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Sample records for ndv production kinetics

  1. Production kinetics of zirconium tetrachloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudjoko, D.; Masduki, B.; Sunardjo; Sulistyo, B.

    1996-01-01

    This research was intended to study the kinetics of zirconium tetrachloride production. The process was carried out in semi continuous reactor, equipped with heater, temperature controller, sublimator and scrubber. The variables investigated were time, temperature and the pellet forming pressure. Within the range of variables studied, the expression of the process in the chemical reaction controller region and diffusion controller region were both presented. (author)

  2. Recombinant Newcastle disease virus (NDV/Anh-IL-2 expressing human IL-2 as a potential candidate for suppresses growth of hepatoma therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunzhou Wu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Newcastle disease virus (NDV have shown oncolytic therapeutic efficacy in preclinical study and are currently approved for clinical trials. NDV Anhinga strain which is a mesogenic strain should be classified as lytic strain and has a therapeutic efficacy in hepatocellular cancer. In this study, we evaluated the capacity of NDV Anhinga strain to elicit immune reaction in vivo and the possibility for using as a vaccine vector for expressing tumor therapeutic factors. Interleukin-2 (IL-2 could boost the immune response against the tumor cells. Therefore, we use NDV Anhinga strain as backbone to construct a recombinant virus (NDV/Anh-IL-2 expressing IL-2. The virus growth curve showed that the production of recombinant NDV/Anh-IL-2 was slightly delayed compared to the wild type. The NDV/Anh-IL-2 strain could express soluble IL-2 and effectively inhibit the growth of hepatocellular carcinoma in vivo. 60 days post-treatment, mice which were completely cured by previous treatment were well protected when rechallenged with the same tumor cell. From the H&E-stained sections, intense infiltration of lymphocyte was observed in the NDV Anhinga strain treated group, especially in NDV/Anh-IL-2 group. The NDV Anhinga strain could not only kill the tumor directly, but could also elicit immune reaction and a potent immunological memory when killing tumor in vivo. In conclusion, the Anhinga strain could be an effective vector for tumor therapy; the recombinant NDV/Anh-IL-2 strain expressing soluble IL-2 is a promising candidate for hepatoma therapy.

  3. Aluminum corrosion product release kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, Matt, E-mail: Matthew.Edwards@cnl.ca; Semmler, Jaleh; Guzonas, Dave; Chen, Hui Qun; Toor, Arshad; Hoendermis, Seanna

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Release of Al corrosion product was measured in simulated post-LOCA sump solutions. • Increased boron was found to enhance Al release kinetics at similar pH. • Models of Al release as functions of time, temperature, and pH were developed. - Abstract: The kinetics of aluminum corrosion product release was examined in solutions representative of post-LOCA sump water for both pressurized water and pressurized heavy-water reactors. Coupons of AA 6061 T6 were exposed to solutions in the pH 7–11 range at 40, 60, 90 and 130 °C. Solution samples were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy, and coupon samples were analyzed by secondary ion mass spectrometry. The results show a distinct “boron effect” on the release kinetics, expected to be caused by an increase in the solubility of the aluminum corrosion products. New models were developed to describe both sets of data as functions of temperature, time, and pH (where applicable)

  4. Antibiotic resistance and ndvB gene expression among biofilm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A novel antibiotic resistant mechanism among biofilms is glucan-mediated sequestration in which ndvB gene encodes a glucosyltransferase involved in the formation of this glucans. We studied the biofilm formation and antibiotic susceptibility pattern of P. aeruginosa isolated from clinical samples, and measured the ...

  5. Production of a sterile species: Quantum kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyanovsky, D.; Ho, C. M.

    2007-10-01

    Production of a sterile species is studied within an effective model of active-sterile neutrino mixing in a medium in thermal equilibrium. The quantum kinetic equations for the distribution functions and coherences are obtained from two independent methods: the effective action and the quantum master equation. The decoherence time scale for active-sterile oscillations is τdec=2/Γaa, but the evolution of the distribution functions is determined by the two different time scales associated with the damping rates of the quasiparticle modes in the medium: Γ1=Γaacos⁡2θm; Γ2=Γaasin⁡2θm where Γaa is the interaction rate of the active species in the absence of mixing and θm the mixing angle in the medium. These two time scales are widely different away from Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein resonances and preclude the kinetic description of active-sterile production in terms of a simple rate equation. We give the complete set of quantum kinetic equations for the active and sterile populations and coherences and discuss in detail the various approximations. A generalization of the active-sterile transition probability in a medium is provided via the quantum master equation. We derive explicitly the usual quantum kinetic equations in terms of the “polarization vector” and show their equivalence to those obtained from the quantum master equation and effective action.

  6. Recombinant infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) H120 vaccine strain expressing the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) protects chickens against IBV and NDV challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xin; Zhou, Yingshun; Li, Jianan; Fu, Li; Ji, Gaosheng; Zeng, Fanya; Zhou, Long; Gao, Wenqian; Wang, Hongning

    2016-05-01

    Infectious bronchitis (IB) and Newcastle disease (ND) are common viral diseases of chickens, which are caused by infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) and Newcastle disease virus (NDV), respectively. Vaccination with live attenuated strains of IBV-H120 and NDV-LaSota are important for the control of IB and ND. However, conventional live attenuated vaccines are expensive and result in the inability to differentiate between infected and vaccinated chickens. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop new efficacious vaccines. In this study, using a previously established reverse genetics system, we generated a recombinant IBV virus based on the IBV H120 vaccine strain expressing the haemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein of NDV. The recombinant virus, R-H120-HN/5a, exhibited growth dynamics, pathogenicity and viral titers that were similar to those of the parental IBV H120, but it had acquired hemagglutination activity from NDV. Vaccination of SPF chickens with the R-H120-HN/5a virus induced a humoral response at a level comparable to that of the LaSota/H120 commercial bivalent vaccine and provided significant protection against challenge with virulent IBV and NDV. In summary, the results of this study indicate that the IBV H120 strain could serve as an effective tool for designing vaccines against IB and other infectious diseases, and the generation of IBV R-H120-HN/5a provides a solid foundation for the development of an effective bivalent vaccine against IBV and NDV.

  7. Generation and evaluation of a recombinant Newcastle disease virus (NDV) expressing the F and G proteins of avian metapneumovirus subtype C (aMPV-C) as a bivalent vaccine against NDV and aMPV-C challenges in turkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virulent strains of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) and avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) can cause serious respiratory diseases in poultry. Vaccination combined with strict biosecurity practices has been the recommendation for controlling NDV and aMPV diseases in the field. Previously we generated a NDV r...

  8. Et slag for den stolte håndværker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    Snart vil samfundet skrige af mangel på dygtige håndværkere, lyder det fra politikere og erhvervsfolk. Asterisk har sat den ansete amerikanske sociolog Richard Sennett i stævne for at få svar på, hvad vi kan lære af godt håndværk, og hvorfor det har trange kår i et konkurrencestyret vidensamfund....

  9. Digestion kinetics of carbohydrate fractions of citrus by-products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lashkari, Saman; Taghizadeh, Akbar

    2015-01-01

    The present experiment was carried out to determine the digestion kinetics of carbohydrate fractions of citrus by-products. Grapefruit pulp (GP), lemon pulp (LE), lime pulp (LI) and orange pulp (OP) were the test feed. Digestion kinetic of whole citrus by-products and neutral detergent fiber (NDF......) fraction and acid detergent fiber (ADF) fractions of citrus by-products were measured using the in vitro gas production technique. Fermentation kinetics of the neutral detergent soluble carbohydrates (NDSC) fraction and hemicelluloses were calculated using a curve subtraction. The fermentation rate...... of whole was the highest for the LE (p by-products lag time was longer for hemicellulose than other carbohydrate fractions. There was no significant difference among potential gas production (A) volumes of whole test feeds (p

  10. Sum rule limitations of kinetic particle-production models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knoll, J.; CEA Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Grenoble, 38; Guet, C.

    1988-04-01

    Photoproduction and absorption sum rules generalized to systems at finite temperature provide a stringent check on the validity of kinetic models for the production of hard photons in intermediate energy nuclear collisions. We inspect such models for the case of nuclear matter at finite temperature employed in a kinetic regime which copes those encountered in energetic nuclear collisions, and find photon production rates which significantly exceed the limits imposed by the sum rule even under favourable concession. This suggests that coherence effects are quite important and the production of photons cannot be considered as an incoherent addition of individual NNγ production processes. The deficiencies of present kinetic models may also apply for the production of probes such as the pion which do not couple perturbatively to the nuclear currents. (orig.)

  11. Methane production from cellulosic wastes: kinetic studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goma, G; De La Torre, I; Maugheri, F; Yameogo, T

    1979-09-01

    The anaerobic fermentation is studied on lignocellulosic materials and sucrose as substrate. With the lignocellulosic material cellulolysis is rate limiting. The reducing sugar concentration in the fermentation broth is less than 15 mgl/sup -1/. With rumen bacteria, 50% of the initial polyoside are used and 12% of the lignin is solubilized. With sucrose studies on the kinetic behaviour of the mixed population responsible of the acidogenesis step permite to find the optimal temperature (40/sup 0/C) feed substrate concentration (50 gl/sup -1/) residence time (60 hours) and pH (5,5 - 6). The better technology is a plug flow fermentor with cell recycling. Modeling of the behaviour of this reactor was performed. The use of this reactor for the selection of acido resistant bacteria is discussed. For methanogenesis, in continuous culture, the ideal technology seems to be an association of two reactors. In the first step, a plug flow reactor must be used for acidogenesis, and in the second step a well mixed reactor permit the conversion of organic acids in methane.

  12. Relativistic kinetics of baryon production in hot Universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ignat'ev, Yu.G.

    1985-01-01

    The process of baryon production in the hot Universe is investigated in the framework of the relativistic kinetic theory. The exact solution of kinetic equations for supermassive bosons is obtained, thus giving the possibility to correct the results of previous papers: the known optimum domain of baryon production m sub(X) > α sub(X)msub(PI)√N js complemented by the small-mass boson domain, m sub(X) << α sub(X) m sub(PI)√N; as a result, the cosmological lower-limit restriction on the superheavy bosons masses js removed

  13. Formation kinetics of gemfibrozil chlorination reaction products: analysis and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krkosek, Wendy H; Peldszus, Sigrid; Huck, Peter M; Gagnon, Graham A

    2014-07-01

    Aqueous chlorination kinetics of the lipid regulator gemfibrozil and the formation of reaction products were investigated in deionized water over the pH range 3 to 9, and in two wastewater matrices. Chlorine oxidation of gemfibrozil was found to be highly dependent on pH. No statistically significant degradation of gemfibrozil was observed at pH values greater than 7. Gemfibrozil oxidation between pH 4 and 7 was best represented by first order kinetics. At pH 3, formation of three reaction products was observed. 4'-C1Gem was the only reaction product formed from pH 4-7 and was modeled with zero order kinetics. Chlorine oxidation of gemfibrozil in two wastewater matrices followed second order kinetics. 4'-C1Gem was only formed in wastewater with pH below 7. Deionized water rate kinetic models were applied to two wastewater effluents with gemfibrozil concentrations reported in literature in order to calculate potential mass loading rates of 4'C1Gem to the receiving water.

  14. Purification, product characterization and kinetic properties of soluble tomato lipoxygenase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliegenthart, J.F.G.; Suurmeijer, C.N.S.P.; Pérez-Gilabert, M.; Hijden, H.T.W.M. van der; Veldink, G.A.

    1998-01-01

    Soluble lipoxygenase (EC 1.13.11.12) from tomato fruits (Lycopersicon esculentum, var. Trust) was purified to apparent homogeneity as judged by SDS-PAGE, and the products and kinetics of the enzyme were studied in order to clarify the contradictory results that were obtained with a less purified

  15. Kinetic study of sphingomyelin hydrolysis for ceramide production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Long; Hellgren, Lars; Xu, Xuebing

    2008-01-01

    in cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries such as in hair and skin care products. The enzymatic hydrolysis of sphingomyelin has been proved to be a feasible method to produce ceramide. The kinetic performance of sphingomyelin hydrolysis in the optimal two-phase (water:organic solvent) reaction system...

  16. An in-depth review of NDV, including epidemiology and molecular diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birds infected with virulent strains of avian paramyxovirus serotype 1 (APMV-1), also known as Newcastle disease virus (NDV), and pigeon PMV-1 (PPMV-1)are defined as having Newcastle disease (ND), which in the United States is sometimes called Exoctic Newcastle disease (END). Infections with virule...

  17. Recovery of avirulent, thermostable Newcastle disease virus strain NDV4-C from cloned cDNA and stable expression of an inserted foreign gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, X.; Liu, H.; Liu, P.; Peeters, B.P.H.; Zhao, C.; Kong, X.

    2013-01-01

    A reverse genetics system for thermostable Newcastle disease virus (NDV) is not currently available. In this study, we developed a reverse genetics system for the avirulent and thermostable NDV4-C strain. Successful recovery of NDV4-C was achieved by using either T7 RNA polymerase or cellular RNA

  18. Comparison of kinetic model for biogas production from corn cob

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shitophyta, L. M.; Maryudi

    2018-04-01

    Energy demand increases every day, while the energy source especially fossil energy depletes increasingly. One of the solutions to overcome the energy depletion is to provide renewable energies such as biogas. Biogas can be generated by corn cob and food waste. In this study, biogas production was carried out by solid-state anaerobic digestion. The steps of biogas production were the preparation of feedstock, the solid-state anaerobic digestion, and the measurement of biogas volume. This study was conducted on TS content of 20%, 22%, and 24%. The aim of this research was to compare kinetic models of biogas production from corn cob and food waste as a co-digestion using the linear, exponential equation, and first-kinetic models. The result showed that the exponential equation had a better correlation than the linear equation on the ascending graph of biogas production. On the contrary, the linear equation had a better correlation than the exponential equation on the descending graph of biogas production. The correlation values on the first-kinetic model had the smallest value compared to the linear and exponential models.

  19. Newcastle disease virus (NDV) recombinants expressing infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) glycoproteins gB and gD protect chickens against ILTV and NDV challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Spatz, Stephen; Zhang, Zhenyu; Wen, Guoyuan; Garcia, Maricarmen; Zsak, Laszlo; Yu, Qingzhong

    2014-08-01

    Infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) is a highly contagious acute respiratory disease of chickens caused by infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV). The disease is controlled mainly through biosecurity and vaccination with live attenuated strains of ILTV and vectored vaccines based on turkey herpesvirus (HVT) and fowlpox virus (FPV). The current live attenuated vaccines (chicken embryo origin [CEO] and tissue culture origin [TCO]), although effective, can regain virulence, whereas HVT- and FPV-vectored ILTV vaccines are less efficacious than live attenuated vaccines. Therefore, there is a pressing need to develop safer and more efficacious ILTV vaccines. In the present study, we generated Newcastle disease virus (NDV) recombinants, based on the LaSota vaccine strain, expressing glycoproteins B (gB) and D (gD) of ILTV using reverse genetics technology. These recombinant viruses, rLS/ILTV-gB and rLS/ILTV-gD, were slightly attenuated in vivo yet retained growth dynamics, stability, and virus titers in vitro that were similar to those of the parental LaSota virus. Expression of ILTV gB and gD proteins in the recombinant virus-infected cells was detected by immunofluorescence assay. Vaccination of specific-pathogen-free chickens with these recombinant viruses conferred significant protection against virulent ILTV and velogenic NDV challenges. Immunization of commercial broilers with rLS/ILTV-gB provided a level of protection against clinical disease similar to that provided by the live attenuated commercial vaccines, with no decrease in body weight gains. The results of the study suggested that the rLS/ILTV-gB and -gD viruses are safe, stable, and effective bivalent vaccines that can be mass administered via aerosol or drinking water to large chicken populations. This paper describes the development and evaluation of novel bivalent vaccines against chicken infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) and Newcastle disease (ND), two of the most economically important infectious

  20. Kinetics of Methane Production from Swine Manure and Buffalo Manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chen; Cao, Weixing; Liu, Ronghou

    2015-10-01

    The degradation kinetics of swine and buffalo manure for methane production was investigated. Six kinetic models were employed to describe the corresponding experimental data. These models were evaluated by two statistical measurements, which were root mean square prediction error (RMSPE) and Akaike's information criterion (AIC). The results showed that the logistic and Fitzhugh models could predict the experimental data very well for the digestion of swine and buffalo manure, respectively. The predicted methane yield potential for swine and buffalo manure was 487.9 and 340.4 mL CH4/g volatile solid (VS), respectively, which was close to experimental values, when the digestion temperature was 36 ± 1 °C in the biochemical methane potential assays. Besides, the rate constant revealed that swine manure had a much faster methane production rate than buffalo manure.

  1. Multiphasic analysis of gas production kinetics for in vitro fermentation of ruminant feeds.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, J.C.J.; Cone, J.W.; Williams, B.A.; Debersaques, F.M.A.; Lantinga, E.A.

    1996-01-01

    Recently developed time-related gas production techniques to quantify the kinetics of ruminant feed fermentation have a high resolution. Consequently, fermentation processes with clearly contrasting gas production kinetics can be identified. Parameterization of the separate processes is possible

  2. Perturbations in the antioxidant metabolism during Newcastle disease virus (NDV) infection in chicken. Protective role of vitamin E

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbaiah, Kadiam C. Venkata; Raniprameela, D.; Visweswari, Gopalareddygari; Rajendra, Wudayagiri; Lokanatha, Valluru

    2011-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of vitamin E on pro/anti-oxidant status in the liver, brain and heart of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) infected chickens. Activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione- S-transferase (GST) and the levels of reduced glutathione and malonaldehyde were estimated in selected tissues of uninfected, NDV-infected and NDV + vit. E-treated chickens. A significant increase in MDA levels in brain and liver ( p neuronal necrosis and degeneration of Purkinje cells were observed in brain and moderate infiltration of inflammatory cells was observed in heart. However such histological alterations were not observed in NDV + vit. E-treated animals. The results of the present study, thus demonstrated that antioxidant defense mechanism is impaired after the induction of NDV, suggesting its critical role in cellular injury in brain and liver. Further, the results also suggest that vitamin E treatment will ameliorate the antioxidant status in the infected animals. The findings could be beneficial to understand the role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of NDV and therapeutic interventions of antioxidants.

  3. NDV-induced apoptosis in absence of Bax; evidence of involvement of apoptotic proteins upstream of mitochondria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molouki Aidin

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently it was shown that following infection of HeLa cells with Newcastle disease virus (NDV, the matrix (M protein binds to Bax and subsequently the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis is activated. Moreover, there was very little alteration on mRNA and protein levels of Bax and Bcl-2 after infection with NDV. Finding In order to further investigate the role of members of the Bcl-2 family, Bax-knockout and wild-type HCT116 cells were infected with NDV strain AF2240. Although both cells underwent apoptosis through the activation of the intrinsic pathway and the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria, the percentage of dead Bax-knockout cells was significantly lower than wt cells (more than 10% at 48 h post-infection. In a parallel experiment, the effect of NDV on HT29 cells, that are originally Bcl-2-free, was studied. Apoptosis in HT29 cells was associated with Bax redistribution from cytoplasm to mitochondria, similar to that of HeLa and wt HCT116 cells. Conclusion Although the presence of Bax during NDV-induced apoptosis contributes to a faster cell death, it was concluded that other apoptotic protein(s upstream of mitochondria are also involved since cancer cells die whether in the presence or absence of Bax. Therefore, the classic Bax/Bcl-2 ratio may not be a major determinant in NDV-induced apoptosis.

  4. Avian influenza virus and Newcastle disease virus (NDV) surveillance in commercial breeding farm in China and the characterization of Class I NDV isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Beixia; Huang, Yanyan; He, Yefeng; Xu, Chuantian; Lu, Xishan; Zhang, Wei; Meng, Bin; Yan, Shigan; Zhang, Xiumei

    2010-07-29

    In order to determine the actual prevalence of avian influenza virus (AIV) and Newcastle disease virus (NDV) in ducks in Shandong province of China, extensive surveillance studies were carried out in the breeding ducks of an intensive farm from July 2007 to September 2008. Each month cloacal and tracheal swabs were taken from 30 randomly selected birds that appeared healthy. All of the swabs were negative for influenza A virus recovery, whereas 87.5% of tracheal swabs and 100% cloacal swabs collected in September 2007, were positive for Newcastle disease virus isolation. Several NDV isolates were recovered from tracheal and cloacal swabs of apparently healthy ducks. All of the isolates were apathogenic as determined by the MDT and ICPI. The HN gene and the variable region of F gene (nt 47-420) of four isolates selected at random were sequenced. A 374 bp region of F gene and the full length of HN gene were used for phylogenetic analysis. Four isolates were identified as the same isolate based on nucleotide sequences identities of 99.2-100%, displaying a closer phylogenetic relationship to lentogenic Class I viruses. There were 1.9-9.9% nucleotide differences between the isolates and other Class I virus in the variable region of F gene (nt 47-420), whereas there were 38.5-41.2% nucleotide difference between the isolates and Class II viruses. The amino acid sequences of the F protein cleavage sites in these isolates were 112-ERQERL-117. The full length of HN gene of these isolates was 1851 bp, coding 585 amino acids. The homology analysis of the nucleotide sequence of HN gene indicated that there were 2.0-4.2% nucleotide differences between the isolates and other Class I viruses, whereas there were 29.5-40.9% differences between the isolates and Class II viruses. The results shows that these isolates are not phylogenetically related to the vaccine strain (LaSota). This study adds to the understanding of the ecology of influenza viruses and Newcastle disease viruses in

  5. Kinetic and economic considerations of biogas production systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bala, B K; Satter, M A [Bangladesh Agricultural Univ., Mymensingh (BD). Dept. of Farm Power and Machinery

    1990-01-01

    In this paper, the kinetics and economics of substrate degradation and biogas production are discussed. Mass balance on substrate, with either the Contois or Adams-Eckenfelder models, is used to design the mathematical models of volatile solids reduction and biogas fermentation. The predictions of both the models are found to be in close agreement with the observed values reported. A computer model based on a system dynamics approach is used to model the economics of biogas production by anaerobic digestion from cattle slurry available from typical rural families in Bangladesh. This model incorporates the Adams-Eckenfelder model to determine the amount of gas production and the technique described by Audsley and Wheeler to take into account the effects of price, interest, and inflation. The effects of changes of these parameters on the net profit or loss from the process are also considered. (author).

  6. Kinetic Studies on Microbial Production of Tannase Using Redgram Husk

    OpenAIRE

    S. K. Mohan; T. Viruthagiri; C. Arunkumar

    2015-01-01

    Tannase (tannin acyl hydrolase, E.C.3.1.1.20) is an important hydrolysable enzyme with innumerable applications and industrial potential. In the present study, a kinetic model has been developed for the batch fermentation used for the production of tannase by A.flavus MTCC 3783. Maximum tannase activity of 143.30 U/ml was obtained at 96 hours under optimum operating conditions at 35oC, an initial pH of 5.5 and with an inducer tannic acid concentration of 3% (w/v) for a fe...

  7. Modeling texture kinetics during thermal processing of potato products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyano, P C; Troncoso, E; Pedreschi, F

    2007-03-01

    A kinetic model based on 2 irreversible serial chemical reactions has been proposed to fit experimental data of texture changes during thermal processing of potato products. The model links dimensionless maximum force F*(MAX) with processing time. Experimental texture changes were obtained during frying of French fries and potato chips at different temperatures, while literature data for blanching/cooking of potato cubes have been considered. A satisfactory agreement between experimental and predicted values was observed, with root mean square values (RMSs) in the range of 4.7% to 16.4% for French fries and 16.7% to 29.3% for potato chips. In the case of blanching/cooking, the proposed model gave RMSs in the range of 1.2% to 17.6%, much better than the 6.2% to 44.0% obtained with the traditional 1st-order kinetics. The model is able to predict likewise the transition from softening to hardening of the tissue during frying.

  8. Characterisation and evaluation of antiviral recombinant peptides based on the heptad repeat regions of NDV and IBV fusion glycoproteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaojia; Li Chuangen; Chi Xiaojing; Wang Ming

    2011-01-01

    Mixed virus infections can cause livestock losses that are more devastating than those caused by single virus infections. Newcastle disease virus (NDV) and infectious bronchitis virus (IBV), serious threats to the poultry industry, can give rise to complex mixed infections that hinder diagnosis and prevention. In this study, we show that newly designed peptides, which are based on the heptad repeat (HR) region of the fusion glycoproteins from NDV and IBV, have more potent antiviral activity than the mother HR peptides. Plaque formation and chicken embryo infectivity assays confirmed these results. The novel peptides completely inhibited single virus infections and mixed infections caused by NDV and IBV. Furthermore, we assessed cell toxicity and possible targets for the peptides, thereby strengthening the notion that HR2 is an attractive site for therapeutic intervention. These results suggest the possibility of designing a relatively broad-spectrum class of antiviral peptides that can reduce the effects of mixed-infections.

  9. Kinetic study and syngas production from pyrolysis of forestry waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Mian; Wang, Xun; Chen, Jian; Yang, Ping; Liu, Cuixia; Xiao, Bo; Guo, Dabin

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Pyrolysis process can be divided into three stages using differential DTG method. • A modified discrete DAEM model fitted experimental data well. • Fe/biochar catalyst showed a good performance on catalytic reforming process. - Abstract: Kinetic study and syngas production from pyrolysis of forestry waste (pine sawdust (PS)) were investigated using a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) and a fixed-bed reactor, respectively. In TGA, it was found that the pyrolysis of PS could be divided into three stages and stage II was the major mass reduction stage with mass loss of 73–74%. The discrete distributed activation energy model (DAEM) with discrete 200 first-order reactions was introduced to study the pyrolysis kinetic. The results indicated that the DAEM with 200 first-order reactions could approximate the pyrolysis process with an excellent fit between experimental and calculated data. The apparent activation energies of PS ranged from 147.86 kJ·mol −1 to 395.76 kJ·mol −1 , with corresponding pre-exponential factors of 8.30 × 10 13 s −1 to 3.11 × 10 25 s −1 . In the fixed-bed reactor, char supported iron catalyst was prepared for tar cracking. Compared with no catalyst which the gas yield and tar yield were 0.58 N m 3 /kg biomass and 201.23 g/kg biomass, the gas yield was markedly increased to 1.02 N m 3 /kg biomass and the tar yield was decreased to only 26.37 g/kg biomass in the presence of char supported iron catalyst. These results indicated that char supported iron catalyst could potentially be used to catalytically decompose tar molecules in syngas generated via biomass pyrolysis.

  10. Nitrous oxide production kinetics during nitrate reduction in river sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laverman, Anniet M; Garnier, Josette A; Mounier, Emmanuelle M; Roose-Amsaleg, Céline L

    2010-03-01

    A significant amount of nitrogen entering river basins is denitrified in riparian zones. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of nitrate and carbon concentrations on the kinetic parameters of nitrate reduction as well as nitrous oxide emissions in river sediments in a tributary of the Marne (the Seine basin, France). In order to determine these rates, we used flow-through reactors (FTRs) and slurry incubations; flow-through reactors allow determination of rates on intact sediment slices under controlled conditions compared to sediment homogenization in the often used slurry technique. Maximum nitrate reduction rates (R(m)) ranged between 3.0 and 7.1microg Ng(-1)h(-1), and affinity constant (K(m)) ranged from 7.4 to 30.7mg N-NO(3)(-)L(-1). These values were higher in slurry incubations with an R(m) of 37.9microg Ng(-1)h(-1) and a K(m) of 104mg N-NO(3)(-)L(-1). Nitrous oxide production rates did not follow Michaelis-Menten kinetics, and we deduced a rate constant with an average of 0.7 and 5.4ng Ng(-1)h(-1) for FTR and slurry experiments respectively. The addition of carbon (as acetate) showed that carbon was not limiting nitrate reduction rates in these sediments. Similar rates were obtained for FTR and slurries with carbon addition, confirming the hypothesis that homogenization increases rates due to release of and increasing access to carbon in slurries. Nitrous oxide production rates in FTR with carbon additions were low and represented less than 0.01% of the nitrate reduction rates and were even negligible in slurries. Maximum nitrate reduction rates revealed seasonality with high potential rates in fall and winter and low rates in late spring and summer. Under optimal conditions (anoxia, non-limiting nitrate and carbon), nitrous oxide emission rates were low, but significant (0.01% of the nitrate reduction rates). Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Recombinant Newcastle disease virus (NDV) with inserted gene coding for GM-CSF as a new vector for cancer immunogene therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janke, M.; Peeters, B.P.H.; Leeuw, de O.S.; Moormann, R.J.M.; Arnold, A.; Fournier, P.; Schirrmacher, V.

    2007-01-01

    This is the first report describing recombinant (rec) Newcastle disease virus (NDV) as vector for gene therapy of cancer. The gene encoding granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) was inserted as an additional transcription unit at two different positions into the NDV genome. The

  12. Protection by recombinant Newcastle disease viruses (NDV) expressing the glycoprotein (G) of avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) subtype A or B against challenge with virulent NDV and aMPV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) and Newcastle disease virus (NDV) are threatening avian pathogens that cause sporadic but serious respiratory diseases in poultry worldwide. Although, vaccination, combined with strict biosecurity practices, has been the recommendation for controlling these diseases in t...

  13. Generation and evaluation of recombinant Newcastle disease viruses (NDV) expressing the F and G proteins of avian metapneumovirus subtype C (aMPV-C) as bivalent vaccine against NDV and aMPV challenges in turkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previously we generated a Newcastle disease virus (NDV) LaSota strain-based recombinant virus expressing the glycoprotein (G) of avian metapneumovirus subgroup C (aMPV-C) as a bivalent vaccine, which provided a partial protection against aMPV-C challenge in turkeys. To improve the vaccine efficacy,...

  14. Kinetic modeling of cell metabolism for microbial production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Rafael S; Hartmann, Andras; Vinga, Susana

    2016-02-10

    Kinetic models of cellular metabolism are important tools for the rational design of metabolic engineering strategies and to explain properties of complex biological systems. The recent developments in high-throughput experimental data are leading to new computational approaches for building kinetic models of metabolism. Herein, we briefly survey the available databases, standards and software tools that can be applied for kinetic models of metabolism. In addition, we give an overview about recently developed ordinary differential equations (ODE)-based kinetic models of metabolism and some of the main applications of such models are illustrated in guiding metabolic engineering design. Finally, we review the kinetic modeling approaches of large-scale networks that are emerging, discussing their main advantages, challenges and limitations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Atmospheric degradation of 3-methylfuran: kinetic and products study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Tapia

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available A study of the kinetics and products obtained from the reactions of 3-methylfuran with the main atmospheric oxidants has been performed. The rate coefficients for the gas-phase reaction of 3-methylfuran with OH and NO3 radicals have been determined at room temperature and atmospheric pressure (air and N2 as bath gases, using a relative method with different experimental techniques. The rate coefficients obtained for these reactions were (in units cm3 molecule−1 s−1 kOH = (1.13 ± 0.22 × 10−10 and kNO3 = (1.26 ± 0.18 × 10−11. Products from the reaction of 3-methylfuran with OH, NO3 and Cl atoms in the absence and in the presence of NO have also been determined. The main reaction products obtained were chlorinated methylfuranones and hydroxy-methylfuranones in the reaction of 3-methylfuran with Cl atoms, 2-methylbutenedial, 3-methyl-2,5-furanodione and hydroxy-methylfuranones in the reaction of 3-methylfuran with OH and NO3 radicals and also nitrated compounds in the reaction with NO3 radicals. The results indicate that, in all cases, the main reaction path is the addition to the double bond of the aromatic ring followed by ring opening in the case of OH and NO3 radicals. The formation of 3-furaldehyde and hydroxy-methylfuranones (in the reactions of 3-methylfuran with Cl atoms and NO3 radicals confirmed the H-atom abstraction from the methyl group and from the aromatic ring, respectively. This study represents the first product determination for Cl atoms and NO3 radicals in reactions with 3-methylfuran. The reaction mechanisms and atmospheric implications of the reactions under consideration are also discussed.

  16. Protection against California 2002 NDV strain afforded by adenovirus vectored vaccine expressing Fusion or Hemagglutination-neuraminidase genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vectored vaccines expressing the combination of the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) and fusion (F) genes generally have better clinical protection against Newcastle disease virus (NDV) than when either the F and HN genes are expressed alone. Interestingly, the protection induced by F is usually bet...

  17. Porphyroblast crystallization kinetics: the role of the nutrient production rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwarz, Jens-Oliver; Engi, Martin; Berger, Alfons

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms that govern porphyroblast crystallization are investigated by comparing quantitative textural data with predictions from different crystallization models. Such numerical models use kinetic formulations of the main crystallization mechanism to predict textural characteristics, such ...

  18. Study of growth kinetic and modeling of ethanol production by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... coefficient (0.96299). Based on Leudking-Piret model, it could be concluded that ethanol batch fermentation is a non-growth associated process. Key words: Kinetic parameters, simulation, cell growth, ethanol, Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  19. Evaluation of a LaSota strain-based recombinant Newcastle disease virus (NDV) expressing the glycoprotein (G) of avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) subgroup A or B as a bivalent vaccine in turkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    To develop a bivalent vaccine candidate, a LaSota strain-based recombinant Newcastle disease virus (NDV) clone expressing the glycoprotein (G) of avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) subgroup A or B was generated using reverse genetics. Vaccination of turkeys with the NDV/aMPV-A G or NDV/aMPV-B G recombinan...

  20. Measuring and modelling in-vitro gas production kinetics to evaluate ruminal fermentation of feedstuffs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beuvink, J.M.W.

    1993-01-01

    In this thesis, the possibilities of kinetic gas production measurements for the evaluation of ruminant feedstuffs have been examined. Present in-vitro methods were mostly end- point methods. There was a need for a kinetic in-vitro method that described ruminal fermentation, due to new

  1. Application of Uncertainty and Sensitivity Analysis to a Kinetic Model for Enzymatic Biodiesel Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Price, Jason Anthony; Nordblad, Mathias; Woodley, John

    2014-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the added benefits of using uncertainty and sensitivity analysis in the kinetics of enzymatic biodiesel production. For this study, a kinetic model by Fedosov and co-workers is used. For the uncertainty analysis the Monte Carlo procedure was used to statistically quantify...

  2. Kinetic computer modeling of microwave surface-wave plasma production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganachev, Ivan P.

    2004-01-01

    Kinetic computer plasma modeling occupies an intermediate position between the time consuming rigorous particle dynamic simulation and the fast but rather rough cold- or warm-plasma fluid models. The present paper reviews the kinetic modeling of microwave surface-wave discharges with accent on recent kinetic self-consistent models, where the external input parameters are reduced to the necessary minimum (frequency and intensity of the applied microwave field and pressure and geometry of the discharge vessel). The presentation is limited to low pressures, so that Boltzmann equation is solved in non-local approximation and collisional electron heating is neglected. The numerical results reproduce correctly the bi-Maxwellian electron energy distribution functions observed experimentally. (author)

  3. Kinetics of Intracellular, Extracellular and Production of Pro ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: Pro-inflammatory cytokine, Tumor necrosis factor-α, Interleukin-1α, Interleukin-1β,. Interleukin-6, Interleukin-8. Tropical Journal of ... retains neutrophils at sites of inflammation [6]. Many studies on the kinetics of cytokine ..... Lijnen P, Saavedra A, Petrov P. In vitro proliferative response of human peripheral blood ...

  4. Spray Drying Processing: granules production and drying kinetics of droplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondragon, R.; Julia, J. E.; Barba, A.; Jarque, J. C.

    2013-01-01

    Spray drying is a unit operation very common in many industrial processes. For each particular application, the resulting granulated material must possess determined properties that depend on the conditions in which the spray drying processing has been carried out, and whose dependence must be known in order to optimize the quality of the material obtained. The large number of variables that influence on the processes of matter and energy transfer and on the formation of granular material has required a detailed analysis of the drying process. Over the years there have been many studies on the spray drying processing of all kind of materials and the influence of process variables on the drying kinetics of the granulated material properties obtained. This article lists the most important works published for both the spray drying processing and the drying of individual droplets, as well as studies aimed at modeling the drying kinetics of drops. (Author)

  5. Generation of Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV) Recombinants Expressing the Infectious Laryngotracheitis Virus (ILTV) Glycoprotein gB or gD as Dual Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Spatz, Stephen; Zsak, Laszlo; Yu, Qingzhong

    2016-01-01

    Infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) is a highly contagious acute respiratory disease of chickens caused by infection with infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV), a member of the family Herpesviridae. The current commercial ILT vaccines are either unsafe or ineffective. Therefore, there is a pressing need to develop safer and more efficacious vaccines. Newcastle disease (ND), caused by infection with Newcastle disease virus (NDV), a member of the family Paramyxoviridae, is one of the most serious infectious diseases of poultry. The NDV LaSota strain, a naturally occurring low-virulence NDV strain, has been routinely used as a live vaccine throughout the world. This chapter describes the generation of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) LaSota vaccine strain-based recombinant viruses expressing glycoprotein B (gB) or glycoprotein D (gD) of ILTV as dual vaccines against ND and ILT using reverse genetics technology.

  6. Evaluation of methane production features and kinetics of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    zino

    2015-06-03

    Jun 3, 2015 ... as agricultural fertilizer. In recent years, the conversion of ... few studies investigated the biogas production rate. In the ... evaluate biogas production rate using obtained .... The parameters obtained in the optimization process.

  7. Oxidation kinetics of reaction products formed in uranium metal corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Totemeier, T. C.

    1998-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of uranium metal ZPPR fuel corrosion products in environments of Ar-4%O 2 and Ar-20%O 2 were studied using thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA). These tests were performed to extend earlier work in this area specifically, to assess plate-to-plate variations in corrosion product properties and the effect of oxygen concentration on oxidation behavior. The corrosion products from two relatively severely corroded plates were similar, while the products from a relatively intact plate were not reactive. Oxygen concentration strongly affected the burning rate of reactive products, but had little effect on low-temperature oxidation rates

  8. Oxidation kinetics of reaction products formed in uranium metal corrosion.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Totemeier, T. C.

    1998-04-22

    The oxidation behavior of uranium metal ZPPR fuel corrosion products in environments of Ar-4%O{sub 2} and Ar-20%O{sub 2} were studied using thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA). These tests were performed to extend earlier work in this area specifically, to assess plate-to-plate variations in corrosion product properties and the effect of oxygen concentration on oxidation behavior. The corrosion products from two relatively severely corroded plates were similar, while the products from a relatively intact plate were not reactive. Oxygen concentration strongly affected the burning rate of reactive products, but had little effect on low-temperature oxidation rates.

  9. Effects of preservation conditions of canine feces on in vitro gas production kinetics and fermentation end-products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, G.; Wrigglesworth, D.J.; Cone, J.W.; Pellikaan, W.F.; Hendriks, W.H.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of chilling and freezing (for 24 h) canine feces on in vitro gas production kinetics and fermentation end-product profiles from carbohydrate-rich (in vitro run 1) and protein-rich substrates (in vitro run 2). Feces were collected from 3 adult Retriever-type dogs

  10. Relationship between in situ degradation kinetics and in vitro gas production fermentation using different mathematical models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodrigues, M.A.M.; Cone, J.W.; Ferreira, L.M.M.; Blok, M.C.; Guedes, C.

    2009-01-01

    In vitro and in situ studies were conducted to evaluate the influence of different mathematical models, used to fit gas production profiles of 15 feedstuffs, on estimates of nylon bag organic matter (OM) degradation kinetics. The gas production data were fitted to Exponential, Logistic, Gompertz and

  11. Fermentative production and kinetics of cellulase protein on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJB SERVER

    2006-10-16

    Oct 16, 2006 ... various carbon sources on the production of cellulase using strains of T. reesei QM 9414, 97.177 and Tm3. Pretreatment of sugarcane ... of cellulose chains; endo-1,4-β-D-glucanses which cleave internal glucosidic bonds ..... production, the Leudeking piret model (Rakshit and Sahai, 1991) was developed.

  12. The biofilm-specific antibiotic resistance gene ndvB is important for expression of ethanol oxidation genes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudoin, Trevor; Zhang, Li; Hinz, Aaron J; Parr, Christopher J; Mah, Thien-Fah

    2012-06-01

    Bacteria growing in biofilms are responsible for a large number of persistent infections and are often more resistant to antibiotics than are free-floating bacteria. In a previous study, we identified a Pseudomonas aeruginosa gene, ndvB, which is important for the formation of periplasmic glucans. We established that these glucans function in biofilm-specific antibiotic resistance by sequestering antibiotic molecules away from their cellular targets. In this study, we investigate another function of ndvB in biofilm-specific antibiotic resistance. DNA microarray analysis identified 24 genes that were responsive to the presence of ndvB. A subset of 20 genes, including 8 ethanol oxidation genes (ercS', erbR, exaA, exaB, eraR, pqqB, pqqC, and pqqE), was highly expressed in wild-type biofilm cells but not in ΔndvB biofilms, while 4 genes displayed the reciprocal expression pattern. Using quantitative real-time PCR, we confirmed the ndvB-dependent expression of the ethanol oxidation genes and additionally demonstrated that these genes were more highly expressed in biofilms than in planktonic cultures. Expression of erbR in ΔndvB biofilms was restored after the treatment of the biofilm with periplasmic extracts derived from wild-type biofilm cells. Inactivation of ethanol oxidation genes increased the sensitivity of biofilms to tobramycin. Together, these results reveal that ndvB affects the expression of multiple genes in biofilms and that ethanol oxidation genes are linked to biofilm-specific antibiotic resistance.

  13. Kinetic Study on Ultrasound Assisted Biodiesel Production from Waste Cooking Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widayat

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to study a kinetic model of biodiesel production from waste cooking oil assisted by ultrasound power. The model considered the biodiesel production process as a 2nd order reversible reaction, while its kinetic parameters were estimated using MATLAB, based on data extracted from Hingu, et al. [1]. The data represented experiments under low-frequency ultrasonic wave (20 kHz and variations of temperature, power, catalyst concentration, and alcohol-oil molar ratio. Statistical analysis showed that the proposed model fits well to the experimental data with a determination coefficient (R2 higher than 0.9.

  14. Kinetic study and modeling of biosurfactant production using Bacillus sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesty Heryani

    2017-05-01

    Conclusions: For further development and industrial applications, the modified Gompertz equation is proposed to predict the cell mass and biosurfactant production as a goodness of fit was obtained with this model. The modified Gompertz equation was also extended to enable the excellent prediction of the surface tension.

  15. Kinetics studies of fungal biogas production from certain agricultural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anaerobic degradation of sugar cane and rice husk by cellulolytic fungus was studied respectively at optimum operational condition of concentration, 1:5 w/v of the lignocelluloses: water and temperature of 33oC. The average rates of biogas production determined for sugar cane and rice husk were 57cm3per day and ...

  16. Conjugated Linoleic Acid Production by Bifidobacteria: Screening, Kinetic, and Composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Raimondi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Conjugated linoleic acids (CLA are positional and geometric isomers of linoleic acid involved in a number of health aspects. In humans, CLA production is performed by gut microbiota, including some species of potential probiotic bifidobacteria. 128 strains of 31 Bifidobacterium species were screened with a spectrophotometric assay to identify novel CLA producers. Most species were nonproducers, while producers belonged to B. breve and B. pseudocatenulatum. GC-MS revealed that CLA producer strains yielded 9cis,11trans-CLA and 9trans,11trans-CLA, without any production of other isomers. Hydroxylated forms of LA were absent in producer strains, suggesting that the myosin-cross-reactive antigen (MCRA protein that exerts hydratase activity is not involved in LA isomerization. Moreover, both CLA producer and nonproducer species bear a MCRA homologue. The strain B. breve WC 0421 was the best CLA producer, converting LA into 68.8% 9cis,11trans-CLA and 25.1% 9trans,11trans-CLA. Production occurred mostly during the lag and the exponential phase. For the first time, production and incorporation of CLA in biomass were assessed. B. breve WC 0421 stored CLA in the form of free fatty acids, without changing the composition of the esterified fatty acids, which mainly occurred in the plasmatic membrane.

  17. Production of fungal lipids : kinetic modeling and process design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeuwse, P.

    2011-01-01

    Finding alternatives for fossil fuels is currently urgent. One of the new processes in this field is the production of biodiesel from lipids accumulated by microorganisms. Some yeasts and fungi accumulate lipids when a component needed for growth, usually the N-source, is limiting while the

  18. Production of furfural from palm oil empty fruit bunches: kinetic model comparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panjaitan, J. R. H.; Monica, S.; Gozan, M.

    2017-05-01

    Furfural is a chemical compound that can be applied to pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, resins and cleaning compound which can be produced by acid hydrolysis of biomass. Indonesia’s demand for furfural in 2010 reached 790 tons that still imported mostly 72% from China. In this study, reaction kinetic models of furfural production from oil palm empty fruit bunches with submitting acid catalyst at the beginning of the experiment will be determine. Kinetic data will be obtained from hydrolysis of empty oil palm bunches using sulfuric acid catalyst 3% at temperature 170°C, 180°C and 190°C for 20 minutes. From this study, the kinetic model to describe the production of furfural is the kinetic model where generally hydrolysis reaction with an acid catalyst in hemicellulose and furfural will produce the same decomposition product which is formic acid with different reaction pathways. The activation energy obtained for the formation of furfural, the formation of decomposition products from furfural and the formation of decomposition products from hemicellulose is 8.240 kJ/mol, 19.912 kJ/mol and -39.267 kJ / mol.

  19. The influence of naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) and coumarin on flavonoid production by fungus Phellinus sp.: modeling of production kinetic profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiao-Kui; Li, Le; Peterson, Eric Charles; Ruan, Tingting; Duan, Xiaoyi

    2015-11-01

    For the purpose of improving the fungal production of flavonoids, the influence of naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) and coumarin on flavonoid production by fungus Phellinus sp. P0988 was investigated by developing the corresponding kinetics of flavonoid production in a 7-L bioreactor. Phellinus sp. was confirmed to form flavonoids in pellets and broth when cultivated in basic medium, and the optimum concentration of NAA and coumarin in medium for flavonoid production were determined to be 0.03 and 0.02 g/L, respectively. The developed unstructured mathematical models were in good agreement with the experimental results with respect to flavonoid production kinetic profiles with NAA and coumarin supplementation at optimum levels and revealed significant accuracy in terms of statistical consistency and robustness. Analysis of these kinetic processes indicated that NAA and coumarin supplementations imposed a stronger positive influence on flavonoid production and substrate consumption compared to their effects on cell growth. The separate addition of NAA and coumarin resulted in enhancements in final product accumulation and productivity, achieving final flavonoid concentrations of 3.60 and 2.75 g/L, respectively, and glucose consumption showed a significant decrease compared to the non-supplemented control as well. Also, the separate presence of NAA and coumarin respectively decreased maintenance coefficients (M s) from 2.48 in the control to 1.39 and 0.22, representing decreases of 43.9 and 91.1 %, respectively. The current study is the first known application of mathematical kinetic models to explore the influence of medium components adding on flavonoid production by fungi.

  20. Oxidation kinetics of hydride-bearing uranium metal corrosion products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totemeier, Terry C.; Pahl, Robert G.; Frank, Steven M.

    The oxidation behavior of hydride-bearing uranium metal corrosion products from Zero Power Physics Reactor (ZPPR) fuel plates was studied using thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) in environments of Ar-4%O 2, Ar-9%O 2, and Ar-20%O 2. Ignition of corrosion product samples from two moderately corroded plates was observed between 125°C and 150°C in all environments. The rate of oxidation above the ignition temperature was found to be dependent only on the net flow rate of oxygen in the reacting gas. Due to the higher net oxygen flow rate, burning rates increased with increasing oxygen concentration. Oxidation rates below the ignition temperature were much slower and decreased with increasing test time. The hydride contents of the TGA samples from the two moderately corroded plates, determined from the total weight gain achieved during burning, were 47-61 wt% and 29-39 wt%. Samples from a lightly corroded plate were not reactive; X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirmed that they contained little hydride.

  1. Oxidation kinetics of hydride-bearing uranium metal corrosion products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Totemeier, T.C.; Pahl, R.G.; Frank, S.M.

    1998-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of hydride-bearing uranium metal corrosion products from zero power physics reactor (ZPPR) fuel plates was studied using thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) in environments of Ar-4%O 2 , Ar-9%O 2 , and Ar-20%O 2 . Ignition of corrosion product samples from two moderately corroded plates was observed between 125 C and 150 C in all environments. The rate of oxidation above the ignition temperature was found to be dependent only on the net flow rate of oxygen in the reacting gas. Due to the higher net oxygen flow rate, burning rates increased with increasing oxygen concentration. Oxidation rates below the ignition temperature were much slower and decreased with increasing test time. The hydride contents of the TGA samples from the two moderately corroded plates, determined from the total weight gain achieved during burning, were 47-61 wt% and 29-39 wt%. Samples from a lightly corroded plate were not reactive; X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirmed that they contained little hydride. (orig.)

  2. Kinetic study on ferulic acid production from banana stem waste via mechanical extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zainol, Norazwina; Masngut, Nasratun; Khairi Jusup, Muhamad

    2018-04-01

    Banana is the tropical plants associated with lots of medicinal properties. It has been reported to be a potential source of phenolic compounds such as ferulic acid (FA). FA has excellent antioxidant properties higher than vitamin C and E. FA also have a wide range of biological activities, such as antioxidant activities and anti-microbial activities. This paper presents an experimental and kinetic study on ferulic acid (FA) production from banana stem waste (BSW) via mechanical extraction. The objective of this research is to determine the kinetic parameters in the ferulic acid production. The banana stem waste was randomly collected from the local banana plantation in Felda Lepar Hilir, Pahang. The banana stem juice was mechanically extracted by using sugarcane press machine (KR3176) and further analyzed in high performance liquid chromatography. The differential and integral method was applied to determine the kinetic parameter of the extraction process and the data obtained were fitted into the 0th, 1st and 2nd order of extraction process. Based on the results, the kinetic parameter and R2 value from were 0.05 and 0.93, respectively. It was determined that the 0th kinetic order fitted the reaction processes to best represent the mechanical extraction.

  3. Iridium-Catalyzed Dynamic Kinetic Isomerization: Expedient Synthesis of Carbohydrates from Achmatowicz Rearrangement Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao-Yuan; Yang, Ka; Bennett, Scott R; Guo, Sheng-rong; Tang, Weiping

    2015-07-20

    A highly stereoselective dynamic kinetic isomerization of Achmatowicz rearrangement products was discovered. This new internal redox isomerization provided ready access to key intermediates for the enantio- and diastereoselective synthesis of a series of naturally occurring sugars. The nature of the de novo synthesis also enables the preparation of both enantiomers. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. The kinetics of steam-carbon dioxide conversion, rational ways and production catalysts of process gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khamroev, F.B.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present work is to study the kinetics of steam-carbon dioxide conversion, rational ways and production catalysts of process gas. The experimental equation of steam-carbon methane conversion, heat stability increasing and catalyst efficiency, decreasing of hydrodynamical resistance of catalyst layer were determined.

  5. Reaction kinetics, reaction products and compressive strength of ternary activators activated slag designed by Taguchi method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yuan, B.; Yu, Q.L.; Brouwers, H.J.H.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the reaction kinetics, the reaction products and the compressive strength of slag activated by ternary activators, namely waterglass, sodium hydroxide and sodium carbonate. Nine mixtures are designed by the Taguchi method considering the factors of sodium carbonate content

  6. Humoral responses of broiler chickens challenged with NDV following supplemental treatment with extracts of Aloe vera, Alma millsoni, Ganoderma lucidum and Archachatina marginata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojiezeh, Tony I; Eghafona, Nosahkare'Odeh

    2015-01-01

    The significance of nutritional supplements for immunity has been documented. Locally sourced extracts used in alternative medicine were studied to determine their potential effects on antibody production and humoral responses in viral challenged birds. Three hundred and eighty birds were distributed into 19 groups of 20 birds each. Following acclimatization for 16 days, they were fed with standard broilers feed and water ad libitum. Group A was supplemented with Aloe vera (AV) extract, group B was given Alma millsoni (AM) extract, group C was given Archachatina marginata (AMS) extract and group D was given Ganoderma lucidum (GL) extract, and group E was the control group. Extract concentrations of 50 mg, 100 mg and 150 mg were given to three subsets of each treatment group for 30 days. Birds were then challenged with intramuscular administration of 0.2 ml of 50% Embryo Lethal Dose of saline suspension of the challenge strain of Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV) on the 30(th) day, and were examined for clinical signs and symptoms. Serum from venous blood was used for antibody and immunological assay. Aloe vera at 50 µg and A. millsoni extracts supplementations yielded a significant antibody titre (p vera enhanced the ability to mount humoral responses against viral infection in broiler chickens.

  7. Optimization of macronutrient kinetics for biomass production in Nostoc calcicola

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiyer, Subramanian Seshadri C.; Akshai, A.; Kumar, B. G. Prakash; Ramachandran, S.

    2018-04-01

    To assess the feasibility of Allen and Arnon’s (AA) media addition to increase the biomass productivity, (0, 2.5, 5, 7.5 ml of 10x media concentrate - MC) was added to aerated culture every six days, in two separate conditions i.e., single harvest (SH) and continuous harvest (CH) after 15th day. Results show that with addition of 5 ml of MC produced maximum amount of biomass is 1.32 g/L and 2.88 g/L for Sh and CH respectively. These results show that with addition of 5 ml of MC to an aerated culture every six days with continuous biomass harvesting leads to maximum growth of Nostoc calcicola @25°C

  8. Degradation kinetics and transformation products of chlorophene by aqueous permanganate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xinxin; Chen, Jing; Wang, Siyuan; Ge, Jiali; Qu, Ruijuan; Feng, Mingbao; Sharma, Virender K; Wang, Zunyao

    2018-07-01

    This paper evaluates the oxidation of an antibacterial agent, chlorophene (4-chloro-2-(phenylmethyl)phenol, CP), by permanganate (Mn(VII)) in water. Second-order rate constant (k) for the reaction between Mn(VII) and CP was measured as (2.05 ± 0.05) × 10 1  M -1  s -1 at pH 7.0 for an initial CP concentration of 20.0 μM and Mn(VII) concentration of 60.0 μM. The value of k decreased with increasing pH in the pH range of 5.0-7.0, and then increased with an increase in solution pH from 7.0 to 10.0. The presence of MnO 2 and Fe 3+ in water generally enhanced the removal of CP, while the effect of humic acid was not obvious. Fourteen oxidation products of CP were identified by an electrospray time-of-flight mass spectrometer, and direct oxidation, ring-opening, and decarboxylation were mainly observed in the reaction process. The initial reaction sites of CP by Mn(VII) oxidation were rationalized by density functional theory calculations. Toxicity changes of the reaction solutions were assessed by the luminescent bacteria P. phosphoreum, and the intermediate products posed a relatively low ecological risk during the degradation process. The efficient removal of CP in secondary clarifier effluent and river water demonstrated the potential application of this Mn(VII) oxidation method in water treatment. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Modeling the high pressure inactivation kinetics of Listeria monocytogenes on RTE cooked meat products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hereu, A.; Dalgaard, Paw; Garriga, M.

    2012-01-01

    High pressure (HP) inactivation curves of Listeria monocytogenes CTC1034 (ca. 107CFU/g) on sliced RTE cooked meat products (ham and mortadella) were obtained at pressures from 300 to 800MPa. A clear tail shape was observed at pressures above 450MPa and the log-linear with tail primary model...... provided the best fit to the HP-inactivation kinetics. The relationships between the primary kinetic parameters (log kmax and log Nres) and pressure treatments were described by a polynomial secondary model. To estimate HP-inactivation of L. monocytogenes in log (N/N0) over time, a one-step global fitting...

  10. Kinetics of radiolysis of irradiated ligno celluloses into soluble products in water and rumen liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tukenmez, I.; Bakioglu, A.T.; Ersen, M.S.

    1997-01-01

    In order to increase the low bio hydrolysis of ligno celluloses in biotechnological and biological processes where these materials are used as raw materials and ruminant feed, the substrates were pretreated with irradiation to induce radiolytic depolymerisation and then kinetics of their radiolysis into soluble products in water and rumen liquid were analyzed. Wheat straw used as a representative lignocellulose substrate was irradiated at 0-2.5 MGy doses at 20''o''C with an optimum equilibrium humidity of 6.6% in Cs-137 gamma irradiator with a dose rate of 1.8 kGy/h, and soluablefractions in water and in situ rumen liquid were determined gravimetrically. Based on these data, a reaction mechanism was proposed for the radiolysis of ligno celluloses into soluble fractions. From the corresponding reaction rate equations with this mechanism a dose dependent kinetics was derived for the radiolysis of ligno celluloses into water/rumen liquid-soluble products. Defined by this kinetics, the threshold doses for the radiolysis of the substrate into water/rumen liquid-soluble products were respectively found 80.6 kGy and 186.0 kGy, and fractional radiolytic decomposition yields 0.193 MGy''-1''.It was emphasized that developed kinetic models may be used for the process design of irradiation pretreatments to improve the bio hydrolysis of ligno celluloses.(2figs. and 17 refs.)

  11. Kinetics Studies on citric acid production by gamma ray induced mutant of Aspergillus niger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Begum, A.A.; Choudhury, N.; Islam, M.S.

    1991-01-01

    Effect of cultural pH and incubation temperature on citric acid yield and kinetic patterns of citric acid fermentation by a natural isolate of aspergillus niger as CA16 and one of its gamma ray induced mutants were studied using cane molasses as growth and fermentation substrate. Mutant strain, 277/30 gave maximum citric acid yield of 85 g/l at pH 3.5 and 28 degree centigrade in molasses medium adjusted to 16% sugar and 25% prescott salt in the medium. Parent strain, CA16 gave a maximum yield of 34 g/l at pH 4.0 and 26 degree centigrade in molasses medium adjusted to 16% sugar and 100% prescott salt in the medium. In kinetic studies, strains showed combination kinetics of citric acid fermentation where product formation is directly related to growth and cell mass and indirectly related to carbohydrate uptake

  12. Esterification kinetics of free fatty acids with supercritical methanol for biodiesel production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alenezi, R.; Leeke, G.A.; Winterbottom, J.M.; Santos, R.C.D.; Khan, A.R.

    2010-01-01

    Non-catalytic esterification of Free Fatty Acids (FFA) with supercritical methanol was studied under reaction conditions of (250-320 deg. C) at 10 MPa. A detailed experimental programme was implemented to investigate the influence of temperature, stirring rate and the molar ratio of methanol to FFA in the feed in a batch-type reaction vessel. The esterification products of FFA with supercritical methanol are Fatty Acids Methyl Esters (FAME; biodiesel) and water. The yield of FAME was found to increase with an increase in temperature, and with an increase in the molar ratio of methanol to FFA. At >850 rpm the yield of FAME was not affected by stirring rate. The rate constants and energy of activation have been numerically evaluated by solving an ordinary differential equation that describes the reaction kinetics. The proposed kinetic model shows a reversible second order reaction and represents all the experimental data satisfactorily, providing deeper insight into the kinetics of the reaction.

  13. A new study of the kinetics of curd production in the process of cheese manufacture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Susana Vargas; Torres, Maykel González; Guerrero, Francisco Quintanilla; Talavera, Rogelio Rodríguez

    2017-11-01

    We studied the role played by temperature and rennet concentration in the coagulation process for cheese manufacture and the evaluation of their kinetics. We concluded that temperature is the main factor that determines the kinetics. The rennet concentration was unimportant probably due to the fast action of the enzyme chymosin. The Dynamic light scattering technique allowed measuring the aggregate's size and their formation kinetics. The volume fraction of solids was determined from viscosity measurements, showing profiles that are in agreement with the size profiles. The results indicate that the formation of the aggregates for rennet cheese is strongly dependent on temperature and rennet concentration. The results revealed that at 35·5 °C the volume fraction of solids has the maximum slope, indicating that at this temperature the curd is formed rapidly. The optimal temperature throughout the process was established. Second-order kinetics were obtained for the process. We observed a quadratic dependence between the rennet volume and the volume fraction of solids (curd), thereby indicating that the kinetics of the curd production should be of order two.

  14. Kinetic study on the effect of temperature on biogas production using a lab scale batch reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepanraj, B; Sivasubramanian, V; Jayaraj, S

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, biogas production from food waste through anaerobic digestion was carried out in a 2l laboratory-scale batch reactor operating at different temperatures with a hydraulic retention time of 30 days. The reactors were operated with a solid concentration of 7.5% of total solids and pH 7. The food wastes used in this experiment were subjected to characterization studies before and after digestion. Modified Gompertz model and Logistic model were used for kinetic study of biogas production. The kinetic parameters, biogas yield potential of the substrate (B), the maximum biogas production rate (Rb) and the duration of lag phase (λ), coefficient of determination (R(2)) and root mean square error (RMSE) were estimated in each case. The effect of temperature on biogas production was evaluated experimentally and compared with the results of kinetic study. The results demonstrated that the reactor with operating temperature of 50°C achieved maximum cumulative biogas production of 7556ml with better biodegradation efficiency. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Time extrapolation of radiolytic degradation product kinetics: the case of polyurethane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dannoux, A.

    2007-02-01

    The prediction of the environmental impact of organic materials in nuclear waste geological storage needs knowledge of radiolytic degradation mechanisms and kinetics in aerobic and anaerobic conditions. In this framework, the effect of high doses (> MGy) and the variation of dose rate have to be considered. The material studied is a polyurethane composed of polyether soft segment and aromatic hard segments. Mechanisms were built on the analysis of material submitted to irradiations of simulation (high energy electrons and gamma radiation) by FTIR spectroscopy and gaseous and liquid degradation products by gas mass spectrometry and size exclusion chromatography. The electron paramagnetic resonance study of radical process and the determination of oxygen consumption and gas formation radiolytic yields allowed us to acquire kinetic data and to estimate dose rate and high doses effects. The polyurethane radio-oxidation mainly concerns soft segments and induced cross-linkings and production by scissions of oxidised compounds (esters, alcohols, carboxylic acids). The kinetic of radical termination is rapid and the dose rate effect is limited. After 10 MGy, branching and scission reactions are in equilibrium and low molecular weight products accumulate. At last, the degradation products release in water is influenced by the oxidation rate and the temperature. After 10 MGy, the soluble fraction is stabilised at 25%. The water soluble products identified by electro-spray ionisation mass spectrometry (alcohols, aldehydes, carboxylic acids) potentially formed complexes with radionuclides. (author)

  16. Butia Yatay coconut oil: Process development for biodiesel production and kinetics of esterification with ethanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanuttini, M.S.; Pisarello, M.L.; Querini, C.A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Coconut oil contains high levels of phosphorous and free fatty acids. • Especial degumming process is needed in order to decrease the phosphorous content. • Kinetic constant for esterification reaction decreases as a function of time. • Two-step esterification is more efficient to reduce acidity than one-step. • Approximately 15% of esters are formed by acid-catalyzed transesterification. - Abstract: The aim of this work is to study biodiesel production using Butia Yatay coconut oil. This oil has acid values between 109 and 140 mg KOH/g, and phosphorus content in the order of 600 ppm. A three-step degumming pre-treatment of the raw material was adjusted in order to decrease the phosphorus content to approximately 200 ppm. Afterwards, a two-step esterification followed by transesterification was required in order to obtain a high-quality product. The esterification kinetics was studied including the simultaneous reactions that take place during the esterification of free fatty acids: autocatalysis, triacylglycerides hydrolysis, transesterification, and the reaction of sulphuric acid with the alcohol, being the most important ones. The kinetic parameters for the esterification and autocatalysis reactions were also obtained, being different compared to sunflower oil, due to the presence of short chain fatty acids. The kinetic constant for the esterification reaction rapidly decreases as a function of time, due to the consumption of the catalyst by the alkyl-sulphate formation reaction

  17. Photodegradation kinetics and transformation products of ketoprofen, diclofenac and atenolol in pure water and treated wastewater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salgado, R.; Pereira, V.J.; Carvalho, G.; Soeiro, R.; Gaffney, V.; Almeida, C.; Cardoso, V. Vale; Ferreira, E.; Benoliel, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Direct UV photolysis of 3 pharmaceuticals in pure and waste water was investigated. ► Ketoprofen has higher photodegradion kinetics, followed by diclofenac and atenolol. ► MP/UV photodegradation products were identified for the 3 compounds. ► Photodegradation pathways were proposed to explain the obtained products. ► The persistent photoproducts were identified for each compound. -- Abstract: Pharmaceutical compounds such as ketoprofen, diclofenac and atenolol are frequently detected at relatively high concentrations in secondary effluents from wastewater treatment plants. Therefore, it is important to assess their transformation kinetics and intermediates in subsequent disinfection processes, such as direct ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. The photodegradation kinetics of these compounds using a medium pressure (MP) lamp was assessed in pure water, as well as in filtered and unfiltered treated wastewater. Ketoprofen had the highest time- and fluence-based rate constants in all experiments, whereas atenolol had the lowest values, which is consistent with the corresponding decadic molar absorption coefficient and quantum yield. The fluence-based rate constants of all compounds were evaluated in filtered and unfiltered wastewater matrices as well as in pure water. Furthermore, transformation products of ketoprofen, diclofenac and atenolol were identified and monitored throughout the irradiation experiments, and photodegradation pathways were proposed for each compound. This enabled the identification of persistent transformation products, which are potentially discharged from WWTP disinfection works employing UV photolysis

  18. Photodegradation kinetics and transformation products of ketoprofen, diclofenac and atenolol in pure water and treated wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salgado, R. [REQUIMTE/CQFB, Chemistry Department, FCT, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); ESTS-IPS, Escola Superior de Tecnologia de Setúbal do Instituto Politécnico de Setúbal, Rua Vale de Chaves, Campus do IPS, Estefanilha, 2910-761 Setúbal (Portugal); Pereira, V.J. [Instituto de Biologia Experimental e Tecnológica (IBET), Av. da República (EAN), 2784-505 Oeiras (Portugal); Instituto de Tecnologia Química e Biológica (ITQB) – Universidade Nova de Lisboa (UNL), Av. da República, Estação Agronómica Nacional, 2780-157 Oeiras, 5 Portugal (Portugal); Carvalho, G., E-mail: gs.carvalho@fct.unl.pt [REQUIMTE/CQFB, Chemistry Department, FCT, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Instituto de Biologia Experimental e Tecnológica (IBET), Av. da República (EAN), 2784-505 Oeiras (Portugal); Soeiro, R. [REQUIMTE/CQFB, Chemistry Department, FCT, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Gaffney, V.; Almeida, C. [Institute for Medicines and Pharmaceutical Sciences (iMed.UL), Faculdade de Farmácia da Universidade de Lisboa (FFUL), Av. Prof. Gama Pinto, 1600-049 Lisboa (Portugal); Cardoso, V. Vale; Ferreira, E.; Benoliel, M.J. [Empresa Portuguesa das Águas Livres, S.A., Direcção de Controlo de Qualidade da Água, Laboratório Central, Avenida de Berlim, 15, 1800-031 Lisboa (Portugal); and others

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: ► Direct UV photolysis of 3 pharmaceuticals in pure and waste water was investigated. ► Ketoprofen has higher photodegradion kinetics, followed by diclofenac and atenolol. ► MP/UV photodegradation products were identified for the 3 compounds. ► Photodegradation pathways were proposed to explain the obtained products. ► The persistent photoproducts were identified for each compound. -- Abstract: Pharmaceutical compounds such as ketoprofen, diclofenac and atenolol are frequently detected at relatively high concentrations in secondary effluents from wastewater treatment plants. Therefore, it is important to assess their transformation kinetics and intermediates in subsequent disinfection processes, such as direct ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. The photodegradation kinetics of these compounds using a medium pressure (MP) lamp was assessed in pure water, as well as in filtered and unfiltered treated wastewater. Ketoprofen had the highest time- and fluence-based rate constants in all experiments, whereas atenolol had the lowest values, which is consistent with the corresponding decadic molar absorption coefficient and quantum yield. The fluence-based rate constants of all compounds were evaluated in filtered and unfiltered wastewater matrices as well as in pure water. Furthermore, transformation products of ketoprofen, diclofenac and atenolol were identified and monitored throughout the irradiation experiments, and photodegradation pathways were proposed for each compound. This enabled the identification of persistent transformation products, which are potentially discharged from WWTP disinfection works employing UV photolysis.

  19. The Kinetic of Biogas Production Rate from Cattle Manure in Batch Mode

    OpenAIRE

    Budiyono; I N. Widiasa; S. Johari; Sunarso

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the kinetic of biogas production was studied by performing a series laboratory experiment using rumen fluid of animal ruminant as inoculums. Cattle manure as substrate was inoculated by rumen fluid to the anaerobic biodigester. Laboratory experiments using 400 ml biodigester were performed in batch operation mode. Given 100 grams of fresh cattle manure was fed to each biodigester and mixed with rumen fluid by manure : rumen weight ratio of 1:1 (MR11). The operating temperatures...

  20. State and Kinetic Parameters Estimation of Bio-Ethanol Production with Immobilized Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Mihaylova, Iva; Popova, Silviya; Kostov, Georgi; Ignatova, Maya; Lubenova, Velislava; Naydenova, Vessela; Pircheva, Desislava; Angelov, Mihail

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, state and kinetic parameters estimation based on extended Kalman filter (EKF) is proposed. Experimental data from alcoholic fermentation process with immobilized cells is used. The measurements of glucose and ethanol concentration are used as on-line measurements for observers design and biomass concentration is used for results verification. Biomass, substrate and product concentrations inside immobilized compounds are estimated using the proposed algorithm. Monitoring of the ...

  1. Modeling nitrous oxide production and reduction in soil through explicit representation of denitrification enzyme kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jianqiu; Doskey, Paul V

    2015-02-17

    An enzyme-explicit denitrification model with representations for pre- and de novo synthesized enzymes was developed to improve predictions of nitrous oxide (N2O) accumulations in soil and emissions from the surface. The metabolic model of denitrification is based on dual-substrate utilization and Monod growth kinetics. Enzyme synthesis/activation was incorporated into each sequential reduction step of denitrification to regulate dynamics of the denitrifier population and the active enzyme pool, which controlled the rate function. Parameterizations were developed from observations of the dynamics of N2O production and reduction in soil incubation experiments. The model successfully reproduced the dynamics of N2O and N2 accumulation in the incubations and revealed an important regulatory effect of denitrification enzyme kinetics on the accumulation of denitrification products. Pre-synthesized denitrification enzymes contributed 20, 13, 43, and 62% of N2O that accumulated in 48 h incubations of soil collected from depths of 0-5, 5-10, 10-15, and 15-25 cm, respectively. An enzyme activity function (E) was defined to estimate the relative concentration of active enzymes and variation in response to environmental conditions. The value of E allows for activities of pre-synthesized denitrification enzymes to be differentiated from de novo synthesized enzymes. Incorporating explicit representations of denitrification enzyme kinetics into biogeochemical models is a promising approach for accurately simulating dynamics of the production and reduction of N2O in soils.

  2. Continuous production of biodiesel under supercritical methyl acetate conditions: Experimental investigation and kinetic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farobie, Obie; Matsumura, Yukihiko

    2017-10-01

    In this study, biodiesel production by using supercritical methyl acetate in a continuous flow reactor was investigated for the first time. The aim of this study was to elucidate the reaction kinetics of biodiesel production by using supercritical methyl. Experiments were conducted at various reaction temperatures (300-400°C), residence times (5-30min), oil-to-methyl acetate molar ratio of 1:40, and a fixed pressure of 20MPa. Reaction kinetics of biodiesel production with supercritical methyl acetate was determined. Finally, biodiesel yield obtained from this method was compared to that obtained with supercritical methanol, ethanol, and MTBE (methyl tertiary-butyl ether). The results showed that biodiesel yield with supercritical methyl acetate increased with temperature and time. The developed kinetic model was found to fit the experimental data well. The reactivity of supercritical methyl acetate was the lowest, followed by that of supercritical MTBE, ethanol, and methanol, under the same conditions. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Aqueous chlorination of mefenamic acid: kinetics, transformation by-products and ecotoxicity assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adira Wan Khalit, Wan Nor; Tay, Kheng Soo

    2016-05-18

    Mefenamic acid (Mfe) is one of the most frequently detected nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in the environment. This study investigated the kinetics and the transformation by-products of Mfe during aqueous chlorination. The potential ecotoxicity of the transformation by-products was also evaluated. In the kinetic study, the second-order rate constant (kapp) for the reaction between Mfe and free available chlorine (FAC) was determined at 25 ± 0.1 °C. The result indicated that the degradation of Mfe by FAC is highly pH-dependent. When the pH was increased from 6 to 8, it was found that the kapp for the reaction between Mfe and FAC was decreased from 16.44 to 4.4 M(-1) s(-1). Characterization of the transformation by-products formed during the chlorination of Mfe was carried out using liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight accurate mass spectrometry. Four major transformation by-products were identified. These transformation by-products were mainly formed through hydroxylation, chlorination and oxidation reactions. Ecotoxicity assessment revealed that transformation by-products, particularly monohydroxylated Mfe which is more toxic than Mfe, can be formed during aqueous chlorination.

  4. Kinetic model of biodiesel production using immobilized lipase Candida antarctica lipase B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fedosov, Sergey; Brask, Jesper; Pedersen, Anders K.

    2013-01-01

    We have designed a kinetic model of biodiesel production using Novozym 435 (Nz435) with immobilized Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB) as a catalyst. The scheme assumed reversibility of all reaction steps and imitated phase effects by introducing various molecular species of water and methanol....... Residual enzymatic activity in biodiesel of standard quality causes increase of D above its specification level because of the reaction 2M↔D+G. Filtration or alkaline treatment of the product prior to storage resolves this problem. The optimal field of Nz435 application appears to be decrease of F, M, D...

  5. Levofloxacin oxidation by ozone and hydroxyl radicals: kinetic study, transformation products and toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdi El Najjar, Nasma; Touffet, Arnaud; Deborde, Marie; Journel, Romain; Leitner, Nathalie Karpel Vel

    2013-10-01

    This work was carried out to investigate the fate of the antibiotic levofloxacin upon oxidation with ozone and hydroxyl radicals. A kinetic study was conducted at 20 °C for each oxidant. Ozonation experiments were performed using a competitive kinetic method with carbamazepin as competitor. Significant levofloxacin removal was observed during ozonation and a rate constant value of 6.0×10(4) M(-1) s(-1) was obtained at pH 7.2. An H2O2/UV system was used for the formation of hydroxyl radicals HO. The rate constant of HO was determined in the presence of a high H2O2 concentration. The kinetic expressions yielded a [Formula: see text] value of 4.5×10(9) M(-1) s(-1) at pH 6.0 and 5.2×10(9) M(-1) s(-1) at pH 7.2. These results were used to develop a model to predict the efficacy of the ozonation process and pharmaceutical removal was estimated under different ozonation conditions (i.e. oxidant concentrations and contact times). The results showed that levofloxacin was completely degraded by molecular ozone during ozonation of water and that hydroxyl radicals had no effect in real waters conditions. Moreover, LC/MS/MS and toxicity assays using Lumistox test were performed to identify ozonation transformation products. Under these conditions, four transformation products were observed and their chemical structures were proposed. The results showed an increase in toxicity during ozonation, even after degradation of all of the observed transformation products. The formation of other transformation products not identified under our experimental conditions could be responsible for the observed toxicity. These products might be ozone-resistant and more toxic to Vibrio fisheri than levofloxacin. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Long-term kinetics of Salmonella Typhimurium ATCC 14028 survival on peanuts and peanut confectionery products.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maristela S Nascimento

    Full Text Available Due to recent large outbreaks, peanuts have been considered a product of potential risk for Salmonella. Usually, peanut products show a low water activity (aw and high fat content, which contribute to increasing the thermal resistance and survival of Salmonella. This study evaluated the long-term kinetics of Salmonella survival on different peanut products under storage at 28°C for 420 days. Samples of raw in-shell peanuts (aw = 0.29, roasted peanuts (aw = 0.39, unblanched peanut kernel (aw = 0.54, peanut brittle (aw = 0.30, paçoca (aw = 0.40 and pé-de-moça (aw = 0.68 were inoculated with Salmonella Typhimurium ATCC 14028 at two inoculum levels (3 and 6 log cfu/ g. The Salmonella behavior was influenced (p420 days, especially in products with aw around 0.40.

  7. Ruminal degradation kinetics of protein foods by in vitro gas production technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivone Yurika Mizubuti

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Chemical analysis of carbohydrates and nitrogen fractions, as well as, determination their carbohydrates digestion rates in soyben meal (SM, crambe meal (CM, radish meal (RM, wet brewery residue (WBR and dehydrated silkworm chrysalis (SCD were accomplished. The kinetics parameters of non-fibrous carbohydrates (NFC and B2 fraction were estimated using cumulative gas production technique. Among the foods studied there was considerable variation in chemical composition. The crambe meal was the only food that did not present synchronism between carbohydrate and nitrogen fractions. In this food there was predominance of A+B1 carbohydrates fractions and B1+B2 nitrogen compounds fraction, and for the other predominated B2 carbohydrate fraction and B1+ B2 nitrogen compounds fraction. There were differences among the digestive kinetic parameters for all foods. The greater participation in gas production due to non-fibrous carbohydrates was found in the crambe meal and oilseed radish meal. The fermentation of fibrous carbohydrates provided higher gas volume in the wet brewery residue and in the soybean meal, however, the soybean meal was food with higher total gas volume. Non fibrous carbohydrates degradation rates of wet brewery residue and dehydrated silkworm chrysalis were far below the limits of degradation of this fraction. Due to the parameters obtained by the cumulative gas production, the soybean meal was the best food, however, all others have potential for use in animal nutrition. The cumulative gas production technique allows the estimative of degradation rates and provides further information about the ruminal fermentation kinetics of foods.

  8. Production of lactic acid from sucrose: strain selection, fermentation, and kinetic modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunelli, Betânia H; Andrade, Rafael R; Atala, Daniel I P; Wolf Maciel, Maria Regina; Maugeri Filho, Francisco; Maciel Filho, Rubens

    2010-05-01

    Lactic acid is an important product arising from the anaerobic fermentation of sugars. It is used in the pharmaceutical, cosmetic, chemical, and food industries as well as for biodegradable polymer and green solvent production. In this work, several bacterial strains were isolated from industrial ethanol fermentation, and the most efficient strain for lactic acid production was selected. The fermentation was conducted in a batch system under anaerobic conditions for 50 h at a temperature of 34 degrees C, a pH value of 5.0, and an initial sucrose concentration of 12 g/L using diluted sugarcane molasses. Throughout the process, pulses of molasses were added in order to avoid the cell growth inhibition due to high sugar concentration as well as increased lactic acid concentrations. At the end of the fermentation, about 90% of sucrose was consumed to produce lactic acid and cells. A kinetic model has been developed to simulate the batch lactic acid fermentation results. The data obtained from the fermentation were used for determining the kinetic parameters of the model. The developed model for lactic acid production, growth cell, and sugar consumption simulates the experimental data well.

  9. Oxidation of trimethoprim by ferrate(VI): kinetics, products, and antibacterial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anquandah, George A K; Sharma, Virender K; Knight, D Andrew; Batchu, Sudha Rani; Gardinali, Piero R

    2011-12-15

    Kinetics, stoichiometry, and products of the oxidation of trimethoprim (TMP), one of the most commonly detected antibacterial agents in surface waters and municipal wastewaters, by ferrate(VI) (Fe(VI)) were determined. The pH dependent second-order rate constants of the reactions of Fe(VI) with TMP were examined using acid-base properties of Fe(VI) and TMP. The kinetics of reactions of diaminopyrimidine (DAP) and trimethoxytoluene (TMT) with Fe(VI) were also determined to understand the reactivity of Fe(VI) with TMP. Oxidation products of the reactions of Fe(VI) with TMP and DAP were identified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Reaction pathways of oxidation of TMP by Fe(VI) are proposed to demonstrate the cleavage of the TMP molecule to ultimately result in 3,4,5,-trimethoxybenzaldehyde and 2,4-dinitropyrimidine as among the final identified products. The oxidized products mixture exhibited no antibacterial activity against E. coli after complete consumption of TMP. Removal of TMP in the secondary effluent by Fe(VI) was achieved.

  10. Metabolic and Kinetic analyses of influenza production in perfusion HEK293 cell culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lohr Verena

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell culture-based production of influenza vaccine remains an attractive alternative to egg-based production. Short response time and high production yields are the key success factors for the broader adoption of cell culture technology for industrial manufacturing of pandemic and seasonal influenza vaccines. Recently, HEK293SF cells have been successfully used to produce influenza viruses, achieving hemagglutinin (HA and infectious viral particle (IVP titers in the highest ranges reported to date. In the same study, it was suggested that beyond 4 × 106 cells/mL, viral production was limited by a lack of nutrients or an accumulation of toxic products. Results To further improve viral titers at high cell densities, perfusion culture mode was evaluated. Productivities of both perfusion and batch culture modes were compared at an infection cell density of 6 × 106 cells/mL. The metabolism, including glycolysis, glutaminolysis and amino acids utilization as well as physiological indicators such as viability and apoptosis were extensively documented for the two modes of culture before and after viral infection to identify potential metabolic limitations. A 3 L bioreactor with a perfusion rate of 0.5 vol/day allowed us to reach maximal titers of 3.3 × 1011 IVP/mL and 4.0 logHA units/mL, corresponding to a total production of 1.0 × 1015 IVP and 7.8 logHA units after 3 days post-infection. Overall, perfusion mode titers were higher by almost one order of magnitude over the batch culture mode of production. This improvement was associated with an activation of the cell metabolism as seen by a 1.5-fold and 4-fold higher consumption rates of glucose and glutamine respectively. A shift in the viral production kinetics was also observed leading to an accumulation of more viable cells with a higher specific production and causing an increase in the total volumetric production of infectious influenza particles. Conclusions These results

  11. Kinetics study of levulinic acid production from corncobs by tin tetrachloride as catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing, Qing; Guo, Qi; Wang, Pengbo; Qian, Hongjia; Gao, Xiaohang; Zhang, Yue

    2018-07-01

    Levulinic acid (LA) is an ideal platform chemical that can be produced through acid-catalyzed dehydration and hydrolysis of hexose sugars obtained from lignocellulosic materials. In this study, SnCl 4 was identified as an efficient catalyst for LA production and the reaction kinetics was investigated in a single water phase under different reaction conditions. The Box-Behnken design response surface methodology (RSM) was applied to determine the optimized reaction conditions and three individual variables including reaction temperature, duration, and catalyst concentration were evaluated. An appealing LA yield of 76.0% was achieved at 193 °C and 17 min with 82 mM SnCl 4 catalyst. A kinetics model was developed to predict the yields of glucose, HMF, and LA, which are tally with the experimental results. The analysis of the related kinetic parameters and the results of the RSM experiment helped to provide insights into the interplay between various reaction steps with SnCl 4 as catalysts. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Photolysis of nonylphenol ethoxylates: the determination of the degradation kinetics and the intermediate products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ling; Zhou, Hai-Yun; Deng, Qin-Ying

    2007-06-01

    The photolysis of nonylphenol ethoxylates with an average oligomers length of ten ethoxylate units (NPEO(10)) in aqueous solution under UV, as well as the influence of humic acid (HA) on the photolysis was studied. A 125W high-pressure mercury lamp was employed as the light source. The intermediate products from the photolysis were determined by LC-MS. The results indicated that NPEO(10) underwent direct photolysis upon exposed to UV. The degradation pathway was complex. Besides the generally proposed degradation pathway of ethylene oxide (EO) side chains shortening, the oxidation of alkyl chain and EO chain led to intermediates having both a carboxylated (as well as carbonylated) ethoxylate and alkyl chain of varying lengths. The hydrogenation of benzene ring was also detected. The kinetics data showed that the first order reaction kinetics could be well used to describe the kinetics of NPEO(10) degradation. In the presence of dissolved organic matter by HA addition, the performance of NPEO(10) photodegradation was reduced. The photolysis rate decreased with increased HA concentration.

  13. Kinetics and Products of Chromium(VI) Reduction by Iron(II/III)-Bearing Clay Minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joe-Wong, Claresta; Brown, Gordon E; Maher, Kate

    2017-09-05

    Hexavalent chromium is a water-soluble pollutant, the mobility of which can be controlled by reduction of Cr(VI) to less soluble, environmentally benign Cr(III). Iron(II/III)-bearing clay minerals are widespread potential reductants of Cr(VI), but the kinetics and pathways of Cr(VI) reduction by such clay minerals are poorly understood. We reacted aqueous Cr(VI) with two abiotically reduced clay minerals: an Fe-poor montmorillonite and an Fe-rich nontronite. The effects of ionic strength, pH, total Fe content, and the fraction of reduced structural Fe(II) [Fe(II)/Fe(total)] were examined. The last variable had the largest effect on Cr(VI) reduction kinetics: for both clay minerals, the rate constant of Cr(VI) reduction varies by more than 3 orders of magnitude with Fe(II)/Fe(total) and is described by a linear free energy relationship. Under all conditions examined, Cr and Fe K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectra show that the main Cr-bearing product is a Cr(III)-hydroxide and that Fe remains in the clay structure after reacting with Cr(VI). This study helps to quantify our understanding of the kinetics of Cr(VI) reduction by Fe(II/III)-bearing clay minerals and may improve predictions of Cr(VI) behavior in subsurface environments.

  14. Biohydrogen Production and Kinetic Modeling Using Sediment Microorganisms of Pichavaram Mangroves, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Mullai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mangrove sediments host rich assemblages of microorganisms, predominantly mixed bacterial cultures, which can be efficiently used for biohydrogen production through anaerobic dark fermentation. The influence of process parameters such as effect of initial glucose concentration, initial medium pH, and trace metal (Fe2+ concentration was investigated in this study. A maximum hydrogen yield of 2.34, 2.3, and 2.6 mol H2 mol−1 glucose, respectively, was obtained under the following set of optimal conditions: initial substrate concentration—10,000 mg L−1, initial pH—6.0, and ferrous sulphate concentration—100 mg L−1, respectively. The addition of trace metal to the medium (100 mg L−1 FeSO4·7H2O enhanced the biohydrogen yield from 2.3 mol H2 mol−1 glucose to 2.6 mol H2 mol−1 glucose. Furthermore, the experimental data was subjected to kinetic analysis and the kinetic constants were estimated with the help of well-known kinetic models available in the literature, namely, Monod model, logistic model and Luedeking-Piret model. The model fitting was found to be in good agreement with the experimental observations, for all the models, with regression coefficient values >0.92.

  15. An new MHD/kinetic model for exploring energetic particle production in macro-scale systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, J. F.; Swisdak, M.; Dahlin, J. T.

    2017-12-01

    A novel MHD/kinetic model is being developed to explore magneticreconnection and particle energization in macro-scale systems such asthe solar corona and the outer heliosphere. The model blends the MHDdescription with a macro-particle description. The rationale for thismodel is based on the recent discovery that energetic particleproduction during magnetic reconnection is controlled by Fermireflection and Betatron acceleration and not parallel electricfields. Since the former mechanisms are not dependent on kineticscales such as the Debye length and the electron and ion inertialscales, a model that sheds these scales is sufficient for describingparticle acceleration in macro-systems. Our MHD/kinetic model includesmacroparticles laid out on an MHD grid that are evolved with the MHDfields. Crucially, the feedback of the energetic component on the MHDfluid is included in the dynamics. Thus, energy of the total system,the MHD fluid plus the energetic component, is conserved. The systemhas no kinetic scales and therefore can be implemented to modelenergetic particle production in macro-systems with none of theconstraints associated with a PIC model. Tests of the new model insimple geometries will be presented and potential applications will bediscussed.

  16. Optimization and kinetic studies of sea mango (Cerbera odollam) oil for biodiesel production via supercritical reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ang, Gaik Tin; Ooi, San Nee; Tan, Kok Tat; Lee, Keat Teong; Mohamed, Abdul Rahman

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Sea mango oil as feedstock for biodiesel via non-catalytic supercritical reaction. • Extracted sea mango oil with high FFA could produce high yield of FAME. • Employment of Response Surface Methodology for optimization of FAME. • Kinetic study for reversible transesterification and esterification reactions. - Abstract: Sea mango (Cerbera odollam) oil, which is rich in free fatty acids, was utilized to produce fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) via supercritical transesterification reaction. Sea mango oil was extracted from seeds and was subsequently reacted with methanol in a batch-type supercritical reactor. Response surface methodology (RSM) analysis was used to optimize important parameters, including reaction temperature, reaction time and the molar ratio of methanol to oil. The optimum conditions were found as 380 °C, 40 min and 45:1 mol/mol, respectively, to achieve 78% biodiesel content. The first kinetic modelling of FAME production from sea mango oil incorporating reversible transesterification and reversible esterification was verified simultaneously. The kinetic parameters, including reaction rate constants, k, the pre-exponential constant, A, and the activation energy, Ea, for transesterification and esterification were determined using an ordinary differential equation (ODE45) solver. The highest activation energy of 40 kJ/mol and the lowest reaction rate constant of 2.50 × 10 −5 dm 3 /mol s verified that the first stepwise reaction of TG to produce DG was the rate-limiting step

  17. Electro-oxidation of the dye azure B: kinetics, mechanism, and by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olvera-Vargas, Hugo; Oturan, Nihal; Aravindakumar, C T; Paul, M M Sunil; Sharma, Virender K; Oturan, Mehmet A

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the electrochemical degradation of the dye azure B in aqueous solutions was studied by electrochemical advanced oxidation processes (EAOPs), electro-Fenton, and anodic oxidation processes, using Pt/carbon-felt and boron-doped diamond (BDD)/carbon-felt cells with H₂O₂ electrogeneration. The higher oxidation power of the electro-Fenton (EF) process using BDD anode was demonstrated. The oxidative degradation of azure B by the electrochemically generated hydroxyl radicals ((•)OH) follows a pseudo-first-order kinetics. The apparent rate constants of the oxidation of azure B by (•)OH were measured according to pseudo-first-order kinetic model. The absolute rate constant of azure B hydroxylation reaction was determined by competition kinetics method and found to be 1.19 × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1). It was found that the electrochemical degradation of the dye leads to the formation of aromatic by-products which are then oxidized to aliphatic carboxylic acids before their almost mineralization to CO₂ and inorganic ions (sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium). The evolution of the TOC removal and time course of short-chain carboxylic acids during treatment were also investigated.

  18. Kinetics of ethanol production from Jerusalem artichoke juice with some Kluyveromyces species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuvnjak, Z.; Kosaric, N.; Hayes, R.D.

    1981-01-01

    The kinetics of ethanol production by Kluyveromyces marxianus ATCC 12708 and ATCC 10606, K. cicerisporus ATCC 22295 and K. fragilis 105 were studied using raw juice of the Jerusalem artichoke in which the carbohydrates were not hydrolyzed prior to fermentation. This juice contains enough nutrients and can serve as a complete medium without additional nutrients both for growth of the yeasts and for ethanol production. Both specific ethanol productivity and specific glucose uptake rates were the highest with K. marxianus ATCC 12708 (1.68 gg-1 h-1 and 3.78 gg-1h-1, respectively). This microorganism produced an ethanol yield of 87.5% of the theoretical value in 25 hours.

  19. Kinetic modeling of simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of corn starch for ethanol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Białas, Wojciech; Czerniak, Adrian; Szymanowska-Powałowska, Daria

    2014-01-01

    Fuel ethanol production, using a simultaneous saccharification and fermentation process (SSF) of native starch from corn flour, has been performed using Saccharomyces cerevisiae and a granular starch hydrolyzing enzyme. The quantitative effects of mash concentration, enzyme dose and pH were investigated with the use of a Box-Wilson central composite design protocol. Proceeding from results obtained in optimal fermentation conditions, a kinetics model relating the utilization rates of starch and glucose as well as the production rates of ethanol and biomass was tested. Moreover, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was applied to investigate corn starch granule surface after the SFF process. A maximum ethanol concentration of 110.36 g/l was obtained for native corn starch using a mash concentration of 25%, which resulted in ethanol yield of 85.71%. The optimal conditions for the above yield were found with an enzyme dose of 2.05 ml/kg and pH of 5.0. These results indicate that by using a central composite design, it is possible to determine optimal values of the fermentation parameters for maximum ethanol production. The investigated kinetics model can be used to describe SSF process conducted with granular starch hydrolyzing enzymes. The SEM micrographs reveal randomly distributed holes on the surface of granules.

  20. Is automated kinetic measurement superior to end-point for advanced oxidation protein product?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguz, Osman; Inal, Berrin Bercik; Emre, Turker; Ozcan, Oguzhan; Altunoglu, Esma; Oguz, Gokce; Topkaya, Cigdem; Guvenen, Guvenc

    2014-01-01

    Advanced oxidation protein product (AOPP) was first described as an oxidative protein marker in chronic uremic patients and measured with a semi-automatic end-point method. Subsequently, the kinetic method was introduced for AOPP assay. We aimed to compare these two methods by adapting them to a chemistry analyzer and to investigate the correlation between AOPP and fibrinogen, the key molecule responsible for human plasma AOPP reactivity, microalbumin, and HbA1c in patients with type II diabetes mellitus (DM II). The effects of EDTA and citrate-anticogulated tubes on these two methods were incorporated into the study. This study included 93 DM II patients (36 women, 57 men) with HbA1c levels > or = 7%, who were admitted to the diabetes and nephrology clinics. The samples were collected in EDTA and in citrate-anticoagulated tubes. Both methods were adapted to a chemistry analyzer and the samples were studied in parallel. In both types of samples, we found a moderate correlation between the kinetic and the endpoint methods (r = 0.611 for citrate-anticoagulated, r = 0.636 for EDTA-anticoagulated, p = 0.0001 for both). We found a moderate correlation between fibrinogen-AOPP and microalbumin-AOPP levels only in the kinetic method (r = 0.644 and 0.520 for citrate-anticoagulated; r = 0.581 and 0.490 for EDTA-anticoagulated, p = 0.0001). We conclude that adaptation of the end-point method to automation is more difficult and it has higher between-run CV% while application of the kinetic method is easier and it may be used in oxidative stress studies.

  1. Enzyme-catalyzed synthesis and kinetics of ultrasonic-assisted biodiesel production from waste tallow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adewale, Peter; Dumont, Marie-Josée; Ngadi, Michael

    2015-11-01

    The use of ultrasonic processing was evaluated for its ability to achieve adequate mixing while providing sufficient activation energy for the enzymatic transesterification of waste tallow. The effects of ultrasonic parameters (amplitude, cycle and pulse) and major reaction factors (molar ratio and enzyme concentration) on the reaction kinetics of biodiesel generation from waste tallow bio-catalyzed by immobilized lipase [Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB)] were investigated. Three sets of experiments namely A, B, and C were conducted. In experiment set A, two factors (ultrasonic amplitude and cycle) were investigated at three levels; in experiment set B, two factors (molar ratio and enzyme concentration) were examined at three levels; and in experiment set C, two factors (ultrasonic amplitude and reaction time) were investigated at five levels. A Ping Pong Bi Bi kinetic model approach was employed to study the effect of ultrasonic amplitude on the enzymatic transesterification. Kinetic constants of transesterification reaction were determined at different ultrasonic amplitudes (30%, 35%, 40%, 45%, and 50%) and enzyme concentrations (4, 6, and 8 wt.% of fat) at constant molar ratio (fat:methanol); 1:6, and ultrasonic cycle; 5 Hz. Optimal conditions for ultrasound-assisted biodiesel production from waste tallow were fat:methanol molar ratio, 1:4; catalyst level 6% (w/w of fat); reaction time, 20 min (30 times less than conventional batch processes); ultrasonic amplitude 40% at 5 Hz. The kinetic model results revealed interesting features of ultrasound assisted enzyme-catalyzed transesterification (as compared to conventional system): at ultrasonic amplitude 40%, the reaction activities within the system seemed to be steady after 20 min which means the reaction could proceed with or without ultrasonic mixing. Reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography indicated the biodiesel yield to be 85.6±0.08%. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Ethanol Production from Whey by Kluyveromyces marxianus in Batch Fermentation System: Kinetics Parameters Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dessy Ariyanti

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Whey is the liquid remaining after milk has been curdled and strained. It is a by-product of the manufacture of cheese or casein and has several commercial uses. In environmental point of view, whey is kind of waste which has high pollution level due to it’s contain high organic compound with BOD and COD value 50 and 80 g/L respectively. On the other side, whey also contain an amount of lactose (4.5%-5%; lactose can be used as carbon source and raw material for producing ethanol via fermentation using yeast strain Kluyveromyces marxianus. The objective of this research is to investigate the ethanol production kinetics from crude whey through fermentation using Kluyveromyces marxianus and to predict the model kinetics parameter. The yeast was able to metabolize most of the lactose within 16 h to give 8.64 g/L ethanol, 4.43 g/L biomass, and remain the 3.122 g/L residual lactose. From the results presented it also can be concluded that common kinetic model for microbial growth, substrate consumption, and product formation is a good alternative to describe an experimental batch fermentation of Kluyveromyces marxianus grown on a medium composed of whey. The model was found to be capable of reflecting all batch culture phases to a certain degree of accuracy, giving the parameter value: μmax, Ks, YX/S, α, β : 0.32, 10.52, 0.095, 1.52, and 0.11 respectively. © 2013 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved(Selected Paper from International Conference on Chemical and Material Engineering (ICCME 2012Received: 27th September 2012; Revised: 29th November 2012; Accepted: 7th December 2012[How to Cite: D. Ariyanti, H. Hadiyanto, (2013. Ethanol Production from Whey by Kluyveromyces marxianus in Batch Fermentation System: Kinetics Parameters Estimation. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 7 (3: 179-184. (doi:10.9767/bcrec.7.3.4044.179-184][Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.7.3.4044.179-184 ] View in  |

  3. Some Investigations on Protease Enzyme Production Kinetics Using Bacillus licheniformis BBRC 100053 and Effects of Inhibitors on Protease Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Ghobadi Nejad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to great commercial application of protease, it is necessary to study kinetic characterization of this enzyme in order to improve design of enzymatic reactors. In this study, mathematical modeling of protease enzyme production kinetics which is derived from Bacillus licheniformis BBRC 100053 was studied (at 37°C, pH 10 after 73 h in stationary phase, and 150 rpm. The aim of the present paper was to determine the best kinetic model and kinetic parameters for production of protease and calculating Ki (inhibition constant of different inhibitors to find the most effective one. The kinetic parameters Km (Michaelis-Menten constant and Vm (maximum rate were calculated 0.626 mM and 0.0523 mM/min. According to the experimental results, using DFP (diisopropyl fluorophosphate and PMSF (phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride as inhibitors almost 50% of the enzyme activity could be inhibited when their concentrations were 0.525 and 0.541 mM, respectively. Ki for DFP and PMSF were 0.46 and 0.56 mM, respectively. Kinetic analysis showed that the Lineweaver-Burk model was the best fitting model for protease production kinetics DFP was more effective than PMSF and both of them should be covered in the group of noncompetitive inhibitors.

  4. Intrinsic gas production kinetics of selected intermediates in anaerobic filters for demand-orientated energy supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krümpel, Johannes Hagen; Illi, Lukas; Lemmer, Andreas

    2018-03-01

    As a consequence of a growing share of solar and wind power, recent research on biogas production highlighted a need for demand-orientated, flexible gas production to provide grid services and enable a decentralized stabilization of the electricity infrastructure. Two-staged anaerobic digestion is particularly suitable for shifting the methane production into times of higher demand due to the spatio-temporal separation of hydrolysis and methanogenesis. To provide a basis for predicting gas production in an anaerobic filter, kinetic parameters of gas production have been determined experimentally in this study. A new methodology is used, enabling their determination during continuous operation. An order in methane production rate could be established by comparing the half lives of methane production. The order was beginning with the fastest: acetic acid>ethanol>butyric acid>iso-butyric acid>valeric acid>propionic acid>1,2propanediol>lactic acid. However, the mixture of a natural hydrolysate from the acidification tank appeared to produce methane faster than all single components tested.

  5. Transformation of benzophenone-type UV filters by chlorine: Kinetics, products identification and toxicity assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jian; Ma, Li-yun; Xu, Li

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Chlorination kinetics of three benzophenone-type UV filters (BPs) was studied. • Chlorination of BPs followed second-order reaction. • The transformation products (TPs) of six BPs were identified. • Several transformation pathways were proposed. • Mostly enhanced toxicity of TPs after chlorination was observed. - Abstract: The present study focused on the kinetics, transformation pathways and toxicity of several benzophenone-type ultraviolet filters (BPs) during the water chlorination disinfection process. The transformation kinetics of the studied three BPs was found to be second-order reaction, which was dependent on the concentration of BPs and chlorine. The second-order rate constants increased from 86.7 to 975 M"−"1 s"−"1 for oxybenzone, 49.6–261.7 M"−"1 s"−"1 for 4-hydroxybenzophenone and 51.7–540 M"−"1 s"−"1 for 2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzophenone-5-sulfonic acid with the increasing pH value from 6 to 8 of the chlorination disinfection condition. Then the transformation products (TPs) of these BPs were identified by HPLC-QTof analysis. Several transformation pathways, including electrophilic substitution, methoxyl substitution, ketone groups oxidation, hydrolysis, decarboxylation and ring cleavage reaction, were speculated to participate in the chlorination transformation process. Finally, according to the toxicity experiment on luminescent bacteria, Photobacterium phosphoreum, enhanced toxicity was observed for almost all the TPs of the studied BPs except for 2,2′-dihydroxy-4,4′-dimethoxybenzophenone; it suggested the formation of TPs with more toxic than the parent compounds during the chlorination process. The present study provided a foundation to understand the transformation of BPs during chlorination disinfection process, and was of great significance to the drinking water safety.

  6. Transformation of benzophenone-type UV filters by chlorine: Kinetics, products identification and toxicity assessments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jian; Ma, Li-yun; Xu, Li, E-mail: xulpharm@mails.tjmu.edu.cn

    2016-07-05

    Highlights: • Chlorination kinetics of three benzophenone-type UV filters (BPs) was studied. • Chlorination of BPs followed second-order reaction. • The transformation products (TPs) of six BPs were identified. • Several transformation pathways were proposed. • Mostly enhanced toxicity of TPs after chlorination was observed. - Abstract: The present study focused on the kinetics, transformation pathways and toxicity of several benzophenone-type ultraviolet filters (BPs) during the water chlorination disinfection process. The transformation kinetics of the studied three BPs was found to be second-order reaction, which was dependent on the concentration of BPs and chlorine. The second-order rate constants increased from 86.7 to 975 M{sup −1} s{sup −1} for oxybenzone, 49.6–261.7 M{sup −1} s{sup −1} for 4-hydroxybenzophenone and 51.7–540 M{sup −1} s{sup −1} for 2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzophenone-5-sulfonic acid with the increasing pH value from 6 to 8 of the chlorination disinfection condition. Then the transformation products (TPs) of these BPs were identified by HPLC-QTof analysis. Several transformation pathways, including electrophilic substitution, methoxyl substitution, ketone groups oxidation, hydrolysis, decarboxylation and ring cleavage reaction, were speculated to participate in the chlorination transformation process. Finally, according to the toxicity experiment on luminescent bacteria, Photobacterium phosphoreum, enhanced toxicity was observed for almost all the TPs of the studied BPs except for 2,2′-dihydroxy-4,4′-dimethoxybenzophenone; it suggested the formation of TPs with more toxic than the parent compounds during the chlorination process. The present study provided a foundation to understand the transformation of BPs during chlorination disinfection process, and was of great significance to the drinking water safety.

  7. Kinetics of ethanol production from Jerusalem artichoke juice with some Klugveromyces species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duvnjak, Z.; Kosaric, N.; Hayes, R.D.

    1981-01-01

    The kinetics of ethanol produce by Kluyveromyces marxianus ATCC 12708 and ATCC 10606, K. cicerisporus ATCC 22295, and K. fragilis 105 have been studied using raw juice of the Jerusalem artichoke in which the carbohydrates were not hydrolyzed prior to fermentation. The experiments revealed that this juice contains enough nutrients and can serve as a complete medium without additional nutrients both for growth of the yeasts and for ethanol production. It was found that both specific ethanol productivity and specific uptake rates were the highest with K. marxianus ATCC 12708 (1.68 g/g/hour and 3.78 g/g/hour respectively). This microorganism produced an ethanol yield of 87.5% of the theoretical value in 25 hours. (Refs. 15).

  8. Kinetic analysis of in vitro production of wild-type Spodoptera frugiperda nucleopolyhedrovirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréa Farias de Almeida

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the kinetic behavior of Sf9 and Sf21 cells used in the production of a baculovirus biopesticide to control the pest of corn Spodoptera frugiperda was analyzed. Kinetic variables such as maximum specific growth rate, cell productivity, mean rate of infection, as well as the mean rate of occlusion body production were determined during the infection of these cell-lines with the extracellular virus of the S. frugiperda nucleopolyhedrovirus (SfMNPV. The Sf9 cell-line resulted in better viral production results (5.0 x 10(8 OB/mL than the Sf21 cell-line (2.5 x 10(8 OB/mL.Neste trabalho, analisou-se o comportamento cinético das células Sf9 e Sf21 utilizadas na produção de biopesticida para o controle de Spodoptera frugiperda. Variáveis cinéticas, como velocidade específica máxima de crescimento, produtividade em células, velocidade média de infecção e a velocidade média de produção de OB foram determinadas durante a infecção destas linhagens com o vírus extracelular do nucleopoliedrovirus de S. frugiperda. A linhagem Sf9 resultou em melhores resultados de produção do baculovírus (5 x 10(8 OB/mL, quando comparada à linhagem Sf21 (2,5 x 10(8 OB/mL e outras linhagens da literatura.

  9. Kinetic studies on batch cultivation of Trichoderma reesei and application to enhance cellulase production by fed-batch fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lijuan; Li, Chen; Yang, Zhenhua; Jia, Wendi; Zhang, Dongyuan; Chen, Shulin

    2013-07-20

    Reducing the production cost of cellulase as the key enzyme for cellulose hydrolysis to fermentable sugars remains a major challenge for biofuel production. Because of the complexity of cellulase production, kinetic modeling and mass balance calculation can be used as effective tools for process design and optimization. In this study, kinetic models for cell growth, substrate consumption and cellulase production in batch fermentation were developed, and then applied in fed-batch fermentation to enhance cellulase production. Inhibition effect of substrate was considered and a modified Luedeking-Piret model was developed for cellulase production and substrate consumption according to the growth characteristics of Trichoderma reesei. The model predictions fit well with the experimental data. Simulation results showed that higher initial substrate concentration led to decrease of cellulase production rate. Mass balance and kinetic simulation results were applied to determine the feeding strategy. Cellulase production and its corresponding productivity increased by 82.13% after employing the proper feeding strategy in fed-batch fermentation. This method combining mathematics and chemometrics by kinetic modeling and mass balance can not only improve cellulase fermentation process, but also help to better understand the cellulase fermentation process. The model development can also provide insight to other similar fermentation processes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Antiviral effect of Anthocleista nobilis root extract on the liver homogenate indices of poultry fowls infected with Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV)

    OpenAIRE

    Ayodele P. O,; Okonko I. O,; Chukwuka K. S,; Odu N. N; Michael V. I

    2011-01-01

    This study reports the preliminary investigation of the antiviral effect of Anthocleista nobilis root extract on the liver homogenate indices of poultry fowls treated for Newcastle Disease (ND). Eighteen (18) weeks-old fowls were used for this study. These were divided into 3 groups, A (infected and with treatment), B (infected and without treatment) and C (control). Groups A and B were challenged with Newcastle disease virus (NDV). Group A and C were given ethanolic root extract of A. nobili...

  11. End product inhibition of hepatic 25-hydroxyvitamin D production in the rat: specificity and kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milne, M.L.; Baran, D.T.

    1985-01-01

    The role of vitamin D metabolites in the regulation of hepatic 25-hydroxyvitamin D production was investigated by examining the effects of 25-hydroxyvitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, and 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D on the synthesis of [25- 3 H]hydroxyvitamin D by rachitic rat liver homogenates. Production of [25- 3 H]hydroxyvitamin D was inhibited by 25-hydroxyvitamin D and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, but not by 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D increased the Km of the vitamin D-25-hydroxylase enzyme(s), while 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D decreased the Vmax with a Ki of 88.7 ng/ml. Inhibition of hepatic 25-hydroxyvitamin D production by 25-hydroxyvitamin D and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D may be another control mechanism to regulate circulating vitamin D levels

  12. Kinetic of orange pigment production from Monascus ruber on submerged fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendruscolo, Francielo; Schmidell, Willibaldo; de Oliveira, Débora; Ninow, Jorge Luiz

    2017-01-01

    Pigments produced by species of Monascus have been used to coloring rice, meat, sauces, wines and beers in East Asian countries. Monascus can produce orange (precursor), yellow and red pigments. Orange pigments have low solubility in culture media and when react with amino groups they become red and largely soluble. The orange pigments are an alternative to industrial pigment production because the low solubility facilitates the downstream operations. The aim of this work was to study the kinetic on the production of orange pigments by Monascus ruber CCT 3802. The shaking frequency of 300 rpm was favorable to production, whereas higher shaking frequencies showed negative effect. Pigment production was partially associated with cell growth, the critical dissolved oxygen concentration was between 0.894 and 1.388 mgO 2  L -1 at 30 °C, and limiting conditions of dissolved oxygen decreased the production of orange pigments. The maintenance coefficient (mo) and the conversion factor of oxygen in biomass (Yo) were 18.603 mgO 2  g x -1  h -1 and 3.133 g x  gO 2 -1 and the consideration of these parameters in the oxygen balance to estimate the biomass concentration provided good fits to the experimental data.

  13. Biogas Production from Sugarcane Waste: Assessment on Kinetic Challenges for Process Designing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janke, Leandro; Leite, Athaydes; Nikolausz, Marcell; Schmidt, Thomas; Liebetrau, Jan; Nelles, Michael; Stinner, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Biogas production from sugarcane waste has large potential for energy generation, however, to enable the optimization of the anaerobic digestion (AD) process each substrate characteristic should be carefully evaluated. In this study, the kinetic challenges for biogas production from different types of sugarcane waste were assessed. Samples of vinasse, filter cake, bagasse, and straw were analyzed in terms of total and volatile solids, chemical oxygen demand, macronutrients, trace elements, and nutritional value. Biochemical methane potential assays were performed to evaluate the energy potential of the substrates according to different types of sugarcane plants. Methane yields varied considerably (5–181 Nm3·tonFM−1), mainly due to the different substrate characteristics and sugar and/or ethanol production processes. Therefore, for the optimization of AD on a large-scale, continuous stirred-tank reactor with long hydraulic retention times (>35 days) should be used for biogas production from bagasse and straw, coupled with pre-treatment process to enhance the degradation of the fibrous carbohydrates. Biomass immobilization systems are recommended in case vinasse is used as substrate, due to its low solid content, while filter cake could complement the biogas production from vinasse during the sugarcane offseason, providing a higher utilization of the biogas system during the entire year. PMID:26404248

  14. Shape-Controlled Synthesis of Colloidal Metal Nanocrystals: Thermodynamic versus Kinetic Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Younan; Xia, Xiaohu; Peng, Hsin-Chieh

    2015-07-01

    This Perspective provides a contemporary understanding of the shape evolution of colloidal metal nanocrystals under thermodynamically and kinetically controlled conditions. It has been extremely challenging to investigate this subject in the setting of one-pot synthesis because both the type and number of seeds involved would be changed whenever the experimental conditions are altered, making it essentially impossible to draw conclusions when comparing the outcomes of two syntheses conducted under different conditions. Because of the uncertainty about seeds, most of the mechanistic insights reported in literature for one-pot syntheses of metal nanocrystals with different shapes are either incomplete or ambiguous, and some of them might be misleading or even wrong. Recently, with the use of well-defined seeds for such syntheses, it became possible to separate growth from nucleation and therefore investigate the explicit role(s) played by a specific thermodynamic or kinetic parameter in directing the evolution of colloidal metal nanocrystals into a specific shape. Starting from single-crystal seeds enclosed by a mix of {100}, {111}, and {110} facets, for example, one can obtain colloidal nanocrystals with diversified shapes by adjusting various thermodynamic or kinetic parameters. The mechanistic insights learnt from these studies can also be extended to account for the products of conventional one-pot syntheses that involve self-nucleation only. The knowledge can be further applied to many other types of seeds with twin defects or stacking faults, making it an exciting time to design and synthesize colloidal metal nanocrystals with the shapes sought for a variety of fundamental studies and technologically important applications.

  15. Kinetics of two-stage fermentation process for the production of hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nath, Kaushik [Department of Chemical Engineering, G.H. Patel College of Engineering and Technology, Vallabh Vidyanagar 388 120, Gujarat (India); Muthukumar, Manoj; Kumar, Anish; Das, Debabrata [Fermentation Technology Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India)

    2008-02-15

    Two-stage process described in the present work is a combination of dark and photofermentation in a sequential batch mode. In the first stage glucose is fermented to acetate, CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} in an anaerobic dark fermentation by Enterobacter cloacae DM11. This is followed by a successive second stage where acetate is converted to H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} in a photobioreactor by photosynthetic bacteria, Rhodobacter sphaeroides O.U. 001. The yield of hydrogen in the first stage was about 3.31molH{sub 2}(molglucose){sup -1} (approximately 82% of theoretical) and that in the second stage was about 1.5-1.72molH{sub 2}(molaceticacid){sup -1} (approximately 37-43% of theoretical). The overall yield of hydrogen in two-stage process considering glucose as preliminary substrate was found to be higher compared to a single stage process. Monod model, with incorporation of substrate inhibition term, has been used to determine the growth kinetic parameters for the first stage. The values of maximum specific growth rate ({mu} {sub max}) and K{sub s} (saturation constant) were 0.398h{sup -1} and 5.509gl{sup -1}, respectively, using glucose as substrate. The experimental substrate and biomass concentration profiles have good resemblance with those obtained by kinetic model predictions. A model based on logistic equation has been developed to describe the growth of R. sphaeroides O.U 001 in the second stage. Modified Gompertz equation was applied to estimate the hydrogen production potential, rate and lag phase time in a batch process for various initial concentration of glucose, based on the cumulative hydrogen production curves. Both the curve fitting and statistical analysis showed that the equation was suitable to describe the progress of cumulative hydrogen production. (author)

  16. Simulation of rumen fermentation kinetics of by-products from the biodiesel industry with in vitro gas production technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Lopes da Silva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the rumen fermentation kinetics of 18 by-products from the biodiesel industry exhibiting potential for use in the feeding of ruminants via the in vitro gas production technique. The following feeds were investigated: cottonseed, canudo de pito, crambe, sunflower, castor seed (detoxified with lime and soybean meals and cottonseed, peanut, babassu, crambe, palm kernel, sunflower, licuri nut, macaúba, forage radish and jatropha cakes. The evaluated parameters were total gas production (VfT, gas production from fibrous carbohydrates (VfFC, gas production from non-fibrous carbohydrates (VfNFC, the degradation rate of fibrous carbohydrates (kdFC, the degradation rate of non-fibrous carbohydrates (kdNFC and lag time (lag. The feeds were grouped into six different groups according to rumen fermentation kinetic parameters and adopting an R2 of 0.8. Forage radish cake and the meals of cottonseed, soybean, crambe and sunflower composed the first group, while the cakes of babassu and sunflower formed the second group. Canudo de pito and castor seed meals and the cakes of cottonseed, licuri and jatropha I and II formed the third group. The fourth group was composed by the cakes of crambe, palm kernel and peanut I. The fifth group was formed by peanut cake II, while macauba fruit cake formed the sixth group. The VfNFC and VfFC varied from 16.72 to 200.07 mL and from 53.09 to 242.12 mL, respectively. The mean kdFC and kdNFC values varied from 0.002 to 0.039% h-1and from 0.022 to 0.430% h-1, respectively. The mean lag and VfT varied from 0.0001 to 5.2029 hours and 136.94 to 301.44 mL, respectively. A number of the products exhibited the potential to replace soybean meal, especially the forage radish cake and cottonseed, crambe and sunflower meals.

  17. Kinetics of levulinic acid and furfural production from Miscanthus × giganteus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dussan, K; Girisuta, B; Haverty, D; Leahy, J J; Hayes, M H B

    2013-12-01

    This study investigated the kinetics of acid hydrolysis of the cellulose and hemicellulose in Miscanthus to produce levulinic acid and furfural under mild temperature and high acid concentration. Experiments were carried out in an 8L-batch reactor with 9%-wt. biomass loading, acid concentrations between 0.10 and 0.53 M H2SO4, and at temperatures between 150 and 200°C. The concentrations of xylose, glucose, furfural, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural and levulinic acid were used in two mechanistic kinetic models for the prediction of the performance of ideal continuous reactors for the optimisation of levulinic acid and the concurrent production of furfural. A two-stage arrangement was found to maximise furfural in the first reactor (PFR - 185°C, 0.5M H2SO4, 27.3%-mol). A second stage leads to levulinic acid yields between 58% and 72%-mol at temperatures between 160 and 200°C. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Oxidation of β-lactam antibiotics by peracetic acid: Reaction kinetics, product and pathway evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kejia; Zhou, Xinyan; Du, Penghui; Zhang, Tuqiao; Cai, Meiquan; Sun, Peizhe; Huang, Ching-Hua

    2017-10-15

    Peracetic acid (PAA) is a disinfection oxidant used in many industries including wastewater treatment. β-Lactams, a group of widely prescribed antibiotics, are frequently detected in wastewater effluents and surface waters. The reaction kinetics and transformation of seven β-lactams (cefalexin (CFX), cefadroxil (CFR), cefapirin (CFP), cephalothin (CFT), ampicillin (AMP), amoxicillin (AMX) and penicillin G (PG)) toward PAA were investigated to elucidate the behavior of β-lactams during PAA oxidation processes. The reaction follows second-order kinetics and is much faster at pH 5 and 7 than at pH 9 due to speciation of PAA. Reactivity to PAA follows the order of CFR ∼ CFX > AMP ∼ AMX > CFT ∼ CFP ∼ PG and is related to β-lactam's nucleophilicity. The thioether sulfur of β-lactams is attacked by PAA to generate sulfoxide products. Presence of the phenylglycinyl amino group on β-lactams can significantly influence electron distribution and the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) location and energy in ways that enhance the reactivity to PAA. Reaction rate constants obtained in clean water matrix can be used to accurately model the decay of β-lactams by PAA in surface water matrix and only slightly overestimate the decay in wastewater matrix. Results of this study indicate that the oxidative transformation of β-lactams by PAA can be expected under appropriate wastewater treatment conditions. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Methane production from formate, acetate and H2/CO2; focusing on kinetics and microbial characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pan, Xiaofang; Angelidaki, Irini; Alvarado-Morales, Merlin

    2016-01-01

    For evaluating the methanogenesis from typical methanogenic precursors (formate, acetate and H-2/CO2), CH4 production kinetics were investigated at 37 +/- 1 degrees C in batch anaerobic digestion tests and stimulated by modified Gompertz model. The results showed that maximum methanation rate from...... formate, acetate and H-2/CO2 were 19.58 +/- 0.49, 42.65 +/- 1.17 and 314.64 +/- 3.58 N mL/gVS/d in digested manure system and 6.53 +/- 0.31, 132.04 +/- 3.96 and 640.16 +/- 19.92 N mL/gVS/d in sewage sludge system during second generation incubation. Meanwhile the model could not fit well in granular...... sludge system, while the rate of formate methanation was faster than from H-2/CO2 and acetate. Considering both the kinetic results and microbial assay we could conclude that H-2/CO2 methanation was the fastest methanogenic step in digested manure and sewage sludge system with Methanomicrobiales...

  20. Kinetic study of the thermal hydrolysis of Agave salmiana for mezcal production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Soto, M J; Jimenez-Islas, H; Navarrete-Bolanos, J L; Rico-Martinez, R; Miranda-Lopez, R; Botello-Alvarez, J E

    2011-07-13

    The kinetics of the thermal hydrolysis of the fructans of Agave salmiana were determined during the cooking step of mezcal production in a pilot autoclave. Thermal hydrolysis was achieved at different temperatures and cooking times, ranging from 96 to 116 °C and from 20 to 80 h. A simple kinetic model of the depolymerization of fructans to monomers and other reducing sugars and of the degradation of reducing sugars to furans [principally 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural, HMF] was developed. From this model, the rate constants of the reactions were calculated, as well as the pre-exponential factors and activation energies of the Arrhenius equation. The model was found to fit the experimental data well. The tradeoff between a maximum fructan hydrolysis and a critical furan concentration in allowing for the best ethanol yield during fermentation was investigated. The results indicated that the thermal hydrolysis of agave was optimal, from the point of view of ethanol yield in the ensuing fermentation, in the temperature range of 106-116 °C and the cooking range time of 6-14 h. The optimal conditions corresponded to a fructan hydrolysis of 80%, producing syrups with furan and reducing sugar concentrations of 1 ± 0.1 and 110 ± 10 g/L, respectively.

  1. Kinetics of the hydrogen production reaction in a copper-chlorine water splitting plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamfirescu, C.; Naterer, G.F.; Dincer, I.

    2009-01-01

    The exothermic reaction of HCl with particulate Cu occurs during hydrogen production step in the thermochemical copper-chlorine (Cu-Cl) water splitting cycle. In this paper, this chemical reaction is modeled kinetically, and a parametric study is performed to determine the influences of particle size, temperature and molar ratios on the reaction kinetics. It is determined that the residence time of copper particles varies between 10 and 100 s, depending on the operating conditions. The hydrogen conversion at equilibrium varies between 55 and 85%, depending on the reaction temperature. The heat flux at the particle surface, caused by the exothermic enthalpy of reaction, reaches about 3,000 W/m 2 when the particle shrinks to 0.1% from its initial size. A numerical algorithm is developed to solve the moving boundary Stefan problem with a chemical reaction. It predicts the shrinking of copper particles based on the hypothesis that the chemical reaction and heat transfer are decoupled. The model allows for estimation of the temperature of the copper particle, assumed spherical, in the radial direction. The maximum temperature at the interface is higher than the melting point of CuCl by 10-50 o C, depending on the assumed operating conditions. (author)

  2. Growth and production kinetics of human x mouse and mouse hybridoma cells at reduced temperature and serum content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borth, N; Heider, R; Assadian, A; Katinger, H

    1992-09-01

    The growth and production kinetics of a mouse hybridoma cell line and a human-mouse heterohybridoma were analyzed under conditions of reduced temperature and serum content. The mouse hybridoma P24 had a constant cell specific production rate and RNA content, while the heterohybridoma 3D6-LC4 showed growth associated production kinetics and an increased RNA content at higher growth rates. This behaviour of 3D6-LC4 cells can be explained by the unusual cell cycle kinetics of this line, which can be arrested in any phase under growth limiting conditions, so that a low growth rate does not result in a greater portion of high producing G1-phase cells. Substrate limitation changes the cell cycle distribution of this cell line to a greater extent than low temperature or serum content, which indicates that this stress factor exerts a greater physiological control than assumed.

  3. Heterogeneous reaction of particulate chlorpyrifos with NO3 radicals: Products, pathways, and kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nana; Zhang, Peng; Yang, Bo; Shu, Jinian; Wang, Youfeng; Sun, Wanqi

    2014-08-01

    Chlorpyrifos is a typical chlorinated organophosphorus pesticide. The heterogeneous reaction of chlorpyrifos particles with NO3 radicals was investigated using a vacuum ultraviolet photoionization aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (VUV-ATOFMS) and a real-time atmospheric gas analysis mass spectrometer. Chlorpyrifos oxon, 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol, O,O-diethyl O-hydrogen phosphorothioate, O,O-diethyl ester thiophosphoric acid, diethyl hydrogen phosphate and a phosphinyl disulfide compound were identified as the main degradation products. The heterogeneous reaction pathways were proposed and their kinetic processes were investigated via a mixed-phase relative rate method. The observed effective rate constant is 3.4 ± 0.2 × 10-12 cm3 molecule-1 s-1.

  4. Kinetic simulation of neutron production in a deuterium z-pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mostrom, C.; Stygar, William A.; Thoma, Carsten; Welch, Dale Robert; Clark, R.E.; Leeper, Ramon Joe; Rose, David V.

    2010-01-01

    We have found computationally that, at sufficiently high currents, half of the neutrons produced by a deuterium z pinch are thermonuclear in origin. Early experiments below 1-MA current found that essentially all of the neutrons produced by a deuterium pinch are not thermonuclear, but are initiated by an instability that creates beam-target neutrons. Many subsequent authors have supported this result while others have claimed that pinch neutrons are thermonuclear. To resolve this issue, we have conducted fully kinetic, collisional, and electromagnetic simulations of the complete time evolution of a deuterium pinch. We find that at 1-MA pinch currents, most of the neutrons are, indeed, beam-target in origin. At much higher current, half of the neutrons are thermonuclear and half are beam-target driven by instabilities that produce a power law fall off in the ion energy distribution function at large energy. The implications for fusion energy production with such pinches are discussed.

  5. Experimental study of the reactions of limonene with OH and OD radicals: kinetics and products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braure, Tristan; Bedjanian, Yuri; Romanias, Manolis N; Morin, Julien; Riffault, Véronique; Tomas, Alexandre; Coddeville, Patrice

    2014-10-09

    The kinetics of the reactions of limonene with OH and OD radicals has been studied using a low-pressure flow tube reactor coupled with a quadrupole mass spectrometer: OH + C10H16 → products (1), OD + C10H16 → products (2). The rate constants of the title reactions were determined using four different approaches: either monitoring the kinetics of OH (OD) radicals or limonene consumption in excess of limonene or of the radicals, respectively (absolute method), and by the relative rate method using either the reaction OH (OD) + Br2 or OH (OD) + DMDS (dimethyl disulfide) as the reference one and following HOBr (DOBr) formation or DMDS and limonene consumption, respectively. As a result of the absolute and relative measurements, the overall rate coefficients, k1 = (3.0 ± 0.5) × 10(-11) exp((515 ± 50)/T) and k2 = (2.5 ± 0.6) × 10(-11) exp((575 ± 60)/T) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), were determined at a pressure of 1 Torr of helium over the temperature ranges 220-360 and 233-353 K, respectively. k1 was found to be pressure independent over the range 0.5-5 Torr. There are two possible pathways for the reaction between OH (OD) and limonene: addition of the radical to one of the limonene double bonds (reactions 1a and 2a ) and abstraction of a hydrogen atom (reactions 1b and 2b ), resulting in the formation of H2O (HOD). Measurements of the HOD yield as a function of temperature led to the following branching ratio of the H atom abstraction channel: k2b/k2 = (0.07 ± 0.03) × exp((460 ± 140)/T) for T = (253-355) K.

  6. Process optimization and analysis of product inhibition kinetics of crude glycerol fermentation for 1,3-Dihydroxyacetone production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikshit, Pritam Kumar; Padhi, Susant Kumar; Moholkar, Vijayanand S

    2017-11-01

    In present study, statistical optimization of biodiesel-derived crude glycerol fermentation to DHA by immobilized G. oxydans cells over polyurethane foam is reported. Effect of DHA (product) inhibition on crude glycerol fermentation was analyzed using conventional biokinetic models and new model that accounts for both substrate and product inhibition. Optimum values of fermentation parameters were: pH=4.7, temperature=31°C, initial substrate concentration=20g/L. At optimum conditions, DHA yield was 89% (17.83g/L). Effect of product inhibition on fermentation was trivial for DHA concentrations ≤30g/L. At higher concentrations (≥50g/L), kinetics and yield of fermentation showed marked reduction with sharp drop in V max and K S values. Inhibition effect was more pronounced for immobilized cells due to restricted transport of fermentation mixture across polyurethane foam. Retention of fermentation mixture in immobilized matrix resulted in higher localized DHA concentration that possibly enhanced inhibition effect. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Kinetic study of biosurfactant production by Bacillus subtilis LAMI005 grown in clarified cashew apple juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Darlane Wellen Freitas; França, Italo Waldimiro Lima; Félix, Anne Kamilly Nogueira; Martins, João Jeferson Lima; Giro, Maria Estela Aparecida; Melo, Vânia Maria M; Gonçalves, Luciana Rocha Barros

    2013-01-01

    In this work a low cost medium for the production of a biosurfactant by Bacillus subtilis LAMI005 and the kinetics of surfactin production considering the effect of initial substrate concentration were investigated. First, cashew apple juice supplementation for optimal production of biosurfactant by B. subtilis LAMI005 was studied. The medium formulated with clarified cashew apple juice and distilled water, supplemented with 1.0 g/L of (NH(4))(2)SO(4), proved to be the best among the nutrients evaluated. The crude biosurfactant had the ability to decrease the surface tension of water to 30 dyne/cm, with a critical micelle concentration (CMC) of 63.0 mg/L. Emulsification experiments indicated that this biosurfactant effectively emulsified kerosene (IE(24)=67%) and soybean oil (IE(24)=64%). Furthermore, the emulsion stability was always very high. It was shown by biochemical analysis, IR spectra, that there is no qualitative differences in the composition of the crude biosurfactant from a standard sample of surfactin from B. subtilis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Product Characterization and Kinetics of Biomass Pyrolysis in a Three-Zone Free-Fall Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natthaya Punsuwan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyrolysis of biomass including palm shell, palm kernel, and cassava pulp residue was studied in a laboratory free-fall reactor with three separated hot zones. The effects of pyrolysis temperature (250–1050°C and particle size (0.18–1.55 mm on the distribution and properties of pyrolysis products were investigated. A higher pyrolysis temperature and smaller particle size increased the gas yield but decreased the char yield. Cassava pulp residue gave more volatiles and less char than those of palm kernel and palm shell. The derived solid product (char gave a high calorific value of 29.87 MJ/kg and a reasonably high BET surface area of 200 m2/g. The biooil from palm shell is less attractive to use as a direct fuel, due to its high water contents, low calorific value, and high acidity. On gas composition, carbon monoxide was the dominant component in the gas product. A pyrolysis model for biomass pyrolysis in the free-fall reactor was developed, based on solving the proposed two-parallel reactions kinetic model and equations of particle motion, which gave excellent prediction of char yields for all biomass precursors under all pyrolysis conditions studied.

  9. Photodegradation of malachite green under simulated and natural irradiation: kinetics, products, and pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Li; Zhanqi, Gao; Yuefei, Ji; Xiaobin, Hu; Cheng, Sun; Shaogui, Yang; Lianhong, Wang; Qingeng, Wang; Die, Fang

    2015-03-21

    In this work photodegradation rates and pathways of malachite green were studied under simulated and solar irradiation with the goal of assessing the potential of photolysis as a removal mechanism in real aquatic environment. Factors influencing the photodegradation process were investigated, including pH, humic acid, Fe(2+), Ca(2+), HCO3(-), and NO3(-), of which favorable conditions were optimized by the orthogonal array design under simulated sunlight irradiation in the presence of dissolved oxygen. The degradation processes of malachite green conformed to pseudo first-order kinetics and their degradation rate constants were between 0.0062 and 0.4012 h(-1). Under solar irradiation, the decolorization efficiency of most tests can reach almost 100%, and relatively thorough mineralization could be observed. Forty degradation products were detected by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, and thirteen small molecular products were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Based on the analyses of the degradation products and calculation of the frontier electron density, the pathways were proposed: decomposition of conjugated structure, N-demethylation reactions, hydroxyl addition reactions, the removal of benzene ring, and the ring-opening reaction. This study has provided a reference, both for photodegradation of malachite green and future safety applications and predictions of decontamination of related triphenylmethane dyes under real conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Medium Optimization and Fermentation Kinetics for κ-Carrageenase Production by Thalassospira sp. Fjfst-332

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juanjuan Guo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Effective degradation of κ-carrageenan by isolated Thalassospira sp. fjfst-332 is reported for the first time in this paper. It was identified by 16S rDNA sequencing and morphological observation using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM. Based on a Plackett–Burman design for significant variables, Box–Behnken experimental design and response surface methodology were used to optimize the culture conditions. Through statistical optimization, the optimum medium components were determined as follows: 2.0 g/L κ-carrageenan, 1.0 g/L yeast extract, 1.0 g/L FOS, 20.0 g/L NaCl, 2.0 g/L NaNO3, 0.5 g/L MgSO4·7H2O, 0.1 g/L K2HPO4, and 0.1 g/L CaCl2. The highest activity exhibited by Thalassospira sp. fjfst-332 was 267 U/mL, which makes it the most vigorous wild bacterium for κ-carrageenan production. In order to guide scaled-up production, two empirical models—the logistic equation and Luedeking–Piretequation—were proposed to predict the strain growth and enzyme production, respectively. Furthermore, we report the fermentation kinetics and every empirical equation of the coefficients (α, β, X0, Xm and μm for the two models, which could be used to design and optimize industrial processes.

  11. Quantitative production of compound I from a cytochrome P450 enzyme at low temperatures. Kinetics, activation parameters, and kinetic isotope effects for oxidation of benzyl alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qin; Sheng, Xin; Horner, John H; Newcomb, Martin

    2009-08-05

    Cytochrome P450 enzymes are commonly thought to oxidize substrates via an iron(IV)-oxo porphyrin radical cation transient termed Compound I, but kinetic studies of P450 Compounds I are essentially nonexistent. We report production of Compound I from cytochrome P450 119 (CYP119) in high conversion from the corresponding Compound II species at low temperatures in buffer mixtures containing 50% glycerol by photolysis with 365 nm light from a pulsed lamp. Compound I was studied as a reagent in oxidations of benzyl alcohol and its benzylic mono- and dideuterio isotopomers. Pseudo-first-order rate constants obtained at -50 degrees C with concentrations of substrates between 1.0 and 6.0 mM displayed saturation kinetics that gave binding constants for the substrate in the Compound I species (K(bind)) and first-order rate constants for the oxidation reactions (k(ox)). Representative results are K(bind) = 214 M(-1) and k(ox) = 0.48 s(-1) for oxidation of benzyl alcohol. For the dideuterated substrate C(6)H(5)CD(2)OH, kinetics were studied between -50 and -25 degrees C, and a van't Hoff plot for complexation and an Arrhenius plot for the oxidation reaction were constructed. The H/D kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) at -50 degrees C were resolved into a large primary KIE (P = 11.9) and a small, inverse secondary KIE (S = 0.96). Comparison of values extrapolated to 22 degrees C of both the rate constant for oxidation of C(6)H(5)CD(2)OH and the KIE for the nondeuterated and dideuterated substrates to values obtained previously in laser flash photolysis experiments suggested that tunneling could be a significant component of the total rate constant at -50 degrees C.

  12. Photodegradation of malachite green under simulated and natural irradiation: Kinetics, products, and pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yong, Li; Zhanqi, Gao; Yuefei, Ji; Xiaobin, Hu; Cheng, Sun; Shaogui, Yang; Lianhong, Wang; Qingeng, Wang; Die, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Photofate of malachite green was studied under simulated and natural irradiation. • Favorable conditions for degradation were optimized by the orthogonal array design. • Main ROS for the decomposition were determined by free radical quenchers. • Fifty-three products were determined by LC–MS and GC–MS. • Pathways were proposed with the aid of theoretical calculation. - Abstract: In this work photodegradation rates and pathways of malachite green were studied under simulated and solar irradiation with the goal of assessing the potential of photolysis as a removal mechanism in real aquatic environment. Factors influencing the photodegradation process were investigated, including pH, humic acid, Fe 2+ , Ca 2+ , HCO 3 − , and NO 3 − , of which favorable conditions were optimized by the orthogonal array design under simulated sunlight irradiation in the presence of dissolved oxygen. The degradation processes of malachite green conformed to pseudo first-order kinetics and their degradation rate constants were between 0.0062 and 0.4012 h −1 . Under solar irradiation, the decolorization efficiency of most tests can reach almost 100%, and relatively thorough mineralization could be observed. Forty degradation products were detected by liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry, and thirteen small molecular products were identified by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. Based on the analyses of the degradation products and calculation of the frontier electron density, the pathways were proposed: decomposition of conjugated structure, N-demethylation reactions, hydroxyl addition reactions, the removal of benzene ring, and the ring-opening reaction. This study has provided a reference, both for photodegradation of malachite green and future safety applications and predictions of decontamination of related triphenylmethane dyes under real conditions

  13. Photodegradation of malachite green under simulated and natural irradiation: Kinetics, products, and pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yong, Li [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Zhanqi, Gao [State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Monitoring and Analysis for Organic Pollutants in Surface Water, Jiangsu Provincial Environmental Monitoring Center, Nanjing 210036 (China); Yuefei, Ji [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Xiaobin, Hu [School of Life Science, Huzhou University, Huzhou 313000 (China); Cheng, Sun, E-mail: envidean@nju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Shaogui, Yang; Lianhong, Wang; Qingeng, Wang; Die, Fang [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China)

    2015-03-21

    Highlights: • Photofate of malachite green was studied under simulated and natural irradiation. • Favorable conditions for degradation were optimized by the orthogonal array design. • Main ROS for the decomposition were determined by free radical quenchers. • Fifty-three products were determined by LC–MS and GC–MS. • Pathways were proposed with the aid of theoretical calculation. - Abstract: In this work photodegradation rates and pathways of malachite green were studied under simulated and solar irradiation with the goal of assessing the potential of photolysis as a removal mechanism in real aquatic environment. Factors influencing the photodegradation process were investigated, including pH, humic acid, Fe{sup 2+}, Ca{sup 2+}, HCO{sub 3}{sup −}, and NO{sub 3}{sup −}, of which favorable conditions were optimized by the orthogonal array design under simulated sunlight irradiation in the presence of dissolved oxygen. The degradation processes of malachite green conformed to pseudo first-order kinetics and their degradation rate constants were between 0.0062 and 0.4012 h{sup −1}. Under solar irradiation, the decolorization efficiency of most tests can reach almost 100%, and relatively thorough mineralization could be observed. Forty degradation products were detected by liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry, and thirteen small molecular products were identified by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. Based on the analyses of the degradation products and calculation of the frontier electron density, the pathways were proposed: decomposition of conjugated structure, N-demethylation reactions, hydroxyl addition reactions, the removal of benzene ring, and the ring-opening reaction. This study has provided a reference, both for photodegradation of malachite green and future safety applications and predictions of decontamination of related triphenylmethane dyes under real conditions.

  14. Reactions of the CN Radical with Benzene and Toluene: Product Detection and Low-Temperature Kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trevitt, Adam J.; Goulay, Fabien; Taatjes, Craig A.; Osborn, David L.; Leone, Stephen R.

    2009-12-23

    Low temperature rate coefficients are measured for the CN + benzene and CN + toluene reactions using the pulsed Laval nozzle expansion technique coupled with laser-induced fluorescence detection. The CN + benzene reaction rate coefficient at 105, 165 and 295 K is found to be relatively constant over this temperature range, 3.9 - 4.9 x 10-10 cm3 molecule-1 s-1. These rapid kinetics, along with the observed negligible temperature dependence, are consistent with a barrierless reaction entrance channel and reaction efficiencies approaching unity. The CN + toluene reaction is measured to have a slower rate coefficient of 1.3 x 10-10 cm3 molecule-1 s-1 at 105 K. At room temperature, non-exponential decay profiles are observed for this reaction that may suggest significant back-dissociation of intermediate complexes. In separate experiments, the products of these reactions are probed at room temperature using synchrotron VUV photoionization mass spectrometry. For CN + benzene, cyanobenzene (C6H5CN) is the only product recorded with no detectable evidence for a C6H5 + HCN product channel. In the case of CN + toluene, cyanotoluene (NCC6H4CH3) constitutes the only detected product. It is not possible to differentiate among the ortho, meta and para isomers of cyanotoluene because of their similar ionization energies and the ~;; 40 meV photon energy resolution of the experiment. There is no significant detection of benzyl radicals (C6H5CH2) that would suggest a H-abstraction or a HCN elimination channel is prominent at these conditions. As both reactions are measured to be rapid at 105 K, appearing to have barrierless entrance channels, it follows that they will proceed efficiently at the temperatures of Saturn?s moon Titan (~;;100 K) and are also likely to proceed at the temperature of interstellar clouds (10-20 K).

  15. Simultaneous saccharification and bioethanol production from corn cobs: Process optimization and kinetic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewsynker-Sukai, Yeshona; Gueguim Kana, E B

    2018-08-01

    This study investigates the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) process for bioethanol production from corn cobs with prehydrolysis (PSSF) and without prehydrolysis (OSSF). Two response surface models were developed with high coefficients of determination (>0.90). Process optimization gave high bioethanol concentrations and bioethanol conversions for the PSSF (36.92 ± 1.34 g/L and 62.36 ± 2.27%) and OSSF (35.04 ± 0.170 g/L and 58.13 ± 0.283%) models respectively. Additionally, the logistic and modified Gompertz models were used to study the kinetics of microbial cell growth and ethanol formation under microaerophilic and anaerobic conditions. Cell growth in the OSSF microaerophilic process gave the highest maximum specific growth rate (µ max ) of 0.274 h -1 . The PSSF microaerophilic bioprocess gave the highest potential maximum bioethanol concentration (P m ) (42.24 g/L). This study demonstrated that microaerophilic rather than anaerobic culture conditions enhanced cell growth and bioethanol production, and that additional prehydrolysis steps do not significantly impact on the bioethanol concentration and conversion in SSF process. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Study on fermentation kinetics and extraction process of rhamnolipid production by papermaking wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Keer

    2018-01-01

    Paper mill wastewater (PMW) is the outlet water generated during pulp and papermaking process in the paper industry. Fermentation by wastewater can lower the cost of production as well as alleviate the pressure of wastewater treatment. Rhamnolipids find broad placations as natural surfactants. This paper studied the rhamnolipids fermentation by employing Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated by the laboratory, and determined to use wastewater which filtered by medium speed filter paper and strain Z2, the culture conditions were optimized, based on the flask shaking fermentation. On the basis of 5L tank fermentation, batch fermentation was carried out, the yield of fermentation reached 7.067g/L and the fermentation kinetics model of cell growth, product formation and substrate consumption was established by using origin software, and the fermentation process could be simulated well. And studied on the extraction process of rhamnolipids, through fermentation dynamic equation analysis can predict the in fill material yield can be further improved. Research on the extraction process of rhamnolipid simplifies the operation of extraction, and lays the foundation for the industrial extraction.

  17. Effects of heating rate on slow pyrolysis behavior, kinetic parameters and products properties of moso bamboo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dengyu; Zhou, Jianbin; Zhang, Qisheng

    2014-10-01

    Effects of heating rate on slow pyrolysis behaviors, kinetic parameters, and products properties of moso bamboo were investigated in this study. Pyrolysis experiments were performed up to 700 °C at heating rates of 5, 10, 20, and 30 °C/min using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and a lab-scale fixed bed pyrolysis reactor. The results show that the onset and offset temperatures of the main devolatilization stage of thermogravimetry/derivative thermogravimetry (TG/DTG) curves obviously shift toward the high-temperature range, and the activation energy values increase with increasing heating rate. The heating rate has different effects on the pyrolysis products properties, including biochar (element content, proximate analysis, specific surface area, heating value), bio-oil (water content, chemical composition), and non-condensable gas. The solid yields from the fixed bed pyrolysis reactor are noticeably different from those of TGA mainly because the thermal hysteresis of the sample in the fixed bed pyrolysis reactor is more thorough. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. 15N kinetic analysis of N2O production by Nitrosomonas europaea: an examination of nitrifier denitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poth, M.; Focht, D.D.

    1985-01-01

    A series of 15 N isotope tracer experiments showed that Nitrosomonas europaea produces nitrous oxide only under oxygen-limiting conditions and that the labeled N from nitrite, but not nitrate, is incorporated into nitrous oxide, indicating the presence of the denitrifying enzyme nitrite reductase. A kinetic analysis of the m/z 44, 45, and 46 nitrous oxide produced by washed cell suspensions of N. europaea when incubated with 4 mM ammonium (99% 14 N) and 0.4 mM nitrite (99% 15 N) was performed. No labeled nitirte was reduced to ammonium. All labeled material added was accounted for as either nitrite or nitrous oxide. The hypothesis that nitrous oxide is produced directly from nitrification was rejected since (i) it does not allow for the large amounts of double-labeled (m/z 46) nitrous oxide observed; (ii) the observed patterns of m/z 44, 45, 46 nitrous oxide were completely consistent with a kinetic analysis based on denitrification as the sole mechanism of nitrous oxide production but not with a kinetic analysis based on both mechanisms; (iii) the asymptotic ratio of m/z 45 to m/z 46 nitrous oxide was consistent with denitrification kinetics but inconsistent with nitrification kinetics, which predicted no limit to m/z 45 production. It is concluded that N. europaea is a denitrifier which, under conditions of oxygen stress, uses nitrite as a terminal electron acceptor and produces nitrous oxide

  19. KINETICS OF GROWTH AND ETHANOL PRODUCTION ON DIFFERENT CARBON SUBSTRATES USING GENETICALLY ENGINEERED XYLOSE-FERMENTING YEAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae 424A (LNH-ST) strain was used for fermentation of glucose and xylose. Growth kinetics and ethanol productivity were calculated for batch fermentation on media containing different combinations of glucose and xylose to give a final sugar concentra...

  20. Kinetics of corrosion products release from nickel-base alloys corroding in primary water conditions. A new modeling of release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrette, F.; Guinard, L.; Pieraggi, B.

    2002-01-01

    The radioactivity in the primary circuit arises mainly from the activation of corrosion products in the core of pressurised water reactors; corrosion products dissolve from the oxide scales developed on steam generator tubes of alloy 690. The controlling and modelling of this process require a detailed knowledge of the microstructure and chemical composition of oxide scales as well as the kinetics of their corrosion and dissolution. Alloy 690 was studied as tubes and sheets, with three various surface states (as-received, cold-worked, electropolished). Corrosion tests were performed at 325 C and 155 bar in primary water conditions (B/Li - 1000/2 ppm, [H 2 ] 30 cm 3 .kg -1 TPN, [O 2 ] < 5 ppb); test durations ranged between 24 and 2160 hours. Corrosion tests in the TITANE loop provided mainly corrosion and oxidation kinetics, and tests in the BOREAL loop yielded release kinetics. This study revealed asymptotic type kinetics. Characterisation of the oxide scales grown in representative conditions of the primary circuit was performed by several techniques (SEM, TEM, SIMS, XPS, GIXRD). These analyses revealed the essential role of the fine grained cold-worked scale present on as-received and cold-worked materials. This scale controls the corrosion and release phenomena. The kinetic study and the characterisation of the oxide scales contributed to the modelling of the corrosion/release process. A growth/dissolution model was proposed for corrosion product scales grown in non-saturated dynamic fluid. This model provided the temporal evolution of oxide scales and release kinetics for different species (Fe, Ni, Cr). The model was validated for several surface states and several alloys. (authors)

  1. Degradation kinetics of organic chloramines and formation of disinfection by-products during chlorination of creatinine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tianyang; Xu, Bin; Wang, Anqi; Cui, Changzheng

    2018-03-01

    Organic chloramines can interfere with the measurement of effective combined chlorine in chlorinated water and are potential intermediate products of highly toxic disinfection by-products (DBPs). In order to know more about the degradation and transformation of organic chloramines, a typical organic chloramine precursor creatinine was selected for investigation and a corresponding individual organic chloramine chlorocreatinine was prepared in this study. The preparation condition of chlorocreatinine by chlorination was established as chlorine/creatinine = 1 M/M, reaction time = 2 h and pH = 7.0. Then the degradation kinetics of chlorocreatinine during further chlorination was studied, and a second-order rate constant of 1.16 (±0.14) M -1 s -1 was obtained at pH 7.0. Solution pH significantly influenced the degradation rate, and the elementary rate constants of chlorocreatinine with HOCl+H + , HOCl, OCl - and chlorocreatinine - with OCl - were calculated as 2.43 (±1.55) × 10 4  M -2  s -1 , 1.05 (±0.09) M -1 s -1 , 2.86 (±0.30) M -1 s -1 and 3.09 (±0.24) M -1 s -1 , respectively. Besides, it was found that chlorocreatinine could be further converted into several C-DBPs (chloroform and trichloroacetone) and N-DBPs (dichloroacetonitrile (DCAN) and trichloronitromethane (TCNM)) during chlorination. The total yield of DBPs increased obviously with increasing pH, especially for TCNM. In addition, the presence of humic acid in creatinine solution could increase the formation of DCAN obviously during chlorination. Based on the UPLC-Q-TOF-MS analysis, the conversion pathways of chlorocreatinine were proposed. Several kinds of intermediate products were also identified as organic chloramines and some of them could even exist stably during the further chlorination. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Esterification of Oleic Acid for Biodiesel Production Catalyzed by SnCl2: A Kinetic Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio J. da Silva

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The production of biodiesel from low-cost raw materials which generally contain high amounts of free fatty acids (FFAs is a valuable alternative that would make their production costs more competitive than petroleum-derived fuel. Currently, the production of biodiesel from this kind of raw materials comprises a two-stage process, which requires an initial acid-catalyzed esterification of the FFA, followed by a basecatalyzed transesterification of the triglycerides. Commonly, the acid H2SO4 is the catalyst on the first step of this process. It must be said, however, that major drawbacks such as substantial reactor corrosion and the great generation of wastes, including the salts formed due to neutralization of the mineral acid, are negative and virtually unsurmountable aspects of this protocol. In this paper, tin(II chloride dihydrate (SnCl2·2H2O, an inexpensive Lewis acid, was evaluated as catalyst on the ethanolysis of oleic acid, which is the major component of several fat and vegetable oils feedstocks. Tin chloride efficiently promoted the conversion of oleic acid into ethyl oleate in ethanol solution and in soybean oil samples, under mild reaction conditions. The SnCl2 catalyst was shown to be as active as the mineral acid H2SO4. Its use has relevant advantages in comparison to mineral acids catalysts, such as less corrosion of the reactors and as well as avoiding the unnecessary neutralization of products. Herein, the effect of the principal parameters of reaction on the yield and rate of ethyl oleate production has been investigated. Kinetic measurements revealed that the esterification of oleic acid catalyzed by SnCl2·2H2O is first-order in relation to both FFAs and catalyst concentration. Experimentally, it was verified that the energy of activation of the esterification reaction of oleic acid catalyzed by SnCl2 was very close those reported for H2SO4.

  3. Etching kinetics of swift heavy ion irradiated silicone rubber with insoluble additives or reaction products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, D.; Mueller, M.; Petrov, A.; Farenzena, L.; Behar, M.; Papaleo, R.P.

    2003-01-01

    It is normally understood as a basic precondition of the etching of swift heavy ion tracks in polymers that both the additives and etching products are soluble in the etchant. If this is not given, the polymer surface may be gradually blocked by the deposition of the insoluble material that acts as a diffusion barrier for the penetration of fresh etchant into the tracks, and therefore the effective track etching speed will gradually be reduced. The etching kinetics is developed for that case, and the theory is compared with first experimental findings. For that purpose we have taken commercial silicone rubber foils as test materials, that were irradiated with GeV heavy ions through a mask at a fluence that corresponds to the onset of track overlapping. After etching with NaOH, the corresponding etching speed was recorded via the reduction of the foil thickness. The etching speed is seen to decrease with exposure time, in parallel to the development of an insoluble surface layer. It is discussed how to prevent that surface blocking, to maintain a high etching speed

  4. Efficient hydrogen production on MoNi4 electrocatalysts with fast water dissociation kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Wang, Tao; Liu, Pan; Liao, Zhongquan; Liu, Shaohua; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Chen, Mingwei; Zschech, Ehrenfried; Feng, Xinliang

    2017-05-01

    Various platinum-free electrocatalysts have been explored for hydrogen evolution reaction in acidic solutions. However, in economical water-alkali electrolysers, sluggish water dissociation kinetics (Volmer step) on platinum-free electrocatalysts results in poor hydrogen-production activities. Here we report a MoNi4 electrocatalyst supported by MoO2 cuboids on nickel foam (MoNi4/MoO2@Ni), which is constructed by controlling the outward diffusion of nickel atoms on annealing precursor NiMoO4 cuboids on nickel foam. Experimental and theoretical results confirm that a rapid Tafel-step-decided hydrogen evolution proceeds on MoNi4 electrocatalyst. As a result, the MoNi4 electrocatalyst exhibits zero onset overpotential, an overpotential of 15 mV at 10 mA cm-2 and a low Tafel slope of 30 mV per decade in 1 M potassium hydroxide electrolyte, which are comparable to the results for platinum and superior to those for state-of-the-art platinum-free electrocatalysts. Benefiting from its scalable preparation and stability, the MoNi4 electrocatalyst is promising for practical water-alkali electrolysers.

  5. EFFECT OF PRE-TREATMENT ON THE DRYING KINETICS AND PRODUCT QUALITY OF STAR FRUIT SLICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHING LIK HII

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Start fruit (Avverhoa carambola is rich in nutrients and contains dietary antioxidants which are beneficial to human health. Currently, the commercial potential of this fruit has not been fully explored especially in its dried form. The objectives of this research were to investigate the effect of pre-treatment on the drying kinetics and product quality of star fruit slices. The various pre-treatment methods investigated were hot water blanching and dipping in sugar solution. The star fruit was cut into thin slices (5 mm for drying (60°C-80°C using a hot air ventilated oven. Mathematical modelling showed that the Page model was able to describe the moisture diffusion process during drying. Effective diffusivity values were found within the order reported for most food materials (10-8-10-12 m2/s. A decreasing trend in shrinkage ratios was observed with decreasing moisture ratios which corresponds to the greater rate of moisture removal especially at the falling rate period. Overall colour changes were more significant in the blanched samples which could be due to the non-enzymatic browning.

  6. Kinetic studies and thermodynamics of oil extraction and transesterification of Chlorella sp. for biodiesel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, A L; Yasin, N H Mat; Derek, C J C; Lim, J K

    2014-01-01

    In this work, a mixture of chloroform and methanol (1:1, v/v) was applied to oil extraction from Chlorella sp. at 30, 40, 50 and 60 degrees C for 150 min extraction times. Kinetic studies revealed that the values of n and the rate constants were found to depend strongly on temperature. The activation energy was Ea = 38.893 kJ/mol, and the activation thermodynamic parameters at 60 degrees C were ΔS≠ = -180.190 J/mol , ΔH≠ = 36.124k J/mol and ΔG≠ = 96.128k J/mol. Both ΔH and ΔS yielded positive values, whereas ΔG was negative at 60 degrees C, indicating that this process is endothermic, irreversible and spontaneous. The acidic transesterification process was also investigated by gas chromatographic analysis of the microalgae fatty acid methyl esters (biodiesel) at different temperatures and reaction times. The fatty acid profile indicated that the main components were palmitic, linoleic and linolenic acids. The concentration of linolenic acid increased and oleic acid decreased as the temperature increased. Two-hour transesterification is the best reaction time for biodiesel production because it produces the highest percentage of unsaturated fatty acids (74%). These results indicate the potential of Chlorella sp. to produce biodiesel of good quality.

  7. Transformation of aminopyrine in the presence of free available chlorine: Kinetics, products, and reaction pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Mei-Quan; Feng, Li; Zhang, Li-Qiu

    2017-03-01

    Aminopyrine (AMP) has been frequently detected in the aquatic environment. In this study, the transformation mechanism of AMP by free available chlorine (FAC) oxidation was investigated. The results showed that FAC reacted with AMP rapidly, and a 74% elimination was achieved for 1.30 μM AMP after 2 min at 14.08 μM FAC dose. AMP chlorination was strongly pH-dependent, and its reaction included second- and third-order kinetic processes. Three active FAC species, including chlorine monoxide (Cl 2 O), molecular chlorine (Cl 2 ), and hypochlorous acid (HOCl), were observed to contribute to AMP degradation. The intrinsic rate constants of each FAC species with neutral (AMP 0 ) and cation (AMP + ) species were obtained by kinetic fitting. Cl 2 O exhibited the highest reactivity with AMP 0 (k AMP0, Cl2O  = (4.33 ± 1.4) × 10 9  M -1 s -1 ). In addition, Cl 2 showed high reactivity (10 6 -10 7  M -1 s -1 ) in the presence of chloride, compared with HOCl (k AMP+, HOCl  = (5.73 ± 0.23) × 10 2  M -1 s -1 , k AMP0, HOCl  = (9.68 ± 0.96) × 10 2  M -1 s -1 ). At pH 6.15 and 14.08 μM FAC dose without chloride addition, the contribution of Cl 2 O reached to the maximum (33.3%), but in the whole pH range, HOCl was the main contributor (>66.6%) for AMP degradation. The significance of Cl 2 was noticeable in water containing chloride. Moreover, 11 transformation products were identified, and the main transformation pathways included pyrazole ring breakage, hydroxylation, dehydrogenation, and halogenation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Sulphated Polysaccharides from Ulva clathrata and Cladosiphon okamuranus Seaweeds both Inhibit Viral Attachment/Entry and Cell-Cell Fusion, in NDV Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Alberto Aguilar-Briseño

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sulphated polysaccharides (SP extracted from seaweeds have antiviral properties and are much less cytotoxic than conventional drugs, but little is known about their mode of action. Combination antiviral chemotherapy may offer advantages over single agent therapy, increasing efficiency, potency and delaying the emergence of resistant virus. The paramyxoviridae family includes pathogens causing morbidity and mortality worldwide in humans and animals, such as the Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV in poultry. This study aims at determining the antiviral activity and mechanism of action in vitro of an ulvan (SP from the green seaweed Ulva clathrata, and of its mixture with a fucoidan (SP from Cladosiphon okamuranus, against La Sota NDV strain. The ulvan antiviral activity was tested using syncytia formation, exhibiting an IC50 of 0.1 μg/mL; ulvan had a better anti cell-cell spread effect than that previously shown for fucoidan, and inhibited cell-cell fusion via a direct effect on the F0 protein, but did not show any virucidal effect. The mixture of ulvan and fucoidan showed a greater anti-spread effect than SPs alone, but ulvan antagonizes the effect of fucoidan on the viral attachment/entry. Both SPs may be promising antivirals against paramyxovirus infection but their mixture has no clear synergistic advantage.

  9. Sulphated polysaccharides from Ulva clathrata and Cladosiphon okamuranus seaweeds both inhibit viral attachment/entry and cell-cell fusion, in NDV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Briseño, José Alberto; Cruz-Suarez, Lucia Elizabeth; Sassi, Jean-François; Ricque-Marie, Denis; Zapata-Benavides, Pablo; Mendoza-Gamboa, Edgar; Rodríguez-Padilla, Cristina; Trejo-Avila, Laura María

    2015-01-26

    Sulphated polysaccharides (SP) extracted from seaweeds have antiviral properties and are much less cytotoxic than conventional drugs, but little is known about their mode of action. Combination antiviral chemotherapy may offer advantages over single agent therapy, increasing efficiency, potency and delaying the emergence of resistant virus. The paramyxoviridae family includes pathogens causing morbidity and mortality worldwide in humans and animals, such as the Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV) in poultry. This study aims at determining the antiviral activity and mechanism of action in vitro of an ulvan (SP from the green seaweed Ulva clathrata), and of its mixture with a fucoidan (SP from Cladosiphon okamuranus), against La Sota NDV strain. The ulvan antiviral activity was tested using syncytia formation, exhibiting an IC50 of 0.1 μg/mL; ulvan had a better anti cell-cell spread effect than that previously shown for fucoidan, and inhibited cell-cell fusion via a direct effect on the F0 protein, but did not show any virucidal effect. The mixture of ulvan and fucoidan showed a greater anti-spread effect than SPs alone, but ulvan antagonizes the effect of fucoidan on the viral attachment/entry. Both SPs may be promising antivirals against paramyxovirus infection but their mixture has no clear synergistic advantage.

  10. Efficacy of different methanolic plant extracts on anti-methanogenesis, rumen fermentation and gas production kinetics in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirohi, S K; Goel, N; Pandey, P

    2012-01-01

    The present study was carried out to evaluate the effect of methanolic extracts of three plants, mehandi (Lawsonia inermis), jaiphal (Myristica fragrans) and green chili (Capsicum annuum) on methanogenesis, rumen fermentation and fermentation kinetic parameters by in vitro gas production techniques. Single dose of each plant extract (1 ml / 30 ml buffered rumen fluid) and two sorghum fodder containing diets (high and low fiber diets) were used for evaluating the effect on methanogenesis and rumen fermentation pattern, while sequential incubations (0, 1, 2, 3, 6 9, 12, 24, 36, 48, 60, 72 and 96 h) were carried out for gas production kinetics. Results showed that methane production was reduced, ammonia nitrogen was increased significantly, while no significant effect was found on pH and protozoal population following addition of different plant extracts in both diets except mehandi. Green chili significantly reduced digestibility of dry matter, total fatty acid and acetate concentration at incubation with sorghum based high and low fiber diets. Among all treatments, green chili increased potential gas production, while jaiphal decreased the gas production rate constant significantly. The present results demonstrate that methanolic extracts of different plants are promising rumen modifying agents. They have the potential to modulate the methane production, potential gas production, gas production rate constant, dry matter digestibility and microbial biomass synthesis.

  11. Effect of Temperature and pH on Formulating the Kinetic Growth Parameters and Lactic Acid Production of Lactobacillus bulgaricus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzieh Aghababaie

    2014-09-01

    Results: Second order model for Xmax, μmax, P and K was significant but product formation parameters were almost constant. The optimum values of temperature and pH for attaining maximum biomass, maximum specific growth rate, and maximum acid production were obtained at 44 °C and 5.7, respectively. Conclusions: The attained empirical mathematical correlations of RSM alongside the kinetic equations could be used to determine growth conditions under predefined temperature and pH in the fermentation process. Keywords: Lactobacillus bulgaricus, Richards model, Response surface methodology, Lactic acid production, Luedeking-Piret model

  12. Kinetics of the direct sulfation of limestone at the initial stage of crystal growth of the solid product

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Guilin; Dam-Johansen, Kim; Wedel, Stig

    2011-01-01

    The direct sulfation of limestone was studied in a quartz bench scale fixed‐bed reactor with the technique of data deconvolution. The obtained results show that the direct sulfation of limestone has a two‐period kinetic behavior: a short initial sulfation period with high but fast decreasing...... such as SO2, O2, and CO2 and the temperature. The sulfation process in the initial stage of the period with product crystal growth can be described by the combination of the sulfation reaction at the gas–solid interface, diffusion of the product ions toward the product crystal grains, diffusion of carbonate...

  13. General decoupling procedure for expectation values of four-operator products in electron–phonon quantum kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teeny, Nicolas; Fähnle, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    In the density-matrix formalism of electron–phonon quantum kinetics, the hierarchy of infinitely many coupled equations of motion for the expectation values of products of electron and phonon creation and annihilation operators of arbitrary order is usually terminated on the level of the equations of motion for the expectation values of three-operator products by using decoupling procedures for the four-operator products occurring in these equations. In the literature, decoupling procedures are discussed for special types of electron and phonon states. In the present paper, generalized decoupling procedures are derived for arbitrary electron and phonon states. (paper)

  14. Kinetics of abiotic nitrous oxide production via oxidation of hydroxylamine by particulate metals in seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavazos, A. R.; Taillefert, M.; Glass, J. B.

    2016-12-01

    The oceans are a significant of nitrous oxide (N2O) to the atmosphere. Current models of global oceanic N2­O flux focus on microbial N2O cycling and often ignore abiotic reactions, such as the thermodynamically favorable oxidation of the nitrification intermediate hydroxylamine (NH2OH) by Mn(IV) or Fe(III). At circumneutral pH, NH2OH oxidation is more thermodynamically favorable via Mn(IV) than Fe(III) reduction. We characterized the kinetics of NH2OH oxidation in synthetic ocean water at pH 5.1-8.8 using microsensor electrodes to measure real-time N2O production. N2O production rates and yield were greater when NH2OH was oxidized by Mn(IV) than Fe(III). Accordingly, the reduction of Mn(IV) was first order with respect to NH2OH whereas the reduction of Fe(III) was zero order with respect to NH2OH. Interestingly, the order of the reaction with respect to Mn(IV) appears to be negative whereas the reaction is second order with respect to Fe(III). The inverse order with respect to Mn(IV) may be due to the aggregation of particles in seawater, which decreases their surface area and changes their reactivity. Finally, the reaction is first order with respect to protons with Fe(III) as the oxidant but zero order with Mn(IV). The stronger effect of the pH on the reaction with Fe(III) as the oxidant compared to Mn(IV) reflects the stoichiometry of these two reactions, as each mole of N2O produced by Fe(III) reduction consumes eight protons while each mole of N2O produced with Mn(IV) as the oxidant requires only four protons. Our data show that abiotic NH2OH oxidation by Mn(IV) or Fe(III) particles may represent a significant source of N2O in seawater. These findings suggest that abiotic N2O production in marine waters may be significant in areas of the oceans where particulate metals originating from aerosols, dust, or rivers may react with NH2OH released from ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms.

  15. Modeling of Fusarium redolens Dzf2 mycelial growth kinetics and optimal fed-batch fermentation for beauvericin production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Li-Jian; Liu, Yuan-Shuai; Zhou, Li-Gang; Wu, Jian-Yong

    2011-09-01

    Beauvericin (BEA) is a cyclic hexadepsipeptide mycotoxin with notable phytotoxic and insecticidal activities. Fusarium redolens Dzf2 is a highly BEA-producing fungus isolated from a medicinal plant. The aim of the current study was to develop a simple and valid kinetic model for F. redolens Dzf2 mycelial growth and the optimal fed-batch operation for efficient BEA production. A modified Monod model with substrate (glucose) and product (BEA) inhibition was constructed based on the culture characteristics of F. redolens Dzf2 mycelia in a liquid medium. Model parameters were derived by simulation of the experimental data from batch culture. The model fitted closely with the experimental data over 20-50 g l(-1) glucose concentration range in batch fermentation. The kinetic model together with the stoichiometric relationships for biomass, substrate and product was applied to predict the optimal feeding scheme for fed-batch fermentation, leading to 54% higher BEA yield (299 mg l(-1)) than in the batch culture (194 mg l(-1)). The modified Monod model incorporating substrate and product inhibition was proven adequate for describing the growth kinetics of F. redolens Dzf2 mycelial culture at suitable but not excessive initial glucose levels in batch and fed-batch cultures.

  16. Studies on generalized kinetic model and Pareto optimization of a product-driven self-cycling bioprocess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Kaibiao; Kasperski, Andrzej; Tian, Yuan

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study is the optimization of a product-driven self-cycling bioprocess and presentation of a way to determine the best possible decision variables out of a set of alternatives based on the designed model. Initially, a product-driven generalized kinetic model, which allows a flexible choice of the most appropriate kinetics is designed and analysed. The optimization problem is given as the bi-objective one, where maximization of biomass productivity and minimization of unproductive loss of substrate are the objective functions. Then, the Pareto fronts are calculated for exemplary kinetics. It is found that in the designed bioprocess, a decrease of emptying/refilling fraction and an increase of substrate feeding concentration cause an increase of the biomass productivity. An increase of emptying/refilling fraction and a decrease of substrate feeding concentration cause a decrease of unproductive loss of substrate. The preferred solutions are calculated using the minimum distance from an ideal solution method, while giving proposals of their modifications derived from a decision maker's reactions to the generated solutions.

  17. Product sampling during transient continuous countercurrent hydrolysis of canola oil and development of a kinetic model

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Weicheng; Natelson, Robert H.; Stikeleather, Larry F.; Roberts, William L.

    2013-01-01

    A chemical kinetic model has been developed for the transient stage of the continuous countercurrent hydrolysis of triglycerides to free fatty acids and glycerol. Departure functions and group contribution methods were applied to determine

  18. Kinetics of enzymatic trans-esterification of glycerides for biodiesel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrò, Vincenza; Ricca, Emanuele; De Paola, Maria Gabriela; Curcio, Stefano; Iorio, Gabriele

    2010-08-01

    In this paper, the reaction of enzymatic trans-esterification of glycerides with ethanol in a reaction medium containing hexane at a temperature of 37 degrees C has been studied. The enzyme was Lipase from Mucor miehei, immobilized on ionic exchange resin, aimed at achieving high catalytic specific surface and recovering, regenerating and reusing the biocatalyst. A kinetic analysis has been carried out to identify the reaction path; the rate equation and kinetic parameters have been also calculated. The kinetic model has been validated by comparison between predicted and experimental results. Mass transport resistances estimation was undertaken in order to verify that the kinetics found was intrinsic. Model potentialities in terms of reactors design and optimization are also shown.

  19. Time extrapolation of radiolytic degradation product kinetics: the case of polyurethane; Extrapolation dans le temps des cinetiques de production des produits de degradation radiolytique: application a un polyurethane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dannoux, A

    2007-02-15

    The prediction of the environmental impact of organic materials in nuclear waste geological storage needs knowledge of radiolytic degradation mechanisms and kinetics in aerobic and anaerobic conditions. In this framework, the effect of high doses (> MGy) and the variation of dose rate have to be considered. The material studied is a polyurethane composed of polyether soft segment and aromatic hard segments. Mechanisms were built on the analysis of material submitted to irradiations of simulation (high energy electrons and gamma radiation) by FTIR spectroscopy and gaseous and liquid degradation products by gas mass spectrometry and size exclusion chromatography. The electron paramagnetic resonance study of radical process and the determination of oxygen consumption and gas formation radiolytic yields allowed us to acquire kinetic data and to estimate dose rate and high doses effects. The polyurethane radio-oxidation mainly concerns soft segments and induced cross-linkings and production by scissions of oxidised compounds (esters, alcohols, carboxylic acids). The kinetic of radical termination is rapid and the dose rate effect is limited. After 10 MGy, branching and scission reactions are in equilibrium and low molecular weight products accumulate. At last, the degradation products release in water is influenced by the oxidation rate and the temperature. After 10 MGy, the soluble fraction is stabilised at 25%. The water soluble products identified by electro-spray ionisation mass spectrometry (alcohols, aldehydes, carboxylic acids) potentially formed complexes with radionuclides. (author)

  20. Chemical Editing of Macrocyclic Natural Products and Kinetic Profiling Reveal Slow, Tight-Binding Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors with Picomolar Affinities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kitir, Betül; Maolanon, Alex R.; Ohm, Ragnhild G.

    2017-01-01

    medicines. Therefore, detailed mechanistic information and precise characterization of the chemical probes used to investigate the effects of HDAC enzymes are vital. We interrogated Nature's arsenal of macrocyclic nonribosomal peptide HDAC inhibitors by chemical synthesis and evaluation of more than 30...... natural products and analogues. This furnished surprising trends in binding affinities for the various macrocycles, which were then exploited for the design of highly potent class I and IIb HDAC inhibitors. Furthermore, thorough kinetic investigation revealed unexpected inhibitory mechanisms of important...

  1. Efficacy of different methanolic plant extracts on anti-methanogenesis, rumen fermentation and gas production kinetics in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    P. Pandey; N. Goel; S.K. Sirohi

    2012-01-01

    The present study was carried out to evaluate the effect of methanolic extracts of three plants, mehandi (Lawsonia inermis), jaiphal (Myristica fragrans) and green chili (Capsicum annuum) on methanogenesis, rumen fermentation and fermentation kinetic parameters by in vitro gas production techniques. Single dose of each plant extract (1 ml / 30 ml buffered rumen fluid) and two sorghum fodder containing diets (high and low fiber diets) were used for evaluating the effect on methanogenesis and r...

  2. Removal of triclosan via peroxidases-mediated reactions in water: Reaction kinetics, products and detoxification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jianhua; Peng, Jianbiao; Zhang, Ya; Ji, Yuefei; Shi, Huanhuan; Mao, Liang; Gao, Shixiang

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Enzymatic treatment of triclosan in water by soybean and horseradish peroxidases. • pH, H_2O_2 concentration and enzyme dosage affected the removal efficiency of TCS. • The removal of TCS by SBP was more efficient than that of HRP. • K_C_A_T and K_C_A_T/K_M values for SBP toward TCS were much higher than those for HRP. • Polymers formed via radical coupling mechanism were nontoxic to the growth of alga. - Abstract: This study investigated and compared reaction kinetics, product characterization, and toxicity variation of triclosan (TCS) removal mediated by soybean peroxidase (SBP), a recognized potential peroxidase for removing phenolic pollutants, and the commonly used horseradish peroxidase (HRP) with the goal of assessing the technical feasibility of SBP-catalyzed removal of TCS. Reaction conditions such as pH, H_2O_2 concentration and enzyme dosage were found to have a strong influence on the removal efficiency of TCS. SBP can retain its catalytic ability to remove TCS over broad ranges of pH and H_2O_2 concentration, while the optimal pH and H_2O_2 concentration were 7.0 and 8 μM, respectively. 98% TCS was removed with only 0.1 U mL"−"1 SBP in 30 min reaction time, while an HRP dose of 0.3 U mL"−"1 was required to achieve the similar conversion. The catalytic performance of SBP towards TCS was more efficient than that of HRP, which can be explained by catalytic rate constant (K_C_A_T) and catalytic efficiency (K_C_A_T/K_M) for the two enzymes. MS analysis in combination with quantum chemistry computation showed that the polymerization products were generated via C−C and C−O coupling pathways. The polymers were proved to be nontoxic through growth inhibition of green alga (Scenedesmus obliquus). Taking into consideration of the enzymatic treatment cost, SBP may be a better alternative to HRP upon the removal and detoxification of TCS in water/wastewater treatment.

  3. Oxidative degradation of triclosan by potassium permanganate: Kinetics, degradation products, reaction mechanism, and toxicity evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Qu, Ruijuan; Pan, Xiaoxue; Wang, Zunyao

    2016-10-15

    In this study, we systematically investigated the potential applicability of potassium permanganate for removal of triclosan (TCS) in water treatment. A series of kinetic experiments were carried out to study the influence of various factors, including the pH, oxidant doses, temperature, and presence of typical anions (Cl(-), SO4(2-), NO3(-)), humic acid (HA), and fulvic acid (FA) on triclosan removal. The optimal reaction conditions were: pH = 8.0, [TCS]0:[KMnO4]0 = 1:2.5, and T = 25 °C, where 20 mg/L of TCS could be completely degraded in 120 s. However, the rate of TCS (20 μg/L) oxidation by KMnO4 ([TCS]0:[KMnO4]0 = 1:2.5) was 1.64 × 10(-3) mg L(-1)·h(-1), lower than that at an initial concentration of 20 mg/L (2.24 × 10(3) mg L(-1)·h(-1)). A total of eleven products were detected by liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (LC-Q-TOF-MS) analysis, including phenol and its derivatives, benzoquinone, an organic acid, and aldehyde. Two main reaction pathways involving CO bond cleavage (-C(8)O(7)-) and benzene ring opening (in the less chlorinated benzene ring) were proposed, and were further confirmed based on frontier electron density calculations and point charges. Furthermore, the changes in the toxicity of the reaction solution during TCS oxidation by KMnO4 were evaluated by using both the luminescent bacteria Photobacterium phosphoreum and the water flea Daphnia magna. The toxicity of 20 mg/L triclosan to D. magna and P. phosphoreum after 60 min was reduced by 95.2% and 43.0%, respectively. Phenol and 1,4-benzoquinone, the two representative degradation products formed during permanganate oxidation, would yield low concentrations of DBPs (STHMFP, 20.99-278.97 μg/mg; SHAAFP, 7.86 × 10(-4)-45.77 μg/mg) after chlorination and chloramination. Overall, KMnO4 can be used as an effective oxidizing agent for TCS removal in water and wastewater treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Removal of triclosan via peroxidases-mediated reactions in water: Reaction kinetics, products and detoxification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jianhua; Peng, Jianbiao [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Zhang, Ya [Nanjing Institute of Environmental Sciences, Ministry of Environmental Protection of the People’s Republic of China, Nanjing 210042 (China); Ji, Yuefei [College of Resources and Environmental Science, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); Shi, Huanhuan; Mao, Liang [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Gao, Shixiang, E-mail: ecsxg@nju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China)

    2016-06-05

    Highlights: • Enzymatic treatment of triclosan in water by soybean and horseradish peroxidases. • pH, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration and enzyme dosage affected the removal efficiency of TCS. • The removal of TCS by SBP was more efficient than that of HRP. • K{sub CAT} and K{sub CAT}/K{sub M} values for SBP toward TCS were much higher than those for HRP. • Polymers formed via radical coupling mechanism were nontoxic to the growth of alga. - Abstract: This study investigated and compared reaction kinetics, product characterization, and toxicity variation of triclosan (TCS) removal mediated by soybean peroxidase (SBP), a recognized potential peroxidase for removing phenolic pollutants, and the commonly used horseradish peroxidase (HRP) with the goal of assessing the technical feasibility of SBP-catalyzed removal of TCS. Reaction conditions such as pH, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration and enzyme dosage were found to have a strong influence on the removal efficiency of TCS. SBP can retain its catalytic ability to remove TCS over broad ranges of pH and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration, while the optimal pH and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration were 7.0 and 8 μM, respectively. 98% TCS was removed with only 0.1 U mL{sup −1} SBP in 30 min reaction time, while an HRP dose of 0.3 U mL{sup −1} was required to achieve the similar conversion. The catalytic performance of SBP towards TCS was more efficient than that of HRP, which can be explained by catalytic rate constant (K{sub CAT}) and catalytic efficiency (K{sub CAT}/K{sub M}) for the two enzymes. MS analysis in combination with quantum chemistry computation showed that the polymerization products were generated via C−C and C−O coupling pathways. The polymers were proved to be nontoxic through growth inhibition of green alga (Scenedesmus obliquus). Taking into consideration of the enzymatic treatment cost, SBP may be a better alternative to HRP upon the removal and detoxification of TCS in water

  5. Nitrate denitrification with nitrite or nitrous oxide as intermediate products: Stoichiometry, kinetics and dynamics of stable isotope signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavilin, V A; Rytov, S V

    2015-09-01

    A kinetic analysis of nitrate denitrification by a single or two species of denitrifying bacteria with glucose or ethanol as a carbon source and nitrite or nitrous oxide as intermediate products was performed using experimental data published earlier (Menyailo and Hungate, 2006; Vidal-Gavilan et al., 2013). Modified Monod kinetics was used in the dynamic biological model. The special equations were added to the common dynamic biological model to describe how isotopic fractionation between N species changes. In contrast to the generally assumed first-order kinetics, in this paper, the traditional Rayleigh equation describing stable nitrogen and oxygen isotope fractionation in nitrate was derived from the dynamic isotopic equations for any type of kinetics. In accordance with the model, in Vidal-Gavilan's experiments, the maximum specific rate of nitrate reduction was proved to be less for ethanol compared to glucose. Conversely, the maximum specific rate of nitrite reduction was proved to be much less for glucose compared to ethanol. Thus, the intermediate nitrite concentration was negligible for the ethanol experiment, while it was significant for the glucose experiment. In Menyailo's and Hungate's experiments, the low value of maximum specific rate of nitrous oxide reduction gives high intermediate value of nitrous oxide concentration. The model showed that the dynamics of nitrogen and oxygen isotope signatures are responding to the biological dynamics. Two microbial species instead of single denitrifying bacteria are proved to be more adequate to describe the total process of nitrate denitrification to dinitrogen. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Investigating and modeling the pyrolysis kinetic of leaves and stems of pistachio trees for biofuel production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Ostad Hoseini

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The lignocelluloses materials have high potential for producing various types of biofuels. These materials include various parts of plants, especially leaves and stems that are left without a specific usage after annual pruning. These residues can be used through slow or fast pyrolysis process for production of liquid and gaseous biofuels. The slow pyrolysis is taking place at temperatures below 500°C while fast pyrolysis process takes place at a temperature above 700°C. Various studies on production of biofuels from plant residues have shown that the temperature, heating rate and the resident time of pyrolysis process are the main factors that affect the final product quality. At present time, in Iran, there are more than 360 thousands hectares of pistachio growing fields which annually produce over 215 thousands metric tons residues which are mainly leaves and stems. The main objective of this study was to measure the heating properties of the powders prepared from the leaves and the stem of pistachio trees. These properties include higher heating value (HHV, lower heating value (LHV and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA of the powders. Then the powders were separately pyrolysed and the kinetic of the pyrolysis process for producing charcoal from them was investigated. Materials and Methods In this research, leaves and stems of pistachio trees were initially analyzed to determine their chemical constituents including moisture content, volatile compounds, carbon (C, hydrogen (H, nitrogen (N, sulfur (S and oxygen (O content. Using these constituents the height heating value and low heating value for the leaves and the stems were determined. The thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA of the powders was made to select a proper heating temperature for pyrolysis of the powders. In each experiment about 10 g of powder powders were pyrolyzed to produce char. Based on TGA results, the pyrolysis experiments were performed at 350, 400, 450 and

  7. Product sampling during transient continuous countercurrent hydrolysis of canola oil and development of a kinetic model

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Weicheng

    2013-11-01

    A chemical kinetic model has been developed for the transient stage of the continuous countercurrent hydrolysis of triglycerides to free fatty acids and glycerol. Departure functions and group contribution methods were applied to determine the equilibrium constants of the four reversible reactions in the kinetic model. Continuous countercurrent hydrolysis of canola oil in subcritical water was conducted experimentally in a lab-scale reactor over a range of temperatures and the concentrations of all neutral components were quantified. Several of the rate constants in the model were obtained by modeling this experimental data, with the remaining determined from calculated equilibrium constants. Some reactions not included in the present, or previous, hydrolysis modeling efforts were identified from glycerolysis kinetic studies and may explain the slight discrepancy between model and experiment. The rate constants determined in this paper indicate that diglycerides in the feedstock accelerate the transition from "emulsive hydrolysis" to "rapid hydrolysis". © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Process optimization and kinetics of biodiesel production from neem oil using copper doped zinc oxide heterogeneous nanocatalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurunathan, Baskar; Ravi, Aiswarya

    2015-08-01

    Heterogeneous nanocatalyst has become the choice of researchers for better transesterification of vegetable oils to biodiesel. In the present study, transesterification reaction was optimized and kinetics was studied for biodiesel production from neem oil using CZO nanocatalyst. The highly porous and non-uniform surface of the CZO nanocatalyst was confirmed by AFM analysis, which leads to the aggregation of CZO nanoparticles in the form of multi layered nanostructures. The 97.18% biodiesel yield was obtained in 60min reaction time at 55°C using 10% (w/w) CZO nanocatalyst and 1:10 (v:v) oil:methanol ratio. Biodiesel yield of 73.95% was obtained using recycled nanocatalyst in sixth cycle. The obtained biodiesel was confirmed using GC-MS and (1)H NMR analysis. Reaction kinetic models were tested on biodiesel production, first order kinetic model was found fit with experimental data (R(2)=0.9452). The activation energy of 233.88kJ/mol was required for transesterification of neem oil into biodiesel using CZO nanocatalyst. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Reaction of diazepam and related benzodiazepines with chlorine. Kinetics, transformation products and in-silico toxicological assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpinteiro, Inmaculada; Rodil, Rosario; Quintana, José Benito; Cela, Rafael

    2017-09-01

    In this work, the reaction of four benzodiazepines (diazepam, oxazepam, nordazepam and temazepam) during water chlorination was studied by means of liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time of flight-mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF-MS). For those compounds that showed a significant degradation, i.e. diazepam, oxazepam and nordazepam, parameters affecting to the reaction kinetics (pH, chlorine and bromide level) were studied in detail and transformation products were tentatively identified. The oxidation reactions followed pseudofirst-order kinetics with rate constants in the range of 1.8-42.5 M -1  s -1 , 0.13-1.16 M -1  s -1 and 0.04-20.4 M -1  s -1 corresponding to half-life values in the range of 1.9-146 min, 1.8-87 h and 2.5-637 h for oxazepam, nordazepam and diazepam, respectively, depending of the levels of studied parameters. Chlorine and pH affected significantly the reaction kinetics, where an increase of the pH resulted into a decrease of the reaction rate, whereas higher chlorine dosages led to faster kinetics, as expected in this case. The transformation of the studied benzodiazepines occurs mainly at the 1,4-diazepine 7-membered-ring, resulting in ring opening to form benzophenone derivatives or the formation of a 6-membered pyrimidine ring, leading to quinazoline derivatives. The formation of these by-products was also tested in real surface water samples observing kinetics of oxazepam degradation slower in river than in creek water, while the degradation of the two other benzodiazepines occurred only in the simpler sample (creek water). Finally, the acute and chronical toxicity and mutagenicity of precursors and transformation products were estimated using quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) software tools: Ecological Structure Activity Relationships (ECOSAR) and Toxicity Estimation Software Tool (TEST), finding that some transformation products could be more toxic/mutagenic than the precursor drug, but additional test would be needed

  10. Effect of hydrophobicity of pharmaceuticals and personal care products for adsorption on activated carbon: Adsorption isotherms, kinetics and mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Harkirat; Bansiwal, Amit; Hippargi, Girivyankatesh; Pophali, Girish R

    2017-09-11

    Adsorption of three pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs), namely caffeine, ibuprofen and triclosan on commercial powdered activated carbon was examined in aqueous medium. The contaminants were chosen based on their diverse log K ow (octanol-water partition coefficient) viz. - 0.07 for caffeine, 3.97 for ibuprofen and 4.76 for triclosan to examine the role of hydrophobicity on adsorption process. The adsorbent characterisation was achieved using BET surface area, SEM, pore size distribution studies and FTIR. Influence of mass of PAC, contact time, solution pH and initial concentration on adsorption capacity of PAC was studied. Adsorption isotherms and kinetics were applied to establish the mechanism of adsorption. The kinetics followed pseudo-second order with physisorption occurring through particle diffusion. The Freundlich model fitted best among the isotherm models. The adsorption capacity increased in the order CFN activated carbon.

  11. Schwinger pair production in space- and time-dependent electric fields: Relating the Wigner formalism to quantum kinetic theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hebenstreit, F.; Alkofer, R.; Gies, H.

    2010-01-01

    The nonperturbative electron-positron pair production (Schwinger effect) is considered for space- and time-dependent electric fields E-vector(x-vector,t). Based on the Dirac-Heisenberg-Wigner formalism, we derive a system of partial differential equations of infinite order for the 16 irreducible components of the Wigner function. In the limit of spatially homogeneous fields the Vlasov equation of quantum kinetic theory is rediscovered. It is shown that the quantum kinetic formalism can be exactly solved in the case of a constant electric field E(t)=E 0 and the Sauter-type electric field E(t)=E 0 sech 2 (t/τ). These analytic solutions translate into corresponding expressions within the Dirac-Heisenberg-Wigner formalism and allow to discuss the effect of higher derivatives. We observe that spatial field variations typically exert a strong influence on the components of the Wigner function for large momenta or for late times.

  12. Simulation of the kinetics of enzymic hydrolysis of starch in standard apparatus used in alcohol production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rovinskii, L A; Yarovenko, V L

    1977-01-01

    A mathematical model is described for kinetics of enzymic hydrolysis of starch in standard apparatus used in alcohol fermentation. The apparatus with uniform mixing and displacement was highly superior compared with other apparatuses. Differences of temperature with the apparatus significantly affects the rate of starch hydrolysis compared with constant temperature.

  13. Metabolite production and kinetics of branched-chain aldehyde oxidation in Staphylococcus xylosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Hans Christian; Hansen, A.M.; Lauritsen, F.R.

    2002-01-01

    detected at levels ranging from 0.4 to 2.0μM. The concentrations of the corresponding carboxy acids were 963, 858 and 1486μM respectively. We demonstrated that α-ketoisocaproic acid was biotransformed to 3-methylbutanal which immediately was oxidised into 3-methylbutanoic acid. Kinetic studies...

  14. Generation and evaluation of a LaSota strain-based recombinant Newcastle disease virus (NDV) expressing the glycoprotein (G) of avian metapneumovirus subgroup C (aMPV-C) as a bivalent vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    To develop a bivalent vaccine, a recombinant Newcastle disease virus was generated by using the NDV LaSota strain with insertion of the G gene of aMPV-C. The biological assessments of the recombinant virus, rLS/aMPV-CG, by conducting the mean death time, intracerebral pathogenicity index, and growth...

  15. Kinetic analysis of dihydroxyacetone production from crude glycerol by immobilized cells of Gluconobacter oxydans MTCC 904.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikshit, Pritam Kumar; Moholkar, Vijayanand S

    2016-09-01

    The present study has investigated kinetic features of bioconversion of biodiesel-derived crude glycerol to dihydroxyacetone with immobilized Gluconobacter oxydans cells using modified Haldane substrate-inhibition model. The results have been compared against free cells and pure glycerol. Relative variations in the kinetic parameters KS, KI, Vmax, n and X reveal that immobilized G. oxydans cells (on PU foam substrate) with crude glycerol as substrate give higher order of inhibition (n) and lower maximum reaction velocities (Vmax). These results are essentially implications of substrate transport restrictions across immobilization matrix, which causes retention of substrate in the matrix and reduction in fractional available substrate (X) for the cells. This causes reduction in both KS (substrate concentration at Vmax/2) and KI (inhibition constant) as compared to free cells. For immobilized cells, substrate concentration (Smax) corresponding to Vmax is practically same for both pure and crude glycerol as substrate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. X-ray induced production and yield kinetics of photo- and Auger Electrons in semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peregudov, V.I.; Pashaev, Eh.M.

    1991-01-01

    The paper is dedicated to theoretical and experimental analysis of the mechanism of indirect excitation of soft Auger-electrons due to atom electron ionization using Ge crystal exposed to MoK α radiation as an example. Process of generation of these Auger-electrons is considered in detail, solution of kinetic equation for electrons, as well as, experimental data proving crucial role of indirect processes in generation of soft Auger-electrons are given

  17. Modeling of hydrogen production methods: Single particle model and kinetics assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, R.S.; Bellan, J. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The investigation carried out by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is devoted to the modeling of biomass pyrolysis reactors producing an oil vapor (tar) which is a precursor to hydrogen. This is an informal collaboration with NREL whereby JPL uses the experimentally-generated NREL data both as initial and boundary conditions for the calculations, and as a benchmark for model validation. The goal of this investigation is to find drivers of biomass fast-pyrolysis in the low temperature regime. The rationale is that experimental observations produce sparse discrete conditions for model validation, and that numerical simulations produced with a validated model are an economic way to find control parameters and an optimal operation regime, thereby circumventing costly changes in hardware and tests. During this first year of the investigation, a detailed mathematical model has been formulated for the temporal and spatial accurate modeling of solid-fluid reactions in biomass particles. These are porous particles for which volumetric reaction rate data is known a priori and both the porosity and the permeability of the particle are large enough to allow for continuous gas phase flow. The methodology has been applied to the pyrolysis of spherically symmetric biomass particles by considering previously published kinetics schemes for both cellulose and wood. The results show that models which neglect the thermal and species boundary layers exterior to the particle will generally over predict both the pyrolysis rates and experimentally obtainable tar yields. An evaluation of the simulation results through comparisons with experimental data indicates that while the cellulose kinetics is reasonably accurate, the wood pyrolysis kinetics is not accurate; particularly at high reactor temperatures. Current effort in collaboration with NREL is aimed at finding accurate wood kinetics.

  18. Study on reaction mechanism by analysis of kinetic energy spectra of light particles and formation of final products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardina, G.; Mandaglio, G.; Nasirov, A. K.; Anastasi, A.; Curciarello, F.; Fazio, G.

    2018-05-01

    The sensitivity of reaction mechanism in the formation of compound nucleus (CN) by the analysis of kinetic energy spectra of light particles and of reaction products are shown. The dependence of the P CN fusion probability of reactants and W sur survival probability of CN against fission at its deexcitation on the mass and charge symmetries in the entrance channel of heavy-ion collisions, as well as on the neutron numbers is discussed. The possibility of conducting a complex program of investigations of the complete fusion by reliable ways depends on the detailed and refined methods of experimental and theoretical analyses.

  19. A kinetic model for quantitative evaluation of the effect of hydrogen and osmolarity on hydrogen production by Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zacchi Guido

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus has attracted increased interest as an industrial hydrogen (H2 producer. The aim of the present study was to develop a kinetic growth model for this extreme thermophile. The model is based on Monod kinetics supplemented with the inhibitory effects of H2 and osmotic pressure, as well as the liquid-to-gas mass transfer of H2. Results Mathematical expressions were developed to enable the simulation of microbial growth, substrate consumption and product formation. The model parameters were determined by fitting them to experimental data. The derived model corresponded well with experimental data from batch fermentations in which the stripping rates and substrate concentrations were varied. The model was used to simulate the inhibition of growth by H2 and solute concentrations, giving a critical dissolved H2 concentration of 2.2 mmol/L and an osmolarity of 0.27 to 29 mol/L. The inhibition by H2, being a function of the dissolved H2 concentration, was demonstrated to be mainly dependent on H2 productivity and mass transfer rate. The latter can be improved by increasing the stripping rate, thereby allowing higher H2 productivity. The experimentally determined degree of oversaturation of dissolved H2 was 12 to 34 times the equilibrium concentration and was comparable to the values given by the model. Conclusions The derived model is the first mechanistically based model for fermentative H2 production and provides useful information to improve the understanding of the growth behavior of C. saccharolyticus. The model can be used to determine optimal operating conditions for H2 production regarding the substrate concentration and the stripping rate.

  20. Studies on Pyrolysis Kinetic of Newspaper Wastes in a Packed Bed Reactor: Experiments, Modeling, and Product Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aparna Sarkar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Newspaper waste was pyrolysed in a 50 mm diameter and 640 mm long reactor placed in a packed bed pyrolyser from 573 K to 1173 K in nitrogen atmosphere to obtain char and pyro-oil. The newspaper sample was also pyrolysed in a thermogravimetric analyser (TGA under the same experimental conditions. The pyrolysis rate of newspaper was observed to decelerate above 673 K. A deactivation model has been attempted to explain this behaviour. The parameters of kinetic model of the reactions have been determined in the temperature range under study. The kinetic rate constants of volatile and char have been determined in the temperature range under study. The activation energies 25.69 KJ/mol, 27.73 KJ/mol, 20.73 KJ/mol and preexponential factors 7.69 min−1, 8.09 min−1, 0.853 min−1 of all products (solid reactant, volatile, and char have been determined, respectively. A deactivation model for pyrolysis of newspaper has been developed under the present study. The char and pyro-oil obtained at different pyrolysis temperatures have been characterized. The FT-IR analyses of pyro-oil have been done. The higher heating values of both pyro-products have been determined.

  1. Hydrogen peroxide release kinetics into saliva from different whitening products: a double-blind, randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Duarte Nuno da Silva; da Mata, António Duarte Sola Pereira; Silveira, João Miguel Lourenço; Marques, Joana Rita Oliveira Faria; Amaral, João Pedro de Almeida Rato; Guilherme, Nuno Filipe Rito Parada Marques

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this study is to compare salivary hydrogen peroxide (HP) release kinetics and potential toxicity of systemic exposure of four different whitening products. A double-blind, randomized controlled trial was conducted in a Portuguese dental faculty clinic. Two hundred forty volunteers were randomized to eight intervention groups. Participants were randomly assigned to receive active or placebo applications of one of four different products: Opalescence 10% PF™ (OPL), Vivastyle® 10%™ (VS10%), Vivadent Paint On Plus™ (PO+), and Trés White Supreme™ (TWS). Saliva collection was obtained by established methods at different times. The HP salivary content was determined by a photometric method. Salivary HP variations, total amount of salivary HP, and counts of subjects above the safe daily HP dose were the main outcome measures. All whitening systems significantly released HP to the saliva when compared to placebo, and all showed different release kinetics. The adaptable tray system (TWS) presented a risk increase of 37% [20-54%, 95% confidence interval] when compared to the other systems. The use of an adaptable tray whitening system with higher concentration of HP increases the toxicity potential.

  2. Kinetic studies on the removal of fission products from molten salt using Zeolite-4A. Contributed Paper RD-15

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafi, Suheel; Prabhakara Reddy, B.; Perumal, S.V.; Nagarajan, K.

    2014-01-01

    Molten salt electrorefining process is one of the nonaqueous processes, being developed for reprocessing metallic spent fuel. This process uses liquid metals and molten salts and is operated at elevated temperatures. In the electro-refining process, the spent fuel is used as the anode of the electro-refiner and the actinide elements in the spent fuel are electrotransported from the anode through the molten salt electrolyte onto a suitable cathode where they are collected as metals in pure form. After some batches are processed, chlorides of fission products such as alkali, alkaline earth and rare earth metals accumulate in the electrolyte salt. The accumulated FPs in the salt will be removed by adsorption/ion-exchange by using zeolite columns. Hence, kinetic studies on the adsorption of Cs, Ba which are some of the major FP products in LiCI-KCI eutectic, have been carried out

  3. Kinetics study of Jatropha oil esterification with ethanol in the presence of tin (II) chloride catalyst for biodiesel production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusumaningtyas, Ratna Dewi; Ratrianti, Naomi; Purnamasari, Indah; Budiman, Arief

    2017-01-01

    Jatropha oil is one of the promising feedstocks for biodiesel production. Jatropha oil is non-edible oil hence utilization of this oil would not compete with the needs of food. However, crude jatropha oil usually has high free fatty acid (FFA) content. Due to this fact, direct alkaline-catalyzed transesterification of crude jatropha oil for biodiesel production cannot be performed. FFA in crude jatropha oil will react with a base catalyst, resulting in soap as by product and hindering methyl ester (biodiesel) production. Therefore, prior to a transesterification reaction, it is crucial to run a pretreatment step of jatropha oil which can lower the FFA content in the oil. In this work, the pretreatment process was conducted through the esterification reaction of FFA contained in crude jatropha oil with ethanol over tin (II) chloride catalyst to reduce the acid value of the feedstock. The feedstock was Indonesia crude jatropha oil containing 12.03% of FFA. The esterification reaction was carried out in a batch reactor with a molar ratio of FFA to ethanol was 1:60 and total reaction time was 180 minutes. Tin (II) chloride catalyst was varied at 2.5, 5, 7.5, and 10% wt, whereas the effect of the reaction temperature was studied at 35, 34, 55, and 65 °C. The best reaction conversion was 71.55%, achieved at the following condition: a reaction temperature of 65 °C, catalyst concentration of 10% wt, the reaction time of 180 min, and the molar ratio of FFA to ethanol was 1:60. Kinetics study was also conducted in this work. It was found that esterification reaction of jatropha oil FFA with ethanol catalyzed by tin(II) chloride fitted the first-order pseudo-homogeneous kinetics model. It was also revealed that the frequency factor (A) and the activation energy (Ea) were 4.3864 × 106 min-1 and 56.2513 kJ/mole, respectively.

  4. Kinetics, Mechanism, and Secondary Organic Aerosol Yield of Aqueous Phase Photo-oxidation of α-Pinene Oxidation Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljawhary, Dana; Zhao, Ran; Lee, Alex K Y; Wang, Chen; Abbatt, Jonathan P D

    2016-03-10

    Formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) involves atmospheric oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), the majority of which are emitted from biogenic sources. Oxidation can occur not only in the gas-phase but also in atmospheric aqueous phases such as cloudwater and aerosol liquid water. This study explores for the first time the aqueous-phase OH oxidation chemistry of oxidation products of α-pinene, a major biogenic VOC species emitted to the atmosphere. The kinetics, reaction mechanisms, and formation of SOA compounds in the aqueous phase of two model compounds, cis-pinonic acid (PIN) and tricarballylic acid (TCA), were investigated in the laboratory; TCA was used as a surrogate for 3-methyl-1,2,3-butanetricarboxylic acid (MBTCA), a known α-pinene oxidation product. Aerosol time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometry (Aerosol-ToF-CIMS) was used to follow the kinetics and reaction mechanisms at the molecular level. Room-temperature second-order rate constants of PIN and TCA were determined to be 3.3 (± 0.5) × 10(9) and 3.1 (± 0.2) × 10(8) M(-1) s(-1), respectively, from which were estimated their condensed-phase atmospheric lifetimes. Aerosol-ToF-CIMS detected a large number of products leading to detailed reaction mechanisms for PIN and MBTCA. By monitoring the particle size distribution after drying, the amount of SOA material remaining in the particle phase was determined. An aqueous SOA yield of 40 to 60% was determined for PIN OH oxidation. Although recent laboratory studies have focused primarily on aqueous-phase processing of isoprene-related compounds, we demonstrate that aqueous formation of SOA materials also occurs from monoterpene oxidation products, thus representing an additional source of biogenically driven aerosol formation.

  5. Evaluation of sources of variation on in vitro fermentation kinetics of feedstuffs in a gas production system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keim, Juan P; Alvarado-Gilis, Christian; Arias, Rodrigo A; Gandarillas, Mónica; Cabanilla, Jaime

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different sources of variation in gas production technique on the in vitro gas production kinetics of feedstuffs. Triplicates of commercial concentrate, grass silage, grass hay and grass pasture were incubated in three experiments: experiment 1 assessed two agitation methods; experiment 2 evaluated different rumen inocula (pooled or different donor cows for each incubation run); and experiment 3 used Goering-Van Soest or Mould buffers for media preparation. Gas production data were fitted into the Michaelis-Menten model and then subjected to analysis of variance. Gas production (GP) at 48 h and asymptote gas production (A) were lower when bottles were continuously under horizontal movement. Time to produce half and 75% of A, and A were affected by rumen inocula, while buffer type affected time to produce half and 25% of A and GP. No interactions between substrates and sources of variation were observed, suggesting that the effects of substrates on GP parameters were not modified. It is concluded that comparison of numerical data from in vitro experiments that follow different protocols must be done carefully. However, the ranking of different substrates is more robust and less affected by the sources of variation. © 2017 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  6. Prokaryotic Expression of Truncate F Protein Gene of Newcastle Disease Virus%截短NDV F蛋白的原核表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王杰; 王宇鹏; 刘振格; 杨鸣发; 林红丽; 田斌; 侯喜林

    2013-01-01

    根据NDV LaSota株F基因已知的抗原表位,对F蛋白进行分段表达。应用RT-PCR方法分段扩增F基因,并将其克隆到pET30a(+)原核表达载体上,得到重组质粒pET30-F780和pET30-F760,将质粒导入BL21(ED3)感受态中,经IPTG诱导表达。表达的重组蛋白通过SDS-PAGE和Westem-blotting方法进行鉴定。表达的两段蛋白大小约为31.1 kDa和27.9 kDa,与预期的蛋白分子量大小相符。Western blot分析表明重组蛋白可以和NDV抗体发生特异性反应。成功构建了原核表达质粒pET-F780和pET-F760,并获得了高效表达,通过Western blot分析表明重组蛋白具有良好的免疫反应性。%According to the epitopes of F gene of NDV LaSota strain,the F gene truncated two fragments were expressed in E.coli BL21 (ED3)strain. The two truncate F gene amplified by RT-PCR were inserted into pET30 (+),a prokaryotic expression vector. The recombinant plasmid pET30-F780 and pET30-F760 were transformed into BL21(ED3)competent cells. SDS-PAGE and Western-blotting screened the recombinant proteins induced by IPTG in E.coli. The size of the recombinant proteins were 31.1 kDa and 27.9 kDa,which were also consistent with those expected. Western-blotting showed that F780 and F760 were of immunogenicity.The recombinant plasmids were constructed,called pET-F780 and pET-F760,which were expressed the corresponding proteins with better immunoreactivity.

  7. Effect of structural modifications on the drying kinetics of foods: changes in volume, surface area and product shape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio De Michelis

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Macro and micro-structural changes take place during food dehydration. Macro-structural changes encompass modifications in shape, area and volume. Studies of such changes are important because dehydration kinetics (essential for calculating industrial dryers may be highly influenced by changes in food shape and dimensions. The overall changes in volume, surface area (“shrinkage” and shape (Heywood factor, with provides a close description of food shape were determined experimentally, and the results were correlated with simple expressions. Hence, although dehydration kinetics can be modeled with simplified overall shrinkage expressions, the possibility of selecting a suitable geometry and predicting the characteristics dimensions will provide higher accuracy. An additional unresolved problem is the lack of a general model that predicts macro-structural changes for various foods and diverse geometries. In this work, based on experimental data of sweet and sour cherries, and rose hip fruits, a simplified general model to predict changes in volume and surface area are proposed. To estimate how the changes in characteristic dimensions affect the kinetic studies, experimental drying curves for the three fruits by means of a diffusional model considered the following variants for the characteristic dimensions: (i The radius of the fresh food, assumed constant; (ii The radius of the partially dehydrated product; (iii The radius predicted by the correlation for structural changes, especially volume, obtained in this work and generalized for the three fruits, and (iv to demonstrate the need to study the macro-structural changes for all dehydrated foods, also be present the case of a restructured food.

  8. Oxidation of fluoroquinolone antibiotics and structurally related amines by chlorine dioxide: Reaction kinetics, product and pathway evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pei; He, Yi-Liang; Huang, Ching-Hua

    2010-12-01

    Fluoroquinolones (FQs) are a group of widely prescribed antibiotics and have been frequently detected in the aquatic environment. The reaction kinetics and transformation of seven FQs (ciprofloxacin (CIP), enrofloxacin (ENR), norfloxacin (NOR), ofloxacin (OFL), lomefloxacin (LOM), pipemidic acid (PIP) and flumequine (FLU)) and three structurally related amines (1-phenylpiperazine (PP), N-phenylmorpholine (PM) and 4-phenylpiperidine (PD)) toward chlorine dioxide (ClO(2)) were investigated to elucidate the behavior of FQs during ClO(2) disinfection processes. The reaction kinetics are highly pH-dependent, can be well described by a second-order kinetic model incorporating speciation of FQs, and follow the trend of OFL > ENR > CIP ∼ NOR ∼ LOM > > PIP in reactivity. Comparison among FQs and related amines and product characterization indicate that FQs' piperazine ring is the primary reactive center toward ClO(2). ClO(2) likely attacks FQ's piperazinyl N4 atom followed by concerted fragmentation involving piperazinyl N1 atom, leading to dealkylation, hydroxylation and intramolecular ring closure at the piperazine moiety. While FQs with tertiary N4 react faster with ClO(2) than FQs with secondary N4, the overall reactivity of the piperazine moiety also depends strongly on the quinolone ring through electronic effects. The reaction rate constants obtained in clean water matrix can be used to model the decay of CIP by ClO(2) in surface water samples, but overestimate the decay in wastewater samples. Overall, transformation of FQs, particularly for those with tertiary N4 amines, could be expected under typical ClO(2) disinfection conditions. However, the transformation may not eliminate antibacterial activity because of little destruction at the quinolone ring. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Kinetic studies of sea mango (Cerbera odollam) oil for biodiesel production via injection of superheated methanol vapour technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ang, Gaik Tin; Tan, Kok Tat; Lee, Keat Teong; Mohamed, Abdul Rahman

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Sea mango oil with high FFA was directly used to produce biodiesel. • Non-catalytic superheated methanol transesterification system is developed. • High content of FAME can be obtained. • Kinetic modelling based on reaction mechanism is proposed and verified. • Kinetic study for reversible transesterification and esterification reactions. - Abstract: In this study, sea mango (Cerbera odollam) oil which is rich in free fatty acid was utilised as the feedstock in one-step superheated methanol vapour (SMV) transesterification reaction without going through pre-treatment step. SMV transesterification reaction was initiated by injecting superheated methanol vapour into sea mango oil phase. Effect of methanol flow rate at the range of 1–4 mL/min as well as effect of reaction temperatures at the range of 260–290 °C was studied based on FAME production rates at constant initial oil volume of 100 mL. Kinetic modelling of semi-batch system, incorporating second-order of three-stepwise reversible transesterification of triglycerides (TG) and second order of reversible esterification of free fatty acid (FFA) were verified simultaneously using ordinary differential equation (ODE45) solver. It shows that transesterification reaction of TG and esterification of FFA would occur simultaneously. The high activation energy of 50 kJ/mol and low reaction rate constant of 1.62 × 10"−"4 dm"3/mol min verified that the reaction of TG to become diglycerides (DG) as the rate limiting step in this semi-batch SMV system.

  10. Methods for detecting acylated homoserine lactones produced by Gram-negative bacteria and their application in studies of AHL- production kinetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, L.; Christensen, Allan Beck; Molin, Søren

    2001-01-01

    and enabled an assessment of the kinetics of AHL- production of 3 strains (Serratia proteamaculans strain B5a, Erwinia carotovora ATCC 39048 and V. fischeri strain MJ-1). As expected, the production of AHL (OHHL) and luminescence in Vibrio fischeri strain MJ-1 increased faster than growth indicating up...

  11. Nano-MnO2-mediated transformation of triclosan with humic molecules present: kinetics, products, and pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Kai; Li, Shunyao; Waigi, Michael Gatheru; Huang, Qingguo

    2018-05-01

    It has been shown that manganese dioxide (MnO 2 ) can mediate transformation of phenolic contaminants to form phenoxyl radical intermediates, and subsequently, these intermediates intercouple to form oligomers via covalent binding. However, the reaction kinetics and transformation mechanisms of phenolic contaminants with humic molecules present in nano-MnO 2 -mediated systems were still unclear. In this study, it was proven that nano-MnO 2 were effective in transforming triclosan under acidic conditions (pH 3.5-5.0) during manganese reduction, and the apparent pseudo first-order kinetics rate constants (k = 0.0599-1.5314 h -1 ) increased as the pH decreased. In particular, the transformation of triclosan by nano-MnO 2 was enhanced in the presence of low-concentration humic acid (1-10 mg L -1 ). The variation in the absorption of humic molecules at 275 nm supported possible covalent binding between humic molecules and triclosan in the nano-MnO 2 -mediated systems. A total of four main intermediate products were identified by high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS), regardless of humic molecules present in the systems or not. These products correspond to a suite of radical intercoupling reactions (dimers and trimers), ether cleavage (2,4-dichlorophenol), and oxidation to quinone-like products, triggered by electron transfer from triclosan molecules to nano-MnO 2 . A possible reaction pathway in humic acid solutions, including homo-coupling, decomposition, oxidation, and cross-coupling, was proposed. Our findings provide valuable information regarding the environmental fate and transformation mechanism of triclosan by nano-MnO 2 in complex water matrices.

  12. Experimental and theoretical understanding of the gas phase oxidation of atmospheric amides with OH radicals: kinetics, products, and mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borduas, Nadine; da Silva, Gabriel; Murphy, Jennifer G; Abbatt, Jonathan P D

    2015-05-14

    Atmospheric amides have primary and secondary sources and are present in ambient air at low pptv levels. To better assess the fate of amides in the atmosphere, the room temperature (298 ± 3 K) rate coefficients of five different amides with OH radicals were determined in a 1 m(3) smog chamber using online proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). Formamide, the simplest amide, has a rate coefficient of (4.44 ± 0.46) × 10(-12) cm(3) molec(-1) s(-1) against OH, translating to an atmospheric lifetime of ∼1 day. N-methylformamide, N-methylacetamide and propanamide, alkyl versions of formamide, have rate coefficients of (10.1 ± 0.6) × 10(-12), (5.42 ± 0.19) × 10(-12), and (1.78 ± 0.43) × 10(-12) cm(3) molec(-1) s(-1), respectively. Acetamide was also investigated, but due to its slow oxidation kinetics, we report a range of (0.4-1.1) × 10(-12) cm(3) molec(-1) s(-1) for its rate coefficient with OH radicals. Oxidation products were monitored and quantified and their time traces were fitted using a simple kinetic box model. To further probe the mechanism, ab initio calculations are used to identify the initial radical products of the amide reactions with OH. Our results indicate that N-H abstractions are negligible in all cases, in contrast to what is predicted by structure-activity relationships. Instead, the reactions proceed via C-H abstraction from alkyl groups and from formyl C(O)-H bonds when available. The latter process leads to radicals that can readily react with O2 to form isocyanates, explaining the detection of toxic compounds such as isocyanic acid (HNCO) and methyl isocyanate (CH3NCO). These contaminants of significant interest are primary oxidation products in the photochemical oxidation of formamide and N-methylformamide, respectively.

  13. Ensiling of fish industry waste for biogas production: a lab scale evaluation of biochemical methane potential (BMP) and kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafle, Gopi Krishna; Kim, Sang Hun; Sung, Kyung Ill

    2013-01-01

    Fish waste (FW) obtained from a fish processor was ensiled for biogas production. The FW silages were prepared by mixing FW with bread waste (BW) and brewery grain waste (BGW), and the quality of the prepared silages were evaluated. The biogas potentials of BW, BGW, three different types of FW, and FW silages were measured. A first-order kinetic model and the modified Gompertz model were also used to predict methane yield. The biogas and methane yield for FW silages after 96 days was calculated to be 671-763 mL/g VS and 441-482 mL/g VS, respectively. There were smaller differences between measured and predicted methane yield for FW silages when using a modified Gompertz model (1.1-4.3%) than when using a first-order kinetic model (22.5-32.4%). The critical HRTs and technical digestion times (T(80-90)) for the FW silages were calculated to be 21.0-23.8 days and 40.5-52.8 days, respectively. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. High-yield hydrogen production from biomass by in vitro metabolic engineering: Mixed sugars coutilization and kinetic modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollin, Joseph A.; Martin del Campo, Julia; Myung, Suwan; Sun, Fangfang; You, Chun; Bakovic, Allison; Castro, Roberto; Chandrayan, Sanjeev K.; Wu, Chang-Hao; Adams, Michael W. W.; Senger, Ryan S.; Zhang, Y.-H. Percival

    2015-01-01

    The use of hydrogen (H2) as a fuel offers enhanced energy conversion efficiency and tremendous potential to decrease greenhouse gas emissions, but producing it in a distributed, carbon-neutral, low-cost manner requires new technologies. Herein we demonstrate the complete conversion of glucose and xylose from plant biomass to H2 and CO2 based on an in vitro synthetic enzymatic pathway. Glucose and xylose were simultaneously converted to H2 with a yield of two H2 per carbon, the maximum possible yield. Parameters of a nonlinear kinetic model were fitted with experimental data using a genetic algorithm, and a global sensitivity analysis was used to identify the enzymes that have the greatest impact on reaction rate and yield. After optimizing enzyme loadings using this model, volumetric H2 productivity was increased 3-fold to 32 mmol H2⋅L−1⋅h−1. The productivity was further enhanced to 54 mmol H2⋅L−1⋅h−1 by increasing reaction temperature, substrate, and enzyme concentrations—an increase of 67-fold compared with the initial studies using this method. The production of hydrogen from locally produced biomass is a promising means to achieve global green energy production. PMID:25848015

  15. High-yield hydrogen production from biomass by in vitro metabolic engineering: Mixed sugars coutilization and kinetic modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollin, Joseph A; Martin del Campo, Julia; Myung, Suwan; Sun, Fangfang; You, Chun; Bakovic, Allison; Castro, Roberto; Chandrayan, Sanjeev K; Wu, Chang-Hao; Adams, Michael W W; Senger, Ryan S; Zhang, Y-H Percival

    2015-04-21

    The use of hydrogen (H2) as a fuel offers enhanced energy conversion efficiency and tremendous potential to decrease greenhouse gas emissions, but producing it in a distributed, carbon-neutral, low-cost manner requires new technologies. Herein we demonstrate the complete conversion of glucose and xylose from plant biomass to H2 and CO2 based on an in vitro synthetic enzymatic pathway. Glucose and xylose were simultaneously converted to H2 with a yield of two H2 per carbon, the maximum possible yield. Parameters of a nonlinear kinetic model were fitted with experimental data using a genetic algorithm, and a global sensitivity analysis was used to identify the enzymes that have the greatest impact on reaction rate and yield. After optimizing enzyme loadings using this model, volumetric H2 productivity was increased 3-fold to 32 mmol H2⋅L(-1)⋅h(-1). The productivity was further enhanced to 54 mmol H2⋅L(-1)⋅h(-1) by increasing reaction temperature, substrate, and enzyme concentrations--an increase of 67-fold compared with the initial studies using this method. The production of hydrogen from locally produced biomass is a promising means to achieve global green energy production.

  16. UV/chlorine treatment of carbamazepine: Transformation products and their formation kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yanheng; Cheng, ShuangShuang; Yang, Xin; Ren, Jingyue; Fang, Jingyun; Shang, Chii; Song, Weihua; Lian, Lushi; Zhang, Xinran

    2017-06-01

    Carbamazepine (CBZ) is one of the pharmaceuticals most frequently detected in the aqueous environment. This study investigated the transformation products when CBZ is degraded by chlorine under ultraviolet (UV) irradiation (the UV/chlorine process). Detailed pathways for the degradation of CBZ were elucidated using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC)-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (QTOF-MS). CBZ is readily degraded by hydroxyl radicals (HO) and chlorine radicals (Cl) in the UV/chlorine process, and 24 transformation products were identified. The products indicate that the 10,11-double bond and aromatic ring in CBZ are the sites most susceptible to attack by HO and Cl. Subsequent reaction produces hydroxylated and chlorinated aromatic ring products. Four specific products were quantified and their evolution was related with the chlorine dose, pH, and natural organic matter concentration. Their yields showed an increase followed by a decreasing trend with prolonged reaction time. CBZ-10,11-epoxide (I), the main quantified transformation product from HO oxidation, was observed with a peak transformation yield of 3-32% depending on the conditions. The more toxic acridine (IV) was formed involving both HO and Cl with peak transformation yields of 0.4-1%. All four quantified products together amounted to a peak transformation yield of 34.5%. The potential toxicity of the transformation products was assayed by evaluating their inhibition of the bioluminescence of the bacterium Vibrio Fischeri. The inhibition increased at first and the decreased at longer reaction times, which was in parallel with the evolution of transformation products. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Determining In Vitro Gas Production Kinetics and Methane Production of Wheat Straw and Soybean Straw Pelleted with Different Additives

    OpenAIRE

    GÜLEÇYÜZ, Emre; KILIÇ, Ünal

    2018-01-01

    In this study, it was aimed todetermine the effects of pelletting on the invitro gas productions (IVGP), invitro digestibilities and methane productions of wheat straw and soy strawpelletted with different additives such as molasses, guar meal and sepolite. Inthe study, 2x2x4 factorial experimental design was used and total 16 groups (2straws (wheat-soybean), 2 different sepiolite applications (absent-present) and4 additives (control, guar meal,molasses and guar meal +molasses) wereformed.The...

  18. Influence of the product gases on the kinetics of water vapour gasification as a function of pressure and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muehlen, H.J.

    1983-01-01

    The reaction kinetics of coal gasification by using the process heat is investigated. Pressure, temperature and composition of the gasifying agent are varied. Starting from other models, a kinetic model is derived and tested for its applicability. (PW) [de

  19. Enzymatic production of sterculic acid from the novel Phoenix tree seed oil: Optimization and kinetic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou, X.; Sun, S.

    2017-01-01

    Phoenix tree (Firmiana simplex) seed oil is a novel oil which is rich in sterculic acid. Sterculic acid, a cyclopropene fatty acid, can be used as the inhibitor of the stearoyl-CoA desaturase system and mammary carcinomas growth. In this work, Lipozyme TLIM-catalyzed hydrolysis of the novel Phoenix tree seed oil was used to prepare sterculic acid. High temperature GC-FID and the degree of hydrolysis (DH) were used to monitor the reaction progress. Effects of reaction variables on the hydrolysis were evaluated and optimized using response surface methodology. Results showed that sterculic acid can be successfully prepared from the novel seed oil, and the effect of reaction variables on the hydrolysis decreased in the order of reaction time > enzyme load > temperature. A high yield of fatty acids (DH, 98.2±0.8%) can be obtained under optimized conditions (45 ºC, mass ratio of water to oil 10:1, enzyme load 10%, and 18 h). The Arrhenius equation for the hydrolysis was LnV0 = 9.12 − 4721/T. The activation energy was 39.25KJ/mol. The kinetic values for Vmax, K/m were 0.232mol/(L∙min) and 0.084 mol/L, respectively. [es

  20. Kinetic modeling of sporulation and product formation in stationary phase by Bacillus coagulans RK-02 vis-à-vis other Bacilli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Subhasish; Sen, Ramkrishna

    2011-10-01

    A logistic kinetic model was derived and validated to characterize the dynamics of a sporogenous bacterium in stationary phase with respect to sporulation and product formation. The kinetic constants as determined using this model are particularly important for describing intrinsic properties of a sporogenous bacterial culture in stationary phase. Non-linear curve fitting of the experimental data into the mathematical model showed very good correlation with the predicted values for sporulation and lipase production by Bacillus coagulans RK-02 culture in minimal media. Model fitting of literature data of sporulation and product (protease and amylase) formation in the stationary phase by some other Bacilli and comparison of the results of model fitting with those of Bacillus coagulans helped validate the significance and robustness of the developed kinetic model. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The kinetics of glucose production from rice straw by Aspergillus niger

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-06-03

    Jun 3, 2008 ... The concentration and rate of glucose production was observed to depend on pretreatment of ... cerning reaction rate parameters for rice straw hydrolysis. The generation of such ... The experiment and glucose analysis was ...

  2. The maximum entropy production and maximum Shannon information entropy in enzyme kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobovišek, Andrej; Markovič, Rene; Brumen, Milan; Fajmut, Aleš

    2018-04-01

    We demonstrate that the maximum entropy production principle (MEPP) serves as a physical selection principle for the description of the most probable non-equilibrium steady states in simple enzymatic reactions. A theoretical approach is developed, which enables maximization of the density of entropy production with respect to the enzyme rate constants for the enzyme reaction in a steady state. Mass and Gibbs free energy conservations are considered as optimization constraints. In such a way computed optimal enzyme rate constants in a steady state yield also the most uniform probability distribution of the enzyme states. This accounts for the maximal Shannon information entropy. By means of the stability analysis it is also demonstrated that maximal density of entropy production in that enzyme reaction requires flexible enzyme structure, which enables rapid transitions between different enzyme states. These results are supported by an example, in which density of entropy production and Shannon information entropy are numerically maximized for the enzyme Glucose Isomerase.

  3. Kinetics and Thermal Properties of Crude and Purified β-Galactosidase with Potential for the Production of Galactooligosaccharides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Rafaela Cavalcante Braga

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available β-Galactosidase is an enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of lactose. It has potential importance due to various applications in the food and dairy industries, involving lactose-reduced ingredients. The properties of two β-galactosidase enzymes, crude and purified, from different sources, Kluyveromyces marxianus CCT 7082 and Kluyveromyces marxianus ATCC 16045, were analyzed. The pH and temperature optima, deactivation energy, thermal stability and kinetic and thermodynamic parameters were determined, as well as the ability to hydrolyze lactose and produce galactooligosaccharides. Purification process improved the properties of the enzymes, and the results showed that purified enzymes from both strains had a higher optimum temperature, and lower values of Km, thus showing greater affinity for o-nitrophenyl-β-D-galactopiranoside than the crude enzymes. The production of galactooligosaccharides was also greater when using purified enzymes, increasing the synthesis by more than 30 % by both strains.

  4. Heterogeneous oxidation of saturated organic aerosols by hydroxyl radicals: uptake kinetics, condensed-phase products, and particle size change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. J. George

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics and reaction mechanism for the heterogeneous oxidation of saturated organic aerosols by gas-phase OH radicals were investigated under NOx-free conditions. The reaction of 150 nm diameter Bis(2-ethylhexyl sebacate (BES particles with OH was studied as a proxy for chemical aging of atmospheric aerosols containing saturated organic matter. An aerosol reactor flow tube combined with an Aerodyne time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (ToF-AMS and scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS was used to study this system. Hydroxyl radicals were produced by 254 nm photolysis of O3 in the presence of water vapour. The kinetics of the heterogeneous oxidation of the BES particles was studied by monitoring the loss of a mass fragment of BES with the ToF-AMS as a function of OH exposure. We measured an initial OH uptake coefficient of γ0=1.3 (±0.4, confirming that this reaction is highly efficient. The density of BES particles increased by up to 20% of the original BES particle density at the highest OH exposure studied, consistent with the particle becoming more oxidized. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry analysis showed that the major particle-phase reaction products are multifunctional carbonyls and alcohols with higher molecular weights than the starting material. Volatilization of oxidation products accounted for a maximum of 17% decrease of the particle volume at the highest OH exposure studied. Tropospheric organic aerosols will become more oxidized from heterogeneous photochemical oxidation, which may affect not only their physical and chemical properties, but also their hygroscopicity and cloud nucleation activity.

  5. Oxidation of the odorous compound 2,4,6-trichloroanisole by UV activated persulfate: Kinetics, products, and pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Congwei; Jiang, Jin; Ma, Jun; Pang, Suyan; Liu, Yongze; Song, Yang; Guan, Chaoting; Li, Juan; Jin, Yixin; Wu, Daoji

    2016-06-01

    The transformation efficiency and products of an odorous compound 2,4,6-trichloroanisole (TCA) at the wavelength of 254 nm in the presence of persulfate were investigated for the first time. The effects of water matrix (i.e., natural organic matter (NOM), pH, carbonate/bicarbonate (HCO3(-)/CO3(2-)), and chloride ions (Cl(-))) were evaluated. The second order rate constant of TCA reacting with sulfate radical (SO4(-)) was determined to be (3.72 ± 0.10) × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1). Increasing dosage of persulfate increased the observed pseudo-first-order rate constant for TCA degradation (kobs), and the contribution of SO4(-) to TCA degradation was much higher than that of HO at each experimental condition. Degradation rate of TCA decreased with pH increasing from 4.0 to 9.0, which could be explained by the lower radical scavenging effect of dihydrogen phosphate than hydrogen phosphate in acidic condition (pH kinetic results could be described by a steady-state kinetic model. Furthermore, liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry at powerful precursor ion scan approach was used to selectively detect oxidation products of TCA. It was found that 2,4,6-trichorophenol (TCP) was the major oxidation product (i.e., the initial yield of TCP was above 90%). The second order rate constant between TCP and SO4(-) was estimated to be (4.16 ± 0.20) × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1). In addition, three products (i.e., 2,6-dichloro-1,4-benzoquinone and two aromatic ring-opening products) were detected in the reaction of TCP with SO4(-), which also appeared in the oxidation of TCA in the UV/persulfate process. A tentative pathway was proposed, where the initial one-electron oxidation of TCA by SO4(-) and further reactions (e.g., ipso-hydroxylation and aromatic ring-cleavage) of the formed cation intermediate TCA were involved. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Ketoprofen removal by O3 and O3/UV processes: Kinetics, transformation products and ecotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Illés, Erzsébet; Szabó, Emese; Takács, Erzsébet; Wojnárovits, László; Dombi, András; Gajda-Schrantz, Krisztina

    2014-01-01

    Ozonation (O 3 ) and its combination with ultraviolet radiation (O 3 /UV) were used to decompose ketoprofen (KET). Depending on the initial KET concentration, fourteen to fifty time's faster KET degradation was achieved using combined O 3 /UV method compared to simple ozonation. Using both methods, formation of four major aromatic transformation products were observed: 3-(1-hydroxyethyl)benzophenone, 3-(1-hydroperoxyethyl) benzophenone, 1-(3-benzoylphenyl) ethanone and 3-ethylbenzophenone. In the combined treatment the degradation was mainly due to the direct effect of UV light, however, towards the end of the treatment, O 3 highly contributed to the mineralization of small carboxylic acids. High (∼ 90%) mineralization degree was achieved using the O 3 /UV method. Toxicity tests performed using representatives of three trophic levels of the aquatic ecosystems (producers, consumers and decomposers) Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata green algae, Daphnia magna zooplanktons and Vibrio fischeri bacteria showed that under the used experimental conditions the transformation products have significantly higher toxicity towards all the test organisms, than KET itself. The bacteria and the zooplanktons showed higher tolerance to the formed products than algae. The measured toxicity correlates well with the concentration of the aromatic transformation products, therefore longer treatments than needed for complete degradation of KET are strongly suggested, in order to avoid possible impact of aromatic transformation products on the aquatic ecosystem. - Highlights: • Ketoprofen degradation is significantly faster using O 3 /UV compared to ozonation. • The presence of O 3 enhances the overall mineralization. • Formation of four major aromatic by-products was observed. • The main step in the decomposition is the decarboxylation. • Degradation products have higher toxicity than ketoprofen itself

  7. Kinetics of nitrous oxide production by denitrification in municipal solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chuanfu; Shimaoka, Takayuki; Nakayama, Hirofumi; Komiya, Teppei

    2015-04-01

    As one of the Nitrous Oxide (N2O) production pathways, denitrification plays an important role in regulating the emission of N2O into the atmosphere. In this study, the influences of different substrate concentrations and transient conditions on the denitrification rate and N2O-reducing activities were investigated. Results revealed that N2O production rates (i.e. denitrification rates) were stimulated by increased total organic carbon (TOC) concentration, while it was restrained under high oxygen concentrations. Moreover, the impact of nitrate concentrations on N2O production rates depended on the TOC/NO3--N ratios. All the N2O production rate data fitted well to a multiplicative Monod equation, with terms describing the influence of TOC and nitrate concentrations, and an Arrhenius-type equation. Furthermore, results demonstrated that high temperatures minimized the N2O-reducing activities in aged municipal solid waste, resulting in an accumulation of N2O. On the other hand, a transient condition caused by changing O2 concentrations may strongly influence the N2O production rates and N2O-reducing activities in solid waste. Finally, based on the results, we believe that a landfill aeration strategy properly designed to prevent rising temperatures and to cycle air injection is the key to reducing emissions of N2O during remediation of old landfills by means of in situ aeration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Avaliação cinética da produção de biossurfactantes bacterianos Bacteria biosurfactants production kinetic evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Heidtmann Pinto

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Biosurfactants present advantages in relation to the synthetic surfactants, as the biodegradability and low toxicity, and can be applied in the food industry, in pharmaceutical products, cosmetics and in the petroleum recovery. This paper aimed at selecting bacteria for biosurfactant production, evaluating the surface tension and the emulsifying activity and studying the fermentation process kinetics. The pure culture of Corynebacterium aquaticum showed capacity to promote emulsions formation and presented the smallest surface tension (28.8 mN m-1, and, in general, larger kinetic parameters, being selected as biosurfactant producer.

  9. Drinking water treatment sludge as an effective additive for biogas production from food waste; kinetic evaluation and biomethane potential test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi-Nik, Mohammadali; Heidari, Ava; Ramezani Azghandi, Shamim; Asadi Mohammadi, Fatemeh; Younesi, Habibollah

    2018-07-01

    The effect of drinking water treatment sludge (DWTS) as a mixture additive, on biogas and methane production from food waste was studied. Mesophilic anaerobic digestion of food waste with 5 concentrations of DWTS (0, 2, 6, 12, and 18 ppm) was carried out. It was found that DWTS can significantly enhance biogas and methane yield. The highest biogas (671 Nml/g VS) as well as methane yield (522 Nml/g VS) was observed when 6 mg/kg DWTS was added. This is equal to 65 and 58 percent increase in comparison with the control digester. The calculated lag time for methane was found to be in between 3.3 and 4.7 days. The DWTS also reduced the lag phase and retention time. The biogas experimental data was fitted with the modified Gompertz and the first-order kinetic models with R 2 higher than 0.994 and 0.949, respectively. The ratio of the experimental biogas production to the theoretical biogas production (ɛ) for control sample was 0.53 while for other samples containing additive were higher than 0.78. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Co-fermentation of sewage sludge with ryegrass for enhancing hydrogen production: Performance evaluation and kinetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guang; Wang, Jianlong

    2017-11-01

    The low C/N ratio and low carbohydrate content of sewage sludge limit its application for fermentative hydrogen production. In this study, perennial ryegrass was added as the co-substrate into sludge hydrogen fermentation with different mixing ratios for enhancing hydrogen production. The results showed that the highest hydrogen yield of 60mL/g-volatile solids (VS) added was achieved when sludge/perennial ryegrass ratio was 30:70, which was 5 times higher than that from sole sludge. The highest VS removal of 21.8% was also achieved when sludge/perennial ryegrass ratio was 30:70, whereas VS removal from sole sludge was only 0.7%. Meanwhile, the co-fermentation system simultaneously improved hydrogen production efficiency and organics utilization of ryegrass. Kinetic analysis showed that the Cone model fitted hydrogen evolution better than the modified Gompertz model. Furthermore, hydrogen yield and VS removal increased with the increase of dehydrogenase activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Transformation products and reaction kinetics of fragrances in advanced wastewater treatment with ozone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janzen, Niklas; Dopp, Elke; Hesse, Julia

    2011-01-01

    ) ethanone (musk ketone/MK), and 1-(2,3,8,8-tetramethyl-1,3,4,5,6,7-hexahydronaphthalen-2-yl)ethanone (OTNE) with ozone in tap water as well as waste water treatment plant (WWTP) effluents is described. Several transformation products are characterized by means of gas chromatography coupled to mass...

  12. THE KINETICS OF METHYL METHACRYLATE POLYMERIZATION INITIATED BY THE VOLATILE PRODUCTS OF A METHYL METHACRYLATE PLASMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨梅林; 马於光; 郑莹光; 沈家骢

    1990-01-01

    It is found that the volatile products of methyl methacrylate plasma can very actively initiate the polymerization of the monomer to produce ultrahigh molecular weight polymers. This polymerization of MMA occurs by a livlng free radical mechanism with instantaneous initiation and monomer transfer.

  13. Metabolic pathway analysis and kinetic studies for production of nattokinase in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unrean, Pornkamol; Nguyen, Nhung H A

    2013-01-01

    We have constructed a reaction network model of Bacillus subtilis. The model was analyzed using a pathway analysis tool called elementary mode analysis (EMA). The analysis tool was used to study the network capabilities and the possible effects of altered culturing conditions on the production of a fibrinolytic enzyme, nattokinase (NK) by B. subtilis. Based on all existing metabolic pathways, the maximum theoretical yield for NK synthesis in B. subtilis under different substrates and oxygen availability was predicted and the optimal culturing condition for NK production was identified. To confirm model predictions, experiments were conducted by testing these culture conditions for their influence on NK activity. The optimal culturing conditions were then applied to batch fermentation, resulting in high NK activity. The EMA approach was also applied for engineering B. subtilis metabolism towards the most efficient pathway for NK synthesis by identifying target genes for deletion and overexpression that enable the cell to produce NK at the maximum theoretical yield. The consistency between experiments and model predictions proves the feasibility of EMA being used to rationally design culture conditions and genetic manipulations for the efficient production of desired products.

  14. The coupled kinetics of grain growth and fission product behavior in nuclear fuel under degraded-core accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rest, J.

    1985-01-01

    The theoretical FASTGRASS-VFP model has been used in the interpretation of fission gas, iodine, and cesium release from (1) irradiated high-burnup LWR fuel in a flowing steam atmosphere during high-temperature, in-cell heating tests (performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory) and (2) trace-irratiated LWR fuel during severe-fuel-damage (SFD) tests (performed in the PBF reactor in Idaho). A theory of grain boundary sweeping of gas bubbles has been included within the FASTGRASS-VFP formalism. This theory considers the interaction between the moving grain boundary and two distinct size classes of bubbles, those on grain faces and on grain edges, and provides a means of determining whether gas bubbles are caught up and moved along by a moving grain boundary or whether the grain boundary is only temporarily retarded by the bubbles and then breaks away. In addition, as FASTGRASS-VFP provides for a mechanistic calculation of intra- and intergranular fission product behavior, the coupled calculation between fission gas behavior and grain growth is kinetically comprehensive. Results of the analyses demonstrate that intragranular fission product behavior during both types of tests can be interpreted in terms of a grain-growth/grain-boundary-sweeping mechanism that enhances the flow of fission products from within the grains to the grain boundaries. The effect of fuel oxidation by steam on fission product and grain growth behavior is also considered. The FASTGRASS-VFP predictions, measured release rates from the above tests, and previously published release rates are compared and differences between fission product behavior in trace-irradiated and in high-burnup fuel are highlighted. (orig.)

  15. Fermentation Kinetics for Xylitol Production by a Pichia stipitis d-Xylulokinase Mutant Previously Grown in Spent Sulfite Liquor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Rita C. L. B.; Lu, Chenfeng; Lin, Bernice; Jeffries, Thomas W.

    Spent sulfite pulping liquor (SSL) contains lignin, which is present as lignosulfonate, and hemicelluloses that are present as hydrolyzed carbohydrates. To reduce the biological oxygen demand of SSL associated with dissolved sugars, we studied the capacity of Pichia stipitis FPL-YS30 (xyl3Δ) to convert these sugars into useful products. FPL-YS30 produces a negligible amount of ethanol while converting xylose into xylitol. This work describes the xylose fermentation kinetics of yeast strain P.stipitis FPL-YS30. Yeast was grown in rich medium supplemented with different carbon sources: glucose, xylose, or ammonia-base SSL. The SSL and glucose-acclimatized cells showed similar maximum specific growth rates (0.146 h-1). The highest xylose consumption at the beginning of the fermentation process occurred using cells precultivated in xylose, which showed relatively high specific activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.49). However, the maximum specific rates of xylose consumption (0.19 gxylose/gcel h) and xylitol production (0.059 gxylitol/gcel h) were obtained with cells acclimatized in glucose, in which the ratio between xylose reductase (EC 1.1.1.21) and xylitol dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.9) was kept at higher level (0.82). In this case, xylitol production (31.6 g/l) was 19 and 8% higher than in SSL and xylose-acclimatized cells, respectively. Maximum glycerol (6.26 g/l) and arabitol (0.206 g/l) production were obtained using SSL and xylose-acclimatized cells, respectively. The medium composition used for the yeast precultivation directly reflected their xylose fermentation performance. The SSL could be used as a carbon source for cell production. However, the inoculum condition to obtain a high cell concentration in SSL needs to be optimized.

  16. Minimal RED Cell Pairs Markedly Improve Electrode Kinetics and Power Production in Microbial Reverse Electrodialysis Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Cusick, Roland D.

    2013-12-17

    Power production from microbial reverse electrodialysis cell (MRC) electrodes is substantially improved compared to microbial fuel cells (MFCs) by using ammonium bicarbonate (AmB) solutions in multiple RED cell pair stacks and the cathode chamber. Reducing the number of RED membranes pairs while maintaining enhanced electrode performance could help to reduce capital costs. We show here that using only a single RED cell pair (CP), created by operating the cathode in concentrated AmB, dramatically increased power production normalized to cathode area from both acetate (Acetate: from 0.9 to 3.1 W/m 2-cat) and wastewater (WW: 0.3 to 1.7 W/m2), by reducing solution and charge transfer resistances at the cathode. A second RED cell pair increased RED stack potential and reduced anode charge transfer resistance, further increasing power production (Acetate: 4.2 W/m2; WW: 1.9 W/m2). By maintaining near optimal electrode power production with fewer membranes, power densities normalized to total membrane area for the 1-CP (Acetate: 3.1 W/m2-mem; WW: 1.7 W/m2) and 2-CP (Acetate: 1.3 W/m2-mem; WW: 0.6 W/m2) reactors were much higher than previous MRCs (0.3-0.5 W/m2-mem with acetate). While operating at peak power, the rate of wastewater COD removal, normalized to reactor volume, was 30-50 times higher in 1-CP and 2-CP MRCs than that in a single chamber MFC. These findings show that even a single cell pair AmB RED stack can significantly enhance electrical power production and wastewater treatment. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  17. Minimal RED Cell Pairs Markedly Improve Electrode Kinetics and Power Production in Microbial Reverse Electrodialysis Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Cusick, Roland D.; Hatzell, Marta; Zhang, Fang; Logan, Bruce E.

    2013-01-01

    Power production from microbial reverse electrodialysis cell (MRC) electrodes is substantially improved compared to microbial fuel cells (MFCs) by using ammonium bicarbonate (AmB) solutions in multiple RED cell pair stacks and the cathode chamber. Reducing the number of RED membranes pairs while maintaining enhanced electrode performance could help to reduce capital costs. We show here that using only a single RED cell pair (CP), created by operating the cathode in concentrated AmB, dramatically increased power production normalized to cathode area from both acetate (Acetate: from 0.9 to 3.1 W/m 2-cat) and wastewater (WW: 0.3 to 1.7 W/m2), by reducing solution and charge transfer resistances at the cathode. A second RED cell pair increased RED stack potential and reduced anode charge transfer resistance, further increasing power production (Acetate: 4.2 W/m2; WW: 1.9 W/m2). By maintaining near optimal electrode power production with fewer membranes, power densities normalized to total membrane area for the 1-CP (Acetate: 3.1 W/m2-mem; WW: 1.7 W/m2) and 2-CP (Acetate: 1.3 W/m2-mem; WW: 0.6 W/m2) reactors were much higher than previous MRCs (0.3-0.5 W/m2-mem with acetate). While operating at peak power, the rate of wastewater COD removal, normalized to reactor volume, was 30-50 times higher in 1-CP and 2-CP MRCs than that in a single chamber MFC. These findings show that even a single cell pair AmB RED stack can significantly enhance electrical power production and wastewater treatment. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  18. Nitrogen and Phosphorus Biomass-Kinetic Model for Chlorella vulgaris in a Biofuel Production Scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    using a Hach DR-890 colorimeter and the cadmium reduction method (Method 8048). A Hach Nitra Ver 5 Nitrate reagent powder pillow was added to the...for testing purposes. Distilled water was used as the diluting agent; no reagent was used. This blank was used to zero the colorimeter prior to...to form an amber product. The colorimeter measurement of the treatment sample was converted to mg/L NO3-N. 31 PO4-P Uptake Phosphorus uptake

  19. Effect of wood type and thickness on acetification kinetics in traditional vinegar production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria-Jesús Torija

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Maria-Jesús Torija1, Estibaliz Mateo1, Carlos-Alfredo Vegas1, Carla Jara1, Angel González1, Montse Poblet1, Cristina Reguant1, Jóse-Manuel Guillamon2, Albert Mas11Biotecnología enológica. Departament de Bioquímica i Biotecnologia, Facultat d’enologia, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Tarragona, Spain; 2Departamento de Biotecnología de los Alimentos, Instituto de Agroquímica y Tecnología de Alimentos (CSIC, Burjassot, València, SpainAbstract: Traditional vinegar production is a lengthy process which implies high operational risks and jeopardizes the organoleptic characteristics of the final product. In an effort to solve these problems without changing the traditional model, we modified the wood type and thickness of vinegar barrels. We acetified in triplicate in barrels made of acacia, cherry, chestnut, and oak and in three wood thicknesses (15, 20, and 25 mm in two different vinegar plants. The operating volume was set at 60 L. Reducing wood thickness improved neither maximum acetification velocity or the total length of the process, and in some cases even worsened them. The process took longer in oak barrels than in other types of wood barrel in one of the vinegar plants. Therefore, the choice of wood is a parameter to be considered in the wine vinegar production. Keywords: acacia, cherry, chestnut, oak, acetic acid bacteria

  20. Sustainable biobutanol production from pineapple waste by using Clostridium acetobutylicum B 527: Drying kinetics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khedkar, Manisha A; Nimbalkar, Pranhita R; Gaikwad, Shashank G; Chavan, Prakash V; Bankar, Sandip B

    2017-02-01

    Present investigation explores the use of pineapple peel, a food industry waste, for acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) production using Clostridium acetobutylicum B 527. Proximate analysis of pineapple peel shows that it contains 35% cellulose, 19% hemicellulose, and 16% lignin on dry basis. Drying experiments on pineapple peel waste were carried out in the temperature range of 60-120°C and experimental drying data was modeled using moisture diffusion control model to study its effect on ABE production. The production of ABE was further accomplished via acid hydrolysis, detoxification, and fermentation process. Maximum total sugar release obtained by using acid hydrolysis was 97g/L with 95-97% and 10-50% removal of phenolics and acetic acid, respectively during detoxification process. The maximum ABE titer obtained was 5.23g/L with 55.6% substrate consumption when samples dried at 120°C were used as a substrate (after detoxification). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Products and kinetics of the heterogeneous reaction of suspended vinclozolin particles with ozone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Jie; Yang, Bo; Zhang, Yang; Shu, Xi; Liu, Changgeng; Shu, Jinian

    2010-11-25

    Vinclozolin is a widely used fungicide that can be released into the atmosphere via application and volatilization. This paper reports an experimental investigation on the heterogeneous ozonation of vinclozolin particles. The ozonation of vinclozolin adsorbed on azelaic acid particles under pseudo-first-order conditions is investigated online with a vacuum ultraviolet photoionization aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (VUV-ATOFMS). The ozonation products are analyzed with a combination of VUV-ATOFMS and GC/MS. Two main ozonation products are observed. The formation of the ozonation products results from addition of O(3) on the C-C double bond of the vinyl group. The heterogeneous reactive rate constant of vinclozolin particles under room temperature is (2.4 ± 0.4) × 10(-17) cm(3) molecules(-1) s(-1), with a corresponding lifetime at 100 ppbv O(3) of 4.3 ± 0.7 h, which is almost comparable with the estimated lifetime due to the reaction with atmospheric OH radicals (∼1.7 h). The reactive uptake coefficient for O(3) on vinclozolin particles is (6.1 ± 1.0) × 10(-4).

  2. Thin layer drying kinetics of by-products from olive oil processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero, Irene; Miranda, Teresa; Arranz, Jose Ignacio; Rojas, Carmen Victoria

    2011-01-01

    The thin-layer behavior of by-products from olive oil production was determined in a solar dryer in passive and active operation modes for a temperature range of 20-50 °C. The increase in the air temperature reduced the drying time of olive pomace, sludge and olive mill wastewater. Moisture ratio was analyzed to obtain effective diffusivity values, varying in the oil mill by-products from 9.136 × 10(-11) to 1.406 × 10(-9) m(2)/s in forced convection (m(a) = 0.22 kg/s), and from 9.296 × 10(-11) to 6.277 × 10(-10) m(2)/s in natural convection (m(a) = 0.042 kg/s). Diffusivity values at each temperature were obtained using the Fick's diffusion model and, regardless of the convection, they increased with the air temperature. The temperature dependence on the effective diffusivity was determined by an Arrhenius type relationship. The activation energies were found to be 38.64 kJ/mol, 30.44 kJ/mol and 47.64 kJ/mol for the olive pomace, the sludge and the olive mill wastewater in active mode, respectively, and 91.35 kJ/mol, 14.04 kJ/mol and 77.15 kJ/mol in natural mode, in that order.

  3. Graphene-modified nickel foam electrode for cathodic degradation of nitrofuranzone: Kinetics, transformation products and toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya Ma

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Simple, efficient, and durable electrodes are highly demanded for practical electro­chemical process. In this study, a reduced graphene oxide modified nickel foam electrode (GR‑Ni foam was facilely prepared via one-step cyclic voltammetry electrodeposition of gra­phene oxide suspension onto the Ni foam. The electrochemical degradation of nitrofuran­zone (NFZ, a kind of typical antibiotics was studied on the GR-Ni foam cathode. The cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectra analysis confirmed that presence of GR loading accelerated the electron transfer from the cathode surface to NFZ. With the applied cathode potential of −1.25 V (vs. Ag/AgCl, the removal efficiency of NFZ (C0 = 20 mg L−1 at the GR-Ni foam electrode reached up to 99 % within 30 min, showing a higher reaction rate constant (0.1297 min−1 than 0.0870 min−1 at the Pd-Ni foam and 0.0186 min−1 at the Ni foam electrode. It was also found that the pH, dissolved oxygen and NFZ initial concentration have slight effect on NFZ degradation at the GR-Ni foam electrode. The reactions first occurred at nitro groups (-NO2, unsaturated C=N bonds and N-N bonds to generate furan ring-containing products, and then these products were transformed into linear diamine products. The direct reduction by electrons was mainly responsible for NFZ reduction at the GR-Ni foam electrode. Even after 18 cycles, the removal efficiency of NFZ still reached up to 98 % within 1 h. In addition, the cathodic degradation process could eliminate the antibacterial activity of NFZ. The GR-Ni foam electrode would have a great potential in electrochemical process for treating wastewater containing furan antibiotics.

  4. Effects of methanol on lipases: molecular, kinetic and process issues in the production of biodiesel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotti, Marina; Pleiss, Jürgen; Valero, Francisco; Ferrer, Pau

    2015-01-01

    The biotechnological production of biodiesel is based on transesterification/esterification reactions between a source of fatty acids and a short-chain alcohol, usually methanol, catalysed by enzymes belonging to the class known as lipases. Several lipases used in industrial processes, although stable in the presence of other organic solvents, are inactivated by methanol at or below the concentration optimal for biodiesel production, making it necessary to use stepwise methanol feeding or pre-treatment of the enzyme. In this review article we focus on what is currently know about methanol inactivation of lipases, a phenomenon which is not common to all lipase enzymes, with the goal of improving the biocatalytic process. We suggest that different mechanisms can lead to inactivation of different lipases, in particular substrate inhibition and protein unfolding. Attempts to improve the performances of methanol sensitive lipases by mutagenesis as well as process engineering approaches are also summarized. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Oxidation of D-glucose and D-fructose with oxygen in aqueous, alkaline solutions. III. Kinetic approach to the product distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wilt, H.G.J.; Kuster, Ben

    1972-01-01

    Based on a previously reported, integral reaction-scheme for the homogeneous oxidation of -glucose and -fructose with oxygen in aqueous, alkaline solutions, a kinetic model covering the product distribution has been developed. The model consists of a repeated set of reactions with constant rate

  6. Heterogeneous kinetics, products, and mechanisms of ferulic acid particles in the reaction with NO3 radicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Changgeng; Zhang, Peng; Wen, Xiaoying; Wu, Bin

    2017-03-01

    Methoxyphenols, as an important component of wood burning, are produced by lignin pyrolysis and considered to be the potential tracers for wood smoke emissions. In this work, the heterogeneous reaction between ferulic acid particles and NO3 radicals was investigated. Six products including oxalic acid, 4-vinylguaiacol, vanillin, 5-nitrovanillin, 5-nitroferulic acid, and caffeic acid were confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). In addition, the reaction mechanisms were proposed and the main pathways were NO3 electrophilic addition to olefin and the meta-position to the hydroxyl group. The uptake coefficient of NO3 radicals on ferulic acid particles was 0.17 ± 0.02 and the effective rate constant under experimental conditions was (1.71 ± 0.08) × 10-12 cm3 molecule-1 s-1. The results indicate that ferulic acid degradation by NO3 can be an important sink at night.

  7. Separation of uranium, plutonium and fission products on zirconium phosphate, Part 1 - Adsorption equilibria and kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gal, I.; Ruvarac, A.

    1963-01-01

    The distribution coefficients of UO 2 ++ , PuO 2 ++ , Pu 3+ , Pu 4+ , Fe 3+ , 137 Cs + , 90 Sr ++ , 95 Zr + + 95 Nb 5+ , 106 Ru and 144 Ce 3+ were determined in the system zirconium phosphate-aqueous solution of HNO 3 . As for the exchange reation Cs + /H + and Sr ++ /2H + , it has been shown that the mass action law can be applied. For these reactions the corresponding equilibrium constants were calculated. The rates of adsorption of Cs + , Sr ++ , Fe 3+ and Pu 4+ from solutions of a fixed HNO 3 concentration were studied, and empirical rate equations were derived. The experimental data confirm that UO 2 ++ can be separated from Pu 4+ . Among the fission products, 90 Sr, 106 Ru and 144 Ce mainly follow the fraction of uranium, while 137 Cs, 95 Zr and 95 Nb follow the plutonium fraction. Separations within the fractions are possible (author)

  8. Effect of 5-aminolevulinic acid on kinetics of protoporphyrin IX production in CHO cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Warchoł

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA is utilized in a photodynamic therapy as a compound capable of augmenting intracellular pool of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX, which exhibits properties of a photosensitizer. The studies were aimed at monitoring accumulation of endogenous protoporphyrin IX in CHO cells under effect of various concentrations of ALA in culture medium and following removal of the compound from the culture medium. Cell content of PpIX was determined following incubation of the cells for 72 h in a culture medium containing different concentration of ALA. Moreover, the cells were preincubated for 2 h in ALA at various concentrations and separated from the compound by medium change and their PpIX content was monitored following incubation. PpIX content was defined by a fluorescent technique under the confocal microscope. In the course of continuous incubation of cells with ALA, biphasic alterations were noted in cellular PpIX concentration. Removal of ALA from the incubation medium resulted at first in a decrease in PpIX content in cells, which was followed by an evidently augmented accumulation of the compound in the cells. The results suggested that in the case of CHO cells, exogenous ALA was not an exclusive source of PpIX synthesis and that alterations in enzyme activities were responsible for production of PpIX.

  9. Radiolytic production and thermal decay kinetics of free radicals in n-alkoxyazoxybenzenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tria, J.J.

    1977-01-01

    Free radical production and decay over several temperature ranges have been studied by ESR for three members of the series of n-alkoxyazoxybenzenes, those with one, two and seven carbon atoms respectively in the alkoxy chain: p,p'-azoxydianisole (PAA), p,p'-azoxydiphenetole (PAP) and 4,4'-bis-heptyloxyazoxybenzene (HAB). Radical yields per 100 ev absorbed at room temperature were: PAA 0.018, 0.019; PAP 0.033, 0.046; HAB 0.10, 0.14 for powder and single crystal samples respectively. Radicals present at room temperature and above are believed to be formed by loss of hydrogen from the benzene rings and the alkoxy groups, with more of the latter (probably α-alkoxy radicals) occurring as the alkoxy group becomes longer, based on the poorly resolved powder spectra. No cyclohexadienyl radicals or alkoxy radicals were seen. Decay of radicals between room temperature and the first liquid crystal phase transition occurred in a ''stepwise'' manner without radical conversions and was analyzed according to a model due to Waite (Phys. Rev., 107, 463 (1957) for diffusion-controlled reaction of randomly distributed reactants with a significant activation energy for the reaction step. Thermodynamic data are included for PAA powder samples and for toluene-grown single crystals. Reactions are postulated for the higher radical yields in powder samples of the three compounds irradiated at 77 0 K

  10. Separation of uranium, plutonium and fission products on zirconium phosphate, Part 1 - Adsorption equilibria and kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gal, I; Ruvarac, A [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Laboratorija za hemiju visoke aktivnosti, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1963-02-15

    The distribution coefficients of UO{sub 2}{sup ++}, PuO{sub 2}{sup ++}, Pu{sup 3+}, Pu{sup 4+}, Fe{sup 3+}, {sup 137}Cs{sup +}, {sup 90}Sr{sup ++}, {sup 95}Zr{sup +}+{sup 95}Nb{sup 5+}, {sup 106}Ru and {sup 144}Ce{sup 3+} were determined in the system zirconium phosphate-aqueous solution of HNO{sub 3}. As for the exchange reation Cs{sup +}/H{sup +} and Sr{sup ++}/2H{sup +}, it has been shown that the mass action law can be applied. For these reactions the corresponding equilibrium constants were calculated. The rates of adsorption of Cs{sup +}, Sr{sup ++}, Fe{sup 3+} and Pu{sup 4+} from solutions of a fixed HNO{sub 3} concentration were studied, and empirical rate equations were derived. The experimental data confirm that UO{sub 2}{sup ++} can be separated from Pu{sup 4+}. Among the fission products, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 106}Ru and {sup 144}Ce mainly follow the fraction of uranium, while {sup 137}Cs, {sup 95}Zr and {sup 95}Nb follow the plutonium fraction. Separations within the fractions are possible (author)

  11. Clearance kinetics and matrix binding partners of the receptor for advanced glycation end products.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavle S Milutinovic

    Full Text Available Elucidating the sites and mechanisms of sRAGE action in the healthy state is vital to better understand the biological importance of the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE. Previous studies in animal models of disease have demonstrated that exogenous sRAGE has an anti-inflammatory effect, which has been reasoned to arise from sequestration of pro-inflammatory ligands away from membrane-bound RAGE isoforms. We show here that sRAGE exhibits in vitro binding with high affinity and reversibly to extracellular matrix components collagen I, collagen IV, and laminin. Soluble RAGE administered intratracheally, intravenously, or intraperitoneally, does not distribute in a specific fashion to any healthy mouse tissue, suggesting against the existence of accessible sRAGE sinks and receptors in the healthy mouse. Intratracheal administration is the only effective means of delivering exogenous sRAGE to the lung, the organ in which RAGE is most highly expressed; clearance of sRAGE from lung does not differ appreciably from that of albumin.

  12. Treatment of selected pharmaceuticals by ferrate(VI): performance, kinetic studies and identification of oxidation products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhengwei; Jiang, Jia-Qian

    2015-03-15

    The performance of ferrate(VI) in treating sulfamethoxazole (SMX), diclofenac (DCF), carbamazepine (CBZ) and bezafibrate (BZF) in test solutions containing the four compounds was investigated. A series of jar-test experiments was performed on a bench-scale at pH 6-9 and at a ferrate(VI) dose of 1-5 mg Fe/L. The results suggested that ferrate(VI) can effectively remove SMX, DCF and CBZ from the test solutions, with greater than 80% removal under optimum conditions. However, the removal efficiency of BZF was very low, less than 25% under the studied conditions. Increasing the dose of ferrate(VI) improved the treatment performance, while the influence of solution pH on ferrate(VI) performance varied among the different target compounds. Ferrate(VI) demonstrated the highest reactivity with SMX at pH 8 and pH 9 (20 °C), with apparent second-order rate constants of 360±17 M(-1) s(-1) and 1.26±0.02 M(-1) s(-1), respectively. However, BZF showed the lowest removal by ferrate(VI) with the smallest rate constants (less than 0.5 M(-1) s(-1)) at pH 8 and pH 9. Furthermore, a number of oxidation products (OPs) of SMX, DCF and CBZ during ferrate(VI) oxidation were detected by liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry (LC-MS), and their degradation pathways were tentatively proposed. No OPs of BZF were detected during ferrate(VI) oxidation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Kinetic analysis of rare gas metastable production and optically pumped Xe lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demyanov, A. V.; Kochetov, I. V.; Mikheyev, P. A.; Azyazov, V. N.; Heaven, M. C.

    2018-01-01

    Optically pumped all-rare-gas lasers use metastable rare gas atoms as the lasing species in mixtures with He or Ar buffer gas. The metastables are generated in a glow discharge, and we report model calculations for the optimal production of Ne*, Ar*, Kr* and Xe*. Discharge efficiency was estimated by solving the Boltzmann equation. Laser efficiency, gain and output power of the CW optically pumped Xe laser were assessed as functions of heavier rare gas content, pressure, optical pump intensity and the optical path length. It was found that, for efficient operation the heavier rare gas content has to be of the order of one percent or less, and the total pressure—in the range 0.3-1.5 atm. Output power and specific discharge power increase approximately linearly with pump intensity over the output range from 300-500 W cm-2. Ternary mixtures Xe:Ar:He were found to be the most promising. Total laser efficiency was found to be nearly the same for pumping the 2p8 or 2p9 state, reaching 61%-70% for a pump intensity of ~720 W cm-2 when the Xe fraction was in the range 0.001 ÷ 0.01 and Ar fraction—0.1 ÷ 0.5. However, when the 2p8 state was pumped, the maximum total efficiency occurred at larger pressures than for pumping of the 2p9 state. The discharge power density required to sustain a sufficient Xe* number density was in the range of tens of watts per cubic centimeter for 50% Ar in the mixture.

  14. Proposed kinetic mechanism of biodiesel production through lipase catalysed interesterification with a methyl acetate acyl acceptor and ionic liquid BMIM PF6 co-solvent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruzich, Nicholas Ivan; Bassi, A.S.

    2011-02-15

    As the depletion of fossil resources continues, the demand for environmentally friendly sources of energy as biodiesel is increasing. Biodiesel is the resulting fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) from an esterification reaction. To enhance this reaction lipase catalysts and ionic liquids can also used. The aim of this study was to develop a kinetic model of this reaction and to determine the effect of ionic liquids. The esterification reaction was conducted in a jacketed reactor under constant temperature in presence of ionic liquid and with the use of lipase to start the reaction; samples were analyzed with a high-performance liquid chromatography. A kinetic model was developed and results indicated that ionic liquids tend to limit mass transfer and thus reduce initial reaction rates; the authors proposed to increase the flow rate of the reaction mixture to overcome this issue. This study successfully investigated the reaction of lipase-catalyzed biodiesel production and developed its kinetic model.

  15. Thermal stability and kinetics of degradation of deoxynivalenol, deoxynivalenol conjugates and ochratoxin A during baking of wheat bakery products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Arnau; Sanchis, Vicente; Ramos, Antonio J; Marín, Sonia

    2015-07-01

    The stability of deoxynivalenol (DON), deoxynivalenol-3-glucoside (DON-3-glucoside), 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol (3-ADON), 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol (15-ADON), de-epoxy-deoxynivalenol (DOM-1) and ochratoxin A (OTA) during thermal processing has been studied. Baking temperature, time and initial mycotoxin concentration in the raw materials were assayed as factors. An improved UPLC-MS/MS method to detect DON, DON-3-glucoside, 3-ADON, 15-ADON and DOM-1 in wheat baked products was developed in the present assay. The results highlighted the importance of temperature and time in mycotoxin stability in heat treatments. OTA is more stable than DON in a baking treatment. Interestingly, the DON-3-glucoside concentrations increased (>300%) under mild baking conditions. On the other hand, it was rapidly reduced under harsh conditions. The 3-ADON decreased during the heat treatment; while DOM-1 increased after the heating process. Finally, the data followed first order kinetics for analysed mycotoxins and thermal constant rates (k) were calculated. This parameter can be a useful tool for prediction of mycotoxin levels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Kinetics of ethanol production by immobilized Kluyveromyces marxianus cells at varying sugar concentrations of Jerusalem artichoke juice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bajpai, P.; Margaritis, A.

    1987-08-01

    Kinetics of ethanol fermentation at varying sugar concentrations of Jerusalem artichoke tuber extract has been studied using Kluyveromyces marxianus cells immobilized in calcium alginate gel beads. A maximum ethanol concentration of 111 g/l was achieved at an initial sugar concentration of 260 g/l in 20 hours, when the immobilized cell concentration in the calcium alginate beads was 53.3 g dry wt./l bead volume. Ethanol yield remained almost unaffected by initial sugar concentration up to 250 g/l and was found to be about 88% of the theoretical. Maximum rate of ethanol production decreased from 22.5 g ethanol/l/h to 10.5 g ethanol/l/h while the maximum rate of total sugars utilization decreased from 74.9 g sugars/l/h to 28.5 g sugars/l/h as the initial substrate concentration was increased from 100 to 300 g/l. The concentration of free cells in the fermentation broth was low.

  17. Trajectory Calculations for Bergman Cyclization Predict H/D Kinetic Isotope Effects Due to Nonstatistical Dynamics in the Product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doubleday, Charles; Boguslav, Mayla; Howell, Caronae; Korotkin, Scott D; Shaked, David

    2016-06-22

    An unusual H/D kinetic isotope effect (KIE) is described, in which isotopic selectivity arises primarily from nonstatistical dynamics in the product. In DFT-based quasiclassical trajectories of Bergman cyclization of (Z)-3-hexen-1,5-diyne (1) at 470 K, the new CC bond retains its energy, and 28% of nascent p-benzyne recrosses back to the enediyne on a vibrational time scale. The competing process of intramolecular vibrational redistribution (IVR) in p-benzyne is too slow to prevent this. Deuteration increases the rate of IVR, which decreases the fraction of recrossing and increases the yield of statistical (trapable) p-benzyne, 2. Trapable yields for three isotopomers of 2 range from 72% to 86%. The resulting KIEs for Bergman cyclization differ substantially from KIEs predicted by transition state theory, which suggests that IVR in this reaction can be studied by conventional KIEs. Leakage of vibrational zero point energy (ZPE) into the reaction coordinate was probed by trajectories in which initial ZPE in the CH/CD stretching modes was reduced by 25%. This did not change the predicted KIEs.

  18. The analysis of the derivation principles of kinetic equations based on exactly solvable models of the bulk reaction A + B → Product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kipriyanov, A.A.; Doktorov, A.B.

    2005-01-01

    We have considered two many-particle models of the irreversible reaction A + B → Product for which closed kinetic equations for the mean concentration N A (t) of A species can be exactly obtained. These equations are identically recast into a unified form of integro-differential equation of general kinetic theory. It is shown that the memory functions for both models under consideration can be represented as a sum of the Markovian and non-Markovian parts. It is essential that the Markovian part of the Laplace transform of any kernel can be obtained using the Laplace transform of the kernel itself, and is the root of the non-Markovian part of the Laplace transform of the kernel. The properties established allowed us to perform correct approximation of the memory functions at small concentrations [B] of B species and derive the binary non-Markovian integro-differential equation. Within the binary theory accuracy this equation has been rewritten in a regular frame of a familiar rate equation satisfying general principles of binary kinetic equations. Thus using particular exactly solvable many-particle models, we have reproduced the most essential steps of the known general way for the derivation of the binary kinetic equation avoiding the sophisticated many-particle technique and the corresponding approximations. Besides, the results obtained can serve as an additional evidence of the approximations made in a general many-particle approach to the derivation of the binary kinetic equation

  19. Pre-steady-state kinetic analysis of 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate reductoisomerase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis reveals partially rate-limiting product release by parallel pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Juan; Murkin, Andrew S

    2012-07-03

    As part of the non-mevalonate pathway for the biosynthesis of the isoprenoid precursor isopentenyl pyrophosphate, 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate (DXP) reductoisomerase (DXR) catalyzes the conversion of DXP into 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) by consecutive isomerization and NADPH-dependent reduction reactions. Because this pathway is essential to many infectious organisms but is absent in humans, DXR is a target for drug discovery. In an attempt to characterize its kinetic mechanism and identify rate-limiting steps, we present the first complete transient kinetic investigation of DXR. Stopped-flow fluorescence measurements with Mycobacterium tuberculosis DXR (MtDXR) revealed that NADPH and MEP bind to the free enzyme and that the two bind together to generate a nonproductive ternary complex. Unlike the Escherichia coli orthologue, MtDXR exhibited a burst in the oxidation of NADPH during pre-steady-state reactions, indicating a partially rate-limiting step follows chemistry. By monitoring NADPH fluorescence during these experiments, the transient generation of MtDXR·NADPH·MEP was observed. Global kinetic analysis supports a model involving random substrate binding and ordered release of NADP(+) followed by MEP. The partially rate-limiting release of MEP occurs via two pathways--directly from the binary complex and indirectly via the MtDXR·NADPH·MEP complex--the partitioning being dependent on NADPH concentration. Previous mechanistic studies, including kinetic isotope effects and product inhibition, are discussed in light of this kinetic mechanism.

  20. Ab initio chemical kinetics for the ClOO + NO reaction: Effects of temperature and pressure on product branching formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghunath, P.; Lin, M. C.

    2012-07-01

    The kinetics and mechanism for the reaction of ClOO with NO have been investigated by ab initio molecular orbital theory calculations based on the CCSD(T)/6-311+G(3df)//PW91PW91/6-311+G(3df) method, employed to evaluate the energetics for the construction of potential energy surfaces and prediction of reaction rate constants. The results show that the reaction can produce two key low energy products ClNO + 3O2 via the direct triplet abstraction path and ClO + NO2 via the association and decomposition mechanism through long-lived singlet pc-ClOONO and ClONO2 intermediates. The yield of ClNO + O2 (1△) from any of the singlet intermediates was found to be negligible because of their high barriers and tight transition states. As both key reactions initially occur barrierlessly, their rate constants were evaluated with a canonical variational approach in our transition state theory and Rice-Ramspergen-Kassel-Marcus/master equation calculations. The rate constants for ClNO + 3O2 and ClO + NO2 production from ClOO + NO can be given by 2.66 × 10-16 T1.91 exp(341/T) (200-700 K) and 1.48 × 10-24 T3.99 exp(1711/T) (200-600 K), respectively, independent of pressure below atmospheric pressure. The predicted total rate constant and the yields of ClNO and NO2 in the temperature range of 200-700 K at 10-760 Torr pressure are in close agreement with available experimental results.

  1. Cobalt catalyzed peroxymonosulfate oxidation of tetrabromobisphenol A: Kinetics, reaction pathways, and formation of brominated by-products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Yuefei [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); Kong, Deyang [Nanjing Institute of Environmental Science, Ministry of Environmental Protection of PRC, Nanjing 210042 (China); Lu, Junhe, E-mail: jhlu@njau.edu.cn [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); Jin, Hao; Kang, Fuxing; Yin, Xiaoming; Zhou, Quansuo [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China)

    2016-08-05

    Highlights: • Cobalt catalyzed peroxymonosulfate oxidation of tetrabromobisphenol A. • Phenolic moiety was the reactive site for sulfate radical attack. • Pathways include β-scission, oxidation, debromination and coupling reactions. • Brominated disinfection by-products were found during TBBPA degradation. • Humic acid inhibited TBBPA degradation but promoted DBPs formation. - Abstract: Degradation of tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), a flame retardant widely spread in the environment, in Co(II) catalyzed peroxymonosulfate (PMS) oxidation process was systematically explored. The second-order-rate constant for reaction of sulfate radical (SO{sub 4}{sup ·−}) with TBBPA was determined to be 5.27 × 10{sup 10} M{sup −1} s{sup −1}. Apparently, degradation of TBBPA showed first-order kinetics to the concentrations of both Co(II) and PMS. The presence of humic acid (HA) and bicarbonate inhibited TBBPA degradation, most likely due to their competition for SO{sub 4}{sup ·−}. Degradation of TBBPA was initiated by an electron abstraction from one of the phenolic rings. Detailed transformation pathways were proposed, including β-scission of isopropyl bridge, phenolic ring oxidation, debromination and coupling reactions. Further oxidative degradation of intermediates in Co(II)/PMS process yielded brominated disinfection by-products (Br-DBPs) such as bromoform and brominated acetic acids. Evolution profile of Br-DBPs showed an initially increasing and then decreasing pattern with maximum concentrations occurring around 6–10 h. The presence of HA enhanced the formation of Br-DBPs significantly. These findings reveal potentially important, but previously unrecognized, formation of Br-DBPs during sulfate radical-based oxidation of bromide-containing organic compounds that may pose toxicological risks to human health.

  2. The interactive effect of fungicide residues and yeast assimilable nitrogen on fermentation kinetics and hydrogen sulfide production during cider fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudreau, Thomas F; Peck, Gregory M; O'Keefe, Sean F; Stewart, Amanda C

    2017-01-01

    Fungicide residues on fruit may adversely affect yeast during cider fermentation, leading to sluggish or stuck fermentation or the production of hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S), which is an undesirable aroma compound. This phenomenon has been studied in grape fermentation but not in apple fermentation. Low nitrogen availability, which is characteristic of apples, may further exacerbate the effects of fungicides on yeast during fermentation. The present study explored the effects of three fungicides: elemental sulfur (S 0 ) (known to result in increased H 2 S in wine); fenbuconazole (used in orchards but not vineyards); and fludioxonil (used in post-harvest storage of apples). Only S 0 led to increased H 2 S production. Fenbuconazole (≥0.2 mg L -1 ) resulted in a decreased fermentation rate and increased residual sugar. An interactive effect of yeast assimilable nitrogen (YAN) concentration and fenbuconazole was observed such that increasing the YAN concentration alleviated the negative effects of fenbuconazole on fermentation kinetics. Cidermakers should be aware that residual fenbuconazole (as low as 0.2 mg L -1 ) in apple juice may lead to stuck fermentation, especially when the YAN concentration is below 250 mg L -1 . These results indicate that fermentation problems attributed to low YAN may be caused or exacerbated by additional factors such as fungicide residues, which have a greater impact on fermentation performance under low YAN conditions. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of The Science of Food and Agriculture published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of The Science of Food and Agriculture published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Thermal decomposition of gaseous ammonium nitrate at low pressure: kinetic modeling of product formation and heterogeneous decomposition of nitric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J; Lin, M C

    2009-12-03

    The thermal decomposition of ammonium nitrate, NH(4)NO(3) (AN), in the gas phase has been studied at 423-56 K by pyrolysis/mass spectrometry under low-pressure conditions using a Saalfeld reactor coated with boric acid. The sublimation of NH(4)NO(3) at 423 K was proposed to produce equal amounts of NH(3) and HNO(3), followed by the decomposition reaction of HNO(3), HNO(3) + M --> OH + NO(2) + M (where M = third-body and reactor surface). The absolute yields of N(2), N(2)O, H(2)O, and NH(3), which can be unambiguously measured and quantitatively calibrated under a constant pressure at 5-6.2 torr He are kinetically modeled using the detailed [H,N,O]-mechanism established earlier for the simulation of NH(3)-NO(2) (Park, J.; Lin, M. C. Technologies and Combustion for a Clean Environment. Proc. 4th Int. Conf. 1997, 34-1, 1-5) and ADN decomposition reactions (Park, J.; Chakraborty, D.; Lin, M. C. Proc. Combust. Inst. 1998, 27, 2351-2357). Since the homogeneous decomposition reaction of HNO(3) itself was found to be too slow to account for the consumption of reactants and the formation of products, we also introduced the heterogeneous decomposition of HNO(3) in our kinetic modeling. The heterogeneous decomposition rate of HNO(3), HNO(3) + (B(2)O(3)/SiO(2)) --> OH + NO(2) + (B(2)O(3)/SiO(2)), was determined by varying its rate to match the modeled result to the measured concentrations of NH(3) and H(2)O; the rate could be represented by k(2b) = 7.91 x 10(7) exp(-12 600/T) s(-1), which appears to be consistent with those reported by Johnston and co-workers (Johnston, H. S.; Foering, L.; Tao, Y.-S.; Messerly, G. H. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1951, 73, 2319-2321) for HNO(3) decomposition on glass reactors at higher temperatures. Notably, the concentration profiles of all species measured could be satisfactorily predicted by the existing [H,N,O]-mechanism with the heterogeneous initiation process.

  4. Thermal Decomposition of Gaseous Ammonium Nitrate at Low Pressure: Kinetic Modeling of Product Formation and Heterogeneous Decomposition of Nitric Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J.; Lin, M. C.

    2009-10-01

    The thermal decomposition of ammonium nitrate, NH4NO3 (AN), in the gas phase has been studied at 423-56 K by pyrolysis/mass spectrometry under low-pressure conditions using a Saalfeld reactor coated with boric acid. The sublimation of NH4NO3 at 423 K was proposed to produce equal amounts of NH3 and HNO3, followed by the decomposition reaction of HNO3, HNO3 + M → OH + NO2 + M (where M = third-body and reactor surface). The absolute yields of N2, N2O, H2O, and NH3, which can be unambiguously measured and quantitatively calibrated under a constant pressure at 5-6.2 torr He are kinetically modeled using the detailed [H,N,O]-mechanism established earlier for the simulation of NH3-NO2 (Park, J.; Lin, M. C. Technologies and Combustion for a Clean Environment. Proc. 4th Int. Conf. 1997, 34-1, 1-5) and ADN decomposition reactions (Park, J.; Chakraborty, D.; Lin, M. C. Proc. Combust. Inst. 1998, 27, 2351-2357). Since the homogeneous decomposition reaction of HNO3 itself was found to be too slow to account for the consumption of reactants and the formation of products, we also introduced the heterogeneous decomposition of HNO3 in our kinetic modeling. The heterogeneous decomposition rate of HNO3, HNO3 + (B2O3/SiO2) → OH + NO2 + (B2O3/SiO2), was determined by varying its rate to match the modeled result to the measured concentrations of NH3 and H2O; the rate could be represented by k2b = 7.91 × 107 exp(-12 600/T) s-1, which appears to be consistent with those reported by Johnston and co-workers (Johnston, H. S.; Foering, L.; Tao, Y.-S.; Messerly, G. H. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1951, 73, 2319-2321) for HNO3 decomposition on glass reactors at higher temperatures. Notably, the concentration profiles of all species measured could be satisfactorily predicted by the existing [H,N,O]-mechanism with the heterogeneous initiation process.

  5. Redox Kinetics and Nonstoichiometry of Ce0.5Zr0.5O2−δ for Water Splitting and Hydrogen Production

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Zhenlong

    2017-04-25

    Water splitting and chemical fuel production as a promising carbon-neutral energy solution relies critically on an efficient electrochemical process over catalyst surfaces. The fundamentals within the surface redox pathways, including the complex interactions of mobile ions and electrons between the bulk and the surface, along with the role of adsorbates and electrostatic fields remain yet to be understood quantitatively. This work presents a detailed kinetics study and nonstoichiometry characterization of Ce0.5Zr0.5O2−δ (CZO), one of the most recognized catalysts for water splitting. The use of CZO leads to >60% improvement in the kinetic rates as compared with undoped ceria with twice the total yield at 700 °C, resulting from the improved reducibility. The peak H2 production rate is 95 μmol g–1 s–1 at 700 °C, and the total production is 750 μmol g–1. A threshold temperature of 650 °C is required to achieve significant H2 production at fast rates. The redox kinetics is modeled using two-step surface chemistry with bulk-to-surface transport equilibrium. Kinetics and equilibrium parameters are extracted, and the model predictions show good agreement with the measurements. The enthalpy of bulk defect formation for CZO is found to be 262 kJ/mol, >40% lower than that of undoped ceria. As oxygen vacancy is gradually filled up, the surface H2O splitting chemistry undergoes a transition from exothermic to endothermic, with the crossover around δ = 0.04 to 0.05, which constrains the further ion incorporation process. Our kinetics study reveals that the H2O splitting process with CZO is kinetics limited at low temperature and transitions to partial-equilibrium with significantly enhanced backward reaction at high temperature. The charge-transfer step is found to be the rate-limiting step for H2O splitting. The detailed kinetics and nonstoichiometric equilibria should be helpful in guiding the design and optimization of CZO as a catalyst, oxygen storage

  6. UV and solar photo-degradation of naproxen: TiO₂ catalyst effect, reaction kinetics, products identification and toxicity assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jallouli, Nabil; Elghniji, Kais; Hentati, Olfa; Ribeiro, Ana R; Silva, Adrián M T; Ksibi, Mohamed

    2016-03-05

    Direct photolysis and TiO2-photocatalytic degradation of naproxen (NPX) in aqueous solution were studied using a UV lamp and solar irradiation. The degradation of NPX was found to be in accordance with pseudo-first order kinetics, the photocatalytic process being more efficient than photolysis. The NPX removal by photolysis (pHinitial 6.5) was 83% after 3h, with 11% of chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction, whereas the TiO2-UV process led to higher removals of both NPX (98%) and COD (25%). The apparent pseudo-first-order rate constant (kapp) for NPX degradation by photolysis ranged from 0.0050 min(-1) at pH 3.5 to 0.0095 min(-1) at pH 6.5, while it was estimated to be 0.0063 min(-1) under acidic conditions in photocatalysis, increasing by 4-fold at pH 6.5. Ultra High Performance Liquid chromatography (UHPLC) coupled with a triple quadrupole detector and also a hybrid mass spectrometer which combines the linear ion trap triple quadrupole (LTQ) and OrbiTrap mass analyser, were used to identify NPX degradation products. The main intermediates detected were 1-(6-methoxynaphtalene-2-yl) ethylhydroperoxide, 2-ethyl-6-methoxynaphthalene, 1-(6-methoxynaphtalen-2-yl) ethanol, 1-(6-methoxynaphtalen-2-yl) ethanone and malic acid. Solar photocatalysis of NPX showed COD removals of 33% and 65% after 3 and 4h of treatment, respectively, and some reduction of acute toxicity, evaluated by the exposure of Eisenia andrei to OECD soils spiked with NPX-treated solutions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Photolysis of model emerging contaminants in ultra-pure water: kinetics, by-products formation and degradation pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benitez, F Javier; Acero, Juan L; Real, Francisco J; Roldan, Gloria; Rodriguez, Elena

    2013-02-01

    The photolysis of five frequent emerging contaminants (Benzotriazole, Chlorophene, N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide or DEET, Methylindole, and Nortriptyline HCl) was investigated in ultrapure water under monochromatic ultraviolet radiation at 254 nm and by a combination of UV and hydrogen peroxide. The results revealed that the photolysis rates followed first-order kinetics, with rate constant values depending on the nature of the specific compound, the pH, and the presence or absence of the scavenger tert-butanol. Quantum yields were also determined and values in the range of 53.8 × 10⁻³ - 9.4 × 10⁻³ mol E⁻¹ for Benzotriazole, 525 × 10⁻³ - 469 × 10⁻³ mol E⁻¹ for Chlorophene, 2.8 × 10⁻³ - 0.9 × 10⁻³ mol E⁻¹ for DEET, 108 × 10⁻³ - 165 × 10⁻³ mol E⁻¹ for Methylindole, and 13.8 × 10⁻³ - 15.0 × 10⁻³ mol E⁻¹ for Nortriptyline were obtained. The study also found that the UV/H₂O₂ process enhanced the oxidation rate in comparison to direct photolysis. High-performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-QTOF-MS) technique was applied to the concentrations evaluation and further identification of the parent compounds and their by-products, which allowed the proposal of the degradation pathways for each compound. Finally, in order to assess the aquatic toxicity in the photodegradation of these compounds, the Vibrio fischeri acute toxicity test was used, and the results indicated an initial increase of this parameter in all cases, followed by a decrease in the specific case of Benzotriazole, DEET, Methylindole, and Chlorophene. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Efficient transformation of DDT by peroxymonosulfate activated with cobalt in aqueous systems: Kinetics, products, and reactive species identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Wenxiu; Fang, Guodong; Wang, Yujun; Wu, Tongliang; Zhu, Changyin; Zhou, Dongmei

    2016-04-01

    Recently, sulfate radical ( [Formula: see text] ) based-advanced oxidation technologies (AOTs) have been attracted great attention in the remediation of contaminated soil and groundwater. In the present study, Co(2+) ions activated peroxymonosulfate (PMS) system was used to degrade 1, 1, 1-trichloro-2, 2'bis(p-chlorophenyl) ethane (DDT) in aqueous solutions. It was found that DDT was efficiently degraded in the PMS/Co(II) solutions within several hours, and the degradation efficiency of DDT was dependent on the concentrations of PMS and Co(II), and the optimum molar ratio of PMS and Co(II) was 50:1. The degradation kinetics of DDT were well described with pseudo-first-order equations over a range of temperature (10-40 °C), and the activation energy that was calculated with Arrhenius equation was 72.3 ± 2.6 kJ/mol. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and GC-MS techniques were applied to identify the intermediates and reactive species for DDT degradation. The results indicated that [Formula: see text] and OH were the main reactive species accounting for DDT degradation. Dichlorobenzophenone, 4-chlorobenzoic acid and benzylalcohol were the dominant intermediates for DDT degradation, and the likely degradation pathway of DDT was proposed on the basis of these identified products. Increasing pH inhibited the formation of [Formula: see text] and OH, and thus decreased the catalytic degradation of DDT. Cl(-) ion was found to significantly inhibit, while [Formula: see text] and dissolved oxygen had limited effects on DDT degradation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Reaction kinetics and oxidation products formation in the degradation of ciprofloxacin and ibuprofen by ferrate(VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhengwei; Jiang, Jia-Qian

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of ciprofloxacin (CIP) and ibuprofen (IBU) in test solutions by ferrate(VI) was investigated in this study. A series of jar test was performed in bench-scale at pH 6-9 and ferrate(VI) dose of 1-5 mg L(-1). Results demonstrated that ferrate(VI) removed CIP from test solutions efficiently, with above 70% of reduction under study conditions. In contrary, the removal rates of IBU were very low, less than 25% in all conditions. Raising ferrate(VI) dose improved the treatment performance, while the influence of solution pH was not significant at pH 6-9 compared with that of ferrate(VI) dose. In addition, kinetic studies of ferrate(VI) with both compounds were carried out at pH 8 and pH 9 (20 °C). Ferrate(VI) had a much higher reactivity with CIP than IBU at pH 8 and pH 9, with CIP's apparent second-order rate constants of 113.7±6.3 M(-1) s(-1) and 64.1±1.0 M(-1) s(-1), respectively. The rate constants of ferrate(VI) with IBU were less than 0.2 M(-1) s(-1) at pH 8 and pH 9. Furthermore, seven oxidation products (OPs) were formed during CIP degradation by ferrate(VI). The attack on the piperazinyl ring of the CIP by ferrate(VI) appeared to lead to the cleavage or hydroxylation of the rings, and the attack on the quinolone moiety by ferrate(VI) might lead to the cleavage of the double bond at the six-member heterocyclic ring. No OPs of IBU were detected during ferrate(VI) oxidation due to very small part of IBU was degraded by ferrate(VI). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Kinetics and mechanism of the condensation of pyridoxal hydrochloride with L-tryptophan and D-tryptophan, and the chemical transformation of their products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pishchugin, F. V.; Tuleberdiev, I. T.

    2017-10-01

    The kinetics and mechanism of interaction between pyridoxal and L-tryptophan, D-tryptophan, and their derivatives are studied. It is found that condensation reactions proceed via three kinetically distinguishable stages: (1) the rapid intraplanar addition of the NH2 groups of the amino acids to pyridoxal with the formation of amino alcohols; (2) the rotational isomerism of amino alcohol fragments with their subsequent dehydration and the formation of a Schiff base with a specific configuration; (3) the abstraction of α-hydrogen in the product of condensation of pyridoxal with L-tryptophan, or the abstraction of CO2 in the product of condensation of pyridoxal with D-tryptophan with the formation of quinoid structures, hydrolysis of which results in the preparation of pyridoxamine and keto acid or pyridoxal and tryptamine, respectively. Schiff bases resistant to further chemical transformations are formed in the reaction with tryptophan methyl ester.

  11. Kinetic model-based feed-forward controlled fed-batch fermentation of Lactobacillus rhamnosus for the production of lactic acid from Arabic date juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Minsung; Al-Zahrani, Saeed M; Lee, Sang Yup

    2014-06-01

    Arabic date is overproduced in Arabic countries such as Saudi Arabia and Iraq and is mostly composed of sugars (70-80 wt%). Here we developed a fed-batch fermentation process by using a kinetic model for the efficient production of lactic acid to a high concentration from Arabic date juice. First, a kinetic model of Lactobacillus rhamnosus grown on date juice in batch fermentation was constructed in EXCEL so that the estimation of parameters and simulation of the model can be easily performed. Then, several fed-batch fermentations were conducted by employing different feeding strategies including pulsed feeding, exponential feeding, and modified exponential feeding. Based on the results of fed-batch fermentations, the kinetic model for fed-batch fermentation was also developed. This new model was used to perform feed-forward controlled fed-batch fermentation, which resulted in the production of 171.79 g l(-1) of lactic acid with the productivity and yield of 1.58 and 0.87 g l(-1) h(-1), respectively.

  12. The removal of COD and NH3-N from atrazine production wastewater treatment using UV/O3: experimental investigation and kinetic modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Liang; Chen, Bing; Wen, Diya; Zheng, Jisi; Zhang, Baiyu

    2018-01-01

    In this study, a UV/O 3 hybrid advanced oxidation system was used to remove chemical oxygen demand (COD), ammonia nitrogen (NH 3 -N), and atrazine (ATZ) from ATZ production wastewater. The removal of COD and NH 3 -N, under different UV and O 3 conditions, was found to follow pseudo-first-order kinetics with rate constants ranging from 0.0001-0.0048 and 0.0015-0.0056 min -1 , respectively. The removal efficiency of ATZ was over 95% after 180 min treatment, regardless the level of UV power. A kinetic model was further proposed to simulate the removal processes and to quantify the individual roles and contributions of photolysis, direct O 3 oxidation, and hydroxyl radical (OH·) induced oxidation. The experimental and kinetic modeling results agreed reasonably well with deviations of 12.2 and 13.1% for the removal of COD and NH 3 -N, respectively. Photolysis contributed appreciably to the degradation of ATZ, while OH· played a dominant role for the removal of both COD and NH 3 -N, especially in alkaline environments. This study provides insights into the treatment of ATZ containing wastewater using UV/O 3 and broadens the knowledge of kinetics of ozone-based advanced oxidation processes.

  13. Production of cellobionate from cellulose using an engineered Neurospora crassa strain with laccase and redox mediator addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    We report a novel production process for cellobionic acid from cellulose using an engineered fungal strain with the exogenous addition of laccase and a redox mediator. A previously engineered strain of Neurospora crassa (F5'ace-1'cre-1'ndvB) was shown to produce cellobionate directly from cellulose ...

  14. Kinetic Typography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Leeuwen, Theo; Djonov, Emilia

    2014-01-01

    After discussing broad cultural drivers behind the development of kinetic typography, the chapter outlines an approach to analysing kinetic typography which is based on Halliday's theory of transitivity, as applied by Kress and Van Leeuwen to visual images.......After discussing broad cultural drivers behind the development of kinetic typography, the chapter outlines an approach to analysing kinetic typography which is based on Halliday's theory of transitivity, as applied by Kress and Van Leeuwen to visual images....

  15. Essential role of cyclophilin A for hepatitis C virus replication and virus production and possible link to polyprotein cleavage kinetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur Kaul

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Viruses are obligate intracellular parasites and therefore their replication completely depends on host cell factors. In case of the hepatitis C virus (HCV, a positive-strand RNA virus that in the majority of infections establishes persistence, cyclophilins are considered to play an important role in RNA replication. Subsequent to the observation that cyclosporines, known to sequester cyclophilins by direct binding, profoundly block HCV replication in cultured human hepatoma cells, conflicting results were obtained as to the particular cyclophilin (Cyp required for viral RNA replication and the underlying possible mode of action. By using a set of cell lines with stable knock-down of CypA or CypB, we demonstrate in the present work that replication of subgenomic HCV replicons of different genotypes is reduced by CypA depletion up to 1,000-fold whereas knock-down of CypB had no effect. Inhibition of replication was rescued by over-expression of wild type CypA, but not by a mutant lacking isomerase activity. Replication of JFH1-derived full length genomes was even more sensitive to CypA depletion as compared to subgenomic replicons and virus production was completely blocked. These results argue that CypA may target an additional viral factor outside of the minimal replicase contributing to RNA amplification and assembly, presumably nonstructural protein 2. By selecting for resistance against the cyclosporine analogue DEBIO-025 that targets CypA in a dose-dependent manner, we identified two mutations (V2440A and V2440L close to the cleavage site between nonstructural protein 5A and the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase in nonstructural protein 5B that slow down cleavage kinetics at this site and reduce CypA dependence of viral replication. Further amino acid substitutions at the same cleavage site accelerating processing increase CypA dependence. Our results thus identify an unexpected correlation between HCV polyprotein processing and CypA dependence

  16. Essential role of cyclophilin A for hepatitis C virus replication and virus production and possible link to polyprotein cleavage kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Artur; Stauffer, Sarah; Berger, Carola; Pertel, Thomas; Schmitt, Jennifer; Kallis, Stephanie; Zayas, Margarita; Lopez, Margarita Zayas; Lohmann, Volker; Luban, Jeremy; Bartenschlager, Ralf

    2009-08-01

    Viruses are obligate intracellular parasites and therefore their replication completely depends on host cell factors. In case of the hepatitis C virus (HCV), a positive-strand RNA virus that in the majority of infections establishes persistence, cyclophilins are considered to play an important role in RNA replication. Subsequent to the observation that cyclosporines, known to sequester cyclophilins by direct binding, profoundly block HCV replication in cultured human hepatoma cells, conflicting results were obtained as to the particular cyclophilin (Cyp) required for viral RNA replication and the underlying possible mode of action. By using a set of cell lines with stable knock-down of CypA or CypB, we demonstrate in the present work that replication of subgenomic HCV replicons of different genotypes is reduced by CypA depletion up to 1,000-fold whereas knock-down of CypB had no effect. Inhibition of replication was rescued by over-expression of wild type CypA, but not by a mutant lacking isomerase activity. Replication of JFH1-derived full length genomes was even more sensitive to CypA depletion as compared to subgenomic replicons and virus production was completely blocked. These results argue that CypA may target an additional viral factor outside of the minimal replicase contributing to RNA amplification and assembly, presumably nonstructural protein 2. By selecting for resistance against the cyclosporine analogue DEBIO-025 that targets CypA in a dose-dependent manner, we identified two mutations (V2440A and V2440L) close to the cleavage site between nonstructural protein 5A and the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase in nonstructural protein 5B that slow down cleavage kinetics at this site and reduce CypA dependence of viral replication. Further amino acid substitutions at the same cleavage site accelerating processing increase CypA dependence. Our results thus identify an unexpected correlation between HCV polyprotein processing and CypA dependence of HCV

  17. Optimization of a low-cost hyperosmotic medium and establishing the fermentation kinetics of erythritol production by Yarrowia lipolytica from crude glycerol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li-Bo; Zhan, Xiao-Bei; Zhu, Li; Gao, Min-Jie; Lin, Chi-Chung

    2016-05-18

    The production of erythritol by Yarrowia lipolytica from low-cost substitutable substrates for high yield was investigated. Crude glycerol, urea, and NaCl related to osmotic pressure were the most significant factors affecting erythritol production. An artificial neural network model and genetic algorithm were used to search the optimal composition of the significant factors and locate the resulting erythritol yield. Medium with 232.39 g/L crude glycerol, 1.57 g/L urea, and 31.03 g/L NaCl led to predictive maximum erythritol concentration of 110.7 g/L. The erythritol concentration improved from 50.4 g/L to 109.2 g/L with the optimized medium, which was reproducible. Erythritol fermentation kinetics were investigated in a batch system. Multistep fermentation kinetic models with hyperosmotic inhibitory effects were developed. The resulting mathematical equations provided a good description of temporal variations such as microbial growth (X), substrate consumption (S), and product formation (P) in erythritol fermentation. The accordingly derived model is the first reported model for fermentative erythritol production from glycerol, providing useful information to optimize the growth of Y. lipolytica and contributing visual description for the erythritol fermentation process under high osmotic pressure, as well as improvement of productivity and efficiency.

  18. Physicochemical Characteristics, in Vitro Fermentation Indicators, Gas Production Kinetics, and Degradability of Solid Herbal Waste as Alternative Feed Source for Ruminants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Kisworo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this research were to study the nutrient and secondary metabolite contents of solid herbal wastes (SHW that were preserved by freeze drying, sun drying and silage, as well as to analyze their effects on in vitro fermentation indicators i.e., gas production kinetics and degradability of solid herbal waste. Physical and chemical properties on three forms of SHW (sun dry, freeze dry, and silage were characterized and then an in vitro gas production experiment was performed to determine the kinetics of gas production, methane production, NH3, microbial protein, and SHW degradability. Polyethylene glycol (PEG was added to the three treatments to determine the biological activity of tannins. Results showed that all three preparations of SHW still contained high nutrient and plant secondary metabolite contents. Gas production, methane, NH3, microbial protein, in vitro degradability of dry matter (IVDMD and organic matter (IVDOM of SHW silage were lower (P<0.05 compared to sun dry and freeze dry. These results were apparently due to the high content of secondary metabolites especially tannin. It can be concluded that solid herbal wastes (SHW can be used as an alternative feed ingredients for ruminants with attention to the content of secondary metabolites that can affect the process of fermentation and digestibility in the rumen.

  19. Enzymatic oxidation of rutin by horseradish peroxidase: kinetic mechanism and identification of a dimeric product by LC-Orbitrap mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savic, Sasa; Vojinovic, Katarina; Milenkovic, Sanja; Smelcerovic, Andrija; Lamshoeft, Marc; Petronijevic, Zivomir

    2013-12-15

    Flavonoid oxidation is important issue in food processing and quality. The kinetic mechanism of enzymatic oxidation of rutin by horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was studied. Rutin oxidation reaction was followed by recording of spectral changes over the time at 360 nm. The studied oxidation is mostly enzymatic and less part non-enzymatic. The reaction with HRP has a higher rate compared with the reaction without of HRP, whereby is part of non-enzymatic reaction about 10% of the total reaction. Kinetic parameters were determined from graphics of linear Michaelis-Menten equation, and it was found that investigated reactions of rutin oxidation by HRP take place in a ping-pong kinetic mechanism. High resolution HPLC-MS analysis of the mixture of oxidized products of rutin revealed the presence of rutin dimer. Because of widely distribution of rutin as well as presence of peroxidases and hydrogen peroxide in fresh foods identification of this enzymatic modification product can be beneficial for foods quality and safety. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Kinetics of the avian influenza-specific humoral responses in lung are indicative of local antibody production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geus, de E.D.; Rebel, J.M.J.; Vervelde, L.

    2012-01-01

    The role and kinetics of respiratory immunoglobulins in AIV infection has not been investigated. In this study we determined the numbers of both total antibody secreting cells (ASC) and virus-specific ASC in lung, spleen, blood and bone marrow (BM) following low-pathogenic AIV infection. Antiviral

  1. Production of activated carbons from waste carpets and its application in methylene blue adsorption: Kinetic and thermodynamic studies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hassan, A F.; Elhadidy, Hassan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 1 (2017), s. 955-963 ISSN 2213-3437 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1601 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Waste carpets * Activated carbons * Adsorption * Kinetic Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.)

  2. Determination of moxifloxacin and its oxidation products with kinetic evaluation under potassium permanganate treatment in acidic solution by ultra-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubicka, Urszula; Zmudzki, Paweł; Zajdel, Paweł; Krzek, Jan

    2013-01-01

    A simple, sensitive, and reproducible ultra-performance LC method for the determination of moxifloxacin (MOXI) oxidation stability under permanganate treatment in acidic conditions (pH 3.0-6.0) was developed. Besides the MOXI peak [retention time (RT) = 2.58], four additional products (RT = 0.86, 0.91, 1.42, and 1.89) were observed in all conditions tested. The oxidation process followed second-order reaction kinetics and depended upon solution acidity. The highest reaction rate constant was observed at pH 3.0, and this value decreased as the pH was increased to 6.0. The oxidation products were characterized, and their fragmentation pathways, derived from MS/MS data, were proposed. Two of these products were identified as hydroxyl derivatives of MOXI and two others as their oxidation product analogs with molecular ions of 418.4 and 416.4 m/z, respectively.

  3. Kinetic modeling of light limitation and sulfur deprivation effects in the induction of hydrogen production with Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: Part I. Model development and parameter identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouchard, Swanny; Pruvost, Jérémy; Degrenne, Benoit; Titica, Mariana; Legrand, Jack

    2009-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a green microalga capable of turning its metabolism towards H2 production under specific conditions. However this H2 production, narrowly linked to the photosynthetic process, results from complex metabolic reactions highly dependent on the environmental conditions of the cells. A kinetic model has been developed to relate culture evolution from standard photosynthetic growth to H2 producing cells. It represents transition in sulfur-deprived conditions, known to lead to H2 production in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and the two main processes then induced which are an over-accumulation of intracellular starch and a progressive reduction of PSII activity for anoxia achievement. Because these phenomena are directly linked to the photosynthetic growth, two kinetic models were associated, the first (one) introducing light dependency (Haldane type model associated to a radiative light transfer model), the second (one) making growth a function of available sulfur amount under extracellular and intracellular forms (Droop formulation). The model parameters identification was realized from experimental data obtained with especially designed experiments and a sensitivity analysis of the model to its parameters was also conducted. Model behavior was finally studied showing interdependency between light transfer conditions, photosynthetic growth, sulfate uptake, photosynthetic activity and O2 release, during transition from oxygenic growth to anoxic H2 production conditions.

  4. Influence of a yeast fermented product on the serum levels of the mannan-binding lectin and the antibodies against the Newcastle disease virus in Ross broilers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortés-Coronado, R F; Gómez-Rosales, S; de L Angeles, M

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this research was to evaluate the serum concentrations of mannan-binding lectin (MBL) at different ages in Ross broilers fed increasing amounts of a yeast-fermented product (YFP) and inoculated with a vaccine against Newcastle disease virus (NDV). Eighty mixed Ross B308 broilers...

  5. Kinetics of β-galactosidase Production by Lactobacillus bulgaricus During pH Controlled Batch Fermentation in Three Commercial Bulk Starter Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Abbasalizadeh

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The potential of bulk starter fermentation strategy for production of a cost-effective and GRAS source of β-galactosidase from a starter culture strain Lactobacillus bulgaricus was investigated. Three different media were selected and the strain, L. bulgaricus DSM 20081 was cultivated in these media under pH-controlled condition (pH = 5.6 at 43°C. The media were: bulk starter medium based on skim milk + whey, bulk starter medium based on whey, and skim milk. Growth and β-lactic acid production parameters were estimated from experimental data with the Garcia and Luedeking-Piret models, respectively. β-galactosidase production kinetics was also simulated using models based on biomass concentration and lactic acid production. Growth in the bulk starter medium based on skim milk + whey resulted in a higher rate of lactic acid production (7.35 ± 0.23  mg lactic acid ml-1 media h-1 and β-galactosidase activity (800.1± 0.7 nmol ONP ml-1 media compared to the other two media (P<0.01. Simulation of β- galactosidase production based on rate of lactic acid production resulted in very good agreement with experimental data for all three tested media. The results revealed the potential of bulk starter fermentation strategy and skim milk + whey based medium for in-house and relatively low cost production of food-grade β-galactosidase by dairy plants.

  6. Kinetics and Products of the Reactions of Fluorine Atoms with ClNO and Br2 from 295 to 950 K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedjanian, Yuri

    2017-11-09

    The kinetics and products of the reactions of F atoms with Br 2 and ClNO have been studied in a flow reactor coupled with an electron impact ionization mass spectrometer at nearly 2 Torr total pressure of helium and over a wide temperature range, T = 295-950 K. The rate constant of the reaction F + ClNO → products (1) was determined under pseudo-first order conditions, monitoring the kinetics of F atom consumption in excess of ClNO. The measured temperature independent rate constant, k 1 = (1.29 ± 0.13) × 10 -10 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 (T = 299-950 K), was found to be in excellent agreement with the only previous low temperature study which allowed to recommend the value of k 1 in an extended temperature range, 228-950 K. FCl and Cl atoms were observed as the reactions products (corresponding to two reaction pathways: Cl-atom abstraction and replacement with fluorine atom, respectively) with the independent of temperature, in the range 295-948 K, yields of 0.68 ± 0.10 and 0.32 ± 0.05, respectively. Rate constant of the reaction F + Br 2 (2), k 2 = (1.28 ± 0.20) × 10 -10 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 , determined using both absolute and relative rate methods, was found to be independent of temperature at T = 299-940 K.

  7. Kinetic study of Escherichia coli BPPTCC-EgRK2 to produce recombinant cellulase for ethanol production from oil palm empty fruit bunch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limoes, S.; Rahman, S. F.; Setyahadi, S.; Gozan, M.

    2018-03-01

    Oil Palm Empty Fruit Bunch (OPEFB) is an abundant biomass resource in Indonesia, which contains 46,77% (w/w) of cellulose. The high cellulose content of OPEFB can be used as a substrate for bacteria cultivation to produce cellulase. By using OPEFB as an alternative substrate, the production cost of cellulase in industrial scale can be suppressed. However, currently there are no available research that simulate a cellulase production plant design. Prior to simulating the cellulase plant design, kinetic studies of bacteria used in cultivation are needed to create an accurate simulation. In this research, kinetic studies of E. coli BPPTCC-EgRK2 growth were examined with the Monod approach to get the Monod constant (Ks) and maximum specific growth rate (μmax). This study found that E. coli BPPTCC-EgRK2 have μmax and Ks of 1.581 and 0.0709 respectively. BPPTCC-EgRK2 produced intracellular cellulase, thus gave linear correlation between cell concentration and cellulase production.

  8. Preparation, characterization, kinetic and thermodynamic studies of MgO-La2O3 nanocatalysts for biodiesel production from sunflower oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feyzi, Mostafa; Hosseini, Nahid; Yaghobi, Nakisa; Ezzati, Rohollah

    2017-06-01

    A series of MgO-La2O3 nanocatalysts were prepared via a co-precipitation method and used for biodiesel production from sunflower oil. The results showed that with increasing Mg/La weight percent the catalytic activity increases obviously. Also the results showed that the catalyst with Mg/La = 60 wt.% (based on weight of La) is an optimal nanocatalyst. The best operational conditions were the CH3OH/oil = 18/1 at 338 K with mechanical stirring 700 rpm for 5 h. Furthermore, the optimal nanocatalyst showed high catalytic activity for biodiesel production and the biodiesel yield reached 97.7% under the optimal conditions. Furthermore, this nanocatalyst was used for 4 runs in biodiesel production without significant decrease of catalytic performance. Also kinetic and thermodynamic of reaction has been studied in the presence of optimal nanocatalyst. From the kinetic and thermodynamic studies, Ea = 77.6 kJ·mol-1, A = 3.5 × 107 l·mol-1 s-1, ΔrHθ = 162 kJ·mol-1 K-1, ΔrSθ = 0.54 kJ·mol-1 K-1 were obtained. Characterization of catalysts was carried out by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), temperature programmed desorption (TPD), Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and N2 adsorption-desorption measurement methods.

  9. Development of a Site-Specific Kinetic Model for Chlorine Decay and the Formation of Chlorination By-Products in Seawater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhur Saeed

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Chlorine is used commonly to prevent biofouling in cooling water systems. The addition of chlorine poses environmental risks in natural systems due to its tendency to form chlorination by-products (CBPs when exposed to naturally-occurring organic matter (NOM. Some of these CBPs can pose toxic risks to aquatic and benthic species in the receiving waters. It is, therefore, important to study the fate of residual chlorine and CBPs to fully understand the potential impacts of chlorination to the environment. The goal of this study was to develop improved predictions of how chlorine and CBP concentrations in seawater vary with time, chlorine dose and temperature. In the present study, chlorination of once-through cooling water at Ras Laffan Industrial City (RLIC, Qatar, was studied by collecting unchlorinated seawater from the RLIC cooling water system intake, treating it with chlorine and measuring time series of chlorine and CBP concentrations. Multiple-rate exponential curves were used to represent fast and slow chlorine decay and CBP formation, and site-specific chlorine kinetic relationships were developed. Through extensive analysis of laboratory measurements, it was found that only some of the control parameters identified in the literature were important for predicting residual chlorine and CBP concentrations for this specific location. The new kinetic relationships were able to significantly improve the predictability and validity of Generalized Environmental Modeling System for Surfacewaters (GEMSS-chlorine kinetics module (CKM, a three-dimensional hydrodynamic and chlorine kinetics and transport model when applied for RLIC outfall studies using actual field measurements.

  10. Physical kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lifschitz, E.M.; Pitajewski, L.P.

    1983-01-01

    The textbook covers the subject under the following headings: kinetic gas theory, diffusion approximation, collisionless plasma, collisions within the plasma, plasma in the magnetic field, theory of instabilities, dielectrics, quantum fluids, metals, diagram technique for nonequilibrium systems, superconductors, and kinetics of phase transformations

  11. 15N Kinetic Analysis of N2O Production by Nitrosomonas europaea: an Examination of Nitrifier Denitrification

    OpenAIRE

    Poth, Mark; Focht, Dennis D.

    1985-01-01

    A series of 15N isotope tracer experiments showed that Nitrosomonas europaea produces nitrous oxide only under oxygen-limiting conditions and that the labeled N from nitrite, but not nitrate, is incorporated into nitrous oxide, indicating the presence of the “denitrifying enzyme” nitrite reductase. A kinetic analysis of the m/z 44, 45, and 46 nitrous oxide produced by washed cell suspensions of N. europaea when incubated with 4 mM ammonium (99% 14N) and 0.4 mM nitrite (99% 15N) was performed....

  12. Heparin kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swart, C.A.M. de.

    1983-01-01

    The author has studied the kinetics of heparin and heparin fractions after intravenous administration in humans and in this thesis the results of this study are reported. Basic knowledge about the physico-chemical properties of heparin and its interactions with proteins resulting in anticoagulant and lipolytic effects are discussed in a review (chapter II), which also comprises some clinical aspects of heparin therapy. In chapter III the kinetics of the anticoagulant effect are described after intravenous administration of five commercial heparin preparations. A mathematical model is presented that fits best to these kinetics. The kinetics of the anticoagulant and lipolytic effects after intravenous injection of various 35 S-radiolabelled heparin fractions and their relationship with the disappearance of the radiolabel are described in chapter IV. Chapter V gives a description of the kinetics of two radiolabels after injection of in vitro formed complexes consisting of purified, 125 I-radiolabelled antithrombin III and various 35 S-radiolabelled heparin fractions. (Auth.)

  13. FT-IR kinetic and product study of the Br-radical initiated oxidation of α, β-unsaturated organic carbonyl compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, C. G.; Barnes, I.; Becker, K. H.

    Using the relative kinetic technique the kinetics of the gas-phase reactions of Br radicals with acrolein, methacrolein and methylvinyl ketone have been investigated at (301±3) K in 1013 mbar of (N 2+O 2) bath gas at varying proportions. In 1013 mbar of synthetic air the following rate coefficients have been obtained (in units of cm 3 molecule -1 s -1): acrolein (3.21±0.11)×10 -12; methacrolein (2.33±0.08)×10 -11; methyl vinyl ketone (1.87±0.06)×10 -11. This study represents the first determination of the rate coefficients for these compounds. As for other unsaturated hydrocarbons the rate coefficient with Br was found to increase with increasing partial pressure of O 2. From the product studies of the reactions it has been established that addition of Br radicals to the terminal C-atom is the major pathway in all three cases. However, for acrolein H atom abstraction from the -CO-H group is also significant. Mechanisms are proposed to explain the observed products, mainly β-brominated carbonyl compounds.

  14. Catalytic valorization of starch-rich food waste into hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF): Controlling relative kinetics for high productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Iris K M; Tsang, Daniel C W; Yip, Alex C K; Chen, Season S; Wang, Lei; Ok, Yong Sik; Poon, Chi Sun

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to maximize the valorization of bread waste, a typical food waste stream, into hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) by improving our kinetic understanding. The highest HMF yield (30mol%) was achieved using SnCl 4 as catalyst, which offered strong derived Brønsted acidity and moderate Lewis acidity. We evaluated the kinetic balance between these acidities to facilitate faster desirable reactions (i.e., hydrolysis, isomerization, and dehydration) relative to undesirable reactions (i.e., rehydration and polymerization). Such catalyst selectivity of SnCl 4 , AlCl 3 , and FeCl 3 was critical in maximizing HMF yield. Higher temperature made marginal advancement by accelerating the undesirable reactions to a similar extent as the desirable pathways. The polymerization-induced metal-impregnated high-porosity carbon was a possible precursor of biochar-based catalyst, further driving up the economic potential. Preliminary economic analysis indicated a net gain of USD 43-236 per kilogram bread waste considering the thermochemical-conversion cost and chemical-trading revenue. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Analysis of neem oils by LC-MS and degradation kinetics of azadirachtin-A in a controlled environment. Characterization of degradation products by HPLC-MS-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrek, Sami; Paisse, Olivier; Grenier-Loustalot, Marie-Florence

    2004-02-01

    Since it was first isolated, the oil extracted from seeds of neem (Azadirachtin indica A juss) has been extensively studied in terms of its efficacy as an insecticide. Several industrial formulations are produced as emulsifiable solutions containing a stated titer of the active ingredient azadirachtin-A (AZ-A). The work reported here is the characterization of a formulation of this insecticide marketed under the name of Neem-azal T/S and kinetic studies of the major active ingredient of this formulation. We initially performed liquid-liquid extraction to isolate the neem oil from other ingredients in the commercial mixture. This was followed by a purification using flash chromatography and semi-preparative chromatography, leading to (13)C NMR identification of structures such as azadirachtin-A, azadirachtin-B, and azadirachtin-H. The neem extract was also characterized by HPLC-MS using two ionization sources, APCI (atmospheric pressure chemical ionization) and ESI (electrospray ionization) in positive and negative ion modes of detection. This led to the identification of other compounds present in the extract-azadirachtin-D, azadirachtin-I, deacetylnimbin, deacetylsalannin, nimbin, and salannin. The comparative study of data gathered by use of the two ionization sources is discussed and shows that the ESI source enables the largest number of structures to be identified. In a second part, kinetic changes in the main product (AZ-A) were studied under precise conditions of pH (2, 4, 6, and 8), temperature (40 to 70 degrees C), and light (UV, dark room and in daylight). This enabled us to determine the degradation kinetics of the product (AZ-A) over time. The activation energy of the molecule (75+/-9 kJ mol(-1)) was determined by examining thermal stability in the range 40 to 70 degrees C. The degradation products of this compound were identified by use of HPLC-MS and HPLC-MS-MS. The results enabled proposal of a chemical degradation reaction route for AZ-A under

  16. Evaluation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's egg pasteurization processes on the inactivation of high pathogenicity avian influenza virus and velogenic Newcastle disease virus in processed egg products

    Science.gov (United States)

    High pathogenicity avian influenza virus (HPAIV) A/chicken/Pennsylvania/1370/1983 (H5N2), and velogenic Newcastle disease virus (vNDV) AMPV-1/California/212676/2002 were inoculated into various egg products then heat treated at various temperatures for 0 to 30 min to determine thermal inactivation p...

  17. Comparison between 2 methods of solid-liquid extraction for the production of Cinchona calisaya elixir: an experimental kinetics and numerical modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naviglio, Daniele; Formato, Andrea; Gallo, Monica

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the extraction process for the production of China elixir starting from the same vegetable mixture, as performed by conventional maceration or a cyclically pressurized extraction process (rapid solid-liquid dynamic extraction) using the Naviglio Extractor. Dry residue was used as a marker for the kinetics of the extraction process because it was proportional to the amount of active principles extracted and, therefore, to their total concentration in the solution. UV spectra of the hydroalcoholic extracts allowed for the identification of the predominant chemical species in the extracts, while the organoleptic tests carried out on the final product provided an indication of the acceptance of the beverage and highlighted features that were not detectable by instrumental analytical techniques. In addition, a numerical simulation of the process has been performed, obtaining useful information about the timing of the process (time history) as well as its mathematical description. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®

  18. Biopolymer Production Kinetics of Mixed Culture Using Wastewater Sludge as a Raw Material and the Effect of Different Cations on Biopolymer Applications in Water and Wastewater Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    More, T T; Yan, S; Tyagi, R D; Surampalli, R Y

    2016-05-01

    Thirteen extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) producing bacterial strains were cultivated (as mixed culture) in the sterilized sludge (suspended solids of 25 g/L) and the batch fermentation was carried out. Mixed culture revealed a high specific growth rate of 0.35/hr. The EPS production rate was higher up to 24 hours, which gradually decreased with further incubation. The kinetic estimates demonstrated growth-associated EPS production. Broth EPS revealed higher flocculation activity when combined with different cations (Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Fe(3+), and Al(3+)) in river water (≥90%), municipal wastewater (≥90%), and brewery wastewater (≥80%), respectively. A low dose (5 to 40 mg/L) of trivalent cations was required to achieve higher flocculation compared to the divalent cations (50 to 250 mg/L). Flocculation performance of EPS was comparable to Magnafloc-155 (chemical polymer) and, hence, it could be used as a flocculant.

  19. Modelling Chemical Kinetics of Soybean Oil Transesterification Process for Biodiesel Production: An Analysis of Molar Ratio between Alcohol and Soybean Oil Temperature Changes on the Process Conversion Rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maicon Tait

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model describing chemical kinetics of transesterification of soybean oil for biodiesel production has been developed. The model is based on the reverse mechanism of transesterification reactions and describes dynamics concentration changes of triglycerides, diglycerides, monoglycerides, biodiesel, and glycerol production. Reaction rate constants were written in the Arrhenius form. An analysis of key process variables such as temperature and molar ratio soybean oil- alcohol using response surface analysis was performed to achieve the maximum soybean conversion rate to biodiesel. The predictive power of the developed model was checked for the very wide range of operational conditions and parameters values by fitting different experimental results for homogeneous catalytic and non-catalytic processes published in the literature. A very good correlation between model simulations and experimental data was observed.

  20. Kinetic Study on the CsXH3−X PW12O40/Fe-SiO2 Nanocatalyst for Biodiesel Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Feyzi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The kinetic of the transesterification reaction over the CsXH3−XPW12O40/Fe-SiO2 catalyst prepared using sol-gel and impregnation procedures was investigated in different operational conditions. Experimental conditions were varied as follows: reaction temperature 323–333 K, methanol/oil molar ratio = 12/1, and the reaction time 0–240 min. The H3PW12O40 heteropolyacid has recently attracted significant attention due to its potential for application in the production of biodiesel, in either homogeneous or heterogeneous catalytic conditions. Although fatty acids esterification reaction has been known for some time, data is still scarce regarding kinetic and thermodynamic parameters, especially when catalyzed by nonconventional compounds such as H3PW12O40. Herein, a kinetic study utilizing Gc-Mas in situ allows for evaluating the effects of operation conditions on reaction rate and determining the activation energy along with thermodynamic constants including ΔG, ΔS, and ΔH. It indicated that the CsXH3−XPW12O40/Fe-SiO2 magnetic nanocatalyst can be easily recycled with a little loss by magnetic field and can maintain higher catalytic activity and higher recovery even after being used 5 times. Characterization of catalyst was carried out by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, N2 adsorption-desorption measurements methods, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC.

  1. Prediction of forage intake using in vitro gas production methods: Comparison of multiphase fermentation kinetics measured in an automated gas test, and combined gas volume and substrate degradability measurements in a manual syringe system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blümmel, M.; Cone, J.W.; Gelder, van A.H.; Nshalai, I.; Umunna, N.N.; Makkar, H.P.S.; Becker, K.

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated two approaches to in vitro analysis of gas production data, being a three phase model with long (¿72 h) incubation times, to obtain kinetics and asymptotic values of gas production, and combination of gas volume measurements with residue determinations after a relatively

  2. Kinetic Interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    A kinetic interface for orientation detection in a video training system is disclosed. The interface includes a balance platform instrumented with inertial motion sensors. The interface engages a participant's sense of balance in training exercises.......A kinetic interface for orientation detection in a video training system is disclosed. The interface includes a balance platform instrumented with inertial motion sensors. The interface engages a participant's sense of balance in training exercises....

  3. The Kinetics of Fission Products Release from Microfuel Taking into Account the Trapped Fraction and Limited Solubility Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, A.S.; Rusinkevich, A.A.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper the effect of the oxygen getter on fission products release from the coated particle was studied by the “FP Kinetics” code. Trapped fraction and limited solubility effects taken into consideration. It was shown that these effects have a significant impact on the concentration profile and integral release of fission products. (author)

  4. Cinética de produção de levedura seca em leito de jorro Production kinetics of dry yeast in spouted bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana P. T. Rocha

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Estudou-se neste trabalho, a cinética de produção durante a secagem em um secador de leito de jorro convencional com inertes, trabalhando-se com alimentação intermitente de levedura, com umidade inicial de 70% em base úmida. Fez-se um planejamento fatorial 22 mais configuração estrela com 3 experimentos no ponto central, totalizando 11 experimentos, objetivando-se o estudo da influência da concentração de levedura e velocidade do ar na entrada sobre a cinética de produção de levedura seca. A cinética se mostrou crescente e praticamente linear em todos os experimentos. Esta análise permitiu a identificação das condições ideais de operação do secador com relação à velocidade de operação e de quantidade de levedura a ser alimentada para obtenção de um produto de qualidade para utilização como complemento protéico na alimentação de animais.In this study the production kinetics are studied during drying in a conventional spouted bed drier, with inert particles, working at intermittent feeding of yeast, with initial moisture content of 70% (wet basis. In order to study the influence of the yeast concentration and the input air speed on the production kinetics of dry yeast, a series of 11 experiments according to a factorial design 22 plus a star configuration, with 3 experiments in the central point, was done. It was found that the increasing kinetics was practically linear in all the experiments. From this analysis, optimal operational conditions were found for the drier input air velocity and amount of yeast to be loaded. The attainment of a quality product to be used as a protein complement for animal feeding was also considered.

  5. Murmanite and lomonosovite as Ag-selective ionites: kinetics and products of ion exchange in aqueous AgNO3 solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lykova, Inna S.; Chukanov, Nikita V.; Kazakov, Anatoliy I.; Tarasov, Viktor P.; Pekov, Igor V.; Yapaskurt, Vasiliy O.; Chervonnaya, Nadezhda A.

    2013-09-01

    Products and kinetics of ion exchange of heterophyllosilicate minerals lomonosovite and murmanite with aqueous AgNO3 solutions under low-temperature conditions have been studied using scanning electron microscopy, electron microprobe analysis, single-crystal X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, 23Na nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and dynamic calorimetry. Both minerals show strong affinity for silver in cation exchange. Simplified formulae of Ag-exchanged forms of murmanite and lomonosovite are (Ag3.0Ca0.5Na0.5) (Ti,Nb,Mn,Fe)3.7-4 (Si2O7)2O4·4(H2O,OH) and (Ag8.2Na1.2Ca0.3) (Ti,Nb,Mn,Fe)3.9-4 (Si2O7)2 (PO4)1.9O4· xH2O, respectively. The reaction of ion exchange for murmanite follows the first-order kinetic model up to ca. 70-80 % conversion. The rate of the process is described by the equation k(h-1) = 107.64±0.60 exp[-(12.2 ± 0.9)·103/RT]. The average heat release value in the temperature range 39.4-72 °C is 230 J g-1. The cation exchange is limited by processes in solid state, most probably binding of silver.

  6. Kinetic study and application of analytical techniques in the obtention of TeO2 for the production of 131 I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plata D, G.

    2006-01-01

    The objectives of this investigation work were: A) To synthesize TeO 2 starting from the reaction among the Te and HNO 3 with a superior yield to 90% b) To determine the good temperature of obtaining of the TeO 2 at laboratory level, c) To determine those constant of reaction kinetics, for each one of the tests carried out to different temperatures, and the activation energy of the reaction, d) To characterize the produced TeO 2 , e) To check the viability of using the obtained TeO 2 as raw matter in the production of 131 I in order to contribute to the technological development of our country inside the radioisotope production area. The production process of TeO 2 consists primarily of seven phases: 1) Preparing and assembly of the production equipment of TeO 2 , 2) Oxidation reaction of tellurium, 3) Drying and elimination of sludges of TeO 2 , 4) Sintering of TeO 2 , 5) Characterization of the TeO 2 by means of analytical techniques, 6) Irradiation of the TeO 2 , 7) Quality control. The present document has five chapters, which allow the reader to follow the development of this work to achieve the objectives and to contrast with the hypothesis of the work. (Author)

  7. Clean production of corn stover pulp using KOH+NH4OH solution and its kinetic during delignification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Yong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The self-made KOH together with NH4OH pulping of corn stover was investigated. The combined alkaline system could effectively remove lignin during pulping. There are three stages of lignin removal during delginification. Approximately 90% of lignin could be removed after temperature reached 150ºC for over 30 minutes. The p-hydroxyl phenol groups in lignin could be completely removed during the delignification reaction. The tendency of the increase of the crystalline degree of cellulose is observed with increase of reaction temperature. The kinetics of delignification is found to be the first order with respect to the remained lignin and the 0.4 order with respect to the remained hydroxide concentration. The activation energy of delignification is 23 kJ/mol. The solution obtained from precipitation of lignin is rich in nitrogen, phosphorous, potassium elements and organic matters. Various techniques including FT-IR, GPC, DSC, were applied to characterize the acid precipitated lignin. The result shows that the lignin with the polydispersity of 1.4 still maintains the p-coumaryl, coniferyl, and sinapyl units in its matrix.

  8. Observation by flow 1H NMR and dimerization kinetics and products of reactive ortho-quinodimethanes and benzocyclobutadiene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, D.

    1990-01-01

    The reactive o-quinodimethanes, 1,2-dimethylene-1,2-dihydronaphthalene (9) and o-xylylene (1) were observed by flow 1 H NMR spectroscopy at room temperature. The 1 H NMR spectrum of 9 was obtained in the absence of precursor and dimers. However, the 1 H NMR spectrum of the more reactive 1, generated in a similar manner from [o-((trimethylsilyl)methyl)benzyl]trimethylammonium iodide (5.) could be obtained only in the presence of its stable [4 + 2] and [4 + 4] dimers. The dimerization kinetics of 3-methyl- (5'), 3,6-dimethyl- (11), 3-isopropyl- (12), and 3,6-diisoproply-1,2-xylylene (13) in acetonitrile (CH 3 CN) were studied by stopped-flow UV-visible spectroscopy. Fluoride ion induced 1,2-elimination from 2-elimination from 2-trimethylsilylbenzocyclobutenyl-1 mesylate (26) was used to generate the reactive molecule benzocyclobutadiene (1') in CD 3 CN, which was observed by flow 1 H NMR spectroscopy at room temperature. The 1 H NMR spectrum (in CD 3 CN) of 1,2-dimethylene-1,2-dihydrothiophene (1 double-prime), obtained by fluoride ion induced 1,4-elimination from 3-(trimethylammoniummethyl)-2-(trimethylsilylmethyl)thiophene iodine was observed by flow 1 H NMR spectroscopy at room temperature. The dimerization rate of 1 double-prime in CH 3 CN, generated in the same manner, was measured by UV-visible spectroscopy. 166 refs., 7 figs., 7 tabs

  9. Effect of calcinations temperature of CuO nanoparticle on the kinetics of decontamination and decontamination products of sulphur mustard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahato, T H; Singh, Beer; Srivastava, A K; Prasad, G K; Srivastava, A R; Ganesan, K; Vijayaraghavan, R

    2011-09-15

    Present study investigates the potential of CuO nanoparticles calcined at different temperature for the decontamination of persistent chemical warfare agent sulphur mustard (HD) at room temperature (30 ± 2 °C). Nanoparticles were synthesized by precipitation method and characterized by using SEM, EDAX, XRD, and Raman Spectroscopy. Synthesized nanoparticles were tested as destructive adsorbents for the degradation of HD. Reactions were monitored by GC-FID technique and the reaction products characterized by GC-MS. It was observed that the rate of degradation of HD decreases with the increase in calcination temperature and there is a change in the percentage of product of HD degradation. GC-MS data indicated that the elimination product increases with increase in calcination temperature whereas the hydrolysis product decreases. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The Effect of Fungicide Residues and Yeast Assimilable Nitrogen on Fermentation Kinetics and H2S Production during Cider Fermentation

    OpenAIRE

    Boudreau IV, Thomas Francis

    2016-01-01

    The Virginia cider industry has grown rapidly in the past decade, and demands research-based recommendations for cider fermentation. This study evaluated relationships between the unique chemistry of apples and production of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in cider fermentations. Yeast assimilable nitrogen (YAN) concentration and composition and residual fungicides influence H2S production by yeast during fermentation, but these factors have to date only been studied in wine grape fermentations. This ...

  11. Maximization of Intracellular Lipase Production in a Lipase-Overproducing Mutant Derivative of Rhizopus oligosporus DGM 31: A Kinetic Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tehreema Iftikhar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Regulation and maximization of lipase production in a mutant derivative of R. oligosporus has been investigated using different substrates, inoculum sizes, pH of the medium, temperature, and nitrogen sources in shake flask experiments and batch fermentation in a fermentor. The production of intracellular lipase was improved 3 times following medium optimization involving one-at-a-time approach and aeration in the fermentor. Interestingly, intracellular lipase was poorly induced by oils, instead its production was induced by sugars, mainly starch, lactose, sucrose, xylose, glucose and glycerol. Dependent variables studied were cell mass, lipase activity, lipase yield, lipase specific and volumetric rate of formation. It was confirmed that lipase production in the derepressed mutant is sufficiently uncoupled from catabolite repression. The results of average specific productivities at various temperatures worked out according to the Arrhenius equation revealed that mutation decreased the magnitude of enthalpy and entropy demand in the inactivation equilibrium during product formation, suggesting that mutation made the metabolic network of the organism thermally more stable. The highest magnitudes of volumetric productivity (QP=490 IU/(L·h and other product attributes of lipase formation occurring on optimized medium in the fermentor are greater than the values reported by other workers. The purified enzyme is monomeric in nature and exhibits stability up to 80 °C and pH=6.0–8.0. Activation energy, enthalpy and entropy of catalysis at 50 °C, and magnitudes of Gibbs free energy for substrate binding, transition state stabilization and melting point indicated that this lipase is highly thermostable.

  12. Product Distribution from Precursor Bite Angle Variation in Multitopic Alkyne Metathesis: Evidence for a Putative Kinetic Bottleneck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moneypenny, Timothy P; Yang, Anna; Walter, Nathan P; Woods, Toby J; Gray, Danielle L; Zhang, Yang; Moore, Jeffrey S

    2018-05-02

    In the dynamic synthesis of covalent organic frameworks and molecular cages, the typical synthetic approach involves heuristic methods of discovery. While this approach has yielded many remarkable products, the ability to predict the structural outcome of subjecting a multitopic precursor to dynamic covalent chemistry (DCC) remains a challenge in the field. The synthesis of covalent organic cages is a prime example of this phenomenon, where precursors designed with the intention of affording a specific product may deviate dramatically when the DCC synthesis is attempted. As such, rational design principles are needed to accelerate discovery in cage synthesis using DCC. Herein, we test the hypothesis that precursor bite angle contributes significantly to the energy landscape and product distribution in multitopic alkyne metathesis (AM). By subjecting a series of precursors with varying bite angles to AM, we experimentally demonstrate that the product distribution, and convergence toward product formation, is strongly dependent on this geometric attribute. Surprisingly, we discovered that precursors with the ideal bite angle (60°) do not afford the most efficient pathway to the product. The systematic study reported here illustrates how seemingly minor adjustments in precursor geometry greatly affect the outcome of DCC systems. This research illustrates the importance of fine-tuning precursor geometric parameters in order to successfully realize desirable targets.

  13. Kinetics and Regulation Studies of the Production of β-Galactosidase from Kluyveromyces marxianus Grown on Different Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samia Khan

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Lactose-intolerance is manifested in 50 % of the world’s population. This can be remediated by removing lactose from the diet or converting it into glucose and galactose with β-galactosidase (EC 3.2.1.23. In this work, batch production of this enzyme in the presence of lactose, galactose, cellobiose, xylose, arabinose, sucrose and glucose was investigated using Kluyveromyces marxianus in shake flask culture studies. Substrate type and temperature were the independent variables that directly regulated the specific growth and β-galactosidase production rates. Lactose (2 % supported the maximum specific product yield (YP/X, followed by galactose, sucrose, cellobiose, xylose, arabinose and glucose. Its synthesis was regulated by an induction and a growth-dependent repression mechanism. The optimum temperature for the production was found to be 35–37 °C. The highest volumetric productivity of enzyme (80.0 IU/L/h occurred on lactose-corn steep liquor medium. This was significantly higher than the calculated values reported in the literature. Thermodynamic studies revealed that the cells provided a defence mechanism against thermal inactivation. The enzyme was stable at 60 °C and pH=5.0–7.0, and it may find application in commercial lactose hydrolysis.

  14. Ethanol production kinetics by a thermo-tolerant mutant of saccharomyces cerevisiae from starch industry waste (hydrol)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, F.A.; Aziz, S.

    2010-01-01

    A thermo-tolerant and deoxyglucose-resistant mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was developed and employed to convert them to fuel ethanol in a 150 litre fermenter. Maximum ethanol production was achieved when fermentation of dextrozyme- treated hydrol was carried out for about 36 hours under optimized fermenting conditions. The maximum specific ethanol production rate (qP), and overall ethanol yield (YP/S) were found to be 2.82 g L/sup -1/ h/sup -1/ and 0.49 g/g respectively. Determination of activation energy for cell growth (Ea= 20.8 kJ/mol) and death (Ed = 19.1 kJ/mol) and product formation and inactivation (EP=35.8 kJ/mol and Edp = 33.5 kJ/mol) revealed the thermo-stability of the organism for up to 47 deg. C. (author)

  15. Ethanol Production Kinetics by a Thermo-Tolerant Mutant of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae from Starch Industry Waste (Hydrol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farman Ali Shah

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A thermo-tolerant and deoxyglucose-resistant mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was developed and employed to convert them to fuel ethanol in a 150 litre fermenter. Maximum ethanol production was achieved when fermentation of dextrozyme- treated hydrol was carried out for about 36 hours under optimized fermenting conditions. The maximum specific ethanol production rate (qP, and overall ethanol yield (YP/S were found to be 2.82 g L-1 h-1 and 0.49 g/g respectively. Determination of activation energy for cell growth (Ea= 20.8 kJ/mol and death (Ed = 19.1 kJ/mol and product formation and inactivation (EP=35.8 kJ/mol and Edp = 33.5 kJ/mol revealed the thermo-stability of the organism for up to 47°C.

  16. Production of Medium-Chain-Length Poly(3-Hydroxyalkanoates from Saponified Palm Kernel Oil by Pseudomonas putida: Kinetics of Batch and Fed-Batch Fermentations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annuar, M. S. M.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics of medium-chain-length poly(3-hydroxyalkanoates, PHAMCL production by Pseudomonas putida PGA1 in batch and fed-batch fermentations were studied. With saponified palm kernel oil (SPKO supplying the free fatty acids mixture as the sole carbon and energy source, PHAMCL accumulation is encouraged under ammonium-limited condition, which is a nitrogen stress environment. The amount of PHAMCL accumulated and its specific production rate, qPHA were influenced by the residual ammonium concentration level in the culture medium. It was observed that in both fermentation modes, when the residual ammonium was exhausted (< 0.05 gL-1, the PHAMCL accumulation (11.9% and qPHA (0.0062 h-1 were significantly reduced. However, this effect can be reversed by feeding low amount of ammonium to the culture, resulting in significantly improved PHAMCL yield (71.4% and specific productivity (0.6 h-1. It is concluded that the feeding of low ammonium concentration to the culture medium during the PHAMCL accumulation has a positive effect on sustaining the PHAMCL biosynthetic capability of the organism. It was also found that increasing SPKO concentration in the medium significantly reduced (up to 50% the volumetric oxygen transfer coefficient (KLa of the fermentation system.

  17. The Chemical Decomposition of 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (Decitabine): Kinetic Analyses and Identification of Products by NMR, HPLC, and Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogstad, Daniel K.; Herring, Jason L.; Theruvathu, Jacob A.; Burdzy, Artur; Perry, Christopher C.; Neidigh, Jonathan W.; Sowers, Lawrence C.

    2014-01-01

    The nucleoside analog 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (Decitabine, DAC) is one of several drugs in clinical use that inhibit DNA methyltransferases, leading to a decrease of 5-methylcytosine in newly replicated DNA and subsequent transcriptional activation of genes silenced by cytosine methylation. In addition to methyltransferase inhibition, DAC has demonstrated toxicity and potential mutagenicity, and can induce a DNA-repair response. The mechanisms accounting for these events are not well understood. DAC is chemically unstable in aqueous solutions, but there is little consensus between previous reports as to its half-life and corresponding products of decomposition at physiological temperature and pH, potentially confounding studies on its mechanism of action and long-term use in humans. Here we have employed a battery of analytical methods to estimate kinetic rates and to characterize DAC decomposition products under conditions of physiological temperature and pH. Our results indicate that DAC decomposes into a plethora of products, formed by hydrolytic opening and deformylation of the triazine ring, in addition to anomerization and possibly other changes in the sugar ring structure. We also discuss the advantages and problems associated with each analytical method used. The results reported here will facilitate ongoing studies and clinical trials aimed at understanding the mechanisms of action, toxicity, and possible mutagenicity of DAC and related analogs. PMID:19480391

  18. Kinetics and

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Ahmadi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The aqueous degradation of Reactive Yellow 84 (RY84 by potassium peroxydisulfate (K2S2O8 has been studied in laboratory scale experiments. The effect of the initial concentrations of potassium peroxydisulfate and RY84, pH and temperature on RY84 degradation were also examined. Experimental data were analyzed using first and second-order kinetics. The degradation kinetics of RY84 of the potassium peroxydisulfate process followed the second-order reaction kinetics. These rate constants have an extreme values similar to of 9.493 mM−1min−1 at a peroxydisulfate dose of 4 mmol/L. Thermodynamic parameters such as activation (Ea and Gibbs free energy (ΔG° were also evaluated. The negative value of ΔGo and Ea shows the spontaneous reaction natural conditions and exothermic nature.

  19. Integral parametrization of the Kinetics of Crosslink production in plasmid DNA as a function of 8-methoxypsoralen concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vidania, R. de; Paramio, J. M.; Bauluz, C.

    1986-07-01

    In this paper we present results of crosslink production in pBR322 DNA along a wide range of 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) concentration. Experimental data were obtained as DNA renaturation percentages, from the shift in hyperchromicity after a temperature-dependent denaturation-renaturation process. the experimental results showed a three-stage profile when represented as a function of the natural logarithms of 8-MOP concentration. an integral parametrization which allows a simultaneous fit of the three observed stages is presented here. the theoretical values of crosslink production determined from the fit are useful to asses the genotoxicity of psoralen-induced crosslinks in plasmid DNA. (Author) 24 refs.

  20. Integral parametrization of the Kinetics of Crosslink production in plasmid DNA as a function of 8-methoxypsoralen concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidania, R. de; Paramio, J. M.; Bauluz, C.

    1986-01-01

    In this paper we present results of crosslink production in pBR322 DNA along a wide range of 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) concentration. Experimental data were obtained as DNA renaturation percentages, from the shift in hyperchromicity after a temperature-dependent denaturation-renaturation process. the experimental results showed a three-stage profile when represented as a function of the natural logarithms of 8-MOP concentration. an integral parametrization which allows a simultaneous fit of the three observed stages is presented here. the theoretical values of crosslink production determined from the fit are useful to asses the genotoxicity of psoralen-induced crosslinks in plasmid DNA. (Author) 24 refs

  1. Granulocyte kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, A.M.; Lavender, J.P.; Saverymuttu, S.H.

    1985-01-01

    By using density gradient materials enriched with autologous plasma, the authors have been able to isolate granulocutes from other cellular elements and label them with In-111 without separation from a plasma environment. The kinetic behavior of these cells suggests that phenomena attributed to granulocyte activation are greatly reduced by this labeling. Here, they review their study of granulocyte kinetics in health and disease in hope of quantifying sites of margination and identifying principal sites of destruction. The three principle headings of the paper are distribution, life-span, and destruction

  2. Fermentation Kinetic of Maize Straw-Gliricidia Feed Mixture Supplemented by Fermentable Carbohydrate Measured by In Vitro Gas Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yulistiani, D.; Nurhayati

    2018-02-01

    Utilization of crop by-products such as maize straw mixed with legume is expected to be able to overcome the limitation of forage availability during dry season and have similar nutritional value with grass. Addition of fermentable carbohydrate in this diet can be improved fermentability and reduced methane production. The objective of this study was to evaluate supplementation of ground corn grain or rice bran as fermentable carbohydrate in maize straw-gliricidiamixture. Treatment diets evaluated were: Maize straw + gliricidialeaf meal (Control/RO); Control + 10% ground maize grain (ROC); Control + 10% rice bran (RORB). Maize straw was chopped and ground then mixed with gliricidia leaf meal at ratio 60:40% DM. Maize straw-gliricidia mixture then supplemented either with ground corn grain or rice bran at 10% of DM basal diet (control). Sample was incubated for 48 hours, gas production was recorded at 4, 8,12, 16, 24, 36 and 48 hours. Study was conducted in randomized complete design. Results of the study showed that supplementation of fermentable carbohydrate from corn grain or rice bran was able to increased (Pfermentation and reduced methane production.

  3. Kinetics and products of the reaction of the first-generation isoprene hydroxy hydroperoxide (ISOPOOH) with OH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    St. Clair, Jason M.; Rivera-Rios, Jean C.; Crounse, John D.

    2016-01-01

    from both ISOPOOH isomers was IEPOX (cis-β and trans-β isomers), with a ∼ 2:1 preference for trans-β IEPOX and similar total yields from each ISOPOOH isomer (∼70-80%). An IEPOX global production rate of more than 100 Tg C each year is estimated from this chemistry using a global 3D chemical transport...

  4. Fermentation kinetics for xylitol production by a Pichia stipitis D-xylulokinase mutant previously grown in spent sulfite liquor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rita C.L.B. Rodrigues; Chenfeng Lu; Bernice Liu; Thomas W. Jeffries

    2008-01-01

    Spent sulfite pulping liquor (SSL) contains lignin, which is present as lignosulfonate, and hemicelluloses that are present as hydrolyzed carbohydrates. To reduce the biological oxygen demand of SSL associated with dissolved sugars, we studied the capacity of Pichia stipitis FPL-YS30 (xyl3[delta]) to convert these sugars into useful products. FPL-YS30 produces a...

  5. Oxidative desulfurization: kinetic modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhir, S; Uppaluri, R; Purkait, M K

    2009-01-30

    Increasing environmental legislations coupled with enhanced production of petroleum products demand, the deployment of novel technologies to remove organic sulfur efficiently. This work represents the kinetic modeling of ODS using H(2)O(2) over tungsten-containing layered double hydroxide (LDH) using the experimental data provided by Hulea et al. [V. Hulea, A.L. Maciuca, F. Fajula, E. Dumitriu, Catalytic oxidation of thiophenes and thioethers with hydrogen peroxide in the presence of W-containing layered double hydroxides, Appl. Catal. A: Gen. 313 (2) (2006) 200-207]. The kinetic modeling approach in this work initially targets the scope of the generation of a superstructure of micro-kinetic reaction schemes and models assuming Langmuir-Hinshelwood (LH) and Eley-Rideal (ER) mechanisms. Subsequently, the screening and selection of above models is initially based on profile-based elimination of incompetent schemes followed by non-linear regression search performed using the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm (LMA) for the chosen models. The above analysis inferred that Eley-Rideal mechanism describes the kinetic behavior of ODS process using tungsten-containing LDH, with adsorption of reactant and intermediate product only taking place on the catalyst surface. Finally, an economic index is presented that scopes the economic aspects of the novel catalytic technology with the parameters obtained during regression analysis to conclude that the cost factor for the catalyst is 0.0062-0.04759 US $ per barrel.

  6. Oxidative desulfurization: Kinetic modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhir, S.; Uppaluri, R.; Purkait, M.K.

    2009-01-01

    Increasing environmental legislations coupled with enhanced production of petroleum products demand, the deployment of novel technologies to remove organic sulfur efficiently. This work represents the kinetic modeling of ODS using H 2 O 2 over tungsten-containing layered double hydroxide (LDH) using the experimental data provided by Hulea et al. [V. Hulea, A.L. Maciuca, F. Fajula, E. Dumitriu, Catalytic oxidation of thiophenes and thioethers with hydrogen peroxide in the presence of W-containing layered double hydroxides, Appl. Catal. A: Gen. 313 (2) (2006) 200-207]. The kinetic modeling approach in this work initially targets the scope of the generation of a superstructure of micro-kinetic reaction schemes and models assuming Langmuir-Hinshelwood (LH) and Eley-Rideal (ER) mechanisms. Subsequently, the screening and selection of above models is initially based on profile-based elimination of incompetent schemes followed by non-linear regression search performed using the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm (LMA) for the chosen models. The above analysis inferred that Eley-Rideal mechanism describes the kinetic behavior of ODS process using tungsten-containing LDH, with adsorption of reactant and intermediate product only taking place on the catalyst surface. Finally, an economic index is presented that scopes the economic aspects of the novel catalytic technology with the parameters obtained during regression analysis to conclude that the cost factor for the catalyst is 0.0062-0.04759 US $ per barrel

  7. Genetic and Biological Changes of Newcastle Disease Virus Due to The Development of Chicken Production System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudarisman

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In many countries, Newcastle Disease (ND is one of the most important diseases of poultry. It causes serious economic losses in poultry industry. Newcastle Disease or pseudo-fowl pest is a highly infectious viral disease that causes very high mortality (up to 100% in severe epidemics in poultry and wild birds around the world. Newcastle Disease remains endemic in many regions and continues to severely limit poultry production in some developing countries. The disease is currently being controlled by routine vaccinations in many countries. However, it was reported that outbreaks of ND in vaccinated flocks often occur on the field may not only be due to differences in the antigenicity of the NDV wild field strains and vaccine strains, but could also be as a result of differences in pathogenicity and virulence between different strains used as vaccine seed in NDV vaccine production.

  8. Oxidation of danofloxacin by free chlorine-kinetic study, structural identification of by-products by LC-MS/MS and potential toxicity of by-products using in silico test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassine, Montaha; Rifai, Ahmad; Doumyati, Samah; Trivella, Aurélien; Mazellier, Patrick; Budzinski, Hélène; Al Iskandarani, Mohamad

    2017-03-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the kinetics and the mechanism of reaction of the fluoroquinolone antibacterial danofloxacin (DANO) by free available chlorine (FAC) during water chlorination process. Kinetic study was thus performed at pH 7.2, 20 °C in the presence of an excess of total chlorine. Under these experimental conditions, a second-order reaction rate constant (first-order relative to DANO concentration and first-order relative to FAC concentration) was evaluated to k~1446 M -1  s -1 . Five degradation products were identified at different reaction times. Their structures were investigated by using fragmentations obtained at different CID collision energies in MS/MS experiments. Moreover, the toxicity of the proposed structures was predicted by using T.E.S.T. The results indicated that all by-products may have a developmental toxicity. The oral rat LD 50 concentration was predicted to be lower than that of DANO. Furthermore, two degradation compounds presented a concentration level for fathead minnow LC 50 (96 h) lower than that of DANO and presented toxicity for the marine animals.

  9. Influence of Albizia lebbeck Saponin and Its Fractions on In Vitro Gas Production Kinetics, Rumen Methanogenesis, and Rumen Fermentation Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirohi, Sunil Kumar; Goel, Navneet; Singh, Nasib

    2014-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of crude seed powder (CSP) and gross saponins extract (GSE) of seeds of Albizia lebbeck on antimicrobial activity by taking two Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus), two Gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Salmonella Typhi) bacteria, and two fungi species (Aspergillus niger and Candida butyric) were taken at 25, 50, 100, 250, and 500 µg levels using agar well diffusion method. Zone of inhibition was increased with increasing of concentration of CSP and saponins which indicates that Gram-negative bacteria (E. coli), Gram-positive bacteria (B. cereus), and A. niger were significantly susceptible to inhibition. Another experiment was conducted to study the effect of GSE and saponins fraction A and B of A. lebbeck supplementation at 6% on DM basis on methane production and other rumen fermentation parameters using in vitro gas production test, by taking three different type diets, that is, high fiber diet (D1, 60R : 40C), medium fiber diet (D2, 50R : 50C), and low fiber diet (D3, 40R : 60C). Significant (P ≤ 0.05) increase was seen in IVDMD, methane production; however ammonia nitrogen concentration decreased as compared to control. The methane production was reduced in a range between 12 and 49% by saponin supplemented diets except in case of GSE in D2. Sap A showed the highest methane reduction per 200 mg of truly digested substrate (TDS) than other treatment groups. Results in relation with quantification of methanogens and protozoa by qPCR indicated the decreasing trend with saponins of A. lebbek in comparison with control except total methanogen quantified using mcr-A based primer.

  10. Kinetic modelling of methane production during bio-electrolysis from anaerobic co-digestion of sewage sludge and food waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajapati, Kalp Bhusan; Singh, Rajesh

    2018-05-10

    In present study batch tests were performed to investigate the enhancement in methane production under bio-electrolysis anaerobic co-digestion of sewage sludge and food waste. The bio-electrolysis reactor system (B-EL) yield more methane 148.5 ml/g COD in comparison to reactor system without bio-electrolysis (B-CONT) 125.1 ml/g COD. Whereas bio-electrolysis reactor system (C-EL) Iron Scraps amended yield lesser methane (51.2 ml/g COD) in comparison to control bio-electrolysis reactor system without Iron scraps (C-CONT - 114.4 ml/g COD). Richard and Exponential model were best fitted for cumulative methane production and biogas production rates respectively as revealed modelling study. The best model fit for the different reactors was compared by Akaike's Information Criterion (AIC) and Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC). The bioelectrolysis process seems to be an emerging technology with lesser the loss in cellulase specific activity with increasing temperature from 50 to 80 °C. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Variation in ruminal in situ degradation of crude protein and starch from maize grains compared to in vitro gas production kinetics and physical and chemical characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifried, Natascha; Steingaß, Herbert; Schipprack, Wolfgang; Rodehutscord, Markus

    2016-10-01

    The objectives of this study were (1) to evaluate in situ ruminal dry matter (DM), crude protein (CP) and starch degradation characteristics and in vitro gas production (GP) kinetics using a set of 20 different maize grain genotypes and (2) to predict the effective degradation (ED) of CP and starch from chemical and physical characteristics alone or in combination with in vitro GP measurements. Maize grains were characterised by different chemical and physical characteristics. Ruminal in situ degradation was measured in three lactating Jersey cows. Ground grains (sieve size: 2 mm) were incubated in bags for 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 24, 48 and 72 h. Bag residues were analysed for CP and starch content. Degradation kinetics was determined and the ED of DM, CP and starch calculated using a ruminal passage rate of 5%/h and 8%/h. The GP of the grains (sieve size: 1 mm) was recorded after 2, 4, 6, 8, 12, 24, 48 and 72 h incubation in buffered rumen fluid and fitted to an exponential equation to determine GP kinetics. Correlations and stepwise multiple linear regressions were evaluated for the prediction of ED calculated for a passage rate of 5%/h (ED5) for CP (EDCP5) and starch (EDST5). The in situ parameters and ED5 varied widely between genotypes with average values (±SD) of 64% ± 4.2, 62% ± 4.1 and 65% ± 5.2 for ED5 of DM, EDCP5 and EDST5 and were on average 10 percentage points lower for a passage rate of 8%/h. Degradation rates varied between 4.8%/h and 7.4%/h, 4.1%/h and 6.5%/h and 5.3%/h and 8.9%/h for DM, CP and starch, respectively. These rates were in the same range as GP rates (6.0-8.3%/h). The EDCP5 and EDST5 were related to CP concentration and could be evaluated in detail using CP fractions and specific amino acids. In vitro GP measurements and GP rates correlated well with EDCP5 and EDST5 and predicted EDCP5 and EDST5 in combination with the chemical characteristics of the samples. Equations can be used to obtain quick and cost effective information

  12. Bioaccessibility of polyphenols associated with dietary fiber and in vitro kinetics release of polyphenols in Mexican 'Ataulfo' mango (Mangifera indica L.) by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blancas-Benitez, Francisco J; Mercado-Mercado, Gilberto; Quirós-Sauceda, Ana E; Montalvo-González, Efigenia; González-Aguilar, Gustavo A; Sáyago-Ayerdi, Sonia G

    2015-03-01

    The biological properties of polyphenol (PP) depend on its bioaccessibility and bioavailability. Therefore, part of PP released from the food matrix in the gastrointestinal tract through enzymatic hydrolysis is at least partially absorbed. The aim of this study is to determine the bioaccessibility of PP associated with dietary fiber (DF) and the kinetics release of PP in mango (Mangifera indica L.) 'Ataulfo' by-products by an in vitro model. Soluble and insoluble DF values were 7.99 and 18.56% in the mango paste and 6.98 and 22.78% in the mango peel, respectively. PP associated with soluble and insoluble DF was 6.0 and 3.73 g GAE per 100 g in the paste and 4.72 and 4.50 g GAE per 100 g in the peel. The bioaccessibility of PP was 38.67% in the pulp paste and 40.53% in the peel. A kinetics study shows a release rate of 2.66 and 3.27 g PP min(-1) in the paste and peel, respectively. The antioxidant capacity of the paste increased as digestion reached a value of 2.87 mmol TE min(-1) at 180 min. The antioxidant capacity of the peel had its maximum (28.94 mmol TE min(-1)) between 90 and 120 min of digestion; it started with a value of 2.58 mmol TE min(-1), and thereafter increased to 4.20 mmol TE min(-1) at 180 min. The major PPs released during the digestion of paste were gallic and hydroxybenzoic acids, while in the peel, they were hydroxycinnamic and vanillic acids. It was concluded that these phenolic compounds are readily available for absorption in the small intestine and exert different potential health benefits.

  13. Urban wastewater treatment by seven species of microalgae and an algal bloom: Biomass production, N and P removal kinetics and harvestability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mennaa, Fatima Zahra; Arbib, Zouhayr; Perales, José Antonio

    2015-10-15

    This study evaluates the capacity of seven species and a Bloom of microalgae to grow in urban wastewater. Nutrient removal kinetics and biomass harvesting by means of centrifugation and coagulation-flocculation-sedimentation have been also tested. Results show that the best biomass productivities ranged from between 118 and 108 mgSS L(-1) d(-1) for the Bloom (Bl) and Scenedesmus obliquus (Sco). Regarding nutrient removal, microalgae were able to remove the total dissolved phosphorus and nitrogen concentrations by more than 80% and 87% respectively, depending on the species tested. The final total dissolved concentration of nitrogen and phosphorus in the culture media complies with the European Commission Directive 98/15/CE on urban wastewater treatment. Regarding harvesting, the results of coagulation-flocculation sedimentation using a 60 mg L(-1) dose of Ferric chloride were similar between species, exceeding the biomass removal efficiency by more than 90%. The results of centrifugation (time required to remove 90% of solids at 1000 rpm) were not similar between species, with the shortest time being 2.9 min for Sco, followed by the bloom (7.25 min). An overall analysis suggested that the natural bloom and Scenedesmus obliquus seem to be the best candidates to grow in pre-treated wastewater, according to their biomass production, nutrient removal capability and harvestability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Two-Step Production of Phenylpyruvic Acid from L-Phenylalanine by Growing and Resting Cells of Engineered Escherichia coli: Process Optimization and Kinetics Modeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Hou

    Full Text Available Phenylpyruvic acid (PPA is widely used in the pharmaceutical, food, and chemical industries. Here, a two-step bioconversion process, involving growing and resting cells, was established to produce PPA from l-phenylalanine using the engineered Escherichia coli constructed previously. First, the biotransformation conditions for growing cells were optimized (l-phenylalanine concentration 20.0 g·L-1, temperature 35°C and a two-stage temperature control strategy (keep 20°C for 12 h and increase the temperature to 35°C until the end of biotransformation was performed. The biotransformation conditions for resting cells were then optimized in 3-L bioreactor and the optimized conditions were as follows: agitation speed 500 rpm, aeration rate 1.5 vvm, and l-phenylalanine concentration 30 g·L-1. The total maximal production (mass conversion rate reached 29.8 ± 2.1 g·L-1 (99.3% and 75.1 ± 2.5 g·L-1 (93.9% in the flask and 3-L bioreactor, respectively. Finally, a kinetic model was established, and it was revealed that the substrate and product inhibition were the main limiting factors for resting cell biotransformation.

  15. Two-Step Production of Phenylpyruvic Acid from L-Phenylalanine by Growing and Resting Cells of Engineered Escherichia coli: Process Optimization and Kinetics Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Ying; Hossain, Gazi Sakir; Li, Jianghua; Shin, Hyun-Dong; Liu, Long; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Phenylpyruvic acid (PPA) is widely used in the pharmaceutical, food, and chemical industries. Here, a two-step bioconversion process, involving growing and resting cells, was established to produce PPA from l-phenylalanine using the engineered Escherichia coli constructed previously. First, the biotransformation conditions for growing cells were optimized (l-phenylalanine concentration 20.0 g·L-1, temperature 35°C) and a two-stage temperature control strategy (keep 20°C for 12 h and increase the temperature to 35°C until the end of biotransformation) was performed. The biotransformation conditions for resting cells were then optimized in 3-L bioreactor and the optimized conditions were as follows: agitation speed 500 rpm, aeration rate 1.5 vvm, and l-phenylalanine concentration 30 g·L-1. The total maximal production (mass conversion rate) reached 29.8 ± 2.1 g·L-1 (99.3%) and 75.1 ± 2.5 g·L-1 (93.9%) in the flask and 3-L bioreactor, respectively. Finally, a kinetic model was established, and it was revealed that the substrate and product inhibition were the main limiting factors for resting cell biotransformation.

  16. A study of the kinetics and the effect of trace elements on mixed anaerobic fermentative biogas production by ternary quadratic general rotary unitised design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Chenxiao; Lian, Jing; Jiang, Zongshan; Guo, Jianbo; Guo, Yankai; Gou, Chenye

    2016-01-01

    In this study the effect of trace elements on methanogenesis was investigated during mixed anaerobic fermentation using a single-factor experiment in the present study. The most effective concentrations of Fe"0, Fe"2"+, Co"2"+ and Ni"2"+ that were added were 1500, 250, 0.3 and 0.6 mg/L, respectively. The optimal trace element combination was 0.58 mg/L Ni"2"+, 1200 mg/L Fe"0 and 0.34 mg/L Co"2"+ by the ternary quadratic general rotary unitised design method. The degree of influence exerted by trace elements on the cumulative methane yields decreased in the order of Ni"2"+, Fe"0 and Co"2"+, and the maximum CH_4 yield was 241.6 mL/g volatile solids (VS), according to a regression equation. The non-dissolved organic carbon hydrolytic process showed a good fit with the first-order kinetic model. The maximum value of CH_4 was 312.87 mL/g VS. Compared to the control, the bioconversion efficiencies of CH_4 and CO_2 production increased by 36.76% and 74.50%, respectively, at the optimal trace element combination. The obtained results provide new knowledge for improvements in the efficiency of anaerobic fermentation biogas production

  17. Ultrasound assisted production of fatty acid methyl esters from transesterification of triglycerides with methanol in the presence of KOH catalyst: optimization, mechanism and kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanh, Le Tu; Okitsu, Kenji; Maeda, Yasuaki; Bandow, Hiroshi

    2014-03-01

    Ultrasound assisted transesterification of triglycerides (TG) with methanol in the presence of KOH catalyst was investigated, where the changes in the reactants and products (diglycerides (DG), monoglycerides (MG), fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) and glycerin (GL)) concentrations were discussed to understand the reaction mechanism and kinetics under ultrasound irradiation. The optimum reaction condition for the FAME production was the concentration of KOH 1.0 wt.%, molar ratio of TG to methanol of 1:6, and irradiation time of 25 min. The rate constants during the TG transesterification with methanol into GL and FAME were estimated by a curve fitting method with simulated curves to the obtained experimental results. The rate constants of [Formula: see text] were estimated to be 0.21, 0.008, 0.23, 0.005, 0.14 and 0.001 L mol(-1)min(-1), respectively. The rate determining step for the TG transesterification with methanol into GL and FAME was the reaction of MG with methanol into GL and FAME. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. A stability indicating HPLC method for determination of mebeverine in the presence of its degradation products and kinetic study of its degradation in oxidative condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souri, E; Aghdami, A Negahban; Adib, N

    2014-01-01

    An HPLC method for determination of mebeverine hydrochloride (MH) in the presence of its degradation products was developed. The degradation of MH was studied under hydrolysis, oxidative and photolysis stress conditions. Under alkaline, acidic and oxidative conditions, degradation of MH was observed. The separation was performed using a Symmetry C18 column and a mixture of 50 mM KH2PO4, acetonitrile and tetrahydrfuran (THF) (63:35:2; v/v/v) as the mobile phase. No interference peaks from degradation products in acidic, alkaline and oxidative conditions were observed. The linearity, accuracy and precision of the method were studied. The method was linear over the range of 1-100 μg/ml MH (r(2)>0.999) and the CV values for intra-day and inter-day variations were in the range of 1.0-1.8%. The limit of quantification (LOQ) and the limit of detection (LOD) of the method were 1.0 and 0.2 μg/ml, respectively. Determination of MH in pharmaceutical dosage forms was performed using the developed method. Furthermore the kinetics of the degradation of MH in the presence of hydrogen peroxide was investigated. The proposed method could be a suitable method for routine quality control studies of mebeverine dosage forms.

  19. Two-Step Production of Phenylpyruvic Acid from L-Phenylalanine by Growing and Resting Cells of Engineered Escherichia coli: Process Optimization and Kinetics Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Ying; Hossain, Gazi Sakir; Li, Jianghua; Shin, Hyun-dong; Liu, Long; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Phenylpyruvic acid (PPA) is widely used in the pharmaceutical, food, and chemical industries. Here, a two-step bioconversion process, involving growing and resting cells, was established to produce PPA from l-phenylalanine using the engineered Escherichia coli constructed previously. First, the biotransformation conditions for growing cells were optimized (l-phenylalanine concentration 20.0 g·L−1, temperature 35°C) and a two-stage temperature control strategy (keep 20°C for 12 h and increase the temperature to 35°C until the end of biotransformation) was performed. The biotransformation conditions for resting cells were then optimized in 3-L bioreactor and the optimized conditions were as follows: agitation speed 500 rpm, aeration rate 1.5 vvm, and l-phenylalanine concentration 30 g·L−1. The total maximal production (mass conversion rate) reached 29.8 ± 2.1 g·L−1 (99.3%) and 75.1 ± 2.5 g·L−1 (93.9%) in the flask and 3-L bioreactor, respectively. Finally, a kinetic model was established, and it was revealed that the substrate and product inhibition were the main limiting factors for resting cell biotransformation. PMID:27851793

  20. Kinetic characterization of glucose aerodehydrogenase from Aspergillus niger EMS-150-F after optimizing the dose of mutagen for enhanced production of enzyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huma Umbreen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present study enhanced production of glucose aerodehydrogenase from Aspergillus niger has been achieved after optimizing the dose of chemical mutagen ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS that has not been reported earlier. Different doses of mutagen were applied and a strain was developed basing upon the best production. The selected strain Aspergillus niger EMS-150-F was optimized for nutrient requirements in order to produce enzyme through fermentation and the results showed the best yield at 2% corn steep liquor (CSL, 36 hours fermentation time, pH 5, 30°C temperature, 0.3% KH2PO4, 0.3% urea and 0.06% CaCO3. The enzyme was then purified and resulted in 57.88 fold purification with 52.12% recovery. On kinetic characterization, the enzyme showed optimum activity at pH 6 and temperature 30°C. The Michaelis-Menton constants (Km, Vmax, Kcat and Kcat/Km were 20 mM, 45.87 U mL-1, 1118.81 s-1 and 55.94 s-1 mM-1, respectively. The enzyme was found to be thermaly stable and the enthalpy and free energy showed an increase with increase in temperature and ΔS* was highly negative proving the enzyme from A. niger EMS-150-F resistant to temperature and showing a very little disorderliness.

  1. Airfoil sampling of a pulsed Laval beam with tunable vacuum ultraviolet synchrotron ionization quadrupole mass spectrometry: application to low-temperature kinetics and product detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soorkia, Satchin; Liu, Chen-Lin; Savee, John D; Ferrell, Sarah J; Leone, Stephen R; Wilson, Kevin R

    2011-12-01

    A new pulsed Laval nozzle apparatus with vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron photoionization quadrupole mass spectrometry is constructed to study low-temperature radical-neutral chemical reactions of importance for modeling the atmosphere of Titan and the outer planets. A design for the sampling geometry of a pulsed Laval nozzle expansion has been developed that operates successfully for the determination of rate coefficients by time-resolved mass spectrometry. The new concept employs airfoil sampling of the collimated expansion with excellent sampling throughput. Time-resolved profiles of the high Mach number gas flow obtained by photoionization signals show that perturbation of the collimated expansion by the airfoil is negligible. The reaction of C(2)H with C(2)H(2) is studied at 70 K as a proof-of-principle result for both low-temperature rate coefficient measurements and product identification based on the photoionization spectrum of the reaction product versus VUV photon energy. This approach can be used to provide new insights into reaction mechanisms occurring at kinetic rates close to the collision-determined limit.

  2. The acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of an α-pinene-derived organic nitrate: kinetics, products, reaction mechanisms, and atmospheric impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rindelaub, Joel D.; Borca, Carlos H.; Hostetler, Matthew A.; Slade, Jonathan H.; Lipton, Mark A.; Slipchenko, Lyudmila V.; Shepson, Paul B.

    2016-12-01

    The production of atmospheric organic nitrates (RONO2) has a large impact on air quality and climate due to their contribution to secondary organic aerosol and influence on tropospheric ozone concentrations. Since organic nitrates control the fate of gas phase NOx (NO + NO2), a byproduct of anthropogenic combustion processes, their atmospheric production and reactivity is of great interest. While the atmospheric reactivity of many relevant organic nitrates is still uncertain, one significant reactive pathway, condensed phase hydrolysis, has recently been identified as a potential sink for organic nitrate species. The partitioning of gas phase organic nitrates to aerosol particles and subsequent hydrolysis likely removes the oxidized nitrogen from further atmospheric processing, due to large organic nitrate uptake to aerosols and proposed hydrolysis lifetimes, which may impact long-range transport of NOx, a tropospheric ozone precursor. Despite the atmospheric importance, the hydrolysis rates and reaction mechanisms for atmospherically derived organic nitrates are almost completely unknown, including those derived from α-pinene, a biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) that is one of the most significant precursors to biogenic secondary organic aerosol (BSOA). To better understand the chemistry that governs the fate of particle phase organic nitrates, the hydrolysis mechanism and rate constants were elucidated for several organic nitrates, including an α-pinene-derived organic nitrate (APN). A positive trend in hydrolysis rate constants was observed with increasing solution acidity for all organic nitrates studied, with the tertiary APN lifetime ranging from 8.3 min at acidic pH (0.25) to 8.8 h at neutral pH (6.9). Since ambient fine aerosol pH values are observed to be acidic, the reported lifetimes, which are much shorter than that of atmospheric fine aerosol, provide important insight into the fate of particle phase organic nitrates. Along with rate constant

  3. Effect of dietary seaweed (Ulva lactuca) supplementation on growth performance of sheep and on in vitro gas production kinetics

    OpenAIRE

    EL-WAZIRY, Ahmed; AL-HAIDARY, Ahmed; OKAB, Aly; SAMARA, Emad; ABDOUN, Khalid

    2015-01-01

    This study was carried out to determine the effect of dietary seaweed (Ulva lactuca) supplementation on growth performance of sheep, in vitro gas production, estimated energy, and microbial protein synthesis. A total of 18 Naimey male sheep with average live weight of 22.78 ± 0.24 kg were randomly allocated to 3 groups. Sheep in group 1 were fed a diet containing commercial feed without seaweed as a control diet, sheep in group 2 were fed the control diet with 3% seaweed, and sheep in group 3...

  4. Production of poly(malic acid) from sugarcane juice in fermentation by Aureobasidium pullulans: Kinetics and process economics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Peilian; Cheng, Chi; Lin, Meng; Zhou, Yipin; Yang, Shang-Tian

    2017-01-01

    Poly(β-l-malic acid) (PMA) is a biodegradable polymer with many potential biomedical applications. PMA can be readily hydrolyzed to malic acid (MA), which is widely used as an acidulant in foods and pharmaceuticals. PMA production from sucrose and sugarcane juice by Aureobasidium pullulans ZX-10 was studied in shake-flasks and bioreactors, confirming that sugarcane juice can be used as an economical substrate without any pretreatment or nutrients supplementation. A high PMA titer of 116.3g/L and yield of 0.41g/g were achieved in fed-batch fermentation. A high productivity of 0.66g/L·h was achieved in repeated-batch fermentation with cell recycle. These results compared favorably with those obtained from glucose and other biomass feedstocks. A process economic analysis showed that PMA could be produced from sugarcane juice at a cost of $1.33/kg, offering a cost-competitive bio-based PMA for industrial applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Kinetic modelling and optimisation of antimicrobial compound production by Candida pyralidae KU736785 for control of Candida guilliermondii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mewa-Ngongang, Maxwell; du Plessis, Heinrich W; Hutchinson, Ucrecia F; Mekuto, Lukhanyo; Ntwampe, Seteno Ko

    2017-06-01

    Biological antimicrobial compounds from yeast can be used to address the critical need for safer preservatives in food, fruit and beverages. The inhibition of Candida guilliermondii, a common fermented beverage spoilage organism, was achieved using antimicrobial compounds produced by Candida pyralidae KU736785. The antimicrobial production system was modelled and optimised using response surface methodology, with 22.5 ℃ and pH of 5.0 being the optimum conditions. A new concept for quantifying spoilage organism inhibition was developed. The inhibition activity of the antimicrobial compounds was observed to be at a maximum after 17-23 h of fermentation, with C. pyralidae concentration being between 0.40 and 1.25 × 10 9 CFU ml -1 , while its maximum specific growth rate was 0.31-0.54 h -1 . The maximum inhibitory activity was between 0.19 and 1.08 l contaminated solidified media per millilitre of antimicrobial compound used. Furthermore, the antimicrobial compound formation rate was 0.037-0.086 l VZI ml -1 ACU h -1 , respectively. The response surface methodology analysis showed that the model developed sufficiently described the antimicrobial compound formation rate 1.08 l VZI ml -1 ACU, as 1.17 l VZI ml -1 ACU, predicted under the optimum production conditions.

  6. Irradiated uranium reprocessing, Final report I-VI, Part VI - Separation of uranium, plutonium and fission products from HNO3 solution on the zirconium phosphate (part I), Adsorption equilibrium and kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gal, I.; Ruvarac, A.

    1961-12-01

    Separation of uranium, plutonium and long-lived fission products was investigated on a inorganic ion exchanger. Zirconium phospate was chosen for this purpose because its ion exchanger properties were well known. This report deals with the study of equilibrium and kinetics of the adsorption

  7. Late production of hydrocarbon gases in sedimentary basins: kinetic and isotopic study; Genese tardive des gaz hydrocarbures dans les bassins sedimentaires: etude cinetique et isotopique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorant, F.

    1999-06-23

    the mechanisms of cracking and the isotopic processes. Following this concept, a general class-compound model for the production and the degradation of oil and gas, including the calculation of the isotopic compositions, was set up. The kinetic scheme, based on that proposed by Behar et at. (1992), comprises 10 first-order reactions whose pre exponential factors (A) are not all the same. The various kinetic and isotopic parameters were determined on the basis of pyrolysis experiments performed on an immature Type II kerogen. The first simulations at low temperature show that this model can reproduce isotopic trends that are consistent with natural observations. However the current uncertainty on the isotopic parameters does not yet allow a confident utilization of the model to predict the {delta}{sup 13}C of hydrocarbon gases is the geological conditions. (author)

  8. Effect of steam explosion on in vitro gas production kinetics and rumen fermentation profiles of three common straws

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wen He

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the effect of steam explosion on in vitro gas production (GP and rumen fermentation profiles of common straws, in vitro cultivation was conducted for 96 h with the rumen fluid collected from steers. Different types of straw had various chemical compositions, which were affected by steam explosion (P<0.01. Steam explosion increased (P<0.01 the rate and volume of GP, lag time disappeared and asymptotic GP decreased, which were also affected (P<0.01 by the type of straw. The type of straw influenced (P<0.05 the final pH, while steam explosion exerted an effect (P<0.01 on the ammonia-nitrogen concentration. The proportions of individual volatile fatty acid (VFA, except acetate (A, differed (P<0.05 among the feeds. Steam explosion increased total VFA production and the proportion of propionate (P, while decreased the proportions of A, isobutyrate and valerate as well as the ratio A/P (P<0.01. The type of straw had an effect (P<0.05 on the activities of avicelase and carboxymethyl cellulase (CMCase, while steam explosion increased (P<0.01 the activities of avicelase, CMCase, β-glucanase and xylanase. The available energy concentrations and digestibilities differed (P<0.01 in the feeds and were increased (P<0.05 with steam explosion processing. The interaction straw type×treatments was significant (P<0.05 for most monitored parameters. These results suggest that steam explosion could improve rumen fermentability and energy utilisation of straw, being an effective pre-treatment method in feed industry.

  9. In vitro Ruminal Gas Production Kinetics of Four Fodder Trees Ensiled With or Without Molasses and Urea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abdelfattah Z M Salem; ZHOU Chuan-she; TAN Zhi-liang; Miguel Mellado; Moises Cipriano Salazar; Mona M M Y Elghandopur; Nicholas E Odongo

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated if the addition of urea (U), molasses (M) or their 1:1 (v/v) mixture during ensiling increases the nutritional value of forage from four fodder trees (Prunus persica, Leucaena esculenta, Acacia farnesiana, and Prunus domestica). Forage samples of fodder trees were collected in triplicate (three individual samples of each species) and subjected to an in vitro gas production (GP) procedure. Fermentation at 24 h (GP24), short-chain volatile fatty acids (SCFA), and microbial crude protein production (MCP), in vitro organic matter digestibility (OMD), metabolizable energy (ME) and dry matter degradability (DMD) were estimated. Forage samples were incubated for 72 h in an incubator at 39oC and the volume of GP was recorded at 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 24, 48, and 72 h of incubation using the reading pressure technique. The rumen fermentation profiles were highest for P. persica, which showed the highest (P<0.0001) DMD, ME, OMD, SCFA, GP24 and MCP. On the other hand L. esculenta had the lowest (P<0.0001) DMD, SCFA, MCP;P. domestica had the lowest (P<0.0001) OMD. The addition of M to silage increased (P<0.0001) ME and OMD, as well as GP. However, the addition of U and the mixture of U and M reduced (P<0.0001) DMD, ME, OMD, SCFA, GY24 and MCP. These results show that P. persica has the highest nutritive value and L. esculenta the lowest for ruminants. Additionally, the addition of M to forage from fodder trees increases rumen GP and fermentation, which may improve nutrient utilization in ruminants.

  10. Effects of replacing soybean meal with canola meal differing in rumen-undegradable protein content on ruminal fermentation and gas production kinetics using 2 in vitro systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paula, E M; Monteiro, H F; Silva, L G; Benedeti, P D B; Daniel, J L P; Shenkoru, T; Broderick, G A; Faciola, A P

    2017-07-01

    Previous research indicated that there were significant differences in rumen-undegradable protein (RUP) among canola meals (CM), which could influence the nutritional value of CM. The objectives of this study were to (1) evaluate the effects of feeding CM with different RUP contents on ruminal fermentation, nutrient digestion, and microbial growth using a dual-flow continuous culture system (experiment 1) and (2) evaluate ruminal gas production kinetics, in vitro organic matter (OM) digestibility, and methane (CH 4 ) production of soybean meal (SBM) and CM with low or high RUP in the diet or as a sole ingredient using a gas production system (experiments 2 and 3). In experiment 1, diets were randomly assigned to 6 fermentors in a replicated 3 × 3 Latin square. The only ingredient that differed among diets was the protein supplement. The treatments were (1) solvent-extracted SBM, (2) low-RUP solvent-extracted CM (38% RUP as a percentage of crude protein), and (3) high-RUP solvent-extracted CM (50% RUP). Diets were prepared as 3 concentrate mixtures that were combined with 25% orchardgrass hay and 15% wheat straw (dry matter basis). Experiments 2 and 3 had the same design with 24 bottles incubated 3 times for 48 h each. During the 48-h incubation, the cumulative pressure was recorded to determine gas production kinetics, in vitro OM digestibility, and CH 4 production. In experiment 1, N flow (g/d), efficiency of N use, efficiency of bacterial N synthesis, total volatile fatty acids (mM), and molar proportion of acetate, propionate, and isobutyrate were not affected by treatments. There were tendencies for a decrease in ruminal NH 3 -N and an increase in molar proportion of butyrate for the SBM diet compared with both CM diets. The molar proportion of valerate was greater in both CM diets, whereas the molar proportion of isovalerate and total branched-chain volatile fatty acids was lower for the CM diets compared with the SBM diet. In experiments 2 and 3, the SBM

  11. UV and solar photo-degradation of naproxen: TiO_2 catalyst effect, reaction kinetics, products identification and toxicity assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jallouli, Nabil; Elghniji, Kais; Hentati, Olfa; Ribeiro, Ana R.; Silva, Adrián M.T.; Ksibi, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Degradation kinetics and mineralization rate of naproxen (NPX) were studied. • Direct photolysis and TiO_2/UV approaches were evaluated. • The formation of by-products was followed by UHPLC-DAD-MS. • Ecological risk assessment of NPX-treated solutions was assessed using E. andrei. - Abstract: Direct photolysis and TiO_2-photocatalytic degradation of naproxen (NPX) in aqueous solution were studied using a UV lamp and solar irradiation. The degradation of NPX was found to be in accordance with pseudo-first order kinetics, the photocatalytic process being more efficient than photolysis. The NPX removal by photolysis (pH_i_n_i_t_i_a_l 6.5) was 83% after 3 h, with 11% of chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction, whereas the TiO_2-UV process led to higher removals of both NPX (98%) and COD (25%). The apparent pseudo-first-order rate constant (k_a_p_p) for NPX degradation by photolysis ranged from 0.0050 min"−"1 at pH 3.5 to 0.0095 min"−"1 at pH 6.5, while it was estimated to be 0.0063 min"−"1 under acidic conditions in photocatalysis, increasing by 4-fold at pH 6.5. Ultra High Performance Liquid chromatography (UHPLC) coupled with a triple quadrupole detector and also a hybrid mass spectrometer which combines the linear ion trap triple quadrupole (LTQ) and OrbiTrap mass analyser, were used to identify NPX degradation products. The main intermediates detected were 1-(6-methoxynaphtalene-2-yl) ethylhydroperoxide, 2-ethyl-6-methoxynaphthalene, 1-(6-methoxynaphtalen-2-yl) ethanol, 1-(6-methoxynaphtalen-2-yl) ethanone and malic acid. Solar photocatalysis of NPX showed COD removals of 33% and 65% after 3 and 4 h of treatment, respectively, and some reduction of acute toxicity, evaluated by the exposure of Eisenia andrei to OECD soils spiked with NPX-treated solutions.

  12. Physisorption kinetics

    CERN Document Server

    Kreuzer, Hans Jürgen

    1986-01-01

    This monograph deals with the kinetics of adsorption and desorption of molecules physisorbed on solid surfaces. Although frequent and detailed reference is made to experiment, it is mainly concerned with the theory of the subject. In this, we have attempted to present a unified picture based on the master equation approach. Physisorption kinetics is by no means a closed and mature subject; rather, in writing this monograph we intended to survey a field very much in flux, to assess its achievements so far, and to give a reasonable basis from which further developments can take off. For this reason we have included many papers in the bibliography that are not referred to in the text but are of relevance to physisorption. To keep this monograph to a reasonable size, and also to allow for some unity in the presentation of the material, we had to omit a number of topics related to physisorption kinetics. We have not covered to any extent the equilibrium properties of physisorbed layers such as structures, phase tr...

  13. Effects of packaging and heat transfer kinetics on drug-product stability during storage under uncontrolled temperature conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Toru; Yamaji, Takayuki; Takayama, Kozo

    2013-05-01

    To predict the stability of pharmaceutical preparations under uncontrolled temperature conditions accurately, a method to compute the average reaction rate constant taking into account the heat transfer from the atmosphere to the product was developed. The average reaction rate constants computed with taken into consideration heat transfer (κ(re) ) were then compared with those computed without taking heat transfer into consideration (κ(in) ). The apparent thermal diffusivity (κ(a) ) exerted some influence on the average reaction rate constant ratio (R, R = κ(re) /κ(in) ). In the regions where the κ(a) was large (above 1 h(-1) ) or very small, the value of R was close to 1. On the contrary, in the middle region (0.001-1 h(-1) ), the value of R was less than 1.The κ(a) of the central part of a large-size container and that of the central part of a paper case of 10 bottles of liquid medicine (100 mL) fell within this middle region. On the basis of the above-mentioned considerations, heat transfer may need to be taken into consideration to enable a more accurate prediction of the stability of actual pharmaceutical preparations under nonisothermal atmospheres. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Derivative spectrophotometry for the determination of faropenem in the presence of degradation products: an application for kinetic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cielecka-Piontek, Judyta

    2013-07-01

    A simple and selective derivative spectrophotometric method was developed for the quantitative determination of faropenem in pure form and in pharmaceutical dosage. The method is based on the zero-crossing effect of first-derivative spectrophotometry (λ = 324 nm), which eliminates the overlapping effect caused by the excipients present in the pharmaceutical preparation, as well as degradation products, formed during hydrolysis, oxidation, photolysis, and thermolysis. The method was linear in the concentration range 2.5-300 μg/mL (r = 0.9989) at λ = 341 nm; the limits of detection and quantitation were 0.16 and 0.46 μg/mL, respectively. The method had good precision (relative standard deviation from 0.68 to 2.13%). Recovery of faropenem ranged from 97.9 to 101.3%. The first-order rate constants of the degradation of faropenem in pure form and in pharmaceutical dosage were determined by using first-derivative spectrophotometry. A statistical comparison of the validation results and the observed rate constants for faropenem degradation with these obtained with the high-performance liquid chromatography method demonstrated that both were compatible.

  15. Experimental infection in cattle: kinetics of production of IgM and IgG against bovine cysticercosis and inflammatory response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaella Paola Meneguete dos Guimarães-Peixoto

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Bovine cysticercosis is a zoonosis that affects humans in their adult form (taeniasis and its larval is found inserted in the musculature of infected cattle (cysticerci. It is still not entirely clear how animal immune response against infection occurs, being the comprehension of this process necessary for the enhancement of diagnostic capacity and disease prevention. This work aimed to evaluate the evolution of the immune response in experimentally infected cattle, compared with findings in cell response by optical microscopy. Nine animals were infected at a rate of 120,000 eggs of Taenia saginata. Five of the animals were similar in the kinetics of antibody production against cysticerci, with maximal levels of IgG and IgM. The other four animals showed an immune response different from the majority, with two of them showing delayed response to infection by cysticerci while the others apparently did not have initial contact with antigens secreted by cysticerci. Regarding the cellular response, it was found that, in lesions of viable cysticerci, inflammatory cells predominated, whereas in nonviable cysticerci there were tissue repair cells in the most part, being possible to notice that the amount of migratory calcareous corpuscles are related to the death stage of the parasite. These findings are important for the understanding immune response of cattle infected with cysticercosis.

  16. A Kinetic and Factorial Approach to Study the Effects of Temperature and Salinity on Growth and Toxin Production by the Dinoflagellate Alexandrium ostenfeldii from the Baltic Sea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Salgado

    Full Text Available Alexandrium ostenfeldii is present in a wide variety of environments in coastal areas worldwide and is the only dinoflagellate known species that produces paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP toxins and two types of cyclic imines, spirolides (SPXs and gymnodimines (GYMs. The increasing frequency of A. ostenfeldii blooms in the Baltic Sea has been attributed to the warming water in this region. To learn more about the optimal environmental conditions favoring the proliferation of A. ostenfeldii and its complex toxicity, the effects of temperature and salinity on the kinetics of both the growth and the net toxin production of this species were examined using a factorial design and a response-surface analysis (RSA. The results showed that the growth of Baltic A. ostenfeldii occurs over a wide range of temperatures and salinities (12.5-25.5°C and 5-21, respectively, with optimal growth conditions achieved at a temperature of 25.5°C and a salinity of 11.2. Together with the finding that a salinity > 21 was the only growth-limiting factor detected for this strain, this study provides important insights into the autecology and population distribution of this species in the Baltic Sea. The presence of PSP toxins, including gonyautoxin (GTX-3, GTX-2, and saxitoxin (STX, and GYMs (GYM-A and GYM-B/-C analogues was detected under all temperature and salinity conditions tested and in the majority of the cases was concomitant with both the exponential growth and stationary phases of the dinoflagellate's growth cycle. Toxin concentrations were maximal at temperatures and salinities of 20.9°C and 17 for the GYM-A analogue and > 19°C and 15 for PSP toxins, respectively. The ecological implications of the optimal conditions for growth and toxin production of A. ostenfeldii in the Baltic Sea are discussed.

  17. Stochastic kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colombino, A.; Mosiello, R.; Norelli, F.; Jorio, V.M.; Pacilio, N.

    1975-01-01

    A nuclear system kinetics is formulated according to a stochastic approach. The detailed probability balance equations are written for the probability of finding the mixed population of neutrons and detected neutrons, i.e. detectrons, at a given level for a given instant of time. Equations are integrated in search of a probability profile: a series of cases is analyzed through a progressive criterium. It tends to take into account an increasing number of physical processes within the chosen model. The most important contribution is that solutions interpret analytically experimental conditions of equilibrium (moise analysis) and non equilibrium (pulsed neutron measurements, source drop technique, start up procedures)

  18. Tolrestat kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hicks, D.R.; Kraml, M.; Cayen, M.N.; Dubuc, J.; Ryder, S.; Dvornik, D.

    1984-01-01

    The kinetics of tolrestat, a potent inhibitor of aldose reductase, were examined. Serum concentrations of tolrestat and of total 14 C were measured after dosing normal subjects and subjects with diabetes with 14 C-labeled tolrestat. In normal subjects, tolrestat was rapidly absorbed and disappearance from serum was biphasic. Distribution and elimination t 1/2s were approximately 2 and 10 to 12 hr, respectively, after single and multiple doses. Unchanged tolrestat accounted for the major portion of 14 C in serum. Radioactivity was rapidly and completely excreted in urine and feces in an approximate ratio of 2:1. Findings were much the same in subjects with diabetes. In normal subjects, the kinetics of oral tolrestat were independent of dose in the 10 to 800 mg range. Repetitive dosing did not result in unexpected cumulation. Tolrestat was more than 99% bound to serum protein; it did not compete with warfarin for binding sites but was displaced to some extent by high concentrations of tolbutamide or salicylate

  19. Experimental, kinetic and numerical modeling of hydrogen production by catalytic reforming of crude ethanol over a commercial catalyst in packed bed tubular reactor and packed bed membrane reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aboudheir, Ahmed; Akande, Abayomi; Idem, Raphael

    2006-01-01

    reactor. The model was based on the coupling of mass, momentum and energy balance equations as well as our new kinetic model developed for this process.The simulation results for crude ethanol conversion were found to be in accordance with the experimental data obtained at various operating conditions. In addition, the predicted variations of the concentration and temperature profiles for our process. In the radial direction indicate that the assumption of plug flow and isothermal behaviour is justified within certain kinetics operating conditions. However, even within these operating conditions, our results have proven that the axial dispersion terms in the balance equations (mass, momentum and energy) cannot be neglected, especially in the hypothetical industrial case presented in this work for the reforming of crude ethanol. In addition, in the experimental study of the application of a porous membrane reactor for the crude ethanol reforming process conducted to compare with that for the packed bed tubular reactor, it was found that the membrane reactor outperformed the packed bed tubular reactor in terms of crude ethanol conversion and hydrogen production. This is due to the function of the membrane reactor to shift the thermodynamic equilibrium in favour of the conversion of crude ethanol to hydrogen according to Le Catelier-Braun's law.(Author)

  20. The kinetics of the phospholipase A2-catalyzed hydrolysis of Egg phosphatidylcholine in unilamellar vesicles. Product inhibition and its relief by serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupferberg, J P; Yokoyama, S; Kézdy, F J

    1981-06-25

    Only the lecithin in the outer leaflet (representing 70% of the total) of egg lecithin unilamellar vesicles is hydrolyzed by Crotalus atrox phospholipase A2. Hydrolyzed vesicles remain intact and impermeable to ionic solutes. The fatty acids produced in the hydrolysis remain on the vesicle and are only partially ionized at neutral pH due to electrostatic repulsions. About 40% of the lysolecithin product is desorbed from the vesicle. In the presence of a large excess of bovine serum albumin, the reaction is first order with respect to both the enzyme and the substrate. At 21 degrees C, pH 7.2, I = 0.16 M, and [Ca2+] = 7 mM, the second order rate constant is kex(2) = 1.5 X 10(6) M-1 s-1. In the absence of albumin, the reaction is inhibited competitively by both the monomeric (KIm = 4.5 X 10(-8) M) and micellar (nKIa = 3.7 X 10(-7) M) forms of lysolecithin ([critical micelle concentration] = 4.3 X 10(-6) M). Bovine serum albumin complexes two molecules of lysolecithin with a dissociation constant, Kb = 5 X 10(-8) M. With substoichiometric albumin, the reaction is biphasic, and, when the albumin is saturated with lysolecithin, the kinetics become similar to those observed in the absence of albumin. The action of phospholipase A2 shows that in unilamellar vesicles there is only one major lecithin conformation in the outer leaflet, or that all conformations are rapidly interconvertible.

  1. Timely Diagnosis of Acute Kidney Injury Using Kinetic eGFR and the Creatinine Excretion to Production Ratio, E/eG - Creatinine Can Be Useful!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endre, Zoltán H; Pianta, Timothy J; Pickering, John W

    2016-01-01

    Post transplant repeated measurements of urine volume and serum creatinine (sCr) are used to assess kidney function. Under non-steady state conditions, repeated measurement of sCr allows calculation of the kinetic estimated GFR (KeGFR). Additional measurement of urinary creatinine allows the calculation of the creatinine excretion to (estimated) production ratio (E/eG). We hypothesized that post-transplant KeGFR and E/eG would predict delayed graft function (DGF), as early as 4 h and outperform a validated clinical model at 12 h. This was a retrospective analysis of prospectively acquired data in a study of 56 recipients of deceased-donor kidney transplant. We assessed predictive performance with the area under the receiver operator characteristic curve (AUC) and the added value to a clinical model with integrated discrimination improvement analysis. At 4 h, the AUC for E/eG was 0.87 (95% CI 0.77-0.96) and for KeGFR 0.69 (95% CI 0.56-0.83). Both E/eG and KeGFR improved the risk prediction of a clinical model for DGF by 32 and 18%, and for non-DGF by 17 and 10%, respectively. While E/eG had better predictive performance of DGF than KeGFR, KeGFR might also facilitate perioperative management including drug dosing after kidney transplantation. Together these measurements may facilitate the possibility of conducting trials of early intervention to ameliorate the adverse effects of ischaemia-reperfusion injury on long-term DGF. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Effects of Saccharomyces cerevisiae at direct addition or pre-incubation on in vitro gas production kinetics and degradability of four fibrous feeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona M.Y. Elghandour

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on in vitro gas production (GP kinetics and degradability of corn stover, oat straw, sugarcane bagasse and sorghum straw. Feedstuffs were incubated with different doses of yeast [0, 4, 8 and 12 mg/g dry matter (DM] at direct addition or 72 h pre-incubation. Rumen GP was recorded at 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 24, 30, 48, 54 and 72 h of incubation. After 72 h, rumen pH and methane were determined and contents were filtrated for DM, neutral (NDF and acid detergent fibre (ADF degradability. Fibrous species×method of application×yeast interactions occurred (P<0.001 for all measured ruminal GP parameters and degradability. The direct addition or 72 h pre-incubation of S. cerevisiae with corn stover improved (P<0.05 GP and methane and decreased (P<0.05 the lag time (L and NDF degradability (NDFD. The direct addition of S. cerevisiae to oat straw increased (P<0.05 rate of GP (c and decreased (P<0.05 asymptotic GP (b. However, 72 h pre-incubation increased (P<0.05 c with linearly decreased b, DM degradability (DMD and NDFD. Applying S. cerevisiae for 72 h pre-incubation decreased (P<0.001 methane emission. The direct addition or 72 h pre-incubation of S. cerevisiae to sorghum straw increased (P<0.05 b, c, L, DMD and NDFD. Overall, the effect of dose varied among different feedstuffs and different application methods. Results suggested that the direct addition of S. cerevisiae could support and improve ruminal fermentation of lowquality forages at 4 to 12 g/kg DM.

  3. Product analyses and kinetic studies on gas phase oxidation of the fuel additive ethyl tert-butyl ether and its products; Produktanalysen und Kinetikuntersuchungen der Gasphasenoxidation des Kraftstoffadditivs Ethyl-tert-butylether und seiner Produkte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, K H; Thuener, L

    1997-04-01

    The widespread use of the additive ETBE in gasoline leads to an increased release of this compound into the atmosphere via evaporation or exhaust fumes. In order to determine the influence of this additive on trace gas cycles it is first necessary to carry out studies on the degradation mechanisms and pertinent kinetic properties of this substance. The aim of the present study was to examine the degradation mechanisms of the fuel additive t-butyl ethyl ether under atmospheric conditions. The reactions of the main degradation products (t-butyl formiate and t-butyl acetate, together ca. 80%) were also studied in order to obtain as complete a picture of the degradation paths as possible. This was to permit an assessment of the influence of ETBE and its products on tropospheric trace gas cycles and ozone formation. [Deutsch] Bei haeufigem Zusatz von ETBE in Benzin wird diese Verbindung durch Verdampfung oder als Abgas verstaerkt in die Atmosphaere abgegeben. Um den Einfluss des Additivs auf die Spurengas-Kreislaeufe zu bestimmen, sind daher Untersuchungen noetig, um die Abbau-Mechanismen und die zugehoerigen kinetischen Daten zu ermitteln. Das Ziel dieser Arbeit ist die Untersuchung der Abbaumechanismen des Kraftstoffadditivs t-Butylethylether unter atmosphaerischen Bedingungen. Fuer eine moeglichst vollstaendige Analyse des Abbauweges werden auch die Reaktionen der Hauptabbauprodukte (t-Butylformiat und t-Butylacetat, zusammen etwa 80%) untersucht. Dadurch soll der Einfluss auf troposphaerische Spurengas-Kreislaeufe und auf die Ozonbildung von ETBE und seinen Produkten abgeschaetzt werden. (orig./SR)

  4. Effects of influent fractionation, kinetics, stoichiometry and mass transfer on CH4, H2 and CO2 production for (plant-wide) modeling of anaerobic digesters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solon, Kimberly; Flores Alsina, Xavier; Gernaey, Krist

    2015-01-01

    simulation model no. 2 is used to quantify the generation of CH4, H2 and CO2. A comprehensive global sensitivity analysis based on (i) standardized regression coefficients (SRC) and (ii) Morris' screening's (MS's) elementary effects reveals the set of parameters that influence the biogas production......This paper examines the importance of influent fractionation, kinetic, stoichiometric and mass transfer parameter uncertainties when modeling biogas production in wastewater treatment plants. The anaerobic digestion model no. 1 implemented in the plant-wide context provided by the benchmark...

  5. Calcite Dissolution Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berelson, W.; Subhas, A.; Dong, S.; Naviaux, J.; Adkins, J. F.

    2016-12-01

    A geological buffer for high atmospheric CO2 concentrations is neutralization via reaction with CaCO3. We have been studying the dissolution kinetics of carbonate minerals using labeled 13C calcite and Picarro-based measurements of 13C enrichments in solution DIC. This methodology has greatly facilitated our investigation of dissolution kinetics as a function of water carbonate chemistry, temperature and pressure. One can adjust the saturation state Omega by changing the ion activity product (e.g. adjusting carbonate ion concentration), or by changing the solubility product (e.g. adjusting temperature or pressure). The canonical formulation of dissolution rate vs. omega has been refined (Subhas et al. 2015) and shows distinct non-linear behavior near equilibrium and rates in sea water of 1-3 e-6 g/cm2day at omega = 0.8. Carbonic anhydrase (CA), an enzyme that catalyzes the hydration of dissolved CO2 to carbonic acid, was shown (in concentrations 500x. This result points to the importance of carbonic acid in enhancing dissolution at low degrees of undersaturation. CA activity and abundance in nature must be considered regarding the role it plays in catalyzing dissolution. We also have been investigating the role of temperature on dissolution kinetics. An increase of 16C yields an order of magnitude increase in dissolution rate. Temperature (and P) also change Omega critical, the saturation state where dissolution rates change substantially. Increasing pressure (achieved in a pressure reaction chamber we built) also shifts Omega critical closer to equilibrium and small pressure increases have large impact on dissolution kinetics. Dissolution rates are enhanced by an order of magnitude for a change in pressure of 1500 psi relative to the dissolution rate achieved by water chemistry effects alone for an omega of 0.8. We've shown that the thermodynamic determination of saturation state does not adequately describe the kinetics of dissolution. The interplay of mineral

  6. Quantum kinetic Ising models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Augusiak, R; Cucchietti, F M; Lewenstein, M; Haake, F

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a quantum generalization of classical kinetic Ising models (KIM), described by a certain class of quantum many-body master equations. Similarly to KIMs with detailed balance that are equivalent to certain Hamiltonian systems, our models reduce to a set of Hamiltonian systems determining the dynamics of the elements of the many-body density matrix. The ground states of these Hamiltonians are well described by the matrix product, or pair entangled projected states. We discuss critical properties of such Hamiltonians, as well as entanglement properties of their low-energy states.

  7. Alkylation of Chlorobenzene. An Experiment Illustrating Kinetic versus Thermodynamic Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, Kenneth; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes an experiment which illustrates the kinetic versus thermodynamic control of chemical reactions for organic chemistry students. Considers the laboratory procedures including the isolation of both the kinetic and thermodynamic products. (CW)

  8. Oxidative degradation of triazine- and sulfonylurea-based herbicides using Fe(VI): The case study of atrazine and iodosulfuron with kinetics and degradation products

    Science.gov (United States)

    The occurrence of common herbicides (Atrazine, ATZ and Iodosufuron, IDS), in waters presents potential risk to human and ecological health. The oxidative degradation of ATZ and IDS by ferrate(VI) (FeVIO42-, Fe(VI)) is studied at different pH levels where kinetically observed se...

  9. Spray Drying Processing: granules production and drying kinetics of droplets; El proceso de secado por atomizacion: formacion de granulos y cinetica de secado de gotas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mondragon, R.; Julia, J. E.; Barba, A.; Jarque, J. C.

    2013-09-01

    Spray drying is a unit operation very common in many industrial processes. For each particular application, the resulting granulated material must possess determined properties that depend on the conditions in which the spray drying processing has been carried out, and whose dependence must be known in order to optimize the quality of the material obtained. The large number of variables that influence on the processes of matter and energy transfer and on the formation of granular material has required a detailed analysis of the drying process. Over the years there have been many studies on the spray drying processing of all kind of materials and the influence of process variables on the drying kinetics of the granulated material properties obtained. This article lists the most important works published for both the spray drying processing and the drying of individual droplets, as well as studies aimed at modeling the drying kinetics of drops. (Author)

  10. Corn stover for biogas production: Effect of steam explosion pretreatment on the gas yields and on the biodegradation kinetics of the primary structural compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizasoain, Javier; Trulea, Adrian; Gittinger, Johannes; Kral, Iris; Piringer, Gerhard; Schedl, Andreas; Nilsen, Paal J; Potthast, Antje; Gronauer, Andreas; Bauer, Alexander

    2017-11-01

    This study evaluated the effect of steam explosion on the chemical composition and biomethane potential of corn stover using temperatures ranging between 140 and 220°C and pretreatment times ranging between 2 and 15min. Biodegradation kinetics during the anaerobic digestion of untreated and corn stover, pretreated at two different intensities, 140°C for 5min and 180°C for 5min, were studied in tandem. Results showed that pretreatment at 160°C for 2min improved the methane yield by 22%. Harsher pretreatment conditions led to lower hemicellulose contents and methane yields, as well as higher lignin contents, which may be due to the formation of pseudo-lignin. The biodegradation kinetics trial demonstrated that steam explosion enhances the degradation of structural carbohydrates and acid insoluble lignin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Inhibition of interferon production in human fibroblasts by a tumor promoting phorbol ester

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frankfort, H.M.; Vilcek, J.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) on the induction of interferon in cultures of human fibroblasts was examined. TPA was found to inhibit polyinosinate-polycytidylate [poly(I) X poly(C)]-induced interferon production when added either before or with the inducer. A 3-hour pretreatment of FS-4 cells with TPA produced the greatest ihibitory effect. Partially inhibitory treatments with TPA caused a delay in interferon production. On the other hand, interferon yields were slightly enhanced by TPA added at 1 1/2 or 3 hours postinduction. No gross metabolic perturbations (e.g., inhibition of cellular protein or RNA synthesis) were detected which would explain the phenomenon. The inhibition of interferon production was a stereospecific event: biologically inactive derivatives of TPA (4-0-methyl TPA, 4-α-phorbol-12, 13-didecanoate and phorbol-12, 13-diacetate) had no effect on interferon production. Cellular proteases or nucleases did not appear to be involved in this process. The binding of labeled poly(I) X poly(C) to FS-4 cells was unaltered in TPA-treated cultures. In superinduced cultures (i.e., after enhancement of interferon yields by actinomycin D and cycloheximide), interferon production was generally less inhibited by TPA than after simple induction. Newcastle disease virus (NDV)-induced interferon synthesis in GM-258 cells was also inhibited by the phorbol ester. Both α (leukocyte) and β (fibroblast) interferon production was inhibited to a similar degree in TPA-treated cells inoculated with 0.1 or 1 plaque forming unit (PFU) of NDV per cell. Increasing the multiplicity of infection with NDV to 10 PFU per cell overcame the inhibitory action of TPA. We conclude that the site of TPA action is either the triggering (generation of the hypothetical inducing signal) or transcription of the interferom mRNA. (Author)

  12. Cesium removal and kinetics equilibrium: Precipitation kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, M.J.

    1999-01-01

    This task consisted of both non-radioactive and radioactive (tracer) tests examining the influence of potentially significant variables on cesium tetraphenylborate precipitation kinetics. The work investigated the time required to reach cesium decontamination and the conditions that affect the cesium precipitation kinetics

  13. A study of gamma-ray mutagenesis in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae. Analysis of reversion production kinetics in a wild-type haploid strain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levkovich, N.V.; Chepurnoj, A.I.

    1992-01-01

    After γ-irradiation of a synchronized yeast culture in the G 1 -phase of the cell cycle, radiation-induced leu2 reversions are found to be formed in the first three postradiation phases of DNA replication. Without replication and in periods between two phases of DNA replication, formation of induced reversions was not observed. The analysis of postradiation formation kinetics of induced mutants is proposed to be used together with other know approaches for studying mutation processes. Hypothetical schemes are proposed to explain the ascending descending trend in formation of γ-induced reversions during postradiation growth of irradiated cells. 7 refs.; 5 figs.; 1 tab

  14. Plasma kinetic theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott, J.A.

    1993-01-01

    Plasma kinetic theory is discussed and a comparison made with the kinetic theory of gases. The plasma is described by a modified set of fluid equations and it is shown how these fluid equations can be derived. (UK)

  15. Production of ultra-low-sulfur gasoline: an equilibrium and kinetic analysis on adsorption of sulfur compounds over Ni/MMS sorbents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subhan, Fazle; Liu, B S; Zhang, Q L; Wang, W S

    2012-11-15

    High performance nickel-based micro-mesoporous silica (Ni/MMS) sorbent was prepared by incipient wetness impregnation with ultrasonic aid (IWI-u) for adsorptive desulfurization (ADS) of commercial gasoline and simulated fuels. The sorbents were characterized with BET, XRD, TPR, SEM, HRTEM and TG/DTG. These results show that 20 wt%Ni/MMS (IWI-u) can still retain the framework of MMS and nickel particles were homogeneously distributed in the MMS channels without any aggregation, which improved significantly the ADS performance of the sorbents. The studies on the ADS kinetics indicate that the adsorption behavior of thiophene (T), benzothiophene (BT) and dibenzothiophene (DBT) over 20 wt%Ni/MMS (IWI-u) can be described appropriately by pseudo second-order kinetic model. The intraparticle diffusion model verified that the steric hindrance and intraparticle diffusion were the rate controlling step of the adsorption process of DBT molecules. Langmuir model can be used to describe the adsorption isotherms for T, BT and DBT due to low coverage. The regeneration sorbent maintains the sulfur removal efficiency of 85.9% for 6 cycles. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Dust Effects on Nucleation Kinetics and Nanoparticle Product Size Distributions: Illustrative Case Study of a Prototype Ir(0)n Transition-Metal Nanoparticle Formation System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özkar, Saim; Finke, Richard G

    2017-07-05

    The question is addressed if dust is kinetically important in the nucleation and growth of Ir(0) n nanoparticles formed from [Bu 4 N] 5 Na 3 (1,5-COD)Ir I ·P 2 W 15 Nb 3 O 62 (hereafter [(COD)Ir·POM] 8- ), reduced by H 2 in propylene carbonate solvent. Following a concise review of the (often-neglected) literature addressing dust in nucleation phenomena dating back to the late 1800s, the nucleation and growth kinetics of the [(COD)Ir·POM] 8- precatalyst system are examined for the effects of 0.2 μm microfiltration of the solvent and precatalyst solution, of rinsing the glassware with that microfiltered solvent, of silanizing the glass reaction vessel, for the addition of nucleation apparent rate "constant" k 1obs(bimol) is shown to be slowed by a factor of ∼5 to ∼7.6, depending on the precise experiment and its conditions, just by the filtration of the precatalyst solution using a 0.20 μm filter and rinsing the glassware surface with 0.20 μm filtered propylene carbonate solvent; (ii) that simply employing a 0.20 μm filtration step narrows the size distribution of the resulting Ir(0) n nanoparticles by a factor of 2.4 from ±19 to ±8%, a remarkable result; (iii) that the narrower size distribution can be accounted for by the slowed nucleation rate constant, k 1obs(bimol) , and by the unchanged autocatalytic growth rate constant, k 2obs(bimol) , that is, by the increased ratio of k 2obs(bimol) /k 1obs(bimol) that further separates nucleation from growth in time for filtered vs unfiltered solutions; and (iv) that five lines of evidence indicate that the filterable component of the solution, which has nucleation rate-enhancing and size-dispersion broadening effects, is dust.

  17. Kinetic and Enhancement of Biogas Production For The Purpose of Rnewable Fuel Generation by Co-digestion of Cow Manure and Corn Straw in A Pilot Scale CSTR System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jabraeil Taghinazhad

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Biogas production from anaerobic co-digestion of cow manure (CM and corn straw residue (CSR were experimentally investigated using a completely stirred tank reactor (CSTR under semi- continuously feeding circumstance at mesophilic (35°C±2 temperature. The pilot-scale digester with 180 L in volume was employed under experimental protocol to examine the effect of the change in organic loading rate on efficiency of biogas production and to report on its steady-state performance. An average organic loading rates of 2 and 3 kg VS. (m-3.d-1 and a hydraulic retention time (HRT of 25 days was examined with respect to two different CM to CSR mixing ratios of 100:0 , 75:25 and 50:50, respectively. The results showed both organic loading rates at co-digestion of CM+ CSR gave better methane yields than single digestion of cow manure. The biogas production efficiency was obtained 0.242, 0.204, 0.311 0.296, 259.5 and 235 m3.(kg VS input-1 for 2 and 3 kg VS.(m-3.d-1 at CM to CSR mixing ratios of100:0 , 75:25 and 50:50, respectively. The reactor showed stable performance with VS reduction between 55-74% during different runs. With increment of loading rate, the VS degradation and biogas yield decreased. Modified Gompertz and logistic plot equation was employed to model the methane production at different organic loading rates and substrate concentrations. The equations gave a good approximation of the maximum methane production (rm and the methane yield potential (P with correlation coefficient (R2 over 0.99. Keywords: Biogas; cow manure; corn straw; Kinetic; semi-continuously Article History: Received Oct 25th 2016; Received in revised form Dec 19th 2016; Accepted 2nd January 2017; Available online How to Cite This Article: Taghinazhad. J., Abdi, R. and Adl, M. (2017. Kinetic and Enhancement of Biogas Production for the purpose of renewable fuel generation by Co-digestion of Cow Manure and Corn Straw in a Pilot Scale CSTR System. Int Journal of Renewable

  18. Liquefaction chemistry and kinetics: Hydrogen utilization studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothenberger, K.S.; Warzinski, R.P.; Cugini, A.V. [Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The objectives of this project are to investigate the chemistry and kinetics that occur in the initial stages of coal liquefaction and to determine the effects of hydrogen pressure, catalyst activity, and solvent type on the quantity and quality of the products produced. The project comprises three tasks: (1) preconversion chemistry and kinetics, (2) hydrogen utilization studies, and (3) assessment of kinetic models for liquefaction. The hydrogen utilization studies work will be the main topic of this report. However, the other tasks are briefly described.

  19. Pyrolysis and kinetic analyses of a perennial grass (Saccharum ravannae L.) from north-east India: Optimization through response surface methodology and product characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikia, Ruprekha; Baruah, Bhargav; Kalita, Dipankar; Pant, Kamal K; Gogoi, Nirmali; Kataki, Rupam

    2018-04-01

    The objective of the present investigation was to optimize the pyrolysis condition of an abundantly available and low cost perennial grass of north-east India Saccharum ravannae L. (S. ravannae) using response surface methodology based on central composite design. Kinetic study of the biomass was conducted at four different heating rates of 10, 20, 40 and 60 °C min -1 and results were interpreted by Friedman, Kissinger Akira Sunnose and Flynn-Wall-Ozawa methods. Average activation energy 151.45 kJ mol -1 was used for evaluation of reaction mechanism following Criado master plot. Maximum bio-oil yield of 38.1 wt% was obtained at pyrolysis temperature of 550 °C, heating rate of 20 °C min -1 and nitrogen flow rate of 226 mL min -1 . Study on bio-oil quality revealed higher content of hydrocarbon, antioxidant property, total phenolic content and metal chelating capacity. These opened up probable applications of S. ravannae bio-oil in different fields including fuel, food industry and biomedical domain. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Redox Kinetics and Nonstoichiometry of Ce0.5Zr0.5O2−δ for Water Splitting and Hydrogen Production

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Zhenlong; Uddi, Mruthunjaya; Tsvetkov, Nikolai; Yildiz, Bilge; Ghoniem, Ahmed F.

    2017-01-01

    Water splitting and chemical fuel production as a promising carbon-neutral energy solution relies critically on an efficient electrochemical process over catalyst surfaces. The fundamentals within the surface redox pathways, including the complex

  1. Effect of in situ exopolysaccharide production on physicochemical, rheological, sensory, and microstructural properties of the yogurt drink ayran: an optimization study based on fermentation kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, M T; Dertli, E; Toker, O S; Tatlisu, N B; Sagdic, O; Arici, M

    2015-03-01

    Exopolysaccharide (EPS)-producing starter cultures are preferred for the manufacture of fermented milk products to improve rheological and technological properties. However, no clear correlation exists between EPS production and the rheological and technological properties of fermented milk products such as the yogurt drink ayran. In this study, 4 different strain conditions (EPS- and EPS+ Streptococcus thermophilus strains) were tested as a function of incubation temperature (32, 37, or 42°C) and time (2, 3, or 4 h) to determine the effect of culture type and in situ EPS production on physicochemical, rheological, sensory, and microstructural properties of ayran. Furthermore, we assessed the effect of fermentation conditions on amounts of EPS production by different EPS-producing strains during ayran production. A multifactorial design of response surface methodology was used to model linear, interaction, and quadratic effects of these variables on steady shear rheological properties of ayran samples and in situ EPS production levels. The physicochemical and microbiological characteristics of ayran samples altered depending on incubation conditions and strain selection. Steady shear tests showed that ayran samples inoculated with EPS+ strains exhibited pseudoplastic flow behavior. Production of ayran with EPS- strain (control sample) resulted in the lowest apparent viscosity values (η50), whereas those produced with the combination of 2 EPS+ strains yielded ayran with notably increased η50 values. We concluded that incubation time was the variable with the greatest effect on η50, consistency coefficient (K), and flow behavior index (n) values. In situ EPS production was also affected by these conditions during ayran fermentation in which strain-specific metabolism conditions were found to be the most important factor for EPS production. In addition, these findings correlated the amount of in situ EPS produced with the rheological properties of ayran. Scanning

  2. Kinetic characterization of glucose aerodehydrogenase from Aspergillus niger EMS-150-F after optimizing the dose of mutagen for enhanced production of enzyme

    OpenAIRE

    Umbreen, Huma; Zia, Muhammad Anjum; Rasul, Samreen

    2013-01-01

    In the present study enhanced production of glucose aerodehydrogenase from Aspergillus niger has been achieved after optimizing the dose of chemical mutagen ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS) that has not been reported earlier. Different doses of mutagen were applied and a strain was developed basing upon the best production. The selected strain Aspergillus niger EMS-150-F was optimized for nutrient requirements in order to produce enzyme through fermentation and the results showed the best yield ...

  3. Dynamics of multidissociation paths of acetaldehyde photoexcited at 157 nm: Branching ratios, distributions of kinetic energy, and angular anisotropies of products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shih-Huang

    2009-11-01

    After the photolysis of acetaldehyde (CH3CHO) at 157.6 nm in a molecular-beam apparatus using photofragment translational spectroscopy and vacuum-ultraviolet photoionization to detect products, we observed 13 photofragments associated with six primary dissociation channels and secondary dissociation of products CH3CO and HCO. We measured time-of-flight spectra and spatial angular anisotropies of products and evaluated the branching ratios of products. All photoproducts have nearly isotropic angular distributions with an average |β| value less than 0.05. Primary dissociations to CH3CO+H and CH3+HCO are two major paths; most CH3CO subsequently decomposes spontaneously to CH3+CO and CH2CO+H and most HCO decomposes to H+CO. The ternary dissociation to CH3+CO+H thus accounts for approximately half of the total branching. Dissociations to CH2CO+H2 and CH2+CH2O are observable, but the production of CH4+CO is ambiguous. The productions of C2H3+OH and C2H2+H2O indicate that isomerization from acetaldehyde to ethenol occurs before fragmentation. After photoexcitation to the n-3p state, most acetaldehyde converts into states T1 and S0 but a little isomerizes to ethenol followed by multichannel decomposition.

  4. Effects of three methane mitigation agents on parameters of kinetics of total and hydrogen gas production, ruminal fermentation and hydrogen balance using in vitro technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Min; Wang, Rong; Yang, Shan; Deng, Jin Ping; Tang, Shao Xun; Tan, Zhi Liang

    2016-02-01

    Methane (CH4 ) can be mitigated through directly inhibiting methanogen activity and starving methanogens by hydrogen (H2 ) sink. Three types of mechanism (i.e. bromoethanesulphonate (BES), nitrate and emodin) and doses of CH4 mitigation agents were employed to investigate their pathways of CH4 inhibition. Results indicated that both BES and emodin inhibited CH4 production and altered H2 balance, which could be accompanied by decreased dry matter disappearance (DMD), fractional rate of gH2 formation, volatile fatty acid (VFA) production, ability to produce and use reducing equivalences and molecular H2 , and increased final asymptotic gH2 production, time to the peak of gH2 , discrete lag time of gH2 production and fermentation efficiency. However, emodin decreased gas volume produced by rapidly fermentable components of substrate and the rate of fermentation at early stage of incubation, while BES supplementation inhibited gas volume produced by both rapidly and slowly fermentable components of substrate and the rate of fermentation at middle or late stage of incubation. The nitrate supplementation inhibited CH4 production without affecting VFA profile, because of its dual role as H2 sink and being toxic to methanogens. Nitrate supplementation had more complicated pattern of fermentation, VFA production and profile and H2 balance in comparison to BES and emodin supplementation. © 2015 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  5. Principles of chemical kinetics

    CERN Document Server

    House, James E

    2007-01-01

    James House's revised Principles of Chemical Kinetics provides a clear and logical description of chemical kinetics in a manner unlike any other book of its kind. Clearly written with detailed derivations, the text allows students to move rapidly from theoretical concepts of rates of reaction to concrete applications. Unlike other texts, House presents a balanced treatment of kinetic reactions in gas, solution, and solid states. The entire text has been revised and includes many new sections and an additional chapter on applications of kinetics. The topics covered include quantitative rela

  6. Introduction to chemical kinetics

    CERN Document Server

    Soustelle, Michel

    2013-01-01

    This book is a progressive presentation of kinetics of the chemical reactions. It provides complete coverage of the domain of chemical kinetics, which is necessary for the various future users in the fields of Chemistry, Physical Chemistry, Materials Science, Chemical Engineering, Macromolecular Chemistry and Combustion. It will help them to understand the most sophisticated knowledge of their future job area. Over 15 chapters, this book present the fundamentals of chemical kinetics, its relations with reaction mechanisms and kinetic properties. Two chapters are then devoted to experimental re

  7. KINETIC ALGORITHMS FOR HARBOUR MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Gold

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Modern harbour management for a busy port needs to resolve a variety of simultaneous problems. Harbour traffic may be busy and the waterways congested, both by the major shipping and by the attendant harbour tugs. The harbour channel may be narrow and tortuous, and rapidly changing tides may require frequent course adjustments. Navigation aids must be clearly specified and immediately identifiable, in order to permit safe passage for the vessels. This requires a GIS with attributes not easily available with traditional products. The GeoVS system is a kinetic GIS with full three-dimensional visualisation, so that ships, bathymetry and landscape may be viewed in a form that is immediately understandable to both harbour pilots and the harbour authority. The system is kinetic because the data structures used to preserve the topological relationships between ships, seafloor and coastline are able to be maintained on a real-time basis, taking account of ship movement recorded on the compulsory AIS (Automatic Information System beacons. Maintenance of this real-time topology allows for easy detection of potential collisions, as well as real-time bathymetric estimations, necessary to prevent ship grounding in highly tidal environments. The system, based on previous research into kinetic Voronoi diagrams, as well as development of a completely new graphical engine, is now in commercial production, where its advantages over simpler twodimensional models without automatic collision and grounding detection are becoming evident. Other applications are readily envisaged, and will be addressed in the near future.

  8. Stochastic theory of interfacial enzyme kinetics: A kinetic Monte Carlo study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Biswajit; Gangopadhyay, Gautam

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Stochastic theory of interfacial enzyme kinetics is formulated. Numerical results of macroscopic phenomenon of lag-burst kinetics is obtained by using a kinetic Monte Carlo approach to single enzyme activity. Highlights: ► An enzyme is attached with the fluid state phospholipid molecules on the Langmuir monolayer. ► Through the diffusion, the enzyme molecule reaches the gel–fluid interface. ► After hydrolysing a phospholipid molecule it predominantly leaves the surface in the lag phase. ► The enzyme is strictly attached to the surface with scooting mode of motion and the burst phase appears. - Abstract: In the spirit of Gillespie’s stochastic approach we have formulated a theory to explore the advancement of the interfacial enzyme kinetics at the single enzyme level which is ultimately utilized to obtain the ensemble average macroscopic feature, lag-burst kinetics. We have provided a theory of the transition from the lag phase to the burst phase kinetics by considering the gradual development of electrostatic interaction among the positively charged enzyme and negatively charged product molecules deposited on the phospholipid surface. It is shown that the different diffusion time scales of the enzyme over the fluid and product regions are responsible for the memory effect in the correlation of successive turnover events of the hopping mode in the single trajectory analysis which again is reflected on the non-Gaussian distribution of turnover times on the macroscopic kinetics in the lag phase unlike the burst phase kinetics.

  9. Characterizing nutrient uptake kinetics for efficient crop production during Solanum lycopersicum var. cerasiforme Alef. growth in a closed indoor hydroponic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ju Yeon; Rahman, Arifur; Azam, Hossain; Kim, Hyung Seok; Kwon, Man Jae

    2017-01-01

    A balanced nutrient supply is essential for the healthy growth of plants in hydroponic systems. However, the commonly used electrical conductivity (EC)-based nutrient control for plant cultivation can provide amounts of nutrients that are excessive or inadequate for proper plant growth. In this study, we investigated the kinetics of major and minor nutrient uptake in a nutrient solution during the growth of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum var. cerasiforme Alef.) in a closed hydroponic system. The concentrations of major and minor ions in the nutrient solution were determined by various analytical methods including inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES), ion chromatography (IC), ion specific electrodes, and/or colorimetric methods. The concentrations of the individual nutrient ions were compared with changes in the EC. The EC of the nutrient solution varied according to the different growth stages of tomato plants. Variation in the concentrations of NO3-, SO42-, Mg2+, Ca2+, and K+ was similar to the EC variation. However, in the cases of PO43-, Na+, Cl-, dissolved Fe and Mn, Cu2+, and Zn2+, variation did not correspond with that of EC. These ions were generally depleted (to 0 mg L-1) during tomato growth, suggesting that these specific ions should be monitored individually and their supply increased. Nutrient uptake rates of major ions increased gradually at different growth stages until harvest (from 15 mg L-1 d-1). Saturation indices determined by MINEQL+ simulation and a mineral precipitation experiment demonstrated the potential for amorphous calcium phosphate precipitation, which may facilitate the abiotic adsorptive removal of dissolved Fe, dissolved Mn, Cu2+, and Zn2+.

  10. Mutation effects of kojic acid production strain induced by synchrotron radiation of soft X-rays and kinetics of the fermentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Liang; Jiang Shiping; Wan Libiao; Ma Xiaodong; Li Meifang

    2006-01-01

    The irradiation effect on Aspergillus oryzae spores was studied by 0.54 keV X-rays (about the K shell absorption edge of oxygen) from the synchrotron facility at NSRL. A high production mutant for kojic acid was obtained from the spores irradiated by soft X-rays, which accumulated 27.79 g kojic acid per L in 500 mL shake-flask fermentation for 10 days using glucose as carbon source, and has increased about 56% of production than that of the original (17.81 g/L). Also the fermentation conditions were studied with different carbon sources and nitrogen sources. The results showed that the mutant induced by the X-rays of synchrotron radiation would be of potential for high kojic acid production. (authors)

  11. Kinetic equation solution by inverse kinetic method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salas, G.

    1983-01-01

    We propose a computer program (CAMU) which permits to solve the inverse kinetic equation. The CAMU code is written in HPL language for a HP 982 A microcomputer with a peripheral interface HP 9876 A ''thermal graphic printer''. The CAMU code solves the inverse kinetic equation by taking as data entry the output of the ionization chambers and integrating the equation with the help of the Simpson method. With this program we calculate the evolution of the reactivity in time for a given disturbance

  12. Reaction of β-blockers and β-agonist pharmaceuticals with aqueous chlorine. Investigation of kinetics and by-products by liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana, José Benito; Rodil, Rosario; Cela, Rafael

    2012-06-01

    The degradation of two β-blockers (atenolol and propranolol) and one β-receptor agonist (salbutamol) during water chlorination was investigated by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). An accurate-mass quadrupole time-of-flight system (QTOF) was used to follow the time course of the pharmaceuticals and also used in the identification of the by-products. The degradation kinetics of these drugs was investigated at different concentrations of chlorine, bromide and sample pH by means of a Box-Behnken experimental design. Depending on these factors, dissipation half-lives varied in the ranges 68-145 h for atenolol, 1.3-33 min for salbutamol and 42-8362 min for propranolol. Normally, an increase in chlorine dosage and pH resulted in faster degradation of these pharmaceuticals. Moreover, the presence of bromide in water samples also resulted in a faster transformation of atenolol at low chlorine doses. The use of an accurate-mass high-resolution LC-QTOF-MS system permitted the identification of a total of 14 by-products. The transformation pathway of β-blockers/agonists consisted mainly of halogenations, hydroxylations and dealkylations. Also, many of these by-products are stable, depending on the chlorination operational parameters employed.

  13. Light particle production in spallation reactions induced by protons of 0.8-2.5 GeV incident kinetic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbach, Claus-Michael; Enke, Michael; Boehm, Andreas

    2002-01-01

    Absolute production cross sections have been measured simultaneously for neutrons and light charged particles in 0.8-2.5 GeV proton induced spallation reactions for a series of target nuclei from aluminum up to uranium. The high detection efficiency both for neutral and charged evaporative particles provides an event-wise access to the amount of projectile energy dissipated into nuclear excitation. Various intra nuclear cascade plus evaporation models have been confronted with the experimental data showing large discrepancies for hydrogen and helium production. (author)

  14. Kinetics in radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hummel, A.

    1987-01-01

    In this chapter the authors first briefly review the kinetics of first- and second-order processes for continuous and pulsed irradiation, without taking the effects of nonhomogeneous formation of the species into consideration. They also discuss diffusion controlled reactions under conditions where interactions of more than two particles can be neglected, first the kinetics of the diffusion-controlled reaction of randomly generated species (homogeneous reaction) and then that of isolated pairs of reactants. The latter is often called geminate kinetics when dealing with pairs of oppositely charged species; they shall use this term for the kinetics of isolated pairs in general. In the last section they discuss briefly the kinetics of groups of more than two reactants

  15. Kinetics of thyroid hormones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inada, Mitsuo; Nishikawa, Mitsushige; Naito, Kimikazu; Ishii, Hitoshi; Tanaka, Kiyoshi

    1980-01-01

    Kinetics of thyroid hormones were outlined, and recent progress in metabolism of these hormones was also described. Recently, not only T 4 and T 3 but also rT 3 , 3,3'-T 2 , 3',5'-T 2 , and 3,5-T 2 can be measured by RIA. To clarify metabolic pathways of these hormones, metabolic clearance rate and production rate of these hormones were calculated. As single-compartment analysis was insufficient to clarify disappearance curves of thyroid hormones in blood such as T 3 and T 2 of which metabolic speed was so fast, multi-compartment analysis or non-compartment analysis were also performed. Thyroid hormones seemed to be measured more precisely by constant infusion method. At the first step of T 4 metabolism, T 3 was formed by 5'-monodeiodination of T 4 , and rT 3 was formed by 5-monodeiodination of T 4 . As metabolic pathways of T 3 and rT 3 , conversion of them to 3,3'-T 2 or to 3',5'-T 2 and 3,5-T 2 was supposed. This subject will be an interesting research theme in future. (Tsunoda, M.)

  16. Non-kinetic capabilities: complementing the kinetic prevalence to targeting

    OpenAIRE

    Ducheine, P.

    2014-01-01

    Targeting is used in military doctrine to describe a military operational way, using (military) means to influence a target (or addressee) in order to achieve designated political and/or military goals. The four factors italicized are used to analyse non-kinetic targeting, complementing our knowledge and understanding of the kinetic prevalence. Paradoxically, non-kinetic targeting is not recognized as a separate concept: kinetic and non-kinetic are intertwined facets of targeting. Kinetic tar...

  17. Gamma-interferon bioassay for detection of bovine tuberculosis in cattle: kinetics of production and dose response in whole blood culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatia, Sandeep; Das, S.K.

    1999-01-01

    Stimulation with mycobacterium bovis PPD sensitised lymphocytes (whole blood or peripheral blood lymphocytes) results in release of gamma-interferon that can be detected by simple bioassay. The optimum concentration of bovine PPD was 20 μg ml and the optimum incubation period was 24 hr for maximum production of gamma-interferon in whole blood culture (128 units/ml) and peripheral blood culture (64 units/ml). (author)

  18. Produção de celulases por Aspergillus niger e cinética da desativação celulásica=Cellulases production by Aspergillus niger and cellulase deactivation kinetic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Mariana de Aguiar

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho teve como objetivo a avaliação da cinética de produção de enzimas celulases pelo fungo Aspergillus niger e da cinética de desativação das celulases. Foi utilizado bagaço de cana-de-açúcar pré-tratado como fonte de carbono na fermentação para a produção do complexo celulásico e também como substrato da hidrólise enzimática. A. niger foi cultivado em três bateladas, cada uma contendo 10, 50 e 100 g L-1 de bagaço pré-tratado com NaOH 4% (m v-1. A cinética da produção das celulases foi obtida determinando-se a atividade enzimática das amostras coletadas ao longo do tempo. As variações do pH também foram determinadas. A deativação enzimática foi avaliada determinando-se periodicamente a atividade das amostras armazenadas nas condições de resfriamento (4°C e de congelamento (-18ºC. Conclui-se que o A. niger produz celulases quando cultivado em meio de cultivo contendo bagaço de cana-de-açúcar pré-tratado e que o tempo ideal para coleta do caldo enzimático foi de aproximadamente sete dias, com produtividade máxima de 0,0013 U mL-1∙h para a batelada com 10 g L-1 e 0,0018 U mL-1∙h para as bateladas com 50 e 100 g L-1. O complexo celulásico não sofre desativação se armazenado à temperatura de -18°C por 43 dias, mas perde cerca de 40% da sua atividade após 48h se armazenado a 4°C.This work aimed to evaluate the kinetic for the cellulase production by Aspergillus niger and the deactivation kinetic of the cellulase enzymes. Cellulase were produced in three different batches using NaOH 4% (w v-1 pre-treated sugarcane bagasse as the carbon source in the fermentation broth. The amount of the bagasse in each batch was 10, 50 and 100 g L-1. The kinetic of the cellulase production was accomplished by periodically determining the cellulasic activity of the fermentation broth using pre-treated bagasse as the hydrolysis substrate. Changes in the pH also were determined. The cellulase

  19. Reaction of the C2H radical with 1-butyne (C4H6): Low Temperature Kinetics and Isomer-Specific Product Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soorkia, Satchin; Trevitt, Adam J.; Selby, Talitha M.; Osborn, David L.; Taatjes, Craig A.; Wilson, Kevin R.; Leone, Stephen R.

    2009-12-22

    The rate coefficient for the reaction of the ethynyl radical (C{sub 2}H) with 1-butyne (H-C{triple_bond}C-CH{sub 2}-CH{sub 3}) is measured in a pulsed Laval nozzle apparatus. Ethynyl radicals are formed by laser photolysis of acetylene (C{sub 2}H{sub 2}) at 193 nm and detected via chemiluminescence (C{sub 2}H + O{sub 2} {yields} CH (A{sup 2}{Delta}) + CO{sub 2}). The rate coefficients are measured over the temperature range of 74-295 K. The C{sub 2}H + 1-butyne reaction exhibits no barrier and occurs with rate constants close to the collision limit. The temperature dependent rate coefficients can be fit within experimental uncertainties by the expression k = (2.4 {+-} 0.5) x 10{sup -10} (T/295 K)-(0.04 {+-} 0.03) cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1}s{sup -1}. Reaction products are detected at room temperature (295 K) and 533 Pa using a Multiplexed Photoionization Mass Spectrometer (MPIMS) coupled to the tunable VUV synchrotron radiation from the Advanced Light Source at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Two product channels are identified for this reaction: m/z = 64 (C{sub 5}H{sub 4}) and m/z = 78 (C{sub 6}H{sub 6}) corresponding to the CH{sub 3}- and H-loss channels, respectively. Photoionization efficiency (PIE) curves are used to analyze the isomeric composition of both product channels. The C{sub 5}H{sub 4} products are found to be exclusively linear isomers composed of ethynylallene and methyldiacetylene in a 4:1 ratio. In contrast, the C{sub 6}H{sub 6} product channel includes two cyclic isomers, fulvene 18({+-}5)% and 3,4-dimethylenecyclobut-1-ene 32({+-}8)%, as well as three linear isomers, 2-ethynyl-1,3-butadiene 8({+-}5)%, 3,4-hexadiene-1-yne 28({+-}8)% and 1,3-hexadiyne 14({+-}5)%. Within experimental uncertainties, we do not see appreciable amounts of benzene and an upper limit of 10% is estimated. Diacetylene (C{sub 4}H{sub 2}) formation via the C{sub 2}H{sub 5}-loss channel is also thermodynamically possible but cannot be observed due to experimental

  20. Experimental and kinetics study for phytoremediation of sugar mill effluent using water lettuce (Pistia stratiotes L.) and its end use for biogas production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vinod; Singh, Jogendra; Pathak, V V; Ahmad, Shamshad; Kothari, Richa

    2017-10-01

    In present study, the performance of phytoremediation by Pistia stratiotes on sugar mill effluent (SME) and its end use for biogas production are investigated. The objectives of the study are to determine the nutrient and pollution reduction efficiency of P. stratiotes from SME and evaluation of its biomass as a feedstock for biogas production. Various concentrations of SME (25, 50, 75, and 100%) were remediated by Pistia stratiotes (initial weight; 150 g) outdoor for 60 days under batch mode experimental setup. The results showed that P. stratiotes achieved marked reduction in nutrient (TKN, 72.86%; TP, 71.49%) and pollutant load (EC, 25.69%; TDS, 57.26%; BOD, 69.40%; COD, 61.80%; Ca 2+ , 56.79%; Mg 2+ , 55.01%; Na + , 42.86%; K + , 54.38%; MPN, 78.13%; SPC, 60.13%) from 75% SME at the end of the experiment. The highest biomass (328.48 ± 2.04 g) and chlorophyll content (3.62 ± 3.04 mg/g) were also achieved with 75% SME. The dried biomass of P. stratiotes (from 75% SME) was inoculated with cow dung (10% w/v) and diluted with distilled water (1:10). The whole content was used as a substrate for the biogas production within hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 30 days at room temperature. Substrate parameters such as pH, TS (%), COD (mg/L), TKN (%), TOC (%), VS (%), and C/N ratio were reduced from 7.85 to 6.0, 66.65 to 28.65%, 12,900 to 2800 mg/L, 0.95 to 0.75%, 45.54 to 19.5%, 76.87 to 28.78%, and 47.94 to 26.00, respectively, in 30 days of HRT. About 8478.6 mL of cumulative biogas production was evaluated by modified Gompertz equation. Thus, the present investigation not only achieved efficient nutrient and pollution reduction from SME but also proved the potential of P. stratiotes for biogas production.

  1. Practical steady-state enzyme kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorsch, Jon R

    2014-01-01

    Enzymes are key components of most biological processes. Characterization of enzymes is therefore frequently required during the study of biological systems. Steady-state kinetics provides a simple and rapid means of assessing the substrate specificity of an enzyme. When combined with site-directed mutagenesis (see Site-Directed Mutagenesis), it can be used to probe the roles of particular amino acids in the enzyme in substrate recognition and catalysis. Effects of interaction partners and posttranslational modifications can also be assessed using steady-state kinetics. This overview explains the general principles of steady-state enzyme kinetics experiments in a practical, rather than theoretical, way. Any biochemistry textbook will have a section on the theory of Michaelis-Menten kinetics, including derivations of the relevant equations. No specific enzymatic assay is described here, although a method for monitoring product formation or substrate consumption over time (an assay) is required to perform the experiments described. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Kinetics of phase transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, M.O.; Aziz, M.J.; Stephenson, G.B.

    1992-01-01

    This volume contains papers presented at the Materials Research Society symposium on Kinetics of Phase Transformations held in Boston, Massachusetts from November 26-29, 1990. The symposium provided a forum for research results in an exceptionally broad and interdisciplinary field. Presentations covered nearly every major class of transformations including solid-solid, liquid-solid, transport phenomena and kinetics modeling. Papers involving amorphous Si, a dominant topic at the symposium, are collected in the first section followed by sections on four major areas of transformation kinetics. The symposium opened with joint sessions on ion and electron beam induced transformations in conjunction with the Surface Chemistry and Beam-Solid Interactions: symposium. Subsequent sessions focused on the areas of ordering and nonlinear diffusion kinetics, solid state reactions and amorphization, kinetics and defects of amorphous silicon, and kinetics of melting and solidification. Seven internationally recognized invited speakers reviewed many of the important problems and recent results in these areas, including defects in amorphous Si, crystal to glass transformations, ordering kinetics, solid-state amorphization, computer modeling, and liquid/solid transformations

  3. Evaluation of co-pyrolysis petrochemical wastewater sludge with lignite in a thermogravimetric analyzer and a packed-bed reactor: Pyrolysis characteristics, kinetics, and products analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Lin; Chen, Jianbiao; Yao, Pikai; Zhou, Dapeng; Zhao, Liang; Yin, Hongchao

    2016-12-01

    Co-pyrolysis characteristics of petrochemical wastewater sludge and Huolinhe lignite were investigated using thermogravimetric analyzer and packed-bed reactor coupled with Fourier transform infrared spectrometer and gas chromatography. The pyrolysis characteristics of the blends at various sludge blending ratios were compared with those of the individual materials. Thermogravimetric experiments showed that the interactions between the blends were beneficial to generate more residues. In packed-bed reactor, synergetic effects promoted the release of gas products and left less liquid and solid products than those calculated by additive manner. Fourier transform infrared spectrometer analysis showed that main functional groups in chars gradually disappeared with pyrolysis temperatures increasing, and H 2 O, CH 4 , CO, and CO 2 appeared in volatiles during pyrolysis. Gas compositions analysis indicated that, the yields of H 2 and CO clearly increased as the pyrolysis temperature and sludge blending ratio increasing, while the changes of CH 4 and CO 2 yields were relatively complex. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. In vitro rumen fermentation kinetics of some co-products generated in the biodiesel production chain by gas production techniqueCinética de fermentação ruminal in vitro de alguns co-produtos gerados na cadeia produtiva do biodiesel pela técnica de produção de gás

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Ricardo Rebouças Dórea

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Fermentation kinetics rates of co-products generated in the supply chain of biodiesel were evaluated by in vitro gas production technique. Crambe meal, cottonseed meal, crambe cake, soybean cake and sunflower cake were evaluated. The soybean cake had higher rates of degradation of non-fiber carbohydrates (NFC, compared to other foods, resulting in higher volume of gas. Cottonseed meal and crambe meal had degradation rates of NFC and gas production similar. Although the crambe cake did not differ from crambe meal on gas production in the degradation of NFC, there were differences in the rate of degradation, being the highest value found for the cake. The biggest lag time was required for soybean cake and the lowest for the sunflower cake. The highest rates of degradation of fibrous carbohydrates (FC were observed in soybean cake and crambe cake, and lowest in sunflower cake. The highest gas production coming from the degradation of FC was obtained for the crambe meal. The soybean cake and crambe cake were the co-products with a better profile on rumen fermentation kinetics in relation to the degradation of non-fiber carbohydrates and fibrous carbohydrates.Objetivou-se com este experimento avaliar a cinética de fermentação ruminal de diferentes co-produtos gerados na cadeia produtiva do biodiesel, mediante o uso da técnica de semi-automática de produção de gases in vitro, usando um delineamento inteiramente casualizado, com cinco tratamentos e quatro repetições por tratamento. Os tratamentos foram: farelo de crambe; farelo de algodão; torta de crambe; torta de soja e torta de girassol. A torta de soja apresentou maior taxa de degradação de carboidratos não fibrosos (CNF, quando comparada aos demais alimentos, resultando em maior volume final de gases. O farelo de algodão e o farelo de crambe apresentaram taxa de degradação de CNF e produção de gases similares. Apesar da torta de crambe não diferir do farelo de crambe quanto a

  5. Irradiated uranium reprocessing, Final report I-VI, Part VI - Separation of uranium, plutonium and fission products from HNO{sub 3} solution on the zirconium phosphate (part I), Adsorption equilibrium and kinetics; Prerada ozracenog urana. Zavrani izvestaj - I-VI, VI Deo - Odvajanje urana, plutonijuma i fisionih produkata iz rastvora HNO{sub 3} na cirkonijum fosfatu (deo I.), Ravnoteza i kinetika adsorpcije

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gal, I; Ruvarac, A [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Odeljenje za eksploataciju nuklearnog goriva, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1961-12-15

    Separation of uranium, plutonium and long-lived fission products was investigated on a inorganic ion exchanger. Zirconium phospate was chosen for this purpose because its ion exchanger properties were well known. This report deals with the study of equilibrium and kinetics of the adsorption.

  6. Irreversible processes kinetic theory

    CERN Document Server

    Brush, Stephen G

    2013-01-01

    Kinetic Theory, Volume 2: Irreversible Processes deals with the kinetic theory of gases and the irreversible processes they undergo. It includes the two papers by James Clerk Maxwell and Ludwig Boltzmann in which the basic equations for transport processes in gases are formulated, together with the first derivation of Boltzmann's ""H-theorem"" and a discussion of this theorem, along with the problem of irreversibility.Comprised of 10 chapters, this volume begins with an introduction to the fundamental nature of heat and of gases, along with Boltzmann's work on the kinetic theory of gases and s

  7. Mycotoxin production and predictive modelling kinetics on the growth of Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus isolates in whole black peppercorns (Piper nigrum L).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yogendrarajah, Pratheeba; Vermeulen, An; Jacxsens, Liesbeth; Mavromichali, Evangelia; De Saeger, Sarah; De Meulenaer, Bruno; Devlieghere, Frank

    2016-07-02

    The growth and mycotoxin production of three Aspergillus flavus isolates and an Aspergillus parasiticus isolate were studied in whole black peppercorns (Piper nigrum L.) using a full factorial design with seven water activity (aw) (0.826-0.984) levels and three temperatures (22, 30 and 37°C). Growth rates and lag phases were estimated using linear regression. Diverse secondary models were assessed for their ability to describe the radial growth rate as a function of individual and combined effect of aw and temperature. Optimum radial growth rate ranged from 0.75±0.04 to 2.65±0.02mm/day for A. flavus and 1.77±0.10 to 2.50±0.10mm/day for A. parasiticus based on the Rosso cardinal estimations. Despite the growth failure of some isolates at marginal conditions, all the studied models showed good performance to predict the growth rates. Validation of the models was performed on independently derived data. The bias factors (0.73-1.03), accuracy factors (0.97-1.36) and root mean square error (0.050-0.278) show that the examined models are conservative predictors of the colony growth rate of both fungal species in black peppers. The Rosso cardinal model can be recommended to describe the individual aw effect while the extended Gibson model was the best model for describing the combined effect of aw and temperature on the growth rate of both fungal species in peppercorns. Temperature optimum ranged from 30 to 33°C, while aw optimum was 0.87-0.92 as estimated by multi-factorial cardinal model for both species. The estimated minimum temperature and aw for A. flavus and A. parasiticus for growth were 11-16°C and 0.73-0.76, respectively, hence, achieving these conditions should be considered during storage to prevent the growth of these mycotoxigenic fungal species in black peppercorns. Following the growth study, production of mycotoxins (aflatoxins B1, B2, G1, G2, sterigmatocystin and O-methyl sterigmatocystin (OMST)) was quantified using LC-MS/MS. Very small

  8. Mass yields in the reaction 235U(nsub(th),f) as a function of the kinetic energy and ion charge of the fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wohlfarth, H.

    1977-01-01

    In this paper measurements of mass- and ioncharge distributions of the lower mass 235 U(nsub(th),f)-fission products, performed with the 'Lohengrin' recoil spectrometer of the Institut Lane-Langevin at Grenoble, are reported. The uranium targets used led to an energy loss of the fission fragments of only 1 to 2 MeV, so their energy was well defined. The mass abundance have been measured for the following fragment energies: E = 83.6, 88.5, 93.4, 98.3, 103.1, 108.0, 112.0 MeV. The energy integrated mass distributions were compared with recent data collections of fission yields. For nearly all masses the abundancies agree well within the limits of error. So these maesurements can be used as an independent source of data. (orig./RW) [de

  9. Time-of-flight mass spectrometry assessment of fluconazole and climbazole UV and UV/H2O2 degradability: Kinetics study and transformation products elucidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Gabriela; Casado, Jorge; Rodríguez, Isaac; Ramil, María; Ferradás, Aida; Cela, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    The efficiency of UV irradiation for the removal of the antimycotic drugs fluconazole (FCZ) and climbazole (CBZ) from water samples is evaluated. Degradation experiments, at laboratory scale, were carried out with spiked aliquots of ultrapure water solutions and treated wastewater samples using low-pressure mercury lamps emitting at 254 nm. Time course of precursor pollutants and identification of arising transformation products (TPs) was performed by injection of different reaction time aliquots in a liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF-MS) system. Chemical structures of identified TPs were proposed from their full-product ion spectra, acquired using different collision energies. During UV irradiation experiments, the half-lives (t1/2) of FCZ and CBZ were similar in ultrapure water solutions and wastewater samples; however, the first species was more recalcitrant than the second one. Four TPs were identified in case of FCZ resulting from substitution of fluorine atoms by hydroxyl moieties and intramolecular cyclization with fluorine removal. CBZ interacted with UV radiation through reductive dechlorination, hydroxylation and cleavage of the ether bond; moreover, five additional primary TPs, with the same empirical formula as CBZ, were also noticed. Given the relatively long t1/2 of FCZ under direct photolysis (ca. 42 min), UV irradiation was combined with H2O2 addition to promote formation of reactive hydroxyl radicals. Under such conditions, the degradation rate of FCZ was enhanced significantly and no TPs were detected. These latter conditions allowed also the effective removal of CBZ TPs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Oxidation of Tris (2-chloroethyl) phosphate in aqueous solution by UV-activated peroxymonosulfate: Kinetics, water matrix effects, degradation products and reaction pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xinxin; Chen, Jing; Qu, Ruijuan; Wang, Zunyao

    2017-10-01

    The feasibility of UV-activated peroxymonosulfate (PMS) technology for the degradation of Tris (2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP) in an aqueous solution was investigated in this study. The conditions of [PMS] 0 : [TCEP] 0  = 20:1, T = 25 ± 2 °C and pH = 5.5 ± 0.5 cause a 94.6% removal of TCEP (1 mg L -1 ) after 30 min of Hg lamp irradiation. The effects of operating parameters (the oxidant doses, pH and presence of typical cations (Fe 3+ , Cu 2+ , Ni 2+ , NH 4 + ), anions (Cl - , HCO 3 - , NO 3 - , HPO 4 2- ) and humic acid (HA)) were evaluated. It was found that an increase of the PMS dose and the presence of Fe 3+ could accelerate the reaction, while the anions and HA inhibited the reaction. Meanwhile, TCEP removal in various water matrices was compared, and the order for TCEP removal was as follows: ultrapure water > tap water > synthetic water > secondary clarifier effluent > Jiuxiang river water. Twenty-two oxidation products were identified using an electrospray time-of-flight mass spectrometer, and the degradation pathways mainly involved radicals' addition and CO bond cleavage. Furthermore, ECOSAR analysis revealed that the intermediate products during the TCEP oxidation process were generally not harmful to three typical aquatic species. Hence, UV/PMS can be used as an efficient technology to treat TCEP-containing water and wastewaters. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Abnormal myocardial energy-production state in mitochondrial cardiomyopathy and acute response to L-arginine infusion. C-11 acetate kinetics revealed by positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arakawa, Kenichiro; Kudo, Takashi; Ikawa, Masamichi

    2010-01-01

    Cardiomyopathy is a life-threatening condition in patients with mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (known as MELAS). However, no effective therapy has been available until now. In the present study cardiac energetics and acute effects of L-arginine (Arg) were evaluated in MELAS patients. The 6 patients with MELAS (M-group) and 6 volunteers (C-group) underwent dynamic C-11 acetate positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. Tricarboxylic acid (TCA)-cycle metabolic rate (k mono ), myocardial efficiency (double product (DP)/k mono ), and myocardial blood flow (MBF) were determined before and after L-Arg administration. Baseline k mono showed a lower value in the M-group than in the C-group (0.051±0.013 vs 0.070±0.019 min -1 , P=0.055). On the other hand, baseline DP/k mono was significantly greater in the M-group (1.69±5.9 vs 0.95±1.2 x 10 5 , P=0.004). After L-Arg administration, 4 patients showed significant elevation of k mono . No relationship was observed between the distribution of k mono elevation and the increase in MBF. The TCA cycle metabolic rate is markedly suppressed in MELAS patients, indicating a shift in energy production to the anaerobic pathway, leading to a paradoxical increase in myocardial efficiency. L-Arg can enhance TCA-cycle metabolism, regardless of its vasodilatation effect, and can be used as a treatment for patients with mitochondrial cardiomyopathy. (author)

  12. SHORT COMMUNICATION CATALYTIC KINETIC ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    IV) catalyzes the discoloring reaction of DBS-arsenazo oxidized by potassium bromate, a new catalytic kinetic spectrophotometric method for the determination of trace titanium (IV) was developed. The linear range of the determination of ...

  13. Oxidation Kinetics of Bromophenols by Nonradical Activation of Peroxydisulfate in the Presence of Carbon Nanotube and Formation of Brominated Polymeric Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Chaoting; Jiang, Jin; Pang, Suyan; Luo, Congwei; Ma, Jun; Zhou, Yang; Yang, Yi

    2017-09-19

    This work demonstrated that bromophenols (BrPs) could be readily oxidized by peroxydisulfate (PDS) activated by a commercial carbon nanotube (CNT), while furfuryl alcohol (a chemical probe for singlet oxygen ( 1 O 2 )) was quite refractory. Results obtained by radical quenching experiments, electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy further confirmed the involvement of nonradical PDS-CNT complexes rather than 1 O 2 . Bicarbonate and chloride ion exhibited negligible impacts on BrPs degradation by the PDS/CNT system, while a significant inhibitory effect was observed for natural organic matter. The oxidation of BrPs was influenced by solution pH with maximum rates occurring at neutral pH. Linear free energy relationships (LFERs) were established between the observed pseudo-first-order oxidation rates of various substituted phenols and the classical descriptor variables (i.e., Hammett constant σ + , and half-wave oxidation potential E 1/2 ). Products analyses by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry clearly showed the formation of hydroxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers and hydroxylated polybrominated biphenyls on CNT surface. Their formation pathway possibly involved the generation of bromophenoxyl radicals from BrPs one-electron oxidation and their subsequent coupling reactions. These results suggest that the novel nonradical PDS/CNT oxidation technology is a good alternative for selectively eliminating BrPs with alleviating toxic byproducts in treated water effluent.

  14. Low temperature hot air drying of potato cubes subjected to osmotic dehydration and intermittent microwave: drying kinetics, energy consumption and product quality indexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghannya, Jalal; Bozorghi, Somayyeh; Heshmati, Maryam Khakbaz

    2018-04-01

    Hot-air drying is a slow energy-extensive process. Use of intermittent microwave (IM) in hot-air (HA) drying of food products is characterized with advantages including reduced process time, energy saving, and improved final quality. In this study, the effect of IM-HA drying following an osmotic dehydration (OD) pretreatment was analyzed on qualitative and quantitative properties of the output (i.e. effective moisture diffusion coefficient (Deff), shrinkage, bulk density, rehydration and energy consumption). Temperature and airflow velocity were fixed at 40°C and 1 m/s, respectively. The process variables included sucrose solution concentration at five levels (0 or control, 10, 30, 50 and 70 w/w%), microwave output power at four levels (0 or control, 360, 600 and 900 W), and pulse ratio at four levels (1, 2, 3 and 4). Use of osmotic dehydration in combination with IM-HA drying reduced the drying time by up to about 54%. Increasing the osmotic solution concentration to 30% and using higher pulse ratios increased the Deff. The lowest shrinkage and bulk density as well as the highest rehydration belonged to the 900 W microwave power and pulse ratio of 4. The lowest energy consumption was observed when using the 900 W power level, showing 63.27% less consumption than the HA drying method.

  15. Kinetics and thermodynamics of living copolymerization processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspard, Pierre

    2016-11-13

    Theoretical advances are reported on the kinetics and thermodynamics of free and template-directed living copolymerizations. Until recently, the kinetic theory of these processes had only been established in the fully irreversible regime, in which the attachment rates are only considered. However, the entropy production is infinite in this regime and the approach to thermodynamic equilibrium cannot be investigated. For this purpose, the detachment rates should also be included. Inspite of this complication, the kinetics can be exactly solved in the regimes of steady growth and depolymerization. In this way, analytical expressions are obtained for the mean growth velocity, the statistical properties of the copolymer sequences, as well as the thermodynamic entropy production. The results apply to DNA replication, transcription and translation, allowing us to understand important aspects of molecular evolution.This article is part of the themed issue 'Multiscale modelling at the physics-chemistry-biology interface'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  16. Investigations on the determination of corrosion kinetics and the structure of corrosion products on high-temperature alloys under low oxygen partial pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poestges, A.; Naoumidis, A.; Nickel, H.

    1979-04-01

    On three nickel-base-alloys (NIMONIC 80A, INCONNEL 617 and ALLOY 713LC), which are planned as materials for components of the primary cooling circuit of high-temperature reactors, studies for the determination of the oxidation behaviour under reactor relevant conditions were performed. The test conditions were fixed at an oxygen partial pressure of 10 -16 bars with a total pressure of 0,2 bars and a temperature of 1080 0 C. The use of the X-ray diffraction analysis on the oxidised samples of type NIMONIC 80A showed the corrosion products Cr 2 O 3 , TiO 2 and Cr 2 Ti 2 O 7 in the outer oxide coating as well as Al 2 O 3 in the inner oxide zone. The samples of the alloy type INCOEL 617 showed the oxides Cr 2 O 3 and Cr 2 Ti 2 O 7 in the outer oxide coating. Samples of the alloy ALLOY 713LC showed Cr 2 O 3 and CrNbO 4 in the outer oxide coating and Al 2 O 3 in the zone of inner oxidation. Sufficient detection certainty was only ascertained by investigating samples with plane surface. For both alloys first mentioned, it was possible to prove the validity of the paralinear relationship W = k x t -1 / 2 - a x t for the increase in weight for the explanation of the time law of the oxidation. For the non-destructive determination of the oxide coating thickness on the alloys samples, the X-ray fluorescence analysis gave reproducible results of good precision. (orig.) [de

  17. Incubating Isolated Mouse EDL Muscles with Creatine Improves Force Production and Twitch Kinetics in Fatigue Due to Reduction in Ionic Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, Stewart I.; Greenaway, Bronwen; Chan, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Background Creatine supplementation can improve performance during high intensity exercise in humans and improve muscle strength in certain myopathies. In this present study, we investigated the direct effects of acute creatine incubation on isolated mouse fast-twitch EDL muscles, and examined how these effects change with fatigue. Methods and Results The extensor digitorum longus muscle from mice aged 12–14 weeks was isolated and stimulated with field electrodes to measure force characteristics in 3 different states: (i) before fatigue; (ii) immediately after a fatigue protocol; and (iii) after recovery. These served as the control measurements for the muscle. The muscle was then incubated in a creatine solution and washed. The measurement of force characteristics in the 3 different states was then repeated. In un-fatigued muscle, creatine incubation increased the maximal tetanic force. In fatigued muscle, creatine treatment increased the force produced at all frequencies of stimulation. Incubation also increased the rate of twitch relaxation and twitch contraction in fatigued muscle. During repetitive fatiguing stimulation, creatine-treated muscles took 55.1±9.5% longer than control muscles to lose half of their original force. Measurement of weight changes showed that creatine incubation increased EDL muscle mass by 7%. Conclusion Acute creatine application improves force production in isolated fast-twitch EDL muscle, and these improvements are particularly apparent when the muscle is fatigued. One likely mechanism for this improvement is an increase in Ca2+ sensitivity of contractile proteins as a result of ionic strength decreases following creatine incubation. PMID:21850234

  18. Incubating isolated mouse EDL muscles with creatine improves force production and twitch kinetics in fatigue due to reduction in ionic strength.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stewart I Head

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Creatine supplementation can improve performance during high intensity exercise in humans and improve muscle strength in certain myopathies. In this present study, we investigated the direct effects of acute creatine incubation on isolated mouse fast-twitch EDL muscles, and examined how these effects change with fatigue. METHODS AND RESULTS: The extensor digitorum longus muscle from mice aged 12-14 weeks was isolated and stimulated with field electrodes to measure force characteristics in 3 different states: (i before fatigue; (ii immediately after a fatigue protocol; and (iii after recovery. These served as the control measurements for the muscle. The muscle was then incubated in a creatine solution and washed. The measurement of force characteristics in the 3 different states was then repeated. In un-fatigued muscle, creatine incubation increased the maximal tetanic force. In fatigued muscle, creatine treatment increased the force produced at all frequencies of stimulation. Incubation also increased the rate of twitch relaxation and twitch contraction in fatigued muscle. During repetitive fatiguing stimulation, creatine-treated muscles took 55.1±9.5% longer than control muscles to lose half of their original force. Measurement of weight changes showed that creatine incubation increased EDL muscle mass by 7%. CONCLUSION: Acute creatine application improves force production in isolated fast-twitch EDL muscle, and these improvements are particularly apparent when the muscle is fatigued. One likely mechanism for this improvement is an increase in Ca(2+ sensitivity of contractile proteins as a result of ionic strength decreases following creatine incubation.

  19. Efficacy of single dose of a bivalent vaccine containing inactivated Newcastle disease virus and reassortant highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus against lethal HPAI and NDV infection in chickens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Hun Lee

    Full Text Available Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI and Newcastle disease (ND are 2 devastating diseases of poultry, which cause great economic losses to the poultry industry. In the present study, we developed a bivalent vaccine containing antigens of inactivated ND and reassortant HPAI H5N1 viruses as a candidate poultry vaccine, and we evaluated its immunogenicity and protective efficacy in specific pathogen-free chickens. The 6:2 reassortant H5N1 vaccine strain containing the surface genes of the A/Chicken/Korea/ES/2003(H5N1 virus was successfully generated by reverse genetics. A polybasic cleavage site of the hemagglutinin segment was replaced by a monobasic cleavage site. We characterized the reverse genetics-derived reassortant HPAI H5N1 clade 2.5 vaccine strain by evaluating its growth kinetics in eggs, minimum effective dose in chickens, and cross-clade immunogenicity against HPAI clade 1 and 2. The bivalent vaccine was prepared by emulsifying inactivated ND (La Sota strain and reassortant HPAI viruses with Montanide ISA 70 adjuvant. A single immunization with this vaccine induced high levels of hemagglutination-inhibiting antibody titers and protected chickens against a lethal challenge with the wild-type HPAI and ND viruses. Our results demonstrate that the bivalent, inactivated vaccine developed in this study is a promising approach for the control of both HPAI H5N1 and ND viral infections.

  20. Kinetic modeling of reactions in Foods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekel, van M.A.J.S.

    2008-01-01

    The level of quality that food maintains as it travels down the production-to-consumption path is largely determined by the chemical, biochemical, physical, and microbiological changes that take place during its processing and storage. Kinetic Modeling of Reactions in Foods demonstrates how to

  1. Lithium hydride hydrolysis: experimental and kinetic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charton, S.; Maupoix, C.; Brevet, A.; Delaunay, F.; Heintz, O.; Saviot, L.

    2006-01-01

    In this work has been studied the contribution of various analyses techniques in the framework, on the one hand of revealing the mechanisms implied in lithium hydride hydrolysis, and on the other hand of studying the kinetics of hydrogen production. Among the methods recently investigated, Raman spectroscopy, XPS and SIMS seem to be particularly attractive. (O.M.)

  2. Productivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spring, Martin; Johnes, Geraint; Hald, Kim Sundtoft

    Productivity is increasingly critical for developed economies. It has always been important: as Paul Krugman puts it, “Productivity isn’t everything, but in the long run it is almost everything. A country’s ability to improve its standard of living over time depends almost entirely on its ability...... to raise its output per worker”(Krugman, 1994). Analyses of productivity have, by and large, been the preserve of economists. Operations Management (OM) is rooted in a similar concern for the efficient use of scarce resources; Management Accounting (MA) is concerned with the institutionalised measurement...... and management of productivity. Yet the three perspectives are rarely connected. This paper is a sketch of a literature review seeking to identify, contrast and reconcile these three perspectives. In so doing, it aims to strengthen the connections between policy and managerial analyses of productivity....

  3. Relativistic Chiral Kinetic Theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephanov, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    This very brief review of the recent progress in chiral kinetic theory is based on the results of Refs. [J.-Y. Chen, D. T. Son, M. A. Stephanov, H.-U. Yee, Y. Yin, Lorentz Invariance in Chiral Kinetic Theory, Phys. Rev. Lett. 113 (18) (2014) 182302. doi: (10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.182302); J.-Y. Chen, D. T. Son, M. A. Stephanov, Collisions in Chiral Kinetic Theory, Phys. Rev. Lett. 115 (2) (2015) 021601. doi: (10.1103/PhysRevLett.115.021601); M. A. Stephanov, H.-U. Yee, The no-drag frame for anomalous chiral fluid, Phys. Rev. Lett. 116 (12) (2016) 122302. doi: (10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.122302)].

  4. Relativistic Chiral Kinetic Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephanov, Mikhail

    2016-12-15

    This very brief review of the recent progress in chiral kinetic theory is based on the results of Refs. [J.-Y. Chen, D. T. Son, M. A. Stephanov, H.-U. Yee, Y. Yin, Lorentz Invariance in Chiral Kinetic Theory, Phys. Rev. Lett. 113 (18) (2014) 182302. doi: (10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.182302); J.-Y. Chen, D. T. Son, M. A. Stephanov, Collisions in Chiral Kinetic Theory, Phys. Rev. Lett. 115 (2) (2015) 021601. doi: (10.1103/PhysRevLett.115.021601); M. A. Stephanov, H.-U. Yee, The no-drag frame for anomalous chiral fluid, Phys. Rev. Lett. 116 (12) (2016) 122302. doi: (10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.122302)].

  5. Erbium hydride decomposition kinetics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrizz, Robert Matthew

    2006-11-01

    Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) is used to study the decomposition kinetics of erbium hydride thin films. The TDS results presented in this report are analyzed quantitatively using Redhead's method to yield kinetic parameters (E{sub A} {approx} 54.2 kcal/mol), which are then utilized to predict hydrogen outgassing in vacuum for a variety of thermal treatments. Interestingly, it was found that the activation energy for desorption can vary by more than 7 kcal/mol (0.30 eV) for seemingly similar samples. In addition, small amounts of less-stable hydrogen were observed for all erbium dihydride films. A detailed explanation of several approaches for analyzing thermal desorption spectra to obtain kinetic information is included as an appendix.

  6. The coke drum thermal kinetic effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldescu, Maria M.; Romero, Sim; Larson, Mel [KBC Advanced Technologies plc, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-01

    The coke drum thermal kinetic dynamics fundamentally affect the coker unit yields as well as the coke product properties and unit reliability. In the drum the thermal cracking and polymerization or condensation reactions take place in a semi-batch environment. Understanding the fundamentals of the foaming kinetics that occur in the coke drums is key to avoiding a foam-over that could result in a unit shutdown for several months. Although the most dynamic changes with time occur during drum filling, other dynamics of the coker process will be discussed as well. KBC has contributed towards uncovering and modelling the complexities of heavy oil thermal dynamics. (author)

  7. Kinetic studies of elementary chemical reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durant, J.L. Jr. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This program concerning kinetic studies of elementary chemical reactions is presently focussed on understanding reactions of NH{sub x} species. To reach this goal, the author is pursuing experimental studies of reaction rate coefficients and product branching fractions as well as using electronic structure calculations to calculate transition state properties and reaction rate calculations to relate these properties to predicted kinetic behavior. The synergy existing between the experimental and theoretical studies allow one to gain a deeper insight into more complex elementary reactions.

  8. Relativistic Kinetic Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vereshchagin, Gregory V.; Aksenov, Alexey G.

    2017-02-01

    Preface; Acknowledgements; Acronyms and definitions; Introduction; Part I. Theoretical Foundations: 1. Basic concepts; 2. Kinetic equation; 3. Averaging; 4. Conservation laws and equilibrium; 5. Relativistic BBGKY hierarchy; 6. Basic parameters in gases and plasmas; Part II. Numerical Methods: 7. The basics of computational physics; 8. Direct integration of Boltzmann equations; 9. Multidimensional hydrodynamics; Part III. Applications: 10. Wave dispersion in relativistic plasma; 11. Thermalization in relativistic plasma; 12. Kinetics of particles in strong fields; 13. Compton scattering in astrophysics and cosmology; 14. Self-gravitating systems; 15. Neutrinos, gravitational collapse and supernovae; Appendices; Bibliography; Index.

  9. Quantum kinetic theory

    CERN Document Server

    Bonitz, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This book presents quantum kinetic theory in a comprehensive way. The focus is on density operator methods and on non-equilibrium Green functions. The theory allows to rigorously treat nonequilibrium dynamics in quantum many-body systems. Of particular interest are ultrafast processes in plasmas, condensed matter and trapped atoms that are stimulated by rapidly developing experiments with short pulse lasers and free electron lasers. To describe these experiments theoretically, the most powerful approach is given by non-Markovian quantum kinetic equations that are discussed in detail, including computational aspects.

  10. Fully kinetic simulations of megajoule-scale dense plasma focus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, A.; Link, A.; Tang, V.; Halvorson, C.; May, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore California 94550 (United States); Welch, D. [Voss Scientific, LLC, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87108 (United States); Meehan, B. T.; Hagen, E. C. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Las Vegas, Nevada 89030 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Dense plasma focus (DPF) Z-pinch devices are sources of copious high energy electrons and ions, x-rays, and neutrons. Megajoule-scale DPFs can generate 10{sup 12} neutrons per pulse in deuterium gas through a combination of thermonuclear and beam-target fusion. However, the details of the neutron production are not fully understood and past optimization efforts of these devices have been largely empirical. Previously, we reported on the first fully kinetic simulations of a kilojoule-scale DPF and demonstrated that both kinetic ions and kinetic electrons are needed to reproduce experimentally observed features, such as charged-particle beam formation and anomalous resistivity. Here, we present the first fully kinetic simulation of a MegaJoule DPF, with predicted ion and neutron spectra, neutron anisotropy, neutron spot size, and time history of neutron production. The total yield predicted by the simulation is in agreement with measured values, validating the kinetic model in a second energy regime.

  11. Adsorption kinetics of cadmium and lead by chitosan

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-04-26

    Apr 26, 2010 ... The lead and cadmium adsorption kinetic behavior could not be described using the Langmuir ... by chemical or by physical adsorption (Dean and Dixon,. 1992 ... phate fertilizer burning fuels, cement production, mining.

  12. Kinetic model for polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) production by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-05-24

    May 24, 2010 ... substrates such as glucose, fructose were 0.36, 0.24, h-1 and 106, 80 g/l, respectively. A good agreement ... such as corn syrup, cane molasses, beet molasses, or .... (UNICO2100, USA) with distilled water for suitable dilution.

  13. Thermodynamic Activity-Based Progress Curve Analysis in Enzyme Kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleiss, Jürgen

    2018-03-01

    Macrokinetic Michaelis-Menten models based on thermodynamic activity provide insights into enzyme kinetics because they separate substrate-enzyme from substrate-solvent interactions. Kinetic parameters are estimated from experimental progress curves of enzyme-catalyzed reactions. Three pitfalls are discussed: deviations between thermodynamic and concentration-based models, product effects on the substrate activity coefficient, and product inhibition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Modeling chemical kinetics graphically

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heck, A.

    2012-01-01

    In literature on chemistry education it has often been suggested that students, at high school level and beyond, can benefit in their studies of chemical kinetics from computer supported activities. Use of system dynamics modeling software is one of the suggested quantitative approaches that could

  15. CATALYTIC KINETIC SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC DETERMINATION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    acetylchlorophosphonazo(CPApA) by hydrogen peroxide in 0.10 M phosphoric acid. A novel catalytic kinetic-spectrophotometric method is proposed for the determination of copper based on this principle. Copper(II) can be determined spectrophotometrically ...

  16. Kinetic energy budget details

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. This paper presents the detailed turbulent kinetic energy budget and higher order statistics of flow behind a surface-mounted rib with and without superimposed acoustic excitation. Pattern recognition technique is used to determine the large-scale structure magnitude. It is observed that most of the turbulence ...

  17. Point kinetics modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimpland, R.H.

    1996-01-01

    A normalized form of the point kinetics equations, a prompt jump approximation, and the Nordheim-Fuchs model are used to model nuclear systems. Reactivity feedback mechanisms considered include volumetric expansion, thermal neutron temperature effect, Doppler effect and void formation. A sample problem of an excursion occurring in a plutonium solution accidentally formed in a glovebox is presented

  18. Comparing three methods of simultaneous synthesis and stabilization of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles: Changing physicochemical properties of products to improve kinetic and thermodynamic of dye adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakhshaee, Roohan, E-mail: roohan_rakhshaee@guilan.ac.ir; Noorani, Yasaman

    2017-01-15

    Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles (FNPs) were synthesized by conventional heating (CH), co-precipitation (CP) and microwave heating (MH) methods in presence of pectin crosslinked by β-isopropylglutaric acid (-CP) to stabilize nanoparticles. The role of the cross-linked pectin and kinds of synthesis methods was appeared to increase the effective total surface of FNPs both simultaneously as the synergistic effects and separately. The effective role of the microwave irradiation to decrease FNPs mean size was seen, so that its size in FMH was smaller 21.5% and 38.2% than that of FCP and FCH, and in FMH-CP was smaller 27.2% and 58.9% than that of FCP-CP and FCH-CP, respectively. The various experiments were done on the structures, functional groups, and connection quantities of -CP to FNPs synthesized by CH, CP and MH methods. The different physical properties of the obtained composites containing magnetization, zeta potential and thermal analyses were determined. To study the adsorption of methylene blue (MB) from the aqueous and alkali solution, the role Fe–O{sup −} groups of FNPs was evaluated more effective than the role of –COO{sup −} and –O{sup −} of -CP in the stabilized nanoparticles. Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs stabilized by -CP using microwave heating showed the highest capacity of MB adsorption due to having the most suitable thermodynamic and kinetic parameters. - Highlights: • Studying simultaneous synergistic effects to reduce Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles size. • Quantity and quality study of particles stabilization by cross linked pectin. • Comparing abilities of new products for methylene blue adsorption. • Microwave heating as the most effective factor to reach desired results.

  19. LLNL Chemical Kinetics Modeling Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Mehl, M; Herbinet, O; Curran, H J; Silke, E J

    2008-09-24

    The LLNL chemical kinetics modeling group has been responsible for much progress in the development of chemical kinetic models for practical fuels. The group began its work in the early 1970s, developing chemical kinetic models for methane, ethane, ethanol and halogenated inhibitors. Most recently, it has been developing chemical kinetic models for large n-alkanes, cycloalkanes, hexenes, and large methyl esters. These component models are needed to represent gasoline, diesel, jet, and oil-sand-derived fuels.

  20. The kinetically dominated quasar 3C 418

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punsly, Brian; Kharb, Preeti

    2017-06-01

    The existence of quasars that are kinetically dominated, where the jet kinetic luminosity, Q, is larger than the total (infrared to X-ray) thermal luminosity of the accretion flow, Lbol, provides a strong constraint on the fundamental physics of relativistic jet formation. Since quasars have high values of Lbol by definition, only ˜10 kinetically dominated quasars (with \\overline{Q}/L_{bol}>1) have been found, where \\overline{Q} is the long-term time-averaged jet power. We use low-frequency (151 MHz-1.66 GHz) observations of the quasar 3C 418 to determine \\overline{Q}≈ 5.5 ± 1.3 × 10^{46} {erg s^{-1}}. Analysis of the rest-frame ultraviolet spectrum indicates that this equates to 0.57 ± 0.28 times the Eddington luminosity of the central supermassive black hole and \\overline{Q}/L_{bol} ≈ 4.8 ± 3.1, making 3C 418 one of the most kinetically dominated quasars found to date. It is shown that this maximal \\overline{Q}/L_{bol} is consistent with models of magnetically arrested accretion of jet production in which the jet production reproduces the observed trend of a decrement in the extreme ultraviolet continuum as the jet power increases. This maximal condition corresponds to an almost complete saturation of the inner accretion flow with vertical large-scale magnetic flux (maximum saturation).

  1. Extraction kinetics and properties of proanthocyanidins from pomegranate peel

    Science.gov (United States)

    With an objective of developing a safe and efficient method to extract proanthocyanidins products from pomegranate peel for use in nutraceuticals or as food additives, the effects of extraction parameters on the production efficiency, product properties, and extraction kinetics were systematically s...

  2. Kinetic investigation of heterogeneous catalytic reactions by means of the kinetic isotope method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, F; Dermietzel, J [Akademie der Wissenschaften der DDR, Leipzig. Zentralinstitut fuer Isotopen- und Strahlenforschung

    1978-09-01

    The application of the kinetic isotope method to heterogeneous catalytic processes is possible for surface compounds by using the steady-state relation. However, the characterization of intermediate products becomes ambiguous if sorption rates are of the same order of magnitude as surface reactions rates. The isotopic exchange reaction renders possible the estimation of sorption rates.

  3. Kinetic energy absorbing pad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bricmont, R.J.; Hamilton, P.A.; Ming Long Ting, R.

    1981-01-01

    Reactors, fuel processing plants etc incorporate pipes and conduits for fluids under high pressure. Fractures, particularly adjacent to conduit elbows, produce a jet of liquid which whips the broken conduit at an extremely high velocity. An enormous impact load would be applied to any stationary object in the conduit's path. The design of cellular, corrugated metal impact pads to absorb the kinetic energy of the high velocity conduits is given. (U.K.)

  4. Relaxation and kinetics in scalar field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyanovsky, D.; Lawrie, I.D.; Lee, D.

    1996-01-01

    A new approach to the dynamics of relaxation and kinetics of thermalization in a scalar field theory is presented that incorporates the relevant time scales through the resummation of hard thermal loops. An alternative derivation of the kinetic equations for the open-quote open-quote quasiparticle close-quote close-quote distribution functions is obtained that allows a clear understanding of the different open-quote open-quote coarse-graining close-quote close-quote approximations usually involved in a kinetic description. This method leads to a systematic perturbative expansion to obtain the kinetic equations including hard thermal loop resummation and to an improvement including renormalization, off-shell effects, and contributions that change chemical equilibrium on short time scales. As a by-product of these methods we establish the equivalence between the relaxation time scale in the linearized equation of motion of the quasiparticles and the thermalization time scale of the quasiparticle distribution function in the open-quote open-quote relaxation time approximation close-quote close-quote including hard thermal loop effects. Hard thermal loop resummation dramatically modifies the scattering rate for long wavelength modes as compared to the usual (semi)classical estimate. Relaxation and kinetics are studied both in the unbroken and broken symmetry phases of the theory. The broken symmetry phase also provides the setting to obtain the contribution to the kinetic equations from processes that involve decay of a heavy scalar into light scalar particles in the medium. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  5. Exercise: Kinetic considerations for gas exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossiter, Harry B

    2011-01-01

    The activities of daily living typically occur at metabolic rates below the maximum rate of aerobic energy production. Such activity is characteristic of the nonsteady state, where energy demands, and consequential physiological responses, are in constant flux. The dynamics of the integrated physiological processes during these activities determine the degree to which exercise can be supported through rates of O₂ utilization and CO₂ clearance appropriate for their demands and, as such, provide a physiological framework for the notion of exercise intensity. The rate at which O₂ exchange responds to meet the changing energy demands of exercise--its kinetics--is dependent on the ability of the pulmonary, circulatory, and muscle bioenergetic systems to respond appropriately. Slow response kinetics in pulmonary O₂ uptake predispose toward a greater necessity for substrate-level energy supply, processes that are limited in their capacity, challenge system homeostasis and hence contribute to exercise intolerance. This review provides a physiological systems perspective of pulmonary gas exchange kinetics: from an integrative view on the control of muscle oxygen consumption kinetics to the dissociation of cellular respiration from its pulmonary expression by the circulatory dynamics and the gas capacitance of the lungs, blood, and tissues. The intensity dependence of gas exchange kinetics is discussed in relation to constant, intermittent, and ramped work rate changes. The influence of heterogeneity in the kinetic matching of O₂ delivery to utilization is presented in reference to exercise tolerance in endurance-trained athletes, the elderly, and patients with chronic heart or lung disease. © 2011 American Physiological Society.

  6. Kinetic study on Iranian furfural extract hydrocracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarkesh, J.; Akbarnejad, M. M. [NIOC Research Institute of Petroleum Industry, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khorasheh, F. [Sharif Univ. of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Badakhshan, A. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada)

    1998-05-01

    Upgrading heavy crude oil to light crude oil is one of the most important refining processes. Familiarity with the kinetics and related kinetic models is one of the important aspects of developing expertise in this field. This joint study between the NIOC Institute of Research of the Petroleum Industry and Sharif University was undertaken to determine the most appropriate upgrading process for Iranian heavy feed stock and to predict the conversion and product distribution in commercial hydrocracking units. The study involved the evaluation of stoichiometry of the hydrocracking process, focusing on the catalytic hydrocracking of furfural extract (a by-product of the lubricating oil plant) of the Tehran refinery. A pilot plant reactor was used. Good correspondence between model predictions and theoretical values was obtained.

  7. Nanostructured energy devices equilibrium concepts and kinetics

    CERN Document Server

    Bisquert, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Due to the pressing needs of society, low cost materials for energy devices have experienced an outstanding development in recent times. In this highly multidisciplinary area, chemistry, material science, physics, and electrochemistry meet to develop new materials and devices that perform required energy conversion and storage processes with high efficiency, adequate capabilities for required applications, and low production cost. Nanostructured Energy Devices: Equilibrium Concepts and Kinetics introduces the main physicochemical principles that govern the operation of energy devices. It inclu

  8. Kinetics of tetrataenite disordering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dos Santos, E.; Gattacceca, J.; Rochette, P.; Fillion, G.; Scorzelli, R.B.

    2015-01-01

    Tetrataenite is a chemically ordered L1 0 -type Fe 50 Ni 50 alloy detected for the first time in 1977 by 57 Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy studies in iron meteorites. The thermal history of meteorites, in particular short thermal events like those associated to hypervelocity impacts, can be constrained by tracing the presence of tetrataenite or its disordering into taenite. The knowledge of the disordering kinetics of tetrataenite, that is associated with changes in its magnetic properties, is still very fragmentary so that the time–temperature history of these meteorites cannot be constrained in details. Furthermore, knowledge of disordering kinetics is important due to potential technological application of tetrataenite as a rare-earth free strong magnet. Thus, this work provides the first time–temperature data for disordering reaction of tetrataenite. We have shown that disordering is not an instantaneous process but is a kinetic limited reaction. It was shown that disordering may take place at any temperature above the order–disorder transition for L 10 superstructure phase (∼320 °C) when the appropriate time-scale is considered. This result means that the apparent Curie point for tetrataenite is not an absolute property in the sense that any estimate of this parameter should be referred to a given time-scale. - Highlights: • The first time–temperature data for tetrataenite disordering reaction is provided. • Previous works does not give a complete picture of tetrataenite disordering. • Apparent Curie temperature of tetrataenite should be referred to a time-scale. • Tetrataenite can be used as a probe to detect thermal/shock events recorded in meteorites

  9. Effect of operational and water quality parameters on conventional ozonation and the advanced oxidation process O3/H2O2: Kinetics of micropollutant abatement, transformation product and bromate formation in a surface water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgin, Marc; Borowska, Ewa; Helbing, Jakob; Hollender, Juliane; Kaiser, Hans-Peter; Kienle, Cornelia; McArdell, Christa S; Simon, Eszter; von Gunten, Urs

    2017-10-01

    The efficiency of ozone-based processes under various conditions was studied for the treatment of a surface water (Lake Zürich water, Switzerland) spiked with 19 micropollutants (pharmaceuticals, pesticides, industrial chemical, X-ray contrast medium, sweetener) each at 1 μg L -1 . Two pilot-scale ozonation reactors (4-5 m 3  h -1 ), a 4-chamber reactor and a tubular reactor, were investigated by either conventional ozonation and/or the advanced oxidation process (AOP) O 3 /H 2 O 2 . The effects of selected operational parameters, such as ozone dose (0.5-3 mg L -1 ) and H 2 O 2 dose (O 3 :H 2 O 2  = 1:3-3:1 (mass ratio)), and selected water quality parameters, such as pH (6.5-8.5) and initial bromide concentration (15-200 μg L -1 ), on micropollutant abatement and bromate formation were investigated. Under the studied conditions, compounds with high second-order rate constants k O3 >10 4  M -1  s -1 for their reaction with ozone were well abated (>90%) even for the lowest ozone dose of 0.5 mg L -1 . Conversely, the abatement efficiency of sucralose, which only reacts with hydroxyl radicals (OH), varied between 19 and 90%. Generally, the abatement efficiency increased with higher ozone doses and higher pH and lower bromide concentrations. H 2 O 2 addition accelerated the ozone conversion to OH, which enables a faster abatement of ozone-resistant micropollutants. Interestingly, the abatement of micropollutants decreased with higher bromide concentrations during conventional ozonation due to competitive ozone-consuming reactions, except for lamotrigine, due to the suspected reaction of HOBr/OBr - with the primary amine moieties. In addition to the abatement of micropollutants, the evolution of the two main transformation products (TPs) of hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ) and tramadol (TRA), chlorothiazide (CTZ) and tramadol N-oxide (TRA-NOX), respectively, was assessed by chemical analysis and kinetic modeling. Both selected TPs were quickly formed initially

  10. Kinetics of propionate conversion in anaerobic continuously stirred tank reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsø Nielsen, Henrik; Mladenovska, Zuzana; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2008-01-01

    The kinetic parameters of anaerobic propionate degradation by biomass from 7 continuously stirred tank reactors differing in temperature, hydraulic retention time and substrate composition were investigated. In substrate-depletion experiments (batch) the maximum propionate degradation rate, A......-m, was estimated. The results demonstrate that the rate of endogenous substrate (propionate) production should be taken into account when estimating kinetic parameters in biomass from manure-based anaerobic reactors....

  11. Kinetics model development of cocoa bean fermentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kresnowati, M. T. A. P.; Gunawan, Agus Yodi; Muliyadini, Winny

    2015-12-01

    Although Indonesia is one of the biggest cocoa beans producers in the world, Indonesian cocoa beans are oftenly of low quality and thereby frequently priced low in the world market. In order to improve the quality, adequate post-harvest cocoa processing techniques are required. Fermentation is the vital stage in series of cocoa beans post harvest processing which could improve the quality of cocoa beans, in particular taste, aroma, and colours. During the fermentation process, combination of microbes grow producing metabolites that serve as the precursors for cocoa beans flavour. Microbial composition and thereby their activities will affect the fermentation performance and influence the properties of cocoa beans. The correlation could be reviewed using a kinetic model that includes unstructured microbial growth, substrate utilization and metabolic product formation. The developed kinetic model could be further used to design cocoa bean fermentation process to meet the expected quality. Further the development of kinetic model of cocoa bean fermentation also serve as a good case study of mixed culture solid state fermentation, that has rarely been studied. This paper presents the development of a kinetic model for solid-state cocoa beans fermentation using an empirical approach. Series of lab scale cocoa bean fermentations, either natural fermentations without starter addition or fermentations with mixed yeast and lactic acid bacteria starter addition, were used for model parameters estimation. The results showed that cocoa beans fermentation can be modelled mathematically and the best model included substrate utilization, microbial growth, metabolites production and its transport. Although the developed model still can not explain the dynamics in microbial population, this model can sufficiently explained the observed changes in sugar concentration as well as metabolic products in the cocoa bean pulp.

  12. Kinetics of coal pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seery, D.J.; Freihaut, J.D.; Proscia, W.M. (United Technologies Research Center, East Hartford, CT (USA)); Howard, J.B.; Peters, W.; Hsu, J.; Hajaligol, M.; Sarofim, A. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (USA)); Jenkins, R.; Mallin, J.; Espindola-Merin, B. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (USA)); Essenhigh, R.; Misra, M.K. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (USA))

    1989-07-01

    This report contains results of a coordinated, multi-laboratory investigation of coal devolatilization. Data is reported pertaining to the devolatilization for bituminous coals over three orders of magnitude in apparent heating rate (100 to 100,000 + {degree}C/sec), over two orders of magnitude in particle size (20 to 700 microns), final particle temperatures from 400 to 1600{degree}C, heat transfer modes ranging from convection to radiative, ambient pressure ranging from near vacuum to one atmosphere pressure. The heat transfer characteristics of the reactors are reported in detail. It is assumed the experimental results are to form the basis of a devolatilization data base. Empirical rate expressions are developed for each phase of devolatilization which, when coupled to an awareness of the heat transfer rate potential of a particular devolatilization reactor, indicate the kinetics emphasized by a particular system reactor plus coal sample. The analysis indicates the particular phase of devolatilization that will be emphasized by a particular reactor type and, thereby, the kinetic expressions appropriate to that devolatilization system. Engineering rate expressions are developed from the empirical rate expressions in the context of a fundamental understanding of coal devolatilization developed in the course of the investigation. 164 refs., 223 figs., 44 tabs.

  13. Repair kinetics in tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thames, H.D.

    1989-01-01

    Monoexponential repair kinetics is based on the assumption of a single, dose-independent rate of repair of sublethal injury in the target cells for tissue injury after exposure to ionizing radiation. Descriptions of the available data based on this assumption have proved fairly successful for both acutely responding (skin, lip mucosa, gut) and late-responding (lung, spinal cord) normal tissues. There are indications of biphasic exponential repair in both categories, however. Unfortunately, the data usually lack sufficient resolution to permit unambiguous determination of the repair rates. There are also indications that repair kinetics may depend on the size of the dose. The data are conflicting on this account, however, with suggestions of both faster and slower repair after larger doses. Indeed, experiments that have been explicitly designed to test this hypothesis show either no effect (gut, spinal cord), faster repair after higher doses (lung, kidney), or slower repair after higher doses (skin). Monoexponential repair appears to be a fairly accurate description that provides an approximation to a more complicated picture, the elucidation of whose details will, however, require very careful and extensive experimental study. (author). 30 refs.; 1 fig

  14. Diffusion Influenced Adsorption Kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Toshiaki; Seki, Kazuhiko

    2015-08-27

    When the kinetics of adsorption is influenced by the diffusive flow of solutes, the solute concentration at the surface is influenced by the surface coverage of solutes, which is given by the Langmuir-Hinshelwood adsorption equation. The diffusion equation with the boundary condition given by the Langmuir-Hinshelwood adsorption equation leads to the nonlinear integro-differential equation for the surface coverage. In this paper, we solved the nonlinear integro-differential equation using the Grünwald-Letnikov formula developed to solve fractional kinetics. Guided by the numerical results, analytical expressions for the upper and lower bounds of the exact numerical results were obtained. The upper and lower bounds were close to the exact numerical results in the diffusion- and reaction-controlled limits, respectively. We examined the validity of the two simple analytical expressions obtained in the diffusion-controlled limit. The results were generalized to include the effect of dispersive diffusion. We also investigated the effect of molecular rearrangement of anisotropic molecules on surface coverage.

  15. Chemical kinetics and reaction mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Ou Sik; Park, Youn Yeol

    1996-12-01

    This book is about chemical kinetics and reaction mechanism. It consists of eleven chapters, which deal with reaction and reaction speed on reaction mechanism, simple reaction by rate expression, reversible reaction and simultaneous reaction, successive reaction, complicated reaction mechanism, assumption for reaction mechanism, transition state theory, successive reaction and oscillating reaction, reaction by solution, research method high except kinetics on reaction mechanism, high reaction of kinetics like pulsed radiolysis.

  16. Chemical kinetics of gas reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kondrat'Ev, V N

    2013-01-01

    Chemical Kinetics of Gas Reactions explores the advances in gas kinetics and thermal, photochemical, electrical discharge, and radiation chemical reactions. This book is composed of 10 chapters, and begins with the presentation of general kinetic rules for simple and complex chemical reactions. The next chapters deal with the experimental methods for evaluating chemical reaction mechanisms and some theories of elementary chemical processes. These topics are followed by discussions on certain class of chemical reactions, including unimolecular, bimolecular, and termolecular reactions. The rema

  17. Adsorption analysis equilibria and kinetics

    CERN Document Server

    Do, Duong D

    1998-01-01

    This book covers topics of equilibria and kinetics of adsorption in porous media. Fundamental equilibria and kinetics are dealt with for homogeneous as well as heterogeneous particles. Five chapters of the book deal with equilibria and eight chapters deal with kinetics. Single component as well as multicomponent systems are discussed. In kinetics analysis, we deal with the various mass transport processes and their interactions inside a porous particle. Conventional approaches as well as the new approach using Maxwell-Stefan equations are presented. Various methods to measure diffusivity, such

  18. Reexamining Michaelis-Menten Enzyme Kinetics for Xanthine Oxidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassingthwaighte, James B.; Chinn, Tamara M.

    2013-01-01

    Abbreviated expressions for enzyme kinetic expressions, such as the Michaelis-Menten (M-M) equations, are based on the premise that enzyme concentrations are low compared with those of the substrate and product. When one does progress experiments, where the solute is consumed during conversion to form a series of products, the idealized conditions…

  19. Engineering Neurospora crassa for cellobionate production directly from cellulose without any enzyme addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    A previously engineered strain of N. crassa F5'ace-1'cre-1'ndvB) with six out of seven ß-glucosidase (bgl) genes, two transcription factors (cre1 and ace-1) and cellobionate phosphorylase (ndvB) deleted was able to produce cellobiose and cellobionate directly from cellulose without the addition of e...

  20. Kinetics of molybdenum and chlorine interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelikman, A.N.; Nazarov, Yu.N.; Sarkarov, T.Eh.; Tulyakov, N.V.

    1977-01-01

    The kinetics is studied of molybdenite chlorination with gaseous chlorine. The time dependences of the depth and degree of molybdenite chlorination are given along with the dependence on chlorine concentration of molybdenite chlorination rate. Active interaction is shown to take place at 450-470 deg C. At 350-435 deg C, chlorination occurs in the kinetic range, the apparent activation energy being equal to 22.2 kcal/mole and the order of reaction by chlorine to 0.77. At 435-610 deg C, the process takes place in the diffusion range and is restricted by dissipation of the reaction products (activation energy - 4.05 kcal/mole; order of reaction by chlorine - 0.6)

  1. Kinetics of Social Contagion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Zhongyuan; Iñiguez, Gerardo; Karsai, Márton; Kertész, János

    2015-11-01

    Diffusion of information, behavioral patterns or innovations follows diverse pathways depending on a number of conditions, including the structure of the underlying social network, the sensitivity to peer pressure and the influence of media. Here we study analytically and by simulations a general model that incorporates threshold mechanism capturing sensitivity to peer pressure, the effect of "immune" nodes who never adopt, and a perpetual flow of external information. While any constant, nonzero rate of dynamically introduced spontaneous adopters leads to global spreading, the kinetics by which the asymptotic state is approached shows rich behavior. In particular, we find that, as a function of the immune node density, there is a transition from fast to slow spreading governed by entirely different mechanisms. This transition happens below the percolation threshold of network fragmentation, and has its origin in the competition between cascading behavior induced by adopters and blocking due to immune nodes. This change is accompanied by a percolation transition of the induced clusters.

  2. The temperature hydration kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mircea Oroian

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to evaluate the hydration kinetics of lentil seeds (Lens culinaris in water at different temperatures (25, 32.5, 40, 55, 70 and 80 °C for assessing the adequacy of models for describing the absorption phenomena during soaking. The diffusion coefficient values were calculated using Fick’s model for spherical and hemispherical geometries and the values were in the range of 10−6 m2/s. The experimental data were fitted to Peleg, Sigmoidal, Weibull and Exponential models. The models adequacy was determined using regression coefficients (R2, root mean square error (RMSE and reduced chi-square (χ2. The Peleg model is the suitable one for predicting the experimental data. Temperature had a positive and significant effect on the water absorption capacities and absorption was an endothermic process.

  3. Selective catalytic oxidation of NO as a process stage in NOx separation from power plant and production systems off-gases. Catalyst development and reaction kinetics. Final report. Die selektive katalytische Oxidation des NO als Prozess-Stufe bei der Stickoxidabscheidung aus Abgasen von Kraftwerken und Produktionsanlagen. Katalysatorentwicklung und Reaktionskinetik. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emig, G.; Seifert, J.

    1989-06-01

    The research project was to investigate the heterogeneously catalyzed oxidation of NO in flue gas using 1. metal oxide catalysts (commonly on a MnO{sub 2} basis), 2. ZSM5 zeolites (pentasil), and 3. noble metal catalysts. Apart from the reaction kinetics, also the activity and resistance to typical catalyst poisons (SO{sub 2}, HCl, HF, heavy metals) were investigated. A fully automatic, computer-controlled experimental apparatus was developed which apart from the analysis of reaction products permitted also dynamic experiments with time constants in the seconds range and experiments with cyclic variation of concentration, temperature, and time of residue. (RB).

  4. Kinetic theory of Jeans instability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trigger, S.A.; Ershkovic, A.I.; Heijst, van G.J.F.; Schram, P.P.J.M.

    2004-01-01

    Kinetic treatment of the Jeans gravitational instability, with collisions taken into account, is presented. The initial-value problem for the distribution function which obeys the kinetic equation, with the collision integral conserving the number of particles, is solved. Dispersion relation is

  5. Spectroscopy and reaction kinetics of HCO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Yili.

    1989-01-01

    The high-resolution infrared spectrum of the C-H stretching fundamental of HCO has been studied by means of infrared flash kinetic spectroscopy. HCO was generated by flash photolysis of acetaldehyde or formaldehyde using a 308 nm (XeCl) excimer laser. The transient absorption was probed with an infrared difference frequency laser system. The high resolution spectra obtained were assigned and fitted with rotational, spin-rotational, and centrifugal distortion constants. The ν 1 band origin is 2434.48 cm/sup /minus/1/. New ground state constants have been derived from a least-squares fit combining the ν 1 data with previous microwave and FIR LMR measurements. A new set of spectroscopic constants for the (1, 0, 0) state, the equilibrium rotational constants, and the orientation of the transition dipole moment are also reported. The kinetics and product branching ratios of the HCO + NO 2 reaction have been studied using visible and infrared laser flash kinetic spectroscopy. The rate constant for the disappearance of HCO radical at 296 K is (5.7 +- 0.9) /times/ 10/sup /minus/11/ cm 3 molec/sup /minus/1/ sec/sup /minus/1/, and it is independent of the pressure of SF 6 buffer gas up to 700 torr. Less than 10% of the reaction goes through the most exothermic product channel, HNO + CO 2 . The product channel, H + CO 2 + NO, is responsible for 52% of the reaction. HONO has been observed, though not quantitatively, as a reaction product corresponding to the HONO + CO channel. 51 refs., 21 figs., 8 tabs

  6. The Particle-in-Cell and Kinetic Simulation Software Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, W. B.; Decyk, V. K.; Tableman, A.; Fonseca, R. A.; Tsung, F. S.; Hu, Q.; Winjum, B. J.; An, W.; Dalichaouch, T. N.; Davidson, A.; Hildebrand, L.; Joglekar, A.; May, J.; Miller, K.; Touati, M.; Xu, X. L.

    2017-10-01

    The UCLA Particle-in-Cell and Kinetic Simulation Software Center (PICKSC) aims to support an international community of PIC and plasma kinetic software developers, users, and educators; to increase the use of this software for accelerating the rate of scientific discovery; and to be a repository of knowledge and history for PIC. We discuss progress towards making available and documenting illustrative open-source software programs and distinct production programs; developing and comparing different PIC algorithms; coordinating the development of resources for the educational use of kinetic software; and the outcomes of our first sponsored OSIRIS users workshop. We also welcome input and discussion from anyone interested in using or developing kinetic software, in obtaining access to our codes, in collaborating, in sharing their own software, or in commenting on how PICKSC can better serve the DPP community. Supported by NSF under Grant ACI-1339893 and by the UCLA Institute for Digital Research and Education.

  7. Kinetics of hydrogen peroxide decomposition by catalase: hydroxylic solvent effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raducan, Adina; Cantemir, Anca Ruxandra; Puiu, Mihaela; Oancea, Dumitru

    2012-11-01

    The effect of water-alcohol (methanol, ethanol, propan-1-ol, propan-2-ol, ethane-1,2-diol and propane-1,2,3-triol) binary mixtures on the kinetics of hydrogen peroxide decomposition in the presence of bovine liver catalase is investigated. In all solvents, the activity of catalase is smaller than in water. The results are discussed on the basis of a simple kinetic model. The kinetic constants for product formation through enzyme-substrate complex decomposition and for inactivation of catalase are estimated. The organic solvents are characterized by several physical properties: dielectric constant (D), hydrophobicity (log P), concentration of hydroxyl groups ([OH]), polarizability (α), Kamlet-Taft parameter (β) and Kosower parameter (Z). The relationships between the initial rate, kinetic constants and medium properties are analyzed by linear and multiple linear regression.

  8. Production of vaccines for treatment of infectious diseases by transgenic plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina LEDL

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Since the first pathogen antigen was expressed in transgenic plants with the aim of producing edible vaccine in early 1990s, transgenic plants have become a well-established expression system for production of alternative vaccines against various human and animal infectious diseases. The main focus of plant expression systems in the last five years has been on improving expression of well-studied antigens such as porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRSV, bovine viral diarrhea disease virus (BVDV, footh and mouth disease virus (FMDV, hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg, rabies G protein, rotavirus, Newcastle disease virus (NDV, Norwalk virus capsid protein (NVCP, avian influenza virus H5N1, Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin subunit B (LT-B, cholera toxin B (CT-B, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, artherosclerosis, ebola and anthrax. Significant increases in expression have been obtained using improved expression vectors, different plant species and transformation methods.

  9. Chemical kinetics and modeling of planetary atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yung, Yuk L.

    1990-01-01

    A unified overview is presented for chemical kinetics and chemical modeling in planetary atmospheres. The recent major advances in the understanding of the chemistry of the terrestrial atmosphere make the study of planets more interesting and relevant. A deeper understanding suggests that the important chemical cycles have a universal character that connects the different planets and ultimately link together the origin and evolution of the solar system. The completeness (or incompleteness) of the data base for chemical kinetics in planetary atmospheres will always be judged by comparison with that for the terrestrial atmosphere. In the latter case, the chemistry of H, O, N, and Cl species is well understood. S chemistry is poorly understood. In the atmospheres of Jovian planets and Titan, the C-H chemistry of simple species (containing 2 or less C atoms) is fairly well understood. The chemistry of higher hydrocarbons and the C-N, P-N chemistry is much less understood. In the atmosphere of Venus, the dominant chemistry is that of chlorine and sulfur, and very little is known about C1-S coupled chemistry. A new frontier for chemical kinetics both in the Earth and planetary atmospheres is the study of heterogeneous reactions. The formation of the ozone hole on Earth, the ubiquitous photochemical haze on Venus and in the Jovian planets and Titan all testify to the importance of heterogeneous reactions. It remains a challenge to connect the gas phase chemistry to the production of aerosols.

  10. Kinetic effects on magnetohydrodynamic phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Taro

    2001-01-01

    Resistive and ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theories are insufficient to adequately explain MHD phenomena in the high-temperature plasma. Recent progress in numerical simulations concerning kinetic effects on magnetohydrodynamic phenomena is summarized. The following three topics are studied using various models treating extended-MHD phenomena. (1) Kinetic modifications of internal kink modes in tokamaks with normal and reversed magnetic shear configurations. (2) Temporal evolution of the toroidal Alfven eigenmode and fishbone mode in tokamaks with energetic ions. (3) Kinetic stabilization of a title mode in field-reversed configurations by means of anchoring ions and beam ions. (author)

  11. Bicarbonate kinetics in Indian males

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu

    ized kinetics of bicarbonate using a three-compartment model, to assess which compartmental fluxes changed dur- .... total VCO2 was < 3 % and the average respiratory quotient ..... a part of the nonrespiratory losses of 13CO2 occur to this.

  12. Kinetic equations in dirty superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraehenbuehl, Y.

    1981-01-01

    Kinetic equations for superconductors in the dirty limit are derived using a method developed for superfluid systems, which allows a systematic expansion in small parameters; exact charge conservation is obeyed. (orig.)

  13. Cell kinetics and therapeutic efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreeff, M.; Abenhardt, W.; Gruner, B.; Stoffner, D.; Mainz Univ.

    1976-01-01

    The study shows that cell kinetics effects correlate with the effects of cytostatic drugs in the tumour model investigated here. It should, however, be noted that even genetically related tumour cell types may react differently to the same cytostatic drug, and that the cell kinetics effects, due to the changes in the cell cycle, cannot be predicted but should be followed with a very fast method, e.g. sequential flan fluorescence cytophotometry, for optimal therapeutic results. (orig./GSE) [de

  14. Product design - Molecules, devices, functional products, and formulated products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gani, Rafiqul; Ng, Ka M.

    2015-01-01

    Chemical product design is a multidisciplinary and diverse subject. This article provides an overview of product design while focusing on product conceptualization. Four product types are considered - molecular products, formulated products, devices and functional products. For molecular products......, computer-aided design tools are used to predict the physicochemical properties of single molecules and blends. For formulated products, an integrated experiment-modeling approach is used to generate the formula with the specified product attributes. For devices and functional products, conceptual product...... design is carried out by modeling the product based on thermodynamics, kinetics and transport processes, by performing experiments, and by decision making based on rule-based methods The results are product specifications in terms of the type of ingredients, composition, and the structure, form, shape...

  15. Kinetic parameters from thermogravimetric analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    High performance polymeric materials are finding increased use in aerospace applications. Proposed high speed aircraft will require materials to withstand high temperatures in an oxidative atmosphere for long periods of time. It is essential that accurate estimates be made of the performance of these materials at the given conditions of temperature and time. Temperatures of 350 F (177 C) and times of 60,000 to 100,000 hours are anticipated. In order to survey a large number of high performance polymeric materials on a reasonable time scale, some form of accelerated testing must be performed. A knowledge of the rate of a process can be used to predict the lifetime of that process. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) has frequently been used to determine kinetic information for degradation reactions in polymeric materials. Flynn and Wall studied a number of methods for using TGA experiments to determine kinetic information in polymer reactions. Kinetic parameters, such as the apparent activation energy and the frequency factor, can be determined in such experiments. Recently, researchers at the McDonnell Douglas Research Laboratory suggested that a graph of the logarithm of the frequency factor against the apparent activation energy can be used to predict long-term thermo-oxidative stability for polymeric materials. Such a graph has been called a kinetic map. In this study, thermogravimetric analyses were performed in air to study the thermo-oxidative degradation of several high performance polymers and to plot their kinetic parameters on a kinetic map.

  16. Gyrocenter-gauge kinetic theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, H.; Tang, W.M.; Lee, W.W.

    2000-01-01

    Gyrocenter-gauge kinetic theory is developed as an extension of the existing gyrokinetic theories. In essence, the formalism introduced here is a kinetic description of magnetized plasmas in the gyrocenter coordinates which is fully equivalent to the Vlasov-Maxwell system in the particle coordinates. In particular, provided the gyroradius is smaller than the scale-length of the magnetic field, it can treat high frequency range as well as the usual low frequency range normally associated with gyrokinetic approaches. A significant advantage of this formalism is that it enables the direct particle-in-cell simulations of compressional Alfven waves for MHD applications and of RF waves relevant to plasma heating in space and laboratory plasmas. The gyrocenter-gauge kinetic susceptibility for arbitrary wavelength and arbitrary frequency electromagnetic perturbations in a homogeneous magnetized plasma is shown to recover exactly the classical result obtained by integrating the Vlasov-Maxwell system in the particle coordinates. This demonstrates that all the waves supported by the Vlasov-Maxwell system can be studied using the gyrocenter-gauge kinetic model in the gyrocenter coordinates. This theoretical approach is so named to distinguish it from the existing gyrokinetic theory, which has been successfully developed and applied to many important low-frequency and long parallel wavelength problems, where the conventional meaning of gyrokinetic has been standardized. Besides the usual gyrokinetic distribution function, the gyrocenter-gauge kinetic theory emphasizes as well the gyrocenter-gauge distribution function, which sometimes contains all the physics of the problems being studied, and whose importance has not been realized previously. The gyrocenter-gauge distribution function enters Maxwell's equations through the pull-back transformation of the gyrocenter transformation, which depends on the perturbed fields. The efficacy of the gyrocenter-gauge kinetic approach is

  17. Crystallization Kinetics within a Generic Modelling Framework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meisler, Kresten Troelstrup; von Solms, Nicolas; Gernaey, Krist

    2013-01-01

    An existing generic modelling framework has been expanded with tools for kinetic model analysis. The analysis of kinetics is carried out within the framework where kinetic constitutive models are collected, analysed and utilized for the simulation of crystallization operations. A modelling...... procedure is proposed to gain the information of crystallization operation kinetic model analysis and utilize this for faster evaluation of crystallization operations....

  18. Oxidation of L-cystine by chromium(VI) - a kinetic study | Kumar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The kinetics of the title reaction was studied spectrophotometrically in HClO4 medium at 380 nm. The data suggested that the order with respect to cystine is fractional, whereas chromium(VI) follows first order kinetics. The reaction was second order in [H+]. Cysteic acid was found to be the main product of oxidation.

  19. Kinetics of reactions of aquacobalamin with aspartic and glutamic acids and their amides in water solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, T. T. T.; Sal'nikov, D. S.; Dereven'kov, I. A.; Makarov, S. V.

    2017-04-01

    The kinetics of aquacobalamin reaction with aspartic and glutamic acids, and with their amides in water solutions, is studied via spectrophotometry. The kinetic and activation parameters of the process are determined. It is shown that the reaction product is cobalamin-amino acid complex. The data are compared to results on the reaction between aquacobalamin and primary amines.

  20. Multiple Reaction Monitoring for quantitative laccase kinetics by LC-MS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perna, Valentina; Agger, Jane W.; Holck, Jesper

    2018-01-01

    as substrates to assess enzyme kinetics by HPLC-MS on two fungal laccases Trametes versicolor laccase, Tv and Ganoderma lucidum laccase, Gl. The method allowed accurate kinetic measurements and detailed insight into the product profiles of both laccases. Both Tv and Gl laccase are active...

  1. A kinetic model for the glucose/glycine Maillard reaction pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martins, S.I.F.S.; Boekel, van M.A.J.S.

    2005-01-01

    A comprehensive kinetic model for the glucose/glycine Maillard reaction is proposed based on an approach called multiresponse kinetic modelling. Special attention was paid to reactants, intermediates and end products: -fructose, N-(1-deoxy--fructos-1-yl)-glycine (DFG), 1-deoxy-2,3-hexodiulose and

  2. Dynamic kinetic resolution of biaryl atropisomers by chiral dialkylaminopyridine catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Gaoyuan; Deng, Chao; Deng, Jun; Sibi, Mukund P

    2018-05-02

    The acylative dynamic kinetic resolution (DKR) of configurationally unstable biaryl atropisomers is achieved by using newly developed chiral dialkylaminopyridine catalysts with fluxional chirality. Various types of biaryl substrates containing phenolic structures were subjected to the DKR to obtain a range of acylated biaryl products with enantiomeric ratios up to 90 : 10.

  3. Kinetic Studies of Catalytic Oxidation of Cyclohexene Using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cyclohexene was oxidized using chromium (VI) oxide (CrO3) in pure acetic acid medium. The products of oxidation were analysed using simple qualitative analysis, IR spectroscopy and Gas chromatography-Mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Kinetics studies were carried out to determine the order of reaction, rate constant and ...

  4. Tandem mass spectrometry at low kinetic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooks, R.G.; Hand, O.W.

    1987-01-01

    Recent progress in mass spectrometry, as applied to molecular analysis, is reviewed with emphasis on tandem mass spectrometry. Tandem instruments use multiple analyzers (sector magnets, quadrupole mass filters and time-of-flight devices) to select particular molecules in ionic form, react them in the gas-phase and then record the mass, momenta or kinetic energies of their products. The capabilities of tandem mass spectrometry for identification of individual molecules or particular classes of compounds in complex mixtures are illustrated. Several different types of experiments can be run using a tandem mass spectrometer; all share the feature of sifting the molecular mixture being analyzed on the basis of chemical properties expressed in terms of ionic mass, kinetic energy or charge state. Applications of mass spectrometry to biological problems often depend upon desorption methods of ionization in which samples are bombarded with particle beams. Evaporation of preformed charged species from the condensed phase into the vacuum is a particularly effective method of ionization. It is suggested that the use of accelerator mass spectrometers be extended to include problems of molecular analysis. In such experiments, low energy tandem mass spectrometry conducted in the eV or keV range of energies, would be followed by further characterization of the production ion beam using high selective MeV collision processes

  5. Study of exclusive one-pion and one-eta production using hadron and dielectron channels in pp reactions at kinetic beam energies of 1.25 GeV and 2.2 GeV with HADES

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Agakishiev, G.; Balanda, A.; Bokemeyer, H.; Finocchiaro, P.; Guber, F.; Gumberidze, M.; Karavicheva, T.; Křížek, Filip; Kugler, Andrej; Markert, J.; Pachmayer, Y.C.; Pechenova, O.; Pospíšil, Vladimír; Rustamov, A.; Sobolev, Yuri, G.; Strobele, H.; Tarantola, A.; Teilab, K.; Tlustý, Pavel; Wagner, Vladimír

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 5 (2012), s. 1-17 ISSN 1434-6001 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC07050; GA AV ČR IAA100480803 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : meson production * relativistic collision * dilepton production Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 2.043, year: 2012

  6. Anaerobic digestion of waste waters after washing olives used for oil production: in fluence of harvest time on the kinetics of the process. Digestion anaerobia de las aguas de lavado de aceitunas de almazara: influencia del periodo de recoleccion sobre la cinetica del proceso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borja-Padilla, R.; Alba-Mendoza, J.; Hidalgo-Casado, F.

    1994-01-01

    A kinetic study was carried out of anaerobic digestion of waste waters after washing olives used for oil production, collected at three different harvest times (December 1992, January and February 1993). A 1-litre mixed batch bioreactor operated at 35 degree centigree and containing a sepiolite-immobilized biomass was used. Assuming that the overall anaerobic digestion process conforms to a first-order kinetics, experimental data pairs, namely methane volume yield (G) and time (t), fit Roediger's equation, from which the rate coefficient values, k[sub o], were determined in each of the situations studied. The rate coefficient considerably decreased with the harvest time, over the substrate concentration range studied (0.5-2.5 g COD/1). The average values obtained were [sub 1.67],[sub 1.13] and [sub 0.75] days for the waste waters corresponding to the three harvest times considered. Also, the methanogenic activity decreased with the ripening of the olives; the observed differences increased when the substrate concentration in the digester increased. The coefficients of methane yield, Yp ranged between 0.263 (first harvest time) and 0.298 I CH[sub 4]/g COD removed (third harvest time). The elimination of COD exceeded 64% in all cases. (Author) 13 refs.

  7. Kinetic study and application of analytical techniques in the obtention of TeO{sub 2} for the production of {sup 131} I; Estudio cinetico y aplicacion de tecnicas analiticas en la obtencion de TeO{sub 2} para la produccion de {sup 131} I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plata D, G

    2006-07-01

    The objectives of this investigation work were: A) To synthesize TeO{sub 2} starting from the reaction among the Te and HNO{sub 3} with a superior yield to 90% b) To determine the good temperature of obtaining of the TeO{sub 2} at laboratory level, c) To determine those constant of reaction kinetics, for each one of the tests carried out to different temperatures, and the activation energy of the reaction, d) To characterize the produced TeO{sub 2}, e) To check the viability of using the obtained TeO{sub 2} as raw matter in the production of {sup 131} I in order to contribute to the technological development of our country inside the radioisotope production area. The production process of TeO{sub 2} consists primarily of seven phases: 1) Preparing and assembly of the production equipment of TeO{sub 2}, 2) Oxidation reaction of tellurium, 3) Drying and elimination of sludges of TeO{sub 2}, 4) Sintering of TeO{sub 2}, 5) Characterization of the TeO{sub 2} by means of analytical techniques, 6) Irradiation of the TeO{sub 2}, 7) Quality control. The present document has five chapters, which allow the reader to follow the development of this work to achieve the objectives and to contrast with the hypothesis of the work. (Author)

  8. Development and validation of an SPME-GC method for a degradation kinetics study of propiconazole I, propiconazole II and tebuconazole in blueberries in Concordia, the main production area of Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munitz, Martín S; Medina, María B; Montti, María I T

    2017-05-01

    An analytical method for the simultaneous determination of propiconazole isomers and tebuconazole residues in blueberries was developed using solid-phase microextraction (SPME) coupled to gas chromatography. Confirmation was performed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in selected-ion monitoring mode. The SPME fibre coating selected was CWX-DVB, and the pH was adjusted to 7 with NaOH. The method is selective with adequate precision and high accuracy and sensitivity. Recoveries ranged between 97.4% and 98.9% for all compounds; and detection and quantification limits were respectively 0.21 and 0.49 μg kg -1 for propiconazole I; 0.16 and 0.22 μg kg -1 for propiconazole II; and 0.16 and 0.48 μg kg -1 for tebuconazole. The degradation of these fungicides in blueberries followed first-order rate kinetics. The half-life times for flowering and fruit set applications were respectively 4.0 and 10.3 days for propiconazole I, 4.0 and 11.4 days for propiconazole II, and 3.5 and 12.4 days for tebuconazole.

  9. Transformation kinetics for nucleus clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villa, Elena; Rios, Paulo R.

    2009-01-01

    A rigorous mathematical approach based on stochastic geometry concepts is presented to extend previous Johnson-Mehl, Avrami, Kolmogorov treatment of transformation kinetics to situations in which nuclei are not homogeneously located in space but are located in clusters. An exact analytical solution is presented here for the first time assuming that nucleation sites follow a Matern cluster process. The influence of Matern cluster process parameters on subsequent growth kinetics and the microstructural path are illustrated by means of numerical examples. Moreover, using the superposition principle, exact analytical solutions are also obtained when nucleation takes place by a combination of a Matern cluster process and an inhomogeneous Poisson point process. The new solutions presented here significantly increase the number of exactly solvable cases available to formal kinetics.

  10. Chapter 22. Cell population kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tubiana, M.

    1975-01-01

    The main contribution of radioisotopes to the development of a new discipline, cell population kinetics, was shown. The aim of this science is to establish, for each tissue of the organism, the life span of its component cells and the mechanisms governing its growth, its differentiation and its homeostasis with respect to outside attacks. Labelling techniques have been used to follow the cells during these various processes. The case of non-dividing cells was considered first, taking as example, the red blood cells of which the lifetime was studied, after which the case of proliferating cells was examined using 14 C- or tritium-labelled thymidine. The methods used to measure the cell cycle parameters were described: labelled-mitosis curve method, double-labelling and continuous labelling methods, proliferation coefficient measurement. Cell kinetics were shown to allow an interpretation of radiobiological data. Finally the practical value of cell kinetics research was shown [fr

  11. Kinetic theory and transport phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Soto, Rodrigo

    2016-01-01

    This textbook presents kinetic theory, which is a systematic approach to describing nonequilibrium systems. The text is balanced between the fundamental concepts of kinetic theory (irreversibility, transport processes, separation of time scales, conservations, coarse graining, distribution functions, etc.) and the results and predictions of the theory, where the relevant properties of different systems are computed. The book is organised in thematic chapters where different paradigmatic systems are studied. The specific features of these systems are described, building and analysing the appropriate kinetic equations. Specifically, the book considers the classical transport of charges, the dynamics of classical gases, Brownian motion, plasmas, and self-gravitating systems, quantum gases, the electronic transport in solids and, finally, semiconductors. Besides these systems that are studied in detail, concepts are applied to some modern examples including the quark–gluon plasma, the motion of bacterial suspen...

  12. Kinetics of the methylparathion hydrolysis in aqueous medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manzanilla, J.; Barcelo, M.; Reyes, O.

    1997-01-01

    The kinetics of alkaline hydrolysis of methylparathion was studied at different temperatures (0-50 Centigrade) in the p H range of 8-12 by ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy. Optimum p H and wavelength conditions were defined to carry out the simultaneous determination of methylparathion and one of its hydrolysis product, paranitrophenol, in buffered aqueous medium. Based on the experimental data and the mathematical equation of the kinetics, a rate constant (k) of first-order and an activation energy (Ea) of 9.2 Kcal/mol, were estimated. (Author) activation energy (Ea) of 9.2 Kcal/mol, were estimated. (Author)

  13. Kinetic chain contributions to elbow function and dysfunction in sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Kibler, W; Sciascia, Aaron

    2004-10-01

    The elbow functions in throwing and other athletic activities as a link in the kinetic chain of force development, regulation, and transfer. Efficient function, with maximal performance and minimal injury risk, requires optimum activation of all the link in the kinetic chain. Injury is often associated with alterations in force production or regulation capabilities in links that may be distant to the site of injury. Evaluation of injured athletes should include screening examinations for these areas, and treatment and conditioning should also include these areas.

  14. Selected readings in chemical kinetics

    CERN Document Server

    Back, Margaret H

    2013-01-01

    Selected Readings in Chemical Kinetics covers excerpts from 12 papers in the field of general and gas-phase kinetics. The book discusses papers on the laws of connexion between the conditions of a chemical change and its amount; on the reaction velocity of the inversion of the cane sugar by acids; and the calculation in absolute measure of velocity constants and equilibrium constants in gaseous systems. The text then tackles papers on simple gas reactions; on the absolute rate of reactions in condensed phases; on the radiation theory of chemical action; and on the theory of unimolecular reacti

  15. Chemical kinetics and reaction dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Houston, Paul L

    2006-01-01

    This text teaches the principles underlying modern chemical kinetics in a clear, direct fashion, using several examples to enhance basic understanding. It features solutions to selected problems, with separate sections and appendices that cover more technical applications.Each chapter is self-contained and features an introduction that identifies its basic goals, their significance, and a general plan for their achievement. This text's important aims are to demonstrate that the basic kinetic principles are essential to the solution of modern chemical problems, and to show how the underlying qu

  16. Chemical kinetics and combustion modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, J.A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is to gain qualitative insight into how pollutants are formed in combustion systems and to develop quantitative mathematical models to predict their formation rates. The approach is an integrated one, combining low-pressure flame experiments, chemical kinetics modeling, theory, and kinetics experiments to gain as clear a picture as possible of the process in question. These efforts are focused on problems involved with the nitrogen chemistry of combustion systems and on the formation of soot and PAH in flames.

  17. Deuteration kinetics of the graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nefedov, Alexei; Woell, Christof [KIT, Leopoldshafen (Germany); Paris, Alessio; Calliari, Lucia [FBK-CMM, Trento (Italy); Verbitskiy, Nikolay [MSU, Moscow (Russian Federation); University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Wang, Ying; Irle, Stephan [Nagoya University, Nagoya (Japan); Fedorov, Alexander [IFW Dresden, Dresden (Germany); St. Petersburg University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Haberer, Danny; Knupfer, Martin; Buechner, Bernd [IFW Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Oetzelt, Martin [BESSY II, Berlin (Germany); Petaccia, Luca [Elettra, Trieste (Italy); Usachov, Dmitry [St. Petersburg University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Vyalikh, Denis [St. Petersburg University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); TU Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Sagdev, Hermann [MPI fuer Polymerforschung, Mainz (Germany); Yashina, Lada [MSU, Moscow (Russian Federation); Grueneis, Alexander [IFW Dresden, Dresden (Germany); University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    2013-07-01

    The kinetics of the hydrogenation/deuteration reaction of graphene was studied by time-dependent x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). The graphene layer was then exposed to hydrogen or deuterium atomic gas beams, obtained by thermal cracking in a tungsten capillary at T=3000 K. After each step XPS of the C1s line was performed in order to measure H/C and D/C ratios. We have observed a strong kinetic isotope effect for the hydrogenation/deuteration reaction leading to substantially faster adsorption and higher maximum D/C ratios as compared to H/C (D/C 35% vs. H/C 25%).

  18. Vlasov simulations of Kinetic Alfven Waves at proton kinetic scales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.L. Vasconez; F. Valentini (Francesco); E. Camporeale (Enrico); P. Veltri

    2014-01-01

    htmlabstractKinetic Alfv ́en waves represent an important subject in space plasma physics, since they are thought to play a crucial role in the development of the turbulent energy cascade in the solar wind plasma at short wavelengths (of the order of the proton inertial length d p and beyond). A

  19. Thermal dehydration kinetics of phosphogypsum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López, F. A.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Phsophogypsum is a by-product from the processing phosphate rock. Before the use of it in cement industry such as setting regulator is necessary a study of dehydration reaction of phosphogypsum to avoid the false setting during the milling. The aim is to study the thermal behavior of two different phosphogypsum sources (Spain and Tunisia under non-isothermal conditions in argon atmosphere by using Thermo-Gravimetriy, Differential Thermal Analysis (TG-DTA and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC. DSC experiments were carried out at temperatures ranging from ambient to 350 °C at different heating rates. The temperatures of conversion from gypsum to hemihydrate and anhydrite states and heat of dehydration were determined. Various methods were used to analyze the DSC data for reaction kinetics determination. The activation energy and frequency factor were calculated for dehydration of phosphogypsum. Activation energy values of the main dehydration reaction of phosphogypsum were calculated to be approximately 61–118 kJ/mol.El fosfoyeso es un subproducto procedente del procesado de la roca fosfato. Una de las posibles vías de reutilización y revalorización es su uso como regulador del fraguado en la industria cementera. Debido a los posibles problemas de falso fraguado asociado a los procesos de deshidratación que tienen lugar durante la molienda del cemento, esta investigación estudió el comportamiento térmico, bajo condiciones no-isotérmicas en atmósfera de argón, de dos fosfoyesos, mediante TG-DTA y DSC. Los ensayos de DSC se realizaron hasta los 350 °C a diferentes velocidades de calentamiento. La temperatura de conversión del yeso a las formas de hemihidrato y anhidrita y el calor de hidratación fueron determinados. Las cinéticas de reacción fueron obtenidas analizando los datos de DSC mediante varios métodos. Se calculó la energía de activación y el factor de frecuencia para las reacciones de deshidratación del

  20. Kinetics of niobium carbide precipitation in ferrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gendt, D.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a NbC precipitation modelling in ferrite. This theoretical study is motivated by the fact it considers a ternary system and focus on the concurrence of two different diffusion mechanisms. An experimental study with TEP, SANS and Vickers micro-hardening measurements allows a description of the NbC precipitation kinetics. The mean radius of the precipitates is characterized by TEM observations. To focus on the nucleation stage, we use the Tomographic Atom Probe that analyses, at an atomistic scale, the position of the solute atoms in the matrix. A first model based on the classical nucleation theory and the diffusion-limited growth describes the precipitation of spherical precipitates. To solve the set of equations, we use a numerical algorithm that furnishes an evaluation of the precipitated fraction, the mean radius and the whole size distribution of the particles. The parameters that are the interface energy, the solubility product and the diffusion coefficients are fitted with the data available in the literature and our experimental results. It allows a satisfactory agreement as regards to the simplicity of the model. Monte Carlo simulations are used to describe the evolution of a ternary alloy Fe-Nb-C on a cubic centred rigid lattice with vacancy and interstitial mechanisms. This is realized with an atomistic description of the atoms jumps and their related frequencies. The model parameters are fitted with phase diagrams and diffusion coefficients. For the sake of simplicity, we consider that the precipitation of NbC is totally coherent and we neglect any elastic strain effect. We can observe different kinetic paths: for low supersaturations, we find an expected precipitation of NbC but for higher supersaturations, the very fast diffusivity of carbon atoms conducts to the nucleation of iron carbide particles. We establish that the occurrence of this second phenomenon depends on the vacancy arrival kinetics and can be related

  1. Kinetics of exciplex formation/dissipation in reaction following Weller Scheme II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorenko, S. G.; Burshtein, A. I.

    2014-09-01

    Creation of exciplexes from the charged products of photoionization is considered by means of Integral Encounter Theory. The general kinetic equations of such a reaction following the Weller scheme II are developed. The special attention is given to the particular case of irreversible remote ionization of primary excited electron donor. Kinetics of exciplex formation is considered at fast biexponential geminate transformation of exciplexes in cage that gives way to subsequent bulk reaction of equilibrated reaction products controlled by power law recombination of ions. It is shown that the initial geminate stage of exciplex kinetics is observed only in diffusion controlled regime of the reaction and disappears with increasing mobility of ions in passing to kinetic regime. The quantum yield of exciplexes is studied along with their kinetics.

  2. Kinetics of exciplex formation/dissipation in reaction following Weller Scheme II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedorenko, S. G. [Voevodsky Institute of Chemical Kinetics and Combustion, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Burshtein, A. I. [Weizmann Institute of Science, 76100, Rehovot (Israel)

    2014-09-21

    Creation of exciplexes from the charged products of photoionization is considered by means of Integral Encounter Theory. The general kinetic equations of such a reaction following the Weller scheme II are developed. The special attention is given to the particular case of irreversible remote ionization of primary excited electron donor. Kinetics of exciplex formation is considered at fast biexponential geminate transformation of exciplexes in cage that gives way to subsequent bulk reaction of equilibrated reaction products controlled by power law recombination of ions. It is shown that the initial geminate stage of exciplex kinetics is observed only in diffusion controlled regime of the reaction and disappears with increasing mobility of ions in passing to kinetic regime. The quantum yield of exciplexes is studied along with their kinetics.

  3. Kinetics of exciplex formation/dissipation in reaction following Weller Scheme II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedorenko, S. G.; Burshtein, A. I.

    2014-01-01

    Creation of exciplexes from the charged products of photoionization is considered by means of Integral Encounter Theory. The general kinetic equations of such a reaction following the Weller scheme II are developed. The special attention is given to the particular case of irreversible remote ionization of primary excited electron donor. Kinetics of exciplex formation is considered at fast biexponential geminate transformation of exciplexes in cage that gives way to subsequent bulk reaction of equilibrated reaction products controlled by power law recombination of ions. It is shown that the initial geminate stage of exciplex kinetics is observed only in diffusion controlled regime of the reaction and disappears with increasing mobility of ions in passing to kinetic regime. The quantum yield of exciplexes is studied along with their kinetics

  4. Oligosaccharide synthesis by the hyperthermostable b-glucosidase from Pyrococcus furiosus: kinetics and modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruins, M.E.; Strubel, M.; Lieshout, van J.F.T.; Janssen, A.E.M.; Boom, R.M.

    2003-01-01

    Oligosaccharides can be synthesised from monosaccharides or disaccharides, using glycosidases as a catalyst. To investigate the potential of this synthesis with beta-glycosidase from Pyrococcus furiosus we determined kinetic parameters for substrate conversion and product formation from cellobiose,

  5. Molecular beam kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behrens, R. Jr.

    1975-11-01

    The design of a crossed molecular beam ''supermachine'' for neutral--neutral collisions is discussed. The universal electron bombardment ionizer, mass filter, and ion detection system of the detector, the supersonic nozzle sources, the differential pumping arrangement for the sources and detector, the time-of-flight detection of scattered products, and the overall configuration of the apparatus are described. The elastic scattering of two systems, CH 4 + Ar and NH 3 + Ar, has been measured using the supermachine with two supersonic nozzle sources. The rainbow structure and the interference oscillations are seen in each system. The best fit to the data was found using a Morse--Spline--Van der Waals (MSV) potential. The three potential parameters epsilon, r/sub m/, and β were found to be 2.20(+-0.04) x 10 -14 ergs, 3.82(+-0.04)A, and 7.05 +- 0.20 for CH 4 + Ar, and 2.21(+-0.04) x 10 -14 ergs 3.93 (+-0.05)A, and 8.45 +- 0.30 for NH 3 + Ar. A new phenomenon in crossed molecular beams of condensation of a molecule on a cluster to form a complex was observed. A bromine molecule condensed on clusters of chlorine (Cl 2 )/sub chi/ and ammonia (NH 3 )/sub chi/. The value of chi for measurements in these experiments ranges from 7 to 40 for chlorine clusters and from 10 to 70 ammonia clusters

  6. Elements of plasma kinetic theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guasp, J.

    1976-01-01

    The physical foundations of plasma kinetic equations are exposed inside a series of seminars on plasma and fusion physics. The Vlasov and collisional equations with its application range have been discussed. The momenta equations for the macroscopic magnitudes and the more usual approximations have been obtained: two fluid equations for cold and warm plasmas, magnetohydrodynamic equations and the double-adiabatic theory. (author)

  7. Kinetic studies on leucite precursors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mrázová, M.; Kloužková, A.; Kohoutková, Martina

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 2 (2009), s. 205-210 ISSN 1895-1066 R&D Projects: GA MPO 2A-1TP1/063 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : leucite * crystallization kinetics * hydrothermal Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 1.065, year: 2009

  8. Some parameters of radionuclide kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prokof'ev, O.N.; Smirnov, V.A.; Belen'kij, E.I.

    1978-01-01

    Numerical values of the rates of radionuclide absorption into, and elimination from, bovine organs were determined. Kinetic rate constants of radionuclides such as 89 Sr, 99 Mo, 131 I, 132 Tl, and 140 Be were calculated. The calculations were done for muscle, liver, and kidney

  9. Solving Simple Kinetics without Integrals

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Pen~a, Lisandro Herna´ndez

    2016-01-01

    The solution of simple kinetic equations is analyzed without referencing any topic from differential equations or integral calculus. Guided by the physical meaning of the rate equation, a systematic procedure is used to generate an approximate solution that converges uniformly to the exact solution in the case of zero, first, and second order…

  10. Robustness Analysis of Kinetic Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2009-01-01

    Kinetic structures in architecture follows a new trend which is emerging in responsive architecture coined by Nicholas Negroponte when he proposed that architecture may benefit from the integration of computing power into built spaces and structures, and that better performing, more rational...

  11. Kinetics of Bio-Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, John

    2015-01-01

    his chapter predicts the specific rates of reaction by means of a mathematical expression, the kinetics of the reaction. This expression can be derived through a mechanistic interpretation of an enzymatically catalyzed reaction, but it is essentially of empirical nature for cell reactions. The mo...

  12. Resonance transport and kinetic entropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, Yu.B.; Knoll, J.; Voskresensky, D.N.

    2000-01-01

    We continue the description of the dynamics of unstable particles within the real-time formulation of nonequilibrium field theory initiated in a previous paper . There we suggest to use Baym's PHI-functional method in order to achieve approximation schemes with 'built in' consistency with respect to conservation laws and thermodynamics even in the case of particles with finite damping width. Starting from Kadanoff-Baym equations we discuss a consistent first order gradient approach to transport which preserves the PHI-derivable properties. The validity conditions for the resulting quantum four-phase-space kinetic theory are discussed under the perspective to treat particles with broad damping widths. This non-equilibrium dynamics naturally includes all those quantum features already inherent in the corresponding equilibrium limit (e.g. Matsubara formalism) at the same level of PHI-derivable approximation. Various collision-term diagrams are discussed including those of higher order which lead to memory effects. As an important novel part we derive a generalized nonequilibrium expression for the kinetic entropy flow, which includes contributions from fluctuations and mass-width effects. In special cases an H-theorem is derived implying that the entropy can only increase with time. Memory effects in the kinetic terms provide contributions to the kinetic entropy flow that in the equilibrium limit recover the famous bosonic type T 3 lnT correction to the specific heat in the case of Fermi liquids like Helium-3

  13. Kinetic mechanism and nucleotide specificity of NADH peroxidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoll, V.S.; Blanchard, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    NADH peroxidase is a flavoprotein isolated from Streptococcus faecalis which catalyzes the pyridine nucleotide-dependent reduction of hydrogen peroxide to water. Initial velocity, product, and dead-end inhibition studies have been performed at pH 7.5 and support a ping-pong kinetic mechanism. In the absence of hydrogen peroxide, both transhydrogenation between NADH and thioNAD, and isotope exchange between [ 14 C]NADH and NAD, have been demonstrated, although in both these experiments, the maximal velocity of nucleotide exchange was less than 1.5% the maximal velocity of the peroxidatic reaction. We propose that NADH binds tightly to both oxidized and two-electron reduced enzyme. NADH oxidation proceeds stereospecifically with the transfer of the 4S hydrogen to enzyme, and then, via exchange, to water. No primary tritium kinetic isotope effect was observed, and no statistically significant primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects on V/K were determined, although primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects on V were observed in the presence and absence of sodium acetate. NADH peroxidase thus shares with other flavoprotein reductases striking kinetic, spectroscopic, and stereochemical similarities. On this basis, we propose a chemical mechanism for the peroxide cleaving reaction catalyzed by NADH peroxidase which involves the obligate formation of a flavinperoxide, and peroxo bond cleavage by nucleophilic attack by enzymatic dithiols

  14. Effect of surfactant on kinetics of thinning of capillary bridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Emilia; Kovalchuk, Nina; Simmons, Mark

    2015-11-01

    Kinetics of thinning of capillary bridges is of great scientific and industrial interest being of vital importance for example in various emulsification and microfluidic processes. It is well known that the rate of bridge thinning is proportional to the interfacial tension. Therefore it is expected that the process should slow down by addition of surfactant. The kinetics of capillary bridges in the presence of surfactant was studied by the dripping of liquid from a capillary tip under conditions of nearly zero flow rate (We personal care products. The viscosity, surfactant activity and adsorption kinetics have been controlled by addition of glycerol and sodium chloride. The study has shown that the kinetics of capillary bridges are determined by dynamic surface tension rather than by its equilibrium value. In particular, the kinetics of the bridge thinning for the 0.1 g L-1 aqueous SLES solution is practically the same as that of pure water despite twice lower equilibrium surface tension. EPSRC Programme Grant, MEMPHIS, EP/K0039761/1.

  15. Uniqueness of thermodynamic projector and kinetic basis of molecular individualism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorban, Alexander N.; Karlin, Iliya V.

    2004-05-01

    Three results are presented: First, we solve the problem of persistence of dissipation for reduction of kinetic models. Kinetic equations with thermodynamic Lyapunov functions are studied. Uniqueness of the thermodynamic projector is proven: There exists only one projector which transforms any vector field equipped with the given Lyapunov function into a vector field with the same Lyapunov function for a given anzatz manifold which is not tangent to the Lyapunov function levels. Second, we use the thermodynamic projector for developing the short memory approximation and coarse-graining for general nonlinear dynamic systems. We prove that in this approximation the entropy production increases. ( The theorem about entropy overproduction.) In example, we apply the thermodynamic projector to derive the equations of reduced kinetics for the Fokker-Planck equation. A new class of closures is developed, the kinetic multipeak polyhedra. Distributions of this type are expected in kinetic models with multidimensional instability as universally as the Gaussian distribution appears for stable systems. The number of possible relatively stable states of a nonequilibrium system grows as 2 m, and the number of macroscopic parameters is in order mn, where n is the dimension of configuration space, and m is the number of independent unstable directions in this space. The elaborated class of closures and equations pretends to describe the effects of “molecular individualism”. This is the third result.

  16. Analysis of lipid peroxidation kinetics. I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doktorov, Alexander B.; Lukzen, Nikita N.; Pedersen, Jørgen Boiden

    2008-01-01

    concentrations of reactants or different ways of initiating the re-  action. Nor has it been possible to predict the time dependence of the  products. The reason for these problems is the complicated structure  of the kinetic scheme, which includes a chain reaction. In this work  we perform an in depth analysis......  The kinetics of the lipid peroxidation reaction is only partly under-  stood. Although the set of reactions constituting the overall reaction  is believed to be known, it has not been possible to predict how the  reaction will respond to a change of one or more of the parameters, e.g.  initial...... of the importance of the individual  reaction steps and we introduce a new quasi-stationary concentration  method based on the assumption that one or more concentrations vary  much slower than the others. We show that it is justified to use a  quasi-stationary concentration approximation for the alkyl radical L...

  17. Kinetics of Scheelite Conversion in Sulfuric Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Leiting; Li, Xiaobin; Zhou, Qiusheng; Peng, Zhihong; Liu, Guihua; Qi, Tiangui; Taskinen, Pekka

    2018-02-01

    Complete conversion of scheelite in H2SO4 solution plays a key role in exploration of cleaner technology for producing ammonium paratungstate. In this work, the factors influencing scheelite conversion were investigated experimentally to model its kinetics. The results indicated that the conversion rate increases with increasing temperature and reducing particle size, but is almost independent of stirring speed. Moreover, although the conversion rate increases with increasing initial H2SO4 concentration (≤ 1.25 mol/L), it decreases rapidly at 1.5 mol/L H2SO4 after 10 min due to formation of a H2WO4 layer. The experimental data agree quite well with the shrinking core model under chemical reaction control in ≤ 1.25 mol/L H2SO4 solution, and the kinetic equation was established as: 1- ( 1- α )^{ 1 / 3} = 2 2 2 5 4 6. 6\\cdot C_{{{H}_{ 2} {SO}_{ 4} }}^{ 1. 2 2 6} \\cdot r_{ 0}^{ - 1} \\cdot e^{{ - 3 9 2 6 0/RT}} \\cdot t (t, min). This work could contribute to better understanding of scheelite conversion in H2SO4 solution and development of a new route for ammonium paratungstate production.

  18. Ozone kinetics in low-pressure discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Vasco; Marinov, Daniil; Guaitella, Olivier; Rousseau, Antoine

    2012-10-01

    Ozone kinetics is quite well established at atmospheric pressure, due to the importance of ozone in atmospheric chemistry and to the development of industrial ozone reactors. However, as the pressure is decreased and the dominant three-body reactions lose importance, the main mechanisms involved in the creation and destruction of ozone are still surrounded by important uncertainties. In this work we develop a self-consistent model for a pulsed discharge and its afterglow operating in a Pyrex reactor with inner radius 1 cm, at pressures in the range 1-5 Torr and discharge currents of 40-120 mA. The model couples the electron Boltzmann equation with a system of equations for the time evolution of the heavy particles. The calculations are compared with time-dependent measurements of ozone and atomic oxygen. Parametric studies are performed in order to clarify the role of vibrationally excited ozone in the overall kinetics and to establish the conditions where ozone production on the surface may become important. It is shown that vibrationally excited ozone does play a significant role, by increasing the time constants of ozone formation. Moreover, an upper limit for the ozone formation at the wall in these conditions is set at 10(-4).

  19. Study on platelet kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yui, Tokuo

    1981-01-01

    Fundamental study: Factors influencing the labeling on human platelets were evaluated and optimal labeling conditions were chosen. Then, platelet survival times were measured and organ distribution of labeled platelets was observed in rat by four different methods. These results were compared with each other. Based on the findings of those studies, the protocol of human platelet labeling with 111 In-oxine for clinical use was established. Clinical study: In normal cases, a platelet survival time and a platelet turnover rate were quite similar to the results from 51 Cr method. In gamma camera imaging, a radioactivity on the heart decreased with the lapse of time, while that on the spleen and liver gradually increased. In patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, platelet survival time was markedly shortened and both a platelet turnover rate and an effective production increased. In patient with congestive splenomegaly, a platelet survival time was normal, whereas a platelet pooling on the spleen markedly increased. In patients who were implanted dacron-graft for abdominal aortic aneurysm, a radioactivity accumulated to the graft and a platelet survival time shortened. In a patient with myocardial infarction, the camera imaging clearly showed the thrombus in the left ventricular aneurysm. In three patients with mitral stenosis, thrombi in left atrium were observed at the camera images. Imaging of a platelet distribution and measurement of platelet survival time using 111 In-oxine labeled platelets are considered to be an excellent method for the diagnosis and decision of treatment on various disorders with thrombocytopenia and thrombosis. (J.P.N.)

  20. Biosorption kinetics of Cd (II), Cr (III) and Pb (II) in aqueous solutions by olive stone

    OpenAIRE

    M. Calero; F. Hernáinz; G. Blázquez; M. A. Martín-Lara; G. Tenorio

    2009-01-01

    A by-product from olive oil production, olive stone, was investigated for the removal of Cd (II), Cr (III) and Pb (II) from aqueous solutions. The kinetics of biosorption are studied, analyzing the effect of the initial concentration of metal and temperature. Pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, Elovich and intraparticle diffusion models have been used to represent the kinetics of the process and obtain the main kinetic parameters. The results show that the pseudo-second order model is th...