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Sample records for nda remote experiment station

  1. Experience of remote under water handling operations at Tarapur Atomic Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, S.K.

    1990-01-01

    Each Refuelling outage of Tarapur Atomic Power Station Reactors involves a great deal of remote underwater handling operations using special remote handling tools, working deep down in the reactor vessel under about sixty feet of water and in the narrow confines of highly radioactive core. The remote underwater handling operations include incore and out of core sipping operations, fuel reloading or shuffling, uncoupling of control rod drives, replacement and shuffling of control blades, replacement of local power range monitors, spent fuel shipment in casks, retrieval of fallen or displaced fuel top guide spacers, orifices and their installation, underwater CCTV inspection of reactor internals, core verification, channelling and dechannelling of fuel bundles, inspection of fuel bundles and channels, unbolting and removal of old racks, installation of high density racks, removal and reinstallation of fuel support plugs and guide tubes, underwater cutting of irradiated hardware material and their disposal, fuel reconstitution, removal and reinstallation of system dryer separator etc.. The paper describes in brief the salient experience of remote underwater handling operations at TAPS especially the unusual problems faced and solved, by using special tools, employing specific techniques and by repeated efforts, patience, ingenuity and skills. (author). 10 figs

  2. Remote input/output station

    CERN Multimedia

    1972-01-01

    A general view of the remote input/output station installed in building 112 (ISR) and used for submitting jobs to the CDC 6500 and 6600. The card reader on the left and the line printer on the right are operated by programmers on a self-service basis.

  3. The remote security station (RSS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pletta, J.B.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that, as an outgrowth of research into physical security systems, Sandia is investigating robotic technologies for improving physical security performance and flexibility. Robotic systems have the potential to allow more effective utilization of security personnel, especially in scenarios where they might be exposed to harm. They also can supplement fixed site installations where sensors have failed or where transient assets are present. The Remote Security Station (RSS) program for the defense Nuclear Agency is developing a proof-of-principle robotic system which will be used to evaluate the role, and associated cost, of robotic technologies in exterior physical security systems. The RSS consists of three primary elements: a fixed but quickly moveable tripod with intrusion detection sensors and assessment camera; a mobile robotic platform with a functionally identical security module; and a control console which allows an operator to perform security functions and teleoperate the mobile platform

  4. Ground-based simulation of telepresence for materials science experiments. [remote viewing and control of processes aboard Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, James C.; Rosenthal, Bruce N.; Bonner, Mary JO; Hahn, Richard C.; Herbach, Bruce

    1989-01-01

    A series of ground-based telepresence experiments have been performed to determine the minimum video frame rate and resolution required for the successive performance of materials science experiments in space. The approach used is to simulate transmission between earth and space station with transmission between laboratories on earth. The experiments include isothermal dendrite growth, physical vapor transport, and glass melting. Modifications of existing apparatus, software developed, and the establishment of an inhouse network are reviewed.

  5. IAEA experience with authentication of in-plant NDA instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Augustson, R.H.; Dermendjiev, E.

    1983-01-01

    The paper discusses IAEA experience with permanently installed measuring equipment, i.e. in-plant NDA instrumentation, which often has advantages over portable equipment, such as improved accuracy, automated sample handling and data collection, and capacity for higher throughput. In some cases, in-plant equipment is the only means of making a field measurement. However, the use of in-plant equipment requires an additional set of inspector procedures to ensure that the instrument is working correctly and has not been tampered with. This process of verifying instrument performance is called authentication. General guidelines for approaches to authentication have been studied and formulated by an IAEA Advisory Group Meeting held in November 1981. Procedures for specific instruments have been developed in some cases with the help of national support programmes. The field application of authentication is accomplished by incorporating specific actions into inspection procedures. Results are written down as part of the working papers and included in the final inspection report. For quantitative checks such as measurement of a working standard the results are sent along with the inspection measurements to the Agency for inclusion in the safeguards data base. The in-plant equipment may be owned by the facility, a State, a safeguards organization or the Agency. In each case, the use of the in-plant equipment will necessitate additional interactions between facility operator and inspector, in order to judge the impact on plant operation, and understand what is being measured and what can go wrong. The paper discusses the IAEA's experience gained in the field application of authentication procedures for instrument systems such as weighing and volume measuring devices, rod scanners, neutron activation systems and K-edge densitometers

  6. Very Portable Remote Automatic Weather Stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    John R. Warren

    1987-01-01

    Remote Automatic Weather Stations (RAWS) were introduced to Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management field units in 1978 following development, test, and evaluation activities conducted jointly by the two agencies. The original configuration was designed for semi-permanent installation. Subsequently, a need for a more portable RAWS was expressed, and one was...

  7. Remote earth sensing experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trifonov, Yu V

    1981-01-01

    Description of data devices for deriving multi-spectral measuring television measurement data of middle and high resolution through use of second generation Meteor-type satellites. Options for developing a permanent and active remote sensing system in USSR are discussed. It is noted that the present experiment is an important step in that direction. Design and structural data for this particular device and its application in the experiment are covered.

  8. The Remote Security Station (RSS) final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pletta, J.B.; Amai, W.A.; Klarer, P.; Frank, D.; Carlson, J.; Byrne, R.

    1992-10-01

    The Remote Security Station (RSS) was developed by Sandia National Laboratories for the Defense Nuclear Agency to investigate issues pertaining to robotics and sensor fusion in physical security systems. This final report documents the status of the RSS program at its completion in April 1992. The RSS system consists of the Man Portable Security Station (MaPSS) and the Telemanaged Mobile Security Station (TMSS), which are integrated by the Operator's Control Unit (OCU) into a flexible exterior perimeter security system. The RSS system uses optical, infrared, microwave, and acoustic intrusion detection sensors in conjunction with sensor fusion techniques to increase the probability of detection and to decrease the nuisance alarm rate of the system. Major improvements to the system developed during the final year are an autonomous patrol capability, which allows TMSS to execute security patrols with limited operator interaction, and a neural network approach to sensor fusion, which significantly improves the system's ability to filter out nuisance alarms due to adverse weather conditions

  9. Remote MINOS Shift Station at IF-UFG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tognini, Stefano Castro; Gomes, Ricardo Avelino

    2011-01-01

    Full text: MINOS is a very well known neutrino experiment mainly designed to study neutrino oscillations and measure the parameters that rule the phenomena. The experiment uses an intense neutrino beam provided by the NuMI (Neutrinos at the Main Injector) beamline at Fermilab and two similar magnetized detectors - the Near Detector located at Fermilab, 1 km downstream the target and 94 m underground; and the Far Detector located in the Soudan Mine in northern Minnesota, 734 km downstream the Near Detector and 713 m underground. The MINOS control room is consisted of four main systems used to monitor the beam, the detectors and the data acquisition process: the Beam Monitoring System - a set of tools used to monitor the status of the NuMI beam, such as its intensity, its alignment with the target and beamline and if the beam data acquisition is working properly; the Online Monitoring System (OM) - responsible for monitoring the electronics of both detectors, which determines the quality of the data; the Detector Control System (DCS) - which monitors the detectors information, such as the high voltage systems, state of the rack protection system, the magnet control, chiller monitor, coil current, humidity and environmental temperatures; and the Data Acquisition System (DAQ) - used to control the runs/subruns and monitor the recording process. The experiment is taking data with the Far Detector since 2003 and with the Near Detector since 2005. The Physics Institute of the Federal University of Goias (IF-UFG) is joining the MINOS Collaboration since June 2009 and this work describes the configuration of our Remote MINOS Shift Station. In order to accomplish the shift tasks with minimum expenditure of time and money efforts, MINOS decided to authorize remote shifts on January 2011. Apart of being able to realize remote shifts, the main goals of our shift station are to allow the training of new users, in particular graduate students; to allow our real-time monitoring of

  10. Remote participation for LHD experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emoto, M.; Yamamoto, T.; Komada, S.; Nagayama, Y.

    2006-01-01

    To accomplish a large-scale experiment, such as large helical device (LHD) experiment, effective cooperation among institutes is necessary. In order to establish such cooperation, the NIFS provides the following remote participation facilities for the LHD experiments. (1) Remote access: The user can use a virtual private network (VPN) to connect to the LAN. This is the most flexible technique to participate in the experiments. The users who are not familiar with the experiments can log into the remote server running MetaFrame and Linux. In these computers, the required software is already installed. Therefore, the user need not be concerned with installing software. (2) Remote data reference: A mirror server exists to provide physical data to remote users. Moreover, the users can retrieve summarized data via a web server, which provides summarized information of each discharge experiment and graphs of the principal physical data. These graphs are useful for finding the required data quickly. (3) Remote communication and monitoring: For effective remote cooperation, communication between researchers is very important. For this purpose, a video conferencing system and a video streaming service are available. In addition to these facilities, the NIFS introduced Super SINET in 2002. This is an optical-fiber-based network. The backbone speed of this network is 10 Gbps, and the speed is 1 Gbps for direct connections

  11. Remote participation for LHD experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emoto, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, National Institutes of Natural Sciences, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki 509-5292 (Japan)]. E-mail: emoto.masahiko@LHD.nifs.ac.jp; Yamamoto, T. [National Institute for Fusion Science, National Institutes of Natural Sciences, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Komada, S. [National Institute for Fusion Science, National Institutes of Natural Sciences, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Nagayama, Y. [National Institute for Fusion Science, National Institutes of Natural Sciences, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki 509-5292 (Japan)

    2006-07-15

    To accomplish a large-scale experiment, such as large helical device (LHD) experiment, effective cooperation among institutes is necessary. In order to establish such cooperation, the NIFS provides the following remote participation facilities for the LHD experiments. (1) Remote access: The user can use a virtual private network (VPN) to connect to the LAN. This is the most flexible technique to participate in the experiments. The users who are not familiar with the experiments can log into the remote server running MetaFrame and Linux. In these computers, the required software is already installed. Therefore, the user need not be concerned with installing software. (2) Remote data reference: A mirror server exists to provide physical data to remote users. Moreover, the users can retrieve summarized data via a web server, which provides summarized information of each discharge experiment and graphs of the principal physical data. These graphs are useful for finding the required data quickly. (3) Remote communication and monitoring: For effective remote cooperation, communication between researchers is very important. For this purpose, a video conferencing system and a video streaming service are available. In addition to these facilities, the NIFS introduced Super SINET in 2002. This is an optical-fiber-based network. The backbone speed of this network is 10 Gbps, and the speed is 1 Gbps for direct connections.

  12. ICUD-0499 Low-cost remotely sensed environmental monitoring stations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus; Thorndahl, Søren Liedtke

    2017-01-01

    This study contributes with extensive research of applying low-cost remotely sensed monitoring stations to an urban environment. Design requirements are scrutinized, including applications for remote data access, hardware design, and monitoring network design. A network of 9 monitoring stations...... measuring stream water level is deployed during July 2017. Data is streamed to a web page using cellular-based data transmission. Monitoring network performance is quantified with respect to local physical and weather conditions....

  13. Emergency protection and nuclear power station remote monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowak, K.; Wolf, H.

    1986-01-01

    The States of the Federal Republic of Germany are planning emergency protection measures for the environment of nuclear power stations based on their statutory duty of care. In this connection the paper explains to what extent remote monitoring of nuclear power stations practised by the Federal Supervisory Authorities may support the design and implementation of emergency protection measures. (orig.) [de

  14. Remote experiment participation on Tore-Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theis, J.-M.; Larsen, J.-M.

    2004-01-01

    The DRFC has traditionally had a very large external collaboration involvement. In particular, 15% of the DRFC work is directed towards the JET programme. As a consequence substantial telecommunications facilities have been installed [F.E.D. 60/3 (2002) 449; F.E.D. 60/3 (2002) 459]. A specific station for remote communication has been set up in the Tore-Supra control room, closely coupled to a collaborating team at INRS Que., Canada. This paper describes our pilot experience with the Canadian participation, which gives details of the communication and data sharing tools used to fully work on Tore-Supra

  15. Remote Diagnosis of the International Space Station Utilizing Telemetry Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb, Somnath; Ghoshal, Sudipto; Malepati, Venkat; Domagala, Chuck; Patterson-Hine, Ann; Alena, Richard; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Modern systems such as fly-by-wire aircraft, nuclear power plants, manufacturing facilities, battlefields, etc., are all examples of highly connected network enabled systems. Many of these systems are also mission critical and need to be monitored round the clock. Such systems typically consist of embedded sensors in networked subsystems that can transmit data to central (or remote) monitoring stations. Moreover, many legacy are safety systems were originally not designed for real-time onboard diagnosis, but a critical and would benefit from such a solution. Embedding additional software or hardware in such systems is often considered too intrusive and introduces flight safety and validation concerns. Such systems can be equipped to transmit the sensor data to a remote-processing center for continuous health monitoring. At Qualtech Systems, we are developing a Remote Diagnosis Server (RDS) that can support multiple simultaneous diagnostic sessions from a variety of remote subsystems.

  16. NDA National Graduate Programme 'nucleargraduates'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawson, Carl

    2010-01-01

    leading technical proficiency mixed with indications of 'high performer' potential. Professional - Throughout the programme the graduates will be working towards achieving professional qualifications though the relevant 'Institute' for their discipline, such as the IMECHE. The training and experience gained from the scheme is programmed around a syllabus of work and courses, which will be accredited retrospectively by the 'Institutes'. The two year 'initial professional development' programme whilst the graduate is with the NDA is then fitted into a further two years with stakeholders for their first 'substantive role'. Whilst there is no monetary contribution from the stakeholders there is a significant resource support from the programme stakeholders. They will provide a sophisticated matrix of support in attraction and assessment support, professional development, mentoring, training and scheme evaluation. The programme will be using cutting edge marketing, assessment, recruitment and training tools. It will also deliver a pioneering socio economic programme that will combine professional training with cultural and behavioural insight work. The aims of the programme are aligned with the NDA succession plan and Skills Strategy Document. The graduate profile by the end of the two year programme is 'mobile, professional, aware and ambitious.' The Programme is driven by a group comprising of companies across the industry including the NDA, SLC's, defence operators, operational power station organisations, regulators and the supply chain. Uniquely, the programme offers no 'specific job' with the NDA after the two year programme is completed. The programme will be integrated into the existing partners' schemes to ensure smooth progression. The Graduate's progress after 2 years will be facilitated by a careers service and formal rules governing the behaviour of partners. The first cohort targeted graduates from the following disciplines areas: Civil and Mechanical Engineering

  17. International remote monitoring project Argentina Nuclear Power Station Spent Fuel Transfer Remote Monitoring System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, S.; Lucero, R.; Glidewell, D.

    1997-01-01

    The Autoridad Regulataria Nuclear (ARN) and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) are cooperating on the development of a Remote Monitoring System for nuclear nonproliferation efforts. A Remote Monitoring System for spent fuel transfer will be installed at the Argentina Nuclear Power Station in Embalse, Argentina. The system has been designed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), with Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) providing gamma and neutron sensors. This project will test and evaluate the fundamental design and implementation of the Remote Monitoring System in its application to regional and international safeguards efficiency. This paper provides a description of the monitoring system and its functions. The Remote Monitoring System consists of gamma and neutron radiation sensors, RF systems, and video systems integrated into a coherent functioning whole. All sensor data communicate over an Echelon LonWorks Network to a single data logger. The Neumann DCM 14 video module is integrated into the Remote Monitoring System. All sensor and image data are stored on a Data Acquisition System (DAS) and archived and reviewed on a Data and Image Review Station (DIRS). Conventional phone lines are used as the telecommunications link to transmit on-site collected data and images to remote locations. The data and images are authenticated before transmission. Data review stations will be installed at ARN in Buenos Aires, Argentina, ABACC in Rio De Janeiro, IAEA Headquarters in Vienna, and Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. 2 refs., 2 figs

  18. Experience of joint use NDA instruments between Japan and IAEA in inspection fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshii, Hiroshi; Aoki, Minoru; Shimizu, Toku

    1997-01-01

    In order to implement more effective and efficient safeguards scheme in Japan, Japan and IAEA established joint use program of NDA instruments which was commenced in 1989 from LEU fuel fabrication facilities. The joint use program was proposed by Science and Technology Agency (STA) in the 10th (1989) Joint Japan and IAEA Committee, and it was agreed. Subsequently, Japan and IAEA established working group of the joint use program, whose prepared necessary joint use procedures. Currently, the joint use program has been expanding to almost facilities in domestic, and has been contributing reduce the facility operator's burden for the for inspection activities. (author)

  19. First operation of the wide-area remote experiment system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, Y.; Hasegawa, K.; Ueno, G.

    2012-01-01

    The Wide-area Remote Experiment System (WRES) at Spring-8 has been successfully developed. The system communicates with remote users on the basis of SSL/TLS with bi-directional authentication to avoid interference from unauthorized access to the system. The system has a message-filtering system to allow remote users access only to the corresponding beamline equipment and safety interlock system. This is to protect persons inside the experimental station from injury from any accidental motion of heavy equipment. The system also has a video streaming system to monitor samples or experimental equipment. We have tested the system from the point of view of safety, stability, reliability etc. and successfully performed the first experiment from a remote site, i.e., RIKEN's Wako campus, which is 480 km away from Spring-8, at the end of October 2010. (authors)

  20. Remote Decommissioning Experiences at Sellafield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brownridge, M.

    2006-01-01

    British Nuclear Group has demonstrated through delivery of significant decommissioning projects the ability to effectively deploy innovative remote decommissioning technologies and deliver cost effective solutions. This has been achieved through deployment and development of off-the-shelf technologies and design of bespoke equipment. For example, the worlds first fully remotely operated Brokk was successfully deployed to enable fully remote dismantling, packaging and export of waste during the decommissioning of a pilot reprocessing facility. British Nuclear Group has also successfully implemented remote decommissioning systems to enable the decommissioning of significant challenges, including dismantling of a Caesium Extraction Facility, Windscale Pile Chimney and retrieval of Plutonium Contaminated Material (PCM) from storage cells. The challenge for the future is to continue to innovate through utilization of the supply chain and deploy off-the-shelf technologies which have been demonstrated in other industry sectors, thus reducing implementation schedules, cost and maintenance. (authors)

  1. Remote infrared signage evaluation for transit stations and intersections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crandall, W; Brabyn, J; Bentzen, B L; Myers, L

    1999-10-01

    Opportunities for education and employment depend upon effective and independent travel. For mainstream society, this is accomplished to a large extent by printed signs. People who are print disabled, visually impaired, or totally blind are at a disadvantage because they do not have access to signage. Remote infrared signage, such as the Talking Signs (TS) system, provides a solution to this need by labeling the environment for distant viewing. The system uses a transmitting "sign" and a hand-held receiver to tell people about their surroundings. In a seamless infrared signage environment, a visually impaired traveler could: walk safely across an intersection to an ATM or fare machine, from fare machine to bus stop, from bus stop to bus; from bus to building, from building to elevator, from elevator to office, from office to restroom, and so forth. This paper focuses on two problems that are among the most challenging and dangerous faced by blind travelers: negotiating complex transit stations and controlled intersections. We report on human factors studies of TS in these critical tasks, examining such issues as how much training is needed to use the system, its impact on performance and safety, benefits for different population subgroups and user opinions of its value. Results indicate that blind people can quickly and easily learn to use remote infrared signage effectively, and that its use improves travel safety, efficiency, and independence.

  2. International Remote Monitoring Project Embalse Nuclear Power Station, Argentina Embalse Remote Monitoring System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Sigfried L.; Glidewell, Donnie D.; Bonino, Anibal; Bosler, Gene; Mercer, David; Maxey, Curt; Vones, Jaromir; Martelle, Guy; Busse, James; Kadner, Steve; White, Mike; Rovere, Luis

    1999-01-01

    The Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear of Argentina (ARN), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), ABACC, the US Department of Energy, and the US Support Program POTAS, cooperated in the development of a Remote Monitoring System for nuclear nonproliferation efforts. This system was installed at the Embalse Nuclear Power Station last year to evaluate the feasibility of using radiation sensors in monitoring the transfer of spent fuel from the spent fuel pond to dry storage. The key element in this process is to maintain continuity of knowledge throughout the entire transfer process. This project evaluated the fundamental design and implementation of the Remote Monitoring System in its application to regional and international safeguard efficiency. New technology has been developed to enhance the design of the system to include storage capability on board sensor platforms. This evaluation has led to design enhancements that will assure that no data loss will occur during loss of RF transmission of the sensors

  3. Experiences with remote electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Keefe, Michael A.; Parvin, Bahram

    2002-02-22

    With the advent of a rapidly proliferating international computer network, it became feasible to consider remote operation of instrumentation normally operated locally. For modern electron microscopes, the growing automation and computer control of many instrumental operations facilitated the task of providing remote operation. In order to provide use of NCEM TEMs by distant users, a project was instituted in 1995 to place a unique instrument, a Kratos EM-1500 operating at 1.5MeV, on-line for remote use. In 1996, the Materials Microcharacterization Collaboratory (MMC) was created as a pilot project within the US Department of Energy's DOE2000 program to establish national collaboratories to provide access via the Internet to unique or expensive DOE research facilities as well as to expertise for remote collaboration, experimentation, production, software development, modeling, and measurement. A major LBNL contribution to the MMC was construction of DeepView, a microscope-independent computer-control system that could be ported to other MMC members to provide a common graphical user-interface (GUI) for control of any MMC instrument over the wide area network.

  4. US remote monitoring operational experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupree, S.A.; Sonnier, C.S.

    1997-01-01

    Under international partnerships and bilateral agreements with the U.S. Department of Energy, Sandia National Laboratories, other national laboratories, and international partner organizations have emplaced remote monitoring systems in nuclear facilities and laboratories in various parts of the world for the purpose of conducting field trials of remote monitoring. The purpose of the present report is to review the results from these field trials and draw general conclusions regarding the trials. Many thousands of hours of sensor and system operation have been logged, and data have been retrieved from many locations. In virtually all cases the system components have functioned as intended and data have been successfully collected and transmitted for review. Comparisons between front-end-triggered video and time-lapse video have shown that the triggered record has captured all relevant monitored operations at the various nuclear facilities included in the field trials. We believe the utility and functional reliability of remote monitoring for international safeguards has been shown. However, it should be kept in mind that openness and transparency, including some form of short-notice inspections, are likely to be prerequisites to the safeguards implementation of remote monitoring in any State

  5. Man/machine interface for a nuclear cask remote handling control station: system design requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, M.M.; Kreifeldt, J.G.; Draper, J.V.

    1984-01-01

    Design requirements are presented for a control station of a proposed semi-automated facility for remote handling of nuclear waste casks. Functional and operational man/machine interface: controls, displays, software format, station architecture, and work environment. In addition, some input is given to the design of remote sensing systems in the cask handling areas. 18 references, 9 figures, 12 tables

  6. Experience with Remote Job Execution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynch, Vickie E.; Cobb, John W; Green, Mark L.; Kohl, James Arthur; Miller, Stephen D.; Ren, Shelly; Smith, Bradford C.; Vazhkudai, Sudharshan S.

    2008-01-01

    The Neutron Science Portal at Oak Ridge National Laboratory submits jobs to the TeraGrid for remote job execution. The TeraGrid is a network of high performance computers supported by the US National Science Foundation. There are eleven partner facilities with over a petaflop of peak computing performance and sixty petabytes of long-term storage. Globus is installed on a local machine and used for job submission. The graphical user interface is produced by java coding that reads an XML file. After submission, the status of the job is displayed in a Job Information Service window which queries globus for the status. The output folder produced in the scratch directory of the TeraGrid machine is returned to the portal with globus-url-copy command that uses the gridftp servers on the TeraGrid machines. This folder is copied from the stage-in directory of the community account to the user's results directory where the output can be plotted using the portal's visualization services. The primary problem with remote job execution is diagnosing execution problems. We have daily tests of submitting multiple remote jobs from the portal. When these jobs fail on a computer, it is difficult to diagnose the problem from the globus output. Successes and problems will be presented

  7. Field experience with remote monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desrosiers, A.E. [Bartlett Services, Inc., Plymouth, MA (United States)

    1995-03-01

    The Remote Monitoring System (RMS) is a combination of Merlin Gerin detection hardware, digital data communications hardware, and computer software from Bartlett Services, Inc. (BSI) that can improve the conduct of reactor plant operations in several areas. Using the RMS can reduce radiation exposures to radiation protection technicians (RPTs), reduce radiation exposures to plant maintenance and operations personnel, and reduce the time required to complete maintenance and inspections during outages. The number of temporary RPTs required during refueling outages can also be reduced. Data from use of the RMS at a two power plants are presented to illustrate these points.

  8. The SPS Target Station for CHORUS and NOMAD Neutrino Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Péraire, S; Zazula, J M

    1996-01-01

    A new SPS target station, T9, has been constructed for the CHORUS and NOMAD neutrino experiments at CERN. The heart of the station is the target box : 11 beryllium rods are aligned in a cast aluminium box ; they are cooled by a closed circuit helium gas with adjusted flow to each rod. The box is motorised horizontally and vertically at both ends, to remotely optimise the secondary particle production by aligning the target with the incident proton beam. Radiation protection around the station is guaranteed by more than 100 tons of shielding material (iron, copper, marble). This presentation describes briefly the various components of the target station ; it emphasises particularly the thermal and mechanical calculations which define a safe maximum beam intensity on the beryllium rods. Over the first two years of successful operation, the station has received more than 2€1019 protons at 450 GeV/c, with intensity peaks of 2.8€1013 protons per machine cycle.

  9. Remote Communication Engineering Experiments Through Internet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Gogoi

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available In technical education, laboratory components comprise an essential and integral part without which engineering education remains incomplete. Experiments conducted on laboratory equipments lend a practical touch to the theoretical knowledge acquired by the students. However, setting up a specialized laboratory consisting of sophisticated and expensive equipments such as Digital Storage Oscilloscope, Signal Generator, Spectrum Analyzer and Network Analyzer is an expensive and unaffordable proposition for many universities and engineering colleges. Sophisticated technologies incorporated in recent models of such high-end equipments enable remote access through Internet to the instruments. This concept of accessing these expensive instruments over the Internet can be exploited by setting up a Remote Laboratory. This remote laboratory system aims at not only providing an opportunity to students from distant places to conduct hardware experiments but also to take the corresponding measurements. In this work, real-time hardware experiments have been designed and implemented. These are based on modulation techniques widely employed in Communication Engineering. An interactive Graphical User Interface (GUI environment has also been developed using Microsoft Visual Basic. This GUI is provided at the user end to facilitate the remote control and access of various instruments and experiment setups. It has been specifically designed and optimized for a low-bandwidth remote access link. The above mentioned system, as a whole, uses real-time capture of images and data from the instruments to perform experiment-related measurements.

  10. Remote Experiments in Resistor Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popescu Viorel

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes blended learningapproach to teaching resistor measurement. It is basedon “Learning by Doing” paradigm: interacticesimulation, laboratory plants, real experimentsaccessed by Web Publishing Tools under LabVIEW.Studying and experimenting access is opened for 24hours a day, 7 days a week under Moodle bookingsystem.

  11. Design principles for target stations and methods of remote handling at PSI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, E.W.

    1992-01-01

    Two design concepts for target stations used at Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) are shown. The method of the remote handling of activated elements is described and some conclusions with respect to a radioactive beam facility are given

  12. Remote participation at JET Task Force work: users' experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suttrop, W.; Kinna, D.; Farthing, J.; Hemming, O.; How, J.; Schmidt, V.

    2002-01-01

    The Joint European Torus (JET) fusion experiment is now operated with strong involvement of physicists from outside research laboratories, which often requires remote participation in JET physics experiments. Users' experience with tools for remote collaborative work is reported, including remote computer and data access, remote meetings, shared documentation and various other communication channels

  13. Remote Experiments in Control Engineering Education Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milica B Naumović

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents Automatic Control Engineering Laboratory (ACEL - WebLab, an under-developed, internet-based remote laboratory for control engineering education at the Faculty of Electronic Engineering in Niš. Up to now, the remote laboratory integrates two physical systems (velocity servo system and magnetic levitation system and enables some levels of measurement and control. To perform experiments in ACEL-WebLab, the "LabVIEW Run Time Engine"and a standard web browser are needed.

  14. Potential of remote multiplexing systems in reducing cabling cost and complexity in nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stirling, A.J.; L'Archeveque, J.V.R.

    1977-03-01

    Control and instrumentation cabling accounts for nearly 1% of the capital cost of a CANDU generating station. This study of cabling requirements, methods and costs for nuclear reactors, shows that efficient design and scale economies make CANDU wiring costs (per field point) among the lowest for comparable applications. Although attractive in other reactors, commercially available remote multiplexing systems are not, as yet, cost effective for general use in CANDU stations. The report, with its comprehensive tabulation of remote multiplexing equipment, and analysis of cabling procedures describes an approach for re-evaluating the tradeoff between remote multiplexing and conventional wiring as conditions change. (author)

  15. Experiences with remote collaborations in fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wurden, G.A.; Davis, S.; Barnes, D.

    1998-03-01

    The magnetic fusion research community has considerable experience in placing remote collaboration tools in the hands of real user. The ability to remotely view operations and to control selected instrumentation and analysis tasks has been demonstrated. University of Wisconsin scientists making turbulence measurements on TFTR: (1) were provided with a remote control room from which they could operate their diagnostic, while keeping in close contact with their colleagues in Princeton. LLNL has assembled a remote control room in Livermore in support of a large, long term collaboration on the DIII-D tokamak in San Diego. (2) From the same control room, a joint team of MIT and LLNL scientists has conducted full functional operation of the Alcator C-Mod tokamak located 3,000 miles away in Cambridge Massachusetts. (3) These early efforts have been highly successful, but are only the first steps needed to demonstrate the technical feasibility of a complete facilities on line environment. These efforts have provided a proof of principle for the collaboratory concept and they have also pointed out shortcomings in current generation tools and approaches. Current experiences and future directions will be discussed

  16. Regulatory experience in nuclear power station decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, W.M.; Waters, R.E.; Taylor, F.E.; Burrows, P.I.

    1995-01-01

    In the UK, decommissioning on a licensed nuclear site is regulated and controlled by HM Nuclear Installations Inspectorate on behalf of the Health and Safety Executive. The same legislative framework used for operating nuclear power stations is also applied to decommissioning activities and provides a continuous but flexible safety regime until there is no danger from ionising radiations. The regulatory strategy is discussed, taking into account Government policy and international guidance for decommissioning and the implications of the recent white paper reviewing radioactive waste management policy. Although each site is treated on a case by case basis as regulatory experience is gained from decommissioning commercial nuclear power stations in the UK, generic issues have been identified and current regulatory thinking on them is indicated. Overall it is concluded that decommissioning is an evolving process where dismantling and waste disposal should be carried out as soon as reasonably practicable. Waste stored on site should, where it is practical and cost effective, be in a state of passive safety. (Author)

  17. Remote Decontamination Facility and Repair Station for hot-cell manipulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryz, M.A.

    1977-01-01

    Increasingly high radiation levels on manipulators at the Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment, Pinawa, Manitoba, Canada, necessitated design and construction of a Remote Decontamination Facility and Repair Station. This facility reduces radiation levels on manipulators by an order of magnitude over previous hand decontamination techniques. The reduced radiation levels have allowed superior manipulator repair and maintenance, resulting in 50% fewer manipulator breakdowns

  18. 47 CFR 74.431 - Special rules applicable to remote pickup stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... occur outside the studio back to studio or production center. The transmitted material shall be intended... system. (b) Remote pickup mobile or base stations may be used for communications related to production..., Hawaii, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands may be used for any purpose related to the programming or...

  19. Preparing and Managing the Remote Experiment in Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Kozík

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Remote laboratories have become a real fact in recent years not only at technical universities, but also at lower educational levels. The use of such technology in education is not associated only with the advantages. The attention of pedagogical research is necessary to focus also to some specific problems, pitfalls and risks that occur as a side effect. The development and operation of remote laboratories requires certain resources. Some experiments are able to run fully automatically, others require constant human interference on the spot. What has been overlooked the developers and users of remote experiments was the question how to manage the long-term operation, reliability and innovation of the remote real experiments installed at remote laboratories. In remote experiments, students, consciously or unconsciously, are trying the limit parameters of the experiment. Although such behaviour is important in terms of education, safety of the facilities must be taken into account.

  20. Operating experience at Scottish Nuclear's power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackburn, P.

    1991-01-01

    A brief history is presented of the design and operation of the four Scottish nuclear power stations currently run by Scottish Nuclear, namely Hunterston 'A' and 'B' and the Torness reactors. A design flaw in the Magnox reactor at Hunterston 'A' led to it being operated at lower than optimal temperature and hence producing less power. For Hunterston 'B' reactor the Advanced Gas Cooled design prototype was used. Operating setbacks and successes are noted. The design chosen for Torness embraced all the good points of Hunterston 'B' but sought to eliminate its faults. After 26 years of successful operation Hunterston 'A' is now being decommissioned, while the other three stations continue to generate electricity successfully. (UK)

  1. Remote telepresence surgery: the Canadian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anvari, M

    2007-04-01

    On 28 February 2003, the world's first telerobotic surgical service was established between St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton, a teaching hospital affiliated with McMaster University, and North Bay General Hospital, a community hospital 400 km away. The service was designed to provide telerobotic surgery and assistance by expert surgeons to local surgeons in North Bay, and to improve the range and quality of advanced laparoscopic surgeries offered locally. The two surgeons have collaboratively performed 22 remote telepresence surgeries including laparoscopic fundoplications, laparoscopic colon resections, and laparoscopic inguinal hernia repairs. This article describes the important lessons learned, including the telecommunication requirements, the impact from lack of haptic feedback, surgeons' adaptation to latency, and ethical and medicolegal issues. This is currently the largest clinical experience with assisted robotic telepresence surgery (ARTS) in the world, and the lessons learned will help guide the future design and development of telesurgical robotic platforms. It also will guide the establishment of telesurgical networks connecting various centers in the world, allowing for rapid and safe dissemination of new surgical techniques.

  2. The International Space Station: A Unique Platform for Remote Sensing of Natural Disasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanov, William L.; Evans, Cynthia A.

    2014-01-01

    Assembly of the International Space Station (ISS) was completed in 2012, and the station is now fully operational as a platform for remote sensing instruments tasked with collecting scientific data about the Earth system. Remote sensing systems are mounted inside the ISS, primarily in the U.S. Destiny Module's Window Observational Research Facility (WORF), or are located on the outside of the ISS on any of several attachment points. While NASA and other space agencies have had remote sensing systems orbiting Earth and collecting publicly available data since the early 1970s, these sensors are carried onboard free-flying, unmanned satellites. These satellites are traditionally placed into Sun-synchronous polar orbits that allow imaging of the entire surface of the Earth to be repeated with approximately the same Sun illumination (typically local solar noon) over specific areas, with set revisit times that allow uniform data to be taken over long time periods and enable straightforward analysis of change over time. In contrast, the ISS has an inclined, Sun-asynchronous orbit (the solar illumination for data collections over any location changes as the orbit precesses) that carries it over locations on the Earth between approximately 52degnorth and 52deg south latitudes (figure 1). The ISS is also unique among NASA orbital platforms in that it has a human crew. The presence of a crew provides options not available to robotic sensors and platforms, such as the ability to collect unscheduled data of an unfolding event using handheld digital cameras as part of the Crew Earth Observations (CEO) facility and on-the-fly assessment of environmental conditions, such as cloud cover, to determine whether conditions are favorable for data collection. The crew can also swap out internal sensor systems installed in the WORF as needed. The ISS orbit covers more than 90 percent of the inhabited surface of the Earth, allowing the ISS to pass over the same ground locations at

  3. Human-factors-based implementation of the remote characterization system high-level control station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noakes, M.W.; Richardson, B.S.; Rowe, J.C.; Draper, J.V.; Sandness, G.R.

    1993-01-01

    The detection and characterization of buried objects and materials is an important first step in the restoration of the numerous US Department of Energy (DOE) and US Department of Defense waste disposal sites. DOE, through its Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Robotics and Technology Development Program, has developed the Remote Characterization System (RCS) to address the needs of remote subsurfacecharacterization. The RCS consists of a low-metal-content (low-metallic-signature) remotely piloted vehicle, a high-level control station (HLCS) where operators can remotely control the vehicle and analyze real-time data from sensors, and an array of sensors that can be chosen to meet the survey task at hand. Communication between the vehicle and the base station is handled by a radio link. Site mapping is made possible through the use of geopositioning satellite data. The primary mode of vehicle operation is teleoperation, but provision has been made for semiautonomous or supervisory control that allows for automated sitesurvey on simple sites. Data analysis and display is supported for both real-time observation and postprocessing of data. The particular emphasis of this paper documents the human-factors-based design influences on the HLCS and describes the design in detail

  4. Pilot plant experiments at Wairakei Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Kevin L.; Bacon, Lew G.

    2009-01-01

    In the mid-1990s, several pilot plants were constructed at Wairakei to either improve the operational and economic performance of the power station or to mitigate the environmental effects of discharges to the Waikato River. The results of the following investigations are discussed: (1) fluid flow dynamic effects on silica scaling; (2) production of silica sols of predetermined particle size to evaluate the potential for generating commercial grade silica products; (3) use of 'sulfur oxidising bacteria' for the abatement of dissolved hydrogen sulphide in cooling water; (4) removal of arsenic from separated geothermal water; (5) steam line condensate corrosion; and (6) measurement and modelling of steam scrubbing in Wairakei's long steamlines. (author)

  5. NDA National Graduate Programme 'nucleargraduates'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawson, Carl

    2010-07-01

    institutions and will have a blend of leading technical proficiency mixed with indications of 'high performer' potential. Professional - Throughout the programme the graduates will be working towards achieving professional qualifications though the relevant 'Institute' for their discipline, such as the IMECHE. The training and experience gained from the scheme is programmed around a syllabus of work and courses, which will be accredited retrospectively by the 'Institutes'. The two year 'initial professional development' programme whilst the graduate is with the NDA is then fitted into a further two years with stakeholders for their first 'substantive role'. Whilst there is no monetary contribution from the stakeholders there is a significant resource support from the programme stakeholders. They will provide a sophisticated matrix of support in attraction and assessment support, professional development, mentoring, training and scheme evaluation. The programme will be using cutting edge marketing, assessment, recruitment and training tools. It will also deliver a pioneering socio economic programme that will combine professional training with cultural and behavioural insight work. The aims of the programme are aligned with the NDA succession plan and Skills Strategy Document. The graduate profile by the end of the two year programme is 'mobile, professional, aware and ambitious.' The Programme is driven by a group comprising of companies across the industry including the NDA, SLC's, defence operators, operational power station organisations, regulators and the supply chain. Uniquely, the programme offers no 'specific job' with the NDA after the two year programme is completed. The programme will be integrated into the existing partners' schemes to ensure smooth progression. The Graduate's progress after 2 years will be facilitated by a careers service and formal rules governing the behaviour

  6. Study on temperature field airborne remote sensing survey along shore nuclear power station in different tide status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Chunli; Li Mingsong

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear Power Station needs to let large quantity of cooling water to the near sea area when it is running. Whether the cooling water has effect to surrounding environment and the running of Nuclear Power Station needs further research. Temperature Drainage Mathematic Model and Physical Analogue Model need to acquire the distribution characteristic of near Station sea surface temperature field in different seasons and different tide status. Airborne Remote Sending Technique has a advantage in gaining high resolution sea surface temperature in different tide status, and any other manual method with discrete point survey can not reach it. After a successful implementation of airborne remote sensing survey to gain the near-shore temperature drainage information in Qinshan Nuclear Power Station, it provides the reference methods and ideas for temperature drainage remote sensing survey of Nuclear Power Station. (authors)

  7. Operating experience of Fugen Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohteru, Shigeru; Kaneko, Jun; Kawahara, Toshio; Matsumoto, Mitsuo

    1987-01-01

    The prototype ATR 'Fugen' developed as one of the national project has verified the performance and reliability of the advanced thermal reactor system through the operation for about eight years since 1979, and the elucidation of the characteristics in plutonium utilization and the development and verification of the tuilizing techniques have been advanced. Besides, the operational results and the achievement of the technical development are successively reflected to the design of a demonstration reactor. In this paper, the outline of Fugan and the operational results are reported. The ATR Fugen Power Station is that of the prototype reactor of heavy water moderated, boiling light water cooled, pressure tube type, having the electric output of 165 MW. It started the full scale operation on March 20, 1979, and as of January, 1987, the total generated electric power reached about 7 billion kWh, the time of power generation was about 43,000 h, and the average capacity factor was 60.6 %. Plutonium utilization techniques, the flow characteristics and the dynamic plant characteristics of a pressure tube type reactor, the operational characteristics of a heavy water system and the techniques of handling heavy water containing tritium, and the operational reliability and maintainability of the machinery and equipment installed have been studied. (Kako, I.)

  8. NDA 2000 -- A modern, networked laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, K.A.; Ceo, R.N.

    1996-01-01

    As part of the modernization process, the Nondestructive Analysis (NDA) laboratory at Oak Ridge is undergoing changes to increase reliability, incorporate new analytical techniques, and improve quality assurance. The data system has been decentralized into a network, allowing any instrument to be controlled from any client, even remotely for trouble shooting purposes. By making the computers interchangeable, reliability increases. The software has been redesigned to function on a network, and incorporates several improvements to enhance accuracy and include quality assurance. The emphasis of this paper is directed at the actual hardware and software to integrate NDA 2000. Another paper (Reference 1) by the same authors presented at this symposium gives more details concerning new analytical and QA techniques

  9. Virtual and remote experiments for radiometric and photometric measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoms, L-J; Girwidz, R

    2017-01-01

    The analysis of spectra is fundamental to our modern understanding of wave optics and colour perception. Since spectrometers are expensive, and accurate calibration is necessary to achieve high quality spectra, we developed a remote lab on optical spectrometry. With this tool, students can carry out real experiments over the Internet. In this article the pros and cons of remote labs, the physical background of optical spectrometry, and the development and use of a radiometric remote lab for higher education are discussed. The remote lab is freely accessible to everyone at http://virtualremotelab.net. (paper)

  10. Virtual and remote experiments for radiometric and photometric measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoms, L.-J.; Girwidz, R.

    2017-09-01

    The analysis of spectra is fundamental to our modern understanding of wave optics and colour perception. Since spectrometers are expensive, and accurate calibration is necessary to achieve high quality spectra, we developed a remote lab on optical spectrometry. With this tool, students can carry out real experiments over the Internet. In this article the pros and cons of remote labs, the physical background of optical spectrometry, and the development and use of a radiometric remote lab for higher education are discussed. The remote lab is freely accessible to everyone at http://virtualremotelab.net.

  11. Semiconductor laser technology for remote sensing experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Joseph

    1988-01-01

    Semiconductor injection lasers are required for implementing virtually all spaceborne remote sensing systems. Their main advantages are high reliability and efficiency, and their main roles are envisioned in pumping and injection locking of solid state lasers. In some shorter range applications they may even be utilized directly as the sources.

  12. Argentinian experience in selecting sites for nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csik, B.J.

    1975-01-01

    One nuclear power station is in operation in the Republic of Argentina, a second is under construction, and the decision to build a third has been taken. According to existing plans, about ten nuclear power stations should go into operation during the next decade. The present paper analyses the experience acquired in selecting sites for the first units, commenting on the criteria and methods applied, the studies that were carried out, the specific problems encountered and the solutions adopted, as well as on the question of acceptance of the chosen sites by the public. It goes on to describe the current programme of selection and study of sites for future nuclear power stations

  13. Physics Experiments at the Agesta Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apelqvist, G.; Bliselius, P. Aa.; Blomberg, P.E.; Jonsson, E.; Aakerhielm, F.

    1966-09-01

    Part A. Dynamic measurements have been performed at the Aagesta reactor at power levels from 0.3 to 65 MW(th). The purposes of the experiments have been both to develop experimental methods and equipment for the dynamic studies and to measure the dynamic characteristics of the reactor in order to check the dynamic model. The experiments have been performed with four different perturbation functions: trapezoidal and step functions and two types of periodic multifrequency signals. Perturbations were introduced in the reactivity and in the load. The recordings were made of the responses of nuclear power, coolant inlet and outlet temperature and control rod position. The results are presented as step responses and transfer functions (Bode diagrams). Inmost cases the relative accuracy is ± 0.5 dB in amplitude and ± 5 deg in phase. The results from the experiments in general show rather good agreement with the results obtained from a dynamic model, which successively has been improved. Experience on reactor noise analysis based on measurements in the Agesta power reactor is discussed. It is shown that the noise measurements have given complementary dynamic information of the reactor. Part B. Static measurements of the physics parameters in the Agesta reactor are carried out to confirm theoretical methods for reactor calculations and to form a good basis for safe operation of the reactor. The reactivity worth of groups of control rods are determined with different methods and compared with calculations with the three-dimensional code HETERO. The excess reactivity as a function of burn up is obtained from the control rod positions. The temperature coefficient of the moderator is measured by lowering the moderator temperature at constant power and observing the change in control rod insertion. As burn up increases the experiments are repeated in order to follow the changes in the coefficient. The xenon poisoning effects are measured by changing the power level and

  14. Physics Experiments at the Agesta Power Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apelqvist, G [State Power Board, Stockholm (Sweden); Bliselius, P Aa; Blomberg, P E; Jonsson, E; Aakerhielm, F [AB Atomenergi, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    1966-09-15

    Part A. Dynamic measurements have been performed at the Aagesta reactor at power levels from 0.3 to 65 MW(th). The purposes of the experiments have been both to develop experimental methods and equipment for the dynamic studies and to measure the dynamic characteristics of the reactor in order to check the dynamic model. The experiments have been performed with four different perturbation functions: trapezoidal and step functions and two types of periodic multifrequency signals. Perturbations were introduced in the reactivity and in the load. The recordings were made of the responses of nuclear power, coolant inlet and outlet temperature and control rod position. The results are presented as step responses and transfer functions (Bode diagrams). Inmost cases the relative accuracy is {+-} 0.5 dB in amplitude and {+-} 5 deg in phase. The results from the experiments in general show rather good agreement with the results obtained from a dynamic model, which successively has been improved. Experience on reactor noise analysis based on measurements in the Agesta power reactor is discussed. It is shown that the noise measurements have given complementary dynamic information of the reactor. Part B. Static measurements of the physics parameters in the Agesta reactor are carried out to confirm theoretical methods for reactor calculations and to form a good basis for safe operation of the reactor. The reactivity worth of groups of control rods are determined with different methods and compared with calculations with the three-dimensional code HETERO. The excess reactivity as a function of burn up is obtained from the control rod positions. The temperature coefficient of the moderator is measured by lowering the moderator temperature at constant power and observing the change in control rod insertion. As burn up increases the experiments are repeated in order to follow the changes in the coefficient. The xenon poisoning effects are measured by changing the power level and

  15. Smart Ultrasound Remote Guidance Experiment (SURGE) Preliminary Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Victor; Dulchavsky, Scott; Garcia, Kathleen; Sargsyan, Ashot; Ebert, Doug

    2009-01-01

    To date, diagnostic quality ultrasound images were obtained aboard the International Space Station (ISS) using the ultrasound of the Human Research Facility (HRF) rack in the Laboratory module. Through the Advanced Diagnostic Ultrasound in Microgravity (ADUM) and the Braslet-M Occlusion Cuffs (BRASLET SDTO) studies, non-expert ultrasound operators aboard the ISS have performed cardiac, thoracic, abdominal, vascular, ocular, and musculoskeletal ultrasound assessments using remote guidance from ground-based ultrasound experts. With exploration class missions to the lunar and Martian surfaces on the horizon, crew medical officers will necessarily need to operate with greater autonomy given communication delays (round trip times of up to 5 seconds for the Moon and 90 minutes for Mars) and longer periods of communication blackouts (due to orbital constraints of communication assets). The SURGE project explored the feasibility and training requirements of having non-expert ultrasound operators perform autonomous ultrasound assessments in a simulated exploration mission outpost. The project aimed to identify experience, training, and human factors requirements for crew medical officers to perform autonomous ultrasonography. All of these aims pertained to the following risks from the NASA Bioastronautics Road Map: 1) Risk 18: Major Illness and Trauna; 2) Risk 20) Ambulatory Care; 3) Risk 22: Medical Informatics, Technologies, and Support Systems; and 4) Risk 23: Medical Skill Training and Maintenance.

  16. Data Assimilation of Dead Fuel Moisture Observations from Remote automated Weather Stations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vejmelka, Martin; Kochanski, A.; Mandel, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 5 (2016), s. 558-568 ISSN 1049-8001 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-34856S Grant - others:National Science Foundation(US) AGS-0835579 and DMS-1216481; NASA (US) NNX12AQ85G and NNX13AH9G. Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : data assimilation * dead fuel moisture * equilibrium * Kalman filter * remote automated weather stations * time lag model * trend surface model Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 2.748, year: 2016

  17. Development of a Cost-Effective Solar/Diesel Independent Power Plant for a Remote Station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okeolu Samuel Omogoye

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the design, simulation, and optimization of a solar/diesel hybrid power supply system for a remote station. The design involves determination of the station total energy demand as well as obtaining the station solar radiation data. This information was used to size the components of the hybrid power supply system (HPSS and to determine its configuration. Specifically, an appropriate software package, HOMER, was used to determine the number of solar panels, deep-cycle batteries, and rating of the inverter that comprise the solar section of the HPSS. A suitable diesel generator was also selected for the HPSS after careful technical and cost analysis of those available in the market. The designed system was simulated using the HOMER software package and the simulation results were used to carry out the optimization of the system. The final design adequately meets the station energy requirement. Based on a life expectancy of twenty-five years, a cost-benefit analysis of the HPSS was carried out. This analysis shows that the HPSS has a lower cost as compared to a conventional diesel generator power supply, thus recommending the HPSS as a more cost-effective solution for this application.

  18. Earth Observation from the International Space Station -Remote Sensing in Schools-

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Johannes; Rienow, Andreas; Graw, Valerie; Heinemann, Sascha; Selg, Fabian; Menz, Gunter

    2016-04-01

    Since spring 2014, the NASA High Definition Earth Viewing (HDEV) mission at the International Space Station (ISS) is online. HDEV consists of four cameras mounted at ESA's Columbus laboratory and is recording the earth 24/7. The educational project 'Columbus Eye - Live-Imagery from the ISS in Schools' has published a learning portal for earth observation from the ISS (www.columbuseye.uni-bonn.de). Besides a video live stream, the portal contains an archive providing spectacular footage, web-GIS and an observatory with interactive materials for school lessons. Columbus Eye is carried out by the University of Bonn and funded by the German Aerospace Center (DLR) Space Administration. Pupils should be motivated to work with the footage in order to learn about patterns and processes of the coupled human-environment system like volcano eruptions or deforestation. The material is developed on the experiences of the FIS (German abbreviation for "Remote Sensing in Schools") project and its learning portal (http://www.fis.uni-bonn.de). Based on the ISS videos three different teaching material types are developed. The simplest teaching type are provided by worksheets, which have a low degree of interactivity. Alongside a short didactical commentary for teachers is included. Additionally, videos, ancillary information, maps, and instructions for interactive school experiments are provided. The observatory contains the second type of the Columbus Eye teaching materials. It requires a high degree of self-organisation and responsibility of the pupils. Thus, the observatory provides the opportunity for pupils to freely construct their own hypotheses based on a spatial analysis tool similar to those provided by commercial software. The third type are comprehensive learning and teaching modules with a high degree of interactivity, including background information, interactive animations, quizzes and different analysis tools (e.g. change detection, classification, polygon or NDVI

  19. Tarapur Atomic Power Station - - an overview of experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, J.C.

    1979-01-01

    A broad overview of the experience and performance of the Tarapur Atomic Power Station (TAPS) in its role as the developing world's first foray in commercial atomic power has been attempted. The prime objective was not just generation of power but assimilation of an advanced technology on an economically viable basis in the underdeveloped environment compounded with governmental organisational culture. Scientific and technical advances registered through the TAPS experience in the area of design, operation and maintenance are mentioned. Aspects of station performance, management and even economics are also covered. (auth.)

  20. Methodology for NDA performance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuypers, M.; Franklin, M.; Guardini, S.

    1986-01-01

    In the framework of the RandD programme of the Joint Research Centre of the Commission of the European Communities, a considerable effort is being dedicated to performance assessment of NDA techniques taking account of field conditions. By taking account of field conditions is meant measurement samples of the size encountered in practice and training which allows inspectors to design cost efficient verification plans for the real situations encountered in the field. Special laboratory facilities referred to as PERLA are being constructed for this purpose. These facilities will be used for measurement experiments and for training. In this paper, performance assessment is discussed under the headings of measurement capability and in-field effectiveness. Considerable emphasis is given to the role of method specific measurement error models. The authors outline the advantages of giving statistical error models a sounder basis in the physical phenomenology of the measurement method

  1. Estimation of Remote Microclimates from Weather Station Data with Applications to Landscape Architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Robert Douglas

    Several components of a system for quantitative application of climatic statistics to landscape planning and design (CLIMACS) have been developed. One component model (MICROSIM) estimated the microclimate at the top of a remote crop using physically-based models and inputs of weather station data. Temperatures at the top of unstressed, uniform crops on flat terrain within 1600 m of a recording weather station were estimated within 1.0 C 96% of the time for a corn crop and 92% of the time for a soybean crop. Crop top winds were estimated within 0.4 m/s 92% of the time for corn and 100% of the time for soybean. This is of sufficient accuracy for application in landscape planning and design models. A physically-based model (COMFA) was developed for the determination of outdoor human thermal comfort from microclimate inputs. Estimated versus measured comfort levels in a wide range of environments agreed with a correlation coefficient of r = 0.91. Using these components, the CLIMACS concept has been applied to a typical planning example. Microclimate data were generated from weather station information using MICROSIM, then input to COMFA and to a house energy consumption model called HOTCAN to derive quantitative climatic justification for design decisions.

  2. Remote Viewing and Computer Communications--An Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallee, Jacques

    1988-01-01

    A series of remote viewing experiments were run with 12 participants who communicated through a computer conferencing network. The correct target sample was identified in 8 out of 33 cases. This represented more than double the pure chance expectation. Appendices present protocol, instructions, and results of the experiments. (Author/YP)

  3. Stuart Energy's experiences in developing 'Hydrogen Energy Station' infrastructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crilly, B.

    2004-01-01

    'Full text:' With over 50 years experience, Stuart Energy is the global leader in the development, manufacture and integration of multi-use hydrogen infrastructure products that use the Company's proprietary IMET hydrogen generation water electrolysis technology. Stuart Energy offers its customers the power of hydrogen through its integrated Hydrogen Energy Station (HES) that provides clean, secure and distributed hydrogen. The HES can be comprised of five modules: hydrogen generation, compression, storage, fuel dispensing and / or power generation. This paper discusses Stuart Energy's involvement with over 10 stations installed in recent years throughout North America, Asia and Europe while examining the economic and environmental benefits of these systems. (author)

  4. Potential for remote sensing of agriculture from the international space station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgenthaler, George W.; Khatib, Nader

    1999-01-01

    Today's spatial resolution of orbital sensing systems is too coarse to economically serve the yield-improvement/contamination-reduction needs of the small to mid-size farm enterprise. Remote sensing from aircraft is being pressed into service. However, satellite remote sensing constellations with greater resolution and more spectral bands, i.e., with resolutions of 1 m in the panchromatic, 4 m in the multi-spectral, and 8 m in the hyper-spectral are expected to be in orbit by the year 2000. Such systems coupled with Global Positioning System (GPS) capability will make 'precision agriculture', i.e., the identification of specific and timely fertilizer, irrigation, herbicide, and insecticide needs on an acre-by-acre basis and the ability to meet these needs with precision delivery systems at affordable costs, is what is needed and can be achieved. Current plans for remote sensing systems on the International Space Station (ISS) include externally attached payloads and a window observation platform. The planned orbit of the Space Station will result in overflight of a specific latitude and longitude at the same clock time every 3 months. However, a pass over a specific latitude and longitude during 'daylight hours' could occur much more frequently. The ISS might thus be a space platform for experimental and developmental testing of future commercial space remote sensing precision agriculture systems. There is also a need for agricultural 'truth' sites so that predictive crop yield and pollution models can be devised and corrective suggestions delivered to farmers at affordable costs. In Summer 1998, the University of Colorado at Boulder and the Center for the Study of Terrestrial and Extraterrestrial Atmospheres (CSTEA) at Howard University, under NASA Goddard Space Flight Center funding, established an agricultural 'truth' site in eastern Colorado. The 'truth' site was highly instrumented for measuring trace gas concentrations (NO x , SO x , CO 2 , O 3 , organics

  5. Minimum long-term cost solution for remote telecommunication stations on the basis of photovoltaic-based hybrid power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaldellis, J.K.; Ninou, I.; Zafirakis, D.

    2011-01-01

    In the case of the telecommunication (T/C) services' expansion to rural and remote areas, the market generally responds with the minimum investments required. Considering the existing situation, cost-effective operation of the T/C infrastructure installed in these regions (i.e. remote T/C stations) becomes critical. However, since in most cases grid-connection is not feasible, the up-to-now electrification solution for remote T/C stations is based on the operation of costly, oil consuming and heavy polluting diesel engines. Instead, the use of photovoltaic (PV)-based hybrid power stations is currently examined, using as a case study a representative remote T/C station of the Greek territory. In this context, the present study is concentrated on the detailed cost-benefit analysis of the proposed solution. More precisely, the main part of the analysis is devoted to develop a complete electricity production cost model, accordingly applied for numerous oil consumption and service period scenarios. Note that in all cases examined, zero load rejections is a prerequisite while minimum long-term cost solutions designated are favorably compared with the diesel-only solution. Finally, a sensitivity analysis, demonstrating the impact of the main economic parameters on the energy production cost of optimum sized PV-diesel hybrid power stations, is also provided. - Research highlights: → Expansion of telecommunication (T/C) in remote areas is vital for their development. → Off-grid T/C stations employed in such areas operate on diesel engines. → The use of PV-diesel-battery hybrid power stations is currently examined. → A detailed long-term electricity production cost model is developed. → Cost-effectiveness of the proposed system is reflected for numerous configurations.

  6. Engineering test station for TFTR blanket module experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jassby, D.L.; Leinoff, S.

    1979-12-01

    A conceptual design has been carried out for an Engineering Test Station (ETS) which will provide structural support and utilities/instrumentation services for blanket modules positioned adjacent to the vacuum vessel of the TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor). The ETS is supported independently from the Test Cell floor. The ETS module support platform is constructed of fiberglass to eliminate electromagnetic interaction with the pulsed tokamak fields. The ETS can hold blanket modules with dimensions up to 78 cm in width, 85 cm in height, and 105 cm in depth, and with a weight up to 4000 kg. Interfaces for all utility and instrumentation requirements are made via a shield plug in the TFTR igloo shielding. The modules are readily installed or removed by means of TFTR remote handling equipment

  7. Remote Control and Monitoring of VLBI Experiments by Smartphones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruztort, C. H.; Hase, H.; Zapata, O.; Pedreros, F.

    2012-12-01

    For the remote control and monitoring of VLBI operations, we developed a software optimized for smartphones. This is a new tool based on a client-server architecture with a Web interface optimized for smartphone screens and cellphone networks. The server uses variables of the Field System and its station specific parameters stored in the shared memory. The client running on the smartphone by a Web interface analyzes and visualizes the current status of the radio telescope, receiver, schedule, and recorder. In addition, it allows commands to be sent remotely to the Field System computer and displays the log entries. The user has full access to the entire operation process, which is important in emergency cases. The software also integrates a webcam interface.

  8. Developments in remote participation in plasma physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackwell, B.

    1999-01-01

    Recent growth in the size of plasma experiments and developments in network based software have contributed to a high level of interest in remote participation. Highlights of the recent conferences on this subject, and the ensuing 'white paper' are presented, with demonstrations of various Data Server/Web/Java based remote access techniques. These not only allow AINSE/AFRG users convenient access to H-1NF data from their home laboratory, but are (or soon will be) available to and from many overseas laboratories with similar systems. Many large plasma laboratories predict a large increase in remote access in the next two years. Several demonstrations of remote experiment control have been performed over medium speed networks, and several new experiments are planning on remote access from the beginning. In this paper we consider data access rights and security, access to common documents, and access to processed and raw data. The full version of this document can be viewed on the ANU's H-1NF web page at: http://rsphysse.anu.edu.au/

  9. ARIES NDA Robot operators' manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheer, N.L.; Nelson, D.C.

    1998-05-01

    The ARIES NDA Robot is an automation device for servicing the material movements for a suite of Non-destructive assay (NDA) instruments. This suite of instruments includes a calorimeter, a gamma isotopic system, a segmented gamma scanner (SGS), and a neutron coincidence counter (NCC). Objects moved by the robot include sample cans, standard cans, and instrument plugs. The robot computer has an RS-232 connection with the NDA Host computer, which coordinates robot movements and instrument measurements. The instruments are expected to perform measurements under the direction of the Host without operator intervention. This user's manual describes system startup, using the main menu, manual operation, and error recovery

  10. Slovenian experience in applicability of remote sensing data in hydrology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horvat, A; Vidmar, A; Petan, S; Brilly, M [University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Civil and Geodetic Engineering, Chair of Hydrology and Hydraulic Engineering, Hajdrihova 28, Ljubljana (Slovenia)], E-mail: mbrillygg@uni-lj.si

    2008-11-01

    Nowadays remote sensing data are great value for many ways of use as for snow hydrology. Snow cover mapping on basis of satellite images is widely spread because it is easier than in-situ measuring and interpolating. To verify the use of satellite imagery (MODIS product) we used all available data of snow cover and satellite images and compared detected snow cover on images and in-situ measured snow cover. The information about clouds and snow cover measured on the Ljubljana climatological station were acquired and analysed. The use of satellite images showed out to be useless because of climate characteristics of Slovenia and low elevation of much area.

  11. Slovenian experience in applicability of remote sensing data in hydrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvat, A; Vidmar, A; Petan, S; Brilly, M

    2008-01-01

    Nowadays remote sensing data are great value for many ways of use as for snow hydrology. Snow cover mapping on basis of satellite images is widely spread because it is easier than in-situ measuring and interpolating. To verify the use of satellite imagery (MODIS product) we used all available data of snow cover and satellite images and compared detected snow cover on images and in-situ measured snow cover. The information about clouds and snow cover measured on the Ljubljana climatological station were acquired and analysed. The use of satellite images showed out to be useless because of climate characteristics of Slovenia and low elevation of much area.

  12. Virginia Coast Reserve 2007 Remote Sensing Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-09

    beaches, maritime forests , wetlands, tidal flats, and coastal lagoons ; - Natural lands and built up areas along Cape Charles, VA are...representative of barrier island coasts , worldwide; and - It is a major natural resource for the Mid Atlantic Region. Imagery-derived information for...support Joint Logistics Over the Shore. This experiment uses the VCR to study a barrier island coast with coastal lagoons , tidal inlets, and

  13. Simulation platform for remote participants in fusion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrera, E.; Ruiz, M.; Lopez, S.; Vega, J.; Sanchez, E.

    2004-01-01

    One of the major challenges in remote participation in fusion experiments is the control from remote locations of the data acquisition and treatment process. In an optimum situation, the remote researcher should be able to control the data acquisition configuration parameters, and data processing, specifying the results that must be returned to him. The simulation platform presented here, allows the researcher to develop and test complex algorithms in a high level graphical language (LabVIEW), which includes powerful data processing libraries. These algorithms will be downloaded later into the data acquisition system. Furthermore, the platform allows the simulation of hardware data acquisition, which include the following points: (a) simulation of channel configuration from one or several data acquisition cards (channels used, sample frequencies, etc.), (b) generation of buffered simulated data (it is also possible the use of raw data, acquired in previous experiments, as simulated data), and (c) reproduction of hardware behavior (except, of course, in terms of real time behavior and real data). For this purpose, Virtual Instruments (VIs) libraries written in LabVIEW will be provided to the remote developers. These VIs will be replaced later, in the data acquisition system, by their homologous VIs that actually interface with the hardware. This facility will allow remote researchers to verify the correct behavior of their own data processing algorithms before downloading them into the data acquisition system

  14. Remote teaching experiments on magnetic domains in thin films

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dobrogowski, W.; Maziewski, A.; Zablotskyy, Vitaliy A.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 28, - (2007), s. 71-83 ISSN 0143-0807 Grant - others:Marie Curie Felloships Transfer of Knowledge(XE) NANOMAG-LAB, 2004-003177 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : magnetic domains * remote experiment * education Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.608, year: 2007

  15. EMR Measurements on NDA Equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macdonell, Alexander Thomas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Meierbachtol, Krista Cruse [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Evans, James Walter Jr. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mayo, Douglas R. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-07-10

    Electromagnetic radiation (EMR) emission strength measurements were performed on a suite of passive non-destructive assay (NDA) radiation detection equipment. Data were collected from 9 kHz up to 6 GHz on each of the assembled systems.

  16. Manned remote work station development article. Volume 1, book 2, appendix B: Trade and design definition studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    System trades, evaluations, and selection were organized under the appropriate manned remote work station roles and subsystems. Those trades/evaluations that have an impact on simulator fidelity were given emphasis in terms of identifying alternate concepts, making a selection, and defining the system approach. Those trades that do not impact simulator fidelity have the issues delineated and future study requirements identified.

  17. Operating experience and performance at Narora Atomic Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mittal, Subhash; Gupta, J.P.

    1998-01-01

    Narora Atomic Power Station consists of two units of 220 MWe capacity each. These are Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors, fuelled by natural uranium, moderated and cooled by heavy water. The Station is owned by Nuclear Power Corporation of India Ltd., which is responsible for design, construction, commissioning, and operation of all nuclear power stations in the country. NAPS was the first opportunity to apply operating experiences in design, keeping in view the evolving safety and seismicity requirements, ease of maintenance, inservice inspection needs, improved construction ability and standardization. Both the units of NAPS are having improved safety standards of current international levels. All the equipment are indigenous with improved quality and reliability. The first unit of the station went critical in March 1989 and synchronized to the grid in July 1989. The second units followed with its criticality in October 1991 and synchronization in January 1992. Considering the initial stabilizing period, the performance of both units of NAPS has progressively improved over the years. The annual capacity factor for NAPS - 1 was 90.01% and for NAPS - 2 was 89.01% for the financial year 1997-1998. This paper presents an analysis of the performance during the last three years and measures taken to improve it. The stated enhanced performance could be achieved by improvement in human performance by training/re-training, scrupulous monitoring and review of equipment/systems, institution of adequate procedure and ensuring their adherence. (authors)

  18. Network Performance and Quality of Experience of Remote Access Laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander A. Kist

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Remote Access Laboratories (RAL have become important learning and teaching tools. This paper presents a performance study that targets a specific remote access architecture implemented within a universities operational environment. This particular RAL system provides globally authenticated and arbitrated remote access to virtualized computers as well as computer controlled hardware experiments. This paper presents system performance results that have been obtained utilizing both a set of automated and human subject tests. Principle objectives of the study were: To gain a better understanding of the nature of network traffic caused by experimental activity usage; to obtain an indication of user expectations of activity performance; and to develop a measure to predict Quality of Experience, based on easily measurable Quality of Service parameters. The study emulates network layer variation of access-bandwidth and round-trip-time of typical usage scenarios and contrasts against user perception results that allow classifying expected user performance. It demonstrates that failure rate is excellent measure of usability, and that round-trip-time predominantly affects user experience. Thin-client and remote desktop architectures are popular to separate the location of users and the actual data processing and use similar structures, hence results of this study to be applied in these application areas as well.

  19. Online remote monitoring facilities for the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Kolos, S; The ATLAS collaboration; Feng, E; Hauser, R; Yakovlev, A; Zaytsev, A

    2010-01-01

    ATLAS is one of the 4 LHC experiments which started to be operated in the collisions mode in 2010. The ATLAS apparatus itself as well as the Trigger and the DAQ system are extremely complex facilities which have been built up by the collaboration including 144 institutes from 33 countries. The effective running of the experiment is supported by a large number of experts distributed all over the world. This paper describes the online remote monitoring system which has been developed in the ATLAS TDAQ community in order to support efficient participation of the experts from remote institutes in the exploitation of the experiment. The facilities provided by the remote monitoring system are ranging from the WEB based access to the general status and data quality for the ongoing data taking session to the scalable service providing real-time mirroring of the detailed monitoring data from the experimental area to the dedicated computers in the CERN public network, where this data is made available to remote users t...

  20. Remote maintenance of an operational fusion experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiptily, V.G.; Jarvis, O.N.; Popovichev, S. [Euratom/UKAEA Fusion Assoc., Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon. (United Kingdom)] [and others

    2001-07-01

    Optimisation of auxiliary plasma heating by means of Ion Cyclotron Radio-Frequency (ICRF) and Neutral Beam Injection (NBI) as envisaged for the future fusion reactors is one of the main priorities in present research at today's tokamaks. Therefore, investigation of the production of fast ions during heating and of the subsequent fast ion behaviour in magnetically confined plasmas, together with an evaluation of the resulting bulk ion heating efficiency, are of essential importance for fusion reactor development. Gamma-ray diagnostics, based on the measurement of the gamma-ray emission from nuclear reactions between fast ions and the main plasma impurities, is a valuable technique for studying the fast particle energy distributions. Gamma-ray spectrometry provides information on the energy distribution, and the measurement of emission profiles supplies information on the spatial distribution of the reaction sites. Since 1987, the {gamma}-ray emission from JET plasmas has been systematically monitored and used successfully in the analysis of heating effects during ICRF and NBI heating in the JET tokamak. The classical character of the fast ion slowing down behaviour has been demonstrated and estimates have been obtained of the fast particle confinement time. The study of sawtooth crashes has demonstrated dramatic spatial redistribution of fast particles and other effects. In recent JET experiments to study the ITER-relevant ICRH scenarios ({sup 3}He)D and ({sup 3}He){sup 4}He, {gamma}-ray measurements provided information on the fast ion population, with the effective temperature of the energetic tail ions being deduced with the help of a {gamma}-ray spectrum simulation code, GAMMOD. In this paper, the main y-ray results are presented and the capabilities of gamma diagnostics are discussed in the light of the ITER-project programme.

  1. Remote Experiments and Online Games: How to Merge them?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Dziabenko

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Online games fulfill the basic requirements of learning environments and can provide engaging learning experience for students. The remote experimentations bring to STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics students the ability to practice configuration, deployment, and troubleshooting scenarios in real-life environment on real equipment. These two teaching methodologies are well known, developed and described in the literature. However, the concepts of integration of the remote experimentations and the game setting are yet to be developed. This paper discusses the guidelines for such integrations. The emphasis is made on the educational game design and the flow as a positive impact on learning and attitude of the players. Besides the challenges of balancing attractive elements (graphics, sounds and educational objectives, the design of the games related to remote laboratories needs to be adjusted to contemporary technological conditions.

  2. Experience from the construction and operation of Tarapur and Rajasthan Nuclear Power Stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, J.C.; Pardiwala, T.F.; Kothare, V.V.; Rao, M.H.P.; Nanjundeswaran, K.

    1977-01-01

    India's experience in construction and operation of nuclear power stations so far covers two BWR and four PHWR Units in three power stations. Two more PHWR units are at an early stage of construction. The twin unit Tarapur Station (2x210 MWe BWR) was built as a turnkey project which restricted participation of Indian engineers in design and construction considerably. The contrasting approach adopted for Rajasthan Station (2x220 MWe PHWR) involved Indian personnel and contractors fully in construction and commissioning, with Canadians providing supervisory assistance in Rajasthan I and essentially consultative help for Rajasthan II. Subsequent stations are wholly Indian efforts. Tarapur went into commercial operation in 1969, 60 months after breaking of ground. Construction was essentially uneventful, major problems faced being stress corrosion induced cracks in the reactor lining and complete change of steam generator tubes. In its seven years of operations, Tarapur has faced several problems mainly arising from rather early designs, indifferent fuel performance, constraints of twin-unit approach and operations in an inadequately developed grid system apart from those generally stemming from assimilation of an advanced technology in a developing country. The Station has undergone six refuellings during this period. Most of the problems have been overcome by design changes, system augmentations and experience and the Station operation since mid 1974 have generally been steady at around 90% of the rated capacity. Construction of Rajasthan I at a remote and isolated site proceeded relatively slowly. Local availability of skilled and semi-skilled manpower was poor, affecting construction. Inadequate roads impeded movements of overdimensioned components. Observing strict Quality Assurance standards required several major rectifications at site. Rajasthan I went on line in 1973 after overcoming major turbine bearing problems during commissioning. Since then, while

  3. Experiences of operation for Ikata Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashimoto, Shigeyuki

    1979-01-01

    No. 1 plant in the Ikata Nuclear Power Station, Shikoku Electric Power Co., Inc., is a two-loop PWR unit with electric output of 566 MW, and it began the commercial operation on September 30, 1977, as the first nuclear power station in Shikoku. It is the 13th LWR and 7th PWR in Japan. The period of construction was 52 months since it had been started in June, 1973. During the period, it became the object of the first administrative litigation to seek the cancellation of permission to install the reactor, and it was subjected to the influence of the violent economical variation due to the oil shock, but it was completed as scheduled. After the start of operation, it continued the satisfactory operation, and generated about 2.35 billion KWh for 4300 operation hours. It achieved the rate of utilization of 96.7%. Since March 28, 1978, the first periodical inspection was carried out, and abnormality was not found in the reactor, the steam generator and the fuel at all. The period of inspection was 79 days and shorter than expected. The commercial operation was started again on June 14. The outline of the Ikata Nuclear Power Station, its state of operation, and the periodical inspection are reported. Very good results were able to be reported on the operation for one year, thanks to the valuable experiences offered by other electric power companies. (Kako, I.)

  4. Data report for the Southwest Residential Experiment Station, January 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lieberman, M.; Hai, O. Y.; Hocking, G.; Whitaker, C.

    1982-02-23

    Physical performance data obtained from the photovoltaic energy systems under test at the Southwest Residential Experiment Station in Las Cruces, New Mexico are tabulated and graphed for the month of January, 1982. Data drawn from the Residential Data System (RDS) appears in several formats. A one-page summary is provided as well as a more detailed hour-by-hour tabulation for an average day of the month. Energy histograms are provided, based on RDS data and recording kilowatt hour meters. The histograms also present horizontal and plane-of-array insolation data as well as comments that explain data and/or energy production anomalies. (LEW)

  5. The role of the restructured Mobile Remote Service Base System (MBS) in support of Space Station maintenance and servicing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darlington, T.; Krukewich, K.

    1992-08-01

    The critical parameters resulting from the restructuring of Space Station Freedom which necessitated the redesign of the Mobile Remote Service Base System (MBS) are described. These include optimization of robotic attachment locations for access to the Space Station truss-mounted orbital replacement units, transport of logistics carriers to the maintenance sites, minimization of EVA overhead associated with maintenance, self-maintenance of other mobile servicing system (MSS) elements on the MBS, and balancing of station EVA and extravehicular robotics in a complementary fashion to minimize maintenance overhead in general. Consideration is given to the configuration of the resulting MBS, which provides the program with maximum flexibility to utilize the assets of the MSS and optimizes end-to-end maintenance with regard to the use of station resources such as crew time and power. Maintenance and servicing scenarios which are instrumental to the reconfigured MBS as well as the results of improved maintenance capability are presented.

  6. Replacement of five main block valves without interruption of normal operation in a remote NGL station placed at 13400 FT AMSL, challenge and strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinto, Yamil; Morales, Raul; Elorreaga, Gerson [Compania Operadora del Gas del Amazonas, Lima (Peru)

    2012-07-01

    The present paper is aimed to share experience of the replacement of five block valves carried on in a pressure reduction station remotely operated and located in a remote area in The Andes of Peru at 13400 ft AMSL. To accomplish the job, it was necessary the construction of a temporary bypass made of carbon steel pipeline with its own regulating, instrumentation and automation facilities, hence capable of reduce the NGL pressure, controlled and remotely operated by a SCADA system. The temporary bypass connection and disconnection to put on service was carried out using Hot Tap and Line Stop equipment. The replacement of the five block valves was met without interruption of the hydrocarbons flow, and resetting the pressure reduction station to steady operating conditions. Besides the operating works these activities involve safety considerations for personal working in high altitudes. The outputs were the successful replacements of the block valves, and most important was that the NGL continuous flow was met, so both the production and processing plants were supplied with the daily transportation rates in standard conditions, and in accordance with the requirements of the plant operation. (author)

  7. Online remote monitoring facilities for the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Kolos, S; The ATLAS collaboration; Feng, E; Hauser, R; Yakovlev, A; Zaytsev, A

    2011-01-01

    ATLAS is one of the 4 LHC experiments which started to be operated in the collisions mode in 2010. The ATLAS apparatus itself as well as the Trigger and the DAQ system are extremely complex facilities which have been built up by the collaboration including 144 institutes from 33 countries. The effective running of the experiment is supported by a large number of experts distributed all over the world. This paper describes the online remote monitoring system which has been developed in the ATLAS Trigger and DAQ(TDAQ) community in order to support efficient participation of the experts from remote institutes in the exploitation of the experiment. The facilities provided by the remote monitoring system are ranging from the WEB based access to the general status and data quality for the ongoing data taking session to the scalable service providing real-time mirroring of the detailed monitoring data from the experimental area to the dedicated computers in the CERN public network, where this data is made available ...

  8. Object Recognition System in Remote Controlled Weapon Station using SIFT and SURF Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Midriem Mirdanies

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Object recognition system using computer vision that is implemented on Remote Controlled Weapon Station (RCWS is discussed. This system will make it easier to identify and shoot targeted object automatically. Algorithm was created to recognize real time multiple objects using two methods i.e. Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT and Speeded Up Robust Features (SURF combined with K-Nearest Neighbors (KNN and Random Sample Consensus (RANSAC for verification. The algorithm is designed to improve object detection to be more robust and to minimize the processing time required. Objects are registered on the system consisting of the armored personnel carrier, tanks, bus, sedan, big foot, and police jeep. In addition, object selection can use mouse to shoot another object that has not been registered on the system. Kinect™ is used to capture RGB images and to find the coordinates x, y, and z of the object. The programming language used is C with visual studio IDE 2010 and opencv libraries. Object recognition program is divided into three parts: 1 reading image from kinect™ and simulation results, 2 object recognition process, and 3 transfer of the object data to the ballistic computer. Communication between programs is performed using shared memory. The detected object data is sent to the ballistic computer via Local Area Network (LAN using winsock for ballistic calculation, and then the motor control system moves the direction of the weapon model to the desired object. The experimental results show that the SIFT method is more suitable because more accurate and faster than SURF with the average processing time to detect one object is 430.2 ms, two object is 618.4 ms, three objects is 682.4 ms, and four objects is 756.2 ms. Object recognition program is able to recognize multi-objects and the data of the identified object can be processed by the ballistic computer in realtime.

  9. Solid waste processing experience at Susquehanna Steam Electric Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, J.W.; Granus, M.W.

    1984-01-01

    This paper reviews the first year's operation at the Susquehanna Steam Electric Station (SSES) with respect to the Westinghouse Hittman Nuclear Incorporated (Hittman) mobile solidification system and the dry activated waste generation, handling and processing. Experiences pertinent to the mobile solidification system are reviewed with emphasis on the integration of the system into the plant, problems associated with unexpected waste properties and the myriad of operating procedures that had to be prepared. The processing history for 1983 is reviewed in terms of the volume of waste, including solidified wastes, dewatered wastes an DAW. Factors that must be considered in evaluating processing alternatives, i.e., dewatering vs. solidification; steel liners vs. HICs, are discussed. Actions taken by Hittman and SSES to maximize the processing economics are also discussed. Finally, recommendations are provided to the utility considering implementing mobile solification services to ensure a smooth and timely integration of services into the plant

  10. Assessing Wetland Hydroperiod and Soil Moisture With Remote Sensing: A Demonstration for the NASA Plum Brook Station Year 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Colin; Bourgeau-Chavez, Laura; Endres, Sarah; Battaglia, Michael; Shuchman, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Primary Goal: Assist with the evaluation and measuring of wetlands hydroperiod at the PlumBrook Station using multi-source remote sensing data as part of a larger effort on projecting climate change-related impacts on the station's wetland ecosystems. MTRI expanded on the multi-source remote sensing capabilities to help estimate and measure hydroperiod and the relative soil moisture of wetlands at NASA's Plum Brook Station. Multi-source remote sensing capabilities are useful in estimating and measuring hydroperiod and relative soil moisture of wetlands. This is important as a changing regional climate has several potential risks for wetland ecosystem function. The year two analysis built on the first year of the project by acquiring and analyzing remote sensing data for additional dates and types of imagery, combined with focused field work. Five deliverables were planned and completed: 1) Show the relative length of hydroperiod using available remote sensing datasets 2) Date linked table of wetlands extent over time for all feasible non-forested wetlands 3) Utilize LIDAR data to measure topographic height above sea level of all wetlands, wetland to catchment area radio, slope of wetlands, and other useful variables 4) A demonstration of how analyzed results from multiple remote sensing data sources can help with wetlands vulnerability assessment 5) A MTRI style report summarizing year 2 results. This report serves as a descriptive summary of our completion of these our deliverables. Additionally, two formal meetings were held with Larry Liou and Amanda Sprinzl to provide project updates and receive direction on outputs. These were held on 2/26/15 and 9/17/15 at the Plum Brook Station. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) is a multivariate statistical technique used to identify dominant spatial and temporal backscatter signatures. PCA reduces the information contained in the temporal dataset to the first few new Principal Component (PC) images. Some advantages of PCA

  11. BIOLOGICAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL RADIATION EXPERIENCE AT INDIAN POINT STATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, H. F.

    1963-09-15

    The environs monitoring program at Indian Point Station is presented. Thirty sampling stations within a circle of approximately 10 miles of the station are used for the collection of samples of air, water, vegetation, and soil that are then analyzed for gross beta-gamma activity. Data are tabulated. (P.C.H.)

  12. TANPOPO: Microbe and micrometeoroid capture experiments on International Space Station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, Akihiko; Kobayashi, Kensei; Yano, Hajime; Yokobori, Shinichi; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Kawai, Hideyuki; Yamashita, Masamichi

    There is a long history of the microbe-collection experiments at high altitude. Microbes have been collected using balloons, aircraft and meteorological rockets from 1936 to 1976. Spore forming fungi and Bacilli, and Micrococci have been isolated in these experiments. It is not clear how high do microbes go up. If the microbes might have been present even at higher altitudes, the fact would endorse the possibility of interplanetary migration of life. TANPOPO, dandelion, is the name of a grass whose seeds with floss are spread by the wind. We propose the analyses of interplanetary migration of microbes, organic compounds and meteoroids on Japan Experimental Module (JEM) of the International Space Station (ISS). Ultra low-density aerogel will be used to capture micrometeoroid and debris. Particles captured by aerogel will be used for several analyses after the initial inspection of the gel and tracks. Careful analysis of the tracks in the aerogel will provide the size and velocity dependence of debris flux. The particles will be analyzed for mineralogical, organic and microbiological characteristics. Aerogels are ready for production in Japan. Aerogels and trays are space proven. All the analytical techniques are ready. The Tanpopo mission was accepted as a candidate experiments on Exposed Facility of ISS-JEM.

  13. Experiences of rural and remote nurses assisting with disasters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulig, Judith C; Penz, Kelly; Karunanayake, Chandima; MacLeod, Martha L P; Jahner, Sharleen; Andrews, Mary Ellen

    2017-05-01

    Globally, disasters are on the rise. Nurses play a significant role in responding to such events but little is known about rural and remote nurses' experiences. A national cross-sectional survey of regulated nurses (registered nurses, registered psychiatric nurses, licensed practical nurses and nurse practitioners) in rural and remote Canada provided the data (n=2465) for the logistic regression of predictors of assisting with a disaster event within the last five years. The types of disaster events were also examined and open-ended responses were explored to reveal nurses' perspectives. Nurse type, age, region of employment, employment status, number of rural communities worked, distance to advanced referral centre, remote community, personal-professional boundaries, burnout and work engagement were significant factors related to assisting with a disaster event. Open-ended data alluded to the importance of pre-disaster preparation, and the difficulties experienced when personal-professional relationships are impacted during a disaster. Nursing education curricula needs to include information about disasters and the nurse's role. Continuing education opportunities and preparation for nurses should be offered in the workplace. Psychosocial supports to assist rural nurses who attend to disasters in their workplace will help them deal with issues such as the blurring of personal-professional relationships. Copyright © 2017 College of Emergency Nursing Australasia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Highly active vitrification plant remote handling operational experience and improvements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milgate, I.

    1996-01-01

    All the main process plant and equipment at the Sellafield Waste Vitrification Plant (WVP) is enclosed in heavily shielded concrete walled cells. There is a large quantity of relatively complex plant and equipment which must be remotely operated, maintained or replaced in-cell in a severe environment. The WVP has five in-cell polar cranes which are of modular construction to aid replacement of failed components. Each can be withdrawn into a shielded cell extension for decontamination and hands-on maintenance. The cells have a total of 80 through wall tube positions to receive Master Slave Manipulators (MSMs). The MSMs are used where possible for ''pick and place'' purposes but are often called upon to position substantial pieces of mechanical equipment and thus are subject to heavy loading and high failure rates. An inward flow of air is maintained in the active cells. The discharged air passes through a filter cell where remote damper operation filter changing and maintenance is carried out by means of a PAR3000 manipulator. A Nuclear Engineered Advanced Teleoperated Robot (Neater) swabs the vitrified product container to ensure cleanliness before storage. There is a significant arising of solid radioactive waste from replaced in-cell items which undergoes sorting and size reduction in a breakdown cell equipped with a large reciprocating saw and a hydraulic shear. Improvements to the remote handling facilities made in the light of operational experience are described. (UK)

  15. Elements of nondestructive assay (NDA) technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    This session provides an introduction to nondestructive assay methods and instruments as they are applied to nuclear safeguards. The purpose of the sessions is to enable participants to: (1) discuss the general principles and major applications of NDA; (2) describe situations in which NDA is particularly useful for nuclear safeguards purposes; (3) distinguish between various passive and active gamma-ray and neutron NDA methods; (4) describe several NDA instruments that measure gamma rays, and identify assay situations particularly suited to gamma-ray techniques; (5) describe several NDA instruments that measure neutrons, and identify assay situations particularly suited to neutron techniques; (6) discuss the role of calorimetry in the NDA of plutonium-bearing materials; and (7) compare the advantages and disadvantages of various NDA methods for different types of nuclear materials

  16. Operating Experience at the Aagesta Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandstroem, S.

    1966-09-01

    Sweden's first nuclear power reactor Agesta, achieved criticality on July 17, 1963. Full power (65 MW t ) was attained on March 20, 1964. Aagesta is a heavy water cooled and moderated pressure vessel reactor used for production of electricity as well as for district heating. The design, assembly and construction etc, of the reactor was described in detail in a staff report by AB Atomenergi, 'The Aagesta Nuclear Power Station' edited by B McHugh, which was published in September, 1964. In the book experiences from the commissioning and the first operation of the reactor were reported as well as findings from the extensive reactor physics studies made during this period. The report now presented is written by members of the operating team at Aagesta since its start. It reflects in general the experiences up to the end of 1965. The Aagesta Log, however, covers the period up to the normal summer stop 1966. The reactor has hitherto produced 506,000 MWh power of which 48,700 MWh have been electric power. In July 1965 the responsibility for the reactor operation was taken over by the Swedish State Power Board from AB Atomenergi, which company had started the reactor and operated it until the summer break 1965

  17. Operating Experience at the Aagesta Nuclear Power Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandstroem, S [ed.

    1966-09-15

    Sweden's first nuclear power reactor Agesta, achieved criticality on July 17, 1963. Full power (65 MW{sub t}) was attained on March 20, 1964. Aagesta is a heavy water cooled and moderated pressure vessel reactor used for production of electricity as well as for district heating. The design, assembly and construction etc, of the reactor was described in detail in a staff report by AB Atomenergi, 'The Aagesta Nuclear Power Station' edited by B McHugh, which was published in September, 1964. In the book experiences from the commissioning and the first operation of the reactor were reported as well as findings from the extensive reactor physics studies made during this period. The report now presented is written by members of the operating team at Aagesta since its start. It reflects in general the experiences up to the end of 1965. The Aagesta Log, however, covers the period up to the normal summer stop 1966. The reactor has hitherto produced 506,000 MWh power of which 48,700 MWh have been electric power. In July 1965 the responsibility for the reactor operation was taken over by the Swedish State Power Board from AB Atomenergi, which company had started the reactor and operated it until the summer break 1965.

  18. Operating Experience at the Aagesta Nuclear Power Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandstroem, S. (ed.)

    1966-09-15

    Sweden's first nuclear power reactor Agesta, achieved criticality on July 17, 1963. Full power (65 MW{sub t}) was attained on March 20, 1964. Aagesta is a heavy water cooled and moderated pressure vessel reactor used for production of electricity as well as for district heating. The design, assembly and construction etc, of the reactor was described in detail in a staff report by AB Atomenergi, 'The Aagesta Nuclear Power Station' edited by B McHugh, which was published in September, 1964. In the book experiences from the commissioning and the first operation of the reactor were reported as well as findings from the extensive reactor physics studies made during this period. The report now presented is written by members of the operating team at Aagesta since its start. It reflects in general the experiences up to the end of 1965. The Aagesta Log, however, covers the period up to the normal summer stop 1966. The reactor has hitherto produced 506,000 MWh power of which 48,700 MWh have been electric power. In July 1965 the responsibility for the reactor operation was taken over by the Swedish State Power Board from AB Atomenergi, which company had started the reactor and operated it until the summer break 1965.

  19. Remote programming of MED-EL cochlear implants: users' and professionals' evaluation of the remote programming experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzovkov, Vladislav; Yanov, Yuri; Levin, Sergey; Bovo, Roberto; Rosignoli, Monica; Eskilsson, Gunnar; Willbas, Staffan

    2014-07-01

    Remote programming is safe and is well received by health-care professionals and cochlear implant (CI) users. It can be adopted into clinic routine as an alternative to face-to-face programming. Telemedicine allows a patient to be treated anywhere in the world. Although it is a growing field, little research has been published on its application to CI programming. We examined hearing professionals' and CI users' subjective reactions to the remote programming experience, including the quality of the programming and the use of the relevant technology. Remote CI programming was performed in Italy, Sweden, and Russia. Programming sessions had three participants: a CI user, a local host, and a remote expert. After the session, each CI user, local host, and remote expert each completed a questionnaire on their experience. In all, 33 remote programming sessions were carried out, resulting in 99 completed questionnaires. The overwhelming majority of study participants responded positively to all aspects of remote programming. CI users were satisfied with the results in 96.9% of the programming sessions; 100% of participants would use remote programming again. Although technical problems were encountered, they did not cause the sessions to be considerably longer than face-to-face sessions.

  20. Stakeout electronic total station construction layout boring of the experience and precision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Zhiqiang

    2012-01-01

    Electronic total station can simultaneously measure angle and distance, together with the appropriate calculation methods and operating skills, able to efficiently complete the survey work, this paper based on practical experience, theoretical analysis, based on total station introduced in setting out a few boring in the skills and the measurement of total station in the construction layout for accuracy. (authors)

  1. Non destructive assay (NDA) techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mafra Guidicini, Olga; Llacer, Carlos D.; Rojo, Marcelo

    2001-01-01

    In the IAEA Safeguards System the basic verification method used is nuclear material accountancy, with containment and surveillance as important complementary measures. If nuclear material accountancy is to be effective, IAEA inspectors have to make independent measurements to verify declared material quantities. Most of the equipment available to the inspectors is designed to measure gamma rays and/or neutrons emitted by various nuclear materials. Equipment is also available to measure the gross weight of an item containing nuclear material. These types of measurement techniques are generally grouped under the title of nondestructive assay (NDA). The paper describes the NDA techniques and instruments used to verify the total amount of nuclear material held at a nuclear facility. (author)

  2. Concept definition for space station technology development experiments. Experiment definition, task 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    The second task of a study with the overall objective of providing a conceptual definition of the Technology Development Mission Experiments proposed by LaRC on space station is discussed. During this task, the information (goals, objectives, and experiment functional description) assembled on a previous task was translated into the actual experiment definition. Although still of a preliminary nature, aspects such as: environment, sensors, data acquisition, communications, handling, control telemetry requirements, crew activities, etc., were addressed. Sketches, diagrams, block diagrams, and timeline analyses of crew activities are included where appropriate.

  3. Chemistry control experiences at Kaiga Generating Station (KGS), NPCIL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harikrishna, K.; Somasundaram, K.M.; Sanathkumar, V.V.; Nageswara Rao, G.

    2006-01-01

    The Chemistry control section at Kaiga Generating Station (KGS), NPCIL had keenly pursued many developmental works and projects which had not only improved the system performance and reliability but also largely benefited the Station by many ways. The highlights of some of the major developmental works that have contributed significantly are: 1. Studies on frequent and sharp rise in dew point values of AGMS: In the Annulus Gas Monitoring Systems (AGMS) of KGS units, it was observed that the system dew points were rising very sharply and abruptly. The systematic studies revealed the presence of Hydrogen impurity in CO 2 gas cylinders, hence emphasized the need to ensure the gaseous contents before injecting the media from the cylinders to the system. 2. a. Studies on frequent tube failures of TG auxiliary coolers: The detailed studies and investigation revealed that under deposit corrosion contributed by microbiological attack was the main cause for frequent failures of 90/10 Cupro Nickel cooler tubes which could be minimized either by resorting to periodical mechanical/chemical cleaning of cooler tubes or by regular chemical treatment with a suitable chemical formulation. b. Development of suitable chemical formulation for chemical cleaning of TG auxiliary coolers: A series of in-house experiments at site resulted in developing a suitable chemical formulation for effective cleaning of 90/10 Cupro Nickel cooler tubes. The formulation with 1 % w/w Citric acid with pH adjusted to 8.0 by Ammonia in first step followed by 1 % w/w EDTA with pH adjusted to 9.0 by Hydrazine in the second step could yield more than 90 % cleanliness. 3. Chemical cleaning of cooling circuits of AHUs: An in-house formulation was developed and used for chemical cleaning of cooling circuits (with copper tubes) of AHUs. Post chemical cleaning, the room temperatures decreased by 3-4 degC, hence resulted in better cooling. 4. Enhancement in service period of BBD IX columns: The service period of

  4. Ethanolamine experience at Koeberg nuclear power station, South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galt, K.J.; Caris, N.B.

    2002-01-01

    Following testing of ethanolamine as an alternative to ammonia on Unit 2 in 1997, Unit 1 of the Koeberg Nuclear Power Station was converted to ethanolamine in 1998. The Unit has now operated for just over one and a half cycle on ETA. The decision to change to ETA was made to achieve further reductions in feedwater iron transport. Koeberg has always operated ammonia/hydrazine AVT control and ran the feedwater pH at 9.6-9.7 before the changeover. The original pH levels were increased in response to concerns over flow-accelerated corrosion. A by product of reducing the FAC rates is a reduction in iron transport. Although nominally all-ferrous, there are a number of small copper-containing components and the Koeberg Engineering Department would not countenance a further increase in ammonia concentrations in case of copper transport to the SGs. This led to ethanolamine being selected as an alternative to ammonia. The Koeberg condensate polishing plant has been modified, largely to accommodate ETA operation, but is not currently operable in the modified configuration. It is therefore on standby while ETA is implemented. The SG blowdown demineralizers have begun to be operated past ammonia/ETA break, but optimisation is largely dependent on CPP availability in the modified configuration. This paper documents the Koeberg experience to date of operation under an ethanolamine-AVT regime. As one of the few plants outside of the USA to have changed to ethanolamine, it is hoped we can make a valuable contribution for other non-US plants considering such a move. (authors)

  5. Vibration monitoring of large vertical pumps via a remote satellite station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, S.A.; Crowe, R.D.; Roblyer, S.P.; Toffer, H.

    1985-01-01

    The Hanford N Reactor is operated by UNC Nuclear Industries for the Department of Energy for the production of special isotopes and electric energy. The reactor has a unique design in which the equipment such as pumps, turbines, generators and diesel engines are located in separate buildings. This equipment arrangement has led to the conclusion that the most cost-effective implementation of a dedicated vibration monitoring system would be to install a computerized network system in lieu of a single analyzing station. In this approach, semi-autonomous micro processor based data collection stations referred to as satellite stations are located near each concentration of machinery to be monitored. The satellite stations provide near continuous monitoring of the machinery. They are linked to a minicomputer using voice grade telephone circuits and hardware and software specifically designed for network communications. The communications link between the satellite stations and the minicomputer permits data and programs to be transmitted between the units. This paper will describe the satellite station associated with large vertical pumps vibration monitoring. The reactor has four of these pumps to supply tertiary cooling to reactor systems. 4 figs

  6. Elements of nondestructive assay (NDA) technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatcher, C.R.; Smith, H.

    1984-01-01

    A thorough introduction to nondestructive assay methods and instruments as they are applied to nuclear safeguards is presented. The general principles and major applications of NDA are discussed and situations in which NDA is particularly useful for nuclear safeguards purposes are described. Various passive and active γ-ray and neutron methods are examined and assay situations particularly suited to γ-ray techniques, or to neutron techniques are identified. The role of calorimetry in the NDA of plutonium-bearing materials is also discussed. The advantages and disadvantages of various NDA methods for different types of nuclear materials are mentioned

  7. Design of an off-grid hybrid PV/wind power system for remote mobile base station: A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mulualem T. Yeshalem

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a clear challenge to provide reliable cellular mobile service at remote locations where a reliable power supply is not available. So, the existing Mobile towers or Base Transceiver Station (BTSs uses a conventional diesel generator with backup battery banks. This paper presents the solution to utilizing a hybrid of photovoltaic (PV solar and wind power system with a backup battery bank to provide feasibility and reliable electric power for a specific remote mobile base station located at west arise, Oromia. All the necessary modeling, simulation, and techno-economic evaluation are carried out using Hybrid Optimization Model for Electric Renewable (HOMER software. The best optimal system configurations namely PV/Battery and PV/Wind/Battery hybrid systems are compared with the conventional stand-alone diesel generator (DG system. Findings indicated that PV array and battery is the most economically viable option with the total net present cost (NPC of $\\$$57,508 and per unit cost of electricity (COE of $\\$$0.355. Simulation results show that the hybrid energy systems can minimize the power generation cost significantly and can decrease CO2 emissions as compared to the traditional diesel generator only. The sensitivity analysis is also carried out to analysis the effects of probable variation in solar radiation, wind speed, diesel price and average annual energy usage of the system load in the optimal system configurations.

  8. Modelling a reliable wind/PV/storage power system for remote radio base station sites without utility power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bitterlin, Ian F [Emerson Network Power Ltd., Globe Park, Marlow, SL7 1YG (United Kingdom)

    2006-11-22

    The development of photovoltaic (PV) cells has made steady progress from the early days, when only the USA space program could afford to deploy them, to now, seeing them applied to roadside applications even in our Northern European climes. The manufacturing cost per watt has fallen and the daylight-to-power conversion efficiency increased. At the same time, the perception that the sun has to be directly shining on it for a PV array to work has faded. On some of those roadside applications, particularly for remote emergency telephones or for temporary roadwork signage where a utility electrical power connection is not practical, the keen observer will spot, usually in addition to a PV array, a small wind-turbine and an electrical cabinet quite obviously (by virtue of its volume) containing a storage battery. In the UK, we have the lions share (>40%) of Europe's entire wind power resource although, despite press coverage of the 'anti-wind' lobby to the contrary, we have hardly started to harvest this clean and free energy source. Taking this (established and proven) roadside solution one step further, we will consider higher power applications. A cellular phone system is one where a multitude of remote radio base stations (RBS) are required to provide geographical coverage. With networks developing into the so called '3G' technologies the need for base stations has tripled, as each 3G cell covers only 1/3 the geographical area of its '2G' counterpart. To cover >90% of the UK's topology (>97% population coverage) with 3G cellular technology will requires in excess of 12,000 radio base stations per operator network. In 2001, there were around 25,000 established sites and, with an anticipated degree of collocation by necessity, that figure is forecast to rise to >47,000. Of course, the vast majority of these sites have a convenient grid connection. However, it is easy to see that the combination of wind and PV power generation and an energy storage system may be an

  9. Setup and organisation of a NDA-system procurement project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botte, John; Gielen, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Belgoprocess is momentarily in the process of purchasing its fifth NDA-system. Measurement systems are, although based on general designs, not from the shelf items but tailor-made sophisticated and highly automated devices. It is obvious that such a project cannot be carried out by solely a NDA team, but needs a multifunctional team. This team combines NDA expertise with experts in civil works, electrical and mechanical engineering, procurement, IT, safety and legal administration. From less positive experiences in the past, Belgoprocess learned a lot and has now a systematic in place. This systematic structures the project from definition of requirements to operation, a two to three year process. This paper defines the phases of a NDA project and gives for each phase some do's and don'ts. A second subject is the writing and handling of the vast but needed and required documentation. It gives a brief overview of the over thirty documents and files needed. The described, integrated and formal approach reduces the risk of failing projects, systems not meeting the expectations or denied qualification. It puts clear agreements in place, smoothening the relationship between company, supplier and authorities. (authors)

  10. BR3/Vulcain Nuclear Power Station. Construction and Operational Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storrer, J. [Belgonucleaire, S.A., Brussels (Belgium)

    1968-04-15

    A full-scale reactor experiment was set out as the main objective of the Vulcain research and development programme agreed in May 1962 between the UKAEA and BelgoNucleaire, manager of ''Syndicat Vulcain''. Vulcain uses variable moderation as the long-term method to control reactivity: the reactor is cooled and moderated by a mixture of heavy and light water, the D{sub 2}O content being stepwise reduced to permit power operation with all control rods completely out of the core. To carry out the Vulcain power experiment it was decided to modify the BR3 nuclear power plant located at Mol, Belgium, which had operated from 1962 to 1964 as a conventional PWR with outputs of 40.9 MW(th) and 11.45 MW(e). The BR3/Vulcain plant was started in December 1966 and since then is running with a load factor around 90%. It is the first time that such a reactor type has been built and operated and the experience gained by its design, construction, commissioning and operation has proven to be most valuable. D{sub 2}O is being used at a pressure (2000 lb/in{sup 2} abs.) never before achieved in a heavy-water reactor and the leak rate from the HP primary systems to the atmosphere has been kept to a negligible value, around 1 to 2 grams/h. Commissioning of the primary plant had been carried out with light water first without fuel, and thereafter with fuel, at which time the water was poisoned with boric acid. The reactor vessel contains experimental devices such as 65 in-pile instrumentation detectors and four hydraulically operated Zircaloy control rods. They required the interposition of a collar between the vessel and its lid. Refuelling is performed under boronated light water, the interchange between the primary water and the H{sub 2}O being carried out by means of a draining and spraying system. The reactor had been operated for two years before its modifications for Vulcain: many lessons have therefore been learned about working on irradiated systems. The BR3/Vulcain core has a

  11. Internet-based remote consultations - general practitioner experience and attitudes in Norway and Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampik, Timotheus; Larsen, Frank; Bellika, Johan Gustav

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study was to identify experiences and attitudes of German and Norwegian general practitioners (GPs) towards Internet-based remote consultation solutions supporting communication between GPs and patients in the context of the German and Norwegian healthcare systems. Interviews with four German and five Norwegian GPs were conducted. The results were qualitatively analyzed. All interviewed GPs stated they would like to make use of Internet-based remote consultations in the future. Current experiences with remote consultations are existent to a limited degree. No GP reported to use a comprehensive remote consultation solution. The main features GPs would like to see in a remote consultation solution include asynchronous exchange of text messages, video conferencing with text chat, scheduling of remote consultation appointments, secure login and data transfer and the integration of the remote consultation solution into the GP's EHR system.

  12. Remote Observing: Equipment, Methods and Experiences at the Dark Sky Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caton, Daniel B.; Hawkins, L.

    2009-01-01

    Over the last few years we have experimented with remote observing with the 32-inch telescope at our Dark Sky Observatory. We have used relatively inexpensive X10 control modules and software to control many electrical and electronic circuits and devices. User access is via a combination of Microsoft Remote Desktop and RealVNC. X10's ActiveHome Pro software provides the interface for device control. Data acquisition has been with a Photometrics CH250 CCD camera under control of PMIS. Our new imaging camera is an Apogee U42 controlled by MaximDL. In both cases the control over the Internet is by the RD/VNC interface. All of this goes through an ordinary DSL connection at the observatory and provides surprisingly good performance even with the user having only DSL access at home as well. Field acquisition for cases of telescope misalignment with the sky after an instrument changeover are provided by an ImagingSource DMK 41AU02-USB camera on a Vixen 80mm f/5 auxiliary telescope. In some cases, to prevent crashing PMIS due to buffer overrun/interrupt issues, the field alignment is monitored using a streaming Linksys webcam that looks at the data-acquisition PC's monitor. Autoguiding uses an SBIG ST-402 camera and either CCDOPS or MaximDL. While we have only done imaging via remote use, we are working to develop control of the spectrograph as well. Weather conditions are monitored with a combination of a Davis Vantage Pro weather station, a Boltwood cloud/precipitation detector, daytime webcams and an infrared-sensitive SBIG Meteor camera for night views of the sky. We are grateful for support for this work from National Science Foundation grants AST-0520812 and AST-0722491.

  13. Performance values for non destructive assay (NDA) techniques applied to safeguards: the 2002 evaluation by the ESARDA NDA Working Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guardini, S.

    2003-01-01

    The first evaluation of NDA performance values undertaken by the ESARDA Working Group for Standards and Non Destructive Assay Techniques (WGNDA) was published in 1993. Almost 10 years later the Working Group decided to review those values, to report about improvements and to issue new performance values for techniques which were not applied in the early nineties, or were at that time only emerging. Non-Destructive Assay techniques have become more and more important in recent years, and they are used to a large extent in nuclear material accountancy and control both by operators and control authorities. As a consequence, the performance evaluation for NDA techniques is of particular relevance to safeguards authorities in optimising Safeguards operations and reducing costs. Performance values are important also for NMAC regulators, to define detection levels, limits for anomalies, goal quantities and to negotiate basic audit rules. This paper presents the latest evaluation of ESARDA Performance Values (EPVs) for the most common NDA techniques currently used for the assay of nuclear materials for Safeguards purposes. The main topics covered by the document are: techniques for plutonium bearing materials: PuO 2 and MOX; techniques for U-bearing materials; techniques for U and Pu in liquid form; techniques for spent fuel assay. This issue of the performance values is the result of specific international round robin exercises, field measurements and ad hoc experiments, evaluated and discussed in the ESARDA NDA Working Group. (author)

  14. Life science research objectives and representative experiments for the space station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Catherine C. (Editor); Arno, Roger D. (Editor); Mains, Richard (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    A workshop was convened to develop hypothetical experiments to be used as a baseline for space station designer and equipment specifiers to ensure responsiveness to the users, the life science community. Sixty-five intra- and extramural scientists were asked to describe scientific rationales, science objectives, and give brief representative experiment descriptions compatible with expected space station accommodations, capabilities, and performance envelopes. Experiment descriptions include hypothesis, subject types, approach, equipment requirements, and space station support requirements. The 171 experiments are divided into 14 disciplines.

  15. Remote-controlled optics experiment for supporting senior high school and undergraduate teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, S. H.; Jim, K. L.; Mak, C. L.; Leung, C. W.

    2017-08-01

    This paper reports the development of a remote laboratory (RemoteLab) platform for practising technologyenhanced learning of optics. The development of RemoteLab enhances students' understanding of experimental methodologies and outcomes, and enable students to conduct experiments everywhere at all times. While the initial goal of the system was for physics major undergradutes, the sytem was also made available for senior secondary school students. To gauge the impact of the RemoteLab, we evaluated two groups of students, which included 109 physics 1st-year undergraduates and 11 students from a local secondary school. After the experiments, evaluation including questionnaire survey and interviews were conducted to collect data on students' perceptions on RemoteLab and implementation issues related to the platform. The surveys focused on four main topics, including user interface, experiment setup, booking system and learning process. The survey results indicated that most of the participants' views towards RemoteLab was positive.

  16. Real remote physics experiments across Internet-- inherent part of Integrated e-Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frantisek Lustig

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract— The implementation of the real remote experiments across the Internet into teaching process, up till now not available, enables introduction of Integrated e-Learning, composed of three components: the real remote experiments across the Internet, the simulation applets and the electronic interactive textbooks. We present here the prospective remote laboratory system with data transfer using Intelligent School Experimental System (ISES as hardware and ISES WEB Control kit as software. This approach enables the simple construction of remote experiments without building any hardware and virtually no programming, only with paste and copy approach of pre-built typical blocks as camera view, controls, graphs, displays etc. In conclusion we summarize the achieved experience with remote experiments.

  17. International cooperation in the Space Station programme - Assessing the experience to date

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logsdon, John M.

    1991-01-01

    The origins and framework for cooperation in the Space Station program are outlined. Particular attention is paid to issues and commitments between the countries and to the political context of the Station partnership. A number of conclusions concerning international cooperation in space are drawn based on the Space Station experience. Among these conclusions is the assertion that an international partnership requires realistic assesments, mutual trust, and strong commitments in order to work.

  18. Ice nuclei measurements at a high altitude remote station in the Northern Apennines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrod, Jann; Bingemer, Heinz; Haunold, Werner; Curtius, Joachim; Decesari, Stefano; Marinoni, Angela; Rinaldi, Matteo; Bonasoni, Paolo; Cristofanelli, Paolo

    2013-04-01

    During a field campaign of the PEGASOS (Pan-European Gas-AeroSOls-climate interactions Study, http://pegasos.iceht.forth.gr/) project in June 2012 we have made daily ice nucleus measurements on top of the Monte Cimone (44.18° N, 10.70° E, 2165 m asl) in the Northern Apennines at the "O. Vittori" Climate Observatory. Samples were taken at this GAW-WMO Global Station in a six hour rhythm (4 a.m., 10 a.m., 4 p.m. and 10 p.m.) and at increased frequency during specific events (e.g. dust transport episodes). Ice nuclei were measured by an offline technique. Aerosol particles of 40 liters of air were collected by electrostatic precipitation on a silicon substrate. Subsequently the ice nuclei were analyzed in the vacuum diffusion chamber FRIDGE [Klein et al. 2010] (FRankfurt Ice Nuclei Deposition FreezinG Experiment) by exposing the particles to supersaturation with respect to ice (106 % to 119 %) at -8 ° C, -13 ° C and -18 ° C. In our setup ice nuclei are activated in deposition and condensation freezing modes. A camera detects and counts ice crystals grown on ice nuclei. Every ice crystal counted is assumed to represent at least one ice nucleus. The mean IN concentration at Mt. Cimone was 60 IN per liter (at -18 ° C and 119% relative humility over ice), significantly higher than a longstanding mean at Mt. Kleiner Feldberg (30 IN/l), Germany for June. A mean active site density (IN per surface area of large aerosol particles) of 2.3 * 109 m-2 was calculated. The origin of the air masses sampled was established based on backward trajectories. With more than 100 IN/l on average (at -18° C and 119% relative humility over ice) the samples originating from North Africa were highest, and activated fractions were 4 to 20 times higher than for other transport sectors. An intensive event of dust transport was recorded by several instruments in the middle of June. At its peak in the morning of the 21st of June large aerosol surface and mass concentrations were observed by

  19. Development of remote decontamination technologies improving internal environment of reactor buildings at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hotta, Koji; Hayashi, Hirotada; Sakai, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    The reactor buildings at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station of Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc., which was seriously damaged by the Great East Japan Earthquake of March 11, 2011, have been highly contaminated by radioactive materials. To safely and efficiently advance the processes related to the forthcoming decommissioning of the reactors, it is necessary to improve the hazardous environment inside the reactor buildings. During the more than four years that have elapsed since the Great East Japan Earthquake, Toshiba has been implementing various measures to reduce the ambient dose rates inside the reactor buildings through decontamination work and participation in a national project for the development of remote decontamination technologies for reactor buildings. A variety of vehicles and technologies to support decontamination work have been developed through these activities, and are significantly contributing to improvement of the environment inside the reactor buildings. (author)

  20. French experience in operating pressurized water reactor power stations. Ten years' operation of the Ardennes power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teste du Bailler, A.; Vedrinne, J.F.

    1978-01-01

    In the paper the experience gained over ten years' operation of the Ardennes (Chooz) nuclear power station is summarized from the point of view of monitoring and control equipment. The reactor was the first pressurized water reactor to be installed in France; it is operated jointly by France and Belgium. The equipment, which in many cases consists of prototypes, was developed for industrial use and with the experience that has now been gained it is possible to evaluate its qualities and defects, the constraints which it imposes and the action that has to be taken in the future. (author)

  1. Remote sensing terminology: past experience and recent needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kancheva, Rumiana

    2013-10-01

    Terminology is a key issue for a better understanding among people using various languages. Terminology accuracy is essential during all phases of international cooperation. It is crucial to keep up with the latest quantitative and qualitative developments and novelties of the terminology in advanced technology fields such as aerospace science and industry. This is especially true in remote sensing and geoinformatics which develop rapidly and have wide and ever extending applications in various domains of human activity. The importance of the correct use of remote sensing terms refers not only to people working in this field but also to experts in many disciplines who handle remote sensing data and information products. The paper is devoted to terminology issues that refer to all aspects of remote sensing research and application areas. The attention is drawn on the recent needs and peculiarities of compiling specialized dictionaries in the subject area of remote sensing. Details are presented about the work in progress on the preparation of an English-Bulgarian dictionary of remote sensing terms focusing on Earth observations and geoinformation science. Our belief is that the elaboration of bilingual and multilingual dictionaries and glossaries in this spreading, most technically advanced and promising field of human expertise is of great practical importance. Any interest in cooperation and initiating of suchlike collaborative multilingual projects is welcome and highly appreciated.

  2. Remote handling of JET in-torus components. A practical experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, S.; Brade, R.; Edwards, P.

    2000-01-01

    This paper summarises the experiences gained from the extensive handling of JET components inside the torus. The problems involved with handling components not designed to be remotely handled and the methods used to overcome them are described and discussed with specific examples from recent JET remote operations. The method employed for remotely producing structural TIG welds is explained. The problems of dextrous manipulation in an inverted attitude are discussed and the methods of amelioration are described

  3. Return on experience on control gates in nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valendru, N.

    2009-01-01

    In application of an EDF internal directive, control gates are used at the exit of the Controlled Areas of each nuclear power station site for the radiological control of materials or wastes on pedestrians and vehicles. The author first presents the radiological control chain for people and its principles. This chain comprises the different controls performed within the controlled area, either at the exit of a works area or at the exit of the reactor building, the different controls performed at the exit of the controlled area (depending on the site classification), the control of pedestrians at the site exit, and the 'whole body' anthropo-gamma-metric control. For each of these controls, the authors indicate the detection objectives, the different contamination threshold values, and the type of gate used. In a second part, the authors more precisely present the new C2 gates which include gamma and beta sensors, indicate how control thresholds are adjusted on different power station sites, and discuss the lessons learned after the first years of use of these new gates (difficulties and problems faced as far as detection and detection thresholds are concerned, changes in organization)

  4. Human Nutrition Research Conducted at State Agricultural Experiment Stations and 1890/Tuskegee Agricultural Research Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driskell, Judy A.; Myers, John R.

    1989-01-01

    Cooperative State Research Service-administered and state-appropriated State Agriculture Experiment Station funds for human nutrition research increased about two-fold from FY70-FY86, while the percentage of budget expended for this research decreased. (JOW)

  5. SUMMARY AND EVALUATION OF STARTUP AND OPERATING EXPERIENCE AT INDIAN POINT STATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freyberg, R. H.; Prestele, J. A.

    1963-09-15

    A description of the Indian Point Power Station is given aiong with a summary and evaluation of startup and operating experience. Equipment failures and problems and various corrective measures are also outlined. (C.E.S.)

  6. Remote multiplexing system application to a nuclear generating station--An update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazzoni, O.S.; Cava, A.L.; Bijoor, G.D.; Wiitala, M.F.

    1979-01-01

    Washington Public Power Supply System's Nuclear Power Plant WNP-2 is a 1200 MW, boiling water reactor (BWR) nuclear generating facility now under construction at Hanford, Washington. An early study indicated that substantial savings in cost could be obtained by the substitution of the Remote Multiplexing System (RMS) for the control and signal wiring between the Control Building and the outside facilities, which required long cable runs. It is a high speed, data system providing time-sharing digital communication. The purpose of this paper is to give the details of the RMS used in the WNP-2 project. It discusses the qualification requirements for Class IE systems and includes the description of the tests on the system

  7. Interactive Online Tools for Enhancing Student Learning Experiences in Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Karen E.; Boitshwarelo, Bopelo; Phinn, Stuart R.; Hill, Greg J. E.; Kelly, Gail D.

    2014-01-01

    The rapid growth in Information and Communications Technologies usage in higher education has provided immense opportunities to foster effective student learning experiences in geography. In particular, remote sensing lends itself to the creative utilization of multimedia technologies. This paper presents a case study of a remote sensing computer…

  8. The search for forest facts: a history of the Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, 1926–2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony. Godfrey

    2013-01-01

    In 1926, the California Forest Experiment Station, which later became the Pacific Southwest (PSW) Research Station, was established at the University of California, Berkeley. Today, the PSW Research Station represents the research and development branch of the USDA Forest Service in California and Hawaii and the U.S.-affiliated Pacific Islands. The PSW Research Station...

  9. Biotechnological experiments in space flights on board of space stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nechitailo, Galina S.

    2012-07-01

    Space flight conditions are stressful for any plant and cause structural-functional transition due to mobiliation of adaptivity. In space flight experiments with pea tissue, wheat and arabidopsis we found anatomical-morphological transformations and biochemistry of plants. In following experiments, tissue of stevia (Stevia rebaudiana), potato (Solanum tuberosum), callus culture and culture and bulbs of suffron (Crocus sativus), callus culture of ginseng (Panax ginseng) were investigated. Experiments with stevia carried out in special chambers. The duration of experiment was 8-14 days. Board lamp was used for illumination of the plants. After experiment the plants grew in the same chamber and after 50 days the plants were moved into artificial ionexchange soil. The biochemical analysis of plants was done. The total concentration of glycozides and ratio of stevioside and rebauside were found different in space and ground plants. In following generations of stevia after flight the total concentration of stevioside and rebauside remains higher than in ground plants. Experiments with callus culture of suffron carried out in tubes. Duration of space flight experiment was 8-167 days. Board lamp was used for illumination of the plants. We found picrocitina pigment in the space plants but not in ground plants. Tissue culture of ginseng was grown in special container in thermostate under stable temperature of 22 ± 0,5 C. Duration of space experiment was from 8 to 167 days. Biological activity of space flight culutre was in 5 times higher than the ground culture. This difference was observed after recultivation of space flight samples on Earth during year after flight. Callus tissue of potato was grown in tubes in thermostate under stable temperature of 22 ± 0,5 C. Duration of space experiment was from 8 to 14 days. Concentration of regenerates in flight samples was in 5 times higher than in ground samples. The space flight experiments show, that microgravity and other

  10. A kinematic analysis of the Space Station remote manipulator system (SSRMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Carl D., III; Duffy, Joseph; Carnahan, Tim

    1991-01-01

    An efficient reverse analysis of three 6-degree-of-freedom (dof) subchains of the 7-dof SSRMS is presented. The first subchain is formed by locking the seventh joint. The second subchain is formed by locking the second joint, while the third subchain is formed by locking the first joint (the grounded joint is counted as the first joint in the chain). There are a maximum of eight different arm configurations in each of the three subchains, and these were determined by employing a computer-efficient algorithm, which required the rooting of only at most quadratic polynomials. The algorithms were implemented, and the SSRMS was employed in an animated environment to perform and practice a number of useful tasks for Space Station servicing. The locking of the second joint has the advantage in that an operator can choose the orientation of the plane that contains the two longest links so as to avoid collisions with obstacles. However, it has the disadvantage that when the second joint angle equals 0 deg or 180 deg, the manipulator is in a singularity configuration. This plane can also be oriented by specifying the first joint angle, so that the plane can be oriented arbitrarily and, in this, the singularity is avoided.

  11. Design of a Flexible Hardware Interface for Multiple Remote Electronic practical Experiments of Virtual Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farah Said

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work is to present a new design of a Flexible Hardware Interface (FHI based on PID control techniques to use in a virtual laboratory. This flexible hardware interface allows the easy implementation of different and multiple remote electronic practical experiments for undergraduate engineering classes. This interface can be viewed as opened hardware architecture to easily develop simple or complex remote experiments in the electronic domain. The philosophy of the use of this interface can also be expanded to many other domains as optic experiments for instance. It is also demonstrated that software can be developed to enable remote measurements of electronic circuits or systems using only Web site Interface. Using standard browsers (such as Internet explorer, Firefox, Chrome or Safari, different students can have a remote access to different practical experiments at a time.

  12. Remote diagnosis via a telecommunication satellite--ultrasonic tomographic image transmission experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, I; Inokuchi, S; Tajima, T; Takahashi, T

    1985-04-01

    An experiment to transmit ultrasonic tomographic section images required for remote medical diagnosis and care was conducted using the mobile telecommunication satellite OSCAR-10. The images received showed the intestinal condition of a patient incapable of verbal communication, however the image screen had a fairly coarse particle structure. On the basis of these experiments, were considered as the transmission of ultrasonic tomographic images extremely effective in remote diagnosis.

  13. Experiments in the topography station of the Daresbury Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machado, W.G.

    1983-01-01

    A comparison is made of the contrast in topographies by diffraction, produced by synchrotron radiation and by copper and molybdenum characteristic radiations conventionally generated. Some experiments in the study of diamond geminated crystals and the photoluminescence of several crystalline specimens by synchrotron radiation are related. (L.C.) [pt

  14. Shippingport Atomic Power Station Operating Experience, Developments and Future Plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinroth, H.; Oldham, G.M.; Stiefel, J.T.

    1963-01-01

    This paper describes and evaluates five years of operation and test of the Shippingport Atomic Power Station and discusses the current technical developments and future plans of the Shippingport programme. This programme is directed towards development of the basic technology of light-water reactors to provide the basis for potential reduction in the costs of nuclear power. The Shippingport reactor plant has operated for over five years and has been found to integrate readily into a utility system either as a base load or peak load unit. Plant component performance has been reliable. There have been no problems in contamination or waste disposal. Access to primary coolant components for maintenance has been good, demonstrating the integrity of fuel elements. Each of the three refuelling operations performed since start-up of Shippingport has required successively less time to accomplish. Recently, the third seed was refuelled in 32 working days, about one quarter the time required for the first refuelling. The formal requirements of personnel training, written administrative procedures, power plant manuals, etc., which have been a vital factor in the successful implementation of the Shippingport programme, are described. The results obtained from the comprehensive test programme carried out at Shippingport are compared with calculations, and good agreement has been obtained. Reactor core performance, plant stability, and response to load changes, fuel element and control rod performance, long-term effects such as corrosion and radiation level build-up, component performance, etc., are discussed in this paper. The principal objective of the current and future programmes of the Shippingport Project in advancing the basic technology of water-cooled reactors is discussed. This programme includes the continued operation of the Shippingport plant, and the development, design, manufacture and test operation of a long-life, highpower density second core - Core 2. At its

  15. Experience in safeguarding nuclear material at the Rheinsberg nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkler, R.

    1976-01-01

    The three years' experience that has been gained in application of the Safeguards Agreement shows that the carrying out of inspections at the nuclear power plant has virtually no effect on operating conditions. In future it will be possible to reduce this effect even further and still maintain the operational reliability of the station. Verification of the transfer of nuclear material and detection of possible violations have proved relatively simple. The labour requirement of each unit at the station for the performance of inspections is not more that thirty man-days. Constructive collaboration between power station staff and inspectors is of great importance in improving the safeguards procedures. (author)

  16. Experience with remediation implementation at railroad station Freital-Potschappel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streubel, G.; Tottewitz, K.

    1995-01-01

    As a result of the measuring activities for the contaminated sites cadastre, the Saxonian Landesamt fuer Umwelt und Geologie requested the Deutsche Bahn AG as the responsible site owner to clean up the radioactively contaminated surfaces open to the general public. In response, the Deutsche Bahn AG commissioned the TUeV Sachsen GmbH to carry out the remediation work. The lecture reports on aspects of main interest and experience obtained in these activities. (orig./DG) [de

  17. Remote manipulator experience in target train maintenance at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butala, S.W.

    1984-01-01

    When Fermilab was designed in the late 1960's and early 1970's, it was anticipated that Neutrino target train servicing could be costly in terms of personnel radiation exposure. This was based in part on the expectation that target intensities of at least 1E13 protons/pulse would be required to produce several neutrino interactions in a large bubble chamber detector. This was indeed later proven to be the case and historically the Neutrino beamline has been targeted with about one half of the protons available from the Main Ring. It was believed that much of the occupational radiation dose from the Neutrino Area could be spared by utilization of a remote manipulator system, which was eventually installed. It is the purpose of this report to examine the use of the Fermilab remote manipulator system and evaluate its cost effectiveness and success as an ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) tool. 16 references, 11 figures

  18. Current experience with central-station nuclear cogeneration plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-10-01

    In considering the potential of the HTGR for nuclear cogeneration, a logical element for investigation is the recent history of nuclear cogeneration experience. Little is found in recent literature; however, the twin nuclear cogeneration plant at Midland is nearing completion and this milestone will no doubt be the basis for a number of reports on the unique cogeneration facility and operating experiences with it. Less well known in the US is the Bruce Nuclear Power Development in Ontario, Canada. Originally designed to cogenerate steam for heavy water production, the Bruce facility is the focus of a major initiative to create an energy park on the shores of Lake Huron. To obtain an improved understanding of the status and implications of current nuclear cogeneration experience, GCRA representatives visited the Ontario Hydro offices in Toronto and subsequently toured the Midland site near Midland, Michigan. The primary purpose of this report is to summarize the results of those visits and to develop a series of conclusions regarding the implications for HTGR cogeneration concepts

  19. Extending the GEMINI advanced review station development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadner, S.; Spahn, W.; Pepper, S.

    1999-01-01

    Recent changes in the objectives of arms control agreements will have a dramatic impact on the nuclear non-proliferation regime. Meeting the demands of the nuclear non-proliferation regime will require the utilisation of the best available technological means for verification. The following discussion focuses on the increasing demands for safeguards with a view towards the possible technological solutions available to meet these demands. Based on the assumption that the gap between the international nonproliferation verification agenda and the available financial means can only be bridged via technology, the following discussion hopes to offer a compelling argument for the adoption of remote monitoring technologies in safeguards applications, specifically, data collection and review. The GEMINI Advanced Review Station (GARS) was developed with initial support from USPOTAS. This poster presentation presents the latest developments in GARS, including its extension to other surveillance systems under IAEA consideration, NDA applications, and networked safeguards. (author)

  20. Evaluation of tele-ultrasound as a tool in remote diagnosis and clinical management at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station and the McMurdo Research Station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Christian; Shemenski, Ron; Scott, Jessica M; Hartshorn, Jeanette; Bishop, Sheryl; Viegas, Steven

    2013-03-01

    Abstract Background: A large number of Antarctic stations do not utilize ultrasound for medical care. Regular use of ultrasound imaging at South Pole and McMurdo Stations first began in October 2002. To date, there has been no evaluation of medical events requiring ultrasound examination from this remote environment. Additionally, the importance of tele-ultrasound for clinical management in Antarctica has not yet been assessed. We therefore conducted a retrospective analysis of all ultrasound exams performed at South Pole and McMurdo Stations between October 2002 and October 2003. Radiology reports and patient charts were reviewed for pre- and post-ultrasound diagnosis and treatment. Sixty-six ultrasound exams were conducted on 49 patients. Of the exams, 94.0% were interpreted by the store-and-forward method, whereas 6.0% were interpreted in "real-time" format. Abdominal, genitourinary, and gynecology ultrasound exams accounted for 63.6% of exams. Ultrasound examination prevented an intercontinental aeromedical evacuation in 25.8% of cases, and had a significant effect on the diagnosis and management of illness in patients at South Pole and McMurdo research stations. These findings indicate that diagnostic ultrasound has significant benefits for medical care at Antarctic stations and that tele-ultrasound is a valuable addition to remote medical care for isolated populations with limited access to tertiary-healthcare facilities.

  1. Support systems for optics in the experiment stations at the Advanced Photon Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barraza, J.; Shu, D.; Kuzay, T.M.

    1994-01-01

    Support systems have been designed for optics in the experiment stations of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. These systems utilize modular precision positioning slides and stages arranged in 3-point kinematic mount fashion for optimum mechanical stability. Through the use of novel configurations, these systems can achieve large linear motions, six degree-of-freedom motion, and large load capacities without sacrificing valuable experimental station space. This paper will discuss the designs and specifications of the positioning systems developed

  2. Definition of common support equipment and space station interface requirements for IOC model technology experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Richard A.; Waiss, Richard D.

    1988-01-01

    A study was conducted to identify the common support equipment and Space Station interface requirements for the IOC (initial operating capabilities) model technology experiments. In particular, each principal investigator for the proposed model technology experiment was contacted and visited for technical understanding and support for the generation of the detailed technical backup data required for completion of this study. Based on the data generated, a strong case can be made for a dedicated technology experiment command and control work station consisting of a command keyboard, cathode ray tube, data processing and storage, and an alert/annunciator panel located in the pressurized laboratory.

  3. Long distance fast data transfer experiments for the ITER Remote Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamanaka, Kenjiro, E-mail: yamanaka@nii.ac.jp [National Institute of Informatics, 2-1-2 Hitotsubashi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo (Japan); The Graduate University for Advanced Studies (SOKENDAI), Shonan Village, Hayama, Kanagawa (Japan); Nakanishi, Hideya [National Institute of Fusion Science, 322-6 Orochi, Toki, Gifu (Japan); The Graduate University for Advanced Studies (SOKENDAI), Shonan Village, Hayama, Kanagawa (Japan); Ozeki, Takahisa [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Obuchi-Omotedate 2-166, Rokkasho, Kamikita, Aomori (Japan); Abe, Shunji; Urushidani, Shigeo [National Institute of Informatics, 2-1-2 Hitotsubashi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo (Japan); The Graduate University for Advanced Studies (SOKENDAI), Shonan Village, Hayama, Kanagawa (Japan); Yamamoto, Takashi [National Institute of Fusion Science, 322-6 Orochi, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Ohtsu, Hideo [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Obuchi-Omotedate 2-166, Rokkasho, Kamikita, Aomori (Japan); Nakajima, Noriyoshi [National Institute of Fusion Science, 322-6 Orochi, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • This paper presents fast data transfer experiments using packet pacing and mmcftp and results. • An upgrade plan of Japanese Academic Network SINET is also described. • To send the huge amount of data from ITER to the ITER Remote Experiment Center (REC), effective transfer method and super high-speed international network are required. • This paper presents a progress of the investigation for fast transfer method. - Abstract: Developing effective and fast data transfer system for the huge amount data between Europe and Japan is a critical issue for the ITER Remote Experimentation Center (REC). To implement the system, effective data transfer methods and wide bandwidth international network are required. This paper describes results of data transfer experiments. We have evaluated two data transfer methods: Packet Pacing and MMCFTP. By using Packet Pacing and 2.4 Gbps line, we achieved 2.2 Gbps data transfer from NIFS to IFERC. By using MMCFTP and 10 Gbps line, we achieved 2.5 Gbps data transfer from NIFS to Dublin, Ireland. Furthermore, by using MMCFTP and 100Gbps line, we successfully achieved the stable transmission of 1PB of data at approximately 84 Gbps, one of the world’s fastest transmission speeds. This paper also describes the upgrade plan of SINET (a Japanese academic backbone network), which is used for ITER and REC communications. SINET will be upgraded to the network based on 100-Gigabit Ethernet technology in April 2016. Furthermore, direct lines of 20 Gbps (10 Gbps × 2) between Japan and Europe will be introduced. These direct lines will reduce latency between Europe and Japan and will realize higher speed data transfer.

  4. Experimenting Galileo on Board the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantinato, Samuele; Pozzobon, Oscar; Sands, Obed S.; Welch, Bryan W.; Clapper, Carolyn J.; Miller, James J.; Gamba, Giovanni; Chiara, Andrea; Montagner, Stefano; Giordano, Pietro; hide

    2016-01-01

    The SCaN Testbed is an advanced integrated communications system and laboratory facility installed on the International Space Station (ISS) in 2012. The testbed incorporates a set of new generation of Software Defined Radio (SDR) technologies intended to allow researchers to develop, test, and demonstrate new communications, networking, and navigation capabilities in the actual environment of space. Qascom, in cooperation with ESA and NASA, is designing a Software Defined Radio GalileoGPS Receiver capable to provide accurate positioning and timing to be installed on the ISS SCaN Testbed. The GalileoGPS waveform will be operated in the JPL SDR that is constituted by several hardware components that can be used for experimentations in L-Band and S-Band. The JPL SDR includes an L-Band Dorne Margolin antenna mounted onto a choke ring. The antenna is connected to a radio front end capable to provide one bit samples for the three GNSS frequencies (L1, L2 and L5) at 38 MHz, exploiting the subharmonic sampling. The baseband processing is then performed by an ATMEL AT697 processor (100 MIPS) and two Virtex 2 FPGAs. The JPL SDR supports the STRS (Space Telecommunications Radio System) that provides common waveform software interfaces, methods of instantiation, operation, and testing among different compliant hardware and software products. The standard foresees the development of applications that are modular, portable, reconfigurable, and reusable. The developed waveform uses the STRS infrastructure-provided application program interfaces (APIs) and services to load, verify, execute, change parameters, terminate, or unload an application. The project is divided in three main phases. 1)Design and Development of the GalileoGPS waveform for the SCaN Testbed starting from Qascom existing GNSS SDR receiver. The baseline design is limited to the implementation of the single frequency Galileo and GPS L1E1 receiver even if as part of the activity it will be to assess the

  5. Operating Experience of MACSTOR Modules at CANDU 6 Stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaudoin, Robert R.

    2005-01-01

    Over the last three decades, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) has contributed to the technology development and implementation of dry spent fuel management facilities in Canada, Korea and Romania During that period, AECL has developed a number of concrete canister models and the MACSTOR200 module, a medium size air-cooled vault with a 228 MgU (Mega grams of Uranium) capacity. AECL's dry storage technologies were used for the construction of eight large-scale above ground dry storage facilities for CANDU spent fuel. As of 2005, those facilities have an installed capacity in excess of 5,000 MgU. Since 1995, the two newest dry storage installations built for CANDU 6 reactors at Gentilly 2 (Canada) and Cernavoda (Romania) used the MACSTOR 200 module. Seven such modules have been built at Gentilly 2 during the 1995 to 2004 period and one at Cernavoda in 2003. The construction and operating experience of those modules is reviewed in this paper. The MACSTOR 200 modules were initially designed for a 50-year service life, with recent units at Gentilly 2 licensed for a 100-year service life in a rural (non-maritime) climate. During the 1995-2005 period, six of the eight modules were loaded with fuel. Their operation has brought a significant amount of experience on loading operations, performance of fuel handling equipment, radiation shielding, heat transfer, monitoring of the two confinement boundaries and radiation dose to personnel. Heat dissipation performance of the MACSTOR 200 was initially licensed using values derived from full scale tests made at AECL's Whiteshell Research Laboratories, that were backed-up by temperature measurements made on the first two modules. Results and computer models developed for the MACSTOR 200 module are described. Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power (KHNP) and its subsidiary Nuclear Environment Technology Institute (NETEC), in collaboration with Hyundai Engineering Company Ltd. (HEC) and AECL, are developing a new dry storage module to

  6. GEROS-ISS: Ocean Remote Sensing with GNSS Reflectometry from the International Space Station

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wickert, Jens; Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Camps, Adriano

    on exploiting reflected signals of opportunity from Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) at L-band to measure key parameters of ocean surfaces. GEROS will utilize the U.S. American GPS (Global Positioning System) and pioneer the exploitation of signals from Galileo and possibly other GNSS systems (GLONASS......, QZSS, BeiDou), for reflectometry and occultation, thereby improving the accuracy as well as the spatio-temporal resolution of the derived geophysical properties. The primary mission objectives of GEROS are: (1) to measure the altimetric sea surface height of the ocean using reflected GNSS signals...... the oceanographic significance of the expected measurements and to demonstrate the usefulness of the GEROS concept. The presentation will give an overview on the current status of the GEROS experiment, review the science activities within the international GARCA study and related ESA-supported science activities....

  7. The JET experience with remote handling equipment and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raimondi, T.

    1989-01-01

    The commissioning and testing of numerous pieces of equipment are now in progress at JET. Two microprocessor controlled force feedback MASCOT IV servomanipulators have shown comparable characteristics to those of the previous analogue types. Teach and repeat software permits precision welding and repetitive operations in a robotics mode. Other computer aids are planned to improve the man-machine interface: Tool-weight compensation, constraints along preferred lines or planes, automatic tracking of the TV cameras. The in-vessel transporter, provided with 5 vertical hinges, a pan-tilt-roll extension and special purpose end effectors, has been used under direct visual control to install 32 toroidal limiters and 8 radio frequency antennae. Test of remote installation in teach and repeat were done, using the JET spare octant as a mock-up, achieving repeatability of better than 5 mm. A considerable number of special remote handling tools were used inside the vessel hands-on to align, cut and weld diagnostics ports and water pipes. The cutting and welding trolleys were used hands-on, on a total of 250 m of lip joints. The ex-vessel transporter, a crane-mounted vertical telescope, 17 m high with a 10 m horizontal arm, is being manufactured. It will be equipped with manipulator and TV systems and controlled via joystick or keyboard or in teach and repeat. Image processing for collision avoidance is being studied. A low level transporter was used for turbo-pump replacement and is now being equipped with remote control. Mock-up work has started on the replacement of the Neutral Injector sources. Bench tests on flanges, heating jackets and connectors are being done to identify refinements needed. The in-vessel inspection system has been used at high temperature in vacuum. (orig.)

  8. The Jet experience with remote handling equipment and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raimondi, T.

    1989-01-01

    The commissioning and testing of numerous pieces of equipment are now in progress at JET. Two microprocessor controlled force feedback MASCOT IV servomanipulators have shown comparable characteristics to those of the previous analogue types. Teach and repeat software permits precision welding and repetitive operations in a robotics mode. Other computer aids are planned to improve the man-machine interface: tool-weight compensation, constraints along preferred lines or planes, automatic tracking of the TV cameras. The in-vessel transporter, provided with 5 vertical hinges, a pan-tilt-roll extension and special purpose end effectors, has been used under direct visual control to install 32 toroidal limiters and 8 radio frequency antennae. Tests of remote installation in teach and repeat were done, using the JET spare octant as a mock-up, achieving repeatability of better than 5mm. A considerable number of special remote handling tools were used inside the vessel hands-on to align, cut and weld diagnostics ports and water pipes. The cutting and welding trolleys were used hands-on, on a total of 250m of lip joints. The ex-vessel transporter, a crane-mounted vertical telescope, 17m high with a 10m horizontal arm, is being manufactured. It will be equipped with manipulator and TV systems and controlled via joystick or keyboard or in teach and repeat. Image processing for collision avoidance is being studied. A low level transporter was used for turbo-pump replacement and is now being equipped with remote control. Mock-up work has started on the replacement of the Neutral Injector sources. Bench tests on flanges, heating jackets and connectors are being done to identify refinements needed. The in-vessel inspection system has been used at high temperature in vacuum

  9. The JET experience with remote handling equipment and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raimondi, T.

    1989-01-01

    The commissioning and testing of numerous pieces of equipment are now in progress at JET. Two microprocessor controlled force feedback MASCOT IV servomanipulators have shown comparable characteristics to those of the previous analogue types. Teach and repeat software permits precision welding and repetitive operations in a robotics mode. Other computer aids are planned to improve the man-machine interface: tool-weigth compensation, constraints along preferred lines or planes, automatic tracking of the TV cameras. The in-vessel transporter, provided with 5 vertical hinges, a pan-tilt-roll extension and special purpose end effectors, has been used under direct visual control to install 32 toroidal limiters and 8 radio frequency antennae. Tests of remote installation in teach and repeat were done, using the JET spare octant as a mock-up, achieving repeatability of better than 5 mm. A considerable number of special remote handling tools were used inside the vessel hands-on to align, cut and weld diagnostics ports and water pipes. The cutting and welding trolleys were used hands-on, on a total of 250 m of lip joints. The ex-vessel transporter, a crane-mounted vertical telescope, 17 m high with a 10 m horizontal arm, is being manufactured. it will be equipped with manipulator and TV systems and controlled via joystick or keyboard or in teach and repeat. image processing for collision avoidance is being studied. A low level transporter was used for turbo-pump replacement and is now being equipped with remote control. Mock-up work has started on the replacement of the Neutral Injector sources. Bench tests on flanges, heating jackets and connectors are being done to identify refinements needed. The in-vessel inspection system has been used at high temperature in vacuum. (author). 14 refs.; 12 figs

  10. Open Learning Approach with Remote Experiments: OLAREX Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Garcia-Zubia

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The project’s primary target groups are the European secondary schools. More specifically: secondary school and university teachers, students and managers of schools, museum employees and their visitors, and other STEM education providers. The main goal of the OLAREX project is to offer the providers of formal and non-formal education an efficient way to improve their e-didactic and digital competences. For this purpose a training program is created with using ICT-based learning materials, remote laboratories, and e-learning methodologies

  11. UK experience of safety requirements for thermal reactor stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, R.R.; Dale, G.C.; Tweedy, J.N.

    1977-01-01

    The paper summarises the development of safety requirements since the first of the Generating Boards' Magnox reactors commenced operation in 1962 and includes A.G.R. safety together with the preparation of S.G.H.W.R. design safety criteria. It outlines the basic principles originally adopted and shows how safety assessment is a continuing process throughout the life of a reactor. Some description is given of the continuous effort over the years to obtain increased safety margins for existing and new reactors, taking into account the construction and operating experience, experimental information, and more sophisticated computer-aided design techniques which have become available. The main safeguards against risks arising from the Generating Boards' reactors are the achievement of high standards of design, construction and operation, in conjunction with comprehensive fault analyses to ensure that adequate protective equipment is provided. The most important analyses refer to faults which can lead to excessive fuel element temperatures arising from an increase in power or a reduction in cooling capacity. They include the possibility of unintended control rod withdrawal at power or at start-up, coolant flow failure, pressure circuit failure, loss of boiler feed water, and failure of electric power. The paper reviews the protective equipment, and the policy for reactor safety assessments which include application of maximum credible accident philosophy and later the limited use of reliability and probability methods. Some of the Generating Boards' reactors are now more than half way through their planned working lives and during this time safety protective equipment has occasionally been brought into operation, often for spurious reasons. The general performance, of safety equipment is reviewed particularly for incidents such as main turbo-alternator trip, circulator failure, fuel element failures and other similar events, and some problems which have given rise to

  12. Automation and Control Learning Environment with Mixed Reality Remote Experiments Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederico M. Schaf

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available This work aims to the use of remotely web-based experiments to improve the learning process of automation and control systems theory courses. An architecture combining virtual learning environments, remote experiments, students guide and experiments analysis is proposed based on a wide state of art study. The validation of the architecture uses state of art technologies and new simple developed programs to implement the case studies presented. All implementations presented use an internet accessible virtual learning environment providing educational resources, guides and learning material to create a distance learning course associated with the remote mixed reality experiment. This work is part of the RExNet consortium, supported by the European Alfa project.

  13. Low-cost workbench client / server cores for remote experiments in electronics

    OpenAIRE

    José M. M. Ferreira; Americo Dias; Paulo Sousa; Zorica Nedic; Jan Machotka; Ozdemir Gol; Andrew Nafalski

    2010-01-01

    This paper offers an open-source solution to implement low-cost workbenches serving a wide range of remote experiments in electronics. The proposed solution comprises 1) a small (9,65 x 6,1 cm) Linux server board; 2) a server core supporting two TCP/IP communication channels, and general purpose I/O pin drivers to interface the remote experiment hardware; and 3) a client core based on a multi-tab user interface supporting text file management to exchange experiment scripts / status informatio...

  14. Modern NDA needs at Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, S.H.

    1995-01-01

    As the missions within the nuclear weapons complex change, so do the accountability measurement needs. Non-Destructive Assay (NDA) measurements have played a key role in accounting for special nuclear materials (SNM), and as time goes on, more and more reliance is made on this type of measurement. Key questions NDA instrument designers ask are: Which isotopes are of interest? What matrix are they in? What other isotopes are present? What container configuration will it be measured through? What precision and accuracy is required? What level of resolution is required? At the Savannah River Site (SRS) the desire to make direct measurements of SNM isotopes has prompted the evaluation to these and other questions. This paper will outline the current NDA needs at SRS. The discussion includes the types of materials that require measurement ,including the very difficult waste measurements. The special challenges associated with these measurement efforts will also be discussed

  15. Material screening with HPGe counting station for PandaX experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, X.; Chen, X.; Fu, C.; Ji, X.; Liu, X.; Xie, P.; Zhang, T.; Mao, Y.; Wang, S.; Wang, H.

    2016-01-01

    A gamma counting station based on high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector was set up for the material screening of the PandaX dark matter experiments in the China Jinping Underground Laboratory. Low background gamma rate of 2.6 counts/min within the energy range of 20 to 2700 keV is achieved due to the well-designed passive shield. The sentivities of the HPGe detetector reach mBq/kg level for isotopes like K, U, Th, and even better for Co and Cs, resulted from the low-background rate and the high relative detection efficiency of 175%. The structure and performance of the counting station are described in this article. Detailed counting results for the radioactivity in materials used by the PandaX dark-matter experiment are presented. The upgrading plan of the counting station is also discussed.

  16. Dangerous Practices: The Practicum Experiences of Non-Indigenous Pre-Service Teachers in Remote Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auld, Glenn; Dyer, Julie; Charles, Claire

    2016-01-01

    This paper seeks to explore the risks of providing preservice teachers with professional experiences in remote communities. In particular this paper focuses on the risks associated with this kind of professional experience. Twelve pre-service teachers were interviewed whilst on a three-week practicum around Katherine and in Maningrida in the…

  17. Offering Remotely Triggered, Real-Time Experiments in Electrochemistry for Distance Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Sachin; Satsangee, Soami P.

    2014-01-01

    Remote access to real experiments is crucial for distance learners to experience the sciences. The exploitation of technology for this purpose is advantageous in global teaching and in exchange of ideas on a single front irrespective of distance barriers. Implementation of the distance method leads to cost-effective integrated-e-learning where…

  18. Remote Station User's Guide

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Clark, John T

    2008-01-01

    .... The transponder is further enhanced to simulate a moving target by returning a signal with an artificial Doppler frequency and power level commensurate with that of a particular Radar Cross Section (RCS...

  19. Using an Online Remote Laboratory for Electrical Experiments in Upper Secondary Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Håkansson

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of remote laboratories in courses at university level has been reported in literature numerous times since the mid 90’s. In this article focus is on activities carried out by teachers and students, at the Upper Secondary School Level, using the remote laboratory VISIR (Virtual Instrument Systems in Reality. The Upper Secondary School, Katedralskolan in Lund, Sweden, cooperate with Blekinge Institute of Technology, Sweden, in a project that concerns the introduction of remote laboratory environment suitable for Upper Secondary School science courses. A remote laboratory in electronics has been introduced and is used as a complement to the traditional workbench in the hands-on laboratory. Significant results from the project are; 1 the great interest shown by the students for the remote experiments, 2 the students appreciation for the fact that it was not simulations but actual real experiments, 3 the remote laboratory is easy to implement for use by both teachers and students and 4 it can be used simultaneously by many students.

  20. Remote Laboratory Experiments in a Virtual Immersive Learning Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Berruti

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The Virtual Immersive Learning (VIL test bench implements a virtual collaborative immersive environment, capable of integrating natural contexts and typical gestures, which may occur during traditional lectures, enhanced with advanced experimental sessions. The system architecture is described, along with the motivations, and the most significant choices, both hardware and software, adopted for its implementation. The novelty of the approach essentially relies on its capability of embedding functionalities that stem from various research results (mainly carried out within the VICOM national project, and “putting the pieces together” in a well-integrated framework. These features, along with its high portability, good flexibility, and, above all, low cost, make this approach appropriate for educational and training purposes, mainly concerning measurements on telecommunication systems, at universities and research centers, as well as enterprises. Moreover, the methodology can be employed for remote access to and sharing of costly measurement equipment in many different activities. The immersive characteristics of the framework are illustrated, along with performance measurements related to a specific application.

  1. Operation Request Gatekeeper: A software system for remote access control of diagnostic instruments in fusion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abla, G.; Schissel, D. P.; Fredian, T. W.; Stillerman, J. A.; Greenwald, M. J.; Stepanov, D. N.; Ciarlette, D. J.

    2010-01-01

    Tokamak diagnostic settings are repeatedly modified to meet the changing needs of each experiment. Enabling the remote diagnostic control has significant challenges due to security and efficiency requirements. The Operation Request Gatekeeper (ORG) is a software system that addresses the challenges of remotely but securely submitting modification requests. The ORG provides a framework for screening all the requests before they enter the secure machine zone and are executed by performing user authentication and authorization, grammar validation, and validity checks. A prototype ORG was developed for the ITER CODAC that satisfies their initial requirements for remote request submission and has been tested with remote control of the KSTAR Plasma Control System. This paper describes the software design principles and implementation of ORG as well as worldwide test results.

  2. Large remote manipulator operating and maintenance experience at IEM cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hicks, D.F.; McGuinness, P.W.

    1985-01-01

    The Interim Examination and Maintenance (IEM) Cell at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) has two large Electro-Mechanical Manipulators (EMM's). These manipulators are used for cell operations (processing of reactor core components) as well as general cell maintenance. From our eleven years of operation and maintenance experience with these large EMM's, we have learned many lessons concerning manipulator design. This paper describes the IEM Cell EMM design features and discusses operating and maintenance experience at the IEM Cell

  3. Adding New Features to New and Existing Remote Experiments through their Integration in WebLab-Deusto

    OpenAIRE

    Diego López-de-Ipiña; Fabricio Gazzola; Javier Garcia-Zubia; Luis Rodriguez-Gil; Jaime Irurzun; Pablo Orduña

    2011-01-01

    During the last decade, efforts have been made in the development and publishing of remote experiments for educational purposes. In order to reduce the duplicity of work and to improve the common requirements that are shared by different remote laboratories, remote experiment management platforms have been developed, such as MIT iLabs, LabShare Sahara or WebLab-Deusto. In this paper, we describe how the development of experiments is handled in WebLab-Deusto, supporting both managed (developed...

  4. The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) experiment on the International Space Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alpat, Behcet E-mail: behcet.alpat@pg.infn.it

    2001-04-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) is a detector designed to operate in space to search for antimatter components in cosmic ray, the annihilation products of darkmatter and to study the antiprotons, positrons and light nuclei. A 'baseline' version of the experiment has successfully completed the precursor flight on Space Shuttle Discovery (June 2-12, 1998). The complete AMS is programmed for installation on International Space Station in year 2003 for an operational period of 3 years. In this contribution we report on the experimental configuration of AMS that will be installed on International Space Station.

  5. Boiler recirculation pumps for nuclear power stations - present state of development. Directions for planning, operational experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattias, H.B.

    1976-01-01

    Boiler recirculation pumps are important components of modern power stations. The development of large recirculation pumps up to a driving power of 1,500 kW was faced with some problems in meeting the plant requirements. In this paper, the present state of development is dealt with. The development problems in the fields of hydrodynamics, cavitation, corrosion and erosion are dealt with as well as the problems of the design of the casing with regard to thermodynamics and strength. Finally, operational experience with the boiler recirculation pump for 600 MW power stations will be reported on. (orig./AK) [de

  6. Design and fabrication of NDA standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, S.M.; Hsue, S.T.

    1996-01-01

    The Plutonium Facility, TA-55, at Los Alamos National Laboratory is currently producing NDA calibration standards used by various laboratories in the DOE complex. These NIST traceable standards have been produced to calibrate NDA instruments for accountability measurements used for resolving shipper/receiver differences, and for accountability in process residues and process waste. Standards are needed to calibrate various NDA (Non-destructive Assay) instruments such as neutron coincidence counters, gamma-ray counters, and calorimeters. These instruments measure various ranges of nuclear material being produced in the DOE nuclear community. Los Alamos National Laboratory has taken a lead role in fabrication of uranium and plutonium standards, along with other actinides such as neptunium and americium. These standards have been fabricated for several laboratories within the complex. This paper will summarize previous publications detailing the careful planning encompassing components such as precise weighing, destructive analysis, and the use of post fabrication NDA measurements to confirm that the standards meet all preliminary expectations before use in instrument calibration. The paper will also describe the specialized containers, diluents, and the various amount of nuclear materials needed to accommodate the calibration ranges of the instruments

  7. A Contribution to Real-Time Experiments in Remote Laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoltán Janík

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper is focused on realization of hard real-time control of experiments in on-line laboratories. The presented solution utilizes already developed on-line laboratory portal that is based on open-source Scilab environment. The customized solution is based on Linux RTAI platform with RTAI-XML server, Comedi and jRTAILab with support of ScicosLab environment. It generates real-time executable code that is used to operate student experiments performed on Humusoft CE152 Magnetic Levitation plant.

  8. A remote control system for the LELA experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellano, M.; Cavallo, N.; Cevenini, F.; Patteri, P.

    1983-01-01

    A modular system for closed loop computer control of stepping motors has been realized and used for optical component movement of LELA experiment in radiation risk area. A CAMAC module, controlling up to 15 stepping motors, a NIM dual motor driver and a special purpose circuit for computer interfacing are described

  9. A Global Remote Laboratory Experimentation Network and the Experiment Service Provider Business Model and Plans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tor Ivar Eikaas

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results from the IST KAII Trial project ReLAX - Remote LAboratory eXperimentation trial (IST 1999-20827, and contributes with a framework for a global remote laboratory experimentation network supported by a new business model. The paper presents this new Experiment Service Provider business model that aims at bringing physical experimentation back into the learning arena, where remotely operable laboratory experiments used in advanced education and training schemes are made available to a global education and training market in industry and academia. The business model is based on an approach where individual experiment owners offer remote access to their high-quality laboratory facilities to users around the world. The usage can be for research, education, on-the-job training etc. The access to these facilities is offered via an independent operating company - the Experiment Service Provider. The Experiment Service Provider offers eCommerce services like booking, access control, invoicing, dispute resolution, quality control, customer evaluation services and a unified Lab Portal.

  10. Simple economic evaluation and applications experiments for photovoltaic systems for remote sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rios, M. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A simple evaluation of the cost effectiveness of photovoltaic systems is presented. The evaluation is based on a calculation of breakeven costs of photovoltaics (PV) arrays with the levelized costs of two alternative energy sources (1) extension of the utility grid and (2) diesel generators. A selected number of PV applications experiments that are in progress in remote areas of the US are summarized. These applications experiments range from a 23 watt insect survey trap to a 100 kW PV system for a national park complex. It is concluded that PV systems for remote areas are now cost effective in remote small applications with commercially available technology and will be cost competitive for intermediate scale systems (approx. 10 kW) in the 1980s if the DOE 1986 Commercial Readiness Goals are achieved.

  11. Ex-vessel remote maintenance development plans for the Burning Plasma Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgess, T.W.; Davis, F.C.

    1991-01-01

    Remote maintenance (RM) is fundamental to the basic design requirements of the Burning Plasma Experiment (BPX), and an extensive RM development and demonstration program is planned to meet these requirements. The program first draws from the experience base that exists in the fission community and Europe's Joint European Torus (JET) Project. Successful solutions are applied where possible and, in many cases, improved in order to achieve the performance demanded by a multiyear program that must be capable of efficiently executing RM procedures. Early, concurrent efforts in the design and fabrication of prototype remote handling (RH) equipment, remote tooling, and maintainable machine components will precede an extensive use of mock-up equipment in order to test, develop, and demonstrate the technology. 7 refs,. 5 figs

  12. Design and Development of a CPCI-Based Electronics Package for Space Station Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolacz, John S.; Clapper, Randy S.; Wade, Raymond P.

    2006-01-01

    The NASA John H. Glenn Research Center is developing a Compact-PCI (CPCI) based electronics package for controlling space experiment hardware on the International Space Station. Goals of this effort include an easily modified, modular design that allows for changes in experiment requirements. Unique aspects of the experiment package include a flexible circuit used for internal interconnections and a separate enclosure (box in a box) for controlling 1 kW of power for experiment fuel heating requirements. This electronics package was developed as part of the FEANICS (Flow Enclosure Accommodating Novel Investigations in Combustion of Solids) mini-facility which is part of the Fluids and Combustion Facility s Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR). The CIR will be the platform for future microgravity combustion experiments and will reside on the Destiny Module of the International Space Station (ISS). The FEANICS mini-facility will be the primary means for conducting solid fuel combustion experiments in the CIR on ISS. The main focus of many of these solid combustion experiments will be to conduct applied scientific investigations in fire-safety to support NASA s future space missions. A description of the electronics package and the results of functional testing are the subjects of this report. The report concludes that the use of innovative packaging methods combined with readily available COTS hardware can provide a modular electronics package which is easily modified for changing experiment requirements.

  13. People challenges in biospheric systems for long-term habitation in remote areas, space stations, moon, and Mars expeditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, John

    2002-01-01

    People who participate in remote and difficult expeditions, such as the 2-year (1991-1993) Biosphere 2 experiment or a future biospheric system on Mars or other long voyages, will face individual psycho-physiological, social, and cultural value challenges. The individual psycho-physiological vectors include the lure of being a hero/heroine and pushing it to the maximum, concealment of problems with the belief that he/she can overcome the obstacle alone, as well as the difficulty of keeping intact the critical differentiation of the risks associated with the overall expedition as opposed to the experimental objectives. The social challenges occur as a group dynamic context as well as for the individual, resulting in regressions and the need to "act out" one's difficulties. Cultural areas of importance that must be taken into consideration will include esthetic, ethical, cosmological, and epistemological values. The epistemological values must involve the five methods of scientific inquiry for a comprehensive total systems project to succeed fully.

  14. Overview of the Bushland Evapotranspiration and Agricultural Remote sensing EXperiment 2008 (BEAREX08): A field experiment evaluating methods for quantifying ET at multiple scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evett, Steven R.; Kustas, William P.; Gowda, Prasanna H.; Anderson, Martha C.; Prueger, John H.; Howell, Terry A.

    2012-12-01

    In 2008, scientists from seven federal and state institutions worked together to investigate temporal and spatial variations of evapotranspiration (ET) and surface energy balance in a semi-arid irrigated and dryland agricultural region of the Southern High Plains in the Texas Panhandle. This Bushland Evapotranspiration and Agricultural Remote sensing EXperiment 2008 (BEAREX08) involved determination of micrometeorological fluxes (surface energy balance) in four weighing lysimeter fields (each 4.7 ha) containing irrigated and dryland cotton and in nearby bare soil, wheat stubble and rangeland fields using nine eddy covariance stations, three large aperture scintillometers, and three Bowen ratio systems. In coordination with satellite overpasses, flux and remote sensing aircraft flew transects over the surrounding fields and region encompassing an area contributing fluxes from 10 to 30 km upwind of the USDA-ARS lysimeter site. Tethered balloon soundings were conducted over the irrigated fields to investigate the effect of advection on local boundary layer development. Local ET was measured using four large weighing lysimeters, while field scale estimates were made by soil water balance with a network of neutron probe profile water sites and from the stationary flux systems. Aircraft and satellite imagery were obtained at different spatial and temporal resolutions. Plot-scale experiments dealt with row orientation and crop height effects on spatial and temporal patterns of soil surface temperature, soil water content, soil heat flux, evaporation from soil in the interrow, plant transpiration and canopy and soil radiation fluxes. The BEAREX08 field experiment was unique in its assessment of ET fluxes over a broad range in spatial scales; comparing direct and indirect methods at local scales with remote sensing based methods and models using aircraft and satellite imagery at local to regional scales, and comparing mass balance-based ET ground truth with eddy covariance

  15. Remote device control and monitor system for the LHD deuterium experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakanishi, Hideya, E-mail: nakanisi@nifs.ac.jp [National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS), Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Dept. Fusion Science, SOKENDAI (The Graduate University for Advanced Studies), Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Ohsuna, Masaki; Ito, Tatsuki; Nonomura, Miki; Imazu, Setsuo; Emoto, Masahiko; Iwata, Chie; Yoshida, Masanobu; Yokota, Mitsuhiro; Maeno, Hiroya; Aoyagi, Miwa; Ogawa, Hideki; Nakamura, Osamu; Morita, Yoshitaka; Inoue, Tomoyuki; Watanabe, Kiyomasa [National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS), Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Ida, Katsumi; Ishiguro, Seiji; Kaneko, Osamu [National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS), Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Dept. Fusion Science, SOKENDAI (The Graduate University for Advanced Studies), Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Device remote control will be significant for the LHD deuterium experiments. • A central management GUI to control the power distribution for devices. • For safety, power management is separated from operational commanding. • Wi-Fi was tested and found to be not reliable with fusion plasmas. - Abstract: Upon beginning the LHD deuterium experiment, the opportunity for maintenance work in the torus hall will be conspicuously reduced such that all instruments must be controlled remotely. The LHD data acquisition (DAQ) and archiving system have been using about 110 DAQ front-end, and the DAQ central control and monitor system has been implemented for their remote management. This system is based on the “multi-agent” model whose communication protocol has been unified. Since DAQ front-end electronics would suffer from the “single-event effect” (SEE) of D-D neutrons, software-based remote operation might become ineffective, and then securely intercepting or recycling the electrical power of the device would be indispensable for recovering from a non-responding fault condition. In this study, a centralized control and monitor system has been developed for a number of power distribution units (PDUs). This system adopts the plug-in structure in which the plug-in modules can absorb the differences among the commercial products of numerous vendors. The combination of the above-mentioned functionalities has led to realizing the flexible and highly reliable remote control infrastructure for the plasma diagnostics and the device management in LHD.

  16. Potential performances of remotely sensed LAI assimilation in WOFOST model based on an OSS experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Curnel, Y.; Wit, de A.J.W.; Duveiller, G.; Defourny, P.

    2011-01-01

    An Observing System Simulation Experiment (OSSE) has been defined to assess the potentialities of assimilating winter wheat leaf area index (LAI) estimations derived from remote sensing into the crop growth model WOFOST. Two assimilation strategies are considered: one based on Ensemble Kalman Filter

  17. Book Review "Advances on remote laboratories and e-learning experiences"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús A. del Alamo

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Book Review "Advances on remote laboratories and e-learning experiences", book editors: Luís Gomes and Javier García-Zubía, University of Deusto, Spain. Reviewed by Jesús A. del Alamo, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, M.I.T.

  18. REMOTE SENSING IMAGE QUALITY ASSESSMENT EXPERIMENT WITH POST-PROCESSING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Jiang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper briefly describes the post-processing influence assessment experiment, the experiment includes three steps: the physical simulation, image processing, and image quality assessment. The physical simulation models sampled imaging system in laboratory, the imaging system parameters are tested, the digital image serving as image processing input are produced by this imaging system with the same imaging system parameters. The gathered optical sampled images with the tested imaging parameters are processed by 3 digital image processes, including calibration pre-processing, lossy compression with different compression ratio and image post-processing with different core. Image quality assessment method used is just noticeable difference (JND subject assessment based on ISO20462, through subject assessment of the gathered and processing images, the influence of different imaging parameters and post-processing to image quality can be found. The six JND subject assessment experimental data can be validated each other. Main conclusions include: image post-processing can improve image quality; image post-processing can improve image quality even with lossy compression, image quality with higher compression ratio improves less than lower ratio; with our image post-processing method, image quality is better, when camera MTF being within a small range.

  19. NASA Glenn Research Center Solar Cell Experiment Onboard the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Matthew G.; Wolford, David S.; Prokop, Norman F.; Krasowski, Michael J.; Parker, David S.; Cassidy, Justin C.; Davies , William E.; Vorreiter, Janelle O.; Piszczor, Michael F.; Mcnatt, Jeremiah S.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Accurate air mass zero (AM0) measurement is essential for the evaluation of new photovoltaic (PV) technology for space solar cells. The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has flown an experiment designed to measure the electrical performance of several solar cells onboard NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's (GSFC) Robotic Refueling Missions (RRM) Task Board 4 (TB4) on the exterior of the International Space Station (ISS). Four industry and government partners provided advanced PV devices for measurement and orbital environment testing. The experiment was positioned on the exterior of the station for approximately eight months, and was completely self-contained, providing its own power and internal data storage. Several new cell technologies including four-junction (4J) Inverted Metamorphic Multi-junction (IMM) cells were evaluated and the results will be compared to ground-based measurement methods.

  20. Hybrid Off-Grid SPV/WTG Power System for Remote Cellular Base Stations Towards Green and Sustainable Cellular Networks in South Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed H. Alsharif

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to address the sustainability of power resources and environmental conditions for telecommunication base stations (BSs at off-grid sites. Accordingly, this study examined the feasibility of using a hybrid solar photovoltaic (SPV/wind turbine generator (WTG system to feed the remote Long Term Evolution-macro base stations at off-grid sites of South Korea the energy necessary to minimise both the operational expenditure and greenhouse gas emissions. Three key aspects have been discussed: (i optimal system architecture; (ii energy yield analysis; and (iii economic analysis. In addition, this study compares the feasibility of using a hybrid SPV/WTG system vs. a diesel generator. The simulation results show that by applying the proposed SPV/WTG system scheme to the cellular system, the total operational expenditure can be up to 48.52% more efficient and sustainability can be ensured with better planning by providing cleaner energy.

  1. Experience on environmental qualification of safety-related components for Darlington Nuclear Generating Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, A.S.; Kukreti, B.M.

    1987-01-01

    The proliferation of Nuclear Power Plant safety concerns has lead to increasing attention over the Environmental Qualification (EQ) of Nuclear Power Plant Safety-Related Components to provide the assurance that the safety related equipment will meet their intended functions during normal operation and postulated accident conditions. The environmental qualification of these components is also a Licensing requirement for Darlington Nuclear Generating Station. This paper provides an overview of EQ and the experience of a pilot project, in the qualification of the Main Moderator System safety-related functions for the Darlington Nuclear Generating Station currently under construction. It addresses the various phases of qualification from the identification of the EQ Safety-Related Components List, definition of location specific service conditions (normal, adbnormal and accident), safety-related functions, Environmental Qualification Assessments and finally, an EQ system summary report for the Main Moderator System. The results of the pilot project are discussed and the methodology reviewed. The paper concludes that the EQ Program developed for Darlington Nuclear Generating Station, as applied to the qualification of the Main Moderator System, contained all the elements necessary in the qualification of safety-related equipment. The approach taken in the qualification of the Moderator safety-related equipment proves to provide a sound framework for the qualification of other safety-related components in the station

  2. Remote Systems Experience at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory--A Summary of Lessons Learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noakes, Mark W.; Burgess, Thomas W.; Rowe, John C.

    2011-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has a long history in the development of remote systems to support the nuclear environment. ORNL, working in conjunction with Central Research Laboratories, created what is believed to be the first microcomputer-based implementation of dual-arm master-slave remote manipulation. As part of the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program, ORNL developed the dual-arm advanced servomanipulator focusing on remote maintainability for systems exposed to high radiation fields. ORNL also participated in almost all of the various technical areas of the U.S. Department of Energy s Robotics Technology Development Program, while leading the Decontamination and Decommissioning and Tank Waste Retrieval categories. Over the course of this involvement, ORNL has developed a substantial base of working knowledge as to what works when and under what circumstances for many types of remote systems tasks as well as operator interface modes, control bandwidth, and sensing requirements to name a few. By using a select list of manipulator systems that is not meant to be exhaustive, this paper will discuss history and outcome of development, field-testing, deployment, and operations from a lessons learned perspective. The final outcome is a summary paper outlining ORNL experiences and guidelines for transition of developmental remote systems to real-world hazardous environments.

  3. Adding New Features to New and Existing Remote Experiments through their Integration in WebLab-Deusto

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego López-de-Ipiña

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade, efforts have been made in the development and publishing of remote experiments for educational purposes. In order to reduce the duplicity of work and to improve the common requirements that are shared by different remote laboratories, remote experiment management platforms have been developed, such as MIT iLabs, LabShare Sahara or WebLab-Deusto. In this paper, we describe how the development of experiments is handled in WebLab-Deusto, supporting both managed (developed used the APIs provided by WebLab-Deusto and unmanaged experiments (using Virtual Machines or LabVIEW, and comparing both approaches. It also shows the results of integrating remote experiments under this system, with the use case of VISIR, the electronics remote laboratory developed in BTH.

  4. Tethered elevator and platforms as space station facilities: Systems studies and demonstrative experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    Several key concepts of the science and applications tethered platforms were studied. Some conclusions reached are herein listed. Tether elevator and platform could improve the space station scientific and applicative capabilities. The space elevator presents unique characteristics as microgravity facility and as a tethered platform servicing vehicle. Pointing platforms could represent a new kind of observation facility for large class of payloads. The dynamical, control and technological complexity of these concepts advised demonstrative experiments. The on-going tethered satellite system offers the opportunity to perform such experiments. And feasibility studies are in progress.

  5. In-space research, technology and engineering experiments and Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyson, Richard; Gartrell, Charles F.

    1988-01-01

    The NASA Space Station will serve as a technology research laboratory, a payload-servicing facility, and a large structure fabrication and assembly facility. Space structures research will encompass advanced structural concepts and their dynamics, advanced control concepts, sensors, and actuators. Experiments dealing with fluid management will gather data on such fundamentals as multiphase flow phenomena. As requirements for power systems and thermal management grow, experiments quantifying the performance of energy systems and thermal management concepts will be undertaken, together with expanded efforts in the fields of information systems, automation, and robotics.

  6. Optimizing the use of operating experience at Ontario Hydro's Bruce Nuclear Generating Station 'A'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, E.L.

    1991-01-01

    One of the most significant lessons learned from the Three Mile Island event (March 1979), and again with the Chernobyl disaster - (April 1986) was the ongoing requirement to learn from our mistakes and near misses, and those of our fellow utilities around the world: so that as an industry we do not repeat the same mistakes. The very future of our industry will depend on how well each one of us accomplishes this important ask. This paper describes in detail the challenges encountered by one station when incorporating a comprehensive 'Operating Program'. It begins with the Corporate Office's directives to its stations for such a program; and follows up with the details of the actual station implementation of the program, and day to day operating experiences. The paper describes in detail the following Operating Experience programs: - Root Cause Determination process. The Institute of Nuclear Power Operations, Human Performance Enhancement System (HPES) as an integral component of the Root Cause process. Finding solutions for our station for problems identified elsewhere is covered herein; - Significant Event Recommendation Tracking System: - Commitment Tracking System; - Operating Experience (Sharing Lessons Learned) System. The paper will show all the above processes tie closely together and complement each other. The paper discusses the staff required for such processes and their training requirements. It recommends process time lines, reporting mechanisms, and sign off requirements. It will describe the equipment utilized to carry out this work effectively, and with a minimum of staff. One unique feature of the Bruce 'A' system is an 'Effectiveness Follow-Up', usually three to six months after the event recommendations have been completed. By rechecking the finished actions and reviewing them with the personnel involved with the originating event we ensure that the real root causes have been identified and resolved. (author)

  7. Optimizing the use of operating experience at Ontario Hydro's Bruce Nuclear Generating Station 'A'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, E L [Operating Experience Reactor Safety, Bruce Nuclear Generating Station ' A' , Ontario Hydro, Tiverton, Ontario (Canada)

    1991-04-01

    One of the most significant lessons learned from the Three Mile Island event (March 1979), and again with the Chernobyl disaster - (April 1986) was the ongoing requirement to learn from our mistakes and near misses, and those of our fellow utilities around the world: so that as an industry we do not repeat the same mistakes. The very future of our industry will depend on how well each one of us accomplishes this important ask. This paper describes in detail the challenges encountered by one station when incorporating a comprehensive 'Operating Program'. It begins with the Corporate Office's directives to its stations for such a program; and follows up with the details of the actual station implementation of the program, and day to day operating experiences. The paper describes in detail the following Operating Experience programs: - Root Cause Determination process. The Institute of Nuclear Power Operations, Human Performance Enhancement System (HPES) as an integral component of the Root Cause process. Finding solutions for our station for problems identified elsewhere is covered herein; - Significant Event Recommendation Tracking System: - Commitment Tracking System; - Operating Experience (Sharing Lessons Learned) System. The paper will show all the above processes tie closely together and complement each other. The paper discusses the staff required for such processes and their training requirements. It recommends process time lines, reporting mechanisms, and sign off requirements. It will describe the equipment utilized to carry out this work effectively, and with a minimum of staff. One unique feature of the Bruce 'A' system is an 'Effectiveness Follow-Up', usually three to six months after the event recommendations have been completed. By rechecking the finished actions and reviewing them with the personnel involved with the originating event we ensure that the real root causes have been identified and resolved. (author)

  8. Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III on the International Space Station (SAGE III/ISS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasbarre, Joseph; Walker, Richard; Cisewski, Michael; Zawodny, Joseph; Cheek, Dianne; Thornton, Brooke

    2015-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III on the International Space Station (SAGE III/ISS) mission will extend the SAGE data record from the ideal vantage point of the International Space Station (ISS). The ISS orbital inclination is ideal for SAGE measurements providing coverage between 70 deg north and 70 deg south latitude. The SAGE data record includes an extensively validated data set including aerosol optical depth data dating to the Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM) experiments in 1975 and 1978 and stratospheric ozone profile data dating to the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) in 1979. These and subsequent data records, notably from the SAGE II experiment launched on the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite in 1984 and the SAGE III experiment launched on the Russian Meteor-3M satellite in 2001, have supported a robust, long-term assessment of key atmospheric constituents. These scientific measurements provide the basis for the analysis of five of the nine critical constituents (aerosols, ozone (O3), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), water vapor (H2O), and air density using O2) identified in the U.S. National Plan for Stratospheric Monitoring. SAGE III on ISS was originally scheduled to fly on the ISS in the same timeframe as the Meteor-3M mission, but was postponed due to delays in ISS construction. The project was re-established in 2009.

  9. "EGM" (Electrostatics of Granular Matter): A Space Station Experiment to Examine Natural Particulate Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, J.; Sauke, T.; Buehler, M.; Farrell, W.; Green, R.; Birchenough, A.

    1999-09-01

    A granular-materials experiment is being developed for a 2002 launch for Space Station deployment. The experiment is funded by NASA HQ and managed through NASA Lewis Research Center. The experiment will examine electrostatic aggregation of coarse granular materials with the goals of (a) obtaining proof for an electrostatic dipole model of grain interactions, and (b) obtaining knowledge about the way aggregation affects the behavior of natural particulate masses: (1) in unconfined dispersions (clouds such as nebulae, aeolian dust palls, volcanic plumes), (2) in semi-confined, self-loaded masses as in fluidized flows (pyroclastic surges, avalanches) and compacted regolith, or (3) in semi-confined non-loaded masses as in dust layers adhering to solar cells or space suits on Mars. The experiment addresses both planetary/astrophysical issues as well as practical concerns for human exploration of Mars or other solar system bodies. Additional information is contained in the original.

  10. The Remote Monitoring of Earth’s Atmosphere Based on Operative Processing GNSS Data in the UA-EUPOS/ZAKPOS Network of Active Reference Stations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataliya Kablak

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The system of remote monitoring of atmosphere is designed to obtain information about the state of atmosphere. The principle of the remote monitoring of atmosphere is based on registering and processing GLONASS/GPS radio signals. Modern networks of active reference stations allow us to solve both practical problems of geodesy, navigation, and purely scientific problems that are important in all geosciences. The paper investigates a spatiotemporal instability in the atmosphere, based on 845 temporal measurements of tropospheric delay over the territory covered by 20 active reference stations of the UA-EUPOS/ZAKPOS network. The method elaborated by the authors for the determination of tropospheric delay in the UA-EUPOS/ZAKPOS network in real time takes relief of the region into account. The results are very good, since mapping tropospheric delay can be made with an average RMSE of 1.5 mm. The method developed in this research can be used to improve the quality of weather forecasts and the prevention of natural disasters.

  11. Fluid Physical and Transport Phenomena Studies aboard the International Space Station: Planned Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Bhim S.

    1999-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the microgravity fluid physics and transport phenomena experiments planned for the International Spare Station. NASA's Office of Life and Microgravity Science and Applications has established a world-class research program in fluid physics and transport phenomena. This program combines the vast expertise of the world research community with NASA's unique microgravity facilities with the objectives of gaining new insight into fluid phenomena by removing the confounding effect of gravity. Due to its criticality to many terrestrial and space-based processes and phenomena, fluid physics and transport phenomena play a central role in the NASA's Microgravity Program. Through widely publicized research announcement and well established peer-reviews, the program has been able to attract a number of world-class researchers and acquired a critical mass of investigations that is now adding rapidly to this field. Currently there arc a total of 106 ground-based and 20 candidate flight principal investigators conducting research in four major thrust areas in the program: complex flows, multiphase flow and phase change, interfacial phenomena, and dynamics and instabilities. The International Space Station (ISS) to be launched in 1998, provides the microgravity research community with a unprecedented opportunity to conduct long-duration microgravity experiments which can be controlled and operated from the Principal Investigators' own laboratory. Frequent planned shuttle flights to the Station will provide opportunities to conduct many more experiments than were previously possible. NASA Lewis Research Center is in the process of designing a Fluids and Combustion Facility (FCF) to be located in the Laboratory Module of the ISS that will not only accommodate multiple users but, allow a broad range of fluid physics and transport phenomena experiments to be conducted in a cost effective manner.

  12. A Remote and Virtual Lab with Experiments for Secondary Education, Engineering and Lifelong Learning Courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Cardoso

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The Information and Communication Technology tools are nowadays invaluable to support e-learning and b-learning programs. The Remote and Virtual Laboratory in development at the Department of Informatics Engineering of the University of Coimbra (Portugal, RVL@DEI-UC, is a web-based platform that allows users to perform a large set of experiments in different areas and contexts, such as in education or training. This paper aims to describe the inherent potential of this platform in secondary education, engineering and lifelong learning courses. The conceptualization, architecture and implementation of the web platform for real and virtual experiments, which is remotely accessed using the Internet, are presented and the relevance of the lab’s integration in an intelligent tutoring system is also highlighted, mainly in what regards the requirements of adaptation and customization to different users’ profile in different learning contexts.

  13. New Paradigm for Macromolecular Crystallography Experiments at SSRL: Automated Crystal Screening And Remote Data Collection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soltis, S.M.; Cohen, A.E.; Deacon, A.; Eriksson, T.; Gonzalez, A.; McPhillips, S.; Chui, H.; Dunten, P.; Hollenbeck, M.; Mathews, I.; Miller, M.; Moorhead, P.; Phizackerley, R.P.; Smith, C.; Song, J.; Bedem, H. van dem; Ellis, P.; Kuhn, P.; McPhillips, T.; Sauter, N.; Sharp, K.

    2009-01-01

    Complete automation of the macromolecular crystallography experiment has been achieved at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) through the combination of robust mechanized experimental hardware and a flexible control system with an intuitive user interface. These highly reliable systems have enabled crystallography experiments to be carried out from the researchers' home institutions and other remote locations while retaining complete control over even the most challenging systems. A breakthrough component of the system, the Stanford Auto-Mounter (SAM), has enabled the efficient mounting of cryocooled samples without human intervention. Taking advantage of this automation, researchers have successfully screened more than 200 000 samples to select the crystals with the best diffraction quality for data collection as well as to determine optimal crystallization and cryocooling conditions. These systems, which have been deployed on all SSRL macromolecular crystallography beamlines and several beamlines worldwide, are used by more than 80 research groups in remote locations, establishing a new paradigm for macromolecular crystallography experimentation.

  14. Manageable and Extensible Video Streaming Systems for On-Line Monitoring of Remote Laboratory Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Wei Lin

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available To enable clients to view real-time video of the involved instruments during a remote experiment, two real-time video streaming systems are devised. One is for the remote experiments which instruments locate in one geographic spot and the other is for those which instruments scatter over different places. By means of running concurrent streaming processes at a server, multiple instruments can be monitored simultaneously by different clients. The proposed systems possess excellent extensibility, that is, the systems can easily add new digital cameras for instruments without modifying any software. Also they are well-manageable, meaning that an administrator can conveniently adjust the quality of the real-time video depending on system load and visual requirements. Finally, some evaluation concerning CPU utilization and bandwidth consumption of the systems have been evaluated to verify the effectiveness of the proposed solutions.

  15. Web-based Java application to advanced JT-60 Man-Machine Interfacing System for remote experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Totsuka, Toshiyuki; Suzuki, Yoshio; Sakata, Shinya; Oshima, Takayuki; Iba, Katsuyuki

    2008-01-01

    Since remote participation in ITER experiments is planned, it is expected to demonstrate that the JT-60SA experiment is controlled from a Japanese remote experiment center located in Rokkasho-mura, Aomori-ken, Japan as a part of the ITER-BA project. Functions required for this experiment are monitoring of the discharge sequence status, handling of the discharge parameter, checking of experiment data, and monitoring of plant data, all of which are included in the existing JT-60 Man-Machine Interfacing System (MMIF). The MMIF is now only available to on-site users at the Naka site due to network safety. The motivation for remote MMIF is prompted by the issue of developing and achieving compatibility with network safety. The Java language has been chosen to implement this task. This paper deals with details of the JT-60 MMIF for the remote experiment that has evolved using the Java language

  16. Los Alamos safeguards program overview and NDA in safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keepin, G.R.

    1988-01-01

    Over the years the Los Alamos safeguards program has developed, tested, and implemented a broad range of passive and active nondestructive analysis (NDA) instruments (based on gamma and x-ray detection and neutron counting) that are now widely employed in safeguarding nuclear materials of all forms. Here very briefly, the major categories of gamma ray and neutron based NDA techniques, give some representative examples of NDA instruments currently in use, and cite a few notable instances of state-of-the-art NDA technique development. Historical aspects and a broad overview of the safeguards program are also presented

  17. Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) special-purpose remote maintenance systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masson, L.S.; Welland, H.J.

    1985-01-01

    A key element in the preconceptual design of the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) was the development of design concepts for special-purpose remote maintenance systems. Included were systems for shield sector replacement, vacuum vessel sector and toroidal field coil replacement, limiter blade replacement, protective tile replacement, and general-purpose maintenance. This paper addresses these systems as they apply to the copper toroidal field (TF) coil version of the TFCX

  18. Techno-economic analysis of stand alone solar pv systems for remote base stations in Ghana. (a case study at Abofrem vodafone cell site)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denkyira, Samuel

    2015-06-01

    Information and Communications Technologies (ICT) have become an important part of today’s global economy. ICT infrastructural development is developing at a very fast pace in Ghana. Growth is above the 1.1% average for Sub-Saharan Africa. The growth in the sector has meant a massive investment in telecommunication infrastructure such as base stations from telecom companies such as Vodafone, Millicom, Glo, Espresso, MTN etc. Hundreds of base stations have been installed all over the country. Currently base stations depend mainly on the national grid, with diesel generators as backups, for its power requirement. In some remote or hilly areas where there are no grid supplied electricity, base stations are usually powered with diesel fuelled generators since lengthy grid extensions may not be cost effective. In addition to high fuel delivery and consumption costs, maintenance of the generators can also be expensive in terms of parts and labour time working on the unit. There are also concerns about environmental pollution using diesel generators. Photovoltaic technology has the ability to convert solar energy into electricity consuming no fossil fuels, using no moving parts, creating no pollution and noise, and lasting for years with little maintenance. The environmental, noise, reliability and power availability benefits of the PV system make it an attractive option. Ghana, being a few degrees north of the equator, is endowed with enormous solar energy resource spread across the entire country. Daily solar radiation level ranges from 4 kWh/m 2 to 6 kWh/m 2 . The annual sunshine duration ranges between 1800 to 3000 hours offering very high potential for grid connected and off grid applications. In this thesis work, the use of solar PV technology as a cost effective source of power for cellular base stations in remote or hilly areas, far off the national grid, is reviewed. RETScreen software is used to determine the technical and financial viability of the PV system

  19. The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE III) on the International Space Station (ISS) Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisewski, Michael; Zawodny, Joseph; Gasbarre, Joseph; Eckman, Richard; Topiwala, Nandkishore; Rodriquez-Alvarez, Otilia; Cheek, Dianne; Hall, Steve

    2014-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III on the International Space Station (SAGE III/ISS) mission will provide the science community with high-vertical resolution and nearly global observations of ozone, aerosols, water vapor, nitrogen dioxide, and other trace gas species in the stratosphere and upper-troposphere. SAGE III/ISS measurements will extend the long-term Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM) and SAGE data record begun in the 1970s. The multi-decadal SAGE ozone and aerosol data sets have undergone intense scrutiny and are considered the international standard for accuracy and stability. SAGE data have been used to monitor the effectiveness of the Montreal Protocol. Key objectives of the mission are to assess the state of the recovery in the distribution of ozone, to re-establish the aerosol measurements needed by both climate and ozone models, and to gain further insight into key processes contributing to ozone and aerosol variability. The space station mid-inclination orbit allows for a large range in latitude sampling and nearly continuous communications with payloads. The SAGE III instrument is the fifth in a series of instruments developed for monitoring atmospheric constituents with high vertical resolution. The SAGE III instrument is a moderate resolution spectrometer covering wavelengths from 290 nm to 1550 nm. Science data is collected in solar occultation mode, lunar occultation mode, and limb scatter measurement mode. A SpaceX Falcon 9 launch vehicle will provide access to space. Mounted in the unpressurized section of the Dragon trunk, SAGE III will be robotically removed from the Dragon and installed on the space station. SAGE III/ISS will be mounted to the ExPRESS Logistics Carrier-4 (ELC-4) location on the starboard side of the station. To facilitate a nadir view from this location, a Nadir Viewing Platform (NVP) payload was developed which mounts between the carrier and the SAGE III Instrument Payload (IP).

  20. Extreme Tele-Echocardiography: Methodology for Remote Guidance of In-Flight Echocardiography Aboard the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, David S.; Borowski, Allan; Bungo, Michael W.; Gladding, Patrick; Greenberg, Neil; Hamilton, Doug; Levine, Benjamin D.; Lee, Stuart M.; Norwood, Kelly; Platts, Steven H.; hide

    2012-01-01

    Methods: In the year before launch of an ISS mission, potential astronaut echocardiographic operators participate in 5 sessions to train for echo acquisitions that occur roughly monthly during the mission, including one exercise echocardiogram. The focus of training is familiarity with the study protocol and remote guidance procedures. On-orbit, real-time guidance of in-flight acquisitions is provided by a sonographer in the Telescience Center of Mission Control. Physician investigators with remote access are able to relay comments on image quality to the sonographer. Live video feed is relayed from the ISS to the ground via the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System with a 2- second transmission delay. The expert sonographer uses these images, along with twoway audio, to provide instructions and feedback. Images are stored in non-compressed DICOM format for asynchronous relay to the ground for subsequent off-line analysis. Results: Since June, 2009, a total of 27 resting echocardiograms and 5 exercise studies have been performed during flight. Average acquisition time has been 45 minutes, reflecting 26,000 km of ISS travel per study. Image quality has been adequate in all studies, and remote guidance has proven imperative for fine-tuning imaging and prioritizing views when communication outages limit the study duration. Typical resting studies have included 27 video loops and 30 still-frame images requiring 750 MB of storage. Conclusions: Despite limited crew training, remote guidance allows research-quality echocardiography to be performed by non-experts aboard the ISS. Analysis is underway and additional subjects are being recruited to define the impact of microgravity on cardiac structure and systolic and diastolic function.

  1. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) ; Guidance on the scientific requirements for health claims related to physical performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    The Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) was asked by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) to draft guidance on scientific requirements for health claims related to physical performance. This guidance has been drawn from scientific opinions of the NDA Panel on such health...... claims. Thus, this guidance document represents the views of the NDA Panel based on the experience gained to date with the evaluation of health claims in this area. It is not intended that the document should include an exhaustive list of beneficial effects and studies/outcome measures which...

  2. Virtuality and efficiency - overcoming past antinomy in the remote collaboration experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, Joao; Bjorkli, Knut; Clavo, David Martin; Baron, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Several recent initiatives have been put in place by the CERN IT Department to improve the user experience in remote dispersed meetings and remote collaboration at large in the LHC communities worldwide. We will present an analysis of the factors which were historically limiting the efficiency of remote dispersed meetings and describe the consequent actions which were undertaken at CERN to overcome these limitations. After giving a status update of the different equipment available at CERN to enable the virtual sessions and the various collaborative tools which are currently proposed to users, we will focus on the evolution of this market: how can the new technological trends (among others, HD videoconferencing, Telepresence, Unified Communications, etc.) impact positively the user experience and how to attain the best usage of them. Finally, by projecting ourselves in the future, we will give some hints as to how to answer the difficult question of selecting the next generation of collaborative tools: which set of tools among the various offers (systems like Vidyo H264 SVC, next generation EVO, Groupware offers, standard H323 systems, etc.) is best suited for our environment and how to unify this set for the common user. This will finally allow us to definitively overcome the past antinomy between virtuality and efficiency.

  3. UAV Flight Experiments Applied to the Remote Sensing of Vegetated Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Salamí

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The miniaturization of electronics, computers and sensors has created new opportunities for remote sensing applications. Despite the current restrictions on regulation, the use of unmanned aerial vehicles equipped with small thermal, laser or spectral sensors has emerged as a promising alternative for assisting modeling, mapping and monitoring applications in rangelands, forests and agricultural environments. This review provides an overview of recent research that has reported UAV flight experiments on the remote sensing of vegetated areas. To provide a differential trend to other reviews, this paper is not limited to crops and precision agriculture applications, but also includes forest and rangeland applications. This work follows a top-down categorization strategy and attempts to fill the gap between application requirements and the characteristics of selected tools, payloads and platforms. Furthermore, correlations between common requirements and the most frequently used solutions are highlighted.

  4. Deposition and light absorption characteristics of precipitation dissolved organic carbon (DOC) at three remote stations in the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chaoliu; Yan, Fangping; Kang, Shichang; Chen, Pengfei; Hu, Zhaofu; Han, Xiaowen; Zhang, Guoshuai; Gao, Shaopeng; Qu, Bin; Sillanpää, Mika

    2017-12-15

    The concentrations, depositions and optical properties of precipitation DOC at three remote stations (Nam Co, Lulang and Everest) were investigated in the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau (HTP). The results showed that their volume-weighted mean DOC concentrations were 1.05±1.01mgCL -1 , 0.83±0.85mgCL -1 and 0.86±0.91mgCL -1 , respectively, close to those of other remote areas in the world and lower than those of typical polluted urban cities. Combined with precipitation amounts, the DOC depositions at these three stations were calculated to be 0.34±0.32gCm -2 yr -1 , 0.84±0.86gCm -2 yr -1 and 0.16±0.17gCm -2 yr -1 , respectively. The annual DOC deposition in the HTP was approximately 0.94±0.87TgC, the highest and lowest values appeared in the southeastern and northwestern plateau, respectively. The sources of DOC in the precipitation at these three stations were remarkably different, indicating large spatial heterogeneity in the sources of precipitation DOC over the HTP. Nam Co presented combustion sources from South Asia and local residents, Lulang showed biomass combustion source from South Asia, and Everest was mainly influenced by local mineral dust. The values of the MAC DOC at 365nm were 0.48±0.47m 2 g -1 , 0.25±0.15m 2 g -1 , and 0.64±0.49m 2 g -1 , respectively, for the precipitation at the three stations. All of these values were significantly lower than those of corresponding near-surface aerosol samples because precipitation DOC contains more secondary organic aerosol with low light absorption abilities. Additionally, this phenomenon was also observed in seriously polluted urban areas, implying it is universal in the atmosphere. Because precipitation DOC contains information for both particle-bound and gaseous components from the near surface up to the altitude of clouds where precipitation occurs, the MAC DOC of precipitation is more representative than that of near-surface aerosols for a given region. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  5. 21 CFR 330.11 - NDA deviations from applicable monograph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false NDA deviations from applicable monograph. 330.11... EFFECTIVE AND NOT MISBRANDED Administrative Procedures § 330.11 NDA deviations from applicable monograph. A new drug application requesting approval of an OTC drug deviating in any respect from a monograph that...

  6. The Capillary Flow Experiments Aboard the International Space Station: Increments 9-15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenson, Ryan M.; Weislogel, Mark M.; Tavan, Noel T.; Chen, Yongkang; Semerjian, Ben; Bunnell, Charles T.; Collicott, Steven H.; Klatte, Jorg; dreyer, Michael E.

    2009-01-01

    This report provides a summary of the experimental, analytical, and numerical results of the Capillary Flow Experiment (CFE) performed aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The experiments were conducted in space beginning with Increment 9 through Increment 16, beginning August 2004 and ending December 2007. Both primary and extra science experiments were conducted during 19 operations performed by 7 astronauts including: M. Fincke, W. McArthur, J. Williams, S. Williams, M. Lopez-Alegria, C. Anderson, and P. Whitson. CFE consists of 6 approximately 1 to 2 kg handheld experiment units designed to investigate a selection of capillary phenomena of fundamental and applied importance, such as large length scale contact line dynamics (CFE-Contact Line), critical wetting in discontinuous structures (CFE-Vane Gap), and capillary flows and passive phase separations in complex containers (CFE-Interior Corner Flow). Highly quantitative video from the simply performed flight experiments provide data helpful in benchmarking numerical methods, confirming theoretical models, and guiding new model development. In an extensive executive summary, a brief history of the experiment is reviewed before introducing the science investigated. A selection of experimental results and comparisons with both analytic and numerical predictions is given. The subsequent chapters provide additional details of the experimental and analytical methods developed and employed. These include current presentations of the state of the data reduction which we anticipate will continue throughout the year and culminate in several more publications. An extensive appendix is used to provide support material such as an experiment history, dissemination items to date (CFE publication, etc.), detailed design drawings, and crew procedures. Despite the simple nature of the experiments and procedures, many of the experimental results may be practically employed to enhance the design of spacecraft engineering

  7. A remote lab for experiments with a team of mobile robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casini, Marco; Garulli, Andrea; Giannitrapani, Antonio; Vicino, Antonio

    2014-09-04

    In this paper, a remote lab for experimenting with a team of mobile robots is presented. Robots are built with the LEGO Mindstorms technology and user-defined control laws can be directly coded in the Matlab programming language and validated on the real system. The lab is versatile enough to be used for both teaching and research purposes. Students can easily go through a number of predefined mobile robotics experiences without having to worry about robot hardware or low-level programming languages. More advanced experiments can also be carried out by uploading custom controllers. The capability to have full control of the vehicles, together with the possibility to define arbitrarily complex environments through the definition of virtual obstacles, makes the proposed facility well suited to quickly test and compare different control laws in a real-world scenario. Moreover, the user can simulate the presence of different types of exteroceptive sensors on board of the robots or a specific communication architecture among the agents, so that decentralized control strategies and motion coordination algorithms can be easily implemented and tested. A number of possible applications and real experiments are presented in order to illustrate the main features of the proposed mobile robotics remote lab.

  8. A Remote Lab for Experiments with a Team of Mobile Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Casini

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a remote lab for experimenting with a team of mobile robots is presented. Robots are built with the LEGO Mindstorms technology and user-defined control laws can be directly coded in the Matlab programming language and validated on the real system. The lab is versatile enough to be used for both teaching and research purposes. Students can easily go through a number of predefined mobile robotics experiences without having to worry about robot hardware or low-level programming languages. More advanced experiments can also be carried out by uploading custom controllers. The capability to have full control of the vehicles, together with the possibility to define arbitrarily complex environments through the definition of virtual obstacles, makes the proposed facility well suited to quickly test and compare different control laws in a real-world scenario. Moreover, the user can simulate the presence of different types of exteroceptive sensors on board of the robots or a specific communication architecture among the agents, so that decentralized control strategies and motion coordination algorithms can be easily implemented and tested. A number of possible applications and real experiments are presented in order to illustrate the main features of the proposed mobile robotics remote lab.

  9. The photoelectric effect and study of the diffraction of light: Two new experiments in UNILabs virtual and remote laboratories network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sánchez, Juan Pedro; Carreras, Carmen; Yuste, Manuel; Dormido, Sebastián; Sáenz, Jacobo; De la Torre, Luis; Rubén, Heradio

    2015-01-01

    This work describes two experiments: 'study of the diffraction of light: Fraunhofer approximation' and 'the photoelectric effect'. Both of them count with a virtual, simulated, version of the experiment as well as with a real one which can be operated remotely. The two previous virtual and remote labs (built using Easy Java(script) Simulations) are integrated in UNILabs, a network of online interactive laboratories based on the free Learning Management System Moodle. In this web environment, students can find not only the virtual and remote labs but also manuals with related theory, the user interface description for each application, and so on.

  10. "That is how I speak nowadays" - experiences of remote communication among persons with communicative and cognitive disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchholz, Margret; Ferm, Ulrika; Holmgren, Kristina

    2018-06-01

    The aim of the study was to explore the experiences of remote communication (i.e., communication between persons who are not in the same place) among people with communicative and cognitive disabilities. Eleven adolescents and adults were interviewed using Talking Mats and interview data was analyzed qualitatively with systematic text condensation. The use of remote communication varies between the participants. The participants also value remote communication differently. Having the possibility to choose between different means of remote communication is important. Being able to determine whether to communicate independently or with support from another person is also valued as relevant. Strategies used to manage remote communication include facilitating for the communication partner and preparing for future communication situations. Those who are able to use writing as an alternative to problematic spoken remote communication like phone calls, for example by using chat or text messaging. Decisions regarding means of communication and human support relate to the concept of self-determination. Better access to remote communication trough assistive technology such as speech synthesis and picture symbols would make remote communication easier and facilitate participation for people with communicative and cognitive disabilities. Implications for rehabilitation People with communicative and cognitive disabilities face challenges with access to remote communication. Access to communication technology including remote communication is important for self-determination, for personal safety and for overall participation in society. Communication technology should be considered in the rehabilitation process and training is crucial. To understand the possible benefits of remote communication, people with communicative and cognitive disability need to get the possibility to practice. Professionals play a key role in the assessment and intervention of remote communication for

  11. Remote rural women's choice of birthplace and transfer experiences in rural Otago and Southland New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Jean; Foureur, Maralyn; Skinner, Joan

    2017-09-01

    Birth in primary midwife-led maternity units has been demonstrated to be a safe choice for well women anticipating a normal birth. The incidence of serious perinatal outcomes for these women is comparable to similarly low risk women, who choose to birth in hospital. New Zealand women have a choice of Lead Maternity Carer (LMC) and birthplace; home, primary birthing unit, or a base hospital, though not all women may have all these choices available locally. Women in rural and rural remote areas can also choose to birth in their rural primary maternity unit. A percentage of these women (approx. 15-17%) will require transfer during labour, an event which can cause distress and often loss of midwifery continuity of care. To explore retrospectively the choice of birth place decisions and the labour and birth experiences of a sample of women resident in remotely zoned, rural areas of the lower South Island of New Zealand. A purposive sample of women living in remote rural areas, recruited by advertising in local newspapers and flyers. Individual semi-structured interviews were digitally recorded using a pragmatic interpretive approach. The data (transcripts and field notes) were analysed using thematic and content analysis. Ethical approval was obtained from the Health and Disability Ethics Committee (HEDC) MEC/06/05/045. Thirteen women consented to participate. Each was resident in a remote rural area having given birth in the previous 18 months. The women had been well during their pregnancies and at the onset of labour had anticipated a spontaneous vaginal birth. Rural remote zoned areas in Otago and Southland in the South Island of New Zealand FINDINGS: Five women planned to birth in a regional hospital and eight chose their nearest rural primary maternity unit. All of the women were aware of the possibility of transfer and had made their decision about their birthplace based on their perception of their personal safety, and in consideration of their distance from

  12. Cost-benefit analysis of remote hybrid wind-diesel power stations: Case study Aegean Sea islands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaldellis, J.K.; Kavadias, K.A.

    2007-01-01

    More than one third of world population has no direct access to interconnected electrical networks. Hence, the electrification solution usually considered is based on expensive, though often unreliable, stand-alone systems, mainly small diesel-electric generators. Hybrid wind-diesel power systems are among the most interesting and environmental friendly technological alternatives for the electrification of remote consumers, presenting also increased reliability. More precisely, a hybrid wind-diesel installation, based on an appropriate combination of a small diesel-electric generator and a micro-wind converter, offsets the significant capital cost of the wind turbine and the high operational cost of the diesel-electric generator. In this context, the present study concentrates on a detailed energy production cost analysis in order to estimate the optimum configuration of a wind-diesel-battery stand-alone system used to guarantee the energy autonomy of a typical remote consumer. Accordingly, the influence of the governing parameters-such as wind potential, capital cost, oil price, battery price and first installation cost-on the corresponding electricity production cost is investigated using the developed model. Taking into account the results obtained, hybrid wind-diesel systems may be the most cost-effective electrification solution for numerous isolated consumers located in suitable (average wind speed higher than 6.0 m/s) wind potential regions

  13. Novel apparatus and methods for performing remotely controlled particle-solid interaction experiments at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, H. F.; Deveney, E. F.; Jones, N. L.; Vane, C. R.; Datz, S.; Knudsen, H.; Grafström, P.; Schuch, R.

    1997-04-01

    Recent atomic physics studies involving ultrarelativistic Pb ions required solid target positioners, scintillators, and a sophisticated data acquisition and control system placed in a remote location at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron near Geneva, Switzerland. The apparatus, installed in a high-radiation zone underground, had to (i) function for months, (ii) automatically respond to failures such as power outages and particle-induced computer upsets, and (iii) communicate with the outside world via a telephone line. The heart of the apparatus developed was an Apple Macintosh-based CAMAC system that answered the telephone and interpreted and executed remote control commands that (i) sensed and set targets, (ii) controlled voltages and discriminator levels for scintillators, (iii) modified data acquisition hardware logic, (iv) reported control information, and (v) automatically synchronized data acquisition to the CERN spill cycle via a modem signal and transmitted experimental data to a remote computer. No problems were experienced using intercontinental telephone connections at 1200 baud. Our successful "virtual laboratory" approach that uses off-the-shelf electronics is generally adaptable to more conventional bench-type experiments.

  14. Experience with procuring, deploying and maintaining hardware at remote co-location centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bärring, O; Bonfillou, E; Clement, B; Santos, M Coelho Dos; Dore, V; Gentit, A; Grossir, A; Salter, W; Valsan, L; Xafi, A

    2014-01-01

    In May 2012 CERN signed a contract with the Wigner Data Centre in Budapest for an extension to CERN's central computing facility beyond its current boundaries set by electrical power and cooling available for computing. The centre is operated as a remote co-location site providing rack-space, electrical power and cooling for server, storage and networking equipment acquired by CERN. The contract includes a 'remote-hands' services for physical handling of hardware (rack mounting, cabling, pushing power buttons, ...) and maintenance repairs (swapping disks, memory modules, ...). However, only CERN personnel have network and console access to the equipment for system administration. This report gives an insight to adaptations of hardware architecture, procurement and delivery procedures undertaken enabling remote physical handling of the hardware. We will also describe tools and procedures developed for automating the registration, burn-in testing, acceptance and maintenance of the equipment as well as an independent but important change to the IT assets management (ITAM) developed in parallel as part of the CERN IT Agile Infrastructure project. Finally, we will report on experience from the first large delivery of 400 servers and 80 SAS JBOD expansion units (24 drive bays) to Wigner in March 2013. Changes were made to the abstract file on 13/06/2014 to correct errors, the pdf file was unchanged.

  15. Operating Experience with Nuclear Power Stations in Member States in 2012. 2013 Edition (CD-ROM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-07-01

    This report is the forty-fourth in the IAEA’s series of annual reports on operating experience with nuclear power stations in Member States. This report provides annual performance data and outage information for individual nuclear power plants from around the world. Summaries of historical performance and outages during the lifetimes of those plants are also included. Additionally, in order to provide a broad picture of nuclear power usage, this report contains six figures that illustrate global operational statistics through 2012. The report is a direct output from the IAEA’s Power Reactor Information System (PRIS), whose databank contains all operating experience data published in the IAEA’s operating experience annual reports since 1970 and basic information on power reactors, including design data. It presents operating experience data for all worldwide nuclear power plants after starting commercial operation. The PRIS databank is available free of charge to IAEA Member States through its public website and on-line application PRIS-Statistics. The web-site www.iaea.org/pris contains publicly available information about reactor units and nuclear industry results. The PRIS-Statistics (http://pris.iaea.org) allows direct access to the database through the Internet. This application allows registered users report generation through pre-designed reports and filters

  16. A synchrotron-based X-ray exposure station for radiation biology experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, A.C.; Blakely, E.A.; Bjornstad, K.A.; Chang, P.Y.; Rosen, C.J.; Schwarz, R.I.

    2007-01-01

    Synchrotron X-ray sources enable radiation biology experiments that are difficult with conventional sources. A synchrotron source can easily deliver a monochromatic, tunable energy, highly collimated X-ray beam of well-calibrated intensity. An exposure station at beamline 10.3.1 of the Advanced Light Source (ALS) has been developed which delivers a variable energy (5-20 keV) X-ray fan beam with very sharp edges (10-90% in less than 3 μm). A series of experiments have been done with a four-well slide where a stripe (100 μm widex18 mm long) of cells in each well has been irradiated and the dose varied from well to well. With this facility we have begun a series of experiments to study cells adjacent to irradiated cells and how they respond to the damage of their neighbors. Initial results have demonstrated the advantages of using synchrotron radiation for these experiments

  17. A synchrotron-based X-ray exposure station for radiation biology experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, A.C. [Division of Life Sciences, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Bld. 50A-6120, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)], E-mail: acthompson@lbl.gov; Blakely, E.A.; Bjornstad, K.A. [Division of Life Sciences, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Bld. 50A-6120, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Chang, P.Y. [Division of Life Sciences, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Bld. 50A-6120, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Rosen, C.J.; Schwarz, R.I. [Division of Life Sciences, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Bld. 50A-6120, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2007-11-11

    Synchrotron X-ray sources enable radiation biology experiments that are difficult with conventional sources. A synchrotron source can easily deliver a monochromatic, tunable energy, highly collimated X-ray beam of well-calibrated intensity. An exposure station at beamline 10.3.1 of the Advanced Light Source (ALS) has been developed which delivers a variable energy (5-20 keV) X-ray fan beam with very sharp edges (10-90% in less than 3 {mu}m). A series of experiments have been done with a four-well slide where a stripe (100 {mu}m widex18 mm long) of cells in each well has been irradiated and the dose varied from well to well. With this facility we have begun a series of experiments to study cells adjacent to irradiated cells and how they respond to the damage of their neighbors. Initial results have demonstrated the advantages of using synchrotron radiation for these experiments.

  18. The decommissioning of nuclear power stations. France and the American experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonnac, Alain de; Perves, Jean-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    After having noticed that many electronuclear reactors have already been stopped, and that some research reactors have just been dismantled in Grenoble by the CEA, and evoked the main involved actors (ASN, IRSN, ANDRA), some characteristics of the French situation are outlined: the strategy adopted by EDF for a fast dismantling process, the long legal delays for stopping, dismantling and downgrading of sites, the absence of waste radioactivity release thresholds, and the responsibility of operators for dismantling operations. The main steps of a station dismantling are indicated and discussed: end of exploitation; steps of deconstruction (evacuation of big components, elimination of building radioactivity, building destruction, site partial or total reconversion). The French authorization process is briefly commented. Then, the American experience and situation is commented in terms of number of concerned sites, of site situation, but also in terms of organisation and selected technologies. Critical steps are outlined as well as improvements obtained in terms of exposure, of waste volumes, of effluent filtration capacities, and of cutting methods. The next part proposes an overview of the situation or steps of decommissioning in France for different sites: the Chooz PWR, the fleet of first generation reactors, graphite gas reactors, the Brennilis power station and Super Phenix in Creys Malville. Costs and delays are briefly evoked for the USA as well as for France

  19. The use of a Nintendo Wii remote control in physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abellán, F J; Arenas, A; Núñez, M J; Victoria, L

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we describe how a Nintendo Wii remote control (known as the Wiimote) can be used in the design and implementation of several undergraduate-level experiments in a physics laboratory class. An experimental setup composed of a Wiimote and a conveniently located IR LED allows the trajectory of one or several moving objects to be tracked and recorded accurately, in both long and short displacement. The authors have developed a user interface program to configure the operation of the acquisition system of such data. The two experiments included in this work are the free fall of a body with magnetic braking and the simple pendulum, but other physics experiments could have been chosen. The treatment of the data was performed using Bayesian inference. (paper)

  20. The use of a Nintendo Wii remote control in physics experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abellán, F. J.; Arenas, A.; Núñez, M. J.; Victoria, L.

    2013-09-01

    In this paper we describe how a Nintendo Wii remote control (known as the Wiimote) can be used in the design and implementation of several undergraduate-level experiments in a physics laboratory class. An experimental setup composed of a Wiimote and a conveniently located IR LED allows the trajectory of one or several moving objects to be tracked and recorded accurately, in both long and short displacement. The authors have developed a user interface program to configure the operation of the acquisition system of such data. The two experiments included in this work are the free fall of a body with magnetic braking and the simple pendulum, but other physics experiments could have been chosen. The treatment of the data was performed using Bayesian inference.

  1. TNB Experience in Developing Solar Hybrid Station at RPS Kemar, Gerik, Perak Darul Ridzuan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aziz, K A; Shamsudin, K N

    2013-01-01

    This paper will discuss on TNB experience in developing Solar Hybrid Station at RPS Kemar, Gerik, Perak. TNB has been approached by KKLW to submit proposal to provide electricity in the rural area namely RPS Kemar. Looking at area and source available, Solar Hybrid System was the best method in order to provide electricity at this area. This area is far from national grid sources. Solar Hybrid System is the best method to produce electrical power using the renewable energy from Solar PV, Battery and Diesel Generator Set. Nowadays, price of petroleum is slightly high due to higher demand from industry. Solar energy is good alternative in this country to practice in order to reduce cost for produce of electrical energy. Generally, Solar will produce energy during daytime and when become cloudy and dark, automatically battery and diesel generator set will recover the system through the hybrid controller system.

  2. Experience in surveillance of the prestress of concrete reactor vessels in Wylfa nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawson, P.; Paton, A.A.; Walsh, S.R.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes experience gained in the in-service surveillance of the prestressing system for the prestressed concrete reactor vessels (PCRVs) at Wylfa nuclear power station. The paper gives details of results for the prestressing system obtained from the statutory in-service inspection program of the PCRVs. The program includes a detailed examination of a selection of prestressing tendon anchorages, anchorage load checks using a lift-off technique on a one percent sample of tendons and corrosion inspection of samples of prestressing strand and determination of their mechanical properties. The results obtained from the above in-service inspections have shown that the prestressing system continues to function within its design limits

  3. Evaluation of local versus remote areas of CH4 sources at IC3 stations using a combined analysis of 222Rn tracer and Atmospheric Particles Transport Model (APTM) results. Application at the Gredos and Iruelas station (GIC3), Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossi, Claudia; Morguí, Josep Anton; Curcoll, Roger; Àgueda, Alba; Arnold, Delia; Batet, Oscar; Cañas, Lidia; Nofuentes, Manel; Occhipinti, Paola; Vogel, Felix; Vargas, Arturo; Rodó, Xavier

    2014-05-01

    The Gredos and Iruelas station (GIC3) is part of the IC3 (Institut Català de Ciències del Clima) atmospheric monitoring network. This station is located in the Gredos Natural Park (40.22º N; -5.14º E) in the Spanish central plateau. The IC3 network consists of 8 stations distributed across Spain. It has been developed with the aim of studying climatic processes and the responses of impacted systems at different temporal and spatial scales. Since 2012, CO2, CH4, 222Rn (a natural radioactive gas) and meteorological variables are continuously measured at GIC3 at 20 m a.g.l. (1100 m a.s.l.). Furthermore, 4-days backward simulations are run daily for each IC3 station using the FLEXPART model. Simulations use ECMWF meteorological data as input and a horizontal spatial resolution of 0.2 degrees. The Laboratory of the Atmosphere and the Oceans (LAO) of the IC3 has elaborated a new approach to evaluate the local or remote greenhouse gases emissions using the radon gas as tracer and the atmospheric particles transport model FLEXPART under nocturnal and winter conditions. The ratios between the normalized and rescaled measured concentrations of CH4 and 222Rn during nocturnal hours (21h, 00h, 03h and 06h) and in the winter season, in order to reduce local radon flux and methane source due to seasonal livestock migration and to get stable atmospheric conditions, have been analyzed in relation to the influence of the local area (set to an initial dimension of 20x20 km2). The influence area (IA) has been defined as the percentage of the ratio between the residence time of the fictitious particles released in FLEXPART simulations over the area of interest (TLocal Area) and the residence time of these fictitious particles over the total area included in the simulation (TTotal Area ), i.e. IA = (TLocal Area/TTotal Area * 100). First results considering an area of interest of 20x20 km2 show a linear increase of the radon concentration with IA until reaching a maximum when IA is

  4. Operating experience with nuclear power stations in Member States in 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-12-01

    This report is twenty-ninth in the IAEA series of annual reports on operating experience with nuclear power stations in Member States. The report is a direct output from the Agency's Power Reactor Information System (PRIS), whose database contains all operating experience data published in Agency's operating experience annual reports published since 1971 and basic information on power reactors, including design data. According to the information available to the Agency at the end of 1997, there were 437 nuclear power reactors having a total capacity of 351795 MW(e). During 1997 three new reactors having total capacity of 3555 MW(e) were connected to the grid in France and the Republic of Korea. There were 36 nuclear power plants under construction in the world. Load, operation and availability factors are used as the basic performance factors. In addition to annual performance data and outage information, the report contains a historical summary of performance and outages during the lifetime of individual plants and five figures illustrating worldwide performance and statistical data

  5. Performance Evaluation of the International Space Station Flow Boiling and Condensation Experiment (FBCE) Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Mohammad; Balasubramaniam, R.; Nahra, Henry; Mackey, Jeff; Hall, Nancy; Frankenfield, Bruce; Harpster, George; May, Rochelle; Mudawar, Issam; Kharangate, Chirag R.; hide

    2016-01-01

    A ground-based experimental facility to perform flow boiling and condensation experiments is built in support of the development of the long duration Flow Boiling and Condensation Experiment (FBCE) destined for operation on board of the International Space Station (ISS) Fluid Integrated Rack (FIR). We performed tests with the condensation test module oriented horizontally and vertically. Using FC-72 as the test fluid and water as the cooling fluid, we evaluated the operational characteristics of the condensation module and generated ground based data encompassing the range of parameters of interest to the condensation experiment to be performed on the ISS. During this testing, we also evaluated the pressure drop profile across different components of the fluid subsystem, heater performance, on-orbit degassing subsystem, and the heat loss from different components. In this presentation, we discuss representative results of performance testing of the FBCE flow loop. These results will be used in the refinement of the flight system design and build-up of the FBCE which is scheduled for flight in 2019.

  6. A method for optical ground station reduce alignment error in satellite-ground quantum experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Dong; Wang, Qiang; Zhou, Jian-Wei; Song, Zhi-Jun; Zhong, Dai-Jun; Jiang, Yu; Liu, Wan-Sheng; Huang, Yong-Mei

    2018-03-01

    A satellite dedicated for quantum science experiments, has been developed and successfully launched from Jiuquan, China, on August 16, 2016. Two new optical ground stations (OGSs) were built to cooperate with the satellite to complete satellite-ground quantum experiments. OGS corrected its pointing direction by satellite trajectory error to coarse tracking system and uplink beacon sight, therefore fine tracking CCD and uplink beacon optical axis alignment accuracy was to ensure that beacon could cover the quantum satellite in all time when it passed the OGSs. Unfortunately, when we tested specifications of the OGSs, due to the coarse tracking optical system was commercial telescopes, the change of position of the target in the coarse CCD was up to 600μrad along with the change of elevation angle. In this paper, a method of reduce alignment error between beacon beam and fine tracking CCD is proposed. Firstly, OGS fitted the curve of target positions in coarse CCD along with the change of elevation angle. Secondly, OGS fitted the curve of hexapod secondary mirror positions along with the change of elevation angle. Thirdly, when tracking satellite, the fine tracking error unloaded on the real-time zero point position of coarse CCD which computed by the firstly calibration data. Simultaneously the positions of the hexapod secondary mirror were adjusted by the secondly calibration data. Finally the experiment result is proposed. Results show that the alignment error is less than 50μrad.

  7. Remote power supply by wind/diesel/battery systems - operational experience and economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kniehl, R.; Cramer, G.; Toenges, K.H.

    1995-01-01

    To continuously supply remote villages and settlements not connected to the public grid with electric power is an ambitious technical task considering ecological and economical points of view. The German company SMA has developed a modular supply system as a solution for this task in the range of 30 kW to 5 MW. Meanwhile more than 20 applications of these 'Intelligent Power Systems (IPS)' have proved their technical reliability and economical competitiveness worldwide under different, and also extreme environmental conditions. Actually it is the first commercially available advanced Wind/Diesel/Battery System for remote area electrification. The modular autonomous electric supply systems realized by SMA basically consist of two or more diesel power sets, battery storage with converter, a rotating phaseshifter, and an optional number of wind turbines. All modules are coupled on the 3-phase AC system grid and run in various parallel configurations depending on the wind speed and the consumer power demand. The control system operates fully automatical and offers a very user-friendly graphical interface. This advanced system control also contains a remote control and operating data output via modem and telephone line. SMA and CES have considerable experience with Wind/Diesel/Battery Systems for more than eight years. In many cases wind energy converters in the power range of 30 to 40 kW were used, but it is also possible to use larger wind turbines (e.g. 250 kW). In the following the system technology is described in detail, experience of different system sizes in several countries of application is presented, and economical analyses for power supply by IPS are given in comparison to a conventional fully diesel power supply. (author)

  8. Remote power supply by wind/diesel/battery systems - operational experience and economy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kniehl, R [CES - Consulting and Engineering Services, Heidelberg (Germany); Cramer, G; Toenges, K H [SMA Regelsysteme GmbH, Niestetal (Germany)

    1996-12-31

    To continuously supply remote villages and settlements not connected to the public grid with electric power is an ambitious technical task considering ecological and economical points of view. The German company SMA has developed a modular supply system as a solution for this task in the range of 30 kW to 5 MW. Meanwhile more than 20 applications of these `Intelligent Power Systems (IPS)` have proved their technical reliability and economical competitiveness worldwide under different, and also extreme environmental conditions. Actually it is the first commercially available advanced Wind/Diesel/Battery System for remote area electrification. The modular autonomous electric supply systems realized by SMA basically consist of two or more diesel power sets, battery storage with converter, a rotating phaseshifter, and an optional number of wind turbines. All modules are coupled on the 3-phase AC system grid and run in various parallel configurations depending on the wind speed and the consumer power demand. The control system operates fully automatical and offers a very user-friendly graphical interface. This advanced system control also contains a remote control and operating data output via modem and telephone line. SMA and CES have considerable experience with Wind/Diesel/Battery Systems for more than eight years. In many cases wind energy converters in the power range of 30 to 40 kW were used, but it is also possible to use larger wind turbines (e.g. 250 kW). In the following the system technology is described in detail, experience of different system sizes in several countries of application is presented, and economical analyses for power supply by IPS are given in comparison to a conventional fully diesel power supply. (author)

  9. Remote power supply by wind/diesel/battery systems - operational experience and economy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kniehl, R. [CES - Consulting and Engineering Services, Heidelberg (Germany); Cramer, G.; Toenges, K.H. [SMA Regelsysteme GmbH, Niestetal (Germany)

    1995-12-31

    To continuously supply remote villages and settlements not connected to the public grid with electric power is an ambitious technical task considering ecological and economical points of view. The German company SMA has developed a modular supply system as a solution for this task in the range of 30 kW to 5 MW. Meanwhile more than 20 applications of these `Intelligent Power Systems (IPS)` have proved their technical reliability and economical competitiveness worldwide under different, and also extreme environmental conditions. Actually it is the first commercially available advanced Wind/Diesel/Battery System for remote area electrification. The modular autonomous electric supply systems realized by SMA basically consist of two or more diesel power sets, battery storage with converter, a rotating phaseshifter, and an optional number of wind turbines. All modules are coupled on the 3-phase AC system grid and run in various parallel configurations depending on the wind speed and the consumer power demand. The control system operates fully automatical and offers a very user-friendly graphical interface. This advanced system control also contains a remote control and operating data output via modem and telephone line. SMA and CES have considerable experience with Wind/Diesel/Battery Systems for more than eight years. In many cases wind energy converters in the power range of 30 to 40 kW were used, but it is also possible to use larger wind turbines (e.g. 250 kW). In the following the system technology is described in detail, experience of different system sizes in several countries of application is presented, and economical analyses for power supply by IPS are given in comparison to a conventional fully diesel power supply. (author)

  10. NDA for a new facility at SRP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studley, R.V.

    1987-01-01

    In 1980, plans were initiated to build a new facility to process high purity highly enriched 235 U. Interest in improving nuclear safeguards had been increasing in the previous few years. A basic objective of the design, therefore, included achievement of maximum performance in special nuclear material (SNM) accountability. A near-real-time accountability system with high accuracy assay measurements was developed for this purpose. Simultaneous design of facility, process equipment, and the accountability system allowed maximum integration of equipment and also permitted influence on process design and material characteristics to optimize accountability performance. This was an ideal situation in which to pursue maximum improvement in nondestructive assay (NDA) measurement performance. The resulting systems are described

  11. The remote supervisory and controlling experiment system of traditional Chinese medicine production based on Fieldbus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Jinliang; Lu, Pei

    2006-11-01

    Since the quality of traditional Chinese medicine products are affected by raw material, machining and many other factors, it is difficult for traditional Chinese medicine production process especially the extracting process to ensure the steady and homogeneous quality. At the same time, there exist some quality control blind spots due to lacking on-line quality detection means. But if infrared spectrum analysis technology was used in traditional Chinese medicine production process on the basis of off-line analysis to real-time detect the quality of semi-manufactured goods and to be assisted by advanced automatic control technique, the steady and homogeneous quality can be obtained. It can be seen that the on-line detection of extracting process plays an important role in the development of Chinese patent medicines industry. In this paper, the design and implement of a traditional Chinese medicine extracting process monitoring experiment system which is based on PROFIBUS-DP field bus, OPC, and Internet technology is introduced. The system integrates intelligence node which gathering data, superior sub-system which achieving figure configuration and remote supervisory, during the process of traditional Chinese medicine production, monitors the temperature parameter, pressure parameter, quality parameter etc. And it can be controlled by the remote nodes in the VPN (Visual Private Network). Experiment and application do have proved that the system can reach the anticipation effect fully, and with the merits of operational stability, real-time, reliable, convenient and simple manipulation and so on.

  12. NDA issues with RFETS vitrified waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurd, J.; Veazey, G.

    1998-01-01

    A study was conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for the purpose of determining the feasibility of using a segmented gamma scanner (SGS) to accurately perform non-destructive analysis (NDA) on certain Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) vitrified waste samples. This study was performed on a full-scale vitrified ash sample prepared at LANL according to a procedure similar to that anticipated to be used at RFETS. This sample was composed of a borosilicate-based glass frit, blended with ash to produce a Pu content of ∼1 wt %. The glass frit was taken to a degree of melting necessary to achieve a full encapsulation of the ash material. The NDA study performed on this sample showed that SGSs with either 1/2- or 2-inch collimation can achieve an accuracy better than 6 % relative to calorimetry and γ-ray isotopics. This accuracy is achievable, after application of appropriate bias corrections, for transmissions of about 1/2 % through the waste form and counting times of less than 30 minutes. These results are valid for ash material and graphite fines with the same degree of plutonium particle size, homogeneity, sample density, and sample geometry as the waste form used to obtain the results in this study. A drum-sized thermal neutron counter (TNC) was also included in the study to provide an alternative in the event the SGS failed to meet the required level of accuracy. The preliminary indications are that this method will also achieve the required accuracy with counting times of ∼30 minutes and appropriate application of bias corrections. The bias corrections can be avoided in all cases if the instruments are calibrated on standards matching the items

  13. Overcoming correlation fluctuations in two-photon interference experiments with differently bright and independently blinking remote quantum emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Jonas H.; Kettler, Jan; Vural, Hüseyin; Müller, Markus; Maisch, Julian; Jetter, Michael; Portalupi, Simone L.; Michler, Peter

    2018-05-01

    As a fundamental building block for quantum computation and communication protocols, the correct verification of the two-photon interference (TPI) contrast between two independent quantum light sources is of utmost importance. Here, we experimentally demonstrate how frequently present blinking dynamics and changes in emitter brightness critically affect the Hong-Ou-Mandel-type (HOM) correlation histograms of remote TPI experiments measured via the commonly utilized setup configuration. We further exploit this qualitative and quantitative explanation of the observed correlation dynamics to establish an alternative interferometer configuration, which is overcoming the discussed temporal fluctuations, giving rise to an error-free determination of the remote TPI visibility. We prove full knowledge of the obtained correlation by reproducing the measured correlation statistics via Monte Carlo simulations. As an exemplary system, we make use of two pairs of remote semiconductor quantum dots; however, the same conclusions apply for TPI experiments with flying qubits from any kind of remote solid-state quantum emitters.

  14. Space Station Biological Research Project (SSBRP) Cell Culture Unit (CCU) and incubator for International Space Station (ISS) cell culture experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandendriesche, Donald; Parrish, Joseph; Kirven-Brooks, Melissa; Fahlen, Thomas; Larenas, Patricia; Havens, Cindy; Nakamura, Gail; Sun, Liping; Krebs, Chris; de Luis, Javier; hide

    2004-01-01

    The CCU and Incubator are habitats under development by SSBRP for gravitational biology research on ISS. They will accommodate multiple specimen types and reside in either Habitat Holding Racks, or the Centrifuge Rotor, which provides selectable gravity levels of up to 2 g. The CCU can support multiple Cell Specimen Chambers, CSCs (18, 9 or 6 CSCs; 3, 10 or 30 mL in volume, respectively). CSCs are temperature controlled from 4-39 degrees C, with heat shock to 45 degrees C. CCU provides automated nutrient supply, magnetic stirring, pH/O2 monitoring, gas supply, specimen lighting, and video microscopy. Sixty sample containers holding up to 2 mL each, stored at 4-39 degrees C, are available for automated cell sampling, subculture, and injection of additives and fixatives. CSCs, sample containers, and fresh/spent media bags are crew-replaceable for long-term experiments. The Incubator provides a 4-45 degrees C controlled environment for life science experiments or storage of experimental reagents. Specimen containers and experiment unique equipment are experimenter-provided. The Specimen Chamber exchanges air with ISS cabin and has 18.8 liters of usable volume that can accommodate six trays and the following instrumentation: five relocatable thermometers, two 60 W power outlets, four analog ports, and one each relative humidity sensor, video port, ethernet port and digital input/output port.

  15. Feasibility analysis of large length-scale thermocapillary flow experiment for the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberts, Samantha J.

    The investigation of microgravity fluid dynamics emerged out of necessity with the advent of space exploration. In particular, capillary research took a leap forward in the 1960s with regards to liquid settling and interfacial dynamics. Due to inherent temperature variations in large spacecraft liquid systems, such as fuel tanks, forces develop on gas-liquid interfaces which induce thermocapillary flows. To date, thermocapillary flows have been studied in small, idealized research geometries usually under terrestrial conditions. The 1 to 3m lengths in current and future large tanks and hardware are designed based on hardware rather than research, which leaves spaceflight systems designers without the technological tools to effectively create safe and efficient designs. This thesis focused on the design and feasibility of a large length-scale thermocapillary flow experiment, which utilizes temperature variations to drive a flow. The design of a helical channel geometry ranging from 1 to 2.5m in length permits a large length-scale thermocapillary flow experiment to fit in a seemingly small International Space Station (ISS) facility such as the Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR). An initial investigation determined the proposed experiment produced measurable data while adhering to the FIR facility limitations. The computational portion of this thesis focused on the investigation of functional geometries of fuel tanks and depots using Surface Evolver. This work outlines the design of a large length-scale thermocapillary flow experiment for the ISS FIR. The results from this work improve the understanding thermocapillary flows and thus improve technological tools for predicting heat and mass transfer in large length-scale thermocapillary flows. Without the tools to understand the thermocapillary flows in these systems, engineers are forced to design larger, heavier vehicles to assure safety and mission success.

  16. The GEM detectors for the innermost region of the forward muon station of the LHCb experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Alfonsi, M

    The LHCb experiment will take place at the LHC accelerator at CERN and will start in 2008. It is dedicated to precision measurements of CP violation and rare decays in the b quark sec- tor. The apparatus is a single arm spectrometer and it is designed with a robust and flexible trigger in order to extensively gain access to a wide spread of differ ent physical processes involving beauty particles. This will allow to over-constrain the Standard M odel predictions about CP violation, and to discover any possible inconsistency, whi ch would reveal the presence of “New Physics” beyond the Standard Model. This thesis reports the work performed on two aspects of the L HCb experiment: the main contribution is the development and the construction of a de tector based on Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) technology for the instrumentation of the high irradiated region around the beam pipe of the forward Muon Station; in the second part t he possibility of the search of the rare D 0 → + − decay at the LHCb exper...

  17. Flow Boiling and Condensation Experiment (FBCE) for the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudawar, Issam; O'Neill, Lucas; Hasan, Mohammad; Nahra, Henry; Hall, Nancy; Balasubramaniam, R.; Mackey, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    An effective means to reducing the size and weight of future space vehicles is to replace present mostly single-phase thermal management systems with two-phase counterparts. By capitalizing upon both latent and sensible heat of the coolant rather than sensible heat alone, two-phase thermal management systems can yield orders of magnitude enhancement in flow boiling and condensation heat transfer coefficients. Because the understanding of the influence of microgravity on two-phase flow and heat transfer is quite limited, there is an urgent need for a new experimental microgravity facility to enable investigators to perform long-duration flow boiling and condensation experiments in pursuit of reliable databases, correlations and models. This presentation will discuss recent progress in the development of the Flow Boiling and Condensation Experiment (FBCE) for the International Space Station (ISS) in collaboration between Purdue University and NASA Glenn Research Center. Emphasis will be placed on the design of the flow boiling module and on new flow boiling data that were measured in parabolic flight, along with extensive flow visualization of interfacial features at heat fluxes up to critical heat flux (CHF). Also discussed a theoretical model that will be shown to predict CHF with high accuracy.

  18. Materials on the International Space Station - Forward Technology Solar Cell Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, R. J.; Garner, J. C.; Lam, S. N.; Vazquez, J. A.; Braun, W. R.; Ruth, R. E.; Lorentzen, J. R.; Bruninga, R.; Jenkins, P. P.; Flatico, J. M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a space solar cell experiment currently being built by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) in collaboration with NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), and the US Naval Academy (USNA). The experiment has been named the Forward Technology Solar Cell Experiment (FTSCE), and the purpose is to rapidly put current and future generation space solar cells on orbit and provide validation data for these technologies. The FTSCE is being fielded in response to recent on-orbit and ground test anomalies associated with space solar arrays that have raised concern over the survivability of new solar technologies in the space environment and the validity of present ground test protocols. The FTSCE is being built as part of the Fifth Materials on the International Space Station (MISSE) Experiment (MISSE-5), which is a NASA program to characterize the performance of new prospective spacecraft materials when subjected to the synergistic effects of the space environment. Telemetry, command, control, and communication (TNC) for the FTSCE will be achieved through the Amateur Satellite Service using the PCSat2 system, which is an Amateur Radio system designed and built by the USNA. In addition to providing an off-the-shelf solution for FTSCE TNC, PCSat2 will provide a communications node for the Amateur Radio satellite system. The FTSCE and PCSat2 will be housed within the passive experiment container (PEC), which is an approximately 2ft x2ft x 4in metal container built by NASA Langley Research Center (NASA LaRC) as part of the MISSE-5 program. NASA LaRC has also supplied a thin film materials experiment that will fly on the exterior of the thermal blanket covering the PCSat2. The PEC is planned to be transported to the ISS on a Shuttle flight. The PEC will be mounted on the exterior of the ISS by an astronaut during an extravehicular activity (EVA). After nominally one year, the PEC will be retrieved and returned to Earth. At the time of writing this paper, the

  19. Floating nuclear heat. And power station 'Pevec' with KLT-40S type reactor plant for remote regions of Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veshnyakov, K.B.; Kiryushin, A.I.; Panov, Yu.K.; Polunichev, V.I.

    2000-01-01

    Floating small nuclear power plants power for local energy systems of littoral regions of Russia, located far from central energy system, open a new line in nuclear power development. Designing a floating power unit of a lead nuclear heat and power generating station for port Pevec at the Chuckchee national district is currently nearing completion. Most labor-intensive components are being manufactured. The co-generation NPP Pevec is to be created on the basis of a floating power unit with KLT-40S type reactor plant. KLT-40S reactor plant is based on similar propulsion plants, verified at operation of Russia's nuclear-powered civil ships, evolutionary improved by elimination of 'weak points' revealed during its prototypes operation or on the basis of safety analysis. KLT-40S reactor plant uses the most wide-spread and developed in the world practice PWR-type reactor. KLT-40S meets contemporary national and international requirements imposed to future reactor plants. The NHPS description, its main technical-economic data, environmental safety indices, basic characteristics of KLT-40S reactor plant are presented. Prospects of small NPPs utilization outside Russia, particularly as an energy source for sea water desalination, are considered. (author)

  20. Developing Spent Fuel Assembly for Advanced NDA Instrument Calibration - NGSI Spent Fuel Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Jianwei [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gauld, Ian C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Banfield, James [GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy, Wilmington, NC (United States); Skutnik, Steven [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2014-02-01

    This report summarizes the work by Oak Ridge National Laboratory to investigate the application of modeling and simulation to support the performance assessment and calibration of the advanced nondestructive assay (NDA) instruments developed under the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative Spent Fuel (NGSI-SF) Project. Advanced NDA instrument calibration will likely require reference spent fuel assemblies with well-characterized nuclide compositions that can serve as working standards. Because no reference spent fuel standard currently exists, and the practical ability to obtain direct measurement of nuclide compositions using destructive assay (DA) measurements of an entire fuel assembly is prohibitive in the near term due to the complexity and cost of spent fuel experiments, modeling and simulation will be required to construct such reference fuel assemblies. These calculations will be used to support instrument field tests at the Swedish Interim Storage Facility (Clab) for Spent Nuclear Fuel.

  1. Experiments recently carried out on the photoemission station at Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurash Ibrahim; Wu Ziyu; Qian Haijie; Zhang Jing; Abbas, M.I.; Chen Zhigang; Su Run; Liu Fengqin

    2003-01-01

    With a sustained and steady operation of the photoemission station at Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, users from different research fields have carried out their investigation on the electronic structure of metal surface-interface, metal doped fullerene as well as colossal magneto-resistance materials utilizing different experimental modes provided by the photoemission station. In this paper authors would present some representative experimental results obtained on the station

  2. CVB: the Constrained Vapor Bubble Capillary Experiment on the International Space Station MARANGONI FLOW REGION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayner, Peter C., Jr.; Kundan, Akshay; Plawsky, Joel

    2014-01-01

    The Constrained Vapor Bubble (CVB) is a wickless, grooved heat pipe and we report on a full- scale fluids experiment flown on the International Space Station (ISS). The CVB system consists of a relatively simple setup a quartz cuvette with sharp corners partially filled with either pentane or an ideal mixture of pentane and isohexane as the working fluids. Along with temperature and pressure measurements, the two-dimensional thickness profile of the menisci formed at the corners of the quartz cuvette was determined using the Light Microscopy Module (LMM). Even with the large, millimeter dimensions of the CVB, interfacial forces dominate in these exceedingly small Bond Number systems. The experiments were carried out at various power inputs. Although conceptually simple, the transport processes were found to be very complex with many different regions. At the heated end of the CVB, due to a high temperature gradient, we observed Marangoni flow at some power inputs. This region from the heated end to the central drop region is defined as a Marangoni dominated region. We present a simple analysis based on interfacial phenomena using only measurements from the ISS experiments that lead to a predictive equation for the thickness of the film near the heated end of the CVB. The average pressure gradient for flow in the film is assumed due to the measured capillary pressure at the two ends of the liquid film and that the pressure stress gradient due to cohesion self adjusts to a constant value over a distance L. The boundary conditions are the no slip condition at the wall interface and an interfacial shear stress at the liquid- vapor interface due to the Marangoni stress, which is due to the high temperature gradient. Although the heated end is extremely complex, since it includes three- dimensional variations in radiation, conduction, evaporation, condensation, fluid flow and interfacial forces, we find that using the above simplifying assumptions, a simple successful

  3. Remote sensing of PBL meteorology and air quality: the outcome of the ESCOMPTE experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drobinski, P [Institut Pierre Simon Laplace/Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique, Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau (France)], E-mail: philippe.drobinski@lmd.polytechnique.fr

    2008-05-01

    In the French Mediterranean basin, the large city of Marseille and its industrialized suburbs (oil plants in the Fos-Berre area) are major pollutant sources which cause frequent and hazardous pollution episodes especially in summer when intense solar heating enhances the photochemical activity and when sea-breeze circulation redistributes pollutants further north in the countryside. This paper summarizes the findings of five years of research on the sea-breeze in southeastern France and related mesoscale transport and dilution of pollutants within the ESCOMPTE program held in June and July 2001 (field experiment to constraint models of atmospheric pollution and emissions transport), obtained thanks to a composite observing system and a combination of remote sensing and in situ systems which produced a wealth of data. Indeed, the combination of established and novel and highly sophisticated remote sensing instruments with conventional in situ measurements (dense surface network and radiosondes) allowed to capture previously unseen details of the fine structure of the sea breeze, allowed unprecedented insight into the structure of the sea breeze flow and its contribution to ozone redistribution and allowed the validation of ultrahigh-resolution numerical research and weather prediction models as well as chemistry transport models.

  4. Remote sensing of PBL meteorology and air quality: the outcome of the ESCOMPTE experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drobinski, P

    2008-01-01

    In the French Mediterranean basin, the large city of Marseille and its industrialized suburbs (oil plants in the Fos-Berre area) are major pollutant sources which cause frequent and hazardous pollution episodes especially in summer when intense solar heating enhances the photochemical activity and when sea-breeze circulation redistributes pollutants further north in the countryside. This paper summarizes the findings of five years of research on the sea-breeze in southeastern France and related mesoscale transport and dilution of pollutants within the ESCOMPTE program held in June and July 2001 (field experiment to constraint models of atmospheric pollution and emissions transport), obtained thanks to a composite observing system and a combination of remote sensing and in situ systems which produced a wealth of data. Indeed, the combination of established and novel and highly sophisticated remote sensing instruments with conventional in situ measurements (dense surface network and radiosondes) allowed to capture previously unseen details of the fine structure of the sea breeze, allowed unprecedented insight into the structure of the sea breeze flow and its contribution to ozone redistribution and allowed the validation of ultrahigh-resolution numerical research and weather prediction models as well as chemistry transport models

  5. Urban Heat Islands of the World's Major Cities Revealed at Multiple Scales Using Both Station Observations and Complementary Remotely Sensed Data Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, L. H.; Krehbiel, C.; Henebry, G. M.

    2016-12-01

    Urban heat islands (UHIs) have long been studied using both ground-based observations of air temperature and remotely sensed data. In the rapidly urbanizing world, cross-comparison between various datasets will allow us to characterize and model UHI effects more generally. Here we analyze UHIs of the world's major cities using station observations from the Global Historical Climate Network (GHCN), surface air temperatures derived from Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometers (AMSRs), and land surface temperatures (LST) estimated from Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). We compute the two measurements of thermal time (accumulated diurnal degree-days or ADDD and nocturnal degree-days or ANDD) and the normalized difference accumulated thermal time index (NDATTI) to characterize urban and rural thermal differences and day-night dynamics over multiple growing seasons. Our preliminary results for 27 major cities and 83 urban-rural groupings in the USA and Canada indicate that daytime urban thermal accumulations from the passive microwave data (AMSRs) were generally lower than in adjacent rural areas, with only 18% of urban-rural groupings showing higher thermal accumulations in cities. In contrast, station observations and MODIS LST showed consistently higher ADDD in cities (82% and 93% for GHCN and MODIS data respectively). UHIs are more pronounced at night, with 55% (AMSR), 93% (GHCN) and 100% (MODIS) of urban-rural groupings showing higher ANDD in cities. Humidity appears to be a common factor driving the day-night thermal dynamics throughout all three datasets (Figure 1). Normalized day-night differences in thermal time metrics were consistently lower (>90% of urban-rural groupings) in urban than rural areas for both air temperature datasets (GHCN and AMSRs). With MODIS LST, only 70% of urban-rural groupings show lower NDATTI in cities. We will present results for the rest of the globe.

  6. An integrated framework to support remote IEEE 1149.1 / 1149.4 design for test experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio M. Cardoso

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Remote experiments for academic purposes can only achieve their educational goals if an appropriate framework is able to provide a basic set of features, namely remote laboratory management, collaborative learning tools and content management and delivery. This paper presents a framework developed to support remote experiments in a design for test class offered to final year students at the Electrical and Computer Engineering degree at the University of Porto. The proposed solution combines a test language command interpreter and various virtual instruments (VIs, with a demonstration board that comprises a boundary-scan IEEE 1149.1 / 1149.4 test infrastructure. The experiments are presented as embedded learning objects, with no distinction from other e-learning contents (e.g. lessons, lecture notes, etc..

  7. Maintenance experience on reactor recirculation pumps at Tarapur Atomic Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, A.K.

    1995-01-01

    Reactor recirculation pumps at Tarapur Atomic Power Station (TAPS) are vertical, single stage centrifugal pumps having mechanical shaft seals and are driven by vertical mounted 3.3 kV, 3 phase, 1500 h.p. electric motors. During these years of operation TAPS has gained enough experience and expertise on the maintenance of reactor recirculation pumps which are dealt in this article. Failure of mechanical shaft seals, damage on pump carbon bearings, motor winding insulation failures and motor shaft damage have been the main areas of concern on recirculation pump. A detailed procedure step by step with component sketches has helped in eliminating errors during shaft seal assembly and installation. Pressure breakdown devices in seal assembly were rebuilt. Additional coolant water injection for shaft seal cooling was provided. These measures have helped in extending the reactor recirculation pump seal life. Pump bearing problems were mainly due to failure of anti-rotation pins and dowel pins of bearing assembly. These pins were redesigned and strengthened. Motor stator winding insulation failures were detected. Stator winding replacement program has been taken up on regular basis to avoid winding insulation failure due to aging. 3 refs., 2 tabs., 7 figs

  8. Strata-1: An International Space Station Experiment into Fundamental Regolith Processes in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, M.; Abell, P.; Brisset, J.; Britt, D.; Colwell, J.; Durda, D.; Dove, A.; Graham, L.; Hartzell, C.; John, K.; hide

    2016-01-01

    The Strata-1 experiment will study the evolution of asteroidal regolith through long-duration exposure of simulant materials to the microgravity environment on the International Space Station (ISS). Many asteroids feature low bulk densities, which implies high values of porosity and a mechanical structure composed of loosely bound particles, (i.e. the "rubble pile" model), a prime example of a granular medium. Even the higher-density, mechanically coherent asteroids feature a significant surface layer of loose regolith. These bodies are subjected to a variety of forces and will evolve in response to very small perturbations such as micrometeoroid impacts, planetary flybys, and the YORP effect. Our understanding of this dynamical evolution and the inter-particle forces involved would benefit from long-term observations of granular materials exposed to small vibrations in microgravity. A detailed understanding of asteroid mechanical evolution is needed in order to predict the surface characteristics of as-of-yet unvisited bodies, to understand the larger context of samples collected by missions such as OSIRIS-REx and Hayabusa 1 and 2, and to mitigate risks for both manned and unmanned missions to asteroidal bodies. Understanding regolith dynamics will inform designs of how to land and set anchors, safely sample/move material on asteroidal surfaces, process large volumes of material for in situ resource utilization (ISRU) purposes, and, in general, predict behavior of large and small particles on disturbed asteroid surfaces.

  9. The International Space Station: Operations and Assembly - Learning From Experiences - Past, Present, and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Sean; Dillon, William F.

    2006-01-01

    As the Space Shuttle continues flight, construction and assembly of the International Space Station (ISS) carries on as the United States and our International Partners resume the building, and continue to carry on the daily operations, of this impressive and historical Earth-orbiting research facility. In his January 14, 2004, speech announcing a new vision for America s space program, President Bush ratified the United States commitment to completing construction of the ISS by 2010. Since the launch and joining of the first two elements in 1998, the ISS and the partnership have experienced and overcome many challenges to assembly and operations, along with accomplishing many impressive achievements and historical firsts. These experiences and achievements over time have shaped our strategy, planning, and expectations. The continual operation and assembly of ISS leads to new knowledge about the design, development and operation of systems and hardware that will be utilized in the development of new deep-space vehicles needed to fulfill the Vision for Exploration and to generate the data and information that will enable our programs to return to the Moon and continue on to Mars. This paper will provide an overview of the complexity of the ISS Program, including a historical review of the major assembly events and operational milestones of the program, along with the upcoming assembly plans and scheduled missions of the space shuttle flights and ISS Assembly sequence.

  10. Materials International Space Station Experiment (MISSE): Overview, Accomplishments and Future Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    deGroh, Kim K.; Jaworske, Donald A.; Pippin, Gary; Jenkins, Philip P.; Walters, Robert J.; Thibeault, Sheila A.; Palusinski, Iwona; Lorentzen, Justin R.

    2014-01-01

    Materials and devices used on the exterior of spacecraft in low Earth orbit (LEO) are subjected to environmental threats that can cause degradation in material properties, possibly threatening spacecraft mission success. These threats include: atomic oxygen (AO), ultraviolet and x-ray radiation, charged particle radiation, temperature extremes and thermal cycling, micrometeoroid and debris impacts, and contamination. Space environmental threats vary greatly based on spacecraft materials, thicknesses and stress levels, and the mission environment and duration. For more than a decade the Materials International Space Station Experiment (MISSE) has enabled the study of the long duration environmental durability of spacecraft materials in the LEO environment. The overall objective of MISSE is to test the stability and durability of materials and devices in the space environment in order to gain valuable knowledge on the performance of materials in space, as well as to enable lifetime predictions of new materials that may be used in future space flight. MISSE is a series of materials flight experiments, which are attached to the exterior of the International Space Station (ISS). Individual experiments were loaded onto suitcase-like trays, called Passive Experiment Containers (PECs). The PECs were transported to the ISS in the Space Shuttle cargo bay and attached to, and removed from, the ISS during extravehicular activities (EVAs). The PECs were retrieved after one or more years of space exposure and returned to Earth enabling post-flight experiment evaluation. MISSE is a multi-organization project with participants from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the Department of Defense (DoD), industry and academia. MISSE has provided a platform for environmental durability studies for thousands of samples and numerous devices, and it has produced many tangible impacts. Ten PECs (and one smaller tray) have been flown, representing MISSE 1 through MISSE

  11. Experience gained in the operation of the Beznau nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kueffer, K. von.

    1976-01-01

    The 24th December 1969, when the Beznau 1 nuclear power station was placed in commercial operation, marked the beginning of electricity production from nuclear energy in Switzerland. Beznau 2 followed on the 15th March 1972. Together with the Muehleberg nuclear power station, nuclear energy accounts for approximately 20 percent of the total electricity production in Switzerland. Until the end of 1975, Switzerland's three nuclear power stations had a mean energy utilisation factor of 71.3 percent which, as compared with a mean energy utilization factor of 60.5 percent for all the nuclear power stations in the West, suggests fairly good operational results. Problems that arose during operation are discussed in detail. By way of summary it is stated that the operation of the Beznau nuclear power station has so far proved a success. The production of electrical energy has always remained within the limits imposed by the law and by the safety aspects. (Auth.)

  12. A friendly tool to remotely follow-up fusion machines experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Signoret, J.; Balme, S.; Theis, J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • ShotListener allows a remote user to easily follow up the shot sequence and receive information on the shot operation. • ShotListener is a java application available for Windows and Linux platform. • ShotListener is suitable for any tokamak. -- Abstract: When the international collaborations gather around a project more and more geographically scattered participants, it is imperative for them to get tools to keep in touch with the laboratory hosting the experiment, to know about the ongoing operations or even to remotely participate in them. The CEA-IRFM developed ShotListener to meet these needs, which should appear for actual or future tokamaks. This Java application intercepts the main events of a discharge sequence and notifies the user with visual or sound alerts, allowing him to follow the distant experiments easily. An API based on an MDSplus server has been developed to insure communication with the local CODAC supervision system. This API translates the Tokamak events as MDSplus events, available for any subscribers. The java application ShotListener, available for Windows and Linux platforms as an auto-installable package, connects to the MDSplus server, subscribes to a list of shot events (customizable by the end-user) and sends a visual or sound alert when a selected event occurs. For example, depending on the selected events, the user can display an extract of the shots log or visualize the video of the pulse. This architecture is obviously suitable for any machine, as long as the specific API sending MDSplus events is implemented. The aim of this paper is to describe the detailed architecture of ShotListener, to present its different functionalities and to introduce some possible enhancements

  13. A friendly tool to remotely follow-up fusion machines experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Signoret, J., E-mail: jacqueline.signoret@cea.fr; Balme, S.; Theis, J.M.

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • ShotListener allows a remote user to easily follow up the shot sequence and receive information on the shot operation. • ShotListener is a java application available for Windows and Linux platform. • ShotListener is suitable for any tokamak. -- Abstract: When the international collaborations gather around a project more and more geographically scattered participants, it is imperative for them to get tools to keep in touch with the laboratory hosting the experiment, to know about the ongoing operations or even to remotely participate in them. The CEA-IRFM developed ShotListener to meet these needs, which should appear for actual or future tokamaks. This Java application intercepts the main events of a discharge sequence and notifies the user with visual or sound alerts, allowing him to follow the distant experiments easily. An API based on an MDSplus server has been developed to insure communication with the local CODAC supervision system. This API translates the Tokamak events as MDSplus events, available for any subscribers. The java application ShotListener, available for Windows and Linux platforms as an auto-installable package, connects to the MDSplus server, subscribes to a list of shot events (customizable by the end-user) and sends a visual or sound alert when a selected event occurs. For example, depending on the selected events, the user can display an extract of the shots log or visualize the video of the pulse. This architecture is obviously suitable for any machine, as long as the specific API sending MDSplus events is implemented. The aim of this paper is to describe the detailed architecture of ShotListener, to present its different functionalities and to introduce some possible enhancements.

  14. Full scale reactor safety experiments performed in the Marviken Power Station Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoren, H.G.; Ericson, L.

    1977-01-01

    Since 1972 experiments oriented towards increasing the understanding of reactor safety processes have been performed at the Marviken Power Station. This was originally built as a direct cycle BHWR but was never taken into nuclear operation. In addition to Sweden, the countries represented in these experiments are Denmark, the Federal Republic of Germany, Finland, Norway, the United States, the Netherlands, France and Japan. The first series of sixteen experiments included studies of the response of the PS-containment to simulated ruptures in the pipe systems that are connected to the pressure vessel. These tests were completed in 1973 and also included experimental studies of iodine transport, containment leakage, the behaviour of auxiliary components under accident conditions and pressure fluctuations in the wetwell water pool. One of the more essential findings of the tests was that the containment performance was in accordance with the pre-test calculations. A second series of eight blowdown tests was begun in February 1976. The main purpose of these tests is to provide additional information as to the characteristics of the pressure oscillations inside the containment and primarily in the wetwell water pool under different conditions. These oscillations were observed in the first series of blowdowns but only low frequencies could then be detected due to limitations in the measurement system. The measurement system was therefore substantially extended for this second series of experiments. A summary of the results from these two sets of blowdown tests are given in the paper. In 1976 preparations for a new test program were initiated. The objective of these tests is to improve the understanding of critical flow in the low quality and subcooled flow regions through short length, large diameter pipes. Extensive modifications of the test facility will be necessary in order to allow a discharge flow through openings which are up to 500 mm in diameter. Advanced plans

  15. Analysis of historical delta values for IAEA/LANL NDA training courses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geist, William; Santi, Peter; Swinhoe, Martyn; Bonner, Elisa

    2009-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) supports the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) by providing training for IAEA inspectors in neutron and gamma-ray Nondestructive Assay (NDA) of nuclear material. Since 1980, all new IAEA inspectors attend this two week course at LANL gaining hands-on experience in the application of NDA techniques, procedures and analysis to measure plutonium and uranium nuclear material standards with well known pedigrees. As part of the course the inspectors conduct an inventory verification exercise. This exercise provides inspectors the opportunity to test their abilities in performing verification measurements using the various NDA techniques. For an inspector, the verification of an item is nominally based on whether the measured assay value agrees with the declared value to within three times the historical delta value. The historical delta value represents the average difference between measured and declared values from previous measurements taken on similar material with the same measurement technology. If the measurement falls outside a limit of three times the historical delta value, the declaration is not verified. This paper uses measurement data from five years of IAEA courses to calculate a historical delta for five non-destructive assay methods: Gamma-ray Enrichment, Gamma-ray Plutonium Isotopics, Passive Neutron Coincidence Counting, Active Neutron Coincidence Counting and the Neutron Coincidence Collar. These historical deltas provide information as to the precision and accuracy of these measurement techniques under realistic conditions.

  16. AMO EXPRESS: A Command and Control Experiment for Crew Autonomy Onboard the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stetson, Howard K.; Haddock, Angie T.; Frank, Jeremy; Cornelius, Randy; Wang, Lui; Garner, Larry

    2015-01-01

    NASA is investigating a range of future human spaceflight missions, including both Mars-distance and Near Earth Object (NEO) targets. Of significant importance for these missions is the balance between crew autonomy and vehicle automation. As distance from Earth results in increasing communication delays, future crews need both the capability and authority to independently make decisions. However, small crews cannot take on all functions performed by ground today, and so vehicles must be more automated to reduce the crew workload for such missions. NASA's Advanced Exploration Systems Program funded Autonomous Mission Operations (AMO) project conducted an autonomous command and control experiment on-board the International Space Station that demonstrated single action intelligent procedures for crew command and control. The target problem was to enable crew initialization of a facility class rack with power and thermal interfaces, and involving core and payload command and telemetry processing, without support from ground controllers. This autonomous operations capability is enabling in scenarios such as initialization of a medical facility to respond to a crew medical emergency, and representative of other spacecraft autonomy challenges. The experiment was conducted using the Expedite the Processing of Experiments for Space Station (EXPRESS) rack 7, which was located in the Port 2 location within the U.S Laboratory onboard the International Space Station (ISS). Activation and deactivation of this facility is time consuming and operationally intensive, requiring coordination of three flight control positions, 47 nominal steps, 57 commands, 276 telemetry checks, and coordination of multiple ISS systems (both core and payload). Utilization of Draper Laboratory's Timeliner software, deployed on-board the ISS within the Command and Control (C&C) computers and the Payload computers, allowed development of the automated procedures specific to ISS without having to certify

  17. Neutron dose study with bubble detectors aboard the International Space Station as part of the Matroshka-R experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machrafi, R.; Garrow, K.; Ing, H.; Smith, M. B.; Andrews, H. R.; Akatov, Yu; Arkhangelsky, V.; Chernykh, I.; Mitrikas, V.; Petrov, V.; Shurshakov, V.; Tomi, L.; Kartsev, I.; Lyagushin, V.

    2009-01-01

    As part of the Matroshka-R experiments, a spherical phantom and space bubble detectors (SBDs) were used on board the International Space Station to characterise the neutron radiation field. Seven experimental sessions with SBDs were carried out during expeditions ISS-13, ISS-14 and ISS-15. The detectors were positioned at various places throughout the Space Station, in order to determine dose variations with location and on/in the phantom in order to establish the relationship between the neutron dose measured externally to the body and the dose received internally. Experimental data on/in the phantom and at different locations are presented. (authors)

  18. A Decade of Life Sciences Experiment Unique Equipment Development for Spacelab and Space Station, 1990-1999

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Paul D.; Connolly, J. P.; Navarro, B. J.

    1999-01-01

    Ames Research Center's Life Sciences Division has developed and flown an extensive array of spaceflight experiment unique equipment (EUE) during the last decade of the twentieth century. Over this ten year span, the EUE developed at ARC supported a vital gravitational biology flight research program executed on several different platforms, including the Space Shuttle, Spacelab, and Space Station Mir. This paper highlights some of the key EUE elements developed at ARC and flown during the period 1990-1999. Resulting lessons learned will be presented that can be applied to the development of similar equipment for the International Space Station.

  19. Development and operational experiences of an automated remote inspection system for interior of primary containment vessel of a BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozaki, N.; Chikara, S.; Fumio, T.; Katsuhiro, M.; Katsutoshi, S.; Ken-Ichiro, S.; Masaaki, F.; Masayoshi, S.

    1983-01-01

    A prototype was developed for an automated remote inspection system featuring continuous monitoring of the working status of major components inside the primary containment vessel of a boiling water reactor. This inspection system consists of four units, or vehicles, which are towed by a trolley chain along a monorail; a complex coaxial cable for data transmission and for power supply; and an operator's console. A TV camera, microphone, thermometer, hygrometer, and ionization chamber are mounted on the various units. After several months' testing under high-ambient temperature, the system was installed in the Tokai-2 power station of Japan Atomic Power Company for in situ tests

  20. Operating experience with nuclear power stations in Member States in 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-11-01

    This report is the thirty-fourth in the Agency's series of annual reports on operating experience with nuclear power stations in Member States. The report is a direct output from the Agency's Power Reactor Information System (PRIS), whose database contains all operating experience data published in the Agency's operating experience annual reports since 1971 and basic information on power reactors, including design data. It presents operating experience data for all worldwide nuclear power plants after starting commercial operation. The PRIS databank is available free of charge to IAEA Member States through its two services: PRIS-PC and MicroPRIS. The PRIS-PC allows direct access to the database via telephone lines or through the Internet. The MicroPRIS contains a subset of the PRIS database and is a personal computer version of PRIS data available on diskette in a form readily accessible by standard, commercially available personal computer packages. PRIS is also available in the Internet at http://www.iaea.org/programmes/a2. Load, operation and availability factors are used as the basic performance factors. Energy unavailability factors, separate for planned and unplanned unavailability, due either to causes in the plant or causes external to the plant, are used as a measure of energy lost through a unit not being available. However, some ambiguity remains in the operator reports of the unavailability data, resulting in inconsistencies in these factors. It is recognized that there is an inherent difficulty in reporting unavailability in energy with relation to a maximum capacity which may change several times during the year. In addition, there are different practices in reporting planned and unplanned unavailability among Member States. The unavailability factors in this report should therefore be used with caution. It should be noted that, for load, operation and unavailability factors, there might be differences between the data of this report and those

  1. Web-based objective structured clinical examination with remote standardized patients and Skype: resident experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenau, Erik; Kachur, Elizabeth; Horber, Dot

    2014-07-01

    Using Skype and remote standardized patients (RSPs), investigators sought to evaluate user acceptance of a web-based objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) among resident physicians. After participating in four web-based clinical encounters addressing pain with RSPs, 59 residents from different training programs, disciplines and geographic locations completed a 52-item questionnaire regarding their experience with Skype and RSPs. Open-ended responses were solicited as well. The majority of participants (97%) agreed or strongly agreed the web-based format was convenient and a practical learning exercise, and 90% agreed or strongly agreed the format was effective in teaching communication skills. Although 93% agreed or strongly agreed they could communicate easily with RSPs using Skype, 80% preferred traditional face-to-face clinical encounters, and 58% reported technical difficulties during the encounters. Open-ended written responses supported survey results. Findings from this study expose challenges with technology and human factors, but positive experiences support the continued investigation of web-based OSCEs as a synchronous e-learning initiative for teaching and assessing doctor-patient communication. Such educational programs are valuable but unlikely to replace face-to-face encounters with patients. This web-based OSCE program provides physician learners with additional opportunity to improve doctor-patient communication. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Fluid Physics Experiments onboard International Space Station: Through the Eyes of a Scientist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevtsova, Valentina

    Fluids are present everywhere in everyday life. They are also present as fuel, in support systems or as consumable in rockets and onboard of satellites and space stations. Everyone experiences every day that fluids are very sensitive to gravity: on Earth liquids flow downwards and gases mostly rise. Nowadays much of the interest of the scientific community is on studying the phenomena at microscales in so-called microfluidic systems. However, at smaller scales the experimental investigation of convective flows becomes increasingly difficult as the control parameter Ra scales with g L (3) (g; acceleration level, L: length scale). A unique alternative to the difficulty of investigating systems with small length scale on the ground is to reduce the gravity level g. In systems with interfaces, buoyancy forces are proportional to the volume of the liquid, while capillary forces act solely on the liquid surface. The importance of buoyancy diminishes either at very small scales or with reducing the acceleration level. Under the weightless conditions of space where buoyancy is virtually eliminated, other mechanisms such as capillary forces, diffusion, vibration, shear forces, electrostatic and electromagnetic forces are dominating in the fluid behaviour. This is why research in space represents a powerful tool for scientific research in this field. Understanding how fluids work really matters and so does measuring their properties accurately. Presently, a number of scientific laboratories, as usual goes with multi-user instruments, are involved in fluid research on the ISS. The programme of fluid physics experiments on-board deals with capillary flows, diffusion, dynamics in complex fluids (foams, emulsions and granular matter), heat transfer processes with phase change, physics and physico-chemistry near or beyond the critical point and it also extends to combustion physics. The top-level objectives of fluid research in space are as follows: (i) to investigate fluid

  3. LabView Based Nuclear Physics Laboratory experiments as a remote teaching and training tool for Latin American Educational Centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajo-Bohus, L.; Greaves, E. D.; Barros, H.; Gonzalez, W.; Rangel, A.

    2007-01-01

    A virtual laboratory via internet to provide a highly iterative and powerful teaching tool for scientific and technical discipline is given. The experimenter takes advantage of a virtual laboratory and he can execute nuclear experiment at introductory level e.g. Gamma ray detection with Geiger-Mueller Counter at remote location using internet communication technology

  4. R and D activities of the ESARDA NDA working group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guardini, S.; Bignan, G.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to report the R and D activities of the ESARDA Working Group on Techniques and Standards for Non-Destructive Analysis (NDA), as well as to discuss the role and possibilities of the group in the modern R and D scenario in safeguards and non-proliferation. The main tasks of the ESARDA NDA Working have been identified as being to: Define needs for procedural standards and reference materials; Design and manage the production and characterisation of reference materials; Assess and contribute to improving the performances of NDA techniques; Set up and maintain a list of NDA instruments and methods currently used for Safeguards purposes; and, through the above activities, assist Operators and Safeguards Authorities in their duty of Safeguards implementation. Members and observers appointed to the working group represent plant operators, the nuclear industry, R and D laboratories, NDA instrument developers and both safeguards control authorities. The participation of major European plant operators and of the EURATOM Safeguards Directorate and IAEA has always been assured and contributes to the good outcome of the WG activities. The ongoing R and D activities of the NDA Working Group are: Monte Carlo performance intercomparisons; 242 Pu accuracy assessment and improvement; NDA Sampling errors; General NDA performance evaluations. Some milestones have recently been reached: The 242 Pu uncertainty improvement project is coming to an end with the issuing of a new isotopic correlation; The NCC 'reals' evaluation and the Monte Carlo round robin is producing its first results; The Uranium Enrichment Round Robin Exercise has been completed; The waste drum standards are being characterised and constructed: they will be available by spring 1998. The round robin amongst laboratories will then start: summer 1998. Future activities comprise, beside the above issues, technical problems linked with the new challenges posed by new regimes of safeguards and non

  5. Assessing the engagement, learning, and overall experience of students operating an atomic absorption spectrophotometer with remote access technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erasmus, Daniel J; Brewer, Sharon E; Cinel, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    The use of internet-based technologies in the teaching of laboratories has emerged as a promising education tool. This study evaluated the effectiveness of using remote access technology to operate an atomic absorption spectrophotometer in analyzing the iron content in a crude myoglobin extract. Sixty-two students were surveyed on their level of engagement, learning, and overall experience. Feedback from students suggests that the use of remote access technology is effective in teaching students the principles of chemical analysis by atomic absorption spectroscopy. © 2014 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  6. Study and design of a hybrid wind-diesel-compressed air system for providing electricity to a remote telecommunication station; Etudes et conception d'un systeme hybride eolien-diesel-air comprime pour l'electrification d'une station de telecommunications isolee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibrahim, H.; Dimitrova, M. [TechnoCentre eolien Gaspesie-les Iles, Gaspe, PQ (Canada); Ilinca, A. [Quebec Univ., Rimouski, PQ (Canada); Perron, J. [Quebec Univ., Chicoutimi, PQ (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    This poster reported on a study that examined the feasibility of using a hybrid wind-diesel-compressed air system to produce electricity at remote telecommunication stations. Low and high penetration wind-diesel hybrid systems were studied in order to reduce the diesel consumption. The use of a high penetration wind-diesel system together with compressed air energy storage (CAES) was shown to be a viable alternative to improve the overall percentage of renewable energy and reduce the cost of electricity in remote areas where a good wind resource is available. Different technical solutions for the CAES system were compared. refs., figs.

  7. Experience and development of on-line BWR surveillance system at Onagawa nuclear power station unit-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishi, A.; Chiba, K.; Kato, K.; Ebata, S.; Ando, Y.; Sakamoto, H.

    1986-01-01

    ONAGAWA nuclear power station Unit-1 (Tohoku Electric Power Co.) is a BWR-4 nuclear power station of 524 MW electric power which started commercial operation in June 1984. To attain high reliability and applicability for ONAGAWA-1, Tohoku Electric Power Co. and Toshiba started a Research and Development project on plant surveillance and diagnosis from April 1982. Main purposes of this project are to: (1) Develop an on-line surveillance system and acquire its operating experience at a commercial BWR, (2) Assist in plant operation and maintenance by data acquisition and analysis, (3) Develop a new technique for plant surveillance and diagnosis. An outline of the project, operating experience gained from the on-line surveillance system and an introduction to new diagnosis techniques are reported in this paper. (author)

  8. Further Analyses of the NASA Glenn Research Center Solar Cell and Photovoltaic Materials Experiment Onboard the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Matthew G.; Prokop, Norman F.; Krasowski, Michael J.; Piszczor, Michael F.; McNatt, Jeremiah S.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate air mass zero (AM0) measurement is essential for the evaluation of new photovoltaic (PV) technology for space solar cells. The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has flown an experiment designed to measure the electrical performance of several solar cells onboard NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's (GSFC) Robotic Refueling Mission's (RRM) Task Board 4 (TB4) on the exterior of the International Space Station (ISS). Four industry and government partners provided advanced PV devices for measurement and orbital environment testing. The experiment was positioned on the exterior of the station for approximately eight months, and was completely self-contained, providing its own power and internal data storage. Several new cell technologies including four-junction (4J) Inverted Metamorphic Multi-Junction (IMM) cells were evaluated and the results will be compared to ground-based measurement methods.

  9. Preliminary data for the 20 May 1974, simultaneous evaluation of remote sensors experiment. [water pollution monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. W.; Batten, C. E.; Bowker, D. E.; Bressette, W. E.; Grew, G. W.

    1975-01-01

    Several remote sensors were simultaneously used to collect data over the tidal James River from Hopewell to Norfolk, Virginia. Sensors evaluated included the Multichannel-Ocean Color Sensor, multispectral scanners, and multispectral photography. Ground truth measurements and remotely sensed data are given. Preliminary analysis indicates that suspended sediment and concentrated industrial effluent are observable from all sensors.

  10. Remote sensing in landscape ecology: experiences and perspectives in a European context

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groom, G.; Mücher, C.A.; Ihse, M.; Wrbka, T.

    2006-01-01

    That the relationship between remote sensing and landscape ecology is significant is due in large part to the strong spatial component within landscape ecology. However it is nevertheless necessary to have frequent overview of the interface between remote sensing and landscape ecology, particularly

  11. Remote handling experiments with the MASCOT IV servomanipulator at JET and prospects of enhancements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, D.; Colombi, S.; Galbiati, L.; Haist, B.; Mills, S.; Raimondi, T.

    1995-01-01

    Ongoing remote handling trials are being performed at JET, using the MASCOT IV servomanipulator, in order to establish the feasibility of proposed remote handling tasks. This promotes the development of appropriate tools and methods, the determination of time scales, and suggests modifications to be incorporated into the final design of the related JET components. (orig.)

  12. Recent Experience Using Active Love Wave Techniques to Characterize Seismographic Station Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, A. J.; Yong, A.; Salomone, L.

    2014-12-01

    Active-source Love waves recorded by the multi-channel analysis of surface wave (MASLW) technique were recently analyzed in two site characterization projects. Between 2010 and 2011, the 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funded GEOVision to conduct geophysical investigations at 189 seismographic stations—185 in California and 4 in the Central Eastern U.S. (CEUS). The original project plan was to utilize active and passive Rayleigh wave-based techniques to obtain shear-wave velocity (VS) profiles to a minimum depth of 30 m and the time-averaged VS of the upper 30 meters (VS30). Early in the investigation it became evident that Rayleigh wave techniques, such as multi-channel analysis of surface waves (MASRW), were not effective at characterizing all sites. Shear-wave seismic refraction and MASLW techniques were therefore applied. The MASLW technique was deployed at a total of 38 sites, in addition to other methods, and used as the primary technique to characterize 22 sites, 5 of which were also characterized using Rayleigh wave techniques. In 2012, the Electric Power Research Institute funded characterization of 33 CEUS station sites. Based on experience from the ARRA investigation, both MASRW and MASLW data were acquired by GEOVision at 24 CEUS sites—the remaining 9 sites and 2 overlapping sites were characterized by University of Texas, Austin. Of the 24 sites characterized by GEOVision, 16 were characterized using MASLW data, 4 using both MASLW and MASRW data and 4 using MASRW data. Love wave techniques were often found to perform better, or at least yield phase velocity data that could be more readily modeled using the fundamental mode assumption, at shallow rock sites, sites with steep velocity gradients, and, sites with a thin, low velocity, surficial soil layer overlying stiffer sediments. These types of velocity structure often excite dominant higher modes in Rayleigh wave data, but not in Love wave data. At such sites, it may be possible

  13. Utilization of gas micro turbines in the PETROBRAS remote unattended stations; Utilizacao de microturbinas a gas nas instalacoes desassistidas da PETROBRAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavinatto, Eduardo F.; Salles, Fabio P.; Peres, Marcelo B.; Pereira, Leandro S.; Reis, Paulo F.I. dos [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    This paper presents PETROBRAS experience in the utilization of gas micro turbines in the production of gas and oil located in off-shore fields and gas metering stations of the transportation system. Available alternatives will be presented for the electrical power supply of these units and they will be outstanding the acquired benefits by using gas micro turbines. Also will be presented the performance test results conducted by CENPES technical staff. Finally, we will present an analysis of the observed acting of these equipment after they have been installed in the units of PETROBRAS under the reliability point of view, maintenance rates, adaptation to the local environmental conditions, behavior of the electric system and operational versatility. (author)

  14. Sources of SO{sub 2}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, NO{sub x} and NO{sub 3}{sup -} in the air of four Spanish remote stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rua, A.; Hernandez, E.; Parras, J. de las; Martin, I.; Gimeno, L. [Complutense University, Madrid (Spain). Dept. of Statistic and Operative Investigation II

    1998-09-01

    In this study we have analyzed the sources of SO{sub 2}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, NO{sub x}, and NO{sub 3}{sup -} in the air of four remote Spanish stations belonging to the European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme (EMEP) network. Information about trajectories has been used together with the conditional probability functions (CPFs). The most remarkable result is that the Mediterranean area is the main source of these pollutants in the air of the Spanish EMEP stations. Northern Africa and Central Europe are also important sources while the Atlantic Ocean and British Islands are, in general terms, low sources of these pollutants. The role of the Iberian Peninsula as a source of these pollutants in one of the stations, Logrono, is analyzed with more details using smaller regions to define CPFs. 26 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Preliminary research informing policy on remote alcohol monitoring in criminal justice: the Scottish experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodall, Christine A; Neville, Fergus G; Williams, Damien J; Donnelly, Peter D

    2016-11-01

    To explore the views of Scottish offenders on the impact of alcohol on their experience of offending and their lives in general. Furthermore, to explore their views on the concept of remote alcohol monitoring (RAM) as a way to address alcohol misuse upon liberation from prison. A convenience sample of 12 serving offenders participated in one of three focus groups. Data were analysed using the principles of thematic analysis. Analysis of the data revealed the significant impact of alcohol on the lives of the participants. Key themes included the amount and frequency of alcohol consumption; the association of alcohol with harm; the association of alcohol with offending; the previous attempts to reduce alcohol consumption and possible reasons for failure; and the views of participants on the utility of RAM in relation to crime prevention. Participants had significant issues with alcohol misuse prior to incarceration that had impacted on their offending and resulted in both health and social harms. Participants were generally positive but pragmatic about RAM, recognising that technology alone may not be enough to change deeply ingrained and addictive behaviours.

  16. Fabricating defensible reference standards for the NDA lab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceo, R.N.; May, P.K. [Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, TN (United States)

    1997-11-01

    Nondestructive analysis (NDA) is performed at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant in support of the enriched uranium operations. Process materials are analyzed using gamma ray- and neutron-based instruments including segmented gamma scanners, solution assay systems, and an active well coincidence counter. Process wastes are also discarded based on results of these measurements. Good analytical practice, as well as applicable regulations, mandates that these analytical methods be calibrated using reference materials traceable to the national standards base. Reference standards for NDA instruments are not commercially available owing to the large quantities of special nuclear materials involved. Instead, representative materials are selected from each process stream, then thoroughly characterized by methods that are traceable to the national standards base. This paper discusses the process materials to be analyzed, reference materials selected for calibrating each NDA instrument, and details of their characterization and fabrication into working calibrations standards. Example calibration curves are also presented. 4 figs.

  17. Fabricating defensible reference standards for the NDA lab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceo, R.N.; May, P.K.

    1997-01-01

    Nondestructive analysis (NDA) is performed at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant in support of the enriched uranium operations. Process materials are analyzed using gamma ray- and neutron-based instruments including segmented gamma scanners, solution assay systems, and an active well coincidence counter. Process wastes are also discarded based on results of these measurements. Good analytical practice, as well as applicable regulations, mandates that these analytical methods be calibrated using reference materials traceable to the national standards base. Reference standards for NDA instruments are not commercially available owing to the large quantities of special nuclear materials involved. Instead, representative materials are selected from each process stream, then thoroughly characterized by methods that are traceable to the national standards base. This paper discusses the process materials to be analyzed, reference materials selected for calibrating each NDA instrument, and details of their characterization and fabrication into working calibrations standards. Example calibration curves are also presented. 4 figs

  18. Operating experience with nuclear power stations in Member States in 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-10-01

    This report is the thirty-seventh in the Agency's series of annual reports on operating experience with nuclear power stations in Member States. For the first time it is issued purely in an electronic version. The report is a direct output from the Agency's Power Reactor Information System (PRIS), whose databank contains all operating experience data published in the Agency's operating experience annual reports since 1970 and basic information on power reactors, including design data. It presents operating experience data for all worldwide nuclear power plants after starting commercial operation. The PRIS databank is available free of charge to IAEA Member States through its two services: PRIS-PC, and PRIS CD-ROM. The PRIS-PC allows direct access to the database through the Internet. The PRIS-PC on CD-ROM only includes data for reactors in operation, under construction and shutdown. It keeps the same feature as in the current front-end-tool PRIS-PC interface. This front-end-tool interface allows to search and query through pre-designed statistics. The PRIS-PC on CD-ROM contains mapping interface including a view of the world map with zooming features to country, region and site map and links to PRIS database to retrieve related (nuclear power plant) information. PRIS data and related indicators are also available on the PRIS Website: www.iaea.org/programmes/a2. It contains publicly available information about reactor units and nuclear industry results. Load, operation and availability factors are used as the basic performance indicators. Energy unavailability factors, separate for planned and unplanned unavailability, due either to causes under plant management control or external causes out of plant management control, are used as a measure of energy lost through a unit not being available. However, some ambiguity remains in the operators' reports of the unavailability data, resulting in inconsistencies in these factors. It is recognized that there is an inherent

  19. Operating experience with nuclear power stations in Member States in 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-08-01

    This report is the thirty-eighth in the Agency's series of annual reports on operating experience with nuclear power stations in Member States. For the second time it is issued purely in an electronic version. The report is a direct output from the Agency's Power Reactor Information System (PRIS), whose databank contains all operating experience data published in the Agency's operating experience annual reports since 1970 and basic information on power reactors, including design data. It presents operating experience data for all worldwide nuclear power plants after starting commercial operation. The PRIS databank is available free of charge to IAEA Member States through its services: web-based PRIS-Statistics (http://prisweb.iaea.org/statistics/), PRIS-PC, PRIS CD-ROM and PRIS Website. The PRIS-Statistics and PRIS-PC allow direct access to the database through the Internet. The PRIS-PC on CD-ROM only includes data for reactors in operation, under construction and shutdown. It keeps the same feature as in the current front-end-tool PRIS-PC interface. This front-endtool interface allows to search and query through pre-designed statistics. PRIS data and related indicators are also available on the PRIS Website: www.iaea.org/programmes/a2. It contains publicly available information about reactor units and nuclear industry results. Load, operation and availability factors are used as the basic performance indicators. Energy unavailability factors, separate for planned and unplanned unavailability, due either to causes under plant management control or external causes out of plant management control, are used as a measure of energy lost through a unit not being available. However, some ambiguity remains in the operators' reports of the unavailability data, resulting in inconsistencies in these factors. It is recognized that there is an inherent difficulty in reporting unavailability in energy due to external causes with relation to energy losses due to load following

  20. Microwave remote sensing of sea ice in the AIDJEX Main Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, W.J.; Wayenberg, J.; Ramseyer, J.B.; Ramseier, R.O.; Vant, M.R.; Weaver, R.; Redmond, A.; Arsenaul, L.; Gloersen, P.; Zwally, H.J.; Wilheit, T.T.; Chang, T.C.; Hall, D.; Gray, L.; Meeks, D.C.; Bryan, M.L.; Barath, F.T.; Elachi, C.; Leberl, F.; Farr, Tom

    1978-01-01

    During the AIDJEX Main Experiment, April 1975 through May 1976, a comprehensive microwave sensing program was performed on the sea ice of the Beaufort Sea. Surface and aircraft measurements were obtained during all seasons using a wide variety of active and passive microwave sensors. The surface program obtained passive microwave measurements of various ice types using four antennas mounted on a tracked vehicle. In three test regions, each with an area of approximately 1.5 ?? 104 m2, detailed ice crystallographic, dielectric properties, and brightness temperatures of first-year, multiyear, and first-year/multiyear mixtures were measured. A NASA aircraft obtained passive microwave measurements of the entire area of the AIDJEX manned station array (triangle) during each of 18 flights. This verified the earlier reported ability to distinguish first-year and multiyear ice types and concentration and gave new information on ways to observe ice mixtures and thin ice types. The active microwave measurements from aircraft included those from an X- and L-band radar and from a scatterometer. The former is used to study a wide variety of ice features and to estimate deformations, while both are equally usable to observe ice types. With the present data, only the scatterometer can be used to distinguish positively multiyear from first-year and various types of thin ice. This is best done using coupled active and passive microwave sensing. ?? 1978 D. Reidel Publishing Company.

  1. NDA [nondestructive assay] training for new IAEA inspectors at Los Alamos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, J.E.; Reilly, T.D.; Belew, W.; Woelfl, E.; Fager, J.

    1987-01-01

    The history of the evolution of nondestructive assay (NDA) training for international inspectors at Los Alamos is described. The current NDA training course for International Atomic Energy Agency inspectors is presented in terms of structure, content, and rationale. Results of inspector measurement exercises are given along with projections for future developments in NDA inspector training. 3 refs

  2. Experience in industrial operation of the plant for immobilizing radioactive wastes in thermosetting resins at the Ardennes Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haller, P.; Romestain, P.; Bruant, J.P.

    1983-01-01

    The French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) has developed, at the Grenoble Centre for Nuclear Studies, a procedure for immobilizing low- and intermediate-level wastes in thermosetting resins of the polyester or epoxy types. To demonstrate feasibility on an industrial scale, a pilot plant has been set up at the effluent treatment station of the Ardennes Franco-Belgium Nuclear Power Station (SENA), which is a 305 MW(e) PWR type. Assembly work began in January 1979. After a period devoted to final adjustments and operation with inactive products, conditioning of active products began in January 1981. In the paper, the methods of conditioning the three types of waste (evaporation concentrates, ion exchange resins and filter cartridges) are described, experience of the start-up and operation of the plant is reported and the principal results of coating characterization tests are given. The results of tests on active and inactive products show that the characteristics of the materials obtained on an industrial scale match those of laboratory products and confirm their high quality with regard to mechanical behaviour, fire resistance, homogeneity and low-leachability. Industrial experience and economic comparisons show that the process of immobilizing waste from nuclear power stations in thermosetting resins offers an extremely interesting alternative to classical methods of conditioning. (author)

  3. Conditioning of cooling water in power stations. Feedback from twenty years of experience with acid feeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goffin, C.; Duvivier, L.; Girasa, E. [LABORELEC, Chemistry of Water (Belgium); Brognez, J. [ELECTRABEL, TIHANGE Nuclear Power Station (Belgium)

    2002-07-01

    In the late 1970's and early 1980's, with the development of the nuclear programme in many European countries, the recirculation of cooling water in power stations became an issue which required urgent attention. The concentration of several plants of 1000 MW or more on sites along inland waterways actually made simple once-through cooling impossible, owing to the risk of an unacceptable rise in the river's water temperature. The chemical composition of natural freshwater in western European waterways is such that when it becomes slightly concentrated, scale is rapidly formed. The relatively low solubility of calcium carbonate and the degassing of the carbon dioxide during close contact between the water and air in the heat exchangers of the cooling tower explain this precipitation tendency. Fairly soon, experts in the electricity power generation companies highlighted the need for on-site, pilot loop simulations, in order to foresee the physico-chemical phenomena that could arise in industrial installations. The number of financially justifiable processing possibilities could be briefly summarised by the following three solutions: to adapt the concentration factor in order to be under the calcium carbonate solubility limit and thereby avoid the need for any water conditioning; to accept concentration factors of between 1.4 and 1.9 and control the calcium carbonate precipitation through controlled acid injection in the circulation water; to raise the concentration factor over 5 and soften the makeup water through the addition of lime and flocculant. The last of these solutions was rarely ever used in Belgium and France. It was however widely used in Germany. Its application requires a greater investment and leads to higher operating costs than acid injection. Furthermore, it leads to the problem of daily drying and disposal of several dozen tonnes of sludge, which have to be recycled or dumped. In an increasingly stringent environmental context, this

  4. Conditioning of cooling water in power stations. Feedback from twenty years of experience with acid feeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goffin, C.; Duvivier, L.; Girasa, E.; Brognez, J.

    2002-01-01

    In the late 1970's and early 1980's, with the development of the nuclear programme in many European countries, the recirculation of cooling water in power stations became an issue which required urgent attention. The concentration of several plants of 1000 MW or more on sites along inland waterways actually made simple once-through cooling impossible, owing to the risk of an unacceptable rise in the river's water temperature. The chemical composition of natural freshwater in western European waterways is such that when it becomes slightly concentrated, scale is rapidly formed. The relatively low solubility of calcium carbonate and the degassing of the carbon dioxide during close contact between the water and air in the heat exchangers of the cooling tower explain this precipitation tendency. Fairly soon, experts in the electricity power generation companies highlighted the need for on-site, pilot loop simulations, in order to foresee the physico-chemical phenomena that could arise in industrial installations. The number of financially justifiable processing possibilities could be briefly summarised by the following three solutions: to adapt the concentration factor in order to be under the calcium carbonate solubility limit and thereby avoid the need for any water conditioning; to accept concentration factors of between 1.4 and 1.9 and control the calcium carbonate precipitation through controlled acid injection in the circulation water; to raise the concentration factor over 5 and soften the makeup water through the addition of lime and flocculant. The last of these solutions was rarely ever used in Belgium and France. It was however widely used in Germany. Its application requires a greater investment and leads to higher operating costs than acid injection. Furthermore, it leads to the problem of daily drying and disposal of several dozen tonnes of sludge, which have to be recycled or dumped. In an increasingly stringent environmental context, this solution is no

  5. Experiences of occupational dose reduction at the Fugen nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Kazuya; Nakao, Hiromi; Naoi, Yohsuke; Takei, Hiroaki

    1992-01-01

    Occupational radiation dose has been effectively suppressed by efforts against both internal and external exposure in the Fugen nuclear power station. The tritium internal dose is completely suppressed by developments of high sensitivity tritium monitors with hollow fiber radon filters, comfortable tritium protection suits, and established working procedure for equipment maintenance of the heavy water system. The internal occupational dose has been suppressed to a negligible level comparing to the external dose. The external occupational dose had increased with dose rates of the primary cooling system. Establishment of radiation work procedure for maintenance works and development of chemical decontamination has been effectively saving the external occupational dose. The chemical decontaminations carried out in 1989 and 1991 are the first applications to the whole primary cooling system of operating power stations in Japan. This paper describes these efforts and effects on occupational dose reduction in Fugen. (author)

  6. Proposal of commercialization of Swietenia macrophylla King seeds genetic improved in the UCTB Experiment Station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Puig Pérez

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This work was conducted at the Agroforestry Experimental Station of Guise in 2013, with the aim of establishing a proposal for the marketing of seed of Swietenia macrophylla with high added value. A brief characterization of the entity and description of the species under study was carried out. Internal and external environment was also characterized by identifying strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, threats, noting that the station should take advantage of opportunities and mitigate weaknesses and threats. The macro market segmentation and the action plan for marketing programs of the seeds were performed. With the marketing of seed of high added value of this valuable plantations will increase and latifolia seed growths will be greater.

  7. Building and Deploying Remotely Operated Vehicles in the First-Year Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien-Gayes, A.; Fuss, K.; Gayes, P.

    2007-12-01

    Coastal Carolina University has committed to improving student retention and success in Mathematics and Science through a pilot program to engage first-year students in an applied and investigative project as part of the University's First-Year Experience (FYE). During the fall 2007 semester, five pilot sections of FYE classes, consisting of students from the College of Natural and Applied Sciences are building and deploying Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs). These ROV-based classes are designed to: accelerate exploration of the broad fields of science and mathematics; enlist interest in technology by engaging students in a multi-stepped, interdisciplinary problem solving experience; explore science and mathematical concepts; institute experiential learning; and build a culture of active learners to benefit student success across traditional departmental boundaries. Teams of three students (forty teams total) will build, based on the MIT Sea Perch design, and test ROVs in addition to collecting data with their ROVs. Various accessories attached to the vehicles for data collection will include temperature and light sensors, plankton nets and underwater cameras. The first-year students will then analyze the data, and the results will be documented as part of their capstone projects. Additionally, two launch days will take place on two campus ponds. Local middle and high school teachers and their students will be invited to observe this event. The teams of students with the most capable and successful ROVs will participate in a workshop held in November 2007 for regional elementary, middle and high school teachers. These students will give a presentation on the building of the ROVs and also provide a hands-on demonstration for the workshop participants. These activities will ensure an incorporation of service learning into the first semester of the freshmen experience. The desired outcomes of the ROV-based FYE classes are: increased retention at the postsecondary

  8. Experience of the remote dismantling of the Windscale advanced gas-cooled reactor and Windscale pile chimneys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, E.M.

    1993-01-01

    This paper gives brief descriptions of some of the remote dismantling work and equipment used on two large decommissioning projects: the BNFL Windscale Pile Chimneys Project (remote handling machine, waste packaging machine, remotely controlled excavator, remotely controlled demolition machine) and the AEA Windscale Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor Project (remote dismantling machine, operational waste, bulk removal techniques, semi-remote cutting operations)

  9. Materials International Space Station Experiment (MISSE) 5 Developed to Test Advanced Solar Cell Technology Aboard the ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilt, David M.

    2004-01-01

    The testing of new technologies aboard the International Space Station (ISS) is facilitated through the use of a passive experiment container, or PEC, developed at the NASA Langley Research Center. The PEC is an aluminum suitcase approximately 2 ft square and 5 in. thick. Inside the PEC are mounted Materials International Space Station Experiment (MISSE) plates that contain the test articles. The PEC is carried to the ISS aboard the space shuttle or a Russian resupply vehicle, where astronauts attach it to a handrail on the outer surface of the ISS and deploy the PEC, which is to say the suitcase is opened 180 deg. Typically, the PEC is left in this position for approximately 1 year, at which point astronauts close the PEC and it is returned to Earth. In the past, the PECs have contained passive experiments, principally designed to characterize the durability of materials subjected to the ultraviolet radiation and atomic oxygen present at the ISS orbit. The MISSE5 experiment is intended to characterize state-of-art (SOA) and beyond photovoltaic technologies.

  10. ORO appraisal strategy involving use of NDA instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lux, C.R.

    1977-12-01

    ORO has used the following nondestructive assay (NDA) systems for verifying uranium inventories at contractor-operated installations: gamma spectroscopy, thickness-corrected gamma spectroscopy, passive neutron measurement, and random driver measurement. A brief description of each system is given and results of in-field measurements performed on contractors' inventories utilizing each system are discussed

  11. Sounding rocket experiments during the IMS period at Syowa Station, Antarctica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirasawa, T.; Nagata, T.

    1979-01-01

    During IMS Period, 19 sounding rockets were launched into auroras at various stages of polar substorms from Syowa Station (Geomag. lat. = -69.6 0 , Geomag. log. = 77.1 0 ), Antarctica. Through the successful rocket flights, the significant physical quantities in auroras were obtained: 19 profiles of electron density and temperature, 11 energy spectra of precipitating electrons, 15 frequency spectra of VLF and HF plasma waves and 4 vertical profiles of electric and magnetic fields. These rocket data have been analyzed and compared with the coordinated ground-based observation data for studies of polar substorms. (author)

  12. Concrete with superabsorbent polymers (SAP) - experience from the Fehmarn field exposure station in Rødbyhavn

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasholt, Marianne Tange; Pade, Claus

    2011-01-01

    A field exposure station has been established in Rødbyhavn Habour. One of the concrete types tested is with superabsorbent polymer (SAP) - a new type of additive, which can be used to mitigate self-desiccation and to control air void structure. This paper presents results from the extensive...... laboratory test program, which was conducted before test panels were placed in Rødbyhavn Habour. Results show that when using SAP, it is possible to produce concrete with a pre-defined air void structure. Strength and transport properties are comparable to the properties of a reference concrete, but results...

  13. Latest Results from the AMS Experiment on the International Space Station

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2018-01-01

    In seven years on the Space Station, AMS has collected more than 115 billion charged cosmic rays with energies up to multi TeV.  The measured positron spectra agrees well with dark matter models. The energy dependence of elementary particles (electrons, positrons, protons and antiprotons)  as well as the rigidity dependence of primary cosmic rays and secondary cosmic rays are unique and distinct.  These results require a new understanding of the cosmos. 

  14. Pyroprocess Deployment Analysis and Remote Accessibility Experiment using Digital Mockup and Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K. H.; Park, H. S.; Kim, S. H.; Choi, C. H.; Lee, H. J.; Park, B. S.; Yoon, G. S.; Kim, K. H.; Kim, H. D.

    2009-11-01

    Nuclear fuel cycle facility that treats with spent fuel must be designed and manufactured a Pyroprcess facility and process with considering a speciality as every process have to be processed remotely. To prevent an unexpected accident under a circumstance that must operate with a remote manipulator after done the Pyroprocess facility, an procedure related Pyroprocess operation and maintenance need to establish it in the early design stage. To develop the simulator that is mixed by 3D modelling and simulation, a system architecture was designed. A full-scale digital mockup with a real pyroprocess facility was designed and manufactured. An inverse kinematics algorithm of remote manipulator was created in order to simulate an accident and repair that could happen in pyroprocess operation and maintenance under a virtual digital mockup environment. Deployment analysis of process devices through a workspace analysis was carried out and Accessibility analysis by using haptic device was examined

  15. Remote monitoring technologies and applications. JAEA-SNL technical cooperation experience in RM for nuclear transparency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matter, John

    2006-01-01

    In ten years of remote monitoring cooperation, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the JAEA (formerly JNC) have developed technology and demonstrated it at the Joyo Experimental Reactor. The program goals were to develop technology to support international safeguards, help evaluate and standardize the technologies for safeguards uses, and demonstrate them for potential regional cooperation. This paper described three generations of remote monitoring systems at the Joyo Fresh Storage and at one of the Joyo Spent Fuel Ponds. Communications and control methods within the facility and between the facility and the remote viewer have changed rapidly. The current configuration is similar to an international safeguards installation, but provides a foundation for transparency cooperation between the JAEA and SNL. Plans to expand this cooperation to other partners are noted. (author)

  16. Effect of metal stress on the thermal infrared emission of soybeans: A greenhouse experiment - Possible utility in remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, R.; Schwaller, M. R.; Foy, C. D.; Weidner, J. R.; Schnetzler, C. S.

    1989-01-01

    Manganese-sensitive forest and manganese-tolerant lee soybean cultivars were subjected to differential manganese stress in loring soil in a greenhouse experiment. Leaf temperature measurements were made using thermistors for forest and lee. Manganese-stressed plants had higher leaf temperatures than control plants in both forest and lee. Results of this experiment have potential applications in metal stress detection using remote sensing thermal infrared data over large areas of vegetation. This technique can be useful in reconnaissance mineral exploration in densely-vegetated regions where conventional ground-based methods are of little help.

  17. Operating experience with remote handling equipment in a typical hot facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravishankar, A.; Balasubramanian, G.R.

    1990-01-01

    Large number of articulated arm manipulators and special purpose remote tools have been used either alone or in combination in a recent campaign of treatment of irradiated J rods of CIRUS for separation of 233 U. These equipments were used for operations such as remote maintenance of centrifuge, centrifugal extractor, direct sampling, assistance for sample conveying operations etc. Paper discusses problems encountered in using articulated arm manipulators of type MAll,AMl and how they were overcome. Problems encountered in use of model-8 manipulator for chopper maintenence in a mockup facility are also highlighted. (author). 4 figs., 1 tab

  18. The experience of living with a traumatic hand injury in a rural and remote location: an interpretive phenomenological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingston, Gail A; Judd, Dr Jenni; Gray, Marion A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this research study was to gain an understanding of how rural and remote residents in North Queensland, Australia, engaged in work, activities of daily living tasks and social activities following a traumatic hand injury. Findings from a previous retrospective survey with these participants revealed that patients experienced difficulties such as pain for many years after their injury; however, because of the survey methodology, the voices of participants were not heard. This study contributes to a larger project that seeks to propose a model of service delivery to rural and remote residents who have sustained a traumatic injury. Utilising an interpretive phenomenological research design, data were gathered through in-depth, semistructured interviews. Fifteen participants were recruited into this study and questions were designed to explore the experience of having a traumatic hand injury in rural and remote areas of North Queensland. The thematic analysis indicated five major themes: injury and impairment, pain, occupation and activity, and resilience. Participants reported that having a hand injury often caused further injury due to the impairment. The pain experienced could be 'all consuming' yet participants reported 'pushing through' this pain to complete daily tasks. Participants reported that they would 'go mad' if they did not work and highlighted the importance of activity in their recovery. Participants felt grateful at having their hand and thought towards the future. Being self-reliant was important but they were willing to accept support from others when needed. Incorporating activity and occupation in rehabilitation programs as opposed to focusing on strict protocols is an important consideration in the recovery process of rural and remote residents. In particular, engaging in activity and occupation was an important part of managing the pain associated with the hand trauma. This research also found that participants demonstrated resilient

  19. Experiences of ultra-low-crud high-nickel control in Onagawa nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, M.; Goto, Y.; Shinomiya, T.; Sato, M.; Yamazaki, K.; Hirasawa, H.; Yotsuyanagi, T.

    2002-01-01

    We have adopted various countermeasures for worker dose reduction to plants in Onagawa Nuclear Power Station. ''Ni/Fe ratio control'' has been adopted to Unit 1, and ''ultra-low-crud high-nickel control'' has been adopted to Unit 2 and 3, along with other countermeasures like wide utilization of low Co materials, for the purpose of dose rate reduction of primary recirculation piping which is thought to be one of the main exposure sources. In this paper, we describe, first, the reason and background that ultra-low-crud high-nickel control has been adopted to Unit 2, and, second, water chemistry of Unit 2 up to the 5. cycle under ultra-low-crud high-nickel control compared to that of Unit 1 under Ni/Fe ratio control. Following those, we show brief analysis of the fuel crud of Unit 2 and water chemistry of Unit 3 only at the startup stage. (authors)

  20. Experience with reactor power cutback system at Palo Verde nuclear generating station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chari, D.R.; Rec, J.R.; Simoni, L.P.; Eimar, R.L.; Sowers, G.W.

    1987-01-01

    Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station (PVNGS) is a three unit site which illustrates System 80 nuclear steam supply system (NSSS) design. The System 80 NSSS is the Combustion Engineering (C-E) standard design rated at 3817 Mwth. PVNGS Units 1 and 2 achieved commercial operation on February 13, 1986 and September 22, 1986, respectively, while Unit 3 has a forecast date for commercial operation in the third quarter of 1987. The System 80 design incorporates a reactor power cutback system (RPCS) feature which reduces plant trips caused by two common initiating events: loss of load/turbine trip (LOL) and loss of one main feedwater pump (LOMFWP). The key design objective of the RPCS is to improve overall plant availability and performance, while minimizing challenges to the plant safety system

  1. Student Pave Way for First Microgravity Experiments on International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Chemist Arna Holmes, left, from the University of Alabama in Huntsville, teaches NaLonda Moorer, center, and Maricar Bana, right, both from Terry Parker High School in Jacksonville, Fl, procedures for preparing protein crystal growth samples for flight aboard the International Space Station (ISS). NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL, is a sponsor for this educational activity. The proteins are placed in plastic tubing that is heat-sealed at the ends, then flash-frozen and preserved in a liquid nitrogen Dewar. Aborad the ISS, the nitrogen will be allowed to evaporated so the samples thaw and then slowly crystallize. They will be analyzed after return to Earth. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

  2. Experience of Electricite de France in the use of sea water for cooling thermal power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyer, R.M.E.; Malherbe, C.

    1979-01-01

    The sea is a practically unlimited reserve of water for cooling conventional or nuclear thermal power stations. On the other hand, its use gives rise to numerous problems relating to the design and operation of the equipment. The main problems encountered at EDF are associated with filter screens (clogging, corrosion), the distribution ducts (encrusted organisms), the water boxes, the tube plates, and above all, the condenser tubes (corrosion, corrosion-erosion). The site-construction of several PWR nuclear sets has caused EDF to dispense with the use of cuprous alloys for the tubes of condensers using sea water; these are now of thin-walled seam-welded titanium. In order to reduce further the risks of leakage, these tubes are expanded into double tube plates between which fresh water is trapped under pressure. (author)

  3. Recent experience related to neutronic transients in Ontario Hydro CANDU nuclear generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frescura, G.M.; Smith, A.J.; Lau, J.H.

    1991-01-01

    Ontario Hydro presently operates 18 CANDU reactors in the province of Ontario, Canada. All of these reactors are of the CANDU Pressurized Heavy Water design, although their design features differ somewhat reflecting the evolution that has taken place from 1971 when the first Pickering unit started operation to the present as the Darlington units are being placed in service. Over the last three years, two significant neutronic transients took place at the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station 'A' (NGS A) one of which resulted in a number of fuel failures. Both events provided valuable lessons in the areas of operational safety, fuel performance And accident analysis. The events and the lessons learned are discussed in this paper

  4. A remote in-vessel and ex-vessel force-reflecting telerobotic system for the burning plasma experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuban, D.P.; Busko, N.

    1992-01-01

    The Burning Plasma Experiment (BPX) has made an applaudable commitment to total remote maintenance which will undoubtedly move fusion energy closer to commercial reality. This commitment poses new and formidable challenges due to the dimensional constraints, diversity of maintenance operations, and the geometrically intricate equipment arrangements. These challenges must be addressed for successful hot operation of the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory BPX. This paper reports on a new manipulator system, called the TeleMate, which is under development to contribute to this needed capability. This system combines enhancements to a proven mechanical design with state-of-the-art controls technology, to produce a flexible system that can be configured to address the numerous remote fusion applications. The mechanical portion of the system has many years of operation in existing radioactive facilities. This paper presents a system description, the development status, initial test data, and control system performance

  5. Smoke flow temperature beneath tunnel ceiling for train fire at subway station: Reduced-scale experiments and correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng, Na; Wang, Qiang; Liu, Zhaoxia; Li, Xiao; Yang, He

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Reduced-scale experiments on train fire at subway station. • Smoke flow temperature beneath tunnel ceiling measured and correlated. • Effect of platform-tunnel conjunction door type on smoke temperature is clarified. - Abstract: This paper is to investigate the smoke flow temperature beneath tunnel ceiling for a train on fire stopping besides a subway station. Experiments were carried out in a reduced-scale (1:10) subway station model to study the maximum smoke temperature and the longitudinal temperature distribution beneath the tunnel ceiling by considering platform-tunnel conjunction doors of two types: the full-seal platform screen door (PSD) and the full-height safety door. For the maximum temperature beneath the tunnel ceiling, it is found to be well correlated non-dimensionally with heat release rate by a 3.65 and a 2.92 power law function for the full-seal platform screen door and the full-height safety door, respectively. For the longitudinal temperature distribution along the tunnel ceiling, it can be well correlated by an exponential function for both types of platform-tunnel conjunction doors. Concerning the effect of the door type, the maximum temperature is lower and the longitudinal temperature decays faster for full-height safety door than that for full-seal PSD. This is due to that with the full-height safety door, the effective width of the tunnel ceiling is widened, which results in more heat losses from the smoke flow to the ceiling.

  6. NODC Standard Format Coastal Ocean Wave and Current (F181) Data from the Atlantic Remote Sensing Land/Ocean Experiment (ARSLOE) (1980) (NODC Accession 0014202)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains time series coastal ocean wave and current data collected during the Atlantic Remote Sensing Land/Ocean Experiment (ARSLOE). ARSLOE was...

  7. Remotely Operated Vehicles under sea ice - Experiences and results from five years of polar operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katlein, Christian; Arndt, Stefanie; Lange, Benjamin; Belter, Hans Jakob; Schiller, Martin; Nicolaus, Marcel

    2016-04-01

    The availability of advanced robotic technologies to the Earth Science community has largely increased in the last decade. Remotely operated vehicles (ROV) enable spatially extensive scientific investigations underneath the sea ice of the polar oceans, covering a larger range and longer diving times than divers with significantly lower risks. Here we present our experiences and scientific results acquired from ROV operations during the last five years in the Arctic and Antarctic sea ice region. Working under the sea ice means to have all obstacles and investigated objects above the vehicle, and thus changes several paradigms of ROV operations as compared to blue water applications. Observations of downwelling spectral irradiance and radiance allow a characterization of the optical properties of sea ice and the spatial variability of the energy partitioning across the atmosphere-ice-ocean boundary. Our results show that the decreasing thickness and age of the sea ice have led to a significant increase in light transmission during summer over the last three decades. Spatially extensive measurements from ROV surveys generally provide more information on the light field variability than single spot measurements. The large number of sampled ice conditions during five cruises with the German research icebreaker RV Polarstern allows for the investigations of the seasonal evolution of light transmittance. Both, measurements of hyperspectral light transmittance through sea ice, as well as classification of upward-looking camera images were used to investigate the spatial distribution of ice-algal biomass. Buoyant ice-algal aggregates were found to be positioned in the stretches of level ice, rather than pressure ridges due to a physical interaction of aggregate-buoyancy and under-ice currents. Synchronous measurements of sea ice thickness by upward looking sonar provides crucial additional information to put light-transmittance and biological observations into context

  8. Experience in the chemistry field from the operating cycle of Grohnde and Philippsburg II nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobi, G.; Ruehle, W.

    1987-01-01

    Experience from the primary section of the plants in relation to the activity pattern of corrosion products, indicates primarily that cobalt-free materials have been used throughout in Philippsburg II nuclear power station, which was no longer economically possible at Grohnde because of the advanced stages of manufacture and installation. Consequently, the activity concentration for Co-60 in Philippsburg was lower from the outset than at a comparable time at Grohnde. The second part of the paper discusses experience from the secondary section of the plants, based on the AVT (all volatile treatment) method of operation and its effect on the deposits in the steam generators. The chemical control is described and a comparison is made between the sampling points at Grohnde and Philippsburg II. (orig.) [de

  9. Pore Formation and Mobility Investigation (PFMI): Concept, Hardware Development, and Initial Analysis of Experiments Conducted Aboard the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grugel, Richard N.

    2003-01-01

    Porosity in the form of "bubbles and pipes" can occur during controlled directional solidification processing of metal alloys. This is a consequence that 1) precludes obtaining any meaningful scientific results and 2) is detrimental to desired material properties. Unfortunately, several Microgravity experiments have been compromised by porosity. The intent of the PFMl investigation is to conduct a systematic effort directed towards understanding porosity formation and mobility during controlled directional solidification (DS) in a microgravity environment. PFMl uses a pure transparent material, succinonitrile (SCN), as well as SCN "alloyed" with water, in conjunction with a translating temperature gradient stage so that direct observation and recording of pore generation and mobility can be made. PFMl is investigating the role of thermocapillary forces and temperature gradients in affecting bubble dynamics as well as other solidification processes in a microgravity environment. This presentation will cover the concept, hardware development, operations, and the initial results from experiments conducted aboard the International Space Station.

  10. National Coral Reef Monitoring Program: Benthic Percent Cover Derived from Analysis of Benthic Images Collected for Climate Stations across the Pacific Remote Island Areas since 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The data described here result from benthic photo-quadrat surveys conducted along transects at climate stations and permanent sites identified by the Ocean and...

  11. Two-way laser ranging and time transfer experiments between LOLA and an Earth-based satellite laser ranging station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, D.; Sun, X.; Neumann, G. A.; Barker, M. K.; Mazarico, E. M.; Hoffman, E.; Zagwodzki, T. W.; Torrence, M. H.; Mcgarry, J.; Smith, D. E.; Zuber, M. T.

    2017-12-01

    Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) has established time-of-flight measurements with mm precision to targets orbiting the Earth and the Moon using single-ended round-trip laser ranging to passive optical retro-reflectors. These high-precision measurements enable advances in fundamental physics, solar system dynamics. However, the received signal strength suffers from a 1/R4 decay, which makes it impractical for measuring distances beyond the Moon's orbit. On the other hand, for a two-way laser transponder pair, where laser pulses are both transmitted to and received from each end of the laser links, the signal strength at both terminals only decreases by 1/R2, thus allowing a greater range of distances to be covered. The asynchronous transponder concept has been previously demonstrated by a test in 2005 between the Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) aboard the MESSENGER (MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, Geochemistry, and Ranging) spacecraft and NASA's Goddard Geophysical and Astronomical Observatory (GGAO) at a distance of ˜0.16 AU. In October 2013, regular two-way transponder-type range measurements were obtained over 15 days between the Lunar Laser Communication Demonstration (LLCD) aboard the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) spacecraft and NASA's ground station at White Sands, NM. The Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) aboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) provides us a unique capability to test time-transfer beyond near Earth orbit. Here we present results from two-way transponder-type experiments between LOLA and GGAO conducted in March 2014 and 2017. As in the time-transfer by laser link (T2L2) experiments between a ground station and an earth-orbiting satellite, LOLA and GGAO ranged to each other simultaneously in these two-way tests at lunar distance. We measured the time-of-flight while cross-referencing the spacecraft clock to the ground station time. On May 4th, 2017, about 20 minutes of two-way measurements were collected. The

  12. Experiences for construction and preoperation test of Shimane nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niki, Yoshiya; Taniguchi, Takashi.

    1975-01-01

    Shimane nuclear power station of Chugoku Electric Power Company has begun its commercial operation on March 29, 1974 after the construction period of 49.5 months. The fundamental construction process which Chugoku Electric Power Company and Hitachi Ltd. had agreed was 45 month process, which was the readjustment of the construction process which General Electric Company had presented for preceding nuclear power plants in Japan and its results. The achieved construction and test process required 49.5 months with 4.5 months delay. This delay occurred in two points. The one was caused by the ''upside down'' problem of control rods which had been imported from G.E. The another was caused by the restriction of the rate of load increasing. Fuel charging which indicates the substantial finish of construction works, had begun at May 1, 1973 on schedule. Therefore it can be said that the construction works had been carried out just according to the fundamental process. However, analyzing the result of progress, the pressure test of a reactor containment vessel and the set-up and the first pressure test of a reactor pressure vessel led the schedule by about 2 months. On the contrary, the subsequent works delayed by just that leading time. (Tai, I.)

  13. Passive seismic experiment - A summary of current status. [Apollo-initiated lunar surface station data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latham, G. V.; Dorman, H. J.; Horvath, P.; Ibrahim, A. K.; Koyama, J.; Nakamura, Y.

    1978-01-01

    The data set obtained from the four-station Apollo seismic network including signals from approximately 11,800 events, is surveyed. Some refinement of the lunar model will result, but its gross features remain the same. Attention is given to the question of a small, molten lunar core, the answer to which remains dependent on analysis of signals from a far side impact. Seventy three sources of repeating, deep moonquakes have been identified, thirty nine of which have been accurately located. Concentrated at depths from 800 to 1000 km, the periodicities of these events have led to the hypothesis that they are generated by tidal stresses. Lunar seismic data has also indicated that the meteoroid population is ten times lower than originally determined from earth based observations. Lunar seismic activity is much lower and mountainous masses show no sign of sinking, in contrast to earth, as a result of the lunar crust being four times thicker. While much work remains to be done, significant correlation between terrestrial and lunar observations can be seen.

  14. Experience with the TUeV pipe monitoring system at the Grohnde nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dittmar, H.; Hofstoetter, P.

    1995-01-01

    A special pipe monitoring system has been developed by TUeV Rheinland during the construction, commissioning and operation of the Grohnde nuclear power station. On the basis of measurements during construction and commissioning a basic monitoring system has been developed, using not only a system of sophisticated sensors that had been permanently installed from the beginning but also a large number of quite simple additional sensors. Measurements were taken before, during and after inspections and led to the discovery of unexpected and high stresses during service as well as to long-term changes over a period of years.Special measurements were taken with high temperature strain gauges and thermocouples to identify problems such as temperature layering. A special on-line measuring device was developed and used for the continuous monitoring of temperatures during operation.All these measurements help to identify out areas with high stresses or service conditions giving rise to high loads, in order on the one hand to prevent damage and on the other hand to prove that the pipes are functioning within their design parameters without problems. ((orig.))

  15. Plume tracer experiments at Hinkley Point 'A' [Nuclear Power Station] during 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foster, P.M.

    1988-11-01

    The results of the first part of a programme of plume dispersion measurements at the Hinkley Point Nuclear Power Station are described. Using SF 6 gas and pyrotechnic smoke tracer techniques developed during an earlier study at Oldbury, measurements of ground level plume behaviour out to about 4 km and elevated plume behaviour out to about 1 km have been made in a series of twelve 1 hour trials and one 15 minute trial. Whereas the Oldbury study considered passive emissions, attention in this study has been focussed on the behaviour of the buoyant shield cooling air emission. Data on plume rise and the degree of plume entrainment by the building wake and on the effects of entrainment and wind meander on plume width and concentration, are presented and discussed in relation to current modelling recommendations. A limited number of 10 minute averaged measurements of plume concentration and 41-Ar decay gamma count were also made at 2 km range and their correlation and variability examined. (author)

  16. New results from the
 AMS experiment on the International Space Station

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer, AMS, is a general purpose high energy particle phys- ics detector. It was installed on the International Space Station, ISS, on 19 May 2011 to conduct a unique long duration mission of fundamental physics research in space. Knowledge of the precise rigidity dependence of the proton and helium flux is important in understanding the origin, acceleration, and propagation of cosmic rays. Pre- cise measurements of the proton and of the helium flux in primary cosmic rays with rigidities (momentum/charge) up to the TV scale are presented and the detailed varia- tion with rigidity of the flux spectral indices will be discussed. A precision measurement by AMS of the antiproton flux and antiproton-to-proton ratio in primary cosmic rays in the rigidity range from 1 to 450 GV is presented. This measurement increases the precision of the previous observations and significantly extends their rigidity range. It shows that the antiproton-to-proton ratio remains constant above ∼60 GV. In a...

  17. Nudging healthy food choices: a field experiment at the train station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroese, Floor M; Marchiori, David R; de Ridder, Denise T D

    2016-06-01

    Recognizing the mindless nature of many food decisions, it has been suggested that attempts to increase healthy eating should not focus on convincing people what is 'right' but rather aim to adjust the environment such that people are automatically directed toward healthy choices. This study investigated a nudge aiming to promote healthy food choices in train station snack shops. The nudge involved a repositioning of food products: healthy foods were placed at the cash register desk, while keeping unhealthy products available elsewhere in the shop. Three snack shops were included: a control condition; a nudge condition repositioning healthy products and a nudge + disclosure condition employing the same nudge together with an explanatory sign. Next to examining its effectiveness during 1 week, the study assessed customers' acceptance of the nudge. Controlling for a baseline week, more healthy (but not fewer unhealthy) products were sold in both nudge conditions, with no difference between the nudge and the nudge + disclosure condition. A majority of customers reported positive attitudes toward the nudge. Repositioning healthy foods is a simple, effective and well-accepted nudge to increase healthy purchases. Moreover, disclosing its purpose does not impact on effectiveness. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Faculty of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Construction and start-up testing experience of Kashiwazakikariwa Nuclear Power Station Unit No.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natsume, Nobuo; Murakami, Hideaki

    1986-01-01

    In order to overcome the new location condition in Japan Sea coast, new techniques were developed and adopted to ensure the safety in construction and to shorten the construction period as far as possible. The commercial operation was started on September 18, 1985. This plant is a BWR plant of 1100 MWe output. The results of the improvement and standardization of BWRs and the measures for reliability improvement and radiation dose reduction were fully adopted in this plant. The site of the power station and the layout of the main facilities are explained. As the features of the location condition, the severe weather condition in winter such as snow, wind and lightning and high waves in the sea were considered. The rockbed for installing the foundation of the reactor building was deep, and the aseismatic design condition was made stricter, accordingly, the quantity of materials increased. A tent dome was developed to cover above the reactor containment vessel being assembled, a lightning forecast system was installed, and synchro-lift method was adopted for caisson breakwaters. The countermeasures to the deep rockbed and the measures to shorten the construction period were taken. The results of the trial operation are reported. (Kako, I.)

  19. Proceedings of the Workshop on remote participation in fusion experiments. Satellite meeting to the 25th EPS 1998 ICPP, Prague

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piffl, V.; Pichal, J.

    1999-01-01

    The following topics were dealt with: (i) Current status of the Garching/Greifswald connection; (ii) Remote participation across national boundaries; (iii) The TEC approach to a remote control room at TEXTOR; (iv) Uniform data access for remote participation; (v) Remote participation in the US transport code collaboration; (vi) Client-server for remote collaboration and remote invocation of analysis applications and application to the national transport code; (vii) Remote collaboration and data access at the DIII-D national fusion facility; (viii) The collaboration for support of scientific research; and (ix) JET and remote participation. (P.A.)

  20. Proceedings of the Workshop on remote participation in fusion experiments. Satellite meeting to the 25th EPS 1998 ICPP, Prague

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piffl, V; Pichal, J [eds.

    1999-04-01

    The following topics were dealt with: (i) Current status of the Garching/Greifswald connection; (ii) Remote participation across national boundaries; (iii) The TEC approach to a remote control room at TEXTOR; (iv) Uniform data access for remote participation; (v) Remote participation in the US transport code collaboration; (vi) Client-server for remote collaboration and remote invocation of analysis applications and application to the national transport code; (vii) Remote collaboration and data access at the DIII-D national fusion facility; (viii) The collaboration for support of scientific research; and (ix) JET and remote participation. (P.A.)

  1. A brief history of NDA at the IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprinkle, J.K.; Sinkule, B.J.; Hsue, S.-T.; Abhold, M.E.

    2001-01-01

    Nearly 30 years ago, the first portable nondestructive assay instrument, a SAM-II, was brought to Vienna for IAEA consideration. This initial foray into the usage of nondestructive assay (NDA) as an independent assessment tool has materialized into one of the important tools for IAEA inspections. NDA instruments have several inherent advantages for inspectors; their measurements generate no radioactive waste, provide immediate answers, do not require specialized operators, and can be either taken to the items to be measured (portable instruments), or the items for measurement can be brought to the instruments, such as can be applied in on-site IAEA laboratories or off-site IAEA lab at Siebersdorf. The SAM-II was a small, lightweight, battery-powered, gamma-ray instrument used for uranium enrichment measurements. It was also found to be usehl for locating nuclear material, distinguishing between uranium and plutonium, and determining the active length of items like fuel pins. However it was not well suited for determining the amount of bulk material present, except for small containers of low-density materials. A 6-sided neutron coincidence counter, easily disassembled so it could be shipped and carried by airplane, was developed for bulk measurements of plutonium. The HLNCC (High Level Neutron Coincidence Counter) was immediately useful for quantitative measurements of pure plutonium oxide. However, the IAEA had to make a trade-off between the ease of use of NDA instruments on-site, and the problems of obtaining small samples for shipment to an independent lab for more accurate analysis. NDA does not create radioactive waste, so as waste handling has become more cautious and more regulated, NDA looks better and better. After acceptance of NDA by the IAEA for routine use, the follow-up question was naturally, 'How much better can this measurement be made?' The Program for Technical Assistance to IAEA Safeguards (POTAS) supported multiple and varied efforts in this

  2. Neutron method for NDA in the Sapphire Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, K.D.

    1995-01-01

    The implementation of Project Sapphire, the top-secret mission to the Republic of Kazakhstan to recover weapons-grade nuclear materials, consisted of four major elements: (1) repacking of fissile material from Kazakh containers into suitable U.S. containers; (2) nondestructive analyses (NDA) to quantify the 235 U content of each container for nuclear criticality safety and compliance purposes; (3) packaging of the fissile material containers into 6M/2R drums, which are internationally approved for shipping fissile material; and (4) shipping or transport of the recovered fissile material to the United States. This paper discusses the development and application of a passive neutron counting technique used in the NDA phase of the Sapphire operations to analyze uranium/beryllium (U/Be) alloys and compounds for 235 U content

  3. A neutron method for NDA analysis in the SAPPHIRE Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, K.D.

    1995-01-01

    The implementation of Project SAPPHIRE, the top secret mission to the Republic of Kazakhstan to recover weapons grade nuclear materials, consisted of four major elements: (1) the re-packing of fissile material from Kazakh containers into suitable US containers; (2) nondestructive analyses (NDA) to quantify the U-235 content of each container for Nuclear Criticality Safety and compliance purposes; (3) the packaging of the fissile material containers into 6M/2R drums, which are internationally approved for shipping fissile material; and (4) the shipping or transport of the recovered fissile material to the United States. This paper discusses the development and application of a passive neutron counting technique used in the NDA phase of SAPPHIRE operations to analyze uranium/beryllium (U/Be) alloys and compounds for U-235 content

  4. NDA [nondestructive assay] for a facility at SRP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studley, R.V.

    1987-01-01

    A near-real-time accountability system with associated high accuracy assay measurements has recently been placed in service at a Savannah River Plant (SRP) facility. A computer cluster provides facility wide communication between personnel and the accountability, process control, and laboratory data systems. The cluster is also connected to communicate with process, accountability, and laboratory instrumentation and process controls plus an item tracking bar code printer/reader system. Eight high performance microprocessor-based nondestructive assay (NDA) systems which were developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for this process are also connected to this cluster. With standards developed for them, these instruments are achieving the highest currently known NDA measurement accuracies

  5. A practical experience of using special remote handling tools on JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, S.F.; Schreibmaier, J.; Tesini, A.; Wykes, M.

    1987-01-01

    Over 50 cutting and 200 UHV welding operations were made during the installation of new water cooled belt limiters and ICRF Antennae into the JET Vacuum Vessel. This work was performed by the hands-on use of 45 special tools which have been specifically designed for use with the Mascot servomanipulator in preparation for the JET D-T phase when all maintenance will be performed remotely. This paper reports on the techniques used and the performance of the tools. (author)

  6. Measurement control program for NDA instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsue, S.T.; Marks, T.

    1983-01-01

    Measurement control checks for nondestructive assay instruments have been a constant and continuing concern at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This paper summarizes the evolution of the measurement control checks in the various high-resolution gamma systems we have developed. In-plant experiences with these systems and checks will be discussed. Based on these experiences, a set of measurement control checks is recommended for high-resolution gamma-ray systems

  7. Computer networks for remote laboratories in physics and engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starks, Scott; Elizandro, David; Leiner, Barry M.; Wiskerchen, Michael

    1988-01-01

    This paper addresses a relatively new approach to scientific research, telescience, which is the conduct of scientific operations in locations remote from the site of central experimental activity. A testbed based on the concepts of telescience is being developed to ultimately enable scientific researchers on earth to conduct experiments onboard the Space Station. This system along with background materials are discussed.

  8. Preparation of plant-specific NDA reference material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abedin-Zadeh, R.; Beetle, T.; Kuhn, E.; Terrey, D.; Turel, S.; Busca, G.; Guardini, S.

    1983-01-01

    The importance of having suitable and well characterized non-destructive assay (NDA) reference materials for the verification activities of the safeguards control authorities is stressed. The Euratom Inspectorate and the IAEA have initiated an extensive programme for the procurement and preparation of Joint Euratom/IAEA safeguards NDA reference materials with the active participation of the Ispra Establishment of the Euratom Joint Research Centre. The different type and nature of materials, condition of measurements, and plant characteristics and provisions had to be taken into account for plant-specific NDA reference materials. The preparation of each reference material was planned case by case and specific criteria such as limitations in different facilities, measurement capabilities, conditions, product availability and population variability are being ascertained. A procurement scheme was prepared describing step-by-step procedures detailing responsibilities, measurement conditions, destructive analysis schemes, desired characteristics and methods of data evaluation. This paper describes the principles and procedures carried out for the preparation of a reference MOX pin, low enriched uranium reference rods, low enriched uranium reference drums, reference MTR assemblies, and THTR reference pebbles. The scheme for each characterization technique is presented. (author)

  9. Kazak Mitleri ve Mitik Efsaneleri Hakkında

    OpenAIRE

    İBRAYEV, Şakir; ARIKAN, Metin

    2006-01-01

    Kazak halkının geleneksel dünya görüşü ile söz sanatının kaynağı diyebileceğimiz mitler; dünyanın yaratılışı, nelerin, nasıl, nereden meydana çıktığı, sebebi ve safhaları, etrafımızı kuşatan çevrenin sırları ve özellikleri hakkında söylenen, insanoğlunun ilkel düşüncesinin sonucu meydana gelen olağanüstü anlatmalar, belki de inanışlar, anlayışlar. En eski mitlerin arasında gökyüzü cisimleri - güneş, ay, yıldız ve gezegenler hakkında söylenilen mitleri gösterebiliriz. Bu türdeki mitlerin başlı...

  10. Dry spent fuel storage experience at overseas nuclear stations focus USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, T. L.; Kumar, S.; Marcelli, D. G.

    1997-01-01

    This paper provides a summary of US dry spent fuel storage experience, including application of this experience outside the United States. Background information on the US nuclear and spent fuel storage industry is provided as a basis for discussing the various types of options and systems available. An overview of technology options is presented, including systems being used and/or considered by the US government and private sector, as well as a discussion of overall system design, licensing and operation. Factors involved in selecting the best available technology option for a specific site or group of sites are presented, along with a typical timeline for project implementation. Cross-geographical use of technologies under different regulatory and technological regimes is also discussed. The paper concludes that dry storage is safe and reliable based on a successful ten year period. The information presented may be considered for use in the development of dry spent fuel storage in Korea and other countries. (author)

  11. Aging of nuclear station diesel generators: Evaluation of operating and expert experience: Phase 1, Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoopingarner, K.R.; Vause, J.W.; Dingee, D.A.; Nesbitt, J.F.

    1987-08-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory evaluated operational and expert experience pertaining to the aging degradation of diesel generators in nuclear service. The research, sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), identified and characterized the contribution of aging to emergency diesel generator failures. This report, Volume I, reviews diesel-generator experience to identify the systems and components most subject to aging degradation and isolates the major causes of failure that may affect future operational readiness. Evaluations show that as plants age, the percent of aging-related failures increases and failure modes change. A compilation is presented of recommended corrective actions for the failures identified. This study also includes a review of current, relevant industry programs, research, and standards. Volume II reports the results of an industry-wide workshop held on May 28 and 29, 1986 to discuss the technical issues associated with aging of nuclear service emergency diesel generators

  12. Experience with intermediate strong base anion resins at three mile island nuclear station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Federick, K.H.; Reed, J.G.; Glass, R.M.

    1978-01-01

    A-104 resin appears to have been an excellent replacement for upflow regenerated Stratabeds at Three Mile Island. It has resulted in a 50% increase in operating throughputs, lower maintenance and greater ease of operation for the makeup trains. It should be stressed that differences in raw water characteristics or equipment design might render this experience not applicable to any given specific installation. A thorough evaluation of all aspects of such a conversion is recommended before any changes are attempted. 1 ref

  13. Wet steam turbines for nuclear generating stations -design and operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usher, J.

    1977-01-01

    Lecture to the Institution of Nuclear Engineers, 11 Jan. 1977. The object of this lecture was to give an account of some design features of large wet steam turbines and to show by describing some recent operational experience how their design concepts were fulfilled. Headings are as follows: effects of wet steam cycle on turbine layout and operation (H.P. turbine, L.P. turbine); turbine control and operation; water separators; and steam reheaters. (U.K.)

  14. Performance Values for Non-Destructive Assay (NDA) Technique Applied to Wastes: Evaluation by the ESARDA NDA Working Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rackham, Jamie; Weber, Anne-Laure; Chard, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    The first evaluation of NDA performance values was undertaken by the ESARDA Working Group for Standards and Non Destructive Assay Techniques and was published in 1993. Almost ten years later in 2002 the Working Group reviewed those values and reported on improvements in performance values and new measurement techniques that had emerged since the original assessment. The 2002 evaluation of NDA performance values did not include waste measurements (although these had been incorporated into the 1993 exercise), because although the same measurement techniques are generally applied, the performance is significantly different compared to the assay of conventional Safeguarded special nuclear material. It was therefore considered more appropriate to perform a separate evaluation of performance values for waste assay. Waste assay is becoming increasingly important within the Safeguards community, particularly since the implementation of the Additional Protocol, which calls for declaration of plutonium and HEU bearing waste in addition to information on existing declared material or facilities. Improvements in the measurement performance in recent years, in particular the accuracy, mean that special nuclear materials can now be accounted for in wastes with greater certainty. This paper presents an evaluation of performance values for the NDA techniques in common usage for the assay of waste containing special nuclear material. The main topics covered by the document are: 1- Techniques for plutonium bearing solid wastes 2- Techniques for uranium bearing solid wastes 3 - Techniques for assay of fissile material in spent fuel wastes. Originally it was intended to include performance values for measurements of uranium and plutonium in liquid wastes; however, as no performance data for liquid waste measurements was obtained it was decided to exclude liquid wastes from this report. This issue of the performance values for waste assay has been evaluated and discussed by the ESARDA

  15. Performance Values for Non-Destructive Assay (NDA) Technique Applied to Wastes: Evaluation by the ESARDA NDA Working Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rackham, Jamie [Babcock International Group, Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria, (United Kingdom); Weber, Anne-Laure [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire Fontenay-Aux-Roses (France); Chard, Patrick [Canberra, Forss Business and Technology park, Thurso, Caithness (United Kingdom)

    2012-12-15

    The first evaluation of NDA performance values was undertaken by the ESARDA Working Group for Standards and Non Destructive Assay Techniques and was published in 1993. Almost ten years later in 2002 the Working Group reviewed those values and reported on improvements in performance values and new measurement techniques that had emerged since the original assessment. The 2002 evaluation of NDA performance values did not include waste measurements (although these had been incorporated into the 1993 exercise), because although the same measurement techniques are generally applied, the performance is significantly different compared to the assay of conventional Safeguarded special nuclear material. It was therefore considered more appropriate to perform a separate evaluation of performance values for waste assay. Waste assay is becoming increasingly important within the Safeguards community, particularly since the implementation of the Additional Protocol, which calls for declaration of plutonium and HEU bearing waste in addition to information on existing declared material or facilities. Improvements in the measurement performance in recent years, in particular the accuracy, mean that special nuclear materials can now be accounted for in wastes with greater certainty. This paper presents an evaluation of performance values for the NDA techniques in common usage for the assay of waste containing special nuclear material. The main topics covered by the document are: 1- Techniques for plutonium bearing solid wastes 2- Techniques for uranium bearing solid wastes 3 - Techniques for assay of fissile material in spent fuel wastes. Originally it was intended to include performance values for measurements of uranium and plutonium in liquid wastes; however, as no performance data for liquid waste measurements was obtained it was decided to exclude liquid wastes from this report. This issue of the performance values for waste assay has been evaluated and discussed by the ESARDA

  16. Electron cyclotron current drive experiments in LHCD plasmas using a remote steering antenna on the TRIAM-1M tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idei, H.; Hanada, K.; Zushi, H.; Ohkubo, K.; Hasegawa, M.; Kubo, S.; Nishi, S.; Fukuyama, A.; Sato, K.N.; Nakamura, K.; Sakamoto, M.; Iyomasa, A.; Kawasaki, S.; Nakashima, H.; Higashijima, A.; Notake, T.; Shimozuma, T.; Ito, S.; Hoshika, H.; Maezono, N.; Nakashima, K.; Ogawa, M.

    2006-01-01

    A remote steering antenna was recently developed for electron cyclotron heating and current drive (ECH/ECCD) experiments on the TRIAM-1M tokamak. This is the first application of the remote steering antenna concept for ECH/ECCD experiments, which have conditions relevant to the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Fundamental ECH and ECCD experiments were conducted in the ITER frequency from the low field using this antenna system. In addition to the angles near 0 0 , the launcher was a symmetric direction antenna with an extended steering-angle capability of ±(8 0 -19 0 ). The output beam from the antenna was a well-defined Gaussian with a proper steering angle. The Gaussian content and the steering-angle accuracy were 0.85 and -0.5 0 , respectively. The high power tests measured the antenna transmission efficiency at 0.90-0.94. The efficiencies obtained in the low and high power tests were consistent with the calculations using higher-order modes. In order to excite the pure O/X-modes in the oblique injection, two polarizers were used to control the elliptical polarization of the incident beam for the ECCD experiments. The fundamental O/X-mode ECH/ECCD was applied to lower hyrid current drive plasmas at the optimized incident polarization. In the X-mode experiment, at medium density (∼1 x 10 19 m -3 ), clear differences in the plasma current and the hard x-ray intensity were observed between the co- and counter-steering injections due to the ECCD effect on the coupling of forward fast electrons

  17. Operating Experience with Nuclear Power Stations in Member States in 2014. 2015 Edition (CD-ROM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    This CD-ROM contains the 46th edition of the IAEA’s series of annual reports on operating experience with nuclear power plants in Member States. It is a direct output from the IAEA’s Power Reactor Information System (PRIS) and contains information on electricity production and overall performance of individual plants during 2014. In addition to annual information, the report contains a historical summary of performance during the lifetime of individual plants and figures illustrating worldwide performance of the nuclear industry. The CD-ROM contains also an overview of design characteristics and dashboards of all operating nuclear power plants worldwide

  18. Operating Experience with Nuclear Power Stations in Member States in 2013. 2014 Edition (CD-ROM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-07-01

    This CD-ROM contains the 45th edition of the IAEA's series of annual reports on operating experience with nuclear power plants in Member States. It is a direct output from the IAEA's Power Reactor Information System (PRIS) and contains information on electricity production and overall performance of individual plants during 2013. In addition to annual information, the report contains a historical summary of performance during the lifetime of individual plants and figures illustrating worldwide performance of the nuclear industry. The CD-ROM contains also an overview of design characteristics and dashboards (not included into the web version) of all operating nuclear power plants worldwide

  19. Operating Experience with Nuclear Power Stations in Member States in 2011. 2012 Edition (CD-ROM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-08-01

    This CD contains the 43rd edition of the IAEA's series of annual reports on operating experience with nuclear power plants in Member States. It is a direct output from the IAEA's Power Reactor Information System (PRIS) and contains information on electricity production and overall performance of individual operational plants during 2011. In addition to annual information, the report contains a historical summary of performance during the lifetime of individual plants and figures illustrating worldwide performance of the nuclear industry. The CD contains also an overview of design characteristics and dashboards of all operating nuclear power plants worldwide.

  20. Operating Experience with Nuclear Power Stations in Member States. 2016 Edition (CD-ROM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-06-01

    This CD-ROM contains the 47th edition of the IAEA’s series of annual reports on operating experience with nuclear power plants in Member States. It is a direct output from the IAEA’s Power Reactor Information System (PRIS) and contains information on electricity production and overall performance of individual plants during 2015. In addition to annual information, the report contains a historical summary of performance during the lifetime of individual plants and figures illustrating worldwide performance of the nuclear industry. The CD-ROM contains also an overview of design characteristics and dashboards of all operating nuclear power plants worldwide

  1. Operating experience with nuclear power stations in Member States in 2008. 2009 edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-08-01

    This edition is the fortieth in the IAEA's series of annual reports on operating experience with nuclear power plants in Member States. It is a direct output from the IAEA's Power Reactor Information System (PRIS) and contains information on electricity production and overall performance of individual plants during 2008. In addition to annual information, the report contains a historical summary of performance during the lifetime of individual plants and figures illustrating worldwide performance of the nuclear industry. The CD-ROM provides enhanced features for data search and analysis

  2. Aging of nuclear station diesel generators: Evaluation of operating and expert experience: Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoopingarner, K.R.; Vause, J.W.

    1987-08-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) evaluated operational and expert experience pertaining to the aging degradation of diesel generators in nuclear service. The research, sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), identified and characterized the contribution of aging to emergency diesel generator failures. This report, Volume II, reports the results of an industry-wide workshop held on May 28 and 29, 1986, to discuss the technical issues associated with aging of nuclear service emergency diesel generators. The technical issues discussed most extensively were: man/machine interfaces, component interfaces, thermal gradients of startup and cooldown and the need for an accurate industry database for trend analysis of the diesel generator system

  3. Maximizing Science Return from Future Rodent Experiments on the International Space Station (ISS): Tissue Preservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, S. Y.; Lai, S.; Klotz, R.; Popova, Y.; Chakravarty, K.; Beegle, J. E.; Wigley, C. L.; Globus, R. K.

    2014-01-01

    To better understand how mammals adapt to long duration habitation in space, a system for performing rodent experiments on the ISS is under development; Rodent Research-1 is the first flight and will include validation of both on-orbit animal support and tissue preservation. To evaluate plans for on-orbit sample dissection and preservation, we simulated conditions for euthanasia, tissue dissection, and prolonged sample storage on the ISS, and we also developed methods for post-flight dissection and recovery of high quality RNA from multiple tissues following prolonged storage in situ for future science. Mouse livers and spleens were harvested under conditions that simulated nominal, on-orbit euthanasia and dissection operations including storage at -80 C for 4 months. The RNA recovered was of high quality (RNA Integrity Number, RIN(is) greater than 8) and quantity, and the liver enzyme contents and activities (catalase, glutathione reductase, GAPDH) were similar to positive controls, which were collected under standard laboratory conditions. We also assessed the impact of possible delayed on-orbit dissection scenarios (off-nominal) by dissecting and preserving the spleen (RNAlater) and liver (fast-freezing) at various time points post-euthanasia (from 5 min up to 105 min). The RNA recovered was of high quality (spleen, RIN (is) greater than 8; liver, RIN (is) greater than 6) and liver enzyme activities were similar to positive controls at all time points, although an apparent decline in select enzyme activities was evident at the latest time (105 min). Additionally, various tissues were harvested from either intact or partially dissected, frozen carcasses after storage for approximately 2 months; most of the tissues (brain, heart, kidney, eye, adrenal glands and muscle) were of acceptable RNA quality for science return, whereas some tissues (small intestine, bone marrow and bones) were not. These data demonstrate: 1) The protocols developed for future flight

  4. Food and beverage price discounts to improve health in remote Aboriginal communities: mixed method evaluation of a natural experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Megan; O'Dea, Kerin; Holden, Stacey; Miles, Eddie; Brimblecombe, Julie

    2017-02-01

    Retrospectively evaluate food price discounts in remote Aboriginal community stores. Four price discount strategies of 10% were designed in 2010, aiming to influence grocery, fruit, vegetables and diet soft-drink sales. This natural experiment across a group of stores was evaluated using an explanatory, sequential mixed method design through analysis of store point-of-sale, document, observation and interview data. The outcome was measured by change in: 1) percentage of grocery sales to total food and beverage; 2) fruit and vegetable sales; and 3) diet soft-drink sales. Qualitative data enabled the interpretation of outcomes through understanding perceived success and benefits, and enablers and barriers to implementation. Eighteen community stores and 54 informants participated. While targeted price discounts were considered important to improving health, no discernible effect was evident, due to inadequate design and communication of discount promotion, and probably inadequate magnitude of discount. Strategy impact on food and beverage sales was limited by promotion and magnitude of discount. Implication for Public Health: This study demonstrates key factors and commitment required to design, communicate, implement and monitor strategies to improve health in this challenging remote retail context. Evaluation of natural experiments can contribute evidence to policy-making. © 2016 The Authors.

  5. Radiation dosimetry for microbial experiments in the International Space Station using different etched track and luminescent detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goossens, O.; Vanhavere, F.; Leys, N.; De Boever, P.; O'Sullivan, D.; Zhou, D.; Spurny, F.; Yukihara, E. G.; Gaza, R.; McKeever, S. W. S.

    2006-01-01

    The laboratory of Microbiology at SCK.CEN, in collaboration with different universities, participates in several ESA programmes with bacterial experiments that are carried out in the International Space Station (ISS). The main objective of these programmes is to study the effects of space flight conditions such as microgravity and cosmic radiation on the general behaviour of model bacteria. To measure the radiation doses received by the bacteria, different detectors accompanied the microbiological experiments. The results obtained during two space flight missions are discussed. This dosimetry experiment was a collaboration between different institutes so that the doses could be estimated by different techniques. For measurement of the high linear energy transfer (LET) doses (>10 keV μm -1 ), two types of etched track detectors were used. The low LET part of the spectrum was measured by three types of thermoluminescent detectors ( 7 LiF:Mg,Ti; 7 LiF:Mg,Cu,P; Al 2 O 3 :C) and by the optically stimulated luminescence technique using Al 2 O 3 :C detectors. (authors)

  6. Accelerator-based approach experiments for remote identification of fissionable and other materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuvilo, I.V.; Danilov, M.M.; Katarzhnov, Yu.D.; Kushin, V.V.; Nedopekin, V.G.; Plotnikov, S.V.; Rogov, V.I.

    1998-01-01

    Recently there has been a great deal of interest in studying possible methods for remote non-destructive material composition testing, for example, for cargo identification at transportation, neutron logging etc., by means of nuclear detection (D.R. Brown, T. Gozani (1995)). Of current concern are the applications of pulsed fast neutron analysis in determining the composition of fissile objects (I.I. Zaliubovskiy et al. (1993)). In this paper the observed experimental results are discussed indicating the possibility of practical realization of the method for remote material identification. The approach is based on measuring gamma ray spectra from an object to be examined after its irradiation with short neutron pulses produced by an accelerator. The obtained time and energy gamma spectra are used for material inspection. The information is obtained by using time-of-flight (TOF) analysis between the accelerator pulse and the arrival of gamma rays in NaI detectors located far enough from an object to be examined. The method seems to be the most effective for fissile materials identification. (orig.)

  7. Report of space experiment project, 'Rad Gene', performed in the International Space Station Kibo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnishi, Takeo; Takahashi, Akihisa; Nagamatsu, Aiko

    2010-01-01

    This report summarizes results of the project in the title adopted by Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) (in 2000) aiming to elucidate the biological effect of space environment, and contains 3 major parts of the process of the experiment, and of findings by analysis after flight and in radioadaptive response. The process for the experiment includes training of the experimenter crew (Dr. S. Magnus) in JAXA, preparation of samples (frozen cells with normal and mutated p53 genes derived from human lymphoblast TK6) and their transfer to the Space Shuttle Endeavour STS-126 launched on Nov. 15, 2008 (Japanese time) for cell culturing in Feb., 2009. Analyses after flight back to the Kennedy Space Center on Mar. 29, 2009, done on the ground in Japan thereafter include the physical evaluation, confirmation of DNA damage, and phenotypic expression with DNA- and protein-arrays (genes induced for expression of p53-related phenotypes in those cells which were stored frozen in the space, thawed on the ground and then cultured, genes induced for expressing the phenotypes and p53-related proteins expressed in cells cultured in space). Physically, total absorbed dose and dose equivalent are found to be respectively 43.5 mGy and 71.2 mSv (0.5 mSv/day). Interestingly, the biologically estimated dose by DNA-double strand breaks detected by γH2AX staining, 94.5 mSv (0.7 mSv/day), in living, frozen cells in space, is close to the above physical dose. Expression experiments of p53-related phenotypes have revealed that expression of 750 or more genes in 41,000 genes in the array is changed: enhanced or suppressed by space radiation, micro-gravity and/or their mixed effects in space environment. In 642 protein antibodies in the array, 2 proteins are found enhanced and 8, suppressed whereas heat-shock protein is unchanged. Radioadaptive response is the acquisition of radio-resistance to acute exposure by previous irradiation of small dose (window width 20-100 mSv) in normal p53

  8. Speech-language pathology telehealth in rural and remote schools: the experience of school executive and therapy assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairweather, Glenn C; Lincoln, Michelle A; Ramsden, Robyn

    2017-01-01

    Difficulties in accessing allied health services, especially in rural and remote areas, appear to be driving the use of telehealth services to children in schools. The objectives of this study were to investigate the experiences and views of school executive staff and therapy assistants regarding the feasibility and acceptability of a speech-language pathology telehealth program for children attending schools in rural and remote New South Wales, Australia. The program, called Come N See, provided therapy interventions remotely via low-bandwidth videoconferencing, with email follow-up. Over a 12-week period, children were offered therapy blocks of six fortnightly sessions, each lasting a maximum of 30 minutes. School executives (n=5) and therapy assistants (n=6) described factors that promoted or threatened the program's feasibility and acceptability, during semistructured interviews. Thematic content analysis with constant comparison was applied to the transcribed interviews to identify relationships in the data. Emergent themes related to (a) unmet speech pathology needs, (b) building relationships, (c) telehealth's advantages, (d) telehealth's disadvantages, (e) anxiety replaced by joy and confidence in growing skills, and (f) supports. School executive staff and therapy assistants verified that the delivery of the school-based telehealth service was feasible and acceptable. However, the participants saw significant opportunities to enhance this acceptability through building into the program stronger working relationships and supports for stakeholders. These findings are important for the future development of allied health telehealth programs that are sustainable as well as effective and fit the needs of all crucial stakeholders. The results have significant implications for speech pathology clinical practice relating to technology, program planning and teamwork within telehealth programs.

  9. NanoRocks: Design and performance of an experiment studying planet formation on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisset, Julie; Colwell, Joshua; Dove, Adrienne; Maukonen, Doug

    2017-07-01

    In an effort to better understand the early stages of planet formation, we have developed a 1.5U payload that flew on the International Space Station (ISS) in the NanoRacks NanoLab facility between September 2014 and March 2016. This payload, named NanoRocks, ran a particle collision experiment under long-term microgravity conditions. The objectives of the experiment were (a) to observe collisions between mm-sized particles at relative velocities of acrylic, glass, and copper beads and 0.75 mm-sized JSC-1 lunar regolith simulant grains. The particles were placed in sample cells carved out of an aluminum tray. This tray was attached to one side of the payload casing with three springs. Every 60 s, the tray was agitated, and the resulting collisions between the particles in the sample cells were recorded by the experiment camera. During the 18 months the payload stayed on ISS, we obtained 158 videos, thus recording a great number of collisions. The average particle velocities in the sample cells after each shaking event were around 1 cm/s. After shaking stopped, the inter-particle collisions damped the particle kinetic energy in less than 20 s, reducing the average particle velocity to below 1 mm/s, and eventually slowing them to below our detection threshold. As the particle velocity decreased, we observed the transition from bouncing to sticking collisions. We recorded the formation of particle clusters at the end of each experiment run. This paper describes the design and performance of the NanoRocks ISS payload.

  10. Safety assessment of RF and microwave radiation emitted by the mobile telephone base station (MTBS) in Malaysia: experience and challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roha Tukimin; Rozaimah Abd Rahim; Mohamad Amirul Nizam; Mohd Yusof Mohd Ali

    2007-01-01

    Non-ionising radiation (NIR) is known to be hazardous if the amount received is excessive. It is a fact that NIR, including extremely low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields, radiofrequency (RF) and microwave radiation can be found almost everywhere generated by both natural and man-made source. This is due to increase in demand for telecommunication and wireless technology which is become very important and as part of our lives. However, the widespread of the relevant technology contributed more NIR man-made sources exposure to the human. Due to public concern their potential of causing such health hazard, members of public and companies approached and request NIR Group of Nuclear Malaysia to carry out surveys and safety assessments of radiofrequency and microwave radiation emitted by the mobile telephone base station (MTBS) erected near the residential area or installed on the rooftop of the commercial building. Objective of the survey was to assess the presence of radiofrequency and microwave radiation and to identify radiation level which may lead to significant personnel exposure. Findings of the survey was compared to the standard guidelines issued by Malaysian Communication and Multimedia Commission (MCMC) and International Committee on Non-Ionising Radiation Protection (ICNIRP). This paper highlights the works that had been carried out by NIR Group of Nuclear Malaysia from 1997 to 2007. We will share the experience and challenge in carried out the NIR safety assessment at mobile telephone base station. Results of the assessment work will be used to develop non-ionising radiation database for future reference in Malaysia. (Author)

  11. Contaminations of inner surface of magnesium fluoride windows in the `Expose-R' experiment on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skurat, V. E.

    2017-10-01

    A series of experiments was carried out previously on board of the International Space Station in `EXPOSE-R', a multi-user expose facility, provided by European Space Agency attached to the external surface of the Russian Segment. In one experiment, spores of microorganisms and species of higher plant seeds, in heat-sealed polymer bags were irradiated by solar radiation passed through MgF2 windows in a high space vacuum. After sample exposure, it was found that in many cases the inner surfaces of windows were contaminated. Analysis of the contamination revealed the presence of chemical groups CH2, CH3, NH, OH, C═O, Si-CH3 (Demets et al. in 2015). Their presence in deposits was explained by photofixation of gaseous precursors - some of the vapours of glues and additives in polymeric materials in the core facility of `Expose-R'. Carbon-, oxygen- and silicon-containing groups may be deposited from outer intrinsic atmosphere. This atmosphere is connected with sample compartments and core facility. However, the presence of NH groups on inner surfaces of windows was not expected. This paper shows that the process responsible for carbon-, nitrogen- and oxygen-containing group formation can be a photopolymerization of caprolactam, which is released from the outer Nylon 6 layer of polymer bags under Solar vacuum ultraviolet radiation.

  12. 25 years of experience with closed cycle vapor turbogenerators as primary power source in remote telecommunications projects in Russia and CIS countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gropper, J. [ORMAT Industries Ltd., Yavne (Israel)

    2000-07-01

    One of the most severe problems confronting telecommunications projects in extreme arctic environment conditions, with temperatures as low as -60 C, is the supply of continuous, reliable remote power for unattended microwave repeater stations that in many cases cannot be reached by maintenance technicians for months at a time. Another important problem is that the telecommunications equipment must be kept at temperatures between 0 C and +45 C in order to ensure correct electronics operation. The obvious, simple solution of having an electrical heater in the equipment shelter is not practical because of the power required for such a heater. The use of specially designed, arctic type, closed cycle vapor turbogenerators (CCVT) and their associated non-electric heating systems in arctic telecommunication systems has solved both problems: reliable remote power in the range of 400 to 2500 Watts in provided with maintenance requirements reduced to a visit only once in 6 months or more, and required temperature ranges in equipment shelters are maintained, assuring correct operation of the sensitive electronics, without any need of electrical power. During the last 25 years, many major telecommunication projects in Siberia, Alaska and Antarctica have been designed to use and continue to use over 1200 arctic type closed cycle vapor turbogenerators. The CCVTs are designed to operate at nominal power in a range of temperatures from -60 to +45 C and at wind velocity of 120 km/hr, with acceptable gusts of 160 km/hr. They can be fuelled by either arctic kerosene or diesel fuel, or by natural or liquefied gas (LPG) and provide 24 or 48 VDC to the telecommunications equipment. The non-electric heating system associated with the CCVT draws extra heat accumulated in the CCVT's vapor turbogenerator in winter to vaporize a fluid that will transmit 1000 kcal/hr of heat to the equipment shelter or room where telecommunication equipment is located. The heating system is

  13. The DOSIS -Experiment onboard the Columbus Laboratory of the International Space Station -Overview and first mission results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitz, Guenther; Berger, Thomas; Kürner, Christine; Burmeister, Sünke; Hajek, Michael; Bilski, Pawel; Horwacik, Tomasz; Vanhavere, Filip; Spurny, Frantisek; Jadrnickova, Iva; Pálfalvi, József K.; O'Sullivan, Denis; Yasuda, Nakahiro; Uchihori, Yukio; Kitamura, Hisashi; Kodaira, Satoshi; Yukihara, Eduardo; Benton, Eric; Zapp, Neal; Gaza, Ramona; Zhou, Dazhuang; Semones, Edward; Roed, Yvonne; Boehme, Matthias; Haumann, Lutz

    Besides the effects of the microgravity environment, and the psychological and psychosocial problems encountered in confined spaces, radiation is the main health detriment for long dura-tion human space missions. The radiation environment encountered in space differs in nature from that on earth, consisting mostly of high energetic ions from protons up to iron, resulting in radiation levels far exceeding the ones encountered on earth for occupational radiation workers. Accurate knowledge of the physical characteristics of the space radiation field in dependence on the solar activity, the orbital parameters and the different shielding configurations of the International Space Station ISS is therefore needed. The DOSIS (Dose Distribution inside the ISS) experiment, under the project and science lead of DLR, aims for the spatial and tempo-ral measurement of the radiation field parameters inside the European Columbus laboratory onboard the International Space Station. This goal is achieved by applying a combination of passive (Thermo-and Optical luminescence detectors and Nuclear track etch detectors) and active (silicon telescope) radiation detectors. The passive radiation detectors -so called pas-sive detector packages (PDP) are mounted at eleven positions within the Columbus laboratory -aiming for a spatial dose distribution measurement of the absorbed dose, the linear energy transfer spectra and the dose equivalent with an average exposure time of six months. Two active silicon telescopes -so called Dosimetry Telescopes (DOSTEL 1 and DOSTEL 2) together with a Data and Power Unit (DDPU) are mounted within the DOSIS Main Box at a fixed loca-tion beneath the European Physiology Module (EPM) rack. The DOSTEL 1 and DOSTEL 2 detectors are positioned at a 90 angle to each other for a precise measurement of the temporal and spatial variation of the radiation field, especially during crossing of the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA). The DOSIS hardware was launched with the

  14. Remote viewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, C

    1988-04-15

    Remote viewing is the supposed faculty which enables a percipient, sited in a closed room, to describe the perceptions of a remote agent visiting an unknown target site. To provide convincing demonstration of such a faculty poses a range of experimental and practical problems, especially if feedback to the percipient is allowed after each trial. The precautions needed are elaborate and troublesome; many potential loopholes have to be plugged and there will be strong temptations to relax standards, requiring exceptional discipline and dedication by the experimenters. Most reports of remote viewing experiments are rather superficial and do not permit assessment of the experimental procedures with confidence; in many cases there is clear evidence of particular loopholes left unclosed. Any serious appraisal of the evidence would have to go beyond the reports. Meanwhile the published evidence is far from compelling, and certainly insufficient to justify overthrow of well-established scientific principles.

  15. Remote Sensing of the Upper Atmosphere and the Ionosphere in the Extreme and Far Ultraviolet: Results from the LITES Experiment aboard the IS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, S. C.; Chakrabarti, S.; Stephan, A. W.; Geddes, G.; Budzien, S. A.; Cook, T.; Aryal, S.; Martel, J.; Galkin, I. A.; Erickson, P. J.

    2017-12-01

    The Limb-Imaging Ionospheric and Thermospheric Extreme-ultraviolet Spectrograph (LITES) was launched as part of the Space Test Program Houston #5 (STP-H5) payload aboard a commercial resupply flight on February 19, 2017 and was subsequently installed on the International Space Station (ISS). LITES is an imaging spectrograph that spans the 60 - 140 nm wavelength range at 1 nm spectral resolution and samples tangent altitudes 150 - 350 km with 0.2° angular resolution. LITES, in combination with the GPS Radio Occultation and Ultraviolet Photometry - Colocated (GROUP-C) experiment, which includes a GPS receiver and a nadir viewing 135.6 nm photometer, jointly collect new information on the thermosphere and the ionosphere using simultaneous UV and radio emissions. LITES, which uses standard stars to perform in-flight calibration, observes altitude profiles of day and night airglow emissions that are being used to infer thermospheric and ionospheric density profiles. Furthermore, due to the inclination of the ISS, LITES has also observed auroral spectrum and their altitude and spatial variations. Finally, geomagnetic storm effects on its UV emissions can be used to remotely sense their effects on the upper atmospheric morphology. These ISS observations,which are complement to the upcoming ICON and GOLD NASA missions, are focused on ionosphere-atmosphere coupling and global-scale atmospheric response to space weather observed from higher altitudes . We will present an overview of the LITES instrument, some early results from the first few months of operations. We will also summarize the advantages in calibration and validation activities that are possible through space-based LITES, GROUP-C and stellar measurements and simultaneous ground-based optical and radar observations.

  16. HYPERSPECTRAL REMOTE SENSING WITH THE UAS "STUTTGARTER ADLER" – CHALLENGES, EXPERIENCES AND FIRST RESULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Buettner

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The UAS "Stuttgarter Adler" was designed as a flexible and cost-effective remote-sensing platform for acquisition of high quality environmental data. Different missions for precision agriculture applications and BRDF-research have been successfully performed with a multispectral camera system and a spectrometer as main payloads. Currently, an imaging spectrometer is integrated in the UAS as a new payload, which enables the recording of hyperspectral data in more than 200 spectral bands in the visible and near infrared spectrum. The recording principle of the hyperspectral instrument is based on a line scanner. Each line is stored as a matrix image with spectral information in one axis and spatial information in the other axis of the image. Besides a detailed specification of the system concept and instrument design, the calibration procedure of the hyperspectral sensor system is discussed and results of the laboratory calibration are presented. The complete processing chain of measurement data is described and first results of measurement-flights over agricultural test sites are presented.

  17. Viability Study for an Unattended UF_6 Cylinder Verification Station: Phase I Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Leon E.; Miller, Karen A.; Garner, James R.; Branney, Sean; McDonald, Benjamin S.; Webster, Jennifer B.; Zalavadia, Mital A.; Todd, Lindsay C.; Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Nordquist, Heather; Deshmukh, Nikhil S.; Stewart, Scott

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has pursued innovative techniques and an integrated suite of safeguards measures to address the verification challenges posed by the front end of the nuclear fuel cycle. Among the unattended instruments currently being explored by the IAEA is an Unattended Cylinder Verification Station (UCVS) that could provide automated, independent verification of the declared relative enrichment, "2"3"5U mass, total uranium mass and identification for all declared UF_6 cylinders in a facility (e.g., uranium enrichment plants and fuel fabrication plants). Under the auspices of the United States and European Commission Support Programs to the IAEA, a project was undertaken to assess the technical and practical viability of the UCVS concept. The US Support Program team consisted of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL, lead), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Savanah River National Laboratory (SRNL). At the core of the viability study is a long-term field trial of a prototype UCVS system at a Westinghouse fuel fabrication facility. A key outcome of the study is a quantitative performance evaluation of two nondestructive assay (NDA) methods being considered for inclusion in a UCVS: Hybrid Enrichment Verification Array (HEVA), and Passive Neutron Enrichment Meter (PNEM). This report provides context for the UCVS concept and the field trial: potential UCVS implementation concepts at an enrichment facility; an overview of UCVS prototype design; field trial objectives and activities. Field trial results and interpretation are presented, with a focus on the performance of PNEM and HEVA for the assay of over 200 ''typical'' Type 30B cylinders, and the viability of an ''NDA Fingerprint'' concept as a high-fidelity means to periodically verify that the contents of a given cylinder are consistent with previous scans. A modeling study, combined with field-measured instrument

  18. "We as Human Beings Get Farther and Farther Apart": the experiences of patients with remote monitoring systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottenberg, Abigale L; Swetz, Keith M; Mueller, Luke A; Gerhardson, Samantha; Mueller, Paul S

    2013-01-01

    To explore the experiences of patients living with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) who had received remote monitoring (RM). Anecdotal evidence suggests that not all patients with RM use the technology. Focus groups of patients with an ICD who received an RM system. Transcripts reviewed using thematic analysis. Nine patients (3 women and 6 men; median [range] age, 73 [58-91] years) received an RM system. Patients were assigned to a group in regard to RM system use (nonusers, n = 5; users, n = 4). Few nonusers recalled having prior conversations about the system. Users described it as "simple" and "easy" to use. Nonusers often were unsure whether their system was correctly transmitting information. System benefits perceived by users included convenience and security. Nonusers expressed mistrust. Recommendations included early education and help lines. Patient adherence to RM systems can be improved by explaining perceived benefits and addressing barriers to use. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Erosion Data from the MISSE 8 Polymers Experiment After 2 Years of Space Exposure on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groh, Kim K.; Banks, Bruce A.; Asmar, Olivia C.; Yi, Grace T.; Mitchell, Gianna G.; Guo, Aobo; Sechkar, Edward A.

    2016-01-01

    The Polymers Experiment was exposed to the low Earth orbit (LEO) space environment for 2.14 and 2.0 years as part of the Materials International Space Station Experiment 8 (MISSE 8) and the Optical Reflector Materials Experiment-III (ORMatE-III), respectively. The experiment contained 42 samples, which were flown in either ram, wake, or zenith orientations. The primary objective was to determine the effect of solar exposure on the atomic oxygen erosion yield (Ey) of fluoropolymers. This paper provides an overview of the experiment with details on the polymers flown, the characterization techniques used, the atomic oxygen fluence for each exposure orientation, and the LEO Ey results. The Ey values for the fluoropolymers range from 1.45 x 10(exp -25) cm(exp 3)/atom for white Tedlar Registered Trademark? (polyvinyl fluoride with white titanium dioxide pigment) flown in the ram orientation to 6.32 x 10(exp -24) cm(exp 3)/atom for aluminized-Teflon Registered Trademark? fluorinated ethylene propylene (Al-FEP) flown in the zenith orientation. Erosion yield data for FEP flown in ram, wake and zenith orientations are compared, and the Ey was found to be highly dependent on orientation, hence environmental exposure. Teflon FEP had an order of magnitude higher Ey when flown in the zenith direction (6.32 x10(exp -24) cm(exp3)/atom) as compared to the ram direction (2.37 x 10(exp -25) cm(exp 3)/atom). The Ey of FEP was found to increase with a direct correlation to the solar exposure/AO fluence ratio showing the effect of solar radiation and/or heating due to solar exposure on FEP erosion. In addition, back-surface carbon painted FEP (C-FEP) flown in the zenith orientation had a significantly higher Ey than clear FEP or Al-FEP further indicating that heating has a significant impact on the erosion of FEP, particularly in the zenith orientation.

  20. Quality assurance in the enriched uranium operations NDA facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, P.K.; Ceo, R.N. [Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, TN (United States)

    1997-11-01

    The Nondestructive Analysis (NDA) Facility at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant has characterized process wastes for Enriched Uranium Operations since 1978. Since that time, over 50,000 items have been analyzed. Analysis results are used to determine whether or not recovery of uranium from process wastes is economically feasible. Our instrument complement includes one large segmented gamma scanner (SGS), two smaller SGS, two solution assay systems (SAS), and Active Well Coincidence Counter (AWCC). The large SGS is used for analyzing High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters ant 208-L drums filled with combustible contaminated waste. The smaller SGS are used to analyze 4-L containers of ash and leached residues. The SAS are used to analyze 125 ml bottles of aqueous or organic waste solutions that may contain uranium. The gamma-based NDA techniques are used to identify which process wastes can be discarded, and which must be recycled. The AWCC is used to analyze high-density materials which are not amenable to gamma-ray analysis. 1 ref., 4 figs.

  1. On-Orbit Prospective Echocardiography on International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Douglas R.; Sargsyan, Ashot E.; Martin, David; Garcia, Kathleen M.; Melton, Shannon; Feiverson, Alan; Dulchavsky, Scott A.

    2010-01-01

    A number of echocardiographic research projects and experiments have been flown on almost every space vehicle since 1970, but validation of standard methods and the determination of Space Normal cardiac function has not been reported to date. Advanced Diagnostics in Microgravity (ADUM) -remote guided echocardiographic technique provides a novel and effective approach to on-board assessment of cardiac physiology and structure using a just-in-time training algorithm and real-time remote guidance aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The validation of remotely guided echocardiographic techniques provides the procedures and protocols to perform scientific and clinical echocardiography on the ISS and the Moon. The objectives of this study were: 1.To confirm the ability of non-physician astronaut/cosmonaut crewmembers to perform clinically relevant remotely guided echocardiography using the Human Research Facility on board the ISS. 2.To compare the preflight, postflight and in-flight echocardiographic parameters commonly used in clinical medicine.

  2. Methanol Droplet Extinction in Oxygen/Carbon-dioxide/Nitrogen Mixtures in Microgravity: Results from the International Space Station Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayagam, Vedha; Dietrich, Daniel L.; Ferkul, Paul V.; Hicks, Michael C.; Williams, Forman A.

    2012-01-01

    Motivated by the need to understand the flammability limits of condensed-phase fuels in microgravity, isolated single droplet combustion experiments were carried out in the Combustion Integrated Rack Facility onboard the International Space Station. Experimental observations of methanol droplet combustion and extinction in oxygen/carbon-dioxide/nitrogen mixtures at 0.7 and 1 atmospheric pressure in quiescent microgravity environment are reported for initial droplet diameters varying between 2 mm to 4 mm in this study.The ambient oxygen concentration was systematically lowered from test to test so as to approach the limiting oxygen index (LOI) at fixed ambient pressure. At one atmosphere pressure, ignition and some burning were observed for an oxygen concentration of 13% with the rest being nitrogen. In addition, measured droplet burning rates, flame stand-off ratios, and extinction diameters are presented for varying concentrations of oxygen and diluents. Simplified theoretical models are presented to explain the observed variations in extinction diameter and flame stand-off ratios.

  3. ENEL's experience in the management of irradiated fuel. Old and new problems encountered by nuclear station operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ariemma, A.; Cuzzaniti, M.; Zaffiro, B.; Bertini, A.

    1983-01-01

    The experience acquired in recent years in the management of spent fuel discharged from ENEL's reactors has revealed a substantial change in the attitude of nuclear station operators in connection with the end of the fuel cycle downstream from the reactor (back-end). While in the past, after President Carter's outline of US policy in April 1977, the utilities had to face great difficulty in reprocessing their fuel owing to inadequate capacity, today the same problem is regarded as a matter of cost-benefit analysis from an industrial standpoint and of appropriate planning for the utilization of the recovered fissile materials. Since the present technology allows spent fuel storage (dry or underwater) to be planned for rather long periods and plutonium utilization requires a very stringent schedule, the present trend is to ensure medium-term storage of spent fuel and to seek a greater flexibility in the final reprocessing stages so as to render plutonium availability consistent with the programmes for its utilization. As a consequence, the solution to the problems posed by high-activity waste disposal is being delayed, thus allowing an exhaustive and detailed analysis of all the possible solutions to be made. The paper describes a number of solutions to the problems ENEL has encountered in the fuel cycle back-end. (author)

  4. [Experience in organization of joint actions of expert divisions during the accident at P.S. Podporozniy Sayano-Shushenskaya hydroelectric power station].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolkutin, V V; Ivanov, P L; Fetisov, V A; Afanas'ev, S A; Dorozhkin, O A; Vognerubov, R N; Kuznetsov, T L

    2010-01-01

    The authors illustrate positive experience in organization and coordination of joint actions of expert divisions of different sectors during the accident at P.S. Podporozniy Sayano-Shushenskaya hydroelectric power station in August 2009. Special emphasis is laid on the participation of experts of quick-reaction teams formed by territorial forensic medical bureaus, mobile and supporting forces from the adjacent regions.

  5. Optical beam transport to a remote location for low jitter pump-probe experiments with a free electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Cinquegrana

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we propose a scheme that allows a strong reduction of the timing jitter between the pulses of a free electron laser (FEL and external laser pulses delivered simultaneously at the FEL experimental stations for pump-probe–type experiments. The technique, applicable to all seeding-based FEL schemes, relies on the free-space optical transport of a portion of the seed laser pulse from its optical table to the experimental stations. The results presented here demonstrate that a carefully designed laser beam transport, incorporating also a transverse beam position stabilization, allows one to keep the timing fluctuations, added by as much as 150 m of free space propagation and a number of beam folding mirrors, to less than 4 femtoseconds rms. By its nature our scheme removes the major common timing jitter sources, so the overall jitter in pump-probe measurements done in this way will be below 10 fs (with a margin to be lowered to below 5 fs, much better than the best results reported previously in the literature amounting to 33 fs rms.

  6. Field experience with advanced methods of on-line monitoring of water chemistry and corrosion degradation in nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stellwag, B.; Aaltonen, P.; Hickling, J.

    1997-01-01

    Advanced methods for on-line, in-situ water chemistry and corrosion monitoring in nuclear power stations have been developed during the past decade. The terms ''on-line'' and ''in-situ'' characterize approaches involving continuous measurement of relevant parameters in high temperature water, preferably directly in the systems and components and not in removed samples at room temperature. This paper describes the field experience to-date with such methods in terms of three examples: (1) On-line chemistry monitoring of the primary coolant during shutdown of a Type WWER-440 PWR. (2) Redox and corrosion potential measurements in final feedwater preheaters and steam generators of two large KWU PWRs over several cycles of plant operation. (3) Real-time, in-situ corrosion surveillance inside the calundia vault of a CANDU reactor. The way in which water chemistry sensors and corrosion monitoring sensors complement each other is outlined: on-line, in-situ measurement of pH, conductivity and redox potential gives information about the possible corrosivity of the environment. Electrochemical noise techniques display signals of corrosion activity under the actual environmental conditions. A common experience gained from separate use of these different types of sensors has been that new and additional information about plants and their actual process conditions is obtained. Moreover, they reveal the intimate relationship between the operational situation and its consequences for the quality of the working fluid and the corrosion behaviour of the plant materials. On this basis, the efficiency of the existing chemistry sampling and control system can be checked and corrosion degradation can be minimized. Furthermore, activity buildup in the primary circuit can be studied. Further significant advantages can be expected from an integration of these various types of sensors into a common water chemistry and corrosion surveillance system. For confirmation, a complete set of sensors

  7. Field experience with advanced methods of on-line monitoring of water chemistry and corrosion degradation in nuclear power stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stellwag, B [Siemens AG Unternehmensbereich KWU, Erlangen (Germany); Aaltonen, P [Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Hickling, J [CML GmbH, Erlangen (Germany)

    1997-02-01

    Advanced methods for on-line, in-situ water chemistry and corrosion monitoring in nuclear power stations have been developed during the past decade. The terms ``on-line`` and ``in-situ`` characterize approaches involving continuous measurement of relevant parameters in high temperature water, preferably directly in the systems and components and not in removed samples at room temperature. This paper describes the field experience to-date with such methods in terms of three examples: (1) On-line chemistry monitoring of the primary coolant during shutdown of a Type WWER-440 PWR. (2) Redox and corrosion potential measurements in final feedwater preheaters and steam generators of two large KWU PWRs over several cycles of plant operation. (3) Real-time, in-situ corrosion surveillance inside the calundia vault of a CANDU reactor. The way in which water chemistry sensors and corrosion monitoring sensors complement each other is outlined: on-line, in-situ measurement of pH, conductivity and redox potential gives information about the possible corrosivity of the environment. Electrochemical noise techniques display signals of corrosion activity under the actual environmental conditions. A common experience gained from separate use of these different types of sensors has been that new and additional information about plants and their actual process conditions is obtained. Moreover, they reveal the intimate relationship between the operational situation and its consequences for the quality of the working fluid and the corrosion behaviour of the plant materials. On this basis, the efficiency of the existing chemistry sampling and control system can be checked and corrosion degradation can be minimized. Furthermore, activity buildup in the primary circuit can be studied. Further significant advantages can be expected from an integration of these various types of sensors into a common water chemistry and corrosion surveillance system. (Abstract Truncated)

  8. Modeling and analysis of selected organization for economic cooperation and development PKL-3 station blackout experiments using TRACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Mukin

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available A series of tests dedicated to station blackout (SBO accident scenarios have been recently performed at the Primärkreislauf-Versuchsanlage (primary coolant loop test facility; PKL facility in the framework of the OECD/NEA PKL-3 project. These investigations address current safety issues related to beyond design basis accident transients with significant core heat up. This work presents a detailed analysis using the best estimate thermal–hydraulic code TRACE (v5.0 Patch4 of different SBO scenarios conducted at the PKL facility; failures of high- and low-pressure safety injection systems together with steam generator (SG feedwater supply are considered, thus calling for adequate accident management actions and timely implementation of alternative emergency cooling procedures to prevent core meltdown. The presented analysis evaluates the capability of the applied TRACE model of the PKL facility to correctly capture the sequences of events in the different SBO scenarios, namely the SBO tests H2.1, H2.2 run 1 and H2.2 run 2, including symmetric or asymmetric secondary side depressurization, primary side depressurization, accumulator (ACC injection in the cold legs and secondary side feeding with mobile pump and/or primary side emergency core coolant injection from the fuel pool cooling pump. This study is focused specifically on the prediction of the core exit temperature, which drives the execution of the most relevant accident management actions. This work presents, in particular, the key improvements made to the TRACE model that helped to improve the code predictions, including the modeling of dynamical heat losses, the nodalization of SGs' heat exchanger tubes and the ACCs. Another relevant aspect of this work is to evaluate how well the model simulations of the three different scenarios qualitatively and quantitatively capture the trends and results exhibited by the actual experiments. For instance, how the number of SGs considered for

  9. The Effect of Agile Workspace and Remote Working on Experiences of Privacy, Crowding and Satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevor Keeling

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Occupant density is an important and basic metric of space use efficiency. It affects user experience of privacy, crowding and satisfaction. The effect of agile working has been two fold. Firstly, offices have an increasing range of workspace settings such as break out space, collaborative space and contemplative space in contrast to the traditional workspace settings of assigned desks and formal meeting rooms. Secondly, office workers have become increasingly mobile as they are able to work from a greater variety of locations both in and out of their main place of work. This study asks whether workers who occupy agile workspaces and those with greater mobility experience privacy differently from workers with more conventional offices and work patterns. The experience of privacy can be considered in terms of retreat from people, control of information flow and control of interactions. Our results show that agile workspaces improve the ability to control information compared with open plan offices. It was also found that highly mobile workers are more sensitive to the negative effects of interacting with people. From this a taxonomy of offices is defined in terms of the features that contribute to the experience of privacy.

  10. Session 31B - Panel: Opportunities in the UK with the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benda, Gary; Hayes, David; Gorham, Ron; Wareing, Mark; Simper, Adrian; Selby, Terry

    2006-01-01

    The NDA participated in a panel session 31B on Wednesday afternoon starting at 3:15. The NDA is a non-departmental public body, set up in April 2005 under the Energy Act 2004 to take strategic responsibility for the UK's nuclear legacy. Details of their organization and history are located on their web site at www.nda.gov.uk. Also copies of their Power Point presentations made at WM'06 are available on their web site. Their core objective is to ensure that the 20 civil public sector nuclear sites under our ownership are decommissioned and cleaned up safely, securely, cost effectively and in ways that protect the environment for this and future generations. They lead the development of a unified and coherent decommissioning strategy, working in partnership with regulators and site licensees to achieve best value, optimum impact on local communities, and the highest environmental standards. The NDA's main task is the decommissioning and clean up of civil nuclear sites. If the Government decides it is necessary, however, the Energy Act 2004 allows the NDA to take responsibility for sites currently operated by, or on behalf of, the Ministry of Defence (MoD). Resources will then be transferred from the MoD to meet the costs of clean up. The NDA made a number of presentations to allow conference delegates the opportunity to understand some of the major aspects of their work and to interact with NDA staff. These included the following topics and gave opportunity for audience discussion: - A brief presentation to update on progress by the NDA; - Outline of low level waste management and the prioritisation process; - Discussion of the competition schedule related to low level waste management and the Drigg site. The following presentations and handout were delivered in various sessions of the conference as noted below and are available on their web page including the WM'06 Plenary Session presentation by Sir Anthony Cleaver, Chairman of the NDA. During Session 31B, the

  11. Nuclear power station siting experience in the United Kingdom: past and present and proposals for the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haire, T.P.; Usher, E.F.F.W.

    1975-01-01

    Foremost of the many factors in site selection considerations are population distribution, cooling-water availability and amenity. Others are safety of potable water sources, geological stability and the risk of external hazards. Where cooling-water supplies are a limiting factor, the choica of reactor system is of major importance. To determine as early as possible the effect a station might have on its environment, desk studies, visual surveys and wind-tunnel tests are carried out. The Central Electricity Generating Board places great importance on obtaining the fullest degree of acceptance by the public for its nuclear stations and ensures that full consultation is provided with the relevant authorities at all stages of power-station development. It also provides public exhibitions, public meetings and liaison with the local inhabitants. Recruitment of station staff where possible from the immediate area of the station and formation of sports and social clubs are two of the practical steps which help to integrate the station into the local community. Whilst the current energy crisis has reinforced the need for a substantial nuclear programme, possible ways of further reducing the impact of nuclear stations on the environment are being considered. The paper concludes that sufficient nuclear sites can be provided for future needs but that continuing effort will be required to ensure public acceptance. (author)

  12. UMTS Network Stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, C.

    2010-09-01

    The weakness of small island electrical grids implies a handicap for the electrical generation with renewable energy sources. With the intention of maximizing the installation of photovoltaic generators in the Canary Islands, arises the need to develop a solar forecasting system that allows knowing in advance the amount of PV generated electricity that will be going into the grid, from the installed PV power plants installed in the island. The forecasting tools need to get feedback from real weather data in "real time" from remote weather stations. Nevertheless, the transference of this data to the calculation computer servers is very complicated with the old point to point telecommunication systems that, neither allow the transfer of data from several remote weather stations simultaneously nor high frequency of sampling of weather parameters due to slowness of the connection. This one project has developed a telecommunications infrastructure that allows sensorizadas remote stations, to send data of its sensors, once every minute and simultaneously, to the calculation server running the solar forecasting numerical models. For it, the Canary Islands Institute of Technology has added a sophisticated communications network to its 30 weather stations measuring irradiation at strategic sites, areas with high penetration of photovoltaic generation or that have potential to host in the future photovoltaic power plants connected to the grid. In each one of the stations, irradiance and temperature measurement instruments have been installed, over inclined silicon cell, global radiation on horizontal surface and room temperature. Mobile telephone devices have been installed and programmed in each one of the weather stations, which allow the transfer of their data taking advantage of the UMTS service offered by the local telephone operator. Every minute the computer server running the numerical weather forecasting models receives data inputs from 120 instruments distributed

  13. Potentialities of the internal target station at the Nuclotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malakhov, A.I.; Afanasiev, S.V.; Anisimov, Yu.S.; Artiomov, A.S.; Bazilev, S.N.; Khrenov, A.N.; Kliman, J.; Krasnov, V.A.; Matousek, V.; Morhac, M. E-mail: fyzimiro@savba.sk; Starikov, A.Yu.; Shabunov, A.V.; Slepnev, V.M.; Turzo, I

    2000-02-01

    The potentialities of the internal target station used in physics experiments at the Nuclotron, as well as its construction, hardware and software configurations are described. The remote control of the station is performed by means of a PC and is based on operative presentation of the magnetic field cycle, the beam parameters and the target position on screen. Consequently, the space-time trajectory of motion of a chosen target can be determined in an interactive way by an operator. During the accelerator operation the motion is carried out by means of a stepper motor.

  14. Waste characterization methods at belgoprocess and the importance of NDA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botte, J.; Luycx, P.

    2003-01-01

    Waste characterization in the end cycle becomes more and more important. Several methods are available for a radiological characterization: from copying the waste producers declaration over a calculation based on known characteristics or measured values to combinations of several techniques. The decision on what technique(s) to be used will be based on several criteria. One also has to evaluate at what stage of the waste treatment process the characterization has to be performed. Recently belgoprocess has performed large efforts and investments to assure a good waste characterization. These are concentrated in studies on historical and recent waste, resulting in isotopic vectors and the purchase of several NDA devices in order to cover the whole scala of waste the company treats. The measuring results always need to be integrated with isotopic vectors. (orig.)

  15. RUMINATIONS ON NDA MEASUREMENT UNCERTAINTY COMPARED TO DA UNCERTAINTY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salaymeh, S.; Ashley, W.; Jeffcoat, R.

    2010-06-17

    It is difficult to overestimate the importance that physical measurements performed with nondestructive assay instruments play throughout the nuclear fuel cycle. They underpin decision making in many areas and support: criticality safety, radiation protection, process control, safeguards, facility compliance, and waste measurements. No physical measurement is complete or indeed meaningful, without a defensible and appropriate accompanying statement of uncertainties and how they combine to define the confidence in the results. The uncertainty budget should also be broken down in sufficient detail suitable for subsequent uses to which the nondestructive assay (NDA) results will be applied. Creating an uncertainty budget and estimating the total measurement uncertainty can often be an involved process, especially for non routine situations. This is because data interpretation often involves complex algorithms and logic combined in a highly intertwined way. The methods often call on a multitude of input data subject to human oversight. These characteristics can be confusing and pose a barrier to developing and understanding between experts and data consumers. ASTM subcommittee C26-10 recognized this problem in the context of how to summarize and express precision and bias performance across the range of standards and guides it maintains. In order to create a unified approach consistent with modern practice and embracing the continuous improvement philosophy a consensus arose to prepare a procedure covering the estimation and reporting of uncertainties in non destructive assay of nuclear materials. This paper outlines the needs analysis, objectives and on-going development efforts. In addition to emphasizing some of the unique challenges and opportunities facing the NDA community we hope this article will encourage dialog and sharing of best practice and furthermore motivate developers to revisit the treatment of measurement uncertainty.

  16. Ruminations On NDA Measurement Uncertainty Compared TO DA Uncertainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salaymeh, S.; Ashley, W.; Jeffcoat, R.

    2010-01-01

    It is difficult to overestimate the importance that physical measurements performed with nondestructive assay instruments play throughout the nuclear fuel cycle. They underpin decision making in many areas and support: criticality safety, radiation protection, process control, safeguards, facility compliance, and waste measurements. No physical measurement is complete or indeed meaningful, without a defensible and appropriate accompanying statement of uncertainties and how they combine to define the confidence in the results. The uncertainty budget should also be broken down in sufficient detail suitable for subsequent uses to which the nondestructive assay (NDA) results will be applied. Creating an uncertainty budget and estimating the total measurement uncertainty can often be an involved process, especially for non routine situations. This is because data interpretation often involves complex algorithms and logic combined in a highly intertwined way. The methods often call on a multitude of input data subject to human oversight. These characteristics can be confusing and pose a barrier to developing and understanding between experts and data consumers. ASTM subcommittee C26-10 recognized this problem in the context of how to summarize and express precision and bias performance across the range of standards and guides it maintains. In order to create a unified approach consistent with modern practice and embracing the continuous improvement philosophy a consensus arose to prepare a procedure covering the estimation and reporting of uncertainties in non destructive assay of nuclear materials. This paper outlines the needs analysis, objectives and on-going development efforts. In addition to emphasizing some of the unique challenges and opportunities facing the NDA community we hope this article will encourage dialog and sharing of best practice and furthermore motivate developers to revisit the treatment of measurement uncertainty.

  17. Development plan of Pu NDA system using ZnS ceramic scintillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kureta, Masatoshi; Soyama, Kazuhiko; Seya, Michio; Ohzu, Akira; Haruyama, Mitsuo; Takase, Misao; Sakasai, Kaoru; Nakamura, Tatsuya; Toh, Kentaro

    2012-01-01

    Alternative techniques to neutron detection by He-3 for nuclear security and safeguards systems are necessary to be developed since He-3 shortage is serious. With support of Japanese government (the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, and Technology), we have started an R and D project of Pu NDA system using ZnS ceramic scintillator. Here we present development plan, production of a new type of ZnS ceramic scintillator experimentally and basic design of a PCAS alternative Pu NDA system. We are planning the demonstration tests using the alternative NDA system comparing with the current PCAS in which the He-3 counters are installed. (author)

  18. Standard guide for the selection, training and qualification of nondestructive assay (NDA) personnel

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2004-01-01

    1.1 This guide contains good practices for the selection, training, qualification, and professional development of personnel performing analysis, calibration, physical measurements, or data review using nondestructive assay equipment, methods, results, or techniques. The guide also covers NDA personnel involved with NDA equipment setup, selection, diagnosis, troubleshooting, or repair. Selection, training, and qualification programs based on this guide are intended to provide assurance that NDA personnel are qualified to perform their jobs competently. This guide presents a series of options but does not recommend a specific course of action.

  19. The Miksova water power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    This leaflet describes the Miksova water power station. The Miksova water power station is part of the second derived cascade of hydro power stations on the river Vah. It was built at the end of a huge development in Slovak hydro-energy in the late 1950's and the beginning of the 1960's. It is the second water power station on this derived cascade, which is situated downstream the Hricov reservoir and water power station. At the power station, three turbine sets with vertical Kaplan turbines are installed with a total power output of 3 x 31.2 = 93.6 MW. With this power output the Miksova water power station (Miksova I) was the biggest water power station in the Slovak Republic until the construction of Pumping water power station Liptovska Mara. And it is still the biggest channel water power station on the Vah so far. It was put into operation during the period 1963 to 1965. There are three turbine sets with Kaplan turbines from CKD Blansko, with a synchronous hydro-alternator installed in the power station. Their installed capacity is 93.6 MW in total and the projected annual production of electrical energy is 207 GWh. The turbines are fi ve-bladed (on the Hricov and Povazska Bystrica water power stations they are four-bladed) and the impeller wheel has a diameter of 4800 mm. They are designed for extension of the head from 24.1 to 22.21 m and each of them has an absorption capacity of 134 m 3 .s -1 nd a nominal operating speed of 2.08 m 3 .s -1 , runaway speed 4.9 m 3 .s -1 . Each synchronous hydro-alternator has a maximum power output of 31.2 MW, a nominal voltage of 10.5 kV and power factor cos φ of 0.8. Power from the power station is led out through 110 kV switchgear. The water power station operates under automatic turbine mode of operation with remote indication and control from the Dispatch Centre at Vodne elektrarne, in Trencin. From start of operation until the end of 2003 all three turbine sets operated for a total of 450,500 running hours and the

  20. Remote Systems Design & Deployment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, Sharon A.; Baker, Carl P.; Valdez, Patrick LJ

    2009-08-28

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked by Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) to provide information and lessons learned relating to the design, development and deployment of remote systems, particularly remote arm/manipulator systems. This report reflects PNNL’s experience with remote systems and lays out the most important activities that need to be completed to successfully design, build, deploy and operate remote systems in radioactive and chemically contaminated environments. It also contains lessons learned from PNNL’s work experiences, and the work of others in the national laboratory complex.

  1. Offloading social care responsibilities: recent experiences of local voluntary organisations in a remote urban centre in British Columbia, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanlon, Neil; Rosenberg, Mark; Clasby, Rachael

    2007-07-01

    Services offered by voluntary organisations are an integral but often overlooked component of health and social care. Of late, there has been a renewed interest in voluntary welfare provision as a viable alternative to state and market. Recent developments in welfare provision in Canada appear to have brought greater social care roles for the voluntary sector at the same time as new and arguably more restrictive funding and accountability mechanisms are being imposed by different arms of the state. To explore these issues more closely, the present paper examines the impressions and experiences of voluntary and formal sector providers of services for senior citizens and people with disabilities in a remote urban centre (population less than 100 000) in the interior of British Columbia, Canada. Two important operational pressures provide the context of the analysis: (1) reform of provincial government funding and regulation of voluntary services; and (2) the restructuring of welfare provision, especially in the areas of health care and social services. The authors found evidence of an escalating incursion of the state into local voluntary sector affairs that needs to be understood in the context of long-standing institutional links between government and 'professional' voluntary welfare provision in British Columbia. The results point to three important directions in contemporary local voluntary provision: (1) an emerging ethos of accountability, efficiency and competition in voluntary provision; (2) increasing pressure to centralise volunteer services; and consequently, (3) the potential erosion of flexibility and personalisation that are seen to characterise the voluntary sector.

  2. Experiment Design Regularization-Based Hardware/Software Codesign for Real-Time Enhanced Imaging in Uncertain Remote Sensing Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castillo Atoche A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A new aggregated Hardware/Software (HW/SW codesign approach to optimization of the digital signal processing techniques for enhanced imaging with real-world uncertain remote sensing (RS data based on the concept of descriptive experiment design regularization (DEDR is addressed. We consider the applications of the developed approach to typical single-look synthetic aperture radar (SAR imaging systems operating in the real-world uncertain RS scenarios. The software design is aimed at the algorithmic-level decrease of the computational load of the large-scale SAR image enhancement tasks. The innovative algorithmic idea is to incorporate into the DEDR-optimized fixed-point iterative reconstruction/enhancement procedure the convex convergence enforcement regularization via constructing the proper multilevel projections onto convex sets (POCS in the solution domain. The hardware design is performed via systolic array computing based on a Xilinx Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA XC4VSX35-10ff668 and is aimed at implementing the unified DEDR-POCS image enhancement/reconstruction procedures in a computationally efficient multi-level parallel fashion that meets the (near real-time image processing requirements. Finally, we comment on the simulation results indicative of the significantly increased performance efficiency both in resolution enhancement and in computational complexity reduction metrics gained with the proposed aggregated HW/SW co-design approach.

  3. Assimilating Remote Sensing Observations of Leaf Area Index and Soil Moisture for Wheat Yield Estimates: An Observing System Simulation Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nearing, Grey S.; Crow, Wade T.; Thorp, Kelly R.; Moran, Mary S.; Reichle, Rolf H.; Gupta, Hoshin V.

    2012-01-01

    Observing system simulation experiments were used to investigate ensemble Bayesian state updating data assimilation of observations of leaf area index (LAI) and soil moisture (theta) for the purpose of improving single-season wheat yield estimates with the Decision Support System for Agrotechnology Transfer (DSSAT) CropSim-Ceres model. Assimilation was conducted in an energy-limited environment and a water-limited environment. Modeling uncertainty was prescribed to weather inputs, soil parameters and initial conditions, and cultivar parameters and through perturbations to model state transition equations. The ensemble Kalman filter and the sequential importance resampling filter were tested for the ability to attenuate effects of these types of uncertainty on yield estimates. LAI and theta observations were synthesized according to characteristics of existing remote sensing data, and effects of observation error were tested. Results indicate that the potential for assimilation to improve end-of-season yield estimates is low. Limitations are due to a lack of root zone soil moisture information, error in LAI observations, and a lack of correlation between leaf and grain growth.

  4. Development of Flow Boiling and Condensation Experiment on the International Space Station- Normal and Low Gravity Flow Boiling Experiment Development and Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahra, Henry K.; Hall, Nancy R.; Hasan, Mohammad M.; Wagner, James D.; May, Rochelle L.; Mackey, Jeffrey R.; Kolacz, John S.; Butcher, Robert L.; Frankenfield, Bruce J.; Mudawar, Issam; hide

    2013-01-01

    Flow boiling and condensation have been identified as two key mechanisms for heat transport that are vital for achieving weight and volume reduction as well as performance enhancement in future space systems. Since inertia driven flows are demanding on power usage, lower flows are desirable. However, in microgravity, lower flows are dominated by forces other than inertia (like the capillary force). It is of paramount interest to investigate limits of low flows beyond which the flow is inertial enough to be gravity independent. One of the objectives of the Flow Boiling and Condensation Flight Experiment sets to investigate these limits for flow boiling and condensation. A two-phase flow loop consisting of a Flow Boiling Module and two Condensation Modules has been developed to experimentally study flow boiling condensation heat transfer in the reduced gravity environment provided by the reduced gravity platform. This effort supports the development of a flow boiling and condensation facility for the International Space Station (ISS). The closed loop test facility is designed to deliver the test fluid, FC-72 to the inlet of any one of the test modules at specified thermodynamic and flow conditions. The zero-g-aircraft tests will provide subcooled and saturated flow boiling critical heat flux and flow condensation heat transfer data over wide range of flow velocities. Additionally, these tests will verify the performance of all gravity sensitive components, such as evaporator, condenser and accumulator associated with the two-phase flow loop. We will present in this paper the breadboard development and testing results which consist of detailed performance evaluation of the heater and condenser combination in reduced and normal gravity. We will also present the design of the reduced gravity aircraft rack and the results of the ground flow boiling heat transfer testing performed with the Flow Boiling Module that is designed to investigate flow boiling heat transfer and

  5. Multiphase Transport in Porous Media: Gas-Liquid Separation Using Capillary Pressure Gradients International Space Station (ISS) Flight Experiment Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Richard R., Jr.; Holtsnider, John T.; Dahl, Roger W.; Deeks, Dalton; Javanovic, Goran N.; Parker, James M.; Ehlert, Jim

    2013-01-01

    Advances in the understanding of multiphase flow characteristics under variable gravity conditions will ultimately lead to improved and as of yet unknown process designs for advanced space missions. Such novel processes will be of paramount importance to the success of future manned space exploration as we venture into our solar system and beyond. In addition, because of the ubiquitous nature and vital importance of biological and environmental processes involving airwater mixtures, knowledge gained about fundamental interactions and the governing properties of these mixtures will clearly benefit the quality of life here on our home planet. The techniques addressed in the current research involving multiphase transport in porous media and gas-liquid phase separation using capillary pressure gradients are also a logical candidate for a future International Space Station (ISS) flight experiment. Importantly, the novel and potentially very accurate Lattice-Boltzmann (LB) modeling of multiphase transport in porous media developed in this work offers significantly improved predictions of real world fluid physics phenomena, thereby promoting advanced process designs for both space and terrestrial applications.This 3-year research effort has culminated in the design and testing of a zero-g demonstration prototype. Both the hydrophilic (glass) and hydrophobic (Teflon) media Capillary Pressure Gradient (CPG) cartridges prepared during the second years work were evaluated. Results obtained from ground testing at 1-g were compared to those obtained at reduced gravities spanning Martian (13-g), Lunar (16-g) and zero-g. These comparisons clearly demonstrate the relative strength of the CPG phenomena and the efficacy of its application to meet NASAs unique gas-liquid separation (GLS) requirements in non-terrestrial environments.LB modeling software, developed concurrently with the zero-g test effort, was shown to accurately reproduce observed CPG driven gas-liquid separation

  6. IonLab. A remote-controlled experiment for academic and vocational education and training on extraction chromatography and ion exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, Wolfgang; Fournier, Claudia; Vahlbruch, Jan-Willem; Walther, Clemens [Leibniz Univ., Hannover (Germany). Inst. for Radioecology and Radiation Protection (IRS)

    2016-07-01

    As a major contribution to modern web-based education and training in nuclear chemistry we have built and operated a remote-controlled experiment - IonLab - as part of the integrated EUFP7 project CINCHII. The setup is suitable for teaching basics on extraction chromatography and ion exchange using radionuclides. We describe separation of the beta emitting nuclides Sr-90 and Y-90 followed by radiometric detection, but the experiment is easily adapted to other separation schemes. This approach is aimed at institutions in academic or vocational education who need to convey the skills of handling radioactive (or otherwise dangerous, e.g. biotoxic) substances without appropriately licensed laboratory space for teaching. This camera-monitored remote controlled lab experiment has proved to be much closer to a real hands-on training and superior to a mere computer simulation.

  7. Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment, SAGE III on ISS, An Earth Science Mission on the International Space Station, Schedule Risk Analysis, A Project Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonine, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    The presentation provides insight into the schedule risk analysis process used by the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III on the International Space Station Project. The presentation focuses on the schedule risk analysis process highlighting the methods for identification of risk inputs, the inclusion of generic risks identified outside the traditional continuous risk management process, and the development of tailored analysis products used to improve risk informed decision making.

  8. Data collecting and treatment control system in the «Alpha-Electron» space experiment on board the International Space Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galper, A M; Batischev, A G; Naumov, P P; Naumov, P Yu

    2017-01-01

    The fast multilayer scintillation detector of the new telescope-spectrometer for the ALFA-ELECTRON space experiment is in ground testing mode now. Modules of data control system for spectrometer are discussed. The structure of the main data format and functional blocks for data treatment are presented. The device will planned to install on the outer surface of the Russian Segment (RS) of the International Space Station (ISS) in 2018. (paper)

  9. OLDES - an on-line dose evaluation system that can be integrated into the remote monitoring system of nuclear power stations for additional monitoring and prognostic assessment in case of major accidental activity release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witt, H. de; Brenk, H.D.; Kruschel, K.P.; Knaup, A.G.

    1986-01-01

    Remote monitoring systems are an inherent part of the environmental surveillance installations of most commercial LWR power plants in the FRG. The systems are designed to cover routine and accident situations. They provide meteorological data, gross effluent dose rates, and dose measurements at approximately 25 locations in the vicinity of the plant in time steps of 10 minutes. Based on such a network, an attempt has been made to develop an on-line dose evaluation system (OLDES) as a tool to aid decision making processes in case of major accidental releases. On-line, here means that the software package directly includes the measurements at the monitoring stations in order to adjust the dose computations to the measurements in time steps of 10 minutes. In this way the system yields the best possible bases, both for actual diagnosis of radiation exposure, and for dose projections. The software package uses a Gaussian puff trajectory model to simulate atmospheric dispersion and deposition of radionuclides. It includes 'cloud- and ground-shine irradiation' and allows for changing weather conditions without exceeding the limits of real time calculation. Preliminary tests of the software package revealed reasonable semioperational performance. (orig.)

  10. Genel Anestezi Altında Çocukta Diş Tedavisi

    OpenAIRE

    Gülhan, A.; Sandallı, N.

    2013-01-01

    ÖZETBu makalede çocuklarda genel anestezi altında diş tedavisinin koşulları anlatıldı ve normal tedavi koşulları sağlanamadığı takdirde, genel anesteziye başvurmanın yararlarına ve sakıncalarına değinildi. Genel anestezi indikasyonları sıralanarak, bunlar arasında en sık rastladığımız «Güç çocuklarım" genci anesteziye başvurmadan Önce hangi yollara başvurularak normal tedavinin deneneceğinden bahsedildi.Bir hastane ortamında genel anestezi altında çalışmaya karar verildikten sonra, bir a...

  11. Instructor station of full scope simulator for Qinshan 300 MW Nuclear Power Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Fanghui

    1996-01-01

    The instructor station of Full Scope Simulator for Qinshan 300 MW Nuclear Power Unit is based on SGI graphic workstation. The operation system is real time UNIX, and the development of man-machine interface, mainly depends on standard X window system, special for X TOOLKITS and MOTIF. The instructor station has been designed to increase training effectiveness and provide the most flexible environment possible to enhance its usefulness. Based on experiences in the development of the instructor station, many new features have been added including I/O panel diagrams, simulation diagrams, graphic operation of malfunction, remote function and I/O overrides etc

  12. Viability Study for an Unattended UF6 Cylinder Verification Station: Phase I Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Leon E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Miller, Karen A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Garner, James R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Branney, Sean [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); McDonald, Benjamin S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Webster, Jennifer B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zalavadia, Mital A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Todd, Lindsay C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kulisek, Jonathan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Nordquist, Heather [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Deshmukh, Nikhil S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stewart, Scott [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-05-31

    In recent years, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has pursued innovative techniques and an integrated suite of safeguards measures to address the verification challenges posed by the front end of the nuclear fuel cycle. Among the unattended instruments currently being explored by the IAEA is an Unattended Cylinder Verification Station (UCVS) that could provide automated, independent verification of the declared relative enrichment, 235U mass, total uranium mass and identification for all declared UF6 cylinders in a facility (e.g., uranium enrichment plants and fuel fabrication plants). Under the auspices of the United States and European Commission Support Programs to the IAEA, a project was undertaken to assess the technical and practical viability of the UCVS concept. The US Support Program team consisted of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL, lead), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Savanah River National Laboratory (SRNL). At the core of the viability study is a long-term field trial of a prototype UCVS system at a Westinghouse fuel fabrication facility. A key outcome of the study is a quantitative performance evaluation of two nondestructive assay (NDA) methods being considered for inclusion in a UCVS: Hybrid Enrichment Verification Array (HEVA), and Passive Neutron Enrichment Meter (PNEM). This report provides context for the UCVS concept and the field trial: potential UCVS implementation concepts at an enrichment facility; an overview of UCVS prototype design; field trial objectives and activities. Field trial results and interpretation are presented, with a focus on the performance of PNEM and HEVA for the assay of over 200 “typical” Type 30B cylinders, and the viability of an “NDA Fingerprint” concept as a high-fidelity means to periodically verify that the contents of a given cylinder are consistent with previous scans. A modeling study, combined with field

  13. Review and Ranking of NDA Techniques to Determine Plutonium Content in Spent Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheatham, Jesse R.; Wagner, John C.

    2010-01-01

    A number of efforts are under way to improve nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) safeguard applications. These efforts have largely focused on advancing individual NDA approaches to assay plutonium content. Although significant improvements have been made in NDA techniques, relatively little work has been done to thoroughly and systematically compare the methods. A comparative review of the relative strengths and weaknesses of current NDA techniques brings a new perspective to guide future research. To gauge the practicality and effectiveness of the various relevant NDA approaches, criteria have been developed from two broad categories: functionality and operability. The functionality category includes accuracy estimates, measurement time, plutonium verification capabilities, and assembly or fuel rod assay. Since SNF composition changes with operational history and cooling times, the viability of certain NDA approaches will also change over time. While active interrogation approaches will benefit from reduced background radiation, passive assays will lose the information contained in short-lived isotopes. Therefore, the expected assay accuracy as a function of time is considered. The operability category attempts to gauge the challenges associated with the application of different NDA techniques. This category examines the NDA deploy-ability, measurement capabilities and constraints in spent fuel pools, required on-site facilities, NDA technique synergies, and the extent to which the measurements are obtrusive to the facility. Each topic listed in the categories will be given a numerical score used to rank the different NDA approaches. While the combined numerical score of each technique is informative, the individual-topic scoring will allow for a more-tailored ranking approach. Since the needs and tools of the International Atomic Energy Agency differ from those of a recycling facility, the best assay technique may change with users

  14. Fire Stations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Fire Stations in the United States Any location where fire fighters are stationed or based out of, or where equipment that such personnel use in carrying out their...

  15. Remote inspection system for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inagaki, K.; Fujii, M.; Doi, A.; Harima, T.

    1977-01-01

    A remote inspection system for nuclear power plants was constructed based on an analysis of inspections performed by an operator on patrol. This system consists of an operator's console and a remote station. The remote station, equipped with five kinds of sensors, is steered along the inspection route by a photoelectric guiding system or may be manually controlled from an operator's console in a main control room. Signals for control and inspection data are multiplexed and transmitted through a coaxial cable

  16. Investigations of the Cardiovascular and Respiratory Systems on Board the International Space Station: Experiments Puls and Pneumocard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranov, V. M.; Baevsky, R. M.; Drescher, J.; Tank, J.

    parameters describing the results of the function of these systems like heart rate, arterial pressure, cardiac output, or breathing frequency, concentration of O2 and CO2 , etc. Missing significant changes of these parameters during weightlessness supports the hypothesis that adaptational and compensatory mechanisms are sufficient and guarantee cardiovascular homeostasis under changing environmental conditions. characteristic changes of the vegetative balance and of the activity of different regulatory elements at the brainstem and subcortical level. This changes guaranteed the adaptation to long term weightlessness. However, it remains unclear to what extent the different levels are involved. Moreover, the criteria describing the efficacy of cardiorespiratory interaction for the different functional states are not defined yet. The investigation of this problems is highly relevant in order to improve the medical control, especially if considering that the disruption of regulatory systems mostly precedes dangerous destruction of homeostasis. cardiovascular and respiratory function on Board the International Space Station (ISS) aiming to obtain new insights into the interaction between different regulatory elements. "Puls" is measures ECG, photoplethysmogram (PPG), and the pneumotachogram (PTG). The ECG is used to measure time series of R-R intervals and to analyse HRV. PPG is used to define the pulse wave velocity, phases of the cardiac cycle, and an estimate of the filling of finger vessels. The variability of these parameters is also calculated and compared to HRV. The analysis of the PTG allows to describe the interaction of the regulatory parameters of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems. Hence, an important feature of the experiment "Puls" is the investigation of regulatory mechanisms rather than of cardiovascular homeostasis. cardiography) and left ventricular contractility (seismocardiography) will be obtained. This expansion is of major importance

  17. CSER 94-015: New portable NDA equipment for use in SNM audits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hess, A.L.

    1994-12-12

    A criticality safety review is presented for the use of two portable NDA detectors from Los Alamos during an IAEA inspection of the SNM at PFP. The units are an Active Well Coincidence Counter (AWCC) and a High Level Neutron Coincidence Counter (HLNCC). Approval for their employment is based on the inherent safety of the containers to be assayed, one at a time, and because their designs conform with the acceptability criteria which allow the other NDA detectors currently employed at the facility.

  18. Remote sensing for water quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giardino, Claudia

    2006-01-01

    The application of remote sensing to the study of lakes is begun in years 80 with the lunch of the satellites of second generation. Many experiences have indicated the contribution of remote sensing for the limnology [it

  19. Uncertainty analysis of NDA waste measurements using computer simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackwood, L.G.; Harker, Y.D.; Yoon, W.Y.; Meachum, T.R.

    2000-01-01

    Uncertainty assessments for nondestructive radioassay (NDA) systems for nuclear waste are complicated by factors extraneous to the measurement systems themselves. Most notably, characteristics of the waste matrix (e.g., homogeneity) and radioactive source material (e.g., particle size distribution) can have great effects on measured mass values. Under these circumstances, characterizing the waste population is as important as understanding the measurement system in obtaining realistic uncertainty values. When extraneous waste characteristics affect measurement results, the uncertainty results are waste-type specific. The goal becomes to assess the expected bias and precision for the measurement of a randomly selected item from the waste population of interest. Standard propagation-of-errors methods for uncertainty analysis can be very difficult to implement in the presence of significant extraneous effects on the measurement system. An alternative approach that naturally includes the extraneous effects is as follows: (1) Draw a random sample of items from the population of interest; (2) Measure the items using the NDA system of interest; (3) Establish the true quantity being measured using a gold standard technique; and (4) Estimate bias by deriving a statistical regression model comparing the measurements on the system of interest to the gold standard values; similar regression techniques for modeling the standard deviation of the difference values gives the estimated precision. Actual implementation of this method is often impractical. For example, a true gold standard confirmation measurement may not exist. A more tractable implementation is obtained by developing numerical models for both the waste material and the measurement system. A random sample of simulated waste containers generated by the waste population model serves as input to the measurement system model. This approach has been developed and successfully applied to assessing the quantity of

  20. A Remote Radioactivity Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jona, Kemi; Vondracek, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Imagine a high school with very few experimental resources and limited budgets that prevent the purchase of even basic laboratory equipment. For example, many high schools do not have the means of experimentally studying radioactivity because they lack Geiger counters and/or good radioactive sources. This was the case at the first high school one…

  1. How Patients and Nurses Experience an Open Versus an Enclosed Nursing Station on an Inpatient Psychiatric Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shattell, Mona; Bartlett, Robin; Beres, Kyle; Southard, Kelly; Bell, Claire; Judge, Christine A; Duke, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    The inpatient environment is a critical space for nurses and patients in psychiatric settings. In this article, we describe nurses' and patients' perceptions of the inpatient environment both before the removal of a Plexiglas enclosure around a nurses' station and after its removal. Nurses had mixed feelings about the enclosure, reporting that it provided for confidentiality and a concentrated work space but also acknowledged the challenge of the barrier for communication with their patients. Patients unanimously preferred the nurses' station without the barrier, reporting increased feelings of freedom, safety, and connection with the nurses after its removal. It is important to consider the implications of environmental decisions in inpatient settings in order to promote a healthy workplace and healing environment for all community members. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. Recent activities of the ESARDA working group on NDA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harry, R.J.S.

    1983-01-01

    The European Safeguards Research and Development Association, ESARDA, has one of the largest coordinated safeguards and development programs in the world. There are several working groups for specific R and D activities. One of these is the ''ESARDA Working Group on Techniques and Standards for non-Destructive Analysis''. The NDA working group has initiated the international project of the preparation of uranium oxide certified reference materials for the gamma spectrometric determination of the enrichment, which are made in a collaboration with the US NBS and the European Communities' Central Bureau for Nuclear Measurements, CBNM, at Geel. The possibility of a similar type of reference material for Pu isotopic abundance measurements is investigated at CBNM, and the pilot samples may become available for intercomparisons. Safeguards acceptability and users manual have been considered carefully. The working group has undertaken an intercomparison on the determination of plutonium isotopic ratios by gamma spectrometry, using NBS-SRM's-946, -947 and 948. A new exercise on 0,5 gram samples of seven different isotopic compositions samples will be executed under the name PIDIE (Plutonium Isotopic Determination Intercomparison Exercise)

  3. Performance results from the first integrated NDA VXI safeguards system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bot, D.; Messner, R.

    1999-01-01

    The VIFM system is the first integrated safeguard system to be developed and deployed by the IAEA. The system is also noteworthy in that it is the most versatile of any NDA system thus far deployed. Due to the high level of functionality, the VIFM is probably the most 'tested' of all IAEA systems. This paper discusses the results obtained from detailed in field and laboratory testing of a variety of VIFM configurations ranging from simple single systems to highly integrated system implementations. A total of 4 sites have had VIFM equipment installed. Data collected from these sites have been of very high quality and consistency despite the failure of commercial hard disk drive equipment. The systematic failure of these drives have been corrected using a variety of methods and performance since those corrections have been excellent with no equipment failures. The tests carried out also included the test of a twisted pair to coaxial cable interface. This interface was required in order to allow installation even with a significant facility cabling limitation. The performance obtained from the system utilizing this device showed no degradation as compared to that of systems utilizing direct coaxial cable connections. To conclude, the VIFM system, has been reliable even after partial failure of commercial off-the-shelf components which required the systems to operate on full fail-safe backup. These tests have thus shown both the reliable operation of the VIFM in normal operating conditions as well as the most adverse

  4. Solution for remote handling in accelerator installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgerjon, J.J.; Ekberg, E.L.; Grisham, D.L.; Horne, R.A.; Meyer, R.E.; Flatau, C.R.; Wilson, K.B.

    1977-01-01

    A description is given of a remote-handling system designed for the Los Alamos Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF), versatile enough to be used in a variety of situations found around particle accelerators. The system consists of a bilateral (force-reflecting) servomanipulator installed on an articulated hydraulic boom. The boom also carries the necessary tools and observation devices. The whole slave unit can be moved by crane or truck to the area of operation. A control cable connects the slave unit with the control station, located at a safe distance in a trailer. Various stages of development as well as some operating experience are discussed

  5. Technology of remote nuclear activity monitoring for national safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwack, Eun Ho; Kim, B. K.; Kim, J. S.; Yoon, W. K.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, J. S.; Cha, H. R.; Na, W. W.; Choi, Y. M.

    2001-07-01

    This project mainly focused on technical development on remote monitoring. It covers optical fiber scintillator to be used as NDA sensor to targets to be applied. Optical fiber scintillator was tested at the high radioactive environment. It is the first try in its kind for spent fuel measurement. It is confirmed that optical fiber sensor can be used for safeguards verification. Its feasibility for spent fuel storage silo at Wolsong reactor was studied. And to optimize remote transmission cost which can be regarded as a major barrier, virtual private network was studied for possible application for safeguards purpose. It can drastically reduce transmission cost and upgrade information surety. As target for remote monitoring, light water reactor and heavy water reactor were feasibly studied. Especially heavy water reactor has much potential for reduction of inspection efforts if remote monitoring is introduced. In overall remote monitoring can play a pivotal role to streamline safeguards inspection

  6. Evolution of on-power refuelling system for 500 MWe PHWR based on experience from Rajasthan, Madras and Narora Atomic Power Stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warrier, S.R.; Inder Jit; Sanatkumar, A.

    1991-01-01

    The on-power fuel handling system design at Rajasthan and Madras Atomic Power Stations (RAPS and MAPS) is essentially based on the design of the fuel handling system at Douglas Point Station (CANADA) Although, a number of improvements have been carried out in the fuel handling system of RAPS and MAPS at the component and sub-assembly level, some problems of repetitive nature like frequent deterioration in the performance of B-ram ball screw, leak detector solenoid valves etc., still exist. Further, there are certain limitations and drawbacks in the fuelling systems of these stations. For example, FM carriage design would not meet current seismic qualification standards. Also there are chances of fuel transfer room getting contaminated during movement of a failed fuel bundle. In order to obviate these deficiencies, a new concept has been worked out for the fuel handling system of Narora Atomic Power Station (NAPS) and accordingly, major changes have been made adopting a new layout. For example, FM head supporting arrangement has been changed to 'Suspension' type and a 'Linear-indexed' transfer magazine has been introduced in the fuel transfer system. Based on the experience gained from RAPS, MAPS and NAPS, design concept for 500 MWe fuel handling system has been evolved with further improvements especially in the layout. Also, a Calibration and Maintenance Facility for maintenance, testing calibration of FM head, sub-assemblies and components of fuel handling system has been introduced in the 500 MWe design. This paper discusses some of the experience gained from RAPS, MAPS and NAPS and also highlights the features of 500 MWe fuel handling system. (author)

  7. Is previous disaster experience a good predictor for disaster preparedness in extreme poverty households in remote Muslim minority based community in China?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Emily Y Y; Kim, Jean H; Lin, Cherry; Cheung, Eliza Y L; Lee, Polly P Y

    2014-06-01

    Disaster preparedness is an important preventive strategy for protecting health and mitigating adverse health effects of unforeseen disasters. A multi-site based ethnic minority project (2009-2015) is set up to examine health and disaster preparedness related issues in remote, rural, disaster prone communities in China. The primary objective of this reported study is to examine if previous disaster experience significantly increases household disaster preparedness levels in remote villages in China. A cross-sectional, household survey was conducted in January 2011 in Gansu Province, in a predominately Hui minority-based village. Factors related to disaster preparedness were explored using quantitative methods. Two focus groups were also conducted to provide additional contextual explanations to the quantitative findings of this study. The village household response rate was 62.4 % (n = 133). Although previous disaster exposure was significantly associated with perception of living in a high disaster risk area (OR = 6.16), only 10.7 % households possessed a disaster emergency kit. Of note, for households with members who had non-communicable diseases, 9.6 % had prepared extra medications to sustain clinical management of their chronic conditions. This is the first study that examined disaster preparedness in an ethnic minority population in remote communities in rural China. Our results indicate the need of disaster mitigation education to promote preparedness in remote, resource-poor communities.

  8. Remote RemoteRemoteRemote sensing potential for sensing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Remote RemoteRemoteRemote sensing potential for sensing potential for sensing potential for sensing potential for sensing potential for sensing potential for sensing potential for sensing potential for sensing potential for sensing potential for sensing p. A Ngie, F Ahmed, K Abutaleb ...

  9. Experience in the radiometric on-line determination of the ash content of raw lignite at the Hagenwerder power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koerner, G.; Leonhardt, J.; Thuemmel, H.W.; Fritzsche, D.

    1986-01-01

    For power station feed control an ash monitoring system has been working for one year. It comprises a by-pass sampling system including the scatter-transmission ash gauge KRAS-1 (total error 3.8 weight percentage ash on dry basis) which is used for calibrating the non-contact on-stream computer-controlled ash gauge KRAS-2 based on the 2-energy transmission method (total error 4.5 weight percentage ash on dry basis). The economic benefit is estimated to 1.4 million Mark per year. (author)

  10. Amtrak Stations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Updated database of the Federal Railroad Administration's (FRA) Amtrak Station database. This database is a geographic data set containing Amtrak intercity railroad...

  11. Using the Light Microscopy Module (LMM) on the International Space Station (ISS), The Advanced Colloids Experiment (ACE) and MacroMolecular Biophysics (MMB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, William; Foster, William M.; Motil, Brian J.; Sicker, Ronald; Abbott-Hearn, Amber; Chao, David; Chiaramonte, Fran; Atherton, Arthur; Beltram, Alexander; Bodzioney, Christopher M.; hide

    2016-01-01

    The Light Microscopy Module (LMM) was launched to the International Space Station (ISS) in 2009 and began science operations in 2010. It continues to support Physical and Biological scientific research on ISS. During 2016, if all goes as planned, three experiments will be completed: [1] Advanced Colloids Experiments with Heated base-2 (ACE-H2) and [2] Advanced Colloids Experiments with Temperature control (ACE-T1). Preliminary results, along with an overview of present and future LMM capabilities will be presented; this includes details on the planned data imaging processing and storage system, along with the confocal upgrade to the core microscope. [1] a consortium of universities from the State of Kentucky working through the Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR): Stuart Williams, Gerold Willing, Hemali Rathnayake, et al. and [2] from Chungnam National University, Daejeon, S. Korea: Chang-Soo Lee, et al.

  12. Remote possibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, J.

    1995-01-01

    The impact that wireless communications has had for gas and oil producers was discussed. Wireless communication, which has been replacing the traditional formats of radio and telephone data networks, has proved to be cheaper, smaller, and faster than creating privately owned communication networks. With highly developed supervisory control and data acquisition systems - combined with cellular or satellite technology - information from drill sites can be online at the corporate headquarters instantaneously. Eighty percent of Canada's land mass is beyond reach of traditional wireline and wireless services. Research into advanced communications, including telecommunication and mobile applications, yielded lucrative results for service providers such as BCTel, SaskTel, Bell Mobility and AGT. The latest data transmission technology is the cellular digital packet data (CDPD) which will operate over existing cellular networks. However, unlike circuit-switched cellular, CDPD technology provides an airlink where data is secure. It will be available to the marketplace over the course of the coming year. Among other advantages, CDPD will allow producers to remotely monitor production information and downtime alarms from wells and compressor stations. It will also provide fleet operators with the means to monitor operating vital signs on rolling stock

  13. Jung Işığında Heba Heba In The Light Of Jung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esra SAZYEK

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Hasan Ali Toptaş, is one of the important authors of Turkishliterature, in his novel called Heba discusses inward looking personalityof Ziya, who lives in the same childish purity during his life consistingof all periods of childhood, military service, marriage and death. Due tothis property, he lives world of dreams and fantasies rather than reeltime. 16 years after he lost his wife and unborn son as casualties inbomb attack, Yazıköy where he breaks away from the crowd of the cityand settle in here, feeds his this side. Thus, the hours passing in thenature, turn into a worship. However, whole peace of Ziya, who hasfound what he seeks in Yazıköy, ends by killing of Kenan. This periodwhen everything has became complicated, is followed by killing of himas being lynched because of the gossips about him.When you reread the novel focusing on a wasted life, of whichtragic events are finished by death in the light of Jungian psychology, itturns into a story of award to reach immortality obtained after thesorrows felt.Experiences of Ziya in Yazıköy resembling Heaven until he isdismissed, realize on the cusp of a magical environment is surroundedby dreams and fantasies. Appearance of unconscious plane by means ofsymbolical contents in dreams indicates that Yazıköy representsunconscious world beyond being a geographic and travelling from thecity to natural follows a way from conscious towards unconscious.Exploring of Ziya moving in unknown darkness of unconsciousthe inner treasure in the deepest, requires passing the each phase fromsurface towards center with a different figure of unconscious named as"archetype" by Jung.In this study, dimensions of period in question will be discussedin terms of Jungian psychology; trails of his thoughts will be examinedin detail by its aspects are reflected on contextual dimension of thenovel. Türk edebiyatının önemli yazarlarından olan Hasan Ali Toptaş, Heba adlı romanında çocukluk, askerlik, evlilik

  14. Space Station Freedom pressurized element interior design process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopson, George D.; Aaron, John; Grant, Richard L.

    1990-01-01

    The process used to develop the on-orbit working and living environment of the Space Station Freedom has some very unique constraints and conditions to satisfy. The goal is to provide maximum efficiency and utilization of the available space, in on-orbit, zero G conditions that establishes a comfortable, productive, and safe working environment for the crew. The Space Station Freedom on-orbit living and working space can be divided into support for three major functions: (1) operations, maintenance, and management of the station; (2) conduct of experiments, both directly in the laboratories and remotely for experiments outside the pressurized environment; and (3) crew related functions for food preparation, housekeeping, storage, personal hygiene, health maintenance, zero G environment conditioning, and individual privacy, and rest. The process used to implement these functions, the major requirements driving the design, unique considerations and constraints that influence the design, and summaries of the analysis performed to establish the current configurations are described. Sketches and pictures showing the layout and internal arrangement of the Nodes, U.S. Laboratory and Habitation modules identify the current design relationships of the common and unique station housekeeping subsystems. The crew facilities, work stations, food preparation and eating areas (galley and wardroom), and exercise/health maintenance configurations, waste management and personal hygiene area configuration are shown. U.S. Laboratory experiment facilities and maintenance work areas planned to support the wide variety and mixtures of life science and materials processing payloads are described.

  15. The new Mediterranean background monitoring station of Ersa, Cape Corsica: A long term Observatory component of the Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment (ChArMEx)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulac, Francois

    2013-04-01

    The Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment (ChArMEx, http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr/) is a French initiative supported by the MISTRALS program (Mediterranean Integrated Studies at Regional And Locals Scales, http://www.mistrals-home.org). It aims at a scientific assessment of the present and future state of the atmospheric environment in the Mediterranean Basin, and of its impacts on the regional climate, air quality, and marine biogeochemistry. The major stake is an understanding of the future of the Mediterranean region in a context of strong regional anthropogenic and climatic pressures. The target of ChArMEx is short-lived particulate and gaseous tropospheric trace species which are the cause of poor air quality events, have two-way interactions with climate, or impact the marine biogeochemistry. In order to fulfill these objectives, important efforts have been put in 2012 in order to implement the infrastructure and instrumentation for a fully equipped background monitoring station at Ersa, Cape Corsica, a key location at the crossroads of dusty southerly air masses and polluted outflows from the European continent. The observations at this station began in June 2012 (in the context of the EMEP / ACTRIS / PEGASOS / ChArMEx campaigns). A broad spectrum of aerosol properties is also measured at the station, from the chemical composition (off-line daily filter sampling in PM2.5/PM10, on-line Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor), ground optical properties (extinction/absorption/light scattering coeff. with 1-? CAPS PMex monitor, 7-? Aethalometer, 3-? Nephelometer), integrated and vertically resolved optical properties (4-? Cimel sunphotometer and LIDAR, respective), size distribution properties (N-AIS, SMPS, APS, and OPS instruments), mass (PM1/PM10 by TEOM/TEOM-FDMS), hygroscopicity (CCN), as well as total insoluble deposition. So far, real-time measurement of reactive gases (O3, CO, NO, NO2), and off-line VOC measurements (cylinders, cartridges) are also

  16. The first year experience of occupational therapy students at an Australian regional university: Promoting student retention and developing a regional and remote workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Jackie; Cordier, Reinie; Thomas, Yvonne; Tanner, Bronwyn; Salata, Karen

    2017-02-01

    Student retention at regional universities is important in addressing regional and remote workforce shortages. Students attending regional universities are more likely to work in regional areas. First year experience at university plays a key role in student retention. This study aimed to explore factors influencing the first year experience of occupational therapy students at a regional Australian university. Surveys were administered to 58 second year occupational therapy students in the first week of second year. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics, inferential statistics (Pearson χ 2 ; Spearman rho) and summarising descriptive responses. An Australian regional university. Second year undergraduate occupational therapy students. Factors influencing students' decisions to study and continue studying occupational therapy; factors enhancing first year experience of university. Fifty-four students completed the survey (93.1%). A quarter (25.9%) of students considered leaving the course during the first year. The primary influence for continuing was the teaching and learning experience. Most valued supports were orientation week (36.7%) and the first year coordinator (36.7%). The importance of the first year experience in retaining occupational therapy students is highlighted. Engagement with other students and staff and academic support are important factors in facilitating student retention. It is important to understand the unique factors influencing students' decisions, particularly those from regional and remote areas, to enter and continue in tertiary education to assist in implementing supports and strategies to improve student retention. © 2015 National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

  17. Experiment on the diagnostics of the interplanetary and magnetospheric plasma on the ''Venera-11, 12'' automatic interplanetary stations and the ''Prognoz 7'' artificial Earth satellite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vajsberg, O.L.; Gorn, L.S.; Ermolaev, Yu.I.

    1979-01-01

    Solar wind with the Earth magnetosphere are studied. The experiments have been carried out at the ''Venera 11'', ''Venera 12'' automatic interplanetary stations and at the ''Prognoz 7'' artificial satellite of the Earth in 1978-79 with the help of the three identical combined plasma spectrometers. The SCS spectrometer measures the electron, proton and α particle spectra in the energy ranges of 10-200 eV, 250-5000 eV, and 500-10000 eV, respectively. Examples of energy spectra of charged particles are presented. Some characteristics of solar wind and the Earth magnetosphere plasma are discussed

  18. Design and performance of U7B beamline and X-ray diffraction and scattering station at NSRL and its preliminary experiments in protein crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Guoqiang; Xu, Chaoyin; Fan Rong; Gao Chen; Lou Xiaohua; Teng Maikun; Huang Qingqiu; Niu Liwen

    2005-01-01

    This publication describes the design and performance of the U7B beamline and X-ray diffraction and diffuse scattering station at National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). The beamline optics comprise a Pt-coated toroidal focusing mirror and a double-crystal Si(1 1 1) monochromator. A preliminary experiment of diffraction data collection and processing was carried out using a commercial imaging plate detector system (Mar345). The data collected from one single crystal of acutohaemolysin, a Lys49-type PLA2 from Agkistrodon acutus venom, are of high quality

  19. Incentives for non-physician health professionals to work in the rural and remote areas of Mozambique--a discrete choice experiment for eliciting job preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Ayako; Vio, Ferruccio

    2015-04-26

    Successfully motivating and retaining health workers is critical for the effective performance of health systems. In Mozambique, a shortage of health care professionals and low levels of staff motivation in rural and remote areas pose challenges to the provision of equitable health care delivery. This study provides quantitative information on the job preferences of non-physician health professionals in Mozambique, examining how different aspects of jobs are valued and how health professionals might respond to policy options that would post them to district hospitals in rural areas. The study used a discrete choice experiment (DCE) to elicit the job preferences of non-physician health professionals. Data collection took place in four Mozambique provinces: Maputo City, Maputo Province, Sofala and Nampula. DCE questionnaires were administered to 334 non-physician health professionals with specialized or university training ('mid-level specialists' and N1 and N2 categories). In addition, questionnaires were administered to 123 N1 and N2 students to enable comparison of the results for those with work experience with those without and determine how new N1 and N2 graduates can be attracted to rural posts. The results indicate that the provision of basic government housing has the greatest impact on the probability of choosing a job at a public health facility, followed by the provision of formal education opportunities and the availability of equipment and medicine at a health facility. The sub-group analysis suggests that job preferences vary according to stage of life and that incentive packages should vary accordingly. Recruitment strategies to encourage non-clinical professionals to work in rural/remote areas should also consider birthplace, as those born in rural/remote areas are more willing to work remotely. The study was undertaken within an overarching project that aimed to develop incentive packages for non-physician health professionals assigned to work in

  20. Assessing the Engagement, Learning, and Overall Experience of Students Operating an Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer with Remote Access Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erasmus, Daniel J.; Brewer, Sharon E.; Cinel, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    The use of internet-based technologies in the teaching of laboratories has emerged as a promising education tool. This study evaluated the effectiveness of using remote access technology to operate an atomic absorption spectrophotometer in analyzing the iron content in a crude myoglobin extract. Sixty-two students were surveyed on their level of…

  1. The role of GIS and remote sensing in land degradation assessment and conservation mapping: some user experiences and expectations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lynden, van G.W.J.; Mantel, S.

    2001-01-01

    Planning strategies for sustainable land management require solid base line data on natural resources (soils, physiography, climate, vegetation, land use, etc.) and on socio-economic aspects. GIS and remote sensing have an important role in linkage and analysis of such data, in particular for

  2. A Remote and Virtual Synchrotron Beamline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, J. M.; Alp, E.; Sturhahn, W.

    2012-12-01

    National facilities offer one-of-a-kind opportunities to apply state-of-the-art experimental techniques to the pressing scientific problems of today. Yet, few students are able to experience research projects at national facilities due to limited accessibility caused in part by limited involvement in the local academic institution, constrained working areas at the experimental stations, and/or travel costs. We present a virtual and remote beam-line for Earth science studies using nuclear resonant and inelastic x-ray scattering methods at Sector 3 of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. Off-site students have the capability of controlling their measurements via secure internet connections and webcams. Students can access a 'view only mode' for ease of interaction and safety-control. More experienced users have exclusive control of the experiment and can remotely change variables within the experimental setup. Students may also access the virtual aspects these experiments by simulating certain conditions with our newly developed software. We evaluate such a tool by giving "before" and "after" assignments to students at different levels. These levels include high-school students from the Pasadena and greater Los Angeles area school districts, undergraduate students from Caltech's SURF/MURF program, and graduate students at Caltech. We specifically target underrepresented groups. Our results thus far show that the capabilities offered by our remote and virtual beamline show improved knowledge and understanding of applying experimental-based studies at the synchrotron to solve problems in the Earth sciences.

  3. Environmental Radiation Surveillance Results from over the Last Decade of Operational Experience at the Regional Radiation Monitoring Stations(RRMS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hae Young [Daegu Regional Radiation Monitoring Station, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Dong Han [Ulsan Regional Radiation Monitoring Station, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Hoon [Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The objectives of the current program are to monitor environmental radiation/radioactivity level in Korea and to provide the base-line data on environmental radiation/radioactivity which will be useful in the case of radiological emergency situations. This program plays an important role in the view of protecting the public health against the potential hazards of radiation and maintaining a clean environment. This paper describes an introduction to the Regional Radiation Monitoring Stations (RRMS), and also presents some results of recent years (2001-2014). The environmental radiation surveillance results of years 2001-2014 have been described. It indicates normal levels of radiation in the past years. These kinds of studies are very important in providing references in understanding the environmental radioactivity level in a particular region.

  4. Construction and cost experience regarding the 2nd pool house for spent fuel storage facility in the Atucha Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbosa, C.A.

    1980-01-01

    The Atucha I second pool house storage for spent fuel is designed as an extension of the Atucha I power station. The two are linked by civil structure, controlling circuits, electrical and compressed air and water supplies, low level wastes disposal, ventilation under pressure maintenance, and, most important, the ability to transfer spent and new fuel in both directions. Because the second pool house is, by location and design, an extension of the existing installation, and since there is no design departure, regarding storage and transfer of fuel from that of the original installation, the rules and regulations applied for its construction were the same as those valid for the Atucha I construction. The requirement not to exceed a four-year period for construction and commissioning was determined by the need to have storage room for the Atucha I fuel. Argentina will meet the 1982 target by having the installation available during the second half of 1981. The second pool house is a wet storage location with a capacity of 1000 tons metallic uranium. It was designed by the Kraftwerk Union of West Germany along the same lines as the 440-ton storage location originally built with the station. The Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina has managed the construction and participated in project and design stages. As in the original pool, the 6 m long assemblies are stacked in double tiers. The cost figures which are mentioned differ from previously released figures and are not the final ones. With civil construction almost finished and mechanical erection started, the present estimates should not differ by more than 10% from the final figures. The installation has an investment cost of 61 million dollars, (1980), and, depending on the amortization time span considered, a total yearly cost per kg of capacity of metallic uranium, ranging between 5.5 and 9.3 dollars per kg

  5. Enflasyon Ortamında Mamul Fiyatlandırması

    OpenAIRE

    GÜNEŞ, Recep

    2013-01-01

    Fiyatlandırma konusu farklı bilim dallarında farklı varsayımlaradayandırılarak açıklanmaya çalışılırken, uygulama alanındamaliyet artı metodunun önemli bir yer tuttuğu yapılan saha çalışmalarındaortaya konulmuştur. Maliyet artı kar metodunun genelolarak enflasyonun olmadığı ortamlarda kolayca uygulanabilirken,maliyetlerin sürekli değiştiği enflasyon ortamında fiyatlandırmadaha da karmaşık bir görünüm arz etmektedir. Bu çalışmada,enflasyon ortamında maliyet artı kar metodunun uygulanabilirliği...

  6. Remote pre-procedural ischemic stroke as the greatest risk in carotid‑stenting‑associated stroke and death: a single center's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rašiová, Mária; Špak, Ľubomír; Farkašová, Ľudmila; Pataky, Štefan; Koščo, Martin; Hudák, Marek; Moščovič, Matej; Leško, Norbert

    2017-08-01

    .4% (N.=10) of symptomatic patients and 2.8% (N.=9) of asymptomatic patients. The risk of periprocedural stroke/death was 3.4 times higher in patients with (N.=198) compared to patients without remote ischemic stroke (N.=304) (6.6% versus 2.0% of patients without remote ischemic stroke; P=0.008). Periprocedural stroke/death in symptomatic patients (N.=186) was non-significantly higher in patients with remote ischemic stroke (N.=76) compared with patients without remote ischemic stroke (N.=110) (7.9% versus 3.6%; P=0.206). Asymptomatic patients with remote ischemic stroke (N.=122) had a 5.6-time-higher periprocedural risk of stroke/death compared with asymptomatic patients without remote ischemic stroke (N.=194) (5.7% versus 1.0%; P=0.014). Patients ≥75 years (N.=83) had a 3.0-time-higher periprocedural risk of stroke/death compared with younger patients (N.=419) (8.4% versus 2.9%; P=0.015); a non-significant increase of periprocedural stroke/death was found in both symptomatic (N.=35) and asymptomatic (N.=48) elderly patients (11.4% versus 4.0%, P=0.078; and 6.3% versus 2.4%, P=0.124, respectively). Increased periprocedural risk of stroke/death was not documented in other analyzed patient subgroups. During long-term follow-up, a 1.5-time-higher mortality risk was found in patients with remote ischemic stroke compared with patients without remote ischemic stroke in multivariable analysis; other patient subgroups (except older versus younger patients) did not differ in long-term mortality following carotid stenting. In our experience, all patients with remote pre-procedural any-territory ischemic stroke belong to risky subgroup for periprocedural stroke death after CAS. All asymptomatic patients with remote ischemic stroke should not be treated with CAS. Remote ischemic stroke increases all-cause mortality in long-term follow-up after carotid stenting. Patients aged ≥75 years also have increased risk of periprocedural stroke and death after CAS. These factors should

  7. Passive Thermal Design Approach for the Space Communications and Navigation (SCaN) Testbed Experiment on the International Space Station (ISS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siamidis, John; Yuko, Jim

    2014-01-01

    The Space Communications and Navigation (SCaN) Program Office at NASA Headquarters oversees all of NASAs space communications activities. SCaN manages and directs the ground-based facilities and services provided by the Deep Space Network (DSN), Near Earth Network (NEN), and the Space Network (SN). Through the SCaN Program Office, NASA GRC developed a Software Defined Radio (SDR) testbed experiment (SCaN testbed experiment) for use on the International Space Station (ISS). It is comprised of three different SDR radios, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) radio, Harris Corporation radio, and the General Dynamics Corporation radio. The SCaN testbed experiment provides an on-orbit, adaptable, SDR Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) - based facility to conduct a suite of experiments to advance the Software Defined Radio, Space Telecommunications Radio Systems (STRS) standards, reduce risk (Technology Readiness Level (TRL) advancement) for candidate Constellation future space flight hardware software, and demonstrate space communication links critical to future NASA exploration missions. The SCaN testbed project provides NASA, industry, other Government agencies, and academic partners the opportunity to develop and field communications, navigation, and networking technologies in the laboratory and space environment based on reconfigurable, software defined radio platforms and the STRS Architecture.The SCaN testbed is resident on the P3 Express Logistics Carrier (ELC) on the exterior truss of the International Space Station (ISS). The SCaN testbed payload launched on the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV) and was installed on the ISS P3 ELC located on the inboard RAM P3 site. The daily operations and testing are managed out of NASA GRC in the Telescience Support Center (TSC).

  8. Use of remote monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fournel, E; Gouilloux, C

    1977-01-01

    Paper traces the development of remote monitoring devices, since their first appearance for safety purposes. Discusses their uses in coal mines: working and safety (definitions); sources and channels of information (transmission of information by automatic or verbal means); mine control stations; duties and responsibilities of persons in charge. Examines the contribution made by remote monitoring to management in production sector. Gives examples of assistance given to production management showing a very advantageous result on balance, by their use. The use of computers in real time and in batched mode is compared. Discusses their use in monitoring mine atmosphere. Very favorable results have already been obtained in France and abroad. The broadening scope and future of remote monitoring is considered.

  9. Niyith NiyithWatmam [corrected] (the quiet story): exploring the experiences of Aboriginal women who give birth in their remote community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireland, Sarah; Wulili Narjic, Concepta; Belton, Suzanne; Kildea, Sue

    2011-10-01

    to investigate the beliefs and practices of Aboriginal women who decline transfer to urban hospitals and remain in their remote community to give birth. an ethnographic approach was used which included: the collection of birth histories and narratives, observation and participation in the community for 24 months, field notes, training and employment of an Aboriginal co-researcher, and consultation with and advice from a local reference group. a remote Aboriginal community in the Northern Territory, Australia. narratives were collected from seven Aboriginal women and five family members. findings showed that women, through their previous experiences of standard care, appeared to make conscious decisions and choices about managing their subsequent pregnancies and births. Women took into account their health, the baby's health, the care of their other children, and designated men with a helping role. narratives described a breakdown of traditional birthing practices and high levels of non-compliance with health-system-recommended care. standard care provided for women relocating for birth must be improved, and the provision of a primary maternity service in this particular community may allow Aboriginal Women's Business roles and cultural obligations to be recognised and invigorated. International examples of primary birthing services in remote areas demonstrate that they can be safe alternatives to urban transfer for childbirth. A primary maternity service would provide a safer environment for the women who choose to avoid standard care. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Remote Research

    CERN Document Server

    Tulathimutte, Tony

    2011-01-01

    Remote studies allow you to recruit subjects quickly, cheaply, and immediately, and give you the opportunity to observe users as they behave naturally in their own environment. In Remote Research, Nate Bolt and Tony Tulathimutte teach you how to design and conduct remote research studies, top to bottom, with little more than a phone and a laptop.

  11. Direct measurements of employees involved in the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station accident for internal dose estimates. JAEA's experiences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurihara, Osamu; Kanai, Katsuta; Nakagawa, Takahiro; Takada, Chie; Momose, Takumaro; Furuta, Sadaaki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Nuclear Fuel Cycle Engineering Laboratories, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2012-11-15

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) performed internal dose measurements of employees involved in the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station accident. Nuclear Fuel Cycle Engineering Laboratories (NFCEL), one of the JAEA's core centers, examined 560 of these employees by direct (in vivo) measurements during the period from April 20 to August 5 in 2011. These measurements consisted of whole-body counting for radiocesium and thyroid counting for radioiodine. The whole-body counting was conducted with two types of whole-body counters (WBCs): a standing-type WBC with two large NaI(Tl) detectors (Fastscan{sup TM}, Canberra Inc.) and a chair-type WBC with HPGe detectors (GC5021, Canberra Inc.) installed in a shielded chamber made of 20-cm-thick steel. The thyroid counting was mainly performed using one of the two HPGe detectors equipped with the chair-type WBC. The subjects examined in this work were divided into two groups: Group 1 was the first 39 subjects who were measured up to June 17, 2011 and Group 2 was the remaining 521 subjects who were measured on and after June 18, 2011. The performance of our direct measurements was validated by comparing measurement results of the Group 1 subjects using two different methods (e.g., the standing-type WBC vs. the chair-type WBC). Tentative internal dose estimates of the subjects of Group 1 were also performed based on the assumption of a single intake scenario on either March 12, when the first hydrogen explosion occurred at the station or the first day of work after the accident. It was found that the contribution of {sup 131}I to the total internal dose greatly exceeded those of {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs, the other major nuclides detected in the measurements. The maximum committed effective dose (CED) was found in a male subject whose thyroid content of {sup 131}I was 9760 Bq on May 23, 2011; the CED of this subject was estimated to be 600 mSv including a small contribution of {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs. The typical

  12. Can teledermatology be a useful diagnostic tool in dermatology practice in remote areas? An Egyptian experience with 600 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Nadia; Abdel Hay, Rania; Hegazy, Rehab; Hussein, Marwa; Gomaa, Dalia

    2017-02-01

    Introduction The paucity of studies evaluating teledermatology (TD) in developing countries was the impetus behind conducting this work. We aimed to evaluate the feasibility and reliability of TD in remote areas where medical facilities and consultant dermatologists are not available, through measurement of diagnostic concordance rates between face-to-face diagnosis and store-and-forward (SAF) TD diagnosis. Methods A total of 600 patients with dermatological ailments who attended Abshway Hospital were recruited into the study, examined by an on-site dermatology resident, and offered a diagnosis. The clinical images and patients' history were collected and transferred (through the Dropbox application) to two remote consultant dermatologists. The reliability of the three physicians' agreement rates was assessed. Results Diagnostic agreement rates between the face-to-face dermatologist and the two teledermatologists were 86.7% and 87% respectively. Of the cases, 97% had complete or partial agreement and 81.3% of cases showed complete agreement between the three physicians. The reliability of the three physicians' agreement rates was assessed statistically using Cohen's kappa coefficient (κ) and this showed a range of 0.46-0.52. Conclusion This study might aid in enhancing the utilization of this tool in our country, especially in remote areas with a lack of a proper dermatological service. The simplicity and low cost of the adopted technique might facilitate its use over large sectors. It opens the door for gaining the benefit of this technology in other aspects such as teaching and monitoring health care providers.

  13. Evalution of NDA techniques and instruments for assay of nuclear waste at a waste terminal storage facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blakeman, E.D.; Allen, E.J.; Jenkins, J.D.

    1978-05-01

    The use of Nondestructive Assay (NDA) instrumentation at a nuclear waste terminal storage facility for purposes of Special Nuclear Material (SNM) accountability is evaluated. Background information is given concerning general NDA techniques and the relative advantages and disadvantages of active and passive NDA methods are discussed. The projected characteristics and amounts of nuclear wastes that will be delivered to a waste terminal storage facility are presented. Wastes are divided into four categories: High Level Waste, Cladding Waste, Intermediate Level Waste, and Low Level Waste. Applications of NDA methods to the assay of these waste types is discussed. Several existing active and passive NDA instruments are described and, where applicable, results of assays performed on wastes in large containers (e.g., 55-gal drums) are given. It is concluded that it will be difficult to routinely achieve accuracies better than approximately 10--30% with ''simple'' NDA devices or 5--20% with more sohpisticated NDA instruments for compacted wastes. It is recommended that NDA instruments not be used for safeguards accountability at a waste storage facility. It is concluded that item accountability methods be implemented. These conclusions and recommendations are detailed in a concurrent report entitled ''Recommendations on the Safeguards Requirements Related to the Accountability of Special Nuclear Material at Waste Terminal Storage Facilities'' by J.D. Jenkins, E.J. Allen and E.D. Blakeman

  14. Suitability Evaluation for Products Generation from Multisource Remote Sensing Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jining Yan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available With the arrival of the big data era in Earth observation, the remote sensing communities have accumulated a large amount of invaluable and irreplaceable data for global monitoring. These massive remote sensing data have enabled large-area and long-term series Earth observation, and have, in particular, made standard, automated product generation more popular. However, there is more than one type of data selection for producing a certain remote sensing product; no single remote sensor can cover such a large area at one time. Therefore, we should automatically select the best data source from redundant multisource remote sensing data, or select substitute data if data is lacking, during the generation of remote sensing products. However, the current data selection strategy mainly adopts the empirical model, and has a lack of theoretical support and quantitative analysis. Hence, comprehensively considering the spectral characteristics of ground objects and spectra differences of each remote sensor, by means of spectrum simulation and correlation analysis, we propose a suitability evaluation model for product generation. The model will enable us to obtain the Production Suitability Index (PSI of each remote sensing data. In order to validate the proposed model, two typical value-added information products, NDVI and NDWI, and two similar or complementary remote sensors, Landsat-OLI and HJ1A-CCD1, were chosen, and the verification experiments were performed. Through qualitative and quantitative analysis, the experimental results were consistent with our model calculation results, and strongly proved the validity of the suitability evaluation model. The proposed production suitability evaluation model could assist with standard, automated, serialized product generation. It will play an important role in one-station, value-added information services during the big data era of Earth observation.

  15. Experiences, opportunities and challenges of implementing task shifting in underserved remote settings: the case of Kongwa district, central Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munga Michael A

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tanzania is experiencing acute shortages of Health Workers (HWs, a situation which has forced health managers, especially in the underserved districts, to hastily cope with health workers’ shortages by adopting task shifting. This has however been due to limited options for dealing with the crisis of health personnel. There are on-going discussions in the country on whether to scale up task shifting as one of the strategies for addressing health personnel crisis. However, these discussions are not backed up by rigorous scientific evidence. The aim of this paper is two-fold. Firstly, to describe the current situation of implementing task shifting in the context of acute shortages of health workers and, secondly, to provide a descriptive account of the potential opportunities or benefits and the likely challenges which might ensue as a result of implementing task shifting. Methods We employed in-depth interviews with informants at the district level and supplemented the information with additional interviews with informants at the national level. Interviews focussed on the informants’ practical experiences of implementing task shifting in their respective health facilities (district level and their opinions regarding opportunities and challenges which might be associated with implementation of task shifting practices. At the national level, the main focus was on policy issues related to management of health personnel in the context of implementation of task shifting, in addition to seeking their opinions and perceptions regarding opportunities and challenges of implementing task shifting if formally adopted. Results Task shifting has been in practice for many years in Tanzania and has been perceived as an inevitable coping mechanism due to limited options for addressing health personnel shortages in the country. Majority of informants had the concern that quality of services is likely to be affected if appropriate policy

  16. Observation Platform for Dynamic Biomedical and Biotechnology Experiments Using the International Space Station (ISS) Light Microscopy Module (LMM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurk, Michael A. (Andy)

    2015-01-01

    Techshot, Inc., has developed an observation platform for the LMM on the ISS that will enable biomedical and biotechnology experiments. The LMM Dynamic Stage consists of an electronics module and the first two of a planned suite of experiment modules. Specimens and reagent solutions can be injected into a small, hollow microscope slide-the heart of the innovation-via a combination of small reservoirs, pumps, and valves. A life science experiment module allows investigators to load up to two different fluids for on-orbit, real-time image cytometry. Fluids can be changed to initiate a process, fix biological samples, or retrieve suspended cells. A colloid science experiment module conducts microparticle and nanoparticle tests for investigation of colloid self-assembly phenomena. This module includes a hollow glass slide and heating elements for the creation of a thermal gradient from one end of the slide to the other. The electronics module supports both experiment modules and contains a unique illuminator/condenser for bright and dark field and phase contrast illumination, power supplies for two piezoelectric pumps, and controller boards for pumps and valves. This observation platform safely contains internal fluids and will greatly accelerate the research and development (R&D) cycle of numerous experiments, products, and services aboard the ISS.

  17. NDA generic research programme for higher activity waste management issues - 16390

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinney, James; Brownridge, Melanie

    2009-01-01

    NDA has a responsibility to ensure decommissioning activities are sufficiently technically underpinned and appropriate Research and Development (Rand D) is carried out. The NDA funds research and development (R and D) indirectly via the Site Licence Companies (SLCs) or directly. The main component of directly funded R and D is the NDA Direct Research Portfolio (DRP). The DRP is split into four framework areas: - University Interactions; - Waste Processing; - Material Characterisation; - Actinide and Strategic Nuclear Materials. These four framework areas were competed through an Official Journal of European Union (OJEU) process in 2008. Although all four areas involve waste management, Waste Processing and Material Characterisation specifically deal with Higher Activity Waste (HAW) waste management issues. The Waste Processing area was awarded to three groups: (i) National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL), (ii) Consortium led by Hyder Consulting Ltd, and (iii) Consortium led by UKAEA Ltd. The Material Characterisation area was awarded to three groups: (i) NNL, (ii) Serco, and (iii) Consortium led by UKAEA Ltd. The initial work in Waste Processing and Material Characterisation was centered on establishing a forward research programme to address the generic needs of the UK civil nuclear industry and the NDA strategic drivers for waste management and land quality. This has been achieved by the four main framework contractors from the Waste Processing and Materials Characterisation areas working together with the NDA to identify the key research themes and begin the development of the NDA's HAW Management Research Programme. The process also involves active engagement with both industry and regulators via the Nuclear Waste Research Forum (NWRF). The NDA's HAW Management Research Programme includes a number of themes: - Optimisation of Interim Store Operation and Design; - Alternative Waste Encapsulants; - Waste Package Integrity; - Alternative Waste treatment methods

  18. Automatic identification of NDA measured items: Use of E-tags

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chitumbo, K.; Olsen, R.; Hatcher, C.R.; Kadner, S.P.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes how electronic identification devices or E-tags could reduce the time spent by LAEA inspectors making nondestructive assay (NDA) measurements. As one example, the use of E-tags with a high-level neutron coincidence counter (HLNC) is discussed in detail. Sections of the paper include inspection procedures, system description, software, and future plans. Mounting of E-tabs, modifications to the HLNC, and the use of tamper indicating devices are also discussed. The technology appears to have wide application to different types of nuclear facilities and inspections and could significantly change NDA inspection procedures

  19. Experience in ultrasonic gap measurement between calandria tubes and liquid injection shutdown systems nozzles in Bruce Nuclear Generating Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abucay, R.C.; Mahil, K.S.; Goszczynski, J.J.

    1995-01-01

    The gaps between calandria tubes (CT) and Liquid Injection Shutdown System (LISS) nozzles at the Bruce Nuclear Generating Station ''A'' (Bruce A) are known to decrease with time due to radiation induced creep/sag of the calandria tubes. If this gap decreases to a point where the calandria tubes come into contact with the LISS nozzle, the calandria tubes could fail as a result of fretting damage. Proximity measurements were needed to verify the analytical models and ensure that CT/LISS nozzle contact does not occur earlier than predicted. The technique used was originally developed at Ontario Hydro Technologies (formerly Ontario Hydro Research Division) in the late seventies and put into practical use by Research and Productivity Council (RPC) of New Brunswick, who carried out similar measurements at Point Lepreau NGS in 1989 and 1991. The gap measurement was accomplished y inserting an inspection probe, containing four ultrasonic transducers (2 to measure gaps and 2 to check for probe tilt) and a Fredericks electrolytic potentiometer as a probe rotational sensor, inside LISS Nozzle number-sign 7. The ultrasonic measurements were fed to a system computer that was programmed to convert the readings into fully compensated gaps, taking into account moderator heavy water temperature and probe tilt. Since the measured gaps were found to be generally larger than predicted, the time to CT/LISS nozzle contact is now being re-evaluated and the planned LISS nozzle replacement will likely be deferred, resulting in considerable savings

  20. Remote Sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Khorram, Siamak; Koch, Frank H; van der Wiele, Cynthia F

    2012-01-01

    Remote Sensing provides information on how remote sensing relates to the natural resources inventory, management, and monitoring, as well as environmental concerns. It explains the role of this new technology in current global challenges. "Remote Sensing" will discuss remotely sensed data application payloads and platforms, along with the methodologies involving image processing techniques as applied to remotely sensed data. This title provides information on image classification techniques and image registration, data integration, and data fusion techniques. How this technology applies to natural resources and environmental concerns will also be discussed.

  1. Radiation dosimetry for microbial experiments in the International Space Station using different etched track and luminescent detectors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Goossens, O.; Vanhavere, F.; Leys, N.; De Boever, P.; O'Sullivan, D.; Zhou, D.; Spurný, František; Yukihara, E.; Gaza, R.; McKeever, S.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 120, 1- 4 (2006), s. 433-437 ISSN 0144-8420 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1P05OC032 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : bacteria l experiments * space flight * etched track detectors * thermoluminescent detectors Subject RIV: DN - Health Impact of the Environment Quality Impact factor: 0.446, year: 2006

  2. Track calorimeter (TCAL) of alpha magnetic spectrometer (AMS) (a particle physics experiment on the international space station alpha)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anosov, V.; Baranov, S.; Bednyakov, V.

    1999-01-01

    Based on the simulation and R and D results the JINR project - to supplement AMS with a finely granulated scintillator calorimeter (TCAL) - is discussed. The project cost is about 1 million USD. TCAL would essentially increase the AMS potential in the studies of antimatter, matter and missing matter in the experiments in outer space

  3. A control and data acquisition system for photoelectron spectroscopy experiment station at Hefei National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Weimin; Liu Yinim

    1992-01-01

    The paper describes system configuration and software design. The system has the following features; flexible user interface, succinct control levels, strict protection and high intelligence. It can run EDC, CFS, CIS experiment modes very conveniently with SR light source. Its construction and design idea of the system can be applied to other data acquisition systems. (author)

  4. Correction of the equilibrium temperature caused by slight evaporation of water in protein crystal growth cells during long-term space experiments at International Space Station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Takahisa; Suzuki, Yoshihisa; Yoshizaki, Izumi; Tsukamoto, Katsuo; Murayama, Kenta; Fukuyama, Seijiro; Hosokawa, Kouhei; Oshi, Kentaro; Ito, Daisuke; Yamazaki, Tomoya; Tachibana, Masaru; Miura, Hitoshi

    2015-08-01

    The normal growth rates of the {110} faces of tetragonal hen egg-white lysozyme crystals, R, were measured as a function of the supersaturation σ parameter using a reflection type interferometer under μG at the International Space Station (NanoStep Project). Since water slightly evaporated from in situ observation cells during a long-term space station experiment for several months, equilibrium temperature T(e) changed, and the actual σ, however, significantly increased mainly due to the increase in salt concentration C(s). To correct σ, the actual C(s) and protein concentration C(p), which correctly represent the measured T(e) value in space, were first calculated. Second, a new solubility curve with the corrected C(s) was plotted. Finally, the revised σ was obtained from the new solubility curve. This correction method successfully revealed that the 2.8% water was evaporated from the solution, leading to 2.8% increase in the C(s) and C(p) of the solution.

  5. Selected solutions and design features from the design of remotely handled filters and the technology of remote filter handling. Previous operating experience with these components in the PASSAT facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jannakos, K.; Lange, W.; Potgeter, G.; Furrer, J.; Wilhelm, J.G.

    1981-01-01

    In a prototype filter offgas cleaning system for reprocessing plants (PASSAT) built at the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center a fullscale filter cell with remotely handled filters for aerosol and iodine removal and the corresponding remote handling systems for exchange, bagging out, packaging and disposal of spent filter elements has been installed and run in trial operation since July 1978. The filters and the replacement techniques have been tested for the past two years or so and so far have always worked satisfactory over the test period involving some 150 replacement events. Neither wear nor corrosion phenomena were found in the filter housings and the replacement systems. The seals and clamping devices were selected so that during operation the prescribed leak rates of -3 Torr l/s were always maintained on the filter lid, the seat of the filter element and the cell lock. The total clamping loads for the filter element and the filter lid amount to approx. 20 kN. The force necessary to separate the filter element from the filter housing is approx. 3.5 kN. No ruptures of seals or gaskets were to be detected. The design of the filters and of the handling systems has been found satisfactorily in the cold test operation so far and can be recommended for use in nuclear facilities. In all experiments conducted until now PASSAT has worked without any failure. All operating data required in the specifications were met in the test period. The maximum pressure loss in the system with loaded filter elements amounts to some 3000 mm of water. After operation with iodine and NO/sub x/, plant components exposed to 100% relative humidity and condensate showed corrosion

  6. Practical experience with own monitoring of clay sealings on dumps for brown coal-fired power station residues. Erfahrungen mit der Eigenueberwachung an Tonabdichtungen der Deponien fuer Braunkohlenkraftwerksrueckstaende

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winter, K

    1989-07-01

    In order to dispose of power station residues Rheinbraun erects dumps which are encased by a clay sealing. For the Fortuna dump 10 hectares sealing area, with a permeability that is lower than the required limit value of k = 5x10{sup -10} m/s, have so far been constructed. The quality of the sealing is monitored and ensured by graded checking. The practical experience gained so far with own monitoring (selection of material, supervision of construction site and own checking) on the finished clay sealings is discussed in the present paper. The system of testing the sealings has proved very satisfactory. The results of the tests carried out in the course of own monitoring show that processing work in the laboratory can be reduced by systematic selection of material and intensive expert supervision of the construction site. (orig.).

  7. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on bovine lactoferrin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    Following a request from the European Commission, the EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) was asked to carry out the additional assessment for ‘lactoferrin’ as a food ingredient in the context of Regulation (EC) No 258/97 taking into account the comments and objections...

  8. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on Dihydrocapsiate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    Following a request from the European Commission, the EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) was asked to deliver a scientific opinion on the safety of a synthetic dihydrocapsiate (DHC) as a food ingredient in the context of Regulation (EC) No 258/97 taking into account...

  9. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on bovine lactoferrin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    Following a request from the European Commission, the EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) was asked to carry out the additional assessment of ‘lactoferrin’ as a food ingredient in the context of Regulation (EC) No 258/97 taking into account the comments and objections...

  10. Particle Engulfment and Pushing (PEP): Past Micro-Gravity Experiments and Future Experimental Plan on the International Space Station (ISS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Subhayu; Stefanescu, Doru M.; Catalina, A. V.; Juretzko, F.; Dhindaw, B. K.; Curreri, P. A.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The interaction of an insoluble particle with a growing solid-liquid interface (SLI) has been a subject of investigation for the four decades. For a metallurgist or a material scientist understanding the fundamental physics of such an interaction is relevant for applications that include distribution of reinforcement particles in metal matrix composites, inclusion management in castings, and distribution of Y2Ba1Cu1O5 (211) precipitates (flux pinning sites) in Y1Ba2Cu3O7 (123) superconducting crystals. The same physics is also applicable to other areas including geological applications (frost heaving in soils) and preservation of biological cells. Experimentally this interaction can be quantified in terms of a critical growth velocity, Vcr, of the SLI below which particles are pushed ahead of the advancing interface, and above which the particles are engulfed. Past experimental evidence suggests that this Vcr is an inverse function of the particle radius, R. In order to isolate the fundamental physics that governs such a relationship it is necessary to minimize natural convection at the SLI that is inherent in ground based experiments. Hence for the purpose of producing benchmark data (Vcr vs. R) PEP is a natural candidate for micro-gravity experimentation. Accordingly, experiments with pure Al containing a dispersion of ZrO2 particles and an organic analogue, succinonitrile (SCN) containing polystyrene particles have been performed on the LMS and USMP-4 mission respectively. In this paper we will summarize the experimental data that was obtained during these two micro-gravity missions and show that the results differ compared to terrestrial experiments. We will also discuss the basic elements of our analytical and numerical model and present a comparison of the predictions of these models against micro-gravity experimental data. Finally. we will discuss our future experimental plan that includes the ISS glovebox and MSRRl.

  11. Station Capacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Landex, Alex

    2011-01-01

    the probability of conflicts and the minimum headway times into account. The last method analyzes how optimal platform tracks are used by examining the arrival and departure pattern of the trains. The developed methods can either be used separately to analyze specific characteristics of the capacity of a station......Stations are often limiting the capacity of railway networks. This is due to extra need of tracks when trains stand still, trains turning around, and conflicting train routes. Although stations are often the capacity bottlenecks, most capacity analysis methods focus on open line capacity. Therefore...... for platform tracks and the probability that arriving trains will not get a platform track immediately at arrival. The third method is a scalable method that analyzes the conflicts in the switch zone(s). In its simplest stage, the method just analyzes the track layout while the more advanced stages also take...

  12. Remote operation for pipelines; Operacao remota para gasodutos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teixeira, Paulo Lyra Borgerth [TBG - Transportadora Brasileira Gasoduto Bolivia Brasil S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2003-07-01

    This paper describes pipeline GASBOL which are remotely monitored, operated and controlled from a central control station in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. This is a result of TBG's experience in design, construction and operation of compressor stations and city gates that are built for unattended operation. Only a small maintenance crew is necessary for routine tasks. In this connection, a complete set of resources has been implemented in order to ensure the required reliability level. This includes monitoring instruments, redundant systems and protections, together with automatic control system for each of the relevant components. Equipment status signals, process variables as well as alarm and trip signals are exchanged via a SCADA system with the Control and Supervision Center, CSC, in Rio de Janeiro. In addition, the CSC is capable of performing all relevant control actions such as start / stop compressor units and station auxiliaries, also remotely setting the station pressure and flow control points. The paper describes also the architecture and configuration of the supervisory and control functions which are performed by means of a SCADA system, along with the pipeline telecommunications system. (author)

  13. First observations of tropospheric δD data observed by ground- and space-based remote sensing and surface in-situ measurement techniques at MUSICA's principle reference station (Izaña Observatory, Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Yenny; Schneider, Matthias; Christner, Emanuel; Rodríguez, Omaira E.; Sepúlveda, Eliezer; Dyroff, Christoph; Wiegele, Andreas

    2013-04-01

    The main goal of the project MUSICA (Multiplatform remote Sensing of Isotopologues for investigating the Cycle of Atmospheric water) is the generation of a quasi global tropospheric water vapor isototopologue dataset of a good and well-documented quality. Therefore, new ground- and space-based remote sensing observations (NDACC-FTIR and IASI/METOP) are combined with in-situ measurements. This work presents the first comparison between in-situ and remote sensing observations made at the Izaña Atmospheric Research Centre (Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain). The in-situ measurements are made by a Picarro L2120-i water vapor isotopologue analyzer. At Izaña the in-situ data are affected by local small-scale mixing processes: during daylight, the thermally buoyant upslope flow prompts the mixing between the Marine Boundary Layer (MBL) and the low Free Troposphere (FT). However, the remote sensors detect δD values averaged over altitudes that are more representative for the free troposphere. This difference has to be considered for the comparison. In general, a good agreement between the MUSICA remote sensing and the in situ H2O-versus-δD plots is found, which demonstrates that the MUSICA δD remote sensing products add scientifically valuable information to the H2O data.

  14. Creating NDA working standards through high-fidelity spent fuel modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skutnik, Steven E.; Gauld, Ian C.; Romano, Catherine E.; Trellue, Holly

    2012-01-01

    The Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) is developing advanced non-destructive assay (NDA) techniques for spent nuclear fuel assemblies to advance the state-of-the-art in safeguards measurements. These measurements aim beyond the capabilities of existing methods to include the evaluation of plutonium and fissile material inventory, independent of operator declarations. Testing and evaluation of advanced NDA performance will require reference assemblies with well-characterized compositions to serve as working standards against which the NDA methods can be benchmarked and for uncertainty quantification. To support the development of standards for the NGSI spent fuel NDA project, high-fidelity modeling of irradiated fuel assemblies is being performed to characterize fuel compositions and radiation emission data. The assembly depletion simulations apply detailed operating history information and core simulation data as it is available to perform high fidelity axial and pin-by-pin fuel characterization for more than 1600 nuclides. The resulting pin-by-pin isotopic inventories are used to optimize the NDA measurements and provide information necessary to unfold and interpret the measurement data, e.g., passive gamma emitters, neutron emitters, neutron absorbers, and fissile content. A key requirement of this study is the analysis of uncertainties associated with the calculated compositions and signatures for the standard assemblies; uncertainties introduced by the calculation methods, nuclear data, and operating information. An integral part of this assessment involves the application of experimental data from destructive radiochemical assay to assess the uncertainty and bias in computed inventories, the impact of parameters such as assembly burnup gradients and burnable poisons, and the influence of neighboring assemblies on periphery rods. This paper will present the results of high fidelity assembly depletion modeling and uncertainty analysis from independent

  15. International Space Station Data Collection for Disaster Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanov, William L.; Evans, Cynthia A.

    2015-01-01

    Remotely sensed data acquired by orbital sensor systems has emerged as a vital tool to identify the extent of damage resulting from a natural disaster, as well as providing near-real time mapping support to response efforts on the ground and humanitarian aid efforts. The International Space Station (ISS) is a unique terrestrial remote sensing platform for acquiring disaster response imagery. Unlike automated remote-sensing platforms it has a human crew; is equipped with both internal and externally-mounted remote sensing instruments; and has an inclined, low-Earth orbit that provides variable views and lighting (day and night) over 95 percent of the inhabited surface of the Earth. As such, it provides a useful complement to autonomous sensor systems in higher altitude polar orbits. NASA remote sensing assets on the station began collecting International Disaster Charter (IDC) response data in May 2012. The initial NASA ISS sensor systems responding to IDC activations included the ISS Agricultural Camera (ISSAC), mounted in the Window Observational Research Facility (WORF); the Crew Earth Observations (CEO) Facility, where the crew collects imagery using off-the-shelf handheld digital cameras; and the Hyperspectral Imager for the Coastal Ocean (HICO), a visible to near-infrared system mounted externally on the Japan Experiment Module Exposed Facility. The ISSAC completed its primary mission in January 2013. It was replaced by the very high resolution ISS SERVIR Environmental Research and Visualization System (ISERV) Pathfinder, a visible-wavelength digital camera, telescope, and pointing system. Since the start of IDC response in 2012 there have been 108 IDC activations; NASA sensor systems have collected data for thirty-two of these events. Of the successful data collections, eight involved two or more ISS sensor systems responding to the same event. Data has also been collected by International Partners in response to natural disasters, most notably JAXA and

  16. Analysis of the feasibility of an experiment to measure carbon monoxide in the atmosphere. [using remote platform interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortner, M. H.; Alyea, F. N.; Grenda, R. N.; Liebling, G. R.; Levy, G. M.

    1973-01-01

    The feasibility of measuring atmospheric carbon monoxide from a remote platform using the correlation interferometry technique was considered. It has been determined that CO data can be obtained with an accuracy of 10 percent using this technique on the first overtone band of CO at 2.3 mu. That band has been found to be much more suitable than the stronger fundamental band at 4.6 mu. Calculations for both wavelengths are presented which illustrate the effects of atmospheric temperature profiles, inversion layers, ground temperature and emissivity, CO profile, reflectivity, and atmospheric pressure. The applicable radiative transfer theory on which these calculations are based is described together with the principles of the technique.

  17. The Design and Implementation of a Remote Fault Reasoning Diagnosis System for Meteorological Satellites Data Acquisition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Jie

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Under the background of the trouble shooting requirements of FENGYUN-3 (FY-3 meteorological satellites data acquisition in domestic and oversea ground stations, a remote fault reasoning diagnosis system is developed by Java 1.6 in eclipse 3.6 platform. The general framework is analyzed, the workflow is introduced. Based on the system, it can realize the remote and centralized monitoring of equipment running status in ground stations,triggering automatic fault diagnosis and rule based fault reasoning by parsing the equipment quality logs, generating trouble tickets and importing expert experience database, providing text and graphics query methods. Through the practical verification, the system can assist knowledge engineers in remote precise and rapid fault location with friendly graphical user interface, boost the fault diagnosis efficiency, enhance the remote monitoring ability of integrity operating control system. The system has a certain practical significance to improve reliability of FY-3 meteorological satellites data acquisition.

  18. ROBOCAL: An automated NDA [nondestructive analysis] calorimetry and gamma isotopic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurd, J.R.; Powell, W.D.; Ostenak, C.A.

    1989-01-01

    ROBOCAL, which is presently being developed and tested at Los Alamos National Laboratory, is a full-scale, prototype robotic system for remote calorimetric and gamma-ray analysis of special nuclear materials. It integrates a fully automated, multidrawer, vertical stacker-retriever system for staging unmeasured nuclear materials, and a fully automated gantry robot for computer-based selection and transfer of nuclear materials to calorimetric and gamma-ray measurement stations. Since ROBOCAL is designed for minimal operator intervention, a completely programmed user interface is provided to interact with the automated mechanical and assay systems. The assay system is designed to completely integrate calorimetric and gamma-ray data acquisition and to perform state-of-the-art analyses on both homogeneous and heterogeneous distributions of nuclear materials in a wide variety of matrices

  19. Experiment 2008 – A Two Station Re-Measurement of the Geometry of the EE-3 Near Casing Fracture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potter, Robert M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pearson, Christopher F. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    1982-03-10

    Analysis of the accelerometer system response to 11 microseismic events created in Experiment 2007 indicates that they are located in an ellipsoidal volume whose major axis direction is N 48° E and dips 47° to the SW. The intermediate axis is essentially horizontal and whose direction N 42° W is the strike of the plane containing the two major axes. The dimensions of the three axes are 315,100 and 65 m respectively. The relationship of this seismic feature to the downhole wellbore map is shown in Figures 1 and 2. It will be noted that the ellipsoid is tangent to the injection point in EE-3 and descends at a 45 angle. The plan view shown in Figure 1 indicates that the zone of seismic activity nearly cut the EE-2 wellbore at a depth of 11500 ft (TVD). Examination of the EE-2 wellbore geology and drilling history shows a well defined zone from 11450-11550 ft TVD with a very fast drilling rate (30 ft/hr) and extensive alteration. Laney labels it as a fault zone. This then coudl be an unpressurized part of the planar feature described above.

  20. Aortic aneurysm sac pressure measurements after endovascular repair using an implantable remote sensor: initial experience and short-term follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoppe, Hanno; Kaufman, John A.; Segall, Jocelyn A.; Liem, Timothy K.; Landry, Gregory J.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this single-center study was to report our initial experience with an implantable remote pressure sensor for aneurysm sac pressure measurement in patients post-endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) including short-term follow-up. A pressure sensor (EndoSure, Atlanta, GA) was implanted in 12 patients treated with different commercially available aortic endografts for EVAR. Pressure was read pre- and post-EVAR in the operating room. One-month follow-up (30 days ± 6 days) was performed including sac pressure readings and IV contrast CT scans. Variables were compared using the paired Student's t test. An intraprocedure type-I endoleak and a type-III endoleak were successfully treated resulting in decreasing sac pressures. In all patients, post-EVAR systolic sac pressure decreased by an average of 33% (P ≤ 0.005) compared to pre-EVAR measurements. One-month follow-up demonstrated a 47% decrease in systolic sac pressure (P ≤ 0.05). On follow-up CT scans, the average maximum aneurysm diameter pre-EVAR was 6.3 ± 1.6 cm and post-EVAR 6.0 ± 1.7 cm (P≤0.05). The diameter of the aneurysm sac was larger only in one patient with a type-III endoleak. Remote sac pressure measurement may provide important information in addition to imaging and may help to reduce the number of follow-up CT scans. (orig.)

  1. Thermodiffusion in Ternary Mixtures of Water/Ethanol/Triethylene Glycol: First Report on the DCMIX3-Experiments Performed on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triller, T.; Bataller, H.; Bou-Ali, M. M.; Braibanti, M.; Croccolo, F.; Ezquerro, J. M.; Galand, Q.; Gavaldà, Jna.; Lapeira, E.; Laverón-Simavilla, A.; Lyubimova, T.; Mialdun, A.; Zárate, J. M. Ortiz de; Rodríguez, J.; Ruiz, X.; Ryzhkov, I. I.; Shevtsova, V.; Vaerenbergh, S. Van; Köhler, W.

    2018-02-01

    We report on thermodiffusion experiments conducted on the International Space Station ISS during fall 2016. These experiments are part of the DCMIX (Diffusion and thermodiffusion Coefficients Measurements in ternary Mixtures) project, which aims at establishing a reliable data base of non-isothermal transport coefficients for selected ternary liquid mixtures. The third campaign, DCMIX3, focuses on aqueous systems with water/ethanol/triethylene glycol as an example, where sign changes of the Soret coefficient have already been reported for certain binary subsystems. Investigations have been carried out with the SODI (Selectable Optical Diagnostics Instrument) instrument, a Mach-Zehnder interferometer set up inside the Microgravity Science Glovebox in the Destiny Module of the ISS. Concentration changes within the liquids have been monitored in response to an external temperature gradient using phase-stepping interferometry. The complete data set has been made available in spring 2017. Due to additionally available measurement time, it was possible to collect a complete data set at 30∘C and an almost complete data set at 25∘C, which significantly exceeds the originally envisaged measurements at a single temperature only. All samples could be measured successfully. The SODI instrument and the DCMIX experiments have proven reliable and robust, allowing to extract meaningful data even in case of unforeseen laser instabilities. First assessments of the data quality have revealed six out of 31 runs with some problems in image contrast and/or phase step stability that will require more sophisticated algorithms. This publication documents all relevant parameters of the conducted experiments and also events that might have an influence on the final results. The compiled information is intended to serve as a starting point for all following data evaluations.

  2. Thermodiffusion in Ternary Mixtures of Water/Ethanol/Triethylene Glycol: First Report on the DCMIX3-Experiments Performed on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triller, T.; Bataller, H.; Bou-Ali, M. M.; Braibanti, M.; Croccolo, F.; Ezquerro, J. M.; Galand, Q.; Gavaldà, Jna.; Lapeira, E.; Laverón-Simavilla, A.; Lyubimova, T.; Mialdun, A.; Zárate, J. M. Ortiz de; Rodríguez, J.; Ruiz, X.; Ryzhkov, I. I.; Shevtsova, V.; Vaerenbergh, S. Van; Köhler, W.

    2018-05-01

    We report on thermodiffusion experiments conducted on the International Space Station ISS during fall 2016. These experiments are part of the DCMIX (Diffusion and thermodiffusion Coefficients Measurements in ternary Mixtures) project, which aims at establishing a reliable data base of non-isothermal transport coefficients for selected ternary liquid mixtures. The third campaign, DCMIX3, focuses on aqueous systems with water/ethanol/triethylene glycol as an example, where sign changes of the Soret coefficient have already been reported for certain binary subsystems. Investigations have been carried out with the SODI (Selectable Optical Diagnostics Instrument) instrument, a Mach-Zehnder interferometer set up inside the Microgravity Science Glovebox in the Destiny Module of the ISS. Concentration changes within the liquids have been monitored in response to an external temperature gradient using phase-stepping interferometry. The complete data set has been made available in spring 2017. Due to additionally available measurement time, it was possible to collect a complete data set at 30∘C and an almost complete data set at 25∘C, which significantly exceeds the originally envisaged measurements at a single temperature only. All samples could be measured successfully. The SODI instrument and the DCMIX experiments have proven reliable and robust, allowing to extract meaningful data even in case of unforeseen laser instabilities. First assessments of the data quality have revealed six out of 31 runs with some problems in image contrast and/or phase step stability that will require more sophisticated algorithms. This publication documents all relevant parameters of the conducted experiments and also events that might have an influence on the final results. The compiled information is intended to serve as a starting point for all following data evaluations.

  3. National Coral Reef Monitoring Program: Benthic Cover Derived from Analysis of Benthic Images Collected for Climate Stations across the Pacific Remote Island Areas from 2015-01-26 to 2015-04-27 (NCEI Accession 0159152)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The data described here result from benthic photo-quadrat surveys conducted along transects at climate stations and permanent sites identified by the Ocean and...

  4. Verification experiment on the downblending of high enriched uranium (HEU) at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. Digital video surveillance of the HEU feed stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, R.L.; Tolk, K.; Whiting, N.; Castleberry, K.; Lenarduzzi, R.

    1998-01-01

    As part of a Safeguards Agreement between the US and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio, was added to the list of facilities eligible for the application of IAEA safeguards. Currently, the facility is in the process of downblending excess inventory of HEU to low enriched uranium (LEU) from US defense related programs for commercial use. An agreement was reached between the US and the IAEA that would allow the IAEA to conduct an independent verification experiment at the Portsmouth facility, resulting in the confirmation that the HEU was in fact downblended. The experiment provided an opportunity for the DOE laboratories to recommend solutions/measures for new IAEA safeguards applications. One of the measures recommended by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and selected by the IAEA, was a digital video surveillance system for monitoring activity at the HEU feed stations. This paper describes the SNL implementation of the digital video system and its integration with the Load Cell Based Weighing System (LCBWS) from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The implementation was based on commercially available technology that also satisfied IAEA criteria for tamper protection and data authentication. The core of the Portsmouth digital video surveillance system was based on two Digital Camera Modules (DMC-14) from Neumann Consultants, Germany

  5. Greenhouse (III): Gas-Exchange and Seed-to-Seed Experiments on the Russian Space Station MIR and Earth-grown, Ethylene-Treated Wheat Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, William F.; Bingham, Gail; Carman, John; Bubenheim, David; Levinskikh, Margarita; Sytchev, Vladimir N.; Podolsky, Igor B.; Chernova, Lola; Nefodova, Yelena

    2001-01-01

    The Mir Space Station provided an outstanding opportunity to study long-term plant responses when exposed to a microgravity environment. Furthermore, if plants can be grown to maturity in a microgravity environment, they might be used in future bioregenerative life-support systems (BLSS). The primary objective of the Greenhouse experiment onboard Mir was to grow Super Dwarf and Apogee wheat through complete life cycles in microgravity; i.e., from seed-to-seed-to-seed. Additional objectives were to study chemical, biochemical, and structural changes in plant tissues as well as photosynthesis, respiration, and transpiration (evaporation of water from plants). Another major objective was to evaluate the suitability clothe facilities on Mir for advanced research with plants. The Greenhouse experiment was conducted in the Russian/Bulgarian plant growth chamber, the Svet, to which the United States added instrumentation systems to monitor changes in CO2 and water vapor caused by the plants (with four infrared gas analyzers monitoring air entering and leaving two small plastic chambers). In addition, the US instrumentation also monitored O2; air, leaf (IR), cabin pressure; photon flux; and substrate temperature and substrate moisture (16 probes in the root module). Facility modifications were first performed during the summer of 1995 during Mir 19, which began after STS-72 left Mir. Plant development was monitored by daily observations and some photographs.

  6. Review of 5.5 Years' Experience Using E-mail-Based Telemedicine to Deliver Orthopedic Care to Remote Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cota, Adam; Tarchala, Magdalena; Parent-Harvey, Caroline; Engel, Victor; Berry, Greg; Reindl, Rudy; Harvey, Edward J

    2017-01-01

    The use of e-mail-based telemedicine has been demonstrated as an effective and low-cost way of delivering healthcare to patients in remote areas who have limited access to medical services. We established a novel teleorthopedic service for a catchment area encompassing 972,000 km 2 using a commercial off-the-shelf e-mail application. Before the implementation of this program, patients with acute orthopedic injuries were required to travel by air up to 1,900 km for evaluation by an orthopedic surgeon. In the present study, we examined the patient demographics and consultation characteristics and calculated the cost savings associated with patient travel for this teleorthopedic service. We retrospectively reviewed 1,000 consecutive e-mail-based consults and radiographic images received for new patients with acute orthopedic injuries from January 2008 to June 2013. Seventy-nine consults were excluded due to incomplete documentation, leaving 921 available for analysis. The service records were examined to identify patient demographics, orthopedic diagnosis, the percentage of patients managed locally, and the medical indications for patients requiring transfer. As the travel costs for patients requiring transport to the university hospital center are borne by governmental health agencies, the savings accrued from treating patients in their home communities were also calculated. For the 921 consultations, the mean age of patients was 27 years (range, 3 months-88 years), with 40.7% of all patients being younger than 18 years. The most common diagnoses were ankle fractures (15.2%), clavicle fractures (11.2%), distal radius fractures (11.2%), and fractures of the foot (10.2%). One hundred ninety patients (20.6%) required transfer, whereas 731 patients (79.4%) were treated in their home communities. Of the patients who were transferred, 123 (64.7%) required surgery, 55 (28.9%) required clinical evaluation by an orthopedic surgeon, and 12 (6.4%) required CT or MRI. Cost

  7. Earth Science With the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III (SAGE III) on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawodny, Joe; Vernier, Jean-Paul; Thomason, Larry; Roell, Marilee; Pitts, Mike; Moore, Randy; Hill, Charles; Flittner, David; Damadeo, Rob; Cisewski, Mike

    2015-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) III is the fourth generation of solar occultation instruments operated by NASA, the first coming under a different acronym, to investigate the Earth's upper atmosphere. Three flight-ready SAGE III instruments were built by Ball Aerospace in the late 1990s, with one launched aboard the former Russian Aviation and Space Agency (now known as Roskosmos) Meteor-3M platform on 10 December 2001 (continuing until the platform lost power in 2006). Another of the original instruments was manifested for the ISS in the 2004 time frame, but was delayed because of budgetary considerations. Fortunately, that SAGE III/ISS mission was restarted in 2009 with a major focus upon filling an anticipated gap in ozone and aerosol observation in the second half of this decade. Here we discuss the mission architecture, its implementation, and data that will be produced by SAGE III/ISS, including their expected accuracy and coverage. The 52-degree inclined orbit of the ISS is well-suited for solar occultation and provides near-global observations on a monthly basis with excellent coverage of low and mid-latitudes. This is similar to that of the SAGE II mission (1985-2005), whose data set has served the international atmospheric science community as a standard for stratospheric ozone and aerosol measurements. The nominal science products include vertical profiles of trace gases, such as ozone, nitrogen dioxide and water vapor, along with multi-wavelength aerosol extinction. Though in the visible portion of the spectrum the brightness of the Sun is one million times that of the full Moon, the SAGE III instrument is designed to cover this large dynamic range and also perform lunar occultations on a routine basis to augment the solar products. The standard lunar products were demonstrated during the SAGE III/M3M mission and include ozone, nitrogen dioxide & nitrogen trioxide. The operational flexibility of the SAGE III spectrometer accomplishes

  8. 'Sometimes they run away, that's how scared they feel': the peadiatric hospitalisation experiences of Indigenous families from remote areas of Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Laura; Agius, Kendall; Darbyshire, Philip

    Hospitalisation can be a traumatic experience for any child and family but the experience can be significantly more so for Indigenous parents and children from remote areas of Australia. Despite the importance of this issue for child and family health and for Indigenous health, the hospitalisation experiences of Indigenous families and children have received almost no research attention. This paper describes selected findings from a recently completed Honours research study which used the participatory and collaborative Indigenous research approach of Dadirri to explore this question. Following a brief description of the methodology of Dadirri, the paper presents the participating families' depictions of their experiences of 'Coming Down' and 'Being in Hospital', where they revealed the extent and effects of marked culture shock. The significant cultural differences between staff and Indigenous families contributed to the parents' sense of fear, powerlessness and isolation from their child, home community and culture. For these families this isolation was not merely geographic but intricately linked to their health and wellbeing.

  9. Power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cawte, H.; Philpott, E.F.

    1980-01-01

    The object is to provide a method of operating a dual purpose power station so that the steam supply system is operated at a high load factor. The available steam not required for electricity generation is used to provide process heat and the new feature is that the process plant capacity is determined to make the most economic use of the steam supply system, and not to match the passout capacity of the turbine of the turbogenerator. The product of the process plant should, therefore, be capable of being stored. A dual-purpose power station with a nuclear-powered steam source, turbogenerating means connected to the steam source and steam-powered process plant susceptible to wide variation in its rate of operation is described. (U.K.)

  10. Clock synchronisation experiment in India using symphonie satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somayajulu, Y. V.; Mathur, B. S.; Banerjee, P.; Garg, S. C.; Singh, L.; Sood, P. C.; Tyagi, T. R.; Jain, C. L.; Kumar, K.

    1979-01-01

    A recent clock synchronization experiment between the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), New Delhi and Space Applications Center (SAC), Ahemedabad, in India via geostationary satellite symphonie 2, stationed at 49 E longitude, is reported. A two-way transmission using a microwave transponder considered to provide the greatest precision in synchronization of two remote clocks is described.

  11. Development and Performance of the Alaska Transportable Array Posthole Broadband Seismic Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aderhold, K.; Enders, M.; Miner, J.; Bierma, R. M.; Bloomquist, D.; Theis, J.; Busby, R. W.

    2017-12-01

    The final stations of the Alaska Transportable Array (ATA) will be constructed in 2017, completing the full footprint of 280 new and existing broadband seismic stations stretching across 19 degrees of latitude from western Alaska to western Canada. Through significant effort in planning, site reconnaissance, permitting and the considerable and concerted effort of field crews, the IRIS Alaska TA team is on schedule to successfully complete the construction of 194 new stations and upgrades at 28 existing stations over four field seasons. The station design and installation method was developed over the course of several years, leveraging the experience of the L48 TA deployments and existing network operators in Alaska as well as incorporating newly engineered components and procedures. A purpose-built lightweight drill was designed and fabricated to facilitate the construction of shallow boreholes to incorporate newly available posthole seismometers. This allowed for the development of a streamlined system of procedures to manufacture uniform seismic stations with minimal crew and minimal time required at each station location. A new station can typically be constructed in a single day with a four-person field crew. The ATA utilizes a hammer-drilled, cased posthole emplacement method adapted to the remote and harsh working environment of Alaska. The same emplacement design is implemented in all ground conditions to preserve uniformity across the array and eliminate the need for specialized mechanical equipment. All components for station construction are ideally suited for transport via helicopter, and can be adapted to utilize more traditional methods of transportation when available. This emplacement design delivers high quality data when embedded in bedrock or permafrost, reaching the low noise levels of benchmark permanent global broadband stations especially at long periods over 70 seconds. The TA will operate the network of real-time stations through at least

  12. Local control stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, W.S.; Higgins, J.C.; Wachtel, J.A.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes research concerning the effects of human engineering design at local control stations (i.e., operator interfaces located outside the control room) on human performance and plant safety. The research considered both multifunction panels (e.g. remote shutdown panels) as well as single-function interfaces (e.g., valves, breakers, gauges, etc.). Changes in performance shaping factors associated with variations in human engineering at LCSs were estimated based on expert opinion. By means of a scaling procedure, these estimates were used to modify the human error probabilities in a PRA model, which was then employed to generate estimates of plant risk and scoping-level value/impact ratios for various human engineering upgrades. Recent documentation of human engineering deficiencies at single-function LCSs was also reviewed, and an assessment of the current status of LCSs with respect to human engineering was conducted

  13. Efficient solutions to the NDA-NCA low-order eigenvalue problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willert, J. A.; Kelley, C. T.

    2013-01-01

    Recent algorithmic advances combine moment-based acceleration and Jacobian-Free Newton-Krylov (JFNK) methods to accelerate the computation of the dominant eigenvalue in a k-eigenvalue calculation. In particular, NDA-NCA [1], builds a sequence of low-order (LO) diffusion-based eigenvalue problems in which the solution converges to the true eigenvalue solution. Within NDA-NCA, the solution to the LO k-eigenvalue problem is computed by solving a system of nonlinear equation using some variant of Newton's method. We show that we can speed up the solution to the LO problem dramatically by abandoning the JFNK method and exploiting the structure of the Jacobian matrix. (authors)

  14. Çeşitli Türk musikisi makamlarında ezan

    OpenAIRE

    KOPAR, Saadettin Volkan

    2010-01-01

    Bu çalışmada, geçmişten günümüze kadar okuna gelmiş geleneksel ezan makamlarının dışında bu güne kadar okunmamış veya kayıt altına alınmamış yedi farklı makamda ezan örnekleri sunulmuştur. Bu ezanlar, stüdyo ortamında okunmuş ve cd ile kayıt altına alınarak çalışmaya eklenmiştir. Okunan ezanlar notaya alınarak, makamları ile ilgili bilgiler verilmiş ve kayıtla...

  15. Remote radiation environmental monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pashayev, A.M.; Mehdiyev, A.Sh.; Bayramov, A.A.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The project of the automated remote monitoring for a level of an environment background radiation in settlements along boundary of the Azerbaijan Republic is developed. The main purpose of the project is: increase of a level of a radiation safety on territory of the Azerbaijan Republic; controlling of a level of an environment background radiation on boundary of the Azerbaijan Republic with the purpose of well-timed warning and acceptance of indispensable measures at probable emergencies on Atomic Power Stations in a number adjacent from Azerbaijan countries, or other ecological catastrophes; controlling of a level of an environment background radiation along eastern suburbs of Azerbaijan regions occupied of Armenia's army and detection of the facts of wrongful disposals of atomic engineering of Armenia on territory of Azerbaijan. As is known, in a number adjacent from Azerbaijan countries the nuclear industry is advanced or develops. It has resulted in origin of threat of a radiation hazard in case of ecological catastrophes: widely scale leakage of radioactive wastes, explosions, or fires on nuclear generating sets, acts of sabotage, directional against Azerbaijan. In this case, at unfavorable meteorological conditions a radioactive waste may be brought by a wind or a rain on territory of Azerbaijan. Measurement is supposed a carry with the help of 'EKOMON' fixed stations. The results of round-the-clock a gamma and a neutron background measurement from the stations will be transmitted automatically to a dispatcher station in the central computer. Established on the stations telescopic sensors also will allow to determine a direction of a radiation and coordinates of radiation source. Stations will be located along boundary, and also in Kedabek, Akstafa, Terter, Agdam and Fizuli regions, and in Autonomous Republic of Nakhichevan

  16. Mobile and modular. BGR develops seismological monitoring stations for universal applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinz, Erwin; Hanneken, Mark

    2016-01-01

    BGR seismologists often set up monitoring stations for testing purposes. The engineers from the Central Seismological Observatory have now developed a new type of mobile monitoring station which can be remotely controlled.

  17. Survey of DOE NDA practices for CH-Tru waste certification--illustrated with a greater than 10,000 drum NDA data base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, F.J.; Caldwell, J.T.; Smith, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    We have compiled a greater than 10,000 CH-TRU waste drum data base from seven DOE sites which have utilized such multiple NDA measurements within the past few years. Most of these nondestructive assay (NDA) technique assay result comparisons have been performed on well-characterized, segregated waste categories such as cemented sludges, combustibles, metals, graphite residues, glasses, etc., with well-known plutonium isotopic compositions. Waste segregation and categorization practices vary from one DOE site to another. Perhaps the most systematic approach has been in use for several years at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP), operated by Rockwell International, and located near Golden, Colorado. Most of the drum assays in our data base result from assays of RFP wastes, with comparisons available between the original RFP assays and PAN assays performed independently at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Solid Waste Examination Pilot Plant (SWEPP) facility. Most of the RFP assays were performed with hyperpure germanium (HPGe)-based SGS assay units. However, at least one very important waste category, processed first-stage sludges, is assayed at RFP using a sludge batch-sampling procedure, prior to filling of the waste drums. 5 refs., 5 figs

  18. LIFE experiment: isolation of cryptoendolithic organisms from Antarctic colonized sandstone exposed to space and simulated Mars conditions on the international space station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalzi, Giuliano; Selbmann, Laura; Zucconi, Laura; Rabbow, Elke; Horneck, Gerda; Albertano, Patrizia; Onofri, Silvano

    2012-06-01

    Desiccated Antarctic rocks colonized by cryptoendolithic communities were exposed on the International Space Station (ISS) to space and simulated Mars conditions (LiFE-Lichens and Fungi Experiment). After 1.5 years in space samples were retrieved, rehydrated and spread on different culture media. Colonies of a green alga and a pink-coloured fungus developed on Malt-Agar medium; they were isolated from a sample exposed to simulated Mars conditions beneath a 0.1 % T Suprasil neutral density filter and from a sample exposed to space vacuum without solar radiation exposure, respectively. None of the other flight samples showed any growth after incubation. The two organisms able to grow were identified at genus level by Small SubUnit (SSU) and Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) rDNA sequencing as Stichococcus sp. (green alga) and Acarospora sp. (lichenized fungal genus) respectively. The data in the present study provide experimental information on the possibility of eukaryotic life transfer from one planet to another by means of rocks and of survival in Mars environment.

  19. Hands-On Experiences of Undergraduate Students in Automatics and Robotics Using a Virtual and Remote Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jara, Carlos A.; Candelas, Francisco A.; Puente, Santiago T.; Torres, Fernando

    2011-01-01

    Automatics and Robotics subjects are always greatly improved when classroom teaching is supported by adequate laboratory courses and experiments following the "learning by doing" paradigm, which provides students a deep understanding of theoretical lessons. However, expensive equipment and limited time prevent teachers having sufficient…

  20. 'Remote Parenting': Parents' Perspectives on, and Experiences of, Home and Preschool Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuorinen, Tuula

    2018-01-01

    This article explores parents' perspectives on, and experiences of, home and preschool collaboration. The data consist of in-depth interviews with 10 parents with one or several children attending preschool. The research process of gathering and analyzing data follows the procedures of constructivist grounded theory. The results show how parents…

    1. A preliminary evaluation of certain NDA techniques for RH-TRU characterization

      Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

      Hartwell, J.K.; Yoon, W.Y.; Peterson, H.K. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

      1997-11-01

      This report presents the results of modeling efforts to evaluate selected NDA assay methods for RH-TRU waste characterization. The target waste stream was Content Code 104/107 113-liter waste drums that comprise the majority of the INEL`s RH-TRU waste inventory. Two NDA techniques are treated in detail. One primary NDA technique examined is gamma-ray spectrometry to determine the drum fission and activation product content, and fuel sample inventory calculations using the ORIGEN code to predict the total drum inventory. A heavily shielded and strongly collimated HPGe spectrometer system was designed using MCNP modeling. Detection limits and expected precision of this approach were estimated by a combination of Monte Carlo modeling and synthetic gamma-ray spectrum generation. This technique may allow the radionuclide content of these wastes to be determined with relative standard deviations of 20 to 50% depending on the drum matrix and radionuclide. The INEL Passive/Active Neutron (PAN) assay system is the second primary technique considered. A shielded overpack for the 113-liter CC104/107 RH-TRU drums was designed to shield the PAN detectors from excessive gamma radiation. MCNP modeling suggests PAN detection limits of about 0.06 g {sup 235}U and 0.04 g {sup 239}Pu during active assays. 12 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

    2. NDA PDP Program PuO2 increased particle size specification and design

      International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

      Marshall, R.S.; Taggart, D.P.; Becker, G.K.; Woon, W.Y.

      1996-01-01

      Provisions in the National TRU Program Quality Assurance Program Plan require an assessment of performance for nondestructive waste assay (NDA) systems employed in the program. This requirement is in part fulfilled through the use of Performance Demonstration programs. In order to optimize the quality and quantity of information acquired during a given Performance Demonstration Program cycle, the assessment employed is to be carefully specified and designed. The assessment must yield measurement system performance data meaningful with respect to NDA system capability to accommodate attributes of interest known to occur in actual waste forms. The design and specification of the increased particle size PuO 2 PDP working reference materials (WRMs) is directed at providing a straightforward mechanism to assess waste NDA system capability to account for biases introduced by large PuO 2 particles. The increased particle size PuO 2 PDP WRM design addresses actual waste form attributes associated with PuO 2 particle size and distributions thereof, the issue of a known and stable WRM configuration and equally important appropriate certification and tractability considerations

    3. Antarctic station life: The first 15 years of mixed expeditions to the Antarctic

      Science.gov (United States)

      Sarris, Aspa

      2017-02-01

      This study examined the experiences of women who lived and worked on remote and isolated Antarctic stations for up to 15 months at a time. The study employed purposeful sampling and a longitudinal - processual approach to study women's experiences over the first 15 years of mixed gender Antarctic expeditions. The retrospective analysis was based on a semi-structured interview administered to 14 women upon their return to Australia. The results showed that women referred to the natural physical Antarctic environment as one of the best aspects of their experience and the reason they would recommend the Antarctic to their friends as a good place to work. In describing the worst aspect of their experience, women referred to aspects of Antarctic station life, including: (i) the male dominated nature of station culture; (ii) the impact of interpersonal conflict, including gender based conflict and friction between scientists and trades workers; and (iii) the lack of anonymity associated with living and working with the same group of individuals, mainly men, for up to 12 months or more. The results are discussed within the context of the evolution of Antarctic station culture and recommendations are made in terms of the demography of expeditions, expeditioner selection and recruitment and the ongoing monitoring of Antarctic station culture. The study presents a framework that can be applied to groups and teams living and working in analogous isolated, confined and extreme work environments, including outer space missions.

    4. Commercial opportunities utilizing the International Space Station

      Science.gov (United States)

      Kearney, Michael E.; Mongan, Phil; Overmyer, Carolyn M.; Jackson, Kenneth

      1998-01-01

      The International Space Station (ISS) has the unique capability of providing a low-g environment for both short- and long-duration experimentation. This environment can provide a unique and competitive research capability to industry; but until recently, utilization of this environment by the private sector has been limited if not totally unavailable. NASA has recently expressed an interest in the commercial development of space and this is now an integral part of the Agency's enabling legislation through the Space Act. NASA's objective is to foster the use of the space environment for the development of commercial products and processes. Through alliances and agreements with several commercial companies and universities, SPACEHAB, Inc., has built a comprehensive package of services designed to provide low-cost reliable access to space for experimenters. These services provide opportunities to support engineering test beds for materials exposure analysis, to mitigate structural failures as observed on the Hubble Space Telescope; materials processing, remote sensing; space environment definition; and electronic experiments. The intent of this paper is to identify commercial opportunities for utilizing the International Space Station and provide examples of several facilities currently being designed and manufactured by commercial companies with the purpose of providing access to the space environment for commercial users.

    5. A Remote WIRELESS Facility

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Kees Uiterwijk

      2007-10-01

      Full Text Available Continuing need for available distance learning facilities has led to the development of a remote lab facility focusing on wireless technology. In the field of engineering there is a student need of gaining experience in set-up, monitoring and maintenance of 802.11A/B/G based wireless LAN environments.

    6. CREST-Snow Field Experiment: analysis of snowpack properties using multi-frequency microwave remote sensing data

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      T. Y. Lakhankar

      2013-02-01

      Full Text Available The CREST-Snow Analysis and Field Experiment (CREST-SAFE was carried out during January–March 2011 at the research site of the National Weather Service office, Caribou, ME, USA. In this experiment dual-polarized microwave (37 and 89 GHz observations were accompanied by detailed synchronous observations of meteorology and snowpack physical properties. The objective of this long-term field experiment was to improve understanding of the effect of changing snow characteristics (grain size, density, temperature under various meteorological conditions on the microwave emission of snow and hence to improve retrievals of snow cover properties from satellite observations. In this paper we present an overview of the field experiment and comparative preliminary analysis of the continuous microwave and snowpack observations and simulations. The observations revealed a large difference between the brightness temperature of fresh and aged snowpack even when the snow depth was the same. This is indicative of a substantial impact of evolution of snowpack properties such as snow grain size, density and wetness on microwave observations. In the early spring we frequently observed a large diurnal variation in the 37 and 89 GHz brightness temperature with small depolarization corresponding to daytime snowmelt and nighttime refreeze events. SNTHERM (SNow THERmal Model and the HUT (Helsinki University of Technology snow emission model were used to simulate snowpack properties and microwave brightness temperatures, respectively. Simulated snow depth and snowpack temperature using SNTHERM were compared to in situ observations. Similarly, simulated microwave brightness temperatures using the HUT model were compared with the observed brightness temperatures under different snow conditions to identify different states of the snowpack that developed during the winter season.

    7. Laser long-range remote-sensing program experimental results

      Science.gov (United States)

      Highland, Ronald G.; Shilko, Michael L.; Fox, Marsha J.; Gonglewski, John D.; Czyzak, Stanley R.; Dowling, James A.; Kelly, Brian; Pierrottet, Diego F.; Ruffatto, Donald; Loando, Sharon; Matsuura, Chris; Senft, Daniel C.; Finkner, Lyle; Rae, Joe; Gallegos, Joe

      1995-12-01

      A laser long range remote sensing (LRS) program is being conducted by the United States Air Force Phillips Laboratory (AF/PL). As part of this program, AF/PL is testing the feasibility of developing a long path CO(subscript 2) laser-based DIAL system for remote sensing. In support of this program, the AF/PL has recently completed an experimental series using a 21 km slant- range path (3.05 km ASL transceiver height to 0.067 km ASL target height) at its Phillips Laboratory Air Force Maui Optical Station (AMOS) facility located on Maui, Hawaii. The dial system uses a 3-joule, (superscript 13)C isotope laser coupled into a 0.6 m diameter telescope. The atmospheric optical characterization incorporates information from an infrared scintillometer co-aligned to the laser path, atmospheric profiles from weather balloons launched from the target site, and meteorological data from ground stations at AMOS and the target site. In this paper, we report a description of the experiment configuration, a summary of the results, a summary of the atmospheric conditions and their implications to the LRS program. The capability of such a system for long-range, low-angle, slant-path remote sensing is discussed. System performance issues relating to both coherent and incoherent detection methods, atmospheric limitations, as well as, the development of advanced models to predict performance of long range scenarios are presented.

    8. Draper Station Analysis Tool

      Science.gov (United States)

      Bedrossian, Nazareth; Jang, Jiann-Woei; McCants, Edward; Omohundro, Zachary; Ring, Tom; Templeton, Jeremy; Zoss, Jeremy; Wallace, Jonathan; Ziegler, Philip

      2011-01-01

      Draper Station Analysis Tool (DSAT) is a computer program, built on commercially available software, for simulating and analyzing complex dynamic systems. Heretofore used in designing and verifying guidance, navigation, and control systems of the International Space Station, DSAT has a modular architecture that lends itself to modification for application to spacecraft or terrestrial systems. DSAT consists of user-interface, data-structures, simulation-generation, analysis, plotting, documentation, and help components. DSAT automates the construction of simulations and the process of analysis. DSAT provides a graphical user interface (GUI), plus a Web-enabled interface, similar to the GUI, that enables a remotely located user to gain access to the full capabilities of DSAT via the Internet and Webbrowser software. Data structures are used to define the GUI, the Web-enabled interface, simulations, and analyses. Three data structures define the type of analysis to be performed: closed-loop simulation, frequency response, and/or stability margins. DSAT can be executed on almost any workstation, desktop, or laptop computer. DSAT provides better than an order of magnitude improvement in cost, schedule, and risk assessment for simulation based design and verification of complex dynamic systems.

    9. On-line data acquisition system for Aanderaa weather station

      Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

      AshokKumar, K.; Diwan, S.G.

      Aanderaa Weather Station can be installed at unattended remote places for collection of various weather parameters at regular preselected intervals. The weather parameters are recorded on the magnetic spool inside a battery operated datalogger which...

    10. Remote sensing image fusion

      CERN Document Server

      Alparone, Luciano; Baronti, Stefano; Garzelli, Andrea

      2015-01-01

      A synthesis of more than ten years of experience, Remote Sensing Image Fusion covers methods specifically designed for remote sensing imagery. The authors supply a comprehensive classification system and rigorous mathematical description of advanced and state-of-the-art methods for pansharpening of multispectral images, fusion of hyperspectral and panchromatic images, and fusion of data from heterogeneous sensors such as optical and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images and integration of thermal and visible/near-infrared images. They also explore new trends of signal/image processing, such as

    11. Remote data monitoring for CDF

      International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

      Kippenhan, H.A. Jr.; Lidinsky, W.; Roediger, G.

      1995-11-01

      Remote data monitoring from the physicists' home institutions has become an important issue in large international experiments to ensure high performance of the detectors and high quality of data and scientific results. The CDF experiment is a collaboration of 450 physicists from 36 institutions in the U.S., Japan, Canada, Italy and Taiwan. Future experiments at Fermilab, CERN and elsewhere will be even larger, and will be performed over a period of order 10 years. The ability of collaborators at remote sites to monitor the increasingly complex detectors and feed the results back into the data acquisition process will be of great importance We report on the status and performance of remote monitoring from Japan of the CDF experiment in Batavia Illinois. We also discuss feasibilities for modest Remote Control Rooms

    12. The Ship Tethered Aerostat Remote Sensing System (STARRS): Observations of Small-Scale Surface Lateral Transport During the LAgrangian Submesoscale ExpeRiment (LASER)

      Science.gov (United States)

      Carlson, D. F.; Novelli, G.; Guigand, C.; Özgökmen, T.; Fox-Kemper, B.; Molemaker, M. J.

      2016-02-01

      The Consortium for Advanced Research on the Transport of Hydrocarbon in the Environment (CARTHE) will carry out the LAgrangian Submesoscale ExpeRiment (LASER) to study the role of small-scale processes in the transport and dispersion of oil and passive tracers. The Ship-Tethered Aerostat Remote Sensing System (STARRS) will observe small-scale surface dispersion in the open ocean. STARRS is built around a high-lift-capacity (30 kg) helium-filled aerostat. STARRS is equipped with a high resolution digital camera. An integrated GNSS receiver and inertial navigation system permit direct geo-rectification of the imagery. Consortium for Advanced Research on the Transport of Hydrocarbon in the Environment (CARTHE) will carry out the LAgrangian Submesoscale ExpeRiment (LASER) to study the role of small-scale processes in the transport and dispersion of oil and passive tracers. The Ship-Tethered Aerostat Remote Sensing System (STARRS) was developed to produce observational estimates of small-scale surface dispersion in the open ocean. STARRS is built around a high-lift-capacity (30 kg) helium-filled aerostat. STARRS is equipped with a high resolution digital camera. An integrated GNSS receiver and inertial navigation system permit direct geo-rectification of the imagery. Thousands of drift cards deployed in the field of view of STARRS and tracked over time provide the first observational estimates of small-scale (1-500 m) surface dispersion in the open ocean. The STARRS imagery will be combined with GPS-tracked surface drifter trajectories, shipboard observations, and aerial surveys of sea surface temperature in the DeSoto Canyon. In addition to obvious applications to oil spill modelling, the STARRS observations will provide essential benchmarks for high resolution numerical modelsDrift cards deployed in the field of view of STARRS and tracked over time provide the first observational estimates of small-scale (1-100 m) surface dispersion in the open ocean. The STARRS

    13. Growth of In x Ga1-x Sb alloy semiconductor at the International Space Station (ISS) and comparison with terrestrial experiments.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Inatomi, Y; Sakata, K; Arivanandhan, M; Rajesh, G; Nirmal Kumar, V; Koyama, T; Momose, Y; Ozawa, T; Okano, Y; Hayakawa, Y

      2015-01-01

      In x Ga 1- x Sb is an important material that has tunable properties in the infrared (IR) region and is suitable for IR-device applications. Since the quality of crystals relies on growth conditions, the growth process of alloy semiconductors can be examined better under microgravity (μG) conditions where convection is suppressed. To investigate the dissolution and growth process of In x Ga 1- x Sb alloy semiconductors via a sandwiched structure of GaSb(seed)/InSb/GaSb(feed) under normal and μG conditions. In x Ga 1- x Sb crystals were grown at the International Space Station (ISS) under μG conditions, and a similar experiment was conducted under terrestrial conditions (1G) using the vertical gradient freezing (VGF) method. The grown crystals were cut along the growth direction and its growth properties were studied. The indium composition and growth rate of grown crystals were calculated. The shape of the growth interface was nearly flat under μG, whereas under 1G, it was highly concave with the initial seed interface being nearly flat and having facets at the peripheries. The quality of the μG crystals was better than that of the 1G samples, as the etch pit density was low in the μG sample. The growth rate was higher under μG compared with 1G. Moreover, the growth started at the peripheries under 1G, whereas it started throughout the seed interface under μG. Kinetics played a dominant role under 1G. The suppressed convection under μG affected the dissolution and growth process of the In x Ga 1- x Sb alloy semiconductor.

    14. General-purpose computer networks and resource sharing in ERDA. Volume 3. Remote resource-sharing experience and findings

      Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

      1977-07-15

      The investigation focused on heterogeneous networks in which a variety of dissimilar computers and operating systems were interconnected nationwide. Homogeneous networks, such as MFE net and SACNET, were not considered since they could not be used for general purpose resource sharing. Issues of privacy and security are of concern in any network activity. However, consideration of privacy and security of sensitive data arise to a much lesser degree in unclassified scientific research than in areas involving personal or proprietary information. Therefore, the existing mechanisms at individual sites for protecting sensitive data were relied on, and no new protection mechanisms to prevent infringement of privacy and security were attempted. Further development of ERDA networking will need to incorporate additional mechanisms to prevent infringement of privacy. The investigation itself furnishes an excellent example of computational resource sharing through a heterogeneous network. More than twenty persons, representing seven ERDA computing sites, made extensive use of both ERDA and non-ERDA computers in coordinating, compiling, and formatting the data which constitute the bulk of this report. Volume 3 analyzes the benefits and barriers encountered in actual resource sharing experience, and provides case histories of typical applications.

    15. EXPERIENCE OF THE REMOTE COURSE IMPLEMENTATION FOR THE ORGANIZATION OF THE INDEPENDENT WORK OF STUDENTS FROM MATHEMATICAL ANALYSIS

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Botuzova Y.

      2017-12-01

      Full Text Available The article raises the problem of organization independent work of students. In particular, the model of integration of traditional and distance learning in the form of a blended learning is considered. The experience of introducing a distance course in the discipline "Mathematical Analysis" is described. The purpose of this distance course is the effective organization of independent out of class work of future mathematics teachers. In this paper, the structure of educational and methodological support of the educational process on mathematical analysis is examined, as well as its model in a blended learning is presented. The didactic capabilities of distance technologies are analyzed. The step-by-step scheme of organization of independent work of students in the context of the use of distance course is offered. The scheme consists of the following stages: preparatory, theoretical, practical-activity, controlling, corrective. The author describes in detail the contents of the work of the teacher and students at each of these stages. The peculiarities of planning, developing and implementing a distance course, and the leadership of independent work of students are revealed. For this, the teacher performs the following functions: the formation of a permanent positive student motivation; defining and setting goals and objectives; organization of interaction between students; control and counseling of students in the learning process. A number of psychological and pedagogical problems are highlighted in the implementation of the distance learning form and the ways of their partial or complete elimination are indicated.

    16. MIT-NASA/KSC space life science experiments - A telescience testbed

      Science.gov (United States)

      Oman, Charles M.; Lichtenberg, Byron K.; Fiser, Richard L.; Vordermark, Deborah S.

      1990-01-01

      Experiments performed at MIT to better define Space Station information system telescience requirements for effective remote coaching of astronauts by principal investigators (PI) on the ground are described. The experiments were conducted via satellite video, data, and voice links to surrogate crewmembers working in a laboratory at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. Teams of two PIs and two crewmembers performed two different space life sciences experiments. During 19 three-hour interactive sessions, a variety of test conditions were explored. Since bit rate limits are necessarily imposed on Space Station video experiments surveillance video was varied down to 50 Kb/s and the effectiveness of PI controlled frame rate, resolution, grey scale, and color decimation was investigated. It is concluded that remote coaching by voice works and that dedicated crew-PI voice loops would be of great value on the Space Station.

    17. GEROS-ISS: GNSS REflectometry, Radio Occultation and Scatterometry onboard the International Space Station

      DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

      Wickert, Jens; Cardellach, Estel; Bandeiras, Jorge

      2016-01-01

      GEROS-ISS stands for GNSS REflectometry, radio occultation, and scatterometry onboard the International Space Station (ISS). It is a scientific experiment, successfully proposed to the European Space Agency in 2011. The experiment as the name indicates will be conducted on the ISS. The main focus...... of GEROS-ISS is the dedicated use of signals from the currently available Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) in L-band for remote sensing of the Earth with a focus to study climate change. Prime mission objectives are the determination of the altimetric sea surface height of the oceans...

    18. Spinel-rich lithologies in the lunar highland crust: Linking lunar samples, crystallization experiments and remote sensing

      Science.gov (United States)

      Gross, J.; Treiman, A. H.

      2012-12-01

      The discovery of areas rich in (Mg,Fe)-Al spinel on the rims and central peaks of lunar impact basins (by the M3 mapping spectrometer on Chandrayaan-1) has revived the old puzzle of the origin of lunar spinel. (Mg,Fe)-Al spinel is rare but widespread in lunar highlands rocks, and thus might be an important component of the lunar crust [1-3]. However, the origin of this spinel is not clear. Lunar (Mg,Fe)-Al spinel could have formed (1) during 'normal' basalt petrogenesis at high pressure; (2) during low-pressure crystallization of melts rich in olivine and plagioclase components, e.g. impact-melted lunar troctolite; or (3) formed at low pressure during assimilation of anorthosite into picritic magma; thus, lunar spinel-rich areas represent old (pre-impact) intrusions of magma. In the absence of spinel-rich samples from the Moon, however, these ideas have been highly speculative. Here we describe a rock fragment from lunar meteorite ALHA 81005 that we recently reported [4] that not only contains spinel, but is the first spinel-rich lunar sample described. This fragment contains ~30% (Mg,Fe)Al spinel and is so fine grained that it reasonably could represent a larger rock body. However, the fragment is so rich in spinel that it could not have formed by melting a peridotitic mantle or a basaltic lunar crust. The clast's small grain size and its apparent disequilibrium between spinel and pyroxene suggest fairly rapid crystallization at low pressure. It could have formed as a spinel cumulate from an impact melt of troctolitic composition; or from a picritic magma that assimilated crustal anorthosite on its margins. The latter mechanism is preferred because it explains the petrographic and chemical features of our clast, and is consistent with the regional setting of the Moscoviense spinel deposit [4]. To better understand the origin and formation history(s) of spinel-rich rocks, we also performed liquidus/crystallization experiments at low-pressure as analogues for impact

    19. Technology Advancements for Active Remote Sensing of Carbon Dioxide From Space using the ASCENDS CarbonHawk Experiment Simulator

      Science.gov (United States)

      Obland, M. D.; Liu, Z.; Campbell, J. F.; Lin, B.; Kooi, S. A.; Carrion, W.; Hicks, J.; Fan, T. F.; Nehrir, A. R.; Browell, E. V.; Meadows, B.; Davis, K. J.

      2016-12-01

      This work describes advances in critical lidar technologies and techniques developed as part of the ASCENDS CarbonHawk Experiment Simulator (ACES) system for measuring atmospheric column carbon dioxide (CO2) mixing ratios in support of the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission. The ACES design demonstrates advancements in: (1) enhanced power-aperture product through the use and operation of multiple co-aligned laser transmitters and a multi-aperture telescope design; (2) high-efficiency, high-power Erbium-Doped Fiber Amplifiers (EDFAs); (3) high-bandwidth, low-noise HgCdTe detector and transimpedence amplifier (TIA) subsystem capable of long-duration operation; and (4) advanced algorithms for cloud and aerosol discrimination. The ACES instrument, an Intensity-Modulated Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) lidar, was designed for high-altitude aircraft operations and can be directly applied to space instrumentation to meet the ASCENDS mission requirements. Specifically, the lidar simultaneously transmits three IM-CW laser beams from the high power EDFAs operating near 1571 nm. The outgoing laser beams are aligned to the field of view of three fiber-coupled 17.8-cm diameter telescopes, and the backscattered light collected by the same three telescopes is sent to the detector/TIA subsystem, which has a bandwidth of 4.9 MHz and operates service-free with a tactical Dewar and cryocooler. The electronic bandwidth is only slightly higher than 1 MHz, effectively limiting the noise level. Two key laser modulation approaches are being tested to significantly mitigate the effects of thin clouds on the retrieved CO2 column amounts. This work provides an over view of these technologies, the modulation approaches, and results from recent test flights during the Atmospheric Carbon and Transport - America (ACT-America) Earth Venture Suborbital flight campaign.

    20. Remote control radioactive-waste removal system uses modulated laser transmitter

      Science.gov (United States)

      Burcher, E. E.; Kopia, L. P.; Rowland, C. W.; Sinclair, A. R.

      1971-01-01

      Laser remote control system consists of transmitter, auto tracker, and receiver. Transmitter and tracker, packaged together and bore sighted, constitute control station, receiver is slave station. Model has five command channels and optical link operating range of 110 m.