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Sample records for ncbi biosystems database

  1. The NCBI BioSystems database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geer, Lewis Y; Marchler-Bauer, Aron; Geer, Renata C; Han, Lianyi; He, Jane; He, Siqian; Liu, Chunlei; Shi, Wenyao; Bryant, Stephen H

    2010-01-01

    The NCBI BioSystems database, found at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/biosystems/, centralizes and cross-links existing biological systems databases, increasing their utility and target audience by integrating their pathways and systems into NCBI resources. This integration allows users of NCBI's Entrez databases to quickly categorize proteins, genes and small molecules by metabolic pathway, disease state or other BioSystem type, without requiring time-consuming inference of biological relationships from the literature or multiple experimental datasets.

  2. BioSystems

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The NCBI BioSystems Database provides integrated access to biological systems and their component genes, proteins, and small molecules, as well as literature...

  3. The NCBI Taxonomy database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federhen, Scott

    2012-01-01

    The NCBI Taxonomy database (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/taxonomy) is the standard nomenclature and classification repository for the International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration (INSDC), comprising the GenBank, ENA (EMBL) and DDBJ databases. It includes organism names and taxonomic lineages for each of the sequences represented in the INSDC's nucleotide and protein sequence databases. The taxonomy database is manually curated by a small group of scientists at the NCBI who use the current taxonomic literature to maintain a phylogenetic taxonomy for the source organisms represented in the sequence databases. The taxonomy database is a central organizing hub for many of the resources at the NCBI, and provides a means for clustering elements within other domains of NCBI web site, for internal linking between domains of the Entrez system and for linking out to taxon-specific external resources on the web. Our primary purpose is to index the domain of sequences as conveniently as possible for our user community.

  4. Searching NCBI Databases Using Entrez.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibney, Gretchen; Baxevanis, Andreas D

    2011-10-01

    One of the most widely used interfaces for the retrieval of information from biological databases is the NCBI Entrez system. Entrez capitalizes on the fact that there are pre-existing, logical relationships between the individual entries found in numerous public databases. The existence of such natural connections, mostly biological in nature, argued for the development of a method through which all the information about a particular biological entity could be found without having to sequentially visit and query disparate databases. Two basic protocols describe simple, text-based searches, illustrating the types of information that can be retrieved through the Entrez system. An alternate protocol builds upon the first basic protocol, using additional, built-in features of the Entrez system, and providing alternative ways to issue the initial query. The support protocol reviews how to save frequently issued queries. Finally, Cn3D, a structure visualization tool, is also discussed.

  5. Type material in the NCBI Taxonomy Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federhen, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Type material is the taxonomic device that ties formal names to the physical specimens that serve as exemplars for the species. For the prokaryotes these are strains submitted to the culture collections; for the eukaryotes they are specimens submitted to museums or herbaria. The NCBI Taxonomy Database (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/taxonomy) now includes annotation of type material that we use to flag sequences from type in GenBank and in Genomes. This has important implications for many NCBI resources, some of which are outlined below.

  6. BIOSPIDA: A Relational Database Translator for NCBI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Matthew S; Lee, Eva K

    2010-11-13

    As the volume and availability of biological databases continue widespread growth, it has become increasingly difficult for research scientists to identify all relevant information for biological entities of interest. Details of nucleotide sequences, gene expression, molecular interactions, and three-dimensional structures are maintained across many different databases. To retrieve all necessary information requires an integrated system that can query multiple databases with minimized overhead. This paper introduces a universal parser and relational schema translator that can be utilized for all NCBI databases in Abstract Syntax Notation (ASN.1). The data models for OMIM, Entrez-Gene, Pubmed, MMDB and GenBank have been successfully converted into relational databases and all are easily linkable helping to answer complex biological questions. These tools facilitate research scientists to locally integrate databases from NCBI without significant workload or development time.

  7. NCBI2RDF: Enabling Full RDF-Based Access to NCBI Databases

    OpenAIRE

    Alberto Anguita; Miguel García-Remesal; Diana de la Iglesia; Victor Maojo

    2013-01-01

    RDF has become the standard technology for enabling interoperability among heterogeneous biomedical databases. The NCBI provides access to a large set of life sciences databases through a common interface called Entrez. However, the latter does not provide RDF-based access to such databases, and, therefore, they cannot be integrated with other RDF-compliant databases and accessed via SPARQL query interfaces. This paper presents the NCBI2RDF system, aimed at providing RDF-based access to the c...

  8. Searching the NCBI databases using Entrez.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxevanis, Andreas D

    2006-11-01

    One of the most widely-used interfaces for the retrieval of information from biological databases is the NCBI Entrez system. Entrez capitalizes on the fact that there are pre-existing, logical relationships between the individual entries found in numerous public databases. The existence of such natural connections, mostly biological in nature, argued for the development of a method through which all the information about a particular biological entity could be found without having to sequentially visit and query disparate databases. Two Basic Protocols describe simple, text-based searches, illustrating the types of information that can be retrieved through the Entrez system. An Alternate Protocol builds upon the first Basic Protocol, using additional, built-in features of the Entrez system, and providing alternative ways to issue the initial query. The Support Protocol reviews how to save frequently-issued queries. Finally, Cn3D, a structure visualization tool, is also discussed.

  9. NCBI2RDF: enabling full RDF-based access to NCBI databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anguita, Alberto; García-Remesal, Miguel; de la Iglesia, Diana; Maojo, Victor

    2013-01-01

    RDF has become the standard technology for enabling interoperability among heterogeneous biomedical databases. The NCBI provides access to a large set of life sciences databases through a common interface called Entrez. However, the latter does not provide RDF-based access to such databases, and, therefore, they cannot be integrated with other RDF-compliant databases and accessed via SPARQL query interfaces. This paper presents the NCBI2RDF system, aimed at providing RDF-based access to the complete NCBI data repository. This API creates a virtual endpoint for servicing SPARQL queries over different NCBI repositories and presenting to users the query results in SPARQL results format, thus enabling this data to be integrated and/or stored with other RDF-compliant repositories. SPARQL queries are dynamically resolved, decomposed, and forwarded to the NCBI-provided E-utilities programmatic interface to access the NCBI data. Furthermore, we show how our approach increases the expressiveness of the native NCBI querying system, allowing several databases to be accessed simultaneously. This feature significantly boosts productivity when working with complex queries and saves time and effort to biomedical researchers. Our approach has been validated with a large number of SPARQL queries, thus proving its reliability and enhanced capabilities in biomedical environments.

  10. dbSNP: the NCBI database of genetic variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherry, S T; Ward, M H; Kholodov, M; Baker, J; Phan, L; Smigielski, E M; Sirotkin, K

    2001-01-01

    In response to a need for a general catalog of genome variation to address the large-scale sampling designs required by association studies, gene mapping and evolutionary biology, the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) has established the dbSNP database [S.T.Sherry, M.Ward and K. Sirotkin (1999) Genome Res., 9, 677-679]. Submissions to dbSNP will be integrated with other sources of information at NCBI such as GenBank, PubMed, LocusLink and the Human Genome Project data. The complete contents of dbSNP are available to the public at website: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/SNP. The complete contents of dbSNP can also be downloaded in multiple formats via anonymous FTP at ftp://ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/snp/.

  11. The World Bacterial Biogeography and Biodiversity through Databases: A Case Study of NCBI Nucleotide Database and GBIF Database

    OpenAIRE

    Okba Selama; Phillip James; Farida Nateche; Wellington, Elizabeth M. H.; Hocine Hacène

    2013-01-01

    Databases are an essential tool and resource within the field of bioinformatics. The primary aim of this study was to generate an overview of global bacterial biodiversity and biogeography using available data from the two largest public online databases, NCBI Nucleotide and GBIF. The secondary aim was to highlight the contribution each geographic area has to each database. The basis for data analysis of this study was the metadata provided by both databases, mainly, the taxonomy and the geog...

  12. NCBI - MicrobeDB.jp | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available switchLanguage; BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Data ...2 10.18908/lsdba.nbdc01181-009.V002 Update History V1 - Description of data contents The RDF data of several...ports in NCBI Assembly. About This Database Database Description Download License Update History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us NCBI - MicrobeDB.jp | LSDB Archive ...

  13. BioProject and BioSample databases at NCBI: facilitating capture and organization of metadata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Tanya; Clark, Karen; Gevorgyan, Robert; Gorelenkov, Vyacheslav; Gribov, Eugene; Karsch-Mizrachi, Ilene; Kimelman, Michael; Pruitt, Kim D; Resenchuk, Sergei; Tatusova, Tatiana; Yaschenko, Eugene; Ostell, James

    2012-01-01

    As the volume and complexity of data sets archived at NCBI grow rapidly, so does the need to gather and organize the associated metadata. Although metadata has been collected for some archival databases, previously, there was no centralized approach at NCBI for collecting this information and using it across databases. The BioProject database was recently established to facilitate organization and classification of project data submitted to NCBI, EBI and DDBJ databases. It captures descriptive information about research projects that result in high volume submissions to archival databases, ties together related data across multiple archives and serves as a central portal by which to inform users of data availability. Concomitantly, the BioSample database is being developed to capture descriptive information about the biological samples investigated in projects. BioProject and BioSample records link to corresponding data stored in archival repositories. Submissions are supported by a web-based Submission Portal that guides users through a series of forms for input of rich metadata describing their projects and samples. Together, these databases offer improved ways for users to query, locate, integrate and interpret the masses of data held in NCBI's archival repositories. The BioProject and BioSample databases are available at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/bioproject and http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/biosample, respectively.

  14. The World Bacterial Biogeography and Biodiversity through Databases: A Case Study of NCBI Nucleotide Database and GBIF Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okba Selama

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Databases are an essential tool and resource within the field of bioinformatics. The primary aim of this study was to generate an overview of global bacterial biodiversity and biogeography using available data from the two largest public online databases, NCBI Nucleotide and GBIF. The secondary aim was to highlight the contribution each geographic area has to each database. The basis for data analysis of this study was the metadata provided by both databases, mainly, the taxonomy and the geographical area origin of isolation of the microorganism (record. These were directly obtained from GBIF through the online interface, while E-utilities and Python were used in combination with a programmatic web service access to obtain data from the NCBI Nucleotide Database. Results indicate that the American continent, and more specifically the USA, is the top contributor, while Africa and Antarctica are less well represented. This highlights the imbalance of exploration within these areas rather than any reduction in biodiversity. This study describes a novel approach to generating global scale patterns of bacterial biodiversity and biogeography and indicates that the Proteobacteria are the most abundant and widely distributed phylum within both databases.

  15. The world bacterial biogeography and biodiversity through databases: a case study of NCBI Nucleotide Database and GBIF Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selama, Okba; James, Phillip; Nateche, Farida; Wellington, Elizabeth M H; Hacène, Hocine

    2013-01-01

    Databases are an essential tool and resource within the field of bioinformatics. The primary aim of this study was to generate an overview of global bacterial biodiversity and biogeography using available data from the two largest public online databases, NCBI Nucleotide and GBIF. The secondary aim was to highlight the contribution each geographic area has to each database. The basis for data analysis of this study was the metadata provided by both databases, mainly, the taxonomy and the geographical area origin of isolation of the microorganism (record). These were directly obtained from GBIF through the online interface, while E-utilities and Python were used in combination with a programmatic web service access to obtain data from the NCBI Nucleotide Database. Results indicate that the American continent, and more specifically the USA, is the top contributor, while Africa and Antarctica are less well represented. This highlights the imbalance of exploration within these areas rather than any reduction in biodiversity. This study describes a novel approach to generating global scale patterns of bacterial biodiversity and biogeography and indicates that the Proteobacteria are the most abundant and widely distributed phylum within both databases.

  16. Use of molecular variation in the NCBI dbSNP database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherry, S T; Ward, M; Sirotkin, K

    2000-01-01

    While high quality information regarding variation in genes is currently available in locus-specific or specialized mutation databases, the need remains for a general catalog of genome variation to address the large-scale sampling designs required by association studies, gene mapping, and evolutionary biology. In response to this need, the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) has established the dbSNP database http://ncbi. nlm.nih.gov/SNP/ to serve as a generalized, central variation database. Submissions to dbSNP will be integrated with other sources of information at NCBI such as GenBank, PubMed, LocusLink, and the Human Genome Project data, and the complete contents of dbSNP are available to the public via anonymous FTP. Hum Mutat 15:68-75, 2000. Published 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. NCBI Reference Sequence (RefSeq): a curated non-redundant sequence database of genomes, transcripts and proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruitt, Kim D; Tatusova, Tatiana; Maglott, Donna R

    2005-01-01

    The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) Reference Sequence (RefSeq) database (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/RefSeq/) provides a non-redundant collection of sequences representing genomic data, transcripts and proteins. Although the goal is to provide a comprehensive dataset representing the complete sequence information for any given species, the database pragmatically includes sequence data that are currently publicly available in the archival databases. The database incorporates data from over 2400 organisms and includes over one million proteins representing significant taxonomic diversity spanning prokaryotes, eukaryotes and viruses. Nucleotide and protein sequences are explicitly linked, and the sequences are linked to other resources including the NCBI Map Viewer and Gene. Sequences are annotated to include coding regions, conserved domains, variation, references, names, database cross-references, and other features using a combined approach of collaboration and other input from the scientific community, automated annotation, propagation from GenBank and curation by NCBI staff.

  18. NCBI GEO: mining tens of millions of expression profiles--database and tools update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Tanya; Troup, Dennis B; Wilhite, Stephen E; Ledoux, Pierre; Rudnev, Dmitry; Evangelista, Carlos; Kim, Irene F; Soboleva, Alexandra; Tomashevsky, Maxim; Edgar, Ron

    2007-01-01

    The Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) repository at the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) archives and freely disseminates microarray and other forms of high-throughput data generated by the scientific community. The database has a minimum information about a microarray experiment (MIAME)-compliant infrastructure that captures fully annotated raw and processed data. Several data deposit options and formats are supported, including web forms, spreadsheets, XML and Simple Omnibus Format in Text (SOFT). In addition to data storage, a collection of user-friendly web-based interfaces and applications are available to help users effectively explore, visualize and download the thousands of experiments and tens of millions of gene expression patterns stored in GEO. This paper provides a summary of the GEO database structure and user facilities, and describes recent enhancements to database design, performance, submission format options, data query and retrieval utilities. GEO is accessible at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/

  19. Construction of customized sub-databases from NCBI-nr database for rapid annotation of huge metagenomic datasets using a combined BLAST and MEGAN approach

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    We developed a fast method to construct local sub-databases from the NCBI-nr database for the quick similarity search and annotation of huge metagenomic datasets based on BLAST-MEGAN approach. A three-step sub-database annotation pipeline (SAP) was further proposed to conduct the annotation in a much more time-efficient way which required far less computational capacity than the direct NCBI-nr database BLAST-MEGAN approach. The 1(st) BLAST of SAP was conducted using the original metagenomic d...

  20. An updated validation of Promega's PowerPlex 16 System: high throughput databasing under reduced PCR volume conditions on Applied Biosystem's 96 capillary 3730xl DNA Analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spathis, Rita; Lum, J Koji

    2008-11-01

    The PowerPlex 16 System from Promega Corporation allows single tube multiplex amplification of sixteen short tandem repeat (STR) loci including all 13 core combined DNA index system STRs. This report presents an updated validation of the PowerPlex 16 System on Applied Biosystem's 96 capillary 3730xl DNA Analyzer. The validation protocol developed in our laboratory allows for the analysis of 1536 loci (96 x 16) in c. 50 min. We have further optimized the assay by decreasing the reaction volume to one-quarter that recommended by the manufacturer thereby substantially reducing the total cost per sample without compromising reproducibility or specificity. This reduction in reaction volume has the ancillary benefit of dramatically increasing the sensitivity of the assay allowing for accurate analysis of lower quantities of DNA. Due to its substantially increased throughput capability, this extended validation of the PowerPlex 16 System should be useful in reducing the backlog of unanalyzed DNA samples currently facing public DNA forensic laboratories.

  1. Construction of customized sub-databases from NCBI-nr database for rapid annotation of huge metagenomic datasets using a combined BLAST and MEGAN approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ke; Zhang, Tong

    2013-01-01

    We developed a fast method to construct local sub-databases from the NCBI-nr database for the quick similarity search and annotation of huge metagenomic datasets based on BLAST-MEGAN approach. A three-step sub-database annotation pipeline (SAP) was further proposed to conduct the annotation in a much more time-efficient way which required far less computational capacity than the direct NCBI-nr database BLAST-MEGAN approach. The 1(st) BLAST of SAP was conducted using the original metagenomic dataset against the constructed sub-database for a quick screening of candidate target sequences. Then, the candidate target sequences identified in the 1(st) BLAST were subjected to the 2(nd) BLAST against the whole NCBI-nr database. The BLAST results were finally annotated using MEGAN to filter out those mistakenly selected sequences in the 1(st) BLAST to guarantee the accuracy of the results. Based on the tests conducted in this study, SAP achieved a speedup of ~150-385 times at the BLAST e-value of 1e-5, compared to the direct BLAST against NCBI-nr database. The annotation results of SAP are exactly in agreement with those of the direct NCBI-nr database BLAST-MEGAN approach, which is very time-consuming and computationally intensive. Selecting rigorous thresholds (e.g. e-value of 1e-10) would further accelerate SAP process. The SAP pipeline may also be coupled with novel similarity search tools (e.g. RAPsearch) other than BLAST to achieve even faster annotation of huge metagenomic datasets. Above all, this sub-database construction method and SAP pipeline provides a new time-efficient and convenient annotation similarity search strategy for laboratories without access to high performance computing facilities. SAP also offers a solution to high performance computing facilities for the processing of more similarity search tasks.

  2. Reference sequence (RefSeq) database at NCBI: current status, taxonomic expansion, and functional annotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Nuala A.; Wright, Mathew W.; Brister, J. Rodney; Ciufo, Stacy; Haddad, Diana; McVeigh, Rich; Rajput, Bhanu; Robbertse, Barbara; Smith-White, Brian; Ako-Adjei, Danso; Astashyn, Alexander; Badretdin, Azat; Bao, Yiming; Blinkova, Olga; Brover, Vyacheslav; Chetvernin, Vyacheslav; Choi, Jinna; Cox, Eric; Ermolaeva, Olga; Farrell, Catherine M.; Goldfarb, Tamara; Gupta, Tripti; Haft, Daniel; Hatcher, Eneida; Hlavina, Wratko; Joardar, Vinita S.; Kodali, Vamsi K.; Li, Wenjun; Maglott, Donna; Masterson, Patrick; McGarvey, Kelly M.; Murphy, Michael R.; O'Neill, Kathleen; Pujar, Shashikant; Rangwala, Sanjida H.; Rausch, Daniel; Riddick, Lillian D.; Schoch, Conrad; Shkeda, Andrei; Storz, Susan S.; Sun, Hanzhen; Thibaud-Nissen, Francoise; Tolstoy, Igor; Tully, Raymond E.; Vatsan, Anjana R.; Wallin, Craig; Webb, David; Wu, Wendy; Landrum, Melissa J.; Kimchi, Avi; Tatusova, Tatiana; DiCuccio, Michael; Kitts, Paul; Murphy, Terence D.; Pruitt, Kim D.

    2016-01-01

    The RefSeq project at the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) maintains and curates a publicly available database of annotated genomic, transcript, and protein sequence records (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/refseq/). The RefSeq project leverages the data submitted to the International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration (INSDC) against a combination of computation, manual curation, and collaboration to produce a standard set of stable, non-redundant reference sequences. The RefSeq project augments these reference sequences with current knowledge including publications, functional features and informative nomenclature. The database currently represents sequences from more than 55 000 organisms (>4800 viruses, >40 000 prokaryotes and >10 000 eukaryotes; RefSeq release 71), ranging from a single record to complete genomes. This paper summarizes the current status of the viral, prokaryotic, and eukaryotic branches of the RefSeq project, reports on improvements to data access and details efforts to further expand the taxonomic representation of the collection. We also highlight diverse functional curation initiatives that support multiple uses of RefSeq data including taxonomic validation, genome annotation, comparative genomics, and clinical testing. We summarize our approach to utilizing available RNA-Seq and other data types in our manual curation process for vertebrate, plant, and other species, and describe a new direction for prokaryotic genomes and protein name management. PMID:26553804

  3. Reference sequence (RefSeq) database at NCBI: current status, taxonomic expansion, and functional annotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Nuala A; Wright, Mathew W; Brister, J Rodney; Ciufo, Stacy; Haddad, Diana; McVeigh, Rich; Rajput, Bhanu; Robbertse, Barbara; Smith-White, Brian; Ako-Adjei, Danso; Astashyn, Alexander; Badretdin, Azat; Bao, Yiming; Blinkova, Olga; Brover, Vyacheslav; Chetvernin, Vyacheslav; Choi, Jinna; Cox, Eric; Ermolaeva, Olga; Farrell, Catherine M; Goldfarb, Tamara; Gupta, Tripti; Haft, Daniel; Hatcher, Eneida; Hlavina, Wratko; Joardar, Vinita S; Kodali, Vamsi K; Li, Wenjun; Maglott, Donna; Masterson, Patrick; McGarvey, Kelly M; Murphy, Michael R; O'Neill, Kathleen; Pujar, Shashikant; Rangwala, Sanjida H; Rausch, Daniel; Riddick, Lillian D; Schoch, Conrad; Shkeda, Andrei; Storz, Susan S; Sun, Hanzhen; Thibaud-Nissen, Francoise; Tolstoy, Igor; Tully, Raymond E; Vatsan, Anjana R; Wallin, Craig; Webb, David; Wu, Wendy; Landrum, Melissa J; Kimchi, Avi; Tatusova, Tatiana; DiCuccio, Michael; Kitts, Paul; Murphy, Terence D; Pruitt, Kim D

    2016-01-04

    The RefSeq project at the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) maintains and curates a publicly available database of annotated genomic, transcript, and protein sequence records (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/refseq/). The RefSeq project leverages the data submitted to the International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration (INSDC) against a combination of computation, manual curation, and collaboration to produce a standard set of stable, non-redundant reference sequences. The RefSeq project augments these reference sequences with current knowledge including publications, functional features and informative nomenclature. The database currently represents sequences from more than 55,000 organisms (>4800 viruses, >40,000 prokaryotes and >10,000 eukaryotes; RefSeq release 71), ranging from a single record to complete genomes. This paper summarizes the current status of the viral, prokaryotic, and eukaryotic branches of the RefSeq project, reports on improvements to data access and details efforts to further expand the taxonomic representation of the collection. We also highlight diverse functional curation initiatives that support multiple uses of RefSeq data including taxonomic validation, genome annotation, comparative genomics, and clinical testing. We summarize our approach to utilizing available RNA-Seq and other data types in our manual curation process for vertebrate, plant, and other species, and describe a new direction for prokaryotic genomes and protein name management.

  4. Mining the NCBI Influenza Sequence Database: adaptive grouping of BLAST results using precalculated neighbor indexing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaslavsky, Leonid; Tatusova, Tatiana

    2009-10-30

    The Influenza Virus Resource and other Virus Variation Resources at NCBI provide enhanced visualization web tools for exploratory analysis for influenza sequence data. Despite the improvements in data analysis, the initial data retrieval remains unsophisticated, frequently producing huge and imbalanced datasets due to the large number of identical and nearly-identical sequences in the database.We propose a data mining algorithm to organize reported sequences into groups based on their relatedness to the query sequence and to each other. The algorithm uses BLAST to find database sequences related to the query. Neighbor lists precalculated from pairwise BLAST alignments between database sequences are used to organize results in groups of nearly-identical and strongly related sequences. We propose to use a non-symmetric dissimilarity measure well crafted for dealing with sequences of different length (fragments).A balanced and representative data set produced by this tool can be used for further analysis, i.e. multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic trees. The algorithm is implemented for protein coding sequences and is being integrated with the NCBI Influenza Virus Resource.

  5. NCBI GEO: mining millions of expression profiles--database and tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Tanya; Suzek, Tugba O; Troup, Dennis B; Wilhite, Stephen E; Ngau, Wing-Chi; Ledoux, Pierre; Rudnev, Dmitry; Lash, Alex E; Fujibuchi, Wataru; Edgar, Ron

    2005-01-01

    The Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) at the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) is the largest fully public repository for high-throughput molecular abundance data, primarily gene expression data. The database has a flexible and open design that allows the submission, storage and retrieval of many data types. These data include microarray-based experiments measuring the abundance of mRNA, genomic DNA and protein molecules, as well as non-array-based technologies such as serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) and mass spectrometry proteomic technology. GEO currently holds over 30,000 submissions representing approximately half a billion individual molecular abundance measurements, for over 100 organisms. Here, we describe recent database developments that facilitate effective mining and visualization of these data. Features are provided to examine data from both experiment- and gene-centric perspectives using user-friendly Web-based interfaces accessible to those without computational or microarray-related analytical expertise. The GEO database is publicly accessible through the World Wide Web at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo.

  6. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1, human protein interaction database at NCBI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, William; Sanders-Beer, Brigitte E; Katz, Kenneth S; Maglott, Donna R; Pruitt, Kim D; Ptak, Roger G

    2009-01-01

    The 'Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1), Human Protein Interaction Database', available through the National Library of Medicine at www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/RefSeq/HIVInteractions, was created to catalog all interactions between HIV-1 and human proteins published in the peer-reviewed literature. The database serves the scientific community exploring the discovery of novel HIV vaccine candidates and therapeutic targets. To facilitate this discovery approach, the following information for each HIV-1 human protein interaction is provided and can be retrieved without restriction by web-based downloads and ftp protocols: Reference Sequence (RefSeq) protein accession numbers, Entrez Gene identification numbers, brief descriptions of the interactions, searchable keywords for interactions and PubMed identification numbers (PMIDs) of journal articles describing the interactions. Currently, 2589 unique HIV-1 to human protein interactions and 5135 brief descriptions of the interactions, with a total of 14,312 PMID references to the original articles reporting the interactions, are stored in this growing database. In addition, all protein-protein interactions documented in the database are integrated into Entrez Gene records and listed in the 'HIV-1 protein interactions' section of Entrez Gene reports. The database is also tightly linked to other databases through Entrez Gene, enabling users to search for an abundance of information related to HIV pathogenesis and replication.

  7. NCBI reference sequences (RefSeq): a curated non-redundant sequence database of genomes, transcripts and proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruitt, Kim D; Tatusova, Tatiana; Maglott, Donna R

    2007-01-01

    NCBI's reference sequence (RefSeq) database (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/RefSeq/) is a curated non-redundant collection of sequences representing genomes, transcripts and proteins. The database includes 3774 organisms spanning prokaryotes, eukaryotes and viruses, and has records for 2,879,860 proteins (RefSeq release 19). RefSeq records integrate information from multiple sources, when additional data are available from those sources and therefore represent a current description of the sequence and its features. Annotations include coding regions, conserved domains, tRNAs, sequence tagged sites (STS), variation, references, gene and protein product names, and database cross-references. Sequence is reviewed and features are added using a combined approach of collaboration and other input from the scientific community, prediction, propagation from GenBank and curation by NCBI staff. The format of all RefSeq records is validated, and an increasing number of tests are being applied to evaluate the quality of sequence and annotation, especially in the context of complete genomic sequence.

  8. BGMUT: NCBI dbRBC database of allelic variations of genes encoding antigens of blood group systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patnaik, Santosh Kumar; Helmberg, Wolfgang; Blumenfeld, Olga O

    2012-01-01

    Analogous to human leukocyte antigens, blood group antigens are surface markers on the erythrocyte cell membrane whose structures differ among individuals and which can be serologically identified. The Blood Group Antigen Gene Mutation Database (BGMUT) is an online repository of allelic variations in genes that determine the antigens of various human blood group systems. The database is manually curated with allelic information collated from scientific literature and from direct submissions from research laboratories. Currently, the database documents sequence variations of a total of 1251 alleles of all 40 gene loci that together are known to affect antigens of 30 human blood group systems. When available, information on the geographic or ethnic prevalence of an allele is also provided. The BGMUT website also has general information on the human blood group systems and the genes responsible for them. BGMUT is a part of the dbRBC resource of the National Center for Biotechnology Information, USA, and is available online at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/projects/gv/rbc/xslcgi.fcgi?cmd=bgmut. The database should be of use to members of the transfusion medicine community, those interested in studies of genetic variation and related topics such as human migrations, and students as well as members of the general public.

  9. Microfluidics for food, agriculture and biosystems industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neethirajan, Suresh; Kobayashi, Isao; Nakajima, Mitsutoshi; Wu, Dan; Nandagopal, Saravanan; Lin, Francis

    2011-05-07

    Microfluidics, a rapidly emerging enabling technology has the potential to revolutionize food, agriculture and biosystems industries. Examples of potential applications of microfluidics in food industry include nano-particle encapsulation of fish oil, monitoring pathogens and toxins in food and water supplies, micro-nano-filtration for improving food quality, detection of antibiotics in dairy food products, and generation of novel food structures. In addition, microfluidics enables applications in agriculture and animal sciences such as nutrients monitoring and plant cells sorting for improving crop quality and production, effective delivery of biopesticides, simplified in vitro fertilization for animal breeding, animal health monitoring, vaccination and therapeutics. Lastly, microfluidics provides new approaches for bioenergy research. This paper synthesizes information of selected microfluidics-based applications for food, agriculture and biosystems industries. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  10. Industrial biosystems engineering and biorefinery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shulin

    2008-06-01

    The concept of Industrial Biosystems Engineering (IBsE) was suggested as a new engineering branch to be developed for meeting the needs for science, technology and professionals by the upcoming bioeconomy. With emphasis on systems, IBsE builds upon the interfaces between systems biology, bioprocessing, and systems engineering. This paper discussed the background, the suggested definition, the theoretical framework and methodologies of this new discipline as well as its challenges and future development.

  11. Industrial Biosystems Engineering and Biorefinery Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shulin Chen

    2008-01-01

    The concept of Industrial Biosystems Engineering (IBsE) was suggested as a new engineering branch to be developed for meeting the needs for science, technology and professionals by the upcoming bioeconomy. With emphasis on systems, IBsE builds upon the interfaces between systems biology, bioprocessing, and systems engineering. This paper discussed the background, the suggested definition, the theoretical framework and methodologies of this new discipline as well as its challenges and future development

  12. The Kernel Estimation in Biosystems Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esperanza Ayuga Téllez

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available In many fields of biosystems engineering, it is common to find works in which statistical information is analysed that violates the basic hypotheses necessary for the conventional forecasting methods. For those situations, it is necessary to find alternative methods that allow the statistical analysis considering those infringements. Non-parametric function estimation includes methods that fit a target function locally, using data from a small neighbourhood of the point. Weak assumptions, such as continuity and differentiability of the target function, are rather used than "a priori" assumption of the global target function shape (e.g., linear or quadratic. In this paper a few basic rules of decision are enunciated, for the application of the non-parametric estimation method. These statistical rules set up the first step to build an interface usermethod for the consistent application of kernel estimation for not expert users. To reach this aim, univariate and multivariate estimation methods and density function were analysed, as well as regression estimators. In some cases the models to be applied in different situations, based on simulations, were defined. Different biosystems engineering applications of the kernel estimation are also analysed in this review.

  13. Linking NCBI to Wikipedia: a wiki-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Roderic D M

    2011-03-31

    The NCBI Taxonomy underpins many bioinformatics and phyloinformatics databases, but by itself provides limited information on the taxa it contains. One readily available source of information on many taxa is Wikipedia. This paper describes iPhylo Linkout, a Semantic wiki that maps taxa in NCBI's taxonomy database onto corresponding pages in Wikipedia. Storing the mapping in a wiki makes it easy to edit, correct, or otherwise annotate the links between NCBI and Wikipedia. The mapping currently comprises some 53,000 taxa, and is available at http://iphylo.org/linkout. The links between NCBI and Wikipedia are also made available to NCBI users through the NCBI LinkOut service.

  14. The biosystems engineering design challenge at University College Dublin

    OpenAIRE

    Curran, Thomas P.; Cummins, Enda; Nicholas M. Holden; McDonnell, Kevin; Blaney, Colleen

    2007-01-01

    The Biosystems Engineering Design Challenge has recently become an academic module open to all undergraduate students at University College Dublin. The focus of the module is on designing and building a working, bench-scale device that solves a practical problem relevant to Biosystems Engineering. The module provides an opportunity for students to learn about engineering design, project management and teamwork. Enrolled students are split into teams of up to seven and meet an assi...

  15. Finding your way through Pneumocystis sequences in the NCBI gene database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissenbacher-Lang, Christiane; Nedorost, Nora; Weissenböck, Herbert

    2014-01-01

    Pneumocystis sequences can be downloaded from GenBank for purposes as primer/probe design or phylogenetic studies. Due to changes in nomenclature and assignment, available sequences are presented with a variety of inhomogeneous information, which renders practical utilization difficult. The aim of this study was the descriptive evaluation of different parameters of 532 Pneumocystis sequences of mitochondrial and ribosomal origin downloaded from GenBank with regard to completeness and information content. Pneumocystis sequences were characterized by up to four different names. Official changes in nomenclature have only been partly implemented and the usage of the "forma specialis", a special feature of Pneumocystis, has only been established fragmentary in the database. Hints for a mitochondrial or ribosomal genomic origin could be found, but can easily be overlooked, which renders the download of wrong reference material possible. The specification of the host was either not available or variable regarding the used language and the localization of this information in the title or several subtitles, which limits their applicability in phylogenetic studies. Declaration of products and geographic origin was incomplete. The print version of this manuscript is completed by an online database which contains detailed information to every accession number included in the meta-analysis.

  16. Inverted battery design as ion generator for interfacing with biosystems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chengwei Wang; Kun (kelvin) Fu; Jiaqi Dai; Steven D Lacey; Yonggang Yao; Glenn Pastel; Lisha Xu; Jianhua Zhang; Liangbing Hu

    2017-01-01

    ... with electrons at the cathode. Inspired by the fundamental electrochemistry of the lithium-ion battery, we envision a cell that can generate a current of ions instead of electrons, so that ions can be used for potential applications in biosystems...

  17. Entrez Gene: gene-centered information at NCBI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglott, Donna; Ostell, Jim; Pruitt, Kim D; Tatusova, Tatiana

    2011-01-01

    Entrez Gene (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/gene) is National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI)'s database for gene-specific information. Entrez Gene maintains records from genomes which have been completely sequenced, which have an active research community to submit gene-specific information, or which are scheduled for intense sequence analysis. The content represents the integration of curation and automated processing from NCBI's Reference Sequence project (RefSeq), collaborating model organism databases, consortia such as Gene Ontology and other databases within NCBI. Records in Entrez Gene are assigned unique, stable and tracked integers as identifiers. The content (nomenclature, genomic location, gene products and their attributes, markers, phenotypes and links to citations, sequences, variation details, maps, expression, homologs, protein domains and external databases) is available via interactive browsing through NCBI's Entrez system, via NCBI's Entrez programming utilities (E-Utilities) and for bulk transfer by FTP.

  18. Differentiating rectal carcinoma by an immunohistological analysis of carcinomas of pelvic organs based on the NCBI Literature Survey and the Human Protein Atlas database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Koh; Ishida, Kazuyuki; Fujibuchi, Wataru; Ito, Akihiro; Niikura, Hitoshi; Ogawa, Hitoshi; Sasaki, Iwao

    2012-06-01

    The treatments and prognoses of pelvic organ carcinomas differ, depending on whether the primary tumor originated in the rectum, urinary bladder, prostate, ovary, or uterus; therefore, it is essential to diagnose pathologically the primary origin and stages of these tumors. To establish the panels of immunohistochemical markers for differential diagnosis, we reviewed 91 of the NCBI articles on these topics and found that the results correlated closely with those of the public protein database, the Human Protein Atlas. The results revealed the panels of immunohistochemical markers for the differential diagnosis of rectal adenocarcinoma, in which [+] designates positivity in rectal adenocarcinoma and [-] designates negativity in rectal adenocarcinoma: from bladder adenocarcinoma, CDX2[+], VIL1[+], KRT7[-], THBD[-] and UPK3A[-]; from prostate adenocarcinoma, CDX2[+], VIL1[+], CEACAM5[+], KLK3(PSA)[-], ACPP(PAP)[-] and SLC45A3(prostein)[-]; and from ovarian mucinous adenocarcinoma, CEACAM5[+], VIL1[+], CDX2[+], KRT7[-] and MUC5AC[-]. The panels of markers distinguishing ovarian serous adenocarcinoma, cervical carcinoma, and endometrial adenocarcinoma were also represented. Such a comprehensive review on the differential diagnosis of carcinomas of pelvic organs has not been reported before. Thus, much information has been accumulated in public databases to provide an invaluable resource for clinicians and researchers.

  19. NCBI Mass Sequence Downloader–Large dataset downloading made easy

    OpenAIRE

    Pina-Martins, F; Paulo, O. S.

    2016-01-01

    Sequence databases, such as NCBI, are a very important resource in many areas of science. Downloading small amounts of sequences to local storage can easily be performed using any recent web browser, but downloading tens of thousands of sequences is not as simple. NCBI Mass Sequence Downloader is an open source program aimed at simplifying obtaining large amounts of sequence data from NCBI databases to local storage. It is written in python (can be run under both python 2 and python 3), an...

  20. Linking NCBI to Wikipedia: a wiki-based approach

    OpenAIRE

    Page, R.D.M.

    2011-01-01

    The NCBI Taxonomy underpins many bioinformatics and phyloinformatics databases, but by itself provides limited information on the taxa it contains. One readily available source of information on many taxa is Wikipedia. This paper describes iPhylo Linkout, a Semantic wiki that maps taxa in NCBI's taxonomy database onto corresponding pages in Wikipedia. Storing the mapping in a wiki makes it easy to edit, correct, or otherwise annotate the links between NCBI and Wikipedia. The mapping currently...

  1. [Analysis, identification and correction of some errors of model refseqs appeared in NCBI Human Gene Database by in silico cloning and experimental verification of novel human genes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, De-Li; Ji, Liang; Li, Yan-Da

    2004-05-01

    We found that human genome coding regions annotated by computers have different kinds of many errors in public domain through homologous BLAST of our cloned genes in non-redundant (nr) database, including insertions, deletions or mutations of one base pair or a segment in sequences at the cDNA level, or different permutation and combination of these errors. Basically, we use the three means for validating and identifying some errors of the model genes appeared in NCBI GENOME ANNOTATION PROJECT REFSEQS: (I) Evaluating the support degree of human EST clustering and draft human genome BLAST. (2) Preparation of chromosomal mapping of our verified genes and analysis of genomic organization of the genes. All of the exon/intron boundaries should be consistent with the GT/AG rule, and consensuses surrounding the splice boundaries should be found as well. (3) Experimental verification by RT-PCR of the in silico cloning genes and further by cDNA sequencing. And then we use the three means as reference: (1) Web searching or in silico cloning of the genes of different species, especially mouse and rat homologous genes, and thus judging the gene existence by ontology. (2) By using the released genes in public domain as standard, which should be highly homologous to our verified genes, especially the released human genes appeared in NCBI GENOME ANNOTATION PROJECT REFSEQS, we try to clone each a highly homologous complete gene similar to the released genes in public domain according to the strategy we developed in this paper. If we can not get it, our verified gene may be correct and the released gene in public domain may be wrong. (3) To find more evidence, we verified our cloned genes by RT-PCR or hybrid technique. Here we list some errors we found from NCBI GENOME ANNOTATION PROJECT REFSEQs: (1) Insert a base in the ORF by mistake which causes the frame shift of the coding amino acid. In detail, abase in the ORF of a gene is a redundant insertion, which causes a reading frame

  2. Inverted battery design as ion generator for interfacing with biosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chengwei; Fu, Kun (Kelvin); Dai, Jiaqi; Lacey, Steven D.; Yao, Yonggang; Pastel, Glenn; Xu, Lisha; Zhang, Jianhua; Hu, Liangbing

    2017-07-01

    In a lithium-ion battery, electrons are released from the anode and go through an external electronic circuit to power devices, while ions simultaneously transfer through internal ionic media to meet with electrons at the cathode. Inspired by the fundamental electrochemistry of the lithium-ion battery, we envision a cell that can generate a current of ions instead of electrons, so that ions can be used for potential applications in biosystems. Based on this concept, we report an `electron battery' configuration in which ions travel through an external circuit to interact with the intended biosystem whereas electrons are transported internally. As a proof-of-concept, we demonstrate the application of the electron battery by stimulating a monolayer of cultured cells, which fluoresces a calcium ion wave at a controlled ionic current. Electron batteries with the capability to generate a tunable ionic current could pave the way towards precise ion-system control in a broad range of biological applications.

  3. Study on Algae Removal by Immobilized Biosystem on Sponge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PEI Haiyan; HU Wenrong

    2006-01-01

    In this study, sponges were used to immobilize domesticated sludge microbes in a limited space, forming an immobilized biosystem capable of algae and microcystins removal. The removal effects on algae, microcystins and UV260 of this biosystem and the mechanism of algae removal were studied. The results showed that active sludge from sewage treatment plants was able to remove algae from a eutrophic lake's water after 7 d of domestication. The removal efficiency for algae,organic matter and microcystins increased when the domesticated sludge was immobilized on sponges. When the hydraulic retention time (HRT) was 5h, the removal rates of algae, microcystins and UV260 were 90%, 94.17% and 84%, respectively.The immobilized biosystem consisted mostly of bacteria, the Ciliata and Sarcodina protozoans and the Rotifer metazoans.Algal decomposition by zoogloea bacteria and preying by microcreatures were the two main modes of algal removal, which occurred in two steps: first, absorption by the zoogloea; second, decomposition by the zoogloea bacteria and the predacity of the microcreatures.

  4. Databases

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The databases of computational and experimental data from the first Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop are located here. The databases file names tell their contents by...

  5. Databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick Ryan

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Databases are deeply embedded in archaeology, underpinning and supporting many aspects of the subject. However, as well as providing a means for storing, retrieving and modifying data, databases themselves must be a result of a detailed analysis and design process. This article looks at this process, and shows how the characteristics of data models affect the process of database design and implementation. The impact of the Internet on the development of databases is examined, and the article concludes with a discussion of a range of issues associated with the recording and management of archaeological data.

  6. Nano-Biotechnology: Structure and Dynamics of Nanoscale Biosystems

    CERN Document Server

    Manjasetty, Babu A; Ramaswamy, Y S

    2010-01-01

    Nanoscale biosystems are widely used in numerous medical applications. The approaches for structure and function of the nanomachines that are available in the cell (natural nanomachines) are discussed. Molecular simulation studies have been extensively used to study the dynamics of many nanomachines including ribosome. Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) serve as prototypes for biological channels such as Aquaporins (AQPs). Recently, extensive investigations have been performed on the transport of biological nanosystems through CNTs. The results are utilized as a guide in building a nanomachinary such as nanosyringe for a needle free drug delivery.

  7. An elongation method for large systems toward bio-systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Yuriko; Gu, Feng Long

    2012-06-07

    The elongation method, proposed in the early 1990s, originally for theoretical synthesis of aperiodic polymers, has been reviewed. The details of derivation of the localization scheme adopted by the elongation method are described along with the elongation processes. The reliability and efficiency of the elongation method have been proven by applying it to various models of bio-systems, such as gramicidin A, collagen, DNA, etc. By means of orbital shift, the elongation method has been successfully applied to delocalized π-conjugated systems. The so-called orbital shift works in such a way that during the elongation process, some strongly delocalized frozen orbitals are assigned as active orbitals and joined with the interaction of the attacking monomer. By this treatment, it has been demonstrated that the total energies and non-linear optical properties determined by the elongation method are more accurate even for bio-systems and delocalized systems like fused porphyrin wires. The elongation method has been further developed for treating any three-dimensional (3D) systems and its applicability is confirmed by applying it to entangled insulin models whose terminal is capped by both neutral and zwitterionic sequences.

  8. Inverted battery design as ion generator for interfacing with biosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chengwei; Fu, Kun (Kelvin); Dai, Jiaqi; Lacey, Steven D.; Yao, Yonggang; Pastel, Glenn; Xu, Lisha; Zhang, Jianhua; Hu, Liangbing

    2017-01-01

    In a lithium-ion battery, electrons are released from the anode and go through an external electronic circuit to power devices, while ions simultaneously transfer through internal ionic media to meet with electrons at the cathode. Inspired by the fundamental electrochemistry of the lithium-ion battery, we envision a cell that can generate a current of ions instead of electrons, so that ions can be used for potential applications in biosystems. Based on this concept, we report an ‘electron battery’ configuration in which ions travel through an external circuit to interact with the intended biosystem whereas electrons are transported internally. As a proof-of-concept, we demonstrate the application of the electron battery by stimulating a monolayer of cultured cells, which fluoresces a calcium ion wave at a controlled ionic current. Electron batteries with the capability to generate a tunable ionic current could pave the way towards precise ion-system control in a broad range of biological applications. PMID:28737174

  9. Entrez Gene: gene-centered information at NCBI

    OpenAIRE

    Maglott, Donna; Ostell, Jim; Pruitt, Kim D; Tatusova, Tatiana

    2006-01-01

    Entrez Gene () is NCBI's database for gene-specific information. Entrez Gene includes records from genomes that have been completely sequenced, that have an active research community to contribute gene-specific information or that are scheduled for intense sequence analysis. The content of Entrez Gene represents the result of both curation and automated integration of data from NCBI's Reference Sequence project (RefSeq), from collaborating model organism databases and from other databases wit...

  10. Fungal genome resources at NCBI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbertse, B; Tatusova, T

    2011-09-01

    The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) is well known for the nucleotide sequence archive, GenBank and sequence analysis tool BLAST. However, NCBI integrates many types of biomolecular data from variety of sources and makes it available to the scientific community as interactive web resources as well as organized releases of bulk data. These tools are available to explore and compare fungal genomes. Searching all databases with Fungi [organism] at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/ is the quickest way to find resources of interest with fungal entries. Some tools though are resources specific and can be indirectly accessed from a particular database in the Entrez system. These include graphical viewers and comparative analysis tools such as TaxPlot, TaxMap and UniGene DDD (found via UniGene Homepage). Gene and BioProject pages also serve as portals to external data such as community annotation websites, BioGrid and UniProt. There are many different ways of accessing genomic data at NCBI. Depending on the focus and goal of research projects or the level of interest, a user would select a particular route for accessing genomic databases and resources. This review article describes methods of accessing fungal genome data and provides examples that illustrate the use of analysis tools.

  11. Judging the Orientation of Development of Chinese Database Construction from NCBI%从NCBI看我国数据库建设的发展方向

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    娄长春; 曹俊武

    2008-01-01

    结合美国国立生物技术信息中心(NCBI)数据库的复杂性、公开性、广泛性、及时性、综合性、权威性等几大特点,从实际出发,分析出我国数据库建设的不足之处,并提出我国数据库建设的发展方向.

  12. Abstracts of the 17. world congress of the International Commission of Agriculture and Biosystems Engineering (CIGR) : sustainable biosystems through engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savoie, P.; Villeneuve, J.; Morisette, R. [Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Quebec City, PQ (Canada). Soils and Crops Research and Development Centre] (eds.)

    2010-07-01

    This international conference provided a forum to discuss methods to produce agricultural products more efficiently through improvements in engineering and technology. It was attended by engineers and scientists working from different perspectives on biosystems. Beyond food, farms and forests can provide fibre, bio-products and renewable energy. Seven sections of CIGR were organized in the following technical sessions: (1) land and water engineering, (2) farm buildings, equipment, structures and environment, (3) equipment engineering for plants, (4) energy in agriculture, (5) management, ergonomics and systems engineering, (6) post harvest technology and process engineering, and (7) information systems. The Canadian Society of Bioengineering (CSBE) merged its technical program within the 7 sections of CIGR. Four other groups also held their activities during the conference. The American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers (ASABE) organized its 9th international drainage symposium and the American Ecological Engineering Society (AEES) held its 10th annual meeting. The International Network for Information Technology in Agriculture (INFITA), and the 8th world congress on computers in agriculture also joined CIGR 2010.

  13. biochem4j: Integrated and extensible biochemical knowledge through graph databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swainston, Neil; Batista-Navarro, Riza; Carbonell, Pablo; Dobson, Paul D; Dunstan, Mark; Jervis, Adrian J; Vinaixa, Maria; Williams, Alan R; Ananiadou, Sophia; Faulon, Jean-Loup; Mendes, Pedro; Kell, Douglas B; Scrutton, Nigel S; Breitling, Rainer

    2017-01-01

    Biologists and biochemists have at their disposal a number of excellent, publicly available data resources such as UniProt, KEGG, and NCBI Taxonomy, which catalogue biological entities. Despite the usefulness of these resources, they remain fundamentally unconnected. While links may appear between entries across these databases, users are typically only able to follow such links by manual browsing or through specialised workflows. Although many of the resources provide web-service interfaces for computational access, performing federated queries across databases remains a non-trivial but essential activity in interdisciplinary systems and synthetic biology programmes. What is needed are integrated repositories to catalogue both biological entities and-crucially-the relationships between them. Such a resource should be extensible, such that newly discovered relationships-for example, those between novel, synthetic enzymes and non-natural products-can be added over time. With the introduction of graph databases, the barrier to the rapid generation, extension and querying of such a resource has been lowered considerably. With a particular focus on metabolic engineering as an illustrative application domain, biochem4j, freely available at http://biochem4j.org, is introduced to provide an integrated, queryable database that warehouses chemical, reaction, enzyme and taxonomic data from a range of reliable resources. The biochem4j framework establishes a starting point for the flexible integration and exploitation of an ever-wider range of biological data sources, from public databases to laboratory-specific experimental datasets, for the benefit of systems biologists, biosystems engineers and the wider community of molecular biologists and biological chemists.

  14. Evolution and applications of plant pathway resources and databases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sucaet, Yves; Deva, Taru

    2011-01-01

    Plants are important sources of food and plant products are essential for modern human life. Plants are increasingly gaining importance as drug and fuel resources, bioremediation tools and as tools for recombinant technology. Considering these applications, database infrastructure for plant model...... quantitative modeling of plant biosystems. We propose Good Database Practice as a possible model for collaboration and to ease future integration efforts....

  15. Gene: a gene-centered information resource at NCBI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Garth R; Hem, Vichet; Katz, Kenneth S; Ovetsky, Michael; Wallin, Craig; Ermolaeva, Olga; Tolstoy, Igor; Tatusova, Tatiana; Pruitt, Kim D; Maglott, Donna R; Murphy, Terence D

    2015-01-01

    The National Center for Biotechnology Information's (NCBI) Gene database (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/gene) integrates gene-specific information from multiple data sources. NCBI Reference Sequence (RefSeq) genomes for viruses, prokaryotes and eukaryotes are the primary foundation for Gene records in that they form the critical association between sequence and a tracked gene upon which additional functional and descriptive content is anchored. Additional content is integrated based on the genomic location and RefSeq transcript and protein sequence data. The content of a Gene record represents the integration of curation and automated processing from RefSeq, collaborating model organism databases, consortia such as Gene Ontology, and other databases within NCBI. Records in Gene are assigned unique, tracked integers as identifiers. The content (citations, nomenclature, genomic location, gene products and their attributes, phenotypes, sequences, interactions, variation details, maps, expression, homologs, protein domains and external databases) is available via interactive browsing through NCBI's Entrez system, via NCBI's Entrez programming utilities (E-Utilities and Entrez Direct) and for bulk transfer by FTP.

  16. [Correction of five different types of errors of model REFSEQs appeared in NCBI human gene database only by using two novel human genes C17orf32 and ZNF362].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, De-Li; Li, Yan-Da; Ji, Liang

    2004-04-01

    Found that there exist many mistakes in the REFSEQ issued in the genome annotation project of NCBI, the result of which indicates that people be cautious in using REFSEQ database in NCBI. By adopting the technical route combining bioinformatics analysis and experimental verification, through the comparison of the cloned genes in the non-redundant database, we found that there were many mistakes in the computer annotation human genome coding sequences that were issued on the internet. First we quoted nine wrong types of novel human genes anticipated by NCBI GENOME Annotation Project. Here we give one example in detail: (1) Comparison of the sequences between novel human gene C17orf32 and hypothetical human gene LOC124919. LOC123722 is a modified sequence of C17orf32 cDNA with an inserted G between 406 -407 nucleotides. The base G in the 401 position of LOC123722 cDNA is a redundant insert, which causes a reading frame shift in the translation of an alternative protein. This inserted G has not been found in our experimental clone, and is fully rejected by human EST alignment, and is shown as a redundance by genomic GT/AG organization analysis. (2) Comparison of the sequences between novel human gene C17orf32 and hypothetical human gene LOC147007. C17orf32 gene (ORF from 31 to 657 nucleotides) is located on human chromosome 17(Accession No. NT_010808.7), and is only linked with a hypothetical human gene LOC147007 (ORF from 55 to 435 nucleotides) at present. This hypothetical human gene sequence has not been verified by experiment, and is a wrong form of our verified C17orf32 gene. The full-length 1 679 bp cDNA sequence of C17orf32 exhibits overall homology to that of LOC147007 of 625 bp mRNA, with matching percentage of 37% in 36% of total window over the full-length nucleotide, especially 121 approximately 366 bp of LOC147007 is just the same as 316 approximately 561 bp of C17orf32. Thus, the 126 aa protein encoded by XP_097165 of LOC147007 exhibits overall homology

  17. NCBI Mass Sequence Downloader-Large dataset downloading made easy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pina-Martins, F.; Paulo, O. S.

    Sequence databases, such as NCBI, are a very important resource in many areas of science. Downloading small amounts of sequences to local storage can easily be performed using any recent web browser, but downloading tens of thousands of sequences is not as simple. NCBI Mass Sequence Downloader is an open source program aimed at simplifying obtaining large amounts of sequence data from NCBI databases to local storage. It is written in python (can be run under both python 2 and python 3), and uses PyQt5 for the GUI. The program can be run in either graphical or command line mode. Source code is licensed under the GPLv3, and is supported on Linux, Windows and Mac OSX. Available at https://github.com/ElsevierSoftwareX/SOFTX-D-15-00072.git, https://github.com/StuntsPT/NCBI_Mass_Downloader

  18. NCBI genetic resources supporting immunogenetic research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feolo, M; Helmberg, W; Sherry, S; Maglott, D R

    2000-01-01

    The NCBI creates and maintains a set of integrated bibliographic, sequence, map, structure and other database resources to promote the efficient retrieval of information and the discovery of novel relationships. The connections made between elements of these resources permit researchers to start a search from a wide spectrum of entry points. These multiple dimensions of data can be roughly categorized by primary content as text or bibliographic (PubMed, PubMedCentral, OMIM, LocusLink), sequence (GenBank, Reference Sequence Project (RefSeq), dbSNP, MMDB), protein structure (MMDB) or map position (MapView). They can also becategorized by level of expert curation, which may range from validation of submissions from external groups (GenBank, PubMed, PubMedCentral,), to automatic computation (HomoloGene, UniGene), and to highly reviewed and corrected (LocusLink, MMDB, OMIM, RefSeq). Searches can be made by words (in an article title, key words, sequence annotation, database value, author) by sequence (BLAST or e-PCR against multiple sequence databases), or by map coordinates. By computing or curating bi-directional links between related objects, NCBI can represent content on the genetics, molecular biology, and clinical considerations of interest to immunogeneticists. There is also an emerging resource developed by the NCBI in collaboration with the IHWG devoted to the presentation of MHC data (dbMHC). How dbMHC will augment existing resources at the NCBI is described.

  19. NCBI Epigenomics: what's new for 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fingerman, Ian M; Zhang, Xuan; Ratzat, Walter; Husain, Nora; Cohen, Robert F; Schuler, Gregory D

    2013-01-01

    The Epigenomics resource at the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) has been created to serve as a comprehensive public repository for whole-genome epigenetic data sets (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/epigenomics). We have constructed this resource by selecting the subset of epigenetics-specific data from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database and then subjecting them to further review and annotation. Associated data tracks can be viewed using popular genome browsers or downloaded for local analysis. We have performed extensive user testing throughout the development of this resource, and new features and improvements are continuously being implemented based on the results. We have made substantial usability improvements to user interfaces, enhanced functionality, made identification of data tracks of interest easier and created new tools for preliminary data analyses. Additionally, we have made efforts to enhance the integration between the Epigenomics resource and other NCBI databases, including the Gene database and PubMed. Data holdings have also increased dramatically since the initial publication describing the NCBI Epigenomics resource and currently consist of >3700 viewable and downloadable data tracks from 955 biological sources encompassing five well-studied species. This updated manuscript highlights these changes and improvements.

  20. NCBI Bookshelf: books and documents in life sciences and health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeppner, Marilu A

    2013-01-01

    Bookshelf (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/) is a full-text electronic literature resource of books and documents in life sciences and health care at the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI). Created in 1999 with a single book as an encyclopedic reference for resources such as PubMed and GenBank, it has grown to its current size of >1300 titles. Unlike other NCBI databases, such as GenBank and Gene, which have a strict data structure, books come in all forms; they are diverse in publication types, formats, sizes and authoring models. The Bookshelf data format is XML tagged in the NCBI Book DTD (Document Type Definition), modeled after the National Library of Medicine journal article DTDs. The book DTD has been used for systematically tagging the diverse data formats of books, a move that has set the foundation for the growth of this resource. Books at NCBI followed the route of journal articles in the PubMed Central project, using the PubMed Central architectural framework, workflows and processes. Through integration with other NCBI molecular databases, books at NCBI can be used to provide reference information for biological data and facilitate its discovery. This article describes Bookshelf at NCBI: its growth, data handling and retrieval and integration with molecular databases.

  1. 基于NCBI核酸数据库的紫荆皮混淆品种华中五味子的DNA鉴定研究%DNA identification of Zijingpi's adulterant species Schisandra sphenanthera based on NCBI nucleotide database analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程小丽; 廖彩丽; 刘春生; 白贞芳; 杨瑶珺; 郑健; 张继

    2012-01-01

    目的:探讨利用NCBI核酸数据库中ITS序列鉴定紫荆皮商品药材,为保证紫荆皮药材质量提供依据.方法:从紫荆皮药材中提取DNA,以ITS序列通用引物进行PCR扩增,扩增产物经纯化后直接双向测序,利用ITS序列相似度和系统发育树进行鉴定.结果:获得了紫荆皮商品药材的ITS序列信息.结论:经DNA鉴定,发现市场上流通的紫荆皮主流商品来源于木兰科五味子属植物华中五味子,药用部位为茎皮.%Objective: To provide basis for quality control of Zijingpi, DNA identification was used based on NCBI nucleotide database analysis. Method; Firstly, total DNA of Zijingpi was extracted. Secondly, the ITS sequence was amplified by PCR with universal primer of ITS and PCR products was directly sequenced after purification. Finally, ITS sequence similarity and phylogenetic tree were used for identification. Result; The ITS sequence information of the mainstream commercial drugs of Zijingpi was obtained. Conclusion : It is firstly reported that the mainstream commercial drugs of Zijingpi was the bark of Schisandra sphenanthera.

  2. NCBI Reference Sequence project: update and current status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruitt, Kim D; Tatusova, Tatiana; Maglott, Donna R

    2003-01-01

    The goal of the NCBI Reference Sequence (RefSeq) project is to provide the single best non-redundant and comprehensive collection of naturally occurring biological molecules, representing the central dogma. Nucleotide and protein sequences are explicitly linked on a residue-by-residue basis in this collection. Ideally all molecule types will be available for each well-studied organism, but the initial database collection pragmatically includes only those molecules and organisms that are most readily identified. Thus different amounts of information are available for different organisms at any given time. Furthermore, for some organisms additional intermediate records are provided when the genome sequence is not yet finished. The collection is supplied by NCBI through three distinct pipelines in addition to collaborations with community groups. The collection is curated on an ongoing basis. Additional information about the NCBI RefSeq project is available at http://www.ncbi.nih.gov/RefSeq/.

  3. The possible origin of the first cell biosystem in the thermal subsurface environment of the earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevors, Jack T

    2004-01-01

    Bacteria are the simplest living biosystems or organisms that exhibit all the characteristics of life. As such, they are excellent models to examine the cell as the basic unit of life and the cell theory which states that all organisms are composed of one or more similar cells. In this article I examine the hypothesis that the primordial soup so often referred to in science was possibly an oil/water interface and/or emulsion in the Earth's, warm, anaerobic subsurface. This warm subsurface location, protected from surface radiation, could have been a favourable location for the assembly of the first bacterial cells on the Earth capable of growth and controlled division or the first biosystem.

  4. Present and future of the numerical methods in buildings and infrastructures areas of biosystems engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Ayuga

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Biosystem engineering is a discipline resulting from the evolution of the traditional agricultural engineering to include new engineering challenges related with biological systems, from the cell to the environment. Modern buildings and infrastructures are needed to satisfy crop and animal production demands. In this paper a review on the status of numerical methods applied to solve engineering problems in the field of buildings and infrastructures in biosystem engineering is presented. The history and basic background of the finite element method is presented. This is the first numerical method implemented and also the more developed one. The history and background of other two more recent methods, with practical applications, the computer fluids dynamics and the discrete element method are also presented. Besides, a review on the scientific and professional applications on the field of buildings and infrastructures for biosystem engineering needs is presented. Today we can simulate engineering problems with solids, engineering problems with fluids and engineering problems with particles and get to practical solutions faster and cheaper than in the past. The paper encourages young engineers and researchers to make progress these tools and their engineering applications. The capacities of all numerical methods in their present development status go beyond the present practical applications. There is a broad field to work on it.

  5. Assembly: a resource for assembled genomes at NCBI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitts, Paul A; Church, Deanna M; Thibaud-Nissen, Françoise; Choi, Jinna; Hem, Vichet; Sapojnikov, Victor; Smith, Robert G; Tatusova, Tatiana; Xiang, Charlie; Zherikov, Andrey; DiCuccio, Michael; Murphy, Terence D; Pruitt, Kim D; Kimchi, Avi

    2016-01-04

    The NCBI Assembly database (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/assembly/) provides stable accessioning and data tracking for genome assembly data. The model underlying the database can accommodate a range of assembly structures, including sets of unordered contig or scaffold sequences, bacterial genomes consisting of a single complete chromosome, or complex structures such as a human genome with modeled allelic variation. The database provides an assembly accession and version to unambiguously identify the set of sequences that make up a particular version of an assembly, and tracks changes to updated genome assemblies. The Assembly database reports metadata such as assembly names, simple statistical reports of the assembly (number of contigs and scaffolds, contiguity metrics such as contig N50, total sequence length and total gap length) as well as the assembly update history. The Assembly database also tracks the relationship between an assembly submitted to the International Nucleotide Sequence Database Consortium (INSDC) and the assembly represented in the NCBI RefSeq project. Users can find assemblies of interest by querying the Assembly Resource directly or by browsing available assemblies for a particular organism. Links in the Assembly Resource allow users to easily download sequence and annotations for current versions of genome assemblies from the NCBI genomes FTP site.

  6. Production of biofuels and biochemicals by in vitro synthetic biosystems: Opportunities and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi-Heng Percival

    2015-11-15

    The largest obstacle to the cost-competitive production of low-value and high-impact biofuels and biochemicals (called biocommodities) is high production costs catalyzed by microbes due to their inherent weaknesses, such as low product yield, slow reaction rate, high separation cost, intolerance to toxic products, and so on. This predominant whole-cell platform suffers from a mismatch between the primary goal of living microbes - cell proliferation and the desired biomanufacturing goal - desired products (not cell mass most times). In vitro synthetic biosystems consist of numerous enzymes as building bricks, enzyme complexes as building modules, and/or (biomimetic) coenzymes, which are assembled into synthetic enzymatic pathways for implementing complicated bioreactions. They emerge as an alternative solution for accomplishing a desired biotransformation without concerns of cell proliferation, complicated cellular regulation, and side-product formation. In addition to the most important advantage - high product yield, in vitro synthetic biosystems feature several other biomanufacturing advantages, such as fast reaction rate, easy product separation, open process control, broad reaction condition, tolerance to toxic substrates or products, and so on. In this perspective review, the general design rules of in vitro synthetic pathways are presented with eight supporting examples: hydrogen, n-butanol, isobutanol, electricity, starch, lactate,1,3-propanediol, and poly-3-hydroxylbutyrate. Also, a detailed economic analysis for enzymatic hydrogen production from carbohydrates is presented to illustrate some advantages of this system and the remaining challenges. Great market potentials will motivate worldwide efforts from multiple disciplines (i.e., chemistry, biology and engineering) to address the remaining obstacles pertaining to cost and stability of enzymes and coenzymes, standardized building parts and modules, biomimetic coenzymes, biosystem optimization, and scale

  7. PLANEX: the plant co-expression database

    OpenAIRE

    Yim, Won Cheol; Yu, YongBin; Song, Kitae; Jang, Cheol Seong; Lee, Byung-Moo

    2013-01-01

    Background The PLAnt co-EXpression database (PLANEX) is a new internet-based database for plant gene analysis. PLANEX (http://planex.plantbioinformatics.org) contains publicly available GeneChip data obtained from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) of the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI). PLANEX is a genome-wide co-expression database, which allows for the functional identification of genes from a wide variety of experimental designs. It can be used for the characterization...

  8. Effect of various normalization methods on Applied Biosystems expression array system data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keys David N

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA microarray technology provides a powerful tool for characterizing gene expression on a genome scale. While the technology has been widely used in discovery-based medical and basic biological research, its direct application in clinical practice and regulatory decision-making has been questioned. A few key issues, including the reproducibility, reliability, compatibility and standardization of microarray analysis and results, must be critically addressed before any routine usage of microarrays in clinical laboratory and regulated areas can occur. In this study we investigate some of these issues for the Applied Biosystems Human Genome Survey Microarrays. Results We analyzed the gene expression profiles of two samples: brain and universal human reference (UHR, a mixture of RNAs from 10 cancer cell lines, using the Applied Biosystems Human Genome Survey Microarrays. Five technical replicates in three different sites were performed on the same total RNA samples according to manufacturer's standard protocols. Five different methods, quantile, median, scale, VSN and cyclic loess were used to normalize AB microarray data within each site. 1,000 genes spanning a wide dynamic range in gene expression levels were selected for real-time PCR validation. Using the TaqMan® assays data set as the reference set, the performance of the five normalization methods was evaluated focusing on the following criteria: (1 Sensitivity and reproducibility in detection of expression; (2 Fold change correlation with real-time PCR data; (3 Sensitivity and specificity in detection of differential expression; (4 Reproducibility of differentially expressed gene lists. Conclusion Our results showed a high level of concordance between these normalization methods. This is true, regardless of whether signal, detection, variation, fold change measurements and reproducibility were interrogated. Furthermore, we used TaqMan® assays as a reference, to generate

  9. Third cycle university studies in Europe in the field of agricultural engineering and in the emerging discipline of biosystems engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayuga, F; Briassoulis, D; Aguado, P; Farkas, I; Griepentrog, H; Lorencowicz, E

    2010-01-01

    The main objectives of European Thematic Network entitled 'Education and Research in Agricultural for Biosystems Engineering in Europe (ERABEE-TN)' is to initiate and contribute to the structural development and the assurance of the quality assessment of the emerging discipline of Biosystems Engineering in Europe. ERABEE is co-financed by the European Community in the framework of the LLP Programme. The partnership consists of 35 participants from 27 Erasmus countries, out of which 33 are Higher Education Area Institutions (EDU) and 2 are Student Associations (ASS). 13 Erasmus participants (e.g. Thematic Networks, Professional Associations, and Institutions from Brazil, Croatia, Russia and Serbia) are also involved in the Thematic Network through synergies. To date, very few Biosystems Engineering programs exist in Europe and those that are initiated are at a very primitive stage of development. The innovative and novel goal of the Thematic Network is to promote this critical transition, which requires major restructuring in Europe, exploiting along this direction the outcomes accomplished by its predecessor; the USAEE-TN (University Studies in Agricultural Engineering in Europe). It also aims at enhancing the compatibility among the new programmes of Biosystems Engineering, aiding their recognition and accreditation at European and International level and facilitating greater mobility of skilled personnel, researchers and students. One of the technical objectives of ERABEE is dealing with mapping and promoting the third cycle studies (including European PhDs) and supporting the integration of research at the 1st and 2nd cycle regarding European Biosystems Engineering university studies. During the winter 2008 - spring 2009 period, members of ERABEE conducted a survey on the contemporary status of doctoral studies in Europe, and on a possible scheme for promotion of cooperation and synergies in the framework of the third cycle of studies and the European Doctorate

  10. Geoinformation modeling system for analysis of atmosphere pollution impact on vegetable biosystems using space images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polichtchouk, Yuri; Ryukhko, Viatcheslav; Tokareva, Olga; Alexeeva, Mary

    2002-02-01

    Geoinformation modeling system structure for assessment of the environmental impact of atmospheric pollution on forest- swamp ecosystems of West Siberia is considered. Complex approach to the assessment of man-caused impact based on the combination of sanitary-hygienic and landscape-geochemical approaches is reported. Methodical problems of analysis of atmosphere pollution impact on vegetable biosystems using geoinformation systems and remote sensing data are developed. Landscape structure of oil production territories in southern part of West Siberia are determined on base of processing of space images from spaceborn Resource-O. Particularities of atmosphere pollution zones modeling caused by gas burning in torches in territories of oil fields are considered. For instance, a pollution zones were revealed modeling of contaminants dispersal in atmosphere by standard model. Polluted landscapes areas are calculated depending on oil production volume. It is shown calculated data is well approximated by polynomial models.

  11. Electro-Quasistatic Simulations in Bio-Systems Engineering and Medical Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rienen, U.; Flehr, J.; Schreiber, U.; Schulze, S.; Gimsa, U.; Baumann, W.; Weiss, D. G.; Gimsa, J.; Benecke, R.; Pau, H.-W.

    2005-05-01

    Slowly varying electromagnetic fields play a key role in various applications in bio-systems and medical engineering. Examples are the electric activity of neurons on neurochips used as biosensors, the stimulating electric fields of implanted electrodes used for deep brain stimulation in patients with Morbus Parkinson and the stimulation of the auditory nerves in deaf patients, respectively. In order to simulate the neuronal activity on a chip it is necessary to couple Maxwell's and Hodgkin-Huxley's equations. First numerical results for a neuron coupling to a single electrode are presented. They show a promising qualitative agreement with the experimentally recorded signals. Further, simulations are presented on electrodes for deep brain stimulation in animal experiments where the question of electrode ageing and energy deposition in the surrounding tissue are of major interest. As a last example, electric simulations for a simple cochlea model are presented comparing the field in the skull bones for different electrode types and stimulations in different positions.

  12. A collection of plant-specific genomic data and resources at NCBI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatusova, Tatiana; Smith-White, Brian; Ostell, James

    2007-01-01

    The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) provides a data-rich environment in support of genomic research by collecting the biological data for genomes, genes, gene expressions, gene variation, gene families, proteins, and protein domains and integrating the data with analytical, search, and retrieval resources through the NCBI Web site. Entrez, an integrated search and retrieval system, enables text searches across various diverse biological databases maintained at NCBI. Map Viewer, the genome browser developed at NCBI, displays aligned genetic, physical, and sequence maps for eukaryotic genomes including those of many plants. A specialized plant query page allows maps from all plant genomes available in the Map Viewer to be searched to produce a display of aligned maps from several species. Customized Plant Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (PlantBLAST) allows the user to perform sequence similarity searches in a special collection of mapped plant sequence data and to view the resulting alignments within a genomic context using Map Viewer. In addition, pre-computed sequence similarities, such as those for proteins offered by BLAST Link (BLink), enable fluid navigation from un-annotated to annotated sequences, quickening the pace of discovery. Plant Genome Central (PGC) is a Web portal that provides centralized access to all NCBI plant genome resources. Also, there are links to plant-specific Web resources external to NCBI such as organism-specific databases, genome-sequencing project Web pages, and homepages of genomic bioinformatics organizations.

  13. The Rücker-Markov invariants of complex Bio-Systems: applications in Parasitology and Neuroinformatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Díaz, Humberto; Riera-Fernández, Pablo; Pazos, Alejandro; Munteanu, Cristian R

    2013-03-01

    Rücker's walk count (WC) indices are well-known topological indices (TIs) used in Chemoinformatics to quantify the molecular structure of drugs represented by a graph in Quantitative structure-activity/property relationship (QSAR/QSPR) studies. In this work, we introduce for the first time the higher-order (kth order) analogues (WCk) of these indices using Markov chains. In addition, we report new QSPR models for large complex networks of different Bio-Systems useful in Parasitology and Neuroinformatics. The new type of QSPR models can be used for model checking to calculate numerical scores S(Lij) for links Lij (checking or re-evaluation of network connectivity) in large networks of all these fields. The method may be summarized as follows: (i) first, the WCk(j) values are calculated for all jth nodes in a complex network already created; (ii) A linear discriminant analysis (LDA) is used to seek a linear equation that discriminates connected or linked (Lij=1) pairs of nodes experimentally confirmed from non-linked ones (Lij=0); (iii) The new model is validated with external series of pairs of nodes; (iv) The equation obtained is used to re-evaluate the connectivity quality of the network, connecting/disconnecting nodes based on the quality scores calculated with the new connectivity function. The linear QSPR models obtained yielded the following results in terms of overall test accuracy for re-construction of complex networks of different Bio-Systems: parasite-host networks (93.14%), NW Spain fasciolosis spreading networks (71.42/70.18%) and CoCoMac Brain Cortex co-activation network (86.40%). Thus, this work can contribute to the computational re-evaluation or model checking of connectivity (collation) in complex systems of any science field.

  14. NCBI Reference Sequences: current status, policy and new initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruitt, Kim D; Tatusova, Tatiana; Klimke, William; Maglott, Donna R

    2009-01-01

    NCBI's Reference Sequence (RefSeq) database (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/RefSeq/) is a curated non-redundant collection of sequences representing genomes, transcripts and proteins. RefSeq records integrate information from multiple sources and represent a current description of the sequence, the gene and sequence features. The database includes over 5300 organisms spanning prokaryotes, eukaryotes and viruses, with records for more than 5.5 x 10(6) proteins (RefSeq release 30). Feature annotation is applied by a combination of curation, collaboration, propagation from other sources and computation. We report here on the recent growth of the database, recent changes to feature annotations and record types for eukaryotic (primarily vertebrate) species and policies regarding species inclusion and genome annotation. In addition, we introduce RefSeqGene, a new initiative to support reporting variation data on a stable genomic coordinate system.

  15. The 2012 Nucleic Acids Research Database Issue and the online Molecular Biology Database Collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galperin, Michael Y; Fernández-Suárez, Xosé M

    2012-01-01

    The 19th annual Database Issue of Nucleic Acids Research features descriptions of 92 new online databases covering various areas of molecular biology and 100 papers describing recent updates to the databases previously described in NAR and other journals. The highlights of this issue include, among others, a description of neXtProt, a knowledgebase on human proteins; a detailed explanation of the principles behind the NCBI Taxonomy Database; NCBI and EBI papers on the recently launched BioSample databases that store sample information for a variety of database resources; descriptions of the recent developments in the Gene Ontology and UniProt Gene Ontology Annotation projects; updates on Pfam, SMART and InterPro domain databases; update papers on KEGG and TAIR, two universally acclaimed databases that face an uncertain future; and a separate section with 10 wiki-based databases, introduced in an accompanying editorial. The NAR online Molecular Biology Database Collection, available at http://www.oxfordjournals.org/nar/database/a/, has been updated and now lists 1380 databases. Brief machine-readable descriptions of the databases featured in this issue, according to the BioDBcore standards, will be provided at the http://biosharing.org/biodbcore web site. The full content of the Database Issue is freely available online on the Nucleic Acids Research web site (http://nar.oxfordjournals.org/).

  16. Tutorial My NCBI para bibliotecas

    OpenAIRE

    Campos Asensio, Concepción

    2005-01-01

    My NCBI (National Center for Biotechnology Information) works keeping information and preferences of the user in order to provide customized additional services. With My NCBI, search strategies can be saved and it is possible to activate an option so that the system sends automatically by e-mail the results of the searches previously saved. Besides, My NCBI allows to store e-mail addresses, to filter the results of the searches and LinkOut, documents shipment service and preferences of exter...

  17. Landfill gas distribution at the base of passive methane oxidation biosystems: Transient state analysis of several configurations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahoughalandari, Bahar; Cabral, Alexandre R

    2017-08-18

    The design process of passive methane oxidation biosystems needs to include design criteria that account for the effect of unsaturated hydraulic behavior on landfill gas migration, in particular, restrictions to landfill gas flow due to the capillary barrier effect, which can greatly affect methane oxidation rates. This paper reports the results of numerical simulations performed to assess the landfill gas flow behavior of several passive methane oxidation biosystems. The concepts of these biosystems were inspired by selected configurations found in the technical literature. We adopted the length of unrestricted gas migration (LUGM) as the main design criterion in this assessment. LUGM is defined as the length along the interface between the methane oxidation and gas distribution layers, where the pores of the methane oxidation layer material can be considered blocked for all practical purposes. High values of LUGM indicate that landfill gas can flow easily across this interface. Low values of LUGM indicate greater chances of having preferential upward flow and, consequently, finding hotspots on the surface. Deficient designs may result in the occurrence of hotspots. One of the designs evaluated included an alternative to a concept recently proposed where the interface between the methane oxidation and gas distribution layers was jagged (in the form of a see-saw). The idea behind this ingenious concept is to prevent blockage of air-filled pores in the upper areas of the jagged segments. The results of the simulations revealed the extent of the capability of the different scenarios to provide unrestricted and conveniently distributed upward landfill gas flow. They also stress the importance of incorporating an appropriate design criterion in the selection of the methane oxidation layer materials and the geometrical form of passive biosystems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Electro-Quasistatic Simulations in Bio-Systems Engineering and Medical Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. van Rienen

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Slowly varying electromagnetic fields play a key role in various applications in bio-systems and medical engineering. Examples are the electric activity of neurons on neurochips used as biosensors, the stimulating electric fields of implanted electrodes used for deep brain stimulation in patients with Morbus Parkinson and the stimulation of the auditory nerves in deaf patients, respectively. In order to simulate the neuronal activity on a chip it is necessary to couple Maxwell's and Hodgkin-Huxley's equations. First numerical results for a neuron coupling to a single electrode are presented. They show a promising qualitative agreement with the experimentally recorded signals. Further, simulations are presented on electrodes for deep brain stimulation in animal experiments where the question of electrode ageing and energy deposition in the surrounding tissue are of major interest. As a last example, electric simulations for a simple cochlea model are presented comparing the field in the skull bones for different electrode types and stimulations in different positions.

  19. Statistical Techniques Complement UML When Developing Domain Models of Complex Dynamical Biosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmis, Jon; Qwarnstrom, Eva E.

    2016-01-01

    Computational modelling and simulation is increasingly being used to complement traditional wet-lab techniques when investigating the mechanistic behaviours of complex biological systems. In order to ensure computational models are fit for purpose, it is essential that the abstracted view of biology captured in the computational model, is clearly and unambiguously defined within a conceptual model of the biological domain (a domain model), that acts to accurately represent the biological system and to document the functional requirements for the resultant computational model. We present a domain model of the IL-1 stimulated NF-κB signalling pathway, which unambiguously defines the spatial, temporal and stochastic requirements for our future computational model. Through the development of this model, we observe that, in isolation, UML is not sufficient for the purpose of creating a domain model, and that a number of descriptive and multivariate statistical techniques provide complementary perspectives, in particular when modelling the heterogeneity of dynamics at the single-cell level. We believe this approach of using UML to define the structure and interactions within a complex system, along with statistics to define the stochastic and dynamic nature of complex systems, is crucial for ensuring that conceptual models of complex dynamical biosystems, which are developed using UML, are fit for purpose, and unambiguously define the functional requirements for the resultant computational model. PMID:27571414

  20. Statistical Techniques Complement UML When Developing Domain Models of Complex Dynamical Biosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Richard A; Timmis, Jon; Qwarnstrom, Eva E

    2016-01-01

    Computational modelling and simulation is increasingly being used to complement traditional wet-lab techniques when investigating the mechanistic behaviours of complex biological systems. In order to ensure computational models are fit for purpose, it is essential that the abstracted view of biology captured in the computational model, is clearly and unambiguously defined within a conceptual model of the biological domain (a domain model), that acts to accurately represent the biological system and to document the functional requirements for the resultant computational model. We present a domain model of the IL-1 stimulated NF-κB signalling pathway, which unambiguously defines the spatial, temporal and stochastic requirements for our future computational model. Through the development of this model, we observe that, in isolation, UML is not sufficient for the purpose of creating a domain model, and that a number of descriptive and multivariate statistical techniques provide complementary perspectives, in particular when modelling the heterogeneity of dynamics at the single-cell level. We believe this approach of using UML to define the structure and interactions within a complex system, along with statistics to define the stochastic and dynamic nature of complex systems, is crucial for ensuring that conceptual models of complex dynamical biosystems, which are developed using UML, are fit for purpose, and unambiguously define the functional requirements for the resultant computational model.

  1. ORION-VIRCAT: a tool for mapping ICTV and NCBI taxonomies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivia-Granda, Willy; Larson, Francis

    2009-01-01

    Viruses, viroids and prions are the smallest infectious biological entities that depend on their host for replication. The number of pathogenic viruses is considerably large and their impact in human global health is well documented. Currently, the International Committee on the Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV) has classified approximately 4379 virus species while the National Center for Biotechnology Information Viral Genomes Resource (NCBI-VGR) database has mapped 617 705 proteins to eight large taxonomic groups. Despite these efforts, an automated approach for mapping the ICTV master list and its officially accepted virus naming to the NCBI-VGR's taxonomical classification is not available. Due to metagenomic sequencing, it is likely that the discovery and naming of new viral species will increase by at least ten fold. Unfortunately, existing viral databases are not adequately prepared to scale, maintain and annotate automatically ultra-high throughput sequences and place this information into specific taxonomic categories. ORION-VIRCAT is a scalable and interoperable object-relational database designed to serve as a resource for the integration and verification of taxonomical classifications generated by the ICTV and NCBI-VGR. The current release (v1.0) of ORION-VIRCAT is implemented in PostgreSQL and it has been extended to ORACLE, MySQL and SyBase. ORION-VIRCAT automatically mapped and joined 617 705 entries from the NCBI-VGR to the viral naming of the ICTV. This detailed analysis revealed that 399 095 entries from the NCBI-VGR can be mapped to the ICTV classification and that one Order, 10 families, 35 genera and 503 species listed in the ICTV disagree with the the NCBI-VGR classification schema. Nevertheless, we were eable to correct several discrepancies mapping 234 000 additional entries.Database URL:http://www.orionbiosciences.com/research/orion-vircat.html.

  2. Expression of adhesion molecules and collagen on rat chondrocyte seeded into alginate and hyaluronate based 3D biosystems. Influence of mechanical stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigant-Huselstein, C; Hubert, P; Dumas, D; Dellacherie, E; Netter, P; Payan, E; Stoltz, J F

    2004-01-01

    Chondrocytes use mechanical signals, via interactions with their environment, to synthesize an extracellular matrix capable to withstanding high loads. Most chondrocyte-matrix interactions are mediated via transmembrane receptors such as integrins or non-integrins receptors (i.e. annexin V and CD44). The aim of this study was to analyze, by flow cytometry, the adhesion molecules (alpha5/beta1 integrins and CD44) on rat chondrocytes seeded into 3D biosystem made of alginate and hyaluronate. These biosystems were submitted to mechanical stress by knocking the biosystems between them for 48 hours. The expression of type I and type II collagen was also evaluated. The results of the current study showed that mechanical stress induced an increase of type II collagen production and weak variations of alpha5/beta1 receptors expression no matter what biosystems. Moreover, our results indicated that hyaluronan receptor CD44 expression depends on extracellular matrix modifications. Thus, these receptors were activated by signals resulted from cell environment variations (HA addition and modifications owing to mechanical stress). It suggested that this kind of receptor play a crucial role in extracellular matrix homeostasis. Finally, on day 24, no dedifferentiation of chondrocytes was noted either in biosystems or under mechanical stress. For all biosystems, the neosynthesized matrix contained an important level of collagen, which was type II, whatever biosystems. In conclusion, it appeared that the cells, under mechanical stress, maintained their phenotype. In addition, it seems that, on rat chondrocytes, alpha5/beta1 integrins did not act as the main mechanoreceptor (as described for human chondrocytes). In return, hyaluronan receptor CD44 seems to be in relation with matrix composition.

  3. Towards Viral Genome Annotation Standards, Report from the 2010 NCBI Annotation Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brister, James Rodney; Bao, Yiming; Kuiken, Carla; Lefkowitz, Elliot J; Le Mercier, Philippe; Leplae, Raphael; Madupu, Ramana; Scheuermann, Richard H; Schobel, Seth; Seto, Donald; Shrivastava, Susmita; Sterk, Peter; Zeng, Qiandong; Klimke, William; Tatusova, Tatiana

    2010-10-01

    Improvements in DNA sequencing technologies portend a new era in virology and could possibly lead to a giant leap in our understanding of viral evolution and ecology. Yet, as viral genome sequences begin to fill the world's biological databases, it is critically important to recognize that the scientific promise of this era is dependent on consistent and comprehensive genome annotation. With this in mind, the NCBI Genome Annotation Workshop recently hosted a study group tasked with developing sequence, function, and metadata annotation standards for viral genomes. This report describes the issues involved in viral genome annotation and reviews policy recommendations presented at the NCBI Annotation Workshop.

  4. Interactions of zero-frequency and oscillating magnetic fields with biostructures and biosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpe, Pietro

    2003-06-01

    . In the framework of studies on the origin and adaptation of life on Earth or in the Universe, theoretical insights paving the way to elucidate the mechanisms of the MF interactions with biostructures and biosystems are considered.

  5. Workflow and web application for annotating NCBI BioProject transcriptome data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera Alvarez, Roberto; Medeiros Vidal, Newton; Garzón-Martínez, Gina A; Barrero, Luz S; Landsman, David; Mariño-Ramírez, Leonardo

    2017-01-01

    The volume of transcriptome data is growing exponentially due to rapid improvement of experimental technologies. In response, large central resources such as those of the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) are continually adapting their computational infrastructure to accommodate this large influx of data. New and specialized databases, such as Transcriptome Shotgun Assembly Sequence Database (TSA) and Sequence Read Archive (SRA), have been created to aid the development and expansion of centralized repositories. Although the central resource databases are under continual development, they do not include automatic pipelines to increase annotation of newly deposited data. Therefore, third-party applications are required to achieve that aim. Here, we present an automatic workflow and web application for the annotation of transcriptome data. The workflow creates secondary data such as sequencing reads and BLAST alignments, which are available through the web application. They are based on freely available bioinformatics tools and scripts developed in-house. The interactive web application provides a search engine and several browser utilities. Graphical views of transcript alignments are available through SeqViewer, an embedded tool developed by NCBI for viewing biological sequence data. The web application is tightly integrated with other NCBI web applications and tools to extend the functionality of data processing and interconnectivity. We present a case study for the species Physalis peruviana with data generated from BioProject ID 67621. URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/projects/physalis/.

  6. Toward richer metadata for microbial sequences: replacing strain-level NCBI taxonomy taxids with BioProject, BioSample and Assembly records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federhen, Scott; Clark, Karen; Barrett, Tanya; Parkinson, Helen; Ostell, James; Kodama, Yuichi; Mashima, Jun; Nakamura, Yasukazu; Cochrane, Guy; Karsch-Mizrachi, Ilene

    2014-06-15

    Microbial genome sequence submissions to the International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration (INSDC) have been annotated with organism names that include the strain identifier. Each of these strain-level names has been assigned a unique 'taxid' in the NCBI Taxonomy Database. With the significant growth in genome sequencing, it is not possible to continue with the curation of strain-level taxids. In January 2014, NCBI will cease assigning strain-level taxids. Instead, submitters are encouraged provide strain information and rich metadata with their submission to the sequence database, BioProject and BioSample.

  7. Validation of the Applied Biosystems RapidFinder Shiga Toxin-Producing E. coli (STEC) Detection Workflow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloke, Jonathan; Matheny, Sharon; Swimley, Michelle; Tebbs, Robert; Burrell, Angelia; Flannery, Jonathan; Bastin, Benjamin; Bird, Patrick; Benzinger, M Joseph; Crowley, Erin; Agin, James; Goins, David; Salfinger, Yvonne; Brodsky, Michael; Fernandez, Maria Cristina

    2016-11-01

    The Applied Biosystems™ RapidFinder™ STEC Detection Workflow (Thermo Fisher Scientific) is a complete protocol for the rapid qualitative detection of Escherichia coli (E. coli) O157:H7 and the "Big 6" non-O157 Shiga-like toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) serotypes (defined as serogroups: O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, and O145). The RapidFinder STEC Detection Workflow makes use of either the automated preparation of PCR-ready DNA using the Applied Biosystems PrepSEQ™ Nucleic Acid Extraction Kit in conjunction with the Applied Biosystems MagMAX™ Express 96-well magnetic particle processor or the Applied Biosystems PrepSEQ Rapid Spin kit for manual preparation of PCR-ready DNA. Two separate assays comprise the RapidFinder STEC Detection Workflow, the Applied Biosystems RapidFinder STEC Screening Assay and the Applied Biosystems RapidFinder STEC Confirmation Assay. The RapidFinder STEC Screening Assay includes primers and probes to detect the presence of stx1 (Shiga toxin 1), stx2 (Shiga toxin 2), eae (intimin), and E. coli O157 gene targets. The RapidFinder STEC Confirmation Assay includes primers and probes for the "Big 6" non-O157 STEC and E. coli O157:H7. The use of these two assays in tandem allows a user to detect accurately the presence of the "Big 6" STECs and E. coli O157:H7. The performance of the RapidFinder STEC Detection Workflow was evaluated in a method comparison study, in inclusivity and exclusivity studies, and in a robustness evaluation. The assays were compared to the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) Microbiology Laboratory Guidebook (MLG) 5.09: Detection, Isolation and Identification of Escherichia coli O157:H7 from Meat Products and Carcass and Environmental Sponges for raw ground beef (73% lean) and USDA/FSIS-MLG 5B.05: Detection, Isolation and Identification of Escherichia coli non-O157:H7 from Meat Products and Carcass and Environmental Sponges for raw beef trim. No statistically significant

  8. The 2013 Nucleic Acids Research Database Issue and the online molecular biology database collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Suárez, Xosé M; Galperin, Michael Y

    2013-01-01

    The 20th annual Database Issue of Nucleic Acids Research includes 176 articles, half of which describe new online molecular biology databases and the other half provide updates on the databases previously featured in NAR and other journals. This year's highlights include two databases of DNA repeat elements; several databases of transcriptional factors and transcriptional factor-binding sites; databases on various aspects of protein structure and protein-protein interactions; databases for metagenomic and rRNA sequence analysis; and four databases specifically dedicated to Escherichia coli. The increased emphasis on using the genome data to improve human health is reflected in the development of the databases of genomic structural variation (NCBI's dbVar and EBI's DGVa), the NIH Genetic Testing Registry and several other databases centered on the genetic basis of human disease, potential drugs, their targets and the mechanisms of protein-ligand binding. Two new databases present genomic and RNAseq data for monkeys, providing wealth of data on our closest relatives for comparative genomics purposes. The NAR online Molecular Biology Database Collection, available at http://www.oxfordjournals.org/nar/database/a/, has been updated and currently lists 1512 online databases. The full content of the Database Issue is freely available online on the Nucleic Acids Research website (http://nar.oxfordjournals.org/).

  9. Genomic Database Searching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchins, James R A

    2017-01-01

    The availability of reference genome sequences for virtually all species under active research has revolutionized biology. Analyses of genomic variations in many organisms have provided insights into phenotypic traits, evolution and disease, and are transforming medicine. All genomic data from publicly funded projects are freely available in Internet-based databases, for download or searching via genome browsers such as Ensembl, Vega, NCBI's Map Viewer, and the UCSC Genome Browser. These online tools generate interactive graphical outputs of relevant chromosomal regions, showing genes, transcripts, and other genomic landmarks, and epigenetic features mapped by projects such as ENCODE.This chapter provides a broad overview of the major genomic databases and browsers, and describes various approaches and the latest resources for searching them. Methods are provided for identifying genomic locus and sequence information using gene names or codes, identifiers for DNA and RNA molecules and proteins; also from karyotype bands, chromosomal coordinates, sequences, motifs, and matrix-based patterns. Approaches are also described for batch retrieval of genomic information, performing more complex queries, and analyzing larger sets of experimental data, for example from next-generation sequencing projects.

  10. NCBI viral genomes resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brister, J Rodney; Ako-Adjei, Danso; Bao, Yiming; Blinkova, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Recent technological innovations have ignited an explosion in virus genome sequencing that promises to fundamentally alter our understanding of viral biology and profoundly impact public health policy. Yet, any potential benefits from the billowing cloud of next generation sequence data hinge upon well implemented reference resources that facilitate the identification of sequences, aid in the assembly of sequence reads and provide reference annotation sources. The NCBI Viral Genomes Resource is a reference resource designed to bring order to this sequence shockwave and improve usability of viral sequence data. The resource can be accessed at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/genome/viruses/ and catalogs all publicly available virus genome sequences and curates reference genome sequences. As the number of genome sequences has grown, so too have the difficulties in annotating and maintaining reference sequences. The rapid expansion of the viral sequence universe has forced a recalibration of the data model to better provide extant sequence representation and enhanced reference sequence products to serve the needs of the various viral communities. This, in turn, has placed increased emphasis on leveraging the knowledge of individual scientific communities to identify important viral sequences and develop well annotated reference virus genome sets.

  11. NCBI Reference Sequences (RefSeq): current status, new features and genome annotation policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruitt, Kim D; Tatusova, Tatiana; Brown, Garth R; Maglott, Donna R

    2012-01-01

    The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) Reference Sequence (RefSeq) database is a collection of genomic, transcript and protein sequence records. These records are selected and curated from public sequence archives and represent a significant reduction in redundancy compared to the volume of data archived by the International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration. The database includes over 16,00 organisms, 2.4 × 0(6) genomic records, 13 × 10(6) proteins and 2 × 10(6) RNA records spanning prokaryotes, eukaryotes and viruses (RefSeq release 49, September 2011). The RefSeq database is maintained by a combined approach of automated analyses, collaboration and manual curation to generate an up-to-date representation of the sequence, its features, names and cross-links to related sources of information. We report here on recent growth, the status of curating the human RefSeq data set, more extensive feature annotation and current policy for eukaryotic genome annotation via the NCBI annotation pipeline. More information about the resource is available online (see http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/RefSeq/).

  12. NCBI prokaryotic genome annotation pipeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatusova, Tatiana; DiCuccio, Michael; Badretdin, Azat; Chetvernin, Vyacheslav; Nawrocki, Eric P; Zaslavsky, Leonid; Lomsadze, Alexandre; Pruitt, Kim D; Borodovsky, Mark; Ostell, James

    2016-08-19

    Recent technological advances have opened unprecedented opportunities for large-scale sequencing and analysis of populations of pathogenic species in disease outbreaks, as well as for large-scale diversity studies aimed at expanding our knowledge across the whole domain of prokaryotes. To meet the challenge of timely interpretation of structure, function and meaning of this vast genetic information, a comprehensive approach to automatic genome annotation is critically needed. In collaboration with Georgia Tech, NCBI has developed a new approach to genome annotation that combines alignment based methods with methods of predicting protein-coding and RNA genes and other functional elements directly from sequence. A new gene finding tool, GeneMarkS+, uses the combined evidence of protein and RNA placement by homology as an initial map of annotation to generate and modify ab initio gene predictions across the whole genome. Thus, the new NCBI's Prokaryotic Genome Annotation Pipeline (PGAP) relies more on sequence similarity when confident comparative data are available, while it relies more on statistical predictions in the absence of external evidence. The pipeline provides a framework for generation and analysis of annotation on the full breadth of prokaryotic taxonomy. For additional information on PGAP see https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/genome/annotation_prok/ and the NCBI Handbook, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK174280/.

  13. Database Resources of the National Center for Biotechnology Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) provides a large suite of online resources for biological information and data, including the GenBank® nucleic acid sequence database and the PubMed database of citations and abstracts for published life science journals. The Entrez system provides search and retrieval operations for most of these data from 37 distinct databases. The E-utilities serve as the programming interface for the Entrez system. Augmenting many of the Web applications are custom implementations of the BLAST program optimized to search specialized data sets. New resources released in the past year include iCn3D, MutaBind, and the Antimicrobial Resistance Gene Reference Database; and resources that were updated in the past year include My Bibliography, SciENcv, the Pathogen Detection Project, Assembly, Genome, the Genome Data Viewer, BLAST and PubChem. All of these resources can be accessed through the NCBI home page at www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov. PMID:27899561

  14. Ab initio O(N) elongation-counterpoise method for BSSE-corrected interaction energy analyses in biosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orimoto, Yuuichi; Xie, Peng; Liu, Kai [Department of Material Sciences, Faculty of Engineering Sciences, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasuga-Park, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Yamamoto, Ryohei [Department of Molecular and Material Sciences, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Sciences, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasuga-Park, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Imamura, Akira [Hiroshima Kokusai Gakuin University, 6-20-1 Nakano, Aki-ku, Hiroshima 739-0321 (Japan); Aoki, Yuriko, E-mail: aoki.yuriko.397@m.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Material Sciences, Faculty of Engineering Sciences, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasuga-Park, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST, 4-1-8 Hon-chou, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan)

    2015-03-14

    An Elongation-counterpoise (ELG-CP) method was developed for performing accurate and efficient interaction energy analysis and correcting the basis set superposition error (BSSE) in biosystems. The method was achieved by combining our developed ab initio O(N) elongation method with the conventional counterpoise method proposed for solving the BSSE problem. As a test, the ELG-CP method was applied to the analysis of the DNAs’ inter-strands interaction energies with respect to the alkylation-induced base pair mismatch phenomenon that causes a transition from G⋯C to A⋯T. It was found that the ELG-CP method showed high efficiency (nearly linear-scaling) and high accuracy with a negligibly small energy error in the total energy calculations (in the order of 10{sup −7}–10{sup −8} hartree/atom) as compared with the conventional method during the counterpoise treatment. Furthermore, the magnitude of the BSSE was found to be ca. −290 kcal/mol for the calculation of a DNA model with 21 base pairs. This emphasizes the importance of BSSE correction when a limited size basis set is used to study the DNA models and compare small energy differences between them. In this work, we quantitatively estimated the inter-strands interaction energy for each possible step in the transition process from G⋯C to A⋯T by the ELG-CP method. It was found that the base pair replacement in the process only affects the interaction energy for a limited area around the mismatch position with a few adjacent base pairs. From the interaction energy point of view, our results showed that a base pair sliding mechanism possibly occurs after the alkylation of guanine to gain the maximum possible number of hydrogen bonds between the bases. In addition, the steps leading to the A⋯T replacement accompanied with replications were found to be unfavorable processes corresponding to ca. 10 kcal/mol loss in stabilization energy. The present study indicated that the ELG-CP method is promising for

  15. P225-T Influence of Sample-Loading Solutions on Sequencing Performance and Loss of Resolution on the Applied Biosystems 3730 DNA Analyzer

    OpenAIRE

    Fisher, J. A.; Berosik, S. R.; Lee, K.B.; Santhanam, S.

    2007-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of sample-loading solutions on sequencing performance on the Applied Biosystems 3730 DNA Analyzer, and in particular their effects on the decline of sequencing performance, or loss of resolution. We compared sequencing performance of samples resuspended in water, 0.1 mM EDTA, or deionized formamide. Our results show that samples resuspended in water give poorer overall performance in terms of average number of Q20 bases per sample and in the amount of variabil...

  16. The Pfam protein families database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Robert D; Tate, John; Mistry, Jaina; Coggill, Penny C; Sammut, Stephen John; Hotz, Hans-Rudolf; Ceric, Goran; Forslund, Kristoffer; Eddy, Sean R; Sonnhammer, Erik L L; Bateman, Alex

    2008-01-01

    Pfam is a comprehensive collection of protein domains and families, represented as multiple sequence alignments and as profile hidden Markov models. The current release of Pfam (22.0) contains 9318 protein families. Pfam is now based not only on the UniProtKB sequence database, but also on NCBI GenPept and on sequences from selected metagenomics projects. Pfam is available on the web from the consortium members using a new, consistent and improved website design in the UK (http://pfam.sanger.ac.uk/), the USA (http://pfam.janelia.org/) and Sweden (http://pfam.sbc.su.se/), as well as from mirror sites in France (http://pfam.jouy.inra.fr/) and South Korea (http://pfam.ccbb.re.kr/).

  17. The NCBI. Publicly available tools and resources on the Web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenuth, J P

    2000-01-01

    As computing technology advances and new sources of valuable biological information are collected the numbers of database and the tools that are used to analyze the data they contain will change. From the time this article was originally written to the time (about 6 months) this summary was put together another 4 releases of Genbank have been made available, two new BLAST search engines, PHI-BLAST and organism-specific BLAST, a database of Human Genetic Variation (dbSNP), and a new version of Cn-3D. The NCBI will, for the forseeable future, provide the research community with a wealth of information and computing tools. made a number of other tools available for molecular biologists.

  18. Relational databases

    CERN Document Server

    Bell, D A

    1986-01-01

    Relational Databases explores the major advances in relational databases and provides a balanced analysis of the state of the art in relational databases. Topics covered include capture and analysis of data placement requirements; distributed relational database systems; data dependency manipulation in database schemata; and relational database support for computer graphics and computer aided design. This book is divided into three sections and begins with an overview of the theory and practice of distributed systems, using the example of INGRES from Relational Technology as illustration. The

  19. The 2014 Nucleic Acids Research Database Issue and an updated NAR online Molecular Biology Database Collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Suárez, Xosé M; Rigden, Daniel J; Galperin, Michael Y

    2014-01-01

    The 2014 Nucleic Acids Research Database Issue includes descriptions of 58 new molecular biology databases and recent updates to 123 databases previously featured in NAR or other journals. For convenience, the issue is now divided into eight sections that reflect major subject categories. Among the highlights of this issue are six databases of the transcription factor binding sites in various organisms and updates on such popular databases as CAZy, Database of Genomic Variants (DGV), dbGaP, DrugBank, KEGG, miRBase, Pfam, Reactome, SEED, TCDB and UniProt. There is a strong block of structural databases, which includes, among others, the new RNA Bricks database, updates on PDBe, PDBsum, ArchDB, Gene3D, ModBase, Nucleic Acid Database and the recently revived iPfam database. An update on the NCBI's MMDB describes VAST+, an improved tool for protein structure comparison. Two articles highlight the development of the Structural Classification of Proteins (SCOP) database: one describes SCOPe, which automates assignment of new structures to the existing SCOP hierarchy; the other one describes the first version of SCOP2, with its more flexible approach to classifying protein structures. This issue also includes a collection of articles on bacterial taxonomy and metagenomics, which includes updates on the List of Prokaryotic Names with Standing in Nomenclature (LPSN), Ribosomal Database Project (RDP), the Silva/LTP project and several new metagenomics resources. The NAR online Molecular Biology Database Collection, http://www.oxfordjournals.org/nar/database/c/, has been expanded to 1552 databases. The entire Database Issue is freely available online on the Nucleic Acids Research website (http://nar.oxfordjournals.org/).

  20. Biofuel Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biofuel Database (Web, free access)   This database brings together structural, biological, and thermodynamic data for enzymes that are either in current use or are being considered for use in the production of biofuels.

  1. Onzekere databases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Keulen, Maurice

    Een recente ontwikkeling in het databaseonderzoek betret zogenaamde 'onzekere databases'. Dit artikel beschrijft wat onzekere databases zijn, hoe ze gebruikt kunnen worden en welke toepassingen met name voordeel zouden kunnen hebben van deze technologie.

  2. Community Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This excel spreadsheet is the result of merging at the port level of several of the in-house fisheries databases in combination with other demographic databases such...

  3. Database Administrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Pam

    2010-01-01

    The Internet and electronic commerce (e-commerce) generate lots of data. Data must be stored, organized, and managed. Database administrators, or DBAs, work with database software to find ways to do this. They identify user needs, set up computer databases, and test systems. They ensure that systems perform as they should and add people to the…

  4. Database Administrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Pam

    2010-01-01

    The Internet and electronic commerce (e-commerce) generate lots of data. Data must be stored, organized, and managed. Database administrators, or DBAs, work with database software to find ways to do this. They identify user needs, set up computer databases, and test systems. They ensure that systems perform as they should and add people to the…

  5. NCBI GEO: archive for high-throughput functional genomic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Tanya; Troup, Dennis B; Wilhite, Stephen E; Ledoux, Pierre; Rudnev, Dmitry; Evangelista, Carlos; Kim, Irene F; Soboleva, Alexandra; Tomashevsky, Maxim; Marshall, Kimberly A; Phillippy, Katherine H; Sherman, Patti M; Muertter, Rolf N; Edgar, Ron

    2009-01-01

    The Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) at the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) is the largest public repository for high-throughput gene expression data. Additionally, GEO hosts other categories of high-throughput functional genomic data, including those that examine genome copy number variations, chromatin structure, methylation status and transcription factor binding. These data are generated by the research community using high-throughput technologies like microarrays and, more recently, next-generation sequencing. The database has a flexible infrastructure that can capture fully annotated raw and processed data, enabling compliance with major community-derived scientific reporting standards such as 'Minimum Information About a Microarray Experiment' (MIAME). In addition to serving as a centralized data storage hub, GEO offers many tools and features that allow users to effectively explore, analyze and download expression data from both gene-centric and experiment-centric perspectives. This article summarizes the GEO repository structure, content and operating procedures, as well as recently introduced data mining features. GEO is freely accessible at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/.

  6. muBLASTP: database-indexed protein sequence search on multicore CPUs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Misra, Sanchit; Wang, Hao; Feng, Wu-Chun

    2016-11-04

    The Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) is a fundamental program in the life sciences that searches databases for sequences that are most similar to a query sequence. Currently, the BLAST algorithm utilizes a query-indexed approach. Although many approaches suggest that sequence search with a database index can achieve much higher throughput (e.g., BLAT, SSAHA, and CAFE), they cannot deliver the same level of sensitivity as the query-indexed BLAST, i.e., NCBI BLAST, or they can only support nucleotide sequence search, e.g., MegaBLAST. Due to different challenges and characteristics between query indexing and database indexing, the existing techniques for query-indexed search cannot be used into database indexed search. muBLASTP, a novel database-indexed BLAST for protein sequence search, delivers identical hits returned to NCBI BLAST. On Intel Haswell multicore CPUs, for a single query, the single-threaded muBLASTP achieves up to a 4.41-fold speedup for alignment stages, and up to a 1.75-fold end-to-end speedup over single-threaded NCBI BLAST. For a batch of queries, the multithreaded muBLASTP achieves up to a 5.7-fold speedups for alignment stages, and up to a 4.56-fold end-to-end speedup over multithreaded NCBI BLAST. With a newly designed index structure for protein database and associated optimizations in BLASTP algorithm, we re-factored BLASTP algorithm for modern multicore processors that achieves much higher throughput with acceptable memory footprint for the database index.

  7. The NIF LinkOut broker: a web resource to facilitate federated data integration using NCBI identifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marenco, Luis; Ascoli, Giorgio A; Martone, Maryann E; Shepherd, Gordon M; Miller, Perry L

    2008-09-01

    This paper describes the NIF LinkOut Broker (NLB) that has been built as part of the Neuroscience Information Framework (NIF) project. The NLB is designed to coordinate the assembly of links to neuroscience information items (e.g., experimental data, knowledge bases, and software tools) that are (1) accessible via the Web, and (2) related to entries in the National Center for Biotechnology Information's (NCBI's) Entrez system. The NLB collects these links from each resource and passes them to the NCBI which incorporates them into its Entrez LinkOut service. In this way, an Entrez user looking at a specific Entrez entry can LinkOut directly to related neuroscience information. The information stored in the NLB can also be utilized in other ways. A second approach, which is operational on a pilot basis, is for the NLB Web server to create dynamically its own Web page of LinkOut links for each NCBI identifier in the NLB database. This approach can allow other resources (in addition to the NCBI Entrez) to LinkOut to related neuroscience information. The paper describes the current NLB system and discusses certain design issues that arose during its implementation.

  8. Bacterial diversity of a consortium degrading high-molecular-weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in a two-liquid phase biosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafortune, Isabelle; Juteau, Pierre; Déziel, Eric; Lépine, François; Beaudet, Réjean; Villemur, Richard

    2009-04-01

    -five percent of clones and strains were affiliated to Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria; among them, several were affiliated to bacterial species known for their PAH degradation activities such as those belonging to the Sphingomonadaceae. Finally, three genes involved in the degradation of aromatic molecules were detected in the consortium and two in IAFILS9. This study provides information on the bacterial composition of a HWM PAH-degrading consortium and its dynamics in a TLP biosystem during PAH degradation.

  9. Influence of capillary barrier effect on biogas distribution at the base of passive methane oxidation biosystems: Parametric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahoughalandari, Bahar; Cabral, Alexandre R

    2017-05-01

    The efficiency of methane oxidation in passive methane oxidation biosystems (PMOBs) is influenced by, among other things, the intensity and distribution of the CH4 loading at the base of the methane oxidation layer (MOL). Both the intensity and distribution are affected by the capillary barrier that results from the superposition of the two materials constituting the PMOB, namely the MOL and the gas distribution layer (GDL). The effect of capillary barriers on the unsaturated flow of water has been well documented in the literature. However, its effect on gas flow through PMOBs is still poorly documented. In this study, sets of numerical simulations were performed to evaluate the effect of unsaturated hydraulic characteristics of the MOL material on the value and distribution of moisture and hence, the ease and uniformity in the distribution of the upward flow of biogas along the GDL-MOL interface. The unsaturated hydraulic parameters of the materials used to construct the experimental field plot at the St-Nicephore landfill (Quebec, Canada) were adopted to build the reference simulation of the parametric study. The behavior of the upward flow of biogas for this particular material was analyzed based on its gas intrinsic permeability function, which was obtained in the laboratory. The parameters that most influenced the distribution and the ease of biogas flow at the base of the MOL were the saturated hydraulic conductivity and pore size distribution of the MOL material, whose effects were intensified as the slope of the interface increased. The effect of initial dry density was also assessed herein. Selection of the MOL material must be made bearing in mind that these three parameters are key in the effort to prevent unwanted restriction in the upward flow of biogas, which may result in the redirection of biogas towards the top of the slope, leading to high CH4 fluxes (hotspots). In a well-designed PMOB, upward flow of biogas across the GDL-MOL interface is

  10. Laser influence to biosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jevtić Sanja D.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a continous (cw lasers in visible region were applied in order to study the influence of quantum generator to certain plants. The aim of such projects is to analyse biostimulation processes of living organizms which are linked to defined laser power density thresholds (exposition doses. The results of irradiation of corn and wheat seeds using He-Ne laser in the cw regime of 632.8nm, 50mW are presented and compared to results for other laser types. The dry and wet plant seeds were irradiated in defined time intervals and the germination period plant was monitored by days. Morphological data (stalk thickness, height, cob lenght for chosen plants were monitored. From the recorded data, for the whole vegetative period, we performed appropriate statistical data processing. One part of experiments were the measurements of coefficient of reflection in visible range. Correlation estimations were calculated and discussed for our results. Main conclusion was that there were a significant increments in plant's height and also a cob lenght elongation for corn.

  11. Human Performance and Biosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-08

    to low-level exposures of photo-electro- magnetic stimuli. Potential long-term benefits may include accelerated recovery from mental fatigue and...protocol in preparation DoD Benefit : Effective and safe augmentation of warfighter cognitive capabilities under sleep deprived (or other stressful...Microscopy of cells reveals lipid bodies lipid chlorophyll 1. Generate thousands of mutants 2. Combine mutants into one mixed culture 3. Measure

  12. The 2016 database issue of Nucleic Acids Research and an updated molecular biology database collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigden, Daniel J; Fernández-Suárez, Xosé M; Galperin, Michael Y

    2016-01-04

    The 2016 Database Issue of Nucleic Acids Research starts with overviews of the resources provided by three major bioinformatics centers, the U.S. National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), the European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI) and Swiss Institute for Bioinformatics (SIB). Also included are descriptions of 62 new databases and updates on 95 databases that have been previously featured in NAR plus 17 previously described elsewhere. A number of papers in this issue deal with resources on nucleic acids, including various kinds of non-coding RNAs and their interactions, molecular dynamics simulations of nucleic acid structure, and two databases of super-enhancers. The protein database section features important updates on the EBI's Pfam, PDBe and PRIDE databases, as well as a variety of resources on pathways, metabolomics and metabolic modeling. This issue also includes updates on popular metagenomics resources, such as MG-RAST, EBI Metagenomics, and probeBASE, as well as a newly compiled Human Pan-Microbe Communities database. A significant fraction of the new and updated databases are dedicated to the genetic basis of disease, primarily cancer, and various aspects of drug research, including resources for patented drugs, their side effects, withdrawn drugs, and potential drug targets. A further six papers present updated databases of various antimicrobial and anticancer peptides. The entire Database Issue is freely available online on the Nucleic Acids Research website (http://nar.oxfordjournals.org/). The NAR online Molecular Biology Database Collection, http://www.oxfordjournals.org/nar/database/c/, has been updated with the addition of 88 new resources and removal of 23 obsolete websites, which brought the current listing to 1685 databases.

  13. NCBI GEO: archive for functional genomics data sets--update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Tanya; Wilhite, Stephen E; Ledoux, Pierre; Evangelista, Carlos; Kim, Irene F; Tomashevsky, Maxim; Marshall, Kimberly A; Phillippy, Katherine H; Sherman, Patti M; Holko, Michelle; Yefanov, Andrey; Lee, Hyeseung; Zhang, Naigong; Robertson, Cynthia L; Serova, Nadezhda; Davis, Sean; Soboleva, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    The Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO, http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/) is an international public repository for high-throughput microarray and next-generation sequence functional genomic data sets submitted by the research community. The resource supports archiving of raw data, processed data and metadata which are indexed, cross-linked and searchable. All data are freely available for download in a variety of formats. GEO also provides several web-based tools and strategies to assist users to query, analyse and visualize data. This article reports current status and recent database developments, including the release of GEO2R, an R-based web application that helps users analyse GEO data.

  14. Validation of the Applied Biosystems 7500 Fast Instrument for Detection of Listeria monocytogenes with the SureTect Listeria monocytogenes PCR Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-31

    In 2013, the Thermo Scientific™ SureTect™ Listeria monocytogenes Real-Time PCR Assay was certified by the AOAC Research Institute (RI) Performance Tested Methods (SM) program as a rapid method for the detection of L. monocytogenes from a wide range of food matrixes and surface samples. This report details the method modification studies undertaken to extend the analysis of this PCR assay to the Applied Biosystems™ 7500 Fast PCR Instrument and Applied Biosystems RapidFinder™ Express 2.0 software allowing the use of the SureTect assay on a 96 well format PCR cycler in addition to the current workflow, which uses the 24 well Thermo Scientific PikoReal™ PCR Instrument and Thermo Scientific SureTect software. Because this study was deemed by AOAC-RI to be a level 2 method modification study, a representative range of food matrixes covering raw ground turkey, 2% fat pasteurized milk, and bagged lettuce as well as stainless steel surface samples were analyzed with the Applied Biosystems 7500 Fast PCR Instrument and RapidFinder Express 2.0 software. All testing was conducted in comparison to the reference method detailed in International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 6579:2002. No significant difference by probability of detection statistical analysis was found between the SureTect Listeria monocytogenes PCR Assay or the ISO reference method methods for any of the matrixes analyzed during the study.

  15. Validation of the Applied Biosystems 7500 Fast Instrument for Detection of Listeria monocytogenes with the SureTect Listeria monocytogenes PCR Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloke, Jonathan; Arizanova, Julia; Crabtree, David; Simpson, Helen; Evans, Katharine; Vaahtoranta, Laura; Palomäki, Jukka-Pekka; Artimo, Paulus; Huang, Feng; Liikanen, Maria; Koskela, Suvi

    2016-05-01

    In 2013, the Thermo Scientific™ SureTect™ Listeria monocytogenes Real-Time PCR Assay was certified by the AOAC Research Institute (RI) Performance Tested Methods(SM) program as a rapid method for the detection of L. monocytogenes from a wide range of food matrixes and surface samples. This report details the method modification studies undertaken to extend the analysis of this PCR assay to the Applied Biosystems™ 7500 Fast PCR Instrument and Applied Biosystems RapidFinder™ Express 2.0 software allowing the use of the SureTect assay on a 96 well format PCR cycler in addition to the current workflow, which uses the 24 well Thermo Scientific PikoReal™ PCR Instrument and Thermo Scientific SureTect software. Because this study was deemed by AOAC-RI to be a level 2 method modification study, a representative range of food matrixes covering raw ground turkey, 2% fat pasteurized milk, and bagged lettuce as well as stainless steel surface samples were analyzed with the Applied Biosystems 7500 Fast PCR Instrument and RapidFinder Express 2.0 software. All testing was conducted in comparison to the reference method detailed in International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 6579:2002. No significant difference by probability of detection statistical analysis was found between the SureTect Listeria monocytogenes PCR Assay or the ISO reference method methods for any of the matrixes analyzed during the study.

  16. Characterization of the dynamic behavior of nonlinear biosystems in the presence of model uncertainty using singular invariance PDEs: application to immobilized enzyme and cell bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazantzis, Nikolaos; Kazantzi, Vasiliki

    2010-04-01

    A new approach to the problem of characterizing the dynamic behavior of nonlinear biosystems in the presence of model uncertainty using the notion of slow invariant manifold is proposed. The problem of interest is addressed within the context of singular partial differential equations (PDE) theory, and in particular, through a system of singular quasi-linear invariance PDEs for which a general set of conditions for solvability is provided. Within the class of analytic solutions, this set of conditions guarantees the existence and uniqueness of a locally analytic solution which represents the system's slow invariant manifold exponentially attracting all dynamic trajectories in the absence of model uncertainty. An exact reduced-order model is then obtained through the restriction of the original biosystem dynamics on the slow manifold. The analyticity property of the solution to the invariance PDEs enables the development of a series solution method that can be easily implemented using MAPLE leading to polynomial approximations up to the desired degree of accuracy. Furthermore, the aforementioned attractivity property and the transition towards the above manifold is analyzed and characterized in the presence of model uncertainty. Finally, examples of certain immobilized enzyme bioreactors are considered to elucidate aspects of the proposed context of analysis.

  17. NCBI BLAST: a better web interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Mark; Zaretskaya, Irena; Raytselis, Yan; Merezhuk, Yuri; McGinnis, Scott; Madden, Thomas L

    2008-07-01

    Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) is a sequence similarity search program. The public interface of BLAST, http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/blast, at the NCBI website has recently been reengineered to improve usability and performance. Key new features include simplified search forms, improved navigation, a list of recent BLAST results, saved search strategies and a documentation directory. Here, we describe the BLAST web application's new features, explain design decisions and outline plans for future improvement.

  18. The Gene Expression Omnibus database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clough, Emily; Barrett, Tanya

    2016-01-01

    The Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database is an international public repository that archives and freely distributes high-throughput gene expression and other functional genomics data sets. Created in 2000 as a worldwide resource for gene expression studies, GEO has evolved with rapidly changing technologies and now accepts high-throughput data for many other data applications, including those that examine genome methylation, chromatin structure, and genome–protein interactions. GEO supports community-derived reporting standards that specify provision of several critical study elements including raw data, processed data, and descriptive metadata. The database not only provides access to data for tens of thousands of studies, but also offers various Web-based tools and strategies that enable users to locate data relevant to their specific interests, as well as to visualize and analyze the data. This chapter includes detailed descriptions of methods to query and download GEO data and use the analysis and visualization tools. The GEO homepage is at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/. PMID:27008011

  19. 如何利用NCBI的资源与工具检索基因/基因编码产物的功能%How to Find the Function of A Gene or Gene Product by NCBI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李轶; 张雪梅

    2014-01-01

    美国国立生物技术信息中心(NCBI)是目前国际上几个重要的生物信息学网站之一,Entrez是NCBI的数据库检索查询系统,BLAST是NCBI开发的序列相似搜索程序,本文重点介绍如何利用Entrez检索查询系统以及BLAST序列相似搜索程序在NCBI的多个数据库中检索基因/基因编码产物的功能。%NCBI (National Center for Biotechnology Information) is one of the most important international bioinformatics websites. Entrez is database searching system of NCBI.BLAST is sequence similarity searching program developed by NCBI. This article introduces the skil s of searching the function of a gene or gene product by Entrez and BLAST in several database of NCBI.

  20. Database Manager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    It is normal practice today for organizations to store large quantities of records of related information as computer-based files or databases. Purposeful information is retrieved by performing queries on the data sets. The purpose of DATABASE MANAGER is to communicate to students the method by which the computer performs these queries. This…

  1. Genome databases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courteau, J.

    1991-10-11

    Since the Genome Project began several years ago, a plethora of databases have been developed or are in the works. They range from the massive Genome Data Base at Johns Hopkins University, the central repository of all gene mapping information, to small databases focusing on single chromosomes or organisms. Some are publicly available, others are essentially private electronic lab notebooks. Still others limit access to a consortium of researchers working on, say, a single human chromosome. An increasing number incorporate sophisticated search and analytical software, while others operate as little more than data lists. In consultation with numerous experts in the field, a list has been compiled of some key genome-related databases. The list was not limited to map and sequence databases but also included the tools investigators use to interpret and elucidate genetic data, such as protein sequence and protein structure databases. Because a major goal of the Genome Project is to map and sequence the genomes of several experimental animals, including E. coli, yeast, fruit fly, nematode, and mouse, the available databases for those organisms are listed as well. The author also includes several databases that are still under development - including some ambitious efforts that go beyond data compilation to create what are being called electronic research communities, enabling many users, rather than just one or a few curators, to add or edit the data and tag it as raw or confirmed.

  2. Database Replication

    CERN Document Server

    Kemme, Bettina

    2010-01-01

    Database replication is widely used for fault-tolerance, scalability and performance. The failure of one database replica does not stop the system from working as available replicas can take over the tasks of the failed replica. Scalability can be achieved by distributing the load across all replicas, and adding new replicas should the load increase. Finally, database replication can provide fast local access, even if clients are geographically distributed clients, if data copies are located close to clients. Despite its advantages, replication is not a straightforward technique to apply, and

  3. Probabilistic Databases

    CERN Document Server

    Suciu, Dan; Koch, Christop

    2011-01-01

    Probabilistic databases are databases where the value of some attributes or the presence of some records are uncertain and known only with some probability. Applications in many areas such as information extraction, RFID and scientific data management, data cleaning, data integration, and financial risk assessment produce large volumes of uncertain data, which are best modeled and processed by a probabilistic database. This book presents the state of the art in representation formalisms and query processing techniques for probabilistic data. It starts by discussing the basic principles for rep

  4. Dealer Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The dealer reporting databases contain the primary data reported by federally permitted seafood dealers in the northeast. Electronic reporting was implemented May 1,...

  5. RDD Databases

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This database was established to oversee documents issued in support of fishery research activities including experimental fishing permits (EFP), letters of...

  6. National database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Helen Grundtvig; Stjernø, Henrik

    1995-01-01

    Artikel om national database for sygeplejeforskning oprettet på Dansk Institut for Sundheds- og Sygeplejeforskning. Det er målet med databasen at samle viden om forsknings- og udviklingsaktiviteter inden for sygeplejen.......Artikel om national database for sygeplejeforskning oprettet på Dansk Institut for Sundheds- og Sygeplejeforskning. Det er målet med databasen at samle viden om forsknings- og udviklingsaktiviteter inden for sygeplejen....

  7. NCBI GEO: archive for functional genomics data sets--10 years on.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Tanya; Troup, Dennis B; Wilhite, Stephen E; Ledoux, Pierre; Evangelista, Carlos; Kim, Irene F; Tomashevsky, Maxim; Marshall, Kimberly A; Phillippy, Katherine H; Sherman, Patti M; Muertter, Rolf N; Holko, Michelle; Ayanbule, Oluwabukunmi; Yefanov, Andrey; Soboleva, Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    A decade ago, the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database was established at the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI). The original objective of GEO was to serve as a public repository for high-throughput gene expression data generated mostly by microarray technology. However, the research community quickly applied microarrays to non-gene-expression studies, including examination of genome copy number variation and genome-wide profiling of DNA-binding proteins. Because the GEO database was designed with a flexible structure, it was possible to quickly adapt the repository to store these data types. More recently, as the microarray community switches to next-generation sequencing technologies, GEO has again adapted to host these data sets. Today, GEO stores over 20,000 microarray- and sequence-based functional genomics studies, and continues to handle the majority of direct high-throughput data submissions from the research community. Multiple mechanisms are provided to help users effectively search, browse, download and visualize the data at the level of individual genes or entire studies. This paper describes recent database enhancements, including new search and data representation tools, as well as a brief review of how the community uses GEO data. GEO is freely accessible at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/.

  8. OMIA (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Animals): an enhanced platform and integration into the Entrez search interface at NCBI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenffer, Johann; Nicholas, Frank W; Castle, Kao; Rao, Arjun; Gregory, Stefan; Poidinger, Michael; Mailman, Matthew D; Ranganathan, Shoba

    2006-01-01

    Online Mendelian Inheritance in Animals (OMIA) is a comprehensive, annotated catalogue of inherited disorders and other familial traits in animals other than humans and mice. Structured as a comparative biology resource, OMIA is a comprehensive resource of phenotypic information on heritable animal traits and genes in a strongly comparative context, relating traits to genes where possible. OMIA is modelled on and is complementary to Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM). OMIA has been moved to a MySQL database at the Australian National Genomic Information Service (ANGIS) and can be accessed at http://omia.angis.org.au/. It has also been integrated into the Entrez search interface at the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI; http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=omia). Curation of OMIA data by researchers working on particular species and disorders has also been enabled.

  9. Validation of the Applied Biosystems 7500 Fast Instrument for the Detection of Salmonellae with SureTect Salmonella Species PCR Kit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloke, Jonathan; Evans, Katharine; Crabtree, David; Hughes, Annette; Simpson, Helen

    2016-07-01

    The Thermo Scientific SureTect™ Salmonella species real-time PCR assay is a rapid alternative method designed for the detection of salmonellae in a wide range of foods, animal feeds, and production-environment samples. The assay has previously been validated according to the AOAC Research Institute Performance Tested Methods(SM) program using Thermo Scientific PikoReal™ PCR cycler and Thermo Scientific SureTect Software Performance Tested Method 051303). This report details the method-modification study performed to validate an updated assay format, utilizing a reduced target probe concentration and an extension of the PCR cycler platform to enable the use of the kit with a Applied Biosystems 7500 Fast PCR cycler and Applied Biosystems RapidFinder™ Express 2.0 software. During this validation study, a matrix study was conducted on a subset of the method's claimed matrixes, comparing the performance of the modified SureTect Salmonella species kit (a reduced target probe concentration with a 7500 Fast platform) to the reference method detailed in ISO 6579:2002. No significant difference by probability of detection statistical analysis was found between SureTect or International Organization for Standardization methods for any of the matrixes analyzed during the study. Inclusivity and exclusivity studies using the modified method demonstrated accurate results for the 117 Salmonella and 36 non-Salmonella strains tested. Multiple production lots of the newly formatted kit were evaluated and found to be consistent with the current assay. Robustness studies confirmed that the change to the kit had no impact on the assay's performance when alterations were made to method parameters having the greatest potential impact on assay performance.

  10. Biological Databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaviena Baskaran

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Biology has entered a new era in distributing information based on database and this collection of database become primary in publishing information. This data publishing is done through Internet Gopher where information resources easy and affordable offered by powerful research tools. The more important thing now is the development of high quality and professionally operated electronic data publishing sites. To enhance the service and appropriate editorial and policies for electronic data publishing has been established and editors of article shoulder the responsibility.

  11. VerSeDa: vertebrate secretome database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortazar, Ana R.; Oguiza, José A.

    2017-01-01

    Based on the current tools, de novo secretome (full set of proteins secreted by an organism) prediction is a time consuming bioinformatic task that requires a multifactorial analysis in order to obtain reliable in silico predictions. Hence, to accelerate this process and offer researchers a reliable repository where secretome information can be obtained for vertebrates and model organisms, we have developed VerSeDa (Vertebrate Secretome Database). This freely available database stores information about proteins that are predicted to be secreted through the classical and non-classical mechanisms, for the wide range of vertebrate species deposited at the NCBI, UCSC and ENSEMBL sites. To our knowledge, VerSeDa is the only state-of-the-art database designed to store secretome data from multiple vertebrate genomes, thus, saving an important amount of time spent in the prediction of protein features that can be retrieved from this repository directly. Database URL: VerSeDa is freely available at http://genomics.cicbiogune.es/VerSeDa/index.php PMID:28365718

  12. FERN Ethnomedicinal Plant Database: Exploring Fern Ethnomedicinal Plants Knowledge for Computational Drug Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakar, Sambhaji B; Ghorpade, Pradnya N; Kale, Manisha V; Sonawane, Kailas D

    2015-01-01

    Fern plants are known for their ethnomedicinal applications. Huge amount of fern medicinal plants information is scattered in the form of text. Hence, database development would be an appropriate endeavor to cope with the situation. So by looking at the importance of medicinally useful fern plants, we developed a web based database which contains information about several group of ferns, their medicinal uses, chemical constituents as well as protein/enzyme sequences isolated from different fern plants. Fern ethnomedicinal plant database is an all-embracing, content management web-based database system, used to retrieve collection of factual knowledge related to the ethnomedicinal fern species. Most of the protein/enzyme sequences have been extracted from NCBI Protein sequence database. The fern species, family name, identification, taxonomy ID from NCBI, geographical occurrence, trial for, plant parts used, ethnomedicinal importance, morphological characteristics, collected from various scientific literatures and journals available in the text form. NCBI's BLAST, InterPro, phylogeny, Clustal W web source has also been provided for the future comparative studies. So users can get information related to fern plants and their medicinal applications at one place. This Fern ethnomedicinal plant database includes information of 100 fern medicinal species. This web based database would be an advantageous to derive information specifically for computational drug discovery, botanists or botanical interested persons, pharmacologists, researchers, biochemists, plant biotechnologists, ayurvedic practitioners, doctors/pharmacists, traditional medicinal users, farmers, agricultural students and teachers from universities as well as colleges and finally fern plant lovers. This effort would be useful to provide essential knowledge for the users about the adventitious applications for drug discovery, applications, conservation of fern species around the world and finally to create

  13. BioWarehouse: a bioinformatics database warehouse toolkit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stringer-Calvert David WJ

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This article addresses the problem of interoperation of heterogeneous bioinformatics databases. Results We introduce BioWarehouse, an open source toolkit for constructing bioinformatics database warehouses using the MySQL and Oracle relational database managers. BioWarehouse integrates its component databases into a common representational framework within a single database management system, thus enabling multi-database queries using the Structured Query Language (SQL but also facilitating a variety of database integration tasks such as comparative analysis and data mining. BioWarehouse currently supports the integration of a pathway-centric set of databases including ENZYME, KEGG, and BioCyc, and in addition the UniProt, GenBank, NCBI Taxonomy, and CMR databases, and the Gene Ontology. Loader tools, written in the C and JAVA languages, parse and load these databases into a relational database schema. The loaders also apply a degree of semantic normalization to their respective source data, decreasing semantic heterogeneity. The schema supports the following bioinformatics datatypes: chemical compounds, biochemical reactions, metabolic pathways, proteins, genes, nucleic acid sequences, features on protein and nucleic-acid sequences, organisms, organism taxonomies, and controlled vocabularies. As an application example, we applied BioWarehouse to determine the fraction of biochemically characterized enzyme activities for which no sequences exist in the public sequence databases. The answer is that no sequence exists for 36% of enzyme activities for which EC numbers have been assigned. These gaps in sequence data significantly limit the accuracy of genome annotation and metabolic pathway prediction, and are a barrier for metabolic engineering. Complex queries of this type provide examples of the value of the data warehousing approach to bioinformatics research. Conclusion BioWarehouse embodies significant progress on the

  14. PLANEX: the plant co-expression database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Won Cheol; Yu, Yongbin; Song, Kitae; Jang, Cheol Seong; Lee, Byung-Moo

    2013-05-20

    The PLAnt co-EXpression database (PLANEX) is a new internet-based database for plant gene analysis. PLANEX (http://planex.plantbioinformatics.org) contains publicly available GeneChip data obtained from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) of the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI). PLANEX is a genome-wide co-expression database, which allows for the functional identification of genes from a wide variety of experimental designs. It can be used for the characterization of genes for functional identification and analysis of a gene's dependency among other genes. Gene co-expression databases have been developed for other species, but gene co-expression information for plants is currently limited. We constructed PLANEX as a list of co-expressed genes and functional annotations for Arabidopsis thaliana, Glycine max, Hordeum vulgare, Oryza sativa, Solanum lycopersicum, Triticum aestivum, Vitis vinifera and Zea mays. PLANEX reports Pearson's correlation coefficients (PCCs; r-values) that distribute from a gene of interest for a given microarray platform set corresponding to a particular organism. To support PCCs, PLANEX performs an enrichment test of Gene Ontology terms and Cohen's Kappa value to compare functional similarity for all genes in the co-expression database. PLANEX draws a cluster network with co-expressed genes, which is estimated using the k-mean method. To construct PLANEX, a variety of datasets were interpreted by the IBM supercomputer Advanced Interactive eXecutive (AIX) in a supercomputing center. PLANEX provides a correlation database, a cluster network and an interpretation of enrichment test results for eight plant species. A typical co-expressed gene generates lists of co-expression data that contain hundreds of genes of interest for enrichment analysis. Also, co-expressed genes can be identified and cataloged in terms of comparative genomics by using the 'Co-expression gene compare' feature. This type of analysis will help interpret

  15. VerSeDa: vertebrate secretome database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortazar, Ana R; Oguiza, José A; Aransay, Ana M; Lavín, José L

    2017-01-01

    Based on the current tools, de novo secretome (full set of proteins secreted by an organism) prediction is a time consuming bioinformatic task that requires a multifactorial analysis in order to obtain reliable in silico predictions. Hence, to accelerate this process and offer researchers a reliable repository where secretome information can be obtained for vertebrates and model organisms, we have developed VerSeDa (Vertebrate Secretome Database). This freely available database stores information about proteins that are predicted to be secreted through the classical and non-classical mechanisms, for the wide range of vertebrate species deposited at the NCBI, UCSC and ENSEMBL sites. To our knowledge, VerSeDa is the only state-of-the-art database designed to store secretome data from multiple vertebrate genomes, thus, saving an important amount of time spent in the prediction of protein features that can be retrieved from this repository directly. VerSeDa is freely available at http://genomics.cicbiogune.es/VerSeDa/index.php.

  16. The NIF LinkOut Broker: A Web Resource to Facilitate Federated Data Integration using NCBI Identifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascoli, Giorgio A.; Martone, Maryann E.; Shepherd, Gordon M.; Miller, Perry L.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the NIF LinkOut Broker (NLB) that has been built as part of the Neuroscience Information Framework (NIF) project. The NLB is designed to coordinate the assembly of links to neuroscience information items (e.g., experimental data, knowledge bases, and software tools) that are (1) accessible via the Web, and (2) related to entries in the National Center for Biotechnology Information’s (NCBI’s) Entrez system. The NLB collects these links from each resource and passes them to the NCBI which incorporates them into its Entrez LinkOut service. In this way, an Entrez user looking at a specific Entrez entry can LinkOut directly to related neuroscience information. The information stored in the NLB can also be utilized in other ways. A second approach, which is operational on a pilot basis, is for the NLB Web server to create dynamically its own Web page of LinkOut links for each NCBI identifier in the NLB database. This approach can allow other resources (in addition to the NCBI Entrez) to LinkOut to related neuroscience information. The paper describes the current NLB system and discusses certain design issues that arose during its implementation. PMID:18975149

  17. Ontological interpretation of biomedical database content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana da Silva, Filipe; Jansen, Ludger; Freitas, Fred; Schulz, Stefan

    2017-06-26

    Biological databases store data about laboratory experiments, together with semantic annotations, in order to support data aggregation and retrieval. The exact meaning of such annotations in the context of a database record is often ambiguous. We address this problem by grounding implicit and explicit database content in a formal-ontological framework. By using a typical extract from the databases UniProt and Ensembl, annotated with content from GO, PR, ChEBI and NCBI Taxonomy, we created four ontological models (in OWL), which generate explicit, distinct interpretations under the BioTopLite2 (BTL2) upper-level ontology. The first three models interpret database entries as individuals (IND), defined classes (SUBC), and classes with dispositions (DISP), respectively; the fourth model (HYBR) is a combination of SUBC and DISP. For the evaluation of these four models, we consider (i) database content retrieval, using ontologies as query vocabulary; (ii) information completeness; and, (iii) DL complexity and decidability. The models were tested under these criteria against four competency questions (CQs). IND does not raise any ontological claim, besides asserting the existence of sample individuals and relations among them. Modelling patterns have to be created for each type of annotation referent. SUBC is interpreted regarding maximally fine-grained defined subclasses under the classes referred to by the data. DISP attempts to extract truly ontological statements from the database records, claiming the existence of dispositions. HYBR is a hybrid of SUBC and DISP and is more parsimonious regarding expressiveness and query answering complexity. For each of the four models, the four CQs were submitted as DL queries. This shows the ability to retrieve individuals with IND, and classes in SUBC and HYBR. DISP does not retrieve anything because the axioms with disposition are embedded in General Class Inclusion (GCI) statements. Ambiguity of biological database content is

  18. The Personal Sequence Database: a suite of tools to create and maintain web-accessible sequence databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sullivan Christopher M

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Large molecular sequence databases are fundamental resources for modern bioscientists. Whether for project-specific purposes or sharing data with colleagues, it is often advantageous to maintain smaller sequence databases. However, this is usually not an easy task for the average bench scientist. Results We present the Personal Sequence Database (PSD, a suite of tools to create and maintain small- to medium-sized web-accessible sequence databases. All interactions with PSD tools occur via the internet with a web browser. Users may define sequence groups within their database that can be maintained privately or published to the web for public use. A sequence group can be downloaded, browsed, searched by keyword or searched for sequence similarities using BLAST. Publishing a sequence group extends these capabilities to colleagues and collaborators. In addition to being able to manage their own sequence databases, users can enroll sequences in BLASTAgent, a BLAST hit tracking system, to monitor NCBI databases for new entries displaying a specified level of nucleotide or amino acid similarity. Conclusion The PSD offers a valuable set of resources unavailable elsewhere. In addition to managing sequence data and BLAST search results, it facilitates data sharing with colleagues, collaborators and public users. The PSD is hosted by the authors and is available at http://bioinfo.cgrb.oregonstate.edu/psd/.

  19. Systemic structural modular generalization of the crystallography of bound water applied to study the mechanisms of processes in biosystems at the atomic and molecular level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulienkov, N. A.

    2011-07-01

    The main reasons of the modern scientific revolution, one of the consequences of which are nanotechnologies and the development of interdisciplinary overall natural science (which can build potentially possible atomic structures and study the mechanisms of the processes occurring in them), are considered. The unifying role of crystallography in the accumulation of interdisciplinary knowledge is demonstrated. This generalization of crystallography requires the introduction of a new concept: a module which reflects the universal condition for stability of all real and potential and equilibrium and nonequilibrium structures of matter (their connectivity). A modular generalization of crystallography covers all forms of solids, including the structure of bound water (a system-forming matrix for the self-organization and morphogenesis of hierarchical biosystems which determines the metric selection of all other structural components of these systems). A dynamic model of the water surface layer, which serves as a matrix in the formation of Langmuir monolayers and plays a key role in the occurrence of life on the Earth, is developed.

  20. Evaluation of applied biosystems MicroSeq real-time PCR system for detection of Listeria monocytogenes in food. Performance Tested Method 011002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tebbs, Robert S; Balachandran, Priya; Wong, Lily Y; Zoder, Patrick; Furtado, Manohar R; Petrauskene, Olga V; Cao, Yanxiang

    2011-01-01

    Increasingly, more food companies are relying on molecular methods, such as PCR, for pathogen detection due to their improved simplicity, sensitivity, and rapid time to results. This report describes the validation of a new Real-Time PCR method to detect Listeria monocytogenes in nine different food matrixes. The complete system consists of the MicroSEQ L. monocytogenes Detection Kit, sample preparation, the Applied Biosystems 7500 Fast Real-Time PCR instrument, and RapidFinder Express software. Two sample preparation methods were validated: the PrepSEQ Nucleic Acid extraction kit and the PrepSEQ Rapid Spin sample preparation kit. The test method was compared to the ISO 11290-1 reference method using an unpaired-study design to detect L. monocytogenes in roast beef, cured bacon, lox (smoked salmon), lettuce, whole cow's milk, dry infant formula, ice cream, salad dressing, and mayonnaise. The MicroSEQ L. monocytogenes Detection Kit and the ISO 11290-1 reference method showed equivalent detection based on Chi-square analysis for all food matrixes when the samples were prepared using either of the two sample preparation methods. An independent validation confirmed these findings on smoked salmon and whole cow's milk. The MicroSEQ kit detected all 50 L. monocytogenes strains tested, and none of the 30 nontargeted bacteria strains.

  1. Evaluation of applied biosystems MicroSEQ real-time PCR system for detection of Listeria spp. in food and environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrauskene, Olga V; Cao, Yanxiang; Zoder, Patrick; Wong, Lily Y; Balachandran, Priya; Furtado, Manohar R; Tebbs, Robert S

    2012-01-01

    A complete system for real-time PCR detection of Listeria species was validated in five food matrixes and five environmental surfaces, namely, hot dogs, roast beef, lox (smoked salmon), pasteurized whole cow's milk, dry infant formula, stainless steel, plastic cutting board, ceramic tile, rubber sheets, and sealed concrete. The system consists of the MicroSEQ Listeria spp. Detection Kit, two sample preparation kits (PrepSEQ Nucleic Acid Extraction Kit and PrepSEQ Rapid Spin Sample Preparation Kit), the Applied Biosystems 7500 Fast Real-Time PCR instrument, and the RapidFinderTM Express v1.1 Software for data analysis. The test method was compared to the ISO 11290-1 reference method using an unpaired study design. The MicroSEQ Listeria spp. Detection Kit and the ISO 11290-1 reference method showed equivalent detection based on Chi-square analysis for all matrixes except hot dogs. For hot dogs, the MicroSEQ method detected more positives than the reference method for the low- and high-level inoculations, with all of the presumptive positives confirmed by the reference method. An independent validation study confirmed these findings on lox and stainless steel surface. The MicroSEQ kit detected all 50 Listeria strains tested and none of the 31 nontarget bacteria strains.

  2. Automated comparative auditing of NCIT genomic roles using NCBI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Barry; Oren, Marc; Min, Hua; Perl, Yehoshua; Halper, Michael

    2008-12-01

    Biomedical research has identified many human genes and various knowledge about them. The National Cancer Institute Thesaurus (NCIT) represents such knowledge as concepts and roles (relationships). Due to the rapid advances in this field, it is to be expected that the NCIT's Gene hierarchy will contain role errors. A comparative methodology to audit the Gene hierarchy with the use of the National Center for Biotechnology Information's (NCBI's) Entrez Gene database is presented. The two knowledge sources are accessed via a pair of Web crawlers to ensure up-to-date data. Our algorithms then compare the knowledge gathered from each, identify discrepancies that represent probable errors, and suggest corrective actions. The primary focus is on two kinds of gene-roles: (1) the chromosomal locations of genes, and (2) the biological processes in which genes play a role. Regarding chromosomal locations, the discrepancies revealed are striking and systematic, suggesting a structurally common origin. In regard to the biological processes, difficulties arise because genes frequently play roles in multiple processes, and processes may have many designations (such as synonymous terms). Our algorithms make use of the roles defined in the NCIT Biological Process hierarchy to uncover many probable gene-role errors in the NCIT. These results show that automated comparative auditing is a promising technique that can identify a large number of probable errors and corrections for them in a terminological genomic knowledge repository, thus facilitating its overall maintenance.

  3. NCBI Epigenomics: a new public resource for exploring epigenomic data sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fingerman, Ian M; McDaniel, Lee; Zhang, Xuan; Ratzat, Walter; Hassan, Tarek; Jiang, Zhifang; Cohen, Robert F; Schuler, Gregory D

    2011-01-01

    The Epigenomics database at the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) is a new resource that has been created to serve as a comprehensive public resource for whole-genome epigenetic data sets (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/epigenomics). Epigenetics is the study of stable and heritable changes in gene expression that occur independently of the primary DNA sequence. Epigenetic mechanisms include post-translational modifications of histones, DNA methylation, chromatin conformation and non-coding RNAs. It has been observed that misregulation of epigenetic processes has been associated with human disease. We have constructed the new resource by selecting the subset of epigenetics-specific data from general-purpose archives, such as the Gene Expression Omnibus, and Sequence Read Archives, and then subjecting them to further review, annotation and reorganization. Raw data is processed and mapped to genomic coordinates to generate 'tracks' that are a visual representation of the data. These data tracks can be viewed using popular genome browsers or downloaded for local analysis. The Epigenomics resource also provides the user with a unique interface that allows for intuitive browsing and searching of data sets based on biological attributes. Currently, there are 69 studies, 337 samples and over 1100 data tracks from five well-studied species that are viewable and downloadable in Epigenomics.

  4. Contamination of sequence databases with adaptor sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, Takeo; Sanders, A.R.; Detera-Wadleigh, S.D. [National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1997-02-01

    Because of the exponential increase in the amount of DNA sequences being added to the public databases on a daily basis, it has become imperative to identify sources of contamination rapidly. Previously, contaminations of sequence databases have been reported to alert the scientific community to the problem. These contaminations can be divided into two categories. The first category comprises host sequences that have been difficult for submitters to manage or control. Examples include anomalous sequences derived from Escherichia coli, which are inserted into the chromosomes (and plasmids) of the bacterial hosts. Insertion sequences are highly mobile and are capable of transposing themselves into plasmids during cloning manipulation. Another example of the first category is the infection with yeast genomic DNA or with bacterial DNA of some commercially available cDNA libraries from Clontech. The second category of database contamination is due to the inadvertent inclusion of nonhost sequences. This category includes incorporation of cloning-vector sequences and multicloning sites in the database submission. M13-derived artifacts have been common, since M13-based vectors have been widely used for subcloning DNA fragments. Recognizing this problem, the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) started to screen, in April 1994, all sequences directly submitted to GenBank, against a set of vector data retrieved from GenBank by use of key-word searches, such as {open_quotes}vector.{close_quotes} In this report, we present evidence for another sequence artifact that is widespread but that, to our knowledge, has not yet been reported. 11 refs., 1 tab.

  5. Validation of the Applied Biosystems 7500 Fast Instrument for Detection of Listeria Species with the SureTect Listeria Species PCR Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloke, Jonathan; Arizanova, Julia; Crabtree, David; Simpson, Helen; Evans, Katharine; Vaahtoranta, Laura; Palomäki, Jukka-Pekka; Artimo, Paulus; Huang, Feng; Liikanen, Maria; Koskela, Suvi; Chen, Yi

    2016-01-01

    The Thermo Scientific™ SureTect™ Listeria species Real-Time PCR Assay was certified during 2013 by the AOAC Research Institute (RI) Performance Tested Methods(SM) program as a rapid method for the detection of Listeria species from a wide range of food matrixes and surface samples. A method modification study was conducted in 2015 to extend the matrix claims of the product to a wider range of food matrixes. This report details the method modification study undertaken to extend the use of this PCR kit to the Applied Biosystems™ 7500 Fast PCR Instrument and Applied Biosystems RapidFinder™ Express 2.0 software allowing use of the assay on a 96-well format PCR cycler in addition to the current workflow, using the 24-well Thermo Scientific PikoReal™ PCR Instrument and Thermo Scientific SureTect software. The method modification study presented in this report was assessed by the AOAC-RI as being a level 2 method modification study, necessitating a method developer study on a representative range of food matrixes covering raw ground turkey, 2% fat pasteurized milk, and bagged lettuce as well as stainless steel surface samples. All testing was conducted in comparison to the reference method detailed in International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 6579:2002. No significant difference by probability of detection statistical analysis was found between the SureTect Listeria species PCR Assay or the ISO reference method methods for any of the three food matrixes and the surface samples analyzed during the study.

  6. Database development and management

    CERN Document Server

    Chao, Lee

    2006-01-01

    Introduction to Database Systems Functions of a DatabaseDatabase Management SystemDatabase ComponentsDatabase Development ProcessConceptual Design and Data Modeling Introduction to Database Design Process Understanding Business ProcessEntity-Relationship Data Model Representing Business Process with Entity-RelationshipModelTable Structure and NormalizationIntroduction to TablesTable NormalizationTransforming Data Models to Relational Databases .DBMS Selection Transforming Data Models to Relational DatabasesEnforcing ConstraintsCreating Database for Business ProcessPhysical Design and Database

  7. LINE FUSION GENES: a database of LINE expression in human genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Hong-Seog

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long Interspersed Nuclear Elements (LINEs are the most abundant retrotransposons in humans. About 79% of human genes are estimated to contain at least one segment of LINE per transcription unit. Recent studies have shown that LINE elements can affect protein sequences, splicing patterns and expression of human genes. Description We have developed a database, LINE FUSION GENES, for elucidating LINE expression throughout the human gene database. We searched the 28,171 genes listed in the NCBI database for LINE elements and analyzed their structures and expression patterns. The results show that the mRNA sequences of 1,329 genes were affected by LINE expression. The LINE expression types were classified on the basis of LINEs in the 5' UTR, exon or 3' UTR sequences of the mRNAs. Our database provides further information, such as the tissue distribution and chromosomal location of the genes, and the domain structure that is changed by LINE integration. We have linked all the accession numbers to the NCBI data bank to provide mRNA sequences for subsequent users. Conclusion We believe that our work will interest genome scientists and might help them to gain insight into the implications of LINE expression for human evolution and disease. Availability http://www.primate.or.kr/line

  8. A Taxonomic Search Engine: Federating taxonomic databases using web services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Page Roderic DM

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The taxonomic name of an organism is a key link between different databases that store information on that organism. However, in the absence of a single, comprehensive database of organism names, individual databases lack an easy means of checking the correctness of a name. Furthermore, the same organism may have more than one name, and the same name may apply to more than one organism. Results The Taxonomic Search Engine (TSE is a web application written in PHP that queries multiple taxonomic databases (ITIS, Index Fungorum, IPNI, NCBI, and uBIO and summarises the results in a consistent format. It supports "drill-down" queries to retrieve a specific record. The TSE can optionally suggest alternative spellings the user can try. It also acts as a Life Science Identifier (LSID authority for the source taxonomic databases, providing globally unique identifiers (and associated metadata for each name. Conclusion The Taxonomic Search Engine is available at http://darwin.zoology.gla.ac.uk/~rpage/portal/ and provides a simple demonstration of the potential of the federated approach to providing access to taxonomic names.

  9. Databases and their application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.C. Grimm; R.H.W Bradshaw; S. Brewer; S. Flantua; T. Giesecke; A.M. Lézine; H. Takahara; J.W.,Jr Williams

    2013-01-01

    During the past 20 years, several pollen database cooperatives have been established. These databases are now constituent databases of the Neotoma Paleoecology Database, a public domain, multiproxy, relational database designed for Quaternary-Pliocene fossil data and modern surface samples. The poll

  10. Development of a panel of unigene-derived polymorphic EST-SSR markers in lentil using public database information

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Debjyoti Sen Gupta; Peng Cheng; Gaurav Sablok; Dil Thavarajah; Pushparajah Thavarajah; Clarice J Coyne; Shiv Kumar; Michael Baum; Rebecca J McGee

    2016-01-01

    Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.), a diploid (2n=14) with a genome size greater than 4000 Mbp, is an important cool season food legume grown worldwide. The availability of genomic resources is limited in this crop species. The objective of this study was to develop polymorphic markers in lentil using publicly available curated expressed sequence tag information (ESTs). In this study, 9513 ESTs were downloaded from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) database to develop unigene-based simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. The ESTs were assembled into 4053 unigenes and then analyzed to identify 374 SSRs using the MISA microsatellite identification tool. Among the 374 SSRs, 26 compound SSRs were observed. Primer pairs for these SSRs were designed using Primer3 version 1.14. To classify the functional annotation of ESTs and EST–SSRs, BLASTx searches (using E-value 1 × 10−5) against the public UniProt (http://www.uniprot.org/) and NCBI (http://www.ncbi.nlh.nih.gov/) data-bases were performed. Further functional annotation was performed using PLAZA (version 3.0) comparative genomics and GO annotation was summarized using the Plant GO slim category. Among the synthesized 312 primers, 219 successfully amplified Lens DNA. A diverse panel of 24 Lens genotypes was used to identify polymorphic markers. A polymorphic set of 57 markers successfully discriminated the test genotypes. This set of polymorphic markers with functional annotation data could be used as molecular tools in lentil breeding.

  11. Dietary Supplement Ingredient Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and US Department of Agriculture Dietary Supplement Ingredient Database Toggle navigation Menu Home About DSID Mission Current ... values can be saved to build a small database or add to an existing database for national, ...

  12. Achievement report for fiscal 1997 on the development of technologies for utilizing biological resources such as complex biosystems. Development of complex biosystem analyzing technology; 1997 nendo fukugo seibutsukei nado seibutsu shigen riyo gijutsu kaihatsu seika hokokusho. Fukugo seibutsukei kaiseki gijutsu no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    The aim is to utilize the sophisticated functions of complex biosystems. In the research and development of technologies for effectively utilizing unexploited resources and substances such as seeweeds and algae, seaweeds are added to seawater to turn into a microbial suspension after the passage of two weeks, the suspension is next scattered on a carageenan culture medium, and then carageenan decomposing microbes are obtained. In the research and development of technologies for utilizing microbe/fauna-flora complex systems, technologies for exploring and analyzing microbes are studied. For this purpose, 48 kinds of sponges and 300 kinds of bacteria symbiotic with the sponges are sampled in Malaysia. Out of them, 15 exhibit enzyme inhibition and Artemia salina lethality activities. In the development of technologies for analyzing the functions of microbes engaged in the production of useful resources and substances for animals and plants, 150 kinds of micro-algae are subjected to screening using protease and chitinase inhibiting activities as the indexes, and it is found that an extract of Isochrysis galbana displays an intense inhibitory activity. The alga is cultured in quantities, the active component is isolated from 20g of dried alga, and its constitution is determined. (NEDO)

  13. SoyDB: a knowledge database of soybean transcription factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valliyodan Babu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcription factors play the crucial rule of regulating gene expression and influence almost all biological processes. Systematically identifying and annotating transcription factors can greatly aid further understanding their functions and mechanisms. In this article, we present SoyDB, a user friendly database containing comprehensive knowledge of soybean transcription factors. Description The soybean genome was recently sequenced by the Department of Energy-Joint Genome Institute (DOE-JGI and is publicly available. Mining of this sequence identified 5,671 soybean genes as putative transcription factors. These genes were comprehensively annotated as an aid to the soybean research community. We developed SoyDB - a knowledge database for all the transcription factors in the soybean genome. The database contains protein sequences, predicted tertiary structures, putative DNA binding sites, domains, homologous templates in the Protein Data Bank (PDB, protein family classifications, multiple sequence alignments, consensus protein sequence motifs, web logo of each family, and web links to the soybean transcription factor database PlantTFDB, known EST sequences, and other general protein databases including Swiss-Prot, Gene Ontology, KEGG, EMBL, TAIR, InterPro, SMART, PROSITE, NCBI, and Pfam. The database can be accessed via an interactive and convenient web server, which supports full-text search, PSI-BLAST sequence search, database browsing by protein family, and automatic classification of a new protein sequence into one of 64 annotated transcription factor families by hidden Markov models. Conclusions A comprehensive soybean transcription factor database was constructed and made publicly accessible at http://casp.rnet.missouri.edu/soydb/.

  14. NoSQL Databases

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    This thesis deals with database systems referred to as NoSQL databases. In the second chapter, I explain basic terms and the theory of database systems. A short explanation is dedicated to database systems based on the relational data model and the SQL standardized query language. Chapter Three explains the concept and history of the NoSQL databases, and also presents database models, major features and the use of NoSQL databases in comparison with traditional database systems. In the fourth ...

  15. USAID Anticorruption Projects Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — The Anticorruption Projects Database (Database) includes information about USAID projects with anticorruption interventions implemented worldwide between 2007 and...

  16. Collecting Taxes Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — The Collecting Taxes Database contains performance and structural indicators about national tax systems. The database contains quantitative revenue performance...

  17. BRAGI: linking and visualization of database information in a 3D viewer and modeling tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichelt, Joachim; Dieterich, Guido; Kvesic, Marsel; Schomburg, Dietmar; Heinz, Dirk W

    2005-04-01

    BRAGI is a well-established package for viewing and modeling of three-dimensional (3D) structures of biological macromolecules. A new version of BRAGI has been developed that is supported on Windows, Linux and SGI. The user interface has been rewritten to give the standard 'look and feel' of the chosen operating system and to provide a more intuitive, easier usage. A large number of new features have been added. Information from public databases such as SWISS-PROT, InterPro, DALI and OMIM can be displayed in the 3D viewer. Structures can be searched for homologous sequences using the NCBI BLAST server.

  18. Evolutionary Models for Simple Biosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagnoli, Franco

    The concept of evolutionary development of structures constituted a real revolution in biology: it was possible to understand how the very complex structures of life can arise in an out-of-equilibrium system. The investigation of such systems has shown that indeed, systems under a flux of energy or matter can self-organize into complex patterns, think for instance to Rayleigh-Bernard convection, Liesegang rings, patterns formed by granular systems under shear. Following this line, one could characterize life as a state of matter, characterized by the slow, continuous process that we call evolution. In this paper we try to identify the organizational level of life, that spans several orders of magnitude from the elementary constituents to whole ecosystems. Although similar structures can be found in other contexts like ideas (memes) in neural systems and self-replicating elements (computer viruses, worms, etc.) in computer systems, we shall concentrate on biological evolutionary structure, and try to put into evidence the role and the emergence of network structure in such systems.

  19. Development of Deduced Protein Database Using Variable Bit Binary Encoding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Parvathavarthini

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A large amount of biological data is semi-structured and stored in any one the following file formats such as flat, XML and relational files. These databases must be integrated with the structured data available in relational or object-oriented databases. The sequence matching process is difficult in such file format, because string comparison takes more computation cost and time. To reduce the memory storage size of amino acid sequence in protein database, a novel probability-based variable bit length encoding technique has been introduced. The number of mapping of triplet CODON for every amino acid evaluates the probability value. Then, a binary tree has been constructed to assign unique bits of binary codes to each amino acid. This derived unique bit pattern of amino acid replaces the existing fixed byte representation. The proof of reduced protein database space has been discussed and it is found to be reduced between 42.86 to 87.17%. To validate our method, we have collected few amino acid sequences of major organisms like Sheep, Lambda phage and etc from NCBI and represented them using proposed method. The comparison shows that of minimum and maximum reduction in storage space are 43.30% and 72.86% respectively. In future the biological data can further be reduced by applying lossless compression on this deduced data.

  20. Cloud Databases: A Paradigm Shift in Databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indu Arora

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Relational databases ruled the Information Technology (IT industry for almost 40 years. But last few years have seen sea changes in the way IT is being used and viewed. Stand alone applications have been replaced with web-based applications, dedicated servers with multiple distributed servers and dedicated storage with network storage. Cloud computing has become a reality due to its lesser cost, scalability and pay-as-you-go model. It is one of the biggest changes in IT after the rise of World Wide Web. Cloud databases such as Big Table, Sherpa and SimpleDB are becoming popular. They address the limitations of existing relational databases related to scalability, ease of use and dynamic provisioning. Cloud databases are mainly used for data-intensive applications such as data warehousing, data mining and business intelligence. These applications are read-intensive, scalable and elastic in nature. Transactional data management applications such as banking, airline reservation, online e-commerce and supply chain management applications are write-intensive. Databases supporting such applications require ACID (Atomicity, Consistency, Isolation and Durability properties, but these databases are difficult to deploy in the cloud. The goal of this paper is to review the state of the art in the cloud databases and various architectures. It further assesses the challenges to develop cloud databases that meet the user requirements and discusses popularly used Cloud databases.

  1. Correction of Five Different Types of Errors of Model Refseqs Appeared in NCBI Human Gene Database Only by Using Two Novel Human Genes C17orf32 and ZNF362%用电子克隆新基因C17orf32和ZNF362对NCBI人类基因数据库模式参考序列5种错误类型的分析与纠正

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张德礼; 李衍达; 季梁

    2004-01-01

    采用生物信息学分析与实验确认相结合的技术路线,通过所识别的基因在非冗余数据库比对发现了网上公布的计算机注释人类基因组编码序列存在各种类型的多处错误.该策略既有助于发现更多的人类新基因,又有助于纠正美国国家生物技术信息中心(NCBI)基因组注释项目公布的参考序列(REFSEQs)中所存在的错误.比如他们采用基因预测方法通过自动计算分析从NCBI contig NT_010808预测到两个模式参考序列LOC124919和LOC147007,本该都是C17orf32,但却都是C17orf32的不同错误形式,分别为第1和2类型错误;再如,他们采用基因预测方法通过自动计算分析从NCBI contig NT_004511预测到3个模式参考序列LOC14907、LOC200084和LOC91126,实际上都是ZNF362一种基因,却提交了ZNF362的3种不同错误形式,分别为第4、5和7类型错误.本研究利用计算机识别并结合实验验证能够纠正或避免现有的人类基因组编码序列错误.以前公开发表的文献没有明确指出NCBI人类基因模式参考序列存在错误,因此应当慎重看待计算机注释的可能存在各种类型错误的人类基因组编码序列.人类新基因的正确识别和注释仍是一项长期而繁重的任务.

  2. Logical database design principles

    CERN Document Server

    Garmany, John; Clark, Terry

    2005-01-01

    INTRODUCTION TO LOGICAL DATABASE DESIGNUnderstanding a Database Database Architectures Relational Databases Creating the Database System Development Life Cycle (SDLC)Systems Planning: Assessment and Feasibility System Analysis: RequirementsSystem Analysis: Requirements Checklist Models Tracking and Schedules Design Modeling Functional Decomposition DiagramData Flow Diagrams Data Dictionary Logical Structures and Decision Trees System Design: LogicalSYSTEM DESIGN AND IMPLEMENTATION The ER ApproachEntities and Entity Types Attribute Domains AttributesSet-Valued AttributesWeak Entities Constraint

  3. An Interoperable Cartographic Database

    OpenAIRE

    Slobodanka Ključanin; Zdravko Galić

    2007-01-01

    The concept of producing a prototype of interoperable cartographic database is explored in this paper, including the possibilities of integration of different geospatial data into the database management system and their visualization on the Internet. The implementation includes vectorization of the concept of a single map page, creation of the cartographic database in an object-relation database, spatial analysis, definition and visualization of the database content in the form of a map on t...

  4. Database Description - RMOS | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us RMOS Database Description General information of database Database name RMOS Alternative nam...arch Unit Shoshi Kikuchi E-mail : Database classification Plant databases - Rice Microarray Data and other Gene Expression Database...s Organism Taxonomy Name: Oryza sativa Taxonomy ID: 4530 Database description The Ric...e Microarray Opening Site is a database of comprehensive information for Rice Mic...es and manner of utilization of database You can refer to the information of the

  5. Tripal: a construction toolkit for online genome databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficklin, Stephen P; Sanderson, Lacey-Anne; Cheng, Chun-Huai; Staton, Margaret E; Lee, Taein; Cho, Il-Hyung; Jung, Sook; Bett, Kirstin E; Main, Doreen

    2011-01-01

    As the availability, affordability and magnitude of genomics and genetics research increases so does the need to provide online access to resulting data and analyses. Availability of a tailored online database is the desire for many investigators or research communities; however, managing the Information Technology infrastructure needed to create such a database can be an undesired distraction from primary research or potentially cost prohibitive. Tripal provides simplified site development by merging the power of Drupal, a popular web Content Management System with that of Chado, a community-derived database schema for storage of genomic, genetic and other related biological data. Tripal provides an interface that extends the content management features of Drupal to the data housed in Chado. Furthermore, Tripal provides a web-based Chado installer, genomic data loaders, web-based editing of data for organisms, genomic features, biological libraries, controlled vocabularies and stock collections. Also available are Tripal extensions that support loading and visualizations of NCBI BLAST, InterPro, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes and Gene Ontology analyses, as well as an extension that provides integration of Tripal with GBrowse, a popular GMOD tool. An Application Programming Interface is available to allow creation of custom extensions by site developers, and the look-and-feel of the site is completely customizable through Drupal-based PHP template files. Addition of non-biological content and user-management is afforded through Drupal. Tripal is an open source and freely available software package found at http://tripal.sourceforge.net.

  6. SpliceDisease database: linking RNA splicing and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Zhang, Jie; Li, Kaibo; Zhao, Wei; Cui, Qinghua

    2012-01-01

    RNA splicing is an important aspect of gene regulation in many organisms. Splicing of RNA is regulated by complicated mechanisms involving numerous RNA-binding proteins and the intricate network of interactions among them. Mutations in cis-acting splicing elements or its regulatory proteins have been shown to be involved in human diseases. Defects in pre-mRNA splicing process have emerged as a common disease-causing mechanism. Therefore, a database integrating RNA splicing and disease associations would be helpful for understanding not only the RNA splicing but also its contribution to disease. In SpliceDisease database, we manually curated 2337 splicing mutation disease entries involving 303 genes and 370 diseases, which have been supported experimentally in 898 publications. The SpliceDisease database provides information including the change of the nucleotide in the sequence, the location of the mutation on the gene, the reference Pubmed ID and detailed description for the relationship among gene mutations, splicing defects and diseases. We standardized the names of the diseases and genes and provided links for these genes to NCBI and UCSC genome browser for further annotation and genomic sequences. For the location of the mutation, we give direct links of the entry to the respective position/region in the genome browser. The users can freely browse, search and download the data in SpliceDisease at http://cmbi.bjmu.edu.cn/sdisease.

  7. E3 Staff Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — E3 Staff database is maintained by E3 PDMS (Professional Development & Management Services) office. The database is Mysql. It is manually updated by E3 staff as...

  8. Native Health Research Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... APP WITH JAVASCRIPT TURNED OFF. THE NATIVE HEALTH DATABASE REQUIRES JAVASCRIPT IN ORDER TO FUNCTION. PLEASE ENTER ... To learn more about searching the Native Health Database, click here. Keywords Title Author Source of Publication ...

  9. Physiological Information Database (PID)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA has developed a physiological information database (created using Microsoft ACCESS) intended to be used in PBPK modeling. The database contains physiological parameter values for humans from early childhood through senescence as well as similar data for laboratory animal spec...

  10. Cell Centred Database (CCDB)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Cell Centered Database (CCDB) is a web accessible database for high resolution 2D, 3D and 4D data from light and electron microscopy, including correlated imaging.

  11. Database Urban Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sleutjes, B.; de Valk, H.A.G.

    2016-01-01

    Database Urban Europe: ResSegr database on segregation in The Netherlands. Collaborative research on residential segregation in Europe 2014–2016 funded by JPI Urban Europe (Joint Programming Initiative Urban Europe).

  12. Scopus database: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnham, Judy F

    2006-03-08

    The Scopus database provides access to STM journal articles and the references included in those articles, allowing the searcher to search both forward and backward in time. The database can be used for collection development as well as for research. This review provides information on the key points of the database and compares it to Web of Science. Neither database is inclusive, but complements each other. If a library can only afford one, choice must be based in institutional needs.

  13. Future database machine architectures

    OpenAIRE

    Hsiao, David K.

    1984-01-01

    There are many software database management systems available on many general-purpose computers ranging from micros to super-mainframes. Database machines as backened computers can offload the database management work from the mainframe so that we can retain the same mainframe longer. However, the database backend must also demonstrate lower cost, higher performance, and newer functionality. Some of the fundamental architecture issues in the design of high-performance and great-capacity datab...

  14. MPlus Database system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-20

    The MPlus Database program was developed to keep track of mail received. This system was developed by TRESP for the Department of Energy/Oak Ridge Operations. The MPlus Database program is a PC application, written in dBase III+'' and compiled with Clipper'' into an executable file. The files you need to run the MPLus Database program can be installed on a Bernoulli, or a hard drive. This paper discusses the use of this database.

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MDOM-04-0035 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MDOM-04-0035 ref|NP_001025060.1| hypothetical protein LOC207806 [Mus musculus] gb|EDK98034.1| gene mode...l 608, (NCBI), isoform CRA_a [Mus musculus] gb|AAI41331.1| Gene model 608, (NCBI) [...Mus musculus] gb|AAI41332.1| Gene model 608, (NCBI) [Mus musculus] NP_001025060.1 0.0 73% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MMUR-01-1315 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MMUR-01-1315 ref|NP_001025060.1| hypothetical protein LOC207806 [Mus musculus] gb|EDK98034.1| gene mode...l 608, (NCBI), isoform CRA_a [Mus musculus] gb|AAI41331.1| Gene model 608, (NCBI) [...Mus musculus] gb|AAI41332.1| Gene model 608, (NCBI) [Mus musculus] NP_001025060.1 0.0 77% ...

  17. CTD_DATABASE - Cascadia tsunami deposit database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Cascadia Tsunami Deposit Database contains data on the location and sedimentological properties of tsunami deposits found along the Cascadia margin. Data have...

  18. Database Description - Trypanosomes Database | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available [ Credits ] BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Contact us Trypanosomes Database... Database Description General information of database Database name Trypanosomes Database...rmation and Systems Yata 1111, Mishima, Shizuoka 411-8540, JAPAN E mail: Database... classification Protein sequence databases Organism Taxonomy Name: Trypanosoma Taxonomy ID: 5690 Taxonomy Na...me: Homo sapiens Taxonomy ID: 9606 Database description The Trypanosomes database is a database providing th

  19. Database Description - PLACE | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available [ Credits ] BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Contact us PLACE Database... Description General information of database Database name A Database of Plant Cis-acting Regu...araki 305-8602, Japan National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences E-mail : Database classification Plant database...s Organism Taxonomy Name: Tracheophyta Taxonomy ID: 58023 Database description PLACE is a database of... motifs found in plant cis-acting regulatory DNA elements based on previously pub

  20. GlycomeDB – integration of open-access carbohydrate structure databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    von der Lieth Claus-Wilhelm

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although carbohydrates are the third major class of biological macromolecules, after proteins and DNA, there is neither a comprehensive database for carbohydrate structures nor an established universal structure encoding scheme for computational purposes. Funding for further development of the Complex Carbohydrate Structure Database (CCSD or CarbBank ceased in 1997, and since then several initiatives have developed independent databases with partially overlapping foci. For each database, different encoding schemes for residues and sequence topology were designed. Therefore, it is virtually impossible to obtain an overview of all deposited structures or to compare the contents of the various databases. Results We have implemented procedures which download the structures contained in the seven major databases, e.g. GLYCOSCIENCES.de, the Consortium for Functional Glycomics (CFG, the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG and the Bacterial Carbohydrate Structure Database (BCSDB. We have created a new database called GlycomeDB, containing all structures, their taxonomic annotations and references (IDs for the original databases. More than 100000 datasets were imported, resulting in more than 33000 unique sequences now encoded in GlycomeDB using the universal format GlycoCT. Inconsistencies were found in all public databases, which were discussed and corrected in multiple feedback rounds with the responsible curators. Conclusion GlycomeDB is a new, publicly available database for carbohydrate sequences with a unified, all-encompassing structure encoding format and NCBI taxonomic referencing. The database is updated weekly and can be downloaded free of charge. The JAVA application GlycoUpdateDB is also available for establishing and updating a local installation of GlycomeDB. With the advent of GlycomeDB, the distributed islands of knowledge in glycomics are now bridged to form a single resource.

  1. ARCPHdb: A comprehensive protein database for SF1 and SF2 helicase from archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moukhtar, Mirna; Chaar, Wafi; Abdel-Razzak, Ziad; Khalil, Mohamad; Taha, Samir; Chamieh, Hala

    2017-01-01

    Superfamily 1 and Superfamily 2 helicases, two of the largest helicase protein families, play vital roles in many biological processes including replication, transcription and translation. Study of helicase proteins in the model microorganisms of archaea have largely contributed to the understanding of their function, architecture and assembly. Based on a large phylogenomics approach, we have identified and classified all SF1 and SF2 protein families in ninety five sequenced archaea genomes. Here we developed an online webserver linked to a specialized protein database named ARCPHdb to provide access for SF1 and SF2 helicase families from archaea. ARCPHdb was implemented using MySQL relational database. Web interfaces were developed using Netbeans. Data were stored according to UniProt accession numbers, NCBI Ref Seq ID, PDB IDs and Entrez Databases. A user-friendly interactive web interface has been developed to browse, search and download archaeal helicase protein sequences, their available 3D structure models, and related documentation available in the literature provided by ARCPHdb. The database provides direct links to matching external databases. The ARCPHdb is the first online database to compile all protein information on SF1 and SF2 helicase from archaea in one platform. This database provides essential resource information for all researchers interested in the field. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Keyword Search in Databases

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Jeffrey Xu; Chang, Lijun

    2009-01-01

    It has become highly desirable to provide users with flexible ways to query/search information over databases as simple as keyword search like Google search. This book surveys the recent developments on keyword search over databases, and focuses on finding structural information among objects in a database using a set of keywords. Such structural information to be returned can be either trees or subgraphs representing how the objects, that contain the required keywords, are interconnected in a relational database or in an XML database. The structural keyword search is completely different from

  3. An Interoperable Cartographic Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slobodanka Ključanin

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The concept of producing a prototype of interoperable cartographic database is explored in this paper, including the possibilities of integration of different geospatial data into the database management system and their visualization on the Internet. The implementation includes vectorization of the concept of a single map page, creation of the cartographic database in an object-relation database, spatial analysis, definition and visualization of the database content in the form of a map on the Internet. 

  4. SPODOBASE : an EST database for the lepidopteran crop pest Spodoptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabourault Cécile

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Lepidoptera Spodoptera frugiperda is a pest which causes widespread economic damage on a variety of crop plants. It is also well known through its famous Sf9 cell line which is used for numerous heterologous protein productions. Species of the Spodoptera genus are used as model for pesticide resistance and to study virus host interactions. A genomic approach is now a critical step for further new developments in biology and pathology of these insects, and the results of ESTs sequencing efforts need to be structured into databases providing an integrated set of tools and informations. Description The ESTs from five independent cDNA libraries, prepared from three different S. frugiperda tissues (hemocytes, midgut and fat body and from the Sf9 cell line, are deposited in the database. These tissues were chosen because of their importance in biological processes such as immune response, development and plant/insect interaction. So far, the SPODOBASE contains 29,325 ESTs, which are cleaned and clustered into non-redundant sets (2294 clusters and 6103 singletons. The SPODOBASE is constructed in such a way that other ESTs from S. frugiperda or other species may be added. User can retrieve information using text searches, pre-formatted queries, query assistant or blast searches. Annotation is provided against NCBI, UNIPROT or Bombyx mori ESTs databases, and with GO-Slim vocabulary. Conclusion The SPODOBASE database provides integrated access to expressed sequence tags (EST from the lepidopteran insect Spodoptera frugiperda. It is a publicly available structured database with insect pest sequences which will allow identification of a number of genes and comprehensive cloning of gene families of interest for scientific community. SPODOBASE is available from URL: http://bioweb.ensam.inra.fr/spodobase

  5. PseudoMLSA: a database for multigenic sequence analysis of Pseudomonas species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalucat Jorge

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genus Pseudomonas comprises more than 100 species of environmental, clinical, agricultural, and biotechnological interest. Although, the recommended method for discriminating bacterial species is DNA-DNA hybridisation, alternative techniques based on multigenic sequence analysis are becoming a common practice in bacterial species discrimination studies. Since there is not a general criterion for determining which genes are more useful for species resolution; the number of strains and genes analysed is increasing continuously. As a result, sequences of different genes are dispersed throughout several databases. This sequence information needs to be collected in a common database, in order to be useful for future identification-based projects. Description The PseudoMLSA Database is a comprehensive database of multiple gene sequences from strains of Pseudomonas species. The core of the database is composed of selected gene sequences from all Pseudomonas type strains validly assigned to the genus through 2008. The database is aimed to be useful for MultiLocus Sequence Analysis (MLSA procedures, for the identification and characterisation of any Pseudomonas bacterial isolate. The sequences are available for download via a direct connection to the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI. Additionally, the database includes an online BLAST interface for flexible nucleotide queries and similarity searches with the user's datasets, and provides a user-friendly output for easily parsing, navigating, and analysing BLAST results. Conclusions The PseudoMLSA database amasses strains and sequence information of validly described Pseudomonas species, and allows free querying of the database via a user-friendly, web-based interface available at http://www.uib.es/microbiologiaBD/Welcome.html. The web-based platform enables easy retrieval at strain or gene sequence information level; including references to published peer

  6. The PubChemQC project: A large chemical database from the first principle calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maho, Nakata

    2015-12-01

    In this research, we have been constructing a large database of molecules by ab initio calculations. Currently, we have over 1.53 million entries of 6-31G* B3LYP optimized geometries and ten excited states by 6-31+G* TDDFT calculations. To calculate molecules, we only refer the InChI (International Chemical Identifier) representation of chemical formula by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC), thus, no reference to experimental data. These results are open to public at http://pubchemqc.riken.jp/. The molecular data have been taken from the PubChem Project (http://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/) which is one of the largest in the world (approximately 63 million molecules are listed) and free (public domain) database. Our final goal is, using these data, to develop a molecular search engine or molecular expert system to find molecules which have desired properties.

  7. The PubChemQC Project: a large chemical database from the first principle calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Nakata, Maho

    2015-01-01

    In this research, we have been constructing a large database of molecules by {\\it ab initio} calculations. Currently, we have over 1.53 million entries of 6-31G* B3LYP optimized geometries and ten excited states by 6-31+G* TDDFT calculations. To calculate molecules, we only refer the InChI (International Chemical Identifier) representation of chemical formula by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC), thus, no reference to experimental data. These results are open to public at http://pubchemqc.riken.jp/. The molecular data have been taken from the PubChem Project (http://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/) which is one of the largest in the world (approximately 63 million molecules are listed) and free (public domain) database. Our final goal is, using these data, to develop a molecular search engine or molecular expert system to find molecules which have desired properties.

  8. Update History of This Database - Arabidopsis Phenome Database | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us Arabidopsis Phenome Database Update History of This Database Date Update contents 2017/02/27... Arabidopsis Phenome Database English archive site is opened. - Arabidopsis Phenome Database (http://jphenom...e.info/?page_id=95) is opened. About This Database Database Description Download License Update History of This Database... Site Policy | Contact Us Update History of This Database - Arabidopsis Phenome Database | LSDB Archive ...

  9. Update History of This Database - SKIP Stemcell Database | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us SKIP Stemcell Database Update History of This Database Date Update contents 2017/03/13 SKIP Stemcell Database... English archive site is opened. 2013/03/29 SKIP Stemcell Database ( https://www.skip.med.k...eio.ac.jp/SKIPSearch/top?lang=en ) is opened. About This Database Database Description Download License Upda...te History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us Update History of This Database - SKIP Stemcell Database | LSDB Archive ...

  10. Database Description - RMG | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available [ Credits ] BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Contact us RMG Database... Description General information of database Database name RMG Alternative name Rice Mitochondri...ational Institute of Agrobiological Sciences E-mail : Database classification Nucleotide Sequence Databases ...Organism Taxonomy Name: Oryza sativa Japonica Group Taxonomy ID: 39947 Database description This database co...e of rice mitochondrial genome and information on the analysis results. Features and manner of utilization of database

  11. Natural language processing pipelines to annotate BioC collections with an application to the NCBI disease corpus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comeau, Donald C; Liu, Haibin; Islamaj Doğan, Rezarta; Wilbur, W John

    2014-01-01

    BioC is a new format and associated code libraries for sharing text and annotations. We have implemented BioC natural language preprocessing pipelines in two popular programming languages: C++ and Java. The current implementations interface with the well-known MedPost and Stanford natural language processing tool sets. The pipeline functionality includes sentence segmentation, tokenization, part-of-speech tagging, lemmatization and sentence parsing. These pipelines can be easily integrated along with other BioC programs into any BioC compliant text mining systems. As an application, we converted the NCBI disease corpus to BioC format, and the pipelines have successfully run on this corpus to demonstrate their functionality. Code and data can be downloaded from http://bioc.sourceforge.net. Database URL: http://bioc.sourceforge.net. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  12. National Database of Geriatrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kannegaard, Pia Nimann; Vinding, Kirsten L; Hare-Bruun, Helle

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The aim of the National Database of Geriatrics is to monitor the quality of interdisciplinary diagnostics and treatment of patients admitted to a geriatric hospital unit. STUDY POPULATION: The database population consists of patients who were admitted to a geriatric hospital unit....... Geriatric patients cannot be defined by specific diagnoses. A geriatric patient is typically a frail multimorbid elderly patient with decreasing functional ability and social challenges. The database includes 14-15,000 admissions per year, and the database completeness has been stable at 90% during the past......, percentage of discharges with a rehabilitation plan, and the part of cases where an interdisciplinary conference has taken place. Data are recorded by doctors, nurses, and therapists in a database and linked to the Danish National Patient Register. DESCRIPTIVE DATA: Descriptive patient-related data include...

  13. Hazard Analysis Database Report

    CERN Document Server

    Grams, W H

    2000-01-01

    The Hazard Analysis Database was developed in conjunction with the hazard analysis activities conducted in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U S . Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports, for HNF-SD-WM-SAR-067, Tank Farms Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR). The FSAR is part of the approved Authorization Basis (AB) for the River Protection Project (RPP). This document describes, identifies, and defines the contents and structure of the Tank Farms FSAR Hazard Analysis Database and documents the configuration control changes made to the database. The Hazard Analysis Database contains the collection of information generated during the initial hazard evaluations and the subsequent hazard and accident analysis activities. The Hazard Analysis Database supports the preparation of Chapters 3 ,4 , and 5 of the Tank Farms FSAR and the Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) process and consists of two major, interrelated data sets: (1) Hazard Analysis Database: Data from t...

  14. Conditioning Probabilistic Databases

    CERN Document Server

    Koch, Christoph

    2008-01-01

    Past research on probabilistic databases has studied the problem of answering queries on a static database. Application scenarios of probabilistic databases however often involve the conditioning of a database using additional information in the form of new evidence. The conditioning problem is thus to transform a probabilistic database of priors into a posterior probabilistic database which is materialized for subsequent query processing or further refinement. It turns out that the conditioning problem is closely related to the problem of computing exact tuple confidence values. It is known that exact confidence computation is an NP-hard problem. This has lead researchers to consider approximation techniques for confidence computation. However, neither conditioning nor exact confidence computation can be solved using such techniques. In this paper we present efficient techniques for both problems. We study several problem decomposition methods and heuristics that are based on the most successful search techn...

  15. Database design and database administration for a kindergarten

    OpenAIRE

    Vítek, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    The bachelor thesis deals with creation of database design for a standard kindergarten, installation of the designed database into the database system Oracle Database 10g Express Edition and demonstration of the administration tasks in this database system. The verification of the database was proved by a developed access application.

  16. ITS-90 Thermocouple Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 60 NIST ITS-90 Thermocouple Database (Web, free access)   Web version of Standard Reference Database 60 and NIST Monograph 175. The database gives temperature -- electromotive force (emf) reference functions and tables for the letter-designated thermocouple types B, E, J, K, N, R, S and T. These reference functions have been adopted as standards by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) and the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC).

  17. Searching Databases with Keywords

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shan Wang; Kun-Long Zhang

    2005-01-01

    Traditionally, SQL query language is used to search the data in databases. However, it is inappropriate for end-users, since it is complex and hard to learn. It is the need of end-user, searching in databases with keywords, like in web search engines. This paper presents a survey of work on keyword search in databases. It also includes a brief introduction to the SEEKER system which has been developed.

  18. Specialist Bibliographic Databases

    OpenAIRE

    Gasparyan, Armen Yuri; Yessirkepov, Marlen; Voronov, Alexander A.; Trukhachev, Vladimir I.; Kostyukova, Elena I.; Gerasimov, Alexey N.; Kitas, George D.

    2016-01-01

    Specialist bibliographic databases offer essential online tools for researchers and authors who work on specific subjects and perform comprehensive and systematic syntheses of evidence. This article presents examples of the established specialist databases, which may be of interest to those engaged in multidisciplinary science communication. Access to most specialist databases is through subscription schemes and membership in professional associations. Several aggregators of information and d...

  19. Smart Location Database - Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Smart Location Database (SLD) summarizes over 80 demographic, built environment, transit service, and destination accessibility attributes for every census block...

  20. Database principles programming performance

    CERN Document Server

    O'Neil, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Database: Principles Programming Performance provides an introduction to the fundamental principles of database systems. This book focuses on database programming and the relationships between principles, programming, and performance.Organized into 10 chapters, this book begins with an overview of database design principles and presents a comprehensive introduction to the concepts used by a DBA. This text then provides grounding in many abstract concepts of the relational model. Other chapters introduce SQL, describing its capabilities and covering the statements and functions of the programmi

  1. Smart Location Database - Service

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Smart Location Database (SLD) summarizes over 80 demographic, built environment, transit service, and destination accessibility attributes for every census block...

  2. Database Publication Practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernstein, P.A.; DeWitt, D.; Heuer, A.

    2005-01-01

    There has been a growing interest in improving the publication processes for database research papers. This panel reports on recent changes in those processes and presents an initial cut at historical data for the VLDB Journal and ACM Transactions on Database Systems.......There has been a growing interest in improving the publication processes for database research papers. This panel reports on recent changes in those processes and presents an initial cut at historical data for the VLDB Journal and ACM Transactions on Database Systems....

  3. The Danish Melanoma Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hölmich, Lisbet Rosenkrantz; Klausen, Siri; Spaun, Eva

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The aim of the database is to monitor and improve the treatment and survival of melanoma patients. STUDY POPULATION: All Danish patients with cutaneous melanoma and in situ melanomas must be registered in the Danish Melanoma Database (DMD). In 2014, 2,525 patients with invasive......, nature, and treatment hereof is registered. In case of death, the cause and date are included. Currently, all data are entered manually; however, data catchment from the existing registries is planned to be included shortly. DESCRIPTIVE DATA: The DMD is an old research database, but new as a clinical...

  4. Danish Gynecological Cancer Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Sarah Mejer; Bjørn, Signe Frahm; Jochumsen, Kirsten Marie

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The Danish Gynecological Cancer Database (DGCD) is a nationwide clinical cancer database and its aim is to monitor the treatment quality of Danish gynecological cancer patients, and to generate data for scientific purposes. DGCD also records detailed data on the diagnostic measures...... is the registration of oncological treatment data, which is incomplete for a large number of patients. CONCLUSION: The very complete collection of available data from more registries form one of the unique strengths of DGCD compared to many other clinical databases, and provides unique possibilities for validation...

  5. Transporter Classification Database (TCDB)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Transporter Classification Database details a comprehensive classification system for membrane transport proteins known as the Transporter Classification (TC)...

  6. The Relational Database Dictionary

    CERN Document Server

    J, C

    2006-01-01

    Avoid misunderstandings that can affect the design, programming, and use of database systems. Whether you're using Oracle, DB2, SQL Server, MySQL, or PostgreSQL, The Relational Database Dictionary will prevent confusion about the precise meaning of database-related terms (e.g., attribute, 3NF, one-to-many correspondence, predicate, repeating group, join dependency), helping to ensure the success of your database projects. Carefully reviewed for clarity, accuracy, and completeness, this authoritative and comprehensive quick-reference contains more than 600 terms, many with examples, covering i

  7. IVR EFP Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This database contains trip-level reports submitted by vessels participating in Exempted Fishery projects with IVR reporting requirements.

  8. Databases for Microbiologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Databases play an increasingly important role in biology. They archive, store, maintain, and share information on genes, genomes, expression data, protein sequences and structures, metabolites and reactions, interactions, and pathways. All these data are critically important to microbiologists. Furthermore, microbiology has its own databases that deal with model microorganisms, microbial diversity, physiology, and pathogenesis. Thousands of biological databases are currently available, and it becomes increasingly difficult to keep up with their development. The purpose of this minireview is to provide a brief survey of current databases that are of interest to microbiologists. PMID:26013493

  9. Veterans Administration Databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Veterans Administration Information Resource Center provides database and informatics experts, customer service, expert advice, information products, and web technology to VA researchers and others.

  10. Residency Allocation Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Residency Allocation Database is used to determine allocation of funds for residency programs offered by Veterans Affairs Medical Centers (VAMCs). Information...

  11. The Genome Database for Rosaceae (GDR): year 10 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sook; Ficklin, Stephen P; Lee, Taein; Cheng, Chun-Huai; Blenda, Anna; Zheng, Ping; Yu, Jing; Bombarely, Aureliano; Cho, Ilhyung; Ru, Sushan; Evans, Kate; Peace, Cameron; Abbott, Albert G; Mueller, Lukas A; Olmstead, Mercy A; Main, Dorrie

    2014-01-01

    The Genome Database for Rosaceae (GDR, http:/www.rosaceae.org), the long-standing central repository and data mining resource for Rosaceae research, has been enhanced with new genomic, genetic and breeding data, and improved functionality. Whole genome sequences of apple, peach and strawberry are available to browse or download with a range of annotations, including gene model predictions, aligned transcripts, repetitive elements, polymorphisms, mapped genetic markers, mapped NCBI Rosaceae genes, gene homologs and association of InterPro protein domains, GO terms and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway terms. Annotated sequences can be queried using search interfaces and visualized using GBrowse. New expressed sequence tag unigene sets are available for major genera, and Pathway data are available through FragariaCyc, AppleCyc and PeachCyc databases. Synteny among the three sequenced genomes can be viewed using GBrowse_Syn. New markers, genetic maps and extensively curated qualitative/Mendelian and quantitative trait loci are available. Phenotype and genotype data from breeding projects and genetic diversity projects are also included. Improved search pages are available for marker, trait locus, genetic diversity and publication data. New search tools for breeders enable selection comparison and assistance with breeding decision making.

  12. The Genome Database for Rosaceae (GDR): year 10 update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sook; Ficklin, Stephen P.; Lee, Taein; Cheng, Chun-Huai; Blenda, Anna; Zheng, Ping; Yu, Jing; Bombarely, Aureliano; Cho, Ilhyung; Ru, Sushan; Evans, Kate; Peace, Cameron; Abbott, Albert G.; Mueller, Lukas A.; Olmstead, Mercy A.; Main, Dorrie

    2014-01-01

    The Genome Database for Rosaceae (GDR, http:/www.rosaceae.org), the long-standing central repository and data mining resource for Rosaceae research, has been enhanced with new genomic, genetic and breeding data, and improved functionality. Whole genome sequences of apple, peach and strawberry are available to browse or download with a range of annotations, including gene model predictions, aligned transcripts, repetitive elements, polymorphisms, mapped genetic markers, mapped NCBI Rosaceae genes, gene homologs and association of InterPro protein domains, GO terms and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway terms. Annotated sequences can be queried using search interfaces and visualized using GBrowse. New expressed sequence tag unigene sets are available for major genera, and Pathway data are available through FragariaCyc, AppleCyc and PeachCyc databases. Synteny among the three sequenced genomes can be viewed using GBrowse_Syn. New markers, genetic maps and extensively curated qualitative/Mendelian and quantitative trait loci are available. Phenotype and genotype data from breeding projects and genetic diversity projects are also included. Improved search pages are available for marker, trait locus, genetic diversity and publication data. New search tools for breeders enable selection comparison and assistance with breeding decision making. PMID:24225320

  13. License - Trypanosomes Database | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us Trypanosomes Database License License to Use This Database Last updated : 2014/02/04 You may use this database...pecifies the license terms regarding the use of this database and the requirements you must follow in using this database.... The license for this database is specified in the Creative Commons... Attribution-Share Alike 2.1 Japan . If you use data from this database, please be sure attribute this database...pan is found here . With regard to this database, you are licensed to: freely access part or whole of this database

  14. Evaluating the impact of different sequence databases on metaproteome analysis: insights from a lab-assembled microbial mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanca, Alessandro; Palomba, Antonio; Deligios, Massimo; Cubeddu, Tiziana; Fraumene, Cristina; Biosa, Grazia; Pagnozzi, Daniela; Addis, Maria Filippa; Uzzau, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Metaproteomics enables the investigation of the protein repertoire expressed by complex microbial communities. However, to unleash its full potential, refinements in bioinformatic approaches for data analysis are still needed. In this context, sequence databases selection represents a major challenge. This work assessed the impact of different databases in metaproteomic investigations by using a mock microbial mixture including nine diverse bacterial and eukaryotic species, which was subjected to shotgun metaproteomic analysis. Then, both the microbial mixture and the single microorganisms were subjected to next generation sequencing to obtain experimental metagenomic- and genomic-derived databases, which were used along with public databases (namely, NCBI, UniProtKB/SwissProt and UniProtKB/TrEMBL, parsed at different taxonomic levels) to analyze the metaproteomic dataset. First, a quantitative comparison in terms of number and overlap of peptide identifications was carried out among all databases. As a result, only 35% of peptides were common to all database classes; moreover, genus/species-specific databases provided up to 17% more identifications compared to databases with generic taxonomy, while the metagenomic database enabled a slight increment in respect to public databases. Then, database behavior in terms of false discovery rate and peptide degeneracy was critically evaluated. Public databases with generic taxonomy exhibited a markedly different trend compared to the counterparts. Finally, the reliability of taxonomic attribution according to the lowest common ancestor approach (using MEGAN and Unipept software) was assessed. The level of misassignments varied among the different databases, and specific thresholds based on the number of taxon-specific peptides were established to minimize false positives. This study confirms that database selection has a significant impact in metaproteomics, and provides critical indications for improving depth and

  15. Neutrosophic Relational Database Decomposition

    OpenAIRE

    Meena Arora; Ranjit Biswas; Dr. U.S.Pandey

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present a method of decomposing a neutrosophic database relation with Neutrosophic attributes into basic relational form. Our objective is capable of manipulating incomplete as well as inconsistent information. Fuzzy relation or vague relation can only handle incomplete information. Authors are taking the Neutrosophic Relational database [8],[2] to show how imprecise data can be handled in relational schema.

  16. HIV Structural Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 102 HIV Structural Database (Web, free access)   The HIV Protease Structural Database is an archive of experimentally determined 3-D structures of Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 (HIV-1), Human Immunodeficiency Virus 2 (HIV-2) and Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV) Proteases and their complexes with inhibitors or products of substrate cleavage.

  17. Structural Ceramics Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 30 NIST Structural Ceramics Database (Web, free access)   The NIST Structural Ceramics Database (WebSCD) provides evaluated materials property data for a wide range of advanced ceramics known variously as structural ceramics, engineering ceramics, and fine ceramics.

  18. Odense Pharmacoepidemiological Database (OPED)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallas, Jesper; Poulsen, Maja Hellfritzsch; Hansen, Morten Rix

    2017-01-01

    The Odense University Pharmacoepidemiological Database (OPED) is a prescription database established in 1990 by the University of Southern Denmark, covering reimbursed prescriptions from the county of Funen in Denmark and the region of Southern Denmark (1.2 million inhabitants). It is still active...

  19. The Danish Anaesthesia Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antonsen, Kristian; Rosenstock, Charlotte Vallentin; Lundstrøm, Lars Hyldborg

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The aim of the Danish Anaesthesia Database (DAD) is the nationwide collection of data on all patients undergoing anesthesia. Collected data are used for quality assurance, quality development, and serve as a basis for research projects. STUDY POPULATION: The DAD was founded in 2004...

  20. World Database of Happiness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Veenhoven (Ruut)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractABSTRACT The World Database of Happiness is an ongoing register of research on subjective appreciation of life. Its purpose is to make the wealth of scattered findings accessible, and to create a basis for further meta-analytic studies. The database involves four sections:
    1.

  1. Balkan Vegetation Database

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vassilev, Kiril; Pedashenko, Hristo; Alexandrova, Alexandra; Tashev, Alexandar; Ganeva, Anna; Gavrilova, Anna; Gradevska, Asya; Assenov, Assen; Vitkova, Antonina; Grigorov, Borislav; Gussev, Chavdar; Filipova, Eva; Aneva, Ina; Knollová, Ilona; Nikolov, Ivaylo; Georgiev, Georgi; Gogushev, Georgi; Tinchev, Georgi; Pachedjieva, Kalina; Koev, Koycho; Lyubenova, Mariyana; Dimitrov, Marius; Apostolova-Stoyanova, Nadezhda; Velev, Nikolay; Zhelev, Petar; Glogov, Plamen; Natcheva, Rayna; Tzonev, Rossen; Boch, Steffen; Hennekens, Stephan M.; Georgiev, Stoyan; Stoyanov, Stoyan; Karakiev, Todor; Kalníková, Veronika; Shivarov, Veselin; Russakova, Veska; Vulchev, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    The Balkan Vegetation Database (BVD; GIVD ID: EU-00-019; http://www.givd.info/ID/EU-00- 019) is a regional database that consists of phytosociological relevés from different vegetation types from six countries on the Balkan Peninsula (Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Kosovo, Montenegro

  2. Balkan Vegetation Database

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vassilev, Kiril; Pedashenko, Hristo; Alexandrova, Alexandra; Tashev, Alexandar; Ganeva, Anna; Gavrilova, Anna; Gradevska, Asya; Assenov, Assen; Vitkova, Antonina; Grigorov, Borislav; Gussev, Chavdar; Filipova, Eva; Aneva, Ina; Knollová, Ilona; Nikolov, Ivaylo; Georgiev, Georgi; Gogushev, Georgi; Tinchev, Georgi; Pachedjieva, Kalina; Koev, Koycho; Lyubenova, Mariyana; Dimitrov, Marius; Apostolova-Stoyanova, Nadezhda; Velev, Nikolay; Zhelev, Petar; Glogov, Plamen; Natcheva, Rayna; Tzonev, Rossen; Boch, Steffen; Hennekens, Stephan M.; Georgiev, Stoyan; Stoyanov, Stoyan; Karakiev, Todor; Kalníková, Veronika; Shivarov, Veselin; Russakova, Veska; Vulchev, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    The Balkan Vegetation Database (BVD; GIVD ID: EU-00-019; http://www.givd.info/ID/EU-00- 019) is a regional database that consists of phytosociological relevés from different vegetation types from six countries on the Balkan Peninsula (Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Kosovo, Montenegro

  3. Biological Macromolecule Crystallization Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 21 Biological Macromolecule Crystallization Database (Web, free access)   The Biological Macromolecule Crystallization Database and NASA Archive for Protein Crystal Growth Data (BMCD) contains the conditions reported for the crystallization of proteins and nucleic acids used in X-ray structure determinations and archives the results of microgravity macromolecule crystallization studies.

  4. Database Publication Practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernstein, P.A.; DeWitt, D.; Heuer, A.

    2005-01-01

    There has been a growing interest in improving the publication processes for database research papers. This panel reports on recent changes in those processes and presents an initial cut at historical data for the VLDB Journal and ACM Transactions on Database Systems....

  5. A Quality System Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell, William H.; Turner, Anne M.; Gifford, Luther; Stites, William

    2010-01-01

    A quality system database (QSD), and software to administer the database, were developed to support recording of administrative nonconformance activities that involve requirements for documentation of corrective and/or preventive actions, which can include ISO 9000 internal quality audits and customer complaints.

  6. An organic database system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.L. Kersten (Martin); A.P.J.M. Siebes (Arno)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractThe pervasive penetration of database technology may suggest that we have reached the end of the database research era. The contrary is true. Emerging technology, in hardware, software, and connectivity, brings a wealth of opportunities to push technology to a new level of maturity.

  7. Atomic Spectra Database (ASD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 78 NIST Atomic Spectra Database (ASD) (Web, free access)   This database provides access and search capability for NIST critically evaluated data on atomic energy levels, wavelengths, and transition probabilities that are reasonably up-to-date. The NIST Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center has carried out these critical compilations.

  8. World Database of Happiness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Veenhoven (Ruut)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractABSTRACT The World Database of Happiness is an ongoing register of research on subjective appreciation of life. Its purpose is to make the wealth of scattered findings accessible, and to create a basis for further meta-analytic studies. The database involves four sections:
    1. Bib

  9. World Database of Happiness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Veenhoven (Ruut)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractABSTRACT The World Database of Happiness is an ongoing register of research on subjective appreciation of life. Its purpose is to make the wealth of scattered findings accessible, and to create a basis for further meta-analytic studies. The database involves four sections:
    1. Bib

  10. Database Description - Yeast Interacting Proteins Database | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Yeast Interacting Proteins Database Database Description General information of database Database name Yeast... Interacting Proteins Database Alternative name - Creator Creator Name: Takashi Ito* Creator Affiliation: Di...-4-7136-3989 FAX: +81-4-7136-3979 E-mail : Database classification Metabolic and Signaling Pathways - Protei...n-protein interactions Organism Taxonomy Name: Saccharomyces cerevisiae Taxonomy ID: 4932 Database descripti...ive yeast two-hybrid analysis of budding yeast proteins. Features and manner of utilization of database Prot

  11. Reclamation research database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    A reclamation research database was compiled to help stakeholders search publications and research related to the reclamation of Alberta's oil sands region. New publications are added to the database by the Cumulative Environmental Management Association (CEMA), a nonprofit association whose mandate is to develop frameworks and guidelines for the management of cumulative environmental effects in the oil sands region. A total of 514 research papers have been compiled in the database to date. Topics include recent research on hydrology, aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, laboratory studies on biodegradation, and the effects of oil sands processing on micro-organisms. The database includes a wide variety of studies related to reconstructed wetlands as well as the ecological effects of hydrocarbons on phytoplankton and other organisms. The database format included information on research format availability, as well as information related to the author's affiliations. Links to external abstracts were provided where available, as well as details of source information.

  12. The LHCb configuration database

    CERN Document Server

    Abadie, L; Van Herwijnen, Eric; Jacobsson, R; Jost, B; Neufeld, N

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the LHCb configuration database is to store information about all the controllable devices of the detector. The experiment's control system (that uses PVSS ) will configure, start up and monitor the detector from the information in the configuration database. The database will contain devices with their properties, connectivity and hierarchy. The ability to store and rapidly retrieve huge amounts of data, and the navigability between devices are important requirements. We have collected use cases to ensure the completeness of the design. Using the entity relationship modelling technique we describe the use cases as classes with attributes and links. We designed the schema for the tables using relational diagrams. This methodology has been applied to the TFC (switches) and DAQ system. Other parts of the detector will follow later. The database has been implemented using Oracle to benefit from central CERN database support. The project also foresees the creation of tools to populate, maintain, and co...

  13. Cascadia Tsunami Deposit Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Robert; Jaffe, Bruce; Gelfenbaum, Guy; Peterson, Curt

    2003-01-01

    The Cascadia Tsunami Deposit Database contains data on the location and sedimentological properties of tsunami deposits found along the Cascadia margin. Data have been compiled from 52 studies, documenting 59 sites from northern California to Vancouver Island, British Columbia that contain known or potential tsunami deposits. Bibliographical references are provided for all sites included in the database. Cascadia tsunami deposits are usually seen as anomalous sand layers in coastal marsh or lake sediments. The studies cited in the database use numerous criteria based on sedimentary characteristics to distinguish tsunami deposits from sand layers deposited by other processes, such as river flooding and storm surges. Several studies cited in the database contain evidence for more than one tsunami at a site. Data categories include age, thickness, layering, grainsize, and other sedimentological characteristics of Cascadia tsunami deposits. The database documents the variability observed in tsunami deposits found along the Cascadia margin.

  14. Database Description - DGBY | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available [ Credits ] BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Contact us DGBY Database... Description General information of database Database name DGBY Alternative name Database for G...-12 Kannondai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8642 Japan Akira Ando TEL: +81-29-838-8066 E-mail: Database classificati...on Microarray Data and other Gene Expression Databases Organism Taxonomy Name: Sa...ccharomyces cerevisiae Taxonomy ID: 4932 Database description Baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an e

  15. Database Description - RPSD | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available [ Credits ] BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Contact us RPSD Database... Description General information of database Database name RPSD Alternative name Summary inform...n National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences Toshimasa Yamazaki E-mail : Database classification Structure Database...idopsis thaliana Taxonomy ID: 3702 Taxonomy Name: Glycine max Taxonomy ID: 3847 Database description We have...nts such as rice, and have put together the result and related informations. This database contains the basi

  16. PADB : Published Association Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Jin-Sung

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although molecular pathway information and the International HapMap Project data can help biomedical researchers to investigate the aetiology of complex diseases more effectively, such information is missing or insufficient in current genetic association databases. In addition, only a few of the environmental risk factors are included as gene-environment interactions, and the risk measures of associations are not indexed in any association databases. Description We have developed a published association database (PADB; http://www.medclue.com/padb that includes both the genetic associations and the environmental risk factors available in PubMed database. Each genetic risk factor is linked to a molecular pathway database and the HapMap database through human gene symbols identified in the abstracts. And the risk measures such as odds ratios or hazard ratios are extracted automatically from the abstracts when available. Thus, users can review the association data sorted by the risk measures, and genetic associations can be grouped by human genes or molecular pathways. The search results can also be saved to tab-delimited text files for further sorting or analysis. Currently, PADB indexes more than 1,500,000 PubMed abstracts that include 3442 human genes, 461 molecular pathways and about 190,000 risk measures ranging from 0.00001 to 4878.9. Conclusion PADB is a unique online database of published associations that will serve as a novel and powerful resource for reviewing and interpreting huge association data of complex human diseases.

  17. Database and Expert Systems Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viborg Andersen, Kim; Debenham, John; Wagner, Roland

    submissions. The papers are organized in topical sections on workflow automation, database queries, data classification and recommendation systems, information retrieval in multimedia databases, Web applications, implementational aspects of databases, multimedia databases, XML processing, security, XML...... schemata, query evaluation, semantic processing, information retrieval, temporal and spatial databases, querying XML, organisational aspects of databases, natural language processing, ontologies, Web data extraction, semantic Web, data stream management, data extraction, distributed database systems...

  18. Glycoproteomic and glycomic databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baycin Hizal, Deniz; Wolozny, Daniel; Colao, Joseph; Jacobson, Elena; Tian, Yuan; Krag, Sharon S; Betenbaugh, Michael J; Zhang, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Protein glycosylation serves critical roles in the cellular and biological processes of many organisms. Aberrant glycosylation has been associated with many illnesses such as hereditary and chronic diseases like cancer, cardiovascular diseases, neurological disorders, and immunological disorders. Emerging mass spectrometry (MS) technologies that enable the high-throughput identification of glycoproteins and glycans have accelerated the analysis and made possible the creation of dynamic and expanding databases. Although glycosylation-related databases have been established by many laboratories and institutions, they are not yet widely known in the community. Our study reviews 15 different publicly available databases and identifies their key elements so that users can identify the most applicable platform for their analytical needs. These databases include biological information on the experimentally identified glycans and glycopeptides from various cells and organisms such as human, rat, mouse, fly and zebrafish. The features of these databases - 7 for glycoproteomic data, 6 for glycomic data, and 2 for glycan binding proteins are summarized including the enrichment techniques that are used for glycoproteome and glycan identification. Furthermore databases such as Unipep, GlycoFly, GlycoFish recently established by our group are introduced. The unique features of each database, such as the analytical methods used and bioinformatical tools available are summarized. This information will be a valuable resource for the glycobiology community as it presents the analytical methods and glycosylation related databases together in one compendium. It will also represent a step towards the desired long term goal of integrating the different databases of glycosylation in order to characterize and categorize glycoproteins and glycans better for biomedical research.

  19. Update History of This Database - Trypanosomes Database | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us Trypanosomes Database Update History of This Database Date Update contents 2014/05/07 The co...ntact information is corrected. The features and manner of utilization of the database are corrected. 2014/02/04 Trypanosomes Databas...e English archive site is opened. 2011/04/04 Trypanosomes Database ( http://www.tan...paku.org/tdb/ ) is opened. About This Database Database Description Download Lice...nse Update History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us Update History of This Database - Trypanosomes Database | LSDB Archive ...

  20. Phase Equilibria Diagrams Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 31 NIST/ACerS Phase Equilibria Diagrams Database (PC database for purchase)   The Phase Equilibria Diagrams Database contains commentaries and more than 21,000 diagrams for non-organic systems, including those published in all 21 hard-copy volumes produced as part of the ACerS-NIST Phase Equilibria Diagrams Program (formerly titled Phase Diagrams for Ceramists): Volumes I through XIV (blue books); Annuals 91, 92, 93; High Tc Superconductors I & II; Zirconium & Zirconia Systems; and Electronic Ceramics I. Materials covered include oxides as well as non-oxide systems such as chalcogenides and pnictides, phosphates, salt systems, and mixed systems of these classes.

  1. LandIT Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iftikhar, Nadeem; Pedersen, Torben Bach

    2010-01-01

    and reporting purposes. This paper presents the LandIT database; which is result of the LandIT project, which refers to an industrial collaboration project that developed technologies for communication and data integration between farming devices and systems. The LandIT database in principal is based...... on the ISOBUS standard; however the standard is extended with additional requirements, such as gradual data aggregation and flexible exchange of farming data. This paper describes the conceptual and logical schemas of the proposed database based on a real-life farming case study....

  2. ALICE Geometry Database

    CERN Document Server

    Santo, J

    1999-01-01

    The ALICE Geometry Database project consists of the development of a set of data structures to store the geometrical information of the ALICE Detector. This Database will be used in Simulation, Reconstruction and Visualisation and will interface with existing CAD systems and Geometrical Modellers.At the present time, we are able to read a complete GEANT3 geometry, to store it in our database and to visualise it. On disk, we store different geometry files in hierarchical fashion, and all the nodes, materials, shapes, configurations and transformations distributed in this tree structure. The present status of the prototype and its future evolution will be presented.

  3. Database machine performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cesarini, F.; Salza, S.

    1987-01-01

    This book is devoted to the important problem of database machine performance evaluation. The book presents several methodological proposals and case studies, that have been developed within an international project supported by the European Economic Community on Database Machine Evaluation Techniques and Tools in the Context of the Real Time Processing. The book gives an overall view of the modeling methodologies and the evaluation strategies that can be adopted to analyze the performance of the database machine. Moreover, it includes interesting case studies and an extensive bibliography.

  4. Product Licenses Database Application

    CERN Document Server

    Tonkovikj, Petar

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this project is to organize and centralize the data about software tools available to CERN employees, as well as provide a system that would simplify the license management process by providing information about the available licenses and their expiry dates. The project development process is consisted of two steps: modeling the products (software tools), product licenses, legal agreements and other data related to these entities in a relational database and developing the front-end user interface so that the user can interact with the database. The result is an ASP.NET MVC web application with interactive views for displaying and managing the data in the underlying database.

  5. Plant Genome Duplication Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tae-Ho; Kim, Junah; Robertson, Jon S; Paterson, Andrew H

    2017-01-01

    Genome duplication, widespread in flowering plants, is a driving force in evolution. Genome alignments between/within genomes facilitate identification of homologous regions and individual genes to investigate evolutionary consequences of genome duplication. PGDD (the Plant Genome Duplication Database), a public web service database, provides intra- or interplant genome alignment information. At present, PGDD contains information for 47 plants whose genome sequences have been released. Here, we describe methods for identification and estimation of dates of genome duplication and speciation by functions of PGDD.The database is freely available at http://chibba.agtec.uga.edu/duplication/.

  6. LandIT Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iftikhar, Nadeem; Pedersen, Torben Bach

    2010-01-01

    and reporting purposes. This paper presents the LandIT database; which is result of the LandIT project, which refers to an industrial collaboration project that developed technologies for communication and data integration between farming devices and systems. The LandIT database in principal is based...... on the ISOBUS standard; however the standard is extended with additional requirements, such as gradual data aggregation and flexible exchange of farming data. This paper describes the conceptual and logical schemas of the proposed database based on a real-life farming case study....

  7. Danish Pancreatic Cancer Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fristrup, Claus; Detlefsen, Sönke; Palnæs Hansen, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The Danish Pancreatic Cancer Database aims to prospectively register the epidemiology, diagnostic workup, diagnosis, treatment, and outcome of patients with pancreatic cancer in Denmark at an institutional and national level. STUDY POPULATION: Since May 1, 2011, all patients......, and survival. The results are published annually. CONCLUSION: The Danish Pancreatic Cancer Database has registered data on 2,217 patients with microscopically verified ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. The data have been obtained nationwide over a period of 4 years and 2 months. The completeness...

  8. RGST - Rat Gene Symbol Tracker, a database for defining official rat gene symbols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ståhl Fredrik

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The names of genes are central in describing their function and relationship. However, gene symbols are often a subject of controversy. In addition, the discovery of mammalian genes is now so rapid that a proper use of gene symbol nomenclature rules tends to be overlooked. This is currently the situation in the rat and there is a need for a cohesive and unifying overview of all rat gene symbols in use. Based on the experiences in rat gene symbol curation that we have gained from running the "Ratmap" rat genome database, we have now developed a database that unifies different rat gene naming attempts with the accepted rat gene symbol nomenclature rules. Description This paper presents a newly developed database known as RGST (Rat Gene Symbol Tracker. The database contains rat gene symbols from three major sources: the Rat Genome Database (RGD, Ensembl, and NCBI-Gene. All rat symbols are compared with official symbols from orthologous human genes as specified by the Human Gene Nomenclature Committee (HGNC. Based on the outcome of the comparisons, a rat gene symbol may be selected. Rat symbols that do not match a human ortholog undergo a strict procedure of comparisons between the different rat gene sources as well as with the Mouse Genome Database (MGD. For each rat gene this procedure results in an unambiguous gene designation. The designation is presented as a status level that accompanies every rat gene symbol suggested in the database. The status level describes both how a rat symbol was selected, and its validity. Conclusion This database fulfils the important need of unifying rat gene symbols into an automatic and cohesive nomenclature system. The RGST database is available directly from the RatMap home page: http://ratmap.org.

  9. Stemcell Information: SKIP000788 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available n JA, Hallmayer J, Dolmetsch RE Nature--Nature 2011--2011 471--471 7337--7337 230-4--230-4 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21307850--http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21307850 -- ...

  10. ARTI Refrigerant Database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calm, J.M. [Calm (James M.), Great Falls, VA (United States)

    1994-05-27

    The Refrigerant Database consolidates and facilitates access to information to assist industry in developing equipment using alternative refrigerants. The underlying purpose is to accelerate phase out of chemical compounds of environmental concern.

  11. Kansas Cartographic Database (KCD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Kansas Cartographic Database (KCD) is an exact digital representation of selected features from the USGS 7.5 minute topographic map series. Features that are...

  12. Records Management Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — The Records Management Database is tool created in Microsoft Access specifically for USAID use. It contains metadata in order to access and retrieve the information...

  13. OTI Activity Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — OTI's worldwide activity database is a simple and effective information system that serves as a program management, tracking, and reporting tool. In each country,...

  14. Children's Culture Database (CCD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wanting, Birgit

    a Dialogue inspired database with documentation, network (individual and institutional profiles) and current news , paper presented at the research seminar: Electronic access to fiction, Copenhagen, November 11-13, 1996...

  15. Danish Urogynaecological Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ulla Darling; Gradel, Kim Oren; Larsen, Michael Due

    2016-01-01

    The Danish Urogynaecological Database is established in order to ensure high quality of treatment for patients undergoing urogynecological surgery. The database contains details of all women in Denmark undergoing incontinence surgery or pelvic organ prolapse surgery amounting to ~5,200 procedures...... per year. The variables are collected along the course of treatment of the patient from the referral to a postoperative control. Main variables are prior obstetrical and gynecological history, symptoms, symptom-related quality of life, objective urogynecological findings, type of operation......, complications if relevant, implants used if relevant, 3-6-month postoperative recording of symptoms, if any. A set of clinical quality indicators is being maintained by the steering committee for the database and is published in an annual report which also contains extensive descriptive statistics. The database...

  16. Fine Arts Database (FAD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    General Services Administration — The Fine Arts Database records information on federally owned art in the control of the GSA; this includes the location, current condition and information on artists.

  17. Rat Genome Database (RGD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Rat Genome Database (RGD) is a collaborative effort between leading research institutions involved in rat genetic and genomic research to collect, consolidate,...

  18. The Exoplanet Orbit Database

    CERN Document Server

    Wright, Jason T; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Han, Eunkyu; Feng, Ying; Johnson, John Asher; Howard, Andrew W; Valenti, Jeff A; Anderson, Jay; Piskunov, Nikolai

    2010-01-01

    We present a database of well determined orbital parameters of exoplanets. This database comprises spectroscopic orbital elements measured for 421 planets orbiting 357 stars from radial velocity and transit measurements as reported in the literature. We have also compiled fundamental transit parameters, stellar parameters, and the method used for the planets discovery. This Exoplanet Orbit Database includes all planets with robust, well measured orbital parameters reported in peer-reviewed articles. The database is available in a searchable, filterable, and sortable form on the Web at http://exoplanets.org through the Exoplanets Data Explorer Table, and the data can be plotted and explored through the Exoplanets Data Explorer Plotter. We use the Data Explorer to generate publication-ready plots giving three examples of the signatures of exoplanet migration and dynamical evolution: We illustrate the character of the apparent correlation between mass and period in exoplanet orbits, the selection different biase...

  19. National Geochemical Database: Concentrate

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Geochemistry of concentrates from the National Geochemical Database. Primarily inorganic elemental concentrations, most samples are from the continental US and...

  20. National Geochemical Database: Soil

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Geochemical analysis of soil samples from the National Geochemical Database. Primarily inorganic elemental concentrations, most samples are from the continental US...

  1. National Geochemical Database: Sediment

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Geochemical analysis of sediment samples from the National Geochemical Database. Primarily inorganic elemental concentrations, most samples are of stream sediment in...

  2. The Danish Urogynaecological Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guldberg, Rikke; Brostrøm, Søren; Hansen, Jesper Kjær

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS: The Danish Urogynaecological Database (DugaBase) is a nationwide clinical database established in 2006 to monitor, ensure and improve the quality of urogynaecological surgery. We aimed to describe its establishment and completeness and to validate selected variables....... This is the first study based on data from the DugaBase. METHODS: The database completeness was calculated as a comparison between urogynaecological procedures reported to the Danish National Patient Registry and to the DugaBase. Validity was assessed for selected variables from a random sample of 200 women...... in the DugaBase from 1 January 2009 to 31 October 2010, using medical records as a reference. RESULTS: A total of 16,509 urogynaecological procedures were registered in the DugaBase by 31 December 2010. The database completeness has increased by calendar time, from 38.2 % in 2007 to 93.2 % in 2010 for public...

  3. The Danish Depression Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Videbech, Poul Bror Hemming; Deleuran, Anette

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The purpose of the Danish Depression Database (DDD) is to monitor and facilitate the improvement of the quality of the treatment of depression in Denmark. Furthermore, the DDD has been designed to facilitate research. STUDY POPULATION: Inpatients as well as outpatients...... as an evaluation of the risk of suicide are measured before and after treatment. Whether psychiatric aftercare has been scheduled for inpatients and the rate of rehospitalization are also registered. DESCRIPTIVE DATA: The database was launched in 2011. Every year since then ~5,500 inpatients and 7,500 outpatients...... have been registered annually in the database. A total of 24,083 inpatients and 29,918 outpatients have been registered. The DDD produces an annual report published on the Internet. CONCLUSION: The DDD can become an important tool for quality improvement and research, when the reporting is more...

  4. Molecular marker databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Kaitao; Lorenc, Michał Tadeusz; Edwards, David

    2015-01-01

    The detection and analysis of genetic variation plays an important role in plant breeding and this role is increasing with the continued development of genome sequencing technologies. Molecular genetic markers are important tools to characterize genetic variation and assist with genomic breeding. Processing and storing the growing abundance of molecular marker data being produced requires the development of specific bioinformatics tools and advanced databases. Molecular marker databases range from species specific through to organism wide and often host a variety of additional related genetic, genomic, or phenotypic information. In this chapter, we will present some of the features of plant molecular genetic marker databases, highlight the various types of marker resources, and predict the potential future direction of crop marker databases.

  5. Consumer Product Category Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Chemical and Product Categories database (CPCat) catalogs the use of over 40,000 chemicals and their presence in different consumer products. The chemical use...

  6. Eldercare Locator Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Eldercare Locator is a searchable database that allows a user to search via zip code or city/ state for agencies at the State and local levels that provide...

  7. Drycleaner Database - Region 7

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — THIS DATA ASSET NO LONGER ACTIVE: This is metadata documentation for the Region 7 Drycleaner Database (R7DryClnDB) which tracks all Region7 drycleaners who notify...

  8. Reach Address Database (RAD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Reach Address Database (RAD) stores the reach address of each Water Program feature that has been linked to the underlying surface water features (streams,...

  9. Toxicity Reference Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Toxicity Reference Database (ToxRefDB) contains approximately 30 years and $2 billion worth of animal studies. ToxRefDB allows scientists and the interested...

  10. 1988 Spitak Earthquake Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 1988 Spitak Earthquake database is an extensive collection of geophysical and geological data, maps, charts, images and descriptive text pertaining to the...

  11. Hawaii bibliographic database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Thomas L.; Takahashi, Taeko Jane

    The Hawaii bibliographic database has been created to contain all of the literature, from 1779 to the present, pertinent to the volcanological history of the Hawaiian-Emperor volcanic chain. References are entered in a PC- and Macintosh-compatible EndNote Plus bibliographic database with keywords and s or (if no ) with annotations as to content. Keywords emphasize location, discipline, process, identification of new chemical data or age determinations, and type of publication. The database is updated approximately three times a year and is available to upload from an ftp site. The bibliography contained 8460 references at the time this paper was submitted for publication. Use of the database greatly enhances the power and completeness of library searches for anyone interested in Hawaiian volcanism.

  12. Food Habits Database (FHDBS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NEFSC Food Habits Database has two major sources of data. The first, and most extensive, is the standard NEFSC Bottom Trawl Surveys Program. During these...

  13. NLCD 2011 database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — National Land Cover Database 2011 (NLCD 2011) is the most recent national land cover product created by the Multi-Resolution Land Characteristics (MRLC) Consortium....

  14. Mouse Phenome Database (MPD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Mouse Phenome Database (MPD) has characterizations of hundreds of strains of laboratory mice to facilitate translational discoveries and to assist in selection...

  15. Disaster Debris Recovery Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The US EPA Region 5 Disaster Debris Recovery Database includes public datasets of over 3,500 composting facilities, demolition contractors, haulers, transfer...

  16. National Geochemical Database: Sediment

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Geochemical analysis of sediment samples from the National Geochemical Database. Primarily inorganic elemental concentrations, most samples are of stream sediment...

  17. Uranium Location Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — A GIS compiled locational database in Microsoft Access of ~15,000 mines with uranium occurrence or production, primarily in the western United States. The metadata...

  18. National Assessment Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The National Assessment Database stores and tracks state water quality assessment decisions, Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) and other watershed plans designed to...

  19. Household Products Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This database links over 4,000 consumer brands to health effects from Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) provided by the manufacturers and allows scientists and...

  20. Dissolution Methods Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — For a drug product that does not have a dissolution test method in the United States Pharmacopeia (USP), the FDA Dissolution Methods Database provides information on...

  1. ATLAS DAQ Configuration Databases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    I.Alexandrov; A.Amorim; 等

    2001-01-01

    The configuration databases are an important part of the Trigger/DAQ system of the future ATLAS experiment .This paper describes their current status giving details of architecture,implementation,test results and plans for future work.

  2. Venus Crater Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This web page leads to a database of images and information about the 900 or so impact craters on the surface of Venus by diameter, latitude, and name.

  3. Global Volcano Locations Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NGDC maintains a database of over 1,500 volcano locations obtained from the Smithsonian Institution Global Volcanism Program, Volcanoes of the World publication. The...

  4. IVR RSA Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This database contains trip-level reports submitted by vessels participating in Research Set-Aside projects with IVR reporting requirements.

  5. Dissolution Methods Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — For a drug product that does not have a dissolution test method in the United States Pharmacopeia (USP), the FDA Dissolution Methods Database provides information on...

  6. Chemical Kinetics Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 17 NIST Chemical Kinetics Database (Web, free access)   The NIST Chemical Kinetics Database includes essentially all reported kinetics results for thermal gas-phase chemical reactions. The database is designed to be searched for kinetics data based on the specific reactants involved, for reactions resulting in specified products, for all the reactions of a particular species, or for various combinations of these. In addition, the bibliography can be searched by author name or combination of names. The database contains in excess of 38,000 separate reaction records for over 11,700 distinct reactant pairs. These data have been abstracted from over 12,000 papers with literature coverage through early 2000.

  7. Medicaid CHIP ESPC Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Environmental Scanning and Program Characteristic (ESPC) Database is in a Microsoft (MS) Access format and contains Medicaid and CHIP data, for the 50 states and...

  8. Medicare Coverage Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Medicare Coverage Database (MCD) contains all National Coverage Determinations (NCDs) and Local Coverage Determinations (LCDs), local articles, and proposed NCD...

  9. The Jungle Database Search Engine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøhlen, Michael Hanspeter; Bukauskas, Linas; Dyreson, Curtis

    1999-01-01

    Information spread in in databases cannot be found by current search engines. A database search engine is capable to access and advertise database on the WWW. Jungle is a database search engine prototype developed at Aalborg University. Operating through JDBC connections to remote databases, Jungle...

  10. Neutrosophic Relational Database Decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meena Arora

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present a method of decomposing a neutrosophic database relation with Neutrosophic attributes into basic relational form. Our objective is capable of manipulating incomplete as well as inconsistent information. Fuzzy relation or vague relation can only handle incomplete information. Authors are taking the Neutrosophic Relational database [8],[2] to show how imprecise data can be handled in relational schema.

  11. Database on Wind Characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højstrup, J.; Ejsing Jørgensen, Hans; Lundtang Petersen, Erik

    1999-01-01

    his report describes the work and results of the project: Database on Wind Characteristics which was sponsered partly by the European Commision within the framework of JOULE III program under contract JOR3-CT95-0061......his report describes the work and results of the project: Database on Wind Characteristics which was sponsered partly by the European Commision within the framework of JOULE III program under contract JOR3-CT95-0061...

  12. Querying genomic databases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baehr, A.; Hagstrom, R.; Joerg, D.; Overbeek, R.

    1991-09-01

    A natural-language interface has been developed that retrieves genomic information by using a simple subset of English. The interface spares the biologist from the task of learning database-specific query languages and computer programming. Currently, the interface deals with the E. coli genome. It can, however, be readily extended and shows promise as a means of easy access to other sequenced genomic databases as well.

  13. Fashion Information Database

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jun; WU Hai-yan; WANG Yun-yi

    2002-01-01

    In the field of fashion industry, it is a bottleneck of how to control and apply the information in the procedure of fashion merchandising. By the aid of digital technology,a perfect and practical fashion information database could be established so that high- quality and efficient,low-cost and characteristic fashion merchandising system could be realized. The basic structure of fashion information database is discussed.

  14. The Gun Violence Database

    OpenAIRE

    Pavlick, Ellie; Callison-Burch, Chris

    2016-01-01

    We describe the Gun Violence Database (GVDB), a large and growing database of gun violence incidents in the United States. The GVDB is built from the detailed information found in local news reports about gun violence, and is constructed via a large-scale crowdsourced annotation effort through our web site, http://gun-violence.org/. We argue that centralized and publicly available data about gun violence can facilitate scientific, fact-based discussion about a topic that is often dominated by...

  15. Database computing in HEP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, C. T.; Loken, S.; Macfarlane, J. F.; May, E.; Lifka, D.; Lusk, E.; Price, L. E.; Baden, A.; Grossman, R.; Qin, X.

    1992-01-01

    The major SSC experiments are expected to produce up to 1 Petabyte of data per year each. Once the primary reconstruction is completed by farms of inexpensive processors, I/O becomes a major factor in further analysis of the data. We believe that the application of database techniques can significantly reduce the I/O performed in these analyses. We present examples of such I/O reductions in prototypes based on relational and object-oriented databases of CDF data samples.

  16. Database on Wind Characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højstrup, J.; Ejsing Jørgensen, Hans; Lundtang Petersen, Erik

    1999-01-01

    his report describes the work and results of the project: Database on Wind Characteristics which was sponsered partly by the European Commision within the framework of JOULE III program under contract JOR3-CT95-0061......his report describes the work and results of the project: Database on Wind Characteristics which was sponsered partly by the European Commision within the framework of JOULE III program under contract JOR3-CT95-0061...

  17. Specialist Bibliographic Databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparyan, Armen Yuri; Yessirkepov, Marlen; Voronov, Alexander A; Trukhachev, Vladimir I; Kostyukova, Elena I; Gerasimov, Alexey N; Kitas, George D

    2016-05-01

    Specialist bibliographic databases offer essential online tools for researchers and authors who work on specific subjects and perform comprehensive and systematic syntheses of evidence. This article presents examples of the established specialist databases, which may be of interest to those engaged in multidisciplinary science communication. Access to most specialist databases is through subscription schemes and membership in professional associations. Several aggregators of information and database vendors, such as EBSCOhost and ProQuest, facilitate advanced searches supported by specialist keyword thesauri. Searches of items through specialist databases are complementary to those through multidisciplinary research platforms, such as PubMed, Web of Science, and Google Scholar. Familiarizing with the functional characteristics of biomedical and nonbiomedical bibliographic search tools is mandatory for researchers, authors, editors, and publishers. The database users are offered updates of the indexed journal lists, abstracts, author profiles, and links to other metadata. Editors and publishers may find particularly useful source selection criteria and apply for coverage of their peer-reviewed journals and grey literature sources. These criteria are aimed at accepting relevant sources with established editorial policies and quality controls.

  18. Greenhouse gas (GHG) emission in organic farming. Approximate quantification of its generation at the organic garden of the School of Agricultural, Food and Biosystems Engineering (ETSIAAB) in the Technical University of Madrid (UPM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Jorge; Barbado, Elena; Maldonado, Mariano; Andreu, Gemma; López de Fuentes, Pilar

    2016-04-01

    As it well-known, agricultural soil fertilization increases the rate of greenhouse gas (GHG) emission production such as CO2, CH4 and N2O. Participation share of this activity on the climate change is currently under study, as well as the mitigation possibilities. In this context, we considered that it would be interesting to know how this share is in the case of organic farming. In relation to this, a field experiment was carried out at the organic garden of the School of Agricultural, Food and Biosystems Engineering (ETSIAAB) in the Technical University of Madrid (UPM). The orchard included different management growing areas, corresponding to different schools of organic farming. Soil and gas samples were taken from these different sites. Gas samples were collected throughout the growing season from an accumulated atmosphere inside static chambers inserted into the soil. Then, these samples were carried to the laboratory and there analyzed. The results obtained allow knowing approximately how ecological fertilization contributes to air pollution due to greenhouse gases.

  19. Gene Expression Omnibus: NCBI gene expression and hybridization array data repository.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgar, Ron; Domrachev, Michael; Lash, Alex E

    2002-01-01

    The Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) project was initiated in response to the growing demand for a public repository for high-throughput gene expression data. GEO provides a flexible and open design that facilitates submission, storage and retrieval of heterogeneous data sets from high-throughput gene expression and genomic hybridization experiments. GEO is not intended to replace in house gene expression databases that benefit from coherent data sets, and which are constructed to facilitate a particular analytic method, but rather complement these by acting as a tertiary, central data distribution hub. The three central data entities of GEO are platforms, samples and series, and were designed with gene expression and genomic hybridization experiments in mind. A platform is, essentially, a list of probes that define what set of molecules may be detected. A sample describes the set of molecules that are being probed and references a single platform used to generate its molecular abundance data. A series organizes samples into the meaningful data sets which make up an experiment. The GEO repository is publicly accessible through the World Wide Web at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo.

  20. Update History of This Database - Yeast Interacting Proteins Database | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available [ Credits ] BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Contact us ...Yeast Interacting Proteins Database Update History of This Database Date Update contents 2010/03/29 Yeast In...t This Database Database Description Download License Update History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us Update History

  1. Using the NCBI Genome Databases to Compare the Genes for Human & Chimpanzee Beta Hemoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offner, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The beta hemoglobin protein is identical in humans and chimpanzees. In this tutorial, students see that even though the proteins are identical, the genes that code for them are not. There are many more differences in the introns than in the exons, which indicates that coding regions of DNA are more highly conserved than non-coding regions.

  2. NCBI高通量测序数据库SRA介绍%Introduction to NCBI's SRA database

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊筱晶

    2010-01-01

    随着新一代测序技术的发展,高通量测序技术的应用越来越广泛,其产生的海量数据的存储、查询需要专门的数据库辅助,NCBI的SRA(Sequence Read Archive)数据库是高通量测序存储的代表,本文对SRA数据库的组织架构,数据形态作了综述分析,并对其存贮的数据进行了总结.

  3. The NCBI dbGaP database of genotypes and phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mailman, Matthew D; Feolo, Michael; Jin, Yumi; Kimura, Masato; Tryka, Kimberly; Bagoutdinov, Rinat; Hao, Luning; Kiang, Anne; Paschall, Justin; Phan, Lon; Popova, Natalia; Pretel, Stephanie; Ziyabari, Lora; Lee, Moira; Shao, Yu; Wang, Zhen Y; Sirotkin, Karl; Ward, Minghong; Kholodov, Michael; Zbicz, Kerry; Beck, Jeffrey; Kimelman, Michael; Shevelev, Sergey; Preuss, Don; Yaschenko, Eugene; Graeff, Alan; Ostell, James; Sherry, Stephen T

    2007-10-01

    The National Center for Biotechnology Information has created the dbGaP public repository for individual-level phenotype, exposure, genotype and sequence data and the associations between them. dbGaP assigns stable, unique identifiers to studies and subsets of information from those studies, including documents, individual phenotypic variables, tables of trait data, sets of genotype data, computed phenotype-genotype associations, and groups of study subjects who have given similar consents for use of their data.

  4. Surgery Risk Assessment (SRA) Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Surgery Risk Assessment (SRA) database is part of the VA Surgical Quality Improvement Program (VASQIP). This database contains assessments of selected surgical...

  5. Accessing and using chemical databases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolov, Nikolai Georgiev; Pavlov, Todor; Niemelä, Jay Russell

    2013-01-01

    Computer-based representation of chemicals makes it possible to organize data in chemical databases-collections of chemical structures and associated properties. Databases are widely used wherever efficient processing of chemical information is needed, including search, storage, retrieval......, and dissemination. Structure and functionality of chemical databases are considered. The typical kinds of information found in a chemical database are considered-identification, structural, and associated data. Functionality of chemical databases is presented, with examples of search and access types. More details...... are included about the OASIS database and platform and the Danish (Q)SAR Database online. Various types of chemical database resources are discussed, together with a list of examples....

  6. Danish clinical databases: An overview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Clinical databases contain data related to diagnostic procedures, treatments and outcomes. In 2001, a scheme was introduced for the approval, supervision and support to clinical databases in Denmark....

  7. ADANS database specification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-01-16

    The purpose of the Air Mobility Command (AMC) Deployment Analysis System (ADANS) Database Specification (DS) is to describe the database organization and storage allocation and to provide the detailed data model of the physical design and information necessary for the construction of the parts of the database (e.g., tables, indexes, rules, defaults). The DS includes entity relationship diagrams, table and field definitions, reports on other database objects, and a description of the ADANS data dictionary. ADANS is the automated system used by Headquarters AMC and the Tanker Airlift Control Center (TACC) for airlift planning and scheduling of peacetime and contingency operations as well as for deliberate planning. ADANS also supports planning and scheduling of Air Refueling Events by the TACC and the unit-level tanker schedulers. ADANS receives input in the form of movement requirements and air refueling requests. It provides a suite of tools for planners to manipulate these requirements/requests against mobility assets and to develop, analyze, and distribute schedules. Analysis tools are provided for assessing the products of the scheduling subsystems, and editing capabilities support the refinement of schedules. A reporting capability provides formatted screen, print, and/or file outputs of various standard reports. An interface subsystem handles message traffic to and from external systems. The database is an integral part of the functionality summarized above.

  8. The CAPEC Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Thomas Lund; Abildskov, Jens; Harper, Peter Mathias

    2001-01-01

    The Computer-Aided Process Engineering Center (CAPEC) database of measured data was established with the aim to promote greater data exchange in the chemical engineering community. The target properties are pure component properties, mixture properties, and special drug solubility data. The datab......The Computer-Aided Process Engineering Center (CAPEC) database of measured data was established with the aim to promote greater data exchange in the chemical engineering community. The target properties are pure component properties, mixture properties, and special drug solubility data....... The database divides pure component properties into primary, secondary, and functional properties. Mixture properties are categorized in terms of the number of components in the mixture and the number of phases present. The compounds in the database have been classified on the basis of the functional groups...... in the compound. This classification makes the CAPEC database a very useful tool, for example, in the development of new property models, since properties of chemically similar compounds are easily obtained. A program with efficient search and retrieval functions of properties has been developed....

  9. FishTraits Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angermeier, Paul L.; Frimpong, Emmanuel A.

    2009-01-01

    The need for integrated and widely accessible sources of species traits data to facilitate studies of ecology, conservation, and management has motivated development of traits databases for various taxa. In spite of the increasing number of traits-based analyses of freshwater fishes in the United States, no consolidated database of traits of this group exists publicly, and much useful information on these species is documented only in obscure sources. The largely inaccessible and unconsolidated traits information makes large-scale analysis involving many fishes and/or traits particularly challenging. FishTraits is a database of >100 traits for 809 (731 native and 78 exotic) fish species found in freshwaters of the conterminous United States, including 37 native families and 145 native genera. The database contains information on four major categories of traits: (1) trophic ecology, (2) body size and reproductive ecology (life history), (3) habitat associations, and (4) salinity and temperature tolerances. Information on geographic distribution and conservation status is also included. Together, we refer to the traits, distribution, and conservation status information as attributes. Descriptions of attributes are available here. Many sources were consulted to compile attributes, including state and regional species accounts and other databases.

  10. The Danish Depression Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Videbech P

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Poul Videbech,1 Anette Deleuran2 1Mental Health Centre Glostrup, Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Copenhagen, Glostrup, 2Psychiatric Centre Amager, Copenhagen S, Denmark Aim of database: The purpose of the Danish Depression Database (DDD is to monitor and facilitate the improvement of the quality of the treatment of depression in Denmark. Furthermore, the DDD has been designed to facilitate research. Study population: Inpatients as well as outpatients with depression, aged above 18 years, and treated in the public psychiatric hospital system were enrolled. Main variables: Variables include whether the patient has been thoroughly somatically examined and has been interviewed about the psychopathology by a specialist in psychiatry. The Hamilton score as well as an evaluation of the risk of suicide are measured before and after treatment. Whether psychiatric aftercare has been scheduled for inpatients and the rate of rehospitalization are also registered. Descriptive data: The database was launched in 2011. Every year since then ~5,500 inpatients and 7,500 outpatients have been registered annually in the database. A total of 24,083 inpatients and 29,918 outpatients have been registered. The DDD produces an annual report published on the Internet. Conclusion: The DDD can become an important tool for quality improvement and research, when the reporting is more complete. Keywords: quality assurance, suicide, somatic diseases, national database

  11. The Chandra Bibliography Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rots, A. H.; Winkelman, S. L.; Paltani, S.; Blecksmith, S. E.; Bright, J. D.

    2004-07-01

    Early in the mission, the Chandra Data Archive started the development of a bibliography database, tracking publications in refereed journals and on-line conference proceedings that are based on Chandra observations, allowing our users to link directly to articles in the ADS from our archive, and to link to the relevant data in the archive from the ADS entries. Subsequently, we have been working closely with the ADS and other data centers, in the context of the ADEC-ITWG, on standardizing the literature-data linking. We have also extended our bibliography database to include all Chandra-related articles and we are also keeping track of the number of citations of each paper. Obviously, in addition to providing valuable services to our users, this database allows us to extract a wide variety of statistical information. The project comprises five components: the bibliography database-proper, a maintenance database, an interactive maintenance tool, a user browsing interface, and a web services component for exchanging information with the ADS. All of these elements are nearly mission-independent and we intend make the package as a whole available for use by other data centers. The capabilities thus provided represent support for an essential component of the Virtual Observatory.

  12. NCBI Peptidome: a new repository for mass spectrometry proteomics data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Li; Barrett, Tanya; Ayanbule, Oluwabukunmi; Troup, Dennis B; Rudnev, Dmitry; Muertter, Rolf N; Tomashevsky, Maxim; Soboleva, Alexandra; Slotta, Douglas J

    2010-01-01

    Peptidome is a public repository that archives and freely distributes tandem mass spectrometry peptide and protein identification data generated by the scientific community. Data from all stages of a mass spectrometry experiment are captured, including original mass spectra files, experimental metadata and conclusion-level results. The submission process is facilitated through acceptance of data in commonly used open formats, and all submissions undergo syntactic validation and curation in an effort to uphold data integrity and quality. Peptidome is not restricted to specific organisms, instruments or experiment types; data from any tandem mass spectrometry experiment from any species are accepted. In addition to data storage, web-based interfaces are available to help users query, browse and explore individual peptides, proteins or entire Samples and Studies. Results are integrated and linked with other NCBI resources to ensure dissemination of the information beyond the mass spectroscopy proteomics community. Peptidome is freely accessible at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/peptidome.

  13. Open Geoscience Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashev, A.

    2012-04-01

    Currently there is an enormous amount of various geoscience databases. Unfortunately the only users of the majority of the databases are their elaborators. There are several reasons for that: incompaitability, specificity of tasks and objects and so on. However the main obstacles for wide usage of geoscience databases are complexity for elaborators and complication for users. The complexity of architecture leads to high costs that block the public access. The complication prevents users from understanding when and how to use the database. Only databases, associated with GoogleMaps don't have these drawbacks, but they could be hardly named "geoscience" Nevertheless, open and simple geoscience database is necessary at least for educational purposes (see our abstract for ESSI20/EOS12). We developed a database and web interface to work with them and now it is accessible at maps.sch192.ru. In this database a result is a value of a parameter (no matter which) in a station with a certain position, associated with metadata: the date when the result was obtained; the type of a station (lake, soil etc); the contributor that sent the result. Each contributor has its own profile, that allows to estimate the reliability of the data. The results can be represented on GoogleMaps space image as a point in a certain position, coloured according to the value of the parameter. There are default colour scales and each registered user can create the own scale. The results can be also extracted in *.csv file. For both types of representation one could select the data by date, object type, parameter type, area and contributor. The data are uploaded in *.csv format: Name of the station; Lattitude(dd.dddddd); Longitude(ddd.dddddd); Station type; Parameter type; Parameter value; Date(yyyy-mm-dd). The contributor is recognised while entering. This is the minimal set of features that is required to connect a value of a parameter with a position and see the results. All the complicated data

  14. Database Vs Data Warehouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Data warehouse technology includes a set of concepts and methods that offer the users useful information for decision making. The necessity to build a data warehouse arises from the necessity to improve the quality of information in the organization. The date proceeding from different sources, having a variety of forms - both structured and unstructured, are filtered according to business rules and are integrated in a single large data collection. Using informatics solutions, managers have understood that data stored in operational systems - including databases, are an informational gold mine that must be exploited. Data warehouses have been developed to answer the increasing demands for complex analysis, which could not be properly achieved with operational databases. The present paper emphasizes some of the criteria that information application developers can use in order to choose between a database solution or a data warehouse one.

  15. The LHCb configuration database

    CERN Document Server

    Abadie, Lana; Gaspar, Clara; Jacobsson, Richard; Jost, Beat; Neufeld, Niko

    2005-01-01

    The Experiment Control System (ECS) will handle the monitoring, configuration and operation of all the LHCb experimental equipment. All parameters required to configure electronics equipment under the control of the ECS will reside in a configuration database. The database will contain two kinds of information: 1.\tConfiguration properties about devices such as hardware addresses, geographical location, and operational parameters associated with particular running modes (dynamic properties). 2.\tConnectivity between devices : this consists of describing the output and input connections of a device (static properties). The representation of these data using tables must be complete so that it can provide all the required information to the ECS and must cater for all the subsystems. The design should also guarantee a fast response time, even if a query results in a large volume of data being loaded from the database into the ECS. To fulfil these constraints, we apply the following methodology: Determine from the d...

  16. Mouse genome database 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bult, Carol J; Eppig, Janan T; Blake, Judith A; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E

    2016-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD; http://www.informatics.jax.org) is the primary community model organism database for the laboratory mouse and serves as the source for key biological reference data related to mouse genes, gene functions, phenotypes and disease models with a strong emphasis on the relationship of these data to human biology and disease. As the cost of genome-scale sequencing continues to decrease and new technologies for genome editing become widely adopted, the laboratory mouse is more important than ever as a model system for understanding the biological significance of human genetic variation and for advancing the basic research needed to support the emergence of genome-guided precision medicine. Recent enhancements to MGD include new graphical summaries of biological annotations for mouse genes, support for mobile access to the database, tools to support the annotation and analysis of sets of genes, and expanded support for comparative biology through the expansion of homology data.

  17. Database Application Schema Forensics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hector Quintus Beyers

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The application schema layer of a Database Management System (DBMS can be modified to deliver results that may warrant a forensic investigation. Table structures can be corrupted by changing the metadata of a database or operators of the database can be altered to deliver incorrect results when used in queries. This paper will discuss categories of possibilities that exist to alter the application schema with some practical examples. Two forensic environments are introduced where a forensic investigation can take place in. Arguments are provided why these environments are important. Methods are presented how these environments can be achieved for the application schema layer of a DBMS. A process is proposed on how forensic evidence should be extracted from the application schema layer of a DBMS. The application schema forensic evidence identification process can be applied to a wide range of forensic settings.

  18. Towards Sensor Database Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnet, Philippe; Gehrke, Johannes; Seshadri, Praveen

    2001-01-01

    Sensor networks are being widely deployed for measurement, detection and surveillance applications. In these new applications, users issue long-running queries over a combination of stored data and sensor data. Most existing applications rely on a centralized system for collecting sensor data....... These systems lack flexibility because data is extracted in a predefined way; also, they do not scale to a large number of devices because large volumes of raw data are transferred regardless of the queries that are submitted. In our new concept of sensor database system, queries dictate which data is extracted...... from the sensors. In this paper, we define the concept of sensor databases mixing stored data represented as relations and sensor data represented as time series. Each long-running query formulated over a sensor database defines a persistent view, which is maintained during a given time interval. We...

  19. The Danish Melanoma Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hölmich, Lisbet Rosenkrantz; Klausen, Siri; Spaun, Eva;

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The aim of the database is to monitor and improve the treatment and survival of melanoma patients. STUDY POPULATION: All Danish patients with cutaneous melanoma and in situ melanomas must be registered in the Danish Melanoma Database (DMD). In 2014, 2,525 patients with invasive...... melanoma and 780 with in situ tumors were registered. The coverage is currently 93% compared with the Danish Pathology Register. MAIN VARIABLES: The main variables include demographic, clinical, and pathological characteristics, including Breslow's tumor thickness, ± ulceration, mitoses, and tumor...... quality register. The coverage is high, and the performance in the five Danish regions is quite similar due to strong adherence to guidelines provided by the Danish Melanoma Group. The list of monitored indicators is constantly expanding, and annual quality reports are issued. Several important scientific...

  20. The Danish Sarcoma Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Peter Holmberg; Lausten, Gunnar Schwarz; Pedersen, Alma B

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The aim of the database is to gather information about sarcomas treated in Denmark in order to continuously monitor and improve the quality of sarcoma treatment in a local, a national, and an international perspective. STUDY POPULATION: Patients in Denmark diagnosed with a sarcoma, both...... skeletal and ekstraskeletal, are to be registered since 2009. MAIN VARIABLES: The database contains information about appearance of symptoms; date of receiving referral to a sarcoma center; date of first visit; whether surgery has been performed elsewhere before referral, diagnosis, and treatment; tumor...... of Diseases - tenth edition codes and TNM Classification of Malignant Tumours, and date of death (after yearly coupling to the Danish Civil Registration System). Data quality and completeness are currently secured. CONCLUSION: The Danish Sarcoma Database is population based and includes sarcomas occurring...

  1. DistiLD Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palleja, Albert; Horn, Heiko; Eliasson, Sabrina

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified thousands of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with the risk of hundreds of diseases. However, there is currently no database that enables non-specialists to answer the following simple questions: which SNPs associated...... blocks, so that SNPs in LD with each other are preferentially in the same block, whereas SNPs not in LD are in different blocks. By projecting SNPs and genes onto LD blocks, the DistiLD database aims to increase usage of existing GWAS results by making it easy to query and visualize disease......-associated SNPs and genes in their chromosomal context. The database is available at http://distild.jensenlab.org/....

  2. Harmonization of Databases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charlifue, Susan; Tate, Denise; Biering-Sorensen, Fin

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this article are to (1) provide an overview of existing spinal cord injury (SCI) clinical research databases-their purposes, characteristics, and accessibility to users; and (2) present a vision for future collaborations required for cross-cutting research in SCI. This vision...... strengths and weaknesses. Efforts to provide a uniform approach to data collection are also reviewed. The databases reviewed offer different approaches to capture important clinical information on SCI. They vary on size, purpose, data points, inclusion of standard outcomes, and technical requirements. Each...... highlights the need for validated and relevant data for longitudinal clinical trials and observational and epidemiologic SCI-related studies. Three existing SCI clinical research databases/registries are reviewed and summarized with regard to current formats, collection methods, and uses, including major...

  3. Danish Gynecological Cancer Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Sarah Mejer; Bjørn, Signe Frahm; Jochumsen, Kirsten Marie;

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The Danish Gynecological Cancer Database (DGCD) is a nationwide clinical cancer database and its aim is to monitor the treatment quality of Danish gynecological cancer patients, and to generate data for scientific purposes. DGCD also records detailed data on the diagnostic measures...... for gynecological cancer. STUDY POPULATION: DGCD was initiated January 1, 2005, and includes all patients treated at Danish hospitals for cancer of the ovaries, peritoneum, fallopian tubes, cervix, vulva, vagina, and uterus, including rare histological types. MAIN VARIABLES: DGCD data are organized within separate...... Danish personal identification number (CPR number). DESCRIPTIVE DATA: Data from DGCD and registers are available online in the Statistical Analysis Software portal. The DGCD forms cover almost all possible clinical variables used to describe gynecological cancer courses. The only limitation...

  4. Medical database security evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pangalos, G J

    1993-01-01

    Users of medical information systems need confidence in the security of the system they are using. They also need a method to evaluate and compare its security capabilities. Every system has its own requirements for maintaining confidentiality, integrity and availability. In order to meet these requirements a number of security functions must be specified covering areas such as access control, auditing, error recovery, etc. Appropriate confidence in these functions is also required. The 'trust' in trusted computer systems rests on their ability to prove that their secure mechanisms work as advertised and cannot be disabled or diverted. The general framework and requirements for medical database security and a number of parameters of the evaluation problem are presented and discussed. The problem of database security evaluation is then discussed, and a number of specific proposals are presented, based on a number of existing medical database security systems.

  5. The Danish Sarcoma Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorgensen PH

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Peter Holmberg Jørgensen,1 Gunnar Schwarz Lausten,2 Alma B Pedersen3 1Tumor Section, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, 2Tumor Section, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, 3Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark Aim: The aim of the database is to gather information about sarcomas treated in Denmark in order to continuously monitor and improve the quality of sarcoma treatment in a local, a national, and an international perspective. Study population: Patients in Denmark diagnosed with a sarcoma, both skeletal and ekstraskeletal, are to be registered since 2009. Main variables: The database contains information about appearance of symptoms; date of receiving referral to a sarcoma center; date of first visit; whether surgery has been performed elsewhere before referral, diagnosis, and treatment; tumor characteristics such as location, size, malignancy grade, and growth pattern; details on treatment (kind of surgery, amount of radiation therapy, type and duration of chemotherapy; complications of treatment; local recurrence and metastases; and comorbidity. In addition, several quality indicators are registered in order to measure the quality of care provided by the hospitals and make comparisons between hospitals and with international standards. Descriptive data: Demographic patient-specific data such as age, sex, region of living, comorbidity, World Health Organization's International Classification of Diseases – tenth edition codes and TNM Classification of Malignant Tumours, and date of death (after yearly coupling to the Danish Civil Registration System. Data quality and completeness are currently secured. Conclusion: The Danish Sarcoma Database is population based and includes sarcomas occurring in Denmark since 2009. It is a valuable tool for monitoring sarcoma incidence and quality of treatment and its improvement, postoperative

  6. Database Description - KOME | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available [ Credits ] BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Contact us KOME Database... Description General information of database Database name Knowledge-based Oryza Molecular biol...baraki 305-8602, Japan National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences Plant Genome Research Unit Shoshi Kikuchi E-mail : Database... classification Plant databases - Rice Organism Taxonomy Name: Oryza sativa Taxonomy ID: 4530 Database...A clones that were completely sequenced in the Rice full-length cDNA project is shown in the database. The f

  7. Database Description - GETDB | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us GETDB Database Description General information of database Database name GETDB Alternative n...ame Gal4 Enhancer Trap Insertion Database DOI 10.18908/lsdba.nbdc00236-000 Creator Creator Name: Shigeo Haya... Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0047 Tel: +81-78-306-3185 FAX: +81-78-306-3183 E-mail: Database classification Expression... Invertebrate genome database Organism Taxonomy Name: Drosophila melanogaster Taxonomy ID: 7227 Database des...cription About 4,600 insertion lines of enhancer trap lines based on the Gal4-UAS

  8. C# Database Basics

    CERN Document Server

    Schmalz, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Working with data and databases in C# certainly can be daunting if you're coming from VB6, VBA, or Access. With this hands-on guide, you'll shorten the learning curve considerably as you master accessing, adding, updating, and deleting data with C#-basic skills you need if you intend to program with this language. No previous knowledge of C# is necessary. By following the examples in this book, you'll learn how to tackle several database tasks in C#, such as working with SQL Server, building data entry forms, and using data in a web service. The book's code samples will help you get started

  9. Rett networked database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grillo, Elisa; Villard, Laurent; Clarke, Angus

    2012-01-01

    underlie some (usually variant) cases. There is only limited correlation between genotype and phenotype. The Rett Networked Database (http://www.rettdatabasenetwork.org/) has been established to share clinical and genetic information. Through an "adaptor" process of data harmonization, a set of 293...... clinical items and 16 genetic items was generated; 62 clinical and 7 genetic items constitute the core dataset; 23 clinical items contain longitudinal information. The database contains information on 1838 patients from 11 countries (December 2011), with or without mutations in known genes. These numbers...

  10. MARKS ON ART database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Vlierden, Marieke; Wadum, Jørgen; Wolters, Margreet

    2016-01-01

    Mestermærker, monogrammer og kvalitetsmærker findes ofte præget eller stemplet på kunstværker fra 1300-1700. En illustreret database med denne typer mræker er under etablering på Nederlands Kunsthistoriske Institut (RKD) i Den Haag.......Mestermærker, monogrammer og kvalitetsmærker findes ofte præget eller stemplet på kunstværker fra 1300-1700. En illustreret database med denne typer mræker er under etablering på Nederlands Kunsthistoriske Institut (RKD) i Den Haag....

  11. The CATH database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knudsen Michael

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The CATH database provides hierarchical classification of protein domains based on their folding patterns. Domains are obtained from protein structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank and both domain identification and subsequent classification use manual as well as automated procedures. The accompanying website http://www.cathdb.info provides an easy-to-use entry to the classification, allowing for both browsing and downloading of data. Here, we give a brief review of the database, its corresponding website and some related tools.

  12. High-performance computational analysis and peptide screening from databases of cyclotides from poaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porto, William F; Miranda, Vivian J; Pinto, Michelle F S; Dohms, Stephan M; Franco, Octavio L

    2016-01-01

    Cyclotides are a family of head-to-tail cyclized peptides containing three conserved disulfide bonds, in a structural scaffold also known as a cyclic cysteine knot. Due to the high degree of cysteine conservation, novel members from this peptide family can be identified in protein databases through a search through regular expression (REGEX). In this work, six novel cyclotide-like precursors from the Poaceae were identified from NCBI's non-redundant protein database by the use of REGEX. Two out of six sequences (named Zea mays L and M) showed an Asp residue in the C-terminal, which indicated that they could be cyclic. Gene expression in maize tissues was investigated, showing that the previously described cyclotide-like Z. mays J is expressed in the roots. According to molecular dynamics, the structure of Z. mays J seems to be stable, despite the putative absence of cyclization. As regards cyclotide evolution, it was hypothesized that this is an outcome from convergent evolution and/or horizontal gene transfer. The results showed that peptide screening from databases should be performed periodically in order to include novel sequences, which are deposited as the databases grow. Indeed, the advances in computational and experimental methods will together help to answer key questions and reach new horizons in defense-related peptide identification. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. HIV-1, human interaction database: current status and new features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ako-Adjei, Danso; Fu, William; Wallin, Craig; Katz, Kenneth S; Song, Guangfeng; Darji, Dakshesh; Brister, J Rodney; Ptak, Roger G; Pruitt, Kim D

    2015-01-01

    The 'Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1), Human Interaction Database', available through the National Library of Medicine at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/genome/viruses/retroviruses/hiv-1/interactions, serves the scientific community exploring the discovery of novel HIV vaccine candidates and therapeutic targets. Each HIV-1 human protein interaction can be retrieved without restriction by web-based downloads and ftp protocols and includes: Reference Sequence (RefSeq) protein accession numbers, National Center for Biotechnology Information Gene identification numbers, brief descriptions of the interactions, searchable keywords for interactions and PubMed identification numbers (PMIDs) of journal articles describing the interactions. In addition to specific HIV-1 protein-human protein interactions, included are interaction effects upon HIV-1 replication resulting when individual human gene expression is blocked using siRNA. A total of 3142 human genes are described participating in 12,786 protein-protein interactions, along with 1316 replication interactions described for each of 1250 human genes identified using small interfering RNA (siRNA). Together the data identifies 4006 human genes involved in 14,102 interactions. With the inclusion of siRNA interactions we introduce a redesigned web interface to enhance viewing, filtering and downloading of the combined data set.

  14. Database management systems understanding and applying database technology

    CERN Document Server

    Gorman, Michael M

    1991-01-01

    Database Management Systems: Understanding and Applying Database Technology focuses on the processes, methodologies, techniques, and approaches involved in database management systems (DBMSs).The book first takes a look at ANSI database standards and DBMS applications and components. Discussion focus on application components and DBMS components, implementing the dynamic relationship application, problems and benefits of dynamic relationship DBMSs, nature of a dynamic relationship application, ANSI/NDL, and DBMS standards. The manuscript then ponders on logical database, interrogation, and phy

  15. MARC and Relational Databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorens, Jose; Trenor, Asuncion

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the use of MARC format in relational databases and addresses problems of incompatibilities. A solution is presented that is in accordance with Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) standards and is based on experiences at the library of the Universidad Politecnica de Valencia (Spain). (four references) (EA)

  16. NoSQL Databases

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    In this document, I present the main notions of NoSQL databases and compare four selected products (Riak, MongoDB, Cassandra, Neo4J) according to their capabilities with respect to consistency, availability, and partition tolerance, as well as performance. I also propose a few criteria for selecting the right tool for the right situation.

  17. Dansk kolorektal Cancer Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harling, Henrik; Nickelsen, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    The Danish Colorectal Cancer Database was established in 1994 with the purpose of monitoring whether diagnostic and surgical principles specified in the evidence-based national guidelines of good clinical practice were followed. Twelve clinical indicators have been listed by the Danish Colorectal...

  18. Dutch Vegetation Database (LVD)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hennekens, S.M.

    2011-01-01

    The Dutch Vegetation Database (LVD) hosts information on all plant communities in the Netherlands. This substantial archive consists of over 600.000 recent and historic vegetation descriptions. The data provide information on more than 85 years of vegetation recording in various habitats covering te

  19. Database Programming Languages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This volume contains the proceedings of the 11th International Symposium on Database Programming Languages (DBPL 2007), held in Vienna, Austria, on September 23-24, 2007. DBPL 2007 was one of 15 meetings co-located with VLBD (the International Conference on Very Large Data Bases). DBPL continues...

  20. Database for West Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Such database can prove an invaluable source of information for a wide range of agricultural and ... national soil classification systems around the world ... West African Journal of Appl ied Ecology, vol. .... SDB FAO-ISRIC English, French, Spanish Morphology and analytical ..... Furthermore, it will enhance the state of soil.

  1. Food composition databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Food composition is the determination of what is in the foods we eat and is the critical bridge between nutrition, health promotion and disease prevention and food production. Compilation of data into useable databases is essential to the development of dietary guidance for individuals and populat...

  2. The Ribosomal Database Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, G. J.; Overbeek, R.; Larsen, N.; Marsh, T. L.; McCaughey, M. J.; Maciukenas, M. A.; Kuan, W. M.; Macke, T. J.; Xing, Y.; Woese, C. R.

    1992-01-01

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) complies ribosomal sequences and related data, and redistributes them in aligned and phylogenetically ordered form to its user community. It also offers various software packages for handling, analyzing and displaying sequences. In addition, the RDP offers (or will offer) certain analytic services. At present the project is in an intermediate stage of development.

  3. Hydrocarbon Spectral Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 115 Hydrocarbon Spectral Database (Web, free access)   All of the rotational spectral lines observed and reported in the open literature for 91 hydrocarbon molecules have been tabulated. The isotopic molecular species, assigned quantum numbers, observed frequency, estimated measurement uncertainty and reference are given for each transition reported.

  4. Database on wind characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, K.S. [The Technical Univ. of Denmark (Denmark); Courtney, M.S. [Risoe National Lab., (Denmark)

    1999-08-01

    The organisations that participated in the project consists of five research organisations: MIUU (Sweden), ECN (The Netherlands), CRES (Greece), DTU (Denmark), Risoe (Denmark) and one wind turbine manufacturer: Vestas Wind System A/S (Denmark). The overall goal was to build a database consisting of a large number of wind speed time series and create tools for efficiently searching through the data to select interesting data. The project resulted in a database located at DTU, Denmark with online access through the Internet. The database contains more than 50.000 hours of measured wind speed measurements. A wide range of wind climates and terrain types are represented with significant amounts of time series. Data have been chosen selectively with a deliberate over-representation of high wind and complex terrain cases. This makes the database ideal for wind turbine design needs but completely unsuitable for resource studies. Diversity has also been an important aim and this is realised with data from a large range of terrain types; everything from offshore to mountain, from Norway to Greece. (EHS)

  5. Databases and data mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Over the course of the past decade, the breadth of information that is made available through online resources for plant biology has increased astronomically, as have the interconnectedness among databases, online tools, and methods of data acquisition and analysis. For maize researchers, the numbe...

  6. The AMMA database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boichard, Jean-Luc; Brissebrat, Guillaume; Cloche, Sophie; Eymard, Laurence; Fleury, Laurence; Mastrorillo, Laurence; Moulaye, Oumarou; Ramage, Karim

    2010-05-01

    The AMMA project includes aircraft, ground-based and ocean measurements, an intensive use of satellite data and diverse modelling studies. Therefore, the AMMA database aims at storing a great amount and a large variety of data, and at providing the data as rapidly and safely as possible to the AMMA research community. In order to stimulate the exchange of information and collaboration between researchers from different disciplines or using different tools, the database provides a detailed description of the products and uses standardized formats. The AMMA database contains: - AMMA field campaigns datasets; - historical data in West Africa from 1850 (operational networks and previous scientific programs); - satellite products from past and future satellites, (re-)mapped on a regular latitude/longitude grid and stored in NetCDF format (CF Convention); - model outputs from atmosphere or ocean operational (re-)analysis and forecasts, and from research simulations. The outputs are processed as the satellite products are. Before accessing the data, any user has to sign the AMMA data and publication policy. This chart only covers the use of data in the framework of scientific objectives and categorically excludes the redistribution of data to third parties and the usage for commercial applications. Some collaboration between data producers and users, and the mention of the AMMA project in any publication is also required. The AMMA database and the associated on-line tools have been fully developed and are managed by two teams in France (IPSL Database Centre, Paris and OMP, Toulouse). Users can access data of both data centres using an unique web portal. This website is composed of different modules : - Registration: forms to register, read and sign the data use chart when an user visits for the first time - Data access interface: friendly tool allowing to build a data extraction request by selecting various criteria like location, time, parameters... The request can

  7. DataBase on demand

    CERN Document Server

    Aparicio, Ruben Gaspar; Coterillo Coz, I

    2012-01-01

    At CERN a number of key database applications are running on user-managed MySQL database services. The database on demand project was born out of an idea to provide the CERN user community with an environment to develop and run database services outside of the actual centralised Oracle based database services. The Database on Demand (DBoD) empowers the user to perform certain actions that had been traditionally done by database administrators, DBA's, providing an enterprise platform for database applications. It also allows the CERN user community to run different database engines, e.g. presently open community version of MySQL and single instance Oracle database server. This article describes a technology approach to face this challenge, a service level agreement, the SLA that the project provides, and an evolution of possible scenarios.

  8. DataBase on Demand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspar Aparicio, R.; Gomez, D.; Coterillo Coz, I.; Wojcik, D.

    2012-12-01

    At CERN a number of key database applications are running on user-managed MySQL database services. The database on demand project was born out of an idea to provide the CERN user community with an environment to develop and run database services outside of the actual centralised Oracle based database services. The Database on Demand (DBoD) empowers the user to perform certain actions that had been traditionally done by database administrators, DBA's, providing an enterprise platform for database applications. It also allows the CERN user community to run different database engines, e.g. presently open community version of MySQL and single instance Oracle database server. This article describes a technology approach to face this challenge, a service level agreement, the SLA that the project provides, and an evolution of possible scenarios.

  9. Hadoop NoSQL database

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The theme of this work is database storage Hadoop Hbase. The main goal is to demonstrate the principles of its function and show the main usage. The entire text assumes that the reader is already familiar with the basic principles of NoSQL databases. The theoretical part briefly describes the basic concepts of databases then mostly covers Hadoop and its properties. This work also includes the practical part which describes how to install a database repository and illustrates basic database op...

  10. The Database State Machine Approach

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    Database replication protocols have historically been built on top of distributed database systems, and have consequently been designed and implemented using distributed transactional mechanisms, such as atomic commitment. We present the Database State Machine approach, a new way to deal with database replication in a cluster of servers. This approach relies on a powerful atomic broadcast primitive to propagate transactions between database servers, and alleviates the need for atomic comm...

  11. Identification of minimal eukaryotic introns through GeneBase, a user-friendly tool for parsing the NCBI Gene databank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piovesan, Allison; Caracausi, Maria; Ricci, Marco; Strippoli, Pierluigi; Vitale, Lorenza; Pelleri, Maria Chiara

    2015-12-01

    We have developed GeneBase, a full parser of the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) Gene database, which generates a fully structured local database with an intuitive user-friendly graphic interface for personal computers. Features of all the annotated eukaryotic genes are accessible through three main software tables, including for each entry details such as the gene summary, the gene exon/intron structure and the specific Gene Ontology attributions. The structuring of the data, the creation of additional calculation fields and the integration with nucleotide sequences allow users to make many types of comparisons and calculations that are useful for data retrieval and analysis. We provide an original example analysis of the existing introns across all the available species, through which the classic biological problem of the 'minimal intron' may find a solution using available data. Based on all currently available data, we can define the shortest known eukaryotic GT-AG intron length, setting the physical limit at the 30 base pair intron belonging to the human MST1L gene. This 'model intron' will shed light on the minimal requirement elements of recognition used for conventional splicing functioning. Remarkably, this size is indeed consistent with the sum of the splicing consensus sequence lengths.

  12. Searching for first-degree familial relationships in California's offender DNA database: validation of a likelihood ratio-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Steven P; Timken, Mark D; Piucci, Matthew L; Sims, Gary A; Greenwald, Michael A; Weigand, James J; Konzak, Kenneth C; Buoncristiani, Martin R

    2011-11-01

    A validation study was performed to measure the effectiveness of using a likelihood ratio-based approach to search for possible first-degree familial relationships (full-sibling and parent-child) by comparing an evidence autosomal short tandem repeat (STR) profile to California's ∼1,000,000-profile State DNA Index System (SDIS) database. Test searches used autosomal STR and Y-STR profiles generated for 100 artificial test families. When the test sample and the first-degree relative in the database were characterized at the 15 Identifiler(®) (Applied Biosystems(®), Foster City, CA) STR loci, the search procedure included 96% of the fathers and 72% of the full-siblings. When the relative profile was limited to the 13 Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) core loci, the search procedure included 93% of the fathers and 61% of the full-siblings. These results, combined with those of functional tests using three real families, support the effectiveness of this tool. Based upon these results, the validated approach was implemented as a key, pragmatic and demonstrably practical component of the California Department of Justice's Familial Search Program. An investigative lead created through this process recently led to an arrest in the Los Angeles Grim Sleeper serial murders.

  13. The Danish Melanoma Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hölmich Lr

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Lisbet Rosenkrantz Hölmich,1 Siri Klausen,2 Eva Spaun,3 Grethe Schmidt,4 Dorte Gad,5 Inge Marie Svane,6,7 Henrik Schmidt,8 Henrik Frank Lorentzen,9 Else Helene Ibfelt10 1Department of Plastic Surgery, 2Department of Pathology, Herlev-Gentofte Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Herlev, 3Institute of Pathology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, 4Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Breast Surgery and Burns, Rigshospitalet – Glostrup, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, 5Department of Plastic Surgery, Odense University Hospital, Odense, 6Center for Cancer Immune Therapy, Department of Hematology, 7Department of Oncology, Herlev-Gentofte Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Herlev, 8Department of Oncology, 9Department of Dermatology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, 10Registry Support Centre (East – Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Research Centre for Prevention and Health, Glostrup – Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Glostrup, Denmark Aim of database: The aim of the database is to monitor and improve the treatment and survival of melanoma patients.Study population: All Danish patients with cutaneous melanoma and in situ melanomas must be registered in the Danish Melanoma Database (DMD. In 2014, 2,525 patients with invasive melanoma and 780 with in situ tumors were registered. The coverage is currently 93% compared with the Danish Pathology Register.Main variables: The main variables include demographic, clinical, and pathological characteristics, including Breslow’s tumor thickness, ± ulceration, mitoses, and tumor–node–metastasis stage. Information about the date of diagnosis, treatment, type of surgery, including safety margins, results of lymphoscintigraphy in patients for whom this was indicated (tumors > T1a, results of sentinel node biopsy, pathological evaluation hereof, and follow-up information, including recurrence, nature, and treatment hereof is registered. In case of death, the cause and date

  14. Database Description - DMPD | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us DMPD Database Description General information of database Database name DMPD Alternative nam...e Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database DOI 10.18908/lsdba.nbdc00558-000 Creator Creator Name: Masao Naga...ty of Tokyo 4-6-1 Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 Tel: +81-3-5449-5615 FAX: +83-3-5449-5442 E-mail: Database...606 Taxonomy Name: Mammalia Taxonomy ID: 40674 Database description DMPD collects... pathway models of transcriptional regulation and signal transduction in CSML format for dymamic simulation base

  15. Exploring human disease using the Rat Genome Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Shimoyama

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Rattus norvegicus, the laboratory rat, has been a crucial model for studies of the environmental and genetic factors associated with human diseases for over 150 years. It is the primary model organism for toxicology and pharmacology studies, and has features that make it the model of choice in many complex-disease studies. Since 1999, the Rat Genome Database (RGD; http://rgd.mcw.edu has been the premier resource for genomic, genetic, phenotype and strain data for the laboratory rat. The primary role of RGD is to curate rat data and validate orthologous relationships with human and mouse genes, and make these data available for incorporation into other major databases such as NCBI, Ensembl and UniProt. RGD also provides official nomenclature for rat genes, quantitative trait loci, strains and genetic markers, as well as unique identifiers. The RGD team adds enormous value to these basic data elements through functional and disease annotations, the analysis and visual presentation of pathways, and the integration of phenotype measurement data for strains used as disease models. Because much of the rat research community focuses on understanding human diseases, RGD provides a number of datasets and software tools that allow users to easily explore and make disease-related connections among these datasets. RGD also provides comprehensive human and mouse data for comparative purposes, illustrating the value of the rat in translational research. This article introduces RGD and its suite of tools and datasets to researchers – within and beyond the rat community – who are particularly interested in leveraging rat-based insights to understand human diseases.

  16. Exploring human disease using the Rat Genome Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laulederkind, Stanley J. F.; De Pons, Jeff; Nigam, Rajni; Smith, Jennifer R.; Tutaj, Marek; Petri, Victoria; Hayman, G. Thomas; Wang, Shur-Jen; Ghiasvand, Omid; Thota, Jyothi; Dwinell, Melinda R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rattus norvegicus, the laboratory rat, has been a crucial model for studies of the environmental and genetic factors associated with human diseases for over 150 years. It is the primary model organism for toxicology and pharmacology studies, and has features that make it the model of choice in many complex-disease studies. Since 1999, the Rat Genome Database (RGD; http://rgd.mcw.edu) has been the premier resource for genomic, genetic, phenotype and strain data for the laboratory rat. The primary role of RGD is to curate rat data and validate orthologous relationships with human and mouse genes, and make these data available for incorporation into other major databases such as NCBI, Ensembl and UniProt. RGD also provides official nomenclature for rat genes, quantitative trait loci, strains and genetic markers, as well as unique identifiers. The RGD team adds enormous value to these basic data elements through functional and disease annotations, the analysis and visual presentation of pathways, and the integration of phenotype measurement data for strains used as disease models. Because much of the rat research community focuses on understanding human diseases, RGD provides a number of datasets and software tools that allow users to easily explore and make disease-related connections among these datasets. RGD also provides comprehensive human and mouse data for comparative purposes, illustrating the value of the rat in translational research. This article introduces RGD and its suite of tools and datasets to researchers – within and beyond the rat community – who are particularly interested in leveraging rat-based insights to understand human diseases. PMID:27736745

  17. Protein Model Database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fidelis, K; Adzhubej, A; Kryshtafovych, A; Daniluk, P

    2005-02-23

    The phenomenal success of the genome sequencing projects reveals the power of completeness in revolutionizing biological science. Currently it is possible to sequence entire organisms at a time, allowing for a systemic rather than fractional view of their organization and the various genome-encoded functions. There is an international plan to move towards a similar goal in the area of protein structure. This will not be achieved by experiment alone, but rather by a combination of efforts in crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, and computational modeling. Only a small fraction of structures are expected to be identified experimentally, the remainder to be modeled. Presently there is no organized infrastructure to critically evaluate and present these data to the biological community. The goal of the Protein Model Database project is to create such infrastructure, including (1) public database of theoretically derived protein structures; (2) reliable annotation of protein model quality, (3) novel structure analysis tools, and (4) access to the highest quality modeling techniques available.

  18. Search Databases and Statistics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Refsgaard, Jan C; Munk, Stephanie; Jensen, Lars J

    2016-01-01

    the vast amounts of raw data. This task is tackled by computational tools implementing algorithms that match the experimental data to databases, providing the user with lists for downstream analysis. Several platforms for such automated interpretation of mass spectrometric data have been developed, each...... having strengths and weaknesses that must be considered for the individual needs. These are reviewed in this chapter. Equally critical for generating highly confident output datasets is the application of sound statistical criteria to limit the inclusion of incorrect peptide identifications from database...... searches. Additionally, careful filtering and use of appropriate statistical tests on the output datasets affects the quality of all downstream analyses and interpretation of the data. Our considerations and general practices on these aspects of phosphoproteomics data processing are presented here....

  19. Geologic Field Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina Hribernik

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the paper is to present the field data relational database, which was compiled from data, gathered during thirty years of fieldwork on the Basic Geologic Map of Slovenia in scale1:100.000. The database was created using MS Access software. The MS Access environment ensures its stability and effective operation despite changing, searching, and updating the data. It also enables faster and easier user-friendly access to the field data. Last but not least, in the long-term, with the data transferred into the GISenvironment, it will provide the basis for the sound geologic information system that will satisfy a broad spectrum of geologists’ needs.

  20. ARTI Refrigerant Database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calm, J.M.

    1992-11-09

    The database provides bibliographic citations and abstracts for publications that may be useful in research and design of air- conditioning and refrigeration equipment. The database identifies sources of specific information on R-32, R-123, R-124, R-125, R-134, R-134a, R-141b, R-142b, R-143a, R-152a, R-245ca, R-290 (propane), R- 717 (ammonia), ethers, and others as well as azeotropic and zeotropic and zeotropic blends of these fluids. It addresses lubricants including alkylbenzene, polyalkylene glycol, ester, and other synthetics as well as mineral oils. It also references documents on compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with metals, plastics, elastomers, motor insulation, and other materials used in refrigerant circuits. A computerized version is available that includes retrieval software.

  1. The DIPPR® databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, G. H.

    1996-01-01

    The Design Institute for Physical Property Data® (DIPPR), one of the Sponsored Research groups of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE), has been in existence for 15 years and has supported a total of 14 projects, some completed, some ongoing. Four of these projects are “database” projects for which the primary product is a database of carefully evaluated property data. These projects are Data Compilation; Evaluated Data on Mixtures; Environmental, Safety, and Health Data Compilation; and Difusivities and Thermal Properties of Polymer Solutions. This paper lists the existing DIPPR projects; discusses DIPPR's structure and modes of dissemination of results; describes DIPPR's supporters and its unique characteristics; and finally, discusses the origin, nature, and content of the four database projects.

  2. What is a lexicographical database?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergenholtz, Henning; Skovgård Nielsen, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    project. Such cooperation will reach the highest level of success if the lexicographer has at least a basic knowledge of the topic presented in this paper: What is a database? This type of knowledge is also needed when the lexicographer describes an ongoing or a finished project. In this article, we......50 years ago, no lexicographer used a database in the work process. Today, almost all dictionary projects incorporate databases. In our opinion, the optimal lexicographical database should be planned in cooperation between a lexicographer and a database specialist in each specific lexicographic...... provide the description of this type of cooperation, using the most important theoretical terms relevant in the planning of a database. It will be made clear that a lexicographical database is like any other database. The only difference is that an optimal lexicographical database is constructed to fulfil...

  3. ARTI refrigerant database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calm, J.M.

    1996-11-15

    The Refrigerant Database is an information system on alternative refrigerants, associated lubricants, and their use in air conditioning and refrigeration. It consolidates and facilitates access to property, compatibility, environmental, safety, application and other information. It provides corresponding information on older refrigerants, to assist manufacturers and those using alternative refrigerants, to make comparisons and determine differences. The underlying purpose is to accelerate phase out of chemical compounds of environmental concern.

  4. Mathematical Foundations of Databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-15

    34Spreadsheet Histories , Object- Histories , and Projection Simulation." ICDT 󈨜 2nd International Conference on Database Theory Bruges , Belgium, August...dissertation. The first topic, "Properties of Spreadsheet Histories ", formalized the use of spreadsheets for modelling the history of accounting-like...describing in more detail the results obtained. The first report, "Properties of Spreadsheet Histories ", is by Stephen Kurtzman. In this report, some

  5. ARTI refrigerant database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calm, J.M.

    1996-07-01

    The Refrigerant Database is an information system on alternative refrigerants, associated lubricants, and their use in air conditioning and refrigeration. It consolidates and facilitates access to property, compatibility, environmental, safety, application and other information. It provides corresponding information on older refrigerants, to assist manufacturers and those using alternative refrigerants, to make comparisons and determine differences. The underlying purpose is to accelerate phase out of chemical compounds of environmental concern.

  6. ARTI refrigerant database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calm, J.M. [Calm (James M.), Great Falls, VA (United States)

    1999-01-01

    The Refrigerant Database is an information system on alternative refrigerants, associated lubricants, and their use in air conditioning and refrigeration. It consolidates and facilities access to property, compatibility, environmental, safety, application and other information. It provides corresponding information on older refrigerants, to assist manufacturers and those using alternative refrigerants, to make comparisons and determine differences. The underlying purpose is to accelerate phase out of chemical compounds of environmental concern.

  7. Real Time Baseball Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukue, Yasuhiro

    The author describes the system outline, features and operations of "Nikkan Sports Realtime Basaball Database" which was developed and operated by Nikkan Sports Shimbun, K. K. The system enables to input numerical data of professional baseball games as they proceed simultaneously, and execute data updating at realtime, just-in-time. Other than serving as supporting tool for prepareing newspapers it is also available for broadcasting media, general users through NTT dial Q2 and others.

  8. Modeling Digital Video Database

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The main purpose of the model is to present how the UnifiedModeling L anguage (UML) can be used for modeling digital video database system (VDBS). It demonstrates the modeling process that can be followed during the analysis phase of complex applications. In order to guarantee the continuity mapping of the mo dels, the authors propose some suggestions to transform the use case diagrams in to an object diagram, which is one of the main diagrams for the next development phases.

  9. Austrian Social Security Database

    OpenAIRE

    Zweimüller, Josef; Winter-Ebmer, Rudolf; Lalive, Rafael; Kuhn, Andreas; Wuellrich, Jean-Philippe; Ruf, Oliver; Büchi, Simon

    2009-01-01

    The Austrian Social Security Database (ASSD) is a matched firm-worker data set, which records the labor market history of almost 11 million individuals from January 1972 to April 2007. Moreover, more than 2.2 million firms can be identified. The individual labor market histories are described in the follow- ing dimensions: very detailed daily labor market states and yearly earnings at the firm-worker level, together with a limited set of demographic characteris- tics. Additionally the ASSD pr...

  10. The Cambridge Structural Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groom, Colin R; Bruno, Ian J; Lightfoot, Matthew P; Ward, Suzanna C

    2016-04-01

    The Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) contains a complete record of all published organic and metal-organic small-molecule crystal structures. The database has been in operation for over 50 years and continues to be the primary means of sharing structural chemistry data and knowledge across disciplines. As well as structures that are made public to support scientific articles, it includes many structures published directly as CSD Communications. All structures are processed both computationally and by expert structural chemistry editors prior to entering the database. A key component of this processing is the reliable association of the chemical identity of the structure studied with the experimental data. This important step helps ensure that data is widely discoverable and readily reusable. Content is further enriched through selective inclusion of additional experimental data. Entries are available to anyone through free CSD community web services. Linking services developed and maintained by the CCDC, combined with the use of standard identifiers, facilitate discovery from other resources. Data can also be accessed through CCDC and third party software applications and through an application programming interface.

  11. The GLENDAMA Database

    CERN Document Server

    Goicoechea, Luis J; Gil-Merino, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    This is the first version (v1) of the Gravitational LENses and DArk MAtter (GLENDAMA) database accessible at http://grupos.unican.es/glendama/database. The new database contains more than 6000 ready-to-use (processed) astronomical frames corresponding to 15 objects that fall into three classes: (1) lensed QSO (8 objects), (2) binary QSO (3 objects), and (3) accretion-dominated radio-loud QSO (4 objects). Data are also divided into two categories: freely available and available upon request. The second category includes observations related to our yet unpublished analyses. Although this v1 of the GLENDAMA archive incorporates an X-ray monitoring campaign for a lensed QSO in 2010, the rest of frames (imaging, polarimetry and spectroscopy) were taken with NUV, visible and NIR facilities over the period 1999$-$2014. The monitorings and follow-up observations of lensed QSOs are key tools for discussing the accretion flow in distant QSOs, the redshift and structure of intervening (lensing) galaxies, and the physica...

  12. ARTI refrigerant database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calm, J.M.

    1997-02-01

    The Refrigerant Database is an information system on alternative refrigerants, associated lubricants, and their use in air conditioning and refrigeration. It consolidates and facilitates access to property, compatibility, environmental, safety, application and other information. It provides corresponding information on older refrigerants, to assist manufacturers and those using alterative refrigerants, to make comparisons and determine differences. The underlying purpose is to accelerate phase out of chemical compounds of environmental concern. The database provides bibliographic citations and abstracts for publications that may be useful in research and design of air-conditioning and refrigeration equipment. The complete documents are not included, though some may be added at a later date. The database identifies sources of specific information on various refrigerants. It addresses lubricants including alkylbenzene, polyalkylene glycol, polyolester, and other synthetics as well as mineral oils. It also references documents addressing compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with metals, plastics, elastomers, motor insulation, and other materials used in refrigerant circuits. Incomplete citations or abstracts are provided for some documents. They are included to accelerate availability of the information and will be completed or replaced in future updates.

  13. ARTI Refrigerant Database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cain, J.M. (Calm (James M.), Great Falls, VA (United States))

    1993-04-30

    The Refrigerant Database consolidates and facilitates access to information to assist industry in developing equipment using alternative refrigerants. The underlying purpose is to accelerate phase out of chemical compounds of environmental concern. The database provides bibliographic citations and abstracts for publications that may be useful in research and design of air-conditioning and refrigeration equipment. The complete documents are not included. The database identifies sources of specific information on R-32, R-123, R-124, R-125, R-134, R-134a, R-141b, R-142b, R-143a, R-152a, R-245ca, R-290 (propane), R-717 (ammonia), ethers, and others as well as azeotropic and zeotropic blends of these fluids. It addresses lubricants including alkylbenzene, polyalkylene glycol, ester, and other synthetics as well as mineral oils. It also references documents addressing compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with metals, plastics, elastomers, motor insulation, and other materials used in refrigerant circuits. Incomplete citations or abstracts are provided for some documents to accelerate availability of the information and will be completed or replaced in future updates.

  14. ARTI Refrigerant Database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cain, J.M. [Calm (James M.), Great Falls, VA (United States)

    1993-04-30

    The Refrigerant Database consolidates and facilitates access to information to assist industry in developing equipment using alternative refrigerants. The underlying purpose is to accelerate phase out of chemical compounds of environmental concern. The database provides bibliographic citations and abstracts for publications that may be useful in research and design of air-conditioning and refrigeration equipment. The complete documents are not included. The database identifies sources of specific information on R-32, R-123, R-124, R-125, R-134, R-134a, R-141b, R-142b, R-143a, R-152a, R-245ca, R-290 (propane), R-717 (ammonia), ethers, and others as well as azeotropic and zeotropic blends of these fluids. It addresses lubricants including alkylbenzene, polyalkylene glycol, ester, and other synthetics as well as mineral oils. It also references documents addressing compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with metals, plastics, elastomers, motor insulation, and other materials used in refrigerant circuits. Incomplete citations or abstracts are provided for some documents to accelerate availability of the information and will be completed or replaced in future updates.

  15. ARTI refrigerant database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calm, J.M. [Calm (James M.), Great Falls, VA (United States)

    1998-08-01

    The Refrigerant Database is an information system on alternative refrigerants, associated lubricants, and their use in air conditioning and refrigeration. It consolidates and facilitates access to property, compatibility, environmental, safety, application and other information. It provides corresponding information on older refrigerants, to assist manufactures and those using alternative refrigerants, to make comparisons and determine differences. The underlying purpose is to accelerate phase out of chemical compounds of environmental concern. The database provides bibliographic citations and abstracts for publications that may be useful in research and design of air-conditioning and refrigeration equipment. The complete documents are not included, though some may be added at a later date. The database identifies sources of specific information on many refrigerants including propane, ammonia, water, carbon dioxide, propylene, ethers, and others as well as azeotropic and zeotropic blends of these fluids. It addresses lubricants including alkylbenzene, polyalkylene glycol, polyolester, and other synthetics as well as mineral oils. It also references documents addressing compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with metals, plastics, elastomers, motor insulation, and other materials used in refrigerant circuits. Incomplete citations or abstracts are provided for some documents. They are included to accelerate availability of the information and will be completed or replaced in future updates.

  16. GeneBase 1.1: a tool to summarize data from NCBI gene datasets and its application to an update of human gene statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piovesan, Allison; Caracausi, Maria; Antonaros, Francesca; Pelleri, Maria Chiara; Vitale, Lorenza

    2016-01-01

    We release GeneBase 1.1, a local tool with a graphical interface useful for parsing, structuring and indexing data from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) Gene data bank. Compared to its predecessor GeneBase (1.0), GeneBase 1.1 now allows dynamic calculation and summarization in terms of median, mean, standard deviation and total for many quantitative parameters associated with genes, gene transcripts and gene features (exons, introns, coding sequences, untranslated regions). GeneBase 1.1 thus offers the opportunity to perform analyses of the main gene structure parameters also following the search for any set of genes with the desired characteristics, allowing unique functionalities not provided by the NCBI Gene itself. In order to show the potential of our tool for local parsing, structuring and dynamic summarizing of publicly available databases for data retrieval, analysis and testing of biological hypotheses, we provide as a sample application a revised set of statistics for human nuclear genes, gene transcripts and gene features. In contrast with previous estimations strongly underestimating the length of human genes, a ‘mean’ human protein-coding gene is 67 kbp long, has eleven 309 bp long exons and ten 6355 bp long introns. Median, mean and extreme values are provided for many other features offering an updated reference source for human genome studies, data useful to set parameters for bioinformatic tools and interesting clues to the biomedical meaning of the gene features themselves. Database URL: http://apollo11.isto.unibo.it/software/ PMID:28025344

  17. GeneBase 1.1: a tool to summarize data from NCBI gene datasets and its application to an update of human gene statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piovesan, Allison; Caracausi, Maria; Antonaros, Francesca; Pelleri, Maria Chiara; Vitale, Lorenza

    2016-01-01

    We release GeneBase 1.1, a local tool with a graphical interface useful for parsing, structuring and indexing data from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) Gene data bank. Compared to its predecessor GeneBase (1.0), GeneBase 1.1 now allows dynamic calculation and summarization in terms of median, mean, standard deviation and total for many quantitative parameters associated with genes, gene transcripts and gene features (exons, introns, coding sequences, untranslated regions). GeneBase 1.1 thus offers the opportunity to perform analyses of the main gene structure parameters also following the search for any set of genes with the desired characteristics, allowing unique functionalities not provided by the NCBI Gene itself. In order to show the potential of our tool for local parsing, structuring and dynamic summarizing of publicly available databases for data retrieval, analysis and testing of biological hypotheses, we provide as a sample application a revised set of statistics for human nuclear genes, gene transcripts and gene features. In contrast with previous estimations strongly underestimating the length of human genes, a 'mean' human protein-coding gene is 67 kbp long, has eleven 309 bp long exons and ten 6355 bp long introns. Median, mean and extreme values are provided for many other features offering an updated reference source for human genome studies, data useful to set parameters for bioinformatic tools and interesting clues to the biomedical meaning of the gene features themselves.Database URL: http://apollo11.isto.unibo.it/software/.

  18. Download - Trypanosomes Database | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available [ Credits ] BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Contact us ...earch and download Downlaod via FTP Joomla SEF URLs by Artio About This Database Database Description Download License Update History

  19. The Danish Testicular Cancer database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugaard, Gedske; Kier, Maria Gry Gundgaard; Bandak, Mikkel

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The nationwide Danish Testicular Cancer database consists of a retrospective research database (DaTeCa database) and a prospective clinical database (Danish Multidisciplinary Cancer Group [DMCG] DaTeCa database). The aim is to improve the quality of care for patients with testicular cancer (TC......) in Denmark, that is, by identifying risk factors for relapse, toxicity related to treatment, and focusing on late effects. STUDY POPULATION: All Danish male patients with a histologically verified germ cell cancer diagnosis in the Danish Pathology Registry are included in the DaTeCa databases. Data...

  20. Multilevel security for relational databases

    CERN Document Server

    Faragallah, Osama S; El-Samie, Fathi E Abd

    2014-01-01

    Concepts of Database Security Database Concepts Relational Database Security Concepts Access Control in Relational Databases      Discretionary Access Control      Mandatory Access Control      Role-Based Access Control Work Objectives Book Organization Basic Concept of Multilevel Database Security IntroductionMultilevel Database Relations Polyinstantiation      Invisible Polyinstantiation      Visible Polyinstantiation      Types of Polyinstantiation      Architectural Consideration

  1. Surgical research using national databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alluri, Ram K; Leland, Hyuma; Heckmann, Nathanael

    2016-10-01

    Recent changes in healthcare and advances in technology have increased the use of large-volume national databases in surgical research. These databases have been used to develop perioperative risk stratification tools, assess postoperative complications, calculate costs, and investigate numerous other topics across multiple surgical specialties. The results of these studies contain variable information but are subject to unique limitations. The use of large-volume national databases is increasing in popularity, and thorough understanding of these databases will allow for a more sophisticated and better educated interpretation of studies that utilize such databases. This review will highlight the composition, strengths, and weaknesses of commonly used national databases in surgical research.

  2. The Danish Fetal Medicine database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekelund, Charlotte; Kopp, Tine Iskov; Tabor, Ann

    2016-01-01

    trimester ultrasound scan performed at all public hospitals in Denmark are registered in the database. Main variables/descriptive data: Data on maternal characteristics, ultrasonic, and biochemical variables are continuously sent from the fetal medicine units’Astraia databases to the central database via...... analyses are sent to the database. Conclusion: It has been possible to establish a fetal medicine database, which monitors first-trimester screening for chromosomal abnormalities and second-trimester screening for major fetal malformations with the input from already collected data. The database...

  3. SmallSat Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petropulos, Dolores; Bittner, David; Murawski, Robert; Golden, Bert

    2015-01-01

    The SmallSat has an unrealized potential in both the private industry and in the federal government. Currently over 70 companies, 50 universities and 17 governmental agencies are involved in SmallSat research and development. In 1994, the U.S. Army Missile and Defense mapped the moon using smallSat imagery. Since then Smart Phones have introduced this imagery to the people of the world as diverse industries watched this trend. The deployment cost of smallSats is also greatly reduced compared to traditional satellites due to the fact that multiple units can be deployed in a single mission. Imaging payloads have become more sophisticated, smaller and lighter. In addition, the growth of small technology obtained from private industries has led to the more widespread use of smallSats. This includes greater revisit rates in imagery, significantly lower costs, the ability to update technology more frequently and the ability to decrease vulnerability of enemy attacks. The popularity of smallSats show a changing mentality in this fast paced world of tomorrow. What impact has this created on the NASA communication networks now and in future years? In this project, we are developing the SmallSat Relational Database which can support a simulation of smallSats within the NASA SCaN Compatability Environment for Networks and Integrated Communications (SCENIC) Modeling and Simulation Lab. The NASA Space Communications and Networks (SCaN) Program can use this modeling to project required network support needs in the next 10 to 15 years. The SmallSat Rational Database could model smallSats just as the other SCaN databases model the more traditional larger satellites, with a few exceptions. One being that the smallSat Database is designed to be built-to-order. The SmallSat database holds various hardware configurations that can be used to model a smallSat. It will require significant effort to develop as the research material can only be populated by hand to obtain the unique data

  4. Freshwater Biological Traits Database (Final Report)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA announced the release of the final report, Freshwater Biological Traits Database. This report discusses the development of a database of freshwater biological traits. The database combines several existing traits databases into an online format. The database is also...

  5. Stemcell Information: SKIP000812 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available pes. Yamashita A, Morioka M, Kishi H, Kimura T, Yahara Y, Okada M, Fujita K, Sawai H, Ikegawa S, Tsumaki N Nature 2014 513 7519 507-11 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25231866 ...

  6. Matching curated genome databases: a non trivial task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labedan Bernard

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Curated databases of completely sequenced genomes have been designed independently at the NCBI (RefSeq and EBI (Genome Reviews to cope with non-standard annotation found in the version of the sequenced genome that has been published by databanks GenBank/EMBL/DDBJ. These curation attempts were expected to review the annotations and to improve their pertinence when using them to annotate newly released genome sequences by homology to previously annotated genomes. However, we observed that such an uncoordinated effort has two unwanted consequences. First, it is not trivial to map the protein identifiers of the same sequence in both databases. Secondly, the two reannotated versions of the same genome differ at the level of their structural annotation. Results Here, we propose CorBank, a program devised to provide cross-referencing protein identifiers no matter what the level of identity is found between their matching sequences. Approximately 98% of the 1,983,258 amino acid sequences are matching, allowing instantaneous retrieval of their respective cross-references. CorBank further allows detecting any differences between the independently curated versions of the same genome. We found that the RefSeq and Genome Reviews versions are perfectly matching for only 50 of the 641 complete genomes we have analyzed. In all other cases there are differences occurring at the level of the coding sequence (CDS, and/or in the total number of CDS in the respective version of the same genome. CorBank is freely accessible at http://www.corbank.u-psud.fr. The CorBank site contains also updated publication of the exhaustive results obtained by comparing RefSeq and Genome Reviews versions of each genome. Accordingly, this web site allows easy search of cross-references between RefSeq, Genome Reviews, and UniProt, for either a single CDS or a whole replicon. Conclusion CorBank is very efficient in rapid detection of the numerous differences existing

  7. PhyloFinder: An intelligent search engine for phylogenetic tree databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bansal Mukul S

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bioinformatic tools are needed to store and access the rapidly growing phylogenetic data. These tools should enable users to identify existing phylogenetic trees containing a specified taxon or set of taxa and to compare a specified phylogenetic hypothesis to existing phylogenetic trees. Results PhyloFinder is an intelligent search engine for phylogenetic databases that we have implemented using trees from TreeBASE. It enables taxonomic queries, in which it identifies trees in the database containing the exact name of the query taxon and/or any synonymous taxon names, and it provides spelling suggestions for the query when there is no match. Additionally, PhyloFinder can identify trees containing descendants or direct ancestors of the query taxon. PhyloFinder also performs phylogenetic queries, in which it identifies trees that contain the query tree or topologies that are similar to the query tree. Conclusion PhyloFinder can enhance the utility of any tree database by providing tools for both taxonomic and phylogenetic queries as well as visualization tools that highlight the query results and provide links to NCBI and TBMap. An implementation of PhyloFinder using trees from TreeBASE is available from the web client application found in the availability and requirements section.

  8. Sentra : a database of signal transduction proteins for comparative genome analysis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Souza, M.; Glass, E. M.; Syed, M. H.; Zhang, Y.; Rodriguez, A.; Maltsev, N.; Galerpin, M. Y.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Univ. of Chicago; NIH

    2007-01-01

    Sentra (http://compbio.mcs.anl.gov/sentra), a database of signal transduction proteins encoded in completely sequenced prokaryotic genomes, has been updated to reflect recent advances in understanding signal transduction events on a whole-genome scale. Sentra consists of two principal components, a manually curated list of signal transduction proteins in 202 completely sequenced prokaryotic genomes and an automatically generated listing of predicted signaling proteins in 235 sequenced genomes that are awaiting manual curation. In addition to two-component histidine kinases and response regulators, the database now lists manually curated Ser/Thr/Tyr protein kinases and protein phosphatases, as well as adenylate and diguanylate cyclases and c-di-GMP phosphodiesterases, as defined in several recent reviews. All entries in Sentra are extensively annotated with relevant information from public databases (e.g. UniProt, KEGG, PDB and NCBI). Sentra's infrastructure was redesigned to support interactive cross-genome comparisons of signal transduction capabilities of prokaryotic organisms from a taxonomic and phenotypic perspective and in the framework of signal transduction pathways from KEGG. Sentra leverages the PUMA2 system to support interactive analysis and annotation of signal transduction proteins by the users.

  9. An EST database of the Caribbean fruit fly, Anastrepha suspensa (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirmala, Xavier; Schetelig, Marc F; Yu, Fahong; Handler, Alfred M

    2013-04-01

    Invasive tephritid fruit flies are a great threat to agriculture worldwide and warrant serious pest control measures. Molecular strategies that promote embryonic lethality in these agricultural pests are limited by the small amount of nucleotide sequence data available for tephritids. To increase the dataset for sequence mining, we generated an EST database by 454 sequencing of the caribfly, Anastrepha suspensa, a model tephritid pest. This database yielded 95,803 assembled sequences with 24% identified as independent transcripts. The percentage of caribfly sequences with hits to the closely related tephritid, Rhagoletis pomonella, transcriptome was higher (28%) than to Drosophila proteins/genes (18%) in NCBI. The database contained genes specifically expressed in embryos, genes involved in the cell death, sex-determination, and RNAi pathways, and transposable elements and microsatellites. This study significantly expands the nucleotide data available for caribflies and will be a valuable resource for gene isolation and genomic studies in tephritid insects. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. MRPrimerV: a database of PCR primers for RNA virus detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyerin; Kang, NaNa; An, KyuHyeon; Kim, Doyun; Koo, JaeHyung; Kim, Min-Soo

    2017-01-01

    Many infectious diseases are caused by viral infections, and in particular by RNA viruses such as MERS, Ebola and Zika. To understand viral disease, detection and identification of these viruses are essential. Although PCR is widely used for rapid virus identification due to its low cost and high sensitivity and specificity, very few online database resources have compiled PCR primers for RNA viruses. To effectively detect viruses, the MRPrimerV database (http://MRPrimerV.com) contains 152 380 247 PCR primer pairs for detection of 1818 viruses, covering 7144 coding sequences (CDSs), representing 100% of the RNA viruses in the most up-to-date NCBI RefSeq database. Due to rigorous similarity testing against all human and viral sequences, every primer in MRPrimerV is highly target-specific. Because MRPrimerV ranks CDSs by the penalty scores of their best primer, users need only use the first primer pair for a single-phase PCR or the first two primer pairs for two-phase PCR. Moreover, MRPrimerV provides the list of genome neighbors that can be detected using each primer pair, covering 22 192 variants of 532 RefSeq RNA viruses. We believe that the public availability of MRPrimerV will facilitate viral metagenomics studies aimed at evaluating the variability of viruses, as well as other scientific tasks. PMID:27899620

  11. A Case for Database Filesystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, P A; Hax, J C

    2009-05-13

    Data intensive science is offering new challenges and opportunities for Information Technology and traditional relational databases in particular. Database filesystems offer the potential to store Level Zero data and analyze Level 1 and Level 3 data within the same database system [2]. Scientific data is typically composed of both unstructured files and scalar data. Oracle SecureFiles is a new database filesystem feature in Oracle Database 11g that is specifically engineered to deliver high performance and scalability for storing unstructured or file data inside the Oracle database. SecureFiles presents the best of both the filesystem and the database worlds for unstructured content. Data stored inside SecureFiles can be queried or written at performance levels comparable to that of traditional filesystems while retaining the advantages of the Oracle database.

  12. Mobile Source Observation Database (MSOD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Mobile Source Observation Database (MSOD) is a relational database being developed by the Assessment and Standards Division (ASD) of the US Environmental...

  13. Brasilia’s Database Administrators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Adriana

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Database administration has gained an essential role in the management of new database technologies. Different data models are being created for supporting the enormous data volume, from the traditional relational database. These new models are called NoSQL (Not only SQL databases. The adoption of best practices and procedures, has become essential for the operation of database management systems. Thus, this paper investigates some of the techniques and tools used by database administrators. The study highlights features and particularities in databases within the area of Brasilia, the Capital of Brazil. The results point to which new technologies regarding database management are currently the most relevant, as well as the central issues in this area.

  14. Shark Mark Recapture Database (MRDBS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Shark Mark Recapture Database is a Cooperative Research Program database system used to keep multispecies mark-recapture information in a common format for...

  15. Categorical database generalization in GIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Y.

    2002-01-01

    Key words: Categorical database, categorical database generalization, Formal data structure, constraints, transformation unit, classification hierarchy, aggregation hierarchy, semantic similarity, data model, Delaunay triangulation

  16. Mobile Source Observation Database (MSOD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Mobile Source Observation Database (MSOD) is a relational database developed by the Assessment and Standards Division (ASD) of the U.S. EPA Office of Transportation and Air Quality (formerly the Office of Mobile Sources).

  17. Usability in Scientific Databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-Maria Suduc

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Usability, most often defined as the ease of use and acceptability of a system, affects the users' performance and their job satisfaction when working with a machine. Therefore, usability is a very important aspect which must be considered in the process of a system development. The paper presents several numerical data related to the history of the scientific research of the usability of information systems, as it is viewed in the information provided by three important scientific databases, Science Direct, ACM Digital Library and IEEE Xplore Digital Library, at different queries related to this field.

  18. Social Capital Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paldam, Martin; Svendsen, Gert Tinggaard

    2005-01-01

      This report has two purposes: The first purpose is to present our 4-page question­naire, which measures social capital. It is close to the main definitions of social capital and contains the most successful measures from the literature. Also it is easy to apply as discussed. The second purpose ...... is to present the social capital database we have collected for 21 countries using the question­naire. We do this by comparing the level of social capital in the countries covered. That is, the report compares the marginals from the 21 surveys....

  19. Social Capital Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paldam, Martin; Svendsen, Gert Tinggaard

    2005-01-01

      This report has two purposes: The first purpose is to present our 4-page question­naire, which measures social capital. It is close to the main definitions of social capital and contains the most successful measures from the literature. Also it is easy to apply as discussed. The second purpose ...... is to present the social capital database we have collected for 21 countries using the question­naire. We do this by comparing the level of social capital in the countries covered. That is, the report compares the marginals from the 21 surveys....

  20. Maize microarray annotation database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berger Dave K

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarray technology has matured over the past fifteen years into a cost-effective solution with established data analysis protocols for global gene expression profiling. The Agilent-016047 maize 44 K microarray was custom-designed from EST sequences, but only reporter sequences with EST accession numbers are publicly available. The following information is lacking: (a reporter - gene model match, (b number of reporters per gene model, (c potential for cross hybridization, (d sense/antisense orientation of reporters, (e position of reporter on B73 genome sequence (for eQTL studies, and (f functional annotations of genes represented by reporters. To address this, we developed a strategy to annotate the Agilent-016047 maize microarray, and built a publicly accessible annotation database. Description Genomic annotation of the 42,034 reporters on the Agilent-016047 maize microarray was based on BLASTN results of the 60-mer reporter sequences and their corresponding ESTs against the maize B73 RefGen v2 "Working Gene Set" (WGS predicted transcripts and the genome sequence. The agreement between the EST, WGS transcript and gDNA BLASTN results were used to assign the reporters into six genomic annotation groups. These annotation groups were: (i "annotation by sense gene model" (23,668 reporters, (ii "annotation by antisense gene model" (4,330; (iii "annotation by gDNA" without a WGS transcript hit (1,549; (iv "annotation by EST", in which case the EST from which the reporter was designed, but not the reporter itself, has a WGS transcript hit (3,390; (v "ambiguous annotation" (2,608; and (vi "inconclusive annotation" (6,489. Functional annotations of reporters were obtained by BLASTX and Blast2GO analysis of corresponding WGS transcripts against GenBank. The annotations are available in the Maize Microarray Annotation Database http://MaizeArrayAnnot.bi.up.ac.za/, as well as through a GBrowse annotation file that can be uploaded to

  1. The Danish Intensive Care Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Christian Fynbo; Møller, Morten Hylander; Nielsen, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The aim of this database is to improve the quality of care in Danish intensive care units (ICUs) by monitoring key domains of intensive care and to compare these with predefined standards. STUDY POPULATION: The Danish Intensive Care Database (DID) was established in 2007...

  2. Choosing among the physician databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, R H

    1988-04-01

    Prudent examination and knowing how to ask the "right questions" can enable hospital marketers and planners to find the most accurate and appropriate database. The author compares the comprehensive AMA physician database with the less expensive MEDEC database to determine their strengths and weaknesses.

  3. Clinical databases in physical therapy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swinkels, I.C.; Ende, C.H.M. van den; Bakker, D. de; Wees, P.J. van der; Hart, D.L.; Deutscher, D.; Bosch, W.J.H.M. van den; Dekker, J.

    2007-01-01

    Clinical databases in physical therapy provide increasing opportunities for research into physical therapy theory and practice. At present, information on the characteristics of existing databases is lacking. The purpose of this study was to identify clinical databases in which physical therapists r

  4. Clinical databases in physical therapy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swinkels, I.C.; Ende, C.H.M. van den; Bakker, D. de; Wees, P.J. van der; Hart, D.L.; Deutscher, D.; Bosch, W.J.H.M. van den; Dekker, J.

    2007-01-01

    Clinical databases in physical therapy provide increasing opportunities for research into physical therapy theory and practice. At present, information on the characteristics of existing databases is lacking. The purpose of this study was to identify clinical databases in which physical therapists

  5. Identification and correction of abnormal, incomplete and mispredicted proteins in public databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bányai László

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite significant improvements in computational annotation of genomes, sequences of abnormal, incomplete or incorrectly predicted genes and proteins remain abundant in public databases. Since the majority of incomplete, abnormal or mispredicted entries are not annotated as such, these errors seriously affect the reliability of these databases. Here we describe the MisPred approach that may provide an efficient means for the quality control of databases. The current version of the MisPred approach uses five distinct routines for identifying abnormal, incomplete or mispredicted entries based on the principle that a sequence is likely to be incorrect if some of its features conflict with our current knowledge about protein-coding genes and proteins: (i conflict between the predicted subcellular localization of proteins and the absence of the corresponding sequence signals; (ii presence of extracellular and cytoplasmic domains and the absence of transmembrane segments; (iii co-occurrence of extracellular and nuclear domains; (iv violation of domain integrity; (v chimeras encoded by two or more genes located on different chromosomes. Results Analyses of predicted EnsEMBL protein sequences of nine deuterostome (Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Rattus norvegicus, Monodelphis domestica, Gallus gallus, Xenopus tropicalis, Fugu rubripes, Danio rerio and Ciona intestinalis and two protostome species (Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster have revealed that the absence of expected signal peptides and violation of domain integrity account for the majority of mispredictions. Analyses of sequences predicted by NCBI's GNOMON annotation pipeline show that the rates of mispredictions are comparable to those of EnsEMBL. Interestingly, even the manually curated UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot dataset is contaminated with mispredicted or abnormal proteins, although to a much lesser extent than UniProtKB/TrEMBL or the EnsEMBL or GNOMON

  6. Asbestos Exposure Assessment Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcot, Divya K.

    2010-01-01

    Exposure to particular hazardous materials in a work environment is dangerous to the employees who work directly with or around the materials as well as those who come in contact with them indirectly. In order to maintain a national standard for safe working environments and protect worker health, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has set forth numerous precautionary regulations. NASA has been proactive in adhering to these regulations by implementing standards which are often stricter than regulation limits and administering frequent health risk assessments. The primary objective of this project is to create the infrastructure for an Asbestos Exposure Assessment Database specific to NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) which will compile all of the exposure assessment data into a well-organized, navigable format. The data includes Sample Types, Samples Durations, Crafts of those from whom samples were collected, Job Performance Requirements (JPR) numbers, Phased Contrast Microscopy (PCM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) results and qualifiers, Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), and names of industrial hygienists who performed the monitoring. This database will allow NASA to provide OSHA with specific information demonstrating that JSC s work procedures are protective enough to minimize the risk of future disease from the exposures. The data has been collected by the NASA contractors Computer Sciences Corporation (CSC) and Wyle Laboratories. The personal exposure samples were collected from devices worn by laborers working at JSC and by building occupants located in asbestos-containing buildings.

  7. Federated Spatial Databases and Interoperability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    It is a period of information explosion. Especially for spatialinfo rmation science, information can be acquired through many ways, such as man-mad e planet, aeroplane, laser, digital photogrammetry and so on. Spatial data source s are usually distributed and heterogeneous. Federated database is the best reso lution for the share and interoperation of spatial database. In this paper, the concepts of federated database and interoperability are introduced. Three hetero geneous kinds of spatial data, vector, image and DEM are used to create integrat ed database. A data model of federated spatial databases is given

  8. Genomic Databases for Crop Improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Edwards

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Genomics is playing an increasing role in plant breeding and this is accelerating with the rapid advances in genome technology. Translating the vast abundance of data being produced by genome technologies requires the development of custom bioinformatics tools and advanced databases. These range from large generic databases which hold specific data types for a broad range of species, to carefully integrated and curated databases which act as a resource for the improvement of specific crops. In this review, we outline some of the features of plant genome databases, identify specific resources for the improvement of individual crops and comment on the potential future direction of crop genome databases.

  9. Databases as an information service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, D. A.

    1983-01-01

    The relationship of databases to information services, and the range of information services users and their needs for information is explored and discussed. It is argued that for database information to be valuable to a broad range of users, it is essential that access methods be provided that are relatively unstructured and natural to information services users who are interested in the information contained in databases, but who are not willing to learn and use traditional structured query languages. Unless this ease of use of databases is considered in the design and application process, the potential benefits from using database systems may not be realized.

  10. Cloud Database Management System (CDBMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snehal B. Shende

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cloud database management system is a distributed database that delivers computing as a service. It is sharing of web infrastructure for resources, software and information over a network. The cloud is used as a storage location and database can be accessed and computed from anywhere. The large number of web application makes the use of distributed storage solution in order to scale up. It enables user to outsource the resource and services to the third party server. This paper include, the recent trend in cloud service based on database management system and offering it as one of the services in cloud. The advantages and disadvantages of database as a service will let you to decide either to use database as a service or not. This paper also will highlight the architecture of cloud based on database management system.

  11. The Danish Testicular Cancer database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugaard, Gedske; Kier, Maria Gry Gundgaard; Bandak, Mikkel

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The nationwide Danish Testicular Cancer database consists of a retrospective research database (DaTeCa database) and a prospective clinical database (Danish Multidisciplinary Cancer Group [DMCG] DaTeCa database). The aim is to improve the quality of care for patients with testicular cancer (TC......) in Denmark, that is, by identifying risk factors for relapse, toxicity related to treatment, and focusing on late effects. STUDY POPULATION: All Danish male patients with a histologically verified germ cell cancer diagnosis in the Danish Pathology Registry are included in the DaTeCa databases. Data...... survivors alive on October 2014 were invited to fill in this questionnaire including 160 validated questions. Collection of questionnaires is still ongoing. A biobank including blood/sputum samples for future genetic analyses has been established. Both samples related to DaTeCa and DMCG DaTeCa database...

  12. Danish Palliative Care Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Groenvold M

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Mogens Groenvold,1,2 Mathilde Adsersen,1 Maiken Bang Hansen1 1The Danish Palliative Care Database (DPD Secretariat, Research Unit, Department of Palliative Medicine, Bispebjerg Hospital, 2Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark Aims: The aim of the Danish Palliative Care Database (DPD is to monitor, evaluate, and improve the clinical quality of specialized palliative care (SPC (ie, the activity of hospital-based palliative care teams/departments and hospices in Denmark. Study population: The study population is all patients in Denmark referred to and/or in contact with SPC after January 1, 2010. Main variables: The main variables in DPD are data about referral for patients admitted and not admitted to SPC, type of the first SPC contact, clinical and sociodemographic factors, multidisciplinary conference, and the patient-reported European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionaire-Core-15-Palliative Care questionnaire, assessing health-related quality of life. The data support the estimation of currently five quality of care indicators, ie, the proportions of 1 referred and eligible patients who were actually admitted to SPC, 2 patients who waited <10 days before admission to SPC, 3 patients who died from cancer and who obtained contact with SPC, 4 patients who were screened with European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionaire-Core-15-Palliative Care at admission to SPC, and 5 patients who were discussed at a multidisciplinary conference. Descriptive data: In 2014, all 43 SPC units in Denmark reported their data to DPD, and all 9,434 cancer patients (100% referred to SPC were registered in DPD. In total, 41,104 unique cancer patients were registered in DPD during the 5 years 2010–2014. Of those registered, 96% had cancer. Conclusion: DPD is a national clinical quality database for SPC having clinically relevant variables and high data

  13. Analysis of newly established EST databases reveals similarities between heart regeneration in newt and fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weis Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The newt Notophthalmus viridescens possesses the remarkable ability to respond to cardiac damage by formation of new myocardial tissue. Surprisingly little is known about changes in gene activities that occur during the course of regeneration. To begin to decipher the molecular processes, that underlie restoration of functional cardiac tissue, we generated an EST database from regenerating newt hearts and compared the transcriptional profile of selected candidates with genes deregulated during zebrafish heart regeneration. Results A cDNA library of 100,000 cDNA clones was generated from newt hearts 14 days after ventricular injury. Sequencing of 11520 cDNA clones resulted in 2894 assembled contigs. BLAST searches revealed 1695 sequences with potential homology to sequences from the NCBI database. BLAST searches to TrEMBL and Swiss-Prot databases assigned 1116 proteins to Gene Ontology terms. We also identified a relatively large set of 174 ORFs, which are likely to be unique for urodele amphibians. Expression analysis of newt-zebrafish homologues confirmed the deregulation of selected genes during heart regeneration. Sequences, BLAST results and GO annotations were visualized in a relational web based database followed by grouping of identified proteins into clusters of GO Terms. Comparison of data from regenerating zebrafish hearts identified biological processes, which were uniformly overrepresented during cardiac regeneration in newt and zebrafish. Conclusion We concluded that heart regeneration in newts and zebrafish led to the activation of similar sets of genes, which suggests that heart regeneration in both species might follow similar principles. The design of the newly established newt EST database allows identification of molecular pathways important for heart regeneration.

  14. Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineeri

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2015-01-03

    Jan 3, 2015 ... Department of Agricultural Engineering, Landmark University, Omuaran, ... of operation was very low compared to the theoretical efficiency .... They produce food crops as well as cash .... efficiency and unit yield of the field.

  15. Applications of terahertz spectroscopy in biosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plusquellic, David F; Siegrist, Karen; Heilweil, Edwin J; Esenturk, Okan

    2007-12-03

    Terahertz (THz) spectroscopic investigations of condensed-phase biological samples are reviewed ranging from the simple crystalline forms of amino acids, carbohydrates and polypeptides to the more complex aqueous forms of small proteins, DNA and RNA. Vibrationally resolved studies of crystalline samples have revealed the exquisite sensitivity of THz modes to crystalline order, temperature, conformational form, peptide sequence and local solvate environment and have given unprecedented measures of the binding force constants and anharmonic character of the force fields, properties necessary to improve predictability but not readily obtainable using any other method. These studies have provided benchmark vibrational data on extended periodic structures for direct comparisons with classical (CHARMm) and quantum chemical (density functional theory) theories. For the larger amorphous and/or aqueous phase samples, the THz modes form a continuum-like absorption that arises because of the full accessibility to conformational space and/or the rapid time scale for inter-conversion in these environments. Despite severe absorption by liquid water, detailed investigations have uncovered the photo- and hydration-induced conformational flexibility of proteins, the solvent shell depth of the water/biomolecule boundary layers and the solvent reorientation dynamics occurring in these interfacial layers that occur on sub-picosecond time scales. As such, THz spectroscopy has enhanced and extended the accessibility to intermolecular forces, length- and timescales important in biological structure and activity.

  16. SEARCH FOR QUALITY IN BIOSYSTEM ENGINEERING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bülent Eker

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Today, engineering has become a disciplined field. The demand in food products caused the agricultural engineers to consider the matter in a different way. This consideration led the engineer to resolve the biological issues together with electronic and information disciplines and also advanced con trol, advanced technological materials and developed sensor systems. The subject has persuaded them to design solutions for problems related with living things and their environment. Bio - system engineering which has been developed for this purpose has beco me the application of technical knowledge aiming to fulfill the human requirements. The pursuit of bio - system engineering discipline are automation, new developed technologies, information technologies and human interaction, sensitive agriculture techniqu es, power and work machines, product technologies after harvest, structures and relation with environment, animal production technology, soil and water sources, rural development and planning. Bio - system engineering which covers such a wide area should re ach the solution by using its system engineering feature first and then determine the process parameters of the subjects that it resolves. Therefore it has to attribute the reason - result relation in every stage to quality parameters. Therefore, in this a nnouncement, the quality issues necessary for explaining the subjects dealt in bio - system engineering basis are examined one by one and solution models are created depending on these issues.

  17. Human Performance and Biosystems (Spring Review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    public release; distribution is unlimited Areas of Emphasis Biofilms/Nanowires – microbe communication, extracellular electron transfer, cyborg ...Artificial Photosynthesis • Algal oil generation • Biofilm, Nanowires, Cyborg Cell • tDCS • Biomarkers 5 Distribution A: Approved for public...release; distribution is unlimited Program Interactions BRI magnetic navigation Microbes/nanowires tDCS/ Cyborg cell Synthetic Biology

  18. NMR of porous bio-systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snaar, J.E.M.

    2002-01-01

    The structure and dynamics of water diffusion and -transport at a microscale in heterogeneous porous media have been investigated using various 1H NMR techniques. In particular in biological porous media the dynamics are usually very complex

  19. Integrating Biosystem Models Using Waveform Relaxation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Baigent

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Modelling in systems biology often involves the integration of component models into larger composite models. How to do this systematically and efficiently is a significant challenge: coupling of components can be unidirectional or bidirectional, and of variable strengths. We adapt the waveform relaxation (WR method for parallel computation of ODEs as a general methodology for computing systems of linked submodels. Four test cases are presented: (i a cascade of unidirectionally and bidirectionally coupled harmonic oscillators, (ii deterministic and stochastic simulations of calcium oscillations, (iii single cell calcium oscillations showing complex behaviour such as periodic and chaotic bursting, and (iv a multicellular calcium model for a cell plate of hepatocytes. We conclude that WR provides a flexible means to deal with multitime-scale computation and model heterogeneity. Global solutions over time can be captured independently of the solution techniques for the individual components, which may be distributed in different computing environments.

  20. The VARSUL Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira da Silva Menon, Odete

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This study introduces the Project that gave origin to one of the most important databases about oral language in Brazil. The Project on Urban Linguistic Variation in the South of Brazil (VARSUL, that started in 1990, initially comprised the three federal universities of the three States of Southern Brazil: Federal University of Santa Catarina (UFSC, Federal University of Paraná (UFPR and Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS. In 1993, the Project began to also rely on the Pontific Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul (PUC–RS. The VARSUL Project aims at storing samples of speech realizations by inhabitants of socio-representative urban areas from each of the three states of the South of Brazil, stratified by location, age range, gender and education.

  1. Danish Palliative Care Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønvold, Mogens; Adsersen, Mathilde; Hansen, Maiken Bang

    2016-01-01

    Aims: The aim of the Danish Palliative Care Database (DPD) is to monitor, evaluate, and improve the clinical quality of specialized palliative care (SPC) (ie, the activity of hospital-based palliative care teams/departments and hospices) in Denmark. Study population: The study population is all......, and the patient-reported European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionaire-Core-15-Palliative Care questionnaire, assessing health-related quality of life. The data support the estimation of currently five quality of care indicators, ie, the proportions of 1) referred......-Core-15-Palliative Care at admission to SPC, and 5) patients who were discussed at a multidisciplinary conference. Descriptive data: In 2014, all 43 SPC units in Denmark reported their data to DPD, and all 9,434 cancer patients (100%) referred to SPC were registered in DPD. In total, 41,104 unique cancer...

  2. The Danish Anaesthesia Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonsen K

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Kristian Antonsen,1 Charlotte Vallentin Rosenstock,2 Lars Hyldborg Lundstrøm2 1Board of Directors, Copenhagen University Hospital, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospital, Capital Region of Denmark, Denmark; 2Department of Anesthesiology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Nordsjællands Hospital-Hillerød, Capital Region of Denmark, Denmark Aim of database: The aim of the Danish Anaesthesia Database (DAD is the nationwide collection of data on all patients undergoing anesthesia. Collected data are used for quality assurance, quality development, and serve as a basis for research projects. Study population: The DAD was founded in 2004 as a part of Danish Clinical Registries (Regionernes Kliniske Kvalitetsudviklings Program [RKKP]. Patients undergoing general anesthesia, regional anesthesia with or without combined general anesthesia as well as patients under sedation are registered. Data are retrieved from public and private anesthesia clinics, single-centers as well as multihospital corporations across Denmark. In 2014 a total of 278,679 unique entries representing a national coverage of ~70% were recorded, data completeness is steadily increasing. Main variable: Records are aggregated for determining 13 defined quality indicators and eleven defined complications all covering the anesthetic process from the preoperative assessment through anesthesia and surgery until the end of the postoperative recovery period. Descriptive data: Registered variables include patients' individual social security number (assigned to all Danes and both direct patient-related lifestyle factors enabling a quantification of patients' comorbidity as well as variables that are strictly related to the type, duration, and safety of the anesthesia. Data and specific data combinations can be extracted within each department in order to monitor patient treatment. In addition, an annual DAD report is a benchmark for departments nationwide. Conclusion: The DAD is covering the

  3. FEEDBACK ON A PUBLICLY DISTRIBUTED IMAGE DATABASE: THE MESSIDOR DATABASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etienne Decencière

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The Messidor database, which contains hundreds of eye fundus images, has been publicly distributed since 2008. It was created by the Messidor project in order to evaluate automatic lesion segmentation and diabetic retinopathy grading methods. Designing, producing and maintaining such a database entails significant costs. By publicly sharing it, one hopes to bring a valuable resource to the public research community. However, the real interest and benefit of the research community is not easy to quantify. We analyse here the feedback on the Messidor database, after more than 6 years of diffusion. This analysis should apply to other similar research databases.

  4. MetaBase—the wiki-database of biological databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolser, Dan M.; Chibon, Pierre-Yves; Palopoli, Nicolas; Gong, Sungsam; Jacob, Daniel; Angel, Victoria Dominguez Del; Swan, Dan; Bassi, Sebastian; González, Virginia; Suravajhala, Prashanth; Hwang, Seungwoo; Romano, Paolo; Edwards, Rob; Bishop, Bryan; Eargle, John; Shtatland, Timur; Provart, Nicholas J.; Clements, Dave; Renfro, Daniel P.; Bhak, Daeui; Bhak, Jong

    2012-01-01

    Biology is generating more data than ever. As a result, there is an ever increasing number of publicly available databases that analyse, integrate and summarize the available data, providing an invaluable resource for the biological community. As this trend continues, there is a pressing need to organize, catalogue and rate these resources, so that the information they contain can be most effectively exploited. MetaBase (MB) (http://MetaDatabase.Org) is a community-curated database containing more than 2000 commonly used biological databases. Each entry is structured using templates and can carry various user comments and annotations. Entries can be searched, listed, browsed or queried. The database was created using the same MediaWiki technology that powers Wikipedia, allowing users to contribute on many different levels. The initial release of MB was derived from the content of the 2007 Nucleic Acids Research (NAR) Database Issue. Since then, approximately 100 databases have been manually collected from the literature, and users have added information for over 240 databases. MB is synchronized annually with the static Molecular Biology Database Collection provided by NAR. To date, there have been 19 significant contributors to the project; each one is listed as an author here to highlight the community aspect of the project. PMID:22139927

  5. ATGC: a database of orthologous genes from closely related prokaryotic genomes and a research platform for microevolution of prokaryotes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novichkov, Pavel S.; Ratnere, Igor; Wolf, Yuri I.; Koonin, Eugene V.; Dubchak, Inna

    2009-07-23

    The database of Alignable Tight Genomic Clusters (ATGCs) consists of closely related genomes of archaea and bacteria, and is a resource for research into prokaryotic microevolution. Construction of a data set with appropriate characteristics is a major hurdle for this type of studies. With the current rate of genome sequencing, it is difficult to follow the progress of the field and to determine which of the available genome sets meet the requirements of a given research project, in particular, with respect to the minimum and maximum levels of similarity between the included genomes. Additionally, extraction of specific content, such as genomic alignments or families of orthologs, from a selected set of genomes is a complicated and time-consuming process. The database addresses these problems by providing an intuitive and efficient web interface to browse precomputed ATGCs, select appropriate ones and access ATGC-derived data such as multiple alignments of orthologous proteins, matrices of pairwise intergenomic distances based on genome-wide analysis of synonymous and nonsynonymous substitution rates and others. The ATGC database will be regularly updated following new releases of the NCBI RefSeq. The database is hosted by the Genomics Division at Lawrence Berkeley National laboratory and is publicly available at http://atgc.lbl.gov.

  6. Replikasi Unidirectional pada Heterogen Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendro Nindito

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of diverse database technology in enterprise today can not be avoided. Thus, technology is needed to generate information in real time. The purpose of this research is to discuss a database replication technology that can be applied in heterogeneous database environments. In this study we use Windows-based MS SQL Server database to Linux-based Oracle database as the goal. The research method used is prototyping where development can be done quickly and testing of working models of the interaction process is done through repeated. From this research it is obtained that the database replication technolgy using Oracle Golden Gate can be applied in heterogeneous environments in real time as well.

  7. Moving Observer Support for Databases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bukauskas, Linas

    Interactive visual data explorations impose rigid requirements on database and visualization systems. Systems that visualize huge amounts of data tend to request large amounts of memory resources and heavily use the CPU to process and visualize data. Current systems employ a loosely coupled...... architecture to exchange data between database and visualization. Thus, the interaction of the visualizer and the database is kept to the minimum, which most often leads to superfluous data being passed from database to visualizer. This Ph.D. thesis presents a novel tight coupling of database and visualizer...... together with the VR-tree enables the fast extraction of appearing and disappearing objects from the observer's view as he navigates through the data space. Usage of VAST structure significantly reduces the number of objects to be extracted from the VR-tree and VAST enables a fast interaction of database...

  8. Table manipulation in simplicial databases

    CERN Document Server

    Spivak, David I

    2010-01-01

    In \\cite{Spi}, we developed a category of databases in which the schema of a database is represented as a simplicial set. Each simplex corresponds to a table in the database. There, our main concern was to find a categorical formulation of databases; the simplicial nature of the schemas was to some degree unexpected and unexploited. In the present note, we show how to use this geometric formulation effectively on a computer. If we think of each simplex as a polygonal tile, we can imagine assembling custom databases by mixing and matching tiles. Queries on this database can be performed by drawing paths through the resulting tile formations, selecting records at the start-point of this path and retrieving corresponding records at its end-point.

  9. Clone DB: an integrated NCBI resource for clone-associated data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Valerie A; Chen, Hsiu-Chuan; Clausen, Cliff; Meric, Peter A; Zhou, Zhigang; Bouk, Nathan; Husain, Nora; Maglott, Donna R; Church, Deanna M

    2013-01-01

    The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) Clone DB (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/clone/) is an integrated resource providing information about and facilitating access to clones, which serve as valuable research reagents in many fields, including genome sequencing and variation analysis. Clone DB represents an expansion and replacement of the former NCBI Clone Registry and has records for genomic and cell-based libraries and clones representing more than 100 different eukaryotic taxa. Records provide details of library construction, associated sequences, map positions and information about resource distribution. Clone DB is indexed in the NCBI Entrez system and can be queried by fields that include organism, clone name, gene name and sequence identifier. Whenever possible, genomic clones are mapped to reference assemblies and their map positions provided in clone records. Clones mapping to specific genomic regions can also be searched for using the NCBI Clone Finder tool, which accepts queries based on sequence coordinates or features such as gene or transcript names. Clone DB makes reports of library, clone and placement data on its FTP site available for download. With Clone DB, users now have available to them a centralized resource that provides them with the tools they will need to make use of these important research reagents.

  10. Inorganic Crystal Structure Database (ICSD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 84 FIZ/NIST Inorganic Crystal Structure Database (ICSD) (PC database for purchase)   The Inorganic Crystal Structure Database (ICSD) is produced cooperatively by the Fachinformationszentrum Karlsruhe(FIZ) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The ICSD is a comprehensive collection of crystal structure data of inorganic compounds containing more than 140,000 entries and covering the literature from 1915 to the present.

  11. References for Galaxy Clusters Database

    OpenAIRE

    Kalinkov, M.; Valtchanov, I.; Kuneva, I.

    1998-01-01

    A bibliographic database will be constructed with the purpose to be a general tool for searching references for galaxy clusters. The structure of the database will be completely different from the available now databases as NED, SIMBAD, LEDA. Search based on hierarchical keyword system will be performed through web interfaces from numerous bibliographic sources -- journal articles, preprints, unpublished results and papers, theses, scientific reports. Data from the very beginning of the extra...

  12. Database Engines: Evolution of Greenness

    OpenAIRE

    Miranskyy, Andriy V.; Al-zanbouri, Zainab; Godwin, David; Bener, Ayse Basar

    2017-01-01

    Context: Information Technology consumes up to 10\\% of the world's electricity generation, contributing to CO2 emissions and high energy costs. Data centers, particularly databases, use up to 23% of this energy. Therefore, building an energy-efficient (green) database engine could reduce energy consumption and CO2 emissions. Goal: To understand the factors driving databases' energy consumption and execution time throughout their evolution. Method: We conducted an empirical case study of energ...

  13. Database design for a kindergarten Pastelka

    OpenAIRE

    Grombíř, Tomáš

    2010-01-01

    This bachelor thesis deals with analysis, creation of database for a kindergarten and installation of the designed database into the database system MySQL. Functionality of the proposed database was verified through an application written in PHP.

  14. Cloud database development and management

    CERN Document Server

    Chao, Lee

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays, cloud computing is almost everywhere. However, one can hardly find a textbook that utilizes cloud computing for teaching database and application development. This cloud-based database development book teaches both the theory and practice with step-by-step instructions and examples. This book helps readers to set up a cloud computing environment for teaching and learning database systems. The book will cover adequate conceptual content for students and IT professionals to gain necessary knowledge and hands-on skills to set up cloud based database systems.

  15. The Danish Testicular Cancer database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daugaard G

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Gedske Daugaard,1 Maria Gry Gundgaard Kier,1 Mikkel Bandak,1 Mette Saksø Mortensen,1 Heidi Larsson,2 Mette Søgaard,2 Birgitte Groenkaer Toft,3 Birte Engvad,4 Mads Agerbæk,5 Niels Vilstrup Holm,6 Jakob Lauritsen1 1Department of Oncology 5073, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, 2Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, 3Department of Pathology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, 4Department of Pathology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, 5Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, 6Department of Oncology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark Aim: The nationwide Danish Testicular Cancer database consists of a retrospective research database (DaTeCa database and a prospective clinical database (Danish Multidisciplinary Cancer Group [DMCG] DaTeCa database. The aim is to improve the quality of care for patients with testicular cancer (TC in Denmark, that is, by identifying risk factors for relapse, toxicity related to treatment, and focusing on late effects. Study population: All Danish male patients with a histologically verified germ cell cancer diagnosis in the Danish Pathology Registry are included in the DaTeCa databases. Data collection has been performed from 1984 to 2007 and from 2013 onward, respectively. Main variables and descriptive data: The retrospective DaTeCa database contains detailed information with more than 300 variables related to histology, stage, treatment, relapses, pathology, tumor markers, kidney function, lung function, etc. A questionnaire related to late effects has been conducted, which includes questions regarding social relationships, life situation, general health status, family background, diseases, symptoms, use of medication, marital status, psychosocial issues, fertility, and sexuality. TC survivors alive on October 2014 were invited to fill in this questionnaire including 160 validated questions

  16. Network-based Database Course

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J.N.; Knudsen, Morten; Nielsen, Jens Frederik Dalsgaard

    A course in database design and implementation has been de- signed, utilizing existing network facilities. The course is an elementary course for students of computer engineering. Its purpose is to give the students a theoretical database knowledge as well as practical experience with design...... and implementation. A tutorial relational database and the students self-designed databases are implemented on the UNIX system of Aalborg University, thus giving the teacher the possibility of live demonstrations in the lecture room, and the students the possibility of interactive learning in their working rooms...

  17. Working with Documents in Databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian DARDALA

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Using on a larger and larger scale the electronic documents within organizations and public institutions requires their storage and unitary exploitation by the means of databases. The purpose of this article is to present the way of loading, exploitation and visualization of documents in a database, taking as example the SGBD MSSQL Server. On the other hand, the modules for loading the documents in the database and for their visualization will be presented through code sequences written in C#. The interoperability between averages will be carried out by the means of ADO.NET technology of database access.

  18. Network-based Database Course

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J.N.; Knudsen, Morten; Nielsen, Jens Frederik Dalsgaard

    A course in database design and implementation has been de- signed, utilizing existing network facilities. The course is an elementary course for students of computer engineering. Its purpose is to give the students a theoretical database knowledge as well as practical experience with design...... and implementation. A tutorial relational database and the students self-designed databases are implemented on the UNIX system of Aalborg University, thus giving the teacher the possibility of live demonstrations in the lecture room, and the students the possibility of interactive learning in their working rooms...

  19. Croatian Cadastre Database Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zvonko Biljecki

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The Cadastral Data Model has been developed as a part of a larger programme to improve products and production environment of the Croatian Cadastral Service of the State Geodetic Administration (SGA. The goal of the project was to create a cadastral data model conforming to relevant standards and specifications in the field of geoinformation (GI adapted by international organisations for standardisation under the competence of GI (ISO TC211 and OpenGIS and it implementations.The main guidelines during the project have been object-oriented conceptual modelling of the updated users' requests and a "new" cadastral data model designed by SGA - Faculty of Geodesy - Geofoto LLC project team. The UML of the conceptual model is given per all feature categories and is described only at class level. The next step was the UML technical model, which was developed from the UML conceptual model. The technical model integrates different UML schemas in one united schema.XML (eXtensible Markup Language was applied for XML description of UML models, and then the XML schema was transferred into GML (Geography Markup Language application schema. With this procedure we have completely described the behaviour of each cadastral feature and rules for the transfer and storage of cadastral features into the database.

  20. Public chemical compound databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Anthony J

    2008-05-01

    The internet has rapidly become the first port of call for all information searches. The increasing array of chemistry-related resources that are now available provides chemists with a direct path to the information that was previously accessed via library services and was limited by commercial and costly resources. The diversity of the information that can be accessed online is expanding at a dramatic rate, and the support for publicly available resources offers significant opportunities in terms of the benefits to science and society. While the data online do not generally meet the quality standards of manually curated sources, there are efforts underway to gather scientists together and 'crowdsource' an improvement in the quality of the available data. This review discusses the types of public compound databases that are available online and provides a series of examples. Focus is also given to the benefits and disruptions associated with the increased availability of such data and the integration of technologies to data mine this information.

  1. SymbioGenomesDB: a database for the integration and access to knowledge on host-symbiont relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Prieto, Mariana; Vargas-Chávez, Carlos; Latorre, Amparo; Moya, Andrés

    2015-01-01

    Symbiotic relationships occur naturally throughout the tree of life, either in a commensal, mutualistic or pathogenic manner. The genomes of multiple organisms involved in symbiosis are rapidly being sequenced and becoming available, especially those from the microbial world. Currently, there are numerous databases that offer information on specific organisms or models, but none offer a global understanding on relationships between organisms, their interactions and capabilities within their niche, as well as their role as part of a system, in this case, their role in symbiosis. We have developed the SymbioGenomesDB as a community database resource for laboratories which intend to investigate and use information on the genetics and the genomics of organisms involved in these relationships. The ultimate goal of SymbioGenomesDB is to host and support the growing and vast symbiotic-host relationship information, to uncover the genetic basis of such associations. SymbioGenomesDB maintains a comprehensive organization of information on genomes of symbionts from diverse hosts throughout the Tree of Life, including their sequences, their metadata and their genomic features. This catalog of relationships was generated using computational tools, custom R scripts and manual integration of data available in public literature. As a highly curated and comprehensive systems database, SymbioGenomesDB provides web access to all the information of symbiotic organisms, their features and links to the central database NCBI. Three different tools can be found within the database to explore symbiosis-related organisms, their genes and their genomes. Also, we offer an orthology search for one or multiple genes in one or multiple organisms within symbiotic relationships, and every table, graph and output file is downloadable and easy to parse for further analysis. The robust SymbioGenomesDB will be constantly updated to cope with all the data being generated and included in major

  2. The Mouse Genome Database: integration of and access to knowledge about the laboratory mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Judith A; Bult, Carol J; Eppig, Janan T; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E

    2014-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD) (http://www.informatics.jax.org) is the community model organism database resource for the laboratory mouse, a premier animal model for the study of genetic and genomic systems relevant to human biology and disease. MGD maintains a comprehensive catalog of genes, functional RNAs and other genome features as well as heritable phenotypes and quantitative trait loci. The genome feature catalog is generated by the integration of computational and manual genome annotations generated by NCBI, Ensembl and Vega/HAVANA. MGD curates and maintains the comprehensive listing of functional annotations for mouse genes using the Gene Ontology, and MGD curates and integrates comprehensive phenotype annotations including associations of mouse models with human diseases. Recent improvements include integration of the latest mouse genome build (GRCm38), improved access to comparative and functional annotations for mouse genes with expanded representation of comparative vertebrate genomes and new loads of phenotype data from high-throughput phenotyping projects. All MGD resources are freely available to the research community.

  3. Hanford Site technical baseline database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, P.E.

    1996-09-30

    This document includes a cassette tape that contains the Hanford specific files that make up the Hanford Site Technical Baseline Database as of September 30, 1996. The cassette tape also includes the delta files that dellinate the differences between this revision and revision 4 (May 10, 1996) of the Hanford Site Technical Baseline Database.

  4. Hanford Site technical baseline database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, P.E., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-05-10

    This document includes a cassette tape that contains the Hanford specific files that make up the Hanford Site Technical Baseline Database as of May 10, 1996. The cassette tape also includes the delta files that delineate the differences between this revision and revision 3 (April 10, 1996) of the Hanford Site Technical Baseline Database.

  5. Wind turbine reliability database update.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, Valerie A.; Hill, Roger Ray; Stinebaugh, Jennifer A.; Veers, Paul S.

    2009-03-01

    This report documents the status of the Sandia National Laboratories' Wind Plant Reliability Database. Included in this report are updates on the form and contents of the Database, which stems from a fivestep process of data partnerships, data definition and transfer, data formatting and normalization, analysis, and reporting. Selected observations are also reported.

  6. The UCSC Genome Browser Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karolchik, D; Kuhn, R M; Baertsch, R

    2008-01-01

    The University of California, Santa Cruz, Genome Browser Database (GBD) provides integrated sequence and annotation data for a large collection of vertebrate and model organism genomes. Seventeen new assemblies have been added to the database in the past year, for a total coverage of 19 vertebrat...

  7. Adaptive Segmentation for Scientific Databases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ivanova, M.G.; Kersten, M.L.; Nes, N.J.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we explore database segmentation in the context of a column-store DBMS targeted at a scientific database. We present a novel hardware- and scheme-oblivious segmentation algorithm, which learns and adapts to the workload immediately. The approach taken is to capitalize on (intermediate)

  8. XCOM: Photon Cross Sections Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 8 XCOM: Photon Cross Sections Database (Web, free access)   A web database is provided which can be used to calculate photon cross sections for scattering, photoelectric absorption and pair production, as well as total attenuation coefficients, for any element, compound or mixture (Z <= 100) at energies from 1 keV to 100 GeV.

  9. Adaptive segmentation for scientific databases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ivanova, M.; Kersten, M.L.; Nes, N.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we explore database segmentation in the context of a column-store DBMS targeted at a scientific database. We present a novel hardware- and scheme-oblivious segmentation algorithm, which learns and adapts to the workload immediately. The approach taken is to capitalize on (intermediate)

  10. A Database of Invariant Rings

    OpenAIRE

    Kemper, Gregor; Körding, Elmar; Malle, Gunter; Matzat, B. Heinrich; Vogel, Denis; Wiese, Gabor

    2001-01-01

    We announce the creation of a database of invariant rings. This database contains a large number of invariant rings of finite groups, mostly in the modular case. It gives information on generators and structural properties of the invariant rings. The main purpose is to provide a tool for researchers in invariant theory.

  11. Content independence in multimedia databases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, A.P. de

    2001-01-01

    A database management system is a general-purpose software system that facilitates the processes of defining, constructing, and manipulating databases for various applications. This article investigates the role of data management in multimedia digital libraries, and its implications for the design

  12. The Danish Cardiac Rehabilitation Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe; Rossau, Henriette Knold; Nakano, Anne

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The Danish Cardiac Rehabilitation Database (DHRD) aims to improve the quality of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) to the benefit of patients with coronary heart disease (CHD). STUDY POPULATION: Hospitalized patients with CHD with stenosis on coronary angiography treated with percutane...

  13. Automatic assistants for database exploration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sellam, T.H.J.

    2016-01-01

    Data explorers interrogate a database to discover its content. Their aim is to get an overview of the data and discover interesting new facts. They have little to no knowledge of the data, and their requirements are often vague and abstract. How can such users write database queries? This thesis pre

  14. Storing XML Documents in Databases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmidt, A.R.; Manegold, S.; Kersten, M.L.; Rivero, L.C.; Doorn, J.H.; Ferraggine, V.E.

    2005-01-01

    The authors introduce concepts for loading large amounts of XML documents into databases where the documents are stored and maintained. The goal is to make XML databases as unobtrusive in multi-tier systems as possible and at the same time provide as many services defined by the XML standards as pos

  15. Numerical databases in marine biology

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarupria, J.S.; Bhargava, R.M.S.

    stream_size 9 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Natl_Workshop_Database_Networking_Mar_Biol_1991_45.pdf.txt stream_source_info Natl_Workshop_Database_Networking_Mar_Biol_1991_45.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content...

  16. Behaviour specification in database interoperation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeer, W.W.M.; Apers, Peter M.G.

    We discuss the impact of locally implemented behaviour in a federation of object-oriented databases. In particular, given a specification of an integrated view of a number of component databases, we discuss the process of determining the global methods that are implicitly implemented by a given set

  17. Adaptive segmentation for scientific databases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ivanova, M.; Kersten, M.L.; Nes, N.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we explore database segmentation in the context of a column-store DBMS targeted at a scientific database. We present a novel hardware- and scheme-oblivious segmentation algorithm, which learns and adapts to the workload immediately. The approach taken is to capitalize on (intermediate)

  18. Logical Querying of Relational Databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luminita Pistol

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to demonstrate the usefulness of formal logic and lambda calculus in database programming. After a short introduction in propositional and first order logic, we implement dynamically a small database and translate some SQL queries in filtered java 8 streams, enhanced with Tuples facilities from jOOλ library.

  19. Mathematical Notation in Bibliographic Databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasterczyk, Catherine E.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses ways in which using mathematical symbols to search online bibliographic databases in scientific and technical areas can improve search results. The representations used for Greek letters, relations, binary operators, arrows, and miscellaneous special symbols in the MathSci, Inspec, Compendex, and Chemical Abstracts databases are…

  20. CUDASW++: optimizing Smith-Waterman sequence database searches for CUDA-enabled graphics processing units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongchao; Maskell, Douglas L; Schmidt, Bertil

    2009-05-06

    The Smith-Waterman algorithm is one of the most widely used tools for searching biological sequence databases due to its high sensitivity. Unfortunately, the Smith-Waterman algorithm is computationally demanding, which is further compounded by the exponential growth of sequence databases. The recent emergence of many-core architectures, and their associated programming interfaces, provides an opportunity to accelerate sequence database searches using commonly available and inexpensive hardware. Our CUDASW++ implementation (benchmarked on a single-GPU NVIDIA GeForce GTX 280 graphics card and a dual-GPU GeForce GTX 295 graphics card) provides a significant performance improvement compared to other publicly available implementations, such as SWPS3, CBESW, SW-CUDA, and NCBI-BLAST. CUDASW++ supports query sequences of length up to 59K and for query sequences ranging in length from 144 to 5,478 in Swiss-Prot release 56.6, the single-GPU version achieves an average performance of 9.509 GCUPS with a lowest performance of 9.039 GCUPS and a highest performance of 9.660 GCUPS, and the dual-GPU version achieves an average performance of 14.484 GCUPS with a lowest performance of 10.660 GCUPS and a highest performance of 16.087 GCUPS. CUDASW++ is publicly available open-source software. It provides a significant performance improvement for Smith-Waterman-based protein sequence database searches by fully exploiting the compute capability of commonly used CUDA-enabled low-cost GPUs.

  1. CUDASW++: optimizing Smith-Waterman sequence database searches for CUDA-enabled graphics processing units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maskell Douglas L

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Smith-Waterman algorithm is one of the most widely used tools for searching biological sequence databases due to its high sensitivity. Unfortunately, the Smith-Waterman algorithm is computationally demanding, which is further compounded by the exponential growth of sequence databases. The recent emergence of many-core architectures, and their associated programming interfaces, provides an opportunity to accelerate sequence database searches using commonly available and inexpensive hardware. Findings Our CUDASW++ implementation (benchmarked on a single-GPU NVIDIA GeForce GTX 280 graphics card and a dual-GPU GeForce GTX 295 graphics card provides a significant performance improvement compared to other publicly available implementations, such as SWPS3, CBESW, SW-CUDA, and NCBI-BLAST. CUDASW++ supports query sequences of length up to 59K and for query sequences ranging in length from 144 to 5,478 in Swiss-Prot release 56.6, the single-GPU version achieves an average performance of 9.509 GCUPS with a lowest performance of 9.039 GCUPS and a highest performance of 9.660 GCUPS, and the dual-GPU version achieves an average performance of 14.484 GCUPS with a lowest performance of 10.660 GCUPS and a highest performance of 16.087 GCUPS. Conclusion CUDASW++ is publicly available open-source software. It provides a significant performance improvement for Smith-Waterman-based protein sequence database searches by fully exploiting the compute capability of commonly used CUDA-enabled low-cost GPUs.

  2. The magnet components database system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baggett, M.J. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Leedy, R.; Saltmarsh, C.; Tompkins, J.C. (Superconducting Supercollider Lab., Dallas, TX (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The philosophy, structure, and usage MagCom, the SSC magnet components database, are described. The database has been implemented in Sybase (a powerful relational database management system) on a UNIX-based workstation at the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL); magnet project collaborators can access the database via network connections. The database was designed to contain the specifications and measured values of important properties for major materials, plus configuration information (specifying which individual items were used in each cable, coil, and magnet) and the test results on completed magnets. These data will facilitate the tracking and control of the production process as well as the correlation of magnet performance with the properties of its constituents. 3 refs., 10 figs.

  3. The Danish Fetal Medicine Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekelund, Charlotte K; Petersen, Olav Bjørn; Jørgensen, Finn S

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the establishment and organization of the Danish Fetal Medicine Database and to report national results of first-trimester combined screening for trisomy 21 in the 5-year period 2008-2012. DESIGN: National register study using prospectively collected first-trimester screening...... data from the Danish Fetal Medicine Database. POPULATION: Pregnant women in Denmark undergoing first-trimester screening for trisomy 21. METHODS: Data on maternal characteristics, biochemical and ultrasonic markers are continuously sent electronically from local fetal medicine databases (Astraia Gmbh......%. The national screen-positive rate increased from 3.6% in 2008 to 4.7% in 2012. The national detection rate of trisomy 21 was reported to be between 82 and 90% in the 5-year period. CONCLUSION: A national fetal medicine database has been successfully established in Denmark. Results from the database have shown...

  4. National Center for Biotechnology Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to NCBI Sign Out NCBI National Center for Biotechnology Information Search database All Databases Assembly Biocollections BioProject ... Search Welcome to NCBI The National Center for Biotechnology Information advances science and health by providing access ...

  5. Database tomography for commercial application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostoff, Ronald N.; Eberhart, Henry J.

    1994-01-01

    Database tomography is a method for extracting themes and their relationships from text. The algorithms, employed begin with word frequency and word proximity analysis and build upon these results. When the word 'database' is used, think of medical or police records, patents, journals, or papers, etc. (any text information that can be computer stored). Database tomography features a full text, user interactive technique enabling the user to identify areas of interest, establish relationships, and map trends for a deeper understanding of an area of interest. Database tomography concepts and applications have been reported in journals and presented at conferences. One important feature of the database tomography algorithm is that it can be used on a database of any size, and will facilitate the users ability to understand the volume of content therein. While employing the process to identify research opportunities it became obvious that this promising technology has potential applications for business, science, engineering, law, and academe. Examples include evaluating marketing trends, strategies, relationships and associations. Also, the database tomography process would be a powerful component in the area of competitive intelligence, national security intelligence and patent analysis. User interests and involvement cannot be overemphasized.

  6. Unifying Memory and Database Transactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Ricardo J.; Lourenço, João M.

    Software Transactional Memory is a concurrency control technique gaining increasing popularity, as it provides high-level concurrency control constructs and eases the development of highly multi-threaded applications. But this easiness comes at the expense of restricting the operations that can be executed within a memory transaction, and operations such as terminal and file I/O are either not allowed or incur in serious performance penalties. Database I/O is another example of operations that usually are not allowed within a memory transaction. This paper proposes to combine memory and database transactions in a single unified model, benefiting from the ACID properties of the database transactions and from the speed of main memory data processing. The new unified model covers, without differentiating, both memory and database operations. Thus, the users are allowed to freely intertwine memory and database accesses within the same transaction, knowing that the memory and database contents will always remain consistent and that the transaction will atomically abort or commit the operations in both memory and database. This approach allows to increase the granularity of the in-memory atomic actions and hence, simplifies the reasoning about them.

  7. The YH database: the first Asian diploid genome database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Guoqing; Ma, Lijia; Song, Chao

    2009-01-01

    The YH database is a server that allows the user to easily browse and download data from the first Asian diploid genome. The aim of this platform is to facilitate the study of this Asian genome and to enable improved organization and presentation large-scale personal genome data. Powered by GBrowse......, we illustrate here the genome sequences, SNPs, and sequencing reads in the MapView. The relationships between phenotype and genotype can be searched by location, dbSNP ID, HGMD ID, gene symbol and disease name. A BLAST web service is also provided for the purpose of aligning query sequence against YH...... genome consensus. The YH database is currently one of the three personal genome database, organizing the original data and analysis results in a user-friendly interface, which is an endeavor to achieve fundamental goals for establishing personal medicine. The database is available at http://yh.genomics.org.cn....

  8. The YH database: the first Asian diploid genome database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guoqing; Ma, Lijia; Song, Chao; Yang, Zhentao; Wang, Xiulan; Huang, Hui; Li, Yingrui; Li, Ruiqiang; Zhang, Xiuqing; Yang, Huanming; Wang, Jian; Wang, Jun

    2009-01-01

    The YH database is a server that allows the user to easily browse and download data from the first Asian diploid genome. The aim of this platform is to facilitate the study of this Asian genome and to enable improved organization and presentation large-scale personal genome data. Powered by GBrowse, we illustrate here the genome sequences, SNPs, and sequencing reads in the MapView. The relationships between phenotype and genotype can be searched by location, dbSNP ID, HGMD ID, gene symbol and disease name. A BLAST web service is also provided for the purpose of aligning query sequence against YH genome consensus. The YH database is currently one of the three personal genome database, organizing the original data and analysis results in a user-friendly interface, which is an endeavor to achieve fundamental goals for establishing personal medicine. The database is available at http://yh.genomics.org.cn.

  9. Database Description - RPD | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ation: National Institute of Crop Science, National Agriculture and Food Research Organization Journal Searc...titute of Crop Science, National Agriculture and Food Research Organization Setsuko Komatsu E-mail: Database

  10. Database on wind characteristics. Contents of database bank

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Gunner Chr.; Hansen, K.S.

    2001-01-01

    The main objective of IEA R&D Wind Annex XVII - Database on Wind Characteristics - is to provide wind energy planners and designers, as well as the international wind engineering community in general, with easy access to quality controlled measured windfield time series observed in a wide range...... of environments. The project partners are Sweden, Norway, U.S.A., The Netherlands, Japan and Denmark, with Denmark as the Operating Agent. The reporting of IEA R&D Annex XVII falls in three separate parts. Partone deals with the overall structure and philosophy behind the database, part two accounts in details...... for the available data in the established database bank and part three is the Users Manual describing the various ways to access and analyse the data. The present report constitutes the second part of the Annex XVII reporting. Basically, the database bank contains three categories of data, i.e. i) high sampled wind...

  11. Using the NCBI Map Viewer to browse genomic sequence data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfsberg, Tyra G

    2011-04-01

    This unit includes a basic protocol with an introduction to the Map Viewer, describing how to perform a simple text-based search of genome annotations to view the genomic context of a gene, navigate along a chromosome, zoom in and out, and change the displayed maps to hide and show information. It also describes some of NCBI's sequence-analysis tools, which are provided as links from the Map Viewer. The alternate protocols describe different ways to query the genome sequence, and also illustrate additional features of the Map Viewer. Alternate Protocol 1 shows how to perform and interpret the results of a BLAST search against the human genome. Alternate Protocol 2 demonstrates how to retrieve a list of all genes between two STS markers. Finally, Alternate Protocol 3 shows how to find all annotated members of a gene family.

  12. Databases of the marine metagenomics

    KAUST Repository

    Mineta, Katsuhiko

    2015-10-28

    The metagenomic data obtained from marine environments is significantly useful for understanding marine microbial communities. In comparison with the conventional amplicon-based approach of metagenomics, the recent shotgun sequencing-based approach has become a powerful tool that provides an efficient way of grasping a diversity of the entire microbial community at a sampling point in the sea. However, this approach accelerates accumulation of the metagenome data as well as increase of data complexity. Moreover, when metagenomic approach is used for monitoring a time change of marine environments at multiple locations of the seawater, accumulation of metagenomics data will become tremendous with an enormous speed. Because this kind of situation has started becoming of reality at many marine research institutions and stations all over the world, it looks obvious that the data management and analysis will be confronted by the so-called Big Data issues such as how the database can be constructed in an efficient way and how useful knowledge should be extracted from a vast amount of the data. In this review, we summarize the outline of all the major databases of marine metagenome that are currently publically available, noting that database exclusively on marine metagenome is none but the number of metagenome databases including marine metagenome data are six, unexpectedly still small. We also extend our explanation to the databases, as reference database we call, that will be useful for constructing a marine metagenome database as well as complementing important information with the database. Then, we would point out a number of challenges to be conquered in constructing the marine metagenome database.

  13. Databases of the marine metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mineta, Katsuhiko; Gojobori, Takashi

    2016-02-01

    The metagenomic data obtained from marine environments is significantly useful for understanding marine microbial communities. In comparison with the conventional amplicon-based approach of metagenomics, the recent shotgun sequencing-based approach has become a powerful tool that provides an efficient way of grasping a diversity of the entire microbial community at a sampling point in the sea. However, this approach accelerates accumulation of the metagenome data as well as increase of data complexity. Moreover, when metagenomic approach is used for monitoring a time change of marine environments at multiple locations of the seawater, accumulation of metagenomics data will become tremendous with an enormous speed. Because this kind of situation has started becoming of reality at many marine research institutions and stations all over the world, it looks obvious that the data management and analysis will be confronted by the so-called Big Data issues such as how the database can be constructed in an efficient way and how useful knowledge should be extracted from a vast amount of the data. In this review, we summarize the outline of all the major databases of marine metagenome that are currently publically available, noting that database exclusively on marine metagenome is none but the number of metagenome databases including marine metagenome data are six, unexpectedly still small. We also extend our explanation to the databases, as reference database we call, that will be useful for constructing a marine metagenome database as well as complementing important information with the database. Then, we would point out a number of challenges to be conquered in constructing the marine metagenome database.

  14. Danish Colorectal Cancer Group Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingeholm, Peter; Gögenur, Ismail; Iversen, Lene H

    2016-01-01

    , and other pathological risk factors. DESCRIPTIVE DATA: The database has had >95% completeness in including patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma with >54,000 patients registered so far with approximately one-third rectal cancers and two-third colon cancers and an overrepresentation of men among rectal......-term survivals since it started in 2001 for both patients with colon and rectal cancers.......AIM OF DATABASE: The aim of the database, which has existed for registration of all patients with colorectal cancer in Denmark since 2001, is to improve the prognosis for this patient group. STUDY POPULATION: All Danish patients with newly diagnosed colorectal cancer who are either diagnosed...

  15. Physical database design using Oracle

    CERN Document Server

    Burleson, Donald K

    2004-01-01

    INTRODUCTION TO ORACLE PHYSICAL DESIGNPrefaceRelational Databases and Physical DesignSystems Analysis and Physical Database DesignIntroduction to Logical Database DesignEntity/Relation ModelingBridging between Logical and Physical ModelsPhysical Design Requirements Validation PHYSICAL ENTITY DESIGN FOR ORACLEData Relationships and Physical DesignMassive De-Normalization: STAR Schema DesignDesigning Class HierarchiesMaterialized Views and De-NormalizationReferential IntegrityConclusionORACLE HARDWARE DESIGNPlanning the Server EnvironmentDesigning the Network Infrastructure for OracleOracle Netw

  16. Fundamental Research of Distributed Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati Gupta

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to present an introduction toDistributed Databases which are becoming very popularnow a days. Today’s business environment has anincreasing need for distributed database and Client/server applications as the desire for reliable, scalable and accessible information is Steadily rising. Distributed database systems provide an improvement on communication and data processing due to its datadistribution throughout different network sites. Not Only isdata access faster, but a single-point of failure is less likelyto occur, and it provides local control of data for users.

  17. The JWS online simulation database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Martin; Eicher, Johann J; van Niekerk, David D; Waltemath, Dagmar; Snoep, Jacky L

    2017-05-15

    JWS Online is a web-based platform for construction, simulation and exchange of models in standard formats. We have extended the platform with a database for curated simulation experiments that can be accessed directly via a URL, allowing one-click reproduction of published results. Users can modify the simulation experiments and export them in standard formats. The Simulation database thus lowers the bar on exploring computational models, helps users create valid simulation descriptions and improves the reproducibility of published simulation experiments. The Simulation Database is available on line at https://jjj.bio.vu.nl/models/experiments/ . jls@sun.ac.za .

  18. Biological Databases for Human Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Zou; Lina Ma; Jun Yu; Zhang Zhang

    2015-01-01

    The completion of the Human Genome Project lays a foundation for systematically studying the human genome from evolutionary history to precision medicine against diseases. With the explosive growth of biological data, there is an increasing number of biological databases that have been developed in aid of human-related research. Here we present a collection of human-related biological databases and provide a mini-review by classifying them into different categories according to their data types. As human-related databases continue to grow not only in count but also in volume, challenges are ahead in big data storage, processing, exchange and curation.

  19. Biological Databases for Human Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Dong; Ma, Lina; Yu, Jun; Zhang, Zhang

    2015-01-01

    The completion of the Human Genome Project lays a foundation for systematically studying the human genome from evolutionary history to precision medicine against diseases. With the explosive growth of biological data, there is an increasing number of biological databases that have been developed in aid of human-related research. Here we present a collection of human-related biological databases and provide a mini-review by classifying them into different categories according to their data types. As human-related databases continue to grow not only in count but also in volume, challenges are ahead in big data storage, processing, exchange and curation. PMID:25712261

  20. A coordination language for databases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Ximeng; Wu, Xi; Lluch Lafuente, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    We present a coordination language for the modeling of distributed database applications. The language, baptized Klaim-DB, borrows the concepts of localities and nets of the coordination language Klaim but re-incarnates the tuple spaces of Klaim as databases. It provides high-level abstractions...... in the semantics. The use of the language is illustrated in a scenario where the sales from different branches of a chain of department stores are aggregated from their local databases. Raising the abstraction level and encapsulating integrity checks in the language primitives have benefited the modeling task...

  1. OECD/NEA thermochemical database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byeon, Kee Hoh; Song, Dae Yong; Shin, Hyun Kyoo; Park, Seong Won; Ro, Seung Gy

    1998-03-01

    This state of the art report is to introduce the contents of the Chemical Data-Service, OECD/NEA, and the results of survey by OECD/NEA for the thermodynamic and kinetic database currently in use. It is also to summarize the results of Thermochemical Database Projects of OECD/NEA. This report will be a guide book for the researchers easily to get the validate thermodynamic and kinetic data of all substances from the available OECD/NEA database. (author). 75 refs.

  2. Database of recent tsunami deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Robert; Jaffe, Bruce E.

    2010-01-01

    This report describes a database of sedimentary characteristics of tsunami deposits derived from published accounts of tsunami deposit investigations conducted shortly after the occurrence of a tsunami. The database contains 228 entries, each entry containing data from up to 71 categories. It includes data from 51 publications covering 15 tsunamis distributed between 16 countries. The database encompasses a wide range of depositional settings including tropical islands, beaches, coastal plains, river banks, agricultural fields, and urban environments. It includes data from both local tsunamis and teletsunamis. The data are valuable for interpreting prehistorical, historical, and modern tsunami deposits, and for the development of criteria to identify tsunami deposits in the geologic record.

  3. USGS Dam Removal Science Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellmore, J. Ryan; Vittum, Katherine; Duda, Jeff J.; Greene, Samantha L.

    2015-01-01

    This database is the result of an extensive literature search aimed at identifying documents relevant to the emerging field of dam removal science. In total the database contains 179 citations that contain empirical monitoring information associated with 130 different dam removals across the United States and abroad. Data includes publications through 2014 and supplemented with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers National Inventory of Dams database, U.S. Geological Survey National Water Information System and aerial photos to estimate locations when coordinates were not provided. Publications were located using the Web of Science, Google Scholar, and Clearinghouse for Dam Removal Information.

  4. Practical database programming with Java

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Ying

    2011-01-01

    "This important resource offers a detailed description about the practical considerations and applications in database programming using Java NetBeans 6.8 with authentic examples and detailed explanations. This book provides readers with a clear picture as to how to handle the database programming issues in the Java NetBeans environment. The book is ideal for classroom and professional training material. It includes a wealth of supplemental material that is available for download including Powerpoint slides, solution manuals, and sample databases"--

  5. Database Description - TMBETA-GENOME | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available TMBETA-GENOME Database Description General information of database Database name TMBETA-GENOME Alternative n...oinfo/Gromiha/ Database classification Protein sequence databases - Protein prope...: Eukaryota Taxonomy ID: 2759 Database description TMBETA-GENOME is a database for transmembrane β-barrel pr...lgorithms and statistical methods have been perfumed and the annotation results are accumulated in the database.... Features and manner of utilization of database Users can download lists of sequences predicted as β-bar

  6. HistoneDB 2.0: a histone database with variants--an integrated resource to explore histones and their variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draizen, Eli J; Shaytan, Alexey K; Mariño-Ramírez, Leonardo; Talbert, Paul B; Landsman, David; Panchenko, Anna R

    2016-01-01

    Compaction of DNA into chromatin is a characteristic feature of eukaryotic organisms. The core (H2A, H2B, H3, H4) and linker (H1) histone proteins are responsible for this compaction through the formation of nucleosomes and higher order chromatin aggregates. Moreover, histones are intricately involved in chromatin functioning and provide a means for genome dynamic regulation through specific histone variants and histone post-translational modifications. 'HistoneDB 2.0--with variants' is a comprehensive database of histone protein sequences, classified by histone types and variants. All entries in the database are supplemented by rich sequence and structural annotations with many interactive tools to explore and compare sequences of different variants from various organisms. The core of the database is a manually curated set of histone sequences grouped into 30 different variant subsets with variant-specific annotations. The curated set is supplemented by an automatically extracted set of histone sequences from the non-redundant protein database using algorithms trained on the curated set. The interactive web site supports various searching strategies in both datasets: browsing of phylogenetic trees; on-demand generation of multiple sequence alignments with feature annotations; classification of histone-like sequences and browsing of the taxonomic diversity for every histone variant. HistoneDB 2.0 is a resource for the interactive comparative analysis of histone protein sequences and their implications for chromatin function. Database URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/projects/HistoneDB2.0.

  7. A bioinformatics pipeline to build a knowledge database for in silico antibody engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shanrong; Lu, Jin

    2011-04-01

    A challenge to antibody engineering is the large number of positions and nature of variation and opposing concerns of introducing unfavorable biochemical properties. While large libraries are quite successful in identifying antibodies with improved binding or activity, still only a fraction of possibilities can be explored and that would require considerable effort. The vast array of natural antibody sequences provides a potential wealth of information on (1) selecting hotspots for variation, and (2) designing mutants to mimic natural variations seen in hotspots. The human immune system can generate an enormous diversity of immunoglobulins against an almost unlimited range of antigens by gene rearrangement of a limited number of germline variable, diversity and joining genes followed by somatic hypermutation and antigen selection. All the antibody sequences in NCBI database can be assigned to different germline genes. As a result, a position specific scoring matrix for each germline gene can be constructed by aligning all its member sequences and calculating the amino acid frequencies for each position. The position specific scoring matrix for each germline gene characterizes "hotspots" and the nature of variations, and thus reduces the sequence space of exploration in antibody engineering. We have developed a bioinformatics pipeline to conduct analysis of human antibody sequences, and generated a comprehensive knowledge database for in silico antibody engineering. The pipeline is fully automatic and the knowledge database can be refreshed anytime by re-running the pipeline. The refresh process is fast, typically taking 1min on a Lenovo ThinkPad T60 laptop with 3G memory. Our knowledge database consists of (1) the individual germline gene usage in generation of natural antibodies; (2) the CDR length distributions; and (3) the position specific scoring matrix for each germline gene. The knowledge database provides comprehensive support for antibody engineering

  8. The Molecular Biology Database Collection: 2008 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galperin, Michael Y

    2008-01-01

    The Nucleic Acids Research online Molecular Biology Database Collection is a public repository that lists more than 1000 databases described in this and previous Nucleic Acids Research annual database issues, as well as a selection of molecular biology databases described in other journals. All databases included in this Collection are freely available to the public. The 2008 update includes 1078 databases, 110 more than the previous one. The links to more than 80 databases have been updated and 25 obsolete databases have been removed from the list. The complete database list and summaries are available online at the Nucleic Acids Research web site, http://nar.oxfordjournals.org/.

  9. Tidal Creek Sentinel Habitat Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Ecological Research, Assessment and Prediction's Tidal Creeks: Sentinel Habitat Database was developed to support the National Oceanic and Atmospheric...

  10. E3 Portfolio Review Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — The E3 Portfolio Review Database houses operational and performance data for all activities that the Bureau funds and/or manages. Activity-level data is collected by...

  11. National Benthic Infaunal Database (NBID)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NBID is a quantitative database on abundances of individual benthic species by sample and study region, along with other synoptically measured environmental...

  12. Disaster Debris Recovery Database - Recovery

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The US EPA Region 5 Disaster Debris Recovery Database includes public datasets of over 6,000 composting facilities, demolition contractors, transfer stations,...

  13. Consolidated Human Activities Database (CHAD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Consolidated Human Activity Database (CHAD) contains data obtained from human activity studies that were collected at city, state, and national levels. CHAD is...

  14. National Patient Care Database (NPCD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The National Patient Care Database (NPCD), located at the Austin Information Technology Center, is part of the National Medical Information Systems (NMIS). The NPCD...

  15. Database of Interacting Proteins (DIP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The DIP database catalogs experimentally determined interactions between proteins. It combines information from a variety of sources to create a single, consistent...

  16. Object Oriented Databases: a reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GALANTE, A. C.

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to demonstrate that the new technology of oriented objects database can be used and is fully available to developers who wish to start in the "entirely OO world”. It is shown that the basic concepts of oriented objects, which the main types of database and in order to give a more precise focus on the database oriented objects. Furthermore, it shows also the use of the database objects aimed at explaining the types of queries that can take place and how the conduct, showing that the OQL syntax is not as far of the syntax of SQL, but with more advanced features and facilitating the tracing data. All done with practical examples and easy to be understood.

  17. InterAction Database (IADB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The InterAction Database includes demographic and prescription information for more than 500,000 patients in the northern and middle Netherlands and has been integrated with other systems to enhance data collection and analysis.

  18. Disaster Debris Recovery Database - Landfills

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The US EPA Region 5 Disaster Debris Recovery Database includes public datasets of over 6,000 composting facilities, demolition contractors, transfer stations,...

  19. Air Compliance Complaint Database (ACCD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — THIS DATA ASSET NO LONGER ACTIVE: This is metadata documentation for the Region 7 Air Compliance Complaint Database (ACCD) which logs all air pollution complaints...

  20. DATABASE, AIKEN COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...