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Sample records for nci sponsors science

  1. The generalizability of NCI-sponsored clinical trials accrual among women with gynecologic malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishkin, Grace; Minasian, Lori M; Kohn, Elise C; Noone, Anne-Michelle; Temkin, Sarah M

    2016-12-01

    Enrollment of a representative population to cancer clinical trials ensures scientific reliability and generalizability of results. This study evaluated the similarity of patients enrolled in NCI-supported group gynecologic cancer trials to the incident US population. Accrual to NCI-sponsored ovarian, uterine, and cervical cancer treatment trials between 2003 and 2012 were examined. Race, ethnicity, age, and insurance status were compared to the analogous US patient population estimated using adjusted SEER incidence data. There were 18,913 accruals to 156 NCI-sponsored gynecologic cancer treatment trials, ovarian (56%), uterine (32%), and cervical cancers (12%). Ovarian cancer trials included the least racial, ethnic and age diversity. Black women were notably underrepresented in ovarian trials (4% versus 11%). Hispanic patients were underrepresented in ovarian and uterine trials (4% and 5% versus 18% and 19%, respectively), but not in cervical cancer trials (14 versus 11%). Elderly patients were underrepresented in each disease area, with the greatest underrepresentation seen in ovarian cancer patients over the age of 75 (7% versus 29%). Privately insured women were overrepresented among accrued ovarian cancer patients (87% versus 76%), and the uninsured were overrepresented among women with uterine or cervical cancers. These patterns did not change over time. Several notable differences were observed between the patients accrued to NCI funded trials and the incident population. Improving representation of racial and ethnic minorities and elderly patients on cancer clinical trials continues to be a challenge and priority. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. At NCI, Supporting the Best Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesterday, at the AACR annual meeting, Dr. Doug Lowy spoke directly to the research community about his goals as NCI Acting Director. Dr. Lowy said that he plans to continue many of the programs launched by his predecessor, Dr. Harold Varmus, and to sharp

  3. NCI and the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences Sign Statement of Intent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Today the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the Cancer Institute/Hospital of the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences (CICAMS) signed a statement of intent to share an interest in fostering collaborative biomedical research in oncology and a common goal

  4. NCI's High Performance Computing (HPC) and High Performance Data (HPD) Computing Platform for Environmental and Earth System Data Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Ben; Allen, Chris; Antony, Joseph; Bastrakova, Irina; Gohar, Kashif; Porter, David; Pugh, Tim; Santana, Fabiana; Smillie, Jon; Trenham, Claire; Wang, Jingbo; Wyborn, Lesley

    2015-04-01

    The National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) has established a powerful and flexible in-situ petascale computational environment to enable both high performance computing and Data-intensive Science across a wide spectrum of national environmental and earth science data collections - in particular climate, observational data and geoscientific assets. This paper examines 1) the computational environments that supports the modelling and data processing pipelines, 2) the analysis environments and methods to support data analysis, and 3) the progress so far to harmonise the underlying data collections for future interdisciplinary research across these large volume data collections. NCI has established 10+ PBytes of major national and international data collections from both the government and research sectors based on six themes: 1) weather, climate, and earth system science model simulations, 2) marine and earth observations, 3) geosciences, 4) terrestrial ecosystems, 5) water and hydrology, and 6) astronomy, social and biosciences. Collectively they span the lithosphere, crust, biosphere, hydrosphere, troposphere, and stratosphere. The data is largely sourced from NCI's partners (which include the custodians of many of the major Australian national-scale scientific collections), leading research communities, and collaborating overseas organisations. New infrastructures created at NCI mean the data collections are now accessible within an integrated High Performance Computing and Data (HPC-HPD) environment - a 1.2 PFlop supercomputer (Raijin), a HPC class 3000 core OpenStack cloud system and several highly connected large-scale high-bandwidth Lustre filesystems. The hardware was designed at inception to ensure that it would allow the layered software environment to flexibly accommodate the advancement of future data science. New approaches to software technology and data models have also had to be developed to enable access to these large and exponentially

  5. NCI Core Open House Shines Spotlight on Supportive Science and Basic Research | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    The lobby of Building 549 at NCI at Frederick bustled with activity for two hours on Tuesday, May 1, as several dozen scientists and staff gathered for the NCI Core Open House. The event aimed to encourage discussion and educate visitors about the capabilities of the cores, laboratories, and facilities that offer support to NCI’s Center for Cancer Research.

  6. A sense of urgency: Evaluating the link between clinical trial development time and the accrual performance of cancer therapy evaluation program (NCI-CTEP) sponsored studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Steven K; Dietrich, Mary S; Dilts, David M

    2010-11-15

    Postactivation barriers to oncology clinical trial accruals are well documented; however, potential barriers prior to trial opening are not. We investigate one such barrier: trial development time. National Cancer Institute Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program (CTEP)-sponsored trials for all therapeutic, nonpediatric phase I, I/II, II, and III studies activated between 2000 and 2004 were investigated for an 8-year period (n = 419). Successful trials were those achieving 100% of minimum accrual goal. Time to open a study was the calendar time from initial CTEP submission to trial activation. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to calculate unadjusted and adjusted odds ratios (OR), controlling for study phase and size of expected accruals. Among the CTEP-approved oncology trials, 37.9% (n = 221) failed to attain the minimum accrual goals, with 70.8% (n = 14) of phase III trials resulting in poor accrual. A total of 16,474 patients (42.5% of accruals) accrued to those studies were unable to achieve the projected minimum accrual goal. Trials requiring less than 12 months of development were significantly more likely to achieve accrual goals (OR, 2.15; 95% confidence interval, 1.29-3.57, P = 0.003) than trials with the median development times of 12 to 18 months. Trials requiring a development time of greater than 24 months were significantly less likely to achieve accrual goals (OR, 0.40; 95% confidence interval, 0.20-0.78; P = 0.011) than trials with the median development time. A large percentage of oncology clinical trials do not achieve minimum projected accruals. Trial development time appears to be one important predictor of the likelihood of successfully achieving the minimum accrual goals. ©2010 AACR.

  7. [Analysis of projects of schistosomiasis sponsored by National Science Foundation of China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen-di, Zhou; Liang, Shi; Xue-Dan, Ke; Jie, Wang

    2017-07-27

    To summarize the present development by analysis of projects in schistosomiasis funded by National Science Foundation of China (NSFC). Based on the ISIS database of NFSC, the projects in the studies of schistosomiasis from 2005 to 2016 were analyzed. The distributions of sponsored numbers, amounts, types, agencies, disciplines and changes in research topics by means of network profiles were described. During the study period, 198 projects were funded by NSFC totally with 76.05 million yuan in which the general and youth projects were main types. The main sponsored agencies were research institutes and medical colleges. The top three fields sponsored were medical pathogenic microbes and infection, veterinary and medical immunology. The funding on schistosomiasis researches has a downward trend, but studies are continuing in depth. In this situation, innovative and interdisciplinary researches need to be encouraged to promote the development of schistosomiasis.

  8. NCI Visuals Online

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI Visuals Online contains images from the collections of the National Cancer Institute's Office of Communications and Public Liaison, including general biomedical and science-related images, cancer-specific scientific and patient care-related images, and portraits of directors and staff of the National Cancer Institute.

  9. How do staff members at science and technology centres consider the impact of sponsors on the scientific content of exhibitions?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsson, Eva; Sørensen, Helene

    2009-01-01

    or historical museums. But in what ways may sponsors impact exhibition content and design at science and technology centres? This study seeks to explore how staff members consider the impact of sponsors and donors on exhibit content and design. The data collection involves a survey, interviews and a focus group...... interview with staff members, who work with planning and constructing new exhibitions at their science and technology centre. The results suggest that sponsors may interfere in exhibition construction both directly and indirectly. This means that sponsors could put explicit demands when it comes...... to the choice of scientific content and design and thereby interfere directly. Indirect impact, on the other hand, refers to implicit demands of sponsors where staff members take into account for what they believe are views of the sponsors through self-censorship....

  10. [Analysis of projects of infectious disease epidemiology sponsored by National Natural Science Foundation of China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian-Ming, Wang; Yan-Kai, Xia; Hui-Juan, Zhu; Feng, Chen; Hong-Bing, Shen

    2016-05-10

    To analyze the projects on the infectious disease epidemiology sponsored by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC), explore the hotspot and development trend, and offer a reference for researchers in this field. Based on the NSFC database, the projects on the infectious disease epidemiology (H2609) sponsored from 1987 to 2014 were analyzed. The changes of fund numbers, amounts and research fields were described. During the study period, NSFC sponsored 373 projects, including 228 general projects (61.1%), 78 youth projects (20.9%) and 67 other projects (18.0%). The average amount of the grant was 358.2 thousand Yuan (20 thousand-8 million). The main sponsored research fields were mechanisms of pathogen and immunity (36.2%) and population-based epidemiological studies (33.0%). The top three diseases were hepatitis, HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis. The amount of funding on researches of infectious disease epidemiology has increased continuously, which has played an important role in training scientific talents in the field of prevention and control of infectious diseases.

  11. Cooperative Research Projects in the Microgravity Combustion Science Programs Sponsored by NASA and NEDO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Howard (Compiler)

    2000-01-01

    This document contains the results of a collection of selected cooperative research projects between principal investigators in the microgravity combustion science programs, sponsored by NASA and NEDO. Cooperation involved the use of drop towers in Japan and the United States, and the sharing of subsequent research data and findings. The topical areas include: (1) Interacting droplet arrays, (2) high pressure binary fuel sprays, (3) sooting droplet combustion, (4) flammability limits and dynamics of spherical, premixed gaseous flames and, (5) ignition and transition of flame spread across thin solid fuel samples. All of the investigators view this collaboration as a success. Novel flame behaviors were found and later published in archival journals. In some cases the experiments provided verification of the design and behavior in subsequent experiments performed on the Space Shuttle. In other cases, the experiments provided guidance to experiments that are expected to be performed on the International Space Station.

  12. NCI & Division Obligations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Displays obligations for grants, contracts, training fellowships, intramural research, and management and support, including the number of grant awards, funding amounts, and percent of the total NCI budget.

  13. [Scholarships for a science in crisis: the JAE as sponsor for macroscopic anatomy (1912-1931)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco Morgado, Raúl

    2010-01-01

    Beside the creation of national research institutions, the patronage work of the JAE (through scholarships and recognition given to Spanish scientists in the first third of the 20th century) was important in opening the door to the silver age of Spanish science. In the morphologic sciences, macroscopic anatomy was an almost closed science and in crisis with regard to the microscopic sciences and embryology. Despite this setting, the JAE chose to promote this science, importing European anatomical pedagogy and including the technologies and philosophy of the new dynamic anatomy under way on the continent. In this paper, we analyze the grantholders listed in the JAE archives and the studies that they published by them. We conclude that the utilization of these grants played an important role in promoting the international exchange necessary for the reform of a science in crisis, with anatomical pedagogy and technology being the major protagonists of this renewal.

  14. The role of NIGMS P50 sponsored team science in our understanding of multiple organ failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Frederick A; Moore, Ernest E; Billiar, Timothy R; Vodovotz, Yoram; Banerjee, Anirban; Moldawer, Lyle L

    2017-09-01

    The history of the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS) Research Centers in Peri-operative Sciences (RCIPS) is the history of clinical, translational, and basic science research into the etiology and treatment of posttraumatic multiple organ failure (MOF). Born out of the activism of trauma and burn surgeons after the Viet Nam War, the P50 trauma research centers have been a nidus of research advances in the field and the training of future academic physician-scientists in the fields of trauma, burns, sepsis, and critical illness. For over 40 years, research conducted under the aegis of this funding program has led to numerous contributions at both the bedside and at the bench. In fact, it has been this requirement for team science with a clinician-scientist working closely with basic scientists from multiple disciplines that has led the RCIPS to its unrivaled success in the field. This review will briefly highlight some of the major accomplishments of the RCIPS program since its inception, how they have both led and evolved as the field moved steadily forward, and how they are responsible for much of our current understanding of the etiology and pathology of MOF. This review is not intended to be all encompassing nor a historical reference. Rather, it serves as recognition to the foresight and support of many past and present individuals at the NIGMS and at academic institutions who have understood the cost of critical illness and MOF to the individual and to society.

  15. Science Innovation Through Industry Partnership: Lessons from AMPERE in Bridging the Federal Sponsor/Private Corporation Divide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.; Erlandson, R. E.

    2017-12-01

    The Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE) was made possible by harnessing an fortuitous capability of the Iridium Communications constellation of 70 polar orbiting satellites. In 1996 it was realized that the attitude magnetometers on-board the Iridium satellites, then in fabrication, could potentially be used to obtain the first ever global and continuous measurements of the Birkeland currents with a sufficiently short re-sampling cadence (10 minutes) to track the dynamic evolution of the large-scale currents. The experience of taking this idea from 1996 through various research grant supported efforts, mission of opportunity proposal attempts, and finally through funding and implementation as a National Science Foundation geospace facility, revealed a number of challenges both in proposing innovative solutions to existing sponsor programs and also in working between the federal sponsor community and the private commercial space environment. Implementing AMPERE required a code change to on-board software on the Iridium satellites and it proved necessary to engage NASA to adjust the solicitation language to allow AMPERE. For NASA proposals we also encountered a conflict with respect to federal sponsorship such that the original business configuration of Iridium could not accept the accounting regime implied by a sub-contract derived from a federal contract acquisition. Subsequent mission of opportunity efforts encountered various other challenges including the cancellation of an explorer to fund the exploration initiative in 2001. The facilities proposal to NSF was almost not submitted owing a funding vehicle disparity between the preferred proposer structure (contract) vs NSF's requirement to fund only grants and a final hurdle concerned the structure of the contract with Iridium which was initially a sub-contract but was changed to a fixed-price data purchase due to NSF's limitations on funding fee-bearing engineering

  16. Data Sets from Major NCI Initiaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI Data Catalog includes links to data collections produced by major NCI initiatives and other widely used data sets, including animal models, human tumor cell lines, epidemiology data sets, genomics data sets from TCGA, TARGET, COSMIC, GSK, NCI60.

  17. NCI Pediatric Preclinical Testing Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI has awarded grants to five research teams to participate in its Pediatric Preclinical Testing Consortium, which is intended to help to prioritize which agents to pursue in pediatric clinical trials.

  18. NCI's Role in Immunotherapy Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Reporting & Auditing Grant Transfer Grant Closeout Contracts & Small Business Training Cancer Training at NCI (Intramural) Resources for ... promising immunotherapies to the clinic more efficiently and cost effectively. For ... of the checkpoint inhibitor pembrolizumab in patients with ...

  19. Molecular Energy and Environmental Science: A Workshop Sponsored by The National Science Foundation and The Department of Energy May 26-27, 1999 in Rosemont, Illinois

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stair, Peter C [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); DeSimone, Joseph M. [University of North Carolina Chapel Hill; Frost, John W. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    1999-05-26

    Energy and the environment pose major scientific and technological challenges for the 21st century. New technologies for increasing the efficiency of harvesting and utilizing energy resources are essential to the nation’s economic competitiveness. At the same time, the quality of life in the United States depends inherently on the environmental impact of energy production and utilization. This interdependence makes it imperative to develop a better understanding of the environment and new strategies for minimizing the impact of energy-related activities. Recent advances in techniques for the synthesis and characterization of chemicals and materials and for the molecular control of biological organisms make it possible, for the first time, to address this imperative. Chemistry, with its focus on the molecular level, plays a central role in addressing the needs for fundamental understanding and technology development in both the energy and environmental fields. Understanding environmental processes and consequences requires studying natural systems, rather than focussing exclusively on laboratory models. Natural systems and their complexity pose an enormous, perhaps the ultimate, challenge to chemists, and will provide them with varied and exciting new problems for years to come. In addition, the complexity of the underlying systems and processes often requires multi-disciplinary programs that bridge the interfaces between chemistry and other disciplines. (See Figure 1) This has ramifications in the approach to funding research and suggests needs for broadening the educational training of future scientists and engineers in these programs. Figure 1. NSF and DOE should consider sponsoring research centers and focused research groups organized to optimize their impact on Technological Challenges of national interest. The research will have significant impact if it addresses issues of fundamental molecular science in one or more Enabling Research Areas. Approximately 7

  20. NCI's Transdisciplinary High Performance Scientific Data Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Ben; Antony, Joseph; Bastrakova, Irina; Car, Nicholas; Cox, Simon; Druken, Kelsey; Evans, Bradley; Fraser, Ryan; Ip, Alex; Kemp, Carina; King, Edward; Minchin, Stuart; Larraondo, Pablo; Pugh, Tim; Richards, Clare; Santana, Fabiana; Smillie, Jon; Trenham, Claire; Wang, Jingbo; Wyborn, Lesley

    2016-04-01

    The Australian National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) manages Earth Systems data collections sourced from several domains and organisations onto a single High Performance Data (HPD) Node to further Australia's national priority research and innovation agenda. The NCI HPD Node has rapidly established its value, currently managing over 10 PBytes of datasets from collections that span a wide range of disciplines including climate, weather, environment, geoscience, geophysics, water resources and social sciences. Importantly, in order to facilitate broad user uptake, maximise reuse and enable transdisciplinary access through software and standardised interfaces, the datasets, associated information systems and processes have been incorporated into the design and operation of a unified platform that NCI has called, the National Environmental Research Data Interoperability Platform (NERDIP). The key goal of the NERDIP is to regularise data access so that it is easily discoverable, interoperable for different domains and enabled for high performance methods. It adopts and implements international standards and data conventions, and promotes scientific integrity within a high performance computing and data analysis environment. NCI has established a rich and flexible computing environment to access to this data, through the NCI supercomputer; a private cloud that supports both domain focused virtual laboratories and in-common interactive analysis interfaces; as well as remotely through scalable data services. Data collections of this importance must be managed with careful consideration of both their current use and the needs of the end-communities, as well as its future potential use, such as transitioning to more advanced software and improved methods. It is therefore critical that the data platform is both well-managed and trusted for stable production use (including transparency and reproducibility), agile enough to incorporate new technological advances and

  1. Reports on the research projects in the field of reactor safety sponsored by the Federal Ministry of Science and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-12-01

    Investigations on the safety of Light Water Reactors (LWR) being performed in the framework of the safety program 'Reactor Safety' are sponsored by the Bundesminister fuer Forschung und Technologie (BMFT - Secretary of State for Research and Technology). Objective of this program is to continue improving the safety of LWR, in order to minimize the risk for the environment. With grant assistance from the Bundesminister des Innern (BMI - Secretary of State for Home Affairs) research contracts in the field of reactor safety are being performed. Results of these projects should contribute to resolve questions arising nuclear licensing procedures. The Forschungsbetreuung (FB - research supervision department) at the Institute for Reactor Safety (IRS), as consultants to BMFT and BMI, provides information about the progress of investigations. Individual reports will be prepared and put into standard forms by the research contractors. Each report gives information on: 1) the work accomplished, 2) the results obtained, 3) the work planned to be continued. Initial reports of research projects describe in addition the purpose of the work. A BMFT-research program on the safety of Fast Breeders (Schneller Brutreaktor - SBR) is presently under discussion. In order to define several problems, investigations included in the present compilation (RS 139, 140, 143, 162) will be previously performed. (orig.) [de

  2. Reports on the research projects in the field of reactor safety sponsored by the Federal Ministry of Science and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-12-01

    Investigations on the safety of light water reactors (LWR) being performed in the framework of the safety program 'Reactor Safety' are sponsored by the Bundesminister fuer Forschung und Technologie (BMFT - Secretary of State for Research and Technology). Objective of this program is to continue improving the safety of LWR, in order to minimize the risk for the environment. With grant assistance from the Bundesminister des Innern (BMI - Secretary of State for Home Affairs) research contrcts in the field of reactor safety are being performed. Results of these projects should contribute to resolve questions arising nuclear licensing procedures. The Forschungsbetreuung (FB - research supervision department) at the Institute for Reactor Safety (IRS), as consultants to BMFT and BMI, provides information about the progress of investigations. Individual reports will be prepared and put into standard forms by the research contractors. Each report gives information on: 1) the work accomplished, 2) the results obtained, 3) the work planned to be continued. Initial reports of research projects describe in addition the purpose of the work. A BMFT-research program on the safety of Fast Breeders (Schneller Brutreaktor - SRB) is presently under discussion. In order to define several problems, investigations included in the present compilation (RS 139, 140, 143, 162) will be previously performed. (orig.) [de

  3. NCI at Frederick Employees Receive Awards at the Spring Research Festival | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI and Frederick National Laboratory staff members were among those honored at the Spring Research Festival Awards Ceremony on May 28. The ceremony was the culmination of the festival, which was sponsored by the National Interagency Confederation for Biological Research (NICBR), May 4–7. Maj. Gen. Brian Lein, commanding general, U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command

  4. Robert Wiltrout Says Goodbye to NCI in 2015 | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    After 34 years at NCI, Robert Wiltrout, Ph.D., said he is looking forward to trading his I-270 commute for another type of commute: exploring the waterways of Maryland, Alaska, and Wyoming to fulfill his love of fishing. Wiltrout officially retired as director of the NCI Center for Cancer Research (CCR) on July 2 of last year. Throughout his college academic career, Wiltrout had an interest in science, but it was not until he was working on a research project for his master’s degree that he considered a career in scientific research.

  5. NCI collaborates with Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) announced a collaboration with the Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation (MMRF) to incorporate MMRF's wealth of genomic and clinical data on the disease into the NCI Genomic Data Commons (GDC), a publicly available datab

  6. NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer funds the Cancer Nanotechnology Training Centers collectively with the NCI Cancer Training Center. Find out about the funded Centers, to date, that train our next generation of scientists in the field of Canc

  7. License Agreements | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI Technology Transfer Center (TTC) licenses the discoveries of NCI and nine other NIH Institutes so new technologies can be developed and commercialized, to convert them into public health benefits.

  8. An NCI perspective on creating sustainable biospecimen resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaught, Jimmie; Rogers, Joyce; Myers, Kimberly; Lim, Mark David; Lockhart, Nicole; Moore, Helen; Sawyer, Sherilyn; Furman, Jeffrey L; Compton, Carolyn

    2011-01-01

    High-quality biospecimens with appropriate clinical annotation are critical in the era of personalized medicine. It is now widely recognized that biospecimen resources need to be developed and operated under established scientific, technical, business, and ethical/legal standards. To date, such standards have not been widely practiced, resulting in variable biospecimen quality that may compromise research efforts. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Office of Biorepositories and Biospecimen Research (OBBR) was established in 2005 to coordinate NCI's biospecimen resource activities and address those issues that affect access to the high-quality specimens and data necessary for its research enterprises as well as the broader translational research field. OBBR and the NCI Biorepository Coordinating Committee developed NCI's "Best Practices for Biospecimen Resources" after consultation with a broad array of experts. A Biospecimen Research Network was established to fund research to develop additional evidence-based practices. Although these initiatives will improve the overall availability of high-quality specimens and data for cancer research, OBBR has been authorized to implement a national biobanking effort, cancer HUman Biobank (caHUB). caHUB will address systematically the gaps in knowledge needed to improve the state-of-the-science and strengthen the standards for human biobanking. This commentary outlines the progressive efforts by NCI in technical, governance, and economic considerations that will be important as the new caHUB enterprise is undertaken.

  9. FOREWORD: International Workshop on Theoretical Plasma Physics: Modern Plasma Science. Sponsored by the Abdus Salam ICTP, Trieste, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, P. K.; Stenflo, L.

    2005-01-01

    The "International Workshop on Theoretical Plasma Physics: Modern Plasma Science was held at the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (Abdus Salam ICTP), Trieste, Italy during the period 5 16 July 2004. The workshop was organized by P K Shukla, R Bingham, S M Mahajan, J T Mendonça, L Stenflo, and others. The workshop enters into a series of previous biennial activities that we have held at the Abdus Salam ICTP since 1989. The scientific program of the workshop was split into two parts. In the first week, most of the lectures dealt with problems concerning astrophysical plasmas, while in the second week, diversity was introduced in order to address the important role of plasma physics in modern areas of science and technology. Here, attention was focused on cross-disciplinary topics including Schrödinger-like models, which are common in plasma physics, nonlinear optics, quantum engineering (Bose-Einstein condensates), and nonlinear fluid mechanics, as well as emerging topics in fundamental theoretical and computational plasma physics, space and dusty plasma physics, laser-plasma interactions, etc. The workshop was attended by approximately hundred-twenty participants from the developing countries, Europe, USA, and Japan. A large number of participants were young researchers from both the developing and industrial countries, as the directors of the workshop tried to keep a good balance in inviting senior and younger generations of theoretical, computational and experimental plasma physicists to our Trieste activities. In the first week, there were extensive discussions on the physics of electromagnetic wave emissions from pulsar magnetospheres, relativistic magnetohydrodynamics of astrophysical objects, different scale sizes turbulence and structures in astrophysics. The scientific program of the second week included five review talks (60 minutes) and about thirty invited topical lectures (30 minutes). In addition, during the two weeks, there

  10. Reports on research projects in the field of reactor safety sponsored by the Federal Ministry for Education, Science, Research and Technology. Period covered: January 1 - June 30, 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    Within the framework of its research programme on reactor safety, the Bundesministerium fuer Bildung, Wissenschaft, Forschung und Technology (BMBF) (Federal Ministry for Education, Science, Research and Technology) sponsors investigations into the safety of nuclear reactors. These investigations that are carried out within the framework of the programme are to provide fundamental knowledge, procedures and methods contributing to realistic safety assessments of nuclear facilities, the further development of safety technology, and the use of the potential of innovative safety-related approaches. Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) bmH, by order of the BMBF, continuously issues information on the status of such investigations by publishing semiannual and annual progress reports within the series of GRS-F-Fortschrittsberichte (GRS-F-Progress Reports). Each progress report represents a compilation of individual reports about the objectives, work performed, results, next steps of the work etc. The individual reports are prepared in a standard form by the research organisations themselves as documentation of their progress in work and are published by the Research Management Division of GRS within the framework of general information on the progress in reactor safety research. (orig./SR) [de

  11. The Sponsored Film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Walter J.

    For public relations professionals and would-be sponsors of films, this book provides guidelines for understanding the film medium and its potential as a persuasive force in industry, government, organizations, and religious orders. For filmmakers, it brings together practical information needed to survive in the sponsored-film industry and to…

  12. NCI Holds on to Defelice Cup | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI kept the Defelice Cup trophy this year after beating Leidos Biomedical Research, 15 to 9, at the 10th annual Ronald H. Defelice Golf Tournament held on Columbus Day. Sixteen players on each team battled it out at the yearly contractor vs. government tournament held at Rattlewood Golf Course in Mount Airy, Md. NCI leads the series 6–4. “The score was the highest NCI margin

  13. 78 FR 2678 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request (60-Day FRN): The National Cancer Institute (NCI...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-14

    ... Request (60-Day FRN): The National Cancer Institute (NCI) SmokefreeTXT (Text Message) Program Evaluation..., Behavioral Scientist/ Health Science Administrator, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, 6130... text message smoking cessation intervention designed for young adult smokers ages 18-29. The Smokefree...

  14. Selected Publications by the NCI Director

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dr. Norman Sharpless's written work on cancer research appears in many leading scientific journals, as well as a variety of other publications. This page lists some of the articles published by Dr. Sharpless since becoming NCI director.

  15. Find an NCI-Designated Cancer Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Find the locations of NCI-designated cancer centers by area, region, state, or name that includes contact information to help health care providers and cancer patients with referrals to clinical trials.

  16. About TTC | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The TTC facilitates licensing and co-development partnerships between biomedical industry, academia, and government agencies and the research laboratories of the NCI and nine other institutes and centers of NIH.

  17. Life Outside NCI | Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    The CPFP Office is located at the NCI facilities in Rockville, Maryland, near the Nation’s Capital. With the convenient Metro subway reaching throughout the metropolitan area, transportation is within easy reach.

  18. NCI at Frederick Ebola Response Team | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Editor’s note: This article was adapted from the Employee Diversity Team’s display case exhibit “Recognizing the NCI at Frederick Ebola Response Team,” in the lobby of Building 549. The Poster staff recognizes that this article does not include everyone who was involved in the response to the Ebola crisis, both at NCI at Frederick and in Africa. When the Ebola crisis broke out

  19. International Fellows of NCI at Frederick | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Each year, the Employee Diversity Team (EDT) acknowledges members of the NCI at Frederick Community for their achievements and contributions towards the mission of facility.  Historically, the team has profiled the “Women of NCI at Frederick,” but this year, the team decided to instead shed light on the diverse and successful individuals who make up the international fellows community.

  20. NCI's Distributed Geospatial Data Server

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larraondo, P. R.; Evans, B. J. K.; Antony, J.

    2016-12-01

    Earth systems, environmental and geophysics datasets are an extremely valuable source of information about the state and evolution of the Earth. However, different disciplines and applications require this data to be post-processed in different ways before it can be used. For researchers experimenting with algorithms across large datasets or combining multiple data sets, the traditional approach to batch data processing and storing all the output for later analysis rapidly becomes unfeasible, and often requires additional work to publish for others to use. Recent developments on distributed computing using interactive access to significant cloud infrastructure opens the door for new ways of processing data on demand, hence alleviating the need for storage space for each individual copy of each product. The Australian National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) has developed a highly distributed geospatial data server which supports interactive processing of large geospatial data products, including satellite Earth Observation data and global model data, using flexible user-defined functions. This system dynamically and efficiently distributes the required computations among cloud nodes and thus provides a scalable analysis capability. In many cases this completely alleviates the need to preprocess and store the data as products. This system presents a standards-compliant interface, allowing ready accessibility for users of the data. Typical data wrangling problems such as handling different file formats and data types, or harmonising the coordinate projections or temporal and spatial resolutions, can now be handled automatically by this service. The geospatial data server exposes functionality for specifying how the data should be aggregated and transformed. The resulting products can be served using several standards such as the Open Geospatial Consortium's (OGC) Web Map Service (WMS) or Web Feature Service (WFS), Open Street Map tiles, or raw binary arrays under

  1. Committees and sponsors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    International Advisory Committee Richard F CastenYale, USA Luiz Carlos ChamonSão Paulo, Brazil Osvaldo CivitareseLa Plata, Argentina Jozsef CsehATOMKI, Hungary Jerry P DraayerLSU, USA Alfredo Galindo-UribarriORNL & UT, USA James J KolataNotre Dame, USA Jorge López UTEP, USA Joseph B NatowitzTexas A & M, USA Ma Esther Ortiz IF-UNAM Stuart PittelDelaware, USA Andrés SandovalIF-UNAM Adam SzczepaniakIndiana, USA Piet Van IsackerGANIL, France Michael WiescherNotre Dame, USA Organizing Committee Libertad Barrón-Palos (Chair)IF-UNAM Roelof BijkerICN-UNAM Ruben FossionICN-UNAM David LizcanoININ Sponsors Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, UNAMInstituto de Física, UNAMInstituto Nacional de Investigaciones NuclearesDivisión de Física Nuclear de la SMFCentro Latinoamericano de Física

  2. CRADA Payment Options | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI TTC CRADA PAYMENT OPTIONS: Electronic Payments by Wire Transfer via Fedwire, Mail a check to the Institute or Center, or Automated Clearing House (ACH)/Electronic Funds Transfer (ETF) payments via Pay.gov (NCI ONLY).

  3. NCI International EBV-Gastric Cancer Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    A collaboration among NCI and extramural investigators, established by DCEG in 2006, that utilizes data and biospecimens from completed and ongoing case series and observational studies of gastric cancer to replicate and extend findings from previous studies hindered by small numbers of EBV-positive cases, and to stimulate multidisciplinary research in this area.

  4. Jointly Sponsored Research Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Everett A. Sondreal; John G. Hendrikson; Thomas A. Erickson

    2009-03-31

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-98FT40321 funded through the Office of Fossil Energy and administered at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) supported the performance of a Jointly Sponsored Research Program (JSRP) at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) with a minimum 50% nonfederal cost share to assist industry in commercializing and effectively applying highly efficient, nonpolluting energy systems that meet the nation's requirements for clean fuels, chemicals, and electricity in the 21st century. The EERC in partnership with its nonfederal partners jointly performed 131 JSRP projects for which the total DOE cost share was $22,716,634 (38%) and the nonfederal share was $36,776,573 (62%). Summaries of these projects are presented in this report for six program areas: (1) resource characterization and waste management, (2) air quality assessment and control, (3) advanced power systems, (4) advanced fuel forms, (5) value-added coproducts, and (6) advanced materials. The work performed under this agreement addressed DOE goals for reductions in CO{sub 2} emissions through efficiency, capture, and sequestration; near-zero emissions from highly efficient coal-fired power plants; environmental control capabilities for SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, fine respirable particulate (PM{sub 2.5}), and mercury; alternative transportation fuels including liquid synfuels and hydrogen; and synergistic integration of fossil and renewable resources.

  5. Computer-science guest-lecture series at Langston University sponsored by the U.S. Geological Survey; abstracts, 1992-93

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, K. S.

    1994-01-01

    Langston University, a Historically Black University located at Langston, Oklahoma, has a computing and information science program within the Langston University Division of Business. Since 1984, Langston University has participated in the Historically Black College and University program of the U.S. Department of Interior, which provided education, training, and funding through a combined earth-science and computer-technology cooperative program with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). USGS personnel have presented guest lectures at Langston University since 1984. Students have been enthusiastic about the lectures, and as a result of this program, 13 Langston University students have been hired by the USGS on a part-time basis while they continued their education at the University. The USGS expanded the offering of guest lectures in 1992 by increasing the number of visits to Langston University, and by inviting participation of speakers from throughout the country. The objectives of the guest-lecture series are to assist Langston University in offering state-of-the-art education in the computer sciences, to provide students with an opportunity to learn from and interact with skilled computer-science professionals, and to develop a pool of potential future employees for part-time and full-time employment. This report includes abstracts for guest-lecture presentations during 1992-93 school year.

  6. UNC Cancer Center Director to Lead NCI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    President Donald Trump has selected Norman "Ned" Sharpless, MD, director of the University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, to lead the NCI. The news was met with widespread approval among cancer researchers, who view Sharpless as a strong communicator who can ably represent the needs of the cancer community in the face of proposed funding cuts. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  7. Crosscut report: Exascale Requirements Reviews, March 9–10, 2017 – Tysons Corner, Virginia. An Office of Science review sponsored by: Advanced Scientific Computing Research, Basic Energy Sciences, Biological and Environmental Research, Fusion Energy Sciences, High Energy Physics, Nuclear Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, Richard [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC); Hack, James [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF); Riley, Katherine [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF); Antypas, Katie [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC); Coffey, Richard [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF); Dart, Eli [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). ESnet; Straatsma, Tjerk [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF); Wells, Jack [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF); Bard, Deborah [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC); Dosanjh, Sudip [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC); Monga, Inder [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). ESnet; Papka, Michael E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Argonne Leadership Computing Facility; Rotman, Lauren [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). ESnet

    2018-01-22

    The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science (DOE SC) is the delivery of scientific discoveries and major scientific tools to transform our understanding of nature and to advance the energy, economic, and national security missions of the United States. To achieve these goals in today’s world requires investments in not only the traditional scientific endeavors of theory and experiment, but also in computational science and the facilities that support large-scale simulation and data analysis. The Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) program addresses these challenges in the Office of Science. ASCR’s mission is to discover, develop, and deploy computational and networking capabilities to analyze, model, simulate, and predict complex phenomena important to DOE. ASCR supports research in computational science, three high-performance computing (HPC) facilities — the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Leadership Computing Facilities at Argonne (ALCF) and Oak Ridge (OLCF) National Laboratories — and the Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) at Berkeley Lab. ASCR is guided by science needs as it develops research programs, computers, and networks at the leading edge of technologies. As we approach the era of exascale computing, technology changes are creating challenges for science programs in SC for those who need to use high performance computing and data systems effectively. Numerous significant modifications to today’s tools and techniques will be needed to realize the full potential of emerging computing systems and other novel computing architectures. To assess these needs and challenges, ASCR held a series of Exascale Requirements Reviews in 2015–2017, one with each of the six SC program offices,1 and a subsequent Crosscut Review that sought to integrate the findings from each. Participants at the reviews were drawn from the communities of leading domain

  8. Advanced Scientific Computing Research Exascale Requirements Review. An Office of Science review sponsored by Advanced Scientific Computing Research, September 27-29, 2016, Rockville, Maryland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almgren, Ann [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); DeMar, Phil [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Vetter, Jeffrey [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Riley, Katherine [Argonne Leadership Computing Facility, Argonne, IL (United States); Antypas, Katie [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Bard, Deborah [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC); Coffey, Richard [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Dart, Eli [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Energy Science Network; Dosanjh, Sudip [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Gerber, Richard [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Hack, James [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Monga, Inder [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Energy Science Network; Papka, Michael E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Rotman, Lauren [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Energy Science Network; Straatsma, Tjerk [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wells, Jack [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bernholdt, David E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bethel, Wes [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Bosilca, George [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Cappello, Frank [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gamblin, Todd [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Habib, Salman [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hill, Judy [Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hollingsworth, Jeffrey K. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); McInnes, Lois Curfman [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Mohror, Kathryn [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Moore, Shirley [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Moreland, Ken [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Roser, Rob [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Shende, Sameer [Univ. of Oregon, Eugene, OR (United States); Shipman, Galen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Williams, Samuel [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-06-20

    The widespread use of computing in the American economy would not be possible without a thoughtful, exploratory research and development (R&D) community pushing the performance edge of operating systems, computer languages, and software libraries. These are the tools and building blocks — the hammers, chisels, bricks, and mortar — of the smartphone, the cloud, and the computing services on which we rely. Engineers and scientists need ever-more specialized computing tools to discover new material properties for manufacturing, make energy generation safer and more efficient, and provide insight into the fundamentals of the universe, for example. The research division of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Office of Advanced Scientific Computing and Research (ASCR Research) ensures that these tools and building blocks are being developed and honed to meet the extreme needs of modern science. See also http://exascaleage.org/ascr/ for additional information.

  9. The Nuclear Science Facility at San Jose State University and the U.S. Department of Energy sponsored Summer School in Nuclear Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling, A.C.

    1990-01-01

    The Nuclear Science Facility at SJSU was first opened for classes in 1975. It is designed primarily for undergraduate teaching of nuclear chemistry, radiochemistry, tracer techniques, and radiation safety. Utilizing nearly $1.5 million in counting equipment alone, but excluding a reactor or accelerator, it allows simultaneous use of multiple counting assemblages for up to 20 individual students, even for advanced experiments with Ge/MCA units. Current academic programs include a B.S. Degree in Radiochemistry, an M.S. in Radiological Health Physics, and community outreach to grade schools (nearly 2,000 student-experiments for grades 7-12 were performed in AY88/89). To encourage nuclear chemistry as a potential area of study in graduate school, the US Department of Energy funded a special national Summer School in Nuclear Chemistry. This was first held at SJSU in 1984; summer 1990 will see the seventh such program taught

  10. Fusion Energy Sciences Exascale Requirements Review. An Office of Science review sponsored jointly by Advanced Scientific Computing Research and Fusion Energy Sciences, January 27-29, 2016, Gaithersburg, Maryland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Choong-Seock [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Greenwald, Martin [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Riley, Katherine [Argonne Leadership Computing Facility, Argonne, IL (United States); Antypas, Katie [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Coffey, Richard [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Dart, Eli [Esnet, Berkeley, CA (United States); Dosanjh, Sudip [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Gerber, Richard [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Hack, James [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Monga, Inder [Esnet, Berkeley, CA (United States); Papka, Michael E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Rotman, Lauren [Esnet, Berkeley, CA (United States); Straatsma, Tjerk [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wells, Jack [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Andre, R. [TRANSP Group, Princeton, NJ (United States); Bernholdt, David [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bhattacharjee, Amitava [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Bonoli, Paul [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Boyd, Iain [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Bulanov, Stepan [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Cary, John R. [Tech-X Corporation, Boulder, CO (United States); Chen, Yang [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Curreli, Davide [Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL (United States); Ernst, Darin R. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Ethier, Stephane [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Green, David [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hager, Robert [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Hakim, Ammar [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Hassanein, A. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Hatch, David [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Held, E. D. [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States); Howard, Nathan [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Izzo, Valerie A. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Jardin, Steve [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Jenkins, T. G. [Tech-X Corp., Boulder, CO (United States); Jenko, Frank [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Kemp, Andreas [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); King, Jacob [Tech-X Corp., Boulder, CO (United States); Kritz, Arnold [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States); Krstic, Predrag [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Kruger, Scott E. [Tech-X Corp., Boulder, CO (United States); Kurtz, Rick [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lin, Zhihong [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Loring, Burlen [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Nandipati, Giridhar [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pankin, A. Y. [Tech-X Corp., Boulder, CO (United States); Parker, Scott [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Perez, Danny [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pigarov, Alex Y. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Poli, Francesca [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Pueschel, M. J. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Rafiq, Tariq [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States); Rübel, Oliver [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Setyawan, Wahyu [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sizyuk, Valeryi A. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Smithe, D. N. [Tech-X Corp., Boulder, CO (United States); Sovinec, C. R. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Turner, Miles [Dublin City University, Leinster (Ireland); Umansky, Maxim [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Vay, Jean-Luc [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Verboncoeur, John [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States); Vincenti, Henri [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Voter, Arthur [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Wang, Weixing [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Wirth, Brian [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Wright, John [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Yuan, X. [TRANSP Group, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2017-02-01

    The additional computing power offered by the planned exascale facilities could be transformational across the spectrum of plasma and fusion research — provided that the new architectures can be efficiently applied to our problem space. The collaboration that will be required to succeed should be viewed as an opportunity to identify and exploit cross-disciplinary synergies. To assess the opportunities and requirements as part of the development of an overall strategy for computing in the exascale era, the Exascale Requirements Review meeting of the Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) community was convened January 27–29, 2016, with participation from a broad range of fusion and plasma scientists, specialists in applied mathematics and computer science, and representatives from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its major computing facilities. This report is a summary of that meeting and the preparatory activities for it and includes a wealth of detail to support the findings. Technical opportunities, requirements, and challenges are detailed in this report (and in the recent report on the Workshop on Integrated Simulation). Science applications are described, along with mathematical and computational enabling technologies. Also see http://exascaleage.org/fes/ for more information.

  11. Physical sciences and engineering advances in life sciences and oncology a WTEC global assessment

    CERN Document Server

    Fletcher, Daniel; Gerecht, Sharon; Levine, Ross; Mallick, Parag; McCarty, Owen; Munn, Lance; Reinhart-King, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    This book presents an Assessment of Physical Sciences and Engineering Advances in Life Sciences and Oncology (APHELION) by a panel of experts. It covers the status and trends of applying physical sciences and engineering principles to oncology research in leading laboratories and organizations in Europe and Asia. The book elaborates on the six topics identified by the panel that have the greatest potential to advance understanding and treatment of cancer, each covered by a chapter in the book. The study was sponsored by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) at the National Institute of Health (NIH), the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering at the NIH in the US under a cooperative agreement with the World Technology Evaluation Center (WTEC).

  12. Basic Energy Sciences Exascale Requirements Review. An Office of Science review sponsored jointly by Advanced Scientific Computing Research and Basic Energy Sciences, November 3-5, 2015, Rockville, Maryland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Windus, Theresa [Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States); Banda, Michael [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Devereaux, Thomas [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); White, Julia C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Antypas, Katie [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Coffey, Richard [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Dart, Eli [Energy Sciences Network (ESNet), Berkeley, CA (United States); Dosanjh, Sudip [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Gerber, Richard [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Hack, James [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Monga, Inder [Energy Sciences Network (ESNet), Berkeley, CA (United States); Papka, Michael E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Riley, Katherine [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Rotman, Lauren [Energy Sciences Network (ESNet), Berkeley, CA (United States); Straatsma, Tjerk [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wells, Jack [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Baruah, Tunna [Univ. of Texas, El Paso, TX (United States); Benali, Anouar [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Borland, Michael [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Brabec, Jiri [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Carter, Emily [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Ceperley, David [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Chan, Maria [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Chelikowsky, James [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Chen, Jackie [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Cheng, Hai-Ping [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Clark, Aurora [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Darancet, Pierre [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); DeJong, Wibe [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Deslippe, Jack [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC); Dixon, David [Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States); Donatelli, Jeffrey [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Dunning, Thomas [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Fernandez-Serra, Marivi [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Freericks, James [Georgetown Univ., Washington, DC (United States); Gagliardi, Laura [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Galli, Giulia [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Garrett, Bruce [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Glezakou, Vassiliki-Alexandra [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gordon, Mark [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Govind, Niri [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gray, Stephen [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gull, Emanuel [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Gygi, Francois [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Hexemer, Alexander [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Isborn, Christine [Univ. of California, Merced, CA (United States); Jarrell, Mark [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Kalia, Rajiv K. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Kent, Paul [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Klippenstein, Stephen [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Kowalski, Karol [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Krishnamurthy, Hulikal [Indian Inst. of Science, Bangalore (India); Kumar, Dinesh [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Lena, Charles [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Li, Xiaosong [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Maier, Thomas [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Markland, Thomas [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); McNulty, Ian [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Millis, Andrew [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Mundy, Chris [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Nakano, Aiichiro [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Niklasson, A.M.N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Panagiotopoulos, Thanos [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Pandolfi, Ron [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Parkinson, Dula [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Pask, John [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Perazzo, Amedeo [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Rehr, John [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Rousseau, Roger [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Schenter, Greg [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Selloni, Annabella [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Sethian, Jamie [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Siepmann, Ilja [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Slipchenko, Lyudmila [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Sternberg, Michael [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Stevens, Mark [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Summers, Michael [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Sumpter, Bobby [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Sushko, Peter [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Thayer, Jana [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Toby, Brian [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Tull, Craig [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Valeev, Edward [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Vashishta, Priya [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Venkatakrishnan, V. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Yang, C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Yang, Ping [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Zwart, Peter H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-02-03

    Computers have revolutionized every aspect of our lives. Yet in science, the most tantalizing applications of computing lie just beyond our reach. The current quest to build an exascale computer with one thousand times the capability of today’s fastest machines (and more than a million times that of a laptop) will take researchers over the next horizon. The field of materials, chemical reactions, and compounds is inherently complex. Imagine millions of new materials with new functionalities waiting to be discovered — while researchers also seek to extend those materials that are known to a dizzying number of new forms. We could translate massive amounts of data from high precision experiments into new understanding through data mining and analysis. We could have at our disposal the ability to predict the properties of these materials, to follow their transformations during reactions on an atom-by-atom basis, and to discover completely new chemical pathways or physical states of matter. Extending these predictions from the nanoscale to the mesoscale, from the ultrafast world of reactions to long-time simulations to predict the lifetime performance of materials, and to the discovery of new materials and processes will have a profound impact on energy technology. In addition, discovery of new materials is vital to move computing beyond Moore’s law. To realize this vision, more than hardware is needed. New algorithms to take advantage of the increase in computing power, new programming paradigms, and new ways of mining massive data sets are needed as well. This report summarizes the opportunities and the requisite computing ecosystem needed to realize the potential before us. In addition to pursuing new and more complete physical models and theoretical frameworks, this review found that the following broadly grouped areas relevant to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) would directly affect the Basic Energy

  13. Sponsoring Organization | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) project officers are responsible for the design and oversight of all aspects of the PLCO trial. These NCI components work directly with the Coordinating Center which provides support for development and implementation of the study protocol; and with the Principal Investigators from each of the Screening Centers to ensure that the technical

  14. NCI Think Tank Concerning the Identifiability of Biospecimens and “-Omic” Data

    OpenAIRE

    Weil, Carol J.; Mechanic, Leah E.; Green, Tiffany; Kinsinger, Christopher; Lockhart, Nicole C.; Nelson, Stefanie A.; Rodriguez, Laura L.; Buccini, Laura D.

    2013-01-01

    On June 11 and 12, 2012, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) hosted a think tank concerning the identifiability of biospecimens and “omic” Data in order to explore challenges surrounding this complex and multifaceted topic. The think tank brought together forty-six leaders from several fields, including cancer genomics, bioinformatics, human subject protection, patient advocacy, and commercial genetics. The first day involved presentations regarding the state of the science of re-identificati...

  15. Employer-sponsored pension plans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakonjac-Antić Tatjana N.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Apart from pension plans within social insurance, in developed pension systems there are also available to individuals schemes which may to a large extent ensure a significant part of their total pension. Among them are the following: employer-sponsored pension plans or individual pension plans. The most widely used employer-sponsored pension plan in the USA is 401(k, in which both the employer and the employee contribute to the financing of the pension. These contributions as well as the return to their investment have a preferential tax treatment, i.e. do not enter a tax base. The funds are taxed only when drawn from the account in the form of a pension. This paper aims to present the functioning of 401(k pension plan as the most widely used employer sponsored pension plan in the USA, which is likely, in a modified form, to have an important place within our future reformed pension insurance system.

  16. Observatory Sponsoring Astronomical Image Contest

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-05-01

    Forget the headphones you saw in the Warner Brothers thriller Contact, as well as the guttural throbs emanating from loudspeakers at the Very Large Array in that 1997 movie. In real life, radio telescopes aren't used for "listening" to anything - just like visible-light telescopes, they are used primarily to make images of astronomical objects. Now, the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) wants to encourage astronomers to use radio-telescope data to make truly compelling images, and is offering cash prizes to winners of a new image contest. Radio Galaxy Fornax A Radio Galaxy Fornax A Radio-optical composite image of giant elliptical galaxy NGC 1316, showing the galaxy (center), a smaller companion galaxy being cannibalized by NGC 1316, and the resulting "lobes" (orange) of radio emission caused by jets of particles spewed from the core of the giant galaxy Click on image for more detail and images CREDIT: Fomalont et al., NRAO/AUI/NSF "Astronomy is a very visual science, and our radio telescopes are capable of producing excellent images. We're sponsoring this contest to encourage astronomers to make the extra effort to turn good images into truly spectacular ones," said NRAO Director Fred K.Y. Lo. The contest, offering a grand prize of $1,000, was announced at the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Minneapolis, Minnesota. The image contest is part of a broader NRAO effort to make radio astronomical data and images easily accessible and widely available to scientists, students, teachers, the general public, news media and science-education professionals. That effort includes an expanded image gallery on the observatory's Web site. "We're not only adding new radio-astronomy images to our online gallery, but we're also improving the organization and accessibility of the images," said Mark Adams, head of education and public outreach (EPO) at NRAO. "Our long-term goal is to make the NRAO Image Gallery an international resource for radio astronomy imagery

  17. Mission & Role | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI TTC serves as the focal point for implementing the Federal Technology Transfer Act to utilize patents as incentive for commercial development of technologies and to establish research collaborations and licensing among academia, federal laboratories, non-profit organizations, and industry. The TTC supports technology development activities for the National Cancer Institute and nine other NIH Institutes and Centers. TTC staff negotiate co-development agreements and licenses with universities, non-profit organizations, and pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies to ensure compliance with Federal statutes, regulations and the policies of the National Institutes of Health. TTC also reviews employee invention reports and makes recommendations concerning filing of domestic and foreign patent applications. | [google6f4cd5334ac394ab.html

  18. Published Research - NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer has published much exciting and impactful research over the years. Find here a list of all of these listed in PubMed and others across the field of Cancer Nanotechnology.

  19. NCI and the Precision Medicine Initiative®

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI's activities related to precision medicine focuses on new and expanded precision medicine clinical trials; mechanisms to overcome drug resistance to cancer treatments; and developing a shared digital repository of precision medicine trials data.

  20. NCI-MATCH Trial Links Targeted Drugs to Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Investigators for the nationwide trial, NCI-MATCH: Molecular Analysis for Therapy Choice, announced that the trial will seek to determine whether targeted therapies for people whose tumors have specific gene mutations will be effective regardless of their cancer type. NCI-MATCH will incorporate more than 20 different study drugs or drug combinations, each targeting a specific gene mutation, in order to match each patient in the trial with a therapy that targets a molecular abnormality in their tumor.

  1. Invention Development Program Helps Nurture NCI at Frederick Technologies | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Invention Development Fund (IDF) was piloted by the Technology Transfer Center (TTC) in 2014 to facilitate the commercial development of NCI technologies. The IDF received a second round of funding from the NCI Office of the Director and the Office of Budget and Management to establish the Invention Development Program (IDP) for fiscal year 2016. The IDP is using these funds to help advance a second set of inventions.

  2. 45 CFR 1226.12 - Sponsor employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Sponsor employees. 1226.12 Section 1226.12 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE PROHIBITIONS ON ELECTORAL AND LOBBYING ACTIVITIES Sponsor Employee Activities § 1226.12 Sponsor employees...

  3. List of Organizing Committees and Sponsors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Organizers DIRECTORS Maria L CalvoPresident of International Commission for Optics, Spain Aram V PapoyanDirector of Institute for Physical Research of NAS, Armenia HEADS OF PROJECT Tigran Dadalyan YSU, Armenia Artsrun MartirosyanIPR, Armenia COORDINATOR Narine GevorgyanIPR, Armenia / ICTP, Italy MANAGERS Paytsar MantashyanIPR, Armenia Karen VardanyanIPR, Armenia INTERNATIONAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE Marcis AuzinshLatvia Roland AvagyanArmenia Tapash ChakrabortyCanada Yuri ChilingaryanArmenia Eduard KazaryanArmenia Albert KirakosyanArmenia Radik KostanyanArmenia Avinash PandeyIndia Marat SoskinUkraine INTERNATIONAL PROGRAM COMMITTEE David Sarkisyan (Chair)Armenia Roman AlaverdyanArmenia Dan ApostolRomania Levon AslanyanArmenia Aranya BhattacherjeeIndia Gagik BuniatyanArmenia Vigen ChaltykyanArmenia Roldao Da RochaBrazil Miltcho DanailovItaly Vladimir GerdtRussia Samvel GevorgyanArmenia Gayane GrigoryanArmenia Rafik HakobyanArmenia Takayuki MiyaderaJapan Levon MouradianArmenia Atom MuradyanArmenia Simon RochesterUSA Hayk SarkisyanArmenia Aleksandr VardanyanArmenia LOCAL ORGANIZING COMMITTEE Narek AghekyanArmenia Anahit GogyanArmenia Melanya GrigoryanArmenia Armen HovhannisyanArmenia Lilit HovhannisyanArmenia Tatevik KhachatryanArmenia Astghik KuzanyanArmenia Satenik KuzanyanArmenia Vladimir LazarevRussia Lilit MantashyanArmenia Hripsime MkrtchyanArmenia Pavel MuzhikyanArmenia Wahi NarsisianArmenia Sahak OrdukhanyanArmenia Anna ReymersArmenia Narine TorosyanArmenia The Symposium was organized by YSU & NAS SPIE Armenian Student Chapter Institute for Physical Research (IPR) of National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Russian-Armenian (Slavonic) University (RAU) LT-PYRKAL cjsc Yerevan State University (YSU) Official Sponsors of the Symposium LT-PYRKAlRussian ArmenianSPIE LT-PYRKAL cjscRussian-Armenian UniversityYSU & NAS SPIE Student Chapter Further sponsors NFSATICTPSCSADevout Generation National Foundation of Science and Advanced TechnologiesThe Abdus Salam International Centre

  4. DNA fingerprinting of the NCI-60 cell line panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzi, Philip L; Reinhold, William C; Varma, Sudhir; Hutchinson, Amy A; Pommier, Yves; Chanock, Stephen J; Weinstein, John N

    2009-04-01

    The National Cancer Institute's NCI-60 cell line panel, the most extensively characterized set of cells in existence and a public resource, is frequently used as a screening tool for drug discovery. Because many laboratories around the world rely on data from the NCI-60 cells, confirmation of their genetic identities represents an essential step in validating results from them. Given the consequences of cell line contamination or misidentification, quality control measures should routinely include DNA fingerprinting. We have, therefore, used standard DNA microsatellite short tandem repeats to profile the NCI-60, and the resulting DNA fingerprints are provided here as a reference. Consistent with previous reports, the fingerprints suggest that several NCI-60 lines have common origins: the melanoma lines MDA-MB-435, MDA-N, and M14; the central nervous system lines U251 and SNB-19; the ovarian lines OVCAR-8 and OVCAR-8/ADR (also called NCI/ADR); and the prostate lines DU-145, DU-145 (ATCC), and RC0.1. Those lines also show that the ability to connect two fingerprints to the same origin is not affected by stable transfection or by the development of multidrug resistance. As expected, DNA fingerprints were not able to distinguish different tissues-of-origin. The fingerprints serve principally as a barcodes.

  5. The NCI Digital Divide Pilot Projects: implications for cancer education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreps, Gary L; Gustafson, David; Salovey, Peter; Perocchia, Rosemarie Slevin; Wilbright, Wayne; Bright, Mary Anne; Muha, Cathy

    2007-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) supported four innovative demonstration research projects, "The Digital Divide Pilot Projects," to test new strategies for disseminating health information via computer to vulnerable consumers. These projects involved active research collaborations between the NCI's Cancer Information Service (CIS) and regional cancer control researchers to field test new approaches for enhancing cancer communication in vulnerable communities. The projects were able to use computers to successfully disseminate relevant cancer information to vulnerable populations. These demonstration research projects suggested effective new strategies for using communication technologies to educate underserved populations about cancer prevention, control, and care.

  6. 77 FR 26697 - New Animal Drugs; Change of Sponsor; Change of Sponsor Address; Change of Sponsor Name and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-07

    ... rights and interest in, abbreviated new animal drug application (ANADA) 200-472 for Fomepizole for... [Docket No. FDA-2012-N-0002] New Animal Drugs; Change of Sponsor; Change of Sponsor Address; Change of.... SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending the animal drug regulations to reflect a...

  7. Budget constraints and optimization in sponsored search auctions

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Yanwu

    2013-01-01

    The Intelligent Systems Series publishes reference works and handbooks in three core sub-topic areas: Intelligent Automation, Intelligent Transportation Systems, and Intelligent Computing. They include theoretical studies, design methods, and real-world implementations and applications. The series' readership is broad, but focuses on engineering, electronics, and computer science. Budget constraints and optimization in sponsored search auctions takes into account consideration of the entire life cycle of campaigns for researchers and developers working on search systems and ROI maximization

  8. SPONSORING, BRAND VALUE AND SOCIAL MEDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Zauner

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The increasing involvement of individuals in social media over the past decade has enabled firms to pursue new avenues in communication and sponsoring activities. Besides general research on either social media or sponsoring, questions regarding the consequences of a joint activity (sponsoring activities in social media remain unexplored. Hence, the present study analyses whether the perceived image of the brand and the celebrity endorser credibility of a top sports team influence the perceived brand value of the sponsoring firm in a social media setting. Moreover, these effects are compared between existing customers and non-customers of the sponsoring firm. Interestingly, perceived celebrity endorser credibility plays no role in forming brand value perceptions in the case of the existing customers. Implications for marketing theory and practice are derived.

  9. Paradigma Baru Sponsor sebagai Mitra Penyelenggaraan Event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia Evelina

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The goals of this article is to know why sponsorship only to be viewed as sources of funding to implement the public relation events or marketing communication events. Method used in this article is qualitative method research to be based on observation, library study and content analysis. The result of this research seems that change happened in role of sponsorship from only fund source to become a partner of cooperation (mutual symbiotism between sponsor and event organizer. This article exploring the change of sponsorship concept from only looking for sponsor as an activity of fund mobilitation to become a partnership cooperation between event organizer and sponsor company. The mean of sponsor itself beside the fund supporter, they are also a side who takes mutual benefit from the cooperation. Conclusion, any close relationship (mutual benefit between two sides who take cooperation in event implementation (sponsor and event organiser. 

  10. New Phone System Coming to NCI Campus at Frederick | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Travis Fouche and Trent McKee, Guest Writers Beginning in September, phones at the NCI Campus at Frederick will begin to be replaced, as the project to upgrade the current phone system ramps up. Over the next 16 months, the Information Systems Program (ISP) will be working with Facilities Maintenance and Engineering and Computer & Statistical Services to replace the current

  11. NCI intramural research highlighted at 2014 AACR meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    This year’s American Association for Cancer Research meeting featured plenary talks by two NCI scientists, Steven Rosenberg, M.D., and Louis Staudt, M.D., Ph.D., that highlighted the challenges in developing varied and potentially synergistic treatments f

  12. NIH Employee Invention Report (EIR) | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    NIH researchers must immediately contact their Laboratory or Branch Chief and inform him or her of a possible invention, and then consult with your NCI TTC Technology Transfer Manager about submitting an Employee Invention Report (EIR) Form. | [google6f4cd5334ac394ab.html

  13. Russian delegation visits NIH and NCI to discuss research collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI Center for Global Health hosted a delegation from the Russian Foundation for Basic Research to discuss ongoing and future collaborations in cancer research. The delegation was accompanied by representatives from the US Embassy in Moscow and the Embassy of the Russian Federation in Washington DC.

  14. Creating Start-up Companies around NCI Inventions | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Karen Surabian, Thomas Stackhouse, and Rose Freel, Contributing Writers, and Rosemarie Truman, Guest Writer The National Cancer Institute (NCI), led by the Technology Transfer Center (TTC),  the Avon Foundation, and The Center for Advancing Innovation have partnered to create a “first-of-a-kind” Breast Cancer Start-up Challenge.

  15. Help NCI at Frederick “Knock Out Hunger” | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI at Frederick is once again participating in the Feds Feed Families initiative, an annual food drive that addresses severe shortages of non-perishable items in food banks across D.C., Maryland, and Virginia during the summer months, when giving is at its lowest.

  16. IJUE. Tema 3. Les competències de la Unió Europea

    OpenAIRE

    Torres Pérez, María

    2018-01-01

    PowerPoint del Tema 3 de la asignatura "Institucions Jurídiques de la Unió Europea". Curso académico 2017-2018. Tema 3. Les competències de la Unió Europea. 1. L’atribució de competències a la Unió Europea. 2. La delimitació de les competències a la Unió Europea. 3. Els principis que regeixen l’exercici de les competències. 4. L’exercici de les competències de la Unió per “alguns Estats membres”.

  17. The national cancer institute (NCI) and cancer biology in a 'post genome world'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klausner, Richard D.

    1996-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) exists to reduce the burden of all cancers through research and discovery. Extensive restructuring of the NCI over the past year has been aimed at assuring that the institution functions in all ways to promote opportunities for discovery in the laboratory, in the clinic, and in the community. To do this well requires the difficult and almost paradoxical problem of planning for scientific discovery which, in turn is based on the freedom to pursue the unanticipated. The intellectual and structural landscape of science is changing and it places new challenges, new demands and new opportunities for facilitating discovery. The nature of cancer as a disease of genomic instability and of accumulated genetic change, coupled with a possibility of the development of new technologies for reading, utilizing, interpreting and manipulating the genome of single cells, provides unprecedented opportunities for a new type of high through-put biology that will change the nature of discovery, cancer detection, diagnosis, prognosis, therapeutic decision-making and therapeutic discovery. To capture these new opportunities will require attention to be paid to integrate the development of technology and new scientific discoveries with the ability to apply advances rapidly and efficiently through clinical trials

  18. 76 FR 28439 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; NCI Cancer Genetics Services Directory Web-Based...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-17

    ...; Comment Request; NCI Cancer Genetics Services Directory Web-Based Application Form and Update Mailer... currently valid OMB control number. Proposed Collection: Title: NCI Cancer Genetics Services Directory Web... included in the NCI Cancer Genetics Services Directory on NCI's Cancer.gov Web site. The information...

  19. Regular paths in SparQL: querying the NCI Thesaurus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detwiler, Landon T; Suciu, Dan; Brinkley, James F

    2008-11-06

    OWL, the Web Ontology Language, provides syntax and semantics for representing knowledge for the semantic web. Many of the constructs of OWL have a basis in the field of description logics. While the formal underpinnings of description logics have lead to a highly computable language, it has come at a cognitive cost. OWL ontologies are often unintuitive to readers lacking a strong logic background. In this work we describe GLEEN, a regular path expression library, which extends the RDF query language SparQL to support complex path expressions over OWL and other RDF-based ontologies. We illustrate the utility of GLEEN by showing how it can be used in a query-based approach to defining simpler, more intuitive views of OWL ontologies. In particular we show how relatively simple GLEEN-enhanced SparQL queries can create views of the OWL version of the NCI Thesaurus that match the views generated by the web-based NCI browser.

  20. Like a Good Neighbor, NCI-Frederick Is There | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    The main campus of the National Cancer Institute at Frederick is an island of sorts: 68 acres of land that was once part of Fort Detrick. Accessing NCI property means passing through the Fort Detrick gates and crossing the post. While the campus is surrounded by the military installation, is protected by NIH police, and doesn’t allow the use of tobacco products, it is not a

  1. Softball Games Bring NCI and Leidos Biomed Employees Together | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI and Leidos Biomed employees took to the fields at Nallin Pond for the third annual slow-pitch softball games on August 26. The series attracted 54 employees who were divided into four teams, Red, Blue, Gray, and White, and they were cheered on by about 40 enthusiastic spectators. In the first set of games, the Gray team defeated the Blue team, 15–8, and the White team

  2. NCI investment in nanotechnology: achievements and challenges for the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickherber, Anthony; Morris, Stephanie A; Grodzinski, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology offers an exceptional and unique opportunity for developing a new generation of tools addressing persistent challenges to progress in cancer research and clinical care. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) recognizes this potential, which is why it invests roughly $150 M per year in nanobiotechnology training, research and development. By exploiting the various capacities of nanomaterials, the range of nanoscale vectors and probes potentially available suggests much is possible for precisely investigating, manipulating, and targeting the mechanisms of cancer across the full spectrum of research and clinical care. NCI has played a key role among federal R&D agencies in recognizing early the value of nanobiotechnology in medicine and committing to its development as well as providing training support for new investigators in the field. These investments have allowed many in the research community to pursue breakthrough capabilities that have already yielded broad benefits. Presented here is an overview of how NCI has made these investments with some consideration of how it will continue to work with this research community to pursue paradigm-changing innovations that offer relief from the burdens of cancer. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  3. Global Proteome Analysis of the NCI-60 Cell Line Panel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Moghaddas Gholami

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The NCI-60 cell line collection is a very widely used panel for the study of cellular mechanisms of cancer in general and in vitro drug action in particular. It is a model system for the tissue types and genetic diversity of human cancers and has been extensively molecularly characterized. Here, we present a quantitative proteome and kinome profile of the NCI-60 panel covering, in total, 10,350 proteins (including 375 protein kinases and including a core cancer proteome of 5,578 proteins that were consistently quantified across all tissue types. Bioinformatic analysis revealed strong cell line clusters according to tissue type and disclosed hundreds of differentially regulated proteins representing potential biomarkers for numerous tumor properties. Integration with public transcriptome data showed considerable similarity between mRNA and protein expression. Modeling of proteome and drug-response profiles for 108 FDA-approved drugs identified known and potential protein markers for drug sensitivity and resistance. To enable community access to this unique resource, we incorporated it into a public database for comparative and integrative analysis (http://wzw.tum.de/proteomics/nci60.

  4. Improving global data infrastructures for more effective and scalable analysis of Earth and environmental data: the Australian NCI NERDIP Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Ben; Wyborn, Lesley; Druken, Kelsey; Richards, Clare; Trenham, Claire; Wang, Jingbo; Rozas Larraondo, Pablo; Steer, Adam; Smillie, Jon

    2017-04-01

    The National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) facility hosts one of Australia's largest repositories (10+ PBytes) of research data collections spanning datasets from climate, coasts, oceans, and geophysics through to astronomy, bioinformatics, and the social sciences domains. The data are obtained from national and international sources, spanning a wide range of gridded and ungridded (i.e., line surveys, point clouds) data, and raster imagery, as well as diverse coordinate reference projections and resolutions. Rather than managing these data assets as a digital library, whereby users can discover and download files to personal servers (similar to borrowing 'books' from a 'library'), NCI has built an extensive and well-integrated research data platform, the National Environmental Research Data Interoperability Platform (NERDIP, http://nci.org.au/data-collections/nerdip/). The NERDIP architecture enables programmatic access to data via standards-compliant services for high performance data analysis, and provides a flexible cloud-based environment to facilitate the next generation of transdisciplinary scientific research across all data domains. To improve use of modern scalable data infrastructures that are focused on efficient data analysis, the data organisation needs to be carefully managed including performance evaluations of projections and coordinate systems, data encoding standards and formats. A complication is that we have often found multiple domain vocabularies and ontologies are associated with equivalent datasets. It is not practical for individual dataset managers to determine which standards are best to apply to their dataset as this could impact accessibility and interoperability. Instead, they need to work with data custodians across interrelated communities and, in partnership with the data repository, the international scientific community to determine the most useful approach. For the data repository, this approach is essential to enable

  5. Protecting Information: The Role of Community Colleges in Cybersecurity Education. A Report from a Workshop Sponsored by the National Science Foundation and the American Association of Community Colleges (Washington, DC, June 26-28, 2002).

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Association of Community Colleges, Washington, DC.

    The education and training of the cybersecurity workforce is an essential element in protecting the nation's computer and information systems. On June 26-28, 2002, the National Science Foundation supported a cybersecurity education workshop hosted by the American Association of Community Colleges. The goals of the workshop were to map out the role…

  6. Biological and Environmental Research Exascale Requirements Review. An Office of Science review sponsored jointly by Advanced Scientific Computing Research and Biological and Environmental Research, March 28-31, 2016, Rockville, Maryland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arkin, Adam [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Bader, David C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Coffey, Richard [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Antypas, Katie [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Bard, Deborah [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC); Dart, Eli [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Esnet; Dosanjh, Sudip [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Gerber, Richard [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Hack, James [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Monga, Inder [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Esnet; Papka, Michael E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Riley, Katherine [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Rotman, Lauren [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Esnet; Straatsma, Tjerk [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wells, Jack [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Aluru, Srinivas [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Andersen, Amity [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Aprá, Edoardo [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). EMSL; Azad, Ariful [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Bates, Susan [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Blaby, Ian [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Blaby-Haas, Crysten [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bonneau, Rich [New York Univ. (NYU), NY (United States); Bowen, Ben [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Bradford, Mark A. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Brodie, Eoin [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Brown, James (Ben) [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Buluc, Aydin [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Bernholdt, David [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bylaska, Eric [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Calvin, Kate [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cannon, Bill [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Chen, Xingyuan [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cheng, Xiaolin [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Cheung, Margaret [Univ. of Houston, Houston, TX (United States); Chowdhary, Kenny [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Colella, Phillip [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Collins, Bill [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Compo, Gil [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Boulder, CO (United States); Crowley, Mike [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Debusschere, Bert [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); D’Imperio, Nicholas [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Dror, Ron [Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); Egan, Rob [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Evans, Katherine [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Friedberg, Iddo [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Fyke, Jeremy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gao, Zheng [Stony Brook Univ., Stony Brook, NY (United States); Georganas, Evangelos [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Giraldo, Frank [Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA (United States); Gnanakaran, Gnana [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Govind, Niri [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). EMSL; Grandy, Stuart [Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States); Gustafson, Bill [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hammond, Glenn [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hargrove, William [USDA Forest Service, Washington, D.C. (United States); Heroux, Michael [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hoffman, Forrest [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hofmeyr, Steven [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Hunke, Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Jackson, Charles [Univ. of Texas-Austin, Austin, TX (United States); Jacob, Rob [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Jacobson, Dan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jacobson, Matt [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Jain, Chirag [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Johansen, Hans [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Johnson, Jeff [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Jones, Andy [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Jones, Phil [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kalyanaraman, Ananth [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Kang, Senghwa [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); King, Eric [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Koanantakool, Penporn [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Kollias, Pavlos [Stony Brook Univ., Stony Brook, NY (United States); Kopera, Michal [Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Kotamarthi, Rao [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Kowalski, Karol [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). EMSL; Kumar, Jitendra [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kyrpides, Nikos [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Leung, Ruby [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Li, Xiaolin [Stony Brook Univ., Stony Brook, NY (United States); Lin, Wuyin [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Link, Robert [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Liu, Yangang [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Loew, Leslie [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States); Luke, Edward [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ma, Hsi -Yen [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan [Univ. of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Maranas, Costas [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Martin, Daniel [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Maslowski, Wieslaw [Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA (United States); McCue, Lee Ann [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); McInnes, Lois Curfman [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Mills, Richard [Intel Corp., Santa Clara, CA (United States); Molins Rafa, Sergi [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Morozov, Dmitriy [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Mostafavi, Sara [Center for Molecular Medicine and Therapeutics, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Moulton, David J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mourao, Zenaida [Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom); Najm, Habib [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Ng, Bernard [Center for Molecular Medicine and Therapeutics, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Ng, Esmond [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Norman, Matt [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Oh, Sang -Yun [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Oliker, Leonid [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Pan, Chongle [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Pass, Rebecca [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Pau, George S. H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Petridis, Loukas [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Prakash, Giri [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Price, Stephen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Randall, David [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States); Renslow, Ryan [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Riihimaki, Laura [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ringler, Todd [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Roberts, Andrew [Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA (United States); Rokhsar, Dan [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Ruebel, Oliver [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Salinger, Andrew [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Scheibe, Tim [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schulz, Roland [Intel, Mountain View, CA (United States); Sivaraman, Chitra [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Smith, Jeremy [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Sreepathi, Sarat [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Steefel, Carl [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Talbot, Jenifer [Boston Univ., Boston, MA (United States); Tantillo, D. J. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Tartakovsky, Alex [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Taylor, Mark [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Taylor, Ronald [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Trebotich, David [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Urban, Nathan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Valiev, Marat [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). EMSL; Wagner, Allon [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Wainwright, Haruko [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Wieder, Will [NCAR/Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Wiley, Steven [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Williams, Dean [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Worley, Pat [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Xie, Shaocheng [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Yelick, Kathy [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Yoo, Shinjae [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Yosef, Niri [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Zhang, Minghua [Stony Brook Univ., Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    2016-03-31

    Understanding the fundamentals of genomic systems or the processes governing impactful weather patterns are examples of the types of simulation and modeling performed on the most advanced computing resources in America. High-performance computing and computational science together provide a necessary platform for the mission science conducted by the Biological and Environmental Research (BER) office at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This report reviews BER’s computing needs and their importance for solving some of the toughest problems in BER’s portfolio. BER’s impact on science has been transformative. Mapping the human genome, including the U.S.-supported international Human Genome Project that DOE began in 1987, initiated the era of modern biotechnology and genomics-based systems biology. And since the 1950s, BER has been a core contributor to atmospheric, environmental, and climate science research, beginning with atmospheric circulation studies that were the forerunners of modern Earth system models (ESMs) and by pioneering the implementation of climate codes onto high-performance computers. See http://exascaleage.org/ber/ for more information.

  7. The Political Economy of Federally Sponsored Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bart Ragon

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Librarian involvement in the Open Access (OA movement has traditionally focused on access to scholarly publications. Recent actions by the White House have focused attention on access on the data produced from federally sponsored research. Questions have emerged concerning access to the output of federally sponsored research and whether it is a public or private good. Understanding the political battle over access to federally funded research is closely tied to the ownership of the peer review process in higher education and associated revenue streams, and as a result, interest groups seeking to influence government regulation have politicized the issues. As a major funder of research in higher education, policies from the federal government are likely to drive change in research practices at higher education institutions and impact library services. The political economy of federally sponsored research data will shape research enterprises in higher education inspire a number of new services distributed throughout the research life cycle.

  8. Computational Environments and Analysis methods available on the NCI High Performance Computing (HPC) and High Performance Data (HPD) Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, B. J. K.; Foster, C.; Minchin, S. A.; Pugh, T.; Lewis, A.; Wyborn, L. A.; Evans, B. J.; Uhlherr, A.

    2014-12-01

    The National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) has established a powerful in-situ computational environment to enable both high performance computing and data-intensive science across a wide spectrum of national environmental data collections - in particular climate, observational data and geoscientific assets. This paper examines 1) the computational environments that supports the modelling and data processing pipelines, 2) the analysis environments and methods to support data analysis, and 3) the progress in addressing harmonisation of the underlying data collections for future transdisciplinary research that enable accurate climate projections. NCI makes available 10+ PB major data collections from both the government and research sectors based on six themes: 1) weather, climate, and earth system science model simulations, 2) marine and earth observations, 3) geosciences, 4) terrestrial ecosystems, 5) water and hydrology, and 6) astronomy, social and biosciences. Collectively they span the lithosphere, crust, biosphere, hydrosphere, troposphere, and stratosphere. The data is largely sourced from NCI's partners (which include the custodians of many of the national scientific records), major research communities, and collaborating overseas organisations. The data is accessible within an integrated HPC-HPD environment - a 1.2 PFlop supercomputer (Raijin), a HPC class 3000 core OpenStack cloud system and several highly connected large scale and high-bandwidth Lustre filesystems. This computational environment supports a catalogue of integrated reusable software and workflows from earth system and ecosystem modelling, weather research, satellite and other observed data processing and analysis. To enable transdisciplinary research on this scale, data needs to be harmonised so that researchers can readily apply techniques and software across the corpus of data available and not be constrained to work within artificial disciplinary boundaries. Future challenges will

  9. Event seeking for sponsors: Case Helsinki Pride

    OpenAIRE

    Jaakkola, Johanna

    2014-01-01

    This thesis was done for HeSeTa Ry (Helsingin seudun seksuaalinen tasavertaisuus ry) and the goal was to find out how Helsinki Pride could get sponsors more efficiently and how the co-operation could be made more long lasting with the current sponsors. Helsinki Pride is an event organized in Helsinki each year in June. It is also the biggest LGBT event organized in Finland. The biggest event of the week is the Gay Parade and the Party in the Park. In 2014 only these events had over 20 000 par...

  10. NCI Takes Back the Defelice Cup at Ninth Annual Golf Tournament | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer After being down by a point in the morning, NCI reclaimed the Defelice Cup trophy from Leidos Biomedical Research, with a final score of 12 ½ to 11 ½, at the ninth annual Ronald H. Defelice Golf Tournament, held Oct. 13. “The tightest matches in the nine-year history of this cup competition resulted in a narrow victory for NCI and allowed NCI to

  11. NCI Scientists Awarded National Medal of Technology and Innovation by President Obama | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two NCI scientists received the National Medal of Technology and Innovation, the nation’s highest honor for technological achievement. The award was announced by President Obama in October. The honorees, John Schiller, Ph.D., Laboratory of Cellular Oncology (LCO), Center for Cancer Research, NCI, and Douglas Lowy, M.D., also from LCO and NCI deputy director, received their medals at a White House ceremony on Nov. 20.

  12. NCI designated cancer center funding not influenced by organizational structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Margaret E; Yagoda, Daniel; Thurman, Paul W; Luna, Jorge M; Figg, William Douglas

    2009-05-01

    National Cancer Institutes (NCI) designated cancer centers use one of three organizational structures. The hypothesis of this study is that there are differences in the amount of annual NCI funding per faculty member based on a cancer center's organizational structure. The study also considers the impact of secondary factors (i.e., the existence of a clinical program, the region and the size of the city in which the cancer center is located) on funding and the number of Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) investigators at each cancer center. Of the 63 cancer centers, 44 use a matrix structure, 16 have a freestanding structure, and three have a Department of Oncology structure. Kruskal-Wallis tests reveal no statistically significant differences in the amount of funding per faculty member or the number of HHMI investigators between centers with a matrix, freestanding or Department of Oncology structure. Online research and telephone interviews with each cancer center were used to gather information, including: organizational structure, the presence of a clinical program, the number of faculty members, and the number of Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigators. Statistical tests were used to assess the impact which organizational structure has on the amount of funding per faculty member and number of HHMI investigators. While the results seem to suggest that the organizational structure of a given cancer center does not impact the amount of NCI funding or number of HHMI investigators which it attracts, the existence of this relationship is likely masked by the small sample size in this study. Further studies may be appropriate to examine the effect organizational structure has on other measurements which are relevant to cancer centers, such as quality and quantity of research produced.

  13. 22 CFR 62.3 - Sponsor eligibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sponsor eligibility. 62.3 Section 62.3 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE PUBLIC DIPLOMACY AND EXCHANGES EXCHANGE VISITOR PROGRAM General Provisions... visitor program are: (1) United States local, state and federal government agencies; (2) International...

  14. Sponsored Research & the Freedom of Publication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packham, David

    This paper examines conflicts and collaboration between industry and universities regarding sponsored research and freedom of publication, particularly in the United Kingdom. An opening section notes that the values of the market and the university are in fundamental conflict which presents problems for institutions attempting to work in…

  15. Use and Misuse of Industry Sponsored Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuVall, Charles R.; Krepel, Wayne J.

    A review of educational research reveals that free and inexpensive materials are used today to a much greater extent than they had been in the past. Two studies, sponsored by the American Iron and Steel Institute, are evidence of the producer's interest in determining the strengths and weaknesses of the materials being sent into classrooms and…

  16. Market Imperfections and Firm-Sponsored Training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Picchio, M.; van Ours, J.C.

    2010-01-01

    Recent human capital theories predict that labor market frictions and product market competition influence firm-sponsored training. Using matched worker-firm data from Dutch manufacturing, our paper empirically assesses the validity of these predictions. We find that a decrease in labor market

  17. The University Campus: Why Military Sponsored Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messing, Aubrey E.

    Military-sponsored research on the university campus has been a major issue during the past several years. Opposition has come from radicals, who wish to destroy the university itself, to critics, who feel such activities take needed funds and personnel from the more important task of solving our nation's social problems. These viewpoints and the…

  18. Ressonàncies en plasmons sobre grafè

    OpenAIRE

    Alcaraz Iranzo, David

    2014-01-01

    Treball final de màster oficial fet en col·laboració amb Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB), Universitat de Barcelona (UB) i Institut de Ciències Fotòniques (ICFO) [ANGLÈS] Graphene is used as a novel, versatile plasmonic material. The most common way to implement resonant light-plasmon coupling is to etch graphene into periodic nanostructures, which is invasive. Here, we study a non-invasive way to engineer graphene plasmon resonances, based on periodic doping profiles. The plasmon r...

  19. Vaccines for HIV | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The development of an effective HIV vaccine has been an ongoing area of research. The high variability in HIV-1 virus strains has represented a major challenge in successful development. Ideally, an effective candidate vaccine would provide protection against the majority of clades of HIV. Two major hurdles to overcome are immunodominance and sequence diversity. This vaccine utilizes a strategy for overcoming these two issues by identifying the conserved regions of the virus and exploiting them for use in a targeted therapy. NCI seeks licensees and/or research collaborators to commercialize this technology, which has been validated in macaque models.

  20. High Energy Physics Exascale Requirements Review. An Office of Science review sponsored jointly by Advanced Scientific Computing Research and High Energy Physics, June 10-12, 2015, Bethesda, Maryland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habib, Salman [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Roser, Robert [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Gerber, Richard [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Antypas, Katie [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Dart, Eli [Esnet, Berkeley, CA (United States); Dosanjh, Sudip [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Hack, James [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Monga, Inder [Esnet, Berkeley, CA (United States); Papka, Michael E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Riley, Katherine [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Rotman, Lauren [Esnet, Berkeley, CA (United States); Straatsma, Tjerk [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wells, Jack [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Williams, Tim [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Almgren, A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Amundson, J. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Bailey, Stephen [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Bard, Deborah [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Bloom, Ken [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States); Bockelman, Brian [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States); Borgland, Anders [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Borrill, Julian [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Boughezal, Radja [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Brower, Richard [Boston Univ., MA (United States); Cowan, Benjamin [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Finkel, Hal [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Frontiere, Nicholas [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Fuess, Stuart [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Ge, Lixin [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Gnedin, Nick [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Gottlieb, Steven [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Gutsche, Oliver [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Han, T. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Heitmann, Katrin [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hoeche, Stefan [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Ko, Kwok [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Kononenko, Oleksiy [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); LeCompte, Thomas [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Li, Zheng [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Lukic, Zarija [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Mori, Warren [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Ng, Cho-Kuen [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Nugent, Peter [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Oleynik, Gene [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); O’Shea, Brian [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States); Padmanabhan, Nikhil [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Petravick, Donald [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). National Center for Supercomputing Applications; Petriello, Frank J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Pope, Adrian [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Power, John [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Qiang, Ji [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Reina, Laura [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Rizzo, Thomas Gerard [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Ryne, Robert [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Schram, Malachi [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Spentzouris, P. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Toussaint, Doug [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Vay, Jean Luc [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Viren, B. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wuerthwein, Frank [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Xiao, Liling [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Coffey, Richard [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-11-29

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science (SC) Offices of High Energy Physics (HEP) and Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) convened a programmatic Exascale Requirements Review on June 10–12, 2015, in Bethesda, Maryland. This report summarizes the findings, results, and recommendations derived from that meeting. The high-level findings and observations are as follows. Larger, more capable computing and data facilities are needed to support HEP science goals in all three frontiers: Energy, Intensity, and Cosmic. The expected scale of the demand at the 2025 timescale is at least two orders of magnitude — and in some cases greater — than that available currently. The growth rate of data produced by simulations is overwhelming the current ability of both facilities and researchers to store and analyze it. Additional resources and new techniques for data analysis are urgently needed. Data rates and volumes from experimental facilities are also straining the current HEP infrastructure in its ability to store and analyze large and complex data volumes. Appropriately configured leadership-class facilities can play a transformational role in enabling scientific discovery from these datasets. A close integration of high-performance computing (HPC) simulation and data analysis will greatly aid in interpreting the results of HEP experiments. Such an integration will minimize data movement and facilitate interdependent workflows. Long-range planning between HEP and ASCR will be required to meet HEP’s research needs. To best use ASCR HPC resources, the experimental HEP program needs (1) an established, long-term plan for access to ASCR computational and data resources, (2) the ability to map workflows to HPC resources, (3) the ability for ASCR facilities to accommodate workflows run by collaborations potentially comprising thousands of individual members, (4) to transition codes to the next-generation HPC platforms that will be available at ASCR

  1. College Graduate with NCI Internship Gains Experience, Carries Chemistry into Medicine | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    For Jennifer Marshall, the skills learned through an internship at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) at Frederick have prepared her for the next step of her life—medical school. Marshall, who will be attending the West Virginia University School of Medicine in the fall, spent three summers in NCI at Frederick’s Summer Internship Program expanding her love and passion for

  2. Human Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting Glypican-2 in Neuroblastoma | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Researchers at the National Cancer Institute’s Laboratory of Molecular Biology (NCI LMB) have developed and isolated several single domain monoclonal human antibodies against GPC2. NCI seeks parties interested in licensing or co-developing GPC2 antibodies and/or conjugates.

  3. Vaccine for BK Polyomavirus-associated Infections in Transplant Recipients | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI researches identified a BK polyomavirus (BKV) virulent strain that causes chronic urinary tract infections, and the development of vaccine and therapeutic methods that would block BKV pathogenesis. The NCI Laboratory of Cellular Oncology, seek parties to license or co-develop this technology.

  4. What can Bilfinger teach Olympic sponsors?

    OpenAIRE

    Mark Dodds; Mauro Palmero

    2016-01-01

    Bilfinger SE (Bilfinger) is a leading international engineering and services group (Bilfinger.com, 2015), and was a local sponsor of the 2014 FIFA World Cup. The company is accused of paying bribes through its subsidiary company, Mauell, (dw. com, 2015) to public officials in Brazil for contracts related to the 2014 World Cup (Cassin, 2015). The corruption allegations relate to orders to equip security command centers at twelve host cities during the 2014 World Cup in Brazil (dw.com, 2015). B...

  5. The Complex Dynamics of Sponsored Search Markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robu, Valentin; La Poutré, Han; Bohte, Sander

    This paper provides a comprehensive study of the structure and dynamics of online advertising markets, mostly based on techniques from the emergent discipline of complex systems analysis. First, we look at how the display rank of a URL link influences its click frequency, for both sponsored search and organic search. Second, we study the market structure that emerges from these queries, especially the market share distribution of different advertisers. We show that the sponsored search market is highly concentrated, with less than 5% of all advertisers receiving over 2/3 of the clicks in the market. Furthermore, we show that both the number of ad impressions and the number of clicks follow power law distributions of approximately the same coefficient. However, we find this result does not hold when studying the same distribution of clicks per rank position, which shows considerable variance, most likely due to the way advertisers divide their budget on different keywords. Finally, we turn our attention to how such sponsored search data could be used to provide decision support tools for bidding for combinations of keywords. We provide a method to visualize keywords of interest in graphical form, as well as a method to partition these graphs to obtain desirable subsets of search terms.

  6. A multidisciplinary "think tank": the top 10 clinical trial opportunities in transfusion medicine from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute-sponsored 2009 state-of-the-science symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josephson, Cassandra D; Glynn, Simone A; Kleinman, Steve H; Blajchman, Morris A

    2011-04-01

    In September 2009, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute convened the State-of-the-Science Symposium in Transfusion Medicine to identify Phase II and/or III clinical trials that would provide important information to advance transfusion medicine. Seven multidisciplinary subcommittees developed proposals in the following areas: 1) platelet (PLT) product use, 2) neonatal and/or pediatric transfusion practice, 3) surgical transfusion practice, 4) intensive care unit and/or in trauma transfusion practice, 5) plasma and/or cryoprecipitate product use and therapeutic apheresis practice, 6) red blood cell (RBC) product use and/or blood conservation management, and 7) medical transfusion practice or blood donor studies. The committees consisted of transfusion medicine specialists, hematologists, cardiovascular surgeons, anesthesiologists, neonatologists, critical care physicians, and clinical trial methodologists. Proposals were presented and an external panel evaluated and prioritized each concept for scientific merit, clinical importance, and feasibility. Twenty-four concepts were presented by the subcommittees. Ten concepts addressed four areas deemed most important: 1) PLT transfusion strategies to prevent and/or mitigate bleeding in neonates and patients with hematologic malignancies, 2) RBC transfusion trigger strategies to improve overall outcomes in different patient populations, 3) evaluation of optimal plasma:PLT:RBC ratios in trauma resuscitation, and 4) pathogen inactivation of PLTs to improve PLT transfusion safety. The proposal themes not only represent inquiries about the indications for transfusion, but also epitomize the lack of consensus when clinical practice lacks a strong evidence base. Ultimately, the purpose of this publication is to provide a "blueprint" of ideas for further development rather than endorse any one specific clinical trial design. © 2010 American Association of Blood Banks.

  7. Persistent Identifier Practice for Big Data Management at NCI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingbo Wang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The National Computational Infrastructure (NCI manages over 10 PB research data, which is co-located with the high performance computer (Raijin and an HPC class 3000 core OpenStack cloud system (Tenjin. In support of this integrated High Performance Computing/High Performance Data (HPC/HPD infrastructure, NCI’s data management practices includes building catalogues, DOI minting, data curation, data publishing, and data delivery through a variety of data services. The metadata catalogues, DOIs, THREDDS, and Vocabularies, all use different Uniform Resource Locator (URL styles. A Persistent IDentifier (PID service provides an important utility to manage URLs in a consistent, controlled and monitored manner to support the robustness of our national ‘Big Data’ infrastructure. In this paper we demonstrate NCI’s approach of utilising the NCI’s 'PID Service 'to consistently manage its persistent identifiers with various applications.

  8. 48 CFR 35.017-1 - Sponsoring agreements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... of the FFRDC's relationship with its sponsor(s). (3) A provision for the identification of retained earnings (reserves) and the development of a plan for their use and disposition. (4) A prohibition against...

  9. DOE-EERC jointly sponsored research program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendrikson, J.G.; Sondreal, E.A.

    1999-09-01

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement DE-FC21-93MC30098 funded through the Office of Fossil Energy and administered at the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) supported the performance of a Jointly Sponsored Research Program (JSRP) at the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) with a minimum 50% nonfederal cost share to assist industry in commercializing and effectively applying efficient, nonpolluting energy technologies that can compete effectively in meeting market demands for clean fuels, chemical feedstocks, and electricity in the 21st century. The objective of the JSRP was to advance the deployment of advanced technologies for improving energy efficiency and environmental performance through jointly sponsored research on topics that would not be adequately addressed by the private sector alone. Examples of such topics include the barriers to hot-gas cleaning impeding the deployment of high-efficiency power systems and the search for practical means for sequestering CO{sub 2} generated by fossil fuel combustion. The selection of particular research projects was guided by a combination of DOE priorities and market needs, as provided by the requirement for joint venture funding approved both by DOE and the private sector sponsor. The research addressed many different energy resource and related environmental problems, with emphasis directed toward the EERC's historic lead mission in low-rank coals (LRCs), which represent approximately half of the U.S. coal resources in the conterminous states, much larger potential resources in Alaska, and a major part of the energy base in the former U.S.S.R., East Central Europe, and the Pacific Rim. The Base and JSRP agreements were tailored to the growing awareness of critical environmental issues, including water supply and quality, air toxics (e.g., mercury), fine respirable particulate matter (PM{sub 2.5}), and the goal of zero net CO{sub 2} emissions.

  10. 14 CFR 151.121 - Procedures: Offer; sponsor assurances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Procedures: Offer; sponsor assurances. 151.121 Section 151.121 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Engineering Proposals § 151.121 Procedures: Offer; sponsor assurances. Each sponsor must adopt the following...

  11. 45 CFR 233.51 - Eligibility of sponsored aliens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Eligibility of sponsored aliens. 233.51 Section... CONDITIONS OF ELIGIBILITY IN FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS § 233.51 Eligibility of sponsored aliens... affidavit(s) of support or similar agreement on behalf of an alien (who is not the child of the sponsor or...

  12. Modelling Emotional and Attitudinal Evaluations of Major Sponsors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martensen, Anne; Hansen, Flemming

    2004-01-01

    The paper reports findings from a larger study of sponsors and their relationship to sponsoredparties. In the present reporting, the focus is on sponsors. Rather than evaluating suchsponsorships in traditional effect hierarchical terms, a conceptual Sponsor Value Model isspecified as a structural...

  13. Screening mammography. A missed clinical opportunity? Results of the NCI [National Cancer Institute] Breast Cancer Screening Consortium and national health interview survey studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    Data from seven studies sponsored by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) were used to determine current rates of breast cancer screening and to identify the characteristics of and reasons for women not being screened. All seven studies were population-based surveys of women aged 50 to 74 years without breast cancer. While over 90% of non-Hispanic white respondents had regular sources of medical care, 46% to 76% had a clinical breast examination within the previous year, and only 25% to 41% had a mammogram. Less educated and poorer women had fewer mammograms. The two most common reasons women gave for never having had a mammogram were that they did not known they needed it and that their physician had not recommended it. Many physicians may have overlooked the opportunity to recommend mammography for older women when performing a clinical breast examination and to educate their patients about the benefit of screening mammography

  14. What can Bilfinger teach Olympic sponsors?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Dodds

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Bilfinger SE (Bilfinger is a leading international engineering and services group (Bilfinger.com, 2015, and was a local sponsor of the 2014 FIFA World Cup. The company is accused of paying bribes through its subsidiary company, Mauell, (dw. com, 2015 to public officials in Brazil for contracts related to the 2014 World Cup (Cassin, 2015. The corruption allegations relate to orders to equip security command centers at twelve host cities during the 2014 World Cup in Brazil (dw.com, 2015. Because Brazil hosted the 2014 FIFA World Cup and will host the 2016 Summer Olympic Games, companies need to consider the risks of many international anti-corruption laws, such as Brazil’s anti-corruption law commonly referred as The Clean Companies Act and other applicable anticorruption law like the United States’ Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (Rogers, et. al, 2014. This paper will analyze the Bilfinger case involving corruption activity at the 2014 FIFA World Cup and offer insights for sponsors of the 2016 Summer Olympic Games.

  15. National Science Bowl | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Science Bowl National Science Bowl The Department of Energy's Office of Science sponsors the National Science Bowl competition. This fun, fast-paced academic tournament tests the brainpower of middle and high school student teams on science and math topics. The National Science Bowl provides an

  16. Beware: this is sponsored! How disclosures of sponsored content affect persuasion knowledge and brand responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerman, S.; van Reijmersdal, E.; Neijens, P.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined how disclosure of sponsored content influences persuasion knowledge and brand responses (i.e., brand memory and brand attitude). Moreover, we tested whether extending disclosure duration increases its effect. We conducted an experiment (N = 116) in which we compared the effects

  17. In memoriam: an appreciation for the NCI R25T cancer education and career development program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shine

    2014-06-01

    On September 7, 2013, the NCI R25T award mechanism ended its final "receipt/review/award cycle" after more than two decades shaping the cancer prevention and control workforce. Created in 1991 to respond to a national shortage of cancer prevention and control researchers, the R25T supported innovative institutional programs with specialized curricula preparing individuals for careers as independent scientists for the field. Required elements ensured developing transdisciplinary sensibilities and skills highly suited to team science, including conducting collaborative research with mentors of complementary expertise. R25Ts provided trainee stipends, research, education, and travel funds at levels far higher than T32 National Service Research Awards to attract individuals from diverse disciplines. Graduates are faculty at all academic ranks, and hold leadership positions such as associate directors of cancer prevention and control. Beyond its trainees, R25Ts also recruited into the field other students exposed through courses in specialized prevention curricula, as well as course instructors and trainee mentors, who did not initially consider their work to be relevant to cancer prevention. Although advances are being achieved, prevention efforts are not yet fully realized, and currently unknown is the impact on the workforce of terminating the R25T, including whether it is another barrier to preventing cancer. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  18. NCI Think Tank Concerning the Identifiability of Biospecimens and “-Omic” Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weil, Carol J.; Mechanic, Leah E.; Green, Tiffany; Kinsinger, Christopher; Lockhart, Nicole C.; Nelson, Stefanie A.; Rodriguez, Laura L.; Buccini, Laura D.

    2014-01-01

    On June 11 and 12, 2012, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) hosted a think tank concerning the identifiability of biospecimens and “omic” Data in order to explore challenges surrounding this complex and multifaceted topic. The think tank brought together forty-six leaders from several fields, including cancer genomics, bioinformatics, human subject protection, patient advocacy, and commercial genetics. The first day involved presentations regarding the state of the science of re-identification; current and proposed regulatory frameworks for assessing identifiability; developments in law, industry and biotechnology; and the expectations of patients and research participants. The second day was spent by think tank participants in small break-out groups designed to address specific sub-topics under the umbrella issue of identifiability, including considerations for the development of best practices for data sharing and consent, and targeted opportunities for further empirical research. We describe the outcomes of this two day meeting, including two complimentary themes that emerged from moderated discussions following the presentations on Day 1, and ideas presented for further empirical research to discern the preferences and concerns of research participants about data sharing and individual identifiability. PMID:23579437

  19. NCI Funding Trends and Priorities in Physical Activity and Energy Balance Research Among Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfano, Catherine M; Bluethmann, Shirley M; Tesauro, Gina; Perna, Frank; Agurs-Collins, Tanya; Elena, Joanne W; Ross, Sharon A; O'Connell, Mary; Bowles, Heather R; Greenberg, Deborah; Nebeling, Linda

    2016-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that a healthy lifestyle consisting of physical activity, healthy diet, and weight control is associated with reduced risk of morbidity and mortality after cancer. However, these behavioral interventions are not widely adopted in practice or community settings. Integrating heath behavior change interventions into standard survivorship care for the growing number of cancer survivors requires an understanding of the current state of the science and a coordinated scientific agenda for the future with focused attention in several priority areas. To facilitate this goal, this paper presents trends over the past decade of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) research portfolio, fiscal year 2004 to 2014, by funding mechanism, research focus, research design and methodology, primary study exposures and outcomes, and study team expertise and composition. These data inform a prioritized research agenda for the next decade focused on demonstrating value and feasibility and creating desire for health behavior change interventions at multiple levels including the survivor, clinician, and healthcare payer to facilitate the development and implementation of appropriately targeted, adaptive, effective, and sustainable programs for all survivors. Published by Oxford University Press (2015). This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  20. Silica-Coated Nanodiamonds for Imaging and Delivery of Therapeutic Agents | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI Radiation Oncology Branch and the NHLBI Laboratory of Single Molecule Biophysics seek parties to co-develop fluorescent nanodiamonds for use as in vivo and in vitro optical tracking probes toward commercialization.

  1. History of the Diet History Questionnaire (DHQ) | EGRP/DCCPS/NCI/NIH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn about the evolution of the Diet History Questionnaire (DHQ), developed by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) initially in 2001, to the DHQ II in 2010, up to the present version, DHQ III, launched in 2018.

  2. Program Spotlight: Ground Broken for NCI-supported Cancer Treatment Center in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dr. Sanya A. Springfield represented NCI at the groundbreaking ceremonies for the University of Puerto Rico (UPR) cancer hospital. In her remarks, she acknowledged the driving force behind this development is the UPR and the MD Anderson Cancer Center partnership.

  3. Craig Reynolds, Ph.D., to Retire as NCI Associate Director for Frederick | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    On December 2, Craig Reynolds, Ph.D., director, Office of Scientific Operations, and NCI associate director for Frederick, will put the finishing touches on a 37-year career with the National Cancer Institute.

  4. NCI Requests Cancer Targets for Monoclonal Antibody Production and Characterization | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    In an effort to provide well-characterized monoclonal antibodies to the scientific community, NCI's Antibody Characterization Program requests cancer-related protein targets for affinity production and distribution. Submissions will be accepted through July 11, 2014.

  5. NCI Requests Targets for Monoclonal Antibody Production and Characterization | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    In an effort to provide well-characterized monoclonal antibodies to the scientific community, NCI's Antibody Characterization Program requests cancer-related protein targets for affinity production and distribution. Submissions will be accepted through July 9, 2012.

  6. Gardasil® and Cervarix® | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccine for human papilloma virus (HPV) to protect from cancers Key elements of the technology for Gardasil® and Cervarix originated from the HPV research of the laboratory of Drs. Douglas Lowy and John Schiller of the NCI.

  7. Ratio Based Biomarkers for the Prediction of Cancer Survival | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI seeks licensees or co-development partners for this technology, which describes compositions, methods and kits for identifying, characterizing biomolecules expressed in a sample that are associated with the presence, the development, or progression of cancer.

  8. How You Can Partner with NIH | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI Technology Transfer Center (TTC) provides an array of agreements to support the National Cancer Institute's partnering. Deciding which type of agreement to use can be a challenge: CRADA, MTA, collaboration, agreement, CTA, Materials-CRADA

  9. Jointly Sponsored Research Program Energy Related Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Western Research Institute

    2009-03-31

    Cooperative Agreement, DE-FC26-98FT40323, Jointly Sponsored Research (JSR) Program at Western Research Institute (WRI) began in 1998. Over the course of the Program, a total of seventy-seven tasks were proposed utilizing a total of $23,202,579 in USDOE funds. Against this funding, cosponsors committed $26,557,649 in private funds to produce a program valued at $49,760,228. The goal of the Jointly Sponsored Research Program was to develop or assist in the development of innovative technology solutions that will: (1) Increase the production of United States energy resources - coal, natural gas, oil, and renewable energy resources; (2) Enhance the competitiveness of United States energy technologies in international markets and assist in technology transfer; (3) Reduce the nation's dependence on foreign energy supplies and strengthen both the United States and regional economies; and (4) Minimize environmental impacts of energy production and utilization. Under the JSR Program, energy-related tasks emphasized enhanced oil recovery, heavy oil upgrading and characterization, coal beneficiation and upgrading, coal combustion systems development including oxy-combustion, emissions monitoring and abatement, coal gasification technologies including gas clean-up and conditioning, hydrogen and liquid fuels production, coal-bed methane recovery, and the development of technologies for the utilization of renewable energy resources. Environmental-related activities emphasized cleaning contaminated soils and waters, processing of oily wastes, mitigating acid mine drainage, and demonstrating uses for solid waste from clean coal technologies, and other advanced coal-based systems. Technology enhancement activities included resource characterization studies, development of improved methods, monitors and sensors. In general the goals of the tasks proposed were to enhance competitiveness of U.S. technology, increase production of domestic resources, and reduce environmental

  10. Coping with change: a challenge for sponsors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, T P; McGowan, K

    1987-04-01

    In the past 25 years a trend away from lifetime commitment in religious institutes, a rising number of retired religious,, and the Second Vatican Council's call for greater lay involvement in all aspects of ministry have led to many changes in Catholic-sponsored health care facilities. The development process of religious institutes parallels that of individuals as they mature from infancy to late adulthood. After Vatican II, religious institutes underwent an "intimacy versus isolation" stage similar to that experienced by people in their twenties, in which interpersonal relationships became more important. Now institutes are in a stage of "ego integrity versus despair," where they must consider changes--closing facilities, mergers, affiliations,, or divestiture of sponsorship--and how they can keep their mission alive afterward. Religious leaders must be energetic in creating programs that allow laypersons who share the institute's mission, charism, and philosophy to carry out its ministry. But in the midst of these changes, religious members also will experience grief at the loss of their sponsorship or control over their facility. They pass through the same stages people experience after the death of a loved one: denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and acceptance. Only by confronting and accepting their grief can institute members go on to either new ministries or reaffirmed commitment to their current work.

  11. MO-E-BRF-01: Research Opportunities in Technology for Innovation in Radiation Oncology (Highlight of ASTRO NCI 2013 Workshop)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, S; Jaffray, D; Chetty, I; Benedict, S

    2014-01-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the most effective treatments for solid tumors, in large part due to significant technological advances associated with, for instance, the ability to target tumors to very high levels of accuracy (within millimeters). Technological advances have played a central role in the success of radiation therapy as an oncologic treatment option for patients. ASTRO, AAPM and NCI sponsored a workshop “Technology for Innovation in Radiation Oncology” at the NCI campus in Bethesda, MD on June 13–14, 2013. The purpose of this workshop was to bring together expert clinicians and scientists to discuss the role of disruptive technologies in radiation oncology, in particular with regard to how they are being developed and translated to clinical practice in the face of current and future challenges and opportunities. The technologies discussed encompassed imaging and delivery aspects, along with methods to enable/facilitate application of them in the clinic. Measures for assessment of the performance of these technologies, such as techniques to validate quantitative imaging, were reviewed. Novel delivery technologies, incorporating efficient and safe delivery mechanisms enabled by development of tools for process automation and the associated field of oncology informatics formed one of the central themes of the workshop. The discussion on disruptive technologies was grounded in the need for evidence of efficacy. Scientists in the areas of technology assessment and bioinformatics provided expert views on different approaches toward evaluation of technology efficacy. Clinicians well versed in clinical trials incorporating disruptive technologies (e.g. SBRT for early stage lung cancer) discussed the important role of these technologies in significantly improving local tumor control and survival for these cohorts of patients. Recommendations summary focused on the opportunities associated with translating the technologies into the clinic and assessing their

  12. MO-E-BRF-01: Research Opportunities in Technology for Innovation in Radiation Oncology (Highlight of ASTRO NCI 2013 Workshop)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, S [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Jaffray, D [Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Chetty, I [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States); Benedict, S [UC Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Radiotherapy is one of the most effective treatments for solid tumors, in large part due to significant technological advances associated with, for instance, the ability to target tumors to very high levels of accuracy (within millimeters). Technological advances have played a central role in the success of radiation therapy as an oncologic treatment option for patients. ASTRO, AAPM and NCI sponsored a workshop “Technology for Innovation in Radiation Oncology” at the NCI campus in Bethesda, MD on June 13–14, 2013. The purpose of this workshop was to bring together expert clinicians and scientists to discuss the role of disruptive technologies in radiation oncology, in particular with regard to how they are being developed and translated to clinical practice in the face of current and future challenges and opportunities. The technologies discussed encompassed imaging and delivery aspects, along with methods to enable/facilitate application of them in the clinic. Measures for assessment of the performance of these technologies, such as techniques to validate quantitative imaging, were reviewed. Novel delivery technologies, incorporating efficient and safe delivery mechanisms enabled by development of tools for process automation and the associated field of oncology informatics formed one of the central themes of the workshop. The discussion on disruptive technologies was grounded in the need for evidence of efficacy. Scientists in the areas of technology assessment and bioinformatics provided expert views on different approaches toward evaluation of technology efficacy. Clinicians well versed in clinical trials incorporating disruptive technologies (e.g. SBRT for early stage lung cancer) discussed the important role of these technologies in significantly improving local tumor control and survival for these cohorts of patients. Recommendations summary focused on the opportunities associated with translating the technologies into the clinic and assessing their

  13. Team sponsors in community-based health leadership programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Tracy Enright; Dinkin, Donna R; Champion, Heather

    2017-05-02

    Purpose The purpose of this article is to share the lessons learned about the role of team sponsors in action-learning teams as part of community-based health leadership development programs. Design/methodology/approach This case study uses program survey results from fellow participants, action learning coaches and team sponsors to understand the value of sponsors to the teams, the roles they most often filled and the challenges they faced as team sponsors. Findings The extent to which the sponsors were perceived as having contributed to the work of the action learning teams varied greatly from team to team. Most sponsors agreed that they were well informed about their role. The roles sponsors most frequently played were to provide the teams with input and support, serve as a liaison to the community and serve as a sounding board, motivator and cheerleader. The most common challenges or barriers team sponsors faced in this role were keeping engaged in the process, adjusting to the role and feeling disconnected from the program. Practical implications This work provides insights for program developers and community foundations who are interested in building the capacity for health leadership by linking community sponsors with emerging leaders engaged in an action learning experience. Originality/value This work begins to fill a gap in the literature. The role of team sponsors has been studied for single organization work teams but there is a void of understanding about the role of sponsors with multi-organizational teams working to improve health while also learning about leadership.

  14. 42 CFR 423.401 - General requirements for PDP sponsors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... sponsor is organized and licensed under State law as a risk bearing entity eligible to offer health insurance or health benefits coverage in each State in which it offers a prescription drug plan. If not... with State Law and Preemption by Federal Law § 423.401 General requirements for PDP sponsors. (a...

  15. Blauwe ogen schieten tekort. Lessen voor sponsoring van landschap

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overbeek, M.M.M.; Graaff, de R.P.M.

    2010-01-01

    Literatuuronderzoek en gesprekken met (ervarings)deskundigen en vertegenwoordigers van bedrijven in Amstelland en in Het Groene Woud over het proces en de voorwaarden van bedrijven om sponsoring van landschap te realiseren. Sponsoring gebeurt meestal in het kader van mvo, waarbij bedrijven de

  16. 45 CFR 1226.13 - Obligations of sponsors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Obligations of sponsors. 1226.13 Section 1226.13 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE PROHIBITIONS ON ELECTORAL AND LOBBYING ACTIVITIES Sponsor Employee Activities § 1226.13...

  17. Sponsors of Nebraska Indochinese Refugees: Meeting the Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, William H.; Cramer, Sheran L.

    This report summarizes the response of 80 sponsors of Indochinese refugees in Nebraska to a survey designed to explore their sponsorship experience. Problem solving areas for sponsors and refugees are named as: acculturation, emotional adjustments, communication, health, housing, transportation, employment, and legal, financial and consumer…

  18. Pharmacologically directed strategies in academic anticancer drug discovery based on the European NCI compounds initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, Hans R; Govaerts, Anne-Sophie; Fichtner, Iduna; Burtles, Sally; Westwell, Andrew D; Peters, Godefridus J

    2017-07-11

    The European NCI compounds programme, a joint initiative of the EORTC Research Branch, Cancer Research Campaign and the US National Cancer Institute, was initiated in 1993. The objective was to help the NCI in reducing the backlog of in vivo testing of potential anticancer compounds, synthesised in Europe that emerged from the NCI in vitro 60-cell screen. Over a period of more than twenty years the EORTC-Cancer Research Campaign panel reviewed ∼2000 compounds of which 95 were selected for further evaluation. Selected compounds were stepwise developed with clear go/no go decision points using a pharmacologically directed programme. This approach eliminated quickly compounds with unsuitable pharmacological properties. A few compounds went into Phase I clinical evaluation. The lessons learned and many of the principles outlined in the paper can easily be applied to current and future drug discovery and development programmes. Changes in the review panel, restrictions regarding numbers and types of compounds tested in the NCI in vitro screen and the appearance of targeted agents led to the discontinuation of the European NCI programme in 2017 and its transformation into an academic platform of excellence for anticancer drug discovery and development within the EORTC-PAMM group. This group remains open for advice and collaboration with interested parties in the field of cancer pharmacology.

  19. The NCI High Performance Computing (HPC) and High Performance Data (HPD) Platform to Support the Analysis of Petascale Environmental Data Collections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, B. J. K.; Pugh, T.; Wyborn, L. A.; Porter, D.; Allen, C.; Smillie, J.; Antony, J.; Trenham, C.; Evans, B. J.; Beckett, D.; Erwin, T.; King, E.; Hodge, J.; Woodcock, R.; Fraser, R.; Lescinsky, D. T.

    2014-12-01

    The National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) has co-located a priority set of national data assets within a HPC research platform. This powerful in-situ computational platform has been created to help serve and analyse the massive amounts of data across the spectrum of environmental collections - in particular the climate, observational data and geoscientific domains. This paper examines the infrastructure, innovation and opportunity for this significant research platform. NCI currently manages nationally significant data collections (10+ PB) categorised as 1) earth system sciences, climate and weather model data assets and products, 2) earth and marine observations and products, 3) geosciences, 4) terrestrial ecosystem, 5) water management and hydrology, and 6) astronomy, social science and biosciences. The data is largely sourced from the NCI partners (who include the custodians of many of the national scientific records), major research communities, and collaborating overseas organisations. By co-locating these large valuable data assets, new opportunities have arisen by harmonising the data collections, making a powerful transdisciplinary research platformThe data is accessible within an integrated HPC-HPD environment - a 1.2 PFlop supercomputer (Raijin), a HPC class 3000 core OpenStack cloud system and several highly connected large scale and high-bandwidth Lustre filesystems. New scientific software, cloud-scale techniques, server-side visualisation and data services have been harnessed and integrated into the platform, so that analysis is performed seamlessly across the traditional boundaries of the underlying data domains. Characterisation of the techniques along with performance profiling ensures scalability of each software component, all of which can either be enhanced or replaced through future improvements. A Development-to-Operations (DevOps) framework has also been implemented to manage the scale of the software complexity alone. This ensures that

  20. DISSENYAR EXPERIÈNCIES AMB VALOR TURÍSTIC: PAISATGES URBANS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesc Fusté

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aquest article tracta sobre les possibilitats que la creació d’experiències té en relació al desenvolupament empresarial i regional, gràcies a la tematització del sector turístic i la modificació intencional de l’entorn, tant cultural com natural. El paisatge caracteritza els espais en funció de la seva configuració territorial i també arquitectònica i urbana. Les estructures arquitectòniques, els esdeveniments i les activitats que impliquen la participació activa dels usuaris són la clau de l’èxit del disseny de les experiències amb un valor afegit, on les noves tecnologies ajuden a emfatitzar-ne l’impacte. Sigui com sigui, convertir els llocs en experiències tant pels residents com pels visitants.

  1. NIH and NCI grant-related changes during fiscal years 2014 and 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Rosemary S. L.

    2015-03-01

    The 2014 fiscal year (FY) continued to be a challenging one for all federal agencies despite the many Congressional strategies proposed to address the U.S. budget deficit. The Bipartisan Budget Act of 2013 passed by the House and Senate in December 2013 approved a two-year spending bill which cancelled the FY2014 and FY2015 required sequestration cuts (i.e., 4-5% National Institute of Health (NIH)/National Cancer Institute (NCI) budget reduction initiated on March 1, 2013), but extended the sequestration period through FY2023. This bill passage helped minimize any further budget reductions and resulted in a final FY2014 NIH budget of 29.9 billion and a NCI budget of 4.9 billion. Both NIH and NCI worked hard to maintain awarding the same number of NIH/NCI investigator-initiated R01 and exploratory R21 grants funded in FY2014 and similar to the level seen in FY2013 and previous years (see Tables 1 and 2). Since Congress only recently passed the 2015 spending bill in December 16, 2014, the final NIH and NCI budget appropriations for FY2015 remains unknown at this time and most likely will be similar to the FY2014 budget level. The NCI overall success and funding rates for unsolicited investigator-initiated R01 applications remained at 15%, while the success rate for exploratory R21 applications was 12% in FY2014 with similar rates seen in FY2013 (see Tables 1 and 2). The success rate for biomedical research applications in the Photodynamic Therapy and laser research field will be provided for the past few years. NIH provides numerous resources to help inform the extramural biomedical research community of new and current grant applicants about new grant policy changes and the grant submission and review processes.

  2. 77 FR 2734 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request: Solar Cell: A Mobile UV Manager for Smart Phones (NCI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Proposed Collection; Comment Request: Solar Cell: A Mobile UV Manager for Smart Phones (NCI) SUMMARY: In compliance with the... Manager for Smart Phones (NCI). Type of Information Collection Request: New. Need and Use of Information...

  3. The relationship between absenteeism and employer-sponsored ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Establishing on- site employer-sponsored child-care facilities is an example of such ..... The sample size and characteristics of each of the groups are presented in Table 1. Table 1: ...... 'A qualitative and quantitative review of antecedents.

  4. 7 CFR 226.16 - Sponsoring organization provisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... comparison, reviewers must determine whether the meal counts were accurate. If there is a discrepancy between...) Program payments. The sponsoring organization must continue to pay any claims for reimbursement for...

  5. An industry-sponsored, school-focused model for continuing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An industry-sponsored, school-focused model for continuing professional ... HEIs and Departments of Education (DoE), could change the traditional concept that CPTD is the responsibility of DoEs into a new model where the business

  6. Reducing Friction: An Update on the NCIP Open Development Initiative - NCI BioMedical Informatics Blog

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCIP has migrated 132 repositories from the NCI subversion repository to our public NCIP GitHub channel with the goal of facilitating third party contributions to the existing code base. Within the GitHub environment, we are advocating use of the GitHub “fork and pull” model.

  7. NCI and the Chinese National Cancer Center pursue new collaborations in cancer research

    Science.gov (United States)

    CGH Director, Dr. Ted Trimble, and East Asia Program Director, Dr. Ann Chao, traveled to Beijing with Mr. Matthew Brown from the Department of Health and Human Services Office of Global Affairs to attend the Joint Meeting of the NCC and the U.S. NCI.

  8. 78 FR 53763 - Proposed Collection; 60-day Comment Request Cancer Trials Support Unit (CTSU) (NCI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-30

    ... proposed data collection projects, the National Cancer Institute (NCI), National Institutes of Health (NIH), will publish periodic summaries of proposed projects to be submitted to the Office of Management and... proposed collection of information, including the validity of the methodology and assumptions used; (3...

  9. Microsoft Office 365 Deployment Continues through June at NCI at Frederick | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    The latest Microsoft suite, Office 365 (O365), is being deployed to all NCI at Frederick computers during the months of May and June to comply with federal mandates. The suite includes the latest versions of Word, Excel, Outlook, PowerPoint, and Skype for Business, along with cloud-based capabilities. These cloud-based capabilities will help meet the federal mandates that

  10. Puerto Rico NCI Community Oncology Research Program Minority/Underserved | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Puerto Rico NCI Community Oncology Research Program (PRNCORP) will be the principal organization in the island that promotes cancer prevention, control and screening/post-treatment surveillance clinical trials. It will conduct cancer care delivery research and will provide access to treatment and imaging clinical trials conducted under the reorganization of the National

  11. 75 FR 61763 - Submission of OMB Review; Comment Request; Drug Accountability Record (Form NIH 2564) (NCI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-06

    ...; Comment Request; Drug Accountability Record (Form NIH 2564) (NCI) SUMMARY: In compliance with the..., 2011, unless it displays a valid OMB control number. Proposed Collection: Title: Drug Accountability... accountability. In order to fulfill these requirements, a standard Investigational Drug Accountability Report...

  12. 75 FR 46945 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; the Drug Accountability Record (Form NIH 2564) (NCI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-04

    ... Request; the Drug Accountability Record (Form NIH 2564) (NCI) SUMMARY: In compliance with the requirement... Management and Budget (OMB) for review and approval. Proposed Collection Title: The Drug Accountability... agent accountability. In order to fulfill these requirements, a standard Investigational Drug...

  13. 76 FR 14034 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; NCI Cancer Genetics Services Directory Web-Based...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Proposed Collection; Comment Request; NCI Cancer Genetics Services Directory Web-Based Application Form and Update Mailer Summary: In... Cancer Genetics Services Directory Web-based Application Form and Update Mailer. [[Page 14035

  14. Paracytosis of Haemophilus influenzae through cell layers of NCI-H292 lung epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schilfgaarde, M.; van Alphen, L.; Eijk, P.; Everts, V.; Dankert, J.

    1995-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae penetrates the respiratory epithelium during carriage and invasive disease, including respiratory tract infections. We developed an in vitro model system consisting of lung epithelial NCI-H292 cells on permeable supports to study the passage of H. influenzae through lung

  15. NCI Statement on the U.S. Surgeon General's "Call to Action to Prevent Skin Cancer"

    Science.gov (United States)

    As the Federal Government's principal agency for cancer research and training, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) endorses the U.S. Surgeon General’s “Call to Action to Prevent Skin Cancer,” which provides a comprehensive evaluation of the current state of skin cancer prevention efforts in the United States and recommends actions for improvement in the future.

  16. Corporate sponsored education initiatives on board the ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, Ian T.; Durham, Alyson S.; Pawelczyk, James A.; Brod, Lawrence B.; Durham, Thomas F.

    1999-01-01

    This paper proposes the creation of a corporate sponsored ``Lecture from Space'' program on board the International Space Station (ISS) with funding coming from a host of new technology and marketing spin-offs. This program would meld existing education initiatives in NASA with new corporate marketing techniques. Astronauts in residence on board the ISS would conduct short ten to fifteen minute live presentations and/or conduct interactive discussions carried out by a teacher in the classroom. This concept is similar to a program already carried out during the Neurolab mission on Shuttle flight STS-90. Building on that concept, the interactive simulcasts would be broadcast over the Internet and linked directly to computers and televisions in classrooms worldwide. In addition to the live broadcasts, educational programs and demonstrations can be recorded in space, and marketed and sold for inclusion in television programs, computer software, and other forms of media. Programs can be distributed directly into classrooms as an additional presentation supplement, as well as over the Internet or through cable and broadcast television, similar to the Canadian Discovery Channel's broadcasts of the Neurolab mission. Successful marketing and advertisement can eventually lead to the creation of an entirely new, privately run cottage industry involving the distribution and sale of educationally related material associated with the ISS that would have the potential to become truly global in scope. By targeting areas of expertise and research interest in microgravity, a large curriculum could be developed using space exploration as a unifying theme. Expansion of this concept could enhance objectives already initiated through the International Space University to include elementary and secondary school students. The ultimate goal would be to stimulate interest in space and space related sciences in today's youth through creative educational marketing initiatives while at the

  17. CellMiner: a relational database and query tool for the NCI-60 cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinhold William C

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Advances in the high-throughput omic technologies have made it possible to profile cells in a large number of ways at the DNA, RNA, protein, chromosomal, functional, and pharmacological levels. A persistent problem is that some classes of molecular data are labeled with gene identifiers, others with transcript or protein identifiers, and still others with chromosomal locations. What has lagged behind is the ability to integrate the resulting data to uncover complex relationships and patterns. Those issues are reflected in full form by molecular profile data on the panel of 60 diverse human cancer cell lines (the NCI-60 used since 1990 by the U.S. National Cancer Institute to screen compounds for anticancer activity. To our knowledge, CellMiner is the first online database resource for integration of the diverse molecular types of NCI-60 and related meta data. Description CellMiner enables scientists to perform advanced querying of molecular information on NCI-60 (and additional types through a single web interface. CellMiner is a freely available tool that organizes and stores raw and normalized data that represent multiple types of molecular characterizations at the DNA, RNA, protein, and pharmacological levels. Annotations for each project, along with associated metadata on the samples and datasets, are stored in a MySQL database and linked to the molecular profile data. Data can be queried and downloaded along with comprehensive information on experimental and analytic methods for each data set. A Data Intersection tool allows selection of a list of genes (proteins in common between two or more data sets and outputs the data for those genes (proteins in the respective sets. In addition to its role as an integrative resource for the NCI-60, the CellMiner package also serves as a shell for incorporation of molecular profile data on other cell or tissue sample types. Conclusion CellMiner is a relational database tool for

  18. [Criminal implication of sponsoring in medicine: legal ramifactions and recommendations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahnken, A H; Theilmann, M; Bolenz, M; Günther, R W

    2005-08-01

    As a consequence of the so-called "Heart-Valve-Affair" in 1994, the German public became aware of the potential criminal significance of industrial sponsoring and third-party financial support in medicine. Since 1997, when the German Anti-Corruption Law came into effect, the penal regulations regarding bribery and benefits for public officers were tightened. Due to the lack of explicit and generally accepted guidelines in combination with regional differences of jurisdiction, there is a lingering uncertainty regarding the criminal aspects of third-party funding and industrial sponsoring. The aim of this review is to summarize the penal and professional implications of third-party funding and sponsoring in medicine including recent aspects of jurisdiction. The currently available recommendations on this issue are introduced.

  19. Criminal implication of sponsoring in medicine: legal ramifactions and recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahnken, A.H.; Guenther, R.W.; Theilmann, M.; Bolenz, M.

    2005-01-01

    As a consequence of the so-called ''Heart-Valve-Affair'' in 1994, the German public became aware of the potential criminal significance of industrial sponsoring and third-party financial support in medicine. Since 1997, when the German Anti-Corruption Law came into effect, the penal regulations regarding bribery and benefits for public officers were tightened. Due to the lack of explicit and generally accepted guidelines in combination with regional differences of jurisdiction, there is a lingering uncertainty regarding the criminal aspects of third-party funding and industrial sponsoring. The aim of this review is to summarize the penal and professional implications of third-party funding and sponsoring in medicine including recent aspects of jurisdiction. The currently available recommendations on this issue are introduced. (orig.)

  20. Sponsorship investments: do they deliver brand awareness for all sponsors?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mpolokeng Sephapo Catherine

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Sponsorship as a marketing communications tool is well adopted in South Africa across various areas such as sports and entertainment. Although world markets have experienced economic turmoil in the last few years, the sponsorship market may be considered to be thriving as companies use this marketing communication tool as a vehicle to create and maintain relationships. The purpose of this study was to explore which sponsors of the South African National Rugby team are sports consumers aware of as a result of the sponsorship. Literature states that awareness also influences the judgments about brands in the consideration set, even without any brand associations in the consumer’s mind. In low involvement decision; where consumers do not need to search extensively for information in order to make a decision; minimal brand awareness levels may be enough to convince the consumer to make their final choice. The study is exploratory in nature however provides a South African perspective on how effective the sponsorship of the Springbok is with regards to creating awareness of the sponsors among sports consumers. The study made use of a qualitative approach whereby primary data was collected by means of focus groups and naïve sketches. Data collected was analyzed by means of content analysis. The findings suggest that participants were predominantly aware of the key sponsors of the Springboks; these were sponsors who had their branding on the Springbok jersey worn during rugby matches. The factors that participants mentioned to contribute to their awareness of the sponsors were the branding on the Springbok playing jersey as well as television adverts along with other promotional tools. This study urges sponsors to not only rely on the sponsorship initiative to create awareness but rather leverage the sponsorship with tools that are relevant to their target audience. This study contributes to sponsorship literature relating to the effectiveness of

  1. Analysis of 125I-[Tyr3] octreotide receptors of NCI-H466 cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Junjie; Fan Wo; Xu Yujie; Zhang Youjiu; Zhu Ran

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the affinity of small cell lung carcinoma to [Tyr 3 ] octreotide (TOC). Methods: Taking 125 I-[Tyr 3 ] octreotide (labeled by chloramine-T method), as the ligand, small cell lung carcinoma NCI-H466 cell line was inspected for the receptor-binding points and affinity constant. Results: The radio-chemical purity of 125 I-TOC purified through sephadex G-10 was higher than 95%. Receptor analysis study showed that the expression of somatostatin receptors on NCI-H446 cells was numerous (Bmax = 1.17 x 10 5 /cell) with strong affinity to 125 I-TOC (Kd = 0.56 nM). Conclusion: Labeled TOC could be used for small cell lung carcinoma receptor imaging and radio-pharmaceutical therapy

  2. 77 FR 4334 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Solar Cell: A Mobile UV Manager for Smart Phones (NCI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-27

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Solar Cell: A Mobile UV Manager for Smart Phones (NCI) SUMMARY: In compliance with the... Manager for Smart Phones [[Page 4335

  3. It’s Easy to Recycle at NCI at Frederick | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    From 2013 through the first quarter of 2018, NCI at Frederick has recycled over 1,667 tons of material, while incinerating or landfilling over 4,273 tons of trash. This earns us a recycling rate close to 28 percent, which is below the national average of 32 percent, according to the Environmental Protection Agency, and well below our goal of 50 percent. (These numbers only

  4. A Gene-Based Prognostic for Hepatocellular Carcinoma Patient Response to Adjuvant Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The gold standard of care for hepatocellular carcinoma patients with intermediate- to locally advanced tumors is transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE), a procedure whereby the tumor is targeted both with local chemotherapy and restriction of local blood supply. NCI scientists have identified a 14-gene signature predictive of response to TACE, and NCI seeks licensees or co-development partners to develop the technology toward commercialization.

  5. Best Performers Announced for the NCI-CPTAC DREAM Proteogenomics Computational Challenge | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) is pleased to announce that teams led by Jaewoo Kang (Korea University), and Yuanfang Guan with Hongyang Li (University of Michigan) as the best performers of the NCI-CPTAC DREAM Proteogenomics Computational Challenge. Over 500 participants from 20 countries registered for the Challenge, which offered $25,000 in cash awards contributed by the NVIDIA Foundation through its Compute the Cure initiative.

  6. Spatial patterns of FUS-immunoreactive neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions (NCI) in neuronal intermediate filament inclusion disease (NIFID).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Richard A; Gearing, Marla; Bigio, Eileen H; Cruz-Sanchez, Felix F; Duyckaerts, Charles; Mackenzie, Ian R A; Perry, Robert H; Skullerud, Kari; Yokoo, Hideaki; Cairns, Nigel J

    2011-11-01

    Neuronal intermediate filament inclusion disease (NIFID), a rare form of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), is characterized neuropathologically by focal atrophy of the frontal and temporal lobes, neuronal loss, gliosis, and neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions (NCI) containing epitopes of ubiquitin and neuronal intermediate filament (IF) proteins. Recently, the 'fused in sarcoma' (FUS) protein (encoded by the FUS gene) has been shown to be a component of the inclusions of NIFID. To further characterize FUS proteinopathy in NIFID, we studied the spatial patterns of the FUS-immunoreactive NCI in frontal and temporal cortex of 10 cases. In the cerebral cortex, sectors CA1/2 of the hippocampus, and the dentate gyrus (DG), the FUS-immunoreactive NCI were frequently clustered and the clusters were regularly distributed parallel to the tissue boundary. In a proportion of cortical gyri, cluster size of the NCI approximated to those of the columns of cells was associated with the cortico-cortical projections. There were no significant differences in the frequency of different types of spatial patterns with disease duration or disease stage. Clusters of NCI in the upper and lower cortex were significantly larger using FUS compared with phosphorylated, neurofilament heavy polypeptide (NEFH) or α-internexin (INA) immunohistochemistry (IHC). We concluded: (1) FUS-immunoreactive NCI exhibit similar spatial patterns to analogous inclusions in the tauopathies and synucleinopathies, (2) clusters of FUS-immunoreactive NCI are larger than those revealed by NEFH or ΙΝΑ, and (3) the spatial patterns of the FUS-immunoreactive NCI suggest the degeneration of the cortico-cortical projections in NIFID.

  7. The NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer: achievement and path forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptak, Krzysztof; Farrell, Dorothy; Panaro, Nicholas J; Grodzinski, Piotr; Barker, Anna D

    2010-01-01

    Nanotechnology is a 'disruptive technology', which can lead to a generation of new diagnostic and therapeutic products, resulting in dramatically improved cancer outcomes. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) of National Institutes of Health explores innovative approaches to multidisciplinary research allowing for a convergence of molecular biology, oncology, physics, chemistry, and engineering and leading to the development of clinically worthy technological approaches. These initiatives include programmatic efforts to enable nanotechnology as a driver of advances in clinical oncology and cancer research, known collectively as the NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer (ANC). Over the last 5 years, ANC has demonstrated that multidisciplinary approach catalyzes scientific developments and advances clinical translation in cancer nanotechnology. The research conducted by ANC members has improved diagnostic assays and imaging agents, leading to the development of point-of-care diagnostics, identification and validation of numerous biomarkers for novel diagnostic assays, and the development of multifunctional agents for imaging and therapy. Numerous nanotechnology-based technologies developed by ANC researchers are entering clinical trials. NCI has re-issued ANC program for next 5 years signaling that it continues to have high expectations for cancer nanotechnology's impact on clinical practice. The goals of the next phase will be to broaden access to cancer nanotechnology research through greater clinical translation and outreach to the patient and clinical communities and to support development of entirely new models of cancer care.

  8. 14 CFR 151.51 - Performance of construction work: Sponsor force account.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Performance of construction work: Sponsor... Development Projects § 151.51 Performance of construction work: Sponsor force account. (a) Before undertaking any force account construction work, the sponsor (or any public agency acting as agent for the sponsor...

  9. Exclusion of pregnant women from industry-sponsored clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Kristine E; Lyerly, Anne Drapkin

    2013-11-01

    The lack of human data available to inform evidence-based treatment for illness during pregnancy has led to calls for greater inclusion of pregnant women in research, but the extent of their current representation is poorly characterized. Our objective was to measure the current exclusion of pregnant women from industry-sponsored clinical trials as a baseline for future comparison. We compiled data from studies enrolling women of childbearing potential posted on www.ClinicalTrials.gov between 1 October 2011 and 31 January 2012. The review was limited to open United States-based phase IV interventional studies sponsored by the pharmaceutical industry evaluating treatment of conditions that may be experienced by but are not limited to pregnant women and did not involve a medication classified as potentially teratogenic. If there was no mention of pregnancy in the inclusion or exclusion criteria, we contacted a study representative to confirm that pregnant women could be enrolled. Of 558 qualifying industry-sponsored studies, five (1%) were designed specifically for pregnant women. Of 367 phase IV clinical trials with verified inclusion and exclusion criteria, 348 (95%) excluded pregnant women and 19 (5%) did not. We found the exclusion of pregnant women from industry-sponsored clinical trials to be common practice. Moving beyond reflexive exclusion and developing thoughtful criteria for inclusion of pregnant women in clinical research would likely advance the evidence base to inform treatment decisions during pregnancy and lead to better health outcomes for women and children.

  10. A Commentary on Literacy Narratives as Sponsors of Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    This brief commentary first clarifies Brandt's concept of sponsors of literacy in light of the way the concept has been taken up in writing studies. Then it treats Brandt's methods for handling accounts of literacy learning in comparison with other ways of analyzing biographical material. Finally it takes up Lawrence's argument about literacy…

  11. Highlight: IDRC sponsors Caribbean symposium on impact of ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    12 mai 2015 ... An IDRC-sponsored symposium exploring the impact of the Internet on economic ... Le symposium commandité par le CRDI, qui a eu lieu à Saint Andrew, ... Une nouvelle recherche fait état d'arguments convaincants pour ...

  12. Undergraduates with Employer-Sponsored Aid: Comparing Group Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulk, Dagney G.; Wang, Zhenlei

    2014-01-01

    Tuition assistance offered by employers is an understudied area of financial aid research. The purpose of this study is to compare the demographic, socioeconomic, academic and financial aid characteristics of college students who receive employer-sponsored financial aid with students who receive traditional financial aid (institutional, state, or…

  13. 14 CFR 152.309 - Availability of sponsor's records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS AIRPORT AID PROGRAM Accounting and Reporting Requirements § 152.309 Availability of... the purposes of accounting and audit. (b) The sponsor or planning agency shall allow appropriate FAA...-term retention value, the FAA may require transfer of custody of those records to the FAA. ...

  14. 76 FR 2807 - New Animal Drugs; Change of Sponsor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-18

    .... FDA-2010-N-0002] New Animal Drugs; Change of Sponsor AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending the animal drug regulations to...., Cambridge, MA 02141 has informed FDA that it has transferred ownership of, and all rights and interest in...

  15. 22 CFR 42.31 - Family-sponsored immigrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Family-sponsored immigrants. 42.31 Section 42.31 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE VISAS VISAS: DOCUMENTATION OF IMMIGRANTS UNDER THE IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY ACT, AS AMENDED Immigrants Subject to Numerical Limitations § 42.31 Family...

  16. Risk sharing between competing health plans and sponsors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.M. van Barneveld (Erik); W.P.M.M. van de Ven (Wynand); R.C.J.A. van Vliet (René)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractIn many countries, competing health plans receive capitation payments from a sponsor, whether government or a private employer. All capitation payment methods are far from perfect and have raised concerns about risk selection. Paying health plans partly on the basis

  17. 7 CFR 225.14 - Requirements for sponsor participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 225.14 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS SUMMER FOOD SERVICE PROGRAM Sponsor and Site Provisions... Youth Sports Program; and (5) Private nonprofit organizations as defined in § 225.2. (c) General...

  18. Recycling: Establishing a Citizen-Sponsored Reclamation Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keep America Beautiful, Inc., New York, NY.

    This booklet applies the Clean Community System (CCS) of Keep America Beautiful, Inc. to the development of citizen-sponsored recycling projects. Six initial steps in establishing a reclamation center are given and include information gathering, market analysis, legal requirements, and site location. Suggestions are included for recruiting staff…

  19. Consumer Perceptions of Sponsors of Disease Awareness Advertising

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Danika V.; Jones, Sandra C.; Iverson, Donald C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: In many countries there is emerging concern regarding alliances between the pharmaceutical industry and health non-profit organizations (NPOs), and the increase of co-sponsored marketing activities such as disease awareness advertising. The current study aims to explore Australian women's perceptions of disease awareness advertising with…

  20. School-Sponsored Health Insurance: Planning for a New Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Bryan A.

    2010-01-01

    Health care reform efforts in both the Clinton and Obama administrations have attempted to address college and university health. Yet, although the world of health care delivery has almost universally evolved to managed care, school health programs have not. In general, school-sponsored health plans do little to improve access and have adopted…

  1. 76 FR 48714 - New Animal Drugs; Change of Sponsor; Moxidectin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-09

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Parts 520, 522, and 524 [Docket No. FDA-2011-N-0003] New Animal Drugs; Change of Sponsor; Moxidectin AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending the animal...

  2. Media exposure and sponsor recall: Cricket World Cup 2003 | Van ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper reports on a study into the relationship between media exposure and sponsor recall relating to an international event, namely the Cricket World Cup 2003 (CWC 2003). The application of sponsorship as a communication construct and recall as a media vehicle effect is investigated. Recall has been widely ...

  3. Science Academies Refresher Course on Crustal Strength ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-05-26

    May 26, 2017 ... Sponsored by Indian Academy of Sciences, Bengaluru. Indian National Science ... Only 25 outstations and 10 Local ... a brief statement (between 250 and 500 words) as to why they think the Course will help to improve their.

  4. Cancer communication science funding trends, 2000-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, A Susana; Galica, Kasia; Blake, Kelly D; Chou, Wen-Ying Sylvia; Hesse, Bradford W

    2013-12-01

    Since 2000, the field of health communication has grown tremendously, owing largely to research funding by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). This study provides an overview of cancer communication science funding trends in the past decade. We conducted an analysis of communication-related grant applications submitted to the NCI in fiscal years 2000-2012. Using 103 keywords related to health communication, data were extracted from the Portfolio Management Application, a grants management application used at NCI. Automated coding described key grant characteristics such as mechanism and review study section. Manual coding determined funding across the cancer control continuum, by cancer site, and by cancer risk factors. A total of 3307 unique grant applications met initial inclusion criteria; 1013 of these were funded over the 12-year period. The top funded grant mechanisms were the R01, R21, and R03. Applications were largely investigator-initiated proposals as opposed to responses to particular funding opportunity announcements. Among funded communication research, the top risk factor being studied was tobacco, and across the cancer control continuum, cancer prevention was the most common stage investigated. NCI support of cancer communication research has been an important source of growth for health communication science over the last 12 years. The analysis' findings describe NCI's priorities in cancer communication science and suggest areas for future investments.

  5. Biopharmaceutical industry-sponsored global clinical trials in emerging countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarenga, Lenio Souza; Martins, Elisabeth Nogueira

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate biopharmaceutical industry-sponsored clinical trials placed in countries previously described as emerging regions for clinical research, and potential differences for those placed in Brazil. Data regarding recruitment of subjects for clinical trials were retrieved from www.clinicaltrials.gov on February 2nd 2009. Proportions of sites in each country were compared among emerging countries. Multiple logistic regressions were performed to evaluate whether trial placement in Brazil could be predicted by trial location in other countries and/or by trial features. A total of 8,501 trials were then active and 1,170 (13.8%) included sites in emerging countries (i.e., Argentina, Brazil, China, Czech Republic, Hungary, India, Mexico, Poland, Russia, South Korea, and South Africa). South Korea and China presented a significantly higher proportion of sites when compared to other countries (pattractiveness for biopharmaceutical industry-sponsored clinical trials.

  6. Unfulfilled translation opportunities in industry sponsored clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smed, Marie; Getz, Kenneth A.

    2013-01-01

    in the industry and site representatives are changing. The process of clinical trials has increased in complexity over the years, resulting in additional management layers. Besides an increase in internal management layers, sponsors often also outsource various tasks related to clinical trials to a CRO (Contract...... Research Organization) and thereby adding another link in the relationships between site and sponsor. These changes are intended to optimize the time-consuming and costly trial phases; however, there is a need to study whether valuable knowledge and experience is compromised in the process. Limited......' knowledge gained in clinical trials is utilized by the industry. Responses from 451 global investigative site representatives are included in the study. The analysis of the extensive dataset reveals that the current processes of collaboration between sites and the industry restrict the leverage of valuable...

  7. On a State-Sponsored Sport System in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jie; Zhiwei, Pan

    The gold medal success of China in recent Olympic Games can be traced to the advancement of the state-sponsored sport system (SSSS). While the program was developed initially through socialist ideals, it is more than a centralized government system to monopolize resources for glorified sport performance. Participation in competition is an inherent part of the human condition. Success in athletics is associated with national identity and has economic, social, and cultural implications. Because of this, it is essential that the SSSS adjust and improve to keep pace with other facets of China's quickly changing national reform. In association with emerging economic reform, some sports now receive equal or more funds from private investments compared to government allocation. The state-sponsored sport system must continue to adapt to maintain the Chinese tradition of excellence in competition.

  8. A New Typology for State-Sponsored International Terrorism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    tolerated the stacks of books with “ scary people” on the covers. xiv THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK 1 I. INTRODUCTION State sponsorship of...sponsors of terrorism list in August of 1993.133 The explanation of the State Department’s update to the list stated that despite warnings , “the... warning signs, Qaddafi directed his associates to attempt to re- establish communications with the U.S in 1992. At that point, however, the U.S. was not

  9. Searching for sponsors for four national rugby teams in Finland

    OpenAIRE

    Ylönen, Niina

    2017-01-01

    How to get more sponsors to four national rugby teams in Finland? Finnish Rugby Federation and its four national teams are in the need of new long lasting sponsorship deals to fund the national teams’ tournaments in Finland and abroad. Since rugby is quite unknown sports in Finland it faces challenges in getting new sponsorship deals and also its visibility is currently very low. The purpose of this thesis is to analyse the current situation of rugby, sponsorship contracts Finnish rugby F...

  10. Safety research programs sponsored by Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, A.J.; Azarm, A.; Baum, J.W.

    1989-07-01

    This progress report describes current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the Division of Regulatory Applications, Division of Engineering, Division of Safety Issue Resolution, and Division of Systems Research of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research following the reorganization in July 1988. The previous reports have covered the period October 1, 1976 through September 30, 1988

  11. PubSCIENCE

    CERN Document Server

    United States. Department of Energy. Office of Scientific and Technical Information

    PubSCIENCE, a component of EnergyFiles, indexes 1,000 scientific and technical journals. It contains over one million multi-source journal citations dating back over 25 years from DOE's Energy Science and Technology Database. The focus of PubSCIENCE is on those journals where DOE researchers report their scientific discoveries. Frequency of contributions by DOE-sponsored researchers to scientific journals has been analyzed to prioritize data collection efforts. OSTI partners with participating publishers to provide information that is both relevant and useful to the DOE scientific community as well as information that was developed as the result of government sponsored R&D.

  12. Redactions in protocols for drug trials: what industry sponsors concealed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquardsen, Mikkel; Ogden, Michelle; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2018-04-01

    Objective To describe the redactions in contemporary protocols for industry-sponsored randomised drug trials with patient relevant outcomes and to evaluate whether there was a legitimate rationale for the redactions. Design Cohort study. Under the Freedom of Information Act, we requested access to trial protocols approved by a research ethics committee in Denmark from October 2012 to March 2013. We received 17 consecutive protocols, which had been redacted before we got them, and nine protocols without redactions. In five additional cases, the companies refused to let the committees give us access, and in three other cases, documents were missing. Participants Not applicable. Setting Not applicable. Main outcome measure Amount and nature of redactions in 22 predefined key protocol variables. Results The redactions were most widespread in those sections of the protocol where there is empirical evidence of substantial problems with the trustworthiness of published drug trials: data analysis, handling of missing data, detection and analysis of adverse events, definition of the outcomes, interim analyses and premature termination of the study, sponsor's access to incoming data while the study is running, ownership to the data and investigators' publication rights. The parts of the text that were redacted differed widely, both between companies and within the same company. Conclusions We could not identify any legitimate rationale for the redactions. The current mistrust in industry-sponsored drug trials can only change if the industry offers unconditional access to its trial protocols and other relevant documents and data.

  13. The Science of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The science of cancer prevention is described by Dr. Barnett S. Kramer, M.D., M.P.H., director of the Division of Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Institute (NCI). The Division of Cancer Prevention administers a broad spectrum of research that spans basic pre-clinical, laboratory research, supportive and palliative care research, early detection, and randomized controlled clinical trials. The Division also supports the Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program and is devoted to the balanced communication of scientific results.

  14. Curcumin Inhibits Growth of Human NCI-H292 Lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cells by Increasing FOXA2 Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingling Tang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Lung squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC is a common histological lung cancer subtype, but unlike lung adenocarcinoma, limited therapeutic options are available for treatment. Curcumin, a natural compound, may have anticancer effects in various cancer cells, but how it may be used to treat LSCC has not been well studied. Here, we applied curcumin to a human NCI-H292 LSCC cell line to test anticancer effects and explored underlying potential mechanisms of action. Curcumin treatment inhibited NCI-H292 cell growth and increased FOXA2 expression in a time-dependent manner. FOXA2 expression was decreased in LSCC tissues compared with adjacent normal tissues and knockdown of FOXA2 increased NCI-H292 cells proliferation. Inhibition of cell proliferation by curcumin was attenuated by FOXA2 knockdown. Moreover inhibition of STAT3 pathways by curcumin increased FOXA2 expression in NCI-H292 cells whereas a STAT3 activator (IL-6 significantly inhibited curcumin-induced FOXA2 expression. Also, SOCS1 and SOCS3, negative regulators of STAT3 activity, were upregulated by curcumin treatment. Thus, curcumin inhibited human NCI-H292 cells growth by increasing FOXA2 expression via regulation of STAT3 signaling pathways.

  15. Quantification of Biodegradation: Applied Example on Oil Seeps in Armàncies Fm, Southeastern Pyrenees

    OpenAIRE

    Permanyer, Albert; Caja, Miguel Ángel

    2005-01-01

    La presencia de petróleo expulsado directamente de la roca madre de la Formación Armàncies, constituye un caso único para el estudio de los procesos de biodegradación aeróbica en petróleo. El estado de degradación bacteriana es moderado y está principalmente limitado a la alteración de n-alcanos, isoprenoides y algunos aromáticos. La cuantificación ha sido realizada mediante el contenido en sulfuro y con los marcadores moleculares de la fracción aromática. Los resultados obtenidos...

  16. Test de visualitat: les preferències del bon disseny

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quim Merino

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Aquest article pretén donar notícia de la investigació dirigida pel Grup de Recerca en Publicitat i Relacions Públiques (en endavant, GRP de la Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona duta a terme pels autors d'aquesta ressenya. El treball s'emmarca en una activitat de l'assignatura de Disseny en Publicitat i Relacions Públiques del Grau en Publicitat i Relacions Públiques de la UAB. L'objectiu del treball és constatar les preferències del consumidor davant diferents estímuls formals del disseny gràfic en publicitat

  17. Malalties de transmissió sexual a urgències pediàtriques

    OpenAIRE

    Díaz Sabogal, Diana; Curcoy Barcenilla, Ana Isabel; Trenchs Sainz de la Maza, Victoria; Giménez Roca, Clara; Luaces Cubells, Carles

    2014-01-01

    Determinar les característiques dels pacients diag- nosticats de malalties de transmissió sexual (MTS) a urgèn- cies i establir la freqüència en què són degudes a abús sexual. Mètode. Estudi retrospectiu fet entre el gener del 2007 i el desembre del 2011. S'inclouen els pacients menors de 18 anys diagnosticats a urgències d'MTS -infecció per Neisse- ria gonorrhoeae, Chlamydia trachomatis, Treponema palli- dum, , virus d'immunodeficiència humana (VIH), virus del pa- pil loma humà (VPH) i virus...

  18. Anàlisi forense d'evidències digitals

    OpenAIRE

    Bonachera López, Esteban

    2014-01-01

    L'objectiu principal d'aquest projecte consisteix en la realització de l'anàlisi forense del disc dur i de la memòria RAM d'un ordinador personal, en concret un Netbook, vinculat a una possible conducta delictiva. També s'inclou en l'anàlisi una base de dades del conegut programari WhatsApp extreta d'un smartphone. Per realitzar aquesta tasca s'utilitzaran eines específiques per localitzar les evidències digitals que puguin demostrar els presumptes delictes. El objetivo principal de este p...

  19. science

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    David Spurgeon

    Give us the tools: science and technology for development. Ottawa, ...... altered technical rela- tionships among the factors used in the process of production, and the en- .... to ourselves only the rights of audit and periodic substantive review." If a ...... and destroying scarce water reserves, recreational areas and a generally.

  20. Phenethyl Isothiocyanate Induces Apoptotic Cell Death Through the Mitochondria-dependent Pathway in Gefitinib-resistant NCI-H460 Human Lung Cancer Cells In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsia, Te-Chun; Huang, Yi-Ping; Jiang, Yi-Wen; Chen, Hsin-Yu; Cheng, Zheng-Yu; Hsiao, Yung-Ting; Chen, Cheng-Yen; Peng, Shu-Fen; Chueh, Fu-Shin; Chou, Yu-Cheng; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2018-04-01

    Some lung cancer patients treated with gefitinib develop resistance to this drug resulting in unsatisfactory treatment outcomes. Phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), present in our common cruciferous vegetables, exhibits anticancer activities in many human cancer cell lines. Currently, there is no available information on the possible modification of gefitinib resistance of lung cancer in vitro by PEITC. Thus, the effects of PEITC on gefitinib resistant lung cancer NCI-H460 cells were investigated in vitro. The total cell viability, apoptotic cell death, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and Ca 2+ , levels of mitochondria membrane potential (ΔΨ m ) and caspase-3, -8 and -9 activities were measured by flow cytometry assay. PEITC induced chromatin condensation was examined by DAPI staining. PEITC-induced cell morphological changes, decreased total viable cell number and induced apoptotic cell death in NCI-H460 and NCI-H460/G cells. PEITC decreased ROS production in NCI-H460 cells, but increased production in NCI-H460/G cells. PEITC increased Ca 2+ production, decreased the levels of ΔΨ m and increased caspase-3, -8 and -9 activities in both NCI-H460 and NCI-H460/G cells. Western blotting was used to examine the effect of apoptotic cell death associated protein expression in NCI-H460 NCI-H460/G cells after exposure to PEITC. Results showed that PEITC increased expression of cleaved caspase-3, PARP, GADD153, Endo G and pro-apoptotic protein Bax in NCI-H460/G cells. Based on these results, we suggest that PEITC induces apoptotic cell death via the caspase- and mitochondria-dependent pathway in NCI-H460/G cells. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  1. Asthma: NIH-Sponsored Research and Clinical Trials | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Asthma Asthma: NIH-Sponsored Research and Clinical Trials Past Issues / Fall 2011 Table of Contents NIH-Sponsored Research Asthma in the Inner City: Recognizing that asthma severity ...

  2. "This program contains advertising": How the timing of sponsorship disclosure influences critical processing of sponsored content

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerman, S.; van Reijmersdal, E.; Neijens, P.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates whether the timing of sponsorship disclosure influences the processing of sponsored content. A model is proposed in which sponsorship disclosure activates persuasion knowledge, which leads to critical processing of the sponsored content, and ultimately negatively affects the

  3. Enhanced Missing Proteins Detection in NCI60 Cell Lines Using an Integrative Search Engine Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guruceaga, Elizabeth; Garin-Muga, Alba; Prieto, Gorka; Bejarano, Bartolomé; Marcilla, Miguel; Marín-Vicente, Consuelo; Perez-Riverol, Yasset; Casal, J Ignacio; Vizcaíno, Juan Antonio; Corrales, Fernando J; Segura, Victor

    2017-12-01

    The Human Proteome Project (HPP) aims deciphering the complete map of the human proteome. In the past few years, significant efforts of the HPP teams have been dedicated to the experimental detection of the missing proteins, which lack reliable mass spectrometry evidence of their existence. In this endeavor, an in depth analysis of shotgun experiments might represent a valuable resource to select a biological matrix in design validation experiments. In this work, we used all the proteomic experiments from the NCI60 cell lines and applied an integrative approach based on the results obtained from Comet, Mascot, OMSSA, and X!Tandem. This workflow benefits from the complementarity of these search engines to increase the proteome coverage. Five missing proteins C-HPP guidelines compliant were identified, although further validation is needed. Moreover, 165 missing proteins were detected with only one unique peptide, and their functional analysis supported their participation in cellular pathways as was also proposed in other studies. Finally, we performed a combined analysis of the gene expression levels and the proteomic identifications from the common cell lines between the NCI60 and the CCLE project to suggest alternatives for further validation of missing protein observations.

  4. NCI Workshop Report: Clinical and Computational Requirements for Correlating Imaging Phenotypes with Genomics Signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rivka Colen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The National Cancer Institute (NCI Cancer Imaging Program organized two related workshops on June 26–27, 2013, entitled “Correlating Imaging Phenotypes with Genomics Signatures Research” and “Scalable Computational Resources as Required for Imaging-Genomics Decision Support Systems.” The first workshop focused on clinical and scientific requirements, exploring our knowledge of phenotypic characteristics of cancer biological properties to determine whether the field is sufficiently advanced to correlate with imaging phenotypes that underpin genomics and clinical outcomes, and exploring new scientific methods to extract phenotypic features from medical images and relate them to genomics analyses. The second workshop focused on computational methods that explore informatics and computational requirements to extract phenotypic features from medical images and relate them to genomics analyses and improve the accessibility and speed of dissemination of existing NIH resources. These workshops linked clinical and scientific requirements of currently known phenotypic and genotypic cancer biology characteristics with imaging phenotypes that underpin genomics and clinical outcomes. The group generated a set of recommendations to NCI leadership and the research community that encourage and support development of the emerging radiogenomics research field to address short-and longer-term goals in cancer research.

  5. The Meaning of Sponsoring : A study on the motives behind sponsoring a sports team and the following effects on brand awareness.

    OpenAIRE

    Skovshoved, Fredrik; Roshandel, Salar

    2009-01-01

    Background: Sponsoring is a topic that has always been present but in different forms. Recently however, it has become even more popular and companies today invest small fortunes on becoming sponsors of different events, individuals and teams. However, there is still not much research done within this field, hence we find it interesting to investigate further. Purpose: The purpose of this thesis is to investigate, from a strategic marketing perspective, what a sponsoring organization wants to...

  6. Provider-sponsored HMOs: make, buy, or joint venture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay, S B

    1997-03-01

    Providers can sponsor their own HMOs in one of three ways: by creating their own HMO, by joint venturing with an existing HMO, or by purchasing an existing HMO. When selecting the best option, providers must consider various market conditions. Managed care penetration in the area, potential competitive responses of existing HMOs, market demand, provider reputation, and provider marketing ability will all influence the feasibility of each option. Providers also must examine their own organizational identity, their ability to raise the necessary capital to start an HMO, their managed care expertise and risk contracting experience, and their information systems capabilities.

  7. The Race for Sponsored Links: Bidding Patterns for Search Advertising

    OpenAIRE

    Zsolt Katona; Miklos Sarvary

    2010-01-01

    Paid placements on search engines reached sales of nearly $11 billion in the United States last year and represent the most rapidly growing form of online advertising today. In its classic form, a search engine sets up an auction for each search word in which competing websites bid for their sponsored links to be displayed next to the search results. We model this advertising market, focusing on two of its key characteristics: (1) the interaction between the list of search results and the lis...

  8. Annotated bibliography of GEND-sponsored TMI-2 reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-04-01

    In the continuing effort to distribute information about the TMI-2 cleanup and recovery effort, the GEND group has sponsored publication of 70 reports to date on various aspects of the Technical Information and Examination Program. Each report is indicated below by number, title, and date of publication, and followed by a brief description. For the formal reports, the National Technical Information Service price codes are indicated within parentheses following the date of publication (where available). The first code is for printed copy; the second is for microfiche

  9. Strategic management of government-sponsored R&D portfolios

    OpenAIRE

    Barry Bozeman; Juan Rogers

    2001-01-01

    Although strategic management of R&D portfolios is common practice in private sector R&D, government R&D management tends to be more discrete and ad hoc, focusing on generating maximum output from individual projects. Often, there is no clear notion of the desired public sector output. Whereas private sector R&D evaluation is generally straightforward, with the function of R&D being measured in terms of a company's internal return on investment, the benefits of public-sponsored R&D tend to be...

  10. THE NCI STUDIES ON RADIATION DOSES AND CANCER RISKS IN THE MARSHALL ISLANDS ASSOCIATED WITH EXPOSURE TO RADIOACTIVE FALLOUT

    OpenAIRE

    Simon, Steven L.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. National Cancer Institute (NCI, National Institutes of Health) was requested by the U.S. Congress in 2004 to assess the number of radiation-related illnesses to be expected among the people of the Marshall Islands from nuclear tests conducted there during 1946-1958. A thorough analysis conducted by the NCI concluded that 20 of the 66 nuclear devices tested in or near the Marshall Islands resulted in measurable fallout deposition on one or more of the inhabited atolls of the Marshall ...

  11. Coordinated Analysis 101: A Joint Training Session Sponsored by LPI and ARES/JSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, D. S.; Treiman, A. H.

    2017-01-01

    The Lunar and Planetary Institute (LPI) and the Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science (ARES) Division, part of the Exploration Integration and Science Directorate at NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC), co-sponsored a training session in November 2016 for four early-career scientists in the techniques of coordinated analysis. Coordinated analysis refers to the approach of systematically performing high-resolution and -precision analytical studies on astromaterials, particularly the very small particles typical of recent and near-future sample return missions such as Stardust, Hayabusa, Hayabusa2, and OSIRIS-REx. A series of successive analytical steps is chosen to be performed on the same particle, as opposed to separate subsections of a sample, in such a way that the initial steps do not compromise the results from later steps in the sequence. The data from the entire series can then be integrated for these individual specimens, revealing important in-sights obtainable no other way. ARES/JSC scientists have played a leading role in the development and application of this approach for many years. Because the coming years will bring new sample collections from these and other planned NASA and international exploration missions, it is timely to begin disseminating specialized techniques for the study of small and precious astromaterial samples. As part of the Cooperative Agreement between NASA and the LPI, this training workshop was intended as the first in a series of similar training exercises that the two organizations will jointly sponsor in the coming years. These workshops will span the range of analytical capabilities and sample types available at ARES/JSC in the Astromaterials Research and Astro-materials Acquisition and Curation Offices. Here we summarize the activities and participants in this initial training.

  12. Building Strong Bonds with Program Sponsors--Public Relations Ideas To Make It Happen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Karen

    2003-01-01

    Lists public relations strategies for child care center directors seeking to cultivate relationships with their program sponsors. Suggests ways to identify a public relations message, make the sponsor part of the child care family, become part of the sponsor's family, give public recognition, and share the children's accomplishments. (JPB)

  13. 21 CFR 316.22 - Permanent-resident agent for foreign sponsor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE ORPHAN DRUGS Designation of an Orphan Drug § 316.22 Permanent-resident agent for foreign sponsor. Every foreign sponsor that seeks orphan-drug designation shall name a permanent resident of the United States as the sponsor's agent upon whom service of all processes, notices...

  14. Medical malpractice reform and employer-sponsored health insurance premiums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrisey, Michael A; Kilgore, Meredith L; Nelson, Leonard Jack

    2008-12-01

    Tort reform may affect health insurance premiums both by reducing medical malpractice premiums and by reducing the extent of defensive medicine. The objective of this study is to estimate the effects of noneconomic damage caps on the premiums for employer-sponsored health insurance. Employer premium data and plan/establishment characteristics were obtained from the 1999 through 2004 Kaiser/HRET Employer Health Insurance Surveys. Damage caps were obtained and dated based on state annotated codes, statutes, and judicial decisions. Fixed effects regression models were run to estimate the effects of the size of inflation-adjusted damage caps on the weighted average single premiums. State tort reform laws were identified using Westlaw, LEXIS, and statutory compilations. Legislative repeal and amendment of statutes and court decisions resulting in the overturning or repealing state statutes were also identified using LEXIS. Using a variety of empirical specifications, there was no statistically significant evidence that noneconomic damage caps exerted any meaningful influence on the cost of employer-sponsored health insurance. The findings suggest that tort reforms have not translated into insurance savings.

  15. Effects of sponsorship disclosure timing on the processing of sponsored content: a study on the effectiveness of European disclosure regulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerman, S.C.; van Reijmersdal, E.A.; Neijens, P.C.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates whether the timing of sponsorship disclosure affects viewers’ processing of sponsored content, and whether a disclosure influences the persuasive effect of the sponsored content. A model is proposed in which sponsorship disclosure enhances the recognition of sponsored

  16. "Food company sponsors are kind, generous and cool": (Misconceptions of junior sports players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    King Lesley

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Children's exposure to unhealthy food marketing influences their food knowledge, preferences and consumption. Sport sponsorship by food companies is widespread and industry investment in this marketing is increasing. This study aimed to assess children's awareness of sport sponsors and their brand-related attitudes and purchasing intentions in response to this marketing. Methods Sports clubs known to have food sponsors and representing the most popular sports for Australian children across a range of demographic areas were recruited. Interview-based questionnaires were conducted at clubs with children aged 10-14 years (n = 103 to examine their recall of local sports club and elite sport sponsors, and their attitudes towards sponsors and sponsorship activities. Results Most children (68% could recall sponsors of their sports club, naming a median of two sponsors, including a median of one food company sponsor each. Almost half (47% of children could recall any sponsors of their favourite elite sporting team. Children aged 10-11 years were more likely than older children to report that they thought about sponsors when buying something to eat or drink (P Conclusions Children's high recall of food and beverage company sport sponsors and their positive attitudes towards these sponsors and their promotions is concerning as this is likely to be linked to children's food preferences and consumption. Limiting children's exposure to this marketing is an important initiative to improve children's nutrition.

  17. Plant collecting program in Southeast Asia under the sponsorship of the United States National Cancer Institute (NCI) (1986-1991)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soejarto, D.D.

    1992-01-01

    Under the funding from the United States National Cancer Institute (NCI)¹, a program was undertaken to collect plant samples in Southeast Asia to be tested for their cancer- and AIDS-arresting properties, for the period of September 1, 1986 through August 31, 1991. The program was implemented with

  18. NCI Helps Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia to Identify and Treat New Target in Pediatric Cancer | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    There may be a new, more effective method for treating high-risk neuroblastoma, according to scientists at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and collaborators in the Cancer and Inflammation Program at NCI at Frederick. Together, the groups published a study describing a previously unrecognized protein on neuroblastoma cells, called GPC2, as well as the creation of a

  19. Photoactivatable Lipid-based Nanoparticles as a Vehicle for Dual Agent Delivery | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) RNA Biology Laboratory have developed nanoparticles that can deliver an agent (i.e., therapeutic or imaging) and release the agent upon targeted photoactivation allowing for controlled temporal and localized release of the agent.

  20. Tendències de les publicacions informatives cientificomèdiques en l'era 2.0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González Pacanowski, Antonio

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available En els últims anys ha crescut l'audiència que consulta continguts de salut en publicacions i mitjans a Internet, especialment a Europa i als Estats Units. S'ha passat d'un usuari d'Internet unidireccional en la comunicació a un escenari en el qual la multidireccionalitat i la instantaneïtat són constants. Els nous mitjans i la creació de plataformes d'intercanvi d'informació més especialitzada mostren que els recursos multimèdia i la interactivitat també poden donar-se en mitjans especialitzats i distants del públic general com ara informació sobre biomedicina i salut. Simultàniament, el canvi cap a actituds més solidàries i d'ajuda mútua aflora mitjançant les xarxes socials. Amb l'objectiu de traçar un escenari sobre el comportament de les audiències davant els continguts de caràcter científic, especialment els de tipus sanitari, s'analitzen en aquest treball els perfils i costums dels usuaris utilitzant referències estadístiques tant europees com nord-americanes. De la mateixa manera, s'identifica el mapa actual de cibermitjans relacionats amb la informació cientificomèdica segmentada en mitjans de comunicació generals, especialitzats i els propis del web 2.0, com ara blogs i mitjans cocreatius. Aquesta descripció permet orientar sobre les tendències que seguiran els públics diferents i segmentats, però ara interconnectats per les noves tecnologies, i sobre la transformació de l'arquitectura i les funcionalitats dels mitjans a Internet.En los últimos años ha crecido la audiencia que consulta contenidos de salud en publicaciones y medios en Internet, especialmente en Europa y Estados Unidos. Se ha pasado de un usuario de Internet unidireccional en la comunicación a un escenario en el que la multidireccionalidad y la instantaneidad son constantes. Los nuevos medios y la creación de plataformas de intercambio de información más especializada evidencian que los recursos multimedia y la interactividad tambi

  1. ANIONIC POLYMERIZATION OF ALKYL METHACRYLATES INITIATED BY nBuCu(NCy2)Li

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bing-yong Han; Jian-guo Liang; Jian-min Lu; Feng An; Wan-tai Yang

    2009-01-01

    Anionic polymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA), n-butyl methacrylate (nBMA) and glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) initiated by nBuCu(NCy2)Li (1) in tetrahydrofuran (THF) at -50℃ to -10℃ was investigated. It was found that the polymerization of MMA and nBMA initiated by 1 proceeded quantitatively in THF to afford PMMA and PBMA with polydispersity index 1.15-1.30 and nearly 100% initiator efficiencies at -10℃. The molecular weights increased linearly with the ratio of [monomer]/[1]. However, a post-polymerization experiment carried out on this system revealed a double polymer peak by GPC when fresh monomer was added after an interval of 10 rain. Polymerization of styrene could be initiated by 1, but the initiator efficiency was low.

  2. Government-sponsored microfinance program: Joint liability vs. individual liability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arghya Kusum Mukherjee

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Swarnajayanti Gram Swarozgar Yojana (SGSY is a government-sponsored microfinance program. The scheme is based on four features: group lending with joint liability, progressive lending, back-ended subsidy, and social capital. We propose a new model of SGSY having these features: group lending with individual liability, progressive lending, back-ended subsidy, and social capital. “Joint liability” clause of the existing model is replaced with individual liability in the new model. The paper shows that problem of adverse selection is removed in both models, i.e. in “SGSY with group lending and joint liability” and “SGSY with group lending and individual liability.” The problem of “moral hazard” is more severe in the existing model of SGSY compared with the proposed model of SGSY. Borrowers are also benefitted from participation in the proposed scheme of SGSY than that in the existing model of SGSY.

  3. Summary of the ORNL-sponsored reactor radwaste management workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kibbey, A.H.

    1977-01-01

    On January 12 to 14, 1977, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) sponsored a Radwaste Management Workshop in New Orleans, Louisiana, the object of which was to obtain operating data on the uses of evaporation, ion exchange, filtration, and on solid radwaste practices at nuclear power plants. The collected data are being used to update three earlier generic reports done by ORNL on the status of evaporation, ion exchange, and solid radwaste practices at nuclear power plants and to prepare a new one on filtration. All segments of the nuclear power industry were invited to participate, and a total of 188 representatives came. There were four major Workshop groups: volume reduction, solidification, physical and chemical separations, and corrosion. The major findings of each group are reported

  4. Employer-sponsored health insurance and the gender wage gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Benjamin; Schwab, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    During prime working years, women have higher expected healthcare expenses than men. However, employees' insurance rates are not gender-rated in the employer-sponsored health insurance (ESI) market. Thus, women may experience lower wages in equilibrium from employers who offer health insurance to their employees. We show that female employees suffer a larger wage gap relative to men when they hold ESI: our results suggest this accounts for roughly 10% of the overall gender wage gap. For a full-time worker, this pay gap due to ESI is on the order of the expected difference in healthcare expenses between women and men. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Assessing the Financial Condition of Provider-Sponsored Health Plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCue, Michael J

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the performance of health plans sponsored by provider organizations, with respect to plans generating strong positive cash flow relative to plans generating weaker cash flow. A secondary aim was to assess their capital adequacy. The study identified 24 provider-sponsored health plans (PSHPs) with an average positive cash flow margin from 2011 through 2013 at or above the top 75th percentile, defined as "strong cash flow PSHPs:" This group was compared with 72 PSHPs below the 75th percentile, defined as "weak cash flow PSHPs:" Atlantic Information Services Directory of Health Plans was used to identify the PSHPs. Financial ratios were computed from 2013 National Association of Insurance Commissioners Financial Filings. The study conducted a t test mean comparison between strong and weak cash flow PSHPs across an array of financial performance and capital adequacy measures. In 2013, the strong cash flow PSHPs averaged a cash-flow margin ratio of 6.6%. Weak cash flow PSHPs averaged a cash-flow margin of -0.4%. The net worth capital position of both groups was more than 4.5 times authorized capital. The operational analysis shows that strong cash-flow margin PSHPs are managing their medical costs to achieve this position. Although their medical loss ratio increased by almost 300 basis points from 2011 to 2013, it was still statistically significantly lower than the weaker cash flow PSHP group (P<.001). In terms of capital adequacy, both strong and weak cash-flow margin PSHP groups possessed sufficient capital to ensure the viability of these plans.

  6. Pharmacokinetics and Safety of Bortezomib in Patients with Advanced Malignancies and Varying Degrees of Liver Dysfunction: Phase 1 NCI Organ Dysfunction Working Group Study NCI-6432

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoRusso, Patricia M; Venkatakrishnan, Karthik; Ramanathan, Ramesh K; Sarantopoulos, John; Mulkerin, Daniel; Shibata, Stephen I; Hamilton, Anne; Dowlati, Afshin; Mani, Sridhar; Rudek, Michelle A; Takimoto, Chris H; Neuwirth, Rachel; Esseltine, Dixie-Lee; Ivy, Percy

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The proteasome inhibitor bortezomib undergoes oxidative hepatic metabolism. This study (NCI-6432; NCT00091117) was conducted to evaluate bortezomib pharmacokinetics and safety in patients with varying degrees of hepatic impairment, to inform dosing recommendations in these special populations. Methods Patients received bortezomib on days 1, 4, 8, and 11 of 21-day cycles. Patients were assigned to four hepatic function groups based on the National Cancer Institute Organ Dysfunction Working Group classification. Those with normal function received bortezomib at the 1.3 mg/m2 standard dose. Patients with severe, moderate, and mild impairment received escalating doses from 0.5, 0.7, and 1.0 mg/m2, respectively, up to a 1.3 mg/m2 maximum. Serial blood samples were collected for 24 hours post-dose on days 1 and 8, cycle 1, for bortezomib plasma concentration measurements. Results Sixty-one patients were treated, including 14 with normal hepatic function and 17, 12, and 18 with mild, moderate, and severe impairment, respectively. Mild hepatic impairment did not alter dose-normalized bortezomib exposure (AUC0-tlast) or Cmax compared with patients with normal function. Mean dose-normalized AUC0-tlast was increased by approximately 60% on day 8 in patients with moderate or severe impairment. Conclusions Patients with mild hepatic impairment do not require a starting dose adjustment of bortezomib. Patients with moderate or severe hepatic impairment should be started at a reduced dose of 0.7 mg/m2. PMID:22394984

  7. Direct cortical hemodynamic mapping of somatotopy of pig nostril sensation by functional near-infrared cortical imaging (fNCI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uga, Minako; Saito, Toshiyuki; Sano, Toshifumi; Yokota, Hidenori; Oguro, Keiji; Rizki, Edmi Edison; Mizutani, Tsutomu; Katura, Takusige; Dan, Ippeita; Watanabe, Eiju

    2014-05-01

    Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is a neuroimaging technique for the noninvasive monitoring of human brain activation states utilizing the coupling between neural activity and regional cerebral hemodynamics. Illuminators and detectors, together constituting optodes, are placed on the scalp, but due to the presence of head tissues, an inter-optode distance of more than 2.5cm is necessary to detect cortical signals. Although direct cortical monitoring with fNIRS has been pursued, a high-resolution visualization of hemodynamic changes associated with sensory, motor and cognitive neural responses directly from the cortical surface has yet to be realized. To acquire robust information on the hemodynamics of the cortex, devoid of signal complications in transcranial measurement, we devised a functional near-infrared cortical imaging (fNCI) technique. Here we demonstrate the first direct functional measurement of temporal and spatial patterns of cortical hemodynamics using the fNCI technique. For fNCI, inter-optode distance was set at 5mm, and light leakage from illuminators was prevented by a special optode holder made of a light-shielding rubber sheet. fNCI successfully detected the somatotopy of pig nostril sensation, as assessed in comparison with concurrent and sequential somatosensory-evoked potential (SEP) measurements on the same stimulation sites. Accordingly, the fNCI system realized a direct cortical hemodynamic measurement with a spatial resolution comparable to that of SEP mapping on the rostral region of the pig brain. This study provides an important initial step toward realizing functional cortical hemodynamic monitoring during neurosurgery of human brains. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Investigation of internalization and cytotoxicity of 125I-[Tyr3]-octreotide in NCI-H446 cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Junjie; Fan Wo; Xu Yujie; Zhang Youjiu; Zhu Ran; Hu Mingjiang

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the [Tyr 3 ]-octreotide (TOC) internalizing capacity of NCI-H446 cell line, and the cytotoxicity of 125 I-TOC in NCI-H446 cell line. To assess the therapeutic radiopharmaceutical potentiality of 125 I-TOC for the somatostatin receptor (SSTR) positive tumor. Methods: NCI-H446 cells were incubated together with 125 I-TOC for different periods of time, the amount of internalized 125 I-TOC and the 125 I-TOC bound on the cellular nucleus were detected with γ counter, respectively. The viability of the cells was analyzed by a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay at different time points with various doses of 125 I-TOC, free 125 I and TOC. Results: 125 I-TOC was internalized into the nucleus and bound on the nucleus in a time-dependent manner. 125 I-TOC bound on the nucleus increased to the highest level at 24 h, the amount of nucleus bound 125 I-TOC at 24 h was 7 times higher than that at 0.5 h. Cytotoxicity of 125 I-TOC in SSTR positive NCI-H446 cells was also dose- and time-dependent. The supreme effect of cytotoxicity was found at 96 h with 74 kBq 125 I-TOC, the survival ratio of cells was reduced to (44.8 ± 7.2)%. Conclusions: 125 I-TOC can be internalized into SSTR positive cells mediated by SSTR. The NCI-H446 cells can be killed by Auger electron emitting from 125 I-TOC. Effect of cytotoxicity showed dose- and time-dependent

  9. NCI's national environmental research data collection: metadata management built on standards and preparing for the semantic web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingbo; Bastrakova, Irina; Evans, Ben; Gohar, Kashif; Santana, Fabiana; Wyborn, Lesley

    2015-04-01

    National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) manages national environmental research data collections (10+ PB) as part of its specialized high performance data node of the Research Data Storage Infrastructure (RDSI) program. We manage 40+ data collections using NCI's Data Management Plan (DMP), which is compatible with the ISO 19100 metadata standards. We utilize ISO standards to make sure our metadata is transferable and interoperable for sharing and harvesting. The DMP is used along with metadata from the data itself, to create a hierarchy of data collection, dataset and time series catalogues that is then exposed through GeoNetwork for standard discoverability. This hierarchy catalogues are linked using a parent-child relationship. The hierarchical infrastructure of our GeoNetwork catalogues system aims to address both discoverability and in-house administrative use-cases. At NCI, we are currently improving the metadata interoperability in our catalogue by linking with standardized community vocabulary services. These emerging vocabulary services are being established to help harmonise data from different national and international scientific communities. One such vocabulary service is currently being established by the Australian National Data Services (ANDS). Data citation is another important aspect of the NCI data infrastructure, which allows tracking of data usage and infrastructure investment, encourage data sharing, and increasing trust in research that is reliant on these data collections. We incorporate the standard vocabularies into the data citation metadata so that the data citation become machine readable and semantically friendly for web-search purpose as well. By standardizing our metadata structure across our entire data corpus, we are laying the foundation to enable the application of appropriate semantic mechanisms to enhance discovery and analysis of NCI's national environmental research data information. We expect that this will further

  10. "Food company sponsors are kind, generous and cool": (mis)conceptions of junior sports players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Bridget; Baur, Louise A; Bauman, Adrian E; King, Lesley; Chapman, Kathy; Smith, Ben J

    2011-09-05

    Children's exposure to unhealthy food marketing influences their food knowledge, preferences and consumption. Sport sponsorship by food companies is widespread and industry investment in this marketing is increasing. This study aimed to assess children's awareness of sport sponsors and their brand-related attitudes and purchasing intentions in response to this marketing. Sports clubs known to have food sponsors and representing the most popular sports for Australian children across a range of demographic areas were recruited. Interview-based questionnaires were conducted at clubs with children aged 10-14 years (n = 103) to examine their recall of local sports club and elite sport sponsors, and their attitudes towards sponsors and sponsorship activities. Most children (68%) could recall sponsors of their sports club, naming a median of two sponsors, including a median of one food company sponsor each. Almost half (47%) of children could recall any sponsors of their favourite elite sporting team. Children aged 10-11 years were more likely than older children to report that they thought about sponsors when buying something to eat or drink (P return the favour to sponsors by buying their products (P marketing is an important initiative to improve children's nutrition.

  11. Can the ministry collaborate to form the "next generation" of sponsors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Teresa

    2007-01-01

    In looking to the future of sponsored ministry of Catholic institutions, the formation of future sponsors--both religious and lay alike--is an important issue. As this ministry continues to evolve, and sponsoring groups determine how best to prepare new sponsors, might it not be time to think about how to pool the ministry's collective wisdom on formation? Sponsors act not only in the name of the health care institution (or other ministry) but on behalf of the faith community engaged in continuing the compassionate healing ministry of Jesus. In Catholic ministry, and particularly health care ministry, sponsors carry out their responsibilities through a multiplicity of organizational relationships. Just as structures differ, so too do criteria that guide who will be called to join a sponsoring group. There are several core elements that are incorporated in the majority of sponsor competency sets. Elements identified by a committee of ministry members, and reviewed by hundreds of sponsors and other ministry leaders are: mission oriented, animated, theologically grounded, collaborative, church related, and accountable. If one is looking at the potential for convening dialogues about possible areas of collaboration in formation, these core elements, with examples of how they are lived out, may offer an outline of areas new sponsors might need to learn more about for their personal and professional development. Our Catholic health ministry depends on leaders who can create and steward organizational cultures that incarnate Jesus' healing. The possibilities for collaboration in the formation of future sponsors are endless, but there are challenges. If you are a member of a sponsor body/council/corporate member in Catholic health care, and are interested in nominating potential persons to take part in a representative group that would discuss possibilities for collaboration in sponsor formation, please go to www.chausa.org/sponsorformation and complete all sections of the

  12. Science Academies' Refresher Course on Advanced Quantum ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    2016-10-10

    Sponsored by Indian Academy of Sciences, Bengaluru. Indian National ... brief statement (between 250 and 500 words) as to why they think the Course will help to improve their classroom ... Last date for receipt of applications: October 10, 2016.

  13. 76 FR 68808 - Exchange Visitor Program-Cap on Current Participant Levels and Moratorium on New Sponsor...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-07

    ... participants for whom sponsors are responsible and the third parties that sponsors rely upon to assist them in administering their programs (i.e., U.S. employers and foreign agents); (b) requires that participants from non... sponsors to fully vet employers and all SWT job offers; and, (d) requires sponsors to contact current...

  14. A Mathematics and Science Trail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kathy Horak; Fuentes, Sarah Quebec

    2012-01-01

    In an attempt to engage primary-school students in a hands-on, real-world problem-solving context, a large urban district, a mathematics and science institute housed in a college of education, and a corporate sponsor in the southwest United States, joined forces to create a mathematics and science trail for fourth- and fifth-grade students. A…

  15. 45 CFR 2552.24 - What are a sponsor's responsibilities for securing community participation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...? (a) A sponsor shall secure community participation in local project operation by establishing an Advisory Council or a similar organizational structure with a membership that includes people: (1...

  16. 45 CFR 2551.24 - What are a sponsor's responsibilities for securing community participation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...? (a) A sponsor shall secure community participation in local project operation by establishing an Advisory Council or a similar organizational structure with a membership that includes people: (1...

  17. Provider-Sponsored Health Plans: Lessons Learned over Three Decades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breon, Richard C

    2016-01-01

    Healthcare's movement to value-based care is causing health systems across the country to consider whether owning or partnering with a health plan could benefit their organizations. Although organizations have different reasons for wanting to enter the insurance business, potential benefits include improving care quality, lowering costs, managing population health, expanding geographic reach, and diversifying the organization's revenue stream. However, the challenges and risks of owning a health plan are formidable: Assuming 100 percent financial risk for a patient population requires considerable financial resources, as well as competencies that are wholly different from those needed to run a hospital or physician group. For Spectrum Health, an integrated, not-for-profit health system based in Grand Rapids, Michigan, owning a health plan has been vital to fulfilling its mission of improving the health of the communities it serves, as well as its value proposition of providing highquality care at lower costs. This article weighs the pros and cons of operating a health plan; explores key business factors and required competencies that organizations need to consider when deciding whether to buy, build, or partner; examines the current environment for provider-sponsored health plans; and shares some of the lessons Spectrum Health has learned over three decades of running its health plan, Priority Health.

  18. Strategic Bidding Behaviors in Nondecreasing Sponsored Search Auctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Kun Tsung

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To realize the specific results in the sponsored search auctions, most advertisers submit particular bid prices. The bidding behaviors with specific purposes are called as the strategic bidding. However, some strategic bidding behaviors will result in negative effects, such as the elimination of the equilibrium and the payment increase for some advertisers. The bidding behaviors with negative results are termed as the vindictive bidding. We survey four strategic bidding behaviors which include a rational bidding and three vindictive bidding strategies. In this paper, we study the relationship between the effects resulted by the vindictive bidding and the valuations of the vindictive advertisers. In our experiments, the search engine provider (SEP is benefited by all vindictive bidding behaviors, and the increment of the SEP's revenue is proportional to the degree of the vindictiveness. Bidding vindictively without sacrificing the own utility improves the advertiser's utility with high probability. Moreover, we observe that the SEP's revenue is improved by the following situations. First, the vindictive advertiser with low valuation in the keywords with high market value results in more SEP's revenue than that in the keywords with low market value. The second case is to raise the bidding competition between advertisers.

  19. Ethical considerations in industry-sponsored multiregional clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibia, Ekopimo; Binkowitz, Bruce; Saillot, Jean-Louis; Talerico, Steven; Koerner, Chin; Ferreira, Irene; Agarwal, Anupam; Metz, Craig; Maman, Marianne

    2010-01-01

    During the last several decades, the scientific and ethics communities have addressed important ethical issues in medical research, resulting in the elaboration and adoption of concepts, guidelines, and codes. Ethical issues in the conduct of Multiregional Clinical Trials have attracted significant attention mainly in the last two decades. With the globalization of clinical research and the rapid expansion to countries with a limited tradition of biomedical research, sponsors must proactively address local ethical issues, the adequacy of oversight as well as the applicability and validity of data, and scientific conclusions drawn from diverse patient populations. This paper highlights some core ethical principles and milestones in medical research, and, from an industry perspective, it discusses ethical issues that the clinical trial team may face when conducting Multiregional Clinical Trials (MRCT, clinical trials conducted at sites located across multiple geographic regions of the world). This paper further highlights the areas of consensus and controversies and proposes points to consider. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Who foregoes survivor protection in employer-sponsored pension annuities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Richard W; Uccello, Cori E; Goldwyn, Joshua H

    2005-02-01

    Retirees in traditional pension plans must generally choose between single life annuities, which provide regular payments until death, and joint and survivor annuities, which pay less each month but continue to make payments to the spouse after the death of the retired worker. This article examines the payout decision and measures the share of married retirees with pension annuities who forego survivor protection. The analysis consists of a probit model of the pension payout decision, based on data from the 1992-2000 waves of the Health and Retirement Study. More than one quarter (28%) of married men and two thirds of married women receiving employer-sponsored retirement annuities declined survivor protection. Men with small pensions and limited household wealth, men in better health than their spouses, and men whose spouses have pension coverage from their own employers are more likely than other men to reject survivor protection. Most workers appear to make payout decisions by rationally balancing the costs and benefits of each type of annuity, suggesting that existing measures to encourage joint and survivor annuities are adequate. However, the growth in 401(k) plans, which are generally not covered by existing laws protecting spousal pension rights, may leave widows vulnerable.

  1. The effectiveness of environmental education programs from the perspectives of three stakeholders: Participants, sponsors, and professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luera, Gail Rose

    As the field of environmental education has matured since its inception in 1970, so have the number and variety of environmental programs. Along with the increased number of programs has come a need for in-depth program evaluations. This is especially critical because of reductions in educational funding and competition for a place in an already crowded curriculum. Evaluation is essential to convince the educational community that environmental education can improve the curriculum, ensure cost effectiveness, and become more relevant to students. Drawing on program evaluation research, action research, and interpretive (qualitative) research to strengthen the research design and methodology, this dissertation explores how different stakeholders of two environmental education programs determine program effectiveness. Effectiveness was investigated primarily through the use of in-depth interviews of participants, program sponsors, and professionals. Program success at the professional field level was determined by criteria set by the North American Association for Environmental Education. Characteristics considered in the selection of programs for this study included: method of dissemination, sponsor, subject focus, the method of action which they encourage, and their vision for the future. Using the qualitative case study approach, the Orange County Outdoor Science School in California and Project WILD in Michigan were evaluated. The results show that all levels of stakeholders perceived the two programs to be effective. Areas of effectiveness varied with each program and by stakeholder level. Issues facing each program also differed. At the Orange County Outdoor Science School, program cost was named as the major issue. The most often cited issues for Project WILD was public awareness of the program and stabilizing long term financial support for the Michigan program. Interview data were analyzed at the question level in addition to the thematic level. Themes which

  2. NSF-Sponsored Summit on the Future of Undergraduate Geoscience Education: outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosher, S.

    2014-12-01

    The NSF-sponsored Summit on the Future of Undergraduate Geoscience Education made major progress toward developing a collective community vision for the geosciences. A broad spectrum of the geoscience education community, ~200 educators from research universities/four and two year colleges, focused on preparation of undergraduates for graduate school and future geoscience careers, pedagogy, use of technology, broadening participation/retention of underrepresented groups, and preparation of K-12 science teachers. Participants agreed that key concepts, competencies and skills learned throughout the curriculum were more important than specific courses. Concepts included understanding Earth as complex, dynamic system, deep time, evolution of life, natural resources, energy, hazards, hydrogeology, surface processes, Earth materials and structure, and climate change. Skills/competencies included ability to think spatially and temporally, reason inductively and deductively, make and use indirect observations, engage in complex open, coupled systems thinking, and work with uncertainty, non-uniqueness, and incompleteness, as well as critical thinking, problem solving, communication, and ability to think like a scientist and continue to learn. Successful ways of developing these include collaborative, integrative projects involving teams, interdisciplinary projects, fieldwork and research experiences, as well as flipped classrooms and integration and interactive use of technology, including visualization, simulation, modeling and analysis of real data. Wider adoption of proven, effective best practices is our communities' main pedagogical challenge, and we focused on identifying implementation barriers. Preparation of future teachers in introductory and general geoscience courses by incorporating Next Generation Science Standards and using other sciences/math to solve real world geoscience problems should help increase diversity and number of future geoscientists and

  3. Metformin synergistically enhances antiproliferative effects of cisplatin and etoposide in NCI-H460 human lung cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Fernandes Teixeira

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To test the effectiveness of combining conventional antineoplastic drugs (cisplatin and etoposide with metformin in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer in the NCI-H460 cell line, in order to develop new therapeutic options with high efficacy and low toxicity.METHODS: We used the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay and calculated the combination index for the drugs studied.RESULTS: We found that the use of metformin as monotherapy reduced the metabolic viability of the cell line studied. Combining metformin with cisplatin or etoposide produced a synergistic effect and was more effective than was the use of cisplatin or etoposide as monotherapy.CONCLUSIONS: Metformin, due to its independent effects on liver kinase B1, had antiproliferative effects on the NCI-H460 cell line. When metformin was combined with cisplatin or etoposide, the cell death rate was even higher.

  4. NCI Releases Video: Proteogenomics Research - On the Frontier of Precision Medicine | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) of the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health, announces the release of an educational video titled “Proteogenomics Research: On the Frontier of Precision Medicine."  Launched at the HUPO2017 Global Leadership Gala Dinner, catalyzed in part by the Cancer Moonshot initiative and featuring as keynote speaker the 47th Vice President of the United States of America Joseph R.

  5. Imaging sciences workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candy, J.V.

    1994-11-15

    This workshop on the Imaging Sciences sponsored by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory contains short abstracts/articles submitted by speakers. The topic areas covered include the following: Astronomical Imaging; biomedical imaging; vision/image display; imaging hardware; imaging software; Acoustic/oceanic imaging; microwave/acoustic imaging; computed tomography; physical imaging; imaging algorithms. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  6. EU-sponsored photovoltaic systems for rural electrification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riesch, Gerhard [Joint Research Centre of the European Union, JRC, Ispra (Italy)

    1995-12-31

    Development and proliferation of renewable energies are sponsored since 1983 by the European Union, normally up to 40% of the cost. (Programme THERMIE and predecessors). In the frame of this programme for more than one hundred projects of all kinds with thousands of photovoltaic energy supply systems have been implemented in Europe, 29 of these projects with 939 single pv-systems concern electrification of rural sites (e.g. agriculture) or isolated sites (e.g. mountain huts). Most of the single systems are of small size, 50 to 1000 Wp. A few of the systems are larger, up to 25 kWp, and supply local isolated mini-grids. In this paper the main features of the systems in six european countries are presented: The technical, economical and social results as well as the contributions of the Electric Power Utility (EPU`s) to these electrification are discussed. [Espanol] Desde 1983 la Union Europea ha auspiciado normalmente hasta el 40% del costo del desarrollo y proliferacion de las energias renovables. (Programa THERMIE y predecesores). En el marco de este programa con mas de cien proyectos de todos tipos, con miles de sistemas fotovoltaicos de suministro de energia, han sido implantados en Europa, 29 de estos proyectos con 929 sistemas fotovoltaicos sencillos se relacionan con la electrificacion de sitios rurales (por ejemplo agricultura) o de sitios aislados (por ejemplo cabanas en la montana). La mayoria de los sistemas sencillos son de pequeno tamano, 50 a 1000 Wp. Unos pocos de los sistemas son mas grandes, hasta de 25 kWp y alimentan mini-redes locales aisladas. En este articulo se presentan las caracteristicas principales de los sistemas en seis paises europeos: se analizan los resultados tecnicos, economicos y sociales, asi como las contribuciones de las empresas electricas.

  7. EU-sponsored photovoltaic systems for rural electrification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riesch, Gerhard [Joint Research Centre of the European Union, JRC, Ispra (Italy)

    1996-12-31

    Development and proliferation of renewable energies are sponsored since 1983 by the European Union, normally up to 40% of the cost. (Programme THERMIE and predecessors). In the frame of this programme for more than one hundred projects of all kinds with thousands of photovoltaic energy supply systems have been implemented in Europe, 29 of these projects with 939 single pv-systems concern electrification of rural sites (e.g. agriculture) or isolated sites (e.g. mountain huts). Most of the single systems are of small size, 50 to 1000 Wp. A few of the systems are larger, up to 25 kWp, and supply local isolated mini-grids. In this paper the main features of the systems in six european countries are presented: The technical, economical and social results as well as the contributions of the Electric Power Utility (EPU`s) to these electrification are discussed. [Espanol] Desde 1983 la Union Europea ha auspiciado normalmente hasta el 40% del costo del desarrollo y proliferacion de las energias renovables. (Programa THERMIE y predecesores). En el marco de este programa con mas de cien proyectos de todos tipos, con miles de sistemas fotovoltaicos de suministro de energia, han sido implantados en Europa, 29 de estos proyectos con 929 sistemas fotovoltaicos sencillos se relacionan con la electrificacion de sitios rurales (por ejemplo agricultura) o de sitios aislados (por ejemplo cabanas en la montana). La mayoria de los sistemas sencillos son de pequeno tamano, 50 a 1000 Wp. Unos pocos de los sistemas son mas grandes, hasta de 25 kWp y alimentan mini-redes locales aisladas. En este articulo se presentan las caracteristicas principales de los sistemas en seis paises europeos: se analizan los resultados tecnicos, economicos y sociales, asi como las contribuciones de las empresas electricas.

  8. An ensemble based top performing approach for NCI-DREAM drug sensitivity prediction challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Wan

    Full Text Available We consider the problem of predicting sensitivity of cancer cell lines to new drugs based on supervised learning on genomic profiles. The genetic and epigenetic characterization of a cell line provides observations on various aspects of regulation including DNA copy number variations, gene expression, DNA methylation and protein abundance. To extract relevant information from the various data types, we applied a random forest based approach to generate sensitivity predictions from each type of data and combined the predictions in a linear regression model to generate the final drug sensitivity prediction. Our approach when applied to the NCI-DREAM drug sensitivity prediction challenge was a top performer among 47 teams and produced high accuracy predictions. Our results show that the incorporation of multiple genomic characterizations lowered the mean and variance of the estimated bootstrap prediction error. We also applied our approach to the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia database for sensitivity prediction and the ability to extract the top targets of an anti-cancer drug. The results illustrate the effectiveness of our approach in predicting drug sensitivity from heterogeneous genomic datasets.

  9. Permissivity of the NCI-60 cancer cell lines to oncolytic Vaccinia Virus GLV-1h68

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ascierto, Maria Libera; Bedognetti, Davide; Uccellini, Lorenzo; Rossano, Fabio; Ascierto, Paolo A; Stroncek, David F; Restifo, Nicholas P; Wang, Ena; Szalay, Aladar A; Marincola, Francesco M; Worschech, Andrea; Yu, Zhiya; Adams, Sharon; Reinboth, Jennifer; Chen, Nanhai G; Pos, Zoltan; Roychoudhuri, Rahul; Di Pasquale, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    Oncolytic viral therapy represents an alternative therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cancer. We previously described GLV-1h68, a modified Vaccinia Virus with exclusive tropism for tumor cells, and we observed a cell line-specific relationship between the ability of GLV-1h68 to replicate in vitro and its ability to colonize and eliminate tumor in vivo. In the current study we surveyed the in vitro permissivity to GLV-1h68 replication of the NCI-60 panel of cell lines. Selected cell lines were also tested for permissivity to another Vaccinia Virus and a vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) strain. In order to identify correlates of permissity to viral infection, we measured transcriptional profiles of the cell lines prior infection. We observed highly heterogeneous permissivity to VACV infection amongst the cell lines. The heterogeneity of permissivity was independent of tissue with the exception of B cell derivation. Cell lines were also tested for permissivity to another Vaccinia Virus and a vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) strain and a significant correlation was found suggesting a common permissive phenotype. While no clear transcriptional pattern could be identified as predictor of permissivity to infection, some associations were observed suggesting multifactorial basis permissivity to viral infection. Our findings have implications for the design of oncolytic therapies for cancer and offer insights into the nature of permissivity of tumor cells to viral infection

  10. Developing Cancer Informatics Applications and Tools Using the NCI Genomic Data Commons API.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Shane; Fitzsimons, Michael; Ferguson, Martin; Heath, Allison; Jensen, Mark; Miller, Josh; Murphy, Mark W; Porter, James; Sahni, Himanso; Staudt, Louis; Tang, Yajing; Wang, Zhining; Yu, Christine; Zhang, Junjun; Ferretti, Vincent; Grossman, Robert L

    2017-11-01

    The NCI Genomic Data Commons (GDC) was launched in 2016 and makes available over 4 petabytes (PB) of cancer genomic and associated clinical data to the research community. This dataset continues to grow and currently includes over 14,500 patients. The GDC is an example of a biomedical data commons, which collocates biomedical data with storage and computing infrastructure and commonly used web services, software applications, and tools to create a secure, interoperable, and extensible resource for researchers. The GDC is (i) a data repository for downloading data that have been submitted to it, and also a system that (ii) applies a common set of bioinformatics pipelines to submitted data; (iii) reanalyzes existing data when new pipelines are developed; and (iv) allows users to build their own applications and systems that interoperate with the GDC using the GDC Application Programming Interface (API). We describe the GDC API and how it has been used both by the GDC itself and by third parties. Cancer Res; 77(21); e15-18. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  11. Detecting Role Errors in the Gene Hierarchy of the NCI Thesaurus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yehoshua Perl

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene terminologies are playing an increasingly important role in the ever-growing field of genomic research. While errors in large, complex terminologies are inevitable, gene terminologies are even more susceptible to them due to the rapid growth of genomic knowledge and the nature of its discovery. It is therefore very important to establish quality- assurance protocols for such genomic-knowledge repositories. Different kinds of terminologies oftentimes require auditing methodologies adapted to their particular structures. In light of this, an auditing methodology tailored to the characteristics of the NCI Thesaurus’s (NCIT’s Gene hierarchy is presented. The Gene hierarchy is of particular interest to the NCIT’s designers due to the primary role of genomics in current cancer research. This multiphase methodology focuses on detecting role-errors, such as missing roles or roles with incorrect or incomplete target structures, occurring within that hierarchy. The methodology is based on two kinds of abstraction networks, called taxonomies, that highlight the role distribution among concepts within the IS-A (subsumption hierarchy. These abstract views tend to highlight portions of the hierarchy having a higher concentration of errors. The errors found during an application of the methodology

  12. Highlights of recent developments and trends in cancer nanotechnology research--view from NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, L C; Farrell, D; Grodzinski, P

    2014-01-01

    Although the incidence of cancer and cancer related deaths in the United States has decreased over the past two decades due to improvements in early detection and treatment, cancer still is responsible for a quarter of the deaths in this country. There is much room for improvement on the standard treatments currently available and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) has recognized the potential for nanotechnology and nanomaterials in this area. The NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer was formed in 2004 to support multidisciplinary researchers in the application of nanotechnology to cancer diagnosis and treatment. The researchers in the Alliance have been productive in generating innovative solutions to some of the central issues of cancer treatment including how to detect tumors earlier, how to target cancer cells specifically, and how to improve the therapeutic index of existing chemotherapies and radiotherapy treatments. Highly creative ideas are being pursued where novelty in nanomaterial development enables new modalities of detection or therapy. This review highlights some of the innovative materials approaches being pursued by researchers funded by the NCI Alliance. Their discoveries to improve the functionality of nanoparticles for medical applications includes the generation of new platforms, improvements in the manufacturing of nanoparticles and determining the underlying reasons for the movement of nanoparticles in the blood. © 2013.

  13. Les competències. La doctrina del Tribunal sobre la definició de les competències. Les competències exclusives, les compartides i les executives. - Las competencias. La doctrina del Tribunal sobre la definición de las competencias. Competencias exclusivas, compartidas y ejecutivas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon Riu

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available La doctrina de la Sentència 31/2010 sobre la definició estatutària de les categories competencials (251-257 Mercè Barceló i SerramaleraLa doctrina del Tribunal Constitucional sobre la definició de competències. Les competències exclusives, les compartides i les executives (258-261Antoni Bayona RocamoraLa doctrina de la Sentència 31/2010 sobre les competències executives (Xavier Bernadí GilLa doctrina del Tribunal sobre la definició de les competències. Les ompetències exclusives, les compartides i les executives (270-276Marc Carrillo LópezEls efectes de la Sentència sobre la definició estatutària de les competències: la «devaluació» jurídica dels estatuts d’autonomia (277-281Mercè Corretja TorrensLes categories funcionals de competències a l’Estatut d’autonomia de Catalunya. Comentaris a la Sentència 31/2010 (282-287Ramon Riu FortunyTipologia de les competències. El seu abast funcional: els articles 110 a 112 (288-294Joaquín Tornos Massostenella e no enmendalla (262-269 La doctrina de la Sentencia 31/2010 sobre la definición estatutaria de las categorías competenciales (251-257Mercè Barceló i SerramaleraLa doctrina del Tribunal Constitucional sobre la definición de competencias. Las competencias exclusivas, las compartidas y las ejecutivas (258-261Antoni Bayona RocamoraLa doctrina de la Sentencia 31/2010 sobre las competencias ejecutivas (sostenella e no enmendalla (262-270 Xavier Bernadí GilLa doctrina del Tribunal sobre la definición de las competencias. Las competencias exclusivas, las compartidas y las ejecutivas (271-277Marc Carrillo LópezLos efectos de la Sentencia sobre la definición estatutaria de las competencias:la «devaluación» jurídica de los estatutos de autonomía (278-283Mercè Corretja TorrensLas categorías funcionales de competencias en el Estatuto de Autonomía de Cataluña. Comentarios a la Sentencia 31/2010 (284-289Ramon Riu FortunyTipología de las competencias. Su alcance

  14. 21 CFR 500.84 - Conditions for approval of the sponsored compound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Conditions for approval of the sponsored compound. 500.84 Section 500.84 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Used in Food-Producing Animals § 500.84 Conditions for approval of the sponsored compound. (a) On the...

  15. 14 CFR 152.105 - Sponsors and planning agencies: Airport planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sponsors and planning agencies: Airport planning. 152.105 Section 152.105 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF....105 Sponsors and planning agencies: Airport planning. (a) To be eligible to apply for a project for...

  16. 29 CFR 4010.12 - Alternative method of compliance for certain sponsors of multiple employer plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... BENEFIT GUARANTY CORPORATION CERTAIN REPORTING AND DISCLOSURE REQUIREMENTS ANNUAL FINANCIAL AND ACTUARIAL INFORMATION REPORTING § 4010.12 Alternative method of compliance for certain sponsors of multiple employer... part for an information year if any contributing sponsor of the multiple employer plan provides a...

  17. 76 FR 2807 - New Animal Drugs; Change of Sponsor; Follicle Stimulating Hormone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-18

    ... [Docket No. FDA-2010-N-0002] New Animal Drugs; Change of Sponsor; Follicle Stimulating Hormone AGENCY...) is amending the animal drug regulations to reflect a change of sponsor for a new animal drug....O. Box 324-12, Tyler, TX 75703 has informed FDA that it has transferred ownership of, and all rights...

  18. A Case Study of Teaching Marketing Research Using Client-Sponsored Projects: Method, Challenges, and Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bove, Liliana L.; Davies, W. Martin

    2009-01-01

    This case study outlines the use of client-sponsored research projects in a quantitative postgraduate marketing research subject conducted in a 12-week semester in a research-intensive Australian university. The case study attempts to address the dearth of recent literature on client-sponsored research projects in the discipline of marketing.…

  19. 77 FR 43345 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Sponsor's Notice of Change of Address, Form I-865...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-24

    ...-0076] Agency Information Collection Activities: Sponsor's Notice of Change of Address, Form I-865...: Sponsor's Notice of Change of Address. (3) Agency form number, if any, and the applicable component of the.... During this 60-day period, USCIS will be evaluating whether to revise the Form I-865. Should USCIS decide...

  20. 8 CFR 204.1 - General information about immediate relative and family-sponsored petitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... relative and family-sponsored petitions. 204.1 Section 204.1 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... about immediate relative and family-sponsored petitions. (a) Types of petitions. Petitions may be filed..., Application to Determine Suitability as Adoptive Parents for a Convention adoptee; and (ii) After USCIS...

  1. Highlight: IDRC sponsors Caribbean symposium on impact of ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-04-15

    Apr 15, 2016 ... Among the attendees were the Honourable Julian Robinson, Jamaica's Minister of State for the Ministry of Science, Technology, Energy and Mining and Celia Champagnie, Trade Commissioner ... IDRC project: Harnessing Open Data to Achieve Development Results in Latin America and the Caribbean ...

  2. RU SciTech: Weaving Astronomy and Physics into a University-sponsored Summer Camp for Middle School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Quyen N.

    2015-01-01

    We present a successful model for organizing a small University-sponsored summer camp that integrates astronomy and physics content with other science disciplines and computer programming content. The aim of our science and technology camp is to engage middle school students in a wide array of critical thinking tasks and hands-on activities centered on science and technology. Additionally, our program seeks to increase and maintain STEM interest among children, particularly in under-represented populations (e.g., Hispanic, African-American, women, and lower socioeconomic individuals) with hopes of decreasing disparities in diversity across many STEM fields.During this four-day camp, organized and facilitated by faculty volunteers, activities rotated through many STEM modules, including optics, telescopes, circuit building, computer hardware, and programming. Specifically, we scaffold camp activities to build upon similar ideas and content if possible. Using knowledge and skills gained through the AAS Astronomy Ambassadors program, we were able to integrate several astronomy activities into the camp, leading students through engaging activities, and conduct educational research. We present best practices on piloting a similar program in a university environment, our efforts to connect the learning outcomes common across all the modules, specifically in astronomy and physics, outline future camp activities, and the survey results on the impact of camp activities on attitudes toward science, technology, and science careers.

  3. NSF-Sponsored Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, M. D.; Chandler, C. L.; Copley, N.; Galvarino, C.; Gegg, S. R.; Glover, D. M.; Groman, R. C.; Wiebe, P. H.; Work, T. T.; Biological; Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office

    2010-12-01

    Ocean biogeochemistry and marine ecosystem research projects are inherently interdisciplinary and benefit from improved access to well-documented data. Improved data sharing practices are important to the continued exploration of research themes that are a central focus of the ocean science community and are essential to interdisciplinary and international collaborations that address complex, global research themes. In 2006, the National Science Foundation Division of Ocean Sciences (NSF OCE) funded the Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO) to serve the data management requirements of scientific investigators funded by the National Science Foundation’s Biological and Chemical Oceanography Sections. BCO-DMO staff members work with investigators to manage marine biogeochemical, ecological, and oceanographic data and information developed in the course of scientific research. These valuable data sets are documented, stored, disseminated, and protected over short and intermediate time frames. One of the goals of the BCO-DMO is to facilitate regional, national, and international data and information exchange through improved data discovery, access, display, downloading, and interoperability. In May 2010, NSF released a statement to the effect that in October 2010, it is planning to require that all proposals include a data management plan in the form of a two-page supplementary document. The data management plan would be an element of the merit review process. NSF has long been committed to making data from NSF-funded research publicly available and the new policy will strengthen this commitment. BCO-DMO is poised to assist in creating the data management plans and in ultimately serving the data and information resulting from NSF OCE funded research. We will present an overview of the data management system capabilities including: geospatial and text-based data discovery and access systems; recent enhancements to data search tools; data

  4. Enabling Data Intensive Science through Service Oriented Science: Virtual Laboratories and Science Gateways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lescinsky, D. T.; Wyborn, L. A.; Evans, B. J. K.; Allen, C.; Fraser, R.; Rankine, T.

    2014-12-01

    We present collaborative work on a generic, modular infrastructure for virtual laboratories (VLs, similar to science gateways) that combine online access to data, scientific code, and computing resources as services that support multiple data intensive scientific computing needs across a wide range of science disciplines. We are leveraging access to 10+ PB of earth science data on Lustre filesystems at Australia's National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) Research Data Storage Infrastructure (RDSI) node, co-located with NCI's 1.2 PFlop Raijin supercomputer and a 3000 CPU core research cloud. The development, maintenance and sustainability of VLs is best accomplished through modularisation and standardisation of interfaces between components. Our approach has been to break up tightly-coupled, specialised application packages into modules, with identified best techniques and algorithms repackaged either as data services or scientific tools that are accessible across domains. The data services can be used to manipulate, visualise and transform multiple data types whilst the scientific tools can be used in concert with multiple scientific codes. We are currently designing a scalable generic infrastructure that will handle scientific code as modularised services and thereby enable the rapid/easy deployment of new codes or versions of codes. The goal is to build open source libraries/collections of scientific tools, scripts and modelling codes that can be combined in specially designed deployments. Additional services in development include: provenance, publication of results, monitoring, workflow tools, etc. The generic VL infrastructure will be hosted at NCI, but can access alternative computing infrastructures (i.e., public/private cloud, HPC).The Virtual Geophysics Laboratory (VGL) was developed as a pilot project to demonstrate the underlying technology. This base is now being redesigned and generalised to develop a Virtual Hazards Impact and Risk Laboratory

  5. Readability of Online Patient Educational Resources Found on NCI-Designated Cancer Center Web Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Stephen A; Francis, David; Hullett, Craig R; Morris, Zachary S; Fisher, Michael M; Brower, Jeffrey V; Bradley, Kristin A; Anderson, Bethany M; Bassetti, Michael F; Kimple, Randall J

    2016-06-01

    The NIH and Department of Health & Human Services recommend online patient information (OPI) be written at a sixth grade level. We used a panel of readability analyses to assess OPI from NCI-Designated Cancer Center (NCIDCC) Web sites. Cancer.gov was used to identify 68 NCIDCC Web sites from which we collected both general OPI and OPI specific to breast, prostate, lung, and colon cancers. This text was analyzed by 10 commonly used readability tests: the New Dale-Chall Readability Formula, Flesch Reading Ease scale, Flesch-Kinaid Grade Level, FORCAST scale, Fry Readability Graph, Simple Measure of Gobbledygook test, Gunning Frequency of Gobbledygook index, New Fog Count, Raygor Readability Estimate Graph, and Coleman-Liau Index. We tested the hypothesis that the readability of NCIDCC OPI was written at the sixth grade level. Secondary analyses were performed to compare readability of OPI between comprehensive and noncomprehensive centers, by region, and to OPI produced by the American Cancer Society (ACS). A mean of 30,507 words from 40 comprehensive and 18 noncomprehensive NCIDCCs was analyzed (7 nonclinical and 3 without appropriate OPI were excluded). Using a composite grade level score, the mean readability score of 12.46 (ie, college level: 95% CI, 12.13-12.79) was significantly greater than the target grade level of 6 (middle-school: Preadability metrics (P<.05). ACS OPI provides easier language, at the seventh to ninth grade level, across all tests (P<.01). OPI from NCIDCC Web sites is more complex than recommended for the average patient. Copyright © 2016 by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

  6. Criminal implication of sponsoring in medicine: legal ramifactions and recommendations; Strafrechtliche Bedeutung des Sponsorings in der Medizin: Gesetzliche Rahmenbedingungen und Handlungsempfehlungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahnken, A.H.; Guenther, R.W. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Universitaetsklinikum Aachen (Germany); Theilmann, M. [Rechtsanwalt Martin Theilmann, Osnabrueck (Germany); Bolenz, M. [Fakultaet Wirtschafts- und Sozialwissenschaften, Fachhochschule Osnabrueck (Germany)

    2005-08-01

    As a consequence of the so-called ''Heart-Valve-Affair'' in 1994, the German public became aware of the potential criminal significance of industrial sponsoring and third-party financial support in medicine. Since 1997, when the German Anti-Corruption Law came into effect, the penal regulations regarding bribery and benefits for public officers were tightened. Due to the lack of explicit and generally accepted guidelines in combination with regional differences of jurisdiction, there is a lingering uncertainty regarding the criminal aspects of third-party funding and industrial sponsoring. The aim of this review is to summarize the penal and professional implications of third-party funding and sponsoring in medicine including recent aspects of jurisdiction. The currently available recommendations on this issue are introduced. (orig.)

  7. The Influence of Sponsor-Event Congruence in Sponsorship of Music Festivals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penny Hutabarat

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses the research on the Influence of Sponsor-Event Congruence toward Brand Image, Attitudes toward the Brand and Purchase Intention. Having reviewed the literatures and arranged the hypotheses, the data has been gathered by distributing the questionnaire to 155 audiences at the Java Jazz Music Festival, firstly with convenience sampling and then snowballing sampling approach. The analysis of data was executed with Structural Equation Modeling (SEM. The result shows the sponsor-event congruence variable has a positive impact toward brand image and attitudes toward the brand sponsor. Brand Image also has a positive impact toward purchase intention; in contrary attitudes toward the brand do not have a positive purchase intention. With those results, to increase the sponsorship effectiveness, the role of congruency is very significant in the sponsorship event. Congruency is a key influencer to trigger the sponsorship effectiveness. Congruency between the event and the sponsor is able to boost up the brand image and bring out favorable attitudes towards the brand for the success of marketing communication programs, particularly sponsorship. In addition to it, image transfer gets higher due to the congruency existence (fit between sponsor and event and directs the intention creation to buy sponsor brand product/service (purchase intention. In conclusion, sponsor-event congruence has effect on consumer responds toward sponsorship, either on the cognitive level, affective and also behavior.

  8. The Influence of Sponsor-Event Congruence in Sponsorship of Music Festivals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penny Hutabarat

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false IN X-NONE X-NONE This paper focuses the research on the Influence of Sponsor-Event Congruence toward Brand Image, Attitudes toward the Brand and Purchase Intention. Having reviewed the literatures and arranged the hypotheses, the data has been gathered by distributing the questionnaire to 155 audiences at the Java Jazz Music Festival, firstly with convenience sampling and then snowballing sampling approach. The analysis of data was executed with Structural Equation Modeling (SEM. The result shows the sponsor-event congruence variable has a positive impact toward brand image and attitudes toward the brand sponsor. Brand Image also has a positive impact toward purchase intention; in contrary attitudes toward the brand do not have a positive purchase intention. With those results, to increase the sponsorship effectiveness, the role of congruency is very significant in the sponsorship event. Congruency is a key influencer to trigger the sponsorship effectiveness. Congruency between the event and the sponsor is able to boost up the brand image and bring out favorable attitudes towards the brand for the success of marketing communication programs, particularly sponsorship. In addition to it, image transfer gets higher due to the congruency existence (fit between sponsor and event and directs the intention creation to buy sponsor brand product/service (purchase intention. In conclusion, sponsor-event congruence has effect on consumer responds toward sponsorship, either on the cognitive level, affective and also behavior.

  9. Life sciences and environmental sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-02-01

    The DOE laboratories play a unique role in bringing multidisciplinary talents -- in biology, physics, chemistry, computer sciences, and engineering -- to bear on major problems in the life and environmental sciences. Specifically, the laboratories utilize these talents to fulfill OHER's mission of exploring and mitigating the health and environmental effects of energy use, and of developing health and medical applications of nuclear energy-related phenomena. At Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) support of this mission is evident across the spectrum of OHER-sponsored research, especially in the broad areas of genomics, structural biology, basic cell and molecular biology, carcinogenesis, energy and environment, applications to biotechnology, and molecular, nuclear and radiation medicine. These research areas are briefly described.

  10. Life sciences and environmental sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-02-01

    The DOE laboratories play a unique role in bringing multidisciplinary talents -- in biology, physics, chemistry, computer sciences, and engineering -- to bear on major problems in the life and environmental sciences. Specifically, the laboratories utilize these talents to fulfill OHER`s mission of exploring and mitigating the health and environmental effects of energy use, and of developing health and medical applications of nuclear energy-related phenomena. At Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) support of this mission is evident across the spectrum of OHER-sponsored research, especially in the broad areas of genomics, structural biology, basic cell and molecular biology, carcinogenesis, energy and environment, applications to biotechnology, and molecular, nuclear and radiation medicine. These research areas are briefly described.

  11. Wisdom for Building the Project Manager/Project Sponsor Relationship: Partnership for Project Success

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Patton, Nanette; Shechet, Allan

    2007-01-01

    .... This article discusses conventional roles and responsibilities of the project sponsor and then discusses strategies a project manager can employ to define boundaries to reduce role confusion and promote partnership to facilitate project success.

  12. Legitimate Use of Military Force Against State-Sponsored International Terrorism

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Erickson, Richard

    1989-01-01

    ... is part of a larger strategy that seeks to maximize the risk of punishment for terrorists and their sponsors and supporters while minimizing their potential rewards, In this context military action...

  13. Gulf Regional Planning Commission scenario planning workshop : sponsored by the Federal Highway Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    This report summarizes noteworthy practices shared during a scenario planning workshop, hosted by the Gulf Regional Planning Commission, on March 15-16, 2016, in Biloxi, Mississippi. The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) sponsored this event as p...

  14. 45 CFR 2553.24 - What are a sponsor's responsibilities for securing community participation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... community participation? (a) A sponsor shall secure community participation in local project operation by establishing an Advisory Council or a similar organizational structure with a membership that includes people...

  15. Vectors to Increase Production Efficiency of Inducible Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC) | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    This invention describes the discovery that specific p53 isoform increase the number of inducible pluripotent stem cells (iPS). It is known that the activity of p53 regulates the self-renewal and pluripotency of normal and cancer stem cells, and also affects re-programming efficiency of iPS cells. This p53 isoform-based technology provides a more natural process of increasing iPS cell production than previous methods of decreasing p53. NCI seeks licensees for this technology.

  16. Science in the Citadel

    OpenAIRE

    Bower, Colleen

    2017-01-01

    On a sunny Saturday afternoon, the 22nd of April, Science in the Citadel was held in Gozo’s iconic medieval Citadel. It provided an atmospheric venue for the first science festival on the island. The festival was sponsored by EcoGozo, and inaugurated by Minister of Gozo, Dr Anton Refalo. The aim of the festival was to engage the public with science, to inspire the next generation towards scientific endeavour and to showcase Gozo as a potential future hub for scientific discussion and developm...

  17. Outsourcing ethical obligations: should the revised common rule address the responsibilities of investigators and sponsors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Seema K

    2013-01-01

    The Common Rule creates a division of moral labor in research. It implies that investigators and sponsors can outsource their ethical obligations to IRBs and participants, thereby fostering a culture of compliance, rather than one of responsibility. The proposed revisions to the Common Rule are likely to exacerbate this problem. To harness the expressive power of the law, I propose the Common Rule be revised to include the ethical responsibilities of investigators and sponsors. © 2013 American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics, Inc.

  18. Transparency for Sponsored Content : Analysing Codes of Ethics in Public Relations, Marketing, Advertising and Journalism

    OpenAIRE

    Ikonen, Pasi; Luoma-aho, Vilma; Bowen, Shannon A.

    2017-01-01

    As sponsored content is gaining ground globally, the boundaries between strategic communication, advertising and journalism are blurring. As sponsored content becomes more common, it raises novel ethical concerns that no industry alone can answer, such as How much disclosure is needed for transparency? Self-regulation via codes of ethics has been suggested as a remedy to meet the rising transparency expectations, and this article analysed 40 codes of ethics in the fields of communication, adv...

  19. Measuring Consumer Reactions to Sponsoring Partnerships Based upon Emotional and Attitudinal Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Riis Christensen, Sverre

    2004-01-01

    Consumers reactions from being exposed to sponsorships has primarily been measured and docu-mented applying cognitive information processing models to the phenomenon. In the paper it is argued that such effects are probably better modelled applying models of peripheral information processing to the measurements, and it is suggested that the effects can be measured on the atti-tudes-towards-the sponsor and on the emotion-towards-the sponsor levels. This type of modelling is known as the ELAM m...

  20. China’s Foreign Aid and Government-Sponsored Investment Activities: Scale, Content, Destinations, and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    this document Browse Reports & Bookstore Make a charitable contribution Limited Electronic Distribution Rights This document and trademark(s...sponsors. Support RAND—make a tax-deductible charitable contribution at www.rand.org/giving/contribute.html R® is a registered trademark © Copyright 2013...cooperation organizations such as the xvi China’s Foreign Aid and Government-Sponsored Investment Activities Shanghai Cooperation Organisation have

  1. why sponsored posts on facebook and instagram are effective online branding tools

    OpenAIRE

    Eggers, Raphael

    2017-01-01

    This research is motivated by the incongruence of how businesses and contemporary research evaluate paid social media advertisement as online branding tools. Therefore, we examine the possibilities of social media marketing: why sponsored posts on Facebook and Instagram are effective online branding tools. A questionnaire was utilized to approach the research, and answer the hypotheses. Results from 316 participants indicated that sponsored posts were effective for brand awaren...

  2. NCI-60 whole exome sequencing and pharmacological CellMiner analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William C Reinhold

    Full Text Available Exome sequencing provides unprecedented insights into cancer biology and pharmacological response. Here we assess these two parameters for the NCI-60, which is among the richest genomic and pharmacological publicly available cancer cell line databases. Homozygous genetic variants that putatively affect protein function were identified in 1,199 genes (approximately 6% of all genes. Variants that are either enriched or depleted compared to non-cancerous genomes, and thus may be influential in cancer progression and differential drug response were identified for 2,546 genes. Potential gene knockouts are made available. Assessment of cell line response to 19,940 compounds, including 110 FDA-approved drugs, reveals ≈80-fold range in resistance versus sensitivity response across cell lines. 103,422 gene variants were significantly correlated with at least one compound (at p<0.0002. These include genes of known pharmacological importance such as IGF1R, BRAF, RAD52, MTOR, STAT2 and TSC2 as well as a large number of candidate genes such as NOM1, TLL2, and XDH. We introduce two new web-based CellMiner applications that enable exploration of variant-to-compound relationships for a broad range of researchers, especially those without bioinformatics support. The first tool, "Genetic variant versus drug visualization", provides a visualization of significant correlations between drug activity-gene variant combinations. Examples are given for the known vemurafenib-BRAF, and novel ifosfamide-RAD52 pairings. The second, "Genetic variant summation" allows an assessment of cumulative genetic variations for up to 150 combined genes together; and is designed to identify the variant burden for molecular pathways or functional grouping of genes. An example of its use is provided for the EGFR-ERBB2 pathway gene variant data and the identification of correlated EGFR, ERBB2, MTOR, BRAF, MEK and ERK inhibitors. The new tools are implemented as an updated web-based Cell

  3. Tendències en el disseny metodològic de recerca sobre l’avaluació de competències a l’educació superior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Angélica Villegas Sandoval

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available L’article té com a finalitat descriure i analitzar les metodologies d'investigació utilitzades per estudis recents que aborden el tema de l’avaluació per competències a l’educació superior i la formació docent, per tal de detectar les tendències en el disseny metodològic i orientar futurs projectes d'investigació sobre aquest tema. El mètode de treball que s'ha seguit per dur a terme aquest estudi és l’anàlisi de contingut de 22 documents trobats a Dialnet. Els resultats mostren que les investigacions que tracten el tema assenyalat han anat en augment en els últims tretze anys, i es destaca el canvi de metodologia utilitzada, amb dissenys majoritàriament descriptius i avaluatius. Al seu torn, però, crida l'atenció que un gran nombre d'estudis no expliquen ni el mètode ni el disseny d'investigació que han aplicat. Es conclou que és important que les investigacions presentin un apartat que al·ludeixi al disseny metodològic a fi d’afavorir la comprensió del lector dels processos d'indagació que s'han dut a terme.

  4. Resonance – Journal of Science Education | Indian Academy of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    37th International Mathematical Olympiad / Indian Statistical Institute · More Details .... Instructional School on Linear Algebra - Sponsored by Indian Academy of Sciences ...... Refresher Course on Mountain Hydrology and Climate Change.

  5. Science Academies' 83rd Refresher Course on Experimental Physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Science and Technology, Lakshmangarh, District Sikar (Rajasthan). Sponsored by ... Scanned copies of the duly signed documents sent by email will also be accepted. Applications ... E-mail: sbrajraj@gmail.com, sbrajraj@yahoo.com, Phone:.

  6. Differential Globalization of Industry- and Non-Industry-Sponsored Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atal, Ignacio; Trinquart, Ludovic; Porcher, Raphaël; Ravaud, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Mapping the international landscape of clinical trials may inform global health research governance, but no large-scale data are available. Industry or non-industry sponsorship may have a major influence in this mapping. We aimed to map the global landscape of industry- and non-industry-sponsored clinical trials and its evolution over time. We analyzed clinical trials initiated between 2006 and 2013 and registered in the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP). We mapped single-country and international trials by World Bank's income groups and by sponsorship (industry- vs. non- industry), including its evolution over time from 2006 to 2012. We identified clusters of countries that collaborated significantly more than expected in industry- and non-industry-sponsored international trials. 119,679 clinical trials conducted in 177 countries were analysed. The median number of trials per million inhabitants in high-income countries was 100 times that in low-income countries (116.0 vs. 1.1). Industry sponsors were involved in three times more trials per million inhabitants than non-industry sponsors in high-income countries (75.0 vs. 24.5) and in ten times fewer trials in low- income countries (0.08 vs. 1.08). Among industry- and non-industry-sponsored trials, 30.3% and 3.2% were international, respectively. In the industry-sponsored network of collaboration, Eastern European and South American countries collaborated more than expected; in the non-industry-sponsored network, collaboration among Scandinavian countries was overrepresented. Industry-sponsored international trials became more inter-continental with time between 2006 and 2012 (from 54.8% to 67.3%) as compared with non-industry-sponsored trials (from 42.4% to 37.2%). Based on trials registered in the WHO ICTRP we documented a substantial gap between the globalization of industry- and non-industry-sponsored clinical research. Only 3% of academic trials but 30% of industry trials are

  7. Differential Globalization of Industry- and Non-Industry–Sponsored Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atal, Ignacio; Trinquart, Ludovic; Porcher, Raphaël; Ravaud, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Background Mapping the international landscape of clinical trials may inform global health research governance, but no large-scale data are available. Industry or non-industry sponsorship may have a major influence in this mapping. We aimed to map the global landscape of industry- and non-industry–sponsored clinical trials and its evolution over time. Methods We analyzed clinical trials initiated between 2006 and 2013 and registered in the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP). We mapped single-country and international trials by World Bank's income groups and by sponsorship (industry- vs. non- industry), including its evolution over time from 2006 to 2012. We identified clusters of countries that collaborated significantly more than expected in industry- and non-industry–sponsored international trials. Results 119,679 clinical trials conducted in 177 countries were analysed. The median number of trials per million inhabitants in high-income countries was 100 times that in low-income countries (116.0 vs. 1.1). Industry sponsors were involved in three times more trials per million inhabitants than non-industry sponsors in high-income countries (75.0 vs. 24.5) and in ten times fewer trials in low- income countries (0.08 vs. 1.08). Among industry- and non-industry–sponsored trials, 30.3% and 3.2% were international, respectively. In the industry-sponsored network of collaboration, Eastern European and South American countries collaborated more than expected; in the non-industry–sponsored network, collaboration among Scandinavian countries was overrepresented. Industry-sponsored international trials became more inter-continental with time between 2006 and 2012 (from 54.8% to 67.3%) as compared with non-industry–sponsored trials (from 42.4% to 37.2%). Conclusions Based on trials registered in the WHO ICTRP we documented a substantial gap between the globalization of industry- and non-industry–sponsored clinical research. Only 3% of

  8. Avaluació de competències professionalitzadores en els estudis de grau de comunicació audiovisual

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Romeo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Els recents canvis en la formació universitària han comportat un destacable nivell de professionalització dels estudis i una constant adequació a les demandes socials. En aquest sentit, una de les necessitats per a la formació universitària a l'àrea de la comunicació audiovisual és desenvolupar en els estudiants competències professionalitzadores que els permetin trobar nínxols d'ocupació en un mercat altament competitiu i sotmès a canvis continus. Aquesta recerca té per objecte crear una rúbrica que permeti avaluar l'aprenentatge professionalitzador en els estudis de grau en comunicació audiovisual (CAV que es desenvolupen a Espanya. Per desenvolupar-la hem comptat amb ocupadors i acadèmics experts de l'àmbit de la comunicació audiovisual triats de forma intencional. La rúbrica final desenvolupada, a més de permetre avaluar el grau d'adquisició de les competències professionalitzadores en CAV, permet dibuixar un mapa clar de l'organització i adequació dels processos i metodologies docents. En aquest sentit, la rúbrica pot ser un instrument pedagògic clau per a una futura promoció d'estudiants, i es pot convertir en un instrument que afavoreixi l'avaluació formativa dels alumnes.

  9. Improving clinical research and cancer care delivery in community settings: evaluating the NCI community cancer centers program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fennell Mary L

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this article, we describe the National Cancer Institute (NCI Community Cancer Centers Program (NCCCP pilot and the evaluation designed to assess its role, function, and relevance to the NCI's research mission. In doing so, we describe the evolution of and rationale for the NCCCP concept, participating sites' characteristics, its multi-faceted aims to enhance clinical research and quality of care in community settings, and the role of strategic partnerships, both within and outside of the NCCCP network, in achieving program objectives. Discussion The evaluation of the NCCCP is conceptualized as a mixed method multi-layered assessment of organizational innovation and performance which includes mapping the evolution of site development as a means of understanding the inter- and intra-organizational change in the pilot, and the application of specific evaluation metrics for assessing the implementation, operations, and performance of the NCCCP pilot. The assessment of the cost of the pilot as an additional means of informing the longer-term feasibility and sustainability of the program is also discussed. Summary The NCCCP is a major systems-level set of organizational innovations to enhance clinical research and care delivery in diverse communities across the United States. Assessment of the extent to which the program achieves its aims will depend on a full understanding of how individual, organizational, and environmental factors align (or fail to align to achieve these improvements, and at what cost.

  10. Improving clinical research and cancer care delivery in community settings: evaluating the NCI community cancer centers program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauser, Steven B; Johnson, Maureen R; O'Brien, Donna M; Beveridge, Joy M; Fennell, Mary L; Kaluzny, Arnold D

    2009-09-26

    In this article, we describe the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Community Cancer Centers Program (NCCCP) pilot and the evaluation designed to assess its role, function, and relevance to the NCI's research mission. In doing so, we describe the evolution of and rationale for the NCCCP concept, participating sites' characteristics, its multi-faceted aims to enhance clinical research and quality of care in community settings, and the role of strategic partnerships, both within and outside of the NCCCP network, in achieving program objectives. The evaluation of the NCCCP is conceptualized as a mixed method multi-layered assessment of organizational innovation and performance which includes mapping the evolution of site development as a means of understanding the inter- and intra-organizational change in the pilot, and the application of specific evaluation metrics for assessing the implementation, operations, and performance of the NCCCP pilot. The assessment of the cost of the pilot as an additional means of informing the longer-term feasibility and sustainability of the program is also discussed. The NCCCP is a major systems-level set of organizational innovations to enhance clinical research and care delivery in diverse communities across the United States. Assessment of the extent to which the program achieves its aims will depend on a full understanding of how individual, organizational, and environmental factors align (or fail to align) to achieve these improvements, and at what cost.

  11. NCI Program for Natural Product Discovery: A Publicly-Accessible Library of Natural Product Fractions for High-Throughput Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornburg, Christopher C; Britt, John R; Evans, Jason R; Akee, Rhone K; Whitt, James A; Trinh, Spencer K; Harris, Matthew J; Thompson, Jerell R; Ewing, Teresa L; Shipley, Suzanne M; Grothaus, Paul G; Newman, David J; Schneider, Joel P; Grkovic, Tanja; O'Keefe, Barry R

    2018-06-13

    The US National Cancer Institute's (NCI) Natural Product Repository is one of the world's largest, most diverse collections of natural products containing over 230,000 unique extracts derived from plant, marine, and microbial organisms that have been collected from biodiverse regions throughout the world. Importantly, this national resource is available to the research community for the screening of extracts and the isolation of bioactive natural products. However, despite the success of natural products in drug discovery, compatibility issues that make extracts challenging for liquid handling systems, extended timelines that complicate natural product-based drug discovery efforts and the presence of pan-assay interfering compounds have reduced enthusiasm for the high-throughput screening (HTS) of crude natural product extract libraries in targeted assay systems. To address these limitations, the NCI Program for Natural Product Discovery (NPNPD), a newly launched, national program to advance natural product discovery technologies and facilitate the discovery of structurally defined, validated lead molecules ready for translation will create a prefractionated library from over 125,000 natural product extracts with the aim of producing a publicly-accessible, HTS-amenable library of >1,000,000 fractions. This library, representing perhaps the largest accumulation of natural-product based fractions in the world, will be made available free of charge in 384-well plates for screening against all disease states in an effort to reinvigorate natural product-based drug discovery.

  12. NCI-FDA Interagency Oncology Task Force Workshop Provides Guidance for Analytical Validation of Protein-based Multiplex Assays | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    An NCI-FDA Interagency Oncology Task Force (IOTF) Molecular Diagnostics Workshop was held on October 30, 2008 in Cambridge, MA, to discuss requirements for analytical validation of protein-based multiplex technologies in the context of its intended use. This workshop developed through NCI's Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer initiative and the FDA focused on technology-specific analytical validation processes to be addressed prior to use in clinical settings. In making this workshop unique, a case study approach was used to discuss issues related to

  13. The National Cancer Institute's Physical Sciences - Oncology Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espey, Michael Graham

    In 2009, the NCI launched the Physical Sciences - Oncology Centers (PS-OC) initiative with 12 Centers (U54) funded through 2014. The current phase of the Program includes U54 funded Centers with the added feature of soliciting new Physical Science - Oncology Projects (PS-OP) U01 grant applications through 2017; see NCI PAR-15-021. The PS-OPs, individually and along with other PS-OPs and the Physical Sciences-Oncology Centers (PS-OCs), comprise the Physical Sciences-Oncology Network (PS-ON). The foundation of the Physical Sciences-Oncology initiative is a high-risk, high-reward program that promotes a `physical sciences perspective' of cancer and fosters the convergence of physical science and cancer research by forming transdisciplinary teams of physical scientists (e.g., physicists, mathematicians, chemists, engineers, computer scientists) and cancer researchers (e.g., cancer biologists, oncologists, pathologists) who work closely together to advance our understanding of cancer. The collaborative PS-ON structure catalyzes transformative science through increased exchange of people, ideas, and approaches. PS-ON resources are leveraged to fund Trans-Network pilot projects to enable synergy and cross-testing of experimental and/or theoretical concepts. This session will include a brief PS-ON overview followed by a strategic discussion with the APS community to exchange perspectives on the progression of trans-disciplinary physical sciences in cancer research.

  14. Measuring Consumer Reactions to Sponsoring Partnerships Based upon Emotional and Attitudinal Responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis Christensen, Sverre

    2004-01-01

    Consumers' reactions from being exposed to sponsorships has primarily been measured and docu-mented applying cognitive information processing models to the phenomenon. In the paper it is argued that such effects are probably better modelled applying models of peripheral information processing...... in consumer reactions towards sponsored objects of different natures as well as towards potential sponsoring organisations. For instance, the charitable institutions measured in the study elicit larger negative emotional re-sponses than positive responses, corresponding to a negative Net Emotional Response...... to the net scores and to the full evaluations on the attitude and emotion batteries and it seems as if the latter approach will be richer in explanatory power for a potential sponsor....

  15. Enhanced evaluation data initiates a collaborative out-of-school time food sponsors work group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rifkin, Robin; Williams, Lauren A; Grode, Gabrielle M; Roberts-Johnson, Wendy-Anne

    2015-01-01

    Philadelphia's Healthy Kids, Healthy Communities Out-of-School Time (OST) Initiative led by the Health Promotion Council developed 10 Healthy Living Guidelines for Out-of-School Time Programs to support a healthy environment for Philadelphia youth in 200 OST programs. Health Promotion Council participated in an enhanced cross-site evaluation with the national Robert Wood Johnson Foundation evaluator during the final year of funding to learn more about food and nutrition in the OST setting, and to share data and engage the OST food providers. A plate waste study measured the quantity and nutrition composition of meals served to youth compared to food not eaten. Staff interviews measured program adherence to the Healthy Living Guidelines, along with other facets of the food environment in 7 Philadelphia OST programs. Online surveys were sent to OST programs. Food providers (sponsors) were interviewed using Appreciative Inquiry methodology to gain insight into systems, goals, and common interests. Aggregated plate waste data from 7 observations showed an average of 42% of the food uneaten after meal/snack consumption, and high sodium content of the meals. Twenty-nine staff at OST programs completed the online survey, and 3 food sponsors were interviewed. Recommendations to improve the food included increasing variety, offering more salads, fruits and vegetables, and culturally appropriate foods. Food sponsor interviews showed a variety of meal production, distribution, service and training systems, and an interest in working together. The food sponsors met to review the data and prioritized common goals. They continue to work together to improve systems and meals for food service. A food sponsors work group formed and continues as a result of sharing enhanced cross-site data about food in OST settings. Food sponsors continue to work together to improve systems and nutritional offerings for Philadelphia OST programs.

  16. Time, Concentration, and pH-Dependent Transport and Uptake of Anthocyanins in a Human Gastric Epithelial (NCI-N87 Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison A. Atnip

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Anthocyanins are the largest class of water soluble plant pigments and a common part of the human diet. They may have many potential health benefits, including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, and cardioprotective activities. However, anthocyanin metabolism is not well understood. Studies suggest that anthocyanins absorption may occur in the stomach, in which the acidic pH favors anthocyanin stability. A gastric epithelial cell line (NCI-N87 has been used to study the behavior of anthocyanins at a pH range of 3.0–7.4. This work examines the effects of time (0–3 h, concentration (50–1500 µM, and pH (3.0, 5.0, 7.4 on the transport and uptake of anthocyanins using NCI-N87 cells. Anthocyanins were transported from the apical to basolateral side of NCI-N87 cells in time and dose dependent manners. Over the treatment time of 3 h the rate of transport increased, especially with higher anthocyanin concentrations. The non-linear rate of transport may suggest an active mechanism for the transport of anthocyanins across the NCI-N87 monolayer. At apical pH 3.0, higher anthocyanin transport was observed compared to pH 5.0 and 7.4. Reduced transport of anthocyanins was found to occur at apical pH 5.0.

  17. Association of a single nucleotide polymorphic variation in the human chromosome 19q13.3 with drug responses in the NCI60 cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, K.K.; Vogel, Ulla Birgitte; Nexo, B.A.

    2009-01-01

    the correlations between the responses of the NCI60 cells to different anticancer drugs and their respective alleles of five DNA polymorphisms located in a cancer-related chromosomal area. One polymorphism, located in the 5' noncoding region of the gene ASE-1, alias CD3EAP, proved to be associated with drug...

  18. The frequency of company-sponsored alcohol brand-related sites on Facebook™-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nhean, Siphannay; Nyborn, Justin; Hinchey, Danielle; Valerio, Heather; Kinzel, Kathryn; Siegel, Michael; Jernigan, David H

    2014-06-01

    This research provides an estimate of the frequency of company-sponsored alcohol brand-related sites on Facebook™. We conducted a systematic overview of the extent of alcohol brand-related sites on Facebook™ in 2012. We conducted a 2012 Facebook™ search for sites specifically related to 898 alcohol brands across 16 different alcoholic beverage types. Descriptive statistics were produced using Microsoft SQL Server. We identified 1,017 company-sponsored alcohol-brand related sites on Facebook™. Our study advances previous literature by providing a systematic overview of the extent of alcohol brand sites on Facebook™.

  19. Student experimenter and sponsor display SE83-9 'Chix in Space' incubator

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    Student experimenter John C. Vellinger (left) explains components of an incubator for his Student Experiment (SE) 83-9 Chicken Embryo Development in Space or 'Chix in Space' to be carried onboard STS-29 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103. Mark S. Deusser, representing the sponsoring organization, holds up the incubator for inspection by STS-29 crewmembers who will monitor in-space operation of the experiment. Mission Specialist (MS) Robert C. Springer is partially visible in the lower right foreground. The student's sponsor is Kentucky Fried Chicken (KFC).

  20. 2002 Microgravity Materials Science Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, Donald (Editor); Ramachandran, Narayanan (Editor); Murphy, Karen (Editor); McCauley, Dannah (Editor); Bennett, Nancy (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    The 2002 Microgravity Materials Science Conference was held June 25-26, 2002, at the Von Braun Center, Huntsville, Alabama. Organized by the Microgravity Materials Science Discipline Working Group, sponsored by the Physical Sciences Research Division, NASA Headquarters, and hosted by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and member institutions under the Cooperative Research in Biology and Materials Science (CORBAMS) agreement, the conference provided a forum to review the current research and activities in materials science, discuss the envisioned long-term goals, highlight new crosscutting research areas of particular interest to the Physical Sciences Research Division, and inform the materials science community of research opportunities in reduced gravity. An abstracts book was published and distributed at the conference to the approximately 240 people attending, who represented industry, academia, and other NASA Centers. This CD-ROM proceedings is comprised of the research reports submitted by the Principal Investigators in the Microgravity Materials Science program.

  1. Gender and the effect of working hours on firm-sponsored training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Picchio, Matteo; van Ours, Jan

    Using employees’ longitudinal data, we study the effect of working hours on the propensity of firms to sponsor training of their employees. We show that, whereas male part-time workers are less likely to receive training than male full-timers, part-time working women are as likely to receive

  2. Gender and the Effect of Working Hours on Firm-Sponsored Training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Picchio, Matteo; van Ours, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Using employees’ longitudinal data, we study the effect of working hours on the propensity of firms to sponsor training of their employees. We show that, whereas male part-time workers are less likely to receive training than male full-timers, parttime working women are as likely to receive training

  3. Heineken in the House: Improving Online Media Reputation through Featuring a Sponsored Brand Community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeer, S.; Remmelswaal, P.; Jacobs, S.

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, more and more organizations use social media to promote their sponsorships of big events. Heineken has created a major brand community by facilitating the Holland Heineken House during the Olympic Games. This study investigates to what extent featuring a sponsored brand community on social

  4. 45 CFR 2551.25 - What are a sponsor's administrative responsibilities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... the sponsor organization and/or project service area. (f) Establish risk management policies and... project and carry out its project management responsibilities. (c) Employ a full-time project director to... responsibility for securing maximum and continuing community financial and in-kind support to operate the project...

  5. 75 FR 1790 - Draft Guidance for Institutional Review Boards, Clinical Investigators, and Sponsors: IRB...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2009-D-0605... clinical investigators and sponsors better understand their responsibilities related to continuing review...-463-6332 or 301-796-3400); or the Office of Communication, Outreach and Development (HFM-40), Center...

  6. Industry sponsored anti-smoking ads and adolescent reactance: test of a boomerang effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, L; Dauphinee, A L; Wang, Y; Fortmann, S P

    2006-02-01

    To examine whether adolescents' exposure to youth smoking prevention ads sponsored by tobacco companies promotes intentions to smoke, curiosity about smoking, and positive attitudes toward the tobacco industry. A randomised controlled experiment compared adolescents' responses to five smoking prevention ads sponsored by a tobacco company (Philip Morris or Lorillard), or to five smoking prevention ads sponsored by a non-profit organisation (the American Legacy Foundation), or to five ads about preventing drunk driving. A large public high school in California's central valley. A convenience sample of 9th and 10th graders (n = 832) ages 14-17 years. Perceptions of ad effectiveness, intention to smoke, and attitudes toward tobacco companies measured immediately after exposure. As predicted, adolescents rated Philip Morris and Lorillard ads less favourably than the other youth smoking prevention ads. Adolescents' intention to smoke did not differ as a function of ad exposure. However, exposure to Philip Morris and Lorillard ads engendered more favourable attitudes toward tobacco companies. This study demonstrates that industry sponsored anti-smoking ads do more to promote corporate image than to prevent youth smoking. By cultivating public opinion that is more sympathetic toward tobacco companies, the effect of such advertising is likely to be more harmful than helpful to youth.

  7. NICBR-Sponsored Spring Research Festival Set for May 8 and 9 | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer For the first time, the Spring Research Festival (SRF), scheduled for May 8 and 9, will be sponsored by all of the agencies that are part of the National Interagency Confederation for Biological Research (NICBR).

  8. Industrial Sponsor Perspective on Leveraging Capstone Design Projects to Enhance Their Business

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissbach, Robert S.; Snyder, Joseph W.; Evans, Edward R., Jr.; Carucci, James R., Jr.

    2017-01-01

    Capstone design projects have become commonplace among engineering and engineering technology programs. These projects are valuable tools when assessing students, as they require students to work in teams, communicate effectively, and demonstrate technical competency. The use of industrial sponsors enhances these projects by giving these projects…

  9. Informing consumers about 'hidden' advertising. A literature review of the effects of disclosing sponsored content

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerman, S.C.; van Reijmersdal, E.A.; De Pelsmacker, P.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of what is currently known in the scientific literature about the effects of disclosures of sponsored content on consumers' responses. Methodology We provide a qualitative literature review of 21 empirical studies. Findings Awareness of disclosures is rather low,

  10. Marveling at "The Man Called Nova": Comics as Sponsors of Multimodal Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Dale

    2007-01-01

    This essay theorizes the ways in which comics, and Marvel Comics in particular, acted as sponsors of multimodal literacy for the author. In doing so, the essay demonstrates the possibilities that exist in examining comics more closely and in thinking about how literacy sponsorship happens in multimodal texts. (Contains 1 figure and 13 notes.)

  11. 7 CFR 226.12 - Administrative payments to sponsoring organizations for day care homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... amount of administrative payments and food service payments for day care home operations. (b) Start-up... for day care homes. 226.12 Section 226.12 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... day care homes. (a) General. Sponsoring organizations for day care homes shall receive payments for...

  12. "To Teach and To Sell": Irna Phillips and Her Sponsors, 1930-1954.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiter, Ellen

    1989-01-01

    Examines the relationships between Irna Phillips, the most powerful woman in soap opera production from the 1930s through the 1960s, and the sponsors of her radio soap operas. Explores how Phillips represented women both in her scripts and in her public relations efforts. (MM)

  13. 7 CFR 226.13 - Food service payments to sponsoring organizations for day care homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... (breakfasts, lunches, suppers, and snacks) and by category (tier I and tier II), served to children enrolled... eligible for free or reduced price meals submit the number of meals served, by type, to enrolled children... sponsoring organization identify enrolled children who are eligible for free or reduced price meals. In such...

  14. 75 FR 66304 - New Animal Drugs; Change of Sponsor; Monensin Blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-28

    ... [Docket No. FDA-2010-N-0002] New Animal Drugs; Change of Sponsor; Monensin Blocks AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending the animal... 64116, has informed FDA that it has transferred ownership of, and all rights and interest in, NADA 118...

  15. The Politics of Health as a School-Sponsored Ethic: Foucault, Neoliberalism, and the Unhealthy Employee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Schee, Carolyn

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the emergence of health policies targeted at the unhealthy school employee by examining how these are manifest in a Nevada school district. The analysis draws on the work of Foucault, specifically his writings on governmentality. The purpose of this critical appraisal is to problematize school-sponsored health policies by…

  16. Directory of Indochinese Health Education Materials for Southeast Asian Refugees, Refugee Sponsors and Refugee Health Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnesota State Dept. of Health, St. Paul. Refugee Education Resource Center.

    This is a directory of (print) health education materials for Indochinese refugees, refugee sponsors, and refugee health providers. Materials listed for refugees cover dental health, diseases, family planning, infant and child health, maternal care and pregnancy, legal systems, nutrition, patient instruction, and education. The directory also…

  17. Motivations of Government-Sponsored Kurdish Students for Pursuing Postgraduate Studies Abroad; An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Ahmad Bayiz; Hassan, Hemin Ali; Al-Ahmedi, Mustafa Wshyar Abdulla

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the motivations of government-sponsored Kurdish students to study abroad and the reasons for choosing a particular country as their destination choice. Based on data we collected through an online survey and follow-up interviews, we compare demographic differences to explore the diversity among this cohort. The findings of the…

  18. 42 CFR 403.822 - Reimbursement of transitional assistance and associated sponsor requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Reimbursement of transitional assistance and associated sponsor requirements. 403.822 Section 403.822 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... Prescription Drug Discount Card and Transitional Assistance Program § 403.822 Reimbursement of transitional...

  19. The Impact of Employer-Sponsored Educational Assistance Benefits on Community College Student Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Henry; Smith, Douglas

    2017-01-01

    Studies of community college finance often focus on revenue sources from the state and local government, private foundations, and tuition. While these resources are important, an often-neglected source of revenue is employer-sponsored educational assistance benefits for students. Given the dearth of literature on the benefits of this funding…

  20. 4th openlab Board of Sponsors Meeting takes place at CERN on July 6, 2005

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2005-01-01

    The 4th openlab Board of Sponsors Meeting is taking place at CERN, room 513, 1-024, the 6th July 2005. The meeting will open with an Executive Session in the presence of Dr. Robert Aymar, Director General of CERN

  1. 29 CFR 4043.29 - Change in contributing sponsor or controlled group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... assumptions and methodology in § 4010.4(b)(2) of this chapter. (4) Public company/80-percent funded. Notice is... the plan's contributing sponsor before the effective date of the transaction is a public company, 30...” includes, but is not limited to, a legally binding agreement, whether or not written, to transfer ownership...

  2. Participants in School-Sponsored and Independent Sports: Perceptions of Self and Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Beverly A.; Francis, Sally K.

    1993-01-01

    Examined perceptions of social competence and family dynamics among adolescent participants in school-sponsored and independent sports (baseball and skateboarding). Findings from 271 adolescents revealed that perceptions of social competence were differentially related to degree of sports involvement and perceived skill but were not related to…

  3. Undergraduates' Perceptions of Conflict of Interest in Industry-Sponsored Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Heather Brodie

    2018-01-01

    The prevalence of industry-sponsored research has led to significant concerns about financial conflicts of interest and the impact on research findings. This case study sought to examine how students considered conflict of interest when establishing the cognitive authority of a journal article. The case study used a mixed methods pretest and…

  4. 14 CFR 1214.306 - Payload specialist relationship with sponsoring institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Payload specialist relationship with... ADMINISTRATION SPACE FLIGHT Payload Specialists for Space Transportation System (STS) Missions § 1214.306 Payload specialist relationship with sponsoring institutions. Specialists who are not U.S. Government employees must...

  5. 47 CFR 68.602 - Sponsor of the Administrative Council for Terminal Attachments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Attachments. (a) The Telecommunications Industry Association (TIA) and the Alliance for Telecommunications... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Sponsor of the Administrative Council for Terminal Attachments. 68.602 Section 68.602 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED...

  6. Tendències investigadores de la ciència de la informació i la biblioteconomia a Iberoamèrica i al Carib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menéndez Echavarría, Alfredo Luis

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectiu: aquest article presenta categories que mostren tendències investigadores de la ciència de la informació i la biblioteconomia en l'entorn d'Iberoamèrica i el Carib. Les categories han estat producte d'una recerca l'objectiu de la qual es relaciona amb l'anàlisi d'aquests aspectes predictius i prospectius de la disciplina, així com la configuració de l'horitzó d'aquest camp des d'una perspectiva científica. -- Metodologia: l'enfocament que assumeix el projecte és de caràcter mixt, ja que integra l'anàlisi quantitativa i qualitativa, tenint en compte que s'utilitzen tècniques bibliomètriques, i procediments que integren l'ús de variables de mesura i obtenció d'indicadors de producció científica. De la mateixa manera, s'examinen i descriuen els articles seleccionats respecte del seu contingut teoricoepistemològic, recuperats del Web of Science, informació d'Iberoamèrica i del Carib, entre els anys 2009 i 2013, corresponents als títols de revistes que integren la categoria temàticaObjetivo: este artículo presenta categorías que evidencian tendencias investigativas de la ciencia de la información y la bibliotecología en el entorno de Iberoamérica y el Caribe. Estas han sido producto de una investigación cuyo objetivo se relaciona con el análisis de estos aspectos predictivos y prospectivos de la disciplina, así como la configuración del horizonte de este campo desde una perspectiva científica. -- Metodología: el enfoque que asume el proyecto es de carácter mixto, pues integra el análisis cuantitativo y cualitativo, teniendo en cuenta que se utilizan técnicas bibliométricas, y procedimientos que integran el uso de variables de medición y obtención de indicadores de producción científica. De igual modo se examinan y describen los artículos seleccionados respecto de su contenido teórico-epistemológico, recuperados de la Web of Science, información de Iberoamérica y el Caribe, entre los años 2009 y

  7. Imaging Sciences Workshop Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candy, J.V.

    1996-11-21

    This report contains the proceedings of the Imaging Sciences Workshop sponsored by C.A.S.LS., the Center for Advanced Signal & Image Sciences. The Center, established primarily to provide a forum where researchers can freely exchange ideas on the signal and image sciences in a comfortable intellectual environment, has grown over the last two years with the opening of a Reference Library (located in Building 272). The Technical Program for the 1996 Workshop include a variety of efforts in the Imaging Sciences including applications in the Microwave Imaging, highlighted by the Micro-Impulse Radar (MIR) system invented at LLNL, as well as other applications in this area. Special sessions organized by various individuals in Speech, Acoustic Ocean Imaging, Radar Ocean Imaging, Ultrasonic Imaging, and Optical Imaging discuss various applica- tions of real world problems. For the more theoretical, sessions on Imaging Algorithms and Computed Tomography were organized as well as for the more pragmatic featuring a session on Imaging Systems.

  8. Experiències de realitat augmentada en biblioteques : estat de la qüestió

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arroyo Vázquez, Natalia

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectiu: donar a conèixer les experiències més significatives d'ús de la realitat augmentada en biblioteques, amb una especial atenció als resultats obtinguts, les aportacions i les limitacions que s'han de tenir en compte. -- Metodologia: revisió bibliogràfica, selecció i anàlisi d'experiències sobre l'ús de realitat augmentada en biblioteques. -- Resultats: tot i ser una tecnologia recent, són diversos els exemples d'ús de la realitat augmentada en biblioteques. No obstant això, es fa necessari donar a conèixer els resultats d'aquestes experiències, de manera que puguin servir no solament com a model, sinó també per conèixer què és el que funciona. Es presenta als professionals un catàleg d'usos de la realitat augmentada en biblioteques, dels quals s'analitzen de forma crítica els possibles beneficis i limitacions, i s'agrupen en set apartats segons la utilitat: geolocalització, contextualització històrica, exposicions i altres activitats, publicacions, enriquiment dels espais físics, alfabetització i ludificació i, finalment, usos professionals.Objetivo: dar a conocer las experiencias más significativas de uso de la realidad aumentada en bibliotecas, con una especial atención a los resultados obtenidos, las aportaciones y las limitaciones que se deben tener en cuenta. -- Metodología: revisión bibliográfica, selección y análisis de experiencias sobre el uso de realidad aumentada en bibliotecas. -- Resultados: a pesar de ser una tecnología reciente, son varios los ejemplos de uso de la realidad aumentada en bibliotecas. Sin embargo, se hace necesario dar a conocer los resultados de dichas experiencias, de forma que puedan servir no solo como modelo, sino también para conocer qué es lo que funciona. Se presenta a los profesionales un catálogo de usos de la realidad aumentada en bibliotecas, analizados de forma crítica sus posibles beneficios y limitaciones, agrupados en siete apartados según la utilidad

  9. Experiències de realitat augmentada en biblioteques : estat de la qüestió

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arroyo Vázquez, Natalia

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectiu: donar a conèixer les experiències més significatives d'ús de la realitat augmentada en biblioteques, fent una especial atenció als resultats obtinguts, les aportacions i les limitacions que s'han de tenir en compte. -- Metodologia: revisió bibliogràfica, selecció i anàlisi d'experiències sobre l'ús de la realitat augmentada en biblioteques. -- Resultats: malgrat ser una tecnologia recent, els exemples d'ús de la realitat augmentada en biblioteques són diversos. No obstant això, es fa necessari donar a conèixer els resultats d'aquestes experiències, de manera que puguin servir no solament com a model, sinó també per conèixer què és el que funciona. Es presenta als professionals un catàleg d'usos de la realitat augmentada en biblioteques, dels quals s'analitzen de forma crítica els possibles beneficis i limitacions, i s'agrupen en set apartats segons la utilitat: geolocalització, contextualització històrica, exposicions i altres activitats, publicacions, enriquiment dels espais físics, alfabetització i ludificació i, finalment, usos professionals.Objetivo: dar a conocer las experiencias más significativas de uso de la realidad aumentada en bibliotecas, con una especial atención a los resultados obtenidos, las aportaciones y las limitaciones que se deben tener en cuenta. -- Metodología: revisión bibliográfica, selección y análisis de experiencias sobre el uso de la realidad aumentada en bibliotecas. -- Resultados: a pesar de ser una tecnología reciente, son varios los ejemplos de uso de la realidad aumentada en bibliotecas. Sin embargo, se hace necesario dar a conocer los resultados de dichas experiencias, de forma que puedan servir no solo como modelo, sino también para conocer qué es lo que funciona. Se presenta a los profesionales un catálogo de usos de la realidad aumentada en bibliotecas, analizados de forma crítica sus posibles beneficios y limitaciones, agrupados en siete apartados según la

  10. 42 CFR 423.2010 - When CMS, the IRE, or Part D plan sponsors may participate in an ALJ hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false When CMS, the IRE, or Part D plan sponsors may... PRESCRIPTION DRUG BENEFIT Reopening, ALJ Hearings, MAC review, and Judicial Review § 423.2010 When CMS, the IRE... require, CMS, the IRE, and/or the Part D plan sponsor to participate in any proceedings before the ALJ...

  11. 75 FR 54017 - New Animal Drugs; Change of Sponsor; Penicillin G Benzathine and Penicillin G Procaine Suspension...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-03

    ... [Docket No. FDA-2010-N-0002] New Animal Drugs; Change of Sponsor; Penicillin G Benzathine and Penicillin G... animal drug regulations to reflect a change of sponsor for two new animal drug applications (NADAs) from..., Syracuse, NY 13201, has informed FDA that it has transferred ownership of, and all rights and interest in...

  12. 75 FR 5637 - Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs; Secondary School Student Sponsor On-Site Reviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-03

    ... will include, but are not limited to, decision-making processes (including the numbers of students... the changing demographics of potential American host families, however, are having an impact on the... attention; cap program growth; more closely monitor sponsor performance; evaluate sponsor compliance; and...

  13. Biomedical learning experiences for middle school girls sponsored by the Kansas State University Student Chapter of the IEEE EMBS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Lucinda; Griffith, Connor; Young, Ethan; Sullivan, Adriann; Schuler, Jeff; Arnold-Christian, Susan; Warren, Steve

    2009-01-01

    Learning experiences for middle school girls are an effective means to steer young women toward secondary engineering curricula that they might not have otherwise considered. Sponsorship of such experiences by a collegiate student group is worthwhile, as it gives the group common purpose and places college students in a position to mentor these young women. This paper addresses learning experiences in different areas of bio-medical engineering offered to middle school girls in November 2008 via a day-long workshop entitled "Engineering The Body." The Kansas State University (KSU) Student Chapter of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBS) worked with the KSU Women in Engineering and Science Program (WESP) to design and sponsor these experiences, which addressed the areas of joint mechanics, electrocardiograms, membrane transport, computer mouse design, and audio filters for cochlear implants. Fifty five middle-school girls participated in this event, affirming the notion that biomedical engineering appeals to young women and that early education and recruitment efforts have the potential to expand the biomedical engineering talent pool.

  14. Clinical studies in orthodontics--an overview of NIDR-sponsored clinical orthodontic studies in the US.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumrind, S

    1998-11-01

    A number of clinical trials sponsored by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) use rigorous methods of data acquisition and analysis previously developed in fundamental biology and the physical sciences. The naive expectation that these trials would lead relatively rapidly to definitive answers concerning the therapeutic strategies and techniques under study is dispelled. This presentation focuses on delineating differences between the study of central tendencies and individual variation, more specifically on the strategy to study this variation: measure additional sources of variance within each patient at more timepoints and perhaps with greater precision. As rigorous orthodontic research is still in its infancy, the problem of defining the proper mix between prospective and retrospective trials is discussed. In view of the high costs of prospective clinical trials, many of the questions germane to orthodontics can be answered by well-conducted retrospective trials, assuming that properly randomized sampling procedures are employed. Definitive clinical trials are likely to require better theoretical constructs, better instrumentation, and better measures than now available. Reasons for concern are the restricted resources available and the fact that current mensurational approaches may not detect many of the individual differences. The task of constructing sharable databases and record bases stored in digital form and available either remotely from servers, or locally from CD-ROMs or optical disks, is crucial to the optimization of future investigations.

  15. Incorporació de petites seqüències de cinema comercial en l’ensenyament de les drogodependències. Assaig pilot en l'assignatura de Toxicologia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Rodamilans-Pérez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available El Grup d'Innovació Docent Orfila, en el seu projecte per millorar la qualitat de la docència, està assajant la utilització del cinema amb finalitat didàctica. El material didàctic que hem desenvolupat en aquest projecte són petites seqüències de pel·lícules comercials de 3 a 5 minuts, per ser utilitzades com a elements il·lustratius del procés addictiu. Se seleccionen escenes de la filmografia i s'adeqüen als nostres programes docents. Es recull l'opinió dels professors participants, així com la dels alumnes, mitjançant una entrevista personal i una enquesta d'opinió, respectivament.De les entrevistes als professors i de les enquestes d'opinió dels alumnes, es dedueix un alt grau de satisfacció.

  16. Computer Science Research Institute 2004 annual report of activities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeLap, Barbara J.; Womble, David Eugene; Ceballos, Deanna Rose

    2006-03-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Computer Science Research Institute (CSRI) at Sandia National Laboratories during the period January 1, 2004 to December 31, 2004. During this period the CSRI hosted 166 visitors representing 81 universities, companies and laboratories. Of these 65 were summer students or faculty. The CSRI partially sponsored 2 workshops and also organized and was the primary host for 4 workshops. These 4 CSRI sponsored workshops had 140 participants--74 from universities, companies and laboratories, and 66 from Sandia. Finally, the CSRI sponsored 14 long-term collaborative research projects and 5 Sabbaticals.

  17. Computer Science Research Institute 2003 annual report of activities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeLap, Barbara J.; Womble, David Eugene; Ceballos, Deanna Rose

    2006-03-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Computer Science Research Institute (CSRI) at Sandia National Laboratories during the period January 1, 2003 to December 31, 2003. During this period the CSRI hosted 164 visitors representing 78 universities, companies and laboratories. Of these 78 were summer students or faculty members. The CSRI partially sponsored 5 workshops and also organized and was the primary host for 3 workshops. These 3 CSRI sponsored workshops had 178 participants--137 from universities, companies and laboratories, and 41 from Sandia. Finally, the CSRI sponsored 18 long-term collaborative research projects and 5 Sabbaticals.

  18. Computer Science Research Institute 2005 annual report of activities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watts, Bernadette M.; Collis, Samuel Scott; Ceballos, Deanna Rose; Womble, David Eugene

    2008-04-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Computer Science Research Institute (CSRI) at Sandia National Laboratories during the period January 1, 2005 to December 31, 2005. During this period, the CSRI hosted 182 visitors representing 83 universities, companies and laboratories. Of these, 60 were summer students or faculty. The CSRI partially sponsored 2 workshops and also organized and was the primary host for 3 workshops. These 3 CSRI sponsored workshops had 105 participants, 78 from universities, companies and laboratories, and 27 from Sandia. Finally, the CSRI sponsored 12 long-term collaborative research projects and 3 Sabbaticals.

  19. Student Science Training Program in Mathematics, Physics and Computer Science. Final Report to the National Science Foundation. Artificial Intelligence Memo No. 393.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelson, Harold; diSessa, Andy

    During the summer of 1976, the MIT Artificial Intelligence Laboratory sponsored a Student Science Training Program in Mathematics, Physics, and Computer Science for high ability secondary school students. This report describes, in some detail, the style of the program, the curriculum and the projects the students under-took. It is hoped that this…

  20. CPTC and NIST-sponsored Yeast Reference Material Now Publicly Available | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The yeast protein extract (RM8323) developed by National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) under the auspices of NCI's CPTC initiative is currently available to the public at https://www-s.nist.gov/srmors/view_detail.cfm?srm=8323. The yeast proteome offers researchers a unique biological reference material. RM8323 is the most extensively characterized complex biological proteome and the only one associated with several large-scale studies to estimate protein abundance across a wide concentration range.

  1. The Effect of Massachusetts' Health Reform on Employer-Sponsored Insurance Premiums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogan, John F; Hubbard, R Glenn; Kessler, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we use publicly available data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey - Insurance Component (MEPS-IC) to investigate the effect of Massachusetts' health reform plan on employer-sponsored insurance premiums. We tabulate premium growth for private-sector employers in Massachusetts and the United States as a whole for 2004 - 2008. We estimate the effect of the plan as the difference in premium growth between Massachusetts and the United States between 2006 and 2008-that is, before versus after the plan-over and above the difference in premium growth for 2004 to 2006. We find that health reform in Massachusetts increased single-coverage employer-sponsored insurance premiums by about 6 percent, or $262. Although our research design has important limitations, it does suggest that policy makers should be concerned about the consequences of health reform for the cost of private insurance.

  2. L’avaluació de competències a l’Educació Superior: el cas d’un màster universitari

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Ma. Triadó i Ivern

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available La implantació de les competències és una tasca que ha anat incorporant-se paulatinament pels docents de la universitat espanyola amb l’entrada en vigor del EEES. Tot i això, encara s’està lluny d’aconseguir nivells òptims d’avaluació de les mateixes. Aquest article permet reflexionar sobre algunes bones practiques al respecte i sobre les dificultats i limitacions que apareixen en voler implementar un canvi en les metodologies docents, en el marc d’un màster universitari. Els resultats indiquen el grau en què s’han avaluat i adquirit tant les competències genèriques com especifiques en l’educació superior.

  3. Predictors of Weight Loss Maintenance following an Insurance-Sponsored Weight Management Program

    OpenAIRE

    Christiaan G. Abildso; Olivier Schmid; Megan Byrd; Sam Zizzi; Alessandro Quartiroli; Sean J. Fitzpatrick

    2014-01-01

    Intentional weight loss among overweight and obese adults (body mass index ≥ 25 kg/m2) is associated with numerous health benefits, but weight loss maintenance (WLM) following participation in weight management programming has proven to be elusive. Many individuals attempting to lose weight join formal programs, especially women, but these programs vary widely in focus, as do postprogram weight regain results. We surveyed 2,106 former participants in a community-based, insurance-sponsored wei...

  4. India : Note on Public Financial Management and Accountability in Centrally Sponsored Schemes

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2006-01-01

    The budget outlay for Centrally Sponsored Schemes (CSS) for India in 2005-06 is significantly higher as compared to the previous year's level of Rs.395,000 million. This includes increased allocations for rural roads, rural employment, and education and nutritional support for pre-school children. At present there are over 200 such schemes in operation, of which a dozen accounts for more t...

  5. The Impact of Repealing the Exclusion for Employer-Sponsored Insurance

    OpenAIRE

    Gillette, Robert; Hunter, Gillian; Lurie, Ithai Z.; Siegel, Jonathan; Silverstein, Gerald

    2010-01-01

    The paper uses a new micro-simulation model to estimate the impact of repealing the employer-sponsored insurance (ESI) exclusion on ESI coverage given two alternative scenarios: a non-group market that is fully underwritten and a modified community-rated market where the low income population receives premium subsidies. When the alternative to ESI is the underwritten market, repeal of the exclusion reduces ESI coverage by 14 percent both overall and for those over 400 percent FPL. In contrast...

  6. Does Sport Event Involvement Influence Brand Recognition of Official Sponsors and Ambush Marketers?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piątkowska Monika

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of the study is to verify how event involvement in the UEFA Euro 2012 influenced the recognition of both sponsors’ and ambushers’ brands. Computer-Assisted Personal Interviews were conducted on a representative sample of the Polish society (N = 1,000. On the basis of five groups of consumers regarding involvement in the event, authors examined brand recognition, using Top of Mind Awareness (TOMA tests of official sponsors and ambushers.

  7. Estimating the Returns to Firm-Sponsored on-the-Job and Classroom Training

    OpenAIRE

    Benoit Dostie

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we estimate returns to classroom and on-the-job firm-sponsored training in terms of value-added per worker using longitudinal linked employee-employer Canadian data from 1999 to 2006. We estimate a standard production function controlling for endogenous training decisions because of perceived net benefits and time-varying market conditions using dynamic panel GMM methods. We find that employees who undertook classroom training are 11 percent more productive than otherwise simil...

  8. Why Consumers Misattribute Sponsorships to Non-Sponsor Brands: Differential Roles of Item and Relational Communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Clinton S; Humphreys, Michael S; Cornwell, T Bettina

    2018-02-01

    Brands engaged in sponsorship of events commonly have objectives that depend on consumer memory for the sponsor-event relationship (e.g., sponsorship awareness). Consumers however, often misattribute sponsorships to nonsponsor competitor brands, indicating erroneous memory for these relationships. The current research uses an item and relational memory framework to reveal sponsor brands may inadvertently foster this misattribution when they communicate relational linkages to events. Effects can be explained via differential roles of communicating item information (information that supports processing item distinctiveness) versus relational information (information that supports processing relationships among items) in contributing to memory outcomes. Experiment 1 uses event-cued brand recall to show that correct memory retrieval is best supported by communicating relational information when sponsorship relationships are not obvious (low congruence). In contrast, correct retrieval is best supported by communicating item information when relationships are obvious (high congruence). Experiment 2 uses brand-cued event recall to show that, against conventional marketing recommendations, relational information increases misattribution, whereas item information guards against misattribution. Results suggest sponsor brands must distinguish between item and relational communications to enhance correct retrieval and limit misattribution. Methodologically, the work shows that choice of cueing direction is critical in differentially revealing patterns of correct and incorrect retrieval with pair relationships. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Systematic review of employer-sponsored wellness strategies and their economic and health-related outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaspin, Lisa C; Gorman, Kathleen M; Miller, Ross M

    2013-02-01

    This review determines the characteristics and health-related and economic outcomes of employer-sponsored wellness programs and identifies possible reasons for their success. PubMed, ABI/Inform, and Business Source Premier databases, and Corporate Wellness Magazine were searched. English-language articles published from 2005 to 2011 that reported characteristics of employer-sponsored wellness programs and their impact on health-related and economic outcomes among US employees were accepted. Data were abstracted, synthesized, and interpreted. Twenty references were accepted. Wellness interventions were classified into health assessments, lifestyle management, and behavioral health. Improved economic outcomes were reported (health care costs, return on investment, absenteeism, productivity, workers' compensation, utilization) as well as decreased health risks. Programs associated with favorable outcomes had several characteristics in common. First, the corporate culture encouraged wellness to improve employees' lives, not only to reduce costs. Second, employees and leadership were strongly motivated to support the wellness programs and to improve their health in general. Third, employees were motivated by a participation-friendly corporate policy and physical environment. Fourth, successful programs adapted to the changing needs of the employees. Fifth, community health organizations provided support, education, and treatment. Sixth, successful wellness programs utilized technology to facilitate health risk assessments and wellness education. Improved health-related and economic outcomes were associated with employer-sponsored wellness programs. Companies with successful programs tended to include wellness as part of their corporate culture and supported employee participation in several key ways.

  10. Computational Science And Engineering Software Sustainability And Productivity (CSESSP) Challenges Workshop Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    Networking and Information Technology Research and Development, Executive Office of the President — This report details the challenges and opportunities discussed at the NITRD sponsored multi-agency workshop on Computational Science and Engineering Software...

  11. Ternary copper(II) complex: NCI60 screening, toxicity studies, and evaluation of efficacy in xenograft models of nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Tai-Lin; Abdul Aziz, Norazlin; Mohd Kornain, Noor-Kaslina; Samiulla, D. S.; Lo, Kwok-Wai; Ng, Chew-Hee

    2018-01-01

    Copper(II) ternary complex, [Cu(phen)(C-dmg)(H2O)]NO3 was evaluated against a panel of cell lines, tested for in vivo efficacy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma xenograft models as well as for toxicity in NOD scid gamma mice. The Cu(II) complex displayed broad spectrum cytotoxicity against multiple cancer types, including lung, colon, central nervous system, melanoma, ovarian, and prostate cancer cell lines in the NCI-60 panel. The Cu(II) complex did not cause significant induction of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A and 1A enzymes but moderately inhibited CYP isoforms 1A2, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6, 2B6, 2C8 and 3A4. The complex significantly inhibited tumor growth in nasopharyngeal carcinoma xenograft bearing mice models at doses which were well tolerated without causing significant or permanent toxic side effects. However, higher doses which resulted in better inhibition of tumor growth also resulted in toxicity. PMID:29329342

  12. Effect of bcl-2 antisense oligodexynucleotides on chemotherapy efficacy of Vp-16 on human small cell lung cancer cell line NCI-H69

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Wenqian; Liu Zhonghua

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of bcl-2 antisense oligodexynucleotides on chemotherapy efficacy of Vp-16 on human small cell lung cancer cell line NCI-H69. Methods: Cultured NCI-H69 cells were derided into 4 groups: bcl-2 antisense oligodexynucleotides (ASODN) added, sense oligodexynucleotides (SODN) added, nonsense oligodexynucleotides (NSODN) added and control (no nucleotides added), the oligodexynucleotides were transfected into the cultured cells with oligofectamine. The cellular expression of Bcl-2 protein 72h later was examined with Western-Blot. The four different groups of cultured tumor cells were treated with etopside(Vp-16) at different concentrations (0, 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0 μg/ml) for 48hr then the cell survival fraction was assessed with MTY test. Results: The apoptotic rate of cells in the ASODN group was significantly higher than that of the control group, also, the survival fraction of cells in ASODN group was significantly lower than that of the control group. The Bcl-2 protein expression in ASODN group was significantly lower than that in the control group, but no inhibition was observed in SODN and NSODN groups. Conclusion: The bcl-2 ASODN could enhance the sensitivity to chemotherapy with Vp-16 in small cell lung cancer cell line NCI-H69 by effectively blocking bcl-2 gene expression. (authors)

  13. Resveratrol enhances radiosensitivity of human non-small cell lung cancer NCI-H838 cells accompanied by inhibition of nuclear factor-kappa B activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, Hui-Fen; Kuo Cheng-Deng; Yang, Yuh-Cheng; Lin, Chin-Ping; Tai, Hung-Chi; Chen, Yu-Jen; Chen, Yu-Yawn

    2005-01-01

    Resveratrol, a polyphenol in red wine, possesses many pharmacological activities including cardio-protection, chemoprevention, anti-tumor effects, and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) inactivation. The present study was designed to evaluate the effects and possible mechanism of resveratrol in enhancing radiosensitivity of lung cancer cells. Human non-small cell lung cancer NCI-H838 cells were irradiated with or without resveratrol pretreatment. The surviving fraction and sensitizer enhancement ratio (SER) were estimated by using a colony formation assay and linear-quadratic model. The cell-cycle distribution was evaluated by using prospidium iodide staining and flow cytometry. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)-based assay with immobilized oligonucleotide was performed to assess the DNA binding activity of NF-κB. Resveratrol had no direct growth-inhibitory effect on NCI-H838 cells treated for 24 hours with doses up to 25 μM. Pretreatment with resveratrol significantly enhanced cell killing by radiation, with an SER up to 2.2. Radiation activated NF-κB, an effect reversed by resveratrol pretreatment. Resveratrol resulted in a decrease of cells in the G 0 /G 1 phase and an increase in the S phase. Our results demonstrate that resveratrol enhances the radiosensitivity of NCI-H838 cells accompanied by NF-κB inhibition and S-phase arrest. (author)

  14. NCI think tank concerning the identifiability of biospecimens and "omic" data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weil, Carol J; Mechanic, Leah E; Green, Tiffany; Kinsinger, Christopher; Lockhart, Nicole C; Nelson, Stefanie A; Rodriguez, Laura L; Buccini, Laura D

    2013-12-01

    On 11 and 12 June 2012, the National Cancer Institute hosted a think tank concerning the identifiability of biospecimens and "omic" data in order to explore challenges surrounding this complex and multifaceted topic. The think tank brought together 46 leaders from several fields, including cancer genomics, bioinformatics, human subject protection, patient advocacy, and commercial genetics. The first day involved presentations regarding the state of the science of reidentification; current and proposed regulatory frameworks for assessing identifiability; developments in law, industry, and biotechnology; and the expectations of patients and research participants. The second day was spent by think tank participants in small breakout groups designed to address specific subtopics under the umbrella issue of identifiability, including considerations for the development of best practices for data sharing and consent, and targeted opportunities for further empirical research. We describe the outcomes of this 2-day meeting, including two complementary themes that emerged from moderated discussions following the presentations on day 1, and ideas presented for further empirical research to discern the preferences and concerns of research participants about data sharing and individual identifiability.

  15. NASA Microgravity Materials Science Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, D. C. (Compiler); McCauley, D. E. (Compiler)

    1999-01-01

    The Microgravity Materials Science Conference was held July 14-16, 1998 at the Von Braun Center in Huntsville, AL. It was organized by the Microgravity Materials Science Discipline Working Group, sponsored by the Microgravity Research Division at NASA Headquarters, and hosted by the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and the Alliance for Microgravity Materials Science and Applications. It was the third NASA conference of this type in the microgravity materials science discipline. The microgravity science program sponsored approximately 125 investigations and 100 principal investigators in FY98, almost all of whom made oral or poster presentations at this conference. The conference's purpose was to inform the materials science community of research opportunities in reduced gravity in preparation for a NASA Research Announcement scheduled for release in late 1998 by the Microgravity Research Division at NASA Headquarters. The conference was aimed at materials science researchers from academia, industry, and government. A tour of the Marshall Space Flight Center microgravity research facilities was held on July 16, 1998. This volume is comprised of the research reports submitted by the principal investigators after the conference.

  16. Office of Science User Facilities Summary Report, Fiscal Year 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science provides the Nation’s researchers with worldclass scientific user facilities to propel the U.S. to the forefront of science and innovation. A user facility is a federally sponsored research facility available for external use to advance scientific or technical knowledge under the following conditions: open, accessible, free, collaborative, competitive, and unique.

  17. Teacher's Guide to SERAPHIM Software V. Chemistry: The Central Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogner, Donna J.

    Designed to assist chemistry teachers in selecting appropriate software programs, this publication is the fifth in a series of six teacher's guides from Project SERAPHIM, a program sponsored by the National Science Foundation. This guide is keyed to the chapters of the text "Chemistry: The Central Science." Program suggestions are…

  18. Information and Announcements Science Academies 81st Refresher ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    2016-09-25

    Sep 25, 2016 ... are in (a) mechanics, (b) heat, (c) electricity both DC and AC, (d) magnetism, (e) relaxation, (f) phase sensitive detection technique, and (g) non-linear dynamics. This course is sponsored by Indian Academy of Sciences,. Bangalore, Indian National Science Academy, New Delhi and National Academy of ...

  19. Science Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laboratory Delivering science and technology to protect our nation and promote world stability Science & ; Innovation Collaboration Careers Community Environment Science & Innovation Facilities Science Pillars Research Library Science Briefs Science News Science Highlights Lab Organizations Science Programs Applied

  20. Danusertib, a potent pan-Aurora kinase and ABL kinase inhibitor, induces cell cycle arrest and programmed cell death and inhibits epithelial to mesenchymal transition involving the PI3K/Akt/mTOR-mediated signaling pathway in human gastric cancer AGS and NCI-N78 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan CX

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Chun-Xiu Yuan,1,2 Zhi-Wei Zhou,2,3 Yin-Xue Yang,4 Zhi-Xu He,3 Xueji Zhang,5 Dong Wang,6 Tianxing Yang,7 Si-Yuan Pan,8 Xiao-Wu Chen,9 Shu-Feng Zhou2 1Department of Oncology, General Hospital, Ningxia Medical University, Yinchuan, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Pharmaceutical Science, College of Pharmacy, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA; 3Guizhou Provincial Key Laboratory for Regenerative Medicine, Stem Cell and Tissue Engineering Research Center and Sino-US Joint Laboratory for Medical Sciences, Guiyang Medical University, Guiyang, 4Department of Colorectal Surgery, General Hospital, Ningxia Medical University, Yinchuan, 5Research Center for Bioengineering and Sensing Technology, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 6Cancer Center, Daping Hospital and Research Institute of Surgery, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, People’s Republic of China; 7Department of Internal Medicine, University of Utah and Salt Lake Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Salt Lake City, UT, USA; 8Department of Pharmacology, School of Chinese Materia Medica, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, 9Department of General Surgery, The First People’s Hospital of Shunde, Southern Medical University, Shunde, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide, with a poor response to current chemotherapy. Danusertib is a pan-inhibitor of the Aurora kinases and a third-generation Bcr-Abl tyrosine kinase inhibitor with potent anticancer effects, but its antitumor effect and underlying mechanisms in the treatment of human gastric cancer are unknown. This study aimed to investigate the effects of danusertib on cell growth, apoptosis, autophagy, and epithelial to mesenchymal transition and the molecular mechanisms involved in human gastric cancer AGS and NCI-N78 cells. The results showed that danusertib had potent growth-inhibitory, apoptosis-inducing, and

  1. Development, implementation and critique of a bioethics framework for pharmaceutical sponsors of human biomedical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Campen, Luann E; Therasse, Donald G; Klopfenstein, Mitchell; Levine, Robert J

    2015-11-01

    Pharmaceutical human biomedical research is a multi-dimensional endeavor that requires collaboration among many parties, including those who sponsor, conduct, participate in, or stand to benefit from the research. Human subjects' protections have been promulgated to ensure that the benefits of such research are accomplished with respect for and minimal risk to individual research participants, and with an overall sense of fairness. Although these protections are foundational to clinical research, most ethics guidance primarily highlights the responsibilities of investigators and ethics review boards. Currently, there is no published resource that comprehensively addresses bioethical responsibilities of industry sponsors; including their responsibilities to parties who are not research participants, but are, nevertheless key stakeholders in the endeavor. To fill this void, in 2010 Eli Lilly and Company instituted a Bioethics Framework for Human Biomedical Research. This paper describes how the framework was developed and implemented and provides a critique based on four years of experience. A companion article provides the actual document used by Eli Lilly and Company to guide ethical decisions regarding all phases of human clinical trials. While many of the concepts presented in this framework are not novel, compiling them in a manner that articulates the ethical responsibilities of a sponsor is novel. By utilizing this type of bioethics framework, we have been able to develop bioethics positions on various topics, provide research ethics consultations, and integrate bioethics into the daily operations of our human biomedical research. We hope that by sharing these companion papers we will stimulate discussion within and outside the biopharmaceutical industry for the benefit of the multiple parties involved in pharmaceutical human biomedical research.

  2. Mortality Risk from Co-Morbidities independent of Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Status: NCI SEER-based Cohort Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swede, Helen; Sarwar, Amna; Magge, Anil; Braithwaite, Dejana; Cook, Linda S.; Gregorio, David I.; Jones, Beth A; Hoag, Jessica; Gonsalves, Lou; Salner, Andrew; Zarfos, Kristen; Andemariam, Biree; Stevens, Richard G; Dugan, Alicia; Pensa, Mellisa; Brockmeyer, Jessica

    2017-01-01

    Purpose A comparatively high prevalence of co-morbidities among African-American/Blacks (AA/B) has been implicated in disparate survival in breast cancer. There is a scarcity of data, however, if this effect persists when accounting for the adverse triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) subtype which occurs at three-fold the rate in AA/B compared to white breast cancer patients. Methods We reviewed charts of 214 white and 202 AA/B breast cancer patients in the NCI-SEER Connecticut Tumor Registry who were diagnosed in 2000-07. We employed the Charlson Co-Morbidity Index (CCI), a weighted 17-item tool to predict risk of death in cancer populations. Cox Survival Analyses estimated hazard ratios (HR) for all-cause mortality in relation to TNBC and CCI adjusting for clinicopathological factors. Results Among patients with SEER-Local Stage, TNBC increased the risk of death (HR=2.18, 95% CI 1.14-4.16), which was attenuated when the CCI score was added to the model (Adj. HR=1.50, 95% CI 0.74-3.01). Conversely, the adverse impact of the CCI score persisted when controlling for TNBC (Adj. HR=1.49, 95% CI 1.29-1.71; per one point increase). Similar patterns were observed in SEER-Regional Stage but estimated HRs were lower. AA/B patients with a CCI score of ≥3 had a significantly higher risk of death compared to AA/B patients without comorbidities (Adj. HR=5.65, 95% CI 2.90-11.02). A lower and non-significant effect was observed for whites with a CCI of ≥3 (Adj. HR=1.90, 95% CI 0.68-5.29). Conclusions Co-morbidities at diagnosis increase risk of death independent of TNBC, and AA/B patients may be disproportionately at risk. PMID:27000206

  3. Mortality risk from comorbidities independent of triple-negative breast cancer status: NCI-SEER-based cohort analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swede, Helen; Sarwar, Amna; Magge, Anil; Braithwaite, Dejana; Cook, Linda S; Gregorio, David I; Jones, Beth A; R Hoag, Jessica; Gonsalves, Lou; L Salner, Andrew; Zarfos, Kristen; Andemariam, Biree; Stevens, Richard G; G Dugan, Alicia; Pensa, Mellisa; A Brockmeyer, Jessica

    2016-05-01

    A comparatively high prevalence of comorbidities among African-American/Blacks (AA/B) has been implicated in disparate survival in breast cancer. There is a scarcity of data, however, if this effect persists when accounting for the adverse triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) subtype which occurs at threefold the rate in AA/B compared to white breast cancer patients. We reviewed charts of 214 white and 202 AA/B breast cancer patients in the NCI-SEER Connecticut Tumor Registry who were diagnosed in 2000-2007. We employed the Charlson Co-Morbidity Index (CCI), a weighted 17-item tool to predict risk of death in cancer populations. Cox survival analyses estimated hazard ratios (HRs) for all-cause mortality in relation to TNBC and CCI adjusting for clinicopathological factors. Among patients with SEER local stage, TNBC increased the risk of death (HR 2.18, 95 % CI 1.14-4.16), which was attenuated when the CCI score was added to the model (Adj. HR 1.50, 95 % CI 0.74-3.01). Conversely, the adverse impact of the CCI score persisted when controlling for TNBC (Adj. HR 1.49, 95 % CI 1.29-1.71; per one point increase). Similar patterns were observed in SEER regional stage, but estimated HRs were lower. AA/B patients with a CCI score of ≥3 had a significantly higher risk of death compared to AA/B patients without comorbidities (Adj. HR 5.65, 95 % CI 2.90-11.02). A lower and nonsignificant effect was observed for whites with a CCI of ≥3 (Adj. HR 1.90, 95 % CI 0.68-5.29). comorbidities at diagnosis increase risk of death independent of TNBC, and AA/B patients may be disproportionately at risk.

  4. Identification of a radiosensitivity signature using integrative metaanalysis of published microarray data for NCI-60 cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Han

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the postgenome era, a prediction of response to treatment could lead to better dose selection for patients in radiotherapy. To identify a radiosensitive gene signature and elucidate related signaling pathways, four different microarray experiments were reanalyzed before radiotherapy. Results Radiosensitivity profiling data using clonogenic assay and gene expression profiling data from four published microarray platforms applied to NCI-60 cancer cell panel were used. The survival fraction at 2 Gy (SF2, range from 0 to 1 was calculated as a measure of radiosensitivity and a linear regression model was applied to identify genes or a gene set with a correlation between expression and radiosensitivity (SF2. Radiosensitivity signature genes were identified using significant analysis of microarrays (SAM and gene set analysis was performed using a global test using linear regression model. Using the radiation-related signaling pathway and identified genes, a genetic network was generated. According to SAM, 31 genes were identified as common to all the microarray platforms and therefore a common radiosensitivity signature. In gene set analysis, functions in the cell cycle, DNA replication, and cell junction, including adherence and gap junctions were related to radiosensitivity. The integrin, VEGF, MAPK, p53, JAK-STAT and Wnt signaling pathways were overrepresented in radiosensitivity. Significant genes including ACTN1, CCND1, HCLS1, ITGB5, PFN2, PTPRC, RAB13, and WAS, which are adhesion-related molecules that were identified by both SAM and gene set analysis, and showed interaction in the genetic network with the integrin signaling pathway. Conclusions Integration of four different microarray experiments and gene selection using gene set analysis discovered possible target genes and pathways relevant to radiosensitivity. Our results suggested that the identified genes are candidates for radiosensitivity biomarkers and that

  5. Breast cancer in women aging 35 years old and younger: The Egyptian National Cancer Institute (NCI) experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwish, A D; Helal, A M; Aly El-Din, N H; Solaiman, L L; Amin, A

    2017-02-01

    The aim is to identify the epidemiological and clinicopathological features associated with young breast cancer (BC) patients and to discuss factors affecting tumor recurrence and DFS. A retrospective analysis was conducted based on medical records from young females patients aged ≤35 years with pathologically confirmed primary breast cancer treated during 2008-2010 at NCI. Cases with non invasive cancer and non carcinoma histology are excluded. Of the 5408 cases diagnosed with breast cancer, 554 were young. Four hundred & fifty eight patients representing 9.2% were within our inclusion criteria. Almost half of the patients (45.9%) presented with stage III. Axillary nodes involvement was in 63.9%, 83.3% were grade 2. More than one quarter of tumors was hormone receptors negative (28.8%) & Her2 was over-expressed in 30%. Mastectomy was offered in 72% while conservative breast surgery in 26%, 69.2% received chemotherapy either adjuvant, neoadjuvant or both, 82.5% received adjuvant radiotherapy, 68.6% received hormonal therapy. Metastatic disease developed in 51.3%, with 31% having more than one site of metastases. After a median follow up period of 66 months, the median DFS of patients was 60 months. The median DFS was significantly shorter among patients with positive lymph nodes (P Breast cancer in young women is aggressive from the time of diagnosis. Our results provide baseline data of young BC in the Middle East & North Africa region; thus, contributing to future epidemiological and hospital-based researches. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Past, present, and future of statistical science

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Xihong; Banks, David L; Molenberghs, Geert; Scott, David W; Wang, Jane-Ling

    2014-01-01

    Past, Present, and Future of Statistical Science was commissioned in 2013 by the Committee of Presidents of Statistical Societies (COPSS) to celebrate its 50th anniversary and the International Year of Statistics. COPSS consists of five charter member statistical societies in North America and is best known for sponsoring prestigious awards in statistics, such as the COPSS Presidents' award. Through the contributions of a distinguished group of 50 statisticians who are past winners of at least one of the five awards sponsored by COPSS, this volume showcases the breadth and vibrancy of statisti

  7. 76 FR 70722 - Request for Co-Sponsors for the Office of Healthcare Quality's Programs To Strengthen...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-15

    ... as collaborating co- sponsors in the development and implementation of an innovative program that... life. They are among the leading causes of preventable death in the United States. On average, 1 in 3...

  8. Gender and the Effect of Working Hours on Firm-Sponsored Training

    OpenAIRE

    Picchio, Matteo; van Ours, Jan C.

    2015-01-01

    Using employees' longitudinal data, we study the effect of working hours on the propensity of firms to sponsor training of their employees. We show that, whereas male part-time workers are less likely to receive training than male full-timers, part-time working women are as likely to receive training as full-time working women. Although we cannot rule out gender-working time specific monopsony power, we speculate that the gender-specific effect of working hours on training has to do with gend...

  9. A university-sponsored home health nursing program in Karachi, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smego, Raymond A; Khan, Mohammad Aslam; Khowaja, Khurshid; Rafique, Rozina; Datoo, Farida

    2005-11-01

    This article describes a university-sponsored home health nursing program in a large urban center in Pakistan and details the essential elements needed in implementing such a program in a developing country. Compared to in-hospital treatment, home healthcare reduced hospital stay from 12.8 days to 3.9 days, and resulted in a net savings of Pakistani rupees (PRs) 5,374,135 (USD 89,569). A cost-effective home treatment program in a resource-limited country can be successfully implemented by using the hospital pharmacy as the central point for the preparation and distribution of medications and specialty nursing services.

  10. Health risk reduction programs in employer-sponsored health plans: Part II-law and ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothstein, Mark A; Harrell, Heather L

    2009-08-01

    We sought to examine the legal and ethical implications of workplace health risk reduction programs (HRRPs) using health risk assessments, individually focused risk reduction, and financial incentives to promote compliance. We conducted a literature review, analyzed relevant statutes and regulations, and considered the effects of these programs on employee health privacy. A variety of laws regulate HRRPs, and there is little evidence that employer-sponsored HRRPs violate these provisions; infringement on individual health privacy is more difficult to assess. Although current laws permit a wide range of employer health promotion activities, HRRPs also may entail largely unquantifiable costs to employee privacy and related interests.

  11. Health Risk Reduction Programs in Employer-Sponsored Health Plans: Part II—Law and Ethics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothstein, Mark A.; Harrell, Heather L.

    2011-01-01

    Objective We sought to examine the legal and ethical implications of workplace health risk reduction programs (HRRPs) using health risk assessments, individually focused risk reduction, and financial incentives to promote compliance. Methods We conducted a literature review, analyzed relevant statutes and regulations, and considered the effects of these programs on employee health privacy. Results A variety of laws regulate HRRPs, and there is little evidence that employer-sponsored HRRPs violate these provisions; infringement on individual health privacy is more difficult to assess. Conclusion Although current laws permit a wide range of employer health promotion activities, HRRPs also may entail largely unquantifiable costs to employee privacy and related interests. PMID:19625971

  12. Participants in school-sponsored and independent sports: perceptions of self and family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, B A; Francis, S K

    1993-01-01

    Sports are believed to contribute to physical well-being, social adjustment, and self-esteem. In this study, perceptions of social competence and family dynamics were examined among adolescent participants in school-sponsored and independent sports (baseball and skateboarding). Subjects, aged 12 to 19 years, completed a questionnaire consisting of FACES III, a social competence scale, and miscellaneous items concerning school performance, sports commitment, and perceptions of adult attitudes. Perceptions of social competence were differentially related to degree of sports involvement and perceived skill but were not related to the social acceptability of the sport. Adolescents in both groups depicted their families as demonstrating low levels of cohesion but high adaptability.

  13. Information risk in emerging utility markets: The role of commission- sponsored audits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wirick, D.W.; Lawton, R.W.; Burns, R.E.; Lee, S.

    1996-03-01

    As public utilities and regulators begin to define their new relationship under various forms of regulations, some have questioned the continuing need for commission-sponsored audits. This study evaluates the role of such audits by examining their core purpose: the reduction of information risk (risk that a commission might make a wrong decision because of reliance on faulty information). It identifies five generic types of information that will be needed by commissions in the future and describes a cost-benefit analysis for identifying the appropriate method for mitigating information risk for state regulatory commissions.

  14. Geotechnical aspects of the UK DOE-sponsored radioactive waste disposal research programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooling, C.M.; Hudson, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    One of the crucial factors for underground repository design is understanding the engineering properties and behaviour of the host rock. To develop this understanding, the Department of the Environment has sponsored a continuing programme of geotechnical research from 1979 to the present day. The authors describe the structure of the research programme, highlight some of the individual projects, indicate the most important conclusions and provide an overview of both the current state of knowledge and 'the way ahead'. 9 refs.; 9 figs.; 1 table

  15. Impacts and Characteristics of Computer-Based Science Inquiry Learning Environments for Precollege Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Dermot F.; Linn, Marcia C.; Ludvigsen, Sten

    2014-01-01

    The National Science Foundation-sponsored report "Fostering Learning in the Networked World" called for "a common, open platform to support communities of developers and learners in ways that enable both to take advantage of advances in the learning sciences." We review research on science inquiry learning environments (ILEs)…

  16. Science and Science Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oravetz, David

    2005-01-01

    This article is for teachers looking for new ways to motivate students, increase science comprehension, and understanding without using the old standard expository science textbook. This author suggests reading a science fiction novel in the science classroom as a way to engage students in learning. Using science fiction literature and language…

  17. Good Publication Practice for Communicating Company-Sponsored Medical Research: GPP3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battisti, Wendy P; Wager, Elizabeth; Baltzer, Lise; Bridges, Dan; Cairns, Angela; Carswell, Christopher I; Citrome, Leslie; Gurr, James A; Mooney, LaVerne A; Moore, B Jane; Peña, Teresa; Sanes-Miller, Carol H; Veitch, Keith; Woolley, Karen L; Yarker, Yvonne E

    2015-09-15

    This updated Good Publication Practice (GPP) guideline, known as GPP3, builds on earlier versions and provides recommendations for individuals and organizations that contribute to the publication of research results sponsored or supported by pharmaceutical, medical device, diagnostics, and biotechnology companies. The recommendations are designed to help individuals and organizations maintain ethical and transparent publication practices and comply with legal and regulatory requirements. These recommendations cover publications in peer-reviewed journals and presentations (oral or poster) at scientific congresses. The International Society for Medical Publication Professionals invited more than 3000 professionals worldwide to apply for a position on the steering committee, or as a reviewer, for this guideline. The GPP2 authors reviewed all applications (n = 241) and assembled an 18-member steering committee that represented 7 countries and a diversity of publication professions and institutions. From the 174 selected reviewers, 94 sent comments on the second draft, which steering committee members incorporated after discussion and consensus. The resulting guideline includes new sections (Principles of Good Publication Practice for Company-Sponsored Medical Research, Data Sharing, Studies That Should Be Published, and Plagiarism), expands guidance on the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors' authorship criteria and common authorship issues, improves clarity on appropriate author payment and reimbursement, and expands information on the role of medical writers. By following good publication practices (including GPP3), individuals and organizations will show integrity; accountability; and responsibility for accurate, complete, and transparent reporting in their publications and presentations.

  18. Australian consumer responses to DTCA and other pharmaceutical company sponsored advertisements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Danika V; Jones, Sandra C

    2008-10-01

    This study aimed to elicit and compare the responses of Australian consumers towards New Zealand (NZ) direct-to-consumer-advertisements (DTCA) for prescription medicines and matched pharmaceutical company-sponsored advertisements from Australia. A survey questionnaire was mailed to a random sample of residents in a metropolitan area in NSW. Potential participants were randomised to receive one of four different advertisements: two for weight loss and two for Alzheimer's disease. A total of 413 responses were received and analysed. Participants reported that they were not likely to ask for a prescription from their doctor as a result of seeing any of the advertisements in the study. The Australian disease awareness advertisement that did not refer to a medicinal treatment was perceived as more valuable than the NZ DTCA or other Australian advertisement. Overall, participants found it easier to make sense of the more informational advertisements, and felt that there was insufficient information regarding the disease/condition and treatments in the more emotive and transformational advertisements. While there is concern over potential negative effects of pharmaceutical-sponsored disease awareness advertisements, this study found that Australian consumers perceived an informational advertisement with a list of disease symptoms to be valuable. These findings contribute to debate in New Zealand and Australia regarding DTCA and disease awareness advertising, and have the potential to inform guidelines relevant to the advertising of prescription medicine in each country.

  19. The international space station: An opportunity for industry-sponsored global education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Cathleen E.

    1999-01-01

    The International Space Station provides an excellent opportunity for industry sponsorship of international space education. As a highly visible worldwide asset, the space station already commands our interest. It has captured the imagination of the world's researchers and connected the world's governments. Once operational, it can also be used to capture the dreams of the world's children and connect the world's industry through education. The space station's global heritage and ownership; its complex engineering, construction, and operation; its flexible research and technology demonstration capability; and its long duration make it the perfect educational platform. These things also make a space station education program attractive to industry. Such a program will give private industry the opportunity to sponsor space-related activities even though a particular industry may not have a research or technology-driven need for space utilization. Sponsors will benefit through public relations and goodwill, educational promotions and advertising, and the sale and marketing of related products. There is money to be made by supporting, fostering, and enabling education in space through the International Space Station. This paper will explore various ISS education program and sponsorship options and benefits, will examine early industry response to such an opportunity, and will make the case for moving forward with an ISS education program as a private sector initiative.

  20. Student diversity programs : sponsored items and events for 2013-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Support made scholarships available to minority and women students interested in engineering and science and increased significantly : the number of minority and female students that Missouri S&T can recruit to its science and engineering programs. R...

  1. Sponsors' and investigative staffs' perceptions of the current investigational new drug safety reporting process in oncology trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Raymond; Archdeacon, Patrick; Roach, Nancy; Goodwin, Robert; Jarow, Jonathan; Stuccio, Nina; Forrest, Annemarie

    2017-06-01

    The Food and Drug Administration's final rule on investigational new drug application safety reporting, effective from 28 March 2011, clarified the reporting requirements for serious and unexpected suspected adverse reactions occurring in clinical trials. The Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative released recommendations in 2013 to assist implementation of the final rule; however, anecdotal reports and data from a Food and Drug Administration audit indicated that a majority of reports being submitted were still uninformative and did not result in actionable changes. Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative investigated remaining barriers and potential solutions to full implementation of the final rule by polling and interviewing investigators, clinical research staff, and sponsors. In an opinion-gathering effort, two discrete online surveys designed to assess challenges and motivations related to management of expedited (7- to 15-day) investigational new drug safety reporting processes in oncology trials were developed and distributed to two populations: investigators/clinical research staff and sponsors. Data were collected for approximately 1 year. Twenty-hour-long interviews were also conducted with Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative-nominated interview participants who were considered as having extensive knowledge of and experience with the topic. Interviewees included 13 principal investigators/study managers/research team members and 7 directors/vice presidents of pharmacovigilance operations from 5 large global pharmaceutical companies. The investigative site's responses indicate that too many individual reports are still being submitted, which are time-consuming to process and provide little value for patient safety assessments or for informing actionable changes. Fewer but higher quality reports would be more useful, and the investigator and staff would benefit from sponsors'"filtering" of reports and increased sponsor communication. Sponsors

  2. Inactivated Tianjin strain, a novel genotype of Sendai virus, induces apoptosis in HeLa, NCI-H446 and Hep3B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Han, Han; Wang, Bin; Shi, Liying

    2016-07-01

    The Sendai virus strain Tianjin is a novel genotype of the Sendai virus. In previous studies, ultraviolet-inactivated Sendai virus strain Tianjin (UV-Tianjin) demonstrated antitumor effects on human breast cancer cells. The aim of the present study was to investigate the in vitro antitumor effects of UV-Tianjin on the human cervical carcinoma HeLa, human small cell lung cancer NCI-H446 and human hepatocellular carcinoma Hep 3B cell lines, and the possible underlying mechanisms of these antitumor effects. A 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay revealed that UV-Tianjin treatment inhibited the proliferation of HeLa, NCI-H446 and Hep 3B cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Hoechst and Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide double staining indicated that UV-Tianjin induced dose-dependent apoptosis in all three cell lines with the most significant effect observed in the HeLa cell line. In the HeLa cell line, UV-Tianjin-induced apoptosis was further confirmed by the disruption of the mitochondria membrane potential and the activation of caspases, as demonstrated by fluorescent cationic dye and colorimetric assays, respectively. In addition, western blot analysis revealed that UV-Tianjin treatment resulted in significant upregulation of cytochrome c , apoptosis protease activating factor-1, Fas, Fas ligand and Fas-associated protein with death domain, and activated caspase-9, -8 and -3 in HeLa cells. Based on these results, it is hypothesized that UV-Tianjin exhibits anticancer activity in HeLa, NCI-H446 and Hep 3B cell lines via the induction of apoptosis. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicate that in the HeLa cell line, intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways may be involved in UV-Tianjin-induced apoptosis.

  3. Relationship between leadership style and Conflict Management among the Managers of the Hospitals sponsored by Lorestan university of medical sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    feizollah Akbari

    2005-08-01

    Conclusion: Determining the leadership and management styles and identifying the methods of dealing with disagreements and conflicts in hospitals is crucial. Since some of the factors involved in leadership style and conflict management have been studied in this research, it is suggested that the effect of other factors such as organizational culture , social culture , race , personality , etc. on the leadership style of people be studied more comprehensively.

  4. Reports on research projects in the field of reactor safety sponsored by BMFT (Federal Ministry for Science and Technology)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-03-01

    The GRS (Reactor Safety Association), Gesellschaft fuer Reaktorsicherheit mbH, by order of the BMFT, informs continuously of the status of such investigations by means of semi-annual and annual publication of progress reports within the series GRS-F-Fortschrittsberichte (GRS-F-Progress Reports). Each progress report represents a compilation of individual reports about objectives, the work performed, the results, the next steps of the work etc. The individual reports are prepared in a standard form by the contractors themselves as a documentation of their progress in work and published by the FB (Research Coordination Department), Forschungsbetreuung at the GRS, within the framework of general information of progress in reactor safety research. The individual reports are classified according to the Research Program on the Safety of LWRs 1977-1980 of the BMFT. Another table of contents uses the same classification system as applied in the Nuclear Safety Index of the CEC (Commission of the European Communities) and the OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development). The reports are arranged in the sequence of their project numbers. (orig.) [de

  5. Variations in Mre11/Rad50/Nbs1 status and DNA damage-induced S-phase arrest in the cell lines of the NCI60 panel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eastman Alan

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Mre11/Rad50/Nbs1 (MRN complex is a regulator of cell cycle checkpoints and DNA repair. Defects in MRN can lead to defective S-phase arrest when cells are damaged. Such defects may elicit sensitivity to selected drugs providing a chemical synthetic lethal interaction that could be used to target therapy to tumors with these defects. The goal of this study was to identify these defects in the NCI60 panel of cell lines and identify compounds that might elicit selective cytotoxicity. Methods We screened the NCI60 panel in search of cell lines that express low levels of MRN proteins, or that fail to arrest in S-phase in response to the topisomerase I inhibitor SN38. The NCI COMPARE program was used to discover compounds that preferentially target cells with these phenotypes. Results HCT116 cells were initially identified as defective in MRN and S phase arrest. Transfection with Mre11 also elevated Rad50 and Nbs1, and rescued the defective S-phase arrest. Cells of the NCI60 panel exhibited a large range of protein expression but a strong correlation existed between Mre11, Rad50 and Nbs1 consistent with complex formation determining protein stability. Mre11 mRNA correlated best with protein level suggesting it was the primary determinant of the overall level of the complex. Three other cell lines failed to arrest in response to SN38, two of which also had low MRN. However, other cell lines with low MRN still arrested suggesting low MRN does not predict an inability to arrest. Many compounds, including a family of benzothiazoles, correlated with the failure to arrest in S phase. The activity of benzothiazoles has been attributed to metabolic activation and DNA alkylation, but we note several cell lines in which sensitivity does not correlate with metabolism. We propose that the checkpoint defect imposes an additional mechanism of sensitivity on cells. Conclusions We have identified cells with possible defects in the MRN complex

  6. Evaluation of the UF/NCI hybrid computational phantoms for use in organ dosimetry of pediatric patients undergoing fluoroscopically guided cardiac procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Emily L.; Borrego, David; Tran, Trung; Fudge, James C.; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2018-03-01

    Epidemiologic data demonstrate that pediatric patients face a higher relative risk of radiation induced cancers than their adult counterparts at equivalent exposures. Infants and children with congenital heart defects are a critical patient population exposed to ionizing radiation during life-saving procedures. These patients will likely incur numerous procedures throughout their lifespan, each time increasing their cumulative radiation absorbed dose. As continued improvements in long-term prognosis of congenital heart defect patients is achieved, a better understanding of organ radiation dose following treatment becomes increasingly vital. Dosimetry of these patients can be accomplished using Monte Carlo radiation transport simulations, coupled with modern anatomical patient models. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of the University of Florida/National Cancer Institute (UF/NCI) pediatric hybrid computational phantom library for organ dose assessment of patients that have undergone fluoroscopically guided cardiac catheterizations. In this study, two types of simulations were modeled. A dose assessment was performed on 29 patient-specific voxel phantoms (taken as representing the patient’s true anatomy), height/weight-matched hybrid library phantoms, and age-matched reference phantoms. Two exposure studies were conducted for each phantom type. First, a parametric study was constructed by the attending pediatric interventional cardiologist at the University of Florida to model the range of parameters seen clinically. Second, four clinical cardiac procedures were simulated based upon internal logfiles captured by a Toshiba Infinix-i Cardiac Bi-Plane fluoroscopic unit. Performance of the phantom library was quantified by computing both the percent difference in individual organ doses, as well as the organ dose root mean square values for overall phantom assessment between the matched phantoms (UF/NCI library or reference) and the patient

  7. Competències i factors clau per a l’èxit educatiu des de la perspectiva dels estudiants universitaris fills/es dels immigrants

    OpenAIRE

    Cano García, Elena

    2013-01-01

    L’estudi realitzat ha abordat quines són les competències i els factors clau que estudiants universitaris d’origen immigrant consideren que han estat claus per arribar a la universitat, assolint així l’èxit educatiu. S’han escollit estudiants que haguessin fet l’escolaritat obligatòria total o parcialment a Catalunya.Per dur a terme la recerca s’ha treballat amb relats de vida (un total de 13 escrits) i narracions audiovisuals (amb un total de 4 produccions), essent finalment 17 les evidèncie...

  8. Variations in Mre11/Rad50/Nbs1 status and DNA damage-induced S-phase arrest in the cell lines of the NCI60 panel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, Kristen M; Eastman, Alan

    2011-01-01

    The Mre11/Rad50/Nbs1 (MRN) complex is a regulator of cell cycle checkpoints and DNA repair. Defects in MRN can lead to defective S-phase arrest when cells are damaged. Such defects may elicit sensitivity to selected drugs providing a chemical synthetic lethal interaction that could be used to target therapy to tumors with these defects. The goal of this study was to identify these defects in the NCI60 panel of cell lines and identify compounds that might elicit selective cytotoxicity. We screened the NCI60 panel in search of cell lines that express low levels of MRN proteins, or that fail to arrest in S-phase in response to the topisomerase I inhibitor SN38. The NCI COMPARE program was used to discover compounds that preferentially target cells with these phenotypes. HCT116 cells were initially identified as defective in MRN and S phase arrest. Transfection with Mre11 also elevated Rad50 and Nbs1, and rescued the defective S-phase arrest. Cells of the NCI60 panel exhibited a large range of protein expression but a strong correlation existed between Mre11, Rad50 and Nbs1 consistent with complex formation determining protein stability. Mre11 mRNA correlated best with protein level suggesting it was the primary determinant of the overall level of the complex. Three other cell lines failed to arrest in response to SN38, two of which also had low MRN. However, other cell lines with low MRN still arrested suggesting low MRN does not predict an inability to arrest. Many compounds, including a family of benzothiazoles, correlated with the failure to arrest in S phase. The activity of benzothiazoles has been attributed to metabolic activation and DNA alkylation, but we note several cell lines in which sensitivity does not correlate with metabolism. We propose that the checkpoint defect imposes an additional mechanism of sensitivity on cells. We have identified cells with possible defects in the MRN complex and S phase arrest, and a series of compounds that may

  9. Incidència i consequències de les caigudes en les persones grans que viuen a la comunitat

    OpenAIRE

    Salvà, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    ANTECEDENTS I OBJECTIUS: Avaluar la incidència de les caigudes en funció dels factors sociodemogràfics i de salut, i determinar llurs conseqüències físiques, psicològiques i socials. Desenvolupar una nova eina d'avaluació del factor de risc amb l'objectiu d'assolir una intervenció preventiva multifactorial. METODOLOGIA: Estudi poblacional prospectiu, que inclou una cohort representativa de 448 persones grans, de 65 anys o més, que viuen a la ciutat de Mataró (Espanya). Hem fet una avaluació b...

  10. The utilization of websites for fundraising by NCI-designated cancer centers: Examining the capacity for dialogic communication with prospective donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwin, Cathleen O; Dias, Ashley M

    2016-01-01

    The study employs a dialogic public relations framework to explore the utilization of the Internet for fundraising by nonprofit health care organizations-specifically, NCI-designated cancer centers. Cancer centers have been noted for effective websites and for being highly engaged in fundraising, which is characterized as relationship marketing. Results indicate all but one cancer center use websites and social media for fundraising but are limited in capacity for two-way symmetrical dialogue. Results are discussed and recommendations are made for future research.

  11. The cost of unintended pregnancies for employer-sponsored health insurance plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieguez, Gabriela; Pyenson, Bruce S; Law, Amy W; Lynen, Richard; Trussell, James

    2015-04-01

    Pregnancy is associated with a significant cost for employers providing health insurance benefits to their employees. The latest study on the topic was published in 2002, estimating the unintended pregnancy rate for women covered by employer-sponsored insurance benefits to be approximately 29%. The primary objective of this study was to update the cost of unintended pregnancy to employer-sponsored health insurance plans with current data. The secondary objective was to develop a regression model to identify the factors and associated magnitude that contribute to unintended pregnancies in the employee benefits population. We developed stepwise multinomial logistic regression models using data from a national survey on maternal attitudes about pregnancy before and shortly after giving birth. The survey was conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention through mail and via telephone interviews between 2009 and 2011 of women who had had a live birth. The regression models were then applied to a large commercial health claims database from the Truven Health MarketScan to retrospectively assign the probability of pregnancy intention to each delivery. Based on the MarketScan database, we estimate that among employer-sponsored health insurance plans, 28.8% of pregnancies are unintended, which is consistent with national findings of 29% in a survey by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. These unintended pregnancies account for 27.4% of the annual delivery costs to employers in the United States, or approximately 1% of the typical employer's health benefits spending for 1 year. Using these findings, we present a regression model that employers could apply to their claims data to identify the risk for unintended pregnancies in their health insurance population. The availability of coverage for contraception without employee cost-sharing, as was required by the Affordable Care Act in 2012, combined with the ability to identify women who are at high

  12. Nuclear science and engineering workshop for secondary science teachers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, W.H.; Neumeyer, G.M.; Langhorst, S.M.

    1992-01-01

    A 2-week workshop has been held for the past 10 yr at the University of Missouri-Columbia for secondary science teachers to increase their knowledge of nuclear science and its applications. It is sponsored jointly by Union Electric Company (St. Louis, Missouri), the University of Missouri-Columbia, the American Nuclear Society (ANS) student branch at the University of Missouri-Columbia, and the Central/Eastern Section of the ANS. The workshop focuses on two principal educational areas: basic nuclear science and its applications and nuclear energy systems. The philosophy of the workshop is to provide factual information without emphasis on the political issues of the use of nuclear without emphasis on the political issues of the use of nuclear science in the modern society, allowing the participants to form their own perceptions of the risks and benefits of nuclear technology. The paper describes the workshop organization, curriculum, and evaluation

  13. Ignatius of Loyola on medical education. Or: Should today's Jesuits continue to run health sciences schools?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welie, Jos V M

    2003-01-01

    There are present 28 Jesuit colleges and universities in the United States, which together offer more than 50 health sciences degree programs. But as the Society's membership is shrinking and the financial risks involved in sponsoring health sciences education are rising, the question arises whether the Society should continue to sponsor health sciences degree programs. In fact, at least eight Jesuit health sciences schools have already closed their doors. This paper attempts to contribute to the resolution of this urgent question by reexamining Ignatius own views on health sciences education and, more specifically, his prohibition of the Society's sponsoring medical education. It concludes on the basis of an historical analysis of Ignatius' views that there is insufficient support for today's Jesuits to maintain their engagement in medical and health care education.

  14. NCI Precision Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    This illustration represents the National Cancer Institute’s support of research to improve precision medicine in cancer treatment, in which unique therapies treat an individual’s cancer based on specific genetic abnormalities of that person’s tumor.

  15. New Estimates of Offer and Take-Up of Employer-Sponsored Insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramowitz, Joelle; O'Hara, Brett

    2017-10-01

    This analysis uses new questions in the Current Population Survey Annual Social and Economic Supplement to examine rates of offer and take-up of employer-sponsored health insurance over early 2014 and early 2015, as well as reasons reported for why individuals did not enroll. We find increases in offer and eligible rates of 0.5 and 0.9 percentage points, respectively, and a decrease in the take-up rate of 1.5 percentage points, while the coverage rate remained stable. We further find an increase in the proportion of workers covered by another plan and decreases in the proportions eligible for coverage but having a preexisting condition, employed as contract or temporary employees not allowed in the plan, and who have not yet worked for an employer long enough.

  16. Biological research work within the Association of the Government-Sponsored Research Institutions (AGF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    Six of the thirteen government-sponsored research institutions in the Federal Republic of Germany carry out research work for the protection of the population against the harmful effects of ionizing radiation. Their activities in this field concentrate on the following four points of main interest: analysis of radiation-induced processes resulting in biological radiation injury; description and analysis of complex radiation effects on man; medical applications of ionizing radiation for diagnosis and therapy; concepts and methods for radiological protection. The work reported reviews the main problems encountered in the above-mentioned subject fields and presents examples of significant results, with illustrations. The original research papers and their authors are listed separately under the four points of main interest. (orig./MG) [de

  17. "Doping, Fair Play, and the Dilemmas of Government Sponsored Sport Institutions"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Ask Vest

    2005-01-01

    The article inquires into the moral dilemmas public sport institutions are facing when they on the one hand officially argue that the important thing in sport is fair play and sportsmanship while their raison d'etre on the other hand is to help the athletes to achieve the best possible results....... The article demonstrates that a public institution like Team Danmark in its relations with the public as well as with the athletes runs a high risk for exposing hypocrisy and double standards when they ignore that it is the will to victory and not the virtues of the English gentleman sport that is the driving...... on the international arenas. The problems of the governement sponsored elite sport institution Team Danmark', is not only seen in their moral panic following doping cases that hardly can be surprising, but also in the institutions ambiguous handling of and advisory to athletes about the use of grey area products...

  18. Health benefits in 2013: moderate premium increases in employer-sponsored plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claxton, Gary; Rae, Matthew; Panchal, Nirmita; Damico, Anthony; Whitmore, Heidi; Bostick, Nathan; Kenward, Kevin

    2013-09-01

    Employer-sponsored health insurance premiums rose moderately in 2013, the annual Kaiser Family Foundation/Health Research and Educational Trust (Kaiser/HRET) Employer Health Benefits Survey found. In 2013 single coverage premiums rose 5 percent to $5,884, and family coverage premiums rose 4 percent to $16,351. The percentage of firms offering health benefits (57 percent) was similar to that in 2012, as was the percentage of workers at offering firms who were covered by their firm's health benefits (62 percent). The share of workers with a deductible for single coverage increased significantly from 2012, as did the share of workers in small firms with annual deductibles of $1,000 or more. Most firms (77 percent), including nearly all large employers, continued to offer wellness programs, but relatively few used incentives to encourage employees to participate. More than half of large employers offering health risk appraisals to workers offered financial incentives for completing the appraisal.

  19. Boosting healthy heart employer-sponsored health dissemination efforts: identification and information-sharing intentions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Keri K; Pastorek, Angie; Crook, Brittani; Mackert, Michael; Donovan, Erin E; Shalev, Heidi

    2015-01-01

    Health information dissemination options have expanded to include workplaces and employer-sponsored efforts. This study focuses on a core relational concept found in workplaces, organizational identification-the feeling of belongingness-and the impact of partnering with employers and health clinics in health information dissemination. We use social-identity theory and multiple identification to test our predictions from a sample of working adults representing more than 100 different employers. We found that when people strongly identify with their employer, they have increased health behavioral intentions and they intend to talk about the health information with coworkers. The significant models explain more than 50% and 30% of the variance in these two outcomes. The experimental results examining single and multiple organizational sources revealed no differences on any outcomes. These findings offer a contribution to health information dissemination research by articulating how identification with an employer functions to affect behavioral intentions.

  20. HMO market penetration and costs of employer-sponsored health plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, L C; Cantor, J C; Long, S H; Marquis, M S

    2000-01-01

    Using two employer surveys, we evaluate the role of increased health maintenance organization (HMO) market share in containing costs of employer-sponsored coverage. Total costs for employer health plans are about 10 percent lower in markets in which HMOs' market share is above 45 percent than they are in markets with HMO enrollments of below 25 percent. This is the result of lower premiums for HMOs than for non-HMO plans, as well as the competitive effect of HMOs that leads to lower non-HMO premiums for employers that continue to offer these benefits. Slower growth in premiums in areas with high HMO enrollments suggests that expanded HMO market share may also lower the long-run growth in costs.

  1. Provider-based Medicare risk contracting and subcontracting: opportunities and risks for provider sponsored organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, H A; Zenner, P A; Kipp, R A; Whitney, E L

    1997-01-01

    Provider sponsored organizations (PSOs) are increasingly acquiring the risk for the management of Medicare Risk patients by accepting capitation directly from the Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA) or through contracts with HMOs or other organizations contracting with HCFA. The Medicare population and the requirements that the federal administration has put into place with respect to risk contracting are unique and demand specific responses on the part of the PSO for a contract to be successful. The PSO is cautioned to understand the actuarial risk, the clinical uniqueness of the Medicare beneficiary, Medicare reimbursement regulatory requirements, utilization management needs, and necessary reporting before entering into a contractual arrangement. This article attempts to describe some of the more common issues a provider organization must consider.

  2. Proposal to establish a Sponsoring Consortium for Open Access Publishing in Particle Physics

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2007-01-01

    In the present proposal, the publishers' subscription income from multiple institutions is replaced by an "author-side" funding. Journals are paid through contracts between publishers and a single financial partner, the "Sponsoring Consortium for Open Access Publishing in Particle Physics" (SCOAP3). SCOAP3 is envisioned as a global network of funding agencies, research laboratories, and libraries that will contribute the necessary funding; each SCOAP3 partner will recover its contribution from the cancellation of journal subscriptions. This model avoids the obvious disadvantage of authors being directly charged for the OA publication of their articles, which is perceived as an even higher barrier than subscription charges, in particular for theoretical physicists from small institutions who account for the vast majority of HEP papers. The financing and governance of SCOAP3 will follow as much as possible the example of the memoranda of understanding governing large research collaborations. Its partners will c...

  3. Policy uncertainty and corporate performance in government-sponsored voluntary environmental programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ning; Tang, Shui-Yan; Zhan, Xueyong; Lo, Carlos Wing-Hung

    2018-08-01

    This study combines insights from the policy uncertainty literature and neo-institutional theory to examine corporate performance in implementing a government-sponsored voluntary environmental program (VEP) during 2004-2012 in Guangzhou, China. In this regulatory context, characterized by rapid policy changes, corporate performance in VEPs is affected by government surveillance, policy uncertainty, and peer pressures. Specifically, if VEP participants have experienced more government surveillance, they tend to perform better in program implementation. Such positive influence of government surveillance is particularly evident among those joining under high and low, rather than moderate uncertainty. Participants also perform better if they belong to an industry with more certified VEP firms, but worse if they are located in a regulatory jurisdiction with more certified VEP firms. At a moderate level of policy uncertainty, within-industry imitation is most likely to occur but within-jurisdiction imitation is least likely to occur. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Vioxx redux - or how I learned to worry about industry-sponsored clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brophy, James M

    2016-01-01

    I read with interest Mark Wilson's recent article, "The New England Journal of Medicine: commercial conflict of interest and revisiting the Vioxx scandal". I believe this is an important contribution that underlines the aphorism "Those who don't know history are doomed to repeat it." As Vioxx is a seminal example, it is important to place it in its proper context, examining if this malfeasance extends beyond the VIGOR study. While the epicentre of this conflict of interest surely begins with the sponsor, I believe the following essay demonstrates that this wave of egregiously unethical behaviour can exist and be propagated only with the complicity of academic investigators, medical journals, a flawed peer-review system and an uncritical medical readership. Perhaps the most troubling is that the factors that coalesced into the Vioxx scandal are, if anything, more ubiquitous today, mandating increased vigilance to decrease the probability of "getting fooled" again.

  5. Glycemic control and sponsor rank of military dependents with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz, Rachael; Rouhanian, Minoo; Vogt, Karen

    2016-09-01

    Disparities in glycemic control are reported in children with type 1 diabetes related to differences in access to health care and socioeconomic status. In the US military, rank is an indicator of socioeconomic status, but all have complete health care access without cost. We sought to determine if glycemic control in children with type 1 diabetes differs if their sponsor (parent) is an officer vs. enlisted military service member. We performed a cross-sectional retrospective chart review of children with type 1 diabetes >1 yr duration whose parent is a military service member. A total of 281 subjects met study criteria, 136 (48.4%) having an enlisted and 145 (51.6%) having an officer sponsor. The groups differed by race with 38.2% black in the enlisted and 9% black in the officer group (p 1). The median enlisted average hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) over the most recent year of available data was significantly higher than the officer group (9.2 vs. 8.4%, p 1). The difference remained significant when controlled for age and race. Diabetes-related hospitalizations were greater in the enlisted group (39.0 vs. 19.3%, p 1). More subjects in the officer group were on insulin pumps (54.5 vs. 28.7%, p 1). Dependent children of enlisted service members with type 1 diabetes have higher HbA1c levels, more diabetes-related hospitalizations, and are less likely to use insulin pumps than children of officers. These differences are likely linked to socioeconomic status and education levels given the universal access to health care within the military system. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  6. Overview of the projects sponsored within th EU-R and D framework programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zurita, A.; Goethem, G. van; Bermejo, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    Assuming that preventive measures to avoid reactor pressure vessel (RPV) failure under core degradation scenarios have failed, the stabilisation of the core melts after its release from the RPV is a key issue. Adequate cooling of the ex-vessel corium and the control of its interactions with the coolant and structures are the main challenges to mitigate and stabilise the situation preserving the containment integrity. In this regard, the on-going Fourth Euratom Framework Programme (4 th EFP) contributes with experimental and theoretical research activities aimed at responding to the main challenges mentioned, by satisfying three objectives: - To improve the understanding of the basic physics related to ex-vessel corium behaviour from the phenomenological and technological viewpoints, as well as to provide a methodology for investigating it and setting up joint multi-partner projects to be co-sponsored and co-ordinated by the EC; - to quantify and reduce the uncertainties associated with the risk issues by conducting experimental and numerical investigations and eventually to achieve a European consensus on the phenomenology and on accident mitigation strategies; - to provide a technological response to the risk issues by developing engineered safety systems (e.g. core-catchers) and severe accident management strategies (e.g. guidelines), and to discuss such a technological response with the end users of these technologies, i.e. designers and licensers. To fulfil these objectives, the 4 th EFP co-sponsors a total of five projects within the cluster 'Ex-Vessel Corium Behaviour and Coolability' of the Nuclear Fission Safety Programme. The research undertaken addresses the main different aspects such as the determination of the composition and thermodynamic data of the melt; experiments on spreading behaviour on various types of surfaces, as well as on corium coolability by flooding or water injection; investigation of corium stratification, crust and heat transfer

  7. Duration of breast milk expression among working mothers enrolled in an employer-sponsored lactation program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Joan; McGilligan, Kathryn; Kelly, Patricia

    2004-01-01

    Maternal employment has been one of the greatest barriers to breastfeeding. Women are increasingly solving this problem by expressing milk at work and taking it home to their infants. The objective was to determine duration of breast milk expression among working mothers enrolled in an employer-sponsored lactation program. Retrospective reviews were conducted on the lactation records of 462 women employed by 5 corporations in order to describe and characterize their experiences. The lactation program included the employees' choice of (a) a class on the benefits of breastfeeding; (b) services of a certified lactation consultant (CLC); and (c) private room in the workplace with equipment for pumping. Breastfeeding was initiated by 97.5% of the participants, with 57.8% continuing for at least 6 months. Of the 435 (94.2%) who returned to work after giving birth, 343 (78.9%) attempted pumping milk at work, and 336 (98%) were successful. They expressed milk in the workplace for a mean of 6.3 months (SD = 3.9, range 2 weeks to 21 months). The mean age of infants when the mothers stopped pumping at work was 9.1 months (SD = 4.1, range 1.9 to 25 months). Most of the women who pumped their milk at work were working full time (84.2%). The mean postnatal maternity leave was 2.8 months. The proportion of women who chose to pump at work was higher among women who were salaried than among those who were paid hourly wages (p < 0.01). Company-sponsored lactation programs can enable employed mothers to provide breast milk for their infants as long as they wish, thus helping the nation attain the Healthy People 2010 goals of 50% of mothers breastfeeding until their infants are 6-months-old.

  8. Sponsoring surgeons; an investigation on the influence of the da Vinci robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criss, Cory N; Gadepalli, Samir K

    2017-08-26

    The integrity of the medical literature about robotic surgery remains unclear despite wide-spread adoption. We sought to determine if payment from Intuitive Surgical Incorporated (ISI) affected quality of the research produced by surgeons. Publicly available financial data from the CMS website regarding the top-20 earners from ISI for 2015 was gathered. Studies conducted by these surgeons were identified using PubMed. Inclusion criteria consisted of publications about the da Vinci ® robot on patient outcomes. The primary outcome of our study was if the study conclusion was positive/equivocal/negative towards the robot. Secondary outcomes included authorship, sponsorship, study controls, and disclosure. The top earners received $3,296,844 in 2015, with a median of $141,959. Sub-specialties included general surgery (55%), colorectal (20%), thoracic (15%), and obstetrics/gynecology (10%). Of the 37 studies, there was 1 RCT, with observational studies comprising the rest. The majority of the studies (n = 16, 43%) had no control population, with 11 (30%) comparing to same institution/surgeon, Though ISI sponsored only 6 (16%) studies, all with positive conclusions, 27 (73%) studies had positive conclusions for robot use, 9 (24%) equivocal, and only 1 (3%) negative. Overall, 13 earners had lead authorship and 11 senior. This initial pilot study highlights a potential bias as current literature published by benefactors demonstrates low quality and highly positive conclusions towards approval of the robot. This substantiates the need for a large, systematic review of the potential influence of sponsoring surgeons on medical literature. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Making renewable energy competitive in India: Reducing financing costs via a government-sponsored hedging facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farooquee, Arsalan Ali; Shrimali, Gireesh

    2016-01-01

    In India, a significant barrier to market-competitiveness of renewable energy is a shortage of attractive debt. Domestic debt has high cost, short tenors, and variable interest rates, adding 30% to the cost of renewable energy compared to renewable energy projects elsewhere. Foreign debt is as expensive as domestic debt because it requires costly market-based currency hedging solutions. We investigate a government-sponsored foreign exchange facility as an alternative to reducing hedging costs. Using the geometric Brownian motion (GBM) as a representative stochastic model of the INR–USD foreign exchange rate, we find that the expected cost of providing a currency hedge via this facility is 3.5 percentage points, 50% lower than market. This leads to an up to 9% reduction in the per unit cost of renewable energy. However, this requires the government to manage the risks related to unexpected currency movements appropriately. One option to manage these risks is via a capital buffer; for the facility to obtain India's sovereign rating, the capital buffer would need to be almost 30% of the underlying loan. Our findings have significant policy implications given that the Indian government can use this facility to make renewable energy more competitive and, therefore, hasten its deployment. - Highlights: • We analyze a government-sponsored foreign exchange facility in India. •We use geometric Brownian motion to represent the INR–USD exchange rate. •This facility can reduce the currency hedging costs by 50%. •This facility can reduce the levelized cost of renewable energy by 9%. •The capital buffer to reach India's sovereign rating is 30% of the original loan.

  10. Project-based fieldwork: perspectives of graduate entry students and project sponsors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortune, Tracy; McKinstry, Carol

    2012-08-01

    This article builds on an earlier viewpoint regarding the need for project-focussed fieldwork. It presents the findings of an evaluative study into the value of project placements undertaken by final year graduate entry master's students as part of a capstone subject. The authors argue that provision of project placements enable impending graduates to develop and implement macro level strategies to develop prevention, resource and service development skills often required of contemporary occupational therapy practitioners. A qualitative approach is adopted. Student cohorts from 2005 and 2006 completed open-ended, written questionnaires, and agency project sponsors were interviewed to obtain their perspectives of the project placement experience. Despite some concern that project placements might be undertaken at the expense of 'clinical' placements these findings reveal that projects managed by students were perceived by services to add great value enabling them to advance important priorities. Students and sponsors highlighted a range of positive learning outcomes, including the ability to work collaboratively with supervisors and develop advanced communication skills and political acumen. The success of such placements depends on supportive supervision from academic staff. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE OF THE STUDY: The findings promote project placements as a highly authentic aspect of work integrated learning enabling learners to draw together a range of attributes that support the ability to manage complex issues that have occupational relevance at a macro level. In addition, such experiences help learners to develop agency and political acumen both increasingly important capabilities for the contemporary workplace. © 2012 The Authors Australian Occupational Therapy Journal © 2012 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  11. Are results from pharmaceutical-company-sponsored studies available to the public?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal-Ré, Rafael; Pedromingo, Alejandro; García-Losa, Manuel; Lahuerta, Juan; Ortega, Rafael

    2010-11-01

    Only 53% and 63% of studies and clinical trials results presented at congresses are published. Company-sponsored trial results are being posted on publicly accessible Web sites. We analyzed the public availability (publication or posting on a Web site) rate, time to publication, and factors predicting public availability of results of studies sponsored by a pharmaceutical company. This was a retrospective cohort study analyzing all studies conducted by GlaxoSmithKline in Spain between 2001 and 2006. Initiation and completion were defined as first participant/first visit and last participant/last visit (or their equivalents). Papers published up to 31 March 2009 were considered. Logistic regression models were used to identify factors predicting public availability of results. The cohort comprised 143 studies (94 clinical trials; of these, 87 were included in international products clinical development plans). Public availability rate was 80% (114/143) for all studies and 78% (73/94) for clinical trials; publication rates were 68% and 61%, respectively. The median time to publication for all studies and trials was 27.3 and 28.4 months, respectively. Study associated to a cancelled project was the only significant factor associated with lower publication rate for all studies [odds ratio (OR) 0.069; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.02-024; p public availability rate (OR 0.052; 95% CI 0.007-0.382; p = 0.004) for trial results. Therapy area, sample size, positive trial results, duration of experimental phase, and being a clinical trial did not predict publication or public availability. Eighty percent of studies included in this analysis are publicly available. Web site posting increases public availability rate of clinical trial results from 61% to 78%. Cancellation of projects is the single factor negatively influencing publication and public availability rates.

  12. Science and data science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blei, David M; Smyth, Padhraic

    2017-08-07

    Data science has attracted a lot of attention, promising to turn vast amounts of data into useful predictions and insights. In this article, we ask why scientists should care about data science. To answer, we discuss data science from three perspectives: statistical, computational, and human. Although each of the three is a critical component of data science, we argue that the effective combination of all three components is the essence of what data science is about.

  13. La colección ibero-balear de Meloidae Gyllenhal, 1810 (Coleoptera, Tenebrionoidea del Museu de Ciències Naturals de Barcelona

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prieto, M.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The Ibero-Balearic collection of Meloidae Gyllenhal, 1810 (Coleoptera, Tenebrionoidea of the Museu de Ciències Naturals de Barcelona A commented catalogue of the Ibero-Balearic collection of Meloidae Gyllenhal, 1810 housed in the Museu de Ciències Naturals de Barcelona is presented. The studied material consists of 2,129 specimens belonging to 49 of 64 species from the Iberian peninsula and the Balearic Islands. The temporal coverage of the collection extends from the last decades of the nineteenth century to the present time. Revision, documentation, and computerization of the material have been made, resulting in 963 collection records (June 2014. For each lot, the catalogue includes the register number, geographical data, collection date, collector or origin of the collection, and number of specimens. Information about taxonomy and distribution of the species is also given. Chorological novelties are provided, extending the distribution areas for most species. The importance of the collection for the knowledge of the Ibero-Balearic fauna of Meloidae is discussed, particularly concerning the area of Catalonia (northeastern Iberian peninsula as it accounts for 60% of the records. Some rare or particularly interesting species in the collection are highlighted, as are those requiring protection measures in Spain and Catalonia. The catalogue also shows a brief gallery of photographs that includes four type specimens.

  14. Xplora: making science fun!

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Remember those humdrum lectures in science class? Static textbook lessons have not done much to ignite excitement and interest in young children. Now the tables are turned and it is the teachers who are learning, but this time it is all about how to make science classes fun and spark the imaginations of the next generation. Xplora conference participants observing a working cloud experiment. The Xplora Conference, held at CERN from 15 to 18 June, was attended by more than 80 teachers and educators from across Europe ready to share and acquire some creative ways of teaching science. Xplora is an online reference project providing inventive techniques for teaching science in the classroom and beyond. Xplora is part of the Permanent European Resource Centre for Informal Learning (PENCIL) sponsored by the European Commission. PENCIL is comprised of 13 science centres, museums and aquariums, is partners with the University of Naples, Italy and King's College London, UK and is involved with 14 pilot projects thro...

  15. El procés d'avaluació i intervenció psicològica a pacients amb trastorns per abús d' alcohol i/o altres substàncies psicotròpiques

    OpenAIRE

    Trasovares Navarrete, María Victoria

    2004-01-01

    Aquest treball, realitzat al Centre d'Atenció i Seguiment de Drogodependències (CASD) de Nou Barris, ha tingut com a objectiu principal observar el rol del psicòleg clínic en el procés d'avaluació i intervenció psicoterapèutica en pacients que presenten un trastorn per dependència de substàncies psicotròpiques. Este trabajo, realizado en el Centro de Atención y Seguimiento de Drogodependencias (CASD) de Nou Barris, ha tenido como principal objetivo observar el rol del psicólogo clínico en ...

  16. Report on a Boston University Conference December 7-8, 2012 on "How Can the History and Philosophy of Science Contribute to Contemporary US Science Teaching?"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garik, Peter; Benétreau-Dupin, Yann

    2014-01-01

    This is an editorial report on the outcomes of an international conference sponsored by a grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) (REESE-1205273) to the School of Education at Boston University and the Center for Philosophy and History of Science at Boston University for a conference titled: "How Can the History and Philosophy of…

  17. Life sciences recruitment objectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, J. Richard

    1992-01-01

    The goals of the Life Sciences Division of the Office of Space Sciences and Application are to ensure the health, well being and productivity of humans in space and to acquire fundamental scientific knowledge in space life sciences. With these goals in mind Space Station Freedom represents substantial opportunities and significant challenges to the Life Sciences Division. For the first time it will be possible to replicate experimental data from a variety of simultaneously exposed species with appropriate controls and real-time analytical capabilities over extended periods of time. At the same time, a system for monitoring and ameliorating the physiological adaptations that occur in humans subjected to extended space flight must be evolved to provide the continuing operational support to the SSF crew. To meet its goals, and take advantage of the opportunities and overcome the challenges presented by Space Station Freedom, the Life Sciences Division is developing a suite of discipline-focused sequence. The research phase of the Life Sciences Space Station Freedom Program will commence with the utilization flights following the deployment of the U.S. laboratory module and achievement of Man Tended Capability. Investigators that want the Life Sciences Division to sponsor their experiment on SSF can do so in one of three ways: submitting a proposal in response to a NASA Research Announcement (NRA), submitting a proposal in response to an Announcement of Opportunity (AO), or submitting an unsolicited proposal. The scientific merit of all proposals will be evaluated by peer review panels. Proposals will also be evaluated based on relevance to NASA's missions and on the results of an Engineering and Cost Analyses. The Life Sciences Division expects that the majority of its funding opportunities will be announced through NRA's. It is anticipated that the first NRA will be released approximately three years before first element launch (currently scheduled for late 1995

  18. Should Health Care Organizations Use Information Gleaned from Organization-Sponsored Patient Support Groups in Strategic Planning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambisan, Priya

    2017-11-01

    Online forums and partnerships with patients have several benefits, such as the creation of new products and services. However, as with any such initiatives, there are risks as well as benefits. Through analysis of a case of misinformation being spread through a health care provider-sponsored online support group for patients dealing with obesity, this article outlines best practices and strategies to deploy in such organization-sponsored patient support groups. These strategies would enable organizations and patients to use such forums to the fullest extent while preventing or managing their potential risks as best as possible. © 2017 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Delayed Cystectomy for T1G3 Transitional Cell Carcinoma (TCC) of the Urinary Bladder, NCI Retrospective Case Series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FAKHR, I.; EL-HOSSIENY, H.; SALAMA, A.

    2008-01-01

    Aim: We aim to evaluate the National Cancer Institute (NCI) treatment protocol and its outcome regarding recurrence, progression and survival in patients with T1G3 urinary bladder transitional cell carcinoma. Patients and Methods: In a retrospective study, between January 2001 and December 2007, all 34 patients with T1G3 bladder transitional cell carcinoma (TCC), after complete transurethral resection (TURBT), received intravesical BCG as adjuvant therapy. A conservative approach was adopted, whereby those with superficial recurrences were eligible to TURBT, with delayed cystectomy for progression to muscle invasion. Overall, recurrence, and progression-free survival were analyzed. Results: Thirty-three patients were included, 29 were males and 4 were females. The mean age was 61 years (range 35-89 years). Final analysis was made at median follow-up of 15 months (Range of 3-68 months, mean 18 months) for survival. Eleven (33.3%) patients had multi- focal tumors. Associated schistosomiasis was present in 12 (36.6%) patients. Twenty-two (66.67%) patients showed recurrence. Eleven out of these 22 (50.0%) patients progressed to muscle invasion and underwent radical cystectomy. Ten out of 34 (30.3%) patients received post- cystectomy radiotherapy. Two (20.0%) of them, were staged as TNM stage II, 6 (60.0%) as TNM stage III and 2 (20.0%) patients were TNM stage IV. Eight (72.7%) of these 11 patients had post-cystectomy radiotherapy alone; while the 2 (6.0%) other patients with stage IV had adjuvant concomitant Cisplatin and Gemcitabine chemotherapy. Five (14%) patients of those cystectomy patients died of TCC. Three (60%) patients died from metastatic disease (to lung, liver and bone), one patient died from advanced locoregional disease and another patient died from post- operative complications. Among those patients who received radiotherapy alone, 62.5% are alive. Although, we report a biologically more aggressive behavior of T1G3 than that reported by some authors

  20. Implementation and Clinical Outcomes of an Employer-Sponsored, Pharmacist-Provided Medication Therapy Management Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theising, Katie M; Fritschle, Traci L; Scholfield, Angelina M; Hicks, Emily L; Schymik, Michelle L

    2015-11-01

    Our objective was to describe the implementation and clinical outcomes of an employer-sponsored, pharmacist-provided medication therapy management (MTM) program for health plan beneficiaries with diabetes mellitus and/or hypertension. We conducted a single-center retrospective medical record review. The setting was a Pharmacy MTM Clinic at a self-insured health system consisting of six hospitals and several ancillary facilities. A total of 161 health plan beneficiaries with diabetes identified during annual wellness screenings for the health plan in 2012 and 225 health plan beneficiaries with diabetes and/or hypertension identified during annual wellness screenings for the health plan in 2013 were referred to the MTM clinic based on specific criteria. In 2012 the health system expanded its existing wellness program by implementing a voluntary diabetes care program for health plan beneficiaries with uncontrolled diabetes (hemoglobin A(1c) [A1C] 7% or higher); a similar program was added for hypertension for the 2013 plan year. All participants' A1C and blood pressure results were tracked from the date of their wellness screening through the end of the plan year. The pharmacists involved had the capability to directly implement drug regimen changes according to hospital protocol or provide recommendations to the physician, as specified by the referring physician. For the 2012-2013 plan year, the mean difference in A1C from baseline to program completion was -0.38% (95% confidence interval [CI] -0.58 to -0.18%, p<0.05). For beneficiaries with a baseline A1C of 7% or higher, the mean difference was -0.69% (95% CI -0.99 to -0.39%, p<0.05). For the 2013-2014 plan year, the mean difference in A1C from baseline to program completion was -0.62% (95% CI -0.81 to -0.44%, p<0.05). In that year, the mean difference in A1C for beneficiaries with A1C 7% or higher was -0.97% (95% CI -1.23 to -0.72%, p<0.05). For those referred for hypertension, a mean difference of -13 mm Hg (95

  1. Science in Science Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allday, Jonathan

    2003-01-01

    Offers some suggestions as to how science fiction, especially television science fiction programs such as "Star Trek" and "Star Wars", can be drawn into physics lessons to illuminate some interesting issues. (Author/KHR)

  2. Bibliography of publications related to Nevada-sponsored research of the proposed Yucca Mountain high-level radioactive waste repository site through 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, M.

    1994-12-01

    Since 1985, the State of Nevada has sponsored academic/private sector research into various health, safety, and environmental issues identified with the Yucca Mountain site. This research has been documented in scientific peer-reviewed literature, conferences, and workshops, as well as numerous state-sponsored University thesis and dissertation programs. This document is a bibliography of the scientific articles, manuscripts, theses, dissertations, conference symposium abstracts, and meeting presentations produced as a result of state-sponsored research

  3. Protocol per a la implantació d’eines didàctiques virtuals: competències i habilitats adquirides pels estudiants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Guitart Tarrés

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available L’adaptació al nou espai europeu d’educació superior (EEES ha plantejat alguns canvis en l’enfocament de la formació universitària al nostre país. On abans era el docent el protagonista, ara és l’estudiant el que pren el rol d’actor principal de la seva formació, i l’aprenentatge s’orienta cap a una autonomia i reflexió més grans. En aquest escenari, les noves tecnologies ofereixen un ampli ventall d’opcions per millorar els processos formatius. En aquests sentit, el Grup d’Innovació Docent G•IDEA ha participat activament en aquest procés d’adaptació des de ja fa uns quants anys, i ha creat una sèrie de recursos docents digitals que han estat àmpliament provats en diversos ensenyaments de la Facultat d’Economia i Empresa de la Universitat de Barcelona. L’objectiu d’aquest article és presentar el protocol dissenyat per l’equip d’investigadors del G•IDEA per implantar aquestes eines didàctiques (webquestes i exercicis tutoritzats, i també els resultats d’una enquesta de satisfacció sobre les competències i habilitats adquirides pels nostres estudiants en la utilització dels recursos. Els resultats mostren, d’una banda, que no ha estat possible crear un mateix protocol aplicable a tots els recursos, a causa de les diferències en els objectius didàctics de les distintes eines docents implantades. D’altra banda, la valoració que els estudiants fan de la utilització de les eines és molt positiva, tot i que hi ha algunes diferències entre els recursos analitzats. Conèixer la valoració que l’alumnat fa d’aquests recursos permet al grup d’investigadors poder-los millorar i adequar al perfil dels estudiants perquè aquests en puguin treure el màxim profit possible.

  4. 75 FR 16125 - Call for Co-Sponsors for Office of Healthcare Quality's Programs to Strengthen Coordination and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-31

    ... collaborating co-sponsors in the development and implementation of an innovative program that advances the goals... preventable death in the United States, accounting for an estimated 1.7 million infections and 99,000... to the substantial human suffering caused by healthcare- associated infections, the financial burden...

  5. An Analysis of Collaborative Problem-Solving Mechanisms in Sponsored Projects: Applying the 5-Day Sprint Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raubenolt, Amy

    2016-01-01

    In May 2016, the office of Finance and Sponsored Projects at The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital conducted a 5-day design sprint session to re-evaluate and redesign a flawed final reporting process within the department. The department sprint was modeled after the design sprint sessions that occur routinely in software…

  6. 41 CFR 301-74.8 - Who may authorize reimbursement of the conference lodging allowance for a Government sponsored...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ....8 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES 74-CONFERENCE PLANNING Agency Responsibilities § 301-74.8 Who...? The approval authority for the conference lodging allowance is the Government agency sponsoring the...

  7. Board of Director Configurations in Mutual Funds Sponsors: A Board-Level Analysis of Director Performance and Ownership

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fraser, Steven

    2003-01-01

    ... (or a cluster of funds); referred to as a Multiple Board Configuration (MBC). In a sample of the largest open-end mutual fund sponsors, I find MBC boards have significantly higher board-level objective-adjusted excess returns than SBC boards...

  8. Comedy Stages, Poets Projects, Sports Columns, and Kinesiology 341: Illuminating the Importance of Basic Writers' Self-Sponsored Literacies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roozen, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Dominant perspectives of basic writers' self-sponsored literacies tend to overlook the important roles such activities can play in literate development. Drawn from texts, interviews, and participant-observations collected during a five-year study, this article continues the examination of the relationship between one writer's curricular and…

  9. How Student Written Communication Skills Benefit during Participation in an Industry-Sponsored Civil Engineering Capstone Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, Ryan; Cross, Brad; Zhou, Jianpeng; Verbais, Chad

    2017-01-01

    Because many engineering programs use capstone design courses and value strong communication abilities, authors sought to identify how student written communication skills changed because of industry-sponsored capstone design projects. A student exit survey was collected at the end of the capstone design course during faculty-led projects and…

  10. Case Study: Applying the Theory of Planned Behavior as Interventions to Increase Sponsored Project Proposal Submissions from Liberal Arts Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Anita

    2011-01-01

    In the current economic climate, many colleges and universities face similar challenges: the need to increase external sponsorship for research activities and the need to benefit from additional indirect cost recovery. Preparing funding proposals for submission to sponsors is a faculty behavior that can be modified by applying behavioral theory to…

  11. Federally Sponsored Research at Educational Institutions: A Need for Improved Accountability. Report by the U.S. General Accounting Office.

    Science.gov (United States)

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC.

    This report discusses federally sponsored research at educational institutions and suggests ways to improve accountability for these funds. The following suggestions are made for minimizing problems presented in this report: (1) development of more definitive cost principles for both the institutions and the Federal auditors to follow; (2) more…

  12. Army Corps of Engineers: Better Guidance Could Improve Corps’ Information on Water Resources Projects Undertaken by Nonfederal Sponsors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    2Section 2003(b) of the Water Resources Development Act (WRDA) of 2007 amended the definition of a nonfederal interest to include federally...commerce and tourism from deeper-draft ships having the ability to enter ports that have been deepened, according to one nonfederal sponsor.26 In 2013

  13. Effects of Disclosing Sponsored Content in Blogs: How the Use of Resistance Strategies Mediates Effects on Persuasion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.A. van Reijmersdal (Eva); M.L. Fransen (Marieke); G. van Noort (Guda); S.J. Opree (Suzanna); L. Vandeberg (Lisa); Reusch, S. (Sanne); van Lieshout, F. (Floor); Boerman, S.C. (Sophie C.)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThis article presents two studies examining the effects of disclosing online native advertising (i.e., sponsored content in blogs) on people’s brand attitude and purchase intentions. To investigate the mechanisms underlying these effects, we integrated resistance theories with the

  14. Effects of disclosing sponsored content in blogs : how the use of resistance strategies mediates effects on persuasion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Reijmersdal, E.A.; Fransen, M.L.; van Noort, G.; Opree, S.J.; Vandeberg, L.; Reusch, S.; van Lieshout, F.; Boerman, S.C.

    2016-01-01

    This article presents two studies examining the effects of disclosing online native advertising (i.e., sponsored content in blogs) on people’s brand attitude and purchase intentions. To investigate the mechanisms underlying these effects, we integrated resistance theories with the persuasion

  15. 78 FR 25909 - Minimum Value of Eligible Employer-Sponsored Plans and Other Rules Regarding the Health Insurance...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-03

    ... Minimum Value of Eligible Employer-Sponsored Plans and Other Rules Regarding the Health Insurance Premium.... SUMMARY: This document contains proposed regulations relating to the health insurance premium tax credit... who enroll in qualified health plans through Affordable Insurance Exchanges (Exchanges) and claim the...

  16. The Tax Exclusion for Employer-Sponsored Insurance Is Not Regressive-But What Is It?

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Joseph

    2017-08-01

    Conventional wisdom says that the tax exclusion for employer-sponsored health insurance (ESI) is "regressive and therefore unfair." Yet, by the standard definition of regressive tax policy, the conventional view is almost certainly false. It confuses the absolute size of the tax exclusion with its proportional effect on income. The error results from paying attention only to the marginal tax rate applied to ESI benefits as a portion of income and ignoring the fact that benefits are normally a much larger share of income for people with lower wages. This article explains the difference and then considers other distributional effects of ESI. It suggests that ESI-for those who receive it-further redistributes toward those with lesser means or greater need. The most evident effect is by need, favoring employees with families over those without. Yet there is good reason to believe there is also a redistribution by income, with the package of wages plus benefits being less unequal than wages alone would be. Therefore reformers should be much more careful before criticizing either ESI or its subsidy through the tax code as "unfair," especially as the likelihood of enacting something better in the United States seems quite low. Copyright © 2017 by Duke University Press.

  17. A Christian faith-based recovery theory: understanding God as sponsor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmons, Shirley M

    2012-12-01

    This article reports the development of a substantive theory to explain an evangelical Christian-based process of recovery from addiction. Faith-based, 12-step, mutual aid programs can improve drug abstinence by offering: (a) an intervention option alone and/or in conjunction with secular programs and (b) an opportunity for religious involvement. Although literature on religion, spirituality, and addiction is voluminous, traditional 12-step programs fail to explain the mechanism that underpins the process of Christian-based recovery (CR). This pilot study used grounded theory to explore and describe the essence of recovery of 10 former crack cocaine-addicted persons voluntarily enrolled in a CR program. Data were collected from in-depth interviews during 4 months of 2008. Audiotapes were transcribed verbatim, and the constant comparative method was used to analyze data resulting in the basic social process theory, understanding God as sponsor. The theory was determined through writing theoretical memos that generated key elements that allow persons to recover: acknowledging God-centered crises, communicating with God, and planning for the future. Findings from this preliminary study identifies important factors that can help persons in recovery to sustain sobriety and program administrators to benefit from theory that guides the development of evidence-based addiction interventions.

  18. Does company-sponsored egg freezing promote or confine women's reproductive autonomy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertes, Heidi

    2015-08-01

    A critical ethical analysis of the initiative of several companies to cover the costs of oocyte cryopreservation for their healthy employees. The main research question is whether such policies promote or confine women's reproductive autonomy. A distinction needs to be made between the ethics of AGE banking in itself and the ethics of employers offering it to their employees. Although the utility of the former is expected to be low, there are few persuasive arguments to deny access to oocyte cryopreservation to women who are well informed about the procedure and the success rates. However, it does not automatically follow that it would be ethically unproblematic for employers to offer egg banking to their employees. For these policies to be truly 'liberating', a substantial number of conditions need to be fulfilled, which can be reduced to three categories: (1) women should understand the benefits, risks and limitations, (2) women should feel no pressure to take up the offer; (3) the offer should have no negative effect on other family-friendly policies and should in fact be accompanied by such policies. Fulfilling these conditions may turn out to be impossible. Thus, regardless of companies' possible good intentions, women's reproductive autonomy is not well served by offering them company-sponsored AGE banking.

  19. NRC sponsored rotating equipment vibration research: a program description and progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitzel, M.E.

    1986-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is currently involved in a research project sponsored by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regarding operational vibration in rotating equipment. The object of this program is to assess the nature of vibrational failures and the effect that improved qualification standards may have in reducing the incidence of failure. In order to limit the scope of the initial effort, safety injection (SI) pumps were chosen as the component group for concentrated study. The task has been oriented to addressing the issues of whether certain SI pumps experience more failures than others, examining the dynamic environments in operation, examining the adequacy of current qualification standards, and examining what performance parameters could be used more efficiently to predict degradation or failure. Results of a literature search performed to survey SI pump failures indicate that failures are due to a diversity of causes, many of which may not be influenced by qualification criteria. Cooperative efforts have been undertaken with a limited number of nuclear utilities to describe the variety of possible operating environments and to analyze available data. The results of this analysis as they apply to the research issues are presented and possibilities for the future direction of the program are discussed

  20. Sports Mark Communities Fantasy Games: Identification, Engagement, Continuity of Intent and Value of Sponsor's Mark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael Bastos de Almeida

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to investigate to what extent does a Fantasy Sports Game (FSG brand community’s members Identification and Engagement influence their Membership Continuance Intention as well as their perception of the brand equity of the FSG’s sponsor. The Consumer Culture Theory – CCT  CITATION Arn05 \\l 1046 (Arnould & Thompson, 2005 was used as the theoretical framework for this study, more specifically situated in the brand community group of CCT studies. The ‘Social Influence of Brand Communities’ model  CITATION Alg05 \\l 1046 (Algesheimer, Dholakia, & Herrmann, 2005 was used as the basis for the development of the conceptual model of this study, which focused on the players of Cartola FC, the most important Brazilian football (soccer FSG. A non-probabilistic judgment sample was collected through a web survey focusing on the Cartola FC’s official Facebook fan page members resulting in 3,710 valid responses. The constructs’ reliability, as well as their convergent, discriminant and nomological validities were assessed. Structural equation modeling was used to test the substantive hypotheses of this study. Five of the six substantive hypotheses were empirically supported. The results suggest that the sponsor’s consumer based brand equity is positively influenced by the brand communities members engagement and membership continuance intention.

  1. Should nutritional supplements and sports drinks companies sponsor sport? A short review of the ethical concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Outram, Simon M; Stewart, Bob

    2015-06-01

    This paper proposes that the sponsorship of sport by nutritional supplements and sport drinks companies should be re-examined in the light of ethical concerns about the closeness of this relationship. A short overview is provided of the sponsorship of sport, arguing that ethical concerns about its appropriateness remain despite the imposition of severe restrictions on tobacco sponsorship. Further, the paper examines the main concerns about supplement use and sports drinks with respect to efficacy, health and the risks of doping. Particular consideration is given to the health implications of these concerns. It is suggested that they, of themselves, do not warrant the restriction of sponsorship by companies producing supplements and sports drinks. Nevertheless, it is argued that sports sponsorship does warrant further ethical examination--above and beyond that afforded to other sponsors of sport--as sport sponsorship is integral to the perceived need for such products. In conclusion, it is argued that sport may have found itself lending unwarranted credibility to products which would otherwise not necessarily be seen as beneficial for participation in sports and exercise or as inherently healthy products. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  2. Employee response to a company-sponsored program of colorectal and prostate cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, R E; Vernon, S W; Carpenter, A V; Balshem, A M; Lewis, P G; Wolf, T A; Hilbert, J; DeFonso, L R; Ross, E A

    1997-01-01

    Studies done in the mid-1970s documented increased risk for respiratory cancer and leukemia among employees in a chemical company manufacturing plant where chloromethyl ethers were used in production from 1948 to 1971. In the late 1980s, the company informed current and former employees about the results of follow-up studies which showed a moderation of risk of respiratory cancer and leukemia. New data showing elevated rates of mortality from colorectal, prostate, bladder, and pancreatic cancer in the population were also reported. Via mailed correspondence, the company made a no-cost program of colorectal and prostate cancer screening available to employees upon request; and information about bladder and pancreatic cancer was made available. Thirteen percent of employees in the population indicated interest in colorectal and prostate cancer screening (response). Thirty-one percent of these responders were screened (adherence). Multivariate analyses showed that education and length of employment in the plant were positively associated with response. Being white was positively associated with response for younger workers; while among older workers being male was positively associated with response. In terms of adherence, we found that older, more highly educated workers were more likely to have a screening examination. Findings indicate that employee participation in workplace-sponsored colorectal and prostate cancer screening can vary according to worker sociodemographic factors and length of employment in areas of potential exposure.

  3. Scholars Convene to Discuss Ethics of Science in Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ Jointly organized by CAS and the World Commission on the Ethics of Scientific Knowledge and Technology (COMEST),a conference on ethics of science and technology was held on Oct.31 in Beijing. It is one of the worldwide meeting series "Ethics around the World" sponsored by COMEST, an advisory body to the UNESCO Director-General on issues in the field.

  4. Open Science Strategies in Research Policies: A Comparative Exploration of Canada, the US and the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasthiotakis, Helen; Kretz, Andrew; Sá, Creso

    2015-01-01

    Several movements have emerged related to the general idea of promoting "openness" in science. Research councils are key institutions in bringing about changes proposed by these movements, as sponsors and facilitators of research. In this paper we identify the approaches used in Canada, the US and the UK to advance open science, as a…

  5. Defending Champions Reign Supreme at 2017 Student Science Jeopardy Tournament | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anuk Dayaprema and Evan Yamaguchi, champions of the 2016 Student Science Jeopardy Tournament, have done it again. After a grueling competition, they emerged victorious for the second year in a row at the 2017 Student Science Jeopardy Tournament, sponsored by the Scientific Library.

  6. Planning for Integrated Science Education in Africa. Report of a Regional Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France).

    This report of a workshop held in Nigeria for the leaders of science education at primary and lower secondary levels in 15 African nations describes the status of science instruction in those countries. The workshop was sponsored by UNESCO/UNICEF and continued from September 20th through October 4th, 1971. The main address to the conference,…

  7. 77 FR 31329 - Northeast Fisheries Science Center, Woods, Hole, MA; Public Meeting/Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-25

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Northeast Fisheries Science Center, Woods, Hole, MA; Public Meeting/Workshop AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS.../workshop. SUMMARY: NOAA's Northeast Fisheries Science Center will sponsor a workshop to address the stock...

  8. Materials Sciences programs, Fiscal Year 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-02-01

    The Materials Sciences Division supports basic research on materials properties and phenomena important to all energy systems. This report contains a listing of research underway in FY 1992 together with an index to the Division's programs. Recent publications from Division-sponsored panel meetings and workshops are listed. The body of the report is arranged under the following section headings: laboratories, grant and contract research, small business innovation research, major user facilities, other user facilities, funding levels, and index

  9. La història de les ciències en l'ensenyament de la física i la química

    OpenAIRE

    Traver i Ribes, Manel Josep

    1996-01-01

    TESI DOCTORAL : “LA HISTÒRIA DE LES CIÈNCIES EN L’ENSENYAMENT DE LA FÍSICA I LA QUÍMICA” RESUM El problema que s’ha investigat en aquest treball consisteix en l’anàlisi del paper que juga actualment la Història de la Ciència en l’ensenyament de la Física i la Química i de la seua influència en la imatge de la ciència i en les actituds dels alumnes. S’hi han investigat dues hipòtesis principals. La primera consisteix en la constatació de l’escàs paper atribuït habitualment a la His...

  10. A Micro-Grid Simulator Tool (SGridSim) using Effective Node-to-Node Complex Impedance (EN2NCI) Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Udhay Ravishankar; Milos manic

    2013-08-01

    This paper presents a micro-grid simulator tool useful for implementing and testing multi-agent controllers (SGridSim). As a common engineering practice it is important to have a tool that simplifies the modeling of the salient features of a desired system. In electric micro-grids, these salient features are the voltage and power distributions within the micro-grid. Current simplified electric power grid simulator tools such as PowerWorld, PowerSim, Gridlab, etc, model only the power distribution features of a desired micro-grid. Other power grid simulators such as Simulink, Modelica, etc, use detailed modeling to accommodate the voltage distribution features. This paper presents a SGridSim micro-grid simulator tool that simplifies the modeling of both the voltage and power distribution features in a desired micro-grid. The SGridSim tool accomplishes this simplified modeling by using Effective Node-to-Node Complex Impedance (EN2NCI) models of components that typically make-up a micro-grid. The term EN2NCI models means that the impedance based components of a micro-grid are modeled as single impedances tied between their respective voltage nodes on the micro-grid. Hence the benefit of the presented SGridSim tool are 1) simulation of a micro-grid is performed strictly in the complex-domain; 2) faster simulation of a micro-grid by avoiding the simulation of detailed transients. An example micro-grid model was built using the SGridSim tool and tested to simulate both the voltage and power distribution features with a total absolute relative error of less than 6%.

  11. Usual Intake Distribution of Vitamins and Prevalence of Inadequacy in a Large Sample of Iranian At-Risk Population: Application of NCI Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari, Zahra; Feizi, Awat; Azadbakht, Leila; Sarrafzadegan, Nizal

    2016-01-01

    This study provides an assessment of usual intake distribution of vitamins and estimating prevalence of inadequacy and excess among a large representative sample of middle-aged and elderly people in central regions of Iran. A cross-sectional study that is a second follow-up to the Isfahan Cohort Study (ICS). The study setting included urban and rural areas from 3 cities (Isfahan, Najafabad, and Arak) in central regions of Iran. Subjects included 1922 people aged 40 years and older, with a mean age of 55.9 ± 10.6; 50.4% were male and the majority (79.3%) were urban. Dietary intakes were collected using a 24-hour recall and 2 food records. Distribution of vitamins intake was estimated using traditional and national cancer institute (NCI) methods. The proportion of subjects at risk of vitamin intake inadequacy or excess was estimated using the estimated average requirement (EAR) cut-point method and the tolerable upper intake levels (UL) index. There were differences between values obtained from traditional and NCI methods, particularly in the lower and upper percentiles of the intake distribution. High prevalence of inadequacies for vitamins A, D, E, B2, B3 (especially among females), and B9 was observed. Significant gender differences were found in terms of inadequate intakes for vitamins A, B1, B2, B3, B6, B9, B12, and C (p vitamin intake was observed in the middle-aged and elderly Iranian population. Nutritional interventions particularly through population-based educational programs in order to improve diet variety and consume nutrient supplements may be necessary.

  12. Theoretical analysis of the binding of iron(III) protoporphyrin IX to 4-methoxyacetophenone thiosemicarbazone via DFT-D3, MEP, QTAIM, NCI, ELF, and LOL studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkungli, Nyiang Kennet; Ghogomu, Julius Numbonui

    2017-07-01

    Thiosemicarbazones display diverse pharmacological properties, including antimalarial activities. Their pharmacological activities have been studied in depth, but little of this research has focused on their antimalarial mode of action. To elucidate this antimalarial mechanism, we investigated the nature of the interactions between iron(III) protoporphyrin IX (Fe(III)PPIX) and the thione-thiol tautomers of 4-methoxyacetophenone thiosemicarbazone (MAPTSC). Dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D3), the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM), the noncovalent interaction (NCI) index, the electron localization function (ELF), the localized orbital locator (LOL), and thermodynamic calculations were employed in this work. Fe(III)PPIX-MAPTSC binding is expected to inhibit hemozoin formation, thereby preventing Fe(III)PPIX detoxification in plasmodia. Preliminary studies geared toward the identification of atomic binding sites in the thione-thiol tautomers of MAPTSC were carried out using molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) maps and conceptual DFT-based local reactivity indices. The thionic sulfur and the 2 N-azomethine nitrogen/thiol sulfur of, respectively, the thione and thiol tautomers of MAPTSC were identified as the most favorable nucleophilic sites for electrophilic attack. The negative values of the computed Fe(III)PPIX-MAPTSC binding energies, enthalpies, and Gibbs free energies are indicative of the existence and stability of Fe(III)PPIX-MAPTSC complexes. MAPTSC-Fe(III) coordinate bonds and strong hydrogen bonds (N-H···O) between the NH 2 group in MAPTSC and the C=O group in one propionate side chain of Fe(III)PPIX are crucial to Fe(III)PPIX-MAPTSC binding. QTAIM, NCI, ELF, and LOL analyses revealed a subtle interplay of weak noncovalent interactions dominated by dispersive-like van der Waals interactions between Fe(III)PPIX and MAPTSC that stabilize the Fe(III)PPIX-MAPTSC complexes.

  13. A Citation Tracking System to Facilitate Sponsoring Institution Oversight of ACGME-Accredited Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Timothy R; Poe, John D; Zimmerman, Richard S; Rose, Steven H

    2012-12-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) requires the graduate medical education committee and the designated institutional official to ensure that citations for noncompliance with the accreditation standards and institutional trends in citations are reviewed and corrected. To describe a citation tracking system (CTS) that uses Microsoft Office Access to efficiently catalogue, monitor, and document resolution of citations. The CTS was implemented in a sponsoring institution with oversight of 133 ACGME-accredited programs. The designated institutional official and the graduate medical education committee review all program letters of notification and enter citations into the CTS. A program-correction plan is required for each citation and is entered into the database. Open citations and action plans are reviewed by the graduate medical education committee and the designated institutional official on a quarterly basis, with decisions ranging from "closing" the citation to approving the action plan in process to requiring a new or modified action plan. Citation categories and subcategories are accessed on the ACGME website and entered into the CTS to identify trends. All 236 citations received since the 2006 Mayo School of Graduate Medical Education institutional site visit were entered into the CTS. On November 22, 2011, 26 of 236 citations (11%) were in active status with ongoing action plans, and 210 (89%) citations had been resolved and were closed. The CTS uses commercially available software to ensure citations are monitored and addressed and to simplify analysis of citation trends. The approach requires minimal staff time for data input and updates and can be performed without institutional information technology assistance.

  14. Mental Health Services Utilization and Expenditures Among Children Enrolled in Employer-Sponsored Health Plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Angela Wangari; Yuan, Yiyang; Cabral, Howard J

    2017-05-01

    Mental illness in children increases the risk of developing mental health disorders in adulthood, and reduces physical and emotional well-being across the life course. The Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act (MHPAEA, 2008) aimed to improve access to mental health treatment by requiring employer-sponsored health plans to include insurance coverage for behavioral health services. Investigators used IBM Watson/Truven Analytics MarketScan claims data (2007-2013) to examine: (1) the distribution of mental illness; (2) trends in utilization and out-of-pocket expenditures; and (3) the overall effect of the MHPAEA on mental health services utilization and out-of-pocket expenditures among privately-insured children aged 3 to 17 with mental health disorders. Multivariate Poisson regression and linear regression modeling techniques were used. Mental health services use for outpatient behavioral health therapy (BHT) was higher in the years after the implementation of the MHPAEA (2010-2013). Specifically, before the MHPAEA implementation, the annual total visits for BHT provided by mental health physicians were 17.1% lower and 2.5% lower for BHT by mental health professionals, compared to years when MHPAEA was in effect. Children covered by consumer-driven and high-deductible plans had significantly higher out-of-pocket expenditures for BHT compared to those enrolled PPOs. Our findings demonstrate increased mental health services use and higher out-of-pocket costs per outpatient visit after implementation of the MHPAEA. As consumer-driven and high-deductible health plans continue to grow, enrollees need to be cognizant of the impact of health insurance benefit designs on health services offered in these plans. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  15. Primary care COPD patients compared with large pharmaceutically-sponsored COPD studies: an UNLOCK validation study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annemarije L Kruis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Guideline recommendations for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD are based on the results of large pharmaceutically-sponsored COPD studies (LPCS. There is a paucity of data on disease characteristics at the primary care level, while the majority of COPD patients are treated in primary care. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to evaluate the external validity of six LPCS (ISOLDE, TRISTAN, TORCH, UPLIFT, ECLIPSE, POET-COPD on which current guidelines are based, in relation to primary care COPD patients, in order to inform future clinical practice guidelines and trials. METHODS: Baseline data of seven primary care databases (n=3508 from Europe were compared to baseline data of the LPCS. In addition, we examined the proportion of primary care patients eligible to participate in the LPCS, based on inclusion criteria. RESULTS: Overall, patients included in the LPCS were younger (mean difference (MD-2.4; p=0.03, predominantly male (MD 12.4; p=0.1 with worse lung function (FEV1% MD -16.4; p<0.01 and worse quality of life scores (SGRQ MD 15.8; p=0.01. There were large differences in GOLD stage distribution compared to primary care patients. Mean exacerbation rates were higher in LPCS, with an overrepresentation of patients with ≥ 1 and ≥ 2 exacerbations, although results were not statistically significant. Our findings add to the literature, as we revealed hitherto unknown GOLD I exacerbation characteristics, showing 34% of mild patients had ≥ 1 exacerbations per year and 12% had ≥ 2 exacerbations per year. The proportion of primary care patients eligible for inclusion in LPCS ranged from 17% (TRISTAN to 42% (ECLIPSE, UPLIFT. CONCLUSION: Primary care COPD patients stand out from patients enrolled in LPCS in terms of gender, lung function, quality of life and exacerbations. More research is needed to determine the effect of pharmacological treatment in mild to moderate patients. We encourage future guideline makers to involve primary care

  16. The Role of a Provider-Sponsored Health Plan in Achieving Scale and Integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Steven P

    2016-01-01

    In pursuit of two primary strategies-to become an integrated delivery network (IDN) on the local level and to achieve additional overall organizational scale to sustain operations-Health First, based in Rockledge, Florida, relies on the success of its provider-sponsored health plan (PSHP) as a critical asset. For Health First, the PSHP serves as an agent for holding and administering financial risk for the health of populations. In addition, we are learning that our PSHP is a critical asset in support of integrating the components of our care delivery system to manage that financial risk effectively, efficiently, and in a manner that creates a unified experience for the customer.Health First is challenged by continuing pressure on reimbursement, as well as by a substantial regulatory burden, as we work to optimize the environments and tools of care and population health management. Even with strong margins and a healthy balance sheet, we simply do not have the resources needed to bring an IDN robustly to life. However, we have discovered that our PSHP can be the vehicle that carries us to additional scale. Many health systems do not own or otherwise have access to a PSHP to hold and manage financial risk. Health First sought and found a not-for-profit health system with complementary goals and a strong brand to partner with, and we now provide private-label health plan products for that system using its strong name while operating the insurance functions under our license and with our capabilities.

  17. Skin injuries from discrete radioactive particles: A summary of EPRI-sponsored experiments. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, D.E.; Reece, W.D.; Poston, J.W. Sr.; McFarlane, D.L.

    1994-12-01

    In recent years there has been the debate over the risk to nuclear power plant workers from beta radiation-emitting discrete radioactive particles (or DRPs). DRPs-sometimes called open-quotes hot particlesclose quotes-are small, often microscopic, radioactive particles that can adhere to the skin and protective clothing of plant workers. They can potentially produce high radiation doses to very small areas of the skin. Concern is based on the knowledge that various types of nonstochastic skin injuries can result from sufficiently high beta radiation doses. While the effects for large-area irradiations (several square centimeters and larger) are generally well understood, the effects for doses to very small areas are less clear. However, the evidence is clear that the doses required to produce skin injuries from DRP irradiations are significantly larger than the dose limits prescribed in existing regulations for large-area skin exposures. One concern is that nuclear power plant efforts to comply with skin dose limits causes workers to receive unnecessary whole-body radiation exposure. In addition, DRP protection measures focus radiation protection resources on very low risk hazards, and may not be an optimum use of radiation protection resources. EPRI sponsored a series of irradiation experiments to address some of the DRP exposure issues. This report summarizes the results of experiments using sources covering a range of sizes and beta energies, simulating both activation product and fuel-bearing DRPS. NCRP Publication 106 states that all of these small skin injuries are minor, but that acute deep ulceration should be avoided. Accordingly, this research focused on open sores or scabs that remain unhealed for very long times. The ED 50 dose for these injuries was determined to be about 5 krad (50 Gy). A revised guideline might lower whole-body exposures associated with DRP control measures, while not significantly increasing the likelyhood of DRP injuries

  18. Factors affecting choice of sponsoring institution for residency among medical students in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Chew Lip; Liu, Xuan Dao; Murali Govind, Renuka; Tan, Jonathan Wei Jian; Ooi, Shirley Beng Suat; Archuleta, Sophia

    2018-03-16

    Postgraduate medical education in Singapore underwent major transition recently, from a British-style system and accreditation to a competency-based residency programme modelled after the American system. We aimed to identify the relative importance of factors influencing the choice of residency sponsoring institutions (SIs) among medical students during this transition period. A questionnaire-based cross-sectional study of Singaporean undergraduate medical students across all years of study was performed in 2011. Participants rated 45 factors (including research, academia and education, marketing, reputation of faculty, working conditions, posting experience and influence by peers/seniors) for degree of importance to their choice of SIs on a five-point Likert scale. Differences with respect to gender and seniority were compared. 705 of 1,274 students completed the survey (response rate 55.3%). The top five influencing factors were guidance by mentor (4.48 ± 0.74), reputation for good teaching (4.46 ± 0.76), personal overall experience in SIs (4.41 ± 0.88), quality of mentorship and supervision (4.41 ± 0.75), and quality and quantity of teaching (4.37 ± 0.78). The five lowest-rated factors were social networking (2.91 ± 1.00), SI security (3.01 ± 1.07), open house impact (3.15 ± 0.96), advertising paraphernalia (3.17 ± 0.95) and research publications (3.21 ± 1.00). Female students attributed more importance to security and positive work environment. Preclinical students rated research and marketing aspects more highly while clinical students valued positive work environment more. Quality of education, mentorship, experiences during clerkship and positive working environment were the most important factors influencing the choice of SIs.

  19. Researchers', Regulators', and Sponsors' Views on Pediatric Clinical Trials: A Multinational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Pathma D; Craig, Jonathan C; Tong, Allison; Caldwell, Patrina H Y

    2016-10-01

    The last decade has seen dramatic changes in the regulatory landscape to support more trials involving children, but child-specific challenges and inequitable conduct across income regions persist. The goal of this study was to describe the attitudes and opinions of stakeholders toward trials in children, to inform additional strategies to promote more high-quality, relevant pediatric trials across the globe. Key informant semi-structured interviews were conducted with stakeholders (researchers, regulators, and sponsors) who were purposively sampled from low- to middle-income countries and high-income countries. The transcripts were thematically analyzed. Thirty-five stakeholders from 10 countries were interviewed. Five major themes were identified: addressing pervasive inequities (paucity of safety and efficacy data, knowledge disparities, volatile environment, double standards, contextual relevance, market-driven forces, industry sponsorship bias and prohibitive costs); contending with infrastructural barriers (resource constraints, dearth of pediatric trial expertise, and logistical complexities); navigating complex ethical and regulatory frameworks ("draconian" oversight, ambiguous requirements, exploitation, excessive paternalism and precariousness of coercion versus volunteerism); respecting uniqueness of children (pediatric research paradigms, child-appropriate approaches, and family-centered empowerment); and driving evidence-based child health (advocacy, opportunities, treatment access, best practices, and research prioritization). Stakeholders acknowledge that changes in the regulatory environment have encouraged more trials in children, but they contend that inequities and political, regulatory, and resource barriers continue to exist. Embedding trials as part of routine clinical care, addressing the unique needs of children, and streamlining regulatory approvals were suggested. Stakeholders recommended increasing international collaboration

  20. Information Science: Science or Social Science?

    OpenAIRE

    Sreeramana Aithal; Paul P.K.,; Bhuimali A.

    2017-01-01

    Collection, selection, processing, management, and dissemination of information are the main and ultimate role of Information Science and similar studies such as Information Studies, Information Management, Library Science, and Communication Science and so on. However, Information Science deals with some different characteristics than these subjects. Information Science is most interdisciplinary Science combines with so many knowledge clusters and domains. Information Science is a broad disci...

  1. Taxonomy for science and engineering indicators: a reassessment

    OpenAIRE

    Mary Kathleen Feeney; Barry Bozeman

    2005-01-01

    Science policy researchers and scientists themselves know reflexively that differences among scientific fields matter. However, sets of government-sponsored science and engineering (S&E) indicators are quite general and in most instances do not report differences among fields. We evaluate the current limitations of S&E indicators, identifying particular data needs about scientific fields. We suggest developing a disaggregated, flexible S&E classification. We argue that disaggregating S&E indi...

  2. Environmental programs for grades K-12 sponsored by the Westinghouse Waste Isolation Division Educational Programs Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikel, C.J.

    1993-01-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) created its educational programs department in 1990 as a result of the Secretary of Energy's focus on education stated in SEN-23-90. This Secretary of Energy Notice reflects the focus for US Department of Energy facilities to enhance education through their resources (both human and financial) with an emphasis on math and science. The mission of the Westinghouse Waste Isolation Division (WID) educational programs department is to enhance education at all levels and to promote educational experiences that give students the opportunity to make decisions and develop skills for productive lives. Programs have been developed around the environmental monitoring department, to give students from different grade levels hands on experiences in the environmental sciences field to stimulate their interest in the natural sciences

  3. Life Sciences Data Archive (LSDA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitts, M.; Johnson-Throop, Kathy; Thomas, D.; Shackelford, K.

    2008-01-01

    In the early days of spaceflight, space life sciences data were been collected and stored in numerous databases, formats, media-types and geographical locations. While serving the needs of individual research teams, these data were largely unknown/unavailable to the scientific community at large. As a result, the Space Act of 1958 and the Science Data Management Policy mandated that research data collected by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration be made available to the science community at large. The Biomedical Informatics and Health Care Systems Branch of the Space Life Sciences Directorate at JSC and the Data Archive Project at ARC, with funding from the Human Research Program through the Exploration Medical Capability Element, are fulfilling these requirements through the systematic population of the Life Sciences Data Archive. This program constitutes a formal system for the acquisition, archival and distribution of data for Life Sciences-sponsored experiments and investigations. The general goal of the archive is to acquire, preserve, and distribute these data using a variety of media which are accessible and responsive to inquiries from the science communities.

  4. The Effects of Employer-Sponsored Child Care on Employee Absenteeism, Turnover, Productivity, Recruitment or Job Satisfaction: What Is Claimed and What Is Known.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Thomas I.

    1984-01-01

    Evaluates the evidence supporting claims that employer-sponsored child care programs improve employee work behaviors and attitudes. Results indicated that assertions that employer-sponsored child care reduces workers' absenteeism or tardiness, or that it increases workers' productivity or job satisfaction are not supported by credible research.…

  5. The Perceived Influence of Industry-Sponsored Credentials on the Recruitment Process in the Information Technology Industry: Employer and Employee Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Kenneth R.; Horwitz, Sujin K.; Ipe, Minu; Liu, Yuwen

    2005-01-01

    The increase in the number of industry-sponsored credential programs raises many questions for career and technical education. This study investigated the perceived influence of industry-sponsored credentials on the recruitment process in the information technology (IT) field. Influence is examined from the perspective of Human Resource (HR)…

  6. 41 CFR 301-74.14 - Are there any special requirements for sponsoring or funding a conference at a hotel, motel or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Are there any special requirements for sponsoring or funding a conference at a hotel, motel or other place of public accommodation... Responsibilities § 301-74.14 Are there any special requirements for sponsoring or funding a conference at a hotel...

  7. Bringing Inquiry Science to K-5 Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schachtel, Paula L.; Messina, D. L.; McDermott, L. C.

    2006-12-01

    As a science coach in the Seattle School District, I am responsible for helping other elementary teachers teach science. For several years, I have been participating in a program that consists of intensive NSF Summer Institutes and an ongoing academic-year Continuation Course. Teachers in this program work through modules in Physics by Inquiry, a research-based curriculum developed by the Physics Education Group at the University of Washington.1 I will discuss how this type of professional development has deepened my understanding of topics in physical science, helped me to teach science by inquiry to my own students, and enabled me to assist my colleagues in implementing inquiry science in their K-5 classrooms. Sponsored by Lillian C. McDermott. 1. A research-based curriculum developed by L.C. McDermott and the Physics Education Group at the University of Washington, Physics by Inquiry, New York, NY, John Wiley & Sons, Inc. (1996.)

  8. The functions of human saliva : A review sponsored by the World Workshop on Oral Medicine VI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dawes, C.; Pedersen, A. M. L.; Villa, A.; Ekstrom, J.; Proctor, G. B.; Vissink, A.; Aframian, D.; McGowan, R.; Aliko, A.; Narayana, N.; Sia, Y. W.; Joshi, R. K.; Jensen, S. B.; Kerr, A. R.; Wolff, A.

    This narrative review of the functions of saliva was conducted in the PubMed, Embase and Web of Science databases. Additional references relevant to the topic were used, as our key words did not generate references which covered all known functions of saliva. These functions include maintaining a

  9. Grid-enabled measures: using Science 2.0 to standardize measures and share data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Richard P; Hesse, Bradford W; Shaikh, Abdul R; Courtney, Paul; Morgan, Glen; Augustson, Erik; Kobrin, Sarah; Levin, Kerry Y; Helba, Cynthia; Garner, David; Dunn, Marsha; Coa, Kisha

    2011-05-01

    Scientists are taking advantage of the Internet and collaborative web technology to accelerate discovery in a massively connected, participative environment--a phenomenon referred to by some as Science 2.0. As a new way of doing science, this phenomenon has the potential to push science forward in a more efficient manner than was previously possible. The Grid-Enabled Measures (GEM) database has been conceptualized as an instantiation of Science 2.0 principles by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) with two overarching goals: (1) promote the use of standardized measures, which are tied to theoretically based constructs; and (2) facilitate the ability to share harmonized data resulting from the use of standardized measures. The first is accomplished by creating an online venue where a virtual community of researchers can collaborate together and come to consensus on measures by rating, commenting on, and viewing meta-data about the measures and associated constructs. The second is accomplished by connecting the constructs and measures to an ontological framework with data standards and common data elements such as the NCI Enterprise Vocabulary System (EVS) and the cancer Data Standards Repository (caDSR). This paper will describe the web 2.0 principles on which the GEM database is based, describe its functionality, and discuss some of the important issues involved with creating the GEM database such as the role of mutually agreed-on ontologies (i.e., knowledge categories and the relationships among these categories--for data sharing). Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Reports on research programs in the field of reactor safety sponsored by the Federal Ministry for Research and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-11-01

    Investigations on the safety of Light Water Reactors (LWR) being performed in the framework of the research program on reactor safety (RS-projects) are sponsored by the Federal Ministry for Research and Technology (BMFT). Objective of this program is to investigate in greater detail the safety margins of nuclear power plants and their systems and the further development of safety technology. Besides the investigations of LWR tasks also projects on the safety of advanced reactors are sponsored by the BMFT. The individual reports are classified according to the research program on the safety of LWRs 1977-1980 of the BMFT. Another table of contents uses the same classification system as applied in the nuclear safety index of the CEC (Commission of the European Communities) and the OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development). The reports are arranged in the sequence of their project numbers. (orig./HP) [de

  11. Reports of research programs in the field of reactor safety sponsored by the Federal Ministry for Research and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-06-01

    Investigations on the safety of Light Water Reactors (LWR) being performed in the framework of his research program on reactor safety (RS-projects) are sponsored by the Federal Ministry for Research and Technology (BMFT). Objective of this program is to investigate in greater detail the safety margins of nuclear power plants and their systems and the further development of safety technology. Besides the investigations of LWR tasks also projects on the safety of advanced reactors are sponsored by the BMFT. The individual reports are classified according to the research program on the safety of LWRs 1977-1980 of the BMFT. Another table of contents uses the same classification system as applied in the nuclear safety index of the CEC (Commission of the European Communities) and the OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development). The reports are arranged in the sequence of their project numbers. (orig./HP) [de

  12. Science of science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortunato, Santo; Bergstrom, Carl T; Börner, Katy; Evans, James A; Helbing, Dirk; Milojević, Staša; Petersen, Alexander M; Radicchi, Filippo; Sinatra, Roberta; Uzzi, Brian; Vespignani, Alessandro; Waltman, Ludo; Wang, Dashun; Barabási, Albert-László

    2018-03-02

    Identifying fundamental drivers of science and developing predictive models to capture its evolution are instrumental for the design of policies that can improve the scientific enterprise-for example, through enhanced career paths for scientists, better performance evaluation for organizations hosting research, discovery of novel effective funding vehicles, and even identification of promising regions along the scientific frontier. The science of science uses large-scale data on the production of science to search for universal and domain-specific patterns. Here, we review recent developments in this transdisciplinary field. Copyright © 2018 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  13. The Rules of Engagement: CTTI Recommendations for Successful Collaborations Between Sponsors and Patient Groups Around Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Diane; Beetsch, Joel; Harker, Matthew; Hesterlee, Sharon; Moreira, Paulo; Patrick-Lake, Bray; Selig, Wendy; Sherman, Jeffrey; Smith, Sophia K; Valentine, James E; Roberts, Jamie N

    2018-03-01

    To identify the elements necessary for successful collaboration between patient groups and academic and industry sponsors of clinical trials, in order to develop recommendations for best practices for effective patient group engagement. In-depth interviews, informed by a previously reported survey, were conducted to identify the fundamentals of successful patient group engagement. Thirty-two respondents from 3 sectors participated: patient groups, academic researchers, and industry. The findings were presented to a multistakeholder group of experts in January 2015. The expert group came to consensus on a set of actionable recommendations for best practices for patient groups and research sponsors. Interview respondents acknowledged that not all patient groups are created equal in terms of what they can contribute to a clinical trial. The most important elements for effective patient group engagement include establishing meaningful partnerships, demonstrating mutual benefits, and collaborating as partners from the planning stage forward. Although there is a growing appreciation by sponsors about the benefits of patient group engagement, there remains some resistance and some uncertainty about how best to engage. Barriers include mismatched expectations and a perception that patient groups lack scientific sophistication and that "wishful thinking" may cloud their recommendations. Patient groups are developing diverse skillsets and acquiring assets to leverage in order to become collaborators with industry and academia on clinical trials. Growing numbers of research sponsors across the clinical trials enterprise are recognizing the benefits of continuous and meaningful patient group engagement, but there are still mindsets to change, and stakeholders need further guidance on operationalizing a new model of clinical trial conduct.

  14. 15 year's summary report on blanket technology and materials of mixed fuel reactor research sponsored by national '863' projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Zengyu; Chen Jiming; Liu Xiang

    2001-01-01

    15 year's achievements of Southwestern Institute of Physics, China, in fusion technology and materials research sponsored by National '863' Engineering Projects are summarized. Many scientific and technical achievements are obtained in the researches on tritium production and recovery, doped carbon basic materials, V-alloys, 316L SS irradiation performance, B 4 C and TiC coatings, etc. Some facilities were built and some were improved for materials research. 108 references are annexed

  15. Televised state-sponsored antitobacco advertising and youth smoking beliefs and behavior in the United States, 1999-2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emery, Sherry; Wakefield, Melanie A; Terry-McElrath, Yvonne; Saffer, Henry; Szczypka, Glen; O'Malley, Patrick M; Johnston, Lloyd D; Chaloupka, Frank J; Flay, Brian

    2005-07-01

    Recent state budget crises have dramatically reduced funding for state-sponsored antitobacco media campaigns. If campaigns are associated with reduced smoking, such cuts could result in long-term increases in state health care costs. Commercial ratings data on mean audience exposure to antitobacco advertising that appeared on network and cable television across the largest 75 media markets in the United States for 1999 through 2000 were combined with nationally representative survey data from school-based samples of youth in the contiguous 48 states. Multivariate regression models were used to analyze associations between mean exposure to state antitobacco advertising and youth smoking-related beliefs and behaviors, controlling for individual and environmental factors usually associated with youth smoking and other televised tobacco-related advertising. Mean exposure to at least 1 state-sponsored antitobacco advertisement in the past 4 months was associated with lower perceived rates of friends' smoking (odds ratio [OR], 0.72; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.58-0.88), greater perceived harm of smoking (OR, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.11-1.42), stronger intentions not to smoke in the future (OR, 1.43; 95% CI, 1.17-1.74), and lower odds of being a smoker (OR, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.63-0.88). To our knowledge, this study is the first to explore the potential impact of state-sponsored antitobacco media campaigns while controlling for other tobacco-related advertising and other tobacco control policies. State-sponsored antitobacco advertising is associated with desired outcomes of greater antitobacco sentiment and reduced smoking among youth. Recent cuts in these campaigns may have future negative health and budgetary consequences.

  16. Safety research programs sponsored by Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research: Progress report, October 1--December 31, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, A J; Azarm, A; Baum, J W; Boccio, J L; Carew, J; Diamond, D J; Fitzpatrick, R; Ginsberg, T; Greene, G A; Guppy, J G; Haber, S B

    1989-07-01

    This progress report describes current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the Division of Regulatory Applications, Division of Engineering, Division of Safety Issue Resolution, and Division of Systems Research of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research following the reorganization in July 1988. The previous reports have covered the period October 1, 1976 through September 30, 1988.

  17. Safety research programs sponsored by Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research: Progress report, January 1--June 30, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baum, J W; Boccio, J L; Diamond, D; Fitzpatrick, R; Ginsberg, T; Greene, G A; Guppy, J G; Hall, R E; Higgins, J C; Weiss, A J [comp.

    1988-12-01

    This progress report describes current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the Division of Regulatory Applications, Division of Engineering, Division of Safety Issue Resolution, and Division of Systems Research of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research following the reorganization in July 1988. The previous reports have covered the period October 1, 1976 through December 31, 1987.

  18. Safety research programs sponsored by Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research: Progress report, January 1--June 30, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, J.W.; Boccio, J.L.; Diamond, D.

    1988-12-01

    This progress report describes current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the Division of Regulatory Applications, Division of Engineering, Division of Safety Issue Resolution, and Division of Systems Research of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research following the reorganization in July 1988. The previous reports have covered the period October 1, 1976 through December 31, 1987

  19. Safety research programs sponsored by Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research: Progress report, July 1--September 30, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, A J [comp.

    1989-02-01

    This progress report describes current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the Division of Regulatory Applications, Division of Engineering, Division of Safety Issue Resolution, and Division of Systems of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research following the reorganization in July 1988. The previous reports have covered the period October 1, 1976 through June 30, 1988. 71 figs., 24 tabs.

  20. Safety research programs sponsored by Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research: Progress report, July 1--September 30, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, A.J.

    1989-02-01

    This progress report describes current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the Division of Regulatory Applications, Division of Engineering, Division of Safety Issue Resolution, and Division of Systems of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research following the reorganization in July 1988. The previous reports have covered the period October 1, 1976 through June 30, 1988. 71 figs., 24 tabs

  1. Integrating Project Management, Product Design with Industry Sponsored Projects provides Stimulating Senior Capstone Experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip A. Sanger

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available

    Abstract ¾ Many students are uncomfortable with real world engineering problems where needs and requirements must be concretely defined and the selection of design solutions is not black and white. This paper describes a two semester, multi-disciplinary senior capstone project for students from three Engineering and Technology Department programs (electrical engineering, electrical and computer engineering technology, and engineering technology that brings together the tools of project management and the creative product development process into industry sponsored projects.  The projects are fully integrated with the Center for Rapid Product Realization with its dual goals of economic development and enhanced learning.  The stage/gate development process is used with six formal reviews covering the development of the proposal through to the fabrication and testing of the project’s output.  Over the past four years thirty five (35 projects have been undertaken with students getting an exciting

  2. Employer-sponsored long-term care insurance: best practices for increasing sponsorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pincus, J

    2000-04-01

    Behind the enthusiasm of policymakers for long-term care (LTC) insurance is the belief that increased ownership of private LTC insurance will reduce the government's future liability for financing the nation's LTC needs, currently projected by the Congressional Budget Office to increase by 2.6 percent annually between 2000 and 2040. Some observers say that sustained economic growth could keep these increased expenditures at the same share of total GDP; others argue that current federal expenditure trends will become unsustainable without large tax increases. The potential of the employer-sponsored group LTC market to stave off a national LTC financing crisis has recently started to receive popular notice in the news media. However, for the potential of the group LTC market to be realized, there must be widespread employer sponsorship of group LTC plans and significant participation levels among eligible employees in these plans. The present analysis of industry data estimates the LTC plan sponsorship rate for all U.S. employers with 10 or more employees at 0.2 percent. The sponsorship rate among large employers is significantly higher (8.7 percent). The greatest growth opportunities are projected to lie in the smaller employer market, because it is enormous and virtually untapped. Nonsponsors cite a variety of barriers to employer sponsorship of LTC plans. For many nonsponsors, the most important obstacles are the intrinsic characteristics of their work forces: employees are too young, transient, part-time, and/or low-income to be suitable for LTC insurance. For many others, lack of awareness and low priority are the primary obstacles. Because group LTC insurance has been widely available for only 10 years, many benefits managers view it as "too new and untested." Prior to the passage of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), in August 1996, the tax treatment of long-term care insurance premiums was unclear because Congress had not

  3. The Effects of Korean Medical Service Quality and Satisfaction on Revisit Intention of the United Arab Emirates Government Sponsored Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seoyoung; Kim, Eun-Kyung

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate medical service quality, satisfaction and to examine factors influencing hospital revisit intention of the United Arab Emirates government sponsored patients in Korea. A total of 152 UAE government sponsored patients who visited Korean hospitals participated in the questionnaire survey from August to November 2016. Stepwise multiple regression was used to identify the factors that affected the revisit intention of the participants. The mean scores of medical service quality, satisfaction, and revisit intention were 5.72 out of 7, 88.88 out of 100, 4.59 out of 5, respectively. Medical service quality and satisfaction, Medical service quality and revisit intention, satisfaction and revisit intention were positively correlated. Medical service of physician, visiting routes and responsiveness of medical service quality explained about 23.8% of revisit intention. There are needs for physicians to communicate with patients while ensuring sufficient consultation time based on excellent medical skills and nurses to respond immediately for the patients' needs through an empathic encounter in order to improve medical service quality and patient satisfaction so that to increase the revisit intention of the United Arab Emirates government sponsored patients. Further, it is necessary for the hospitals to have support plans for providing country specialized services in consideration of the UAE culture to ensure that physicians' and nurses' competencies are not undervalued by non-medical service elements such as interpreters and meals. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. On sponsoring and CSR involvement. Two theories explaining their effects on a company’s attractiveness for candidates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Wozniak

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of e-recruitment for hiring personnel is constantly expanding. However, the scientific understanding of factors affecting company employer brand during e-recruitment, is still poor. Research into corporate social responsibilities (CSR shows that information about the company’s involvement in these areas makes its image more positive, including its image as an employer. CSR is an umbrella concept, which includes activities similar to traditional sponsoring of sports and cultural events. Two theories explaining the impact of information on attractiveness of the employer’s brand in the e-recruitment process are presented. The aim of the text is to check which of them – cultural fit or signaling theory – more adequately explains the changes in how a candidate perceives a company’s attractiveness, when given information about its’ sports and cultural sponsoring and environment-related activities. The effect of both positive and negative information concerning a company’s activities on its employer image in the e-recruitment situation is analyzed. Data from an questionnaire filled in by 80 young full-time workers shows that positive information about a company’s CSR and sponsoring activities affects candidates according to the cultural fit model, while negative – according to the signaling theory model. The consequences for theory and managerial practice are described.

  5. Science Smiles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Science Smiles. Articles in Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Volume 1 Issue 4 April 1996 pp 4-4 Science Smiles. Chief Editor's column / Science Smiles · R K Laxman · More Details Fulltext PDF. Volume 1 Issue 5 May 1996 pp 3-3 Science Smiles.

  6. The Human Factor in Innovation and Productivity Including an Analysis of Hearings on the Human Factor. Report by the Subcommittee on Science, Research and Technology, Transmitted to the Committee on Science and Technology, U.S. House of Representatives, Ninety-Seventh Congress, Second Session. Serial FF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Science and Technology.

    The House Committee on Science and Technology, Subcommittee on Science, Research and Technology, sponsored an American Association for the Advancement of Science seminar (July 28, 1981) and 6 days of hearings (September 9-17, 1981) on "The Human Factor in Innovation and Productivity." These hearings were designed to increase knowledge…

  7. Los Alamos Neutron Science Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kippen, Karen Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-11-08

    For more than 30 years the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) has provided the scientific underpinnings in nuclear physics and material science needed to ensure the safety and surety of the nuclear stockpile into the future. In addition to national security research, the LANSCE User Facility has a vibrant research program in fundamental science, providing the scientific community with intense sources of neutrons and protons to perform experiments supporting civilian research and the production of medical and research isotopes. Five major experimental facilities operate simultaneously. These facilities contribute to the stockpile stewardship program, produce radionuclides for medical testing, and provide a venue for industrial users to irradiate and test electronics. In addition, they perform fundamental research in nuclear physics, nuclear astrophysics, materials science, and many other areas. The LANSCE User Program plays a key role in training the next generation of top scientists and in attracting the best graduate students, postdoctoral researchers, and early-career scientists. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) —the principal sponsor of LANSCE—works with the Office of Science and the Office of Nuclear Energy, which have synergistic long-term needs for the linear accelerator and the neutron science that is the heart of LANSCE.

  8. Science or Science Fiction?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lefsrud, Lianne M.; Meyer, Renate

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the framings and identity work associated with professionals’ discursive construction of climate change science, their legitimation of themselves as experts on ‘the truth’, and their attitudes towards regulatory measures. Drawing from survey responses of 1077 professional......, legitimation strategies, and use of emotionality and metaphor. By linking notions of the science or science fiction of climate change to the assessment of the adequacy of global and local policies and of potential organizational responses, we contribute to the understanding of ‘defensive institutional work...

  9. Microgravity Materials Science Conference 2000. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Narayanan (Editor); Bennett, Nancy (Editor); McCauley, Dannah (Editor); Murphy, Karen (Editor); Poindexter, Samantha (Editor)

    2001-01-01

    This is Volume 1 of 3 of the 2000 Microgravity Material Science Conference that was held June 6-8 at the Von Braun Center, Huntsville, Alabama. It was organized by the Microgravity Materials Science Discipline Working Group, sponsored by the Microgravity Research Division (MRD) at NASA Headquarters, and hosted by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and the Alliance for Microgravity Materials Science and Applications (AMMSA). It was the fourth NASA conference of this type in the microgravity materials science discipline. The microgravity science program sponsored approx. 200 investigators, all of whom made oral or poster presentations at this conference. In addition, posters and exhibits covering NASA microgravity facilities, advanced technology development projects sponsored by the NASA Microgravity Research Division at NASA Headquarters, and commercial interests were exhibited. The purpose of the conference was to inform the materials science community of research opportunities in reduced gravity and to highlight the Spring 2001 release of the NASA Research Announcement (NRA) to solicit proposals for future investigations. It also served to review the current research and activities in materials science, to discuss the envisioned long-term goals. and to highlight new crosscutting research areas of particular interest to MRD. The conference was aimed at materials science researchers from academia, industry, and government. A workshop on in situ resource utilization (ISRU) was held in conjunction with the conference with the goal of evaluating and prioritizing processing issues in Lunar and Martian type environments. The workshop participation included invited speakers and investigators currently funded in the material science program under the Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) initiative. The conference featured a plenary session every day with an invited speaker that was followed by three parallel breakout sessions in subdisciplines. Attendance was

  10. Microgravity Materials Science Conference 2000. Volume 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Narayanan; Bennett, Nancy; McCauley, Dannah; Murphy, Karen; Poindexter, Samantha

    2001-01-01

    This is Volume 3 of 3 of the 2000 Microgravity Materials Science Conference that was held June 6-8 at the Von Braun Center, Huntsville, Alabama. It was organized by the Microgravity Materials Science Discipline Working Group, sponsored by the Microgravity Research Division (MRD) at NASA Headquarters, and hosted by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and the Alliance for Microgravity Materials Science and Applications (AMMSA). It was the fourth NASA conference of this type in the Microgravity materials science discipline. The microgravity science program sponsored 200 investigators, all of whom made oral or poster presentations at this conference- In addition, posters and exhibits covering NASA microgravity facilities, advanced technology development projects sponsored by the NASA Microgravity Research Division at NASA Headquarters, and commercial interests were exhibited. The purpose of the conference was to inform the materials science community of research opportunities in reduced gravity and to highlight the Spring 2001 release of the NASA Research Announcement (NRA) to solicit proposals for future investigations. It also served to review the current research and activities in material,, science, to discuss the envisioned long-term goals. and to highlight new crosscutting research areas of particular interest to MRD. The conference was aimed at materials science researchers from academia, industry, and government. A workshop on in situ resource utilization (ISRU) was held in conjunction with the conference with the goal of evaluating and prioritizing processing issues in Lunar and Martian type environments. The workshop participation included invited speakers and investigators currently funded in the material science program under the Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) initiative. The conference featured a plenary session every day with an invited speaker that was followed by three parallel breakout sessions in subdisciplines. Attendance was close

  11. Microgravity Materials Science Conference 2000. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Narayanan (Editor); Bennett, Nancy (Editor); McCauley, Dannah (Editor); Murphy, Karen (Editor); Poindexter, Samantha (Editor)

    2001-01-01

    This is Volume 2 of 3 of the 2000 Microgravity Materials Science Conference that was held June 6-8 at the Von Braun Center, Huntsville, Alabama. It was organized by the Microgravity Materials Science Discipline Working Group, sponsored by the Microgravity Research Division (MRD) at NASA Headquarters, and hosted by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and the Alliance for Microgravity Materials Science and Applications (AMMSA). It was the fourth NASA conference of this type in the Microgravity materials science discipline. The microgravity science program sponsored approx. 200 investigators, all of whom made oral or poster presentations at this conference- In addition, posters and exhibits covering NASA microgravity facilities, advanced technology development projects sponsored by the NASA Microgravity Research Division at NASA Headquarters, and commercial interests were exhibited. The purpose of the conference %%,its to inform the materials science community of research opportunities in reduced gravity and to highlight the Spring 2001 release of the NASA Research Announcement (NRA) to solicit proposals for future investigations. It also served to review the current research and activities in material,, science, to discuss the envisioned long-term goals. and to highlight new crosscutting research areas of particular interest to MRD. The conference was aimed at materials science researchers from academia, industry, and government. A workshop on in situ resource utilization (ISRU) was held in conjunction with the conference with the goal of evaluating and prioritizing processing issues in Lunar and Martian type environments. The workshop participation included invited speakers and investigators currently funded in the material science program under the Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) initiative. The conference featured a plenary session every day with an invited speaker that was followed by three parallel breakout sessions in subdisciplines. Attendance

  12. Down-regulation of GRP78 is associated with the sensitivity of chemotherapy to VP-16 in small cell lung cancer NCI-H446 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yingyan; Wang, Wei; Wang, Siyan; Wang, Jiarui; Shao, Shujuan; Wang, Qi

    2008-01-01

    Chemotherapy resistance remains a major obstacle for the treatment of small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), an endoplasmic reticulum chaperone, plays a critical role in chemotherapy resistance in some cancers. However, whether the suppression of the chaperone can enhance the sensitivity of chemotherapy in SCLC is still unclear. The SCLC NCI-H446 cells were divided into three groups: BAPTA-AM→A23187-treated group, A23187-treated group and control-group. Immunofluorescence, western blot and RT-PCR were used to assess the expression of GRP78 at both protein and mRNA levels. Cell apoptosis and the cell cycle distributions of the cells were analyzed by flow cytometry in order to evaluate the therapeutic sensitivity to VP-16. The expression of GRP78 at both protein and mRNA levels in the BAPTA-AM→A23187-treated cells dramatically decreased as compared to that in both A23187-treated and control groups. After treatment by VP-16, the percentage of apoptotic cells in BAPTA-AM→A23187-treated cells were: 33.4 ± 1.01%, 48.2 ± 1.77%, 53.0 ± 1.43%, 56.5 ± 2.13%, respectively, corresponding to the concentrations of BAPTA-AM 10, 15, 25, 40 μM, which was statistically significant high in comparison with the A23187-treated group and untreated-group (7.18 ± 1.03% and 27.8 ± 1.45%, respectively, p < 0.05). The results from analysis of cell cycle distribution showed that there was a significantly decreased in G 1 phase and a dramatically increased in S phase for the BAPTA-AM→A23187-treated cells as compared with the untreated cells. BAPTA-AM is a strong inhibitor of GRP78 in the NCI-H446 cell line, the down-regulation of GRP78 can significantly increase the sensitivity to VP-16. The suppression of GRP78 may offer a new surrogated therapeutic approach to the clinical management of lung cancer

  13. Information in the Language Sciences: Proceedings of the Conference Held at Warrenton, Virginia, March 4-6, 1966.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Robert R., Ed.; And Others

    This collection of 22 papers from the Conference on Information in the Language Sciences held in Warrenton, Va., in 1966, sponsored by the Center for Applied Linguistics, stresses three themes: general trends, information needs of the languages sciences, and system design. Discussions attempt to formulate modern rational approaches to the complex…

  14. Planetary Science Research Discoveries (PSRD): Effective Education and Outreach Website at http://www.soest.hawaii.edu/PSRdiscoveries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, G. J.; Martel, L. M. V.

    2000-01-01

    Planetary Science Research Discoveries (PSRD) website reports the latest research about planets, meteorites, and other solar system bodies being made by NASA-sponsored scientists. In-depth articles explain research results and give insights to contemporary questions in planetary science.

  15. DOE-NSF-NIH Workshop on Opportunities in THz Science, February 12-14, 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherwin, M.A.; Bucksbaum, P.H.; Schmuttenmaer, C. A.; Allen, J.; Biedron, S.; Carr, L.; Chamberlain, M.; Crowe, T.; DeLucia, F.; Hu, Q.; Jones, B.; Noordham, B.; Norris, T.; Orenstein, J.; Unterrainer, K.; Van der Meer, L.; Wilke, I.; Williams, G.; Zhang, X.-C.; Cheville, A.; Markelz, A.; Parks, B.; Plancken, P.; Shan, J.; Austin, B.; Basov, D.; Citrin, D.; Grundfest, W.; Heinz, T.; Kono, J.; Mittleman, D.; Siegel, P.; Taylor, T.; Jones, B.; Markelz, A.; Martin, M.; Nelson, K.; Smith, T.; Williams, G.; Allen, M.; Averitt, R.; Brunel, L.; Heilweil, T.; Heyman, J.; Jepsen, P.; Kaind, R.; Leemans, W.; Mihaly, L.; Rangan, C.; Tom, H.; Wallace, V.; Zimdars, D.

    2004-02-14

    This is the report of the Workshop on Opportunities in THz Science, held on February 12-14, 2004 in Arlington, VA. This workshop brought together researchers who use or produce THz radiation for physics, chemistry, biology, medicine, and materials science to discuss new research opportunities and common resource needs. The charge from the sponsors of the workshop was to focus on basic science questions within these disciplines that have and can be answered using THz radiation.

  16. Does industry-sponsored education foster overdiagnosis and overtreatment of depression, osteoporosis and over-active bladder syndrome? An Australian cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintzes, Barbara; Swandari, Swestika; Fabbri, Alice; Grundy, Quinn; Moynihan, Ray; Bero, Lisa

    2018-02-13

    To investigate patterns of industry-sponsored educational events that focus on specific health conditions for which there are concerns about overdiagnosis and overtreatment. This retrospective cohort study examines publicly reported industry-sponsored events in Australia from October 2011 to September 2015 for three conditions potentially subject to overdiagnosis and overtreatment: depression, osteoporosis and overactive bladder. We used a database of transparency reports to identify events with a focus on depression, osteoporosis and overactive bladder and compared these with other sponsored events. We hypothesised that companies marketing treatments for each condition would sponsor related events and that target audiences would mainly work in primary care, reflecting a broad patient population. Event and attendee characteristics, sponsoring companies, related marketed treatments, cost-effectiveness ratings and dispensing rates. Over the study period, we identified 1567 events focusing on depression, 1375 on osteoporosis and 190 on overactive bladder (total n=3132, with 96 660 attendees). These events were attended by primary care doctors more often than sponsored events without a focus on these three conditions: relative risk (RR)=3.06 (95% CI 2.81 to 3.32) for depression, RR=1.48 (95% CI 1.41 to 1.55) for osteoporosis and RR=2.59 (95% CI 2.09 to 3.21) for overactive bladder. Servier, which markets agomelatine and AstraZeneca (quetiapine) sponsored 51.2% and 23.0% of depression events, respectively. Amgen and GlaxoSmithKline, which co-market denosumab, sponsored 49.5% of osteoporosis events and Astellas and Commonwealth Serum Laboratories (CSL) (mirabegron and solifenacin) sponsored 80.5% of overactive bladder events. This 4-year overview of industry-sponsored events on three overdiagnosed and overtreated conditions found that primary care clinicians were often targeted, dinner was often provided and that a few companies sponsored most events. In most cases

  17. The handbook of science and technology studies

    CERN Document Server

    Fouché, Rayvon; Miller, Clark A; Smith-Doerr, Laurel

    2017-01-01

    Science and Technology Studies (STS) is a flourishing interdisciplinary field that examines the transformative power of science and technology to arrange and rearrange contemporary societies. The Handbook of Science and Technology Studies provides a comprehensive and authoritative overview of the field, reviewing current research and major theoretical and methodological approaches in a way that is accessible to both new and established scholars from a range of disciplines. This new edition, sponsored by the Society for Social Studies of Science, is the fourth in a series of volumes that have defined the field of STS. It features 36 chapters, each written for the fourth edition, that capture the state of the art in a rich and rapidly growing field. One especially notable development is the increasing integration of feminist, gender, and postcolonial studies into the body of STS knowledge. The book covers methods and participatory practices in STS research; mechanisms by which knowledge, people, and societies ...

  18. Esters of Quinoxaline 1ˏ4-Di-N-oxide with Cytotoxic Activity on Tumor Cell Lines Based on NCI-60 Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Gildardo; Ahmad Shah, Syed Shoaib; Arrieta-Baez, Daniel; Palos, Isidro; Mongue, Antonio; Sánchez-Torres, Luvia Enid

    2017-01-01

    Quinoxalines display diverse and interesting pharmacological activities as antibacterial, antiviral, antiparasitic and anticancer agents. Particularly, their 1ˏ4-di-N-oxide derivatives have proved to be cytotoxic agents that are active under hypoxic conditions as that of solid tumours. A new series of quinoxaline 1ˏ4-di-N-oxide substitutes at 7-position with esters group were synthetized and characterized by infrared (IR), proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR), spectroscopy, and elemental analysis. Seventeen derivatives (M1-M3, E1-E8, P1-P3 and DR1-DR3) were selected and evaluated for antitumor activities using the NCI-60 human tumor cell lines screen. Results showed that E7, P3 and E6 were the most active compounds against the cell lines tested. Substitutions at 7-position with esters group not necessarily affect the biological activity, but the nature of the esters group could exert an influence on the selectivity. Additionally, substitutions at 2-position influenced the cytotoxic activity of the compounds. PMID:29201086

  19. Regulation of voltage-gated potassium channels attenuates resistance of side-population cells to gefitinib in the human lung cancer cell line NCI-H460.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seon Young; Kim, Hang-Rae; Ryu, Pan Dong; Lee, So Yeong

    2017-02-21

    Side-population (SP) cells that exclude anti-cancer drugs have been found in various tumor cell lines. Moreover, SP cells have a higher proliferative potential and drug resistance than main population cells (Non-SP cells). Also, several ion channels are responsible for the drug resistance and proliferation of SP cells in cancer. To confirm the expression and function of voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels of SP cells, these cells, as well as highly expressed ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters and stemness genes, were isolated from a gefitinib-resistant human lung adenocarcinoma cell line (NCI-H460), using Hoechst 33342 efflux. In the present study, we found that mRNA expression of Kv channels in SP cells was different compared to Non-SP cells, and the resistance of SP cells to gefitinib was weakened with a combination treatment of gefitinib and Kv channel blockers or a Kv7 opener, compared to single-treatment gefitinib, through inhibition of the Ras-Raf signaling pathway. The findings indicate that Kv channels in SP cells could be new targets for reducing the resistance to gefitinib.

  20. Design of Phase I Combination Trials: Recommendations of the Clinical Trial Design Task Force of the NCI Investigational Drug Steering Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paller, Channing J.; Bradbury, Penelope A.; Ivy, S. Percy; Seymour, Lesley; LoRusso, Patricia M.; Baker, Laurence; Rubinstein, Larry; Huang, Erich; Collyar, Deborah; Groshen, Susan; Reeves, Steven; Ellis, Lee M.; Sargent, Daniel J.; Rosner, Gary L.; LeBlanc, Michael L.; Ratain, Mark J.

    2014-01-01

    Anticancer drugs are combined in an effort to treat a heterogeneous tumor or to maximize the pharmacodynamic effect. The development of combination regimens, while desirable, poses unique challenges. These include the selection of agents for combination therapy that may lead to improved efficacy while maintaining acceptable toxicity, the design of clinical trials that provide informative results for individual agents and combinations, and logistical and regulatory challenges. The phase 1 trial is often the initial step in the clinical evaluation of a combination regimen. In view of the importance of combination regimens and the challenges associated with developing them, the Clinical Trial Design (CTD) Task Force of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Investigational Drug Steering Committee developed a set of recommendations for the phase 1 development of a combination regimen. The first two recommendations focus on the scientific rationale and development plans for the combination regimen; subsequent recommendations encompass clinical design aspects. The CTD Task Force recommends that selection of the proposed regimens be based on a biological or pharmacological rationale supported by clinical and/or robust and validated preclinical evidence, and accompanied by a plan for subsequent development of the combination. The design of the phase 1 clinical trial should take into consideration the potential pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions as well as overlapping toxicity. Depending on the specific hypothesized interaction, the primary endpoint may be dose optimization, pharmacokinetics, and/or pharmacodynamic (i.e., biomarker). PMID:25125258