data over the last 150 000 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. E. M. Rickaby

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The isotopic composition of carbon, δ13C, in seawater is used in reconstructions of ocean circulation, marine productivity, air-sea gas exchange, and biosphere carbon storage. Here, a synthesis of δ13C measurements taken from foraminifera in marine sediment cores over the last 150 000 years is presented. The dataset comprises previously published and unpublished data from benthic and planktonic records throughout the global ocean. Data are placed on a common δ18O age scale suitable for examining orbital timescale variability but not millennial events, which are removed by a 10 ka filter. Error estimates account for the resolution and scatter of the original data, and uncertainty in the relationship between δ13C of calcite and of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC in seawater. This will assist comparison with δ13C of DIC output from models, which can be further improved using model outputs such as temperature, DIC concentration, and alkalinity to improve estimates of fractionation during calcite formation. High global deep ocean δ13C, indicating isotopically heavy carbon, is obtained during Marine Isotope Stages (MIS 1, 3, 5a, c and e, and low δ13C during MIS 2, 4 and 6, which are temperature minima, with larger amplitude variability in the Atlantic Ocean than the Pacific Ocean. This is likely to result from changes in biosphere carbon storage, modulated by changes in ocean circulation, productivity, and air-sea gas exchange. The North Atlantic vertical δ13C gradient is greater during temperature minima than temperature maxima, attributed to changes in the spatial extent of Atlantic source waters. There are insufficient data from shallower than 2500 m to obtain a coherent pattern in other ocean basins. The data synthesis indicates that basin-scale δ13C during the last interglacial (MIS 5e is not clearly distinguishable from the Holocene (MIS 1 or from MIS 5a and 5c, despite significant differences in ice volume and atmospheric CO2

  3. Alkenone paleothermometry: Biological lessons from marine sediment records off western South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prahl, Fredrick G.; Mix, Alan C.; Sparrow, Margaret A.

    2006-01-01

    An empirical global core-top calibration that relates the alkenone unsaturation index U37K' to mean annual SST (maSST) is statistically the same as that defined for a subarctic Pacific strain of Emiliania huxleyi (CCMP1742) grown exponentially in batch culture under isothermal conditions. Although both equations have been applied widely for paleoSST reconstruction, uncertainty still stems from two key ecological factors: variability in the details of biosynthesis among genetically distinct alkenone-producing strains, and impacts of non-thermal physiological growth factors on U37K'. New batch culture experiments with CCMP1742 here reveal that U37K' diverge systematically from the core-top calibration in response to nutrient depletion and light deprivation, two physiological stresses experienced by phytoplankton populations in the real ocean. Other aspects of alkenone/alkenoate composition also respond to these stresses and may serve as signatures of such effects, providing an opportunity to detect, understand, and potentially correct for such impacts on the geologic record. A test case documents that sediments from the Southeast Pacific display the alkenone/alkenoate compositional signature characteristic of cells physiologically stressed by light deprivation. Such an observation could be explained if marine snow provided a major vector of sedimentation for these biomarkers. Late Pleistocene U37K' records in the Southeast Pacific yield plausible paleotemperature histories of ice-age cooling, but ice-age alkenone/alkenoate signatures fall outside the range of modern calibration samples of similar U37K'. They better match core-top samples deposited beneath waters characterized by much cooler maSST, suggesting key features of ice-age ecology for alkenone-producing haptophytes were different from today, and that the U37K' index taken alone may misgauge the total range of ice-age cooling at these locations. Analysis of the full spectrum of alkenone/alkenoate compositions

  4. Sub-Milankovitch millennial-scale climate variability in Middle Eocene deep-marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotchman, J. I.; Pickering, K. T.; Robinson, S. A.

    2009-12-01

    Sub-Milankovitch millennial scale climate variability appears ubiquitous throughout the Quaternary and Pleistocene palaeoenvironmental records (e.g. McManus et al., 1999) yet the driving mechanism remains elusive. Possible mechanisms are generally linked to Quaternary-specific oceanic and cryospheric conditions (e.g. Maslin et al., 2001). An alternative external control, such as solar forcing, however, remains a compelling alternative hypothesis (e.g. Bond et al., 2001). This would imply that millennial-scale cycles are an intrinsic part of the Earth’s climatic system and not restricted to any specific period of time. Determining which of these hypotheses is correct impacts on our understanding of the climate system and its role as a driver of cyclic sedimentation during both icehouse and greenhouse climates. Here we show that Middle Eocene, laminated deep-marine sediments deposited in the Ainsa Basin, Spanish Pyrenees, contain 1,565-year (469 mm) cycles modulated by a 7,141-year (2157 mm) period. Climatic oscillations of 1,565-years recorded by element/Al ratios, are interpreted as representing climatically driven variation in sediment supply (terrigenous run-off) to the Ainsa basin. Climatic oscillations with this period are comparable to Quaternary Bond (~1,500-year), Dansgaard-Oeschger (~1,470-year) and Heinrich (~7,200-year) climatic events. Recognition of similar millennial-scale oscillations in the greenhouse climate of the Middle Eocene would appear inconsistent with an origin dependent upon Quaternary-specific conditions. Our observations lend support for pervasive millennial-scale climatic variability present throughout geologic time likely driven by an external forcing mechanism such as solar forcing. References Bond, G., Kromer, B., Beer, J., Muscheler, R., Evans, M.N., Showers, W., Hoffmann, S., Lotti-Bond, R., Hajdas, I., Bonani, G. 2001. Persistent Solar Influence on North Atlantic Climate During the Holocene. Science, 294, 2130-2136 Maslin, M

  5. Northern Gulf Littoral Initiative (NGLI), Geology and Physical Properties of Marine Sediments in the N.E. Gulf of Mexico: Data Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Northern Gulf Littoral Initiative (NGLI), Geology and Physical Properties of Marine Sediments in the N.E. gulf of Mexico: Data Report, was produced by the U.S....

  6. Nitrogen and phosphorus treatment of marine wastewater by a laboratory-scale sequencing batch reactor with eco-friendly marine high-efficiency sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Seonghyeon; Kim, Jinsoo; Kim, Sungchul; Lee, Sang-Seob

    2017-06-22

    We screened and identified a NH 3 -N-removing bacterial strain, Bacillus sp. KGN1, and a [Formula: see text] removing strain, Vibrio sp. KGP1, from 960 indigenous marine isolates from seawater and marine sediment from Tongyeong, South Korea. We developed eco-friendly high-efficiency marine sludge (eco-HEMS), and inoculated these marine bacterial strains into the marine sediment. A laboratory-scale sequencing batch reactor (SBR) system using the eco-HEMS for marine wastewater from land-based fish farms improved the treatment performance as indicated by 88.2% removal efficiency (RE) of total nitrogen (initial: 5.6 mg/L) and 90.6% RE of total phosphorus (initial: 1.2 mg/L) under the optimal operation conditions (food and microorganism (F/M) ratio, 0.35 g SCOD Cr /g mixed liquor volatile suspended solids (MLVSS)·d; dissolved oxygen (DO) 1.0 ± 0.2 mg/L; hydraulic retention time (HRT), 6.6 h; solids retention time (SRT), 12 d). The following kinetic parameters were obtained: cell yield (Y), 0.29 g MLVSS/g SCOD Cr ; specific growth rate (µ), 0.06 d -1 ; specific nitrification rate (SNR), 0.49 mg NH 3 -N/g MLVSS·h; specific denitrification rate (SDNR), 0.005 mg [Formula: see text]/g MLVSS·h; specific phosphorus uptake rate (SPUR), 0.12 mg [Formula: see text]/g MLVSS·h. The nitrogen- and phosphorus-removing bacterial strains comprised 18.4% of distribution rate in the microbial community of eco-HEMS under the optimal operation conditions. Therefore, eco-HEMS effectively removed nitrogen and phosphorus from highly saline marine wastewater from land-based fish farms with improving SNR, SDNR, and SPUR values in more diverse microbial communities. DO: dissolved oxygen; Eco-HEMS: eco-friendly high efficiency marine sludge; F/M: food and microorganism ratio; HRT: hydraulic retention time; ML(V)SS: mixed liquor (volatile) suspended solids; NCBI: National Center for Biotechnology Information; ND: not determined; qPCR: quantitative real-time polymerase

  7. Application of microwave energy to speed up the alkaline extraction of humic and fulvic acids from marine sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romaris-Hortas, Vanessa; Moreda-Pineiro, Antonio [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Nutrition and Bromatology, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Santiago de Compostela, Avenida das Ciencias s/n, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Bermejo-Barrera, Pilar [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Nutrition and Bromatology, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Santiago de Compostela, Avenida das Ciencias s/n, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain)], E-mail: pbermejo@usc.es

    2007-10-29

    The feasibility of microwave energy to speed up the alkaline extraction of humic substances (humic acid, HA, and fulvic acid, FA) from marine sediments has been checked. Extractions were performed by using 20 mL of sodium hydroxide at 0.1 M (two repeated extractions) after an ultrasound-assisted acid pre-treatment of samples to remove the carbonate fraction (ultrasound power at 17 kHz, 10 mL of 6.0 M hydrochloric acid for 15 min). After separation of HA and FA fractions by acidifying with 6 M HCl, the FA fraction (supernatant) was purified by passing the solution through a column of Amberlite XAD-8. Both HA and FA extracts were measured by UV-visible spectrophotometry. All variables affecting the extraction process (sodium hydroxide concentration and volume, ramp and hold times, temperature and number of repeated extractions) have been screened by using a Plackett-Burman design (PBD) as multivariate approach. The variables temperature and number of repeated extractions were the most significant factors (P = 95%) affecting the extraction of both FA and HA from marine sediments. These two variables have led optimum values of 150 deg. C and two repeated extractions. The developed method has been found precise (R.S.D.s of 9% for HA and 12% for FA, for 11 determinations) and its results were comparable in terms of elemental (C, H and N) composition to those obtained after applying methods based on mechanical stirring and ultrasounds assisting. However, higher HA and FA concentrations than those obtained after conventional stirring and ultrasound irradiation were obtained when applying microwave energy. This means a higher efficiency of microwave energy than ultrasounds or mechanical stirring to extract HA and FA fractions from marine sediments. The method was finally applied to different surface marine sediments from the Ria de Arousa estuary.

  8. Cultivation of autotrophic ammonia-oxidizing archaea from marine sediments in coculture with sulfur-oxidizing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Byoung-Joon; Park, Soo-Je; Yoon, Dae-No; Schouten, Stefan; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S; Rhee, Sung-Keun

    2010-11-01

    The role of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) in nitrogen cycling in marine sediments remains poorly characterized. In this study, we enriched and characterized AOA from marine sediments. Group I.1a crenarchaea closely related to those identified in marine sediments and "Candidatus Nitrosopumilus maritimus" (99.1 and 94.9% 16S rRNA and amoA gene sequence identities to the latter, respectively) were substantially enriched by coculture with sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB). The selective enrichment of AOA over ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) is likely due to the reduced oxygen levels caused by the rapid initial growth of SOB. After biweekly transfers for ca. 20 months, archaeal cells became the dominant prokaryotes (>80%), based on quantitative PCR and fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis. The increase of archaeal 16S rRNA gene copy numbers was coincident with the amount of ammonia oxidized, and expression of the archaeal amoA gene was observed during ammonia oxidation. Bacterial amoA genes were not detected in the enrichment culture. The affinities of these AOA to oxygen and ammonia were substantially higher than those of AOB. [(13)C]bicarbonate incorporation and the presence and activation of genes of the 3-hydroxypropionate/4-hydroxybutyrate cycle indicated autotrophy during ammonia oxidation. In the enrichment culture, ammonium was oxidized to nitrite by the AOA and subsequently to nitrate by Nitrospina-like bacteria. Our experiments suggest that AOA may be important nitrifiers in low-oxygen environments, such as oxygen-minimum zones and marine sediments.

  9. The impact of military activities on the concentration of mercury in soils of military training grounds and marine sediments

    OpenAIRE

    G?bka, Karolina; Be?dowski, Jacek; Be?dowska, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Military activities have been conducted on land and at sea. Both during conflicts and in peace time, some regions served as a military training ground which included firing positions and bunkers. Mercury fulminate has been used in ammunition primers and detonators. Certain amount of ammunition was dumped into the Baltic Sea after the Second World War. Because of corroded containers, mercury can be released into the marine environment. The soil and sediment samples were taken from military tra...

  10. Monitoring in the nearshore: A process for making reasoned decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodkin, James L.; Dean, T.A.

    2003-01-01

    Over the past several years, a conceptual framework for the GEM nearshore monitoring program has been developed through a series of workshops. However, details of the proposed monitoring program, e.g. what to sample, where to sample, when to sample and at how many sites, have yet to be determined. In FY 03 we were funded under Project 03687 to outline a process whereby specific alternatives to monitoring are developed and presented to the EVOS Trustee Council for consideration. As part of this process, two key elements are required before reasoned decisions can be made. These are: 1) a comprehensive historical perspective of locations and types of past studies conducted in the nearshore marine communities within Gulf of Alaska, and 2) estimates of costs for each element of a proposed monitoring program. We have developed a GIS database that details available information from past studies of selected nearshore habitats and species in the Gulf of Alaska and provide a visual means of selecting sites based (in part) on the locations for which historical data of interest are available. We also provide cost estimates for specific monitoring plan alternatives and outline several alternative plans that can be accomplished within reasonable budgetary constraints. The products that we will provide are: 1) A GIS database and maps showing the location and types of information available from the nearshore in the Gulf of Alaska; 2) A list of several specific monitoring alternatives that can be conducted within reasonable budgetary constraints; and 3) Cost estimates for proposed tasks to be conducted as part of the nearshore program. Because data compilation and management will not be completed until late in FY03 we are requesting support for close-out of this project in FY 04.

  11. Exopolysaccharide production by a marine Pseudoalteromonas sp. strain isolated from Madeira Archipelago ocean sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca, Christophe; Lehmann, Mareen; Torres, Cristiana A V; Baptista, Sílvia; Gaudêncio, Susana P; Freitas, Filomena; Reis, Maria A M

    2016-06-25

    Exopolysaccharides (EPS) are polymers excreted by some microorganisms with interesting properties and used in many industrial applications. A new Pseudoalteromonas sp. strain, MD12-642, was isolated from marine sediments and cultivated in bioreactor in saline culture medium containing glucose as carbon source. Its ability to produce EPS under saline conditions was demonstrated reaching an EPS production of 4.4g/L within 17hours of cultivation, corresponding to a volumetric productivity of 0.25g/Lh, the highest value so far obtained for Pseudoalteromonas sp. strains. The compositional analysis of the EPS revealed the presence of galacturonic acid (41-42mol%), glucuronic acid (25-26mol%), rhamnose (16-22mol%) and glucosamine (12-16mol%) sugar residues. The polymer presents a high molecular weight (above 1000kDa). These results encourage the biotechnological exploitation of strain MD12-642 for the production of valuable EPS with unique composition, using saline by-products/wastes as feedstocks. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Thermostable Bacteriocin BL8 from Bacillus licheniformis isolated from marine sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smitha, S; Bhat, S G

    2013-03-01

    To isolate and characterize bacteriocin, BL8, from the bacteria identified as Bacillus licheniformis from marine environment. One-hundred and twelve bacterial isolates from sediment and water samples collected off the coast of Cochin, India, were screened for antibacterial activity. Strain BTHT8, identified as Bacillus licheniformis, inhibited the growth of Gram-positive test organisms. The active component labelled as bacteriocin BL8 was partially purified by ammonium sulphate fractionation and was subjected to glycine SDS-PAGE. The band exhibiting antimicrobial activity was electroeluted and analysed using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, and the molecular mass was determined as 1.4 kDa. N-terminal amino acid sequencing of BL8 gave a 13 amino acid sequence stretch. Bacteriocin BL8 was stable even after boiling at 100 °C for 30 min and over a wide pH range of 1-12. A novel, pH-tolerant and thermostable bacteriocin BL8, active against the tested Gram-positive bacteria, was isolated from Bacillus licheniformis. This study reports a stable, low molecular weight bacteriocin from Bacillus licheniformis. This bacteriocin can be used to address two important applications: as a therapeutic agent and as a biopreservative in food processing industry. © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  13. Offshore drilling effects in Brazilian SE marine sediments: a meta-analytical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dore, Marina Pereira; Farias, Cássia; Hamacher, Cláudia

    2017-01-01

    The exploration and production of oil and gas reserves often result to drill cutting accumulations on the seafloor adjacent to drill locations. In this study, the detection of drilling influence on marine sediments was performed by meta-analytical comparison between data from pre- and post-drilling surveys undertaken in offshore Campos Basin, southeast of Brazil. Besides this overall appraisal on the geochemical variables, a multivariate assessment, considering only the post-drilling data, was performed. Among the variables, fines content, carbonates, total organic carbon, barium, chromium, copper, iron, manganese, nickel, lead, vanadium, zinc, and total petroleum hydrocarbons, only barium, copper, and hydrocarbons were related to drilling impacts. In relation to the point of discharge, relative elevated levels in the post-drilling campaigns were observed preferentially up to 500 m in the northeast and southwest directions, associated to the Brazil Current-predominant direction. Other distributed concentrations in the surroundings seem to indicate the dilution and dispersion of drilling waste promoted by meteoceanographic factors.

  14. Neutron activation analysis methodology of marine sediments of the Cuban shelf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, G.

    1988-01-01

    It is described the methodology followed for the neutron activation analysis of marine sediments of the Cuban shelf. A total of 35 elements were determined by means of the employment of thermal and epithermal fluxes of a nuclear reactor as well as from the flux of a generator of 14 MeV neutrons. It is signaled the particularities of detection and measurement of some elements and their interferences, with and special mention of the correction over 153 Sm, 113m In(Sn), 65 Zn, 160 Th, 169 Yb, 75 Sc and 177 Lu. It is concluded that 82% of elements may be determined with epithermal neutrons and 41%, with thermal neutrons. Only Si is determined with 14 MeV neutrons. Moreover, it is recommended the optimal periods of decaying (''cooling'') by groups of elements. The determined elements were: Ag, As, Au, Ba, Br, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, Fe, Hf, K, La, Lu, Mo, Na, Nd, Ni, Rb, Sb, Sc, Se, Si, Sm, Sn, Sr, Ta, Tb, Th, U, W, Yb, Zn and Zr. The accuracy varied between 1% and 5% to 19 elements, between 6% and 10% to 5 elements, between 11% and 30% to 6 elements and it was greater than 30% to 5 elements

  15. Radioactivity in Norwegian Waters: Distribution in seawater and sediments, and uptake in marine organisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heldal, Hilde Elise

    2001-07-01

    Prior to the detonation of the first thermonuclear bomb, small amounts of radioactivity, for example in mineral water, were considered to be health enriching. Negative experiences related to thermonuclear bombs and several nuclear accidents have, however, changed people's attitude towards radioactivity during the past 40-50 years. Today, there is a common concern for regular and potential accidental releases of radioactivity from sources such as Sellafield. Although this is important, incorrect assessments of the effects of these releases (e.g. created by uncritical journalism) have the potential to harm the country's fisheries and economy. Therefore, it is of major importance to document up-to-date levels of radioactive contamination of the marine environment, and be able to place these into the proper perspectives. The main topics of the thesis may be summarised as follows: (1) Distribution of Caesium-137, Plutonium-238, Plutonium-239,240 and Americium-241 in sediments with emphasis on the Spitsbergen-Bear Island area, (2) Uptake of Caesium-137 in phytoplankton representative for the Barents and Norwegian Seas phytoplankton communities (laboratory experiments), (3) Bioaccumulation of Caesium-137 in food webs in the Barents and Norwegian Seas, (4) Geographical variations of Caesium-137 in harbour porpoises (Phocoena phocoena) along the Norwegian coast, (5) Transport times for Technetium-99 from Sellafield to various locations along the Norwegian coast and the Arctic Ocean.

  16. Neutron activation analysis of trace elements in a marine sediment reference material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esquivel, D.; Eguren, L.; Montoya, E.

    1993-01-01

    As part of the second intercomparison run of ARCAL-IV, it was analyzed the marine sediment, reference materials PACS-NR CC1 by INAA, in the RP-10 Reactor with a thermal flux of 7,8 x 10 13 n/cm 2 s. The results obtained (± 1σ,n=4) were: Co: 17,2±0,8 ppm; Cr:97,8±0,6 ppm; Fe: 46,0± 0,7 ppm; Na: 31,0±1,09/kg; Sb: 175±5 ppm; in good agreement with the certified values. The results in ppm (±18,n=4), for non certified elements were:Ba: 730±58; Ce: 25±3; Cs: 3,8±0,8; Eu: 1,00±0,03; Hf: 3,30±0,07; Lu:0,25±0,04; Rb: 44,0±0,9; Sc: 14,40±0,04; Sm: 3,4±0,5; Ta: 0,60±0,03; Tb: 0,5±0,05; Th: 3,80±0,02; U: 2,6±0,4; which are in good agreement with other three Latin American and one European INAA Laboratories. It was used the comparative method with AGV-1, GSP-1 and G-2 , USGS reference materials, as standards. (authors). 7 refs., 4 tabs

  17. Quick, portable toxicity testing of marine or terrigenous fluids, sediments, or chemicals with bioluminescent organism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabate, R.W.; Stiffey, A.V.; Dewailly, E.L. [Lumitox Gulf L.C., New Orleans, LA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    A hand-held, battery-operated instrument, which measures bioluminescence inhibition of the microscopic marine dinoflagellate Pyrocystis lunula, is capable of field-testing substances for toxicity. The organism is sensitive to ppb of strong toxicants. It tolerates some solvents in concentrations necessary for testing lipophylic samples. A test consumes only micrograms of sample. This method requires no adjustments for salinity, pH, color, or turbidity. It has been used successfully to test oil-well drilling fluids, brines produced with oil, waters and sediments from streams and lakes and petroleum-plant effluents containing contaminants such as benzene. The test is non-specific; however, if the substance is known, the end-point effects a direct measurement of its concentration. One-hour toxicity screening tests in the field produce results comparable to the standard four-hour laboratory test. Keeping the sample in the dark during incubation and testing, together with shortness of the overall procedure, eliminates anomalies from light-sensitive substances. Day-to-day variation, as well as among test replicates, is less than 10%. This quick method yields results comparable with a quick test that uses Photobacterium phosphoria, and with 96-hour tests that use Mysidopsis bahia, Artemia salina, Gonyaulax polyedra, Pimephales promelas, Ceriodaphnia dubia, and Cyprinodon variegatus.

  18. Radioactivity in Norwegian Waters: Distribution in seawater and sediments, and uptake in marine organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heldal, Hilde Elise

    2001-01-01

    Prior to the detonation of the first thermonuclear bomb, small amounts of radioactivity, for example in mineral water, were considered to be health enriching. Negative experiences related to thermonuclear bombs and several nuclear accidents have, however, changed people's attitude towards radioactivity during the past 40-50 years. Today, there is a common concern for regular and potential accidental releases of radioactivity from sources such as Sellafield. Although this is important, incorrect assessments of the effects of these releases (e.g. created by uncritical journalism) have the potential to harm the country's fisheries and economy. Therefore, it is of major importance to document up-to-date levels of radioactive contamination of the marine environment, and be able to place these into the proper perspectives. The main topics of the thesis may be summarised as follows: (1) Distribution of Caesium-137, Plutonium-238, Plutonium-239,240 and Americium-241 in sediments with emphasis on the Spitsbergen-Bear Island area, (2) Uptake of Caesium-137 in phytoplankton representative for the Barents and Norwegian Seas phytoplankton communities (laboratory experiments), (3) Bioaccumulation of Caesium-137 in food webs in the Barents and Norwegian Seas, (4) Geographical variations of Caesium-137 in harbour porpoises (Phocoena phocoena) along the Norwegian coast, (5) Transport times for Technetium-99 from Sellafield to various locations along the Norwegian coast and the Arctic Ocean

  19. Diversity and bioactivity of actinomycetes from marine sediments of the Yellow Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shumin; Ye, Liang; Tang, Xuexi

    2012-03-01

    Among the 116 actinomycetes collected from marine sediments of the Yellow Sea, 56 grew slowly and appeared after 2-3 weeks of incubation. Among the 56 strains, only 3 required seawater (SW) for growth, and 21 grew well in the medium prepared with SW rather than distilled water (DW), while the remaining 32 grew well either with SW or with DW. Six representatives with different morphological characteristics, including 1 SW-requiring strain and 5 well-growing with SW strains, were selected for phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene. Two strains belong to Micrococcaceae and Nocardiopsaceae respectively. The other 4 strains belong to the family of Streptomycetaceae. In the analyzed 6 strains, one was related to Nocardiopsis spp. and the other three were related to Streptomyces spp., representing new taxa. Bioactivity testing of fermentation products from 3 SW-requiring strains and 21 well-growing with SW strains revealed that 17 strains possessed remarkable activities against gram-positive pathogen or/and tumor cells, suggesting that they were prolific resources for natural drug discovery.

  20. Microbial distributions detected by an oligonucleotide microarray across geochemical zones associated with methane in marine sediments from the Ulleung Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briggs, Brandon R; Graw, Michael; Brodie, Eoin L; Bahk, Jang-Jun; Kim, Sung-Han; Hyun, Jung-Ho; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Torres, Marta; Colwell, Frederick S

    2013-11-01

    The biogeochemical processes that occur in marine sediments on continental margins are complex; however, from one perspective they can be considered with respect to three geochemical zones based on the presence and form of methane: sulfate–methane transition (SMTZ), gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ), and free gas zone (FGZ). These geochemical zones may harbor distinct microbial communities that are important in biogeochemical carbon cycles. The objective of this study was to describe the microbial communities in sediments from the SMTZ, GHSZ, and FGZ using molecular ecology methods (i.e. PhyloChip microarray analysis and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP)) and examining the results in the context of non-biological parameters in the sediments. Non-metric multidimensional scaling and multi-response permutation procedures were used to determine whether microbial community compositions were significantly different in the three geochemical zones and to correlate samples with abiotic characteristics of the sediments. This analysis indicated that microbial communities from all three zones were distinct from one another and that variables such as sulfate concentration, hydrate saturation of the nearest gas hydrate layer, and depth (or unmeasured variables associated with depth e.g. temperature, pressure) were correlated to differences between the three zones. The archaeal anaerobic methanotrophs typically attributed to performing anaerobic oxidation of methane were not detected in the SMTZ; however, the marine benthic group-B, which is often found in SMTZ, was detected. Within the GHSZ, samples that were typically closer to layers that contained higher hydrate saturation had indicator sequences related to Vibrio-type taxa. These results suggest that the biogeographic patterns of microbial communities in marine sediments are distinct based on geochemical zones defined by methane.

  1. A new marine sediment certified reference material (CRM) for the determination of persistent organic contaminants: IAEA-459.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolosa, Imma; Cassi, Roberto; Huertas, David

    2018-04-11

    A new marine sediment certified reference material (IAEA 459) with very low concentrations (μg kg -1 ) for a variety of persistent organic contaminants (POPs) listed by the Stockholm Convention, as well as other POPs and priority substances (PSs) listed in many environmental monitoring programs was developed by the IAEA. The sediment material was collected from the Ham River estuary in South Korea, and the assigned final values were derived from robust statistics on the results provided by selected laboratories which demonstrated technical and quality competence, following the guidance given in ISO Guide 35. The robust mean of the laboratory means was assigned as certified values, for those compounds where the assigned value was derived from at least five datasets and its relative expanded uncertainty was less than 40% of the assigned value (most of the values ranging from 8 to 20%). All the datasets were derived from at least two different analytical techniques which have allowed the assignment of certified concentrations for 22 polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, 6 organochlorinated (OC) pesticides, 5 polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), and 18 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAHs). Mass fractions of compounds that did not fulfill the criteria of certification are considered information values, which include 29 PAHs, 11 PCBs, 16 OC pesticides, and 5 PBDEs. The extensive characterization and associated uncertainties at concentration levels close to the marine sediment quality guidelines will make CRM 459 a valuable matrix reference material for use in marine environmental monitoring programs.

  2. Effects of oil dispersants on settling of marine sediment particles and particle-facilitated distribution and transport of oil components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zhengqing; Fu, Jie; Liu, Wen; Fu, Kunming; O'Reilly, S E; Zhao, Dongye

    2017-01-15

    This work investigated effects of three model oil dispersants (Corexit EC9527A, Corexit EC9500A and SPC1000) on settling of fine sediment particles and particle-facilitated distribution and transport of oil components in sediment-seawater systems. All three dispersants enhanced settling of sediment particles. The nonionic surfactants (Tween 80 and Tween 85) play key roles in promoting particle aggregation. Yet, the effects varied with environmental factors (pH, salinity, DOM, and temperature). Strongest dispersant effect was observed at neutral or alkaline pH and in salinity range of 0-3.5wt%. The presence of water accommodated oil and dispersed oil accelerated settling of the particles. Total petroleum hydrocarbons in the sediment phase were increased from 6.9% to 90.1% in the presence of Corexit EC9527A, and from 11.4% to 86.7% for PAHs. The information is useful for understanding roles of oil dispersants in formation of oil-sediment aggregates and in sediment-facilitated transport of oil and PAHs in marine eco-systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Distribution of clay minerals in marine sediments off Chennai, Bay of Bengal, India: Indicators of sediment sources and transport processes .

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Veerasingam, S.; Venkatachalapathy, R.; Ramkumar, T.

    . Due to the presence of man-made breakwaters and the naturally formed offshore shoals along the Chennai coast with a series of alternating zones of erosion and deposition caused. Rangarao et al. (2009) estimated the sediment transport along Ennore...

  4. Investigation of the Acoustics of Marine Sediments Using an Impedance Tube and Continued Investigation of the Acoustics of Marine Sediments Using Impedance Tube and Acoustic Resonator Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-02

    experiment design, construction and operation. Paul A. Waters is an Undergraduate Research Assistant on the project and is a UTME senior. Waters...P.S. Wilson and R.A. Roy, "Evidence of dispersion in a water-saturated granular sediment," presented at IEEE Oceans 󈧉 Europe, Brest , France, 2005...34Evidence of dispersion in a water-saturated granular sediment," in Proceedings of the IEEE Oceans 󈧉 Europe Conference, Brest , France, June 20-23, 2005

  5. Partition of iodine (¹²⁹I and ¹²⁷I) isotopes in soils and marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Violeta; Roos, Per; Aldahan, Ala; Hou, Xiaolin; Possnert, Göran

    2011-12-01

    Natural organic matter, such as humic and fulvic acids and humin, plays a key role in determining the fate and mobility of radioiodine in soil and sediments. The radioisotope ¹²⁹I is continuously produced and released from nuclear fuel reprocessing plants, and as a biophilic element, its environmental mobility is strongly linked to organic matter. Due to its long half-life (15.7 million years), ¹²⁹I builds up in the environment and can be traced since the beginning of the nuclear era in reservoirs such as soils and marine sediments. Nevertheless, partition of the isotope between the different types of organic matter in soil and sediment is rarely explored. Here we present a sequential extraction of ¹²⁹I and ¹²⁷I chemical forms encountered in a Danish soil, a soil reference material (IAEA-375), an anoxic marine sediment from Southern Norway and an oxic sediment from the Barents Sea. The different forms of iodine are related to water soluble, exchangeable, carbonates, oxides as well as iodine bound to humic acid, fulvic acid and to humin and minerals. This is the first study to identify ¹²⁹I in humic and fulvic acid and humin. The results show that 30-56% of the total ¹²⁷I and 42-60% of the total ¹²⁹I are associated with organic matter in soil and sediment samples. At a soil/sediment pH below 5.0-5.5, (¹²⁷I and ¹²⁹I in the organic fraction associate primarily with the humic acid while at soil/sediment pH > 6 ¹²⁹I was mostly found to be bound to fulvic acid. Anoxic conditions seem to increase the mobility and availability of iodine compared to oxic, while subaerial conditions (soils) reduces the availability of water soluble fraction compared to subaqueous (marine) conditions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Assessment of 238Pu and 239+240Pu, in marine sediments of the oceans Atlantic and Pacific of Guatemala

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendez Ochaita, L.

    2000-01-01

    In this investigation samples of marine sediments were taken from 14 places representatives of the oceans coast of Guatemala. For the assesment of 238 Pu and 239+240 Pu in sediments a radiochemical method was used to mineralize sediments and by ionic interchange it was separated from other elements, after that an electrodeposition of plutonium was made in metallic discs. The radioactivity of plutonium was measured by alpha spectrometry system and the alpha spectrums were obtained. The levels of plutonium are not higher than other countries that shown contamination. The contamination of isotope of 239+240 Pu is higher than 238 Pu and the contamination by two isotopes of plutonium is higher in the Atlantic than the Pacific ocean

  7. Rare earth elements determination and distribution patterns in sediments of polluted marine environment by instrumental neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akyil, S.; Yusof, A.M.; Wood, A.K.H.

    2001-01-01

    Results obtained from the analysis of sediment core samples taken from a fairly polluted marine environment were analyzed for the REE contents to determine the concentrations of La, Ce, Sm, Eu, Tb, Dy and Yb using instrumental neutron activation analysis. Core samples were divided into strata of between 2 to 3 cm intervals and prepared in the powdered form before irradiating them in a TRIGA Mk.II reactor. Down-core concentration profiles of La, Ce, Sm, Eu, Tb, Dy and Yb in 3 core sediments from three sites are obtained. The shale-normalized REE pattern from each site was examined and later used to explain the history of sedimentation by natural processes such as shoreline erosion and weathering products deposited on the seabed and furnishing some baseline data and/or pollution trend occurring within the study area

  8. The Tsitsikamma coastal shelf, Agulhas Bank, South Africa: example of an isolated Holocene sediment trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flemming, Burg W.; Keith Martin, A.

    2018-02-01

    Under certain geomorphological conditions, sandy sediments supplied to a coast may become trapped in nearshore sedimentary compartments because these are laterally confined by bedload boundaries or convergences. Where sediment supply is small or the shoreface very steep, and accommodation space as a consequence large, the trapping mechanism may be very efficient. The Tsitsikamma coast along the South African south coast is a case in point, the sediment supplied by local rivers over the past 12 ka having been trapped in a nearshore sediment wedge extending at least 5 km offshore. On the basis of high-resolution seismic surveys, the volume of the sediment wedge has been estimated at 1,354×106 m3. As 5% of this volume is considered to have been contributed by bioclastic material of marine origin, the terrestrial input would be 1,286×106 m3. This amounts to an average annual terrestrial sediment input of 0.1072×106 m3. Using a detailed sediment yield map, the modern mean annual sediment supply to the Tsitsikamma coast by local rivers has been estimated at 0.1028×106 m3. Unless coincidental, the remarkable similarity of the two values suggests that the current climatic conditions along the Tsitsikamma coast correspond to the Holocene mean. This conclusion is supported by the currently available climate data for the South African south coast.

  9. Butyltin compounds and their relation with organic matter in marine sediments from San Vicente Bay-Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinochet, Hugo; Tessini, Catherine; Bravo, Manuel; Quiroz, Waldo; De Gregori, Ida

    2009-08-01

    Tributyltin and its degradation products, mono-and dibutyltin have been determined in sediments collected in some representative sites in San Vicente Bay, Chile. The organic matter contents of sediments and water collected simultaneously from the same sampling sites were also determined. High levels of total organic carbon were found in sediments, especially in those from the northern part of the bay (1.80-8.87%). Good correlations were found between total organic carbon and the oxidizable and refractory carbon fractions. Among the butyltin species determined, TBT presented the highest levels, ranging from 14 to 1,560 ng Sn g(-1) dry weight. Concentration ratios of TBT to DBT ranged between 1.33 and 3.10, showing a high degree of contamination in sediments of this Chilean bay. All data obtained were analysed by the chemometric method of principal components analysis. A strong correlation was found between TBT and DBT concentrations in sediments, the different organic matter contents in sediments and water. In marine organisms only TBT was detected, containing the filterer organism Semele solida higher level than Perumytilus purpuratus and Pyura chilensis (220, 150 and 120 ng Sn g(-1) dry weight, respectively). For the alga Rodoficea iridae the TBT concentration was 60 ng Sn g(-1) dw. Comparatively, these values are higher than those reported for the same kind of marine organisms worldwide. The different samples from San Vicente Bay were found to be contaminated by TBT. This contamination can be attributed to the different anthropogenic activities taking place in the bay.

  10. Formation of Calcium Silicates during Ignition of Marine Sediments and its Implication on the State of Silica on the Sea Floor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duursma, E.K.; Bosch, C.J.; Eisma, D.

    1976-01-01

    Anomalies in the formation of calcium silicates in various marine sediment samples were observed on ignition at 800°C. The hypothesis is put forward that silica, originating from the land and from marine diatoms, undergoes a slow hydrolysis in the seabed and becomes more reactive. (author)

  11. Phylogeny of Cyclic Nitramine-Degrading Psychrophilic Bacteria in Marine Sediment and Their Potential Role in the Natural Attenuation of Explosives

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhao, Jian-Shen; Spain, Jim; Thiboutot, Sonia; Ampleman, Guy; Greer, Charles; Hawari, Jalal

    2004-01-01

    ...) and octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX) in marine sediment from Halifax Harbour. In the present study, we isolated several novel psychrophilic bacteria from the sediment with optimal growth temperature at 10 or 15 C...

  12. Environmental risk assessment of triclosan and ibuprofen in marine sediments using individual and sub-individual endpoints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusceddu, F H; Choueri, R B; Pereira, C D S; Cortez, F S; Santos, D R A; Moreno, B B; Santos, A R; Rogero, J R; Cesar, A

    2018-01-01

    The guidelines for the Environmental Risk Assessment (ERA) of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCP) recommend the use of standard ecotoxicity assays and the assessment of endpoints at the individual level to evaluate potential effects of PPCP on biota. However, effects at the sub-individual level can also affect the ecological fitness of marine organisms chronically exposed to PPCP. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the environmental risk of two PPCP in marine sediments: triclosan (TCS) and ibuprofen (IBU), using sub-individual and developmental endpoints. The environmental levels of TCS and IBU were quantified in marine sediments from the vicinities of the Santos submarine sewage outfall (Santos Bay, São Paulo, Brazil) at 15.14 and 49.0 ng g -1 , respectively. A battery (n = 3) of chronic bioassays (embryo-larval development) with a sea urchin (Lytechinus variegatus) and a bivalve (Perna perna) were performed using two exposure conditions: sediment-water interface and elutriates. Moreover, physiological stress through the Neutral Red Retention Time Assay (NRRT) was assessed in the estuarine bivalve Mytella charruana exposed to TCS and IBU spiked sediments. These compounds affected the development of L. variegatus and P. perna (75 ng g -1 for TCS and 15 ng g -1 for IBU), and caused a significant decrease in M. charruana lysosomal membrane stability at environmentally relevant concentrations (0.08 ng g -1 for TCS and 0.15 ng g -1 for IBU). Chemical and ecotoxicological data were integrated and the risk quotient estimated for TCS and IBU were higher than 1.0, indicating a high environmental risk of these compounds in sediments. These are the first data of sediment risk assessment of pharmaceuticals and personal care products of Latin America. In addition, the results suggest that the ERA based only on individual-level and standard toxicity tests may overlook other biological effects that can affect the health of marine organisms

  13. Enriching Metal-Oxidizing Microbes from Marine Sediment on Cathodic Currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, A. R.; Nealson, K. H.

    2013-12-01

    The ability of organisms to transfer electrons to and from substrates outside the cell is reshaping the way we look at microbial respiration. While this process, termed extracellular electron transport (EET), has been described in a number of metal reducing organisms, current evidence suggests that this process is widespread in nature and across physiologies. Additionally, it has been speculated that these previously overlooked electrochemical interactions may play an important role in global biogeochemical cycles. Requirements for EET could play a role in why the ';uncultured majority' have so far been resistant to culturing. As such, we are currently developing culturing techniques to target microbes capable of utilizing insoluble electron acceptors utilizing electrochemical techniques. Microbe-electrode interactions are analogous to the reactions that occur between microbes and minerals and may provide an apt way to mimic the environmental conditions (i.e., insoluble electron donor/acceptor at specific redox potentials) required for culturing specialized or EET dependent metabolisms. It has been previously demonstrated that aquatic sediments are capable of utilizing anodes as electron acceptors, thereby generating a current. While, it is known that microbes utilize electrons from a cathode for the reduction of different metals and oxygen in microbial fuel cells, currently there are no reports of environmental enrichments of microbes using cathodes. Replicate microcosms from marine sediments (sampled from Catalina Harbor, California) were incubated with ITO plated glass electrodes. Negative current production at -400mV (vs. Ag/AgCl reference electrodes) potentials was sustained for four weeks. Secondary enrichments were then constructed using the cathode as the primary electron source and a variety of anaerobic terminal electron acceptors--Nitrate, Fe3+, and SO42-. Positive current was maintained in enrichment cultures (compared to abiotic control containing

  14. When time affects space: Dispersal ability and extreme weather events determine metacommunity organization in marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corte, Guilherme N; Gonçalves-Souza, Thiago; Checon, Helio H; Siegle, Eduardo; Coleman, Ross A; Amaral, A Cecília Z

    2018-05-01

    Community ecology has traditionally assumed that the distribution of species is mainly influenced by environmental processes. There is, however, growing evidence that environmental (habitat characteristics and biotic interactions) and spatial processes (factors that affect a local assemblage regardless of environmental conditions - typically related to dispersal and movement of species) interactively shape biological assemblages. A metacommunity, which is a set of local assemblages connected by dispersal of individuals, is spatial in nature and can be used as a straightforward approach for investigating the interactive and independent effects of both environmental and spatial processes. Here, we examined (i) how environmental and spatial processes affect the metacommunity organization of marine macroinvertebrates inhabiting the intertidal sediments of a biodiverse coastal ecosystem; (ii) whether the influence of these processes is constant through time or is affected by extreme weather events (storms); and (iii) whether the relative importance of these processes depends on the dispersal abilities of organisms. We found that macrobenthic assemblages are influenced by each of environmental and spatial variables; however, spatial processes exerted a stronger role. We also found that this influence changes through time and is modified by storms. Moreover, we observed that the influence of environmental and spatial processes varies according to the dispersal capabilities of organisms. More effective dispersers (i.e., species with planktonic larvae) are more affected by spatial processes whereas environmental variables had a stronger effect on weaker dispersers (i.e. species with low motility in larval and adult stages). These findings highlight that accounting for spatial processes and differences in species life histories is essential to improve our understanding of species distribution and coexistence patterns in intertidal soft-sediments. Furthermore, it shows that

  15. Dynamic transition of chemolithotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in response to amendment with nitrate in deposited marine sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomo eAoyagi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Although environmental stimuli are known to affect the structure and function of microbial communities, their impact on the metabolic network of microorganisms has not been well investigated. Here, geochemical analyses, high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA genes and transcripts, and isolation of potentially relevant bacteria were carried out to elucidate the anaerobic respiration processes stimulated by nitrate (20 mM amendment of marine sediments. Marine sediments deposited by the Great East Japan Earthquake in 2011 were incubated anaerobically in the dark at 25°C for 5 days. Nitrate in slurry water decreased gradually for 2 days, then more rapidly until its complete depletion at day 5; production of N2O followed the same pattern. From day 2 to 5, the sulfate concentration increased and the sulfur content in solid-phase sediments significantly decreased. These results indicated that denitrification and sulfur oxidation occurred simultaneously. Illumina sequencing revealed the proliferation of known sulfur oxidizers, i.e., Sulfurimonas spp. and Chromatiales bacteria, which accounted for approximately 43.5% and 14.8% of the total population at day 5, respectively. They also expressed 16S rRNA to a considerable extent, whereas the other microorganisms, e.g., iron(III reducers and methanogens, became metabolically active at the end of the incubation. Extinction dilution culture in a basal-salts medium supplemented with sulfur compounds and nitrate successfully isolated the predominant sulfur oxidizers: Sulfurimonas sp. strain HDS01 and Thioalkalispira sp. strain HDS22. Their 16S rRNA genes showed 95.2−96.7% sequence similarity to the closest cultured relatives and they grew chemolithotrophically on nitrate and sulfur. Novel sulfur-oxidizing bacteria were thus directly involved in carbon fixation under nitrate-reducing conditions, activating anaerobic respiration processes and the reorganization of microbial communities in the deposited marine

  16. Vitamin B1 in marine sediments: pore water concentration gradient drives benthic flux with potential biological implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle eMonteverde

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin B1, or thiamin, can limit primary productivity in marine environments, however the major marine environmental sources of this essential coenzyme remain largely unknown. Vitamin B1 can only be produced by organisms that possess its complete synthesis pathway, while other organisms meet their cellular B1 quota by scavenging the coenzyme from exogenous sources. Due to high bacterial cell density and diversity, marine sediments could represent some of the highest concentrations of putative B1 producers, yet these environments have received little attention as a possible source of B1 to the overlying water column. Here we report the first dissolved pore water profiles of B1 measured in cores collected in two consecutive years from Santa Monica Basin, CA. Vitamin B1 concentrations were fairly consistent between the two years ranging from 30 pM up to 770 pM. A consistent maximum at ~5 cm sediment depth covaried with dissolved concentrations of iron. Pore water concentrations were higher than water column levels and represented some of the highest known environmental concentrations of B1 measured to date, (over two times higher than maximum water column concentrations suggesting increased rates of cellular production and release within the sediments. A one dimensional diffusion-transport model applied to the B1 profile was used to estimate a diffusive benthic flux of ~0.7 nmol m 2 d-1. This is an estimated flux across the sediment-water interface in a deep sea basin; if similar magnitude B-vitamin fluxes occur in shallow coastal waters, benthic input could prove to be a significant B1-source to the water column and may play an important role in supplying this organic growth factor to auxotrophic primary producers.

  17. Nearshore and offshore environmental effects monitoring at the Sable Offshore Energy project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurley, G. V.

    2000-01-01

    A monitoring program to determine whether any temporary or permanent environmental perturbations may be attributable to the Sable offshore gas pipeline project as it approaches landfall at Goldboro through an outer bay is discussed, This nearshore region is an active fishing region for the residents of Goldboro, hence the concern about possible contamination. The monitoring project began with a baseline study, followed by monitoring the construction and the recovery period following construction, to ensure that any persistent changes to the nearshore aquatic environment were documented. The monitoring study included representatives of the fishing community to ensure that concerns are addressed early and on a continuing basis. At various phases of the project water properties,sediment modelling, the effects of construction on sea bottom conditions, benthic biota and cultivated mussels, water quality, phytoplankton, and resuspension of toxic cysts, terns and other seabirds were studied. Monitoring programs were also established for sea urchins and mussels, two important commercial species. Commercial-sized sea urchins showed a decrease of 60 per cent between 1998 and 1999 (i.e. the construction period). Recovery of sea urchin population in the immediate trench region will be the special focus of the post-construction monitoring phase. Mussel spat settlement and mussel tissue condition, lobster trapping, water properties, and bird behaviour showed no measurable changes during construction monitoring. In addition to these studies there is an ongoing offshore monitoring program in effect by Sable Offshore Energy Inc., put in place as a condition of approval of its Development Plan by the Canada-Nova Scotia Offshore Petroleum Board. This program monitors attributes such as water quality, suspended particulate matter in the benthic boundary layer, sediment quality, the benthic habitat and megafaunal community, shellfish body burden and taint, marine mammals and seabirds

  18. Marine sediments and palaeoclimatic variations since the Late Pleistocene: An overview for the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.; Hashimi, N.H.

    A large number of surfacial and sub-surface sediments from the Arabian Sea have been studied to enhance our understanding of palaeoclimatic variations over the Indian region. Bsically the surficial sediments have been studied for their living...

  19. Measuring Customer Data Protection in Nearshores

    OpenAIRE

    Ruivo, Pedro; Oliveira, Tiago; Santos, Vítor

    2015-01-01

    Customer's data protection and nearshores aspects are currently experiencing an increasing interest from both the academic, governments and business communities. This paper empirically test 12 factors of customer data protection in regards to three nearshores locations. Testing was performed based on a 127 data set web survey across three nearshore locations (Egypt, Portugal and Romania) of a large multinational software company. Our study report high scores for Data Classification and Passwo...

  20. Quaternary forest and climate history of Hokkaido, Japan, from marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igarashi, Yaeko

    Pollen data from Quaternary marine sediments deposited in central Hokkaido, northern Japan provide insight into northeast Asian vegetation and climatic changes over the last few million years. During the Early Pleistocene, coniferous forest, dominated by Picea and Cryptomeria japonica, and taiga composed of Larix and Picea developed under cool/wet and cold/dry climates, respectively. Strong climatic contrasts are inferred from Late Pleistocene interglacial and glacial pollen assemblages which precede the last glacial cycle. In the former, cool temperate broad-leaf forest, mainly composed of Fagus, reflects a warmer and wetter climate than now. In the latter, taiga similar to that now found in northern Sakhalin apparently flourished in Hokkaido. The composition of pollen assemblages correlated with Oxygen Isotope Stage 5, changed from cool temperate forest of Quercus, Ulmus and Juglans (Substage 5e), to Picea-Larix taiga (Substage 5d), cool temperate forest of Quercus and Ulmus (Substage 5c) and Picea-Abies forest (Substage 5b). Compared with present conditions, climate during Stage 5 in northern Japan apparently fluctuated from warmer/wetter to colder/drier. Taiga composed of Picea, Pinus and Larix indicating colder/dry conditions during Stage 4, was replaced by Picea-Abies forest and Picea-Larix taiga in Stage 3, suggesting relatively cool and cold/dry environments. Taiga and mixed forest with taiga and cool temperate components characterize Stage 2. Holocene forests with Juglans-Betula and Quercus-Juglans were succeeded by Picea and Abies during the early Holocene warm interval ˜7000 BP. Subsequently, Quercus-Ulmus and Abies-Alnus assemblages reflect climatic deterioration. 'Pan-mixed' forest has been developed in Hokkaido since 2000 BP.

  1. Marine organic geochemistry in industrially affected coastal areas in Greece: Hydrocarbons in surface sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzianestis, Ioannis

    2015-04-01

    Hydrocarbons are abundant components of the organic material in coastal zones. Their sources are mainly anthropogenic, but several natural ones have also been recognized. Among hydrocarbons, the polycyclic aromatic ones (PAHs) have received special attention since they considered as hazardous environmental chemicals and are included in priority pollutant lists. The purpose of this study was to investigate the distribution, sources and transport pathways of hydrocarbons in marine areas in Greece directly influenced from the operation of major industrial units in the coastal zone by using a molecular marker approach, characteristic compositional patterns and related indices and also to evaluate their potential toxicity. Thirty two surface sediment samples were collected from three marine areas: a) Antikyra bay in Korinthiakos gulf, affected from the operation of an alumina and production plant b) Larymna bay in Noth Evoikos, affected from the operation of a nickel production plant and c) Aliveri bay in South Evoikos Gulf, affected from a cement production plant. In all the studied areas aquaculture and fishing activities have been also developed in the coastal zone. High aliphatic hydrocarbon (AHC) concentrations (~500 μg/g), indicating significant petroleum related inputs, were measured only in Antikyra bay. In all the other samples, AHC values were below 100 μg/g. N-alkanes were the most prominent resolved components (R) with an elevated odd to even carbon number preference, revealing the high importance of terrestrial inputs in the study areas. The unresolved complex mixture (UCM) was the major component of the aliphatic fraction (UCM/R > 4), indicating a chronic oil pollution. A series of hopanes were also identified, with patterns characteristic of oil-derived hydrocarbons, further confirming the presence of pollutant inputs from fossil fuel products. Extremely high PAH concentrations (> 100,000 ng/g) were found in the close vicinity of the alumina production

  2. Distribution of Trace Elements in Core Marine Sediments of Coastal East Malaysia by Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashraf, Ahmadreza; Saion, Elias; Gharibshahi, Elham; Kamari, Halimah Mohamed; Yap, Chee Kong; Hamzah, Mohd Suhaimi; Elias, Md Suhaimi

    2017-01-01

    A study was carried out on the distribution and enrichment of trace elements in the core marine sediments of East Malaysia from three stations at South China Sea and one station each at Sulu Sea and Sulawesi Sea. Five stations of sediment cores were recovered and the vertical concentration profiles of six elements namely Br, Cs, Hf, Rb, Ta, and V were determined using the instrumental neutron activation analysis. The enrichment factor, geoaccumulation index and the modified degree of contamination were used to calculate the anthropogenic and pollution status of the elements in the samples. Except for Cs and Hf, which by the enrichment factor are categorized from minimum enrichment to moderate enrichment in all stations and for V and Rb in Sulu Sea and Sulawesi Sea, which are categorized minimum enrichment, other elements are found to be no enrichment at all stations. The geoaccumulation index of Hf in one station shows moderately polluted and for other elements are unpolluted. However, the modified degree values of all samples are less than 1, suggesting very low contamination of elements found in all the stations. - Highlights: • Measurement of trace elements distribution in the Malaysian East core marine sediment by INAA. • Standard reference materials were used as quality control of analytical procedure. • Assessment of pollution based on EF of related elements to the average shale. • Determine the contamination status of trace elements with the modified degree of contamination. • Evaluation of pollution status by I geo calculation.

  3. Development of a hybrid pollution index for heavy metals in marine and estuarine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, James P; Ayoko, Godwin A; Martens, Wayde N; Goonetilleke, Ashantha

    2015-05-01

    Heavy metal pollution of sediments is a growing concern in most parts of the world, and numerous studies focussed on identifying contaminated sediments by using a range of digestion methods and pollution indices to estimate sediment contamination have been described in the literature. The current work provides a critical review of the more commonly used sediment digestion methods and identifies that weak acid digestion is more likely to provide guidance on elements that are likely to be bioavailable than other traditional methods of digestion. This work also reviews common pollution indices and identifies the Nemerow Pollution Index as the most appropriate method for establishing overall sediment quality. Consequently, a modified Pollution Index that can lead to a more reliable understanding of whole sediment quality is proposed. This modified pollution index is then tested against a number of existing studies and demonstrated to give a reliable and rapid estimate of sediment contamination and quality.

  4. Sedimentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cliff R. Hupp; Michael R. Schening

    2000-01-01

    Sedimentation is arguably the most important water-quality concern in the United States. Sediment trapping is cited frequently as a major function of riverine-forested wetlands, yet little is known about sedimcntation rates at the landscape scale in relation to site parameters, including woody vegetation type, elevation, velocity, and hydraulic connection to the river...

  5. Development of a wave-induced forcing threshold for nearshore impact of Wave Energy Converter arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dea, A.; Haller, M. C.; Ozkan-Haller, H. T.

    2016-02-01

    Wave-induced forcing is a function of spatial gradients in the wave radiation stresses and is the main driver of alongshore currents, rip currents, and nearshore sediment transport. The installation of nearshore Wave Energy Converter (WEC) arrays may cause significant changes in the surf zone radiation stresses and could therefore impact nearshore littoral processes. In the first part of this study, a new threshold for nearshore hydrodynamic impact due to the presence of WEC devices is established based on changes in the alongshore radiation stress gradients shoreward of WEC arrays. The threshold is defined based on the relationship between nearshore radiation stresses and alongshore currents as observed in field data. Next, we perform a parametric study of the nearshore impact of WEC arrays using the SWAN wave model. Trials are conducted on an idealized, alongshore-uniform beach with a range of WEC array configurations, locations, and incident wave conditions, and conditions that generate radiation stress gradients above the impact threshold are identified. Finally, the same methodology is applied to two wave energy test sites off the coast of Newport, OR with more complicated bathymetries. Although the trends at the field sites are similar to those seen in the parametric study, the location and extent of the changes in the alongshore radiation stress gradients appear to be heavily influenced by the local bathymetry.

  6. Long-term trends in catch and effort in the Kwazulu-Natal nearshore ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Long-term trends in catch and effort in the Kwazulu-Natal nearshore linefisheries. AJ Penney, JB Mann-Lang, RP Van der Elst, C Wilke. Abstract. The boat-based linefishery is the most important marine fishery along the coast of KwaZulu-Natal, producing 40% of the total annual mass of fish landed there. Since 1900, the ...

  7. Carbonate Geochemistry of Marine Authigenic Carbonates and Host Sediments: Exploring Mineral Formation Pathways and Organic Preservation Potential in Modern Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnoff, M. N.; Loyd, S. J.

    2016-12-01

    Ancient authigenic dolomites (e.g., concretions) have been long studied in order to determine formation conditions and provide insight into shallow diagenetic environments. The formation of these dolomites is commonly attributed to the anaerobic microbial degradation of organic matter (a process that can increase the local pore water alkalinity), based on carbon isotope as well as other geochemical data. Authigenic dolomites also occur in modern, "still soft" sediments rich in organic matter. However, a comprehensive carbon isotopic characterization of these precipitates has yet to be conducted. Preliminary data show a wide range of δ13C values (about -11 to +12‰). Positive values that typify dolomites of the Gulf of California and the southwestern African margin indicate methanogenesis. Dolomites of the Peru margin and Cariaco Basin yield negative values that may represent a variety of organic matter degradation mechanisms. Regardless of specific mechanisms, organic matter degradation can promote authigenesis. Ultimately, mineralization encases primary sedimentary components and may act to preserve organic matter from subsequent degradation due to permeability reduction resulting from cementation. Concretionary carbonates have been found to preserve macro and micro fossils, metastable sedimentary grains, magnetic minerals, sedimentary structures, various specific organic compounds, and overmature organic matter exposed in outcrop. However, a similar protective relationship has not been demonstrated for disseminated, bulk organic matter in still-soft sediments. The study of these sediments 1) reveal the relationship between organic carbon degradation and authigenesis and 2) may provide insight into the potential of cementation to preserve organic matter during subsequent burial.

  8. Analysis of the impacts of Wave Energy Converter arrays on the nearshore wave climate in the Pacific Northwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dea, A.; Haller, M. C.

    2013-12-01

    As concerns over the use of fossil fuels increase, more and more effort is being put into the search for renewable and reliable sources of energy. Developments in ocean technologies have made the extraction of wave energy a promising alternative. Commercial exploitation of wave energy would require the deployment of arrays of Wave Energy Converters (WECs) that include several to hundreds of individual devices. Interactions between WECs and ocean waves result in both near-field and far-field changes in the incident wave field, including a significant decrease in wave height and a redirection of waves in the lee of the array, referred to as the wave shadow. Nearshore wave height and direction are directly related to the wave radiation stresses that drive longshore currents, rip currents and nearshore sediment transport, which suggests that significant far-field changes in the wave field due to WEC arrays could have an impact on littoral processes. The goal of this study is to investigate the changes in nearshore wave conditions and radiation stress forcing as a result of an offshore array of point-absorber type WECs using a nested SWAN model, and to determine how array size, configuration, spacing and distance from shore influence these changes. The two sites of interest are the Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center (NNMREC) test sites off the coast of Newport Oregon, the North Energy Test Site (NETS) and the South Energy Test Site (SETS). NETS and SETS are permitted wave energy test sites located approximately 4 km and 10 km offshore, respectively. Twenty array configurations are simulated, including 5, 10, 25, 50 and 100 devices in two and three staggered rows in both closely spaced (three times the WEC diameter) and widely spaced (ten times the WEC diameter) arrays. Daily offshore wave spectra are obtained from a regional WAVEWATCH III hindcast for 2011, which are then propagated across the continental shelf using SWAN. Arrays are represented in SWAN