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Sample records for nci national cancer

  1. 78 FR 27974 - Proposed Collection; 60-Day Comment Request: National Cancer Institute (NCI) Alliance for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-13

    ... Comment Request: National Cancer Institute (NCI) Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer Platform... project, contact: Dorothy Farrell, Center for Strategic Scientific Initiatives, Office of Cancer... Institute (NCI) Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer Platform Partnership Scientific Progress Reports, 0925...

  2. NCI Designated Cancer Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peer Review and Funding Outcomes Step 4: Award Negotiation & Issuance Manage Your Award Grants Management Contacts Monitoring ... Reporting & Auditing Grant Transfer Grant Closeout Contracts & Small Business Training Cancer Training at NCI (Intramural) Funding for ...

  3. The national cancer institute (NCI) and cancer biology in a 'post genome world'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klausner, Richard D.

    1996-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) exists to reduce the burden of all cancers through research and discovery. Extensive restructuring of the NCI over the past year has been aimed at assuring that the institution functions in all ways to promote opportunities for discovery in the laboratory, in the clinic, and in the community. To do this well requires the difficult and almost paradoxical problem of planning for scientific discovery which, in turn is based on the freedom to pursue the unanticipated. The intellectual and structural landscape of science is changing and it places new challenges, new demands and new opportunities for facilitating discovery. The nature of cancer as a disease of genomic instability and of accumulated genetic change, coupled with a possibility of the development of new technologies for reading, utilizing, interpreting and manipulating the genome of single cells, provides unprecedented opportunities for a new type of high through-put biology that will change the nature of discovery, cancer detection, diagnosis, prognosis, therapeutic decision-making and therapeutic discovery. To capture these new opportunities will require attention to be paid to integrate the development of technology and new scientific discoveries with the ability to apply advances rapidly and efficiently through clinical trials

  4. NCI QuitPal, an App from the National Cancer Institute | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Services National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute What if the tools you need to quit smoking were as easy to find as a cigarette? NCI QuitPal is a free, interactive app for iPhone or iPad that uses proven quit ...

  5. NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer funds the Cancer Nanotechnology Training Centers collectively with the NCI Cancer Training Center. Find out about the funded Centers, to date, that train our next generation of scientists in the field of Canc

  6. NCI and the Chinese National Cancer Center pursue new collaborations in cancer research

    Science.gov (United States)

    CGH Director, Dr. Ted Trimble, and East Asia Program Director, Dr. Ann Chao, traveled to Beijing with Mr. Matthew Brown from the Department of Health and Human Services Office of Global Affairs to attend the Joint Meeting of the NCC and the U.S. NCI.

  7. 78 FR 44136 - Submission for OMB review; 30-day Comment Request: National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-23

    ... Act of 1995, the National Institutes of Health (NIH), has submitted to the Office of Management and... associated response time, should be directed to the: Office of Management and Budget, Office of Regulatory...: Dorothy Farrell, Center for Strategic Scientific Initiatives, Office of Cancer Nanotechnology Research...

  8. The NCI All Ireland Cancer Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston; Daly; Liu

    1999-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) has recently decided to embark on an international partnership with the developing cancer programs on the Island of Ireland (Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland) in an attempt to further improve the quality and range of cancer services available for patients. This Transatlantic Partnership called the All Ireland-NCI Cancer Consortium offers exciting opportunities in cancer treatment, education and research as the cancer-caring communities from both the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland prepare to join with the U.S. NCI in this major endeavor. The inaugural event of the partnership will be the NCI All Ireland Cancer Conference to be held in Belfast, October 3-6, 1999. (See www.allirelandcancer.com, for information on the conference.) Cancer is a significant cause of mortality and morbidity on the Island of Ireland. There are approximately 28,000 new cases and approximately 11,000 deaths from cancer each year. Therefore, Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland have among the highest cancer incidence and mortality rates in the Western World. In recent years there has been a major restructuring of cancer services in both parts of the Island. This is the result of several government reports such as the Campbell Report in Northern Ireland and the National Strategy Document for Cancer in the Republic of Ireland. The National Strategy Document proposes that cancer treatment services should be centered around primary care services, regional services, supra-regional centers and a national coordinating structure whereby the supra-regional centers deliver specialist surgery, medical and radiation oncology, rehabilitation and specialist palliative care. Three supra-regional cancer centers are being established in the cities of Dublin, Cork and Galway and a National Cancer Forum, which has served as a multidisciplinary advisory board to the Government, has pushed the development and implementation of this plan. This has

  9. 76 FR 14034 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; NCI Cancer Genetics Services Directory Web-Based...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Proposed Collection; Comment Request; NCI Cancer Genetics Services Directory Web-Based Application Form and Update Mailer Summary: In compliance with the requirement... included in the NCI Cancer Genetics Services Directory on NCI's Cancer.gov Web site. The information...

  10. The NCI Digital Divide Pilot Projects: implications for cancer education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreps, Gary L; Gustafson, David; Salovey, Peter; Perocchia, Rosemarie Slevin; Wilbright, Wayne; Bright, Mary Anne; Muha, Cathy

    2007-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) supported four innovative demonstration research projects, "The Digital Divide Pilot Projects," to test new strategies for disseminating health information via computer to vulnerable consumers. These projects involved active research collaborations between the NCI's Cancer Information Service (CIS) and regional cancer control researchers to field test new approaches for enhancing cancer communication in vulnerable communities. The projects were able to use computers to successfully disseminate relevant cancer information to vulnerable populations. These demonstration research projects suggested effective new strategies for using communication technologies to educate underserved populations about cancer prevention, control, and care.

  11. Evaluation of leakage in cobalt-60 unit in National Cancer Institute (NCI) Wad Medani

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fadlellah, R. A.

    2013-08-01

    This study has been conducted primarily to evaluate the leakages radiation in cobalt-60 unit in National Cancer Institute Wad Medani, which represent the basic risky factor in this unit for the radio therapists who spend much time during patient set up, also they need to stand near the head of the machine to fix some accessories. The measurements which done using survey meter give normal level of occupational exposure compared with IAEA references except one situation that the radio therapist to be close contact to the head of unit for long time which may increase the received dose, in this situation. The radio therapist either not well trained, or there is insufficient accessories to reduce the time inside the room. Radiotherapy department need a special considerations from the beginning of construction till starting of treatment. It is important to contain separate rooms, for planning to determine treatment area, another one for molding to shape lead blocks to protect normal parts and an optimum designed room for treatment to enable workers to apply basic radiation protection principles. (Author)

  12. UNC Cancer Center Director to Lead NCI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    President Donald Trump has selected Norman "Ned" Sharpless, MD, director of the University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, to lead the NCI. The news was met with widespread approval among cancer researchers, who view Sharpless as a strong communicator who can ably represent the needs of the cancer community in the face of proposed funding cuts. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. NCI Scientists Awarded National Medal of Technology and Innovation by President Obama | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two NCI scientists received the National Medal of Technology and Innovation, the nation’s highest honor for technological achievement. The award was announced by President Obama in October. The honorees, John Schiller, Ph.D., Laboratory of Cellular Oncology (LCO), Center for Cancer Research, NCI, and Douglas Lowy, M.D., also from LCO and NCI deputy director, received their medals at a White House ceremony on Nov. 20.

  14. NCI Cancer Research Data Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    An infographic explaining NCI’s present and future efforts to promote a culture of sharing data—clinical, genomic, proteomic, imaging, patient histories, and outcomes data—among stakeholders to impact cancer care.

  15. NCI designated cancer center funding not influenced by organizational structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Margaret E; Yagoda, Daniel; Thurman, Paul W; Luna, Jorge M; Figg, William Douglas

    2009-05-01

    National Cancer Institutes (NCI) designated cancer centers use one of three organizational structures. The hypothesis of this study is that there are differences in the amount of annual NCI funding per faculty member based on a cancer center's organizational structure. The study also considers the impact of secondary factors (i.e., the existence of a clinical program, the region and the size of the city in which the cancer center is located) on funding and the number of Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) investigators at each cancer center. Of the 63 cancer centers, 44 use a matrix structure, 16 have a freestanding structure, and three have a Department of Oncology structure. Kruskal-Wallis tests reveal no statistically significant differences in the amount of funding per faculty member or the number of HHMI investigators between centers with a matrix, freestanding or Department of Oncology structure. Online research and telephone interviews with each cancer center were used to gather information, including: organizational structure, the presence of a clinical program, the number of faculty members, and the number of Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigators. Statistical tests were used to assess the impact which organizational structure has on the amount of funding per faculty member and number of HHMI investigators. While the results seem to suggest that the organizational structure of a given cancer center does not impact the amount of NCI funding or number of HHMI investigators which it attracts, the existence of this relationship is likely masked by the small sample size in this study. Further studies may be appropriate to examine the effect organizational structure has on other measurements which are relevant to cancer centers, such as quality and quantity of research produced.

  16. Published Research - NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer has published much exciting and impactful research over the years. Find here a list of all of these listed in PubMed and others across the field of Cancer Nanotechnology.

  17. Delivering prostate cancer prevention messages to the public: how the National Cancer Institute (NCI) effectively spread the word about the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial (PCPT) results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croker, Kara Smigel; Ryan, Anne; Morzenti, Thuy; Cave, Lynn; Maze-Gallman, Tamara; Ford, Leslie

    2004-01-01

    The Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial was the first clinical trial to show that a direct intervention (5 mg of finasteride daily for 7 years) could reduce a man's risk of developing prostate cancer. Initial results also suggested that men taking finasteride had an increased risk of developing what appeared to be higher-grade disease (Gleason score 7-10). The National Cancer Institute has a congressional mandate to communicate health information to the public and has established methods to reach the public directly and to reach information intermediaries in the media, professional societies, and advocacy groups. The groundbreaking yet complicated results of the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial were widely disseminated by National Cancer Institute using the social marketing and public-relations strategies and tactics detailed here. Copyright 2004 Elsevier Inc.

  18. 76 FR 28439 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; NCI Cancer Genetics Services Directory Web-Based...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; NCI Cancer Genetics Services Directory Web-Based Application Form and Update Mailer Summary: Under the provisions of... Collection: Title: NCI Cancer Genetics Services Directory Web-based Application Form and Update Mailer. Type...

  19. Life Outside NCI | Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    The CPFP Office is located at the NCI facilities in Rockville, Maryland, near the Nation’s Capital. With the convenient Metro subway reaching throughout the metropolitan area, transportation is within easy reach.

  20. 78 FR 53763 - Proposed Collection; 60-day Comment Request Cancer Trials Support Unit (CTSU) (NCI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-30

    ... proposed data collection projects, the National Cancer Institute (NCI), National Institutes of Health (NIH), will publish periodic summaries of proposed projects to be submitted to the Office of Management and... proposed collection of information, including the validity of the methodology and assumptions used; (3...

  1. 2013 NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer Annual Bulletin

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer Bulletin is a resource that serves to connect Alliance participants, partners, and affiliates by highlighting the innovative work of the Alliance members in their efforts to harness the power of nanotechnology to radically change the way we diagnose, treat, and prevent cancer.

  2. Puerto Rico NCI Community Oncology Research Program Minority/Underserved | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): The Puerto Rico NCI Community Oncology Research Program (PRNCORP) will be the principal organization in the island that promotes cancer prevention, control and screening/post-treatment surveillance clinical trials. It will conduct cancer care delivery research and will provide access to treatment and imaging clinical trials conducted under the reorganization of the National Clinical Trials Network (NCTN). It will evaluate disparity issues and outcomes in cancer care delivery and treatments. |

  3. The NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer: achievement and path forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptak, Krzysztof; Farrell, Dorothy; Panaro, Nicholas J; Grodzinski, Piotr; Barker, Anna D

    2010-01-01

    Nanotechnology is a 'disruptive technology', which can lead to a generation of new diagnostic and therapeutic products, resulting in dramatically improved cancer outcomes. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) of National Institutes of Health explores innovative approaches to multidisciplinary research allowing for a convergence of molecular biology, oncology, physics, chemistry, and engineering and leading to the development of clinically worthy technological approaches. These initiatives include programmatic efforts to enable nanotechnology as a driver of advances in clinical oncology and cancer research, known collectively as the NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer (ANC). Over the last 5 years, ANC has demonstrated that multidisciplinary approach catalyzes scientific developments and advances clinical translation in cancer nanotechnology. The research conducted by ANC members has improved diagnostic assays and imaging agents, leading to the development of point-of-care diagnostics, identification and validation of numerous biomarkers for novel diagnostic assays, and the development of multifunctional agents for imaging and therapy. Numerous nanotechnology-based technologies developed by ANC researchers are entering clinical trials. NCI has re-issued ANC program for next 5 years signaling that it continues to have high expectations for cancer nanotechnology's impact on clinical practice. The goals of the next phase will be to broaden access to cancer nanotechnology research through greater clinical translation and outreach to the patient and clinical communities and to support development of entirely new models of cancer care.

  4. Best Performers Announced for the NCI-CPTAC DREAM Proteogenomics Computational Challenge | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) is pleased to announce that teams led by Jaewoo Kang (Korea University), and Yuanfang Guan with Hongyang Li (University of Michigan) as the best performers of the NCI-CPTAC DREAM Proteogenomics Computational Challenge. Over 500 participants from 20 countries registered for the Challenge, which offered $25,000 in cash awards contributed by the NVIDIA Foundation through its Compute the Cure initiative.

  5. NCI Visuals Online

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI Visuals Online contains images from the collections of the National Cancer Institute's Office of Communications and Public Liaison, including general biomedical and science-related images, cancer-specific scientific and patient care-related images, and portraits of directors and staff of the National Cancer Institute.

  6. The relationship between CNS prophylactic treatment and smoking behavior in adult survivors of childhood leukemia: a National Cancer Institute and Children's Cancer Group (NCI/CCG) study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao, M.L.; Weiss, R.E.; Guo, M.D.; Byrne, J.; Mills, J.L.; Robison, L.L.; Zeltzer, L.K.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To determine the relationship of both cranial radiation dose (CRD) and intra-thecal methotrexate (IT-MTX) dose with smoking behavior in survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Material and Methods: A retrospective cohort study was conducted by NCI/CCG with 593 young adult survivors (median age, 21.6 years), treated prior to age 20 years on CCG ALL protocols from 1970 to 1986, and 409 sibling controls (median age, 24.5 years). Subjects were telephone surveyed regarding risk-taking behaviors, including cigarette smoking. A previous report has compared the smoking behavior of survivors to controls; this report will focus on the association between CNS treatment variables and smoking behavior for survivors only. Contingency table analysis was used to determine the prevalence of having ever smoked regularly (i.e. ≥ 100 cigarettes total and daily use for ≥ 6 months) for each treatment group: combinations of CRD (0-18 Gy vs. 24 Gy) and IT-MTX (0 to ≤ 83 mg vs. >83 mg). Logistic regression analysis was used to examine CRD, IT-MTX dose, age at diagnosis and age at follow-up as predictors for smoking. Too few subjects received intravenous methotrexate to evaluate this as an explanatory variable. The analysis was done separately for survivors from treatment periods 1 and 2 (1970-77 and 1978-86, respectively) to control for the time period cohort effect (which we have previously demonstrated to be significant). These treatment period definitions also correlated with a shift in protocol treatment trends from 24 Gy to 0-18 Gy and lower dose IT-MTX to higher dose IT-MTX. Results: Among the survivors from treatment period 1 who received 24 Gy CRD, those treated with higher dose IT-MTX (>83 mg) were significantly more likely to have ever been regular smokers than those treated with no or lower dose IT-MTX (31% vs. 16%, p=0.016). Among survivors from treatment period 1 who received 0-18 Gy CRD, the smoking prevalence was also greater in

  7. 76 FR 76981 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-09

    ... Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel, Nanotechnology Reformulations for Cancer Drugs. Date: April 12... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute... Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel, NCI SPORE in Prostate and Gastrointestinal Cancers. Date...

  8. Inclusion Criteria for NCI Cancer Genetics Services Directory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Professionals who provide services related to cancer genetics (cancer risk assessment, genetic counseling, genetic susceptibility testing, and others) must meet these criteria before applying to be listed in the National Cancer Institute's Cancer Genetics Services Directory.

  9. Highlights of recent developments and trends in cancer nanotechnology research--view from NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, L C; Farrell, D; Grodzinski, P

    2014-01-01

    Although the incidence of cancer and cancer related deaths in the United States has decreased over the past two decades due to improvements in early detection and treatment, cancer still is responsible for a quarter of the deaths in this country. There is much room for improvement on the standard treatments currently available and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) has recognized the potential for nanotechnology and nanomaterials in this area. The NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer was formed in 2004 to support multidisciplinary researchers in the application of nanotechnology to cancer diagnosis and treatment. The researchers in the Alliance have been productive in generating innovative solutions to some of the central issues of cancer treatment including how to detect tumors earlier, how to target cancer cells specifically, and how to improve the therapeutic index of existing chemotherapies and radiotherapy treatments. Highly creative ideas are being pursued where novelty in nanomaterial development enables new modalities of detection or therapy. This review highlights some of the innovative materials approaches being pursued by researchers funded by the NCI Alliance. Their discoveries to improve the functionality of nanoparticles for medical applications includes the generation of new platforms, improvements in the manufacturing of nanoparticles and determining the underlying reasons for the movement of nanoparticles in the blood. © 2013.

  10. CellMiner: a relational database and query tool for the NCI-60 cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinhold William C

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Advances in the high-throughput omic technologies have made it possible to profile cells in a large number of ways at the DNA, RNA, protein, chromosomal, functional, and pharmacological levels. A persistent problem is that some classes of molecular data are labeled with gene identifiers, others with transcript or protein identifiers, and still others with chromosomal locations. What has lagged behind is the ability to integrate the resulting data to uncover complex relationships and patterns. Those issues are reflected in full form by molecular profile data on the panel of 60 diverse human cancer cell lines (the NCI-60 used since 1990 by the U.S. National Cancer Institute to screen compounds for anticancer activity. To our knowledge, CellMiner is the first online database resource for integration of the diverse molecular types of NCI-60 and related meta data. Description CellMiner enables scientists to perform advanced querying of molecular information on NCI-60 (and additional types through a single web interface. CellMiner is a freely available tool that organizes and stores raw and normalized data that represent multiple types of molecular characterizations at the DNA, RNA, protein, and pharmacological levels. Annotations for each project, along with associated metadata on the samples and datasets, are stored in a MySQL database and linked to the molecular profile data. Data can be queried and downloaded along with comprehensive information on experimental and analytic methods for each data set. A Data Intersection tool allows selection of a list of genes (proteins in common between two or more data sets and outputs the data for those genes (proteins in the respective sets. In addition to its role as an integrative resource for the NCI-60, the CellMiner package also serves as a shell for incorporation of molecular profile data on other cell or tissue sample types. Conclusion CellMiner is a relational database tool for

  11. Renal Cancer Biomarkers | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute's Laboratory of Proteomics and Analytical Technologies is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize diagnostic, therapeutic and prognostic cancer biomarkers from clinical specimens.

  12. Improved Personalized Cancer Immunotherapy | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute’s Surgery Branch seeks partners interested in collaborative research to co-develop adoptive transfer of tumor infiltrating leukocytes (TIL) for cancers other than melanoma.

  13. Ratio Based Biomarkers for the Prediction of Cancer Survival | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI seeks licensees or co-development partners for this technology, which describes compositions, methods and kits for identifying, characterizing biomolecules expressed in a sample that are associated with the presence, the development, or progression of cancer.

  14. NCI scientists at forefront of new prostate cancer diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction of the UroNav was the result of nearly a decade’s research and development, principally conducted at NCI. Resembling a stylized computer workstation on wheels, the system electronically fuses together pictures from magnetic resonance imaging

  15. Future opportunities in cancer nanotechnology--NCI strategic workshop report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grodzinski, Piotr; Farrell, Dorothy

    2014-03-01

    There has been significant progress in utilizing nanotechnology in several areas of cancer care, including in vitro diagnostics, imaging, and therapy. The National Cancer Institute, which currently supports an array of research activities in cancer nanotechnology, convened a strategic workshop to explore the most promising directions and areas for future resource investment. The major discussion points as well as the opportunities identified are presented herein. ©2014 AACR

  16. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Role in Cancer Research Intramural Research Extramural Research Bioinformatics and Cancer NCI-Designated Cancer Centers Frederick National ... Role in Cancer Research Intramural Research Extramural Research Bioinformatics and Cancer NCI-Designated Cancer Centers Frederick National ...

  17. In memoriam: an appreciation for the NCI R25T cancer education and career development program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shine

    2014-06-01

    On September 7, 2013, the NCI R25T award mechanism ended its final "receipt/review/award cycle" after more than two decades shaping the cancer prevention and control workforce. Created in 1991 to respond to a national shortage of cancer prevention and control researchers, the R25T supported innovative institutional programs with specialized curricula preparing individuals for careers as independent scientists for the field. Required elements ensured developing transdisciplinary sensibilities and skills highly suited to team science, including conducting collaborative research with mentors of complementary expertise. R25Ts provided trainee stipends, research, education, and travel funds at levels far higher than T32 National Service Research Awards to attract individuals from diverse disciplines. Graduates are faculty at all academic ranks, and hold leadership positions such as associate directors of cancer prevention and control. Beyond its trainees, R25Ts also recruited into the field other students exposed through courses in specialized prevention curricula, as well as course instructors and trainee mentors, who did not initially consider their work to be relevant to cancer prevention. Although advances are being achieved, prevention efforts are not yet fully realized, and currently unknown is the impact on the workforce of terminating the R25T, including whether it is another barrier to preventing cancer. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  18. Frederick National Laboratory Advisory Committee Welcomes New FNL, NCI Leaders | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Frederick National Laboratory Advisory Committee recently met to discuss the future of several high-profile Frederick National Lab initiatives in a meeting that included a chance to meet the new NCI and FNLCR leaders. Here is a look at a few of the highlights from the last of the 2017 FNLAC meetings.

  19. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Extramural Research Bioinformatics and Cancer NCI-Designated Cancer Centers Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research Partners & Collaborators ... Extramural Research Bioinformatics and Cancer NCI-Designated Cancer Centers Frederick National Lab Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists ...

  20. CGH and OCC Announce a New, Two-Year Funding Opportunity for NCI-designated Cancer Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    CGH and OCC announce a new funding opportunity available from CGH for cancer prevention and control (CPC) researchers at NCI-designated cancer centers: Administrative Supplements to Promote Cancer Prevention and Control Research in Low and Middle Income Countries.

  1. 75 FR 4827 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request Clinical Trials Reporting Program (CTRP) Database (NCI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-29

    ... intended to assist the NCI in management of the NCI's clinical trials portfolio, which is global in nature... ensure an optimal return on the nation's investment in cancer clinical research. Information will be...

  2. 76 FR 22714 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Health Information National Trends Survey 4 (HINTS 4) (NCI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-22

    ... Request; Health Information National Trends Survey 4 (HINTS 4) (NCI) SUMMARY: In compliance with the... Trends Survey 4 (HINTS 4) (OMB 0925-0538, Exp 11/30/2008). Type of Information Collection Request... and/or suggestions from the public and affected agencies are invited on one or more of the following...

  3. Improving clinical research and cancer care delivery in community settings: evaluating the NCI community cancer centers program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauser, Steven B; Johnson, Maureen R; O'Brien, Donna M; Beveridge, Joy M; Fennell, Mary L; Kaluzny, Arnold D

    2009-09-26

    In this article, we describe the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Community Cancer Centers Program (NCCCP) pilot and the evaluation designed to assess its role, function, and relevance to the NCI's research mission. In doing so, we describe the evolution of and rationale for the NCCCP concept, participating sites' characteristics, its multi-faceted aims to enhance clinical research and quality of care in community settings, and the role of strategic partnerships, both within and outside of the NCCCP network, in achieving program objectives. The evaluation of the NCCCP is conceptualized as a mixed method multi-layered assessment of organizational innovation and performance which includes mapping the evolution of site development as a means of understanding the inter- and intra-organizational change in the pilot, and the application of specific evaluation metrics for assessing the implementation, operations, and performance of the NCCCP pilot. The assessment of the cost of the pilot as an additional means of informing the longer-term feasibility and sustainability of the program is also discussed. The NCCCP is a major systems-level set of organizational innovations to enhance clinical research and care delivery in diverse communities across the United States. Assessment of the extent to which the program achieves its aims will depend on a full understanding of how individual, organizational, and environmental factors align (or fail to align) to achieve these improvements, and at what cost.

  4. Improving clinical research and cancer care delivery in community settings: evaluating the NCI community cancer centers program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fennell Mary L

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this article, we describe the National Cancer Institute (NCI Community Cancer Centers Program (NCCCP pilot and the evaluation designed to assess its role, function, and relevance to the NCI's research mission. In doing so, we describe the evolution of and rationale for the NCCCP concept, participating sites' characteristics, its multi-faceted aims to enhance clinical research and quality of care in community settings, and the role of strategic partnerships, both within and outside of the NCCCP network, in achieving program objectives. Discussion The evaluation of the NCCCP is conceptualized as a mixed method multi-layered assessment of organizational innovation and performance which includes mapping the evolution of site development as a means of understanding the inter- and intra-organizational change in the pilot, and the application of specific evaluation metrics for assessing the implementation, operations, and performance of the NCCCP pilot. The assessment of the cost of the pilot as an additional means of informing the longer-term feasibility and sustainability of the program is also discussed. Summary The NCCCP is a major systems-level set of organizational innovations to enhance clinical research and care delivery in diverse communities across the United States. Assessment of the extent to which the program achieves its aims will depend on a full understanding of how individual, organizational, and environmental factors align (or fail to align to achieve these improvements, and at what cost.

  5. NCI Funding Trends and Priorities in Physical Activity and Energy Balance Research Among Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfano, Catherine M; Bluethmann, Shirley M; Tesauro, Gina; Perna, Frank; Agurs-Collins, Tanya; Elena, Joanne W; Ross, Sharon A; O'Connell, Mary; Bowles, Heather R; Greenberg, Deborah; Nebeling, Linda

    2016-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that a healthy lifestyle consisting of physical activity, healthy diet, and weight control is associated with reduced risk of morbidity and mortality after cancer. However, these behavioral interventions are not widely adopted in practice or community settings. Integrating heath behavior change interventions into standard survivorship care for the growing number of cancer survivors requires an understanding of the current state of the science and a coordinated scientific agenda for the future with focused attention in several priority areas. To facilitate this goal, this paper presents trends over the past decade of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) research portfolio, fiscal year 2004 to 2014, by funding mechanism, research focus, research design and methodology, primary study exposures and outcomes, and study team expertise and composition. These data inform a prioritized research agenda for the next decade focused on demonstrating value and feasibility and creating desire for health behavior change interventions at multiple levels including the survivor, clinician, and healthcare payer to facilitate the development and implementation of appropriately targeted, adaptive, effective, and sustainable programs for all survivors. Published by Oxford University Press (2015). This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  6. Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI is the nation's leader in cancer research. Learn more about NCI's cancer research areas, key initiatives, progress made in cancer research, and resources for researchers like research tools, specimens and data.

  7. Best practices in cancer nanotechnology: perspective from NCI nanotechnology alliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamboni, William C; Torchilin, Vladimir; Patri, Anil K; Hrkach, Jeff; Stern, Stephen; Lee, Robert; Nel, Andre; Panaro, Nicholas J; Grodzinski, Piotr

    2012-06-15

    Historically, treatment of patients with cancer using chemotherapeutic agents has been associated with debilitating and systemic toxicities, poor bioavailability, and unfavorable pharmacokinetics. Nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems, on the other hand, can specifically target cancer cells while avoiding their healthy neighbors, avoid rapid clearance from the body, and be administered without toxic solvents. They hold immense potential in addressing all of these issues, which has hampered further development of chemotherapeutics. Furthermore, such drug delivery systems will lead to cancer therapeutic modalities that are not only less toxic to the patient but also significantly more efficacious. In addition to established therapeutic modes of action, nanomaterials are opening up entirely new modalities of cancer therapy, such as photodynamic and hyperthermia treatments. Furthermore, nanoparticle carriers are also capable of addressing several drug delivery problems that could not be effectively solved in the past and include overcoming formulation issues, multidrug-resistance phenomenon, and penetrating cellular barriers that may limit device accessibility to intended targets, such as the blood-brain barrier. The challenges in optimizing design of nanoparticles tailored to specific tumor indications still remain; however, it is clear that nanoscale devices carry a significant promise toward new ways of diagnosing and treating cancer. This review focuses on future prospects of using nanotechnology in cancer applications and discusses practices and methodologies used in the development and translation of nanotechnology-based therapeutics. ©2012 AACR.

  8. National Cancer Institute Formulary: A Public-Private Partnership Providing Investigators Access to Investigational Anticancer Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristofaro, J V; Ansher, S S; Zwiebel, J A; Ivy, P; Conley, B; Abrams, J S; Doroshow, J H

    2017-05-01

    As part of the White House Cancer Moonshot Initiative, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) has developed a drug formulary to provide investigational anticancer agents to the extramural research community. This article describes how the NCI Formulary functions, how researchers may apply for access to drugs in the formulary, and the NCI's initial goals for formulary participation. Approved investigators may apply for access to formulary agents at: https://nciformulary.cancer.gov. © 2016 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  9. Differentiated Thyroid Cancer Multidisciplinary Management at the Colombian National Cancer Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garavito, Gloria; Llamas O, Augusto; Cadena, Enrique; De Los Reyes, Amelia

    2009-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common malignant disease of the endocrine system. Two hundred and twenty-one new cases were diagnosed at the National Cancer Institute of Colombia (NCI) in 2006, roughly 4% of all new cancer cases. Weekly multidisciplinary decision-making meetings on thyroid cancer management have been held at the NCI since 1994. This article covers the body of knowledge gathered through 14 years of interdisciplinary collaboration where experience has been combined with the best available evidence.

  10. 75 FR 7489 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-19

    ... Institute Special Emphasis Panel; NCI Cancer Nanotechnology Training (R25) and Career Development Award (K99... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; The Early Detection...

  11. 78 FR 16272 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-14

    ...: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel, Nanotechnology RNA Therapeutics. Date: April 18-19, 2013... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute... Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel, NCI Provocative Questions. Date: March 28, 2013. Time: 7:30 a.m...

  12. NCI RNA Biology 2017 symposium recap | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The recent discovery of new classes of RNAs and the demonstration that alterations in RNA metabolism underlie numerous human cancers have resulted in enormous interest among CCR investigators in RNA biology. In order to share the latest research in this exciting field, the CCR Initiative in RNA Biology held its second international symposium April 23-24, 2017, in Natcher Auditorium. Learn more...

  13. Cooperative research and development opportunities with the National Cancer Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sybert, Kathleen

    1991-01-01

    The Office of Technology Development (OTD) of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) is responsible for negotiating Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs), whereby the knowledge resulting from NCI investigators' government-sponsored research is developed in collaboration with universities and/or industry into new products of importance for the diagnosis and treatment of cancer and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The NCI has recently executed a unique 'clinical trials' CRADA and is developing a model agreement based upon it for the development and commercialization of products for the diagnosis and treatment of cancer and AIDS. NCI drug screening, preclinical testing, clinical trials, and AIDS program capabilities form the basis for this new technology development/technology transfer vehicle. NCI's extensive drug screening program and 'designer foods' program serve as potential sources of investigational new drugs (INDs) and cancer preventatives. Collaborations between NCI and pharmaceutical companies having the facilities, experience, and expertise necessary to develop INDs into approved drugs available to the public are being encouraged where the companies have proprietary rights to INDs, or where NCI has proprietary rights to INDs and invites companies to respond to a collaborator announcement published in the Federal Register. The joint efforts of the NCI and the chosen collaborator are designed to generate the data necessary to obtain pharmaceutic regulatory approval from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to market the drugs developed, and thereby make them available to health care providers for the diagnosis and treatment of cancer and AIDS.

  14. Evaluation of the national cancer program and proposed reforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, S S

    1993-07-01

    A statement by some 68 prominent national experts in industrial medicine, carcinogenesis, epidemiology, and public health, released at a February 4, 1992 press conference in Washington, D.C., charged that the National Cancer Institute (NCI) has confused the public by repeated claims of winning the war against cancer. In fact, age standardized incidence rates have increased sharply over recent decades, while ability to treat and cure most cancers has not materially improved. Furthermore, the NCI has minimized evidence for increasing cancer rates which are largely attributed to smoking and to diet. In so doing, NCI trivializes the importance of occupational carcinogens as non-smoking-attributable causes of lung and other cancers, and ignores the tenuous and inconsistent evidence for the causal role of diet per se and also the important role of carcinogenic dietary contaminants. Reflecting this near exclusionary blame-the-victim theory of cancer causation, with support from the American Cancer Society and industry, the NCI discounts the role of avoidable involuntary exposures to industrial carcinogens in air, water, food, the home, and the workplace. The NCI has also failed to provide scientific guidance to Congress and regulatory agencies on fundamental principles of carcinogenesis and epidemiology, and on the critical need to reduce avoidable exposures to environmental and occupational carcinogens. Contrary to NCI, analysis of their $2 billion budget reveals very limited allocations for research on primary cancer prevention, and for occupational cancer which receives only $19 million annually, 1% of NCI's total budget. Problems of professional mindsets in NCI leadership--fixation on diagnosis, treatment, and basic research (much of questionable relevance) and the neglect of cancer prevention--are exemplified by the composition of the Executive President's Cancer Panel and the National Cancer Advisory Board. Contrary to the explicit mandate of the National Cancer Act

  15. Brenda K. Edwards, PhD | DCCPS/NCI/NIH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenda K. Edwards, PhD, has been with the Surveillance Research Program (SRP) and its predecessor organizations at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) since 1989, serving as SRP’s Associate Director from 1990-2011.

  16. Cancer Clinical Trials at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Cancer Clinical Trials at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center ... they are eligible for a clinical trial . NCI Clinical Trials at the NIH Clinical Center Cancer research at ...

  17. Training the Cancer Research Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) builds up the nation's cancer research workforce through training and career development grants, as well as intramural research experiences at the NIH Clinical Center and NCI offices and laboratories in Maryland.

  18. NCI's national environmental research data collection: metadata management built on standards and preparing for the semantic web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingbo; Bastrakova, Irina; Evans, Ben; Gohar, Kashif; Santana, Fabiana; Wyborn, Lesley

    2015-04-01

    National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) manages national environmental research data collections (10+ PB) as part of its specialized high performance data node of the Research Data Storage Infrastructure (RDSI) program. We manage 40+ data collections using NCI's Data Management Plan (DMP), which is compatible with the ISO 19100 metadata standards. We utilize ISO standards to make sure our metadata is transferable and interoperable for sharing and harvesting. The DMP is used along with metadata from the data itself, to create a hierarchy of data collection, dataset and time series catalogues that is then exposed through GeoNetwork for standard discoverability. This hierarchy catalogues are linked using a parent-child relationship. The hierarchical infrastructure of our GeoNetwork catalogues system aims to address both discoverability and in-house administrative use-cases. At NCI, we are currently improving the metadata interoperability in our catalogue by linking with standardized community vocabulary services. These emerging vocabulary services are being established to help harmonise data from different national and international scientific communities. One such vocabulary service is currently being established by the Australian National Data Services (ANDS). Data citation is another important aspect of the NCI data infrastructure, which allows tracking of data usage and infrastructure investment, encourage data sharing, and increasing trust in research that is reliant on these data collections. We incorporate the standard vocabularies into the data citation metadata so that the data citation become machine readable and semantically friendly for web-search purpose as well. By standardizing our metadata structure across our entire data corpus, we are laying the foundation to enable the application of appropriate semantic mechanisms to enhance discovery and analysis of NCI's national environmental research data information. We expect that this will further

  19. Geographic disparities amongst patients with gynecologic malignancies at an urban NCI-designated cancer center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temkin, Sarah M; Fleming, Saroj A; Amrane, Selma; Schluterman, Nicholas; Terplan, Mishka

    2015-06-01

    Women with gynecologic malignancies require specialized care. We hypothesize that a geographic disparity exists amongst patients with gynecologic malignancies and that longer distance and time traveled negatively impact completion of adjuvant therapy. Patients with incident gynecologic malignancies at a single, urban NCI-designated cancer center were identified. Distances from the patient's home to the treating facility were calculated in miles and minutes. Demographic variables were evaluated for their impact on treatment outcomes using Chi-squared, ANOVA and Kruskal-Wallis analyses. One hundred and fifty consecutive patients were identified. The median distance traveled to the hospital was 16.9miles with a median travel time of 28min. The distance and time traveled were significantly different between insurance groups, with the uninsured traveling the furthest for care by distance (p=0.04) and time (p=0.03). Race, tumor site, medical comorbidities and median income at zip code were not associated with travel distance or time to the hospital. The majority of patients (87%) completed recommended initial treatment. Treatment completion was related to distance traveled with those patients living at the distance extremes (50miles) least likely to complete care (p<0.01). The presence of medical comorbidities (p<0.01) but not insurance status was correlated to treatment completion. Geographic disparities exist in women with gynecologic malignancies receiving treatment at an NCI-designated cancer center. Approaches to decreasing these disparities may include improved support for cancer patients needing assistance with travel and additional social work and psychosocial support to patients with medical co-morbidities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. NCI and the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences Sign Statement of Intent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Today the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the Cancer Institute/Hospital of the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences (CICAMS) signed a statement of intent to share an interest in fostering collaborative biomedical research in oncology and a common goal

  1. Nonlinear quantitative radiation sensitivity prediction model based on NCI-60 cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunying; Girard, Luc; Das, Amit; Chen, Sun; Zheng, Guangqiang; Song, Kai

    2014-01-01

    We proposed a nonlinear model to perform a novel quantitative radiation sensitivity prediction. We used the NCI-60 panel, which consists of nine different cancer types, as the platform to train our model. Important radiation therapy (RT) related genes were selected by significance analysis of microarrays (SAM). Orthogonal latent variables (LVs) were then extracted by the partial least squares (PLS) method as the new compressive input variables. Finally, support vector machine (SVM) regression model was trained with these LVs to predict the SF2 (the surviving fraction of cells after a radiation dose of 2 Gy γ-ray) values of the cell lines. Comparison with the published results showed significant improvement of the new method in various ways: (a) reducing the root mean square error (RMSE) of the radiation sensitivity prediction model from 0.20 to 0.011; and (b) improving prediction accuracy from 62% to 91%. To test the predictive performance of the gene signature, three different types of cancer patient datasets were used. Survival analysis across these different types of cancer patients strongly confirmed the clinical potential utility of the signature genes as a general prognosis platform. The gene regulatory network analysis identified six hub genes that are involved in canonical cancer pathways.

  2. Nonlinear Quantitative Radiation Sensitivity Prediction Model Based on NCI-60 Cancer Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunying Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We proposed a nonlinear model to perform a novel quantitative radiation sensitivity prediction. We used the NCI-60 panel, which consists of nine different cancer types, as the platform to train our model. Important radiation therapy (RT related genes were selected by significance analysis of microarrays (SAM. Orthogonal latent variables (LVs were then extracted by the partial least squares (PLS method as the new compressive input variables. Finally, support vector machine (SVM regression model was trained with these LVs to predict the SF2 (the surviving fraction of cells after a radiation dose of 2 Gy γ-ray values of the cell lines. Comparison with the published results showed significant improvement of the new method in various ways: (a reducing the root mean square error (RMSE of the radiation sensitivity prediction model from 0.20 to 0.011; and (b improving prediction accuracy from 62% to 91%. To test the predictive performance of the gene signature, three different types of cancer patient datasets were used. Survival analysis across these different types of cancer patients strongly confirmed the clinical potential utility of the signature genes as a general prognosis platform. The gene regulatory network analysis identified six hub genes that are involved in canonical cancer pathways.

  3. Phenethyl Isothiocyanate Induces Apoptotic Cell Death Through the Mitochondria-dependent Pathway in Gefitinib-resistant NCI-H460 Human Lung Cancer Cells In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsia, Te-Chun; Huang, Yi-Ping; Jiang, Yi-Wen; Chen, Hsin-Yu; Cheng, Zheng-Yu; Hsiao, Yung-Ting; Chen, Cheng-Yen; Peng, Shu-Fen; Chueh, Fu-Shin; Chou, Yu-Cheng; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2018-04-01

    Some lung cancer patients treated with gefitinib develop resistance to this drug resulting in unsatisfactory treatment outcomes. Phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), present in our common cruciferous vegetables, exhibits anticancer activities in many human cancer cell lines. Currently, there is no available information on the possible modification of gefitinib resistance of lung cancer in vitro by PEITC. Thus, the effects of PEITC on gefitinib resistant lung cancer NCI-H460 cells were investigated in vitro. The total cell viability, apoptotic cell death, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and Ca 2+ , levels of mitochondria membrane potential (ΔΨ m ) and caspase-3, -8 and -9 activities were measured by flow cytometry assay. PEITC induced chromatin condensation was examined by DAPI staining. PEITC-induced cell morphological changes, decreased total viable cell number and induced apoptotic cell death in NCI-H460 and NCI-H460/G cells. PEITC decreased ROS production in NCI-H460 cells, but increased production in NCI-H460/G cells. PEITC increased Ca 2+ production, decreased the levels of ΔΨ m and increased caspase-3, -8 and -9 activities in both NCI-H460 and NCI-H460/G cells. Western blotting was used to examine the effect of apoptotic cell death associated protein expression in NCI-H460 NCI-H460/G cells after exposure to PEITC. Results showed that PEITC increased expression of cleaved caspase-3, PARP, GADD153, Endo G and pro-apoptotic protein Bax in NCI-H460/G cells. Based on these results, we suggest that PEITC induces apoptotic cell death via the caspase- and mitochondria-dependent pathway in NCI-H460/G cells. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  4. Population-based geographic access to parent and satellite National Cancer Institute Cancer Center Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onega, Tracy; Alford-Teaster, Jennifer; Wang, Fahui

    2017-09-01

    Satellite facilities of National Cancer Institute (NCI) cancer centers have expanded their regional footprints. This study characterized geographic access to parent and satellite NCI cancer center facilities nationally overall and by sociodemographics. Parent and satellite NCI cancer center facilities, which were geocoded in ArcGIS, were ascertained. Travel times from every census tract in the continental United States and Hawaii to the nearest parent and satellite facilities were calculated. Census-based population attributes were used to characterize measures of geographic access for sociodemographic groups. From the 62 NCI cancer centers providing clinical care in 2014, 76 unique parent locations and 211 satellite locations were mapped. The overall proportion of the population within 60 minutes of a facility was 22% for parent facilities and 32.7% for satellite facilities. When satellites were included for potential access, the proportion of some racial groups for which a satellite was the closest NCI cancer center facility increased notably (Native Americans, 22.6% with parent facilities and 39.7% with satellite facilities; whites, 34.8% with parent facilities and 50.3% with satellite facilities; and Asians, 40.0% with parent facilities and 54.0% with satellite facilities), with less marked increases for Hispanic and black populations. Rural populations of all categories had dramatically low proportions living within 60 minutes of an NCI cancer center facility of any type (1.0%-6.6%). Approximately 14% of the population (n = 43,033,310) lived more than 180 minutes from a parent or satellite facility, and most of these individuals were Native Americans and/or rural residents (37% of Native Americans and 41.7% of isolated rural residents). Racial/ethnic and rural populations showed markedly improved geographic access to NCI cancer center care when satellite facilities were included. Cancer 2017;123:3305-11. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American

  5. Developing Cancer Informatics Applications and Tools Using the NCI Genomic Data Commons API.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Shane; Fitzsimons, Michael; Ferguson, Martin; Heath, Allison; Jensen, Mark; Miller, Josh; Murphy, Mark W; Porter, James; Sahni, Himanso; Staudt, Louis; Tang, Yajing; Wang, Zhining; Yu, Christine; Zhang, Junjun; Ferretti, Vincent; Grossman, Robert L

    2017-11-01

    The NCI Genomic Data Commons (GDC) was launched in 2016 and makes available over 4 petabytes (PB) of cancer genomic and associated clinical data to the research community. This dataset continues to grow and currently includes over 14,500 patients. The GDC is an example of a biomedical data commons, which collocates biomedical data with storage and computing infrastructure and commonly used web services, software applications, and tools to create a secure, interoperable, and extensible resource for researchers. The GDC is (i) a data repository for downloading data that have been submitted to it, and also a system that (ii) applies a common set of bioinformatics pipelines to submitted data; (iii) reanalyzes existing data when new pipelines are developed; and (iv) allows users to build their own applications and systems that interoperate with the GDC using the GDC Application Programming Interface (API). We describe the GDC API and how it has been used both by the GDC itself and by third parties. Cancer Res; 77(21); e15-18. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. Immunocompetent mouse model for tracking cancer progression | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute seeks licensees or research collaborators to develop and commercialize transgenic mice having immunocompetent rat growth hormone-firefly Luciferase-enhanced green fluorescent protein.

  7. Trans-NCI Pharmacogenomics and Pharmacoepidemiology Working Group (PPWG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI established the Trans-NCI Pharmacogenomics and Pharmacoepidemiology Working Group to support development of a comprehensive and interdisciplinary pharmacoepidemiology and pharmacogenomics cancer research program.

  8. NCI Cancer Imaging Program efforts and their application to non-conventional radionuclides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croft, B Y

    2008-06-01

    The US National Institute of Health (NIH) National Cancer Institute's Cancer Imaging Program funds research in cancer imaging. The article describes funding initiatives, such as Requests for Application and Program Announcement, funding mechanisms such as the R01 and R21, the Institutes of the NIH that fund imaging research, the application process, the application review process, and on-line resources to assist applicants for research funding for non-conventional radionuclides for imaging and therapy.

  9. United States military contributions to the National Cancer Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarvis, Jamey A; Thompson, Ian M

    2009-01-01

    To review contributions from the Department of Defense and the United States military to cancer research and the National Cancer Institute. The Department of Defense and the military have a number of programs aimed at cancer research with significant dedication to prostate cancer, such as the Prostate Cancer Research Program and Center for Prostate Disease Research. In addition, the military has significant involvement with the National Cancer Institute (NCI) through the various Cooperative Research Groups. The military has played a critical role in large NCI sponsored multi-institutional clinical trials such as the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial (PCPT) and the Servicemen's Testicular Tumor Environmental Endocrine Determinants Study (STEED). The Department of Defense has demonstrated a consistent commitment to cancer research.

  10. Types of Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    An infographic from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) describing the four broad categories of cancer research: basic research, clinical research, population-based research, and translational research.

  11. Office of Cancer Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... C Research. Information. Outreach. The Office of Cancer Complementary and Alternative Medicine (OCCAM) was established in October 1998 to coordinate ... National Cancer Institute (NCI) in the arena of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). More about us. CAM at the NCI ...

  12. Metformin synergistically enhances antiproliferative effects of cisplatin and etoposide in NCI-H460 human lung cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Fernandes Teixeira

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To test the effectiveness of combining conventional antineoplastic drugs (cisplatin and etoposide with metformin in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer in the NCI-H460 cell line, in order to develop new therapeutic options with high efficacy and low toxicity.METHODS: We used the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay and calculated the combination index for the drugs studied.RESULTS: We found that the use of metformin as monotherapy reduced the metabolic viability of the cell line studied. Combining metformin with cisplatin or etoposide produced a synergistic effect and was more effective than was the use of cisplatin or etoposide as monotherapy.CONCLUSIONS: Metformin, due to its independent effects on liver kinase B1, had antiproliferative effects on the NCI-H460 cell line. When metformin was combined with cisplatin or etoposide, the cell death rate was even higher.

  13. Cancer Inhibitors Isolated from an African Plant | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute's Molecular Targets Development Program is seeking parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize cancer inhibitors isolated from the African plant Phyllanthus englerii. The technology is also available for exclusive or non-exclusive licensing.

  14. Nanotechnology-based cancer therapeutics--promise and challenge--lessons learned through the NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Dorothy; Ptak, Krzysztof; Panaro, Nicholas J; Grodzinski, Piotr

    2011-02-01

    The new generation of nanotechnology-based drug formulations is challenging the accepted ways of cancer treatment. Multi-functional nanomaterial constructs have the capability to be delivered directly to the tumor site and eradicate cancer cells selectively, while sparing healthy cells. Tailoring of the nano-construct design can result in enhanced drug efficacy at lower doses as compared to free drug treatment, wider therapeutic window, and lower side effects. Nanoparticle carriers can also address several drug delivery problems which could not be effectively solved in the past and include reduction of multi-drug resistance effects, delivery of siRNA, and penetration of the blood-brain-barrier. Although challenges in understanding toxicity, biodistribution, and paving an effective regulatory path must be met, nanoscale devices carry a formidable promise to change ways cancer is diagnosed and treated. This article summarizes current developments in nanotechnology-based drug delivery and discusses path forward in this field. The discussion is done in context of research and development occurring within the NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer program.

  15. History of the Diet History Questionnaire (DHQ) | EGRP/DCCPS/NCI/NIH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn about the evolution of the Diet History Questionnaire (DHQ), developed by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) initially in 2001, to the DHQ II in 2010, up to the present version, DHQ III, launched in 2018.

  16. How You Can Partner with NIH | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI Technology Transfer Center (TTC) provides an array of agreements to support the National Cancer Institute's partnering. Deciding which type of agreement to use can be a challenge: CRADA, MTA, collaboration, agreement, CTA, Materials-CRADA

  17. Creating Start-up Companies around NCI Inventions | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Karen Surabian, Thomas Stackhouse, and Rose Freel, Contributing Writers, and Rosemarie Truman, Guest Writer The National Cancer Institute (NCI), led by the Technology Transfer Center (TTC),  the Avon Foundation, and The Center for Advancing Innovation have partnered to create a “first-of-a-kind” Breast Cancer Start-up Challenge.

  18. VIG Seminar March 1, 2018 Alex Compton NCI-Frederick | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Please join us for the Virology Interest Group Seminar on Thursday, March 1st, from 2:30 until 3:30 in Bethesda, Building 50, Room 2328. The seminar will also be broadcasted to Frederick, Building 549, Conference Room A. This seminar will be presented by Alex Compton, NCI-Frederick.

  19. NCI Helps Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia to Identify and Treat New Target in Pediatric Cancer | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    There may be a new, more effective method for treating high-risk neuroblastoma, according to scientists at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and collaborators in the Cancer and Inflammation Program at NCI at Frederick. Together, the groups published a study describing a previously unrecognized protein on neuroblastoma cells, called GPC2, as well as the creation of a novel antibody-drug conjugate, a combination of a human antibody and a naturally occurring anticancer drug, that locates and binds to GPC2 in a highly efficient way.

  20. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Laboratory for Cancer Research Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Research Cancer Genomics Research ... Centers Frederick National Lab Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes ...

  1. Spatial analyses identify the geographic source of patients at a National Cancer Institute Comprehensive Cancer Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Shu-Chih; Kanarek, Norma; Fox, Michael G; Guseynova, Alla; Crow, Shirley; Piantadosi, Steven

    2010-02-01

    We examined the geographic distribution of patients to better understand the service area of the Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, a designated National Cancer Institute (NCI) comprehensive cancer center located in an urban center. Like most NCI cancer centers, the Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center serves a population beyond city limits. Urban cancer centers are expected to serve their immediate neighborhoods and to address disparities in access to specialty care. Our purpose was to learn the extent and nature of the cancer center service area. Statistical clustering of patient residence in the continental United States was assessed for all patients and by gender, cancer site, and race using SaTScan. Primary clusters detected for all cases and demographically and tumor-defined subpopulations were centered at Baltimore City and consisted of adjacent counties in Delaware, Pennsylvania, Virginia, West Virginia, New Jersey and New York, and the District of Columbia. Primary clusters varied in size by race, gender, and cancer site. Spatial analysis can provide insights into the populations served by urban cancer centers, assess centers' performance relative to their communities, and aid in developing a cancer center business plan that recognizes strengths, regional utility, and referral patterns. Today, 62 NCI cancer centers serve a quarter of the U.S. population in their immediate communities. From the Baltimore experience, we might project that the population served by these centers is actually more extensive and varies by patient characteristics, cancer site, and probably cancer center services offered.

  2. An NCI perspective on creating sustainable biospecimen resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaught, Jimmie; Rogers, Joyce; Myers, Kimberly; Lim, Mark David; Lockhart, Nicole; Moore, Helen; Sawyer, Sherilyn; Furman, Jeffrey L; Compton, Carolyn

    2011-01-01

    High-quality biospecimens with appropriate clinical annotation are critical in the era of personalized medicine. It is now widely recognized that biospecimen resources need to be developed and operated under established scientific, technical, business, and ethical/legal standards. To date, such standards have not been widely practiced, resulting in variable biospecimen quality that may compromise research efforts. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Office of Biorepositories and Biospecimen Research (OBBR) was established in 2005 to coordinate NCI's biospecimen resource activities and address those issues that affect access to the high-quality specimens and data necessary for its research enterprises as well as the broader translational research field. OBBR and the NCI Biorepository Coordinating Committee developed NCI's "Best Practices for Biospecimen Resources" after consultation with a broad array of experts. A Biospecimen Research Network was established to fund research to develop additional evidence-based practices. Although these initiatives will improve the overall availability of high-quality specimens and data for cancer research, OBBR has been authorized to implement a national biobanking effort, cancer HUman Biobank (caHUB). caHUB will address systematically the gaps in knowledge needed to improve the state-of-the-science and strengthen the standards for human biobanking. This commentary outlines the progressive efforts by NCI in technical, governance, and economic considerations that will be important as the new caHUB enterprise is undertaken.

  3. Diffusion of intraperitoneal (IP chemotherapy in women with advanced ovarian cancer in community settings 2003-2008: the effect of the NCI clinical recommendation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin J A Bowles

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: A 2006 National Cancer Institute (NCI clinical announcement recommended the use of combined intravenous (IV and intraperitoneal (IP chemotherapy over IV chemotherapy alone for women with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO stage 3 optimally debulked ovarian cancer due to significant survival benefit demonstrated in multiple randomized clinical trials. We examined uptake of IP chemotherapy in community practice before and after this recommendation. Methods: We identified 288 women with FIGO stage 2 or greater incident ovarian cancer diagnosed from 2003 to 2008 at three integrated delivery systems in the US. Administrative health plan data were used to determine patient characteristics and receipt of IV and IP chemotherapy within 12 months of diagnosis. We compared characteristics of women receiving IV chemotherapy alone versus IP chemotherapy (with or without IV chemotherapy and assessed temporal trends in IP chemotherapy use. Results: Overall 12.5% (n=36 of women received IP chemotherapy during the study period. IP chemotherapy use was nonexistent between 2003 and 2005. Use of IP chemotherapy occurred among 26.9% of women diagnosed in 2006 and plateaued at 20.4% of women diagnosed in 2008. IP recipients were younger (mean age 55.9 vs 63.5 years, p= Conclusions: Use of IP chemotherapy for newly diagnosed advanced stage ovarian cancer patients was uncommon in this community setting. Future research should identify potential patient, physician, and system barriers and facilitators to using IP chemotherapy in this setting.

  4. Cancer Vaccine Composed of Oligonucleotides Conjugated to Apoptotic Tumor Cells | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) containing unmethylated Cytosine-Guanine (CpG) motifs mimic the immunostimulatory activity of bacterial DNA. CpG ODN directly stimulate B cells and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC), promote the production of T Helper 1 cells (Th1) and pro-inflammatory cytokines, and  trigger the maturation/activation of professional antigen presenting cells. The National Cancer Institute, Laboratory of Experimental Immunology, seeks interested parties to co- develop methods for inducing an immune response to tumors.

  5. Leveraging National Cancer Institute Programmatic Collaboration for Uterine Cervix Cancer Patient Accrual in Puerto Rico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles A. Kunos

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Women in the U.S. Commonwealth of Puerto Rico (PR have a higher age-adjusted incidence rate for uterine cervix cancer than the U.S. mainland as well as substantial access and economic barriers to cancer care. The National Cancer Institute (NCI funds a Minority/Underserved NCI Community Oncology Research Program in PR (PRNCORP as part of a national network of community-based health-care systems to conduct multisite cancer clinical trials in diverse populations. Participation by the PRNCORP in NCI’s uterine cervix cancer clinical trials, however, has remained limited. This study reports on the findings of an NCI site visit in PR to assess barriers impeding site activation and accrual to its sponsored gynecologic cancer clinical trials. Qualitative, semi-structured individual, and group interviews were conducted at six PRNCORP-affiliated locations to ascertain: long-term trial accrual objectives; key stakeholders in PR that address uterine cervix cancer care; key challenges or barriers to activating and to enrolling patients in NCI uterine cervix cancer treatment trials; and resources, policies, or procedures in place or needed on the island to support NCI-sponsored clinical trials. An NCI-sponsored uterine cervix cancer radiation–chemotherapy intervention clinical trial (NCT02466971, already activated on the island, served as a test case to identify relevant patient accrual and site barriers. The site visit identified five key barriers to accrual: (1 lack of central personnel to coordinate referrals for treatment plans, medical tests, and medical imaging across the island’s clinical trial access points; (2 patient insurance coverage; (3 lack of a coordinated brachytherapy schedule at San Juan-centric service providers; (4 limited credentialed radiotherapy machines island-wide; and (5 too few radiology medical physicists tasked to credential trial-specified positron emission tomography scanners island-wide. PR offers a unique opportunity to

  6. Construction and analysis of the NCI-EDRN breast cancer reference set for circulating markers of disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Jeffrey R; Anderson, Karen S; Engstrom, Paul; Godwin, Andrew K; Esserman, Laura J; Longton, Gary; Iversen, Edwin S; Mathew, Anu; Patriotis, Christos; Pepe, Margaret S

    2015-02-01

    Many circulating biomarkers have been reported for the diagnosis of breast cancer, but few, if any, have undergone rigorous credentialing using prospective cohorts and blinded evaluation. The NCI Early Detection Research Network (EDRN) has created a prospective, multicenter collection of plasma and serum samples from 832 subjects designed to evaluate circulating biomarkers for the detection and diagnosis of breast cancer. These samples are available to investigators who wish to evaluate their biomarkers using a set of blinded samples. The breast cancer reference set is composed of blood samples collected using a standard operating procedure at four U.S. medical centers from 2008 to 2010 from women undergoing either tissue diagnosis for breast cancer or routine screening mammography. The reference set contains samples from women with incident invasive cancer (n = 190), carcinoma in situ (n = 55), benign pathology with atypia (n = 63), benign disease with no atypia (n = 231), and women with no evidence of breast disease by screening mammography (BI-RADS 1 or 2, n = 276). Using a subset of plasma samples (n = 505) from the reference set, we analyzed 90 proteins by multiplexed immunoassays for their potential utility as diagnostic markers. We found that none of these markers is useful for distinguishing cancer from benign controls. However, elevated CA-125 does appear to be a candidate marker for estrogen receptor-negative cancers. Markers that can distinguish benign breast conditions from invasive cancer have not yet been found. Availability of prospectively collected samples should improve future validation efforts. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  7. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... NCI NCI Overview History Contributing to Cancer Research Leadership Director's Page Deputy Director's Page Previous NCI Directors ... History of NCI Contributing to Cancer Research Senior Leadership Director Deputy Director Previous Directors NCI Organization Divisions, ...

  8. NCI at Frederick Ebola Response Team | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Editor’s note: This article was adapted from the Employee Diversity Team’s display case exhibit “Recognizing the NCI at Frederick Ebola Response Team,” in the lobby of Building 549. The Poster staff recognizes that this article does not include everyone who was involved in the response to the Ebola crisis, both at NCI at Frederick and in Africa. When the Ebola crisis broke out in 2014 in West Africa, staff members from the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research responded quickly. Members of the Clinical Monitoring Research Program (CMRP) were instrumental not only in setting up the clinical trials of the vaccine in Liberia, but also in providing training, community outreach, and recruitment strategies for the trials.

  9. Global microRNA analysis of the NCI-60 cancer cell panel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søkilde, Rolf; Kaczkowski, Bogumil; Podolska, Agnieszka

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNA) are a group of short noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression at the posttranscriptional level. They are involved in many biological processes, including development, differentiation, apoptosis, and carcinogenesis. Because miRNAs may play a role in the initiation and progres......MicroRNAs (miRNA) are a group of short noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression at the posttranscriptional level. They are involved in many biological processes, including development, differentiation, apoptosis, and carcinogenesis. Because miRNAs may play a role in the initiation......-type–specific miRNA patterns by unsupervised hierarchical clustering and statistical analysis. A comparison of our data to three previously published miRNA expression studies on the NCI-60 panel showed a remarkably high correlation between the different technical platforms. In addition, the current work...

  10. College Graduate with NCI Internship Gains Experience, Carries Chemistry into Medicine | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    For Jennifer Marshall, the skills learned through an internship at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) at Frederick have prepared her for the next step of her life—medical school. Marshall, who will be attending the West Virginia University School of Medicine in the fall, spent three summers in NCI at Frederick’s Summer Internship Program expanding her love and passion for science and the medical field.

  11. DNA fingerprinting of the NCI-60 cell line panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzi, Philip L; Reinhold, William C; Varma, Sudhir; Hutchinson, Amy A; Pommier, Yves; Chanock, Stephen J; Weinstein, John N

    2009-04-01

    The National Cancer Institute's NCI-60 cell line panel, the most extensively characterized set of cells in existence and a public resource, is frequently used as a screening tool for drug discovery. Because many laboratories around the world rely on data from the NCI-60 cells, confirmation of their genetic identities represents an essential step in validating results from them. Given the consequences of cell line contamination or misidentification, quality control measures should routinely include DNA fingerprinting. We have, therefore, used standard DNA microsatellite short tandem repeats to profile the NCI-60, and the resulting DNA fingerprints are provided here as a reference. Consistent with previous reports, the fingerprints suggest that several NCI-60 lines have common origins: the melanoma lines MDA-MB-435, MDA-N, and M14; the central nervous system lines U251 and SNB-19; the ovarian lines OVCAR-8 and OVCAR-8/ADR (also called NCI/ADR); and the prostate lines DU-145, DU-145 (ATCC), and RC0.1. Those lines also show that the ability to connect two fingerprints to the same origin is not affected by stable transfection or by the development of multidrug resistance. As expected, DNA fingerprints were not able to distinguish different tissues-of-origin. The fingerprints serve principally as a barcodes.

  12. NCI-supported facility to conduct cancer trials breaks ground in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Puerto Rican government has allocated $196 million dollars to build a 287,000 sq. ft., 96-bed, cancer hospital in San Juan. The new hospital, which will provide cancer treatment and conduct clinical trials, is the first of its kind in the Caribbean.

  13. The utilization of websites for fundraising by NCI-designated cancer centers: Examining the capacity for dialogic communication with prospective donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwin, Cathleen O; Dias, Ashley M

    2016-01-01

    The study employs a dialogic public relations framework to explore the utilization of the Internet for fundraising by nonprofit health care organizations-specifically, NCI-designated cancer centers. Cancer centers have been noted for effective websites and for being highly engaged in fundraising, which is characterized as relationship marketing. Results indicate all but one cancer center use websites and social media for fundraising but are limited in capacity for two-way symmetrical dialogue. Results are discussed and recommendations are made for future research.

  14. National Cancer Institute’s Cancer Disparities Research Partnership Program: Experience and Lessons Learned

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemary S. L. Wong

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To increase access of underserved/health disparities communities to National Cancer Institute (NCI clinical trials, the Radiation Research Program (RRP piloted a unique model - the Cancer Disparities Research Partnership (CDRP program. CDRP targeted community hospitals with a limited past NCI funding history and provided funding to establish the infrastructure for their clinical research program.Methods: Initially, 5-year planning phase funding was awarded to six CDRP institutions through a cooperative agreement (U56. Five were subsequently eligible to compete for 5-year implementation phase (U54 funding and three received a second award. Additionally, the NCI Center to Reduce Cancer Health Disparities supported their U56 Patient Navigation programs.Results: Community-based hospitals with little or no clinical trials experience required at least a year to develop the infrastructure and establish community outreach/education and Patient Navigation programs before accrual to clinical trials could begin. Once established, CDRP sites increased their yearly patient accrual mainly to NCI-sponsored cooperative group trials (~60% and Principal Investigator (PI/mentor-initiated trials (~30%. The total number of patients accrued on all types of trials was 2,371, while 5,147 patients received navigation services. Conclusions: Despite a historical gap in participation in clinical cancer research, underserved communities are willing/eager to participate. Since a limited number of cooperative group trials address locally advanced diseases seen in health disparities populations, this shortcoming needs to be rectified. Sustainability for these programs remains a challenge. Addressing these gaps through research and public health mechanisms may have an important impact on their health, scientific progress and efforts to increase diversity in NCI clinical trials.

  15. Best Practices in Cancer Nanotechnology – Perspective from NCI Nanotechnology Alliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamboni, William C.; Torchilin, Vladimir; Patri, Anil; Hrkach, Jeff; Stern, Stephen; Lee, Robert; Nel, Andre; Panaro, Nicholas J.; Grodzinski, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Historically, treatment of patients with cancer using chemotherapeutic agents has been associated with debilitating and systemic toxicities, poor bioavailability, and unfavorable pharmacokinetics. Nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems, on the other hand, can specifically target cancer cells while avoiding their healthy neighbors, avoid rapid clearance from the body, and be administered without toxic solvents. They hold immense potential in addressing all of these issues which has hampered further development of chemotherapeutics. Furthermore, such drug delivery systems will lead to cancer therapeutic modalities which are not only less toxic to the patient but also significantly more efficacious. In addition to established therapeutic modes of action, nanomaterials are opening up entirely new modalities of cancer therapy, such as photodynamic and hyperthermia treatments. Furthermore, nanoparticle carriers are also capable of addressing several drug delivery problems which could not be effectively solved in the past and include overcoming formulation issues, multi-drug-resistance phenomenon and penetrating cellular barriers that may limit device accessibility to intended targets such as the blood-brain-barrier. The challenges in optimizing design of nanoparticles tailored to specific tumor indications still remain; however, it is clear that nanoscale devices carry a significant promise towards new ways of diagnosing and treating cancer. This review focuses on future prospects of using nanotechnology in cancer applications and discusses practices and methodologies used in the development and translation of nanotechnology-based therapeutics. PMID:22669131

  16. 75 FR 79009 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Questionnaire Cognitive Interview and Pretesting (NCI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-17

    ... comment on proposed data collection projects, the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the National Institutes of Health (NIH) will publish periodic summaries of proposed projects to be submitted to the Office of... adopted by other Federal agencies, as well as by academic and commercial survey organizations. There are...

  17. Effect of bcl-2 antisense oligodexynucleotides on chemotherapy efficacy of Vp-16 on human small cell lung cancer cell line NCI-H69

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Wenqian; Liu Zhonghua

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of bcl-2 antisense oligodexynucleotides on chemotherapy efficacy of Vp-16 on human small cell lung cancer cell line NCI-H69. Methods: Cultured NCI-H69 cells were derided into 4 groups: bcl-2 antisense oligodexynucleotides (ASODN) added, sense oligodexynucleotides (SODN) added, nonsense oligodexynucleotides (NSODN) added and control (no nucleotides added), the oligodexynucleotides were transfected into the cultured cells with oligofectamine. The cellular expression of Bcl-2 protein 72h later was examined with Western-Blot. The four different groups of cultured tumor cells were treated with etopside(Vp-16) at different concentrations (0, 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0 μg/ml) for 48hr then the cell survival fraction was assessed with MTY test. Results: The apoptotic rate of cells in the ASODN group was significantly higher than that of the control group, also, the survival fraction of cells in ASODN group was significantly lower than that of the control group. The Bcl-2 protein expression in ASODN group was significantly lower than that in the control group, but no inhibition was observed in SODN and NSODN groups. Conclusion: The bcl-2 ASODN could enhance the sensitivity to chemotherapy with Vp-16 in small cell lung cancer cell line NCI-H69 by effectively blocking bcl-2 gene expression. (authors)

  18. Application Period Open for NCI Biospecimen Use | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The application period for investigators interested in obtaining biospecimens and data from the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial re-opened June 1. A separate application for obtaining biospecimens and data with research funding is also open. |

  19. Oncologists’ Perspectives on Concurrent Palliative Care in an NCI-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakitas, Marie; Lyons, Kathleen Doyle; Hegel, Mark T.; Ahles, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To understand oncology clinicians’ perspectives about the care of advanced cancer patients following the completion of the ENABLE II (Educate, Nurture, Advise, Before Life Ends) randomized clinical trial (RCT) of a concurrent oncology palliative care model. Methods Qualitative interview study of 35 oncology clinicians about their approach to patients with advanced cancer and the effect of the ENABLE II RCT. Results Oncologists believed that integrating palliative care at the time of an advanced cancer diagnosis enhanced patient care and complemented their practice. Self-assessment of their practice with advanced cancer patients comprised four themes: 1) treating the whole patient, 2) focusing on quality versus quantity of life, 3) “some patients just want to fight”, and 4) helping with transitions; timing is everything. Five themes comprised oncologists’ views on the complementary role of palliative care: 1) “refer early and often”, 2) referral challenges: “Palliative” equals hospice; “Heme patients are different”, 3) palliative care as consultants or co-managers, 4) palliative care “shares the load”, and 5) ENABLE II facilitated palliative care integration. Conclusions Oncologists described the RCT as holistic and complementary, and as a significant factor in adopting concurrent care as a standard of care. PMID:23040412

  20. Cancer Therapeutic Based on T Cell Receptors Designed to Regiospecifically Release Interleukin-12 | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute's Surgery Branch is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize a potential cancer therapeutic based on T cells genetically engineered to express the human interleukin 12 (IL-12) cytokine only in the tumor environment.

  1. NCI Precision Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    This illustration represents the National Cancer Institute’s support of research to improve precision medicine in cancer treatment, in which unique therapies treat an individual’s cancer based on specific genetic abnormalities of that person’s tumor.

  2. Disparities in Geographic Accessibility of National Cancer Institute Cancer Centers in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yanqing; Fu, Cong; Onega, Tracy; Shi, Xun; Wang, Fahui

    2017-11-11

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer Centers form the backbone of the cancer care system in the United States since their inception in the early 1970s. Most studies on their geographic accessibility used primitive measures, and did not examine the disparities across urbanicity or demographic groups. This research uses an advanced accessibility method, termed "2-step floating catchment area (2SFCA)" and implemented in Geographic Information Systems (GIS), to capture the degree of geographic access to NCI Cancer Centers by accounting for competition intensity for the services and travel time between residents and the facilities. The results indicate that urban advantage is pronounced as the average accessibility is highest in large central metro areas, declines to large fringe metro, medium metro, small metro, micropolitan and noncore rural areas. Population under the poverty line are disproportionally concentrated in lower accessibility areas. However, on average Non-Hispanic White have the lowest geographic accessibility, followed by Hispanic, Non-Hispanic Black and Asian, and the differences are statistically significant. The "reversed racial disadvantage" in NCI Cancer Center accessibility seems counterintuitive but is consistent with an influential prior study; and it is in contrast to the common observation of co-location of concentration of minority groups and people under the poverty line.

  3. Like a Good Neighbor, NCI-Frederick Is There | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    The main campus of the National Cancer Institute at Frederick is an island of sorts: 68 acres of land that was once part of Fort Detrick. Accessing NCI property means passing through the Fort Detrick gates and crossing the post. While the campus is surrounded by the military installation, is protected by NIH police, and doesn’t allow the use of tobacco products, it is not a part of the military.

  4. Leidos Biomed Teams with NCI, DOE, and Argonne National Lab to Support National X-Ray Resource | FNLCR Staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists are making progress in understanding a bleeding disorder caused by prescription drug interactions, thanks to a high-tech research facility involving two federal national laboratories, Argonne and Frederick. Miroslawa Dauter is a Senior Res

  5. Leidos Biomed Teams with NCI, DOE, and Argonne National Lab to Support National X-Ray Resource | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists are making progress in understanding a bleeding disorder caused by prescription drug interactions, thanks to a high-tech research facility involving two federal national laboratories, Argonne and Frederick.

  6. National Ovarian Cancer Coalition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... History Day – Prepare for a Family Conversation About Genetics and Cancer November 08, 2017 Live Webinar on ... us here . Thanksgiving Day, November 23rd, is National Family ... Read ... Tree Display November 19, 2017 @ 10:00AM Hosted by ...

  7. Identification of a radiosensitivity signature using integrative metaanalysis of published microarray data for NCI-60 cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Han

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the postgenome era, a prediction of response to treatment could lead to better dose selection for patients in radiotherapy. To identify a radiosensitive gene signature and elucidate related signaling pathways, four different microarray experiments were reanalyzed before radiotherapy. Results Radiosensitivity profiling data using clonogenic assay and gene expression profiling data from four published microarray platforms applied to NCI-60 cancer cell panel were used. The survival fraction at 2 Gy (SF2, range from 0 to 1 was calculated as a measure of radiosensitivity and a linear regression model was applied to identify genes or a gene set with a correlation between expression and radiosensitivity (SF2. Radiosensitivity signature genes were identified using significant analysis of microarrays (SAM and gene set analysis was performed using a global test using linear regression model. Using the radiation-related signaling pathway and identified genes, a genetic network was generated. According to SAM, 31 genes were identified as common to all the microarray platforms and therefore a common radiosensitivity signature. In gene set analysis, functions in the cell cycle, DNA replication, and cell junction, including adherence and gap junctions were related to radiosensitivity. The integrin, VEGF, MAPK, p53, JAK-STAT and Wnt signaling pathways were overrepresented in radiosensitivity. Significant genes including ACTN1, CCND1, HCLS1, ITGB5, PFN2, PTPRC, RAB13, and WAS, which are adhesion-related molecules that were identified by both SAM and gene set analysis, and showed interaction in the genetic network with the integrin signaling pathway. Conclusions Integration of four different microarray experiments and gene selection using gene set analysis discovered possible target genes and pathways relevant to radiosensitivity. Our results suggested that the identified genes are candidates for radiosensitivity biomarkers and that

  8. VP-16 resistance in the NCI-H460 human lung cancer cell line is significantly associated with glucose-regulated protein78 (GRP78) induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Wang, Tao; Wang, Yingyan; Wang, Wei; Wang, Yanyan; Hu, Xiujuan; Shao, Shujuan; Zhang, Jinhui; Suo, Zhenhe

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between the expression of glucose-regulated protein (GRP78) and resistance to VP-16 in the NCI-H460 cell line. RT-PCR, real-time RT-PCR and Western blotting were used in analyzing the expression of GRP78 at mRNA and protein levels in the NCI-H460 cell line induced by A23187 at different concentrations. Cell survival with VP-16 was determined using a colony-formation assay with the account of IC50. The expression of GRP78 at both the mRNA and protein levels was higher in the NCI-H460 cell line induced by A23187. A23187 treatment resulted in up to 4.8-fold elevation of GRP78 mRNA and up to 3.2-fold elevation of GRP78 protein in the experimental cells compared to the controls, all in a dose-dependent manner. The IC50s for VP-16 in the cells pretreated with different concentrations of A23187 (0, 1, 2, 4 and 6 microM) were: 12.11 +/- 0.83, 12.68 +/- 1.04, 25.82 +/- 1.83, 37.46 +/- 1.89 and 45.19 +/- 2.34 microM, respectively. Compared to the control, there was a significant elevation of IC50 for VP-16 in the cells pretreated with A23187. Survival curve analysis also showed that the induction of A23187 caused a significantly longer survival for the cells subjected to VP-16 treatment (p VP-16 in the human lung cancer NCI-H460 cell line. Based on the trend of the change in IC50 and the expression of GRP78 in differently exposed cells, we conclude that the induction of GRP78 by A23187 is significantly associated with the resistance to VP-16.

  9. Diagnostic Marker for Improving Treatment Outcomes of Hepatitis C | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI Researchers have discovered Interferon-lambda 4 (IFNL4), a protein found through analysis of genomic data. Preliminary studies indicate that this protein may play a role in the clearance of HCV and may be a new target for diagnosing and treating HCV infection. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics (DCEG) Immunoepidemiology Branch is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in in-licensing or collaborative research to further co-develop a gene-based diagnostic for Hepatitis C virus (HepC, HCV).

  10. NCI's Dr. Barry Kramer on C-SPAN Over-Diagnosis and Treatment of Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dr. Barnett Kramer on Over-Diagnosis and Treatment of Cancer. Dr. Barnett Kramer talked about a study published in the Journal of American Medical Association on the changing the definition of cancer that could reduce unnecessary treatments for benign cancers. He also responded to telephone calls and electronic communications. |

  11. NCI investment in nanotechnology: achievements and challenges for the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickherber, Anthony; Morris, Stephanie A; Grodzinski, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology offers an exceptional and unique opportunity for developing a new generation of tools addressing persistent challenges to progress in cancer research and clinical care. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) recognizes this potential, which is why it invests roughly $150 M per year in nanobiotechnology training, research and development. By exploiting the various capacities of nanomaterials, the range of nanoscale vectors and probes potentially available suggests much is possible for precisely investigating, manipulating, and targeting the mechanisms of cancer across the full spectrum of research and clinical care. NCI has played a key role among federal R&D agencies in recognizing early the value of nanobiotechnology in medicine and committing to its development as well as providing training support for new investigators in the field. These investments have allowed many in the research community to pursue breakthrough capabilities that have already yielded broad benefits. Presented here is an overview of how NCI has made these investments with some consideration of how it will continue to work with this research community to pursue paradigm-changing innovations that offer relief from the burdens of cancer. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  12. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Reporting & Auditing Grant Transfer Grant Closeout Contracts & Small Business Training Cancer Training at NCI (Intramural) Funding for ... NCI NCI Overview History Contributing to Cancer Research Leadership Director's Page Deputy Director's Page Previous NCI Directors ...

  13. National Comprehensive Cancer Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Anal Carcinoma B-Cell Lymphomas Basal Cell Skin Cancer Bladder Cancer Bone Cancer Breast Cancer Central Nervous System Cancers ... Breast Cancer Risk Reduction Breast Cancer Screening and Diagnosis Cervical Cancer Screening Colorectal Cancer Screening Genetic/Familial ...

  14. Mission & Role | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI TTC serves as the focal point for implementing the Federal Technology Transfer Act to utilize patents as incentive for commercial development of technologies and to establish research collaborations and licensing among academia, federal laboratories, non-profit organizations, and industry. The TTC supports technology development activities for the National Cancer Institute and nine other NIH Institutes and Centers. TTC staff negotiate co-development agreements and licenses with universities, non-profit organizations, and pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies to ensure compliance with Federal statutes, regulations and the policies of the National Institutes of Health. TTC also reviews employee invention reports and makes recommendations concerning filing of domestic and foreign patent applications. | [google6f4cd5334ac394ab.html

  15. Nanotechnology: Emerging Developments and Early Detection of Cancer. A Two-Day Workshop Sponsored by the National Cancer Institute and the National Institute of Standards and Technology, August 30–31 2001, on the National Institute of Standards and Technology Campus, Gaithersburg, MD, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zullo, Steven J.; Srivastava, Sudhir; Looney, J. Patrick; Barker, Peter E.

    2002-01-01

    A recent meeting jointly sponsored by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) brought together researchers active in nanotechnology and cancer molecular biology to discuss and evaluate the interface between disciplines. Emerging areas where nanotechnologies may impact cancer prevention and early cancer detection were elaborated by key researchers who catalyzed interdisciplinary dialogue aimed at fostering cross-discipline communications and future collaboration. PMID:12590168

  16. Family history record and hereditary cancer risk perception according to National Cancer Institute criteria in a Spanish medical oncology service: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez-Rodas, Iván; López-Trabada, Daniel; Rupérez Blanco, Ana Belén; Custodio Cabello, Sara; Peligros Gómez, María Isabel; Orera Clemente, María; Calvo, Felipe A; Martín, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Identification of patients at risk of hereditary cancer is an essential component of oncology practice, since it enables clinicians to offer early detection and prevention programs. However, the large number of hereditary syndromes makes it difficult to take them all into account in daily practice. Consequently, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) has suggested a series of criteria to guide initial suspicion. It was the aim of this study to assess the perception of the risk of hereditary cancer according to the NCI criteria in our medical oncology service. We retrospectively analyzed the recordings of the family history in new cancer patients seen in our medical oncology service from January to November 2009, only 1 year before the implementation of our multidisciplinary hereditary cancer program. The family history was recorded in only 175/621 (28%) patients. A total of 119 (19%) patients met 1 or more NCI criteria (1 criterion, n = 91; 2 criteria, n = 23; 3 criteria, n = 4; and 4 criteria, n = 1), and only 14 (11.4%) patients were referred to genetic counseling. This study shows that few clinicians record the family history. The perception of the risk of hereditary cancer is low according to the NCI criteria in our medical oncology service. These findings can be explained by the lack of a multidisciplinary hereditary cancer program when the study was performed. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Comparing Local TV News with National TV News in Cancer Coverage: An Exploratory Content Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chul-joo; Long, Marilee; Slater, Michael D.; Song, Wen

    2014-01-01

    We compared local TV news with national TV news in terms of cancer coverage using a nationally representative sample of local nightly TV and national network TV (i.e., ABC, CBS, NBC, and CNN) cancer news stories that aired during 2002 and 2003. Compared to national TV news, local TV cancer stories were (a) much shorter in length, (b) less likely to report on cancer prevention (i.e., preventive behaviors and screening tests), and (c) less likely to reference national organizations (i.e., NCI, ACS, NIH, CDC, FDA) that have made clear recommendations about ways to prevent cancer. The implications of these findings for health communication research and cancer education were discussed. PMID:24750022

  18. Down-regulation of GRP78 is associated with the sensitivity of chemotherapy to VP-16 in small cell lung cancer NCI-H446 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yingyan; Wang, Wei; Wang, Siyan; Wang, Jiarui; Shao, Shujuan; Wang, Qi

    2008-12-17

    Chemotherapy resistance remains a major obstacle for the treatment of small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), an endoplasmic reticulum chaperone, plays a critical role in chemotherapy resistance in some cancers. However, whether the suppression of the chaperone can enhance the sensitivity of chemotherapy in SCLC is still unclear. The SCLC NCI-H446 cells were divided into three groups: BAPTA-AM-->A23187-treated group, A23187-treated group and control-group. Immunofluorescence, western blot and RT-PCR were used to assess the expression of GRP78 at both protein and mRNA levels. Cell apoptosis and the cell cycle distributions of the cells were analyzed by flow cytometry in order to evaluate the therapeutic sensitivity to VP-16. The expression of GRP78 at both protein and mRNA levels in the BAPTA-AM-->A23187-treated cells dramatically decreased as compared to that in both A23187-treated and control groups. After treatment by VP-16, the percentage of apoptotic cells in BAPTA-AM-->A23187-treated cells were: 33.4 +/- 1.01%, 48.2 +/- 1.77%, 53.0 +/- 1.43%, 56.5 +/- 2.13%, respectively, corresponding to the concentrations of BAPTA-AM 10, 15, 25, 40 microM, which was statistically significant high in comparison with the A23187-treated group and untreated-group (7.18 +/- 1.03% and 27.8 +/- 1.45%, respectively, p A23187-treated cells as compared with the untreated cells. BAPTA-AM is a strong inhibitor of GRP78 in the NCI-H446 cell line, the down-regulation of GRP78 can significantly increase the sensitivity to VP-16. The suppression of GRP78 may offer a new surrogated therapeutic approach to the clinical management of lung cancer.

  19. NCI Think Tank Concerning the Identifiability of Biospecimens and “-Omic” Data

    OpenAIRE

    Weil, Carol J.; Mechanic, Leah E.; Green, Tiffany; Kinsinger, Christopher; Lockhart, Nicole C.; Nelson, Stefanie A.; Rodriguez, Laura L.; Buccini, Laura D.

    2013-01-01

    On June 11 and 12, 2012, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) hosted a think tank concerning the identifiability of biospecimens and “omic” Data in order to explore challenges surrounding this complex and multifaceted topic. The think tank brought together forty-six leaders from several fields, including cancer genomics, bioinformatics, human subject protection, patient advocacy, and commercial genetics. The first day involved presentations regarding the state of the science of re-identificati...

  20. BHD Tumor Cell Line and Renal Cell Carcinoma Line | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists at the National Cancer Institute  have developed a novel renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cell line designated UOK257, which was derived from the surgical kidney tissue of a patient with hereditary Birt-Hogg-Dube''''(BHD) syndrome and companion cell line UOK257-2 in which FLCN expression has been restored by lentivirus infection. The NCI Urologic Oncology Branch seeks parties interested in licensing or collaborative research to co-develop, evaluate, or commercialize kidney cancer tumor cell lines.

  1. Coping with Advanced Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Tools, Specimens, and Data Conducting Clinical Trials Statistical Tools and Data Terminology Resources NCI Data Catalog ... Levels of Evidence: Integrative Therapies Fact Sheets NCI Dictionaries NCI Dictionary of Cancer Terms NCI Drug Dictionary ...

  2. When Cancer Returns

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Tools, Specimens, and Data Conducting Clinical Trials Statistical Tools and Data Terminology Resources NCI Data Catalog ... Levels of Evidence: Integrative Therapies Fact Sheets NCI Dictionaries NCI Dictionary of Cancer Terms NCI Drug Dictionary ...

  3. National Cancer Institute News

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with Cancer Feelings and Cancer Adjusting to Cancer Self-Image & Sexuality Day-to-Day Life Support for Caregivers ... Alternative Medicine Coping Feelings & Cancer Adjusting to Cancer Self Image & Sexuality Day to Day Life Survivorship Support for ...

  4. No increase in brain cancer rates during period of expanding cell phone use

    Science.gov (United States)

    In a new examination of United States cancer incidence data, investigators at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) reported that incidence trends have remained roughly constant for glioma, the main type of brain cancer hypothesized to be related to cell ph

  5. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Reporting & Auditing Grant Transfer Grant Closeout Contracts & Small Business Training Cancer Training at NCI (Intramural) Funding for ... M.D., a national expert on doctor-patient communications, talks with one of his patients about what ...

  6. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Reporting & Auditing Grant Transfer Grant Closeout Contracts & Small Business Training Cancer Training at NCI (Intramural) Funding for ... Oncologist Anthony L. Back, M.D., a national expert on doctor-patient communications, talks with one of ...

  7. 76 FR 66932 - The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Announces the Initiation of a Public Private Industry...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-28

    ... has been providing funding to academic groups to support large multi- disciplinary projects--Centers... facilitate their successful translation from academic research to clinical environment, resulting in safe... participating in a academic-private partnership aimed at promoting translational opportunities. Consortium Goals...

  8. 78 FR 2678 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request (60-Day FRN): The National Cancer Institute (NCI...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-14

    ... of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and approval. Written comments and/or suggestions from the... information technology. To submit comments in writing, request more information on the proposed project, or to... attachments accompany this memorandum. This study seeks to assess the efficacy of the SmokefreeTXT program, a...

  9. An overview of the NCI precision medicine trials-NCI MATCH and MPACT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Khanh; O'Sullivan Coyne, Geraldine; Chen, Alice P

    2015-09-01

    The concept of oncogene addiction was first proposed by Weinstein in 2002, postulating that tumors rely on a single dominant mutation, the oncogenic "driver", for growth and survival. We have since come to realize that the genomic landscape of tumors is heterogeneous and more complex than previously thought. Advances in biotechnology and bioinformatics over the past decade have shifted treatment paradigms with regard to the development of molecular targeted therapeutics to identify and target the presumptive dominant lesion. As such, the decision of choosing targeted treatment strategies has become increasingly more reliant on the reporting of genomic screens of patients' tumor tissue. Whether this change in treatment paradigm will translate into improved clinical benefit, remains to be seen. To this end, the United States National Cancer Institute (NCI) has launched precision-based medicine trials to address this question. NCI Molecular Analysis for Therapy Choice (MATCH), a genomic pre-screening study, was designed to explore the efficacy of using targeted agents to target specific molecular aberrations and whether these same therapies have comparable activity across different tumor subtypes. Molecular Profiling-based Assignment of Cancer Therapy (MPACT), is a smaller, provocative trial designed to address whether targeting an oncogenic "driver" would be more efficacious than one not. The Exceptional Responders' initiative further aims to evaluate patients who have derived an unexpected durable benefit to these therapies, with retrospective analysis of their tumors to delineate potential predictive biomarkers which could predict response. The results of these trials will serve to help guide the field of precision medicine and personalized care.

  10. Comparison of Intracellular Stress Response of NCI-H526 Small Cell Lung Cancer (SCLC) Cells to Platinum(II) Cisplatin and Platinum(IV) Oxoplatin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, Gerhard [Ludwig Boltzmann Cluster of Translational Oncology, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2014-07-08

    In attempts to develop an orally applicable platinum-based drug, platinum(IV) drugs which exhibit higher in vivo stability compared to the platinum(II) drug cisplatin were formulated. The first such chemotherapeutic agent, namely satraplatin, failed to receive approval. In the present work, we checked the initial cellular stress response of the chemosensitive NCI-H526 small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cells by determination of the relative phosphorylation of 46 specific phosphorylation sites of 38 selected proteins in a six hours response to cisplatin (platinum(II)) or oxoplatin (platinum(IV)), respectively. Oxoplatin is considered as prodrug of cisplatin, although several findings point to differences in intracellular effects. Cisplatin induced hyperphosphorylation of p38α MAPK and AMPKα1, whereas oxoplatin treatment resulted in increased phosphorylation of a large number of signaling proteins involved in stress response/drug resistance, including JNK, GSK-3α, AMPKα1, src kinases, STATs, CHK-2 and especially focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Cisplatin exerts markedly higher cytotoxicity upon four hours short-term exposure in comparison to oxoplatin and, correspondingly, the extended initial stress response to the platinum(IV) drug oxoplatin thus is expected to increase clinical drug resistance. Induction of a substantial stress response to any prodrug of a platinum-based compound may likewise limit the effectivity of its active metabolite(s), such contributing to the failure of selected derivatized platinum complexes.

  11. Facing Forward Series: Life After Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Tools, Specimens, and Data Conducting Clinical Trials Statistical Tools and Data Terminology Resources NCI Data Catalog ... Levels of Evidence: Integrative Therapies Fact Sheets NCI Dictionaries NCI Dictionary of Cancer Terms NCI Drug Dictionary ...

  12. Children with Cancer: A Guide for Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Tools, Specimens, and Data Conducting Clinical Trials Statistical Tools and Data Terminology Resources NCI Data Catalog ... Levels of Evidence: Integrative Therapies Fact Sheets NCI Dictionaries NCI Dictionary of Cancer Terms NCI Drug Dictionary ...

  13. Taking Time: Support for People with Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Tools, Specimens, and Data Conducting Clinical Trials Statistical Tools and Data Terminology Resources NCI Data Catalog ... Levels of Evidence: Integrative Therapies Fact Sheets NCI Dictionaries NCI Dictionary of Cancer Terms NCI Drug Dictionary ...

  14. Cancer Information Summaries: Screening/Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Tools, Specimens, and Data Conducting Clinical Trials Statistical Tools and Data Terminology Resources NCI Data Catalog ... Levels of Evidence: Integrative Therapies Fact Sheets NCI Dictionaries NCI Dictionary of Cancer Terms NCI Drug Dictionary ...

  15. Perspectives on Strengthening Cancer Research and Control in Latin America Through Partnerships and Diplomacy: Experience of the National Cancer Institute’s Center for Global Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvina Frech

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available According to the Pan American Health Organization, noncommunicable diseases, including cancer, are the leading causes of preventable and premature death in the Americas. Governments and health care systems in Latin America face numerous challenges as a result of increasing morbidity and mortality from cancer. Multiple international organizations have recognized the need for collaborative action on and technical support for cancer research and control in Latin America. The Center for Global Health at the US National Cancer Institute (NCI-CGH is one entity among many that are working in the region and has sought to develop a strategy for working in Latin America that draws on and expands the collaborative potential of engaged, skilled, and diverse partners. NCI-CGH has worked toward developing and implementing initiatives in collaboration with global partners that share the common objectives of building a global cancer research community and translating research results into evidence-informed policy and practice. Both objectives are complementary and synergistic and are additionally supported by an overarching strategic framework that is focused on partnerships and science diplomacy. This work highlights the overall strategy for NCI-CGH engagement in Latin America through partnerships and diplomacy, and highlights selected collaborative efforts that are aimed at improving cancer outcomes in the region.

  16. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 2013 Media Resources Media Contacts Multicultural Media Events Scientific Meetings & Lectures Conferences Advisory Board Meetings Social Media Cancer Currents Blog About NCI NCI Overview History Contributing to Cancer Research Leadership Director's Page Deputy Director's Page Previous NCI ...

  17. Alterations of phosphoproteins in NCI-H526 small cell lung cancer cells involved in cytotoxicity of cisplatin and titanocene Y.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszewski, Ulrike; Deally, Anthony; Tacke, Matthias; Hamilton, Gerhard

    2012-09-01

    First-line treatment of small cell lung cancer (SCLC) with combination chemotherapy consisting of cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (cisplatin) and etoposide is frequently followed by early relapses and a dismal prognosis. Survival of a fraction of tumor cells and development of chemoresistance may be influenced by an initial cellular stress response against the administered xenobiotics. Therefore, we compared the short-term effects of cisplatin and non-cross-resistant bis-[(p-methoxybenzyl)cyclopentadienyl] titanium(IV) dichloride (Titanocene Y) on phosphorylation of 46 sites of a total of 38 signaling proteins in tumor suppressor protein 53 (p53)-wild-type NCI-H526 SCLC cells. The functional significance of selected kinases for the cytotoxicity of both drugs was tested using specific inhibitors and an activator. The cisplatin-induced cellular stress response involved activation of p38α mitogen-activated protein kinase, whereas Titanocene Y-triggered signaling affected c-Jun N-terminal kinase. Phosphorylation of adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase α1 (AMPKα1) was increased by both drugs, which promoted cell survival, as indicated by results obtained using AMPK inhibitor compound C and AMPK activator 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide 1-β-d-ribofuranoside. This is in good agreement with previous reports, where AMPKα1 was demonstrated to represent an important factor for the sensitivity to cisplatin in colon and ovarian cancers, most likely by induction of autophagy. Thus, AMPKα1 constitutes a potential target to be exploited for chemotherapeutic treatment of SCLC to circumvent resistance to metal-based compounds.

  18. Alterations of Phosphoproteins in NCI-H526 Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells Involved in Cytotoxicity of Cisplatin and Titanocene Y

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Olszewski

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available First-line treatment of small cell lung cancer (SCLC with combination chemotherapy consisting of cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II (cisplatin and etoposide is frequently followed by early relapses and a dismal prognosis. Survival of a fraction of tumor cells and development of chemoresistance may be influenced by an initial cellular stress response against the administered xenobiotics. Therefore, we compared the short-term effects of cisplatin and non-cross-resistant bis-[(p-methoxybenzylcyclopentadienyl] titanium(IV dichloride (Titanocene Y on phosphorylation of 46 sites of a total of 38 signaling proteins in tumor suppressor protein 53 (p53-wild-type NCI-H526 SCLC cells. The functional significance of selected kinases for the cytotoxicity of both drugs was tested using specific inhibitors and an activator. The cisplatin-induced cellular stress response involved activation of p38α mitogen-activated protein kinase, whereas Titanocene Y-triggered signaling affected c-Jun N-terminal kinase. Phosphorylation of adenosine monophosphate (AMP-activated protein kinase α1 (AMPKα1 was increased by both drugs, which promoted cell survival, as indicated by results obtained using AMPK inhibitor compound C and AMPK activator 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide 1-β-d-ribofuranoside. This is in good agreement with previous reports, where AMPKα1 was demonstrated to represent an important factor for the sensitivity to cisplatin in colon and ovarian cancers, most likely by induction of autophagy. Thus, AMPKα1 constitutes a potential target to be exploited for chemotherapeutic treatment of SCLC to circumvent resistance to metal-based compounds.

  19. 78 FR 69428 - Submission for OMB Review; 30-Day Comment Request: Cancer Trials Support Unit (CTSU) (NCI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-19

    ... Program, Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis, 9609 Medical Center Drive, Rockville, MD 20850 or... redundancy among grant and contract holders, thereby reducing overall cost of maintaining a robust treatment... information, changes to membership, patient enrollment data, and routing information for case report forms. In...

  20. A Week of Excitement and Hope: Communicating the Story of Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter Garrett, acting director of NCI's communications office, discusses the Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer and activities surrounding the broadcast of the documentary film, Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies.

  1. NIH mouse study finds gut microorganisms may determine cancer treatment outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    An intact gut commensal microbiota, which is a population of microorganisms living in the intestine, is required for optimal response to cancer therapy, according to a mouse study by scientists at the National Cancer Institute (NCI)

  2. Women with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations survive ovarian cancer at higher rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Results from a National Cancer Institute (NCI) sponsored multicenter study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association on January 25, 2012, provides strong evidence that BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutation carriers with ovarian cancer were more

  3. Sustainability and performance of the National Cancer Institute's Community Clinical Oncology Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, William R; Fortune-Greeley, Alice K; Zullig, Leah L; Lee, Shoou-Yih; Weiner, Bryan J

    2012-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute's (NCI) Community Clinical Oncology Program (CCOP) contributes one third of NCI treatment trial enrollment ("accrual") and most cancer prevention and control (CP/C) trial enrollment. Prior research indicated that the local clinical environment influenced CCOP accrual performance during the 1990s. As the NCI seeks to improve the operations of the clinical trials system following critical reports by the Institute of Medicine and the NCI Operational Efficiency Working Group, the current relevance of the local environmental context on accrual performance is unknown. This longitudinal quasi-experimental study used panel data on 45 CCOPs nationally for years 2000-2007. Multivariable models examine organizational, research network, and environmental factors associated with accrual to treatment trials, CP/C trials, and trials overall. For total trial accrual and treatment trial accrual, the number of active CCOP physicians and the number of trials were associated with CCOP performance. Factors differ for CP/C trials. CCOPs in areas with fewer medical school-affiliated hospitals had greater treatment trial accrual. Findings suggest a shift in the relevance of the clinical environment since the 1990s, as well as changes in CCOP structure associated with accrual performance. Rather than a limited number of physicians being responsible for the preponderance of trial accrual, there is a trend toward accrual among a larger number of physicians each accruing relatively fewer patients to trial. Understanding this dynamic in the context of CCOP efficiency may inform and strengthen CCOP organization and physician practice. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Five National Cancer Institute-designated cancer centers' data collection on racial/ethnic minority participation in therapeutic trials: a current view and opportunities for improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawk, Ernest T; Habermann, Elizabeth B; Ford, Jean G; Wenzel, Jennifer A; Brahmer, Julie R; Chen, Moon S; Jones, Lovell A; Hurd, Thelma C; Rogers, Lisa M; Nguyen, Lynne H; Ahluwalia, Jasjit S; Fouad, Mona; Vickers, Selwyn M

    2014-04-01

    To ensure that National Institutes of Health-funded research is relevant to the population's needs, specific emphasis on proportional representation of minority/sex groups into National Cancer Institute (NCI) cancer centers' clinical research programs is reported to the NCI. EMPaCT investigators at 5 regionally diverse comprehensive cancer centers compared data reported to the NCI for their most recent Cancer Center Support Grant competitive renewal to assess and compare the centers' catchment area designations, data definitions, data elements, collection processes, reporting, and performance regarding proportional representation of race/ethnicity and sex subsets. Cancer centers' catchment area definitions differed widely in terms of their cancer patient versus general population specificity, levels of specificity, and geographic coverage. Racial/ethnic categories were similar, yet were defined differently, across institutions. Patients' socioeconomic status and insurance status were inconsistently captured across the 5 centers. Catchment area definitions and the collection of patient-level demographic factors varied widely across the 5 comprehensive cancer centers. This challenged the assessment of success by cancer centers in accruing representative populations into the cancer research enterprise. Accrual of minorities was less than desired for at least 1 racial/ethnic subcategory at 4 of the 5 centers. Institutions should clearly and consistently declare their primary catchment area and the rationale and should report how race/ethnicity and sex are defined, determined, collected, and reported. More standardized, frequent, consistent collection, reporting, and review of these data are recommended, as is a commitment to collecting socioeconomic data, given that socioeconomic status is a primary driver of cancer disparities in the United States. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  5. NCI-MATCH Trial Links Targeted Drugs to Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Investigators for the nationwide trial, NCI-MATCH: Molecular Analysis for Therapy Choice, announced that the trial will seek to determine whether targeted therapies for people whose tumors have specific gene mutations will be effective regardless of their cancer type. NCI-MATCH will incorporate more than 20 different study drugs or drug combinations, each targeting a specific gene mutation, in order to match each patient in the trial with a therapy that targets a molecular abnormality in their tumor.

  6. Data Sets from Major NCI Initiaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI Data Catalog includes links to data collections produced by major NCI initiatives and other widely used data sets, including animal models, human tumor cell lines, epidemiology data sets, genomics data sets from TCGA, TARGET, COSMIC, GSK, NCI60.

  7. What You Need to Know about Liver Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Tools, Specimens, and Data Conducting Clinical Trials Statistical Tools and Data Terminology Resources NCI Data Catalog ... Levels of Evidence: Integrative Therapies Fact Sheets NCI Dictionaries NCI Dictionary of Cancer Terms NCI Drug Dictionary ...

  8. What You Need to Know about Cancer of the Larynx

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Tools, Specimens, and Data Conducting Clinical Trials Statistical Tools and Data Terminology Resources NCI Data Catalog ... Levels of Evidence: Integrative Therapies Fact Sheets NCI Dictionaries NCI Dictionary of Cancer Terms NCI Drug Dictionary ...

  9. Eating Hints: Before, During, and After Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Tools, Specimens, and Data Conducting Clinical Trials Statistical Tools and Data Terminology Resources NCI Data Catalog ... Levels of Evidence: Integrative Therapies Fact Sheets NCI Dictionaries NCI Dictionary of Cancer Terms NCI Drug Dictionary ...

  10. What You Need to Know about Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Tools, Specimens, and Data Conducting Clinical Trials Statistical Tools and Data Terminology Resources NCI Data Catalog ... Levels of Evidence: Integrative Therapies Fact Sheets NCI Dictionaries NCI Dictionary of Cancer Terms NCI Drug Dictionary ...

  11. What You Need to Know about Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Tools, Specimens, and Data Conducting Clinical Trials Statistical Tools and Data Terminology Resources NCI Data Catalog ... Levels of Evidence: Integrative Therapies Fact Sheets NCI Dictionaries NCI Dictionary of Cancer Terms NCI Drug Dictionary ...

  12. What You Need to Know about Cancer of the Esophagus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Tools, Specimens, and Data Conducting Clinical Trials Statistical Tools and Data Terminology Resources NCI Data Catalog ... Levels of Evidence: Integrative Therapies Fact Sheets NCI Dictionaries NCI Dictionary of Cancer Terms NCI Drug Dictionary ...

  13. What You Need to Know about Cancer of the Pancreas

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Tools, Specimens, and Data Conducting Clinical Trials Statistical Tools and Data Terminology Resources NCI Data Catalog ... Levels of Evidence: Integrative Therapies Fact Sheets NCI Dictionaries NCI Dictionary of Cancer Terms NCI Drug Dictionary ...

  14. Chemotherapy and You: Support for People with Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Tools, Specimens, and Data Conducting Clinical Trials Statistical Tools and Data Terminology Resources NCI Data Catalog ... Levels of Evidence: Integrative Therapies Fact Sheets NCI Dictionaries NCI Dictionary of Cancer Terms NCI Drug Dictionary ...

  15. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Adult Cancers Metastatic Cancer Recurrent Cancer Research NCI’s Role in Cancer Research Intramural Research Extramural Research Bioinformatics ... Terminology Resources NCI Data Catalog Cryo-EM NCI's Role in Cancer Research Intramural Research Extramural Research Bioinformatics ...

  16. National Cancer Institute Biospecimen Evidence-Based Practices: a novel approach to pre-analytical standardization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Kelly B; Vaught, Jim; Moore, Helen M

    2014-04-01

    Variable biospecimen collection, processing, and storage practices may introduce variability in biospecimen quality and analytical results. This risk can be minimized within a facility through the use of standardized procedures; however, analysis of biospecimens from different facilities may be confounded by differences in procedures and inferred biospecimen quality. Thus, a global approach to standardization of biospecimen handling procedures and their validation is needed. Here we present the first in a series of procedural guidelines that were developed and annotated with published findings in the field of human biospecimen science. The series of documents will be known as NCI Biospecimen Evidence-Based Practices, or BEBPs. Pertinent literature was identified via the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Biospecimen Research Database ( brd.nci.nih.gov ) and findings were organized by specific biospecimen pre-analytical factors and analytes of interest (DNA, RNA, protein, morphology). Meta-analysis results were presented as annotated summaries, which highlight concordant and discordant findings and the threshold and magnitude of effects when applicable. The detailed and adaptable format of the document is intended to support the development and execution of evidence-based standard operating procedures (SOPs) for human biospecimen collection, processing, and storage operations.

  17. National Cancer Institute's leadership role in promoting State and Community Tobacco Control research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginexi, Elizabeth M; Vollinger, Robert E

    2016-10-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) has been at the vanguard of funding tobacco control research for decades with major efforts such as the Community Intervention Trial for Smoking Cessation (COMMIT) in 1988 and the American Stop Smoking Intervention Study (ASSIST) in 1991, followed by the Tobacco Research Initiative for State and Community Interventions in 1999. Most recently, in 2011, the NCI launched the State and Community Tobacco Control (SCTC) Research Initiative to address gaps in secondhand smoke policies, tax and pricing policies, mass media countermeasures, community and social norms and tobacco marketing. The initiative supported large scale research projects and time-sensitive ancillary pilot studies in response to expressed needs of state and community partners. This special issue of Tobacco Control showcases exciting findings from the SCTC. In this introductory article, we provide a brief account of NCI's historical commitment to promoting research to inform tobacco control policy. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  18. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Reporting & Auditing Grant Transfer Grant Closeout Contracts & Small Business Training Cancer Training at NCI (Intramural) Funding for ... and Review Groups Budget & Appropriations About the Annual Plan & Budget Proposal NCI Congressional Justification NCI Budget Fact ...

  19. Investigation of South African plants for anti cancer properties

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Khorombi, TE

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A collaborative research programme between the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) in South Africa and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) in the USA aimed at the screening of plant extracts and identification of potentially new...

  20. Contract Funding Opportunities Available for Innovative SBIR Development | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Does your small business need early-stage financing to take its cancer research to the next level? The National Cancer Institute Small Business Innovation Research (NCI SBIR) Development Center has released $5 million for new contract funding opportunities to support cancer research and technology development in key emerging areas of need. The NCI SBIR can help you finance and advance innovations in cancer prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and basic research.

  1. NCI Pediatric Preclinical Testing Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI has awarded grants to five research teams to participate in its Pediatric Preclinical Testing Consortium, which is intended to help to prioritize which agents to pursue in pediatric clinical trials.

  2. Receptor-Based Virtual Screening of EGFR Kinase Inhibitors from the NCI Diversity Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiattawee Choowongkomon

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR abnormalities have been associated with several types of human cancer. The crystal structures of its tyrosine kinase domain (EGFR-TK complexed with small molecule inhibitors revealed the kinase inhibition modes, prompting us to search for novel anti-cancer drugs. A total of 1,990 compounds from the National Cancer Institute (NCI diversity set with nonredundant structures have been tested to inhibit cancer cell lines with unknown mechanism. Cancer inhibition through EGFR-TK is one of the mechanisms of these compounds. In this work, we performed receptor-based virtual screening against the NCI diversity database. Using two different docking algorithms, AutoDock and Gold, combined with subsequent post-docking analyses, we found eight candidate compounds with high scoring functions that all bind to the ATP-competitive site of the kinase. None of these compounds belongs to the main group of the currently known EGFR-TK inhibitors. Binding mode analyses revealed that the way these compounds complexed with EGFR-TK differs from quinazoline inhibitor binding and the interaction mainly involves hydrophobic interactions. Also, the common kinase-inhibitor (NH---N and CO---HC hydrogen bonds between the hinge region and the hit compounds are rarely observed. Our results suggest that these molecules could be developed as novel lead compounds in anti-cancer drug design.

  3. Modeling a description logic vocabulary for cancer research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartel, Frank W; de Coronado, Sherri; Dionne, Robert; Fragoso, Gilberto; Golbeck, Jennifer

    2005-04-01

    The National Cancer Institute has developed the NCI Thesaurus, a biomedical vocabulary for cancer research, covering terminology across a wide range of cancer research domains. A major design goal of the NCI Thesaurus is to facilitate translational research. We describe: the features of Ontylog, a description logic used to build NCI Thesaurus; our methodology for enhancing the terminology through collaboration between ontologists and domain experts, and for addressing certain real world challenges arising in modeling the Thesaurus; and finally, we describe the conversion of NCI Thesaurus from Ontylog into Web Ontology Language Lite. Ontylog has proven well suited for constructing big biomedical vocabularies. We have capitalized on the Ontylog constructs Kind and Role in the collaboration process described in this paper to facilitate communication between ontologists and domain experts. The artifacts and processes developed by NCI for collaboration may be useful in other biomedical terminology development efforts.

  4. Suppression of cancer stem-like phenotypes in NCI-H460 lung cancer cells by vanillin through an Akt-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinual, Songpol; Chanvorachote, Pithi; Pongrakhananon, Varisa

    2017-04-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been reported as a major cause of cancer metastasis and the failure of cancer treatment. Cumulative studies have indicated that protein kinase B (Akt) and its downstream signaling pathway, including CSC markers, play a critical role in the aggressive behavior of this cancer. In this study, we investigated whether vanillin, a major component in Vanilla planifolia seed, could suppress cancer stemness phenotypes and related proteins in the human non-small cell lung cancer NCI‑H460 cell line. A non-toxic concentration of vanillin suppressed spheroid and colony formation, two hallmarks of the cancer stemness phenotype, in vitro in NCI‑H460 cells. Western blot analysis revealed that the CSC markers CD133 and ALDH1A1 and the associated transcription factors, Oct4 and Nanog, were extensively downregulated by vanillin. Vanillin also attenuated the expression and activity of Akt, a transcription regulator upstream of CSCs, an action that was confirmed by treatment with the Akt inhibitor perifosine. Furthermore, the ubiquitination of Akt was elevated in response to vanillin treatment prior to proteasomal degradation. This finding indicates that vanillin can inhibit cancer stem cell-like behavior in NCI‑H460 cells through the induction of Akt-proteasomal degradation and reduction of downstream CSC transcription factors. This inhibitory effect of vanillin may be an alternative approach in the treatment against lung cancer metastasis and its resistance to chemotherapy.

  5. Genetic polymorphisms of the GNRH1 and GNRHR genes and risk of breast cancer in the National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lund Eiliv

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GNRH1 triggers the release of follicle stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone from the pituitary. Genetic variants in the gene encoding GNRH1 or its receptor may influence breast cancer risk by modulating production of ovarian steroid hormones. We studied the association between breast cancer risk and polymorphisms in genes that code for GNRH1 and its receptor (GNRHR in the large National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (NCI-BPC3. Methods We sequenced exons of GNRH1 and GNRHR in 95 invasive breast cancer cases. Resulting single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were genotyped and used to identify haplotype-tagging SNPs (htSNPS in a panel of 349 healthy women. The htSNPs were genotyped in 5,603 invasive breast cancer cases and 7,480 controls from the Cancer Prevention Study-II (CPS-II, European Prospective Investigation on Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC, Multiethnic Cohort (MEC, Nurses' Health Study (NHS, and Women's Health Study (WHS. Circulating levels of sex steroids (androstenedione, estradiol, estrone and testosterone were also measured in 4713 study subjects. Results Breast cancer risk was not associated with any polymorphism or haplotype in the GNRH1 and GNRHR genes, nor were there any statistically significant interactions with known breast cancer risk factors. Polymorphisms in these two genes were not strongly associated with circulating hormone levels. Conclusion Common variants of the GNRH1 and GNRHR genes are not associated with risk of invasive breast cancer in Caucasians.

  6. Genetic polymorphisms of the GNRH1 and GNRHR genes and risk of breast cancer in the National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canzian, Federico; Calle, Eugenia E; Chanock, Stephen; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Dossus, Laure; Feigelson, Heather Spencer; Haiman, Christopher A; Hankinson, Susan E; Hoover, Robert; Hunter, David J; Isaacs, Claudine; Kaaks, Rudolf; Lenner, Per; Lund, Eiliv; Overvad, Kim; Palli, Domenico; Pearce, Celeste Leigh; Quiros, Jose R; Riboli, Elio; Stram, Daniel O; Thomas, Gilles; Thun, Michael J; Cox, David G; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Gils, Carla H van; Ziegler, Regina G; Henderson, Katherine D; Henderson, Brian E; Berg, Christine; Bingham, Sheila; Boeing, Heiner; Buring, Julie

    2009-01-01

    Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GNRH1) triggers the release of follicle stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone from the pituitary. Genetic variants in the gene encoding GNRH1 or its receptor may influence breast cancer risk by modulating production of ovarian steroid hormones. We studied the association between breast cancer risk and polymorphisms in genes that code for GNRH1 and its receptor (GNRHR) in the large National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (NCI-BPC3). We sequenced exons of GNRH1 and GNRHR in 95 invasive breast cancer cases. Resulting single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped and used to identify haplotype-tagging SNPs (htSNPS) in a panel of 349 healthy women. The htSNPs were genotyped in 5,603 invasive breast cancer cases and 7,480 controls from the Cancer Prevention Study-II (CPS-II), European Prospective Investigation on Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), Multiethnic Cohort (MEC), Nurses' Health Study (NHS), and Women's Health Study (WHS). Circulating levels of sex steroids (androstenedione, estradiol, estrone and testosterone) were also measured in 4713 study subjects. Breast cancer risk was not associated with any polymorphism or haplotype in the GNRH1 and GNRHR genes, nor were there any statistically significant interactions with known breast cancer risk factors. Polymorphisms in these two genes were not strongly associated with circulating hormone levels. Common variants of the GNRH1 and GNRHR genes are not associated with risk of invasive breast cancer in Caucasians

  7. Annual Report to the Nation, 1975-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    A press release from the American Cancer Society and NCI about the Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, 1975-2014, reports that overall cancer death rates continue to decline, however, death rates for some cancers increased or stabilized.

  8. Early Access to Investigational Agents through the National Cancer Institute's Treatment Referral Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Tali M; Boron, Matthew J

    2012-12-01

    The National Cancer Institute's (NCI) Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis (DCTD), as an investigational new drug sponsor, may provide early access to investigational agents for treatment use. Until recently, the NCI had 3 protocol mechanisms for distributing investigational agents through the Treatment Referral Center (TRC), a service provided by the Pharmaceutical Management Branch (PMB) within the Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program of the NCI's DCTD. The first mechanism is the Group C protocol, the second mechanism is the TRC protocol, and the third, and most common, mechanism is the Special Exception protocol. The purpose of this article is to describe and report on the activities of the TRC at the PMB since 2000 through the end of 2011. Capital Technology Information Services performed PMB data mining for all treatment protocols from January 1, 2000, to December 31, 2011. Requests to PMB were sorted in spreadsheet format by disposition, either as referred, approved, or denied, and were counted by type, either as Group C, TRC, or Special Exception. More than 60% of requests were either referred or approved between 2000 and 2011. The peak number of requests was 1664 between 2000 and 2011 and occurred in 2003. The peak was mostly a result of Special Exception requests; however, more than 400 TRC requests and 20 Group C requests were approved that year. The total number of requests dropped precipitously after 2003, and since 2008 have totaled fewer than 50 annually. All Group C and TRC protocols were completed by March 2006. The lowest number of treatment use requests occurred in 2011. Providing agents through the Special Exception mechanism is one way that promising investigational new drug agents can get to patients with life-threatening illnesses. In general, the PMB's TRC is a useful drug information resource for sites conducting clinical research in oncology, and it provides a valuable service to the oncology community.

  9. NCI's Transdisciplinary High Performance Scientific Data Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Ben; Antony, Joseph; Bastrakova, Irina; Car, Nicholas; Cox, Simon; Druken, Kelsey; Evans, Bradley; Fraser, Ryan; Ip, Alex; Kemp, Carina; King, Edward; Minchin, Stuart; Larraondo, Pablo; Pugh, Tim; Richards, Clare; Santana, Fabiana; Smillie, Jon; Trenham, Claire; Wang, Jingbo; Wyborn, Lesley

    2016-04-01

    The Australian National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) manages Earth Systems data collections sourced from several domains and organisations onto a single High Performance Data (HPD) Node to further Australia's national priority research and innovation agenda. The NCI HPD Node has rapidly established its value, currently managing over 10 PBytes of datasets from collections that span a wide range of disciplines including climate, weather, environment, geoscience, geophysics, water resources and social sciences. Importantly, in order to facilitate broad user uptake, maximise reuse and enable transdisciplinary access through software and standardised interfaces, the datasets, associated information systems and processes have been incorporated into the design and operation of a unified platform that NCI has called, the National Environmental Research Data Interoperability Platform (NERDIP). The key goal of the NERDIP is to regularise data access so that it is easily discoverable, interoperable for different domains and enabled for high performance methods. It adopts and implements international standards and data conventions, and promotes scientific integrity within a high performance computing and data analysis environment. NCI has established a rich and flexible computing environment to access to this data, through the NCI supercomputer; a private cloud that supports both domain focused virtual laboratories and in-common interactive analysis interfaces; as well as remotely through scalable data services. Data collections of this importance must be managed with careful consideration of both their current use and the needs of the end-communities, as well as its future potential use, such as transitioning to more advanced software and improved methods. It is therefore critical that the data platform is both well-managed and trusted for stable production use (including transparency and reproducibility), agile enough to incorporate new technological advances and

  10. 77 FR 15783 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-16

    ... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel Nanotechnology... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute... proposals. Place: National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute, 6116 Executive Blvd., Conference...

  11. NCI Workshop Report: Clinical and Computational Requirements for Correlating Imaging Phenotypes with Genomics Signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rivka Colen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The National Cancer Institute (NCI Cancer Imaging Program organized two related workshops on June 26–27, 2013, entitled “Correlating Imaging Phenotypes with Genomics Signatures Research” and “Scalable Computational Resources as Required for Imaging-Genomics Decision Support Systems.” The first workshop focused on clinical and scientific requirements, exploring our knowledge of phenotypic characteristics of cancer biological properties to determine whether the field is sufficiently advanced to correlate with imaging phenotypes that underpin genomics and clinical outcomes, and exploring new scientific methods to extract phenotypic features from medical images and relate them to genomics analyses. The second workshop focused on computational methods that explore informatics and computational requirements to extract phenotypic features from medical images and relate them to genomics analyses and improve the accessibility and speed of dissemination of existing NIH resources. These workshops linked clinical and scientific requirements of currently known phenotypic and genotypic cancer biology characteristics with imaging phenotypes that underpin genomics and clinical outcomes. The group generated a set of recommendations to NCI leadership and the research community that encourage and support development of the emerging radiogenomics research field to address short-and longer-term goals in cancer research.

  12. NIH Research: Cancers: A "Constellation" of Diseases | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Dr. Varmus received early training in genetics and molecular biology at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) in the ... now new technologies for genomic analysis. Progress in molecular biology has transformed our ability to understand the broken ...

  13. 42 CFR 81.10 - Use of cancer risk assessment models in NIOSH IREP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... cohort. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) are... will be incorporated in a version of IREP named NIOSH-IREP, specifically designed for adjudication of...

  14. TESTICULAR CANCER AT KENYATTA NATIONAL HOSPITAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2000-02-02

    Feb 2, 2000 ... Objective: To determine the prevalence, clinical characteristics, management methods and prognosis of testicular cancer at ... component of testicular cancer management at Kenyatta National Hospital. INTRODUCTION ..... adenopathy, haemoptysis from lung metastasis, back pain from retroperitoneal ...

  15. Russian delegation visits NIH and NCI to discuss research collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI Center for Global Health hosted a delegation from the Russian Foundation for Basic Research to discuss ongoing and future collaborations in cancer research. The delegation was accompanied by representatives from the US Embassy in Moscow and the Embassy of the Russian Federation in Washington DC.

  16. 76 FR 576 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-05

    ... Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Nanotechnology Sensing Platforms. Date: March 2... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute... Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; SPORE in Mesothelioma, Lung, Breast and Ovarian Cancers. Date...

  17. NCI's Distributed Geospatial Data Server

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larraondo, P. R.; Evans, B. J. K.; Antony, J.

    2016-12-01

    Earth systems, environmental and geophysics datasets are an extremely valuable source of information about the state and evolution of the Earth. However, different disciplines and applications require this data to be post-processed in different ways before it can be used. For researchers experimenting with algorithms across large datasets or combining multiple data sets, the traditional approach to batch data processing and storing all the output for later analysis rapidly becomes unfeasible, and often requires additional work to publish for others to use. Recent developments on distributed computing using interactive access to significant cloud infrastructure opens the door for new ways of processing data on demand, hence alleviating the need for storage space for each individual copy of each product. The Australian National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) has developed a highly distributed geospatial data server which supports interactive processing of large geospatial data products, including satellite Earth Observation data and global model data, using flexible user-defined functions. This system dynamically and efficiently distributes the required computations among cloud nodes and thus provides a scalable analysis capability. In many cases this completely alleviates the need to preprocess and store the data as products. This system presents a standards-compliant interface, allowing ready accessibility for users of the data. Typical data wrangling problems such as handling different file formats and data types, or harmonising the coordinate projections or temporal and spatial resolutions, can now be handled automatically by this service. The geospatial data server exposes functionality for specifying how the data should be aggregated and transformed. The resulting products can be served using several standards such as the Open Geospatial Consortium's (OGC) Web Map Service (WMS) or Web Feature Service (WFS), Open Street Map tiles, or raw binary arrays under

  18. License Agreements | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI Technology Transfer Center (TTC) licenses the discoveries of NCI and nine other NIH Institutes so new technologies can be developed and commercialized, to convert them into public health benefits.

  19. Wikipedia and the National Cancer Institute Website Appear to Offer Similar Osteosarcoma Information for Patients. A Review of: Leithner, A., Werner, M., Glehr, M., Friesenbichler, J., Keithner, K., & Windhager R. (2010. Wikipedia and osteosarcoma: A trustworthy patients' information? Journal of the Medical Informatics Association, 17(4, 373-374.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Kelly

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To compare the completeness and accuracy of information about osteosarcoma in Wikipedia to information found on the patient and health professional versions of the U.S. National Cancer Institute (NCI website.Design – Comparative study, test against 20 item questionnaire and expert opinion.Setting – n/aSubjects – n/aMethods – The authors developed a 20-item questionnaire to test the completeness and accuracy of information on osteosarcoma in Wikipedia and on the "patient version and the health professional version of the National Cancer Institute's website as 'official' reference websites" (p. 373. Three independent observers, two surgeons specializing in musculoskeletal tumour surgery and a medical student, tested the English language version of Wikipedia and the NCI “websites” on April 3, 2009. Answers to the 20 questions found on the websites were scored from zero to three and were discussed with a member of the "German board for guidelines in musculoskeletal surgery" (p. 373 and verified against international guidelines published by the World Health Organization. Data was analyzed using SPSS and group comparisons were performed using Mann-Whitney U test with p-values of less than 0.05 significance. Main Results – The quality of information about osteosarcoma found in the English language version of Wikipedia was good but inferior to the patient information from NCI. Out of a total of 60 points Wikipedia scored 33, NCI patient information 40 and NCI professional information 50. There was no significant difference between the NCI patient information and Wikipedia but a significant difference (p=0.039 between Wikipedia and NCI professional information.Conclusion – Non-peer reviewed websites providing health information, such as Wikipedia, should include links to sites such as NCI and other more definitive sources such as professional and international organizations. Frequent checks should be used to ensure external

  20. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Advisory Board Meetings Social Media Events Cancer Currents Blog All Press Releases 2018 2017 2016 2015 2014 ... Conferences Advisory Board Meetings Social Media Cancer Currents Blog About NCI NCI Overview History Contributing to Cancer ...

  1. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cancer Training at NCI Funding for Cancer Training Building a Diverse Workforce Other Fellowships and Internships About ... at NCI (Intramural) Funding for Cancer Training (Extramural) Building a Diverse Workforce Other Fellowships & Internships Training Program ...

  2. National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Journey Forward Breakaway from Cancer Lilly Oncology On Canvas Our Sponsors Blog Donate The Stovall Award Cancer ... Journey Forward Breakaway from Cancer Lilly Oncology On Canvas Our Sponsors Blog Donate The Stovall Award NCCS ...

  3. Tumorigenicity, invasion and metastasis of the small cell lung cancer cell line NCI-H69 and two derivative lines MOG-H69V and MOG-H69VZ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M Z; McNicol, A M; Freshney, R I

    1996-01-01

    Two adherent cell lines MOG-H69V and MOG-H69VZ have been isolated from a continuous cell line, NCI-H69, derived from human small cell lung cancer by Carney et al, [1987]. They have been established and characterised morphologically, biochemically, and for growth characteristics in vitro Khan et al (19). In the present study both the parental and the derivative lines have been investigated for invasiveness in vitro and in vivo. The parental line showed an early invasiveness compared with both the derivative cell lines. All cell lines formed tumours in nude mice with 100% take rate. Xenograft histology of all the cell lines revealed pleomorphic tumours, however the derivative lines showed areas of focal, large, spindle cells containing both acidic and neutral mucin, and spaces between the cells were found filled with alcianophilic, amorphous material. The parental line was invasive and metastatic. Tumours of both the derivative lines were non-metastatic under similar conditions. They were also investigated for neuroendocrine-cell marker expression. These data show that while the behaviour of the parental line was compatible with small cell lung cancer, that of the derivative lines was more indicative of non-small cell lung cancer, both in vitro and in vivo. As previous data suggested a common origin of the parental and the derivative lines, probably from a stem cell subpopulation present in the parental line, these lines represent a useful model for the study of phenotypic changes in lung cancer.

  4. Gardasil® and Cervarix® | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccine for human papilloma virus (HPV) to protect from cancers Key elements of the technology for Gardasil® and Cervarix originated from the HPV research of the laboratory of Drs. Douglas Lowy and John Schiller of the NCI.

  5. SEER Statistics | DCCPS/NCI/NIH

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program of the National Cancer Institute works to provide information on cancer statistics in an effort to reduce the burden of cancer among the U.S. population.

  6. Working Together, We Can Defeat Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Director, National Cancer Institute; Acting Commissioner, Food and Drug Administration Photo courtesy of NIH/NCI An interview with ... cancer, we have seen the introduction of the drugs Iressa and Tarceva, which ... an enzymatic pathway involved in the proliferation and growth of cancer ...

  7. The Science of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The science of cancer prevention is described by Dr. Barnett S. Kramer, M.D., M.P.H., director of the Division of Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Institute (NCI). The Division of Cancer Prevention administers a broad spectrum of research that spans basic pre-clinical, laboratory research, supportive and palliative care research, early detection, and randomized controlled clinical trials. The Division also supports the Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program and is devoted to the balanced communication of scientific results.

  8. Phase II multicenter trial of bevacizumab plus fluorouracil and leucovorin in patients with advanced refractory colorectal cancer: an NCI Treatment Referral Center Trial TRC-0301.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Helen X; Mooney, Margaret; Boron, Matthew; Vena, Don; Mosby, Kimberly; Grochow, Louise; Jaffe, Carl; Rubinstein, Lawrence; Zwiebel, James; Kaplan, Richard S

    2006-07-20

    To provide bevacizumab (BV) -based therapy to patients with advanced colorectal cancers (CRC) who had exhausted standard chemotherapy options, and to evaluate the response to BV combined with fluorouracil (FU) and leucovorin (LV) in this patient population. This was a multicenter, single-arm treatment trial conducted under the National Cancer Institute Treatment Referral Center network nationwide. Patients were treated with BV 5 mg/kg every 2 weeks combined with FU/LV; FU was administered by bolus or continuous infusion. Eligibility criteria included advanced CRC that had progressed after irinotecan- and oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 0 to 2, and absence of thromboembolism. The primary end point was objective response rate (RR) in the first 100 assessable patients. All patients received follow-up for toxicity and survival. Due to rapid accrual, a total of 350 patients were enrolled at 32 participating sites nationwide by October 2003. In the initially planned cohort of 100 assessable patients, the objective RR was 4% (95% CI, 1.1% to 9.9%) by investigators' assessment and 1% (95% CI, 0% to 5.5%) based on independent review; median progression-free survival was 3.5 months and median overall survival was 9.0 months. The safety profile was similar to prior BV trials in CRC. Grade 3 to 4 hemorrhage occurred in 5% of patients, including 3.8% with bleeding in the GI tract. Other adverse events such as hypertension, thrombosis, and bowel perforation were also observed at rates consistent with other studies. For patients with advanced CRC that had progressed after both irinotecan-based and oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy regimens, the combination of BV and FU/LV was associated with rare objective responses.

  9. Feasibility of a Centralized Clinical Trials Coverage Analysis: A Joint Initiative of the American Society of Clinical Oncology and the National Cancer Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczepanek, Connie M; Hurley, Patricia; Good, Marjorie J; Denicoff, Andrea; Willenberg, Kelly; Dawson, Casey; Kurbegov, Dax

    2017-06-01

    Clinical trial billing compliance is a challenge that is faced by overburdened clinical trials sites. The requirements place institutions and research sites at increased potential for financial risk. To reduce their risk, sites develop a coverage analysis (CA) before opening each trial. For multisite trials, this translates into system-wide redundancies, inconsistencies, trial delays, and potential costs to sites and patients. These factors exacerbate low accrual rates to cancer clinical trials. ASCO and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) collaborated to address this problem. An ASCO Research Community Forum working group proposed the concept of providing centrally developed CAs to research sites at protocol startup. The group collaborated with NCI and billing compliance experts to hold a symposium for key stakeholders to share knowledge, build skills, provide tools to conduct centralized CAs, and strategize about the next steps. Forty-eight attendees, who represented a range of stakeholders, participated in the symposium. As a result of this initiative, NCI directed the Cancer Trials Support Unit to convene a working group with NCI's National Clinical Trials Network (NCTN) and Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) to develop tools and processes for generating CAs for their trials. A CA template with core elements was developed and is being adapted in a pilot project across NCTN Group and NCORP Research Bases. Centralized CAs for multisite trials-using standardized tools and templates-are feasible. They have the potential to reduce risk for patients and sites, forecast budget needs, and help decrease trial startup times that impede patient access and accrual to clinical trials.

  10. NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute’s Technology Transfer Center (TTC) facilitates partnerships between the NIH research laboratories and external partners. With specialized teams, TTC guides the interactions of our partners from the point of discovery to patenting, from invention development to licensing. We play a key role in helping to accelerate development of cutting-edge research by connecting our partners to NIH’s world-class researchers, facilities, and knowledge.

  11. A Comparative Dosimetric Study of Adjuvant 3D Conformal Radiotherapy for Operable Stomach Cancer Versus AP-PA Conventional Radiotherapy in NCI-Cairo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Hossiny, H.A.; Diab, N.A.; El-Taher, M.M.

    2009-01-01

    This study was to compare this multiple field conformal technique to the AP-PA technique with respect to target volume coverage and dose to normal tissues. Materials and Methods: Seventeen patients with stages II-III denocarcinoma of the stomach were treated with adjuvant postoperative chemoradiotherapy presented to radiotherapy department in National Cancer Institute, Cairo in period between February 2009 to March 2010 using 3D conformal radiotherapy technique that consisted of a mono isocentric arrangement employing 4-6 radiation fields. For each patient, a second radiotherapy treatment plan was done using an antroposterior (AP-PA) fields, the two techniques were then compared using dose volume histogram (DVH) analysis. Results: Comparing different DVHs, it was found that the planning target volume (PTV) was adequately covered in both (3D and 2D) plans while the left kidney and spinal cord demonstrate lower radiation doses on using the conformal technique. The liver doses is higher in the 3D tecq, but still well below liver tolerance. Conclusions: Both 3D conformal radiotherapy and AP-PA conventional techniques doses are within range of normal tissues tolerance. Regarding the left kidney and spinal cord the 3D conformal radiotherapy is superior than the AP-PA conventional techniques but with higher doses to the liver in the 3D conformal radiotherapy compared to the AP-PA conventional techniques

  12. Organometallic Iridium(III) Anticancer Complexes with New Mechanisms of Action: NCI-60 Screening, Mitochondrial Targeting, and Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Platinum complexes related to cisplatin, cis-[PtCl2(NH3)2], are successful anticancer drugs; however, other transition metal complexes offer potential for combating cisplatin resistance, decreasing side effects, and widening the spectrum of activity. Organometallic half-sandwich iridium (IrIII) complexes [Ir(Cpx)(XY)Cl]+/0 (Cpx = biphenyltetramethylcyclopentadienyl and XY = phenanthroline (1), bipyridine (2), or phenylpyridine (3)) all hydrolyze rapidly, forming monofunctional G adducts on DNA with additional intercalation of the phenyl substituents on the Cpx ring. In comparison, highly potent complex 4 (Cpx = phenyltetramethylcyclopentadienyl and XY = N,N-dimethylphenylazopyridine) does not hydrolyze. All show higher potency toward A2780 human ovarian cancer cells compared to cisplatin, with 1, 3, and 4 also demonstrating higher potency in the National Cancer Institute (NCI) NCI-60 cell-line screen. Use of the NCI COMPARE algorithm (which predicts mechanisms of action (MoAs) for emerging anticancer compounds by correlating NCI-60 patterns of sensitivity) shows that the MoA of these IrIII complexes has no correlation to cisplatin (or oxaliplatin), with 3 and 4 emerging as particularly novel compounds. Those findings by COMPARE were experimentally probed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of A2780 cells exposed to 1, showing mitochondrial swelling and activation of apoptosis after 24 h. Significant changes in mitochondrial membrane polarization were detected by flow cytometry, and the potency of the complexes was enhanced ca. 5× by co-administration with a low concentration (5 μM) of the γ-glutamyl cysteine synthetase inhibitor L-buthionine sulfoximine (L-BSO). These studies reveal potential polypharmacology of organometallic IrIII complexes, with MoA and cell selectivity governed by structural changes in the chelating ligands. PMID:23618382

  13. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Events Scientific Meetings & Lectures Conferences Advisory Board Meetings Social Media Events Cancer Currents Blog All Press Releases ... Events Scientific Meetings & Lectures Conferences Advisory Board Meetings Social Media Cancer Currents Blog About NCI NCI Overview ...

  14. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Events Scientific Meetings & Lectures Conferences Advisory Board Meetings Social Media Events Cancer Currents Blog All Press Releases 2018 ... Events Scientific Meetings & Lectures Conferences Advisory Board Meetings Social Media Cancer Currents Blog About NCI NCI Overview History ...

  15. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Media Cancer Currents Blog About NCI NCI Overview History Contributing to Cancer Research Leadership Director's Page Deputy ... Information Legislative Activities Hearings & Testimonies Current Congress Legislative History Committees of Interest Legislative Resources Recent Public Laws ...

  16. Overview of the National Cancer Institute's activities related to exposure of the public to fallout from the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wachholz, B.W.

    1990-01-01

    The Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) was directed by Congress to assess the risk of thyroid cancer from 131I associated with fallout from the atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons at the Nevada Test Site. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) was requested by DHHS to address Public Law 97-414, Section 7 (a), which directs DHHS to (1) conduct scientific research and prepare analyses necessary to develop valid and credible assessments of the risks of thyroid cancer that are associated with thyroid doses of Iodine 131; (2)...develop...methods to estimate the thyroid doses of Iodine 131 that are received by individuals from nuclear bomb fallout; (and) (3)...develop...assessments of the exposure to Iodine 131 that the American people received from the Nevada atmospheric nuclear bomb tests. In addition, the University of Utah, under contract with the NCI, is carrying out a study to determine if the incidence of thyroid disease and leukemia among identified populations in Utah may be related to exposure from fallout originating at the Nevada Test Site

  17. 75 FR 5092 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    ... . Name of Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel, Quantitative Cell-Based Imaging....396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93.398, Cancer Research Manpower; 93.399... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute...

  18. National Cancer Center Singapore: the way forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Melissa; Soo, Khee Chee

    2016-02-01

    Cancer is the leading cause of death in Singapore, comprising almost 30% of annual deaths. The incidence and prevalence continue to rise, resulting in Singapore having the highest age-standardized rate of cancer in southeast Asia. A review of national health policies in 1992 resulted in the creation of a National Cancer Centre Singapore (NCCS) in 1999. The current NCCS, with its three pillars of clinical service, research and education, manages about 70% of all new cancer cases in the countries public healthcare system. As it outgrows its current outfit and looks to the new NCCS building in 2020, the goal must be for strategic planning to attract and retain the best minds and heart in the field of cancer if it were to continue to be successful in achieving its vision and mission. This article chronicles the NCCS's history and details the foundation of its strategic plans.

  19. Global Proteome Analysis of the NCI-60 Cell Line Panel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Moghaddas Gholami

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The NCI-60 cell line collection is a very widely used panel for the study of cellular mechanisms of cancer in general and in vitro drug action in particular. It is a model system for the tissue types and genetic diversity of human cancers and has been extensively molecularly characterized. Here, we present a quantitative proteome and kinome profile of the NCI-60 panel covering, in total, 10,350 proteins (including 375 protein kinases and including a core cancer proteome of 5,578 proteins that were consistently quantified across all tissue types. Bioinformatic analysis revealed strong cell line clusters according to tissue type and disclosed hundreds of differentially regulated proteins representing potential biomarkers for numerous tumor properties. Integration with public transcriptome data showed considerable similarity between mRNA and protein expression. Modeling of proteome and drug-response profiles for 108 FDA-approved drugs identified known and potential protein markers for drug sensitivity and resistance. To enable community access to this unique resource, we incorporated it into a public database for comparative and integrative analysis (http://wzw.tum.de/proteomics/nci60.

  20. Administrative Assistant | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    An administrative assistant position is available immediately in the Laboratory of Genome Integrity (LGI) within the Center for Cancer Research (CCR) in the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The LGI is actively looking for someone with administrative skills who will facilitate personnel, travel and related demands that support the laboratory chief, all principal investigators and postdoctoral fellows and laboratory support staff. 

  1. 76 FR 9353 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute.... Place: Bethesda North Marriott Hotel & Conference Center, 5701 Marinelli Road, Bethesda, MD 20852... Branch, Division of Extramural Activities, National Cancer Institute, 6116 Executive Blvd., Room 8101...

  2. Clinical validation of chemotherapy predictors developed on global microRNA expression in the NCI60 cell line panel tested in ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prahm, Kira Philipsen; Høgdall, Claus; Karlsen, Mona Aarenstrup

    2017-01-01

    Objective Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death among gynecologic malignancies. This is partly due to a non-durable response to chemotherapy. Prediction of resistance to chemotherapy could be a key role in more personalized treatment. In the current study we aimed to examine if micro......RNA based predictors could predict resistance to chemotherapy in ovarian cancer, and to investigate if the predictors could be prognostic factors for progression free and overall survival. Methods Predictors of chemotherapy-resistance were developed based on correlation between miRNA expression...

  3. Cancer communication science funding trends, 2000-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, A Susana; Galica, Kasia; Blake, Kelly D; Chou, Wen-Ying Sylvia; Hesse, Bradford W

    2013-12-01

    Since 2000, the field of health communication has grown tremendously, owing largely to research funding by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). This study provides an overview of cancer communication science funding trends in the past decade. We conducted an analysis of communication-related grant applications submitted to the NCI in fiscal years 2000-2012. Using 103 keywords related to health communication, data were extracted from the Portfolio Management Application, a grants management application used at NCI. Automated coding described key grant characteristics such as mechanism and review study section. Manual coding determined funding across the cancer control continuum, by cancer site, and by cancer risk factors. A total of 3307 unique grant applications met initial inclusion criteria; 1013 of these were funded over the 12-year period. The top funded grant mechanisms were the R01, R21, and R03. Applications were largely investigator-initiated proposals as opposed to responses to particular funding opportunity announcements. Among funded communication research, the top risk factor being studied was tobacco, and across the cancer control continuum, cancer prevention was the most common stage investigated. NCI support of cancer communication research has been an important source of growth for health communication science over the last 12 years. The analysis' findings describe NCI's priorities in cancer communication science and suggest areas for future investments.

  4. 78 FR 55750 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings... Innovative Molecular Analysis Technology Development for Cancer Research (R21). Date: October 24, 2013. Time...: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Integrative Cancer Biology. Date: October 29, 2013. Time...

  5. 77 FR 24969 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-26

    ... . Name of Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; SPORE in Breast, Prostate and... Construction; 93.393, Cancer Cause and Prevention Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings...

  6. 76 FR 16431 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-23

    ... Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; SPORE in Lymphoma, Breast, Ovarian... and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting...

  7. 75 FR 14172 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings... Emphasis Panel, Nucleic Acid Analysis for the Molecular Characterization of Cancer. Date: April 6, 2010... Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93.398, Cancer Research Manpower; 93.399, Cancer Control...

  8. 75 FR 79010 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings... Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel. Development of Devices for Point of Care Analysis of Circulating... Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93.398, Cancer Research Manpower; 93.399, Cancer Control...

  9. 75 FR 21002 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-22

    ... Panel, SPORE in Lymphoma and Breast Cancer. Date: June 15-16, 2010. Time: 5 p.m. to 5 p.m. Agenda: To...; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings...

  10. 75 FR 3239 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-20

    ... Special Emphasis Panel, Basal-like Breast Cancer Assay. Date: March 10, 2010. Time: 8 a.m. to 7 p.m..., Cancer Cause and Prevention Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings...

  11. 78 FR 27408 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-10

    ... Methods for the Detection of Cancer Recurrence in Post-Therapy Breast Cancer Patients. Date: June 4, 2013... Prevention Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings...

  12. 76 FR 52960 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-24

    ... Emphasis Panel, Mechanisms of Cell Signaling in Cancer. Date: October 13-14, 2011. Time: 3 to 5 p.m. Agenda..., Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93.398... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute...

  13. Mechanisms of Cancer - Annual Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI works to understand the mechanisms of cancer cell growth, survival, and metastasis. Get more information on how NCI supports basic scientific research that will lead to new ways to prevent, detect, and treat cancer.

  14. NCI's Role in Immunotherapy Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the development of innovative cancer immunotherapies and their translation to the treatment of patients with cancer. Efforts run the gamut from basic studies of cancer immunology to the conduct of clinical ...

  15. NCI Blog Post: CPTAC, the Complementary Sibling of TCGA (An Interview with Dr. Henry Rodriguez about NCI’s Proteomics Program) | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    What is proteomics? Proteomics is a highly automated and rapid method for measuring all the proteins in a biological sample. Proteins are the molecules that actually do most of the work inside a cell. When researchers develop cancer drugs, those drugs typically target proteins, so scientists and clinicians really have to understand what the proteins are doing. Proteomics researchers are now able to measure up to 10,000 proteins per tumor sample.

  16. 78 FR 44577 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-24

    ... and AIDS Malignancy priorities. Place: National Cancer Institute, NIH, Building 10, Room 10S255, 10... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute.... App.), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the National Cancer Institute Board of Scientific...

  17. 2,2'-Fluorine mono-carbonyl curcumin induce reactive oxygen species-Mediated apoptosis in Human lung cancer NCI-H460 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guo-Yun; Zhai, Qiang; Chen, Jia-Zhuang; Zhang, Zhuo-Qing; Yang, Jie

    2016-09-05

    In this paper, we synthesized three fluorine-substituted mono-carbonyl curcumin analogs and evaluated their cytotoxicity against several cancer cells by the MTT assay. The results exhibited that all the three compounds were more active than the leading curcumin. Especially, 2,2'-F mono-carbonyl curcumin, 1a, surfaced as an important lead compound displaying almost 4-fold cytotoxicity relative to curcumin. More importantly, 1a was more stable in (RPMI)-1640 medium and more massive uptake than curcumin, which may be relationship to their cytotoxicity, apoptotic acitivity and reactive oxygen species generation. And then, the generation of reactive oxygen species can disrupt the intracellular redox balance, induce lipid peroxidation, cause the collapse of the mitochondrial membrane potential and ultimately lead to apoptosis. The results not only suggest that 2,2'-F mono-carbonyl curcumin (1a) may cause cancer cells apoptosis through reactive oxygen species-Mediated pathway, but also gives us an important information for design of mono-carbonyl curcumin analog. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Reconstructing the pipeline by introducing multiplexed multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry for cancer biomarker verification: an NCI-CPTC initiative perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Henry; Rivers, Robert; Kinsinger, Christopher; Mesri, Mehdi; Hiltke, Tara; Rahbar, Amir; Boja, Emily

    2010-12-01

    Proteomics holds great promise in personalized medicine for cancer in the post-genomic era. In the past decade, clinical proteomics has significantly evolved in terms of technology development, optimization and standardization, as well as in advanced bioinformatics data integration and analysis. Great strides have been made for characterizing a large number of proteins qualitatively and quantitatively in a proteome, including the use of sample fractionation, protein microarrays and MS. It is believed that differential proteomic analysis of high-quality clinical biospecimen (tissue and biofluids) can potentially reveal protein/peptide biomarkers responsible for cancer by means of their altered levels of expression and/or PTMs. Multiple reaction monitoring, a multiplexed platform using stable isotope dilution-MS with sensitivity and reproducibility approaching that of traditional ELISAs commonly used in the clinical setting, has emerged as a potentially promising technique for next-generation high-throughput protein biomarker measurements for diagnostics and therapeutics. Copyright © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. January is Cervical Cancer Awareness Month

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Center for Global Health supports global activities to advance global cancer research, build expertise, and leverage resources across nations to address the challenges of cancer and reduce cancer deaths worldwide. Towards these aims, NCI has partnered with Pink Ribbon Red Ribbon, a global organization founded on public-private partnerships dedicated to saving women’s lives by advancing prevention, screening, and treatment for breast and cervical cancer in sub-Saharan Africa and Latin America.

  20. January Monthly Spotlight: Cervical Health and Cervical Cancer Disparities

    Science.gov (United States)

    In January, CRCHD joins the nation in raising awareness for Cervical Health and Cervical Cancer Disparities. This month we share a special focus on NCI/CRCHD research programs that are trying to reduce cervical cancer disparities in underserved communities and the people who are spreading the word about the importance of early detection.

  1. NIH scientists identify molecular link between metabolism and breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    A protein associated with conditions of metabolic imbalance, such as diabetes and obesity, may play a role in the development of aggressive forms of breast cancer, according to new findings by researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of th

  2. A Pragmatic Evaluation of the National Cancer Institute Physician Data Query (PDQ)®-Based Brief Counseling on Cancer-Related Fatigue among Patients Undergoing Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauml, Joshua; Xie, Sharon X; Penn, Courtney; Desai, Krupali; Dong, Kimberly W; Bruner, Deborah Watkins; Vapiwala, Neha; Mao, Jun James

    2012-01-01

    Cancer-Related Fatigue (CRF) negatively affects quality of life among cancer patients. This study seeks to evaluate the outcome and patient receptiveness of a brief counseling program based on National Cancer Institute (NCI) PDQ® information to manage CRF when integrated into Radiation Therapy (RT). We conducted a prospective cohort study among patients undergoing non-palliative RT. Patients with stage I-III tumors and with Karnofsky score 60 or better were given a ten-minute behavioral counseling session during the first two weeks of RT. The Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI) was administered at baseline/end of RT. Of 93 patients enrolled, 89% found the counseling useful and practical. By the end of RT, 59% reported increased exercise, 41.6% sought nutrition counseling, 72.7% prioritized daily activities, 74.4% took daytime naps, and 70.5% talked with other cancer patients. Regarding counseling, patients who had received chemotherapy prior to RT had no change in fatigue (-0.2), those who received RT alone had mild increase in fatigue (0.7, p=0.02), and those who received concurrent chemotherapy experienced a substantial increase in fatigue (3.0 to 5.2, p=0.05). Higher baseline fatigue and receipt of chemotherapy were predictive of worsened fatigue in a multivariate model (both pbrief behavioral counseling based on NCI guidelines is well accepted by patients showing an uptake in many activities to cope with CRF. Those who receive concurrent chemotherapy and with higher baseline fatigue are at risk for worsening fatigue despite of guideline-based therapy.

  3. About TTC | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The TTC facilitates licensing and co-development partnerships between biomedical industry, academia, and government agencies and the research laboratories of the NCI and nine other institutes and centers of NIH.

  4. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Reporting & Auditing Grant Transfer Grant Closeout Contracts & Small Business Training Cancer Training at NCI (Intramural) Funding for ... History Committees of Interest Legislative Resources Recent Public Laws Contact Overview & Mission History of NCI Contributing to ...

  5. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Legislative History Committees of Interest Legislative Resources Recent Public Laws Contact Overview & Mission History of NCI Contributing to Cancer Research Senior Leadership Director Deputy Director Previous Directors NCI Organization Divisions, Offices & Centers Advisory Boards & Review Groups Budget & ...

  6. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Approvals Annual Reporting & Auditing Grant Transfer Grant Closeout Contracts & Small Business Training Cancer Training at NCI (Intramural) ... History Committees of Interest Legislative Resources Recent Public Laws Contact Overview & Mission History of NCI Contributing to ...

  7. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Overview & Mission History of NCI Contributing to Cancer Research Senior Leadership Director Deputy Director Previous Directors NCI Organization Divisions, Offices & Centers Advisory Boards & Review Groups Budget & ...

  8. International Fellows of NCI at Frederick | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Each year, the Employee Diversity Team (EDT) acknowledges members of the NCI at Frederick Community for their achievements and contributions towards the mission of facility.  Historically, the team has profiled the “Women of NCI at Frederick,” but this year, the team decided to instead shed light on the diverse and successful individuals who make up the international fellows community.

  9. 76 FR 17930 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-31

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings... Special Emphasis Panel; Innovative Emerging Molecular Analysis Technologies. Date: June 2-3, 2011. Time: 8..., Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology...

  10. 78 FR 46357 - National Cancer Institute; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-31

    ... Cancer Institute Board of Scientific Advisors ad hoc Subcommittee on HIV/AIDS Malignancy, August 08, 2013, 10:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m., National Cancer Institute, NIH, Building 10, Room 10S255, 10 Center Drive... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute...

  11. 76 FR 69744 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-09

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel, Cancer Diagnostic and Therapeutic Agents Enabled by Nanotechnology. Date: November 29, 2011. Time: 8 a.m. to 7 p.m...

  12. 75 FR 26968 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-13

    ...: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Nanotechnology Imaging and Sensing Platforms. Date: June... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute... Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Adult Brain Tumor Consortium. Date: May 20, 2010. Time: 1 p.m...

  13. FDA Approves Immunotherapy for a Cancer that Affects Infants and Children | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Frank Blanchard, Staff Writer The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently approved dinutuximab (ch14.18) as an immunotherapy for neuroblastoma, a rare type of childhood cancer that offers poor prognosis for about half of the children who are affected. The National Cancer Institute’s (NCI) Biopharmaceutical Development Program (BDP) at the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research produced ch14.18 for the NCI-sponsored clinical trials that proved the drug’s effectiveness against the disease.

  14. Monitoring of people and workers exposure to the electric, magnetic and electromagnetic fields in an Italian national cancer Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palomba Raffaele

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The paper reports the electric, magnetic and electromagnetic fields (emf measurements carried out in the Regina Elena National Cancer Institute (NCI. Several devices, used in diagnostics and in medical cures, can represent sources of emf for the workers and for the public subjected to the treatments. The aim is to evaluate their exposition, in order to assess the compliance with the law. Methods The investigations have been carried out in the departments of: intensive care, physiotherapy, MR presstherapy and in the surgical rooms. The measurements have been performed using broad band probes in the frequency ranges 5 Hz÷30 kHz and 100 kHz-3 GHz. Results The variability of the magnetic induction (B(μT levels is between 0,05 μT and 80 μT. The statistical distribution shows that most of the measurements are in the range 0,05 Conclusion The measurement of the emf levels in the NCI is recommended because of the presence of the oncological patients; their long stay near the equipments and their day-long exposure represent additional risk factors for which a prudent avoidance strategy have to de adopted.

  15. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Reporting & Auditing Grant Transfer Grant Closeout Contracts & Small Business Training Cancer Training at NCI (Intramural) Funding for Cancer Training ... Media Resources Media ...

  16. 2017 Technology Showcase | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The 2017 Technology Showcase is an inaugural, half-day event showcased technologies developed by the National Cancer Institute's Center for Cancer Research (CCR) and the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (FNLCR).

  17. Promoting Exercise in Young Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    In children and adolescent cancer survivors, an online game helped them get regular exercise, as this NCI Cancer Currents post explains. A NCI-funded trial is testing the approach for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) survivors.

  18. Strengthening the Cancer Research Enterprise - Annual Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI's expanding infrastructure, support for scientists at every career stage, and funding of small business innovation enables discoveries that advance cancer research. Read more about how NCI is strenghtening the cancer research enterprise.

  19. Temporal and Other Exposure Aspects of Residential Magnetic Fields Measurement in Relation to Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia in Children: The National Cancer Institute Children's Cancer Group Study (invited paper)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baris, D.; Linet, M.; Auvinen, A.; Kaune, W.T.; Wacholder, S.; Kleinerman, R.; Hatch, E.; Robison, L.; Niwa, S.; Haines, C.; Tarone, R.E.

    1999-01-01

    Case-control studies have used a variety of measurements to evaluate the relationship of children's exposure to magnetic fields (50 or 60 Hz) with childhood leukaemia and other childhood cancers. In the absence of knowledge about which exposure metrics may be biologically meaningful, studies during the past 10 years have often used time-weighted average (TWA) summaries of home measurements. Recently, other exposure metrics have been suggested, usually based on theoretical considerations or limited laboratory data. In this paper, the rationale and associated preliminary studies undertaken are described as well as feasibility and validity issues governing the choice of the primary magnetic field exposure assessment methods and summary metric used to estimate children's exposure in the National Cancer Institute/Children's Cancer Group (NCI/CCG) case-control study. Also provided are definitions and discussion of the strengths and weaknesses of the various exposure metrics used in exploratory analyses of the NCI/CCG measurement data. Exposure metrics evaluated include measures of central tendency (mean, median, 30th to 70th percentiles), peak exposures (90th and higher percentiles, peak values of the 24 h measurements), and measurements of short-term temporal variability (rate of change). This report describes correlations of the various metrics with the time-weighted average for the 24 h period (TWA-24-h). Most of the metrics were found to be positively and highly correlated with TWA-24-h, but lower correlations of TWA-24-h with peak exposure and with rate of change were observed. To examine further the relation between TWA and alternative metrics, similar exploratory analysis should be considered for existing data sets and for forthcoming measurement investigations of residential magnetic fields and childhood leukaemia. (author)

  20. 76 FR 19257 - National Cancer Control Month, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-06

    ... April 6, 2011 Part IV The President Proclamation 8644 --National Cancer Control Month, 2011 Proclamation 8645 --National Child Abuse Prevention Month, 2011 Proclamation 8646 --National Financial Literacy... 8644 of March 31, 2011 National Cancer Control Month, 2011 By the President of the United States of...

  1. The Danish National Penile Cancer Quality database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakobsen JK

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Jakob Kristian Jakobsen,1 Buket Öztürk,2 Mette Søgaard2 1Department of Urology, 2Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus Nord, Denmark Aim of database: The Danish National Penile Cancer Quality database (DaPeCa-data aims to improve the quality of cancer care and monitor the diagnosis, staging, and treatment of all incident penile cancer cases in Denmark. The aim is to assure referral practice, guideline adherence, and treatment and development of the database in order to enhance research opportunities and increase knowledge and survival outcomes of penile cancer. Study population: The DaPeCa-data registers all patients with newly diagnosed invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the penis in Denmark since June 2011. Main variables: Data are systematically registered at the time of diagnosis by a combination of automated data-linkage to the central registries as well as online registration by treating clinicians. The main variables registered relate to disease prognosis and treatment morbidity and include the presence of risk factors (phimosis, lichen sclerosus, and human papillomavirus, date of diagnosis, date of treatment decision, date of beginning of treatment, type of treatment, treating hospital, type and time of complications, date of recurrence, date of death, and cause of death. Descriptive data: Registration of these variables correlated to the unique Danish ten-digit civil registration number enables characterization of the cohort, individual patients, and patient groups with respect to age; 1-, 3-, and 5-year disease-specific and overall survival; recurrence patterns; and morbidity profile related to treatment modality. As of August 2015, more than 200 patients are registered with ~65 new entries per year. Conclusion: The DaPeCa-data has potential to provide meaningful, timely, and clinically relevant quality data for quality maintenance, development, and research purposes. Keywords: penile cancer

  2. NCI at Frederick Employees Receive Awards at the Spring Research Festival | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI and Frederick National Laboratory staff members were among those honored at the Spring Research Festival Awards Ceremony on May 28. The ceremony was the culmination of the festival, which was sponsored by the National Interagency Confederation for Biological Research (NICBR), May 4–7. Maj. Gen. Brian Lein, commanding general, U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command (USAMRMC), presented the awards.

  3. NCI Dictionary of Genetics Terms

    Science.gov (United States)

    A dictionary of more than 150 genetics-related terms written for healthcare professionals. This resource was developed to support the comprehensive, evidence-based, peer-reviewed PDQ cancer genetics information summaries.

  4. 78 FR 30933 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-23

    .... Time: 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate contract proposals. Place: National Cancer... Conference Call). Contact Person: Clifford W Schweinfest, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, Special Review... Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Nanotech-Biosensor Platforms for Cancer. Date...

  5. 75 FR 44274 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-28

    ... Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel, Nanotechnology Imaging and Sensing Platforms for Improved Diagnosis of Cancer. Date: August 31, 2010. Time: 12 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute...

  6. 75 FR 62297 - National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-08

    ..., diagnosis, and treatment of breast and other cancers. Screenings and early detection are also essential... 8572 of October 1, 2010 National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, 2010 By the President of the United... nearly 40,000 lives will be claimed. During National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, we reaffirm our...

  7. Breast Cancer: Surgery at the South Egypt Cancer Institute

    OpenAIRE

    Salem, Ahmed A.S.; Salem, Mohamed Abou Elmagd; Abbass, Hamza

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent malignant tumor in women worldwide. In Egypt, it is the most common cancer among women, representing 18.9% of total cancer cases (35.1% in women and 2.2% in men) among the Egypt National Cancer Institute?s (NCI) series of 10,556 patients during the year 2001, with an age-adjusted rate of 49.6 per 100,000 people. In this study, the data of all breast cancer patients presented to the surgical department of the South Egypt cancer Institute (SECI) hospital durin...

  8. New Funding Opportunity: Tissue Purchase Order Acquisitions | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) is expanding its basic and translational research programs that rely heavily on sufficient availability of high quality, well annotated biospecimens suitable for use in genomic and proteomic studies.  The NCI’s overarching goal with such programs is to improve the ability to diagnose, treat, and prevent cancer.

  9. Phytochemical investigation and the anti-cancer properties of pengularia daemia and phylica paniculata

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Khorombi, TE

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) implemented an in-house anti-cancer screen aimed at testing several plant extracts. This was done in collaboration with the National Cancer Institute (NCI) in the USA and involved training...

  10. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Research Cancer Genomics Research Research on Causes of ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  11. 77 FR 60605 - National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-04

    ... provider about breast cancer, and to visit www.Cancer.gov to learn more about symptoms, diagnosis, and... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8874 of October 1, 2012 National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, 2012 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Breast cancer touches the lives of Americans from...

  12. Cancer Disparities - Cancer Currents Blog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blog posts on cancer health disparities research—including factors that influence disparities, disparities-related research efforts, and diversity in the cancer research workforce—from NCI Cancer Currents.

  13. Cancer Technology - Cancer Currents Blog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blog posts on technologies that affect cancer research and care—including new technologies for detecting cancer, testing treatments, storing/analyzing data, and improving patient care—from NCI Cancer Currents.

  14. 75 FR 54451 - National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-07

    ... claim more lives than any other gynecologic cancer. During National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, we... Control and Prevention, and the Department of Defense all play vital roles in reducing the burden of this...

  15. CRADA Payment Options | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI TTC CRADA PAYMENT OPTIONS: Electronic Payments by Wire Transfer via Fedwire, Mail a check to the Institute or Center, or Automated Clearing House (ACH)/Electronic Funds Transfer (ETF) payments via Pay.gov (NCI ONLY).

  16. At NCI, Supporting the Best Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesterday, at the AACR annual meeting, Dr. Doug Lowy spoke directly to the research community about his goals as NCI Acting Director. Dr. Lowy said that he plans to continue many of the programs launched by his predecessor, Dr. Harold Varmus, and to sharp

  17. 78 FR 4422 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-22

    ... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; The Role of..., Ph.D., Scientific Review Administrator, Special Review and Logistics Branch, Division of Extramural...

  18. A method for analyzing the business case for provider participation in the National Cancer Institute's Community Clinical Oncology Program and similar federally funded, provider-based research networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, Kristin L; Song, Paula H; Minasian, Lori; Good, Marjorie; Weiner, Bryan J; McAlearney, Ann Scheck

    2012-09-01

    The Community Clinical Oncology Program (CCOP) plays an essential role in the efforts of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) to increase enrollment in clinical trials. Currently, there is little practical guidance in the literature to assist provider organizations in analyzing the return on investment (ROI), or business case, for establishing and operating a provider-based research network (PBRN) such as the CCOP. In this article, the authors present a conceptual model of the business case for PBRN participation, a spreadsheet-based tool and advice for evaluating the business case for provider participation in a CCOP organization. A comparative, case-study approach was used to identify key components of the business case for hospitals attempting to support a CCOP research infrastructure. Semistructured interviews were conducted with providers and administrators. Key themes were identified and used to develop the financial analysis tool. Key components of the business case included CCOP start-up costs, direct revenue from the NCI CCOP grant, direct expenses required to maintain the CCOP research infrastructure, and incidental benefits, most notably downstream revenues from CCOP patients. The authors recognized the value of incidental benefits as an important contributor to the business case for CCOP participation; however, currently, this component is not calculated. The current results indicated that providing a method for documenting the business case for CCOP or other PBRN involvement will contribute to the long-term sustainability and expansion of these programs by improving providers' understanding of the financial implications of participation. Copyright © 2011 American Cancer Society.

  19. Pioneering the Transdisciplinary Team Science Approach: Lessons Learned from National Cancer Institute Grantees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Amanda L; Stipelman, Brooke A; Hall, Kara L; Nebeling, Linda; Stokols, Daniel; Spruijt-Metz, Donna

    2014-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute has been a leader in supporting transdisciplinary (TD) team science. From 2005-2010, the NCI supported Transdisciplinary Research on Energetic and Cancer I (TREC I), a center initiative fostering the TD integration of social, behavioral, and biological sciences to examine the relationships among obesity, nutrition, physical activity and cancer. In the final year of TREC I, we conducted qualitative in-depth-interviews with 31 participating investigators and trainees to learn more about their experiences with TD team science, including challenges, facilitating factors, strategies for success, and impacts. Five main challenges emerged: (1) limited published guidance for how to engage in TD team science, when TREC I was implemented; (2) conceptual and scientific challenges inherent to efforts to achieve TD integration; (3) discipline-based differences in values, terminology, methods, and work styles; (4) project management challenges involved in TD team science; and (5) traditional incentive and reward systems that do not recognize or reward TD team science. Four main facilitating factors and strategies for success emerged: (1) beneficial attitudes and beliefs about TD research and team science; (2) effective team processes; (3) brokering and bridge-building activities by individuals holding particular roles in a research center; and (4) funding initiative characteristics that support TD team science. Broad impacts of participating in TD team science in the context of TREC I included: (1) new positive attitudes about TD research and team science; (2) new boundary-crossing collaborations; (3) scientific advances related to research approaches, findings, and dissemination; (4) institutional culture change and resource creation in support of TD team science; and (5) career advancement. Funding agencies, academic institutions, and scholarly journals can help to foster TD team science through funding opportunities, institutional policies on

  20. Pioneering the Transdisciplinary Team Science Approach: Lessons Learned from National Cancer Institute Grantees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Amanda L; Stipelman, Brooke A; Hall, Kara L; Nebeling, Linda; Stokols, Daniel; Spruijt-Metz, Donna

    2014-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute has been a leader in supporting transdisciplinary (TD) team science. From 2005-2010, the NCI supported Transdisciplinary Research on Energetic and Cancer I (TREC I), a center initiative fostering the TD integration of social, behavioral, and biological sciences to examine the relationships among obesity, nutrition, physical activity and cancer. In the final year of TREC I, we conducted qualitative in-depth-interviews with 31 participating investigators and trainees to learn more about their experiences with TD team science, including challenges, facilitating factors, strategies for success, and impacts. Five main challenges emerged: (1) limited published guidance for how to engage in TD team science, when TREC I was implemented; (2) conceptual and scientific challenges inherent to efforts to achieve TD integration; (3) discipline-based differences in values, terminology, methods, and work styles; (4) project management challenges involved in TD team science; and (5) traditional incentive and reward systems that do not recognize or reward TD team science. Four main facilitating factors and strategies for success emerged: (1) beneficial attitudes and beliefs about TD research and team science; (2) effective team processes; (3) brokering and bridge-building activities by individuals holding particular roles in a research center; and (4) funding initiative characteristics that support TD team science. Broad impacts of participating in TD team science in the context of TREC I included: (1) new positive attitudes about TD research and team science; (2) new boundary-crossing collaborations; (3) scientific advances related to research approaches, findings, and dissemination; (4) institutional culture change and resource creation in support of TD team science; and (5) career advancement. Funding agencies, academic institutions, and scholarly journals can help to foster TD team science through funding opportunities, institutional policies on

  1. Cancer and African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 7 2.3 Source: NCI 2016. Seer Cancer Statistics Review, 1975-2013. Tables 2.15 through 24.15 http://seer.cancer. ... 7 1.0 Source: NCI 2016. Seer Cancer Statistics Review, 1975-2013. Tables 2.15 through 24.15 http://seer.cancer. ...

  2. Monitoring the delivery of cancer care: Commission on Cancer and National Cancer Data Base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Richelle T; Stewart, Andrew K; Winchester, David P

    2012-07-01

    The primary objective of the Commission on Cancer (CoC) is to ensure the delivery of comprehensive, high-quality care that improves survival while maintaining quality of life for patients with cancer. This article examines the initiatives of the CoC toward achieving this goal, utilizing data from the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) to monitor treatment patterns and outcomes, to develop quality measures, and to benchmark hospital performance. The article also highlights how these initiatives align with the Institute of Medicine's recommendations for improving the quality of cancer care and briefly explores future projects of the CoC and NCDB. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. U.S. and Peru Formalize Alliance in Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Center for Global Health (CGH) had the pleasure of welcoming a delegation of health officials from the Government of Peru for the signing of a memorandum of understanding (MOU) between the U.S. and Peru.

  4. NCI Think Tank Concerning the Identifiability of Biospecimens and “-Omic” Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weil, Carol J.; Mechanic, Leah E.; Green, Tiffany; Kinsinger, Christopher; Lockhart, Nicole C.; Nelson, Stefanie A.; Rodriguez, Laura L.; Buccini, Laura D.

    2014-01-01

    On June 11 and 12, 2012, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) hosted a think tank concerning the identifiability of biospecimens and “omic” Data in order to explore challenges surrounding this complex and multifaceted topic. The think tank brought together forty-six leaders from several fields, including cancer genomics, bioinformatics, human subject protection, patient advocacy, and commercial genetics. The first day involved presentations regarding the state of the science of re-identification; current and proposed regulatory frameworks for assessing identifiability; developments in law, industry and biotechnology; and the expectations of patients and research participants. The second day was spent by think tank participants in small break-out groups designed to address specific sub-topics under the umbrella issue of identifiability, including considerations for the development of best practices for data sharing and consent, and targeted opportunities for further empirical research. We describe the outcomes of this two day meeting, including two complimentary themes that emerged from moderated discussions following the presentations on Day 1, and ideas presented for further empirical research to discern the preferences and concerns of research participants about data sharing and individual identifiability. PMID:23579437

  5. 77 FR 55091 - National Childhood Cancer Awareness Month, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-06

    ... be done, our Nation has come far in the fight to understand, treat, and control childhood cancer... cancer and work to ease the burdens they face. Under the Affordable Care Act, insurance companies can no... they drop coverage because a child is diagnosed with cancer. The law also bans insurers from placing a...

  6. Danusertib, a potent pan-Aurora kinase and ABL kinase inhibitor, induces cell cycle arrest and programmed cell death and inhibits epithelial to mesenchymal transition involving the PI3K/Akt/mTOR-mediated signaling pathway in human gastric cancer AGS and NCI-N78 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan CX

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Chun-Xiu Yuan,1,2 Zhi-Wei Zhou,2,3 Yin-Xue Yang,4 Zhi-Xu He,3 Xueji Zhang,5 Dong Wang,6 Tianxing Yang,7 Si-Yuan Pan,8 Xiao-Wu Chen,9 Shu-Feng Zhou2 1Department of Oncology, General Hospital, Ningxia Medical University, Yinchuan, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Pharmaceutical Science, College of Pharmacy, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA; 3Guizhou Provincial Key Laboratory for Regenerative Medicine, Stem Cell and Tissue Engineering Research Center and Sino-US Joint Laboratory for Medical Sciences, Guiyang Medical University, Guiyang, 4Department of Colorectal Surgery, General Hospital, Ningxia Medical University, Yinchuan, 5Research Center for Bioengineering and Sensing Technology, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 6Cancer Center, Daping Hospital and Research Institute of Surgery, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, People’s Republic of China; 7Department of Internal Medicine, University of Utah and Salt Lake Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Salt Lake City, UT, USA; 8Department of Pharmacology, School of Chinese Materia Medica, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, 9Department of General Surgery, The First People’s Hospital of Shunde, Southern Medical University, Shunde, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide, with a poor response to current chemotherapy. Danusertib is a pan-inhibitor of the Aurora kinases and a third-generation Bcr-Abl tyrosine kinase inhibitor with potent anticancer effects, but its antitumor effect and underlying mechanisms in the treatment of human gastric cancer are unknown. This study aimed to investigate the effects of danusertib on cell growth, apoptosis, autophagy, and epithelial to mesenchymal transition and the molecular mechanisms involved in human gastric cancer AGS and NCI-N78 cells. The results showed that danusertib had potent growth-inhibitory, apoptosis-inducing, and

  7. Applied Proteogenomics OrganizationaL Learning and Outcomes (APOLLO) Network | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    July 11, 2016 — In the spirit of collaboration inspired by the Vice President’s Cancer Moonshot, the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), the Department of Defense (DoD), and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) are proud to announce a new tri-agency coalition that will help cancer patients by enabling their oncologists to more rapidly and accurately identify effective drugs to treat cancer based on a patient’s unique proteogenomic profile.

  8. Evaluation of the UF/NCI hybrid computational phantoms for use in organ dosimetry of pediatric patients undergoing fluoroscopically guided cardiac procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Emily L.; Borrego, David; Tran, Trung; Fudge, James C.; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2018-03-01

    Epidemiologic data demonstrate that pediatric patients face a higher relative risk of radiation induced cancers than their adult counterparts at equivalent exposures. Infants and children with congenital heart defects are a critical patient population exposed to ionizing radiation during life-saving procedures. These patients will likely incur numerous procedures throughout their lifespan, each time increasing their cumulative radiation absorbed dose. As continued improvements in long-term prognosis of congenital heart defect patients is achieved, a better understanding of organ radiation dose following treatment becomes increasingly vital. Dosimetry of these patients can be accomplished using Monte Carlo radiation transport simulations, coupled with modern anatomical patient models. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of the University of Florida/National Cancer Institute (UF/NCI) pediatric hybrid computational phantom library for organ dose assessment of patients that have undergone fluoroscopically guided cardiac catheterizations. In this study, two types of simulations were modeled. A dose assessment was performed on 29 patient-specific voxel phantoms (taken as representing the patient’s true anatomy), height/weight-matched hybrid library phantoms, and age-matched reference phantoms. Two exposure studies were conducted for each phantom type. First, a parametric study was constructed by the attending pediatric interventional cardiologist at the University of Florida to model the range of parameters seen clinically. Second, four clinical cardiac procedures were simulated based upon internal logfiles captured by a Toshiba Infinix-i Cardiac Bi-Plane fluoroscopic unit. Performance of the phantom library was quantified by computing both the percent difference in individual organ doses, as well as the organ dose root mean square values for overall phantom assessment between the matched phantoms (UF/NCI library or reference) and the patient

  9. Cancer Genetics Services Directory

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Services Directory Cancer Prevention Overview Research NCI Cancer Genetics Services Directory This directory lists professionals who provide services related to cancer genetics (cancer risk assessment, genetic counseling, genetic susceptibility testing, ...

  10. Summary and recommendations of a National Cancer Institute workshop on issues limiting the clinical use of Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithms for megavoltage external beam radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraass, Benedick A.; Smathers, James; Deye, James

    2003-01-01

    Due to the significant interest in Monte Carlo dose calculations for external beam megavoltage radiation therapy from both the research and commercial communities, a workshop was held in October 2001 to assess the status of this computational method with regard to use for clinical treatment planning. The Radiation Research Program of the National Cancer Institute, in conjunction with the Nuclear Data and Analysis Group at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, gathered a group of experts in clinical radiation therapy treatment planning and Monte Carlo dose calculations, and examined issues involved in clinical implementation of Monte Carlo dose calculation methods in clinical radiotherapy. The workshop examined the current status of Monte Carlo algorithms, the rationale for using Monte Carlo, algorithmic concerns, clinical issues, and verification methodologies. Based on these discussions, the workshop developed recommendations for future NCI-funded research and development efforts. This paper briefly summarizes the issues presented at the workshop and the recommendations developed by the group

  11. Other Considerations for Pregnancy and Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Approvals Annual Reporting & Auditing Grant Transfer Grant Closeout Contracts & Small Business Training Cancer Training at NCI (Intramural) ... History Committees of Interest Legislative Resources Recent Public Laws Contact Overview & Mission History of NCI Contributing to ...

  12. National use of total hip arthroplasty among patients with a history of breast, lung, prostate, colon or bladder cancer-an analysis of the Medicare population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas, Samuel; Sabeh, Karim; Kurowicki, Jennifer; Buller, Leonard; Law, Tsun Yee; Roche, Martin; Conway, Sheila; Hernandez, Victor H

    2017-12-01

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) is a common and growing procedure in the United States. Concomitantly, there has been a rise in patients diagnosed with certain types of malignancies including solid organ ones. Unfortunately there is limited data available in the literature that describes the use of THA in patients who concomitantly have one of these forms of cancer. Because of the limited data available in the literature regarding this topic, the purpose of this study was to analyze the trends in use of THA among patients with the five most common malignancies in the United States, which include breast, lung, prostate, colon and bladder cancer according to the National Cancer Institute (NCI). We conducted a retrospective review of the entire Medicare patient population to analyze the use of THA in patients with a diagnosis of solid organ malignancy including breast, lung, prostate, colon and bladder cancer. Our analysis of over 14 million patients, demonstrate that THA is not as commonly performed procedure in patients with such diagnoses with a 0.26% prevalence. The mean incidence of THA was 0.29%, 0.17%, 0.31%, 0.33% and 0.36% for patients with breast, lung, prostate, colon and bladder cancer respectively. THA in cancer patients are not frequently performed but the use of this technique has increased significantly in patients with lung, prostate and bladder cancer.

  13. CLINICAL FEATURES AND CLINICAL OUTCOME OF ACUTE PROMYELOCYTIC LEUKEMIA PATIENTS TREATED AT CAIRO NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE IN EGYPT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ola Khorshid

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The current study reports the clinical features and treatment outcome of 67 patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL presented to National Cancer Institute (NCI-Cairo, in Egypt from January 2007 to January 2011. The median follow-up time was 36 months. All patients were treated with the simultaneous administration of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA and anthracyclin. The treatment protocol was modified due to resource limitations at the NCI-Cairo by replacing of idarubicin with doxorubicin in most of the cases and the inclusion of cytarbine during the consolidation phase only in pediatric patients. All patients who achieved molecular complete remission (CRm after consolidation received two-year maintenance treatment with low dose chemotherapy composed of 6 mercaptopurine, methotrexate and intermittent ATRA courses. The median age at presentation was 29 years. There was a slight male predominance (53%.  Bleeding was the most common presenting symptom (79%. Most patients had an intermediate risk Sanz score (49% and 34% had a high risk score.  All patients achieved molecular CR at end of consolidation therapy with a median duration of 100 days. The main therapeutic complications during the induction phase were febrile neutropenia (42%, bleeding (18% and differentiation syndrome (11%. Five patients died at diagnosis due to bleeding, three died during induction chemotherapy due to febrile neutropenia (n=2 and bleeding (n=1 and one patient died during consolidation therapy due to febrile neutropenia.  The 3-year OS was 89% and relapse rate was 3%. Adapting standard AIDA treatment protocols to limited resources by reducing dose-intensity during treatment consolidation, using ATRA in the consolidation phase and alternative anthracyclin (doxorubicin may be a valid treatment option in developing countries. In spite of the increased incidence of high and intermediate risk score APL in our sample, we reported an acceptable CR rate, toxicity and OS.

  14. A Comprehensive Infrastructure for Big Data in Cancer Research: Accelerating Cancer Research and Precision Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izumi V. Hinkson

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Advancements in next-generation sequencing and other -omics technologies are accelerating the detailed molecular characterization of individual patient tumors, and driving the evolution of precision medicine. Cancer is no longer considered a single disease, but rather, a diverse array of diseases wherein each patient has a unique collection of germline variants and somatic mutations. Molecular profiling of patient-derived samples has led to a data explosion that could help us understand the contributions of environment and germline to risk, therapeutic response, and outcome. To maximize the value of these data, an interdisciplinary approach is paramount. The National Cancer Institute (NCI has initiated multiple projects to characterize tumor samples using multi-omic approaches. These projects harness the expertise of clinicians, biologists, computer scientists, and software engineers to investigate cancer biology and therapeutic response in multidisciplinary teams. Petabytes of cancer genomic, transcriptomic, epigenomic, proteomic, and imaging data have been generated by these projects. To address the data analysis challenges associated with these large datasets, the NCI has sponsored the development of the Genomic Data Commons (GDC and three Cloud Resources. The GDC ensures data and metadata quality, ingests and harmonizes genomic data, and securely redistributes the data. During its pilot phase, the Cloud Resources tested multiple cloud-based approaches for enhancing data access, collaboration, computational scalability, resource democratization, and reproducibility. These NCI-led efforts are continuously being refined to better support open data practices and precision oncology, and to serve as building blocks of the NCI Cancer Research Data Commons.

  15. 75 FR 56455 - National Childhood Cancer Awareness Month, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-15

    ... Part V The President Proclamation 8556--National Childhood Cancer Awareness Month, 2010 Proclamation 8557--National Historically Black Colleges and Universities Week, 2010 Proclamation 8558--National..., and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-fifth...

  16. The National LGBT Cancer Action Plan: A White Paper of the 2014 National Summit on Cancer in the LGBT Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolies, Liz; Sigurdsson, Hrafn Oli; Walland, Jonathan; Radix, Asa; Rice, David; Buchting, Francisco O.; Sanchez, Nelson F.; Bare, Michael G.; Boehmer, Ulrike; Cahill, Sean; Griebling, Tomas L.; Bruessow, Diane; Maingi, Shail

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Despite growing social acceptance of lesbians, gay men, bisexuals, and transgender (LGBT) persons and the extension of marriage rights for same-sex couples, LGBT persons experience stigma and discrimination, including within the healthcare system. Each population within the LGBT umbrella term is likely at elevated risk for cancer due to prevalent, significant cancer risk factors, such as tobacco use and human immunodeficiency virus infection; however, cancer incidence and mortality data among LGBT persons are lacking. This absence of cancer incidence data impedes research and policy development, LGBT communities' awareness and activation, and interventions to address cancer disparities. In this context, in 2014, a 2-day National Summit on Cancer in the LGBT Communities was convened by a planning committee for the purpose of accelerating progress in identifying and addressing the LGBT communities' concerns and needs in the spheres of cancer research, clinical cancer care, healthcare policy, and advocacy for cancer survivorship and LGBT health equity. Summit participants were 56 invited persons from the United States, United Kingdom, and Canada, representatives of diverse identities, experiences, and knowledge about LGBT communities and cancer. Participants shared lessons learned and identified gaps and remedies regarding LGBT cancer concerns across the cancer care continuum from prevention to survivorship. This white paper presents background on each of the Summit themes and 16 recommendations covering the following: sexual orientation and gender identity data collection in national and state health surveys and research on LGBT communities and cancer, the clinical care of LGBT persons, and the education and training of healthcare providers.

  17. Curcumin Inhibits Growth of Human NCI-H292 Lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cells by Increasing FOXA2 Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Lingling; Liu, Jinjin; Zhu, Linyun; Chen, Qingge; Meng, Ziyu; Sun, Li; Hu, Junsheng; Ni, Zhenhua; Wang, Xiongbiao

    2018-01-01

    Lung squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC) is a common histological lung cancer subtype, but unlike lung adenocarcinoma, limited therapeutic options are available for treatment. Curcumin, a natural compound, may have anticancer effects in various cancer cells, but how it may be used to treat LSCC has not been well studied. Here, we applied curcumin to a human NCI-H292 LSCC cell line to test anticancer effects and explored underlying potential mechanisms of action. Curcumin treatment inhibited NCI-H292 cell growth and increased FOXA2 expression in a time-dependent manner. FOXA2 expression was decreased in LSCC tissues compared with adjacent normal tissues and knockdown of FOXA2 increased NCI-H292 cells proliferation. Inhibition of cell proliferation by curcumin was attenuated by FOXA2 knockdown. Moreover inhibition of STAT3 pathways by curcumin increased FOXA2 expression in NCI-H292 cells whereas a STAT3 activator (IL-6) significantly inhibited curcumin-induced FOXA2 expression. Also, SOCS1 and SOCS3, negative regulators of STAT3 activity, were upregulated by curcumin treatment. Thus, curcumin inhibited human NCI-H292 cells growth by increasing FOXA2 expression via regulation of STAT3 signaling pathways.

  18. Curcumin Inhibits Growth of Human NCI-H292 Lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cells by Increasing FOXA2 Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingling Tang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Lung squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC is a common histological lung cancer subtype, but unlike lung adenocarcinoma, limited therapeutic options are available for treatment. Curcumin, a natural compound, may have anticancer effects in various cancer cells, but how it may be used to treat LSCC has not been well studied. Here, we applied curcumin to a human NCI-H292 LSCC cell line to test anticancer effects and explored underlying potential mechanisms of action. Curcumin treatment inhibited NCI-H292 cell growth and increased FOXA2 expression in a time-dependent manner. FOXA2 expression was decreased in LSCC tissues compared with adjacent normal tissues and knockdown of FOXA2 increased NCI-H292 cells proliferation. Inhibition of cell proliferation by curcumin was attenuated by FOXA2 knockdown. Moreover inhibition of STAT3 pathways by curcumin increased FOXA2 expression in NCI-H292 cells whereas a STAT3 activator (IL-6 significantly inhibited curcumin-induced FOXA2 expression. Also, SOCS1 and SOCS3, negative regulators of STAT3 activity, were upregulated by curcumin treatment. Thus, curcumin inhibited human NCI-H292 cells growth by increasing FOXA2 expression via regulation of STAT3 signaling pathways.

  19. Evaluating compliance to Kenya national cancer guidelines on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: In Kenya, breast cancer is one of the most prevalent diseases among women. Early diagnosis and stage-directed treatment are vital in reducing morbidity and mortality associated with it. The Kenya National Cancer Guidelines (KNCG) was developed in 2013. Utility of the guidelines is expected to improve early ...

  20. Cruciferous Vegetables and Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Chronic Inflammation Common Cancer Myths and Misconceptions Diet Hormones Immunosuppression Infectious Agents Obesity Radiation Sunlight Tobacco Genetics NCI Cancer Genetics Services Directory Cancer Prevention Overview Research Cruciferous Vegetables and Cancer Prevention On This Page What are ...

  1. Lisa B Signorello, ScD, ScM | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisa Signorello is the Director and Chief of the Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program (CPFP) Branch in the National Cancer Institute's Division of Cancer Prevention. Dr. Signorello served as Deputy Director of the CPFP from August 2014 to November 2017 and came to the NCI after having held academic positions at the Harvard School of Public Health, Harvard Medical School, and Vanderbilt University, as well as having had significant private sector research experience. |

  2. Provocative questions in cancer epidemiology in a time of scientific innovation and budgetary constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Tram Kim; Schully, Sheri D; Rogers, Scott D; Benkeser, Rachel; Reid, Britt; Khoury, Muin J

    2013-04-01

    In a time of scientific and technological developments and budgetary constraints, the National Cancer Institute's (NCI) Provocative Questions Project offers a novel funding mechanism for cancer epidemiologists. We reviewed the purposes underlying the Provocative Questions Project, present information on the contributions of epidemiologic research to the current Provocative Questions portfolio, and outline opportunities that the cancer epidemiology community might capitalize on to advance a research agenda that spans a translational continuum from scientific discoveries to population health impact.

  3. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... NCI Funding for Cancer Training Building a Diverse Workforce Other Fellowships and Internships About Center for Cancer ... Funding for Cancer Training (Extramural) Building a Diverse Workforce Other Fellowships & Internships Training Program Contacts News & Events ...

  4. Cancer Nanotechnology Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Nanotechnology Plan serves as a strategic document to the NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer as well as a guiding document to the cancer nanotechnology and oncology fields, as a whole.

  5. 77 FR 2734 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request: Solar Cell: A Mobile UV Manager for Smart Phones (NCI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-19

    ... Manager for Smart Phones (NCI). Type of Information Collection Request: New. Need and Use of Information... sunlight, a primary cause of skin cancer. The purpose of this part of the study is to produce, deploy, and... Table below). There are no Capital Costs, Operating Costs, and/or Maintenance Costs to report. A.12-1...

  6. Evaluation of the UF/NCI hybrid computational phantoms for use in organ dosimetry of pediatric patients undergoing fluoroscopically guided cardiac procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Emily L; Borrego, David; Tran, Trung; Fudge, James C; Bolch, Wesley E

    2018-03-01

    Epidemiologic data demonstrate that pediatric patients face a higher relative risk of radiation induced cancers than their adult counterparts at equivalent exposures. Infants and children with congenital heart defects are a critical patient population exposed to ionizing radiation during life-saving procedures. These patients will likely incur numerous procedures throughout their lifespan, each time increasing their cumulative radiation absorbed dose. As continued improvements in long-term prognosis of congenital heart defect patients is achieved, a better understanding of organ radiation dose following treatment becomes increasingly vital. Dosimetry of these patients can be accomplished using Monte Carlo radiation transport simulations, coupled with modern anatomical patient models. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of the University of Florida/National Cancer Institute (UF/NCI) pediatric hybrid computational phantom library for organ dose assessment of patients that have undergone fluoroscopically guided cardiac catheterizations. In this study, two types of simulations were modeled. A dose assessment was performed on 29 patient-specific voxel phantoms (taken as representing the patient's true anatomy), height/weight-matched hybrid library phantoms, and age-matched reference phantoms. Two exposure studies were conducted for each phantom type. First, a parametric study was constructed by the attending pediatric interventional cardiologist at the University of Florida to model the range of parameters seen clinically. Second, four clinical cardiac procedures were simulated based upon internal logfiles captured by a Toshiba Infinix-i Cardiac Bi-Plane fluoroscopic unit. Performance of the phantom library was quantified by computing both the percent difference in individual organ doses, as well as the organ dose root mean square values for overall phantom assessment between the matched phantoms (UF/NCI library or reference) and the patient

  7. National and international guidelines for rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Liv Bjerre Juul; Wille-Jørgensen, P

    2014-01-01

    concerning the definition of rectal cancer. Ten of the 11 guidelines use the TNM staging system and there was general agreement regarding the recommendation of MRI and CT in rectal cancer. There was consensus concerning a multidisciplinary approach, preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and total mesorectal...... but not all considered the level of evidence. CONCLUSION: The intention of the study was to provide an overview of international guidelines for rectal cancer based on the underlying evidence, but despite hard evidence it was very difficult to reach general conclusions. Despite much knowledge...

  8. Trends in intensity modulated radiation therapy use for locally advanced rectal cancer at National Comprehensive Cancer Network centers

    OpenAIRE

    Marsha Reyngold, MD, PhD; Joyce Niland, PhD; Anna ter Veer, MS; Tanios Bekaii-Saab, MD; Lily Lai, MD; Joshua E. Meyer, MD; Steven J. Nurkin, MD, MS; Deborah Schrag, MD, MPH; John M. Skibber, MD, FACS; Al B. Benson, MD; Martin R. Weiser, MD; Christopher H. Crane, MD; Karyn A. Goodman, MD, MS

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has been rapidly incorporated into clinical practice because of its technological advantages over 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (CRT). We characterized trends in IMRT utilization in trimodality treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer at National Comprehensive Cancer Network cancer centers between 2005 and 2011. Methods and materials: Using the prospective National Comprehensive Cancer Network Colorectal Cancer Database, ...

  9. Essential medicines for cancer: WHO recommendations and national priorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Jane; Barr, Ronald; Shulman, Lawrence N; Forte, Gilles B; Magrini, Nicola

    2016-10-01

    To examine, for essential anti-cancer medicines, the alignment of national lists of essential medicines and national reimbursable medicines lists with the World Health Organization's (WHO's) Model Lists. National medicine lists for 135 countries with per-capita gross national incomes below 25 000 United States dollars in 2015 were compared with WHO's 2013 and 2015 Model Lists of Essential Medicines. Correlations between numbers of anti-cancer medicines included in national lists and gross national income (GNI), government health expenditure and number of physicians per 1000 population were evaluated. Of the 25 anti-cancer medicines on the 2013 Model List and the 16 added via the 2015 revision of the Model List, 0-25 (median: 17) and 0-15 (median: 3) appeared in national lists, respectively. There was considerable variability in these numbers within and between World Bank income groups. Of the 16 new medicines included in the 2015 Model List, for example, 0-10 (median: 1) and 2-15 (median: 10) were included in the national lists of low-income and high-income countries, respectively. The numbers of these new medicines included in national lists were significantly correlated ( P  ≤ 0.0001) with per-capita GNI ( r  = 0.45), per-capita annual government health expenditure ( r  = 0.33) and number of physicians per 1000 population ( r  = 0.48). Twenty-one countries (16%) included the targeted anti-cancer medicines imatinib, rituximab and trastuzumab in their national lists. Substantial numbers of anti-cancer medicines are included in national lists of low- and middle-income countries but the availability, affordability, accessibility and administration feasibility of these medicines, at country-level, need assessment.

  10. 78 FR 8156 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute... proposals. Place: Bethesda North Marriott Hotel & Conference Center, Montgomery County Conference Center... Institute, NIH, 6116 Executive Blvd., Suite 703, Room 7072, Bethesda, md 20892-8329, 301-594-1408, Stoicaa2...

  11. 77 FR 68136 - National Cancer Institute Amended; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-15

    ... Regency Bethesda Hotel, Old Georgetown Room, One Metro Center, Bethesda, MD 20814. The NCAB ad hoc... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute..., Building 31C, Wing C, Conference Room 10, 31 Center Drive, Bethesda, MD 20892 which was published in the...

  12. Co-Development Agreements | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute's TTC uses three different co-development agreements to help industry and academia interact and partner with National Institutes of Health laboratories and scientists to support technology development activities.

  13. Developing National Cancer Registration in Developing Countries- Case Study of the Nigerian National System of Cancer Registries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elima E Jedy-Agba

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The epidemiologic transition in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA has given rise to a concomitant increase in the incidence of non-communicable diseases including cancers. Worldwide, cancer registries have been shown to be critical for the determination of cancer burden, conduct of research, and in the planning and implementation of cancer control measures. Cancer registration though vital is often neglected in SSA owing to competing demands for resources for healthcare.We report the implementation of a system for representative nation-wide cancer registration in Nigeria - the Nigerian National System of Cancer Registries (NSCR. The NSCR coordinates the activities of cancer registries in Nigeria, strengthens existing registries, establishes new registries, complies and analyses data, and makes these freely available to researchers and policy makers. We highlight the key challenges encountered in implementing this strategy and how they were overcome. This report serves as a guide for other low and middle income countries (LMIC wishing to expand cancer registration coverage in their countries and highlights the training, mentoring, scientific and logistic support, and advocacy that are crucial to sustaining cancer registration programs in LMIC

  14. Possible new treatment for Kaposi sarcoma | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    A collaborative effort by researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and Celgene Corporation, a global biopharmaceutical company, has yielded a possible new treatment for Kaposi sarcoma (KS), a cancer caused by a human gammaherpesvirus. The drug, called pomalidomide, is highly effective against KS and has fewer side effects compared with chemotherapy, suggesting that it may be a useful alternative to traditional therapies. Read more...

  15. Cancer Incidence in Egypt: Results of the National Population-Based Cancer Registry Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal S. Ibrahim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This paper aims to present cancer incidence rates at national and regional level of Egypt, based upon results of National Cancer Registry Program (NCRP. Methods. NCRP stratified Egypt into 3 geographical strata: lower, middle, and upper. One governorate represented each region. Abstractors collected data from medical records of cancer centers, national tertiary care institutions, Health Insurance Organization, Government-Subsidized Treatment Program, and death records. Data entry was online. Incidence rates were calculated at a regional and a national level. Future projection up to 2050 was also calculated. Results. Age-standardized incidence rates per 100,000 were 166.6 (both sexes, 175.9 (males, and 157.0 (females. Commonest sites were liver (23.8%, breast (15.4%, and bladder (6.9% (both sexes: liver (33.6% and bladder (10.7% among men, and breast (32.0% and liver (13.5% among women. By 2050, a 3-fold increase in incident cancer relative to 2013 was estimated. Conclusion. These data are the only available cancer rates at national and regional levels of Egypt. The pattern of cancer indicated the increased burden of liver cancer. Breast cancer occupied the second rank. Study of rates of individual sites of cancer might help in giving clues for preventive programs.

  16. Global Cancer Humanitarian Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pat Garcia-Gonzalez of the Max Foundation accepted the first annual NCI Global Cancer Medicine Humanitarian Award for her work in chronic myeloid leukemia at the NCI, Center for Global Health Symposium for Global Cancer Research, held in Boston on March 25, 2015.

  17. Conducting Cancer Control and Survivorship Research via Cooperative Groups: A Report from the American Society of Preventive Oncology

    OpenAIRE

    Palesh, Oxana; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Mustian, Karen; Minasian, Lori; Rowland, Julia; Sprod, Lisa; Janelsins, Michelle; Peppone, Luke; Sloan, Jeff; Engquist, Karen Basen; Jones, Lee; Buist, Diana; Paskett, Electra

    2011-01-01

    As the number of cancer survivors expands, the need for cancer control and survivorship research becomes increasingly important. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cooperative Groups may offer a viable platform to perform such research. Observational, preventive, and behavioral research can often be performed within the cooperative group setting, especially if resources needed for evaluation are fairly simple, if protocols are easily implemented within the typical clinical setting, and if in...

  18. Time to definitive diagnosis of breast cancer in Latina and non-Hispanic white women: the six cities study

    OpenAIRE

    Ramirez, Amelie G; P?rez-Stable, Eliseo J; Talavera, Gregory A; Penedo, Frank J; Carrillo, J Emilio; Fernandez, Maria E; Mu?oz, Edgar; Long Parma, Dorothy; Holden, Alan EC; San Miguel de Majors, Sandra; N?poles, Anna; Casta?eda, Sheila F; Gallion, Kipling J

    2013-01-01

    Time delay after an abnormal screening mammogram may have a critical impact on tumor size, stage at diagnosis, treatment, prognosis, and survival of subsequent breast cancer. This study was undertaken to evaluate disparities between Latina and non-Hispanic white (NHW) women in time to definitive diagnosis of breast cancer after an abnormal screening mammogram, as well as factors contributing to such disparities. As part of the activities of the National Cancer Institute (NCI)-funded Redes En ...

  19. Monitoring of people and workers exposure to the electric, magnetic and electromagnetic fields in an Italian National Cancer Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Nallo, Anna Maria; Strigari, Lidia; Giliberti, Claudia; Bedini, Angelico; Palomba, Raffaele; Benassi, Marcello

    2008-07-03

    The paper reports the electric, magnetic and electromagnetic fields (emf) measurements carried out in the Regina Elena National Cancer Institute (NCI). Several devices, used in diagnostics and in medical cures, can represent sources of emf for the workers and for the public subjected to the treatments. The aim is to evaluate their exposition, in order to assess the compliance with the law. The investigations have been carried out in the departments of: intensive care, physiotherapy, MR presstherapy and in the surgical rooms. The measurements have been performed using broad band probes in the frequency ranges 5 Hz/30 kHz and 100 kHz-3 GHz. The variability of the magnetic induction (B(microT)) levels is between 0,05 microT and 80 microT. The statistical distribution shows that most of the measurements are in the range 0,05oncological patients; their long stay near the equipments and their day-long exposure represent additional risk factors for which a prudent avoidance strategy have to de adopted.

  20. Auditing the NCI thesaurus with semantic web technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mougin, Fleur; Bodenreider, Olivier

    2008-11-06

    Auditing biomedical terminologies often results in the identification of inconsistencies and thus helps to improve their quality. In this paper, we present a method based on Semantic Web technologies for auditing biomedical terminologies and apply it to the NCI thesaurus. We stored the NCI thesaurus concepts and their properties in an RDF triple store. By querying this store, we assessed the consistency of both hierarchical and associative relations from the NCI thesaurus among themselves and with corresponding relations in the UMLS Semantic Network. We show that the consistency is better for associative relations than for hierarchical relations. Causes for inconsistency and benefits from using Semantic Web technologies for auditing purposes are discussed.

  1. 77 FR 19024 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-29

    ...). Contact Person: Lalita D. Palekar, Ph.D. Scientific Review Officer Special Review and Logistics Branch... Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20814. Contact Person: Robert Bird, Ph.D., Chief, Resources and Training Review... Institute Special Emphasis Panel; NCI SPORE in Lymphoma, Leukemia, Brain, Esophageal and Gastrointestinal...

  2. Reflections on a career and on the history of genetic toxicity testing in the National Toxicology Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiger, Errol

    2017-07-01

    One of the highly visible aspects of the U.S. National Toxicology Program (NTP) has been its genetic toxicity testing program, which has been responsible for testing, and making publicly available, in vitro and in vivo test data on thousands of chemicals since 1979. What is less well known, however, is that this NTP program had its origin in two separate testing programs that were initiated independently at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) before the NTP was established. The NCI program was in response to the 1971 National Cancer Act which dramatically increased the NCI budget. In contrast, the NIEHS testing program can be traced back to a publication by Bruce Ames, not the one describing the mutagenicity assay he developed that became known as the Ames test, but because in 1975 he published an article showing that hair dyes were mutagenic. The protocols developed for these NCI contracts became the basis for the NTP Salmonella testing contracts that were awarded a few years later. These protocols, with their supporting NTP data, strongly influenced the initial in vitro OECD Test Guidelines. The background and evolution of the NTP genetic toxicity testing program is described, along with some of the more significant milestone discoveries and accomplishments from this program. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Drugs Approved for Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for skin cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  4. Drugs Approved for Bone Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for bone cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  5. Drugs Approved for Esophageal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for esophageal cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  6. Drugs Approved for Endometrial Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for endometrial cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  7. Drugs Approved for Vulvar Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for vulvar cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  8. The growth and maturation of the National Cancer Data Base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menck, H R; Cunningham, M P; Jessup, J M; Eyre, H J; Winchester, D P; Scott-Conner, C E; Murphy, G P

    1997-12-15

    The National Cancer Data Base (NCDB), a joint project of the Commission on Cancer of the American College of Surgeons and the American Cancer Society, is a cancer management and outcomes data base for health care organizations. It provides a comparative summary of patient care that is used by communities and participating hospitals for self-assessment. The most current (1994) data are described here. Six calls for data have yielded a total of 4,580,000 cases for the years 1985-1994. A total of 1735 hospital cancer registries have each participated in at least one of the calls for data. Summing the last year's report from each of the 1227 hospitals that participated in 1994, the cases represent the equivalent of 57% of the estimated 1994 U.S. cancer cases. These data were received from all six regions of the country, including all 50 states. Ninety-seven percent of patients received all or part of their treatment at the reporting hospital. The four most common cancers are carcinomas of the breast (15.7%), lung (14.3%), prostate (13.1%), and colon (7.7%), and collectively they comprise a majority of new cases. The NCDB is a cancer management and outcomes data base for health care organizations that currently provides data on 57% of the estimated new cases in the U.S. Past data have been used extensively to assess patterns of care and outcomes.

  9. Estimation of National Colorectal-Cancer Incidence Using Claims Databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Quantin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of the study was to assess the accuracy of the colorectal-cancer incidence estimated from administrative data. Methods. We selected potential incident colorectal-cancer cases in 2004-2005 French administrative data, using two alternative algorithms. The first was based only on diagnostic and procedure codes, whereas the second considered the past history of the patient. Results of both methods were assessed against two corresponding local cancer registries, acting as “gold standards.” We then constructed a multivariable regression model to estimate the corrected total number of incident colorectal-cancer cases from the whole national administrative database. Results. The first algorithm provided an estimated local incidence very close to that given by the regional registries (646 versus 645 incident cases and had good sensitivity and positive predictive values (about 75% for both. The second algorithm overestimated the incidence by about 50% and had a poor positive predictive value of about 60%. The estimation of national incidence obtained by the first algorithm differed from that observed in 14 registries by only 2.34%. Conclusion. This study shows the usefulness of administrative databases for countries with no national cancer registry and suggests a method for correcting the estimates provided by these data.

  10. Methodology of Establishing and Identifying NCI-H2228/Crizotinib-resistant Cell Lines In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di WU

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective The mechanisms of small molecule targeting drug resistance and ways to overcome resistance are now both urgent need to improve the clinical efficacy. This study aimed to investigate the feasibility of using different methods to establish the crizotinib-resistant non-small cell lung cancer NCI-H2228/Crizotinib cell lines and to clarify the mechanisms of resistance to small molecule targeting drug, thus providing experimental and theoretical bases for further studies to overcome the mechanisms of Crizotinib resistance. Methods The study utilized stepwise increase of drug concentrations and chemical mutagen to induce Crizotinib-resistant NCI-H2228 cells. The drug 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50 values of parental and resistant cells and the population doubling time were determined by MTT assay. The echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (EML4-ALK expression was evaluated by RT-PCR and Western blot. Full-length sequencing method was used to compare the EML4-ALK genes in the parent and drug-resistant cells and analyze the mechanisms of drug resistance. Results The method of gradually increasing drug concentration to induce Crizotinib-resistant NCI-H2228 cells was time-consuming because the cell growth recovery was extremely slow. Thus, this method was considered invalid. However, chemical mutagen ENU can effectively induce NCI-H2228 cells resistant to crizotinib in a short time [IC50]= (3.810±1.100 μmol/L, P=0.002,9 vs parental cells]. Furthermore, the gene mutation frequency of EML4-ALK in the resistant cells was significantly higher than that in the parent cells. Conclusion Chemical mutagen-induced cell resistance was easily operated and had effectively shortened the experimental process. Preliminary technical methods and experimental evidence for in-depth study of drug resistance mechanisms and approaches to overcome the targeted drug resistance were also provided.

  11. Cancer risk factors and screening in First Nations in Ontario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maegan V. Mazereeuw

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A lack of identifiers in health administrative databases limits our understanding of the cancer burden in First Nations. This study compares cancer risk factors and screening between First Nations in Ontario (on and off reserve and non-Aboriginal Ontarians using two unique health surveys. Methods: We measured age-standardized prevalence estimates using the First Nations Regional Health Survey (RHS Phase 2, 2008/10 (for First Nations on reserve and the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS, 2007–2013 (for First Nations off reserve and non-Aboriginal Ontarians. We used prevalence rate ratios (RR and Pearson’s chisquare tests for differences in proportions to compare estimates between First Nations (on and off reserve and non-Aboriginal Ontarians. Results: A higher proportion of First Nation men, women and adolescents on reserve smoked (RR = 1.97, 2.78 and 7.21 respectively and were obese (RR = 1.73, 2.33 and 3.29 respectively compared to their non-Aboriginal counterparts. Similar patterns were observed for First Nations off reserve. Frequent binge drinking was also more prevalent among First Nation men and women living on reserve (RR = 1.28 and 2.22, respectively and off reserve (RR = 1.70 and 1.45, respectively than non-Aboriginal Ontarians. First Nation men and women on reserve were about half as likely to consume fruit at least twice per day and vegetables at least twice per day compared to non-Aboriginal men and women (RR = 0.53 and 0.54, respectively. Pap test uptake was similar across all groups, while First Nation women on reserve were less likely to have had a mammogram in the last five years than non-Aboriginal women (RR = 0.85. Conclusion: First Nations, especially those living on reserve, have an increased risk for cancer and other chronic diseases compared to non-Aboriginal Ontarians. These results provide evidence to support policies and programs to reduce the future burden of cancer and other chronic diseases in

  12. GPU accelerated implementation of NCI calculations using promolecular density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubez, Gaëtan; Etancelin, Jean-Matthieu; Vigouroux, Xavier; Krajecki, Michael; Boisson, Jean-Charles; Hénon, Eric

    2017-05-30

    The NCI approach is a modern tool to reveal chemical noncovalent interactions. It is particularly attractive to describe ligand-protein binding. A custom implementation for NCI using promolecular density is presented. It is designed to leverage the computational power of NVIDIA graphics processing unit (GPU) accelerators through the CUDA programming model. The code performances of three versions are examined on a test set of 144 systems. NCI calculations are particularly well suited to the GPU architecture, which reduces drastically the computational time. On a single compute node, the dual-GPU version leads to a 39-fold improvement for the biggest instance compared to the optimal OpenMP parallel run (C code, icc compiler) with 16 CPU cores. Energy consumption measurements carried out on both CPU and GPU NCI tests show that the GPU approach provides substantial energy savings. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. ICAM-3, radiation resistance gene, activates PI3K/Akt-CREB-MMPs pathway and promotes migration/invasion of the human non-small cell lung cancer cell NCI-H1299

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jong Kuk; Park, Seon Ho; Hong, Sung Hee; Um, Hong Duck; Yoo, Young Do

    2008-01-01

    Cancer cell is characterized by various distinctive functions difference from normal cell. The one of specific properties of cancer is invasion and metastasis. Invasion and metastasis is a multi-step process involving over-expression of proteolytic enzymes such as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and critically dependent on the ability of cells to move away from the primary tumor to gain access to the vascular or lymphatic systems which disperses cells to distant sites, where they can grow in a permissive microenvironment at a secondary location. All of these processes are critically dependent upon the ability of cancer cells to breach the basement membrane and to migrate through neighboring tissues. Cancer cell invasion is an important, tightly regulated process that is related with development, immune response and wound healing. This invasive response is dependent on activation of signaling pathways that result in both short-term and long-term cellular responses. The gene expressions of the cancer cell invasion related-proteolytic enzymes are regulated at the transcriptional level (through AP-1 and NF-kB via mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and PI3K-Akt pathways) and post-transcriptional levels, and the protein level via their activators or inhibitors, and their cell surface localization. Therefore, the related proteins such as MMPs, MAPK, PI3K, Akt and their regulatory pathway have been considered as promising targets for anti-cancer drugs. In previous reports, Intercellular adherin molecule-3 (ICAM-3) showed increase of radio-resistance and proliferation. We have made ICAM-3 overexpressed cancer cells which shows elevated level of invasion compared with normal cancer cells and its invasion capacity was down regulated with treatment of specific inhibitor for PI3K. These results suggest that ICAM-3 related invasion is associated with PI3K signaling pathway

  14. National cancer control programmes: policies and managerial guidelines

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2002-01-01

    ..., and immunizing against viral hepatitis B. Early detection, and therefore prompt treatment, of a further one-third of cases is possible where resources allow. Effective techniques are sufficiently well established to permit comprehensive palliative care for the remaining, more advanced, cases. The establishment of a national cancer ...

  15. 76 FR 11800 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-03

    ... Emphasis Panel; Biosensors for Early Cancer Detection and Risk Assessment. Date: March 29, 2011. Time: 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate contract proposals. Place: National Institutes of Health...: Lalita D. Palekar, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, Special Review and Logistics Branch, Division of...

  16. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... at NCI Funding for Cancer Training Building a Diverse Workforce Other Fellowships and Internships About Center for ... Intramural) Funding for Cancer Training (Extramural) Building a Diverse Workforce Other Fellowships & Internships Training Program Contacts News & ...

  17. Statins and Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cell membrane integrity, cell signaling, protein synthesis, and cell cycle progression, all of which are potential areas of intervention to arrest the cancer process. What are the ... at the NCI Division of Cancer Prevention Web site at http://prevention. ...

  18. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Your Award Grants Management Contacts Monitoring Prior Approvals Annual Reporting and Auditing Transfer of a Grant Grant Closeout Training Cancer Training at NCI Funding for Cancer Training ...

  19. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of Discovery Research Tools, Specimens, and Data Grants & Training Research Grants Funding Opportunities Research Program Contacts Funding ... and Auditing Transfer of a Grant Grant Closeout Training Cancer Training at NCI Funding for Cancer Training ...

  20. Kidney Cancer Risk Questionnaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NCI Cancer Information A to Z Treatment Roles Cancer Types Bladder Brain/Spine Breast Cervical Colorectal Esophageal Gallbladder Head/Neck Kidney Leukemia Liver Lung Lymphoma Multiple Myeloma Ovarian Pancreatic ...

  1. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Reporting & Auditing Grant Transfer Grant Closeout Contracts & Small Business Training Cancer Training at NCI (Intramural) Funding for ... her diagnosis with pancreatic cancer? No doctor is going to tell her how long she has to ...

  2. PDQ® Cancer Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    An NCI database that contains the latest information about cancer treatment, screening, prevention, genetics, supportive care, and complementary and alternative medicine, plus drug information and a dictionary of cancer terms.

  3. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Reporting & Auditing Grant Transfer Grant Closeout Contracts & Small Business Training Cancer Training at NCI (Intramural) Funding for ... Staging Prognosis Questions to Ask about ... This statistic is another method used to estimate cancer-specific survival that does ...

  4. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Reporting & Auditing Grant Transfer Grant Closeout Contracts & Small Business Training Cancer Training at NCI (Intramural) Funding for ... greatly. Also, it takes years to see the benefit of new treatments and ways of finding cancer. ...

  5. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Reporting Fellowships Events Scientific Meetings & Lectures Conferences Advisory Board Meetings Social Media Events Cancer Currents Blog All ... Multicultural Media Events Scientific Meetings & Lectures Conferences Advisory Board Meetings Social Media Cancer Currents Blog About NCI ...

  6. Research Associate | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The Cancer Research Technology Program (CRTP) develops and implements emerging technology, cancer biology expertise and research capabilities to accomplish NCI research objectives.  The CRTP is an outward-facing, multi-disciplinary hub purposed to enable the external cancer research community and provides dedicated support to NCI’s intramural Center for Cancer Research (CCR).  The dedicated units provide electron microscopy, protein characterization, protein expression, optical microscopy and nextGen sequencing. These research efforts are an integral part of CCR at the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research.  CRTP scientists also work collaboratively with intramural NCI investigators to provide research technologies and expertise. KEY ROLES/RESPONSIBILITIES We are seeking a highly motivated Research Associate II to join the newly established Single Cell Analysis Facility (SCAF) of the CCR at NCI.  The SCAF will house state of the art single cell sequencing technologies including 10xGenomics Chromium, BD Genomics Rhapsody, DEPPArray, and other emerging single cell technologies. This person will work under the guidance of SCAF senior staff to carry out single cell sequencing experiments.

  7. Use of National Comprehensive Cancer Network and Other Guidelines and Biomarkers for Colorectal Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Christina D.; Grady, William M.; Zullig, Leah L.

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains a common cancer and significant public health burden. CRC-related mortality is declining, in part due to the early detection of CRC through robust screening. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) has established CRC screening guidelines to aid healthcare providers in making appropriate recommendations for screening according to a patient’s risk of developing CRC. The purpose of this review is to describe the evolution of CRC screening guidelines for average risk individuals, discuss the role of NCCN CRC screening guidelines in cancer prevention, and comment on the current and emerging use of biomarkers for CRC screening. PMID:27799515

  8. 2017 Technology Showcase Presentations | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presentations from the 2017 Technology Showcase by NIH Intramural Research Program scientists held at Frederick National Laboratories for Cancer Research on June 7, 2017. | [google6f4cd5334ac394ab.html

  9. Palliative care content on cancer center websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vater, Laura B; Rebesco, Gina; Schenker, Yael; Torke, Alexia M; Gramelspacher, Gregory

    2018-03-01

    Professional guidelines recommend that palliative care begin early in advanced cancer management, yet integration of palliative and cancer care remains suboptimal. Cancer centers may miss opportunities to provide palliative care information online. In this study, we described the palliative care content on cancer center websites. We conducted a systematic content analysis of 62 National Cancer Institute- (NCI) designated cancer center websites. We assessed the content of center homepages and analyzed search results using the terms palliative care, supportive care, and hospice. For palliative and supportive care webpages, we assessed services offered and language used to describe care. Two researchers analyzed all websites using a standardized coding manual. Kappa values ranged from 0.78 to 1. NCI-designated cancer center homepages presented information about cancer-directed therapy (61%) more frequently than palliative care (5%). Ten percent of cancer centers had no webpage with palliative care information for patients. Among centers with information for patients, the majority (96%) defined palliative or supportive care, but 30% did not discuss delivery of palliative care alongside curative treatment, and 14% did not mention provision of care early in the disease process. Cancer center homepages rarely mention palliative care services. While the majority of centers have webpages with palliative care content, they sometimes omit information about early use of care. Improving accessibility of palliative care information and increasing emphasis on early provision of services may improve integration of palliative and cancer care.

  10. Minerals Intake Distributions in a Large Sample of Iranian at-Risk Population Using the National Cancer Institute Method: Do They Meet Their Requirements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari, Zahra; Feizi, Awat; Azadbakht, Leila; Sarrafzadegan, Nizal

    2015-01-01

    Minerals are required for the body's normal function. The current study assessed the intake distribution of minerals and estimated the prevalence of inadequacy and excess among a representative sample of healthy middle aged and elderly Iranian people. In this cross-sectional study, the second follow up to the Isfahan Cohort Study (ICS), 1922 generally healthy people aged 40 and older were investigated. Dietary intakes were collected using 24 hour recalls and two or more consecutive food records. Distribution of minerals intake was estimated using traditional (averaging dietary intake days) and National Cancer Institute (NCI) methods, and the results obtained from the two methods, were compared. The prevalence of minerals intake inadequacy or excess was estimated using the estimated average requirement (EAR) cut-point method, the probability approach and the tolerable upper intake levels (UL). There were remarkable differences between values obtained using traditional and NCI methods, particularly in the lower and upper percentiles of the estimated intake distributions. A high prevalence of inadequacy of magnesium (50 - 100 %), calcium (21 - 93 %) and zinc (30 - 55 % for males > 50 years) was observed. Significant gender differences were found regarding inadequate intakes of calcium (21 - 76 % for males vs. 45 - 93 % for females), magnesium (92 % vs. 100 %), iron (0 vs. 15 % for age group 40 - 50 years) and zinc (29 - 55 % vs. 0 %) (all; p < 0.05). Severely imbalanced intakes of magnesium, calcium and zinc were observed among the middle-aged and elderly Iranian population. Nutritional interventions and population-based education to improve healthy diets among the studied population at risk are needed.

  11. Surveillance Evaluation of the National Cancer Registry in Sabah, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffree, Saffree Mohammad; Mihat, Omar; Lukman, Khamisah Awang; Ibrahim, Mohd Yusof; Kamaludin, Fadzilah; Hassan, Mohd Rohaizat; Kaur, Nirmal; Myint, Than

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is the fourth leading cause of death in Sabah Malaysia with a reported agestandardized incidence rate was 104.9 per 100,000 in 2007. The incidence rate depends on nonmandatory notification in the registry. Underreporting will provide the false picture of cancer control program effectiveness. The present study was to evaluate the performance of the cancer registry system in terms of representativeness, data quality, simplicity, acceptability and timeliness and provision of recommendations for improvement. The evaluation was conducted among key informants in the National Cancer Registry (NCR) and reporting facilities from FebMay 2012 and was based on US CDC guidelines. Representativeness was assessed by matching cancer case in the Health Information System (HIS) and state pathology records with those in NCR. Data quality was measured through case finding and reabstracting of medical records by independent auditors. The reabstracting portion comprised 15 data items. Selfadministered questionnaires were used to assess simplicity and acceptability. Timeliness was measured from date of diagnosis to date of notification received and data dissemination. Of 4613 cancer cases reported in HIS, 83.3% were matched with cancer registry. In the state pathology centre, 99.8% was notified to registry. Duplication of notification was 3%. Data completeness calculated for 104 samples was 63.4%. Registrars perceived simplicity in coding diagnosis as moderate. Notification process was moderately acceptable. Median duration of interval 1 was 5.7 months. The performances of registry's attributes are fairly positive in terms of simplicity, case reporting sensitivity, and predictive value positive. It is moderately acceptable, data completeness and inflexible. The usefulness of registry is the area of concern to achieve registry objectives. Timeliness of reporting is within international standard, whereas timeliness to data dissemination was longer up to 4 years. Integration between

  12. Cancer research in India: national priorities, global results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Richard; Badwe, Rajendra A; Rath, Goura K; Pramesh, C S; Shanta, V; Digumarti, Raghunadharao; D'Cruz, Anil; Sharma, Suresh C; Viswanath, Lokesh; Shet, Arun; Vijayakumar, Manavalan; Lewison, Grant; Chandy, Mammen; Kulkarni, Priyadarshini; Bardia, M R; Kumar, Shaleen; Sarin, Rajiv; Sebastian, Paul; Dhillon, Preet K; Rajaraman, Preetha; Trimble, Edward L; Aggarwal, Ajay; Vijaykumar, D K; Purushotham, Arnie D

    2014-05-01

    Over the past 20 years, cancer research in India has grown in size and impact. Clinicians, scientists, and government and state policy makers in India have championed cancer research, from studies to achieve low-tech, large-scale health outcomes to some of the most advanced areas of fundamental cancer science. In this paper, we frame public policy discussions about cancer with use of an in-depth analysis of research publications from India. Cancer research in India is a complex environment that needs to balance public policy across many competing agendas. We identify major needs across these environments such as those for increased research capacity and training and protected time for clinical researchers; for more support from states and enhanced collaborative funding programmes from government; for development of national infrastructures across a range of domains (ie, clinical trials, tissue banking, registries, etc); and for a streamlined and rational regulatory environment. We also discuss improvements that should be made to translate research into improvements in cancer outcomes and public health. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Redes En Acción. Increasing Hispanic participation in cancer research, training, and awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Amelie G; Talavera, Gregory A; Marti, Jose; Penedo, Frank J; Medrano, Martha A; Giachello, Aida L; Pérez-Stable, Eliseo J

    2006-10-15

    Hispanics are affected by many health care disparities. The National Cancer Institute (NCI), through its Special Populations Branch, is supporting networking and capacity-building activities designed to increase Hispanic participation and leadership in cancer research. Redes En Acción established a national network of cancer research centers, community-based organizations, and federal partners to facilitate opportunities for junior Hispanic scientists to participate in training and research projects on cancer control. Since 2000, Redes En Acción has established a network of more than 1800 Hispanic leaders involved in cancer research and education. The project has sustained 131 training positions and submitted 29 pilot projects to NCI for review, with 16 awards for a total of $800,000, plus an additional $8.8 million in competing grant funding based on pilot study results to date. Independent research has leveraged an additional $32 million in non-Redes funding, and together the national and regional network sites have participated in more than 1400 community and professional awareness events. In addition, the program conducted extensive national survey research that provided the basis for the Redes En Acción Latino Cancer Report, a national agenda on Hispanic cancer issues. Redes En Acción has increased participation in cancer control research, training, and awareness among Hispanic scientists and within Hispanic communities. Cancer 2006. (c) 2006 American Cancer Society.

  14. Optimising the expansion of the National Bowel Cancer Screening Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cenin, Dayna R; St John, D James B; Ledger, Melissa J N; Slevin, Terry; Lansdorp-Vogelaar, Iris

    2014-10-20

    To estimate the impact of various expansion scenarios of the National Bowel Cancer Screening Program (NBCSP) on the number of bowel cancer deaths prevented; and to investigate the impact of the expansion scenarios on colonoscopy demand. MISCAN-Colon, a well established, validated computer simulation model for bowel cancer screening, was adjusted to reflect the Australian situation. In July 2013, we simulated the effects of screening over a 50-year period, starting in 2006. The model parameters included rates of participation in screening and follow-up, rates of identification of cancerous and precancerous lesions, bowel cancer incidence, mortality and the outcomes of the NBCSP. Five implementation scenarios, based on biennial screening using an immunochemical faecal occult blood test, were developed and modelled. A sensitivity analysis that increased screening participation to 60% was also conducted. Australian residents aged 50 to 74 years. Comparison of the impact of five implementation scenarios on the number of bowel cancer deaths prevented and demand for colonoscopy. MISCAN-Colon calculated that in its current state, the NBCSP should prevent 35 169 bowel cancer deaths in the coming 40 years. Accelerating the expansion of the program to achieve biennial screening by 2020 would prevent more than 70 000 deaths. If complete implementation of biennial screening results in a corresponding increase in participation to 60%, the number of deaths prevented will increase across all scenarios. The findings strongly support the need for rapid implementation of the NBCSP. Compared with the current situation, achieving biennial screening by 2020 could result in 100% more bowel cancer deaths (about 35 000) being prevented in the coming 40 years.

  15. Comparing local TV news with national TV news in cancer coverage: an exploratory content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chul-Joo; Long, Marilee; Slater, Michael D; Song, Wen

    2014-12-01

    The authors compared local TV news with national TV news in terms of cancer coverage using a nationally representative sample of local nightly TV and national network TV (i.e., ABC, CBS, NBC, and CNN) cancer news stories that aired during 2002 and 2003. Compared with national TV news, local TV cancer stories were (a) much shorter in length, (b) less likely to report on cancer prevention (i.e., preventive behaviors and screening tests), and (c) less likely to reference national organizations (i.e., National Cancer Institute, American Cancer Society, National Institutes of Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Food and Drug Administration) that have made clear recommendations about ways to prevent cancer. The implications of these findings for health communication research and cancer education were discussed.

  16. Completeness and validity in a national clinical thyroid cancer database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Londero, Stefano Christian; Mathiesen, Jes Sloth; Krogdahl, Annelise

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although a prospective national clinical thyroid cancer database (DATHYRCA) has been active in Denmark since January 1, 1996, no assessment of data quality has been performed. The purpose of the study was to evaluate completeness and data validity in the Danish national clinical thyroid...... was around or above 90% in most instances. Perfect agreement on the diagnosis of thyroid carcinoma was found, both inter- and intra-observer, and κ values of selected variables showed overall good to excellent agreement. CONCLUSION: In a setup with public health insurance, personal identity numbers...

  17. Gynecologic Cancer Prevention and Control in the National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program: Progress, Current Activities, and Future Directions

    OpenAIRE

    Stewart, Sherri L.; Lakhani, Naheed; Brown, Phaeydra M.; Larkin, O. Ann; Moore, Angela R.; Hayes, Nikki S.

    2013-01-01

    Gynecologic cancer confers a large burden among women in the United States. Several evidence-based interventions are available to reduce the incidence, morbidity, and mortality from these cancers. The National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program (NCCCP) is uniquely positioned to implement these interventions in the US population. This review discusses progress and future directions for the NCCCP in preventing and controlling gynecologic cancer.

  18. Gynecologic cancer prevention and control in the National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program: progress, current activities, and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Sherri L; Lakhani, Naheed; Brown, Phaeydra M; Larkin, O Ann; Moore, Angela R; Hayes, Nikki S

    2013-08-01

    Gynecologic cancer confers a large burden among women in the United States. Several evidence-based interventions are available to reduce the incidence, morbidity, and mortality from these cancers. The National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program (NCCCP) is uniquely positioned to implement these interventions in the US population. This review discusses progress and future directions for the NCCCP in preventing and controlling gynecologic cancer.

  19. Assessing the value of a Small Grants Program for behavioral research in cancer control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesauro, Gina M; Seger, Yvette R; Dijoseph, Leo; Schnell, Joshua D; Klein, William M P

    2014-03-01

    In 1999, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) issued the first Small Grants Program (SGP) for Behavioral Research in Cancer Control (R03) funding opportunity announcement for investigators new to behavioral cancer prevention and control research. We explored whether the SGP was successful in its goals to encourage new investigators from a variety of disciplines to apply their skills to and promote career development in behavioral cancer prevention and control research. A quasi-experimental design examined applicant characteristics and outcome data by award status. Propensity score matching was used to compare awardees and non-awardees with similar impact scores as a control for application quality. Awardees were more likely than non-awardees to pursue and receive subsequent funding from the NCI and publish their research. Tailored small grant programs create benefit for both promoting and retaining new investigators.

  20. Drugs Approved for Stomach (Gastric) Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for stomach (gastric) cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  1. Treatment deintensification in human papillomavirus-positive oropharynx cancer: Outcomes from the National Cancer Data Base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheraghlou, Shayan; Yu, Phoebe K; Otremba, Michael D; Park, Henry S; Bhatia, Aarti; Zogg, Cheryl K; Mehra, Saral; Yarbrough, Wendell G; Judson, Benjamin L

    2018-02-15

    The growing epidemic of human papillomavirus-positive (HPV+) oropharyngeal cancer and the favorable prognosis of this disease etiology have led to a call for deintensified treatment for some patients with HPV+ cancers. One of the proposed methods of treatment deintensification is the avoidance of chemotherapy concurrent with definitive/adjuvant radiotherapy. To the authors' knowledge, the safety of this form of treatment de-escalation is unknown and the current literature in this area is sparse. The authors investigated outcomes after various treatment combinations stratified by American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) eighth edition disease stage using patients from the National Cancer Data Base. A retrospective study of 4443 patients with HPV+ oropharyngeal cancer in the National Cancer Data Base was conducted. Patients were stratified into AJCC eighth edition disease stage groups. Multivariate Cox regressions as well as univariate Kaplan-Meier analyses were conducted. For patients with stage I disease, treatment with definitive radiotherapy was associated with diminished survival compared with chemoradiotherapy (hazard ratio [HR], 1.798; P = .029), surgery with adjuvant radiotherapy (HR, 2.563; P = .002), or surgery with adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (HR, 2.427; P = .001). For patients with stage II disease, compared with treatment with chemoradiotherapy, patients treated with a single-modality (either surgery [HR, 2.539; P = .009] or radiotherapy [HR, 2.200; P = .030]) were found to have poorer survival. Among patients with stage III disease, triple-modality therapy was associated with improved survival (HR, 0.518; P = .024) compared with treatment with chemoradiotherapy. Deintensification of treatment from chemoradiotherapy to radiotherapy or surgery alone in cases of HPV+ AJCC eighth edition stage I or stage II disease may compromise patient safety. Treatment intensification to triple-modality therapy for patients with stage III disease may improve survival in

  2. Danish Translation and Linguistic Validation of the U.S. National Cancer Institute's Patient-Reported Outcomes version of the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (PRO-CTCAE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bæksted, Christina; Nissen, Aase; Pappot, Helle

    2016-01-01

    CONTEXT: The Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) is the basis for standardized clinician-based grading and reporting of adverse events in cancer clinical trials. The U.S. National Cancer Institute has developed the Patient-Reported Outcomes version of the CTCAE (PRO-CTCAE) to i......CONTEXT: The Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) is the basis for standardized clinician-based grading and reporting of adverse events in cancer clinical trials. The U.S. National Cancer Institute has developed the Patient-Reported Outcomes version of the CTCAE (PRO......-CTCAE) to incorporate patient self-reporting of symptomatic adverse events. OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to translate and linguistically validate a Danish language version of PRO-CTCAE. METHODS: The U.S. English language PRO-CTCAE was translated into Danish using forward and backward procedures...... acceptable and semantically comprehensible was achieved in the second round. Statements from participants describing the meaning of the PRO-CTCAE symptomatic toxicities support conceptual equivalence to the U.S. English language version. CONCLUSION: Availability of the NCI PRO-CTCAE in languages beyond...

  3. Breast cancer and aging: results of the U13 conference breast cancer panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barginear, M F; Muss, H; Kimmick, G; Owusu, C; Mrozek, E; Shahrokni, A; Ballman, K; Hurria, A

    2014-07-01

    Breast cancer is predominantly a disease of older women, yet there is a knowledge gap due to the persisting misalignment between the age distribution of women with breast cancer and the age distribution of participants in clinical trials. The purpose of this report is to state the U13 conference breast cancer panel's recommendations regarding therapeutic clinical trials that will fill gaps in knowledge regarding the care of older patients with breast cancer. The U13 conference was a collaboration between the Cancer and Aging Research Group and the National Institute on Aging and the National Cancer Institute (NCI). Clinical trials should be developed for frail and vulnerable patients who would not enroll on the standard phase III trials, as well as efforts need to be made to increase enrollment of fit older patients on standard phase III trials. As a result of this conference, panel members are working with the NCI and cooperative groups to address these knowledge gaps. With the aging population and increasing incidence of breast cancer with age, it is essential to study the feasibility, toxicity, and efficacy of cancer therapy in this at-risk population.

  4. National Trends in the Epidemiology of Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma: A National Cancer Data Base Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saddoughi, Sahar A; Abdelsattar, Zaid M; Blackmon, Shanda H

    2018-02-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) remains an aggressive malignancy that is difficult to cure. However, the treatment paradigm of MPM has evolved, and the national practice patterns are unknown. This study examined the national trends in the epidemiology, national treatment patterns, and survival of patients with this disease. We identified all patients (n = 19,134) with MPM from the National Cancer Data Base from 2004 to 2013. We analyzed patient, tumor characteristics, and treatment patterns using descriptive statistics and used Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards models to estimate survival stratified by the type of therapy administered. Four histologic subtypes were represented in the National Cancer Data Base, these included sarcomatoid (n = 2,355 [12.3%]), epithelioid (n = 6,858 [35.8%]), biphasic (n = 13,617 [11%]), and not otherwise specified (n = 8,560 [44.7%]). Across all subtypes, the prevalence of mesothelioma was highest among white men. Sarcomatoid had the worst survival (adjusted hazard ratio, 2.2; p Data Base. Although survival remains poor, multimodality therapy with surgical resection is associated with the best survival for MPM. Further research is needed to improve survival and overall patient outcomes. Copyright © 2018 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. CPTAC Collaborates with Molecular & Cellular Proteomics to Address Reproducibility in Targeted Assay Development | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The journal Molecular & Cellular Proteomics (MCP), in collaboration with the Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) of the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health, announce new guidelines and requirements for papers describing the development and application of targeted mass spectrometry measurements of peptides, modified peptides and proteins (Mol Cell Proteomics 2017; PMID: 28183812).  NCI’s participation is part of NIH’s overall effort to address the r

  6. KRAS alleles: the LCS6 3'UTR variant and KRAS coding sequence mutations in the NCI-60 panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Samrat T; Nallur, Sunitha; Paranjape, Trupti; Boeke, Marta; Weidhaas, Joanne B; Slack, Frank J

    2012-01-15

    The KRAS-variant is a germline single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) within the 3'UTR of the KRAS gene predicted to disrupt a complementary binding site (LCS6) for the let-7 microRNA (miRNA). The KRAS-variant is associated with increased risk of various cancers, including lung cancer, ovarian cancer and triple-negative breast cancer, and is associated with altered tumor biology in head and neck cancer, colon cancer and melanoma. To better understand the molecular pathways that may be regulated or affected by the presence of the KRAS-variant allele in cancer cells, we examined its prevalence in the NCI-60 panel of cell lines and sought to identify common features of the cell lines that carry the variant allele. This study provides a step forward towards understanding the molecular and pathological significance of the KRAS-variant.

  7. FDA Approvals - Cancer Currents Blog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blog posts on cancer drugs and devices approved by the Food and Drug Administration—including summaries of the evidence to support the approvals and what they mean for patients—from NCI Cancer Currents.

  8. Thyroid Cancer Risk Assessment Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    The R package thyroid implements a risk prediction model developed by NCI researchers to calculate the absolute risk of developing a second primary thyroid cancer (SPTC) in individuals who were diagnosed with a cancer during their childhood.

  9. Lung Cancer Precision Medicine Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patients with lung cancer are benefiting from the boom in targeted and immune-based therapies. With a series of precision medicine trials, NCI is keeping pace with the rapidly changing treatment landscape for lung cancer.

  10. Management Head and Neck Ewing's Sarcoma Family of tumors: Experience of the National Cancer Institute, Cairo University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel Rahman, M.; El-Baradie, T.; Bahaa, Sh.; Shalan, M.; El-Baradie, M.

    2010-01-01

    Ewing's sarcoma accounts for 4-6% of primary malignant bone tumors and it affects the head and neck in only 1-4% of cases. The purpose of this study was to review the NCI experience with Ewing's sarcoma of the head and neck in children. Patients and Methods: A retrospective analysis of patient files with head and neck Ewing's sarcoma treated at the National Cancer Institute, Cairo University, Egypt, during the period from 1997 to 2008 was done. Files were reviewed and data for patients, tumor and treatment profile were extracted. Results: Twenty patients out of 280 with Ewing's sarcoma were identified during an 11 -year period. Patients had a median age of 11.5 years (range 5 months - 22 years) with a male to female ratio of 1:1. The most common tumor site was in the mandible (9/20, 45%) followed by a neck mass (4/20, 20%) and a clavicular mass (3/20, 15%). Six patients (30%) were metastatic at presentation. Most of the patients (19/20, 95%) received chemotherapy. Local therapy was in the form of radical radiotherapy for 8 patients (40%), 2 patients (10%) had surgery alone, while five patients (25%) had surgical resection and postoperative radiotherapy. Overall survival ranged from 1 to 128 months, with a median of 36 months. At the end of the study, 9 patients (45%) were alive in CR, 6 (30%) were lost to FU in disease progression, while 5 patients died from disease progression. Conclusion: Ewing's sarcoma of the head and neck is a disease of a rare incidence with debate about the optimum local therapy. Small non-metastatic tumors with good response to chemotherapy have abetter outcome.

  11. Primary non-Hodgkin's lymphomas of the breast: 23 years of experience at the Colombian national cancer institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, Myriam; Grajales, Marco; Londono, Sonia; Ortiz, Natascha

    2004-01-01

    Primary non- Hodgkin's lymphomas of the breast (PNHLB) are an infrequent malignancy. In a review of the literature, in which six Latin American journals are included, approximately 450 cases have been reported during the past two decades. in this paper we present the experience of the national cancer institute of Colombia during the last 23 years. Objective: to carry out a retrospective analysis of the characteristics, natural history, prognostic factors, and outcome of patients with PNHLB at the NCI of Colombia. Methods: the medical histories of patients diagnosed with PNHLB between 1980 and 2003 were reviewed; likewise, the clinical characteristics, treatment protocols, and final outcomes were analyzed. Results: 25 patients were identified as PNHLB. The average follow-up was 57 months. The medium age was 58, ranging from 26 to 83. 84% had diffused large cell lymphoma. The Karnofsky index was over 80 in 92% of the patients. 72% received chop chemotherapy. Two patients received a combination without doxorubicin. 68% received combined chemo- and radiation therapy. Two patients refused therapy. Two patients died before receiving any type of treatment. CNS compromise was observed in 20% of patients during the evolution of their disease. The youngest patient, whose case deserves special comment, obtained a second complete remission with simple mastectomy, after having relapsed after conventional chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and autologous bone marrow transplant. No significant prognostic variables were found using the univariate analysis. Conclusions: a high rate of complete remission can be achieved by using combined treatment in patients with PNHLB. The medium overall survival was not reached after 71 months of follow-up. The most frequent relapse site was the CNS

  12. The Effect of National Cancer Screening on Disparity Reduction in Cancer Stage at Diagnosis by Income Level.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye-Min Jung

    Full Text Available Early detection of cancer is an effective and efficient cancer management strategy. In South Korea, the National Health Insurance administers the National Cancer Screening Program to its beneficiaries. We examined the impact of the National Cancer Screening Program on socioeconomic disparities in cancer stage at diagnosis.Cancer patients registered in the Korean Central Cancer Registry from January 1, 2010 to December 31, 2010 with a diagnosis of gastric cancer (n = 22,470, colon cancer (n = 16,323, breast cancer (n = 10,076, or uterine cervical cancer (n = 2,447 were included. Income level was divided into three groups according to their monthly contribution of National Health Insurance. We employed absolute (age-standardized prevalence rate, slope index of inequality and relative (relative index of inequality measures to separately examine social disparities among participants and non-participants of the National Cancer Screening Program in terms of the early-stage rate.Age-standardized prevalence rates of early-stage by income group were always higher in participants than in non-participants. Furthermore, the age-standardized prevalence rate of early-stage in the low income group of the participants was also higher than that of the high income group of the non-participants. The sizes of disparities (both slope index of inequality and relative index of inequality are smaller in participants compared to non-participants.National Cancer Screening Program participation reduced income disparity in cancer stage at diagnosis. Population-based cancer screening programs can be used as an effective measure to reduce income disparity in cancer care.

  13. Pediatric testicular cancer: Two decades of Saudi national data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Abomelha

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric testicular cancer is exceedingly rare. There are no data available touching Saudi children. The aim of the study is to determine the trends and patterns of testicular cancer among Saudi children over a period of 20 years. The national database of the Saudi Cancer Registry (SCR on pediatric testicular cancer over the last two decades was examined including epidemiological and histological patterns. From 1994 to 2013, 82 cases of testicular cancer among Saudi children aged 1–14 years were accumulated at the SCR. The annual percentage change rate was 3.3%. Of all cases, 62% appeared within the first 2 years of life. Seminomas were seen in 39%, nonseminomas in 40.3%, and paratesticular tumors in 20.7%. No gonadal stromal tumors observed. About 91% of the seminomas accrued in the first decade (1994–2003, while all nonseminomas fell in the last decade (2004–2013. The most common subtypes of the nonseminomas were yolk sac tumors and mixed tumors. More than 80% of the paratesticular tumors were rhabdomyosarcomas and lymphomas. The SEER summary stage of seminomas was localized in 56%, regional in 22%, and distant in 16%, while of nonseminomas was 56%, 16%, and 28%, respectively, and no stage improvement over the studied period was noted. No temporal trend in incidence rate was observed. The most affected age group was the first 2 years of life. Noteworthy was the high incidence of seminoma and the low rate of teratomas and stromal tumors, when compared to Western data. Notable was the dominance of the seminomas in the first decade and of the nonseminomas in the second decade. At the time of diagnosis, nonseminomas were more advanced than seminomas. No stage improvement noted over the studied period.

  14. Help NCI at Frederick “Knock Out Hunger” | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI at Frederick is once again participating in the Feds Feed Families initiative, an annual food drive that addresses severe shortages of non-perishable items in food banks across D.C., Maryland, and Virginia during the summer months, when giving is at its lowest.

  15. NIH Employee Invention Report (EIR) | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    NIH researchers must immediately contact their Laboratory or Branch Chief and inform him or her of a possible invention, and then consult with your NCI TTC Technology Transfer Manager about submitting an Employee Invention Report (EIR) Form. | [google6f4cd5334ac394ab.html

  16. Estimated effects of the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program on breast cancer mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoerger, Thomas J; Ekwueme, Donatus U; Miller, Jacqueline W; Uzunangelov, Vladislav; Hall, Ingrid J; Segel, Joel; Royalty, Janet; Gardner, James G; Smith, Judith Lee; Li, Chunyu

    2011-04-01

    The National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP) provides breast cancer screening to medically underserved, low-income women aged 40-64 years. No study has evaluated NBCCEDP's effect on breast cancer mortality. This study estimates life-years saved by NBCCEDP breast cancer screening compared with screening in the absence of NBCCEDP and with no screening. A breast cancer simulation model based on existing Cancer Intervention and Surveillance Modeling Network models was constructed. The screening module from these models was modified to reflect screening frequency for NBCCEDP participants. Screening data for uninsured women represented what would have happened without the program. Separate simulations were performed for women who received NBCCEDP (Program) screening, women who potentially received screening without the program (No Program), and women who received no screening (No Screening). The impact of NBCCEDP was estimated as the difference in life-years between the Program and No Program, and the Program and No Screening scenarios. The analysis was performed in 2008-2009. Among 1.8 million women who were screened between 1991 and 2006, the Program saved 100,800 life-years compared with No Program and 369,000 life-years compared with No Screening. Per woman screened, the Program saved 0.056 life-years (95% CI=0.031, 0.081) compared with No Program and 0.206 life-years (95% CI=0.177, 0.234) compared with No Screening. Per woman with invasive breast cancer and screen-detected invasive cancer, the Program saved 0.41 and 0.71 life-years, respectively, compared with No Program. These estimates suggest that NBCCEDP breast cancer screening has reduced mortality among medically uninsured and underinsured low-income women. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Effect of hospital volume on processes of breast cancer care: A National Cancer Data Base study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Tina W F; Pezzin, Liliana E; Li, Jianing; Sparapani, Rodney; Laud, Purushuttom W; Nattinger, Ann B

    2017-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to examine variations in delivery of several breast cancer processes of care that are correlated with lower mortality and disease recurrence, and to determine the extent to which hospital volume explains this variation. Women who were diagnosed with stage I-III unilateral breast cancer between 2007 and 2011 were identified within the National Cancer Data Base. Multiple logistic regression models were developed to determine whether hospital volume was independently associated with each of 10 individual process of care measures addressing diagnosis and treatment, and 2 composite measures assessing appropriateness of systemic treatment (chemotherapy and hormonal therapy) and locoregional treatment (margin status and radiation therapy). Among 573,571 women treated at 1755 different hospitals, 38%, 51%, and 10% were treated at high-, medium-, and low-volume hospitals, respectively. On multivariate analysis controlling for patient sociodemographic characteristics, treatment year and geographic location, hospital volume was a significant predictor for cancer diagnosis by initial biopsy (medium volume: odds ratio [OR] = 1.15, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.05-1.25; high volume: OR = 1.30, 95% CI = 1.14-1.49), negative surgical margins (medium volume: OR = 1.15, 95% CI = 1.06-1.24; high volume: OR = 1.28, 95% CI = 1.13-1.44), and appropriate locoregional treatment (medium volume: OR = 1.12, 95% CI = 1.07-1.17; high volume: OR = 1.16, 95% CI = 1.09-1.24). Diagnosis of breast cancer before initial surgery, negative surgical margins and appropriate use of radiation therapy may partially explain the volume-survival relationship. Dissemination of these processes of care to a broader group of hospitals could potentially improve the overall quality of care and outcomes of breast cancer survivors. Cancer 2017;123:957-66. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  18. Mouse Xenograft Model for Mesothelioma | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute is seeking parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop, evaluate, or commercialize a new mouse model for monoclonal antibodies and immunoconjugates that target malignant mesotheliomas. Applications of the technology include models for screening compounds as potential therapeutics for mesothelioma and for studying the pathology of mesothelioma.

  19. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Reporting & Auditing Grant Transfer Grant Closeout Contracts & Small Business Training Cancer Training at NCI (Intramural) Funding for ... disease will go for you is called prognosis. It can be hard to understand what prognosis means ...

  20. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cancer.gov en español Multimedia Publications Site Map Digital Standards for NCI Websites POLICIES Accessibility Comment Policy Disclaimer FOIA Privacy & Security Reuse & Copyright Syndication Services Website Linking U.S. ...

  1. Stages of Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... types of surgery : Local excision or simple polypectomy . Resection and anastomosis . This is done when the tumor is too ... stage I colon cancer usually includes the following: Resection and anastomosis . Use our clinical trial search to find NCI- ...

  2. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... History Committees of Interest Legislative Resources Recent Public Laws Contact Overview & Mission History of NCI Contributing to ... History Committees of Interest Legislative Resources Recent Public Laws Careers Visitor Information Search Search Home About Cancer ...

  3. Immunotherapy for Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    In an early phase NCI clinical trial, two patients with metastatic cervical cancer had a complete disappearance of their tumors after receiving treatment with a form of immunotherapy called adoptive cell transfer.

  4. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Review & Outcomes Award Issuance Manage Your Award Grants Management Contacts Monitoring Prior Approvals Annual Reporting & Auditing Grant Transfer Grant Closeout Contracts & Small Business Training Cancer Training at NCI (Intramural) Funding for ...

  5. Nanotechnology in Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI Office of Cancer Nanotechnology Research has had a major impact on bringing novel nano-enabled solutions through the pre-clinical space. The strategic framework of this effort is presented here.

  6. Communicating about Cancer Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patients with cancer may be reluctant to discuss their pain with their doctors for a variety of reasons. NCI sponsors research that examines the barriers that prevent patients from talking about pain.

  7. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Peer Review and Funding Outcomes Step 4: Award Negotiation & Issuance Manage Your Award Grants Management Contacts Monitoring ... Reporting & Auditing Grant Transfer Grant Closeout Contracts & Small Business Training Cancer Training at NCI (Intramural) Funding for ...

  8. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peer Review and Funding Outcomes Step 4: Award Negotiation & Issuance Manage Your Award Grants Management Contacts Monitoring ... Reporting & Auditing Grant Transfer Grant Closeout Contracts & Small Business Training Cancer Training at NCI (Intramural) Funding for ...

  9. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Reporting & Auditing Grant Transfer Grant Closeout Contracts & Small Business Training Cancer Training at NCI (Intramural) Funding for ... may not be based on treatments being used today. Still, your doctor may tell you that you ...

  10. National Practice Patterns for Clinical T1N0 Nasopharyngeal Cancer in the Elderly: A National Cancer Data Base Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Carl M; Lin, Chi; Adeberg, Sebastian; Gupta, Mrigank; Zhen, Weining; Verma, Vivek

    2018-03-01

    The standard of care for T1N0 nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) is definitive radiation therapy (RT). However, practice patterns in the elderly may not necessarily follow national guidelines. Herein, we investigated national practice patterns for T1N0 NPC. The National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) was queried for clinical T1N0 primary NPC cases (2004-2013) in patients ≥70 years old. Patient, tumor, and treatment parameters were extracted. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to compare overall survival (OS) between patients receiving RT versus those under observation. Logistic regression was used to examine variables associated with receipt of RT. Cox proportional hazards modeling determined variables associated with OS. Landmark analysis of patients surviving 1 year or more was performed to assess survival differences between groups. In total, data of 147 patients were analyzed. RT was delivered to 89 patients (61%), whereas 58 (39%) patients underwent observation. On multivariable analysis, older patients were less likely to receive RT (p=0.003), but there were no differences between groups in terms of Charlson-Deyo comorbidity index. Median and 5-year OS in patients receiving RT versus those under observation were 71 and 33 months, and 59% and 48% (p=0.011), respectively. For patients surviving 1 year or more (n=96), there was a strong trend showing that receipt of RT was associated with better median and 5-year OS. This National Data Base analysis shows that observation is relatively common for T1N0 NPC in the elderly, but is associated with poorer survival. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  11. Variation in lung cancer resources and workload: results from the first national lung cancer organisational audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusworth, K; O'Dowd, E; Hubbard, R; Beckett, P; Peake, M D; Woolhouse, I

    2015-10-01

    We report the findings of the first national lung cancer organisational audit. The results demonstrate marked variation in service provision and workload of some lung cancer specialists. For example, over half of the clinical nurse specialists report case volumes over recommended numbers. Some trusts have no access to key treatments such as video assisted thoracoscopy (VAT) lobectomy and stereotactic radiotherapy. Multivariate regression analysis demonstrated an association between higher surgical resection rates and the on-site availability of advanced staging and therapeutic modalities, for example, PET scan and VAT lobectomy. We conclude by making a number of recommendations to address the variation in lung cancer care. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  12. IJUE. Tema 3. Les competències de la Unió Europea

    OpenAIRE

    Torres Pérez, María

    2018-01-01

    PowerPoint del Tema 3 de la asignatura "Institucions Jurídiques de la Unió Europea". Curso académico 2017-2018. Tema 3. Les competències de la Unió Europea. 1. L’atribució de competències a la Unió Europea. 2. La delimitació de les competències a la Unió Europea. 3. Els principis que regeixen l’exercici de les competències. 4. L’exercici de les competències de la Unió per “alguns Estats membres”.

  13. Trends in intensity modulated radiation therapy use for locally advanced rectal cancer at National Comprehensive Cancer Network centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marsha Reyngold, MD, PhD

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: Although most patients with stage II-III rectal cancer at queried National Cancer Institute–designated cancer centers between 2005 and 2011 received 3-dimensional CRT, significant and increasing numbers received IMRT. IMRT utilization is highly variable among institutions and not uniform among sociodemographic groups but may be more consistently embraced in specific clinical settings. Given this trend, comparative-effectiveness research is needed to evaluate the benefits of IMRT for rectal cancer.

  14. Diagnosing cancer in primary care: results from the National Cancer Diagnosis Audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swann, Ruth; McPhail, Sean; Witt, Jana; Shand, Brian; Abel, Gary A; Hiom, Sara; Rashbass, Jem; Lyratzopoulos, Georgios; Rubin, Greg

    2018-01-01

    Continual improvements in diagnostic processes are needed to minimise the proportion of patients with cancer who experience diagnostic delays. Clinical audit is a means of achieving this. To characterise key aspects of the diagnostic process for cancer and to generate baseline measures for future re-audit. Clinical audit of cancer diagnosis in general practices in England. Information on patient and tumour characteristics held in the English National Cancer Registry was supplemented by information from GPs in participating practices. Data items included diagnostic timepoints, patient characteristics, and clinical management. Data were collected on 17 042 patients with a new diagnosis of cancer during 2014 from 439 practices. Participating practices were similar to non-participating ones, particularly regarding population age, urban/rural location, and practice-based patient experience measures. The median diagnostic interval for all patients was 40 days (interquartile range [IQR] 15-86 days). Most patients were referred promptly (median primary care interval 5 days [IQR 0-27 days]). Where GPs deemed diagnostic delays to have occurred (22% of cases), patient, clinician, or system factors were responsible in 26%, 28%, and 34% of instances, respectively. Safety netting was recorded for 44% of patients. At least one primary care-led investigation was carried out for 45% of patients. Most patients (76%) had at least one existing comorbid condition; 21% had three or more. The findings identify avenues for quality improvement activity and provide a baseline for future audit of the impact of 2015 National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidance on management and referral of suspected cancer. © British Journal of General Practice 2018.

  15. Diagnosing cancer in primary care: results from the National Cancer Diagnosis Audit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swann, Ruth; McPhail, Sean; Witt, Jana; Shand, Brian; Abel, Gary A; Hiom, Sara; Rashbass, Jem; Lyratzopoulos, Georgios; Rubin, Greg

    2018-01-01

    Background Continual improvements in diagnostic processes are needed to minimise the proportion of patients with cancer who experience diagnostic delays. Clinical audit is a means of achieving this. Aim To characterise key aspects of the diagnostic process for cancer and to generate baseline measures for future re-audit. Design and setting Clinical audit of cancer diagnosis in general practices in England. Method Information on patient and tumour characteristics held in the English National Cancer Registry was supplemented by information from GPs in participating practices. Data items included diagnostic timepoints, patient characteristics, and clinical management. Results Data were collected on 17 042 patients with a new diagnosis of cancer during 2014 from 439 practices. Participating practices were similar to non-participating ones, particularly regarding population age, urban/rural location, and practice-based patient experience measures. The median diagnostic interval for all patients was 40 days (interquartile range [IQR] 15–86 days). Most patients were referred promptly (median primary care interval 5 days [IQR 0–27 days]). Where GPs deemed diagnostic delays to have occurred (22% of cases), patient, clinician, or system factors were responsible in 26%, 28%, and 34% of instances, respectively. Safety netting was recorded for 44% of patients. At least one primary care-led investigation was carried out for 45% of patients. Most patients (76%) had at least one existing comorbid condition; 21% had three or more. Conclusion The findings identify avenues for quality improvement activity and provide a baseline for future audit of the impact of 2015 National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidance on management and referral of suspected cancer. PMID:29255111

  16. Quality of life among breast cancer patients undergoing treatment in national cancer centers in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manandhar, Sajani; Shrestha, Deepak Sundar; Taechaboonsermsk, Pimsurang; Siri, Sukhontha; Suparp, Jarueyporn

    2014-01-01

    To study the quality of life and to identify associated factors among breast cancer patients undergoing treatment in national cancer centers in Nepal. One hundred breast cancer patients were selected and interviewed using a structured questionnaire. European Organization of Research and Treatment of Cancer EORTC-QLQ-C30 and EORTC-QLQ-BR23 were used to assess quality of life and modified Medical Outcome Study -Social Support survey(mMOS-SS) was used to assess social support. Only multi-item scales of EORTC C30 and BR23 were analyzed for relationships. Independent sample T-tests and ANOVA were applied to analyze differences in mean scores. The score of global health status/quality of life (GHS/GQoL) was marginally above average (mean=52.8). The worst performed scales in C-30 were emotional and social function while best performed scales were physical and role function. In BR-23, most of the patients fell into the problematic group regarding sexual function and enjoyment. Almost 90% had financial difficulties. Symptom scales did not demonstrate many problems. Older individuals, patients with stage I breast cancer and thosewith good social support were found to have good GHS/GQoL. Of all the influencing factors, social support was established to have strong statistical associations with most of the functional scales: GHS/GQoL (0.003), emotional function (system.

  17. Vaccines to Prevent Cancers Not Caused by Viruses - Annual Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have vaccines against viruses that cause cancer, but what about vaccines for cancers not caused by viruses? Learn about NCI's development of safe and effective vaccines for cancers not caused by infectious agents.

  18. 75 FR 42449 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-21

    ... Research Programs and Updates of the Implementation of the Clinical Trials and Translational Research....395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93...

  19. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors (GIST) of the Stomach: Retrospective Experience with Surgical Resection at the National Cancer Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NAGUIB, Sh.F.; ZAGHLOUL, A.S.; El MARAKBY, H.

    2008-01-01

    Gastric Gist's account for more than half of all gastrointestinal stromal tumors and represent less than 5% of all gastric tumors. The peak age for harboring Gist of the stomach is around 60 years and a slight male preponderance is reported. These tumors are identified by expression of CD117 or CD34 antigen. Symptoms at presentation usually include bleeding, ab¬dominal pain or abdominal mass. Endoscopically, they typically appear as a submucosal mass with or without ulceration and on CT scans an extra gastric mass is usually seen. Complete surgical resection provides the only chance for cure, with only l-2 cm free margins needed. However, local recurrence and/or metastases supervene in almost half the patients treated with surgery alone, even when no gross residual is left. Thereby imatinib mesylate was advocated as an adjuvant to surgery, which appears to have improved disease-free and overall survival. Aim of the Work: The aim of this work was to assess clinico-pathological features of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) of the stomach and to appraise the results of treatment by surgery in patients treated at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) of Cairo between January 2002 and December 2007. Patients and Methods: Nineteen patients with histologically and immuno-histochemically proven GIST of the stomach were treated by surgery at the NCI during the 6-year study period. Preoperative assessment included detailed history, clinical examination, full laboratory tests, endoscopy, abdominal ultrasound and CT. General medical assessment included chest X-ray, ECG and echocardiography. Results: The patients' age ranged from 26 to 77 years with a median of 51 years. Obvious male/female preponderance was noticed (68.4% to 31.6%). Tumors were located at the upper 1/3 in 42.1%, at the middle 1/3 in 31.6% and at the lower 1/3 in 26.3%. The most common clinical presentation was related to bleeding (hematemesis, melena or anaemia) and was seen in 63.2%. No tumors were

  20. Abiraterone for Hormone-Sensitive Prostate Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog post on results from two clinical trials that showed adding abiraterone to androgen-deprivation therapy improved survival for men with metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer.

  1. Extended Adjuvant Therapy for Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog on findings from a recent clinical trial which showed that extending adjuvant therapy with an aromatase inhibitor can have important benefits for some women with early-stage cancer.

  2. Preventing Cervical Cancer with HPV Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervical cancer can be prevented with HPV vaccines. NCI-supported researchers helped establish HPV as a cause of cervical cancer. They also helped create the first HPV vaccines, were involved in the vaccine trials, and contribute to ongoing studies.

  3. Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Methods - Annual Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Early cancer detection is a proven life-saving strategy. Learn about the research opportunities NCI supports, including liquid biopsies and other less-invasive methods, for detecting early cancers and precancerous growths.

  4. Advancing Public Health in Cancer - Annual Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer is the leading cause of death from disease among Americans under 85. Learn how NCI advances public health by conducting research to improve the delivery of quality cancer prevention, screening, and treatment to all Americans.

  5. Cancer Information Seeking and Cancer-Related Health Outcomes: A Scoping Review of the Health Information National Trends Survey Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigfall, Lisa T; Friedman, Daniela B

    2016-09-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death among adults in the United States. Only 54% of U.S. adults reported seeking cancer information in 2014. Cancer information seeking has been positively associated with cancer-related health outcomes such as screening adherence. We conducted a scoping review of studies that used data from the Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS) in order to examine cancer information seeking in depth and the relationship between cancer information seeking and cancer-related health outcomes. We searched five databases and the HINTS website. The search yielded a total of 274 article titles. After review of 114 de-duplicated titles, 66 abstracts, and 50 articles, 22 studies met inclusion criteria. Cancer information seeking was the outcome in only four studies. The other 18 studies focused on a cancer-related health outcome. Cancer beliefs, health knowledge, and information seeking experience were positive predictors of cancer information seeking. Cancer-related awareness, knowledge, beliefs, preventive behaviors, and screening adherence were higher among cancer information seekers. Results from this review can inform other research study designs and primary data collection focused on specific cancer sites or aimed at populations not represented or underrepresented in the HINTS data (e.g., minority populations, those with lower socioeconomic status).

  6. 3 CFR 8407 - Proclamation 8407 of August 31, 2009. National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    .... National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month helps educate women and men about the importance of knowing common... me by the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim September 2009 as National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month. I encourage citizens, Government agencies, private businesses, nonprofit...

  7. The Changing Landscape of Lung Cancer Research and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Along with the Lung Cancer Social Media (#LCSM) community, the National Cancer Institute will be co-hosting a lively and interactive Google Hangout on Air about the changing landscape of lung cancer research and treatment. During the chat, viewers will have the opportunity to pose questions to a panel of lung cancer experts including NCI's Dr. Shakun Malik, the head of thoracic oncology therapeutics, Roy S. Herbst, MD, PhD, Chief of Medical Oncology, Yale Cancer Center and Smilow Cancer Hospital at Yale-New Haven and David Tom Cooke MD FACS, Head, Section of General Thoracic Surgery University of California, Davis. You can also learn more and follow along on the #LCSM Chat page. The chat will be moderated by lung cancer advocate and #LCSM co-founder, Janet Freeman-Daily. To ask questions of our experts, simply use the #LCSM hashtag during the chat.

  8. Analysis of esophagogastric cancer patients enrolled in the National Cancer Institute Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program sponsored phase 1 trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bando, Hideaki; Rubinstein, Larry; Harris, Pamela; Yoshino, Takayuki; Doi, Toshihiko; Ohtsu, Atsushi; Welch, John; Takebe, Naoko

    2017-05-01

    In phase 1 trials, an important entry criterion is life expectancy predicted to be more than 90 days, which is generally difficult to predict. The Royal Marsden Hospital (RMH) prognostic score that is determined by lactate dehydrogenase level, albumin level, and number of metastatic sites of disease was developed to help project patient outcomes. There have been no systematic analyses to evaluate the utility of the RMH prognostic score for esophagogastric cancer patients. All nonpediatric phase 1 oncology trials sponsored by the National Cancer Institute Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program that began between 2001 and 2013 were considered in this review. Of 4722 patients with solid tumors, 115 patients were eligible for our analysis; 54 (47 %) with cancer of the esophagus, 14 (12 %) with cancer of the esopagogastric junction, and 47 (41 %) with stomach cancer. Eighty-six patients (75 %) had a good RMH prognostic score (0 or 1) and 29 patients (25 %) had a poor RMH prognostic score (2 or 3). Disease control rates were significantly different between patients with good and poor RMH prognostic scores (49 % vs 17 %; two-sided Fisher's exact test P = 0.004). The median treatment duration and overall survival for good and poor RMH prognostic score patients were significantly different (median treatment duration 2.1 months vs 1.2 months respectively, P = 0.016; median overall survival 10.9 months vs 2.1 months respectively, P cancer patients who might participate in a phase 1 trial.

  9. Cancer of the penis at Kenyatta National Hospital | Magoha | East ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    most common was prostate cancer (56.0%), followed by bladder cancer (25.0%), kidney cancer (7.9%), and testicular cancer (6.1%). Thirty eight ... Twenty five patients had partial penectomy with radiotherapy and or chemotherapy. ... Eleven other patients had radiotherapy either alone or combined with chemotherapy.

  10. 75 FR 20370 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-19

    ... Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel, Assay Systems for Drug Efficacy in Cancer Stem Cells. Date..., Rockville, MD 20852. Contact Person: David G. Ransom, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, Research Programs... Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.392, Cancer Construction; 93.393, Cancer Cause and Prevention Research...

  11. Locally advance breast cancer survival after radiotherapy following mastectomy at the National Cancer Institute of Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ospino, Rosalba; Cendales, Ricardo; Cifuentes, Javier; Sanchez, Zayda; Galvis, Juan; Bobadilla, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate survival after treatment with mastectomy and teletherapy for locally advance breast cancer at the National Cancer Institute of Colombia. Methods: A case serie analysis was conducted. Frequencies and measures of central tendency were applied. Locoregional relapse free survival, disease free survival and overall survival were determined with Kaplan-Meyer and Cox regression analyses. Results: 174 patiens were included. Most of the patients corresponded to ductal tumors with positive axillary nodes and hormone receptors. The treatment was neoadjuvant chemotherapy, mastectomy, axillary nodes resection, radiotherapy, and adjuvant hormone therapy. The 5-years locoregional relapse free survival was 88.8%, disease free survival was 63.3%, and overall survival 84.4%. Conclusions: The results are similar to previous reports. Breast reconstruction was associated with a greater chance of locoregional relapse. The node rate is a relevant predictor for overall survival, disease free survival, and locoregional relapse free survival, and tumor grade for the former two.

  12. Locally advance breast cancer survival after radiotherapy following mastectomy at the National Cancer Institute of Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ospino, Rosalba; Cendales, Ricardo; Cifuentes, Javier; Sanchez, Zayda; Galvis, Juan; Bobadilla, Ivan

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate survival after treatment with mastectomy and teletherapy for locally advance breast cancer at the National Cancer Institute of Colombia. Methods: A case serie analysis was conducted. Frequencies and measures of central tendency were applied. Locoregional relapse free survival, disease free survival and overall survival were determined with Kaplan-Meyer and Cox regression analyses. Results: 174 patients were included. Most of the patients corresponded to ductal tumors with positive axillary nodes and hormone receptors. The treatment was neoadjuvant chemotherapy, mastectomy, axillary nodes resection, radiotherapy, and adjuvant hormone therapy. The 5-years locoregional relapse free survival was 88.8%, disease free survival was 63.3%, and overall survival 84.4%. Conclusions: The results are similar to previous reports. Breast reconstruction was associated with a greater chance of locoregional relapse. The node rate is a relevant predictor for overall survival, disease free survival, and locoregional relapse free survival, and tumor grade for the former two.

  13. Survival As a Quality Metric of Cancer Care: Use of the National Cancer Data Base to Assess Hospital Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulman, Lawrence N; Palis, Bryan E; McCabe, Ryan; Mallin, Kathy; Loomis, Ashley; Winchester, David; McKellar, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    Survival is considered an important indicator of the quality of cancer care, but the validity of different methodologies to measure comparative survival rates is less well understood. We explored whether the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) could serve as a source of unadjusted and risk-adjusted cancer survival data and whether these data could be used as quality indicators for individual hospitals or in the aggregate by hospital type. The NCDB, an aggregate of > 1,500 hospital cancer registries, was queried to analyze unadjusted and risk-adjusted hazards of death for patients with stage III breast cancer (n = 116,787) and stage IIIB or IV non-small-cell lung cancer (n = 252,392). Data were analyzed at the individual hospital level and by hospital type. At the hospital level, after risk adjustment, few hospitals had comparative risk-adjusted survival rates that were statistically better or worse. By hospital type, National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer centers had risk-adjusted survival ratios that were statistically significantly better than those of academic cancer centers and community hospitals. Using the NCDB as the data source, survival rates for patients with stage III breast cancer and stage IIIB or IV non-small-cell lung cancer were statistically better at National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer centers when compared with other hospital types. Compared with academic hospitals, risk-adjusted survival was lower in community hospitals. At the individual hospital level, after risk adjustment, few hospitals were shown to have statistically better or worse survival, suggesting that, using NCDB data, survival may not be a good metric to determine relative quality of cancer care at this level.

  14. Vectors to Increase Production Efficiency of Inducible Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC) | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    This invention describes the discovery that specific p53 isoform increase the number of inducible pluripotent stem cells (iPS). It is known that the activity of p53 regulates the self-renewal and pluripotency of normal and cancer stem cells, and also affects re-programming efficiency of iPS cells. This p53 isoform-based technology provides a more natural process of increasing iPS cell production than previous methods of decreasing p53. NCI seeks licensees for this technology.

  15. National Cancer Institute and American Association for Clinical Chemistry Partner to Bridge the Gap | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute, through its Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer (CPTC) initiative has entered into a memorandum of understanding with the American Association for Clinical Chemistry (AACC) to join forces to promote and educate the clinical chemistry community in the area of proteomic standards and technology advances.

  16. Improving global data infrastructures for more effective and scalable analysis of Earth and environmental data: the Australian NCI NERDIP Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Ben; Wyborn, Lesley; Druken, Kelsey; Richards, Clare; Trenham, Claire; Wang, Jingbo; Rozas Larraondo, Pablo; Steer, Adam; Smillie, Jon

    2017-04-01

    The National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) facility hosts one of Australia's largest repositories (10+ PBytes) of research data collections spanning datasets from climate, coasts, oceans, and geophysics through to astronomy, bioinformatics, and the social sciences domains. The data are obtained from national and international sources, spanning a wide range of gridded and ungridded (i.e., line surveys, point clouds) data, and raster imagery, as well as diverse coordinate reference projections and resolutions. Rather than managing these data assets as a digital library, whereby users can discover and download files to personal servers (similar to borrowing 'books' from a 'library'), NCI has built an extensive and well-integrated research data platform, the National Environmental Research Data Interoperability Platform (NERDIP, http://nci.org.au/data-collections/nerdip/). The NERDIP architecture enables programmatic access to data via standards-compliant services for high performance data analysis, and provides a flexible cloud-based environment to facilitate the next generation of transdisciplinary scientific research across all data domains. To improve use of modern scalable data infrastructures that are focused on efficient data analysis, the data organisation needs to be carefully managed including performance evaluations of projections and coordinate systems, data encoding standards and formats. A complication is that we have often found multiple domain vocabularies and ontologies are associated with equivalent datasets. It is not practical for individual dataset managers to determine which standards are best to apply to their dataset as this could impact accessibility and interoperability. Instead, they need to work with data custodians across interrelated communities and, in partnership with the data repository, the international scientific community to determine the most useful approach. For the data repository, this approach is essential to enable

  17. Cancer Biotechnology | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biotechnology advances continue to underscore the need to educate NCI fellows in new methodologies. The Cancer Biotechnology course will be held on the NCI-Frederick campus on January 29, 2016 (Bldg. 549, Main Auditorium) and the course will be repeated on the Bethesda campus on February 9, 2016 (Natcher Balcony C). The latest advances in DNA, protein and image analysis will be presented. Clinical and postdoctoral fellows who want to learn about new biotechnology advances are encouraged to attend this course.

  18. National assessment of HPV and Pap tests: Changes in cervical cancer screening, National Health Interview Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Meg; Benard, Vicki; King, Jessica; Crawford, Anatasha; Saraiya, Mona

    2017-07-01

    Major organizations recommend cytology screening (Pap test) every 3years for women aged 21-65; women aged 30 to 65 have the option of adding the HPV test (co-test) every 5years. We examined national percentages of cervical cancer screening, and we examined use of co-testing as an option for screening. We used 2015 U.S. National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) data to examine recent cervical cancer screening (Pap test within 3years among women aged 21-65 without a hysterectomy; N=10,596) and co-testing (N=9,125). We also conducted a multivariable analysis to determine odds of having had a Pap test or co-test by demographic variables. To evaluate changes in screening over time, we examined Pap testing during the years 2000, 2005, 2008, 2010, 2013 and 2015. Analysis completed in Atlanta, GA during 2016. Overall, 81.1% of eligible women reported having a Pap test within 3years; percentages declined over time among all age groups. An estimated 14 million women aged 21-65 had not been screened within the past 3years. Recent immigrants to the United States, women without insurance, and women without a usual source of healthcare had lower odds of being up to date with screening. About 1/3 of women up to date on Pap testing reported having a co-test with their most recent Pap test. Declines in screening among women aged 21-65 are cause for concern. More research is needed on co-testing practices. Provider and patient education efforts may be needed to clarify recommended use of HPV tests. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Time, Concentration, and pH-Dependent Transport and Uptake of Anthocyanins in a Human Gastric Epithelial (NCI-N87) Cell Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atnip, Allison A; Sigurdson, Gregory T; Bomser, Joshua; Giusti, M Mónica

    2017-02-18

    Anthocyanins are the largest class of water soluble plant pigments and a common part of the human diet. They may have many potential health benefits, including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, and cardioprotective activities. However, anthocyanin metabolism is not well understood. Studies suggest that anthocyanins absorption may occur in the stomach, in which the acidic pH favors anthocyanin stability. A gastric epithelial cell line (NCI-N87) has been used to study the behavior of anthocyanins at a pH range of 3.0-7.4. This work examines the effects of time (0-3 h), concentration (50-1500 µM), and pH (3.0, 5.0, 7.4) on the transport and uptake of anthocyanins using NCI-N87 cells. Anthocyanins were transported from the apical to basolateral side of NCI-N87 cells in time and dose dependent manners. Over the treatment time of 3 h the rate of transport increased, especially with higher anthocyanin concentrations. The non-linear rate of transport may suggest an active mechanism for the transport of anthocyanins across the NCI-N87 monolayer. At apical pH 3.0, higher anthocyanin transport was observed compared to pH 5.0 and 7.4. Reduced transport of anthocyanins was found to occur at apical pH 5.0.

  20. Cancer incidence among workers at the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acquavella, J.J.; Wilkinson, G.S.; Wiggs, L.D.; Reyes-Waxweiler, M.; Key, C.R.; Tietjen, G.L.

    1985-01-01

    An analysis of cancer incidence among Los Alamos workers was reported at the Sixteenth Mid-Year Topical Symposium of the Health Physics Society. Cancer incidence was especially low among Anglo-American males for cancer of the lung and oral cancer, cancer sites commonly associated with cigarette smoking. No cases of cancer of the lung, oral cavity, pancreas, or bladder were observed among Anglo-American females in the population. Standardized incidence ratios for cancer of the breast and cancer of the uterine corpus exceeded one; however, these findings were not statistically significant. These findings are consistent with expectation for a population of high socioeconomic class, such as the Laboratory work force. Therefore, working conditions at the Laboratory do not appear to have affected cancer incidence in this population. 1 reference, 2 tables

  1. Association of a single nucleotide polymorphic variation in the human chromosome 19q13.3 with drug responses in the NCI60 cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, K.K.; Vogel, Ulla Birgitte; Nexo, B.A.

    2009-01-01

    We studied the importance of certain polymorphisms on human chromosome 19q13.3 for drug sensitivity in human tumor cell cultures. NCI60 is a panel of 60 established tumor-derived cell lines, which have been tested for their sensitivity to tens of thousands of different drugs. Here we investigate...... the correlations between the responses of the NCI60 cells to different anticancer drugs and their respective alleles of five DNA polymorphisms located in a cancer-related chromosomal area. One polymorphism, located in the 5' noncoding region of the gene ASE-1, alias CD3EAP, proved to be associated with drug...... sensitivity (P=0.025). The same polymorphism has previously been associated with treatment response of multiple myeloma after bone marrow ablation. The polymorphism ASE-1-e1 was of importance for the drug response in the human cancer cell lines investigated and could eventually become important...

  2. Early outcomes for rectal cancer surgery in the republic of ireland following a national centralization program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, John P; Coffey, J Calvin; Boyle, Emily; Keane, Frank; McNamara, Deborah A

    2013-10-01

    Following a national audit of rectal cancer management in 2007, a national centralization program in the Republic of Ireland was initiated. In 2010, a prospective evaluation of rectal cancer treatment and early outcomes was conducted. A total of 29 colorectal surgeons in 14 centers prospectively collated data on all patients with rectal cancer who underwent curative surgery in 2010. Data were available on 447 patients who underwent proctectomy with curative intent for rectal cancer in 2010; 23.7 % of patients underwent abdominoperineal excision. The median number of lymph nodes identified was 12. The 30-day mortality rate was 1.1 %. Compared with 2007, there was a reduction in positive circumferential margin rate (15.8 vs 4.5 %, P rectal cancer. Patients undergoing rectal cancer surgery in hospitals following a national centralization initiative received high-quality surgery. Significant heterogeneity exists in radiotherapy administration, and evidence-based guidelines should be developed and implemented.

  3. Application Instructions | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is NOT a grant application - if successful, funds will not be transferred to your institution to support your project. Rather, this is an application to access the scientific capabilities and resources of the NCI with the goal of moving promising cancer chemopreventive agents into clinical testing. If successful, you will partner with the NCI in developing a drug development pipeline. |

  4. Fox Chase Cancer Center's Genitourinary Division: a national resource for research, innovation and patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzzo, Robert G; Horwitz, Eric M; Plimack, Elizabeth R

    2016-04-01

    Founded in 1904, Fox Chase Cancer Center remains committed to its mission. It is one of 41 centers in the country designated as a Comprehensive Cancer Center by the National Cancer Institute, is a founding member of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, holds the magnet designation for nursing excellence, is one of the first to establish a family cancer risk assessment program, and has achieved national distinction because of the scientific discoveries made there that have advanced clinical care. Two of its researchers have won Nobel prizes. The Genitourinary Division is nationally recognized and viewed as one of the top driving forces behind the growth of Fox Chase due to its commitment to initiating and participating in clinical trials, its prolific contributions to peer-reviewed publications and presentations at scientific meetings, its innovations in therapies and treatment strategies, and its commitment to bringing cutting-edge therapies to patients.

  5. Impact of national cancer policies on cancer survival trends and socioeconomic inequalities in England, 1996-2013: population based study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachet, Bernard; Belot, Aurélien; Maringe, Camille; Coleman, Michel P

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess the effectiveness of the NHS Cancer Plan (2000) and subsequent national cancer policy initiatives in improving cancer survival and reducing socioeconomic inequalities in survival in England. Design Population based cohort study. Setting England. Population More than 3.5 million registered patients aged 15-99 with a diagnosis of one of the 24 most common primary, malignant, invasive neoplasms between 1996 and 2013. Main outcome measures Age standardised net survival estimates by cancer, sex, year, and deprivation group. These estimates were modelled using regression model with splines to explore changes in the cancer survival trends and in the socioeconomic inequalities in survival. Results One year net survival improved steadily from 1996 for 26 of 41 sex-cancer combinations studied, and only from 2001 or 2006 for four cancers. Trends in survival accelerated after 2006 for five cancers. The deprivation gap observed for all 41 sex-cancer combinations among patients with a diagnosis in 1996 persisted until 2013. However, the gap slightly decreased for six cancers among men for which one year survival was more than 65% in 1996, and for cervical and uterine cancers, for which survival was more than 75% in 1996. The deprivation gap widened notably for brain tumours in men and for lung cancer in women. Conclusions Little evidence was found of a direct impact of national cancer strategies on one year survival, and no evidence for a reduction in socioeconomic inequalities in cancer survival. These findings emphasise that socioeconomic inequalities in survival remain a major public health problem for a healthcare system founded on equity. PMID:29540358

  6. 77 FR 55095 - National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-06

    ... Proclamation This year, thousands of American women will lose their lives to ovarian cancer. They are mothers... campaign, we are working to raise awareness about the signs and symptoms of ovarian cancer. The Affordable...

  7. 75 FR 54453 - National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-07

    ... several factors that may increase a man's risk of developing prostate cancer, including age, race, and..., husbands, and sons battling prostate cancer, as well as their families and the health care providers...

  8. 76 FR 62285 - National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-07

    ... cancer, and too many will be lost. African-American women bear a particularly large burden, experiencing higher death rates from breast cancer than other racial or ethnic groups in the United States. Too many...

  9. Reflex immunohistochemistry and microsatellite instability testing of colorectal tumors for Lynch syndrome among US cancer programs and follow-up of abnormal results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beamer, Laura C; Grant, Marcia L; Espenschied, Carin R; Blazer, Kathleen R; Hampel, Heather L; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; MacDonald, Deborah J

    2012-04-01

    Immunohistochemistry (IHC) for MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2 protein expression and microsatellite instability (MSI) are well-established tools to screen for Lynch syndrome (LS). Although many cancer centers have adopted these tools as reflex LS screening after a colorectal cancer diagnosis, the standard of care has not been established, and no formal studies have described this practice in the United States. The purpose of this study was to describe prevalent practices regarding IHC/MSI reflex testing for LS in the United States and the subsequent follow-up of abnormal results. A 12-item survey was developed after interdisciplinary expert input. A letter of invitation, survey, and online-survey option were sent to a contact at each cancer program. A modified Dillman strategy was used to maximize the response rate. The sample included 39 National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Centers (NCI-CCCs), 50 randomly selected American College of Surgeons-accredited Community Hospital Comprehensive Cancer Programs (COMPs), and 50 Community Hospital Cancer Programs (CHCPs). The overall response rate was 50%. Seventy-one percent of NCI-CCCs, 36% of COMPs, and 15% of CHCPs were conducting reflex IHC/MSI for LS; 48% of the programs used IHC, 14% of the programs used MSI, and 38% of the programs used both IHC and MSI. One program used a presurgical information packet, four programs offered an opt-out option, and none of the programs required written consent. Although most NCI-CCCs use reflex IHC/MSI to screen for LS, this practice is not well-adopted by community hospitals. These findings may indicate an emerging standard of care and diffusion from NCI-CCC to community cancer programs. Our findings also described an important trend away from requiring written patient consent for screening.

  10. A comparison of cancer burden and research spending reveals discrepancies in the distribution of research funding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carter Ashley JR

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ideally, the distribution of research funding for different types of cancer should be equitable with respect to the societal burden each type of cancer imposes. These burdens can be estimated in a variety of ways; “Years of Life Lost” (YLL measures the severity of death in regard to the age it occurs, "Disability-Adjusted Life-Years" (DALY estimates the effects of non-lethal disabilities incurred by disease and economic metrics focus on the losses to tax revenue, productivity or direct medical expenses. We compared research funding from the National Cancer Institute (NCI to a variety of burden metrics for the most common types of cancer to identify mismatches between spending and societal burden. Methods Research funding levels were obtained from the NCI website and information for societal health and economic burdens were collected from government databases and published reports. We calculated the funding levels per unit burden for a wide range of different cancers and burden metrics and compared these values to identify discrepancies. Results Our analysis reveals a considerable mismatch between funding levels and burden. Some cancers are funded at levels far higher than their relative burden suggests (breast cancer, prostate cancer, and leukemia while other cancers appear underfunded (bladder, esophageal, liver, oral, pancreatic, stomach, and uterine cancers. Conclusions These discrepancies indicate that an improved method of health care research funding allocation should be investigated to better match funding levels to societal burden.

  11. Treatment Option Overview (Colon Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... types of surgery : Local excision or simple polypectomy . Resection and anastomosis . This is done when the tumor is too ... stage I colon cancer usually includes the following: Resection and anastomosis . Use our clinical trial search to find NCI- ...

  12. General Information about Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... types of surgery : Local excision or simple polypectomy . Resection and anastomosis . This is done when the tumor is too ... stage I colon cancer usually includes the following: Resection and anastomosis . Use our clinical trial search to find NCI- ...

  13. Examples of Cancer Health Disparities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... regardless of demographic factors such as race/ethnicity. ( American Cancer Society-ACS ) Studies have found that SES factors are ... death rate is 25 percent higher for African Americans/blacks than for whites. ( NCI ) African American women with ...

  14. Preventing Breast Cancer: Making Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues Preventing Breast Cancer: Making Progress Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table of Contents ... the time a woman is taking the pills, notes Leslie Ford, M.D., associate director for NCI's ...

  15. General Information about Testicular Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may wish to have children should consider sperm banking before having treatment. Sperm banking is the process of freezing sperm and storing ... are listed in PDQ and can be found online at NCI's website . Many cancer doctors who take ...

  16. Pattern of Skin cancer at the National Orthopaedic Hospital, Enugu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... should be undertaken by albinos. Public enlightenment towards early recognition of skin cancer will enhance early presentation and ensure adequate and curative treatment. Keywords: Skin cancers, squamous cell carcinoma, late presentation of skin cancer. Nigerian Journal of Plastic Surgery Vol. 4 (1) 2008: pp. 13-18 ...

  17. Oral cancer at Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi | Onyango | East ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The epidemiology of oral cancer in the African population is still uncertain. Earlier reports suggested a relatively low incidence of oral cancer among Africans. However, there have been recent reports of an upward trend in the incidence of oral cancers in developing countries as a consequence of changes in ...

  18. Cervical cancer in women diagnosed at the National Health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Cancer of the cervix is the second most prevalent cancer of women to date in the Sudan, in a concerted review of the records of the hospital-based cancer registry of the Radiation & Isotope Centre of Khartoum (RICK). However, in spite of a wealth of data, this is the first study to date describing the ...

  19. Clinical Cancer Advances 2018: Annual Report on Progress Against Cancer From the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heymach, John; Krilov, Lada; Alberg, Anthony; Baxter, Nancy; Chang, Susan Marina; Corcoran, Ryan; Dale, William; DeMichele, Angela; Magid Diefenbach, Catherine S; Dreicer, Robert; Epstein, Andrew S; Gillison, Maura L; Graham, David L; Jones, Joshua; Ko, Andrew H; Lopez, Ana Maria; Maki, Robert G; Rodriguez-Galindo, Carlos; Schilsky, Richard L; Sznol, Mario; Westin, Shannon Neville; Burstein, Harold

    2018-04-01

    A MESSAGE FROM ASCO'S PRESIDENT I remember when ASCO first conceived of publishing an annual report on the most transformative research occurring in cancer care. Thirteen reports later, the progress we have chronicled is remarkable, and this year is no different. The research featured in ASCO's Clinical Cancer Advances 2018 report underscores the impressive gains in our understanding of cancer and in our ability to tailor treatments to tumors' genetic makeup. The ASCO 2018 Advance of the Year, adoptive cell immunotherapy, allows clinicians to genetically reprogram patients' own immune cells to find and attack cancer cells throughout the body. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy-a type of adoptive cell immunotherapy-has led to remarkable results in young patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and in adults with lymphoma and multiple myeloma. Researchers are also exploring this approach in other types of cancer. This advance would not be possible without robust federal investment in cancer research. The first clinical trial of CAR T-cell therapy in children with ALL was funded, in part, by grants from the National Cancer Institute (NCI), and researchers at the NCI Center for Cancer Research were the first to report on possible CAR T-cell therapy for multiple myeloma. These discoveries follow decades of prior research on immunology and cancer biology, much of which was supported by federal dollars. In fact, many advances that are highlighted in the 2018 Clinical Cancer Advances report were made possible thanks to our nation's support for biomedical research. Funding from the US National Institutes of Health and the NCI helps researchers pursue critical patient care questions and addresses vital, unmet needs that private industry has little incentive to take on. Federally supported cancer research generates the biomedical innovations that fuel the development and availability of new and improved treatments for patients. We need sustained federal

  20. Vaccines for HIV | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The development of an effective HIV vaccine has been an ongoing area of research. The high variability in HIV-1 virus strains has represented a major challenge in successful development. Ideally, an effective candidate vaccine would provide protection against the majority of clades of HIV. Two major hurdles to overcome are immunodominance and sequence diversity. This vaccine utilizes a strategy for overcoming these two issues by identifying the conserved regions of the virus and exploiting them for use in a targeted therapy. NCI seeks licensees and/or research collaborators to commercialize this technology, which has been validated in macaque models.

  1. New Phone System Coming to NCI Campus at Frederick | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Travis Fouche and Trent McKee, Guest Writers Beginning in September, phones at the NCI Campus at Frederick will begin to be replaced, as the project to upgrade the current phone system ramps up. Over the next 16 months, the Information Systems Program (ISP) will be working with Facilities Maintenance and Engineering and Computer & Statistical Services to replace the current Avaya phone system with a Cisco Unified Communications phone system. The Cisco system is already in use at the Advanced Technology Research Facility (ATRF).

  2. The molecular landscape of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia reveals recurrent structural alterations and age-specific mutational interactions | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    We present the molecular landscape of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and characterize nearly 1,000 participants in Children’s Oncology Group (COG) AML trials. The COG–National Cancer Institute (NCI) TARGET AML initiative assessed cases by whole-genome, targeted DNA, mRNA and microRNA sequencing and CpG methylation profiling. Validated DNA variants corresponded to diverse, infrequent mutations, with fewer than 40 genes mutated in >2% of cases.

  3. An ensemble based top performing approach for NCI-DREAM drug sensitivity prediction challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Wan

    Full Text Available We consider the problem of predicting sensitivity of cancer cell lines to new drugs based on supervised learning on genomic profiles. The genetic and epigenetic characterization of a cell line provides observations on various aspects of regulation including DNA copy number variations, gene expression, DNA methylation and protein abundance. To extract relevant information from the various data types, we applied a random forest based approach to generate sensitivity predictions from each type of data and combined the predictions in a linear regression model to generate the final drug sensitivity prediction. Our approach when applied to the NCI-DREAM drug sensitivity prediction challenge was a top performer among 47 teams and produced high accuracy predictions. Our results show that the incorporation of multiple genomic characterizations lowered the mean and variance of the estimated bootstrap prediction error. We also applied our approach to the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia database for sensitivity prediction and the ability to extract the top targets of an anti-cancer drug. The results illustrate the effectiveness of our approach in predicting drug sensitivity from heterogeneous genomic datasets.

  4. National and Subnational Population-Based Incidence of Cancer in Thailand: Assessing Cancers with the Highest Burdens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shama Virani

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In Thailand, five cancer types—breast, cervical, colorectal, liver and lung cancer—contribute to over half of the cancer burden. The magnitude of these cancers must be quantified over time to assess previous health policies and highlight future trajectories for targeted prevention efforts. We provide a comprehensive assessment of these five cancers nationally and subnationally, with trend analysis, projections, and number of cases expected for the year 2025 using cancer registry data. We found that breast (average annual percent change (AAPC: 3.1% and colorectal cancer (female AAPC: 3.3%, male AAPC: 4.1% are increasing while cervical cancer (AAPC: −4.4% is decreasing nationwide. However, liver and lung cancers exhibit disproportionately higher burdens in the northeast and north regions, respectively. Lung cancer increased significantly in northeastern and southern women, despite low smoking rates. Liver cancers are expected to increase in the northern males and females. Liver cancer increased in the south, despite the absence of the liver fluke, a known factor, in this region. Our findings are presented in the context of health policy, population dynamics and serve to provide evidence for future prevention strategies. Our subnational estimates provide a basis for understanding variations in region-specific risk factor profiles that contribute to incidence trends over time.

  5. Prostate Cancer in South Africa: Pathology Based National Cancer Registry Data (1986–2006) and Mortality Rates (1997–2009)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babb, Chantal; Urban, Margaret; Kielkowski, Danuta; Kellett, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common male cancers globally; however little is known about prostate cancer in Africa. Incidence data for prostate cancer in South Africa (SA) from the pathology based National Cancer Registry (1986–2006) and data on mortality (1997–2009) from Statistics SA were analysed. World standard population denominators were used to calculate age specific incidence and mortality rates (ASIR and ASMR) using the direct method. Prostate cancer was the most common male cancer in all SA population groups (excluding basal cell carcinoma). There are large disparities in the ASIR between black, white, coloured, and Asian/Indian populations: 19, 65, 46, and 19 per 100 000, respectively, and ASMR was 11, 7, 52, and 6 per 100 000, respectively. Prostate cancer was the second leading cause of cancer death, accounting for around 13% of male deaths from a cancer. The average age at diagnosis was 68 years and 74 years at death. For SA the ASIR increased from 16.8 in 1986 to 30.8 in 2006, while the ASMR increased from 12.3 in 1997 to 16.7 in 2009. There has been a steady increase of incidence and mortality from prostate cancer in SA. PMID:24955252

  6. Prostate Cancer in South Africa: Pathology Based National Cancer Registry Data (1986–2006 and Mortality Rates (1997–2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantal Babb

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is one of the most common male cancers globally; however little is known about prostate cancer in Africa. Incidence data for prostate cancer in South Africa (SA from the pathology based National Cancer Registry (1986–2006 and data on mortality (1997–2009 from Statistics SA were analysed. World standard population denominators were used to calculate age specific incidence and mortality rates (ASIR and ASMR using the direct method. Prostate cancer was the most common male cancer in all SA population groups (excluding basal cell carcinoma. There are large disparities in the ASIR between black, white, coloured, and Asian/Indian populations: 19, 65, 46, and 19 per 100 000, respectively, and ASMR was 11, 7, 52, and 6 per 100 000, respectively. Prostate cancer was the second leading cause of cancer death, accounting for around 13% of male deaths from a cancer. The average age at diagnosis was 68 years and 74 years at death. For SA the ASIR increased from 16.8 in 1986 to 30.8 in 2006, while the ASMR increased from 12.3 in 1997 to 16.7 in 2009. There has been a steady increase of incidence and mortality from prostate cancer in SA.

  7. Individual Breast Cancer risk assessment in Underserved Populations: Integrating empirical Bioethics and Health Disparities Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Emily E.; Hoskins, Kent

    2013-01-01

    Research suggests that individual breast cancer risk assessment may improve adherence to recommended screening and prevention guidelines, thereby decreasing morbidity and mortality. Further research on the use of risk assessment models in underserved minority populations is critical to informing national public health efforts to eliminate breast cancer disparities. However, implementing individual breast cancer risk assessment in underserved patient populations raises particular ethical issues that require further examination. After reviewing these issues, we will discuss how empirical bioethics research can be integrated with health disparities research to inform the translation of research findings. Our in-progress National Cancer Institute (NCI) funded study, How Do Underserved Minority Women Think About Breast Cancer?, conducted in the context of a larger study on individual breast cancer risk assessment, is presented as a model. PMID:23124498

  8. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Skip to content Español 1-800-4-CANCER Live Chat Publications Dictionary Menu Contact Dictionary Search About Cancer Causes and Prevention Risk Factors ... MORE INFORMATION About This Website Cancer.gov en español Multimedia Publications Site Map Digital Standards for NCI ...

  9. Breast and Cervical Cancer Screening Behavior in Female Cancer Survivors: The Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2007-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun-Ae; Shin, Jinyoung; Hwang, Eun-Joo; Lee, Jung-Woong

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare breast and cervical cancer screening rates between female cancer survivors and a population without cancer to identify factors related to cervical and breast cancer screening in cancer survivors. We included 17,765 adults (738 cancer survivors and 17,027 individuals without cancer) in this study, all of whom who were 30 years of age or older and participated in the Fourth and Fifth Korean National Health and Nutritional Examination Surveys from 2007-2012. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to identify factors related to cervical and breast cancer screening uptake in female cancer survivors. The screening rate for breast cancer was 56.6%, which was higher than that in the non-cancer control group (P=0.001). The screening rate for cervical cancer was 51.4%, which was not different from that of the non-cancer control group. In terms of breast cancer screening, cancer survivors showed no significant difference in the rate of screening 5 years after their cancer diagnosis. However, cervical cancer survivors were less likely to have cervical cancer screening 10 years after their cancer diagnosis. There was no significant association between cancer screening and sociodemographic factors. Breast and cervical cancer screening rates in Korean female cancer survivors are low. Secondary primary cancer screening of female cancer survivors needs to be planned in a comprehensive manner, with the consideration of influences beyond sociodemographic factors.

  10. From Cancer Screening to Treatment: Service Delivery and Referral in the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jacqueline W.; Hanson, Vivien; Johnson, Gale D.; Royalty, Janet E.; Richardson, Lisa C.

    2015-01-01

    The National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP) provides breast and cervical cancer screening and diagnostic services to low-income and underserved women through a network of providers and health care organizations. Although the program serves women 40-64 years old for breast cancer screening and 21-64 years old for cervical cancer screening, the priority populations are women 50-64 years old for breast cancer and women who have never or rarely been screened for cervical cancer. From 1991 through 2011, the NBCCEDP provided screening and diagnostic services to more than 4.3 million women, diagnosing 54,276 breast cancers, 2554 cervical cancers, and 123,563 precancerous cervical lesions. A critical component of providing screening services is to ensure that all women with abnormal screening results receive appropriate and timely diagnostic evaluations. Case management is provided to assist women with overcoming barriers that would delay or prevent follow-up care. Women diagnosed with cancer receive treatment through the states' Breast and Cervical Cancer Treatment Programs (a special waiver for Medicaid) if they are eligible. The NBCCEDP has performance measures that serve as benchmarks to monitor the completeness and timeliness of care. More than 90% of the women receive complete diagnostic care and initiate treatment less than 30 days from the time of their diagnosis. Provision of effective screening and diagnostic services depends on effective program management, networks of providers throughout the community, and the use of evidence-based knowledge, procedures, and technologies. PMID:25099897

  11. Improving population-based cervical cancer screening in general practice : effects of a national strategy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermens, R P; Hak, E; Hulscher, M E; Mulder, J; Tacken, M A; Braspenning, J C; Grol, R P

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effects of a Dutch national prevention programme, aimed at general practitioners (GPs), on the adherence to organizational guidelines for effective cervical cancer screening in general practice. To identify the characteristics of general practices determining success.

  12. Research on Immunotherapy: Using the Immune System to Treat Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Research Key Initiatives Immunotherapy NCI’s Role in Immunotherapy Research An oral squamous cancer cell (white) being ... immunotherapy to more patients with cancer. NCI-Supported Immunotherapy Research Immunotherapy research funded by or conducted at ...

  13. Combining Drugs to Treat Ovarian Cancer - Annual Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Approximately 70 percent of women diagnosed with ovarian cancer will die from the disease. Read about the NCI-funded combination drug trial that has successfully treated Betsy Brauser's recurrent cancer.

  14. Childhood Cancer Genomics Gaps and Opportunities - Workshop Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI convened a workshop of representative research teams that have been leaders in defining the genomic landscape of childhood cancers to discuss the influence of genomic discoveries on the future of childhood cancer research.

  15. Renal cell cancer stage migration: analysis of the National Cancer Data Base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Christopher J; Mallin, Katherine; Ritchey, Jamie; Cooperberg, Matthew R; Carroll, Peter R

    2008-07-01

    Evidence exists to suggest a pattern of increasing early diagnosis of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The aim of the study was to analyze patterns of disease presentation and outcome of RCC by AJCC stage using data from the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) over a 12-year period. The NCDB was queried for adults diagnosed between 1993 and 2004 presenting with ICD-O-2 of 3 renal cell tumors arising in the kidney. Cases were classified by demographics, 2002 AJCC stage (6th edition), and histology. The Cochran-Armitage Test for Trend was used to determine statistical significance of trends over time. Cox regression multivariate analysis was used to evaluate the impact of stage and histology on relative survival. SPSS 14.0 was used for analyses. Between 1993 and 2004 a total of 205,963 patients from the NCDB fit our case definition of RCC. Comparisons between 1993 and 2004 data show an increase in stage I disease and decrease in stage II, III, and IV disease (P < or = .001). The size of stage I tumors also decreased from a mean of 4.1 cm in 1993 to 3.6 cm in 2003. In multivariate analysis, stage, but not histology, predicted relative survival. A 3.3% increase in survival was found for patients diagnosed in 1998 compared with patients diagnosed in 1993. A greater proportion of newly diagnosed patients with RCC currently present with stage I disease compared with earlier years. Stage predicts relative survival for patients with kidney cancer. More recently diagnosed patients have improved relative survival. (Copyright) 2008 American Cancer Society.

  16. 3 CFR 8354 - Proclamation 8354 of April 1, 2009. National Cancer Control Month, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... America A Proclamation We have achieved remarkable progress in the fight against cancer. Miracles in... Prevention, and academic and other institutions. The Federal Government plays an indispensable role in... 3 The President 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Proclamation 8354 of April 1, 2009. National Cancer...

  17. Vaccine for BK Polyomavirus-associated Infections in Transplant Recipients | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI researches identified a BK polyomavirus (BKV) virulent strain that causes chronic urinary tract infections, and the development of vaccine and therapeutic methods that would block BKV pathogenesis. The NCI Laboratory of Cellular Oncology, seek parties to license or co-develop this technology.

  18. 77 FR 5029 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    ... Community; Cancer Drug Shortages: Economic, Regulatory, and Manufacturing Issues; The Role of the Cancer... security, NIH has instituted stringent procedures for entrance onto the NIH campus. All visitor vehicles, including taxicabs, hotel, and airport shuttles will be inspected before being allowed on campus. Visitors...

  19. 77 FR 20491 - National Cancer Control Month, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-05

    ... unlock new therapies. Innovative studies are paving the way for effective treatments to deadly cancers..., women, and children we have lost to cancer, and we look ahead to a future in which more Americans have..., April 5, 2012 / Presidential Documents#0;#0; #0; #0;Title 3-- #0;The President [[Page 20491...

  20. 75 FR 17839 - National Cancer Control Month, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-07

    ... Institutes of Health to develop more effective treatments. While cancer affects people of every background... from cancer. Americans should discuss preventive care with a health professional. Getting regular check... limiting sun exposure and alcohol consumption, avoiding tobacco, exercising regularly, and maintaining a...

  1. 77 FR 55848 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-11

    ... Clinical Trials and Strategic Planning Subcommittee. Date: September 24, 2012. Time: 5 p.m. to 6 p.m... Trials Strategic Planning Subcommittee. Dial in number: 1-866-652-9542 and Passcode: 4596704. Place... Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397...

  2. 78 FR 5190 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-24

    ... Clinical Trials and Strategic Planning Subcommittee. Date: February 25, 2013. Time: 5:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m... Trials Strategic Planning Subcommittee. Dial in number: 1-866-652-9542 and Passcode: 4596704. Place... Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396...

  3. 77 FR 36564 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-19

    ... Prevention Method: State of the, Science and Evidence. Place: Hilton San Francisco Financial District, 750... applicable, the business or professional affiliation of the interested person. Information is also available... Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396...

  4. UNBS5162, a Novel Naphthalimide That Decreases CXCL Chemokine Expression in Experimental Prostate Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana Mijatovic

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Several naphthalimides have been evaluated clinically as potential anticancer agents. UNBS3157, a naphthalimide that belongs to the same class as amonafide, was designed to avoid the specific activating metabolism that induces amonafide’s hematotoxicity. The current study shows that UNBS3157 rapidly and irreversibly hydrolyzes to UNBS5162 without generating amonafide. In vivo UNBS5162 after repeat administration significantly increased survival in orthotopic human prostate cancer models. Results obtained by the National Cancer Institute (NCI using UNBS3157 and UNBS5162 against the NCI 60 cell line panel did not show a correlation with any other compound present in the NCI database, including amonafide, thereby suggesting a unique mechanism of action for these two novel naphthalimides. Affymetrix genome-wide microarray analysis and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay revealed that in vitro exposure of PC-3 cells to UNBS5162 (1 μM for 5 successive days dramatically decreased the expression of the proangiogenic CXCL chemokines. Histopathology additionally revealed antiangiogenic properties in vivo for UNBS5162 in the orthotopic PC-3 model. In conclusion, the present study reveals UNBS5162 to be a pan-antagonist of CXCL chemokine expression, with the compound displaying antitumor effects in experimental models of human refractory prostate cancer when administered alone and found to enhance the activity of taxol when coadministered with the taxoid.

  5. Development of National Program of Cancer Registries SAS Tool for Population-Based Cancer Relative Survival Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xing; Zhang, Kevin; Ren, Yuan; Wilson, Reda; O'Neil, Mary Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Studying population-based cancer survival by leveraging the high-quality cancer incidence data collected by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Program of Cancer Registries (NPCR) can offer valuable insight into the cancer burden and impact in the United States. We describe the development and validation of a SASmacro tool that calculates population-based cancer site-specific relative survival estimates comparable to those obtained through SEER*Stat. The NPCR relative survival analysis SAS tool (NPCR SAS tool) was developed based on the relative survival method and SAS macros developed by Paul Dickman. NPCR cancer incidence data from 25 states submitted in November 2012 were used, specifically cases diagnosed from 2003 to 2010 with follow-up through 2010. Decennial and annual complete life tables published by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) for 2000 through 2009 were used. To assess comparability between the 2 tools, 5-year relative survival rates were calculated for 25 cancer sites by sex, race, and age group using the NPCR SAS tool and the National Cancer Institute's SEER*Stat 8.1.5 software. A module to create data files for SEER*Stat was also developed for the NPCR SAS tool. Comparison of the results produced by both SAS and SEER*Stat showed comparable and reliable relative survival estimates for NPCR data. For a majority of the sites, the net differences between the NPCR SAS tool and SEER*Stat-produced relative survival estimates ranged from -0.1% to 0.1%. The estimated standard errors were highly comparable between the 2 tools as well. The NPCR SAS tool will allow researchers to accurately estimate cancer 5-year relative survival estimates that are comparable to those produced by SEER*Stat for NPCR data. Comparison of output from the NPCR SAS tool and SEER*Stat provided additional quality control capabilities for evaluating data prior to producing NPCR relative survival estimates.

  6. Diallyl Trisulfide Inhibits Growth of NCI-H460in Vitroandin Vivo, and Ameliorates Cisplatin-Induced Oxidative Injury in the Treatment of Lung Carcinoma in Xenograft Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiaoyan; Zhu, Xiaosong; Liu, Na; Xu, Hongya; Zhao, Zhongxi; Li, Siying; Li, Shanzhong; Cai, Jianhua; Cao, Jimin

    2017-01-01

    Diallyl trisulfide (DATS), an organosulfuric component of garlic oil, exhibits potential anticancer and chemopreventive effects. Cisplatin (DDP), a common chemotherapeutic agent, has provided great therapeutic contributions to treating solid tumors, but with serious side effects. Here, we verified the anti-tumor properties of DATS on lung cancer in vitro and in vivo , and evaluated synergistic effects of DATS combined with DDP on the NCI-H460 xenograft model. Significantly decreased cell viabilities, cell cycle G 1 arrest, and apoptosis induction were observed in DATS treated NCI-H460 cells ( p <0.05). And injection of DATS (30 or 40 mg/kg) to female Balb/c mice significantly inhibited the growth of human NCI-H460 cell tumor xenograft ( p <0.001). Moreover, DATS in combination with DDP exhibited enhanced anti-tumor activity via induction of apoptosis. Apoptosis pathways were confirmed by modulation of p53, Bcl-2 family members; induction of active caspase-3/8/9 and activation of JNK- and p38-MAPK pathways. Interestedly, DATS+DDP administration exerted fewer side effects, such as suppressing the weight loss and ameliorating DDP-induced oxidative injury, especially in renal parenchyma. In addition, increased E-cadherin and decreased MMP-9 expression levels were observed in DATS-treated tumor tissues. These studies provide supports that DATS might be a potential candidate for combination with DDP in cancer treatment.

  7. Coverage of common cancer types in UK national newspapers: a content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konfortion, Julie; Jack, Ruth H; Davies, Elizabeth A

    2014-07-11

    To determine whether recent newspaper coverage of the four most common cancer types relates to their relative burden and national awareness months, and to identify the subject focus during high-coverage periods. Content analysis using the Nexis newspaper article database. UK 2011-2012. Annual number and ranking, monthly proportions and subject of articles on breast, lung, bowel and prostate cancers. 9178 articles were identified during 2011 and 2012 featuring breast (4237), prostate (1757), lung (1746) and bowel (1438) cancer. Peaks in monthly proportions above the 99% upper confidence limit were identified for each. Breast cancer had the highest coverage of 12% and 17% during its awareness month. Smaller peaks (11%) were identified during Bowel Cancer Awareness month. Prostate cancer received high coverage in relation to the case of the man convicted of the Lockerbie bombing who had been diagnosed with the cancer, and lung cancer in relation to the deaths of celebrities. Breast cancer was covered most often overall and by newspaper category while the lower coverage of other cancer types did not consistently mirror the relative number of new cases each year. The peaks by newspaper category were similar to the overall coverage with few exceptions. UK newspaper coverage of common cancer types other than of the breast appears under-represented relative to their population burden. Coverage of breast cancer and bowel cancer appears to be influenced by their awareness months, while that of prostate cancer and lung cancer is influenced by other media stories. Health-promoting public bodies and campaigners could learn from the success of Breast Cancer Awareness Month and work more closely with journalists to ensure that the relevant messages reach wider audiences. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  8. Open source machine-learning algorithms for the prediction of optimal cancer drug therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Cai; Mezencev, Roman; McDonald, John F; Vannberg, Fredrik

    2017-01-01

    Precision medicine is a rapidly growing area of modern medical science and open source machine-learning codes promise to be a critical component for the successful development of standardized and automated analysis of patient data. One important goal of precision cancer medicine is the accurate prediction of optimal drug therapies from the genomic profiles of individual patient tumors. We introduce here an open source software platform that employs a highly versatile support vector machine (SVM) algorithm combined with a standard recursive feature elimination (RFE) approach to predict personalized drug responses from gene expression profiles. Drug specific models were built using gene expression and drug response data from the National Cancer Institute panel of 60 human cancer cell lines (NCI-60). The models are highly accurate in predicting the drug responsiveness of a variety of cancer cell lines including those comprising the recent NCI-DREAM Challenge. We demonstrate that predictive accuracy is optimized when the learning dataset utilizes all probe-set expression values from a diversity of cancer cell types without pre-filtering for genes generally considered to be "drivers" of cancer onset/progression. Application of our models to publically available ovarian cancer (OC) patient gene expression datasets generated predictions consistent with observed responses previously reported in the literature. By making our algorithm "open source", we hope to facilitate its testing in a variety of cancer types and contexts leading to community-driven improvements and refinements in subsequent applications.

  9. Open source machine-learning algorithms for the prediction of optimal cancer drug therapies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai Huang

    Full Text Available Precision medicine is a rapidly growing area of modern medical science and open source machine-learning codes promise to be a critical component for the successful development of standardized and automated analysis of patient data. One important goal of precision cancer medicine is the accurate prediction of optimal drug therapies from the genomic profiles of individual patient tumors. We introduce here an open source software platform that employs a highly versatile support vector machine (SVM algorithm combined with a standard recursive feature elimination (RFE approach to predict personalized drug responses from gene expression profiles. Drug specific models were built using gene expression and drug response data from the National Cancer Institute panel of 60 human cancer cell lines (NCI-60. The models are highly accurate in predicting the drug responsiveness of a variety of cancer cell lines including those comprising the recent NCI-DREAM Challenge. We demonstrate that predictive accuracy is optimized when the learning dataset utilizes all probe-set expression values from a diversity of cancer cell types without pre-filtering for genes generally considered to be "drivers" of cancer onset/progression. Application of our models to publically available ovarian cancer (OC patient gene expression datasets generated predictions consistent with observed responses previously reported in the literature. By making our algorithm "open source", we hope to facilitate its testing in a variety of cancer types and contexts leading to community-driven improvements and refinements in subsequent applications.

  10. 76 FR 55209 - National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-07

    ... month, we remember the mothers, sisters, and daughters we have lost to ovarian cancer, and we extend our... the women, families, and professionals working to end this disease. The Centers for Disease Control...

  11. 77 FR 19674 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-02

    ... commercial property such as patentable material, and personal information concerning individuals associated... and evaluate grant applications. Place: Doubletree Hotel Bethesda, 8120 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, MD... Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Innovative Molecular Analysis Technologies for Cancer (R21). Date: June 26...

  12. 76 FR 20693 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-13

    ... special assistance, such as sign language interpretation or other reasonable accommodations, should notify... Dialogue, Nonprofit Conveners Driving Implementation of Research Outcomes, Barriers to Implementation of Research Outcomes, Presentations Highlighting Local Academic Research in Cancer. Place: Rizzo Conference...

  13. 78 FR 54737 - National Childhood Cancer Awareness Month, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-06

    ... death by disease for American children under 15. For those children and their families, and in memory of... trial, including clinical trials that treat childhood cancer. All children deserve the chance to dream...

  14. 78 FR 69426 - Submission for OMB Review; 30-Day Comment Request: NIH NCI Central Institutional Review Board...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-19

    ... Central Institutional Review Board (CIRB) Initiative (NCI) SUMMARY: Under the provisions of Section 3507(a... Evaluation Program, Operations and Informatics Branch, 9609 Medical Center Drive, Rockville, MD 20850 or call... Collection: NIH NCI Central Institutional Review Board (CIRB) Initiative (NCI), 0925-0625, Expiration Date 1...

  15. Softball Games Bring NCI and Leidos Biomed Employees Together | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI and Leidos Biomed employees took to the fields at Nallin Pond for the third annual slow-pitch softball games on August 26. The series attracted 54 employees who were divided into four teams, Red, Blue, Gray, and White, and they were cheered on by about 40 enthusiastic spectators. In the first set of games, the Gray team defeated the Blue team, 15–8, and the White team pulled out a win against the Red team, 17–15. After a brief rest, the two winning teams and the two losing teams faced each other in a second set of games. On Field 1, the “winners” match-up of the Gray and White teams was a nail biter, with a close score throughout the game. Daylight was a factor, however, and the team captains decided to call the game for safety reasons. With a lead of 15 to 13, the Gray team was declared the overall winner.

  16. National Cryo-Electron Microscopy Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information about the National Cryo-EM Facility at NCI, created to provide researchers access to the latest cryo-EM technology for high resolution imaging. Includes timeline for installation and how to access the facility.

  17. Guidelines for a national epidemiological surveillance system of thyroid cancer in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-10-01

    At the request of the French Department of Health, a multidisciplinary Thyroid Cancer Committee, coordinated by the French Public Health Agency analysed the observed increase of thyroid cancer incidence in France and outlined the limits of the present case registration system. This Committee set up guidelines to improve the national surveillance system of thyroid cancer. The Committee analysed 4 models for the incidence survey, 3 of which have been excluded: a poor cost-benefit ratio precludes the constitution of a national registry dedicated to thyroid cancer; however, the Committee has recommended this model that still exists for thyroid cancer of the youth(under 19 years old), a national system base exclusively on pathological data would only be relevant after significant improvement of data collection, obligatory of all cases of thyroid cancer is inappropriate considering the fit prognosis of this cancer. A two level system is proposed with continuous registration of incident caes through the National Hospital Discharge survey, specific focused analysis of clinical and pathological data in case of a cluster alert in any given area. Whatever the system, it seems necessary to in general: propose a unique health registration number per patient, improve access to medical data, organize a national standardised collection of pathological findings, follow up the diagnosis practices related to thyroid cancer that have an impact on incidence rates. In conclusion, a reliable incidence survey and a follow up of diagnostic practices and of risk factors may provide a relevant model of epidemiological survey of thyroid cancers in France but such a system requires a long lasting strategic and financial involvement. (author)

  18. Evaluation of cancer incidence among employees at the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acquavella, J.F.; Wilkinson, G.S.; Wiggs, L.D.; Tietjen, G.L.; Key, C.R.

    1983-01-01

    As part of the National Plutonium Workers Study, cancer incidence for 1969 to 1978 among employees of the Los Alamos National Laboratory was investigated. Incident cancers were identified by a computer match of the Los Alamos employed roster against New Mexico Tumor Registry files. The resulting numbers of total and site-specific cancers were compared to the numbers expected based on incidence rates for the State of New Mexico, specific for age, sex, ethnicity, and calendar period. For Anglo males, significantly fewer cancers than expected (SIR = 0.60, 95% CI 0.44 to 0.79) were found. This resulted from marked deficits of smoking-related cancers, particularly lung (2 observed, 19.4 expected) and oral (1 observed, 6.5 expected) cancer. Similarly, no smoking-related cancers were detected among Anglo females, though they had a slight nonsignificant excess of breast cancer (14 observed, 9.1 expected) and a suggestive excess of cancer of the uterine corpus (2 observed, 0.25 expected). The pattern of cancerincidence among Anglo employees is typical of high social class populations and not likely related to the Los Alamos working environment

  19. From cancer screening to treatment: service delivery and referral in the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jacqueline W; Hanson, Vivien; Johnson, Gale D; Royalty, Janet E; Richardson, Lisa C

    2014-08-15

    The National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP) provides breast and cervical cancer screening and diagnostic services to low-income and underserved women through a network of providers and health care organizations. Although the program serves women 40-64 years old for breast cancer screening and 21-64 years old for cervical cancer screening, the priority populations are women 50-64 years old for breast cancer and women who have never or rarely been screened for cervical cancer. From 1991 through 2011, the NBCCEDP provided screening and diagnostic services to more than 4.3 million women, diagnosing 54,276 breast cancers, 2554 cervical cancers, and 123,563 precancerous cervical lesions. A critical component of providing screening services is to ensure that all women with abnormal screening results receive appropriate and timely diagnostic evaluations. Case management is provided to assist women with overcoming barriers that would delay or prevent follow-up care. Women diagnosed with cancer receive treatment through the states' Breast and Cervical Cancer Treatment Programs (a special waiver for Medicaid) if they are eligible. The NBCCEDP has performance measures that serve as benchmarks to monitor the completeness and timeliness of care. More than 90% of the women receive complete diagnostic care and initiate treatment less than 30 days from the time of their diagnosis. Provision of effective screening and diagnostic services depends on effective program management, networks of providers throughout the community, and the use of evidence-based knowledge, procedures, and technologies. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  20. Treatment Options (by Stage) for Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... types of surgery : Local excision or simple polypectomy . Resection and anastomosis . This is done when the tumor is too ... stage I colon cancer usually includes the following: Resection and anastomosis . Use our clinical trial search to find NCI- ...

  1. Chromatin Pioneers | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taking advantage of their ability to explore provocative ideas, NCI investigators pioneered the study of chromatin to demonstrate its functional importance and lay the groundwork for understanding its role in cancer and other diseases.

  2. Testing Precision Screening for Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    An NCI research article about individualized approaches that could help identify those at risk of breast cancer who need to be screened and testing screening intervals that are appropriate for each person’s level of risk.

  3. Cancer Education Webinars for Multicultural Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    These webinars from NCI are intended to educate multicultural media professionals about the impact of cancer and other diseases on special populations, including African American, Hispanic, Asian American, and American Indian/Alaska Native communities.

  4. Making Sense of Key Cancer Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Several regularly released reports, including the Annual Report to the Nation—which is jointly released by NCI and several other organizations—provide information on important cancer trends in the United States.

  5. Oral cavity and lip cancer: United Kingdom National Multidisciplinary Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerawala, C; Roques, T; Jeannon, J-P; Bisase, B

    2016-05-01

    This is the official guideline endorsed by the specialty associations involved in the care of head and neck cancer patients in the UK. It provides recommendations on the assessment and management of patients with cancer of the oral cavity and the lip. Recommendations • Surgery remains the mainstay of management for oral cavity tumours. (R) • Tumour resection should be performed with a clinical clearance of 1 cm vital structures permitting. (R) • Elective neck treatment should be offered for all oral cavity tumours. (R) • Adjuvant radiochemotherapy in the presence of advanced neck disease or positive margins improves control rates. (R) • Early stage lip cancer can be treated equally well by surgery or radiation therapy. (R).

  6. The NCI Genomic Data Commons as an engine for precision medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Mark A; Ferretti, Vincent; Grossman, Robert L; Staudt, Louis M

    2017-07-27

    The National Cancer Institute Genomic Data Commons (GDC) is an information system for storing, analyzing, and sharing genomic and clinical data from patients with cancer. The recent high-throughput sequencing of cancer genomes and transcriptomes has produced a big data problem that precludes many cancer biologists and oncologists from gleaning knowledge from these data regarding the nature of malignant processes and the relationship between tumor genomic profiles and treatment response. The GDC aims to democratize access to cancer genomic data and to foster the sharing of these data to promote precision medicine approaches to the diagnosis and treatment of cancer.

  7. Adoption of Hypofractionated Whole-Breast Irradiation for Early-Stage Breast Cancer: A National Cancer Data Base Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Elyn H.; Mougalian, Sarah S.; Soulos, Pamela R.; Rutter, Charles E.; Evans, Suzanne B.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Gross, Cary P.; Yu, James B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the relationship of patient, hospital, and cancer characteristics with the adoption of hypofractionation in a national sample of patients diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective study of breast cancer patients in the National Cancer Data Base from 2004-2011 who were treated with radiation therapy and met eligibility criteria for hypofractionation. We used logistic regression to identify factors associated with receipt of hypofractionation (vs conventional fractionation). Results: We identified 13,271 women (11.7%) and 99,996 women (88.3%) with early-stage breast cancer who were treated with hypofractionation and conventional fractionation, respectively. The use of hypofractionation increased significantly, with 5.4% of patients receiving it in 2004 compared with 22.8% in 2011 (P<.001 for trend). Patients living ≥50 miles from the cancer reporting facility had increased odds of receiving hypofractionation (odds ratio 1.57 [95% confidence interval 1.44-1.72], P<.001). Adoption of hypofractionation was associated with treatment at an academic center (P<.001) and living in an area with high median income (P<.001). Hypofractionation was less likely to be used in patients with high-risk disease, such as increased tumor size (P<.001) or poorly differentiated histologic grade (P<.001). Conclusions: The use of hypofractionation is rising and is associated with increased travel distance and treatment at an academic center. Further adoption of hypofractionation may be tempered by both clinical and nonclinical concerns

  8. Variation in Locoregional Prostate Cancer Care and Treatment Trends at Commission on Cancer Designated Facilities: A National Cancer Data Base Analysis 2004 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löppenberg, Björn; Sood, Akshay; Dalela, Deepansh; Karabon, Patrick; Sammon, Jesse D; Vetterlein, Malte W; Noldus, Joachim; Peabody, James O; Trinh, Quoc-Dien; Menon, Mani; Abdollah, Firas

    2017-12-01

    Contemporary treatment trends for prostate cancer show increased rates of active surveillance. However, nationwide applicability of these reports is limited. Additionally, the effect of Commission on Cancer facility type on prostate cancer treatment patterns is unknown. We used the National Cancer Data Base to identify men diagnosed with prostate cancer, between 2004 and 2013. Our cohort was stratified on the basis of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network prostate cancer risk classes. Cochran-Armitage tests were used to evaluate temporal trends. Random effects hierarchical logit models were used to assess treatment variation at Commission on Cancer facility and institution level. In 825,707 men, utilization of radiation therapy declined and utilization of radical prostatectomy increased for all prostate cancer risk groups between 2004 and 2013 (P Commission on Cancer facility type. Across all risk groups, the lowest rates of radical prostatectomy and highest rates of external beam radiation therapy were observed in community cancer programs. The highest rates of observation for low-risk disease were observed in academic centers. Treatment variation according to institution ranged from 14% (95% confidence interval, 0.12-0.15) for androgen deprivation therapy up to 59% (95% confidence interval, 0.45-0.73) for cryotherapy. The increased utilization of observation in low-risk prostate cancer is an encouraging finding, which appears to be mainly derived by a decrease in radiotherapy utilization in this risk group. Regardless of tumor characteristics, significant variations in treatment modality exist among different facility types and institutions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Selected National Cancer Institute Breast Cancer Research Topics | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer and Environment Research Centers (BCERCs) to conduct interdisciplinary research on the effects of early environmental exposures ... more than 20 cancers using state-of-the art genomic analysis technologies. Recent findings suggest that there ...

  10. Leadership Roles and Activities Among Alumni Receiving Postdoctoral Fellowship Training in Cancer Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, David E; Faupel-Badger, Jessica M; Izmirlian, Grant

    2018-02-28

    This study was conducted in 2016-2017 to better understand formal and informal leadership roles and activities of alumni from postdoctoral research training programs in cancer prevention. Data were obtained from surveys of 254 employed scientists who completed cancer prevention postdoctoral training within the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program, or at US research institutions through NCI-sponsored National Research Service Award (NRSA) individual postdoctoral fellowship (F32) grants, from 1987 to 2011. Fifteen questions categorized under Organizational Leadership, Research Leadership, Professional Society/Conference Leadership, and Broader Scientific/Health Community Leadership domains were analyzed. About 75% of respondents had at least one organizational leadership role or activity during their careers, and 13-34% reported some type of research, professional society/conference, or broader scientific/health community leadership within the past 5 years. Characteristics independently associated with leadership from regression models were being in earlier postdoctoral cohorts (8 items, range for statistically significant ORs = 2.8 to 10.8) and employment sector (8 items, range for statistically significant ORs = 0.4 to 11.7). Scientists whose race/ethnicity was other than white were less likely to report organizational leadership or management responsibilities (OR = 0.4, 95% CI 0.2-0.9). Here, many alumni from NCI-supported cancer prevention postdoctoral programs were involved in leadership, with postdoctoral cohort and employment sector being the factors most often associated with leadership roles and activities. Currently, there is relatively little research on leadership roles of biomedical scientists in general, or in cancer prevention specifically. This study begins to address this gap and provide a basis for more extensive studies of leadership roles and training of scientists.

  11. Electron Microscopist/Structural Biologist | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The Cancer Research Technology Program (CRTP) develops and implements emerging technology, cancer biology expertise and research capabilities to accomplish NCI research objectives. The CRTP is an outward-facing, multi-disciplinary hub purposed to enable the external cancer research community and provides dedicated support to NCI’s intramural Center for Cancer Research (CCR). The dedicated units provide electron microscopy, protein characterization, protein expression, optical microscopy and genetics. These research efforts are an integral part of CCR at the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (FNLCR). CRTP scientists also work collaboratively with intramural NCI investigators to provide research technologies and expertise. KEY ROLES/RESPONSIBILITIES - THIS POSITION IS CONTINGENT UPON FUNDING APPROVAL Develop technologies for application on emerging electron microscopy platforms. Operate and optimize performance of TEM microscopes, specifically Titan Krios and Talos Artctica for high-resolution data collection in single particle studies as well as cryo-electron tomography. Assist with maintenance for the Titan Krios and the Talos Arctica as well as associated instruments. Interact closely with and transfer newly developed technical capabilities to CCR Center for Molecular Microscopy (CMM) and CCR collaborators.

  12. CANCER OF THE PENIS AT KENYATTA NATIONAL HOSPITAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2000-10-10

    Oct 10, 2000 ... It is however widely reported that squamous cell cancer of the penis is commoner in men in their sixth and seventh decades with an abrupt increase in incidence at 60 years and peaking at 80 years of age(23). In two such studies the mean age was reported as being 55 and 58 years(24,25) respectively.

  13. 77 FR 4052 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-26

    ... Person: Marvin L. Salin, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, Special Review and Logistics Branch, Division... Special Emphasis Panel, The Role of Microbial Metabolites in Cancer Prevention and Etiology. Date: March... Soldatenkov, M.D., Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, Special Review and Logistics Branch, Division of...

  14. 78 FR 54745 - National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-06

    ... increase a man's chances of developing prostate cancer. It is more common among older men and men with a... placing lifetime dollar limits on essential health benefits and from dropping coverage because of mistakes... dollar limits on vital benefits, and insurers will no longer be able to deny coverage or charge higher...

  15. 76 FR 55551 - National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-07

    ..., studies show certain factors--including age, race, and family history--may increase the likelihood of.... I encourage all men, especially those who are at an increased risk, to talk to their doctors about... dollar limits on health benefits. These changes free cancer patients to focus on getting better instead...

  16. ORAL CANCER AT KENYATTA NATIONAL HOSPITAL, NAIROBI JF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2004-06-06

    Jun 6, 2004 ... However, there was a very wide age range with occurrences reported as early as the first decade. The tongue was the most frequent site for oral cancer in both males and females (Table 3). This was followed by the mandible and the maxilla. The floor of the mouth was the fourth most common site followed.

  17. 77 FR 49450 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-16

    ... Executive Blvd., Rockville, MD 20852, (Telephone Conference Call). Contact Person: Gerald G. Lovinger, Ph.D... and R01 applications in Lung, Skin, Ovarian, Pancreatic and Gastrointestinal Cancers. Date: September... Washington/Rockville, 1750 Rockville Pike, Rockville, MD 20852. Contact Person: Caron A Lyman, Ph.D...

  18. 78 FR 20213 - National Cancer Control Month, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-04

    ... tomorrow's breakthroughs. My Administration is committed to supporting the kind of medical research that.... This month, we rededicate ourselves to securing better outcomes, reducing new cases, and advancing cancer research. To beat this disease, we must continue our efforts to prevent it. Each of us can reduce...

  19. 78 FR 50068 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-16

    ... be open to the public, with attendance limited to space available. Individuals who plan to attend and.../Default.aspx . Directions/Parking For a map and directions, please visit http://ncifrederick.cancer.gov... (three flag poles in this lot). Space in the parking lot is somewhat limited, and street parking on...

  20. 78 FR 54741 - National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-06

    ... options, protections, and benefits. Thanks to this law, insurance companies can no longer set lifetime dollar limits on coverage or cancel coverage because of errors on paperwork. By 2014, the health care law... understanding of ovarian cancer and develop better methods for diagnosis and treatment. As we continue to...

  1. [Histologic and endoscopic characteristics of gastric cancer diagnosed in a national hospital of Callao, Peru].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Vargas, Briny; Arévalo-Suarez, Fernando; Monge-Salgado, Eduardo; Montes-Teves, Pedro

    2013-03-01

    To describe the histologic and endoscopic characteristics reported among patients diagnosed with gastric cancer in Daniel Alcides Carrion National Hospital in Callao. We performed a case series including all patients with histological diagnosis of gastric cancer from January 2009 to December 2011. Data were obtained from the registers of the pathology service of Daniel Alcides Carrion National Hospital. Factors such as age and gender of patients, histologic type, endoscopic location, presence of intestinal metaplasia, histologic degree, and cancer morphology were evaluated. 120 patients were included. Mean age was 65.4 ± 13.6 years; 59 (49%) were male. Based on the histologic type, intestinal type was found among 68 (56%); diffuse type among 45 (38%), and a mixed type in 7 (6%). Regarding the site, 23 (19%) of gastric cancers were located in the fundus; 52 (43%) in the body; 39 (33%) in the antrum, and 6 (5%) in the pylorus. Patients with gastric cancer of the intestinal type were in average older than those with a diffuse type (69.1 ± 10.3 versus 59.3 ± 15.3). 60.3% of intestinal-type gastric cancers were located proximally, versus 66.6% of diffuse-type cancers. Among the studied population, diffuse-type gastric cancer appears at an earlier age than the intestinal type, and its most common location is proximal.

  2. Hepatitis B vaccinations among Koreans: Results from 2005 Korea National Cancer Screening Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwak Min-Son

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Liver cancer is one of most commonly diagnosed cancers among Koreans. Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV infection is a major risk factor for liver cancer. HBV infection can be prevented by effective screening and vaccination programs. The purpose of this study is to examine the status of HBV infection and the predictors associated with HBV vaccination. Methods The study population was derived from the 2005 Korea National Cancer Screening Survey (KNCSS. The KNCSS is an annual cross-sectional survey that uses a nationally-representative random sampling to investigate cancer screening rates. A total of 1,786 Koreans over 40 years of age participated in this study. Results Of all the participants, 5.9% reported HBV positive (HBsAg+, HBsAb-, 41.8% were HBV negative but protected (HBsAg-, HBsAb+, and 52.3% were unprotected (HBsAg-, HBsAb-. Among unprotected individuals (n = 934, 23.1% reported to have received the vaccination. About half of those who had vaccinations completed the 3-shot vaccine series. In multiple analyses, education, having private cancer insurance, alcohol use, having regular check-up, and doing regular exercise were associated with completed HBV vaccination. Conclusion This study result suggests that we need a liver cancer education program to increase HBV awareness and to increase the liver cancer prevention message among low educated populations.

  3. Utilization of breast cancer screening methods in a developing nation: results from a nationally representative sample of Malaysian households.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Richard A; Tan, Andrew K G

    2011-01-01

    As is the case in many developing nations, previous studies of breast cancer screening behavior in Malaysia have used relatively small samples that are not nationally representative, thereby limiting the generalizability of results. Therefore, this study uses nationally representative data from the Malaysia Non-Communicable Disease Surveillance-1 to investigate the role of socio-economic status on breast cancer screening behavior in Malaysia, particularly differences in screening behaviour between ethnic groups. The decisions of 816 women above age 40 in Malaysia to screen for breast cancer using mammography, clinical breast exams (CBE), and breast self-exams (BSE) are modeled using logistic regression. Results indicate that after adjusting for differences in age, education, household income, marital status, and residential location, Malay women are less likely than Chinese and Indian women to utilize mammography, but more likely to perform BSE. Education level and urban residence are positively associated with utilization of each method, but these relationships vary across ethnicity. Higher education levels are strongly related to using each screening method among Chinese women, but have no statistically significant relationship to screening among Malays. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. International Framework for Cancer Patient Advocacy: Empowering Organizations and Patients to Create a National Call to Action on Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manasco, Leigh; McGoldrick, Devon; Kajana, Kiti; Rosenthal, Lauren; McMikel, Ann; Lins, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Purpose With the rate of cancer and other noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) growing globally, cancer prevention and control efforts are critical internationally. Moreover, since the 2011 United Nations High-Level Meeting on NCDs, the international health and development community has shifted its awareness to include NCDs as a global health priority, especially in developing countries where mortality rates are disproportionately high. Simultaneously, with the dissemination of the World Cancer Declaration and the evolution of cancer control policies, the international cancer community has recognized the value of engaging patients in reducing the global cancer burden. Cancer advocacy programs that involve patients, survivors, and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) have increasing opportunities for global impact. Methods We developed a framework over 4 years through implementation of two pilot projects. We created a series of trainings and tools to build the capacity of local NGOs and patients to plan and implement a forum for patients with cancer and to create and disseminate a national call to action. The framework was piloted in South Africa from 2009 to 2011 and Japan from 2012 to 2014, and results were measured through postproject surveys completed by members of the collaborative working group and interviews with the in-country partner. Results The framework is globally relevant and could be adapted and implemented in low- and middle-income countries to amplify patient voices in the policymaking process, increase grassroots mobilization, and improve health systems and infrastructure through addressing patient needs. Conclusion With the dominant paradigm of global health in developing countries—which has previously focused on HIV/AIDS, maternal and child health, tuberculosis, and malaria—shifting to adapt to the burgeoning NCD burden, effective patient-centered advocacy frameworks are critical to the success of NCD control. PMID:28804777

  5. International Framework for Cancer Patient Advocacy: Empowering Organizations and Patients to Create a National Call to Action on Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schear, Rebekkah M; Manasco, Leigh; McGoldrick, Devon; Kajana, Kiti; Rosenthal, Lauren; McMikel, Ann; Lins, Nancy

    2015-12-01

    With the rate of cancer and other noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) growing globally, cancer prevention and control efforts are critical internationally. Moreover, since the 2011 United Nations High-Level Meeting on NCDs, the international health and development community has shifted its awareness to include NCDs as a global health priority, especially in developing countries where mortality rates are disproportionately high. Simultaneously, with the dissemination of the World Cancer Declaration and the evolution of cancer control policies, the international cancer community has recognized the value of engaging patients in reducing the global cancer burden. Cancer advocacy programs that involve patients, survivors, and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) have increasing opportunities for global impact. We developed a framework over 4 years through implementation of two pilot projects. We created a series of trainings and tools to build the capacity of local NGOs and patients to plan and implement a forum for patients with cancer and to create and disseminate a national call to action. The framework was piloted in South Africa from 2009 to 2011 and Japan from 2012 to 2014, and results were measured through postproject surveys completed by members of the collaborative working group and interviews with the in-country partner. The framework is globally relevant and could be adapted and implemented in low- and middle-income countries to amplify patient voices in the policymaking process, increase grassroots mobilization, and improve health systems and infrastructure through addressing patient needs. With the dominant paradigm of global health in developing countries-which has previously focused on HIV/AIDS, maternal and child health, tuberculosis, and malaria-shifting to adapt to the burgeoning NCD burden, effective patient-centered advocacy frameworks are critical to the success of NCD control.

  6. Associations of cancer site and type with occupation and industry from the Third National Cancer Survey Interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R R; Stegens, N L; Goldsmith, J R

    1977-10-01

    From the Third National Cancer Survey (TNCS) Interview Study of 7,518 incident cases, lifetime histories of occupations and industries were studied for associations with specific cancer sites and types while controlling for age, sex, race, education, use of cigarettes or alcohol, and geographic location. Lung cancer patients were found more often than expected among several categories including trucking, air transportation, wholesaling, painting, building construction, building maintenance, and manufacturing (furniture, transportation equipment, and food products). Controlling for cigarette smoking did not change these associations. Leukemia and multiple myeloma were associated with sales personnel of both sexes, whereas lymphomas and Hodgkin's disease were excessive among women working in the medical industry. Other associations included rectal cancer with several retail industries; prostate cancer with ministers, farmers, plumbers, and coal miners; malignant melanoma with school teachers; and invasive cervical cancer with women working in hotels and restaurants. Breast cancer patients were more common among women who were teachers or other professionals and who worked in business and finance (even after controlling for education). Many other findings are presented in detailed tables. Results are reported mainly as a research resource for use by other investigators doing work in this field. Suggestions are given for future studies.

  7. Breast cancer among Yemeni women using the National Oncology Centre Registry 2004-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Zaemey, S; Nagi, N; Fritschi, L; Heyworth, J

    2012-06-01

    In developing countries including Arab countries breast cancer is one of the most common cancers found in women. Even though breast cancer incidence is lower in Arab developing countries than in western countries, Arabic women are more likely to be diagnosed at an earlier age than the women in western countries. A descriptive study was undertaken to investigate the type of breast cancer, lymph node involvement, side of breast and, region and age distribution of breast cancer patients registered in the National Oncology Centre in Yemen. From September 2004 to December 2010, 2654 women across Yemen diagnosed with breast cancer were registered in the National Oncology Centre for treatment. Between the years 2004 and 2010, breast cancer represented 22% of all cancers registered in women. Seventy-one per cent of the women were aged 50 or younger at the time of diagnosis. The most common age group affected was women aged 41-50 years, with (35%) of cases occurring in this age. Invasive ductal carcinoma was the most common pathology (76%) and 79% of the patients had lymph node involvement at the time of diagnosis. Approximately 2% had bilateral disease and the frequency of left (44%) and right breast cancer (42%) were similar. This study has shown that breast cancer is a disease of young women in Yemen. The majority of women presented with lymph node involvement. Hence efforts are needed to increase breast cancer awareness in Yemen for early detection at all age groups, and to target women living in areas that have lower access to health care services. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. 76 FR 26310 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-06

    ... Group(s); and Budget Presentations. Place: National Institutes of Health, Building 31, 31 Center Drive... entrance onto the NIH campus. All visitor vehicles, including taxicabs, hotel, and airport shuttles will be...

  9. Use of the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program screening and accrual log to address cancer clinical trial accrual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Germain, Diane; Denicoff, Andrea M; Dimond, Eileen P; Carrigan, Angela; Enos, Rebecca A; Gonzalez, Maria M; Wilkinson, Kathy; Mathiason, Michelle A; Duggan, Brenda; Einolf, Shaun; McCaskill-Stevens, Worta; Bryant, Donna M; Thompson, Michael A; Grubbs, Stephen S; Go, Ronald S

    2014-03-01

    Screening logs have the potential to help oncology clinical trial programs at the site level, as well as trial leaders, address enrollment in real time. Such an approach could be especially helpful in improving representation of racial/ethnic minority and other underrepresented populations in clinical trials. The National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program (NCCCP) developed a screening log. Log data collected from March 2009 through May 2012 were analyzed for number of patients screened versus enrolled, including for demographic subgroups; screening methods; and enrollment barriers, including reasons for ineligibility and provider and patient reasons for declining to offer or participate in a trial. User feedback was obtained to better understand perceptions of log utility. Of 4,483 patients screened, 18.4% enrolled onto NCCCP log trials. Reasons for nonenrollment were ineligibility (51.6%), patient declined (25.8%), physician declined (15.6%), urgent need for treatment (6.6%), and trial suspension (0.4%). Major reasons for patients declining were no desire to participate in trials (43.2%) and preference for standard of care (39%). Major reasons for physicians declining to offer trials were preference for standard of care (53%) and concerns about tolerability (29.3%). Enrollment rates onto log trials did not differ between white and black (P = .15) or between Hispanic and non-Hispanic patients (P = .73). Other races had lower enrollment rates than whites and blacks. Sites valued the ready access to log data on enrollment barriers, with some sites changing practices to address those barriers. Use of screening logs to document enrollment barriers at the local level can facilitate development of strategies to enhance clinical trial accrual.

  10. Detecting Role Errors in the Gene Hierarchy of the NCI Thesaurus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yehoshua Perl

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene terminologies are playing an increasingly important role in the ever-growing field of genomic research. While errors in large, complex terminologies are inevitable, gene terminologies are even more susceptible to them due to the rapid growth of genomic knowledge and the nature of its discovery. It is therefore very important to establish quality- assurance protocols for such genomic-knowledge repositories. Different kinds of terminologies oftentimes require auditing methodologies adapted to their particular structures. In light of this, an auditing methodology tailored to the characteristics of the NCI Thesaurus’s (NCIT’s Gene hierarchy is presented. The Gene hierarchy is of particular interest to the NCIT’s designers due to the primary role of genomics in current cancer research. This multiphase methodology focuses on detecting role-errors, such as missing roles or roles with incorrect or incomplete target structures, occurring within that hierarchy. The methodology is based on two kinds of abstraction networks, called taxonomies, that highlight the role distribution among concepts within the IS-A (subsumption hierarchy. These abstract views tend to highlight portions of the hierarchy having a higher concentration of errors. The errors found during an application of the methodology

  11. Coverage of common cancer types in UK national newspapers: a content analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Konfortion, Julie; Jack, Ruth H; Davies, Elizabeth A

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine whether recent newspaper coverage of the four most common cancer types relates to their relative burden and national awareness months, and to identify the subject focus during high-coverage periods. Design Content analysis using the Nexis newspaper article database. Setting UK 2011–2012. Outcome measures Annual number and ranking, monthly proportions and subject of articles on breast, lung, bowel and prostate cancers. Results 9178 articles were identified during 2011 an...

  12. Drugs Approved for Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for cervical cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  13. Drugs Approved for Testicular Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for testicular cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  14. Biweekly cetuximab and irinotecan as second-line therapy in patients with gastro-esophageal cancer previously treated with platinum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoennemann, Katrine R; Bjerregaard, Jon K; Hansen, Tine P

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Until recently there has been no proven second-line therapy for patients with advanced gastro-esophageal cancer (GEC). Since 2004, Denmark has had a national health program where non-proven therapy can be offered to patients with advanced cancer, after approval by an expert panel...... appointed by the National Board of Health. This program has accelerated the introduction and implementation of new therapies in Denmark. Inspired by therapy in metastatic colorectal cancer, a combination of cetuximab and irinotecan (Cetiri) was chosen for second-line therapy in GEC patients. We report our......) on day 1 every 2nd week until progression or unacceptable toxicity. Toxicity was prospectively evaluated according to the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (NCI-CTCAE) version 3.0. RESULTS: From December 2007 to February 2009, 50 consecutive patients received Cetiri...

  15. Silica-Coated Nanodiamonds for Imaging and Delivery of Therapeutic Agents | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI Radiation Oncology Branch and the NHLBI Laboratory of Single Molecule Biophysics seek parties to co-develop fluorescent nanodiamonds for use as in vivo and in vitro optical tracking probes toward commercialization.

  16. Management of thyroid cancer: United Kingdom National Multidisciplinary Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, A L; Gandhi, A; Scott-Coombes, D; Perros, P

    2016-05-01

    This is the official guideline endorsed by the specialty associations involved in the care of head and neck cancer patients in the UK. This paper provides recommendations on the management of thyroid cancer in adults and is based on the 2014 British Thyroid Association guidelines. Recommendations • Ultrasound scanning (USS) of the nodule or goitre is a crucial investigation in guiding the need for fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC). (R) • FNAC should be considered for all nodules with suspicious ultrasound features (U3-U5). If a nodule is smaller than 10 mm in diameter, USS guided FNAC is not recommended unless clinically suspicious lymph nodes on USS are also present. (R) • Cytological analysis and categorisation should be reported according to the current British Thyroid Association Guidance. (R) • Ultrasound scanning assessment of cervical nodes should be done in FNAC-proven cancer. (R) • Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT) should be done in suspected cases of retrosternal extension, fixed tumours (local invasion with or without vocal cord paralysis) or when haemoptysis is reported. When CT with contrast is used pre-operatively, there should be a two-month delay between the use of iodinated contrast media and subsequent radioactive iodine (I131) therapy. (R) • Fluoro-deoxy-glucose positron emission tomography imaging is not recommended for routine evaluation. (G) • In patients with thyroid cancer, assessment of extrathyroidal extension and lymph node disease in the central and lateral neck compartments should be undertaken pre-operatively by USS and cross-sectional imaging (CT or MRI) if indicated. (R) • For patients with Thy 3f or Thy 4 FNAC a diagnostic hemithyroidectomy is recommended. (R) • Total thyroidectomy is recommended for patients with tumours greater than 4 cm in diameter or tumours of any size in association with any of the following characteristics: multifocal disease, bilateral disease, extrathyroidal

  17. Well-directed inclusion of hematology in African national cancer control plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Meaghann; Yao, Atteby J J; Renner, Lorna; Harif, Mhamed; Lam, Catherine G

    2017-07-01

    In the context of a convergent call for noncommunicable disease integration in the global agenda, recognizing cross-cutting needs and opportunities in national strategies across disease fields with shared priorities in low- and middle-income settings can enhance sustainable development approaches. We reviewed publicly available cancer control plans in Africa to evaluate for inclusion of hematology needs and shared service priorities. Pediatric data remain sparse in cancer control plans. While continental Africa represents incredible diversity, recognizing shared priorities and opportunity for collaboration between oncology and hematology services and across age groups may guide prioritized cancer control efforts and reduce programmatic redundancies in resource-limited settings. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. HIV infection connected to rising anal cancer rates in men in the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection contributes substantially to the epidemic of anal cancer in men, but not women in the United States, according to new research from NCI. Chart shows overall incidence rates of anal cancers in general population

  19. Discovery – Cisplatin and The Treatment of Testicular and Other Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior to the discovery of cisplatin in 1965, men with testicular cancer had few medical options. Now, thanks to NCI research, cisplatin and similar chemotherapy drugs are known for curing testicular and other forms of cancer.

  20. Second primary cancers after adjuvant radiotherapy in early breast cancer patients: A national population based study under the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group (DBCG)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grantzau, Trine; Mellemkjær, Lene; Overgaard, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: To analyze the long-term risk of second primary solid non-breast cancer in a national population-based cohort of 46,176 patients treated for early breast cancer between 1982 and 2007. Patients and methods: All patients studied were treated according to the national guidelines of the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group. The risk of second primary cancers was estimated by Standardised incidence ratios (SIRs) and multivariate Cox regression models were used to estimate adjusted hazard ratios (HR) among irradiated women compared to non-irradiated. All irradiated patients were treated on linear accelerators. Second cancers were a priori categorized into two groups; radiotherapy-associated- (oesophagus, lung, heart/mediastinum, pleura, bones, and connective tissue) and non-radiotherapy-associated sites (all other cancers). Results: 2358 second cancers had occurred during the follow-up. For the radiotherapy-associated sites the HR among irradiated women was 1.34 (95% CI 1.11–1.61) with significantly increased HRs for the time periods of 10–14 years (HR 1.55; 95% CI 1.08–2.24) and ⩾15 years after treatment (HR 1.79; 95% CI 1.14–2.81). There was no increased risk for the non-radiotherapy-associated sites (HR 1.04; 95% CI 0.94–1.1). The estimated attributable risk related to radiotherapy for the radiotherapy-associated sites translates into one radiation-induced second cancer in every 200 women treated with radiotherapy. Conclusions: Radiotherapy treated breast cancer patients have a small but significantly excess risk of second cancers