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Sample records for natural sources radioprotection

  1. Radioprotection: Gelam Honey And Other Potential Natural Sources As Radioprotectant Agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tengku Ahbrizal Farizal Tengku Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    The application of antioxidant compounds has been studied since the early days of nuclear era, due to the high possibility of overexposure among individuals working in radiation facilities. Ionising radiations can trigger the formation of free radicals which induces biological damage even at a very low dose. It can damage DNA molecules via two mechanisms, either directly or indirectly. Therefore, radioprotectant must have the characteristic of a free radical scavenger to prevent those damages. In this study, the effect of gamma irradiation-induced DNA damage and cellular response was determined by DNA damage pathway. Gelam honey was chosen to determine its radioprotective efficacy when normal human diploid fibroblasts (HDFs) were exposed to gamma-rays. HDFs were treated with Gelam Honey at pre-, during- and post-irradiation at 1 Gray dose. Through this study, gamma-irradiation modulated the cell defence system which involved expression of gene/protein of DNA damage detection, subsequently lead to cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction. Conversely, HDFs pre-treated with Gelam honey maintained the cell proliferation as shown by the decrease in DNA damage and increase in cell survival rate. These mechanisms may be used as one of the guidelines for radioprotection study with other natural resources such as beta-glucan extract from mushrooms. (author)

  2. Radioprotection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Rashmi; Tiwari, Ajay

    2012-01-01

    A major feature of all higher eukaryotes is the defined life span of the organism. Radioprotections are substances that protect the cells against Radiation induced damage. Over the past decade interest in evaluating oriental medicinal herbs and edible phytoproducts for use in Cancer preventing strategies is encouraging and emerging as an acceptable approach for controlling the Cancer incidence in many developing countries as well as developed countries. Several experimental evidence has indicated that intake of fruit and vegetables and a number of other dietary items are associated with decreased Cancer incidence. These potential agents either abolish or delay the development of Cancer by interfering with one or more steps in the process of carcinogenesis, such as preventing the activation of carcinogen by increasing detoxification or by blocking the interaction of ultimate carcinogen with cellular macromolecules or suppressing the clonal expansion of neoplastic cells. The potential of using medicinal herbs as Cancer chemo preventive neutraceuticals and functional food is promising. Radioprotective potential of extracts of certain dietary botanicals including Mentha arvensi (field mint), Syzyzium cumini (Jamun), Zingiber officinale (Ginger), Aegle marmelos (Bael), Emblica officianalis (Amla), Aloe vera (Gwar patha), Moringa oleifera (Moringa, Horse Radish Tree), Grewia asiatica (Phalsa), Rosemarinus officinalis (Rosemary), Trigonella foenum-graecum, Ocirnurn sanctum, Phylanthus niruri, Vetiveria zizanioides (vetivergrass), Delbergia sisso oil (Sesame oil) was evaluated. All botanicals tested had shown a very low toxicity. Administration of these botanicals increased the survival of whole body irradiated mice and reduced the symptoms of radiation sickness. (author)

  3. Radioprotective action of endoneous and exogenous natural compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Mastro, N.L.

    1991-04-01

    In last years at the Radiobiology Division of our Institute several studies have been performed to determine the radioprotective capacity of some natural products from microbial, vegetal or endogenous origin. This substances have been chosen for some of their specific biological characteristics, among them: immunoestimulating (bacillus of Calmette-Guerin, Corynebacterium parvum), anti-inflammatory (Cordia verbanacea), anti-carcinogenic and anti-oxidant ones (α-tocopherol). Assays were performed using albino mice previously injected intraperitoneally with those agents and then irradiated with lethal doses of sup(60)Co gamma radiation. Survival and body weight curves after irradiation have been studied during 30 days comparing to normal controls. Depending on the specific properties of tested substances the induction of splenomegalia and the behavior of peritoneal cellularity were concomitantly analyzed. (author)

  4. Radiobiological study of the radioprotective activity of a natural Iranian compound, ''Shir-Khecht''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouhanizadeh, N.

    1967-01-01

    After reviewing the primary mechanisms of the action of ionizing radiation, the possible mechanisms of the action of radioprotective substances, the various chemical structures having a protective effect and the methods for studying chemical radioprotection, the author presents the results he has obtained with natural Iranian product: ''Shir-Khecht''. Tests with this product at lethal and sublethal doses have been carried out on the rat using various means of introduction. The effect of radiation, both with and without protection, has been studied using histological and biochemical methods. The product examined has, in effect, a protective action; it is, furthermore, non-toxic and active when taken orally. (author) [fr

  5. Natural products as radioprotective agents; past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baliga, Manjeshwar Shrinath

    2013-01-01

    The use of ionizing radiation, which is the cornerstone of cancer treatment, is compromised by the radiosensitivity of normal tissues. A chemical that can give selective benefit to the normal cells against the deleterious effects of ionizing radiation has been a long sought goal. However, most of the compounds studied have shown inadequate clinical application owing to their inherent toxicity, undesirable side effects, and high cost. Plants commonly used as dietary and or therapeutic agents have recently been the focus of attention since in most cases they are non-toxic and are easily accepted for human use. The proposed talk will mainly deal on the radioprotective potential of some important plant and herbal extracts. (author)

  6. Radioprotective preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanova, D.; Frattadochi, A.; Gattavecchia, E.; Ferri, E.; Tonnelli, D.

    1988-01-01

    The invention is intended for radiation injuries prophylaxis in mammals. It has an well expressed radioprotective effect against acute gamma irradiation on cellular level as well as a prolonged action when applied up to 48 hours before the acute irradiation. The preparation is a coprecipitate of the natural tripeptide glutathione (reduced form) and polyvinyl pyrrolidone (pvp) in ratio 30-60/70-40. It is obtained by incubation method with subsequent lyophilization from water solution of the initial components. The molecular mass of the pvp is 20 till 360.10 3 . 2 claims

  7. Biochemical and molecular genetic approaches on the radioprotective mechanism of natural products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeong Hee; Lee, Eun Ju; Sung, Woo Kyung; Piao, Wen Hua [Kyunghee University, Seoul (Korea)

    1999-04-01

    We reported the radio-protective effect of DTT. The treatment of DTT increased cell survival after gamma-irradiation, decreased in the frequencies of micronucleus, and reduction in DNA fragmentation and apoptotic cells. Induction of apoptosis after UV-C irradiation was revealed by the changes in the relative cell death, increase in the relative amount of apoptotic cells, and the induction of DNA fragmentation. About 100 medicinal plants were purchased and methanol extract samples were prepared. Radio-protective and radio-sensitizing activities of these samples were screened. Seven samples showed above 20% radio-protective activities: Salvia miltiorrhiza, Areca catechu, Cornus officinalis, Alpiniae officinari rhizoma, Meliae fructus, Alpiniae katsumadaii semen, Betulae cortex. Acanthopanax sessiliflous showed the highest radio-sensitizing effect and 10 other samples revealed moderate activities: Melia japonica, Agastache rugosa, Platycodon gradiflorum, Broussonetia bazinoki, Angelica gigas, Inula helenium, Chelidonium majus, Pulsatilla koreana, Oldenlandia diffusa, Dioscorea batatas. (author). 49 refs., 9 figs., 7 tabs.

  8. Development of enhanced radioprotectors - Biochemical and molecular genetical approaches on the radioprotective mechanism of natural products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeong Hee; Lee, Eun Ju; Hong, Jung A [Kyunghee University, Seoul (Korea)

    2000-04-01

    To identify radio-protective agent candidate among medicinal plants and to elucidate the mechanism of action of the candidate material by using modern biochemical and molecular biological methods, we screened radio-protective activity among 48 medicinal plants. Seven samples showed above 20% protective activities against oxidative cell damage: Euryale ferox, Glycyrrhiza uralensis, Salvia miltiorrhiza, Eucomia ulmoides, Paeonia suffruticosa, Spirodela polyrrhiza, and Nelumbo nucifera. We also screened for oxidative stress sensitizing activity among other 51 medicinal plants. Among those samples, 11 samples showed good sensitizing effect; Melia azedarach, Agastache rugosa, Catalpa ovata, Prunus persica, Sinomenium acutum, Pulsatilla koreana, Oldenlandia diffusa, Anthriscus sylvestris, Schizandra chinensis, Gleditsia sinensis, and Cridium officinale. We also reported the radio-protective effect of DTT. The treatment of DTT increased cell survival after gamma-irradiation, decreased in the frequencies of micronucleus, and reduction in DNA fragmentation and apoptotic cells. Induction of apoptosis after UV-C irradiation was revealed by the changes in the relative cell death, increase in the relative amount of apoptotic cells, and the induction of DNA fragmentation. 165 refs., 9 figs., 8 tabs. (Author)

  9. Order n.02-060 /P-RM of 05 June 2002 setting up the creation of Malian Agency for Radioprotection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This order is about the creation of Agence Malienne de Radioprotection (AMARAP) which is in charge of radioprotection and the safe use of ionizing radiation sources. In that regard his attributions related regulation draft, authorization, inspection, emergency, researches, training, information, etc. are defined as well as the nature of his resources and expenditure

  10. Radioprotective effects of natural β-carotene on villi and crypts in abdominally radiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurabe, Teruhisa; Itoh, Youko; Matsumura, Eijin; Nakamura, Atsushi; Ayakawa, Yoshio

    2002-01-01

    The protective effect of β-carotene against radiation injury to the small intestine of abdominally radiated mice (15 Gy) was examined with administration given pre-radiation, during (pre- and post-) radiation, and post-radiation. In the β-carotene group, the ratio of villus length to crypt was significantly greater in comparison with the radiation only group at 2 days after radiation. At 7 days after radiation, the ratio of necrotic cells in the crypt vs. the total was significantly lower, and the ratio of necrotic cells in the villus vs. the total was significantly greater with β-carotene administration, which indicated that β-carotene accelerated recovery from radiation injury. Each group administered β-carotene showed a significant radioprotective effect, with pre-radiation administration yielding a smaller effect than administration during radiation and post-radiation. It is concluded that pre-, during, and post-radiation administration of β-carotene protected against radiation injury of the small intestine and accelerated recovery from it. (author)

  11. Meta-analysis of dragon’s blood resin extract as radio-protective agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subaika Mahmood

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In health sciences, much efforts had been made in past years to explore the radio-protective agents from natural resources due to rapid exposure of radiations to environment such as space traveling, radiotherapy and largely growing telecommunication industry. It becomes crucial to find natural sources for radio-protection. In correspondence, dragon’s blood (DB is a traditional Chinese medicinal plant that possesses great medicinal values due to the presence of several phenolic compounds. For a long time, DB has been used in treatment of blood stasis, inflammation, oxidative stress, immune suppression and tumors, but recently it has been extensively used as radio-protective agent. There is no comprehensive review on radio- protective characterization of DB resin extract in literature. In our review, an attempt has been made to highlight unique and inherent radio-protection in liver, brain, kidney, lung, spleen and cerebrum. This review will help people in exploring the radioactive protectants from natural resources.

  12. Radioprotective Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilker Kelle

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Since1949, a great deal of research has been carried out on the radioprotective activity of various chemical substances. Thiol compounds, compounds which contain –SH radical, different classes of pharmacological agents and other compounds such as vitamine C and WR-2721 have been shown to reduce mortality when administered prior to exposure to a lethal dose of radiation. Recently, honey bee venom as well as that of its components melittin and histamine have shown to be valuable in reduction of radiation-induced damage and also provide prophylactic alternative treatment for serious side effects related with radiotherapy. It has been suggested that the radioprotective activity of bee venom components is related with the stimulation of the hematopoetic system.

  13. Study of the radioprotective efficiency of combined administration of natural antioxidants and a sulfhydryl compound in feverish irradiated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radwan, R.R.

    2008-01-01

    In the present experiments, a study of the radioprotective effects of natural antioxidants, rutin alone, vitamine E alone or each of them combined with synthetic radioprotector, cysteine have been investigated in irradiated and feverish irradiated rats. Furthermore, the oxidative stress bio markers and certain liver function tests of the irradiated and the feverish whole body irradiated rats were examined. Two main sets of animals were used: The 1st set was constructed in order to study the effect of irradiation, while the second set was used to study the effect of irradiation on feverish rats. The effect of irradiation was evaluated by exposing the whole body of rats to gamma radiation at acute single dose level of 6.5 Gy. Rutin was orally daily administered for two weeks before irradiation in a dose of 1.064 mmol/kg , vitamine E was injected intraperitoneally daily for seven days before irradiation in a dose of 50 mg/100 g. While, cysteine was intraperitoneally administered only 30 min. before irradiation in a dose of 30 mg/kg. In order to determine the antipyretic effect of the drugs, body temperature of each animal was measured before induction of hyperthermia as well as 18 hours following yeast injection. Rats were treated with the tested drugs before induction of fever then exposed to whole body gamma radiation at acute single dose level of 6.5 Gy and body temperature of each animal was measured 3 days after irradiation

  14. Natural sources of ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marej, A.N.

    1984-01-01

    Natural sources of ionizing radiations are described in detail. The sources are subdivided into sources of extraterrestrial origin (cosmic radiation) and sources of terrestrial origin. Data on the concentration of different nuclides in rocks, various soils, ground waters, atmospheric air, tissues of plants and animals, various food stuffs are presented. The content of natural radionuclides in environmental objects, related to human activities, is discussed

  15. Study of radioprotective effect of the resveratrol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno, Carolina dos Santos

    2009-01-01

    Resveratrol (3,4,5 trihydroxystilbene), a phenolic phytoalexin occurring naturally in a wide variety of plants, such as grapevines, in response to injury as fungal infections and exposure to ultraviolet light. In the wines this compound is present at high levels and is considered one of the highest antioxidant constituents. This high capacity to scavenge the free radicals generated by several biologic processes by resveratrol can provide a prevention of human cardiovascular diseases and several types of cancer. The main objective of this study was to determine the in vitro radioprotective effect of resveratrol in cell culture with the aid of the tests of cytotoxicity of resveratrol (IC50%) and lethal dose 50% of gamma radiation (LD50). Studies of the level of resveratrol toxicity, found by cytotoxicity test performed by neutral red uptake assay, and lethal dose 50% (LD50) of gamma radiation from source of Cobalt-60 (Co-60) was performed in cell culture NCTC Clone 929 from ATCC. The IC50% of resveratrol was about 50 M/L. The DL50 of gamma radiation showed a value of about 354 Gy. On the basis of these biological results, it was performed studies of radioprotective effect of resveratrol on the same experimental conditions, verifying that the resveratrol in concentrations between 12.5 M/L and 25 M/L showed a more pronounced radioprotective effect. (author)

  16. Radioprotective Effects of Sulfur-containing Mineral Water of Ramsar Hot Spring with High Natural Background Radiation on Mouse Bone Marrow Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari, A H; Shabestani Monfared, A; Mozdarani, H; Mahmoudzadeh, A; Razzaghdoust, A

    2017-12-01

    We intend to study the inhibitory effect of sulfur compound in Ramsar hot spring mineral on tumor-genesis ability of high natural background radiation. The radioprotective effect of sulfur compounds was previously shown on radiation-induced chromosomal aberration, micronuclei in mouse bone marrow cells and human peripheral lymphocyte. Ramsar is known for having the highest level of natural background radiation on Earth. This study was performed to show the radioprotective effect of sulfur-containing Ramsar mineral water on mouse bone marrow cells. Mice were fed three types of water (drinking water, Ramsar radioactive water containing sulfur and Ramsar radioactive water whose sulfur was removed). Ten days after feeding, mice were irradiated by gamma rays (0, 2 and 4 Gy). 48 and 72 hours after irradiating, mice were killed and femurs were removed. Frequency of micronuclei was determined in bone marrow erythrocytes. A significant reduction was shown in the rate of micronuclei polychromatic erythrocyte in sulfur-containing hot spring water compared to sulfur-free water in hot spring mineral water. Gamma irradiation induced significant increases in micronuclei polychromatic erythrocyte (MNPCE) and decreases in polychromatic erythrocyte/polychromatic erythrocyte + normochromatic erythrocyte ratio (PCEs/PCEs+NCEs) (P spring water compared to sulfur-free hot spring mineral water. Also, apparently there was a significant difference between drinking water and sulfur-containing hot spring water in micronuclei polychromatic erythrocyte and polychromatic erythrocyte/polychromatic erythrocyte+ normochromatic erythrocyte ratio. The results indicate that sulfur-containing mineral water could result in a significant reduction in radiation-induced micronuclei representing the radioprotective effect of sulfur compounds.

  17. Natural Colorants: Food Colorants from Natural Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigurdson, Gregory T; Tang, Peipei; Giusti, M Mónica

    2017-02-28

    The color of food is often associated with the flavor, safety, and nutritional value of the product. Synthetic food colorants have been used because of their high stability and low cost. However, consumer perception and demand have driven the replacement of synthetic colorants with naturally derived alternatives. Natural pigment applications can be limited by lower stability, weaker tinctorial strength, interactions with food ingredients, and inability to match desired hues. Therefore, no single naturally derived colorant can serve as a universal alternative for a specified synthetic colorant in all applications. This review summarizes major environmental and biological sources for natural colorants as well as nature-identical counterparts. Chemical characteristics of prevalent pigments, including anthocyanins, carotenoids, betalains, and chlorophylls, are described. The possible applications and hues (warm, cool, and achromatic) of currently used natural pigments, such as anthocyanins as red and blue colorants, and possible future alternatives, such as purple violacein and red pyranoanthocyanins, are also discussed.

  18. Urolithiasis and radioprotection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saussine, C.; Lechevallier, E.; Traxer, O.

    2008-01-01

    Radioactivity is represented by α, β and γ-rays emission which can by interaction with substance produce ionisation. Humankind is exposed to natural radioactivity as well as human activities related radioactivity. Radioactivity risk is dose related and biological dose is expressed in milli-sievert (mSv). Annual biological dose related to natural radioactivity is around 2 to 3 mSv. Regarding urinary lithiasis, radiation can occur during diagnosis and treatment phases for the patient and the latter for the surgeon. Objective of radioprotection is to protect people from radioactivity and is organised by different decrees. Annual biological dose received by internal or external exposition should not exceed 20 mSv a year. Some essential concepts must be known and good practice rules have to be followed. (authors)

  19. Radioprotection in Brazilian universities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caballero, K.C.; Borges, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to obtain a broad knowledge of the circumstances under which activities involving ionizing radiations are held at brazilian academic institutions. Around 90 institutions (universities and isolated schools of both public and private sectors) were invited, by mail, to answer an inquiry with questions from technical to legal aspects of their activities with radiations. Information received from 2/3 of institutions contacted, permitted conclusions as: there is a wide ignorance about radioprotection procedures and legislation, although few universities maintain some efficient radioprotection staff; there is a need for the establishment of a standard radioprotection text dedicated to those specific activities of the sector. (author)

  20. Medicinally important aromatic plants with radioprotective activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samarth, Ravindra M; Samarth, Meenakshi; Matsumoto, Yoshihisa

    2017-11-01

    Aromatic plants are often used as natural medicines because of their remedial and inherent pharmacological properties. Looking into natural resources, particularly products of plant origin, has become an exciting area of research in drug discovery and development. Aromatic plants are mainly exploited for essential oil extraction for applications in industries, for example, in cosmetics, flavoring and fragrance, spices, pesticides, repellents and herbal beverages. Although several medicinal plants have been studied to treat various conventional ailments only a handful studies are available on aromatic plants, especially for radioprotection. Many plant extracts have been reported to contain antioxidants that scavenge free radicals produced due to radiation exposure, thus imparting radioprotective efficacy. The present review focuses on a subset of medicinally important aromatic plants with radioprotective activity.

  1. Computerized techniques for collecting the radioprotection data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cenusa, V.; Valeca, S.; Guta, C.; Talpalariu, C.; Stoica, V.

    2016-01-01

    An important component of a computerized radioprotection system is the module for the collection of the radioprotection data. The data collection can be made automatically from the measurement equipment or manually by the operators after they read the values measured by the mobile devices. Database systems are used for storing the data, they offer higher performances, more efficient data organization, ensure data integrity and controlled access to the data into a multiuser environment. The experimental program for the automatic collection of the remote data transfers periodically, at programmable time intervals, data files from the fixed radiation monitoring stations to a centralized system for radioprotection data. For this is used the File Transfer Protocol (FTP). A Radiation Monitoring Equipment designed and assembled in the Electronics Department of ICN Pitesti was used as a data source for the testing of the experimental programs. (authors)

  2. Biological radiation effects and radioprotection standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clerc, H.

    1991-03-01

    In this report, after recalling the mode of action of ionizing radiations, the notions of dose, dose equivalents and the values of natural irradiation, the author describes the biological radiation effects. Then he presents the ICRP recommendations and their applications to the french radioprotection system

  3. Radioprotection and training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nolibe, D.; Zackova, H.

    1994-01-01

    In a country where 75% of its electric power production is nuclear-based and where the health industry is making more and more use of ionizing radiation, Radioprotection education in France is necessarily characterized by a wide diversity in the trainings delivered and a significant increase in the number of actors providing these training programs. From the isolated worker using an industrial gammagraphy device to the thousands of persons working in major nuclear installations, it is estimated that more than 100,000 workers are exposed to ionizing radiation. Due to the seriousness of the pathological consequences resulting from overexposure to ionizing radiation, the volume of population concerned ant the media impact generated by the problem, one of the basic requirements formulated at the very early stages of the legislation is the obligation of informing workers of the hazards of exposure and the preventive measures to be taken. Employers are legally required to inform their personnel of the risks taken when handling equipment generating ionizing radiation of when using radio-nuclides. This obligation translates concretely by the need for the employer to name a qualified Radioprotection Department. The Qualified Officer or the Radioprotection Department are responsible for, among other tasks, ensuring training of workers. Two training orientations can be distinguished, each having different goals: - the first consists in training a body of highly-skilled Radioprotection professionals or managers (Qualified Officers), - the second consists in training all workers having any contact with ionizing radiation; each person should be capable of ensuring his own Radioprotection regardless of the presence of Qualified Officers. (authors)

  4. 7. national congress of radioprotection - SFRP 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aurengo, A.; Lecomte, J.F.; Averbeck, D.; Makovicka, L.; Barescut, J.C.; Maubert, H.; Benderitter, M.; Menechal, Ph.; Biau, A.; Menetrier, F.; Briand-Champlong, J.; Metivier, H.; Cherin, A.; Paquet, F.; Decobert, V.; Radecki, J.J.; Devin, P.; Roy, C.; Fracas, P.; Schneider, Th.; Italia, J.; Souques, M.; Lagroye, I.; Tamponnet, Ch.; Laurent, G.; Vidal, J.P.; Aubert, B.; Piqueras, P.; Cervera, J.; Vial, Th.; Mear, R.; Visseaux, H.; Patrix, N.; Bourguignon, M.; Acker, A.; Sabatier, L.; Abela, G.; Andrieux, J.L.; Bernard, H.; Vicaud, A.; De Bruyne, T.; Valero, M.; Godet, J.L.; Lebaron-Jacobs, L.; Renaud, P.; Bordy, J.M.; Leuraud, K.; Arranz, L.; Lochard, J.; Vaillant, L.; Droesch, P.; Coenen, S.; Michiels, J.; Pepin, S.; Poffijn, A.; Wertelaers, A.; Schrauben, M.; Pires, N.; Matouk, F.; Wall, B.; Hart, D.; Mol, H.; Lecluyse, A.; Aroua, A.; Trueb, P.; Griebel, J.; Nekolla, E.; Gron, P.; Waltenburg, H.; Beauvais-March, H.; Scanff, P.; Pirard, P.; Sinno-Tellier, S.; Shannoun, F.; Brugmans, M.; Meeuwsen, E.; Stoop, P.; Olerud, H.; Borretzen, I.; Leitz, W.; Marconato, M.; Magnier, F.; Rehel, J.L.; Etard, C.; Ducou Le Pointe, H.; Bouette, A.; Fourrier, P.; Lisbona, A.; Tirmarche, M.; Metz-Flamant, C.; Samson, E.; Caer-Lorho, S.; Giraud, J.M.; Acker, A.; Laurier, D.; Laurent, O.; Rogel, A.; Joly, K.; Hubert, D.; Riedel, A.; Garcier, Y.; Amabile, J.C.; Leuraud, K.; Vacquier, B.; Caer, S.; Griffiths, N.; Van der Meeren, A.; Fritsch, P.; Abram, M.C.; Bernaudin, J.F.; Poncy, J.L.; Chevillard, S.; Cesarini, J.P.; Bertho, J.M.; Louiba, S.; Tourlonias, E.; Faure, M.C.; Stefani, J.; Siffert, B.; Paquet, F.; Dublineau, I.; Adam, C.; Alonzo, F.; Bonzom, J.M.; Gagnaire, B.; Gilbin, R.; Garnier-Laplace, J.; Denoziere, M.; Lecerf, N.; Leroy, E.; Daures, J.; Bordy, J.M.; Clairand, I.; Debroas, J.; Denoziere, M.; Donadille, L.; D'Errico, F.; Gouriou, J.; Itie, C.; Struelens, L.; Broggio, D.; Borissov, N.; Janeczko, J.; Lamart, S.; Blanchardon, E.; Molokanov, A.; Yatsenko, V.; Franck, D.; Rannou, A.; Kockerols, P.; Bickel, M.; De Bruyne, G.; Fessler, A.; McCourt, J.; Lefaure, C.; Godet, J.L.; Bouchet, F.; Ecault, A.; Lacoeuille, F.; Cahouet-Vannier, A.

    2009-01-01

    This document gathers the slides of the available presentations given during this conference. Sixty six presentations out of 68 are assembled in the document. The conference is organized in 11 sessions dealing with: 1 - radioprotection regulations and standards; 2 - radioprotection of patients; 3 - radiation effects on man and ecosystems; 4 - advances in dosimetry and metrology; occupational radioprotection (2 sessions); 5 - radioprotection of populations and ecosystems (2 sessions); 6 - radioprotection in incident, accident and post-accident situations; 7 - radioprotection and society

  5. Radioprotection: mechanism and radioprotective agents including honeybee venom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varanda, E.A.; Tavares, D.C. [UNESP, Araraquara, SP (Brazil). Escola de Ciencias Farmaceuticas. Dept. de Ciencias Biologicas

    1998-07-01

    Since 1949, a great deal of research has been carried on the radioprotective action of chemical substances. These substances have shown to reduce mortality when administered to animals prior to exposure to a lethal dose of radiation. This fact is of considerable importance since it permits reduction of radiation-induced damage and provides prophylactic treatment for the damaging effects produced by radiotherapy. The following radioprotection mechanisms were proposed: free radical scavenger, repair by hydrogen donation to target molecules formation of mixed disulfides, delay of cellular division and induction of hypoxia in the tissues. Radioprotective agents have been divided into four major groups: the thiol compounds, other sulfur compounds, pharmacological agents (anesthetic drugs, analgesics, tranquilizers, etc.) and other radioprotective agents (WR-1065, WR-2721, vitamins C and E, glutathione, etc.). Several studies revealed the radioprotective action of Apis mellifera honeybee venom as well as that of its components mellitin and histamine. Radioprotective activity of bee venom involves mainly the stimulation of the hematopoietic system. In addition, release of histamine and reduction in oxygen tension also contribute to the radioprotective action of bee venom. (author)

  6. Radioprotection: mechanism and radioprotective agents including honeybee venom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varanda, E.A.; Tavares, D.C.

    1998-01-01

    Since 1949, a great deal of research has been carried on the radioprotective action of chemical substances. These substances have shown to reduce mortality when administered to animals prior to exposure to a lethal dose of radiation. This fact is of considerable importance since it permits reduction of radiation-induced damage and provides prophylactic treatment for the damaging effects produced by radiotherapy. The following radioprotection mechanisms were proposed: free radical scavenger, repair by hydrogen donation to target molecules formation of mixed disulfides, delay of cellular division and induction of hypoxia in the tissues. Radioprotective agents have been divided into four major groups: the thiol compounds, other sulfur compounds, pharmacological agents (anesthetic drugs, analgesics, tranquilizers, etc.) and other radioprotective agents (WR-1065, WR-2721, vitamins C and E, glutathione, etc.). Several studies revealed the radioprotective action of Apis mellifera honeybee venom as well as that of its components mellitin and histamine. Radioprotective activity of bee venom involves mainly the stimulation of the hematopoietic system. In addition, release of histamine and reduction in oxygen tension also contribute to the radioprotective action of bee venom. (author)

  7. 7. national congress of radioprotection - SFRP 2009; 7. congres national de radioprotection - SFRP 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aurengo, A.; Lecomte, J.F.; Averbeck, D.; Makovicka, L.; Barescut, J.C.; Maubert, H.; Benderitter, M.; Menechal, Ph.; Biau, A.; Menetrier, F.; Briand-Champlong, J.; Metivier, H.; Cherin, A.; Paquet, F.; Decobert, V.; Radecki, J.J.; Devin, P.; Roy, C.; Fracas, P.; Schneider, Th.; Italia, J.; Souques, M.; Lagroye, I.; Tamponnet, Ch.; Laurent, G.; Vidal, J.P.; Aubert, B.; Piqueras, P.; Cervera, J.; Vial, Th.; Mear, R.; Visseaux, H.; Patrix, N.; Bourguignon, M.; Acker, A.; Sabatier, L.; Abela, G.; Andrieux, J.L.; Bernard, H.; Vicaud, A.; De Bruyne, T.; Valero, M.; Godet, J.L.; Lebaron-Jacobs, L.; Renaud, P.; Bordy, J.M.; Leuraud, K.; Arranz, L.; Lochard, J.; Vaillant, L.; Droesch, P.; Coenen, S.; Michiels, J.; Pepin, S.; Poffijn, A.; Wertelaers, A.; Schrauben, M.; Pires, N.; Matouk, F.; Wall, B.; Hart, D.; Mol, H.; Lecluyse, A.; Aroua, A.; Trueb, P.; Griebel, J.; Nekolla, E.; Gron, P.; Waltenburg, H.; Beauvais-March, H.; Scanff, P.; Pirard, P.; Sinno-Tellier, S.; Shannoun, F.; Brugmans, M.; Meeuwsen, E.; Stoop, P.; Olerud, H.; Borretzen, I.; Leitz, W.; Marconato, M.; Magnier, F.; Rehel, J.L.; Etard, C.; Ducou Le Pointe, H.; Bouette, A.; Fourrier, P.; Lisbona, A.; Tirmarche, M.; Metz-Flamant, C.; Samson, E.; Caer-Lorho, S.; Giraud, J.M.; Acker, A.; Laurier, D.; Laurent, O.; Rogel, A.; Joly, K.; Hubert, D.; Riedel, A.; Garcier, Y.; Amabile, J.C.; Leuraud, K.; Vacquier, B.; Caer, S.; Griffiths, N.; Van der Meeren, A.; Fritsch, P.; Abram, M.C.; Bernaudin, J.F.; Poncy, J.L.; Chevillard, S.; Cesarini, J.P.; Bertho, J.M.; Louiba, S.; Tourlonias, E.; Faure, M.C.; Stefani, J.; Siffert, B.; Paquet, F.; Dublineau, I.; Adam, C.; Alonzo, F.; Bonzom, J.M.; Gagnaire, B.; Gilbin, R.; Garnier-Laplace, J.; Denoziere, M.; Lecerf, N.; Leroy, E.; Daures, J.; Bordy, J.M.; Clairand, I.; Debroas, J.; Denoziere, M.; Donadille, L.; D' Errico, F.; Gouriou, J.; Itie, C.; Struelens, L.; Broggio, D.; Borissov, N.; Janeczko, J.; Lamart, S.; Blanchardon, E.; Molokanov, A. [and others

    2009-07-01

    This document gathers the slides of the available presentations given during this conference. Sixty six presentations out of 68 are assembled in the document. The conference is organized in 11 sessions dealing with: 1 - radioprotection regulations and standards; 2 - radioprotection of patients; 3 - radiation effects on man and ecosystems; 4 - advances in dosimetry and metrology; occupational radioprotection (2 sessions); 5 - radioprotection of populations and ecosystems (2 sessions); 6 - radioprotection in incident, accident and post-accident situations; 7 - radioprotection and society

  8. The natural sources of ionizing radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maximilien, R.

    1982-01-01

    Natural sources of ionizing radiation include external sources (cosmic rays, natural radionuclides present in the crust of the earth and in building materials) and internal sources (naturally occuring radionuclides in the human body, especially the potassium 40 and radon short lived decay products). The principal ways of human exposure to theses different components in ''normal'' areas are reviewed; some examples of the variability of exposure with respect to different regions of the world or the habits of life are given. Actual estimations of the doses delivered to the organs are presented; for the main contributors to population exposure, the conversion into effective dose equivalent has been made for allowing a better evaluation of their respective importance [fr

  9. Occupational exposure to natural sources of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz, T.; Sciocchetti, G.; Rannou, A.

    1993-01-01

    The most important natural sources of radiation are analyzed. The situation in France, Italy, and Spain concerning protection against natural radiation is described, including the identification of sources, and defined practices, organizations charged of national surveys and the responsibility of regulatory bodies and the role of operating management. The activities of the international organizations (ICRP, CEC and IAEA) are presented and discussed, and existing actions toward harmonization in the CEC, IAEA and other international programs is also discussed. (R.P.) 23 refs., 2 tabs

  10. Radioprotective effectiveness of some zootoxins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vernigorova, L.A.; Lebedev, V.G.

    1986-01-01

    A study was made of the effectiveness of a new class of radioprotective agents, polypeptides, obtained from zootoxins of scorpion, tarantula, Lathrodectes tredecimguttatus, and bee under conditions of a short-term and long-term irradiation. The peptide fraction of the sorption venom, butoxin, was most radioprotective: it provided 65% survival after LD 98/30 . Butoxin exerted a stimulatory effect on the hypophysis-adrenal system and haemopoiesis of intact and irradiated animals

  11. Essential Oils and Fragrances from Natural Sources

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 9; Issue 4. Essential Oils and Fragrances from Natural Sources. Padma S Vankar. General Article Volume 9 Issue 4 April 2004 pp 30-41. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/009/04/0030-0041 ...

  12. Establishing Standards on Colors from Natural Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, James E; Decker, Eric A; Ferruzzi, Mario G; Giusti, M Monica; Mejia, Carla D; Goldschmidt, Mark; Talcott, Stephen T

    2017-11-01

    Color additives are applied to many food, drug, and cosmetic products. With up to 85% of consumer buying decisions potentially influenced by color, appropriate application of color additives and their safety is critical. Color additives are defined by the U.S. Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FD&C Act) as any dye, pigment, or substance that can impart color to a food, drug, or cosmetic or to the human body. Under current U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations, colors fall into 2 categories as those subject to an FDA certification process and those that are exempt from certification often referred to as "natural" colors by consumers because they are sourced from plants, minerals, and animals. Certified colors have been used for decades in food and beverage products, but consumer interest in natural colors is leading market applications. However, the popularity of natural colors has also opened a door for both unintentional and intentional economic adulteration. Whereas FDA certifications for synthetic dyes and lakes involve strict quality control, natural colors are not evaluated by the FDA and often lack clear definitions and industry accepted quality and safety specifications. A significant risk of adulteration of natural colors exists, ranging from simple misbranding or misuse of the term "natural" on a product label to potentially serious cases of physical, chemical, and/or microbial contamination from raw material sources, improper processing methods, or intentional postproduction adulteration. Consistent industry-wide safety standards are needed to address the manufacturing, processing, application, and international trade of colors from natural sources to ensure quality and safety throughout the supply chain. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  13. Gamma irradiation of radioprotectant drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobbs, C.R.; Elhardt, C.E.; May, L.

    1980-01-01

    Levamisole [(S)-(-)-2,3,5,6-tetrahydro-6-phenyl-imidazo-(2, 1-b) thiazole], an immunomodulating drug and veterinary antihelminthic, is converted by tissues to a sulfhydryl derivative. The drug and its metabolite have mediating effects on lipid peroxidation in microsomal preparations. Because levamisole, as an inhibitor of lipid peroxidation, is a radioprotectant drug, it was of interest to study the response of the drug itself to ionizing radiation. Experiments were directed toward an examination of the effects of gamma radiation on aqueous solutions of levamisole. Chromatographic analysis (TLC) revealed two distinct groups of radiation products. Further separation and analysis of these groups by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) demonstrated that each group of radiation products consists of several components, indicating that the gamma irradiation of non-deaerated solutions of levamisole gives rise to varying amounts of a multiproduct mixture, no constituent of which corresponds to the natural metabolite. Dose effect curves for the levamisole irradiation indicate that the drug is markedly resistant to molecular alteration under the experimental radiation conditions. (author)

  14. Evaluation of the radioprotective and curative role of a natural antioxidant against cellular ultrastructural hazards induced in rats by gamma radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Azeem, M.G.

    2005-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of Nigella sativa known as black seed in the amelioration of the histological disorders that occur in different tissues of albino rats exposed to 8 Gy whole body gamma irradiation, delivered as a single dose. Nigella sativa oil was administered daily to rats at a dose of 30 mg / 100 g body weight by gavage, 10 days before irradiation and to another group 10 days after irradiation. Experimental investigations performed one day after radiation for the first group and ten days after radiation for the second group showed that Nigella sativa treatment exerted a radioprotective and curative role on the fine structure of the renal tissue detected as swelling and cristalysis of mitochondria, fragmentation and dilatation damage in the rough endoplasmic reticulum which exhibited in various degrees such as active lysosomes, irregular nuclear membrane, clumped marginal chromatin, pyknotic nucleus with abnormal brush border, absence of infolding and irregularity of basement membrane. Moreover, the radiated hepatic cells showed dilation and thickness in membrane of blood sinasoid as well as lysis of cytoplasmic matrix. Treatment of rats with Nigella sativa during 10 consecutive days either before or after exposure to 8 Gy single dose led to partial improvement of hepatic and kidney cells.The results of the current study indicated that Nigella sativa oil exerted an important protective and curative role against radiation-induced damage in the ultrastructure configuration of kidney and liver cells

  15. On the Nature of Orion Source I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Báez-Rubio, A.; Jiménez-Serra, I.; Martín-Pintado, J.; Zhang, Q.; Curiel, S.

    2018-01-01

    The Kleinmann–Low nebula in Orion, the closest region of massive star formation, harbors Source I, whose nature is under debate. Knowledge of this source may have profound implications for our understanding of the energetics of the hot core in Orion KL since it might be the main heating source in the region. The spectral energy distribution of this source in the radio is characterized by a positive spectral index close to 2, which is consistent with (i) thermal bremsstrahlung emission of ionized hydrogen gas produced by a central massive protostar, or (ii) photospheric bremsstrahlung emission produced by electrons when deflected by the interaction with neutral and molecular hydrogen like Mira-like variable stars. If ionized hydrogen gas were responsible for the observed continuum emission, its modeling would predict detectable emission from hydrogen radio recombination lines (RRLs). However, our SMA observations were obtained with a high enough sensitivity to rule out that the radio continuum emission arises from a dense hypercompact H II region because the H26α line would have been detected, in contrast with our observations. To explain the observational constraints, we investigate further the nature of the radio continuum emission from source I. We have compared available radio continuum data with the predictions from our upgraded non-LTE 3D radiative transfer model, MOdel for REcombination LInes, to show that radio continuum fluxes and sizes can only be reproduced by assuming both dust and bremsstrahlung emission from neutral gas. The dust emission contribution is significant at ν ≥ 43 GHz. In addition, our RRL peak intensity predictions for the ionized metals case are consistent with the nondetection of Na and K RRLs at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths.

  16. Radio Source Morphology: 'nature or nuture'?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banfield, Julie; Emonts, Bjorn; O'Sullivan, Shane

    2012-10-01

    Radio sources, emanating from supermassive black-holes in the centres of active galaxies, display a large variety of morphological properties. It is a long-standing debate to what extent the differences between various types of radio sources are due to intrinsic properties of the central engine (`nature') or due to the properties of the interstellar medium that surrounds the central engine and host galaxy (`nurture'). Settling this `nature vs. nurture' debate for nearby radio galaxies, which can be studied in great detail, is vital for understanding the properties and evolution of radio galaxies throughout the Universe. We propose to observe the radio galaxy NGC 612 where previous observations have detected the presence of a large-scale HI bridge between the host galaxy and a nearby galaxy NGC 619. We request a total of 13 hrs in the 750m array-configuration to determine whether or not the 100 kpc-scale radio source morphology is directly related to the intergalactic distribution of neutral hydrogen gas.

  17. Computerized examination system on radioprotection knowledge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanescu, Gabriel; Rosca Fartat, Gabriela; Ghilea, Simion

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the recognition system of the education and training in the field of radioprotection based on the examination system and the software solutions adopted by the regulatory authority in Romania. The Romanian Radiation Protection system is in place since 1950, when the first nuclear research reactor was built and activities involving radioactive sources started to be developed, and several developing phases were passed through. Linked to the Romanian Radiation Protection system an Education, Training and Recognition system was developed. The recognition of the competencies achieved by the personnel in the framework of the education and training system consists in obtaining a work permit. It is mandatory at least for the radiological safety officers to posses a work permit granted by the Romanian Regulatory Body (CNCAN) based on an examination of the radioprotection knowledge. The examination consists in solving a questionnaire on radioprotection and legislation issues. Each participant receives a questionnaire with 60 questions and has to solve it in a time limit of one hour. In 2007 the examination system has been improved by authors who designed a software and a database which contains all the questions and answers with related explanations. For each examination session the software generates randomly for each participant the examination questionnaire. More than 2000 questions and answers from the database are published on the web site of CNCAN for different fields of ionizing radiation applications. Moreover the generated questions and participant's answers are registered in order to perform the further analysis and review. The result is an objective and transparent examination system which encourages the continuous training and retraining. (author)

  18. [Mineral waters from several Brazilian natural sources].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebelo, M A; Araujo, N C

    1999-01-01

    To divulge information on the chemical composition and physical-chemical features of some mineral waters from Brazilian natural sources that will be of useful protocol investigation and patient advice. The survey was based on bottle labels of non-gaseous mineral waters commercially available in the city of Rio de Janeiro. The íon concentration of each mineral was calculated from the salt content. 36 springs were enralled from different states of the country. The pH (25 degrees C), 4.1 to 9.3, varied on dependence of the source and it was linearey correlated with the cations calcium, magnesium and sodium and the anion bicarbonate. It was atributed to high alkalinity (about 70% of bicarbonate in the molecula-gram) of these salts. The calcium (0.3 to 42 mg/l), magnesium (0.0 to 18 mg/l) and bicarbonate (4 to 228 mg/l) contents are relatively low. The mineral content of the Brazilian springs enrolled in this survey is low; about 70% of the sources having calcium and magnesium less than 10 mg/l and 1.0 mg/l, respectively, similar to local tap water.

  19. Proceedings of the 9. meeting of radioprotection skill persons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahaye, Thierry; Vallet, Jeremie; Michel, Nicolas; Saad, Nawal; Benzakri, Adil; Gauron, C.; Prevot, Sylviane; Vrigneaud, Jean-Marc; Mahu, Marjolaine; Tenailleau, Lionel; Pigree, G.; Lemarchand, M.; Barbey, P.; Hery, Michel; Scanff, Pascale; Reuter, Celine; Hoorelbeke, Agnes; Lefaure, Christian; Entine, F.; Dody, C.; Gagna, G.; Michel, X.; Cazoulat, A.; Amabile, J.C.; Winizuk, E.; Baccialone, J.; Renault, Catherine; Rodde, Sylvie; Rousse, Carole; Delisle, Sophie; Karmouche, Kaouthar; Moyon, Jean-Baptiste; Gabrillargues, Jean; Chabert, Emmanuel; Jean, Betty; Guersen, Joel; Boyer, Louis; Cassagnes, Lucie; Rosec, Maeva; Rehel, Jean-Luc; Celier, David; Etard, Cecile; Bassinet, Celine; Coutin, Frederic; Clauss, Nicolas; Mertz, L.; Gangi, Afshjn; Bing, F.; Garnon, J.; Thenint, M.A.; Enescu, I.; Tsoumakidou, G.; Cortet, Laetitia; Quirins, Charles; Craveiro, Nathalie; Philippe, SANS; Giordan, Denis; Chanal, Sandrine; Cojan, Aurelie; Rigaud, Sylvie; Monsanglant-Louvet, Celine; Osmond, Melanie; Jeanjacques, Caroline; Sevestre, Bernard; Barbette, Frederic; Allenet Le Page, Benedicte

    2014-11-01

    During these 2 days of conference, an update was given regarding: the recent or coming soon French regulatory texts, the advances of 2 softwares used by the French Institute of Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) for national inventory of radiation sources and for the monitoring of personnel dosimetry, the reports in progress of working groups (sources, dosimetry), the progress and transposition of the Euratom 2013/59 directive which directly concerns the radioprotection skill persons and which will be enforced in member states by February 6, 2018. Practical aspects and experience feedbacks have been presented by participants as well. This document brings together the available presentations (slides) together with their corresponding abstracts (in French) and dealing with: 1 - Current regulations in radioprotection of workers exposed to ionizing radiations (T. Lahaye); 2 - Changes in the classified facilities nomenclature (J. Vallet); 3 - Transposition works for the 2013/59/Euratom directive dealing with basic radioprotection standards (N. Saad, J. Vallet, T. Lahaye); 4 - 50 years anniversary of the French Society of Radiation Protection (SFRP); 5 - Working group on personnel radiological monitoring: progress of works (P. Barbey); 6 - What about the internal exposure contribution to the efficient dose in nuclear medicine? (S. Prevot); 7 - Environmental monitoring of workplaces subject to tritium exposure risk (L. Tenailleau); 8 - Radon: example of radioprotection skill persons involvement in corrective actions, the case of the university technology institute of Vire - Calvados (G. Pigree); 9 - Unique document, prevention plan: a continuous risk assessment approach (M. Hery); 10 - 2014 evolutions of the SISERI System - first experience feedback (P. Scanff); 11 - Evolution of registration rules for radioactive sources in the national inventory using the SIGIS Internet platform (C. Reuter); 12 - Radioprotection skill person networks, radioprotection actors

  20. Actual knowledge about some plants with radioprotective effect and about the research of possibilities their use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skalka, J.

    2004-01-01

    Study was undertaken to refer to me importance of radiological protection of human and animal species, especially. After the crash of nuclear power station in Chernobyl, Ukraine, an enormous natural catastrophe. The world wide research programs are dedicated to vearch for plants with radioprotective effect. Apparently representing sea vegetation, brown algae, were considered to have a radioprotective effect just as a large amount of plants representing terrestrial flora. The direction of research programs in the world continues in identification of other unknown plants having radioprotective effect. We would like to direct our research interests in this direction and use enormous possibilities of our rich and various vegetation. (author)

  1. Cranberry: A good source of natural antioxidants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tumbas Vesna T.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of extracts of cranbeny fruit and mixed tea (containing 40% cranberry on stable 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH radicals has been investigated by electron spin resonance (ESR spectroscopy. All investigated extracts possess very high antioxidant activity, which increased dose-dependently at mass concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 3.5 mg/ml. The high contents of phenolic s (3.60-4.52 mg/g, anthocyanins (0.23-1.52 mg/g, flavan-3-ols (1.25-3.05 mg/g and vitamin C (0.07-0.15 mg/g in investigated extracts indicated that these compounds significantly contributed to the antioxidant activity. All these results show that the extracts of cranberry fruit and mixed tea can be used as easily accessible source of natural antioxidants and as a possible food supplement.

  2. Return of naturally sourced Pb to Atlantic surface waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bridgestock, L.; van de Flierdt, T.; Rehkämper, M.; Paul, P.; Middag, R.; Milne, A.; Lohan, M.C.; Baker, A.; Chance, R.; Khondoker, R.; Strekopytov, S.; Humphreys-Williams, E.; Achterberg, E.P.; Rijkenberg, M.J.A.; Gerringa, L.J.A.; De Baar, H.J.W.

    2016-01-01

    Anthropogenic emissions completely overwhelmed natural marine lead (Pb) sources duringthe past century, predominantly due to leaded petrol usage. Here, based on Pb isotopemeasurements, we reassess the importance of natural and anthropogenic Pb sources to thetropical North Atlantic following the

  3. Radiobiological study of the radioprotective activity of a natural Iranian compound, ''Shir-Khecht''; Etude radiobiologique de l'activite radioprotectrice d'un compose naturel Iranien: le ''Shir-Khecht''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rouhanizadeh, N. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-01-01

    After reviewing the primary mechanisms of the action of ionizing radiation, the possible mechanisms of the action of radioprotective substances, the various chemical structures having a protective effect and the methods for studying chemical radioprotection, the author presents the results he has obtained with natural Iranian product: ''Shir-Khecht''. Tests with this product at lethal and sublethal doses have been carried out on the rat using various means of introduction. The effect of radiation, both with and without protection, has been studied using histological and biochemical methods. The product examined has, in effect, a protective action; it is, furthermore, non-toxic and active when taken orally. (author) [French] Apres avoir rappele les mecanismes primaires de l'action des rayonnements ionisants, les mecanismes possibles de l'action des substances radioprotectrices, les diverses structures chimiques possedant un effet protecteur et les methodes d'etude de la radioprotection chimique, l'auteur presente les resultats qu'il a obtenus en utilisant un compose naturel iranien: le ''Shir-Khecht''. Des essais de ce produit, chez le rat, par diverses voies d'introduction, a dose letale et subletale ont ete effectues. L'effet des radiations, avec et sans protection, a ete etudie a l'aide de methodes histologiques et biochimiques. Le compose essaye possede un pouvoir protecteur; il est, de plus, non toxique et actif par voie orale. (auteur)

  4. In vitro screening of radioprotective properties in the novel glucosylated flavonoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hao; Haskins, Jeremy S; Su, Cathy; Allum, Allison; Haskins, Alexis H; Salinas, Victoria A; Sunada, Shigeaki; Inoue, Taisuke; Aizawa, Yasushi; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Kato, Takamitsu A

    2016-11-01

    Novel glucosyl flavonoids are developed by the addition of glucose to naturally occurring flavonoids. Flavonoids are known antioxidants that possess radioprotective properties. In order to investigate the radioprotective properties of novel glucosyl flavonoids, in vitro DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) analysis was carried out. In the present study, Quercetin, Naringenin, and Hesperetin groups of flavonoids included in the natural and novel glucosyl 13 flavonoids were investigated. Flavonoids were mixed with Lambda DNA, and subsequently exposed to gamma‑rays. Furthermore, DNA DSB yields were visualized by gel electrophoresis. Quercetin derivatives displayed reduced DNA DSB formation at 10 µM. At a high concentration, the majority of flavonoids displayed radioprotective properties as a reduction of DSB yields. Suppression of DSB formation was confirmed via the molecular combing assay for Quercetin, and three monoglucosyl flavonoids. Glucosylation showed positive effects for radioprotection and monoglucosyl-Rutin showed superior radioprotective properties when compared to monoglucosyl-Naringin and Hesperidin. In addition, Quercetin derivatives had greater total antioxidant capacities and DPPH radical scavenging ability than other flavonoid groups. Since Quercetin, Isoquercetin, and Rutin display poor water solubility, monoglucosyl-Rutin, maltooligosyl-Isoquercetin, and maltooligosyl-Rutin may be better radioprotective agents and easily bioavailable with increased water solubility.

  5. Radioprotection during the diagnostic use of X-ray in western Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Agata, Philip.

    1978-10-01

    The speed-up of technical progress in the field of radiodiagnosis has led to a huge expansion of this technique. The number of acts per year per inhabitant is rising constantly in industrialised countries. The average population dose has already doubled natural irradiation in certain cases. Considering the established effects on carcinogenesis and heredity the need for restrictive measures can no longer be ignored. Exposed staff are safeguarded by international recommendations, largely incorporated into national legislations. The protection of patients against superfluous irradiations, while nevertheless essential, is still neglected. The means are not lacking and must certainly be developed, but above all employed properly. Medical irradiation can be limited to a considerable extent by checking the competence of X-ray source users, systematically using the possibities of the equipment in such a way as to reduce the doses delivered and keeping an irradiation book for patients. Everyone agrees that a 90% reduction of medical irradiation would in no way impair the quality of the examinations. The following points are developed particularly: institutional organisation of radioprotection; aims of radioprotection in the context of the diagnostic use of X-rays; present reference norms in radiodiagnosis; doses delivered during conventional radiodiagnostic examinations [fr

  6. Radiation protection textbook; Manuel pratique de radioprotection (3. Ed.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gambini, D.J.; Granier, R

    2007-07-01

    This textbook of radiation protection presents the scientific bases, legal and statutory measures and technical means of implementation of the radioprotection in the medical and industrial sectors, research and nuclear installations. It collects the practical information (organization, analysis of post, prevention, evaluation and risks management, the controls, the training and the information) usually scattered and the theoretical knowledge allowing every person using ionizing radiation: To analyze jobs in controlled areas, to watch the respect for the current regulations, to participate in the training and in the information of the staffs exposed to intervene in accidental situation. This third edition is widely updated and enriched by the most recent scientific and legal data concerning, notably, the human exposure, the dosimetry, the optimization of the radiation protection and the epidemiological inquiries. The contents is as follows: physics of ionizing radiation, ionizing radiation: origin and interaction with matter, dosimetry and protection against ionizing radiation, detection and measurement of ionizing radiation, radiobiology, legal measures relative to radiation protection, human exposure of natural origin, human exposure of artificial origin, medical, dental and veterinarian radiology, radiotherapy, utilization of unsealed sources in medicine and research, electronuclear industry, non nuclear industrial and aeronautical activities exposing to ionizing radiation, accidental exposures. (N.C.)

  7. Antioxidants: Characterization, natural sources, extraction and analysis

    OpenAIRE

    OROIAN, MIRCEA; Escriche Roberto, Mª Isabel

    2015-01-01

    [EN] Recently many review papers regarding antioxidants fromdifferent sources and different extraction and quantification procedures have been published. However none of them has all the information regarding antioxidants (chemistry, sources, extraction and quantification). This article tries to take a different perspective on antioxidants for the new researcher involved in this field. Antioxidants from fruit, vegetables and beverages play an important role in human health, fo...

  8. The radioprotective effect of a new aminothiol (20-PRA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolabela, M.F.; Lopes, M.T.P.; Pereira, M.T.; Steffani, G.M.; Pilo-Veloso, D.; Salas, C.E.; Nelson, D.L.

    1998-01-01

    We examined the radioprotective effect of aminothiol 2-N-propylamine-cyclohexane thiol (20-PRA) on a human leukemic cell line (K562) following various radiation doses (5,7.5 and 20 Gy) using a source of 60 Co γ-rays. At 5 Gy and 1nM 20-PRA, a substantial protective effect (58%) was seen 24 h after irradiation, followed by a decrease at 48 h (11%). At the high radiation dose (20 Gy) a low protective effect was also seen (35%). In addition, the anti tumorigenic potential of 10 nM 20-PRA was shown by the inhibition of crown gall formation induced by Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The radioprotective potency of 20-PRA is 10 5- 10 6 times higher than that of the aminothiol WR-1065 (N(2-mercaptoethyl)-1,3-diamino propane) whose protective effect is in the 0.1 to 1.0 nM range. (author)

  9. The radioprotective effect of a new aminothiol (20-PRA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.F. Dolabela

    1998-08-01

    Full Text Available We examined the radioprotective effect of aminothiol 2-N-propylamine-cyclo-hexanethiol (20-PRA on a human leukemic cell line (K562 following various radiation doses (5, 7.5 and 20 Gy using a source of 60Co g-rays. At 5 Gy and 1 nM 20-PRA, a substantial protective effect (58% was seen 24 h after irradiation, followed by a decrease at 48 h (11%. At the high radiation dose (20 Gy a low protective effect was also seen (35%. In addition, the antitumorigenic potential of 10 nM 20-PRA was shown by the inhibition of crown gall formation induced by Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The radioprotective potency of 20-PRA is 105-106 times higher than that of the aminothiol WR-1065 (N-(2-mercaptoethyl-1,3-diaminopropane whose protective effect is in the 0.1 to 1.0 mM range.

  10. Radioprotection in the infirmary praxis in service of hemodynamic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flor, Rita de Cassia; Gelbcke, Francine Lima

    2011-01-01

    Qualitative study made in a hemodynamic service at Santa Catarina, Brazil, viewing to analyse the attitude of workers in infirmary related to the use of radioprotection measurements in interventionist procedures. A methodology of Labor Psycho dynamics was used through the observations, collective interviews and the document analysis. Totally it was realized 36 encounters, completed a total of 54 observation hours. The results have shown that the workers used defense strategies for justification the not use of some radioprotection measurements. Yet, become evident that the measurements related to the distance from the radiation source and the exposure time have not used sometimes, perhaps due to negligence. Finally, it was concluded that, some attitudes adopted by the workers referred to the lack of a continued educational program

  11. Radioprotection of industrial radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abela, G.; Bonaventure, P.; Jupin, L.; Truchi, F.

    2006-01-01

    The EDF Nuclear Power Division (N.P.D.) conducts a substantial number of industrial g-ray inspections: about 40.000 inspections are conducted annually on the nuclear fleet by contractors as H.O.R.U.S. Company. Point sources of Iridium 192 are generally used. In normal configurations, the activity of these sources can go up to 4.4 T.Bq (120 Ci), inducing - at a range of 1 meter - such a high dose equivalent rate that the value of 20 mSv is reached in a little more than 2 minutes. To date, no exceeding of the regulatory limit has been observed within EDF, but during the observation of events, a practice that has been in effect for many years, 'low-level events', such as unplanned exposures lower than the regulatory limits, were noted. N.P.D. management and contractors thus decided to take particular actions in the field. An analysis of unplanned exposures was carried out. This analysis related to 1: The 'human factor' analysis showed that the activity, which can seem 'simple' due to its seemingly basic constituent parts, taken in isolation, therefore appears easy to accomplish. In fact, completion of each point requires very extensive technical training, a complex planning file has to be compiled as there are many interfaces with other players, is linked to other activities that have to be carried out prior to the g-ray inspection. It requires preparation of the areas, with measures taken to prohibit access, and requires adaptation to physical conditions (temperature, lighting, noise, dose rate) and sometimes very difficult access conditions. The operators 'error' and lack of attention or vigilance cannot thus be considered by a preventer as being a satisfactory cause of incidents or accidents, within the scope of an ongoing improvement initiative: Vigilance means work. 2: Analysis of material causes did not highlight causes related to the equipment used, but camera ergonomics could be improved. Changes to EDF rules focused on: Compulsory and systematic use of

  12. Mechanisms of radioprotection - a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copeland, E.S.

    1978-01-01

    Theories of radiation protection can be considered at both the molecular and biochemical-physiological levels. Four molecular level protection hypotheses, radical scavenging, hydrogen transfer reactions, the mixed disulfide hypothesis and the endogenous non-protein sulfhydryl hypothesis, probably describe different aspects of the actual protection mechanism, although each has inconsistencies. At the biochemical-physiological level, hypothermia induction and biochemical shock may be involved in protection of the organism against radiation induced damage and death. It is most likely that no single mechanism can account for the protection offered by a radioprotective drug. Certain compounds may operate primarily by means of physiological effects resulting in hypoxia or hypothermia in critical tissues. Others may operate primarily by influencing the intrinsic radiosensitivity of target molecules by causing localized radical scavenging or by donating a hydrogen atom. Metabolic effects such as biochemical shock, release of endogenous non-protein sulfhydryls, induction of structural changes in target molecules or delay in DNA synthesis and cell division are also possible mechanisms for radioprotection. (author)

  13. Antioxidants: Characterization, natural sources, extraction and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oroian, Mircea; Escriche, Isabel

    2015-08-01

    Recently many review papers regarding antioxidants from different sources and different extraction and quantification procedures have been published. However none of them has all the information regarding antioxidants (chemistry, sources, extraction and quantification). This article tries to take a different perspective on antioxidants for the new researcher involved in this field. Antioxidants from fruit, vegetables and beverages play an important role in human health, for example preventing cancer and cardiovascular diseases, and lowering the incidence of different diseases. In this paper the main classes of antioxidants are presented: vitamins, carotenoids and polyphenols. Recently, many analytical methodologies involving diverse instrumental techniques have been developed for the extraction, separation, identification and quantification of these compounds. Antioxidants have been quantified by different researchers using one or more of these methods: in vivo, in vitro, electrochemical, chemiluminescent, electron spin resonance, chromatography, capillary electrophoresis, nuclear magnetic resonance, near infrared spectroscopy and mass spectrometry methods. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Natural sources of ionizing radiation in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, B.M.R.; Hughes, J.S.; Lomas, P.R.

    1993-01-01

    This publication maps levels of radiation of natural origin throughout the European Community (except in the Lander of the former German Democratic Republic), in Scandinavia and in Austria. The booklet explains in simple terms the basic properties and origin of different types of radiation (cosmic rays, gamma rays and radon) and their contribution to the overall exposure of the population. A glossary, a list of administrative regions used in the maps and detailed references to the data for each country are included

  15. Return of naturally sourced Pb to Atlantic surface waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bridgestock, Luke; van de Flierdt, Tina; Rehkamper, Mark; Paul, Maxence; Middag, Rob; Milne, Angela; Lohan, Maeve C.; Baker, Alex R.; Chance, Rosie; Khondoker, Roulin; Strekopytov, Stanislav; Humphreys-Williams, Emma; Achterberg, Eric P.; Rijkenberg, Micha J. A.; Gerringa, Loes J. A.; de Baar, Henricus

    Anthropogenic emissions completely overwhelmed natural marine lead (Pb) sources during the past century, predominantly due to leaded petrol usage. Here, based on Pb isotope measurements, we reassess the importance of natural and anthropogenic Pb sources to the tropical North Atlantic following the

  16. Community Assessment of Natural Food Sources of Vitamin A ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Community Assessment of Natural Food Sources of Vitamin A: Guidelines for an Ethnographic Protocol. Book cover Community Assessment of Natural Food Sources of Vitamin A: Guidelines for an Ethnographic. Auteur(s) : L. Blum, P.J. Pelto, G.H. Pelto, and H.V. Kuhnlein. Maison(s) d'édition : INFDC, IDRC. 1 janvier 1997.

  17. Community Assessment of Natural Food Sources of Vitamin A ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    1 janv. 1997 ... Community Assessment of Natural Food Sources of Vitamin A : Guidelines for an Ethnographic Protocol. Couverture du livre Community Assessment of Natural Food Sources of Vitamin A : Guidelines for an. Auteur(s):. L. Blum, P.J. Pelto, G.H. Pelto et H.V. Kuhnlein. Maison(s) d'édition: INFDC, CRDI.

  18. Effects of radioprotective agents on mammal cella

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuessler, H.; Pauly, H.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of aminothiols and thiophosphates on cultures of B14 Chinese Hamster cells wee investigated. 30 min before irradiation, the cells were covered with a solution of the radioprotective agent. After irradiation, this solution was removed and substituted by culture medium. The radioprotective effect increases with increasing cystamine concentrations. With a cystamine concentration of 60 mM, a dose reduction factor of 3 was achieved. Further investigations showed that already after 2 min of incubation, the radioprotective effect in the same as after 60 min. (orig./MG) [de

  19. Radioprotective effect of vitamins C and E

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Nahas, S.M.; Mohamed, A.A.; Mattar, F.E.

    1993-01-01

    Albino rats were treated with aqueous vitamin C solution and vitamin E solution dissolved in olive oil at two concentrations, 100 and 300 mg/kg/day, for 6 months. Some of the animals where then subjected to whole-body irradiation. Chromosomal aberrations and mitotic activity in non-irradiated and irradiated groups were recorded. Both vitamins were found to be non-mutagenic. Vitamin C exerted a radioprotective effect but vitamin E was not radioprotective and it suppressed the radioprotection otherwise produced by olive oil. (author). 31 refs., 2 figs

  20. Thiazolidine prodrugs of cysteamine and cysteine as radioprotective agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, J.C.; Koch, K.E.; Detrick, S.R. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)] [and others

    1995-08-01

    The need for protection against the toxic effects of ionizing radiation comes from many different directions: occupational exposure, nuclear accidents, environmental sources and protection of normal tissue during the therapeutic irradiation of cancer. Sulfhydryl-containing compounds, including cysteamine and L-cysteine, have long been known to possess radioprotective properties, but their therapeutic utility is limited by their side effects at radioprotective doses. To avoid this drawback, thiazolidine prodrugs of cysteamine and L-cysteine were prepared by the condensation of each thiolamine with the aldose monosaccharides, D-ribose and D-glucose, producing RibCyst, GlcCyst, Rib-Cys and GlcCys. The prodrugs were designed to liberate the parent thiolamine nonenzymatically, after ring opening and hydrolysis, which is then available e to function as a radioprotective agent. Cysteamine`s inherent toxicity, measured using Chinese hamster V79 cells growing in culture, was completely eliminated, even at concentrations as high as 25 mM, by providing the thiolamine in the form of a prodrug. Good protection against radiation-induced lethality was demonstrated by the cysteamine prodrugs using a clonogenic assay. Protection against radiation-induced DNA single-strand breaks, as measured by alkaline elution, was also shown by both RibCyst and GlcCyst; this activity was higher than that exhibited by either cysteamine or WR-1065. The L-cysteine prodrugs, RibCys and GlcCys, also possessed radioprotective abilities under most of the conditions studied. Protection against DNA damage was comparable between L-cystein, WR-1065 and RibCys. 42 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. The AGN Nature of LINER Nuclear Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Márquez, Isabel; Masegosa, Josefa [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia (CSIC), Granada (Spain); González-Martin, Omaira [Instituto de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Morelia (Mexico); Hernández-Garcia, Lorena [Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, Rome (Italy); Pović, Mirjana [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia (CSIC), Granada (Spain); Ethiopian Space Science and Technology Institute and Entoto Observatory and Research Center, Addis Ababa (Ethiopia); Netzer, Hagai [Raymond and Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences, School of Physics and Astronomy and the Wise Observatory, Tel-Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Cazzoli, Sara; Olmo, Ascensión del, E-mail: isabel@iaa.es [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia (CSIC), Granada (Spain)

    2017-11-16

    Low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions (LINERs) are specially interesting objects since not only they represent the most numerous local Active Galactic Nuclei population, but they could be the link between normal and active galaxies as suggested by their low X-ray luminosities. The origin of LINER nuclei being still controversial, our works, through a multiwavelength approach, have contributed, firstly, to confirm that a large number of nuclear LINERs in the local universe are AGN powered. Secondly, from the study of X-ray spectral variability, we found that long term variations are very common, and they are mostly related to hard energies (2–10keV). These variations might be due to changes in the absorber and/or intrinsic variations of the source. Thirdly, Mid-infrared (MIR) imaging also indicates that LINERs are the low luminosity end of AGN toward lower luminosities, and MIR spectroscopy shows that the average spectrum of AGN-dominated LINERs with X-ray luminosities L{sub X}(2–10 keV) > 10{sup 41} erg/s is similar to the average mid-IR spectrum of AGN-dominated Seyfert 2s; for fainter LINERS, their spectral shape suggests that the dusty-torus may disappear. Fourth, the extended Hα emission of LINERs at HST resolution indicates that they follow remarkably well the Narrow Line Region morphology and the luminosity-size relation obtained for Seyfert and QSOs; HST Hα morphology may suggest the presence of outflows, which could contribute to the line broadening, with the resulting consequences on the percentage of LINERs where the Broad Line Region is detected. This issue is being revisited by our group with a high spectral resolution set of optical data for nearby type-1 LINERs. Finally, concerning systematic studies on the role of star formation in LINERs, which are scarce, our contribution deals with the study of a sample of the most luminous, highest star formation rate LINERs in the local Universe (at z from 0.04 to 0.11), together with its comparison

  2. The AGN nature of LINER nuclear sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez, Isabel; Masegosa, Josefa; González-Martin, Omaira; Hernández-Garcia, Lorena; Pović, Mirjana; Netzer, Hagai; Cazzoli, Sara; del Olmo, Ascensión

    2017-11-01

    Low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions (LINERs) are specially interesting objects since not only they represent the most numerous local Active Galactic Nuclei population, but they could be the link between normal and active galaxies as suggested by their low X-ray luminosities. The origin of LINER nuclei being still controversial, our works, through a multiwavelength approach, have contributed, firstly, to confirm that a large number of nuclear LINERs in the local universe are AGN powered. Secondly, from the study of X-ray spectral variability, we found that long term variations are very common, and they are mostly related to hard energies (2-10 keV). These variations might be due to changes in the absorber and/or intrinsic variations of the source. Thirdly, Mid-infrared (MIR) imaging also indicates that LINERs are the low luminosity end of AGN towards lower luminosities, and MIR spectroscopy shows that the average spectrum of AGN-dominated LINERs with X-ray luminosities L_X(2-10 keV) > 10^{41} erg/s is similar to the average mid-IR spectrum of AGN-dominated Seyfert 2s; for fainter LINERS, their spectral shape suggests that the dusty-torus may disappear. Fourth, the extended Hα emission of LINERs at HST resolution indicates that they follow remarkably well the Narrow Line Region morphology and the luminosity-size relation obtained for Seyfert and QSOs; HST Hα morphology may suggest the presence of outflows, which could contribute to the line broadening, with the resulting consequences on the percentage of LINERs where the Broad Line Region is detected. This issue is being revisited by our group with a high spectral resolution set of optical data for nearby type-1 LINERs. Finally, concerning systematic studies on the role of star formation in LINERs, which are scarce, our contribution deals with the study of a sample of the most luminous, highest star formation rate LINERs in the local Universe (at z from 0.04 to 0.11), together with its comparison with both

  3. The AGN Nature of LINER Nuclear Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Márquez, Isabel; Masegosa, Josefa; González-Martin, Omaira; Hernández-Garcia, Lorena; Pović, Mirjana; Netzer, Hagai; Cazzoli, Sara; Olmo, Ascensión del

    2017-01-01

    Low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions (LINERs) are specially interesting objects since not only they represent the most numerous local Active Galactic Nuclei population, but they could be the link between normal and active galaxies as suggested by their low X-ray luminosities. The origin of LINER nuclei being still controversial, our works, through a multiwavelength approach, have contributed, firstly, to confirm that a large number of nuclear LINERs in the local universe are AGN powered. Secondly, from the study of X-ray spectral variability, we found that long term variations are very common, and they are mostly related to hard energies (2–10keV). These variations might be due to changes in the absorber and/or intrinsic variations of the source. Thirdly, Mid-infrared (MIR) imaging also indicates that LINERs are the low luminosity end of AGN toward lower luminosities, and MIR spectroscopy shows that the average spectrum of AGN-dominated LINERs with X-ray luminosities L X (2–10 keV) > 10 41 erg/s is similar to the average mid-IR spectrum of AGN-dominated Seyfert 2s; for fainter LINERS, their spectral shape suggests that the dusty-torus may disappear. Fourth, the extended Hα emission of LINERs at HST resolution indicates that they follow remarkably well the Narrow Line Region morphology and the luminosity-size relation obtained for Seyfert and QSOs; HST Hα morphology may suggest the presence of outflows, which could contribute to the line broadening, with the resulting consequences on the percentage of LINERs where the Broad Line Region is detected. This issue is being revisited by our group with a high spectral resolution set of optical data for nearby type-1 LINERs. Finally, concerning systematic studies on the role of star formation in LINERs, which are scarce, our contribution deals with the study of a sample of the most luminous, highest star formation rate LINERs in the local Universe (at z from 0.04 to 0.11), together with its comparison with

  4. Radioprotection of the patient in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, Maria del R.

    2004-01-01

    The following topics are developed: concepts on radioprotection; stochastic and deterministic effects; the prenatal irradiation; different types of radiation exposition (medical, occupational and public irradiation); and the justification of the levels of radiation

  5. The use of radioprotective indicators in medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tilly Junior, Joao G.; Schmidt, Margot F.S.

    1996-01-01

    Radioprotection indicators are proposed as per the World Health Organization guide-lines, in order to establish policies as well as to show the development and identified new operational strategic in radiological protection

  6. Discussion on posting and labeling for radioprotection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Fabio F.

    2009-01-01

    The radioprotection aims the protection of people against exposure to ionizing radiation or radioactive substances as well as the safety of radiation sources. As ionizing radiation is not perceived by human senses, the warning signs and labels on radiation sources and the safety posters in controlled and supervised areas have an important role to keep the doses and risks as low as reasonably achievable, to prevent radiological accidents and to mitigate their consequences. In Brazil, several technical regulations require such safety labels and posters, however, despite their importance, there is quite few guidance about their format or contents. In this paper the posting and labeling requirements for radiological control existing in Brazilian technical regulations are discussed, confronting them with national, foreign and international technical standards and by drawing up a parallel with requirements of technical regulations from other countries. Changes are suggested in some parts of the national regulations, to prevent some differences in the current guidance, allowing the optimization of posting and labeling programs of radiological facilities. (author)

  7. Prospective of clinical drugs for radioprotection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alok, Amit; Kumar, Sandeep; Kumar, Arun; Chaudhury, N.K.

    2014-01-01

    We are living in an era of nuclear power where power derived from nuclear reaction is used for power generation as well as for nuclear weapons. The terrorism and the threat of dirty bombs looms around the civilized population. Therefore, there is a need to develop radioprotector which could prevent against the harmful effect of radiation. The research on radioprotector started more than fifty years ago but still there is no approved radioprotector in the drug market. Hundreds of lead molecule have been screened and have shown varying amount of radioprotection either in vitro or in vivo or in both. Only one drug amifostine was approved by FDA but due to its toxicity in head and neck cancer, this drug is no more in use. Antioxidants too have proven to be a potential radioprotector but the dose required for radioprotection is too high for maintenance of homeostasis in physiological system. We have taken an alternative approach of using clinical drugs like diclofenac and tetracycline for development of approach for radioprotection and reported the radioprotective role of diclofenac. The advantage of using clinical drug is its wide availability in the market and the ease with which it could be channelized for radioprotection. Antiradical assays have demonstrated possible use of tetracycline for radioprotection. Tetracycline has also ability to reduce oxidative damages ex vivo. Studies related to comet assay as well as antioxidant assays in different organs are in progress for designing further work for efficacy and elucidation of mechanisms. (author)

  8. Gamma radiation induced enhancement in the antioxidant and radioprotective activities of flavonoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arul Anantha Kumar, A.; Sonwani, Swetha; Bakkiam, D.

    2018-01-01

    Recently γ-radiation has been used as a tool to induce structural changes in natural biomolecules to enhance their biological and physiological properties. Flavonoids are a family of plant derived polyphenolic compounds having considerable scientific and therapeutic importance. Structurally they are the benzo-γ-pyrone derivatives containing phenolic and pyrane rings. Flavonoid radioprotection is an intense area of research thanks to features like natural origin, effectiveness at non-toxic dose levels and lack of side effects. But till date no report is available on the effect of γ-radiation mediated enhancement in radioprotection activity of flavonoids. In view of this the present study was carried out to determine the γ-radiation induced structural changes in selected flavonoids i.e. apigenin, naringenin and genistein and also to explore the possibility of enhancement in their antioxidant and radioprotective activities

  9. Community Assessment of Natural Food Sources of Vitamin A ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    1997-01-01

    Jan 1, 1997 ... This manual presents a practical step-by-step guide for assessing various aspects of natural food sources of vitamin A within a community and is essential for any research program involved in alleviating vitamin A deficiency.

  10. Natural sources of atmospheric aerosols influencing air quality across Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana, M; Pey, J; Querol, X; Alastuey, A; de Leeuw, F; Lükewille, Anke

    2014-02-15

    Atmospheric aerosols are emitted by natural and anthropogenic sources. Contributions from natural sources to ambient aerosols vary widely with time (inter-annual and seasonal variability) and as a function of the distance to source regions. This work aims to identify the main natural sources of atmospheric aerosols affecting air quality across Europe. The origin, frequency, magnitude, and spatial and temporal variability of natural events were assessed for the years 2008 and 2009. The main natural sources of atmospheric aerosols identified were African dust, sea spray and wildfires. Primary biological particles were not included in the present work. Volcanic eruptions did not affect air quality significantly in Europe during the study period. The impact of natural episodes on air quality was significant in Southern and Western Europe (Cyprus, Spain, France, UK, Greece, Malta, Italy and Portugal), where they contributed to surpass the PM10 daily and annual limit values. In Central and Northern Europe (Germany, Austria and Latvia) the impact of these events was lower, as it resulted in the exceedance of PM daily but not annual limit values. Contributions from natural sources to mean annual PM10 levels in 2008 and 2009 ranged between 1 and 2 μg/m(3) in Italy, France and Portugal, between 1 and 4 μg/m(3) in Spain (10 μg/m(3) when including the Canary Islands), 5 μg/m(3) in UK, between 3 and 8 μg/m(3) in Greece, and reached up to 13 μg/m(3) in Cyprus. The evaluation of the number of monitoring stations per country reporting natural exceedances of the daily limit value (DLV) is suggested as a potential tool for air quality monitoring networks to detect outliers in the assessment of natural contributions. It is strongly suggested that a reference methodology for the identification and quantification of African dust contributions should be adopted across Europe. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Phyto chemical and biological studies of certain plants with potential radioprotective activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherif, N.H.M.I

    2008-01-01

    One of the promising directions of radiation protection development is the search for natural radioprotective agents.The present work includes: I- Screening of certain edible and medicinal plants growing in Egypt for their radioprotective activities. II- Detailed phyto chemical and biolo-activity studies of the dried leaves of brassaia actinophylla endl. comprising: A-Phyto chemical screening and proximate analysis. B-Investigation of lipoidal matter. C- Isolation, characterization and structure elucidation of phenolic constituents. D- Isolation, characterization and structure elucidation of saponin constituents. E- Evaluation of radioprotective and antitumor activities. I- Evaluation of potential radioprotective activities of certain herbs: In vivo biological screening designed to investigate the radioprotective role of 70% ethanol extract of 11 different herbals was carried out by measuring the lipid peroxide content, as well as the activities of two antioxidant enzymes; viz glutathione, and superoxide dismutase in blood and liver tissues 1 and 7 days after radiation exposure. II : Phyto chemical and biolo-activity studies of the dried leaves of brassaia actinophylla Endl A : preliminary phyto chemical screening, determination and TLC examination of successive extractives. B : Investigation of lipoidal matter. GLC of unsaponifiable matter (USM)

  12. NATURAL PRODUCTS: A CONTINUING SOURCE OF NOVEL DRUG LEADS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cragg, Gordon M.; Newman, David J.

    2013-01-01

    1. Background Nature has been a source of medicinal products for millennia, with many useful drugs developed from plant sources. Following discovery of the penicillins, drug discovery from microbial sources occurred and diving techniques in the 1970s opened the seas. Combinatorial chemistry (late 1980s), shifted the focus of drug discovery efforts from Nature to the laboratory bench. 2. Scope of Review This review traces natural products drug discovery, outlining important drugs from natural sources that revolutionized treatment of serious diseases. It is clear Nature will continue to be a major source of new structural leads, and effective drug development depends on multidisciplinary collaborations. 3. Major Conclusions The explosion of genetic information led not only to novel screens, but the genetic techniques permitted the implementation of combinatorial biosynthetic technology and genome mining. The knowledge gained has allowed unknown molecules to be identified. These novel bioactive structures can be optimized by using combinatorial chemistry generating new drug candidates for many diseases. 4 General Significance: The advent of genetic techniques that permitted the isolation / expression of biosynthetic cassettes from microbes may well be the new frontier for natural products lead discovery. It is now apparent that biodiversity may be much greater in those organisms. The numbers of potential species involved in the microbial world are many orders of magnitude greater than those of plants and multi-celled animals. Coupling these numbers to the number of currently unexpressed biosynthetic clusters now identified (>10 per species) the potential of microbial diversity remains essentially untapped. PMID:23428572

  13. Conceptual design, neutronic and radioprotection study of a fast neutron irradiation station at SINQ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanini, L.; Baluc, N.; Simone, A. De; Eichler, R.; Joray, S.; Manfrin, E.; Pouchon, M.; Rabaioli, S.; Schumann, D.; Welte, J.; Zhernosekov, K.

    2011-12-01

    This comprehensive, illustrated report by the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI in Switzerland documents the proposals concerning the conceptual design, neutronic and radioprotection study of a fast neutron irradiation station at the PSI's Swiss Spallation Neutron Source SINQ facility. The need for fast neutron irradiation is discussed and the possibility of using SINQ as a fast neutron irradiation facility is considered. The production of isotopes, tracers and medical isotopes is discussed, as are fission and fusion reactor technologies. The characteristics of the neutron spectrum in SINQ are discussed. The neutronic and radioprotection calculations for an irradiation station at SINQ are looked at in detail and extensive examples of work done and results obtained are presented and discussed. Radioprotection issues are also looked at. Further contributions in the report cover the hot/cold irradiation station in the SINQ target. An appendix provides detailed drawings of the facility's pneumatic delivery system

  14. Radioprotective effects of a preparation (HemoHIM) of a herb mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Sung Kee; Park, Hae Ran; Jung, U Hee; Jeong, Ill Yun; Byun, Myung Woo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Ho [Chonnam National University, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of); Yee, Sung Tae [Sunchon National University, Sunchon (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    The proliferation of radioactive materials in industry, medicine, scientific and medical research, the military, and as a source of energy has increased the likelihood of an accidental exposure to ionizing radiation. Synthetic radioprotective agents have been studied for decades but their application was limited due to their toxicity. Thus, the radioprotective agent to protect individuals against severe radiation damage is required. A preparation (HemoHIM) of a mixture of 3 edible herbs was designed to protect the gastrointestine and hematopoietic organs and to promote recovery of the immune system against radiation damage. In this study, we evaluated its radioprotective effects with regards to reduction of DNA damage, immune cell repopulation, intestinal crypt survival, and 30-day survival rate.

  15. Radioprotective effect of polyethylene glycol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaeffer, J.; Schellenberg, K.A.; Seymore, C.H.; Schultheiss, T.E.; el-Mahdi, A.M.

    1986-07-01

    Polyethylene glycol of molecular weight 400 (PEG-400) had a radioprotective effect of about 20% against lethality when given ip 20 min prior to single or fractionated X-ray doses to the head and neck. Dose modification factors (DMF) based on LD50/15 values ranged from 1.14 to 1.24. A similar DMF of 1.12 based on LD50/30 values was obtained using single doses of whole-body X irradiation. Mice given head and neck irradiation had significantly reduced rectal temperatures (31.3 +/- 3.0/sup 0/C) 9 days post irradiation compared with unirradiated controls (35.4 +/- 0.6/sup 0/C). No such reduction was observed when PEG-400 was given with radiation (36.3 +/- 0.9/sup 0/C). PEG-400 also lessened, but not significantly, the frequency of shivering in irradiated animals. Histopathologic examination of the oral structures demonstrated only marginal protection by PEG-400. Estimation of the alpha/beta ratio from LD50 data on head and neck-irradiated mice yielded values of 4.4 +/- 1.9 (95% confidence limits) Gy without PEG-400 and 7.9 +/- 1.4 Gy with PEG-400. Since it is a non-thiol radioprotector, PEG-400 may be more useful when combined with more conventional thiol-containing radioprotectors.

  16. Radioprotection program to attend of radiation accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fajardo, P.W.; Costa Silva, L.H. da; Rosa, R.

    1989-04-01

    The aspects of a radioprotection program to be implanted in hospitals to cases of medical treatment to external and internal contamined people are presented. It is based in the experience acquired in the coordination of radioprotection of the Marcilio Dias Naval Medical Center, Rio de Janeiro, due to accident happened in Goiania in 1987. The infra-structure necessary of a ward and the procedures of radioprotection to acess control, entrance and way out of material area and patients monitoring, decontamination and the activities in the support area such as the control and maintenance of detection equipments and radioactive waste management are described. The radiologic protection materials necessaries and the quantity of radioactive waste generated by patient for day are estimated. (V.R.B.)

  17. Mechanisms of chemical radioprotection and radiosensitization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antoku, Shigetoshi

    1977-01-01

    Modification mechanism of radioprotective agents and radiosensitizer was investigated from a standpoint of radiochemistry. Radioprotective agents were divided roughly into the following three groups according to their mechanisms: 1) agents which act to cause hypoxic condition in tissues by pharmacological action such as vasoconstriction, 2) agents which act as radical scavenger, and 3) agents which act to redintegrate radiation injuries by competing with oxygen for primary radiation injuries. And they were investigated. Biochemical shock theory proposed by Bacq et al. was also introduced. According to the mechanism of the action, chemical radiosensitizers were divided into oxygen mimics. DNA mimic precursor, formation of toxic substances by radiation, inhibitor against redintegration, and SH binding agents. Hypotheses, which have been proposed up to date as mechanism of radiosensitization, such as protection with 1) SH-binding agents, 2) electron transport agents, 3) direct action models, and 4) radical fixation, were explained. Lastly, a relationship between radioprotection or radiosensitization and oxygen effect was considered. (Serizawa, K.)

  18. Contributions of natural sources to ozone and PM concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zare, Azimeh; Christensen, Jesper; Gross, Allan; Irannejad, parviz; Glasius, Marianne; Brandt, Jørgen

    2014-05-01

    Natural emissions play an important role in determining ambient levels of harmful atmospheric pollutants, especially tropospheric ozone and particulate matter (PM). Natural sources have become more important with the ongoing reductions of anthropogenic emissions and are expected to be even more significant in the future in connection with a changing climate. Despite of the efforts made for modelling of natural emissions, the uncertainties and gaps with regard to investigation and quantification of these emissions are still quite large. In this study, the large-scale atmospheric chemistry transport model, DEHM (the Danish Eulerian Hemispheric Model) is further developed, evaluated and applied to study and quantify the contributions of many compounds from the natural sources to the concentration of ozone and formation of PM. The relative contributions are calculated for the domain covering more than the Northern Hemisphere for a typical year 2006. Natural source categories adopted in the recent model consist of vegetation, lightning, soils, wild animals and oceans. Here, DEHM has been further developed to include more natural emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) as well as a scheme for describing secondary organic aerosols. Moreover, the parameterization used for estimating sea-salt generation has been modified to contain additional features. Evaluation of the modeled total fine PM, against observations, is conducted for both the previous and new model versions to assess improvement of the model performance with the updated description of natural emissions. Using the developed DEHM, our simulations indicate that at the Northern Hemisphere the contribution from natural emissions to the average annual ozone concentrations over land is between 4-30 ppbV. Among the natural emissions, biogenic VOCs are found to be the most significant contributors to ozone formation. Our results show that biogenic VOCs enhance the average ozone concentration with around

  19. Radiological Protection Experience with natural sources of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quindos, L. S.; Fernandez, P. L.; Vinuela, J.; Arteche, J.; Sainz, G.; Gomez, J.; Matarranz

    2003-01-01

    During the last twenty five years the research Radon Group of the Medical Physics Unit of the University of Cantabria has been involved in projects concerning the measurement of natural radiation, in special that coming from radon gas. At this moment we have available for this field a lot of information in different formats, as paper, video and CD, interesting not only for public in general but also for professionals interested in the evaluation of doses coming from natural sources of radiation. (Author)

  20. Radioprotective activity in some medicinal herbs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yonezawa, Morio (Osaka Prefectural Univ., Sakai (Japan). Research Center for Radioisotopes)

    1993-09-01

    Water-soluble, ethanol-insoluble extracts prepared from several medicinal herbs of the Araliaceae and other families were tested for their radioprotective activity by either measuring 30 days survival rates (a commonly applied method) or counting the thrombocytes 14 days after irradiation (an improved method) in mice. The extracts were i.p. injected once within 4 min after the whole body X-ray irradiation. Of 12 materials examined, Aralia elata, Angelica acutiloba and Morus bombysis seemed to be good starting materials for preparing radioprotective substance(s) because of their relatively high specific activity and high yields of the extracts. (author).

  1. Radioprotective effects of sodium tungstate in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Kaoru; Ichimasa, Michiko; Suzuki, Saeko; Shiomi, Masae; Ichimasa, Yusuke; Miyahara, Kenzo; Nishimura, Yoshikazu

    2000-01-01

    The radioprotective effects of sodium tungstate on gamma-ray (9.8 Gy) induced decreases in survival rate, and hematocrit value in male and female mice were examined. Daily ingestion of 0.02% sodium tungstate solution (33-36 mg/kg body weight/day) as drinking water from 7 days before and up to 60 days after irradiation significantly mitigated the decrease in hematocrit value, especially at 21 days after irradiation. The increase in survival rate was observed in male and female mice administered sodium tungstate solution. As for its radioprotective effects, no significant sex differences were observed. (author)

  2. Nature and magnitude of the problem of spent radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    Various types of sealed radiation sources are widely used in industry, medicine and research. Virtually all countries have some sealed sources. The activity in the sources varies from kilobecquerels in consumer products to hundreds of pentabecquerels in facilities for food irradiation. Loss or misuse of sealed sources can give rise to accidents resulting in radiation exposure of workers and members of the general public, and can also give rise to extensive contamination of land, equipment and buildings. In extreme cases the exposure can be lethal. Problems of safety relating to spent radiation sources have been under consideration within the Agency for some years. The first objective of the project has been to prepare a comprehensive report reviewing the nature and background of the problem, also giving an overview of existing practices for the management of spent radiation sources. This report is the fulfilment of this first objective. The safe management of spent radiation sources cannot be studied in isolation from their normal use, so it has been necessary to include some details which are relevant to the use of radiation sources in general, although that area is outside the scope of this report. The report is limited to radiation sources made up of radioactive material. The Agency is implementing a comprehensive action plan for assistance to Member States, especially the developing countries, in all aspects of the safe management of spent radiation sources. The Agency is further seeking to establish regional or global solutions to the problems of long-term storage of spent radiation sources, as well as finding routes for the disposal of sources when it is not feasible to set up safe national solutions. The cost of remedial actions after an accident with radiation sources can be very high indeed: millions of dollars. If the Agency can help to prevent even one such single accident, the cost of its whole programme in this field would be more than covered. Refs

  3. Importance of pharmacological effects for radioprotective action. Chapter 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacq, Z.M.

    1975-01-01

    A revised approach is required if the mechanism of radioprotection by thiols is to be identified in whole mammals. Present experimental evidence suggests that a general sequence of events occurs when a mammalian organism is suddenly flooded with a large dose of a thiol or disulfide radioprotective agent. In the first few minutes, most of the substance is bound to protein and the intracellular equilibrium between free and bound -SH together with the regulation of redox potential is deeply disturbed. This binding then causes the discharge of other substances (enzymes, glutathione, etc.), and during the following hours the cells slowly recover. The heterogeneous nature of whole mammals makes extrapolation of mechanisms clearly identified in phages and isolated cells difficult. It is suggested that two independent mechanisms act synergistically, a physicochemical one (probably free-radical scavenging) operating on stationary cells and a biochemical one acting only on actively metabolizing cells. The former is of little importance in mammals since the intracellular concentration of protective agent is always too small to be significant. The biochemical mechanism is of greatest importance in mammals, but its exact nature remains to be identified. (U.K.)

  4. Isolation and Screening of Lipase Producing Microorganisms from Natural Sources

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Singh, M. G.; Chandraveer, C.; Tripathi, Abishek

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 1 (2017), s. 19-23 ISSN 0304-5250 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : lipase assay * natural sources * screening * submerged fermentation Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour OBOR OECD: Environmental sciences (social aspects to be 5.7)

  5. Use of herbal medicine for radioprotection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goyal, P.K.

    2008-01-01

    There are primarily three ways to achieve radio-protection in biological systems that have been exposed to ionizing radiation. The first is by changing the environment by physical or chemical means, or physical protection. The second is by chemical alternation of the site of radiation injury, or chemical protection. The third is by biological alternation to decrease the extent of the radiation injury

  6. Peptides, Peptidomimetics, and Polypeptides from Marine Sources: A Wealth of Natural Sources for Pharmaceutical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sable, Rushikesh; Parajuli, Pravin; Jois, Seetharama

    2017-04-22

    Nature provides a variety of peptides that are expressed in most living species. Evolutionary pressure and natural selection have created and optimized these peptides to bind to receptors with high affinity. Hence, natural resources provide an abundant chemical space to be explored in peptide-based drug discovery. Marine peptides can be extracted by simple solvent extraction techniques. The advancement of analytical techniques has made it possible to obtain pure peptides from natural resources. Extracted peptides have been evaluated as possible therapeutic agents for a wide range of diseases, including antibacterial, antifungal, antidiabetic and anticancer activity as well as cardiovascular and neurotoxin activity. Although marine resources provide thousands of possible peptides, only a few peptides derived from marine sources have reached the pharmaceutical market. This review focuses on some of the peptides derived from marine sources in the past ten years and gives a brief review of those that are currently in clinical trials or on the market.

  7. Discovery and development of antineoplastic agents from natural sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cragg, G M; Newman, D J

    1999-01-01

    Nature has provided many effective anticancer agents in current use, such as the microbially derived drugs; dactinomycin; bleomycin and doxorubicin; and the plant-derived drugs, vinblastine, irinotecan, topotecan, etoposide, and paclitaxel. The search for novel antitumor agents from natural sources continues through collaboration among scientists worldwide in the investigation of coral reefs, rainforests, and deep subsurface thermal vents for novel bioactive compounds. The potential for drug discovery is being further enhanced by recent advances in procedures for microbial cultivation and the extraction of nucleic acids from environmental samples, resulting in the identification of novel microbes that provide a vast untapped reservoir of genetic and metabolic diversity. Manipulation of the biosynthetic pathways of microbial polyketides through genetic engineering permits the biosynthesis of bioactive polyketides not generated naturally.

  8. Radioprotective effect of catecholamines on the cultured Chinese hamster fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chirkov, Yu.Yu.; Malatsidze, M.A.; Sobolev, A.S.

    1985-01-01

    On cultivated in vitro Chinese hamster fibroblasts radioprotective properties of adrenaline, noradrenaline and isoproterenol in different concentrations are studied. Isoproterenol radiopreventive effect is clearly manifested with its concentration being 1x10 -8 M; adrenaline and noradrenaline are efficient in higher concentrations. Propranolol, blocking β-adrenergic receptors, completely presents radioprotective effect of catecholamines on the cells. β-adrenergic mechanism of catecholamine radioprotective effect on Mammalia cells is discussed

  9. Incoherences of Brazilian labour laws face to present radioprotection concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, J.C.

    1996-01-01

    The Brazilian labour legislation establishes, since 1950, some privileges for people working in activities which imply exposure to ionizing radiations. Comparing the present legal framework with technical radioprotection knowledge, one can detect several incoherences covering: classification of such activities; additional payments; reduced labour journey; more vacations; medical surveillance; early retirements; special norms for women. An analysis of these incoherences lead us to propose a new frame of labour rights and radioprotection norms, coupling Brazilian juridical principles and modern radioprotection knowledge. (author)

  10. Tracking natural and anthropogenic Pb exposure to its geological source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Jane; Pashley, Vanessa; Madgwick, Richard; Neil, Samantha; Chenery, Carolyn

    2018-01-31

    Human Pb exposure comes from two sources: (i) natural uptake through ingestion of soils and typified by populations that predate mining activity and (ii) anthropogenic exposure caused by the exposure to Pb derived from ore deposits. Currently, the measured concentration of Pb within a sample is used to discriminate between these two exposure routes, with the upper limit for natural exposure in skeletal studies given as 0.5 or 0.7 mg/kg in enamel and 0.5/0.7 μg/dL in blood. This threshold approach to categorising Pb exposure does not distinguish between the geological origins of the exposure types. However, Pb isotopes potentially provide a more definitive means of discriminating between sources. Whereas Pb from soil displays a crustal average 238 U/ 204 Pb (μ) value of c 9.7, Pb from ore displays a much wider range of evolution pathways. These characteristics are transferred into tooth enamel, making it possible to characterize human Pb exposure in terms of the primary source of ingested Pb and to relate mining activity to geotectonic domains. We surmise that this ability to discriminate between silicate and sulphide Pb exposure will lead to a better understanding of the evolution of early human mining activity and development of exposure models through the Anthropocene.

  11. FLAVONOID NATURAL SOURCES AND THEIR IMPORTANCE IN THE HUMAN DIET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Danihelová

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Flavonoids as natural bioactive compounds are present in almost every sort of fruits, vegetables and from them derived products. Flavonols may be found mainly in fruits and vegetables, while flavones are abundant in herbs and spices. Rich natural sources of flavanols are tea, cocoa, grape seeds or apple skin. Flavanones are primarily found in a variety of citrus fruits and anthocyanidins in many coloured berries. Soy is rich in isoflavonoids. Average daily intake of flavonoids is approximately in the range of 150 to 300 mg. It strongly depends on individual, country and culture usages. In west countries main dietary sources of flavonoids consist of tea, wine and fruits, while in east countries there is consumed mainly soy with high isoflavonoid content. Many studies have shown, that intake of fruits and vegetables with high flavonoid content is associated with lowered risk of incidence of some diseases such as cardiovascular or cancer. These findings are attributed to experimentally confirmed biological effects of flavonoids - antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-allergic, anticancer or cardioprotective. The final effect is however depending on their bioavailability, which is in the case of flavonoids not high, because in the nature dominating flavonoid glycosides can poorly penetrate through lipophilic cell membranes. Final effective molecules are flavonoid metabolites, that more or less retain their biological activities. doi: 10.5219/160

  12. Contamination with uranium from natural and anthropological sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todorov, Peter Todorov; Ilieva, Elica Nikolova

    2005-01-01

    Our world is radioactive and always was since it was created. Radioactive elements are often called radioactive isotopes or radionuclides. Radionuclides are found in the environment as naturally occurring elements and as products or byproducts of nuclear technologies. One of the most common radionuclides is Uranium (U). U with atomic number of 92 is the heaviest known natural element. All U isotopes are radioactive. So it is very important their quantity to be under control. Natural U is used in the generation of nuclear fuel. U - 235 is one of two fissile materials used for the production of nuclear weapons and in some nuclear reactors as a source of energy. Because of its use in the fission process U is found in large quantities in stored nuclear waste. Other important source of U to the environment was the nuclear weapon tests, especially during the second half of 20th century. Artificial radionuclides may also be released into the environment from non - nuclear cycle activities in industry and research and from usage in diagnostic and therapeutic medicine. Erosion of agricultural soils may input the 238 U decay radionuclides into drinking water supplies in areas with heavy fertilizer usage. The most common routes of U contamination are through handling, ingesting and inhaling. Inhaling and ingesting increase the risk of lung and bone cancer. U is also chemically toxic at high concentrations. U may also affect reproductive organs and the foetus, and may increase the risk of leukemia and soft tissue cancer. (authors)

  13. Survey on radioprotective attention in the nurses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kayamori, Ryo; Satoh, Shizuma; Sakai, Kunio; Kitabatake, Takashi; Yoshizawa, Yoki

    1978-01-01

    Questionnaires were sent to 2965 nurses and practical nurses in 37 institutions in Niigata prefecture in April, 1977, and the degree of radioprotective knowledge and attention in the nurses were investigated. Answers in 2205 cases were effective. The mean rate of those who answered that they knew International Committee of Radiation Protection and the permissible dose in the abdomen of female who had a possibility to be pregnant and hereditary (significant) dose was 22.2%. Out of the nurses working in the institutions dealing with radiation, the rate of those who wore film-badge was 15.7%, and that of those who received special health examinations was 1.39%. 654 nurses answered that it was better to fix the nurses in the institutions dealing with radiation. An actual condition of radioprotective education in nurse education was analysed, and private opinions on its future direction were described. (Tsunoda, M.)

  14. From fundamental limits to radioprotection practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, P.; Chassany, J.

    1980-01-01

    The individual dose limits fixed by present French legislation for different categories of people refer to dose equivalents received by or delivered to the whole body or to certain tissues or organs over given periods of time. The values concerning personnel engaged directly in work under radiations are summed up in a table. These are the limits which radioprotection authorities must impose, while ensuring that exposure levels are kept as low as possible. With the means available in practical radioprotection it is not possible to measure dose equivalents directly, but information may be obtained on dose rates, absorbed doses, particle fluxes, activities per unit volume and per surface area. An interpretation of these measurements is necessary if an efficient supervision of worker exposure is to be achieved [fr

  15. Metrological needs for radioprotection technical controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tranchant, Ph.

    2009-01-01

    After having outlined that some aspects of the French 'Controls' decree of October 2005 are still subject to interpretation, and that some metrological aspects related to radioprotection have been 'forgotten', the author illustrates these weaknesses by different examples for which the current regulation status makes decisions or choices problematic. These examples are: X ray leaks on electric generators, dose rate measurements (neutron excluded), neutron dose rate measurements, conventional or complex labile contamination measurement, atmospheric contamination measurement

  16. Radioprotective effect of the β-carotene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Ying; Huang Meiying; Zhu Gengbo; Yin Zhiwei; Fang Jixi; Fan Xiudi

    1991-09-01

    The radioprotective effect of β-carotene was studied in animals. The results showed: 1) The chronic death rate decreased; 2) The peripheral leukocytes and spleen-B-Lymph cells increased; 3) The activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in the blood increased; 4) The β-carotene has the function of protecting the structure of the organs of thymus and testes; 5) The free asparagine (Asn) in the plasma increased and proline decreased

  17. Radioprotection rayonnements, dosimétrie, protection

    CERN Document Server

    Marey, Gérard

    2014-01-01

    Pour tous les travailleurs du nucléaire comme pour les étudiants des licences professionnelles et des BTS Environnement nucléaire et BTS radioprotection, l'ouvrage rassemble de façon progressive, claire et précise toutes les informations scientifiques et pratiques qui leur sont indispensables. Une première partie résume les données de base relatives à la structure de la matière, la stabilité des noyaux, les différents rayonnements, leur énergie et la décroissance radioactive. La deuxième partie constitue une approche progressive de la radioprotection s'appuyant sur l'influence des rayonnement sur la matière pour définir les notions de dose et aborder le dimensionnement des protections biologiques et des éléments de ventilation. Enfin, la dernière partie traite de la mise en oeuvre pratique de la radioprotection sur le terrain et de la gestion des déchets nucléaires en application de la technologie actuelle, de la réglementation et des directives imposées par l'exploitant qu'est EDF. De...

  18. Exposure of the Spanish population to radiation from natural sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Talavera, M.; Suarez, E.; Matarranz, J.L.; Salas, R.; Ramos, L. [Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear. Justo Dorado, Madrid (Spain)

    2006-07-01

    We have assessed the exposure of the Spanish population to natural radiation sources. The annual average effective dose is estimated to be 2.38 mSv, taking into account contributions from cosmic radiation (13.8%), terrestrial gamma radiation (39%), radon and thoron inhalation (34%) and ingestion (13.2%). Cosmic radiation doses were calculated from town altitude data. Terrestrial gamma ray exposure outdoors was derived from the M.A.R.N.A. (natural gamma radiation map of Spain). Indoor gamma ray exposure was calculated by multiplying the corresponding outdoor value conversion factor, which was obtained by a linear least-squares fit of experimental measurements. Radon doses were estimated from national surveys carried out throughout the country. To assess doses by ingestion of water and foodstuffs we considered the results from a detailed study on consumption habits by age and geographical area in Spain, promoted by C.S.N., and average radioactivity values from UNSCEAR. (authors)

  19. Natural uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammerich, Marc; Frot, Patricia; Gambini, Denis-Jean; Gauron, Christine; Moureaux, Patrick; Herbelet, Gilbert; Lahaye, Thierry; Pihet, Pascal; Rannou, Alain

    2014-08-01

    This sheet belongs to a collection which relates to the use of radionuclides essentially in unsealed sources. Its goal is to gather on a single document the most relevant information as well as the best prevention practices to be implemented. These sheets are made for the persons in charge of radiation protection: users, radioprotection-skill persons, labor physicians. Each sheet treats of: 1 - the radio-physical and biological properties; 2 - the main uses; 3 - the dosimetric parameters; 4 - the measurement; 5 - the protection means; 6 - the areas delimitation and monitoring; 7 - the personnel classification, training and monitoring; 8 - the effluents and wastes; 9 - the authorization and declaration administrative procedures; 10 - the transport; and 11 - the right conduct to adopt in case of incident or accident. This sheet deals specifically with natural uranium

  20. In vitro analysis of radioprotective effect of monoterpenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ken-ichi Kudo; Tadashi Hanafusa; Toshiro Ono

    2017-01-01

    Monoterpenes are naturally occurring hydrocarbons composed of two units of isoprenes. They exhibit antioxidant activity to scavenge reactive oxygen species, such as hydroxyl radicals. We investigated the potential of monoterpenes such as thymol, linalool, and menthol to act as radioprotectants. The proliferation of EL4 cells, a mouse lymphoma cell line, treated with linalool at a concentration of 500 μM or more was not affected by X-ray irradiation. Plasmid-nicking assay performed using formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase showed that linalool prevented single strand breaks and oxidized purines on pUC19 plasmid DNA. These findings indicate that linalool has the ability to scavenge reactive oxygen species and is a potential radioprotector. (author)

  1. Creation of resource base of radioprotective and antimutagenic substances of plant origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rzaev, N.R.; Abdullaev, N.M.; Kiseleva, T.L; Pavlova, L.A.; Bereza, N.S.; Timokhina, N.I.

    2013-01-01

    The relevance of study is determined by a practical necessity to obtain the most effective radioprotective drugs of natural origin based on vegetable materials that can significantly increase radioresistance, has no toxic effect on the body and which can be used to obtain a number of funds with a broad protective effect, and can also be used in cosmetology , hygiene, beverage and etc. The effectiveness of herbal drugs is more pronounced when they are used repeatedly, due to the positive effect on endogenous background of radioresistance, general non-specific response of the body, stimulation of protective resources of the body and repair of radiation damage. Extracts of vegetable origin in the arsenal of radioprotective substances of natural origin occupy a significant place

  2. The fractal nature materials microstructure influence on electrochemical energy sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitić V.V.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With increasing of the world energy crisis, research for new, renewable and alternative energy sources are in growth. The focus is on research areas, sometimes of minor importance and applications, where the different synthesis methods and microstructure properties optimization, performed significant improvement of output materials’ and components’ electro-physical properties, which is important for higher energy efficiency and in the electricity production (batteries and battery systems, fuel cells and hydrogen energy contribution. Also, the storage tanks capacity improvement, for the energy produced on such way, which is one of the most important development issues in the energy sphere, represents a very promising research and application area. Having in mind, the results achieved in the electrochemical energy sources field, especially electrolyte development, these energy sources, materials fractal nature optimization analysis contribution, have been investigated. Based on materials fractal structure research field, particularly electronic materials, we have performed microstructure influence parameters research in electrochemistry area. We have investigated the Ho2O3 concentration influence (from 0.01wt% to 1wt% and sintering temperature (from 1320°C to 1380°C, as consolidation parameters, and thus, also open the electrochemical function fractalization door and in the basic thermodynamic parameters the fractal correction introduced. The fractal dimension dependence on additive concentration is also investigated. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172057: Directed synthesis, structure and properties of multifunctional materials

  3. Lignicolous fungi as potential natural sources of antioxidants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karaman Maja A.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available As a result of an interest in natural derived metabolites around the world higher fungi (Basidiomycotina have taken on great importance in biochemical investigations. A large number of structurally divergent compounds - both cellular components and secondary metabolites - have been extracted and found to possess significant biological activity, such as an immunomodulative effect on the human body. Effects of fungal biomolecules as potential natural antioxidants have not been examined so far. Biochemical analysis have included in vitro testing of the influence of different extracts (water methanol, chloroform of selected fungal sporocarps on Fe2+/ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation (LP in a lecithin liposome system by TBA assay, as well as various other procedures. Qualitative analysis by TLC revealed a distinction both between different extracts of the same fungal species and between similar extracts of different species. The results obtained on antioxidative activities (LP inhibition and "scavenging" activity indicate that MeOH extracts manifested a degree of activity higher than that of CHCl3 extracts with respect to antioxidative activity, the extracts can be ranged in the following declining order: Ganoderma lucidum, Ganoderma applanatum Meripilus giganteus, and Flammulina velutipes. The obtained results suggest that the analyzed fungi are of potential interest as sources of strong natural antioxidants in the food and cosmetics industries, whereas synthetic ones have proved to be carcinogenic.

  4. Radioprotective Effect of Thymol Against Salivary Glands Dysfunction Induced by Ionizing Radiation in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Abedi, Seyed Mohammad; Yarmand, Fateme; Motallebnejad, Mina; Seyedmajidi, Maryam; Moslemi, Dariush; Bijani, Ali; Hosseinimehr, Seyed Jalal

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the radioprotective effect of thymol as a natural product against salivary glands dysfunction induced by ionizing radiation in rats. The rats were treated with thymol at dose of 50 mg/Kg before exposure to ionizing radiation at dose 15 Gy. Salivary gland function was evaluated with radioisotope scintigraphy and then salivary gland to background counts ratio was calculated. Ionizing radiation caused significant salivary glands dysfunction at the 3th and...

  5. Blocked natural ventilation: the effect of a source mass flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Andrew W.; Caulfield, C. P.; Phillips, Jeremy C.

    2003-11-01

    We analyse the density evolution of fluid within a confined ventilated space resulting from the action of a dense turbulent plume originating at the top of the space with finite source volume flux, Q_0, and initial source buoyancy flux, B_0. The space is ventilated through upper and lower openings of areas A_u and A_l respectively, which are separated by a vertical distance H. We show that if Q_0(3 {<} ) 2 B_0 H c_l(2) A_l(2) (where c_l is an empirically determined discharge coefficient) then a two-layer steady stratification becomes established in the room, with outflow through the lower opening and inflow through the upper opening. The interface location depends not only on the geometry of the openings, but also the source conditions. We show that as Q_0 increases for fixed B_0, the height of the interface, which equals the depth of the lower layer of relatively dense fluid, increases. Eventually, when the source volume flux has a value greater than Q_m {=} (c_l A_l)(2/3) (2B_0 H)(1/3) , the natural exchange flow becomes blocked and a steady outflow through both of the openings develops. As a result, the density of the fluid throughout the room gradually evolves towards the density of the incoming dense fluid. We compare our theoretical predictions with a series of laboratory experiments, and discuss the implications of our model for the design of ventilation systems.

  6. NPASS: natural product activity and species source database for natural product research, discovery and tool development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xian; Zhang, Peng; He, Weidong; Qin, Chu; Chen, Shangying; Tao, Lin; Wang, Yali; Tan, Ying; Gao, Dan; Wang, Bohua; Chen, Zhe; Chen, Weiping; Jiang, Yu Yang; Chen, Yu Zong

    2018-01-04

    There has been renewed interests in the exploration of natural products (NPs) for drug discovery, and continuous investigations of the therapeutic claims and mechanisms of traditional and herbal medicines. In-silico methods have been employed for facilitating these studies. These studies and the optimization of in-silico algorithms for NP applications can be facilitated by the quantitative activity and species source data of the NPs. A number of databases collectively provide the structural and other information of ∼470 000 NPs, including qualitative activity information for many NPs, but only ∼4000 NPs are with the experimental activity values. There is a need for the activity and species source data of more NPs. We therefore developed a new database, NPASS (Natural Product Activity and Species Source) to complement other databases by providing the experimental activity values and species sources of 35 032 NPs from 25 041 species targeting 5863 targets (2946 proteins, 1352 microbial species and 1227 cell-lines). NPASS contains 446 552 quantitative activity records (e.g. IC50, Ki, EC50, GI50 or MIC mainly in units of nM) of 222 092 NP-target pairs and 288 002 NP-species pairs. NPASS, http://bidd2.nus.edu.sg/NPASS/, is freely accessible with its contents searchable by keywords, physicochemical property range, structural similarity, species and target search facilities. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  7. Marine Vibrionaceae as a source of bioactive natural products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Månsson, Maria; Wietz, Matthias; Gram, Lone

    Vibrionaceae are Gram-negative bacteria found widespread in the marine environment where they are particularly abundant on the surface of marine macroorganisms. Production of antibacterial compounds appears to be common among vibrios, yet vibrios are largely underexplored for their proclivity...... to produce secondary metabolites. We have studied the production of antibacterial compounds in Vibrionaceae collected during a global marine expedition, Galathea 3. Apart from growth inhibitory compounds, we searched for compounds that interfere with virulence regulation in Staphylococcus aureus. We found...... that some strains were capable of producing antibacterial compounds when grown on natural substrates such as chitin or seaweed. One Vibrio coralliilyticus strain was capable of producing the antibacterial compound when using chitin as the sole carbon source and in a live chitin model system, suggesting...

  8. Naturally Occurring Diterpenoid Dimers: Source, Biosynthesis, Chemistry and Bioactivities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Li-Gen; Ung, Carolina Oi Lam; Feng, Zhe-Ling; Huang, Li; Hu, Hao

    2016-10-01

    Diterpenoid dimers are rare in nature and mainly found in higher plants including the families Acanthaceae, Annonaceae, Asteraceae, Calceolariaceae, Chrysobalanaceae, Cupressaceae, Euphorbiaceae, Fabaceae, Lamiaceae, Liliaceae, Meliaceae, Rhizophoraceae, Taxaceae, Velloziaceae, and Zingiberaceae. In addition, a few diterpenoid dimers have been also reported from fungi (Psathyrellaceae), liverworts (Scapaniaceae), and a gorgonian (Gorgoniidae). They feature a wide variety of structures due to different core skeletons, linkage patterns, substituents, and configurations. Accordingly, diterpenoid dimers exhibit a broad range of bioactivities, including cytotoxic, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, antimalarial, and antifouling properties, which have attracted more and more research interests in the past decades. This review with 176 metabolites from 109 references provides a comprehensive and up-to-date overview of the source, biosynthesis, structure, synthesis, and bioactivities of diterpenoid dimers. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Natural convection in wavy enclosures with volumetric heat sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oztop, H.F.; Varol, Y.; Abu-Nada, E.; Chamkha, A.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the effects of volumetric heat sources on natural convection heat transfer and flow structures in a wavy-walled enclosure are studied numerically. The governing differential equations are solved by an accurate finite-volume method. The vertical walls of enclosure are assumed to be heated differentially whereas the two wavy walls (top and bottom) are kept adiabatic. The effective governing parameters for this problem are the internal and external Rayleigh numbers and the amplitude of wavy walls. It is found that both the function of wavy wall and the ratio of internal Rayleigh number (Ra I ) to external Rayleigh number (Ra E ) affect the heat transfer and fluid flow significantly. The heat transfer is predicted to be a decreasing function of waviness of the top and bottom walls in case of (IRa/ERa)>1 and (IRa/ERa)<1. (authors)

  10. Interventional techniques in medicine and radioprotection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Guen, B.; Bar, O.; Benderitter, M.; Bourguignon, M.; Chevillard, S.; Gauron, Ch.; Lallemand, J.; Lombard, J.; Maccia, C.; Sapoval, M.; Bernier, M.O.; Pirard, Ph.; Jacob, S.; Donadille, L.; Aubert, B.; Clairand, I.; Mozziconacci, J.G.; Brot, A.M.; Jarrige, V.; Huet, Ch.; Marchal, C.; Martin, M.; Bar, O.; Degrange, J.P.; Livarek, B.; Menechal, Ph.; Sapoval, M.; Pellerin, O.

    2009-01-01

    This document gathers the slides of the available presentations given during this conference day. Nineteen presentations are assembled in the document and deal with: 1 - Interventional radiology: why is it developing? (M. Sapoval); 2 - exposure particularities in interventional radiology (O. Bar); 3 - doses received by organs in interventional cardiology (C. Maccia); 4 - Patients exposure: description of cumulated exposure of patients treated in interventional cardiology (M.O. Bernier); 5 - 2004 inquiry to dermatologists about post-interventional radiology radio-dermatitis (P. Pirard); 6 - exposure and risks to operators (S. Jacob); 7 - dosimetric evaluation techniques and results about interventional imaging operators' extremities (L. Donadille and F. Merat); 8 - bibliographic study of doses received by operators with non-protected organs (B. Aubert); 9 - ORAMED European project: optimization of operational dosimeter uses in interventional radiology (I. Clairand); 10 - reference levels and dosimetric evaluation of patients (C. Maccia); 11 - optimization in coronary angioplasty (J.G. Mozziconacci, A.M. Brot and V. Jarrige); 12 - dosimetry in medical over-exposure situation (C. Huet); 13 - significant radioprotection events in interventional radiology declared to the Nuclear Safety Authority (ASN) - status and experience feedback (C. Marchal); 14 - interventional radiology and unwanted effects (M. Benderitter); 15 - global analyses and new exposure indicators in human epidermis cells (M. Martin); 16 - radioprotection regulations and training (O. Bar); 17 - zoning and workplace analysis in interventional cardiology (J.P. Degrange); 18 - guide of good clinical practices: example of interventional cardiology (B. Livarek); 19 - how to encourage the radioprotection optimization in interventional radiology: the ASN's point of view (P. Menechal). (J.S.)

  11. Note from the radioprotection group's shipping service

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Le service SHIPPING du groupe de radioprotection souhaite vous rappeler qu'avant toute expédition de matériel susceptible d'être radioactif, une demande de transport doit être établie par EDH en cochant la case appropriée (danger radioactif). Merci de bien vouloir prendre note des informations figurant dans le site Web: http://cern.ch/service-rp-shipping Toute demande non conforme ne sera pas prise en compte. Radioactive Shipping Service http://cern.ch/service-rp-shippingTél: 73171Fax: 69200

  12. Natural gas seeps in the French Alps: Sources and pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloppmann, Wolfram; Blessing, Michaela; Proust, Eric; Gal, Frédéric; Bentivegna, Gaetan; Henry, Benoit; Defossez, Pierrick; Catherine, Lerouge; Humez, Pauline; Mayer, Bernhard; Millot, Romain; Gaucher, Eric

    2016-04-01

    Natural gas emanations are part of the geochemical baseline to take into account when assessing global greenhouse gas emissions and potential impacts of conventional and unconventional gas exploration and exploitation on groundwater. Examples of such natural gas macro-seeps are known in several parts of the world (Etiope et al., 2009). Only a limited number of them have been characterized for their gas and isotopic compositions. Such analyses can provide essential information for baseline studies, providing insight in the sources (biogenic vs. thermogenic or modified thermogenic) and pathways of such seeps and may allow for distinction of natural seeps from stray gas leakage associated with human activities. Here, we report gas concentrations and multi-isotope data (δ13C and δ2H of methane and ethane, δ13C and δ18O of CO2, 3He/4He ratio) of two gas seeps in the French subalpine chains, both in a similar geological and structural position within Middle Jurassic claystones along the eastern border of the large synclinal structures of the Vercors and the Chartreuse massifs (Moss, 1992). The "ardent fountain" (fontaine ardente) of Le Gua, 30 km south of Grenoble has most likely the longest continuous written record of existence of any individual natural gas seep, mentioned explicitly as early as the first quarter of the 5th century (Augustin of Hippo (St. Augustin), approx. 426) This natural seep was described in the past as a "wet seep" associated with a spring, whereas the second investigated seep, Rochasson near Meylan north of Grenoble, is a dry seep. Both seeps contain methane and ethane with thermogenic C and H isotope signatures, comparable with a seep in the Northern Swiss Alps at Giswil (Etiope et al., 2010) but with a higher dryness (C1/(C2+C3)>1000) for the Le Gua seep, possibly due to molecular fractionation upon advective fluid+gas migration (Etiope et al., 2009). Maturity (R0) of the reservoir rocks deduced from δ13C(CH4), δ13C(C2H6) is similar to

  13. Sugar cane stillage: a potential source of natural antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caderby, Emma; Baumberger, Stéphanie; Hoareau, William; Fargues, Claire; Decloux, Martine; Maillard, Marie-Noëlle

    2013-11-27

    Biorefinery of sugar cane is the first economic activity of Reunion Island. Some sugar cane manufactured products (juice, syrup, molasses) have antioxidant activities and are sources of both phenolic compounds and Maillard Reaction Products (MRP). The study aimed to highlight the global antioxidant activity of sugar cane stillage and understand its identity. Chromatographic fractionation on Sephadex LH-20 resin allowed the recovery of a MRP-rich fraction, responsible for 58 to 66% of the global antioxidant activity according to the nature of the sugar cane stillage (DPPH test), and a phenolic compounds-rich fraction for 37 to 59% of the activity. A good correlation was recorded between the antioxidant activity of the sugar cane stillage and its content in total reducing compounds amount (Folin-Ciocalteu assay), among them 2.8 to 3.9 g/L of phenolic compounds (in 5-caffeoylquinic acid equivalent). Preliminary experiments by HPLC-DAD-MS allowed to identify several free phenolic acids and gave clues to identify esters of quinic acids.

  14. Natural gas - the energy source of the near future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagland, Jan

    2001-01-01

    According to Exxon, half of the world's total oil and gas reserves must be renewed before 2010. It is the responsibility of governments all over the world to see to it that also natural gas comes on the global energy market. Although oil remains the dominating energy source for the next twenty years, the demand for gas is increasing by fifty percent more than oil, and gas is regarded as the energy resource of the future. As a gas-producing nation, Norway will play an important role in the European gas market in the future. Norwegian gas will supply a considerable amount of gas to the European consumers, competing with Russian and Algerian gas. Norwegian gas resources exist in the North Sea, The Norwegian Sea, and possibly in the Barents Sea. One quarter of the world's oil reserves is found in the Middle East, while even greater quantities are found in the former Soviet Union. Thus, the axis Teheran-Moscow would be a powerful link in energy policy, controlling more than half of the world's gas resources and strongly influencing the gas price. A forum, GECF (Gas Exporting Countries Forum), has been established. This forum is led by Iran and has eleven members, including Norway. It denies that it will become a price-controlling cartel like OPEC

  15. Radioprotective potential of Decalepis hamiltonii: a study on gamma radiation-induced oxidative stress and toxicity in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasha, Muzeer; Shivanandappa, T.; Ramesh, S.R.; Sanjeev, Ganesh

    2016-01-01

    Radiation-induced damage to normal tissues restricts the therapeutic use of radiation in clinical application for cancer treatment and thereby limits the efficacy of the treatment. The use of chemical compounds as radioprotectors is a desirable strategy to improve the therapeutic index of radiotherapy. However, most of the synthetic radioprotective compounds studied have shown to have undesirable properties of toxicity. There is a need for safer, natural radioprotective agents without compromising efficacy of the treatment. We have investigated the radioprotective potential of Decalepis hamiltonii (Dh) root extract which is rich in natural antioxidants by employing Drosophila melanogaster as a model. Irradiation of Drosophila with 100, 200, and 400 Gy of gamma radiation induced dose-dependent mortality. Elevation in the levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), the activities of catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), and depletion of glutathione (GSH) content suggested radiation-induced oxidative stress. Pretreatment of flies with Dh root extract protected them from radiation-induced mortality and oxidative stress as evidenced by reduction in TBARS and restoration of the antioxidant enzymes, SOD and CAT, and GSH to control levels. This is the first report of radioprotective action of Dh root extract in D. melanogaster. (author)

  16. Studies on the radioprotective effect of seaweed sulfated polysaccharide and its mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Chongdao; Qiang Yizong; Shao Yuan; Sun Cunpu; Wu Ke; Cong Jianbo; Wang Shu

    1997-11-01

    Seaweed sulfated polysaccharide (SP) is a natural sulfated polysaccharide isolated from seaweed and has various pharmacological activities. However, previous studies on the radioprotective effect of SP were limited to in vivo whole-body studies. In the present study, SP was examined for radioprotective effect and its mechanism by MTT assay and the electron spin resonance (ESR). The items studied were as follows: (1) Different doses of SP were given to 60 Co γ-ray irradiated KM mice, and their influence on the peripheral blood recovery and 30 d survival rate of the irradiated mice were observed. (2) The radioprotective mechanism of SP on hematopoietic cells was studied in two hematopoietic growth factor-dependent cell lines (NFS-60 to G-CSF, TF-1 to GM-CSF) by MTT assay. (3) The irradiated 5'-TMP was used as a model for estimating the amount of DNA to observe the protective activity of SP on the radiation injury of DNA by using ESR. The results found that SP could promote the recovery of peripheral blood and proliferation of the hematopoietic cells in irradiated mice, increase their 30 d survival rate, and scavenge the free radicals

  17. Spent yeast as natural source of functional food additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakowska, Rita; Sadowska, Anna; Dybkowska, Ewa; Świderski, Franciszek

    Spent yeasts are by-products arising from beer and wine production which over many years have been chiefly used as feed additives for livestock. They contain many valuable and bioactive substances which has thereby generated much interest in their exploitation. Up till now, the main products obtained from beer-brewing yeasts are β-glucans and yeast extracts. Other like foodstuffs include dried brewer’s yeast, where this is dried and the bitterness removed to be fit for human consumption as well as mannan-oligosaccharides hitherto used in the feed industry. β-glucans constitute the building blocks of yeast cell walls and can thus be used in human nutrition as dietary supplements or serving as food additives in functional foods. β-glucans products obtained via post-fermentation of beer also exhibit a high and multi-faceted biological activity where they improve the blood’s lipid profile, enhance immunological status and have both prebiotic and anti-oxidant properties. Yeast extracts are currently being used more and more to enhance flavour in foodstuffs, particularly for meat and its products. Depending on how autolysis is carried out, it is possible to design extracts of various meat flavours characteristic of specific meats. Many different flavour profiles can be created which may be additionally increased in combination with vegetable extracts. Within the food market, yeast extracts can appear in various guises such as liquids, pastes or powders. They all contain significant amounts of glutamic acid, 5’-GMP and 5’-IMP nucleotides together with various amino acids and peptides that act synergistically for enhancing the flavour of foodstuff products. Recent studies have demonstrated additional benefits of yeast extracts as valuable sources of amino acids and peptides which can be used in functional foods and dietary supplements. These products possess GRAS status (Generally Recognised As Safe) which thereby also adds further as to why they should be used

  18. Radioprotection in the medical applications of the ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This publication presents information about of the radiological safety in the medical application of the ionizing radiation compiled in 11 chapter and 1 annex. The first four chapters are principally dedicated to technical uses in radioprotection, the external and internal irradiation and the biological radiation effects. The radioprotection principles, the individual monitoring techniques, and the radioprotection systems are developed afterwards in the followings three chapters. The second half of the document is dedicated entirely to the medical practices using ionizing radiations, specially to the radioprotection aspects in radiodiagnosis, nuclear medicine and radiotherapy. The final chapter is dedicated to radiological accidents happened worldwide in the field of the medical applications of the ionizing radiations. The annex, about of the regulatory area, established a set of standards, laws, decrees and other force regulations in radiological safety, related in radiodiagnosis, nuclear medicine and radiotherapy

  19. Hibernation for space travel: Impact on radioprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerri, Matteo; Tinganelli, Walter; Negrini, Matteo; Helm, Alexander; Scifoni, Emanuele; Tommasino, Francesco; Sioli, Maximiliano; Zoccoli, Antonio; Durante, Marco

    2016-11-01

    Hibernation is a state of reduced metabolic activity used by some animals to survive in harsh environmental conditions. The idea of exploiting hibernation for space exploration has been proposed many years ago, but in recent years it is becoming more realistic, thanks to the introduction of specific methods to induce hibernation-like conditions (synthetic torpor) in non-hibernating animals. In addition to the expected advantages in long-term exploratory-class missions in terms of resource consumptions, aging, and psychology, hibernation may provide protection from cosmic radiation damage to the crew. Data from over half century ago in animal models suggest indeed that radiation effects are reduced during hibernation. We will review the mechanisms of increased radioprotection in hibernation, and discuss possible impact on human space exploration. Copyright © 2016 The Committee on Space Research (COSPAR). Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Hibernation for space travel: Impact on radioprotection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerri, Matteo; Tinganelli, Walter; Negrini, Matteo; Helm, Alexander; Scifoni, Emanuele; Tommasino, Francesco; Sioli, Maximiliano; Zoccoli, Antonio; Durante, Marco

    2016-11-01

    Hibernation is a state of reduced metabolic activity used by some animals to survive in harsh environmental conditions. The idea of exploiting hibernation for space exploration has been proposed many years ago, but in recent years it is becoming more realistic, thanks to the introduction of specific methods to induce hibernation-like conditions (synthetic torpor) in non-hibernating animals. In addition to the expected advantages in long-term exploratory-class missions in terms of resource consumptions, aging, and psychology, hibernation may provide protection from cosmic radiation damage to the crew. Data from over half century ago in animal models suggest indeed that radiation effects are reduced during hibernation. We will review the mechanisms of increased radioprotection in hibernation, and discuss possible impact on human space exploration.

  1. Evaluation of the radioprotective efficacy of rifaximin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Won Woo; Kim, Mi Sook; Jeong, Jae Hoon; Kim, Hee Jong [Dept. of Radiation Treatment Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    Radiation exposure causes severe intestinal damage, and intestinal injury has been shown to plays a pivotal role in survival. The non-systemic antibiotic, rifaximin, is used in the treatment of traveler's diarrhea due to bacterial enteropathogens and has an anti-biotic and an anti-inflammatory effect with low gastrointestinal absorption of < 0.4%. Rifaximin also has been used for treatment of irritable bowel syndrome, small bowel bacterial overgrowth, pouchitis. Jahraus et al. reported that rifaximin diminishes neutropenia following potentially lethalmwhole-body radiation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the radioprotective effect of rifaximin on ionizing radiation-induced intestinal injury. Rifaximin showed increased survival rate as well as decreased weight loss between pre treatment and post treatment. Fortunately rifaximin seems to involveincreased number of crypt cells and length of villus. These findings suggest that rifaximin can be a strategy by protecting intestinal injury.

  2. Evaluation of the radioprotective efficacy of rifaximin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Won Woo; Kim, Mi Sook; Jeong, Jae Hoon; Kim, Hee Jong

    2014-01-01

    Radiation exposure causes severe intestinal damage, and intestinal injury has been shown to plays a pivotal role in survival. The non-systemic antibiotic, rifaximin, is used in the treatment of traveler's diarrhea due to bacterial enteropathogens and has an anti-biotic and an anti-inflammatory effect with low gastrointestinal absorption of < 0.4%. Rifaximin also has been used for treatment of irritable bowel syndrome, small bowel bacterial overgrowth, pouchitis. Jahraus et al. reported that rifaximin diminishes neutropenia following potentially lethalmwhole-body radiation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the radioprotective effect of rifaximin on ionizing radiation-induced intestinal injury. Rifaximin showed increased survival rate as well as decreased weight loss between pre treatment and post treatment. Fortunately rifaximin seems to involveincreased number of crypt cells and length of villus. These findings suggest that rifaximin can be a strategy by protecting intestinal injury

  3. Assessment in vitro of radioprotective efficacy of curcumin and resveratrol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sebastia, Natividad, E-mail: natividad.sebastia@uv.es [Area de Nutricion y Bromatologia, Facultat de Farmacia, Universitat de Valencia, Av. Vicent Andres Estelles s/n, 46100 Burjassot (Spain); Montoro, Alegria [Servicio de Proteccion Radiologica, Hospital Universitario La Fe, 46009, Valencia (Spain); Montoro, Amparo [Area de Nutricion y Bromatologia, Facultat de Farmacia, Universitat de Valencia, Av. Vicent Andres Estelles s/n, 46100 Burjassot (Spain); Almonacid, Miguel; Villaescusa, Juan Ignacio [Servicio de Proteccion Radiologica, Hospital Universitario La Fe, 46009, Valencia (Spain); Cervera, Jose; Such, Esperanza; Silla, Ma Angeles [Servicio de Hematologia, Hospital Universitario La Fe, 46009, Valencia (Spain); Soriano, Jose Miguel [Area de Nutricion y Bromatologia, Facultat de Farmacia, Universitat de Valencia, Av. Vicent Andres Estelles s/n, 46100 Burjassot (Spain)

    2011-09-15

    Many natural substances have been studied in recent past to be used as radioprotectors to mitigate ionizing radiation-induced damage in mammalian systems due to its effectiveness given both pre- and post-irradiation and for long time with out drug-related toxicity. Curcumin and trans-resveratrol are both natural occurring polyphenols, obtained from the root of Curcuma longa and from grapes and other berries, respectively. These compounds have shown antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, immunostimulant and anti-carcinogenic properties. Our aim was to evaluate the radioprotective efficacy, in vitro, of curcumin and trans-resveratrol separately against radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations. The study was carried out by the pre-treatment of human blood lymphocytes at concentrations from 0 to 500 {mu}g mL{sup -1} and from 0 to 50 {mu}g mL{sup -1} for curcumin and trans-resveratrol, respectively. The results showed that all concentrations tested reduced radiation-induced chromosomal damage. Maximum damage protection was observed at the concentration of 5 {mu}g mL{sup -1} for curcumin and 0.5 {mu}g mL{sup -1} for trans-resveratrol. Thus, our results show that curcumin and trans-resveratrol pre-treatment significantly protect normal lymphocytes against {gamma}-radiation-induced cellular damage.

  4. Assessment in vitro of radioprotective efficacy of curcumin and resveratrol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebastia, Natividad; Montoro, Alegria; Montoro, Amparo; Almonacid, Miguel; Villaescusa, Juan Ignacio; Cervera, Jose; Such, Esperanza; Silla, Ma Angeles; Soriano, Jose Miguel

    2011-01-01

    Many natural substances have been studied in recent past to be used as radioprotectors to mitigate ionizing radiation-induced damage in mammalian systems due to its effectiveness given both pre- and post-irradiation and for long time with out drug-related toxicity. Curcumin and trans-resveratrol are both natural occurring polyphenols, obtained from the root of Curcuma longa and from grapes and other berries, respectively. These compounds have shown antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, immunostimulant and anti-carcinogenic properties. Our aim was to evaluate the radioprotective efficacy, in vitro, of curcumin and trans-resveratrol separately against radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations. The study was carried out by the pre-treatment of human blood lymphocytes at concentrations from 0 to 500 μg mL -1 and from 0 to 50 μg mL -1 for curcumin and trans-resveratrol, respectively. The results showed that all concentrations tested reduced radiation-induced chromosomal damage. Maximum damage protection was observed at the concentration of 5 μg mL -1 for curcumin and 0.5 μg mL -1 for trans-resveratrol. Thus, our results show that curcumin and trans-resveratrol pre-treatment significantly protect normal lymphocytes against γ-radiation-induced cellular damage.

  5. Operational measurements in radioprotection in the industrial and medical environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodde, S.; Vial, Th.; Truffert, H.; Kramar, R.; Batalla, A.; Roine, Ph.; Pin, A.; Lahaye, Th.; Rodde, S.; Bordy, J.M.; Paquet, F.; Veres, A.; Cadiou, A.; Branthonne, J.Y.; Noel, A.; Laloubere, L.; Moreau, St.; Gensdarmes, F.; Marques, S.; Lestang, M.; Valendru, N.; Tranchant, Ph.; Martel, P.; Bernhard, S.; Chareyre, P.; Gardin, I.; Casanova, Ph.; De Vita, A.; Tenailleau, L.; Masson, B.; Feret, B.; Guerin, M.; Guillot, L.; Gaultier, E.

    2009-01-01

    This document gathers the slides of the available presentations given during these conference days. Thirty presentations are assembled in the document and deal with: 1 - enforcement circular of the labor code dispositions relative to workers protection against ionizing radiation hazards (T. Lahaye); 2 - context and regulatory evolutions - public health code (S. Rodde); 3 - references and perspectives in external dosimetry (J.M. Bordy); 4 - CIPR's Committee 2 works (F. Paquet); 5 - from protection data to measurement data (A. Pin); 6 - dosimetric control in radiotherapy (A. Veres); 7 - calibration of irradiation measurement devices in industrial environment (A. Cadiou); 8 - calibration and verification of nuclear measurement devices (J.Y. Branthonne); 9 - calibration of measurement devices in medical environment (J.M. Bordy); 10 - quality control in radiotherapy (A. Batalla); 11 - in-vivo dosimetry in radiotherapy (A. Noel); 12 - calibration metrology of fixed post irradiation sensors (L. Laloubere); 13 - design requirements for the radiological zoning and the wastes cleanliness of Flamanville 3 EPR reactor (S. Moreau); 14 - efficiency of aerosol capture systems used in CNPE EDF (F. Gensdarmes); 15 - mobile surveillance means of the atmospheric contamination of CNPE EDF's reactor building (S. Marques and M. Lestang); 16 - experience feedback about the security gates at EDF's nuclear facilities (N. Valendru); 17 - metrology needs for radioprotection technical controls (P. Tranchant); 18 - technical evaluation of a flowmeter/dosemeter in the framework of the regulatory control of X-ray electric generators used in radio-diagnosis (P. Martel); 19 - reinforced natural radioactivity - the case of radon measurement (S. Bernhard); 20 - fires during radioactive materials transport (P. Chareyre); 21 - measurement in the framework of medical examinations: radiology service (A. Noel); 22 - operational measurements in nuclear medicine (I. Gardin); 23 - from the operational

  6. Microbial fermented tea - a potential source of natural food preservatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mo, H.Z.; Yang Zhu, Yang; Chen, Z.M.

    2008-01-01

    Antimicrobial activities of microbial fermented tea are much less known than its health beneficial properties. These antimicrobial activities are generated in natural microbial fermentation process with tea leaves as substrates. The antimicrobial components produced during the fermentation process

  7. Epiphytic marine pigmented bacteria : A prospective source of natural antioxidants

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pawar, R.T.; Mohandass, C.; Sivaperumal, E.; Sabu, E.; Rajasabapathy, R.; Jagtap, T.G.

    Awareness on antioxidants and its significance in human healthcare has increased many folds in recent time. Increased demand requisite on welcoming newer and alternative resources for natural antioxidants. Seaweed associated pigmented bacteria...

  8. Marine organisms: an alternative source of potentially valuable natural products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alphonse Kelecom

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper recalls the outcoming of marine natural products research and reviews a selection of marirne bioactive metabolites in current use together with promising trends in marine pharmacology.

  9. Radioprotective effects of some commonly used calcium blockers (deltiazem, nifidine)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alya, G.

    2002-11-01

    The main aim of this study is looking for other radio protectors less or non-toxic with a favorable therapeutic index and good tolerance in human body. Wistar rats of both sexes were used; control animals were irradiated (total body irradiation) in perforated plexiglas by using the 60 Co source. Dose of irradiation was 9 Gy (lethal dose of 100% of animals-LD 1 00) and dose rate was 80-85 rad/min -1 . Irradiated animals have been monitored for two weeks and percentage of survival has been calculated. Different concentrations of deltiazem and nifidine were used at 15 or 30 minutes before the time of irradiation. Irradiation and treated animals have been monitored for 30 days post-irradiation and the percentage of survival has been calculated. The results showed that the Ca 2+ antagonists in question could be used as radio protectors. moreover, results of this undertaken study revealed that deltiazem is more effective than nifidine, survival rates of deltiazem-treated animals were, significantly, higher than those, which were treated with nifidine. The radio protective effects of these drugs vary according to animals' sex and age. Drugs concentration and time of administration play an important role in their radioprotective effects. These drugs can attenuate radiation injuries and thus they can protect animals from radiation syndromes, especially bone marrow syndrome and gastrointestinal syndrome the matter that causes decreasing in lethality induced by lethal doses of gamma radiation. (author)

  10. Interventional techniques in medicine and radioprotection; Les techniques interventionnelles en medecine et radioprotection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Guen, B.; Bar, O.; Benderitter, M.; Bourguignon, M.; Chevillard, S.; Gauron, Ch.; Lallemand, J.; Lombard, J.; Maccia, C.; Sapoval, M.; Bernier, M.O.; Pirard, Ph.; Jacob, S.; Donadille, L.; Aubert, B.; Clairand, I.; Mozziconacci, J.G.; Brot, A.M.; Jarrige, V.; Huet, Ch.; Marchal, C.; Martin, M.; Bar, O.; Degrange, J.P.; Livarek, B.; Menechal, Ph.; Sapoval, M.; Pellerin, O.

    2009-07-01

    This document gathers the slides of the available presentations given during this conference day. Nineteen presentations are assembled in the document and deal with: 1 - Interventional radiology: why is it developing? (M. Sapoval); 2 - exposure particularities in interventional radiology (O. Bar); 3 - doses received by organs in interventional cardiology (C. Maccia); 4 - Patients exposure: description of cumulated exposure of patients treated in interventional cardiology (M.O. Bernier); 5 - 2004 inquiry to dermatologists about post-interventional radiology radio-dermatitis (P. Pirard); 6 - exposure and risks to operators (S. Jacob); 7 - dosimetric evaluation techniques and results about interventional imaging operators' extremities (L. Donadille and F. Merat); 8 - bibliographic study of doses received by operators with non-protected organs (B. Aubert); 9 - ORAMED European project: optimization of operational dosimeter uses in interventional radiology (I. Clairand); 10 - reference levels and dosimetric evaluation of patients (C. Maccia); 11 - optimization in coronary angioplasty (J.G. Mozziconacci, A.M. Brot and V. Jarrige); 12 - dosimetry in medical over-exposure situation (C. Huet); 13 - significant radioprotection events in interventional radiology declared to the Nuclear Safety Authority (ASN) - status and experience feedback (C. Marchal); 14 - interventional radiology and unwanted effects (M. Benderitter); 15 - global analyses and new exposure indicators in human epidermis cells (M. Martin); 16 - radioprotection regulations and training (O. Bar); 17 - zoning and workplace analysis in interventional cardiology (J.P. Degrange); 18 - guide of good clinical practices: example of interventional cardiology (B. Livarek); 19 - how to encourage the radioprotection optimization in interventional radiology: the ASN's point of view (P. Menechal). (J.S.)

  11. Calculation codes in radioprotection, radio-physics and dosimetry; Codes de calcul en radioprotection, radiophysique et dosimetrie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jan, S.; Laedermann, J.P.; Bochud, F.; Ferragut, A.; Bordy, J.M.; Parisi, L.L.; Abou-Khalil, R.; Longeot, M.; Kitsos, S.; Groetz, J.E.; Villagrasa, C.; Daures, J.; Martin, E.; Henriet, J.; Tsilanizara, A.; Farah, J.; Uyttenhove, W.; Perrot, Y.; De Carlan, L.; Vivier, A.; Kodeli, I.; Sayah, R.; Hadid, L.; Courageot, E.; Fritsch, P.; Davesne, E.; Michel, X.

    2010-07-01

    the pulmonary anthropo-radiometry (J. Farah); 17 - evaluation of the GUINEVERE experiment shielding (W. Uyttenhove); 18 - GATE/GEANT4 validation for external radiotherapy (Y. Perrot); 19 - European intercomparison of Monte Carlo code users for the kerma uncertainty calculation in air near a {sup 137}Cs source (L. De Carlan); 20 - decision threshold and detection limit in gamma dose rate measurement (A. Vivier); 21 - uncertainties spreading from basic data of nuclear reactors key parameters (I. Kodeli); 22 - evaluation of secondary neutrons-related doses received by patients treated by proton-therapy (R. Sayah); 23 - radioprotection optimization for nuclear medicine patients: doses evaluation for the new reference voxelized fantoms of the CIPR (international commission of radiological protection) (L. Hadid); 24 - radiological accident reconstruction using numerical tools: towards a more and more realistic representation of the victim (E. Courageot); 25 - new tools for treatment optimization after internal contamination by Pu/Am/Cm (P. Fritsch); 26 - development of an expert system for the consideration of uncertainties in internal contamination monitoring (E. Davesne); 27 - CUTADOSE, a calculation code for skin dose estimation after skin contamination (X. Michel). (J.S.)

  12. Investigations with beagles about toxicity and radioprotective effect of the chemical radioprotection substance WR 2721

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, M.; Sedlmeier, H.; Wustrow, T.; Messerschmidt, O.

    1980-01-01

    The toxicity of the chemical radioprotection substance WR 2721 (S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethyl-thiophosphate) was examined in 25 beagles. The study showed that the toxicity of the substance increases as the dose gets higher. Between the doses 200 and 250 mg/kg of body weight, the increase of toxicity was significantly greater than could be expected on the basis of the dose difference. Until a dose of 200 mg/kg, the authors found no side effects which would have disturbed vital functions, but higher doses led to marked symptoms of intoxication. (orig.) [de

  13. Natural radiation source fabricated from commercially available instant coffee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawano, Takao; Ando, Yoshiaki; Izumi, Yuuichi

    2015-01-01

    Commercially available instant coffee, Nescafe Excella, contained the radionuclide 40 K. From the instant coffee, sixteen coffee-block radiation sources were successfully fabricated with sufficiently low production dependences. The coffee-block radiation sources were examined their suitability for a radiation protection course. Although a part of radiation counts(cpm) obtained with 1 minute measurement were largely deviated, those determined by 5 minute measurements and five times of 1 minute measurement were less deviated, enabling better comprehension of the three cardinal principles of radiation protection. (author)

  14. Community Assessment of Natural Food Sources of Vitamin A ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Ce manuel constitue un guide pratique qui aide à évaluer, étape par étape, divers aspects des sources alimentaires naturelles de vitamine A dans une collectivité. C'est un document essentiel pour tout programme de recherche qui cherche à lutter contre la carence en vitamine A.

  15. Alfalfa and pastures: sources of pests or generalist natural enemies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce’s disease of grapevine and almond leaf scorch disease are both caused by the bacterial pathogen Xyllela fastidiosa. In the Central Valley of California, the green sharpshooter is the most common vector of X. fastidiosa. As alfalfa fields and pastures are considered source habitats for green s...

  16. Natural sources of radiation exposure and the teaching of radioecology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anjos, R M; Veiga, R; Carvalho, C; Sanches, N; Estellita, L; Macario, K; Zanuto, P; Queiroz, E

    2008-01-01

    We have developed an experimental activity that introduces concepts of the natural ionizing radiation and its interaction with our contemporary environment that can be used with students from secondary to college level. The experiment is based on the use of traditional and cheap portable Geiger–Müller detectors as survey meters for in situ measurements

  17. Naturally occurring fatty acids: Source, chemistry, and uses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natural occurring fatty acids are a large and complex class of compounds found in plants and animals. Fatty acids are abundant and of interest because of their renewability, biodegradability, biocompatibility, low cost, and fascinating chemistry. Of the many fatty acids, only 20-25 of them are widel...

  18. Effect of Food Sources of Natural Chemo preventive Agents on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The work attempted to evaluate the potential of natural products containing cancer chemopreventive agents in increasing the level of some endogenous antioxidant enzymes such as Glutathione STransferase (GST), Glutathione reductase (GR), catalase, superoxide dismutase(SOD-1,2) in brain and kidney ...

  19. Natural Products as Source of Potential Dengue Antivirals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Róbson Ricardo Teixeira

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Dengue is a neglected disease responsible for 22,000 deaths each year in areas where it is endemic. To date, there is no clinically approved dengue vaccine or antiviral for human beings, even though there have been great efforts to accomplish these goals. Several approaches have been used in the search for dengue antivirals such as screening of compounds against dengue virus enzymes and structure-based computational discovery. During the last decades, researchers have turned their attention to nature, trying to identify compounds that can be used as dengue antivirals. Nature represents a vast reservoir of substances that can be explored with the aim of discovering new leads that can be either used directly as pharmaceuticals or can serve as lead structures that can be optimized towards the development of new antiviral agents against dengue. In this review we describe an assortment of natural products that have been reported as possessing dengue antiviral activity. The natural products are organized into classes of substances. When appropriate, structure-activity relationships are outlined. The biological assays used to assess antiviral activity are briefly described.

  20. Radioprotective potential of Emblica officinalis fruit extract against hematological alterations induced by gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Inder; Soyal, Dhanraj; Goyal, P.K.

    2012-01-01

    In the era of expending nuclear energy program all over the world, the role of radiation biology has acquired greater relevance and significance in addressing the health issues in view of constant human exposure to various types of radiations. Radioprotective drugs hold immense promise for saving precious human lives in from irradiation in various situations. Currently available synthetic radiomudulators is fraught with their inherent toxicity at the optimum dose and hence the need to discover and develop new more effective less toxic radiomudulatory drugs from natural sources. In the present study, the protective effect of Emblica officinalis fruit extract (EOFE) has been assessed by estimating hematological constituents against irradiation. For this purpose, Swiss albino mice were divided into four groups. Group I was administered with double distilled water (DDW) volume equal to EOFE (100 mg./kg. body wt./animal/clay) by oral gavages to serve as normal. Group II was administered orally EOFE for 7 days once daily at a does of 100 mg./kg.b. wt./animal/day, Group Ill animals were exposed to 2.5 Gy gamma radiations to serve as irradiated control. Group IV mice were treated with EOFE, orally for consecutive days (as in Group II) and were exposed to 2.5 Gy gamma rays half an hr. after the last administration of EOFE on day 7th. The above animals were necropsied on 12 hr, 24 hr, 3 days, 5 days, 10 days, 20 days and 30 days post treatment intervals, and their blood was collected for estimation of blood constituents. A significant decline in RBC, hemoglobin (Hb) and hematocrit (Hct) contents from normal was observed in irradiated control animals (Group III). All these parameters were found to be significantly higher in EOFE pretreated irradiated animals (Group IV). From these results, it is concluded that Emblica officinalis fruit extract has the ability to protect the individuals from radiation-induced hematological injuries. (author)

  1. Radioprotection shielding for neutrons induced by the reaction (2H (40 MeV, 12C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadil M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of design studies for SPIRAL2, the simulation of the neutron flux generated by 40 MeV deuterons on a thick 12C target was performed and compared to experimental data. The calculation of the dose rate of these neutrons allowed to compare four materials being considered for radioprotection shielding: barites, gypsum, ordinary concrete and heavy concrete. The simulated map of the neutron dose rate in the production building shows a very high dose rate around the neutron source and in the environment of some of the accelerator equipment.

  2. Enzyme histochemical, biochemical and metabolic effects of Solcoseryl in connection with its radioprotective capability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, D; Locker, A; Grigoriadis, P; Goslar, H G; Jaeger, K H

    1979-01-01

    The lethal irradiation with gamma-rays (LD 100/30) of adult mice at ambient temperature of 32.5 degrees C heavily alterates the pattern of LDH in liver. In close correspondence with the radioprotective effect of Solcoseryl on the survival rate of irradiated mice -- which amounts to 100% as compared with 40% survival of solely heat adapted animals -- Solcoseryl normalizes the LDH distribution both histochemically and biochemically. Since Solcoseryl alone generally enhances enzyme activity the normalization observed is obviously attributable to an intrinsically regulatory property of this natural compound.

  3. Comparative study of radioprotective properties of serotin derivatives repeatedly applied before gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorelova, N.V.; Antipov, V.V.; Vasin, M.V.

    1977-01-01

    In the experiments on albino mice, the phenomenon of desensitization has been studied by a specific activity and some pharmacologic properties of serotonin, mexamin and 5-acetyloxytryptamine, the time-intervals between injections of the preparations being 5, 30 and 60 minutes, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8 and 24 hours. A correlation has been found between changes in radioprotective and pharmacologic properties (as determined by the accumulation of the dye in the splenic tissue) after repeated administration of mexamin. The phenomenon of desensitization is probably dependent not only on the chemical nature and mechanism of action of the protectors but also on the conditions under which they are repeatedly applied

  4. Guide for the evaluation of the implementation of radioprotection in an electricity production nuclear centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schieber, C.

    2005-01-01

    This report describes the approach for the evaluation of the implementation of radioprotection in nuclear power plants. This approach encompasses six main themes: radioprotection customization, radioprotection steering quality, professional and contractor commitment, skill and efficiency of the Risk Prevention Department, radioprotection operational management, robustness of the transport system. Each theme comprises sub-themes which are assessed according to 2, 3 or 4 levels, the sum of which giving a mark out of 20 for the theme

  5. Curcuma ecalcarata - new natural source of pinocembrin and piperitenone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rameshkumar, K B; Alan Sheeja, D B; Nair, Mangalam S; George, V

    2015-01-01

    Phytochemical analysis of the rhizome extract of Curcuma ecalcarata, a hitherto uninvestigated south Western Ghats endemic species, resulted in the isolation and identification of the diaryl heptanoid trans, trans-1,7-diphenyl-5-hydroxy-4,6-heptadiene-3-one (1), steroid β-sitosterol (2), flavanone pinocembrin (4) and monoterpenoids piperitenone (3) and 8-hydroxy piperitone (5). HPTLC estimation of pinocembrin in the rhizome revealed the plant as a rich source of pinocembrin (0.37% dry wt.). The rhizome essential oil was isolated by hydrodistillation and analysed by GC-FID, GC-MS and (13)C NMR. Among the 30 constituents identified in the oil, monoterpenoids predominated (94.2%) followed by sesquiterpenoids (5.8%). The major compound consisting of 65.2% of the oil was isolated and identified as piperitenone (3). The study highlights the plant as a rich source of the flavanone pinocembrin and the volatile aroma compound piperitenone.

  6. Pharmacophore-driven identification of PPARγ agonists from natural sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, R. K.; Christensen, Kathrine Bisgaard; Assimopoulou, A. N.

    2011-01-01

    mastic gum fractions, whereas some other sub-fractions exhibited also biological activity towards PPARγ. The results from the present work are two-fold: on the one hand we demonstrate that the pharmacophore model we developed is able to select novel ligand scaffolds that act as PPARγ agonists; while......In a search for more effective and safe anti-diabetic compounds, we developed a pharmacophore model based on partial agonists of PPARγ. The model was used for the virtual screening of the Chinese Natural Product Database (CNPD), a library of plant-derived natural products primarily used in folk...... medicine. From the resulting hits, we selected methyl oleanonate, a compound found, among others, in Pistacia lentiscus var. Chia oleoresin (Chios mastic gum). The acid of methyl oleanonate, oleanonic acid, was identified as a PPARγ agonist through bioassay-guided chromatographic fractionations of Chios...

  7. Determining Source Attenuation History to Support Closure by Natural Attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    second objective established the same trend for both source histories using a non-parametric statistical test ( Mann - Kendall ). 43 Both of the sub...less than 30%. The success criterion for the second sub-objective was also met. Specifically, the Mann - Kendall non-parametric test confirmed both...yielded identical Mann - Kendall tests statistics (0), Coefficient of Variation (0), and Confidence Factor (45.6%). Note that this type of non

  8. Limitation of population's irradiation by natural sources of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krisyuk, Eh.M.

    1989-01-01

    Review of works devoted to evaluating the human irradiation doses at the expense of the main sources of ionizing radiation, is given. It is shown that the human irradiation doses at the expense of DDP can be reduced 10 times and more. However to realize such measures it is necessary to study the efficiency and determine the cost of various protective activities as well as to develop the criteria of their realization necessity

  9. Insects - a natural nutrient source for poultry - a review

    OpenAIRE

    Józefiak, D; Josefiak, A; Kieronczyk, B; Rawski, M; Swiatkiewicz, S; Dlugosz, Jakub; Engberg, Ricarda Greuel

    2016-01-01

    The consumption of poultry meat and eggs is expected to increase considerably in the nearest future, which creates the demand for new poultry feed ingredients in order to support sustainable intensive production. Moreover, the constant improvement of the genetic potential of poultry has resulted in an increased nutrient density in poultry feeds, which limits the possibility to include low quality feed ingredients. Therefore, the feed industry needs new sources of highly digestible protein wit...

  10. 34 CFR 675.27 - Nature and source of institutional share.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nature and source of institutional share. 675.27 Section 675.27 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF... Nature and source of institutional share. (a)(1) An institution may use any resource available to it...

  11. Human Keratinocytes Radioprotection with Mentha Longifolia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Angela Maria; Berselli, P.; Zava, S.; Negroni, M.; Corsetto, P.; Montorfano, G.; Bertolotti, A.; Ranza, E.; Ottolenghi, A.; Berra, B.

    Antioxidants are suggested to act as radioprotectors, and dietary supplements based on antiox-idants have been proposed for astronauts involved in long-term space missions. Plant extracts with antioxidant properties may be used in dietetic supplements for astronauts; in fact recent nutritional guidelines suggest that "fruits and vegetables may become as important on space-going vessels as limes were on the sea-going vessels of old". Mint presents a large variety of biological properties, such as antiallergenic, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, antitumor, an-tiviral, gastrointestinal protective, hepatoprotective, chemopreventive activities, most of which are attributable to its antioxidant activity. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the antioxidant properties and protective bio-efficacy of a phenol enriched Mentha longifolia ex-tract on gamma rays stressed human keratinocytes (NCTC2544). We assessed first the in vitro antioxidant activity (ABTS and DPPH), and then evaluated different stress markers in order to investigate various oxidative stress targets: cell viability (MTT); retained proliferating ca-pability (CA); DNA damage (histone H2AX) and protein damage (HSP70 induction). Results indicate that this Mint extract has a higher antioxidant activity respect to fresh extracts, that could be responsible of its really interesting radio-protective effects.

  12. Radioprotection calculations for the TRADE experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Zanini, L; Herrera-Martínez, A; Kadi, Y; Rubbia, Carlo; Burgio, N; Carta, M; Santagata, A; Cinotti, L

    2002-01-01

    The TRADE project is based on the coupling of, in a sub-critical configuration, of a 115 MeV, 2 mA proton cyclotron with a TRIGA research reactor at the ENEA Casaccia centre (Rome). Detailed radioprotection calculations using the FLUKA and EA-MC Monte Carlo codes were performed during the feasibility study. The study concentrated on dose rates due to beam losses in normal operating conditions and in the calculation of activation in the most sensitive components of the experiment. Results show that a shielding of 1.4 m of barytes concrete around the beam line will be sufficient to maintain the effective doses below the level of 10 Mu Sv/h, provided that the beam losses are at the level of 10 nA/m. The activation level around the beam line and in the water will be negligible, while the spallation target will reach an activation level comparable to the one of a fuel element at maximum burnup.

  13. Production and Radioprotective Effects of Pyrroloquinoline Quinone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De-Xuan Yang

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ was produced by fermentation of the Methylovorus sp. MP688 strain and purified by ion-exchange chromatography, crystallization and recrystallization. The yield of PQQ reached approximately 125 mg/L and highly pure PQQ was obtained. To determine the optimum dose of PQQ for radioprotection, three doses (2 mg/kg, 4 mg/kg, 8 mg/kg of PQQ were orally administrated to the experimental animals subjected to a lethal dose of 8.0 Gy in survival test. Survival of mice in the irradiation + PQQ (4 mg/kg group was found to be significantly higher in comparison with the irradiation and irradiation + nilestriol (10 mg/kg groups. The numbers of hematocytes and bone marrow cells were measured for 21 days after sublethal 4 Gy gamma-ray irradiation with per os of 4 mg/kg of PQQ. The recovery of white blood cells, reticulocytes and bone marrow cells in the irradiation + PQQ group was faster than that in the irradiation group. Furthermore, the recovery of bone marrow cell in the irradiation + PQQ group was superior to that in irradiation + nilestriol group. Our results clearly indicate favourable effects on survival under higher lethal radiation doses and the ability of pyrroloquinoline quinine to enhance haemopoietic recovery after sublethal radiation exposure.

  14. Discovery of Highly Sweet Compounds from Natural Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinghorn, A. Douglas; Kennelly, Edward J.

    1995-08-01

    Sucrose, the most widely used sweetener globally, is of plant origin. In addition, a number of other plant constituents are employed as dietary sucrose substitutes in one or more countries, including the diterpenoid, stevioside, the triterpenoid, glycyrrhizin, and the protein, thaumatin. Accordingly, there has been much interest in discovering further examples of potently sweet compounds of natural origin, for potential use in foods, beverages, and medicines. Approximately 75 plant-derived compounds are presently known, mainly representative of the flavonoid, proanthocyandin, protein, steroidal saponin, and terpenoid chemotypes. In our program directed towards the elucidation of further highly sweet molecules from plants, candidate sweet-tasting plants for laboratory investigation are obtained from ethnobotanical observations in the field or in the existing literature. Examples of novel sweet-tasting compounds obtained so far are the sesquiterpenoids, hernandulcin and 4beta-hydroxyhemandulcin; the triterpenoids, abrusosides A-D; a semi-synthetic dihydroflavonol based on the naturally occurring substance, dihydroquercetin 3-acetate; and the proanthocyanidin, selligueain A. Natural product sweeteners may be of potential commercial use per se, and can be used for synthetic modification to produce improved sweeteners, and can also be of value scientifically to aid in the better understanding of structure-sweetness relationships.

  15. Representative parameter of immunostimulatory ginseng polysaccharide to predict radioprotection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Hyeog Jin; Shim, Ji Young; Ahn, Ji Yeon; Yun, Yeon Sook; Song, Jie Young [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-09-15

    According to the increase in the use of radiotherapy to cancer patients, many approaches have been tried to develop new agents for the protection of surrounding normal tissues. However, it is still few applied in the clinic as a radioprotector. We aim to find a representative parameter for radioprotection to easily predict the activity of in vivo experiment from the results of in vitro screening. The polysaccharide extracted from Panax ginseng was used in this study because the immunostimulator has been regarded as one of the radioprotective agent category and was already reported having a promising radioprotective activity through the increase of hematopoietic cells and the production of several cytokines. Mitogenic activity, AK cells activity and nitric oxide production were monitored for the in vitro immunological assay, and endogenous Colony-Forming Unit (e-CFU) was measured as in vivo radioprotective parameter. The immunological activity was increased by the galactose contents of ginseng polysaccharide dependently. The result of this study suggests that mitogenic activity of splenocytes demonstrated a good correlation with in vivo radioprotective effect, and may be used as a representative parameter to screen the candidates for radioprotector.

  16. Documentary Letters of Credit, Legal Nature and Sources of Law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alavi Hamed

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available There is no doubt about risky nature of international trade. Such risk can be conceptualized as country risk, transportation risk, customer risk and etc. Documentary Letters of Credit (LC are used as a method of payment in international business for many centuries in order to reduce risk of trade specially when parties are located in different countries and do not have precise information from financial standing of each other. In such occasion LC will reduce the risk of trade by shifting payment obligation from buyer as an individual to a payment guarantee of a bank as a legal entity in return for presentation of complying documents with terms of credit by seller. Familiarity with legal nature and different legal frameworks which govern the international operation of documentary letters of credit can facilitate the process of international trade for businessmen and boost national economies. However, lack of knowledge about them can impose huge losses on international traders. Situation will be more complicated when we understand that there are many internationally recognized legal frameworks which can affect the operation of LC and they get frequently updated in order to address technological and economic developments in global market. In this paper, author tries to answer questions regarding (i what are international legal frameworks governing operation of documentary letters of credit? (ii which areas of LC operation has been covered by them and (iii how do they address the legal questions regarding international operation of documentary letters of credit?

  17. Environmental Radioactivity from Natural, Industrial, and Military Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maarouf, B. H.

    2007-01-01

    This book is a translation of the fourth edition of the original book which was written as a reference source for the scientist, engineer, or administrator with a professional interest in the subject, but it may also be a value to the reader who wishes to understand the technical facts behind the public debate. The subject of environmental radioactivity has aspects of vast dimensions. The text of the book concerns primarily with the behavior of radioactive substances when they enter the environment. The important and elaborate technology by which passage of radioactive materials to the environment may be prevented and the equally important field of health physics that is concerned with protecting the atomic energy worker were thus placed beyond the bounds of this work.

  18. A General Overview of Natural Sources in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poncela, L.S.Q.; Fernandez, C.S.; Merino, I.F.; Villanueva, J.L.G.

    2011-01-01

    Nationwide and regional surveys have been conducted to evaluate natural radiation exposure of the Spanish population. In these surveys, indoor radon, external gamma dose rates outdoors and indoors were measured. In the nationwide radon survey, 9% of the tested houses presented radon levels above 200 Bq/m 3 and 25% of houses with radon concentrations above this reference level were located in areas with high radon indoor levels. In 2010, the Radon Group in collaboration with two research groups from the University of Santiago de Compostela and University Autonoma de Barcelona has started the Radon 10 x 10 project which is bases on radon integrated measurements using track-etched detectors using grid 10 x 10 km 2 . In this work we present data measured during the last 30 years in Spain as well as some preliminary results of this new project

  19. Biophysical basis of hypoxic radioprotection by deoxygenated dextran-hemoglobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, J.T.; Hill, R.P.

    1986-01-01

    Perfusion with deoxygenated dextran-hemoglobin provides an effective method for inducing hypoxic radioprotection of normal tissues during radiation treatment of tumors. In this study, the dependence of P50, the half-saturation pressure of oxygen binding to dextran-hemoglobin, was analyzed as a function of solution temperature and pH. The variation of attainable radioprotection with P50, and with the amount of collateral blood entering into the perfused region, was calculated. Upon perfusion of canine gracilis muscle with deoxygenated dextran-hemoglobin, a rapid onset of extensive venous hypoxia was observed

  20. Radioprotective Effects of Hairy Roots of Ginseng

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Hyun Jung; Kim, Jin Kyu [Korea Atomic research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eun Young; Yang, Deok Cho [Chungbuk National Univ., Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    Panax ginseng is an important medicinal plant in Korea, which has broad efficacious effects against hypertension, diabetes, nociception and cancer. And it improves weakness. The native ginseng is a slow growing plant taking 5-7 years from seed planting to mature root harvesting, during which time much care is needed since its growth is susceptible to many environmental factors such as soil, shade, climate, pathogens and pests. Nowadays, a wild ginseng has become extremely scarce and the ginseng supply depends almost exclusively on field cultivation, which is a time-consuming and labor-intensive process. To meet the demand for the plant in the international market, a bioreactor technology is a useful tool for production of root biomass on a large scale. Therefore, suspension culture of ginseng roots in bioreactors is viewed as a primary alternative method for large-scale production and recently our laboratory has developed a protocol for the in vitro culture of P. ginseng. About 60-70% of cellular DNA damage produced by ionizing radiation is caused by OH, formed from the radiolysis of water. Oxidative stress occurs when there is an excessive free radical production and/or low antioxidant defense, and results in the chemical alterations of biomolecules causing structural and functional modifications. The generation of the reactive oxygen metabolites plays an important role in the pathogenesis of the irradiation-induced tissue injury. An extensive literature review implicates cellular DNA as the primary target for the biological and lethal effects of ionizing radiation. Besides DNA, lipids and proteins are also attacked by free radicals. The purpose of this study, aimed at investigating the possible radioprotective effect of the hairy roots of P. ginseng on irradiation-induced damage by the comet assay.

  1. Melatonin as a radioprotective agent: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayalaxmi; Reiter, Russel J.; Tan, D.-X.; Herman, Terence S.; Thomas, Charles R.

    2004-01-01

    Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine), the chief secretory product of the pineal gland in the brain, is well known for its functional versatility. In hundreds of investigations, melatonin has been documented as a direct free radical scavenger and an indirect antioxidant, as well as an important immunomodulatory agent. The radical scavenging ability of melatonin is believed to work via electron donation to detoxify a variety of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, including the highly toxic hydroxyl radical. It has long been recognized that the damaging effects of ionizing radiation are brought about by both direct and indirect mechanisms. The direct action produces disruption of sensitive molecules in the cells, whereas the indirect effects (∼70%) result from its interaction with water molecules, which results in the production of highly reactive free radicals such as · OH, · H, and e aq - and their subsequent action on subcellular structures. The hydroxyl radical scavenging ability of melatonin was used as a rationale to determine its radioprotective efficiency. Indeed, the results from many in vitro and in vivo investigations have confirmed that melatonin protects mammalian cells from the toxic effects of ionizing radiation. Furthermore, several clinical reports indicate that melatonin administration, either alone or in combination with traditional radiotherapy, results in a favorable efficacy:toxicity ratio during the treatment of human cancers. This article reviews the literature from laboratory investigations that document the ability of melatonin to scavenge a variety of free radicals (including the hydroxyl radical induced by ionizing radiation) and summarizes the evidence that should be used to design larger translational research-based clinical trials using melatonin as a radioprotector and also in cancer radiotherapy. The potential use of melatonin for protecting individuals from radiation terrorism is also considered

  2. Radioprotective Effects of Hairy Roots of Ginseng

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, Hyun Jung; Kim, Jin Kyu; Kim, Eun Young; Yang, Deok Cho

    2005-01-01

    Panax ginseng is an important medicinal plant in Korea, which has broad efficacious effects against hypertension, diabetes, nociception and cancer. And it improves weakness. The native ginseng is a slow growing plant taking 5-7 years from seed planting to mature root harvesting, during which time much care is needed since its growth is susceptible to many environmental factors such as soil, shade, climate, pathogens and pests. Nowadays, a wild ginseng has become extremely scarce and the ginseng supply depends almost exclusively on field cultivation, which is a time-consuming and labor-intensive process. To meet the demand for the plant in the international market, a bioreactor technology is a useful tool for production of root biomass on a large scale. Therefore, suspension culture of ginseng roots in bioreactors is viewed as a primary alternative method for large-scale production and recently our laboratory has developed a protocol for the in vitro culture of P. ginseng. About 60-70% of cellular DNA damage produced by ionizing radiation is caused by OH, formed from the radiolysis of water. Oxidative stress occurs when there is an excessive free radical production and/or low antioxidant defense, and results in the chemical alterations of biomolecules causing structural and functional modifications. The generation of the reactive oxygen metabolites plays an important role in the pathogenesis of the irradiation-induced tissue injury. An extensive literature review implicates cellular DNA as the primary target for the biological and lethal effects of ionizing radiation. Besides DNA, lipids and proteins are also attacked by free radicals. The purpose of this study, aimed at investigating the possible radioprotective effect of the hairy roots of P. ginseng on irradiation-induced damage by the comet assay

  3. Rosmarinus Officinalis Leaves as a Natural Source of Bioactive Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Borrás-Linares

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In an extensive search for bioactive compounds from plant sources, the composition of different extracts of rosemary leaves collected from different geographical zones of Serbia was studied. The qualitative and quantitative characterization of 20 rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis samples, obtained by microwave-assisted extraction (MAE, was determined by high performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry (HPLC–ESI-QTOF-MS. The high mass accuracy and true isotopic pattern in both MS and MS/MS spectra provided by the QTOF-MS analyzer enabled the characterization of a wide range of phenolic compounds in the extracts, including flavonoids, phenolic diterpenes and abietan-type triterpenoids, among others. According to the data compiled, rosemary samples from Sokobanja presented the highest levels in flavonoids and other compounds such as carnosol, rosmaridiphenol, rosmadial, rosmarinic acid, and carnosic acid. On the other hand, higher contents in triterpenes were found in the extracts of rosemary from Gložan (Vojvodina.

  4. Radioprotection in the infirmary praxis in service of hemodynamic; Radioprotecao na praxis da enfermagem em servico de hemodinamica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flor, Rita de Cassia, E-mail: flor@ifsc.edu.br; Gelbcke, Francine Lima, E-mail: fgelbcke@ccs.ufsc.b [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarinha (CCS/UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Secretaria do Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Enfermagem

    2011-10-26

    Qualitative study made in a hemodynamic service at Santa Catarina, Brazil, viewing to analyse the attitude of workers in infirmary related to the use of radioprotection measurements in interventionist procedures. A methodology of Labor Psycho dynamics was used through the observations, collective interviews and the document analysis. Totally it was realized 36 encounters, completed a total of 54 observation hours. The results have shown that the workers used defense strategies for justification the not use of some radioprotection measurements. Yet, become evident that the measurements related to the distance from the radiation source and the exposure time have not used sometimes, perhaps due to negligence. Finally, it was concluded that, some attitudes adopted by the workers referred to the lack of a continued educational program

  5. Manilkara zapota (Linn.) Seeds: A Potential Source of Natural Gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sudarshan; Bothara, Sunil B

    2014-01-01

    Mucilage isolated from seeds of Manilkara zapota (Linn.) P. Royen syn. is a plant growing naturally in the forests of India. This mucilage is yet to be commercially exploited, and characterized as polymer. Various physicochemical methods like particle size analysis, scanning electron microscopy, thermal analysis, gel permeation chromatography, X-ray diffraction spectrometry, zeta potential, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy have been employed to characterize this gum in the present study. Particle size analyses suggest that mucilage has particle size in nanometer. Scanning electron microscopy analysis suggests that the mucilage has irregular particle size. The glass transition temperature of the gum was observed to be 138°C and 136°C by differential scanning calorimetry and differential thermal analysis, respectively. The thermogravimetric analysis suggested that mucilage had good thermal stability. The average molecular weight of mucilage was determined to be 379180, by gel permeation chromatography, while the viscosity of mucilage was observed to be 219.1 cP. The X-ray diffraction spectrometry pattern of the mucilage indicates a completely amorphous structure. Elemental analysis of the gum revealed the contents of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, and sulfur to be 80.9 (%), 10.1 (%), 1.58 (%), and 512 (mg/kg), respectively. Mucilage had specific content of calcium, magnesium, potassium, lower concentrations of aluminum, cadmium, cobalt, lead, and nickel. The major functional groups identified from FT-IR spectrum include 3441 cm(-1) (-OH), 1660 cm(-1) (Alkenyl C-H & C=C Stretch), 1632 cm(-1) (-COO-), 1414 cm(-1) (-COO-), and 1219 cm(-1) (-CH3CO). Analysis of mucilage by paper chromatography and 1D NMR, indicated the presence of rhamnose, xylose, arabinose, mannose, and fructose.

  6. Epiphytic marine pigmented bacteria: A prospective source of natural antioxidants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravindra Pawar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Awareness on antioxidants and its significance in human healthcare has increased many folds in recent time. Increased demand requisite on welcoming newer and alternative resources for natural antioxidants. Seaweed associated pigmented bacteria screened for its antioxidant potentials reveals 55.5% of the organisms were able to synthesize antioxidant compounds. DPPH assay showed 20% of the organisms to reach a antioxidant zone of 1 cm and 8.3% of the strains more than 3 cm. Pseudomonas koreensis (JX915782 a Sargassum associated yellowish brown pigmented bacteria have better activity than known commercial antioxidant butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT against DPPH scavenging. Serratia rubidaea (JX915783, an associate of Ulva sp. and Pseudomonas argentinensis (JX915781 an epiphyte of Chaetomorpha media, were also contributed significantly towards ABTS (7.2% ± 0.03 to 15.2 ± 0.09%; 1.8% ± 0.01 to 15.7 ± 0.22% and FRAP (1.81 ± 0.01 to 9.35 ± 0.98; 7.97 ± 0.12 to 18.70 ± 1.84 μg/mL of AsA Eq. respectively. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed bacteria that have higher antioxidant activity belongs to a bacterial class Gammaproteobacteria. Statistical analysis of phenolic contents in relation with other parameters like DPPH, ABTS, reducing power and FRAP are well correlated (p < 0.05. Results obtained from the current study inferred that the seaweed associated pigmented bacteria have enormous potential on antioxidant compounds and need to be extracted in a larger way for clinical applications.

  7. Interactive computer codes for education and training on nuclear safety and radioprotection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leszczynski, Francisco

    2008-01-01

    Two interactive computer codes for education and training on nuclear safety and radioprotection developed at RA6 Reactor Division-Bariloche Atomic Center-CNEA are presented on this paper. The first code named SIMREACT has been developed in order to simulate the control of a research nuclear reactor in real time with a simple but accurate approach. The code solves the equations of neutron punctual kinetics with time variable reactivity. Utilizing the timer of the computer and the controls of a PC keyboard, with an adequate graphic interface, a simulation in real time of the temporal behavior of a research reactor is obtained. The reactivity can be changed by means of the extraction or insertion of control rods. It was implemented also the simulation of automatic pilot and scram. The use of this code is focalized on practices of nuclear reactor control like start-up from the subcritical state with external source up to power to a desired level, change of power level, calibration of a control rod with different methods, and approach to critical condition by interpolation of the answer in function of reactivity. The second code named LICEN has been developed in order to help the studies of all the topics included in examination programs for obtaining licenses for research reactor operators and radioprotection officials. Using the PC mouse, with an adequate graphic interface, the student can gradually learn the topics related with general and special licenses. The general option includes nuclear reactor engineering, radioprotection, nuclear safety, documentation and normative. The specific option includes mandatory documentation, description of the installation and task on normal and emergency situations. For each of these topics there are sub-items with all the relevant information. The objective of this code is to joint in one electronic place a large amount of information which usually it is disseminated on difficult to find separated papers. (author)

  8. Radioprotective Effect of Moderate Wine Consumption in Patients With Breast Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morganti, Alessio G.; Digesu, Cinzia; Panunzi, Simona; De Gaetano, Andrea; Macchia, Gabriella; Deodato, Francesco; Cece, M. Grazia; Cirocco, Massimo; Di Castelnuovo, Augusto; Iacoviello, Licia; Valentini, Vincenzo; Cellini, Numa; Gaetano, Giovanni de

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Given the high cost and side effects of radioprotective agents such as amifostine, attention has been focused on potentially equally effective but less expensive and toxic natural substances. We evaluated the potential radioprotective effects of wine in preventing skin toxicity in patients with breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Before treatment, the medical history and habits of patients were assessed and the information recorded in their clinical folders. Patients were divided into three groups based on the dose/fractionation scheme used: control group, 60.4 Gy (standard technique); Modulated Accelerated Radiotherapy in Adjuvant treatment of breast cancer (MARA)-1 protocol group, 44 Gy (concomitant boost to tumoral bed); and MARA-2 protocol group, 60 Gy (concomitant boost to tumoral bed). The impact of the following variables on acute skin toxicity was evaluated by chart review: radiotherapy protocol, planning target volume (PTV), comorbidity (e.g., hypertension and diabetes), hemoglobin level before therapy, adjuvant hormone therapy, adjuvant chemotherapy, cigarette smoking, and drinking habits. Results: The study population consisted of 348 patients. More severe skin toxicity was significantly associated with the radiotherapy protocol (p < 0.001) and median PTV (p = 0.005). In addition, the incidence of acute toxicity of Grade 2 or greater was higher in patients without alcohol intake (38.4% vs. 22.3%, p = 0.021). The daily amount of alcohol intake also influenced the incidence of skin toxicity, with an incidence of 38.4% in patients with no wine intake, 31.8% in patients drinking half a glass per day, 13.6% in patients drinking one glass per day, and 35.0% in patients drinking two glasses per day. Multivariate analysis showed that wine intake, PTV, and radiotherapy protocol were all significantly correlated with acute toxicity. Conclusions: Our results indicate that wine may have a radioprotective effect; however, prospective studies are needed to

  9. Anthropogenic nutrient sources rival natural sources on small scales in the coastal waters of the Southern California Bight

    KAUST Repository

    Howard, Meredith D. A.

    2014-01-26

    Anthropogenic nutrients have been shown to provide significant sources of nitrogen (N) that have been linked to increased primary production and harmful algal blooms worldwide. There is a general perception that in upwelling regions, the flux of anthropogenic nutrient inputs is small relative to upwelling flux, and therefore anthropogenic inputs have relatively little effect on the productivity of coastal waters. To test the hypothesis that natural sources (e.g., upwelling) greatly exceed anthropogenic nutrient sources to the Southern California Bight (SCB), this study compared the source contributions of N from four major nutrient sources: (1) upwelling, (2) treated wastewater effluent discharged to ocean outfalls, (3) riverine runoff, and (4) atmospheric deposition. This comparison was made using large regional data sets combined with modeling on both regional and local scales. At the regional bight-wide spatial scale, upwelling was the largest source of N by an order of magnitude to effluent and two orders of magnitude to riverine runoff. However, at smaller spatial scales, more relevant to algal bloom development, natural and anthropogenic contributions were equivalent. In particular, wastewater effluent and upwelling contributed the same quantity of N in several subregions of the SCB. These findings contradict the currently held perception that in upwelling-dominated regions anthropogenic nutrient inputs are negligible, and suggest that anthropogenic nutrients, mainly wastewater effluent, can provide a significant source of nitrogen for nearshore productivity in Southern California coastal waters.

  10. Interaction of natural radioprotectants and gamma radiation in rabbit erythrocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, M.; Tomicic, I.; Toha, J. (Chile Univ., Santiago. Dept. de Fisica); Rojo, I. (Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear, Santiago)

    1982-01-01

    The protective capacity of Vitamins such as Niacinamide, Riboflavine, Vitamin K, Thiamine and Cyanocobalamine; the coenzymes NAD and FAD, the electron carrier Cytochrome c and mixtures of these compounds in a molar concentration range between 10/sup -6/ M and 10/sup -4/ M were studied on gamma irradiated rabbit red blood cells. The dose relative factor (DRF 37) was evaluated by visible absorbancy measurements of the liberated Hemoglobin. Some of the best DRF 37 obtained were: Cytochrome c: 4,7; Riboflavine: 4,0; Cyanocobalamine: 3,6; Thiamine: 3,5; Vitamin K: 2,6; Niacinamide: 2,0.

  11. Interaction of natural radioprotectants and gamma radiation in rabbit erythrocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, M.; Tomicic, I.; Toha, J. (Chile Univ., Santiago. Dept. de Fisica); Rojo, I. (Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear, Santiago)

    1983-01-01

    The protective capacity of Vitamins such as Niacinamide, Riboflavine, Vitamin K, Thiamine and Cyanocobalamine; the coenzymes NAD and FAD, the electron carrier Cytochrome c and mixtures of these compounds in a molar concentration range between 10/sup -6/ M and 10/sup -4/ M were studied on gamma irradiated rabbit red blood cells. The dose relative factor (DRF 37) was evaluated by visible absorbancy measurements of the liberated Hemoglobin. Some of the best DRF 37 obtained were: Cytochrome c: 4,7; Riboflavine: 4,0; Cyanocobalamine: 3,6; Thiamine: 3,5; Vitamin K: 2,6; Niacinamide: 2,0.

  12. Interaction of natural radioprotectants and gamma radiation in rabbit erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, M.; Tomicic, I.; Toha, J.; Rojo, I.

    1983-01-01

    The protective capacity of Vitamins such as Niacinamide, Riboflavine, Vitamin K, Thiamine and Cyanocobalamine; the coenzymes NAD and FAD, the electron carrier Cytochrome c and mixtures of these compounds in a molar concentration range between 10 - 6 M and 10 - 4 M were studied on gamma irradiated rabbit red blood cells. The dose relative factor (DRF 37) was evaluated by visible absorbancy measurements of the liberated Hemoglobin. Some of the best DRF 37 obtained were: Cytochrome c: 4,7; Riboflavine: 4,0; Cyanocobalamine: 3,6; Thiamine: 3,5; Vitamin K: 2,6; Niacinamide: 2,0. (author)

  13. Radioprotection by polyethylene glycol-protein complexes in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, B.H.; Stull, R.W.

    1983-01-01

    Polyethylene glycol of about 5000 D was activated with cyanuric chloride, and the activated compound was complexed to each of three proteins. Polyethylene glycol-superoxide dismutase and polyethylene glycol-catalase were each radioprotectants when administered prophylactically to female B6CBF1 mice before irradiation. The dose reduction factor for these mice was 1.2 when 5000 units of polyethylene glycol-catalase was administered before 60 Co irradiation. Female B6CBF1 mice administered prophylactic intravenous injections of catalase, polyethylene glycol-albumin, or heat-denatured polyethylene glycol-catalase had survival rates similar to phosphate-buffered saline-injected control mice following 60 Co irradiation. Polyethylene glycol-superoxide dismutase and polyethylene glycol-catalase have radioprotective activity in B6CBF1 mice, which appears to depend in part on enzymatic activities of the complex. However, no radioprotective effect was observed in male C57BL/6 mice injected with each polyethylene glycol-protein complex at either 3 or 24 hr before irradiation. The mechanism for radioprotection by these complexes may depend in part on other factors

  14. On the radioprotective effect of biotin (vitamin H)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perepelkin, S.R.; Egorova, N.D.; Katsitadze, V.A.

    1977-01-01

    It has been shown on rats exposed to a whole-body X-irradiation with 600 R that food rich in vitamin H (biotin) causes a radioprotective effect. Most effective were the vitamin doses of 4.0 and 8.0 μg/rat

  15. Standard 'Principle guides of radioprotection': introduced concepts and future forecasting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dagnino, R.

    1989-01-01

    The main topics introduced by the new CNEN standard NE 3.01 - Basic Directrix of Radioprotection directly associated to the field work in industrial radiography are presented. It's showed a practical example which evidences the need of information exchange among the industrial security, radiological safety and quality control staffs for the continuity of works in this area. (author)

  16. Radioprotective effect of misoprostol on mouse spermatogonial stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de rooij, D. G.; van Beek, M. E.; Rutgers, D. H.; van Duyn-Goedhart, A.; van Buul, P. P.

    1998-01-01

    The radioprotective effects of misoprostol, a synthetic stable analogue of prostaglandin E1, on spermatogonial stem cells of C3H/HeH x 101/F1 hybrid mice (3H1) were analysed by establishing dose--response relationships for stem cell killing by X-rays in mice that were pretreated with misoprostol.

  17. Phytochemicals with radioprotection and radio-sensitizing potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tripathi, Yamini B.

    2012-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces DNA damage and are harmful to mankind. They act through free radical generation, which target the double bonds of all cellular macromolecules. The radiation damage may be classified as probabilistic or deterministic, depending on the dose of radiation exposure. Since radiation affects multiple organs so those drugs which protect many organs, would be more beneficial. In this process herbal extracts, which are cocktail of several phyto-chemicals, would be more promising. Initially sulphur containing bio-molecules were identified as radio-protector, but now many secondary metabolites from plant kingdom, have been reported to be radio-protective. They have different mechanism of action, but most of them either prevent the FR induced DNA damage or accelerate the DNA repair process. Aminofostine, WR-2721, 159243, 2926 are some of the examples. However they have limited use because of associated cytotoxicity. Eicosanoids, topoisornerase inhibitors (e.g. camptothecin, topotecan), and the hypoxia-activated anthraquinone AQ4N have shown radioprotecting potential. Several plant products, derived from Tulsi, Vinca alkaloids, taxans, turmeric, Rubia cordifolia, Semecarpus anacardium and several plants rich in polyphenols and flavones have shown hemotherapeutic potential. Similarly, Hippophae, rhodiola imbricata, Podophyllum hexandrum, Ocimum sancturn, Plumbago zeylanica etc have shown radioprotection. Rubia cordifolia has shown both chemotherapeutic and radioprotective property in rats and A-431 cells. Similarly Semecarpus anacardium extract has shown cell cycle arrest in DU-145 cells. (author)

  18. Radioprotection in the medical sector: a new quality approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prevot, S.

    2008-01-01

    The author describes how quality assurance is organized in the field of radioprotection in the Georges-Francois-Leclerc medical centre in Dijon. She also recalls how this organization has recently evolved because of legal but also technical and technological evolutions. She indicates the main attributions and missions of the radiation protection expert in this medical centre

  19. Genetic predisposition and implications for radioprotection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streffer, Christian [University Clinics, Essen, Essen (Germany)

    2000-05-01

    retinoblastoma who did not have a genetic predisposition. Mainly osteoblastoma and soft tissue sarcoma were observed in the former radiation field. From these date it must be concluded that such effects also occur in the low dose range. Individuals with the extreme radiosensitivity (dose modifying factor, DMG, of around 5) are rare, but there are individuals with a DMF of around 1.5 to 2 who are more frequent. Therefore it has to be discussed whether the individual variability of radiosensitivity must also be considered for radioprotection by special dose limits or other regulations. (author)

  20. Genetic predisposition and implications for radioprotection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streffer, Christian

    2000-01-01

    retinoblastoma who did not have a genetic predisposition. Mainly osteoblastoma and soft tissue sarcoma were observed in the former radiation field. From these date it must be concluded that such effects also occur in the low dose range. Individuals with the extreme radiosensitivity (dose modifying factor, DMG, of around 5) are rare, but there are individuals with a DMF of around 1.5 to 2 who are more frequent. Therefore it has to be discussed whether the individual variability of radiosensitivity must also be considered for radioprotection by special dose limits or other regulations. (author)

  1. Mimicking a natural pathway for de novo biosynthesis: natural vanillin production from accessible carbon sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Jun; Tao, Fei; Du, Huaiqing; Xu, Ping

    2015-09-02

    Plant secondary metabolites have been attracting people's attention for centuries, due to their potentials; however, their production is still difficult and costly. The rich diversity of microbes and microbial genome sequence data provide unprecedented gene resources that enable to develop efficient artificial pathways in microorganisms. Here, by mimicking a natural pathway of plants using microbial genes, a new metabolic route was developed in E. coli for the synthesis of vanillin, the most widely used flavoring agent. A series of factors were systematically investigated for raising production, including efficiency and suitability of genes, gene dosage, and culture media. The metabolically engineered strain produced 97.2 mg/L vanillin from l-tyrosine, 19.3 mg/L from glucose, 13.3 mg/L from xylose and 24.7 mg/L from glycerol. These results show that the metabolic route enables production of natural vanillin from low-cost substrates, suggesting that it is a good strategy to mimick natural pathways for artificial pathway design.

  2. Mimicking a natural pathway for de novo biosynthesis: natural vanillin production from accessible carbon sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Jun; Tao, Fei; Du, Huaiqing; Xu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Plant secondary metabolites have been attracting people’s attention for centuries, due to their potentials; however, their production is still difficult and costly. The rich diversity of microbes and microbial genome sequence data provide unprecedented gene resources that enable to develop efficient artificial pathways in microorganisms. Here, by mimicking a natural pathway of plants using microbial genes, a new metabolic route was developed in E. coli for the synthesis of vanillin, the most widely used flavoring agent. A series of factors were systematically investigated for raising production, including efficiency and suitability of genes, gene dosage, and culture media. The metabolically engineered strain produced 97.2 mg/L vanillin from l-tyrosine, 19.3 mg/L from glucose, 13.3 mg/L from xylose and 24.7 mg/L from glycerol. These results show that the metabolic route enables production of natural vanillin from low-cost substrates, suggesting that it is a good strategy to mimick natural pathways for artificial pathway design. PMID:26329726

  3. Radioprotection in dentistry: Analysis of the Dentistry Faculties of the Rio de Janeiro State not referring at personnel and installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padilha F, L.G.; Borges, J.C.; Raymundo Junior, R.; Koch, H.A.

    1998-01-01

    The objective was to show the necessity and the importance of the training and formation of the dentist in radioprotection according to the recent proposal for technical regulations 'Radiological protection directrixes in Medical and Dentistry radiodiagnostic' of the Secretaria do Vigilancia Sanitaria of Ministerio da Saude (SVSMS). This regulation establishes basic standards to radioprotection in the medical and dentistry areas, including principles, limits, obligations and basic controls for the man and environment protection, versus possible improper effects caused by the use of ionizing radiation sources. An analysis of the discipline programs of the Dentistry Schools of Rio de Janeiro state indicates that they show a little or none preoccupation by the radiological protection, which was confirmed through a survey applied toward responsible professors by department or radiology service to the dentistry Schools. This work suggests the creation or adaptation of the existing disciplines introducing radioprotection and images quality in radiodiagnostic, to improve, complement and to make uniform the formation of future dentists optimizing the solution of the identified problems. (Author)

  4. Radioprotective effect of the extract of Ziziphus joazeiro and Anacardium occidentale on embryos of Biomphalaria glabrata submitted to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siqueira, Williams N.; Silva, Luanna R.S.; Silva, Edvane B.; Silva, Ronaldo C.; Lacerda, Laila B.N.; Silva, Hianna A.M.F.; Santos, Mariana L.O.; Sa, Jose L.F.; Melo, Ana M.M.A.

    2011-01-01

    Electromagnetic radiations are energies that can be classified as non-ionizing and ionizing. This type of energy is propagated by a material medium and the vacuum. The important characteristic of ionizing radiation is the localized release of large amounts of energy. The biological effects of radiation result principally from damage to DNA, which is the critical target. Given these harmful effects caused by radiation highlights the importance of acquiring knowledge about the radioprotective substance, because they act to protect the living tissue, decreasing the damage he caused by the effects of radiation. In this study we investigated the radioprotective effect of extract hydroalcoholic of Ziziphus joazeiro and Anacardium occidentale on embryos of Biomphalaria glabrata. The embryos of Biomphalaria glabrata pigmented were divided into 18 groups of 100 specimens. The experimental groups were exposed to the extracts at a concentration of 200 ppm and then irradiated. For irradiation, we used a source of 60 Co (Gammacell of Radionics Labs. Dose rate = 4.359 Gy/h). The viability of the embryos was examined using a stereoscopic microscope and statistical analysis was performed using the test Student-Newman-Keuls and χ 2 . Our results showed that the extracts of hydroalcoholic Ziziphus joazeiro showed radioprotective effect and that the aqueous extract of the bark of Anacardium occidentale exhibited a reduction in its embryotoxic effect. (author)

  5. Assessment of the radioprotective effects of amifostine and melatonin on human lymphocytes irradiated with gamma-rays in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopjar, N.; Miocic, S.; Ramic, S.; Milic, M.; Viculin, T.

    2005-01-01

    Radioprotective effects of amifostine and melatonin on human peripheral blood irradiated with g-rays were investigated using the micronucleus (MN) assay and the analysis of sister chromatid exchanges (SCE). Duplicate blood samples were pre-treated with amifostine (7.7 mM), melatonin (2 mM) and their combination for 30 minutes. Negative controls were also included. After treatment with radioprotectors, one blood sample from each experimental group was exposed to g-rays from a 6 0C o source. The radiation dose absorbed was 2 Gy. Pre-treated irradiated blood samples showed a decrease in the total number of MN and in the number of cells with more than one MN. Moreover, they also showed significantly lower mean SCE values. Our results indicate that amifostine, melatonin and their combination in vitro have radioprotective effects on g-irradiated human peripheral blood lymphocytes, with no significant genotoxicity. Therefore, it may be reasonable to use them in combination, adjusting the doses of amifostine to achieve the best radioprotective effect with as few side effects as possible. Before employment, this combination should be extensively tested in vitro and in vivo, using the same and other biomarkers for different radiation dose and concentration ranges of both radioprotectors.(author)

  6. Radioprotective effect of the extract of Ziziphus joazeiro and Anacardium occidentale on embryos of Biomphalaria glabrata submitted to ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siqueira, Williams N.; Silva, Luanna R.S.; Silva, Edvane B. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (DEN/UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear. Grupo de Estudos em Radioprotecao e Radioecologia; Silva, Ronaldo C. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Genetica; Lacerda, Laila B.N.; Silva, Hianna A.M.F.; Santos, Mariana L.O.; Sa, Jose L.F.; Melo, Ana M.M.A. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de de Biofisica e Radiobiologia. Lab. de Radiobiologia

    2011-07-01

    Electromagnetic radiations are energies that can be classified as non-ionizing and ionizing. This type of energy is propagated by a material medium and the vacuum. The important characteristic of ionizing radiation is the localized release of large amounts of energy. The biological effects of radiation result principally from damage to DNA, which is the critical target. Given these harmful effects caused by radiation highlights the importance of acquiring knowledge about the radioprotective substance, because they act to protect the living tissue, decreasing the damage he caused by the effects of radiation. In this study we investigated the radioprotective effect of extract hydroalcoholic of Ziziphus joazeiro and Anacardium occidentale on embryos of Biomphalaria glabrata. The embryos of Biomphalaria glabrata pigmented were divided into 18 groups of 100 specimens. The experimental groups were exposed to the extracts at a concentration of 200 ppm and then irradiated. For irradiation, we used a source of {sup 60}Co (Gammacell of Radionics Labs. Dose rate = 4.359 Gy/h). The viability of the embryos was examined using a stereoscopic microscope and statistical analysis was performed using the test Student-Newman-Keuls and {chi}{sup 2}. Our results showed that the extracts of hydroalcoholic Ziziphus joazeiro showed radioprotective effect and that the aqueous extract of the bark of Anacardium occidentale exhibited a reduction in its embryotoxic effect. (author)

  7. Genotoxic, radioprotective and radiosensitizing effect of curcumin and trans-resveratrol in vitro cultures of human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, V.A.; Tirsa Muñoz, B.; Sebastià, N.; Gómez-Cabrero, L.; La Parra, V.; Hervás, D.; Rodrigo, R.; Villaescusa, J.I.; Soriano, J.M.; Montoro, A.

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin and trans-resveratrol are natural polyphenol compounds. Curcumin is obtained from the rhizomes of the Curcumin plant (Curcuma longa), while trans-resveratrol is found in grapes, blackberries and other types of berry. These compounds have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, immunostimulant and anticarcinogenic properties among others. In addition, they are also known for their radiomodulating properties since they are capable of providing radioprotection or radiosensitization for normal or tumours cells depending on different factors. This dual action may be the result of their properties, such as free radicals scavenging, as well as their influence on cell cycle checkpoints or control mechanisms. These are activated in response to the genetic damage induced by radiation. Despite the many beneficial properties attributed to these polyphenol compounds, some studies suggest that they are able to be genotoxic agents for some cellular lines. The results obtained indicate that both compounds possess a radioprotective effect on the lymphocytes of peripheral blood in the quiescent phase of the cellular cycle (G0). Nevertheless, they are capable of induce radiosensitivity on these type of cells in the growth phase (G2), and in addition, a different genotoxic effect can be seen according to the concentration of each compound. This study suggests, therefore, that curcumin and trans-resveratrol are able to exert a triple effect, genotoxic, radioprotective and radiosensitizing on in vitro cultures of human lymphocytes depending on the study parameters. [es

  8. Training on Radioisotopes Techniques and Radioprotection Aspects at The School of Pharmacy and Biochemistry of the Buenos Aires University (Argentina)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergoc, R. M.; Rivera, E. S.; Bomba, A. M.

    2004-01-01

    The use of ionizing radiation sources and radioisotopes in Argentina takes place at more than 1700 facilities, which operate in Nuclear Medicine, in telecobaltherapy, in Industry, in Biochemistry, and in research. All of these centers have one or more professional trained in the specific field of radioprotection and they have been authorized by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority. At the School of Pharmacy and Biochemistry of the Buenos Aires University, Argentina, we consider of great interest to teach radioisotopes methodology at different levels, to harmonize the use of these methodologies with environmental preservation and to provide education and training on radioprotection. Currently, the school offers five different courses in all of which the radioprotection is one of the most important subjects: 1) Course on Methodology of Radioisotopes for students at the undergraduate level, in the Biochemistry Career (140 hrs). Since 1960, more than 6000 students have passed their examinations. 2) Course on Methodology of Radioisotopes for post-Graduates in Biochemistry, Biology, Chemists or other related disciplines. 3) Course for Graduates in Medicine. Since 1962, the School delivers every year these two courses. Their syllabus (212 hrs) dedicates a 50% of the time schedule to subjects related to radioprotection aspects. More than 1800 professional have passed their examinations, many of them from different Latin American countries. 4) Up-date on Methodology of Radioisotopes (100 hrs) a course delivered since 1992 for professionals wishing to up-date their knowledge. 5) Course for Technicians in Nuclear Medicine (more than 200 hrs). At present, this course is the basic level of the Technicians in Nuclear Medicine Career. At the present paper it will be presented statistics regarding the different courses and the experience that has been gathered for the last 40 years organizing courses and carrying out research activity on radiobiology, radioimmunoanalysis

  9. Training on radioisotopes techniques and radioprotection aspects at the School of Pharmacy and Biochemistry of the Buenos Aires University (Argentina)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergoc, R.M.; Rivera, E.S.

    2005-01-01

    The use of ionizing radiation sources and radioisotopes in Argentina takes place at more than 1700 facilities, which operate in Nuclear Medicine, in Telecobaltherapy, in Industry, in Biochemistry, and in Research. All of these centers have one or more professional trained in the specific field of radioprotection and they have been authorized by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority. At the School of Pharmacy and Biochemistry of the Buenos Aires University, Argentina, we consider of great interest to teach radioisotopes methodology at different levels, to harmonize the use of these methodologies with environmental preservation and to provide education and training on radioprotection. Currently, the school offers five different courses in all of which the radioprotection is one of the most important subjects: 1) Course on Methodology of Radioisotopes for students at the undergraduate level, in the Biochemistry Career (140 hs). Since 1960, more than 6000 students have passed their examinations. 2) Course on Methodology of Radioisotopes for post-Graduates in Biochemistry, Biology, Chemists or other related disciplines. 3) Course for Graduates in Medicine. Since 1962, the School delivers every year these two courses. Their syllabus (212 hs) dedicates a 50% of the time schedule to subjects related to radioprotection aspects. More than 1800 professional have passed their examinations, many of them from different Latin American countries. 4) Up-date on Methodology of Radioisotopes (100 hs) a course delivered since 1992 for professionals wishing to up-date their knowledge. 5) Course for Technicians in Nuclear Medicine (more than 200 hs). At present, this course is the basic level of the Technicians in Nuclear Medicine Career. At the present paper it will be presented statistics regarding the different courses and the experience that has been gathered for the last 40 years organizing courses and carrying out research activity on radiobiology, radioimmunoanalysis, radioreceptors

  10. Appraisal of radio-protective potential of Tinospora cordifolia against radiation mediated biochemical alterations in intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Priyanka; Goyal, P.K.

    2013-01-01

    In the modern technology world, it is important to concern the possible adverse biological effects of radiation due to its widespread use in diverse fields such as medicine for the diagnostic and therapeutic purposes, research, industries and construction site. Radiation injuries to living cells to large extent is attributable to its interaction with biological systems which ultimately unleashes large scale destruction to several essential biological macromolecules like water, nucleic acids, proteins, cellular membrane etc., and cause their dysfunctions and damage. The protection of humans against the harmful effects of radiation is a major challenge that needs an urgent solution. Use of radioprotectors is one among the strategies designed in order to minimize the lethal consequences of radiation exposure to normal cells. Plant products appear to have advantages over the synthetic compounds in terms of low/no toxicity at the effective dose. Large numbers of medicinal and aromatic plants are present in the nature, which are considered as the natural source of antioxidants and used in various Ayurvedic formulations for the treatment of different diseases throughout the centuries. The present study is designed to assess the modulatory effect of Tinospora cordifolia root extract (TCE) against radiation-induced biochemical changes in intestine of Swiss albino mice. For this purpose, one group of male Swiss albino mice was exposed to 5.0 Gy gamma radiation to serve as the irradiated control, while the other group received TCE (75 mg/kg b. wt./day) orally for 5 consecutive days before irradiation to serve as an experimental. Radiation exposure resulted in a significant decline in intestinal proteins, cholesterol, glutathione, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase; whereas, TCE supplementation before irradiation showed a significant elevation in all these parameters. Furthermore, treatment with this plant extract caused a significant fall in the radiation induced lipid

  11. Evaluation of the radioprotective effect of Turkish propolis on foreskin fibroblast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalcin, Can Ozgur; Aliyazicioglu, Yuksel; Demir, Selim; Turan, Ibrahim; Bahat, Zumrut; Misir, Sema; Deger, Orhan

    2016-01-01

    Propolis is a resinous bee product, rich of polyphenolic compounds and flavonoids. It is known that in different geographic zones its chemical composition varies due to the different plant sources. Many biological properties including antimicrobial, antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, antitumoral, antigenotoxic, antimutagenic, cytostatic activities have been ascribed to propolis. These biological effects are predominantly attributed to its content of polyphenols. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the radioprotective effect of ethanolic extract of Turkish propolis. (EETP) against γ-ray-induced DNA damage on fibroblast cells using comet assay for the first time. Fibroblast cells were pretreated 15 and 30 min with concentrations of 100, 200 and 300 μg/mL EETP then they were exposed to 3 Gy γ-rays. Amifostine (synthetic aminothiol compound) was used as a positive control. The results showed a significant decrease in γ-ray-induced DNA damage on cells treated with EETP and amifostine when compared to only irradiated cells. (P < 001). It was concluded that EETP prevent γ-ray-induced DNA damage in fibroblast cells and might have radioprotective activity.

  12. Observational constraints on the physical nature of submillimetre source multiplicity: chance projections are common

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, Christopher C.; Chapman, Scott C.; Steidel, Charles C.; Golob, Anneya; Casey, Caitlin M.; Smith, Daniel J. B.; Zitrin, Adi; Blain, Andrew W.; Bremer, Malcolm N.; Chen, Chian-Chou; Coppin, Kristen E. K.; Farrah, Duncan; Ibar, Eduardo; Michałowski, Michał J.; Sawicki, Marcin; Scott, Douglas; van der Werf, Paul; Fazio, Giovanni G.; Geach, James E.; Gurwell, Mark; Petitpas, Glen; Wilner, David J.

    2018-05-01

    Interferometric observations have demonstrated that a significant fraction of single-dish submillimetre (submm) sources are blends of multiple submm galaxies (SMGs), but the nature of this multiplicity, i.e. whether the galaxies are physically associated or chance projections, has not been determined. We performed spectroscopy of 11 SMGs in six multicomponent submm sources, obtaining spectroscopic redshifts for nine of them. For an additional two component SMGs, we detected continuum emission but no obvious features. We supplement our observed sources with four single-dish submm sources from the literature. This sample allows us to statistically constrain the physical nature of single-dish submm source multiplicity for the first time. In three (3/7, { or} 43^{+39 }_{ -33} {per cent at 95 {per cent} confidence}) of the single-dish sources for which the nature of the blending is unambiguous, the components for which spectroscopic redshifts are available are physically associated, whereas 4/7 (57^{+33 }_{ -39} per cent) have at least one unassociated component. When components whose spectra exhibit continuum but no features and for which the photometric redshift is significantly different from the spectroscopic redshift of the other component are also considered, 6/9 (67^{+26 }_{ -37} per cent) of the single-dish sources are comprised of at least one unassociated component SMG. The nature of the multiplicity of one single-dish source is ambiguous. We conclude that physically associated systems and chance projections both contribute to the multicomponent single-dish submm source population. This result contradicts the conventional wisdom that bright submm sources are solely a result of merger-induced starbursts, as blending of unassociated galaxies is also important.

  13. Observational constraints on the physical nature of submillimetre source multiplicity: chance projections are common

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, Christopher C.; Chapman, Scott C.; Steidel, Charles C.; Golob, Anneya; Casey, Caitlin M.; Smith, Daniel J. B.; Zitrin, Adi; Blain, Andrew W.; Bremer, Malcolm N.; Chen, Chian-Chou; Coppin, Kristen E. K.; Farrah, Duncan; Ibar, Eduardo; Michałowski, Michał J.; Sawicki, Marcin; Scott, Douglas; van der Werf, Paul; Fazio, Giovanni G.; Geach, James E.; Gurwell, Mark; Petitpas, Glen; Wilner, David J.

    2018-02-01

    Interferometric observations have demonstrated that a significant fraction of single-dish submillimetre (submm) sources are blends of multiple submm galaxies (SMGs), but the nature of this multiplicity, i.e. whether the galaxies are physically associated or chance projections, has not been determined. We performed spectroscopy of 11 SMGs in six multi-component submm sources, obtaining spectroscopic redshifts for nine of them. For an additional two component SMGs, we detected continuum emission but no obvious features. We supplement our observed sources with four single-dish submm sources from the literature. This sample allows us to statistically constrain the physical nature of single-dish submm source multiplicity for the first time. In three \\left(3/7, or 43\\substack{+39 \\ -33} per cent at 95% confidence \\right) of the single-dish sources for which the nature of the blending is unambiguous, the components for which spectroscopic redshifts are available are physically associated, whereas 4/7 \\left(57\\substack{+33 \\ -39} per cent \\right) have at least one unassociated component. When components whose spectra exhibit continuum but no features and for which the photometric redshift is significantly different from the spectroscopic redshift of the other component are also considered, 6/9 \\left(67\\substack{+26 \\ -37} per cent\\right) of the single-dish sources are comprised of at least one unassociated component SMG. The nature of the multiplicity of one single-dish source is ambiguous. We conclude that physically associated systems and chance projections both contribute to the multi-component single-dish submm source population. This result contradicts the conventional wisdom that bright submm sources are solely a result of merger-induced starbursts, as blending of unassociated galaxies is also important.

  14. Natural product-likeness score revisited: an open-source, open-data implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaseelan, Kalai Vanii; Moreno, Pablo; Truszkowski, Andreas; Ertl, Peter; Steinbeck, Christoph

    2012-05-20

    Natural product-likeness of a molecule, i.e. similarity of this molecule to the structure space covered by natural products, is a useful criterion in screening compound libraries and in designing new lead compounds. A closed source implementation of a natural product-likeness score, that finds its application in virtual screening, library design and compound selection, has been previously reported by one of us. In this note, we report an open-source and open-data re-implementation of this scoring system, illustrate its efficiency in ranking small molecules for natural product likeness and discuss its potential applications. The Natural-Product-Likeness scoring system is implemented as Taverna 2.2 workflows, and is available under Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported License at http://www.myexperiment.org/packs/183.html. It is also available for download as executable standalone java package from http://sourceforge.net/projects/np-likeness/under Academic Free License. Our open-source, open-data Natural-Product-Likeness scoring system can be used as a filter for metabolites in Computer Assisted Structure Elucidation or to select natural-product-like molecules from molecular libraries for the use as leads in drug discovery.

  15. Natural product-likeness score revisited: an open-source, open-data implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayaseelan Kalai Vanii

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Natural product-likeness of a molecule, i.e. similarity of this molecule to the structure space covered by natural products, is a useful criterion in screening compound libraries and in designing new lead compounds. A closed source implementation of a natural product-likeness score, that finds its application in virtual screening, library design and compound selection, has been previously reported by one of us. In this note, we report an open-source and open-data re-implementation of this scoring system, illustrate its efficiency in ranking small molecules for natural product likeness and discuss its potential applications. Results The Natural-Product-Likeness scoring system is implemented as Taverna 2.2 workflows, and is available under Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported License at http://www.myexperiment.org/packs/183.html. It is also available for download as executable standalone java package from http://sourceforge.net/projects/np-likeness/under Academic Free License. Conclusions Our open-source, open-data Natural-Product-Likeness scoring system can be used as a filter for metabolites in Computer Assisted Structure Elucidation or to select natural-product-like molecules from molecular libraries for the use as leads in drug discovery.

  16. Sources of Free and Open Source Spatial Data for Natural Disasters and Principles for Use in Developing Country Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Faith E.; Malamud, Bruce D.; Millington, James D. A.

    2016-04-01

    Access to reliable spatial and quantitative datasets (e.g., infrastructure maps, historical observations, environmental variables) at regional and site specific scales can be a limiting factor for understanding hazards and risks in developing country settings. Here we present a 'living database' of >75 freely available data sources relevant to hazard and risk in Africa (and more globally). Data sources include national scientific foundations, non-governmental bodies, crowd-sourced efforts, academic projects, special interest groups and others. The database is available at http://tinyurl.com/africa-datasets and is continually being updated, particularly in the context of broader natural hazards research we are doing in the context of Malawi and Kenya. For each data source, we review the spatiotemporal resolution and extent and make our own assessments of reliability and usability of datasets. Although such freely available datasets are sometimes presented as a panacea to improving our understanding of hazards and risk in developing countries, there are both pitfalls and opportunities unique to using this type of freely available data. These include factors such as resolution, homogeneity, uncertainty, access to metadata and training for usage. Based on our experience, use in the field and grey/peer-review literature, we present a suggested set of guidelines for using these free and open source data in developing country contexts.

  17. Radioprotection of vitamin D on mice injured by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaohui; Zhou Zhengyu; Li Bingyan; Nie Jihua; Tong Jian; Zhang Zengli

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the radioprotective effect of vitamin D against irradiation injury, the mice exposed to 60 Co γ-rays at 6 Gy was treated with preparation of vitamin D(Alfacalcidol Soft Capsules). Cell cycle and apoptosis was analyzed by flow cytometry (FCM) following staining of cells with propidium iodide (PI). Peripheral blood cell counts were analyzed by autoanalyzer. It has been found that vitamin D significantly increases white blood cell (WBC) counts, decreases bone marrow PEC micronucleus rate. FCM analysis shows that compared with damaged group, G2 and S phases of bone marrow cells in vitamin D protection group increases significantly at 24 h after whole body irradiation, whereas G1 phase cells decrease at the same times. So vitamin D might be a new radioprotection agent and it should be deserved further study. (authors)

  18. Local-regional networks of persons with abilities in radioprotection and other actors in radioprotection. Audit report; Les reseaux loco-regionaux de personnes competentes en radioprotection et autres acteurs de la radioprotection. Rapport d'audit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefaure, Ch.

    2009-03-15

    As the regulation requires the existence of persons with abilities in radioprotection (PCR, personnes competentes en radioprotection) in many industrial, medical or research activities where ionizing radiations are present, in order to improve worker protection, these professionals who are much less acknowledged in these sectors than in the nuclear sector, felt the need to gather in regional and sector-based networks. This report proposes a presentation of three existing networks (the APCRAP, the Grand-Ouest network, and the Aquitaine-Sud-Ouest network). For each of them, the report addresses the following aspects: creation, objectives, statutes, members, activities, human, technical and financial resources, role. Then answers to a survey and to interviews are analyzed with respect to the professional sector and to the region, in terms of expectations towards the networks, and in terms of network operation and services. Interviews of institutional actors and union and management representatives are also analysed

  19. Natural Radionuclides and Isotopic Signatures for Determining Carbonaceous Aerosol Sources, Aerosol Lifetimes, and Washout Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaffney, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    This is the final technical report. The project description is as follows: to determine the role of aerosol radiative forcing on climate, the processes that control their atmospheric concentrations must be understood, and aerosol sources need to be determined for mitigation. Measurements of naturally occurring radionuclides and stable isotopic signatures allow the sources, removal and transport processes, as well as atmospheric lifetimes of fine carbonaceous aerosols, to be evaluated.

  20. Macroalgal Endophytes from the Atlantic Coast of Canada: A Potential Source of Antibiotic Natural Products?

    OpenAIRE

    Flewelling, Andrew J.; Ellsworth, Katelyn T.; Sanford, Joseph; Forward, Erica; Johnson, John A.; Gray, Christopher A.

    2013-01-01

    As the need for new and more effective antibiotics increases, untapped sources of biodiversity are being explored in an effort to provide lead structures for drug discovery. Endophytic fungi from marine macroalgae have been identified as a potential source of biologically active natural products, although data to support this is limited. To assess the antibiotic potential of temperate macroalgal endophytes we isolated endophytic fungi from algae collected in the Bay of Fundy, Canada and scree...

  1. Natural Radionuclides and Isotopic Signatures for Determining Carbonaceous Aerosol Sources, Aerosol Lifetimes, and Washout Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaffney, Jeffrey [Univ. of Arkansas, Little Rock, AR (United States)

    2012-12-12

    This is the final technical report. The project description is as follows: to determine the role of aerosol radiative forcing on climate, the processes that control their atmospheric concentrations must be understood, and aerosol sources need to be determined for mitigation. Measurements of naturally occurring radionuclides and stable isotopic signatures allow the sources, removal and transport processes, as well as atmospheric lifetimes of fine carbonaceous aerosols, to be evaluated.

  2. The importance of radioprotection controls in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahyun, A.; Sanches, M.P.; Sordi, G.M.A.A.

    1994-01-01

    In nuclear medicine the main objective of radioprotection controls is to protect three people groups from external and internal radiation. To obtain this goal, the dose limitation system has to be followed firmly and for that, basic procedures have to be introduced. These basic procedures are the result of several activities which have to be balanced, one against the other to be effective. The aims of radioprotection are to ensure that people are not exposed to doses enough to cause radiation symptoms and to limit the doses of radiation. This is achieved by the use of shielding, containment, careful design and operating and administrative procedures. This paper presents a small list of general radioprotection problems found in nuclear medicine and establishes some rules to the job schedule and control measures to be followed in favor of safety. By considering the general radioprotection problems, a number of factors of substantial relevance in the control of external and internal doses can be deduced and emphasis properly placed. Work with radioactive material should be concentrated on a limited number of work rooms. Good radioactive materials inventory are essential because of the potentially large diversity of material and users. Storage of radioactive materials ensure that the public is not unnecessarily exposed. Appropriate monitoring equipment should be available within each working site. Line management commitment to safety has led to a heightened awareness for those control measures which encourages individuals to review and improve their own work rules. Investment in training programs, plant modifications and written procedures provide the necessary resource to support the dose reduction initiatives

  3. Attitudes des prescripteurs de scanner en matiere de radioprotection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectif: Evaluer les attitudes des prescripteurs de scanner en matière de radioprotection des patients à Lomé au Togo. Méthodologie: Etude transversale descriptive réalisée du 1er Avril au 30 Juin 2015 dans les centres hospitaliers universitaires, le centre hospitalier régional, les cabinets médicaux et les cliniques privées ...

  4. Experiment research of the microwave radioprotection in building element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zunwei; Wang Xinglian; Chang Qingying

    2007-01-01

    More and more attention to the radiation protection of microwave is being paid by the people. The different materials were used to shield off the radiation from a base station of mobile phone in the experiment. This paper presents the experimental method and results. 12 measuring sites were adopted in the experiment, including lodging house, office building, hospital, school, kindergarden, factory workshop, and gymnasium, they were near the base station of mobile phone. There were 3 materials for radioprotection of microwave: one was nickel-plating nylon cloth of 0.25 nan thick(for short material 1), another was stainless steel wire net of 0.35 mm thick and 1 mm aperture (for short material 2); the material 3 was galvanized board of 0.3 mm thick. The material were hanged on doom, windows, and wall in these experimental sites. The measuring instrument was Nokia 3350 H-2 full direction field indensity apparatus. Experimentation request is that high quality communication is still retained after radioprotection. The results showed that the effect of radioprotection of material 1 is better than material 2, and material 2 is better than material 3, but the material 2 is preferably selected from the point of view of the effect, price, and decorate construction. (authors)

  5. The uranium source-term mineralogy and geochemistry at the Broubster natural analogue site, Caithness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milodowski, A.E.; Pearce, J.M.; Basham, I.R.; Hyslop, E.K.

    1991-01-01

    The British Geological Survey (BGS) has been conducting a coordinated research programme at the Broubster natural analogue site in Caithness, north Scotland. This work on a natural radioactive geochemical system has been carried out with the aim of improving our confidence in using predictive models of radionuclide migration in the geosphere. This report is one of a series being produced and it concentrates on the mineralogical characterization of the uranium distribution in the limestone unit considered as the 'source-term' in the natural analogue model

  6. Local-regional networks of persons with abilities in radioprotection and other actors in radioprotection. Audit report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefaure, Ch.

    2009-03-01

    As the regulation requires the existence of persons with abilities in radioprotection (PCR, personnes competentes en radioprotection) in many industrial, medical or research activities where ionizing radiations are present, in order to improve worker protection, these professionals who are much less acknowledged in these sectors than in the nuclear sector, felt the need to gather in regional and sector-based networks. This report proposes a presentation of three existing networks (the APCRAP, the Grand-Ouest network, and the Aquitaine-Sud-Ouest network). For each of them, the report addresses the following aspects: creation, objectives, statutes, members, activities, human, technical and financial resources, role. Then answers to a survey and to interviews are analyzed with respect to the professional sector and to the region, in terms of expectations towards the networks, and in terms of network operation and services. Interviews of institutional actors and union and management representatives are also analysed

  7. Attributing Methane and Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Anthropogenic and Natural Sources Using AVIRIS-NG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, A. K.; Frankenberg, C.; Thompson, D. R.; Duren, R. M.; Aubrey, A. D.; Bue, B. D.; Green, R. O.; Gerilowski, K.; Krings, T.; Borchardt, J.; Kort, E. A.; Sweeney, C.; Conley, S. A.; Roberts, D. A.; Dennison, P. E.; Ayasse, A.

    2016-12-01

    Imaging spectrometers like the next generation Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS-NG) can map large regions with the high spatial resolution necessary to resolve methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. This capability is aided by real time detection and geolocation of gas plumes, permitting unambiguous identification of individual emission source locations and communication to ground teams for rapid follow up. We present results from AVIRIS-NG flight campaigns in the Four Corners region (Colorado and New Mexico) and the San Joaquin Valley (California). Over three hundred plumes were observed, reflecting emissions from anthropogenic and natural sources. Examples of plumes will be shown for a number of sources, including CH4 from well completions, gas processing plants, tanks, pipeline leaks, natural seeps, and CO2 from power plants. Despite these promising results, an imaging spectrometer built exclusively for quantitative mapping of gas plumes would have improved sensitivity compared to AVIRIS-NG. For example, an instrument providing a 1 nm spectral sampling (2,000-2,400 micron) would permit mapping CH4, CO2, H2O, CO, and N2O from more diffuse sources using both airborne and orbital platforms. The ability to identify emission sources offers the potential to constrain regional greenhouse gas budgets and improve partitioning between anthropogenic and natural emission sources. Because the CH4 lifetime is only about 9 years and CH4 has a Global Warming Potential 86 times that of CO2 for a 20 year time interval, mitigating these emissions is a particularly cost-effective approach to reduce overall atmospheric radiative forcing. Fig. 1. True color image subset with superimposed gas plumes showing concentrations in ppmm. Left: AVIRIS-NG observed CH4 plumes from natural gas processing plant extending over 500 m downwind of multiple emissions sources. Right: Multiple CO2 plumes observed from coal-fired power plant.

  8. EXPOSURE LEVELS FOR PERSONNEL OF NON-URANIUM UNDERGROUND ENTERPRISES FROM NATURAL IRRADIATION SOURCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Koroljova

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The article contains the analysis of the results of radiation survey at more than 100 non-uranium mining enterprises fulfilled by the Institute over the last 20 years. The article considers radiation situation formation appropriateness, demonstrates the evaluation of effective exposure doses of mining enterprises personnel from natural irradiation sources in working conditions, the dose structure is given.

  9. What do we really know about the health effects of natural sources of trans fatty acids?

    Science.gov (United States)

    While the food industry remains actively engaged in the development of alternatives for partially hydrogenated vegetable oils in order to reduce intake of trans fatty acids, intake of these fatty acids from natural sources remains as a small part of our diet. The question remains, are there differ...

  10. Isolation and Preparation of Nanoscale Bioapatites from Natural Sources: A Review

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šupová, Monika

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 1 (2014), s. 546-563 ISSN 1533-4880 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA106/09/1000 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : bioapatites * calcium phosphate * hydroxyapatite * natural sources Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials Impact factor: 1.556, year: 2014

  11. Sources and Nature of Secondary School Teachers' Education in Computer-Related Ergonomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dockrell, Sara; Fallon, Enda; Kelly, Martina; Galvin, Rose

    2009-01-01

    Teachers' knowledge of computer-related ergonomics in education will have an effect on the learning process and the work practices of their students. However little is known about teacher education in this area. The study aimed to investigate the sources and nature of secondary school teachers' education about computer-related ergonomics. It also…

  12. Simulation of preindustrial atmospheric methane to constrain the global source strength of natural wetlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houweling, S; Dentener, F; Lelieveld, J

    2000-01-01

    Previous attempts to quantify the global source strength of CH4 from natural wetlands have resulted in a range of 90-260 TE(CH4) yr(-1). This relatively uncertain estimate significantly limits our understanding of atmospheric methane. In this study we reduce this uncertainty by simulating

  13. Literature: A Natural Source for Teaching English in ESL/ EFL Classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammed Ali Chalikendy

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the ways in which literature function as a source and as a meaningful context for teaching and learning English as a second language or foreign language. It claims that literature is an authentic, stimulating and appealing material to the learners. Therefore, it encourages interaction, promotes language development and motivates learners in the process of learning. Traditionally it is taught as an academic subject without considering its potential in ESL/EFL classrooms. The paper argues that literature can be used as an effective source for teaching English language and the target culture; furthermore, it is used as a natural context for integrating language skills and systems. This paper demonstrates how a poem is used as a natural source or a material for developing English language and integrating the four language skills, grammar and vocabulary through communicative tasks and activities.

  14. Artificial intelligence methods applied for quantitative analysis of natural radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medhat, M.E.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Basic description of artificial neural networks. ► Natural gamma ray sources and problem of detections. ► Application of neural network for peak detection and activity determination. - Abstract: Artificial neural network (ANN) represents one of artificial intelligence methods in the field of modeling and uncertainty in different applications. The objective of the proposed work was focused to apply ANN to identify isotopes and to predict uncertainties of their activities of some natural radioactive sources. The method was tested for analyzing gamma-ray spectra emitted from natural radionuclides in soil samples detected by a high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry based on HPGe (high purity germanium). The principle of the suggested method is described, including, relevant input parameters definition, input data scaling and networks training. It is clear that there is satisfactory agreement between obtained and predicted results using neural network.

  15. Estimation of impact from natural sources of radiation sources in two non nuclear plant workers and nearby residents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sousa, Wanderson de Oliveira

    2005-09-01

    Naturally occurring radioactive materials, often referred to as NORM, are and always have been a part of our world. Our planet 'Earth' and its atmosphere contain many different types of naturally occurring radioactive species , mainly minerals containing radionuclides of uranium and thorium decay series. Human activities for e x p l o i t a t i o n of mineral resources as mining, necessarily, do not enhance the concentration of NORM in products , by-products or residues, but can be a concern, simply due to the increased potential for human exposure. The goal of this work is to assess the impact of the presence of two non-nuclear plants (coal mining and monazite extraction plant) to workers and general population living in the vicinities of plants, by calculating their internal exposure to natural radionuclides . Excreta samples (urine and feces) were collected from workers and inhabitants of the two small towns where workers reside. The activities of 238 U, 234 U ( o n l y in feces), 226 Ra , 210 Pb and 210 Po (only in urine),- present in the samples were determined. The results of daily excretion in urine and feces of the groups, indicate that workers from coal mining, are exposed to natural radionuclides by inhalation and ingestion. The intake of some radionuclides ( 238 U and 210 Po ) are influenced by the professional activity . The results also indicate a chronic intake of 226 Ra by workers of the coal mining and their neighbors. Workers from the monazite extraction plant and inhabitants of the vicinity of the plant are exposed, mainly by ingestion. The intake through diet is the major source of incorporation of natural radionuclides. (author)

  16. 2nd Workshop on the Nature of the High-Energy Unidentified Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, K S; Multiwavelength Approach to Unidentified Gamma-Ray Sources

    2005-01-01

    Nearly one half of the point-like gamma-ray sources detected by EGRET instrument of the late Compton satellite are still defeating our attempts at identifying them. To establish the origin and nature of these enigmatic sources has become a major problem of current high-energy astrophysics. The second workshop on Multiwavelength Approach to Unidentified Gamma-ray Sources intends to shed new and fresh light on the problem of the nature of these mysterious sources and the objects behind them. The proceedings contain 46 contributed papers in this subject, which cover theoretical models on gamma-ray sources as well as the best multiwavelength strategies for the identification of the promising candidates. The topics of this conference also include energetic phenomena ocurring both in galactic and extragalactic scenarios, phenomena that might lead to the appearance of what we have called high-energy unidentified sources. The book will be of interest for all active researchers in the high-energy astrophysics and rela...

  17. Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffy, L.P.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses the sources of radiation in the narrow perspective of radioactivity and the even narrow perspective of those sources that concern environmental management and restoration activities at DOE facilities, as well as a few related sources. Sources of irritation, Sources of inflammatory jingoism, and Sources of information. First, the sources of irritation fall into three categories: No reliable scientific ombudsman to speak without bias and prejudice for the public good, Technical jargon with unclear definitions exists within the radioactive nomenclature, and Scientific community keeps a low-profile with regard to public information. The next area of personal concern are the sources of inflammation. This include such things as: Plutonium being described as the most dangerous substance known to man, The amount of plutonium required to make a bomb, Talk of transuranic waste containing plutonium and its health affects, TMI-2 and Chernobyl being described as Siamese twins, Inadequate information on low-level disposal sites and current regulatory requirements under 10 CFR 61, Enhanced engineered waste disposal not being presented to the public accurately. Numerous sources of disinformation regarding low level radiation high-level radiation, Elusive nature of the scientific community, The Federal and State Health Agencies resources to address comparative risk, and Regulatory agencies speaking out without the support of the scientific community

  18. Evaluation of qualification and radioprotection knowledge of dentists in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padilha Filho, L.G.; Borges, J.C.

    1996-01-01

    The status and implications of the actual radioprotection knowledge of people studying dentistry is evaluated. A brief research of the current situation in Brazil is presented. The inclusion of a discipline - or the remaking of existing ones - in the curricula of Brazilian dentistry schools, covering subjects from radioprotection to images quality control is suggested

  19. Radioprotection, biological effects of the radiations and security in the handling of radioactive material

    CERN Document Server

    Teran, M

    2000-01-01

    The development of the philosophy of the radioprotection is dependent on the understanding of the effects of the radiation in the man. Behind the fact that the radiation is able to produce biological damages there are certain factors with regard to the biological effects of the radiations that determine the boarding of the radioprotection topics.

  20. Medical Management of Acute Radiation Syndromes : Comparison of Antiradiation Vaccine and Antioxidants radioprotection potency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maliev, Slava; Popov, Dmitri; Lisenkov, Nikolai

    against CV-ARS, Cr-ARS, GI -ARS, Hp-ARS forms of the ARS. 4. Irradiated animals were treated with development of Cr -ARS, Cv-ARS, GI -ARS and Hp -ARS forms of the ARS -Combined administration of the Antiradiation Vaccine and Antioxidants used for radiation protection and treatment. Equipment for irradiation: 60 Cobalt Facility : "Panorama", "Puma". Exposure rate: o.6 Gymin. During experiments, animals received the whole-body irradiation in a single dose. The radiation doses varied in a range from 7.5 Gy up to 10 Gy. These experiments were accomplished at the radio-biology department of Moscow State Academy of Veterinary Medicine and Biotechnology and Department of Scientific Research Institute of Nuclear Physics, Dubna, Russia. Radioprotectants: 1. Antioxidants : The Antioxidant mixture contained Coenzyme Q10, Vitamin A(retinol), Vitamin C(ascorbic acid), natural beta-carotene, d-alphatocopherol succinate, d-alpha tocopherol acetate. The antioxidants mixture was prepared in a powder form. Method of administration: oral administration by gavage. The doses of antioxidants varied from 100 mg/kg up to 500 mg/kg. 2. Placebo: Method of administration: oral ad-ministration by gavage. Five days daily before and after the whole-body gamma-irradiation. 3. Antiradiation Vaccine (ARV) contained toxoid (inactivated) forms of radiomimetics -Neu-rotoxins SRD-1; SRD-2; SRD-3 and Hematotoxins SRD-4. Method of administration ARV: intramuscular or subcutaneous,24 days before irradiation. Animals: 15 Sheep, 50 rabbits. Re-sults: The results of oral administration of antioxidants mixture provided before and after the whole-body high doses of gamma-irradiation at doses 10030 had demonstrated that survival rate was similar to placebo group -all animals died in first 5-10 days after irradiation. Ra-dioprotection activity did not depend on the doses of the antioxidants preparation and seam that high doses of antioxidants administered before and after irradiation were even harmful. Comparing to

  1. Laying hens behave differently in artificially and naturally sourced ammoniated environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokharel, B B; Dos Santos, V M; Wood, D; Van Heyst, B; Harlander-Matauschek, A

    2017-12-01

    Laying hens are chronically exposed to high levels of ammonia (NH3), one of the most abundant aerial pollutants in poultry houses. Tests for aversion to NH3 in laying hens have used artificially sourced NH3/air mixtures (i.e., from a gas cylinder) showing that birds prefer fresh air to NH3. However, artificially sourced NH3/air mixtures may not accurately reflect barn air conditions, where manure emits a variety of gases. Herein, we investigated whether laying hens differentiate between artificially and naturally sourced NH3/air mixtures and how exposure to NH3 affects foraging and aversive behavior. A total of 20 laying hens was exposed to artificially sourced [A] (from an anhydrous NH3 cylinder) and naturally sourced [N] (from conspecific laying hen excreta) gas mixtures. Hens were exposed to A and N mixtures with NH3 concentrations of 25 and 45 ppm, as well as fresh air [FA]. During the experiment, all birds were exposed to each treatment 3 times using a custom-built polycarbonate chamber, containing a foraging area (containing raisins, mealworms, and feed mix) and a gas delivery system. All testing sessions were video recorded, analyzed with INTERACT® software, and subjected to a GLIMMIX procedure in SAS. Our results showed that the laying hens spent less time foraging overall (P hens were more likely to forage for a longer time (with fewer interruptions) in N than in A treatments (P hens also reacted with greater aversion towards treatment A compared to treatment N (P hens of our study preferred fresh to ammoniated air and that they behaved differently in artificially and naturally sourced NH3/air mixtures, possibly due to the presence of familiar stimuli from the excreta. These findings have implications for new developments in methodological approaches for behavioral testing and for recommendations regarding NH3 levels inside poultry barns. © 2017 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  2. Evaluating measurements of carbon dioxide emissions using a precision source--A natural gas burner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Rodney; Bundy, Matthew; Zong, Ruowen

    2015-07-01

    A natural gas burner has been used as a precise and accurate source for generating large quantities of carbon dioxide (CO2) to evaluate emissions measurements at near-industrial scale. Two methods for determining carbon dioxide emissions from stationary sources are considered here: predicting emissions based on fuel consumption measurements-predicted emissions measurements, and direct measurement of emissions quantities in the flue gas-direct emissions measurements. Uncertainty for the predicted emissions measurement was estimated at less than 1%. Uncertainty estimates for the direct emissions measurement of carbon dioxide were on the order of ±4%. The relative difference between the direct emissions measurements and the predicted emissions measurements was within the range of the measurement uncertainty, therefore demonstrating good agreement. The study demonstrates how independent methods are used to validate source emissions measurements, while also demonstrating how a fire research facility can be used as a precision test-bed to evaluate and improve carbon dioxide emissions measurements from stationary sources. Fossil-fuel-consuming stationary sources such as electric power plants and industrial facilities account for more than half of the CO2 emissions in the United States. Therefore, accurate emissions measurements from these sources are critical for evaluating efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. This study demonstrates how a surrogate for a stationary source, a fire research facility, can be used to evaluate the accuracy of measurements of CO2 emissions.

  3. Working Group 6: Health. 1. Radioprotection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segaert, O.

    1976-01-01

    The increasing development of nuclear energy needs the evaluation of risks associated with the use of radiation sources. Nuclear energy principles have therefore been defined and elaborated in order to limit the use of any radiation source as well as to reduce to a minimum the exposure either of workers or population to ionizing radiations and relative health hazards. Origin and extent of ionizing radiations and radioactive materials have been evaluated for electricity generating conventional and nuclear installations under normal functioning conditions as well as in case of an accident. More strict protective measures have been recommended for the production, utilization and storage of plutonium containing fuel elements as well as for the treatment of radioactive wastes. (G.C.)

  4. Radioprotection optimization in the electronuclear, industrial and medical domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schieber, C.; Abela, G.; Ammerich, M.; Balduyck, S.; Batalla, A.; Drouet, F.; Fracas, P.; Gauron, Ch.; Le Guen, B.; Lombard, J.; Mougnard, Ph.; Murith, Ch.; Rannou, A.; Rodde, S.; Selva, M.; Tranchant, Ph.; Schieber, C.; Solaire, T.; Le Tonqueze, Y.; Jolivet, P.; Chauveau, D.; Mathevet, L.; Juhel, T.; Mertz, L.; Bochud, F.O.; Desmaris, G.; Turquet de Beauregard, G.; Roy, C.; Delacroix, S.; Sevilla, A.; Rehel, J.L.; Bernhard, S.; Palut-Laurent, O.; Lochard, J.; Lebaron-Jacobs, L.; Wack, G.; Barange, K.; Delabre, H.

    2011-01-01

    This document gathers the slides of the available presentations given during these conference days. Thirty one presentations are assembled in the document and deal with: 1 - implementation of the ALARA principle in the nuclear, industrial and medical domains: status and challenges (C. Schieber); 2 - image quality and scanner irradiation: what ingredients to chose? (T. Solaire); 3 - radioprotection stakes and implementation of the ALARA approach during the IFMIF design (Y. Le Tonqueze); 4 - ALARA at the design stage of the EPR (P. Jolivet); 5 - alternative techniques to iridium 192 gamma-graphy for welds control: results and recommendations from the ALTER-X project (D. Chauveau); 6 - alternative techniques to ionizing radiations use in the medical domain: implementation of navigation strategies (L. Mathevet); 7 - justification of ionizing radiations use in non-medical imaging: overview of the French situation and perspectives status (S. Rodde); 8 - ISOE: task scheduling for radioprotection optimization in nuclear power plants (G. Abela); 9 - Practices and ALARA prospects among big nuclear operators (T. Juhel); 10 - experience feedback on the use of diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) in diagnostic imaging optimization (L. Mertz); 11 - DRLs: Swiss strategy and concept limits (F.O. Bochud); 12 - external dosimetry tools: the existing, the developing and the remaining problems (A. Rannou); 13 - is the optimization principle applicable to the aircraft personnel's exposure to cosmic radiation? (G. Desmaris); 14-15 - experience feedback of the ALARA approach concerning an operation with strong dosimetric stakes (P. Mougnard and N. Fontaine); 16 - optimization of reactor pool decontaminations ((P. Tranchant); 17 - radiopharmaceuticals transport - ALARA principle related stakes (G. Turquet de Beauregard); 18 - ALARA in vet radio-diagnosis activity: good practices guide (C. Roy); 19 - implementation of the ALARA approach at the Proton-therapy centre of Orsay's Curie Institute

  5. Radioprotection of targeted and bystander cells by methylproamine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burdak-Rothkamm, Susanne [Queen' s University Belfast, Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Belfast (United Kingdom); Oxford University Hospitals, Cellular Pathology, Oxford (United Kingdom); Smith, Andrea; Lobachevsky, Pavel; Martin, Roger [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Molecular Radiation Biology Laboratory, Melbourne (Australia); University of Melbourne, The Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, Melbourne (Australia); Prise, Kevin M. [Queen' s University Belfast, Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Belfast (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-23

    Radioprotective agents are of interest for application in radiotherapy for cancer and in public health medicine in the context of accidental radiation exposure. Methylproamine is the lead compound of a class of radioprotectors which act as DNA binding anti-oxidants, enabling the repair of transient radiation-induced oxidative DNA lesions. This study tested methylproamine for the radioprotection of both directly targeted and bystander cells. T98G glioma cells were treated with 15 μM methylproamine and exposed to {sup 137}Cs γ-ray/X-ray irradiation and He{sup 2+} microbeam irradiation. Radioprotection of directly targeted cells and bystander cells was measured by clonogenic survival or γH2AX assay. Radioprotection of directly targeted T98G cells by methylproamine was observed for {sup 137}Cs γ-rays and X-rays but not for He{sup 2+} charged particle irradiation. The effect of methylproamine on the bystander cell population was tested for both X-ray irradiation and He{sup 2+} ion microbeam irradiation. The X-ray bystander experiments were carried out by medium transfer from irradiated to non-irradiated cultures and three experimental designs were tested. Radioprotection was only observed when recipient cells were pretreated with the drug prior to exposure to the conditioned medium. In microbeam bystander experiments targeted and nontargeted cells were co-cultured with continuous methylproamine treatment during irradiation and postradiation incubation; radioprotection of bystander cells was observed. Methylproamine protected targeted cells from DNA damage caused by γ-ray or X-ray radiation but not He{sup 2+} ion radiation. Protection of bystander cells was independent of the type of radiation which the donor population received. (orig.) [German] Radioprotektive Agenzien sind sowohl in der Strahlentherapie von Krebserkrankungen als auch im Strahlenschutz im Zusammenhang mit akzidenteller Exposition von Bedeutung. Methylproamine ist die Leitsubstanz einer Klasse von

  6. OCO-2 Detection of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Variability over Natural and Anthropogenic Point-Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwandner, F. M.; Gunson, M. R.; Miller, C. E.; Carn, S. A.; Eldering, A.; Krings, T.; Verhulst, K. R.; Schimel, D.; Nguyen, H.; Crisp, D.; O'Dell, C.; Osterman, G. B.; Iraci, L. T.; Podolske, J. R.

    2017-12-01

    Natural and anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) to the atmosphere vary temporally and spatially at the 0.1-10 kilometer-scale. Plumes from regional and point-scale emission sources may be discernable from space within their spatial context but the characteristics of aging plumes may pose additional challenges to quantification and attribution. Space-borne measurements by NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2) expose distinct structures of atmospheric carbon dioxide on kilometer scales over known anthropogenic and natural point sources. Urban areas, including megacities, account for over 70% of anthropogenic CO2 emissions. In cities, CO2 emitted from dense clusters of mobile and stationary point sources may form persistent CO2 enhancements producing urban CO2 domes. OCO-2 measurements cross the Los Angeles basin several times a year consistently show enhancements in the column average CO2 dry air mole fraction, XCO2, with highest values over the urban core and decreasing through suburban areas to rural background values, with a seasonally variability of 4.4 to 6.1 ppm. For natural point sources, volcanoes may emit CO2 continuously but variably, at source strengths similar to fossil-fuel burning power plants. An OCO-2 transect passing directly downwind of the persistent isolated natural CO2 plume emanating from Yasur volcano (Vanuatu) produces a narrow strand of enhanced XCO2 values (ΔXCO2 3.4 ppm). Gaussian plume modeling of this plume is consistent with a 41.6 kt d-1 CO2 point source. Additional plume detections over Aoba and Ambrym volcanoes (Vanuatu) show similar results. This first quantitative space-borne volcanic CO2 plume flux estimate puts volcanic CO2 emissions into context: the largest continuous volcanic CO2 emitters on Earth are similar in source strength to a large coal fired power plant, but barely reach the lower end of the range of the 70 largest fossil-fuel burning power plants on Earth, which themselves are dwarfed by megacity

  7. Radioprotective action of 3-(imidazoline-2-alkyl)-5-methoxyindoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bitny-Szlachto, S.; Kwiek, S.; Piotrowska, H.; Serafin, B.; Wejroch-Matacz, K.

    1977-01-01

    Radioprotective action in mice of four 3-(imidazoline-2'-alkyl)-5-methoxyindoles was examined and compared with that of 3-(2'-aminoethyl)-5-hydroxyindole (serotonine). The imidazoline-2-methyl derivatives (S 3 , S 4 ), applied in doses of 50 μmole/kg 10 min prior to irrdiation were found to reduce mortality of mice with LD 50 DRF of 1.14-1.15, while serotonine displayed DRF of 1.45. The imidazoline-2-ethyl derivatives (S 7 , S 8 ) have turned out to be ineffective. (author)

  8. Morphology of local changes following intramuscular application of some radioprotectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resl, M.; Kuna, P.

    1985-01-01

    The dynamics is described of morphological changes following the intramuscular administration to unirradiated rats of Imuna physiological solution, Aqua pro inj. Biotika, gammaphos of domestic make dissolved in physiological solution or in injection water, cystamine either alone or in combination with mexamine dissolved in physiological solution. The least manifest local changes were found following the application of physiological solution alone, the most significant changes were found after the application of Aqua pro inj. Biotika alone. The comparison showed that the most suitable form of radioprotectives is gammaphos in physiological solution. (author)

  9. The Radioprotective Effects of Rhizomata Herbs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung Ho; Jo, Sung Kee; Kwon, Oh Deog

    2001-01-01

    We performed this study to determine the effect of Baizhu (Atractylodes japonica), Chuanxiong (Cnidium officinale), Shanyao (Discorea Japonica) and Shengma (Cimicifuga heracleifolia), as Oriental rhizomata herbs, on jejunal crypt survival, endogenous spleen colony formation and apoptosis in jejunal crypt cells of mice irradiated with high and low dose of γ-radiation. Shengma was effective in intestinal crypt survival(p<0.05). The frequency of radiation induced apoptosis was also reduced by pretreatment with Chuanxiong and Shengma(p<0.05). Although the mechanisms of this effect remain to be elucidated, these results indicated that Shengma might be a useful radioprotector, especially since it is a relatively nontoxic natural product

  10. The Radioprotective Effects of Rhizomata Herbs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Ho [Chonam National Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Jo, Sung Kee [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Oh Deog [Chonbuk National Univ., Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-03-15

    We performed this study to determine the effect of Baizhu (Atractylodes japonica), Chuanxiong (Cnidium officinale), Shanyao (Discorea Japonica) and Shengma (Cimicifuga heracleifolia), as Oriental rhizomata herbs, on jejunal crypt survival, endogenous spleen colony formation and apoptosis in jejunal crypt cells of mice irradiated with high and low dose of {gamma}-radiation. Shengma was effective in intestinal crypt survival(p<0.05). The frequency of radiation induced apoptosis was also reduced by pretreatment with Chuanxiong and Shengma(p<0.05). Although the mechanisms of this effect remain to be elucidated, these results indicated that Shengma might be a useful radioprotector, especially since it is a relatively nontoxic natural product.

  11. Seasonal and Spatial Variability of Anthropogenic and Natural Factors Influencing Groundwater Quality Based on Source Apportionment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xueru; Zuo, Rui; Meng, Li; Wang, Jinsheng; Teng, Yanguo; Liu, Xin; Chen, Minhua

    2018-02-06

    Globally, groundwater resources are being deteriorated by rapid social development. Thus, there is an urgent need to assess the combined impacts of natural and enhanced anthropogenic sources on groundwater chemistry. The aim of this study was to identify seasonal characteristics and spatial variations in anthropogenic and natural effects, to improve the understanding of major hydrogeochemical processes based on source apportionment. 34 groundwater points located in a riverside groundwater resource area in northeast China were sampled during the wet and dry seasons in 2015. Using principal component analysis and factor analysis, 4 principal components (PCs) were extracted from 16 groundwater parameters. Three of the PCs were water-rock interaction (PC₁), geogenic Fe and Mn (PC₂), and agricultural pollution (PC₃). A remarkable difference (PC₄) was organic pollution originating from negative anthropogenic effects during the wet season, and geogenic F enrichment during the dry season. Groundwater exploitation resulted in dramatic depression cone with higher hydraulic gradient around the water source area. It not only intensified dissolution of calcite, dolomite, gypsum, Fe, Mn and fluorine minerals, but also induced more surface water recharge for the water source area. The spatial distribution of the PCs also suggested the center of the study area was extremely vulnerable to contamination by Fe, Mn, COD, and F - .

  12. Radioprotection optimization in the electronuclear, industrial and medical domains; Optimisation de la radioprotection dans les domaines electronucleaire, industriel et medical

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schieber, C.; Abela, G.; Ammerich, M.; Balduyck, S.; Batalla, A.; Drouet, F.; Fracas, P.; Gauron, Ch.; Le Guen, B.; Lombard, J.; Mougnard, Ph.; Murith, Ch.; Rannou, A.; Rodde, S.; Selva, M.; Tranchant, Ph.; Schieber, C.; Solaire, T.; Le Tonqueze, Y.; Jolivet, P.; Chauveau, D.; Mathevet, L.; Juhel, T.; Mertz, L.; Bochud, F.O.; Desmaris, G.; Turquet de Beauregard, G.; Roy, C.; Delacroix, S.; Sevilla, A.; Rehel, J.L.; Bernhard, S.; Palut-Laurent, O.; Lochard, J.; Lebaron-Jacobs, L.; Wack, G.; Barange, K.; Delabre, H.

    2011-07-01

    This document gathers the slides of the available presentations given during these conference days. Thirty one presentations are assembled in the document and deal with: 1 - implementation of the ALARA principle in the nuclear, industrial and medical domains: status and challenges (C. Schieber); 2 - image quality and scanner irradiation: what ingredients to chose? (T. Solaire); 3 - radioprotection stakes and implementation of the ALARA approach during the IFMIF design (Y. Le Tonqueze); 4 - ALARA at the design stage of the EPR (P. Jolivet); 5 - alternative techniques to iridium 192 gamma-graphy for welds control: results and recommendations from the ALTER-X project (D. Chauveau); 6 - alternative techniques to ionizing radiations use in the medical domain: implementation of navigation strategies (L. Mathevet); 7 - justification of ionizing radiations use in non-medical imaging: overview of the French situation and perspectives status (S. Rodde); 8 - ISOE: task scheduling for radioprotection optimization in nuclear power plants (G. Abela); 9 - Practices and ALARA prospects among big nuclear operators (T. Juhel); 10 - experience feedback on the use of diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) in diagnostic imaging optimization (L. Mertz); 11 - DRLs: Swiss strategy and concept limits (F.O. Bochud); 12 - external dosimetry tools: the existing, the developing and the remaining problems (A. Rannou); 13 - is the optimization principle applicable to the aircraft personnel's exposure to cosmic radiation? (G. Desmaris); 14-15 - experience feedback of the ALARA approach concerning an operation with strong dosimetric stakes (P. Mougnard and N. Fontaine); 16 - optimization of reactor pool decontaminations ((P. Tranchant); 17 - radiopharmaceuticals transport - ALARA principle related stakes (G. Turquet de Beauregard); 18 - ALARA in vet radio-diagnosis activity: good practices guide (C. Roy); 19 - implementation of the ALARA approach at the Proton-therapy centre of Orsay's Curie

  13. Benzene observations and source appointment in a region of oil and natural gas development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliday, Hannah Selene

    source, a diesel/compressed natural gas emissions source, a fugitive emissions source, and two sources that have the characteristics of a mix of fresh vehicle emissions and condensate fugitive emissions. 70% of the benzene measured at PAO on the PTR-QMS is attributed to fugitive emissions, primarily located to the SW of PAO. Comparing the PMF source attribution to source calculations done with a source array configured from the literature returns a contradictory result, with the expected sources indicting that aged vehicle emissions are the primary benzene source. However, analysis of the contradictory result indicates that the toluene to benzene ratio measured for PAO is much lower than the literature values, suggesting that the O&NG source emissions have a lower ratio of toluene to benzene than anticipated based on studies of other regions. Finally, we propose and investigate an alternative form of the source receptor model using a constrained optimization. Poor results of the proposed method are described with tests on a synthetic testing dataset, and further testing with the observation data from PAO indicate that the proposed method is not able to converge the best global solution to the system.

  14. Technological Evolution on Computed Tomography and Radioprotection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leite, Bruno Barros; Ribeiro, Nuno Carrilho

    2006-01-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) has been available since the 70s and has experienced a dramatic technical evolution. Multi-detector technology is our current standard, offering capabilities unthinkable only a decade ago. Yet, we must nor forget the ionizing nature of CT's scanning energy (X-rays). It represents the most important cause of medical-associated radiation exposure to the general public, with a trend to increase. It is compulsory to intervene with the objective of dose reduction, following ALARA policies. Currently there are some technical advances that allow dose reduction, without sacrificing diagnostic image capabilities. However, human intervention is also essential. We must keep investment on education so that CT exams are don when they are really useful in clinical decision. Alternative techniques should also be considered. Image quality must not be searched disregarding the biological effects of radiation. Generally, it is possible to obtain clinically acceptable images with lower dose protocols. (author)

  15. The Reduction of Vertical Interchannel Crosstalk: The Analysis of Localisation Thresholds for Natural Sound Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rory Wallis

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In subjective listening tests, natural sound sources were presented to subjects as vertically-oriented phantom images from two layers of loudspeakers, ‘height’ and ‘main’. Subjects were required to reduce the amplitude of the height layer until the position of the resultant sound source matched that of the same source presented from the main layer only (the localisation threshold. Delays of 0, 1 and 10 ms were applied to the height layer with respect to the main, with vertical stereophonic and quadraphonic conditions being tested. The results of the study showed that the localisation thresholds obtained were not significantly affected by sound source or presentation method. Instead, the only variable whose effect was significant was interchannel time difference (ICTD. For ICTD of 0 ms, the median threshold was −9.5 dB, which was significantly lower than the −7 dB found for both 1 and 10 ms. The results of the study have implications both for the recording of sound sources for three-dimensional (3D audio reproduction formats and also for the rendering of 3D images.

  16. Essential and non-essential elements in natural vegetation in southern Norway: Contribution from different sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordløkken, Marit, E-mail: marit.nordlokken@ntnu.no; Berg, Torunn; Flaten, Trond Peder; Steinnes, Eiliv

    2015-01-01

    Concentrations of essential and non-essential elements in five widespread species of natural boreal vegetation were studied with respect to seasonal variation and contribution from different sources. The plant species included in the study were Betula pubescens, Sorbus aucuparia, Vaccinium myrtillus, Vaccinium uliginosum, Calluna vulgaris and Deschampsia flexuosa. Concentrations of elements essential to plants remained essentially constant or decreased slightly throughout the growing season. Concentrations of most non-essential elements increased or tended to increase on a dry mass basis from June to July as well as from July to September. The increasing trend for these elements was observed for all species except C. vulgaris. Principal component analysis (PCA) of the material indicated a common source for many of the non-essential elements; Sc, Ti, V, Ga, As, Y, Sb, lanthanides, Pb, Bi, and U, i.e. both elements presumably of geogenic origin and elements associated with trans-boundary air pollution. Uptake by plant roots appeared to be the main source of nutrient elements as well as some non-essential elements. - Highlights: • Concentrations of elements in different plant species were studied. • Changes in concentrations during a growing season were identified. • PCA indicated a common source for many of the non-essential elements. • Uptake by roots appeared to be the plant’s main source of nutrient elements.

  17. Separating contributions from natural and anthropogenic sources in atmospheric methane from the Black Sea region, Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuna, Stela; Pendall, Elise; Miller, John B.; Tans, Pieter P.; Dlugokencky, Ed; White, James W.C.

    2008-01-01

    The Danube Delta-Black Sea region of Romania is an important wetland, and this preliminary study evaluates the significance of this region as a source of atmospheric CH 4 . Measurements of the mixing ratio and δ 13 C in CH 4 are reported from air and water samples collected at eight sites in the Danube Delta. High mixing ratios of CH 4 were found in air (2500-14,000 ppb) and dissolved in water samples (∼1-10 μmol L -1 ), demonstrating that the Danube Delta is an important natural source of CH 4 . The intercepts on Keeling plots of about -62 per mille show that the main source of CH 4 in this region is microbial, probably resulting primarily from acetate fermentation. Atmospheric CH 4 and CO data from the NOAA/ESRL (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Earth System Research Laboratory) were used to make a preliminary estimate of biogenic CH 4 at the Black Sea sampling site at Constanta (BSC). These data were used to calculate ratios of CH 4 /CO in air samples, and using an assumed CH 4 /CO anthropogenic emissions ratio of 0.6, fossil fuel emissions at BSC were estimated. Biogenic CH 4 emissions were then estimated by a simple mass balance approach. Keeling plots of well-mixed air from the BSC site suggested a stronger wetland source in summer and a stronger fossil fuel source in winter

  18. Radioactivity in papers: the concentration and source of naturally occurring radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radioactivities of naturally occurring radionuclides ( 226 Ra, 228 Ra, 228 Th and 40 K) in papers such as magazines, newspapers, and copying papers produced in Japan were determined by gamma-ray spectrometry to obtain information on radioactivity level of papers. The X-ray diffraction measurement of the samples was also carried out to elucidate the source of radionuclides contained in them. The average 226 Ra, 228 Ra, 228 Th, and 40 K contents of pocket-sized books were 6.4, 21.5, 23.7, and 18.8 Bq kg -1 , respectively, and those of other kinds of samples were near to or less than the values. The 228 Th content was generally somewhat higher than the 228 Ra content. Possibly 228 Ra was leached from the raw materials of the papers to water during their production in preference to 228 Th. The concentrations of the naturally occurring radionuclides were correlated to each other. The X-ray diffraction study showed that kaolinite, talc, and calcite were contained in the papers. The kaolinite content of the samples was correlated to the concentrations of the naturally occurring radionuclides, indicating that the naturally occurring radionuclides in the paper samples were mainly brought with kaolinite used as filler or coating pigment in the papers. The regression analysis of the data showed that the natural radioactivity content of filler kaolinite was higher than that of pigment kaolinite. (author)

  19. Hydrogen as a New Class of Radioprotective Agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Liren; Shen, Jianliang; Chuai, Yunhai; Cai, Jianming

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that most of the ionizing radiation-induced damage is caused by hydroxyl radicals (·OH) follows radiolysis of H2O. Molecular hydrogen (H2) has antioxidant activities by selectively reducing ·OH and peroxynitrite(ONOO-). We firstly hypothesized and demonstrated the radioprotective effect of H2 in vitro and in vivo, which was also repeated on different experimental animal models by different departments. A randomized, placebo-controlled study showed that consumption of hydrogen-rich water reduces the biological reaction to radiation-induced oxidative stress without compromising anti-tumor effects. These encouraging results suggested that H2 represents a potentially novel preventative strategy for radiation-induced oxidative injuries. H2 is explosive. Therefore, administration of hydrogen-rich solution (physiological saline/pure water/other solutions saturated with H2) may be more practical in daily life and more suitable for daily consumption. This review focuses on major scientific and clinical advances of hydrogen-rich solution/H2 as a new class of radioprotective agent. PMID:24155664

  20. The radioprotective potential of 3,5,4'-trihydroxystilbene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clemente, Mary Judith Q.; Gomez, Marlyn O.

    1999-03-01

    The radioprotective potential of 3,5,4'trihydroxystilbene or resveratrol, a compound abundant in grapes, was investigated using the micronucleus test. Gamma radiation (6 Gy) was used to induce micronucleus formation in 12-week old Swiss-Webster mice. Five groups with five mice each were used. Three groups were given corresponding treatments (low, normal, high doses of reservatrol) via oral gavage for one week. The negative control group was not given any radiation nor any compound while the positive control group was exposed to radiation but was not given any compound. The mean micronucleus frequencies arranged from highest to lowest are as follows: low dose, positive control, normal dose, high dose and negative control. Using the analysis of variance-complete random design followed by the Duncan multiple range test, it was proven that resveratrol was able to inhibit micronucleus formation in polychromatic erythrocytes of 12-week old Swiss-Webster mice at the normal (60 micrograms) and high (120 micrograms) concentrations assigned. This suggests that its radioprotective potential may follow a dose-dependent pattern. (Author)

  1. Biomedical laboratories: architecture and radioprotection principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapa, Renata

    2005-01-01

    In institutions where biological research are made and some technologies make use of radioisotope, the radiation protection is an issue of biosecurity for conceptual reasons. In the process of architectural design of Biomedical Laboratories, engineering and architecture reveal interfaces with other areas of knowledge and specific concepts. Exploring the role of architectural design in favor of personal and environmental protection in biological containment laboratories that handle non-sealed sources in research, the work discusses the triad that compose the principle of containment in health environments: best practices, protective equipment, physical facilities, with greater emphasis on the latter component. The shortcomings of the design process are reflected in construction and in use-operation and maintenance of these buildings, with direct consequences on the occupational health and safety, environmental and credibility of work processes. In this context, the importance of adoption of alternatives to improve the design process is confirmed, taking into account the early consideration of several variables involved and providing subsidies to the related laboratories . The research, conducted at FIOCRUZ - a Brazilian health institution, developed from the analysis of the participants in the architectural project, aiming at the formulation of design guidelines which could contribute to the rationalisation of this kind of building construction

  2. Role of peroxide in the radioprotective action of thiols in E. coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naeslund, M.; Fedorcsak, I.; Ehrenberg, L.

    1976-01-01

    The radioprotective action of cysteamine (MEA) and cysteine in E. coli is due partly to autoxidatively generated hydrogen peroxide (H 2 0 2 ). This effect, which predominates at low concentrations of the thiols (1-2 mM in neutral solution), is regularly correlated with a metabolic block, measured as inhibition of RNA synthesis. In experiments with E. coli 15 (autotroph) under exponential growth in complete medium, the role of H 2 0 2 was demonstrated by (a) a decreased radioprotective action if catalase was present in the medium; (b) a radioprotective action if H 2 0 2 added to the medium; (c) a decreased protective action in the absence of catalytically active copper; and (d) oxygen being required for the radioprotective action to develop. At higher concentrations of the thiols, their radioprotective action, and the accompanying metabolic block, are less dependent on H 2 0 2 generation and presumably due to a different mechanism. The radioprotective action of H 2 0 2 is possibly related to the radioprotective action in mammals of catalase inhibitors. (author)

  3. Macroalgal Endophytes from the Atlantic Coast of Canada: A Potential Source of Antibiotic Natural Products?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J. Flewelling

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available As the need for new and more effective antibiotics increases, untapped sources of biodiversity are being explored in an effort to provide lead structures for drug discovery. Endophytic fungi from marine macroalgae have been identified as a potential source of biologically active natural products, although data to support this is limited. To assess the antibiotic potential of temperate macroalgal endophytes we isolated endophytic fungi from algae collected in the Bay of Fundy, Canada and screened fungal extracts for the presence of antimicrobial compounds. A total of 79 endophytes were isolated from 7 species of red, 4 species of brown, and 3 species of green algae. Twenty of the endophytes were identified to the genus or species level, with the remaining isolates designated codes according to their morphology. Bioactivity screening assays performed on extracts of the fermentation broths and mycelia of the isolates revealed that 43 endophytes exhibited antibacterial activity, with 32 displaying antifungal activity. Endophytic fungi from Bay of Fundy macroalgae therefore represent a significant source of antibiotic natural products and warrant further detailed investigation.

  4. Natural and anthropogenic variations in methane sources during the past two millennia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapart, C. J.; Monteil, G.; Prokopiou, M.; Vandewal, R.; Kaplan, J. O.; Sperlich, P.; Krumhardt, K.; van der Veen, C.; Houweling, S.; Krol, M. C.; Blunier, T.; Sowers, T. A.; Martinerie, P.; Witrant, E.; Dahl-Jensen, D.; Roeckmann, T.

    2012-12-01

    Methane (CH4) is an important greenhouse gas that is emitted from multiple natural and anthropogenic sources. Atmospheric levels of CH4 have varied on various timescales in the past, but in many cases the causes of these variations are not understood. Analysis of the isotopic composition of CH4 provides evidence for the environmental drivers of variations in CH4 atmospheric abundance, because different sources and sinks affect the isotopic composition of CH4 specifically. Our data from air trapped in the NEEM and EUROCORE Greenland ice cores show that the carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) of CH4 underwent pronounced centennial-scale variations between 100 BC and 1600 AD. Two-box model calculations suggest that the centennial-scale variations in isotope ratios are due to changes in both pyrogenic and biogenic sources. These changes are correlated with both natural climate variability including the Medieval Climate Anomaly and the Little Ice Age and with changes in human population, land-use and with the decline of both the Roman Empire and the Han dynasty and the Medieval period. Our findings suggest that between 100 BC and 1600 AD human activities may have been responsible for about 20-30 per cent of the total pyrogenic methane emissions and that they have therefore contributed to variations in methane emissions long before the onset of the industrial revolution.

  5. Anthropogenic and natural CO2 emission sources in an arid urban environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koerner, B; Klopatek, J

    2002-01-01

    Recent research has shown the Phoenix, AZ metropolitan region to be characterized by a CO2 dome that peaks near the urban center. The CO2 levels, 50% greater than the surrounding non-urban areas, have been attributed to anthropogenic sources and the physical geography of the area. We quantified sources of CO2 emissions across the metropolitan region. Anthropogenic CO2 emission data were obtained from a variety of government and NGO sources. Soil CO2 efflux from the dominant land-use types was measured over the year. Humans and automobile activity produced more than 80% input of CO2 into the urban environment. Soil CO2 efflux from the natural desert ecosystems showed minimal emissions during hot and dry periods, but responded rapidly to moisture. Conversely, human maintained vegetation types (e.g. golf courses, lawns, irrigated agriculture) have greater efflux and are both temperature and soil moisture dependent. Landfills exhibited the most consistent rates, but were temperature and moisture independent. We estimate the annual CO2 released from the predominant land-use types in the Phoenix region and present a graphical portrayal of soil CO2 emissions and the total natural and anthropogenic CO2 emissions in the metropolitan region using a GIS-based approach. The results presented here do not mimic the spatial pattern shown in previous studies. Only, with sophisticated mixing models will we be able to address the total effect of urbanization on CO2 levels and the contribution to regional patterns.

  6. The role of remediation, natural alkalinity sources and physical stream parameters in stream recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Natalie A; DeRose, Lisa; Korenowsky, Rebekah; Bowman, Jennifer R; Lopez, Dina; Johnson, Kelly; Rankin, Edward

    2013-10-15

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) negatively impacts not only stream chemistry, but also aquatic biology. The ultimate goal of AMD treatment is restoration of the biological community, but that goal is rarely explicit in treatment system design. Hewett Fork in Raccoon Creek Watershed, Ohio, has been impacted by historic coal mining and has been treated with a calcium oxide doser in the headwaters of the watershed since 2004. All of the acidic inputs are isolated to a 1.5 km stretch of stream in the headwaters of the Hewett Fork watershed. The macroinvertebrate and fish communities have begun to recover and it is possible to distinguish three zones downstream of the doser: an impaired zone, a transition zone and a recovered zone. Alkalinity from both the doser and natural sources and physical stream parameters play a role in stream restoration. In Hewett Fork, natural alkaline additions downstream are higher than those from the doser. Both, alkaline additions and stream velocity drive sediment and metal deposition. Metal deposition occurs in several patterns; aluminum tends to deposit in regions of low stream velocity, while iron tends to deposit once sufficient alkalinity is added to the system downstream of mining inputs. The majority of metal deposition occurs upstream of the recovered zone. Both the physical stream parameters and natural alkalinity sources influence biological recovery in treated AMD streams and should be considered in remediation plans. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Investigating effectiveness of activated carbons of natural sources on various supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faisal, Md. Shahnewaz Sabit; Rahman, Muhammad M.; Asmatulu, Ramazan

    2016-04-01

    Activated carbon can be produced from natural sources, such as pistachio and acorn shells, which can be an inexpensive and sustainable sources of natural wastes for the energy storage devices, such as supercapacitors. The carbonaceous materials used in this study were carbonized at the temperatures of 700°C and 900°C after the stabilization process at 240°C for two hours. These shells showed approximately 60% carbon yield. Carbonized nutshells were chemically activated using1wt% potassium hydroxide (KOH). Activated carbon powders with polyvinylidene fluoride (PVdF) were used to construct carbon electrodes. A 1M of tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate (TEABF4) and propylene carbonate (PC) were used as electrolytes. Electrochemical techniques, such as cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were used for the characterization of the supercapacitors. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to inspect the surface texture of the activated carbons. Activated pistachio shells carbonized at 700°C showed more porous surface texture than those carbonized at 900°C. Effects of the carbonization temperatures were studied for their electrochemical characteristics. The shells carbonized at 700°C showed better electrochemical characteristics compared to those carbonized at 900°C. The test results provided about 27,083 μF/g specific capacitance at a scan rate of 10mV/s. This study showed promising results for using these activated carbons produced from the natural wastes for supercapacitor applications.

  8. Source tracing of natural organic matter bound mercury in boreal forest runoff with mercury stable isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiskra, Martin; Wiederhold, Jan G; Skyllberg, Ulf; Kronberg, Rose-Marie; Kretzschmar, Ruben

    2017-10-18

    Terrestrial runoff represents a major source of mercury (Hg) to aquatic ecosystems. In boreal forest catchments, such as the one in northern Sweden studied here, mercury bound to natural organic matter (NOM) represents a large fraction of mercury in the runoff. We present a method to measure Hg stable isotope signatures of colloidal Hg, mainly complexed by high molecular weight or colloidal natural organic matter (NOM) in natural waters based on pre-enrichment by ultrafiltration, followed by freeze-drying and combustion. We report that Hg associated with high molecular weight NOM in the boreal forest runoff has very similar Hg isotope signatures as compared to the organic soil horizons of the catchment area. The mass-independent fractionation (MIF) signatures (Δ 199 Hg and Δ 200 Hg) measured in soils and runoff were in agreement with typical values reported for atmospheric gaseous elemental mercury (Hg 0 ) and distinctly different from reported Hg isotope signatures in precipitation. We therefore suggest that most Hg in the boreal terrestrial ecosystem originated from the deposition of Hg 0 through foliar uptake rather than precipitation. Using a mixing model we calculated the contribution of soil horizons to the Hg in the runoff. At moderate to high flow runoff conditions, that prevailed during sampling, the uppermost part of the organic horizon (Oe/He) contributed 50-70% of the Hg in the runoff, while the underlying more humified organic Oa/Ha and the mineral soil horizons displayed a lower mobility of Hg. The good agreement of the Hg isotope results with other source tracing approaches using radiocarbon signatures and Hg : C ratios provides additional support for the strong coupling between Hg and NOM. The exploratory results from this study illustrate the potential of Hg stable isotopes to trace the source of Hg from atmospheric deposition through the terrestrial ecosystem to soil runoff, and provide a basis for more in-depth studies investigating the

  9. Binary PVA bio-nanocomposites containing cellulose nanocrystals extracted from different natural sources: part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortunati, E; Puglia, D; Luzi, F; Santulli, C; Kenny, J M; Torre, L

    2013-09-12

    PVA bio-nanocomposites reinforced with cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) extracted from commercial microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) and from two types of natural fibres, Phormium tenax and Flax of the Belinka variety, were produced by solvent casting in water. Morphological, thermal, mechanical and transparency properties were studied while the respective efficiency of the extraction process of CNC from the three sources was evaluated. The effect of CNC types and content on PVA properties and water absorption capacity were also evaluated. Natural fibres offered higher levels of extraction efficiency when compared with MCC hydrolysis yield. Thermal analysis proved that CNC promotes the crystallization of the PVA matrix, while improving its plastic response. It was also clarified that all PVA/CNC systems remain transparent due to CNC dispersion at the nanoscale, while being all saturated after the first 18-24h of water absorption. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Design optimization of a polygeneration plant fuelled by natural gas and renewable energy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubio-Maya, Carlos; Uche-Marcuello, Javier; Martinez-Gracia, Amaya; Bayod-Rujula, Angel A.

    2011-01-01

    A new and systematic procedure to select and size a polygeneration plant fuelled by natural gas, solar energy and gasified biomass is presented in this paper. The proposed procedure is based on the superstructure definition, containing a long list of possible configurations for a polygeneration plant simultaneously producing electricity, heat, cold and fresh water. Based on that superstructure, a mathematical programming model was developed and applied to a Spanish tourist resort. Three key aspects were optimized in the mathematical programming problem: energy savings, greenhouse gases (GHG) emission reduction and economic feasibility. The results show, firstly, that the simultaneous production of electricity, heat, cold and fresh water is reliable upon the established assumptions. Secondly, that today higher economic profitability is yet achieved with only natural gas-based technologies, although higher energy savings and GHG reduction are obtained through the gradual increase of renewable energy sources.

  11. Isolation and identification of Acanthamoeba species from natural water sources in the northeastern part of Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thammaratana, Thani; Laummaunwai, Porntip; Boonmars, Thidarut

    2016-04-01

    Acanthamoeba are found in the environment, particularly in water, all over the world. The genus is currently classified into 20 different genotypes, T1-T20. In this study, 63 natural water samples from 11 provinces in northeast Thailand were collected and cultured on non-nutrient agar plates. Positive samples by culture were subsequently analyzed by molecular methods. The identification of Acanthamoeba was based on morphological features and molecular techniques using PCR and DNA sequencing. The results showed that 10 samples out of 63 were positive (15.9 %). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that seven samples were T4, one sample was similar to T3, and the other two samples were similar to T5. This is the first report demonstrating the contamination of Acanthamoeba species in natural water sources in northeast Thailand.

  12. Non destructive mass analysis of natural uranium by the pulsed source technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coelho, P.R.P.; Holland, L.

    1982-07-01

    Results of non destructive mass analysis of natural uranium by the pulsed source technique, are presented. Fissions are produced by irradiating the test sample with pulses of 14 MeV neutrons and the uranium mass is calculated on a relative scale from the measured emission of delayed neutrons. Individual measurements were normalized against the integral counts of a scintilation detector measuring the 14 MeV source neutron output. Delayed neutrons were measured using a specially constructed slab detector operated in antisynchronism with the fast pulsed neutron source. The 14 MeV neutrons were produced via the T(d,n) 4 He reaction using a PN-400 Van de Graaff accelarator operated at 200 kV in the pulsed source mode. Three types of sample were analysed, namely: discs of metalic uranium, pellets of sinterred uranium oxide and plates of uranium aluminium alloy sandwiched between aluminium. These plates simulated those of Material Testing Reactor fuel elements. Results of measurements were reproducible to within an overall error of 1.6 to 3.9%; the error of a specific measurement depending on the shape, size and mass of the sample. (Author) [pt

  13. MICROBIOLOGICAL STUDIES RECQUIRED FOR A SCIENTIFIC MANAGEMENT OF THE NATURAL MINERAL WATER SOURCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANA DESPINA IONESCU

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents some of the results obtained concerning the discovery,characterization, screening and management of some still unknown or not yet fullycharacterized natural sources of mineral waters, in order to render themeconomically profitable and to contribute to the public health development.Following some empiric, local observations upon the qualities they have in thetreatment of different maladies, a set of physical, hydrological, chemical andmicrobiological analyses was established, in order to substantiate scientifically theirtherapeutic potential. Moreover, the authors have selected some areas situated inthe neighborhood of the old (some of them already closed salt mines.

  14. Biosynthesis, natural sources, dietary intake, pharmacokinetic properties, and biological activities of hydroxycinnamic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Seedi, Hesham R; El-Said, Asmaa M A; Khalifa, Shaden A M; Göransson, Ulf; Bohlin, Lars; Borg-Karlson, Anna-Karin; Verpoorte, Rob

    2012-11-07

    Hydroxycinnamic acids are the most widely distributed phenolic acids in plants. Broadly speaking, they can be defined as compounds derived from cinnamic acid. They are present at high concentrations in many food products, including fruits, vegetables, tea, cocoa, and wine. A diet rich in hydroxycinnamic acids is thought to be associated with beneficial health effects such as a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease. The impact of hydroxycinnamic acids on health depends on their intake and pharmacokinetic properties. This review discusses their chemistry, biosynthesis, natural sources, dietary intake, and pharmacokinetic properties.

  15. MICROBIOLOGICAL STUDIES RECQUIRED FOR A SCIENTIFIC MANAGEMENT OF THE NATURAL MINERAL WATER SOURCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IONESCU ANA DESPINA

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents some of the results obtained concerning the discovery,characterization, screening and management of some still unknown or not yet fullycharacterized natural sources of mineral waters, in order to render themeconomically profitable and to contribute to the public health development.Following some empiric, local observations upon the qualities they have in thetreatment of different maladies, a set of physical, hydrological, chemical andmicrobiological analyses was established, in order to substantiate scientifically theirtherapeutic potential. Moreover, the authors have selected some areas situated inthe neighborhood of the old (some of them already closed salt mines.

  16. Discussion on the source survey method in a natural evaporation pond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai Xiaoshu; Fan Chengrong; Fu Yunshan

    2014-01-01

    A natural evaporation pond intended to be decommissioned. The survey of the pond focused on investigating radioactive contamination distribution and estimating the total amount of deposits in the pond, in order to provide support for subsequent decommissioning activities. Based on the source survey in the pond, this paper introduced how to implement radiation measurements and sampling (such as water and sediment) in the water. The movable work platform was built on the pond to facilitate sampling and measurement. In addition, a sludge sampler had been designed so as to accurately determine the amount of sampling and its depth. This paper also described the distribution of sampling points. (authors)

  17. Natural circulation analysis for the advanced neutron source reactor refueling process 11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tucker, R.F.; Dasardhi, S.; Elkassabgi, Y. [Texas A& M Univ., Kingsville, TX (United States); Yoder, G.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-09-01

    During the refueling process of the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor (ANSR), the spent fuel elements must be moved from the primary coolant loop (containing D{sub 2}O), through a heavy water pool, and finally into a light water spent fuel storage area. The present refueling scheme utilizes remote refueling equipment to move the spent fuel elements through a D{sub 2}O filled stack and tunnel into a temporary storage canal. A transfer lock is used to move the spent fuel elements from the D{sub 2}O-filled interim storage canal to a light water pool. Each spent fuel element must be cooled during this process, using either natural circulation or forced convection. This paper presents a summary of the numerical techniques used to analyze natural circulation cooling of the ANSR fuel elements as well as selected results of the calculations. Details of the analysis indicate that coolant velocities below 10 cm/s exist in the coolant channels under single phase natural circulation conditions. Also, boiling does not occur within the channels if power levels are below a few hundred kW when the core transitions to natural circulation conditions.

  18. Experience of the Argentine Radioprotection Society in training in radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bomben, A.M.

    2006-01-01

    From its creation in 1967, the Argentine Radioprotection Society (SAR) has as basic purpose promoting all the aspects related with the radiological protection and the nuclear safety. Due to the great increment in the use of radioactive sources in diverse areas, soon it was evident for the SAR the importance and necessity to promote the knowledge of the radioprotection approaches between the users of radioactive sources and ionizing radiations in all its application fields, be these industrial, academic or doctors. From the year 2000, the SAR comes organizing in regular and periodical form basic and specialized courses about radiological safety of radioactive sources for industrial use and profile of oil wells, among others. In this work, the characteristics of the different dictated courses are described whose programs have been developed keeping in mind the requirements of the competent authorities of Argentina. Also, statistical information on the dictated courses and its participants is presented. The number of dictated courses was incremented from 6 (year 2000) up to 16 (year 2005), being also increased significantly the number of participants for course. The dictated courses are theoretical-practical, with a duration average of 20 hs. The educational body is constituted by specialists in the different topics with recognized experience. Its given to the participants notes and support material, as well as copies of the material presented to develop the course. When concluding the courses, its deliver to the participants certifies of attendance and/or approval, as it corresponds. In their headquarters the SAR has didactic facilities and specific equipment for the dictation of the courses. Also accounts with the easiness of dictating those courses outside of their headquarters. This is particularly advantageous for companies or organizations that are seated in points far from the main cities and they should qualify in radiological safety to the personnel but, by

  19. Proceedings of 5. French speaking scientific days on calculation codes for radioprotection, radio-physics and dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon-Cornu, Marie; Mourlon, Christophe; Bordy, J.M.; Daures, J.; Dusiac, D.; Moignau, F.; Gouriou, J.; Million, M.; Moreno, B.; Chabert, I.; Lazaro, D.; Barat, E.; Dautremer, T.; Montagu, T.; Agelou, M.; De Carlan, L.; Patin, D.; Le Loirec, C.; Dupuis, P.; Gassa, F.; Guerin, L.; Batalla, A.; Leni, Pierre-Emmanuel; Laurent, Remy; Gschwind, Regine; Makovicka, Libor; Henriet, Julien; Salomon, Michel; Vivier, Alain; Lopez, Gerald; Dossat, C.; Pourrouquet, P.; Thomas, J.C.; Sarie, I.; Peyrard, P.F.; Chatry, N.; Lavielle, D.; Loze, R.; Brun, E.; Damian, F.; Diop, C.; Dumonteil, E.; Hugot, F.X.; Jouanne, C.; Lee, Y.K.; Malvagi, F.; Mazzolo, A.; Petit, O.; Trama, J.C.; Visonneau, T.; Zoia, A.; Courageot, Estelle; Gaillard-Lecanu, Emmanuelle; Kutschera, Reinald; Le Meur, Gaelle; Uzio, Fabien; De Conto, Celine; Gschwind, Regine; Makovicka, Libor; Farah, Jad; Martinetti, Florent; Sayah, Rima; Donadille, Laurent; Herault, Joel; Delacroix, Sabine; Nauraye, Catherine; Lee, Choonsik; Bolch, Wesley; Clairand, Isabelle; Horodynski, Jean-Michel; Pauwels, Nicolas; Robert, Pierre; VOLLAIRE, Joachim; Nicoletti, C.; Kitsos, S.; Tardy, M.; Marchaud, G.; Stankovskiy, Alexey; Van Den Eynde, Gert; Fiorito, Luca; Malambu, Edouard; Dreuil, Serge; Mougeot, X.; Be, M.M.; Bisch, C.; Villagrasa, C.; Dos Santos, M.; Clairand, I.; Karamitros, M.; Incerti, S.; Petitguillaume, Alice; Franck, Didier; Desbree, Aurelie; Bernardini, Michela; Labriolle-Vaylet, Claire de; Gnesin, Silvano; Leadermann, Jean-Pascal; Paterne, Loic; Bochud, Francois O.; Verdun, Francis R.; Baechler, Sebastien; Prior, John O.; Thomassin, Alain; Arial, Emmanuelle; Laget, Michael; Masse, Veronique; Saldarriaga Vargas, Clarita; Struelens, Lara; Vanhavere, Filip; Perier, Aurelien; Courageot, Estelle; Gaillard-Lecanu, Emmanuelle; Le-Meur, Gaelle; Monier, Catherine; Thers, Dominique; Le-Guen, Bernard; Blond, Serge; Cordier, Gerard; Le Roy, Maiwenn; De Carlan, Loic; Bordy, Jean-Marc; Caccia, Barbara; Andenna, Claudio; Charimadurai, Arun; Selvam, T Palani; Czarnecki, Damian; Zink, Klemens; Gschwind, Regine; Martin, Eric; Huot, Nicolas; Zoubair, Mariam; El Bardouni, Tarek; Lazaro, Delphine; Barat, Eric; Dautremer, Thomas; Montagu, Thierry; Chabert, Isabelle; Guerin, Lucie; Batalla, Alain; Moignier, C.; Huet, C.; Bassinet, C.; Baumann, M.; Barraux, V.; Sebe-Mercier, K.; Loiseau, C.; Batalla, A.; Makovicka, L.; Desnoyers, Yvon; Juhel, Gabriel; Mattera, Christophe; Tempier, Maryline

    2014-03-01

    These scientific days were organised by the 'technical protection' Section of the French Society of Radiation Protection (SFRP) in cooperation with the French society of medical physicists (SFPM), the Swiss Romandie association of radioprotection (ARRAD) and the associated laboratories of radio-physics and dosimetry (LARD). The objective of these days was to review the existing calculation codes used in radiation transport, source estimation and dose management, and to identify some future prospects. This document brings together the available presentations (slides) together with their corresponding abstracts (in French) and dealing with: 1 - Presentation of the conference days (L. De Carlan); 2 - Simulating radionuclide transfers in the environment: what calculation codes and for what? (C. Mourlon); 3 - Contribution of Monte-Carlo calculation to the theoretical foundation analysis of calibration procedures and dosemeters design for radioprotection photon dosimetry (J.M. Bordy); 4 - Use of calculation codes in R and D for the development of a new passive dosemeter for photons and beta radiations (B. Moreno); 5 - Development of a new virtual sources model for the Monte-Carlo prediction of EPID (Electronic Portal Imaging Device) images and implementation in PENELOPE (I. Chabert); 6 - Prediction of high-resolution EPID images for in-vivo dosimetry (D. Patin); 7 - 4D thorax modeling by artificial neural networks (P.E. Leni); 8 - Presentation of the calculation utilities of the book 'Calculation of ionizing radiations generated doses' (Vivier, Lopez, EDP Sciences 2012) (A. Vivier); 9 - RayXpert C : a 3D modeling and Monte-Carlo dose rate calculation software (C. Dossat); 10 - TRIPOLI-4 R Version 9 S Monte-Carlo code for radioprotection (F. Damian); 11 - Realistic radioprotection training with the digital school workshop (E. Courageot); 12 - Use of BEAMNRC code for dental prostheses influence evaluation in ENT cancers treatment by external radiotherapy (C. De Conto); 13

  20. Radioprotective effects of aronia on radiation irradiated rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mun, Hwan Sik; Lee, Jun Haeng [Dept. of Radiology, Nambu University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    The present study was intended to orally administer aronia to rats, irradiate radiation once to the whole bodies of the rats, and conduct blood tests to observe, compare, and analyze changes in blood cells, such as leukocytes, erythrocytes, and platelets, in order to examine the radioprotective effects of aronia. As experimental animals, 15 male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats aged six weeks weighing 200∼250 g were taken and divided into the normal group (A) of five rats, the 5 Gy control group (B) of five rats, and the 5 Gy experimental group (C) of five rats. The normal group (A) was not irradiated at all, the control group (B) was administered with general diets and irradiated, and the experimental group(C) was orally administered with 50 mg/kg/day of aronia two times per day to achieve a distilled water oral dose of 100 mg/kg/day and irradiated thereafter (5 Gy at 500 cGy/min) for 14 days. After the experiment, differences in leukocytes, erythrocytes, and platelets among the normal group (A), the control group (B), and the experimental group (C) were examined by comparing the counts of the blood cells and the results showed no statistically significant differences. However, on a detailed review, the normal group (A) showed statistically higher mean values for all of lymphocytes, hemoglobin, and mean corpuscular hemoglobin as compared to the control group (B) and the experimental group (C). Statistically significant differences in the counts of lymphocytes were shown between the normal group (A) and the control group (B), and between the normal group (A) and the experimental group (C); furthermore, statistically significant differences in mean corpuscular hemoglobin were shown between the normal group (A) and the experimental group (C). Given the results of the present study, in irradiated rats, aronia was generally considered as having no radioprotective effect on leukocyte, erythrocyte, and platelet while having statistically significant radioprotective effects on

  1. Anti-Candida albicans natural products, sources of new antifungal drugs: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zida, A; Bamba, S; Yacouba, A; Ouedraogo-Traore, R; Guiguemdé, R T

    2017-03-01

    Candida albicans is the most prevalent fungal pathogen in humans. Due to the development of drug resistance, there is today a need for new antifungal agents for the efficient management of C. albicans infections. Therefore, we reviewed antifungal activity, mechanisms of action, possible synergism with antifungal drugs of all natural substances experimented to be efficient against C. albicans for future. An extensive and systematic review of the literature was undertaken and all relevant abstracts and full-text articles analyzed and included in the review. A total of 111 documents were published and highlighted 142 anti-C. albicans natural products. These products are mostly are reported in Asia (44.37%) and America (28.17%). According to in vitro model criteria, from the 142 natural substances, antifungal activity can be considered as important for 40 (28.20%) and moderate for 24 (16.90%). Sixteen products have their antifungal activity confirmed by in vivo gold standard experimentation. Microbial natural products, source of antifungals, have their antifungal mechanism well described in the literature: interaction with ergosterol (polyenes), inhibition 1,3-β-d-glucan synthase (Echinocandins), inhibition of the synthesis of cell wall components (chitin and mannoproteins), inhibition of sphingolipid synthesis (serine palmitoyltransferase, ceramide synthase, inositol phosphoceramide synthase) and inhibition of protein synthesis (sordarins). Natural products from plants mostly exert their antifungal effects by membrane-active mechanism. Some substances from arthropods are also explored to act on the fungal membrane. Interestingly, synergistic effects were found between different classes of natural products as well as between natural products and azoles. Search for anti-C. albicans new drugs is promising since the list of natural substances, which disclose activity against this yeast is today long. Investigations must be pursued not only to found more new anti

  2. Use of ultrasound radiation for extraction of bioactive compounds from natural sources. Current events and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Riera, Zalua; Robaina Mesa, Malvis; Jauregui Haza, Ulises

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, clean technologies have been developed for high efficiency extracting of isolation of biologically active compounds from natural sources, without the loss of biological activity, with good yield and high purity. Ultrasound-assisted extraction has low instrumental requirements and their implementation is very appropriate where the stability of the active component to be removed is affected by the high temperatures of conventional processes. In this paper it is evaluated the state of the art of ultrasound-assisted extraction of bioactive compounds from various natural sources, its mechanism, the parameters governing its use and research perspectives in this field. Ultrasonic cavitation phenomenon promotes cell wall rupture, reduction of particle size and tissue permeability, which facilitates the diffusion of the solvent into the inert part of the plant material and increasing the mass transferred through membranes. This mechanism explains the high efficiency of ultrasound-assisted extraction as it allows to reduce the time, temperature and amounts of solvent extraction process with high yields and high purity of the extracted product. Currently there is a great demand for the use of ultrasound to industrial and current research lead to the development of larger scale reactors and the theoretical modeling of the parameters that determine efficient extraction

  3. Factoring out natural and indirect human effects on terrestrial carbon sources and sinks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canadell, J.G.; Kirschbaum, M.U.F.; Kurz, W.A.; Sanz, M.J.; Schlamadinger, B.; Yamagata, Y.

    2007-01-01

    The capacity to partition natural, indirect, and direct human-induced effects on terrestrial carbon (C) sources and sinks is necessary to be able to predict future terrestrial C dynamics and thus their influence on atmospheric CO2 growth. However, it will take a number of years before we can better attribute quantitative estimates of the contribution of various C processes to the net C balance. In a policy context, factoring out natural and indirect human-induced effects on C sources and sinks from the direct human-induced influences, is seen as a requirement of a C accounting approach that establishes a clear and unambiguous connection between human activities and the assignment of C credits and debits. We present options for factoring out various groups of influences including climate variability, CO2 and N fertilization, and legacies from forest management. These are: (1) selecting longer accounting or measurement periods to reduce the effects of inter-annual variability; (2) correction of national inventories for inter-annual variability; (3) use of activity-based accounting and C response curves; (4) use of baseline scenarios or benchmarks at the national level; (5) stratification of the landscape into units with distinct average C stocks. Other, more sophisticated modeling approaches (e.g., demographic models in combination with forest inventories; process-based models) are possible options for future C accounting systems but their complexity and data requirements make their present adoption more difficult in an inclusive international C accounting system

  4. Oil distillation wastewaters from aromatic herbs as new natural source of antioxidant compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celano, Rita; Piccinelli, Anna Lisa; Pagano, Imma; Roscigno, Graziana; Campone, Luca; De Falco, Enrica; Russo, Mariateresa; Rastrelli, Luca

    2017-09-01

    Distillation wastewaters (DWWs) are generated during the essential oil steam distillation from aromatic herbs. Despite of growing interest on novel source of natural antioxidant compounds as food additives, studies on DWWs are scarse. Herein, the potential of DWWs produced by the distillation of packaged fresh basil, rosemary and sage wastes was evaluated by chemical and antioxidant characterization. HPLC-DAD-HRMS profiling revealed that DWWs contain water-soluble phenolic compounds, mainly caffeic acid derivatives and flavonoid glycosides, with rosmarinic acid (RA) as predominant components (29-135mg/100mL). DWWs demonstrated high levels of total phenolic compounds (TPC, 152-443mg GAE/100mL) and strong antioxidant capacities, in ORAC, DPPH and ABTS assays (1101-4720, 635-4244 and 571-3145μmol TE/100mL, respectively). Highly significant correlations of TEAC values with TPC and RA contents revealed that phenolic compounds and high RA content were responsible of DWWs antioxidant properties.Thus, DWWs are proposed as a new promising source of natural food additives and/or functional ingredients for cosmetic, nutraceutical and food applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Discriminating induced seismicity from natural earthquakes using moment tensors and source spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongliang; Eaton, David W.; Li, Ge; Liu, Yajing; Harrington, Rebecca M.

    2016-02-01

    Earthquake source mechanisms and spectra can provide important clues to aid in discriminating between natural and induced events. In this study, we calculate moment tensors and stress drop values for eight recent induced earthquakes in the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin with magnitudes between 3.2 and 4.4, as well as a nearby magnitude 5.3 event that is interpreted as a natural earthquake. We calculate full moment tensor solutions by performing a waveform-fitting procedure based on a 1-D transversely isotropic velocity model. In addition to a dominant double-couple (DC) signature that is common to nearly all events, most induced events exhibit significant non-double-couple components. A parameter sensitivity analysis indicates that spurious non-DC components are negligible if the signal to noise ratio (SNR) exceeds 10 and if the 1-D model differs from the true velocity structure by less than 5%. Estimated focal depths of induced events are significantly shallower than the typical range of focal depths for intraplate earthquakes in the Canadian Shield. Stress drops of the eight induced events were estimated using a generalized spectral-fitting method and fall within the typical range of 2 to 90 MPa for tectonic earthquakes. Elastic moduli changes due to the brittle damage production at the source, presence of multiple intersecting fractures, dilatant jogs created at the overlapping areas of multiple fractures, or non-planar pre-existing faults may explain the non-DC components for induced events.

  6. Rating of transport and radiation source events. Draft additional guidance for the INES national officers for pilot use and feedback; Echelle de classement des incidents de radioprotection: document d'application du systeme international propose par l'AIEA pour les sources radioactives et les transports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-09-15

    The International Nuclear Event Scale (INES) is a means for promptly communicating to the public in consistent terms the safety significance of any reported event associated with radioactive material and/or radiation and to any event occurring during the transport of radioactive material. As described in the 2001 Edition of the INES User.s Manual, events are classified on the scale at seven levels: the upper levels (4-7) are termed accidents. and the lower levels (1-3) incidents. Events which have no safety significance are classified below scale at Level 0 and termed deviations. An overview of the principles for the rating under INES together with flow charts summarizing the rating process is provided in Appendix I. The 2001 Edition of the INES User.s Manual provides some guidance for the rating of transport and radiation source events. At the technical meeting held in 2002 the INES National Officers requested the IAEA/NEA Secretariat to prepare additional guidance. Progress was reported at the Technical Meeting of the INES National Officers in March 2004 where preparation of this draft additional guidance was requested for pilot use. This note provides additional guidance on the rating of transport and radiation source events. It is for pilot use and feedback and is broadly consistent with the INES User.s Manual. It provides more detailed information and an expanded approach for the rating based on actual exposure of workers and members of the public. It is designed to be used as a self-standing document with limited need for reference to the INES User Manual. (author)

  7. Radioprotective effect of epinephrine as a vasoconstrictor in mouse oral mucosa and scalp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Xianshu; Nakagawa, Tomio; Yamamoto, Michinori

    1996-01-01

    Epinephrine is the most widely used vasoconstrictive drug. However, its radioprotective potential has not yet been studied for radiation-induced mucositis and dermatitis. Other vasoconstrictive drugs induce a radioprotective effect, but are not used because of their severe side effects. We studied the radioprotective effect of epinephrine on the oral mucosa and scalp of the mice. The radiation dose was 20 Gy in a single fraction to the head of the mouse. In the group treated with epinephrine ointment, secretion from the oral cavity was slight, body weight loss was less and hair loss was observed in fewer cases compared to those in the group without of epinephrine ointment. The mechanism is thought to be related to oxygenation. Epinephrine causes vasoconstriction, therefore the blood supply is lowered and the oxygen concentration in the tissue decline. In conclusion, epinephrine is considered to have potential as a radioprotective ointment for mucous membranes and skin. (author)

  8. Atmospheric mercury emissions in Australia from anthropogenic, natural and recycled sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Peter F.; Morrison, Anthony L.; Malfroy, Hugh J.; Cope, Martin; Lee, Sunhee; Hibberd, Mark L.; Meyer, C. P. (Mick); McGregor, John

    2012-12-01

    The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) has begun a process of developing a legally binding instrument to manage emissions of mercury from anthropogenic sources. The UNEP Governing Council has concluded that there is sufficient evidence of significant global adverse impacts from mercury to warrant further international action; and that national, regional and global actions should be initiated as soon as possible to identify populations at risk and to reduce human generated releases. This paper describes the development of, and presents results from, a comprehensive, spatially and temporally resolved inventory of atmospheric mercury emissions from the Australian landmass. Results indicate that the best estimate of total anthropogenic emissions of mercury to the atmosphere in 2006 was 15 ± 5 tonnes. Three industrial sectors contribute substantially to Australian anthropogenic emissions: gold smelting (˜50%, essentially from a single site/operation), coal combustion in power plants (˜15%) and alumina production from bauxite (˜12%). A diverse range of other sectors contribute smaller proportions of the emitted mercury, but industrial emissions account for around 90% of total anthropogenic mercury emissions. The other sectors include other industrial sources (mining, smelting, and cement production) and the use of products containing mercury. It is difficult to determine historical trends in mercury emissions given the large uncertainties in the data. Estimates for natural and re-emitted emissions from soil, water, vegetation and fires are made using meteorological models, satellite observations of land cover and soil and vegetation type, fuel loading, fire scars and emission factors which account for the effects of temperature, insolation and other environmental variables. These natural and re-emitted sources comfortably exceed the anthropogenic emissions, and comprise 4-12 tonnes per year from vegetation, 70-210 tonnes per year from soils, and 21-63 tonnes

  9. Natural attenuation of a plume from an emplaced coal tar creosote source over 14 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, M.; Barker, J. F.; Butler, B.; Blaine, F.; Joseph, S.; Cooke, C.

    2008-09-01

    An emplaced source of coal tar creosote within the sandy Borden research aquifer has documented the long-term (5140 days) natural attenuation for this complex mixture. Plumes of dissolved chemicals were produced by the essentially horizontal groundwater flowing at about 9 cm/day. Eleven chemicals have been extensively sampled seven times using a monitoring network of ˜ 280, 14-point multilevel samplers. A model of source dissolution using Raoult's Law adequately predicted the dissolution of 9 of 11 compounds. Mass transformation has limited the extent of the plumes as groundwater has flowed more than 500 m, yet the plumes are no longer than 50 m. Phenol and xylenes have been removed and naphthalene has attenuated from its maximum extent on day 1357. Some compound plumes have reached an apparent steady state and the plumes of other compounds (dibenzofuran and phenanthrene) are expected to continue to expand due to an increasing mass flux and limited degradation potential. Biotransformation is the major process controlling natural attenuation at the site. The greatest organic mass lost is associated with the high solubility compounds. However, the majority of the mass loss for most compounds has occurred in the source zone. Oxygen is the main electron acceptor, yet the amount of organics lost cannot be accounted for by aerobic mineralization or partial mineralization alone. The complex evolution of these plumes has been well documented but understanding the controlling biotransformation processes is still elusive. This study has shown that anticipating bioattenuation patterns should only be considered at the broadest scale. Generally, the greatest mass loss is associated with those compounds that have a high solubility and low partitioning coefficients.

  10. Patterns of ice nuclei from natural water sources in the mountains of Tirol, Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baloh, Philipp; Hanlon, Regina; Pietsch, Renee; Anderson, Christopher; Schmale, David G., III; Grothe, Hinrich

    2017-04-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation—the process by which particles can nucleate ice between 0 and -35°C—is important for generating artificial snow. Though abiotic and biotic ice nuclei are present in many different natural and managed ecosystems, little is known about their nature, sources, and ecological roles. We collected samples of water and snow from the mountains of Tyrol, Austria in June, July, and November, 2016. The collected water was mostly from sources with minimal anthropogenic pollution, since most of the water from the sampled streams came from glacial melt. The samples were filtered through a 0.22μm filter, and microorganisms were cultured on different types of media. Resulting colonies were tested for their ice nucleation ability using a droplet freezing assay and identified to the level of the species. The unfiltered water and the filtered water will be subjected to additional assays using cryo microscopy and vibrational microscopy (IR and Raman- spectroscopy). Preliminary analyses suggested that the percentage of ice-nucleating microbes varied with season; greater percentages of ice nucleating microbes were present during colder months. The glacial melt also varies strongly over the year with the fraction of mineral dust suspended in it which serves as an inorganic ice nucleation agent. Further investigation of these samples may help to show the combined ice nuleation abilities of biological and non biological particles present in the mountains of Tirol, Austria. Future work may shed light on how the nucleation properties of the natural water changes with the time of the year and what may be responsible for these changes.

  11. Radioprotective properties of DNA methylation-disrupting agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalinich, J.F.; Catravas, G.N.; Snyder, S.L.

    1991-01-01

    5-Azacytidine and sodium butyrate, two DNA methylation-disrupting agents, were tested for radioprotective properties on V79A03 cells. Both compounds can activate genes not previously expressed (e.g. metallothionein). 5-Azecytidine treatment (3 μM, 24h) caused a 50% decrease in the 5-methylcytosine content of V79A03 DNA whereas sodium butyrate treatment (1 mM, 24h) resulted in a 700% increase in 5-methylcytosine content. Additionally, 5-azacytidine treatment resulted in the increased survival of V79A03 cells, with treatment 24 h prior to exposure to gamma radiation providing a dose reduction factor of 1.8. Sodium butyrate treatment did not result in a significant increase in survival. These results indicate that the hypomethylation of genomic DNA prior to exposure to gamma radiation correlates with an increase in survival of V79A03 cells, possibly due to the activation of the enzymes involved in repair. (author)

  12. Relationship between electronic structure and radioprotective activity of some indazoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, Yu.A.

    2000-01-01

    The quantum-chemical study of electronic structure of 29 indasoles with complete optimization of geometry and search of quantitative link between the established characteristics and radioprotective activity (RPA) was carried out through the MNDO method with application of multiple linear and nonlinear regression analysis and the basic component method. The equations of correlation relationship between the RPA and electronic characteristics are presented. 10 indasole structures, the forecasted RPA values whereof (survival rate, %) equal 50% and above, are selected. The statistic significance of the obtained correlation equations and their regression coefficients make it possible to conclude, that the established relationships are not accidental and are prospective for forecasting RPA of other close compounds of the indasole series [ru

  13. Radioprotective action on bone marrow CFU during immobilization of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keizer, H.J.; van Putten, L.M.

    1976-01-01

    Anesthesia and restraint without anesthesia during whole-body x-irradiation decrease the mortality from both the bone marrow and the intestinal syndromes (30- and 5-day mortality). The two types of immobilization decrease the radiosensitivity of the hemopoietic stem cells, as shown by an increased survival of hemopoietic stem cells in the marrow of immobilized mice. The hypoxic cell radiosensitizer Ro-07-0582 reversed the radioprotective effect during restraint without anesthesia, but not during pentobarbital anesthesia. This indicates that hypoxia of the femur bone marrow cannot explain the decreased radiosensitivity of the stem cells during pentobarbital anesthesia. Pentobarbital was also shown to inhibit the recruitment of resting femur bone marrow stem cells (G 0 -phase cells) into cycle following a sublethal dose of x rays. The relevance of these observations is discussed

  14. Radioprotection of the digestive tract by intravenous infusion of vasopressin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juillard, G.J.F.; Peter, H.H.; Weisenburger, T.H.; Tesler, A.S.; Langdon, E.A.; Barenfus, M.; Lagasse, L.D.; Watring, W.E.; Smith, M.L.

    1975-09-01

    The effect of venous infusions of vasopressin during fractionated abdominal radiation exposures was evaluated in four pairs of dogs. In each pair, the control dog was given venous infusion of saline during irradiation. The results were analyzed from clinical observation, autopsy findings, and pathological examination. It appears that venous infusion of vasopressin has a definite and reproducible effect of radioprotection on the gastrointestinal tract, the dose modifying factor (DMF) being 1.5. Radiation therapy of the gynecologic malignancies would be one major application since the radiosensitivity of the intestinal tract is often a limiting factor in delivering high doses to the tumor, and further investigations are being done to study the effects of vasopressin on the radiosensitivity of malignant tumors.

  15. Radioprotection of intestinal crypt cells by cox-inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisnar, Paul O.; Dones, Rosa Angela S.A.; Serna, Paulene-Ver A.; Deocaris, Chester C.; Guttierez, Kalangitan V.; Deocaris, Custer C.

    2006-01-01

    The regulation of tissue homeostasis in the gastrointestinal epithelium after epithelial injury focuses on the prostaglandins(PGs) as its major mediators. The two cyclooxygenase isoforms, cox-1 and cox-2, catalyze synthesis of PGs. Cox-1 is the predominant cyclooxygenase isoform found in the normal intestine. In contrast, cox-2 is present at low levels in normal intestine but is elevated at sites of inflammation, and in adenomas and carcinomas. To study the effects of various commercially-available cox-inhibitors (Ketorolac: cox-1 selective; Celecoxib: cox-2 selective; and Indocid: cox-1/2 non-selective), we determine mouse crypt epithelial cell fate after genotoxic injury with whole-body gamma-ray exposure at 15 Gy. Intestinal tissues of mice treated with cox-2 inhibitors that showed invariable apoptotic event, however, have increased occurrence of regenerating cells. Our results suggest a potential application of cox-2 selective inhibitors as radioprotective agent for normal cells after radiotherapy. (Author)

  16. Performance of ionization chambers in X radiation beams, radioprotection level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bessa, Ana C.M.; Potiens, Maria da Penha A.; Caldas, Linda V.E.

    2005-01-01

    Narrow beams, radioprotection level, were implanted in an X ray system, based on ISO 4037-1, as recommended by IAEA (SRS 16). Energy dependency tests were carried out and short-term stability in ionization chambers for use in radiation protection of trademark Physikalisch-Technische Werkstaetten (PTW), 32002 and 23361 models. The ionization chambers were studied with regard to short-term stability within the program of quality control of the laboratory, with a 90 Sr + 90 Y. The results of the short-term stability test were compared with the recommendations of IEC 60731, respect to dosemeters used in radiotherapy, since this standard presents the more restrictive limits with regard to the behaviour of ionization chambers. All cameras showed results within the limits recommended by this standard. With respect to the energy dependency of the response, the model Chamber 32002 presented a maximum dependence of only 2.7%, and the model Chamber 23361, 4.5%

  17. Study of radio-protective effects of ascorbic acid in rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakir, A.M.; Mohammad, A.

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential radio-protective effects of different ascorbic acid concentrations (vitamin C) in rats before whole body irradiation with total dose of 7 Gy ( 60 Co source) using two different dose rates of 1 and 0.55 Gy.min -1 by increasing percent of surviving. In the first group (1 Gy/m); rats were administered four different concentrations of ascorbic acid (7.5, 12.5, 100, 200 mg/kg b wt ) in drinking water for 30 days before irradiation starting from the ablactation which considered as day 0. Whereas, in the second group (0.55 Gy/m); rats were administered six different concentrations of ascorbic acid (1, 5, 7.5, 12.5, 100, 200 mg/kg b wt) before irradiation with total dose 7 Gy ( 60 Co source). The results have showed that the ascorbic acid enhance the 30-day survival of irradiated rats in 1 and 0.55 Gy/m groups, compared to the control group. The mean cumulated probability of survival of rats (1 Gy/m group) was 66%± 6 (Mean± S.E), 69%± 5, 52%± 9 and 51%± 9 in groups of rats which administered 7.5, 12.5, 100, 200 mg/kg, respectively, versus 41%± 9 in control group for 14 days. While, it was 90%± 2, 90%± 2, 88%± 2, 94%± 1, 84%± 3 and 78%± 3 in groups of rats which administered 1, 5, 7.5, 12.5, 100, 200 mg/kg respectively, versus 52%± 6 in control group for 30 days. Our data, also, indicated that all ascorbic acid concentrations in both groups had significant reduction in mortality and increasing percent of surviving compared to the control groups. We conclude that all ascorbic acid concentrations which used in both groups (1 and 0.55 Gy/m), had radioprotective effects in rats when administrated before irradiations, and this role was more effective against lower dose rate of radiation exposure. (author)

  18. Radioprotection of Swiss albino mice by Adhatoda vesica leaf extract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, A.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The radioprotective role of aqueous extract of Adhatoda vesica leaf extract against radiation induced hematological alterations in peripheral blood of Swiss albino mice was studied at various post-irradiation intervals between 6 hrs to 30 days. Oral administration of Adhatoda vesica leaf extract (800 mg / kg body weight) prior to whole-body irradiation showed a significant protection in terms of survival percentage and hematological parameters. Mice exposed to radiation (8 Gy) without Adhatoda vesica leaf extract pre-treatment exhibited signs of radiation sickness like anorexia, lethargicity, ruffled hairs and diarrhoea and such animals died within 26 days post-irradiation. The dose reduction factor (DRF=1.6) for Adhatoda vesica leaf extract was calculated from LD50/30 values. A significant decline in hematological constituents (RBCs, WBCs, Hb and Hct) was evident till day 15, at later period of observation (day 15 onwards), no animals could survive from control group whereas, in Adhatoda vesica leaf extract pre-treated irradiated group, a gradual recovery was noted in the hematological values. However, these hematological values remained significantly below the normal even till day 30. A significant decrease in GSH was recorded in control animals. Experimental animals showed a significant increase in GSH content (blood as well as liver) with respect to control, but such values remained below normal. A significant increase in TBARS level in liver and serum was evident in control animals. Although, no significant difference was noticed in such levels in normal and Adhatoda vesica leaf extract treated animals. But, a significant decrease was registered in Adhatoda vesica leaf extract pretreated irradiated animals. The results from the present study suggest that Adhatoda vesica leaf extract has radioprotective role in stimulating/protecting the hematopoietic system thereby enhancing the survival and increasing the hematological constituents in peripheral

  19. Radioprotective potential of histamine on rat small intestine and uterus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carabajal, E.; Massari, N.; Croci, M.; Martinel Lamas, D.; Prestifilippo, J.P.; Ciraolo, P.; Bergoc, R.M.; Rivera, E.S.; Medina, V.A.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to improve knowledge about histamine radioprotective potential investigating its effect on reducing ionising radiation-induced injury and genotoxic damage on the rat small intestine and uterus. Forty 10-week-old male and 40 female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups. Histamine and histamine-5Gy groups received a daily subcutaneous histamine injection (0.1 mg/kg) starting 24 h before irradiation. Histamine-5Gy and untreated-5Gy groups were irradiated with a dose of whole-body Cesium-137 irradiation. Three days after irradiation animals were sacrificed and tissues were removed, fixed, and stained with haematoxylin and eosin, and histological characteristics were evaluated. Proliferation, apoptosis and oxidative DNA markers were studied by immunohistochemistry, while micronucleus assay was performed to evaluate chromosomal damage. Histamine treatment reduced radiation-induced mucosal atrophy, oedema and vascular damage produced by ionising radiation, increasing the number of crypts per circumference (239±12 vs 160±10; Phistamine decreased the frequency of micronuclei formation and also significantly attenuated 8-OHdG immunoreactivity, a marker of DNA oxidative damage. Furthermore, radiation induced flattening of the endometrial surface, depletion of deep glands and reduced mitosis, effects that were completely blocked by histamine treatment. The expression of a proliferation marker in uterine luminal and glandular cells was markedly stimulated in histamine treated and irradiated rats. The obtained evidences indicate that histamine is a potential candidate as a safe radio-protective agent that might increase the therapeutic index of radiotherapy for intra-abdominal and pelvic cancers. However, its efficacy needs to be carefully investigated in prospective clinical trials. PMID:23361244

  20. Development of Functional Foods and Advanced Technology for Radioprotection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Sung Kee; Byun, Myung Woo; Kim, Jin Kyu (and others)

    2003-05-15

    We have previously developed two medicinal herb mixtures that protects immune/hematopoietic system and self-renewal tissues against irradiation and enhances immune/hematopoietic functions. In this study, we have developed two pilot products by adding the effective fractions to the hot water extract of the herb mixtures and investigated their efficacy. In irradiated mice, pilot products protected hematopoietic stem cells, promoted the regeneration and activation of immune cells, normalized the unbalanced immune reaction, and inhibited the growth of cancer cells. Polysaccharide was active fraction and mechanisms were elucidated. The products also protected the stem cells in self-renewal tissues. DNA/membrane damages, apoptotic cell signals, chromosome/DNA alterations, and oxidation of protein/lipid were inhibited by pilot products, and their radical scavenging activities were observed. Five active components were isolated and identified. Pilot products also inhibited the cancer development by 30% in irradiated mice. In clinical investigation, pilot products inhibited the side-effects of cancer therapy including immune/hematopoietic depression. Therefore, the pilot products may be used as functional foods for overcoming of immune/hematopoietic depression and self-renewal tissue damages induced by irradiation, as well as for the immune/hematopoietic enhancement. Also we have screened food materials for inhibition of radiation-induced chronic damage (carcinogenesis), and selected effective 4 materials and elicited two mixture preparations with enhanced activity, and confirmed their inhibitory activities in cancer initiation model systems. To obtain the applicability of radiation technology for the safe sanitation and distribution of functional food materials, we verified the toxicological safety, stability of activity and active components of irradiated medicinal herbs. Also, screening of new radioprotective materials and basic biological research for the enhancement of

  1. Utility of DF-1 for Radioprotection in Lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Julia; Casey, Rachael; Wu, Honglu; Huff, Janice; Emami, Kamal; Moore, Valerie; Jeevarajan, Antony

    2007-01-01

    The development of degenerative changes in the vasculature, such as atherosclerosis, is a known consequence of exposure to ionizing radiation, and is thus a concern for astronaut health following long duration space flight. Cellular damage caused by radiation is due to free radical generation and DNA damage. The goal of this project was to assess the ability of a C60-derivative, DF-1, to mitigate cellular damage resulting from radiation exposure in primary human lymphocytes. DF-1 is a water-soluble C60 fullerene encapsulated in dendrimeric functional groups that is proposed to exhibit antioxidant properties. Human lymphocytes are radiosensitive and travel throughout the body potentially causing bystander effects in any tissues they contact. These cells were subjected to varying doses of gamma radiation in the presence or absence of DF-1. Cells were collected at 48 hours post-irradiation for chromosomal aberration studies and at 72 hours post-irradiation for micronuclei studies. These studies showed that the irradiated cells contained more chromosomal aberrations and micronuclei than the control cells. Addition of the DF-1 reduced the amount of observed DNA damage in the irradiated cells. Growth curves were measured for the lymphocytes exposed to 0 and 4 Gray gamma irradiations, and we observed less growth in the cells irradiated at 4 Gy. 2,7-dichlorofluorescein diacetate was used to detect reactive oxygen species production, and increased production of ROS was observed in the irradiated lymphocytes. Human lymphocytes were subjected to varying doses of gamma or photon radiation in the presence and absence of DF-1 and a known radioprotectant, amifostine. After irradiation, the production of reactive oxygen species, growth curves and cell viability were measured. These cells were also collected to quantify chromosomal aberrations and micronuclei formation. We predict that irradiated cells will show the most damage and that DF-1 will provide protective effects similar

  2. Development of Functional Foods and Advanced Technology for Radioprotection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jo, Sung Kee; Byun, Myung Woo; Kim, Jin Kyu

    2003-05-01

    We have previously developed two medicinal herb mixtures that protects immune/hematopoietic system and self-renewal tissues against irradiation and enhances immune/hematopoietic functions. In this study, we have developed two pilot products by adding the effective fractions to the hot water extract of the herb mixtures and investigated their efficacy. In irradiated mice, pilot products protected hematopoietic stem cells, promoted the regeneration and activation of immune cells, normalized the unbalanced immune reaction, and inhibited the growth of cancer cells. Polysaccharide was active fraction and mechanisms were elucidated. The products also protected the stem cells in self-renewal tissues. DNA/membrane damages, apoptotic cell signals, chromosome/DNA alterations, and oxidation of protein/lipid were inhibited by pilot products, and their radical scavenging activities were observed. Five active components were isolated and identified. Pilot products also inhibited the cancer development by 30% in irradiated mice. In clinical investigation, pilot products inhibited the side-effects of cancer therapy including immune/hematopoietic depression. Therefore, the pilot products may be used as functional foods for overcoming of immune/hematopoietic depression and self-renewal tissue damages induced by irradiation, as well as for the immune/hematopoietic enhancement. Also we have screened food materials for inhibition of radiation-induced chronic damage (carcinogenesis), and selected effective 4 materials and elicited two mixture preparations with enhanced activity, and confirmed their inhibitory activities in cancer initiation model systems. To obtain the applicability of radiation technology for the safe sanitation and distribution of functional food materials, we verified the toxicological safety, stability of activity and active components of irradiated medicinal herbs. Also, screening of new radioprotective materials and basic biological research for the enhancement of

  3. The actual research of radioprotective education on the educational facilities for radiological technologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Tadashi; Koga, Sukehiko.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study was to grasp the actual conditions of the radioprotective education in the educational facilities for radiological technologists, and to discuss the ideal way of radioprotective education toward the 21st century. For this purpose, we sent out the questionnaire concerning the circumstances of radioprotective education to 38 educational facilities for radiological technologists in Japan, including 6 universities, 15 junior colleges and 15 technical schools. This research was carried out on March, 1997, and the answers were obtained total 34 educational facilities (86.8%) (6 universities, 15 junior colleges and 13 technical schools) in total. Among the educational facilities in Japan, universities were much richer than the other two facilities in every respect on the educational circumstances including number and the quality of teaching staffs, educational institutions and equipment, practical training facilities and equipment, the number of collection of books in the library, etc. In the process of education for radiological technologists, the background to cause problems concerning the radioprotective education was largely dependent on the difference of educational schemes in Japan. From the view point of the elevation of educational standard for radiological technologists, it is better to transfer all educational processes to the universities, and give high and full level of radioprotective education in universities. And in the field of the medical radiology, the radioprotection and the management system should also be strengthened. For this purpose, it is also required to revise the related laws drastically, to strengthen lessons related to the radioprotection and to plan the richness in contents of the radioprotective education. (K.H.)

  4. Radioprotective effects of selenium and WR 2721: synergy and possible involvement of prostanoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bienvenu, P.; Herodin, F.; Fatome, M.; Kergonou, J.F.

    1988-01-01

    Testing chemical radioprotective efficiency of selenium and WR 2721 on CD 1 male mice, it was shown that acetylsalicylic acid, given ''per os'', may either strengthen the radioprotective efficiency of these two substances, for low or intermediate radiation doses, or counteract their protective effects, in the case of high radiation doses. Tentative explanations are presented on the basis of oxygen metabolism and its modulation by metal or metalloid activators [fr

  5. Nature of the source of vortex sound flowing around a cylindrical profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazhenova, L. A.; Semenov, A. G.

    2014-11-01

    This paper is devoted to refining the nature of a vortex sound source and validly estimating the parameters of the region of source origination in a wake behind a cylindrical profile depending on the incoming flow velocity and profile diameter. Based on experimental measurements of the rms values of pressure pulsations on the surface and in the wake behind the profile and hydrodynamic laws for 2D fluid flows, the position of the origin of the vortex street in the wake and the size of the region where the street is still irregular are estimated. In this region, the street dimensions and pressure pulsation amplitudes change with distance from the profile. It is found that the maximum of the pressure pulsation in the wake approaches the profile surface in the range of Reynolds numbers (4.7 × 103-1.5 × 104); the amplitude of pressure pulsations on the profile and vortex sound intensity also increase. Based on the relationship between the source's position and size and the width of the vortex street, as well as taking into account the decay of vortex circulation in the street with increasing distance to the profile, it is shown that the distance from the source to the surface of the profile should not exceed two gages. It is shown that an obstacle in the wake in the region of its irregularity causes a decrease in pressure pulsations on the profile and attenuation of emitted sound. Sound emission ceases completely when the obstacle comes in direct contact with the region of origination of the vortex street. Theoretical estimates satisfactorily agree with the measurement results.

  6. A comparative study of radioprotective effect of several antioxidants on human blood lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Mingsuo; Zhu Gengbai; Gu Xuandi

    1992-01-01

    By means of improved fluorometric method with 2-thiobarbituric acid (TBA) as the fluorometric agent, radioprotective effects of four kinds of antioxidants on 60 Co γ-ray induced lipid peroxidation (LPO) level, i.e. Malondialdehyde (MDA) content changes in human blood lymphocytes were in human blood lymphocytes were compared by using relative protective efficiency (RPE) as an indicator. The LPO level in human lymphocytes which had been treated with an antioxidant at an concentration of 5 x 10 -3 g/L for 1 hr was measured 2 hr after exposure to 4 Gy of γ-rays, and the RPE values of antioxidants were calculated under these conditions: SOD, 38.23; VE, 23.75:VC, 19.32 and Se +4 , 18.27, thus the anticipation that the compounds, superoxide dismutase (SOD), 2-tocopherols (VE), ascorbic acid (VC) and Na 2 SeO 3 (Se +4 ) had radioprotective effects was confirmed. It was found that the radioprotective beneficial sequences of four kinds of antioxidants were arranged as SOD>VE>VC,Se +4 . The results show that radioprotective effects of exogenous antioxidants on radiation induced LPO damage are dependent not only on irradiation dosage, but also especially on property of antioxidants, drug concentration, pretreatment and monitoring time, etc. The mechanism of these antioxidants effecting as radioprotectants on human lymphocytes is discussed in connection with LPO damage and radioprotection

  7. The intriguing nature of the high-energy gamma ray source XSS J12270-4859

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Martino, D.; Falanga, M.; Bonnet-Bidaud, J.-M.; Belloni, T.; Mouchet, M.; Masetti, N.; Andruchow, I.; Cellone, S. A.; Mukai, K.; Matt, G.

    2010-06-01

    Context. The nature of the hard X-ray source XSS J12270-4859 is still unclear. It was claimed to be a possible magnetic cataclysmic variable of the Intermediate Polar type from its optical spectrum and a possible 860 s X-ray periodicity in RXTE data. However, recent observations do not support the latter variability, leaving this X-ray source still unclassified. Aims: To investigate its nature we present a broad-band X-ray and gamma ray study of this source based on a recent XMM-Newton observation and archival INTEGRAL and RXTE data. Using the Fermi/LAT 1-year point source catalogue, we tentatively associate XSS J12270-4859 with 1FGL J1227.9-4852, a source of high-energy gamma rays with emission up to 10 GeV. We further complement the study with UV photometry from XMM-Newton and ground-based optical and near-IR photometry. Methods: We have analysed both timing and spectral properties in the gamma rays, X-rays, UV and optical/near-IR bands of XSS J12270-4859. Results: The X-ray emission is highly variable, showing flares and intensity dips. The flares consist of flare-dip pairs. Flares are detected in both X-rays and the UV range, while the subsequent dips are present only in the X-ray band. Further aperiodic dipping behaviour is observed during X-ray quiescence, but not in the UV. The broad-band 0.2-100 keV X-ray/soft gamma ray spectrum is featureless and well described by a power law model with Γ = 1.7. The high-energy spectrum from 100 MeV to 10 GeV is represented by a power law index of 2.45. The luminosity ratio between 0.1-100 GeV and 0.2-100 keV is ~0.8, indicating that the GeV emission is a significant component of the total energy output. Furthermore, the X-ray spectrum does not greatly change during flares, quiescence and the dips seen in quiescence. The X-ray spectrum however hardens during the post-flare dips, where a partial covering absorber is also required to fit the spectrum. Optical photometry acquired at different epochs reveals a period of 4

  8. The influence of natural and anthropogenic secondary sources on the glyoxal global distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Myriokefalitakis

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Glyoxal, the smallest dicarbonyl, which has recently been observed from space, is expected to provide indications on volatile organic compounds (VOC oxidation and secondary aerosol formation in the troposphere. Glyoxal (CHOCHO is known to be mostly of natural origin and is produced during biogenic VOC oxidation. However, a number of anthropogenically emitted hydrocarbons, like acetylene and aromatics, have been positively identified as CHOCHO precursors. The present study investigates the contribution of pollution to the CHOCHO levels by taking into account the secondary chemical formation of CHOCHO from precursors emitted from biogenic, anthropogenic and biomass burning sources. The impact of potential primary land emissions of CHOCHO is also investigated. A global 3-dimensional chemistry transport model of the troposphere (TM4-ECPL able to simulate the gas phase chemistry coupled with all major aerosol components is used.

    The secondary anthropogenic contribution from fossil fuel and industrial VOCs emissions oxidation to the CHOCHO columns is found to reach 20–70% in the industrialized areas of the Northern Hemisphere and 3–20% in the tropics. This secondary CHOCHO source is on average three times larger than that from oxidation of VOCs from biomass burning sources. The chemical production of CHOCHO is calculated to equal to about 56 Tg y−1 with 70% being produced from biogenic hydrocarbons oxidation, 17% from acetylene, 11% from aromatic chemistry and 2% from ethene and propene. CHOCHO is destroyed in the troposphere primarily by reaction with OH radicals (23% and by photolysis (63%, but it is also removed from the atmosphere through wet (8% and dry deposition (6%. Potential formation of secondary organic aerosol through CHOCHO losses on/in aerosols and clouds is neglected here due to the significant uncertainties associated with the underlying chemistry. The global annual mean CHOCHO burden and lifetime in the model

  9. The influence of natural and anthropogenic secondary sources on the glyoxal global distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myriokefalitakis, S.; Kanakidou, M.; Vrekoussis, M.; Wittrock, F.; Richter, A.; Burrows, J.P.; Tsigaridis, K.; Bruhl, C.; Volkamer, R.

    2008-01-01

    Glyoxal, the smallest dicarbonyl, which has recently been observed from space, is expected to provide indications on volatile organic compounds (VOC) oxidation and secondary aerosol formation in the troposphere. Glyoxal (CHOCHO) is known to be mostly of natural origin and is produced during biogenic VOC oxidation. However, a number of anthropogenically emitted hydrocarbons, like acetylene and aromatics, have been positively identified as CHOCHO precursors. The present study investigates the contribution of pollution to the CHOCHO levels by taking into account the secondary chemical formation of CHOCHO from precursors emitted from biogenic, anthropogenic and biomass burning sources. The impact of potential primary land emissions of CHOCHO is also investigated. A global 3-dimensional chemistry transport model of the troposphere (TM4-ECPL) able to simulate the gas phase chemistry coupled with all major aerosol components is used. The secondary anthropogenic contribution from fossil fuel and industrial VOCs emissions oxidation to the CHOCHO columns is found to reach 20-70% in the industrialized areas of the Northern Hemisphere and 3-20% in the tropics. This secondary CHOCHO source is on average three times larger than that from oxidation of VOCs from biomass burning sources. The chemical production of CHOCHO is calculated to equal to about 56 Tgy -1 with 70% being produced from biogenic hydrocarbons oxidation, 17% from acetylene, 11% from aromatic chemistry and 2% from ethene and propene. CHOCHO is destroyed in the troposphere primarily by reaction with OH radicals (23%) and by photolysis (63%), but it is also removed from the atmosphere through wet (8%) and dry deposition (6%). Potential formation of secondary organic aerosol through CHOCHO losses on/in aerosols and clouds is neglected here due to the significant uncertainties associated with the underlying chemistry. The global annual mean CHOCHO burden and lifetime in the model domain are estimated to be 0.02 Tg

  10. A Generalized Finite Source Calibration Factor: A Natural Improvement to the Finite Source Correction Factor for Uranium Holdup Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunn, C.A.; Oberer, R.B.; Chiang, L.G.; Ceo, R.N.

    2003-01-01

    This paper proposes refinements to the finite source correction factor used in holdup measurements. Specifically it focuses on a more general method to estimate the average detector response for a finite source. This proposed method for the average detector response is based directly on the Generalized Geometry Holdup (GGH) assay method. First, the finite source correction factor as originally proposed is reviewed in this paper. Following this review the GGH assay method is described. Lastly, a new finite area calibration factor based on GGH is then proposed for finite point and line sources. As an alternative to the direct use of the finite arca calibration factor, finite source correction factors are also derived from this calibration factor. This new correction factor can be used in a manner similar to the finite source correction factor as currently implemented

  11. Long-term dust aerosol production from natural sources in Iceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagsson-Waldhauserova, Pavla; Arnalds, Olafur; Olafsson, Haraldur

    2017-02-01

    Iceland is a volcanic island in the North Atlantic Ocean with maritime climate. In spite of moist climate, large areas are with limited vegetation cover where >40% of Iceland is classified with considerable to very severe erosion and 21% of Iceland is volcanic sandy deserts. Not only do natural emissions from these sources influenced by strong winds affect regional air quality in Iceland ("Reykjavik haze"), but dust particles are transported over the Atlantic ocean and Arctic Ocean >1000 km at times. The aim of this paper is to place Icelandic dust production area into international perspective, present long-term frequency of dust storm events in northeast Iceland, and estimate dust aerosol concentrations during reported dust events. Meteorological observations with dust presence codes and related visibility were used to identify the frequency and the long-term changes in dust production in northeast Iceland. There were annually 16.4 days on average with reported dust observations on weather stations within the northeastern erosion area, indicating extreme dust plume activity and erosion within the northeastern deserts, even though the area is covered with snow during the major part of winter. During the 2000s the highest occurrence of dust events in six decades was reported. We have measured saltation and Aeolian transport during dust/volcanic ash storms in Iceland, which give some of the most intense wind erosion events ever measured. Icelandic dust affects the ecosystems over much of Iceland and causes regional haze. It is likely to affect the ecosystems of the oceans around Iceland, and it brings dust that lowers the albedo of the Icelandic glaciers, increasing melt-off due to global warming. The study indicates that Icelandic dust may contribute to the Arctic air pollution. Long-term records of meteorological dust observations from Northeast Iceland indicate the frequency of dust events from Icelandic deserts. The research involves a 60-year period and

  12. Local Fruit Wastes as a Potential Source of Natural Antioxidant: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, U. K.; Kamarrudin, N.; Suzihaque, M. U. H.; Hashib, S. Abd

    2017-06-01

    Food industry in Malaysia which used fruits as one of the raw material such as the production of fruit juices, concentrates, jams and dried fruits, the main wastes of the production are the peel and the seed of the fruit. Nowadays, people have shown the interests to study the antioxidant content in the fruit wastes. All kind of fruits are believed to contain high amount of natural antioxidant properties such as vitamins, phenol, flavonoid and carotenoid. Thus, this paper presented the work done by researcher on antioxidant activity in the peel especially on local fruit such as mango peel, watermelon rind, banana peel and mangosteen pericarp. The review shows that the peel of the fruit is a good source of antioxidant and other bioactive compounds which have many benefits especially towards human health.

  13. Achiote (Bixa orellanaL.): a natural source of pigment and vitamin E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raddatz-Mota, Denise; Pérez-Flores, Laura J; Carrari, Fernando; Mendoza-Espinoza, José A; de León-Sánchez, Fernando Díaz; Pinzón-López, Luis L; Godoy-Hernández, Gregorio; Rivera-Cabrera, Fernando

    2017-05-01

    Commercialization of agricultural products, including seeds and its derived products, represents an important economic source for developing countries. Natural colorants obtained from the seeds of achiote plant (annatto) have been used since pre-Hispanic times. Also, production of this crop has been important for Mayan cuisine. Annual world production of achiote seeds is approximately 14,500 tons (dry weight). Two thirds of the production is commercialized as dried seeds and the rest as colorant. Latin America produces 60% of the total world production, followed by Africa (27%) and Asia (12%). The main producers in Latin America are Peru, Brazil and Mexico. The purpose of the present paper is to review the most recent literature on Bixa orellana L. focusing on bixin, norbixin, tocotrienols and tocopherols biosynthesis, use and industrial applications of annatto extracts, as well as its nutraceutical potential and its benefits for human health.

  14. Berry Leaves: An Alternative Source of Bioactive Natural Products of Nutritional and Medicinal Value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferlemi, Anastasia-Varvara; Lamari, Fotini N

    2016-06-01

    Berry fruits are recognized, worldwide, as "superfoods" due to the high content of bioactive natural products and the health benefits deriving from their consumption. Berry leaves are byproducts of berry cultivation; their traditional therapeutic use against several diseases, such as the common cold, inflammation, diabetes, and ocular dysfunction, has been almost forgotten nowadays. Nevertheless, the scientific interest regarding the leaf composition and beneficial properties grows, documenting that berry leaves may be considered an alternative source of bioactives. The main bioactive compounds in berry leaves are similar as in berry fruits, i.e., phenolic acids and esters, flavonols, anthocyanins, and procyanidins. The leaves are one of the richest sources of chlorogenic acid. In various studies, these secondary metabolites have demonstrated antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, cardioprotective, and neuroprotective properties. This review focuses on the phytochemical composition of the leaves of the commonest berry species, i.e., blackcurrant, blackberry, raspberry, bilberry, blueberry, cranberry, and lingonberry leaves, and presents their traditional medicinal uses and their biological activities in vitro and in vivo.

  15. Berry Leaves: An Alternative Source of Bioactive Natural Products of Nutritional and Medicinal Value†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferlemi, Anastasia-Varvara; Lamari, Fotini N.

    2016-01-01

    Berry fruits are recognized, worldwide, as “superfoods” due to the high content of bioactive natural products and the health benefits deriving from their consumption. Berry leaves are byproducts of berry cultivation; their traditional therapeutic use against several diseases, such as the common cold, inflammation, diabetes, and ocular dysfunction, has been almost forgotten nowadays. Nevertheless, the scientific interest regarding the leaf composition and beneficial properties grows, documenting that berry leaves may be considered an alternative source of bioactives. The main bioactive compounds in berry leaves are similar as in berry fruits, i.e., phenolic acids and esters, flavonols, anthocyanins, and procyanidins. The leaves are one of the richest sources of chlorogenic acid. In various studies, these secondary metabolites have demonstrated antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, cardioprotective, and neuroprotective properties. This review focuses on the phytochemical composition of the leaves of the commonest berry species, i.e., blackcurrant, blackberry, raspberry, bilberry, blueberry, cranberry, and lingonberry leaves, and presents their traditional medicinal uses and their biological activities in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27258314

  16. Simple biosynthesis of zinc oxide nanoparticles using nature's source, and it's in vitro bio-activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zare, Elham; Pourseyedi, Shahram; Khatami, Mehrdad; Darezereshki, Esmaeel

    2017-10-01

    Nanoparticles with antimicrobial activity, especially as a new class of biomedical materials for use in increasing the level of public health in daily life have emerged. In this study, green synthesis of zinc oxide) ZnO(nanoparticles was studied by Cuminum cyminum (cumin) as novel natural source and zinc nitrate [Zn(NO3)2] as Zn2+ source. The results showed that parameters such as concentration, time, temperature and pH have a direct impact on the synthesis of zinc nanoparticles and change in any of the factors causing the change in the process of synthesis. The properties of synthesized nanoparticles were examined by UV-visible Spectrophotometer, X-ray diffraction spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The UV-visible spectroscopy presented the absorption peak in the range of 370 nm. Transmission electron microscopy images of synthesized nanoparticles are mainly spherical or oval with an average size of about 7 nm. The effect of antimicrobial nanoparticles calculated using disk diffusion method and broth MIC and MBC in different strains of bacteria, which showed that gram positive and negative were sensitive to zinc oxide nanoparticles. The sensitivity of gram-negative bacteria was more.

  17. Berry Leaves: An Alternative Source of Bioactive Natural Products of Nutritional and Medicinal Value

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia-Varvara Ferlemi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Berry fruits are recognized, worldwide, as “superfoods” due to the high content of bioactive natural products and the health benefits deriving from their consumption. Berry leaves are byproducts of berry cultivation; their traditional therapeutic use against several diseases, such as the common cold, inflammation, diabetes, and ocular dysfunction, has been almost forgotten nowadays. Nevertheless, the scientific interest regarding the leaf composition and beneficial properties grows, documenting that berry leaves may be considered an alternative source of bioactives. The main bioactive compounds in berry leaves are similar as in berry fruits, i.e., phenolic acids and esters, flavonols, anthocyanins, and procyanidins. The leaves are one of the richest sources of chlorogenic acid. In various studies, these secondary metabolites have demonstrated antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, cardioprotective, and neuroprotective properties. This review focuses on the phytochemical composition of the leaves of the commonest berry species, i.e., blackcurrant, blackberry, raspberry, bilberry, blueberry, cranberry, and lingonberry leaves, and presents their traditional medicinal uses and their biological activities in vitro and in vivo.

  18. Conjugated linolenic acids (CLnA, super CLA – natural sources and biological activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Białek

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA have a wide range of biological activity. Among them conjugated fatty acids are of great interest. Conjugated linoleic acids (CLA, which exert a multidirectional health-benefiting influence, and conjugated linolenic acids (CLnA, super CLA are examples of this group of fatty acids. CLnA are a group of positional and geometric isomers of octadecatrienoic acid (C18:3, which possess double bonds at positions 9, 11, 13 or 8, 10, 12 of their chain. Some vegetable oils are rich sources of CLnA, e.g. bitter melon oil (from Momordica charantia seeds and pomegranate oil (from Punica granatum seeds. The aim of this paper was to present information concerning natural sources and health-promoting activities of conjugated linolenic acids.The presented data reveal that conjugated linolenic acids may be very useful in prevention and treatment of many diseases, especially diabetes, arteriosclerosis , obesity and cancers (mammary, prostate and colon cancer. Among many potential mechanisms of their action, the fact that some CLnA are converted by oxidoreductases into CLA is very important. It seems to be very reasonable to conduct research concerning the possibility of CLnA use in prevention of many diseases.

  19. Assay Development for the Discovery of Semaphorin 3B Inducing Agents from Natural Product Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Yeonjoong; Pan, Li; Ren, Yulin; Fatima, Nighat; Ahmed, Safia; Chang, Leng Chee; Zhang, Xiaoli; Kinghorn, A. Douglas; Swanson, Steven M.; Carcache de Blanco, Esperanza J.

    2014-01-01

    Semaphorins are a class of membrane-bound and secreted proteins. They have been found to regulate basic cell functions such as axonal growth cone guidance and recent studies have focused on their effect on tumor progression. Semaphorin 3B (Sema 3B) particularly is a secreted protein that has been known to modulate proliferation and apoptosis, processes that are critical for tumor progression and development. In spite of its importance, there is yet no high-throughput screening assay available to detect or quantify the expression of Sema 3B for natural product anticancer drug discovery purposes. Therefore, the development of a new high-throughput bioassay for the discovery of Sema 3B inducing agents from natural product sources is described herein. A wide variety of pure compounds and extracts from plants and microorganisms has been found suitable for screening using this Sema 3B assay to detect and quantify the effect of Sema 3B inducing agents and thereby identify new selective bioactive Sema 3B lead compounds for anticancer drug discovery and development. Also, this new bioassay procedure is based on a high-throughput platform using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay that involves the optimization of sensitivity and selectivity levels as well as accuracy, reproducibility, robustness, and cost effectiveness. PMID:25016954

  20. Fungal endophytes as prolific source of phytochemicals and other bioactive natural products: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisa, Humeera; Kamili, Azra N; Nawchoo, Irshad A; Shafi, Sana; Shameem, Nowsheen; Bandh, Suhaib A

    2015-05-01

    Endophytic fungi are those that live internally in apparently healthy and asymptomatic hosts. Endophytic fungi appear to be ubiquitous; indeed, no study has yet shown the existence of a plant species without endophytes. High species diversity is another characteristic of endophytic mycobiota which is depicted by the fact that it is quite common for endophyte surveys to find assemblages consisting of more than 30 fungal species per host plant species. Medicinal plants had been used to isolate and characterize directly the bioactive metabolites. However, the discovery of fungal endophytes inside these plants with capacity to produce the same compounds shifted the focus of new drug sources from plants to fungi. Bioactive natural products from endophytic fungi, isolated from different plant species, are attracting considerable attention from natural product chemists and biologists alike which is clearly depicted by the steady increase of publications devoted to this topic during the recent years. This review will highlight the chemical potential of endophytic fungi with focus on the detection of pharmaceutically valuable plant constituents as products of fungal biosynthesis. In addition, it will cover newly discovered endophytic fungi and also new bioactive metabolites reported in recent years from fungal endophytes. It summarizes the up-to-date and comprehensive information on bioactive compounds from endophytic fungi by having done a thorough survey of literature. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Natural gas usage as a heat source for integrated SMR and thermochemical hydrogen production technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaber, O.; Naterer, G.F.; Dincer, I.

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates various usages of natural gas (NG) as an energy source for different hydrogen production technologies. A comparison is made between the different methods of hydrogen production, based on the total amount of natural gas needed to produce a specific quantity of hydrogen, carbon dioxide emissions per mole of hydrogen produced, water requirements per mole of hydrogen produced, and a cost sensitivity analysis that takes into account the fuel cost, carbon dioxide capture cost and a carbon tax. The methods examined are the copper-chlorine (Cu-Cl) thermochemical cycle, steam methane reforming (SMR) and a modified sulfur-iodine (S-I) thermochemical cycle. Also, an integrated Cu-Cl/SMR plant is examined to show the unique advantages of modifying existing SMR plants with new hydrogen production technology. The analysis shows that the thermochemical Cu-Cl cycle out-performs the other conventional methods with respect to fuel requirements, carbon dioxide emissions and total cost of production. (author)

  2. Competition as a source of constraint on life history evolution in natural populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, A J

    2014-01-01

    Competition among individuals is central to our understanding of ecology and population dynamics. However, it could also have major implications for the evolution of resource-dependent life history traits (for example, growth, fecundity) that are important determinants of fitness in natural populations. This is because when competition occurs, the phenotype of each individual will be causally influenced by the phenotypes, and so the genotypes, of competitors. Theory tells us that indirect genetic effects arising from competitive interactions will give rise to the phenomenon of 'evolutionary environmental deterioration', and act as a source of evolutionary constraint on resource-dependent traits under natural selection. However, just how important this constraint is remains an unanswered question. This article seeks to stimulate empirical research in this area, first highlighting some patterns emerging from life history studies that are consistent with a competition-based model of evolutionary constraint, before describing several quantitative modelling strategies that could be usefully applied. A recurrent theme is that rigorous quantification of a competition's impact on life history evolution will require an understanding of the causal pathways and behavioural processes by which genetic (co)variance structures arise. Knowledge of the G-matrix among life history traits is not, in and of itself, sufficient to identify the constraints caused by competition.

  3. Transient natural ventilation of a room with a distributed heat source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Shaun D.; Woods, Andrew W.

    We report on an experimental and theoretical study of the transient flows which develop as a naturally ventilated room adjusts from one temperature to another. We focus on a room heated from below by a uniform heat source, with both high- and low-level ventilation openings. Depending on the initial temperature of the room relative to (i) the final equilibrium temperature and (ii) the exterior temperature, three different modes of ventilation may develop. First, if the room temperature lies between the exterior and the equilibrium temperature, the interior remains well-mixed and gradually heats up to the equilibrium temperature. Secondly, if the room is initially warmer than the equilibrium temperature, then a thermal stratification develops in which the upper layer of originally hot air is displaced upwards by a lower layer of relatively cool inflowing air. At the interface, some mixing occurs owing to the effects of penetrative convection. Thirdly, if the room is initially cooler than the exterior, then on opening the vents, the original air is displaced downwards and a layer of ambient air deepens from above. As this lower layer drains, it is eventually heated to the ambient temperature, and is then able to mix into the overlying layer of external air, and the room becomes well-mixed. For each case, we present new laboratory experiments and compare these with some new quantitative models of the transient flows. We conclude by considering the implications of our work for natural ventilation of large auditoria.

  4. Directed Thermal Diffusions through Metamaterial Source Illusion with Homogeneous Natural Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoqiang Xu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Owing to the utilization of transformation optics, many significant research and development achievements have expanded the applications of illusion devices into thermal fields. However, most of the current studies on relevant thermal illusions used to reshape the thermal fields are dependent of certain pre-designed geometric profiles with complicated conductivity configurations. In this paper, we propose a methodology for designing a new class of thermal source illusion devices for achieving directed thermal diffusions with natural homogeneous media. The employments of the space rotations in the linear transformation processes allow the directed thermal diffusions to be independent of the geometric profiles, and the utilization of natural homogeneous media improve the feasibility. Four schemes, with fewer types of homogeneous media filling the functional regions, are demonstrated in transient states. The expected performances are observed in each scheme. The related performance are analyzed by comparing the thermal distribution characteristics and the illusion effectiveness on the measured lines. The findings obtained in this paper see applications in the development of directed diffusions with minimal thermal loss, used in novel “multi-beam” thermal generation, thermal lenses, solar receivers, and waveguide.

  5. Radioprotective properties of some heterocyclic nitrogenous compounds against changes in hemoglobin concentration and hematocrit value in x-irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rousdhy, H.; Pierotti, T.; Polverelli, M.

    1969-01-01

    Radioprotective properties of imidazole and benzimidazole have been proved in previous works. In this study, authors try to demonstrate radioprotective action of these compounds in comparison with cysteamine upon the hematopoietic system after lethal X-irradiation. Results show: no drastic variations of hematologic constants (hemoglobin concentration and hematocrit value) after intraperitoneal injection of radioprotective compounds apart certain apparent reactions with the heterocyclic compounds; the better radioprotective action of benzimidazole. Twenty five days after irradiation, hemoglobin concentration and hematocrit of radio protected mice return to normal values. (author) [fr

  6. Characterization of humins from different natural sources and the effect on microbial reductive dechlorination of pentachlorophenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunfang; Zhang, Dongdong; Xiao, Zhixing; Li, Zhiling; Suzuki, Daisuke; Katayama, Arata

    2015-07-01

    Humins have been reported to function as an electron mediator for microbial reducing reactions. However, the physicochemical properties and the functional moieties of humins from different natural sources have been poorly characterized. In this study, humins extracted from seven types of soil and from a river sediment were examined on the effect on microbial reductive dechlorination of pentachlorophenol (PCP) and characterized polyphasically. All humins facilitated microbial reductive dechlorination of PCP as electron mediators using formate as carbon source, with different dechlorination rates ranging from 0.99 to 7.63 (μmol Cl-) L(-1) d(-1). The highest rates were observed in humins with high carbon contents, extracted from Andisols containing allophone as major clay. Yields of the humins and the elemental compositions varied among sources. Fourier transform infrared analysis showed that all the humins exhibited similar spectra with different absorbance intensity; these data are indicative of their similar structures and identical classes of functional groups. The electron spin resonance spectra of humins prepared at different pH showed typical changes for the semiquinone-type radicals, suggestive of quinone moieties for the redox activity of the humins. Cyclic voltammetry analysis confirmed the presence of redox-active moieties in all the humins, with the estimated redox potentials in the range of -0.30 to -0.13 V (versus a standard hydrogen electrode), falling into the range of standard redox potential between the oxidation of formate as electron donor and the initial dechlorination of PCP as electron acceptor. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Natural honeys of different origin as a source of biologically active components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alica Bobková

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the polyphenol and flavonoid content, electrical conductivity and color measurement of 15 natural honeys. Honey samples were collected from different locations of Slovakia (6 samples, Poland (5 samples and Serbia (4 samples and were obtained directly from local beekeepers. The mean content of polyphenolic substances ranged from 611.2 to 2962.24 mg.kg-1. Multifloral honeys were shown to be a good source of TPC, they ranged from 611 to 1257.12 mg.kg-1, those of the samples originated from Poland showed 611 to 990 mg.kg-1, and from Slovakia 703.7 to 1257.12 mg.kg-1 TPC.  Forest honeys were found to be also good source of TPC, they ranged from 769 to 1052 mg. kg-1. High correlation was found between TPC and flavonoid content (r=0.92. Mean content of flavonoids in the honeys expressed as rutin content ranged from 112.46 to 846.58 mg.kg-1. Multifloral honeys ranged from 112.49 to 592.35 mg.kg-1, those of the samples originated from Poland proved 112.49 to 189.13 mg.kg-1 flavonoids, and from Slovakia 127.48 to 592.35 mg.kg-1.  Forest honeys as a source of flavonoids were proved to be from 136.48 to 266.79 mg.kg-1. Objective measurement of honey color was performed by the L*a*b* system.

  8. Physique appliquée à l’exposition externe dosimétrie et radioprotection

    CERN Document Server

    Antoni, Rodolphe

    2013-01-01

    Cet ouvrage fait la synthèse de nombreuses années d'expériences en dosimétrie et techniques de protection contre l’exposition externe, aussi bien dans le domaine industriel que médical. Il rappelle les concepts physiques de base puis propose un certain nombre d'outils d’évaluation des nuisances radiologiques, et les moyens de s'en prémunir, en détaillant notamment les techniques de calcul pour des blindages appropriés. Le premier chapitre traite de la définition des grandeurs radiométriques et dosimétriques fondamentales. Il permet d’aborder au chapitre 2 la question de l'interaction rayonnement-matière sous un angle dédié au dépôt de la dose dans les tissus biologiques. Le troisième chapitre définit quant à lui les grandeurs de protection et les grandeurs opérationnelles liées à la radioprotection. Dans les deux chapitres suivants, l’accent a été mis sur la définition des risques et contre-mesures associées (i.e. protections biologiques) inhérents aux sources de rayonnemen...

  9. Research progress in the radioprotective effect of the canonical Wnt pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jin-Feng; Liu, Chao; Zhang, Qu; Huang, Guan-Hong

    2013-01-01

    Irradiation from diverse sources is ubiquitous and closely associated with human activities. Radiation therapy (RT), an important component of multiple radiation origins, is a common therapeutic modality for cancer. More importantly, RT provides significant contribution to oncotherapy by killing tumor cells. However, during the course of therapy, irradiation of normal tissues can result in a wide range of side effects, including self-limited acute toxicities, mild chronic symptoms, or severe organ dysfunction. Although numerous promising radioprotective agents have emerged, only a few have successfully entered the market because of various limitations. At present, the widely accepted hypothesis for protection against radiation-caused injury involves the Wnt canonical pathway. Activating the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway may protect the salivary gland, oral mucosa, and gastrointestinal epithelium from radiation damage. The underlying mechanisms include inhibiting apoptosis and preserving normal tissue functions. However, aberrant Wnt signaling underlies a wide range of pathologies in humans, and its various components contribute to cancer. Moreover, studies have suggested that Wnt/β-catenin signaling may lead to radioresistance of cancer stem cell. These facts markedly complicate any definition of the exact function of the Wnt pathway

  10. Radioprotective Effect of Thymol Against Salivary Glands Dysfunction Induced by Ionizing Radiation in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedi, Seyed Mohammad; Yarmand, Fateme; Motallebnejad, Mina; Seyedmajidi, Maryam; Moslemi, Dariush; Bijani, Ali; Hosseinimehr, Seyed Jalal

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the radioprotective effect of thymol as a natural product against salivary glands dysfunction induced by ionizing radiation in rats. The rats were treated with thymol at dose of 50 mg/Kg before exposure to ionizing radiation at dose 15 Gy. Salivary gland function was evaluated with radioisotope scintigraphy and then salivary gland to background counts ratio was calculated. Ionizing radiation caused significant salivary glands dysfunction at the 3 th and the 70 th days with reduction in radioactivity uptake in salivary glands. Ratios of salivary gland to background radioactivities were 2.0 ± 0.05, 1.58 ± 0.62 and 1.99 ± 0.07 at 3 th days for control, radiation, and thymol plus radiation groups, respectively. Thymol significantly protected acute and chronic salivary gland dysfunction induced by ionizing radiation in the rats.This finding may have been a promising application of thymol for the protection of salivary glands dysfunction induced by ionizing irradiation in patients exposed to radiation in head and neck cancer therapy.

  11. Radioprotective effects of chlorogenic acid against mortality induced by gamma irradiation in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seyed Jalal Hosseinimehr; Amirhossein Ahmadi; Shahram Akhlaghpoor; Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The radioprotective effects of the naturally occurring compound chlorogenic acid has been investigated against mortality induced by gamma irradiation in mice. Chlorogenic acid administrated at single doses of 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg 1 and 24 h prior to lethal dose of gamma irradiation (8.5 Gy). At 30 days after treatment, the percentage of animal survival in each group was: control, 20%; 100 mg/kg, 20% and 15%; 200 mg/kg, 45% and 15%; 400 mg/kg, 25% and 35% for 1 h and 24 h treatment prior gamma irradiation, respectively. Percentage of survival increased in animal treated with this agent at 200 mg/kg at 1 h statistically compared with irradiated alone group. Other doses of chlorogenic acid have not showed any enhanced survival at 1 and 24 h before irradiation. Chlorogenic acid exhibited concentration-dependent activity on 1, 1-diphenyl 2-picrylhydrazyl free radical to show strong antioxidant activity. It appeared that chlorogenic acid with antioxidant activity reduced mortality induced by gamma irradiation.

  12. Contamination and cancers: low-dose risks and standards of radioprotection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vignes, S.

    1980-01-01

    Irradiation of the population due to the running of nuclear power stations represents less than 1% of the natural radioactivity today, and should amount to 3% at most by the year 2 000. The main effects of ionizing radiations are reviewed and their undetectability below 100 rems is underlined. Thus the evaluation of low-dose risks can only be speculative and the cautions hypothesis adopted is that of a linear relationship between dose and effect, together with the absence of threshold. According to calculations the worker, supposedly exposed to 500 mrem a year between ages 18 and 65, would run a 22.2% instead of the normal 22% risk of dying of cancer. As for the population, the risk would increase by only 1 per 10 000 in the year 2 000. This means that no other mutagenic and carcinogenic agent is as well regulated as radioactive pollution and efforts directed at a better control of harmful chemicals, for instance, are only taking an example from the ruling on radioprotection [fr

  13. Natural radioactivity in some drinking water sources of coastal, northern, eastern and AlJazera regions in Syria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Masri, M. S.; Byrakdar, E.; Amin, Y.; Abu Baker, S.

    2003-01-01

    Naturally occurring radionuclides in drinking water sources of coastal, northern, eastern and AlJazera regions in Syria have been determined. Samples were collected during the year of 2000 at two periods from the main water sources, from which water being transported for drinking or from houses. Results have shown that most concentrations of the measured naturally occurring radionuclides ( 222 Rn, 222 Ra, 210 Po, 234 U, 238 U) were within the natural levels and below the higher permissible limits of International Organizations. In addition, variations in concentrations from region to another have been observed; these variations may be due to differences in geological formations and water sources (well, spring, surface water). Moreover, the obtained data in this study and other published data for other regions can be used for establishing the radiation map for natural radioactivity in drinking water in Syria. (author)

  14. OSIRIS reactor radioprotection, radioprotection measurements performed during the power rise and the first 50 megawatt operation; Radioprotection de la pile OSIRIS, mesures de radioprotection effectuees au cours de la montee en puissance et des premiers fonctionnements a 50 megawatts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fanton, B.; Lebouleux, P

    1967-12-01

    The authors supply the results of the measurements that have been made near the Osiris reactor during the power increase and during the first functioning at 50 megawatts. The measurements relate to the absorbed dose rates in the premises, the water activation and the atmospheric contamination. The influence of the heat layer of water movements and the water rate in the core chimney on the absorbed dose rate at the footbridge level overhanging the pile core has been studied. The modifications to the protection devices that have been proposed after the measurements and the effect of these modifications on the results of the measures are given then. The regeneration process of a water purification chain has been examined from the radiation protection point of view. It has been possible to make some twenty radionuclides obvious in the produced effluents and to determine the volume activity of these effluents for each radionuclide. The whole of results show that in a general way, the irradiation levels are low during the usual reactor functioning. [French] Les auteurs fournissent les resultats des mesures de radioprotection oui ont ete effectuees aupres de la pile Osiris pendant la montee en puissance et au cours des premiers fonctionnements a 50 megawatts. Les mesures portent sur les debits de dose absorbee dans les locaux, l'activation de l'eau et la contamination atmospherique. L'influence de la couche chaude des mouvements d'eau et du debit d'eau dans la cheminee du coeur sur le debit de dose absorbee au niveau de la passerelle surplombant le coeur de la pile, a ete etudiee. Les modifications aux dispositifs de protection, qui ont ete proposees a la suite des mesures, et l'effet de ces modifications sur les resultats des mesures sont indiques ensuite. Le processus de regeneration d'une chaine d'epuration de l'eau a ete examine sous l'angle de la radioprotection. Il a ete possible de mettre en evidence une vingtaine

  15. The nature of creativity: The roles of genetic factors, personality traits, cognitive abilities, and environmental sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandler, Christian; Riemann, Rainer; Angleitner, Alois; Spinath, Frank M; Borkenau, Peter; Penke, Lars

    2016-08-01

    This multitrait multimethod twin study examined the structure and sources of individual differences in creativity. According to different theoretical and metrological perspectives, as well as suggestions based on previous research, we expected 2 aspects of individual differences, which can be described as perceived creativity and creative test performance. We hypothesized that perceived creativity, reflecting typical creative thinking and behavior, should be linked to specific personality traits, whereas test creativity, reflecting maximum task-related creative performance, should show specific associations with cognitive abilities. Moreover, we tested whether genetic variance in intelligence and personality traits account for the genetic component of creativity. Multiple-rater and multimethod data (self- and peer reports, observer ratings, and test scores) from 2 German twin studies-the Bielefeld Longitudinal Study of Adult Twins and the German Observational Study of Adult Twins-were analyzed. Confirmatory factor analyses yielded the expected 2 correlated aspects of creativity. Perceived creativity showed links to openness to experience and extraversion, whereas tested figural creativity was associated with intelligence and also with openness. Multivariate behavioral genetic analyses indicated that the heritability of tested figural creativity could be accounted for by the genetic component of intelligence and openness, whereas a substantial genetic component in perceived creativity could not be explained. A primary source of individual differences in creativity was due to environmental influences, even after controlling for random error and method variance. The findings are discussed in terms of the multifaceted nature and construct validity of creativity as an individual characteristic. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. Compressive Strength of Concrete made from Natural Fine Aggregate Sources in Minna, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Abdullahi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This work presented an investigation of concrete developed from five fine aggregate sources in Minna, Niger state, Nigeria. Tests conducted on the fine aggregate samples included specific gravity, sieve analysis, bulk density and moisture content. The concrete mix design was done using absolute volume method at various mix proportion of 1:2:4, 1:2:3 and 1:1:2 and water-cement ratios of 0.4, 0.45, 0.5, 0.55 and 0.6. The compressive strengths of concrete were determined at 28-day curing age. Test results revealed that the specific gravities of the aggregate were between 2.60 to 2.70, compacted bulk densities also ranged from 1505.18 to 1701.15kg/m3, loose bulk densities ranged from 1379.32 to 1478.17kg/m3, and moisture content ranged from 0.93 to 2.47%. All the fine aggregate samples satisfied the overall and medium grading limits for natural fine aggregates. The coarse aggregate used fairly followed the grading limit for aggregate size of 20 to 5 mm. The compressive strength of the concrete obtained using the aggregate samples A, B, C, D, and Eall within the ranges of 18.97 to 34.98 N/mm2. Statistical models were developed for the compressive strength of concrete as a function of water-cement ratio for various fine aggregate sources and mix proportions. The models were found to have good predictive the capabilities of the compressive strength of concrete for given water-cement ratio. The properties of fine aggregates and the resulting concrete characteristics showed that all the fine aggregate samples are suitable to be used for concrete production.

  17. RADIOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT OF SOME NATURAL SOURCES OF IONIZING RADIATION IN THE NOVGOROD REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Rosolovskij

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the assessment of some natural sources of ionizing radiation in theNovgorodregion. Among natural environment factors affecting human health in the region from radiological standpoint radon and it’s progeny are most hazardous. This is due to a very high contamination by uranium (radium of some geological formations located at the depth from several meters to several dozen meters from the earth level. Massive exploration of uranium in the region conducted on more than 30-40 blocs identified the two potentially radon-hazardous areas totaling about 25500 square kilometers: Starorusskaya and BorovitchskoLiubytinskaya. These territories contain most of the identified radioactive anomalies in the rocks, underground and ground waters. Such anomalies are typically observed at depths not exceeding 100 m.On the basis of the anomalies’, the study zoning of theNovgorodregion was conducted in accordance with the severity of potential radon hazard. Local radon-hazardous spots were pinpointed as well as their impact upon the population health. The enrichment of the rocks creates the premises for radon emission into soil air, then into the atmosphere and into dwellings. People continuously living in a house with high radon content in the air are subject to the risk of lung or upper respiratory airway cancer.The objective is to substantiate the urgency of prolongation of Radon Program.Radon, the main radiological hazard for theNovgorodregion. The study of its’ effect upon local potentially hazardous spots. Territorial radon hazard-specific zoning, determination of causality in relation to the lungand upper respiratory airway cancer.

  18. Case Study of The ARRA-Funded GSHP Demonstration at the Natural Sources Building, Montana Tech

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malhotra, Mini [ORNL; Liu, Xiaobing [ORNL

    2015-04-01

    Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), 26 ground source heat pump (GSHP) projects were competitively selected in 2009 to demonstrate the benefits of GSHP systems and innovative technologies for cost reduction and/or performance improvement. One of the selected demonstration projects was proposed by Montana Tech of the University of Montana for a 56,000 sq ft, newly constructed, on-campus research facility – the Natural Resources Building (NRB) located in Butte, Montana. This demonstrated GSHP system consists of a 50 ton water-to-water heat pump and a closed-loop ground heat exchanger with two redundant 7.5 hp constant-speed pumps to use water in the nearby flooded mines as a heat source or heat sink. It works in conjunction with the originally installed steam HX and an aircooled chiller to provide space heating and cooling. It is coupled with the existing hot water and chilled water piping in the building and operates in the heating or cooling mode based on the outdoor air temperature. The ground loop pumps operate in conjunction with the existing pumps in the building hot and chilled water loops for the operation of the heat pump unit. The goal of this demonstration project is to validate the technical and economic feasibility of the demonstrated commercial-scale GSHP system in the region, and illustrate the feasibility of using mine waters as the heat sink and source for GSHP systems. Should the demonstration prove satisfactory and feasible, it will encourage similar GSHP applications using mine water, thus help save energy and reduce carbon emissions. The actual performance of the system is analyzed with available measured data for January through July 2014. The annual energy performance is predicted and compared with a baseline scenario, with the heating and cooling provided by the originally designed systems. The comparison is made in terms of energy savings, operating cost savings, cost-effectiveness, and environmental benefits. Finally

  19. New approaches to biochemical radioprotection: antioxidants and DNA repair enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riklis, E.; Emerit, I.; Setlow, R. B.

    Chemical repair may be provided by radioprotective compounds present during exposure to ionizing radiation. Considering DNA as the most sensitive target it is feasible to biochemically improve protection by enhancing DNA repair mechanisms. Protection of DNA by reducing the amount of damage (by radical scavenging and chemical repair) followed by enhanced repair of DNA will provide much improved protection and recovery. Furthermore, in cases of prolonged exposure, such as is possible in prolonged space missions, or of unexpected variations in the intensity of radiation, as is possible when encountering solar flares, it is important to provide long-acting protection, and this may be provided by antioxidants and well functioning DNA repair systems. It has also become important to provide protection from the potentially damaging action of long-lived clastogenic factors which have been found in plasma of exposed persons from Hiroshima & Nagasaki, radiation accidents, radiotherapy patients and recently in ``liquidators'' - persons involved in salvage operations at the Chernobyl reactor. The clastogenic factor, which causes chromatid breaks in non-exposed plasma, might account for late effects and is posing a potential carcinogenic hazard /1/. The enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD) has been shown to eliminate the breakage factor from cultured plasma of exposed persons /2/. Several compounds have been shown to enhance DNA repair: WR-2721 /3/, nicotinamide /4/, glutathione monoester (Riklis et al., unpublished) and others. The right combination of such compounds may prove effective in providing protection from a wide range of radiation exposures over a long period of time.

  20. Radioprotection - an example for non-nuclear industrial hygiene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalabreysse, J.

    1977-01-01

    Basing himself on the experience acquired for 14 years with the atomic energy commision in the sphere of radiotoxicological surveyance of the personnel, the author observes that very strict controles are ensured in the nuclear industry. Simultaneously the results of measures that has been taken in respect to diversification for the past six years in many non-nuclear industries spread over the whole of French Territory are described. The different harmful effects that has been involved in controlling: mineral toxics (lead, mercury); organic toxics (vinyl chloride, benzenic solvents, trichlorethylene, perchlorethylene); physical harmful effects (noise), are studied. The results obtained, both from the biological and toxicological point of view, on the man at work and on the conditions of his exposure to non radioactive harmful effects, are analyzed. The author compares the knowledge acquired in the two fields: nuclear field in which the biological effects of radiation, the metabolism of radioelements, the standards of exposure and radiotoxicological surveyance are now well known and codified; non-nuclear field in which many unknown elements continue, the standards of exposure not being agreed at International Level and even inexistant at national level. The example of vinyl chloride, whose considerable toxicity has recently been displayed, is analyzed. The author can thus conclude that the technology and design of the A.E.C. installations ensure excellent prevention. Radioprotection is an example of what should be attained in all work environments for all other effects harmful to man at work [fr

  1. Radioprotective effects of dimethyl sulfoxide in two biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mastro, N.L. del; Bernardes, D.M.L.; Villavicencio, A.L.C.

    1991-03-01

    The present study was conducted: a) to confirm data from others describing a radioprotective capacity of DMSO in mice; b) to establish whether this protective behavior could be evidenced in an in vitro chemical system utilizing bovine crystalline protein as target. Heterozigous female albino mice were used for the 30-day-survival studies after 9 Gy sup(60)Co gamma irradiation (dose rate: 4.5 Gy/min) injected 1 h prior with 2000 mg/kg DMSO intraperitoneally. Total body weight curves during the same period were also analysed. For the molecular level studies 1 M DMSO was added to a series of aqueous protein solutions from bovine lens and 10 min later irradiated with 5 different doses from 5,000 to 25,000 Gy sup(60)Co (average dose rate 14 Gy/min). After irradiation, spectrophotometric reading at 600 nm and free thiol group determinations were performed in order to evaluate the radiation-induced modifications. (author)

  2. Study on induction of radioprotection using antioxidant combinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, J. S.; Choe, Y. K.; Lee, H. G.; Kim, K. D. [Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Taejeon (Korea)

    2000-04-01

    Antioxidants are applied in tumor patients during chemo- or radiotherapy due to its cytoprotective effects. Therefore, aim of our study was to evaluate the effect of exposure with a variety of antioxidants on primary bone marrow cells after {gamma}-irradiation. We studied the radiation-induced cell death in comparison to mouse bone marrow cells after single-dose irradiation with 1, 2, 3 or 6 Gy and controls without irradiation. Cells cultured in vitro had been exposed to different concentrations of antioxidants prior to {gamma}-irradiation. The effect was evaluated 6, 8, 17 or 24 h after radiation exposure by propium iodide staining. While sodium selenite and N-acetylcyseine could achieve significant inhibition of radiation-induced cell death, aminoguanidine and alpha-lipoic acid were not shown to inhibit it. Furthermore, the combination of N-acetylcysteine with some mild antioxidants such as BHA, propyl gallate, quercetin or trolox induced the significant inhibition of radiation-induced cell death. However, these effect was different depending on the duration of radiation exposure and the concentration of antioxidants added in culture. Although the radioprotective effect of antioxidants should be compared with the effect on tumor itself, our results indicate that the use of antioxidants in combination can efficiently modulate the radiation-induced cell damage like apoptosis and can be applied in tumor patients during radiotherapy. 26 refs., 7 figs., 7 tabs. (Author)

  3. Isolation of whiskers from natural sources and their dispersed in a non-aqueous medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vestena, Mauro; Gross, Idejan Padilha; Pires, Alfredo Tiburcio Nunes; Muller, Carmen Maria Olivera, E-mail: mauro@utfpr.edu.br [Universidade Federal Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)

    2016-10-15

    Whiskers have been used as a nano material dispersed in polymer matrices to modify the microscopic and macroscopic properties of the polymer. These nanomaterials can be isolated from cellulose, one of the most abundant natural renewable sources of biodegradable polymer. In this study, whiskers were isolated from sugarcane bagasse and corn cob straw fibers. Initially, the cellulose fiber was treated through an alkaline/oxidative process followed by acid hydrolysis. Dimethylformamide and dimethyl sulfoxide were used to replace the aqueous medium for the dispersion of the whiskers. For the solvent exchange, dimethylformamide or dimethyl sulfoxide was added to the aqueous dispersion and the water was then removed by fractional distillation. FTIR, TGA, XRD, TEM, Zeta and DLS techniques were used to evaluate the efficiency of the isolation process as well as the morphology and dimensions of the whiskers. The dimensions of the whiskers are comparable with values reported in the literature, maintaining the uniformity and homogeneity in both aqueous and non-aqueous solvents. (author)

  4. Medicinal benefits of marine invertebrates: sources for discovering natural drug candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Zoysa, Mahanama

    2012-01-01

    Marine invertebrates are one of the major groups of organisms, which could be diversified under the major taxonomic groups of Porifera, Cnidaria, Mollusca, Arthropoda, Echinodermata, and many other minor phyla. To date, range of medicinal benefits and a significant number of marine natural products (MNPs) have been discovered from marine invertebrates. Seafood diet from edible marine invertebrates such as mollusks and crustaceans has been linked with various medicinal benefits to improve human health. Among marine invertebrates, spongers from phylum Porifera is the most dominant group responsible for discovering large number of MNPs, which have been used as template to develop therapeutic drugs. MNPs isolated from invertebrates have shown wide range of therapeutic properties including antimicrobial, antioxidant, antihypertensive, anticoagulant, anticancer, anti-inflammatory, wound healing and immune modulator, and other medicinal effects. Therefore, marine invertebrates are rich sources of chemical diversity and health benefits for developing drug candidates, cosmetics, nutritional supplements, and molecular probes that can be supported to increase the healthy life span of human. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Sea foam as a source of fungal inoculum for the isolation of biologically active natural products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overy, David P; Berrue, Fabrice; Correa, Hebelin; Hanif, Novriyandi; Hay, Kathryn; Lanteigne, Martin; Mquilian, Kathrine; Duffy, Stephanie; Boland, Patricia; Jagannathan, Ramesh; Carr, Gavin S; Vansteeland, Marieke; Kerr, Russell G

    2014-07-03

    Due to a rate increase in the resistance of microbial pathogens to currently used antibiotics, there is a need in society for the discovery of novel antimicrobials. Historically, fungi are a proven source for antimicrobial compounds. The main goals of this study were to investigate the fungal diversity associated with sea foam collected around the coast of Prince Edward Island and the utility of this resource for the production of antimicrobial natural products. Obtained isolates were identified using ITS and nLSU rDNA sequences, fermented on four media, extracted and fractions enriched in secondary metabolites were screened for antimicrobial activity. The majority of the isolates obtained were ascomycetes, consisting of four recognized marine taxa along with other ubiquitous genera and many 'unknown' isolates that could not be identified to the species level using rDNA gene sequences. Secondary metabolite isolation efforts lead to the purification of the metabolites epolones A and B, pycnidione and coniothyrione from a strain of Neosetophoma samarorum ; brefeldin A, leptosin J and the metabolite TMC-264 from an unknown fungus (probably representative of an Edenia sp.); and 1-hydroxy-6-methyl-8-hydroxymethylxanthone, chrysophanol and chrysophanol bianthrone from a Phaeospheria spartinae isolate. The biological activity of each of these metabolites was assessed against a panel of microbial pathogens as well as several cell lines.

  6. Isolation of whiskers from natural sources and their dispersed in a non-aqueous medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Vestena

    Full Text Available Abstract Whiskers have been used as a nanomaterial dispersed in polymer matrices to modify the microscopic and macroscopic properties of the polymer. These nanomaterials can be isolated from cellulose, one of the most abundant natural renewable sources of biodegradable polymer. In this study, whiskers were isolated from sugarcane bagasse and corn cob straw fibers. Initially, the cellulose fiber was treated through an alkaline/oxidative process followed by acid hydrolysis. Dimethylformamide and dimethyl sulfoxide were used to replace the aqueous medium for the dispersion of the whiskers. For the solvent exchange, dimethylformamide or dimethyl sulfoxide was added to the aqueous dispersion and the water was then removed by fractional distillation. FTIR, TGA, XRD, TEM, Zeta and DLS techniques were used to evaluate the efficiency of the isolation process as well as the morphology and dimensions of the whiskers. The dimensions of the whiskers are comparable with values reported in the literature, maintaining the uniformity and homogeneity in both aqueous and non-aqueous solvents.

  7. Stevia rebaudiana Bert. leaf extracts as a multifunctional source of natural antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaweł-Bęben, Katarzyna; Bujak, Tomasz; Nizioł-Łukaszewska, Zofia; Antosiewicz, Beata; Jakubczyk, Anna; Karaś, Monika; Rybczyńska, Kamila

    2015-03-27

    The aim of the presented study was to characterize the content and biological activity of extracts prepared from dried Stevia rebaudiana leaves with potential application in the food or cosmetic industry. Aqueous (A), ethanolic (E) and glycol-aqueous (GA) extracts were analyzed for the content of polyphenols and proteins, showing that the highest amount of phenols (15.50 mg/g) and flavonoids (3.85 mg/g) contained GA. All extracts contained significant amount of protein (69.40-374.67 mg/g). Between analyzed stevia extracts (HPLC) GA contained the highest amount of polyphenols, especially ferulic (5.50 mg/g) and rozmaric (4.95 mg/g) acids derivates. The highest antiradical activity against DPPH• and ABTS•+ was noted for GA and E (IC50 = 0.38 and 0.71 µg flavonoids/mL). The highest ability to chelate Fe2+ was observed for E (IC50 = 2.08 µg flavonoids/mL). Stevia extracts were also analyzed for their cytotoxicity and fibroblast irritation potential in vitro. E and GA were the most cytotoxic and irritating, probably due to the high content of biologically active phytochemicals. On the other hand, a extract was the most tolerable by the cells. To summarize, the presented study evaluated the potential application of A, E and GA stevia extracts as natural source of antioxidants in the food and cosmetic industry.

  8. Assay for the antioxidant and radioprotectant activity of extracts form endemic plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Kyu; Kim, Ji Hyang; Woo, Hyun Jung; Plewa, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    Since radiation damage and oxygen poisoning occur through the formation of reactive oxygen species, it is a challenging task to develop agents with high antioxidant and radioprotectant activities from plant species. In this study, several species of Korean endemic plants were chosen as experimental candidates. Water-and ethanol extracts were made from the candidates and tested for their antioxidant and radioprotectant activities. In vitro antioxidant assay of the aqueous-organic extracts was carried out using the free radical 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl-hydrazyl scavenging method. Radioprotective effects were tested by means of experimental on irradiated cell cultures and animals. Among others, the water-extract of Ixeris dentata leaves showed a marked effect on the viability of B16 melanoma cells and provided a radioprotective effect on the number of the leukocytes in the irradiated rodents. DNA damage in the lymphocytes after γ-irradiation decreased in the extract administered animals. Many of the extracts tested in this study showed a slightly lower activity in free radical scavenging than the well-known chemical antiozidants such as ascorbic acid, butylated hydroxytuluene, and glutathione. However, some extracts showed an antioxidant activity similar to that of α-tocopherol acetate and caffeine. These results support the optimistic view for developing radioprotective agents from the Korean endemic plants that showed a strong antioxidant activity

  9. Assay for the antioxidant and radioprotectant activity of extracts form endemic plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Kyu; Kim, Ji Hyang; Woo, Hyun Jung [KAERI, Taejeon (Korea, Republic of); Plewa, Michael J. [University of Illinois, Illinosi (United States)

    2004-07-01

    Since radiation damage and oxygen poisoning occur through the formation of reactive oxygen species, it is a challenging task to develop agents with high antioxidant and radioprotectant activities from plant species. In this study, several species of Korean endemic plants were chosen as experimental candidates. Water-and ethanol extracts were made from the candidates and tested for their antioxidant and radioprotectant activities. In vitro antioxidant assay of the aqueous-organic extracts was carried out using the free radical 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl-hydrazyl scavenging method. Radioprotective effects were tested by means of experimental on irradiated cell cultures and animals. Among others, the water-extract of Ixeris dentata leaves showed a marked effect on the viability of B16 melanoma cells and provided a radioprotective effect on the number of the leukocytes in the irradiated rodents. DNA damage in the lymphocytes after {gamma}-irradiation decreased in the extract administered animals. Many of the extracts tested in this study showed a slightly lower activity in free radical scavenging than the well-known chemical antiozidants such as ascorbic acid, butylated hydroxytuluene, and glutathione. However, some extracts showed an antioxidant activity similar to that of {alpha}-tocopherol acetate and caffeine. These results support the optimistic view for developing radioprotective agents from the Korean endemic plants that showed a strong antioxidant activity.

  10. Anthropogenic and natural sources of acidity and metals and their influence on the structure of stream food webs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogsden, Kristy L.; Harding, Jon S.

    2012-01-01

    We compared food web structure in 20 streams with either anthropogenic or natural sources of acidity and metals or circumneutral water chemistry in New Zealand. Community and diet analysis indicated that mining streams receiving anthropogenic inputs of acidic and metal-rich drainage had much simpler food webs (fewer species, shorter food chains, less links) than those in naturally acidic, naturally high metal, and circumneutral streams. Food webs of naturally high metal streams were structurally similar to those in mining streams, lacking fish predators and having few species. Whereas, webs in naturally acidic streams differed very little from those in circumneutral streams due to strong similarities in community composition and diets of secondary and top consumers. The combined negative effects of acidity and metals on stream food webs are clear. However, elevated metal concentrations, regardless of source, appear to play a more important role than acidity in driving food web structure. - Highlights: ► Food webs in acid mine drainage impacted streams are small and extremely simplified. ► Conductivity explained differences in food web properties between streams. ► Number of links and web size accounted for much dissimilarity between food webs. ► Food web structure was comparable in naturally acidic and circumneutral streams. - Food web structure differs in streams with anthropogenic and natural sources of acidity and metals.

  11. A practical contribution to the dosimetry of fast neutrons in radio-protection - determination of the integrated dose in man using the 32S(n, p)32P reaction (1963)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheidhauer, J.; Chabidon, M.

    1963-01-01

    The problem of fast neutron dosimetry using activation is studied from the radio-protection point of view. The practical development of methods for analyzing phosphorus 32 produced by the activation of sulphur 32 in human hair by the reaction 32 S(n, p) 32 P is described. The sensitivity obtained is 5 rad. A preliminary study was made of the variations in the natural sulphur and phosphorus concentrations. (authors) [fr

  12. Analysis of the different source terms of natural radionuclides in a river affected by NORM (Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials) activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeza, A; Corbacho, J A; Guillén, J; Salas, A; Mora, J C

    2011-05-01

    The present work studied the radioacitivity impact of a coal-fired power plant (CFPP), a NORM industry, on the water of the Regallo river which the plant uses for cooling. Downstream, this river passes through an important irrigated farming area, and it is a tributary of the Ebro, one of Spain's largest rivers. Although no alteration of the (210)Po or (232)Th content was detected, the (234,238)U and (226)Ra contents of the water were significantly greater immediately below CFPP's discharge point. The (226)Ra concentration decreased progressively downstream from the discharge point, but the uranium content increased significantly again at two sampling points 8 km downstream from the CFPP's effluent. This suggested the presence of another, unexpected uranium source term different from the CFPP. The input from this second uranium source term was even greater than that from the CFPP. Different hypotheses were tested (a reservoir used for irrigation, remobilization from sediments, and the effect of fertilizers used in the area), with it finally being demonstrated that the source was the fertilizers used in the adjacent farming areas. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Bioautography with TLC-MS/NMR for Rapid Discovery of Anti-tuberculosis Lead Compounds from Natural Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzelak, Edyta M; Hwang, Changhwa; Cai, Geping; Nam, Joo-Won; Choules, Mary P; Gao, Wei; Lankin, David C; McAlpine, James B; Mulugeta, Surafel G; Napolitano, José G; Suh, Joo-Won; Yang, Seung Hwan; Cheng, Jinhua; Lee, Hanki; Kim, Jin-Yong; Cho, Sang-Hyun; Pauli, Guido F; Franzblau, Scott G; Jaki, Birgit U

    2016-04-08

    While natural products constitute an established source of lead compounds, the classical iterative bioassay-guided isolation process is both time- and labor-intensive and prone to failing to identify active minor constituents. (HP)TLC-bioautography-MS/NMR, which combines cutting-edge microbiological, chromatographic, and spectrometric technologies, was developed to accelerate anti-tuberculosis (TB) drug discovery from natural sources by acquiring structural information at a very early stage of the isolation process. Using the avirulent, bioluminescent Mtb strain mc 2 7000 luxABCDE, three variations of bioautography were evaluated and optimized for sensitivity in detecting anti-TB agents, including established clinical agents and new leads with novel mechanisms of action. Several exemplary applications of this approach to microbial extracts demonstrate its potential as a routine method in anti-TB drug discovery from natural sources.

  14. Radioprotective effect of 2-mercaptopropionylglycine (2-MPG) on the hematology of Swiss albino mice after radiocalcium internal administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, A.; Bhagat, R.M.

    1981-01-01

    The drug 2-MPG, when administered before 45 Ca treatment, shows its radioprotective effect on total red blood cells, total white blood cells, hemoglobin balues and hematocrit percentage. However, the radioprotective effects of 2 MPG are limited to early intervals only. (author)

  15. Classification of natural products as sources of drugs according to the biopharmaceutics drug disposition classification system (BDDCS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ji; Larregieu, Caroline A; Benet, Leslie Z

    2016-12-01

    Natural products (NPs) are compounds that are derived from natural sources such as plants, animals, and micro-organisms. Therapeutics has benefited from numerous drug classes derived from natural product sources. The Biopharmaceutics Drug Disposition Classification System (BDDCS) was proposed to serve as a basis for predicting the importance of transporters and enzymes in determining drug bioavailability and disposition. It categorizes drugs into one of four biopharmaceutical classes according to their water solubility and extent of metabolism. The present paper reviews 109 drugs from natural product sources: 29% belong to class 1 (high solubility, extensive metabolism), 22% to class 2 (low solubility, extensive metabolism), 40% to class 3 (high solubility, poor metabolism), and 9% to class 4 (low solubility, poor metabolism). Herein we evaluated the characteristics of NPs in terms of BDDCS class for all 109 drugs as wells as for subsets of NPs drugs derived from plant sources as antibiotics. In the 109 NPs drugs, we compiled 32 drugs from plants, 50% (16) of total in class 1, 22% (7) in class 2 and 28% (9) in class 3, none found in class 4; Meantime, the antibiotics were found 5 (16%) in class 2, 22 (71%) in class 3, and 4 (13%) in class 4; no drug was found in class 1. Based on this classification, we anticipate BDDCS to serve as a useful adjunct in evaluating the potential characteristics of new natural products. Copyright © 2016 China Pharmaceutical University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Susceptibility to scrapie and disease phenotype in sheep: cross-PRNP genotype experimental transmissions with natural sources

    OpenAIRE

    González, Lorenzo; Jeffrey, Martin; Dagleish, Mark P; Goldmann, Wilfred; Sisó, Sílvia; Eaton, Samantha L; Martin, Stuart; Finlayson, Jeanie; Stewart, Paula; Steele, Philip; Pang, Yvonne; Hamilton, Scott; Reid, Hugh W; Chianini, Francesca

    2012-01-01

    Abstract It has long been established that the sheep Prnp genotype influences the susceptibility to scrapie, and some studies suggest that it can also determine several aspects of the disease phenotype. Other studies, however, indicate that the source of infection may also play a role in such phenotype. To address this question an experiment was set up in which either of two different natural scrapie sources, AAS from AA136 Suffolk and VVC from VV136 Cheviot sheep, were inoculated into AA136,...

  17. Use of micronucleus test in evaluating radioprotective action of mixed tremella preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Jiaben; Huang Yinmei; Zhu Bingchai

    1993-01-01

    The radioprotective action of mixed tremella preparation (Yinshen Yin) on whole body gamma irradiated dogs has been studied. 25 male dogs were divided into five groups: tremella, mercaminum, Yinshen Yin at high dose, Yinshen Yin at low dose and control. All the dogs were given above drugs in 10 successive days before acute exposure of 1 Gy radiation. The results showed that the prophylactic use of Yinshen Yin had good anti-irradiation effect, and the radioprotective effect was similar to the mercaminum, but significantly higher than tremella. Thereby it was considered as a good radioprotective agent. The dose reduction factor in different groups were: Yinshen Yin high dose 2.01, Yinshen Yin low dose group 1.72, mercaminum group 1.55 and tremella group 1.11

  18. Feasibility of landfill gas as a liquefied natural gas fuel source for refuse trucks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zietsman, Josias; Bari, Muhammad Ehsanul; Rand, Aaron J; Gokhale, Bhushan; Lord, Dominique; Kumar, Sunil

    2008-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a methodology to evaluate the feasibility of using landfill gas (LFG) as a liquefied natural gas (LNG) fuel source for heavy-duty refuse trucks operating on landfills. Using LFG as a vehicle fuel can make the landfills more self-sustaining, reduce their dependence on fossil fuels, and reduce emissions and greenhouse gases. Acrion Technologies Inc. in association with Mack Trucks Inc. developed a technology to generate LNG from LFG using the CO2 WASH process. A successful application of this process was performed at the Eco Complex in Burlington County, PA. During this application two LNG refuse trucks were operated for 600 hr each using LNG produced from gases from the landfill. The methodology developed in this paper can evaluate the feasibility of three LFG options: doing nothing, electricity generation, and producing LNG to fuel refuse trucks. The methodology involved the modeling of several components: LFG generation, energy recovery processes, fleet operations, economic feasibility, and decision-making. The economic feasibility considers factors such as capital, maintenance, operational, and fuel costs, emissions and tax benefits, and the sale of products such as surplus LNG and food-grade carbon dioxide (CO2). Texas was used as a case study. The 96 landfills in Texas were prioritized and 17 landfills were identified that showed potential for converting LFG to LNG for use as a refuse truck fuel. The methodology was applied to a pilot landfill in El Paso, TX. The analysis showed that converting LFG to LNG to fuel refuse trucks proved to be the most feasible option and that the methodology can be applied for any landfill that considers this option.

  19. DMA, a bisbenzimidazole, offers radioprotection by promoting NFκB transactivation through NIK/IKK in human glioma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navrinder Kaur

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ionizing radiation (IR exposure often occurs for human beings through occupational, medical, environmental, accidental and/or other sources. Thus, the role of radioprotector is essential to overcome the complex series of overlapping responses to radiation induced DNA damage. METHODS AND RESULTS: Treatment of human glioma U87 cells with DMA (5- {4-methylpiperazin-1-yl}-2-[2'-(3, 4-dimethoxyphenyl-5'-benzimidazolyl] in the presence or absence of radiation uncovered differential regulation of an array of genes and proteins using microarray and 2D PAGE techniques. Pathway construction followed by relative quantitation of gene expression of the identified proteins and their interacting partners led to the identification of MAP3K14 (NFκB inducing kinase, NIK as the candidate gene affected in response to DMA. Subsequently, over expression and knock down of NIK suggested that DMA affects NFκB inducing kinase mediated phosphorylation of IKKα and IKKβ both alone and in the presence of ionizing radiation (IR. The TNF-α induced NFκB dependent luciferase reporter assay demonstrated 1.65, 2.26 and 3.62 fold increase in NFκB activation at 10, 25 and 50 µM DMA concentrations respectively, compared to control cells. This activation was further increased by 5.8 fold in drug + radiation (50 µM +8.5 Gy treated cells in comparison to control. We observed 51% radioprotection in control siRNA transfected cells that attenuated to 15% in siRNA NIK treated U87 cells, irradiated in presence of DMA at 24 h. CONCLUSIONS: Our studies show that NIK/IKK mediated NFκB activation is more intensified in cells over expressing NIK and treated with DMA, alone or in combination with ionizing radiation, indicating that DMA promotes NIK mediated NFκB signaling. This subsequently leads to the radioprotective effect exhibited by DMA.

  20. Águas minerais de algumas fontes naturais brasileiras Mineral waters from brazilian natural sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. P. Rebelo

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available Paciente de litíase renal é estimulado a aumentar a ingestão hídrica, principalmente na forma de água tratada da torneira, pela irrelevante biodisponibilidade de minerais em sua composição. O benefício é atribuído à redução da saturação dos sais urinários. Não está claro se as águas minerais naturais comercialmente disponíveis também é benéfica. OBJETIVO. Divulgar as informações sobre as características químicas e físico-químicas de águas minerais naturais de algumas das diversas fontes brasileiras. Essas informações serão de utilidade na análise de protocolos de pesquisa e na orientação do paciente. MÉTODOS. Foi feito uma coletânea das informações que constam nos rótulos de garrafas de águas minerais naturais, predominantemente não-gasosas, acessíveis ao consumo carioca. A partir da composição salina provável, foi calculada a concentração iônica de cada mineral. RESULTADOS. Foram estudadas as informações de 36 fontes situadas em alguns estados brasileiros. O pH, a 25oC, variou de 4,1 a 9,3 na dependência da fonte e foi linearmente correlacionado com as concentrações dos cátions cálcio, magnésio, sódio e do anion bicarbonato. Isto foi atribuído à alta alcalinidade desses sais, que contêm cerca de 70% de bicarbonato na molécula. Os teores de cálcio (0,3 a 42 mg/l, de magnésio (0,0 a 18 mg/l e de bicarbonato (4 a 228 mg/l foram considerados relativamente baixos. CONCLUSÃO. O teor mineral das fontes brasileiras que compuseram esse levantamento é baixo, com cerca de 70% delas apresentando teores de cálcio e de magnésio abaixo de 10 mg/l e 1 mg/l, respectivamente, semelhantes ao da água tratada da torneira.PURPOSE. To divulge information on the chemical composition and physical-chemical features of some mineral waters from Brazilian natural sources that will be of useful protocol in vestigation and patient advice. METHODS. The survey was based on bottle labels of non

  1. Numerical investigation of natural and mixed convection heat transfer on optimal distribution of discrete heat sources mounted on a substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karvinkoppa, M. V.; Hotta, T. K.

    2017-11-01

    The paper deals with the numerical investigation of natural and mixed convection heat transfer on optimal distribution of five non-identical protruding discrete heat sources (Aluminium) mounted on a substrate (Bakelite) board. The heat sources are subjected to a uniform heat flux of 2000 W/m2. The temperature of heat sources along with the effect of thermal interaction between them is predicted by carrying out numerical simulations using ANSYS Icepak, and the results are validated with the existing experimental findings. The results suggest that mixed convection is a better method for cooling of discrete heat source modules. Also, the temperature of heat sources is a strong function of their shape, size, and positioning on the substrate. Effect of radiation is studied by painting the surface of heat sources by black paint. The results conclude that, under natural convection heat transfer, the temperature of heat sources drops by 6-13% from polished to black painted surface, while mixed convection results in the drop by 3-15%. The numerical predictions are in strong agreement with experimental results.

  2. JVLA observations of IC 348 SW: Compact radio sources and their nature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodríguez, Luis F.; Zapata, Luis A.; Palau, Aina, E-mail: l.rodriguez@crya.unam.mx, E-mail: l.zapata@crya.unam.mx, E-mail: a.palau@crya.unam.mx [Centro de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, UNAM, Apdo. Postal 3-72 (Xangari), 58089 Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico)

    2014-07-20

    We present sensitive 2.1 and 3.3 cm Jansky Very Large Array radio continuum observations of the region IC 348 SW. We detect a total of 10 compact radio sources in the region, 7 of which are first reported here. One of the sources is associated with the remarkable periodic time-variable infrared source LRLL 54361, opening the possibility of monitoring this object at radio wavelengths. Four of the sources appear to be powering outflows in the region, including HH 211 and HH 797. In the case of the rotating outflow HH 797, we detect a double radio source at its center, separated by ∼3''. Two of the sources are associated with infrared stars that possibly have gyrosynchrotron emission produced in active magnetospheres. Finally, three of the sources are interpreted as background objects.

  3. Performance of the Radioprotection Engineering Group in the new structure of IPEN-CNEN/SP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahyun, A.; Sordi, G.M.A.A.

    1992-01-01

    A comparison between the old and now CNEN (Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission) organizational structure was performed. The new structure lead to a new IPEN (Nuclear and Energetics Research Institute) organization and also to gave use to a Radioprotection Engineering Area, The principal modification raised a second block already in accomplishment. The main aim of the Radioprotection Engineering Area is to turn personnel team interested, concerned, dexterous, dynamic and competitive on their activities besides to provide it of a continuously improvement and updating about technical activities in radiation protection. From these results an evaluation of possible drawbacks and ways to overcome them will be performed. (author)

  4. Radioprotection optimization in the electro-nuclear, industrial and medical fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauron, C.

    2007-01-01

    This document proposes abstracts of interventions which have been proposed during a two-day meeting in La Rochelle in September 2006. Thus, it evokes recent regulatory evolutions (the new requirements introduced in the French regulation, the new developments introduced by the International Commission for Radiological Protection or ICRP with respect with the optimization principle), some assessments and returns on experience (external dosimetric monitoring, an inventory of radioprotection events as an optimization tool, a statistic study of quality control in radiology), workstation studies, and radioprotection optimization as a collective approach

  5. Current knowledge from experimental works with radioprotective drugs from the viewpoint of latest scientific research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skalka, J.

    2008-01-01

    The protection of both human and animal population against a radiation impairment proves to be an impulse for continuous intensive searching for plants with radioprotective properties, identification of their radioprotective components and examination of their effects both in vivo an in vitro. I am presenting the results as well as knowledge of a latest scientific research in this field with testing the following plants: Vigna radiata, Mentha piperita, Citrus aurantium var. amara, Syzygium cumini, Tinospora cordifolia, Aegle marmelos, Phyllanthus amarus, Aloe vera, Angelica sinensis, Rosemarinus officinalis, Panax ginseng, Hippophae rhamnoides, Ocimum sanctum, Crataegus microphylla. (authors)

  6. Aminoacids used as radioprotective substances against Cs137 and Sr90 mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danetskaya, E.V.; Ramzaev, P.V.; Troitskaya, M.N.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental study on white rats into the radioprotective action of ten essential amino acids has that valine, arginine, and histidine all effect appreciably the life span and absorbed doses of the principal radionuclides, 137 Cs and 90 Sr. When these amino acids are fed to rats, the survival rate increases and hemopoiesis tends to return to normal more rapidly; the reproductive function is unaffected. The mechanism of radioprotective action of these amino acids has been studied inadequately, but they seem to have a role to play in the metabolism of sulfur-containing compounds. The remaining amino acids have no protective action

  7. The European ALARA network, support and medium of radioprotection optimisation in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauron, C.; Lefaure, C.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the ALARA principle which has been used in radioprotection for the past thirty years, and also the network bearing the same name. ALARA means 'As Low As Reasonably Achievable'. The article recalls the different stages of theoretical and conceptual developments which gave birth to a radioprotection optimisation procedure. It also recalls practical developments. It presents the EAN, the European ALARA Network, its objectives, its recent evolution. It evokes the impact of its recommendations, its means of information, and indicates its perspectives

  8. Acute toxicity and radioprotective efficiency of gammaphos injected intramuscularly to mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuna, P.

    1985-01-01

    In experiments on mice it was shown that acute toxicity of gammaphos (WR-2721) was 790 mg/kg and 862 mg-kg after intraperitoneal and intramuscular administration, resperctively. Gammaphos in the dose of 100 mg/kg, injected intramuscularly, increased the radioresistance of mice in nearly the same way as cystamine, in the dose of 150 mg/kg, did. The increase in the dose of gammaphos up to 200 or 300 mg/kg, injected intramuscularly, enhanced the radioprotective effect. No change was observed in the radioprotective efficiency of gammaphos after intramuscular injection as compared to intraperitoneal administration of the protective agent in the same dose

  9. Environmental radioprotection: main lessons learnt from the Envirhom programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnier-Laplace, J.; Adam, C.; Gilbin, R.; Simon, O.; Tran, D.; Massabuau, J.C.; Fortin, C.; Denison, D.; Pradines, C.; Floriani, M.; Henner, P.

    2004-01-01

    Within the field of chronic low-level exposure of ecosystems to radionuclides where data are critically sparse, the ENVIRHOM research programme launched two years ago at the Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety, proposes to acquire the needed knowledge for Ecological Risk Assessment specific to bioaccumulation of alpha and beta emitters in living organisms. Gaps of knowledge within this field constitute a strong limitation to our capability to make a reasonable risk estimate. Internal doses cannot be accurately calculated and potentially associated biological effects at any organization level remain fairly unknown. As a result, derivation of ecologically relevant and knowledge-based predicted no-effects concentrations becomes a critical issue in ERA. The scope of this presentation is to illustrate the relevance of the development of a greater depth of understanding of radionuclide fate and biological effects at several hierarchical levels to support quantitative risk assessments with defined and acceptable uncertainty bounds. The following crucial issues are discussed and exemplified for uranium and other alpha or beta emitters. First, radionuclide bioavailability is a key knowledge to an accurate assessment of both exposure and effect and media quality criteria are needed. Second, specificities of chronic exposures have to be taken into account to obtain accurate dose estimates and induced effects, as exposure conditions (concentration and duration) strongly modify the radionuclide internal distribution at various biological scales. Lastly, considering different scales for biological effects (from early to delayed, from subcellular to high organisation level) is crucial to evidence ecologically relevant indicators. A global overview of operational data from ENVIRHOM - media criteria to assess exposure, dose-effects relationships at various biological scales that constitute primary data to introduce radionuclides in ERA methods in a consistent manner

  10. Radioprotection conferred by dextran sulfate given before irradiation in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, W.M.; Peeke, J.

    1986-01-01

    Dextran sulfate (DS) has been observed to cause mobilization (fivefold) of hemopoietic stem cells (HSC) and leukocytes, primarily lymphocytes, into the peripheral blood of mice within 2-3 h after intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection. This effect was dose dependent and was prolonged for several hours when the high-molecular-weight version DS500 (500,000 daltons) was used. When DS500 was given 1-3 days before irradiation, hemopoietic recovery was markedly enhanced. Postirradiation injection was ineffective. By ten days after irradiation (7.0 Gy), the number of endogenous spleen colonies (CFUs) and the splenic mass were much larger if DS pretreatment had been given. This effect was dependent on the dose of DS500 and on the time administered, 60 mg/kg producing a maximal effect when given three days before irradiation. DS500 caused a transient anaphylactoid shock, however, in most mice--mild at low doses but potentially lethal at doses above 40 mg/kg (10% mortality within 1-3 days after 60 mg/kg). The following results were obtained with 50 mg/kg, a compromise dose causing minimal mortality (3%) given three days before irradiation. Reticulocyte reappearance was earlier in irradiated mice given DS500, indicating earlier erythropoietic recovery. Some of these reticulocytes were resistant to lysing agents, so their appearance could be detected using the Coulter electronic cell counter, as well as in stained blood smears. The 30-day mortality due to bone marrow failure after irradiation was significantly decreased in DS-treated mice below 9.5 Gy, and the LD50/30 was increased by 0.5 Gy. This study shows that dextran sulfate exerts a radioprotective influence on the hemopoietic system and hence survival when administered prophylactically

  11. Sourcing methane and carbon dioxide emissions from a small city: Influence of natural gas leakage and combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Samuel D; Ingraffea, Anthony R; Sparks, Jed P

    2016-11-01

    Natural gas leakage and combustion are major sources of methane (CH 4 ) and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), respectively; however, our understanding of emissions from cities is limited. We mapped distribution pipeline leakage using a mobile CH 4 detection system, and continuously monitored atmospheric CO 2 and CH 4 concentrations and carbon isotopes (δ 13 C-CO 2 and δ 13 C-CH 4 ) for one-year above Ithaca, New York. Pipeline leakage rates were low (emission source in that wind sector. Our results demonstrate pipeline leakage rates are low in cities with a low extent of leak prone pipe, and natural gas power facilities may be an important source of urban and suburban emissions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Optimization of radioprotection in the nuclear power, industrial and medical domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalifa, G.

    2002-06-01

    These 3. SFRP days are devoted to the optimization of radioprotection in the context of the evolution of the regulation in this domain with the introduction of the ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) principle in the public health regulations. First of all, the optimization of radioprotection is a principle of action aiming at elaborating a practical organization of risk taking based on the responsibility of the different actors and leading to an individual and collective management of the radiological risk. These days are oriented towards practical applications of this optimization and in a lesser extend towards the general radioprotection policies and the technical aspects, in particular the operational dosimetry: 1 - Alara bases and regulation: bases of radioprotection optimization; optimization and Belgium regulation: the contribution of the Royal by-law from July 20, 2001; status of the French regulation; 2 - Alara policies in the nuclear power domain: maintenance of PWR reactor vessels: exploratory approach of a joint safety and radioprotection control by the nuclear safety authority; implementation of the Alara approach at the CEA: status and perspectives; optimization of activities and Alara project at EdF; the file for the intervention in radioactive environment: an Alara tool; 3 - practical applications and experience feedback: optimization in interventional vascular radiology unit; forecast evaluation and personnel exposures optimization in the experiment hall of the laser integration line at CESTA; a French system of radioprotection experience feedback for radiological incidents; the European Alara network: a growing up dialogue and improvement structure; 4 - Alara policies in the medical and first aid services: dosimetry of radiodiagnosis personnel; integration of the radioactive waste management organization to the elimination files of hospital wastes; optimization of patient's radioprotection: a calculation approach of the specific risk by sex

  13. Pricing the (European) option to switch between two energy sources: An application to crude oil and natural gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gatfaoui, Hayette

    2015-01-01

    We consider a firm, which can choose between crude oil and natural gas to run its business. The firm selects the energy source, which minimizes its energy or production costs at a given time horizon. Assuming the energy strategy to be established over a fixed time window, the energy choice decision will be made at a given future date T. In this light, the firm's energy cost can be considered as a long position in a risk-free bond by an amount of the terminal oil price, and a short position in a European put option to switch from oil to gas by an amount of the terminal oil price too. As a result, the option to switch from crude oil to natural gas allows for establishing a hedging strategy with respect to energy costs. Modeling stochastically the underlying asset of the European put, we propose a valuation formula of the option to switch and calibrate the pricing formula to empirical data on a daily basis. Hence, our innovative framework handles widely the hedge against the price increase of any given energy source versus the price of another competing energy source (i.e. minimizing energy costs). Moreover, we provide a price for the cost-reducing effect of the capability to switch from one energy source to another one (i.e. hedging energy price risk). - Highlights: • We consider a firm, which chooses either crude oil or natural gas as an energy source. • The capability to switch offers the firm a hedge against energy commodity price risk. • A European put option prices the ability to switch from crude oil to natural gas. • The capability to switch between two energy sources reduces the firm's energy costs. • The discount illustrates the efficiency of the energy management policy (e.g. timing).

  14. Gross-beta activity in ground water: natural sources and artifacts of sampling and laboratory analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Alan H.

    1995-01-01

    Gross-beta activity has been used as an indicator of beta-emitting isotopes in water since at least the early 1950s. Originally designed for detection of radioactive releases from nuclear facilities and weapons tests, analysis of gross-beta activity is widely used in studies of naturally occurring radioactivity in ground water. Analyses of about 800 samples from 5 ground-water regions of the United States provide a basis for evaluating the utility of this measurement. The data suggest that measured gross-beta activities are due to (1) long-lived radionuclides in ground water, and (2) ingrowth of beta-emitting radionuclides during holding times between collection of samples and laboratory measurements.Although40K and228Ra appear to be the primary sources of beta activity in ground water, the sum of40K plus228Ra appears to be less than the measured gross-beta activity in most ground-water samples. The difference between the contribution from these radionuclides and gross-beta activity is most pronounced in ground water with gross-beta activities > 10 pCi/L, where these 2 radionuclides account for less than one-half the measured ross-beta activity. One exception is groundwater from the Coastal Plain of New Jersey, where40K plus228Ra generally contribute most of the gross-beta activity. In contrast,40K and228Ra generally contribute most of beta activity in ground water with gross-beta activities 10 pCi/L. Ingrowth of beta-emitting progeny of238U, specifically234Pa and234Th, contributes much of the measured gross-beta activity in ground water from 4 of the 5 areas studied. Consequently, gross-beta activity measurements commonly overestimate the abundance of beta-emitting radionuclides actually present in ground water. Differing sample holding times before analysis lead to differing amounts of ingrowth of the two progeny. Therefore, holding times can affect observed gross-beta measurements, particularly in ground water with238U activities that are moderate to high

  15. Genesis and mobility of natural hydrogen: energy source or storable energy carrier?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vacquand, Ch.

    2011-01-01

    This PhD thesis is a study of the production of hydrogen (H 2 ) in several types of continental contexts and an experimental approach of its migration in geological media. In a first part, H 2 -rich gases that were associated with methane CH 4 and nitrogen N 2 from Oman, the Philippines, Turkey and Kansas (USA) were analyzed. Systematic analyses of stable isotopes of carbon, hydrogen and noble gases indicate a relatively low-temperature and shallow aquifer origin for this H 2 . At the surface, we made clear that the H 2 seepage was associated with high-pH sources that capture the atmospheric CO 2 , forming calcite and aragonite. The very heavy carbon isotopic signatures for most of the measured methane suggest a reduction of the inorganic dissolved carbon by this H 2 . We propose that, as in the case of hydrothermal oceanic serpentinization, but at much lower temperatures, the connection between H 2 production and the ultra basic rocks is due to the presence of abundant iron (II) and to adequate redox conditions that allow the reduction of water to H 2 and a good conservation of this H 2 , a variable part of which is converted to methane, depending on the CO 2 activity. The combination of this H 2 generation model with noble gases migration, hydrogeological and geological data allowed us to estimate a global flux of H 2 production from the large ophiolitic belts in the world of 10 13 to 10 18 m 3 /yr. In a second part, we realized migration experiments of H 2 in natural or reconstituted geological media in a laboratory. We showed that this migration is not particularly important compared to that of other gases and quite close to that of argon. This moderate migration, lower than that of CO 2 in porous saturated media is due to a relatively low solubility of H 2 in water and to an effective diffusion coefficient in porous media lower than for helium and close to that of argon. Since H 2 does neither migrate faster nor more efficiently than CH 4 for example, these

  16. Proceedings of the 6. conference days on radioprotection optimization in the nuclear, industrial and medical domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vial, Eric; Bernier, Marie-Odile; De Vita, Antoine; Pignot, Christine; Bardelay, Chantal; Godet, Jean-Luc; Perrin, Marie-Line; Saad, Nawal; Deboodt, Pascal P.A.; Faure, Sophie; Fusil, Laurence; Alvarez, Manuel; Tourneux, C.; Barbey, Pierre; Pigree, Gilbert; Lemarchand, Maxime; Buchaniec, Remi; Rocourt, Nathalie; Bouden, Helene; Lasselin, Stephanie; Moeneclaey, Ludivine; Rebullida, Delphine; Werquin, Marie Odile; Dubus, Francois; Ponsard, Samuel; Marques, Sophie; K-Zerho, R.; Vacher, F.; Vrammout, D.; Guillot, E.; Fucks, I.; Moukarzel, Marianne; Ryckx, Nick; Verdun, Francis R.; Lefaure, Christian; Balduyck, Sebastien; Cruz Suarez, Rodolfo; ); Bouvy, Christophe; Geets, Jean-Michel; Nactergal, Benoit; Davet, Laurent; Carlier, Pierre; Lereculey, Clement; Livolsi, Paul; PIN, Alain; Ducou le Pointe, Hubert; Le Faou, Yann; Courageot, Estelle; Gaillard-Lecanu, Emmanuelle; Kutschera, Reinald; Le Meur, Gaelle; Lantheaume, Noel; Schiedts, Dominique; Nouveau, Philippe; Walterscheid, Bertrand; Humbert, Edouard; Tranchant, Philippe; Dabat-Blondeau, Charlotte; Renard, Francois; Lucas, Jean-Yves; Fritioff, Karin; Svedberg, Torgny; Carlson, Marie; Hennigor, Staffan; Schieber, Caroline; Andresz, Sylvain; Roch, Patrice; Celier, David; Aubert, Bernard; Etard, Cecile; Bouette, Aurelien; Carette, M.F.; Haddad, S.; Khalil, A.; Foulquier, J.N.; Parrot, A.; Ceyrolle, C.; Bechard, Pascal; Clero, E.; Leuraud, K.; Laurier, D.; Couzinet, M.; LE GUEN, B.; Davesne, Estelle; Blanchardon, Eric; Franck, Didier; Quesne, Benoit; De Vita, Antoine; Chojnacki, Eric; Grandeau, E.; Dumont, N.; Cattelotte, J.; Dine, Pierre Emmanuel; Guersen, Joel; Nwatsock, Joseph Francis; Boyer, Louis; Karmouche, K.; Moyon, J.B.; Cassagnes, L.; Garcier, J.M.; Lortal, B.; Caron, J.; Karst, M.; Rage, Estelle; Caer-Lorho, Sylvaine; Drubay, Damien; Ancelet, Sophie; Laurier, Dominique; Laroche, Pierre; Sans, Philippe; Tournier, Helene; Zvorykin, Sonia

    2014-06-01

    This 6. ALARA conference was jointly organised by the French Society of Radiation Protection (SFRP) and several professional associations (ABR, AFPPE, ARRAD, ATSR, RAMIP, SFPM, SFR). The conference was the occasion to review all aspects relative to the issues of radioprotection optimization and to its implementation to workers, patients and the public in the nuclear, industrial and medical domains. A particular attention must be given to the application of the ALARA principle in all sectors relevant to radioprotection, especially in a context characterized by: big dismantling works under preparation in the French nuclear park, an increased use of X-radiation in the medical domain - involving both patients and medical personnel, new knowledge concerning the health effects of ionizing radiations, and an evolution of European and international radioprotection safety standards. All these aspects were discussed during these conference days. This document brings together the available presentations (slides) together with their corresponding abstracts (in French) and dealing with: 1 - Review of the evolution of workers/patients exposure in France and comparison with international data (E. Vial); 2 - Status of low dose epidemiology (M.O. Bernier); 3 - Radioprotection optimization method at the MELOX plant (A. De Vita); 4 - Elaboration method for the annual dosimetric objective of the French nuclear park (C. Pignot); 5 - Optimisation principle in the new EURATOM Directive (N. Saad); 6 - Integrated management of radiological and non-radiological risks: the inevitable challenge (P. Deboodt); 7 - Radiological and conventional risks: the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) integrated approach (S. Faure); 8 - EVEREST (Evolving towards an entry into controlled areas in street clothes, M. Alvarez); 9 - Example of multi-risk management in the medical domain (C. Tourneux); 10 - Radioprotection optimisation in the research domain (P. Barbey); 11 - Child scanning dosimetry

  17. Global Scale Attribution of Anthropogenic and Natural Dust Sources and their Emission Rates Based on MODIS Deep Blue Aerosol Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginoux, Paul; Prospero, Joseph M.; Gill, Thomas E.; Hsu, N. Christina; Zhao, Ming

    2012-01-01

    Our understanding of the global dust cycle is limited by a dearth of information about dust sources, especially small-scale features which could account for a large fraction of global emissions. Here we present a global-scale high-resolution (0.1 deg) mapping of sources based on Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Deep Blue estimates of dust optical depth in conjunction with other data sets including land use. We ascribe dust sources to natural and anthropogenic (primarily agricultural) origins, calculate their respective contributions to emissions, and extensively compare these products against literature. Natural dust sources globally account for 75% of emissions; anthropogenic sources account for 25%. North Africa accounts for 55% of global dust emissions with only 8% being anthropogenic, mostly from the Sahel. Elsewhere, anthropogenic dust emissions can be much higher (75% in Australia). Hydrologic dust sources (e.g., ephemeral water bodies) account for 31% worldwide; 15% of them are natural while 85% are anthropogenic. Globally, 20% of emissions are from vegetated surfaces, primarily desert shrublands and agricultural lands. Since anthropogenic dust sources are associated with land use and ephemeral water bodies, both in turn linked to the hydrological cycle, their emissions are affected by climate variability. Such changes in dust emissions can impact climate, air quality, and human health. Improved dust emission estimates will require a better mapping of threshold wind velocities, vegetation dynamics, and surface conditions (soil moisture and land use) especially in the sensitive regions identified here, as well as improved ability to address small-scale convective processes producing dust via cold pool (haboob) events frequent in monsoon regimes.

  18. The quality of sustainability and the nature of open source software

    OpenAIRE

    Böttcher, Jens

    2005-01-01

    The aim is to categorise Open Source Software as a commons based production process and resource. The definition of the commons is always accompanied by the doubt about its sustainability, the so-called "tragedy of the commons." Therefore it is worth to have a closer look on Open Source and why a "tragedy" does not appear.

  19. Radioprotection optimization in the electro-nuclear, industrial and medical fields; Optimisation de la radioprotection dans les domaines electronucleaire industriel et medical

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauron, C. [Institut National de Recherche et de Securite, INRS, Dept. Etudes et Assistance Medicales, 75 - Paris (France); Gagna, G. [Service de protection radiologique des armees (SPRA), 92 - Clamart (France)

    2010-07-01

    This document proposes abstracts of interventions which have been proposed during a two-day meeting in Saint-Malo in September 2010. Thus, it evokes recent legal and regulatory evolutions (new recommendations by the International Commission for Radiological Protection or ICRP, the new Basic Safety Standards of BSS of the European Commission), the optimization in the electro-nuclear field (overview of the situation for the main nuclear operators, practical examples of radioprotection optimization through the ALARA approach), in the industrial field (ALARA approach for the design of the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility of IFMIF, alternative techniques of use of industrial gamma-graphy, radon management in private dwelling in Switzerland, optimization implementation in NORMS companies, management of solids and sites polluted by radioactive substances), in the medical field (teaching in radioprotection, use of ALARA in design in a proto-therapy centre, development of alternative techniques for the use of ionizing radiations in the medical field, use of diagnosis reference levels for optimization in radio-diagnosis, ALARA in veterinary radio-diagnosis, optimization of doses in nuclear medicine, optimization in interventional radiology). A last set of interventions dealt with the activity international networks for the development of radioprotection

  20. Natural vs. Anthropogenic: Combined Measurements of Methane and Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) for Investigating Sources of Methane Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zannoni, N.; Assan, S.; Gros, V.; Laville, P.; Loubet, B.; Ciuraru, R.; Baisnee, D.; Bonsang, B.; Sarda Esteve, R.; Chuppin, G.; Truong, F.; Lafouge, F.; Vogel, F. R.

    2016-12-01

    Methane is the second globally most abundant anthropogenic greenhouse gas, whose emissions contribute more than 1/3 of today's additional anthropogenic warming. Methane is emitted from the production and transport of coal, oil and natural gas, as well as from livestock and agricultural practices as well as from natural sources such as e.g. wetlands, freshwaters and wild fauna. Volatile organic compounds constitute less than 0.1% of the total atmospheric composition; however, their emissions and further atmospheric photo-oxidation reactions produce ozone and secondary organic aerosols which have adverse effects on climate and air quality. We measured the concentration of methane and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) over a winter wheat (Triticum aestivum) cropland located in the North-West of Europe during June 2016. The measurements site was located nearby a farm and a methanizer bioreactor, therefore was affected by contrasted sources of emissions: agricultural practices, enteric digestion of livestock, animal manures as well as possible leakages from the biogas unit. Here, measurements of methane, its isotopic composition, and VOCs concentrations are combined to investigate the fingerprint of these sources. Specifically, VOCs, as alkanes which are co-emitted by natural gas, and other compounds as ammonia and NOx will help to unravel the different sources contributions.

  1. Incorporation of the radioprotective molecule cysteamine in model membranes: an NMR study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laval, J.D.; Debouzy, J.C.; Fauvelle, F.; Viret, J.; Fatome, M.

    1995-01-01

    The incorporation of the cysteamine molecule in small unilamellar vesicles was studies using proton NMR technics. A linear inclusion of the radioprotective molecule was firstly observed by increasing the Cysteamine/phospholipid molar ratios, followed by a saturation for the highest ratios. Such results may be adapted to a new galenic form study. (authors). 6 refs., 2 figs

  2. Radioprotective Effect of Lidocaine on Function and Ultrastructure of Salivary Glands Receiving Fractionated Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakim, Samer George; Benedek, Gèza Attila; Su Yuxiong; Jacobsen, Hans Christian; Klinger, Matthias; Dendorfer, Andreas; Hemmelmann, Claudia; Meller, Birgit; Nadrowitz, Roger; Rades, Dirk; Sieg, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced xerostomia still represents a common side effect after radiotherapy for head-and-neck malignancies. The aim of the present study was to examine the radioprotective effect of lidocaine hydrochloride during fractionated radiation in an experimental animal model. Methods and Materials: To evaluate the influence of different radiation doses on salivary gland function and the radioprotective effect of lidocaine, rabbits were irradiated with 15, 25, 30, and 35 Gy (equivalent doses in 2-Gy fractions equivalent to 24, 40, 48, and 56 Gy, respectively). Lidocaine hydrochloride (10 and 12 mg/kg) was administered before every radiation fraction in the treatment groups. Salivary gland function was assessed by flow sialometry and sialoscintigraphy, and the morphologic changes were evaluated using transmission electron microscopy. Results: Functional impairment was first observed after 35 Gy and pretreatment with lidocaine improved radiation tolerance of both parotid and submandibular glands. The use of 12 mg/kg lidocaine was superior and displayed significant radioprotection with regard to flow sialometry and sialoscintigraphy. The ultrastructure was largely preserved after pretreatment with both lidocaine doses. Conclusions: Lidocaine represents an effective radioprotective agent and a promising approach for clinical application to avoid radiation-induced functional impairment of salivary glands.

  3. Influence of cesium and lithium ions on radioprotective effectiveness of taurine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhalaya, M.Ya.; Novosel'tseva, S.D.; Kolesnikov, Yu.A.; Bogatyrev, G.P.; Yartsev, E.I.; Kudryashov, Yu.B.

    1976-01-01

    In vitro experiments with irradiated cultures of heart cells from cynomolgus monkeys and mice and in vivo experiments on irradiated mice indicated that CsNO 3 , LiOAc and Li 2 CO 3 potentiated the radioprotective effect of taurine. The maximum effect was observed when equimolar conceptions of taurine and the metal salts were used

  4. Radioprotective Effect of Lidocaine on Function and Ultrastructure of Salivary Glands Receiving Fractionated Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakim, Samer George, E-mail: samer.hakim@mkg-chir.mu-luebeck.de [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Luebeck, Luebeck (Germany); Benedek, Geza Attila [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Luebeck, Luebeck (Germany); Su Yuxiong [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Luebeck, Luebeck (Germany); Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guanghua School of Stomatology, Guanghua (China); Jacobsen, Hans Christian [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Luebeck, Luebeck (Germany); Klinger, Matthias [Institute of Anatomy, University of Luebeck, Luebeck (Germany); Dendorfer, Andreas [Institute of Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Luebeck, Luebeck (Germany); Hemmelmann, Claudia [Institute of Medical Biometry and Statistics, University of Luebeck, Luebeck (Germany); Meller, Birgit [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University of Luebeck, Luebeck (Germany); Nadrowitz, Roger; Rades, Dirk [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Luebeck, Luebeck (Germany); Sieg, Peter [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Luebeck, Luebeck (Germany)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: Radiation-induced xerostomia still represents a common side effect after radiotherapy for head-and-neck malignancies. The aim of the present study was to examine the radioprotective effect of lidocaine hydrochloride during fractionated radiation in an experimental animal model. Methods and Materials: To evaluate the influence of different radiation doses on salivary gland function and the radioprotective effect of lidocaine, rabbits were irradiated with 15, 25, 30, and 35 Gy (equivalent doses in 2-Gy fractions equivalent to 24, 40, 48, and 56 Gy, respectively). Lidocaine hydrochloride (10 and 12 mg/kg) was administered before every radiation fraction in the treatment groups. Salivary gland function was assessed by flow sialometry and sialoscintigraphy, and the morphologic changes were evaluated using transmission electron microscopy. Results: Functional impairment was first observed after 35 Gy and pretreatment with lidocaine improved radiation tolerance of both parotid and submandibular glands. The use of 12 mg/kg lidocaine was superior and displayed significant radioprotection with regard to flow sialometry and sialoscintigraphy. The ultrastructure was largely preserved after pretreatment with both lidocaine doses. Conclusions: Lidocaine represents an effective radioprotective agent and a promising approach for clinical application to avoid radiation-induced functional impairment of salivary glands.

  5. Reduced bone marrow pO2 following treatment with radioprotective drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allalunis-Turner, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    The sensitizer adduct technique [(3H]misonidazole binding) was used to assess the extent of murine bone marrow hypoxia following treatment with a variety of radioprotectors. The binding rates previously determined in vivo were compared to those obtained by incubating marrow cells in atmospheres of varying oxygen content. Parallel experiments demonstrated that the oxygen dependence of [3H]misonidazole binding (Km approximately 0.15% oxygen) was similar to the oxygen dependence of marrow radiosensitivity (Km approximately 0.2% oxygen). Maximally radioprotective doses of several drugs have been shown to increase the binding of [3H]misonidazole significantly in vivo. A comparison to the in vitro binding rates suggests that the average oxygen concentration in the marrow at times associated with radioprotection was on the order of 0.5 to 0.8% oxygen. The relative importance of marrow hypoxia to the overall radioprotective effects of different drugs may vary considerably. However, these results have demonstrated that certain radioprotective drugs can induce marrow hypoxia and this reduced pO2 may contribute to the efficacy of these agents

  6. Modification of the radioprotective effect of hypoxic hypoxia by the artificial hibernation of the organism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ovakimov, V.G.; Yarmonenko, S.P.; Akademiya Meditsinskikh Nauk SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Ehksperimental'noj i Klinicheskoj Onkologii)

    1975-01-01

    A significant weakening of the radioprotective effect of hypoxic hypoxia has been noted in the hibernated mice the resistance of which to acute oxygen deficiency is artificially hibernated (hypothermia under conditions of neuroplegia). The dose decrease factor is about 1.27 and 2.5 for hibernated and nonhibernated animals, respectively

  7. Radio-protection problems presented by iodine isotopes in nuclear fuel chemical treatment plants (1962)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouzigues, H.; Scheidhauer, J.; Messainguiral, L.

    1962-01-01

    The origin of radio-iodine and the conditions in which it is liberated are given. The authors review the question of the risks associated with the presence of this radioelement In the atmosphere. Finally a method is proposed for the trapping and rapid measuring of the iodine in the vapour form, applicable to radioprotection. (authors) [fr

  8. Wheat bran extracts: a potent source of natural antioxidants for the stabilization of canola oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahid Chatha, Shahzad Ali

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, the antioxidant activity of different solvent extracts of wheat (var. Inqalab 91 bran was evaluated following different antioxidant assays using canola oil as the oxidation substrate. The bran samples were extracted with 80% and 100% methanol and acetone. A preliminary assessment of the antioxidant activity of the 80 and 100% acetone and methanolic extracts of wheat bran was done by the measurement of % inhibition of peroxidation in a linoleic acid system, total phenolic contents (TPC and bleachability of β-carotene in the linoleic acid system. Additionally, the canola oil samples were stabilized with crude concentrated extracts and subjected to ambient aging (6 months. The extent of oxidative deterioration was followed by the measurement of peroxide-, p-anisidine-, conjugated dienes-, and trienes- values. The results of ambient stored samples revealed a significant improvement in these oxidation parameters. The overall order of antioxidant activity of the extracts as determined by various antioxidant assays was determined to be; 80% methanolic extract > 100% methanolic extract > 80% acetone extracts . 100% acetone extract. The results of the present comprehensive analysis demonstrate that extracts of the wheat bran indigenous to Pakistan are a viable source of natural antioxidants and might be exploited for commercial and neutraceutical applications.

    En el presente trabajo la actividad antioxidante de diferentes extractos obtenidos con disolventes del salvado de trigo (var. Inqalab 91 fue evaluada mediante diferentes ensayos antioxidantes y aceite de canola como substrato de oxidación. Las muestras de salvado fueron extraídas con metanol y acetona al 80% y al 100%. La evaluación preliminar de la actividad antioxidante de los extractos de metanol y de acetona al 80% y 100% fue hecha mediante la medida del % de inhibición de la peroxidación en un sistema con ácido linoleico, el contenido total de fenoles

  9. Effects of source and seasonal variations of natural organic matters on the fate and transport of CeO2 nanoparticles in the environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natural organic matter (NOM) affects the stability and transport of nanoparticles (NPs) in natural waters by modifying their physiochemical properties. Source location, and seasonal variations, influence their molecular, physical and electrical charge properties. To understand th...

  10. Natural and Anthropogenic Methane Sources, New England, USA, 1990-1994

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains an inventory of natural and anthropogenic methane emissions for all counties in the six New England states of Connecticut, Rhode Island,...

  11. The radioprotective effects of carboxy fullerene C3 on AHH-1 cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shan, Husheng; Cai, Jianming; Huang, Yuecheng; Cui, Jianguo; Liu, Hanchen; Sun, Ding; Zhao, Fang; Dong, Junru; Li, Bailong

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the radioprotective effects of carboxy fullerene C 3 on AHH-1 cell and it's prospective as a novel radioprotectant. Materials and Methods: Carboxy fullerene C 3 was prepared by chemical synthesis and trypan blue rejection test was performed to detect its cytotoxicity to AHH-1 cell. Then different concentration of C 3 was used to treat AHH-1 cells after radiated with 60 Coγ ray. Annexin-V/PI staining and flow cytometry assay were applied to assess the cell proliferation and apoptosis after irradiation. Results: C 3 showed little toxicity to AHH-1 cells with little change of trypan blue rejection rate during the drug concentration range 0-400 mg/L (P>0.05). We found in this study C 3 had good radioprotective effects to AHH-1 cell radiated with 1-8 Gy γ-ray. When the concentration was 10 mg/L, C 3 showed protection effects to AHH-1 cell irradiated with 4 Gy γ -ray, which was enhanced with increase of C 3 concentration. When the final concentration reached 200-400 mg/L, the cell survival rate after irradiation was similar to that of non-irradiated control cells(P >0.05). And the irradiation induced apoptosis and death rate were significantly lower than that of single radiation group cells(P 3 were time-dependant, and the best protection effects were observed when the C 3 was administered before irradiation (0-24 h). Conclusion: Carboxy fullerene C 3 has good radioprotective effects to AHH-1 cell, which is dose-dependent, and the higher concentration of C 3 is, the better protective effects it shows. In the effective drug concentration range of this study, C 3 do little harm on the survival rate of AHH-1 cell, which suggest that C 3 as a novel promising radioprotectant deserve to be further investigated. (author)

  12. Radioprotection in dentistry: Analysis of the Dentistry Faculties of the Rio de Janeiro State not referring at personnel and installations; Radioprotecao em Odontologia: analise das faculdades de Odontologia do Estado do Rio de Janeiro no tocante a pessoal e instalacoes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padilha F, L.G. [PEN-COPPE/UFRJ Fund. Tecnica Educacional Souza Marques. Av. Mirandela 786 c/15 26520-460, Nilopolis, RJ, (Brazil); Borges, J.C.; Raymundo Junior, R.; Koch, H.A

    1998-12-31

    The objective was to show the necessity and the importance of the training and formation of the dentist in radioprotection according to the recent proposal for technical regulations `Radiological protection directrixes in Medical and Dentistry radiodiagnostic` of the Secretaria do Vigilancia Sanitaria of Ministerio da Saude (SVSMS). This regulation establishes basic standards to radioprotection in the medical and dentistry areas, including principles, limits, obligations and basic controls for the man and environment protection, versus possible improper effects caused by the use of ionizing radiation sources. An analysis of the discipline programs of the Dentistry Schools of Rio de Janeiro state indicates that they show a little or none preoccupation by the radiological protection, which was confirmed through a survey applied toward responsible professors by department or radiology service to the dentistry Schools. This work suggests the creation or adaptation of the existing disciplines introducing radioprotection and images quality in radiodiagnostic, to improve, complement and to make uniform the formation of future dentists optimizing the solution of the identified problems. (Author)

  13. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF NATURAL CONVECTION IN A POROUS CAVITY FILLED WITH FERROFLUID IN PRESENCE OF MAGNETIC SOURCE

    OpenAIRE

    Pekmen Geridönmez, Bengisen

    2017-01-01

    In this study, numerical simulation of natural convection in a porous square cavity filled with Fe3O4-water is investigated. A magnetic source through the left wall of the cavity is also taken into account. Radial basis function based pseudo spectral (RBF-PS) method is applied. The effects of dimensionless parameters Darcy (Da), Hartmann (Ha), Rayleigh (Ra) numbers and solid volume fraction are presented both in terms of streamlines, isotherms and vorticity contours and average Nusselt numb...

  14. sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Yin Chiang

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study the simplified models of the ATM (Asynchronous Transfer Mode multiplexer network with Bernoulli random traffic sources. Based on the model, the performance measures are analyzed by the different output service schemes.

  15. Determining the source and genetic fingerprint of natural gases using noble gas geochemistry: a northern Appalachian Basin case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Andrew G.; Darrah, Thomas H.; Poreda, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Silurian and Devonian natural gas reservoirs present within New York state represent an example of unconventional gas accumulations within the northern Appalachian Basin. These unconventional energy resources, previously thought to be noneconomically viable, have come into play following advances in drilling (i.e., horizontal drilling) and extraction (i.e., hydraulic fracturing) capabilities. Therefore, efforts to understand these and other domestic and global natural gas reserves have recently increased. The suspicion of fugitive mass migration issues within current Appalachian production fields has catalyzed the need to develop a greater understanding of the genetic grouping (source) and migrational history of natural gases in this area. We introduce new noble gas data in the context of published hydrocarbon carbon (C1,C2+) (13C) data to explore the genesis of thermogenic gases in the Appalachian Basin. This study includes natural gases from two distinct genetic groups: group 1, Upper Devonian (Marcellus shale and Canadaway Group) gases generated in situ, characterized by early mature (13C[C1  C2][13C113C2]: –9), isotopically light methane, with low (4He) (average, 1  103 cc/cc) elevated 4He/40Ar and 21Ne/40Ar (where the asterisk denotes excess radiogenic or nucleogenic production beyond the atmospheric ratio), and a variable, atmospherically (air-saturated–water) derived noble gas component; and group 2, a migratory natural gas that emanated from Lower Ordovician source rocks (i.e., most likely, Middle Ordovician Trenton or Black River group) that is currently hosted primarily in Lower Silurian sands (i.e., Medina or Clinton group) characterized by isotopically heavy, mature methane (13C[C1 – C2] [13C113C2]: 3), with high (4He) (average, 1.85  103 cc/cc) 4He/40Ar and 21Ne/40Ar near crustal production levels and elevated crustal noble gas content (enriched 4He,21Ne, 40Ar). Because the release of each crustal noble gas (i.e., He, Ne, Ar

  16. Interlaboratory beta source calibration using TL and OSL on natural quartz

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goksu. H.Y.; Bailiff, I.K.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.

    1995-01-01

    Laboratories using luminescence methods for dose reconstruction have to make interlaboratory source calibrations-initially this will be a single isotope beta or gamma source using one particular reference material. The procedure requires not only the administration of exact doses to the material...... difficulties finding sufficient suitable quartz. Five different batches were obtained from the Merck company and tested for sensitivity, linearity and stability of the 340 degrees C peak, the 1992 batch was found to be the most appropriate. The irradiations were performed at the Secondary Standard Dosimetry...... Laboratory at GSF using a Go-60 source as well as the in situ measurements with an ionization chamber, calibrated to the primary standards of PTB Braunschweig. Irradiated and unirradiated quartz was distributed to the five laboratories and although different procedures were used for thermoluminescence...

  17. Chiral recognition of terpenoids in some pharmaceuticals derived from natural sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sybilska, Danuta; Asztemborska, Monika

    2002-12-31

    Capillary gas chromatography was applied to explore the enantiomeric composition of some terpenoids in pharmaceuticals of natural origin. The drugs under investigation were produced in Germany (Rowachol, Rowatinex), Poland (Terpichol, Terpinex, Rub arom, Herbolen and Oleum Camphoratum), Slovenia (Uroterp, Mentoklar) and United Kingdom (Olbas oil, Vicks Vapo Rub). The model compounds tested were: menthone, isomenthone, menthol, fenchone, borneol and camphor. It has been found that depending on the manufacturer, pharmaceuticals possessing similar chemical composition may differ considerably in enantiomer composition. Exceptionally large discrepancies have been found for the content of borneol and fenchone enantiomers in pharmaceuticals applied in liver and kidney diseases. It seems that the changes in enantiomeric composition are the main reason of the lack of general acceptance of natural medicines by clinicians. The study of enantiomeric composition may sometimes lead to information concerning the origin of preparation, i.e. natural or synthetic. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science B.V.

  18. Molecular markers for identifying municipal, domestic and agricultural sources of organic matter in natural waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwood, John J

    2014-01-01

    Molecular markers can be used to determine the sources of organic pollution in water. This review summarizes progress made during the last two decades in identifying reliable molecular markers to distinguish pollution from sewage, animal production, and other sources. Two artificial sweeteners, sucralose and acesulfame-K, are sufficiently stable to be molecular markers and easily associated with domestic wastewater. Waste from different animal species may be distinguished by profiling fecal sterols and bile acids. Other markers which have been evaluated, including caffeine, detergent components, and compounds commonly leached from landfills are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Antibiotic susceptibility profile of bacteria isolated from natural sources of water from rural areas of East Sikkim

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shubra Poonia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Contamination of water, food, and environment with antibiotic-resistant bacteria poses a serious public health issue. Objective: The objective was to study the bacterial pollution of the natural sources of water in east Sikkim and to determine the antimicrobial profile of the bacterial isolates. Materials and Methods: A total of 225 samples, 75 each during winter, summer, and monsoon season were collected from the same source in every season for bacteriological analysis by membrane filtration method. Antibiotic susceptibility test was performed using standard disc diffusion method. Results: A total of 19 bacterial species of the genera Escherichia, Klebsiella, Proteus, Salmonella, Shigella, Enterobacter, Citrobacter, Morganella, Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, Flavobacterium, and Serratia were isolated and their antimicrobial sensitivity tested. Generally, most bacterial isolates except Salmonella and Shigella species were found resistant to commonly used antibiotics such as ampicillin (57.5%, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxaole (39.1%, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (37.4%, cefixime (34.5%, tetracycline (29.1%, ceftazidime (26.3%, ofloxacin (25.9%, amikacin (8.7%, and gentamicin (2.7% but sensitive to imipenem and piperacillin/tazobactam. Conclusion: Natural sources of water in east Sikkim are grossly contaminated with bacteria including enteropathogens. The consumption of untreated water from these sources might pose health risk to consumers.

  20. 77 FR 11039 - Proposed Confidentiality Determinations for the Petroleum and Natural Gas Systems Source Category...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-24

    ... municipally-owned distribution system). For a summary of the source category definitions for subpart W, which..., amended data reporting requirements, clarified terms and definitions, and made technical corrections. This... separate hydrocarbons separator with oil into liquid and gas phases. Separators are throughput greater than...

  1. Dosimetric implications of the exposure to the natural sources of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beninson, D.J.

    1975-01-01

    The absorbed dose to human forms under normal and abnormal conditions in various parts of the world is summarized from information contained in the 1972 UNSCEAR report, and new information available from published and unpublished sources. The dose to humans considers gonads, bone marrow, cortical bone, skin, bronchian epithelium and other organs or tissus of special interest [fr

  2. Web application for the control and management of radioprotection equipment in the Cadarache centre; Application WEB pour le controle et la gestion des appareils de radioprotection sur le centre de Cadarache

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2010-07-01

    The author describes a web 2-type application which has been developed for the periodic calibration controls of radioprotection equipment in Cadarache. This application aims at offering an easy and immediate and even remote access to information, at selecting information with respect to uses (radioprotection department, administrator, and so on), at securing and safeguarding homogeneous data, at editing control statistics. The different functionalities are briefly presented with their displayed interface

  3. Factors influencing the seed source and sink functions of a floodplain nature reserve in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soomers, H.; Sarneel, J.M.; Patberg, W.; Verbeek, S.K.; Verweij, P.A.; Van Diggelen, R.

    2011-01-01

    Question: How do species traits and abiotic factors influence the extent of hydrochorous dispersal into and out of a small floodplain area along a freeflowing river in The Netherlands? Location: The Kappersbult nature reserve (5310702800N, 613701400E), which is a floodplain along the Dutch River

  4. Factors influencing the seed source and sink functions of a floodplain nature reserve in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soomers, Hester; Sarneel, Judith M.; Patberg, Wouter; Verbeek, Steven K.; Verweij, Pita A.; Wassen, Martin J.; van Diggelen, Rudy

    Question How do species traits and abiotic factors influence the extent of hydrochorous dispersal into and out of a small floodplain area along a free-flowing river in The Netherlands? Location The Kappersbult nature reserve (53 degrees 07'28 ' N, 6 degrees 37'14 ' E), which is a floodplain along

  5. Factors influencing the seed source and sink functions of a floodplain nature reserve in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soomers, H.; Sarneel, J.M.; Patberg, W.; Verbeek, S.K.; Verweij, P.A.; Wassen, M.J.; Diggelen, R. van

    2011-01-01

    Question: How do species traits and abiotic factors influence the extent of hydrochorous dispersal into and out of a small floodplain area along a free-flowing river in The Netherlands? Location: The Kappersbult nature reserve (53°07'28″N, 6°37'14″E), which is a floodplain along the Dutch River

  6. Natural and human-related sources of ozone-forming trace gases in southern Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Scholes, RJ

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available or vehicular pollution. The cloud of tropospheric ozone which forms over southern Africa every spring probably has its main origin in natural emissions of the ozone-forming trace gases, including CO from vegetation fires, emissions of NO from soils...

  7. Lyophilization and Reconstitution of Reverse-Osmosis Concentrated Natural Organic Matter from a Drinking Water Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disinfection by-product (DBP) research can be complicated by difficulties in shipping large water quantities and changing natural organic matter (NOM) characteristics over time. To overcome these issues, it is advantageous to have a reliable method for concentrating NOM with min...

  8. Are agricultural and natural sources of bio-products important for modern regenerative medicine? A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Nowacki

    2017-05-01

    Evolving trends in agriculture are likely to play a key role in the future development of a number of systemic and local medical procedures within tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. This is in addition to the use of bio-products derived from the natural environment which are found to deliver positive results in the treatment of prospective patients.

  9. Effects of source rocks, soil features and climate on natural gamma radioactivity in the Crati valley (Calabria, Southern Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guagliardi, Ilaria; Rovella, Natalia; Apollaro, Carmine; Bloise, Andrea; De Rosa, Rosanna; Scarciglia, Fabio; Buttafuoco, Gabriele

    2016-05-01

    The study, which represents an innovative scientific strategy to approach the study of natural radioactivity in terms of spatial and temporal variability, was aimed to characterize the background levels of natural radionuclides in soil and rock in the urban and peri-urban soil of a southern Italy area; to quantify their variations due to radionuclide bearing minerals and soil properties, taking into account nature and extent of seasonality influence. Its main novelty is taking into account the effect of climate in controlling natural gamma radioactivity as well as analysing soil radioactivity in terms of soil properties and pedogenetic processes. In different bedrocks and soils, activities of natural radionuclides ((238)U, (232)Th (4) K) and total radioactivity were measured at 181 locations by means of scintillation γ-ray spectrometry. In addition, selected rocks samples were collected and analysed, using a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) equipped with an Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS) and an X-Ray Powder Diffraction (XRPD), to assess the main sources of radionuclides. The natural-gamma background is intimately related to differing petrologic features of crystalline source rocks and to peculiar pedogenetic features and processes. The radioactivity survey was conducted during two different seasons with marked changes in the main climatic characteristics, namely dry summer and moist winter, to evaluate possible effects of seasonal climatic variations and soil properties on radioactivity measurements. Seasonal variations of radionuclides activities show their peak values in summer. The activities of (238)U, (232)Th and (4) K exhibit a positive correlation with the air temperature and are negatively correlated with precipitations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Natural gas sources from methane seeps on the Northern U.S. Atlantic Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlman, J.; Ruppel, C. D.; Wang, D. T.; Ono, S.; Kluesner, J.; Xu, X.; Sylva, S.; Casso, M.

    2017-12-01

    Following the discovery of shallow- (1000 m) methane seeps north of Cape Hatteras on the U.S. Atlantic margin (USAM), questions have been raised about the source of the emitted gas in an area where deeply-buried thermogenic basins have been identified by the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management. In September 2015, 21 piston cores and 14 multicores were collected along a 365 km section of the margin that extends from Washington Canyon offshore of Virginia to southern New England. Several coring sites targeted gas accumulations in shallow-sediments (age of the source rocks, and the thermal conditions under which the gas is generated. Furthermore, biogeochemical controls responsible for the exceptionally 13C-depleted δ13C values (-106.6 to -109.0 ‰) of core gas methane from the methanogenic sedimentary zone at the northern and southern sections of the continental slope will be evaluated.

  11. Piper nigrum, Piper betle and Gnetum gnemon- Natural Food Sources with Anti-Quorum Sensing Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Li Ying; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2013-01-01

    Various parts of Piper nigrum, Piper betle and Gnetum gnemon are used as food sources by Malaysians. The purpose of this study is to examine the anti-quorum sensing (anti-QS) properties of P. nigrum, P. betle and G. gnemon extracts. The hexane, chloroform and methanol extracts of these plants were assessed in bioassays involving Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA01, Escherichia coli [pSB401], E. coli [pSB1075] and Chromobacterium violaceum CV026. It was found that the extracts of these three plants have anti-QS ability. Interestingly, the hexane, chloroform and methanol extracts from P. betle showed the most potent anti-QS activity as judged by the bioassays. Since there is a variety of plants that serve as food sources in Malaysia that have yet to be tested for anti-QS activity, future work should focus on identification of these plants and isolation of the anti-QS compounds. PMID:23519352

  12. Supercritical Algal Extracts: A Source of Biologically Active Compounds from Nature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela Michalak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the potential applicability of the process of supercritical fluid extraction (SFE in the production of algal extracts with the consideration of the process conditions and yields. State of the art in the research on solvent-free isolation of biologically active compounds from the biomass of algae was presented. Various aspects related with the properties of useful compounds found in cells of microalgae and macroalgae were discussed, including their potential applications as the natural components of plant protection products (biostimulants and bioregulators, dietary feed and food supplements, and pharmaceuticals. Analytical methods of determination of the natural compounds derived from algae were discussed. Algal extracts produced by SFE process enable obtaining a solvent-free concentrate of biologically active compounds; however, detailed economic analysis, as well as elaboration of products standardization procedures, is required in order to implement the products in the market.

  13. Sponges in Qatari waters A new source of marine natural products for biological applications

    OpenAIRE

    Kornprobst, Jean-Michel

    1999-01-01

    Sponges are the most primitive multicellular organisms belonging to Animalia kingdom. They lack symetry and do not have differentiated tissues or organs. However, as a consequence of this primitive organization it is very likely that sponges are the richest source of marine organisms for biological properties and pharmaceutical applications. Attached for life on their substrate and devoid of mecanical protection against predators sponges have elaborated a lot of sophisticated means of chemica...

  14. Fundamental Study of the Delivery of Nanoiron to DNAPL Source Zones in Naturally Heterogeneous Field Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    TCE-contaminated aquifer, using a surfactant/ vegetable oil emulsion to make the NZVI mobile. The technique demonstrated that TCE DNAPL was degraded...different hydrolyzed bonds (α and β) and amide bonds. Aspartic acid is one of the 20 natural proteinogenic amino acids which are the building blocks...of proteins . The properties and structure of these modifiers are summarized in Table 6.2. Quality of commercial NZVI. The reactivity of NZVI will

  15. Analysis of Shade Matching in Natural Dentitions Using Intraoral Digital Spectrophotometer in LED and Filtered LED Light Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitrarsu, Vijai Krishnan; Chidambaranathan, Ahila Singaravel; Balasubramaniam, Muthukumar

    2017-10-31

    To evaluate the shade matching capabilities in natural dentitions using Vita Toothguide 3D-Master and an intraoral digital spectrophotometer (Vita Easyshade Advance 4.0) in various light sources. Participants between 20 and 40 years old with natural, unrestored right maxillary central incisors, no history of bleaching, orthodontic treatment, or malocclusion and no rotations were included. According to their shades, subjects were randomly selected and grouped into A1, A2, and A3. A total of 100 participants (50 male and 50 female) in each group were chosen for this study. Shade selection was made between 10 am and 2 pm for all light sources. The same examiner selected the shade of natural teeth with Vita Toothguide 3D-Master under natural light within 2 minutes. Once the Vita Toothguide 3D-Masterwas matched with the maxillary right central incisor, the L*, a*, and b* values, chroma, and hue were recorded with Vita Easyshade Advance 4.0 by placing it on the shade tab under the same light source. The values were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD post hoc test with SPSS v22.0 software. The mean ∆E* ab values for shades A1, A2, and A3 for groups 1, 2, and 3 were statistically significantly different from each other (p spectrophotometer showed statistically significant differences in shade matching compared to Vita Toothguide 3D-Master. Incandescent light showed more accurate shade matching than the filtered LED, LED, and daylight. © 2017 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  16. Formation and migration of Natural Gases: gas composition and isotopes as monitors between source, reservoir and seep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoell, M.; Etiope, G.

    2015-12-01

    Natural gases form in tight source rocks at temperatures between 120ºC up to 200ºC over a time of 40 to 50my depending on the heating rate of the gas kitchen. Inferring from pyrolysis experiments, gases after primary migration, a pressure driven process, are rich in C2+ hydrocarbons (C2 to C5). This is consistent with gas compositions of oil-associated gases such as in the Bakken Shale which occur in immediate vicinity of the source with little migration distances. However, migration of gases along porous rocks over long distances (up to 200km in the case of the Troll field offshore Norway) changes the gas composition drastically as C2+ hydrocarbons tend to be retained/sequestered during migration of gas as case histories from Virginia and the North Sea will demonstrate. Similar "molecular fractionation" is observed between reservoirs and surface seeps. In contrast to gas composition, stable isotopes in gases are, in general, not affected by the migration process suggesting that gas migration is a steady state process. Changes in isotopic composition, from source to reservoir to surface seeps, is often the result of mixing of gases of different origins. Examples from various gas provinces will support this notion. Natural gas basins provide little opportunity of tracking and identifying gas phase separation. Future research on experimental phase separation and monitoring of gas composition and gas ratio changes e.g. various C2+ compound ratios over C1 or isomer ratios such as iso/n ratios in butane and pentane may be an avenue to develop tracers for phase separation that could possibly be applied to natural systems of retrograde natural condensate fields.

  17. A Requirements-Based Exploration of Open-Source Software Development Projects--Towards a Natural Language Processing Software Analysis Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlas, Radu Eduard

    2012-01-01

    Open source projects do have requirements; they are, however, mostly informal, text descriptions found in requests, forums, and other correspondence. Understanding such requirements provides insight into the nature of open source projects. Unfortunately, manual analysis of natural language requirements is time-consuming, and for large projects,…

  18. ON THE NATURE OF HARD X-RAY EXTRAGALACTIC SOURCES OBSERVED WITH XMM-NEWTON

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiménez-Bailón, E.; Huerta, E. M.; Krongold, Y.; Chavushyan, V.; Schartel, N.; Santos-Lleó, M.

    2012-01-01

    Over the last decade, X-ray surveys have provided outstanding new results due to the lack of the common selection effects present at other wavelengths. Here, we have selected a sample of unidentified sources from the XMM-Newton Slew Survey Catalog, likely to be extragalactic. Five of them were observed with the XMM-Newton observatory. In this work, we present the results of the spectral analysis of these objects in the X-ray and optical bands. Only three of them had useful spectroscopic X-ray data, and follow up observations were carried out in the optical range to determine their coordinates, classification, and redshift. The sources are different types of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with redshifts ranging from 0.059 to 0.386. The properties at both spectral ranges (X-rays and optical) are compatible with the common properties of their types of AGNs. Although the sources were selected by their hard X-ray properties, none of the three detected objects turned out to be an obscured AGN.

  19. Health and safety impacts from discrete sources of naturally-occurring and accelerator-produced radioactive materials (NARM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nussbaumer, D.; Wiblin, C.; Welch, L.

    1993-02-01

    This report characterizes discrete sources of naturally-occurring and accelerator-produced radioactive material (NARM) and estimates risks posed by the possession, use and disposal of them. A distinction between discrete and diffuse NARM sources is made with discrete sources being high activity, low volume and diffuse sources being low activity, high volume. Two nanocuries per gram is used as a separation guide between high and low activity, although use of this value does not impact the report's conclusions. Most NARM is under regulatory control of States that either license or register users but reporting requirements are not uniform. Use in consumer products has declined with virtually no production today; however, lack of information available concerning radiation exposures resulting form possession of ageing radium sources precludes a quantitative risk assessment in this report. The report identifies the type of information needed to permit such an assessment. Regarding accelerator-produced radioactive material (ARM), use of this material in nuclear medicine programs has recently increased. Available radiation exposure data regarding ARM handling and use indicates that the risk to workers and the public is low at this time

  20. Protection of the environment. How to position radioprotection in an ecological risk assessment perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brechignac, Francois

    2003-01-01

    The development of a system capable of ensuring adequate protection of the environment from the harmful effects of ionising radiation is at present particularly debated. This need comes both from a restrictive consideration of the environment in the so far existing system for human radioprotection, and the planetary-wide growing concerns about man's technogenic influence on his environment which have yielded 'sustainability' and 'precaution' as guiding principles for environmental protection. Whilst evolving from the field of human radioprotection, the radioprotection of the environment needs to be discussed in a wider perspective, with particular emphasis on the most advanced concepts which emerge from the efforts to deriving improved approaches to Ecological Risk Assessment. For the sake of protection, the environment is traditionally addressed through its biota since these are the sensitive components of ecosystems. Similarities between man and biotas reflect the ubiquitous mechanistic effects of radiation on life which disrupt molecules. However, important differences also arise in a number of perspectives, from the large spectrum of different species of biotas to their hierarchical self-organisation as interacting populations within ecosystems. Altogether, these aspects are prone to promote complex arrays of different responses to stress which lie beyond the scope of human radioprotection due to its focus on individuals of a single species. By means of selected illustrations, this paper reviews and discusses the current challenges faced in proper identification of measurable effect endpoints (stochastic/deterministic, individual/population- or ecosystem-relevant), dose limits in chronic exposure (or levels of concern), and their consideration according to radiation type (RBE) and interactions with other contaminants (synergies/antagonisms) which represent critical gaps in knowledge. The system of human radioprotection has conceptually been targeted at limiting

  1. natural

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elías Gómez Macías

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Partiendo de óxido de magnesio comercial se preparó una suspensión acuosa, la cual se secó y calcinó para conferirle estabilidad térmica. El material, tanto fresco como usado, se caracterizó mediante DRX, área superficial BET y SEM-EPMA. El catalizador mostró una matriz de MgO tipo periclasa con CaO en la superficie. Las pruebas de actividad catalítica se efectuaron en lecho fijo empacado con partículas obtenidas mediante prensado, trituración y clasificación del material. El flujo de reactivos consistió en mezclas gas natural-aire por debajo del límite inferior de inflamabilidad. Para diferentes flujos y temperaturas de entrada de la mezcla reactiva, se midieron las concentraciones de CH4, CO2 y CO en los gases de combustión con un analizador de gases tipo infrarrojo no dispersivo (NDIR. Para alcanzar conversión total de metano se requirió aumentar la temperatura de entrada al lecho a medida que se incrementó el flujo de gases reaccionantes. Los resultados obtenidos permiten desarrollar un sistema de combustión catalítica de bajo costo con un material térmicamente estable, que promueva la alta eficiencia en la combustión de gas natural y elimine los problemas de estabilidad, seguridad y de impacto ambiental negativo inherentes a los procesos de combustión térmica convencional.

  2. New concepts, experimental approaches, and dereplication strategies for the discovery of novel phytoestrogens from natural sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Thomas; Halabalaki, Maria; Skaltsounis, Alexios-Leandros

    2013-05-01

    Phytoestrogens constitute an attractive research topic due to their estrogenic profile and their biological involvement in woman's health. Therefore, numerous studies are currently performed in natural products chemistry area aiming at the discovery of novel phytoestrogens. The main classes of phytoestrogens are flavonoids (flavonols, flavanones), isoflavonoids (isoflavones, coumestans), lignans, stilbenoids as well as miscellaneous chemical groups abundant in several edible and/or medicinal plants, belonging mostly to the Leguminosae family. As for other bioactives, the detection of new structures and more potent plant-derived phytoestrogens typically follows the general approaches currently available in the natural product discovery process. Plant-based approaches selected from traditional medicine knowledge and bioguided concepts are routinely employed. However, these approaches are associated with serious disadvantages such as time-consuming, repeated, and labor intensive processes as well as lack of specificity and reproducibility. In recent years, the natural products chemistry became more technology-driven, and several different strategies have been developed. Structure-oriented procedures and miniaturized approaches employing advanced hyphenated analytical platforms have recently emerged. They facilitate significantly not only the discovery of novel phytoestrogens but also the dereplication procedure leading to the anticipation of major drawbacks in natural products discovery. In this review, apart from the traditional concepts followed in phytochemistry for the discovery of novel biologically active compounds, recent applications in the field of extraction, analysis, fractionation, and identification of phytoestrogens will be discussed. Moreover, specific methodologies combining identification of actives and biological evaluation in parallel, such as liquid chromatography-biochemical detection, frontal affinity chromatography-mass spectrometry and pulsed

  3. Tracking an oil slick from multiple natural sources, Coal Oil Point, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leifer, Ira [Marine Sciences Institute, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Luyendyk, Bruce [Department of Geological Sciences, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Broderick, Kris [Exxon/Mobil Exploration Company, 13401 N. Freeway, Houston, TX 77060 (United States)

    2006-06-15

    Oil slicks on the ocean surface emitted from natural marine hydrocarbon seeps offshore from Coal Oil Point in the Santa Barbara Channel, California were tracked and sampled over a 2-h period. The objectives were to characterize the seep oil and to track its composition over time using a new sampling device, a catamaran drum sampler (CATDRUMS). The sampler was designed and developed at UCSB. Chromatograms showed that oil originating from an informally named, very active seep area, Shane Seep, primarily evolved during the first hour due to mixing with oil originating from a convergence zone slick surrounding Shane Seep. (author)

  4. Nature of air pollution, emission sources, and management in the Indian cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttikunda, Sarath K.; Goel, Rahul; Pant, Pallavi

    2014-10-01

    The global burden of disease study estimated 695,000 premature deaths in 2010 due to continued exposure to outdoor particulate matter and ozone pollution for India. By 2030, the expected growth in many of the sectors (industries, residential, transportation, power generation, and construction) will result in an increase in pollution related health impacts for most cities. The available information on urban air pollution, their sources, and the potential of various interventions to control pollution, should help us propose a cleaner path to 2030. In this paper, we present an overview of the emission sources and control options for better air quality in Indian cities, with a particular focus on interventions like urban public transportation facilities; travel demand management; emission regulations for power plants; clean technology for brick kilns; management of road dust; and waste management to control open waste burning. Also included is a broader discussion on key institutional measures, like public awareness and scientific studies, necessary for building an effective air quality management plan in Indian cities.

  5. Source apportionment of atmospheric PAHs in the Western Balkans by natural abundance radiocarbon analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zdenek Zencak; Jana Klanova; Ivan Holoubek; Oerjan Gustafsson [Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden). Department of Applied Environmental Science

    2007-06-01

    Progress in source apportionment of priority combustion-derived atmospheric pollutants can be made by an inverse approach to inventory emissions, namely, receptor-based compound class-specific radiocarbon analysis (CCSRA) of target pollutants. In the present study, CCSRA of the combustion-derived polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) present in the atmosphere of the countries of the former republic of Yugoslavia was performed. The carbon stable isotope composition ({delta}{sup 13}C) of PAHs varied between -27.68 and -27.19{per_thousand}, whereas {Delta}{sup 14}C values ranged from -568{per_thousand} for PAHs sampled in Kosovo to -288{per_thousand} for PAHs sampled in the Sarajevo area. The application of an isotopic mass balance model to these {Delta}{sup 14}C data revealed a significant contribution (35-65%) from the combustion of non-fossil material to the atmospheric PAH pollution, even in urban and industrialized areas. Furthermore, consistency was observed between the isotopic composition of PAHs obtained by high-volume sampling and those collected by passive sampling. This encourages the use of passive samplers for CCSRA applications. This marks the first time that a CCSRA investigation could be executed on a geographically wide scale, providing a quantitative field-based source apportionment, which points out that also non-fossil combustion processes should be targeted for remedial action. 36 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  6. The nature and source of irregular discharges to stormwater entering Sydney estuary, Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, H.J.; Birch, G.F.

    2014-01-01

    Irregular discharges of polluted stormwater into drainage systems during base flow (no rainfall) result in acute ecological impacts within fluvial and estuarine environments. In this study, metal and TSS concentrations were significantly more variable during business hours of weekdays (i.e. high-business activity) than weekends/public holidays (i.e. low-business activity) within three highly-urbanised catchments of Sydney estuary (Australia), as determined by analysing multivariate dispersion (PERMDISP). Concentrations of TSS and all metals analysed (Al, Ca, Cu, Fe, Mg, Pb and Zn) were also significantly greater during high- than low-business periods within at least one of the three catchments. In no case were concentrations significantly higher during low- than high-business periods. This pattern of contamination supports the hypothesis that commercial and industrial sources are major contributors of irregular discharges of contamination to Sydney estuary. Irregular discharges and consequential ecological impacts may be effectively reduced in this environment by focussing management efforts on these activities. - Highlights: • Irregular discharges of pollution have acute impacts on aquatic ecosystems. • These discharges were thought to be made during low activity periods, such as night. • Pollution was more concentrated and erratic during high- than low-business periods. • Timing of pollution suggests commercial and industrial activities are major sources. • Discharges effectively reduced by managing commercial and industrial activities. - Previously unreported irregular, illegal discharges of polluted stormwater released to estuaries result in acute ecological impacts and are potentially related to commercial/industrial activities

  7. Myxobacterial natural products: An under-valued source of products for drug discovery for neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehhaghi, Mona; Mohammadipanah, Fatemeh; Guillemin, Gilles J

    2018-03-02

    Age-related disorders impose noticeable financial and emotional burdens on society. This impact is becoming more prevalent with the increasing incidence of neurodegenerative diseases and is causing critical concerns for treatment of patients worldwide. Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis and motor neuron disease are the most prevalent and the most expensive to treat neurodegenerative diseases globally. Therefore, exploring effective therapies to overcome these disorders is a necessity. Natural products and their derivatives have increasingly attracted attention in drug discovery programs that have identified microorganisms which produce a large range of metabolites with bioactive properties. Myxobacteria, a group of Gram-negative bacteria with large genome size, produce a wide range of secondary metabolites with significant chemical structures and a variety of biological effects. They are potent natural product producers. In this review paper, we attempt to overview some secondary metabolites synthesized by myxobacteria with neuroprotective activity through known mechanisms including production of polyunsaturated fatty acids, reduction of apoptosis, immunomodulation, stress reduction of endoplasmic reticulum, stabilization of microtubules, enzyme inhibition and serotonin receptor modulation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Are agricultural and natural sources of bio-products important for modern regenerative medicine? A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowacki, Maciej; Nowacka, Katarzyna; Kloskowski, Tomasz; Pokrywczyńska, Marta; Tyloch, Dominik; Rasmus, Marta; Warda, Karolina; Drewa, Tomasz

    2017-05-11

    [b] Abstract Introduction and objectives[/b]. As tissue engineering and regenerative medicine have continued to evolve within the field of biomedicine, the fundamental importance of bio-products has become increasingly apparent. This true not only in cases where they are derived directly from the natural environment, but also when animals and plants are specially bred and cultivated for their production. [b]Objective.[/b] The study aims to present and assess the global influence and importance of selected bio-products in current regenerative medicine via a broad review of the existing literature. In particular, attention is paid to the matrices, substances and grafts created from plants and animals which could potentially be used in experimental and clinical regeneration, or in reconstructive procedures. [b]Summary.[/b] Evolving trends in agriculture are likely to play a key role in the future development of a number of systemic and local medical procedures within tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. This is in addition to the use of bio-products derived from the natural environment which are found to deliver positive results in the treatment of prospective patients.

  9. Bed bugs, their blood sources and life history parameters: a comparison of artificial and natural feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aak, A; Rukke, B A

    2014-03-01

    A blood-feeding system that utilizes a small amount of whole heparinized human blood in parafilm bags is described in detail, and similarities and differences between artificially fed and naturally rodent-fed bed bugs (Hemiptera: Cimicidae) are discussed. Blood with high levels of heparin (10%) was unsuitable for artificial colony rearing, whereas bed bugs fed on 1% heparinized blood and those that naturally ingested rat blood completed their lifecycle with similar stage structures over time, with no significant differences in mortality. No differences in feeding efficiency or fertility were found in a direct comparison of bed bugs maintained under each of these two treatments, but analysis of the full lifecycle revealed that artificially fed bed bugs became significantly smaller and laid fewer eggs than rodent-fed bed bugs. The level of membrane stretching regulated the number of bed bugs that fed. When the membrane was stretched to twice its length and width, 96% of bed bugs successfully fed through the parafilm. Whole heparinized blood that was stored at 6 °C for ≥ 14 days failed to retain its nutritional value and the amount of blood consumed and number of consecutive moults were significantly reduced. © 2013 The Royal Entomological Society.

  10. Evaluation of the sources of error in the linepack estimation of a natural gas pipeline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marco, Fabio Capelassi Gavazzi de [Transportadora Brasileira Gasoduto Bolivia-Brasil S.A. (TBG), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    The intent of this work is to explore the behavior of the random error associated with determination of linepack in a complex natural gas pipeline based on the effect introduced by the uncertainty of the different variables involved. There are many parameters involved in the determination of the gas inventory in a transmission pipeline: geometrical (diameter, length and elevation profile), operational (pressure, temperature and gas composition), environmental (ambient / ground temperature) and those dependent on the modeling assumptions (compressibility factor and heat transfer coefficient). Due to the extent of a natural gas pipeline and the vast amount of sensor involved it is infeasible to determine analytically the magnitude of resulting uncertainty in the linepack, thus this problem has been addressed using Monte Carlo Method. The approach consists of introducing random errors in the values of pressure, temperature and gas gravity that are employed in the determination of the linepack and verify its impact. Additionally, the errors associated with three different modeling assumptions to estimate the linepack are explored. The results reveal that pressure is the most critical variable while the temperature is the less critical. In regard to the different methods to estimate the linepack, deviations around 1.6% were verified among the methods. (author)

  11. Untreated Natural Graphite as a Graphene Source for High-Performance Li-Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Simón

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Graphene nanosheets (GNS are synthesized from untreated natural graphite (NG for use as electroactive materials in Li-ion batteries (LIBs, which avoids the pollution-generating steps of purifying graphite. Through a modified Hummer method and subsequent thermal exfoliation, graphitic oxide and graphene were synthesized and characterized structurally, morphologically and chemically. Untreated natural graphite samples contain 45–50% carbon by weight; the rest is composed of different elements such as aluminium, calcium, iron, silicon and oxygen, which are present as calcium carbonate and silicates of aluminium and iron. Our results confirm that in the GO and GNS synthesized, calcium is removed due to oxidation, though other impurities are maintained because they are not affected by the synthesis. Despite the remaining mineral phases, the energy storage capacity of GNS electrodes is very promising. In addition, an electrochemical comparison between GNS and NG demonstrated that the specific capacity in GNS is higher during the whole cycling process, 770 mA·g−1 at 100th cycle, which is twice that of graphite.

  12. Use of Monte Carlo Methods in the modeling of the dose/INAK distribution of natural radioactive sources: First studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezerra, Luis R.A.; Vieira, Jose W.; Amaral, Romilton dos S.; Santos Junior, Jose A. dos; Silva, Arykerne N.C. da; Silva, Alberto A. da; Damascena, Kennedy F.; Santos Junior, Otavio P.; Medeiros, Nilson V.S.; Santos, Josineide M.N. dos

    2017-01-01

    One of the means of exposure that the world population is subjected to daily is natural radiation, which covers exposure to sources of cosmic origin and terrestrial origin, which accounts for about 84.1% of all exposure due to natural radiation. Some research groups have been estimating the distribution of the dose by the radiosensitive organs and tissues of people submitted to gamma radiation using Computational Exposure Models (MCE). The MCE is composed, fundamentally, of an anthropomorphic simulator (phantom), a Monte Carlo code and a radioactive source algorithm. The Group of Computational Dosimetry and Embedded Systems (DCSE), together with the group of Radioecology (RAE), have been developing a variety of MCEs to simulate exposure to natural environmental gamma radiation. Such models estimate the dose distribution absorbed by the organs and tissues radiosensitive to ionizing radiation from a flat portion of the ground in which photons emerge from within a circle of radius r, reaching a person in an orthostatic position and centered on the circumference. We investigated in this work the exposure of an individual by a radioactive cloud of gamma emission of Potassium-40, which emits a photon characteristic of energy 1461 keV. It was optimized the number of histories to obtain Dose/Kerma values in the air, with low dispersion and viable computational time for the available PCs, statistically validating the results. To do so, was adapted the MCE MSTA, composed by the MASH (Male Adult meSH) phantom in an orthostatic position coupled to the EGSnrc, with the planar source algorithm. (author)

  13. Use of Monte Carlo Methods in the modeling of the dose/INAK distribution of natural radioactive sources: First studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezerra, Luis R.A.; Vieira, Jose W.; Amaral, Romilton dos S.; Santos Junior, Jose A. dos; Silva, Arykerne N.C. da; Silva, Alberto A. da; Damascena, Kennedy F.; Santos Junior, Otavio P.; Medeiros, Nilson V.S.; Santos, Josineide M.N. dos, E-mail: jaraujo@ufpe.br, E-mail: romilton@ufpe.br, E-mail: kennedy.eng.ambiental@gmail.com, E-mail: nvsmedeiros@gmail.com, E-mail: josineide.santos@ufpe.br, E-mail: arykerne.silva@ufpe.br, E-mail: luis.rodrigo@vitoria.ifpe.edu.br, E-mail: otavio.santos@vitoria.ifpe.edu.br, E-mail: s, E-mail: jose.wilson@recife.ifpe.edu.br, E-mail: alberto.silva@barreiros.ifpe.edu.br, E-mail: jose.wilson59@uol.com.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Departamento de Energia Nuclear; Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia de Pernambuco (IFPE), PE (Brazil); Universidade de Pernambuco (UPE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2017-11-01

    One of the means of exposure that the world population is subjected to daily is natural radiation, which covers exposure to sources of cosmic origin and terrestrial origin, which accounts for about 84.1% of all exposure due to natural radiation. Some research groups have been estimating the distribution of the dose by the radiosensitive organs and tissues of people submitted to gamma radiation using Computational Exposure Models (MCE). The MCE is composed, fundamentally, of an anthropomorphic simulator (phantom), a Monte Carlo code and a radioactive source algorithm. The Group of Computational Dosimetry and Embedded Systems (DCSE), together with the group of Radioecology (RAE), have been developing a variety of MCEs to simulate exposure to natural environmental gamma radiation. Such models estimate the dose distribution absorbed by the organs and tissues radiosensitive to ionizing radiation from a flat portion of the ground in which photons emerge from within a circle of radius r, reaching a person in an orthostatic position and centered on the circumference. We investigated in this work the exposure of an individual by a radioactive cloud of gamma emission of Potassium-40, which emits a photon characteristic of energy 1461 keV. It was optimized the number of histories to obtain Dose/Kerma values in the air, with low dispersion and viable computational time for the available PCs, statistically validating the results. To do so, was adapted the MCE MSTA, composed by the MASH (Male Adult meSH) phantom in an orthostatic position coupled to the EGSnrc, with the planar source algorithm. (author)

  14. Disinfection byproduct formation in reverse-osmosis concentrated and lyophilized natural organic matter from a drinking water source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressman, Jonathan G; McCurry, Daniel L; Parvez, Shahid; Rice, Glenn E; Teuschler, Linda K; Miltner, Richard J; Speth, Thomas F

    2012-10-15

    Drinking water treatment and disinfection byproduct (DBP) research can be complicated by natural organic matter (NOM) temporal variability. NOM preservation by lyophilization (freeze-drying) has been long practiced to address this issue; however, its applicability for drinking water research has been limited because the selected NOM sources are atypical of most drinking water sources. The purpose of this research was to demonstrate that reconstituted NOM from a lyophilized reverse-osmosis (RO) concentrate of a typical drinking water source closely represents DBP formation in the original NOM. A preliminary experiment assessed DBP formation kinetics and yields in concentrated NOM, which demonstrated that chlorine decays faster in concentrate, in some cases leading to altered DBP speciation. Potential changes in NOM reactivity caused by lyophilization were evaluated by chlorination of lyophilized and reconstituted NOM, its parent RO concentrate, and the source water. Bromide lost during RO concentration was replaced by adding potassium bromide prior to chlorination. Although total measured DBP formation tended to decrease slightly and unidentified halogenated organic formation tended to increase slightly as a result of RO concentration, the changes associated with lyophilization were minor. In lyophilized NOM reconstituted back to source water TOC levels and then chlorinated, the concentrations of 19 of 21 measured DBPs, constituting 96% of the total identified DBP mass, were statistically indistinguishable from those in the chlorinated source water. Furthermore, the concentrations of 16 of 21 DBPs in lyophilized NOM reconstituted back to the RO concentrate TOC levels, constituting 86% DBP mass, were statistically indistinguishable from those in the RO concentrate. This study suggests that lyophilization can be used to preserve concentrated NOM without substantially altering the precursors to DBP formation. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Response of the ionosphere to natural and man-made acoustic sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Pokhotelov

    Full Text Available A review is presented of the effects influencing the ionosphere which are caused by acoustic emission from different sources (chemical and nuclear explosions, bolides, meteorites, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, hurricanes, launches of spacecrafts and flights of supersonic jets. A terse statement is given of the basic theoretical principles and simplified theoretical models underlying the physics of propagation of infrasonic pulses and gravity waves in the upper atmosphere. The observations of "quick" response by the ionosphere are pointed out. The problem of magnetic disturbances and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD wave generation in the ionosphere is investigated. In particular, the supersonic propagation of ionospheric disturbances, and the conversion of the acoustic energy into the so-called gyrotropic waves in the ionospheric E-layer are considered.

  16. Several natural indicators of radial well ageing at the Belgrade groundwater source, part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimkić, M; Pusić, M; Vidovic, D; Petković, A; Boreli-Zdravković, D

    2011-01-01

    Over time, the radial collector wells of the Belgrade Groundwater Source, located in the alluvial sediments of the Sava River, exhibit a decline in discharge and a reduction in operating efficiency due to well ageing. An increase in hydraulic losses at the lateral screens, due to chemical and biochemical clogging, has been identified as the primary cause. Certain hydrogeological, hydrochemical and microbiological parameters reflect the well-ageing process and can, therefore, be considered as its indicators. An indicator-based determination of scale is an important aspect in the selection of appropriate well locations, structural characteristics, and maintenance approaches. Well ageing was studied over a period of 5 years (2005-2009). The objective was to investigate the causes of well ageing. The correlations established between the groundwater redox potential, the total iron concentration in groundwater, the grain-size distribution of the aquifer, and well discharge, are presented in the paper.

  17. Carotenoids from Marine Microalgae: A Valuable Natural Source for the Prevention of Chronic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Filomena de Jesus Raposo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies have shown a relation between antioxidants and the prevention of several chronic diseases. Microalgae are a potential novel source of bioactive molecules, including a wide range of different carotenoids that can be used as nutraceuticals, food supplements and novel food products. The objective of this review is (i to update the research that has been carried out on the most known carotenoids produced by marine microalgae, including reporting on their high potentialities to produce other less known important compounds; (ii to compile the work that has been done in order to establish some relationship between carotenoids and oxidative protection and treatment; (iii to summarize the association of oxidative stress and the various reactive species including free radicals with several human diseases; and (iv to provide evidence of the potential of carotenoids from marine microalgae to be used as therapeutics to treat or prevent these oxidative stress-related diseases.

  18. Nature of the ionizing source of the nuclear gas in NGC 1052

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keel, W.C.; Miller, J.S.

    1983-01-01

    We examine the ionization and physical state of the emission-line region in the nucleus of elliptical galaxy NGC 1052. The [O III] lambda4363/lambda5007 ratio, frequently used as a diagnostic for ionization mechanisms, is very poorly determined because of difficulties in matching the underlying stellar continuum spectrum, which is unusual in having very strong lines for the galaxy luminosity. Within these limitations, we find the [O III] temperature to be only marginally compatible with shock models, and the overall emission spectrum to be better fitted by photoionization models with a very dilute flat-spectrum central source. In any event, the case for NGC 1052 as a shock-heated nucleus is not strong

  19. Carotenoids from Marine Microalgae: A Valuable Natural Source for the Prevention of Chronic Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raposo, Maria Filomena de Jesus; de Morais, Alcina Maria Miranda Bernardo; de Morais, Rui Manuel Santos Costa

    2015-08-14

    Epidemiological studies have shown a relation between antioxidants and the prevention of several chronic diseases. Microalgae are a potential novel source of bioactive molecules, including a wide range of different carotenoids that can be used as nutraceuticals, food supplements and novel food products. The objective of this review is (i) to update the research that has been carried out on the most known carotenoids produced by marine microalgae, including reporting on their high potentialities to produce other less known important compounds; (ii) to compile the work that has been done in order to establish some relationship between carotenoids and oxidative protection and treatment; (iii) to summarize the association of oxidative stress and the various reactive species including free radicals with several human diseases; and (iv) to provide evidence of the potential of carotenoids from marine microalgae to be used as therapeutics to treat or prevent these oxidative stress-related diseases.

  20. Assessment of Human Exposures to Natural Sources of Radiation in Kenya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mustapha, A.O.; Patel, J.P.

    1999-01-01

    Levels of exposures to different components of natural background radiation in Kenya were assessed from measured data and published conversion factors. Among them, the average annual per capital effective dose from terrestrial external radiation is 0.76 mSv and the annual per capital effective dose from external exposure to cosmic radiation at ground levels is 0.41 mSv. The total average annual effective dose is greater than the global average. Also among the measured data, concentrations of radon ( 222 Rn) vary from 5 to 1200 Bq m -3 in indoor air of dwellings, and from 1 to 410 KBq m -3 in drinking water. An unusual pathway to internal exposure was discovered among the female population who engage in consumption of some earth materials, some of which are rich in thorium

  1. An Overview on Marine Sponge-Symbiotic Bacteria as Unexhausted Sources for Natural Product Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Candice M. Brinkmann

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Microbial symbiotic communities of marine macro-organisms carry functional metabolic profiles different to the ones found terrestrially and within surrounding marine environments. These symbiotic bacteria have increasingly been a focus of microbiologists working in marine environments due to a wide array of reported bioactive compounds of therapeutic importance resulting in various patent registrations. Revelations of symbiont-directed host specific functions and the true nature of host-symbiont interactions, combined with metagenomic advances detecting functional gene clusters, will inevitably open new avenues for identification and discovery of novel bioactive compounds of biotechnological value from marine resources. This review article provides an overview on bioactive marine symbiotic organisms with specific emphasis placed on the sponge-associated ones and invites the international scientific community to contribute towards establishment of in-depth information of the environmental parameters defining selection and acquisition of true symbionts by the host organisms.

  2. Iceland as the largest source of natural air pollution in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagsson Waldhauserova, Pavla; Meinander, Outi; Olafsson, Haraldur; Arnalds, Olafur

    2017-04-01

    Arctic aerosols are often attributed to the Arctic Haze and long-range transport tracers. There is, however, an important dust source in the Arctic/Sub-arctic region which should receive more attention. The largest desert in the Arctic as well as in the Europe is Iceland with > 40,000 km2 of desert areas. The mean dust suspension frequency was 135 dust days annually in 1949-2012 with decreasing numbers in 2013-2015. The annual dust deposition was calculated as 31-40 million tons yr-1 affecting the area of > 500,000 km2. Satelite MODIS pictures have revealed dust plumes traveling > 1000 km at times. The physical properties of Icelandic dust showed differences in mineralogy, geochemical compositions, shapes, sizes, and colour, compared to the crustal mineral dust. Icelandic dust is of volcanic origin, dark in colour with sharp-tipped shards and large bubbles. About 80% of the particulate matter is volcanic glass rich in heavy metals, such as iron and titanium. Suspended dust measured at the glacial dust source consisted of such high number of close-to-ultrafine particles as concentrations during active eruptions. Generally, about 50% of the suspended PM10 are submicron particles in Iceland. Contrarily, suspended grains > 2 mm were captured during severe dust storm after the 2010 Eyjafjallajokull eruption when the aeolian transport exceeded 11 t m-1 of materials and placed this storms among the most extreme wind erosion events recorded on Earth. Our reflectance measurements showed that Icelandic dust deposited on snow lowers the snow albedo and reduces the snow density as much as Black Carbon. Icelandic volcanic dust tends to act as a positive climate forcing agent, both directly and indirectly, which is different to what generally concluded for crustal dust in the 2013 IPCC report. The high frequency, severity and year-round activity of volcanic dust emissions suggest that Icelandic dust may contribute to Arctic warming.

  3. Radioprotective effects of Cordyceps sinensis extracts on γ-irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Beong Gyu; Kim, On Joong; Kim, Jae Young

    1999-01-01

    Effect of single intraperitoneal administration of Cordyceps sinensis (Cs) extract at 24 hour before whole-body γ - irradiation on the survival ratio, body weight, organ weight changes and serum metabolites in the irradiated mice were investigated. The single pre-administration of Cs extract increased the 40-day survival ration of irradiated mice from 66.7 percent to 83.4 percent. The administration of Cs extract completely prevented weight reductions of spleen and thymus produced by γ - irradiation (P < 0.05, P < 0.01). Similar but somewhat less radioprotective effect was also found in the testis of the Cs treated mice. The administration of Cs inhibited the serum hyperglycemia produced by irradiation on the day 7th(P < 0.01). However, it did not influence the serum cholesterol and protein levels on the days examined. The present study is the first report regarding Cs which was tested and found to be radioprotective. (Author)

  4. ASN report on nuclear safety and radioprotection status in France in 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    After a general overview of the activity of the ASN (the French nuclear safety authority), of its missions and organisation, this activity report indicates the main events of 2010 concerning the actions performed by the ASN and the activities controlled by the ASN. These both aspects are then detailed. The actions performed by the ASN are dealing with nuclear activities (ionizing radiations and risks for health and for the environment), principles and actors of nuclear safety control, radioprotection and environment protection, regulation, control of nuclear activities and exposures to ionizing radiations, emergency situations, public information, international relationship, regional overview of nuclear safety and radioprotection. The activities controlled by the ASN are the medical uses of ionizing radiations, their non medical uses, the transport of radioactive materials, electronuclear plants, installations related to nuclear fuel cycle, nuclear research installations and other nuclear installations, the safety of nuclear installation dismantling, radioactive wastes and polluted sites

  5. Mint oil (Mentha spicata Linn.) offers behavioral radioprotection: a radiation-induced conditioned taste aversion study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haksar, A; Sharma, A; Chawla, R; Kumar, Raj; Lahiri, S S; Islam, F; Arora, M P; Sharma, R K; Tripathi, R P; Arora, Rajesh

    2009-02-01

    Mentha spicata Linn. (mint), a herb well known for its gastroprotective properties in the traditional system of medicine has been shown to protect against radiation-induced lethality, and recently its constituents have been found to possess calcium channel antagonizing properties. The present study examined the behavioral radioprotective efficacy of mint oil (obtained from Mentha spicata), particularly in mitigating radiation-induced conditioned taste aversion (CTA), which has been proposed as a behavioral endpoint that is mediated by the toxic effects of gamma radiation on peripheral systems, primarily the gastrointestinal system in the Sprague-Dawley rat model. Intraperitoneal administration of Mentha spicata oil 10% (v/v), 1 h before 2 Gy gamma radiation, was found to render significant radioprotection against CTA (p Mentha spicata can be effectively utilized in preventing radiation-induced behavioral changes. Copyright (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Radioprotective effect of thymoquinone on salivary gland of rats exposed to total cranial irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyuz, Mehmet; Taysi, Seyithan; Baysal, Elif; Demir, Elif; Alkis, Hilal; Akan, Muslum; Binici, Habip; Karatas, Zeynel Abidin

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the radioprotective effects of thymoquinone against radiation-induced damage in the salivary glands of rats exposed to total cranial gamma irradiation. Thirty-two Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups to test the radioprotective effectiveness of thymoquinone by intraperitoneal injection. An appropriate control group was also studied. Biochemical parameters in liver tissue of rats were determined by spectrophotometer. Glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), total (enzymatic plus nonenzymatic) superoxide scavenger activity (TSSA), nonenzymatic superoxide scavenger activity (NSSA), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities were significantly decreased, whereas xanthine oxidase, nitric oxide synthase activities, malondialdehyde, nitric oxide, and peroxynitrite levels were significantly increased in the irradiation group when compared to the control and sham control groups. Results showed that thymoquinone reduces oxidative and nitrosative stress parameters and has antioxidant effects and a free radical scavenging activity. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Role of endogenous serotonin in the mechanism of action of radioprotective substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konstantinova, M.M.; Nekrasova, I.V.; Gusareva, Eh.V.; Dontsova, G.V.

    1978-01-01

    A study is made of a correlation between radiomodifying activity of noradrenaline (NA), N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) and a combination of these agents and their effect on the content of endogenous serotonin in cells of Ehrlich's ascites tumor and E. coli B. There is no uniformity in the response of different cells and uniform direction of the changes in their radioresistance and endogenous serotonin content both under the effect of the substances (NA and NEM) given separately and under a combined effect of the protector and the agent, which removes the protective effect or prevents realization of the latter (NEM). This enables us to arrive at a conclusion that endogenous serotonin is not the only factor responsible for the radioprotective effect of the protective substances. At the same time, it is not excluded that endogenous serotonin is involved in the chain of reactions which are necessary for the radioprotective effect to come into play

  8. Radioprotective effects of Cordyceps sinensis extracts on {gamma}-irradiated mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Beong Gyu [Wongwang Health Science College, Iri (Korea, Republic of); Kim, On Joong; Kim, Jae Young [Dongguk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-06-01

    Effect of single intraperitoneal administration of Cordyceps sinensis (Cs) extract at 24 hour before whole-body {gamma} - irradiation on the survival ratio, body weight, organ weight changes and serum metabolites in the irradiated mice were investigated. The single pre-administration of Cs extract increased the 40-day survival ration of irradiated mice from 66.7 percent to 83.4 percent. The administration of Cs extract completely prevented weight reductions of spleen and thymus produced by {gamma} - irradiation (P < 0.05, P < 0.01). Similar but somewhat less radioprotective effect was also found in the testis of the Cs treated mice. The administration of Cs inhibited the serum hyperglycemia produced by irradiation on the day 7th(P < 0.01). However, it did not influence the serum cholesterol and protein levels on the days examined. The present study is the first report regarding Cs which was tested and found to be radioprotective. (Author)

  9. Qualification and certification in radioprotection of odontology students in the State of Rio de Janeiro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padilha Filho, Lucas Gomes; Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ; Borges, Jose Carlos

    2000-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to conduct a critical survey on the qualification and certification in radioprotection of odontology students from all dental schools in the State of Rio de Janeiro and some dental schools in the State of Sao Paulo, Brazil. The methodology involved the use of questionnaires applied to radiology professors and supervisors and former students. The questionnaires consisted of open and closed questions, which allowed an analysis of both qualitative and quantitative aspects. A critical analysis of the answers revealed that the students' knowledge of radioprotection is very poor, particularly with regard to the new guidelines of the Brazilian Ministry for Health. Consequently, we suggest that dental schools should reform the contents of radiology teaching, thus permitting upcoming students to be better prepared for the challenge of professional quality. (author)

  10. Radioprotective effects of autotransfusion in patients receiving radiotherapy of irradiated blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Shihuai; Ge Laizeng; He Fangxue; Lu Xiangkun; Shen Yuanfeng

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To study the radioprotective effects of autotransfusion in patients receiving radiotherapy with 60 Co γ-rays. Methods: From January 1996 to May 1997, 514 cases of cancer patients having received radiotherapy or chemotherapy were randomized into a study group (receiving autotransfusion of irradiated blood) and a control group (receiving routine treatment). Before and after treatment, parameters observed included immune function, WBC counts, radiation inflammation, pain relieving, survival quality and relationship between acute radiation reaction and mean radiotherapy dose. Results: The autotransfusion of irradiated blood enhanced immune function, WBC counts, relieved pain, improved survival quality and controlled radiation inflammation. conclusion: The reason that the radioprotective effects of autotransfusion of irradiated blood may be attributed to the enhancement of immune function, thereby increasing tolerance to larger than routine radiotherapy doses and reducing effects. It may protect the normal tissues rather than tumor tissues

  11. Acute toxicity and radioprotective efficiency of Gammaphos (WR-2721) in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuna, P.; Krajcovic, C.

    1981-01-01

    The acute toxicity was investigated of radioprotective compound WR-2721. In rats, after intramuscular administration the LD 50 value was found to be 441 (390-498) mg.kg -1 , after intraperitoneal administration - 463 (402-503) mg.kg -1 . In doses of 150, 2a0 and 250 mg.kg -1 , WR-2721 significantly protected the rats against radiation death after whole body gamma irradiation (0.386-0.381 Gy.min -1 ). WR-2721 was i.m. administered 15 minutes before administration. Evaluation of the radioprotective effect was based on 30 days' survival and on a comparison of lethal radiation doses in the control and in protected rats

  12. Phytoplankton blooms: an overlooked marine source of natural endocrine disrupting chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yinhan; Wang, Xiaochong; Indran, Inthrani Raja; Zhang, Shi-Jun; Lv, Zhengbing; Li, Jun; Holmes, Michael; Tang, Ying Zhong; Yong, E L

    2014-09-01

    We had previously reported high androgenic and estrogenic activities in seawaters in confined clusters close to Singapore. Further investigations revealed a hitherto unsuspected link between estrogenic/androgenic activity and net phytoplankton count. The primary objective of this study was to investigate the cause of a correlation between net phytoplankton and endocrine activity, and corroborate this observation, and rule out other possible confounding factors. Our secondary objective was to study if these estrogenic secretions can impact human health. Five species of phytoplankton, Gymnodinium catenatum, Prorocentrum minimum, Alexandrium leei, Chattonella marina, and Fibrocapsa japonica, were isolated from Singapore waters and mass cultured and the cells and culture media screened for estrogenic and androgenic activity using human cell-based bioassays. The raphidophytes C. marina and F. japonica displayed significant estrogenic activity whilst the dinoflagellates G. catenatum and P. minimum displayed significant androgenic activity in both the cell extracts and the cell culture media extract. Our data shows that selected phytoplankton isolates are potent secretors of estrogenic and androgenic substances, which are potential endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). As the harmful nature of EDCs is largely due to their bioaccumulation in the aquatic food chain our findings imply that the impact of these phytoplankton secretions needs to be investigated especially for seafoods, which are only a single trophic level away from phytoplankton. Alternatively, should these phytoplankton-origin EDCs not accumulate through marine food chains to significantly impact humans or marine mammals, our results indicate that functional assays could greatly over-estimate the risk from naturally occurring EDCs produced by marine phytoplankton. It remains to be determined if these EDCs affect zooplankton and other organisms that directly feed on marine phytoplankton, or if the secreted

  13. Antimicrobial Activity of Carbon Nanoparticles Isolated from Natural Sources against Pathogenic Gram-Negative and Gram-Positive Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheena Varghese

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the isolation of carbon nanoparticles (CNPs from kitchen soot, characterization of the CNPs by UV/visible spectroscopy, SEM and XRD, and their antimicrobial action. The antibacterial activity of the isolated carbon nanoparticles was tested against various pathogenic bacterial strains such as Gram-negative Proteus refrigere and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus haemolyticus. The inhibition zones were measured, and it was found that the carbon nanoparticles isolated from natural sources are active against these Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial strains.

  14. Evaluation of Natural Materials as Exogenous Carbon Sources for Biological Treatment of Low Carbon-to-Nitrogen Wastewater

    OpenAIRE

    Ramírez-Godínez, Juan; Beltrán-Hernández, Icela; Álvarez-Hernández, Alejandro; Coronel-Olivares, Claudia; Contreras-López, Elizabeth; Quezada-Cruz, Maribel; Vázquez-Rodríguez, Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    In the bacterial processes involved in the mitigation of nitrogen pollution, an adequately high carbon-to-nitrogen (C : N) ratio is key to sustain denitrification. We evaluated three natural materials (woodchips, barley grains, and peanut shells) as carbon sources for low C : N wastewater. The amount of organic matter released from these materials to aqueous media was evaluated, as well as their pollution swapping potential by measuring the release of total Kjeldahl nitrogen, N-NH4 +, NO2 −, ...

  15. Quantitative determination of uranium and thorum contents of some rock samples in Nigeria using natural calibration sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uwah, E.J.; Ajakaiye, D.E.

    1987-01-01

    Three natural multiple-source standards were used to estimate eU and eTh concentrations in rock samples collected during in-situ reconnaissance surveys in the Sokoto Basin of Nigeria. The standards were those previously analyzed by Delayed neutron counting (DNC) and X0ray Fluoresence (DRF) techniques (Uwah and Ajakaiye, 1986). Regression analysis of the data from twelve of the samples analyzed by DNC and XRF techniques enabled a quick approximate determination of eU and eTh in many samples in the survey area, containing about 50 ppm U and above

  16. Observations on sediment sources in the Lower Athabasca River basin: implications of natural hydrocarbons inputs from oil sands deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conly, F.M.

    1999-01-01

    Government, industry and public concern exists over the environmental consequences of the development of the oil sand deposits in the McMurray Formation in the lower Athabasca River basin, Alberta. The impact of this development is unclear and is undergoing investigation. Investigations to date have focussed on the nature of the effluent produced by the extraction industry and its effect on biotic systems, and on the spatial distribution of hydrocarbon contaminants associated with deposited fluvial sediments. Natural hydrocarbon outcrops may be responsible for observed biomarker responses in areas not exposed to industrial effluent. Given this source of hydrocarbons and doubt concerning its environmental impact, it is difficult to ascertain the impact of oil extraction activities within a fluvial system. A study was conducted to determine the nature and extent of natural hydrocarbon releases within the context of the sediment regime of the lower Athabasca River basin. A description is included of observations from the field and a context is set up for assessing sediment-bound hydrocarbon contaminants in the lower Athabasca River basin. Abstract only included

  17. Nuclides.net: A computational environment for nuclear data and applications in radioprotection and radioecology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthou, V.; Galy, J.; Leutzenkirchen, K.

    2004-01-01

    An interactive multimedia tool, Nuclides.net, has been developed at the Institute for Transuranium Elements. The Nuclides.net 'integrated environment' is a suite of computer programs ranging from a powerful user-friendly interface, which allows the user to navigate the nuclides chart and explore the properties of nuclides, to various computational modules for decay calculations, dosimetry and shielding calculations, etc. The product is particularly suitable for environmental radioprotection and radioecology. (authors)

  18. Radioprotective efficacy of bisarylidene cyclopentanone on electron beam radiation induced oxidative stress in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darshan Raj, C.G.; Sarojini, B.K.; Musthafa Khaleel, V.; Ramesh, S.R.; Ramakrishna, M.K.; Narayana, B.; Sanjeev, Ganesh

    2010-01-01

    Present study was carried out for evaluating the radioprotective effect of bischalcone (2E, 5E) - 2,5-bis (3-methoxy-4-hydroxy-benzylidene) cyclopentanone (curcumin analog (CA)), on electron beam radiation induced oxidative stress in Drosophila melanogaster adults. The oxidative stress markers and antioxidants included superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT). The oxidative stress was induced at 1.5 Gy. (author)

  19. Methodology for inspection parametrization of radioprotection at radioactive installations: a research agenda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filgueiras, Bruno Costa; Sauerbronn, Fernanda F.

    2011-01-01

    This paper establishes a research agenda based on documental and bibliographic research for radioprotection inspection parametrization at radioactive installations, which is one of the constitutional attributions of Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission. Such proposal, aiming to guarantee that the evaluation of normative requests of radiation protection generated a quantitative result, useful for various institutions in the safety and regulation areas, bringing relevant contribution for the sector

  20. Use of a prototype radioprotection cabin in vascular neuroradiology: Dosimetry and ergonomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guersen, Joel; Karmouche, Kaouthar; Moyon, Jean Baptiste; Osmond, Estelle; Poulin, Maxime; Gabrillargues, Jean; Jean, Betty; Chabert, Emmanuel; Dutheil, Frédéric; Cassagnes, Lucie; Boyer, Louis

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this work was to compare the performance of a prototype radioprotection cabin in interventional neuroradiology, and to assess its suitability for routine use. The radioprotection cabin was a prototype derived from the CATHPAX AF(®) model. Three operators carried out 21 procedures (19 brain arteriographies and 2 embolizations) using the radioprotection cabin and not wearing the usual lead individual protection equipment (IPE), and 17 procedures (16 brain arteriographies and 1 embolization) wearing the standard lead IPE (vest, skirt, thyroid shield and goggles), and not using the radioprotection cabin. In all cases, thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were positioned at head, trunk, pelvic region, and upper and lower limbs to measure the dose equivalent for Hp(0.07) or Hp(3) that they received, attenuated by either the cabin or the lead IPE. Parallel to these dosimetric measurements, the ergonomics of the protection cabin were appraised by each radiologist after each procedure. The cabin procured an overall reduction of 74% of the dose received on the whole body with Hp(0.07)=0.04 mSv ± 0.01 (CL=95%) against Hp(0.07)=0.12 mSv ± 0.04 (CL=95%) for the IPE. Body protection with the cabin was near complete, and close to 100% for the regions not protected by the usual IPE (e.g. the head). We also showed that design weaknesses noted by the operators that hampered procedures (light reflections, reduced hand mobility, awkward access to radioscopy pedal) could be remedied by maker's improvements to the prototype and minor changes in work habits. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Radioprotective effect of cysteamine entrapped in liposomes oraly administered to the Mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roman, Vincent; Bocquier, Francois; Leterrier, Francois; Fatome, Marc

    1982-01-01

    Cysteamine entrapped in liposomes was oraly delivered to Mice and its radioprotective effect observed as a function of the time elapsed between its administration and 60 Co gamma irradiation. A protection is manifest up to 3 hrs after administration. This result contrasts with the absence of protection afforded by cysteamine when oraly given as an aqueous solutions, and with the short lasting activity of its parenteral administration [fr

  2. Evaluation of the free radical scavenging activity and radioprotective efficacy of Grewia asiatica fruit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Krishna V; Sisodia, Rashmi [Radiation Biology Laboratory, Department of Zoology, University of Rajasthan, Jaipur, Rajasthan-302055 (India)], E-mail: rashsisodia@yahoo.co.in

    2009-09-01

    The radioprotective effect of Grewia asiatica fruit (GAE) which contains anthocyanin-type cyanidin 3-glucoside, vitamins C and A, minerals, carotenes and dietary fibre was studied. For the study Swiss albino mice were divided into five groups: (1) control (vehicle treated); (2) GAE treated (700 mg kg{sup -1} day{sup -1} for 15 days); (3) irradiated (5 Gy); (4) GAE+irradiated and (5) irradiated+GAE treated. The irradiation of animals resulted in a significant elevation of lipid peroxidation in terms of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) content and depletion in glutathione (GSH) and protein levels at all intervals studied, namely 1-30 days, in comparison to the control group. Treatment of mice with GAE before and after irradiation caused a significant depletion in TBARS content followed by a significant elevation in GSH and protein concentration in the intestine and testis of mice at all post-irradiation autopsy intervals in comparison to irradiated mice. Significant protection of DNA and RNA in testis was also noticed. GAE was found to have strong radical scavenging activity in 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH{sup *}) and O{sub 2}{sup -} assays and also showed in vitro radioprotective activity in protein carbonyl assay in a dose-dependent manner. The above results prove the radioprotective efficacy of GAE.

  3. Antioxidative and radioprotective potential of rutin and quercetin in Swiss albino mice exposed to gamma radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrikant L Patil

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The radioprotective potential of bioflavonoid, rutin (RUT and quercetin (QRT was investigated in Swiss albino mice exposed to gamma radiation. The radioprotective potential of RUT and QRT was assessed in pre-treatment group of mice followed on radiation-induced changes in glutathione (GSH, glutathione-S-transferase (GST, superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, and lipid peroxidation (LPO levels were also analyzed. Elevation in the GSH, GST, SOD, CAT, and decreased LPO levels were observed in RUT and QRT pretreated group when compared to the irradiated animals. Furthermore, it was observed that RUT and QRT treatment was found to inhibit various free radicals generated in vitro, viz., 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH, O2· , 2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid (ABTS· + , and OH· in a concentration-dependent manner. This study clearly demonstrates the free radical scavenging action of RUT and QRT, indicating that it may have its potential as a radioprotective agent. Furthermore, the presence of a phenolic group in RUT and QRT is known to contribute to scavenging the radiation-induced free radicals and inhibition of oxidative stress. Present findings demonstrate the potential of RUT and QRT in mitigating radiation-induced oxidative stress, which may be attributed to the inhibition of radiation-induced decline in the endogenous antioxidant levels and scavenging of radiation-induced free radicals.

  4. Studies of the radioprotective properties of nicotinyl compounds, aspartic acid, glutamic acid and methionine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itzel-Kietzmann, V.M.

    1986-01-01

    Radioprotective properties of sodium salts of nicotinyl aspartic acid, nicotinyl methionyl aspartic acid and nicotinyl glutamic acid were tested in mice (NMRI). Experimental animals were irradiated by rayage (9,5 Gy). Parameters were: survival rate, peritoneal fluid cell count, weight and DNA concentration of spleen, hepatic DNA polymerase activity and rate of protein synthesis, lactate dehydrogenase activity in serum, maltase, sucrase and leucine aminopeptidase activitiy in duodenum and jejunum. Following results were obtained: 1. There was no significant difference in survival rate of treated and untreated animals. In treated animals only a short prolongation of survival time was observed. 2. After irradiation a quick reduction of splenic weight and DNA concentration was measured. 3. A reduction of DNA polymerase activity in liver was observed in treated and untreated mice. The rate of hepatic protein synthesis was similar in all animals. A final decrease was observed. 4. Variable activities of maltase, sucrase and leucine aminopeptidase activity in duodenum and jejunum indicated no radioprotective effect of tested substances. In conclusion of these results the tested substances show no significant radioprotective properties. (orig.) [de

  5. Radioprotection considerations on the expansion project of an interim storage facility for radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boni-Mitake, Malvina; Suzuki, Fabio F.; Dellamano, Jose C.

    2009-01-01

    The Radioactive Waste Management (GRR) of the Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (IPEN/CNEN-SP) receives, treats, packs, characterizes and stores institutional radioactive wastes generated at IPEN-CNEN/SP and also those received from several radiological facilities in the country. The current storage areas have been used to store the treated radioactive waste since the early 1980's and their occupation is close to their full capacity, so a storage area expansion is needed. The expansion project includes the rebuilding of two sheds and the enlargement of the third one in the area currently occupied by the GRR and in a small adjacent area. The civil works will be in controlled area, where the waste management operations will be maintained, so all the steps of this project should be planned and optimized, from the radioprotection point of view. The civil construction will be made in steps. During the project implementation there will be transfer operations of radioactive waste packages to the rebuilt area. After these transfer operations, the civil works will proceed in the vacant areas. This project implies on radiological monitoring, dose control of the involved workers, decontamination and clearance of areas and it is also envisaged the need for repacking of some radioactive waste. The objective this paper is to describe the radioprotection study developed to this expansion project, taking into account the national radioprotection and civil construction regulations. (author)

  6. Radioprotection against radiation induced bone marrow syndrome by a semi-synthetic derivative of chlorophyll

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suryavanshi, Shweta; Sharma, Deepak; Checker, Rahul; Santosh Kumar, S.; Sainis, Krishna B.

    2014-01-01

    A plethora of biological properties have been attributed to chlorophyllin (CHL), the water soluble derivative of the green plant pigment chlorophyll. Several studies are available describing its ability to modify genotoxic effects. It has been shown that administration CHL to human lymphopenic individuals led to the recovery and restoration of the immune system and also inhibited aflatoxin B1-DNA binding in individuals residing in high risk exposure to this liver carcinogen. The present study is aimed at establishing radioprotective efficacy of CHL against ionizing radiation induced hematopoietic syndrome. CHL offered complete protection against whole body irradiation (WBI, 7 Gy) induced mortality in mice. This observation was supported by increase in the number of macroscopic endogenous colonies enumerated on the surface of the spleens taken from CHL+WBI group as compared to WBI group. Radioprotection by CHL was found to be mediated by increasing the frequency of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) as evaluated by side population assay. Administration of CHL induced G1 arrest in bone marrow cells, increased number of granulocytes and neutrophils in the peripheral blood. At the molecular level, activation of ERK was observed in bone marrow cells obtained from CHL administered mice. In conclusion, CHL mediated radioprotection was attributed to increased stem cell numbers, G1 arrest in bone marrow cells, increased neutrophil numbers and ERK activation. (author)

  7. Medicinal and edible lignicolous fungi as natural sources of antioxidative and antibacterial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaman, M; Jovin, E; Malbasa, R; Matavuly, M; Popović, M

    2010-10-01

    The antioxidant activity of organic extracts of eight fungal species, Ganoderma lucidum, Ganoderma applanatum, Meripilus giganteus, Laetiporus sulphureus, Flammulina velutipes, Coriolus versicolor, Pleurotus ostreatus and Panus tigrinus, was evaluated for free radical (DPPH· and OH·) scavenging capacity and an effect on lipid peroxidation, and the antibacterial activity was tested by the agar well diffusion method. The highest DPPH· scavenging activity was found in the methanol extract of G. applanatum (12.5 μg/mL, 82.80%) and the chloroform extract of G. lucidum (510.2 μg/mL, 69.12%). The same extracts also showed the highest LP inhibition (91.83%, 85.09%) at 500 μg/mL, while the methanol extracts of G. applanatum and L. sulphureus showed the highest scavenging effect on OH· radicals (68.47%, 57.06%, respectively) at 400 μg/mL. A strong antibacterial activity against Gram-positive bacteria was also manifested. The antioxidative potencies correlated generally with the total phenol content (0.19-9.98 mg/g). The HPLC determination showed that the majority of analysed species contained gallic and protocatechic acids. Consequently, these fungi are shown to be potential sources of antioxidative and antibacterial agents. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Hedera nepalensis K. Koch: A Novel Source of Natural Cancer Chemopreventive and Anticancerous Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafri, Laila; Saleem, Samreen; Kondrytuk, Tamara P; Haq, Ihsan-ul; Ullah, Nazif; Pezzuto, John M; Mirza, Bushra

    2016-03-01

    Traditional medicinal plants are often used for both the prevention and the treatment of local diseases. Taking into consideration the medicinal importance of Hedera nepalensis within local Pakistani traditions, the present study was undertaken to analyze the in vitro cancer chemopreventive and cytotoxic properties of the plant. The in vitro cancer chemopreventive testing was performed using nitrite assay, NFκB assay, aromatase assay, and quinone reductase 1 (QR1) assay. The cytotoxic potential was evaluated on three cancer-cell lines: MCF-7, MDA-MB-231, and HeLa using sulforhodamine B (SRB) assay. The results of cancer chemopreventive assays show that n-hexane and ethyl acetate fractions of tested plant have promising cancer chemopreventive potential. Lupeol isolated from n-hexane as well as ethyl acetate fraction showed lowest IC50 (0.20 ± 1.9 μM) in NFκB assay. Crude extract and its fractions inhibited the growth of three cancer cell lines by more than 60%, IC50 value of lupeol varied from 2.32 to 10.2 μM. HPLC-DAD-based quantification of lupeol in different plant tissues demonstrated that leaves of H. nepalensis are a rich source of lupeol (0.196 mg/100 mg dry weight). Our data have shown that H. nepalensis harbors cancer chemopreventive and cytotoxic agents. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. The Naturalistic Fallacy - The Metaethical Source of the Controversy over the Naturalization of Epistemology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Trybulec

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I analyze the phenomenon known as ‘the naturalistic fallacy’. The thesis for which I argue is that the decision not to commit the ‘naturalistic fallacy’ (as taken by anti-naturalists, or to acknowledging it as an inevitable process (as in the naturalist position, forms the basis for every theory concerning the justification of normative judgments. It is this choice that determines what solutions can be proposed within the various fields of philosophy to the problems pertaining to the sources of justificational reasons and the criteria for justified judgment. To justify this thesis I draw an analogy between metaethical and epistemological versions of this ‘fallacy’. In the first part of the paper, I point to the metaethical controversy surrounding the ‘naturalistic fallacy’. In the second part, I transpose the controversy over ‘the  naturalistic fallacy’ from the sphere of metaethics into that epistemology. Firstly, I adopt and seek to justify a chosen epistemic quality that, I argue, may be regarded as analogous to the ethical quality ‘good’. In order to accomplish this, I set out to determine the relation between the truth and the justification of a judgment, arguing that this second category is, in fact, the more important one where epistemological analysis is concerned. Although the ‘naturalistic fallacy’ was initially formulated within metaethics, it might be transferred to every field of  normative consideration.

  10. Designing better methane mitigation policies: the challenge of distributed small sources in the natural gas sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravikumar, Arvind P.; Brandt, Adam R.

    2017-04-01

    Methane—a short-lived and potent greenhouse gas—presents a unique challenge: it is emitted from a large number of highly distributed and diffuse sources. In this regard, the United States’ Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has recommended periodic leak detection and repair surveys at oil and gas facilities using optical gas imaging technology. This regulation requires an operator to fix all detected leaks within a set time period. Whether such ‘find-all-fix-all’ policies are effective depends on significant uncertainties in the character of emissions. In this work, we systematically analyze the effect of facility-related and mitigation-related uncertainties on regulation effectiveness. Drawing from multiple publicly-available datasets, we find that: (1) highly-skewed leak-size distributions strongly influence emissions reduction potential; (2) variations in emissions estimates across facilities leads to large variability in mitigation effectiveness; (3) emissions reductions from optical gas imaging-based leak detection programs can range from 15% to over 70%; and (4) while implementation costs are uniformly lower than EPA estimates, benefits from saved gas are highly variable. Combining empirical evidence with model results, we propose four policy options for effective methane mitigation: performance-oriented targets for accelerated emission reductions, flexible policy mechanisms to account for regional variation, technology-agnostic regulations to encourage adoption of the most cost-effective measures, and coordination with other greenhouse gas mitigation policies to reduce unintended spillover effects.

  11. Mycotoxins: diffuse and point source contributions of natural contaminants of emerging concern to streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolpin, Dana W; Schenzel, Judith; Meyer, Michael T; Phillips, Patrick J; Hubbard, Laura E; Scott, Tia-Marie; Bucheli, Thomas D

    2014-02-01

    To determine the prevalence of mycotoxins in streams, 116 water samples from 32 streams and three wastewater treatment plant effluents were collected in 2010 providing the broadest investigation on the spatial and temporal occurrence of mycotoxins in streams conducted in the United States to date. Out of the 33 target mycotoxins measured, nine were detected at least once during this study. The detections of mycotoxins were nearly ubiquitous during this study even though the basin size spanned four orders of magnitude. At least one mycotoxin was detected in 94% of the 116 samples collected. Deoxynivalenol was the most frequently detected mycotoxin (77%), followed by nivalenol (59%), beauvericin (43%), zearalenone (26%), β-zearalenol (20%), 3-acetyl-deoxynivalenol (16%), α-zearalenol (10%), diacetoxyscirpenol (5%), and verrucarin A (1%). In addition, one or more of the three known estrogenic compounds (i.e. zearalenone, α-zearalenol, and β-zearalenol) were detected in 43% of the samples, with maximum concentrations substantially higher than observed in previous research. While concentrations were generally low (i.e. applications from exposed livestock) and point (e.g. wastewater treatment plants and food processing plants) sources are important environmental pathways for mycotoxin transport to streams. The ecotoxicological impacts from the long-term, low-level exposures to mycotoxins alone or in combination with complex chemical mixtures are unknown. © 2013.

  12. Quality Assessment of Honey Sourced from Natural and Artificial Apiaries in Ekiti State, Nigeria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oyeyemi Sunday Dele

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Honey samples were obtained from wild and domesticated sources and analyzed for some physicochemical properties such as color, pH, moisture content, ash content, refractive index, specific gravity, total solid, viscosity, glucose and fructose content following Standard Association of Official Analytical Chemistry. The following range of values for pH (3.55-4.20, moisture content (18.50-25.60%, soluble solids (74.10-81.20%, ash content (0.08-0.14%, specific gravity (1.38-1.47, refractive index (81.3-83.4%, fructose content (40.5-63.04% and glucose content (19.35-32.34%. The mineral composition analyzed revealed potassium to be the dominant mineral in the honey samples followed by Calcium. However, Cadmium and lead where not detected in the honey samples. The results indicated that parameters such as pH, moisture content, ash content, specific gravity, sugar (majorly fructose and glucose content, fructose/glucose ratio, glucose/water ratio conform within the limit of the international standard for honey. However, moisture contents of the wild honey samples (22.05% and 25.60% were a little higher than the Codex Standards of ≤ 21%. In conclusion, the honey samples investigated have the needed quality criteria and are good for human consumption. The results also revealed excellent organoleptic acceptability of the honey samples, hence are suitable for human uses.

  13. Gamma-ray dose-rates to human tissues from natural external sources in Great Britain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiers, F.W.

    1960-01-01

    The information on environmental gamma radiation given in the last report (Spiers, 1956) was limited by the small amount of experimental data then available. Considerably more information has been accumulated since then and a summary has been published in the Report of the United Nations Scientific Committee on te Effects of Atomic Radiation 1958). The data reported from Austria, France, Sweden and the U.S.A. show that in general dose-rates out-of-doors range from about 0 mrads per year over sedimentary rocks to about 200 mrads per year in granite districts. In houses a similar range of doserates is indicated, the rates in individual houses depending upon the nature of the building materials. In some parts of the world, however, very much higher dose-rates have been observed. On the extensive area of monazite sand in the Kerala State of India dose-rates of up to 4000 mrads per year have been recorded and the mean dose-rate for 10 villages with a total population of 52,000 has been estimated to be 1270 mrads per year. Mean dose-rates of 500 and 1600 mrads per year have also been reported from two localities in Brazil

  14. Comparing Natural Gas Leakage Detection Technologies Using an Open-Source "Virtual Gas Field" Simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Chandler E; Ravikumar, Arvind P; Brandt, Adam R

    2016-04-19

    We present a tool for modeling the performance of methane leak detection and repair programs that can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of detection technologies and proposed mitigation policies. The tool uses a two-state Markov model to simulate the evolution of methane leakage from an artificial natural gas field. Leaks are created stochastically, drawing from the current understanding of the frequency and size distributions at production facilities. Various leak detection and repair programs can be simulated to determine the rate at which each would identify and repair leaks. Integrating the methane leakage over time enables a meaningful comparison between technologies, using both economic and environmental metrics. We simulate four existing or proposed detection technologies: flame ionization detection, manual infrared camera, automated infrared drone, and distributed detectors. Comparing these four technologies, we found that over 80% of simulated leakage could be mitigated with a positive net present value, although the maximum benefit is realized by selectively targeting larger leaks. Our results show that low-cost leak detection programs can rely on high-cost technology, as long as it is applied in a way that allows for rapid detection of large leaks. Any strategy to reduce leakage should require a careful consideration of the differences between low-cost technologies and low-cost programs.

  15. Automated Radiology Report Summarization Using an Open-Source Natural Language Processing Pipeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goff, Daniel J; Loehfelm, Thomas W

    2017-10-30

    Diagnostic radiologists are expected to review and assimilate findings from prior studies when constructing their overall assessment of the current study. Radiology information systems facilitate this process by presenting the radiologist with a subset of prior studies that are more likely to be relevant to the current study, usually by comparing anatomic coverage of both the current and prior studies. It is incumbent on the radiologist to review the full text report and/or images from those prior studies, a process that is time-consuming and confers substantial risk of overlooking a relevant prior study or finding. This risk is compounded when patients have dozens or even hundreds of prior imaging studies. Our goal is to assess the feasibility of natural language processing techniques to automatically extract asserted and negated disease entities from free-text radiology reports as a step towards automated report summarization. We compared automatically extracted disease mentions to a gold-standard set of manual annotations for 50 radiology reports from CT abdomen and pelvis examinations. The automated report summarization pipeline found perfect or overlapping partial matches for 86% of the manually annotated disease mentions (sensitivity 0.86, precision 0.66, accuracy 0.59, F1 score 0.74). The performance of the automated pipeline was good, and the overall accuracy was similar to the interobserver agreement between the two manual annotators.

  16. Chronic oiling of marine birds in California by natural petroleum seeps, shipwrecks, and other sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkel, Laird A; Nevins, Hannahrose; Martin, Marida; Sugarman, Susan; Harvey, James T; Ziccardi, Michael H

    2014-02-15

    We assessed temporal and spatial patterns of chronic oiling of seabirds in California during 2005-2010, using data on: (1) live oiled birds reported to the Oiled Wildlife Care Network (OWCN) from throughout the state, and (2) dead oiled birds found during systematic monthly beached-bird surveys in central California. A mean of 245 (± 141 SD) live miscellaneous oiled birds (not associated with known oil spills) were reported to the OWCN per year, and 0.1 oiled dead birds km(-1) per month were found on beach surveys in central California. Chemical fingerprinting of oiled feathers from a subset of these birds (n=101) indicated that 89% of samples tested were likely from natural petroleum seeps off southern and central California. There was a pronounced peak during late winter in the number of oiled birds reported in southern California, which we theorize may be related to large storm waves disturbing underwater seeps. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Production of Defatted Palm Kernel Cake Protein Hydrolysate as a Valuable Source of Natural Antioxidants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Zarei

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to produce a valuable protein hydrolysate from palm kernel cake (PKC for the development of natural antioxidants. Extracted PKC protein was hydrolyzed using different proteases (alcalase, chymotrypsin, papain, pepsin, trypsin, flavourzyme, and bromelain. Subsequently, antioxidant activity and degree of hydrolysis (DH of each hydrolysate were evaluated using DPPH• radical scavenging activity and O-phthaldialdehyde spectrophotometric assay, respectively. The results revealed a strong correlation between DH and radical scavenging activity of the hydrolysates, where among these, protein hydrolysates produced by papain after 38 h hydrolysis exhibited the highest DH (91 ± 0.1% and DPPH• radical scavenging activity (73.5 ± 0.25% compared to the other hydrolysates. In addition, fractionation of the most effective (potent hydrolysate by reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography indicated a direct association between hydrophobicity and radical scavenging activity of the hydrolysates. Isoelectric focusing tests also revealed that protein hydrolysates with basic and neutral isoelectric point (pI have the highest radical scavenging activity, although few fractions in the acidic range also exhibited good antioxidant potential.

  18. Isotopic identification of natural vs. anthropogenic lead sources in marine sediments from the inner Ria de Vigo (NW Spain)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez-Iglesias, P., E-mail: palvarez@uvigo.es [Department of Marine Geosciences and Land Use Management, Faculty of Marine Sciences, University of Vigo (Spain); Laboratorio de Analisis Quimico Instrumental, C.A.C.T.I., Universidad de Vigo (Spain); Rubio, B., E-mail: brubio@uvigo.es [Department of Marine Geosciences and Land Use Management, Faculty of Marine Sciences, University of Vigo (Spain); Millos, J., E-mail: jmillos@uvigo.es [Laboratorio de Analisis Quimico Instrumental, C.A.C.T.I., Universidad de Vigo (Spain)

    2012-10-15

    San Simon Bay, the inner part of the Ria de Vigo (NW Spain), an area previously identified as highly polluted by Pb, was selected for the application of Pb stable isotope ratios as a fingerprinting tool in subtidal and intertidal sediment cores. Lead isotopic ratios were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry on extracts from bulk samples after total acid digestion. Depth-wise profiles of {sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb, {sup 206}Pb/{sup 204}Pb, {sup 207}Pb/{sup 204}Pb, {sup 208}Pb/{sup 204}Pb and {sup 208}Pb/{sup 207}Pb ratios showed, in general, an upward decrease for both intertidal and subtidal sediments as a consequence of the anthropogenic activities over the last century, or centuries. Waste channel samples from a nearby ceramic factory showed characteristic Pb stable isotope ratios different from those typical of coal and petrol. Natural isotope ratios from non-polluted samples were established for the study area, differentiating sediments from granitic or schist-gneiss sources. A binary mixing model employed on the polluted samples allowed estimating the anthropogenic inputs to the bay. These inputs represented between 25 and 98% of Pb inputs in intertidal samples, and 9-84% in subtidal samples, their contributions varying with time. Anthropogenic sources were apportioned according to a three-source model. Coal combustion-related emissions were the main anthropogenic source Pb to the bay (60-70%) before the establishment of the ceramic factory in the area (in the 1970s) which has since constituted the main source (95-100%), followed by petrol-related emissions. The Pb inputs history for the intertidal area was determined for the 20th century, and, for the subtidal area, the 19th and 20th centuries. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pb stable isotope ratios were applied to study Pb sources in coastal sediments. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pb isotopic ratios were determined for pre-pollution and for industrial samples. Black

  19. Misoprostol-induced radioprotection of Syrian hamster embryo cells in utero from cell death and oncogenic transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, R.C.; LaNasa, P.; Hanson, W.R. [Loyola Univ., Maywood, IL (United States)

    1994-07-01

    Misoprostol, a PGE analog, is an effective radioprotector of murine intestine and hematopoietic and hair cell renewal systems. The radioprotective nature of misoprostol was extended to examine its ability to influence clonogenic cell survival and induction of oncogenic transformation in Syrian hamster embryo cells exposed to X rays in utero and assayed in vitro. Hamsters in their 12th day of pregnancy were injected subcutaneously with misoprostal, and 2 h later the pregnant hamsters were exposed to graded doses of X rays. Immediately after irradiation, hamsters were euthanized and embryonic tissue was explanted into culture dishes containing complete growth medium. After a 2-week incubation period, clongenic cell survival and morphologically transformed foci were determined. Survival of misoprostol-treated SHE cells was increased and yielded a dose reduction factor of 1.5 compared to SHE cells treated with X rays alone. In contrast, radiation-induced oncogenic transformation of misoprostol-treated cells was reduced by a factor of 20 compared to cells treated with X rays alone. These studies suggest that misoprostol not only protects normal tissues in vivo from acute radiation injury, but also protects cells, to a large extent, from injury leading to transforming events. 26 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Misoprostol-induced radioprotection of Syrian hamster embryo cells in utero from cell death and oncogenic transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.C.; LaNasa, P.; Hanson, W.R.

    1994-01-01

    Misoprostol, a PGE analog, is an effective radioprotector of murine intestine and hematopoietic and hair cell renewal systems. The radioprotective nature of misoprostol was extended to examine its ability to influence clonogenic cell survival and induction of oncogenic transformation in Syrian hamster embryo cells exposed to X rays in utero and assayed in vitro. Hamsters in their 12th day of pregnancy were injected subcutaneously with misoprostal, and 2 h later the pregnant hamsters were exposed to graded doses of X rays. Immediately after irradiation, hamsters were euthanized and embryonic tissue was explanted into culture dishes containing complete growth medium. After a 2-week incubation period, clongenic cell survival and morphologically transformed foci were determined. Survival of misoprostol-treated SHE cells was increased and yielded a dose reduction factor of 1.5 compared to SHE cells treated with X rays alone. In contrast, radiation-induced oncogenic transformation of misoprostol-treated cells was reduced by a factor of 20 compared to cells treated with X rays alone. These studies suggest that misoprostol not only protects normal tissues in vivo from acute radiation injury, but also protects cells, to a large extent, from injury leading to transforming events. 26 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  1. Cissampelos pareira Linn: Natural Source of Potent Antiviral Activity against All Four Dengue Virus Serotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Ruchi; Raut, Rajendra; Tyagi, Poornima; Pareek, Pawan Kumar; Barman, Tarani Kanta; Singhal, Smita; Shirumalla, Raj Kumar; Kanoje, Vijay; Subbarayan, Ramesh; Rajerethinam, Ravisankar; Sharma, Navin; Kanaujia, Anil; Shukla, Gyanesh; Gupta, Y K; Katiyar, Chandra K; Bhatnagar, Pradip K; Upadhyay, Dilip J; Swaminathan, Sathyamangalam; Khanna, Navin

    2015-12-01

    Dengue, a mosquito-borne viral disease, poses a significant global public health risk. In tropical countries such as India where periodic dengue outbreaks can be correlated to the high prevalence of the mosquito vector, circulation of all four dengue viruses (DENVs) and the high population density, a drug for dengue is being increasingly recognized as an unmet public health need. Using the knowledge of traditional Indian medicine, Ayurveda, we developed a systematic bioassay-guided screening approach to explore the indigenous herbal bio-resource to identify plants with pan-DENV inhibitory activity. Our results show that the alcoholic extract of Cissampelos pariera Linn (Cipa extract) was a potent inhibitor of all four DENVs in cell-based assays, assessed in terms of viral NS1 antigen secretion using ELISA, as well as viral replication, based on plaque assays. Virus yield reduction assays showed that Cipa extract could decrease viral titers by an order of magnitude. The extract conferred statistically significant protection against DENV infection using the AG129 mouse model. A preliminary evaluation of the clinical relevance of Cipa extract showed that it had no adverse effects on platelet counts and RBC viability. In addition to inherent antipyretic activity in Wistar rats, it possessed the ability to down-regulate the production of TNF-α, a cytokine implicated in severe dengue disease. Importantly, it showed no evidence of toxicity in Wistar rats, when administered at doses as high as 2g/Kg body weight for up to 1 week. Our findings above, taken in the context of the human safety of Cipa, based on its use in Indian traditional medicine, warrant further work to explore Cipa as a source for the development of an inexpensive herbal formulation for dengue therapy. This may be of practical relevance to a dengue-endemic resource-poor country such as India.

  2. Radioprotective activity of curcumin-encapsulated liposomes against genotoxicity caused by Gamma Cobalt-60 irradiation in human blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Minh-Hiep; Pham, Ngoc-Duy; Dong, Bingxue; Nguyen, Thi-Huynh-Nga; Bui, Chi-Bao; Hadinoto, Kunn

    2017-11-01

    While the radioprotective activity of curcumin against genotoxicity has been well established, its poor oral bioavailability has limited its successful clinical applications. Nanoscale formulations, including liposomes, have been demonstrated to improve curcumin bioavailability. The objective of the present work was (1) to prepare and characterize curcumin-encapsulated liposomes (i.e. size, colloidal stability, encapsulation efficiency, and payload), and (2) subsequently to evaluate their radioprotective activity against genotoxicity in human blood cells caused by Gamma Cobalt-60 irradiation. The curcumin-encapsulated liposomes were prepared by lipid-film hydration method using commercial phosphatidylcholine (i.e. Phospholipon ® 90G). The blood cells were obtained from healthy male donors (n = 3) under an approved ethics protocol. The cell uptake and the radioprotective activity of the curcumin-encapsulated liposomes were characterized by fluorescence microscopy and micronucleus assay, respectively. Nanoscale curcumin-encapsulated liposomes exhibiting good physical characteristics and successful uptake by the human blood cells were successfully prepared. The radioprotective activity of the curcumin-encapsulated liposomes was found to be dependent on the curcumin concentration, where an optimal concentration existed (i.e. 30 μg/mL) independent of the irradiation dose, above which the radioprotective activity had become stagnant (i.e. no more reduction in the micronuclei frequency). The present results established for the first time the radioprotective activity of curcumin-encapsulated liposomes in human blood cells, which coupled by its well-established bioavailability, boded well for its potential application as a nanoscale delivery system of other radioprotective phytochemicals.

  3. Radioprotection guidelines to the elaboration of a specific standard for the licensing of radioactive facilities on the practice of oil and gas well logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The regulatory process in oil and gas well logging has shown the need for specific standard for the issuance of a license authorizing the use of sealed sources in well logging activities, in order to guarantee the quality of many factors from the point of view of radiation protection. Currently, have been used only generic radiation protection standards, but are not comprehensive or technically suitable for a well logging licensing purpose. The lack of a specific standard for licensing in radioactive well logging operations in Brazil, weakens the nuclear regulatory body in your aim of regulate and licensing the activity. This work establish, as main objective, a guideline for the future Brazilian radioprotection code in well logging operations, presenting relevant aspects not covered by generic radiation protection standards. (author)

  4. Radioprotection guidelines to the elaboration of a specific standard for the licensing of radioactive facilities on the practice of oil and gas well logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The regulatory process in oil and gas well logging has shown the need for specific standard for the issuance of a license authorizing the use of sealed sources in well logging activities, in order to guarantee the quality of many factors from the point of view of radiation protection. Currently, have been used only generic radiation protection standards, but are not comprehensive or technically suitable for a well logging licensing purpose. The lack of a specific standard for licensing in radioactive well logging operations in Brazil, weakens the nuclear regulatory body in your aim of regulate and licensing the activity. This work establish, as main objective, a guideline for the future Brazilian radioprotection code in well logging operations, presenting relevant aspects not covered by genetic radiation protection standards. (author)

  5. Evidence of natural reproduction of Atlantic sturgeon in the Connecticut River from unlikely sources.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Savoy

    Full Text Available Atlantic Sturgeon is listed under the U.S. Endangered Species Act as five Distinct Population Segments (DPS. The "endangered" New York Bight (NYB DPS is thought to only harbor two populations; one in the Hudson River and a second smaller one in the Delaware River. Historically, the Connecticut River probably supported a spawning population of Atlantic Sturgeon that was believed extirpated many decades ago. In 2014, we successfully collected pre-migratory juvenile specimens from the lower Connecticut River which were subjected to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA control region sequence and microsatellite analyses to determine their genetic relatedness to other populations coastwide. Haplotype and allelic frequencies differed significantly between the Connecticut River collection and all other populations coastwide. Sibship analyses of the microsatellite data indicated that the Connecticut River collection was comprised of a small number of families that were likely the offspring of a limited number of breeders. This was supported by analysis of effective population size (Ne and number of breeders (Nb. STRUCTURE analysis suggested that there were 11 genetic clusters among the coastwide collections and that from the Connecticut River was distinct from those in all other rivers. This was supported by UPGMA analyses of the microsatellite data. In AMOVA analyses, among region variation was maximized, and among population within regions variation minimized when the Connecticut River collection was separate from the other two populations in the NYB DPS indicating the dissimilarity between the Connecticut River collection and the other two populations in the NYB DPS. Use of mixed stock analysis indicated that the Connecticut River juvenile collection was comprised of specimens primarily of South Atlantic and Chesapeake Bay DPS origins. The most parsimonious explanation for these results is that the Connecticut River hosted successful natural reproduction in 2013

  6. Physical setting and natural sources of exposure to carcinogenic trace elements and radionuclides in Lahontan Valley, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, Ralph L.

    2012-01-01

    In Lahontan Valley, Nevada, arsenic, cobalt, tungsten, uranium, radon, and polonium-210 are carcinogens that occur naturally in sediments and groundwater. Arsenic and cobalt are principally derived from erosion of volcanic rocks in the local mountains and tungsten and uranium are derived from erosion of granitic rocks in headwater reaches of the Carson River. Radon and 210Po originate from radioactive decay of uranium in the sediments. Arsenic, aluminum, cobalt, iron, and manganese concentrations in household dust suggest it is derived from the local soils. Excess zinc and chromium in the dust are probably derived from the vacuum cleaner used to collect the dust, or household sources such as the furnace. Some samples have more than 5 times more cobalt in the dust than in the local soil, but whether the source of the excess cobalt is anthropogenic or natural cannot be determined with the available data. Cobalt concentrations are low in groundwater, but arsenic, uranium, radon, and 210Po concentrations often exceed human-health standards, and sometime greatly exceed them. Exposure to radon and its decay products in drinking water can vary significantly depending on when during the day that the water is consumed. Although the data suggests there have been no long term changes in groundwater chemistry that corresponds to the Lahontan Valley leukemia cluster, the occurrence of the very unusual leukemia cluster in an area with numerous 210Po and arsenic contaminated wells is striking, particularly in conjunction with the exceptionally high levels of urinary tungsten in Lahontan Valley residents. Additional research is needed on potential exposure pathways involving food or inhalation, and on synergistic effects of mixtures of these natural contaminants on susceptibility to development of leukemia.

  7. Training in radioprotection in the School of Pharmacy and Biochemistry, University of Buenos Aires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivera, Elena; Cremaschi, Graciela; Martin, Graciela; Zubillaga, Marcela; Davio, Carlos; Genaro, Ana; Cricco, Graciela; Mohamad, Nora; Bianchin, Ana; Goldman, Cinthia; Salgueiro, Jimena; Klecha, Alicia; Nunez, Mariel; Medina, Vanina; Cocca, Claudia; Leonardi, Natalia; Collia, Nicolas; Gutierrez, Alicia; Massari, Noelia; Bomben, Ana; Bergoc, Rosa

    2008-01-01

    The radioisotopes techniques have notably contributed to the advancement of knowledge in medicine and biomedicine during the last 60 years. The School of Pharmacy and Biochemistry of the University of Buenos Aires, Argentina, offers different Courses on methodology of radioisotopes in which the specialized knowledge on radioprotection is adapted to the following different groups: 1) A course for biochemistry students; 2) A course for physicians; 3) A course for graduates in biochemistry, biology, chemistry or other disciplines related to the health; 4) An up-dating course for licensed professionals; 5) A course for nuclear medicine technicians; and finally: 6) A course for Pharmacy students. The main objective of radiological protection teaching is specific and fitted to each level: the course (1) has been given (optional or mandatory) since 1960 for more than 7500 students. Part of the learning process in radioprotection is only informative, because in this case the students are not allowed to ask the Argentinean Nuclear Regulatory Authority authorization for radioactive material handling. Course (2) has been taken by more than 800 physicians since 1962. Here, the students receive a very intensive training in radioprotection which includes: justification, optimization and dose limits; dosimetric magnitudes and units; internal and external dosimetry of 99m Tc, 201 Tl, 60 Co and other isotopes used in medicine; safety in occupational exposure; national and international legislation. Since 1962, more than 1000 graduates have attended course (3). In this case the training in radioprotection is as intensive as in course (2) with special focusing in 125 I, 3 H, 14 C, 32 P and other isotopes used in biomedicine. Course (4) has been given from 1992 and the objective is to up-date knowledge and the intensity of training depends on the requirements of each professional. Course (5) has been given since 1997 and it is mainly directed to the operational aspects of

  8. Genetic diversity/impurity estimation in sources of natural resistance against cotton leaf curl disease in pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarwar, G.

    2007-01-01

    Cotton accounts for more than 60% of Pakistan's export earnings through the export of both raw cotton and cotton products. An epidemic of cotton leaf curl disease (CLCuD) in Pakistan during the 1990s led to the withdrawal of high yielding cotton cultivars. Due of their susceptibility to the disease. The identification of natural resistance in some genotypes provided a means to manage reduce losses due to the disease. But it has been an adversity that almost all these resistant varieties have ultimately 'lost' their resistance. There are also reports that the original sources of resistance, as well as the varieties developed from them, are now susceptible to the disease when grafted with infected scion. For the present studies. Seed of two resistant varieties (LRA-5166 and (CP-152) was obtained from six different research organizations. Plants raised from these seed were grafted with symptomatic scion and used for morphological comparisons. Our results indicated that the genetic pool of these cultivars is not well maintained and that an unacceptable diversity impurity is present within and among the genetic stock of both these lines. There is thus a requirement for screening of these elite lines at the molecular level to ensure the purity of these varieties for future development. The virus causing CLCuD showed change by recombination making the search for new sources of resistance, as well as the maintenance of established sources, indispensable for the sustainable cotton production in Pakistan. (author)

  9. Application of natural citric acid sources and their role on arsenic removal from drinking water: a green chemistry approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Santanu; Nath, Bibhash; Sarkar, Simita; Islam, Sk Mijanul; Bundschuh, Jochen; Chatterjee, Debashis; Hidalgo, Manuela

    2013-11-15

    Solar Oxidation and Removal of Arsenic (SORAS) is a low-cost non-hazardous technique for the removal of arsenic (As) from groundwater. In this study, we tested the efficiency of natural citric acid sources extracted from tomato, lemon and lime to promote SORAS for As removal at the household level. The experiment was conducted in the laboratory using both synthetic solutions and natural groundwater samples collected from As-polluted areas in West Bengal. The role of As/Fe molar ratios and citrate doses on As removal efficiency were checked in synthetic samples. The results demonstrate that tomato juice (as citric acid) was more efficient to remove As from both synthetic (percentage of removal: 78-98%) and natural groundwater (90-97%) samples compared to lemon (61-83% and 79-85%, respectively) and lime (39-69% and 63-70%, respectively) juices. The As/Fe molar ratio and the citrate dose showed an 'optimized central tendency' on As removal. Anti-oxidants, e.g. 'hydroxycinnamates', found in tomato, were shown to have a higher capacity to catalyze SORAS photochemical reactions compared to 'flavanones' found in lemon or lime. The application of this method has several advantages, such as eco- and user- friendliness and affordability at the household level compared to other low-cost techniques. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Calibration of radioprotection equipment gamma radiation at the Laboratory of Ionizing Radiation Metrology - DEN/UFPE; Calibracao de equipamentos de radioprotecao com radiacao gama no Laboratorio de Metrologia das Radiacoes Ionizantes - DEN/UFPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazario, Macilene; Khoury, Helen; Hazin, Clovis [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear], e-mail: khoury@ufpe.br, e-mail: hazin@ufpe.br

    2003-07-01

    This work presents aspects of the radioprotection equipment calibration service of the Laboratory for Metrology of Ionizing Radiations (LMRI) of the DEN/UFPE related to the calibration procedures, characteristics of the radiation beam and the evaluation of equipment calibrated in the period of 2001-2002. The LMRI-DEN/UFPE is one of the four laboratories in Brazil licensed by the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission for the execution of calibration services on area, surface contamination and personal monitors used by industries, hospitals, universities and research institutes using radioactive sources.

  11. Susceptibility to scrapie and disease phenotype in sheep: cross-PRNP genotype experimental transmissions with natural sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González Lorenzo

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract It has long been established that the sheep Prnp genotype influences the susceptibility to scrapie, and some studies suggest that it can also determine several aspects of the disease phenotype. Other studies, however, indicate that the source of infection may also play a role in such phenotype. To address this question an experiment was set up in which either of two different natural scrapie sources, AAS from AA136 Suffolk and VVC from VV136 Cheviot sheep, were inoculated into AA136, VA136 and VV136 sheep recipients (n = 52. The immunohistochemical (IHC profile of disease-associated PrP (PrPd accumulation in the brain of recipient sheep was highly consistent upon codon 136 homologous and semi-homologous transmission, but could be either similar to or different from those of the inoculum donors. In contrast, the IHC profiles were highly variable upon heterologous transmission (VVC to AA136 and AAS to VV136. Furthermore, sheep of the same Prnp genotype could exhibit different survival times and PrPd profiles depending on the source of infection, and a correlation was observed between IHC and Western blot profiles. It was found that additional polymorphisms at codons 112 or 141 of AA136 recipients resulted in a delayed appearance of clinical disease or even in protection from infection. The results of this study strongly suggest that the scrapie phenotype in sheep results from a complex interaction between source, donor and recipient factors, and that the Prnp genotype of the recipient sheep does not explain the variability observed upon codon 136 heterologous transmissions, arguing for other genetic factors to be involved.

  12. Susceptibility to scrapie and disease phenotype in sheep: cross-PRNP genotype experimental transmissions with natural sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Lorenzo; Jeffrey, Martin; Dagleish, Mark P; Goldmann, Wilfred; Sisó, Sílvia; Eaton, Samantha L; Martin, Stuart; Finlayson, Jeanie; Stewart, Paula; Steele, Philip; Pang, Yvonne; Hamilton, Scott; Reid, Hugh W; Chianini, Francesca

    2012-07-02

    It has long been established that the sheep Prnp genotype influences the susceptibility to scrapie, and some studies suggest that it can also determine several aspects of the disease phenotype. Other studies, however, indicate that the source of infection may also play a role in such phenotype. To address this question an experiment was set up in which either of two different natural scrapie sources, AAS from AA136 Suffolk and VVC from VV136 Cheviot sheep, were inoculated into AA136, VA136 and VV136 sheep recipients (n = 52). The immunohistochemical (IHC) profile of disease-associated PrP (PrPd) accumulation in the brain of recipient sheep was highly consistent upon codon 136 homologous and semi-homologous transmission, but could be either similar to or different from those of the inoculum donors. In contrast, the IHC profiles were highly variable upon heterologous transmission (VVC to AA136 and AAS to VV136). Furthermore, sheep of the same Prnp genotype could exhibit different survival times and PrPd profiles depending on the source of infection, and a correlation was observed between IHC and Western blot profiles. It was found that additional polymorphisms at codons 112 or 141 of AA136 recipients resulted in a delayed appearance of clinical disease or even in protection from infection. The results of this study strongly suggest that the scrapie phenotype in sheep results from a complex interaction between source, donor and recipient factors, and that the Prnp genotype of the recipient sheep does not explain the variability observed upon codon 136 heterologous transmissions, arguing for other genetic factors to be involved.

  13. Avoiding radiation exposure while training to locate a radioactive source: a virtual reality exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marins, E.R.; Cotelli do Espírito Santo, A.; Abreu Mól, A. C. de; Cunha, G.; Landau, L.

    2015-01-01

    A technician undergoing radioprotection training must learn to use radiation detectors. Practical exercises involve being near to radiation sources. The work here presented reduces the exposure to individuals using a virtual environment to achieve preliminary apprenticeship prior using real radioactive sources. (authors)

  14. Nature and source of the ore-forming fluids associated with orogenic gold deposits in the Dharwar Craton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biswajit Mishra

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Neoarchean orogenic gold deposits, associated with the greenstone-granite milieus in the Dharwar Craton include (1 the famous Kolar mine and the world class Hutti deposit; (2 small mines at Hira-Buddini, Uti, Ajjanahalli, and Guddadarangavanahalli; (3 prospects at Jonnagiri; and (4 old mining camps in the Gadag and Ramagiri-Penakacherla belts. The existing diametric views on the source of ore fluid for formation of these deposits include fluids exsolved from granitic melts and extracted by metamorphic devolatilization of the greenstone sequences. Lode gold mineralization occurs in structurally controlled higher order splays in variety of host rocks such as mafic/felsic greenstones, banded iron formations, volcaniclastic rocks and granitoids. Estimated metamorphic conditions of the greenstones vary from lower greenschist facies to mid-amphibolite facies and mineralizations in all the camps are associated with distinct hydrothermal alterations. Fluid inclusion microthermometric and Raman spectroscopic studies document low salinity aqueous-gaseous (H2O + CO2 ± CH4 + NaCl ore fluids, which precipitated gold and altered the host rocks in a narrow P–T window of 0.7–2.5 kbar and 215–320 °C. While the calculated fluid O- and C-isotopic values are ambiguous, S-isotopic compositions of pyrite-precipitating fluid show distinct craton-scale uniformity in terms of its reduced nature and a suggested crustal sulfur source.Available ages on greenstone metamorphism, granitoid plutonism and mineralization in the Hutti Belt are tantamount, making a geochronology-based resolution of the existing debate on the metamorphic vs. magmatic fluid source impossible. In contrast, tourmaline geochemistry suggests involvement of single fluid in formation of gold mineralization, primarily derived by metamorphic devolatilization of mafic greenstones and interlayered sedimentary rocks, with minor magmatic contributions. Similarly, compositions of scheelite

  15. Mycobacterium tuberculosis-Secreted Tyrosine Phosphatases as Targets Against Tuberculosis: Exploring Natural Sources in Searching for New Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascarello, Alessandra; Chiaradia-Delatorre, Louise Domeneghini; Mori, Mattia; Terenzi, Hernán; Botta, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), which primarily affects the respiratory tract. Combinations of drugs are used for therapeutic synergism and to prevent the emergence of drug resistant strains, but even first- or secondchoice drugs present some disadvantages, such as significant side effects and the need for long duration of treatments. Thus, new strategies for TB control and treatment are highly demanded. In this context, protein tyrosine phosphatases (PtpA and PtpB) are secreted by Mtb within the host macrophage and they have been shown to contribute to Mtb pathogenicity. The understanding of the role of these PTPs has led to interesting anti-TB drugs discovery. Here, we review the current knowledge on these two proteins as targets for novel anti-TB therapies, with particular emphasis on their mechanism of action and current advancements in developing small molecule inhibitors from natural sources.

  16. Studies of heat source driven natural convection. Ph.D. Thesis. Technical Report, Jul. 1974 - Aug. 1975

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulacki, F. A.; Emara, A. A.

    1975-01-01

    Natural convection energy transport in a horizontal layer of internally heated fluid was measured for Rayleigh numbers from 1890 to 2.17 x 10 to the 12th power. The fluid layer is bounded below by a rigid zero-heat-flux surface and above by a rigid constant-temperature surface. Joule heating by an alternating current passing horizontally through the layer provides the uniform volumetric energy source. The overall steady-state heat transfer coefficient at the upper surface was determined by measuring the temperature difference across the layer and power input to the fluid. The correlation between the Nusselt and Rayleigh numbers for the data of the present study and the data of the Kulacki study is given.

  17. Case Study for the ARRA-funded Ground Source Heat Pump Demonstration at Denver Museum of Nature & Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Im, Piljae [ORNL; Liu, Xiaobing [ORNL

    2016-09-01

    High initial costs and lack of public awareness of ground-source heat pump (GSHP) technology are the two major barriers preventing rapid deployment of this energy-saving technology in the United States. Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), 26 GSHP projects were competitively selected and carried out to demonstrate the benefits of GSHP systems and innovative technologies for cost reduction and/or performance improvement. This report highlights the findings of a case study of one such GSHP demonstration projects that uses a recycled water heat pump (RWHP) system installed at the Denver Museum of Nature & Science in Denver, Colorado. The RWHP system uses recycled water from the city’s water system as the heat sink and source for a modular water-to-water heat pump (WWHP). This case study was conducted based on the available measured performance data from December 2014 through August 2015, utility bills of the building in 2014 and 2015, construction drawings, maintenance records, personal communications, and construction costs. The annual energy consumption of the RWHP system was calculated based on the available measured data and other related information. It was compared with the performance of a baseline scenario— a conventional VAV system using a water-cooled chiller and a natural gas fired boiler, both of which have the minimum energy efficiencies allowed by ASHRAE 90.1-2010. The comparison was made to determine energy savings, operating cost savings, and CO2 emission reductions achieved by the RWHP system. A cost analysis was performed to evaluate the simple payback of the RWHP system. Summarized below are the results of the performance analysis, the learned lessons, and recommended improvement in the operation of the RWHP system.

  18. DISCRIMINATION OF NATURAL AND NON-POINT SOURCE EFFECTS FROM ANTHROGENIC EFFECTS AS REFLECTED IN BENTHIC STATE IN THREE ESTUARIES IN NEW ENGLAND

    Science.gov (United States)

    In order to protect estuarine resources, managers must be able to discern the effects of natural conditions and non-point source effects, and separate them from multiple anthropogenic point source effects. Our approach was to evaluate benthic community assemblages, riverine nitro...

  19. Evaluation of natural materials as exogenous carbon sources for biological treatment of low carbon-to-nitrogen wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Godínez, Juan; Beltrán-Hernández, Icela; Álvarez-Hernández, Alejandro; Coronel-Olivares, Claudia; Contreras-López, Elizabeth; Quezada-Cruz, Maribel; Vázquez-Rodríguez, Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    In the bacterial processes involved in the mitigation of nitrogen pollution, an adequately high carbon-to-nitrogen (C : N) ratio is key to sustain denitrification. We evaluated three natural materials (woodchips, barley grains, and peanut shells) as carbon sources for low C : N wastewater. The amount of organic matter released from these materials to aqueous media was evaluated, as well as their pollution swapping potential by measuring the release of total Kjeldahl nitrogen, N-NH4 (+), NO2 (-), and NO3 (-), and total phosphorous. Barley grains yielded the highest amount of organic matter, which also showed to be the most easily biodegradable. Woodchips and peanut shells released carbon rather steadily and so they would not require frequent replenishment from biological reactors. These materials produced eluates with lower concentrations of nutrients than the leachates from barley grains. However, as woodchips yielded lower amounts of suspended solids, they constitute an adequate exogenous source for the biological treatment of carbon-deficient effluents.

  20. Evaluation of Natural Materials as Exogenous Carbon Sources for Biological Treatment of Low Carbon-to-Nitrogen Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Ramírez-Godínez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the bacterial processes involved in the mitigation of nitrogen pollution, an adequately high carbon-to-nitrogen (C : N ratio is key to sustain denitrification. We evaluated three natural materials (woodchips, barley grains, and peanut shells as carbon sources for low C : N wastewater. The amount of organic matter released from these materials to aqueous media was evaluated, as well as their pollution swapping potential by measuring the release of total Kjeldahl nitrogen, N-NH4+, NO2-, and NO3-, and total phosphorous. Barley grains yielded the highest amount of organic matter, which also showed to be the most easily biodegradable. Woodchips and peanut shells released carbon rather steadily and so they would not require frequent replenishment from biological reactors. These materials produced eluates with lower concentrations of nutrients than the leachates from barley grains. However, as woodchips yielded lower amounts of suspended solids, they constitute an adequate exogenous source for the biological treatment of carbon-deficient effluents.

  1. Primary versus secondary and anthropogenic versus natural sources of aminium ions in atmospheric particles during nine coastal and marine campaigns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, H.; Yao, X.

    2017-12-01

    In this study, size-segregated dimethylaminium (DMA+) and trimethylaminium (TMA+) in atmospheric particles were measured during four coastal campaigns in Qingdao, China and five campaigns cruising over marginal seas of China and the northwest Pacific Ocean. The measured averages of DMA+ and TMA+ in PM0.056-10 (the sum of chemical concentrations from 0.056 to 10 µm) during each campaign, ranged from 0.045 to 1.1 nmol m-3 and from 0.029 to 0.53 nmol m-3, respectively. Size distributions of DMA+ and TMA+ in coastal atmospheric particles suggested that primary combustion emissions featured by mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) at 0.2 µm generally yielded appreciable contributions to their observed concentrations in PM0.056-10 and sometimes dominantly contributed. In the marine atmospheres, the 0.1-0.2 µm modes of DMA+ and TMA+ also existed and sometimes dominated while they were very likely derived from primary ocean-biogenic emissions. In most of the samples during nine campaigns, secondarily-formed DMA+ and TMA+ in droplet mode with MMAD at 0.3-2 µm dominantly contributed to DMA+ and TMA+ in PM0.056-10. Overall, our results suggested that DMA+ and TMA+ in the marine atmospheric particles overwhelmingly came from ocean biogenic sources while they were likely derived from complicated anthropogenic and natural sources at the coastal sites.

  2. Compound-Specific Isotope Analysis (CSIA Application for Source Apportionment and Natural Attenuation Assessment of Chlorinated Benzenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Alberti

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In light of the complex management of chlorobenzene (CB contaminated sites, at which a hydraulic barrier (HB for plumes containment is emplaced, compound-specific stable isotope analysis (CSIA has been applied for source apportionment, for investigating the relation between the upgradient and downgradient of the HB, and to target potential CB biodegradation processes. The isotope signature of all the components potentially involved in the degradation processes has been expressed using the concentration-weighted average δ13C of CBs + benzene (δ13Csum. Upgradient of the HB, the average δ13Csum of −25.6‰ and −29.4‰ were measured for plumes within the eastern and western sectors, respectively. Similar values were observed for the potential sources, with δ13Csum values of −26.5‰ for contaminated soils and −29.8‰ for the processing water pipeline in the eastern and western sectors, respectively, allowing for apportioning of these potential sources to the respective contaminant plumes. For the downgradient of the HB, similar CB concentrations but enriched δ13Csum values between −24.5‰ and −25.9‰ were measured. Moreover, contaminated soils showed a similar δ13Csum signature of −24.5‰, thus suggesting that the plumes likely originate from past activities located in the downgradient of the HB. Within the industrial property, significant δ13C enrichments were measured for 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene (TCB, 1,2-dichlorobenzene (DCB, 1,3-DCB, and 1,4-DCBs, thus suggesting an important role for anaerobic biodegradation. Further degradation of monochlorobenzene (MCB and benzene was also demonstrated. CSIA was confirmed to be an effective approach for site characterization, revealing the proper functioning of the HB and demonstrating the important role of natural attenuation processes in reducing the contamination upgradient of the HB.

  3. Instructions for use of radioactive sources; Notices d'utilisation des sources radioactives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-01-15

    In the industrial and research domain, article L.1333-4, R.1333-26 and R.1333-27 of the public health code submit to authorization of the minister of health the 'nuclear following activities ': the manufacturing of radionuclides; the manufacturing of products or devices by containing; the import, the export of radionuclides, products or devices that contain some; the distribution of radionuclides, of products or devices that contain some; the use of devices emitting X-rays or radioactive sources and the use of accelerators others than electron microscopes; the irradiation of products whatever nature it is, including food products. The activity bringing to plan the manufacturing or the use of radionuclides (in the form of sealed or not sealed sources) there is, in the terms of the public health code (C.S.P.) and except in the cases of exemption which are mentioned there, the obligation to obtain an authorization to hold and to make or to use these radionuclides. The regulations in radioprotection being in full evolution, one will find in these notices the main evolutions relative to the regime of authorizations. (N.C.)

  4. The use of natural radioactive isotopes in the determination of pollution sources of Al-Kabir Al-Shimali river

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ALmasri, M.; Shweikani, R.; Mamish, S.; Al-Haleem, M.A.; Al-Shamali, K.; Jerby, B.

    2010-10-01

    In the present research, variations of concentration levels of some natural radioactive isotopes ( 226 Ra, 210 Po, 210 Pb, U and Th isotopes) and some trace elements (Cu, Zn, Pb, Cd) in water and sediments of Al-Kabir Al-Shimali river during the period of 2009-2010 have been studied. The samples were collected along the river from the asphalt factory to the end of the mouth of the river in the Mediterranean Sea. Results showed that concentrations of natural radioactive isotopes have been increased slightly in water and sediments of the river after the asphalt factory and after the factories area, while the concentrations of Rn in the river's water were low along the river except the waters of October 16, Lake Dam that reached a value of 341mBq/l. These high concentrations in water and sediments of the Al-Kabir Al-Shimali River were due to discharges from the asphalt factory and other factories known to contain natural radioactive isotopes, indicating the possibility of using these isotopes in the determination of pollution sources of Al-Kabir Al-Shimali River. However, the measured concentrations are relatively low compared to the values reported in the world due to river water flow that dilute concentrations of these elements. On the other hand, measurements of trace elements (Cu,Zn,Pb,Cd) showed low concentrations in the waters of the river, with some increases in the concentrations in river sediments after the asphalt factory and the factories area , indicating the contribution of the factories outlets in this increase. The results were compared with the results of previous studies conducted on the Euphrates and the Orontes, where the comparison showed lower values in the Al-Kabir Al-Shimali river environment.(author)

  5. Influence of natural antioxidants on lipid composition of beef burgers submitted to irradiation in 60 Co source and electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trindade, Reginaldo Almeida da

    2007-01-01

    Radiation processing has been employed in some countries as a mean of treatment to assure microbiological safety of meat and meat products, avoiding the occurrence of food-borne disease. The ionizing radiation may cause some undesirable changes on chemistry composition of food and the lipid oxidation is one of the main reactions. In meat products processing industry, the lipid composition is directly related to nutritional and sensory quality of the product. For preventing oxidation, use of antioxidants which can be synthetic or natural, has been practically applied in some products. Currently, most attention has been given to natural antioxidants from herbs and spices like rosemary and oregano. The aim this study was to assess the antioxidant effects of either rosemary and oregano extract in beef burgers submitted to irradiation in 60 Co source with dose 6, 7 e 8 kGy, electron beams with dose 3,5 e 7 kGy and storage under freeze along 0, 45 e 90 days. The results showed that rosemary extract has the major antioxidant effects when it is used on heterogeneous food matrix like beef burger, but oregano extract was better efficient to delay lipid oxidation along storage time when it is used in synergism with rosemary and/or BHT/BHA. Although to have occurred changes in the fatty acids composition it was not possible to demonstrate a straight dependence of irradiation dose and/or storage time. Sensory analysis showed that between the samples prepared with natural antioxidants, the beef burger prepared with oregano has received better scores by panelists. Irradiated beef burger prepared with rosemary has received better scores when compared to non-irradiated one. The use of spices with antioxidant activity to avoid the oxidative damage in foods that contain fats in their formulation is thought to be promising to application in food facilities. (author)

  6. Radioprotection of the environment: on the context of biodiversity and evolutionary theory. A reference organism has no genetic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cedervall, Bjoern

    2008-01-01

    The recent efforts to define a basis for radioprotection of the environment include some concepts and ideas related to various endpoints which need a clarification. This paper focuses on the biodiversity concept and the context of individuals of a species as well as that of the species as a gene pool. A major problem with the ambition to radioprotect biodiversity is the concept 'reference organism' which has no genetic properties and therefore is in contradiction with a real biological species. Biodiversity and the species (gene pool) concept are, just as any other areas of biology, integral parts of evolutionary theory. With the reference organism as a basis no meaningful reasoning can take place which relates data on radioactivity levels or mutations to potential effects on populations or biodiversity. It is therefore suggested that the national and international bodies involved in radioprotection of the environment take advantage of evolutionary theory as a reference frame. (author)

  7. Application of water quality index for the assessment of suitability of natural sources of water for drinking in rural areas of east Sikkim, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poonia, Shubra; Singh, T Shantikumar; Tsering, Dechen C

    2015-01-01

    In Sikkim, especially in the rural areas where there is no supply of treated water for drinking and other domestic uses, natural surface water is the only source. The objective was to assess the water quality of natural sources of water in the rural areas of East Sikkim using a water quality index (WQI) for different seasons. A total of 225 samples, that is, 75 in winter, 75 in summer, and 75 in monsoon were collected from different sources for physicochemical analysis, and a WQI was calculated. The water quality values ranged 32.01-96.71. The results showed that most of the water samples were in poor condition (85.3%) and very few of them were in good condition (2.6%). The water quality of the natural sources indicated that the water is poor-quality and not totally safe for human consumption, and that it needs treatment before consumption.

  8. Antioxidant and radioprotective effect of the active fraction of Pilea microphylla (L.) ethanolic extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakar, K R; Veerapur, V P; Bansal, Punit; Parihar, Vipan Kumar; Reddy Kandadi, Machendar; Bhagath Kumar, P; Priyadarsini, K I; Unnikrishnan, M K

    2007-01-05

    The ethanolic extract of Pilea microphylla (L.) was defatted, successively fractionated with acetone and the residue so obtained was found to be most potent when subjected to detailed free radical scavenging and in vivo radioprotection studies. The most active fraction reacts with free radicals, such as DPPH (50 microM), ABTS(.)(-) (100 microM) and (.)OH (generated by Fenton reaction) with IC(50) value of 23.15 microg/ml, 3.0 microg/ml and 310 microg/ml, respectively. The most active fraction inhibited iron-induced lipid peroxidation in phosphatidyl choline liposomes with an IC(50) of 13.74 microg/ml. The kinetics of scavenging of DPPH and ABTS(.)(-) radicals were followed at different concentrations of the fraction by employing stopped-flow studies. The observed first order decay rate constants at 200 microg/ml and 50 microg/ml of fraction with DPPH (50 microM) and ABTS(.)(-) (50 microM) were found to be 0.4s(-1) and 2.1s(-1), respectively. The fraction when screened for in vivo radioprotection in Swiss albino mice showed 80% protection at a dose of 900 mg/kg and with a DRF of about 1.12. The fraction was also found to protect livers of irradiated mice from depletion of endogenous antioxidant enzymes like glutathione, GST, SOD, catalase and thiols. The fraction also protected the villi height, increased the number of crypt cells while offering general protection to the intestine from acute radiation effects. The fraction also protected the hematopoietic system as assessed by endogenous spleen colony assay, contributing to the overall radioprotective ability.

  9. Radioprotection and Cell Cycle Arrest of Intestinal Epithelial Cells by Darinaparsin, a Tumor Radiosensitizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Junqiang; Doi, Hiroshi [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Saar, Matthias; Santos, Jennifer [Department of Urology, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Li, Xuejun; Peehl, Donna M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Knox, Susan J., E-mail: sknox@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: It was recently reported that the organic arsenic compound darinaparsin (DPS) is a cytotoxin and radiosensitizer of tumor cells in vitro and in subcutaneous xenograft tumors. Surprisingly, it was also found that DPS protects normal intestinal crypt epithelial cells (CECs) from clonogenic death after ionizing radiation (IR). Here we tested the DPS radiosensitizing effect in a clinically relevant model of prostate cancer and explored the radioprotective effect and mechanism of DPS on CECs. Methods and Materials: The radiation modification effect of DPS was tested in a mouse model of orthotopic xenograft prostate cancer and of IR-induced acute gastrointestinal syndrome. The effect of DPS on CEC DNA damage and DNA damage responses was determined by immunohistochemistry. Results: In the mouse model of IR-induced gastrointestinal syndrome, DPS treatment before IR accelerated recovery from body weight loss and increased animal survival. DPS decreased post-IR DNA damage and cell death, suggesting that the radioprotective effect was mediated by enhanced DNA damage repair. Shortly after DPS injection, significant cell cycle arrest was observed in CECs at both G1/S and G2/M checkpoints, which was accompanied by the activation of cell cycle inhibitors p21 and growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible protein 45 alpha (GADD45A). Further investigation revealed that DPS activated ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), an important inducer of DNA damage repair and cell cycle arrest. Conclusions: DPS selectively radioprotected normal intestinal CECs and sensitized prostate cancer cells in a clinically relevant model. This effect may be, at least in part, mediated by DNA damage response activation and has the potential to significantly increase the therapeutic index of radiation therapy.

  10. The GnRH analogue triptorelin confers ovarian radio-protection to adult female rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camats, N. [Institut de Biotecnologia i de Biomedicina (I.B.B.), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Departament de Biologia Cel.lular, Fisiologia i Immunologia, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Garcia, F. [Institut de Biotecnologia i de Biomedicina (I.B.B.), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Parrilla, J.J. [Servicio de Ginecologia y Obstetricia, Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Arrixaca, 30120 El Palmar, Murcia (Spain); Calaf, J. [Servei de Ginecologia i Obstetricia, Hospital Universitari de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, 08025 Barcelona (Spain); Martin-Mateo, M. [Departament de Pediatria, d' Obstetricia i Ginecologia i de Medicina Preventiva, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Caldes, M. Garcia, E-mail: Montserrat.Garcia.Caldes@uab.es [Institut de Biotecnologia i de Biomedicina (I.B.B.), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Departament de Biologia Cel.lular, Fisiologia i Immunologia, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain)

    2009-10-02

    There is a controversy regarding the effects of the analogues of the gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in radiotherapy. This has led us to study the possible radio-protection of the ovarian function of a GnRH agonist analogue (GnRHa), triptorelin, in adult, female rats (Rattus norvegicus sp.). The effects of the X-irradiation on the oocytes of ovarian primordial follicles, with and without GnRHa treatment, were compared, directly in the female rats (F{sub 0}) with reproductive parameters, and in the somatic cells of the resulting foetuses (F{sub 1}) with cytogenetical parameters. In order to do this, the ovaries and uteri from 82 females were extracted for the reproductive analysis and 236 foetuses were obtained for cytogenetical analysis. The cytogenetical study was based on the data from 22,151 metaphases analysed. The cytogenetical parameters analysed to assess the existence of chromosomal instability were the number of aberrant metaphases (2234) and the number (2854) and type of structural chromosomal aberrations, including gaps and breaks. Concerning the reproductive analysis of the ovaries and the uteri, the parameters analysed were the number of corpora lutea, implantations, implantation losses and foetuses. Triptorelin confers radio-protection of the ovaries in front of chromosomal instability, which is different, with respect to the single and fractioned dose. The cytogenetical analysis shows a general decrease in most of the parameters of the triptorelin-treated groups, with respect to their controls, and some of these differences were considered to be statistically significant. The reproductive analysis indicates that there is also radio-protection by the agonist, although minor to the cytogenetical one. Only some of the analysed parameters show a statistically significant decrease in the triptorelin-treated groups.

  11. Radioprotection and Cell Cycle Arrest of Intestinal Epithelial Cells by Darinaparsin, a Tumor Radiosensitizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Junqiang; Doi, Hiroshi; Saar, Matthias; Santos, Jennifer; Li, Xuejun; Peehl, Donna M.; Knox, Susan J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: It was recently reported that the organic arsenic compound darinaparsin (DPS) is a cytotoxin and radiosensitizer of tumor cells in vitro and in subcutaneous xenograft tumors. Surprisingly, it was also found that DPS protects normal intestinal crypt epithelial cells (CECs) from clonogenic death after ionizing radiation (IR). Here we tested the DPS radiosensitizing effect in a clinically relevant model of prostate cancer and explored the radioprotective effect and mechanism of DPS on CECs. Methods and Materials: The radiation modification effect of DPS was tested in a mouse model of orthotopic xenograft prostate cancer and of IR-induced acute gastrointestinal syndrome. The effect of DPS on CEC DNA damage and DNA damage responses was determined by immunohistochemistry. Results: In the mouse model of IR-induced gastrointestinal syndrome, DPS treatment before IR accelerated recovery from body weight loss and increased animal survival. DPS decreased post-IR DNA damage and cell death, suggesting that the radioprotective effect was mediated by enhanced DNA damage repair. Shortly after DPS injection, significant cell cycle arrest was observed in CECs at both G1/S and G2/M checkpoints, which was accompanied by the activation of cell cycle inhibitors p21 and growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible protein 45 alpha (GADD45A). Further investigation revealed that DPS activated ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), an important inducer of DNA damage repair and cell cycle arrest. Conclusions: DPS selectively radioprotected normal intestinal CECs and sensitized prostate cancer cells in a clinically relevant model. This effect may be, at least in part, mediated by DNA damage response activation and has the potential to significantly increase the therapeutic index of radiation therapy

  12. The GnRH analogue triptorelin confers ovarian radio-protection to adult female rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camats, N.; Garcia, F.; Parrilla, J.J.; Calaf, J.; Martin-Mateo, M.; Caldes, M. Garcia

    2009-01-01

    There is a controversy regarding the effects of the analogues of the gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in radiotherapy. This has led us to study the possible radio-protection of the ovarian function of a GnRH agonist analogue (GnRHa), triptorelin, in adult, female rats (Rattus norvegicus sp.). The effects of the X-irradiation on the oocytes of ovarian primordial follicles, with and without GnRHa treatment, were compared, directly in the female rats (F 0 ) with reproductive parameters, and in the somatic cells of the resulting foetuses (F 1 ) with cytogenetical parameters. In order to do this, the ovaries and uteri from 82 females were extracted for the reproductive analysis and 236 foetuses were obtained for cytogenetical analysis. The cytogenetical study was based on the data from 22,151 metaphases analysed. The cytogenetical parameters analysed to assess the existence of chromosomal instability were the number of aberrant metaphases (2234) and the number (2854) and type of structural chromosomal aberrations, including gaps and breaks. Concerning the reproductive analysis of the ovaries and the uteri, the parameters analysed were the number of corpora lutea, implantations, implantation losses and foetuses. Triptorelin confers radio-protection of the ovaries in front of chromosomal instability, which is different, with respect to the single and fractioned dose. The cytogenetical analysis shows a general decrease in most of the parameters of the triptorelin-treated groups, with respect to their controls, and some of these differences were considered to be statistically significant. The reproductive analysis indicates that there is also radio-protection by the agonist, although minor to the cytogenetical one. Only some of the analysed parameters show a statistically significant decrease in the triptorelin-treated groups.

  13. Normal-tissue radioprotection by overexpression of the copper-zinc and manganese superoxide dismutase genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veldwijk, Marlon R. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. Medical Center Mannheim, Univ. of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany); Pharmacology of Cancer Treatment (G402), German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Herskind, Carsten; Wenz, Frederik [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. Medical Center Mannheim, Univ. of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany); Sellner, Leopold; Zeller, W. Jens [Pharmacology of Cancer Treatment (G402), German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Radujkovic, Aleksandar [Dept. of Internal Medicine V, Univ. of Heidelberg (Germany); Laufs, Stephanie [Dept. of Experimental Surgery, Univ. Medical Center Mannheim, Univ. of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany); Molecular Oncology of Solid Tumors (G360), German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Fruehauf, Stefan [Center for Tumor Diagnostic and Therapy, Paracelsus-Klinik, Osnabrueck (Germany)

    2009-08-15

    Background and Purpose: Protection of normal tissue against radiation-induced damage may increase the therapeutic ratio of radiotherapy. A promising strategy for testing this approach is gene therapy-mediated overexpression of the copper-zinc (CuZnSOD) or manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) using recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV2) vectors. The purpose of this study was to test the modulating effects of the SOD genes on human primary lung fibroblasts (HPLF) after irradiation. Material and Methods: HPLF were transduced with rAAV2 vectors containing cDNA for the CuZnSOD, MnSOD or a control gene. The cells were irradiated (1-6 Gy), and gene transfer efficiency, apoptosis, protein expression/activity, and radiosensitivity measured by the colony-forming assay determined. Results: After transduction, 90.0% {+-} 6.4% of the cells expressed the transgene. A significant fivefold overexpression of both SOD was confirmed by an SOD activity assay (control: 21.1 {+-} 12.6, CuZnSOD: 95.1 {+-} 17.1, MnSOD: 108.5 {+-} 36.0 U SOD/mg protein) and immunohistochemistry. CuZnSOD and MnSOD overexpression resulted in a significant radioprotection of HPLF compared to controls (surviving fraction [SF] ratio SOD/control > 1): CuZnSOD: 1.18-fold (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.06-1.32; p = 0.005), MnSOD: 1.23-fold (95% CI: 1.07-1.43; p = 0.01). Conclusion: Overexpression of CuZnSOD and MnSOD in HPLF mediated an increase in clonogenic survival after irradiation compared to controls. In previous works, a lack of radioprotection in SOD-overexpressing tumor cells was observed. Therefore, the present results suggest that rAAV2 vectors are promising tools for the delivery of radioprotective genes in normal tissue. (orig.)

  14. Workers' radioprotection: professional exposure to ionizing radiation in France: assessment for 2010; La radioprotection des travailleurs. Exposition professionnelle aux rayonnements ionisants en France: bilan 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    As more than 300.000 workers are potentially exposed to different artificial sources of ionizing radiation in different activity sectors in France (nuclear, industry, research, and medicine) and some others to natural radiation sources, this report proposes an assessment of these exposures for 2010. The report describes the monitoring of professional exposure (legal framework, monitoring modalities, means and actions of the IRSN), presents the methodology adopted for this annual assessment of workers' exposure to ionizing radiation. It gives this assessment for civilian activities submitted to an authorization or declaration regime and for defence activities (general results for external and internal exposures, exposure in the medical and veterinary sector, in the nuclear sector, in the industrial sector, in the research sector). It finally addresses the exposure of workers to natural radioactivity

  15. Radioactivity and radioprotection: the every day life in a nuclear installation. Press tour at CEA/GRENOBLE 18 november 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-11-01

    In the framework of the public information, this paper gives a general information on the radioactivity and the radioprotection at the CEA/Cadarache center. A first part is devoted to a presentation of the radioactivity with definitions and radiation effects on the human being and the environment. An other part presents the radioprotection activities and regulations. The last part deals with specific activities of the CEA/Cadarache: the CASCAD installations for spent fuels storage, the LECA Laboratory for the Examination of Active Fuels and a dismantling installation for big irradiated objects. Historical aspects of the CEA/Cadarache are also provided. (A.L.B.)

  16. Radioprotective effect of garlic extract on some bacterial strains with different radiation sensitivities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tawfik, Z.S.; Abushady, M.R.

    1992-01-01

    The radioprotective effect of garlic on four bacterial strains with different degrees of radiation sensitivities was investigated. The presence of garlic led to an increase in d-10 value of Ps. Aeruginosa, S. aureus and S. typhimurium by 160%, 50%, and 30% respectively. The protective efficiency of garlic against radiation was noticed to be proportional to its concentration in a given inoculum size. Garlic extract up to 180 micro liter per 10 8 inoculum size of B. cereus showed no protective effect. This fact was attributed to the existence of sulphur compounds in the given strain. Higher garlic concentrations appeared to affect the cloning efficiency of a given strain. 4fig., 2tab

  17. Establishment of standard low energy x-ray, radioprotection levels, for calibration of instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Eliane Carmo

    1995-01-01

    Seven standard low energy X-rays fields were established, radioprotection level, at the Calibration Laboratory of IPEN. Five of the standard calibration qualities used at the National Physical Laboratory, England, with energies between 16 and 38 keV, and two recommended by the International Standard Organization, with energies of 33 and 48 keV, were reproduced. The calibration conditions, radiotherapy level, from 14 to 21 keV, were also verified. Different portable radiation monitors as ionization chambers and Geiger-Mueller detectors were studied in relation to their energy dependence. (author)

  18. On the role of endogenous serotin in the radioprotective action of some aminothiols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sverdlov, A.G.; Pavlova, L.M.

    1977-01-01

    It has been studied whether there is a correlation of the radioprotective effect of cystamine (50 and 150 mg/kg by base) and its analogue, N',N'-tetramethyl cystamine (130 mg/kg by base), with the ability of these compounds to rise the endogenous serotonin content of radiosensitive organs 20 and 60 minutes after intraperitoneal administration to mice. The ability of sulphur-containing radioprotectors does not necessarily correlate with their preventive properties: an ineffective radioprotector analogue, N',N'-tetramethyl cystamine, has the same effect on the endogeneous serotonin level as the protector itself

  19. Podophyllum hexandrum Offers Radioprotection by Modulating Free Radical Flux: Role of Aryl-Tetralin Lignans

    OpenAIRE

    Chawla, Raman; Arora, Rajesh; Singh, Shikha; Sagar, R. K.; Sharma, Rakesh Kumar; Kumar, R.; Sharma, A.; Tripathi, R. P.; Puri, C.; Khan, H. A.; Shawl, A. S.; Sultan, P.; Krishan, Tej; Qazi, G. N.

    2006-01-01

    We have evaluated the effect of variation in aryl-tetralin lignans on the radioprotective properties of Podophyllum hexandrum. Two fractionated fractions of P. hexandrum [methanolic (S1) and chloroform fractions (S2)], with varying aryl-tetralin lignan content were utilized for the present study. The peroxyl ion scavenging potentials of S1 and S2 were found to be comparable [i.e. 45.88% (S1) and 41% (S2)] after a 48 h interval in a time-dependent study, whereas in a 2 h study, S2 exhibite...

  20. Opinion of the IRSN on French electronuclear stock safety and radioprotection in 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    In its first part, this annual report presents the main trends which emerge after a global examination of nuclear safety and radioprotection of the operated nuclear power plants in France during 2009. The second part reports, comments and discusses events which occurred in 2009 and are considered as important as far as safety is concerned. The third part deals with generic anomalies, i.e. those affecting several nuclear plants. The fourth part discusses significant evolutions implemented or planned by EDF, whether they are modifications or arrangements in plant operation aimed at treating safety issues, but also economic constraints