WorldWideScience

Sample records for nd-doped laser materials

  1. Laser properties of an improved average-power Nd-doped phosphate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payne, S.A.; Marshall, C.D.; Bayramian, A.J.

    1995-01-01

    The Nd-doped phosphate laser glass described herein can withstand 2.3 times greater thermal loading without fracture, compared to APG-1 (commercially-available average-power glass from Schott Glass Technologies). The enhanced thermal loading capability is established on the basis of the intrinsic thermomechanical properties (expansion, conduction, fracture toughness, and Young's modulus), and by direct thermally-induced fracture experiments using Ar-ion laser heating of the samples. This Nd-doped phosphate glass (referred to as APG-t) is found to be characterized by a 29% lower gain cross section and a 25% longer low-concentration emission lifetime

  2. Development of continuous glass melting for production of Nd-doped phosphate glasses for the NIF and LMJ laser system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, J. H.; Ficini-Dorn, G.; Hawley-Fedder, R.; McLean, M. J.; Suratwala, T.; Trombert, J. H.

    1998-01-01

    The NIF and LMJ laser systems require about 3380 and 4752 Nd-doped laser glass slabs, respectively. Continuous laser glass melting and forming will be used for the first time to manufacture these slabs. Two vendors have been chosen to produce the glass: Hoya Corporation and Schott Glass Technologies. The laser glass melting systems that each of these two vendors have designed, built and tested are arguably the most advanced in the world. Production of the laser glass will begin on a pilot scale in the fall of 1999

  3. Development of large scale production of Nd-doped phosphate glasses for megajoule-scale laser systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ficini, G.; Campbell, J.H.

    1996-01-01

    Nd-doped phosphate glasses are the preferred gain medium for high-peak-power lasers used for Inertial Confinement Fusion research because they have excellent energy storage and extraction characteristics. In addition, these glasses can be manufactured defect-free in large sizes and at relatively low cost. To meet the requirements of the future mega-joule size lasers, advanced laser glass manufacturing methods are being developed that would enable laser glass to be continuously produced at the rate of several thousand large (790 x 440 x 44 mm 3 ) plates of glass per year. This represents more than a 10 to 100-fold improvement in the scale of the present manufacturing technology

  4. Thermal, spectral and laser characteristics of Nd doped La0.05Lu0.95VO4 crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Honghao; Han, Shuo; Yu, Haohai; Wang, Zhengping; Wang, Jiyang; Zhang, Huaijin; Tang, Dingyuan

    2014-02-01

    A 0.25 at% Nd doped La0.05Lu0.95VO4 mixed crystal was grown by the Czochralski method. The thermal properties including thermal expansion, specific heat, thermal diffusion, and thermal conductivity were systematically studied. Meanwhile the reasons for cracking of this mixed crystal were also discussed. The refractive index at wavelengths of 633 nm and 1539 nm were obtained with the prism coupling method. The polarized absorption and fluorescence spectra of the crystal were also measured at room temperature. It was found that the fluorescence lifetime of 4F3/2 manifold for Nd3+ in Nd:La0.05Lu0.95VO4 is about 90 μs. Diode-pumped continuous-wave (CW) laser operations at 1.06 μm with a- and c-cut crystals were demonstrated. For the a-cut crystal a maximum output power of 5.41 W was obtained at an incident pump power of 12.9 W. Different from the a-cut crystal, the laser spectrum of the c-cut crystal was found to be dual-wavelength.

  5. 20 W continuous-wave cladding-pumped Nd-doped fiber laser at 910 nm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laroche, M; Cadier, B; Gilles, H; Girard, S; Lablonde, L; Robin, T

    2013-08-15

    We demonstrate a double-clad fiber laser operating at 910 nm with a record power of 20 W. Laser emission on the three-level scheme is enabled by the combination of a small inner cladding-to-core diameter ratio and a high brightness pump source at 808 nm. A laser conversion efficiency as high as 44% was achieved in CW operating regime by using resonant fiber Bragg reflectors at 910 nm that prevent the lasing at the 1060 nm competing wavelength. Furthermore, in a master oscillator power-amplifier scheme, an amplified power of 14.8 W was achieved at 914 nm in the same fiber.

  6. Thermal, defects, mechanical and spectral properties of Nd-doped GdNbO{sub 4} laser crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Shoujun [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Anhui Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Hefei, Anhui Province (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei (China); Zhang, Qingli; Luo, Jianqiao; Liu, Wenpeng; Wang, Xiaofei; Sun, Guihua; Li, Xiuli; Sun, Dunlu [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Anhui Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Hefei, Anhui Province (China)

    2017-05-15

    A Nd-doped GdNbO{sub 4} crystal was grown successfully by Czochralski method. Its monoclinic structure was determined by X-ray diffraction; the unit-cell parameters are a = 5.38 Aa, b = 11.09 Aa, c = 5.11 Aa, and β = 94.56 . The morphological defects of Nd:GdNbO{sub 4} crystal were investigated using the chemical etching with the phosphoric acid etchant. For a new crystal, the physical properties are of great importance. The hardness and density of Nd:GdNbO{sub 4} were investigated first. Thermal properties of Nd:GdNbO{sub 4}, including thermal expansion coefficient and specific heat, were measured along a-, b-, and c-crystalline axes. Thermal properties indicate that the Nd:GdNbO{sub 4} pumped along c-axis can reduce the thermal lensing effect effectively. The specific heat is 0.53 J g{sup -1} K{sup -1} at 300 K, indicating a relatively high damage threshold of Nd:GdNbO{sub 4}. The transmission and emission spectrum of Nd:GdNbO{sub 4} were measured, and the absorption peaks were assigned. The strongest emission peak of Nd:GdNbO{sub 4} is located at 1065.3 nm in the spectral range of 850-1420 nm excited by 808 nm laser. The refractive index of Nd:GdNbO{sub 4} was calculated with the transmission spectrum and fitted with Sellmeier equation. All these obtained results is of great significance for the further research of Nd:GdNbO{sub 4}. (orig.)

  7. Pulsed-laser deposition of smooth thin films of Er, Pr and Nd doped glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epurescu, G. [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Atomistilor 409, P.O. Box MG 16, RO- 77125, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania)], E-mail: george@nipne.ro; Vlad, A. [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Atomistilor 409, P.O. Box MG 16, RO- 77125, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Institut fuer Angewandte Physik, Johannes-Kepler-Universitaet Linz, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Bodea, M.A. [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik, Johannes-Kepler-Universitaet Linz, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Vasiliu, C. [National Institute for Optoelectronics INOE 2000, Atomistilor 1, P.O. Box MG 05, 077125 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Dumitrescu, O. [University Politehnica of Bucharest, Faculty of Industrial Chemistry, Science and Engineering of Oxide Materials Department, Polizu Str. 1, sect. 1, Bucharest (Romania); Niciu, H. [National Institute of Glass, Department for Laser Glass Technology, 47 Th. Pallady Str., Sect.3, Bucharest (Romania); Elisa, M. [National Institute for Optoelectronics INOE 2000, Atomistilor 1, P.O. Box MG 05, 077125 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Siraj, K.; Pedarnig, J.D.; Baeuerle, D. [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik, Johannes-Kepler-Universitaet Linz, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Filipescu, M.; Nedelcea, A. [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Atomistilor 409, P.O. Box MG 16, RO- 77125, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Galca, A.C. [National Institute of Materials Physics, Atomistilor 105bis, P.O. Box MG 07, RO- 77125, Magurele (Romania); Grigorescu, C.E.A. [National Institute for Optoelectronics INOE 2000, Atomistilor 1, P.O. Box MG 05, 077125 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Dinescu, M. [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Atomistilor 409, P.O. Box MG 16, RO- 77125, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania)

    2009-03-01

    Thin films of complex oxides have been obtained by pulsed-laser deposition (PLD) from glass targets belonging to the system Li{sub 2}O-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-P{sub 2}O{sub 5}-(RE){sub 2}O{sub 3}, with RE = Nd, Pr, Er. The films were deposited on quartz, silicon and ITO/glass substrates using a F{sub 2} laser ({lambda} = 157 nm, {iota} {approx} 20 ns) for ablation in vacuum. The structural, morphological and optical properties of the oxide films were investigated through IR and UV-VIS spectroscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Scanning Electron Microscopy, Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (SEM-EDX) and Spectroscopic Ellipsometry. The laser wavelength was found to be the key parameter to obtain thin films with very smooth surface. In this way new possibilities are opened to grow multilayer structures for photonic applications.

  8. Concentration quenching in Nd-doped glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stokowski, S.E.; Cook, L.; Mueller, H.; Weber, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    Fluorescence from trivalent Nd in solids is unfortunately quenched by interactions between Nd ions. Thus, laser materials with high Nd concentrations have reduced efficiencies because of this self-quenching, also known as concentration quenching. Nd self-quenching in different crystals and glasses varies considerably. We are therefore investigating this effect in a large number of materials in an effort to: (1) find those materials with long Nd fluorescent lifetimes at high Nd concentrations; and (2) elucidate the basic mechanisms of quenching and how the material structure controls its magnitude. We have concentrated on Nd-doped glasses because they provide a rich variety of structures, albeit complicated by Nd site inhomogeneities, and are easily and quickly made

  9. 7.5 W blue light generation at 452 nm by internal frequency doubling of a continuous-wave Nd-doped fiber laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leconte, Baptiste; Gilles, Hervé; Robin, Thierry; Cadier, Benoit; Laroche, Mathieu

    2018-04-16

    We present the first frequency-doubled neodymium-doped fiber laser generating multi-watt CW power near 450 nm. A bow-tie resonator incorporating a LBO nonlinear crystal is integrated within a Nd-doped fiber laser emitting near 900 nm. This scheme achieves an IR to blue conversion efficiency close to 55% without any active control of the internal resonant cavity. As a result, up to 7.5 W of linearly-polarized blue power is generated, with beam quality factors M x 2 ~1.0 and M y 2 ~1.5. A simple numerical model has been developed to optimize and analyse the IR to blue conversion efficiency in the resonant cavity. Performance limitations and prospects for further improvements are discussed.

  10. Krypton irradiation damage in Nd-doped zirconolite and perovskite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davoisne, C.; Stennett, M.C.; Hyatt, N.C.; Peng, N.; Jeynes, C.; Lee, W.E.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the effect of radiation damage and noble gas accommodation in potential ceramic hosts for plutonium disposition is necessary to evaluate their long-term behaviour during geological disposal. Polycrystalline samples of Nd-doped zirconolite and Nd-doped perovskite were irradiated ex situ with 2 MeV Kr + at a dose of 5 x 10 15 ions cm -2 to simulate recoil of Pu nuclei during alpha decay. The feasibility of thin section preparation of both pristine and irradiated samples by Focused Ion Beam sectioning was demonstrated. After irradiation, the Nd-doped zirconolite revealed a well defined amorphous region separated from the pristine material by a thin (40-60 nm) damaged interface. The zirconolite lattice was lost in the damaged interface, but the fluorite sublattice was retained. The Nd-doped perovskite contained a defined irradiated layer composed of an amorphous region surrounded by damaged but still crystalline layers. The structural evolution of the damaged regions is consistent with a change from orthorhombic to cubic symmetry. In addition in Nd-doped perovskite, the amorphisation dose depended on crystallographic orientation and possibly sample configuration (thin section or bulk). Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy revealed Ti remained in the 4+ oxidation state but there was a change in Ti coordination in both Nd-doped perovskite and Nd-doped zirconolite associated with the crystalline to amorphous transition.

  11. Positive magnetoresistance in ferromagnetic Nd-doped In2O3 thin films grown by pulse laser deposition

    KAUST Repository

    Xing, G. Z.

    2014-05-23

    We report the magnetic and magnetotransport properties of (In 0.985Nd0.015)2O2.89 thin films grown by pulse laser deposition. The clear magnetization hysteresis loops with the complementary magnetic domain structure reveal the intrinsic room temperature ferromagnetism in the as-prepared films. The strong sp-f exchange interaction as a result of the rare earth doping is discussed as the origin of the magnetotransport behaviours. A positive magnetoresistance (∼29.2%) was observed at 5 K and ascribed to the strong ferromagnetic sp-f exchange interaction in (In0.985Nd0.015)2O 2.89 thin films due to a large Zeeman splitting in an external magnetic field of 50 KOe. © 2014 AIP Publishing LLC.

  12. Preparation of Nd-doped gadolinium-gallium garnet laser ceramic powder by sol-gel method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Yan-ping; LIU Jing-he

    2006-01-01

    Preparation of Nd3+:Gd3Ga5O12 polycrystalline material by sol-gel method was preparated in this paper.The structure and the pattern of the sample were analyzed by thermogravimetric analysis and differential thermal analysis(TG-DTA),Infrared spectrum,XRD,TEM and electron spectrum,which indicated that the powder with good characteristics of 70-100 nm can be obtained by sintering at 1 000℃.It was shown that the chemical composition of the sample was agreed with experimental requirements by electron spectrum analysis.

  13. New laser materials: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-10-01

    In the Interim Report No. 1, it was reported that the fluorescence lifetime (≥ 750μs) in Nd doped Y(PO 3 ) 3 was longer by a factor of three as compared to YAG. This means potentially three times as much energy storage and consequently more efficient for flashlamp pumping. It also makes diode pumping easier. In addition, since the Y site is octahedrally coordinated, there is a possibility of energy transfer using Cr as the sensitizing element. As suggested by W. Krupke, we decided to explore the trivalent cation metaphosphates systematically. The compounds investigated can be represented by the general formula A(PO 3 ) 3 where A = Y, Lu, In, Sc, GA and Al. The object is to study the fluorescence characteristics of Nd and Cr as well as the effectiveness of energy transfer from Cr to Nd. In addition, we also investigated other possible laser host crystals, notably CaMgSi 2 O 6 (diopside), LaBO 3 and La(BO 2 ) 3 . Results on these materials will also be discussed

  14. Optical characteristics of novel bulk and nanoengineered laser host materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Narasimha S.; Sova, Stacey; Kelly, Lisa; Bevan, Talon; Arnold, Bradley; Cooper, Christopher; Choa, Fow-Sen; Singh, N. B.

    2018-02-01

    The hexagonal apatite single crystals have been investigated for their applications as laser host materials. Czochralksi and flux growth methods have been utilized to obtain single crystals. For low temperature processing (useful properties as laser hosts and bone materials. Calcium lanthanum silicate (Nd-doped) and lanthanum aluminate material systems were studied in detail. Nanoengineered calcium and lanthanum based silicates were synthesized by a solution method and their optical and morphological characteristics were compared with Czochralski grown bulk hydroxyapatite single crystals. Materials were evaluated by absorbance, fluorescence and Raman characteristics. Neodymium, iron and chromium doped crystals grown by a solution method showed weak but similar optical properties to that of Czochralski grown single crystals.

  15. Preparation of Nd-doped BiFeO{sub 3} films and their electrical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng Meng [Key Laboratory of Auxiliary Chemistry and Technology for Chemical Industry, Ministry of Education of China, Shaanxi University of Science and Technology, Weiyang District, Xi' an 710021 (China); Tan Guoqiang, E-mail: tan3114@163.com [Key Laboratory of Auxiliary Chemistry and Technology for Chemical Industry, Ministry of Education of China, Shaanxi University of Science and Technology, Weiyang District, Xi' an 710021 (China); Xue Xu; Xia Ao; Ren Huijun [Key Laboratory of Auxiliary Chemistry and Technology for Chemical Industry, Ministry of Education of China, Shaanxi University of Science and Technology, Weiyang District, Xi' an 710021 (China)

    2012-09-01

    The Nd-doped BiFeO{sub 3} thin films were prepared on SnO{sub 2}(FTO) substrates spin-coated by the sol-gel method using Nd(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}{center_dot}6H{sub 2}O, Fe(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}{center_dot}9H{sub 2}O and Bi(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}{center_dot}5H{sub 2}O as raw materials. The microstructure and electric properties of the BiFeO{sub 3} thin films were characterized and tested. The results indicate that the diffraction peak of the Nd-doped BiFeO{sub 3} films is shifted towards right as the doping amounts are increased. The structure is transformed from the rhombohedral to pseudotetragonal phase. The crystal grain is changed from an elliptical to irregular polyhedron. Structure transition occurring in the Bi{sub 0.85}Nd{sub 0.15}FeO{sub 3} films gives rise to the largest Pr of 64 {mu}C/cm{sup 2}. The leakage conductance of the Nd doped thin films is reduced. The dielectric constant and dielectric loss of Bi{sub 0.85}Nd{sub 0.15}FeO{sub 3} thin film at 10 kHz are 190 and 0.017 respectively.

  16. Laser material processing

    CERN Document Server

    Steen, William

    2010-01-01

    This text moves from the basics of laser physics to detailed treatments of all major materials processing techniques for which lasers are now essential. New chapters cover laser physics, drilling, micro- and nanomanufacturing and biomedical laser processing.

  17. Optimum design of Nd-doped fiber optical amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard; Lumholt, Ole

    1992-01-01

    The waveguide parameters for a Nd-doped fluoride (Nd:ZBLANP) fiber amplifier have been optimized for small-signal and booster operation using an accurate numerical model. The optimum cutoff wavelength is shown to be 800 nm and the numerical aperture should be made as large as possible. Around 80%......% booster quantum conversion efficiency can be reached for an input power of 10 dBm and a pump power of 100 mW by the use of one filter...

  18. 5.4W cladding-pumped Nd:YAG silica fiber laser

    OpenAIRE

    Yoo, S.; Webb, A.S.; Standish, R.J.; May-Smith, T.C.; Sahu, J.K.

    2012-01-01

    We report on the spectroscopy and laser characteristics of Nd-doped fiber, fabricated by rod-in-tube from Nd:YAG as a core material with silica cladding. A cladding-pumped CW laser operation at 1058nm with 52% slope-efficiency is demonstrated.

  19. In vitro antibacterial activity of ZnO and Nd doped ZnO nanoparticles against ESBL producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameed, Abdulrahman Syedahamed Haja; Karthikeyan, Chandrasekaran; Ahamed, Abdulazees Parveez; Thajuddin, Nooruddin; Alharbi, Naiyf S.; Alharbi, Sulaiman Ali; Ravi, Ganasan

    2016-04-01

    Pure ZnO and Neodymium (Nd) doped ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized by the co-precipitation method. The synthesized nanoparticles retained the wurtzite hexagonal structure. From FESEM studies, ZnO and Nd doped ZnO NPs showed nanorod and nanoflower like morphology respectively. The FT-IR spectra confirmed the Zn-O stretching bands at 422 and 451 cm-1 for ZnO and Nd doped ZnO NPs respectively. From the UV-VIS spectroscopic measurement, the excitonic peaks were found around 373 nm and 380 nm for the respective samples. The photoluminescence measurements revealed that the broad emission was composed of ten different bands due to zinc vacancies, oxygen vacancies and surface defects. The antibacterial studies performed against extended spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) producing strains of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae showed that the Nd doped ZnO NPs possessed a greater antibacterial effect than the pure ZnO NPs. From confocal laser scanning microscopic (CLSM) analysis, the apoptotic nature of the cells was confirmed by the cell shrinkage, disorganization of cell wall and cell membrane and dead cell of the bacteria. SEM analysis revealed the existence of bacterial loss of viability due to an impairment of cell membrane integrity, which was highly consistent with the damage of cell walls.

  20. New nonlinear optical crystal CsLiB6O10 for laser fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Y.; Nakajima, S.; Taguchi, A.; Miyamoto, A.; Inagaki, M.; Sasaki, T.; Yoshida, H.; Nakai, S.

    1996-05-01

    In this paper, we have two main investigation of use SiO@d2 for laser material. The first one, Nd clustering in the SiO@d2 was reduced by using Nd exchanged zeolite for doping material. The second one, the new Nd;doped SiO@d2 shows the good properties comparing with the old Nd:doped SiO@d2. The Nd clustering is thought as the locally high concentration parts. This means the Nd-Nd distance control is effective to regain the fluorescence intensity and to get no opalescence. It is clear that using zeolite for Nd doping is useful for well dispersion of Nd in SiO@d2. (AIP)

  1. Lasers in materials science

    CERN Document Server

    Ossi, Paolo; Zhigilei, Leonid

    2014-01-01

    This book covers various aspects of lasers in materials science, including a comprehensive overview on basic principles of laser-materials interactions and applications enabled by pulsed laser systems.  The material is organized in a coherent way, providing the reader with a harmonic architecture. While systematically covering the major current and emerging areas of lasers processing applications, the Volume provides examples of targeted modification of material properties achieved through careful control of the processing conditions and laser irradiation parameters. Special emphasis is placed on specific strategies aimed at nanoscale control of material structure and properties to match the stringent requirements of modern applications.  Laser fabrication of novel nanomaterials, which expands to the domains of photonics, photovoltaics, sensing, and biomedical applications, is also discussed in the Volume. This book assembles chapters based on lectures delivered at the Venice International School on Lasers...

  2. Ceramic Laser Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Villalobos

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic laser materials have come a long way since the first demonstration of lasing in 1964. Improvements in powder synthesis and ceramic sintering as well as novel ideas have led to notable achievements. These include the first Nd:yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG ceramic laser in 1995, breaking the 1 KW mark in 2002 and then the remarkable demonstration of more than 100 KW output power from a YAG ceramic laser system in 2009. Additional developments have included highly doped microchip lasers, ultrashort pulse lasers, novel materials such as sesquioxides, fluoride ceramic lasers, selenide ceramic lasers in the 2 to 3 μm region, composite ceramic lasers for better thermal management, and single crystal lasers derived from polycrystalline ceramics. This paper highlights some of these notable achievements.

  3. Ceramic Laser Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanghera, Jasbinder; Kim, Woohong; Villalobos, Guillermo; Shaw, Brandon; Baker, Colin; Frantz, Jesse; Sadowski, Bryan; Aggarwal, Ishwar

    2012-01-01

    Ceramic laser materials have come a long way since the first demonstration of lasing in 1964. Improvements in powder synthesis and ceramic sintering as well as novel ideas have led to notable achievements. These include the first Nd:yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) ceramic laser in 1995, breaking the 1 KW mark in 2002 and then the remarkable demonstration of more than 100 KW output power from a YAG ceramic laser system in 2009. Additional developments have included highly doped microchip lasers, ultrashort pulse lasers, novel materials such as sesquioxides, fluoride ceramic lasers, selenide ceramic lasers in the 2 to 3 μm region, composite ceramic lasers for better thermal management, and single crystal lasers derived from polycrystalline ceramics. This paper highlights some of these notable achievements. PMID:28817044

  4. Lasers in materials processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, J.I.; Rockower, E.B.

    1981-01-01

    A status report on the uranium Laser Isotope Separation (LIS) Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is presented. Prior to this status report, process economic analysis is presented so as to understand how the unique properties of laser photons can be best utilized in the production of materials and components despite the high cost of laser energy. The characteristics of potential applications that are necessary for success are identified, and those factors that have up to now frustrated attempts to find commercially viable laser induced chemical and physical process for the production of new or existing materials are pointed out

  5. Continuous-wave ceramic Nd:YAG laser at 1123 nm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, S S; Wang, Q P; Zhang, X Y; Cong, Z H; Fan, S Z; Liu, Z J; Sun, W J

    2009-01-01

    Ceramic Nd:YAG (cNd:YAG) materials are employed to generate 1123-nm laser. A fiber-coupled continuous-wave (CW) 808-nm diode laser is used as the pumping source. With an incident diode power of 26.1 W, a CW output power of up to 10.8 W is obtained with a 10-mm-long ceramic Nd:YAG rod (1.0 at.%-Nd-doped). The conversion efficiency from diode power to 1123-nm laser power is 41.4%. The laser performance of another 10-mm-long cNd:YAG rod with a Nd-doping concentration of 0.6 at.% is studied as a comparison

  6. YCOB lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, Martin; Hammons, Dennis; Eichenholz, Jason; Chai, Bruce; Ye, Qing; Jang, Won; Shah, Lawrence

    1999-01-01

    We review new developments with a new laser host material, YCa 4 O(BO 3 ) 3 or YCOB. Lasers based on this host material will open new opportunities for the development of compact, high-power, frequency-agile visible and near IR laser sources, as well as sources for ultrashort pulses. Efficient diode-pumped laser action with both Nd-doped and Yb-doped YCOB has already been demonstrated. Moreover, since these materials are biaxial, and have high nonlinear optical coefficients, they have become the first laser materials available as efficient self-frequency-doubled lasers, capable of providing tunable laser emission in several regions of the visible spectrum. Self-frequency doubling eliminates the need for inclusion of a nonlinear optical element within or external to the laser resonator. These laser materials possess excellent thermal and optical properties, have high laser-damage thresholds, and can be grown to large sizes. In addition they are non-hygroscopic. They therefore possess all the characteristics necessary for laser materials required in rugged, compact systems. Here we summarize the rapid progress made in the development of this new class of lasers, and review their potential for a number of applications. (author)

  7. Laser materials processing with diode lasers

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Lin; Lawrence, Jonathan; Spencer, Julian T.

    1996-01-01

    Laser materials processing is currently dominated by CO2, Nd-YAG and Excimer lasers. Continuous advances in semiconductor laser technology over the last decade have increased the average power output of the devices annualy by two fold, resulting in the commercial availability of the diode lasers today with delivery output powers in excess of 60W in CW mode and 5kW in qasi-CW mode. The advantages of compactness, high reliability, high efficiency and potential low cost, due to the mass producti...

  8. The structural, electronic and optical properties of Nd doped ZnO using first-principles calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jun-Qing; Zhang, Jian-Min; Chen, Guo-Xiang; Wu, Hua; Yang, Xu

    2018-04-01

    The density functional theory calculations using general gradient approximation (GGA) applying Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) as correlation functional have been systematically performed to research the formation energy, the electronic structures, band structures, total and partial DOS, and optical properties of Nd doping ZnO with the content from 6.25% to 12.5%. The formation energies are negative for both models, which show that two structures are energetically stable. Nd doping ZnO crystal is found to be a direct band gap semiconductor and Fermi level shifts upward into conduction band, which show the properties of n-type semiconductor. Band structures are more compact after Nd doping ZnO, implying that Nd doping induces the strong interaction between different atoms. Nd doping ZnO crystal presents occupied states at near Fermi level, which mainly comes from the Nd 4f orbital. The calculated optical properties imply that Nd doping causes a red-shift of absorption peaks, and enhances the absorption of the visible light.

  9. Laser processing of materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. Senthilkumar (Newgen Imaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    The initial foundation of laser theory was laid by Einstein [11]. ..... general definition and scope of the processes as understood in conventional practice, but is ..... [54]. Laser welding of Ti-alloys. Welding. 2001 TiNi shape memory alloys. CW–CO2. Study corrosion, mechanical and shape memory properties of weldments.

  10. Shearography in laser material processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gualini, M.M.S.; Steinbichler, H.

    1999-01-01

    Several optical methods have been presented in recent years to monitor and assist laser material process (welding, cutting, transformation hardening), from laser triangulation and laser 3D scanning to speckle. We propose the alternative use of shearography for surface investigation. Shearography is, basically, the first derivative of the interference intensities of holograms. This enables to perform real time measurements with high accuracy but less constraint to control environmental vibrations. We propose an optical head that may operate as a shearographic system or as a Twymann-Green interferometer, accordingly to certain contour conditions. We discuss some theoretical aspects and possible practical applications of the device along with some preliminary experimental results. (author)

  11. Femtosecond laser materials processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuart, B.C.

    1997-01-01

    The use femtosecond pulses for materials processing results in very precise cutting and drilling with high efficiency. Energy deposited in the electrons is not coupled into the bulk during the pulse, resulting in negligible shock or thermal loading to adjacent areas

  12. Superfluorescent highly doped neodymium materials as smooth sources for fusion lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husson, D.; Gouedard, C.; Sauteret, C.; Migus, A.; Auzel, F.

    1991-01-01

    Obtaining uniform laser energy deposition on target is one of the main issue in laser driven inertial confinement fusion. Efforts to directly generate laser smooth emission have been unsuccessful up to now. Therefore different methods of laser smoothing have been developed, consisting of tentatives to destroy the spatial and temporal coherence of the emission which are at the origin on the non-uniformity. We may however wonder whether a laser is really needed for this application. In this work we have developed mirrorless light generator based on highly concentrated Nd-doped crystals or powders pumped by laser. We obtain emission showing characteristics of coherence but still compatible with amplification in existing large Nd-glass installation

  13. Effect of Nd-doping on structure and microwave electromagnetic properties of BiFeO{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Sheng [School of Physics and Electronics, Institute of Super-microstructure and Ultrafast Process in Advanced Materials, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Luo, Heng [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Yan, Shuoqing; Yao, Lingling; He, Jun; Li, Yuhan; He, Longhui; Huang, Shengxiang; Deng, Lianwen [School of Physics and Electronics, Institute of Super-microstructure and Ultrafast Process in Advanced Materials, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China)

    2017-03-15

    The single-phase Bi{sub 1-x}Nd{sub x}FeO{sub 3} (x=0, 0.05, 0.10, 0.15, 0.20) were synthesized by the sol-gel method. Their crystal structure and microwave electromagnetic property in the frequency range of 2–18 GHz were investigated. The XRD patterns and Raman spectra showed that structural transition from rhombohedral (x=0, 0.05, 0.1) to triclinic (x=0.15) and tetragonal structure (x=0.20) appeared in the Bi{sub 1-x}Nd{sub x}FeO{sub 3}. Electromagnetic measurement suggested that both microwave permeability μ′ and magnetic loss tanδ{sub m} increased remarkably over 2–18 GHz by doping Nd. Strong dielectric loss peak was observed on the samples of Bi{sub 1-x}Nd{sub x}FeO{sub 3} (x=0.15) and Bi{sub 1-x}Nd{sub x}FeO{sub 3} (x=0.2). Results show that Nd substitution is an effective way to push BiFeO{sub 3} to become microwave absorbing materials with high performance. - Highlights: • Single-phase Bi{sub 1-x}Nd{sub x}FeO{sub 3} samples were prepared by a sol-gel method. • Strong dielectric loss peak was observed in BiFeO{sub 3} with high doping content. • Significant enhancement of microwave absorption property was found in Nd-doped BiFeO{sub 3}.

  14. Novel materials for laser refrigeration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hehlen, Markus P [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The status of optical refrigeration of rare-earth-doped solids is reviewed, and the various factors that limit the performance of current laser-cooling materials are discussed. Efficient optical refrigeration is possible in materials for which {Dirac_h}{omega}{sub max} < E{sub p}/8, where {Dirac_h}{omega}{sub max} is the maximum phonon energy of the host material and E{sub p} is the pump energy of the rare-earth dopant. Transition-metal and OH{sup -}impurities at levels >100 ppb are believed to be the main factors for the limited laser-cooling performance in current materials. The many components of doped ZBLAN glass pose particular processing challenges. Binary fluoride glasses such as YF{sub 3}-LiF are considered as alternatives to ZBLAN. The crystalline system KPb{sub 2}CI{sub 5} :Dy{sup 3+} is identified as a prime candidate for high-efficiency laser cooling.

  15. Laser applications in materials processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ready, J.F.

    1980-01-01

    The seminar focused on laser annealing of semiconductors, laser processing of semiconductor devices and formation of coatings and powders, surface modification with lasers, and specialized laser processing methods. Papers were presented on the theoretical analysis of thermal and mass transport during laser annealing, applications of scanning continuous-wave and pulsed lasers in silicon technology, laser techniques in photovoltaic applications, and the synthesis of ceramic powders from laser-heated gas-phase reactants. Other papers included: reflectance changes of metals during laser irradiation, surface-alloying using high-power continuous lasers, laser growth of silicon ribbon, and commercial laser-shock processes

  16. Laser Materials and Laser Spectroscopy - A Satellite Meeting of IQEC '88

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhijiang; Zhang, Zhiming

    1989-03-01

    * Mixing Frequency Generation of 271.0 - 291.5 nm in β - BaB2O4 * Low Temperature Absorption Steps Near Ultraviolet Intrinsic Edge in Beta Barium Metaborate * The Growth and Properties of BaTiO3 Crystals * High-order Phenomena Accompanied with Self-pumped Phase Conjugation in BaTiO * Growth and Laser Damage Estimation of Potassium Dihydrogen Phosphate Crystals for Laser Fusion * Noncritically Phase-matched KTP for Diode-pumped Lasers (400-700 nm) * Potassium Titanyl Phosphate (KTP): Properties and New Applications * A Kind of New Defect in KTP Crystal and its SHG Enhanced Effect * Nucleation and Growth of the Non-linear Optical Crystal Potassium Pentaborate Tetrahydrate * Quasi-periodic Oscillations in Photoinduced Conical Light Scattering from LiNbO3 : Fe Crystals * Laser Excited Photoreflectance of GaxIn1-xAs/InP Multiple Quantum Wells * Growth, Spectroscopic Properties and Applications of Doped LiNbO3 Crystals * Photorefractive and Photovoltaic Effect in Doped LiNbO3 * Recent Advances in Photorefractive Nonlinear Optics * Study on the Doubling-frequency and Anti-photorefractive Property of Heavily Magnesium-doped Lithium-rich Lithium Niobate Crystals * A New Technique for Increasing Two-wave Mixing Gain in Photorefractive Bi12SiO20 Crystals * Experimental Proof: There Existing Another Mechanism of Photorefractive Index in Crystal Ce-SBN * Effect of Crystal Annealing on Holographic Recording in Bismuth Silicon Oxide * Two Wave Coupling in KNbO3 Photorefractive Crystal * Photorefractive Effects in Nd-Doped Ferroelectric (KxNa1-x)0.4-(SryBa1-y)0.8 Nb2O6 Single Crystal * High Pressure Raman Spectra and the Effect of Pressure to the Ferroelastic Phase Transition in LnP5O15 * Time-delay Four-wave Mixing with Incoherent Light in Absorption Bands Treated as a Multi-level System * Pulsed Laser Induced Dislocation Structure in Lithium Fluoride Single Crystals * Laser Spectroscopy * Nonclassical Radiation from Single-atom Oscillators * Laser Spectroscopic Studies of Molecules in

  17. Laser-assisted fabrication of materials

    CERN Document Server

    Manna, Indranil

    2013-01-01

    Laser assisted fabrication involves shaping of materials using laser as a source of heat. It can be achieved by removal of materials (laser assisted cutting, drilling, etc.), deformation (bending, extrusion), joining (welding, soldering) and addition of materials (surface cladding or direct laser cladding). This book on ´Laser assisted Fabrication’ is aimed at developing in-depth engineering concepts on various laser assisted macro and micro-fabrication techniques with the focus on application and a review of the engineering background of different micro/macro-fabrication techniques, thermal history of the treated zone and microstructural development and evolution of properties of the treated zone.

  18. Preparation and leaching property of Nd-doped zirconolite-based glass-ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Lang; Xu Dong; Teng Yuancheng; Li Yuxiang; Liu Zongqiang

    2014-01-01

    Nd-doped zirconolite-based glass-ceramics were prepared by melting-heat treatment technique. The effects of heat treatment processing on phase structure of the glass-ceramics were investigated. The leaching properties of the glass-ceramics were also evaluated by static leaching experiments (product consistency test, PCT). The results show that glass transformation temperature (T g ) and crystallization temperature of the glass-ceramics are about 580℃ and 740℃, respectively. CaTiO 3 phase forms easily when the glass-ceramics were prepared by two-step method, i.e. the glass was prepared first, and then it was heat-treated at the crystallization temperatures. 2M-zirconolite phase can be obtained by one-step method, i.e. the heat-treatment immediately followed by the melting process. In addition, the zirconolite crystals exhibit a dendritic shape. The normalized mass loss of B and Na in the glass-ceramics remains almost unchanged (about 1 mg/m 2 ) after 14 days, while the normalized mass loss of Nd reaches stable value (about 0.2 mg/m 2 ) after 28 days. The normalized mass loss of B, Na, and Nd in the glass-ceramics is an order of magnitude lower than that of borosilicate glasses, respectively. (authors)

  19. Materials for spaceborne laser systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gusarov, A.

    2006-01-01

    Advanced laser systems are attracting a growing interest for space missions, in particular for LIDAR (LIght Detection And Ranging) applications. An important issue for the LIDARs is the very strict requirements on the optical performance and more specifically the need for a high optical output power combined with a nearly perfect output beam quality. These features are traditionally in conflict with each other. Thermally induced phase distortions indeed corrupt the beam quality of high-power solid-state lasers and it becomes increasingly difficult to maintain a good beam quality while increasing the output power. A possible solution of the problem is to use the optical phase conjugation, which provides a method to dynamically correct for those aberrations. A process by which phase-conjugated waves can be generated is the SBS (stimulated Brillouin scattering). SBS mirrors commonly used in terrestrial application are based on liquids or gases, which are not 'space-friendly' and often toxic. The solid-state alternative seems the most appropriate for space. Such PCMs (Phase-Conjugating Mirrors) have been the subject of many research efforts in recent years and a significant progress in improving their characteristics has been achieved. However, the issue of space qualification remains open. To address it, the European Space Agency initiated in 2004 the research project named Solid-State Phase Conjugation, Radiation Testing and Evaluation for Core Laser Technologies with the TRT (Thales Research and Technology), France, as the prime contractor, and the CSL (Centre Spatial de Liege) and SCKCEN as the subcontractors. The project is to be completed in 2006. To qualify a PCM for a spaceborne laser system, one has to address a number of specific issues. Such a component must be mechanically rugged to sustain vibrations during the launch phase, provide a low out-gassing to prevent optical surfaces contamination in vacuum, be highly reliable to operate properly without

  20. Some applications on laser material processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oros, C.

    2005-01-01

    An overview of the state-of-the-art in laser material processing for a large types of lasers from IR (CO 2 laser, NdYAG laser) to UV (excimer laser) and different kinds of materials (metals, dielectrics) is given. Laser radiation has found a wide range of applications as machining tool for various kinds of materials processing. The machining geometry, the work piece geometry, the material properties and economic productivity claim for customized systems with special design for beam guiding, shaping and delivery in order to fully utilize the laser radiation for surface processing with optimum efficiency, maximum processing speed and high processing quality. The laser-material interaction involves complex processes of heating, melting, vaporization, ejection of atoms, ions, and molecules, shock waves, plasma initiation and plasma expansion. The interaction is dependent on the laser beam parameters (pulse duration, energy and wavelength), the solid target properties and the surrounding environments condition. Experimental results for laser surface melting and laser ablation are given. Also, assuming the applicability of a one dimensional model for short pulses used, and restricting condition to single-pulse exposure, the temperature rise on the target was calculated taking account of the finite optical absorption depth and pulse duration of the laser

  1. Laser-induced damage in optical materials

    CERN Document Server

    Ristau, Detlev

    2014-01-01

    Dedicated to users and developers of high-powered systems, Laser-Induced Damage in Optical Materials focuses on the research field of laser-induced damage and explores the significant and steady growth of applications for high-power lasers in the academic, industrial, and military arenas. Written by renowned experts in the field, this book concentrates on the major topics of laser-induced damage in optical materials and most specifically addresses research in laser damage that occurs in the bulk and on the surface or the coating of optical components. It considers key issues in the field of hi

  2. Advances in laser ablation of materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, R.K.; Lowndes, D.H.; Chrisey, D.B.; Fogarassy, E.; Narayan, J.

    1998-01-01

    The symposium, Advances in Laser Ablation of Materials, was held at the 1998 MRS Spring Meeting in San Francisco, California. The papers in this symposium illustrate the advances in pulsed laser ablation for a wide variety of applications involving semiconductors, superconductors, metals, ceramics, and polymers. In particular, advances in the deposition of oxides and related materials are featured. Papers dealing with both fundamentals and the applications of laser ablation are presented. Topical areas include: fundamentals of ablation and growth; in situ diagnostics and nanoscale synthesis advances in laser ablation techniques; laser surface processing; pulsed laser deposition of ferroelectric, magnetic, superconducting and optoelectronic thin films; and pulsed laser deposition of carbon-based and polymeric materials. Sixty papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base

  3. Laser processing and analysis of materials

    CERN Document Server

    Duley, W W

    1983-01-01

    It has often been said that the laser is a solution searching for a problem. The rapid development of laser technology over the past dozen years has led to the availability of reliable, industrially rated laser sources with a wide variety of output characteristics. This, in turn, has resulted in new laser applications as the laser becomes a familiar processing and analytical tool. The field of materials science, in particular, has become a fertile one for new laser applications. Laser annealing, alloying, cladding, and heat treating were all but unknown 10 years ago. Today, each is a separate, dynamic field of research activity with many of the early laboratory experiments resulting in the development of new industrial processing techniques using laser technology. Ten years ago, chemical processing was in its infancy awaiting, primarily, the development of reliable tunable laser sources. Now, with tunability over the entire spectrum from the vacuum ultraviolet to the far infrared, photo­ chemistry is undergo...

  4. Development of laser materials processing and laser metrology techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Cheol Jung; Chung, Chin Man; Kim, Jeong Mook; Kim, Min Suk; Kim, Kwang Suk; Baik, Sung Hoon; Kim, Seong Ouk; Park, Seung Kyu

    1997-09-01

    The applications of remote laser materials processing and metrology have been investigated in nuclear industry from the beginning of laser invention because they can reduce the risks of workers in the hostile environment by remote operation. The objective of this project is the development of laser material processing and metrology techniques for repairing and inspection to improve the safety of nuclear power plants. As to repairing, we developed our own laser sleeve welding head and innovative optical laser weld monitoring techniques to control the sleeve welding process. Furthermore, we designed and fabricated a 800 W Nd:YAG and a 150 W Excimer laser systems for high power laser materials processing in nuclear industry such as cladding and decontamination. As to inspection, we developed an ESPI and a laser triangulation 3-D profile measurement system for defect detection which can complement ECT and UT inspections. We also developed a scanning laser vibrometer for remote vibration measurement of large structures and tested its performance. (author). 58 refs., 16 tabs., 137 figs

  5. Orthorhombic polar Nd-doped BiFeO{sub 3} thin film on MgO substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leontyev, I N; Janolin, P-E; Dkhil, B [Laboratoire Structures, Proprietes et Modelisation des Solides, UMR CNRS-Ecole Centrale Paris, 92295 Chatenay-Malabry Cedex (France); Yuzyuk, Yu I [Faculty of Physics, Southern Federal University, Zorge 5, Rostov-on-Don 344090 (Russian Federation); El-Marssi, M [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere Condensee, Universite de Picardie Jules Verne, 33 rue Saint Leu, 80039 Amiens (France); Chernyshov, D; Dmitriev, V [Swiss-Norwegian Beam Lines at ESRF, Boite Postale 220, F-38043 Grenoble (France); Golovko, Yu I; Mukhortov, V M, E-mail: i.leontiev@rambler.ru [Southern Scientific Center RAS, Rostov-on-Don, 344006 (Russian Federation)

    2011-08-24

    A Nd-doped BiFeO{sub 3} thin film deposited on MgO substrate was studied by synchrotron diffraction. The ferroelectric nature of the film is proven by in-plane remanent polarization measurement. The highest possible symmetry of the film is determined to be orthorhombic, within the Fm2m space group. Such a structure is rotated by 45{sup 0} with respect to the substrate and is consistent with tilts of oxygen octahedra doubling the unit cell. This polar structure presents a rather unusual strain-accommodation mechanism. (fast track communication)

  6. Orthorhombic polar Nd-doped BiFeO3 thin film on MgO substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leontyev, I N; Janolin, P-E; Dkhil, B; Yuzyuk, Yu I; El-Marssi, M; Chernyshov, D; Dmitriev, V; Golovko, Yu I; Mukhortov, V M

    2011-01-01

    A Nd-doped BiFeO 3 thin film deposited on MgO substrate was studied by synchrotron diffraction. The ferroelectric nature of the film is proven by in-plane remanent polarization measurement. The highest possible symmetry of the film is determined to be orthorhombic, within the Fm2m space group. Such a structure is rotated by 45 0 with respect to the substrate and is consistent with tilts of oxygen octahedra doubling the unit cell. This polar structure presents a rather unusual strain-accommodation mechanism. (fast track communication)

  7. Laser Cutting of Different Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadir ÇAVDAR

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper; in general potential developments and trends of a particular machining field by extensively evaluating present studies of laser beam machining have been discussed. As it is indicated below, technical literatures have been subsumed under five major headlines: Experimental studies, reviews, optimization researches of the cutting parameters, theoretical modelling studies of laser beam cutting and academic studies relating to laser cutting

  8. Femtosecond laser excitation of dielectric materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wædegaard, Kristian Juncher; Balling, Peter; Frislev, Martin Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We report an approach to modeling the interaction between ultrashort laser pulses and dielectric materials. The model includes the excitation of carriers by the laser through strongfield excitation, collisional excitation, and absorption in the plasma consisting of conduction-band electrons formed...

  9. Materials testing using laser energy deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilcox, W.W.; Calder, C.A.

    1977-01-01

    A convenient method for determining the elastic constants of materials has been devised using the energy from a Q-switched neodymium-glass laser. Stress waves are induced in materials having circular rod or rectangular bar geometries by the absorption of energy from the laser. The wave transit times through the material are recorded with a piezoelectric transducer. Both dilatation and shear wave velocities are determined in a single test using an ultrasonic technique and these velocities are used to calculate the elastic constants of the material. A comparison of the constants determined for ten common engineering materials using this method is made with constants derived using the conventional ultrasonic pulse technique and agreement is shown to be about one percent in most cases. Effects of material geometry are discussed and surface damage to the material caused by laser energy absorption is shown

  10. Laser Materials Processing for NASA's Aerospace Structural Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarathnam, Karthik; Hunyady, Thomas A.

    2001-01-01

    Lasers are useful for performing operations such as joining, machining, built-up freeform fabrication, and surface treatment. Due to the multifunctional nature of a single tool and the variety of materials that can be processed, these attributes are attractive in order to support long-term missions in space. However, current laser technology also has drawbacks for space-based applications. Specifically, size, power efficiency, lack of robustness, and problems processing highly reflective materials are all concerns. With the advent of recent breakthroughs in solidstate laser (e.g., diode-pumped lasers) and fiber optic technologies, the potential to perform multiple processing techniques in space has increased significantly. A review of the historical development of lasers from their infancy to the present will be used to show how these issues may be addressed. The review will also indicate where further development is necessary to realize a laser-based materials processing capability in space. The broad utility of laser beams in synthesizing various classes of engineering materials will be illustrated using state-of-the art processing maps for select lightweight alloys typically found on spacecraft. Both short- and long-term space missions will benefit from the development of a universal laser-based tool with low power consumption, improved process flexibility, compactness (e.g., miniaturization), robustness, and automation for maximum utility with a minimum of human interaction. The potential advantages of using lasers with suitable wavelength and beam properties for future space missions to the moon, Mars and beyond will be discussed. The laser processing experiments in the present report were performed using a diode pumped, pulsed/continuous wave Nd:YAG laser (50 W max average laser power), with a 1064 nm wavelength. The processed materials included Ti-6AI-4V, Al-2219 and Al-2090. For Phase I of this project, the laser process conditions were varied and optimized

  11. Laser application in high temperature materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohse, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    The scope and priorities of laser application in materials science and technology are attracting widespread interest. After a brief discussion of the unique capabilities of laser application in the various fields of materials science, main emphasis is given on the three areas of materials processing, surface modification and alloying, and property measurements at high temperatures. In materials processing the operational regimes for surface hardening, drilling, welding and laser glazing are discussed. Surface modifications by laser melting, quenching and surface alloying, the formation of solid solutions, metastable phases and amorphous solids on the basis of rapid solidification, ion implantation and ion beam mixing are considered. The influence of solidification rates and interface velocities on the surface properties are given. The extension of property measurements up to and beyond the melting point of refractory materials into their critical region by a transient-type dynamic laser pulse heating technique is given for the three examples of vapour pressure measurement, density and heat capacity determination in the solid and liquid phases. A new approach, the laser autoclave technique, applying laser heating and x-ray shadow technique under autoclave conditions to acoustically levitated spheres will be presented. (author)

  12. Photoinduced nonlinear optical effects in Nd-doped δ-BiB3O6 crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majchrowski, A.; Wojciechowski, A.; Kityk, I.V.; Chrunik, M.; Jaroszewicz, L.R.; Michalski, E.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • New type of optically operated rare earth doped borates is proposed. • Principal role of the phonon subsystem in photoinduced electrooptics, SHG and piezooptics is shown. • The possibility to create the laser operated materials is shown for the such kind of sold state alloys. - Abstract: The studies of the second harmonic generation, Pockels effect and piezoelectricity were performed for the new synthesized δ-BiB 3 O 6 single crystals. The incorporation of Nd 3+ ions into these crystals plays an important role for the increasing of the photoinduced nonlinear optical properties. Temperature dependences of the optical and piezoelectric features showed existence of some anomalies in the vicinity of 160 K and 220 K. This may confirm a principal role of the photopolarization and of the localized impurity states which give additional contribution into the observed effect. It is crucial that the effect is dependent on the number of the photoinducing pulses. The effect is completely reversible after switching off of the photoinducing laser beam

  13. A first principles study of Nd doped cubic LaAlO{sub 3} perovskite: mBJ+U study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandeep, E-mail: sndp.chettri@gmail.com [Dept. of Physics, Mizoram University, Aizawl 796004 (India); Rai, D.P. [Dept. of Physics, Pachhunga University College, Aizawl, Mizoram 796001 (India); Shankar, A. [Department of Physics, University of North Bengal, Darjeeling 734013 (India); Ghimire, M.P. [Condensed Matter Physics Research Center, Butwal-13, Rupandehi, Lumbini (Nepal); Khenata, R. [Laboratoire de Physique Quantique et de Modlisation Mathmatique (LPQ3M), Dpartement de Technologie, Universit de Mascara, 29000 Mascara (Algeria); Thapa, R.K. [Dept. of Physics, Mizoram University, Aizawl 796004 (India)

    2016-11-01

    The structural, electronic and magnetic properties of Nd-doped Rare earth aluminate, La{sub 1−x}Nd{sub x}AlO{sub 3} (x=0–100%) are studied using the full potential linearized augmented plane-wave (FP-LAPW) method within the density functional theory. The effects of Nd substitution in LaAlO{sub 3} are studied using super-cell calculations. The electronic structures were computed using modified Beck Johnson (mBJ) potential based approximation with the inclusion of Coulomb energy (U) for Nd-4f state electrons. The La{sub 1−x}Nd{sub x}AlO{sub 3} may possess half metallic behavior on Nd doping with finite density of states at E{sub F}. The direct and indirect band gaps were studied as a function of Nd concentration in LaAlO{sub 3}. The calculated magnetic moments in La{sub 1−x}Nd{sub x}AlO{sub 3} were found to arise mainly from the Nd-4f state electrons. A probable half-metallic nature is suggested for these systems with supportive integral magnetic moments and high spin polarized electronic structures in these doped cases at E{sub F}. The controlled decrease in band gap with increase in concentration of Nd doping is a suitable technique for harnessing useful spintronic and magnetic devices. - Highlights: • Electronic and magnetic properties of La{sub 1−x}Nd{sub x}AlO{sub 3} to study the effect of doping (x=0%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100%) is carried out using DFT. • Theoretically calculated U was used in the mBJ+U approximation in order to stress accuracy in band-gap determination along with electron correlation effects in rare earth ions. • A high DOS at E{sub F} for certain doping concentrations in one spin channel with insulting DOS in the other channel supported their probable use as spintronic devices. • The change in doping concentration was found suitable for rare earth aluminates for desirable properties through band-gap tuning.

  14. Thermoluminescence studies of Nd doped Bi_4Ge_3O_1_2 crystals irradiated by UV and beta sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karabulut, Y.; Canimoglu, A.; Ekdal, E.; Ayvacikli, M.; Can, N.; Karali, T.

    2016-01-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL) glow curves of pure and rare earth doped bismuth germanate (BGO) were investigated under UV and beta radiation. The glow curves of pure BGO crystal present different patterns for both kinds of radiation. The TL glow curves of BGO crystals doped with Nd ions are similar to that of pure BGO under UV radiation. The kinetic parameters, kinetic order (b), activation energy (E) and frequency factor (s) of the TL glow curves of pure BGO crystal have been determined by peak shape method. Activation energies of 3 peaks obtained by PS were found to be 1.81, 1.15 and 1.78, respectively. - Highlights: • Thermoluminescence properties of pure and Nd doped BGO crystals. • Irradiated by UV and beta for TL glow curve analysis. • Evaluation of kinetic parameters by PS method.

  15. Filament-induced luminescence and supercontinuum generation in undoped, Yb-doped, and Nd-doped YAG crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudarauskas, D.; Tamošauskas, G.; Vengris, M.; Dubietis, A.

    2018-01-01

    We present a comparative spectral study of filament-induced luminescence and supercontinuum generation in undoped, Yb-doped, and Nd-doped YAG crystals. We show that supercontinuum spectra generated by femtosecond filamentation in undoped and doped YAG crystals are essentially identical in terms of spectral extent. On the other hand, undoped and doped YAG crystals exhibit remarkably different filament-induced luminescence spectra whose qualitative features are independent of the excitation wavelength and provide information on the energy deposition to embedded dopants, impurities, and the crystal lattice itself. Our findings suggest that filament-induced luminescence may serve as a simple and non-destructive tool for spectroscopic studies in various transparent dielectric media.

  16. Light-material interactions in laser material processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiang, S.; Albright, C.E.

    1989-01-01

    The authors discusses how light interactions with materials in laser material processing operations occur by a variety of mechanisms depending on the material being processed, the wavelength of the laser light, the gaseous environment, and the physical state of the material surface. The high reflectivity of metals limits the fraction of the beam power absorbed by the solid metal surface. For metals in the solid state, reflectivity increases as the wavelength of the laser light and the electrical conductivity of the metal increase. The reflectivity of metals is reduced upon heating to the melting point, and further reduced upon melting. At high power densities the liquid metal surface is heated so quickly that very rapid vaporization occurs. The recoil force produced by the evaporation causes a depression in the liquid/vapor interface. The keyhole resulting from this depression allows for multiple reflections and thus increases beam absorption in the liquid

  17. Laser Beam delivering and shaping device for transfer of organic film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kangin; Kwon, Jin Hyuk; Yi, Jonghoon

    2008-01-01

    The laser based organic material transfer methods are developed by several groups for OLED (organic light emitting diode)fabrication. Well developed laser based methods are LITI (Laser Induced Thermal Imaging)and LIPS (Laser Induced Pattern wise Sublimation). These methods are proved to be suitable for large OLED panel fabrication. At an early stage of development, TEM"00"mode Nd:YAG laser was used for pattering organic material. The focused focused Nd:YAG laser beam generated heat in the film and the heat caused expansion of organic material coated layer. The organic film on the layer is transferred to the display panel due to pressure exerted on the display panel by the layer. Recently developed system prefers to employ a diode laser with wavelength of 800nm. Diode laser is cheaper and smaller photon source compared with the Nd:YAG laser. In this work, we use Nd doped fiber laser (wavelength=1070nm, power=10W)because the laser has stable output and well defined Gaussian beam profile compared with diode laser. We also employed fiber coupled diode laser (808nm)because it also has well defined beam distribution. In laser methods, spatially shaped beam is required for clean and sharp transfer. There are several methods for the beam shaping such as aspheric lens, diffractive optical elements, and micro lens array etc. We found that Gaussian beam can be shaped to a square hat like beam just by using simple commercial spherical lens set

  18. Laser-beam interactions with materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allmen, M.V.

    1987-01-01

    Lasers are becoming popular tools and research instruments in materials research, metallurgy, semiconductor technology and engineering. This text treats, from a physicist's point of view, the processes that lasers can induce in materials. A broad view of the field and its perspectives is given: physical topics covered range from optics to shock waves, and applications range from semiconductor annealing to fusion-plasma production. Intuitive analytical models are used whenever possible, in order to foster creative thinking and facilitate access to newcomers and nonspecialists

  19. Laser induced forward transfer of soft materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palla-Papavlu, A; Dinca, V; Luculescu, C; Dinescu, M; Shaw-Stewart, J; Lippert, T; Nagel, M

    2010-01-01

    A strong research effort is presently aimed at patterning methodologies for obtaining controlled defined micrometric polymeric structures for a wide range of applications, including electronics, optoelectronics, sensors, medicine etc. Lasers have been identified as appropriate tools for processing of different materials, such as ceramics and metals, but also for soft, easily damageable materials (biological compounds and polymers). In this work we study the dynamics of laser induced forward transfer (LIFT) with a gap between the donor and the receiver substrates, which is the basis for possible applications that require multilayer depositions with high spatial resolution

  20. GPC Light Shaper for energy efficient laser materials processing.

    OpenAIRE

    Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Palima, Darwin; Villangca, Mark Jayson; Aabo, Thomas; Glückstad, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    The biggest use of lasers is in materials processing. In manufacturing, lasers are used for cutting, drilling, marking and other machining processes. Similarly, lasers are important in microfabrication processes such as photolithography, direct laser writing, or ablation. Lasers are advantageous because they do not wear out, have no physical contact with the processed material, avoid heating or warping effects, and are generally more precise. Since lasers are easier to adapt to different opti...

  1. Femtosecond laser interaction with protection materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, S.; Krueger, J.; Hertwig, A.; Fiedler, A.; Kautek, W

    2003-03-15

    Textile, aluminium and polyethylene used as components in laser protection curtains were investigated with respect to their ablation behaviour. Employing 33-fs pulses (800 nm wavelength, 1 kHz repetition rate), ex situ geometrical measurements of the ablation cavities and in situ acoustic investigations with a microphone were performed to determine the ablation thresholds in the single- and multi-pulse cases. The acoustical method proved advantageous for complex surface morphologies and/or single laser pulse interactions. Incubation phenomena can be observed for all the materials studied. Technically relevant multi-pulse ablation thresholds are presented and are compared with the single-pulse (1-on-1) irradiation.

  2. Two-dimensional materials for ultrafast lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Fengqiu

    2017-01-01

    As the fundamental optical properties and novel photophysics of graphene and related two-dimensional (2D) crystals are being extensively investigated and revealed, a range of potential applications in optical and optoelectronic devices have been proposed and demonstrated. Of the many possibilities, the use of 2D materials as broadband, cost-effective and versatile ultrafast optical switches (or saturable absorbers) for short-pulsed lasers constitutes a rapidly developing field with not only a good number of publications, but also a promising prospect for commercial exploitation. This review primarily focuses on the recent development of pulsed lasers based on several representative 2D materials. The comparative advantages of these materials are discussed, and challenges to practical exploitation, which represent good future directions of research, are laid out. (paper)

  3. Fabrication of planar optical waveguides by 6.0 MeV silicon ion implantation in Nd-doped phosphate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xiao-Liang; Dai, Han-Qing; Zhang, Liao-Lin; Wang, Yue; Zhu, Qi-Feng; Guo, Hai-Tao; Li, Wei-Nan; Liu, Chun-Xiao

    2018-04-01

    We report the fabrication of a planar optical waveguide by silicon ion implantation into Nd-doped phosphate glass at an energy of 6.0 MeV and a dose of 5.0 × 1014 ions/cm2. The change in the surface morphology of the glass after the implantation can be clearly observed by scanning electron microscopy. The measurement of the dark mode spectrum of the waveguide is conducted using a prism coupler at 632.8 nm. The refractive index distribution of the waveguide is reconstructed by the reflectivity calculation method. The near-field optical intensity profile of the waveguide is measured using an end-face coupling system. The waveguide with good optical properties on the glass matrix may be valuable for the application of the Nd-doped phosphate glass in integrated optical devices.

  4. Ultrafast laser spectroscopy in complex solid state materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Tianqi [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2014-12-01

    This thesis summarizes my work on applying the ultrafast laser spectroscopy to the complex solid state materials. It shows that the ultrafast laser pulse can coherently control the material properties in the femtosecond time scale. And the ultrafast laser spectroscopy can be employed as a dynamical method for revealing the fundamental physical problems in the complex material systems.

  5. Selective tuning of magnetization dynamics damping in Tb- and Nd-doped permalloy ultrathin films by adjacent copper nanolayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Dong, E-mail: physzd@yahoo.com [School of Physics Science and Information Engineering, Key Lab. of Communication Science and Technology of Shandong Province, Liaocheng University, Liaocheng 252059 (China); Physics Department, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189 (China); Yue, Jinjin; Jiang, Sheng [Physics Department, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189 (China); Zhai, Ya, E-mail: yazhai@seu.edu.cn [Physics Department, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189 (China); National Laboratory of Solid Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Du, Jun; Zhai, Hongru [National Laboratory of Solid Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2016-07-05

    The mechanism of angular dependence of ferromagnetic resonance linewidth of dilute Tb and Nd doping in permalloy thin films with various thicknesses of adjacent copper layer are investigated by experimental approach and theoretical fitting by considering the contributions from intrinsic spin-orbit coupling, inhomogeneous broadening and two-magnon scattering. The results show that the damping coefficient α, by intrinsic contribution extracted from ferromagnetic resonance linewidth, increases from 0.0153 to 0.0218 for NiFe–Nd films and from 0.0193 to 0.0261 for NiFe–Tb films resulting from the spin pumping effect at the interface of NiFe–Nd(or Tb)/Cu as the thickness of copper layer increases from 1 nm to 15 nm. The surface magnetic anisotropy constant K{sub 1} is obtained and shows an decreasing trend from positive to negative, which implies that the copper layer could reduce the surface perpendicular anisotropy. The fitting spin mixed conductivity is (2.72 ± 0.18) × 10{sup 15} cm{sup −2} at NiFe–Tb/Cu interface and (2.4 ± 0.2) × 10{sup 15} cm{sup −2} at Cu/NiFe–Nd interface, respectively. - Highlights: • The thickness of Cu buffer layer affects the surface perpendicular anisotropy of FM layer. • The interface roughness could be investigated by using FMR linewidth. • The damping coefficient is enhanced by spin-pumping effect.

  6. Nd-doped Lu3Al5O12 single-crystal scintillator for X-ray imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiyama, Makoto; Fujimoto, Yutaka; Yanagida, Takayuki; Totsuka, Daisuke; Chani, Valery; Yokota, Yuui; Yoshikawa, Akira

    2013-01-01

    The optical and scintillation properties of Nd-doped Lu 3 Al 5 O 12 (Nd:LuAG) crystals grown by the Czochralski (Cz) method were examined under X-ray excitation. Their applicability for X-ray imaging was also inspected. The radioluminescence spectrum induced by X-rays showed a broad host emission and sharp Nd 3+ 4f–4f emission peaks in the UV to visible wavelengths. The light output current of the Nd:LuAG was 85% of that of a standard CdWO 4 X-ray scintillator. The afterglow value measured 20 ms after X-ray irradiation was 1.5%. An X-ray radiographic image was successfully obtained using the Nd:LuAG scintillator coupled with the charge coupled device (CCD) photodetector. -- Highlights: ► The Nd:LuAG single crystal was produced to perform X-ray imaging test. ► The sample exhibited the 85% light output current of the standard CdWO 4 . ► The afterglow intensity of the sample was very high compared with the CdWO 4 . ► The X-ray radiographic image was obtained from the Nd:LuAG single crystal

  7. Laser Additive Manufacturing of Magnetic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikler, C. V.; Chaudhary, V.; Borkar, T.; Soni, V.; Jaeger, D.; Chen, X.; Contieri, R.; Ramanujan, R. V.; Banerjee, R.

    2017-03-01

    While laser additive manufacturing is becoming increasingly important in the context of next-generation manufacturing technologies, most current research efforts focus on optimizing process parameters for the processing of mature alloys for structural applications (primarily stainless steels, titanium base, and nickel base alloys) from pre-alloyed powder feedstocks to achieve properties superior to conventionally processed counterparts. However, laser additive manufacturing or processing can also be applied to functional materials. This article focuses on the use of directed energy deposition-based additive manufacturing technologies, such as the laser engineered net shaping (LENS™) process, to deposit magnetic alloys. Three case studies are presented: Fe-30 at.%Ni, permalloys of the type Ni-Fe-V and Ni-Fe-Mo, and Fe-Si-B-Cu-Nb (derived from Finemet) alloys. All these alloys have been processed from a blend of elemental powders used as the feedstock, and their resultant microstructures, phase formation, and magnetic properties are discussed in this paper. Although these alloys were produced from a blend of elemental powders, they exhibited relatively uniform microstructures and comparable magnetic properties to those of their conventionally processed counterparts.

  8. Recent progress in high-power slab lasers in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Y.

    1988-01-01

    Recently, many solid-state lasers have been widely employed in Japanese industries, especially in the electronics industries for precise and reliable processing. To expand the use of solid-state lasers and to achieve higher processing speed, the authors are developing slab lasers of high power, high repetition rate, and high beam quality. Metal processing systems with optical fibers for large and complex 3-D work, multiwork station systems linked to only one laser with optical fibers, and compact x-ray sources for lithography are promising areas for such lasers. Surnitomo Metal Mining is growing Nd:GGG and Nd:YAG crystals 60 mm in diameter and 200 mm long. From 2 at.% Nd-doped GGG crystals without central core regions. The authors obtained two slab materials with dimensions of 35 X 9 X 192 and 55 X 15 X 213 mm/sup 3/. By using the smaller slab, they constructed a slab laser and obtained 370-W laser output power at 24-kW lamp input power and 10-pps repetition rate. Now they are constructing a 1-kW slab laser using the other larger size slab

  9. GPC Light Shaper for energy efficient laser materials processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Palima, Darwin; Villangca, Mark Jayson

    The biggest use of lasers is in materials processing. In manufacturing, lasers are used for cutting, drilling, marking and other machining processes. Similarly, lasers are important in microfabrication processes such as photolithography, direct laser writing, or ablation. Lasers are advantageous...... with steep, well defined edges that would further increase laser cutting precision or allow “single shot” laser engraving of arbitrary 2D profiles, as opposed to point scanning [3,4]. Instead of lossy approaches, GPC beam shaping is achieved with simplified, binary phase-only optics [5] that redistributes...... because they do not wear out, have no physical contact with the processed material, avoid heating or warping effects, and are generally more precise. Since lasers are easier to adapt to different optimized shapes, they can be even more precise and energy efficient for materials processing. The cost...

  10. Synthesis of Nd-doped ZSM-5 and its application to treating slightly polluted water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mang Lu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, ZSM-5 zeolite was synthesized using diatomaceous mud as the raw material, and then doped with different amounts of Nd2O3. The orthogonal experiments were performed to investigate the influence of Nd:Si molar ratio, zeolite dosage, contact time, solution pH and temperature on the removal of humic acid (HA. The removal of HA was comprehensively evaluated by chemical oxygen demand (COD, UV254 and UV410 of the solution. The results demonstrate that solution pH and zeolite dosage are the two most important factors influencing HA adsorption. The optimum experimental conditions were determined to be: 35 °C, Nd:Si molar ratio of 1:100, 2.0 g/L zeolite, pH 4 and 50 min contact time. Under these conditions, the removal efficiencies of UV254, UV410 and COD are 82.70%, 76.00% and 82.10%, respectively, corresponding to a comprehensive removal of 81.02%.

  11. Positive magnetoresistance in ferromagnetic Nd-doped In2O3 thin films grown by pulse laser deposition

    KAUST Repository

    Xing, G. Z.; Yi, J. B.; Yan, F.; Wu, Tao; Li, S.

    2014-01-01

    temperature ferromagnetism in the as-prepared films. The strong sp-f exchange interaction as a result of the rare earth doping is discussed as the origin of the magnetotransport behaviours. A positive magnetoresistance (∼29.2%) was observed at 5 K and ascribed

  12. Single crystal growth of pure and Nd-doped Y2O3 by flotating zone method with Xe arc lamp imaging furnace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuiki, H.; Kitazawa, K.; Fueki, K.; Masumoto, T.; Shiroki, K.

    1980-01-01

    Single crystals of undoped and Nd-doped yttrium oxide were grown by the floating zone method with a Xe arc lamp imaging furnace. The crystals were grown in the and directions. Transparent and subgrain-free single crystals were obtained at a growth rate of 30-60 mm/h for the undoped yttrium oxide. Facets of the cubic [100] and [211] were observed though the high temperature phase of the crystal is hexagonal. Dislocation densities of undoped yttrium oxide are given. (orig./WE)

  13. Energy enhancer for mask based laser materials processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bastue, Jens; Olsen, Flemmming Ove

    1996-01-01

    A device capable of drastically improving the energy efficiency of present mask based laser materials processing systems is presented. Good accordance between experiments and simulations for a TEA-CO2 laser system designed for laser marking has been demonstrated. The energy efficiency may...... be improved with a factor of 2 - 4 for typical mask transmittances between 10 - 40%....

  14. Laser additive manufacturing of high-performance materials

    CERN Document Server

    Gu, Dongdong

    2015-01-01

    This book entitled “Laser Additive Manufacturing of High-Performance Materials” covers the specific aspects of laser additive manufacturing of high-performance new materials components based on an unconventional materials incremental manufacturing philosophy, in terms of materials design and preparation, process control and optimization, and theories of physical and chemical metallurgy. This book describes the capabilities and characteristics of the development of new metallic materials components by laser additive manufacturing process, including nanostructured materials, in situ composite materials, particle reinforced metal matrix composites, etc. The topics presented in this book, similar as laser additive manufacturing technology itself, show a significant interdisciplinary feature, integrating laser technology, materials science, metallurgical engineering, and mechanical engineering. This is a book for researchers, students, practicing engineers, and manufacturing industry professionals interested i...

  15. High Efficiency Mask Based Laser Materials Processing with TEA-CO2 - and Excimer Laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bastue, Jens; Olsen, Flemmming Ove

    1997-01-01

    In general, mask based laser materials processing techniques suffer from a very low energy efficiency. We have developed a simple device called an energy enhancer, which is capable of increasing the energy efficiency of typical mask based laser materials processing systems. A short review of the ...... line marking with TEA-CO2 laser of high speed canning lines. The second one is manufactured for marking or microdrilling with excimer laser....

  16. Cutting of nonmetallic materials using Nd:YAG laser beam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bashir Ahmed Tahir; Rashid Ahmed; M. G. B. Ashiq; Afaq Ahmed; M. A. Saeed

    2012-01-01

    This study deals with Nd:YAG laser cutting nonmetallic materials,which is one of the most important and popular industrial applications of laser.The main theme is to evaluate the effects of Nd:YAG laser beam power besides work piece scanning speed.For approximate cutting depth,a theoretical study is conducted in terms of material property and cutting speed.Results show a nonlinear relation between the cutting depth and input energy.There is no significant effect of speed on cutting depth with the speed being larger than 30 mm/s.An extra energy is utilized in the deep cutting.It is inferred that as the laser power increases,cutting depth increases.The experimental outcomes are in good agreement with theoretical results.This analysis will provide a guideline for laser-based industry to select a suitable laser for cutting,scribing,trimming,engraving,and marking nonmetallic materials.

  17. Cutting of nonmetallic materials using Nd:YAG laser beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahir, Bashir Ahmed; Ashiq, M.G. B.; Saeed, M.A.; Ahmed, Rashid; Ahmed, Afaq

    2012-01-01

    This study deals with Nd:YAG laser cutting nonmetallic materials, which is one of the most important and popular industrial applications of laser. The main theme is to evaluate the effects of Nd:YAG laser beam power besides work piece scanning speed. For approximate cutting depth, a theoretical study is conducted in terms of material property and cutting speed. Results show a nonlinear relation between the cutting depth and input energy. There is no significant effect of speed on cutting depth with the speed being larger than 30 mm/s. An extra energy is utilized in the deep cutting. It is inferred that as the laser power increases, cutting depth increases. The experimental outcomes are in good agreement with theoretical results. This analysis will provide a guideline for laser-based industry to select a suitable laser for cutting, scribing, trimming, engraving, and marking nonmetallic materials. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  18. Transport of biologically active material in laser cutting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenz, M; Mathezloic, F; Stoffel, M H; Zweig, A D; Romano, V; Weber, H P

    1988-01-01

    The transport of biologically active material during laser cutting with CO2 and Er lasers is demonstrated. This transport mechanism removes particles from the surface of gelatin, agar, and liver samples into the depth of the laser-formed craters. The transport phenomenon is explained by a contraction and condensation of enclosed hot water vapor. We show by cultivating transported bacteria in agar that biological particles can survive the shock of the transport. Determination of the numbers of active cells evidences a more pronounced activity of the cultivated bacteria after impact with an Er laser than with a CO2 laser.

  19. NIR optimized dual mode photoluminescence in Nd doped Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} ceramic phosphor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sukul, Prasenjit Prasad; Mahata, Manoj Kumar; Kumar, Kaushal, E-mail: kumar.bhu@gmail.com

    2017-05-15

    Authors here report the dual mode photo luminescence emission in neodymium doped yttrium oxide ceramic phosphor upon 808 nm diode laser excitation. Single cubic phase Nd{sup 3+} doped Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} phosphor was synthesized using urea assisted combustion route. Nd{sup 3+} doped Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} ceramic phosphor has given photoluminescence in a wide wavelength range covering near infrared window (850–1100 nm) to the visible region i.e. green (525 nm) and red (680 nm) upon 808 nm diode laser excitation. The two most intense bands on 808 nm excitation were observed at 750 nm and 1064 nm due to the upconversion and downconversion emission processes. The sample was also tested for emission using 980 nm and intense green emission due to the trace presence of Er{sup 3+} in the raw materials was seen in the sample. The excitation power dependent upconversion measurements have shown that transitions {sup 4}F{sub 9/2}→{sup 4}I{sub 9/2} and {sup 4}S{sub 3/2}→{sup 4}I{sub 9/2} are thermally coupled and can be used to estimate the sample temperature using Boltzmann relation.

  20. Optical improvement for laser material processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosman, J.; De Keijzer, M.A.; De Kok, C.J.G.M. [ECN Engineering and Services, Petten (Netherlands); Molenaar, R.; Kettelarij, H.

    2010-05-15

    The use of laser technology enables flexibility and new concepts for example solar cell production but also optical moulds. The reason why laser technology is used in these cases is not the laser system itself but the ability to tailor this type of energy to the demands of the production processes. To ensure the full potential of the laser technology it can be improved by adding optical elements like polarizer, cameras, lenses and sensors. Two of these extra optical elements are presented here. First laser pulse energy attenuation. This is used to increase the controllability of laser processes. And second a new camera optic that enables integrated alignment with respect to features on the product. This last option enables marking on existing features and automated compensation of scanner drift. These camera systems can be used for micro welding of polymers and repair of existing markings in moulds.

  1. Transient Infrared Measurement of Laser Absorption Properties of Porous Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marynowicz Andrzej

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The infrared thermography measurements of porous building materials have become more frequent in recent years. Many accompanying techniques for the thermal field generation have been developed, including one based on laser radiation. This work presents a simple optimization technique for estimation of the laser beam absorption for selected porous building materials, namely clinker brick and cement mortar. The transient temperature measurements were performed with the use of infrared camera during laser-induced heating-up of the samples’ surfaces. As the results, the absorbed fractions of the incident laser beam together with its shape parameter are reported.

  2. Transient Infrared Measurement of Laser Absorption Properties of Porous Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marynowicz, Andrzej

    2016-06-01

    The infrared thermography measurements of porous building materials have become more frequent in recent years. Many accompanying techniques for the thermal field generation have been developed, including one based on laser radiation. This work presents a simple optimization technique for estimation of the laser beam absorption for selected porous building materials, namely clinker brick and cement mortar. The transient temperature measurements were performed with the use of infrared camera during laser-induced heating-up of the samples' surfaces. As the results, the absorbed fractions of the incident laser beam together with its shape parameter are reported.

  3. Automotive perspective on laser material processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roessler, D.M.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper a broad review is given of the development and use of laser processing in the automotive industry. a brief introduction to the major types of processing lasers and related systems is followed by a summary of the major processing regimes. Examples are given of the automotive industry's use of lasers in a variety of applications, from heat treating and welding, to cutting and marking

  4. Effect of Moisture Content of Paper Material on Laser Cutting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanov, Alexander; Saukkonen, Esa; Piili, Heidi; Salminen, Antti

    Laser technology has been used in industrial processes for several decades. The most advanced development and implementation took place in laser welding and cutting of metals in automotive and ship building industries. However, there is high potential to apply laser processing to other materials in various industrial fields. One of these potential fields could be paper industry to fulfill the demand for high quality, fast and reliable cutting technology. Difficulties in industrial application of laser cutting for paper industry are associated to lack of basic information, awareness of technology and its application possibilities. Nowadays possibilities of using laser cutting for paper materials are widened and high automation level of equipment has made this technology more interesting for manufacturing processes. Promising area of laser cutting application at paper making machines is longitudinal cutting of paper web (edge trimming). There are few locations at a paper making machine where edge trimming is usually done: wet press section, calender or rewinder. Paper web is characterized with different moisture content at different points of the paper making machine. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of moisture content of paper material on laser cutting parameters. Effect of moisture content on cellulose fibers, laser absorption and energy needed for cutting is described as well. Laser cutting tests were carried out using CO2 laser.

  5. Material Processing with High Power CO2-Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakowsky, Lothar

    1986-10-01

    After a period of research and development lasertechnique now is regarded as an important instrument for flexible, economic and fully automatic manufacturing. Especially cutting of flat metal sheets with high power C02-lasers and CNC controlled two or three axes handling systems is a wide spread. application. Three dimensional laser cutting, laser-welding and -heat treatment are just at the be ginning of industrial use in production lines. The main. advantages of laser technology. are - high. accuracy - high, processing velocity - law thermal distortion. - no tool abrasion. The market for laser material processing systems had 1985 a volume of 300 Mio S with growth rates between, 20 % and 30 %. The topic of this lecture are hiTrh. power CO2-lasers. Besides this systems two others are used as machining tools, Nd-YAG- and Eximer lasers. All applications of high. power CO2-lasers to industrial material processing show that high processing velocity and quality are only guaranteed in case of a stable intensity. profile on the workpiece. This is only achieved by laser systems without any power and mode fluctuations and by handling systems of high accuracy. Two applications in the automotive industry are described, below as examples for laser cutting and laser welding of special cylindrical motor parts.

  6. Laser-limiting materials for medical use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podgaetsky, Vitaly M.; Kopylova, Tat'yana N.; Tereshchenko, Sergey A.; Reznichenko, Alexander V.; Selishchev, Sergey V.

    2004-03-01

    The important problem of modern laser medicine is the decrease of an exposure of biological tissues outside of an operational field and can be solved by optical radiation limiting. Organic dyes with reversibly darkening can be placed onto surfaces of irradiated tissues or can be introduced in solder for laser welding of vessels. The limiting properties of a set of nontoxic organic compounds were investigated. Nonlinear optical properties of dyes having reverse saturable absorption (pyran styryl derivatives, cyanine and porphyrine compounds) were studied under XeCl and YAG:Nd (II harmonics) lasers excitation. The effect of attenuation of a visible laser radiation is obtained for ethanol solutions of cyanines: radiation attenuation coefficient ( AC) = 25-35 at N/S = 100-250 MW/cm2. In water solutions of such compounds in UV spectrum range AC ~ 10. The spectral characteristics of compounds appeared expedient enough to operational use in laser limiters (broad passband in visible range of a spectrum). Under the data of Z-scanning (the scheme F/10) value AC ~ 70 was reached. The limiting of power laser radiation in visible (λ = 532 nm) and UV- (λ = 308 nm) spectral region and nanosecond pulse duration (7 -13 ns) across porphyrine solutions and their complexes with some metals (13 compounds) was investigated too. The comparative study of optical limiting dependence on intensity of laser radiation, solvent type and concentration of solutions was carried out for selecte wavelength. There was shown a possible use of pyran styryl derivatives DCM as limiters of visual laser radiation. To understand a mechanism of laser radiation limitation the light induced processes were experimentally and theoretically studied in organic molecules. The quantum-chemical investigation of one cyanine compound was carried out. There were noted the perspectives of laser radiation limiting by application of inverted schemes of traditional laser shutters. Usage of phenomena of light -induced

  7. Laser processing for manufacturing nanocarbon materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van, Hai Hoang

    CNTs have been considered as the excellent candidate to revolutionize a broad range of applications. There have been many method developed to manipulate the chemistry and the structure of CNTs. Laser with non-contact treatment capability exhibits many processing advantages, including solid-state treatment, extremely fast processing rate, and high processing resolution. In addition, the outstanding monochromatic, coherent, and directional beam generates the powerful energy absorption and the resultant extreme processing conditions. In my research, a unique laser scanning method was developed to process CNTs, controlling the oxidation and the graphitization. The achieved controllability of this method was applied to address the important issues of the current CNT processing methods for three applications. The controllable oxidation of CNTs by laser scanning method was applied to cut CNT films to produce high-performance cathodes for FE devices. The production method includes two important self-developed techniques to produce the cold cathodes: the production of highly oriented and uniformly distributed CNT sheets and the precise laser trimming process. Laser cutting is the unique method to produce the cathodes with remarkable features, including ultrathin freestanding structure (~200 nm), greatly high aspect ratio, hybrid CNT-GNR emitter arrays, even emitter separation, and directional emitter alignment. This unique cathode structure was unachievable by other methods. The developed FE devices successfully solved the screening effect issue encounter by current FE devices. The laser-control oxidation method was further developed to sequentially remove graphitic walls of CNTs. The laser oxidation process was directed to occur along the CNT axes by the laser scanning direction. Additionally, the oxidation was further assisted by the curvature stress and the thermal expansion of the graphitic nanotubes, ultimately opening (namely unzipping) the tubular structure to

  8. Laser Cutting of Materials of Various Thicknesses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Grepl

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Thise paper deals with the application of laser technology and optimizing the parameters for cutting nickel alloy. The theoretical part of the paper describes various types of lasers, their principles and usage. The experimental part focuses on optimizing the section parameteres of Haynes 718 alloy using a CO2 gas laser. This alloy is employed in the production of components for the aircraft industry. The experiment was performed on the Wibro Delta laser system designed for sizable parts. The actual section is measured with respect to its quality and any accompanying side effects that occur during the process. In this case, laser output and cutting speed were the parameters with most influence on the final cut. The summary explains the results achieved in a metallographic laboratory.

  9. Ultra-stable, diode-pumped Nd-doped glass regenerative amplifier for the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crane, J.K.; Martinez, M.; Beach, R.J.; Mitchell, S.; Pratt, G.; Christensen, J.J.

    1995-12-01

    We describe a diode laser-pumped Nd:glass regenerative amplifier that amplifies temporally shaped pulses with low distortion, high pulse-to- pulse stability, and high gain. This laser amplifier is a prototype subsystem for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser system. 2 refs., 1 fig

  10. Development of Ceramic Solid-State Laser Host Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Narasimha S.; Trivedi, Sudhir; Kutcher, Susan; Wang, Chen-Chia; Kim, Joo-Soo; Hommerich, Uwe; Shukla, Vijay; Sadangi, Rajendra

    2009-01-01

    Polycrystalline ceramic laser materials are gaining importance in the development of novel diode-pumped solid-state lasers. Compared to single-crystals, ceramic laser materials offer advantages in terms of ease of fabrication, shape, size, and control of dopant concentrations. Recently, we have developed Neodymium doped Yttria (Nd:Y2O3) as a solid-state ceramic laser material. A scalable production method was utilized to make spherical non agglomerated and monodisperse metastable ceramic powders of compositions that were used to fabricate polycrystalline ceramic material components. This processing technique allowed for higher doping concentrations without the segregation problems that are normally encountered in single crystalline growth. We have successfully fabricated undoped and Neodymium doped Yttria material up to 2" in diameter, Ytterbium doped Yttria, and erbium doped Yttria. We are also in the process of developing other sesquioxides such as scandium Oxide (Sc2O3) and Lutesium Oxide (Lu2O3) doped with Ytterbium, erbium and thulium dopants. In this paper, we present our initial results on the material, optical, and spectroscopic properties of the doped and undoped sesquioxide materials. Polycrystalline ceramic lasers have enormous potential applications including remote sensing, chem.-bio detection, and space exploration research. It is also potentially much less expensive to produce ceramic laser materials compared to their single crystalline counterparts because of the shorter fabrication time and the potential for mass production in large sizes.

  11. Fundamentals of ultrafast laser-material interaction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Shugaev, M.V.; Wu, Ch.; Armbruster, O.; Naghilou, A.; Brouwer, N.; Ivanov, D.S.; Derrien, Thibault; Bulgakova, Nadezhda M.; Kautek, W.; Rethfeld, B.; Zhigilei, L.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 12 (2016), s. 960-968 ISSN 0883-7694 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LO1602; GA ČR GA16-12960S EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 657424 - QuantumLaP Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : femtosecond laser * Coulomb explosion * microscopic mechanisms * electron-diffraction * molecular- dynamics * metal targets * ablation * surface * dielectrics Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers OBOR OECD: Optics (including laser optics and quantum optics) Impact factor: 5.199, year: 2016

  12. Functionally graded materials produced with high power lasers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Hosson, J. T. M.; Ocelik, V.; Chandra, T; Torralba, JM; Sakai, T

    2003-01-01

    In this keynote paper two examples will be present of functionally graded materials produced with high power Nd:YAG lasers. In particular the conditions for a successful Laser Melt Injection (LMI) of SiC and WC particles into the melt pool of A18Si and Ti6Al4V alloys are presented. The formation of

  13. Microstructural evolution and control in laser material processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaul, R.; Nath, A.K.

    2005-01-01

    Laser processing, because of its characteristic features, often gives rise to unique microstructure and properties not obtained with other conventional processes. We present various diverse laser processing case studies involving control of microstructure through judicious selection of processing parameters carried out with indigenously developed high power CO 2 lasers. The first study describes microstructural control during end plug laser welding of PFBR fuel pin, involving crack pone alloy D9 tube and type 316 M stainless steel (SS) plug, through preferential displacement of focused laser beam. Crater and associated cracks were eliminated by suitable laser power ramping. Another case study describes how low heat input characteristics of laser cladding process has been exploited for suppressing dilution in 'Colomony 6' deposits on austenitic SS. The results are in sharp contrast to extensive dilution noticed in Colmony 6 hard faced deposits made by GTAW. A novel laser surface melting (LSM) treatment for type 316 (N) SS weld metal has been developed to generate a sensitization-resistant microstructure which leads to enhanced resistance against intergranular corrosion (IGC). IGC resistance of laser treated surface has been found to be critically dependent on laser processing parameters. Experimental observations have been analyzed with thermal simulation. We have also studied the effect of laser beam spatial intensity profile on the microstructure in LSM. We have developed laser-assisted graded hard facing of austenitic SS substrate with Stellite 6 which, in contrast to direct deposition either by laser or GTAW, produced smooth transition in chemical composition and hardness used to control grain coarsening and martensite formation in type 430 SS weldment. Laser rapid manufacturing (LRM) is emerging as a new rapid and cost effective process for low volume fabrication, esp. of expensive materials. The talk will also present microstructural characteristics of laser

  14. Temperature analysis of laser ignited metalized material using spectroscopic technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassi, Ishaan; Sharma, Pallavi; Daipuriya, Ritu; Singh, Manpreet

    2018-05-01

    The temperature measurement of the laser ignited aluminized Nano energetic mixture using spectroscopy has a great scope in in analysing the material characteristic and combustion analysis. The spectroscopic analysis helps to do in depth study of combustion of materials which is difficult to do using standard pyrometric methods. Laser ignition was used because it consumes less energy as compared to electric ignition but ignited material dissipate the same energy as dissipated by electric ignition and also with the same impact. Here, the presented research is primarily focused on the temperature analysis of energetic material which comprises of explosive material mixed with nano-material and is ignited with the help of laser. Spectroscopy technique is used here to estimate the temperature during the ignition process. The Nano energetic mixture used in the research does not comprise of any material that is sensitive to high impact.

  15. Charged particle and laser irradiation of selected materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svendsen, W.E.

    1996-11-01

    The main topics of the present thesis are the processes governing electronic sputtering of insulators and laser ablation of metals and insulators. The sputtering yield for electron bombardment of solid deuterium was investigated using quartz crystal microbalances as the measuring technique. The sputtering yield was measured with varying electron energy and deuterium film thickness. Laser ablation measurements of silver and nickel were carried out using a Nd:YAG laser. The effect of various experimental parameters such as background gas pressure (Ar, N 2 ), position of quartz crystals with respect to target position and the optimal number of laser shots for carrying out the experiments were investigated. The deposition rate was measured with varying laser wavelength and laser fluence. The angular distribution of the ablated material was measured for silver as well. A theoretical model based on the thermal properties of laser interaction with metals was applied in the initial phase of ablation. For the non-thermal processes governing laser interaction with the ablated plasma plume, a model developed by Phipps and Dreyfus was used to interpret the results. Laser ablation measurements of water-ice were carried using a Nitrogen laser. Attempts were made to measure the deposition rate for various the laser wavelengths and energies. (au) 8 tabs., 49 ills., 77 refs

  16. Charged particle and laser irradiation of selected materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svendsen, W E

    1996-11-01

    The main topics of the present thesis are the processes governing electronic sputtering of insulators and laser ablation of metals and insulators. The sputtering yield for electron bombardment of solid deuterium was investigated using quartz crystal microbalances as the measuring technique. The sputtering yield was measured with varying electron energy and deuterium film thickness. Laser ablation measurements of silver and nickel were carried out using a Nd:YAG laser. The effect of various experimental parameters such as background gas pressure (Ar, N{sub 2}), position of quartz crystals with respect to target position and the optimal number of laser shots for carrying out the experiments were investigated. The deposition rate was measured with varying laser wavelength and laser fluence. The angular distribution of the ablated material was measured for silver as well. A theoretical model based on the thermal properties of laser interaction with metals was applied in the initial phase of ablation. For the non-thermal processes governing laser interaction with the ablated plasma plume, a model developed by Phipps and Dreyfus was used to interpret the results. Laser ablation measurements of water-ice were carried using a Nitrogen laser. Attempts were made to measure the deposition rate for various the laser wavelengths and energies. (au) 8 tabs., 49 ills., 77 refs.

  17. Laser irradiation of carbon–tungsten materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcu, A; Lungu, C P; Ursescu, D; Porosnicu, C; Grigoriu, C; Avotina, L; Kizane, G; Marin, A; Osiceanu, P; Grigorescu, C E A; Demitri, N

    2014-01-01

    Carbon–tungsten layers deposited on graphite by thermionic vacuum arc (TVA) were directly irradiated with a femtosecond terawatt laser. The morphological and structural changes produced in the irradiated area by different numbers of pulses were systematically explored, both along the spots and in their depths. Although micro-Raman and Synchrotron-x-ray diffraction investigations have shown no carbide formation, they have shown the unexpected presence of embedded nano-diamonds in the areas irradiated with high fluencies. Scanning electron microscopy images show a cumulative effect of the laser pulses on the morphology through the ablation process. The micro-Raman spatial mapping signalled an increased percentage of sp 3 carbon bonding in the areas irradiated with laser fluencies around the ablation threshold. In-depth x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy investigations suggested a weak cumulative effect on the percentage increase of the sp 2 -sp 3 transitions with the number of laser pulses just for nanometric layer thicknesses. (paper)

  18. Laser materials processing applications at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hargrove, R.S.; Dragon, E.P.; Hackel, R.P.; Kautz, D.D.; Warner, B.E.

    1993-01-01

    High power and high radiance laser technologies developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) such as copper-vapor lasers, solid-state slab lasers, dye lasers, harmonic wavelength conversion of these lasers, and fiber optic delivery systems show great promise for material processing tasks. Evaluation of models suggests significant potential for tenfold increases in welding, cutting, and drilling performance, as well as capability for applications in emerging technologies such as micromachining, surface treatment, and stereolithography. Copper and dye laser systems are currently being developed at LLNL for uranium enrichment production facilities. The goals of this program are to develop low-cost, reliable and maintainable industrial laser systems. Chains of copper lasers currently operate at more than 1.5 kW output and achieve mean time between failures of more than 1,000 hours. The beam quality of copper vapor lasers is approximately three times the diffraction limit. Dye lasers have near diffraction limited beam quality at greater than 1.0 kW. Diode laser pumped, Nd:YAG slab lasers are also being developed at LLNL. Current designs achieve powers of greater than 1.0 kW and projected beam quality is in the two to five times diffraction limited range. Results from cutting and drilling studies in titanium and stainless steel alloys show that cuts and holes with extremely fine features can be made with dye and copper-vapor lasers. High radiance beams produce low distortion and small heat-affected zones. The authors have accomplished very high aspect ratio holes in drilling tests (> 60: 1) and features with micron scale (5-50 μm) sizes. Other, traditionally more difficult, materials such as copper, aluminum and ceramics will soon be studied in detail

  19. Femtosecond laser induced phenomena in transparent solid materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, D.Z.; Sharafudeen, K.N.; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2016-01-01

    solved, especially concerning the interaction of strong, ultra-short electromagnetic pulses with matter, and also because potential advanced technologies will emerge due to the impressive capability of the intense femtosecond laser to create new material structures and hence functionalities. When......The interaction of intense femtosecond laser pulses with transparent materials is a topic that has caused great interest of scientists over the past two decades. It will continue to be a fascinating field in the coming years. This is because many challenging fundamental problems have not been......–matter interaction, and fabricate various integrated micro-devices. In recent years we have witnessed exciting development in understanding and applying femtosecond laser induced phenomena in transparent materials. The interaction of femtosecond laser pulses with transparent materials relies on non...

  20. Short-pulse laser interactions with disordered materials and liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phinney, L.M.; Goldman, C.H.; Longtin, J.P.; Tien, C.L. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    High-power, short-pulse lasers in the picosecond and subpicosecond range are utilized in an increasing number of technologies, including materials processing and diagnostics, micro-electronics and devices, and medicine. In these applications, the short-pulse radiation interacts with a wide range of media encompassing disordered materials and liquids. Examples of disordered materials include porous media, polymers, organic tissues, and amorphous forms of silicon, silicon nitride, and silicon dioxide. In order to accurately model, efficiently control, and optimize short-pulse, laser-material interactions, a thorough understanding of the energy transport mechanisms is necessary. Thus, fractals and percolation theory are used to analyze the anomalous diffusion regime in random media. In liquids, the thermal aspects of saturable and multiphoton absorption are examined. Finally, a novel application of short-pulse laser radiation to reduce surface adhesion forces in microstructures through short-pulse laser-induced water desorption is presented.

  1. Study of underwater laser propulsion using different target materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, Hao; Chen, Jun; Han, Bing; Shen, Zhong-Hua; Lu, Jian; Ni, Xiao-Wu

    2014-07-14

    In order to investigate the influence of target materials, including aluminum (Al), titanium (Ti) and copper (Cu), on underwater laser propulsion, the analytical formula of the target momentum IT is deduced from the enhanced coupling theory of laser propulsion in atmosphere with transparent overlay metal target. The high-speed photography method and numerical simulation are employed to verify the IT model. It is shown that the enhanced coupling theory, which was developed originally for laser propulsion in atmosphere, is also applicable to underwater laser propulsion with metal targets.

  2. Laser cutting of laminated sheet material: a modeling exercise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Graaf, R.F.; Meijer, J.

    1997-01-01

    Laser cutting has been investigated for a number of aluminum-synthetic laminates, newly developed materials for the aeronautic and automotive industry. The materials consist of alternating aluminum and synthetic layers. It is shown that these materials can be cut at rates comparable to those of

  3. Laser assisted embedding of nanoparticles into metallic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Dong; Suslov, Sergey; Ye Chang; Liao Yiliang; Liu, C. Richard; Cheng, Gary J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports a methodology of half-embedding nanoparticles into metallic materials. Transparent and opaque nanoparticles are chosen to demonstrate the process of laser assisted nanoparticle embedding. Dip coating method is used to coat transparent or opaque nanoparticle on the surface of metallic material. Nanoparticles are embedded into substrate by laser irradiation. In this study, the mechanism and process of nanoparticle embedding are investigated. It is found both transparent and opaque nanoparticles embedding are with high densities and good uniformities.

  4. Laser spectroscopy of gas confined in nanoporous materials

    OpenAIRE

    Svensson, Tomas; Shen, Zhijian

    2010-01-01

    We show that high-resolution laser spectroscopy can probe surface interactions of gas confined in nanocavities of porous materials. We report on strong line broadening and unfamiliar line shapes due to tight confinement, as well as signal enhancement due to multiple photon scattering. This new domain of laser spectroscopy constitute a challenge for the theory of collisions and spectroscopic line shapes, and open for new ways of analyzing porous materials and processes taking place therein.

  5. Computational dynamics of laser alloyed metallic materials for improved corrosion performance: computational dynamics of laser alloyed metallic materials

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Fatoba, OS

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Laser alloying is a material processing method which utilizes the high power density available from defocused laser beam to melt both metal coatings and a part of the underlying substrate. Since melting occur solitary at the surface, large...

  6. Solid material evaporation into an ECR source by laser ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harkewicz, R.; Stacy, J.; Greene, J.; Pardo, R.C.

    1993-01-01

    In an effort to explore new methods of producing ion beams from solid materials, we are attempting to develop a laser-ablation technique for evaporating materials directly into an ECR ion source plasma. A pulsed NdYaG laser with approximately 25 watts average power and peak power density on the order of 10 7 W/cm 2 has been used off-line to measure ablation rates of various materials as a function of peak laser power. The benefits anticipated from the successful demonstration of this technique include the ability to use very small quantities of materials efficiently, improved material efficiency of incorporation into the ECR plasma, and decoupling of the material evaporation process from the ECR source tuning operation. Here we report on the results of these tests and describe the design for incorporating such a system directly with the ATLAS PII-ECR ion source

  7. Generation of ultrasound in materials using continuous-wave lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, James N; DiComo, Gregory P; Nikitin, Sergei

    2012-03-01

    Generating and detecting ultrasound is a standard method of nondestructive evaluation of materials. Pulsed lasers are used to generate ultrasound remotely in situations that prohibit the use of contact transducers. The scanning rate is limited by the repetition rates of the pulsed lasers, ranging between 10 and 100 Hz for lasers with sufficient pulse widths and energies. Alternately, a high-power continuous-wave laser can be scanned across the surface, creating an ultrasonic wavefront. Since generation is continuous, the scanning rate can be as much as 4 orders of magnitude higher than with pulsed lasers. This paper introduces the concept, comparing the theoretical scanning speed with generation by pulsed laser. © 2012 Optical Society of America

  8. Technology Assessment of Laser-Assisted Materials Processing in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarathnam, Karthik; Taminger, Karen M. B.

    2001-01-01

    Lasers are useful for performing operations such as joining, machining, built-up freeform fabrication, shock processing, and surface treatments. These attributes are attractive for the supportability of longer-term missions in space due to the multi-functionality of a single tool and the variety of materials that can be processed. However, current laser technology also has drawbacks for space-based applications, specifically size, power efficiency, lack of robustness, and problems processing highly reflective materials. A review of recent laser developments will be used to show how these issues may be reduced and indicate where further improvement is necessary to realize a laser-based materials processing capability in space. The broad utility of laser beams in synthesizing various classes of engineering materials will be illustrated using state-of-the art processing maps for select lightweight alloys typically found on spacecraft. With the advent of recent breakthroughs in diode-pumped solid-state lasers and fiber optic technologies, the potential to perform multiple processing techniques is increasing significantly. Lasers with suitable wavelengths and beam properties have tremendous potential for supporting future space missions to the moon, Mars and beyond.

  9. Laser-accelerated particle beams for stress testing of materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberio, M; Scisciò, M; Vallières, S; Cardelli, F; Chen, S N; Famulari, G; Gangolf, T; Revet, G; Schiavi, A; Senzacqua, M; Antici, P

    2018-01-25

    Laser-driven particle acceleration, obtained by irradiation of a solid target using an ultra-intense (I > 10 18  W/cm 2 ) short-pulse (duration testing materials and are particularly suited for identifying materials to be used in harsh conditions. We show that these laser-generated protons can produce, in a very short time scale, a strong mechanical and thermal damage, that, given the short irradiation time, does not allow for recovery of the material. We confirm this by analyzing changes in the mechanical, optical, electrical, and morphological properties of five materials of interest to be used in harsh conditions.

  10. Laser interaction with biological material mathematical modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Kulikov, Kirill

    2014-01-01

    This book covers the principles of laser interaction with biological cells and tissues of varying degrees of organization. The problems of biomedical diagnostics are considered. Scattering of laser irradiation of blood cells is modeled for biological structures (dermis, epidermis, vascular plexus). An analytic theory is provided which is based on solving the wave equation for the electromagnetic field. It allows the accurate analysis of interference effects arising from the partial superposition of scattered waves. Treated topics of mathematical modeling are: optical characterization of biological tissue with large-scale and small-scale inhomogeneities in the layers, heating blood vessel under laser irradiation incident on the outer surface of the skin and thermo-chemical denaturation of biological structures at the example of human skin.

  11. Development of high-power CO2 lasers and laser material processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Ashish K.; Choudhary, Praveen; Kumar, Manoj; Kaul, R.

    2000-02-01

    Scaling laws to determine the physical dimensions of the active medium and optical resonator parameters for designing convective cooled CO2 lasers have been established. High power CW CO2 lasers upto 5 kW output power and a high repetition rate TEA CO2 laser of 500 Hz and 500 W average power incorporated with a novel scheme for uniform UV pre- ionization have been developed for material processing applications. Technical viability of laser processing of several engineering components, for example laser surface hardening of fine teeth of files, laser welding of martensitic steel shroud and titanium alloy under-strap of turbine, laser cladding of Ni super-alloy with stellite for refurbishing turbine blades were established using these lasers. Laser alloying of pre-placed SiC coating on different types of aluminum alloy, commercially pure titanium and Ti-6Al-4V alloy, and laser curing of thermosetting powder coating have been also studied. Development of these lasers and results of some of the processing studies are briefly presented here.

  12. Review of selective laser melting: Materials and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yap, C. Y., E-mail: cyap001@e.ntu.edu.sg [Singapore Centre for 3D Printing, School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Block N3.1 - B2c - 01, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Energy Research Institute @ NTU, Interdisciplinary Graduate School, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Block S2 - B3a - 01, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Chua, C. K., E-mail: mckchua@ntu.edu.sg; Liu, Z. H., E-mail: azhliu@ntu.edu.sg; Zhang, D. Q., E-mail: zhangdq@ntu.edu.sg; Loh, L. E., E-mail: leloh1@e.ntu.edu.sg; Sing, S. L., E-mail: sing0011@e.ntu.edu.sg [Singapore Centre for 3D Printing, School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Block N3.1 - B2c - 01, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Dong, Z. L., E-mail: zldong@ntu.edu.sg [School of Materials Science & Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Block N4.1, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2015-12-15

    Selective Laser Melting (SLM) is a particular rapid prototyping, 3D printing, or Additive Manufacturing (AM) technique designed to use high power-density laser to melt and fuse metallic powders. A component is built by selectively melting and fusing powders within and between layers. The SLM technique is also commonly known as direct selective laser sintering, LaserCusing, and direct metal laser sintering, and this technique has been proven to produce near net-shape parts up to 99.9% relative density. This enables the process to build near full density functional parts and has viable economic benefits. Recent developments of fibre optics and high-power laser have also enabled SLM to process different metallic materials, such as copper, aluminium, and tungsten. Similarly, this has also opened up research opportunities in SLM of ceramic and composite materials. The review presents the SLM process and some of the common physical phenomena associated with this AM technology. It then focuses on the following areas: (a) applications of SLM materials and (b) mechanical properties of SLM parts achieved in research publications. The review is not meant to put a ceiling on the capabilities of the SLM process but to enable readers to have an overview on the material properties achieved by the SLM process so far. Trends in research of SLM are also elaborated in the last section.

  13. Review of selective laser melting: Materials and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, C. Y.; Chua, C. K.; Dong, Z. L.; Liu, Z. H.; Zhang, D. Q.; Loh, L. E.; Sing, S. L.

    2015-12-01

    Selective Laser Melting (SLM) is a particular rapid prototyping, 3D printing, or Additive Manufacturing (AM) technique designed to use high power-density laser to melt and fuse metallic powders. A component is built by selectively melting and fusing powders within and between layers. The SLM technique is also commonly known as direct selective laser sintering, LaserCusing, and direct metal laser sintering, and this technique has been proven to produce near net-shape parts up to 99.9% relative density. This enables the process to build near full density functional parts and has viable economic benefits. Recent developments of fibre optics and high-power laser have also enabled SLM to process different metallic materials, such as copper, aluminium, and tungsten. Similarly, this has also opened up research opportunities in SLM of ceramic and composite materials. The review presents the SLM process and some of the common physical phenomena associated with this AM technology. It then focuses on the following areas: (a) applications of SLM materials and (b) mechanical properties of SLM parts achieved in research publications. The review is not meant to put a ceiling on the capabilities of the SLM process but to enable readers to have an overview on the material properties achieved by the SLM process so far. Trends in research of SLM are also elaborated in the last section.

  14. Review of selective laser melting: Materials and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yap, C. Y.; Chua, C. K.; Liu, Z. H.; Zhang, D. Q.; Loh, L. E.; Sing, S. L.; Dong, Z. L.

    2015-01-01

    Selective Laser Melting (SLM) is a particular rapid prototyping, 3D printing, or Additive Manufacturing (AM) technique designed to use high power-density laser to melt and fuse metallic powders. A component is built by selectively melting and fusing powders within and between layers. The SLM technique is also commonly known as direct selective laser sintering, LaserCusing, and direct metal laser sintering, and this technique has been proven to produce near net-shape parts up to 99.9% relative density. This enables the process to build near full density functional parts and has viable economic benefits. Recent developments of fibre optics and high-power laser have also enabled SLM to process different metallic materials, such as copper, aluminium, and tungsten. Similarly, this has also opened up research opportunities in SLM of ceramic and composite materials. The review presents the SLM process and some of the common physical phenomena associated with this AM technology. It then focuses on the following areas: (a) applications of SLM materials and (b) mechanical properties of SLM parts achieved in research publications. The review is not meant to put a ceiling on the capabilities of the SLM process but to enable readers to have an overview on the material properties achieved by the SLM process so far. Trends in research of SLM are also elaborated in the last section

  15. Cutting and machining energetic materials with a femtosecond laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roeske, Frank; Benterou, Jerry; Lee, Ronald; Roos, Edward [Energetic Materials Center, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P. O. Box 808, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)

    2003-04-01

    A femtosecond (fs) laser has been used as a tool for solving many problems involving access, machining, disassembly, inspection and avoidance of undesirable hazardous waste streams in systems containing energetic materials. Because of the unique properties of the interaction of ultrashort laser pulses with matter, the femtosecond laser can be used to safely cut these energetic materials in a precise manner without creating an unacceptable waste stream. Many types of secondary high explosives (HE) and propellants have been cut with the laser for a variety of applications ranging from disassembly of aging conventional weapons (demilitarization), inspection of energetic components of aging systems to creating unique shapes of HE for purposes of initiation and detonation physics studies. Hundreds of samples of energetic materials have been cut with the fs laser without ignition and, in most cases, without changing the surface morphology of the cut surfaces. The laser has also been useful in cutting nonenergetic components in close proximity to energetic materials. (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  16. UV laser micromachining of ceramic materials: formation of columnar topographies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, V.; Vilar, R.; Conde, O.

    2001-01-01

    Laser machining is increasingly appearing as an alternative for micromachining of ceramics. Using ceramic materials using excimer lasers can result in smooth surfaces or in the formation of cone-like or columnar topography. Potential applications of cone-shaped or columnar surface topography include, for example, light trapping in anti-reflection coatings and improvement of adhesion bonding between ceramic materials. In this communication results of a comparative study of surface topography change during micromachining of several ceramic materials with different ablation behaviors are reported. (orig.)

  17. Modeling of high energy laser ignition of energetic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyung-cheol; Kim, Ki-hong; Yoh, Jack J.

    2008-01-01

    We present a model for simulating high energy laser heating and ignition of confined energetic materials. The model considers the effect of irradiating a steel plate with long laser pulses and continuous lasers of several kilowatts and the thermal response of well-characterized high explosives for ignition. Since there is enough time for the thermal wave to propagate into the target and to create a region of hot spot in the high explosives, electron thermal diffusion of ultrashort (femto- and picosecond) lasing is ignored; instead, heat diffusion of absorbed laser energy in the solid target is modeled with thermal decomposition kinetic models of high explosives. Numerically simulated pulsed-laser heating of solid target and thermal explosion of cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine, triaminotrinitrobenzene, and octahydrotetranitrotetrazine are compared to experimental results. The experimental and numerical results are in good agreement

  18. Laser Induced Damage in Optical Materials: 1980.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-10-01

    conference organization. As many of you have experienced, the printed proceedings of these Laser Damage Symposia in our personal libraries are...responsible person or agency. I look forward to our continued relationship. Finally, let me thank the organizers of this Symposium. They have done a...the professional operation of the Symposium and Ms. Susie Rivera and Ms. Sheila Aaker for their part in the preparation and publication of the

  19. Laser diagnostics of materials and chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartford, A. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Several examples are given of the ability of laser-based diagnostic techniques to make noninvasive measurements in hostile environments. Using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering both majority and minority species concentrations, as well as temperature, have been measured in the hot, high-pressure, particle-laden stream of a coal gasifier. In addition, numerous toxic and corrosive elements in the gasifier stream have been identified, but not yet quantified. In addition to providing the capability for making analytical determinations, laser techniques have been extensively employed to measure the rates of elementary chemical reactions. Recently, the temperature regime over which such meaurements are possible has been expanded. Although much of the laser diagnostic activity to date has involved investigations of the gas phase, significant information concerning heterogeneous phenomena can still be inferred. For instance, gas-solid reactions can manifest themselves as changes in vapor phase composition. Furthermore, in the future we expect expanded studies involving reactions of refractory metals (both atoms and clusters) and additional investigations of processes occurring at interfaces and on surfaces

  20. Material Property Measurement in Hostile Environments using Laser Acoustics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ken L. Telschow

    2004-01-01

    Acoustic methods are well known and have been used to measure various intrinsic material properties, such as, elastic coefficients, density, crystal axis orientation, microstructural texture, and residual stress. Extrinsic properties, such as, dimensions, motion variables or temperature are also readily determined from acoustic methods. Laser acoustics, employing optical generation and detection of elastic waves, has a unique advantage over other acoustic methods-it is noncontacting, uses the sample surface itself for transduction, requires no couplant or invasive sample surface preparation and can be utilized in any hostile environment allowing optical access to the sample surface. In addition, optical generation and detection probe beams can be focused to the micron scale and/or shaped to alter the transduction process with a degree of control not possible using contact transduction methods. Laser methods are amenable to both continuous wave and pulse-echo measurements and have been used from Hz to 100's of GHz (time scales from sec to psec) and with amplitudes sufficient to fracture materials. This paper shall review recent applications of laser acoustic methods to determining material properties in hostile environments that preclude the use of contacting transduction techniques. Example environments include high temperature (>1000C) sintering and molten metal processing, thin film deposition by plasma techniques, materials moving at high velocity during the fabrication process and nuclear high radiation regions. Recent technological advances in solid-state lasers and telecommunications have greatly aided the development and implementation of laser acoustic methods, particularly at ultra high frequencies. Consequently, laser acoustic material property measurements exhibit high precision and reproducibility today. In addition, optical techniques provide methods of imaging acoustic motion that is both quantitative and rapid. Possible future directions for laser

  1. Requirements and new materials for fusion laser systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stokowski, S.E.; Weber, M.J.; Saroyan, R.A.; Hagen, W.F.

    1977-10-01

    Higher focusable power in neodymium glass fusion lasers can be obtained through the use of new materials with lower nonlinear index (n 2 ) and better energy storage capabilities than the presently employed silicate glass. Silicate, phosphate, fluorophosphate, and beryllium fluoride glasses are discussed in terms of fusion laser requirements, particularly those for the proposed Nova laser. Examples of the variation in spectroscopic and optical properties obtainable with compositional changes are given. Results of a system evaluation of potential laser materials show that fluorophosphate glasses have many of the desired properties for use in Nova. These glasses are now being cast in large sizes (30-cm diameter) and will be tested in prototype amplifiers in 1978

  2. Requirements and new materials for fusion laser systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stokowski, S.E.; Weber, M.J.; Saroyan, R.A.; Hagen, W.F.

    1977-10-01

    Higher focusable power in neodymium glass fusion lasers can be obtained through the use of new materials with lower nonlinear index (n/sub 2/) and better energy storage capabilities than the presently employed silicate glass. Silicate, phosphate, fluorophosphate, and beryllium fluoride glasses are discussed in terms of fusion laser requirements, particularly those for the proposed Nova laser. Examples of the variation in spectroscopic and optical properties obtainable with compositional changes are given. Results of a system evaluation of potential laser materials show that fluorophosphate glasses have many of the desired properties for use in Nova. These glasses are now being cast in large sizes (30-cm diameter) and will be tested in prototype amplifiers in 1978.

  3. Strengthened glass for high average power laser applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerqua, K.A.; Lindquist, A.; Jacobs, S.D.; Lambropoulos, J.

    1987-01-01

    Recent advancements in high repetition rate and high average power laser systems have put increasing demands on the development of improved solid state laser materials with high thermal loading capabilities. The authors have developed a process for strengthening a commercially available Nd doped phosphate glass utilizing an ion-exchange process. Results of thermal loading fracture tests on moderate size (160 x 15 x 8 mm) glass slabs have shown a 6-fold improvement in power loading capabilities for strengthened samples over unstrengthened slabs. Fractographic analysis of post-fracture samples has given insight into the mechanism of fracture in both unstrengthened and strengthened samples. Additional stress analysis calculations have supported these findings. In addition to processing the glass' surface during strengthening in a manner which preserves its post-treatment optical quality, the authors have developed an in-house optical fabrication technique utilizing acid polishing to minimize subsurface damage in samples prior to exchange treatment. Finally, extension of the strengthening process to alternate geometries of laser glass has produced encouraging results, which may expand the potential or strengthened glass in laser systems, making it an exciting prospect for many applications

  4. Final Report: Laser-Material Interactions Relevant to Analytic Spectroscopy of Wide Band Gap Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickinson, J. Thomas [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)

    2014-04-05

    We summarize our studies aimed at developing an understanding of the underlying physics and chemistry in terms of laser materials interactions relevant to laser-based sampling and chemical analysis of wide bandgap materials. This work focused on the determination of mechanisms for the emission of electrons, ions, atoms, and molecules from laser irradiation of surfaces. We determined the important role of defects on these emissions, the thermal, chemical, and physical interactions responsible for matrix effects and mass-dependent transport/detection. This work supported development of new techniques and technology for the determination of trace elements contained such as nuclear waste materials.

  5. Laser Beam Melting of Multi-Material Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laumer, Tobias; Karg, Michael; Schmidt, Michael

    First results regarding the realisation of multi-material components manufactured by Laser Beam Melting of polymers and metals are published. For realising composite structures from polymer powders by additive manufacturing, at first relevant material properties regarding compatibility have to be analysed. The paper shows the main requirements for compatibility between different materials and offers first results in form of a compatibility matrix of possible combinations for composite structures. For achieving gradient properties of additively manufactured metal parts by using composite materials the composition of alloying components in the powder and adapted process strategies are varied. As an alternative to atomizing pre-alloyed materials, mixtures of different powders are investigated.

  6. Acoustic damage detection in laser-cut CFRP composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishino, Michiteru; Harada, Yoshihisa; Suzuki, Takayuki; Niino, Hiroyuki

    2012-03-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) composite material, which is expected to reduce the weight of automotive, airplane and etc., was cut by laser irradiation with a pulsed-CO2 laser (TRUMPF TFL5000; P=800W, 20kHz, τ=8μs, λ=10.6μm, V=1m/min) and single-mode fiber lasers (IPG YLR-300-SM; P=300W, λ=1.07μm, V=1m/min)(IPG YLR- 2000-SM; P=2kW, λ=1.07μm, V=7m/min). To detect thermal damage at the laser cutting of CFRP materials consisting of thermoset resin matrix and PAN or PITCH-based carbon fiber, the cut quality was observed by X-ray CT. The effect of laser cutting process on the mechanical strength for CFRP tested at the tensile test. Acoustic emission (AE) monitoring, high-speed camera and scanning electron microscopy were used for the failure process analysis. AE signals and fractographic features characteristic of each laser-cut CFRP were identified.

  7. Present and future trends of laser materials processing in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunawa, Akira

    1991-10-01

    Lasers quickly penetrated into Japanese industries in the mid-80s. The paper reviews the present situation of industrial lasers and their applications in Japanese industries for materials removal, joining, and some surface modification technologies as well as their economical evaluation compared with competitive technologies. Laser cutting of metallic and nonmetallic thin sheets is widely prevalent even in small scale industries as a flexible manufacturing tool. As for the laser welding is concerned, industrial applications are rather limited in mass production lines. This mainly comes from the fact that the present laser technologies have not employed the adaptive control because of the lack of sensors, monitoring, and control systems which can tolerate the high-precision and high-speed processing. In spite of this situation, laser welding is rapidly increasing in recent years in industries such as automotive, machinery, electric/electronic, steel, heavy industries, etc. Laser surface modification technologies have attracted significant interest from industrial people, but actual application is very limited today. However, the number of R&D papers is increasing year by year. The paper also reviews these new technology trends in Japan.

  8. Femtosecond laser processing of photovoltaic and transparent materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sanghoon

    The photovoltaic semiconducting and transparent dielectric materials are of high interest in current industry. Femtosecond laser processing can be an effective technique to fabricate such materials since non-linear photochemical mechanisms predominantly occur. In this series of studies, femtosecond (fs) laser processing techniques that include laser drilling on Si wafer, laser scribing on CIGS thin film, laser ablation on Lithium Niobate (LN) crystal, and fabrication of 3D structures in fused silica were studied. The fs laser drilling on Si wafer was performed to fabricate via holes for wrap-through PV devices. For reduction of the number of shots in fs laser drilling process, self-action of laser light in the air was initiated. To understand physical phenomena during laser drilling, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), emission, and shadowgraph images were studied. The result indicated the presence of two mechanisms that include fabrication by self-guided beam and wall-guided beam. Based on our study, we could fabricate ~16 micrometer circular-shaped via holes with ~200 laser pulses on 160-170 micrometer thick c- and mc-Si wafer. For the fs laser scribing on ink jet printed CIGS thin film solar cell, the effect of various parameters that include pulse accumulation, wavelength, pulse energy, and overlapping were elucidated. In our processing regime, the effect of wavelength could be diminished due to compensation between beam size, pulse accumulation, energy fluence, and the absorption coefficient. On the other hand, for high PRF fs laser processing, pulse accumulation effect cannot be ignored, while it can be negligible in low PRF fs laser processing. The result indicated the presence of a critical energy fluence for initiating delamination of CIGS layer. To avoid delamination and fabricate fine isolation lines, the overlapping method can be applied. With this method, ~1 micrometer width isolation lines were fabricated. The fs laser ablation on LN wafer was studied

  9. Laser-material interactions: A study of laser energy coupling with solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shannon, Mark Alan [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1993-11-01

    This study of laser-light interactions with solid materials ranges from low-temperature heating to explosive, plasma-forming reactions. Contained are four works concerning laser-energy coupling: laser (i) heating and (ii) melting monitored using a mirage effect technique, (iii) the mechanical stress-power generated during high-powered laser ablation, and (iv) plasma-shielding. First, a photothermal deflection (PTD) technique is presented for monitoring heat transfer during modulated laser heating of opaque solids that have not undergone phase-change. Of main interest is the physical significance of the shape, magnitude, and phase for the temporal profile of the deflection signal. Considered are the effects that thermophysical properties, boundary conditions, and geometry of the target and optical probe-beam have on the deflection response. PTD is shown to monitor spatial and temporal changes in heat flux leaving the surface due to changes in laser energy coupling. The PTD technique is then extended to detect phase-change at the surface of a solid target. Experimental data shows the onset of melt for indium and tin targets. The conditions for which melt can be detected by PTD is analyzed in terms of geometry, incident power and pulse length, and thermophysical properties of the target and surroundings. Next, monitoring high-powered laser ablation of materials with stress-power is introduced. The motivation for considering stress-power is given, followed by a theoretical discussion of stress-power and how it is determined experimentally. Experiments are presented for the ablation of aluminum targets as a function of energy and intensity. The stress-power response is analyzed for its physical significance. Lastly, the influence of plasma-shielding during high-powered pulsed laser-material interactions is considered. Crater size, emission, and stress-power are measured to determine the role that the gas medium and laser pulse length have on plasma shielding.

  10. Laser-material interactions: A study of laser energy coupling with solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shannon, M.A.; California Univ., Berkeley, CA

    1993-11-01

    This study of laser-light interactions with solid materials ranges from low-temperature heating to explosive, plasma-forming reactions. Contained are four works concerning laser-energy coupling: laser (i) heating and (ii) melting monitored using a mirage effect technique, (iii) the mechanical stress-power generated during high-powered laser ablation, and (iv) plasma-shielding. First, a photothermal deflection (PTD) technique is presented for monitoring heat transfer during modulated laser heating of opaque solids that have not undergone phase-change. Of main interest is the physical significance of the shape, magnitude, and phase for the temporal profile of the deflection signal. Considered are the effects that thermophysical properties, boundary conditions, and geometry of the target and optical probe-beam have on the deflection response. PTD is shown to monitor spatial and temporal changes in heat flux leaving the surface due to changes in laser energy coupling. The PTD technique is then extended to detect phase-change at the surface of a solid target. Experimental data shows the onset of melt for indium and tin targets. The conditions for which melt can be detected by PTD is analyzed in terms of geometry, incident power and pulse length, and thermophysical properties of the target and surroundings. Next, monitoring high-powered laser ablation of materials with stress-power is introduced. The motivation for considering stress-power is given, followed by a theoretical discussion of stress-power and how it is determined experimentally. Experiments are presented for the ablation of aluminum targets as a function of energy and intensity. The stress-power response is analyzed for its physical significance. Lastly, the influence of plasma-shielding during high-powered pulsed laser-material interactions is considered. Crater size, emission, and stress-power are measured to determine the role that the gas medium and laser pulse length have on plasma shielding

  11. Laser formation of Bragg gratings in polymer nanocomposite materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazarov, M M; Khaydukov, K V; Sokolov, V I; Khaydukov, E V [Institute on Laser and Information Technologies, Russian Academy of Sciences, Shatura, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-31

    The method investigated in this work is based on the laser-induced, spatially inhomogeneous polymerisation of nanocomposite materials and allows control over the motion and structuring of nanoparticles. The mechanisms of nanoparticle concentration redistribution in the process of radical photopolymerisation are studied. It is shown that under the condition of spatially inhomogeneous illumination of a nanocomposite material, nanoparticles are diffused from the illuminated areas into the dark fields. Diffraction gratings with a thickness of 8 μm and a refractive index modulation of 1 × 10{sup -2} are written in an OCM-2 monomer impregnated by silicon nanoparticles. The gratings may be used in the development of narrowband filters, in holographic information recording and as dispersion elements in integrated optical devices. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  12. Interfacial adhesion of laser clad functionally graded materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pei, Y. T.; Ocelik, V.; De Hosson, J. T. M.

    2003-01-01

    Specially designed samples of laser clad AlSi40 functionally graded materials (FGM) are made for evaluating the interfacial adhesion. To obtain the interfacial bond strength notches are made right at the interface of the FGMs. In-situ microstructural observations during straining in a field-emission

  13. Interfacial adhesion of laser clad functionally graded materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Hosson, JTM; Pei, YT; Ocelik, [No Value; Sudarshan, TS; Stiglich, JJ; Jeandin, M

    2002-01-01

    Specially designed samples of laser clad AlSi40 functionally graded materials (FGM) are made for evaluating the interfacial adhesion. To obtain the interfacial bond strength notches are made right at the interface of the FGMs. In-sitit microstructural observations during straining in an FEG-ESEM

  14. Laser-matter structuration of optical and biological materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallo, L., E-mail: hallo@celia.u-bordeaux1.fr [CELIA, Universite Bordeaux 1 (France); Mezel, C., E-mail: candice.mezel@cea.fr [CELIA, Universite Bordeaux 1 (France); CEA Le Ripault, 37260 Monts (France); Guillemot, F., E-mail: fabien.guillemot@inserm.fr [UMR 577 INSERM, Universite Bordeaux 2 (France); Chimier, B., E-mail: chimier@celia.u-bordeaux1.fr [CELIA, Universite Bordeaux 1 (France); Bourgeade, A., E-mail: antoine.bourgeade@cea.fr [CEA-CESTA, Le Barp (France); Regan, C., E-mail: regan@celia.u-bordeaux1.fr [CELIA, Universite Bordeaux 1 (France); Duchateau, G., E-mail: duchateau@celia.u-bordeaux1.fr [CELIA, Universite Bordeaux 1 (France); Souquet, A., E-mail: agnes.souquet@inserm.fr [UMR 577 INSERM, Universite Bordeaux 2 (France); Hebert, D., E-mail: david.hebert@cea.fr [CEA-CESTA, Le Barp (France)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In this study we model nanomaterial structuring. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The laser energy deposition is discussed first. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Full and approximate models are discussed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dynamic material response is addressed via hydrodynamics. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sild effects are accounted for - Abstract: Interaction of ultrafast laser, i.e. from the femtosecond (fs) to the nanosecond (ns) regime, with initially transparent matter may produce very high energy density hot spots in the bulk as well as at the material surface, depending on focusing conditions. In the fs regime, absorption is due to ionisation of the dielectric, which enables absorption process to begin, and then hydrodynamic to take place. In the ns regime both absorption and hydrodynamic are coupled to each other, which complexifies considerably the comprehension but matter structuration looks similar. A numerical tool including solution of 3D Maxwell equations and a rate equation for free electrons is first compared to some available simple models of laser energy absorption. Then, subsequent material deformation, i.e. structuration, is determined by solving hydrodynamic equations, including or not solid behaviour. We show that nature of the final structures strongly depends on the amount of deposited energy and on the shape of the absorption zone. Then we address some problems related to laser-matter structuration of optical and biological materials in the fs, ps and ns regimes.

  15. Material Engineering for Monolithic Semiconductor Mode-Locked Lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulkova, Irina

    This thesis is devoted to the materials engineering for semiconductor monolithic passively mode-locked lasers (MLLs) as a compact energy-efficient source of ultrashort optical pulses. Up to the present day, the achievement of low-noise sub-picosecond pulse generation has remained a challenge...

  16. AIR EMISSIONS FROM LASER DRILLING OF PRINTED WIRING BOARD MATERIALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper gives results of a study to characterize gases generated during laser drilling of printed wiring board (PWB) material and identifies the pollutants and generation rates found during the drilling process. Typically found in the missions stream were trace amounts of carbo...

  17. Ultrashort-pulse laser excitation and damage of dielectric materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haahr-Lillevang, Lasse; Balling, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Ultrashort-pulse laser excitation of dielectrics is an intricate problem due to the strong coupling between the rapidly changing material properties and the light. In the present paper, details of a model based on a multiple-rate-equation description of the conduction band are provided. The model...

  18. Modeling short-pulse laser excitation of dielectric materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wædegaard, Kristian Juncher; Sandkamm, Ditte Både; Haahr-Lillevang, Lasse

    2014-01-01

    A theoretical description of ultrashort-pulse laser excitation of dielectric materials based on strong-field excitation in the Keldysh picture combined with a multiple-rateequation model for the electronic excitation including collisional processes is presented. The model includes light attenuation...

  19. High precision laser processing of sensitive materials by Microjet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibailly, Ochelio D.; Wagner, Frank R.; Mayor, Laetitia; Richerzhagen, Bernold

    2003-11-01

    Material laser cutting is well known and widely used in industrial processes, including micro fabrication. An increasing number of applications require nevertheless a superior machining quality than can be achieved using this method. A possibility to increase the cut quality is to opt for the water-jet guided laser technology. In this technique the laser is conducted to the work piece by total internal reflection in a thin stable water-jet, comparable to the core of an optical fiber. The water jet guided laser technique was developed originally in order to reduce the heat damaged zone near the cut, but in fact many other advantages were observed due to the usage of a water-jet instead of an assist gas stream applied in conventional laser cutting. In brief, the advantages are three-fold: the absence of divergence due to light guiding, the efficient melt expulsion, and optimum work piece cooling. In this presentation we will give an overview on several industrial applications of the water-jet guided laser technique. These applications range from the cutting of CBN or ferrite cores to the dicing of thin wafers and the manufacturing of stencils, each illustrates the important impact of the water-jet usage.

  20. Flux resistance of the various optical components of neodymium laser networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novaro, M.; Lauriou, J.; Chesnot, J.

    1978-01-01

    Flux resistance of optical components used in Nd +++ doped glass power laser networks is the main point. We tried to explain here the degradation processes of these different components: bare glass, metallic mirrors, multidielectric mirrors and polarizers, apodisors. Measurement data on a lot of samples are presented. Comparison between different proceedings allowing reflection and polarization of a laser beam shows the advantage of multidielectric coatings [fr

  1. Studies of diode-pumped solid-state lasers based on Nd:KGW and Nd:YAG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, Akram Yousif

    1996-01-01

    The experimental part of the thesis was dedicated to the studies of diode-pumped solid- state lasers. it includes experiments with end-pumped continuous wave (CW) Nd-doped crystals. In particular, we have concentrated to Nd:KGW, a relatively new and not studied in the literature about the laser materials. We have performed some basics measurements of this material. A fibre bundle coupled laser diode array was used as a pump source. We have investigated two main optical arrangements for the pump, allowing operation in two regimes: 1- Low pump power operation using selected output power from a single of the fibre bundle. 2- high pump power operation using the total output power from the bundle. The main parameters of the cavities we use (e.g. the cavity mode and the pumping spot size), were determined using the matrix approach and the equations for the propagation of the Gaussian beams. The highest output power obtained in this work for Nd:KGW with a transverse electromagnetic (TEM 0 0) single-mode, continuous (CW) operation, was 400 mW for 1700 mW pumping power from the diode laser. We present also data about the performance of a diode pumped Nd:YAG crystal. Our experiment shows that Nd:KGW is a promising material of low and medium pumping power levels. (Author)

  2. Growth and characterization of Nd-doped disordered Ca3Gd2(BO3)4 crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Z. B.; Zhang, H. J.; Yu, H. H.; Xu, M.; Zhang, Y. Y.; Sun, S. Q.; Wang, J. Y.; Wang, Q.; Wei, Z. Y.; Zhang, Z. G.

    2012-01-01

    A high-quality disordered Nd3+:Ca3Gd2(BO3)4 (Nd3+:CGB) laser crystal was grown by the Czochralski method. The space group and effective segregation coefficient of Nd3+ were determined to be Pnma and 1.06, respectively. The thermal properties, including the average linear thermal expansion coefficient, thermal diffusivity, specific heat, and thermal conductivity were systematically measured for the first time. It was found that the thermal conductivity increases with increasing temperature, indicating glasslike behavior. The polarized spectral properties of the crystal were investigated, including the polarized absorption spectra, polarized fluorescence spectra, and fluorescence decay. The spectroscopic parameters of Nd3+ ions in Nd3+:CGB crystal have been obtained based on Judd-Ofelt theory. The anisotropy of the spectral properties for different polarized directions was discussed. Additionally, the continuous-wave (CW) laser performance at 1.06 μm was demonstrated for the first time. The maximum output power of 603 mW was achieved with corresponding optical conversion efficiency of 8.33% and slope efficiency of 9.95%.

  3. Powder Flux Regulation in the Laser Material Deposition Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrizubieta, Jon Iñaki; Wegener, Maximiliam; Arntz, Kristian; Lamikiz, Aitzol; Ruiz, Jose Exequiel

    In the present research work a powder flux regulation system has been designed, developed and validated with the aim of improving the Laser Material Deposition (LMD) process. In this process, the amount of deposited material per substrate surface unit area depends on the real feed rate of the nozzle. Therefore, a regulation system based on a solenoid valve has been installed at the nozzle entrance in order to control the powder flux. The powder flux control has been performed based on the machine real feed rate, which is compared with the programmed feed rate. An instantaneous velocity error is calculated and the powder flow is controlled as a function of this variation using Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) signals. Thereby, in zones where the Laser Material Deposition machine reduces the feed rate due to a trajectory change, powder accumulation can be avoided and the generated clads would present a homogeneous shape.

  4. Microstructural and mechanical characterization of laser deposited advanced materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sistla, Harihar Rakshit

    Additive manufacturing in the form of laser deposition is a unique way to manufacture near net shape metallic components from advanced materials. Rapid solidification facilitates the extension of solid solubility, compositional flexibility and decrease in micro-segregation in the melt among other advantages. The current work investigates the employment of laser deposition to fabricate the following: 1. Functionally gradient materials: This allows grading dissimilar materials compositionally to tailor specific properties of both these materials into a single component. Specific compositions of the candidate materials (SS 316, Inconel 625 and Ti64) were blended and deposited to study the brittle intermetallics reported in these systems. 2. High entropy alloys: These are multi- component alloys with equiatomic compositions of 5 or more elements. The ratio of Al to Ni was decreased to observe the transition of solid solution from a BCC to an FCC crystal structure in the AlFeCoCrNi system. 3. Structurally amorphous alloys: Zr-based metallic glasses have been reported to have high glass forming ability. These alloys have been laser deposited so as to rapidly cool them from the melt into an amorphous state. Microstructural analysis and X-ray diffraction were used to study the phase formation, and hardness was measured to estimate the mechanical properties.

  5. Mathematical modelling of the laser processing of compose materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gromyko, G.F.; Matsuka, N.P.

    2009-01-01

    Expansion of the protective coating scope led to the necessity to work out lower priced methods of treatment of machine elements. Making of an adequate, agreed with process features, mathematical model and development of effective methods of its solving are promising directions in this fields. In this paper the mathematical model of high-temperature laser treatment via moving source of pre-sprayed with composite powder padding is developed. Presented model describes accurately enough the heat processes taking place by laser processing of machine elements. Varying input parameters of model (laser power, temperature and composition of environment, characteristics and quantitative composition of using materials, etc.) one can get a cheap tool of preliminary estimates for wide range of similar problems. Difference method, based on process physical features and taking into account main process-dependent parameters had been developed for solving of the built system of nonlinear equations. (authors)

  6. Material model validation for laser shock peening process simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amarchinta, H K; Grandhi, R V; Langer, K; Stargel, D S

    2009-01-01

    Advanced mechanical surface enhancement techniques have been used successfully to increase the fatigue life of metallic components. These techniques impart deep compressive residual stresses into the component to counter potentially damage-inducing tensile stresses generated under service loading. Laser shock peening (LSP) is an advanced mechanical surface enhancement technique used predominantly in the aircraft industry. To reduce costs and make the technique available on a large-scale basis for industrial applications, simulation of the LSP process is required. Accurate simulation of the LSP process is a challenging task, because the process has many parameters such as laser spot size, pressure profile and material model that must be precisely determined. This work focuses on investigating the appropriate material model that could be used in simulation and design. In the LSP process material is subjected to strain rates of 10 6  s −1 , which is very high compared with conventional strain rates. The importance of an accurate material model increases because the material behaves significantly different at such high strain rates. This work investigates the effect of multiple nonlinear material models for representing the elastic–plastic behavior of materials. Elastic perfectly plastic, Johnson–Cook and Zerilli–Armstrong models are used, and the performance of each model is compared with available experimental results

  7. Adjustment of Part Properties for an Elastomeric Laser Sintering Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, A.; Ünlü, T.

    2018-03-01

    Laser sintering of polymers is gaining more and more importance within the field of small series productions. Polyamide 12 is predominantly used, although a variety of other materials are also available for the laser sintering process. For example, elastomeric, rubberlike materials offer very different part property profiles. Those make the production of flexible parts like, e.g., sealings, flexible tubes or shoe soles possible because they offer high part ductility and low hardness. At the chair for manufacturing technology, a new elastomeric laser sintering material has been developed and then commercialized by a spin-off from university. The aim of the presented study was the analysis of the new material's properties. Proof was found that Shore hardness can be modified by varying the parameter settings. Therefore, the correlation between process parameters, energy input, Shore hardness and other part properties like mechanical properties were analyzed. Based on these results, suitable parameter settings were established which lead to the possibility of producing parts with different Shore hardnesses.

  8. UV laser engraving of high temperature polymeric materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, D.; Laude, L.D.; Kolev, K.; Hanus, F.

    1999-01-01

    Among emerging technologies, those associated with laser sources as surface processing tools are quite promising. In the present work, a UV pulsed (excimer) laser source is experimented for engraving (or ablating) polymeric materials based on three high temperature polymers: polyethylene terephtalate (PET), polyethersulfone (PES) and polyphenylene sulfide (PPS). The ablation phenomenon is demonstrated on all these polymers and evaluated by stylus profilometry upon varying the laser fluence at impact. For each polymer, results give evidence for three characteristic quantities: an ablation threshold E sub 0, a maximum ablation depth per pulse z sub 0 and an initial rate of ablation α, just above threshold. A simple ablation model is presented which describes correctly the observed behaviours and associates closely the above quantities to the polymer formulation, thus providing for the first time a rational basis to polymer ablation. The model may be extended to parent plastic materials whenever containing the same polymers. It may also be used to predict the behaviours of other polymers when subjected to excimer laser irradiation

  9. [INVITED] Computational intelligence for smart laser materials processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casalino, Giuseppe

    2018-03-01

    Computational intelligence (CI) involves using a computer algorithm to capture hidden knowledge from data and to use them for training ;intelligent machine; to make complex decisions without human intervention. As simulation is becoming more prevalent from design and planning to manufacturing and operations, laser material processing can also benefit from computer generating knowledge through soft computing. This work is a review of the state-of-the-art on the methodology and applications of CI in laser materials processing (LMP), which is nowadays receiving increasing interest from world class manufacturers and 4.0 industry. The focus is on the methods that have been proven effective and robust in solving several problems in welding, cutting, drilling, surface treating and additive manufacturing using the laser beam. After a basic description of the most common computational intelligences employed in manufacturing, four sections, namely, laser joining, machining, surface, and additive covered the most recent applications in the already extensive literature regarding the CI in LMP. Eventually, emerging trends and future challenges were identified and discussed.

  10. Contribution to the beam plasma material interactions during material processing with TEA CO2 laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaschek, Rainer; Konrad, Peter E.; Mayerhofer, Roland; Bergmann, Hans W.; Bickel, Peter G.; Kowalewicz, Roland; Kuttenberger, Alfred; Christiansen, Jens

    1995-03-01

    The TEA-CO2-laser (transversely excited atmospheric pressure) is a tool for the pulsed processing of materials with peak power densities up to 1010 W/cm2 and a FWHM of 70 ns. The interaction between the laser beam, the surface of the work piece and the surrounding atmosphere as well as gas pressure and the formation of an induced plasma influences the response of the target. It was found that depending on the power density and the atmosphere the response can take two forms. (1) No target modification due to optical break through of the atmosphere and therefore shielding of the target (air pressure above 10 mbar, depending on the material). (2) Processing of materials (air pressure below 10 mbar, depending on the material) with melting of metallic surfaces (power density above 0.5 109 W/cm2), hole formation (power density of 5 109 W/cm2) and shock hardening (power density of 3.5 1010 W/cm2). All those phenomena are usually linked with the occurrence of laser supported combustion waves and laser supported detonation waves, respectively for which the mechanism is still not completely understood. The present paper shows how short time photography and spatial and temporal resolved spectroscopy can be used to better understand the various processes that occur during laser beam interaction. The spectra of titanium and aluminum are observed and correlated with the modification of the target. If the power density is high enough and the gas pressure above a material and gas composition specific threshold, the plasma radiation shows only spectral lines of the background atmosphere. If the gas pressure is below this threshold, a modification of the target surface (melting, evaporation and solid state transformation) with TEA-CO2- laser pulses is possible and the material specific spectra is observed. In some cases spatial and temporal resolved spectroscopy of a plasma allows the calculation of electron temperatures by comparison of two spectral lines.

  11. Laser materials processing as manufacturing technology; Seisan gijutsu to shite no laser kako

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyamoto, I. [Osaka University, Osaka (Japan)

    1998-11-01

    This paper describes the laser material processing. Laser is artificial light that uses the amplification based on the induced emission of light. It is very excellent in directivity and monochromaticity. The high power density and concentration characteristics of laser enable a variety of high-performance processing such as junction, removal, reforming, and addition. Excellent controllability (that facilitates the automated processing), transmission performance (the processing by energy transmission in long range space is most suitable for laser), and non-contact processing (that contains no wearing, noise, and contamination) are great advantages that the existing processing method does not have. In the wide wavelength area between ultraviolet and infrared areas, the laser that can be used for material processing is very wide over the range of the continuous oscillation to the ultra short pulse of a nanosecond order. The thermal processing accompanied by melting and evaporation as well as the non-thermal processing (quantum processing) by a photochemical reaction is also available as the type of processing. The processing used for manufacturing technology is almost thermal processing including removal, junction, reforming, and addition. The thermal processing covers the range of electronics to heavy industry. 29 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Surface Thermometry of Energetic Materials by Laser-Induced Fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-09-01

    at 34 yttrium- aluminum -garnet (Dy:YAG). The simplified energy diagram of Dy:YAG is shown in Fig. 1. Absorbed laser light (at 355 nrm) can 5 excite the...the thermometric technique on a surface similar to that of an energetic material, a thermal-setting plastic supplied by Buehler, Ltd., was employed...temperature over the temperature range of interest. The rare-earth ion dysprosium (Dy) doped into a yttrium- aluminum -garnet (YAG) crystal was I determined

  13. Influence of Nd-Doping on Photocatalytic Properties of TiO2 Nanoparticles and Thin Film Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian Wojcieszak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural, optical, and photocatalytic properties of TiO2 and TiO2:Nd nanopowders and thin films composed of those materials have been compared. Titania nanoparticles with 1, 3, and 6 at. % of Nd-dopant were synthesized by sol-gel method. Additionally, thin films with the same material composition were prepared with the aid of spin-coating method. The analysis of structural investigations revealed that all as-prepared nanopowders were nanocrystalline and had TiO2-anatase structure. The average size of crystallites was ca. 4-5 nm and the correlation between the amount of neodymium and the size of TiO2 crystallites was observed. It was shown that the dopant content influenced the agglomeration of the nanoparticles. The results of photocatalytic decomposition of MO showed that doping with Nd (especially in the amount of 3 at. % increased self-cleaning activity of the prepared titania nanopowder. Similar effect was received in case of the thin films, but the decomposition rate was lower due to their smaller active surface area. However, the as-prepared TiO2:Nd photocatalyst in the form of thin films or nanopowders seems to be a very attractive material for various applications.

  14. Ultrafast Bessel beams: advanced tools for laser materials processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoian, Razvan; Bhuyan, Manoj K.; Zhang, Guodong; Cheng, Guanghua; Meyer, Remy; Courvoisier, Francois

    2018-05-01

    Ultrafast Bessel beams demonstrate a significant capacity of structuring transparent materials with a high degree of accuracy and exceptional aspect ratio. The ability to localize energy on the nanometer scale (bypassing the 100-nm milestone) makes them ideal tools for advanced laser nanoscale processing on surfaces and in the bulk. This allows to generate and combine micron and nano-sized features into hybrid structures that show novel functionalities. Their high aspect ratio and the accurate location can equally drive an efficient material modification and processing strategy on large dimensions. We review, here, the main concepts of generating and using Bessel non-diffractive beams and their remarkable features, discuss general characteristics of their interaction with matter in ablation and material modification regimes, and advocate their use for obtaining hybrid micro and nanoscale structures in two and three dimensions (2D and 3D) performing complex functions. High-throughput applications are indicated. The example list ranges from surface nanostructuring and laser cutting to ultrafast laser welding and the fabrication of 3D photonic systems embedded in the volume.

  15. Investigation of residual stress in laser welding dissimilar materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirim, Denilson de Camargo; Oliveira, Rene Ramos de; Berretta, Jose Roberto; Rossi, Wagner de; Lima, Nelson Batista de; Delijaicov, Sergio; Gomes, Diego Oliva

    2010-01-01

    One of the most critical problems found in the different materials welding is the residual stress formation, that happens mainly for the fact of those materials they possess coefficients of thermal expansion and different thermal conductivities. Like this in this work the residual tension was evaluated in the technique of welding laser among the steel low carbon, AISI 1010 and AISI 304. The materials were united for it welds autogenous of top with a laser of continuous Nd:YAG in that they were varied the potency, speed and the focus of the laser stayed constant in relation to surface of the sample. The main objective of the study went identification and to analysis of the residual stress in HAZ on both sides of seem. Um planning factorial of two factors at two levels each it was executed for optimization the combination of the factors potency and speed. The obtained answers were the residual stress in different depths in HAZ. In the surface of the sample measures of residual stress were accomplished by the technique of X-ray diffraction. The hole drilling strain gage method it was applied to measure the residual stress on both sides of the union. The results were analyzed using the variance analysis and the statistical regression based on the different influences of the entrance and combination of the factors in the residual stress generated in that union. The results indicate that the development of models can foresee the answers satisfactorily. (author)

  16. Computational simulation of heat transfer in laser melted material flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shankar, V.; Gnanamuthu, D.

    1986-01-01

    A computational procedure has been developed to study the heat transfer process in laser-melted material flow associated with surface heat treatment of metallic alloys to improve wear-and-tear and corrosion resistance. The time-dependent incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved, accounting for both convective and conductive heat transfer processes. The convection, induced by surface tension and high surface temperature gradients, sets up a counterrotating vortex flow within the molten pool. This recirculating material flow is responsible for determining the molten pool shape and the associated cooling rates which affect the solidifying material composition. The numerical method involves an implicit triple-approximate factorization scheme for the energy equation, and an explicit treatment for the momentum and the continuity equations. An experimental setup, using a continuous wave CO 2 laser beam as a heat source, has been carried out to generate data for validation of the computational model. Results in terms of the depth, width, and shape of the molten pool and the heat-affected zone for various power settings and shapes of the laser, and for various travel speeds of the workpiece, compare very well with experimental data. The presence of the surface tension-induced vortex flow is demonstrated

  17. Laser cutting of laminated sheet material: a modeling exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaf, Roelof F.; Meijer, Johan

    1997-08-01

    Laser cutting has been investigated for a number of aluminum-synthetic laminates, newly developed materials for the aeronautic and automotive industry. The materials consist of alternating aluminum and synthetic layers. It is shown that these materials can be cut at rates comparable to those of homogeneous aluminum alloys. The cuts show little dross attachment. Also some damage on the synthetic layers has to be accepted. These results initiated a modeling exercise, which resulted in a numerical simulation code. The applied cutting model is based on describing the material in several horizontal layers, each with its own specific thermophysical and optical properties. The separate layers are coupled by known mass, energy and force balanced equations.

  18. Perovskite Materials for Light-Emitting Diodes and Lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldhuis, Sjoerd A; Boix, Pablo P; Yantara, Natalia; Li, Mingjie; Sum, Tze Chien; Mathews, Nripan; Mhaisalkar, Subodh G

    2016-08-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites have cemented their position as an exceptional class of optoelectronic materials thanks to record photovoltaic efficiencies of 22.1%, as well as promising demonstrations of light-emitting diodes, lasers, and light-emitting transistors. Perovskite materials with photoluminescence quantum yields close to 100% and perovskite light-emitting diodes with external quantum efficiencies of 8% and current efficiencies of 43 cd A(-1) have been achieved. Although perovskite light-emitting devices are yet to become industrially relevant, in merely two years these devices have achieved the brightness and efficiencies that organic light-emitting diodes accomplished in two decades. Further advances will rely decisively on the multitude of compositional, structural variants that enable the formation of lower-dimensionality layered and three-dimensional perovskites, nanostructures, charge-transport materials, and device processing with architectural innovations. Here, the rapid advancements in perovskite light-emitting devices and lasers are reviewed. The key challenges in materials development, device fabrication, operational stability are addressed, and an outlook is presented that will address market viability of perovskite light-emitting devices. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Laser-solid interaction and dynamics of the laser-ablated materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, K.R.; Leboeuf, J.N.; Geohegan, D.B.; Wood, R.F.; Donato, J.M.; Liu, C.L.; Puretzky, A.A.

    1995-01-01

    Rapid transformations through the liquid and vapor phases induced by laser-solid interactions are described by the authors' thermal model with the Clausius-Clapeyron equation to determine the vaporization temperature under different surface pressure condition. Hydrodynamic behavior of the vapor during and after ablation is described by gas dynamic equations. These two models are coupled. Modeling results show that lower background pressure results lower laser energy density threshold for vaporization. The ablation rate and the amount of materials removed are proportional to the laser energy density above its threshold. The authors also demonstrate a dynamic source effect that accelerates the unsteady expansion of laser-ablated material in the direction perpendicular to the solid. A dynamic partial ionization effect is studied as well. A self-similar theory shows that the maximum expansion velocity is proportional to c s α, where 1 - α is the slope of the velocity profile. Numerical hydrodynamic modeling is in good agreement with the theory. With these effects, α is reduced. Therefore, the expansion front velocity is significantly higher than that from conventional models. The results are consistent with experiments. They further study how the plume propagates in high background gas condition. Under appropriate conditions, the plume is slowed down, separates with the background, is backward moving, and hits the solid surface. Then, it splits into two parts when it rebounds from the surface. The results from the modeling will be compared with experimental observations where possible

  20. Ultrafast dynamic ellipsometry and spectroscopy of laser shocked materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcgrane, Shawn David [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bolme, Cindy B [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Whitley, Von H [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Moore, David S [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Shock waves create extreme states of matter with very high pressures, temperatures, and volumetric compressions, at an exceedingly rapid rate of change. We review how to use a beamsplitter and a note card to turn a typical chirp pulse amplified femtosecond laser system into an ultrafast shock dynamics machine. Open scientific questions that can be addressed with such an apparatus are described. We report on the development of several single shot time resolved diagnostics needed to answer these questions. These single shot diagnostics are expected to be broadly applicable to other types of laser ablation experiments. Experimental results measured from shocked material dynamics of several systems are detailed. Finally, we report on progress towards using transient absorption as a measure of electronic excitation and coherent Raman as a picosecond probe of temperature in shock compressed condensed matter.

  1. Secondary emissions during fiber laser cutting of nuclear material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, A., E-mail: beatriz.mendes.lopez@gmail.com [IDMEC, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisboa (Portugal); Assunção, E. [IDMEC, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisboa (Portugal); European Federation for Welding, Joining and Cutting, Porto Salvo 2740-120 (Portugal); Pires, I. [IDMEC, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisboa (Portugal); Quintino, L. [IDMEC, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisboa (Portugal); European Federation for Welding, Joining and Cutting, Porto Salvo 2740-120 (Portugal)

    2017-04-15

    The laser process has been studied for dismantling work for more than 10 years, however there is almost no data available concerning secondary emissions generated during the process. These emissions are inevitable during the laser cutting process and can have detrimental effects in human health and in the equipment. In terms of safety, for nuclear decommissioning, is crucial to point out ways of controlling the emissions of the process. This paper gives indications about the parameters to be used in order to reduce these secondary emissions and about the influence of these parameters on the particles size distribution. In general, for producing minimal dross and fume emissions the beam focus should be placed on the surface of the material. The higher percentage of secondary emissions which present higher diameter, increases approximately linearly with the stand-off distance and with the use of low air pressure.

  2. Development of Cr,Nd:GSGG laser as a pumping source of Ti:sapphire laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, Koji; Arisawa, Takashi

    1999-08-01

    Since efficiency of Cr,Nd doped gadolinium scandium gallium garnet (GSGG) laser is in principle higher than that of Nd:YAG laser, it can be a highly efficient pumping source for Ti:sapphire laser. We have made GSGG laser, and measured its oscillation properties. It was two times more efficient than Nd:YAG laser at free running mode operation. At Q-switched mode operation, fundamental output of 50 mJ and second harmonics output of 8 mJ were obtained. The developed laser had appropriate spatial profile, temporal duration, long time stability for solid laser pumping. Ti:sapphire laser oscillation was achieved by the second harmonics of GSGG laser. (author)

  3. Laser Spectroscopy Characterization of Materials for Frequency Agile Solid State Laser Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-03-15

    Received 30 November 1987; revised manuscript received 29 January 1988) Single crystals of lanthanum lutetium gallium garnet (LaLuGaG) were grown by...group may be realized it gar- dleternte itf other materials can be found with spectral nets formed with lanthanum occupying tile dodecaliedrial ,1nl...array-pumped Nd: YAG and Nd: Lu: YAG lasers," Opt. inates and gallates with the malilite structure," in Tunable Lett. 14, 116-118 (1989). Solid State

  4. Functionally Graded Materials by Laser Metal Deposition (PREPRINT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    composition of Fe-82 wt% V (powder-1) and Inconel - 625 (powder-2) powders are listed in Table 1. The substrate materials used for the experiment were cold...like laser power, travel speed and powder feed rate is yet to be determined to obtain a successful FGM. Inconel - 625 deposits showed macro-cracks...Composition (wt%) Powder-1: Fe-82 wt% V V (82), Al (0.68), Si (0.9), C (0.07), S (0.01), P (0.02), Fe (18) Powder-2: Inconel - 625 Ni (58), Cr (20-23

  5. Fiber Laser Welding Properties of Copper Materials for Secondary Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Tae YOU

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Secondary battery is composed of four main elements: cathodes, anodes, membranes and electrolyte. The cathodes and the anodes are connected to the poles that allow input and output of the current generated while the battery is being charged or discharged. In this study laser welding is conducted for 40 sheets of pure copper material with thickness of 38μm, which are used in currently manufactured lithium-ion batteries, using pulse-wave fiber laser to compare welded joint to standard bolt joint and to determine optimum process parameters. The parameters, which has significant impact on penetration of the pulse waveform laser to the overlapped thin sheets, is the peak power while the size of the weld zone is mainly affected by the pulse irradiation time and the focal position. It is confirmed that overlapping rate is affected by the pulse repetition rate rather than by the pulse irradiation time. At the cross-section of the weld zone, even with the increased peak power, the width of the front bead weld size does not change significantly, but the cross-sectional area becomes larger. This is because the energy density per pulse increases as the peak power increases.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.23.4.16316

  6. An international interdisciplinary graduate school in laser and material science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fargin, Evelyne; Sarger, Laurent; Kaluza, Malte; Nolte, Stefan; Richardson, Martin; Richardson, Kathleen

    2009-06-01

    The main objective is to establish the first transatlantic Graduate School, proposing a truly international education, training and research platform in the field of Photonics and Material sciences. The wide scope of Photonics encompasses many application fields that will be mostly covered by various curricula involving Laser Optics and Material Sciences and Interactions. This cooperation will build a very efficient scientific international community able to address the 21 century challenges in Photonics and applications. Indeed, the highest level of education, namely Master and PhD , will address the so called "Skill shortage" that impact on our economy. The truly interdisciplinary theme of this graduate school is also a guarantee for the insertion of the graduate into the workforce.

  7. Pulsed laser photoacoustic spectrometer for study of solid materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, N.D.; Kartha, V.B.

    1991-01-01

    The technique of photoacoustic spectroscopy has wide applications bacause it is extremely sensitive, and can be used to obtain spectra in wide spectral range for solids, liquids, gases, solutions, crystals etc. which may be usually difficult by conventional methods. For studying a variety of materials, a pulsed laser photoacoustic spectrometer has been set up in the laboratory. The report discusses the design and performance of the instrument. Some of the spectra of materials like Nd 2 O 9 powder, Nd-YAG crystal, CoCl 2 6H 2 O etc. are shown. A detailed discussion on assignment of the spectra of Nd-YAG is also presented. (author). 4 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  8. New infrared solid state laser materials for CALIOPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeLoach, L.D.; Page, R.H.; Wilke, G.D.

    1994-01-01

    Tunable infrared laser light may serve as a useful means by which to detect the presence of the targeted effluents. Since optical parametric oscillators (OPOs) have proven to be a versatile method of generating coherent light from the ultraviolet to the mid-infrared, this technology is a promising choice by which to service the CALIOPE applications. In addition, since some uncertainty remains regarding the precise wavelengths and molecules that will be targeted, the deployment of OPOs retains the greatest amount of wavelength flexibility. Another approach that the authors are considering is that of generating tunable infrared radiation directly with a diode-pumped solid state laser (DPSSL). One important advantage of a DPSSL is that it offers flexible pulse format modes that can be tailored to meet the needs of a particular application and target molecule. On the other hand, direct generation by a tunable DPSSL will generally be able to cover a more limited wavelength range than is possible with OPO technology. In support of the CALIOPE objectives the authors are exploring the potential for laser action among a class of materials comprised of transition metal-doped zinc chalcogenide crystals (i.e., ZnS, ZnSe and ZnTe). The Cr 2+ , Co 2+ and Ni 2+ dopants were selected as the most favorable candidates, on the basis of their documented spectral properties in the scientific literature. Thus far, the authors have characterized the absorption and emission properties of these ions in the ZnS and ZnSe crystals. The absorption spectra are used to determine the preferred wavelength at which the crystal should be pumped, while the emission spectra reveal the extent of the tuning range potentially offered by the material. In addition, measurements of the emission lifetime as a function of temperature turn out to be quite useful, since this data is suggestive of the room temperature emission yield

  9. Equation of state study of Laser Megajoule capsules ablator materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colin-Lalu, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    This PhD thesis enters the field of inertial confinement fusion studies. In particular, it focuses on the equation of state tables of ablator materials synthesized on LMJ capsules. This work is indeed aims at improving the theoretical models introduced into the equation of state tables. We focused in the Mbar-eV pressure-temperature range because it can be access on kJ-scale laser facilities.In order to achieve this, we used the QEOS model, which is simple to use, configurable, and easily modifiable.First, quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations were performed to generate cold compression curve as well as shock compression curves along the principal Hugoniot. Simulations were compared to QEOS model and showed that atomic bond dissociation has an effect on the compressibility. Results from these simulations are then used to parametrize the Grueneisen parameter in order to generate a tabulated equation of state that includes dissociation. It allowed us to show its influence on shock timing in a hydrodynamic simulation.Second, thermodynamic states along the Hugoniot were measured during three experimental campaigns upon the LULI2000 and GEKKO XII laser facilities. Experimental data confirm QMD simulations.This study was performed on two ablator materials which are an undoped polymer CHO, and a silicon-doped polymer CHOSi. Results showed universal shock compression properties. (author) [fr

  10. Novel Aspects of Materials Processing by Ultrafast Lasers: From Electronic to Biological and Cultural Heritage Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fotakis, C; Zorba, V; Stratakis, E; Athanassiou, A; Tzanetakis, P; Zergioti, I; Papagoglou, D G; Sambani, K; Filippidis, G; Farsari, M; Pouli, V; Bounos, G; Georgiou, S

    2007-01-01

    Materials processing by ultrafast lasers offers several distinct possibilities for micro/nano scale applications. This is due to the unique characteristics of the laser-matter interactions involved, when sub-picosecond pulses are employed. Prospects arising will be discussed in the context of surface and in bulk laser induced modifications. In particular, examples of diverse applications including the development and functionalization of laser engineered surfaces, the laser transfer of biomolecules and the functionalization of 3D structures constructed by three-photon stereolithography will be presented. Furthermore, the removal of molecular substrates by ultrafast laser ablation will be discussed with emphasis placed on assessing the photochemical changes induced in the remaining bulk material. The results indicate that in femtosecond laser processing of organic materials, besides the well acknowledged morphological advantages, a second fundamental factor responsible for its success pertains to the selective chemical effects. This is crucial for the laser cleaning of sensitive painted artworks

  11. Material Processing Opportunites Utilizing a Free Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Alan

    1996-11-01

    Many properties of photocathode-driven Free Electron Lasers (FEL) are extremely attractive for material processing applications. These include: 1) broad-band tunability across the IR and UV spectra which permits wavelength optimization, depth deposition control and utilization of resonance phenomena; 2) picosecond pulse structure with continuous nanosecond spacing for optimum deposition efficiency and minimal collateral damage; 3) high peak and average radiated power for economic processing in quantity; and 4) high brightness for spatially defined energy deposition and intense energy density in small spots. We discuss five areas: polymer, metal and electronic material processing, micromachining and defense applications; where IR or UV material processing will find application if the economics is favorable. Specific examples in the IR and UV, such as surface texturing of polymers for improved look and feel, and anti-microbial food packaging films, which have been demonstrated using UV excimer lamps and lasers, will be given. Unfortunately, although the process utility is readily proven, the power levels and costs of lamps and lasers do not scale to production margins. However, from these examples, application specific cost targets ranging from 0.1=A2/kJ to 10=A2/kJ of delivered radiation at power levels from 10 kW to 500 kW, have been developed and are used to define strawman FEL processing systems. Since =46EL radiation energy extraction from the generating electron beam is typically a few percent, at these high average power levels, economic considerations dictate the use of a superconducting RF accelerator with energy recovery to minimize cavity and beam dump power loss. Such a 1 kW IR FEL, funded by the US Navy, is presently under construction at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. This dual-use device, scheduled to generate first light in late 1997, will test both the viability of high-power FELs for shipboard self-defense against cruise

  12. Development of functional materials by using ultrafast laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimotsuma, Y.; Sakakura, M.; Miura, K.

    2018-01-01

    The polarization-dependent periodic nanostructures inside various materials are successfully induced by ultrafast laser pulses. The periodic nanostructures in various materials can be empirically classified into the following three types: (1) structural deficiency, (2) expanded structure, (3) partial phase separation. Such periodic nanostructures exhibited not only optical anisotropy but also intriguing electric, thermal, and magnetic properties. The formation mechanisms of the periodic nanostructure was interpreted in terms of the interaction between incident light field and the generated electron plasma. Furthermore, the fact that the periodic nanostructures in semiconductors could be formed empirically only if it is indirect bandgap semiconductor materials indicates the stress-dependence of bandgap structure and/or the recombination of the excited electrons are also involved to the nanostructure formation. More recently we have also confirmed that the periodic nanostructures in glass are related to whether a large amount of non-bridged oxygen is present. In the presentation, we demonstrate new possibilities for functionalization of common materials ranging from an eternal 5D optical storage, a polarization imaging, to a thermoelectric conversion, based on the indicated phenomena.

  13. Laser-excited photoluminescence of three-layer GaAs double-heterostructure laser material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nash, F.R.; Dixon, R.W.; Barnes, P.A.; Schumaker, N.E.

    1975-01-01

    The successful fabrication of high-quality DH GaAs lasers from a simplified three-layer structure is reported. A major asset of this structure is the transparency of its final layer to recombination radiation occurring in the active layer, thus permitting the use of nondestructive photoluminescent techniques for material evaluation prior to device fabrication. In the course of photoluminescence investigations on this material the additional important observation has been made that indirect excitation (in which photocarriers are generated in the top ternary layer) has significant advantages over direct excitation (in which photocarriers are generated directly in the active layer). These include (i) the direct measurement of Al concentrations in both upper layers, (ii) the measurements of the minority-carrier diffusion length in the upper layer, (iii) an easily obtained indication of taper in the thickness of the upper layer, and (iv) surprisingly effective excitation of the active layer. By combining direct and indirect excitation it is shown that a clearer understanding of the location and detrimental influences of defects in the GaAs laser structure may be obtained. For example, the width of the region of reduced luminescence associated with many defects is found to be very excitation dependent and is confirmed to arise fr []m reduced active region luminescence. The photoluminescent excitation techniques described should be useful in the study of other heterostructure devices and material systems

  14. High-Tc thin films prepared by laser ablation: material distribution and droplet problem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blank, David H.A.; IJsselsteijn, R.P.J.; IJsselsteijn, R.P.J.; Out, P.G.; Kuiper, H.J.H.; Flokstra, Jakob; Rogalla, Horst

    1992-01-01

    The lateral material distribution of laser-deposited YBa2Cu3O7¿¿ films and the density of droplets coming from the target were studied by varying the laser pulse energy, the laser spot size and the target-to-substrate distance. Silicon wafers at ambient temperature were used as substrates to

  15. Nd:YAG laser in endodontics: filling-material edge bordering on a root channel laser cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belikov, Andrei V.; Sinelnik, Yuri A.; Moroz, Boris T.; Pavlovskaya, Irina V.

    1997-12-01

    For the very first time it is represented a study of filling material edge bordering upon root channel cavity modified with a laser. As a filling material it is used a glass ionomer cement. It is demonstrated that Nd:YAG laser radiation effects on increase of grade of edge bordering on the average of 20 - 30% at temperature rise of no more than 2 - 3 degrees in periodontium area in a period of operation.

  16. Femtosecond laser patterning, synthesis, defect formation, and structural modification of atomic layered materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Jae-Hyuck; Kim, Eunpa; Hwang, David J.

    2016-01-01

    This article summarizes recent research on laser-based processing of twodimensional (2D) atomic layered materials, including graphene and transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs). Ultrafast lasers offer unique processing routes that take advantage of distinct interaction mechanisms with 2D materials to enable extremely localized energy deposition. Experiments have shown that ablative direct patterning of graphene by ultrafast lasers can achieve resolutions of tens of nanometers, as well as single-step pattern transfer. Ultrafast lasers also induce non-thermal excitation mechanisms that are useful for the thinning of TMDCs to tune the 2D material bandgap. Laser-assisted site-specific doping was recently demonstrated where ultrafast laser radiation under ambient air environment could be used for the direct writing of high-quality graphene patterns on insulating substrates. This article concludes with an outlook towards developing further advanced laser processing with scalability, in situ monitoring strategies and potential applications.

  17. Modification of transparent materials with ultrashort laser pulses: What is energetically and mechanically meaningful?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulgakova, Nadezhda M., E-mail: nadezhda.bulgakova@hilase.cz [HiLASE Centre, Institute of Physics ASCR, Za Radnicí 828, 25241 Dolní Břežany (Czech Republic); Institute of Thermophysics SB RAS, 1 Lavrentyev Ave., 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Zhukov, Vladimir P. [Institute of Computational Technologies SB RAS, 6 Lavrentyev Ave., 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State Technical University, 20 Karl Marx Ave., 630073, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Sonina, Svetlana V. [Novosibirsk State University, 1 Koptuga Ave., 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Meshcheryakov, Yuri P. [Design and Technology Branch of Lavrentyev Institute of Hydrodynamics SB RAS, Tereshkovoi street 29, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-21

    A comprehensive analysis of laser-induced modification of bulk glass by single ultrashort laser pulses is presented which is based on combination of optical Maxwell-based modeling with thermoelastoplastic simulations of post-irradiation behavior of matter. A controversial question on free electron density generated inside bulk glass by ultrashort laser pulses in modification regimes is addressed on energy balance grounds. Spatiotemporal dynamics of laser beam propagation in fused silica have been elucidated for the regimes used for direct laser writing in bulk glass. 3D thermoelastoplastic modeling of material relocation dynamics under laser-induced stresses has been performed up to the microsecond timescale when all motions in the material decay. The final modification structure is found to be imprinted into material matrix already at sub-nanosecond timescale. Modeling results agree well with available experimental data on laser light transmission through the sample and the final modification structure.

  18. Numerical analysis of the effects of non-conventional laser beam geometries during laser melting of metallic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safdar, Shakeel; Li, Lin; Sheikh, M A

    2007-01-01

    Laser melting is an important industrial activity encountered in a variety of laser manufacturing processes, e.g. selective laser melting, welding, brazing, soldering, glazing, surface alloying, cladding etc. The majority of these processes are carried out by using either circular or rectangular beams. At present, the melt pool characteristics such as melt pool geometry, thermal gradients and cooling rate are controlled by the variation of laser power, spot size or scanning speed. However, the variations in these parameters are often limited by other processing conditions. Although different laser beam modes and intensity distributions have been studied to improve the process, no other laser beam geometries have been investigated. The effect of laser beam geometry on the laser melting process has received very little attention. This paper presents an investigation of the effects of different beam geometries including circular, rectangular and diamond shapes on laser melting of metallic materials. The finite volume method has been used to simulate the transient effects of a moving beam for laser melting of mild steel (EN-43A) taking into account Marangoni and buoyancy convection. The temperature distribution, melt pool geometry, fluid flow velocities and heating/cooling rates have been calculated. Some of the results have been compared with the experimental data

  19. Nuclear Material Detection by One-Short-Pulse-Laser-Driven Neutron Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favalli, Andrea; Aymond, F.; Bridgewater, Jon S.; Croft, Stephen; Deppert, O.; Devlin, Matthew James; Falk, Katerina; Fernandez, Juan Carlos; Gautier, Donald Cort; Gonzales, Manuel A.; Goodsell, Alison Victoria; Guler, Nevzat; Hamilton, Christopher Eric; Hegelich, Bjorn Manuel; Henzlova, Daniela; Ianakiev, Kiril Dimitrov; Iliev, Metodi; Johnson, Randall Philip; Jung, Daniel; Kleinschmidt, Annika; Koehler, Katrina Elizabeth; Pomerantz, Ishay; Roth, Markus; Santi, Peter Angelo; Shimada, Tsutomu; Swinhoe, Martyn Thomas; Taddeucci, Terry Nicholas; Wurden, Glen Anthony; Palaniyappan, Sasikumar; McCary, E.

    2015-01-01

    Covered in the PowerPoint presentation are the following areas: Motivation and requirements for active interrogation of nuclear material; laser-driven neutron source; neutron diagnostics; active interrogation of nuclear material; and, conclusions, remarks, and future works.

  20. Laser damage study of material of the first wall of target chamber of the future laser Megajoule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubern, Christelle

    1999-01-01

    Study on damage of carbon-like, boron carbide, and stainless steel materials by ultraviolet laser light, has been carried out at CEA/CESTA in France. This work was performed to help designing and dimensioning the target chamber of the future Laser MegaJoule (LMJ) facility to be used for Inertial Confinement Fusion research. The study revealed that depending the laser fluence, the considered materials were ablated in different manners. lt was demonstrated that at low fluence, damage of carbon-like and boron carbide occurs through a thermal-mechanical mechanism resulting in sputtering of material. At higher fluence, damage was driven by a thermal mechanism, dissipating heat inside material until phase change developed. For stainless steel material, failures were the result of heat absorption associated to physical changes only. To explain and validate the proposed mechanisms, theoretical and experimental works were performed and satisfactory results came out. (author) [fr

  1. Computational modelling of Er(3+): Garnet laser materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangler, Lee H.

    1994-01-01

    The Er(3+) ion has attracted a lot of interest for four reasons: (1) Its (4)I(sub 13/2) yields (4)I(sub 15/2) transition lases in the eyesafe region near 1.5 micron; (2) the (4)I(sub 13/2) transition lases near 2.8 micron, an important wavelength for surgical purposes; (3) it displays surprisingly efficient upconversion with lasing observed at 1.7, 1.2, 0.85, 0.56, 0.55, and 0.47 micron following 1.5 micron pumping; and (4) it has absorption bands at 0.96 and 0.81 micron and thus can be diode pumped. However, properties desirable for upconversion reduce the efficiency of 1.5 and 3 micron laser operation and vice versa. Since all of the processes are influenced by the host via the crystal field induced stark splittings in the Er levels, this project undertook modelling of the host influence on the Er lasinng behavior. While growth and measurement of all ten Er(3+) doped garnets is the surest way of identifying hosts which maximize upconversion (or conversly, 1.5 and 3 micron performance), it is also expensive - costing approximately $10,000/material or approximately $100,000 for the materials computationally investigated here. The calculations were performed using a quantum mechanical point charge model developed by Clyde Morrison at Harry Diamond Laboratories. The programs were used to fit the Er:YAG experimental energy levels so that the crystal field parameters, B(sub nm) could be extracted. From these radial factors, rho (sub n) were determined for Er(3+) in garnets. These, in combination with crystal field components, Anm, available from X-ray data, were used to predict energy levels for Er in the other nine garnet hosts. The levels in Er:YAG were fit with an rms error of 12.2/cm over a 22,000/cm range. Predicted levels for two other garnets for which literature values were available had rms errors of less than 17/cm , showing the calculations to be reliable. Based on resonances between pairs of calculated stark levels, the model predicts GSGG as the best host

  2. Chemically modified carbon nanotubes as material enhanced laser desorption ionisation (MELDI) material in protein profiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najam-ul-Haq, M.; Rainer, M.; Schwarzenauer, T.; Huck, C.W.; Bonn, G.K.

    2006-01-01

    Biomarkers play a potential role in the early detection and diagnosis of a disease. Our aim is to derivatize carbon nanotubes for exploration of the differences in human body fluids e.g. serum, through matrix assisted laser desorption ionisation/time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI/TOF-MS) that can be related to disease and subsequently to be employed in the biomarker discovery process. This application we termed as the material enhanced laser desorption ionisation (MELDI). The versatility of this technology is meant to increase the amount of information from biological samples on the protein level, which will have a major impact to serve the cause of diagnostic markers. Serum peptides and proteins are immobilized on derivatized carbon nanotubes, which function as binding material. Protein-loaded suspension is placed on a stainless steel target or buckypaper on aluminum target for direct analysis with MALDI-MS. The elution method to wash the bound proteins from carbon nanotubes was employed to compare with the direct analysis procedure. Elution is carried out by MALDI matrix solution to get them out of the entangled nanotubes, which are difficult to desorb by laser due to the complex nanotube structures. The advantage of these optimized methods compared to the conventional screening methods is the improved sensitivity, selectivity and the short analysis time without prior albumin and immunoglobulin depletion. The comparison of similarly modified diamond and carbon nanotubes exhibit differences in their nature to bind the proteins out of serum due to the differences in their physical characteristics. Infrared (IR) spectroscopy provided hint for the presence of tertiary amine peak at the crucial chemical step of iminodiacetic acid addition to acid chloride functionality on carbon nanotubes. Atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) was utilized to quantitatively measure the copper capacity of these derivatized carbon nanotubes which is a direct measure of capacity of

  3. Temperature response of biological materials to pulsed non-ablative CO2 laser irradiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brugmans, M. J.; Kemper, J.; Gijsbers, G. H.; van der Meulen, F. W.; van Gemert, M. J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents surface temperature responses of various tissue phantoms and in vitro and in vivo biological materials in air to non-ablative pulsed CO2 laser irradiation, measured with a thermocamera. We studied cooling off behavior of the materials after a laser pulse, to come to an

  4. High laser-fluence deposition of organic materials in water ice matrices by ''MAPLE''

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bo Toftmann; Rodrigo, K.; Schou, Jørgen

    2005-01-01

    Matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) is a deposition technique for organic material. Water ice was used as a matrix for the biotechnologically important guest material, polyethylene glycol (PEG), for concentrations from 0.5 to 4 wt.%. The target was irradiated with 6 ns laser pulses...

  5. Physics of Laser Materials Processing Theory and Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Gladush, Gennady G

    2011-01-01

    This book describes the basic mechanisms, theory, simulations and technological aspects of Laser processing techniques. It covers the principles of laser quenching, welding, cutting, alloying, selective sintering, ablation, etc. The main attention is paid to the quantitative description. The diversity and complexity of technological and physical processes is discussed using a unitary approach. The book aims on understanding the cause-and-effect relations in physical processes in Laser technologies. It will help researchers and engineers to improve the existing and develop new Laser machining techniques. The book addresses readers with a certain background in general physics and mathematical analysis: graduate students, researchers and engineers practicing laser applications.

  6. Improve the material absorption of light and enhance the laser tube bending process utilizing laser softening heat treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imhan, Khalil Ibraheem; Baharudin, B. T. H. T.; Zakaria, Azmi; Ismail, Mohd Idris Shah B.; Alsabti, Naseer Mahdi Hadi; Ahmad, Ahmad Kamal

    2018-02-01

    Laser forming is a flexible control process that has a wide spectrum of applications; particularly, laser tube bending. It offers the perfect solution for many industrial fields, such as aerospace, engines, heat exchangers, and air conditioners. A high power pulsed Nd-YAG laser with a maximum average power of 300 W emitting at 1064 nm and fiber-coupled is used to irradiate stainless steel 304 (SS304) tubes of 12.7 mm diameter, 0.6 mm thickness and 70 mm length. Moreover, a motorized rotation stage with a computer controller is employed to hold and rotate the tube. In this paper, an experimental investigation is carried out to improve the laser tube bending process by enhancing the absorption coefficient of the material and the mechanical formability using laser softening heat treatment. The material surface is coated with an oxidization layer; hence, the material absorption of laser light is increased and the temperature rapidly rises. The processing speed is enhanced and the output bending angle is increased to 1.9° with an increment of 70% after the laser softening heat treatment.

  7. High power CO II lasers and their material processing applications at Centre for Advanced Technology, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, A. K.; Paul, C. P.; Rao, B. T.; Kau, R.; Raghu, T.; Mazumdar, J. Dutta; Dayal, R. K.; Mudali, U. Kamachi; Sastikumar, D.; Gandhi, B. K.

    2006-01-01

    We have developed high power transverse flow (TF) CW CO II lasers up to 15kW, a high repetition rate TEA CO II laser of 500Hz, 500W average power and a RF excited fast axial flow CO II laser at the Centre for Advanced Technology and have carried out various material processing applications with these lasers. We observed very little variation of discharge voltage with electrode gap in TF CO II lasers. With optimally modulated laser beam we obtained better results in laser piercing and cutting of titanium and resolidification of 3 16L stainless steel weld-metal for improving intergranular corrosion resistance. We carried out microstructure and phase analysis of laser bent 304 stainless steel sheet and optimum process zones were obtained. We carried out laser cladding of 316L stainless steel and Al-alloy substrates with Mo, WC, and Cr IIC 3 powder to improve their wear characteristics. We developed a laser rapid manufacturing facility and fabricated components of various geometries with minimum surface roughness of 5-7 microns Ra and surface waviness of 45 microns between overlapped layers using Colmonoy-6, 3 16L stainless steel and Inconel powders. Cutting of thick concrete blocks by repeated laser glazing followed by mechanical scrubbing process and drilling holes on a vertical concrete with laser beam incident at an optimum angle allowing molten material to flow out under gravity were also done. Some of these studies are briefly presented here.

  8. Effect analysis of material properties of picosecond laser ablation for ABS/PVC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Y. H.; Ho, C. Y.; Chiou, Y. J.

    2017-06-01

    This paper analytically investigates the picosecond laser ablation of ABS/PVC. Laser-pulsed ablation is a wellestablished tool for polymer. However the ablation mechanism of laser processing for polymer has not been thoroughly understood yet. This study utilized a thermal transport model to analyze the relationship between the ablation rate and laser fluences. This model considered the energy balance at the decomposition interface and Arrhenius law as the ablation mechanisms. The calculated variation of the ablation rate with the logarithm of the laser fluence agrees with the measured data. It is also validated in this work that the variation of the ablation rate with the logarithm of the laser fluence obeys Beer's law for low laser fluences. The effects of material properties and processing parameters on the ablation depth per pulse are also discussed for picosecond laser processing of ABS/PVC.

  9. Selective laser sintering of calcium phosphate materials for orthopedic implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Goonhee

    Two technologies, Solid Freeform Fabrication (SFF) and bioceramics are combined in this work to prepare bone replacement implants with complex geometry. SFF has emerged as a crucial technique for rapid prototyping in the last decade. Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) is one of the established SFF manufacturing processes that can build three-dimensional objects directly from computer models without part-specific tooling or human intervention. Meanwhile, there have been great efforts to develop implantable materials that can assist in regeneration of bone defects and injuries. However, little attention has been focused in shaping bones from these materials. The main thrust of this research was to develop a process that can combine those two separate efforts. The specific objective of this research is to develop a process that can construct bone replacement material of complex geometry from synthetic calcium phosphate materials by using the SLS process. The achievement of this goal can have a significant impact on the quality of health care in the sense that complete custom-fit bone and tooth structures suitable for implantation can be prepared within 24--48 hours of receipt of geometric information obtained either from patient Computed Tomographic (CT) data, from Computer Aided Design (CAD) software or from other imaging systems such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Holographic Laser Range Imaging (HLRI). In this research, two different processes have been developed. First is the SLS fabrication of porous bone implants. In this effort, systematic procedures have been established and calcium phosphate implants were successfully fabricated from various sources of geometric information. These efforts include material selection and preparation, SLS process parameter optimization, and development of post-processing techniques within the 48-hour time frame. Post-processing allows accurate control of geometry and of the chemistry of calcium phosphate, as well as

  10. New pulsed YAG laser performances in cutting thick metallic materials for nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfille, J.P.; Prunele, D. de; Pilot, G.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the capacities of the pulsed YAG laser thick cutting on metallic material and to compare with the CO 2 laser capacities. Stainless steel (304L) cutting tests were made in air and underwater using CO 2 and YAG lasers. A performance assessment was made for each laser and the wastes produced in the cutting operation were measured and the gases and the aerosols analyzed. The results show that the pulsed YAG laser is high performance tool for thick cutting and particularly attractive for nuclear applications

  11. Neodymium-doped phosphate fiber lasers with an all-solid microstructured inner cladding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guang; Zhou, Qinling; Yu, Chunlei; Hu, Lili; Chen, Danping

    2012-06-15

    We report on high-power fiber lasers based on index-guiding, all-solid neodymium-doped (Nd-doped) phosphate photonic crystal fiber (PCF) with a hexagonal-shaped inner cladding. The optimum fiber laser with a 36 cm length active fiber, generated up to 7.92 W output power at 1053 nm, which benefited from a high absorption coefficient for pump power due to its noncircular inner cladding. The guiding properties of the all-solid PCF were also investigated. A stable mode with a donut-shaped profile and a power-dependent laser beam quality have been observed experimentally and analyzed.

  12. Influence of intensity fluctuations on laser damage in optical materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koldunov, M.F.; Manenkov, A.A.; Pocotilo, I.L.

    1995-01-01

    A study is reported of the influence of temporal fluctuations of laser radiation on the development of thermal explosion of absorbing inclusions and on the statistical properties of the laser induced damage in transparent dielectrics. A fluctuation time scale in which the fluctuations affect the thermal explosion of inclusions is established. An analysis is made of the conditions ensuring control of temporal fluctuations of laser radiation so as to eliminate their influence on the experimental statistical relationships governing laser damage associated with the distribution of absorbing inclusions in the bulk and on the surface of a sample

  13. Measurement of product of solid state laser materials by an ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this method a microchip laser is formed by keeping a small piece of the sample in plane–plane resonator and a diode laser (808 nm) is used for pumping. The pump power induced thermal lensing effect is used to make the cavity stable. The cavity mode area is estimated by measuring the thermal lens focal length at the ...

  14. Research progress of VO2 thin film as laser protecting material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhiwei; Lu, Yuan; Hou, Dianxin

    2018-03-01

    With the development of laser technology, the battlefield threat of directional laser weapons is becoming more and more serious. The blinding and destruction caused by laser weapons on the photoelectric equipment is an important part of the current photo-electronic warfare. The research on the defense technology of directional laser weapons based on the phase transition characteristics of VO2 thin films is an important subject. The researches of VO2 thin films are summarized based on review these points: the preparation methods of VO2 thin films, phase transition mechanism, phase transition temperature regulating, interaction between VO2 thin films and laser, and the application prospect of vo2 thin film as laser protecting material. This paper has some guiding significance for further research on the VO2 thin films in the field of defense directional laser weapons.

  15. Laser Deposition of Polymer Nanocomposite Thin Films and Hard Materials and Their Optical Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-05

    visible light on instruments such as microscope tips and micro- surgical tools. Hard carbon known as diamond-like carbon films produced by pulsed laser ...visible (610 nm) LED source and a supplemental infra-red 980-nm laser diode (for the studies of the upconversion fluorescence). The basic package...5/2013 Final Performance Report 15 Sep 2012- 14 Sep 2013 LASER DEPOSITION OF POLYMER NANOCOMPOSITE THIN FILMS AND HARD MATERIALS AND THEIR OPTICAL

  16. A compact plasma pre-ionized TEA-CO2 laser pulse clipper for material processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasmi, Taieb

    2017-08-01

    An extra-laser cavity CO2-TEA laser pulse clipper using gas breakdown techniques for high spatial resolution material processing and shallow material engraving and drilling processes is presented. Complete extinction of the nitrogen tail, that extends the pulse width, is obtained at pressures from 375 up to 1500 torr for nitrogen and argon gases. Excellent energy stability and pulse repeatability were further enhanced using high voltage assisted preionized plasma gas technique. Experimental data illustrates the direct correlation between laser pulse width and depth of engraving in aluminum and alumina materials.

  17. Enhancing the antibacterial performance of orthopaedic implant materials by fibre laser surface engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chan, Chi-Wai; Carson, Louise; Smith, Graham C.

    2017-01-01

    to the effort on enhancing osseointegration, wear and corrosion resistance of implant materials. In this study, the effects of laser surface treatment on enhancing the antibacterial properties of commercially pure (CP) Ti (Grade 2), Ti6Al4V (Grade 5) and CoCrMo alloy implant materials were studied and compared...... for the first time. Laser surface treatment was performed by a continuous wave (CW) fibre laser with a near-infrared wavelength of 1064 nm in a nitrogen-containing environment. Staphylococcus aureus, commonly implicated in infection associated with orthopaedic implants, was used to investigate the antibacterial...... properties of the laser-treated surfaces. The surface roughness and topography of the laser-treated materials were analysed by a 2D roughness testing and by AFM. The surface morphologies before and after 24 h of bacterial cell culture were captured by SEM, and bacterial viability was determined using live...

  18. A review of low density porous materials used in laser plasma experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Keiji; Musgrave, Christopher S. A.; Nazarov, Wigen

    2018-03-01

    This review describes and categorizes the synthesis and properties of low density porous materials, which are commonly referred to as foams and are utilized for laser plasma experiments. By focusing a high-power laser on a small target composed of these materials, high energy and density states can be produced. In the past decade or so, various new target fabrication techniques have been developed by many laboratories that use high energy lasers and consequently, many publications and reviews followed these developments. However, the emphasis so far has been on targets that did not utilize low density porous materials. This review therefore, attempts to redress this balance and endeavors to review low density materials used in laser plasma experiments in recent years. The emphasis of this review will be on aspects of low density materials that are of relevance to high energy laser plasma experiments. Aspects of low density materials such as densities, elemental compositions, macroscopic structures, nanostructures, and characterization of these materials will be covered. Also, there will be a brief mention of how these aspects affect the results in laser plasma experiments and the constrictions that these requirements put on the fabrication of low density materials relevant to this field. This review is written from the chemists' point of view to aid physicists and the new comers to this field.

  19. Computational simulation of laser heat processing of materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Vijaya; Gnanamuthu, Daniel

    1987-04-01

    A computational model simulating the laser heat treatment of AISI 4140 steel plates with a CW CO2 laser beam has been developed on the basis of the three-dimensional, time-dependent heat equation (subject to the appropriate boundary conditions). The solution method is based on Newton iteration applied to a triple-approximate factorized form of the equation. The method is implicit and time-accurate; the maintenance of time-accuracy in the numerical formulation is noted to be critical for the simulation of finite length workpieces with a finite laser beam dwell time.

  20. Behaviour of alkali halides as materials for optical components of high power lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apostol, D.I.; Mihailescu, N.I.; Ghiordanescu, V.; Nistor, C.L.; Nistor, V.S.; Teodorescu, V.; Voda, M.

    1978-01-01

    The physical phenomena taking place in alkali halides when a CO 2 laser radiation is passing through have been reviewed. A special emphasis has been put on the specific qualities which such materials should have for being used as components for high power lasers. (author)

  1. Use of pre-pulse in laser spot welding of materials with high optical reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mys, Ihor; Geiger, Manfred

    2003-11-01

    Laser micro welding has become a standard manufacturing technique, particularly in industry sectors, such as automotive and aerospace electronics or medical devices, where the requirements for strength, miniaturization and temperature resistance are constantly rising. So far the use of laser micro welding is limited due to the fluctuation of the quality of the welded joints, because the welding results for material with high optical reflection and thermal conductivity, such as copper and copper alloys, depend very strongly on the condition of the material surface. This paper presents investigations on the use of a laser pre-pulse in spot welding of electronic materials with Nd:YAG laser. In order to achieve reproducible joining results two strategies are followed-up. The first one utilizes a reflection-based process control for measuring the reflection during the short pre-pulse. The intensity of the reflected light is used to calculate an appropriated welding pulse power, which corresponds to the measured relative absorption. Adjustment of laser parameters according to the condition of the surface is done in real time before laser main pulse. A second possibility for the stabilization of copper welding is the employment of a short and powerful laser pre-pulse before laser main pulse. This pre-pulse affects the workpiece surface and creates more reproducible absorption conditions for the main pulse, independent from the initial situation on material surface.

  2. Monitoring of laser material processing using machine integrated low-coherence interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunze, Rouwen; König, Niels; Schmitt, Robert

    2017-06-01

    Laser material processing has become an indispensable tool in modern production. With the availability of high power pico- and femtosecond laser sources, laser material processing is advancing into applications, which demand for highest accuracies such as laser micro milling or laser drilling. In order to enable narrow tolerance windows, a closedloop monitoring of the geometrical properties of the processed work piece is essential for achieving a robust manufacturing process. Low coherence interferometry (LCI) is a high-precision measuring principle well-known from surface metrology. In recent years, we demonstrated successful integrations of LCI into several different laser material processing methods. Within this paper, we give an overview about the different machine integration strategies, that always aim at a complete and ideally telecentric integration of the measurement device into the existing beam path of the processing laser. Thus, highly accurate depth measurements within machine coordinates and a subsequent process control and quality assurance are possible. First products using this principle have already found its way to the market, which underlines the potential of this technology for the monitoring of laser material processing.

  3. Dynamics of plasma expansion in the pulsed laser material interaction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    at different ambient gas pressures using an adiabatic expansion model. ... Pulsed laser; plasma expansion; plasma ionization; plume dimension. 1. ...... De A, Shakhatov V A, Pascale De O 2001 Optical emission spectroscopy and modeling of.

  4. Experimental analysis of Nd-YAG laser cutting of sheet materials - A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Amit; Yadava, Vinod

    2018-01-01

    Cutting of sheet material is considered as an important process due to its relevance among products of everyday life such as aircrafts, ships, cars, furniture etc. Among various sheet cutting processes (ASCPs), laser beam cutting is one of the most capable ASCP to create complex geometries with stringent design requirements in difficult-to-cut sheet materials. Based on the recent research work in the area of sheet cutting, it is found that the Nd-YAG laser is used for cutting of sheet material in general and reflective sheet material in particular. This paper reviews the experimental analysis of Nd-YAG laser cutting process, carried out to study the influence of laser cutting parameters on the process performance index. The significance of experimental modeling and different optimization approaches employed by various researchers has also been discussed in this study.

  5. 193nm high power lasers for the wide bandgap material processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Junichi; Kobayashi, Masakazu; Kakizaki, Koji; Oizumi, Hiroaki; Mimura, Toshio; Matsunaga, Takashi; Mizoguchi, Hakaru

    2017-02-01

    Recently infrared laser has faced resolution limit of finer micromachining requirement on especially semiconductor packaging like Fan-Out Wafer Level Package (FO-WLP) and Through Glass Via hole (TGV) which are hard to process with less defect. In this study, we investigated ablation rate with deep ultra violet excimer laser to explore its possibilities of micromachining on organic and glass interposers. These results were observed with a laser microscopy and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). As the ablation rates of both materials were quite affordable value, excimer laser is expected to be put in practical use for mass production.

  6. International laser safety standardization. From the European perspective with an emphasis on materials processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulmeister, K [Div. of Life Sciences, Dept. of Radiation Protection, Oesterreichisches Forschungszentrum Seibersdorf, 2444 Seibersdorf (Austria)

    1997-08-01

    This report reviews international standards relevant to the safety of laser products and laser installations, with an emphasis on the safety of laser materials processing from the European perspective. In the first paragraphs an overview of the international standards organisations, their relative roles and ways of developing new standards is given. In the second part of the report, work currently underway in the respective standards committees is summarised and specific standards dealing with different aspects of laser safety are discussed. An appendix contains a list of standards organised in standards organisations (IEC, ISO and EN). (author)

  7. International laser safety standardization. From the European perspective with an emphasis on materials processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulmeister, K.

    1997-08-01

    This report reviews international standards relevant to the safety of laser products and laser installations, with an emphasis on the safety of laser materials processing from the European perspective. In the first paragraphs an overview of the international standards organisations, their relative roles and ways of developing new standards is given. In the second part of the report, work currently underway in the respective standards committees is summarised and specific standards dealing with different aspects of laser safety are discussed. An appendix contains a list of standards organised in standards organisations IEC, ISO and EN). (author)

  8. Parameters Influence of CO2 Laser on Cutting Quality of Polymer Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Robert Cep; Sarka Malotova; Marek Pagac; Marek Sadilek; Jiri Lichovnik

    2016-01-01

    The article deals with evaluating of the resulting surface state of the three plastic materials and identification of suitable conditions for laser cutting with CO2 tube. As representative were chosen polypropylene, polymethylmethacrylate and polyamide. When cutting these types of materials it could melt eventually their re-sintering. A suitable combination of parameters is possible to achieve of sufficient quality of the cut. The samples were cut at different feed speed and laser power. Then...

  9. Multi-wavelength copper vapour lasers for novel materials processing application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knowles, M.; Foster-Turner, R.; Kearsley, A.; Evans, J.

    1995-01-01

    The copper vapour laser (CVL) is a high average power, short pulse laser with a multi-kilohertz pulse repetition rate. The CVL laser lines (511 nm and 578 nm) combined with the good beam quality and high peak power available from these lasers allow it to operate in a unique parameter space. Consequently, it has demonstrated many unique and advantageous machining characteristics. We have also demonstrated efficient conversion of CVL radiation to other wavelengths using non-linear frequency conversion, dye lasers and Ti:AL 2 O 3 . Output powers of up to 4 W at 255 nm have been achieved by frequency doubling. The frequency doubled CVL is inherently narrow linewidth and frequency locked making it a suitable source for UV photolithography. Slope efficiencies in excess of 25 % have been achieved with CVL pumped Ti:Al 2 O 3 and dye lasers. These laser extend the wavelengths options into the red and infrared regions of the spectrum. The near diffraction limited beams from these tunable lasers can be efficiently frequency doubled into the blue and near UV. The wide range of wavelength options from the CVL enable a wide variety of materials processing and material interactions to be explored. A European consortium for Copper Laser Applications in Manufacture and Production (CLAMP) has been set up under the EUREKA scheme to coordinate the commercial and technical expertise currently available in Europe. (author)

  10. Laser cutting of various materials: Kerf width size analysis and life cycle assessment of cutting process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilbas, Bekir Sami; Shaukat, Mian Mobeen; Ashraf, Farhan

    2017-08-01

    Laser cutting of various materials including Ti-6Al-4V alloy, steel 304, Inconel 625, and alumina is carried out to assess the kerf width size variation along the cut section. The life cycle assessment is carried out to determine the environmental impact of the laser cutting in terms of the material waste during the cutting process. The kerf width size is formulated and predicted using the lump parameter analysis and it is measured from the experiments. The influence of laser output power and laser cutting speed on the kerf width size variation is analyzed using the analytical tools including scanning electron and optical microscopes. In the experiments, high pressure nitrogen assisting gas is used to prevent oxidation reactions in the cutting section. It is found that the kerf width size predicted from the lump parameter analysis agrees well with the experimental data. The kerf width size variation increases with increasing laser output power. However, this behavior reverses with increasing laser cutting speed. The life cycle assessment reveals that material selection for laser cutting is critical for the environmental protection point of view. Inconel 625 contributes the most to the environmental damages; however, recycling of the waste of the laser cutting reduces this contribution.

  11. Toxicological characterization of chemicals produced from laser irradiation of graphite composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwan, J.

    1990-11-01

    One of the major potential hazards associated with laser machining of graphite composite materials is the toxic fumes and gases that are generated. When exposed to the intense energy of the laser beam, the organic polymer matrix of the composite material may decompose into various toxic by-products. To advance the understanding of the laser machining process from a health and safety viewpoint, this particular study consisted of the following steps: collect and analyze gaseous by-products generated during laser machining; collect particulates generated during laser machining and chemically extract them to determine the chemical species that may have absorbed or recondensed onto these particles; and review and evaluate the toxicity of the identified chemical species

  12. Picosecond laser ablation of poly-L-lactide: Effect of crystallinity on the material response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz, Rocio; Quintana, Iban; Etxarri, Jon [Manufacturing Processes Department, Fundacion TEKNIKER, Av. Otaola 20, 20600, Eibar, Guipuzcoa (Spain); Lejardi, Ainhoa; Sarasua, Jose-Ramon [Department of Mining and Metallurgy Engineering and Materials Science, School of Engineering, University of the Basque Country (EHU-UPV), Alameda de Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain)

    2011-11-01

    The picosecond laser ablation of poly-L-lactide (PLLA) as a function of laser fluence and degree of crystallinity was examined. The ablation parameters and the surface modifications were analyzed under various irradiation conditions using laser wavelengths ranging from the ultraviolet through the visible. When processing the amorphous PLLA, both energy threshold and topography varied considerably depending on laser wavelength. Laser irradiation showed a reduction in the energy ablation threshold as the degree of crystallinity increased, probably related to photomechanical effects involved in laser ablation with ultra-short pulses and the lower stress accommodation behavior of semicrystalline polymers. In particular, cooperative chain motions are impeded by the higher degree of crystallinity, showing fragile mechanical behavior and lower energy dissipation. The experimental results on ablation rate versus laser energy showed that UV laser ablation on semicrystalline PLLA was more efficient than the visible ablation, i.e., it exhibits higher etch rates over a wide range of pulse energy conditions. These results were interpreted in terms of photo-thermal and photo-chemical response of polymers as a function of material micro-structure and incident laser wavelength. High quality micro-grooves were produced in amorphous PLLA, reveling the potential of ultra-fast laser processing technique in the field of micro-structuring biocompatible and biodegradable polymers for biomedical applications.

  13. A model for self-defocusing in laser drilling of polymeric materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chong; Quick, Nathaniel R.; Kar, Aravinda

    2008-01-01

    A numerical thermal model is presented for laser microvias drilling in multilayer electronic substrates with Nd:YAG (YAG denotes yttrium aluminum garnet) and CO 2 lasers. Such substrates have different optical properties such as the refractive index and absorption coefficient at these two laser wavelengths, resulting in different drilling mechanisms. Since the skin depth of the polymer is large for both the lasers, volumetric heating is considered in the model. As soon as a small cavity is formed during the drilling process, the concave curvature of the drilling front acts as a concave lens that diverges the incident laser beam. This self-defocusing effect can greatly reduce the drilling speed as predicted by the model. This effect makes the refractive index of the substrate at different wavelengths an important parameter for laser drilling. The model was used to calculate the laser ablation thresholds which were found to be 8 and 56 J/cm 2 for the CO 2 and Nd:YAG lasers respectively. Due to the expulsion of materials because of high internal pressures in the case of Nd:YAG laser microvia drilling, the ablation threshold may be far below the calculated value. A particular laser beam shape, such as pitch fork, was found to drill better holes than the Gaussian beam

  14. Picosecond laser ablation of poly-L-lactide: Effect of crystallinity on the material response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz, Rocio; Quintana, Iban; Etxarri, Jon; Lejardi, Ainhoa; Sarasua, Jose-Ramon

    2011-01-01

    The picosecond laser ablation of poly-L-lactide (PLLA) as a function of laser fluence and degree of crystallinity was examined. The ablation parameters and the surface modifications were analyzed under various irradiation conditions using laser wavelengths ranging from the ultraviolet through the visible. When processing the amorphous PLLA, both energy threshold and topography varied considerably depending on laser wavelength. Laser irradiation showed a reduction in the energy ablation threshold as the degree of crystallinity increased, probably related to photomechanical effects involved in laser ablation with ultra-short pulses and the lower stress accommodation behavior of semicrystalline polymers. In particular, cooperative chain motions are impeded by the higher degree of crystallinity, showing fragile mechanical behavior and lower energy dissipation. The experimental results on ablation rate versus laser energy showed that UV laser ablation on semicrystalline PLLA was more efficient than the visible ablation, i.e., it exhibits higher etch rates over a wide range of pulse energy conditions. These results were interpreted in terms of photo-thermal and photo-chemical response of polymers as a function of material micro-structure and incident laser wavelength. High quality micro-grooves were produced in amorphous PLLA, reveling the potential of ultra-fast laser processing technique in the field of micro-structuring biocompatible and biodegradable polymers for biomedical applications.

  15. Laser Shock Processing of Metallic Materials: Coupling of Laser-Plasma Interaction and Material Behaviour Models for the Assessment of Key Process Issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ocana, J. L.; Morales, M.; Molpeceres, C.; Porro, J. A.

    2010-01-01

    Profiting by the increasing availability of laser sources delivering intensities above 109 W/cm 2 with pulse energies in the range of several Joules and pulse widths in the range of nanoseconds, laser shock processing (LSP) is consolidating as an effective technology for the improvement of surface mechanical and corrosion resistance properties of metals. The main advantage of the laser shock processing technique consists on its capability of inducing a relatively deep compression residual stresses field into metallic alloy pieces allowing an improved mechanical behaviour, explicitly, the life improvement of the treated specimens against wear, crack growth and stress corrosion cracking. Although significant work from the experimental side has been contributed to explore the optimum conditions of application of the treatments and to assess their ultimate capability to provide enhanced mechanical behaviour to work-pieces of typical materials, only limited attempts have been developed in the way of full comprehension and predictive assessment of the characteristic physical processes and material transformations with a specific consideration of real material properties. In the present paper, a review on the physical issues dominating the development of LSP processes from a high intensity laser-matter interaction point of view is presented along with the theoretical and computational methods developed by the authors for their predictive assessment and practical results at laboratory scale on the application of the technique to different materials.

  16. Experimental and Modeling Study of Liquid-Assisted—Laser Beam Micromachining of Smart Ceramic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayur Parmar

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Smart ceramic materials are next generation materials with the inherent intelligence to adapt to change in the external environment. These materials are destined to play an essential role in several critical engineering applications. Machining these materials using traditional machining processes is a challenge. The laser beam micromachining (LBMM process has the potential to machine such smart materials. However, laser machining when performed in air induces high thermal stress on the surface, often leading to crack formation, recast and re-deposition of ablated material, and large heat-affected zones (HAZ. Performing laser beam machining in the presence of a liquid medium could potentially resolve these issues. This research investigates the possibility of using a Liquid Assisted—Laser Beam Micromachining (LA-LBMM process for micromachining smart ceramic materials. Experimental studies are performed to compare the machining quality of laser beam machining process in air and in a liquid medium. The study reveals that the presence of liquid medium helps in controlling the heat-affected zone and the taper angle of the cavity drilled, thereby enhancing the machining quality. Analytical modeling is developed for the prediction of HAZ and cavity diameter both in air and underwater conditions, and the model is capable of predicting the experimental results to within 10% error.

  17. Material Properties of Laser-Welded Thin Silicon Foils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. T. Hessmann

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An extended monocrystalline silicon base foil offers a great opportunity to combine low-cost production with high efficiency silicon solar cells on a large scale. By overcoming the area restriction of ingot-based monocrystalline silicon wafer production, costs could be decreased to thin film solar cell range. The extended monocrystalline silicon base foil consists of several individual thin silicon wafers which are welded together. A comparison of three different approaches to weld 50 μm thin silicon foils is investigated here: (1 laser spot welding with low constant feed speed, (2 laser line welding, and (3 keyhole welding. Cross-sections are prepared and analyzed by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD to reveal changes in the crystal structure at the welding side after laser irradiation. The treatment leads to the appearance of new grains and boundaries. The induced internal stress, using the three different laser welding processes, was investigated by micro-Raman analysis. We conclude that the keyhole welding process is the most favorable to produce thin silicon foils.

  18. Melt pool vorticity in deep penetration laser material welding

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    weld pool has been evaluated in case of high power CO2 laser beam welding. The ... The experiments based on twin or triple spot interaction geometry have also ... while the other one is between the liquid and the solid states of the metal.

  19. Mimicking lizard-like surface structures upon ultrashort laser pulse irradiation of inorganic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermens, U.; Kirner, S. V.; Emonts, C.; Comanns, P.; Skoulas, E.; Mimidis, A.; Mescheder, H.; Winands, K.; Krüger, J.; Stratakis, E.; Bonse, J.

    2017-10-01

    Inorganic materials, such as steel, were functionalized by ultrashort laser pulse irradiation (fs- to ps-range) to modify the surface's wetting behavior. The laser processing was performed by scanning the laser beam across the surface of initially polished flat sample material. A systematic experimental study of the laser processing parameters (peak fluence, scan velocity, line overlap) allowed the identification of different regimes associated with characteristic surface morphologies (laser-induced periodic surface structures, grooves, spikes, etc.). Analyses of the surface using optical as well as scanning electron microscopy revealed morphologies providing the optimum similarity to the natural skin of lizards. For mimicking skin structures of moisture-harvesting lizards towards an optimization of the surface wetting behavior, additionally a two-step laser processing strategy was established for realizing hierarchical microstructures. In this approach, micrometer-scaled capillaries (step 1) were superimposed by a laser-generated regular array of small dimples (step 2). Optical focus variation imaging measurements finally disclosed the three dimensional topography of the laser processed surfaces derived from lizard skin structures. The functionality of these surfaces was analyzed in view of wetting properties.

  20. Laser materials processing of complex components. From reverse engineering via automated beam path generation to short process development cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görgl, R.; Brandstätter, E.

    2016-03-01

    The article presents an overview of what is possible nowadays in the field of laser materials processing. The state of the art in the complete process chain is shown, starting with the generation of a specific components CAD data and continuing with the automated motion path generation for the laser head carried by a CNC or robot system. Application examples from laser welding, laser cladding and additive laser manufacturing are given.

  1. Dynamics expansion of laser produced plasma with different materials in magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabia Qindeel; Noriah Bte Bidin; Yaacob Mat daud [Laser Technology Laboratory, Physics Department, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Skudai 81310, Johor (Malaysia)], E-mail: plasmaqindeel@yahoo.com

    2008-12-01

    The dynamics expansion of the plasma generated by laser ablation of different materials has been investigated. The dynamics and confinement of laser generated plasma plumes are expanding across variable magnetic fields. A Q-switched neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser with 1064 nm, 8 ns pulse width and 0.125 J laser energy was used to generate plasma that was allowed to expand across variable magnetic within 0.1 - 0.8 T. The expansions of laser-produced plasma of different materials are characterized by using constant laser power. CCD video camera was used to visualize and record the activities in the focal region. The plasma plume length, width and area were measured by using Matrox Inpector 2.1 and video Test 0.5 software. Spectrums of plasma beam from different materials are studied via spectrometer. The results show that the plasma generated by aluminum target is the largest than Brass and copper. The optical radiation from laser generated plasma beam spectrums are obtained in the range of UV to visible light.

  2. In situ TEM Raman spectroscopy and laser-based materials modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, F.I., E-mail: fiallen@lbl.gov [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); National Center for Electron Microscopy, Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Kim, E. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Andresen, N.C. [Engineering Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Grigoropoulos, C.P. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Minor, A.M., E-mail: aminor@lbl.gov [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); National Center for Electron Microscopy, Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2017-07-15

    We present a modular assembly that enables both in situ Raman spectroscopy and laser-based materials processing to be performed in a transmission electron microscope. The system comprises a lensed Raman probe mounted inside the microscope column in the specimen plane and a custom specimen holder with a vacuum feedthrough for a tapered optical fiber. The Raman probe incorporates both excitation and collection optics, and localized laser processing is performed using pulsed laser light delivered to the specimen via the tapered optical fiber. Precise positioning of the fiber is achieved using a nanomanipulation stage in combination with simultaneous electron-beam imaging of the tip-to-sample distance. Materials modification is monitored in real time by transmission electron microscopy. First results obtained using the assembly are presented for in situ pulsed laser ablation of MoS{sub 2} combined with Raman spectroscopy, complimented by electron-beam diffraction and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. - Highlights: • Raman spectroscopy and laser-based materials processing in a TEM are demonstrated. • A lensed Raman probe is mounted in the sample chamber for close approach. • Localized laser processing is achieved using a tapered optical fiber. • Raman spectroscopy and pulsed laser ablation of MoS{sub 2} are performed in situ.

  3. In situ TEM Raman spectroscopy and laser-based materials modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, F.I.; Kim, E.; Andresen, N.C.; Grigoropoulos, C.P.; Minor, A.M.

    2017-01-01

    We present a modular assembly that enables both in situ Raman spectroscopy and laser-based materials processing to be performed in a transmission electron microscope. The system comprises a lensed Raman probe mounted inside the microscope column in the specimen plane and a custom specimen holder with a vacuum feedthrough for a tapered optical fiber. The Raman probe incorporates both excitation and collection optics, and localized laser processing is performed using pulsed laser light delivered to the specimen via the tapered optical fiber. Precise positioning of the fiber is achieved using a nanomanipulation stage in combination with simultaneous electron-beam imaging of the tip-to-sample distance. Materials modification is monitored in real time by transmission electron microscopy. First results obtained using the assembly are presented for in situ pulsed laser ablation of MoS_2 combined with Raman spectroscopy, complimented by electron-beam diffraction and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. - Highlights: • Raman spectroscopy and laser-based materials processing in a TEM are demonstrated. • A lensed Raman probe is mounted in the sample chamber for close approach. • Localized laser processing is achieved using a tapered optical fiber. • Raman spectroscopy and pulsed laser ablation of MoS_2 are performed in situ.

  4. Innovation Study for Laser Cutting of Complex Geometries with Paper Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happonen, A.; Stepanov, A.; Piili, H.; Salminen, A.

    Even though technology for laser cutting of paper materials has existed for over 30 years, it seems that results of applications of this technology and possibilities of laser cutting systems are not easily available. The aim of this study was to analyze the feasibility of the complex geometry laser cutting of paper materials and to analyze the innovation challenges and potential of current laser cutting technologies offer. This research studied the potential and possible challenges in applying CO2 laser cutting technology for cutting of paper materials in current supply chains trying to fulfil the changing needs of customer in respect of shape, fast response during rapid delivery cycle. The study is focused on examining and analyzing the different possibilities of laser cutting of paper material in application area of complex low volume geometry cutting. The goal of this case was to analyze the feasibility of the laser cutting from technical, quality and implementation points of view and to discuss availability of new business opportunities. It was noticed that there are new business models still available within laser technology applications in complex geometry cutting. Application of laser technology, in business-to-consume markets, in synergy with Internet service platforms can widen the customer base and offer new value streams for technology and service companies. Because of this, existing markets and competition has to be identified, and appropriate new and innovative business model needs to be developed. And to be competitive in the markets, models like these need to include the earning logic and the stages from production to delivery as discussed in the paper.

  5. Material efficiency of laser metal deposited Ti6Al4V: Effect of laser power

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mahamood, RM

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The economy of using Laser Metal Deposition (LMD) process in the manufacturing of aerospace parts depends on the right processing parameters. LMD is an additive manufacturing technology capable of producing complex parts directly from the CAD model...

  6. A novel laser-based method for controlled crystallization in dental prosthesis materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cam, Peter; Neuenschwander, Beat; Schwaller, Patrick; Köhli, Benjamin; Lüscher, Beat; Senn, Florian; Kounga, Alain; Appert, Christoph

    2015-02-01

    Glass-ceramic materials are increasingly becoming the material of choice in the field of dental prosthetics, as they can feature both high strength and very good aesthetics. It is believed that their color, microstructure and mechanical properties can be tuned such as to achieve an optimal lifelike performance. In order to reach that ultimate perfection a controlled arrangement of amorphous and crystalline phases in the material is required. A phase transformation from amorphous to crystalline is achieved by a heat treatment at defined temperature levels. The traditional approach is to perform the heat treatment in a furnace. This, however, only allows a homogeneous degree of crystallization over the whole volume of the parent glass material. Here a novel approach using a local heat treatment by laser irradiation is presented. To investigate the potential of this approach the crystallization process of SiO2-Li2O-Al2O3-based glass has been studied with laser systems (pulsed and continuous wave) operating at different wavelengths. Our results show the feasibility of gradual and partial crystallization of the base material using continuous laser irradiation. A dental prosthesis machined from an amorphous glassy state can be effectively treated with laser irradiation and crystallized within a confined region of a few millimeters starting from the body surface. Very good aesthetics have been achieved. Preliminary investigation with pulsed nanosecond lasers of a few hundreds nanoseconds pulse width has enabled more refinement of crystallization and possibility to place start of phase change within the material bulk.

  7. Direct diode lasers and their advantages for materials processing and other applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritsche, Haro; Ferrario, Fabio; Koch, Ralf; Kruschke, Bastian; Pahl, Ulrich; Pflueger, Silke; Grohe, Andreas; Gries, Wolfgang; Eibl, Florian; Kohl, Stefanie; Dobler, Michael

    2015-03-01

    The brightness of diode lasers is improving continuously and has recently started to approach the level of some solid state lasers. The main technology drivers over the last decade were improvements of the diode laser output power and divergence, enhanced optical stacking techniques and system design, and most recently dense spectral combining. Power densities at the work piece exceed 1 MW/cm2 with commercially available industrial focus optics. These power densities are sufficient for cutting and welding as well as ablation. Single emitter based diode laser systems further offer the advantage of fast current modulation due their lower drive current compared to diode bars. Direct diode lasers may not be able to compete with other technologies as fiber or CO2-lasers in terms of maximum power or beam quality. But diode lasers offer a range of features that are not possible to implement in a classical laser. We present an overview of those features that will make the direct diode laser a very valuable addition in the near future, especially for the materials processing market. As the brightness of diode lasers is constantly improving, BPP of less than 5mm*mrad have been reported with multikW output power. Especially single emitter-based diode lasers further offer the advantage of very fast current modulation due to their low drive current and therefore low drive voltage. State of the art diode drivers are already demonstrated with pulse durations of direct current control allows pulses of several microseconds with hundreds of watts average power. Spot sizes of less than 100 μm are obtained at the work piece. Such a diode system allows materials processing with a pulse parameter range that is hardly addressed by any other laser system. High productivity material ablation with cost effective lasers is enabled. The wide variety of wavelengths, high brightness, fast power modulation and high efficiency of diode lasers results in a strong pull of existing markets, but

  8. Nano-material size dependent laser-plasma thresholds

    Science.gov (United States)

    EL Sherbini, Ashraf M.; Parigger, Christian G.

    2016-10-01

    The reduction of laser fluence for initiation of plasma was measured for zinc monoxide nanoparticles of diameters in the range of 100 to 20 nm. In a previous work by EL Sherbini and Parigger [Wavelength Dependency and Threshold Measurements for Nanoparticle-enhanced Laser-induced Breakdown Spectroscopy, Spectrochim. Acta Part B 116 (2016) 8-15], the hypothesis of threshold dependence on particle size leads to the interpretation of the experiments for varying excitation wavelengths with fixed, 30 nm nanomaterial. The experimental results presented in this work were obtained with 1064 nm Nd:YAG radiation and confirm and validate the suspected reduction due to quenching of the thermal conduction length to the respective sizes of the nanoparticles.

  9. Effects of chemical kinetics and starting material regeneration on the efficiency of an iodine laser amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisk, G.A.

    1977-05-01

    A model of the chemical kinetics occurring in an iodine laser amplifier is presented and used to calculate the degree to which the starting material is consumed as a result of laser operation. The cost of purchasing new starting material is estimated and shown to be prohibitive. A scheme for regenerating the starting material from the species present in the amplifier after lasing is proposed. It is shown that the estimated efficiency of this chemical regeneration process is appreciably higher than the projected optimum efficiency of the pumping process

  10. Thick film laser induced forward transfer for deposition of thermally and mechanically sensitive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kattamis, Nicholas T.; Purnick, Priscilla E.; Weiss, Ron; Arnold, Craig B.

    2007-01-01

    Laser forward transfer processes incorporating thin absorbing films can be used to deposit robust organic and inorganic materials but the deposition of more delicate materials has remained elusive due to contamination and stress induced during the transfer process. Here, we present the approach to high resolution patterning of sensitive materials by incorporating a thick film polymer absorbing layer that is able to dissipate shock energy through mechanical deformation. Multiple mechanisms for transfer as a function of incident laser energy are observed and we show viable and contamination-free deposition of living mammalian embryonic stem cells

  11. Double-pulse standoff laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for versatile hazardous materials detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottfried, Jennifer L. [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, AMSRD-ARL-WM-BD, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD, 21005-5069 (United States)], E-mail: jennifer.gottfried@arl.army.mil; De Lucia, Frank C.; Munson, Chase A.; Miziolek, Andrzej W. [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, AMSRD-ARL-WM-BD, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD, 21005-5069 (United States)

    2007-12-15

    We have developed a double-pulse standoff laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (ST-LIBS) system capable of detecting a variety of hazardous materials at tens of meters. The use of a double-pulse laser improves the sensitivity and selectivity of ST-LIBS, especially for the detection of energetic materials. In addition to various metallic and plastic materials, the system has been used to detect bulk explosives RDX and Composition-B, explosive residues, biological species such as the anthrax surrogate Bacillus subtilis, and chemical warfare simulants at 20 m. We have also demonstrated the discrimination of explosive residues from various interferents on an aluminum substrate.

  12. Modification induced by laser irradiation on physical features of plastics materials filled with nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scolaro Cristina

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The Thermal Laser Welding (TLW process involves localized heating at the interface of two pieces of plastic that will be joined. Polymeric materials of Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE, both pure and containing nanostructures at different concentrations (titanium and silver nanoparticles, were prepared as thin foils in order to produce an interface between a substrate transparent to the infrared laser wavelength and an highly absorbent substrate, in order to be welded by the laser irradiation. The used diode laser operates at 970 nm wavelength, in continuum, with a maximum energy of 100 mJ, for times of the order of 1 -60 s, with a spot of 300 μm of diameter. The properties of the polymers and of nanocomposite sheets, before and after the laser welding process, were measured in terms of optical characteristics, wetting ability, surface roughness and surface morphology.

  13. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Laser Control & Monitoring in New Materials, Biomedicine, Environment, Security & Defense

    CERN Document Server

    Hall, Trevor J; Paredes, Sofia A; Extreme Photonics & Applications

    2010-01-01

    "Extreme Photonics & Applications" arises from the 2008 NATO Advanced Study Institute in Laser Control & Monitoring in New Materials, Biomedicine, Environment, Security and Defense. Leading experts in the manipulation of light offered by recent advances in laser physics and nanoscience were invited to give lectures in their fields of expertise and participate in discussions on current research, applications and new directions. The sum of their contributions to this book is a primer for the state of scientific knowledge and the issues within the subject of photonics taken to the extreme frontiers: molding light at the ultra-finest scales, which represents the beginning of the end to limitations in optical science for the benefit of 21st Century technological societies. Laser light is an exquisite tool for physical and chemical research. Physicists have recently developed pulsed lasers with such short durations that one laser shot takes the time of one molecular vibration or one electron rotation in an ...

  14. Optimisation Of Cutting Parameters Of Composite Material Laser Cutting Process By Taguchi Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokesh, S.; Niresh, J.; Neelakrishnan, S.; Rahul, S. P. Deepak

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this work is to develop a laser cutting process model that can predict the relationship between the process input parameters and resultant surface roughness, kerf width characteristics. The research conduct is based on the Design of Experiment (DOE) analysis. Response Surface Methodology (RSM) is used in this work. It is one of the most practical and most effective techniques to develop a process model. Even though RSM has been used for the optimization of the laser process, this research investigates laser cutting of materials like Composite wood (veneer)to be best circumstances of laser cutting using RSM process. The input parameters evaluated are focal length, power supply and cutting speed, the output responses being kerf width, surface roughness, temperature. To efficiently optimize and customize the kerf width and surface roughness characteristics, a machine laser cutting process model using Taguchi L9 orthogonal methodology was proposed.

  15. X-ray emission as a potential hazard during ultrashort pulse laser material processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legall, Herbert; Schwanke, Christoph; Pentzien, Simone; Dittmar, Günter; Bonse, Jörn; Krüger, Jörg

    2018-06-01

    In laser machining with ultrashort laser pulses unwanted X-ray radiation in the keV range can be generated when a critical laser intensity is exceeded. Even if the emitted X-ray dose per pulse is low, high laser repetition rates can lead to an accumulation of X-ray doses beyond exposure safety limits. For 925 fs pulse duration at a center wavelength of 1030 nm, the X-ray emission was investigated up to an intensity of 2.6 × 1014 W/cm2. The experiments were performed in air with a thin disk laser at a repetition rate of 400 kHz. X-ray spectra and doses were measured for various planar target materials covering a wide range of the periodic table from aluminum to tungsten. Without radiation shielding, the measured radiation doses at this high repetition rate clearly exceed the regulatory limits. Estimations for an adequate radiation shielding are provided.

  16. Laser Materials Processing Final Report CRADA No. TC-1526-98

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crane, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lehane, C. J. [United Technologies Corp., East Hartford, CT (United States)

    2017-09-08

    This CRADA project was a joint effort between Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and United Technologies Corporation (UTC)/Pratt & Whitney (P&W) to demonstrate process capability for drilling holes in turbine airfoils using LLNL-developed femtosecond laser machining technology. The basis for this development was the ability of femtosecond lasers to drill precision holes in variety of materials with little or no collateral damage. The ultimate objective was to develop a laser machine tool consisting of an extremely advanced femtosecond laser subsystem to be developed by LLNL on a best-effort basis and a drilling station for turbine blades and vanes to be developed by P&W. In addition, P&W was responsible for commercializing the system. The goal of the so called Advanced Laser Drilling (ALD) system was to drill specified complex hole-shapes in turbine blades and vanes with a high degree precision and repeatability and simultaneously capable of very high speed processing.

  17. ToF-SIMS characterization of robust window material for use in diode pumped alkali lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Aaron; Turner, David; Fairchild, Steven; Rice, Christopher; Pitz, Gregory

    2018-03-01

    Developments in diode pumped alkali laser (DPAL) systems have been impeded because of the catastrophic failure of laser windows. The window's failure is caused by localized laser-induced heating of window material. This heating is believed to occur due to increases in absorption on or near the surface of the window. This increase is believed to be caused by either adsorption of carbon-based soot from the collisional gas or by the diffusion of rubidium into the bulk material. The work presented here will focus on the diffusion of Rb into the bulk window materials and will strive to identify a superior material to use as windows. The results of this research indicate that aluminum oxynitride (ALON), sapphire, MgAl2O4 (spinel), and ZrO2 are resistant to alkali-induced changes in optical properties.

  18. Beta dosimetry using pulsed laser heating of TLD materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quam, W.

    1983-01-01

    Use of a pulsed CO 2 laser to heat the surface of hot-pressed LiF chips has been investigated. The thermoluminescent traps in the first 10 to 20 μm of depth may be read out with good efficiency, which will allow entrance dose and exit dose to be determined using a standard chip. These dose data can be used to calculate beta dose and gamma dose separately. Readout speed is estimated to be a few milliseconds per chip

  19. Efficiency of crystalline laser materials based on lanthanides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synek, M.

    1990-01-01

    Lanthanide-based laser-crystal efficiency has been investigated, using the laser-active ions Dy 2+ and Nd 3+ as significant illustrations. Authors' calculations, and various approaches by other authors, are reviewed. In specific examples of treatment, the analytical self-consistent field(SCF) expansion method has been used to calculate accurate ab initio wave functions and energy levels for a number of excited states of Nd 3+ and Dy 2+ , which were investigated for the first time. General group-theoretical principles were considered and the formulae for crystal-field parameters were obtained. The Racah quantum numbers were included in these calculations, in fact showing sizeable energy effects. Oscillator strengths, calculated from the SCF wave functions, revealed which orbitals can be neglected without influencing the transition probability at the fourth significant figure. The relationship to the spectral character of the pumping device was considered. The efficiency parameters (mechanical, economic, and energetic) have to be considered as supplementing the related threshold energy parameter. It would be conceivable to predict the applicability of competing laser systems to a specific task, based on integrated energy pictures. (author). 32 refs., 2 tabs

  20. Pyrolysis responses of kevlar/epoxy composite materials on laser irradiating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei-ping; Wei, Cheng-hua; Zhou, Meng-lian; Ma, Zhi-liang; Song, Ming-ying; Wu, Li-xiong

    2017-05-01

    The pyrolysis responses of kevlar/epoxy composite materials are valuable to study in a case of high temperature rising rate for its widely application. Distinguishing from the Thermal Gravimetric Analysis method, an apparatus is built to research the pyrolysis responses of kevlar/epoxy composite materials irradiated by laser in order to offer a high temperature rising rate of the sample. By deploying the apparatus, a near real-time gas pressure response can be obtained. The sample mass is weighted before laser irradiating and after an experiment finished. Then, the gas products molecular weight and the sample mass loss evolution are derived. It is found that the pressure and mass of the gas products increase with the laser power if it is less than 240W, while the molecular weight varies inversely. The variation tendency is confusing while the laser power is bigger than 240W. It needs more deeper investigations to bring it to light.

  1. Maskless Lithography Using Negative Photoresist Material: Impact of UV Laser Intensity on the Cured Line Width

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Mohammed Ziauddin; Mourad, Abdel-Hamid I.; Khashan, Saud A.

    2018-06-01

    The application of maskless lithography technique on negative photoresist material is investigated in this study. The equipment used in this work is designed and built especially for maskless lithography applications. The UV laser of 405 nm wavelength with 0.85 Numerical Aperture is selected for direct laser writing. All the samples are prepared on a glass substrate. Samples are tested at different UV laser intensities and different stage velocities in order to study the impact on patterned line width. Three cases of spin coated layers of thickness 90 μm, 40 μm, and 28 μm on the substrate are studied. The experimental results show that line width has a generally increasing trend with intensity. However, a decreasing trend was observed for increasing velocity. The overall performance shows that the mr-DWL material is suitable for direct laser writing systems.

  2. Maskless Lithography Using Negative Photoresist Material: Impact of UV Laser Intensity on the Cured Line Width

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Mohammed Ziauddin; Mourad, Abdel-Hamid I.; Khashan, Saud A.

    2018-04-01

    The application of maskless lithography technique on negative photoresist material is investigated in this study. The equipment used in this work is designed and built especially for maskless lithography applications. The UV laser of 405 nm wavelength with 0.85 Numerical Aperture is selected for direct laser writing. All the samples are prepared on a glass substrate. Samples are tested at different UV laser intensities and different stage velocities in order to study the impact on patterned line width. Three cases of spin coated layers of thickness 90 μm, 40 μm, and 28 μm on the substrate are studied. The experimental results show that line width has a generally increasing trend with intensity. However, a decreasing trend was observed for increasing velocity. The overall performance shows that the mr-DWL material is suitable for direct laser writing systems.

  3. Laser materials development by means of a solid-state bonding method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiyama, Akira

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews laser materials development via a bonding method without adhesives. Instead of conventional chemical etching, a dry etching technique using an argon beam has been newly developed for the bonding method. This method meets the requirement for the use of optical materials. We succeeded in the fabrication of a composite laser crystal with good heat conductivity by bonding two kinds of crystals; one is neodymium-doped YVO 4 crystal (Nd:YVO 4 ) and the other is its host crystal YVO 4 . In the comparison of the laser performance between the normal and composite crystal, the composite one shows the good lasing capability of increasing laser output without fracture of the crystal due to thermal stress which appeared in the normal one. (author)

  4. Interaction of a high-power laser pulse with supercritical-density porous materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gus'kov, Sergei Yu; Rozanov, Vladislav B; Caruso, A; Strangio, C

    2000-01-01

    The properties of a nonequilibrium plasma produced by high-power laser pulses with intensities I L ∼ 10 14 -10 15 W cm -2 irradiating plane targets made of a porous material are investigated. The mean density of matter in targets was substantially higher than the critical plasma density corresponding to a plasma resonance. The density of porous material was ρ a ∼ 1 - 20 mg cm -3 , whereas the critical density at the wavelength of incident radiation was ρ cr ∼ 3 mg cm -3 . An anomalously high absorption (no less than 80%) of laser radiation inside a target was observed. Within the first 3 - 4 ns of interaction, the plasma flow through the irradiated target surface in the direction opposite of the direction of the laser beam was noticeably suppressed. Only about 5% of absorbed laser energy was transformed into the energy of particles in this flow during the laser pulse. Absorbed energy was stored as the internal plasma energy at this stage (the greenhouse effect). Then, this energy was transformed, similar to a strong explosion, into the energy of a powerful hydrodynamic flow of matter surrounding the absorption region. The specific features of the formation and evolution of a nonequilibrium laser-produced plasma in porous media are theoretically analysed. This study allows the results of experiments to be explained. In particular, we investigated absorption of laser radiation in the bulk of a target, volume evaporation of porous material, the expansion of a laser-produced plasma inside the pores, stochastic collisions of plasma flows, and hydrothermal energy dissipation. These processes give rise to long-lived oscillations of plasma density and lead to the formation of an internal region where laser radiation is absorbed. (invited paper)

  5. Laser-shocked energetic materials with metal additives: evaluation of detonation performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottfried, Jennifer; Bukowski, Eric

    A focused, nanosecond-pulsed laser with sufficient energy to exceed the breakdown threshold of a material generates a laser-induced plasma with high peak temperatures, pressures, and shock velocities. Depending on the laser parameters and material properties, nanograms to micrograms of material is ablated, atomized, ionized and excited in the laser-induced plasma. The subsequent shock wave expansion into the air above the sample has been monitored using high-speed schlieren imaging in a recently developed technique, laser-induced air shock from energetic materials (LASEM). The estimated detonation velocities using LASEM agree well with published experimental values. A comparison of the measured shock velocities for various energetic materials including RDX, DNTF, and LLM-172 doped with Al or B to the detonation velocities predicted by CHEETAH for inert or active metal participation demonstrates that LASEM has potential for predicting the early time participation of metal additives in detonation events. The LASEM results show that reducing the amount of hydrogen present in B formulations increases the resulting detonation velocities

  6. Effect of complex alloying of powder materials on properties of laser melted surface layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tesker, E.I.; Gur'ev, V.A.; Elistratov, V.S.; Savchenko, A.N.

    2001-01-01

    Quality and properties of laser melted surface layers produced using self-fluxing powder mixture of Ni-Cr-B-Si system and the same powders with enhanced Fe content alloyed with Co, Ti, Nb, Mo have been investigated. Composition of powder material is determined which does not cause of defect formation under laser melting and makes possible to produce a good mechanical and tribological properties of treated surface [ru

  7. Fabrication of a reinforced polymer microstructure using femtosecond laser material processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alubaidy, M; Venkatakrishnan, K; Tan, B

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a new method for the formation of microfeatures with reinforced polymer using femtosecond laser material processing. The femtosecond laser was used for the generation of a three-dimensional interweaved nanofiber and the construction of microfeatures, such as microchannels and voxels, through two-photon polymerization of a nanofiber-dispersed polymer resin. This new method has the potential of direct fabrication of reinforced micro/nanostructures.

  8. Deformation measurements of materials at low temperatures using laser speckle photography method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumio Nakahara; Yukihide Maeda; Kazunori Matsumura; Shigeyoshi Hisada; Takeyoshi Fujita; Kiyoshi Sugihara

    1992-01-01

    The authors observed deformations of several materials during cooling down process from room temperature to liquid nitrogen temperature using the laser speckle photography method. The in-plane displacements were measured by the image plane speckle photography and the out-of-plane displacement gradients by the defocused speckle photography. The results of measurements of in-plane displacement are compared with those of FEM analysis. The applicability of laser speckle photography method to cryogenic engineering are also discussed

  9. Reassembling Solid Materials by Femtosecond Laser Ablation: Case of Aluminum Nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Tohru; Matsuo, Yukari

    2013-06-01

    Through atomization and ionization, we could completely alter the composition of a nonconductive material, aluminum nitride, by femtosecond laser ablation. Preferential production of pure aluminum cluster cations Aln+ (n≤32) reflects not only their higher energetic stability compared with mixed clusters AlnNm+ but also completion of thermal relaxation in ablation plasma. Observation of metastable dissociation of Aln+ indicates that cluster cations have still enough internal energy for dissociation to occur, although the process is much slower than the cluster formation. Almost no cluster formation has been observed after nanosecond laser ablation of aluminum nitride, which highlights the distinct nature of ablation plasma produced by femtosecond laser ablation.

  10. Particularities of interaction of CO sub 2 -laser radiation with oxide materials

    CERN Document Server

    Salikhov, T P

    2002-01-01

    The results of experimental investigation of vapor phase influence on the interaction parameters of the infrared laser radiation with oxide materials (Al sub 2 O sub 3 , ZrO sub 2 , CeO sub 2) have been presented. A phenomenon of laser radiation by the samples investigated under laser heating has been experimentally discovered for the first time. This phenomenon connected with forming of the stable vapor shell above the irradiated samples was expressed as a sharp drop in temperature on the heating curve and called as an absorption flash. (author)

  11. Laser tissue welding in genitourinary reconstructive surgery: assessment of optimal suture materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppas, D P; Klioze, S D; Uzzo, R G; Schlossberg, S M

    1995-02-01

    Laser tissue welding in genitourinary reconstructive surgery has been shown in animal models to decrease operative time, improve healing, and decrease postoperative fistula formation when compared with conventional suture controls. Although the absence of suture material is the ultimate goal, this has not been shown to be practical with current technology for larger repairs. Therefore, suture-assisted laser tissue welding will likely be performed. This study sought to determine the optimal suture to be used during laser welding. The integrity of various organic and synthetic sutures exposed to laser irradiation were analyzed. Sutures studied included gut, clear Vicryl, clear polydioxanone suture (PDS), and violet PDS. Sutures were irradiated with a potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP)-532 laser or an 808-nm diode laser with and without the addition of a light-absorbing chromophore (fluorescein or indocyanine green, respectively). A remote temperature-sensing device obtained real-time surface temperatures during lasing. The average temperature, time, and total energy at break point were recorded. Overall, gut suture achieved significantly higher temperatures and withstood higher average energy delivery at break point with both the KTP-532 and the 808-nm diode lasers compared with all other groups (P welding appears to be between 60 degrees and 80 degrees C. Gut suture offers the greatest margin of error for KTP and 808-nm diode laser welding with or without the use of a chromophore.

  12. Laser material purification of neodymium. Hikari reiki seiseiho ni yoru neodymium no kojundoka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Y.; Ozaki, T.; Yoshimatsu, S. (National Research Institute for Metals, Tokyo (Japan)); Chiba, K.; Umeda, H.; Saeki, M. (Nippon Steel Corp., Tokyo (Japan))

    1991-05-20

    Selective photoexcitation and photoionization of neodymium atoms were studied basically by using laser. Also, using their properties, feasibility of laser material purification (LPM) technology in gaseous phase was presented. In the selective 3-step ionization, laser beam with two kinds of proper wave length causes resonance exitation of the target element, which goes up to the excitation level of the first step, and the element is ionized by the second laser beam and the third laser beam. The 3-step ionization scheme by a single wave length laser beam of 577.612nm was used for the ionization of Nd. Nd ionized selectively by laser beam was recovered as thin layer at the negative potential side of plane electrodes placed at both sides of the laser irradiation area. In the layer formed by the TPD technology with this scheme, it is possible to decrease impuritis such as Pr by 1/16 and to form highly purified thin layer. 13 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Ultra-short laser processing of transparent material at the interface to liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehme, R; Pissadakis, S; Ehrhardt, M; Ruthe, D; Zimmer, K

    2006-01-01

    Similarly to laser-induced backside wet etching (LIBWE) with nanosecond ultraviolet (ns UV) laser pulses, the irradiation of the solid/liquid interface of fused silica with sub-picosecond (sub-ps) UV and femtosecond near infrared (fs NIR) laser pulses results in etching of the fused silica surface and deposition of decomposition products from liquid. Furthermore, the etch threshold is reduced compared with both direct ablation with an fs laser in air and backside etching with UV ns pulses. Using 0.5 M pyrene/toluene as absorbing liquid, the thresholds were determined to be 70 mJ cm -2 (sub-ps UV) and 330 mJ cm -2 (fs NIR). Furthermore, an almost linear increase in the etch rate with increasing laser fluence was found. The roughness of surfaces backside etched with ultra-short pulses is higher in comparison with ns pulses but lower than that obtained using direct fs laser ablation. Hence a combination of processes involved in fs laser ablation and ns backside etching can be expected. The processes at the ultra-short pulse laser irradiated solid/liquid interface are discussed, considering the effects of ultra-fast heating, multi-photon absorption processes, as well as defect generation in the materials

  14. Theoretical analysis of material removal mechanisms in pulsed laser fusion cutting of ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quintero, F [Dpto FIsica Aplicada, Universidad de Vigo, ETS Ingenieros Industriales, Lagoas-Marcosende 9, 36310 Vigo (Spain); Varas, F [Dpto Matematica Aplicada II, Universidad de Vigo, ETS Ingenieros Industriales, Lagoas-Marcosende 9, 36310 Vigo (Spain); Pou, J [Dpto FIsica Aplicada, Universidad de Vigo, ETS Ingenieros Industriales, Lagoas-Marcosende 9, 36310 Vigo (Spain); Lusquinos, F [Dpto FIsica Aplicada, Universidad de Vigo, ETS Ingenieros Industriales, Lagoas-Marcosende 9, 36310 Vigo (Spain); Boutinguiza, M [Dpto FIsica Aplicada, Universidad de Vigo, ETS Ingenieros Industriales, Lagoas-Marcosende 9, 36310 Vigo (Spain); Soto, R [Dpto FIsica Aplicada, Universidad de Vigo, ETS Ingenieros Industriales, Lagoas-Marcosende 9, 36310 Vigo (Spain); Perez-Amor, M [Dpto FIsica Aplicada, Universidad de Vigo, ETS Ingenieros Industriales, Lagoas-Marcosende 9, 36310 Vigo (Spain)

    2005-02-21

    It is well known that the efficiency of material removal mechanisms has a crucial influence on the performance and quality of the laser cutting process. However, they are very difficult to study since the physical processes and parameters which govern them are quite complicated to observe and measure experimentally. For this reason, the development of theoretical models to analyse the material removal mechanisms is very important for understanding the characteristics and influence of these processes. In this paper, a theoretical model of the pulsed laser fusion cutting of ceramics is presented. The material removal mechanisms from the cutting front are modelled under the assumption that the ceramic material may be, simultaneously, melted and evaporated by the laser radiation. Therefore, three ejection mechanisms are investigated together: ejection of molten material by the assist gas, evaporation of the liquid and ejection of molten material due to the recoil pressure generated by the evaporation from the cutting front. The temporal evolution of the material removal mechanisms and the thickness of the molten layer are solved for several laser pulse modes. Theoretical results are compared with experimental observations to validate the conclusions regarding the influence of frequency and pulse length on the cutting process.

  15. Laser ablation characteristics of metallic materials: Role of Debye-Waller thermal parameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butt, M Z

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of a high intensity laser pulse with a solid target results in the formation of a crater and a plasma plume. The characteristics of both depend on physical properties of target material, environmental conditions, and laser parameters (e.g. wavelength, pulse duration, energy, beam diameter) etc. It has been shown for numerous metals and their alloys that plasma threshold fluence, plasma threshold energy, ablation efficiency, ablation yield, angular distribution of laser produced plasma (LPP) ions, etc. are a unique function of the Debye-Waller thermal parameter B or the mean-square amplitude of atomic vibration of the target material for given experimental conditions. The FWHM of the angular distribution of LPP ions, ablation yield, and ablation efficiency increase whereas plasma threshold fluence and plasma threshold energy decrease as B-factor of the target material increases

  16. Dimensional and material characteristics of direct deposited tool steel by CO II laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, J.

    2006-01-01

    Laser aided direct metalimaterial deposition (DMD) process builds metallic parts layer-by-layer directly from the CAD representation. In general, the process uses powdered metaUmaterials fed into a melt pool, creating fully dense parts. Success of this technology in the die and tool industry depends on the parts quality to be achieved. To obtain designed geometric dimensions and material properties, delicate control of the parameters such as laser power, spot diameter, traverse speed and powder mass flow rate is critical. In this paper, the dimensional and material characteristics of directed deposited H13 tool steel by CO II laser are investigated for the DMD process with a feedback height control system. The relationships between DMD process variables and the product characteristics are analyzed using statistical techniques. The performance of the DMD process is examined with the material characteristics of hardness, porosity, microstructure, and composition.

  17. Comparative researches concerning cleaning chosen construction materials surface layer using UV and IR laser radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Napadlek, W.; Marczak, J.; Kubicki, J.; Szudrowicz, M.

    2002-01-01

    The paper presents comparative research studies of cleaning out of deposits and pollution disposals on different constructional materials like; steel, cast iron, aluminium, copper by using UV and IR laser radiation of wavelength λ =1.064 μm; λ = 0.532 μm; λ = 0.355 μm and λ = 0.266 μm and also impulse laser TEA CO 2 at radiation λ = 10.6 μm were used for the experiments. Achieved experimental results gave us basic information on parameters and conditions and application of each used radiation wavelength. Each kind of pollution and base material should be individually treated, selecting the length of wave and radiation energy density. Laser microtreatment allows for broad cleaning application of the surface of constructional materials as well as may be used in future during manufacturing processes as: preparation of surface for PVD technology, galvanotechnics, cleaning of the surface of machine parts etc. (author)

  18. The Newest Laser Processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Baek Yeon

    2007-01-01

    This book mentions laser processing with laser principle, laser history, laser beam property, laser kinds, foundation of laser processing such as laser oscillation, characteristic of laser processing, laser for processing and its characteristic, processing of laser hole including conception of processing of laser hole and each material, and hole processing of metal material, cut of laser, reality of cut, laser welding, laser surface hardening, application case of special processing and safety measurement of laser.

  19. Efficiency of laser beam utilization in gas laser cutting of materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galushkin, M. G.; Grishaev, R. V.

    2018-02-01

    Relying on the condition of dynamic matching of the process parameters in gas laser cutting, the dependence of the beam utilization factor on the cutting speed and the beam power has been determined. An energy balance equation has been derived for a wide range of cutting speed values.

  20. Enhancing the antibacterial performance of orthopaedic implant materials by fibre laser surface engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Chi-Wai; Carson, Louise; Smith, Graham C.; Morelli, Alessio; Lee, Seunghwan

    2017-05-01

    Implant failure caused by bacterial infection is extremely difficult to treat and usually requires the removal of the infected components. Despite the severe consequence of bacterial infection, research into bacterial infection of orthopaedic implants is still at an early stage compared to the effort on enhancing osseointegration, wear and corrosion resistance of implant materials. In this study, the effects of laser surface treatment on enhancing the antibacterial properties of commercially pure (CP) Ti (Grade 2), Ti6Al4V (Grade 5) and CoCrMo alloy implant materials were studied and compared for the first time. Laser surface treatment was performed by a continuous wave (CW) fibre laser with a near-infrared wavelength of 1064 nm in a nitrogen-containing environment. Staphylococcus aureus, commonly implicated in infection associated with orthopaedic implants, was used to investigate the antibacterial properties of the laser-treated surfaces. The surface roughness and topography of the laser-treated materials were analysed by a 2D roughness testing and by AFM. The surface morphologies before and after 24 h of bacterial cell culture were captured by SEM, and bacterial viability was determined using live/dead staining. Surface chemistry was analysed by XPS and surface wettability was measured using the sessile drop method. The findings of this study indicated that the laser-treated CP Ti and Ti6Al4V surfaces exhibited a noticeable reduction in bacterial adhesion and possessed a bactericidal effect. Such properties were attributable to the combined effects of reduced hydrophobicity, thicker and stable oxide films and presence of laser-induced nano-features. No similar antibacterial effect was observed in the laser-treated CoCrMo.

  1. Time-resolved study of femtosecond laser induced micro-modifications inside transparent brittle materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, F.; Matylitsky, V. V.; Domke, M.; Huber, Heinz P.

    2016-03-01

    Laser processing of optically transparent or semi-transparent, brittle materials is finding wide use in various manufacturing sectors. For example, in consumer electronic devices such as smartphones or tablets, cover glass needs to be cut precisely in various shapes. The unique advantage of material processing with femtosecond lasers is efficient, fast and localized energy deposition in nearly all types of solid materials. When an ultra-short laser pulse is focused inside glass, only the localized region in the neighborhood of the focal volume absorbs laser energy by nonlinear optical absorption. Therefore, the processing volume is strongly defined, while the rest of the target stays unaffected. Thus ultra-short pulse lasers allow cutting of the chemically strengthened glasses such as Corning Gorilla glass without cracking. Non-ablative cutting of transparent, brittle materials, using the newly developed femtosecond process ClearShapeTM from Spectra-Physics, is based on producing a micron-sized material modification track with well-defined geometry inside. The key point for development of the process is to understand the induced modification by a single femtosecond laser shot. In this paper, pump-probe microscopy techniques have been applied to study the defect formation inside of transparent materials, namely soda-lime glass samples, on a time scale between one nanosecond to several tens of microseconds. The observed effects include acoustic wave propagation as well as mechanical stress formation in the bulk of the glass. Besides better understanding of underlying physical mechanisms, our experimental observations have enabled us to find optimal process parameters for the glass cutting application and lead to better quality and speed for the ClearShapeTM process.

  2. Pico-second laser materials interactions: mechanisms, material lifetime and performance optimization Ted Laurence(14-ERD-014)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurence, Ted A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-12-14

    Laser-induced damage with ps pulse widths straddles the transition from intrinsic, multiphoton ionization- and avalanche ionization-based ablation with fs pulses to defectdominated, thermal-based damage with ns pulses. We investigated the morphology and scaling of damage for commonly used silica and hafnia coatings as well as fused silica. Using carefully calibrated laser-induced damage experiments, in situ imaging, and high-resolution optical microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy, we showed that defects play an important role in laser-induced damage for pulse durations as short as 1 ps. Three damage morphologies were observed: standard material ablation, ultra-high density pits, and isolated absorbers. For 10 ps and longer, the isolated absorbers limited the damage performance of the coating materials. We showed that damage resulting from the isolated absorbers grows dramatically with subsequent pulses for sufficient fluences. For hafnia coatings, we used electric field modeling and experiments to show that isolated absorbers near the surface were affected by the chemical environment (vacuum vs. air) for pulses as short as 10 ps. Coupled with the silica results, these results suggested that improvements in the performance in the 10 -60 ps range have not reached fundamental limits. These findings motivate new efforts, including a new SI LDRD in improving the laser-damage performance of multi-layer dielectric coatings. A damage test facility for ps pulses was developed and automated, and was used for testing production optics for ARC. The resulting software was transferred to other laser test facilities for fs pulses and multiple wavelengths with 30 ps pulses. Additionally, the LDRD supported the retention and promotion of an important staff scientist in high-resolution dynamic microscopy and laser-damage testing.

  3. Numerical estimation of temperature field in a laser welded butt joint made of dissimilar materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saternus Zbigniew

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper concerns numerical analysis of thermal phenomena occurring in the butt welding of two different materials by a laser beam welding. The temperature distribution for the welded butt-joint is obtained on the basis of numerical simulations performed in the ABAQUS program. Numerical analysis takes into account the thermophysical properties of welded plate made of two different materials. Temperature distribution in analysed joints is obtained on the basis of numerical simulation in Abaqus/Standard solver, which allowed the determination of the geometry of laser welded butt-joint.

  4. Ultrafast dynamic ellipsometry and spectroscopies of laser shocked materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcgrane, Shawn David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bolme, Cindy B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Whitley, Von H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Moore, David S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Ultrafast ellipsometry and transient absorption spectroscopies are used to measure material dynamics under extreme conditions of temperature, pressure, and volumetric compression induced by shock wave loading with a chirped, spectrally clipped shock drive pulse.

  5. Evaluation of thermal shock strengths for graphite materials using a laser irradiation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Hoon; Lee, Young Shin; Kim, Duck Hoi; Park, No Seok; Suh, Jeong; Kim, Jeng O.; Il Moon, Soon

    2004-01-01

    Thermal shock is a physical phenomenon that occurs during the exposure to rapidly high temperature and pressure changes or during quenching of a material. The rocket nozzle throat is exposed to combustion gas of high temperature. Therefore, it is important to select suitable materials having the appropriate thermal shock resistance and to evaluate these materials for rocket nozzle design. The material of this study is ATJ graphite, which is the candidate material for rocket nozzle throat. This study presents an experimental method to evaluate the thermal shock resistance and thermal shock fracture toughness of ATJ graphite using laser irradiation. In particular, thermal shock resistance tests are conducted with changes of specimen thickness, with laser source irradiated at the center of the specimen. Temperature distributions on the specimen surface are detected using type K and C thermocouples. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) is used to observe the thermal cracks on specimen surface

  6. Ablation, surface activation, and electroless metallization of insulating materials by pulsed excimer laser irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowndes, D.H.; Godbole, M.J.; Pedraza, A.J.

    1993-01-01

    Pulsed-laser irradiation of wide bandgap ceramic substrates, using photons with sub-bandgap energies, activates the ceramic surface for subsequent electroless copper deposition. The copper deposit is confined within the irradiated region when the substrate is subsequently immersed in an electroless copper bath. However, a high laser fluence (typically several j/cm 2 ) and repeated laser shots are needed to obtain uniform copper coverage by this direct-irradiation process. In contrast, by first applying an evaporated SiO x thin film (with x ∼1), laser ablation at quite low energy density (∼0.5 J/cm 2 ) results in re-deposition on the ceramic substrate of material that is catalytic for subsequent electroless copper deposition. Experiments indicate that the re-deposited material is on silicon, on which copper nucleates. Using an SiO x film on a laser-transparent substrate, quite fine (∼12 μm) copper lines can be formed at the boundary of the region that is laser-etched in SiO x . Using SiO x with an absorbing (polycrystalline) ceramic substrate, more-or-less uniform activation and subsequent copper deposition are obtained. In the later case, interactions with the ceramic substrate also may be important for uniform deposition

  7. Influence of non-collisional laser heating on the electron dynamics in dielectric materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barilleau, L.; Duchateau, G.; Chimier, B.; Geoffroy, G.; Tikhonchuk, V.

    2016-12-01

    The electron dynamics in dielectric materials induced by intense femtosecond laser pulses is theoretically addressed. The laser driven temporal evolution of the energy distribution of electrons in the conduction band is described by a kinetic Boltzmann equation. In addition to the collisional processes for energy transfer such as electron-phonon-photon and electron-electron interactions, a non-collisional process for photon absorption in the conduction band is included. It relies on direct transitions between sub-bands of the conduction band through multiphoton absorption. This mechanism is shown to significantly contribute to the laser heating of conduction electrons for large enough laser intensities. It also increases the time required for the electron distribution to reach the equilibrium state as described by the Fermi-Dirac statistics. Quantitative results are provided for quartz irradiated by a femtosecond laser pulse with a wavelength of 800 nm and for intensities in the range of tens of TW cm-2, lower than the ablation threshold. The change in the energy deposition induced by this non-collisional heating process is expected to have a significant influence on the laser processing of dielectric materials.

  8. Short-pulse-width micromachining of hard materials using DPSS Nd:YAG lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heglin, Michael; Govorkov, Sergei V.; Scaggs, Michael J.; Theoharidis, Haris; Schoelzel, T.

    2002-06-01

    The material processing of an industrial, short-pulse duration DPPS YAG laser producing peak powers greater than 0.2MW is discussed in this paper. This peak power provides sufficient materials processing capability to meet the micro machining needs in the automotive, semiconductor, micro- electronic, medical and telecommunication industries. All hard and soft materials including: plastics, metals, ceramics, diamond and other crystalline materials are suitable candidates for the processing capability of this laser. Micro level features can be machined in these materials to a depth in excess of 1mm with high quality results. In most applications feature sizes can be achieved that are not possible or economical with existing technologies. The optical beam delivery system requirements, and overall micro-machining set-up are also described. The drilling and cutting versatility down to feature sizes of less than 7 micrometers , as well as, complex shapes are shown. The wavelength, pulse length, and peakpower are described and relate to their effect on recast, micro-cracking and material removal rates. Material removal effects related to progressive penetration into the material will be reviewed. The requirements of this DPSS laser technology to meet the operational requirements for high duty cycle operation in industrial environments is covered along with processing flexibility and lower operating cost.

  9. 2000W high beam quality diode laser for direct materials processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Wen-bin; Liu, You-qiang; Cao, Yin-hua; Gao, Jing; Pan, Fei; Wang, Zhi-yong

    2011-11-01

    This article describes high beam quality and kilowatt-class diode laser system for direct materials processing, using optical design software ZEMAX® to simulate the diode laser optical path, including the beam shaping, collimation, coupling, focus, etc.. In the experiment, the diode laser stack of 808nm and the diode laser stack of 915nm were used for the wavelength coupling, which were built vertical stacks up to 16 bars. The threshold current of the stack is 6.4A, the operating current is 85A and the output power is 1280W. Through experiments, after collimating the diode laser beam with micro-lenses, the fast axis BPP of the stack is less than 60mm.mrad, and the slow-axis BPP of the stack is less than 75mm.mrad. After shaping the laser beam and improving the beam quality, the fast axis BPP of the stack is still 60mm.mrad, and the slow-axis BPP of the stack is less than 19mm.mrad. After wavelength coupling and focusing, ultimately the power of 2150W was obtained, focal spot size of 1.5mm * 1.2mm with focal length 300mm. The laser power density is 1.2×105W/cm2, and that can be used for metal remelting, alloying, cladding and welding. The total optical coupling conversion efficiency is 84%, and the total electrical - optical conversion efficiency is 50%.

  10. Modification of semiconductor materials using laser-produced ion streams additionally accelerated in the electric fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosinski, M.; Badziak, B.; Parys, P.; Wolowski, J.; Pisarek, M.

    2009-01-01

    The laser-produced ion stream may be attractive for direct ultra-low-energy ion implantation in thin layer of semiconductor for modification of electrical and optical properties of semiconductor devices. Application of electrostatic fields for acceleration and formation of laser-generated ion stream enables to control the ion stream parameters in broad energy and current density ranges. It also permits to remove the useless laser-produced ions from the ion stream designed for implantation. For acceleration of ions produced with the use of a low fluence repetitive laser system (Nd:glass: 2 Hz, pulse duration: 3.5 ns, pulse energy:∼0.5 J, power density: 10 10 W/cm 2 ) in IPPLM the special electrostatic system has been prepared. The laser-produced ions passing through the diaphragm (a ring-shaped slit in the HV box) have been accelerated in the system of electrodes. The accelerating voltage up to 40 kV, the distance of the diaphragm from the target, the diaphragm diameter and the gap width were changed for choosing the desired parameters (namely the energy band of the implanted ions) of the ion stream. The characteristics of laser-produced Ge ion streams were determined with the use of precise ion diagnostic methods, namely: electrostatic ion energy analyser and various ion collectors. The laser-produced and post-accelerated Ge ions have been used for implantation into semiconductor materials for nanocrystal fabrication. The characteristics of implanted samples were measured using AES

  11. Further investigation of surface velocity measurements for material characterization in laser shockwave experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, James A.; Lacy, Jeffrey M.; Scott, Clark L.; Benefiel, Bradley C.; Lévesque, Daniel; Monchalin, Jean-Pierre; Lord, Martin

    2018-04-01

    As part of the U.S. High Performance Research Reactor program, a laser shock test system is being developed by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to characterize interface strength in innovative plate fuel for research reactors around the world. The INL has been working with National Research Council Canada (NRC) on this project for the last five years. One of the concerns is the difficulty of calibrating and standardizing the laser shock technique. A recent analytical study and testing support the use of the Hugoniot Elastic Limit (HEL) in materials as a robust and simple benchmark to compare stresses generated by different laser shock systems. Using a non-contact laser velocimeter based on a solid Fabry-Perot etalon, the systems at NRC and INL show that the back-surface velocity reached at the HEL is consistent, and independent of the laser power used. In this work, the laser velocimeter of the NRC system is tested against a fast rotating wheel to verify accuracy and determine best operating conditions. A round robin test between the two laser shock systems on plates of different aluminum alloys is presented that shows the consistent characterization of the aluminum alloys based on the HEL velocities as well as determines the bias between the systems. The effects of setup parameters on other characteristics of the back-surface velocity trace and corresponding stress wave are also discussed.

  12. Research on Microstructure and Property of TiC-Co Composite Material Made by Laser Cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei

    The experiment of laser cladding on the surface of 2Cr13 steel was made. Titanium carbide (TiC) powder and Co-base alloy powder were used as cladding material. The microstructure and property of laser cladding layer were tested. The research showed that laser cladding layer had better properties such as minute crystals, deeper layer, higher hardness and good metallurgical bonding with base metal. The structure of cladding was supersaturated solid solution with dispersed titanium carbide. The average hardness of cladding zone was 660HV0.2. 2Cr13 steel was widely used in the field of turbine blades. Using laser cladding, the good wear layer would greatly increase the useful life of turbine blades.

  13. The theory of laser materials processing heat and mass transfer in modern technology

    CERN Document Server

    Schulz, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    The revised edition of this important reference volume presents an expanded overview of the analytical and numerical approaches employed when exploring and developing modern laser materials processing techniques. The book shows how general principles can be used to obtain insight into laser processes, whether derived from fundamental physical theory or from direct observation of experimental results. The book gives readers an understanding of the strengths and limitations of simple numerical and analytical models that can then be used as the starting-point for more elaborate models of specific practical, theoretical or commercial value. Following an introduction to the mathematical formulation of some relevant classes of physical ideas, the core of the book consists of chapters addressing key applications in detail: cutting, keyhole welding, drilling, arc and hybrid laser-arc welding, hardening, cladding and forming. The second edition includes a new a chapter on glass cutting with lasers, as employed in the ...

  14. On the angular dependence of focused laser ablation by nanosecond pulses in solgel and polymer materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, D. S.; Onischenko, A.; Holmes, A. S.

    2004-03-01

    Focused laser ablation by single laser pulses at varying angles of incidence is studied in two materials of interest: a solgel (Ormocer 4) and a polymer (SU8). For a range of angles (up to 70° from normal), and for low-energy (<20 μJ), 40 ns pulses at 266 nm wavelength, the ablation depth along the direction of the incident laser beam is found to be independent of the angle of incidence. This allows the crater profiles at oblique incidence to be generated directly from the crater profiles at normal incidence by a simple coordinate transformation. This result is of use in the development of simulation tools for direct-write laser ablation. A simple model based on the moving ablation front approach is shown to be consistent with the observed behavior.

  15. High power laser and materials investigation. Final report, 31 July 1978-28 October 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chicklis, E.P.; Folweiler, R.C.; Pollak, T.M.; Baer, J.

    1980-06-01

    This is a combined study of resonant pumped solid state lasers as fusion drivers, and the development of crystalline optical materials suitable for propagation of the high peak powers associated with laser fusion research. During this period of study the concept of rare gas halide lasers was first demonstrated by the lasing of Tm:YLF at 453 nm pumped by the 353 nm energy of XeF. Excited stata densities of 5 x 10/sup 18/ cm/sup -3/ have been attained and spectroscopic measurements show that up to 60% of the pump energy can be converted into useful stored energy. Alternative lasers and pumping schemes are also discussed. In all cases the potential RGH/SS systems are evaluated in respect to internal efficiency and heat loading.

  16. Development of advanced coatings for laser modifications through process and materials simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martukanitz, R.P.; Babu, S.S.

    2004-01-01

    A simulation-based system is currently being constructed to aid in the development of advanced coating systems for laser cladding and surface alloying. The system employs loosely coupled material and process models that allow rapid determination of material compatibility over a wide range of processing conditions. The primary emphasis is on the development and identification of composite coatings for improved wear and corrosion resistance. The material model utilizes computational thermodynamics and kinetic analysis to establish phase stability and extent of diffusional reactions that may result from the thermal response of the material during virtual processing. The process model is used to develop accurate thermal histories associated with the laser surface modification process and provides critical input for the non-isothermal materials simulations. These techniques were utilized to design a laser surface modification experiment that utilized the addition of stainless steel alloy 431 and TiC produced using argon and argon and nitrogen shielding. The deposits representing alloy 431 and TiC powder produced in argon resulted in microstructures retaining some TiC particles and an increase in hardness when compared to deposits produced using only the 431 powder. Laser deposits representing alloy 431 and TiC powder produced with a mixture of argon and nitrogen shielding gas resulted in microstructures retaining some TiC particles, as well as fine precipitates of Ti(CN) formed during cooling and a further increase in hardness of the deposit

  17. Laser-based microstructuring of materials surfaces using low-cost microlens arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, Daniel; Vara, G.; Diez, J. A.; O`Connor, Gerard M.; Arines, Justo; Gómez-Reino, C.; Flores-Arias, M.

    2012-03-01

    Since frictional interactions in microscopically small components are becoming increasingly important for the development of new products for all modern technology, we present a laser-based technique for micro-patterning surfaces of materials using low-cost microlens arrays. The microlens used were fabricated on soda-lime glass using a laser direct-write technique, followed by a thermal treatment into an oven. By combining laser direct-write and the thermal treatment it was possible to obtain high quality elements using a low cost infrared laser widely implemented in industry which makes this technique attractive in comparison with other more expensive methods. The main advantage of using microlens arrays for micropatterning surfaces is the possibility of fabricating a large number of identical structures simultaneously, leading to a highly efficient process. In order to study the capabilities of the microlens fabricated for microstructuring materials, identical structures and arrays of holes were fabricated over a variety of materials, such us, stainless steel, polymer and ceramic. The minimum diameter of the individual microstructure generated at surface is 5 μm. Different nanosecond lasers operating at Infrared, Green and UV were used. The topography and morphology of the elements obtained were determined using a confocal microscope SENSOFAR 2300 Plμ.

  18. Nano-pulsed laser irradiation scanning system for phase-change materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sookyung; Li Xuezhe; Lee, Sangbin; Kim, Kyung-Ho; Lee, Seung-Yop

    2008-01-01

    Recently, the demand of a laser irradiation tester is increasing for phase change random access memory (PRAM) as well as conventional optical storage media. In this study, a nano-pulsed laser irradiation system is developed to characterize the optical property and writing performance of phase-change materials, based on a commercially available digital versatile disk (DVD) optical pick-up. The precisely controlled focusing and scanning on the material's surface are implemented using the auto-focusing mechanism and a voice coil motor (VCM) of the commercial DVD pick-up. The laser irradiation system provides various writing and reading functions such as adjustable laser power, pulse duration, recording pattern (spot, line and area), and writing/reading repetition, phase transition, and in situ reflectivity measurement before/after irradiation. Measurements of power time effect (PTE) diagram and reflectivity map of Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 samples show that the proposed laser irradiation system provides the powerful scanning tool to quantify the optical characteristics of phase-change materials

  19. Residual stress improvement mechanism on metal material by underwater laser irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sano, Yuji; Yoda, Masaki; Mukai, Naruhiko; Obata, Minoru; Kanno, Masanori

    2000-01-01

    Residual stress improvement technology for component surface by underwater pulsed laser irradiation has been developed as a method of preventing stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of core components in nuclear reactors. In order to optimize the laser irradiation conditions based on a complete understanding of the mechanism, the propagation of a shock wave induced by the impulse of laser irradiation and the dynamic response of the irradiated material were analyzed through time-dependent elasto-plastic calculations with a finite element program. The calculated results are compared with the measured results obtained by experiments in which laser pulses with an energy of 200 mJ are focused to a diameter of 0.8 mm on a water-immersed test piece of 20% cold-worked Type 304 austenitic stainless steel to simulate neutron irradiation hardening. A residual compressive stress, which is nearly equivalent to the yield stress of the processed material, remains on the material surface after passage of the shock wave with enough amplitude to induce a permanent strain. Multiple irradiation of laser pulses extends the stress-improved depth to about 1 mm, which would be the limit corresponding to the three-dimensional dispersion effect of the shock wave. (author)

  20. Laser materials processing of complex components: from reverse engineering via automated beam path generation to short process development cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görgl, Richard; Brandstätter, Elmar

    2017-01-01

    The article presents an overview of what is possible nowadays in the field of laser materials processing. The state of the art in the complete process chain is shown, starting with the generation of a specific components CAD data and continuing with the automated motion path generation for the laser head carried by a CNC or robot system. Application examples from laser cladding and laser-based additive manufacturing are given.

  1. Design of high-brightness TEM00-mode solar-pumped laser for renewable material processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, D.; Almeida, J.

    2014-08-01

    The conversion of sunlight into laser light by direct solar pumping is of ever-increasing importance because broadband, temporally constant, sunlight is converted into laser light, which can be a source of narrowband, collimated, rapidly pulsed, radiation with the possibility of obtaining extremely high brightness and intensity. Nonlinear processes, such as harmonic generation, might be used to obtain broad wavelength coverage, including the ultraviolet wavelengths, where the solar flux is very weak. The direct excitation of large lasers by sunlight offers the prospect of a drastic reduction in the cost of coherent optical radiation for high average power materials processing. This renewable laser has a large potential for many applications such as high-temperature materials processing, renewable magnesium-hydrogen energy cycle and so on. We propose here a scalable TEM00 mode solar laser pumping scheme, which is composed of four firststage 1.13 m diameter Fresnel lenses with its respective folding mirrors mounted on a two-axis automatic solar tracker. Concentrated solar power at the four focal spots of these Fresnel lenses are focused individually along a common 3.5 mm diameter, 70 mm length Nd:YAG rod via four pairs of second-stage fused-silica spherical lenses and third-stage 2D-CPCs (Compound Parabolic Concentrator), sitting just above the laser rod which is also double-pass pumped by four V-shaped pumping cavities. Distilled water cools both the rod and the concentrators. 15.4 W TEM00 solar laser power is numerically calculated, corresponding to 6.7 times enhancement in laser beam brightness.

  2. Fluoride materials for high peak power lasers, 17 May 1976--31 January 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Folweiler, R.C.

    1977-02-01

    Single crystal fluoride optical materials were grown for potential application to laser fusion. Fluoride materials are of interest for this application, in general, because their low non-linear indices of refraction permit their use in optical components which can sustain very high peak powers without causing beam distortion. Emphasis was placed on Nd:YLF because its emission wave-lengths match the gain curve of promising amplifier materials. In addition to material growth, new feed preparation techniques were investigated and developed and certain material properties measured. The laser material, Nd:YLF, (Nd 3+ in LiYF 4 ) was grown and fabricated into laser rods. This material has laser emission at 1.047 μm and 1.053 μm, depending on the polarization selected. The former wavelength matches the peak emission wavelength of developmental Nd fluoroberyllate glasses, the latter matches Nd phosphate and fluorophosphate glasses that have low values of n 2 . The non-linear index of pure LiYF 4 was measured by Milam and Weber as 0.59 x 10 -13 esu. The concentration of Nd 3+ was varied from 1% to 4%. At higher concentrations and larger diameters a radial strain was found, sufficient to cause spiral cracking. This strain was apparently generated by a radial gradient of Nd 3+ ions. The distribution coefficient observed in one sample was 0.38. The stimulation emission coefficients were determined. Boules of KY 3 F 10 and KTb 3 F 10 were grown, with the latter suitable as a Faraday rotator material with projected low n 2 and larger Verdet constant. Experiments were performed on the systemKF-CeF 3 as a potential Faraday rotator material, and a cubic phase observed. The Ce 3+ ion has slightly lower rotary power/ion, but significantly lower cost

  3. Development of Advanced Wear and Corrosion Resistant Systems Through Laser Surface Alloying and Materials Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. P. Martukanitz and S. Babu

    2007-05-03

    Laser surfacing in the form of cladding, alloying, and modifications are gaining widespread use because of its ability to provide high deposition rates, low thermal distortion, and refined microstructure due to high solidification rates. Because of these advantages, laser surface alloying is considered a prime candidate for producing ultra-hard coatings through the establishment or in situ formation of composite structures. Therefore, a program was conducted by the Applied Research Laboratory, Pennsylvania State University and Oak Ridge National Laboratory to develop the scientific and engineering basis for performing laser-based surface modifications involving the addition of hard particles, such as carbides, borides, and nitrides, within a metallic matrix for improved wear, fatigue, creep, and corrosion resistance. This has involved the development of advanced laser processing and simulation techniques, along with the refinement and application of these techniques for predicting and selecting materials and processing parameters for the creation of new surfaces having improved properties over current coating technologies. This program has also resulted in the formulation of process and material simulation tools capable of examining the potential for the formation and retention of composite coatings and deposits produced using laser processing techniques, as well as positive laboratory demonstrations in producing these coatings. In conjunction with the process simulation techniques, the application of computational thermodynamic and kinetic models to design laser surface alloying materials was demonstrated and resulted in a vast improvement in the formulation of materials used for producing composite coatings. The methodology was used to identify materials and to selectively modify microstructures for increasing hardness of deposits produced by the laser surface alloying process. Computational thermodynamic calculations indicated that it was possible to induce the

  4. Initial Atomic Motion Immediately Following Femtosecond-Laser Excitation in Phase-Change Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, E; Okada, S; Ichitsubo, T; Kawaguchi, T; Hirata, A; Guan, P F; Tokuda, K; Tanimura, K; Matsunaga, T; Chen, M W; Yamada, N

    2016-09-23

    Despite the fact that phase-change materials are widely used for data storage, no consensus exists on the unique mechanism of their ultrafast phase change and its accompanied large and rapid optical change. By using the pump-probe observation method combining a femtosecond optical laser and an x-ray free-electron laser, we substantiate experimentally that, in both GeTe and Ge_{2}Sb_{2}Te_{5} crystals, rattling motion of mainly Ge atoms takes place with keeping the off-center position just after femtosecond-optical-laser irradiation, which eventually leads to a higher symmetry or disordered state. This very initial rattling motion in the undistorted lattice can be related to instantaneous optical change due to the loss of resonant bonding that characterizes GeTe-based phase change materials. Based on the amorphous structure derived by first-principles molecular dynamics simulation, we infer a plausible ultrafast amorphization mechanism via nonmelting.

  5. K-α emission form medium and high-Z materials irradiated by femtosecond laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limpouch, J.; Klimo, O.; Zhavoronkov, N.; Andreev, A.A.

    2006-01-01

    Complete test of publication follows. Fast electrons are created at the target surface during the interaction of high intensity ultra short laser pulses with solids. Fast electrons penetrate deep into the target where they generate K-α and Bremsstrahlung radiation. Generated high brightness K-α pulses offer the prospect of creating a cheap and compact X-ray source, posing a promising alternative to synchrotron radiation, e.g. in medical application and in material science. With an increase in laser intensity, efficient X-ray emission in the multi-keV range with pulse duration shorter than few picoseconds is expected. This short incoherent but monochromatic X-ray emission synchronized with laser pulses may be used for time-resolved measurements. Acceleration of fast electrons, their transport and K-α photon generation and emission from the target surface in both forward and backward directions are studied here numerically. The results are compared to recent experiments studying K-α emission from the front and rear surface of copper foil targets of various thicknesses and for various parameters of the laser plasma interaction. One-dimensional PIC simulations coupled with 3D time-resolved Monte Carlo simulations show that account of ionization processes and of density profile formed by laser ASE emission is essential for reliable explanation of experimental data. While sub-relativistic intensities are optimum for laser energy transformation into K-α emission for medium-Z targets, relativistic laser intensities have to be used for hard X-ray generation in high-Z materials. The cross-section for K-α shell ionization of high-Z elements by electrons increases or remains approximately constant within a factor of two at relativistic electron energies up to electron energies in the 100-MeV range. Moreover, the splitting ratio of K-α photon emission to Auger electron emission is favorable for high-Z materials, and thus efficient K-α emission is possible. In our

  6. Evaluation of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for the determination of macronutrients in plant materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trevizan, Lilian Cristina [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Centenario 303, 13416-000, Piracicaba-SP (Brazil)], E-mail: lilian@conectcor.com.br; Santos, Dario [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo - UNIFESP, Rua Prof. Artur Riedel 275, 09972-270, Diadema-SP (Brazil); Elgul Samad, Ricardo; Dias Vieira, Nilson [Centro de Lasers e Aplicacoes, IPEN/CNEN-SP, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes 2242, 05508-000, Sao Paulo-SP (Brazil); Seimi Nomura, Cassiana [Centro de Ciencias Naturais e Humanas, Universidade Federal do ABC, Rua Santa Adelia 166, 09210-170, Santo Andre-SP (Brazil); Nunes, Lidiane Cristina [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, Rod. Washington Luis, km 235, 13565-905, Sao Carlos-SP (Brazil); Rufini, Iolanda Aparecida; Krug, Francisco Jose [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Centenario 303, 13416-000, Piracicaba-SP (Brazil)

    2008-10-15

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has become an analytical tool for the direct analysis of a large variety of materials in order to provide qualitative and/or quantitative information. However, there is a lack of information for LIBS analysis of agricultural and environmental samples. In this work a LIBS system has been evaluated for the determination of macronutrients (P, K, Ca, Mg) in pellets of vegetal reference materials. An experimental setup was designed by using a Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm and an Echelle spectrometer with ICCD detector. The plasma temperature was estimated by Boltzmann plots and instrumental parameters such as delay time, lens-to-sample distance and pulse energy were evaluated. Certified reference materials as well as reference materials were used for analytical calibrations of P, K, Ca, and Mg. Most results of the direct analysis of plant samples by LIBS were in reasonable agreement with those obtained by ICP OES after wet acid decomposition.

  7. Evaluation of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for the determination of macronutrients in plant materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trevizan, Lilian Cristina; Santos, Dario; Elgul Samad, Ricardo; Dias Vieira, Nilson; Seimi Nomura, Cassiana; Nunes, Lidiane Cristina; Rufini, Iolanda Aparecida; Krug, Francisco Jose

    2008-01-01

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has become an analytical tool for the direct analysis of a large variety of materials in order to provide qualitative and/or quantitative information. However, there is a lack of information for LIBS analysis of agricultural and environmental samples. In this work a LIBS system has been evaluated for the determination of macronutrients (P, K, Ca, Mg) in pellets of vegetal reference materials. An experimental setup was designed by using a Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm and an Echelle spectrometer with ICCD detector. The plasma temperature was estimated by Boltzmann plots and instrumental parameters such as delay time, lens-to-sample distance and pulse energy were evaluated. Certified reference materials as well as reference materials were used for analytical calibrations of P, K, Ca, and Mg. Most results of the direct analysis of plant samples by LIBS were in reasonable agreement with those obtained by ICP OES after wet acid decomposition

  8. New Mid-IR Lasers Based on Rare-Earth-Doped Sulfide and Chloride Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nostrand, M

    2000-01-01

    Applications in remote-sensing and military countermeasures have driven a need for compact, solid-state mid-IR lasers. Due to multi-phonon quenching, non-traditional hosts are needed to extend current solid-state, room-temperature lasing capabilities beyond ∼ 4 (micro)m. Traditional oxide and fluoride hosts have effective phonon energies in the neighborhood of 1000 cm -1 and 500 cm -1 , respectively. These phonons can effectively quench radiation above 2 and 4 (micro)m, respectively. Materials with lower effective phonon energies such as sulfides and chlorides are the logical candidates for mid-IR (4-10 (micro)m) operation. In this report, laser action is demonstrated in two such hosts, CaGa 2 S 4 and KPb 2 Cl 5 . The CaGa 2 S 4 :Dy 3+ laser operating at 4.3 (micro)m represents the first sulfide laser operating beyond 2 (micro)m. The KPb 2 Cl 5 :Dy 3+ laser operating at 2.4 (micro)m represents the first operation of a chloride-host laser in ambient conditions. Laser action is also reported for CaGa 2 S 4 :Dy 3+ at 2.4 (micro)m, CaGa 2 S 4 :Dy 3+ at 1.4 (micro)m, and KPb 2 Cl 5 :Nd 3+ at 1.06 (micro)m. Both host materials have been fully characterized, including lifetimes, absorption and emission cross sections, radiative branching ratios, and radiative quantum efficiencies. Radiative branching ratios and radiative quantum efficiencies have been determined both by the Judd-Ofelt method (which is based on absorption measurements), and by a novel method described herein which is based on emission measurements. Modeling has been performed to predict laser performance, and a new method to determine emission cross section from slope efficiency and threshold data is developed. With the introduction and laser demonstration of rare-earth-doped CaGa 2 S 4 and KPb 2 Cl 5 , direct generation of mid-IR laser radiation in a solid-state host has been demonstrated. In KPb 2 Cl 5 , predictions indicate that laser operation to 9 (micro)m may be possible, a wavelength previously

  9. Highly Sensitive TGA Diagnosis of Thermal Behaviour of Laser-Deposited Materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Galíková, Anna; Pola, Josef

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 473, 1-2 (2008), s. 54-60 ISSN 0040-6031 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400720619 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : thermogravimetry * laser-deposited materials * mass spectroscopy Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.659, year: 2008

  10. Surface engineering with lasers : an application to Co-base materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Hosson, J.T.M.; de Mol van Otterloo, J.L.; Boerstoel, B.M.; Huis in 't Veld, A.J.; Sarton, LAJ; Zeedijk, HB

    1997-01-01

    The present paper concentrates on the applications of CO2 laser treatments to enhance fretting wear properties of stainless steel. Stainless steel 316 is used as substrate material. Powder particles of the various stellites with sizes ranging between 45 and 125 mu m are fed onto the surface. It was

  11. Customer Overview of Pulsed Laser Heating for Evaluation of Gun Bore Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    properties of the gun bore materials. Ideally, well validated interior ballistics modeling has been carried out (typically with NOVA) to provide time...03002, February 2003. 5. J. Warrender, C. Mulligan, and J. Underwood , “Analysis of thermo-mechanical cracking in refractory coatings using variable pulse duration laser pulse heating,” Wear 263 1540 (2007).

  12. Computational Magnetohydrodynamics of General Materials in Generalized Coordinates and Applications to Laser-Target Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacGillivray, Jeff T.; Peterkin, Robert E., Jr.

    2003-10-01

    We have developed a multiblock arbitrary coordinate Hydromagnetics (MACH) code for computing the time-evolution of materials of arbitrary phase (solid, liquid, gas, and plasma) in response to forces that arise from material and magnetic pressures. MACH is a single-fluid, time-dependent, arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation environment. The 2 1/2 -dimensional MACH2 and the parallel 3-D MACH3 are widely used in the MHD community to perform accurate simulation of the time evolution of electrically conducting materials in a wide variety of laboratory situations. In this presentation, we discuss simulations of the interaction of an intense laser beam with a solid target in an ambient gas. Of particular interest to us is a laser-supported detonation wave (blast wave) that originates near the surface of the target when the laser intensity is sufficiently large to vaporize target material within the focal spot of the beam. Because the MACH3 simulations are fully three-dimensional, we are able to simulate non-normal laser incidence. A magnetic field is also produced from plasma energy near the edge of the focal spot.

  13. Production of nanodispersed materials and thin films by laser ablation techniques in liquid and in vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tveryanovich, Yu S; Manshina, A A; Tverjanovich, A S

    2012-01-01

    The methods of laser ablation of chemical compounds in a liquid medium and in vacuum used for the production of highly dispersed materials and films, respectively, are considered. Features and advantages of these methods are noted and the potential of their application for the design of novel materials is discussed. Examples of application of these methods in scientific research are given. The bibliography includes 177 references.

  14. Development of laser material processing and laser metrology techniques. Development of the power supply of high power CO{sub 2} laser for material processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Heon Ju; Lee, Yong Hak; Jang, Do Hyun; Kim, Su Hun [Cheju National University, Cheju (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-08-01

    The 2 Kw solid state RF power supply has been designed and fabricated The power supply was composed of oscillator, driver amplifier and power amplifier. Each part of the power supply was developed and tested. The impedance matching circuit to apply this RF power supply for laser discharge excitation was fabricated also. The RF discharge experiment for the excitation of CO{sub 2} laser was performed. The radiofrequency power supply which has the output power of 2 Kw has been developed. The subsystems of the power supply have been fabricated and their performances were reliable. The RF discharge experiment to generate the laser plasma has been performed and input power density of 6 W/cm{sub 3} has been achieved. (author). 5 refs., 28 figs., 8 tabs.

  15. Effect of Cr4+ impurities in Nd:Cr:GSGG and Nd:Cr:YAG laser materials on parameters of lasers at solar pumping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payziyev, Sh.D.; Bakhramov, S.A.; Shayimov, F.F.; Fayziev, A.Sh.

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of an effect of Cr 4+ impurity ions, existent in Nd 3+ :Cr 3+ :GSGG and Nd 3+ :Cr 3+ :YAG laser materials on output parameters of solar pumped lasers is carried out by modeling of lasing process at solar pumping. (authors)

  16. Femtosecond Laser Irradiation of Plasmonic Nanoparticles in Polymer Matrix: Implications for Photothermal and Photochemical Material Alteration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton A. Smirnov

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the opportunities provided by the plasmonic nanoparticles inserted into the bulk of a transparent medium to modify the material by laser light irradiation. This study is provoked by the advent of photo-induced nano-composites consisting of a typical polymer matrix and metal nanoparticles located in the light-irradiated domains of the initially homogeneous material. The subsequent irradiation of these domains by femtosecond laser pulses promotes a further alteration of the material properties. We separately consider two different mechanisms of material alteration. First, we analyze a photochemical reaction initiated by the two-photon absorption of light near the plasmonic nanoparticle within the matrix. We show that the spatial distribution of the products of such a reaction changes the symmetry of the material, resulting in the appearance of anisotropy in the initially isotropic material or even in the loss of the center of symmetry. Second, we analyze the efficiency of a thermally-activated chemical reaction at the surface of a plasmonic particle and the distribution of the product of such a reaction just near the metal nanoparticle irradiated by an ultrashort laser pulse.

  17. Computational science simulation of laser materials processing and provision of their irradiation conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muramatsu, Toshiharu

    2016-01-01

    In laser processing, it is necessary for achieving the intended performance and product, to understand the complex physical courses including melting and solidification phenomena occurring in laser processing, and thus to set proper laser irradiation conditions. This condition optimization work requires an enormous amount of overhead due to repeated efforts, and has become a cause for inhibiting the introduction of laser processing technology into the industrial field that points to the small lot production of many products. JAEA tried to make it possible to quantitatively handle the complex physical course from the laser light irradiation to the fabricating material until the completion of processing, and is under development of the computational science simulation code SPLICE that connects micro behavior and macro behavior through a multi-level scale model. This SPLICE is able to visualize the design space and to reduce the overhead associated with the setting of laser irradiation conditions and the like, which gives the prospect of being effective as a tool for front-loading. This approach has been confirmed to be effective for the welding and fusing process. (A.O.)

  18. Design of a high pulse repitition frequency carbon dioxide laser for processing high damage threshold materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatwin, Christopher R.; McDonald, Donald W.; Scott, Brian F.

    1989-07-01

    The absence of an applications led design philosophy has compromised both the development of laser source technology and its effective implementation into manufacturing technology in particular. For example, CO2 lasers are still incapable of processing classes of refractory and non-ferrous metals. Whilst the scope of this paper is restricted to high power CO2 lasers; the design methodology reported herein is applicable to source technology in general, which when exploited, will effect an expansion of applications. The CO2 laser operational envelope should not only be expanded to incorporate high damage threshold materials but also offer a greater degree of controllability. By a combination of modelling and experimentation the requisite beam characteristics, at the workpiece, were determined then utilised to design the Laser Manufacturing System. The design of sub-system elements was achieved by a combination of experimentation and simulation which benefited from a comprehensive set of software tools. By linking these tools the physical processes in the laser - electron processes in the plasma, the history of photons in the resonator, etc. - can be related, in a detailed model, to the heating mechanisms in the workpiece.

  19. Thermal coupling and damage mechanisms of laser radiation on selected materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwirzke, F.; Jenkins, W.F.; Schmidt, W.R.

    1983-01-01

    High power laser beams interact with targets by a variety of thermal, impulse, and electrical effects. Energy coupling is considerably enhanced once surface electrical breakdown occurs. The laser heated plasma then causes surface damage via thermal evaporation, ion sputtering, and unipolar arcing. While the first two are purely thermal and mechanical effects, the last one, unipolar arcing, is an electrical plasma-surface interaction process which leads to crater formation, usually called laser-pitting, a process which was often observed but not well understood. Unipolar arcing occurs when a plasma of sufficiently high electron temperature interacts with a surface. Without an external voltage applied, many electrical micro-arcs burn between the surface and the plasma, driven by local variations of the sheath potential with the surface acting as both the cathode and anode. Laser induced unipolar arcing represents the most damaging and non-uniform plasma-surface interaction process since the energy available in the plasma concentrates towards the cathode spots. This causes cratering of the materials surface. The ejection of material in the form of small jets from the craters leads to ripples in the critical plasma density contour. This in turn contributes to the onset of plasma instabilities, small scale magnetic field generation and laser beam filamentation. The ejection of a plasma jet from the unipolar arc crater also causes highly localized shock waves to propagate into the target, softening it in the process. Thus, local surface erosion by unipolar arcing is much more severe than for uniform energy deposition

  20. Effect of Laser Power on Material Efficiency, Layer Height and Width of Laser Metal Deposited Ti6Al4V

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mahamood, RM

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available /sec) during deposition is   600  DFRP TPm ----------------------------------- (3) PFR is the powder flow rate in g/min and the 60 in equation 3 is a conversion factor for the powder flow rate to g/sec. The powder efficiency (μ) is given by:   100/ 0... Alloys for Aerospace Applications, in: Titanium and Titanium Alloys, Advanced Engineering Materials, 5, 2003, pp.419-427. [3] Y. Lu, H.B. Tang, Y.L. Fang, D. Liu, H.M. Wang, Microstructure evolution of sub-critical annealed laser deposited Ti–6Al–4V...

  1. Examination of material manufactured by direct metal laser sintering (DMLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Dobránsky

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article is concerned with assessing microstructural properties of metal component manufactured by additive DMLS technology. Two series of samples were assessed. The first one was manufactured without heat treatment. Samples in the second series were treated with heat in order to assess increase in hardness and influence on modification of microstructure. Subsequently, values of hardness were measured by Vickers Hardness Test and modification of microstructure was observed by optical microscope. Evaluations were carried out in three planes in order to assess the differences in layering of material during its processing. Differences in values of hardness and microstructural components were discovered by examination of changes in three planes.

  2. Bioactive treatment promotes osteoblast differentiation on titanium materials fabricated by selective laser melting technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukanaka, Masako; Fujibayashi, Shunsuke; Takemoto, Mitsuru; Matsushita, Tomiharu; Kokubo, Tadashi; Nakamura, Takashi; Sasaki, Kiyoyuki; Matsuda, Shuichi

    2016-01-01

    Selective laser melting (SLM) technology is useful for the fabrication of porous titanium implants with complex shapes and structures. The materials fabricated by SLM characteristically have a very rough surface (average surface roughness, Ra=24.58 µm). In this study, we evaluated morphologically and biochemically the specific effects of this very rough surface and the additional effects of a bioactive treatment on osteoblast proliferation and differentiation. Flat-rolled titanium materials (Ra=1.02 µm) were used as the controls. On the treated materials fabricated by SLM, we observed enhanced osteoblast differentiation compared with the flat-rolled materials and the untreated materials fabricated by SLM. No significant differences were observed between the flat-rolled materials and the untreated materials fabricated by SLM in their effects on osteoblast differentiation. We concluded that the very rough surface fabricated by SLM had to undergo a bioactive treatment to obtain a positive effect on osteoblast differentiation.

  3. Femtosecond laser ablation of single-wall carbon nanotube-based material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danilov, Pavel A; Ionin, Andrey A; Kudryashov, Sergey I; Makarov, Sergey V; Mel’nik, Nikolay N; Rudenko, Andrey A; Yurovskikh, Vladislav I; Zayarny, Dmitry V; Lednev, Vasily N; Obraztsova, Elena D; Pershin, Sergey M; Bunkin, Alexey F

    2014-01-01

    Single- and multi-shot femtosecond laser surface ablation of a single-wall carbon nanotube-based substrate at 515- and 1030 nm wavelengths was studied by scanning electron microscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The laser ablation proceeds in two ways: as the low-fluence mesoscopic shallow disintegration of the surface nanotube packing, preserving the individual integrity and the semiconducting character of the nanotubes or as the high-fluence deep material removal apparently triggered by the strong intrinsic or impurity-mediated ablation of the individual carbon nanotubes on the substrate surface. (letter)

  4. A history of semi-active laser dome and window materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Roger M.

    2014-05-01

    Semi-Active Laser (SAL) guidance systems were developed starting in the mid-1960's and today form an important class of precision guided weapons. The laser wavelengths generally fall in the short wave infrared region of the spectrum. Relative to passive, image based, infrared seekers the optical demands placed on the domes or windows of SAL seekers is very modest, allowing the use of low cost, easily manufactured materials, such as polycarbonate. This paper will examine the transition of SAL window and dome science and technology from the laboratory to battlefield, with special emphasis on the story of polycarbonate domes.

  5. Theoretical study of laser feedback interferometry for dynamical material's behaviour studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le-Barbier, Laura

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to study the feasibility of optical feedback interferometry (OFI) for measuring velocities for dynamical material's behaviour studies. Dynamical material's behaviour studies permit to analyse the shocked material when subjects to shocks (laser shocks, isentropic compression, projectiles, etc.). In these conditions, we seek to measure velocities up to 10 km/s. The OFI technique is regularly used as an embedded system to measure slow velocities in various fields. However, very few studies have been performed for determining velocities measurement limits for this system. As a matter of fact, the optical feedback induces nonlinear effects into the laser's cavity: it disrupts the laser's emitted optical power. Depending on the optical feedback strength, the laser can show chaotic behaviour, then it is no longer possible to get the information for the target's velocity or displacement regarding the signal. In this study, we have been developing mathematical models and performing a wide range of numerical simulations to study the performances and the limits of the OFI technique. We have been also studying the influence of the targets reflectivity, the length and the modulation frequency of the external cavity. (author) [fr

  6. Target Plate Material Influence on Fullerene-C60 Laser Desorption/Ionization Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeegers, Guido P.; Günthardt, Barbara F.; Zenobi, Renato

    2016-04-01

    Systematic laser desorption/ionization (LDI) experiments of fullerene-C60 on a wide range of target plate materials were conducted to gain insight into the initial ion formation in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry. The positive and negative ion signal intensities of precursor, fragment, and cluster ions were monitored, varying both the laser fluence (0-3.53 Jcm-2) and the ion extraction delay time (0-950 ns). The resulting species-specific ion signal intensities are an indication for the ionization mechanisms that contribute to LDI and the time frames in which they operate, providing insight in the (MA)LDI primary ionization. An increasing electrical resistivity of the target plate material increases the fullerene-C60 precursor and fragment anion signal intensity. Inconel 625 and Ti90/Al6/V4, both highly electrically resistive, provide the highest anion signal intensities, exceeding the cation signal intensity by a factor ~1.4 for the latter. We present a mechanism based on transient electrical field strength reduction to explain this trend. Fullerene-C60 cluster anion formation is negligible, which could be due to the high extraction potential. Cluster cations, however, are readily formed, although for high laser fluences, the preferred channel is formation of precursor and fragment cations. Ion signal intensity depends greatly on the choice of substrate material, and careful substrate selection could, therefore, allow for more sensitive (MA)LDI measurements.

  7. Pulsed Laser-Induced Effects in the Material Properties of Tungsten Thin Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, R [Centro de Investigacion CientIfica y de Educacion Superior de Ensenada, Km. 107 Carretera Tijuana-Ensenada, BC, 22860 (Mexico); Camacho-Lopez, S [Centro de Investigacion Cientifica y de Educacion Superior de Ensenada, Km. 107 Carretera Tijuana-Ensenada, BC, 22860 (Mexico); Camacho-Lopez, M A [Facultad de Quimica, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Paseo Colon y Tollocan, Toluca Edo. de Mexico, 50110 (Mexico); Sanchez-Perez, C [Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnologico, UNAM, Apdo. Postal 70-186, Mexico DF 04510 (Mexico); Esparza-GarcIa, A [Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnologico, UNAM, Apdo. Postal 70-186, Mexico DF 04510 (Mexico)

    2007-04-15

    In this work we present evidence of photo-induced effects on crystalline Tungsten (W) films. A frequency doubled Nd:YAG (5ns) laser was used in our experiments. The W thin films were deposited on silicon substrates by the DC-sputtering technique using W (Lesker, 99.95% purity) targets in an argon atmosphere. The crystalline phase of the deposited W films was determined by X-ray diffraction. Our experimental results show clear evidence that several events take place as a consequence of exposure of the W films to the laser nanosecond pulses. One of those events has a chemical effect that results in a significant degree of oxidation of the film; a second event affects the structural nature of the initial W material, resulting into a material phase change; and a third event changes the initially homogeneous morphology of the film into an unexpected porous material film. As it has been confirmed by the experiments, all of these effects are laser fluence dependent. A full post exposure analysis of the W thin films included Energy Dispersive Spectrometry to determine the degree of oxidation of the W film; a micro-Raman system was used to explore and to study the transition of the crystalline W to the amorphous-crystalline WO{sub 3} phase; further analysis with Scanning Electron Microscopy showed a definite laser-induced porosity which changes the initial homogeneous film into a highly porous film with small features in the range from 100 to 300 nm.

  8. Pulsed Laser-Induced Effects in the Material Properties of Tungsten Thin Films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, R; Camacho-Lopez, S; Camacho-Lopez, M A; Sanchez-Perez, C; Esparza-GarcIa, A

    2007-01-01

    In this work we present evidence of photo-induced effects on crystalline Tungsten (W) films. A frequency doubled Nd:YAG (5ns) laser was used in our experiments. The W thin films were deposited on silicon substrates by the DC-sputtering technique using W (Lesker, 99.95% purity) targets in an argon atmosphere. The crystalline phase of the deposited W films was determined by X-ray diffraction. Our experimental results show clear evidence that several events take place as a consequence of exposure of the W films to the laser nanosecond pulses. One of those events has a chemical effect that results in a significant degree of oxidation of the film; a second event affects the structural nature of the initial W material, resulting into a material phase change; and a third event changes the initially homogeneous morphology of the film into an unexpected porous material film. As it has been confirmed by the experiments, all of these effects are laser fluence dependent. A full post exposure analysis of the W thin films included Energy Dispersive Spectrometry to determine the degree of oxidation of the W film; a micro-Raman system was used to explore and to study the transition of the crystalline W to the amorphous-crystalline WO 3 phase; further analysis with Scanning Electron Microscopy showed a definite laser-induced porosity which changes the initial homogeneous film into a highly porous film with small features in the range from 100 to 300 nm

  9. Laser material processing with tightly focused cylindrical vector beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drevinskas, Rokas, E-mail: rd1c12@soton.ac.uk; Zhang, Jingyu; Beresna, Martynas; Gecevičius, Mindaugas; Kazansky, Peter G. [Optoelectronics Research Centre, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Kazanskii, Andrey G. [Physics Department, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Svirko, Yuri P. [Physics Department, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Institute of Photonics, University of Eastern Finland, P.O.BOX 111, FI-80101 Joensuu (Finland)

    2016-05-30

    We demonstrate a comprehensive modification study of silica glass, crystalline silicon, and amorphous silicon film, irradiated by tightly focused cylindrical vector beams with azimuthal and radial polarizations. The evidence of the longitudinal field associated with radial polarization is revealed by second harmonic generation in z-cut lithium niobate crystal. Despite the lower threshold of ring-shaped modification of silicon materials, the modification in the center of single pulse radially polarized beam is not observed. The phenomenon is interpreted in terms of the enhanced reflection of longitudinal component at the interface with high-index contrast, demonstrating that the longitudinal component is inefficient for the flat surface modification. Enhanced interaction of the longitudinal light field with silicon nanopillar structures produced by the first pulse of double-pulse irradiation is also demonstrated.

  10. Advanced Laser-Compton Gamma-Ray Sources for Nuclear Materials Detection, Assay and Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barty, C. P. J.

    2015-10-01

    Highly-collimated, polarized, mono-energetic beams of tunable gamma-rays may be created via the optimized Compton scattering of pulsed lasers off of ultra-bright, relativistic electron beams. Above 2 MeV, the peak brilliance of such sources can exceed that of the world's largest synchrotrons by more than 15 orders of magnitude and can enable for the first time the efficient pursuit of nuclear science and applications with photon beams, i.e. Nuclear Photonics. Potential applications are numerous and include isotope-specific nuclear materials management, element-specific medical radiography and radiology, non-destructive, isotope-specific, material assay and imaging, precision spectroscopy of nuclear resonances and photon-induced fission. This review covers activities at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory related to the design and optimization of mono-energetic, laser-Compton gamma-ray systems and introduces isotope-specific nuclear materials detection and assay applications enabled by them.

  11. Measurements and modeling of gain coefficients for neodymium laser glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linford, G.J.; Saroyan, R.A.; Trenholme, J.B.; Weber, M.J.

    1979-01-01

    Small-signal gain coefficients are reported for neodymium in silicate, phosphate, fluorophosphate, and fluoroberyllate laser glasses. Measurements were made in a disk amplifier under identical conditions. Using spectroscopic data as the input, amplifier gain is calculated as a fucntion of flashlamp energy, pumping pulse duration, disk thickness, and Nd-doping. The agreement between predicted and measured gains is generally with ;plus or minus;10 percent, consistent with experimental uncertainties in the model and the parameters used. The operating conditions which optimize amplifier performance and efficiency for a given laser glass may be found using spectroscopic data alone. This process can be extended to derive the most cost-effective staging of amplifier chains for fusion lasers. A discussion of the model and examples of calculations are presented

  12. Modern reflective optics for material processing with high power CO/sub 2/-laser beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juptner, W.P.O.; Sepold, G.; Rothe, R.R.

    1986-01-01

    The state of the art in diamond turning of parabolic mirrors allows to manufacture high quality surfaces at a reasonable low price. In this paper a report is given on mirror optics and systems which were developed with the following aims: Small losses of laser power in the system with a high efficiency of the laser beam processing system; Long lifetime of the mirrors under material processing conditions; High Standard of the optical quality; Flexibility for different applications. The requested qualities are guaranteed by the whole construction of the optics and the system. The theoretical works, the state of the art of the development and the future aspects of these laser working head systems are reported

  13. Prototype of an energy enhancer for mask based laser materials processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bastue, Jens; Olsen, Flemmming Ove

    1997-01-01

    In general mask based laser material processing (MBLMP) is a process which suffers from a low energy efficiency, because the majority of the laser light is absorbed in or reflected by the mask. We have developed a device called an energy enhancer which is capable of improving the energy efficienc...... component reflectivity and alignment sensitivity are investigated in order to evaluate the possibility of making commercial use of the device. The obtainable image quality and how this is influenced by the focusing and imaging system is discussed in some detail....... by a factor of 2 - 4 for a typical TEA-CO2 system for mask based laser marking. A simple ray-tracing model has been built in order to design and optimise the energy enhancer. Thus we present experimental results as well as simulations and show fine accordance between the two. Important system parameters like...

  14. Laser Photolysis and Thermolysis of Organic Selenides and Tellurides for Chemical Gas-phase Deposition of Nanostructured Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Pola

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Laser radiation-induced decomposition of gaseous organic selenides and tellurides resulting in chemical deposition of nanostructured materials on cold surfaces is reviewed with regard to the mechanism of the gas-phase decomposition and properties of the deposited materials. The laser photolysis and laser thermolysis of the Se and Te precursors leading to chalcogen deposition can also serve as a useful approach to nanostructured chalcogen composites and IVA group (Si, Ge, Sn element chalcogenides provided that it is carried out simultaneously with laser photolysis or thermolysis of polymer and IVA group element precursor.

  15. Laser Welding Characterization of Kovar and Stainless Steel Alloys as Suitable Materials for Components of Photonic Devices Packaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fadhali, M. M. A.; Zainal, Saktioto J.; Munajat, Y.; Jalil, A.; Rahman, R.

    2010-01-01

    The weldability of Kovar and stainless steel alloys by Nd:YAG laser beam is studied through changing of some laser beam parameters. It has been found that there is a suitable interaction of the pulsed laser beam of low power laser pulse with both the two alloys. The change of thermophysical properties with absorbed energy from the laser pulse is discussed in this paper which reports the suitability of both Kovar and stainless steel 304 as the base materials for photonic devices packaging. We used laser weld system (LW4000S from Newport) which employs Nd:YAG laser system with two simultaneous beams output for packaging 980 nm high power laser module. Results of changing both laser spot weld width and penetration depth with changing both the pulse peak power density, pulse energy and pulse duration show that there are good linear relationships between laser pulse energy or peak power density and pulse duration with laser spot weld dimensions( both laser spot weld width and penetration depth). Therefore we concluded that there should be an optimization for both the pulse peak power and pulse duration to give a suitable aspect ratio (laser spot width to penetration depth) for achieving the desired welds with suitable penetration depth and small spot width. This is to reduce the heat affected zone (HAZ) which affects the sensitive optical components. An optimum value of the power density in the order of 10 5 w/cm 2 found to be suitable to induce melting in the welded joints without vaporization. The desired ratio can also be optimized by changing the focus position on the target material as illustrated from our measurements. A theoretical model is developed to simulate the temperature distribution during the laser pulse heating and predict the penetration depth inside the material. Samples have been investigated using SEM with EDS. The metallographic measurements on the weld spot show a suitable weld yield with reasonable weld width to depth ratio.

  16. Pulsed laser deposition of II-VI and III-V semiconductor materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mele, A.; Di Palma, T.M.; Flamini, C.; Giardini Guidoni, A. [Rome, Univ. `La Sapienza` (Italy). Dep. di Chimica

    1998-12-01

    Pulsed laser irradiation of a solid target involves electronic excitation and heating, followed by expansion from the target of the elliptical gas cloud (plume) which can be eventually condensed on a suitable substrate. Pulsed laser ablation has been found to be a valuable technique to prepare II-VI and III-V thin films of semiconductor materials. Pulsed laser ablation deposition is discussed in the light of the results of an investigation on CdS, CdSe, CdTe and CdSe/CdTe multilayers and AIN, GaN and InN together with Al-Ga-In-N heterostructures. [Italiano] L`irradiazione di un target solido, mediante un fascio laser impulsato, genera una serie di processi che possono essere schematizzati come segue: riscaldamento ed eccitazione elettronica del target, da cui consegue l`espulsione di materiale sotto forma di una nube gassosa di forma ellissoidale (plume), che espande e puo` essere fatta depositare su un opportuno substrato. L`ablazione lasersi e` rivelata una tecnica valida per preparare film sottili di composti di elementi del II-VI e del III-V gruppo della tavola periodica. La deposizione via ablazione laser viene discussa alla luce dei risultati ottenuti nella preparazione di film di CdS, CdSe, CdTe e di film multistrato di CdSe/CdTe, di film di AIN, GaN, InN e di eterostrutture di Al-Ga-In-N.

  17. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) as a rapid tool for material analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, T; Gondal, M A

    2013-01-01

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a novel technique for elemental analysis based on laser-generated plasma. In this technique, laser pulses are applied for ablation of the sample, resulting in the vaporization and ionization of sample in hot plasma which is finally analyzed by the spectrometer. The elements are identified by their unique spectral signatures. LIBS system was developed for elemental analysis of solid and liquid samples. The developed system was applied for qualitative as well as quantitative measurement of elemental concentration present in iron slag and open pit ore samples. The plasma was generated by focusing a pulsed Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm on test samples to study the capabilities of LIBS as a rapid tool for material analysis. The concentrations of various elements of environmental significance such as cadmium, calcium, magnesium, chromium, manganese, titanium, barium, phosphorus, copper, iron, zinc etc., in these samples were determined. Optimal experimental conditions were evaluated for improving the sensitivity of developed LIBS system through parametric dependence study. The laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) results were compared with the results obtained using standard analytical technique such as inductively couple plasma emission spectroscopy (ICP). Limit of detection (LOD) of our LIBS system were also estimated for the above mentioned elements. This study demonstrates that LIBS could be highly appropriate for rapid online analysis of iron slag and open pit waste.

  18. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) as a rapid tool for material analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, T.; Gondal, M. A.

    2013-06-01

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a novel technique for elemental analysis based on laser-generated plasma. In this technique, laser pulses are applied for ablation of the sample, resulting in the vaporization and ionization of sample in hot plasma which is finally analyzed by the spectrometer. The elements are identified by their unique spectral signatures. LIBS system was developed for elemental analysis of solid and liquid samples. The developed system was applied for qualitative as well as quantitative measurement of elemental concentration present in iron slag and open pit ore samples. The plasma was generated by focusing a pulsed Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm on test samples to study the capabilities of LIBS as a rapid tool for material analysis. The concentrations of various elements of environmental significance such as cadmium, calcium, magnesium, chromium, manganese, titanium, barium, phosphorus, copper, iron, zinc etc., in these samples were determined. Optimal experimental conditions were evaluated for improving the sensitivity of developed LIBS system through parametric dependence study. The laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) results were compared with the results obtained using standard analytical technique such as inductively couple plasma emission spectroscopy (ICP). Limit of detection (LOD) of our LIBS system were also estimated for the above mentioned elements. This study demonstrates that LIBS could be highly appropriate for rapid online analysis of iron slag and open pit waste.

  19. Indirect Versus Direct Heating of Sheet Materials: Superplastic Forming and Diffusion Bonding Using Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jocelyn, Alan; Kar, Aravinda; Fanourakis, Alexander; Flower, Terence; Ackerman, Mike; Keevil, Allen; Way, Jerome

    2010-06-01

    Many from within manufacturing industry consider superplastic forming (SPF) to be ‘high tech’, but it is often criticized as too complicated, expensive, slow and, in general, an unstable process when compared to other methods of manipulating sheet materials. Perhaps, the fundamental cause of this negative perception of SPF, and also of diffusion bonding (DB), is the fact that the current process of SPF/DB relies on indirect sources of heating to produce the conditions necessary for the material to be formed. Thus, heat is usually derived from the electrically heated platens of hydraulic presses, to a lesser extent from within furnaces and, sometimes, from heaters imbedded in ceramic moulds. Recent evaluations of these isothermal methods suggest they are slow, thermally inefficient and inappropriate for the process. In contrast, direct heating of only the material to be formed by modern, electrically efficient, lasers could transform SPF/DB into the first choice of designers in aerospace, automotive, marine, medical, architecture and leisure industries. Furthermore, ‘variable temperature’ direct heating which, in theory, is possible with a laser beam(s) may provide a means to control material thickness distribution, a goal of enormous importance as fuel efficient, lightweight structures for transportation systems are universally sought. This paper compares, and contrasts, the two systems and suggests how a change to laser heating might be achieved.

  20. Evaluation of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for the determination of micronutrients in plant materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trevizan, Lilian Cristina; Santos, Dario; Elgul Samad, Ricardo; Dias Vieira, Nilson; Nunes, Lidiane Cristina; Aparecida Rufini, Iolanda; Krug, Francisco Jose

    2009-01-01

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been evaluated for the determination of micronutrients (B, Cu, Fe, Mn and Zn) in pellets of plant materials, using NIST, BCR and GBW biological certified reference materials for analytical calibration. Pellets of approximately 2 mm thick and 15 mm diameter were prepared by transferring 0.5 g of powdered material to a 15 mm die set and applying 8.0 tons cm -2 . An experimental setup was designed by using a Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm (200 mJ per pulse, 10 Hz) and an Echelle spectrometer with ICCD detector. Repeatability precision varied from 4 to 30% from measurements obtained in 10 different positions (8 laser shots per test portion) in the same sample pellet. Limits of detection were appropriate for routine analysis of plant materials and were 2.2 mg kg -1 B, 3.0 mg kg -1 Cu, 3.6 mg kg -1 Fe, 1.8 mg kg -1 Mn and 1.2 mg kg -1 Zn. Analysis of different plant samples were carried out by LIBS and results were compared with those obtained by ICP OES after wet acid decomposition.

  1. Wavelength dependence of femtosecond laser-induced damage threshold of optical materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallais, L., E-mail: laurent.gallais@fresnel.fr; Douti, D.-B.; Commandré, M. [Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS, Centrale Marseille, Institut Fresnel UMR 7249, 13013 Marseille (France); Batavičiūtė, G.; Pupka, E.; Ščiuka, M.; Smalakys, L.; Sirutkaitis, V.; Melninkaitis, A. [Laser Research Center, Vilnius University, Saulétekio aléja 10, LT-10223 Vilnius (Lithuania)

    2015-06-14

    An experimental and numerical study of the laser-induced damage of the surface of optical material in the femtosecond regime is presented. The objective of this work is to investigate the different processes involved as a function of the ratio of photon to bandgap energies and compare the results to models based on nonlinear ionization processes. Experimentally, the laser-induced damage threshold of optical materials has been studied in a range of wavelengths from 1030 nm (1.2 eV) to 310 nm (4 eV) with pulse durations of 100 fs with the use of an optical parametric amplifier system. Semi-conductors and dielectrics materials, in bulk or thin film forms, in a range of bandgap from 1 to 10 eV have been tested in order to investigate the scaling of the femtosecond laser damage threshold with the bandgap and photon energy. A model based on the Keldysh photo-ionization theory and the description of impact ionization by a multiple-rate-equation system is used to explain the dependence of laser-breakdown with the photon energy. The calculated damage fluence threshold is found to be consistent with experimental results. From these results, the relative importance of the ionization processes can be derived depending on material properties and irradiation conditions. Moreover, the observed damage morphologies can be described within the framework of the model by taking into account the dynamics of energy deposition with one dimensional propagation simulations in the excited material and thermodynamical considerations.

  2. Factors affecting the laser processing of wood, 2: Effects of material parameters on machinability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, T.; Hayashi, D.

    1994-01-01

    Material parameters of wood were investigated. Factors relating to the workpiece include cutting direction, specific gravity, and components of the wood such as resin-like materials. Also studies of the effects of irregular tissue on machinability were made. The interactions between laser beam and materials are often greatly complex. They depend on the characteristics of the laser beam, the thermal constants of the woods, and the optical surface properties of the woods. Therefore, high quality beam mode and carefully selected materials were used. The following laser cutting properties became clear after studying the experimental results. Slow speed cutting and softwoods make slight differences, regarding cutting section and fiber direction. However, it can beconsidered that there is not very much change except in cross-section. Because of the high power density of laser, cutting speed makes no big difference. The irregular tissue of wood cannot maintain normal cutting speed and accuracy. The factor of genuine density eta, which is thought to be entirely independent of each specific gravity, is definedas the concept of density in general. It can be obtained by applying a simple rule, that is, the eta is the ratio of r(u)/rho(s) where rho(s) is the wood substance as the characteristic value of wood, and r(u)is specific gravity. An experimental formula shows that the depth of cut decreases in proportion to the value of eta. However, in the strict sense of the word, data of wood material as a natural resources mustbe treated qualitatively, because there are deviations from regularity due to various reasons. (author)

  3. Nanosecond laser pulses for mimicking thermal effects on nanostructured tungsten-based materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besozzi, E.; Maffini, A.; Dellasega, D.; Russo, V.; Facibeni, A.; Pazzaglia, A.; Beghi, M. G.; Passoni, M.

    2018-03-01

    In this work, we exploit nanosecond laser irradiation as a compact solution for investigating the thermomechanical behavior of tungsten materials under extreme thermal loads at the laboratory scale. Heat flux factor thresholds for various thermal effects, such as melting, cracking and recrystallization, are determined under both single and multishot experiments. The use of nanosecond lasers for mimicking thermal effects induced on W by fusion-relevant thermal loads is thus validated by direct comparison of the thresholds obtained in this work and the ones reported in the literature for electron beams and millisecond laser irradiation. Numerical simulations of temperature and thermal stress performed on a 2D thermomechanical code are used to predict the heat flux factor thresholds of the different thermal effects. We also investigate the thermal effect thresholds of various nanostructured W coatings. These coatings are produced by pulsed laser deposition, mimicking W coatings in tokamaks and W redeposited layers. All the coatings show lower damage thresholds with respect to bulk W. In general, thresholds decrease as the porosity degree of the materials increases. We thus propose a model to predict these thresholds for coatings with various morphologies, simply based on their porosity degree, which can be directly estimated by measuring the variation of the coating mass density with respect to that of the bulk.

  4. Femtosecond Laser Processing of Membranes for Sensor Devices on different Bulk Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johann Zehetner

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate that diaphragms for sensor applications can be fabricated by laser ablation in a~variety of substrates such as ceramics, glass, sapphire or SiC. However, ablation can cause pinholes in membranes made of SiC, Si and metals. Our experiments indicate that pinhole defects in the ablated membranes are affected by ripple structures related to the polarization of the laser. From our simulation results on light propagation in Laser-Induced Periodic Surface Structures (LIPSS we find out that they are acting as a slot waveguide in SiC material. The results further show that field intensity is enhanced inside LIPSS and spreads out at surface distortions promoting the formation of pinholes. The membrane corner area is most vulnerable for pinhole formation. Pinholes funnel laser radiation into the bulk material causing structural damage and stress in the membrane. We show that a~polarization flipping technique inhibits the formation of pin holes caused by LIPSS.

  5. Momentum and velocity of the ablated material in laser machining of carbon fiber preforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucha, P.; Speker, N.; Weber, R.; Graf, T.

    2013-11-01

    The automation in fabrication of CFRP (carbon-fiber-reinforced plastics) parts demands efficient and low-cost machining technologies. In conventional cutting technologies, tool-wear and low process speeds are some of the reasons for high costs. Thus, the use of lasers is an attractive option for cutting CF-preforms. A typical effect degrading the quality in laser cutting CF-preform is a bulged cutting edge. This effect is assumed to be caused by interaction of the fibers with the ablated material, which leaves the kerf at high velocity. Hence, a method for measuring the momentum and the velocity of the vapor is presented in this article. To measure the momentum of the ablated material, the CF-preform is mounted on a precision scale while cutting it with a laser. The direction of the momentum was determined by measuring the momentum parallel and orthogonal to the CF-preform surface. A change of the direction of the momentum with different cutting-speeds is assessed at constant laser-power. Averaged velocities of the ablation products of up to 300 m/s were determined by measuring the ablated mass and the momentum.

  6. The Laser Damage Threshold for Materials and the Relation Between Solid-Melt and Melt-Vapor Interface Velocities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, Osama Mostafa

    2010-01-01

    Numerous experiments have demonstrated and analytic theories have predicted that there is a threshold for pulsed laser ablation of a wide range of materials. Optical surface damage threshold is a very complex and important application of high-power lasers. Optical damage may also be considered to be the initial phase of laser ablation. In this work it was determined the time required and the threshold energy of a layer of thickness to heat up. We used the Finite Difference method to simulate the process of laser-target interaction in three cases. Namely, the case before melting begins using a continuous wave (c.w) laser source and a pulsed laser source, the case after the first change of state (from solid to melt), and the case after the second change of state (from melt to vapor). And also study the relation between the solid-melt and melt-vapor interface velocities to have a commonsense of the laser ablation process.

  7. Rare-Earth Tantalates and Niobates Single Crystals: Promising Scintillators and Laser Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renqin Dou

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Rare-earth tantalates, with high density and monoclinic structure, and niobates with monoclinic structure have been paid great attention as potential optical materials. In the last decade, we focused on the crystal growth technology of rare-earth tantalates and niobates and studied their luminescence and physical properties. A series of rare-earth tantalates and niobates crystals have been grown by the Czochralski method successfully. In this work, we summarize the research results on the crystal growth, scintillation, and laser properties of them, including the absorption and emission spectra, spectral parameters, energy levels structure, and so on. Most of the tantalates and niobates exhibit excellent luminescent properties, rich physical properties, and good chemical stability, indicating that they are potential outstanding scintillators and laser materials.

  8. Dissimilar material joining using laser (aluminum to steel using zinc-based filler wire)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Alexandre; Shabadi, Rajashekar; Deschamps, Alexis; Suery, Michel; Matteï, Simone; Grevey, Dominique; Cicala, Eugen

    2007-04-01

    Joining steel with aluminum involving the fusion of one or both materials is possible by laser beam welding technique. This paper describes a method, called laser braze welding, which is a suitable process to realize this structure. The main problem with thermal joining of steel/aluminum assembly with processes such as TIG or MIG is the formation of fragile intermetallic phases, which are detrimental to the mechanical performances of such joints. Braze welding permits a localized fusion of the materials resulting in a limitation on the growth of fragile phases. This article presents the results of a statistical approach for an overlap assembly configuration using a filler wire composed of 85% Zn and 15% Al. Tensile tests carried on these assemblies demonstrate a good performance of the joints. The fracture mechanisms of the joints are analyzed by a detailed characterization of the seams.

  9. Parameters Influence of CO2 Laser on Cutting Quality of Polymer Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Cep

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with evaluating of the resulting surface state of the three plastic materials and identification of suitable conditions for laser cutting with CO2 tube. As representative were chosen polypropylene, polymethylmethacrylate and polyamide. When cutting these types of materials it could melt eventually their re-sintering. A suitable combination of parameters is possible to achieve of sufficient quality of the cut. The samples were cut at different feed speed and laser power. Then they was compared on the basis of the measured roughness parameters Ra a Rz by using a portable touch roughness Hommel-Etamic W5 and dates was processed according to ČSN EN ISO 4287. Cutting of samples was realized at the Department of Machining, Assembly and Engineering Metrology, VŠB-TUO.

  10. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for analysis of plant materials: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Dário; Nunes, Lidiane Cristina; Gustinelli Arantes de Carvalho, Gabriel; Gomes, Marcos da Silva; Souza, Paulino Florêncio de; Leme, Flavio de Oliveira; Gustavo Cofani dos Santos, Luis; Krug, Francisco José

    2012-01-01

    Developments and contributions of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for the determination of elements in plant materials are reviewed. Several applications where the solid samples are interrogated by simply focusing the laser pulses directly onto a fresh or dried surface of leaves, roots, fruits, vegetables, wood and pollen are presented. For quantitative purposes aiming at plant nutrition diagnosis, the test sample presentation in the form of pressed pellets, prepared from clean, dried and properly ground/homogenized leaves, and the use of univariate or multivariate calibration strategies are revisited. - Highlights: ► Qualitative and quantitative LIBS analysis of plant materials are reviewed. ► Fresh or dried leaves, fruits, roots and pellets can be easily interrogated by LIBS. ► LIBS is a powerful tool for plant nutrition diagnosis and elemental mapping. ► Intended LIBS users will find a survey of applications in a comprehensive table.

  11. Study of Low Work Function Materials for Hot Cavity Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Catherall, R; Fedosseev, V; Marsh, B; Mattolat, C; Menna, Mariano; Österdahl, F; Raeder, S; Schwellnus, F; Stora, T; Wendt, K; CERN. Geneva. AB Department

    2008-01-01

    The selectivity of a hot cavity resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) is most often limited by contributions from competing surface ionization on the hot walls of the ionization cavity. In this article we present investigations on the properties of designated high-temperature, low-work function materials regarding their performance and suitability as cavity material for RILIS. Tungsten test cavities, impregnated with a mixture of barium oxide and strontium oxide (BaOSrO on W), or alternatively gadolinium hexaboride (GdB6) were studied in comparison to a standard tungsten RILIS cavity as being routinely used for hot cavity laser ionization at ISOLDE. Measurement campaigns took place at the off-line mass separators at ISOLDE / CERN, Geneva and RISIKO / University of Mainz.

  12. Study of low work function materials for hot cavity resonance ionization laser ion sources

    CERN Document Server

    Schwellnus, F; Crepieux, B; Fedosseev, V N; Marsh, B A; Mattolat, Ch; Menna, M; Österdahl, F K; Raeder, S; Stora, T; Wendta, K

    2009-01-01

    The selectivity of a hot cavity resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) is most often limited by contributions from competing surface ionization of the hot walls of the ionization cavity. In this article we present investigations on the properties of designated high temperature, low work function materials regarding their performance and suitability as cavity material for RILIS. Tungsten test cavities, impregnated with a mixture of barium oxide and strontium oxide (BaOSrO on W), or alternatively gadolinium hexaboride (GdB6) were studied in comparison to a standard tungsten RILIS cavity as being routinely used for hot cavity laser ionization at ISOLDE. Measurement campaigns took place at the off-line mass separators at ISOLDE/CERN, Geneva and RISIKO/University of Mainz.

  13. Manufacturing of the ISO 25178-70 material measures with direct laser writing: a feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eifler, M.; Hering, J.; von Freymann, G.; Seewig, J.

    2018-06-01

    The standard ISO 25178-70 defines material measures for the calibration of 2D- and 3D-topography measurement devices. Some of the suggested material measures are established within the industrial application for a long time while others have not yet been extensively researched regarding their practical abilities. This paper describes a holistic and systematic investigation of the ISO 25178-70 material measures. The manufacturing of the suggested geometries is executed with two-photon laser lithography, alias direct laser writing (DLW). Since this manufacturing process is not yet frequently used in a material measures context, it is examined regarding its suitability for the fabrication of the ISO 25178-70 material measures. With DLW, it is possible to manufacture multiple material measures on one sample in order to enable a comprehensive calibration of optical topography measurement devices. The manufactured ISO 25178-70 geometries are examined using different 3D-topography measuring devices. In doing so, their abilities regarding the calibration of the devices can be evaluated and the practical feasibility of their industrial application is assessed. For the review of this practical usefulness, varying calibration and evaluation strategies are taken into account.

  14. Femtosecond laser excitation of dielectric materials: experiments and modeling of optical properties and ablation depths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wædegaard, Kristian Juncher; Frislev, Martin Thomas; Balling, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Modeling of the interaction between a dielec- tric material and ultrashort laser pulses provides the tem- poral evolution of the electronic excitation and the optical properties of the dielectric. Experimentally determined re- flectances and ablation depths for sapphire are compared...... to the calculations. A decrease in reflectance at high fluences is observed experimentally, which demonstrates the neces- sity of a temperature-dependent electron scattering rate in the model. The comparison thus provides new constraints on the optical parameters of the model....

  15. Transmission electron microscopy of nanostructures synthesized by laser and charged particle beam interaction with materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dey, G. K.

    2011-01-01

    Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), because of its ability to image atomic arrangements directly and its ability to give spectroscopic information at similar resolution has emerged as a very powerful tool for understanding the structure of materials at atomic level. TEM has been particularly useful in resolving the interface structures in materials. This form of microscopy is very suitable for resolving the structure and defects in ultrafine microstructures such as those of the nanocrystalline phases. After a brief description of the different characterization abilities of the aberration corrected transmission electron microscope, this presentation describes the results of TEM investigations on nanocrystalline microstructures generated by laser materials interaction and due to interaction of electrons and ions with materials. Excimer laser has become an attractive choice for new and precision application for ablation and deposition in recent times. In this work, a KrF excimer laser having 30 ns pulse width and 600 mJ energy at source has been used to deposit zirconia on Zr-base alloy in order to explore the ability of the thin oxide film to act as a diffusion barrier to hydrogen ingress into the alloy. It has been found that the variation in pressure by an order of three has resulted in maximum influence on the roughness of the laser deposited oxide film that has not been possible to achieve by other parameters within the range of the instrument. Present study has also indicated an interrelation among the roughness, adherence and the film-thickness, where the last one is indicated by the XPS study. Transmission electron microscopy was carried out to study the size, size distribution and defects in the deposited film. Nanocrystalline phases generated by interaction of electron and ion irradiation of Zr based alloys; Ni based alloys and Fe based alloys have been examined in detail by conventional and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. Results of

  16. Applications of free-electron lasers to measurements of energy transfer in biopolymers and materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Glenn S.; Johnson, J. B.; Kozub, John A.; Tribble, Jerri A.; Wagner, Katrina

    1992-08-01

    Free-electron lasers (FELs) provide tunable, pulsed radiation in the infrared. Using the FEL as a pump beam, we are investigating the mechanisms for energy transfer between localized vibrational modes and between vibrational modes and lattice or phonon modes. Either a laser-Raman system or a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer will serve as the probe beam, with the attribute of placing the burden of detection on two conventional spectroscopic techniques that circumvent the limited response of infrared detectors. More specifically, the Raman effect inelastically shifts an exciting laser line, typically a visible frequency, by the energy of the vibrational mode; however, the shifted Raman lines also lie in the visible, allowing for detection with highly efficient visible detectors. With regards to FTIR spectroscopy, the multiplex advantage yields a distinct benefit for infrared detector response. Our group is investigating intramolecular and intermolecular energy transfer processes in both biopolymers and more traditional materials. For example, alkali halides contain a number of defect types that effectively transfer energy in an intermolecular process. Similarly, the functioning of biopolymers depends on efficient intramolecular energy transfer. Understanding these mechanisms will enhance our ability to modify biopolymers and materials with applications to biology, medecine, and materials science.

  17. The characteristics of laser welded magnesium alloy using silver nanoparticles as insert material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishak, M.; Maekawa, K.; Yamasaki, K.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Ag nanoparticles are used as insert material for welding Mg alloy with laser. ► We examine the microstructure and mechanical properties of welded Mg alloys. ► Nananoparticle promote grain refinement to the weld structure. ► Finer nanoparticle produces high weld efficiency and mechanical properties. - Abstract: This paper describes the characteristics of the laser welding of thin-sheet magnesium alloys using silver (Ag) nanoparticles as an insert material. The experiment was conducted using nanoparticles with 5 nm and 100 nm diameters that were welded with a Nd:YAG laser. The microstructure and mechanical properties of the specimens welded using inserts with different sizes of nanoparticles and without an insert material, were examined. Electron probe micro-analyzer (EPMA) analysis was conducted to confirm the existence of Ag in the welded area. The introduction of the Ag nanoparticle insert promoted large area of fine grain and broadened the acceptable range of scanning speed parameters compared to welds without an insert. Welds with 5 nm nanoparticles yielded the highest fracture load of up to 818 N while the lowest fracture load was found for weld specimens with 100 nm nanoparticles. This lower fracture load was due to larger voids and a smaller throat length, which contributed to a lower fracture load when using larger nanoparticles.

  18. Ultrafast Laser Diagnostics for Energetic-Material Ignition Mechanisms: Tools for Physics-Based Model Development.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kearney, Sean Patrick; Jilek, Brook Anton; Kohl, Ian Thomas; Farrow, Darcie; Urayama, Junji

    2014-11-01

    We present the results of an LDRD project to develop diagnostics to perform fundamental measurements of material properties during shock compression of condensed phase materials at micron spatial scales and picosecond time scales. The report is structured into three main chapters, which each focus on a different diagnostic devel opment effort. Direct picosecond laser drive is used to introduce shock waves into thin films of energetic and inert materials. The resulting laser - driven shock properties are probed via Ultrafast Time Domain Interferometry (UTDI), which can additionally be used to generate shock Hugoniot data in tabletop experiments. Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) is developed as a temperature diagnostic. A transient absorption spectroscopy setup has been developed to probe shock - induced changes during shock compressio n. UTDI results are presented under dynamic, direct - laser - drive conditions and shock Hugoniots are estimated for inert polystyrene samples and for the explosive hexanitroazobenzene, with results from both Sandia and Lawrence Livermore presented here. SRS a nd transient absorption diagnostics are demonstrated on static thin - film samples, and paths forward to dynamic experiments are presented.

  19. Effects of filling material and laser power on the formation of intermetallic compounds during laser-assisted friction stir butt welding of steel and aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Xinjiang; Jin, Xiangzhong; Peng, Nanxiang; Ye, Ying; Wu, Sigen; Dai, Houfu

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, two kinds of materials, Ni and Zn, are selected as filling material during laser-assisted friction stir butt welding of Q235 steel and 6061-T6 aluminum alloy, and their influences on the formation of intermetallic compounds on the steel/aluminum interface of the joints were first studied. SEM was used to analyze the profile of the intermetallic compound layer and the fractography of tensile fracture surfaces. In addition, EDS was applied to investigate the types of the intermetallic compounds. The results indicate that a thin iron-abundant intermetallic compound layer forms and ductile fracture mode occurs when Ni is added, but a thick aluminum-abundant intermetallic compound layer generates and brittle fracture mode occurs when Zn is added. So the tensile strength of the welds with Ni as filling material is greater than that with Zn as filling material. Besides, the effect of laser power on the formation of intermetallic compound layer when Ni is added was investigated. The preheated temperature field produced by laser beam in the cross section of workpiece was calculated, and the tensile strength of the joints at different laser powers was tested. Results show that only when suitable laser power is adopted, can suitable preheating temperature of the steel reach, then can thin intermetallic compound layer form and high tensile strength of the joints reach. Either excessive or insufficient laser power will reduce the tensile strength of the joints.

  20. Synthesis of nano-structured materials by laser-ablation and their application to sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, T.; Suehiro, J.

    2007-01-01

    We describe the synthesis of nano-structured materials of ZnO and Pd by laser ablation and their applications to sensors. The synthesis of ZnO nano-wires was performed by nano-particle assisted deposition (NPAD) where nano-crystals were grown with nano-particles generated by laser-ablating a ZnO sintered target in an Ar background gas. The synthesized ZnO nano-wires were characterized with a scanning electron microscopy and the photoluminescent characteristics were examined under an excitation with the third harmonics of a Nd:YAG laser. The nano-wires with a diameter in the range from 50 to 150 nm and a length of up to 5 μm were taken out of the substrate by laser blow-off technique and/or sonication. It was confirmed that the nano-wires showed the stimulated emission under optical pumping, indicating a high quality of the crystalinity. Pd nano-particles were generated by laser-ablating a Pd plate in pure water. The transmission electron microscope observation revealed that Pd nano-particles with a diameter in the range from 3 nm to several tens of nanometers were produced. Using these nano-structured materials, we successfully fabricated sensors by the dielectrophoresis techniques. In the case of the ultraviolet photosensor, a detection sensitivity of 10 nW/cm 2 was achieved and in the case of hydrogen sensing, the response time of less than 10 s has been demonstrated with Pd nano-particles

  1. Irradiation of nuclear materials with laser-plasma filaments produced in air and deuterium by terrawatt (TW) laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avotina, Liga; Lungu, Mihail; Dinca, Paul; Butoi, Bogdan; Cojocaru, Gabriel; Ungureanu, Razvan; Marcu, Aurelian; Luculescu, Catalin; Hapenciuc, Claudiu; Ganea, Paul C.; Petjukevics, Aleksandrs; Lungu, Cristian P.; Kizane, Gunta; Ticos, C. M.; Antohe, Stefan

    2018-01-01

    Be-C-W mixed materials with variable atomic ratios were exposed to high power (TW) laser induced filamentation plasma in air in normal conditions and in deuterium at a reduced pressure of 20 Torr. Morphological and structural investigations were performed on the irradiated zones for both ambient conditions. The presence of low-pressure deuterium increased the overall ablation rate for all samples. From the elemental concentration point of view, the increase of the carbon percentage has led to an increase in the ablation rate. An increase of the tungsten percentage had the opposite effect. From structural spectroscopic investigations using XPS, Raman and FT-IR of the irradiated and non-irradiated sample surfaces, we conclude that deuterium-induced enhancement of the ablation process could be explained by preferential amorphous carbon removal, possibly by forming deuterated hydrocarbons which further evaporated, weakening the layer structure.

  2. Reduction of damage threshold in dielectric materials induced by negatively chirped laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louzon, E.; Henis, Z.; Pecker, S.; Ehrlich, Y.; Fisher, D.; Fraenkel, M.; Zigler, A.

    2005-01-01

    The threshold fluence for laser induced damage in wide band gap dielectric materials, fused silica and MgF 2 , is observed to be lower by up to 20% for negatively (down) chirped pulses than for positively (up) chirped, at pulse durations ranging from 60 fs to 1 ps. This behavior of the threshold fluence for damage on the chirp direction was not observed in semiconductors (silicon and GaAs). Based on a model including electron generation in the conduction band and Joule heating, it is suggested that the decrease in the damage threshold for negatively chirped pulse is related to the dominant role of multiphoton ionization in wide gap materials

  3. Enhancing the Ductility of Laser-Welded Copper-Aluminum Connections by using Adapted Filler Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigl, M.; Albert, F.; Schmidt, M.

    Laser micro welding of direct copper-aluminum connections typically leads to the formation of intermetallic phases and an embrittlement of the metal joints. By means of adapted filler materials it is possible to reduce the brittle phases and thereby enhance the ductility of these dissimilar connections. As the element silicon features quite a well compatibility with copper and aluminum, filler materials based on Al-Si and Cu-Si alloys are used in the current research studies. In contrast to direct Cu-Al welds, the aluminum filler alloy AlSi12 effectuates a more uniform element mixture and a significantly enhanced ductility.

  4. Multifunctional Material Structures Based on Laser-Etched Carbon Nanotube Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Emplit

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available High-power electronics in the transportation and aerospace sectors need size and weight reduction. Multifunctional and multistructured materials are currently being developed to couple electromagnetic (EM and thermal properties, i.e., shielding against electromagnetic impulsions, and thermal management across the thermal interface material (TIM. In this work, we investigate laser-machined patterned carbon nanotube (CNT micro-brushes as an alternative to metallic structures for driving simultaneously EM and heat propagation. The thermal and electromagnetic response of the CNT array is expected to be sensitive to the micro-structured pattern etched in the CNT brush.

  5. Enhanced Laser Cooling of Rare-Earth-Ion-Doped Composite Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You-Hua, Jia; Biao, Zhong; Xian-Ming, Ji; Jian-Ping, Yin

    2008-01-01

    We predict enhanced laser cooling performance of rare-earth-ions-doped glasses containing nanometre-sized ul-traBne particles, which can be achieved by the enhancement of local Geld around rare earth ions, owing to the surface plasma resonance of small metallic particles. The influence of energy transfer between ions and the particle is theoretically discussed. Depending on the particle size and the ion emission quantum efficiency, the enhancement of the absorption is predicted. It is concluded that the absorption are greatly enhanced in these composite materials, the cooling power is increased as compared to the bulk material

  6. Ultrashort pulse laser processing of hard tissue, dental restoration materials, and biocompatibles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousif, A.; Strassl, M.; Beer, F.; Verhagen, L.; Wittschier, M.; Wintner, E.

    2007-07-01

    During the last few years, ultra-short laser pulses have proven their potential for application in medical tissue treatment in many ways. In hard tissue ablation, their aptitude for material ablation with negligible collateral damage provides many advantages. Especially teeth representing an anatomically and physiologically very special region with less blood circulation and lower healing rates than other tissues require most careful treatment. Hence, overheating of the pulp and induction of microcracks are some of the most problematic issues in dental preparation. Up till now it was shown by many authors that the application of picosecond or femtosecond pulses allows to perform ablation with very low damaging potential also fitting to the physiological requirements indicated. Beside the short interaction time with the irradiated matter, scanning of the ultra-short pulse trains turned out to be crucial for ablating cavities of the required quality. One main reason for this can be seen in the fact that during scanning the time period between two subsequent pulses incident on the same spot is so much extended that no heat accumulation effects occur and each pulse can be treated as a first one with respect to its local impact. Extension of this advantageous technique to biocompatible materials, i.e. in this case dental restoration materials and titanium plasma-sprayed implants, is just a matter of consequence. Recently published results on composites fit well with earlier data on dental hard tissue. In case of plaque which has to be removed from implants, it turns out that removal of at least the calcified version is harder than tissue removal. Therefore, besides ultra-short lasers, also Diode and Neodymium lasers, in cw and pulsed modes, have been studied with respect to plaque removal and sterilization. The temperature increase during laser exposure has been experimentally evaluated in parallel.

  7. Applications of laser produced ion beams to nuclear analysis of materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mima, K.; Azuma, H.; Fujita, K.; Yamazaki, A.; Okuda, C.; Ukyo, Y.; Kato, Y.; Arrabal, R. Gonzalez; Soldo, F.; Perlado, J. M.; Nishimura, H.; Nakai, S.

    2012-01-01

    Laser produced ion beams have unique characteristics which are ultra-short pulse, very low emittance, and variety of nuclear species. These characteristics could be used for analyzing various materials like low Z ion doped heavy metals or ceramics. Energies of laser produced ion beam extend from 0.1MeV to 100MeV. Therefore, various nuclear processes can be induced in the interactions of ion beams with samples. The ion beam driven nuclear analysis has been developed for many years by using various electrostatic accelerators. To explore the applicability of laser ion beam to the analysis of the Li ion battery, a proton beam with the diameter of ∼ 1.0 μm at Takasaki Ion Acceleration for Advanced Radiation Application (TIARA), JAEA was used. For the analysis, the PIGE (Particle-Induced Gamma Ray Emission) is used. The proton beam scans over Li battery electrode samples to diagnose Li density in the LiNi 0.85 Co 0.15 O 2 anode. As the results, PIGE images for Li area density distributions are obtained with the spatial resolution of better than 1.5μm FWHM. By the Li PIGE images, the depth dependence of de-intercalation levels of Li in the anode is obtained. By the POP experiments at TIARA, it is clarified that laser produced ion beam is appropriate for the Li ion battery analysis. 41.85.Lc, 41.75.Jv, 42.62.cf.

  8. Microstructure and Magnetic Properties of Magnetic Material Fabricated by Selective Laser Melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhong, Kai Jyun; Huang, Wei-Chin; Lee, Wen Hsi

    Selective Laser Melting (SLM) is a powder-based additive manufacturing which is capable of producing parts layer-by-layer from a 3D CAD model. The aim of this study is to adopt the selective laser melting technique to magnetic material fabrication. [1]For the SLM process to be practical in industrial use, highly specific mechanical properties of the final product must be achieved. The integrity of the manufactured components depend strongly on each single laser-melted track and every single layer, as well as the strength of the connections between them. In this study, effects of the processing parameters, such as the space distance of surface morphology is analyzed. Our hypothesis is that when a magnetic product is made by the selective laser melting techniques instead of traditional techniques, the finished component will have more precise and effective properties. This study analyzed the magnitudes of magnetic properties in comparison with different parameters in the SLM process and compiled a completed product to investigate the efficiency in contrast with products made with existing manufacturing processes.

  9. TRANSITION METAL OXIDES AS MATERIALS FOR ADDITIVE LASER MARKING ON STAINLESS STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihail Stoyanov Mihalev

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The product information plays an important role in the improvement of the manufacturing, allowing the tracking of the part through the full life cycle. Laser marking is one of the most versatile techniques for this purpose. In this paper, a modification of the powder bed selective laser melting for additive laser marking of stainless steel parts is presented. This modification is based on the use of only one transition metal oxide chemically bonded to the stainless steel substrate, without using any additional materials and cleaning substances. The resulting additive coatings, produced from initial MoO3 and WO3 powders, show strong adhesion, high hardness, long durability and a high optical contrast. For estimation of the chemical and structural properties, the Raman and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD spectroscopy have been implemented. A computer model of the process of the laser melting and re-solidification has been developed as well. A comparative analysis of the properties of both (MoO3 and WO3 additive coatings has been performed. An attempt for a qualitative explanation of the thermo-chemical phenomena during the marking process has been undertaken.

  10. Photo-Machining of Semiconductor Related Materials with Femtosecond Laser Ablation and Characterization of Its Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokotani, Atushi; Mizuno, Toshio; Mukumoto, Toru; Kawahara, Kousuke; Ninomiya, Takahumi; Sawada, Hiroshi; Kurosawa, Kou

    We have analyzed the drilling process with femtosecond laser on the silicon surface in order to investigate a degree of thermal effect during the dicing process of the very thin silicon substrate. A regenerative amplified Ti:Al2O3 laser (E= 30˜500 μJ/pulse, τ= 200 fs, λ= 780 nm, f= 10 Hz) was used and focused onto a 50 μm-thick silicon sample. ICCD (Intensified Charge coupled Device) camera with a high-speed gate of 5 ns was utilized to take images of processing hole. First, we investigated the dependence of laser energy on the speed of the formation of the drilled hole. As a result, it was found that the lager the energy, the slower the speed of the formation under the minimum hole was obtained. Consequently, in the case of defocused condition, even when the smaller the energy density was used, the very slow speed of formation and the much lager thermal effects are simultaneously observed. So we can say that the degree of the thermal effects is not simply related to energy density of the laser but strongly related to the speed of the formation, which can be measured by the ICCD camera. The similar tendency was also obtained for other materials, which are important for the fabrication of ICs (Al, Cu, SiO2 and acrylic resin).

  11. All-fiber-coupled laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy sensor for hazardous materials analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohling, Christian [Institut fuer Physik und Physikalische Technologien, Technische Universitaet Clausthal, Leibnizstrasse 4, 38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); SECOPTA GmbH, Ostendstr. 25, 12459 Berlin (Germany)], E-mail: c.bohling@pe.tu-clausthal.de; Hohmann, Konrad [Institut fuer Physik und Physikalische Technologien, Technische Universitaet Clausthal, Leibnizstrasse 4, 38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany)], E-mail: k.hohmann@pe.tu-clausthal.de; Scheel, Dirk [Systektum GmbH, Arnold-Sommerfeld-Str. 6, 38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany)], E-mail: d.scheel@systektum.de; Bauer, Christoph [LaserAnwendungsCentrum (LAC) Technische Universitaet Clausthal, Arnold-Sommerfeld-Strasse 6, 38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany)], E-mail: c.bauer@pe.tu-clausthal.de; Schippers, Wolfgang [Institut fuer Physik und Physikalische Technologien, Technische Universitaet Clausthal, Leibnizstrasse 4, 38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany)], E-mail: w.schippers@pe.tu-clausthal.de; Burgmeier, Joerg [LaserAnwendungsCentrum (LAC) Technische Universitaet Clausthal, Arnold-Sommerfeld-Strasse 6, 38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany)], E-mail: j.burgmeier@pe.tu-clausthal.de; Willer, Ulrike [Institut fuer Physik und Physikalische Technologien, Technische Universitaet Clausthal, Leibnizstrasse 4, 38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); LaserAnwendungsCentrum (LAC) Technische Universitaet Clausthal, Arnold-Sommerfeld-Strasse 6, 38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany)], E-mail: u.willer@pe.tu-clausthal.de; Holl, Gerhard [Wehrwissenschaftliches Institut fuer Werk-, Explosiv- und Betriebsstoffe (WIWEB), Grosses Cent, 53913, Swisttal (Germany)], E-mail: gerhardholl@bwb.orgd; Schade, Wolfgang [Institut fuer Physik und Physikalische Technologien, Technische Universitaet Clausthal, Leibnizstrasse 4, 38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); LaserAnwendungsCentrum (LAC) Technische Universitaet Clausthal, Arnold-Sommerfeld-Strasse 6, 38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany)], E-mail: w.schade@pe.tu-clausthal.de

    2007-12-15

    An all-fiber-coupled laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) sensor device is developed. A passively Q-switched Cr{sup 4+}Nd{sup 3+}:YAG microchip laser is amplified within an Yb fiber amplifier, thus generating high power laser pulses (pulse energy E{sub p} = 0.8 mJ, wavelength {lambda} = 1064 nm, repetition rate f{sub rep.} = 5 kHz, pulse duration t{sub p} = 1.2 ns). A passive (LMA) optical fiber is spliced to the active fiber of an Yb fiber amplifier for direct guiding of high power laser pulses to the sensor tip. In front of the sensor a plasma is generated on the surface to be analyzed. The plasma emission is collected by a set of optical fibers also integrated into the sensor tip. The spectrally resolved LIBS spectra are processed by application of principal component analysis (PCA) and analyzed together with the time-resolved spectra with neural networks. Such procedure allows accurate analysis of samples by LIBS even for materials with similar atomic composition. The system has been tested successfully during field measurements at the German Armed Forces test facility at Oberjettenberg. The LIBS sensor is not restricted to anti-personnel mine detection but has also the potential to be suitable for analysis of bulk explosives and surface contaminations with explosives, e.g. for the detection of improvised explosive devices (IEDs)

  12. Time-resolved ultraviolet laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for organic material analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baudelet, Matthieu; Boueri, Myriam [Laboratoire de Spectrometrie Ionique et Moleculaire, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, UMR CNRS 5579, 43, Bd. du 11 Novembre 1918, F-69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Yu Jin [Laboratoire de Spectrometrie Ionique et Moleculaire, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, UMR CNRS 5579, 43, Bd. du 11 Novembre 1918, F-69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)], E-mail: jin.yu@lasim.univ-lyon1.fr; Mao, Samuel S; Piscitelli, Vincent; Xianglei, Mao; Russo, Richard E [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2007-12-15

    Ultraviolet pulses (266 nm) delivered by a quadrupled Nd:YAG laser were used to analyze organic samples with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). We present characteristics of the spectra obtained from organic samples with special attentions on the emissions of organic elements, O and N, and molecular bonds CN. The choice of these atomic or molecular species is justified on one hand, by the importance of these species to specify organic or biological materials; and on the other hand by the possible interferences with ambient air when laser ablation takes place in the atmosphere. Time-resolved LIBS was used to determine the time-evolution of line intensity emitted from these species. We demonstrate different kinetic behaviors corresponding to different origins of emitters: native atomic or molecular species directly vaporized from the sample or those generated through dissociation or recombination due to interaction between laser-induced plasma and air molecules. Our results show the ability of time-resolved UV-LIBS for detection and identification of native atomic or molecular species from an organic sample.

  13. Modulating calcium phosphate formation using CO2 laser engineering of a polymeric material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waugh, D.G.; Lawrence, J.

    2012-01-01

    The use of simulated body fluid (SBF) is widely used as a screening technique to assess the ability of materials to promote calcium phosphate formation. This paper details the use of CO 2 laser surface treatment of nylon® 6,6 to modulate calcium phosphate formation following immersion in SBF for 14 days. Through white light interferometry (WLI) it was determined that the laser surface processing gave rise to maximum Ra and Sa parameters of 1.3 and 4.4 μm, respectively. The use of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) enabled a maximum increase in surface oxygen content of 5.6%at. to be identified. The laser-induced surface modifications gave rise to a modulation in the wettability characteristics such that the contact angle, θ, decreased for the whole area processed samples, as expected, and increased for the patterned samples. The increase in θ can be attributed to a transition in wetting nature to a mixed-state wetting regime. It was seen for all samples that calcium phosphate formed on each surface following 14 days. The largest increase in mass, Δg, owed to calcium phosphate formation, was brought about by the whole area processed sample irradiated with a fluence of 51 J cm −2 . No correlation between the calcium phosphate formation and the laser patterned surface properties was determined due to the likely affect of the mixed-state wetting regime. Strong correlations between θ, the surface energy parameters and the calcium phosphate formation for the whole area processed samples allow one to realize the potential for this surface treatment technique in predicting the bone forming ability of laser processed materials. - Highlights: ► Surface modifications brought about a modulation in the wetting of nylon 6,6. ► An increase in θ can be attributed to a mixed-state wetting regime. ► Laser surface treatment modulated the ability to promote apatite formation. ► Mixed-state wetting regime affected the promotion of uniform apatite formation.

  14. Modulating calcium phosphate formation using CO{sub 2} laser engineering of a polymeric material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waugh, D.G., E-mail: Dwaugh@lincoln.ac.uk; Lawrence, J.

    2012-02-01

    The use of simulated body fluid (SBF) is widely used as a screening technique to assess the ability of materials to promote calcium phosphate formation. This paper details the use of CO{sub 2} laser surface treatment of nylon Registered-Sign 6,6 to modulate calcium phosphate formation following immersion in SBF for 14 days. Through white light interferometry (WLI) it was determined that the laser surface processing gave rise to maximum Ra and Sa parameters of 1.3 and 4.4 {mu}m, respectively. The use of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) enabled a maximum increase in surface oxygen content of 5.6%at. to be identified. The laser-induced surface modifications gave rise to a modulation in the wettability characteristics such that the contact angle, {theta}, decreased for the whole area processed samples, as expected, and increased for the patterned samples. The increase in {theta} can be attributed to a transition in wetting nature to a mixed-state wetting regime. It was seen for all samples that calcium phosphate formed on each surface following 14 days. The largest increase in mass, {Delta}g, owed to calcium phosphate formation, was brought about by the whole area processed sample irradiated with a fluence of 51 J cm{sup -2}. No correlation between the calcium phosphate formation and the laser patterned surface properties was determined due to the likely affect of the mixed-state wetting regime. Strong correlations between {theta}, the surface energy parameters and the calcium phosphate formation for the whole area processed samples allow one to realize the potential for this surface treatment technique in predicting the bone forming ability of laser processed materials. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Surface modifications brought about a modulation in the wetting of nylon 6,6. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An increase in {theta} can be attributed to a mixed-state wetting regime. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Laser surface treatment modulated the

  15. Experimental and numerical studies on laser-based powder deposition of slurry erosion resistant materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balu, Prabu

    Slurry erosion (the removal of material caused by the randomly moving high velocity liquid-solid particle mixture) is a serious issue in crude oil drilling, mining, turbines, rocket nozzles, pumps, and boiler tubes that causes excessive downtime and high operating costs as a result of premature part failure. The goal of this research is to enhance the service life of high-value components subjected to slurry erosion by utilizing the concept of functionally graded metal-ceramic composite material (FGMCCM) in which the favorable properties of metal (toughness, ductility, etc.) and ceramic (hardness) are tailored smoothly to improve erosion resistance. Among the potential manufacturing processes, such as the laser-based powder deposition (LBPD), the plasma transferred arc (PTA), and the thermal spray the LBPD process offers good composition and microstructure control with a high deposition rate in producing the FGMCCM. This research focuses on the development of nickel-tungsten carbide (Ni-WC) based FGMCCM using the LBPD process for applications the above mentioned. The LBPD of Ni-WC involves the introduction of Ni and WC powder particle by an inert gas into the laser-formed molten pool at the substrate via nozzles. The LBPD of Ni-WC includes complex multi-physical interactions between the laser beam, Ni-WC powder, substrate, and carrier and shielding gases that are governed by a number of process variables such as laser power, scanning speed, and powder flow rate. In order to develop the best Ni-WC based slurry erosion resistant material using the LBPD process, the following challenges associated with the fabrication and the performance evaluation need to be addressed: 1) flow behavior of the Ni-WC powder and its interaction with the laser, 2) the effect of the process variables, the material compositions, and the thermo-physical properties on thermal cycles, temperature gradient, cooling rate, and residual stress formation within the material and the subsequent

  16. Development of electrical excited CO2-laser with transversal gas flow as well an axial flowed CO2-laser for material treatment, in particular for cutting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wollermann-Windgasse, R.; Ackermann, F.

    1987-04-01

    The project describes the development of a new generation of CO 2 -lasers using high frequency discharge (13.56 MHz) for laser excitation by capacitive dielectrical input. HF-excitation has a lot of advantages compared with direct current technology, these are higher electrical input power into the plasma, better homogeneity and stability of discharges. In addition to this, HF-excitation shows excellent possibilities for pulsing and modulation. As a result of this, there are compact powerful laser systems with the possibility of scaling up to the multi-kW-range. The examination included fast transversal flowed as well as fast axial flowed systems. In the end of this project development prototypes with laser output power of 1000 W, 1500 W and 3000 W were available. Detailed attempts of application show that these lasers on grounds of excellent laser output quality and controlability of laser power specifically to each process make possible new ways for material treatment by laser. (orig./HP) [de

  17. Recent advances in phosphate laser glasses for high power applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, J.H.

    1996-01-01

    Recent advances in Nd-doped phosphate laser glasses for high-peak-power and high-average-power applications are reviewed. Compositional studies have progressed to the point that glasses can be tailored to have specific properties for specific applications. Non-radiative relaxation effects can be accurately modeled and empirical expressions have been developed to evaluate both intrinsic (structural) and extrinsic (contamination induced) relaxation effects. Losses due to surface scattering and bulk glass absorption have been carefully measured and can be accurately predicted. Improvements in processing have lead to high damage threshold (e.g. Pt inclusion free) and high thermal shock resistant glasses with improved edge claddings. High optical quality pieces up to 79 x 45 x 4cm 3 have been made and methods for continuous melting laser glass are under development

  18. UV excimer laser and low temperature plasma treatments of polyamide materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Yiu Wan Joanne

    Polyamides have found widespread application in various industrial sectors, for example, they are used in apparel, home furnishings and similar uses. However, the requirements for high quality performance products are continually increasing and these promote a variety of surface treatments for polymer modification. UV excimer laser and low temperature plasma treatments are ideally suited for polyamide modification because they can change the physical and chemical properties of the material without affecting its bulk features. This project aimed to study the modification of polyamides by UV excimer laser irradiation and low temperature plasma treatment. The morphological changes in the resulting samples were analysed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and tapping mode atomic force microscopy (TM-AFM). The chemical modifications were studied by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) and chemical force microscopy (CFM). Change in degree of crystallinity was examined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). After high-fluence laser irradiation, topographical results showed that ripples of micrometer size form on the fibre surface. By contrast, sub-micrometer size structures form on the polyamide surface when the applied laser energy is well below its ablation threshold. After high-fluence laser irradiation, chemical studies showed that the surface oxygen content of polyamide is reduced. A reverse result is obtained with low-fluence treatment. The DSC result showed no significant change in degree of crystallinity in either high-fluence or low-fluence treated samples. The same modifications in polyamide surfaces were studied after low temperature plasma treatment with oxygen, argon or tetrafluoromethane gas. The most significant result was that the surface oxygen content of polyamide increased after oxygen and argon plasma treatments. Both treatments induced many hydroxyl (-OH) and carboxylic acid (-COOH

  19. High-temperature quadrupole mass spectrometer for studying vaporization from materials heated by a CO2 laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fredin, L.; Hansen, G.P.; Sampson, M.P.; Margrave, J.L.; Behrens, R.G.

    1986-09-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of mass spectrometry techniques in studying vaporization from selected materials, we designed a mass spectrometer than can be used either with a continuous wave or pulsed laser heating system or with a conventional furnace heating system. Our experimental apparatus, the components of which are described in detail, consisted of a quadrupole mass spectrometer positioned in a crossed-beam configuration, controlling electronics, a data acquisition system, a vacuum system, a cryogenic collimation system, and a laser heating system. Results of mass spectral scans taken during laser pyrolysis of polymeric materials and laser vaporization of graphite were compatible with data reported in other studies. Results of mass spectral studies of laser-induced combustion in the Ti + C system are also presented

  20. Parametric study of development of Inconel-steel functionally graded materials by laser direct metal deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Kamran; Haq, Izhar ul; Khan, Ashfaq; Shah, Shaukat Ali; Khan, Mushtaq; Pinkerton, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Functionally graded steel and nickel super-alloy structures have been developed. • Mechanical properties of FGMs can be controlled by process input parameters. • SDAS is strongly dependent on the laser power and powder mass flow rate. • Carbides provide a mechanism to control the hardness and wear resistance of FGM. • Tensile strength of FGM is dependent on the laser power and powder mass flow rate. - Abstract: Laser direct metal deposition (LDMD) has developed from a prototyping to a single and multiple metals manufacturing technique. It offers an opportunity to produce graded components, with differing elemental composition, phase and microstructure at different locations. In this work, continuously graded Stainless Steel 316L and Inconel 718 thin wall structures made by direct laser metal deposition process have been explored. The paper considers the effects of process parameters including laser power levels and powder mass flow rates of SS316L and Inconel 718 during the deposition of the Steel–Ni graded structures. Microstructure characterisation and phase identification are performed by optical microscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques. Mechanical testing, using methods such as hardness, wear resistance and tensile testing have been carried out on the structures. XRD results show the presence of the NbC and Fe 2 Nb phases formed during the deposition. The effect of experimental parameters on the microstructure and physical properties are determined and discussed. Work shows that mechanical properties can be controlled by input parameters and generation of carbides provides an opportunity to selectively control the hardness and wear resistance of the functionally graded material

  1. Single- and multi-pulse femtosecond laser ablation of optical filter materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krueger, J.; Lenzner, M.; Martin, S.; Lenner, M.; Spielmann, C.; Fiedler, A.; Kautek, W.

    2003-01-01

    Ablation experiments employing Ti:sapphire laser pulses with durations from 30 to 340 fs (centre wavelength 800 nm, repetition rate 1 kHz) were performed in air. Absorbing filters (Schott BG18 and BG36) served as targets. The direct focusing technique was used under single- and multi-pulse irradiation conditions. Ablation threshold fluences were determined from a semi-logarithmic plot of the ablation crater diameter versus laser fluence. The threshold fluence decreases for a shorter pulse duration and an increasing number of pulses. The multi-pulse ablation threshold fluences are similar to those of undoped glass material (∼1 J cm -2 ). That means that the multi-pulse ablation threshold is independent on the doping level of the filters. For more than 100 pulses per spot and all pulse durations applied, the threshold fluence is practically constant. This leads to technically relevant ablation threshold values

  2. Synthesis of magnetic nanofibers using femtosecond laser material processing in air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Bo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this study, we report formation of weblike fibrous nanostructure and nanoparticles of magnetic neodymium-iron-boron (NdFeB via femtosecond laser radiation at MHz pulse repetition frequency in air at atmospheric pressure. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM analysis revealed that the nanostructure is formed due to aggregation of polycrystalline nanoparticles of the respective constituent materials. The nanofibers diameter varies between 30 and 70 nm and they are mixed with nanoparticles. The effect of pulse to pulse separation rate on the size of the magnetic fibrous structure and the magnetic strength was reported. X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis revealed metallic and oxide phases in the nanostructure. The growth of magnetic nanostructure is highly recommended for the applications of magnetic devices like biosensors and the results suggest that the pulsed-laser method is a promising technique for growing nanocrystalline magnetic nanofibers and nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

  3. Synthesis of magnetic nanofibers using femtosecond laser material processing in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we report formation of weblike fibrous nanostructure and nanoparticles of magnetic neodymium-iron-boron (NdFeB) via femtosecond laser radiation at MHz pulse repetition frequency in air at atmospheric pressure. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis revealed that the nanostructure is formed due to aggregation of polycrystalline nanoparticles of the respective constituent materials. The nanofibers diameter varies between 30 and 70 nm and they are mixed with nanoparticles. The effect of pulse to pulse separation rate on the size of the magnetic fibrous structure and the magnetic strength was reported. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis revealed metallic and oxide phases in the nanostructure. The growth of magnetic nanostructure is highly recommended for the applications of magnetic devices like biosensors and the results suggest that the pulsed-laser method is a promising technique for growing nanocrystalline magnetic nanofibers and nanoparticles for biomedical applications. PMID:21711890

  4. Differential laser-induced perturbation spectroscopy and fluorescence imaging for biological and materials sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Dallas Jonathan

    The field of laser-based diagnostics has been a topic of research in various fields, more specifically for applications in environmental studies, military defense technologies, and medicine, among many others. In this dissertation, a novel laser-based optical diagnostic method, differential laser-induced perturbation spectroscopy (DLIPS), has been implemented in a spectroscopy mode and expanded into an imaging mode in combination with fluorescence techniques. The DLIPS method takes advantage of deep ultraviolet (UV) laser perturbation at sub-ablative energy fluences to photochemically cleave bonds and alter fluorescence signal response before and after perturbation. The resulting difference spectrum or differential image adds more information about the target specimen, and can be used in combination with traditional fluorescence techniques for detection of certain materials, characterization of many materials and biological specimen, and diagnosis of various human skin conditions. The differential aspect allows for mitigation of patient or sample variation, and has the potential to develop into a powerful, noninvasive optical sensing tool. The studies in this dissertation encompass efforts to continue the fundamental research on DLIPS including expansion of the method to an imaging mode. Five primary studies have been carried out and presented. These include the use of DLIPS in a spectroscopy mode for analysis of nitrogen-based explosives on various substrates, classification of Caribbean fruit flies versus Caribbean fruit flies that have been irradiated with gamma rays, and diagnosis of human skin cancer lesions. The nitrogen-based explosives and Caribbean fruit flies have been analyzed with the DLIPS scheme using the imaging modality, providing complementary information to the spectroscopic scheme. In each study, a comparison between absolute fluorescence signals and DLIPS responses showed that DLIPS statistically outperformed traditional fluorescence techniques

  5. Creating stable Floquet-Weyl semimetals by laser-driving of 3D Dirac materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hübener, Hannes; Sentef, Michael A; De Giovannini, Umberto; Kemper, Alexander F; Rubio, Angel

    2017-01-17

    Tuning and stabilizing topological states, such as Weyl semimetals, Dirac semimetals or topological insulators, is emerging as one of the major topics in materials science. Periodic driving of many-body systems offers a platform to design Floquet states of matter with tunable electronic properties on ultrafast timescales. Here we show by first principles calculations how femtosecond laser pulses with circularly polarized light can be used to switch between Weyl semimetal, Dirac semimetal and topological insulator states in a prototypical three-dimensional (3D) Dirac material, Na 3 Bi. Our findings are general and apply to any 3D Dirac semimetal. We discuss the concept of time-dependent bands and steering of Floquet-Weyl points and demonstrate how light can enhance topological protection against lattice perturbations. This work has potential practical implications for the ultrafast switching of materials properties, such as optical band gaps or anomalous magnetoresistance.

  6. Creating stable Floquet-Weyl semimetals by laser-driving of 3D Dirac materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hübener, Hannes; Sentef, Michael A.; de Giovannini, Umberto; Kemper, Alexander F.; Rubio, Angel

    2017-01-01

    Tuning and stabilizing topological states, such as Weyl semimetals, Dirac semimetals or topological insulators, is emerging as one of the major topics in materials science. Periodic driving of many-body systems offers a platform to design Floquet states of matter with tunable electronic properties on ultrafast timescales. Here we show by first principles calculations how femtosecond laser pulses with circularly polarized light can be used to switch between Weyl semimetal, Dirac semimetal and topological insulator states in a prototypical three-dimensional (3D) Dirac material, Na3Bi. Our findings are general and apply to any 3D Dirac semimetal. We discuss the concept of time-dependent bands and steering of Floquet-Weyl points and demonstrate how light can enhance topological protection against lattice perturbations. This work has potential practical implications for the ultrafast switching of materials properties, such as optical band gaps or anomalous magnetoresistance.

  7. Creating stable Floquet–Weyl semimetals by laser-driving of 3D Dirac materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hübener, Hannes; Sentef, Michael A.; De Giovannini, Umberto; Kemper, Alexander F.; Rubio, Angel

    2017-01-01

    Tuning and stabilizing topological states, such as Weyl semimetals, Dirac semimetals or topological insulators, is emerging as one of the major topics in materials science. Periodic driving of many-body systems offers a platform to design Floquet states of matter with tunable electronic properties on ultrafast timescales. Here we show by first principles calculations how femtosecond laser pulses with circularly polarized light can be used to switch between Weyl semimetal, Dirac semimetal and topological insulator states in a prototypical three-dimensional (3D) Dirac material, Na3Bi. Our findings are general and apply to any 3D Dirac semimetal. We discuss the concept of time-dependent bands and steering of Floquet–Weyl points and demonstrate how light can enhance topological protection against lattice perturbations. This work has potential practical implications for the ultrafast switching of materials properties, such as optical band gaps or anomalous magnetoresistance. PMID:28094286

  8. Development of a technology for amorphous material (Co-free) hardfacing on primary side component materials using laser beam to improve their wear/erosion.corrosion resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Jeong Hun; Kim, J. S.; Han, J. H.; Lee, D. H.; Hwang, S. S

    2000-08-01

    A technology of laser hardfacing of amorphous materials onto materials used in the primary-side components has been developed in order to improve their integrity and reduce the radiation fluence in the primary system. (1) Development of a powder feeding system for the laser cladding. (2) Modification of the laser system in order to perform cladding the part surfaces with complex 3D geometries through the tool paths determined with CAD/CAM. (3) Development of laser cladding technology with amorphous alloy. (4) Examination and analysis of the microstructure, chemical composition, and phases of the clads. (5) Evaluation of the mechanical properties of the clads. (6) Development of an ultrasonic vibrator for VSR.

  9. Development of a technology for amorphous material (Co-free) hardfacing on primary side component materials using laser beam to improve their wear/erosion.corrosion resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, Jeong Hun; Kim, J. S.; Han, J. H.; Lee, D. H.; Hwang, S. S.

    2000-08-01

    A technology of laser hardfacing of amorphous materials onto materials used in the primary-side components has been developed in order to improve their integrity and reduce the radiation fluence in the primary system. 1) Development of a powder feeding system for the laser cladding. 2) Modification of the laser system in order to perform cladding the part surfaces with complex 3D geometries through the tool paths determined with CAD/CAM. 3) Development of laser cladding technology with amorphous alloy. 4) Examination and analysis of the microstructure, chemical composition, and phases of the clads. 5) Evaluation of the mechanical properties of the clads. 6) Development of an ultrasonic vibrator for VSR

  10. Laser ultrasonic receivers based on photorefractive materials in non-destructive testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamiri Hosseinzadeh, S.

    2014-01-01

    The field of laser ultrasonics is one of the most interesting topics in which laser light is used for the generation and the detection of ultrasound waves in materials. This contactless method is extremely useful for materials inspection being nondestructive and contactless, especially for hazardous environments. In this method a pulsed laser with a short pulse length of e.g. nano- or even picoseconds is focused on the surface of a specimen and then ultrasonic waves, nanometer vibrations, such as surface and bulk waves are generated and propagate in all directions on to the material. For contactless detection of ultrasonic waves several interferometers such as confocal Fabry-Perot, Michelson, and long path difference interferometers have been applied. Each of them has its individual advantages and disadvantages concerning, e.g., frequency responses and sensitivity. However, most of these interferometers work best on mirror-like surfaces and exhibit reduced sensitivity on rough surfaces. Also these kinds of interferometer are sensible to external noise as air fluctuations, sample vibrations or thermal deformations, thus requiring relatively complex stabilization techniques. This hinders their applicability in industrial applications with harsh environmental conditions. As an alternative to the before mentioned techniques interferometers based on photorefractive materials (PR) have been established. A typical two wave mixing interferometer (TWMI) configuration enables broadband ultrasonic measurements on rough surfaces. These types of interferometers have a good sensitivity up to 3e-7 nm(W/Hz) 1/2 spatially for samples with a high rough surface unlike the Michelson interferometer. By using ferroelectric photorefractive crystals such as LiNbO:Fe+2, sensitivity even is enhanced to 4e-8 nm(W/Hz) 1/2 but response time in these crystals is slower. In this work, contactless interferometer set ups based on photorefractive materials such as BSO (Bismuth Silicon Oxide: Bi 12

  11. Exploring laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for nuclear materials analysis and in-situ applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Madhavi Z.; Allman, Steve; Brice, Deanne J.; Martin, Rodger C.; Andre, Nicolas O.

    2012-08-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been used to determine the limits of detection of strontium (Sr) and cesium (Cs), common nuclear fission products. Additionally, detection limits were determined for cerium (Ce), often used as a surrogate for radioactive plutonium in laboratory studies. Results were obtained using a laboratory instrument with a Nd:YAG laser at fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm, frequency doubled to 532 nm with energy of 50 mJ/pulse. The data was compared for different concentrations of Sr and Ce dispersed in a CaCO3 (white) and carbon (black) matrix. We have addressed the sampling errors, limits of detection, reproducibility, and accuracy of measurements as they relate to multivariate analysis in pellets that were doped with the different elements at various concentrations. These results demonstrate that LIBS technique is inherently well suited for in situ analysis of nuclear materials in hot cells. Three key advantages are evident: (1) small samples (mg) can be evaluated; (2) nuclear materials can be analyzed with minimal sample preparation; and (3) samples can be remotely analyzed very rapidly (ms-seconds). Our studies also show that the methods can be made quantitative. Very robust multivariate models have been used to provide quantitative measurement and statistical evaluation of complex materials derived from our previous research on wood and soil samples.

  12. New materials properties achievable by ion implantation doping and laser processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appleton, B.R.; Larson, B.C.; White, C.W.; Narayan, J.; Wilson, S.R.; Pronko, P.P.

    1978-12-01

    It is well established that ion implantation techniques can be used to introduce selected impurities into solids in a controlled, accurate and often unique manner. Recent experiments have shown that pulsed laser processing of materials can lead to surface melting, dopant redistribution and crystal regrowth, all on extremely short time scales (approx. < 1 μ sec.). These two processes can be combined to achieve properties not possible with normal materials preparation techniques, or to alter materials properties in a more efficient manner. Investigations are presented utilizing the combined techniques of positive ion scattering-channeling, x-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy which show that supersaturated alloys can be formed in the surface regions (approx. 1 μm) of ion implanted, laser annealed silicon single crystals, and that these surfaces undergo a unique one dimensional lattice contraction or expansion depending on the dopant species. The resultant surface has a lattice parameter significantly different from the bulk, is free from any damage defects, has essentially all the dopant atoms in substitutional sites and the impurity concentrations can exceed solid solubility limits by more than an order of magnitude

  13. Multivariate methods for analysis of environmental reference materials using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shikha Awasthi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of emission from laser-induced plasma has a unique capability for quantifying the major and minor elements present in any type of samples under optimal analysis conditions. Chemometric techniques are very effective and reliable tools for quantification of multiple components in complex matrices. The feasibility of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS in combination with multivariate analysis was investigated for the analysis of environmental reference materials (RMs. In the present work, different (Certified/Standard Reference Materials of soil and plant origin were analyzed using LIBS and the presence of Al, Ca, Mg, Fe, K, Mn and Si were identified in the LIBS spectra of these materials. Multivariate statistical methods (Partial Least Square Regression and Partial Least Square Discriminant Analysis were employed for quantitative analysis of the constituent elements using the LIBS spectral data. Calibration models were used to predict the concentrations of the different elements of test samples and subsequently, the concentrations were compared with certified concentrations to check the authenticity of models. The non-destructive analytical method namely Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA using high flux reactor neutrons and high resolution gamma-ray spectrometry was also used for intercomparison of results of two RMs by LIBS.

  14. Welded joints integrity analysis and optimization for fiber laser welding of dissimilar materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Yuewei; Shao, Xinyu; Jiang, Ping; Li, Peigen; Liu, Yang; Liu, Wei

    2016-11-01

    Dissimilar materials welded joints provide many advantages in power, automotive, chemical, and spacecraft industries. The weld bead integrity which is determined by process parameters plays a significant role in the welding quality during the fiber laser welding (FLW) of dissimilar materials. In this paper, an optimization method by taking the integrity of the weld bead and weld area into consideration is proposed for FLW of dissimilar materials, the low carbon steel and stainless steel. The relationships between the weld bead integrity and process parameters are developed by the genetic algorithm optimized back propagation neural network (GA-BPNN). The particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm is taken for optimizing the predicted outputs from GA-BPNN for the objective. Through the optimization process, the desired weld bead with good integrity and minimum weld area are obtained and the corresponding microstructure and microhardness are excellent. The mechanical properties of the optimized joints are greatly improved compared with that of the un-optimized welded joints. Moreover, the effects of significant factors are analyzed based on the statistical approach and the laser power (LP) is identified as the most significant factor on the weld bead integrity and weld area. The results indicate that the proposed method is effective for improving the reliability and stability of welded joints in the practical production.

  15. Femtosecond laser damage threshold and nonlinear characterization in bulk transparent SiC materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DesAutels, G. Logan; Finet, Marc; Ristich, Scott; Whitaker, Matt; Brewer, Chris; Juhl, Shane; Walker, Mark; Powers, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Semi-insulating and conducting SiC crystalline transparent substrates were studied after being processed by femtosecond (fs) laser radiation (780 nm at 160 fs). Z-scan and damage threshold experiments were performed on both SiC bulk materials to determine each sample's nonlinear and threshold parameters. 'Damage' in this text refers to an index of refraction modification as observed visually under an optical microscope. In addition, a study was performed to understand the damage threshold as a function of numerical aperture. Presented here for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, are the damage threshold, nonlinear index of refraction, and nonlinear absorption measured values

  16. Accelerated expansion of laser-ablated materials near a solid surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, K.R.; Leboeuf, J.N.; Wood, R.F.; Geohegan, D.B.; Donato, J.M.; Liu, C.L.; Puretzky, A.A.

    1995-01-01

    A dynamic source effect that accelerates the expansion of laser-ablated material in the direction perpendicular to the target is demonstrated. A self-similar theory shows that the maximum expansion velocity is proportional to c s /α, where 1-α is the slope of the velocity profile and c s is the sound speed. Numerical hydrodynamic modeling is in good agreement with the theory. A dynamic partial ionization effect is also studied. With these effects, α is reduced and the maximum expansion velocity is significantly increased over that found from conventional models. copyright 1995 The American Physical Society

  17. Colour marking of transparent materials by laser-induced plasma-assisted ablation (LIPAA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanada, Yasutaka; Sugioka, Koji; Miyamoto, Iwao; Midorikawa, Katsumi

    2007-01-01

    We demonstrate colour marking of a transparent material using laser-induced plasma-assisted ablation (LIPAA) system. After the LIPAA process, metal thin film is deposited on the surface of the ablated groove. This feature is applied to RGB (red, green and blue) colour marking by using specific metal targets. The metal targets, for instance, are Pb 3 O 4 for red, Cr 2 O 3 for green and [Cu(C 32 H 15 ClN 8 )] for blue colour marking. Additionally, adhesion of the metal thin film deposited on the processed groove by various experimental conditions is investigated

  18. Studying the Issues in Laser Joining of Lightweight Materials in a Coach-Peel Joint Configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guang

    In the automotive industry, aluminum alloys have been widely used and partially replaced the conventional steel structures in order to decrease the weight of a car and improve its fuel efficiency. This Thesis focuses on the development of laser joining of light-weight materials, such as aluminum alloys and high-strength galvanized steels. Among different joint types, the coach-peel configuration is of a specific design that requires a heat source capable of heating up a large surface area of the joint. Coach-peel joints applied on the visible exterior of a car require a smooth transition from the weld surface to the panel surface and low surface roughness without any need for post-processing. Although these joints are used as non-load-bearing components, a desirable strength of the weld is also needed. A fusion-brazing process using a dual-beam laser allows the automotive components such as the roof and side member panels to be joined in a coach-peel configuration with a high surface quality as well as an acceptable strength of the weld. To improve the weld surface quality, processing parameters such as laser beam configuration, laser-wire position, and shielding gas parameters were optimized for joining of aluminum alloy to aluminum alloy. Laser power was optimized for dual-beam laser joining of aluminum alloy to galvanized steel at high speed. The feasibility of joining as-received panels with lubricant was also explored. The identification of strain hardening models of aluminum alloys was conducted for the mechanical finite element analysis of the joint. Control of the molten pool solidification through the selection of laser beam configuration is one approach to improve joint quality. Laser joining of aluminum alloy AA 6111-T4 coach peel panels with the addition of AA 4047 filler wire was investigated using three configurations of laser beam: a single beam, dual beams in-line with the weld bead, and dual beams aligned perpendicular to the weld bead (herein

  19. Double pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy applied to natural and artificial materials from cultural heritages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brai, Maria; Gennaro, Gaetano; Schillaci, Tiziano; Tranchina, Luigi

    2009-01-01

    The laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is an applied physical technique that has shown in recent years its great potential for rapid qualitative analysis of materials. Thanks to the possibility to implement a portable instrument that perform LIBS analysis, this technique is revealed to be particularly useful for in situ analysis in the field of cultural heritages. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the potentiality of LIBS technique in the field of cultural heritages, with respect to the chemical characterization of complex matrix as calcareous and refractory materials for further quantitative analyses on cultural heritages. X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) analyses were used as reference. Calibration curves of certified materials used as standards were obtained by XRF analyses. The LIBS measurements were performed with a new mobile instrument called Modi (Mobile Double pulse Instrument for LIBS Analysis). The XRF analyses were performed with a portable instrument ArtTAX. LIBS and XRF measurement were performed on both reference materials and samples (bricks and mortars) sampled in the ancient Greek-Roman Theatre of Taormina. Although LIBS measurements performed on reference materials have shown non linear response to concentrations, and so we were not able to obtain quantitative results, an integrated study of XRF and LIBS signals permitted us to distinguish among chemical features and degradation state of measured building materials.

  20. Double pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy applied to natural and artificial materials from cultural heritages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brai, Maria; Gennaro, Gaetano [Dipartimento di Fisica e Tecnologie Relative, Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze Ed.18, 90128 Palermo (Italy); Schillaci, Tiziano, E-mail: tschillaci@unipa.i [Dipartimento di Fisica e Tecnologie Relative, Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze Ed.18, 90128 Palermo (Italy); Tranchina, Luigi [Dipartimento di Fisica e Tecnologie Relative, Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze Ed.18, 90128 Palermo (Italy)

    2009-10-15

    The laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is an applied physical technique that has shown in recent years its great potential for rapid qualitative analysis of materials. Thanks to the possibility to implement a portable instrument that perform LIBS analysis, this technique is revealed to be particularly useful for in situ analysis in the field of cultural heritages. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the potentiality of LIBS technique in the field of cultural heritages, with respect to the chemical characterization of complex matrix as calcareous and refractory materials for further quantitative analyses on cultural heritages. X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) analyses were used as reference. Calibration curves of certified materials used as standards were obtained by XRF analyses. The LIBS measurements were performed with a new mobile instrument called Modi (Mobile Double pulse Instrument for LIBS Analysis). The XRF analyses were performed with a portable instrument ArtTAX. LIBS and XRF measurement were performed on both reference materials and samples (bricks and mortars) sampled in the ancient Greek-Roman Theatre of Taormina. Although LIBS measurements performed on reference materials have shown non linear response to concentrations, and so we were not able to obtain quantitative results, an integrated study of XRF and LIBS signals permitted us to distinguish among chemical features and degradation state of measured building materials.

  1. Study of Material Consolidation at Higher Throughput Parameters in Selective Laser Melting of Inconel 718

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prater, Tracie

    2016-01-01

    Selective Laser Melting (SLM) is a powder bed fusion additive manufacturing process used increasingly in the aerospace industry to reduce the cost, weight, and fabrication time for complex propulsion components. SLM stands poised to revolutionize propulsion manufacturing, but there are a number of technical questions that must be addressed in order to achieve rapid, efficient fabrication and ensure adequate performance of parts manufactured using this process in safety-critical flight applications. Previous optimization studies for SLM using the Concept Laser M1 and M2 machines at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center have centered on machine default parameters. The objective of this work is to characterize the impact of higher throughput parameters (a previously unexplored region of the manufacturing operating envelope for this application) on material consolidation. In phase I of this work, density blocks were analyzed to explore the relationship between build parameters (laser power, scan speed, hatch spacing, and layer thickness) and material consolidation (assessed in terms of as-built density and porosity). Phase II additionally considers the impact of post-processing, specifically hot isostatic pressing and heat treatment, as well as deposition pattern on material consolidation in the same higher energy parameter regime considered in the phase I work. Density and microstructure represent the "first-gate" metrics for determining the adequacy of the SLM process in this parameter range and, as a critical initial indicator of material quality, will factor into a follow-on DOE that assesses the impact of these parameters on mechanical properties. This work will contribute to creating a knowledge base (understanding material behavior in all ranges of the AM equipment operating envelope) that is critical to transitioning AM from the custom low rate production sphere it currently occupies to the world of mass high rate production, where parts are fabricated at a rapid

  2. Laser-assisted development of titanium alloys: the search for new biomedical materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Amelia; Gupta, Dheeraj; Vilar, Rui

    2011-02-01

    Ti-alloys used in prosthetic applications are mostly alloys initially developed for aeronautical applications, so their behavior was not optimized for medical use. A need remains to design new alloys for biomedical applications, where requirements such as biocompatibility, in-body durability, specific manufacturing ability, and cost effectiveness are considered. Materials for this application must present excellent biocompatibility, ductility, toughness and wear and corrosion resistance, a large laser processing window and low sensitivity to changes in the processing parameters. Laser deposition has been investigated in order to access its applicability to laser based manufactured implants. In this study, variable powder feed rate laser cladding has been used as a method for the combinatorial investigation of new alloy systems that offers a unique possibility for the rapid and exhaustive preparation of a whole range of alloys with compositions variable along a single clad track. This method was used as to produce composition gradient Ti-Mo alloys. Mo has been used since it is among the few elements biocompatible, non-toxic β-Ti phase stabilizers. Alloy tracks with compositions in the range 0-19 wt.%Mo were produced and characterized in detail as a function of composition using microscale testing procedures for screening of compositions with promising properties. Microstructural analysis showed that alloys with Mo content above 8% are fully formed of β phase grains. However, these β grains present a cellular substructure that is associated to a Ti and Mo segregation pattern that occurs during solidification. Ultramicroindentation tests carried out to evaluate the alloys' hardness and Young's modulus showed that Ti-13%Mo alloys presented the lowest hardness and Young's modulus (70 GPa) closer to that of bone than common Ti alloys, thus showing great potential for implant applications.

  3. Experimental and numerical investigations of a hydrogen-assisted laser-induced materials transfer procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toet, D.; Smith, P. M.; Sigmon, T. W.; Thompson, M. O.

    2000-01-01

    We present investigations of the mechanisms of a laser-induced transfer technique, which can be used for the spatially selective deposition of materials such as Si. This transfer is effected by irradiating the backside of a hydrogenated amorphous silicon film, deposited on a transparent substrate with an excimer laser pulse. The resulting release and accumulation of hydrogen at the film/substrate interface propels the silicon onto an adjacent receptor wafer. Time-resolved infrared transmission measurements indicate that the amorphous film is melted by the laser pulse and breaks into droplets during ejection. These droplets travel towards the receptor substrate and coalesce upon arrival. The transfer velocity increases as a function of fluence, the rate of increase dropping noticeably around the full melt threshold of the film. At this fluence, the transfer velocity reaches values of around 1000 m/s for typical films. Atomic force microscopy reveals that films transferred below the full melt threshold only partially cover the receptor substrate, while uniform, well-adhering films, which can be smoothed by subsequent laser irradiation, are obtained above it. Transfer of hydrogen-free Si films, on the other hand, does not occur until much higher fluences. The dynamics of the process have been simulated using a semiquantitative numerical model. In this model, hydrogen released from the melt front is instantaneously accumulated at the interface with an initial kinetic energy given by the melting temperature of Si and the enthalpy of solution. The resulting pressure accelerates the Si film, the dynamics of which are modeled using Newtonian mechanics, and the gas cools adiabatically as its kinetic energy is converted to the film's momentum. The results of the calculations are in good agreement with the experimental data. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  4. Effects of Femtosecond Terawatt Laser Pulses on Materials Similar to Porcine Skin

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kumru, Semih S; Noojin, Gary D; Rockwell, Benjamin A

    2004-01-01

    As the laser technology advances and the availability of high power femtosecond pulsed laser systems increase, the urgency to have damage thresholds and ED50 data on these new laser systems becomes...

  5. Studies on laser material processing with nanosecond and sub-nanosecond and picosecond and sub-picosecond pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Tao, Sha; Wang, Brian; Zhao, Jay

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, laser ablation of widely used metal (Al, Cu. stainless-steel), semiconductor (Si), transparent material (glass, sapphire), ceramic (Al2O3, AlN) and polymer (PI, PMMA) in industry were systematically studied with pulse width from nanosecond (5-100ns), picosecond (6-10ps) to sub-picosecond (0.8-0.95ps). A critical damage zone (CDZ) of up to 100um with ns laser, efficiency were also investigated. This is to explore how to provide industry users the best laser solution for device micro-fabrication with best price. Our studies of cutting and drilling with ns, ps, and sub-ps lasers indicate that it is feasible to achieve user accepted quality and speed with cost-effective and reliable laser by optimizing processing conditions.

  6. Fast and stable gratings inscription in POFs made of different materials with pulsed 248 nm KrF laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marques, C. A.F.; Min, R.; Leal, A.

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents fiber Bragg grating (FBG) inscription with a pulsed 248 nm UV KrF laser in polymer optical fibers (POFs) made of different polymers, namely polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), cyclic-olefin polymer and co-polymer, and Polycarbonate. The inscribed gratings and the corresponding...... inscription parameters are compared with grating inscribed in POFs made of the aforementioned materials but with the hitherto most used laser for inscription, which is a continuous wave 325 nm UV HeCd laser. Results show a reduction of the inscription time of at least 16 times. The maximum time reduction...... is more than 130 times. In addition, a reflectivity and a bandwidth close to or higher than the ones with the 325 nm laser were obtained. The polymer optical fiber Bragg gratings (POFBGs) inscribed with the 248 nm laser setup present high stability with small variations in their central wavelength...

  7. A mathematical model and an approximate method for calculating the fracture characteristics of nonmetallic materials during laser cutting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smorodin, F.K.; Druzhinin, G.V.

    1991-01-01

    A mathematical model is proposed which describes the fracture behavior of amorphous materials during laser cutting. The model, which is based on boundary layer equations, is reduced to ordinary differential equations with the corresponding boundary conditions. The reduced model is used to develop an approximate method for calculating the fracture characteristics of nonmetallic materials.

  8. Femtosecond laser ablation profile near an interface: Analysis based on the correlation with superficial properties of individual materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicolodelli, Gustavo, E-mail: nicolodelli@ursa.ifsc.usp.br [Instituto de Fisica de Sao Carlos, University of Sao Paulo, Grupo de Optica, Av. Trabalhador Sancarlense 400, P.O. Box 369, CEP 13560-970, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Kurachi, Cristina; Bagnato, Vanderlei Salvador [Instituto de Fisica de Sao Carlos, University of Sao Paulo, Grupo de Optica, Av. Trabalhador Sancarlense 400, P.O. Box 369, CEP 13560-970, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2011-01-15

    Femtosecond laser ablation of materials is turning to be an important tool for micromachining as well as for selective removal of biological tissues. In a great number of applications, laser ablation has to process through interfaces separating media of different properties. The investigation of the ablation behavior within materials and passing through interfaces is the main aim of this study. Especially, the analysis of the discontinuity in the ablation profile close to interfaces between distinct materials can reveal some of the phenomena involved in the formation of an ablated microcavity geometry. We have used a method that correlates the ablation cross sectional area with the local laser intensity. The effective intensity ablation properties were obtained from surface ablation data of distinct materials. The application of this method allows the prediction of the occurrence of a size discontinuity in the ablation geometry at the interface of distinct media, a fact which becomes important when planning applications in different media.

  9. Study and characterization of ceramic materials from natural origin for application in jewellery design using laser texturing as innovation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elesbao, T.R.; Carus, L.A.; Tabarelli, A.C.; Vieira, R.P.; Takimi, A.S.

    2012-01-01

    Technological development has been largely responsible for changes in the jewelry market. Seeking to contribute to the development of new products, this study analyzed the technique of laser texturing, aiming to add commercial and aesthetic values to the mother of pearl, material used in the jewelry field. The methodology was divided into physico-chemical characterization of the mother-of-pearl and of the resulting residue of laser texturing and analysis of the interaction of laser with the surface of the mother-of-pearl. The characterizations carried out were: Infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis and scanning electron microscopy. Results indicate that the studied material is composed mainly by the aragonite crystal phase, different from that resulting residue from texturing process. Although the process remove some of the gem material, the effect water characteristic of the mother-of-pearl is maintained, suggesting that technology combined with research and design can increase the value of this material. (author)

  10. Lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Milonni, Peter W

    1988-01-01

    A comprehensive introduction to the operating principles and applications of lasers. Explains basic principles, including the necessary elements of classical and quantum physics. Provides concise discussions of various laser types including gas, solid state, semiconductor, and free electron lasers, as well as of laser resonators, diffraction, optical coherence, and many applications including holography, phase conjugation, wave mixing, and nonlinear optics. Incorporates many intuitive explanations and practical examples. Discussions are self-contained in a consistent notation and in a style that should appeal to physicists, chemists, optical scientists and engineers.

  11. Study of the physical mechanisms involved in the femtosecond laser optical breakdown of dielectric materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mouskeftaras, Alexandros

    2013-01-01

    We have carried out detailed time resolved experimental studies of the mechanism of electron excitation-relaxation, when an ultrashort (60 fs -1 ps) laser (UV and IR) pulse interacts with a wide band gap dielectric material. The studies cover a range of different dielectric materials and the investigated regimes span from nondestructive ionization of the material at the low power end (∼TW/cm 2 ) to ablative domain at a higher laser power (∼10 TW/cm 2 ). This gives fundamental insight into the understanding of the laser damaging process taking place under our irradiation conditions. The usage of time-resolved spectral interferometry technique allows to directly measure the electron density of the irradiated material under different excitation conditions and hence leads to quantification of the process. The measurements, carried out at the optical breakdown threshold utilizing different pulse durations, raise questions regarding the usage of critical excitation density as a universal ablation criterion. A new criterion related to the exchanged energy is proposed. Additionally, the use of an experimental setup implementing a double pump pulse allows the identification of different excitation mechanisms taking place at time scales of the order of the pulse duration used. Electronic avalanche is observed in some materials (SiO 2 , NaCl) while this is not the case for others (Al 2 O 3 , MgO). These differences are discussed in detail. Next, we measure the energy spectrum of excited electrons with a complementary technique: the photoemission spectroscopy. These results allow us on one hand to show a crossed effect between the two 'pump' pulses and on the other hand to measure electron relaxation characteristic times, as a function of their kinetic energy. Finally, a morphological study of craters resulting from ablation in the case of a single pulse has been carried out for different irradiation parameters: number of shots, energy and pulse duration. This work has

  12. Photoelectric properties of GaAs materials studied by pulsed laser techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguir, Khalifa

    1981-01-01

    This research thesis addressed the photoelectric properties of single-crystal or epitaxial GaAs (N doped or P doped) materials. The objective is to characterize and to improve the electric quality of these materials and associated components, notably for the production of high performance solar cells for ground-based or space-based applications. More particularly, this research aimed at using an excitation by a pulsed laser to analyse recombination and trapping properties of carriers created by photo-excitation, and also at studying the effect of low doses of particle irradiation on the carrier properties. Thus, the author describes conduction characteristics of two different N-type epitaxial layers, discusses carrier excitation and recombination processes which may occur in semiconductors, and proposes an overview of trapping phenomena. Photoelectric properties of the considered epitaxial layers are then studied and discussed

  13. Laser surface modification of electrically conductive fabrics: Material performance improvement and design effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunakova, Veronika; Hrubosova, Zuzana; Tunak, Maros; Kasparova, Marie; Mullerova, Jana

    2018-01-01

    Development of lightweight flexible materials for electromagnetic interference shielding has obtained increased attention in recent years particularly for clothing, textiles in-house use and technical applications especially in areas of aircraft, aerospace, automobiles and flexible electronics such as portable electronics and wearable devices. There are many references in the literature concerning development and investigation of electromagnetic shielding lightweight flexible materials especially textile based with different electrically conductive additives. However, only little attention is paid to designing and enhancing the properties of these special fabrics by textile finishing processes. Laser technology applied as a physical treatment method is becoming very popular and can be used in different applications to make improvement and even overcome drawbacks of some of the traditional processes. The main purpose of this study is firstly to analyze the possibilities of transferring design onto the surface of electrically conductive fabrics by laser beam and secondly to study of effect of surface modification degree on performance of conductive fabric including electromagnetic shielding ability and mechanical properties. Woven fabric made of yarns containing 10% of extremely thin stainless steel fiber was used as a conductive substrate.

  14. Implementing New Methods of Laser Marking of Items in the Nuclear Material Control and Accountability System at SSC RF-IPPE: An Automated Laser Marking System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regoushevsky, V.I.; Tambovtsev, S.D.; Dvukhsherstnov, V.G.; Efimenko, V.F.; Ilyantsev, A.I.; Russ, G.P. III

    2009-01-01

    For over ten years SSC RF-IPPE, together with the US DOE National Laboratories, has been working on implementing automated control and accountability methods for nuclear materials and other items. Initial efforts to use adhesive bar codes or ones printed (painted) onto metal revealed that these methods were inconvenient and lacked durability under operational conditions. For NM disk applications in critical stands, there is the additional requirement that labels not affect the neutron characteristics of the critical assembly. This is particularly true for the many stainless-steel clad disks containing highly enriched uranium (HEU) and plutonium that are used at SSC RF-IPPE for modeling nuclear power reactors. In search of an alternate method for labeling these disks, we tested several technological options, including laser marking and two-dimensional codes. As a result, the method of laser coloring was chosen in combination with Data Matrix ECC200 symbology. To implement laser marking procedures for the HEU disks and meet all the nuclear material (NM) handling standards and rules, IPPE staff, with U.S. technical and financial support, implemented an automated laser marking system; there are also specially developed procedures for NM movements during laser marking. For the laser marking station, a Zenith 10F system by Telesis Technologies (10 watt Ytterbium Fiber Laser and Merlin software) is used. The presentation includes a flowchart for the automated system and a list of specially developed procedures with comments. Among other things, approaches are discussed for human-factor considerations. To date, markings have been applied to numerous steel-clad HEU disks, and the work continues. In the future this method is expected to be applied to other MC and A items.

  15. Selective ablation of photovoltaic materials with UV laser sources for monolithic interconnection of devices based on a-Si:H

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molpeceres, C. [Centro Laser UPM, Univ. Politecnica de Madrid, Crta. de Valencia Km 7.3, 28031 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: carlos.molpeceres@upm.es; Lauzurica, S.; Garcia-Ballesteros, J.J.; Morales, M.; Guadano, G.; Ocana, J.L. [Centro Laser UPM, Univ. Politecnica de Madrid, Crta. de Valencia Km 7.3, 28031 Madrid (Spain); Fernandez, S.; Gandia, J.J. [Dept. de Energias Renovables, Energia Solar Fotovoltaica, CIEMAT, Avda, Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Villar, F.; Nos, O.; Bertomeu, J. [CeRMAE Dept. Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Universitat de Barcelona, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2009-03-15

    Lasers are essential tools for cell isolation and monolithic interconnection in thin-film-silicon photovoltaic technologies. Laser ablation of transparent conductive oxides (TCOs), amorphous silicon structures and back contact removal are standard processes in industry for monolithic device interconnection. However, material ablation with minimum debris and small heat affected zone is one of the main difficulty is to achieve, to reduce costs and to improve device efficiency. In this paper we present recent results in laser ablation of photovoltaic materials using excimer and UV wavelengths of diode-pumped solid-state (DPSS) laser sources. We discuss results concerning UV ablation of different TCO and thin-film silicon (a-Si:H and nc-Si:H), focussing our study on ablation threshold measurements and process-quality assessment using advanced optical microscopy techniques. In that way we show the advantages of using UV wavelengths for minimizing the characteristic material thermal affection of laser irradiation in the ns regime at higher wavelengths. Additionally we include preliminary results of selective ablation of film on film structures irradiating from the film side (direct writing configuration) including the problem of selective ablation of ZnO films on a-Si:H layers. In that way we demonstrate the potential use of UV wavelengths of fully commercial laser sources as an alternative to standard backscribing process in device fabrication.

  16. Selective ablation of photovoltaic materials with UV laser sources for monolithic interconnection of devices based on a-Si:H

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molpeceres, C.; Lauzurica, S.; Garcia-Ballesteros, J.J.; Morales, M.; Guadano, G.; Ocana, J.L.; Fernandez, S.; Gandia, J.J.; Villar, F.; Nos, O.; Bertomeu, J.

    2009-01-01

    Lasers are essential tools for cell isolation and monolithic interconnection in thin-film-silicon photovoltaic technologies. Laser ablation of transparent conductive oxides (TCOs), amorphous silicon structures and back contact removal are standard processes in industry for monolithic device interconnection. However, material ablation with minimum debris and small heat affected zone is one of the main difficulty is to achieve, to reduce costs and to improve device efficiency. In this paper we present recent results in laser ablation of photovoltaic materials using excimer and UV wavelengths of diode-pumped solid-state (DPSS) laser sources. We discuss results concerning UV ablation of different TCO and thin-film silicon (a-Si:H and nc-Si:H), focussing our study on ablation threshold measurements and process-quality assessment using advanced optical microscopy techniques. In that way we show the advantages of using UV wavelengths for minimizing the characteristic material thermal affection of laser irradiation in the ns regime at higher wavelengths. Additionally we include preliminary results of selective ablation of film on film structures irradiating from the film side (direct writing configuration) including the problem of selective ablation of ZnO films on a-Si:H layers. In that way we demonstrate the potential use of UV wavelengths of fully commercial laser sources as an alternative to standard backscribing process in device fabrication.

  17. Experimental Study of Laser Cladding Methods on Water Erosion Resistance to Low Pressure Blades Materials of Steam Turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An experimental apparatus was built to study the effects of liquid-solid impact on laser cladding processing specimens of 17-4PH stainless steel material in the present investigation. Then the result of specimens without laser surface process was compared. The impact effect on the specimens was observed using the three-dimensional digital microscope. The depth of laser cladding and substrate material caused by liquid droplet impact was studied in detail and measured. The accuracy and reliability of the experimental system and computing methods were also verified. The depth of the impact area of laser cladding specimens was distributed in the range of 0.5–1.5 μm while the 17-4PH group was distributed in the range of 2.5–3.5 μm. In contrast with specimens without laser surface processing, the material processed by laser cladding has significantly higher resistance to water erosion.

  18. Asymmetry of light absorption upon propagation of focused femtosecond laser pulses with spatiotemporal coupling through glass materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukov, Vladimir P.; Bulgakova, Nadezhda M.

    2017-05-01

    Ultrashort laser pulses are usually described in terms of temporal and spatial dependences of their electric field, assuming that the spatial dependence is separable from time dependence. However, in most situations this assumption is incorrect as generation of ultrashort pulses and their manipulation lead to couplings between spatial and temporal coordinates resulting in various effects such as pulse front tilt and spatial chirp. One of the most intriguing spatiotemporal coupling effects is the so-called "lighthouse effect", the phase front rotation with the beam propagation distance [Akturk et al., Opt. Express 13, 8642 (2005)]. The interaction of spatiotemporally coupled laser pulses with transparent materials have interesting peculiarities, such as the effect of nonreciprocal writing, which can be used to facilitate microfabrication of photonic structures inside optical glasses. In this work, we make an attempt to numerically investigate the influence of the pulse front tilt and the lighthouse effect on the absorption of laser energy inside fused silica glass. The model, which is based on nonlinear Maxwell's equations supplemented by the hydrodynamic equations for free electron plasma, is applied. As three-dimensional solution of such a problem would require huge computational resources, a simplified two-dimensional model has been proposed. It has enabled to gain a qualitative insight into the features of propagation of ultrashort laser pulses with the tilted front in the regimes of volumetric laser modification of transparent materials, including directional asymmetry upon direct laser writing in glass materials.

  19. Raman, Infrared, and Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Identification of Particles in Raw Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kathryn; Lankers, Markus; Valet, Oliver

    2018-02-01

    Raw materials need to be of a certain quality with respect to physical and chemical composition. They also need to have no contaminants, including particles, because these could indicate raw material impurities or contaminate the product. Particle identification allows determination of process conditions that caused them and whether the quality of the final product is acceptable. Particles may appear to the eye to be very different things than they actually are. They may be coated with the raw material and may consist of several components; therefore, chemical and elemental analyses are required for accuracy in proper identification and definitive information about their source. Thus, microscope versions of Raman spectroscopy, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), and infrared (IR) spectroscopy are excellent tools for identifying particles in materials. Those tools are fast and accurate, and can provide chemical and elemental composition as well as images that can aid identification. The micro-analysis capabilities allow for easy analysis of different portions of samples so that multiple components can be identified and sample preparation can be reduced or eliminated. The differences in sensitivities of Raman and IR spectroscopies to different functional groups as well as the elemental analysis provided by LIBS and the image analysis provided by the microscopy makes these complementary techniques and provides the advantage of identifying various chemical components. Proper spectral searching techniques and interpretation of the results are important for interpretation and identification of trace contaminants.

  20. Material properties identification using ultrasonic waves and laser Doppler vibrometer measurements: a multi-input multi-output approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longo, R; Vanlanduit, S; Guillaume, P

    2013-01-01

    In this paper a multi-input multi-output approach able to determine the material properties of homogeneous materials is presented. To do so, an experimental set-up which combines the use of multi harmonic signals with interleaved frequencies and laser Doppler vibrometer measurements has been developed. A modeling technique, based on transmission and reflection measurements, allowed the simultaneous determination of longitudinal wave velocity, density and thickness of the materials under test with high levels of precision and accuracy. (paper)

  1. Laser study of phase changes in the surface layer of porous materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wojtatowicz, T W

    2001-01-01

    The paper presents some aspects of the use of interference patterns observed upon reflection of laser radiation from the surface of a porous solid (laser speckles) for the study of moisture condensation in the near-surface layer. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  2. Influences of Nozzle Material on Laser Droplet Brazing Joints with Cu89Sn11 Preforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Stefan; Heberle, Johannes; Gürtler, Franz Josef; Cvecek, Kristian; Roth, Stephan; Schmidt, Michael

    This paper presents latest results on the influences of nozzle material and geometry on the electromechanical contacting of sensitive piezoceramic actuator modules. Two nozzle types have been investigated,a standard WC/Co nozzle which is used for soldering applications and a novelceramic nozzle. Applications for active piezoceramic components integrated in structural parts are e.g. active damping, energy harvesting, or monitoring of vibrations and material failure. Anup to now unsolved problem is the electrical contacting of such components without damaging the conductor or the metallization of the ceramic substrate. Since piezoelectric components are to be integrated into structures made of casted aluminum, requirements are high mechanical strength and temperature resistance. Within this paper a method forcontacting piezoceramic modules is presented. A spherical braze preform of tin bronze Cu89Sn11 with a diameter of 600 μm is located in a ceramic nozzle and is subsequently melted by a laser pulse. The liquid solder is ejected from the nozzlevia nitrogen overpressure and wets the surface of the metallization pad and the Cu-wire, resulting in a brazing joint after solidification. The process is called laser droplet brazing (LDB). To asses the thermal evolution during one cycle WC/Co and ZTA have been simulated numerically for two different geometries enabling a proposition weather the geometry or the material properties have a significant influence on the thermal load during one cycle. To evaluate the influence of the nozzle on the joint the positioning accuracy, joint height and detachment times have been evaluated. Results obtained with the ZTA nozzle show comparable positioning accuracies to a WC/Co nozzle with a lower standard deviation of solder detachment time.

  3. Exploring laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for nuclear materials analysis and in-situ applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Madhavi Z.; Allman, Steve; Brice, Deanne J.; Martin, Rodger C.; Andre, Nicolas O.

    2012-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been used to determine the limits of detection of strontium (Sr) and cesium (Cs), common nuclear fission products. Additionally, detection limits were determined for cerium (Ce), often used as a surrogate for radioactive plutonium in laboratory studies. Results were obtained using a laboratory instrument with a Nd:YAG laser at fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm, frequency doubled to 532 nm with energy of 50 mJ/pulse. The data was compared for different concentrations of Sr and Ce dispersed in a CaCO 3 (white) and carbon (black) matrix. We have addressed the sampling errors, limits of detection, reproducibility, and accuracy of measurements as they relate to multivariate analysis in pellets that were doped with the different elements at various concentrations. These results demonstrate that LIBS technique is inherently well suited for in situ analysis of nuclear materials in hot cells. Three key advantages are evident: (1) small samples (mg) can be evaluated; (2) nuclear materials can be analyzed with minimal sample preparation; and (3) samples can be remotely analyzed very rapidly (ms-seconds). Our studies also show that the methods can be made quantitative. Very robust multivariate models have been used to provide quantitative measurement and statistical evaluation of complex materials derived from our previous research on wood and soil samples. - Highlights: ► Did the detection of strontium, cerium, and cesium in CaCO 3 and graphite matrices. ► The detection of these elements was performed in a systematic manner. ► Univariate calibration curves were used to determine strontium detection. ► Univariate and multivariate statistical analysis built improved statistical models. ► Limits of detection are comparable or better in case of cerium and cesium.

  4. Development of a technology for amorphous material (Co-free) hardfacing on primary side component materials using laser beam to improve their wear/erosion.corrosion resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, Jeong Hun; Kim, J. S.; Hwang, S. S.; Lim, Y. S.

    1999-08-01

    A technology of laser hardfacing of amorphous materials on materials used in the primary-side components has been developed in order to improve their integrity and reduce the radiation fluence in the primary system. 1) Development of a power feeding system for the primary system. 2) Modification of the laser system in order to perform cladding the part surfaces with complex 3D geometries through the tool paths determined with CAD/CAM. 3) Development of laser cladding technology with amorphous alloy. 4) Examination and analysis of the microstructure, chemical composition, and phase of the clad. 5) Evaluation of the mechanical properties of the clad. 6) Development of an ultrasonic vibrator for VSR. (author)

  5. Investigation of the dynamic behavior in materials submitted to sub-picosecond laser driven shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuq-Lelandais, Jean-Paul

    2010-01-01

    Laser driven shocks allow to investigate materials behavior at high strain rate and present a great interest for research and industrial applications. The latest laser technologies evolutions provide an access to shorter regimes in duration, below the picosecond. This work, which results from a collaboration between the P' institute, the PIMM laboratory and the CEA-DAM, is dedicated to the characterization of the metallic material behavior in this ultra-short mode (aluminium, tantalum), leading to extreme dynamic solicitation in the target (>10 7 s -1 ). The study includes the validation of experimental results obtained on the LULI 100 TW facility by comparison with numerical model. First, the study is orientated to the femtosecond (fs) laser-matter interaction, which is different from what happens in nanosecond regime. Indeed, the characteristic duration scale is comparable to several molecular phenomena like non-equilibrium electrons-ions states. The aim is to determine the equivalent pressure loading induced by the laser pulse on the target. Then, the shock wave propagation within the target has been studied and particularly its pressure decay, notably strong in this regime. In this configuration, the spalls observed are thin, a few μm order, and show a planar rupture morphology. The results obtained by post-mortem observation show that the spall thickness is thinner if the target thickness is reduced. The spalls are characterized by the VISAR measurement. Within the framework of dynamic damage modeling and rupture criteria dimensioning, particularly those which have been validated in the ns regime as Kanel, shots with different thicknesses have been carried out to determine the damage properties in function of strain rate and validate the parameters by prolongation to the ultra-shorts modes. Then, the study has been generalized to the 2D propagation waves, which can explain the spall diameter evolutions. Meanwhile, microscopic simulations of ultra-short laser

  6. Single-Photon Ionization Soft-X-Ray Laser Mass Spectrometry of Potential Hydrogen Storage Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, F.; Bernstein, E. R.; Rocca, J. J.

    A desk-top size capillary discharge 46.9 nm lasear is applied in the gas phase study of nanoclusters. The high photon energy allows for single-photon ionization mass spectrometry with reduced cluster fragmentation. In the present studies, neutral Al m C n and Al m C n H x cluster are investigation for the first time. Single photon ionization through 46.9 nm, 118 nm, 193 nm lasers is used to detect neutral cluster distributions through time of flight mass spectrometry. Al m C n clusters are generated through laser ablation of a mixture of Al and C powders pressed into a disk. An oscillation of the vertical ionization energies (VIEs) of Al m C n clusters is observed in the experiments. The VIEs of Al m C n clusters changes as a function of the numbers of Al and C atoms in the clusters. Al m C n H x clusters are generated through an Al ablation plasma-hydrocarbon reaction, an Al-C ablation plasma reacting with H2 gas, or through cold Al m C n clusters reacting with H2 gas in a fast flow reactor. DFT and ab inito calculations are carried out to explore the structures, IEs, and electronic structures of Al m C n H x clusters. C=C bonds are favored for the lowest energy structures for Al m C n clusters. Be m C n H x are generated through a beryllium ablation plasma-hydrocarbon reaction and detected by single photon ionization of 193 nm laser. Both Al m C n H x and Be m C n H x are considered as potential hydrogen storage materials.

  7. Determination of silicon in plant materials by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Paulino Florêncio de [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Centenário 303, 13416-000, Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Centro de Tecnologia Canavieira, PO Box 162, 13400-970 Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Santos, Dário [Departamento de Ciências Exatas e da Terra, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Rua Prof. Artur Riedel, 275, 09972-270, Diadema, SP (Brazil); Gustinelli Arantes de Carvalho, Gabriel; Nunes, Lidiane Cristina [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Centenário 303, 13416-000, Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Silva Gomes, Marcos da [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Centenário 303, 13416-000, Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Química, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, 13565-905 São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Guerra, Marcelo Braga Bueno [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Centenário 303, 13416-000, Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Krug, Francisco José, E-mail: fjkrug@cena.usp.br [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Centenário 303, 13416-000, Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)

    2013-05-01

    In spite of the importance of Si for improving the productivity of many important crops, such as those from the Poaceae family (e.g. sugar cane, maize, wheat, rice), its quantitative determination in plants is seldom carried out and restricted to few laboratories in the world. There is a survey of methods in the literature, but most of them are either laborious or difficult to validate in view of the low availability of reference materials with a certified Si mass fraction. The aim of this study is to propose a method for the direct determination of Si in pellets of plant materials by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The experimental setup was designed by using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm (5 ns, 10 Hz) and the emission signals were collected by lenses into an optical fiber coupled to an Echelle spectrometer equipped with an intensified charge-coupled device. Experiments were carried out with leaves from 24 sugar cane varieties, with mass fractions varying from ca. 2 to 10 g kg{sup −1} Si. Pellets prepared from cryogenically ground leaves were used as test samples for both method development and validation of the calibration model. Best results were obtained when the test samples were interrogated with laser fluence of 50 J cm{sup −2} (750 μm spot size) and measurements carried out at Si I 212.412 nm emission line. The results obtained by LIBS were compared with those from inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry after oven-induced alkaline digestion, and no significant differences were observed after applying the Student's t-test at 95% confidence level. The trueness of the proposed LIBS method was also confirmed from the analysis of CRM GBW 07603 (Bush branches and leaves). - Highlights: • This is the first application of LIBS for determination of Si in plant materials. • Data indicate that the method is appropriate for Si diagnosis in routine analysis. • Silicon can be simultaneously determined with macro- and

  8. Determination of silicon in plant materials by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Paulino Florêncio de; Santos, Dário; Gustinelli Arantes de Carvalho, Gabriel; Nunes, Lidiane Cristina; Silva Gomes, Marcos da; Guerra, Marcelo Braga Bueno; Krug, Francisco José

    2013-01-01

    In spite of the importance of Si for improving the productivity of many important crops, such as those from the Poaceae family (e.g. sugar cane, maize, wheat, rice), its quantitative determination in plants is seldom carried out and restricted to few laboratories in the world. There is a survey of methods in the literature, but most of them are either laborious or difficult to validate in view of the low availability of reference materials with a certified Si mass fraction. The aim of this study is to propose a method for the direct determination of Si in pellets of plant materials by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The experimental setup was designed by using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm (5 ns, 10 Hz) and the emission signals were collected by lenses into an optical fiber coupled to an Echelle spectrometer equipped with an intensified charge-coupled device. Experiments were carried out with leaves from 24 sugar cane varieties, with mass fractions varying from ca. 2 to 10 g kg −1 Si. Pellets prepared from cryogenically ground leaves were used as test samples for both method development and validation of the calibration model. Best results were obtained when the test samples were interrogated with laser fluence of 50 J cm −2 (750 μm spot size) and measurements carried out at Si I 212.412 nm emission line. The results obtained by LIBS were compared with those from inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry after oven-induced alkaline digestion, and no significant differences were observed after applying the Student's t-test at 95% confidence level. The trueness of the proposed LIBS method was also confirmed from the analysis of CRM GBW 07603 (Bush branches and leaves). - Highlights: • This is the first application of LIBS for determination of Si in plant materials. • Data indicate that the method is appropriate for Si diagnosis in routine analysis. • Silicon can be simultaneously determined with macro- and micronutrients

  9. Laser drilling of superdeep micron holes in various materials with a programmable control of laser radiation parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basiev, Tasoltan T; Osiko, Vyacheslav V; Gavrilov, A V; Smetanin, S N; Fedin, A V

    2007-01-01

    The possibilities of enhancing the efficiency of laser drilling of micron holes, increasing their depth, and eliminating their conic shape are studied by using a single-mode loop Nd:YAG laser with self-phase conjugation on the gain gratings and passive Q-switching by a scanned gradiently coloured F 2 - :LiF crystal. Holes of diameters 15-150 μm and depth up to 20 mm with the aspect ratio (ratio of the hole depth to its diameter) of 50-155 are drilled in various metals and alloys. It is shown that passive Q-switch scanning during drilling provides the increase in the depth and speed of the laser drilling of superdeep holes by a factor of 1.5-2. (laser technologies)

  10. Subcritical crack growth in a phosphate laser glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crichton, S.N.; Tomozawa, M.; Hayden, J.S.; Suratwala, T.I.; Campbell, J.H.

    1999-11-01

    The rate of subcritical crack growth in a metaphosphate Nd-doped laser glass was measured using the double-cleavage-drilled compression (DCDC) method. The crack velocity is reported as a function of stress intensity at temperatures ranging from 296 to 573 K and in nitrogen with water vapor pressures ranging from 40 Pa (0.3 mmHg) to 4.7 x 10{sup 4} Pa (355 mmHg). The measured crack velocities follow region I, II, and III behavior similar to that reported for silicate glasses. A chemical and mass-transport-limited reaction rate model explains the behavior of the data except at high temperatures and high water vapor pressures where crack tip blunting is observed. Blunting is characterized to reinitiate slow crack growth at higher stresses. A dynamic crack tip blunting mechanism is proposed to explain the deviation from the reaction rate model.

  11. Progress towards materials science above 1000 GPa (10 Mbar) on the NIF laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remington, B.A.; Park, H.; Prisbrey, S.T.; Pollaine, S.M.; Cavallo, R.M.; Rudd, R.E.; Lorenz, K.T.; Becker, R.; Bernier, J.; Barton, N.; Arsenlis, T.; Glendinning, S.G.; Hamza, A.; Swift, D.; Jankowski, A.; Meyers, M.A.

    2009-01-01

    Solid state dynamics experiments at extreme pressures, P > 1000 GPa (10 Mbar), and ultrahigh strain rates (1.e6-1.e8 1/s) are being developed for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser. These experiments will open up exploration of new regimes of materials science at an order of magnitude higher pressures than have been possible to date. Such extreme, solid state conditions can be accessed with a ramped pressure drive. The experimental, computational, and theoretical techniques are being developed and tested on the Omega laser. Velocity interferometer measurements (VISAR) establish the high pressure conditions generated by the ramped drive. Constitutive models for solid state strength under these conditions are tested by comparing simulations with experiments measuring perturbation growth from the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in solid state samples of vanadium. Radiography techniques using synchronized bursts of x-rays have been developed to diagnose this perturbation growth. Experiments on Omega demonstrating these techniques at peak pressures of ∼1 Mbar will be discussed. The time resolved observation of foil cracking and void formation show the need for tamped samples and a planar drive

  12. 3D Multiphysical Modelling of Fluid Dynamics and Mass Transfer in Laser Welding of Dissimilar Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiazhou Wu

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available A three-dimensional multiphysical transient model was developed to investigate keyhole formation, weld pool dynamics, and mass transfer in laser welding of dissimilar materials. The coupling of heat transfer, fluid flow, keyhole free surface evolution, and solute diffusion between dissimilar metals was simulated. The adaptive heat source model was used to trace the change of keyhole shape, and the Rayleigh scattering of the laser beam was considered. The keyhole wall was calculated using the fluid volume equation, primarily considering the recoil pressure induced by metal evaporation, surface tension, and hydrostatic pressure. Fluid flow, diffusion, and keyhole formation were considered simultaneously in mass transport processes. Welding experiments of 304L stainless steel and industrial pure titanium TA2 were performed to verify the simulation results. It is shown that spatters are shaped during the welding process. The thickness of the intermetallic reaction layer between the two metals and the diffusion of elements in the weld are calculated, which are important criteria for welding quality. The simulation results correspond well with the experimental results.

  13. Does laser-driven heat front propagation depend on material microstructure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvin, J. D.; Matsukuma, H.; Fournier, K. B.; Yoga, A.; Kemp, G. E.; Tanaka, N.; Zhang, Z.; Kota, K.; Tosaki, S.; Ikenouchi, T.; Nishimura, H.

    2016-10-01

    We showed earlier that the laser-driven heat front propagation velocity in low-density Ti-silica aerogel and TiO2 foam targets was slower than that simulated with a 2D radiation-hydrodynamics code incorporating an atomic kinetics model in non-LTE and assuming initially homogeneous material. Some theoretical models suggest that the heat front is slowed over what it would be in a homogeneous medium by the microstructure of the foam. In order to test this hypothesis we designed and conducted a comparison experiment on the GEKKO laser to measure heat front propagation velocity in two targets, one an Ar/CO2 gas mixture and the other a TiO2 foam, that had identical initial densities and average ionization states. We found that the heat front traveled about ten times faster in the gas than in the foam. We present the details of the experiment design and a comparison of the data with the simulations. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LLNL under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344, and the joint research project of ILE Osaka U. (contract Nos. 2014A1-04 and 2015A1-02).

  14. Higher order structure analysis of nano-materials by spectral reflectance of laser-plasma soft x-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azuma, Hirozumi; Takeichi, Akihiro; Noda, Shoji

    1995-01-01

    We have proposed a new experimental arrangement to measure spectral reflectance of nano-materials for analyzing higher order structure with laser-plasma soft x-rays. Structure modification of annealed Mo/Si multilayers and a nylon-6/clay hybrid with poor periodicity was investigated. The measurement of the spectral reflectance of soft x-rays from laser-produced plasma was found to be a useful method for the structure analysis of nano-materials, especially those of rather poor periodicity

  15. Effects of laser focusing and fluence on the analysis of pellets of plant materials by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustinelli Arantes de Carvalho, Gabriel; Santos, Dario; Nunes, Lidiane Cristina; Gomes, Marcos da Silva; Leme, Flavio de Oliveira; Krug, Francisco José

    2012-01-01

    The effects of laser focusing and fluence on LIBS analysis of pellets of plant leaves was evaluated. A Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (5 ns, 10 Hz, 1064 nm) was used and the emission signals were collected by lenses into an optical fiber coupled to a spectrometer with Echelle optics and ICCD. Data were acquired from the accumulation of 20 laser pulses at 2.0 μs delay and 5.0 μs integration time gate. The emission signal intensities increased with both laser fluence and spot size. Higher sensitivities for Ca, K, Mg, P, Al, B, Cu, Fe, Mn, and Zn determinations were observed for fluences in the range from 25 to 60 J cm −2 . Coefficients of variation of site-to-site measurements were generally lower than 10% (n = 30 sites, 20 laser pulses/site) for a fluence of 50 J cm −2 and 750 μm spot size. For most elements, there is an indication that accuracy is improved with higher fluences. - Highlights: ► Laser focusing and fluence affect the quality of LIBS results. ► Improvements on sensitivity and precision were observed for most analytes. ► Matrix effects can be minimized by choosing the most appropriate fluence.

  16. Molecular beam epitaxy growth and characterization of two-six materials for visible semiconductor lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Linfei

    This thesis proposes the molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) growth and characterization of a new Znsb{x}Cdsb{y}Mgsb{(1-x-y)}Se based semiconductor materials system on InP substrates for visible light emitting diodes (LED) and lasers. The growth conditions for lattice-matched Znsb{x}Cdsb{y}Mgsb{(1-x-y)}Se layers with the desired bandgap have been established and optimized. A chemical etching technique to measure the defect density of Znsb{x}Cdsb{y}Mgsb{(1-x-y)}Se materials has been established. The accuracy of this method for revealing stacking faults and dislocations was verified by plan-view TEM. Using the techniques such as III-V buffer layer, Zn-irradiation, low-temperature growth, ZnCdSe interfacial layer and growth interruption to improve the quality of the interface of III-V and II-VI, the material quality of Znsb{x}Cdsb{y}Mgsb{(1-x-y)}Se has been improved dramatically. Defect density has been reduced from 10sp{10}\\ cmsp{-2} to {˜}5×10sp4\\ cmsp{-2}. The properties of this material system such as the quality and strain state in the epilayer, the dependence of bandgap on temperature, and the band offset have been studied by using double crystal x-ray diffraction, photoluminescence and capacitance voltage measurements. The ZnCdSe/ZnCdMgSe based quantum well (QW) structures have been grown and studied. Optically pumped lasing with emission range from red to blue has been obtained from ZnCdSe/ZnCdMgSe based separate-confinement single QW laser structures. The results demonstrate the potential for these materials as integrated full color display devices. Preliminary studies of the degradation behavior of ZnCdSe/ZnCdMgSe QW were performed. No dark line defects (DLDs) were observed during the degradation. A very strong room temperature differential negative resistance behavior was observed from Al/Znsb{0.61}Cdsb{0.39}Se/nsp+-InP devices, which is useful in millimeter-wave applications. We also found that these devices can be set to either in highly conductive or

  17. Glass-ceramic coating material for the CO2 laser based sintering of thin films as caries and erosion protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilandžić, Marin Dean; Wollgarten, Susanne; Stollenwerk, Jochen; Poprawe, Reinhart; Esteves-Oliveira, Marcella; Fischer, Horst

    2017-09-01

    The established method of fissure-sealing using polymeric coating materials exhibits limitations on the long-term. Here, we present a novel technique with the potential to protect susceptible teeth against caries and erosion. We hypothesized that a tailored glass-ceramic material could be sprayed onto enamel-like substrates to create superior adhesion properties after sintering by a CO 2 laser beam. A powdered dental glass-ceramic material from the system SiO 2 -Na 2 O-K 2 O-CaO-Al 2 O 3 -MgO was adjusted with individual properties suitable for a spray coating process. The material was characterized using X-ray fluorescence analysis (XRF), heating microscopy, dilatometry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), grain size analysis, biaxial flexural strength measurements, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and gas pycnometry. Three different groups of samples (each n=10) where prepared: Group A, powder pressed glass-ceramic coating material; Group B, sintered hydroxyapatite specimens; and Group C, enamel specimens (prepared from bovine teeth). Group B and C where spray coated with glass-ceramic powder. All specimens were heat treated using a CO 2 laser beam process. Cross-sections of the laser-sintered specimens were analyzed using laser scanning microscopy (LSM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), and SEM. The developed glass-ceramic material (grain size d50=13.1mm, coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE)=13.310 -6 /K) could be spray coated on all tested substrates (mean thickness=160μm). FTIR analysis confirmed an absorption of the laser energy up to 95%. The powdered glass-ceramic material was successfully densely sintered in all sample groups. The coating interface investigation by SEM and EDX proved atomic diffusion and adhesion of the glass-ceramic material to hydroxyapatite and to dental enamel. A glass-ceramic material with suitable absorption properties was successfully sprayed and laser-sintered in thin films on hydroxyapatite as well as on

  18. Multiscale analysis: a way to investigate laser damage precursors in materials for high power applications at nanosecond pulse duration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natoli, J. Y.; Wagner, F.; Ciapponi, A.; Capoulade, J.; Gallais, L.; Commandré, M.

    2010-11-01

    The mechanism of laser induced damage in optical materials under high power nanosecond laser irradiation is commonly attributed to the presence of precursor centers. Depending on material and laser source, the precursors could have different origins. Some of them are clearly extrinsic, such as impurities or structural defects linked to the fabrication conditions. In most cases the center size ranging from sub-micrometer to nanometer scale does not permit an easy detection by optical techniques before irradiation. Most often, only a post mortem observation of optics permits to proof the local origin of breakdown. Multi-scale analyzes by changing irradiation beam size have been performed to investigate the density, size and nature of laser damage precursors. Destructive methods such as raster scan, laser damage probability plot and morphology studies permit to deduce the precursor densities. Another experimental way to get information on nature of precursors is to use non destructive methods such as photoluminescence and absorption measurements. The destructive and non destructive multiscale studies are also motivated for practical reasons. Indeed LIDT studies of large optics as those used in LMJ or NIF projects are commonly performed on small samples and with table top lasers whose characteristics change from one to another. In these conditions, it is necessary to know exactly the influence of the different experimental parameters and overall the spot size effect on the final data. In this paper, we present recent developments in multiscale characterization and results obtained on optical coatings (surface case) and KDP crystal (bulk case).

  19. Material Evaluation and Process Optimization of CNT-Coated Polymer Powders for Selective Laser Sintering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shangqin Yuan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs as nano-reinforcements were introduced to facilitate the laser sintering process and enhance the thermal and mechanical properties of polymeric composites. A dual experimental-theoretical method was proposed to evaluate the processability and predict the process parameters of newly developed CNT-coated polyamide 12 (CNTs/PA12 powders. The thermal conductivity, melt viscosity, phase transition and temperature-dependent density and heat capacity of PA12 and CNTs/PA12 powders were characterized for material evaluation. The composite powders exhibited improved heat conduction and heat absorption compared with virgin polymer powders, and the stable sintering range of composite powders was extended and found to be favourable for the sintering process. The microstructures of sintered composites revealed that the CNTs remained at the powder boundaries and formed network architectures, which instantaneously induced the significant enhancements in tensile strength, elongation at break and toughness without sacrificing tensile modulus.

  20. Nuclear magnetic resonance of laser-polarized noble gases in molecules, materials and organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodson, Boyd M.

    1999-01-01

    Conventional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are fundamentally challenged by the insensitivity that stems from the ordinarily low spin polarization achievable in even the strongest NMR magnets. However, by transferring angular momentum from laser light to electronic and nuclear spins, optical pumping methods can increase the nuclear spin polarization of noble gases by several orders of magnitude, thereby greatly enhancing their NMR sensitivity. This dissertation is primarily concerned with the principles and practice of optically pumped nuclear magnetic resonance (OPNMR). The enormous sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping noble gases can be exploited to permit a variety of novel NMR experiments across many disciplines. Many such experiments are reviewed, including the void-space imaging of organisms and materials, NMR and MRI of living tissues, probing structure and dynamics of molecules in solution and on surfaces, and zero-field NMR and MRI

  1. Selective Laser Melting of Hot Gas Turbine Components: Materials, Design and Manufacturing Aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goutianos, Stergios

    2017-01-01

    are built additively to nearly net shape. This allows the fabrication of arbitrary complex geometries that cannot be made by conventional manufacturing techniques. However, despite the powerful capabilities of SLM, a number of issues (e.g. part orientation, support structures, internal stresses), have......Selective Laser Melting (SLM) allows the design and manufacturing of novel parts and structures with improved performance e.g. by incorporating complex and more efficient cooling schemes in hot gas turbine parts. In contrast to conventional manufacturing of removing material, with SLM parts...... to be considered in order to manufacture cost-effective and high quality parts at an industrial scale. These issues are discussed in the present work from an engineering point of view with the aim to provide simple quidelines to produce high quality SLM parts....

  2. Laser powder bed fusion additive manufacturing of metals; physics, computational, and materials challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, W. E., E-mail: weking@llnl.gov [Physical and Life Sciences Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Anderson, A. T.; Ferencz, R. M.; Hodge, N. E.; Khairallah, S. A. [Engineering Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Kamath, C. [Computation Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Rubenchik, A. M. [NIF and Photon Sciences Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    The production of metal parts via laser powder bed fusion additive manufacturing is growing exponentially. However, the transition of this technology from production of prototypes to production of critical parts is hindered by a lack of confidence in the quality of the part. Confidence can be established via a fundamental understanding of the physics of the process. It is generally accepted that this understanding will be increasingly achieved through modeling and simulation. However, there are significant physics, computational, and materials challenges stemming from the broad range of length and time scales and temperature ranges associated with the process. In this paper, we review the current state of the art and describe the challenges that need to be met to achieve the desired fundamental understanding of the physics of the process.

  3. Influence of edge conditions on material ejection from periodic grooves in laser shock-loaded tin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rességuier, T. de; Roland, C. [Institut PPRIME, UPR 3346, CNRS, ENSMA, Université de Poitiers, 1 ave. Clément Ader, 86961 Futuroscope Cedex (France); Prudhomme, G.; Lescoute, E.; Mercier, P. [CEA, DAM, DIF, 91297 Arpajon (France); Loison, D. [Institut de Physique de Rennes, CNRS, Université de Rennes 1, 35042 Rennes (France)

    2016-05-14

    In a material subjected to high dynamic compression, the breakout of a shock wave at a rough free surface can lead to the ejection of high velocity debris. Anticipating the ballistic properties of such debris is a key safety issue in many applications involving shock loading, including pyrotechnics and inertial confinement fusion experiments. In this paper, we use laser driven shocks to investigate particle ejection from calibrated grooves of micrometric dimensions and approximately sinusoidal profile in tin samples, with various boundary conditions at the groove edges, including single groove and periodic patterns. Fast transverse shadowgraphy provides ejection velocities after shock breakout. They are found to depend not only on the groove depth and wavelength, as predicted theoretically and already observed in the past, but also, unexpectedly, on the edge conditions, with a jet tip velocity significantly lower in the case of a single groove than behind a periodic pattern.

  4. National Ignition Facility quality assurance plan for laser materials and optical technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfe, C.R.

    1996-05-01

    Quality achievement is the responsibility of the line organizations of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Project. This subtier Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) applies to activities of the Laser Materials & Optical Technology (LM&OT) organization and its subcontractors. It responds to the NIF Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP, L-15958-2, NIF-95-499) and Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5700.6C. This Plan is organized according to 10 Quality Assurance (QA) criteria and subelements of a management system as outlined in the NIF QAPP. This Plan describes how those QA requirements are met. This Plan is authorized by the Associate Project Leader for the LM&OT organization, who has assigned responsibility to the Optics QA engineer to maintain this plan, with the assistance of the NIF QA organization. This Plan governs quality-affecting activities associated with: design; procurement; fabrication; testing and acceptance; handling and storage; and installation of NIF Project optical components into mounts and subassemblies.

  5. Nuclear magnetic resonance of laser-polarized noble gases in molecules, materials and organisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodson, Boyd McLean [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1999-12-01

    Conventional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are fundamentally challenged by the insensitivity that stems from the ordinarily low spin polarization achievable in even the strongest NMR magnets. However, by transferring angular momentum from laser light to electronic and nuclear spins, optical pumping methods can increase the nuclear spin polarization of noble gases by several orders of magnitude, thereby greatly enhancing their NMR sensitivity. This dissertation is primarily concerned with the principles and practice of optically pumped nuclear magnetic resonance (OPNMR). The enormous sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping noble gases can be exploited to permit a variety of novel NMR experiments across many disciplines. Many such experiments are reviewed, including the void-space imaging of organisms and materials, NMR and MRI of living tissues, probing structure and dynamics of molecules in solution and on surfaces, and zero-field NMR and MRI.

  6. Laser powder bed fusion additive manufacturing of metals; physics, computational, and materials challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, W. E.; Anderson, A. T.; Ferencz, R. M.; Hodge, N. E.; Khairallah, S. A.; Kamath, C.; Rubenchik, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    The production of metal parts via laser powder bed fusion additive manufacturing is growing exponentially. However, the transition of this technology from production of prototypes to production of critical parts is hindered by a lack of confidence in the quality of the part. Confidence can be established via a fundamental understanding of the physics of the process. It is generally accepted that this understanding will be increasingly achieved through modeling and simulation. However, there are significant physics, computational, and materials challenges stemming from the broad range of length and time scales and temperature ranges associated with the process. In this paper, we review the current state of the art and describe the challenges that need to be met to achieve the desired fundamental understanding of the physics of the process

  7. Laser powder bed fusion additive manufacturing of metals; physics, computational, and materials challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, W. E.; Anderson, A. T.; Ferencz, R. M.; Hodge, N. E.; Kamath, C.; Khairallah, S. A.; Rubenchik, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    The production of metal parts via laser powder bed fusion additive manufacturing is growing exponentially. However, the transition of this technology from production of prototypes to production of critical parts is hindered by a lack of confidence in the quality of the part. Confidence can be established via a fundamental understanding of the physics of the process. It is generally accepted that this understanding will be increasingly achieved through modeling and simulation. However, there are significant physics, computational, and materials challenges stemming from the broad range of length and time scales and temperature ranges associated with the process. In this paper, we review the current state of the art and describe the challenges that need to be met to achieve the desired fundamental understanding of the physics of the process.

  8. Apparatus and method for pulsed laser deposition of materials on wires and pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Felix E.

    2003-01-01

    Methods and apparatuses are disclosed which allow uniform coatings to be applied by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) on inner and outer surfaces of cylindrical objects, such as rods, pipes, tubes, and wires. The use of PLD makes this technique particularly suitable for complex multicomponent materials, such as superconducting ceramics. Rigid objects of any length, i.e., pipes up to a few meters, and with diameters from less than 1 centimeter to over 10 centimeters can be coated using this technique. Further, deposition is effected simultaneously onto an annular region of the pipe wall. This particular arrangement simplifies the apparatus, reduces film uniformity control difficulties, and can result in faster operation cycles. In addition, flexible wires of any length can be continuously coated using the disclosed invention.

  9. Femtosecond laser ablation of dielectric materials in the optical breakdown regime: Expansion of a transparent shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Lechuga, M.; Siegel, J.; Hernandez-Rueda, J.; Solis, J.

    2014-01-01

    Phase transition pathways of matter upon ablation with ultrashort laser pulses have been considered to be understood long-since for metals and semiconductors. We provide evidence that also certain dielectrics follow the same pathway, even at high pulse energies triggering optical breakdown. Employing femtosecond microscopy, we observe a characteristic ring pattern within the ablating region that dynamically changes for increasing time delays between pump and probe pulse. These transient Newton rings are related to optical interference of the probe beam reflected at the front surface of the ablating layer with the reflection at the interface of the non-ablating substrate. Analysis of the ring structure shows that the ablation mechanism is initiated by a rarefaction wave leading within a few tens of picoseconds to the formation of a transparent thin shell of reduced density and refractive index, featuring optically sharp interfaces. The shell expands and eventually detaches from the solid material at delays of the order of 100 ps.

  10. Femtosecond laser ablation of dielectric materials in the optical breakdown regime: Expansion of a transparent shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Lechuga, M.; Siegel, J., E-mail: j.siegel@io.cfmac.csic.es; Hernandez-Rueda, J.; Solis, J. [Laser Processing Group, Instituto de Optica, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-09-15

    Phase transition pathways of matter upon ablation with ultrashort laser pulses have been considered to be understood long-since for metals and semiconductors. We provide evidence that also certain dielectrics follow the same pathway, even at high pulse energies triggering optical breakdown. Employing femtosecond microscopy, we observe a characteristic ring pattern within the ablating region that dynamically changes for increasing time delays between pump and probe pulse. These transient Newton rings are related to optical interference of the probe beam reflected at the front surface of the ablating layer with the reflection at the interface of the non-ablating substrate. Analysis of the ring structure shows that the ablation mechanism is initiated by a rarefaction wave leading within a few tens of picoseconds to the formation of a transparent thin shell of reduced density and refractive index, featuring optically sharp interfaces. The shell expands and eventually detaches from the solid material at delays of the order of 100 ps.

  11. Non-destructive testing of ceramic materials using mid-infrared ultrashort-pulse laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, S. C.; Qi, Hong; An, X. Y.; Ren, Y. T.; Qiao, Y. B.; Ruan, Liming M.

    2018-04-01

    The non-destructive testing (NDT) of ceramic materials using mid-infrared ultrashort-pulse laser is investigated in this study. The discrete ordinate method is applied to solve the transient radiative transfer equation in 2D semitransparent medium and the emerging radiative intensity on boundary serves as input for the inverse analysis. The sequential quadratic programming algorithm is employed as the inverse technique to optimize objective function, in which the gradient of objective function with respect to reconstruction parameters is calculated using the adjoint model. Two reticulated porous ceramics including partially stabilized zirconia and oxide-bonded silicon carbide are tested. The retrieval results show that the main characteristics of defects such as optical properties, geometric shapes and positions can be accurately reconstructed by the present model. The proposed technique is effective and robust in NDT of ceramics even with measurement errors.

  12. Quality assurance in the production of pipe fittings by automatic laser-based material identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moench, Ingo; Peter, Laszlo; Priem, Roland; Sturm, Volker; Noll, Reinhard

    1999-09-01

    In plants of the chemical, nuclear and off-shore industry, application specific high-alloyed steels are used for pipe fittings. Mixing of different steel grades can lead to corrosion with severe consequential damages. Growing quality requirements and environmental responsibilities demand a 100% material control in the production of the pipe fittings. Therefore, LIFT, an automatic inspection machine, was developed to insure against any mix of material grades. LIFT is able to identify more than 30 different steel grades. The inspection method is based on Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectrometry (LIBS). An expert system, which can be easily trained and recalibrated, was developed for the data evaluation. The result of the material inspection is transferred to an external handling system via a PLC interface. The duration of the inspection process is 2 seconds. The graphical user interface was developed with respect to the requirements of an unskilled operator. The software is based on a realtime operating system and provides a safe and reliable operation. An interface for the remote maintenance by modem enables a fast operational support. Logged data are retrieved and evaluated. This is the basis for an adaptive improvement of the configuration of LIFT with respect to changing requirements in the production line. Within the first six months of routine operation, about 50000 pipe fittings were inspected.

  13. Sol-Gel Derived Active Material for Yb Thin-Disk Lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Rui M; Ribeiro, Tiago; Santos, Luís F

    2017-09-02

    A ytterbium doped active material for thin-disk laser was developed based on aluminosilicate and phosphosilicate glass matrices containing up to 30 mol% YbO 1.5 . Thick films and bulk samples were prepared by sol-gel processing. The structural nature of the base material was assessed by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy and the film morphology was evidenced by scanning electron microscopy. The photoluminescence (PL) properties of different compositions, including emission spectra and lifetimes, were also studied. Er 3+ was used as an internal reference to compare the intensities of the Yb 3+ PL peaks at ~ 1020 nm. The Yb 3+ PL lifetimes were found to vary between 1.0 and 0.5 ms when the Yb concentration increased from 3 to 30 mol%. Based on a figure of merit, the best active material selected was the aluminosilicate glass composition 71 SiO₂-14 AlO 1.5 -15 YbO 1.5 (in mol%). An active disk, ~ 36 μm thick, consisting of a Bragg mirror, an aluminosilicate layer doped with 15 mol% Yb and an anti-reflective coating, was fabricated.

  14. Resonant infrared laser deposition of polymer-nanocomposite materials for optoelectronic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hee K.; Schriver, Kenneth E.; Haglund, Richard F.

    2011-11-01

    Polymers find a number of potentially useful applications in optoelectronic devices. These include both active layers, such as light-emitting polymers and hole-transport layers, and passive layers, such as polymer barrier coatings and light-management films. This paper reports the experimental results for polymer films deposited by resonant infrared matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (RIR-MAPLE) and resonant infrared pulsed laser deposition (RIR-PLD) for commercial optoelectronic device applications. In particular, light-management films, such as anti-reflection coatings, require refractive-index engineering of a material. However, refractive indices of polymers fall within a relatively narrow range, leading to major efforts to develop both low- and high-refractive-index polymers. Polymer nanocomposites can expand the range of refractive indices by incorporating low- or high-refractive-index nanoscale materials. RIR-MAPLE is an excellent technique for depositing polymer-nanocomposite films in multilayer structures, which are essential to light-management coatings. In this paper, we report our efforts to engineer the refractive index of a barrier polymer by combining RIR-MAPLE of nanomaterials (for example, high refractive-index TiO2 nanoparticles) and RIR-PLD of host polymer. In addition, we report on the properties of organic and polymer films deposited by RIR-MAPLE and/or RIR-PLD, such as Alq3 [tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum] and PEDOT:PSS [poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene): poly(styrenesulfonate)]. Finally, the challenges and potential for commercializing RIR-MAPLE/PLD, such as industrial scale-up issues, are discussed.

  15. Data mining for better material synthesis: The case of pulsed laser deposition of complex oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Steven R.; Maksov, Artem; Ziatdinov, Maxim; Cao, Ye; Burch, Matthew; Balachandran, Janakiraman; Li, Linglong; Somnath, Suhas; Patton, Robert M.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Vasudevan, Rama K.

    2018-03-01

    The pursuit of more advanced electronics, and finding solutions to energy needs often hinges upon the discovery and optimization of new functional materials. However, the discovery rate of these materials is alarmingly low. Much of the information that could drive this rate higher is scattered across tens of thousands of papers in the extant literature published over several decades but is not in an indexed form, and cannot be used in entirety without substantial effort. Many of these limitations can be circumvented if the experimentalist has access to systematized collections of prior experimental procedures and results. Here, we investigate the property-processing relationship during growth of oxide films by pulsed laser deposition. To do so, we develop an enabling software tool to (1) mine the literature of relevant papers for synthesis parameters and functional properties of previously studied materials, (2) enhance the accuracy of this mining through crowd sourcing approaches, (3) create a searchable repository that will be a community-wide resource enabling material scientists to leverage this information, and (4) provide through the Jupyter notebook platform, simple machine-learning-based analysis to learn the complex interactions between growth parameters and functional properties (all data/codes available on https://github.com/ORNL-DataMatls). The results allow visualization of growth windows, trends and outliers, which can serve as a template for analyzing the distribution of growth conditions, provide starting points for related compounds and act as a feedback for first-principles calculations. Such tools will comprise an integral part of the materials design schema in the coming decade.

  16. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry for analysis of pellets of plant materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Marcos S. [Departamento de Química, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Rod. Washington Luís, km 235, 13565-905 São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Centenário 303, 13416-000 Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Schenk, Emily R. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida International University, Miami, FL (United States); International Forensic Research Institute, Florida International University, Miami, FL (United States); Santos, Dário [Departamento de Ciências Exatas e da Terra, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Rua Professor Arthur Riedel 275, Diadema, SP (Brazil); Krug, Francisco José [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Centenário 303, 13416-000 Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Almirall, José R., E-mail: almirall@fiu.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida International University, Miami, FL (United States); International Forensic Research Institute, Florida International University, Miami, FL (United States)

    2014-04-01

    An evaluation of laser ablation inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (LAICP OES) for the direct analysis of pelleted plant material is reported. Ground leaves of orange citrus, soy and sugarcane were comminuted using a high-speed ball mill, pressed into pellets and sampled directly with laser ablation and analyzed by ICP OES. The limits of detection (LODs) for the method ranged from as low as 0.1 mg kg{sup −1} for Zn to as high as 94 mg kg{sup −1} for K but were generally below 6 mg kg{sup −1} for most of the elements of interest. A certified reference material consisting of a similar matrix (NIST SRM 1547 peach leaves) was used to check the accuracy of the calibration and the reported method resulted in an average bias of ∼ 5% for all the elements of interest. The precision for the reported method ranged from as low as 4% relative standard deviation (RSD) for Mn to as high as 17% RSD for Zn but averaged ∼ 6.5% RSD for all the elements (n = 10). The proposed method was tested for the determination of Ca, Mg, P, K, Fe, Mn, Zn and B, and the results were in good agreement with those obtained for the corresponding acid digests by ICP-OES, no differences being observed by applying a paired t-test at the 95% confidence level. The reported direct solid sampling method provides a fast alternative to acid digestion that results in similar and appropriate analytical figures of merit with regard to sensitivity, accuracy and precision for plant material analysis. - Highlights: • An evaluation of LA-ICP-OES for the direct analysis of pelleted plant material is reported. • Orange citrus, soy and sugarcane plants were pressed into pellets and sampled directly. • The element menu consisted of Ca, Mg, P, K, Fe, Mn, Zn and B. • LODs for the method ranged from 0.1 mg kg{sup −1} for Zn to 94 mg kg{sup −1} for K. • The precision ranged from 4% RSD for Mn to 17% RSD for Zn (∼ 6.5% RSD average)

  17. Development of a poly(dimethylacrylamide) based matrix material for solid phase high density peptide array synthesis employing a laser based material transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ridder, Barbara; Foertsch, Tobias C.; Welle, Alexander; Mattes, Daniela S.; Bojnicic-Kninski, Clemens M. von; Loeffler, Felix F.; Nesterov-Mueller, Alexander; Meier, Michael A.R.; Breitling, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • New matrix material for peptide array synthesis from a ‘solid solvent’. • Resolution was increased with possible spot densities of up to 20.000 spots per cm"2. • The coupling depth and the effectiveness of washing steps analyzed by ToF-SIMS. • Adaptations and custom changes of the matrix material are possible. - Abstract: Poly(dimethylacrylamide) (PDMA) based matrix materials were developed for laser-based in situ solid phase peptide synthesis to produce high density arrays. In this specific array synthesis approach, amino acid derivatives are embedded into a matrix material, serving as a “solid” solvent material at room temperature. Then, a laser pulse transfers this mixture to the target position on a synthesis slide, where the peptide array is synthesized. Upon heating above the glass transition temperature of the matrix material, it softens, allowing diffusion of the amino acid derivatives to the synthesis surface and serving as a solvent for peptide bond formation. Here, we synthesized PDMA six-arm star polymers, offering the desired matrix material properties, using atom transfer radical polymerization. With the synthesized polymers as matrix material, we structured and synthesized arrays with combinatorial laser transfer. With densities of up to 20,000 peptide spots per cm"2, the resolution could be increased compared to the commercially available standard matrix material. Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry experiments revealed the penetration behavior of an amino acid derivative into the prepared acceptor synthesis surface and the effectiveness of the washing protocols.

  18. Development of a poly(dimethylacrylamide) based matrix material for solid phase high density peptide array synthesis employing a laser based material transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ridder, Barbara [Institute of Microstructure Technology (IMT), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Institute of Organic Chemistry (IOC), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Fritz-Haber-Weg 6, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Foertsch, Tobias C. [Institute of Microstructure Technology (IMT), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Welle, Alexander [Karlsruhe Nano Micro Facility (KNMF), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Mattes, Daniela S. [Institute of Microstructure Technology (IMT), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Institute of Organic Chemistry (IOC), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Fritz-Haber-Weg 6, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Bojnicic-Kninski, Clemens M. von; Loeffler, Felix F.; Nesterov-Mueller, Alexander [Institute of Microstructure Technology (IMT), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Meier, Michael A.R., E-mail: m.a.r.meier@kit.edu [Institute of Organic Chemistry (IOC), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Fritz-Haber-Weg 6, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Breitling, Frank, E-mail: frank.breitling@kit.edu [Institute of Microstructure Technology (IMT), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • New matrix material for peptide array synthesis from a ‘solid solvent’. • Resolution was increased with possible spot densities of up to 20.000 spots per cm{sup 2}. • The coupling depth and the effectiveness of washing steps analyzed by ToF-SIMS. • Adaptations and custom changes of the matrix material are possible. - Abstract: Poly(dimethylacrylamide) (PDMA) based matrix materials were developed for laser-based in situ solid phase peptide synthesis to produce high density arrays. In this specific array synthesis approach, amino acid derivatives are embedded into a matrix material, serving as a “solid” solvent material at room temperature. Then, a laser pulse transfers this mixture to the target position on a synthesis slide, where the peptide array is synthesized. Upon heating above the glass transition temperature of the matrix material, it softens, allowing diffusion of the amino acid derivatives to the synthesis surface and serving as a solvent for peptide bond formation. Here, we synthesized PDMA six-arm star polymers, offering the desired matrix material properties, using atom transfer radical polymerization. With the synthesized polymers as matrix material, we structured and synthesized arrays with combinatorial laser transfer. With densities of up to 20,000 peptide spots per cm{sup 2}, the resolution could be increased compared to the commercially available standard matrix material. Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry experiments revealed the penetration behavior of an amino acid derivative into the prepared acceptor synthesis surface and the effectiveness of the washing protocols.

  19. Color matters--material ejection and ion yields in UV-MALDI mass spectrometry as a function of laser wavelength and laser fluence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltwisch, Jens; Jaskolla, Thorsten W; Dreisewerd, Klaus

    2013-10-01

    The success of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) as a widely employed analytical tool in the biomolecular sciences builds strongly on an effective laser-material interaction that is resulting in a soft co-desorption and ionization of matrix and imbedded biomolecules. To obtain a maximized ion yield for the analyte(s) of interest, in general both wavelength and fluence need to be tuned to match the specific optical absorption profile of the used matrix. However, commonly only lasers with fixed emission wavelengths of either 337 or 355 nm are used for MALDI-MS. Here, we employed a wavelength-tunable dye laser and recorded both the neutral material ejection and the MS ion data in a wide wavelength and fluence range between 280 and 377.5 nm. α-Cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (HCCA), 4-chloro-α-cyanocinnamic acid (ClCCA), α-cyano-2,4-difluorocinnamic acid (DiFCCA), and 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB) were investigated as matrices, and several peptides as analytes. Recording of the material ejection was achieved by adopting a photoacoustic approach. Relative ion yields were derived by division of photoacoustic and ion signals. In this way, distinct wavelength/fluence regions can be identified for which maximum ion yields were obtained. For the tested matrices, optimal results were achieved for wavelengths corresponding to areas of high optical absorption of the respective matrix and at fluences about a factor of 2-3 above the matrix- and wavelength-dependent ion detection threshold fluences. The material ejection as probed by the photoacoustic method is excellently fitted by the quasithermal model, while a sigmoidal function allows for an empirical description of the ion signal-fluence relationship.

  20. Vacuum isostatic micro/macro molding of PTFE materials for laser beam shaping in environmental applications: large scale UV laser water purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizotte, Todd; Ohar, Orest

    2009-08-01

    Accessibility to fresh clean water has determined the location and survival of civilizations throughout the ages [1]. The tangible economic value of water is demonstrated by industry's need for water in fields such as semiconductor, food and pharmaceutical manufacturing. Economic stability for all sectors of industry depends on access to reliable volumes of good quality water. As can be seen on television a nation's economy is seriously affected by water shortages through drought or mismanagement and as such those water resources must therefore be managed both for the public interest and the economic future. For over 50 years ultraviolet water purification has been the mainstay technology for water treatment, killing potential microbiological agents in water for leisure activities such as swimming pools to large scale waste water treatment facilities where the UV light photo-oxidizes various pollutants and contaminants. Well tailored to the task, UV provides a cost effective way to reduce the use of chemicals in sanitization and anti-biological applications. Predominantly based on low pressure Hg UV discharge lamps, the system is plagued with lifetime issues (~1 year normal operation), the last ten years has shown that the technology continues to advance and larger scale systems are turning to more advanced lamp designs and evaluating solidstate UV light sources and more powerful laser sources. One of the issues facing the treatment of water with UV lasers is an appropriate means of delivering laser light efficiently over larger volumes or cross sections of water. This paper examines the potential advantages of laser beam shaping components made from isostatically micro molding microstructured PTFE materials for integration into large scale water purification and sterilization systems, for both lamps and laser sources. Applying a unique patented fabrication method engineers can form micro and macro scale diffractive, holographic and faceted reflective structures

  1. Thermal diffusivity measurements of liquid materials at high temperature with the ''laser flash'' method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otter, Claude; Vandevelde, Jean

    1982-01-01

    Two solutions, one analytical and the other numerical are proposed to solve the thermokinetic problem encountered when measuring the thermal diffusivity of liquid materials at very high temperature (T>3123K). The liquid material is contained in a parallel faced vessel. This liquid is traversed by a short thermal pulse from a relaxed laser. The temperature response of the back face of the measurement cell is analysed. The first model proposed which does not take thermal losses into consideration, is a mathematical model derived from the ''two layer model'' (Larson and Koyama, 1968) extended to ''three layers''. In order to take the possibility of thermal losses to the external environment at high temperature into consideration, a Crank-Nicolson (1947) type numerical model utilizing finite differences is employed. These thermokinetic studies were performed in order to interpret temperature response curves obtained from the back face of a tungsten-liquid UO 2 -tungsten thermal wall, the purpose of the measurements made being to determine the thermal properties of liquid uranium oxide [fr

  2. Stoichiometric transfer of material in the infrared pulsed laser deposition of yttrium doped Bi-2212 films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Vero, Jeffrey C.; Blanca, Glaiza Rose S.; Vitug, Jaziel R.; Garcia, Wilson O.; Sarmago, Roland V.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → This work describes the stoichiometric transfer of Y-doped Bi-2212 during IR-PLD. → As-deposited films show spheroidal morphology with similar composition as the target. Relatively flat and highly c-axis oriented films were obtained after heat treatment. → IR-PLD can be a viable technique in growing other high Tc superconducting materials. - Abstract: Films of Y-doped Bi-2212 were successfully grown on MgO (1 0 0) substrates by infrared pulsed laser deposition (IR-PLD). With post-heat treatments, smooth and highly c-axis oriented films were obtained. The average compositions of the films have the same stoichiometry as the target. Y content is also preserved on the grown films at all doping levels. The electrical properties of the grown Y-doped Bi-2212 films exhibit the expected electrical properties of the bulk Y-doped Bi-2212. This is attributed to the stoichiometric transfer of material by IR-PLD.

  3. Synthesis of Fe-based amorphous composite coatings with low purity materials by laser cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu Qingjun [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China)]. E-mail: sduzhu@yahoo.com.cn; Qu Shiyao [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Wang Xinhong [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Zou Zengda [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China)

    2007-06-30

    Amorphous composite coatings Fe{sub 38}Ni{sub 30-X}Si{sub 16}B{sub 14}V{sub 2}M {sub X} (X = 0, 1, 2) (M contains Al, Ti, Mo, and C) were prepared with low purity of raw materials by laser cladding. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy results show that the coating have an amorphous structure with a few crystalline phase on it. The amorphous phase is the primary phase. The glass forming ability as well as the microhardness of the Fe-based alloy made from low purity raw materials can be much enhanced by adding small amount of multi-components. However, the elements addition has its optimal quantity. When X is equal to 1, the microstructure of the coating contains 97.93% amorphous phase and 2.07% crystalline phase on it. As a result, the microhardness of the coating reaches maximum. With further increasing of the additions, the amorphous phase in the coating lessens instead of augment and the crystalline phase begins to accumulate, which result in the decrease of the microhardness.

  4. Response of inorganic materials to laser - plasma EUV radiation focused with a lobster eye collector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartnik, Andrzej; Fiedorowicz, Henryk; Jarocki, Roman; Kostecki, Jerzy; Szczurek, Miroslaw; Havlikova, Radka; Pína, Ladislav; Švéda, Libor; Inneman, Adolf

    2007-05-01

    A single photon of EUV radiation carries enough energy to break any chemical bond or excite electrons from inner atomic shells. It means that the radiation regardless of its intensity can modify chemical structure of molecules. It is the reason that the radiation even with low intensity can cause fragmentation of long chains of organic materials and desorption of small parts from their surface. In this work interaction of EUV radiation with inorganic materials was investigated. Different inorganic samples were irradiated with a 10 Hz laser - plasma EUV source based on a gas puff target. The radiation was focused on a sample surface using a lobster eye collector. Radiation fluence at the surface reached 30 mJ/cm2 within a wavelength range 7 - 20 nm. In most cases there was no surface damage even after several minutes of irradiation. In some cases there could be noticed discolouration of an irradiated surface or evidences of thermal effects. In most cases however luminescent and scattered radiation was observed. The luminescent radiation was emitted in different wavelength ranges. It was recorded in a visible range of radiation and also in a wide wavelength range including UV, VUV and EUV. The radiation was especially intense in a case of non-metallic chemical compounds.

  5. Utilizing pulsed laser deposition lateral inhomogeneity as a tool in combinatorial material science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, David A; Ginsburg, Adam; Barad, Hannah-Noa; Shimanovich, Klimentiy; Bouhadana, Yaniv; Rosh-Hodesh, Eli; Takeuchi, Ichiro; Aviv, Hagit; Tischler, Yaakov R; Anderson, Assaf Y; Zaban, Arie

    2015-04-13

    Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) is widely used in combinatorial material science, as it enables rapid fabrication of different composite materials. Nevertheless, this method was usually limited to small substrates, since PLD deposition on large substrate areas results in severe lateral inhomogeneity. A few technical solutions for this problem have been suggested, including the use of different designs of masks, which were meant to prevent inhomogeneity in the thickness, density, and oxidation state of a layer, while only the composition is allowed to be changed. In this study, a possible way to take advantage of the large scale deposition inhomogeneity is demonstrated, choosing an iron oxide PLD-deposited library with continuous compositional spread (CCS) as a model system. An Fe₂O₃-Nb₂O₅ library was fabricated using PLD, without any mask between the targets and the substrate. The library was measured using high-throughput scanners for electrical, structural, and optical properties. A decrease in electrical resistivity that is several orders of magnitude lower than pure α-Fe₂O₃ was achieved at ∼20% Nb-O (measured at 47 and 267 °C) but only at points that are distanced from the center of the PLD plasma plume. Using hierarchical clustering analysis, we show that the PLD inhomogeneity can be used as an additional degree of freedom, helping, in this case, to achieve iron oxide with much lower resistivity.

  6. An integrated approach of topology optimized design and selective laser melting process for titanium implants materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Dongming; Yang, Yongqiang; Su, Xubin; Wang, Di; Sun, Jianfeng

    2013-01-01

    The load-bearing bone implants materials should have sufficient stiffness and large porosity, which are interacted since larger porosity causes lower mechanical properties. This paper is to seek the maximum stiffness architecture with the constraint of specific volume fraction by topology optimization approach, that is, maximum porosity can be achieved with predefine stiffness properties. The effective elastic modulus of conventional cubic and topology optimized scaffolds were calculated using finite element analysis (FEA) method; also, some specimens with different porosities of 41.1%, 50.3%, 60.2% and 70.7% respectively were fabricated by Selective Laser Melting (SLM) process and were tested by compression test. Results showed that the computational effective elastic modulus of optimized scaffolds was approximately 13% higher than cubic scaffolds, the experimental stiffness values were reduced by 76% than the computational ones. The combination of topology optimization approach and SLM process would be available for development of titanium implants materials in consideration of both porosity and mechanical stiffness.

  7. Influence of gel/LED-laser application on cervical microleakage of two barrier materials used for endodontically treated teeth whitening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchesan, Melissa Andréia; Barros, Felipe; Porto, Saulo; Zaitter, Suellen; Brugnera, Aldo, Jr.; Sousa-Neto, Manoel D.

    2007-02-01

    This study evaluated ex vivo the influence of the number of gel/LED-laser applications/activations on cervical microleakage of two different barrier materials used for protection during whitening of endodontically treated teeth. Eighty-four canines were instrumented and obturated with epoxy resin sealer. The seal was removed 2 mm beyond the cemento-enamel junction for barrier placement and the teeth were divided into two groups of 40 teeth each: G1, zinc phosphate cement; G2, glass ionomer cement. The two groups were subdivided into 4 subgroups (n=10 each): I) no gel or LED-laser application; II) one gel application and two LED-laser activations; III) two gel applications and four LED-laser activations; IV) three gel applications and six LED-laser activations. The teeth were immersed in India ink for 7 days, decalcified and cleared. Cervical microleakage was quantified with a measurement microscope. Statistical analysis showed that zinc phosphate caused significantly lower microleakage than glass ionomer cement (presented microleakage in all subgroups). However, after two (p<0.01) and three (p<0.001) applications of gel, there was statistially significant microleakage in zinc phosphate barriers. Based on the present results, it can be concluded that cervical barriers with zinc phosphate cement show less cervical microleakage and that two or more applications/activations of gel/LED-laser significantly increase microleakage.

  8. XeCl Excimer Laser For Micro - Machining Of Materials: Preliminary Theoretical And Experimental Works.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanejko, Leszek; Pokora, Ludwik; Stefanski, Miroslaw; Ujda, Zbigniew

    1987-10-01

    The paper presents the results of preliminary investigations, both theoretical and experimental, of XeC1 excimer laser pumped by transverse electric discharge with UU preionization. The medium was a mixture of gases He-Xe-HC1. A theoretical model of the XeC1 laser was worked out and a lot of laser parameters calculations were done. In the same time an excimer laser operating on the mixture He-Xe-HC1 was started, the generation of laser radiation was of energy about 20mJ.

  9. Analysis of material modifications caused by nanosecond pulsed UV laser processing of SiC and GaN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krueger, Olaf; Wernicke, Tim; Wuerfl, Joachim; Traenkle, Guenther [Ferdinand-Braun-Institut fuer Hoechstfrequenztechnik, Berlin (Germany); Hergenroeder, Roland [ISAS-Institute for Analytical Sciences, Dortmund (Germany)

    2008-10-15

    The effects of direct UV laser processing on single crystal SiC in ambient air were investigated by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and measurements of the electrical resistance using the transfer length method (TLM). Scanning electron microscopy was applied to study the morphology and dimensions of the laser-treated regions. After laser processing using a nanosecond pulsed solid-state laser the debris consisting of silicon oxide was removed by etching in buffered hydrofluoric acid. A layer of resolidified material remains at the surface indicating the thermal impact of the laser process. The Si/C ratio is significantly disturbed at the surface of the resolidified layer and approaches unity in a depth of several tens of nanometers. A privileged oxidation of carbon leaves elementary resolidified silicon at the surface, where nanocrystalline silicon was detected. Oxygen and nitrogen were detected near the surface down to a depth of some tens of nanometers. A conductive surface film is formed, which is attributed to the thermal impact causing the formation of the silicon-rich surface layer and the incorporation of nitrogen as dopant. No indications for microcrack or defect formation were found beneath the layer of resolidified material. (orig.)

  10. Investigation of laser-induced pre-breakdown material modifications. Final report, September 15, 1977--March 14, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braeunlich, P.; Schmid, A.

    1979-01-01

    A new mechanism is presented for dielectric breakdown of wide gap materials in intense fields of photons having wavelengths in the visible region of the electromagnetic spectrum. It is based on multiphoton generation of free carriers and energy deposition from the photon field to the lattice via electron--photon--phonon collision processes. This laser breakdown model represents an alternative to the so-called avalanche ionization mechanism. It is further demonstrated that laser pulses with peak fluxes below the single-shot threshold for both bulk and surface damage of sodium chloride crystals modify the properties of this material. As a result of multiphoton exciton generation primary defects are formed which lead to intense directional emission of neutral halogen and alkali atoms. As a consequence, the crystal surface is severely perturbed. The technique of thermally stimulated exoemission of particles to assess the degree of surface pertubation after laser exposure was developed. Ongoing experiments present for the first time evidence that the single-shot laser surface damage threshold decreases with laser-induced surface perturbation

  11. Laser Scribed Graphene Biosensor for Detection of Biogenic Amines in Food Samples Using Locally Sourced Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana C. Vanegas

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In foods, high levels of biogenic amines (BA are the result of microbial metabolism that could be affected by temperatures and storage conditions. Thus, the level of BA is commonly used as an indicator of food safety and quality. This manuscript outlines the development of laser scribed graphene electrodes, with locally sourced materials, for reagent-free food safety biosensing. To fabricate the biosensors, the graphene surface was functionalized with copper microparticles and diamine oxidase, purchased from a local supermarket; and then compared to biosensors fabricated with analytical grade materials. The amperometric biosensor exhibits good electrochemical performance, with an average histamine sensitivity of 23.3 µA/mM, a lower detection limit of 11.6 µM, and a response time of 7.3 s, showing similar performance to biosensors constructed from analytical grade materials. We demonstrated the application of the biosensor by testing total BA concentration in fish paste samples subjected to fermentation with lactic acid bacteria. Biogenic amines concentrations prior to lactic acid fermentation were below the detection limit of the biosensor, while concentration after fermentation was 19.24 ± 8.21 mg histamine/kg, confirming that the sensor was selective in a complex food matrix. The low-cost, rapid, and accurate device is a promising tool for biogenic amine estimation in food samples, particularly in situations where standard laboratory techniques are unavailable, or are cost prohibitive. This biosensor can be used for screening food samples, potentially limiting food waste, while reducing chances of foodborne outbreaks.

  12. Formation of atomic clusters through the laser ablation of refractory materials in a supersonic molecular beam source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haufler, R.E.; Puretzky, A.A.; Compton, R.N.

    1993-01-01

    Concepts which guide the design of atomic cluster supersonic beam sources have been developed. These ideas are founded on the knowledge of laser ablation dynamics and are structured in order to take advantage of certain features of the ablation event. Some of the drawbacks of previous cluster source designs become apparent when the sequence of events following laser ablation are clarified. Key features of the new cluster source design include control of the cluster size distribution, uniform performance with a variety of solid materials and elements, high beam intensity, and significant removal of internal energy during the supersonic expansion

  13. Quantification of UV-Visible and Laser Spectroscopic Techniques for Materials Accountability and Process Control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czerwinski, Kenneth; Weck, Phil

    2013-01-01

    Ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-Visible) and time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) optical techniques can permit on-line analysis of actinide elements in a solvent extraction process in real time. These techniques have been used for measuring actinide speciation and concentration under laboratory conditions and are easily adaptable to multiple sampling geometries, such as dip probes, fiber-optic sample cells, and flow-through cell geometries. To fully exploit these techniques, researchers must determine the fundamental speciation of target actinides and the resulting influence on spectroscopic properties. Detection limits, process conditions, and speciation of key actinide components can be established and utilized in a range of areas, particularly those related to materials accountability and process control. Through this project, researchers will develop tools and spectroscopic techniques to evaluate solution extraction conditions and concentrations of U, Pu, and Cm in extraction processes, addressing areas of process control and materials accountability. The team will evaluate UV- Visible and TRLFS for use in solvent extraction-based separations. Ongoing research is examining efficacy of UV-Visible spectroscopy to evaluate uranium and plutonium speciation under conditions found in the UREX process and using TRLFS to evaluate Cm speciation and concentration in the TALSPEAK process. A uranyl and plutonium nitrate UV-Visible spectroscopy study met with success, which supports the utility and continued exploration of spectroscopic methods for evaluation of actinide concentrations and solution conditions for other aspects of the UREX+ solvent extraction scheme. This project will examine U and Pu absorbance in TRUEX and TALSPEAK, perform detailed examination of Cm in TRUEX and TALSPEAK, study U laser fluorescence, and apply project data to contactors. The team will also determine peak ratios as a function of solution concentrations for the UV

  14. Rare-earth-doped fluorozirconate fiber lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brierly, M.C.; France, P.W.; Moore, M.W.; Davey, S.T.

    1988-01-01

    Rare-earth-doped fiber lasers fabricated using silica-based fibers are rapidly becoming an established technology. Simultaneously, in the search for lower losses to achieve longer repeaterless communications links, another fiber technology based on fluorozirconate glasses is emerging. Fluorozirconate glass systems are known to be suitable laser hosts, and the authors have already reported Nd-doped fiber lasers using this technology. Recently the authors have used a 0.5-m length of 44-μm core fluorozirconate fiber doped with 1000 ppm of Nd 3+ ions in a longitudinally pumped Fabry-Perot cavity with a 90% output coupler. They observed lasing at 1.05 μm with a threshold of 33-mW launched power at 514 nm and a slope efficiency of 16.8%. The authors attribute this improvement to the higher dopant concentration, better fiber to mirror coupling, and more optimum output coupler reflectivity. In addition the same fiber used with two high-reflector mirrors at 1.35μm produced lasing at 1.35μm with a threshold of 60-mW launched power

  15. Effect of coating material on heat transfer and skin friction due to impinging jet onto a laser producedhole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuja, S. Z.; Yilbas, B. S.

    2013-07-01

    Jet impingement onto a two-layer structured hole in relation to laser drilling is investigated. The hole consists of a coating layer and a base material. The variations in the Nusselt number and the skin friction are predicted for various coating materials. The Reynolds stress turbulent model is incorporated to account for the turbulence effect of the jet flow and nitrogen is used as the working fluid. The study is extended to include two jet velocities emanating from the conical nozzle. It is found that coating material has significant effect on the Nusselt number variation along the hole wall. In addition, the skin friction varies considerably along the coating thickness in thehole.

  16. LASER APPLICATIONS AND OTHER TOPICS IN QUANTUM ELECTRONICS: Synthesis of bulk SiO2 : MxOy materials in a steady-state laser plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedev, V. F.

    1997-01-01

    An analysis was made of the conditions of existence of a two-component steady-state laser plume in atmospheric air. Such a plume is used in single-stage synthesis of bulk molten materials belonging to the SiO2 : MxOy system. Targets of the SiO2 : M type (metal foil and a silica glass rod) and doping elements with boiling points below and above the boiling point of silica glass are discussed. The regimes and efficiency of steady-state transfer of the dopants are considered. The efficiency of transfer of metal oxides during growth of samples with the aid of a cw CO2 laser is reported to be ~0.05, 0.4, and 0.75g min-1 kW-1 when the mass dopant concentration is ~8%, 20%, and 60% for the oxides of Ti, Cu, and Ni, respectively.

  17. Metal vapor micro-jet controls material redistribution in laser powder bed fusion additive manufacturing

    OpenAIRE

    Ly, Sonny; Rubenchik, Alexander M.; Khairallah, Saad A.; Guss, Gabe; Matthews, Manyalibo J.

    2017-01-01

    The results of detailed experiments and finite element modeling of metal micro-droplet motion associated with metal additive manufacturing (AM) processes are presented. Ultra high speed imaging of melt pool dynamics reveals that the dominant mechanism leading to micro-droplet ejection in a laser powder bed fusion AM is not from laser induced recoil pressure as is widely believed and found in laser welding processes, but rather from vapor driven entrainment of micro-particles by an ambient gas...

  18. Low dimensional magnetism and nanograined materials - magnetometry, magnetooptics and laser-ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krenn, H.; Paltauf, G.; Rumpf, K.; Granitzer, P.; Kozhushko, V.; Nadeem, K.; Hofmayer, M.

    2008-01-01

    of the magnetism of porous FePd and FePt is investigated in collaboration with the TU Graz (Institute of Materials' Science). The electric charging of the compacted powder is performed by loading with an electrolyte and measuring the magnetic response by SQUID-magnetometry. Simulations of magneto-optic Kerr spectra are performed by M. Hofmayer (PhD) for InMnAs-, InMnSb- ferromagnetic semiconductors in quantizing magnetic fields in close cooperation with Univ. Bayreuth (H. Pascher) and Univ. of Notre Dame, USA (J. Furdyna). This modelling project is supported by the NAWI Graz cooperation with TU Graz. The available equipment at the location of the group consists of cryogenic facilities (cryostats, temperature controller), fiber optic sample holder, Nd:Yag solid state laser, time-resolving ultrasound prober, electrochemical cells for deposition using pulsed charging, potentiostat, SQUID-magnetometry, FTIR-spectrometry, time-resolved luminescence in VIS, MOKE-, Faraday-rotation, ESR-spectroscopy, detection and analysis of Barkhausen noise, versatile semiconductor probing device for magnetoresistance and Hall-effect, and Rapid Thermal Annealing (RTA) facility for 6'' silicon wafers. Furthermore structural characterizations are carried out in close collaboration with the TUG (Institute for Electron Microscopy, FELMI). The personnel consists of 2 permanent staff members (incl. the head), 3 Postdocs, 7 PhD's and 1 diploma student. Current projects are: FWF P18593: Ir/Regular magnetic nanowires in porous silicon; NFN-network S10407-N16: bulk-nanostructured materials: nondestructuve testing of nancrystalline materials by Barkhausen noise, ultrasound and magneto-optic Kerr effect; NAWI Graz cooperation project: magnetic and optic properties of nanocrystalline materials applied projects: Doktorats-Kolleg C53 nanostructured systems: self-assembly, hierarchical ordering and materials foundations, Sub-Projekt: C53.3 (H. Krenn): fabrication of self assembled ferromagnet

  19. Long-wave, infrared laser-induced breakdown (LIBS) spectroscopy emissions from energetic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Clayton S-C; Brown, Ei E; Hommerich, Uwe; Jin, Feng; Trivedi, Sudhir B; Samuels, Alan C; Snyder, A Peter

    2012-12-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has shown great promise for applications in chemical, biological, and explosives sensing and has significant potential for real-time standoff detection and analysis. In this study, LIBS emissions were obtained in the mid-infrared (MIR) and long-wave infrared (LWIR) spectral regions for potential applications in explosive material sensing. The IR spectroscopy region revealed vibrational and rotational signatures of functional groups in molecules and fragments thereof. The silicon-based detector for conventional ultraviolet-visible LIBS operations was replaced with a mercury-cadmium-telluride detector for MIR-LWIR spectral detection. The IR spectral signature region between 4 and 12 μm was mined for the appearance of MIR and LWIR-LIBS emissions directly indicative of oxygenated breakdown products as well as dissociated, and/or recombined sample molecular fragments. Distinct LWIR-LIBS emission signatures from dissociated-recombination sample molecular fragments between 4 and 12 μm are observed for the first time.

  20. Direct Laser Writing of Single-Material Sheets with Programmable Self-Rolling Capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauhofer, Anton; KröDel, Sebastian; Bilal, Osama; Daraio, Chiara; Constantinescu, Andrei

    Direct laser writing, a sub-class of two-photon polymerization, facilitates 3D-printing of single-material microstructures with inherent residual stresses. Here we show that controlled distribution of these stresses allows for fast and cost-effective fabrication of structures with programmable self-rolling capability. We investigate 2D sheets that evolve into versatile 3D structures. Precise control over the shape morphing potential is acquired through variations in geometry and writing parameters. Effects of capillary action and gravity were shown to be relevant for very thin sheets (thickness 1.5um) are dominated by residual stresses and adhesion forces. The presented structures create local tensions up to 180MPa, causing rolling curvatures of 25E3m-1. A comprehensive analytical model that captures the relevant influence factors was developed based on laminate plate theory. The predicted curvature and directionality correspond well with the experimentally obtained data. Potential applications are found in drug encapsulation and particle traps for emulsions with differing surface energies. This work was supported by the Swiss National Science Foundation.

  1. National Ignition Facility quality assurance plan for laser materials and optical technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfe, C.R.

    1996-05-01

    Quality achievement is the responsibility of the line organizations of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Project. This subtier Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) applies to activities of the Laser Materials ampersand Optical Technology (LM ampersand OT) organization and its subcontractors. It responds to the NIF Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP, L-15958-2, NIF-95-499) and Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5700.6C. This Plan is organized according to 10 Quality Assurance (QA) criteria and subelements of a management system as outlined in the NIF QAPP. This Plan describes how those QA requirements are met. This Plan is authorized by the Associate Project Leader for the LM ampersand OT organization, who has assigned responsibility to the Optics QA engineer to maintain this plan, with the assistance of the NIF QA organization. This Plan governs quality-affecting activities associated with: design; procurement; fabrication; testing and acceptance; handling and storage; and installation of NIF Project optical components into mounts and subassemblies

  2. Investigating the CO2 laser cutting parameters of MDF wood composite material

    OpenAIRE

    Eltawahni, Hayat; Olabi, Abdul-Ghani; Benyounis, Khaled

    2011-01-01

    Laser cutting of medium density fibreboard (MDF) is a complicated process and the selection of the process parameters combinations is essential to get the highest quality of the cut section. This paper presents laser cutting of MDF based on design of experiments (DOE). CO2 laser was used to cut three thicknesses 4, 6 and 9 mm of MDF panels. The process factors investigated are: laser power, cutting speed, air pressure and focal point position. In this work, cutting quality was evaluated by me...

  3. Visualization of femtosecond laser-induced stress anisotropy in amorphous and crystalline materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McMillen Ben

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, micro manufacturing with femtosecond lasers has received considerable attention as an efficient technique for producing three-dimensional devices, combining multiple functionalities in a single monolithic substrate. In this manufacturing process, stress-anisotropy resulting from non-ablative laser exposure can have both positive and negative effects on the process out-come. In this work, we present a simple method for visualizing stress anisotropy, combining highly symmetric laser-written patterns with polarization microscopy, as a tool for identifying the various anisotropic contributions to the laser fabrication process.

  4. Influence of particle size distribution on the analysis of pellets of plant materials by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustinelli Arantes de Carvalho, Gabriel; Santos Jr, Dário; Silva Gomes, Marcos da; Nunes, Lidiane Cristina; Guerra, Marcelo Braga Bueno; Krug, Francisco José

    2015-01-01

    Pellets of sieved plant materials (150, 106, 75, 53 and 20 μm sieve apertures) were prepared and analyzed by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), and the results for Ca, K, Mg, P, B and Mn were discussed as a function of particle size distribution. This parameter is of key importance for appropriate test sample presentation in the form of pressed pellets for quantitative analysis by LIBS. Experiments were carried out with a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm, and a spectrometer with Echelle optics and an intensified charge-coupled device. Results indicated that smaller particles yielded up to 50% emission signal intensities' enhancement and attained better measurements' precision (site-to-site variation). Moreover, matrix effects were reduced by analyzing pellets prepared from < 75 μm sieved fractions (mean particle size = 32 μm; d 95 = 102 μm) and by using a 50 J cm −2 laser fluence (220 mJ per pulse; 750 μm laser spot size). The preparation of pellets from laboratory samples with monomodal particle size distributions, where most particles were smaller than 100 μm, was decisive for improving analyte micro-homogeneity within the test samples and for attaining lower coefficients of variation of measurements, typically lower than 10% (n = 10 sites per pellet; 20 laser pulses per site). - Highlights: • First systematic study on the effects of particle size distribution. • Most appropriate particle sizes for pellet preparation depend on laser fluence. • Data can be used for sampling strategies aiming at LIBS analysis of plant materials

  5. Influence of particle size distribution on the analysis of pellets of plant materials by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustinelli Arantes de Carvalho, Gabriel [NAPTISA Research Support Center “Technology and Innovation for a Sustainable Agriculture”, Center for Nuclear Energy in Agriculture, University of São Paulo, Av. Centenário 303, 13416-000 Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Santos Jr, Dário [Departamento de Ciências Exatas e da Terra, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Rua Prof. Artur Riedel, 275, 09972-270 Diadema, SP (Brazil); Silva Gomes, Marcos da; Nunes, Lidiane Cristina; Guerra, Marcelo Braga Bueno [NAPTISA Research Support Center “Technology and Innovation for a Sustainable Agriculture”, Center for Nuclear Energy in Agriculture, University of São Paulo, Av. Centenário 303, 13416-000 Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Krug, Francisco José, E-mail: fjkrug@cena.usp.br [NAPTISA Research Support Center “Technology and Innovation for a Sustainable Agriculture”, Center for Nuclear Energy in Agriculture, University of São Paulo, Av. Centenário 303, 13416-000 Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)

    2015-03-01

    Pellets of sieved plant materials (150, 106, 75, 53 and 20 μm sieve apertures) were prepared and analyzed by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), and the results for Ca, K, Mg, P, B and Mn were discussed as a function of particle size distribution. This parameter is of key importance for appropriate test sample presentation in the form of pressed pellets for quantitative analysis by LIBS. Experiments were carried out with a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm, and a spectrometer with Echelle optics and an intensified charge-coupled device. Results indicated that smaller particles yielded up to 50% emission signal intensities' enhancement and attained better measurements' precision (site-to-site variation). Moreover, matrix effects were reduced by analyzing pellets prepared from < 75 μm sieved fractions (mean particle size = 32 μm; d{sub 95} = 102 μm) and by using a 50 J cm{sup −2} laser fluence (220 mJ per pulse; 750 μm laser spot size). The preparation of pellets from laboratory samples with monomodal particle size distributions, where most particles were smaller than 100 μm, was decisive for improving analyte micro-homogeneity within the test samples and for attaining lower coefficients of variation of measurements, typically lower than 10% (n = 10 sites per pellet; 20 laser pulses per site). - Highlights: • First systematic study on the effects of particle size distribution. • Most appropriate particle sizes for pellet preparation depend on laser fluence. • Data can be used for sampling strategies aiming at LIBS analysis of plant materials.

  6. Studies on nanosecond 532nm and 355nm and ultrafast 515nm and 532nm laser cutting super-hard materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Tao, Sha; Wang, Brian; Zhao, Jay

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, micro-processing of three kinds of super-hard materials of poly-crystal diamond (PCD)/tungsten-carbide (WC), CVD-diamond and cubic boron nitride (CNB) has been systematically studied using nanosecond laser (532nm and 355nm), and ultrafast laser (532nm and 515nm). Our purpose is to investigate a full laser micro-cutting solution to achieve a ready-to-use cutting tool insert (CTI). The results show a clean cut with little burns and recasting at edge. The cutting speed of 2-10mm/min depending on thickness was obtained. The laser ablation process was also studied by varying laser parameters (wavelength, pulse width, pulse energy, repetition rate) and tool path to improve cutting speed. Also, studies on material removal efficiency (MRE) of PCD/WC with 355nm-ns and 515nm-fs laser as a function of laser fluence show that 355nm-ns laser is able to achieve higher MRE for PCD and WC. Thus, ultrafast laser is not necessarily used for superhard material cutting. Instead, post-polishing with ultrafast laser can be used to clean cutting surface and improve smoothness.

  7. Laser-induced emission, fluorescence and Raman hybrid setup: A versatile instrument to analyze materials from cultural heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syvilay, D.; Bai, X. S.; Wilkie-Chancellier, N.; Texier, A.; Martinez, L.; Serfaty, S.; Detalle, V.

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this research project was the development of a hybrid system in laboratory coupling together three analytical techniques, namely laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and Raman spectroscopy in a single instrument. The rationale for combining these three spectroscopies was to identify a material (molecular and elemental analysis) without any preliminary preparation, regardless of its organic or inorganic nature, on the surface and in depth, without any surrounding light interference thanks to time resolution. Such instrumentation would allow characterizing different materials from cultural heritage. A complete study on LIBS-LIF-Raman hybrid was carried out, from its conception to instrumental achievement, in order to elaborate a strategy of analysis according to the material and to be able to address conservation issues. From an instrumental point of view, condensing the three spectroscopies was achieved by using a single laser for excitation and two spectrometers (time-integrated and not time-integrated) for light collection. A parabolic mirror was used as collecting system, while three excitation sources directed through this optical system ensured the examination of a similar probe area. Two categories of materials were chosen to test the hybrid instrumentation on cultural heritage applications (copper corrosion products and wall paintings). Some examples are reported to illustrate the wealth of information provided by the hybrid, thus demonstrating its great potential to be used for cultural heritage issues. Finally, several considerations are outlined aimed at further improving the hybrid.

  8. Optimisation of laser welding parameters for welding of P92 material using Taguchi based grey relational analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanmugarajan B.

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Creep strength enhanced ferritic (CSEF steels are used in advanced power plant systems for high temperature applications. P92 (Cr–W–Mo–V steel, classified under CSEF steels, is a candidate material for piping, tubing, etc., in ultra-super critical and advanced ultra-super critical boiler applications. In the present work, laser welding process has been optimised for P92 material by using Taguchi based grey relational analysis (GRA. Bead on plate (BOP trials were carried out using a 3.5 kW diffusion cooled slab CO2 laser by varying laser power, welding speed and focal position. The optimum parameters have been derived by considering the responses such as depth of penetration, weld width and heat affected zone (HAZ width. Analysis of variance (ANOVA has been used to analyse the effect of different parameters on the responses. Based on ANOVA, laser power of 3 kW, welding speed of 1 m/min and focal plane at −4 mm have evolved as optimised set of parameters. The responses of the optimised parameters obtained using the GRA have been verified experimentally and found to closely correlate with the predicted value.

  9. Active Interrogation of Sensitive Nuclear Material Using Laser Driven Neutron Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favalli, Andrea; Roth, Markus

    2015-01-01

    An investigation of the viability of a laser-driven neutron source for active interrogation is reported. The need is for a fast, movable, operationally safe neutron source which is energy tunable and has high-intensity, directional neutron production. Reasons for the choice of neutrons and lasers are set forth. Results from the interrogation of an enriched U sample are shown.

  10. Use of a double-wave carbon dioxide laser for determining small concentrations of materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voitovich, A.P.; Dunaev, V.B.; Prokopov, A.P.

    1985-09-01

    According to this experiment, the smallest detectable concentration of trichloroethylene is C = 2.0/sup -5/ mg/cm/sup 2/. The experiments described were made with an unstabilized laser; it is expected that with an improved radiation recording and a laser with greater stability, the detection limit could be reduced by one or two orders of magnitude.

  11. Pulsed-laser time-resolved thermal mirror technique in low-absorbance homogeneous linear elastic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukasievicz, Gustavo V B; Astrath, Nelson G C; Malacarne, Luis C; Herculano, Leandro S; Zanuto, Vitor S; Baesso, Mauro L; Bialkowski, Stephen E

    2013-10-01

    A theoretical model for a time-resolved photothermal mirror technique using pulsed-laser excitation was developed for low absorption samples. Analytical solutions to the temperature and thermoelastic deformation equations are found for three characteristic pulse profiles and are compared to finite element analysis methods results for finite samples. An analytical expression for the intensity of the center of a continuous probe laser at the detector plane is derived using the Fresnel diffraction theory, which allows modeling of experimental results. Experiments are performed in optical glasses, and the models are fitted to the data. The parameters of the fit are in good agreement with previous literature data for absorption, thermal diffusion, and thermal expansion of the materials tested. The combined modeling and experimental techniques are shown to be useful for quantitative determination of the physical properties of low absorption homogeneous linear elastic material samples.

  12. New advantages and challenges for laser-induced nanostructured cluster materials: functional capability for experimental verification of macroscopic quantum phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramov, D V; Antipov, A A; Arakelian, S M; Khor’kov, K S; Kucherik, A O; Kutrovskaya, S V; Prokoshev, V G

    2014-01-01

    The main goal of our work is the laser fabrication of nanostructured materials including the nano- and microclusters for control of electrical, optical and other properties of obtained structures. First, we took an opportunity to select nanoparticles in various sizes and weights and also in topology distribution for some materials (carbon, Ni, PbTe, etc). Second, for a deposited extended array of nanoparticles we used a method of laser-induced nanoparticle fabrication in colloid and deposition metal (and/or oxide) nanoparticles from colloidal systems (LDPCS) to obtain the multilayered nanostructures with controlled topology, including the fractal cluster structures (for Ni, Pb Te et al). Electrophysical properties are analyzed for such nanocluster systems as well. A brief analogy of the obtained nanocluster structures with a quantum correlated state evidence is carried out. (paper)

  13. Study of the Wavelength Dependence in Laser Ablation of Advanced Ceramics and Glass-Ceramic Materials in the Nanosecond Range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sola, Daniel; Peña, Jose I

    2013-11-19

    In this work, geometrical dimensions and ablation yields as a function of the machining method and reference position were studied when advanced ceramics and glass-ceramic materials were machined with pulsed lasers in the nanosecond range. Two laser systems, emitting at 1064 and 532 nm, were used. It was shown that the features obtained depend on whether the substrate is processed by means of pulse bursts or by grooves. In particular, when the samples were processed by grooves, machined depth, removed volume and ablation yields reached their maximum, placing the sample out of focus. It was shown that these characteristics do not depend on the processing conditions, the wavelength or the optical configuration, and that this is intrinsic behavior of the processing method. Furthermore, the existence of a close relation between material hardness and ablation yields was demonstrated.

  14. Modeling of complex melting and solidification behavior in laser-irradiated materials [a description and users guide to the LASER8 computer program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geist, G.A.; Wood, R.F.

    1985-11-01

    The conceptual foundation of a computational model and a computer program based on it have been developed for treating various aspects of the complex melting and solidification behavior observed in pulsed laser-irradiated materials. A particularly important feature of the modeling is the capability of allowing melting and solidification to occur at temperatures other than the thermodynamic phase change temperatures. As a result, interfacial undercooling and overheating can be introduced and various types of nucleation events can be simulated. Calculations on silicon with the model have shown a wide variety of behavior, including the formation and propagation of multiple phase fronts. Although originally developed as a tool for studying certain problems arising in the field of laser annealing of semiconductors, the program should be useful in treating many types of systems in which phase changes and nucleation phenomena play important roles. This report describes the underlying physical and mathematical ideas and the basic relations used in LASER8. It also provides enough specific and detailed information on the program to serve as a guide for its use; a listing of one version of the program is given

  15. Linear correlation for identification of materials by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy: Improvement via spectral filtering and masking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gornushkin, I.B., E-mail: igor.gornushkin@bam.d [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Berlin (Germany); Panne, U. [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Berlin (Germany); Winefordner, J.D. [University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida (United States)

    2009-10-15

    The purpose of this work is to improve the performance of a linear correlation method used for material identification in laser induced breakdown spectroscopy. The improved correlation procedure is proposed based on the selection and use of only essential spectral information and ignoring empty spectral fragments. The method is tested on glass samples of forensic interest. The 100% identification capability of the new method is demonstrated in contrast to the traditional approach where the identification rate falls below 100% for many samples.

  16. Analysis of copper contamination in transformer insulating material with nanosecond- and femtosecond-laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparna, N.; Vasa, N. J.; Sarathi, R.

    2018-06-01

    This work examines the oil-impregnated pressboard insulation of high-voltage power transformers, for the determination of copper contamination. Nanosecond- and femtosecond-laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy revealed atomic copper lines and molecular copper monoxide bands due to copper sulphide diffusion. X-ray diffraction studies also indicated the presence of CuO emission. Elemental and molecular mapping compared transformer insulating material ageing in different media—air, N2, He and vacuum.

  17. An extended laser flash technique for thermal diffusivity measurement of high-temperature materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, F.; Khodadadi, J. M.

    1993-01-01

    Knowledge of thermal diffusivity data for high-temperature materials (solids and liquids) is very important in analyzing a number of processes, among them solidification, crystal growth, and welding. However, reliable thermal diffusivity versus temperature data, particularly those for high-temperature liquids, are still far from complete. The main measurement difficulties are due to the presence of convection and the requirement for a container. Fortunately, the availability of levitation techniques has made it possible to solve the containment problem. Based on the feasibility of the levitation technology, a new laser flash technique which is applicable to both levitated liquid and solid samples is being developed. At this point, the analysis for solid samples is near completion and highlights of the technique are presented here. The levitated solid sample which is assumed to be a sphere is subjected to a very short burst of high power radiant energy. The temperature of the irradiated surface area is elevated and a transient heat transfer process takes place within the sample. This containerless process is a two-dimensional unsteady heat conduction problem. Due to the nonlinearity of the radiative plus convective boundary condition, an analytic solution cannot be obtained. Two options are available at this point. Firstly, the radiation boundary condition can be linearized, which then accommodates a closed-form analytic solution. Comparison of the analytic curves for the temperature rise at different points to the experimentally-measured values will then provide the thermal diffusivity values. Secondly, one may set up an inverse conduction problem whereby experimentally obtained surface temperature history is used as the boundary conditions. The thermal diffusivity can then be elevated by minimizing the difference between the real heat flux boundary condition (radiation plus convection) and the measurements. Status of an experimental study directed at measuring the

  18. Fluorescence line-narrowing studies of Nd:glass laser materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riseberg, L.A.; Brecher, C.

    The increasing importance of Nd glass lasers in laser fusion technology has emphasized the inadequacy in the understanding of the optical properties of rare earth ions in glasses. Indeed, it has been difficult to generate models for the performance of these devices, and the selection of host glasses could be done by little more than a trial-and-error approach. The technique of laser-induced fluorescence line-narrowing developed within the last few years provides a new and powerful tool for the study of these systems. In this technique, a laser excites within the inhomogeneously broadened absorption bands a selected subgroup of the ions in the system, namely those whose absorption energy is resonant with the laser. If the excitation does not migrate among the entire collection of ions prior to fluorescence, the fluorescence that is observed is only from the group that was excited and is narrowed. This permits the selective study of classes of ion sites within the ensemble. The concept is indicated schematically. By the use of a tunable laser, such as a dye laser, it is possible to vary the class of sites, defined by energy, that is excited and thereby study the important spectroscopic properties and their variations, unclouded by the averaging that occurs under excitation of the entire system. Furthermore, it is then possible to use the spectroscopic information to infer a description of the variation of the microscopic environment, and a rationalization of the effects of compositional changes. Use of a pulsed dye laser and time-resolved detection permits the study of the dynamics, including, for example, the energy transfer among ions of different energies within the inhomogeneously-broadened spectrum. The goal of this project has been to apply such studies to glasses of interest to glass laser technology, providing information for device modeling, and establishing design criteria for glass selection

  19. Experimental and numerical investigation on cladding of corrosion-erosion resistant materials by a high power direct diode laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahmand, Parisa

    In oil and gas industry, soil particles, crude oil, natural gas, particle-laden liquids, and seawater can carry various highly aggressive elements, which accelerate the material degradation of component surfaces by combination of slurry erosion, corrosion, and wear mechanisms. This material degradation results into the loss of mechanical properties such as strength, ductility, and impact strength; leading to detachment, delamination, cracking, and ultimately premature failure of components. Since the failure of high valued equipment needs considerable cost and time to be repaired or replaced, minimizing the tribological failure of equipment under aggressive environment has been gaining increased interest. It is widely recognized that effective management of degradation mechanisms will contribute towards the optimization of maintenance, monitoring, and inspection costs. The hardfacing techniques have been widely used to enhance the resistance of surfaces against degradation mechanisms. Applying a surface coating improves wear and corrosion resistance and ensures reliability and long-term performance of coated parts. A protective layer or barrier on the components avoids the direct mechanical and chemical contacts of tool surfaces with process media and will reduce the material loss and ultimately its failure. Laser cladding as an advanced hardfacing technique has been widely used for industrial applications in order to develop a protective coating with desired material properties. During the laser cladding, coating material is fused into the base material by means of a laser beam in order to rebuild a damaged part's surface or to enhance its surface function. In the hardfacing techniques such as atmospheric plasma spraying (APS), high velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF), and laser cladding, mixing of coating materials with underneath surface has to be minimized in order to utilize the properties of the coating material most effectively. In this regard, laser cladding offers

  20. Characterization of high power flashlamps and application to Nd:glass laser pumping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, H.T.; Erlandson, A.C.; Jancaitis, K.S.

    1986-01-01

    Detailed spectral and temporal measurements of the output radiation from Xe flashlamps are reported together with their use in predicting the pumping efficiency of Nd-doped laser glass. We have made absolute spectral-intensity measurements for 0.5, 1.5, and 4.2-cm-bore flashlamps for input powers ranging from 5 to 90 kW/cm 2 and pulselengths of 600 μs. Under quasi-stationary conditions these flashlamps emit essentially identical spectra when excited at equal input power per unit-area of the bore. This behavior is characteristic of an optically-thick radiator although it is not completely clear why flashlamps should behave this way. A simple model is also described which accounts for the transient response of flashlamps by characterizing the output spectra and radiation efficiencies in terms of the radiant output power rather than the electrical input power. 23 refs., 16 figs

  1. Investigating the CO 2 laser cutting parameters of MDF wood composite material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltawahni, H. A.; Olabi, A. G.; Benyounis, K. Y.

    2011-04-01

    Laser cutting of medium density fibreboard (MDF) is a complicated process and the selection of the process parameters combinations is essential to get the highest quality cut section. This paper presents a means for selecting the process parameters for laser cutting of MDF based on the design of experiments (DOE) approach. A CO 2 laser was used to cut three thicknesses, 4, 6 and 9 mm, of MDF panels. The process factors investigated are: laser power, cutting speed, air pressure and focal point position. In this work, cutting quality was evaluated by measuring the upper kerf width, the lower kerf width, the ratio between the upper kerf width to the lower kerf width, the cut section roughness and the operating cost. The effect of each factor on the quality measures was determined. The optimal cutting combinations were presented in favours of high quality process output and in favours of low cutting cost.

  2. Laser Induced Shock Waves and Vaporization in Biological System and Material Science

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gerstman, Bernard S

    2008-01-01

    .... We have developed a computational model that allows the calculation of damage resulting from a laser pulse of any duration or energy due to temperature rise, explosive bubble formation, and shock wave production...

  3. Thin film growing by the laser ablation technique: possibilities for growing of dosimetric materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas R, E.M.; Melo M, M.; Enriquez Z, E.; Fernandez G, M.; Haro P, E.; Hernandez P, J.L.

    2005-01-01

    In this talk we will present the basics about the laser ablation technique and how it is used for thin film growing, either as a single film or a stack of thin films, as well as some methods to characterize in real time the film thickness. Finally, we will discuss the possibilities of using laser ablation for growing thin films with applications to dosimetry. (Author)

  4. 3D imaging of cement-based materials at submicron resolution by combining laser scanning confocal microscopy with serial sectioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yio, M H N; Mac, M J; Wong, H S; Buenfeld, N R

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we present a new method to reconstruct large volumes of nontransparent porous materials at submicron resolution. The proposed method combines fluorescence laser scanning confocal microscopy with serial sectioning to produce a series of overlapping confocal z-stacks, which are then aligned and stitched based on phase correlation. The method can be extended in the XY plane to further increase the overall image volume. Resolution of the reconstructed image volume does not degrade with increase in sample size. We have used the method to image cementitious materials, hardened cement paste and concrete and the results obtained show that the method is reliable. Possible applications of the method such as three-dimensional characterization of the pores and microcracks in hardened concrete, three-dimensional particle shape characterization of cementitious materials and three-dimensional characterization of other porous materials such as rocks and bioceramics are discussed. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  5. Feasibility Study on 3-D Printing of Metallic Structural Materials with Robotized Laser-Based Metal Additive Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yaoyu; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2016-07-01

    Metallic structural materials continue to open new avenues in achieving exotic mechanical properties that are naturally unavailable. They hold great potential in developing novel products in diverse industries such as the automotive, aerospace, biomedical, oil and gas, and defense. Currently, the use of metallic structural materials in industry is still limited because of difficulties in their manufacturing. This article studied the feasibility of printing metallic structural materials with robotized laser-based metal additive manufacturing (RLMAM). In this study, two metallic structural materials characterized by an enlarged positive Poisson's ratio and a negative Poisson's ratio were designed and simulated, respectively. An RLMAM system developed at the Research Center for Advanced Manufacturing of Southern Methodist University was used to print them. The results of the tensile tests indicated that the printed samples successfully achieved the corresponding mechanical properties.

  6. Investigation of the particle size distribution of the ejected material generated during the single femtosecond laser pulse ablation of aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Han; Zhang, Nan; Zhu, Xiaonong

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Single 50 fs laser pulse ablation of an aluminium target in vacuum is investigated in our experiments. • Nanoparticles with large radii of several hundred nanometers are observed. • The nanoparticles are most likely from the mechanical tensile stress relaxation. - Abstract: Single femtosecond laser pulses are employed to ablate an aluminium target in vacuum, and the particle size distribution of the ablated material deposited on a mica substrate is examined with atomic force microscopy (AFM). The recorded AFM images show that these particles have a mean radius of several tens of nanometres. It is also determined that the mean radius of these deposited nanoparticles increases when the laser fluence at the aluminium target increases from 0.44 J/cm 2 to 0.63 J/cm 2 . The mechanism of the laser-induced nanoparticle generation is thought to be photomechanical tensile stress relaxation. Raman spectroscopy measurements confirm that the nanoparticles thus produced have the same structure as the bulk aluminium

  7. The effects of lasers on bond strength to ceramic materials: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Sanz, Verónica; Paredes-Gallardo, Vanessa; Mendoza-Yero, Omel; Carbonell-Leal, Miguel; Albaladejo, Alberto; Montiel-Company, José María; Bellot-Arcís, Carlos

    2018-01-01

    Lasers have recently been introduced as an alternative means of conditioning dental ceramic surfaces in order to enhance their adhesive strength to cements and other materials. The present systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to review and quantitatively analyze the available literature in order to determine which bond protocols and laser types are the most effective. A search was conducted in the Pubmed, Embase and Scopus databases for papers published up to April 2017. PRISMA guidelines for systematic review and meta-analysis were followed. Fifty-two papers were eligible for inclusion in the review. Twenty-five studies were synthesized quantitatively. Lasers were found to increase bond strength of ceramic surfaces to resin cements and composites when compared with control specimens (p-value < 0.01), whereas no significant differences were found in comparison with air-particle abraded surfaces. High variability can be observed in adhesion values between different analyses, pointing to a need to standardize study protocols and to determine the optimal parameters for each laser type.

  8. The effects of lasers on bond strength to ceramic materials: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Sanz, Verónica; Mendoza-Yero, Omel; Carbonell-Leal, Miguel; Albaladejo, Alberto; Montiel-Company, José María; Bellot-Arcís, Carlos

    2018-01-01

    Lasers have recently been introduced as an alternative means of conditioning dental ceramic surfaces in order to enhance their adhesive strength to cements and other materials. The present systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to review and quantitatively analyze the available literature in order to determine which bond protocols and laser types are the most effective. A search was conducted in the Pubmed, Embase and Scopus databases for papers published up to April 2017. PRISMA guidelines for systematic review and meta-analysis were followed. Fifty-two papers were eligible for inclusion in the review. Twenty-five studies were synthesized quantitatively. Lasers were found to increase bond strength of ceramic surfaces to resin cements and composites when compared with control specimens (p-value < 0.01), whereas no significant differences were found in comparison with air-particle abraded surfaces. High variability can be observed in adhesion values between different analyses, pointing to a need to standardize study protocols and to determine the optimal parameters for each laser type. PMID:29293633

  9. Lateral Temperature-Gradient Method for High-Throughput Characterization of Material Processing by Millisecond Laser Annealing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Robert T; Jacobs, Alan G; Sorg, Victoria C; Jung, Byungki; Hill, Megan O; Treml, Benjamin E; Thompson, Michael O

    2016-09-12

    A high-throughput method for characterizing the temperature dependence of material properties following microsecond to millisecond thermal annealing, exploiting the temperature gradients created by a lateral gradient laser spike anneal (lgLSA), is presented. Laser scans generate spatial thermal gradients of up to 5 °C/μm with peak temperatures ranging from ambient to in excess of 1400 °C, limited only by laser power and materials thermal limits. Discrete spatial property measurements across the temperature gradient are then equivalent to independent measurements after varying temperature anneals. Accurate temperature calibrations, essential to quantitative analysis, are critical and methods for both peak temperature and spatial/temporal temperature profile characterization are presented. These include absolute temperature calibrations based on melting and thermal decomposition, and time-resolved profiles measured using platinum thermistors. A variety of spatially resolved measurement probes, ranging from point-like continuous profiling to large area sampling, are discussed. Examples from annealing of III-V semiconductors, CdSe quantum dots, low-κ dielectrics, and block copolymers are included to demonstrate the flexibility, high throughput, and precision of this technique.

  10. Pulsed-laser heating: a tool for studying degradation of materials subjected to repeated high-temperature excursions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldberg, A.; Cornell, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    The use of pulsed-laser heating was evaluated as a means to obtain high cyclic peak temperatures with short rise times. A two-stage neodymium glass laser was used which produces a 600-μs pulse with energy outputs of up to 100 J. Small disk-shaped samples of AISI 4340 steel served as targets. Some of these were coated with a tungsten deposit. The rear face of some of the targets was instrumented for evaluation of temperature, strain, and stress response. Post-shot metallographic evaluations were made on a number of targets. We saw evidence of surface melting, cracking, and phase transformation. Surface damage was related to differences in the number of pulse cycles and input energy level, variables in the target materials, and the extent of strain-induced stresses. These experiments were performed in air at 1 atm and ambient laboratory temperature. 36 figures

  11. Advanced materials for the optical delay line of frequency pulse modulator on the basis of semiconductor laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrarov, S.M.

    1999-01-01

    In the paper some materials which can be sued as an optical delay line of the pulse frequency modulator are considered. The structure and the principle are described as a modulator consisting of a laser diode with two Fabry Perot resonators and an optical wave guide providing a feedback loop. The optical wave guide fulfills the function of delay line and links the two resonators. The pulse sequence of the radiation of the semiconductor laser arises due to failure and recovery of optical generation. The pulse frequency modulation can be carried out by the action of electrical tension field on the electro optic martial of the wave guide. The selection of three electro-optic crystals for making of the optical wave guide of the considered modulator is justified. (author)

  12. Effect of type of cavity preparation (bur,Er:YAG laser and restorative materials on prevention of caries lesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masumeh Hasani Tabatabaei

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Despite the reduction of incidence of dental caries in recent years, this disease is common and many efforts were conducted to decrease the prevalence of dental caries. On the other hand secondary caries lesions are the main reason for replacement of direct restorations. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to evaluate suitable methods of preparation and restorative materials to reduce caries recurrence. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, eighty human teeth were collected and stored in normal saline. The teeth were soft-tissue debrided and cleaned with water/pumice slurry and rubber cups in a low-speed handpiece. Speciments were randomly divided in two main groups. Cavities were prepared with diamond burs or Er:YAG laser (10 Hz, 300 mJ, 3W. Each group was divided into 4 sub-groups, and restored with a glass-ionomer cement (Fuji IX, resin modified glass-ionomer (Fuji II LC, total etch bonding + composite resin or self-etch bonding + composite resin. The specimens were submitted to pH cycling. Speciments were then sectioned, polished and Vickers microhardness measurements were performed on each specimen. Differences among the medians were analyzed using two way ANOVA test at a 95% confidence level and Tukey test. Results: Statistical analysis showed significant difference in the type of substrate (enamel, dentin in both main groups (P<0.0001 but no differences in the caries lesion development between the cavities restored with the same material and prepared with diamond burs or Er:YAG laser. Conclusion: The Er:YAG laser used for cavity preparation and different types of restorative materials used did not show the ability to guarantee significantly more acid-resistance tooth structure against demineralization.

  13. Isentropic/shock compression and recovery methodology for materials using high-amplitude laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maddox, B.R., E-mail: maddox3@llnl.gov [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Park, H.-S., E-mail: park1@llnl.gov [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Lu, C.-H., E-mail: chiahuilu@gmail.com [University of California, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, San Diego, CA 92093 (United States); Remington, B.A., E-mail: remington2@llnl.gov [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Prisbrey, S., E-mail: prisbrey1@llnl.gov [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Kad, B., E-mail: bkad@ucsd.edu [University of California, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, San Diego, CA 92093 (United States); Luo, R., E-mail: luorwga@gmail.com [General Atomics, 3483 Dunhill Street, San Diego, CA 92121-1200 (United States); Meyers, M.A., E-mail: mameyers@eng.ucsd.edu [University of California, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, San Diego, CA 92093 (United States)

    2013-08-20

    Abstarct: A new method of subjecting samples to high-amplitude laser pulses with durations in the ns range and recovering them for characterization is presented. It is applied to tantalum monocrystals and nanocrystals that are subjected to controlled and prescribed ramp loading configurations, creating a quasi-isentropic loading in the front that is retained up to 40 μm into the specimen. This is enabled by the use of a reservoir into which six laser beams impinge simultaneously, thereby creating plasma in a reservoir, from which the pulse is launched into the metal. This technique enables, with proper wave trapping devices, the recovery of the specimens for subsequent characterization. Successful experiments conducted in the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, U. of Rochester, generated pressure pulses with initial amplitudes ranging from 15 to 110 GPa and initial durations of ∼3 ns. The quasi-isotropic loading minimizes thermal effects at the front surface. The compression history of the recovered samples is measured using velocity interferometry from an Al-coated LiF witness target on the same shot driven by a separate, but equivalent set of laser beams. These experimental measurements are compared with computations using a radiation hydrodynamics code. Recovered samples are investigated using optical, scanning, and transmission electron microscopy. The laser damage to the surface is characterized.

  14. In vitro mesenchymal stem cell response to a CO{sub 2} laser modified polymeric material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waugh, D.G., E-mail: d.waugh@chester.ac.uk [Laser Engineering and Manufacturing Research Centre, Faculty of Science and Engineering, University of Chester, Chester CH1 4BJ (United Kingdom); Hussain, I. [School of Life Sciences, Brayford Pool, University of Lincoln, Lincoln LN6 7TS (United Kingdom); Lawrence, J.; Smith, G.C. [Laser Engineering and Manufacturing Research Centre, Faculty of Science and Engineering, University of Chester, Chester CH1 4BJ (United Kingdom); Cosgrove, D. [School of Life Sciences, Brayford Pool, University of Lincoln, Lincoln LN6 7TS (United Kingdom); Toccaceli, C. [Laser Engineering and Manufacturing Research Centre, Faculty of Science and Engineering, University of Chester, Chester CH1 4BJ (United Kingdom)

    2016-10-01

    With an ageing world population it is becoming significantly apparent that there is a need to produce implants and platforms to manipulate stem cell growth on a pharmaceutical scale. This is needed to meet the socio-economic demands of many countries worldwide. This paper details one of the first ever studies in to the manipulation of stem cell growth on CO{sub 2} laser surface treated nylon 6,6 highlighting its potential as an inexpensive platform to manipulate stem cell growth on a pharmaceutical scale. Through CO{sub 2} laser surface treatment discrete changes to the surfaces were made. That is, the surface roughness of the nylon 6,6 was increased by up to 4.3 μm, the contact angle was modulated by up to 5° and the surface oxygen content increased by up to 1 atom %. Following mesenchymal stem cell growth on the laser treated samples, it was identified that CO{sub 2} laser surface treatment gave rise to an enhanced response with an increase in viable cell count of up to 60,000 cells/ml when compared to the as-received sample. The effect of surface parameters modified by the CO{sub 2} laser surface treatment on the mesenchymal stem cell response is also discussed along with potential trends that could be identified to govern the mesenchymal stem cell response.

  15. Laser glass: a key material in the search for fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, J H

    1999-01-01

    Nuclear fusion is the energy source that powers the sun. For more than four decades man has sought to develop this essentially inexhaustible, clean power source for use on earth. Unfortunately the conditions needed to initiate fusion are daunting; the nuclear fuel, consisting of isotopes of hydrogen, must be heated to temperatures in excess of 100,000,000 C and maintained at that temperature long enough for the nuclear fuel to ignite and burn. Lasers are being used as one of the tools to achieve these conditions. The best lasers for this work are those that derive their energy from a unique set of optical glasses called laser glasses. The work to develop, manufacture and test these glasses has involved a partnership between university and industry that has spanned more than 25 years. During this time lasers used in fusion development have grown from small systems that could fit on the top of a table to systems currently under construction that are approximately the size of a municipal sports stadium. A brief historical and anecdotal account of the development of laser glasses for fusion energy research applications is the subject of the presentation

  16. Room-temperature subnanosecond waveguide lasers in Nd:YVO4 Q-switched by phase-change VO2: A comparison with 2D materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Weijie; Li, Rang; Cheng, Chen; Chen, Yanxue; Lu, Qingming; Romero, Carolina; Vázquez de Aldana, Javier R; Hao, Xiaotao; Chen, Feng

    2017-04-06

    We report on room-temperature subnanosecond waveguide laser operation at 1064 nm in a Nd:YVO 4 crystal waveguide through Q-switching of phase-change nanomaterial vanadium dioxide (VO 2 ). The unique feature of VO 2 nanomaterial from the insulating to metallic phases offers low-saturation-intensity nonlinear absorptions of light for subnanosecond pulse generation. The low-loss waveguide is fabricated by using the femtosecond laser writing with depressed cladding geometry. Under optical pump at 808 nm, efficient pulsed laser has been achieved in the Nd:YVO 4 waveguide, reaching minimum pulse duration of 690 ps and maximum output average power of 66.7 mW. To compare the Q-switched laser performances by VO 2 saturable absorber with those based on two-dimensional materials, the 1064-nm laser pulses have been realized in the same waveguide platform with either graphene or transition metal dichalcogenide (in this work, WS 2 ) coated mirror. The results on 2D material Q-switched waveguide lasers have shown that the shortest pulses are with 22-ns duration, whilst the maximum output average powers reach ~161.9 mW. This work shows the obvious difference on the lasing properties based on phase-change material and 2D materials, and suggests potential applications of VO 2 as low-cost saturable absorber for subnanosecond laser generation.

  17. Radiation chemistry and advanced polymer materials studied by picosecond pulse radiolysis combined with femtosecond laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagawa, S.; Yoshida, Y.; Miki, M.; Yamamoto, T.; Ushida, K.; Izumi, Y.

    1996-01-01

    We have synchronized a single picosecond MeV electron pulse from L-band linear accelerator (linac) of The Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research of Osaka University to a single femtosecond laser pulse of Ti:Sapphire laser. It is an essential technique for the future femtosecond pulse radiolysis and is also applied to many kinds of combined application of more than two different beams from accelerators in very short time range. Radiation chemistry and new type of polymers have been studied by LL (laser-linac) twin picosecond pulse radiolysis. Especially the early events in radiation chemistry such as geminate recombination processes of electrons and radical cations are have been studied in both liquids and solids. (author)

  18. XPS, AES and laser raman spectroscopy: A fingerprint for a materials surface characterisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaidi Embong

    2011-01-01

    This review briefly describes some of the techniques available for analysing surfaces and illustrates their usefulness with a few examples such as a metal and alloy. In particular, Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and laser Raman spectroscopy are all described as advanced surface analytical techniques. In analysing a surface, AES and XPS would normally be considered first, with AES being applied where high spatial resolution is required and XPS where chemical state information is needed. Laser Raman spectroscopy is useful for determining molecular bonding. A combination of XPS, AES and Laser Raman spectroscopy can give quantitative analysis from the top few atomic layers with a lateral spatial resolution of < 10 nm. (author)

  19. Thin film removal mechanisms in ns-laser processing of photovoltaic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bovatsek, J.; Tamhankar, A.; Patel, R.S.; Bulgakova, N.M.; Bonse, J.

    2010-01-01

    The removal of thin films widely used in photovoltaics (amorphous silicon, tin oxide, zinc oxide, aluminum, and molybdenum) is studied experimentally using multi-kHz Q-switched solid-state lasers at 532 nm and 1064 nm wavelengths. The processing ('scribing') is performed through the film-supporting glass plate at scribing speeds of the order of m/s. The dependence of the film removal threshold on the laser pulse duration (8 ns to 40 ns) is investigated and the results are complemented by a multi-layer thermal model used for numerical simulations of the laser-induced spatio-temporal temperature field within the samples. Possible film removal mechanisms are discussed upon consideration of optical, geometrical, thermal and mechanical properties of the layers.

  20. Subsecond annealing of advanced materials annealing by lasers, flash lamps and swift heavy ions

    CERN Document Server

    Skorupa, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    This book examines thermal processing of elemental semiconductors and materials including nanostructures with novel optoelectronic, magnetic, and superconducting properties. Covers compound semiconductors, dielectric composites and organic materials.