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Sample records for natural fluorite crystals

  1. Selective adsorption of benzhydroxamic acid on fluorite rendering selective separation of fluorite/calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wei; Gao, Zhiyong; Khoso, Sultan Ahmed; Gao, Jiande; Sun, Wei; Pu, Wei; Hu, Yuehua

    2018-03-01

    Fluorite, a chief source of fluorine in the nature, usually coexists with calcite mineral in ore deposits. Worldwide, flotation techniques with a selective collector and/or a selective depressant are commonly preferred for the separation of fluorite from calcite. In the present study, an attempt was made to use benzhydroxamic acid (BHA) as a collector for the selective separation of fluorite from calcite without using any depressant. Results obtained from the flotation experiments for single mineral and mixed binary minerals revealed that the BHA has a good selective collecting ability for the fluorite when 50 mg/L of BHA was used at pH of 9. The results from the zeta potential and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) indicated that the BHA easily chemisorbs onto the fluorite as compared to calcite. Crystal chemistry calculations showed the larger Ca density and the higher Ca activity on fluorite surface mainly account for the selective adsorption of BHA on fluorite, leading to the selective separation of fluorite from calcite. Moreover, a stronger hydrogen bonding with BHA and the weaker electrostatic repulsion with BHA- also contribute to the stronger interaction of BHA species with fluorite surface.

  2. Optical storage media based on fluorite activated crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokienko, I.Yu.; Poletimov, A.E.; Shcheulin, A.S.

    1991-01-01

    Earlier studied mechanisms of photo- and thermotransformations of defects in pure and activated additively coloured crystals with fluorite structure are considered to suggest several methods of reversible optical recording of images, characterized by high resistance to high-power laser radiation and mechanical deformation

  3. The use of natural fluorite as a dosemeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mafra Neto, F.

    1980-01-01

    The possibility of the use of natural fluorite as a dosimeter for X and gama radiations was studied. Its main characteristics such as sensitivity, linearity, fading, standard-deviation, energy dependency, and so on were examined. By the experimental tests, made in the medical area of radiotherapy, we state fluorite as an excellent dosimeter. (Author) [pt

  4. Synthesis of Fluorite (CaF2 Crystal from Gypsum Waste of Phosphoric Acid Factory in Silica Gel

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    Mohammad Misbah Khunur

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper report the synthesis and characterization of fluorite single crystal prepared from gypsum waste of phosphoric acid production in silica gel. Instead of its high calcium, gypsum was used to recycle the waste which was massively produces in the phosphoric acid production. The gypsum waste, the raw material of CaCl2 supernatant, was dissolved in concentrated HCl and then precipitated as calcium oxalate (CaC2O4 by addition of ammonium oxalate. The CaCl2 was obtained by dissolving the CaC2O4 with HCl 3M. The crystals were grown at room temperature in silica gel and characterized by AAS, FTIR and powder XRD. The optimum crystal growth condition, which is pH of gel, CaCl2 concentration and growth time, were investigated. The result shows that at optimum condition of pH 5.80, CaCl2 concentrations of 1.2 M, and growth time of 144 hours, colorless crystals with the longest size of 3 mm, were obtained (72.57%. Characterization of the synthesized crystal by AAS indicates that the obtained crystal has high purity. Meanwhile, analysis by FTIR spectra shows a Ca–F peak at 775 cm-1, and powder-XRD analysis confirms that the obtained crystal was fluorite (CaF2. © 2012 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reservedReceived: 11st April 2012; Revised: 4th June 2012; Accepted: 13rd June 2012[How to Cite: M.M. Khunur, A. Risdianto, S. Mutrofin, Y.P. Prananto. (2012. Synthesis of Fluorite (CaF2 Crystal from Gypsum Waste of Phosphoric Acid Factory in Silica Gel. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 7 (1: 71-77.  doi:10.9767/bcrec.7.1.3171.71-77 ][How to Link / DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.7.1.3171.71-77 ] | View in 

  5. Elasticity of fluorite at high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eke, J.; Tennakoon, S.; Mookherjee, M.

    2017-12-01

    Fluorite (CaF2) is a simple halide with cubic space group symmetry (Fm-3m) and is often used as an internal pressure calibrant in moderate high-pressure/high-temperature experiments [1]. In order to gain insight into the elastic behavior of fluorite, we have conducted Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (RUS) on a single crystal of fluorite with rectangular parallelepiped geometry. Using single crystal X-ray diffraction, we aligned the edges of the rectangular parallelepiped with [-1 1 1], [-1 1 -2], and [-1 -1 0] crystallographic directions. We conducted the RUS measurements up to 620 K. RUS spectra are influenced by the geometry, density, and the full elastic moduli tensor of the material. In our high-temperature RUS experiments, the geometry and density were constrained using thermal expansion from previous studies [2]. We determined the elasticity by minimizing the difference between observed resonance and calculated Eigen frequency using Rayleigh-Ritz method [3]. We found that at room temperature, the single crystal elastic moduli for fluorite are 170, 49, and 33 GPa for C11, C12, and C44 respectively. At room temperatures, the aggregate bulk modulus (K) is 90 GPa and the shear modulus (G) is 43 GPa. We note that the elastic moduli and sound wave velocities decrease linearly as a function of temperature with dVP /dT and dVS /dT being -9.6 ×10-4 and -5.0 ×10-4 km/s/K respectively. Our high-temperature RUS results are in good agreement with previous studies on fluorite using both Ultrasonic methods and Brillouin scattering [4,5]. Acknowledgement: This study is supported by US NSF awards EAR-1639552 and EAR-1634422. References: [1] Speziale, S., Duffy, T. S. 2002, Phys. Chem. Miner., 29, 465-472; [2] Roberts, R. B., White, G. K., 1986, J. Phys. C: Solid State Phys., 19, 7167-7172. [3] Migliori, A., Maynard, J. D., 2005, Rev. Sci. Instrum., 76, 121301. [4] Catlow, C. R. A., Comins, J. D., Germano, F. A., Harley, R. T., Hayes, W., 1978, J. Phys. C Solid State Phys

  6. The reasons for the color green fluorite Mehmandooye cover using UV spectroscopy and XRF results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirzadeh, Sara; Zahiri, Reza

    2016-04-01

    Fluorite mineral or fluorine with chemical formula CaF2 is most important mineralfluor in nature. This mineral crystallization to colors yellow, green, pink, blue, purple, colorless and sometimes black andin cubic system crystallized.assemi transparent and glass with polished.fluoritethe purity include 48/9% fluoreand 51/9% calcium. How the creation colors in minerals different greatly indebted to Kurt Nassau research from Bell Labs, Murray Hill, New Jersey.almostall the mechanisms that cause color in minerals, are the result of the interaction of light waves with the electrons The main factors affecting the color generation include the following: 1)the presence of a constructive element inherent (essential ingredient mineral composition) 2)The presence of a minor impurities (such a element as involved in latticesolid solution) 3) appearancedefects in the crystal structure 4) There are some physical boundaries with distances very small and delicate, like blades out of the solution (which may be the play of colors or Chatvyansy) 5) Mixing mechanical impurities dispersed in a host mineral Based on the results of the analysis, XRF and UV spectrum and also based on the results of ICP, because the color green fluorite examined, the focus color (F_center) and also the presence of some elementsintermediate (such as Y (yttrium). [1] Bill, H., Calas, G. Color centres associated rare earth ions and the origin of coloration in natural fluorites// PhysChem Min, (1978), v 3, pp. 117-131.

  7. Lattice shear distortions in fluorite structure oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faber, J. Jr.; Mueller, M.H.; Hitterman, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    Crystallographic shear distortions have been observed in fluorite structure, single crystals of UO 2 and Zr(Ca)O 2 /sub-x/ by neutron-diffraction techniques. These distortions localize on the oxygen sublattice and do not require the presence of an external strain. The internal rearrangement mode in UO 2 is a transverse, zone boundary q vector = 2π/a (0.5, 0.0) deformation with amplitude 0.014 A. In Zr(Ca)O/sub 2-x/, the mode is a longitudinal, q vector = 2-/a (0,0,0.5) deformation with amplitude 0.23 A. Cation-anion elastic interactions dominate in selecting the nature of the internal distortion

  8. INAA in the determination of the elemental constituents of a natural fluorite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balogun, F.A.; Tubosun, I.A.; Adesanmi, C.A.; Ajao, J.A.; Akanle, A.O.; Spyrou, N.M.; Ojo, J.O.

    1997-01-01

    A complementary use of the comparative and the semi-absolute variations of instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) has enabled us to determine 22 different elements in a sample of natural fluorite originating from the younger granite province of Nigeria. The mineral has a brownish purple appearance with some veinlets having a deep purple coloration. Of all the 22 elements measured, Fe (851.36 ppm), Sb (7.69 ppm), Ag (87.4 ppm), Hg (2.71 ppm) and Se (1.97 ppm) are found to be exclusive to the veinlets while Au (109.15 ppm), Co (2.15 ppm) and W (173.20 ppm) are concentrated in the main matrix of the fluorite. With the aid of the semi-absolute method, it was possible to measure the Au concentration in the IAEA Soil-7 reference material to be 56.83±5.87% ppm. A qualitative electron microprobe analysis (EMA) showed that the bulk of the matrix is composed mainly of Ca and F, as expected. (author)

  9. Study of thermophysical and anharmonic properties of fluorite compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, R.K.; Pandey, N.K.

    1983-01-01

    An extensive study is made of thermophysical and anharmonic properties of fluorite compounds using an interionic potential, which consists of a long-range Coulomb and three-body interactions and the short-range overlap repulsion and van der Waals attraction. The agreement achieved between experimental and theoretical results on third-order elastic constants and pressure derivatives of second order elastic constants are generally better than those obtained by others. This potential succeeds in predicting various thermophysical properties, like compressibility and its pressure and temperature derivatives, thermal expansion and Grueneisen parameters of seven crystals of fluorite structure. (author)

  10. (100) faceted anion voids in electron irradiated fluorite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, E.

    1979-01-01

    High fluence electron irradiation of fluorite crystals in the temperature range 150 to 320 K results in formation of a simple cubic anion void superlattice. Above 320 K the damage structure changes to a random distribution of large [001] faceted anion voids. This voidage behaviour, similar to that observed in a range of irradiated metals, is discussed in terms points defect rather than conventional colour centre terminology. (Auth.)

  11. A new anion-deficient fluorite-related superstructure of Bi{sub 28}V{sub 8}O{sub 62}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Đorđević, T., E-mail: tamara.djordjevic@univie.ac.at [Institut für Mineralogie und Kristallographie-Geozentrum, Universität Wien, Althansstr. 14, A-1090 Wien (Austria); Karanović, Lj., E-mail: ljika2002@yahoo.com [Laboratory for Crystallography, Faculty of Mining and Geology, University of Belgrade, Đušina 7, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2014-12-15

    New hydrothermally synthesized Bi{sub 28}V{sub 8}O{sub 62} was structurally characterized using single-crystal X-ray diffraction data. Bi{sub 28}V{sub 8}O{sub 62} crystallizes in the novel type of defect fluorite structure related to the face-centered cubic δ-Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}. It is monoclinic, s. g. P2{sub 1}/c, and the relation to the fluorite subcell is given as a∼(3/2)a{sub F}+(3/2)c{sub F}; b∼ −b{sub F}; c∼2a{sub F} −4c{sub F} (F in subscript indicate the unit cell parameter of fluorite). Its structure is characterized by slabs of edge sharing OBi{sub 4} tetrahedra surrounded by the OBi{sub 3} triangles. As a part of these OBi{sub 3} triangles, two positionally disordered Bi{sup 3+} cations were observed in the marginal part of the slabs. The slabs are extending along b axis and are linked by inter-slab portion of the structure composed of VO{sub 4} tetrahedra and BiO{sub 6−x} coordination polyhedra, where x is a number of vacant oxygen sites. Raman spectra verified the coordination environment of vanadium atoms in the structure. - Graphical abstract: The [4{sup ¯}01] projection of two slabs and inter-slab part of the structure in one layer parallel to the (3{sup ¯}08)=(002{sup ¯}){sub F} plane (F in subscript indicate a fluorite type structure). The large green circles are Bi atoms. Small blue circles represent partly and fully occupied O sites, respectively. Pink (hatched black) are V1O{sub 4} and blue (hatched white) are V2O{sub 4} coordination tetrahedra. - Highlights: • Single crystals of Bi{sub 28}V{sub 8}O{sub 62} were grown using hydrothermal technique. • The crystal structure of Bi{sub 28}V{sub 8}O{sub 62} was solved using single-crystal XRD method. • Bi{sub 28}V{sub 8}O{sub 62} has an anion-deficient fluorite-related superstructure. • Raman spectrum confirmed the coordination environment of vanadium atoms. • Relation to the structurally related compound was discussed.

  12. Coloring of synthetic fluorite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birsoy, R.

    1980-01-01

    A synthetic fluorite of the Harshaw Chemical Company is analyzed for rare earth elements, yttrium, and sodium. Samples of this fluorite are irradiated with X-rays, γ-rays, neutrons, electrons, protons, and α-particles at different energies, and their absorption spectra are analyzed. Analyzing the thermal bleaching of these radiation-coloured fluorites shows that both, impurities and radiation play a part in the coloration of synthetic fluorite. However, the main contribution comes from the radiation induced lattice defects. In the visible region spectra, the colour centre of the 5800 to 5900 A absorption band is probably mainly related with large aggregates of F-centres. The 5450 and the 5300 A absorption bands are mainly related to monovalent and divalent ion impurities and their association with lattice defects. The 3800 A absorption band seems to be related with F-centre aggregates. However, the contribution from the rare earth elements related complex color centres also plays some part for the production of this absorption band. These results indicate that the color centres of different origin can absorb light at the same wavelength. (author)

  13. Radiation stability of fluorite-type nuclear oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrido, Frederico [Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masse, CNRS-IN2P3-Universite Paris-Sud, Batiments 104-108, 91405 Orsay Campus (France)], E-mail: Frederico.Garrido@csnsm.in2p3.fr; Vincent, Laetitia [Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masse, CNRS-IN2P3-Universite Paris-Sud, Batiments 104-108, 91405 Orsay Campus (France); Nowicki, Lech [Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Hoza 69, 00-681 Warsaw (Poland); Sattonnay, Gael [Laboratoire d' Etudes des Materiaux Hors-Equilibre, Institut de Chimie Moleculaire et des Materiaux d' Orsay, UMR 8182, Universite Paris-Sud, Batiment 410, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Thome, Lionel [Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masse, CNRS-IN2P3-Universite Paris-Sud, Batiments 104-108, 91405 Orsay Campus (France)

    2008-06-15

    Oxides with the fluorite-type structure are radiation tolerant materials. They are widely used or envisaged in hostile nuclear environments, such as nuclear fuels or inert transmutation matrices for actinide burning. Study of the radiation stability of this class of solids in various radiative fields is of major importance. Two issues which may affect the stability of materials are considered in this work: the production of radiation damage (ballistic contribution); the modification of the matrix composition by doping (chemical contribution). Both contributions may drastically affect the solid stability. Urania and zirconia single crystals were chosen as fluorite-type canonical systems. They were implanted with low-energy inert gases (He or Xe). The damage in-growth, due to both ballistic and chemical contributions, was investigated by in situ RBS/C experiments in the channelling mode and TEM. Two main steps in the disordering kinetics were observed for both inert gases. Relevant key parameters were found to be: the number of displaced lattice atoms created by the slowing-down of energetic ions during the implantation process; the concentration of noble gas atoms in the solid which cause the formation of large stress fields surrounding gas aggregates.

  14. Laser site selective spectroscopy of rare-earth defects in fluorites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murdoch, K.M.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Rare-earth (R 3+ ) doped fluorites (CaF 2 , SrF 2 , and BaF 2 ) have long been a model system for investigating the defect chemistry of crystalline solids. The trivalent R 3+ ions substitute for the divalent cations of the host and are charge compensated by the inclusion of additional interstitial fluoride ions (F - j ). A variety of R 3+ centres arise, including cubic symmetry R 3+ sites remote from any F - j , single R 3+ ions associated with one neighbouring F - j , and clusters of R 3+ associated with multiple F - j . Additional R 3+ centres are produced by chemical modifications involving the substitution of host anions or cations. Numerous experimental studies have shown that the relative populations of these centres are determined by the size of the R 3+ ions, the R 3+ concentration in the crystal, the crystals thermal history, and any pressure treatments. A considerable volume of theoretical work has also been presented to interpret these results. Laser site selective spectroscopy has proved a powerful technique for probing the defect chemistry of R 3+ doped fluorites. Some of the important results and conclusions of these experiments will be reviewed. A detailed account, with references to the original studies, has also been published recently

  15. Genesis of rare-metal pegmatites and alkaline apatite-fluorite rocks of Burpala massi, Northern Baikal folded zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotnikova, Irina; Vladykin, Nikolai

    2015-04-01

    thermobarometric evidence suggests that apatite-fluorite rocks were formed from the residual fluid-melt, separated after crystallization of rare-metal pegmatites. Petrochemical and geochemical data Burpalinsky are in accord of general trend of crystal differentiation of alkaline magma containing small concentrations of CO2 and higher P2O5 and F, which accumulated significantly separated from the pegmatite melts. In some pegmatites fluorite with rare-metal minerals (flyuocerit etc) are separating in schlieren. Apatite-fluorite rocks are cut by leucogranite dyke, having genetic connection with rare-metal pegmatites. Late granitic phases has its own association of rare-metal minerals described by A.A. Ganzeev (1972). Thermobarometric geochemical study of apatite-fluorite rocks Burpala massif found a large number of primary fluid inclusions (15-50 micrometers). Thermal and cryometric research of 60 individual fluid inclusions in fluorite showed the domination of Na, Ca, Mg chlorides and high temperatures salt inclusions in fluorites (above 550C) and melt inclusions in apatites (800C). Apatite-fluorite rocks in massif are similar to foskorites in carbonatite complexes, with similar high Ca content, but instead fluorite, together with other "foskoritovymi" minerals - apatite, magnetite, mica, and pyroxene were formed instead for calcite. Isotopic studies (Sr-Nd) indicate the mantle source of primary magma Burpala massif close to EM-2, which is characteristic of alkaline intrusions in the folded belts (Vladykin 2009). RBRF grant 14-45-04057

  16. Kinetic characterization of the first peak of natural fluorite from low ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fluorite samples were irradiated with a low dose-rate (40 μGys-1 ) β- irradiation source to a test dose of 1.2 mGy and the heating rates of β = 1,3 and 5o Cs were considered, in order to minimize the effect of temperature lag. The role of thermal quenching (W) was investigated by evaluating the activation energy using the ...

  17. Effect of natural irradiation in fluorites: possible implications for nuclear waste management?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vlček, V.; Skála, Roman; Goliáš, V.; Drahokoupil, Jan; Čížek, J.; Strnad, L.; Ederová, J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 1 (2012), s. 45-52 ISSN 1802-6222 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/07/0805; GA AV ČR KAN300100801 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : fluorite * irradiation * X-ray diffraction * differential scanning calorimetry * defects * real structure Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 0.804, year: 2012

  18. Direct reading spectrochemical determination of aluminium, iron and silicon in fluorite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roca, M.

    1966-01-01

    A quantitative spectrochemical method for the determination of Al, Fe and Si in fluorite has been worked out. The sample was supported in a graphite electrode with crater of 5 mm. in diameter, 2,5 mm deep, and burned by a d.c. are in a direct reading spectrometer. The excitation of samples has been studied without dilution as well as using graphite powder as diluent in the ratios 1:1, 1:4, and 1:9; the latter factor was chosen. Ag, Ca, Co, Cr, Mo and Sn were tested as internal standards. It has not been found any significant inter element effect. It is necessary to use natural fluorite as base material for the standards. (Author) 5 refs

  19. Fluid Evolution During Mineralization of Atashkuh Fluorite-Barite (±Sulfide Deposit, South of Delijan

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    Seyed Javad Moghaddasi

    2016-07-01

    suggest Mg metasomatism associated with the main stage of fluorite mineralization. As a result of these observations, three stages of mineralization were recognized in the Atashkuh area: (1 Mobilization of a primary multicomponent Na-K(-Mg-Ca high-salinity basinal fluid from the underlying rocks and its migration to the upper horizons. This stage is corresponds with the multi-phase SH inclusions with salinity of 31 wt% NaCl equivalent and 220 to 350 °C temperature. (2 Mixing and dilution of the basinal saline fluid with low-salinity formation or connate water resulted in deposition of fluorite-barite (±sulfide mineralization and the formation of ferruginous dolomites. This stage contains Ca-Na rich inclusions with hydrohalite (LVHH. (3 Carbonate dissolution and increase in CO2 content of solutions due to oxidation of pyrite, formation of sulfuric acid. This stage is supergene oxidation and deposition of supergene minerals. The dissolution of carbonate rocks by acidified meteoric water produced permeable structures and breccias, by followed by of supergene mineralization in the later stages and formation of cerussite, malachite and goethite. Discussion The Atashkuh fluorite-barite (±sulfide mineralization is mainly associated with dolomitized and silicified Jurassic carbonates and shales of Shemshak and Badamu Formation. The mineralization is in the form of two veins about 1 km apart. The epigenetic vein mineralization mainly consists of fluorite and barite with subordinate quartz, calcite, dolomite, galena, chalcopyrite, pyrite, hematite, goethite, malachite and cerussite. The main ore textures are replacements, open-space fillings, breccias and veins. The petrographic studies suggest three paragenetic suites: fluorite/quartz/calcite, barite/dolomite/sulfides and hematite/cerussite/goethite as early, middle and late stages. Micro-thermometric measurements were carried out on primary fluid inclusions of fluorite, barite and quartz crystals from both mineralized veins of

  20. Selective Flotation of Calcite from Fluorite: A Novel Reagent Schedule

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    Zhiyong Gao

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Fluorite is an important strategic mineral. In general, fluorite ores will contain a certain amount of calcite gangue mineral. Thus, they need to be separated from each other. For an economic separation, a reverse flotation process is used to float calcite gangue from fluorite. However, little information on the separation is available. In this study, a novel reagent schedule using citric acid (CA as the depressant, sodium fluoride (NaF as the regulator and sulfoleic acid (SOA as the collector, was developed to separate calcite from fluorite. The results demonstrated a high selectivity for the flotation of calcite from fluorite using this new reagent schedule. The best selective separation for a single mineral and mixed binary minerals was obtained when 200 mg/L of NaF, 50 mg/L of CA, and 6 mg/L of SOA were used at pH 9. In addition, a batch flotation experiment was carried out using a run-of-mine feed material. Selective separation was achieved with 85.18% calcite removal while only 11.2% of fluorite was lost. An attempt was made to understand the effect of the new reagent schedule on the flotation of calcite. The results from both microflotation and bench scale flotation demonstrated a great potential for industrial application using this novel reagent schedule to upgrade fluorite ore.

  1. Elements-admixtures of fluorite. Research technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayziev, A.R.

    2002-01-01

    Present article is devoted to elements-admixtures of fluorite and research techniques used. As a material for researches the mono mineral samples of fluorite of various geologic deposits and ores were used. The determination of sodium and potassium was conducted by means of flame photometry. Strontium, uranium, thorium, lead and rubidium were determined by means of quantitative X-ray spectroscopic analysis. The barium analysis was conducted by means of quantitative method. The manganese analysis was conducted by means of electron paramagnetic resonance.

  2. Naturally irradiated fluorite as a historic violet pigment: Raman spectroscopic and X-ray diffraction study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čermáková, Zdeňka; Bezdička, Petr; Němec, I.; Hradilová, J.; Šrein, V.; Blažek, Jan; Hradil, David

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 2 (2015), s. 236-243 ISSN 0377-0486 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP103/12/2211 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 ; RVO:67985556 Keywords : fluorite * pigment * fluorescence bands * diffraction lines broadening * irradiation Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.395, year: 2015

  3. Rare Earths in fluorite deposits of Elika Formation (East of Mazandaran Province

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    Zahra Mehraban

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The Central Alborz in eastern Mazandaran province is host to the most important carbonate-hosted fluorite deposits in Iran, such as Pachi-Miana, Sheshroodbar, Era and Kamarposht. In these deposits, mineralization occurs in the upper parts of the middle Triassic Elika formation (Vahabzadeh et al., 2009 and references therein. These deposits have long been studied, and various models are presented for ore genesis. Nevertheless, ore genesis in these deposits is still unclear. The present study of the geochemistry of the REEs of these deposits is intended to improve genetic models. Materials and methods Three hundred samples were taken from above mentioned deposits. Samples were categorized into 5 groups: (1 fluorite ore types, (2 ore-stage calcite, (3 carbonate host rocks, (4 basaltic rock around the deposits, and (5 shale of the Shemshak formation. Fourteen pure fluorite samples, 4 samples of pure calcite, 4 samples of carbonate host rock, 1 sample of basalt and 1 sample of shale were analyzed for REEs by ICP-MS at West Lab in Australia. Results Analytical data on fluorite from the Elika deposits show very low REE concentrations (0.5-18ppm, in calcite(0.5-3ppm in carbonate host rocks – limestone (1.8-7ppm, and in dolomitic limestone 6.5ppm, compared with upper Triassic basalt (43ppm and shale (261ppm. REE in fluorite of these deposits are strongly enriched (10 3 to 10 6 times relative to normal sea water, ore stage calcite and carbonate host rocks, especially for mid-REEs (Eu, Gd and heavy REEs (Lu, Yb, La/Yb=~0.05. Also, LREEs depletion (La/Sm= 2-10 and HREEs (La/Yb=0.01-0.08 relatively enrichment of fluorites compared with limestone (La/Sm=2.5-4, La/Yb=0.1-1.5 and dolomitic limestone (La/Sm=4.28, La/Yb=0.07-0.4 host rocks as well as positive Eu anomaly are the most important REEs signatures in fluorites. Fluorite elsewhere in the world with low total REE conten thas been interpreted to have a sedimentary origin (Ronchi et al

  4. Solid thermoluminescent dosemeter of sodium tetraborate and brazilian fluorite sensible to thermal neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fratin, L.; Cruz, M.T. da

    1987-01-01

    A solid termoluminescent dosemeter of sodium tetraborate and brazilian fluorite sensible to thermal neutrons is described. The nuclears reactions 1) 10 B + n → 7 Li + He + Q1 (6,1%) where: Q1=2,79 MeV and Eα1 = 1,758 MeV and 2) 10 B + n → 7 Li* + 4 He + Q2 (93,9%) where: Q2 = 2,316 MeV and E2α 2 = 1,474 MeV are responsible by the thermoluminescent response of the thermal neutrons dosemeters. The stages in the fabrication process of this dosemeter of which are:1) sodium tetraborate vitrification, 2) mixture and pressing 3) sintering are cited. The obtainment of a natural fluorite dosemeter with sodium chloride is also shown. (C.G.C.) [pt

  5. Evaluation of Sulfonate-Based Collectors with Different Hydrophobic Tails for Flotation of Fluorite

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    Renji Zheng

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This investigation aims to demonstrate the effects of hydrophobic tails on the affinity and relevant flotation response of sulfonate-based collectors for fluorite. For this purpose, a series of alkyl sulfonates with different hydrophobic tails, namely sodium decanesulfonate (C10, sodium dodecylsulfate (C12, sodium hexadecanesulfonate (C16, and sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (C12B were applied. The flotation tests showed that C12 and C12B had a better collecting performance than C10 and C16 at pH < 10, and the flotation recovery of fluorite was higher when adopting C12B as a collector compared with C12 with a strong base. The adsorption behaviors of collectors on the fluorite surface were studied through zeta potential, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS analyses. It was found that the affinity of alkyl sulfonates for fluorite was enhanced with the increase of the alkyl chain length from C10 to C16. The existence of phenyl in the hydrophobic tail of sulfonates could improve its activity for fluorite by reducing its surface tension. The abnormal phenomenon C16 with a high affinity for fluorite had a low collecting performance for fluorite mainly due to its overlong alkyl chain, resulting in low solubility in pulp, which restrained its interaction with fluorite. We concluded that C12B was the most applicable collector for fluorite among these reagents due to its high activity, high solubility, and low cost, which was further substantiated by calculating their molecular frontier orbital energy.

  6. Ab-initio calculation for cation vacancy formation energy in anti-fluorite structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleel, V. P. Saleel Ahammad; Chitra, D.; Veluraja, K.; Eithiraj, R. D.

    2018-04-01

    Lithium oxide (Li2O) has been suggested as a suitable breeder blanket material for fusion reactors. Li+ vacancies are created by neutron irradiation, forming bulk defect complex whose extra character is experimentally unclear. We present a theoretical study of Li2O using density functional theory (DFT) with a plane-wave basis set. The generalized gradient approximation (GGA) and local-density approximation (LDA) were used for exchange and correlation. Here we address the total energy for defect free, cation defect, cation vacancy and vacancy formation energy in Li2O crystal in anti-fluorite structure.

  7. The ionic conductivity and defect structure of fluorite-type solid solutions Basub(1-x)Usub(x)Fsub(2+2x)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouwerkerk, M.

    1986-01-01

    The crystal growth and the characterization of the solid solutions Msub(1-x)Usub(x)Fsub(2+2x) (M = Ca, Sr, Ba and Pb) are described. X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence methods have been utilized to determine the U 4+ content of the solid solutions. The incorporation of UF 4 in PbF 2 is found to have a stabilizing effect on the β-PbF 2 (fluorite) structure. A study of the conductivity properties of Basub(1-x)Usub(x)Fsub(2+2x) and of Pbsub(1-x)Usub(x)Fsub(2+2x) is presented. The effect of an anion excess on the diffuse phase transition and the specific heat anomaly of single crystals Msub(1-x)Usub(x)Fsub(2+2x) was studied with impedance spectroscopy and calorimetric measurements. Finally, a study of the fluorite-type solid solutions Basub(1-x)Lasub(x)Fsub(2+x) and Basub(1-x)Usub(x)Fsub(2+2x) using the Thermally Stimulated Depolarization Current (TSDC) technique is presented. (Auth.)

  8. Accelerator-based analytical technique in the evaluation of some Nigeria's natural minerals: Fluorite, tourmaline and topaz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olabanji, S.O. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (LNL), viale dell' Universita 2, 35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy)]. E-mail: skayode2002@yahoo.co.uk; Ige, O.A. [Natural History Museum, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife (Nigeria); Mazzoli, C. [Dipartimento di Mineralogia e Petrologia, Universita di Padova, 35100 Padova (Italy); Ceccato, D. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (LNL), viale dell' Universita 2, 35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Padova, via Marzolo 8, 35100 Padova (Italy); Akintunde, J.A. [CERD, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife (Nigeria); De Poli, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (LNL), viale dell' Universita 2, 35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Moschini, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (LNL), viale dell' Universita 2, 35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Padova, via Marzolo 8, 35100 Padova (Italy)

    2005-10-15

    For the first time, the complementary accelerator-based analytical technique of PIXE and electron microprobe analysis (EMPA) were employed for the characterization of some Nigeria's natural minerals namely fluorite, tourmaline and topaz. These minerals occur in different areas in Nigeria. The minerals are mainly used as gemstones and for other scientific and technological applications and therefore are very important. There is need to characterize them to know the quality of these gemstones and update the geochemical data on them geared towards useful applications. PIXE analysis was carried out using the 1.8 MeV collimated proton beam from the 2.5 MV AN 2000 Van de Graaff accelerator at INFN, LNL, Legnaro, Padova, Italy. The novel results which show many elements at different concentrations in these minerals are presented and discussed.

  9. Formation, structure and magnetism of the metastable defect fluorite phases AVO3.5+x (A=In, Sc)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafi, Shahid P.; Lundgren, Rylan J.; Cranswick, Lachlan M.D.; Bieringer, Mario

    2007-01-01

    We report the preparation and stability of ScVO 3.5+x and the novel phase InVO 3.5+x . AVO 3.5+x (A=Sc, In) defect fluorite structures are formed as metastable intermediates during the topotactic oxidation of AVO 3 bixbyites. The oxidation pathway has been studied in detail by means of thermogravimetric/differential thermal analysis and in-situ powder X-ray diffraction. The oxidation of the bixbyite phase follows a topotactic pathway at temperatures between 300 and 400 deg. C in air/carbon dioxide. The range of accessible oxygen stoichiometries for the AVO 3.5+x structures following this pathway are 0.00≤x≤0.22. Rietveld refinements against powder X-ray and neutron data revealed that InVO 3.54 and ScVO 3.70 crystallize in the defect fluorite structure in space group Fm-3 m (227) with a=4.9863(5) and 4.9697(3)A, respectively with A 3+ /V 4+ disorder on the (4a) cation site. Powder neutron diffraction experiments indicate clustering of oxide defects in all samples. Bulk magnetic measurements showed the presence of V 4+ and the absence of magnetic ordering at low temperatures. Powder neutron diffraction experiments confirmed the absence of a long range ordered magnetic ground state. - Graphical abstract: Topotactic oxidation of AVO 3 bixbyite to AVO 3.5 defect fluorite structure followed by in-situ powder X-ray diffraction. The upper structural diagram shows a six coordinated (A/V)-O 6 fragment in bixbyite, the lower structure illustrates the same seven-fold coordinated (A/V)-O 7 cubic environment in the defect fluorite structure

  10. Trace-element and Sr-Nd isotopic evidence for the origin of the Sardinian fluorite mineralization (Italy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castorina, F.; Masi, U.; Padalino, G.; Palomba, M.

    2008-01-01

    The fluorite-bearing hydrothermal mineralization in Sardinia mainly occurs within Paleozoic volcanic and metasedimentary rocks. Only 3 occurrences are located in volcanic and siliciclastic Cenozoic rocks. Most Sardinian fluorites exhibit relatively high rare earth and Y (REY) contents, strong positive Y anomalies, slightly negative Ce and generally positive Eu anomalies. These features indicate that the REY were mobilized mainly from non-carbonate rocks. Neither Sr nor Nd isotopes can be used to date radiometrically the Sardinian fluorites. However, the measured Sr-isotope ratios of the fluorites hosted by Paleozoic rocks fit mixing lines in the 1000/Sr versus 87 Sr/ 86 Sr plot once recalculated at 280 Ma, suggesting that the age inferred for the correction probably represents that of the formation of the fluorite mineralization. Mixing likely occurred between diluted surficial waters and brines circulating mainly through the Lower Paleozoic metasedimentary basement. The Cenozoic fluorites exhibit chemical and isotopic features similar to those of the Paleozoic fluorites, except the Nuraghe Onigu fluorite displaying a possible contribution of Sr from Cenozoic magmatic rocks. The initial ε Nd values of the Paleozoic fluorites fit the age proposed for the formation of the deposits. Moreover, the values suggest that radiogenic Nd was provided to the fluids from the Ordovician siliciclastic basement, except for 3 deposits where the potential source rocks of Nd were mainly Ordovician acidic magmatic rocks. The initial ε Nd values of the Cenozoic fluorites suggest a provenance of Nd essentially from the leaching of Variscan granitoids

  11. Magnetic properties and structural transitions of fluorite-related rare earth osmates Ln3OsO7 (Ln=Pr, Tb)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinatsu, Yukio; Doi, Yoshihiro

    2013-01-01

    Ternary rare-earth osmates Ln 3 OsO 7 (Ln=Pr, Tb) have been prepared. They crystallize in an ortho-rhombic superstructure of cubic fluorite with space group Cmcm. Both of these compounds undergo a structural phase transition at 130 K (Ln=Pr) and 580 K (Ln=Tb). These compounds show complex magnetic behavior at low temperatures. Pr 3 OsO 7 exhibits magnetic transitions at 8 and 73 K, and Tb 3 OsO 7 magnetically orders at 8 and 60 K. The Os moments become one-dimensionally ordered, and when the temperature is furthermore decreased, it provokes the ordering in the Ln 3+ sublattice that simultaneously becomes three-dimensionally ordered with the Os sublattice. - Graphical abstract: Ternary rare-earth osmates Ln 3 OsO 7 (Ln=Pr, Tb) have been prepared. They crystallize in an orthorhombic superstructure of cubic fluorite with space group Cmcm. Both of these compounds undergo a structural phase transition at 130 K (Ln=Pr) and 580 K (Ln=Tb). These compounds show complex magnetic behavior at low temperatures. Pr 3 OsO 7 exhibits magnetic transitions at 8 and 73 K, and Tb 3 OsO 7 magnetically orders at 8 and 60 K. Highlights: ► Ternary rare-earth osmates Ln 3 OsO 7 (Ln=Pr, Tb) with an ordered defect-fluorite structure have been prepared. ► Both of these compounds undergo a structural phase transition at 130 K (Ln=Pr) and 580 K (Ln=Tb). ► These compounds show complex magnetic behavior at low temperatures due to magnetic ordering of Ln and Os.

  12. Thermoluminescence in fluorite: sensitization mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz, M.T. da; Watanabe, S.; Mayhugh, M.R.

    1974-01-01

    The sensitization of the major glow peaks (approximately to 100 and 200 0 C) in fluorite correlates with population of traps causing higher temperature glow peaks. When considered with supralinearity results, it is concluded that either the sensitization results from an increase in trap-filling efficiencies, or the deeper traps are not filled during irradiation

  13. Factors influencing the determination of fluorite by means of neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutze, H.

    1975-01-01

    Proceeding from the necessity of a rapid analysis of fluorite by neutron activation of an unprepared drill core the influence of interfering elements, of inhomogeneous fluorite distribution, of the sample volume and of moisture are examined. Recommendations are given to overcome these interferences. (author)

  14. Thermoluminescence in fluorite: sensitization mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz, M.T. da; Watanabe, S; Mayhugh, M R

    1974-11-01

    The sensitization of the major glow peaks (approximately to 100 and 200/sup 0/ C) in fluorite correlates with population of traps causing higher temperature glow peaks. When considered with supralinearity results, it is concluded that either the sensitization results from an increase in trap-filling efficiencies, or the deeper traps are not filled during irradiation.

  15. Application of X-ray technique to characterization of fluorite sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancado, R.Z.L.; Luz Ferreira, O. da.

    1986-01-01

    This investigation had the purpose of characterizing fluorite veins of ''Mineracao Sartor'', in Itaborai region/RJ, which is an excelent geographic position in relation to the consuming market. These studies have in view to give subsidy to future works to the best fluorite utilization. They realized tests with X-rays diffractometer and spectrometer, polarizing microscope and with a mounting of electric circuit to measure the type of semiconductivity. (C.M.C.T.R.) [pt

  16. Nuclear magnetic resonance in superionic conductors with fluorite-type structure; Ressonancia magnetica nuclear em condutores superionicos de estrutura fluorita

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souto, Sergio Paulo Amaral

    1991-12-31

    The {sup 19} F NMR relaxation times T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} were measured in ternary and nonstoichiometric compounds with the fluorite-type structure. We have studied the Na{sub 0-4} Y{sub 0-6} F{sub 2-2} crystal in the temperature range 600 K to 900 K, where the crystal has not the fluorite structure. The T{sub 1} values were measured in 2 Larmor frequencies: 20.42 MHz and 34.24 MHz. The results for T{sub 1} were seem to be qualitatively similar to those measured in the system with two inequivalent sublattices. The T{sub 2} measurements, in the Pb{sub O84} Bi{sub 0-16} F{sub 2-16} crystal, were made during temperature cycles in the range of 300 K to 830 K. The difference in activation energy between cooling and heating half cycles, found to be approximately 0.08 eV, appear to be associated with the change in the clusters structure and not to the energy of defect formation. Finally, similar T{sub 2} measurements during temperature cycling was made in K{sub 0-4} Bi{sub 0-6} F{sub 2-2} : 2% Pb F{sub 2} crystal, in the temperature range 300 K to 800 K, but in this case no difference in the cooling and heating results was observed. We also measured, in the same temperature range, the T{sub 1} relaxation time in 3 Larmor frequencies: 11.71 MHz, 20.42 MHz and 34.24 Mhz. This results appear to indicate the existence of two hopping mechanism. (author). 132 refs., 68 figs.

  17. Thermally stimulated depolarization currents in the natural fluorite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valerio, Mario Ernesto Giroldo

    1986-01-01

    The present work deals with natural calcium fluoride from Criciuma, Santa Catarina. Thermally Stimulated Depolarization Currents (TSDC) can be used to determine the properties of dipole defects present in this crystal. The TSDC spectrum of this material shows three bands in the temperature range of 80 to 450 K. The first one, at 130 K, is due the dipoles formed by a trivalent impurity and an interstitial fluorine ion in the next nearest position of an impurity ion (nn R s 3+ -F i - ). The second one, at 102 k, is due to the presence of small aggregates of dipoles (like a dimer). The last band, at 360 k is due to the formation of Large Clusters. The continuous distribution model gave the best fit for these bands with mean activation energies of 0.41 eV, 0.595 eV and 1.02 eV for the first, second and third band respectively. Thermal treatments can modify the number of dipoles, dimers and clusters present in the crystal. The variation in the areas under each band can be used to measure this effect. In this work we used thermal treatments between 15 minutes and 10 hours and temperatures between 200 deg C and 500 deg C. For thermal treatments at 300 deg C, the dipoles and dimers are created and the clusters are destroyed as the time of thermal treatment increases. At 400 deg C the clusters are created and the dipoles and dimers and 350 deg C for the clusters. (author)

  18. Geochemical characterization of rare earth elements from fluorite deposits of Tangua district - RJ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coelho, C.E.S.; Dardenne, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    The Tangua fluorite vein-type deposits are related to an alkaline complex of the same name, and situated in the District of Itaborai, in the State of Rio de Janeiro. The plutonic body of nepheline syenites (Tangua Massif) intrudes basement gneisses, with dykes and sills of trachitic and phonolitic nature of hundreds of meters in length and centimeters to tens of meters in thickness. The fluorite veins are emplaced both in gneisses and alkaline rocks (plutonic body and dykes) in NE-ENE structures created or reactivated during the opening of the South Atlantic Ocean. The geochemical study of rare earth elements reveals that these mineralizations show very low contents in these elements, and a relatively high fractionation spectres. In the deposit environment, four mineralization phases were differenciated, with the first one being considered as the initial solution; the second one characterized by a new europium rich-solution; the third one, representing the evolution of this new solution, but in a reducing environment, with precipitation of pyrite; and the last one, representing a new batch of the initial solution. As a consequence of the REE's and fluid inclusions studies, we are able to suggest an origen by weathering of the country rocks due to superficial meteorics solutions along faults and fractures, that when heated in deep environments, promote lixiviation of silica and fluorine and precipitate the fluorites when their ascending movement comes to an end. (author) [pt

  19. Surface modelling on heavy atom crystalline compounds: HfO2 and UO2 fluorite structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evarestov, Robert; Bandura, Andrei; Blokhin, Eugeny

    2009-01-01

    The study of the bulk and surface properties of cubic (fluorite structure) HfO 2 and UO 2 was performed using the hybrid Hartree-Fock density functional theory linear combination of atomic orbitals simulations via the CRYSTAL06 computer code. The Stuttgart small-core pseudopotentials and corresponding basis sets were used for the core-valence interactions. The influence of relativistic effects on the structure and properties of the systems was studied. It was found that surface properties of Mott-Hubbard dielectric UO 2 differ from those found for other metal oxides with the closed-shell configuration of d-electrons

  20. Conclusion - Admixture elements as indicators of fluorite genesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayziev, A.R.

    2002-01-01

    The information obtained during scientific researches was generalized and analyzed. It was defined that studying of qualitative composition and quantitative content revealed the geochemical features of fluorite.

  1. Size of oxide vacancies in fluorite and perovskite structured oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos; Norby, Poul; Hendriksen, Peter Vang

    2015-01-01

    An analysis of the effective radii of vacancies and the stoichiometric expansion coefficient is performed on metal oxides with fluorite and perovskite structures. Using the hard sphere model with Shannon ion radii we find that the effective radius of the oxide vacancy in fluorites increases...... with increasing ion radius of the host cation and that it is significantly smaller than the radius of the oxide ion in all cases, from 37% smaller for HfO2 to 13 % smaller for ThO2. The perovskite structured LaGaO3 doped with Sr or Mg or both is analyzed in some detail. The results show that the effective radius...... of an oxide vacancy in doped LaGaO3 is only about 6 % smaller than the oxide ion. In spite of this the stoichiometric expansion coefficient (a kind of chemical expansion coefficient) of the similar perovskite, LaCrO3, is significantly smaller than the stoichiometric expansion coefficient of the fluorite...

  2. Investigation of lanthanide ions and other paramagnetic impurities in natural fluorite by electron paramagnetic resonance: examples of application to mining exploration and geochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatagnon, B.

    1981-01-01

    This research thesis reports the application to geology, and more particularly to geochemistry and mining exploration, of a physical method: the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). After a report of a bibliographical investigation on mineralogy and geochemistry of fluorite and lanthanides, as well as on paramagnetic centres observed by physicists in synthetic fluorite, the author reports an experimental work, and describes two examples of application of EPR: firstly, the exploration of radioactive ores, and secondly, with the joint use of neutron activation analysis, the characterization of the redox status of the hydrothermal solution which is at the origin of fluorinated mineralisation

  3. High-pressure U3O8 with the fluorite-type structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, F.X.; Lang, M.; Wang, J.W.; Li, W.X.; Sun, K.; Prakapenka, V.; Ewing, R.C.

    2014-01-01

    A new high-pressure phase of U 3 O 8 , which has a fluorite-type structure, forms at pressures greater than ∼8.1 GPa that was confirmed by in situ x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. The fluorite-type U 3 O 8 is stable at pressures at least up to ∼40 GPa and temperatures to 1700 K, and quenchable to ambient conditions. Based on the XRD analysis, there is a huge volume collapse (>20%) for U 3 O 8 during the phase transition and the quenched high-pressure phase is 28% denser than the initial orthorhombic phase at ambient conditions. The high-pressure phase has a very low compressibility comparing with the starting orthorhombic phase. - Graphical abstract: α-U 3 O 8 is in a layered structure with orthorhombic symmetry, at high pressures, it transformed to a fluorite-type cubic structure. There are a lot of defects in the cubic structure, and it is a new kind of hyperstoichiometric uranium oxide, which is stable at ambient conditions. - Highlights: • A new fluorite-type high-pressure phase was found in hyperstoichometric UO 2 +x (x∼0.8). • The new high-pressure structure is quenchable to ambient conditions. • Pressure driven phase transition in orthorhombic U 3 O 8 was first found

  4. Crystal structure of fluorite-related Ln3SbO7 (Ln=La–Dy) ceramics studied by synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Raman scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siqueira, K.P.F.; Borges, R.M.; Granado, E.; Malard, L.M.; Paula, A.M. de; Moreira, R.L.; Bittar, E.M.; Dias, A.

    2013-01-01

    Ln 3 SbO 7 (Ln=La, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb and Dy) ceramics were synthesized by solid-state reaction in optimized conditions of temperature and time to yield single-phase ceramics. The crystal structures of the obtained ceramics were investigated by synchrotron X-ray diffraction, second harmonic generation (SHG) and Raman scattering. All samples exhibited fluorite-type orthorhombic structures with different oxygen arrangements as a function of the ionic radius of the lanthanide metal. For ceramics with the largest ionic radii (La–Nd), the ceramics crystallized into the Cmcm space group, while the ceramics with intermediate and smallest ionic radii (Sm–Dy) exhibited a different crystal structure belonging to the same space group, described under the Ccmm setting. The results from SHG and Raman scattering confirmed these settings and ruled out any possibility for the non-centrosymmetric C222 1 space group describing the structure of the small ionic radii ceramics, solving a recent controversy in the literature. Besides, the Raman modes for all samples are reported for the first time, showing characteristic features for each group of samples. - Graphical abstract: Raman spectrum for La 3 SbO 7 ceramics showing their 22 phonon modes adjusted through Lorentzian lines. According to synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Raman scattering, this material belongs to the space group Cmcm. - Highlights: • Ln 3 SbO 7 ceramics belonging to the space groups Cmcm and Ccmm are synthesized. • SXRD, SHG and Raman scattering confirmed the orthorhombic structures. • Ccmm instead of C222 1 is the correct one based on SHG and Raman data

  5. Magnetic properties and structural transitions of fluorite-related rare earth osmates Ln{sub 3}OsO{sub 7} (Ln=Pr, Tb)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinatsu, Yukio, E-mail: hinatsu@sci.hokudai.ac.jp [Division of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Doi, Yoshihiro [Division of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan)

    2013-02-15

    Ternary rare-earth osmates Ln{sub 3}OsO{sub 7} (Ln=Pr, Tb) have been prepared. They crystallize in an ortho-rhombic superstructure of cubic fluorite with space group Cmcm. Both of these compounds undergo a structural phase transition at 130 K (Ln=Pr) and 580 K (Ln=Tb). These compounds show complex magnetic behavior at low temperatures. Pr{sub 3}OsO{sub 7} exhibits magnetic transitions at 8 and 73 K, and Tb{sub 3}OsO{sub 7} magnetically orders at 8 and 60 K. The Os moments become one-dimensionally ordered, and when the temperature is furthermore decreased, it provokes the ordering in the Ln{sup 3+} sublattice that simultaneously becomes three-dimensionally ordered with the Os sublattice. - Graphical abstract: Ternary rare-earth osmates Ln{sub 3}OsO{sub 7} (Ln=Pr, Tb) have been prepared. They crystallize in an orthorhombic superstructure of cubic fluorite with space group Cmcm. Both of these compounds undergo a structural phase transition at 130 K (Ln=Pr) and 580 K (Ln=Tb). These compounds show complex magnetic behavior at low temperatures. Pr{sub 3}OsO{sub 7} exhibits magnetic transitions at 8 and 73 K, and Tb{sub 3}OsO{sub 7} magnetically orders at 8 and 60 K. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ternary rare-earth osmates Ln{sub 3}OsO{sub 7} (Ln=Pr, Tb) with an ordered defect-fluorite structure have been prepared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both of these compounds undergo a structural phase transition at 130 K (Ln=Pr) and 580 K (Ln=Tb). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These compounds show complex magnetic behavior at low temperatures due to magnetic ordering of Ln and Os.

  6. [Assessment of Soil Fluorine Pollution in Jinhua Fluorite Ore Areas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Qun-feng; Zhou, Xiao-ling

    2015-07-01

    The contents of. soil total fluorine (TF) and water-soluble fluorine (WF) were measured in fluorite ore areas located in Jinhua City. The single factor index, geoaccumulation index and health risk assessment were used to evaluate fluorine pollution in soil in four fluorite ore areas and one non-ore area, respectively. The results showed that the TF contents in soils were 28. 36-56 052. 39 mg.kg-1 with an arithmetic mean value of 8 325.90 mg.kg-1, a geometric mean of 1 555. 94 mg.kg-1, and a median of 812. 98 mg.kg-1. The variation coefficient of TF was 172. 07% . The soil WF contents ranged from 0. 83 to 74. 63 mg.kg-1 with an arithmetic mean value of 16. 94 mg.kg-1, a geometric mean of 10. 59 mg.kg-1, and a median of 10. 17 mg.kg-1. The variation coefficient of WF was 100. 10%. The soil TF and WF contents were far higher than the national average level of the local fluorine epidemic occurrence area. The fluoride pollution in soil was significantly affected by human factors. Soil fluorine pollution in Yangjia, Lengshuikeng and Huajie fluorite ore areas was the most serious, followed by Daren fluorite ore area, and in non-ore area there was almost no fluorine pollution. Oral ingestion of soils was the main exposure route. Sensitivity analysis of model parameters showed that children's weight exerted the largest influence over hazard quotient. Furthermore, a significant positive correlation was found among the three kinds of evaluation methods.

  7. Surface modelling on heavy atom crystalline compounds: HfO{sub 2} and UO{sub 2} fluorite structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evarestov, Robert [Department of Quantum Chemistry, St. Petersburg State University, 26 Universitetsky Prospect, Peterhof, St. Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation)], E-mail: re1973@re1973.spb.edu; Bandura, Andrei; Blokhin, Eugeny [Department of Quantum Chemistry, St. Petersburg State University, 26 Universitetsky Prospect, Peterhof, St. Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation)

    2009-01-15

    The study of the bulk and surface properties of cubic (fluorite structure) HfO{sub 2} and UO{sub 2} was performed using the hybrid Hartree-Fock density functional theory linear combination of atomic orbitals simulations via the CRYSTAL06 computer code. The Stuttgart small-core pseudopotentials and corresponding basis sets were used for the core-valence interactions. The influence of relativistic effects on the structure and properties of the systems was studied. It was found that surface properties of Mott-Hubbard dielectric UO{sub 2} differ from those found for other metal oxides with the closed-shell configuration of d-electrons.

  8. Synthetic murataite-3C, a complex form for long-term immobilization of nuclear waste. Crystal structure and its comparison with natural analogues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pakhomova, Anna S.; Krivovichev, Sergey V. [St. Petersburg State Univ. (Russian Federation). Dept. of Crystallography; Yudintsev, Sergey V. [Institute of Geology of Ore Deposits, Petrography, Mineralogy and Geochemistry, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Stefanovsky, Sergey V. [MosNPO Radon, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-03-01

    The structure of synthetic murataite-3C intended for long-term immobilization of high-level radioactive waste has been solved using crystals prepared by melting in an electric furnace at 1500 C. The material is cubic, F- anti 43m, a = 14.676(15) A, V = 3161.31(57) A{sup 3}. The structure is based upon a three-dimensional framework consisting of {alpha}-Keggin [Al{sup [4]}Ti{sub 12}{sup [6]}O{sub 40}] clusters linked by sharing the O5 atoms. The Keggin-cluster-framework interpenetrates with the metal-oxide substructure that can be considered as a derivative of the fluorite structure. The crystal chemical formula of synthetic murataite-3C derived from the obtained structure model can be written as {sup [8]}Ca{sub 6}{sup [8]}Ca{sub 4}{sup [6]}Ti{sub 12}{sup [5]}Ti{sub 4}{sup [4]}AlO{sub 42}. Its comparison with the natural murataite shows that the synthetic material has a noticeably less number of vacancies in the cation substructure and contains five instead of four symmetrically independent cation positions. The presence of the additional site essentially increases the capacity of synthetic murataite with respect to large heavy cations such as actinides, rare earth and alkaline earth metals in comparison with the material of natural origin. (orig.)

  9. Stability of fluorite-type La{sub 2}Ce{sub 2}O{sub 7} under extreme conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, F.X., E-mail: zhangfx@umich.edu [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science & Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao, Hebei 066004 (China); Tracy, C.L. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Lang, M. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37966 (United States); Ewing, R.C. [Department of Geological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2016-07-25

    The structural stability of fluorite-type La{sub 2}Ce{sub 2}O{sub 7} was studied at pressure up to ∼40 GPa and under hydrothermal conditions of ∼1 GPa and up to 350 °C, respectively, using synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman scattering measurements. XRD measurements indicated that the fluorite-type La{sub 2}Ce{sub 2}O{sub 7} is not stable at pressures greater than 22.6 GPa and gradually transformed to a high-pressure phase. The high-pressure phase is not stable and changed back to the fluorite-type structure when pressure is released. The La{sub 2}Ce{sub 2}O{sub 7} fluorite is also not stable under hydrothermal conditions and began to react with water at 200–250 °C. Both Raman and XRD results suggest that lanthanum hydroxide La(OH){sub 3} and La{sup 3+}-doped CeO{sub 2} fluorite are the dominant products after hydrothermal treatment. - Graphical abstract: The fluorite-type La{sub 2}Ce{sub 2}O{sub 7} reacted with water at hydrothermal condition (1 GPa, and above 200 °C), and formed rare earth hydroxides. - Highlights: • La{sub 2}Ce{sub 2}O{sub 7} transforms to a metastable phase at pressure higher than 21 GPa. • La{sub 2}Ce{sub 2}O{sub 7} reacts with water at ∼1 GPa and above 200 °C. • The pressure-induced phase transition is reversible.

  10. Diagenetic and post-diagenetic fabrics in the Kamarposht fluorite mine (east of Mazandaran province: Explainaton and genetic interpretation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faezeh Nabiloo

    2017-11-01

    barite as massive and vein, abundant galena and near contact between mineralization zones in carbonate host rocks (Elika Fm. and pyrite-bearing coalified shales (base of Shemshak Fm.? as faulted and/or interbedded are all distinctive geological features for the Kamarposht mine. Fluorite mainly occurs as interrupted, dense and voluminous massive bodies with/without galena which have occupied cavities and open spaces between brecciated fragments of dolomitic limestone relative to the form of disseminate grains, veinlets and geode. Massive and voluminous accumulations of barite in dissolution and karstic cavities and also as discordant veins relative to the bedding of the host rock which have been generated radial, breccias and zebra structures in barite ores. Galena occurs as veinlets and breccias with medium to coarse grain size with/without fluorite in dolomitic and silicified host rocks and also as vein-veinlets into and/or rime of massive barites. Discussion Based on field evidences and mode occurrence of ore minerals and ore textures, mineralization in the Kamaposht mine has occurred as syn-diagenetic (primary and post-diagenetic/epigenetic (main fabrics. Ores with disseminate particles of ore minerals, stylolite, geode and tiny veinlets fabrics have been interpreted as primary textures that co-exist with diagenesis of host rocks. These fabrics have been formed under diagenetic processes such as nucleation, re-crystalization and disolution of host rocks by diagenetic phreatic reactions that have caused increasing temperature-pressure due to increasing depth of burial diagenesis (Force et al., 1991; Fontbote and Gorzawski 1990; Rastad and Shariatmadar, 2001; Haeri-Ardakani et al., 2013. The main textures of mineralization in the Kamarposht mine namely open-space filling fabrics including veins and breccias fabrics with replacement, network and zebra textures which are associated with dolomitized and silicified host rock have been caused by late and/or post

  11. Configurational Model for Conductivity of Stabilized Fluorite Structure Oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Finn Willy

    1981-01-01

    The formalism developed here furnishes means by which ionic configurations, solid solution limits, and conductivity mechanisms in doped fluorite structures can be described. The present model differs markedly from previous models but reproduces qualitatively reality. The analysis reported...

  12. The structural basis of the fluorite-related rare earth higher oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Z.C.; Eyring, LeRoy

    1996-01-01

    In this paper phenomenological structural principles, and rules for their application are advanced for predicting the ideal structures of the higher oxides of the rare earths. These principles allow to establish a generic formula incorporating all known phases, guide the correct modelling of the established structures and demonstrate that structures previously proposed but proven incorrect do not follow the structural principles. They also can be used to predict the structures not yet established for known phases, including polymorphs, and provide rationalization for phases fitting the generic formula that have not yet been found. The structural principles flow naturally from the fluorite substructure characteristic of all established phases. 39 refs., 5 tabs., 16 figs

  13. Direct reading spectrochemical determination of aluminium, iron and silicon in fluorite; Determinacion espectroquimica de lectura directa de aluminio, hierro y silicio en fluorita

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roca, M

    1966-07-01

    A quantitative spectrochemical method for the determination of Al, Fe and Si in fluorite has been worked out. The sample was supported in a graphite electrode with crater of 5 mm. in diameter, 2,5 mm deep, and burned by a d.c. are in a direct reading spectrometer. The excitation of samples has been studied without dilution as well as using graphite powder as diluent in the ratios 1:1, 1:4, and 1:9; the latter factor was chosen. Ag, Ca, Co, Cr, Mo and Sn were tested as internal standards. It has not been found any significant inter element effect. It is necessary to use natural fluorite as base material for the standards. (Author) 5 refs.

  14. High-pressure phase transformations of fluorite-type dioxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin-Gun Liu

    1980-01-01

    Phase transformations in six fluorite-type dioxides ('TbO 2 ', PbO 2 , 'PrO 2 ', CeO 2 , UO 2 and ThO 2 in the order of increasing cation size, where the quotation marks indicate non-stoichiometric materials) have been investigated in the diamond-anvil press coupled with laser heating. Together with earlier work, the results show that the post-fluorite phase transformations of these dioxides fall into two groups. The smaller cation group (HfO 2 , ZrO 2 and 'TbO 2 ') transforms to a cotunnite or a distorted cotunnite-type structure at pressures in the vicinity of 100 kbar and at about 1000 0 C. The larger cation group (from PbO 2 to ThO 2 ) is believed to transform to a different type of orthorhombic modification at high pressures. It is plausible that this high-pressure phase may possess a Ni 2 Si-related structure, as was observed in ThO 2 and 'PrO 2 ' at pressures greater than 150 and 200 kbar, respectively. (orig./ME)

  15. Natural photonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigneron, Jean Pol, E-mail: jean-pol.vigneron@fundp.ac.be [Research Center in Physics of Matter and Radiation (PMR), University of Namur (FUNDP), rue de Bruxelles, 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium); Simonis, Priscilla [Research Center in Physics of Matter and Radiation (PMR), University of Namur (FUNDP), rue de Bruxelles, 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium)

    2012-10-15

    Photonic structures appeared in nature several hundred millions years ago. In the living world, color is used for communication and this important function strongly impacts the individual chances of survival as well as the chances to reproduce. This has a statistical influence on species populations. Therefore, because they are involved in evolution, natural color-generating structures are - from some point of view - highly optimized. In this short review, a survey is presented of the development of natural photonic crystal-type structures occurring in insects, spiders, birds, fishes and other marine animals, in plants and more, from the standpoint of light-waves propagation. One-, two-, and three-dimensional structures will be reviewed with selected examples.

  16. Natural photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vigneron, Jean Pol; Simonis, Priscilla

    2012-01-01

    Photonic structures appeared in nature several hundred millions years ago. In the living world, color is used for communication and this important function strongly impacts the individual chances of survival as well as the chances to reproduce. This has a statistical influence on species populations. Therefore, because they are involved in evolution, natural color-generating structures are - from some point of view - highly optimized. In this short review, a survey is presented of the development of natural photonic crystal-type structures occurring in insects, spiders, birds, fishes and other marine animals, in plants and more, from the standpoint of light-waves propagation. One-, two-, and three-dimensional structures will be reviewed with selected examples.

  17. Interacting Frenkel defects at high concentration and the superionic transition in fluorite crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    March, N.H.; Tosi, M.P.

    1980-11-01

    A spherical cell model is proposed to account for the explicit concentration dependence of Frenkel defects in an ionic system. In the model, the linearized Debye-Hueckel equation is soluble exactly, subject to the boundary condition that the electric field is zero at the cell boundary R, related to the concentration α of defects by R proportional to csup(-1/3). This screened field is used to calculate the chemical potential, which in turn leads to a condition for the instability of the interacting defect assembly. This condition allows one to calculate the enhancement of the concentration of defects above its Arrhenius value at the point of instability in terms of (a) the critical concentration csub(c), (b) a/R, where a is the radius of defect and (c) the Debye-Hueckel screening length kappasub(c). It is clear from the cell model that this enhancement factor is reduced somewhat in the relevant range of parameters in some of the fluorites from its value in extended Debye-Hueckel theory. It is anticipated that the instability discussed here should afford an upper bound to csub(c) at the superionic transition, within the range of validity of the model. The excess he at capacity csub(p) is also discussed briefly. (author)

  18. A kinetic study of the replacement of calcite marble by fluorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trindade Pedrosa, Elisabete; Boeck, Lena; Putnis, Christine V.; Putnis, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Replacement reactions are relevant in any situation that involves the reequilibration between a solid and an aqueous fluid phase and are commonly controlled by an interface-coupled dissolution-precipitation mechanism (Putnis and Putnis, 2007). These reactions control many large-scale Earth processes whenever aqueous fluids are available, such as during metamorphism, metasomatism, and weathering. An important consequence of coupled dissolution-precipitation is the generation of porosity in the product phase that then allows the infiltration of the fluid within the mineral being replaced. Understanding the mechanism and kinetics of the replacement of carbonates by fluorite has application in earth sciences and engineering. Fluorite (CaF2) occurs in all kinds of rocks (igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic) and its origin is commonly associated with hydrothermal fluids. Moreover, calcium carbonate has been suggested as a successful seed material for the sequestration of fluoride from contaminated waters (Waghmare and Arfin, 2015). The aim of the present work is to investigate aspects of the replacement of calcium carbonate by fluorite to better understand the mechanism and kinetics of this reaction. Small cubes (˜ 3 × 3 × 3 mm) of Carrara marble (CaCO3 > 99 %) were cut and reacted with a 4 M ammonium fluoride (NH4F) solution for different times (1 to 48 hours) and temperatures (60, 80, 100, and 140 ° C). The microstructure of the product phases was analysed using SEM. The kinetics of replacement was monitored from the Rietveld analysis of X-ray powder diffraction patterns of the products as a function of temperature and reaction time. After reaction, all samples preserved their size and external morphology (a pseudomorphic replacement) and the product phase (fluorite) was highly porous. The activation energy Ea (kJ/mol) of the replacement reaction was empirically determined by both model-fitting and model-free methods. The isoconversional method yielded an

  19. Magnetic properties and structural transitions of fluorite-related rare earth osmates Ln3OsO7 (Ln=Pr, Tb)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinatsu, Yukio; Doi, Yoshihiro

    2013-02-01

    Ternary rare-earth osmates Ln3OsO7 (Ln=Pr, Tb) have been prepared. They crystallize in an ortho-rhombic superstructure of cubic fluorite with space group Cmcm. Both of these compounds undergo a structural phase transition at 130 K (Ln=Pr) and 580 K (Ln=Tb). These compounds show complex magnetic behavior at low temperatures. Pr3OsO7 exhibits magnetic transitions at 8 and 73 K, and Tb3OsO7 magnetically orders at 8 and 60 K. The Os moments become one-dimensionally ordered, and when the temperature is furthermore decreased, it provokes the ordering in the Ln3+ sublattice that simultaneously becomes three-dimensionally ordered with the Os sublattice.

  20. The Improvement Effect of Dispersant in Fluorite Flotation: Determination by the Analysis of XRD and FESEM-EDX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. J. Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Different dispersants were added in the dispersion process to improve the efficiency of fluorite flotation. The types and dosage of dispersant on the improvement of fluorite flotation were investigated; when the sodium polyacrylate (SPA was used as the dispersant and its addition is 0.5%, the concentrate grade of CaF2 increased from 90% to 98% and the fluorite recovery increased from 81% to 85%. Methods of X-ray powder diffraction (XRD, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM, and Energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDX were used to characterize the sample. According to the analysis of results, the optimal sample consisted of CaF2 and very little CaCO3 in the size range of 0–5 μm. It could be concluded that the mechanism of improvement for the concentrate grade and recovery of CaF2 was attributed to the change of potential energy barrier which caused the separation of particles with different charge. All results indicate that SPA has a great potential to be an efficient and cost-effective dispersant for the improvement of fluorite flotation.

  1. Hydrothermal uranium deposits containing molybdenum and fluorite in the Marysvale volcanic field, west-central Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, C.G.; Rasmussen, J.D.; Steven, T.A.; Rye, R.O.; Rowley, P.D.; Romberger, S.B.; Selverstone, J.

    1998-01-01

    Uranium deposits containing molybdenum and fluorite occur in the Central Mining Area, near Marysvale, Utah, and formed in an epithermal vein system that is part of a volcanic/hypabyssal complex. They represent a known, but uncommon, type of deposit; relative to other commonly described volcanic-related uranium deposits, they are young, well-exposed and well-documented. Hydrothermal uranium-bearing quartz and fluorite veins are exposed over a 300 m vertical range in the mines. Molybdenum, as jordisite (amorphous MoS2, together with fluorite and pyrite, increase with depth, and uranium decreases with depth. The veins cut 23-Ma quartz monzonite, 20-Ma granite, and 19-Ma rhyolite ash-flow tuff. The veins formed at 19-18 Ma in a 1 km2 area, above a cupola of a composite, recurrent, magma chamber at least 24 ?? 5 km across that fed a sequence of 21- to 14-Ma hypabyssal granitic stocks, rhyolite lava flows, ash-flow tuffs, and volcanic domes. Formation of the Central Mining Area began when the intrusion of a rhyolite stock, and related molybdenite-bearing, uranium-rich, glassy rhyolite dikes, lifted the fractured roof above the stock. A breccia pipe formed and relieved magmatic pressures, and as blocks of the fractured roof began to settle back in place, flat-lying, concave-downward, 'pull-apart' fractures were formed. Uranium-bearing, quartz and fluorite veins were deposited by a shallow hydrothermal system in the disarticulated carapace. The veins, which filled open spaces along the high-angle fault zones and flat-lying fractures, were deposited within 115 m of the ground surface above the concealed rhyolite stock. Hydrothermal fluids with temperatures near 200??C, ??18OH2O ~ -1.5, ?? -1.5, ??DH2O ~ -130, log fO2 about -47 to -50, and pH about 6 to 7, permeated the fractured rocks; these fluids were rich in fluorine, molybdenum, potassium, and hydrogen sulfide, and contained uranium as fluoride complexes. The hydrothermal fluids reacted with the wallrock resulting in

  2. The orthorhombic fluorite related compounds Ln/sub 3/RuO/sub 7/, Ln=Nd, Sm and Eu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Berkel, F.P.F.; Ijdo, D.J.W.

    1986-01-01

    Fluorite-related Ru(V) compound with composition Ln/sub 3/RuO/sub 7/ have been found. These compounds with space group Cmcm adopt a superstructure of the cubic fluorite structure with a/sub orth/=2a/sub c/, b/sub orth/=c/sub orth/=a/sub c/√2. These compounds have the same structure as La/sub 3/NbO/sub 7/

  3. Spectroscopic and computer modelling studies of mixed-cation superionic fluorites

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Netshisaulu, TT

    2005-10-19

    Full Text Available into the local environments of the Cd and Pb cations (as a function of composition and temperature) in CdF2 (xPbF(2)) mixed-cation superionic fluorites. A high degree of disorder is shown around both cations. However, the extent of disorder is even larger around...

  4. Activated crystals of fluorite type as photochromic mediums for recording of volumetric holograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arkhangel'skaya, V.A.; Ashcheulov, Yu.V.; Perfilov, V.N.; Rejterov, V.M.; Sukhanov, V.I.; Feofilov, P.P.

    1975-01-01

    The paper is a study of the mechanism of photochromism and of the photochromic and holographic properties of fluorides of alkaline earth metals with one and two rare-earth activators. It is shown that the angular selectivity of ''thick'' (d approximately 2-5 mm) crystals is 2-3 angular minutes and that the optimum energy exposures, corresponding to the maximum diffraction efficiency values, are 0.1-1.0 J/cm 2 for singly-activated crystals and 1.0-10 J/cm 2 for crystals with two activators. The diffraction efficiencies of holograms of both types of crystals is in the range of approximately 0.1-0.2%. The experimental data are compared with calculations made for photochromic crystals with pigmentation centres. It is suggested that the materials studied can serve as a basis for measuring volumetric holograms. (author)

  5. Factors controlling the oxide ion conductivity of fluorite and perovskite structured oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg; Lybye, D.; Bonanos, N.

    2004-01-01

    Many metal oxides of fluorite and perovskite related structures are oxide ion conductors, which have practical applications in devices such as oxygen sensors, solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) and electrolysers. Several structural and thermodynamic parameters such as (1) critical radius of the pathway...... such parameters for fluorite and perovskite oxides by considering their sensitivities to the individual ionic radii. Based on experimental data available in the literature, it is argued that lattice distortion (lattice stress and deviation from cubic symmetry) due to ion radii mismatch determines the ionic...... conductivity to a very large extent, and that lattice distortion is of much greater importance than many other proposed parameters. In case of the perovskites, the charge of the B-site ion is also of major importance. (C) 2004 Published by Elsevier B.V....

  6. Measurements of CaF2 concentration in fluorite ore using thermoluminescence techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lembo, L.; Maestri, G.; Pimpinella, M.; Benzi, V.; Muntoni, C.

    1990-01-01

    Fluorite powder is produced by means of a flotation process on crude ore extracted by the mines. A full automation of the flotation plant would reduce the operating cost and improve the quality and recovery of fluorite production. However, taking into account that the efficiency of a flotation cycle is directly dependent on the CaF 2 content in the concentrate and tail products, this automation requires a quasi-real-time quantitative analysis of CaF 2 concentration in the floated pulp. The feasibility was studied of using a thermoluminescence technique as an on-line analysis method to measure the CaF 2 concentration during the flotation cycle. A first set of experimental conditions to determine CaF 2 content in acid-grade fluorspar has been already developed and the preliminary results so far obtained are presented. (author)

  7. Improvement of graphite crystal analyzer for light elements on X-ray fluorescence holography measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happo, Naohisa; Hada, Takuma; Kubota, Atsushi; Ebisu, Yoshihiro; Hosokawa, Shinya; Kimura, Koji; Tajiri, Hiroo; Matsushita, Tomohiro; Hayashi, Kouichi

    2018-05-01

    Using a graphite crystal analyzer, focused monochromatic fluorescent X-rays can be obtained on an X-ray fluorescence holography (XFH) measurement. To measure the holograms of elements lighter than Ti, we improved a cylindrical-type crystal analyzer and constructed a small C-shaped analyzer. Using the constructed C-shaped analyzer, a Ca Kα hologram of a fluorite single crystal was obtained, from which we reconstructed a clear atomic image. The XFH measurements for the K, Ca, and Sc elements become possible using the presently constructed analyzer.

  8. Thermally stimulated depolarization currents in the natural fluorite; Correntes de despolarizacao termicamente estimuladas na fluorita natural

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valerio, Mario Ernesto Giroldo

    1986-12-31

    The present work deals with natural calcium fluoride from Criciuma, Santa Catarina. Thermally Stimulated Depolarization Currents (TSDC) can be used to determine the properties of dipole defects present in this crystal. The TSDC spectrum of this material shows three bands in the temperature range of 80 to 450 K. The first one, at 130 K, is due the dipoles formed by a trivalent impurity and an interstitial fluorine ion in the next nearest position of an impurity ion (nn R{sub s}{sup 3+} -F{sub i}{sup -}). The second one, at 102 k, is due to the presence of small aggregates of dipoles (like a dimer). The last band, at 360 k is due to the formation of Large Clusters. The continuous distribution model gave the best fit for these bands with mean activation energies of 0.41 eV, 0.595 eV and 1.02 eV for the first, second and third band respectively. Thermal treatments can modify the number of dipoles, dimers and clusters present in the crystal. The variation in the areas under each band can be used to measure this effect. In this work we used thermal treatments between 15 minutes and 10 hours and temperatures between 200 deg C and 500 deg C. For thermal treatments at 300 deg C, the dipoles and dimers are created and the clusters are destroyed as the time of thermal treatment increases. At 400 deg C the clusters are created and the dipoles and dimers and 350 deg C for the clusters. (author) 60 refs., 41 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Thermally stimulated depolarization currents in the natural fluorite; Correntes de despolarizacao termicamente estimuladas na fluorita natural

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valerio, Mario Ernesto Giroldo

    1987-12-31

    The present work deals with natural calcium fluoride from Criciuma, Santa Catarina. Thermally Stimulated Depolarization Currents (TSDC) can be used to determine the properties of dipole defects present in this crystal. The TSDC spectrum of this material shows three bands in the temperature range of 80 to 450 K. The first one, at 130 K, is due the dipoles formed by a trivalent impurity and an interstitial fluorine ion in the next nearest position of an impurity ion (nn R{sub s}{sup 3+} -F{sub i}{sup -}). The second one, at 102 k, is due to the presence of small aggregates of dipoles (like a dimer). The last band, at 360 k is due to the formation of Large Clusters. The continuous distribution model gave the best fit for these bands with mean activation energies of 0.41 eV, 0.595 eV and 1.02 eV for the first, second and third band respectively. Thermal treatments can modify the number of dipoles, dimers and clusters present in the crystal. The variation in the areas under each band can be used to measure this effect. In this work we used thermal treatments between 15 minutes and 10 hours and temperatures between 200 deg C and 500 deg C. For thermal treatments at 300 deg C, the dipoles and dimers are created and the clusters are destroyed as the time of thermal treatment increases. At 400 deg C the clusters are created and the dipoles and dimers and 350 deg C for the clusters. (author) 60 refs., 41 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Importance of surface structure on dissolution of fluorite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godinho, Jose; Piazolo, Sandra; Balic Zunic, Tonci

    2014-01-01

    forming the initial surface and its inclination to the closest stable planes, which are specific for each surface orientation. During an initial dissolution regime dissolution rates decrease significantly, even though the total surface area increases. During a second dissolution regime, some surfaces...... by the relative stability of the planes and type of edges that constitute a surface needs to be considered. Significant differences between dissolution rates calculated based on surface area alone, and based on surface reactivity are expected for materials with the fluorite structure....

  11. Selective Separation of Fluorite, Barite and Calcite with Valonea Extract and Sodium Fluosilicate as Depressants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zijie Ren

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Fluorite, barite and calcite are important industry minerals. However, they often co-exist, presenting difficulty in selectively separating them due to their similar surface properties. In this study, valonea extract and sodium fluosilicate were used as depressants to selectively separate them by flotation, with sodium oleate as the collector. The single mineral flotation results showed that valonea extract displayed the strongest depression on calcite, while sodium fluosilicate displayed the strongest depression on barite. These two depressants allowed selective separation of the three minerals through sequential flotation. The flotation of mixed minerals showed that 94% of the calcite was successfully depressed by the valonea extract, and 95% recovery of the fluorite was achieved in the subsequent flotation with sodium fluosilicate depressing barite. The different depressant–mineral interactions were investigated via electro-kinetic studies and molecular dynamics (MD simulations using the Materials Studio 6.0 program. The valonea extract exhibited the strongest adsorption on the calcite surface, and sodium fluosilicate exhibited the strongest adsorption on the barite surface, which prevented oleate species from reacting with Ca2+ or Ba2+ surface sites. This study provides useful guidance for how to process fluorite, barite and calcite resources.

  12. Study of genesis in Qahr-Abad fluorite deposit using fluid inclusion, southeast of Saqqez, the Kurdistan province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrdad Barati

    2017-07-01

    Department of geology of the Karazmy University. Results Petrography and classification of inclusions: The samples used for the inclusion study were doubly polished sections of fluorite from mineralization stages 1 to 2. A number of inclusion types were identified. These include negative crystals and elongate round, polygonal or irregular shapes with a size range from <1 µm to several tens of µm. Based on their petrographic characteristics at room temperature and phase change characteristics during the heating process, inclusions were grouped into three principal types. Here we just discuss primary and pseudo secondary fluid inclusions, mainly including three fluid inclusions as follows: 1 (vapor + liquid or (L+V and negative crystal fluid inclusions, each of which will provide more believable information for the mineralization hydrothermal fluid. These fluid inclusions in fluorite are, isolated, and irregular or rectangular with 10 μm to 20μm long major axes. They include two phases at room temperature, an aqueous liquid (L and some kind of carbonic vapor phase (V, and have L/ (V +L Fillinge ratio values of 90–95%. Abundant fluid inclusions are present. 2 fluorite that are generally quadrilateral in shape, have 2–20 μm long major axes, and occur as clusters or form trails. These fluid inclusions contain three phases at room temperature depending on the density of the nonaqueous gases in the fluid inclusions and have nonaqueous phase ratios of around 5%. They have major axes 2–15 μm long. They contain two phases and have L/ (V + L volume ratio values around 0.95%. 3 Fluid inclusions in some fluorite are rare. Most of them are isolated and roughly circular. They have 2–10 μm long major axes, and contain four phases as (liquid+ vapor + daughter mineral 1+ daughter mineral 2 or (L+V+S1+S2 and have L/(V + L volume ratios of 90–92% at room temperature. Some twin fluid inclusions were also identified in this type and analyzed during this study

  13. Investigation of thermally induced anion disorder in fluorites using neutron scattering techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hutchings, M T; Clausen, Kurt Nørgaard; Dickens, M H

    1984-01-01

    Some materials with the fluorite structures show a pronounced specific heat anomaly well below their melting temperature. This anomaly is a consequence of lattice disorder and is associated with the onset of fast-ion conduction. This paper presents the results of a series of experiments in which...

  14. Crystal structure and charge density analysis of Li2NH by synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noritake, T.; Nozaki, H.; Aoki, M.; Towata, S.; Kitahara, G.; Nakamori, Y.; Orimo, S.

    2005-01-01

    Complex hydrides, such as lithium amide (LiNH 2 ) and lithium imide (Li 2 NH), have recently been noticed as one of the most promising materials for reversible hydrogen storage. In this paper, we reveal the bonding nature of hydrogen in Li 2 NH crystal by synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction measurement at room temperature. The crystal structure was refined by Rietveld method and the charge density distribution was analyzed by maximum entropy method (MEM). The Li 2 NH crystal is anti-fluorite type structure (space group Fm3-bar m) consisting of Li and NH. Hydrogen atom occupies randomly the 48h (Wyckoff notation) sites around N atom. The refined lattice constant is a=5.0742(2)A. The charge density distribution around NH anion in Li 2 NH is almost spherical. The number of electrons within the sphere around the Li and NH is estimated from the obtained charge density distribution. As the result, the ionic charge is expressed as [Li 0.99+ ] 2 [NH] 1.21- . Therefore, it is confirmed experimentally that Li 2 NH is ionically bonded

  15. Transmission electron microscopic study of pyrochlore to defect-fluorite transition in rare-earth pyrohafnates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karthik, Chinnathambi, E-mail: Karthikchinnathambi@boisestate.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Boise State University, 1910 University drive, Boise, ID 83725 (United States); Center for Advanced Energy Studies, 995 University Blvd, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Anderson, Thomas J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Boise State University, 1910 University drive, Boise, ID 83725 (United States); Gout, Delphine [Oak Ridge National Lab, Neutron Scattering Science Division, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ubic, Rick [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Boise State University, 1910 University drive, Boise, ID 83725 (United States); Center for Advanced Energy Studies, 995 University Blvd, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    A structural transition in rare earth pyrohafnates, Ln{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7} (Ln=Y, La, Pr, Nd, Tb, Dy, Yb and Lu), has been identified. Neutron diffraction showed that the structure transforms from well-ordered pyrochloric to fully fluoritic through the lanthanide series from La to Lu with a corresponding increase in the position parameter x of the 48f (Fd3{sup Macron }m) oxygen site from 0.330 to 0.375. As evidenced by the selected area electron diffraction, La{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7}, Pr{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7} and Nd{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7} exhibited a well-ordered pyrocholoric structure with the presence of intense superlattice spots, which became weak and diffuse (in Dy{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7} and Tb{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7}) before disappearing completely as the series progressed towards the Lu end. High resolution electron microscopic studies showed the breakdown of the pyrochlore ordering in the form of antiphase domains resulting in diffused smoke-like superlattice spots in the case of Dy{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7} and Tb{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7}. - Graphical abstract: Transmission electron microscopic studies showed the ordered pyrochlore to defect fluorite transition in rare-earth pyrohafnates to occur via the formation of anti-phase domains to start with. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pyrochlore to fluorite structural transition in rare earth pyrohafnates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer La{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7}, Pr{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7} and Nd{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7} showed well ordered pyrochlore structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Short range ordering in Dy{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7} and Tb{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Break down of pyrochlore ordering due to antiphase boundaries. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rest of the series showed fluoritic structure.

  16. Geo economical studies of Mina Florencia (Fluorite)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez Rifas, C.; Mari, C.; Theune, C.; Bosse, R.

    1982-01-01

    This report describes the works of Prospecting of Fluorite in Mina Florencia, in Maldonado Province. The project began in January of 1981, with the elaboration of a regional geologic cartography scale 1/20.000 of an area of 90,85 kilometers and cartography detailed scale 1/5.000 of the immediate area to Mina Florencia (6 kilometer that demonstrated the existence other veins of similar characteristic of the mine in exploration. Later on they were carried out geophysical studies (resistividad and electromagnetism, under the direction of the geophysical Fritz R. Haut of the BGR). The main geophysical anomalies inside the mining concession was studied by mechanical well, which results were showed in this report.

  17. The fluorite-pyrochlore transformation of Ho2-yNdyZr2O7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clements, Richard; Hester, James R.; Kennedy, Brendan J.; Ling, Chris D.; Stampfl, Anton P.J.

    2011-01-01

    Twelve members of the Ho 2-y Nd y Zr 2 O 7 series, prepared using conventional solid state methods, have been characterised by neutron powder diffraction. Ho 2 Zr 2 O 7 has a defect fluorite structure whereas Nd 2 Zr 2 O 7 is found to adopt the ordered pyrochlore structure with the composition induced fluorite-pyrochlore transformation occurring near y=1. Rietveld analysis on the neutron data for all the compositions reveals an increase in lattice parameter as a function of y across the entire series, with a small discontinuity associated with the transformation. The neutron profile results suggest that domains of pyrochlore-type initially begin to form before crystallising into a separate phase, and therefore that anion and cation ordering processes are distinct. There is a strong correlation between the extent of disorder in the anion sublattice and the x-parameter of 48f oxygen. These results point the way to a better understanding of the stability observed in pyrochlore structures. - Graphical abstract: Neutron diffraction profiles for Nd 2-y Ho y Zr 2 O 7 type oxides reveal details of the transformation from the ordered pyrochlore structure (y=0) to the disordered fluorite structure (y=2). Highlights: → Structures of twelve members of the Ho 2-y Nd y Zr 2 O 7 series studied using neutron powder diffraction. → Domains of pyrochlore-type materials form at low doping levels. → Higher doping stabilises the pyrochlore. → Anion and cation ordering processes are distinct.

  18. Intricate disorder in defect fluorite/pyrochlore: a concord of chemistry and crystallography

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Simeone, D.; Thorogood, G.J.; Huo, D.; Luneville, L.; Baldinozzi, G.; Petříček, Václav; Porcher, F.; Ribis, J.; Mazerolles, L.; Largeau, L.; Berar, J.F.; Surble, S.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, Jun (2017), 1-7, č. článku 3727. ISSN 2045-2322 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : disorder * atomic scale * metallic allys * oxides * fluorite/pyrochlore Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016

  19. Continental basinal origin of ore fluids from southwestern Massif central fluorite veins (Albigeois, France): evidence from fluid inclusion and stable isotope analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munoz, M.; Boyce, A.J.; Courjault-Rade, P.; Fallick, A.E.; Tollon, F.

    1999-01-01

    The most important fluorspar mining district in France is located in the Palaeozoic basement of the Albigeois in southwestern French Massif Central. The massive fluorite is hosted within large E-W striking fractures, crosscutting Cambro-Ordovician clastics, associated with large zones of hypersilicified tectonic breccia which form the wall of the mined deposits. Fluid inclusion data for pre-fluorite and fluorite stage fluids have salinities between 20-26 wt% NaCl equiv., with homogenisation temperatures between 85-170C. Furthermore, low first ice melting temperatures (around -50C) indicates the presence of significant CaCl 2 and possibly MgCl 2 together with NaCl. Calculated fluid δ 18 O for pre-fluorite quartz ranges from -9.1per thousand to -5.2per thousand, with δD between -55per thousand to -64per thousand, placing the data directly on the present day meteoric water line. Fluorite stage fluids have δ 18 O between +0.1per thousand to +3.2per thousand, and δD ranging from -53per thousand to -75per thousand, indicating an interacted meteoric fluid origin. Combining the fluid inclusion and stable isotope data illustrates that the main fluorite depositing fluid has characteristics typical of a basinal brine. The authors have no evidence that a magmatic system was involved in the deposit genesis. The proposed model highlights that mineralisation was related to major Mesozoic extensional events coinciding with the gradual opening of the Atlantic and Tethys oceans. In order to account for the chemistry of the fluids, and the siting of the deposits, the authors postulate a genetic relationship with local, continental, evaporite-bearing basins coincident with, and controlled by the E-W fractures. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  20. Electron paramagnetic resonance and neutron activation study of lanthanide ions behaviour in fluorite. Application to the geochemical study of Montroc and Burc veins (Tarn)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meary, Alain

    1983-01-01

    In order to obtain a better understanding of fluorite deposits, rare earth impurities have been analyzed for a large number of samples taken from cross-sections of several low temperature hydrothermal veins; two types of measurements have been used: Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) and Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA). This enabled us to measure a 'deficit of spins' relative to the total lanthanide concentration, this deficit reveals that the paramagnetic center observed by EPR is not the only mode of incorporation. For Gd no marked deficit is observed; that is the ratio of spin concentrations to total concentration [Gd 3+ ]/[Gd total ] is close to 1 in all the samples; on the other hand, the ratios [Eu 2+ ]/[Eu total ], [Ce 3- F i - ]/[Ce total ], and [Yb 3+ ]/ [Yb total ] exhibit large variations. The first result suggests that the major part of the lanthanides in the samples is incorporated in the crystal lattice and that clustering of lanthanides ions is not important. Deficit of spins observed for Ce and Nd are probably due to the dissociation of paramagnetic complexes Ce 3+ -F i - and Nd 3+ -F i - ; for Eu, it may be attributed to the oxidized state Eu 3+ . Moreover, the sign and the amplitude of the anomaly exhibited by Eu in the normalized lanthanides spectra may be correlated with the majority valence state of Eu in the crystal: a marked positive anomaly belongs to a deficit of paramagnetic divalent Eu and, inversely, if divalent Eu is the majority valence state, the Eu anomaly appears to be negative. The results obtained for the Montroc vein are consistent with a model involving discontinuous injections of hydrothermal solutions. They may be connected to variations of oxygen fugacity arising from cooling of these solutions and from precipitation of sulfides during fluorite precipitation. (author) [fr

  1. Application of mathematical statistics methods to study fluorite deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chermeninov, V.B.

    1980-01-01

    Considered are the applicability of mathematical-statistical methods for the increase of reliability of sampling and geological tasks (study of regularities of ore formation). Compared is the reliability of core sampling (regarding the selective abrasion of fluorite) and neutron activation logging for fluorine. The core sampling data are characterized by higher dispersion than neutron activation logging results (mean value of variation coefficients are 75% and 56% respectively). However the hypothesis of the equality of average two sampling is confirmed; this fact testifies to the absence of considerable variability of ore bodies

  2. Phase transition of the orthorhombic fluorite-related compounds Ln{sub 3}IrO{sub 7} (Ln = Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinatsu, Yukio, E-mail: hinatsu@sci.hokudai.ac.j [Division of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Doi, Yoshihiro; Nishimine, Hiroaki; Wakeshima, Makoto [Division of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Sato, Mineo [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Niigata University, 8050 Ikarashi 2-nocho, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan)

    2009-12-04

    Rare earth iridium oxides Ln{sub 3}IrO{sub 7} (Ln = Pr, Nd, Sm, and Eu) were prepared and their structures were determined by X-ray diffraction measurements. At room temperature, Pr{sub 3}IrO{sub 7} crystallized in an orthorhombic superstructure of cubic fluorite with space group Cmcm. The differential thermal analysis (DTA) and specific heat measurements for Ln{sub 3}IrO{sub 7} (Ln = Pr, Nd, Sm, and Eu) showed a phase transition at 262, 342, 420, and 485 K, respectively. At low temperatures, Ln{sub 3}IrO{sub 7} crystallized in a monoclinic structure with the space group P2{sub 1}/n. The transition temperatures increased with decreasing the ionic radius of rare earths, which indicates that the transition is stress-induced and occurs with the lattice contraction on cooling. These results for Ln{sub 3}IrO{sub 7} were compared with the phase transitions observed for Ln{sub 3}MoO{sub 7}, Ln{sub 3}RuO{sub 7}, Ln{sub 3}ReO{sub 7}, and Ln{sub 3}OsO{sub 7}.

  3. U-Th/He ages of fluorite mineralizations of the Tangua alkaline intrusion; Idades U-Th/He das mineralizacoes de fluorita da intrusao alcalina de Tangua

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geraldes, M.C.; Vargas, T., E-mail: geraldes@uerj.br, E-mail: vargas@uerj.br [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Geologia; Evans, N., E-mail: Noreen.Evans@csiro.au [CSIRO and Curtin University for Technology, Western Australia (Australia); Nummer, A.R., E-mail: nummer@ufrrj.br [Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro (DEGEOC/IA/UFRRJ), RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The Tangua massif is part of a group of alkaline complexes that occurs in an extensive zone of faults and E-W lineaments and includes the Brazilian Southeastern Rift. This work presents U-He ages of the fluorite mineralization. The Tangua alkaline massif is emplaced in coarse-grained biotite gneiss (Oriental Domain, central portion of the Ribeira belt). Cataclastic gneiss with intense weathering are restricted to the intrusion contacts. The alkaline body is comprised of pulaskites and umptekites, nephelinesyenites, foiaites, and pseudoleucite foiaites and is cut by phonolite dykes, trachytes and alkaline lamprophyres. In the locality of Barbosao, veins of fluorite occur, accompanied by silica and pyrite within trachyte dykes. These veins are parallel to the gneiss foliation (N 50 - 70 E) with an average thickness of 30 cm and the fluorite contains limonite and manganese oxides inclusions. The U-He ages range from <2Ma to 73Ma. The older age is coherent with 80-65 ma range of K-Ar ages reported in the literature. The veins of fluorite crosscut the lithologies associated with shear zones, and are important to economic exploration in the region. The petrographic and U-Th/He sating studies indicate the fluorite formation coeval to alkaline intrusion and meteoric water fluid circulation recently. (author)

  4. Coagulation of fines in fluorite froth flotation; Coagulacion de finos en la flotacion de la fluorita

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarquis, P. E.; Gonzalez, M.; Moyano, A.; Bazan, V.

    2011-07-01

    Fluorite, a valuable mineral in the metallurgical industry, can be found together with silicates, carbonates and oxides in ore deposits. Commercial concentrates with more than 95 % of CaF{sub 2} are obtained processing the mineral in flotation plants and using oleic acid as fluorite collector. Depressor reagents such as sodium silicate, tannin and sodium carbonate are commonly employed to allow the oleic acid selective performance. These reagents cause a dispersant effect separating the solid-liquid solution on tailing plants. Fine particles in the recovered water enter the circuit and affect the flotation efficiency. The effect of coagulant ions was studied as a method to clarify the returned water. The problem of the presence of these ions is related to its reactions with the collector by the formation of compounds and possibly on the selectivity. Variable quantities of Al{sup 3}+, Fe{sup 3}+ and Ca{sup 2}+ ions were added to the flotation to evaluate its effect on the fluorite recovery, in the selectivity and in solids content in recirculation water. Results show that some ions fail to improve water quality and are detrimental to flotation. On the contrary, some ions contribute to reduce fine content in suspension. Therefore, although there is a recovery reduction, such effect can be counteracted increasing the collector consumption a little. (Author) 21 refs.

  5. Chemical ordering in substituted fluorite oxides: a computational investigation of Ho2Zr2O7 and RE2Th2O7 (RE=Ho, Y, Gd, Nd, La)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Jonathan M.; Shamblin, Jacob; Lang, Maik; Navrotsky, Alexandra; Asta, Mark

    2016-12-01

    Fluorite-structured oxides find widespread use for applications spanning nuclear energy and waste containment, energy conversion, and sensing. In such applications the host tetravalent cation is often partially substituted by trivalent cations, with an associated formation of charge-compensating oxygen vacancies. The stability and properties of such materials are known to be influenced strongly by chemical ordering of the cations and vacancies, and the nature of such ordering and associated energetics are thus of considerable interest. Here we employ density-functional theory (DFT) calculations to study the structure and energetics of cation and oxygen-vacancy ordering in Ho2Zr2O7. In a recent neutron total scattering study, solid solutions in this system were reported to feature local chemical ordering based on the fluorite-derivative weberite structure. The calculations show a preferred chemical ordering qualitatively consistent with these findings, and yield values for the ordering energy of 9.5 kJ/mol-cation. Similar DFT calculations are applied to additional RE2Th2O7 fluorite compounds, spanning a range of values for the ratio of the tetravalent and trivalent (RE) cation radii. The results demonstrate that weberite-type order becomes destabilized with increasing values of this size ratio, consistent with an increasing energetic preference for the tetravalent cations to have higher oxygen coordination.

  6. New halides of neodymium and their crystal structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loechner, U.

    1980-01-01

    The crystal structures of the peritectic phases NdClsub(2.27) (t-phase) and NdClsub(2.37) (rh-phase) were determined. The structure of the rh-phase was solved, from the t-phase only the elementary cell could be determined because no single crystals of sufficient quality were obtained. Jutting out feature of the rh-phase which has to be formulated as Nd 14 Cl 32 O is a polyeder cluster of 6 quadratic antiprisms the inner cubo octahedric cavity of which is occupied by an oxygen atom. The linkage of these polyeder cluster ensues only under each other along the triple axis of the rhomboedric system over 3 upper and 3 lower common borders each. Therewith for the first time a superlattice of the fluorite-type was found in which this unit exclusively occurs. The type of linkage of polyeder clusters causes the occurrence of an exceptional polyeder around the twovalent Nd ions which can be looked at as a zwitter polyeder of icosahedron and cube and therefore coordinates tenfold the twovalent neodymium. The strict order of chemically and crystallografically clearly differentiated cations is expressed by a hexagonal-rhomboedric superstructure of the fluorite-aristotyp with a doubled c-axis. The phase diagram of the system Nd-NdBr 3 was determined and a structure proposition was worked out for the first Vernier phase in there with n=4 of the series Lnsub(n)Xsub(2n+1). (SPI)

  7. Selection method and characterization of neutron monochromator natural crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stasiulevicius, R.; Kastner, G.F.

    2000-01-01

    Thermal neutrons are important analytical tools for microscopic material probe. These neutrons can be selected by diffraction technique using monocrystal, usually artificial. A crystal selection process was implemented and the characteristics of natural specimens were studied by activation analysis-k 0 method. The representative 120 samples, of which 21 best types, were irradiated in IPR-R1 and measured with a neutron diffractometer at IEA-R1m Brazilian reactors. These results are useful for database build up and ease the choice of appropriate natural crystal, with some advantage options: highest intensity diffracted, enlarging the energy operational interval and optimal performance in special applications. (author)

  8. Lattice location of gold in natural pyrite crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besten, Jacinta den; Jamieson, David N.; Ryan, Chris G.

    1999-01-01

    The lattice location of gold atoms in naturally occurring Au-doped pyrite crystals has been investigated with a nuclear microprobe using ion channeling. The specimens consisted of 300-μm diameter pyrite crystals in veins embedded in a quartz matrix from the Emperor mine in Fiji. The specimens were prepared by standard geological specimen preparation techniques and the pyrite crystals were analysed in situ in the quartz matrix. Significant trace elements in the crystals, determined by Proton Induced X-ray Emission with a 3 MeV H + microprobe, were Cu, As, Mo, Zn, Te, Au and Pb. The Au concentration was about 0.2 wt%. By the use of 2 MeV He + ion channeling, the Miller indices of the lowest order crystal axes nearest to the normal were determined from backscattering yield maps from two-dimensional angular scanning and comparison of the resulting patterns with published gnomonic projections. Channeling angular yield curves were obtained from Fe, S, As and Au signals. The results indicate that at least 35% of the Au is substituted onto lattice sites

  9. Synthesis and crystal structure of the first Sc-Nb-O-N phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orthmann, Steven; Lerch, Martin [Institut fuer Chemie, Technische Universitaet Berlin (Germany)

    2017-11-17

    Synthesis of phase-pure materials in the system Sc-Nb-O-N is challenging. In this contribution we report on the preparation of the first scandium niobium oxide nitrides via reaction of water-saturated gaseous ammonia or an ammonia-oxygen mixture with amorphous scandium niobium oxides. Two new phases were obtained: rutile-type ScNb{sub 4}O{sub 7}N{sub 3}, which crystallizes in space group P4{sub 2}/mnm, and an anion-deficient fluorite-type Sc{sub 2}Nb(O,N,⬜){sub 6} phase crystallizing in space group Fm anti 3m. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  10. Relationship between uranium-molybdenum, fluorite and gold deposits within provinces of continental volcanicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modnikov, I.S.; Skvortsova, K.V.; Chesnokov, L.V.

    1974-01-01

    The article gives a comparative description of and the age relationships between uranium-molybdenum, gold and fluorite mineralizations in the areas of development of adhesite-diorite and liparite-granite vulcanoplutonic formations, which are most fully and intensively manifest in the intra-anticlinal and median blocks of folded regions in the final stages of geosynclinal development or during the final stages of tectono-magmatic activation. These formations usually fill vulcano-tectonic depression structures - overlaid troughs and inherited delections. The geological and geochemical data are evidence of the close temporal link between the hydrothermal process of ore formation and the type and scale of manifestations of the vulcano-plutonic magmatism that is responsible for the general geochemical features of the ores of deposits of various types. The formation of gold, fluorite and uranium-molybdenum deposits occurred immediately after the completion of effusive and intrusive magmatism during a single metallogenic cycle. The spatial distribution of the ore fields and deposits depends chiefly on the peculiarities of the tectonic make-up of the depression structures, and also on the type and scale of the manifestations of vulcano-plutonic magmatism. (B.Ya.)

  11. Chemical ordering in substituted fluorite oxides: a computational investigation of Ho2Zr2O7 and RE2Th2O7 (RE=Ho, Y, Gd, Nd, La)

    OpenAIRE

    Jonathan M. Solomon; Jacob Shamblin; Maik Lang; Alexandra Navrotsky; Mark Asta

    2016-01-01

    Fluorite-structured oxides find widespread use for applications spanning nuclear energy and waste containment, energy conversion, and sensing. In such applications the host tetravalent cation is often partially substituted by trivalent cations, with an associated formation of charge-compensating oxygen vacancies. The stability and properties of such materials are known to be influenced strongly by chemical ordering of the cations and vacancies, and the nature of such ordering and associated e...

  12. Crystal structures of orthorhombic, hexagonal, and cubic compounds of the Sm(x)Yb(2−x)TiO5 series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aughterson, Robert D.; Lumpkin, Gregory R.; Reyes, Massey de los; Sharma, Neeraj; Ling, Christopher D.; Gault, Baptiste; Smith, Katherine L.; Avdeev, Maxim; Cairney, Julie M.

    2014-01-01

    A series of single phase compounds with nominal stoichiometry Sm (x) Yb (2−x) TiO 5 (x=2, 1.4, 1, 0.6, and 0) have been successfully fabricated to generate a range of crystal structures covering the most common polymorphs previously discovered in the Ln 2 TiO 5 series (Ln=lanthanides and yttrium). Four of the five samples have not been previously fabricated in bulk, single phase form so their crystal structures are refined and detailed using powder synchrotron and single crystal x-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Based on the phase information from diffraction data, there are four crystal structure types in this series; orthorhombic Pnma, hexagonal P6 3 /mmc, cubic (pyrochlore-like) Fd-3m and cubic (fluorite-like) Fm-3m. The cubic materials show modulated structures with variation between long and short range ordering and the variety of diffraction techniques were used to describe these complex crystal structure types. - Graphical abstract: A high resolution image of the compound Sm 0.6 Yb 1.4 TiO 5 showing contrast from lattice fringes and the corresponding fast Fourier transform (FFT) of the HREM image with pyrochlore related diffraction spots marked “P” and fluorite marked “F”. The crystal is oriented down the [1 1 0] zone axis based on the Fd-3m structure. The ideal crystal structure (no vacancies) of the cubic, pyrochlore-like (Sm 0.6 Yb 1.4 TiO 5 ). - Highlights: • First fabrication of bulk single-phase material with stoichiometry Sm 2 TiO 5 . • Systematic study of crystal structure types within Ln 2 TiO 5 series (Ln=lanthanides). • A novel technique using IFFT of HREM images to study cubic structures

  13. Neutron-diffraction study of the crystal structure of the superconductor TiSr2(Eu0.8Ce0.2)2Cu2Oz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishigaki, T.; Ogasawara, Y.; Oikawa, K.; Hoshikawa, A.; Kamiyama, T.

    2004-01-01

    TiSr 2 (RE 1-x Ce x ) 2 Cu 2 O z superconductors (T c ∼20 K) have a 1222-structure with fluorite blocks. Neutron diffraction has been performed on the Eu-containing compound TiSr 2 (Eu 0.8 Ce 0.2 ) 2 Cu 2 O z , with natural Eu, and its crystal structure was refined. The neutron powder diffraction experiment was carried out on the VEGA diffractometer at KENS. The sample was contained in a thin flat cell of 0.5 mm thickness in order to reduce the large absorption effects of natural Eu. The absorption correction for the flat sample was taken into account in the Rietveld refinement. The results show that the O(1) atom in the Ti-layer is shifted from the 4c-site to the split site (8j), and that the concentration is deficient (g∼0.19)

  14. Mineralogical and geochemical characteristics of uranium-rich fluoriteinEl-Missikat mineralized granite,Central Eastern Desert, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Fahmy Raslan

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A unique, highly radioactive variety of fluor it emineral has been recorded in the uranium occurrence of El-Missikat sheared granite pluton. In this occurrence, the uranium assumes different forms, including its presence as discrete, visible, secondary minerals, rare uraninite and its association with the jasperoid and silica veinlets. However,in some other parts of the sheared zone, the uranium was found to be solely incorporated with fluorite crystals,filling veinlet sand fractures with out any other manife station.This paper focuses ont her elevant mineralogical and geochemical characteristics of this unique fluorite variety.In addition to an investigation with binocular and polarizing microscopes, the separated fluorite grains were analyzed usingan environmental scanning electronmicroscope(ESEM and a field-emission scanning electron microscope.In addition to this,some fluorite crystals were subjected to electron microprobe analyses. While the fluorite accounted for as much as 20% of the sheared granite samples studied, it was found to range from 82 to 96 % in the different size fractions of the separated heavy mineral content. In some parts of the separated fluorite crystals,uranium inquantities of up to 2200 ppm was found to be heterogeneously distributed in the fluoritelattice,regardless of its coloration.

  15. Thermodynamic determination of fluorite phases of the ULnO4 type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paula, H.C.B.

    1981-12-01

    A method for the determination of structure and thermodynamical stability of fluorite phases of the ULnO 4 type is presented. Through the use of a solid body galvanic chain with CaO-doped ZrO 2 working as an oxygen ion conductor solid electrolyte, phase transformation temperatures are determined, as well as solubility enthalpies and entropies for ULnO 4 systems (Ln= Sm, Tb, Er, Ho, Tm, YB). X-ray analyses confirmed the electrochemical measurements. The emf measurement system is checked by using binary oxides with known composition and oxygen partial pressure. A comparison between stabilities of analysed compounds is also presented. (Author) [pt

  16. Properties of complex tungstates, niobates, translated with fluorite-like structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vetkina, S.N.; Zolin, V.F.; Sirotinkin, V.P.; Smirnov, S.A.

    1989-01-01

    Spectra of ternary tungstates, niobates and tantalates (MeLa 2 WO 7 , La 3 TO 7 ; Me=Ba, Sr; T=Ta, Nb) related to the layered fluorite group are analyzed. The laser pumping and time resolved luminescence are used for selecting spectra of unequivalent centers. The symmetry of the first center is near to the distorted cubic one. The vibrational spectra of europium in Eu 3 NbO 7 and SrLa 2 WO 7 are due to the chain-like structure of niobates and to the net-like structure of tantalates. The stimulated emission of Nd 3+ in powders of BaLa 2 WO 7 and La 3 NbO 7 is observed at wavelengths of 1.07 and 1.063 μm, respectively

  17. On the nature of the phase transition in uranium dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gofryk, K.; Mast, D.; Antonio, D.; Shrestha, K.; Andersson, D.; Stanek, C.; Jaime, M.

    Uranium dioxide (UO2) is by far the most studied actinide material as it is a primary fuel used in light water nuclear reactors. Its thermal and magnetic properties remain, however, a puzzle resulting from strong couplings between magnetism and lattice vibrations. UO2 crystalizes in the face-centered-cubic fluorite structure and is a Mott-Hubbard insulator with well-localized uranium 5 f-electrons. In addition, below 30 K, a long range antiferromagnetic ordering of the electric-quadrupole of the uranium moments is observed, forming complex non-collinear 3-k magnetic structure. This transition is accompanied by Jahn-Teller distortion of oxygen atoms. It is believed that the first order nature of the transition results from the competition between the exchange interaction and the Jahn-Teller distortion. Here we present results of our extensive thermodynamic investigations on well-characterized and oriented single crystals of UO2+x (x = 0, 0.033, 0.04, and 0.11). By focusing on the transition region under applied magnetic field we are able to study the interplay between different competing interactions (structural, magnetic, and electrical), its dynamics, and relationship to the oxygen content. We will discuss implications of these results. Work supported by the Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences, and Engineering Division.

  18. Gypsum crystals observed in experimental and natural sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geilfus, N.-X.; Galley, R. J.; Cooper, M.; Halden, N.; Hare, A.; Wang, F.; Søgaard, D. H.; Rysgaard, S.

    2013-12-01

    gypsum has been predicted to precipitate in sea ice, it has never been observed. Here we provide the first report on gypsum precipitation in both experimental and natural sea ice. Crystals were identified by X-ray diffraction analysis. Based on their apparent distinguishing characteristics, the gypsum crystals were identified as being authigenic. The FREeZing CHEMistry (FREZCHEM) model results support our observations of both gypsum and ikaite precipitation at typical in situ sea ice temperatures and confirms the "Gitterman pathway" where gypsum is predicted to precipitate. The occurrence of authigenic gypsum in sea ice during its formation represents a new observation of precipitate formation and potential marine deposition in polar seas.

  19. Lattice thermal expansion and solubility limits of neodymium-doped ceria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jinhua; Ke, Changming; Wu, Hongdan; Yu, Jishun; Wang, Jingran

    2016-01-01

    Nd x Ce 1−x O 2−0.5x (x=0–1.0) powders were prepared by reverse coprecipitation-calcination method and characterized by XRD. The crystal structure of product powders transformed from single fluorite structure to the complex of fluorite and C-type cubic structure, and finally to trigonal structure with the increase of x-value. An empirical equation simulating the lattice parameter of neodymium doped ceria was established based on the experimental data. The lattice parameters of the fluorite structure solid solutions increased with extensive adoption of Nd 3+ , and the heating temperature going up. The average thermal expansion coefficients of neodymium doped ceria with fluorite structure are higher than 13.5×10 −6 °C −1 from room temperature to 1200 °C. - Graphical abstract: The crystal structure of Nd x Ce 1−x O 2−0.5x (x=0–1.0) powders transformed from single fluorite structure to the complex of fluorite and C-type cubic structure, and finally to trigonal structure with the increase of x-value.

  20. Effects of quartz on crystallization behavior of mold fluxes and microstructural characteristics of flux film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Liu; Xiuli, Han; Mingduo, Li; Di, Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Mold fluxes are mainly prepared using cement clinker, quartz, wollastonite, borax, fluorite, soda ash and other mineral materials. Quartz, as one of the most common and essential materials, was chosen for this study to analyze itseffects on crystallization temperature, critical cooling rate, crystal incubation time, crystallization ratio and phases of flux film. We used the research methods of process mineralogy with the application of the single hot thermocouple technique, heat flux simulator, polarizing microscope, X-ray diffraction, etc. Results: By increasing the quartz content from 16 mass% to 24 mass%, the crystallization temperature, critical cooling rate and crystallization ratio of flux film decreased, and the crystal incubation time was extended. Meanwhile, the mineralogical structure of the flux film changed, with a large amount of wollastonite precipitation and a significant decrease in the cuspidine content until it reached zero. This showed a steady decline in the heat transfer control capacity of the flux film. The reason for the results above is that, by increasing the quartz content, the silicon-oxygen tetrahedron network structure promoted a rise in viscosity and restrained ion migration, inhibiting crystal nucleation and growth, leading to the weakening of the crystallization and a decline in the crystallization ratio.

  1. Ion channeling in natural and synthetic beryl crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritzsche, C.R.; Diehl, R.; Goetzberger, A.

    1980-01-01

    The transmission of ions by channeling through natural beryl and synthetic emerald has been studied extensively. The transmission ratios depend upon the angle of incidence with a full half width of less than 0.32 0 . While the maximum ratio obtained up to now is only 4 x 10 -4 for 350 keV protons through a crystal of 21 μm thickness, the energy of the transmitted ions is high, the loss being in the order of a few keV/μm. About 60-80% of the particles emerging from the rear surface are ionized. By varying the ion species transmission could be observed up to atomic number 9. It is assumed that the transmission is facilitated by the existence of an electron free channel core. Higher transmission ratios can be expected for sufficiently perfect crystals. (orig.) 891 CDS/orig. 892 MB

  2. A comparative investigation on strain induced crystallization for graphene and carbon nanotubes filled natural rubber composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. H. Fu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Natural rubber containing graphene and carbon nanotubes (CNTs composites were prepared by ultrasonicallyassisted latex mixing. Natural rubber filled by both graphene and CNTs show significant enhanced tensile strength, while graphene exhibits a better reinforcing effect than CNTs. Strain-induced crystallization in natural rubber composites during stretching was determined by synchrotron wide-angle X-ray diffraction. With the addition of CNTs or graphene, the crystallization for natural rubber occurs at a lower strain compared to unfilled natural rubber, and the strain amplification effects were observed. The incorporation of graphene results in a faster strain-induced crystallization rate and a higher crystallinity compared to CNTs. The entanglement-bound rubber tube model was used to analyze the chain network structure and determine the network parameters of composites. The results show that the addition of graphene or CNTs has an influence on the molecular network structure and improves the contribution of entanglement to the conformational constraint, while graphene has a more marked effect than CNTs.

  3. Lattice thermal expansion and solubility limits of neodymium-doped ceria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jinhua, E-mail: jhzhang1212@126.com [The State Key Laboratory of Refractories and Metallurgy, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430081 (China); State Key laboratory of Geological Process and Mineral Resources, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Ke, Changming [The State Key Laboratory of Refractories and Metallurgy, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430081 (China); Wu, Hongdan [College of Resources and Enviromental Engineering, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430081 (China); Yu, Jishun [State Key laboratory of Geological Process and Mineral Resources, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Wang, Jingran [The State Key Laboratory of Refractories and Metallurgy, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430081 (China)

    2016-11-15

    Nd{sub x}Ce{sub 1−x}O{sub 2−0.5x} (x=0–1.0) powders were prepared by reverse coprecipitation-calcination method and characterized by XRD. The crystal structure of product powders transformed from single fluorite structure to the complex of fluorite and C-type cubic structure, and finally to trigonal structure with the increase of x-value. An empirical equation simulating the lattice parameter of neodymium doped ceria was established based on the experimental data. The lattice parameters of the fluorite structure solid solutions increased with extensive adoption of Nd{sup 3+}, and the heating temperature going up. The average thermal expansion coefficients of neodymium doped ceria with fluorite structure are higher than 13.5×10{sup −6} °C{sup −1} from room temperature to 1200 °C. - Graphical abstract: The crystal structure of Nd{sub x}Ce{sub 1−x}O{sub 2−0.5x} (x=0–1.0) powders transformed from single fluorite structure to the complex of fluorite and C-type cubic structure, and finally to trigonal structure with the increase of x-value.

  4. Damage evolution of ion irradiated defected-fluorite La 2 Zr 2 O 7 epitaxial thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaspar, Tiffany C.; Gigax, Jonathan G.; Shao, Lin; Bowden, Mark E.; Varga, Tamas; Shutthanandan, Vaithiyalingam; Spurgeon, Steven R.; Yan, Pengfei; Wang, Chongmin; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Henager, Charles H.

    2017-05-01

    Pyrochlore-structure oxides, A2B2O7, may exhibit remarkable radiation tolerance due to the ease with which they can accommodate disorder by transitioning to a defected fluorite structure. The mechanism of defect formation was explored by evaluating the radiation damage behavior of high quality epitaxial La2Zr2O7 thin films with the defected fluorite structure, irradiated with 1 MeV Zr+ at doses up to 10 displacements per atom (dpa). The level of film damage was evaluated as a function of dose by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry in the channeling geometry (RBS/c) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). At lower doses, the surface of the La2Zr2O7 film amorphized, and the amorphous fraction as a function of dose fit well to a stimulated amorphization model. As the dose increased, the surface amorphization slowed, and amorphization appeared at the interface. Even at a dose of 10 dpa, the core of the film remained crystalline, despite the prediction of amorphization from the model. To inform future ab initio simulations of La2Zr2O7, the bandgap of a thick La2Zr2O7 film was measured to be indirect at 4.96 eV, with a direct transition at 5.60 eV.

  5. Two convenient low-temperature routes to single crystals of plutonium dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meredith, Nathan A. [Departments of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Wang, Shuao; Diwu, Juan [School of Radiation Medicine and Protection and School of Radiological and Interdisciplinary Sciences, Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215123 (China); Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E., E-mail: talbrechtschmitt@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Two low-temperature routes to the growth single crystals of plutonium dioxide. • Safer methods of preparing PuO{sub 2} single crystals that do not involve solid-state synthetic techniques. • Solvothermal crystal growth of plutonium dioxide. - Abstract: During the solvothermal synthesis of a low-dimensional borate, KB{sub 5}O{sub 7}(OH){sub 2}⋅2H{sub 2}O, in the presence of Pu(III), single crystals of plutonium dioxide unexpectedly formed. Single crystals of PuO{sub 2} also formed during the hydrothermal synthesis of another borate, Na{sub 2}B{sub 5}O{sub 8}(OH)⋅2H{sub 2}O, in the presence of Pu(III). The reactions were conducted at 170 °C and 150 °C, respectively, which are much lower temperature than previously reported preparations of crystalline PuO{sub 2}. Yellow–green crystals with a tablet habit were characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction and solid-state UV–vis–NIR absorption spectroscopy. The crystal structure was solved by direct methods with R{sub 1} = 1.26% for 19 unique observed reflections. PuO{sub 2} is cubic, space group Fm3{sup ‾}m, and adopts the fluorite structure type. The lattice parameter was determined to be a = 5.421(5) Å giving a volume of 159.3(2) Å{sup 3}. The absorption spectrum is consistent with Pu(IV)

  6. A Study of F-center in the Ionic Crystal by Using The Quantum Dot Model Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashem Abood Kassim

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a study of the electronic structure of F-center in the crystal of NaCl, CsCl and fluorite structure by using quantum dot model potential. This model employs the semi-continuum method due to Simpson and specifies the F-center as a quantum dot partially confined within finite potential. The energy levels and transition energy of the F-center are calculated analytically by using this new model potential and including the effect of continuum medium due to the coulomb tail and using the strong perturbation approach

  7. Effect of electronegativity on the mechanical properties of metal hydrides with a fluorite structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Masato; Setoyama, Daigo; Matsunaga, Junji; Muta, Hiroaki; Kurosaki, Ken; Uno, Masayoshi; Yamanaka, Shinsuke

    2006-01-01

    Bulk titanium, yttrium, and zirconium hydrides, which have the same structure as that of fluorite-type fcc C 1, were produced and their mechanical properties were investigated. With an increase in the hydrogen content, the lattice parameters of titanium and zirconium hydrides increased, whereas those of yttrium hydride decreased. The elastic moduli of titanium and zirconium hydrides decreased by hydrogen addition, whereas those of yttrium hydride increased. There are linear relations between the electronegativities and hydrogen content dependence of the properties. Therefore, the mechanical properties of the metal hydrides are considered to be determined by a common rule based on the electronegativity

  8. Chemical ordering in substituted fluorite oxides: A computational investigation of Ho2 Zr2 O7 and RE2 Th2 O7 (RE=Ho, Y, Gd, Nd, La)

    OpenAIRE

    Solomon, JM; Shamblin, J; Lang, M; Navrotsky, A; Asta, M

    2016-01-01

    © 2016 The Author(s). Fluorite-structured oxides find widespread use for applications spanning nuclear energy and waste containment, energy conversion, and sensing. In such applications the host tetravalent cation is often partially substituted by trivalent cations, with an associated formation of charge-compensating oxygen vacancies. The stability and properties of such materials are known to be influenced strongly by chemical ordering of the cations and vacancies, and the nature of such ord...

  9. Electronic structures of (Pb sub 2 Cu)Sr sub 2 Eu sub x Ce sub n sub - sub x Cu sub 2 O sub 2 sub n sub + sub 6 (n=2, 3): Effect of fluorite blocks between adjacent CuO sub 2 layers

    CERN Document Server

    Arai, M

    2003-01-01

    The electronic structures of (Pb sub 2 Cu)Sr sub 2 Eu sub x Ce sub n sub - sub x Cu sub 2 O sub 2 sub n sub + sub 6 (n = 2, 3) compounds which have fluorite blocks between two adjacent CuO sub 2 layers have been studied by using ab-initio method. It is found that the anisotropy is enhanced by inserting the fluorite blocks. The Fermi velocity perpendicular to the CuO sub 2 layers decreases as the thickness of fluorite blocks increases. The Eu substitution is found to affect both the atomic positions and electronic structures. The distance between apical oxygen and copper becomes shorter by the Eu substitution. The energy bands derived from oxygens in the fluorite blocks approach Fermi energy as the content of Eu substitution increases. (author)

  10. Determination of enrichment processes and radon concentration in underground mines of fluorite and coal in Santa Catarina state: criteria for radiation risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Carlos Eduardo Lima dos

    2008-01-01

    The inhalation of radon present in underground mines can imply in the deposition of its descendants in the lungs, which may cause harm to the lungs tissues and induce cancer. Concentration of radon not greater than 500 Bq/m 3 in the environment of underground mines is considered to be acceptable internationally and concentrations above 1500 Bq/m 3 require protective measures for the miners. The objectives of this research work are to determine the enrichment processes and the concentrations of radon in air, as well as the resulting doses due to the presence of this radionuclide in three underground mines of fluorite and three underground mines of coal in the State of Santa Catarina. The concentration of radon was measured employing two types of detectors of nuclear tracks (SSNTD), the LEXAN and the CR-39. This detection method consists in counting, with the help of a microscope, tracks resulting from the interaction of alpha particles with the film, due to the penetration of Rn-222 in the interior of the detector chamber and its decaying process. Contents of radium in collected samples of rocks, minerals and underground water were determined and compared with the corresponding radon concentration found in the underground air. It was observed that the coal mines showed low concentrations of radon, which can be explained by the low concentration of radium in rocks (sandstones and siltites in the foot wall and hang wall) and in the coal that composes the mining environment or, yet still, due to the good ventilation system. The average dose to the workers of the coal mines was estimated as 0.7 mSv/a, value inferior to the limit of 1 mSv/a established by the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN) for members of the public, and corresponding to a risk of fatal cancer after 50 years of work under this condition of 0.2%. On the other hand, the fluorite mines showed much higher concentrations of radon and superior to 1000 Bq/m 3 . The inefficiency of the ventilation

  11. Thermal and chemical variations of the Nigerian Benue trough lead-zinc-barite-fluorite deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogundipe, Ibukun Emmanuel

    2017-08-01

    The Benue trough is an intra-continental rift initiated in the Cretaceous during the opening of the South Atlantic Ocean. Lead-zinc-barite-fluorite mineralization occurs along the 600 km axis of the trough in three discrete sub-basins which coincide with the lower, middle and upper mineral districts of the Benue Valley. Lithologically these sub-basins are dominated by black carbonaceous shale in the Lower Benue, platform carbonates in the Middle Benue and sandstones in the Upper Benue. Micro-thermometric analysis of fluid inclusions in sphalerite, fluorite, barite and quartz have shown that each mineral district has its own unique thermal and chemical imprint. For example, the temperature can be bracketed between 109 °C and 160 °C for lower Benue, 89 °C-144 °C for the Middle Benue and 176 °C-254 °C for the Upper Benue. Chemical differentiation also exists between each mineral district with the Lower Benue having 22 wt % equivalent NaCl while the Middle and Upper Benue have 18 and 16 wt % equivalent NaCl respectively. This study shows that inter-district thermal and chemical variations exist between the ore-stage sulfide and post-sulfide gangue minerals of the entire Benue Valley. Similarly, intra-district thermal and chemical variations have also been observed among all the paragenetic minerals of each district. The thermal variations may be as a result of variations in the geothermal gradient accompanying continental rifting from one district to the other. The variations in the chemistry between the Lower Benue and the Upper Benue paragenic minerals may be as a result of the distinct lithological differences across the Benue Trough.

  12. The natural weathering of staurolite: crystal-surface textures, relative stability, and the rate-determining step

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael A. Velbel; Charles L. Basso; Michael J. Zieg

    1996-01-01

    Mineral surface-textures on naturally weathered crystals of staurolite [monoclinic, pseudo-orthorhombic; Fe4Al18Si8O46(OH)2] indicate that staurolite weathering is generally interface-limited. Etch pits on naturally weathered staurolites are disk-shaped,...

  13. High-throughput continuous hydrothermal flow synthesis of Zn-Ce oxides: unprecedented solubility of Zn in the nanoparticle fluorite lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellici, Suela; Gong, Kenan; Lin, Tian; Brown, Sonal; Clark, Robin J H; Vickers, Martin; Cockcroft, Jeremy K; Middelkoop, Vesna; Barnes, Paul; Perkins, James M; Tighe, Christopher J; Darr, Jawwad A

    2010-09-28

    High-throughput continuous hydrothermal flow synthesis has been used as a rapid and efficient synthetic route to produce a range of crystalline nanopowders in the Ce-Zn oxide binary system. High-resolution powder X-ray diffraction data were obtained for both as-prepared and heat-treated (850 degrees C for 10 h in air) samples using the new robotic beamline I11, located at Diamond Light Source. The influence of the sample composition on the crystal structure and on the optical and physical properties was studied. All the nanomaterials were characterized using Raman spectroscopy, UV-visible spectrophotometry, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area and elemental analysis (via energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy). Initially, for 'as-prepared' Ce(1-x)Zn(x)O(y), a phase-pure cerium oxide (fluorite) structure was obtained for nominal values of x=0.1 and 0.2. Biphasic mixtures were obtained for nominal values of x in the range of 0.3-0.9 (inclusive). High-resolution transmission electron microscopy images revealed that the phase-pure nano-CeO(2) (x=0) consisted of ca 3.7 nm well-defined nanoparticles. The nanomaterials produced herein generally had high surface areas (greater than 150 m(2) g(-1)) and possessed combinations of particle properties (e.g. bandgap, crystallinity, size, etc.) that were unobtainable or difficult to achieve by other more conventional synthetic methods.

  14. Magnetic interactions in praseodymium ruthenate Pr{sub 3}RuO{sub 7} with fluorite-related structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inabayashi, Masaki; Doi, Yoshihiro; Wakeshima, Makoto; Hinatsu, Yukio, E-mail: hinatsu@sci.hokudai.ac.jp

    2017-06-15

    Solid solutions Pr{sub 3}(Ru{sub 1-x}Ta{sub x})O{sub 7} (0≤x≤1.0) and (Pr{sub 1-x}Y{sub x}){sub 3}RuO{sub 7} (0≤x≤0.7) were obtained as a single phase compound. They crystallize in an orthorhombic superstructure derived from that of the cubic fluorite with space group Cmcm. The results of the Rietveld analysis for X-ray diffraction profiles of Pr{sub 3}(Ru{sub 1-x}Ta{sub x})O{sub 7} showed that Ru and Ta atoms are randomly situated at the six-coordinate 4b site. For (Pr{sub 1-x}Y{sub x}){sub 3}RuO{sub 7}, with increasing the concentration of Y ions (x value), the smaller Y ions occupy selectively the seven-coordinate 8g site rather than the eight-coordinate 4a site. Through magnetic susceptibility measurements for Pr{sub 3}(Ru{sub 1-x}Ta{sub x})O{sub 7}, the antiferromagnetic transition temperatures decrease linearly with increasing x value, and at x=0.75 no magnetic ordering was found down to 1.8 K, indicating the magnetic interaction is not one-dimensional, but three-dimensional. On the other hand, the antiferromagnetic transition temperature for (Pr{sub 1-x}Y{sub x}){sub 3}RuO{sub 7} decreases with increasing x value, but above x≥0.50 it becomes constant (~12 K). This result indicates that Pr{sup 3+} ions at the seven-coordinate site greatly contribute to the antiferromagnetic interactions observed in (Pr{sub 1-x}Y{sub x}){sub 3}RuO{sub 7}. Density functional calculations of Pr{sub 3}RuO{sub 7} demonstrate that the electronic structure gives insulating character and that oxygen 2p orbitals hybridize strongly with Ru 4d orbitals in the valence band (VB). Near the top of VB, the Pr 4 f orbitals at the seven-coordinated site also show a weak hybridization with the O(1) 2p orbitals. The Ru-O(1)-Pr superexchange pathway take part in three-dimensional magnetic interaction and play an important role in an enhancement of long-range magnetic ordering. - Graphical abstract: The spin densities and the spin polarization of Pr{sub 3}RuO{sub 7} are shown

  15. Crystal structure of olivetolic acid: a natural product from Cetrelia sanguinea (Schaer.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismed, Friardi; Farhan, Aulia; Bakhtiar, Amri; Zaini, Erizal; Nugraha, Yuda Prasetya; Dwichandra Putra, Okky; Uekusa, Hidehiro

    2016-11-01

    The title compound, C 12 H 16 O 4 (systematic name: 2,4-dihy-droxy-6-pentyl-benzoic acid) is a natural product isolated from C. sanguinea (Schaer.) and is reported to have various pharmacological activities. The mol-ecule is approximately planar (r.m.s. deviation for the non-H atoms = 0.096 Å) and features an intra-molecular O-H⋯O hydrogen bond. In the crystal, each olivetolic acid mol-ecule is connected to three neighbours via O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, generating (10-1) sheets. This crystal is essentially isostructural with a related resorcinolic acid with a longer alkyl chain.

  16. Determination of resistance to salt crystallization on natural stone measured with ultrasonic wave

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alm, D.; Brix, S.; Kjærgaard, H. Howe

    2008-01-01

    and after salt exposure. Four different stones are investigated: the limestone Bateig Azul, the sandstone Oberkirchener, the limestone Perlatino, and the limestone Travertine. The procedure for the salt crystallization test is EN 12370 standard “Natural stone test methods – Determination of resistance...

  17. Single-crystal elastic constants of natural ettringite

    KAUST Repository

    Speziale, Sergio

    2008-07-01

    The single-crystal elastic constants of natural ettringite were determined by Brillouin spectroscopy at ambient conditions. The six non-zero elastic constants of this trigonal mineral are: C11 = 35.1 ± 0.1 GPa, C12 = 21.9 ±0.1 GPa, C13 = 20.0 ± 0.5 GPa, C14 = 0.6 ± 0.2 GPa, C33 = 55 ± 1 GPa, C44 = 11.0 ± 0.2 GPa. The Hill average of the aggregate bulk, shear modulus and the polycrystal Young\\'s modulus and Poisson\\'s ratio are 27.3 ± 0.9 GPa, 9.5 ± 0.8 GPa, 25 ± 2 GPa and 0.34 ± 0.02 respectively. The longitudinal and shear elastic anisotropy are C33/C11 = 0.64 ± 0.01 and C66/C44 =0.60 ± 0.01. The elastic anisotropy in ettringite is connected to its crystallographic structure. Stiff chains of [Al(OH)6]3- octahedra alternating with triplets of Ca2+ in eight-fold coordination run parallel to the c-axis leading to higher stiffness along this direction. The determination of the elastic stiffness tensor can help in the prediction of the early age properties of cement paste when ettringite crystals precipitate and in the modeling of both internal and external sulfate attack when secondary ettringite formation leads to expansion of concrete. © 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Single-crystal elastic constants of natural ettringite

    KAUST Repository

    Speziale, Sergio; Jiang, Fuming; Mao, Zhu; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf; Duffy, Thomas S.; Schilling, Frank R.

    2008-01-01

    The single-crystal elastic constants of natural ettringite were determined by Brillouin spectroscopy at ambient conditions. The six non-zero elastic constants of this trigonal mineral are: C11 = 35.1 ± 0.1 GPa, C12 = 21.9 ±0.1 GPa, C13 = 20.0 ± 0.5 GPa, C14 = 0.6 ± 0.2 GPa, C33 = 55 ± 1 GPa, C44 = 11.0 ± 0.2 GPa. The Hill average of the aggregate bulk, shear modulus and the polycrystal Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio are 27.3 ± 0.9 GPa, 9.5 ± 0.8 GPa, 25 ± 2 GPa and 0.34 ± 0.02 respectively. The longitudinal and shear elastic anisotropy are C33/C11 = 0.64 ± 0.01 and C66/C44 =0.60 ± 0.01. The elastic anisotropy in ettringite is connected to its crystallographic structure. Stiff chains of [Al(OH)6]3- octahedra alternating with triplets of Ca2+ in eight-fold coordination run parallel to the c-axis leading to higher stiffness along this direction. The determination of the elastic stiffness tensor can help in the prediction of the early age properties of cement paste when ettringite crystals precipitate and in the modeling of both internal and external sulfate attack when secondary ettringite formation leads to expansion of concrete. © 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Crystal-like nature of acoustic excitations in glassy ethanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matic, A.; Engberg, D.; Boerjesson, L.; Masciovecchio, C.; Santucci, S.C.; Monaco, G.; Verbeni, R.

    2004-01-01

    We report on inelastic x-ray scattering experiments on crystalline and glassy phases of ethanol in order to directly compare the influence of disorder on high frequency acoustic excitations. We find that both the dispersion and the line-width of the longitudinal acoustic excitations in the glass are the same as in the polycrystal in the reciprocal space portion covering the 1st and 2nd Brillouin zones. The structural disorder is found to play little role apart from an intrinsic angular averaging, and the nature of these excitations must essentially be the same in both glass and poly crystal

  20. Monomial Crystals and Partition Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tingley, Peter

    2010-04-01

    Recently Fayers introduced a large family of combinatorial realizations of the fundamental crystal B(Λ0) for ^sln, where the vertices are indexed by certain partitions. He showed that special cases of this construction agree with the Misra-Miwa realization and with Berg's ladder crystal. Here we show that another special case is naturally isomorphic to a realization using Nakajima's monomial crystal.

  1. Determination of enrichment processes and the concentrations of radon in underground mines of fluorite and coal in Santa Catarina state: criteria for evaluation of radiological risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Carlos Eduardo Lima dos

    2008-01-01

    The inhalation of radon present in underground mines can imply in the deposition of its descendent in the lungs, which may cause harm to the lungs tissues and induce cancer. Concentration of radon not greater than 500 Bq/m3 in the environment of underground mines is considered to be acceptable internationally and concentrations above 1500 Bq/m3 require protective measures for the miners. The objectives of this research work are to determine the enrichment processes and the concentrations of radon in air, as well as the resulting doses due to the presence of this radionuclide in three underground mines of fluorite and three underground mines of coal in the State of Santa Catarina. The concentration of radon was measured employing two types of detectors of nuclear tracks (SSNTD), the LEXAN and the CR-39. This detection method consists in counting, with the help of a microscope, tracks resulting from the interaction of alpha particles with the film, due to the penetration of Rn-222 in the interior of the detector chamber and its decaying process. Contents of radium in collected samples of rocks, minerals and underground water were determined and compared with the corresponding radon concentration found in the underground air. It was observed that the coal mines showed low concentrations of radon, which can be explained by the low concentration of radium in rocks (sandstones and siltites in the footwall and hang wall) and in the coal that composes the mining environment or, yet still, due to the good ventilation system. The average dose to the workers of the coal mines was estimated as 0.7 mSv/a, value inferior to the limit of 1 mSv/a established by the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN) for members of the public, and corresponding to a risk of fatal cancer after 50 years of work under this condition of 0.2%. On the other hand, the fluorite mines showed much higher concentrations of radon and superior to 1000 Bq/m3. The inefficiency of the ventilation system

  2. ASM Inaugural Lecture 2010: Single crystal X-ray structural determination: A powerful technique for natural products research and drug discovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fun Hoong Kun; Chantrapromma, S.; Boonnak, N.; Lee, V.S.

    2010-01-01

    Drug discovery from natural products resources have been extensively studied worldwide because natural products with their great structural diversity have traditionally provided most of the drugs in use. They offer major opportunities for finding novel low molecular weight leading-structures that are active against a wide range of assay targets. The most important step in the discovery process is the identification of compounds with interesting biological activity. Single crystal X-ray structure determination is a powerful technique for natural products research and drug discovery. The detailed three-dimensional structures that emerge can be co-related to the activities to these structures. In this article the following is presented: (i) co-crystal and disorder structures; (ii) determination of absolute configuration and (iii) the ability to distinguish between whether a natural product compound is a natural product or a natural product artifact. All these three properties are unique to the technique of single crystal X-ray structure determination. Case (iii) was demonstrated with a compound containing a chromene ring, namely macluraxanthone (which was isolated from Cratoxylum formosum subsp. pruniflorum, a Thai medicinal plant). (author)

  3. REDUPP. Second annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zetterstroem Evins, L.; Vaehaenen, M.

    2013-05-01

    Understanding the interactions between solid surface and fluid during the dissolution process is essential for developing a model for spent fuel dissolution. This project aims to enhance the understanding of the dissolution process of fluorite-type materials; these have the same crystal structure as nuclear fuel. CaF 2 , CeO 2 , ThO 2 and UO 2 are here used in dissolution studies during which the evolution of the solution and surface is monitored as the dissolution proceeds. For the UO 2 -experiments, the effect of natural groundwater on the dissolution of a surface emitting alpha radiation is investigated. The goal is to use the experimental results in combination with first-principles modelling to formulate a model describing the surfaces of dissolving fluorite-type materials. The project is on-going and this report presents the progress after two years. The experimental results reported here point towards effects of surface area and surface area to volume ratios, exposed grain boundaries, and bulk vs. 'local' solubility. The importance of well-controlled analytical conditions and high-resolution measurements are emphasized, in order to distinguish differences between effects of remnant fines, amorphous precipitates, grain boundaries, surface defects and crystallographic orientation of the exposed surfaces. The progress with regards to modelling shows that a surface model is formulated which can predict the surface formation energies of all crystal planes of the fluorite structure. It has been shown that this quantity can be related with the experimental surface stability during dissolution, and that for any material with the fluorite structure the same relation between computed surface stability and experimental stability (dissolution rate) will hold. The work on setting up a model of the dissolution process is ongoing; this kind of modelling is computationally very demanding as it requires a combination of molecular dynamics simulations and ab initio electronic

  4. Solid State Structure-Reactivity Studies on Bixbyites, Fluorites and Perovskites Belonging to the Vanadate, Titanate and Cerate Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafi, Shahid P.

    This thesis primarily focuses on the systematic understanding of structure-reactivity relationships in two representative systems: bixbyite and related structures as well as indium doped CeO2. Topotactic reaction routes have gained significant attention over the past two decades due to their potential to access kinetically controlled metastable materials. This has contributed substantially to the understanding of solid state reaction pathways and provided first insights into mechanisms. Contrary to the widely used ex-situ methods, in-situ techniques including powder x-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric-differential thermal analysis have been employed extensively throughout this work in order to follow the reaction pathways in real time. Detailed analysis of the AVO3 (A = In, Sc) bixbyite reactivity under oxidative conditions has been carried out and a variety of novel metastable oxygen defect phases have been identified and characterized. The novel metastable materials have oxygen deficient fluorite structures and consequently are potential ion conductors. Structural aspects of the topotactic vs. reconstructive transformations are illustrated with this model system. The structure-reactivity study of AVO3 phases was extended to AVO3 perovskite family. Based on the research methodologies and results from AVO3 bixbyite reactivity studies a generalized mechanistic oxidation pathway has been established with a non-vanadium phase, ScTiO3 bixbyite. However, there is stark contrast in terms of structural stability and features beyond this stability limit during AVO3 and ScTiO3 bixbyite reaction pathways. A series of complex reaction sequences including phase separation and phase transitions were identified during the investigation of ScTiO3 reactivity. The two-step formation pathway for the fluorite-type oxide ion conductor Ce1-xInxO2-delta (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.3) is being reported. The formation of the BaCe1-xInxO 3-delta perovskites and the subsequent CO2-capture reaction

  5. Investigation of element contents of natural diamond crystals of different gemological features by INAA and autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khamrayeva, D.S.; Ulugmuradov, S.; Didyk, A.Y.; Gasanov, M.; Solodova, J.P.; Sedova, E.A.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The work presented aims at understanding the role of Co, Ni, Ti, Cr, Mn, Cu impurities on the natural diamond ( Type Ι ) quality, microstructure and morphology having different gemological features for identification their deposit. An according of the Kimberly Process there is Certification Scheme for regulating trade in diamonds to exclude 'bloody' diamonds. The 'four C's' criteria (color, clarity, carat weight, cut) had for decades been used by gemologists worldwide to evaluate precious gem diamonds. Those four parameters were believed to determine the value of the stones. Some 10 years ago gemologists added to those traditional criteria a fifth C, signifying Confidence. The role of the fifth C in pricing precious stones increased over time. An according of the Kimberly Process it is necessary to determine diamond deposit. Impurity content of natural diamonds is basic feature to for identification their deposit. We have used autoradiographic technique for investigation of spatial impurity distributions in natural diamond crystals. It is based on the secondary beta irradiation registration. Impurities were identified by energy lines of the gamma spectra obtained and by half-life periods. We bring information which allow to clarify the spatial distributions of Co, Ni, Ti, Cr, Mn, Cu impurities depended inner morphology of diamond crystal. It was established several types of impurity distributions depending from inner morphology of diamond crystals. Results of INAA and autoradiographic study of natural diamonds use for to make of international data for identification their deposit

  6. Ion irradiation-induced diffusion in bixbyite-fluorite related oxides: Dislocations and phase transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rolly, Gaboriaud, E-mail: Rolly.gaboriaud@univ-poitiers.fr [Institut Pprime, CNRS-University of Poitiers, SP2MI-BP 30179, 86962 Chasseneuil-Futuroscope (France); Fabien, Paumier [Institut Pprime, CNRS-University of Poitiers, SP2MI-BP 30179, 86962 Chasseneuil-Futuroscope (France); Bertrand, Lacroix [CSIC – University of Sevilla, Avenida Américo Vespucio, 49, 41092 Sevilla (Spain)

    2014-05-01

    Ion-irradiation induced diffusion and the phase transformation of a bixbyite-fluorite related rare earth oxide thin films are studied. This work is focused on yttrium sesquioxide, Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, thin films deposited on Si (1 0 0) substrates using the ion beam sputtering technique (IBS). As-deposited samples were annealed ant then irradiated at cryogenic temperature (80 K) with 260 keV Xe{sup 2+} at different fluences. The irradiated thin oxide films are characterized by X-ray diffraction. A cubic to monoclinic phase transformation was observed. Analysis of this phenomenon is done in terms of residual stresses. Stress measurements as a function of irradiation fluences were realised using the XRD-sin{sup 2}ψ method. Stress evolution and kinetic of the phase transformation are compared and leads to the role-played by the nucleation of point and extended defects.

  7. Spectroscopy and crystal structures of natural stereoisomers of neoclerodane diterpenoids from Teucrium yemense of Saudi medicinal plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nur-e-Alam, Mohammad; Kanthasamy, Gopikkaa; Yousaf, Muhammad; Alqahtani, Ali S.; Ghabbour, Hazem A.; Al-Rehaily, Adnan J.

    2017-11-01

    3-O-deacetylteugracilin (1) and teugracilin B (2), two natural stereoisomers, are isolated from Teucrium yemense (Defl). These two compounds are almost identical to each other, differing only at the C6 stereocenter. We now crystallise these two compounds and for the first time, determine the crystal structure through single crystal X-ray diffraction, and the stereochemistry for all positions using spectroscopic data. These techniques enable us to establish the difference between the two compounds. Careful interpretation of the results indicates that HRMS and 1 and 2D NMR spectroscopy, are in agreement with single crystal X-ray diffraction data.

  8. New Insights into the Relationship Between Network Structure and Strain Induced Crystallization in Unvolcanized Natural Rubber by Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toki, S.; Hsiao, B.; Amnuaypornsri, S.; Sakdapipanich, J.

    2009-01-01

    The relationship between the network structure and strain-induced crystallization in un-vulcanized as well as vulcanized natural rubbers (NR) and synthetic poly-isoprene rubbers (IR) was investigated via synchrotron wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) technique. It was found that the presence of a naturally occurring network structure formed by natural components in un-vulcanized NR significantly facilitates strain-induced crystallization and enhances modulus and tensile strength. The stress-strain relation in vulcanized NR is due to the combined effect of chemical and naturally occurring networks. The weakness of naturally occurring network against stress and temperature suggests that vulcanized NR has additional relaxation mechanism due to naturally occurring network. The superior mechanical properties in NR compared with IR are mainly due to the existence of naturally occurring network structure.

  9. Conductivity and hydration trends in disordered fluorite and pyrochlore oxides: A study on lanthanum cerate–zirconate based compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Besikiotis, Vasileios; Ricote, Sandrine; Jensen, Molly Hjorth

    2012-01-01

    In the present contribution we discuss the influence of order/disorder on the concentration and mobility of ionic charge carriers in undoped and acceptor (calcium) doped fluorite and pyrochlore structured lanthanum cerate–zirconate solid solutions: (La1−yCay)2(Ce1−xZrx)2O7−δ (y=0, 0.02, 0.10; x=0...... enthalpy becomes more exothermic with higher cerium content, i.e. with more disordered materials. The proton conductivity decreases upon acceptor substitution of La3+ with Ca2+ which is attributed to trapping of the charge carriers by the effectively negative acceptor....

  10. Exploiting the natural doping gradient of Nd:YLF crystals for high-power end pumped lasers

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bollig, C

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available decided to use crystals of a doping concentration below the 0.5% previously used. In addition, researchers decided to exploit the natural doping gradient along the length of the boule, which is especially pronounced at low concentrations but commonly...

  11. Crystal Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schomaker, Verner; Lingafelter, E. C.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses characteristics of crystal systems, comparing (in table format) crystal systems with lattice types, number of restrictions, nature of the restrictions, and other lattices that can accidently show the same metrical symmetry. (JN)

  12. Dimensions and aspect ratios of natural ice crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Um

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available During the 2006 Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE in the tropics, the 2008 Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC in the Arctic, and the 2010 Small PARTicles In CirrUS (SPARTICUS campaign at mid-latitudes, high-resolution images of ice crystals were recorded by a Cloud Particle Imager at temperatures (T between −87 and 0 °C. The projected maximum dimension (D', length (L', and width (W' of pristine columns, plates, and component bullets of bullet rosettes were measured using newly developed software, the Ice Crystal Ruler. The number of bullets in each bullet rosette was also measured. Column crystals were further distinguished as either horizontally oriented columns or columns with other orientations to eliminate any orientation effect on the measured dimensions. The dimensions and aspect ratios (AR, the dimension of the major axis divided by the dimension of the minor axis of crystals were determined as functions of temperature, geophysical location, and type of cirrus. Dimensions of crystals generally increased with temperature. Columns and bullets had larger dimensions (i.e., W' of the minor axis (i.e., a axis for a given dimension (i.e., D' orL' of the major axis (i.e., c axis, and thus smaller AR, as T increased, whereas this trend did not occur for plate crystals. The average number of branches in bullet rosettes was 5.50 ± 1.35 during three campaigns and 6.32 ± 1.34 (5.46 ± 1.34; 4.95 ± 1.01 during TWP-ICE (SPARTICUS; ISDAC. The AR of bullets increased with the number of branches in bullet rosettes. Most dimensions of crystals and ARs of columnar crystals measured during SPARTICUS were larger than those measured during TWP-ICE and ISDAC at −67 L–W relationships of columns derived using current data exhibited a strong dependence on temperature; similar relationships determined in previous studies were within the range of the current data.

  13. Invariant Natural Killer T Cells Ameliorate Monosodium Urate Crystal-Induced Gouty Inflammation in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Wang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Gout is an inflammatory arthritis caused by deposition of intra-articular monosodium urate (MSU crystal. Previous studies have focused on resident macrophage, infiltrating monocyte, and neutrophil responses to MSU crystal; yet the mechanisms of cellular changes and the potential involvement of other regulatory immune cells remain largely unknown. Invariant natural killer T (iNKT cells, an innate type of T cell, are involved in the development of various inflammatory diseases. Here, we investigate the role of iNKT cells in MSU crystal-induced gouty inflammation. MSU crystal-induced inflammatory profiles in an air-pouch model were examined in iNKT-deficient CD1d knockout (KO and wild-type (WT control mice. To explore potential mechanisms of iNKT cell regulation of gouty inflammation, we cocultured CD4+ or CD4−iNKT cells with bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs. We found that iNKT cells quickly migrated to the site of inflammation upon MSU crystal stimulation in WT mice. The total number of infiltrating cells in CD1d KO mice, especially neutrophils, was dramatically increased at 6 and 12 h (P < 0.01 post-MSU crystal challenge, compared with WT controls. BMDMs cocultured with CD4+iNKT cells produced less tumor necrosis factor-α and expressed higher levels of M2 macrophage markers, including Clec7a, Pdcd1Ig2, and interleukin-4 (P < 0.01, compared with BMDMs cocultured with CD4−iNKT cells or conventional CD4+ T cells. CD4+iNKT cells are one of the key regulators of MSU crystal-induced gouty inflammation through the control of macrophage polarization. iNKT cells may serve as a new therapeutic target for gout.

  14. 3D Micro-topography of Transferred Laboratory and Natural Ice Crystal Surfaces Imaged by Cryo and Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, N. B.; Boaggio, K.; Bancroft, L.; Bandamede, M.

    2015-12-01

    Recent work has highlighted micro-scale roughness on the surfaces of ice crystals grown and imaged in-situ within the chambers of environmental scanning electron microscopes (ESEM). These observations appear to align with theoretical and satellite observations that suggest a prevalence of rough ice in cirrus clouds. However, the atmospheric application of the lab observations are indeterminate because the observations have been based only on crystals grown on substrates and in pure-water vapor environments. In this work, we present details and results from the development of a transfer technique which allows natural and lab-grown ice and snow crystals to be captured, preserved, and transferred into the ESEM for 3D imaging. Ice crystals were gathered from 1) natural snow, 2) a balloon-borne cirrus particle capture device, and 3) lab-grown ice crystals from a diffusion chamber. Ice crystals were captured in a pre-conditioned small-volume (~1 cm3) cryo-containment cell. The cell was then sealed closed and transferred to a specially-designed cryogenic dewer (filled with liquid nitrogen or crushed dry ice) for transport to a new Hitachi Field Emission, Variable Pressure SEM (SU-5000). The cryo-cell was then removed from the dewer and quickly placed onto the pre-conditioned cryo transfer stage attached to the ESEM (Quorum 3010T). Quantitative 3D topographical digital elevation models of ice surfaces are reported from SEM for the first time, including a variety of objective measures of statistical surface roughness. The surfaces of the transported crystals clearly exhibit signatures of mesoscopic roughening that are similar to examples of roughness seen in ESEM-grown crystals. For most transported crystals, the habits and crystal edges are more intricate that those observed for ice grown directly on substrates within the ESEM chamber. Portions of some crystals do appear smooth even at magnification greater than 1000x, a rare observation in our ESEM-grown crystals. The

  15. P-T path fluid evolution in the Gross Spitzkoppe granite stock, Namibia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Frindt

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The Gross Spitzkoppe granite stock (GSS is a zoned 30 km^2 epizonal intrusion that consists of three main granites: 1 medium-grained biotite granite (marginal, 2 a coarse-grained biotite granite, and 3 a central, porphyritic granite. The stock contains pegmatites as banded marginal stockscheiders and isolated pockets composed of large alkali feldspar and quartz, dark mica, interstitial fluorite, and euhedral topaz and beryl crystals. In the porphyritic granite there are local wolframite-bearing greisens and hydrothermal fluorite and topaz-rich veins.Fluid inclusion studies were conducted on: 1 topaz and quartz crystals from the marginal stockscheider; 2 quartz, topaz, fluorite and beryl crystals from isolated pegmatites; 3 topaz from a miarolitic pegmatite; 4 beryl and quartz veins from greisenized porphyritic granite; and 5 fluorite from a late fluorite vein inthe coarse-grained biotite granite. Preliminary data indicate the presence of three compositionally distinct primary and pseudosecondary inclusion types that are of late magmatic-hydrothermal origin.Type 1. Low salinity (0–10 eq. wt% NaCl H2O (± CO2 inclusions that homogenize to the liquid phase in the temperature range of 300 to 550˚C. These inclusions are from quartz, topaz and beryl. Inclusions in fluorite from the fluorite vein homogenize at ~170˚C and have a salinity of ca. 1–2 eq. wt% NaCl.Type 2. Saline (25–30 eq. wt% NaCl halite-bearing H2O (± CO2 inclusions that homogenize to the liquid phase in the temperature range of 300 to 400˚C. These inclusions are from quartz.Type 3. Low salinity (0–3 eq. wt% NaCl H2O-CO2 inclusions that homogenize to vapor phase in the temperature range of 330 to 550˚C. These inclusions are from quartz and topaz.Hydrothermal fluids from greisen minerals are represented by type 1 and type 2 H2O inclusions. They are predominantly of low salinity (~8 eq. wt% NaCl and homogenize to the liquid phase in the temperature range of 300 to 500

  16. Characterization of natural photonic crystals in iridescent wings of damselfly Chalcopteryx rutilans by FIB/SEM, TEM, and TOF-SIMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, David M; Ellsworth, Ashley A; Fisher, Gregory L; Valeriano, Wescley W; Vasco, Juan P; Guimarães, Paulo S S; de Andrade, Rodrigo R; da Silva, Elizabeth R; Rodrigues, Wagner N

    2018-02-05

    The iridescent wings of the Chalcopterix rutilans damselfly (Rambur) (Odonata, Polythoridae) are investigated with focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry. The electron microscopy images reveal a natural photonic crystal as the source of the varying colors. The photonic crystal has a consistent number and thickness (∼195 nm) of the repeat units on the ventral side of the wing, which is consistent with the red color visible from the bottom side of the wing in all regions. The dorsal side of the wing shows strong color variations ranging from red to blue depending on the region. In the electron microscopy images, the dorsal side of the wing exhibits varied number and thicknesses of the repeat units. The repeat unit spacings for the red, yellow/green, and blue regions are approximately 195, 180, and 145 nm, respectively. Three-dimensional analysis of the natural photonic crystals by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry reveals that changes in the relative levels of Na, K, and eumelanin are responsible for the varying dielectric constant needed to generate the photonic crystal. The photonic crystal also appears to be assembled with a chemical tricomponent layer structure due to the enhancement of the CH 6 N 3 + species at every other interface between the high/low dielectric constant layers.

  17. Natural gels: crystal-chemistry of short range ordered components in Al, Fe, and Si systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ildefonse, Ph.; Calas, G.

    1997-01-01

    In this review, the most important inorganic natural gels are presented: opal, aluminosilicate (allophanes) and hydrous iron oxides and silicates. It is demonstrated that natural gels are ordered at the atomic scale. In allophanes, Al is distributed between octahedral and tetrahedral sites. The amount of Al increases as Al/Si ratio decreases. Si-rich allophane have a local structure around Al and Si very different of that is known in kaolinite or halloysite. Transformation of Si-rich allophanes to crystallized minerals implies dissolution-recrystallization processes. On the contrary, in iron silicate with Fe/Si = 0.72, Si and Fe environments are close to those found in nontronite. The gel transformation to Fe-smectite may occur by long range ordering during ageing. In ferric silicate gels, the similarity of local structure around Fe in poorly ordered precursors and what is known in crystallized minerals suggests a solid transformation during ageing. This difference between iron and aluminium is mainly due to the ability of Al to enter both tetrahedral and octahedral sites, while the affinity of iron for octahedral sites is higher at low temperature

  18. Tear energy and strain-induced crystallization of natural rubber/styrene-butadiene rubber blend

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noguchi, F; Akabori, K; Yamamoto, Y; Kawahara, S; Kawazura, T

    2009-01-01

    Strain-induced crystallization of natural rubber (NR), dispersed in styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR), was investigated in relation to dimensional feature of a dispersoid and crosslink density of NR by measuring tear energy (G) of crosslinked NR/SBR blends. The crosslinked NR/SBR blends in ratios of 1/9 and 3/7 by weight were prepared by mixing masticated NR and SBR with an internal mixer at a rotor speed of 30 rpm, followed by crosslinking with dicumyl peroxide on a hot press at 444 K for 60 min. The G, measured in wide-ranges of temperature and tear rate, was superposed into a master curve with a Williams-Landel-Ferry shift factor. The G of the NR/SBR(3/7) blend abruptly decreased to a level comparable to that of SBR at about melting temperature of NR crystals formed on straining. The temperature, at which the dramatic decrease in the G occurred, was associated with the dimensional feature of the NR dispersoid and the crosslink density.

  19. Shock Compression Response of Calcium Fluoride (CaF2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root, Seth

    2017-06-01

    The fluorite crystal structure is a textbook lattice that is observed for many systems, such as CaF2, Mg2 Si, and CeO2. Specifically, CaF2 is a useful material for studying the fluorite system because it is readily available as a single crystal. Under static compression, CaF2 is known to have at least three solid phases: fluorite, cotunnite, and a Ni2 In phase. Along the Hugoniot CaF2 undergoes a fluorite to cotunnite phase transition, however, at higher shock pressures it is unknown whether CaF2 undergoes another solid phase transition or melts directly from the cotunnite phase. In this work, we conducted planar shock compression experiments on CaF2 using Sandia's Z-machine and a two-stage light gun up to 900 GPa. In addition, we use density functional theory (DFT) based quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations to provide insight into the CaF2 state along the Hugoniot. In collaboration with: Michael Desjarlais, Ray Lemke, Patricia Kalita, Scott Alexander, Sandia National Laboratories. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-mission laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL850.

  20. Crystal structure of natural phaeosphaeride A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria V. Abzianidze

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The asymmetric unit of the title compound, C15H23NO5, contains two independent molecules. Phaeosphaeride A contains two primary sections, an alkyl chain consisting of five C atoms and a cyclic system consisting of fused five- and six-membered rings with attached substituents. In the crystal, the molecules form layered structures. Nearly planar sheets, parallel to the (001 plane, form bilayers of two-dimensional hydrogen-bonded networks with the hydroxy groups located on the interior of the bilayer sheets. The network is constructed primarily of four O—H...O hydrogen bonds, which form a zigzag pattern in the (001 plane. The butyl chains interdigitate with the butyl chains on adjacent sheets. The crystal was twinned by a twofold rotation about the c axis, with refined major–minor occupancy fractions of 0.718 (6:0.282 (6.

  1. General description of new equipment 'Fluorite-III' for Bor-Oendoer fluorate factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayar, V.; Basankhueue, O.; Ganzorig, J.; Dushan, P.; Lodoisamba, S.; Otgooloi, B.; Tsehlmehg, A.; Shagjjamba, D.

    1992-01-01

    A new equipment 'Fluorite-III' is described which is used to register and analyze three kinds of following informations: 1. Pulse count for determination of ore's concentration which is transferring by the factory conveyor. 2. Pulse count for determination of ore's thickness which is transferring also by the factory conveyor. 3. Information about that: Is the conveyor moving or not during our measurements. First and second kinds of information are registered by two detectors which is established on the different places from the factory conveyor. Constraction of these detectors are the same. Every one of them consists of a ''photo multiplier tube'' and a scintillator of ''sodium-iodine''. The third information is corresponding to the ''transistor and transistical logic'' level. Every counters data and the information about the conveyor should be transferred every time to the computer which is compatible with the IBM/PC for further treatment through the following devices: 1. Three State Buffer which is made from ''Generic Array Logic'' device. 2. Universal Asynchronous Receiver and Transmitter (UART) which is of type (AY 3-1015). 3. 20 milli-ampere current interface with optical isolators. Also in this way but in reverse order by these devices we can control all processes of the measurements from the computer. 1 fig

  2. The structural priciples that underlie the higher oxides of the rare earths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Z.C.; Zhang, J.; Eyring, L.

    1996-01-01

    The structural principle that accounts for the anion-deficient, fluorite-related homologous series of higher rare earth oxides has awaited the determination of a sufficient number of their structures to test hypotheses. Recent structure refinement of five additional members has permitted extraction of a number of generalizations concerning their crystallization behavior. These general principles are outlined. Furthermore, based on the fluorite structure itself, a phenomenological structural principle is outlined that (1) unifies all known and possible phases in these fluorite-related systems under one generic formula, (2) models all known structures correctly and (3) enables modeling of any unknown structure or polymorph in the series. All that is required are electron diffraction patterns adequate to determine the supercell and a knowledge of its composition. (orig.)

  3. Neutron magnetic multiple diffraction in a natural magnetite crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazzocchi, V.L.; Parente, C.B.R.

    1988-09-01

    Neutron multiple diffraction has been employed in the study of the magnetism in magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ). Magnetite has a crystallographic structure of an inverted spinel with tetrahedral A sites occupied solely by trivalent Fe 3+ ions and octahedral B sites occupied both by divalent Fe 2+ ions and the remaining Fe 3+ ions in random distribution. At room temperature magnetite is a Neel A-B ferrimagnet where the ions on the A, B sites are coupled antiferromagneticaly. This coupling disappears at T sup c approx. or approx.= 580 0 C. Employing a natural single crystal of magnetite experimental neutron multiple diffraction patterns were obtained for the primary reflection 111 at room temperature and 703 0 C. This reflection is almost entirely magnetic in origin resulting in 'Aufhellung' patterns below T c and mixed 'Aufhellung-Umweganregung' patterns above T c . Theoretical patterns were calculated employing the iterative method for the approximation of intensities by a Taylor series and compared to the experimental results. (author) [pt

  4. Crystallization process of zircon and fergusonite during hydrothermal alteration in Nechalacho REE deposit, Thor Lake, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Murakami, H.; Kon, Y.; Tsunematsu, M.

    2012-04-01

    The core samples of two drill holes, which penetrate sub-horizontal mineralized horizons at Nechalacho REE deposit in the Proterozoic Thor Lake syenite, Canada, were studied in order to clarify magmatic and hydrothermal processes that enriched HFSE (e.g. Zr, Nb, Y and REE). Zircon is the most common REE minerals in Nechalacho REE deposit. The zircon is divided into five types as follows: Type-1 zircon occurs as single grain in phlogopite and the chondrite-normalized REE pattern is characterized by a steeply-rising slope from the LREE to the HREE with a positive Ce-anomaly and negative Eu-anomaly. This chemical characteristic is similar to that of igneous zircon. Type-2 zircon consists of HREE-rich magmatic porous core and LREE-Nb-F-rich hydrothermal rim. This type zircon is mostly included in phlogopite and fluorite, and occasionally in microcline. Type-3 zircon is characterized by euhedral to anhedral crystal, occurring in a complex intergrowth with REE fluorocarbonates. Type-3 zircons have high contents of REE, Nb and fluorine. Type-4 zircon consists of porous-core and -rim zones, but their chemical compositions are similar to each other. This type zircon is a subhedral crystal rimmed by fergusonite. Type-5 zircon is characterized by smaller, porous and subhedral to anhedral crystals. The interstices between small zircons are filled by fergusonite. Type-4 and -5 zircons show low REE and Nb contents. Occurrences of these five types of zircon are different according to the depth and degree of the alteration by hydrothermal solutions rich in F- and CO3 of the two drill holes, which permit a model for evolution of the zircon crystallization in Nechalacho REE deposit as follows: (1) type-1 (single magmatic zircon) is formed in miaskitic syenite. (2) LREE-Nb-F-rich hydrothermal zircon formed around HREE-rich magmatic zircon (type-2 zircon); (3) type-3 zircon crystallized thorough F and CO3-rich hydrothermal alteration of type-2 zircon which formed the complex

  5. The Li–Si–(O)–N system revisited: Structural characterization of Li{sub 21}Si{sub 3}N{sub 11} and Li{sub 7}SiN{sub 3}O

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casas-Cabanas, M. [CIC energiGUNE, Parque Tecnológico de Álava, Albert Einstein 48, ED.CIC, 01510 Miñano (Spain); Santner, H. [Institut de Ciència de Materials de Barcelona (CSIC) Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra, Catalonia (Spain); Palacín, M.R., E-mail: rosa.palacin@icmab.es [Institut de Ciència de Materials de Barcelona (CSIC) Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra, Catalonia (Spain)

    2014-05-01

    A systematic study of the Li–Si–(O)–N system is presented. The synthetic conditions to prepare Li{sub 2}SiN{sub 2}, Li{sub 5}SiN{sub 3}, Li{sub 18}Si{sub 3}N{sub 10}, Li{sub 21}Si{sub 3}N{sub 11} and Li{sub 7}SiN{sub 3}O are described and the structure of the last two compounds has been solved for the first time. While Li{sub 21}Si{sub 3}N{sub 11} crystallizes as a superstructure of the anti-fluorite structure with Li and Si ordering, Li{sub 7}SiN{sub 3}O exhibits the anti-fluorite structure with both anion and cation disorder. - Graphical abstract: A systematic study of the Li–Si–(O)–N system is presented. Li{sub 21}Si{sub 3}N{sub 11} crystallizes as a superstructure of the anti-fluorite structure with Li and Si ordering, Li{sub 7}SiN{sub 3}O exhibits the anti-fluorite structure with both anion and cation disorder. - Highlights: • Li{sub 2}SiN{sub 2}, Li{sub 5}SiN{sub 3}, Li{sub 18}Si{sub 3}N{sub 10}, Li{sub 21}Si{sub 3}N{sub 11} and Li{sub 7}SiN{sub 3}O are prepared. • The structures of Li{sub 21}Si{sub 3}N{sub 11} and Li{sub 7}SiN{sub 3}O are presented. • Li{sub 21}Si{sub 3}N{sub 11} exhibits an anti-fluorite superstructure with Li and Si ordering.

  6. The nature of dynamic disorder in lead halide perovskite crystals (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaffe, Omer; Guo, Yinsheng; Hull, Trevor; Stoumpos, Costas; Tan, Liang Z.; Egger, David A.; Zheng, Fan; Szpak, Guilherme; Semonin, Octavi E.; Beecher, Alexander N.; Heinz, Tony F.; Kronik, Leeor; Rappe, Andrew M.; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.; Owen, Jonathan S.; Pimenta, Marcos A.; Brus, Louis E.

    2016-09-01

    We combine low frequency Raman scattering measurements with first-principles molecular dynamics (MD) to study the nature of dynamic disorder in hybrid lead-halide perovskite crystals. We conduct a comparative study between a hybrid (CH3NH3PbBr3) and an all-inorganic lead-halide perovskite (CsPbBr3). Both are of the general ABX3 perovskite formula, and have a similar band gap and structural phase sequence, orthorhombic at low temperature, changing first to tetragonal and then to cubic symmetry as temperature increases. In the high temperature phases, we find that both compounds show a pronounced Raman quasi-elastic central peak, indicating that both are dynamically disordered.

  7. Fluid evolution and mineralogy of Mn-Fe-barite-fluorite mineralizations at the contact of the Thuringian Basin, Thüringer Wald and Thüringer Schiefergebirge in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majzlan Juraj

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Numerous small deposits and occurrences of Mn-Fe-fluorite-barite mineralization have developed at the contact of the Thuringian Basin, Thüringer Wald and Thüringer Schiefergebirge in central Germany. The studied mineralizations comprise the assemblages siderite+ankerite-calcite-fluorite-barite and hematite-Mn oxides-calcite-barite, with the precipitation sequence in that order within each assemblage. A structural geological analysis places the origin of the barite veins between the Middle Jurassic and Early Cretaceous. Primary fluid inclusions contain water vapour and an aqueous phase with NaCl and CaCl2 as the main solutes, with salinities mostly between 24–27 mass. % CaCl2 eq. Th measurements range between 85 °C and 160 °C in barite, between 139 °C and 163 °C in siderite, and between 80 °C and 130 °C in fluorite and calcite. Stable isotopes (S, O point to the evaporitic source of sulphur in the observed mineralizations. The S,C,O isotopic compositions suggest that barite and calcite could not have precipitated from the same fluid. The isotopic composition of the fluid that precipitated barite is close to the sea water in the entire Permo–Mesozoic time span whereas calcite is isotopically distinctly heavier, as if the fluids were affected by evaporation. The fluid evolution in the siliciclastic/volcanic Rotliegend sediments (as determined by a number of earlier petrological and geochemical studies can be correlated with the deposition sequence of the ore minerals. In particular, the bleaching of the sediments by reduced Rotliegend fluids (basinal brines could be the event that mobilized Fe and Mn. These elements were deposited as siderite+ankerite within the Zechstein carbonate rocks and as hematite+Mn oxides within the oxidizing environment of the Permian volcanic and volcanoclastic rocks. A Middle-Jurassic illitization event delivered Ca, Na, Ba, and Pb from the feldspars into the basinal brines. Of these elements, Ba was

  8. Crystal growth and characterization of new semiorganic nonlinear optical single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulshrestha, Shobha, E-mail: shobha011986@gmail.com; Shrivastava, A. K., E-mail: ashwaniaks@rediffmail.com [School of Studies in Physics, Jiwaji University Gwalior (M.P.) – 474 011 (India)

    2016-05-06

    An organic material of a L-histidine monohydrochloride single crystal was grown in a distilled water solution using the slow evaporation method at 40–45°C. The grown crystal was transparent and colourless, with a size of about 20 × 9 × 5 mm{sup 3}, obtained within a period of 21 days. The solubility of grown crystals have found out at various temperatures. The UV-visible transmittance studies show that the grown crystals have wide optical transparency in the entire visible region It is observed that the crystal has transparency window from 255nm to 700nm and its energy gap (Eg) found to be is 3.1eV. The grown crystal was subjected to powder X-ray diffraction analysis, confirming that the orthorhombic crystalline nature of the crystal. To identify the surface morphology, the as grown crystal was subjected to FE-SEM technique. The chemical composition of the grown crystal was estimated by Energy dispersive X-ray analysis. The optical behaviour of the grown crystal was analyzed by PL study.

  9. Hypersonic phononic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorishnyy, T; Ullal, C K; Maldovan, M; Fytas, G; Thomas, E L

    2005-03-25

    In this Letter we propose the use of hypersonic phononic crystals to control the emission and propagation of high frequency phonons. We report the fabrication of high quality, single crystalline hypersonic crystals using interference lithography and show that direct measurement of their phononic band structure is possible with Brillouin light scattering. Numerical calculations are employed to explain the nature of the observed propagation modes. This work lays the foundation for experimental studies of hypersonic crystals and, more generally, phonon-dependent processes in nanostructures.

  10. Determination of crystal structures by x-ray diffraction: applications to a lanthanide complex and a natural organic compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda, J.M. de.

    1986-01-01

    The study fir determining crystal structures of the Ho (ReO sub(4)) sub(3) 4 TDTD 3 H sub(2) O complex and the natural organic compound C sub(14) H sub(16) O sub(6) by X-ray diffraction are presented. The experimental equipments are described in details. (M.C.K.)

  11. Liquid crystals in biotribology synovial joint treatment

    CERN Document Server

    Ermakov, Sergey; Eismont, Oleg; Nikolaev, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    This book summarizes the theoretical and experimental studies confirming the concept of the liquid-crystalline nature of boundary lubrication in synovial joints. It is shown that cholesteric liquid crystals in the synovial liquid play a significant role in the mechanism of intra-articular friction reduction. The results of structural, rheological and tribological research of the creation of artificial synovial liquids - containing cholesteric liquid crystals in natural synovial liquids - are described. These liquid crystals reproduce the lubrication properties of natural synovia and provide a high chondroprotective efficiency. They were tested in osteoarthritis models and in clinical practice.

  12. A molecular dynamics study on the oxygen diffusion in doped fluorites: the effect of the dopant distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarancon, A. [M2E/XaRMAE/IREC, Department of Advanced Materials for Energy Applications, Catalonia Institute for Energy Research (IREC), Josep Pla 2, Torre 2, B2, 08019 Barcelona (Spain); Morata, A.; Peiro, F. [MIND/XaRMAE/IN2UB, Department of Electronics, University of Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Dezanneau, G. [Laboratoire Structures, Proprietes et Modelisation des Solides, Grande Voie des Vignes, Ecole Centrale Paris, F-92295 Chatenay-Malabry Cedex (France)

    2011-02-15

    The effect of the dopant distribution on the oxygen diffusion in doped fluorites typically used for solid oxide fuel cells electrolyte applications has been analysed by using molecular dynamics simulations. The oxygen mass transport in both yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and gadolinia-doped ceria has been studied and compared in the range of temperatures between 1,159 and 1,959 K. A new methodology based on the analysis of local environments is used to describe the diffusion process at an atomic scale. Preferred vacancy migration pathways, most suitable conduction models, energy landscapes and jump efficiency have been detailed for each material. Finally, a particular case of non-random distribution of dopants in YSZ is presented in order to quantitatively evaluate the effect of the dopant pattern on the mass transport properties and the potential of the methodology developed here for understanding and foreseeing real configurations at the nanoscale. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. Study On Beneficiation Technology Of Dong Pao Rare-Earth-Barite-Fluorite With Two Product Plans About Content And Recovery Of Rare-Earth Fine Ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duong Van Su; Truong Thi Ai; Bui Ba Duy; Bui Thi Bay; Nguyen Hong Ha; Le Thi Hong Ha; Doan Thi Mo; Doan Dac Ban; Nguyen Hoang Son

    2014-01-01

    The ore sample used in the research was taken from the F3 ore bodies and the sample of the F7, F9 and F16 ore bodies which contain the average of 5.98% TR 2 O 3 ; they are multi-metals ore which is difficult to enrich, highly weather with very complex ingredients. The process of the experiment is the ore is crushed, ground, screened and classified reasonably to -0.1 mm and divided into 3 particle size with the following technique: (1) -0.020 mm is primary sludge and the rare-earth fine ore; (2) 0.075-1 mm is gotten through the sludge concentrating table with the output is the 2 parts: the heavy part which is dried magnetic separator with high magnetism to get the rare-earth fine ore and the light one; (3) Light minerals, non-magnetic and ferromagnetic minerals group are ground together to 85% of them get size within -0.075 mm then mix it with 0.020-0.075 mm group. Using flotation separator, get barite-rare earth mixture and fluorite. After that, we separate this mixture by secondary flotation and get refined rare earth, barite and fluorite mineral. The result of the theme: (1) product plan A-rare-earth fine ore has TR 2 O 3 content archive 42.07% with recovery is 69.70%; (2) product plan B-rare-earth fine ore has TR 2 O 3 content archive 29.64% with recovery is 80.01%. (author)

  14. Effect of Fe2O3 on the crystallization behavior of glass-ceramics produced from naturally cooled yellow phosphorus furnace slag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong-pan; Huang, Xiao-feng; Ma, Li-ping; Chen, Dan-li; Shang, Zhi-biao; Jiang, Ming

    2017-03-01

    CaO-Al2O3-SiO2 (CAS) glass-ceramics were prepared via a melting method using naturally cooled yellow phosphorus furnace slag as the main raw material. The effects of the addition of Fe2O3 on the crystallization behavior and properties of the prepared glass-ceramics were studied by differential thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy. The crystallization activation energy was calculated using the modified Johnson-Mehl-Avrami equation. The results show that the intrinsic nucleating agent in the yellow phosphorus furnace slag could effectively promote the crystallization of CAS. The crystallization activation energy first increased and then decreased with increasing amount of added Fe2O3. At 4wt% of added Fe2O3, the crystallization activation energy reached a maximum of 676.374 kJ·mol-1. The type of the main crystalline phase did not change with the amount of added Fe2O3. The primary and secondary crystalline phases were identified as wollastonite (CaSiO3) and hedenbergite (CaFe(Si2O6)), respectively.

  15. A multistep single-crystal-to-single-crystal bromodiacetylene dimerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoheisel, Tobias N.; Schrettl, Stephen; Marty, Roman; Todorova, Tanya K.; Corminboeuf, Clémence; Sienkiewicz, Andrzej; Scopelliti, Rosario; Schweizer, W. Bernd; Frauenrath, Holger

    2013-04-01

    Packing constraints and precise placement of functional groups are the reason that organic molecules in the crystalline state often display unusual physical or chemical properties not observed in solution. Here we report a single-crystal-to-single-crystal dimerization of a bromodiacetylene that involves unusually large atom displacements as well as the cleavage and formation of several bonds. Density functional theory computations support a mechanism in which the dimerization is initiated by a [2 + 1] photocycloaddition favoured by the nature of carbon-carbon short contacts in the crystal structure. The reaction proceeded up to the theoretical degree of conversion without loss of crystallinity, and it was also performed on a preparative scale with good yield. Moreover, it represents the first synthetic pathway to (E)-1,2-dibromo-1,2-diethynylethenes, which could serve as synthetic intermediates for the preparation of molecular carbon scaffolds. Our findings both extend the scope of single-crystal-to-single-crystal reactions and highlight their potential as a synthetic tool for complex transformations.

  16. Properties of complex tungstates, niobates, translated with fluorite-like structure. Svojstva slozhnykh vol'framatov, niobatov, tantalatov s flyuoritopodobnoj strukturoj

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vetkina, S N; Zolin, V F; Sirotinkin, V P; Smirnov, S A

    1989-04-01

    Spectra of ternary tungstates, niobates and tantalates (MeLa{sub 2}WO{sub 7}, La{sub 3}TO{sub 7}; Me=Ba, Sr; T=Ta, Nb) related to the layered fluorite group are analyzed. The laser pumping and time resolved luminescence are used for selecting spectra of unequivalent centers. The symmetry of the first center is near to the distorted cubic one. The vibrational spectra of europium in Eu{sub 3}NbO{sub 7} and SrLa{sub 2}WO{sub 7} are due to the chain-like structure of niobates and to the net-like structure of tantalates. The stimulated emission of Nd{sup 3+} in powders of BaLa{sub 2}WO{sub 7} and La{sub 3}NbO{sub 7} is observed at wavelengths of 1.07 and 1.063 {mu}m, respectively.

  17. Natural Cr3+-rich ettringite: occurrence, properties, and crystal structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seryotkin, Yurii V.; Sokol, Ella V.; Kokh, Svetlana N.; Murashko, Mikhail N.

    2017-08-01

    Cr3+-rich ettringite with Cr3+→Al substitution and Cr/(Cr + Al) ratios up to 0.40-0.50 was found in mineral assemblages of the Ma'aleh Adumim area of Mottled Zone (Judean Desert). The Cr3+-rich compositions were the latest in the thaumasite → ettringite-thaumasite solid solution → ettringite → ettringite-bentorite solid solution series. The mineral-forming solution was enriched in Cr3+ and had a pH buffered by afwillite at 11-12. Chromium was inherited from larnite rocks produced by high-temperature combustion metamorphic alteration of bioproductive calcareous sediments. The Cr/(Cr + Al) ratios are within 0.10-0.15 in most of the analysed crystals. This degree of substitution imparts pink colouration to the crystals, but does not affect their habit (a combination of monohedra and a prism). The habit changes to pyramid faces in coarse and later Cr3+-bearing crystals as Cr/(Cr + Al) ratios increase abruptly to 0.40-0.50. Single-crystal XRD analysis of one Cr-free and two Cr3+-rich samples and their structure determination and refinement indicate that the Cr-rich crystals (with Cr/(Cr + Al) to 0.3) preserve the symmetry and metrics of ettringite. The Ca-O bonding network undergoes differentiation with increase of Cr3+ concentration at octahedral M sites. The compression of Ca2 and expansion of Ca1 polyhedra sub-networks correlates with the degree of Cr3+→Al substitution.

  18. Enabling the high capacity of lithium-rich anti-fluorite lithium iron oxide by simultaneous anionic and cationic redox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Chun; Yao, Zhenpeng; Lu, Jun; Ma, Lu; Maroni, Victor A.; Li, Liang; Lee, Eungje; Alp, Esen E.; Wu, Tianpin; Wen, Jianguo; Ren, Yang; Johnson, Christopher; Thackeray, Michael M.; Chan, Maria K. Y.; Wolverton, Chris; Amine, Khalil

    2017-12-01

    Anionic redox reactions in cathodes of lithium-ion batteries are allowing opportunities to double or even triple the energy density. However, it is still challenging to develop a cathode, especially with Earth-abundant elements, that enables anionic redox activity for real-world applications, primarily due to limited strategies to intercept the oxygenates from further irreversible oxidation to O2 gas. Here we report simultaneous iron and oxygen redox activity in a Li-rich anti-fluorite Li5FeO4 electrode. During the removal of the first two Li ions, the oxidation potential of O2- is lowered to approximately 3.5 V versus Li+/Li0, at which potential the cationic oxidation occurs concurrently. These anionic and cationic redox reactions show high reversibility without any obvious O2 gas release. Moreover, this study provides an insightful guide to designing high-capacity cathodes with reversible oxygen redox activity by simply introducing oxygen ions that are exclusively coordinated by Li+.

  19. TEM investigation of irradiation damage in single crystal CeO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Bei; Kirk, Mark A.; Chen, Weiying; Oaks, Aaron; Rest, Jeffery; Yacout, Abdellatif; Stubbins, James F.

    2011-01-01

    In order to understand the evolution of radiation damage in oxide nuclear fuel, 150-1000 keV Kr ions were implanted into single crystal CeO 2 , as a simulation of fluorite ceramic UO 2 , while in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations were carried out. Two characteristic defect structures were investigated: dislocation/dislocation loops and nano-size gas bubbles. The growth behavior of defect clusters induced by 1 MeV Kr ions up to doses of 5 x 10 15 ions/cm 2 were followed at 600 deg. C and 800 deg. C. TEM micrographs clearly show the development of defect structures: nucleation of dislocation loops, transformation to extended dislocation lines, and the formation of tangled dislocation networks. The difference in dislocation growth rates at 600 deg. C and 800 deg. C revealed the important role which Ce-vacancies play in the loop formation process. Bubble formation, studied through 150 keV Kr implantations at room temperature and 600 deg. C, might be influenced by either the mobility of metal-vacancies correlated with at threshold temperature or the limitation of gas solubility as a function of temperature.

  20. Polycrystalline dosimetric discs of natural CaF2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuno, E.; Ferreira, M.M.; Cruz, M.T.; Watanabe, S.

    1977-01-01

    A new method to prepare TL dosimeters in solid discs form, by the application of cold press in a mixture of KCL and fluorite in powder form, is investigated. By this method, it is possible to obtain thousands of dosimeters without difficulty much more uniform than that obtained from monocrystal ingots. The results show that the new dosimeters present the same properties as the fluorite in powder form, with the advantage that it is easier to handle in routine work. The ratio of 2 to 1 for KCL mass to CaF 2 mass presents good Tl sensitivity to ionizing radiation and sufficient mechanical resistivity. The minimum detectable exposure is approximately 10 mR. 83% from 442 CaF 2 solid discs gave TL response within 10% of mean value. Energy dependence is also presented [pt

  1. Brine history indicated by argon, krypton, chlorine, bromine, and iodine analyses of fluid inclusions from the Mississippi Valley type lead-fluorite-barite deposits at Hansonburg, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhlke, J.K.; Irwin, J.J.

    1992-01-01

    Argon, krypton, chlorine, bromine, and iodine were measured in a homogeneous population of high-salinity hydrothermal fluid inclusions from the Tertiary-age Mississippi Valley-type (MVT) lead-fluorite-barite deposits at Hansonburg, New Mexico to establish new types of evidence for the history of both the fluid and the major dissolved salts. Noble gases and halogens in fluid inclusions containing 10−10–10−9 L of brine (Cl= 3 molal) were analyzed by laser microprobe noble-gas mass spectrometry (lmngms) on neutron-irradiated samples.The concentrations of36Ar (4.7 × 10−8 molal) and84Kr1.8 × 10−9 molal) in the fluid inclusions are equal to those of fresh surface waters in equilibrium with air at approximately20 ± 5°. The mole ratios ofBr/Cl (1.2 × 10−4) andI/Cl (1–2 × 10−6) are among the lowest measured in any natural waters, similar to those of modern brines formed by dissolution of Permian NaCl-bearing evaporites in southeast New Mexico.40Ar/36Ar ratios (600) are twice that of air, and indicate that the fluid inclusions had excess radiogenic40Ar (1.4 × 10−5 molal) when trapped. The amount of excess40Ar appears to be too large to have been acquired with Cl by congruent dissolution of halite-bearing evaporites, and possibly too small to have been acquired with Pb by congruent dissolution of granitic basement rocks with Proterozoic KAr ages.From thelmngms data, combined with published Pb and S isotope data, we infer the following sequence of events in the history of the Hansonburg MVT hydrothermal brine: (1) the brine originated as relatively dilute meteoric water, and it did not gain or lose atmospheric Ar or Kr after recharge; (2) the originally dilute fluid acquired the bulk of its Cl and sulfate in the subsurface after recharge by dissolving halite-bearing Permian? marine evaporites; (3) the high salinity brine then acquired most of its Pb and excess radiogenic40Ar from interactions with aquifer rocks other than evaporites, possibly clastic

  2. Single Crystals Grown Under Unconstrained Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunagawa, Ichiro

    Based on detailed investigations on morphology (evolution and variation in external forms), surface microtopography of crystal faces (spirals and etch figures), internal morphology (growth sectors, growth banding and associated impurity partitioning) and perfection (dislocations and other lattice defects) in single crystals, we can deduce how and by what mechanism the crystal grew and experienced fluctuation in growth parameters through its growth and post-growth history under unconstrained condition. The information is useful not only in finding appropriate way to growing highly perfect and homogeneous single crystals, but also in deciphering letters sent from the depth of the Earth and the Space. It is also useful in discriminating synthetic from natural gemstones. In this chapter, available methods to obtain molecular information are briefly summarized, and actual examples to demonstrate the importance of this type of investigations are selected from both natural minerals (diamond, quartz, hematite, corundum, beryl, phlogopite) and synthetic crystals (SiC, diamond, corundum, beryl).

  3. Color change of gemstones by exposure to gamma rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Giovanna L.C. de; Lameiras, Fernando S., E-mail: giovannalarissa17@hotmail.com, E-mail: fsl@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    A gem is appreciated by collectors and, when polished, widely used for jewelry manufacturing. For example, when quartz naturally or artificially acquires a color it becomes a gemstone (smoky quartz, morion, citrine, amethyst, or prasyolite). The presence of chromophore elements in a quartz sample was analysed by Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR). With a semi-quantitative analysis of the absorption FTIR spectra, it was possible to predict if colorless quartz has the potential to develop color when exposed to ionizing radiation and heat. Specific absorption bands show the presence of chromophore elements in quartz such as aluminum, iron, hydrogen, sodium, or lithium. Considering the ratio of the heights of the absorption bands of these elements, it was possible to predict the color quartz can develop. Samples of irradiated dark and light violet fluorites were analyzed by FTIR and energy-dispersive X-rays spectroscopy. The light violet samples has higher content of calcium relative to fluorine, as well higher content of hydroxyl, probably replacing fluorine in crystal lattice. Hydroxyls cannot be precursors of F color centers, which are the cause of violet color in fluorite, explaining the light violet color of hydroxyl-rich samples. (author)

  4. Color change of gemstones by exposure to gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, Giovanna L.C. de; Lameiras, Fernando S.

    2015-01-01

    A gem is appreciated by collectors and, when polished, widely used for jewelry manufacturing. For example, when quartz naturally or artificially acquires a color it becomes a gemstone (smoky quartz, morion, citrine, amethyst, or prasyolite). The presence of chromophore elements in a quartz sample was analysed by Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR). With a semi-quantitative analysis of the absorption FTIR spectra, it was possible to predict if colorless quartz has the potential to develop color when exposed to ionizing radiation and heat. Specific absorption bands show the presence of chromophore elements in quartz such as aluminum, iron, hydrogen, sodium, or lithium. Considering the ratio of the heights of the absorption bands of these elements, it was possible to predict the color quartz can develop. Samples of irradiated dark and light violet fluorites were analyzed by FTIR and energy-dispersive X-rays spectroscopy. The light violet samples has higher content of calcium relative to fluorine, as well higher content of hydroxyl, probably replacing fluorine in crystal lattice. Hydroxyls cannot be precursors of F color centers, which are the cause of violet color in fluorite, explaining the light violet color of hydroxyl-rich samples. (author)

  5. Formation of defect-fluorite structured NdNiOxHy epitaxial thin films via a soft chemical route from NdNiO3 precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onozuka, T; Chikamatsu, A; Katayama, T; Fukumura, T; Hasegawa, T

    2016-07-26

    A new phase of oxyhydride NdNiOxHy with a defect-fluorite structure was obtained by a soft chemical reaction of NdNiO3 epitaxial thin films on a substrate of SrTiO3 (100) with CaH2. The epitaxial relationship of this phase relative to SrTiO3 could be controlled by changing the reaction temperature. At 240 °C, NdNiOxHy grew with a [001] orientation, forming a thin layer of infinite-layer NdNiO2 at the interface between the NdNiOxHy and the substrate. Meanwhile, a high-temperature reaction at 400 °C formed [110]-oriented NdNiOxHy without NdNiO2.

  6. Unusual behavior of uranium dioxide at high magnetic fields. Part I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gofryk, K.; Jaime, M.; Zapf, V.; Harrison, N.; Saul, A.; Radtke, G.; Lashley, J. C.; Salamon, M.; Andersson, A. D.; Stanek, C.; Durakiewicz, T.; Smith, J. L.

    UO2 is a Mott-Hubbard insulator with well-localized 5 f-electrons and its crystal structure is the face-centered-cubic fluorite. It experiences a first-order antiferromagnetic phase transition at 30.8 K to a non-collinear antiferromagnetic structure that remains a topic of debate. It is believed that the first order nature of the transition results from the competition between the exchange interaction and the Jahn-Teller distortion of oxygen atoms. Despite extensive experimental and theoretical efforts the nature of the competing degrees of freedom and their couplings (such as spin-phonon coupling) are still unclear. Here we present results of our extensive thermodynamic investigations, on well-characterized and oriented single crystals of UO2, focusing on magnetization M(T,H) measurements in DC and pulsed magnetic fields to up 65 T at the NHMFL. Work supported by the Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences, and Engineering Division. The NHMFL Pulsed Field Facility is supported by the NSF, the U.S. D.O.E., and the State of Florida through NSF cooperative Grant DMR.

  7. Vibrational spectra and natural bond orbital analysis of organic crystal L-prolinium picrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwin, Bismi; Amalanathan, M.; Hubert Joe, I.

    2012-10-01

    Vibrational spectral analysis and quantum chemical computations based on density functional theory (DFT) have been performed on the organic crystal L-prolinium picrate (LPP). The equilibrium geometry, various bonding features and harmonic vibrational wavenumbers of LPP have been investigated using B3LYP method. The calculated molecular geometry has been compared with the experimental data. The detailed interpretation of the vibrational spectra has been carried out with the aid of VEDA 4 program. The various intramolecular interactions confirming the biological activity of the compound have been exposed by natural bond orbital analysis. The distribution of Mulliken atomic charges and bending of natural hybrid orbitals associated with hydrogen bonding also reflects the presence of intramolecular hydrogen bonding thereby enhancing bioactivity. The analysis of the electron density of HOMO and LUMO gives an idea of the delocalization and low value of energy gap indicates electron transport in the molecule and thereby bioactivity. Vibrational analysis reveals the presence of strong O-H⋯O and N-H⋯O interaction between L-prolinium and picrate ions providing evidence for the charge transfer interaction between the donor and acceptor groups and is responsible for its bioactivity.

  8. Large three-dimensional photonic crystals based on monocrystalline liquid crystal blue phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Wei; Hou, Chien-Tsung; Li, Cheng-Chang; Jau, Hung-Chang; Wang, Chun-Ta; Hong, Ching-Lang; Guo, Duan-Yi; Wang, Cheng-Yu; Chiang, Sheng-Ping; Bunning, Timothy J; Khoo, Iam-Choon; Lin, Tsung-Hsien

    2017-09-28

    Although there have been intense efforts to fabricate large three-dimensional photonic crystals in order to realize their full potential, the technologies developed so far are still beset with various material processing and cost issues. Conventional top-down fabrications are costly and time-consuming, whereas natural self-assembly and bottom-up fabrications often result in high defect density and limited dimensions. Here we report the fabrication of extraordinarily large monocrystalline photonic crystals by controlling the self-assembly processes which occur in unique phases of liquid crystals that exhibit three-dimensional photonic-crystalline properties called liquid-crystal blue phases. In particular, we have developed a gradient-temperature technique that enables three-dimensional photonic crystals to grow to lateral dimensions of ~1 cm (~30,000 of unit cells) and thickness of ~100 μm (~ 300 unit cells). These giant single crystals exhibit extraordinarily sharp photonic bandgaps with high reflectivity, long-range periodicity in all dimensions and well-defined lattice orientation.Conventional fabrication approaches for large-size three-dimensional photonic crystals are problematic. By properly controlling the self-assembly processes, the authors report the fabrication of monocrystalline blue phase liquid crystals that exhibit three-dimensional photonic-crystalline properties.

  9. Crystal structure and ion-diffusion pathway of inorganic materials through neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yashima, Masatomo

    2012-01-01

    The present brief review describes the application of neutron powder diffractometry and maximum-entropy method to the studies of crystal structure and diffusional pathways of mobile ions in ionic conducting ceramic materials. La 0.62 Li 0.16 TiO 3 and L i0.6 FePO 4 exhibit two- and one-dimensional networks of Li cation diffusional pathways, respectively. In the fluorite-structure ionic conductors such as celia solid solution Ce 0.93 Y 0.07 O 1.96 , bismuth oxide solid solution δ-Bi 1.4 Yb 0.6 O 3 and copper iodide CuI, a similar curved diffusion pathway along the directions is observed. In the cubic ABO 3 perovskite-type ionic conductor, lanthanum gallate solid solution, the mobile ions diffuse along a curved line keeping the interatomic distance between the B cation and O 2- anion. We have experimentally confirmed that the anisotropic thermal motions of the apex O2 atom and the interstitial O3 atoms are essential for the high oxygen permeability of the K 2 NiF 4 -type mixed conductor. Diffusion paths of proton are visualized along c axis in hexagonal hydroxyapatite. (author)

  10. The nature of γ-hydride in crept zirconium single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhtar, A.

    1977-01-01

    Single crystals prepared from crystal bar zirconium have been subjected to uniaxial tensile-creep under a vacuum of 10 -4 Pa for 160 h. Transmission electron microscopy of crept crystals has revealed the presence of thin fct γ-zirconium hydride platelets lying parallel to (1100) planes and elongated along the [1120]sub(α) direction. The platelets maintain the following lattice relationship with the hcp (α) matrix: [1120]sub(α)//[110]sub(γ), (0001)sub(α)//(001)sub(γ). This relationship is different from that obtained for needle γ-hydride generally observed in quenched samples. Lattice misfit calculations indicate that the platelets have a large positive misfit normal to the plane of the disc and a small misfit in the plane of the disc, which remains parallel to (1010)sub(α). Displacement fringe contrast is observed inside the platelets under conditions consistent with the lattice misfit. It is proposed that the nucleation of these precipitates occurs at stacking faults in the presence of applied stress. (Auth.)

  11. The feasibility study of BGO crystal applied to natural gamma ray spectral logging in deep wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Wen; Zhang Jingyi

    1992-01-01

    The experimental research on the feasibility of BGO crystal application to natural gamma ray spectral logging was performed under laboratory conditions. The natural radioactive standard sources and heater case were used to simulate the realistic logging environment. The experimental results of BGO detector show that the spectrum stabilization can be effectively realized, and the temperature effect of energy resolution has no obvious impact on spectrum analysis when the temperature of detector ranging from 20 degree C to 60 degree C. The temperature effect of the output pulse height is the main cause of the system error in spectrum analysis, which will surely be reduced in realistic logging by the low temperature gradient. The experimental results of CsI(Na) detector support this conclusion. A suggestion for further work is proposed at the end of this paper

  12. The feasibility study of BGO crystal applied to natural gamma ray spectral logging in deep wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Li; Jingyi, Zhang [Qinghua Univ., Beijing (China). Dept. of Engineering Physics; Chongfan, He; Jingying, Liao [Shanghai Silicate Institute (China)

    1992-09-01

    The experimental research on the feasibility of BGO crystal application to natural gamma ray spectral logging was performed under laboratory conditions. The natural radioactive standard sources and heater case were used to simulate the realistic logging environment. The experimental results of BGO detector show that the spectrum stabilization can be effectively realized, and the temperature effect of energy resolution has no obvious impact on spectrum analysis when the temperature of detector ranging from 20 degree C to 60 degree C. The temperature effect of the output pulse height is the main cause of the system error in spectrum analysis, which will surely be reduced in realistic logging by the low temperature gradient. The experimental results of CsI(Na) detector support this conclusion. A suggestion for further work is proposed at the end of this paper.

  13. Radiation induced color in topaz crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castagnet, A.C.; Rocca, H.C.C.; Rostilato, M.E.C.M.

    1989-08-01

    The presence of defects and impurities in the crystal lattice alters the eletric field distribution within the crystal, allowing the electrons to occupy energy levels in the forbbiden band. Ionizing radiation supply the required energy to permit the electrons originaly bound to lattice atoms, to occupy effectively those intermediate levels, forming color centers. Dependig upon the nature and energy of the radiation, it is possible to produce defects in regions of the crystal, generating color centers. Based on these premises, a technique to induce color in originally colorless topaz, by using the IEA-R1 nuclear reactor, was developed at Engineering and Industrial Application Department (TE). Samples were irradiated inside iron capsules coated with cadmium foils. The iron, and principaly the cadmium, absorb the thermal neutrons that could activate crystal impurities generating long-lived radioisotopes. The epithermal neutrons that overpass the iron and cadmium barriers interact with the crystal atoms, causing lattice defects which give rise to color center, by subsequent ionization processes. The procedure used at TE induces permanent blue color, in natural colorless topaz. (author) [pt

  14. Solubility and crystallization of piroxicam from different solvents in evaporative and cooling crystallizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qu, Haiyan; Ostergaard, Iben

    2018-01-01

    polarities; It has been found that the solubility of piroxicam in the solvents is in the following order: chloroform > dichloromethane > acetone > ethyl acetate > acetonitrile > acetic acid > methanol > hexane. Crystallization of piroxicam from different solvents has been performed with evaporative.......Results obtained in the present work showed the stochastic nature of nucleation of different polymorphs as well as the complexity of the crystallization of a polymorphic system....

  15. Electron transfer kinetics on natural crystals of MoS2 and graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velický, Matěj; Bissett, Mark A; Toth, Peter S; Patten, Hollie V; Worrall, Stephen D; Rodgers, Andrew N J; Hill, Ernie W; Kinloch, Ian A; Novoselov, Konstantin S; Georgiou, Thanasis; Britnell, Liam; Dryfe, Robert A W

    2015-07-21

    Here, we evaluate the electrochemical performance of sparsely studied natural crystals of molybdenite and graphite, which have increasingly been used for fabrication of next generation monolayer molybdenum disulphide and graphene energy storage devices. Heterogeneous electron transfer kinetics of several redox mediators, including Fe(CN)6(3-/4-), Ru(NH3)6(3+/2+) and IrCl6(2-/3-) are determined using voltammetry in a micro-droplet cell. The kinetics on both materials are studied as a function of surface defectiveness, surface ageing, applied potential and illumination. We find that the basal planes of both natural MoS2 and graphite show significant electroactivity, but a large decrease in electron transfer kinetics is observed on atmosphere-aged surfaces in comparison to in situ freshly cleaved surfaces of both materials. This is attributed to surface oxidation and adsorption of airborne contaminants at the surface exposed to an ambient environment. In contrast to semimetallic graphite, the electrode kinetics on semiconducting MoS2 are strongly dependent on the surface illumination and applied potential. Furthermore, while visibly present defects/cracks do not significantly affect the response of graphite, the kinetics on MoS2 systematically accelerate with small increase in disorder. These findings have direct implications for use of MoS2 and graphene/graphite as electrode materials in electrochemistry-related applications.

  16. Pressure derivatives of the second-order elastic constants of strontium, barium, and lead nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedi, S.S.; Verma, M.P.

    1980-01-01

    An interpretation is given of the measured results on the pressure derivatives of second-order elastic constants (SOEC) of strontium barium, and lead nitrate crystallizing in the fluorite type structure from the Lundquist potential. Potential parameters are determined from the experimental values of SOEC and the equilibrium condition

  17. Topotactic oxidation pathway of ScTiO3 and high-temperature structure evolution of ScTiO3.5 and Sc4Ti3O12-type phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafi, Shahid P; Hernden, Bradley C; Cranswick, Lachlan M D; Hansen, Thomas C; Bieringer, Mario

    2012-02-06

    The novel oxide defect fluorite phase ScTiO(3.5) is formed during the topotactic oxidation of ScTiO(3) bixbyite. We report the oxidation pathway of ScTiO(3) and structure evolution of ScTiO(3.5), Sc(4)Ti(3)O(12), and related scandium-deficient phases as well as high-temperature phase transitions between room temperature and 1300 °Cusing in-situ X-ray diffraction. We provide the first detailed powder neutron diffraction study for ScTiO(3). ScTiO(3) crystallizes in the cubic bixbyite structure in space group Ia3 (206) with a = 9.7099(4) Å. The topotactic oxidation product ScTiO(3.5) crystallizes in an oxide defect fluorite structure in space group Fm3m (225) with a = 4.89199(5) Å. Thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis experiments combined with in-situ X-ray powder diffraction studies illustrate a complex sequence of a topotactic oxidation pathway, phase segregation, and ion ordering at high temperatures. The optimized bulk synthesis for phase pure ScTiO(3.5) is presented. In contrast to the vanadium-based defect fluorite phases AVO(3.5+x) (A = Sc, In) the novel titanium analogue ScTiO(3.5) is stable over a wide temperature range. Above 950 °C ScTiO(3.5) undergoes decomposition with the final products being Sc(4)Ti(3)O(12) and TiO(2). Simultaneous Rietveld refinements against powder X-ray and neutron diffraction data showed that Sc(4)Ti(3)O(12) also exists in the defect fluorite structure in space group Fm3m (225) with a = 4.90077(4) Å. Sc(4)Ti(3)O(12) undergoes partial reduction in CO/Ar atmosphere to form Sc(4)Ti(3)O(11.69(2)).

  18. Controlled synthesis of thorium and uranium oxide nano-crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudry, Damien; Apostolidis, Christos; Walter, Olaf; Gouder, Thomas; Courtois, Eglantine; Kubel, Christian; Meyer, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Very little is known about the size and shape effects on the properties of actinide compounds. As a consequence, the controlled synthesis of well-defined actinide-based nano-crystals constitutes a fundamental step before studying their corresponding properties. In this paper, we report on the non-aqueous surfactant-assisted synthesis of thorium and uranium oxide nano-crystals. The final characteristics of thorium and uranium oxide nano-crystals can be easily tuned by controlling a few experimental parameters such as the nature of the actinide precursor and the composition of the organic system (e.g., the chemical nature of the surfactants and their relative concentrations). Additionally, the influence of these parameters on the outcome of the synthesis is highly dependent on the nature of the actinide element (thorium versus uranium). By using optimised experimental conditions, monodisperse isotropic uranium oxide nano-crystals with different sizes (4.5 and 10.7 nm) as well as branched nano-crystals (overall size ca. 5 nm), nano-dots (ca. 4 nm) and nano-rods (with ultra-small diameters of 1 nm) of thorium oxide were synthesised. (authors)

  19. Searching for new TiO2 crystal phases with better photoactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shang, Cheng; Zhao, Wei-Na; Liu, Zhi-Pan

    2015-01-01

    Using the recently developed stochastic surface walking global optimization method, this work explores the potential energy surface of TiO 2 crystals aiming to search for likely phases with higher photocatalytic activity. Five new phases of TiO 2 are identified and the lowest energy phase transition pathways connecting to the most abundant phases (rutile and anatase) are determined. Theory shows that a high-pressure phase, α-PbO 2 -like form (TiO 2 II) acts as the key intermediate in between rutile and anatase. The phase transition of anatase to rutile belongs to the diffusionless Martensitic phase transition, occurring through a set of habit planes, rutile(101)//TiO 2 II(001), and TiO 2 II(100)//anatase(112). With regard to the photocatalytic activity, three pure phases (#110, pyrite and fluorite) are found to possess the band gap narrower than rutile, but they are unstable at the low-pressure condition. Instead, a mixed anatase-TiO 2 II phase is found to have good stability and narrower band gap than both parent phases. Because of the phase separation, the mixed phase is also expected to improve the photocatalytic performance by reducing the probability of the electron-hole pair recombination. (paper)

  20. Magnetophotonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, M [Toyohashi University of Technology, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan); Fujikawa, R [Toyohashi University of Technology, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan); Baryshev, A [Toyohashi University of Technology, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan); Khanikaev, A [Toyohashi University of Technology, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan); Lim, P B [CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Saitama 332-0012, Japan (Japan); Uchida, H [Toyohashi University of Technology, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan); Aktsipetrov, O [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, Moscow, 119992 (Russian Federation); Fedyanin, A [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, Moscow, 119992 (Russian Federation); Murzina, T [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, Moscow, 119992 (Russian Federation); Granovsky, A [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, Moscow, 119992 (Russian Federation)

    2006-04-21

    When the constitutive materials of photonic crystals (PCs) are magnetic, or even only a defect introduced in PCs is magnetic, the resultant PCs exhibit very unique optical and magneto-optical properties. The strong photon confinement in the vicinity of magnetic defects results in large enhancement in linear and nonlinear magneto-optical responses of the media. Novel functions, such as band Faraday effect, magnetic super-prism effect and non-reciprocal or magnetically controllable photonic band structure, are predicted to occur theoretically. All the unique features of the media arise from the existence of magnetization in media, and hence they are called magnetophotonic crystals providing the spin-dependent nature in PCs. (topical review)

  1. Magnetophotonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, M; Fujikawa, R; Baryshev, A; Khanikaev, A; Lim, P B; Uchida, H; Aktsipetrov, O; Fedyanin, A; Murzina, T; Granovsky, A

    2006-01-01

    When the constitutive materials of photonic crystals (PCs) are magnetic, or even only a defect introduced in PCs is magnetic, the resultant PCs exhibit very unique optical and magneto-optical properties. The strong photon confinement in the vicinity of magnetic defects results in large enhancement in linear and nonlinear magneto-optical responses of the media. Novel functions, such as band Faraday effect, magnetic super-prism effect and non-reciprocal or magnetically controllable photonic band structure, are predicted to occur theoretically. All the unique features of the media arise from the existence of magnetization in media, and hence they are called magnetophotonic crystals providing the spin-dependent nature in PCs. (topical review)

  2. Liquid Crystal Colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalyukh, Ivan I.

    2018-03-01

    Colloids are abundant in nature, science, and technology, with examples ranging from milk to quantum dots and the colloidal atom paradigm. Similarly, liquid crystal ordering is important in contexts ranging from biological membranes to laboratory models of cosmic strings and liquid crystal displays in consumer devices. Some of the most exciting recent developments in both of these soft matter fields emerge at their interface, in the fast-growing research arena of liquid crystal colloids. Mesoscale self-assembly in such systems may lead to artificial materials and to structures with emergent physical behavior arising from patterning of molecular order and nano- or microparticles into precisely controlled configurations. Liquid crystal colloids show exceptional promise for new discovery that may impinge on composite material fabrication, low-dimensional topology, photonics, and so on. Starting from physical underpinnings, I review the state of the art in this fast-growing field, with a focus on its scientific and technological potential.

  3. On the laws of disordering of the Ln3+ -ion crystal field in insulating crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaminskij, A.A.

    1988-01-01

    Results of the study of fundamental regularities, which cause crystal field (CF) disordering on Ln 3+ ions in dielectric crystals are summed up. Analysis and systematization of the investigation results of atomic structure of disordered laser crystals and conducted investigations on spectroscopic properties and induced radiation (IR) permitted to come to the conclusion that the nature of disordering on CF is related to two fundamental regularities. The first regularity- the structural-dynamic one- is pronounced in numerous nonstoichiometric phases; the second one - determines spectroscopic properties and IR character

  4. Signature of crystal symmetry in positron annihilation data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, G.; Adam, S.

    1994-12-01

    While the technique of two-dimensional angular correlation of the electron-positron annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR) yields data in a reference frame related to detectors, data interpretation is made in a reference frame related to the crystal. The paper shows that consistent reformulation of the 2D-ACAR data in the crystal frame can be obtained from the knowledge of the signature of crystal symmetry (SCS) in the data. Derivation of the SCS over variations M-Umklapp areas of the reciprocal lattice from a rigorous definition also results in an improved a posteriori criterion concerning the twinned or untwinned nature of the crystal under investigation. The analysis of a c-projected 2D-ACAR spectrum on Y Ba 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ , accurately establishes the untwinned nature of the used crystals and yields better resolved Fermi surface ridge signatures at 2- and 3- Umklapp processes. (author). 32 refs, 4 figs, 2 tabs

  5. Polariton effects in naphthalene crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinette, S.L.

    1977-10-01

    The experimental verification of the two-step nature of energy dissipation of photon energy by a crystal is the subject of this dissertation. The α(O,O) Davydov component of the lowest energy singlet transition in pure strain-free napthalene single crystals is shown to exhibit an increase in absorption with increasing temperature, due to an increase in polariton damping via polariton-phonon scattering processes

  6. Radiation damage studies on synthetic NaCl crystals and natural rock salt for waste disposal applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klaffky, R.W.; Swyler, K.J.; Levy, P.W.

    1979-01-01

    Radiation damage studies are being made on synthetic NaCl and natural rock salt crystals from various localities, including potential repository sites. Measurements are being made with equipment for recording the radiation induced F-center and colloid particle absorption bands during irradiation with 1.5 MeV electrons at various temperatures. A technique has been developed to resolve the overlapping F-center and colloid bands. The resulting spectra and curves of absorption vs. dose provide information on colloid particle size and concentration, activation energies for processes occurring during colloid formation, and additional data suggesting that both strain and radiation induced dislocations contribute to the colloid formation process

  7. Gypsum crystals observed in experimental and natural sea ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geilfus, Nicolas-Xavier; Galley, Ryan; Cooper, Marc

    2013-01-01

    , the gypsum crystals were identified as being authigenic. The FREeZing CHEMistry (FREZCHEM) model results support our observations of both gypsum and ikaite precipitation at typical in situ sea ice temperatures and confirms the “Gitterman pathway” where gypsum is predicted to precipitate. The occurrence...

  8. Key insights on the structural characterization of textured Er{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2} nano-oxides prepared by a surfactant-free solvothermal route

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Julian-Lopez, Beatriz, E-mail: julian@qio.uji.es [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica y Organica, Universitat Jaume I, Avda. Vicente Sos Baynat s/n, 12071 Castellon (Spain); Luz, Veronica de la; Gonell, Francisco; Cordoncillo, Eloisa [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica y Organica, Universitat Jaume I, Avda. Vicente Sos Baynat s/n, 12071 Castellon (Spain); Lopez-Haro, Miguel; Calvino, Jose J. [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica y Quimica Inorganica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cadiz, Campus Rio San Pedro, Puerto Real, 11510 Cadiz (Spain); Escribano, Purificacion [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica y Organica, Universitat Jaume I, Avda. Vicente Sos Baynat s/n, 12071 Castellon (Spain)

    2012-04-05

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structural resolution of fluorite vs. pyrochlore in small nanocrystals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simple template-free solvothermal synthesis of Er{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2} nanooxides. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Good control over size, morphology and surface properties (280 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}). - Abstract: Zirconia-mixed oxides can exhibit cubic fluorite and pyrochlore structure. Their discrimination is not easy in nanooxides with a crystal size close to that of a few unit cells. In this work, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) has been employed to provide key insights on the structural characterization of a nanometric and porous mixed Er{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2} oxide. The material was prepared by a simple template-free solvothermal route that provided nanocrystalline powders at low temperature (170 Degree-Sign C) with spherical morphology, and high surface area ({approx}280 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}). The porosity was mainly originated from the assembling of organic complexing agents used in the synthesis to limit the crystal growth and to control hydrolysis and condensation reaction rates. The samples were characterized by thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and N{sub 2} adsorption measurements. A detailed study by HRTEM was conducted on microtomed samples. It was observed that the material was made of nanocrystals packed into spherical agglomerates. HRTEM simulations indicated that it is not possible to identify the pyrochlore phase in nanoparticles with diameter below 2 nm. In our samples, the analysis of the HRTEM lattice images by means of fast Fourier transform (FFT) techniques revealed well defined spots that can be assigned to different planes of a cubic fluorite-type phase, even in the raw material. Raman spectroscopy was also a powerful technique to elucidate the crystalline phase of the materials with the smallest nanoparticles. HREM and Raman results evidenced

  9. Key insights on the structural characterization of textured Er2O3–ZrO2 nano-oxides prepared by a surfactant-free solvothermal route

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Julián-López, Beatriz; Luz, Verónica de la; Gonell, Francisco; Cordoncillo, Eloisa; López-Haro, Miguel; Calvino, Jose J.; Escribano, Purificación

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Structural resolution of fluorite vs. pyrochlore in small nanocrystals. ► Simple template-free solvothermal synthesis of Er 2 O 3 –ZrO 2 nanooxides. ► Good control over size, morphology and surface properties (280 m 2 g −1 ). - Abstract: Zirconia-mixed oxides can exhibit cubic fluorite and pyrochlore structure. Their discrimination is not easy in nanooxides with a crystal size close to that of a few unit cells. In this work, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) has been employed to provide key insights on the structural characterization of a nanometric and porous mixed Er 2 O 3 –ZrO 2 oxide. The material was prepared by a simple template-free solvothermal route that provided nanocrystalline powders at low temperature (170 °C) with spherical morphology, and high surface area (∼280 m 2 g −1 ). The porosity was mainly originated from the assembling of organic complexing agents used in the synthesis to limit the crystal growth and to control hydrolysis and condensation reaction rates. The samples were characterized by thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and N 2 adsorption measurements. A detailed study by HRTEM was conducted on microtomed samples. It was observed that the material was made of nanocrystals packed into spherical agglomerates. HRTEM simulations indicated that it is not possible to identify the pyrochlore phase in nanoparticles with diameter below 2 nm. In our samples, the analysis of the HRTEM lattice images by means of fast Fourier transform (FFT) techniques revealed well defined spots that can be assigned to different planes of a cubic fluorite-type phase, even in the raw material. Raman spectroscopy was also a powerful technique to elucidate the crystalline phase of the materials with the smallest nanoparticles. HREM and Raman results evidenced that the material is constituted, irrespective of the temperature of the final calcination step, by an ensemble of randomly

  10. The use of fluoride as a natural tracer in water and the relationship to geological features: Examples from the Animas River Watershed, San Juan Mountains, Silverton, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bove, D.J.; Walton-Day, K.; Kimball, B.A.

    2009-01-01

    Investigations within the Silverton caldera, in southwestern Colorado, used a combination of traditional geological mapping, alteration-assemblage mapping, and aqueous geochemical sampling that showed a relationship between geological and hydrologic features that may be used to better understand the provenance and evolution of the water. Veins containing fluorite, huebnerite, and elevated molybdenum concentrations are temporally and perhaps genetically associated with the emplacement of high-silica rhyolite intrusions. Both the rhyolites and the fluorite-bearing veins produce waters containing elevated concentrations of F-, K and Be. The identification of water samples with elevated F/Cl molar ratios (> 10) has also aided in the location of water draining F-rich sources, even after these waters have been diluted substantially. These unique aqueous geochemical signatures can be used to relate water chemistry to key geological features and mineralized source areas. Two examples that illustrate this relationship are: (1) surface-water samples containing elevated F-concentrations (> 1.8 mg/l) that closely bracket the extent of several small high-silica rhyolite intrusions; and (2) water samples containing elevated concentrations of F-(> 1.8 mg/ l) that spatially relate to mines or areas that contain late-stage fluorite/huebnerite veins. In two additional cases, the existence of high F-concentrations in water can be used to: (1) infer interaction of the water with mine waste derived from systems known to contain the fluorite/huebnerite association; and (2) relate changes in water quality over time at a high elevation mine tunnel to plugging of a lower elevation mine tunnel and the subsequent rise of the water table into mineralized areas containing fluorite/huebnerite veining. Thus, the unique geochemical signature of the water produced from fluorite veins indicates the location of high-silica rhyolites, mines, and mine waste containing the veins. Existence of high F

  11. Microprobe channeling analysis of pyrite crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamieson, D.N.; Ryan, C.G.

    1992-01-01

    Nuclear microprobe analysis has provided much useful information about the composition of microscopic inclusions in minerals, mainly through the use of Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE). However this technique, while powerful, does not provide any direct information about the chemical state, in particular the lattice location, of the elements in the mineral. This information is often of crucial importance in understanding the ore genesis. The technique of ion channeling may be used to identify lattice location, but many minerals occur as microscopic crystals. Therefore it is necessary to utilize a nuclear microprobe with the technique of Channeling Contrast Microscopy (CCM). As many minerals contain interesting trace elements, it is necessary to measure both the yield of backscattered particles and the induced x-rays to get a clear picture of the lattice location of the elements in the crystal. CCM with PIXE was used to analyse natural pyrite crystals containing a variety of substitutional and non-substitutional elements and natural pyrite crystals from a gold bearing ore. In the latter case, evidence was obtained for two habits for Au in the 400 μm crystals: one as inclusions of Au rich minerals, the other substituted on the pyrite lattice sites. 31 refs., 3 tabs., 6 figs

  12. Butterfly wing color: A photonic crystal demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proietti Zaccaria, Remo

    2016-01-01

    We have theoretically modeled the optical behavior of a natural occurring photonic crystal, as defined by the geometrical characteristics of the Teinopalpus Imperialis butterfly. In particular, following a genetic algorithm approach, we demonstrate how its wings follow a triclinic crystal geometry with a tetrahedron unit base. By performing both photonic band analysis and transmission/reflection simulations, we are able to explain the characteristic colors emerging by the butterfly wings, thus confirming their crystal form.

  13. Monitoring and modeling of ultrasonic wave propagation in crystallizing mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, T.; Challis, R. E.; Tebbutt, J. S.

    2002-05-01

    The utility of ultrasonic compression wave techniques for monitoring crystallization processes is investigated in a study of the seeded crystallization of copper II sulfate pentahydrate from aqueous solution. Simple models are applied to predict crystal yield, crystal size distribution and the changing nature of the continuous phase. A scattering model is used to predict the ultrasonic attenuation as crystallization proceeds. Experiments confirm that modeled attenuation is in agreement with measured results.

  14. Band Gap Transition Studies of U:ThO2 Using Cathodoluminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    regarding x-ray fluorescence. 2.1 Atomic Properties of Ux:Th1−xO2 Thorium and uranium dioxide are metal oxides with the fluorite crystal structure...thorium oxide is a material upon which few studies have been performed. The goal of this research is to determine how the insertion of uranium atoms into...doped thorium oxide crystal, 041 TU, with uranium mass concentration of 22.7% before chemical cleaning. Mass pre-cleaning: 0.341 g. 7 Figure 1.5

  15. Simulation; an everyday tool for research in chemical kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakhle, M.; Roux, P.; Thomas de Montpreville, C.

    1985-08-01

    In order to make apparent the facilities offered by the NEPTUNIX package in solving some complex problems in chemical kinetics, the paper deals with its application to a particular example taken from material science: assistance to the validation of mechanisms governing colloids growth in a fluorite crystal when it is irradiated by an electron beam

  16. Qualification study of LiF flight crystals for the objective crystal spectrometer on the SPECTRUM-X-GAMMA satellite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Finn Erland; Rasmussen, I.; Schnopper, Herbert W.

    1992-01-01

    The Objective Crystal Spectrometer (OXS) on the SPECTRUM-X-GAMMA satellite will carry these types of natural crystals LiF(220), Ge(111) and RAP(001). They will be used to study, among others, the H- and the He-like emission from the cosmically important elements Fe, S, Ar and O. More than 300 Li...

  17. Growth and surface topography of WSe_2 single crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixit, Vijay; Vyas, Chirag; Pataniya, Pratik; Jani, Mihir; Pathak, Vishal; Patel, Abhishek; Pathak, V. M.; Patel, K. D.; Solanki, G. K.

    2016-01-01

    Tungsten Di-Selenide belongs to the family of TMDCs showing their potential applications in the fields of Optoelectronics and PEC solar cells. Here in the present investigation single crystals of WSe_2 were grown by Direct Vapour Transport Technique in a dual zone furnace having temperature difference of 50 K between the two zones. These single crystals were characterized by EDAX which confirms the stiochiometry of the grown crystals. Surface topography of the crystal was studied by optical micrograph showing the left handed spirals on the surface of WSe_2 crystals. Single crystalline nature of the crystals was confirmed by SAED.

  18. Controllable Tamm states in magnetophotonic crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merzlikin, A.M.; Vinogradov, A.P.; Dorofeenko, A.V.; Inoue, M.; Levy, M.; Granovsky, A.B.

    2007-01-01

    We study the Tamm states existing at the interface of a 1D magnetophotonic crystal made of magneto-optic material and a material with natural anisotropy. It is shown that in such a photonic crystal (PC) Yeh's band gap may exist, which causes a special type of the Tamm state. As this state is due to magneto-optic properties, it is controllable by an external magnetic field

  19. CaSO4:Dy and/or Tm: study of its properties for dosimetry application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, M.M.

    1979-01-01

    In order obtain in practical and cheap solid state dosimeter with high sensitivity, a technique initially developed to cold press a mixture of suitable materials in their powder form sensitive to radiation. The material initially used was natural CaF 2 (fluorite) for this salt was extensively studied in radiation dosimetry since it shows a thermoluminescent (TL) effect after radiation. However, natural calcium fluorite shows two main disadvantages: its high senstivity to room light and the impossibility to control its impurity content due to its natural origin. Calcium sulphate was thus used as a good substitute of fluorite. Rare earths doped calcium sulphate shows a high TL sensitivity and is not disturbed by light. It is also easily obtained in the laboratory under controlled conditions so to get reproducible impurity content. The best dosimeters that can be produced with rare earth doped calcium sulphate are CaSO 4 :Dy and CaSO 4 :Tm. Calcium sulphate, simultaneously doped with Tm and Dy was produced and 100% increase was obtained in the TL sensitivity when compared with the individually are earth doped calcium sulphate. (Author) [pt

  20. Effects of supporting electrolyte on galvanic deposition of Cu2O crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Lida; Liu Guichang; Xue Dongfeng

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The effects of electrolyte on the galvanic deposition of Cu 2 O crystals have been investigated. → The chemical nature of supporting electrolyte plays important roles in the galvanic deposition of Cu 2 O crystals. → Cubic Cu 2 O crystals are formed in chloride electrolytes. → Truncated octahedral Cu 2 O crystals are produced in nitrate, sulfate and fluoride electrolytes. - Abstract: The effects of introduced supporting electrolyte on the galvanic deposition of Cu 2 O crystals have been investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results show that the chemical nature of supporting electrolytes plays very important roles in the galvanic deposition of Cu 2 O crystals. The chloride stabilizes the (1 0 0) planes of Cu 2 O crystals, resulting in the formation of cubic crystals, while nitrate, sulfate and fluoride stabilize the (1 1 1) planes of Cu 2 O crystals, leading to the deposition of truncated octahedral and octahedral Cu 2 O crystals. It provides a facile way to control the morphology of galvanically obtained Cu 2 O crystals by indirectly adjusting the inorganic adsorption agents.

  1. An 'attachment kinetics-based' volume of fraction method for organic crystallization: a fluid-dynamic approach to macromolecular-crystal engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lappa, Marcello

    2003-01-01

    This analysis exhibits a strong interdisciplinary nature and deals with advances in protein (crystal) engineering models and computational methods as well as with novel results on the relative importance of 'controlling forces' in macromolecular crystal growth. The attention is focused in particular on microgravity fluid-dynamic aspects. From a numerical point of view, the growing crystal gives rise to a moving boundary problem. A 'kinetic-coefficient-based' volume tracking method is specifically and carefully developed according to the complex properties and mechanisms of macromolecular protein crystal growth taking into account the possibility of anisotropic (faceted) surface-orientation-dependent growth. The method is used to shed some light on the interplay of surface attachment kinetics and mass transport (diffusive or convective) in liquid phase and on several mechanisms still poorly understood. It is shown that the size of a growing crystal plays a 'critical role' in the relative importance of surface effects and in determining the intensity of convection. Convective effects, in turn, are found to impact growth rates, macroscopic structures of precipitates, particle size and morphology as well as the mechanisms driving growth. The paper introduces a novel computational method (that simulates the growth due to the slow addition of solute molecules to a lattice and can handle the shape of organic growing crystals under the influence of natural convection) and, at the same time, represents a quite exhaustive attempt to help organic crystal growers to discern the complex interrelations among the various parameters under one's control (that are not independent of one another) and to elaborate rational guidelines relating to physical factors that can influence the probability of success in crystallizing protein substances

  2. Trace element distribution in geological crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Den Besten, J.L.; Jamieson, D.N.; Weiser, P.S. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1996-12-31

    Channelling is a useful microprobe technique for determining the structure of crystals, but until now has not been performed on geological crystals. The composition has been investigated rather than the structure, which can further explain the origin of the crystal and provide useful information on the substitutionality of trace elements. This may then lead to applications of extraction of valuable metals and semiconductor electronics. Natural crystals of pyrite, FeS{sub 2}, which contains a substantial concentration of gold were channeled and examined to identify the channel axis orientation. Rutherford Backscattering (RBS) and Particle Induced X-Ray Emission (PIXE) spectra using MeV ions were obtained in the experiment to provide a comparison of lattice and non-lattice trace elements. 3 figs.

  3. Trace element distribution in geological crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Den Besten, J L; Jamieson, D N; Weiser, P S [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1997-12-31

    Channelling is a useful microprobe technique for determining the structure of crystals, but until now has not been performed on geological crystals. The composition has been investigated rather than the structure, which can further explain the origin of the crystal and provide useful information on the substitutionality of trace elements. This may then lead to applications of extraction of valuable metals and semiconductor electronics. Natural crystals of pyrite, FeS{sub 2}, which contains a substantial concentration of gold were channeled and examined to identify the channel axis orientation. Rutherford Backscattering (RBS) and Particle Induced X-Ray Emission (PIXE) spectra using MeV ions were obtained in the experiment to provide a comparison of lattice and non-lattice trace elements. 3 figs.

  4. Effect of deviation from stoichiometry on the nature of shallow acceptor states in CdTe crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agrinskaya, N.V.; Shashkova, V.V.

    1988-01-01

    Photoconductivity and photoluminescence spectra in the region of donor-acceptor recombination of pure CdTe crystals, grown under conditions of different deviations from stoichiometry are investigated. It is shown that the predominant type of minor acceptors in n-type crystals (with Cd excess) differs from acceptors in p-type crystals (with Te excess). Residual acceptors replacing Te(P, As) prevail in n-type crystals and acceptors replacing Cd(Li, Na) prevail in p-type crystals. As a result of p-type crystal annealing a change of the type of prevailing aceptors accurs in Cd pairs (bands linked with P, As prevail) which testifies to the residual impurity reconstruction in Cd and Te sublattices

  5. Controllable Tamm states in magnetophotonic crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merzlikin, A.M. [Institute for Theoretical and Applied Electromagnetics, Russian Academy of Science, 13/19 Izhorskaya ul., 125412 Moscow (Russian Federation); Vinogradov, A.P. [Institute for Theoretical and Applied Electromagnetics, Russian Academy of Science, 13/19 Izhorskaya ul., 125412 Moscow (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: a-vinogr@yandex.ru; Dorofeenko, A.V. [Institute for Theoretical and Applied Electromagnetics, Russian Academy of Science, 13/19 Izhorskaya ul., 125412 Moscow (Russian Federation); Inoue, M. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1 Hibari-Ga-Oka, Tempaku, Toyohashi 441-8580 (Japan); Levy, M. [Department of Physics, Michigan Technological University, 1400 Townsend Drive Houghton, MI 49931-1295 (United States); Granovsky, A.B. [Faculty of Physics, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Vorob' evy Gory, 119992 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2007-05-15

    We study the Tamm states existing at the interface of a 1D magnetophotonic crystal made of magneto-optic material and a material with natural anisotropy. It is shown that in such a photonic crystal (PC) Yeh's band gap may exist, which causes a special type of the Tamm state. As this state is due to magneto-optic properties, it is controllable by an external magnetic field.

  6. Transparent glass–ceramics with (Eu{sup 3+},Yb{sup 3+}):YNbO{sub 4} nanocrystals: Crystallization, structure, optical spectroscopy and cooperative upconversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loiko, P.A. [Center for Optical Materials and Technologies (COMT), Belarusian National Technical University, 65/17 Nezavisimosti Ave., Minsk 220013 (Belarus); Dymshits, O.S., E-mail: vodym@goi.ru [NITIOM Vavilov State Optical Institute, 36/1 Babushkin St, Saint-Petersburg 192171 (Russian Federation); Alekseeva, I.P.; Zhilin, A.A.; Tsenter, M.Ya. [NITIOM Vavilov State Optical Institute, 36/1 Babushkin St, Saint-Petersburg 192171 (Russian Federation); Vilejshikova, E.V. [Center for Optical Materials and Technologies (COMT), Belarusian National Technical University, 65/17 Nezavisimosti Ave., Minsk 220013 (Belarus); Bogdanov, K.V. [National Research University of Information Technologies, Mechanics and Optics, Kronverkskiy pr., 49, 197101 Saint-Petersburg (Russian Federation); Mateos, X. [Física i Cristallografia de Materials i Nanomaterials (FiCMA-FiCNA), Universitat Rovira i Virgili (URV), Campus Sescelades, C/Marcellí Domingo, s/n, Tarragona E-43007 (Spain); Yumashev, K.V. [Center for Optical Materials and Technologies (COMT), Belarusian National Technical University, 65/17 Nezavisimosti Ave., Minsk 220013 (Belarus)

    2016-11-15

    In the present work, we report on a comprehensive study of crystallization, structure and optical spectroscopy of transparent glass–ceramics with (Eu{sup 3+},Yb{sup 3+}):YNbO{sub 4} nanocrystals synthesized by secondary heat-treatments of glass of the Li{sub 2}O–Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–SiO{sub 2} system, for the first time, to the best of our knowledge. Heat treatments result in volume crystallization of RENbO{sub 4} with the sizes of 4–15 nm. Crystals of rare-earth niobates with disordered fluorite structure (T′) appear during heat-treatment at 720–740 °C for 6 h, crystals with tetragonal structure (T) appear at higher temperatures or longer durations of heat-treatment, and in samples heat-treated at 1000 °C, the monoclinic form (M) is detected additionally. Rare-earth niobates act as nucleating agents for bulk crystallization of β-quartz solid solutions, the main crystalline phase of the glass–ceramics, which ensures their good thermo-mechanical properties. Optical spectroscopy confirms entering of both Eu{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+} ions into the RENbO{sub 4} nanophase and their specroscopic properties variation according to the T′→T→M phase transformations. Under UV excitation, glass–ceramics heat-treated at 900 °C provide intense red emission with the color coordinates x=0.665, y=0.335 (CIE 1931). In the sample, heat-treated at 1000 °C, a partial reduction of Eu{sup 3+} to Eu{sup 2+} is observed which allows for tuning the color properties of emission. When excited in the near-IR by an InGaAs diode, the initial glass and glass–ceramics show red cooperative upconversion due to the 2Yb{sup 3+}→Eu{sup 3+} energy transfer. The efficiency of the latter is ~10%. The developed materials due to the good emission and thermo-mechanical properties are promising for the development of color-tunable red phosphors.

  7. Synthesis, crystal growth, optical, thermal, and mechanical properties of a nonlinear optical single crystal: ammonium sulfate hydrogen sulphamate (ASHS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhakar, K.; Nandhini, S.; Muniyappan, S.; Arumanayagam, T.; Vivek, P.; Murugakoothan, P.

    2018-04-01

    Ammonium sulfate hydrogen sulphamate (ASHS), an inorganic nonlinear optical crystal, was grown from the aqueous solution by slow evaporation solution growth technique. The single-crystal XRD confirms that the grown single crystal belongs to the orthorhombic system with the space group of Pna21. Powder XRD confirms the crystalline nature and the diffraction planes were indexed. Crystalline perfection of grown crystal was analysed by high-resolution X-ray diffraction rocking curve technique. UV-Vis-NIR studies revealed that ASHS crystal has optical transparency 65% and lower cut-off wavelength at 218 nm. The violet light emission of the crystal was identified by photoluminescence studies. The particle size-dependent second-harmonic generation efficiency for ASHS crystal was evaluated by Kurtz-Perry powder technique using Nd:YAG laser which established the existence of phase matching. Surface laser damage threshold value was evaluated using Nd:YAG laser. Optical homogeneity of the crystal was evaluated using modified channel spectrum method through birefringence study. Thermal analysis reveals that ASHS crystal is stable up to 213 °C. The mechanical behaviour of the ASHS crystal was analysed using Vickers microhardness study.

  8. Crystal defects and related stress in Y2O3 thin films: Origin, modeling, and consequence on the stability of the C-type structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacroix, Bertrand; Paumier, Fabien; Gaboriaud, Rolly J.

    2011-01-01

    We study the impact that the crystal defects have on the C-type structure of rare earth sesquioxide thin films grown by ion-beam sputtering, through the example of Y 2 O 3 . By monitoring the energy of the argon beam used in the sputter deposition process (between 600 and 1200 eV), we show that it is possible to control the microstructure (defects concentration, stress state and phase) in the oxide layer. Two main types of defects, ascribed to the 'atomic peening effect', are evidenced by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, and nuclear reaction analysis experiments: anti-Frenkel pairs, leading to a disorder on the oxygen-vacancy network, and oxygen-vacancy dislocations loops, to accommodate the strong nonstoichiometry. From a macroscopic measurement of the residual stresses in the as-deposited and the annealed layers, through x-ray diffraction and the sin 2 Ψ method, we have modeled the related stress state using an enhanced triaxial stress model. In the as-grown films, we evidence the coexistence of a biaxial and a hydrostatic stress, due to inclusions of atomic size defects. Quantitative information of the concentration and the nature of each type of defect (size effect) have also been determined, in good agreement with experiments. Interestingly, in the most energetic growth conditions corresponding to the highest degree of disorder on the oxygen-vacancy network and to the highest stress field in the film, we demonstrate that it is possible to stabilize an unexpected and metastable non equilibrium fluorite-like phase (X-type).

  9. Expression, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the extracellular IgV-like domain of the human natural killer cell inhibitory receptor p75/AIRM1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimasi, Nazzareno; Moretta, Lorenzo; Biassoni, Roberto; Mariuzza, Roy A

    2003-10-01

    p75/AIRM1 (Siglec-7) is a sialic acid-binding Ig-like lectin recently identified as an inhibitory receptor on natural killer cells. The expression, in vitro folding, circular-dichroism spectroscopy, crystallization and preliminary X-ray characterization of the Ig-V like domain of p75/AIRM1 are reported. X-ray data were collected from a single crystal at 100 K, with a maximum useful diffraction pattern extending to 1.45 A resolution on a synchrotron source. The crystal belongs to a primitive monoclinic space group, with unit-cell parameters a = 32.65, b = 49.72, c = 39.79 A, alpha = gamma = 90, beta = 113 degrees. The systematic absences indicate that the space group is P2(1). Assuming one molecule per asymmetric unit, V(M) (the Matthews coefficient) was calculated to be 1.879 A(3) Da(-1) and the solvent content was estimated to be 32.01%.

  10. TL, EPR and optical absorption in natural grossular crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yauri, J.M. [Institute of Physics, University of Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao, Travessa R, 187, CEP 05508-900, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Department of Physics, University of San Agustin, Av. Independencia S/N, Arequipa (Peru); Cano, N.F. [Institute of Physics, University of Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao, Travessa R, 187, CEP 05508-900, Sao Paulo (Brazil)], E-mail: nilocano@dfn.if.usp.br; Watanabe, S. [Institute of Physics, University of Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao, Travessa R, 187, CEP 05508-900, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2008-10-15

    Grossular is one of six members of silicate Garnet group. Two samples GI and GII have been investigated concerning their luminescence thermally stimulated (TL). EPR and optical absorption and the measurements were carried out to find out whether or not same point defects are responsible for all three properties. Although X-rays diffraction analysis has shown that both GI and GII have practically the same crystal structure of a standard grossular crystal, they presented different behavior in many aspects. The TL glow curve shape, TL response to radiation dose, the effect of annealing at high temperatures before irradiation, the dependence of UV bleaching parameters on peak temperature, all of them differ going from GI to GII. The EPR signals around g=2.0 as well as at g=4.3 and 6.0 have much larger intensity in GI than in GII. Very high temperature (>800 deg. C) annealing causes large increase in the bulk background absorption in GI, however, only very little in GII. In the cases of EPR and optical absorption, the difference in their behavior can be attributed to Fe{sup 3+} ions; however, in the TL case one cannot and the cause was not found as yet.

  11. TL, EPR and optical absorption in natural grossular crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yauri, J.M.; Cano, N.F.; Watanabe, S.

    2008-01-01

    Grossular is one of six members of silicate Garnet group. Two samples GI and GII have been investigated concerning their luminescence thermally stimulated (TL). EPR and optical absorption and the measurements were carried out to find out whether or not same point defects are responsible for all three properties. Although X-rays diffraction analysis has shown that both GI and GII have practically the same crystal structure of a standard grossular crystal, they presented different behavior in many aspects. The TL glow curve shape, TL response to radiation dose, the effect of annealing at high temperatures before irradiation, the dependence of UV bleaching parameters on peak temperature, all of them differ going from GI to GII. The EPR signals around g=2.0 as well as at g=4.3 and 6.0 have much larger intensity in GI than in GII. Very high temperature (>800 deg. C) annealing causes large increase in the bulk background absorption in GI, however, only very little in GII. In the cases of EPR and optical absorption, the difference in their behavior can be attributed to Fe 3+ ions; however, in the TL case one cannot and the cause was not found as yet

  12. Electron microprobe investigations of ore minerals of the Altenberg tin deposit (Erzgebirge, GDR). 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foerster, H.J.; Hunger, H.J.; Grimm, L.

    1987-01-01

    Members of the scheelite-powellite solid solution series filling thin fractures or mantling wolframite were found in association with fluorite within a small polymineralic quartz vein traversing a topaz-protolithionite-quartz greisen. The composition of the mixed-crystal series determined by means of an automated ARL SEMQ energy-dispersive electron microprobe is characterized by a great variability and heterogeneity which has not previously been reported from any specimen nor from this special mode of occurrence yet. With an amount of powellite component between 3.2 and 58 mole percent, the molybdoscheelites from Altenberg show the today known extent of complete miscibility in the natural scheelite-powellite series. Final remarks deal with the possibilities of using the mineral series, together with some other tungsten minerals, as an indicator of the physicochemical conditions of ore formation. (author)

  13. Crystal structure of obscurine: a natural product isolated from the stem bark of B. obscura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenta, Bruno N; Chouna, Rodolphe J; Neumann, Beate; Stammler, Hans-Georg; Sewald, Norbert

    2015-07-01

    The title compound, C24H31NO3 {systematic name: (E)-3-[(1R*,2S*,4aS*,8aR*)-2-(benzo[d][1,3]dioxol-5-yl)-1,2,4a,5,6,7,8,8a-octa-hydro-naphthalen-1-yl]-N-iso-butyl-acryl-amide}, is a natural product isolated from the stem bark of B. obscura. It is composed of an octa-hydro-naphthalene ring system substituted with an essentially planar benzodioxole ring system [r.m.s. deviation = 0.012 Å] and an extended iso-butyl-acryl-amide group. In the crystal, mol-ecules are linked by N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming chains propagating along [100]. The chains are linked by pairs of C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, involving inversion-related benzodioxole ring systems, forming ribbons lying parallel to (010). There are also C-H⋯π inter-actions present within the ribbons.

  14. Capillarity creates single-crystal calcite nanowires from amorphous calcium carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yi-Yeoun; Hetherington, Nicola B J; Noel, Elizabeth H; Kröger, Roland; Charnock, John M; Christenson, Hugo K; Meldrum, Fiona C

    2011-12-23

    Single-crystal calcite nanowires are formed by crystallization of morphologically equivalent amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) particles within the pores of track etch membranes. The polyaspartic acid stabilized ACC is drawn into the membrane pores by capillary action, and the single-crystal nature of the nanowires is attributed to the limited contact of the intramembrane ACC particle with the bulk solution. The reaction environment then supports transformation to a single-crystal product. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. A thermodynamic framework for the study of crystallization in polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, I. J.; Rajagopal, K. R.

    In this paper, we present a new thermodynamic framework within the context of continuum mechanics, to predict the behavior of crystallizing polymers. The constitutive models that are developed within this thermodynamic setting are able to describe the main features of the crystallization process. The model is capable of capturing the transition from a fluid like behavior to a solid like behavior in a rational manner without appealing to any adhoc transition criterion. The anisotropy of the crystalline phase is built into the model and the specific anisotropy of the crystalline phase depends on the deformation in the melt. These features are incorporated into a recent framework that associates different natural configurations and material symmetries with distinct microstructural features within the body that arise during the process under consideration. Specific models are generated by choosing particular forms for the internal energy, entropy and the rate of dissipation. Equations governing the evolution of the natural configurations and the rate of crystallization are obtained by maximizing the rate of dissipation, subject to appropriate constraints. The initiation criterion, marking the onset of crystallization, arises naturally in this setting in terms of the thermodynamic functions. The model generated within such a framework is used to simulate bi-axial extension of a polymer film that is undergoing crystallization. The predictions of the theory that has been proposed are consistent with the experimental results (see [28] and [7]).

  16. Growth and time dependent alignment of KCl crystals in Hemoglobin LB monolayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahato, Mrityunjoy; Pal, Prabir; Tah, Bidisha; Kamilya, Tapanendu; Talapatra, G.B.

    2012-01-01

    Nature and organism often use the biomineralization technique to build up various highly regular structures such as bone, teeth, kidney stone etc., and recently this becomes the strategy to design and synthesis of novel biocomposite materials. We report here the controlled crystallization of KCl in Langmuir and Langmuir Blodgett (LB) monolayer of Hemoglobin (Hb) at ambient condition. The nucleation and growth of KCl crystals in Hb monolayer has temporal and KCl concentration dependency. The growth of KCl crystals in LB film of Hb has distinct behavior in the alignment of crystals from linear to fractal like structures depending on growth time. The crystallographic identity of the biomineralized KCl crystal is confirmed from HR-TEM, XRD, and from powder diffraction simulation. Our results substantiated that the template of Langmuir monolayer of proteins plays a crucial role in biomineralization as well as in designing and synthesizing of novel biocomposite materials. Highlights: ► Biomineralization of KCl crystal has been studied in Hemoglobin LB film. ► KCl crystal growth is time and concentration of KCl dependent. ► The alignment of KCl crystal growth is fractal nature with time. ► The unfolding of Hb and evaporation factor has some role in crystallization and fractal growth.

  17. Controlling spontaneous emission of light by photonic crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lodahl, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Photonic bandgap crystals were proposed almost two decades ago as a unique tool for controlling propagation and emission of light. Since then the research field of photonic crystals has exploded and many beautiful demonstrations of the use of photonic crystals and fibers for molding light...... propagation have appeared that hold great promises for integrated optics. These major achievements solidly demonstrate the ability to control propagation of light. In contrast, an experimental demonstration of the use of photonic crystals for timing the emission of light has so far lacked. In a recent...... publication in Nature, we have demonstrated experimentally that both the direction and time of spontaneous emission can be controlled, thereby confirming the original proposal by Eli Yablonovich that founded the field of photonic crystals. We believe that this work opens new opportunities for solid...

  18. Analysis of rocking curve measurements of LiF flight crystals for the objective crystal spectrometer on SPECTRUM-X-GAMMA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halm, I.; Wiebicke, H.-J.; Geppert, U.R.M.E.

    1993-01-01

    The Objective Crystal Spectrometer on the SPECTRUM-X-GAMMA satellite will use three types of natural crystals LiF(220), Si(111), RAP(001), and a multilayer structure providing high-resolution X- ray spectroscopy of Fe, S, O, and C line regions of bright cosmic X-ray sources. 330 - 360 LiF(220......) crystals of dimensions approximately 23 × 63 mm2 are required to cover one side of a large (1000 × 600 mm2) panel, which is to be mounted in front of one of two high throughput X- ray telescopes. Rocking curves of 441 LiF(220) crystals measured by using an expanded Cu - Kα2 beam were analyzed to select...... the main parameters of the rocking curve averaged over all crystals can be improved at least by a factor of 1.6 both in full width half maximum and peak reflectivity....

  19. Liquid crystals: a new topic in physics for undergraduates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlin, Jerneja; Čepič, Mojca; Vaupotič, Nataša

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a teaching module about liquid crystals. Since liquid crystals are linked to everyday student experiences and are also a topic of current scientific research, they are an excellent candidate for a modern topic to be introduced into education. We show that liquid crystals can provide a pathway through several fields of physics such as thermodynamics, optics and electromagnetism. We discuss what students should learn about liquid crystals and what physical concepts they should know before considering them. In the presentation of the teaching module, which consists of a lecture and experimental work in a chemistry and physics laboratory, we focus on experiments on phase transitions, polarization of light, double refraction and colours. A pilot evaluation of the module was performed among pre-service primary school teachers who have no special preference for natural sciences. The evaluation shows that the module is very efficient in transferring knowledge. A prior study showed that the informally obtained pre-knowledge on liquid crystals of the first-year students from several different fields of study was negligible. Since social science students are the least interested in natural sciences, it can be expected that students in any study programme will on average achieve at least as good qualitative knowledge of phenomena related to liquid crystals as the group involved in the pilot study. (paper)

  20. Lunar Magma Ocean Crystallization: Constraints from Fractional Crystallization Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, J. F.; Draper, D. S.

    2015-01-01

    The currently accepted paradigm of lunar formation is that of accretion from the ejecta of a giant impact, followed by crystallization of a global scale magma ocean. This model accounts for the formation of the anorthosite highlands crust, which is globally distributed and old, and the formation of the younger mare basalts which are derived from a source region that has experienced plagioclase extraction. Several attempts at modelling the crystallization of such a lunar magma ocean (LMO) have been made, but our ever-increasing knowledge of the lunar samples and surface have raised as many questions as these models have answered. Geodynamic models of lunar accretion suggest that shortly following accretion the bulk of the lunar mass was hot, likely at least above the solidus]. Models of LMO crystallization that assume a deep magma ocean are therefore geodynamically favorable, but they have been difficult to reconcile with a thick plagioclase-rich crust. A refractory element enriched bulk composition, a shallow magma ocean, or a combination of the two have been suggested as a way to produce enough plagioclase to account for the assumed thickness of the crust. Recently however, geophysical data from the GRAIL mission have indicated that the lunar anorthositic crust is not as thick as was initially estimated, which allows for both a deeper magma ocean and a bulk composition more similar to the terrestrial upper mantle. We report on experimental simulations of the fractional crystallization of a deep (approximately 100km) LMO with a terrestrial upper mantle-like (LPUM) bulk composition. Our experimental results will help to define the composition of the lunar crust and mantle cumulates, and allow us to consider important questions such as source regions of the mare basalts and Mg-suite, the role of mantle overturn after magma ocean crystallization and the nature of KREEP

  1. Diffusion pathway of mobile ions and crystal structure of ionic and mixed conductors. A brief review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yashima, Masatomo

    2009-01-01

    A brief review on the field of Solid State Ionics, including the diffusion pathway of mobile ions, crystal structure and materials, is presented. In the fluorite-structured ionic conductors such as ceria solid solution Ce 0.93 Y 0.07 O 1.96 , bismuth oxide solid solution δ-Bi 1.4 Yb 0.6 O 3 and copper iodide CuI, a similar curved diffusion pathway along the directions is observed. In the ionic and mixed conductors with the cubic ABO 3 perovskite-type structure such as lanthanum gallate and lanthanum cobaltite solid solutions, the mobile ions diffuse along a curved line keeping the interatomic distance between the B cation and O 2- anion to some degree. The structure and diffusion path of double-perovskite-type La 0.64 Ti 0.92 Nb 0.08 O 2.99 , K 2 NiF 4 -type (Pr 0.9 La 0.1 ) 2 (Ni 0.74 Cu 0.21 Ga 0.05 )O 4+δ , and apatite-type La 9.69 (Si 5.70 Mg 0.30 )O 26.24 are described. The diffusion paths of Li + ions in La 0.62 Li 0.16 TiO 3 and Li 0.6 FePO 4 are two- and one-dimensional, respectively. (author)

  2. Thin film ionic conductors based on cerium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haridoss, P.; Hellstrom, E.; Garzon, F.H.; Brown, D.R.; Hawley, M.

    1994-01-01

    Fluorite and perovskite structure cerium oxide based ceramics are a class of materials that may exhibit good oxygen ion and/or protonic conductivity. The authors have successfully deposited thin films of these materials on a variety of substrates. Interesting orientation relationships were noticed between cerium oxide films and strontium titanate bi-crystal substrates. Near lattice site coincidence theory has been used to study these relationships

  3. Probabilistic approach to lysozyme crystal nucleation kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, Ivaylo L; Hodzhaoglu, Feyzim V; Koleva, Dobryana P

    2015-09-01

    Nucleation of lysozyme crystals in quiescent solutions at a regime of progressive nucleation is investigated under an optical microscope at conditions of constant supersaturation. A method based on the stochastic nature of crystal nucleation and using discrete time sampling of small solution volumes for the presence or absence of detectable crystals is developed. It allows probabilities for crystal detection to be experimentally estimated. One hundred single samplings were used for each probability determination for 18 time intervals and six lysozyme concentrations. Fitting of a particular probability function to experimentally obtained data made possible the direct evaluation of stationary rates for lysozyme crystal nucleation, the time for growth of supernuclei to a detectable size and probability distribution of nucleation times. Obtained stationary nucleation rates were then used for the calculation of other nucleation parameters, such as the kinetic nucleation factor, nucleus size, work for nucleus formation and effective specific surface energy of the nucleus. The experimental method itself is simple and adaptable and can be used for crystal nucleation studies of arbitrary soluble substances with known solubility at particular solution conditions.

  4. The Structure and Magnetic Properties of Pr 3MO7 with M = Nb, Ta, and Sb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vente, J. F.; Helmholdt, R. B.; IJdo, D. J. W.

    1994-01-01

    The crystal structure of the fluorite-related praseodymium compounds with the composition Pr 3MO7, M = Nb, Ta, and Sb, have been determined using Rietveld refinement from X-ray and neutron powder diffraction data at 293 and 4 K. The structure described is orthorhombic with space group Cmcm (No. 63). It is a superstructure of the cubic fluorite structure with unit cell parameters a orth ≈ 2a c, b orth ≈ c orth ≈ a c2, as in La 3NbO 7. This structure consists of chains of corner linked MO 6 octahedra parallel with the c-axis. The magnetic susceptibility was measured between 4 and 300 K. The compounds obey the Curie-Weiss law including a Van Vleck temperature independent term. Pr 3SbO 7 shows a small deviation from this law below 25 K.

  5. A neutron diffraction study of the superionic transition in (Ca sub 1 sub - sub x Y sub x)F sub 2 sub + sub x with x=0.06

    CERN Document Server

    Hofmann, M; Wilson, C C; McIntyre, G J

    1997-01-01

    We have investigated the high-temperature superionic transition of the anion-excess fluorite (Ca sub 1 sub - sub x Y sub x)F sub 2 sub + sub x with x=0.06 using both monochromatic and time-of-flight Laue single-crystal neutron diffraction. The measured Bragg intensities indicate that the cuboctahedral defect clusters found at ambient temperature start to break up into smaller fragments even below the superionic transition temperature, T sub c approx 1200 K. Information concerning the local defect configuration at T = 1173 K has been provided by modelling the measured distribution of the coherent elastic diffuse scattering within the (11-bar0) plane of reciprocal space. The high-temperature defects are of the 'Willis' type and strongly resemble the short-lived Frenkel clusters found in the pure fluorites such as CaF sub 2 above T sub c. (author)

  6. An insight into the local O{sub h} {yields}T{sub d} instability in BaF{sub 2}:Mn{sup 2+}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Fernandez, P; Aramburu, J A; Barriuso, M T; Moreno, M, E-mail: morenom@unican.e

    2010-11-01

    While most complexes in fluorite-type lattices (CaF{sub 2}, SrF{sub 2}, CdF{sub 2}) containing Mn{sup 2+} impurities remain cubic at all temperatures, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements have shown that the one in BaF{sub 2} is tetrahedral below 50K. This surprising behaviour is intrinsic to the centre and not associated to any close defect or pure lattice phase-transition. Through the use of density functional (DFT) calculations we show that the distortion is linked to the unexpected low force constant along the tetrahedral distortion mode with a{sub 2u} symmetry in these complexes and the large metal-ligand distance existing in BaF{sub 2}:Mn{sup 2+}. Ultimately, these facts reflect that, for substitutional impurities in fluorite-type crystals, the ligand-ligand interaction is dominant over the metal-ligand one.

  7. Crystallization mechanisms of acicular crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puel, François; Verdurand, Elodie; Taulelle, Pascal; Bebon, Christine; Colson, Didier; Klein, Jean-Paul; Veesler, Stéphane

    2008-01-01

    In this contribution, we present an experimental investigation of the growth of four different organic molecules produced at industrial scale with a view to understand the crystallization mechanism of acicular or needle-like crystals. For all organic crystals studied in this article, layer-by-layer growth of the lateral faces is very slow and clear, as soon as the supersaturation is high enough, there is competition between growth and surface-activated secondary nucleation. This gives rise to pseudo-twinned crystals composed of several needle individuals aligned along a crystallographic axis; this is explained by regular over- and inter-growths as in the case of twinning. And when supersaturation is even higher, nucleation is fast and random. In an industrial continuous crystallization, the rapid growth of needle-like crystals is to be avoided as it leads to fragile crystals or needles, which can be partly broken or totally detached from the parent crystals especially along structural anisotropic axis corresponding to weaker chemical bonds, thus leading to slower growing faces. When an activated mechanism is involved such as a secondary surface nucleation, it is no longer possible to obtain a steady state. Therefore, the crystal number, size and habit vary significantly with time, leading to troubles in the downstream processing operations and to modifications of the final solid-specific properties. These results provide valuable information on the unique crystallization mechanisms of acicular crystals, and show that it is important to know these threshold and critical values when running a crystallizer in order to obtain easy-to-handle crystals.

  8. Nucleation and growth of the Naica giant gypsum crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otálora, Fermín; García-Ruiz, JuanMa

    2014-04-07

    The Cave of Giant Crystals in the Naica mine (Mexico) is one of the most amazing displays of mineral beauty ever created in nature. In addition to the colossal crystals of gypsum, which in some cases exceed eleven meters in length and one meter in thickness, the scenery fashioned by the crystalline beams that thrust through the darkness of the cave from floor to ceiling with a luster like moonlight is a unique example of harmony based on crystal symmetry. We review the crystallogenesis of this remarkable and challenging phenomenon of mineralization near equilibrium that can be used to teach the basics of nucleation and crystal growth.

  9. Symmetry and physical properties of crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Malgrange, Cécile; Schlenker, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Crystals are everywhere, from natural crystals (minerals) through the semiconductors and magnetic materials in electronic devices and computers or piezoelectric resonators at the heart of our quartz watches to electro-optical devices. Understanding them in depth is essential both for pure research and for their applications. This book provides a clear, thorough presentation of their symmetry, both at the microscopic space-group level and the macroscopic point-group level. The implications of the symmetry of crystals for their physical properties are then presented, together with their mathematical description in terms of tensors. The conditions on the symmetry of a crystal for a given property to exist then become clear, as does the symmetry of the property. The geometrical representation of tensor quantities or properties is presented, and its use in determining important relationships emphasized. An original feature of this book is that most chapters include exercises with complete solutions. This all...

  10. A comparative study on the crystal structure of bicycle analogues to the natural phytotoxin helminthosporins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Luiz Cláudio de Almeida; Teixeira, Robson Ricardo; Nogueira, Leonardo Brandão; Maltha, Celia Regina Alvares; Doriguetto, Antônio Carlos; Martins, Felipe Terra

    2016-02-01

    Herein we described structural insights of a series of analogues to helminthosporin phytotoxins. The key reaction used to prepare the compounds corresponded to the [3 + 4] cycloaddition between the oxyallyl cation generated from 2,4-dibromopentan-3-one and different furans. Their structures were confirmed upon IR, NMR and X-ray diffraction analyses. While bicycles 7, 8 and 9 crystallize in the centrosymmetric monoclinic space group P21/c, compound 10 was solved in the noncentrosymmetric orthorhombic space group P212121. The solid materials obtained were shown to be racemic crystals (7, 8, 9) or racemic conglomerate (10). In all compounds, there is formation of a bicycle featured by fused tetrahydropyranone and 2,5-dihydrofuran rings. They adopt chair and envelope conformations, respectively. Crystal packing of all compounds is stabilized through C-H•••O contacts. Conformational aspects as well as similarities and differences among the crystal structures of the synthesized analogues are discussed.

  11. Natural age dispersion arising from the analysis of broken crystals. Part I: Theoretical basis and implications for the apatite (U-Th)/He thermochronometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Roderick W.; Beucher, Romain; Roper, Steven; Persano, Cristina; Stuart, Fin; Fitzgerald, Paul

    2013-12-01

    Over the last decade major progress has been made in developing both the theoretical and practical aspects of apatite (U-Th)/He thermochronometry and it is now standard practice, and generally seen as best practice, to analyse single grain aliquots. These individual prismatic crystals are often broken and are fragments of larger crystals that have broken during mineral separation along the weak basal cleavage in apatite. This is clearly indicated by the common occurrence of only 1 or no clear crystal terminations present on separated apatite grains, and evidence of freshly broken ends when grains are viewed using a scanning electron microscope. This matters because if the 4He distribution within the whole grain is not homogeneous, because of partial loss due to thermal diffusion for example, then the fragments will all yield ages different from each other and from the whole grain age. Here we use a numerical model with a finite cylinder geometry to approximate 4He ingrowth and thermal diffusion within hexagonal prismatic apatite crystals. This is used to quantify the amount and patterns of inherent, natural age dispersion that arises from analysing broken crystals. A series of systematic numerical experiments were conducted to explore and quantify the pattern and behaviour of this source of dispersion using a set of 5 simple thermal histories that represent a range of plausible geological scenarios. In addition some more complex numerical experiments were run to investigate the pattern and behaviour of grain dispersion seen in several real data sets. The results indicate that natural dispersion of a set of single fragment ages (defined as the range divided by the mean) arising from fragmentation alone varies from c. 7% even for rapid (c. 10 °C/Ma), monotonic cooling to over 50% for protracted, complex histories that cause significant diffusional loss of 4He. The magnitude of dispersion arising from fragmentation scales with the grain cylindrical radius, and is of

  12. Potassium-cobalt sulphate crystal growth assisted by low frequency vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadovsky, A.; Ermochenkov, I.; Dubovenko, E.; Sukhanova, E.; Bebyakin, M.; Dubov, V.; Avetissov, I.

    2018-02-01

    Single crystals of K2Co(SO4)2·6H2O were grown from solution using the temperature reduction method enhanced by the axial low frequency vibration control technique (AVC-technique). Physical modeling of heat-mass transfer in solution under the AVC action was performed. The growth rate of the AVC grown crystal was found to be twice that of the crystal grown under natural convection conditions. Analysis of spectral characteristics (absorption and Raman spectra) as well as structural properties (dislocation density and microhardness) of the grown crystals showed the significant superiority of the AVC technique for the growth of K2Co(SO4)2·6H2O crystals.

  13. Crystallization Stages of the Bishop Tuff Magma Body Recorded in Crystal Textures in Pumice Clasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pamukcu, Ayla; Gualda, Guilherme A.R.; Anderson, Jr. , Alfred T. (Vanderbilt); (UC)

    2012-07-25

    The Bishop Tuff is a giant silicic ignimbrite erupted at 0.76 Ma in eastern California, USA. Five pumice clasts from the late-erupted Bishop Tuff (Aeolian Buttes) were studied in an effort to better understand the pre- and syn-eruptive history of the Bishop magma body and place constraints on the timescales of its existence. This study complements and expands on a previous study that focused on early-erupted Bishop Tuff pumice clasts. Bulk densities of pumice clasts were measured using an immersion method, and phenocryst crystal contents were determined using a sieving and winnowing procedure. X-ray tomography was used to obtain qualitative and quantitative textural information, particularly crystal size distributions (CSDs). We have determined CSDs for crystals ranging in size from {approx}10 to {approx}1000 {micro}m for three groups of mineral phases: magnetite ({+-}ilmenite), pyroxene + biotite, quartz + feldspar. Similar to early-erupted pumice, late-erupted pumice bulk density and crystal contents are positively correlated, and comparison of crystal fraction vs size trends suggests that the proportion of large crystals is the primary control on crystallinity. Porosity is negatively correlated with crystal content, which is difficult to reconcile with closed-system crystallization. Magnetite and pyroxene + biotite size distributions are fractal in nature, often attributed to fragmentation; however, crystals are mostly whole and euhedral, such that an alternative mechanism is necessary to explain these distributions. Quartz + feldspar size distributions are kinked, with a shallow-sloped log-linear section describing large crystals (> 140 {micro}m) and a steep-sloped log-linear section describing small crystals (< 140 {micro}m). We interpret these two crystal populations as resulting from a shift in crystallization regime. We suggest that the shallow-sloped section describes a pre-eruptive quartz + feldspar growth-dominated regime, whereas the steep

  14. Can Crystal Symmetry and Packing Influence the Active Site Conformation of Homohexameric Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Luić

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available It is generaly believed that enzymes retain most of their functionality in the crystal form due to the large solvent content of protein crystals. This is facilitated by the fact that their natural environment in solution is not too far from the one found in the crystal form. Nevertheless, if the nature of the enzyme is such to require conformational changes, overcoming of the crystal packing constraints may prove to be too difficult. Such conformational change is present in one class of enzymes (purine nucleoside phosphorylases, that is the subject of our scientific interest for many years. The influence of crystal symmetry and crystal packing on the conformation of the active sites in the case of homohexameric purine nucleoside phosphorylases is presented and analysed. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

  15. Maximizing Macromolecule Crystal Size for Neutron Diffraction Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, R. A.; Kephart, R.; Leardi, R.; Myles, D. A.; Snell, E. H.; vanderWoerd, M.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A challenge in neutron diffraction experiments is growing large (greater than 1 cu mm) macromolecule crystals. In taking up this challenge we have used statistical experiment design techniques to quickly identify crystallization conditions under which the largest crystals grow. These techniques provide the maximum information for minimal experimental effort, allowing optimal screening of crystallization variables in a simple experimental matrix, using the minimum amount of sample. Analysis of the results quickly tells the investigator what conditions are the most important for the crystallization. These can then be used to maximize the crystallization results in terms of reducing crystal numbers and providing large crystals of suitable habit. We have used these techniques to grow large crystals of Glucose isomerase. Glucose isomerase is an industrial enzyme used extensively in the food industry for the conversion of glucose to fructose. The aim of this study is the elucidation of the enzymatic mechanism at the molecular level. The accurate determination of hydrogen positions, which is critical for this, is a requirement that neutron diffraction is uniquely suited for. Preliminary neutron diffraction experiments with these crystals conducted at the Institute Laue-Langevin (Grenoble, France) reveal diffraction to beyond 2.5 angstrom. Macromolecular crystal growth is a process involving many parameters, and statistical experimental design is naturally suited to this field. These techniques are sample independent and provide an experimental strategy to maximize crystal volume and habit for neutron diffraction studies.

  16. Characterization of natural pozzolan-based geopolymeric binders

    KAUST Repository

    Moon, Juhyuk

    2014-10-01

    Properties and characteristics of fly ash- or slag-based geopolymers have been extensively explored but comparatively less information is available for natural pozzolan-based geopolymers. The present work focuses on microstructural characteristics of natural pozzolan-based geopolymers activated by sodium hydroxide and a mixture of sodium hydroxide and sodium silicate. Synchrotron XRD and SEM-EDS studies combined with compressive strength tests successfully demonstrate the feasibility of the use of natural pozzolan for sustainable construction material. It is concluded that the geopolymers have sufficient strength as structural materials and matrices contain C-S-H like crystal as well as zeolites of hydroxysodalite and zeolite Y. Two zeolites of hydroxysodalite and zeolite Y are found as the main activation products in sodium hydroxide activation. Substitution with sodium silicate solution yields higher compressive strength and a denser microstructure with dominant activation products of C-S-H like crystal, zeolite Y, and phillipsite. It has been proposed that the crystal size of the activation products ranges from 10 nm to 1 μm. Different microstructural characteristics found herein provide a valuable information to develop natural pozzolan-based sustainable structural materials with improved properties. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Broadband slow light in one-dimensional logically combined photonic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alagappan, G; Png, C E

    2015-01-28

    Here, we demonstrate the broadband slow light effects in a new family of one dimensional photonic crystals, which are obtained by logically combining two photonic crystals of slightly different periods. The logical combination slowly destroys the original translational symmetries of the individual photonic crystals. Consequently, the Bloch modes of the individual photonic crystals with different wavevectors couple with each other, creating a vast number of slow modes. Specifically, we describe a photonic crystal architecture that results from a logical "OR" mixture of two one dimensional photonic crystals with a periods ratio of r = R/(R - 1), where R > 2 is an integer. Such a logically combined architecture, exhibits a broad region of frequencies in which a dense number of slow modes with varnishing group velocities, appear naturally as Bloch modes.

  18. Hydrothermal growth of PbSO4 (Anglesite) single crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuta, Ko-ichi; Yoneta, Yasuhito; Yogo, Toshinobu; Hirano, Shin-ichi

    1994-01-01

    Hydrothermal growth of single crystals of PbSO 4 , which is known as a natural mineral called anglesite, was investigated. Lead nitrate and nitric acid solutions were found to be useful for the growth of angle-site on the basis of the experimental results on the dissolution behavior. Relatively large euhedral single crystals bound by {210} and {101} planes were successfully grown in 1.5 mol/kg Pb(NO 3 ) 2 at 400degC and 100 MPa. Optical characterization revealed that the grown anglesite crystals can be useful for scintillators material. (author)

  19. Shear induced orientation of edible fat and chocolate crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzanti, Gianfranco; Welch, Sarah E.; Marangoni, Alejandro G.; Sirota, Eric B.; Idziak, Stefan H. J.

    2003-03-01

    Shear-induced orientation of fat crystallites was observed during crystallization of cocoa butter, milk fat, stripped milk fat and palm oil. This universal effect was observed in systems crystallized under high shear. The minor polar components naturally present in milk fat were found to decrease the shear-induced orientation effect in this system. The competition between Brownian and shear forces, described by the Peclet number, determines the crystallite orientation. The critical radius size, from the Gibbs-Thomson equation, provides a tool to understand the effect of shear at the onset stages of crystallization.

  20. Effect of indium and antimony doping in SnS single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaki, Sunil H., E-mail: sunilchaki@yahoo.co.in; Chaudhary, Mahesh D.; Deshpande, M.P.

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Single crystals growth of pure SnS, indium doped SnS and antimony doped SnS by direct vapour transport (DVT) technique. • Doping of In and Sb occurred in SnS single crystals by cation replacement. • The replacement mechanism ascertained by EDAX, XRD and substantiated by Raman spectra analysis. • Dopants concentration affects the optical energy bandgap. • Doping influences electrical transport properties. - Abstract: Single crystals of pure SnS, indium (In) doped SnS and antimony (Sb) doped SnS were grown by direct vapour transport (DVT) technique. Two doping concentrations of 5% and 15% each were employed for both In and Sb dopants. Thus in total five samples were studied viz., pure SnS (S1), 5% In doped SnS (S2), 15% In doped SnS (S3), 5% Sb doped SnS (S4) and 15% Sb doped SnS (S5). The grown single crystal samples were characterized by evaluating their surface microstructure, stoichiometric composition, crystal structure, Raman spectroscopy, optical and electrical transport properties using appropriate techniques. The d.c. electrical resistivity and thermoelectric power variations with temperature showed semiconducting and p-type nature of the as-grown single crystal samples. The room temperature Hall Effect measurements further substantiated the semiconducting and p-type nature of the as-grown single crystal samples. The obtained results are deliberated in detail.

  1. Effect of the nature of alkali and alkaline-earth oxides on the structure and crystallization of an alumino-borosilicate glass developed to immobilize highly concentrated nuclear waste solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quintas, A.; Caurant, D.; Majerus, O.; Charpentier, T.; Dussossoy, J.L.

    2008-01-01

    A complex rare-earth rich alumino-borosilicate glass has been proved to be a good candidate for the immobilization of new high level radioactive wastes. A simplified seven-oxides composition of this glass was selected for this study. In this system, sodium and calcium cations were supposed in other works to simulate respectively all the other alkali (R + = Li + , Rb + , Cs + ) and alkaline-earth (R 2+ = Sr 2+ , Ba 2+ ) cations present in the complex glass composition. Moreover, neodymium or lanthanum are used here to simulate all the rare-earths and actinides occurring in waste solutions. In order to study the impact of the nature of R + and R 2+ cations on both glass structure and melt crystallization tendency during cooling, two glass series were prepared by replacing either Na + or Ca 2+ cations in the simplified glass by respectively (Li + , K + , Rb + , Cs + ) or (Mg 2+ , Sr 2+ , Ba 2+ ) cations. From these substitutions, it was established that alkali ions are preferentially involved in the charge compensation of (AlO 4 ) - entities in the glass network comparatively to alkaline-earth ions. The glass compositions containing calcium give way to the crystallization of an apatite silicate phase bearing calcium and rare-earth ions. The melt crystallization tendency during cooling strongly varies with the nature of the alkaline-earth. (authors)

  2. Light-induced dynamic structural color by intracellular 3D photonic crystals in brown algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Garcia, Martin; Masters, Nathan; O'Brien, Heath E; Lennon, Joseph; Atkinson, George; Cryan, Martin J; Oulton, Ruth; Whitney, Heather M

    2018-04-01

    Natural photonic crystals are responsible for strong reflectance at selective wavelengths in different natural systems. We demonstrate that intracellular opal-like photonic crystals formed from lipids within photosynthetic cells produce vivid structural color in the alga Cystoseira tamariscifolia . The reflectance of the opaline vesicles is dynamically responsive to environmental illumination. The structural color is present in low light-adapted samples, whereas higher light levels produce a slow disappearance of the structural color such that it eventually vanishes completely. Once returned to low-light conditions, the color re-emerges. Our results suggest that these complex intracellular natural photonic crystals are responsive to environmental conditions, changing their packing structure reversibly, and have the potential to manipulate light for roles beyond visual signaling.

  3. Solubility and peculiarities of the yttrium-aluminium borate crystal growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azizov, A.V.; Leonyuk, N.I.; Rezvyj, V.R.; Timchenko, T.I.; Belov, N.V.

    1982-01-01

    The nature of crystallization media and crystallization peculiarities of IAl 3 [BO 3 ] 4 yttrium-alluminium borate (YAB) were investigated. The investigation of YAB solubility was conducted in the melts of two different compositions: 88.1K 2 Mo 2 O 10 -3.5V 2 O 3 -8.4B 2 O 3 (1) and 89.5K 2 Mo 3 O 10 - - 10.5B 2 O 3 (2) at 1060-900 deg C. The YAB crystals obtained from different crystallization media had different habit and morphology. The revealed peculiarities are significant for the choice of the YAB crystal growing conditions on orientated seedings: more rapid growth can be exercised along the [0001] face from the solution in the melt (2)

  4. Radiation defects in oxide crystals doped with rare earth ions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matkovskii, A; Durygin, A; Suchocki, A; Sugak, D; Wallrafen, F; Vakiv, M

    1999-01-01

    The nature of stable and transient color centers in Y3Al5O12, Gd3Ca5O12, YAlO3 and LiNbO3 crystals is studied. The color centers are created by various types of irradiation. The effect of irradiation on crystal optical properties in visible and ultraviolet range is presented.

  5. Standard test method for determining the orientation of a metal crystal

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the back-reflection Laue procedure for determining the orientation of a metal crystal. The back-reflection Laue method for determining crystal orientation (1, 2) may be applied to macrograins (3) (0.5-mm diameter or larger) within polycrystalline aggregates, as well as to single crystals of any size. The method is described with reference to cubic crystals; it can be applied equally well to hexagonal, tetragonal, or orthorhombic crystals. 1.2 Most natural crystals have well developed external faces, and the orientation of such crystals can usually be determined from inspection. The orientation of a crystal having poorly developed faces, or no faces at all (for example, a metal crystal prepared in the laboratory) must be determined by more elaborate methods. The most convenient and accurate of these involves the use of X-ray diffraction. The “orientation of a metal crystal” is known when the positions in space of the crystallographic axes of the unit cell have been located with...

  6. Photonic crystals: features and applications (physics research and technology)

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    The present book is focused on the study of unprecedented control and manipulation of light by photonic crystals (PCs) and their applications. These are micro- or usually nano-structures composed of periodic indexes of refraction of dielectrics with high refractive index contrast. They exhibit optical frequency band gaps in analogy to electronic bands for a periodic potential of a semiconductor crystal lattice. The gemstone opal and butterflys feathers colours are already referred to as natural examples of photonic crystals. The characteristics of such supper-lattices were first reported by Yablonovitch in 1987. The exploitation of photonic crystals is a promising tool in communication, sensors, optical computing, and nanophotonics. Discussed are the various features of one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) photonic crystals, photonic quasi crystals, heterostuctures and PC fibres under a variety of conditions using several materials, and metamaterials. It also focuses on the applications of PCs in opt...

  7. Carbon determination in natural crystals of olivines of deeporigin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shilobreeva, S.N.; Kadik, A.A.; Minaev, V.M.; Kazakov, S.S.; Kuz'min, L.E.; Moskovskij Inzhenerno-Fizicheskij Inst.; AN SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Yadernykh Issledovanij)

    1987-01-01

    Activation analysis and nuclear reaction analysis with registration of energy spectrum of forming prompt particles are used to determine carbon concentration and distribution in monocrystals of olivines. Carbon determination in olivine volume was carried out by activation analysis by 12 C(d, n) 13 N reaction and surface content - by registration of protons resulting from 12 C(d, p) 13 C reaction. The deuteron energy being 1.8-2.7 MeV, carbon determination limit and the analysis error were 10 -3 and 20 relat.%, respectively. By means of IR spectroscopy it is shown that carbon constitutes part of crystal lattice of olivines in monatomic form

  8. The effective crystal field potential

    CERN Document Server

    Mulak, J

    2000-01-01

    As it results from the very nature of things, the spherical symmetry of the surrounding of a site in a crystal lattice or an atom in a molecule can never occur. Therefore, the eigenfunctions and eigenvalues of any bound ion or atom have to differ from those of spherically symmetric respective free ions. In this way, the most simplified concept of the crystal field effect or ligand field effect in the case of individual molecules can be introduced. The conventional notion of the crystal field potential is narrowed to its non-spherical part only through ignoring the dominating spherical part which produces only a uniform energy shift of gravity centres of the free ion terms. It is well understood that the non-spherical part of the effective potential "seen" by open-shell electrons localized on a metal ion plays an essential role in most observed properties. Light adsorption, electron paramagnetic resonance, inelastic neutron scattering and basic characteristics derived from magnetic and thermal measurements, ar...

  9. Crystallography beyond periodic Crystal perfection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estevez-Rams, E.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The discovery of the quasi-crystals [D. Schechtman et. Al., Phys.] Rev. Lett. [53, 1951-1953 (1984)] made very narrow definition of the crystalline state based on the periodicity of a local arrangement of atoms. Since the definition of this State has been a matter of much controversy [G.R. Desiraju, Nature 423, 485 (2003); S. van Smaalen, IUCR Aperiodic Commission Reports. August 7, 2002; International Union of Crystallography. Report of the Executive Committee for 1991; ACTA Cryst. A48, 922-946 (1992)]. We will make a presentation of the current time of the crystallography in this regard from the conceptual point of view. We show the use of the formalism of algorithmic complexity or Kolmogorov [M. Li and P. Vitanyi, An Introduction to Kolmogorov Complexity and Its Applications (Springer Verlag, Heidelberg, 1993), W.H. Zurek, Phys.] Rev. 40, 4731 (1989); Nature 341, 119-124 (1989)] provides a different perspective on the nature of the Crystallographic order. Infinite crystals can be considered solid with zero algorithmic complexities by atom. Show statistical analysis of inorganic compounds [J.L.C. Daams et al., Atlas of Crystal Structure Types for Intermetallic Phases (ASM International, Ohio, 1991), Fachinformationszentrum/NIST Inorganic Crystal Structure Database, Karlsruhe (2003) icsd.fkf.mpg.de] demonstrating that the minimization of complexity is a trend in the crystalline arrangement. We will then compare the degree of disorder of some typical solids according to their algorithmic complexity. Finally, space diffraction will be studied from this same perspective and will be discussed that zero algorithmic complexities by point in space of diffraction does not necessarily imply the same thing for the Atomic arrangement. The discrete portion of the diffraction pattern is a fingerprint of the underlying order but not the actual existence of long-range order. Experimental results will be showcased [E. Estévez-Rams et al., Physical Review B, 63 (2001

  10. Solvent freeze out crystallization of lysozyme from a lysozyme-ovalbumin mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz Borbon, V.; Ulrich, J. [Martin-Luther-Universitaet Halle-Wittenberg, Zentrum fuer Ingenieurwissenschaft, Verfahrenstechnik/TVT, 06099 Halle Saale (Germany)

    2012-05-15

    Hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) crystallization conditions from an ovalbumin-lysozyme mixture were found by screening tests and further located in pseudo-phase diagrams. This information was used to set up the initial conditions for the solvent freeze out (SFO) process. The process uses the freezing of ice to create the supersaturation for the proteins to crystallize out of the solution. The crystallization of HEWL (15 mg/mL) out of a lysozyme-ovalbumin mixture (1.7 mg/mL) is carried out by SFO. Under the reported conditions, a crystallization yield of 69 % was obtained. A mean crystal size of 77.8 {mu}m was enhanced in a crystallization time of 15.1 h. The lysozyme nature of the crystals is proven by SDS PAGE and enzymatic activity tests. (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  11. Electronic bandstructure of an incommensurate crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasing, T.

    1984-06-01

    The consequences of an incommensurate lattice modulation on the electronic energy levels have been studied by optical transmission experiments on Rb 2 ZnBr 4 . The results are analyzed with a simple tight-binding model in which the superspace symmetry of the crystal is taken into account. The lattice translational symmetry of crystalline matter leads to the well known concepts of the Brillouin zones, Bloch electrons, phonons and the like. In a crystal where the lattice is periodically distorted with a period that is incommensurate with the underlying lattice, this translational symmetry is broken. Nonetheless, incommensurate crystals are perfectly ordered and can be described by higher dimensional so-called superspace groups. In this paper we will show how this superspace approach provides a natural framework to understand their electronic bandstructure as well. 5 references, 3 figures

  12. Mesoscale martensitic transformation in single crystals of topological defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiao; Martínez-González, José A.; Hernández-Ortiz, Juan P.; Ramírez-Hernández, Abelardo; Zhou, Ye; Sadati, Monirosadat; Zhang, Rui; Nealey, Paul F.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2017-09-05

    Liquid crystal blue phases (BPs) are highly ordered at two levels. Molecules exhibit orientational order at nanometer length scales, while chirality leads to ordered arrays of doubletwisted cylinders over micrometer scales. Past studies of polycrystalline BPs were challenged by grain boundaries between randomly oriented crystalline nanodomains. Here, the nucleation of BPs is controlled with considerable precision by relying on chemically nano-patterned surfaces, leading to macroscopic single-crystal BP specimens where the dynamics of meso-crystal formation can be directly observed. Theory and experiments show that transitions between two BPs having a different network structure proceed through local re-organization of the crystalline array, without diffusion of the double twisted cylinders. In solid crystals, martensitic transformations between crystal structures involve the concerted motion of a few atoms, without diffusion. The transformation between BPs, where crystal features arise in the sub-micron regime, is found to be martensitic in nature, with the diffusion-less feature associated to the collective behavior of the double twist cylinders. Single-crystal BPs are shown to offer fertile grounds for the study of directed crystal-nucleation and the controlled growth of soft matter.

  13. Dielectric and baric characteristics of TlS single crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mustafaeva, S.N., E-mail: solmust@gmail.com [Institute of Physics, ANAS, G. Javid prosp. 33, Az 1143 Baku (Azerbaijan); Asadov, M.M. [Institute of Chemical Problems, ANAS, G. Javid prosp. 29, Az 1143 Baku (Azerbaijan); Ismailov, A.A. [Institute of Physics, ANAS, G. Javid prosp. 33, Az 1143 Baku (Azerbaijan)

    2014-11-15

    The investigation of the frequency dependences of the dielectric coefficients and ac-conductivity of the TlS single crystals made it possible to elucidate the nature of dielectric loss and the charge transfer mechanism. Moreover, we evaluated the density and energy spread of localized states near the Fermi level, the average hopping time and the average hopping length. It was shown that the dc-conductivity of the TlS single crystals can be controlled by varying the hydrostatic pressure. This has opened up possibilities for using TlS single crystals as active elements of pressure detectors.

  14. Selective catalytic reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, W.; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Sarofim, A.F.

    1995-06-01

    This project has investigated new metal oxide catalysts for the single stage selective reduction of SO{sub 2} to elemental sulfur by a reductant, such as CO. Significant progress in catalyst development has been made during the course of the project. We have found that fluorite oxides, CeO{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2}, and rare earth zirconates such as Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} are active and stable catalysts for reduction Of SO{sub 2} by CO. More than 95% sulfur yield was achieved at reaction temperatures about 450{degrees}C or higher with the feed gas of stoichiometric composition. Reaction of SO{sub 2} and CO over these catalysts demonstrated a strong correlation of catalytic activity with the catalyst oxygen mobility. Furthermore, the catalytic activity and resistance to H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2} poisoning of these catalysts were significantly enhanced by adding small amounts of transition metals, such as Co, Ni, Co, etc. The resulting transition metal-fluorite oxide composite catalyst has superior activity and stability, and shows promise in long use for the development of a greatly simplified single-step sulfur recovery process to treat variable and dilute SO{sub 2} concentration gas streams. Among various active composite catalyst systems the Cu-CeO{sub 2} system has been extensively studied. XRD, XPS, and STEM analyses of the used Cu-CeO{sub 2} catalyst found that the fluorite crystal structure of ceria was stable at the present reaction conditions, small amounts of copper was dispersed and stabilized on the ceria matrix, and excess copper oxide particles formed copper sulfide crystals of little contribution to catalytic activity. A working catalyst consisted of partially sulfated cerium oxide surface and partially sulfided copper clusters. The overall reaction kinetics were approximately represented by a first order equation.

  15. Physicochemical properties of dimethylammonium p-nitrophenolate– p-nitrophenol: A nonlinear optical crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rathika, A.; Prasad, L. Guru; Raman, R. Ganapathi

    2016-01-01

    Single crystals of Dimethylammonium p-nitrophenolate–p-nitrophenol have been grown from aqueous solution by slow evaporation solution growth technique. Unit cell parameters of the grown crystal were confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis and the synthesized compound is crystallized in monoclinic system. Various functional groups and their vibrational frequencies were recognized from the FT-IR and FT-Raman spectrum. Thermal stability of the crystal was examined by recording the TGA/DTA curve. The grown crystal has wider transparency nature in the visible region and the lower cut-off wavelength is found at 465 nm. Mechanical property of the crystal was studied by analyzing the Vicker's microhardness measurements. The fluorescence emission from the crystal is observed at 350 nm which arise due to the presence of aromatic ring. Relative SHG conversion efficiency of the grown crystal is about 0.59 times that of KDP.

  16. Physicochemical properties of dimethylammonium p-nitrophenolate– p-nitrophenol: A nonlinear optical crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rathika, A. [Department of Physics, Noorul Islam Centre for Higher Education, Noorul Islam University, Kumaracoil 629 180 (India); Prasad, L. Guru [Departemnt of Science & Humanities, M. Kumarasamy College of Engineering, Karur (India); Raman, R. Ganapathi, E-mail: ganapathiraman83@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Noorul Islam Centre for Higher Education, Noorul Islam University, Kumaracoil 629 180 (India)

    2016-03-15

    Single crystals of Dimethylammonium p-nitrophenolate–p-nitrophenol have been grown from aqueous solution by slow evaporation solution growth technique. Unit cell parameters of the grown crystal were confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis and the synthesized compound is crystallized in monoclinic system. Various functional groups and their vibrational frequencies were recognized from the FT-IR and FT-Raman spectrum. Thermal stability of the crystal was examined by recording the TGA/DTA curve. The grown crystal has wider transparency nature in the visible region and the lower cut-off wavelength is found at 465 nm. Mechanical property of the crystal was studied by analyzing the Vicker's microhardness measurements. The fluorescence emission from the crystal is observed at 350 nm which arise due to the presence of aromatic ring. Relative SHG conversion efficiency of the grown crystal is about 0.59 times that of KDP.

  17. Do carboximide–carboxylic acid combinations form co-crystals? The role of hydroxyl substitution on the formation of co-crystals and eutectics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramanpreet Kaur

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Carboxylic acids, amides and imides are key organic systems which provide understanding of molecular recognition and binding phenomena important in biological and pharmaceutical settings. In this context, studies of their mutual interactions and compatibility through co-crystallization may pave the way for greater understanding and new applications of their combinations. Extensive co-crystallization studies are available for carboxylic acid/amide combinations, but only a few examples of carboxylic acid/imide co-crystals are currently observed in the literature. The non-formation of co-crystals for carboxylic acid/imide combinations has previously been rationalized, based on steric and computed stability factors. In the light of the growing awareness of eutectic mixtures as an alternative outcome in co-crystallization experiments, the nature of various benzoic acid/cyclic imide combinations is established in this paper. Since an additional functional group can provide sites for new intermolecular interactions and, potentially, promote supramolecular growth into a co-crystal, benzoic acids decorated with one or more hydroxyl groups have been systematically screened for co-crystallization with one unsaturated and two saturated cyclic imides. The facile formation of an abundant number of hydroxybenzoic acid/cyclic carboximide co-crystals is reported, including polymorphic and variable stoichiometry co-crystals. In the cases where co-crystals did not form, the combinations are shown invariably to result in eutectics. The presence or absence and geometric disposition of hydroxyl functionality on benzoic acid is thus found to drive the formation of co-crystals or eutectics for the studied carboxylic acid/imide combinations.

  18. Raphide crystal structure in agave tequilana determined by x-ray originating from synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tadokoro, Makoto; Ozawa, Yoshiki; Mitsumi, Minoru; Toriumi, Kohshiro; Ogura, Tetsuya

    2005-01-01

    The first single crystal structure of small natural raphides in an agave plant is completely determined using an intense X-ray originating from a synchrotron radiation. The SEM image shows that the tip of the crystal is approximately hundreds of nanometer in width sharply grow to stick to the tissue of herbivorous vermin. Furthermore, the crystal develops cracks that propagate at an inclination of approximately 45deg towards the direction of crystal growth such that the crystal easily splits into small pieces in the tissue. (author)

  19. Tunable alumina 2D photonic-crystal structures via biomineralization of peacock tail feathers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yonggang; Wang, Rui; Feng, Lin; Li, Jian; An, Zhonglie; Zhang, Deyuan

    2018-04-01

    Peacock tail feathers with subtle periodic nanostructures exhibit diverse striking brilliancy, which can be applied as natural templates to fabricate artificial photonic crystals (PhCs) via a biomineralization method. Alumina photonic-crystal structures are successfully synthesized via an immersion and two-step calcination process. The lattice constants of the artificial PhCs are greatly reduced compared to their natural matrices. The lattice constants are tunable by modifying the final annealing conditions in the biomineralization process. The reflection spectra of the alumina photonic-crystal structures are measured, which is related to their material and structural parameters. This work suggests a facile fabrication process to construct alumina PhCs with a high-temperature resistance.

  20. The influence of crystal structure on ion-irradiation tolerance in the Sm{sub (x)}Yb{sub (2-x)}TiO{sub 5} series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aughterson, R.D., E-mail: roa@ansto.gov.au [Institute of Materials Engineering, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, PMB 1, Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia); Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Lumpkin, G.R.; Reyes, M. de los [Institute of Materials Engineering, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, PMB 1, Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia); Gault, B. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Baldo, P.; Ryan, E. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Whittle, K.R. [Centre for Materials and Structures, School of Engineering, The University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3GH UK (United Kingdom); Smith, K.L. [Government International and External Relations, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, PMB 1, Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia); Cairney, J.M. [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2016-04-01

    This ion-irradiation study covers the four major crystal structure types in the Ln{sub 2}TiO{sub 5} series (Ln = lanthanide), namely orthorhombic Pnma, hexagonal P6{sub 3}/mmc, cubic (pyrochlore-like) Fd-3m and cubic (fluorite-like) Fm-3m. This is the first systematic examination of the complete Ln{sub 2}TiO{sub 5} crystal system and the first reported examination of the hexagonal structure. A series of samples, based on the stoichiometry Sm{sub (x)}Yb{sub (2-x)}TiO{sub 5} (where x = 2, 1.4, 1, 0.6, and 0) have been irradiated using 1 MeV Kr{sup 2+} ions and characterised in-situ using a transmission electron microscope. Two quantities are used to define ion-irradiation tolerance: critical dose of amorphisation (D{sub c}), which is the irradiating ion dose required for a crystalline to amorphous transition, and the critical temperature (T{sub c}), above which the sample cannot be rendered amorphous by ion irradiation. The structure type plus elements of bonding are correlated to ion-irradiation tolerance. The cubic phases, Yb{sub 2}TiO{sub 5} and Sm{sub 0.6}Yb{sub 1.4}TiO{sub 5}, were found to be the most radiation tolerant, with T{sub c} values of 479 and 697 K respectively. The improved radiation tolerance with a change in symmetry to cubic is consistent with previous studies of similar compounds.

  1. Naturally occurring crystalline phases: analogues for radioactive waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haaker, R.F.; Ewing, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    Naturally occurring mineral analogues to crystalline phases that are constituents of crystalline radioactive waste forms provide a basis for comparison by which the long-term stability of these phases may be estimated. The crystal structures and the crystal chemistry of the following natural analogues are presented: baddeleyite, hematite, nepheline; pollucite, scheelite;sodalite, spinel, apatite, monazite, uraninite, hollandite-priderite, perovskite, and zirconolite. For each phase in geochemistry, occurrence, alteration and radiation effects are described. A selected bibliography for each phase is included

  2. Naturally occurring crystalline phases: analogues for radioactive waste forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haaker, R.F.; Ewing, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    Naturally occurring mineral analogues to crystalline phases that are constituents of crystalline radioactive waste forms provide a basis for comparison by which the long-term stability of these phases may be estimated. The crystal structures and the crystal chemistry of the following natural analogues are presented: baddeleyite, hematite, nepheline; pollucite, scheelite;sodalite, spinel, apatite, monazite, uraninite, hollandite-priderite, perovskite, and zirconolite. For each phase in geochemistry, occurrence, alteration and radiation effects are described. A selected bibliography for each phase is included.

  3. Crystallization and diffraction analysis of β-N-acetylhexosaminidase from Aspergillus oryzae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaněk, Ondřej; Brynda, Jiří; Hofbauerová, Kateřina; Kukačka, Zdeněk; Pachl, Petr; Bezouška, Karel; Řezáčová, Pavlína

    2011-01-01

    The fungal β-N-acetylhexosaminidase from A. oryzae was crystallized and diffraction data were collected from two crystal forms to 3.2 and 2.4 Å resolution, respectively. Fungal β-N-acetylhexosaminidases are enzymes that are used in the chemoenzymatic synthesis of biologically interesting oligosaccharides. The enzyme from Aspergillus oryzae was produced and purified from its natural source and crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Diffraction data from two crystal forms (primitive monoclinic and primitive tetragonal) were collected to resolutions of 3.2 and 2.4 Å, respectively. Electrophoretic and quantitative N-terminal protein-sequencing analyses confirmed that the crystals are formed by a complete biologically active enzyme consisting of a glycosylated catalytic unit and a noncovalently attached propeptide

  4. Spherical Nb single crystals containerlessly grown by electrostatic levitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, Y.S.; Takeya, H.; Hirata, K.; Togano, K.

    2003-01-01

    Spherical Nb (T m =2750 K) single crystals were grown via containerless electrostatic levitation (ESL). Samples became spherical at melting in levitation and undercooled typically 300-450 K prior to nucleation. As-processed samples were still spherical without any macroscopic shape change by solidification showing a uniform dendritic surface morphology. Crystallographic {111} planes exposed in equilateral triangular shapes on the surface by preferential macroetching and spotty back-reflection Laue patterns confirm the single crystal nature of the ESL-processed Nb samples. No hysteresis in magnetization between zero field and field cooling also implies a clean defect-free condition of the spherical Nb single crystals

  5. REDUPP First Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zetterstrom Evins, L. [Svensk Kaernbraenslehantering AB (SKB), Stockholm (Sweden); Vahanen, M. (eds.)

    2012-06-15

    The REDUPP project aims to investigate how surfaces of solids with a fluorite structure change with time during dissolution. Laboratory experiments are performed to monitor dissolution of CaF{sub 2}, CeO{sub 2}, ThO{sub 2} and UO{sub 2}, in connection with ab initio calculations. Another aspect of the project involves investigating if using natural groundwater in the leaching tests has an effect on the measured dissolution rate of UO{sub 2}. The preliminary results after one project year are documented here. Samples have been prepared as sintered pellets with similar microstructures as UO{sub 2}. For the UO{sub 2} study, pellets doped with U-233 are used. Preliminary dissolution data show the expected trends for pH and temperature dissolution kinetics dependence. Studies on CeO{sub 2} monolith samples indicate that there is a crystallographic control on leaching, and that the grain boundaries are preferentially attacked. Measurable Th concentrations are achieved in pre-tests for ThO{sub 2} dissolution where the effect of carbonate complexation is also observed. The preliminary results of the studies performed on U-233-doped UO{sub 2} samples in natural groundwater are in agreement with previous results, and show no observable effect of trace elements or level of alpha radiolysis. In the modelling work, the stabilities of surfaces corresponding to different crystal planes have been computed, and work is in progress to develop a model involving stepped surfaces. Preliminary results show that only a few energies of reference planes need to be computed, and all other surface energies can be accurately estimated from a linear relation. The goal is to develop a model of how the surfaces of fluorite-structures evolve during dissolution. (orig.)

  6. Macromolecular Crystal Growth by Means of Microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    vanderWoerd, Mark; Ferree, Darren; Spearing, Scott; Monaco, Lisa; Molho, Josh; Spaid, Michael; Brasseur, Mike; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We have performed a feasibility study in which we show that chip-based, microfluidic (LabChip(TM)) technology is suitable for protein crystal growth. This technology allows for accurate and reliable dispensing and mixing of very small volumes while minimizing bubble formation in the crystallization mixture. The amount of (protein) solution remaining after completion of an experiment is minimal, which makes this technique efficient and attractive for use with proteins, which are difficult or expensive to obtain. The nature of LabChip(TM) technology renders it highly amenable to automation. Protein crystals obtained in our initial feasibility studies were of excellent quality as determined by X-ray diffraction. Subsequent to the feasibility study, we designed and produced the first LabChip(TM) device specifically for protein crystallization in batch mode. It can reliably dispense and mix from a range of solution constituents into two independent growth wells. We are currently testing this design to prove its efficacy for protein crystallization optimization experiments. In the near future we will expand our design to incorporate up to 10 growth wells per LabChip(TM) device. Upon completion, additional crystallization techniques such as vapor diffusion and liquid-liquid diffusion will be accommodated. Macromolecular crystallization using microfluidic technology is envisioned as a fully automated system, which will use the 'tele-science' concept of remote operation and will be developed into a research facility for the International Space Station as well as on the ground.

  7. Effects of humidity and surfaces on the melt crystallization of ibuprofen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Joo; Lee, Suyang; Kim, Il Won

    2012-01-01

    Melt crystallization of ibuprofen was studied to understand the effects of humidity and surfaces. The molecular self-assembly during the amorphous-to-crystal transformation was examined in terms of the nucleation and growth of the crystals. The crystallization was on Al, Au, and self-assembled monolayers with -CH(3), -OH, and -COOH functional groups. Effects of the humidity were studied at room temperature (18-20 °C) with relative humidity 33%, 75%, and 100%. Effects of the surfaces were observed at -20 °C (relative humidity 36%) to enable close monitoring with slower crystal growth. The nucleation time of ibuprofen was faster at high humidity conditions probably due to the local formation of the unfavorable ibuprofen melt/water interface. The crystal morphologies of ibuprofen were governed by the nature of the surfaces, and they could be associated with the growth kinetics by the Avrami equation. The current study demonstrated the effective control of the melt crystallization of ibuprofen through the melt/atmosphere and melt/surface interfaces.

  8. Objective Crystal Spectrometer (OXS) for the Spectrum-X-γ satellite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Finn Erland; Byrnak, B.P.; Hornstrup, Allan

    1990-01-01

    The status of the Objective Crystal Spectrometer (OXS) to be flown on the Soviet Spectrum-X-Gamma satellite together with the X-ray investigation of two of the three natural crystals (LiF(220), Ge(111) and RAP(001) which are chosen as the baseline option are presented. An important result...... on the LiF(220) and Ge(111) surfaces is presented. This design allows simultaneous spectroscopy in two energy bands each centered on cosmically interesting line emission regions. X-ray reflectivity measurements demonstrate that the crystal surface can be made sufficiently smooth for the application...

  9. Optical and electrical properties of ZrSe3 single crystals grown by chemical vapour transport technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Kaushik; Prajapati, Jagdish; Vaidya, Rajiv; Patel, S.G.

    2005-01-01

    Single crystals of the lamellar compound, ZrSe 3 , were grown by chemical vapour transport technique using iodine as a transporting agent. The grown crystals were characterized with the help of energy dispersive analysis by X-ray (EDAX), which gave confirmation about the stoichiometry. The optical band gap measurement of as grown crystals was carried out with the help of optical absorption spectra in the range 700-1450 nm. The indirect as well as direct band gap of ZrSe 3 were found to be 1.1 eV and 1.47 eV, respectively. The resistivity of the as grown crystals was measured using van der Pauw method. The Hall parameters of the grown crystals were determined at room temperature from Hall effect measurements. Electrical resistivity measurements were performed on this crystal in the temperature range 303-423 K. The crystals were found to exhibit semiconducting nature in this range. The activation energy and anisotropy measurements were carried out for this crystal. Pressure dependence of electrical resistance was studied using Bridgman opposed anvils set up up to 8 GPa. The semiconducting nature of ZrSe 3 single crystal was inferred from the graph of resistance vs pressure. The results obtained are discussed in detail. (author)

  10. Preventing Crystal Agglomeration of Pharmaceutical Crystals Using Temperature Cycling and a Novel Membrane Crystallization Procedure for Seed Crystal Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Simone

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a novel membrane crystallization system was used to crystallize micro-sized seeds of piroxicam monohydrate by reverse antisolvent addition. Membrane crystallization seeds were compared with seeds produced by conventional antisolvent addition and polymorphic transformation of a fine powdered sample of piroxicam form I in water. The membrane crystallization process allowed for a consistent production of pure monohydrate crystals with narrow size distribution and without significant agglomeration. The seeds were grown in 350 g of 20:80 w/w acetone-water mixture. Different seeding loads were tested and temperature cycling was applied in order to avoid agglomeration of the growing crystals during the process. Focused beam reflectance measurement (FBRM; and particle vision and measurement (PVM were used to monitor crystal growth; nucleation and agglomeration during the seeded experiments. Furthermore; Raman spectroscopy was used to monitor solute concentration and estimate the overall yield of the process. Membrane crystallization was proved to be the most convenient and consistent method to produce seeds of highly agglomerating compounds; which can be grown via cooling crystallization and temperature cycling.

  11. Growth and characterization of unidirectional benzil single crystal for photonic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saranraj, A.; Thirupathy, J.; Dhas, S. Sahaya Jude; Jose, M.; Vinitha, G.; Dhas, S. A. Martin Britto

    2018-06-01

    Organic nonlinear optical benzil single crystal of fine quality with the dimensions of 168 × 14 mm2 was successfully grown in (100) plane from saturated solution by unidirectional SR method. The structural identity of the grown crystal was confirmed by powder XRD. High-resolution X-ray diffraction analysis indicates the crystalline perfection of the grown benzil crystal. The optical analysis was carried out by UV-visible spectroscopy which shows that the benzil crystal's cut off wavelength is 437 nm. The dielectric constant and dielectric loss of benzil crystal are found to be very much depending upon temperature and frequency. Ferroelectric nature of grown crystal was identified by P- E hysteresis analysis and to find the values of spontaneous polarization and coercive field. The laser damage threshold energy was studied with the help of Nd:YAG laser. The presence of third harmonic generation was identified by z-scan techniques.

  12. Photonic Crystal Sensors Based on Porous Silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Pacholski

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Porous silicon has been established as an excellent sensing platform for the optical detection of hazardous chemicals and biomolecular interactions such as DNA hybridization, antigen/antibody binding, and enzymatic reactions. Its porous nature provides a high surface area within a small volume, which can be easily controlled by changing the pore sizes. As the porosity and consequently the refractive index of an etched porous silicon layer depends on the electrochemial etching conditions photonic crystals composed of multilayered porous silicon films with well-resolved and narrow optical reflectivity features can easily be obtained. The prominent optical response of the photonic crystal decreases the detection limit and therefore increases the sensitivity of porous silicon sensors in comparison to sensors utilizing Fabry-Pérot based optical transduction. Development of porous silicon photonic crystal sensors which allow for the detection of analytes by the naked eye using a simple color change or the fabrication of stacked porous silicon photonic crystals showing two distinct optical features which can be utilized for the discrimination of analytes emphasize its high application potential.

  13. Organic field-effect transistors using single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Tatsuo; Takeya, Jun

    2009-01-01

    Organic field-effect transistors using small-molecule organic single crystals are developed to investigate fundamental aspects of organic thin-film transistors that have been widely studied for possible future markets for 'plastic electronics'. In reviewing the physics and chemistry of single-crystal organic field-effect transistors (SC-OFETs), the nature of intrinsic charge dynamics is elucidated for the carriers induced at the single crystal surfaces of molecular semiconductors. Materials for SC-OFETs are first reviewed with descriptions of the fabrication methods and the field-effect characteristics. In particular, a benchmark carrier mobility of 20-40 cm 2 Vs -1 , achieved with thin platelets of rubrene single crystals, demonstrates the significance of the SC-OFETs and clarifies material limitations for organic devices. In the latter part of this review, we discuss the physics of microscopic charge transport by using SC-OFETs at metal/semiconductor contacts and along semiconductor/insulator interfaces. Most importantly, Hall effect and electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements reveal that interface charge transport in molecular semiconductors is properly described in terms of band transport and localization by charge traps. (topical review)

  14. Photonic Crystal Sensors Based on Porous Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacholski, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Porous silicon has been established as an excellent sensing platform for the optical detection of hazardous chemicals and biomolecular interactions such as DNA hybridization, antigen/antibody binding, and enzymatic reactions. Its porous nature provides a high surface area within a small volume, which can be easily controlled by changing the pore sizes. As the porosity and consequently the refractive index of an etched porous silicon layer depends on the electrochemial etching conditions photonic crystals composed of multilayered porous silicon films with well-resolved and narrow optical reflectivity features can easily be obtained. The prominent optical response of the photonic crystal decreases the detection limit and therefore increases the sensitivity of porous silicon sensors in comparison to sensors utilizing Fabry-Pérot based optical transduction. Development of porous silicon photonic crystal sensors which allow for the detection of analytes by the naked eye using a simple color change or the fabrication of stacked porous silicon photonic crystals showing two distinct optical features which can be utilized for the discrimination of analytes emphasize its high application potential. PMID:23571671

  15. Crystal structure and properties of tetragonal EuAg4In8 grown by metal flux technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subbarao, Udumula; Sarkar, Sumanta; Peter, Sebastian C.

    2015-01-01

    The compound EuAg 4 In 8 has been obtained as single crystals in high yield from reactions run in liquid indium. X-ray diffraction on single crystals suggests that EuAg 4 In 8 crystallizes in the CeMn 4 Al 8 structure type, tetragonal space group I4/mmm with lattice constants a=b=9.7937(2) Å and c=5.7492(2) Å. Crystal structure of EuAg 4 In 8 is composed of pseudo Frank–Kasper cages occupied by one europium atom in each ring, which are shared through the corner along the ab plane resulting in a three dimensional network. The magnetic susceptibility of EuAg 4 In 8 was measured in the temperature range 2–300 K, which obeyed Curie–Weiss law above 50 K. Magnetic moment value calculated from the fitting indicates the presence of divalent europium, which was confirmed by X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy. Electrical resistivity measurements suggest that EuAg 4 In 8 is metallic in nature with a probable Fermi liquid behavior at low temperature. - Graphical abstract: The tetragonal EuAg 4 In 8 has been grown as single crystals from reactions run in liquid indium. Magnetic and XANES measurements suggest divalent nature of Eu and resistivity measurements suggest metallic nature. - Highlights: • EuAg 4 In 8 phase having tetragonal phase is grown by metal flux technique. • Magnetic and XANES measurements exhibit divalent nature of Eu in EuAg 4 In 8 . • Resistivity measurement suggests metallic nature and probable Fermi liquid behavior

  16. Impurities and Electronic Property Variations of Natural MoS 2 Crystal Surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Addou, Rafik; McDonnell, Stephen; Barrera, Diego; Guo, Zaibing; Azcatl, Angelica; Wang, Jian; Zhu, Hui; Hinkle, Christopher L.; Quevedo-Lopez, Manuel; Alshareef, Husam N.; Colombo, Luigi; Hsu, Julia W P; Wallace, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Room temperature X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS), high resolution Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (HR-RBS), Kelvin probe method, and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) are employed to study the properties of a freshly exfoliated surface of geological MoS2 crystals. Our findings reveal that the semiconductor 2H-MoS2 exhibits both n- and p-type behavior, and the work function as measured by the Kelvin probe is found to vary from 4.4 to 5.3 eV. The presence of impurities in parts-per-million (ppm) and a surface defect density of up to 8% of the total area could explain the variation of the Fermi level position. High resolution RBS data also show a large variation in the MoSx composition (1.8 < x < 2.05) at the surface. Thus, the variation in the conductivity, the work function, and stoichiometry across small areas of MoS2 will have to be controlled during crystal growth in order to provide high quality uniform materials for future device fabrication. © 2015 American Chemical Society.

  17. Impurities and Electronic Property Variations of Natural MoS 2 Crystal Surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Addou, Rafik

    2015-09-22

    Room temperature X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS), high resolution Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (HR-RBS), Kelvin probe method, and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) are employed to study the properties of a freshly exfoliated surface of geological MoS2 crystals. Our findings reveal that the semiconductor 2H-MoS2 exhibits both n- and p-type behavior, and the work function as measured by the Kelvin probe is found to vary from 4.4 to 5.3 eV. The presence of impurities in parts-per-million (ppm) and a surface defect density of up to 8% of the total area could explain the variation of the Fermi level position. High resolution RBS data also show a large variation in the MoSx composition (1.8 < x < 2.05) at the surface. Thus, the variation in the conductivity, the work function, and stoichiometry across small areas of MoS2 will have to be controlled during crystal growth in order to provide high quality uniform materials for future device fabrication. © 2015 American Chemical Society.

  18. Trichoderma koningii as a biomineralizing fungous agent of calcium oxalate crystals in typical Argiudolls of the Los Padres Lake natural reserve (Buenos Aires, Argentina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyarbide, F; Osterrieth, M L; Cabello, M

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the present study, performed on typical Argiudolls in a natural reserve with little or no anthropic impact, was to characterize the fungous biomineralizing process of calcium oxalate crystals in organic horizons of the soil. The chosen sites possessed different plant cover, identified as acacia woods and grassy meadows with particular micro environmental conditions that have differing effects in the process of biomineralization. The contribution of the plant material in the soil is a key factor since 1) it generates the particular composition of the organic horizons, 2) it determines the nature of decomposing organisms, and 3) it affects the presence, composition and development of biominerals. According to the results obtained, the acacia woods prove to be a site comparatively more favorable to the fungous biomineralizing process. This makes itself manifest in the greater abundance and development of crystals in the organic horizons of the soil, resulting in whewellite (CaC2O4.H2O) and weddellite (CaC2O4.(2+x) H2O) regarding biomineral species developed, the latter being the major component. The observation of both species of biominerals is noteworthy since it represents the first cited in the country. The isolated fungous organisms were Trichoderma koningii, and Absidia corymbifera. T. koningii was identified as the most active biomineralizing organism thus constituting the first reference to indicate this species as a biomineral producing agent.

  19. At last! The single-crystal X-ray structure of a naturally occurring sample of the ilmenite-type oxide FeCrO3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Cruz, María Ana; Elizalde-González, María de la Paz; Escudero, Roberto; Bernès, Sylvain; Silva-González, Rutilo; Reyes-Ortega, Yasmi

    2015-10-01

    A natural single crystal of the ferrimagnetic oxide FeCrO3, which was found in an opencast mine situated in the San Luis Potosí State in Mexico, has been characterized in order to elucidate some outstanding issues about the actual structure of this material. The single-crystal X-ray analysis unambiguously shows that transition metal cations are segregated in alternating layers normal to the threefold crystallographic axis, affording a structure isomorphous to that of ilmenite (FeTiO3), in the space group R3̅. The possible occurrence of cation antisite and vacancy defects is below the limit of detection available from X-ray data. Structural and magnetic results are in agreement with the coherent slow intergrowth of magnetic phases provided by the two antiferromagnetic corundum-type parent oxides Fe2O3 (hematite) and Cr2O3 (eskolaite). Our results are consistent with the most recent density functional theory (DFT) studies carried out on digital FeCrO3 [Sadat Nabi & Pentcheva (2011). Phys. Rev. B, 83, 214424], and suggest that synthetic samples of FeCrO3 might present a cation distribution different to that of the ilmenite structural type.

  20. Initial testing of a Compact Crystal Positioning System for the TOPAZ Single-Crystal Diffractometer at the Spallation Neutron Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frost, Matthew J.; Austin, Michael D.; Viola, Robert; Thomison, Jack; Carmen, Peter; Hoffmann, Christina; Miller, Echo M.; Mosier, Lisa B.; Overbay, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    A precise, versatile, and automated method of orienting a sub-millimeter crystal in a focused neutron beam is required for e cient operation of the TOPAZ Single Crystal Di ractometer at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. To ful ll this need, a Compact Crystal Positioning System (CCPS) has been developed in collaboration with Square One Systems Design in Jackson, Wyoming. The system incorporates a tripod design with six vacuum-compatible piezoelectric linear motors capable of < 1 m resolution. National Instruments LabVIEW provides a means of system automation while at the same time accommodating the modular nature of the SNS sample environment control software for straightforward system integration. Initial results in a cryogenic test environment will be presented, as well as results from ambient tests performed at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory.

  1. Energy flow in photonic crystal waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Thomas; Dridi, Kim

    2000-01-01

    Theoretical and numerical investigations of energy flow in photonic crystal waveguides made of line defects and branching points are presented. It is shown that vortices of energy flow may occur, and the net energy flow along: the line defect is described via the effective propagation velocity....... Single-mode and multimode operations are studied, and dispersion relations are computed for different waveguide widths. Both strong positive, strong negative, and zero dispersion an possible. It is shown that geometric parameters such as the nature of the lattice, the line defect orientation, the defect...... width, and the branching-point geometry have a significant influence on the electrodynamics. These are important issues for the fabrication of photonic crystal structures....

  2. Shrink, twist, ripple and melt: Studies of frustrated liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernsler, Jonathan G.

    Complex structures can arise out of a simple system with more than one competing influence on its behavior. The protypical example of this is the two-dimensional triangular lattice Ising model. The ferromagnetic model has two simple degenerate ground states of all spins up or down, but the antiferromagnetic model is a frustrated system. Its geometry does not allow satisfaction of the antiferro condition everywhere, which produces complex ordered structures with dimerization of the spins [1]. Without frustration, the complex structures and phase behavior are lost. All of the topics discussed in this thesis concern smectic liquid crystals. Liquid crystals are perhaps uniquely adept at manifesting frustrated phases. Their combination of periodicity in one or more dimensions allows ordered structures, yet their fluid nature in remaining dimensions allows creation of defects and extraordinarily complex structures in ways that a normal crystal could not tolerate. Liquid crystals contain a huge menagerie of frustrated phases and effects including the polarization modulated [2], vortex lattice [3], twist grain boundary [4], and blue [5] phases, as well as frustrated structures such as cholesteric or SmC* helix unwinding [6], defect lattices in thin films [7], and bend melted grain boundary defects [8], arising from boundary conditions and field effects. In this thesis, we study four liquid crystal systems that show unusual phase behavior or complex structures, deriving from the effects of frustration. Frustration, despite some human prejudices against the word, leaves nature all the more interesting and beautiful.

  3. Membrane crystallization for recovery of salts from produced water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quist-Jensen, Cejna Anna; Jensen, Henriette Casper; Ali, Aamer

    Membrane Crystallization (MCr) is a novel technology able to recover freshwater and high-purity salts from complex solutions and therefore, is suggested for a better exploitation of wastewater streams. Unlike other membrane processes, MCr is not limited by high concentrations and, therefore, the ......, the membrane maintained its hydrophobic nature despite that produced water contained oil residues. Conductivity and HPLC was utilized to analyze the quality of the permeate stream......., the solutions can be treated to achieve saturation level. Hereby different salts can be precipitated and directly recovered from various streams. In this study, it is shown that MCr is able to treat produced water by producing clean water and simultaneously NaCl crystals. The recovered crystals exhibited high...

  4. Habit modification of bis-thiourea zinc chloride (ZTC) semi organic crystals by impurities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruby Nirmala, L.; Thomas Joseph Prakash, J.

    2013-06-01

    Single crystals of bis-thiourea zinc chloride (ZTC) doped with metal ion (Li+) possess excellent nonlinear optical properties. These crystals were grown by slow evaporation solution growth technique. The effect of Li+ dopant on the growth and properties of ZTC single crystal were investigated and reported. The grown crystals were crystallized in orthorhombic structure with non-centro symmetric space group Pn21a through the parent compound. The amount of dopant incorporated in the parent crystal was revealed by the inductively coupled plasma (ICP-OES) studies. The FT-IR spectroscopy study was done for finding and confirming the functional groups present in the compound. The UV-Visible spectral study was carried out to find the optical behavior and transparency nature of the grown crystal. TG/DTA measurements and Vickers microhardness measurements were traced to find out the thermal and mechanical stability of the grown crystals respectively. Using Nd:YAG laser, the Second harmonic generation (SHG) for the grown crystals were confirmed.

  5. Unifying the crystallization behavior of hexagonal and square crystals with the phase-field-crystal model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Tao; Chen Zheng; Zhang Jing; Wang Yongxin; Lu Yanli

    2016-01-01

    By employing the phase-field-crystal models, the atomic crystallization process of hexagonal and square crystals is investigated with the emphasis on the growth mechanism and morphological change. A unified regime describing the crystallization behavior of both crystals is obtained with the thermodynamic driving force varying. By increasing the driving force, both crystals (in the steady-state) transform from a faceted polygon to an apex-bulged polygon, and then into a symmetric dendrite. For the faceted polygon, the interface advances by a layer-by-layer (LL) mode while for the apex-bulged polygonal and the dendritic crystals, it first adopts the LL mode and then transits into the multi-layer (ML) mode in the later stage. In particular, a shift of the nucleation sites from the face center to the area around the crystal tips is detected in the early growth stage of both crystals and is rationalized in terms of the relation between the crystal size and the driving force distribution. Finally, a parameter characterizing the complex shape change of square crystal is introduced. (paper)

  6. Magnetoresistance in molybdenite (MoS2) crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, B.R.; Dutta, A.K.

    1975-01-01

    The principal magnetoresistance ratios of molybdenite (MoS 2 ), the naturally occurring semiconducting crystal, have been investigated at magnetic fields ranging from 4.5 KOe and within the temperature range 300 0 K to 700 0 K. Unlike some previous observations, magnetoresistance has been found to be negative. (author)

  7. Microphase Separation Controlled beta-Sheet Crystallization Kinetics in Fibrous Proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, X.; Lu, Q.; Kaplan, D.; Cebe, P.

    2009-01-01

    Silk is a naturally occurring fibrous protein with a multiblock chain architecture. As such, it has many similarities with synthetic block copolymers, including the possibility for e-sheet crystallization restricted within the crystallizable blocks. The mechanism of isothermal crystallization kinetics of e-sheet crystals in silk multiblock fibrous proteins is reported in this study. Kinetics theories, such as Avrami analysis which was established for studies of synthetic polymer crystal growth, are for the first time extended to investigate protein self-assembly in e-sheet rich Bombyx mori silk fibroin samples, using time-resolved Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and synchrotron real-time wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS). The Avrami exponent, n, was close to 2 for all methods and crystallization temperatures, indicating formation of e-sheet crystals in silk proteins is different from the 3-D spherulitic crystal growth found in synthetic polymers. Observations by scanning electron microscopy support the view that the protein structures vary during the different stages of crystal growth, and show a microphase separation pattern after chymotrypsin enzyme biodegradation. We present a model to explain the crystallization of the multiblock silk fibroin protein, by analogy to block copolymers: crystallization of e-sheets occurs under conditions of geometrical restriction caused by phase separation of the crystallizable and uncrystallizable blocks. This crystallization model could be widely applicable in other proteins with multiblock (i.e., crystallizable and noncrystallizable) domains.

  8. Constitutive and life modeling of single crystal blade alloys for root attachment analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, T. G.; Mccarthy, G. J.; Favrow, L. H.; Anton, D. L.; Bak, Joe

    1988-01-01

    Work to develop fatigue life prediction and constitutive models for uncoated attachment regions of single crystal gas turbine blades is described. At temperatures relevant to attachment regions, deformation is dominated by slip on crystallographic planes. However, fatigue crack initiation and early crack growth are not always observed to be crystallographic. The influence of natural occurring microporosity will be investigated by testing both hot isostatically pressed and conventionally cast PWA 1480 single crystal specimens. Several differnt specimen configurations and orientations relative to the natural crystal axes are being tested to investigate the influence of notch acuity and the material's anisotropy. Global and slip system stresses in the notched regions were determined from three dimensional stress analyses and will be used to develop fatigue life prediction models consistent with the observed lives and crack characteristics.

  9. Liquid Crystal Gel Reduces Age Spots by Promoting Skin Turnover

    OpenAIRE

    Mina Musashi; Ariella Coler-Reilly; Teruaki Nagasawa; Yoshiki Kubota; Satomi Kato; Yoko Yamaguchi

    2014-01-01

    Studies have shown that liquid crystals structurally resembling the intercellular lipids in the stratum corneum can beneficially affect the skin when applied topically by stimulating the skin’s natural regenerative functions and accelerating epidermal turnover. In the present study, the effects of applying low concentrations of a liquid crystal gel of our own creation were evaluated using epidermal thickening in mouse skin as an assay for effective stimulation of epidermal turnover. A liquid ...

  10. Numerical simulation of flow and mass transfer for large KDP crystal growth via solution-jet method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Huawei; Li, Mingwei; Hu, Zhitao; Zhou, Chuan; Li, Zhiwei

    2018-06-01

    A novel technique of growing large crystals of potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) named solution-jet method is proposed. The aim is to increase supersaturation on the pyramidal face, especially for crystal surface regions close to the rotation axis. The fluid flow and surface supersaturation distribution of crystals grown under different conditions were computed using the finite-volume method. Results indicate that the time-averaged supersaturation of the pyramidal face in the proposed method significantly increases and the supersaturation difference from the crystal center to edge clearly decreases compared with the rotating-crystal method. With increased jet velocity, supersaturation on the pyramidal face steadily increases. Rotation rate considerably affects the magnitude and distribution of the prismatic surface supersaturation. With increased crystal size, the mean value of surface supersaturation averaged over the pyramid gradually decreases; conversely, standard deviation increases, which is detrimental to crystal growth. Moreover, the significant roles played by natural and forced convection in the process of mass transport are discussed. Results show that further increased jet velocity to 0.6 m/s renders negligible the effects of natural convection around the pyramid. The simulation for step propagation indicates that solution-jet method can promote a steady step migration and enhance surface morphology stability, which can improve the crystal quality.

  11. Electrical properties of zirconium diselenide single crystals grown by iodine transport method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, S.G.; Agarwal, M.K.; Batra, N.M.; Lakshminarayana, D.

    1998-01-01

    Single crystals of zirconium diselenide (ZrSe 2 ) were grown by chemical vapour transport method using iodine as the transporting agent. The crystals were found to exhibit metallic behaviour in the temperature range 77-300 K and semiconducting nature in 300-443 K range. The measurements of thermoelectric power and conductivity enabled the determination of both carrier mobility and carrier concentration. The variation of carrier mobility and carrier concentration with temperature indicates the presence of deep trapping centres and their reduction with temperature in these crystals. (author)

  12. Solid state synthesis, crystal growth and optical properties of urea and p-chloronitrobenzene solid solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rai, R.N., E-mail: rn_rai@yahoo.co.in [Department of Chemistry, Centre of Advanced Study, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India); Kant, Shiva; Reddi, R.S.B. [Department of Chemistry, Centre of Advanced Study, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India); Ganesamoorthy, S. [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102, Tamilnadu (India); Gupta, P.K. [Laser Materials Development & Devices Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013 (India)

    2016-01-15

    Urea is an attractive material for frequency conversion of high power lasers to UV (for wavelength down to 190 nm), but its usage is hindered due to its hygroscopic nature, though there is no alternative organic NLO crystal which could be transparent up to 190 nm. The hygroscopic character of urea has been modified by making the solid solution (UCNB) of urea (U) and p-chloronitrobenzene (CNB). The formation of the solid solution of CNB in U is explained on the basis of phase diagram, powder XRD, FTIR, elemental analysis and single crystal XRD studies. The solubility of U, CNB and UCNB in ethanol solution is evaluated at different temperatures. Transparent single crystals of UCNB are grown from its saturated solution in ethanol. Optical properties e.g., second harmonic generation (SHG), refractive index and the band gap for UCNB crystal were measured and their values were compared with the parent compounds. Besides modification in hygroscopic nature, UCNB has also shown the higher SHG signal and mechanical hardness in comparison to urea crystal. - Highlights: • The hygroscopic character of urea was modified by making the solid solution • Solid solution formation is support by elemental, powder- and single crystal XRD • Crystal of solid solution has higher SHG signal and mechanical stability. • Refractive index and band gap of solid solution crystal have determined.

  13. Effects of Humidity and Surfaces on the Melt Crystallization of Ibuprofen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Il Won Kim

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Melt crystallization of ibuprofen was studied to understand the effects of humidity and surfaces. The molecular self-assembly during the amorphous-to-crystal transformation was examined in terms of the nucleation and growth of the crystals. The crystallization was on Al, Au, and self-assembled monolayers with –CH3, –OH, and –COOH functional groups. Effects of the humidity were studied at room temperature (18–20 °C with relative humidity 33%, 75%, and 100%. Effects of the surfaces were observed at −20 °C (relative humidity 36% to enable close monitoring with slower crystal growth. The nucleation time of ibuprofen was faster at high humidity conditions probably due to the local formation of the unfavorable ibuprofen melt/water interface. The crystal morphologies of ibuprofen were governed by the nature of the surfaces, and they could be associated with the growth kinetics by the Avrami equation. The current study demonstrated the effective control of the melt crystallization of ibuprofen through the melt/atmosphere and melt/surface interfaces.

  14. Two-photon excited UV fluorescence for protein crystal detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madden, Jeremy T.; DeWalt, Emma L.; Simpson, Garth J.

    2011-01-01

    Complementary measurements using SONICC and TPE-UVF allow the sensitive and selective detection of protein crystals. Two-photon excited ultraviolet fluorescence (TPE-UVF) microscopy is explored for sensitive protein-crystal detection as a complement to second-order nonlinear optical imaging of chiral crystals (SONICC). Like conventional ultraviolet fluorescence (UVF), TPE-UVF generates image contrast based on the intrinsic fluorescence of aromatic residues, generally producing higher fluorescence emission within crystals than the mother liquor by nature of the higher local protein concentration. However, TPE-UVF has several advantages over conventional UVF, including (i) insensitivity to optical scattering, allowing imaging in turbid matrices, (ii) direct compatibility with conventional optical plates and windows by using visible light for excitation, (iii) elimination of potentially damaging out-of-plane UV excitation, (iv) improved signal to noise through background reduction from out-of-plane excitation and (v) relatively simple integration into instrumentation developed for SONICC

  15. Thermal-gradient migration of brine inclusions in salt crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagnik, S.K.

    1982-09-01

    It has been proposed that high-level nuclear waste be disposed in a geologic repository. Natural-salt deposits, which are being considered for this purpose, contain a small volume fraction of water in the form of brine inclusions distributed throughout the salt. Radioactive-decay heating of the nuclear wastes will impose a temperature gradient on the surrounding salt which mobilizes the brine inclusions. Inclusions filled completely with brine migrate up the temperature gradient and eventually accumulate brine near the buried waste forms. The brine may slowly corrode or degrade the waste forms which is undesirable. In this work, thermal gradient migration of both all-liquid and gas-liquid inclusions was experimentally studied in synthetic single crystals of NaCl and KCl using a hot-stage attachment to an optical microscope which was capable of imposing temperature gradients and axial compressive loads on the crystals. The migration velocities of the inclusions were found to be dependent on temperature, temperature gradient, and inclusion shape and size. The velocities were also dictated by the interfacial mass transfer resistance at brine/solid interface. This interfacial resistance depends on the dislocation density in the crystal, which in turn, depends on the axial compressive loading of the crystal. At low axial loads, the dependence between the velocity and temperature gradient is non-linear.At high axial loads, however, the interfacial resistance is reduced and the migration velocity depends linearly on the temperature gradient. All-liquid inclusions filled with mixed brines were also studied. For gas-liquid inclusions, three different gas phases (helium, air and argon) were compared. Migration studies were also conducted on single crystallites of natural salt as well as in polycrystalline natural salt samples. The behavior of the inclusions at large angle grain boundaries was observed. 35 figures, 3 tables

  16. Thermal gradient migration of brine inclusions in salt crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagnik, S.K.

    1982-01-01

    Natural salt deposits, which are being considered for high-level nuclear wastes repositories, contain a small volume fraction of water in the form of brine inclusions distributed throughout the salt. Radioactive decay heating of the nuclear wastes will impose a temperature gradient on the surrounding salt which mobilizes the brine inclusions. Inclusions filled completely with brine (the all-liquid inclusions) migrate up the temperature gradient and eventually accumulate brine near the buried waste forms. The brine may slowly corrode or degrade the waste forms which is undesirable. In the present work, thermal gradient migration of both all-liquid and gas-liquid inclusions was experimentally studied in synthetic single crystals of NaCl and KCl using a hot-stage attachment to an optical microscope which was capable of imposing temperature gradients and axial compressive loads on the crystals. The migration velocities of the inclusions were found to be dependent on temperature, temperature gradient, and inclusion shape and size. The velocities were also dictated by the interfacial mass transfer resistance at brine/solid interface. This interfacial resistance depends on the dislocation density in the crystal, which in turn, depends on the axial compressive loading of the crystal. At low axial loads, the dependence between the velocity and temperature gradient is nonlinear. At high axial loads, however, the interfacial resistance is reduced and the migration velocity depends linearly on the temperature gradient. All-liquid inclusions filled with mixed brines were also studied. For gas-liquid inclusions, three different gas phases (helium, air and argon) were compared. Migration studies were also conducted on single crystallites of natural salt as well as in polycrystalline natural salt samples. The behavior of the inclusions at large angle grain boudaries was observed

  17. ESR studies of high-energy phosphorus-ion implanted synthetic diamond crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isoya, J [University of Library and Information Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Kanda, H; Morita, Y; Ohshima, T

    1997-03-01

    Phosphorus is among potential n-type dopants in diamond. High pressure synthetic diamond crystals of type IIa implanted with high energy (9-18 MeV) phosphorus ions have been studied by using electron spin resonance (ESR) technique. The intensity and the linewidth of the ESR signal attributed to the dangling bond of the amorphous phase varied with the implantation dose, suggesting the nature of the amorphization varies with the dose. The ESR signals of point defects have been observed in the low dose as-implanted crystals and in the high dose crystals annealed at high temperature and at high pressure. (author)

  18. Role of local assembly in the hierarchical crystallization of associating colloidal hard hemispheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Qun-li; Hadinoto, Kunn; Ni, Ran

    2017-10-01

    Hierarchical self-assembly consisting of local associations of simple building blocks for the formation of complex structures widely exists in nature, while the essential role of local assembly remains unknown. In this work, by using computer simulations, we study a simple model system consisting of associating colloidal hemispheres crystallizing into face-centered-cubic crystals comprised of spherical dimers of hemispheres, focusing on the effect of dimer formation on the hierarchical crystallization. We found that besides assisting the crystal nucleation because of increasing the symmetry of building blocks, the association between hemispheres can also induce both reentrant melting and reentrant crystallization depending on the range of interaction. Especially when the interaction is highly sticky, we observe a novel reentrant crystallization of identical crystals, which melt only in a certain temperature range. This offers another axis in fabricating responsive crystalline materials by tuning the fluctuation of local association.

  19. Chiral multichromic single crystals for optical devices (LDRD 99406).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemp, Richard Alan; Felix, Ana M. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-12-01

    This report summarizes our findings during the study of a novel system that yields multi-colored materials as products. This system is quite unusual as it leads to multi-chromic behavior in single crystals, where one would expect that only a single color would exist. We have speculated that these novel solids might play a role in materials applications such as non-linear optics, liquid crystal displays, piezoelectric devices, and other similar applications. The system examined consisted of a main-group alkyl compound (a p block element such as gallium or aluminum) complexed with various organic di-imines. The di-imines had substituents of two types--either alkyl or aromatic groups attached to the nitrogen atoms. We observed that single crystals, characterized by X-ray crystallography, were obtained in most cases. Our research during January-July, 2006, was geared towards understanding the factors leading to the multi-chromic nature of the complexes. The main possibilities put forth initially considered (a) the chiral nature of the main group metal, (b) possible reduction of the metal to a lower-valent, radical state, (c) the nature of the ligand(s) attached to the main group metal, and (d) possible degradation products of the ligand leading to highly-colored products. The work carried out indicates that the most likely explanation considered involves degradation of the aromatic ligands (a combination of (c) and (d)), as the experiments performed can clearly rule out (a) and (b).

  20. X-ray topography of natural diamonds on the VEPP-3 SR beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuper, K.E.; Zedgenizov, D.A.; Ragozin, A.L.; Shatsky, V.S.

    2009-01-01

    X-ray topography (XRT) images were obtained using a double-crystal topographic method, with a magnification system in the Laue case. The experiment was performed at the beamline station 'Microscopy and tomography' of the VEPP-3 synchrotron radiation source. Two asymmetrically cut crystals in the Kirkpatrick-Baez scheme were used to increase the spatial resolution. The usage of an asymmetrically cut crystal with a magnification factor of 20 allows us to improve spatial resolution in registered images. A series of slabs of natural diamonds from kimberlite pipes and placers of the Siberian platform was examined. This study confirmed the high efficiency of the XRT method to recover information on the internal structure of natural diamonds. Together with other mineralogical data, the features of internal structure determined by this way are important to deduce the origin and history of growth of natural diamonds.

  1. Crystal chemistry and temperature behavior of the natural hydrous borate colemanite, a mineral commodity of boron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotti, Paolo; Gatta, G. Diego; Demitri, Nicola; Guastella, Giorgio; Rizzato, Silvia; Ortenzi, Marco Aldo; Magrini, Fabrizio; Comboni, Davide; Guastoni, Alessandro; Fernandez-Diaz, Maria Teresa

    2018-05-01

    Colemanite, CaB3O4(OH)3ṡH2O, is the most common hydrous Ca-borate, as well as a major mineral commodity of boron. In this study, we report a thorough chemical analysis and the low-temperature behavior of a natural sample of colemanite by means of a multi-methodological approach. From the chemical point of view, the investigated sample resulted to be relatively pure, its composition being very close to the ideal one, with only a minor substitution of Sr2+ for Ca2+. At about 270.5 K, a displacive phase transition from the centrosymmetric P21/ a to the acentric P21 space group occurs. On the basis of in situ single-crystal synchrotron X-ray (down to 104 K) and neutron diffraction (at 20 K) data, the hydrogen-bonding configuration of both the polymorphs and the structural modifications at the atomic scale at varying temperatures are described. The asymmetric distribution of ionic charges along the [010] axis, allowed by the loss of the inversion center, is likely responsible for the reported ferroelectric behavior of colemanite below the phase transition temperature.

  2. Organic field-effect transistors using single crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuo Hasegawa and Jun Takeya

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Organic field-effect transistors using small-molecule organic single crystals are developed to investigate fundamental aspects of organic thin-film transistors that have been widely studied for possible future markets for 'plastic electronics'. In reviewing the physics and chemistry of single-crystal organic field-effect transistors (SC-OFETs, the nature of intrinsic charge dynamics is elucidated for the carriers induced at the single crystal surfaces of molecular semiconductors. Materials for SC-OFETs are first reviewed with descriptions of the fabrication methods and the field-effect characteristics. In particular, a benchmark carrier mobility of 20–40 cm2 Vs−1, achieved with thin platelets of rubrene single crystals, demonstrates the significance of the SC-OFETs and clarifies material limitations for organic devices. In the latter part of this review, we discuss the physics of microscopic charge transport by using SC-OFETs at metal/semiconductor contacts and along semiconductor/insulator interfaces. Most importantly, Hall effect and electron spin resonance (ESR measurements reveal that interface charge transport in molecular semiconductors is properly described in terms of band transport and localization by charge traps.

  3. Crystallization method employing microwave radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, P; Dwyer, F G; Vartuli, J C

    1992-12-01

    This invention relates to a method of crystallizing materials from aqueous crystallization media. Zeolite materials, both natural and synthetic, have been demonstrated in the past to have catalytic properties for various types of hydrocarbon conversion. Certain zeolitic materials are ordered, porous crystalline metallosilicates having a definite crystalline structure as determined by X-ray diffraction within which there are a number of smaller cavities which may be interconnected by a number of still smaller channels or pores. These cavities and pores are uniform in size within a specific zeolite material. Since the dimensions of these pores are such as to accept for adsorption molecules of certain dimensions while rejecting those of large dimensions, these materials have come to be known as molecular sieves and are utilized in a variety of ways to take advantage of these properties. (author). 3 tabs.

  4. Crystallization method employing microwave radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, P.; Dwyer, F.G.; Vartuli, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    This invention relates to a method of crystallizing materials from aqueous crystallization media. Zeolite materials, both natural and synthetic, have been demonstrated in the past to have catalytic properties for various types of hydrocarbon conversion. Certain zeolitic materials are ordered, porous crystalline metallosilicates having a definite crystalline structure as determined by X-ray diffraction within which there are a number of smaller cavities which may be interconnected by a number of still smaller channels or pores. These cavities and pores are uniform in size within a specific zeolite material. Since the dimensions of these pores are such as to accept for adsorption molecules of certain dimensions while rejecting those of large dimensions, these materials have come to be known as molecular sieves and are utilized in a variety of ways to take advantage of these properties. (author). 3 tabs

  5. The contribution of polystyrene nanospheres towards the crystallization of proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna M Kallio

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Protein crystallization is a slow process of trial and error and limits the amount of solved protein structures. Search of a universal heterogeneous nucleant is an effort to facilitate crystallizability of proteins. METHODOLOGY: The effect of polystyrene nanospheres on protein crystallization were tested with three commercial proteins: lysozyme, xylanase, xylose isomerase, and with five research target proteins: hydrophobins HFBI and HFBII, laccase, sarcosine dimethylglycine N-methyltransferase (SDMT, and anti-testosterone Fab fragment 5F2. The use of nanospheres both in screening and as an additive for known crystallization conditions was studied. In screening, the addition of an aqueous solution of nanosphere to the crystallization drop had a significant positive effect on crystallization success in comparison to the control screen. As an additive in hydrophobin crystallization, the nanospheres altered the crystal packing, most likely due to the amphiphilic nature of hydrophobins. In the case of laccase, nanospheres could be used as an alternative for streak-seeding, which insofar had remained the only technique to produce high-diffracting crystals. With methyltransferase SDMT the nanospheres, used also as an additive, produced fewer, larger crystals in less time. Nanospheres, combined with the streak-seeding method, produced single 5F2 Fab crystals in shorter equilibration times. CONCLUSIONS: All in all, the use of nanospheres in protein crystallization proved to be beneficial, both when screening new crystallization conditions to promote nucleation and when used as an additive to produce better quality crystals, faster. The polystyrene nanospheres are easy to use, commercially available and close to being inert, as even with amphiphilic proteins only the crystal packing is altered and the nanospheres do not interfere with the structure and function of the protein.

  6. Uncovering the inertia of dislocation motion and negative mechanical response in crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yizhe

    2018-01-09

    Dislocations are linear defects in crystals and their motion controls crystals' mechanical behavior. The dissipative nature of dislocation propagation is generally accepted although the specific mechanisms are still not fully understood. The inertia, which is undoubtedly the nature of motion for particles with mass, seems much less convincing for configuration propagation. We utilize atomistic simulations in conditions that minimize dissipative effects to enable uncovering of the hidden nature of dislocation motion, in three typical model metals Mg, Cu and Ta. We find that, with less/no dissipation, dislocation motion is under-damped and explicitly inertial at both low and high velocities. The inertia of dislocation motion is intrinsic, and more fundamental than the dissipative nature. The inertia originates from the kinetic energy imparted from strain energy and stored in the moving core. Peculiar negative mechanical response associated with the inertia is also discovered. These findings shed light on the fundamental nature of dislocation motion, reveal the underlying physics, and provide a new physical explanation for phenomena relevant to high-velocity dislocations.

  7. Biogenic Crystal and New Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigi, A.; Falini, G.; Gazzano, M.; Roveri, N.; Ripamonti, A.; CNR, Bologna

    1998-01-01

    Organism use inorganic compounds to form inorganic-organic structured composites, with remarkable properties and functions. The target of many laboratory experiments is the natural processes simulation, in order to understand the molecular recognition process between the nucleation sites on the macromolecular matrix and the ions on the growing crystal nuclei. The understanding of biological phenomena opens new routes to the design of new materials or to the improvement of ceramics, polymers, semiconductors and composites [it

  8. Disclosure of domain structure in cubic CaxZr1-xO2-x, 0x15 ≤ x ≤ 0x20, by Talbot image enhancement of high-resolution electron micrographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossell, H.J.; Wilson, I.J.; Sellar, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    High-resolution electron microscope images have been recorded of several cystalline samples of calcia-stabilized zirconia (Ca-CSZ) and of the fluorite-related superstructure phase φ 1 (CaZr 4 O 9 ). The contrast of the CSZ images has been enhanced markedly by the light-optical Talbot self-imaging technique. Is is demonstrated that the CSZ crystals contain a coherent dispersion of microdomains approximately 30 A in diameter, and that the structure of the microdomains is that of φ 1 . (orig.)

  9. Synthesis, growth, and structural, optical, mechanical, electrical properties of a new inorganic nonlinear optical crystal: Sodium manganese tetrachloride (SMTC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Packiya raj

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A new inorganic nonlinear optical single crystal of sodium manganese tetrachloride (SMTC has been successfully grown from aqueous solution using the slow evaporation technique at room temperature. The crystals obtained using the aforementioned method were characterized using different techniques. The crystalline nature of the as-grown crystal of SMTC was analyzed using powder X-ray diffraction. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction revealed that the crystal belongs to an orthorhombic system with non-centrosymmetric space group Pbam. The optical transmission study of the SMTC crystal revealed high transmittance in the entire UV–vis region, and the lower cut-off wavelength was determined to be 240 nm. The mechanical strength of the as-grown crystal was estimated using the Vickers microhardness test. The second harmonic generation (SHG efficiency of the crystal was measured using Kurtz's powder technique, which indicated that the crystal has a nonlinear optical (NLO efficiency that is 1.32 times greater than that of KDP. The dielectric constant and dielectric loss of the compound were measured at different temperatures with varying frequencies. The photoconductivity study confirmed that the title compound possesses a negative photoconducting nature. The growth mechanism and surface features of the as-grown crystals were investigated using chemical etching analysis.

  10. Morphological Features of Diamond Crystals Dissolved in Fe0.7S0.3 Melt at 4 GPa and 1400°C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonin, V. M.; Zhimulev, E. I.; Pomazanskiy, B. S.; Zemnuhov, A. L.; Chepurov, A. A.; Afanasiev, V. P.; Chepurov, A. I.

    2018-01-01

    An experimental study of the dissolution of natural and synthetic diamonds in a sulfur-bearing iron melt (Fe0.7S0.3) with high P-T parameters (4 GPa, 1400°C) was performed. The results demonstrated that under these conditions, octahedral crystals with flat faces and rounded tetrahexahedral diamond crystals are transformed into rounded octahedroids, which have morphological characteristics similar to those of natural diamonds from kimberlite. It was suggested that, taking into account the complex history of individual natural diamond crystals, including the dissolution stages, sulfur-bearing metal melts up to sulfide melts were not only diamond-forming media during the early evolution of the Earth, but also natural solvents of diamond in the mantle environment before the formation of kimberlitic melts.

  11. K2SO4 and LiKSO4 crystals luminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charapiev, B.; Nurakhmetov, T.N.

    2002-01-01

    In the paper a nature of X-ray and tunnel luminescence in LiKSO 4 and Li 2 SO 4 ·H 2 O crystals are discussed. It is shown, that X-ray luminescence and Li 2 SO 4 ·H 2 O and LiKSO 4 appeals in the result of electrons recombination with auto-localized holes (SO 4 - ), and tunnel luminescence appeals at electrons transfer from ground state of electron center into hole center capture ground state. Under heating of irradiated crystal de-localized holes at recombination moment with electron capture centers are forming auto-localized excitons, which are disintegrating with photon emitting, and so X-ray luminescence spectrum and thermally induces luminescence peaks are coinciding. Nature of radiation appealing in LiKSO 4 at ultraviolet excitation is discussing

  12. On Regularity Criteria for the Two-Dimensional Generalized Liquid Crystal Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanan Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We establish the regularity criteria for the two-dimensional generalized liquid crystal model. It turns out that the global existence results satisfy our regularity criteria naturally.

  13. Adsorption mechanisms of the nonequilibrium incorporation of admixtures in a growing crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, V. D.; Punin, Yu. O.; Smetannikova, O. G.; Kenunen, D. S.

    2007-12-01

    The nonequilibrium partition of components between a crystal and solution is mainly controlled by impurity adsorption on the surface of the growing crystal. The specificity of adsorption on the faces of various simple forms leads to the sectorial zoning of crystals. This effect was studied experimentally for several crystallizing systems with different impurities, including isomorphous, 2d-isomorphous, and nonisomorphous, readily adsorbed impurities. In all systems, the sectorial selectivity of impurity incorporation into host crystals has been detected with partition coefficients many times higher than in the case of equilibrium partition. Specific capture of impurities by certain faces is accompanied by inhibition of their growth and modification of habit. The decrease in nonequilibrium partition coefficients with degree of oversaturation provides entrapment of impurities in the growing crystals. Thereby, the adsorption mechanism works in much the same mode for impurities of quite different nature. The behavior of partition coefficient differs drastically from impurity capturing by diffusion mechanism.

  14. Photonic time crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Lunwu; Xu, Jin; Wang, Chengen; Zhang, Jianhua; Zhao, Yuting; Zeng, Jing; Song, Runxia

    2017-12-07

    When space (time) translation symmetry is spontaneously broken, the space crystal (time crystal) forms; when permittivity and permeability periodically vary with space (time), the photonic crystal (photonic time crystal) forms. We proposed the concept of photonic time crystal and rewritten the Maxwell's equations. Utilizing Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method, we simulated electromagnetic wave propagation in photonic time crystal and photonic space-time crystal, the simulation results show that more intensive scatter fields can obtained in photonic time crystal and photonic space-time crystal.

  15. Twisted intra-molecular charge transfer investigations of semiorganic triglycine phosphate single crystal for non linear optical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meera, M. R.; Joselin Beaula, T.; Rayar, S. L.; Bena Jothy, V.

    2017-09-01

    NLO materials are gaining importance in technologies such as optical communication, optical computing and dynamic image processing. Many NLO crystals grown by mixing amino acids with various organic and inorganic acids have been reported in the literature. Hence, glycine mixed semi-organic material will be of special interest as a fundamental building block to develop many complex crystals with improved NLO properties. A semi organic Single crystal of Triglycine Phosphate (TGP) which was grown and spectral analysis have been using FTIR and Raman spectral analysis. Natural Bond Orbital Analysis and the atomic natural charges are also predicted. HOMO LUMO energy gap value suggests the possibility of charge transfer within the molecule.

  16. Virtual Crystallizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Land, T A; Dylla-Spears, R; Thorsness, C B

    2006-08-29

    Large dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystals are grown in large crystallizers to provide raw material for the manufacture of optical components for large laser systems. It is a challenge to grow crystal with sufficient mass and geometric properties to allow large optical plates to be cut from them. In addition, KDP has long been the canonical solution crystal for study of growth processes. To assist in the production of the crystals and the understanding of crystal growth phenomena, analysis of growth habits of large KDP crystals has been studied, small scale kinetic experiments have been performed, mass transfer rates in model systems have been measured, and computational-fluid-mechanics tools have been used to develop an engineering model of the crystal growth process. The model has been tested by looking at its ability to simulate the growth of nine KDP boules that all weighed more than 200 kg.

  17. Atmospheric dust deposition on soils around an abandoned fluorite mine (Hammam Zriba, NE Tunisia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djebbi, Chaima; Chaabani, Fredj; Font, Oriol; Queralt, Ignasi; Querol, Xavier

    2017-10-01

    The present study focuses on the eolian dispersion and dust deposition, of major and trace elements in soils in a semi-arid climate, around an old fluorite (CaF 2 ) and barite (BaSO 4 ) mine, located in Hammam Zriba in Northern Tunisia. Ore deposits from this site contain a high amount of metal sulphides constituting heavy metal pollution in the surrounding environment. Samples of waste from the surface of mine tailings and agricultural topsoil samples in the vicinity of the mine were collected. The soil samples and a control sample from unpolluted area, were taken in the direction of prevailing northwest and west winds. Chemical analysis of these solids was performed using both X-ray fluorescence and X-ray diffraction. To determine the transfer from mine wastes to the soils, soluble fraction was performed by inductively coupled plasma and ionic chromatography. The fine grained size fraction of the un-restored tailings, still contained significant levels of barium, strontium, sulphur, fluorine, zinc and lead with mean percentages (wt%) of 30 (calculated as BaO), 13 (as SrO), 10 (as SO 3 ), 4 (F), 2 (Zn) and 1.2 (Pb). Also, high concentrations of cadmium (Cd), arsenic (As) and mercury (Hg) were found with an averages of 36, 24 and 1.2mgkg -1 , respectively. As a result of the eolian erosion of the tailings and their subsequent wind transport, the concentrations of Ba, Sr, S, F, Zn and Pb were extremely high in the soils near to the tailings dumps, with 5%, 4%, 7%, 1%, 0.8% and 0.2%, respectively. Concentration of major pollutants decreases with distance, but they were high even in the farthest samples. Same spatial distribution was observed for Cd, As and Hg. While, the other elements follow different spatial patterns. The leaching test revealed that most elements in the mining wastes, except for the anions, had a low solubility despite their high bulk concentrations. According the 2003/33/CE Decision Threshold, some of these tailings samples were considered as

  18. An affine microsphere approach to modeling strain-induced crystallization in rubbery polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nateghi, A.; Dal, H.; Keip, M.-A.; Miehe, C.

    2018-01-01

    Upon stretching a natural rubber sample, polymer chains orient themselves in the direction of the applied load and form crystalline regions. When the sample is retracted, the original amorphous state of the network is restored. Due to crystallization, properties of rubber change considerably. The reinforcing effect of the crystallites stiffens the rubber and increases the crack growth resistance. It is of great importance to understand the mechanism leading to strain-induced crystallization. However, limited theoretical work has been done on the investigation of the associated kinetics. A key characteristic observed in the stress-strain diagram of crystallizing rubber is the hysteresis, which is entirely attributed to strain-induced crystallization. In this work, we propose a micromechanically motivated material model for strain-induced crystallization in rubbers. Our point of departure is constructing a micromechanical model for a single crystallizing polymer chain. Subsequently, a thermodynamically consistent evolution law describing the kinetics of crystallization on the chain level is proposed. This chain model is then incorporated into the affine microsphere model. Finally, the model is numerically implemented and its performance is compared to experimental data.

  19. Large-area photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhl, Tilmann; Spahn, Peter; Hellmann, Gotz P.; Winkler, Holger

    2004-09-01

    Materials with a periodically modulated refractive index, with periods on the scale of light wavelengths, are currently attracting much attention because of their unique optical properties which are caused by Bragg scattering of the visible light. In nature, 3d structures of this kind are found in the form of opals in which monodisperse silica spheres with submicron diameters form a face-centered-cubic (fcc) lattice. Artificial opals, with the same colloidal-crystalline fcc structure, have meanwhile been prepared by crystallizing spherical colloidal particles via sedimentation or drying of dispersions. In this report, colloidal crystalline films are introduced that were produced by a novel technique based on shear flow in the melts of specially designed submicroscopic silica-polymer core-shell hybrid spheres: when the melt of these spheres flows between the plates of a press, the spheres crystallize along the plates, layer by layer, and the silica cores assume the hexagonal order corresponding to the (111) plane of the fcc lattice. This process is fast and yields large-area films, thin or thick. To enhance the refractive index contrast in these films, the colloidal crystalline structure was inverted by etching out the silica cores with hydrofluoric acid. This type of an inverse opal, in which the fcc lattice is formed by mesopores, is referred to as a polymer-air photonic crystal.

  20. Optical Properties of Natural Minerals in the Far-Infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Larry Lavern

    The reflectivity of natural mineral powders were measured in the far infrared. The complex indices of refraction were then determined by Kramers-Kronig analysis or dispersive analysis. The samples were constructed by pressing the powdered sample into a 13 mm diameter pellet. A few of the samples that were measured were kaolin, illite, and montmorillonite, clay samples that could not be obtained in large single crystals. For calcite and gypsum crystals a comparison between the single crystal measurements and powder measurements was done to determine the effect of sample preparation on the measured spectra.

  1. Degradation of sulfated polysaccharide extracted from algal Laminaria japonica and its modulation on calcium oxalate crystallization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouyang Jianming, E-mail: toyjm@jnu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Institute of Biomineralization and Lithiasis Research, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Wang Miao; Lu Peng; Tan Jin [Department of Chemistry, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Institute of Biomineralization and Lithiasis Research, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China)

    2010-08-30

    Sulfated polysaccharide (LPS) extracted from alga Laminaria japonica was degraded by hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}). The average molecular weight of LPS was apparently decreased from 172,000 to 9550 after degradation, while the proportion of sulfate groups (-OSO{sub 3}{sup -}) and carboxylic groups (-COO{sup -}) in the molecular chains of LPS were slightly decreased from 4.5% and 5.20% to 3.9% and 4.64%, respectively. The effects of degraded and natural LPS on formation of calcium oxalate (CaOxa) crystals were investigated in vitro using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), zeta-potential, and atomic absorption spectroscopy. LPS could increase the concentration of soluble Ca{sup 2+} ions in the solution, decrease the weight of precipitated CaOxa, and increase the negative value of zeta-potential of CaOxa crystals. LPS also inhibits the formation of thermodynamically stable calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals, while inducing and stabilizing metastable calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD) crystals. These results suggested that both degraded and natural LPS could decrease CaOxa crystallization, but the inhibition efficiency of the degraded LPS was clearly superior to that of the natural LPS. We expected this investigation would provide encouragement for further exploration into new drugs for the prevention and treatment of urolithiasis.

  2. Crystal growth of calcium carbonate in silk fibroin/sodium alginate hydrogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Jinfa; Zuo, Baoqi

    2014-01-01

    As known, silk fibroin-like protein plays a pivotal role during the formation of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) crystals in the nacre sheets. Here, we have prepared silk fibroin/sodium alginate nanofiber hydrogels to serve as templates for calcium carbonate mineralization. In this experiment, we report an interesting finding of calcium carbonate crystal growth in the silk fibroin/sodium alginate nanofiber hydrogels by the vapor diffusion method. The experimental results indicate calcium carbonate crystals obtained from nanofiber hydrogels with different proportions of silk fibroin/sodium alginate are mixture of calcite and vaterite with unusual morphologies. Time-dependent growth study was carried out to investigate the crystallization process. It is believed that nanofiber hydrogels play an important role in the process of crystallization. This study would help in understanding the function of organic polymers in natural mineralization, and provide a novel pathway in the design and synthesis of new materials related unique morphology and structure.

  3. Planar channeling and quasichanneling oscillations in a bent crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sytov, A.I.; Guidi, V.; Bagli, E.; Bandiera, L.; Germogli, G.; Mazzolari, A.; Tikhomirov, V.V.

    2016-01-01

    Particles passing through a crystal under planar channeling are captured by a continuous potential and experience transverse oscillations in their motion. As channeled particles approach the atomic planes, they are likely to be dechanneled. This effect is being used in ion-beam analysis with MeV energy. We study this effect in a bent crystal for positive and negative particles within a wide range of energies in sight of application of such crystals at accelerators. We look for the conditions for the observation or not of channeling oscillations in the deflection angle distribution in experiments where the beam passes through the bent crystal. Indeed a new kind of oscillations in the deflection angle distribution, strictly related to the motion of over-barrier particles, i.e. quasichanneled particles, is predicted. Such oscillations, named planar quasichanneling oscillations, possess a different nature than channeling oscillations. Through computer simulation, we study this effect and provided a theoretical interpretation for them. We show that channeling oscillations can be observed only for positive particles while quasichanneling oscillations can exist for particles with either sign. The conditions for experimental observation of channeling and quasichanneling oscillations at existing accelerators with available crystal are found and optimized. (orig.)

  4. Planar channeling and quasichanneling oscillations in a bent crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sytov, A.I. [Universita di Ferrara, Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Ferrara (Italy); Belarusian State University, Research Institute for Nuclear Problems, Minsk (Belarus); INFN, Ferrara (Italy); Guidi, V.; Bagli, E.; Bandiera, L.; Germogli, G.; Mazzolari, A. [Universita di Ferrara, Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Ferrara (Italy); INFN, Ferrara (Italy); Tikhomirov, V.V. [Belarusian State University, Research Institute for Nuclear Problems, Minsk (Belarus); INFN, Ferrara (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    Particles passing through a crystal under planar channeling are captured by a continuous potential and experience transverse oscillations in their motion. As channeled particles approach the atomic planes, they are likely to be dechanneled. This effect is being used in ion-beam analysis with MeV energy. We study this effect in a bent crystal for positive and negative particles within a wide range of energies in sight of application of such crystals at accelerators. We look for the conditions for the observation or not of channeling oscillations in the deflection angle distribution in experiments where the beam passes through the bent crystal. Indeed a new kind of oscillations in the deflection angle distribution, strictly related to the motion of over-barrier particles, i.e. quasichanneled particles, is predicted. Such oscillations, named planar quasichanneling oscillations, possess a different nature than channeling oscillations. Through computer simulation, we study this effect and provided a theoretical interpretation for them. We show that channeling oscillations can be observed only for positive particles while quasichanneling oscillations can exist for particles with either sign. The conditions for experimental observation of channeling and quasichanneling oscillations at existing accelerators with available crystal are found and optimized. (orig.)

  5. Optical Investigation of Nanoconfined Crystal Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, F.; Dysthe, D. K.

    2015-12-01

    Crystals growing in a confined space exert forces on their surroundings. This crystallization force causes deformation of solids and is therefore particularly relevant for the comprehension of geological processes such as replacement and weathering [1]. In addition, these forces are relevant for the understanding of damages in porous building materials caused by crystallization, which is of great economical importance and fundamental for methods that can help to preserve our cultural heritage [2,3]. However, the exact behavior of the growth and the dissolution process in close contact to an interface are still not known in detail. The crystallization, the dissolution and the transport of material is mediated by a nanoconfined water film. We observe brittle NaClO3 crystals growing against a glass surface by optical methods such as reflective interference contrast microscopy (RICM) [4]. In order to carefully control the supersaturation of the fluid close to the crystal interface, a temperature regulated microfluidic system is used (fig. A). The interference based precision of RICM enables to resolve distance variations down to the sub nanometer range without any unwanted disturbances by the measuring method. The combination of RICM with a sensitive camera allows us to observe phenomena such as periodic, wavelike growth of atomic layers. These waves are particularly obvious when observing the difference between two consecutive images (fig. B). In contradiction to some theoretical results, which predict a smooth interface, some recent experiments have shown that the nanoconfined growth surfaces are rough. In combination with theoretical studies and Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations we aim at providing more realistic descriptions of surface energies and energy barriers which are able to explain the discrepancies between experiments and current theory. References:[1] Maliva, Diagenetic replacement controlled by force of crystallization, Geology, August (1988), v. 16 [2] G

  6. Oleoresin crystallization in eastern white pine: relationships with chemical components of cortical oleoresin and resistance to the white-pine weevil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronald C. Wilkinson

    1979-01-01

    Natural and weevil-larva-induced crystallization of oleoresin from 45 eastern white pine trees with known resin acid and monoterpene composition, and from 59 pairs of nonweeviled and heavily weeviled trees from the same seed sources, was examined in mid- and late spring. Very little difference was found between larva-induced and natural crystallization. Strobic acid-...

  7. Amine free crystal structure: The crystal structure of d(CGCGCG)2 and methylamine complex crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohishi, Hirofumi; Tsukamoto, Koji; Hiyama, Yoichi; Maezaki, Naoyoshi; Tanaka, Tetsuaki; Ishida, Toshimasa

    2006-01-01

    We succeeded in the crystallization of d(CGCGCG) 2 and methylamine Complex. The crystal was clear and of sufficient size to collect the X-ray crystallographic data up to 1.0 A resolution using synchrotron radiation. As a result of X-ray crystallographic analysis of 2F o - F c map was much clear and easily traced. It is First time monoamine co-crystallizes with d(CGCGCG) 2 . However, methylamine was not found from the complex crystal of d(CGCGCG) 2 and methylamine. Five Mg ions were found around d(CGCGCG) 2 molecules. These Mg ions neutralized the anion of 10 values of the phosphate group of DNA with five Mg 2+ . DNA stabilized only by a metallic ion and there is no example of analyzing the X-ray crystal structure like this. Mg ion stabilizes the conformation of Z-DNA. To use monoamine for crystallization of DNA, we found that we can get only d(CGCGCG) 2 and Mg cation crystal. Only Mg cation can stabilize the conformation of Z-DNA. The method of using the monoamine for the crystallization of DNA can be applied to the crystallization of DNA of long chain of length in the future like this

  8. Crystal Growth Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheel, Hans J.; Fukuda, Tsuguo

    2004-06-01

    This volume deals with the technologies of crystal fabrication, of crystal machining, and of epilayer production and is the first book on industrial and scientific aspects of crystal and layer production. The major industrial crystals are treated: Si, GaAs, GaP, InP, CdTe, sapphire, oxide and halide scintillator crystals, crystals for optical, piezoelectric and microwave applications and more. Contains 29 contributions from leading crystal technologists covering the following topics: General aspects of crystal growth technology Silicon Compound semiconductors Oxides and halides Crystal machining Epitaxy and layer deposition Scientific and technological problems of production and machining of industrial crystals are discussed by top experts, most of them from the major growth industries and crystal growth centers. In addition, it will be useful for the users of crystals, for teachers and graduate students in materials sciences, in electronic and other functional materials, chemical and metallurgical engineering, micro-and optoelectronics including nanotechnology, mechanical engineering and precision-machining, microtechnology, and in solid-state sciences.

  9. Extended-Range Ultrarefractive 1D Photonic Crystal Prisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, David Z.

    2007-01-01

    A proposal has been made to exploit the special wavelength-dispersive characteristics of devices of the type described in One-Dimensional Photonic Crystal Superprisms (NPO-30232) NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 29, No. 4 (April 2005), page 10a. A photonic crystal is an optical component that has a periodic structure comprising two dielectric materials with high dielectric contrast (e.g., a semiconductor and air), with geometrical feature sizes comparable to or smaller than light wavelengths of interest. Experimental superprisms have been realized as photonic crystals having three-dimensional (3D) structures comprising regions of amorphous Si alternating with regions of SiO2, fabricated in a complex process that included sputtering. A photonic crystal of the type to be exploited according to the present proposal is said to be one-dimensional (1D) because its contrasting dielectric materials would be stacked in parallel planar layers; in other words, there would be spatial periodicity in one dimension only. The processes of designing and fabricating 1D photonic crystal superprisms would be simpler and, hence, would cost less than do those for 3D photonic crystal superprisms. As in 3D structures, 1D photonic crystals may be used in applications such as wavelength-division multiplexing. In the extended-range configuration, it is also suitable for spectrometry applications. As an engineered structure or artificially engineered material, a photonic crystal can exhibit optical properties not commonly found in natural substances. Prior research had revealed several classes of photonic crystal structures for which the propagation of electromagnetic radiation is forbidden in certain frequency ranges, denoted photonic bandgaps. It had also been found that in narrow frequency bands just outside the photonic bandgaps, the angular wavelength dispersion of electromagnetic waves propagating in photonic crystal superprisms is much stronger than is the angular wavelength dispersion obtained

  10. Optical and dielectric studies of KH2PO4 crystal influenced by organic ligand of citric acid and l-valine: A single crystal growth and comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Anis

    Full Text Available In the present study pure, citric acid (CA and l-valine (LV doped potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP crystals have been grown with the aim to investigate the nonlinear optical applications facilitated by UV–visible, third order nonlinear optical (TONLO and dielectric properties. The structural parameters of grown crystals have been confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The enhancement in optical transparency of KDP crystal due to addition of CA and LV has been examined within 200–900 nm by means of UV–visible spectral analysis. In addition, the transmittance data have been used to evaluate the effect of dopants on reflectance, refractive index and extinction coefficient of grown crystals in the visible region. The Z-scan analysis has been performed at 632.8 nm to identify the nature of photoinduced nonlinear refraction and nonlinear absorption in doped KDP crystals. The influence of π-bonded ligand of dopant CA and LV on TONLO susceptibility (χ3, refractive index (n2 and absorption coefficient (β of KDP crystals has been evaluated to discuss laser assisted device applications. The decrease in dielectric constant and dielectric loss of KDP crystal due to addition of CA and LV has been explored using the temperature dependent dielectric studies. Keywords: Crystal growth, Nonlinear optical materials, UV–visible studies, Z-scan analysis, Dielectric studies

  11. Liquid crystal interfaces: Experiments, simulations and biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Piotr

    Interfacial phenomena are ubiquitous and extremely important in various aspects of biological and industrial processes. For example, many liquid crystal applications start by alignment with a surface. The underlying mechanisms of the molecular organization of liquid crystals at an interface are still under intensive study and continue to be important to the display industry in order to develop better and/or new display technology. My dissertation research has been devoted to studying how complex liquid crystals can be guided to organize at an interface, and to using my findings to develop practical applications. Specifically, I have been working on developing biosensors using liquid-crystal/surfactant/lipid/protein interactions as well as the alignment of low-symmetry liquid crystals for potential new display and optomechanical applications. The biotechnology industry needs better ways of sensing biomaterials and identifying various nanoscale events at biological interfaces and in aqueous solutions. Sensors in which the recognition material is a liquid crystal naturally connects the existing knowledge and experience of the display and biotechnology industries together with surface and soft matter sciences. This dissertation thus mainly focuses on the delicate phenomena that happen at liquid interfaces. In the introduction, I start by defining the interface and discuss its structure and the relevant interfacial forces. I then introduce the general characteristics of biosensors and, in particular, describe the design of biosensors that employ liquid crystal/aqueous solution interfaces. I further describe the basic properties of liquid crystal materials that are relevant for liquid crystal-based biosensing applications. In CHAPTER 2, I describe the simulation methods and experimental techniques used in this dissertation. In CHAPTER 3 and CHAPTER 4, I present my computer simulation work. CHAPTER 3 presents insight of how liquid crystal molecules are aligned by

  12. Combined effects of crucible geometry and Marangoni convection on silicon Czochralski crystal growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokhtari, F. [Unit of Developpement of Silicon Technologie, Algiers (Algeria); Bouabdallah, A.; Zizi, M. [LTSE Laboratory, University of Science and Technology USTHB., Babezzouar, Algiers (Algeria); Hanchi, S. [UER Mecanique/ E.M.P/ B.P, El Bahri/Alger (Algeria); Alemany, A. [Laboratoire EPM, CNRS, Grenoble (France)

    2009-08-15

    In order to understand the influence of crucible geometry combined with natural convection and Marangoni convection on melt flow pattern, temperature and pressure fields in silicon Czochralski crystal growth process, a set of numerical simulations was conducted. We carry out calculation enable us to determine temperature, pressure and velocity fields in function of Grashof and Marangoni numbers. The essential results show that the hemispherical geometry of crucible seems to be adapted for the growth of a good quality crystal and the pressure field is strongly affected by natural and Marangoni convection and it is more sensitive than temperature. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  13. Crystallization of bi-functional ligand protein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoni, Claudia; Vera, Laura; Devel, Laurent; Catalani, Maria Pia; Czarny, Bertrand; Cassar-Lajeunesse, Evelyn; Nuti, Elisa; Rossello, Armando; Dive, Vincent; Stura, Enrico Adriano

    2013-06-01

    Homodimerization is important in signal transduction and can play a crucial role in many other biological systems. To obtaining structural information for the design of molecules able to control the signalization pathways, the proteins involved will have to be crystallized in complex with ligands that induce dimerization. Bi-functional drugs have been generated by linking two ligands together chemically and the relative crystallizability of complexes with mono-functional and bi-functional ligands has been evaluated. There are problems associated with crystallization with such ligands, but overall, the advantages appear to be greater than the drawbacks. The study involves two matrix metalloproteinases, MMP-12 and MMP-9. Using flexible and rigid linkers we show that it is possible to control the crystal packing and that by changing the ligand-enzyme stoichiometric ratio, one can toggle between having one bi-functional ligand binding to two enzymes and having the same ligand bound to each enzyme. The nature of linker and its point of attachment on the ligand can be varied to aid crystallization, and such variations can also provide valuable structural information about the interactions made by the linker with the protein. We report here the crystallization and structure determination of seven ligand-dimerized complexes. These results suggest that the use of bi-functional drugs can be extended beyond the realm of protein dimerization to include all drug design projects. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Nuclear coupling of 33S and the nature of free radicals in irradiated crystals of N-acetyl-L-cysteine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadley, J.H. Jr.; Gordy, W.

    1977-01-01

    Hyperfine structure due to 33 S in its natural abundance of 0.76% has been measured in the electron spin resonance of free radicals produced by x-irradiation of single crystals of N-acetyl-L-cysteine at 77 K. These measurements proved that the radicals produced at 77 K with principal g values of 1.990, 2.006, and 2.214 are monosulfide radicals with the 3p unpaired electron density of 0.70 on the S. They are believed to be negatively charged molecules RCH 2 S - H or neutral RCH 2 SH 2 radicals in which 90% of the spin density of the captured electron is concentrated in a d-p hybrid orbital on the S. As the temperature is raised to 300 0 K, these, as well as the carbon-centered radicals produced at the lower temperature, are mostly converted to neutral disulfide radicals RCH 2 SS like those observed in irradiated cysteine

  15. Temperature dependence of the elastocaloric effect in natural rubber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Zhongjian, E-mail: zhongjian.xie521@gmail.com; Sebald, Gael; Guyomar, Daniel

    2017-07-12

    The temperature dependence of the elastocaloric (eC) effect in natural rubber (NR) has been studied. This material exhibits a large eC effect over a broad temperature range from 0 °C to 49 °C. The maximum adiabatic temperature change (ΔT) occurred at 10 °C and the behavior could be predicted by the temperature dependence of the strain-induced crystallization (SIC) and the temperature-induced crystallization (TIC). The eC performance of NR was then compared with that of shape memory alloys (SMAs). This study contributes to the SIC research of NR and also broadens the application of elastomers. - Highlights: • A large elastocaloric effect over a broad temperature range was found in natural rubber (NR). • The caloric performance of NR was compared with that of shape memory alloys. • The temperature dependence of the elastocaloric effect in NR can be prediced by the theory of strain-induced crystallization.

  16. Controllable reflection of X-rays on crystals of saccharose

    CERN Document Server

    Navasardyan, M A; Hayrapetyan, K T; Gabrielyan, R T

    2003-01-01

    Multiple (ten times and more) increase in intensities of separate reflections and of lauegram reflections from organic single crystals of saccharose (C sub 1 2H sub 2 2O sub 1 1) was observed under influence of certain temperature gradient. On the base of the present experiment and the data of our previous woks we show that the controllable reflection process has a common nature and the intensity of the diffracted beam under external influences does not depend on the total number of electrons per unit volume of the unit cell of the single crystal.

  17. Crystal morphology modification by the addition of tailor-made stereocontrolled poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Tommy; Baldursdottir, Stefania; Hietala, Sami

    2012-01-01

    . One such additive is the thermosensitive polymer poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide) (PNIPAM). The use of PNIPAM as a crystallization additive provides a possibility to affect viscosity at separation temperatures and nucleation and growth rates at higher temperatures. In this study, novel PNIPAM derivatives......; the morphology of crystals changed from needle to dendritic shape. Additionally, the amphiphilic nature of PNIPAM increased the solubility of nitrofurantoin in water. PNIPAMs with varying molecular weights and stereoregularities resulted in similar changes in the crystal habit of the drug regardless of whether...

  18. Radiation damage in natural materials: implications for radioactive waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ewing, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    The long-term effect of radiation damage on waste forms, either crystalline or glass, is a factor in the evaluation of the integrity of waste disposal mediums. Natural analogs, such as metamict minerals, provide one approach for the evaluaton of radiation damage effects that might be observed in crystalline waste forms, such as supercalcine or synroc. Metamict minerals are a special class of amorphous materials which were initially crystalline. Although the mechanism for the loss of crystallinity in these minerals (mostly actinide-containing oxides and silicates) is not clearly understood, damage caused by alpha particles and recoil nuclei is critical to the metamictization process. The study of metamict minerals allows the evaluation of long-term radiation damage effects, particularly changes in physical and chemical properties such as microfracturing, hydrothermal alteration, and solubility. In addition, structures susceptible to metamictization share some common properties: (1) complex compositions; (2) some degree of covalent bonding, instead of being ionic close-packed MO/sub x/ structures; and (3) channels or interstitial voids which may accommodate displaced atoms or absorbed water. On the basis of these empirical criteria, minerals such as pollucite, sodalite, nepheline and leucite warrant careful scrutiny as potential waste form phases. Phases with the monazite or fluorite structures are excellent candidates

  19. Principles of crystallization, and methods of single crystal growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chacra, T.

    2010-01-01

    Most of single crystals (monocrystals), have distinguished optical, electrical, or magnetic properties, which make from single crystals, key elements in most of technical modern devices, as they may be used as lenses, Prisms, or grating sin optical devises, or Filters in X-Ray and spectrographic devices, or conductors and semiconductors in electronic, and computer industries. Furthermore, Single crystals are used in transducer devices. Moreover, they are indispensable elements in Laser and Maser emission technology.Crystal Growth Technology (CGT), has started, and developed in the international Universities and scientific institutions, aiming at some of single crystals, which may have significant properties and industrial applications, that can attract the attention of international crystal growth centers, to adopt the industrial production and marketing of such crystals. Unfortunately, Arab universities generally, and Syrian universities specifically, do not give even the minimum interest, to this field of Science.The purpose of this work is to attract the attention of Crystallographers, Physicists and Chemists in the Arab universities and research centers to the importance of crystal growth, and to work on, in the first stage to establish simple, uncomplicated laboratories for the growth of single crystal. Such laboratories can be supplied with equipment, which are partly available or can be manufactured in the local market. Many references (Articles, Papers, Diagrams, etc..) has been studied, to conclude the most important theoretical principles of Phase transitions,especially of crystallization. The conclusions of this study, are summarized in three Principles; Thermodynamic-, Morphologic-, and Kinetic-Principles. The study is completed by a brief description of the main single crystal growth methods with sketches, of equipment used in each method, which can be considered as primary designs for the equipment, of a new crystal growth laboratory. (author)

  20. Review of aragonite and calcite crystal morphogenesis in thermal spring systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Brian

    2017-06-01

    Aragonite and calcite crystals are the fundamental building blocks of calcareous thermal spring deposits. The diverse array of crystal morphologies found in these deposits, which includes monocrystals, mesocrystals, skeletal crystals, dendrites, and spherulites, are commonly precipitated under far-from-equilibrium conditions. Such crystals form through both abiotic and biotic processes. Many crystals develop through non-classical crystal growth models that involve the arrangement of nanocrystals in a precisely controlled crystallographic register. Calcite crystal morphogenesis has commonly been linked to a ;driving force;, which is a conceptual measure of the distance of the growth conditions from equilibrium conditions. Essentially, this scheme indicates that increasing levels of supersaturation and various other parameters that produce a progressive change from monocrystals and mesocrystals to skeletal crystals to crystallographic and non-crystallographic dendrites, to dumbbells, to spherulites. Despite the vast amount of information available from laboratory experiments and natural spring systems, the precise factors that control the driving force are open to debate. The fact that calcite crystal morphogenesis is still poorly understood is largely a reflection of the complexity of the factors that influence aragonite and calcite precipitation. Available information indicates that variations in calcite crystal morphogenesis can be attributed to physical and chemical parameters of the parent water, the presence of impurities, the addition of organic or inorganic additives to the water, the rate of crystal growth, and/or the presence of microbes and their associated biofilms. The problems in trying to relate crystal morphogenesis to specific environmental parameters arise because it is generally impossible to disentangle the controlling factor(s) from the vast array of potential parameters that may act alone or in unison with each other.

  1. A salt diapir-related Mississippi Valley-type deposit: the Bou Jaber Pb-Zn-Ba-F deposit, Tunisia: fluid inclusion and isotope study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhlel, Salah; Leach, David L.; Johnson, Craig A.; Marsh, Erin; Salmi-Laouar, Sihem; Banks, David A.

    2016-08-01

    The Bou Jaber Ba-F-Pb-Zn deposit is located at the edge of the Bou Jaber Triassic salt diapir in the Tunisia Salt Diapir Province. The ores are unconformity and fault-controlled and occur as subvertical column-shaped bodies developed in dissolution-collapse breccias and in cavities within the Late Aptian platform carbonate rocks, which are covered unconformably by impermeable shales and marls of the Fahdene Formation (Late Albian-Cenomanian age). The host rock is hydrothermally altered to ankerite proximal to and within the ore bodies. Quartz, as fine-grained bipyramidal crystals, formed during hydrothermal alteration of the host rocks. The ore mineral assemblage is composed of barite, fluorite, sphalerite, and galena in decreasing abundance. The ore zones outline distinct depositional events: sphalerite-galena, barite-ankerite, and fluorite. Fluid inclusions, commonly oil-rich, have distinct fluid salinities and homogenization temperatures for each of these events: sphalerite-galena (17 to 24 wt% NaCl eq., and Th from 112 to 136 °C); ankerite-barite (11 to 17 wt% NaCl eq., and Th from 100 to 130 °C); fluorite (19 to 21 wt% NaCl eq., Th from 140 to 165 °C). The mean temperature of the ore fluids decreased from sphalerite (125 °C) to barite (115 °C) and increased during fluorite deposition (152 °C); then decreased to ˜110 °C during late calcite precipitation. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) analyses of fluid inclusions in fluorite are metal rich (hundreds to thousands ppm Pb, Zn, Cu, Fe) but the inclusions in barite are deficient in Pb, Zn, Cu, Fe. Inclusions in fluorite have Cl/Br and Na/Br ratios of several thousand, consistent with dissolution of halite while the inclusions analysed in barite have values lower than seawater which are indicative of a Br-enriched brine derived from evaporation plus a component of halite dissolution. The salinity of the barite-hosted fluid inclusions is less than obtained simply by the

  2. Electron spectroscopy of crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Nemoshkalenko, V V

    1979-01-01

    This book is conceived as a monograph, and represents an up-to-date collection of information concerning the use of the method of X-ray photoelectron spec­ troscopy in the study of the electron structure of crystals, as well as a personal interpretation of the subject by the authors. In a natural way, the book starts in Chapter 1 with a recapitulation of the fundamentals of the method, basic relations, principles of operation, and a com­ parative presentation of the characteristics and performances of the most com­ monly used ESCA instruments (from the classical ones-Varian, McPherson, Hewlett Packard, and IEEE-up to the latest model developed by Professor Siegbahn in Uppsala), and continues with a discussion of some of the difficult problems the experimentalist must face such as calibration of spectra, prepara­ tion of samples, and evaluation of the escape depth of electrons. The second chapter is devoted to the theory of photoemission from crystal­ line solids. A discussion of the methods of Hartree-Fo...

  3. Novel Transrotational Solid State Order Discovered by TEM in Crystallizing Amorphous Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolosov, Vladimir

    Exotic thin crystals with unexpected transrotational microstructures have been discovered by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for crystal growth in thin (10-100 nm) amorphous films of different chemical nature (oxides, chalcogenides, metals and alloys) prepared by various methods. Primarily we use our TEM bend contour technique. The unusual phenomenon can be traced in situ in TEM column: dislocation independent regular internal bending of crystal lattice planes in a growing crystal. Such transrotation (unit cell trans lation is complicated by small rotationrealized round an axis lying in the film plane) can result in strong regular lattice orientation gradients (up to 300 degrees per micrometer) of different geometries: cylindrical, ellipsoidal, toroidal, saddle, etc. Transrotation is increasing as the film gets thinner. Transrotational crystal resembles ideal single crystal enclosed in a curved space. Transrotational micro crystals have been eventually recognized by other authors in some vital thin film materials, i.e. PCMs for memory, silicides, SrTiO3. Atomic model and possible mechanisms of the phenomenon are discussed. New transrotational nanocrystalline model of amorphous state is also proposed Support of RF Ministry of Education and Science is acknowledged.

  4. Pyrochlore as nuclear waste form. Actinide uptake and chemical stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finkeldei, Sarah Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Radioactive waste is generated by many different technical and scientific applications. For the past decades, different waste disposal strategies have been considered. Several questions on the waste disposal strategy remain unanswered, particularly regarding the long-term radiotoxicity of minor actinides (Am, Cm, Np), plutonium and uranium. These radionuclides mainly arise from high level nuclear waste (HLW), specific waste streams or dismantled nuclear weapons. Although many countries have opted for the direct disposal of spent fuel, from a scientific and technical point of view it is imperative to pursue alternative waste management strategies. Apart from the vitrification, especially for trivalent actinides and Pu, crystalline ceramic waste forms are considered. In contrast to glasses, crystalline waste forms, which are chemically and physically highly stable, allow the retention of radionuclides on well-defined lattice positions within the crystal structure. Besides polyphase ceramics such as SYNROC, single phase ceramics are considered as tailor made host phases to embed a specific radionuclide or a specific group. Among oxidic single phase ceramics pyrochlores are known to have a high potential for this application. This work examines ZrO 2 based pyrochlores as potential nuclear waste forms, which are known to show a high aqueous stability and a high tolerance towards radiation damage. This work contributes to (1) understand the phase stability field of pyrochlore and consequences of non-stoichiometry which leads to pyrochlores with mixed cationic sites. Mixed cationic occupancies are likely to occur in actinide-bearing pyrochlores. (2) The structural uptake of radionuclides themselves was studied. (3) The chemical stability and the effect of phase transition from pyrochlore to defect fluorite were probed. This phase transition is important, as it is the result of radiation damage in ZrO 2 based pyrochlores. ZrO 2 - Nd 2 O 3 pellets with pyrochlore and defect

  5. Light scattering in additively colored alkali-halide crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trakhbrot, B.M.

    1979-01-01

    Studied is extinction in ultra-violet, visible and infrared spectrum ranges, caused by light scattering in additively colored KCl and KBr crystals. The crystals were prepared of the powder. The specimens were annealed in saturated potassium vapours: KBr - at 600-630 deg C, KCl - at 700 deg C. While investigating the spectra it is observed that the optical density of the specimens processed in such a regime is more than 2 in the ultraviolet and visible spectrum ranges at the 0.1-0.05 cm thickness of the specimens. In the infrared spectra the growth of the extinction coefficient with the wave length decrease is observed. The spectrum character shows IR radiation scattering by the defects in the crystal lattice. The attempt of determination of the scattering centres nature is taken. It is shown that the possible centres causing the light scattering observed can be colloid and quasicolloid centres in the additively colored materials

  6. Capsize of polarization in dilute photonic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevorkian, Zhyrair; Hakhoumian, Arsen; Gasparian, Vladimir; Cuevas, Emilio

    2017-11-29

    We investigate, experimentally and theoretically, polarization rotation effects in dilute photonic crystals with transverse permittivity inhomogeneity perpendicular to the traveling direction of waves. A capsize, namely a drastic change of polarization to the perpendicular direction is observed in a one-dimensional photonic crystal in the frequency range 10 ÷ 140 GHz. To gain more insights into the rotational mechanism, we have developed a theoretical model of dilute photonic crystal, based on Maxwell's equations with a spatially dependent two dimensional inhomogeneous dielectric permittivity. We show that the polarization's rotation can be explained by an optical splitting parameter appearing naturally in Maxwell's equations for magnetic or electric fields components. This parameter is an optical analogous of Rashba like spin-orbit interaction parameter present in quantum waves, introduces a correction to the band structure of the two-dimensional Bloch states, creates the dynamical phase shift between the waves propagating in the orthogonal directions and finally leads to capsizing of the initial polarization. Excellent agreement between theory and experiment is found.

  7. Quantum Dots in Photonic Crystal Waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sollner, Immo Nathanael

    This Thesis is focused on the study of quantum electrodynamics in photonic crystal waveguides. We investigate the interplay between a single quantum dot and the fundamental mode of the photonic crystal waveguide. We demonstrate experimental coupling eciencies for the spontaneous emission...... into the mode exceeding 98% for emitters spectrally close to the band-edge of the waveguide mode. In addition we illustrate the broadband nature of the underlying eects, by obtaining coupling eciencies above 90% for quantum dots detuned from the band edge by as far as 20nm. These values are in good agreement...... with numerical simulations. Such a high coupling eciency implies that the system can be considered an articial 1D-atom, and we theoretically show that this system can generate strong photon-photon interaction, which is an essential functionality for deterministic optical quantum information processing. We...

  8. Improving Agricultural Productivity with Radiation Processed Natural Polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henriques, Sasha

    2013-01-01

    Full text: Through the power of irradiation to break and create chemical bonds, the natural polymer cassava starch is used to make super water absorbents (SWA), 1kg of which can absorb and hold 200 litres of water and release it slowly over time. Placed in the soil near plants’ roots, SWA can be used where there is little rain or frequent drought. After 9 months the crystals, which resemble sugar crystals, completely disintegrate, leaving no residue. (author)

  9. Characterization of natural pozzolan-based geopolymeric binders

    KAUST Repository

    Moon, Juhyuk; Bae, Sungchul; Celik, Kemal; Yoon, Seyoon; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Kim, Kang Su; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.

    2014-01-01

    of natural pozzolan for sustainable construction material. It is concluded that the geopolymers have sufficient strength as structural materials and matrices contain C-S-H like crystal as well as zeolites of hydroxysodalite and zeolite Y. Two zeolites

  10. Thermoluminescence spectra of natural CaF2 irradiated by 10MeV electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manrique, J.; Angulo, S.; Pardo, M.P.; Gastesi, R.; De la Cruz, A.; Perez, A.

    2006-01-01

    The spectra of thermoluminescence from natural and electron-irradiated fluorite in the 350-800nm spectral range were studied between room temperature and 500 o C. The sample came from Asturias (Spain) and was analyzed by X-ray diffractometry and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Glow peaks appeared at 115, 205 and 310 o C. Main emissions occurred at 475, 575, 650 and 745nm, attributed to the Dy +3 ion and, at 410nm, from electron-hole recombination. The fractional glow technique and the general order model were employed to study the emission at 575nm in detail. The results showed that the 115 and 205 o C glow peaks originate at traps with activation energies of 1.6 and 1.9eV, respectively, on the kinetic order of 1.5 and 1.3 and frequency factors of 1.7x10 19 and 2.7x10 19 s -1 , respectively. Spectrally resolved fading produced by storage was observed, and we concluded that the emission was due to large defect complexes. The dosimetric study showed that there was saturation at doses higher than 2kGy

  11. A Study of Biomolecules as Growth Modifiers of Calcium Oxalate Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Junha John

    Crystallization processes are ubiquitous in nature, science, and technology. Controlling crystal growth is pivotal in many industries as material properties and functions can be tailored by tuning crystal habits (e.g. size, shape, phase). In biomineralization, organisms exert excellent control over bottom-up synthesis and assembly of inorganic-organic structures (e.g. bones, teeth, exoskeletons). This is made possible by growth modifiers that range from small molecules to macromolecules, such as proteins. Molecular recognition of the mineral phase allows proteins to function as nucleation templates, matrices, and growth inhibitors or promoters. We are interested in taking a biomimetic approach to control crystallization via biomolecular growth modifiers. We investigated calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM), found in plants and kidney stones, as a model system of crystallization. We studied the effects of four common proteins on COM crystallization: bovine serum albumin (BSA), transferrin, lactoferrin, and lysozyme. Through kinetic studies of COM crystallization, we classified BSA and lysozyme as COM growth inhibitor and promoter respectively. Their inhibition and promotion effects were also evident in the macroscopic crystal habit. Through adsorption and microscopy experiments, we showed that BSA exhibits binding specificity for the apical surfaces of macroscopic COM crystals. Lysozyme, on the other, functions via a non-binding mechanism at the surface to accelerate the growth of the apical surfaces. We also synthesized and studied peptides derived from the protein primary sequences to identify putative domains responsible for these inhibition and promotion effects. Collectively, our study of physiologically relevant biomolecules suggests potential roles of COM modifiers in pathological crystallization and helps to develop guidelines for rational design of biomolecular growth modifiers for applications in crystal engineering.

  12. The Crystal Hotel: A Microfluidic Approach to Biomimetic Crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Xiuqing; Wang, Yun-Wei; Ihli, Johannes; Kim, Yi-Yeoun; Li, Shunbo; Walshaw, Richard; Chen, Li; Meldrum, Fiona C

    2015-12-02

    A "crystal hotel" microfluidic device that allows crystal growth in confined volumes to be studied in situ is used to produce large calcite single crystals with predefined crystallographic orientation, microstructure, and shape by control of the detailed physical environment, flow, and surface chemistry. This general approach can be extended to form technologically important, nanopatterned single crystals. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Stones of Light: The Use of Crystals in Maya Divination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGraw, John J.

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter, I aim to bridge the rewarding archaeological contributions from the earlier part of this volume to ethnographic work performed among contemporary Mayas, particularly as informed by ritual specialists. In considering the ritual use of quartz crystals by living Mayas we may gain...... of functional analysis that situate archaeological and ethnographic data without projecting a particularism onto Maya contexts that may be inappropriate given the local epistemologies. Finally, I draw from cognitive science and religious studies to present a theory regarding the popularity and importance...... of quartz crystals in ritual activity, not only among the Maya, but worldwide. It is hoped that the analyses presented not only clarify ideas regarding quartz crystals in divination, but more broadly address the nature and importance of scrying in Maya religion....

  14. Soft Elasticity in Main Chain Liquid Crystal Elastomers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anselm C. Griffin

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Main chain liquid crystal elastomers exhibit several interesting phenomena, such as three different regimes of elastic response, unconventional stress-strain relationship in one of these regimes, and the shape memory effect. Investigations are beginning to reveal relationships between their macroscopic behavior and the nature of domain structure, microscopic smectic phase structure, relaxation mechanism, and sample history. These aspects of liquid crystal elastomers are briefly reviewed followed by a summary of the results of recent elastic and high-resolution X-ray diffraction studies of the shape memory effect and the dynamics of the formation of the smectic-C chevron-like layer structure. A possible route to realizing auxetic effect at molecular level is also discussed.

  15. Carboxylic acids in crystallization of macromolecules: learning from successful crystallization experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offermann, Lesa R; He, John Z; Mank, Nicholas J; Booth, William T; Chruszcz, Maksymilian

    2014-03-01

    The production of macromolecular crystals suitable for structural analysis is one of the most important and limiting steps in the structure determination process. Often, preliminary crystallization trials are performed using hundreds of empirically selected conditions. Carboxylic acids and/or their salts are one of the most popular components of these empirically derived crystallization conditions. Our findings indicate that almost 40 % of entries deposited to the Protein Data Bank (PDB) reporting crystallization conditions contain at least one carboxylic acid. In order to analyze the role of carboxylic acids in macromolecular crystallization, a large-scale analysis of the successful crystallization experiments reported to the PDB was performed. The PDB is currently the largest source of crystallization data, however it is not easily searchable. These complications are due to a combination of a free text format, which is used to capture information on the crystallization experiments, and the inconsistent naming of chemicals used in crystallization experiments. Despite these difficulties, our approach allows for the extraction of over 47,000 crystallization conditions from the PDB. Initially, the selected conditions were investigated to determine which carboxylic acids or their salts are most often present in crystallization solutions. From this group, selected sets of crystallization conditions were analyzed in detail, assessing parameters such as concentration, pH, and precipitant used. Our findings will lead to the design of new crystallization screens focused around carboxylic acids.

  16. Optical control of light propagation in photonic crystal based on electromagnetically induced transparency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, Wang; Jin-Ze, Wu; Jun-Xiang, Zhang

    2016-06-01

    A kind of photonic crystal structure with modulation of the refractive index is investigated both experimentally and theoretically for exploiting electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). The combination of EIT with periodically modulated refractive index medium gives rise to high efficiency reflection as well as forbidden transmission in a three-level atomic system coupled by standing wave. We show an accurate theoretical simulation via transfer-matrix theory, automatically accounting for multilayer reflections, thus fully demonstrate the existence of photonic crystal structure in atomic vapor. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11574188) and the Project for Excellent Research Team of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61121064).

  17. On dewetting of thin films due to crystallization (crystallization dewetting).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi, Mehran; Rahimzadeh, Amin; Eslamian, Morteza

    2016-03-01

    Drying and crystallization of a thin liquid film of an ionic or a similar solution can cause dewetting in the resulting thin solid film. This paper aims at investigating this type of dewetting, herein termed "crystallization dewetting", using PbI2 dissolved in organic solvents as the model solution. PbI2 solid films are usually used in X-ray detection and lead halide perovskite solar cells. In this work, PbI2 films are fabricated using spin coating and the effect of major parameters influencing the crystallization dewetting, including the type of the solvent, solution concentration, drying temperature, spin speed, as well as imposed vibration on the substrate are studied on dewetting, surface profile and coverage, using confocal scanning laser microscopy. Simplified hydrodynamic governing equations of crystallization in thin films are presented and using a mathematical representation of the process, it is phenomenologically demonstrated that crystallization dewetting occurs due to the absorption and consumption of the solution surrounding a growing crystal. Among the results, it is found that a low spin speed (high thickness), a high solution concentration and a low drying temperature promote crystal growth, and therefore crystallization dewetting. It is also shown that imposed vibration on the substrate can affect the crystal size and crystallization dewetting.

  18. The Morse code effect: A crystal-crystal transformation observed in gel-grown lead (II) oxalate crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisgarten, J. N.; Marks, J. A.

    2018-05-01

    This paper reports on an unusual crystal-crystal transformation phenomenon, which we have called the Morse Code Effect, based on the change in appearance of lead(II) oxalate crystals grown in agarose gels.

  19. Superionic state and interionic potential of α-AgI crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyakov, V.I.

    1999-01-01

    The nature of α-AgI crystal superionic state is condensed using a model of delayed rotational diffusion, in which α-AgI curvilinear conductivity channels are explained processing from the character of silver ions motion. The superionic state nature is explained using periodic equipotential surfaces of spatial interionic potential constructed of monomeric effective coupled potential by the EXAFS method. The physical character of periodic minimal surfaces for analysis of dynamic processes is substantiated [ru

  20. Coherent polarization radiation of relativistic electrons in crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morokhovskii, V.L.

    2014-01-01

    A brief narration about the history of those heated arguments and discussions around the nature of so-called parametric X-radiation, which were concluded by the recognition of the discovery the phenomenon of coherent polarization bremsstrahlung of relativistic charged particles in crystals. Some important information and comments, which stay over of notice of specialists till now are reported.

  1. Effect of synthesis conditions on the nanopowder properties of Ce{sub 0.9}Zr{sub 0.1}O{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimicz, M.G.; Fabregas, I.O.; Lamas, D.G. [CINSO (Centro de Investigaciones en Solidos) CONICET-CITEFA J.B. de La Salle 4397, 1603 Villa Martelli, Pcia. de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Larrondo, S.A., E-mail: susana@di.fcen.uba.ar [Laboratorio de Procesos Cataliticos, Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Pabellon de Industrias, Ciudad Universitaria, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2011-06-15

    Graphical abstract: . The synthesis of nanocrystalline Ce{sub 0.9}Zr{sub 0.1}O{sub 2} powders via the gel-combustion method, using different fuels, and following either stoichiometric or non-stoichiometric pH-controlled routes is investigated. Research highlights: {yields} All samples exhibited the fluorite-type crystal structure, nanometric average crystallite size and negligible carbon content. {yields} Synthesis conditions strongly affect the average crystallite size, the degree of agglomeration, the specific surface area and the pore volume. {yields} Our results indicate that, by controlling the synthesis conditions it is possible to obtain solids with custom-made morphological properties. -- Abstract: In this work, the synthesis of nanocrystalline Ce{sub 0.9}Zr{sub 0.1}O{sub 2} powders via the gel-combustion method, using different fuels, and following either stoichiometric or non-stoichiometric pH-controlled routes is investigated. The objective is to evaluate the effect of synthesis conditions on the textural and morphological properties, and the crystal structure of the synthesized materials. The solids were characterized by nitrogen physisorption, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XPD), and Carbon-Hydrogen-Nitrogen Elemental Analysis (CHN). All the powders exhibited nanometric crystallite size, fluorite-type structure and negligible carbon content. Synthesis conditions strongly affect the average crystallite size, the degree of agglomeration, the specific surface area and the pore volume. Our results indicate that, by controlling the synthesis conditions it is possible to obtain solids with custom-made morphological properties.

  2. Crystal structure and chemistry of natural kutinaite from Černý Důl, Krkonoše, Czech Republic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bindi, Luca; Makovicky, Emil

    2015-01-01

    .75 stoichiometry (Z = 4), or (K, Tl)Cu56Ag24As27 with Z = 16. The crystal structure of an untwinned crystal has been refined to R 1 = 2.61%. It consists of clusters of eight edge-sharing tetrahedra of Cu, which alternate in a 3D chess-board manner with octahedral clusters of six Ag atoms. The latter are surrounded...

  3. Theoretical considerations for the selection of electro-optic crystals for the grating-based laser beam modulators-deflectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramachandran, V.

    1977-03-01

    The optical properties of a crystal can be altered by the application of an external electric field. The electrically induced changes of the crystal properties may, in some cases, be utilized to modulate an optical beam. The nature of propagation of electromagnetic waves inside an optically anisotropic crystal and the variation of the optical properties with an applied electric field are discussed in this paper. The general criteria that must be satisfied by the crystals for efficient modulation and deflection are analyzed. In particular, the properties and suitable orientations of a Li Nb O 3 crystal are analyzed in some detail for using as an efficient modulator

  4. crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yi; Huang, Yisheng; Zhang, Lizhen; Lin, Zhoubin; Sun, Shijia; Wang, Guofu

    2014-07-01

    A Nd3+:Na2La4(WO4)7 crystal with dimensions of ϕ 17 × 30 mm3 was grown by the Czochralski method. The thermal expansion coefficients of Nd3+:Na2La4(WO4)7 crystal are 1.32 × 10-5 K-1 along c-axis and 1.23 × 10-5 K-1 along a-axis, respectively. The spectroscopic characteristics of Nd3+:Na2La4(WO4)7 crystal were investigated. The Judd-Ofelt theory was applied to calculate the spectral parameters. The absorption cross sections at 805 nm are 2.17 × 10-20 cm2 with a full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 15 nm for π-polarization, and 2.29 × 10-20 cm2 with a FWHM of 14 nm for σ-polarization. The emission cross sections are 3.19 × 10-20 cm2 for σ-polarization and 2.67 × 10-20 cm2 for π-polarization at 1,064 nm. The fluorescence quantum efficiency is 67 %. The quasi-cw laser of Nd3+:Na2La4(WO4)7 crystal was performed. The maximum output power is 80 mW. The slope efficiency is 7.12 %. The results suggest Nd3+:Na2La4(WO4)7 crystal as a promising laser crystal fit for laser diode pumping.

  5. Fano resonance in anodic aluminum oxide based photonic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Guo Liang; Fei, Guang Tao; Zhang, Yao; Yan, Peng; Xu, Shao Hui; Ouyang, Hao Miao; Zhang, Li De

    2014-01-08

    Anodic aluminum oxide based photonic crystals with periodic porous structure have been prepared using voltage compensation method. The as-prepared sample showed an ultra-narrow photonic bandgap. Asymmetric line-shape profiles of the photonic bandgaps have been observed, which is attributed to Fano resonance between the photonic bandgap state of photonic crystal and continuum scattering state of porous structure. And the exhibited Fano resonance shows more clearly when the sample is saturated ethanol gas than air-filled. Further theoretical analysis by transfer matrix method verified these results. These findings provide a better understanding on the nature of photonic bandgaps of photonic crystals made up of porous materials, in which the porous structures not only exist as layers of effective-refractive-index material providing Bragg scattering, but also provide a continuum light scattering state to interact with Bragg scattering state to show an asymmetric line-shape profile.

  6. Crystal Nucleation in Liquids: Open Questions and Future Challenges in Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosso, Gabriele C; Chen, Ji; Cox, Stephen J; Fitzner, Martin; Pedevilla, Philipp; Zen, Andrea; Michaelides, Angelos

    2016-06-22

    The nucleation of crystals in liquids is one of nature's most ubiquitous phenomena, playing an important role in areas such as climate change and the production of drugs. As the early stages of nucleation involve exceedingly small time and length scales, atomistic computer simulations can provide unique insights into the microscopic aspects of crystallization. In this review, we take stock of the numerous molecular dynamics simulations that, in the past few decades, have unraveled crucial aspects of crystal nucleation in liquids. We put into context the theoretical framework of classical nucleation theory and the state-of-the-art computational methods by reviewing simulations of such processes as ice nucleation and the crystallization of molecules in solutions. We shall see that molecular dynamics simulations have provided key insights into diverse nucleation scenarios, ranging from colloidal particles to natural gas hydrates, and that, as a result, the general applicability of classical nucleation theory has been repeatedly called into question. We have attempted to identify the most pressing open questions in the field. We believe that, by improving (i) existing interatomic potentials and (ii) currently available enhanced sampling methods, the community can move toward accurate investigations of realistic systems of practical interest, thus bringing simulations a step closer to experiments.

  7. Intermolecular and very strong intramolecular C-SeO/N chalcogen bonds in nitrophenyl selenocyanate crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Liu, Ju; Wang, Weizhou

    2018-02-14

    Single-crystal X-ray diffraction reveals that polymorphic ortho-nitrophenyl selenocyanate (o-NSC, crystals 1a and 1b) and monomorphic para-nitrophenyl selenocyanate (p-NSC, crystal 2) crystals are all stabilized mainly by intermolecular and very strong intramolecular C-SeO/N chalcogen bonds, as well as by other different interactions. Thermogravimetric (TG) and differential scanning calorimetry thermogram (DSC) analyses show that the starting decomposition temperatures and melting points of the three crystals are different, following the order 1b > 1a > 2, which is consistent with the structural characteristics of the crystals. In addition, atoms in molecules (AIM) and natural bond orbital (NBO) analyses indicate that the total strengths of the C-SeO and C-SeN chalcogen bonds decrease in the order 1b > 1a > 2. This study could be significant for engineering functional crystals based on robust C-SeO and C-SeN chalcogen bonds, and for designing drugs containing selenium as well as understanding their interaction in biosystems.

  8. Crystallization of ikaite and its pseudomorphic transformation into calcite: Raman spectroscopy evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Pastor, N.; Oehlerich, Markus; Astilleros, José Manuel; Kaliwoda, Melanie; Mayr, Christoph C.; Fernández-Díaz, Lurdes; Schmahl, Wolfgang W.

    2016-02-01

    Ikaite (CaCO3·6H2O) is a metastable phase that crystallizes in nature from alkaline waters with high phosphate concentrations at temperatures close to 0 °C. This mineral transforms into anhydrous calcium carbonate polymorphs when temperatures rise or when exposed to atmospheric conditions. During the transformation in some cases the shape of the original ikaite crystal is preserved as a pseudomorph. Pseudomorphs after ikaite are considered as a valuable paleoclimatic indicator. In this work we conducted ikaite crystal growth experiments at near-freezing temperatures using the single diffusion silica gel technique, prepared with a natural aqueous solution from the polymictic lake Laguna Potrok Aike (51°57‧S, 70°23‧W) in Patagonia, Argentina. The ikaite crystals were recovered from the gels and the transformation reactions were monitored by in situ Raman spectroscopy at two different temperatures. The first spectra collected showed the characteristic features of ikaite. In successive spectra new bands at 1072, 1081 and 1086 cm-1 and changes in the intensity of bands corresponding to the OH modes were observed. These changes in the Raman spectra were interpreted as corresponding to intermediate stages of the transformation of ikaite into calcite and/or vaterite. After a few hours, the characteristics of the Raman spectrum were consistent with those of calcite. While ikaite directly transforms into calcite at 10 °C in contact with air, at 20 °C this transformation involves the formation of intermediate, metastable vaterite. During the whole process the external shape of ikaite crystals was preserved. Therefore, this transformation showed the typical characteristics of a pseudomorphic mineral replacement, involving the generation of a large amount of porosity to account for the large difference in molar volumes between ikaite and calcite. A mechanism involving the coupled dissolution of ikaite and crystallization of calcite/vaterite is proposed for this

  9. Thermal diffusion boron doping of single-crystal natural diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Jung-Hun; Mikael, Solomon; Mi, Hongyi; Venkataramanan, Giri; Ma, Zhenqiang, E-mail: mazq@engr.wisc.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Wu, Henry; Morgan, Dane [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Blanchard, James P. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Zhou, Weidong [Department of Electrical Engineering, NanoFAB Center, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, Texas 76019 (United States); Gong, Shaoqin [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Wisconsin Institute for Discovery, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2016-05-28

    With the best overall electronic and thermal properties, single crystal diamond (SCD) is the extreme wide bandgap material that is expected to revolutionize power electronics and radio-frequency electronics in the future. However, turning SCD into useful semiconductors requires overcoming doping challenges, as conventional substitutional doping techniques, such as thermal diffusion and ion implantation, are not easily applicable to SCD. Here we report a simple and easily accessible doping strategy demonstrating that electrically activated, substitutional doping in SCD without inducing graphitization transition or lattice damage can be readily realized with thermal diffusion at relatively low temperatures by using heavily doped Si nanomembranes as a unique dopant carrying medium. Atomistic simulations elucidate a vacancy exchange boron doping mechanism that occurs at the bonded interface between Si and diamond. We further demonstrate selectively doped high voltage diodes and half-wave rectifier circuits using such doped SCD. Our new doping strategy has established a reachable path toward using SCDs for future high voltage power conversion systems and for other novel diamond based electronic devices. The novel doping mechanism may find its critical use in other wide bandgap semiconductors.

  10. Thermal diffusion boron doping of single-crystal natural diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Jung-Hun; Mikael, Solomon; Mi, Hongyi; Venkataramanan, Giri; Ma, Zhenqiang; Wu, Henry; Morgan, Dane; Blanchard, James P.; Zhou, Weidong; Gong, Shaoqin

    2016-01-01

    With the best overall electronic and thermal properties, single crystal diamond (SCD) is the extreme wide bandgap material that is expected to revolutionize power electronics and radio-frequency electronics in the future. However, turning SCD into useful semiconductors requires overcoming doping challenges, as conventional substitutional doping techniques, such as thermal diffusion and ion implantation, are not easily applicable to SCD. Here we report a simple and easily accessible doping strategy demonstrating that electrically activated, substitutional doping in SCD without inducing graphitization transition or lattice damage can be readily realized with thermal diffusion at relatively low temperatures by using heavily doped Si nanomembranes as a unique dopant carrying medium. Atomistic simulations elucidate a vacancy exchange boron doping mechanism that occurs at the bonded interface between Si and diamond. We further demonstrate selectively doped high voltage diodes and half-wave rectifier circuits using such doped SCD. Our new doping strategy has established a reachable path toward using SCDs for future high voltage power conversion systems and for other novel diamond based electronic devices. The novel doping mechanism may find its critical use in other wide bandgap semiconductors.

  11. Development of natural fiber reinforced polylactide-based biocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias Herrera, Andrea Marcela

    Polylactide or PLA is a biodegradable polymer that can be produced from renewable resources. This aliphatic polyester exhibits good mechanical properties similar to those of polyethylene terephthalate (PET). Since 2003, bio-based high molecular weight PLA is produced on an industrial scale and commercialized under amorphous and semicrystalline grades for various applications. Enhancement of PLA crystallization kinetics is crucial for the competitiveness of this biopolymer as a commodity material able to replace petroleum-based plastics. On the other hand, the combination of natural fibers with polymer matrices made from renewable resources, to produce fully biobased and biodegradable polymer composite materials, has been a strong trend in research activities during the last decade. Nevertheless, the differences related to the chemical structure, clearly observed in the marked hydrophilic/hydrophobic character of the fibers and the thermoplastic matrix, respectively, represent a major drawback for promoting strong fiber/matrix interactions. The aim of the present study was to investigate the intrinsic fiber/matrix interactions of PLAbased natural fiber composites prepared by melt-compounding. Short flax fibers presenting a nominal length of ˜1 mm were selected as reinforcement and biocomposites containing low to moderate fiber loading were processed by melt-mixing. Fiber bundle breakage during processing led to important reductions in length and diameter. The mean aspect ratio was decreased by about 50%. Quiescent crystallization kinetics of PLA and biocomposite systems was examined under isothermal and non-isothermal conditions. The nucleating nature of the flax fibers was demonstrated and PLA crystallization was effectively accelerated as the natural reinforcement content increased. Such improvement was controlled by the temperature at which crystallization took place, the liquid-to-solid transition being thermodynamically promoted by the degree of supercooling

  12. Contact angle of water droplet on apatite single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Takaomi; Hirose, Go; Oishi, Shuji

    2004-01-01

    Contact angles of water droplets on well-formed crystals of strontium and barium chlorapatites, Sr 5 Cl(PO 4 ) 3 and Ba 5 Cl(PO 4 ) 3 , were observed. The contact angles of water on (1 0 1-bar 0) and (1 0 1-bar 1) faces of Sr 5 Cl(PO 4 ) 3 were 74±8 deg. and 53±5 deg. and those on (1 0 1-bar 0) and (1 0 1-bar 1) faces of Ba 5 Cl(PO 4 ) 3 were 52±5 deg. and 33±1 deg., respectively. The surface tensions of the crystals were calculated using Neumann's equation. They were 39.2±50 and 52.0±3.0 mJ m -2 for (1 0 1-bar 0) and (1 0 1-bar 1) faces of Sr 5 Cl(PO 4 ) 3 , 52.5±2.9 and 63.0±0.5 mJ m -2 for (1 0 1-bar 0) and (1 0 1-bar 1) faces of Ba 5 Cl(PO 4 ) 3 , respectively. The (1 0 1-bar 1) face has larger surface tension than (1 0 1-bar 0) face for both crystals. The chlorapatite crystals have tendency to elongate in directions during the crystal growth process, indicating that (1 0 1-bar 0) face is more stable than (1 0 1-bar 1) face. This nature of crystal morphology is consistent with the surface tensions estimated from the water contact angles. The higher density of Ba 5 Cl(PO 4 ) 3 than Sr 5 Cl(PO 4 ) 3 is considered to cause the smaller contact angles of water droplet on Ba 5 Cl(PO 4 ) 3 crystal than that on Sr 5 Cl(PO 4 ) 3 crystal because the attractive force between the heavier atoms brings the larger surface tension of solid

  13. The effect of oxygen fugacity on the rheological evolution of crystallizing basaltic melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolzenburg, S.; Di Genova, D.; Giordano, D.; Hess, K. U.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2018-04-01

    Storage and transport of silicate melts in the Earth's crust and their emplacement on the planet's surface occur almost exclusively at sub-liquidus temperatures. At these conditions, the melts undergo crystallization under a wide range of cooling-rates, deformation-rates, and oxygen fugacities (fO2). Oxygen fugacity is known to influence the thermodynamics and kinetics of crystallization in magmas and lavas. Yet, its influence on sub-liquidus rheology remains largely uncharted. We present the first rheological characterization of crystallizing lavas along natural cooling paths and deformation-rates and at varying fO2. Specifically, we report on apparent viscosity measurements for two crystallizing magmatic suspensions 1) at log ⁡ fO2 of -9.15 (quartz-fayalite-magnetite buffer, QFM, -2.1) and 2) in air. These fugacities span a range of reduced to oxidized conditions pertinent to magma migration and lava emplacement. We find that: 1) crystallization at constant cooling-rates results in a quasi-exponential increase in the apparent viscosity of the magmatic suspensions until they achieve their rheological cut off temperature (Tcutoff), where the melt effectively solidifies 2) the rheological departure and Tcutoff increase with increasing fO2 and 3) increasing fO2 results in decreased crystallization-rates. Based on the experimental results and by comparison with previous rheological isothermal studies we propose a generalisation of the effect of fO2 on the dynamic rheological evolution of natural magmatic and volcanic suspensions. We further discuss the implications for magmatic transport in plumbing and storage systems (e.g. conduits, dikes and magma chambers) and during lava flow emplacement.

  14. Defect structure of yttria-stabilized zirconia and its influence on the ionic conductivity at elevated temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goff, J.P.; Hayes, W.; Hull, S.

    1999-01-01

    The defect structure of cubic fluorite structured yttria-stabilized zirconia (ZrO2)(1-x)(Y2O3)(x) has been investigated over the composition range 0.100(3)less than or equal to x less than or equal to 0.241 (10) and temperatures T(K) up to 2780(10) K, using single-crystal specimens. Analysis of n......, we propose that the anomalous decrease in the ionic conductivity with increasing x is a consequence of the decreasing mobility of the isolated defects, possibly due to blockage by the increasing number of static aggregates....

  15. Structure of a new crystal form of human Hsp70 ATPase domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osipiuk, J; Walsh, M A; Freeman, B C; Morimoto, R I; Joachimiak, A

    1999-05-01

    Hsp70 proteins are highly conserved proteins induced by heat shock and other stress conditions. An ATP-binding domain of human Hsp70 protein has been crystallized in two major morphological forms at pH 7.0 in the presence of PEG 8000 and CaCl2. Both crystal forms belong to the orthorhombic space group P212121, but show no resemblance in unit-cell parameters. Analysis of the crystal structures for both forms shows a 1-2 A shift of one of the subdomains of the protein. This conformational change could reflect a 'natural' flexibility of the protein which might be relevant to ATP binding and may facilitate the interaction of other proteins with Hsp70 protein.

  16. RNA Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Barbara L.; Kundrot, Craig E.

    2003-01-01

    RNA molecules may be crystallized using variations of the methods developed for protein crystallography. As the technology has become available to syntheisize and purify RNA molecules in the quantities and with the quality that is required for crystallography, the field of RNA structure has exploded. The first consideration when crystallizing an RNA is the sequence, which may be varied in a rational way to enhance crystallizability or prevent formation of alternate structures. Once a sequence has been designed, the RNA may be synthesized chemically by solid-state synthesis, or it may be produced enzymatically using RNA polymerase and an appropriate DNA template. Purification of milligram quantities of RNA can be accomplished by HPLC or gel electrophoresis. As with proteins, crystallization of RNA is usually accomplished by vapor diffusion techniques. There are several considerations that are either unique to RNA crystallization or more important for RNA crystallization. Techniques for design, synthesis, purification, and crystallization of RNAs will be reviewed here.

  17. A crystal barrel

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    The production of crystals for the barrel of the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter has been completed. This is an important milestone for the experiment, which received the last of its 62,960 crystals on 9 March. The members of the team responsible for the crystal acceptance testing at CERN display the last crystal for the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter barrel. From left to right: Igor Tarasov, Etiennette Auffray and Hervé Cornet.One of the six machines specially developed to measure 67 different parameters on each crystal. Igor Tarasov is seen inserting the last batch of crystals into the machine. The last of the 62,960 CMS barrel crystals arrived at CERN on 9 March. Once removed from its polystyrene protection, this delicate crystal, like thousands of its predecessors, will be inserted into the last of the 36 supermodules of the barrel electromagnetic calorimeter in a few days' time. This marks the end of an important chapter in an almost 15-year-long journey by the CMS crystals team, some of whose member...

  18. [Effect of the crystallization conditions of tetracycline base on the properties of the powders and drug forms obtained. The dependence of the degree of dispersion of tetracycline base on the crystallization conditions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin'kov, G I; Zhukovskaia, S A; Dzhabarov, D N; Nabokov, V S

    1977-09-01

    Characteristics of the powder dispersity of tetracycline base samples prepared by directed crystallization with variation of the process conditions were determined by the sedimentation method. It was found that the speed of the solution agitation had the maximum effect on the level and nature of the dispersity. The rate of the solution temperature and pH changing during the crystallization process had also a significant effect at low agitation speed.

  19. Crystallization of ikaite and its pseudomorphic transformation into calcite: Raman spectroscopy evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez-Pastor, Nuria; Oehlerich, Markus; Astilleros, José Manuel; Kaliwoda, Melanie; Mayr, Christoph C.; Fernández Díaz, Lurdes; Schmahl, Wolfgang W.

    2015-01-01

    Ikaite (CaCO3·6H2O) is a metastable phase that crystallizes in nature from alkaline waters with high phosphate concentrations at temperatures close to 0 °C. This mineral transforms into anhydrous calcium carbonate polymorphs when temperatures rise or when exposed to atmospheric conditions. During the transformation in some cases the shape of the original ikaite crystal is preserved as a pseudomorph. Pseudomorphs after ikaite are considered as a valuable paleoclimatic indicator. In this work w...

  20. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the seryl-tRNA synthetase from Candida albicans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocha, Rita; Barbosa Pereira, Pedro José; Santos, Manuel A. S.; Macedo-Ribeiro, Sandra

    2010-01-01

    The seryl-tRNA synthetase from C. albicans was crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method using ammonium sulfate as precipitant. The crystals belonged to the hexagonal space group P6 1 22 and diffraction data were collected to 2.0 Å resolution at a synchrotron source. The seryl-tRNA synthetase (SerRS) from Candida albicans exists naturally as two isoforms resulting from ambiguity in the natural genetic code. Both enzymes were crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method using 3.2–3.4 M ammonium sulfate as precipitant. The crystals belonged to the hexagonal space group P6 1 22 and contained one monomer per asymmetric unit, despite the synthetase existing as a homodimer (with a molecular weight of ∼116 kDa) in solution. Diffraction data were collected to 2.0 Å resolution at a synchrotron source and the crystal structures of unliganded SerRS and of its complexes with ATP and with a seryl-adenylate analogue were solved by molecular replacement. The structure of C. albicans SerRS represents the first reported structure of a eukaryotic cytoplasmic SerRS

  1. X-ray diffraction topography observations of the core in Bi12SiO20 crystals doped with Mn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milenov, T.I.; Botev, P.A.; Rafailov, P.M.; Gospodinov, M.M.

    2004-01-01

    The core region in a bismuth silicate--Bi 12 SiO 20 (BSO) crystal doped with Mn was examined by X-ray double-crystal diffraction topography. Specific features were observed in the topographies as lines and contrast differences that point to defects occupying the central part of the crystal. We discuss the nature of these defects and propose an explanation in terms of stacking faults arranged in different structures

  2. Effects of impurities on crystal growth in fructose crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Y. D.; Shiau, L. D.; Berglund, K. A.

    1989-10-01

    The influence of impurities on the crystallization of anhydrous fructose from aqueous solution was studied. The growth kinetics of fructose crystals in the fructose-water-glucose and fructose-water-difructose dianhydrides systems were investigated using photomicroscopic contact nucleation techniques. Glucose is the major impurity likely to be present in fructose syrup formed during corn wet milling, while several difructose dianhydrides are formed in situ under crystallization conditions and have been proposed as a cause in the decrease of overall yields. Both sets of impurities were found to cause inhibition of crystal growth, but the mechanisms responsible in each case are different. It was found that the presence of glucose increases the solubility of fructose in water and thus lowers the supersaturation of the solution. This is probably the main effect responsible for the decrease of crystal growth. Since the molecular structures of difructose dianhydrides are similar to that of fructose, they are probably "tailor-made" impurities. The decrease of crystal growth is probably caused by the incorporation of these impurities into or adsorption to the crystal surface which would accept fructose molecules in the orientation that existed in the difructose dianhydride.

  3. Process development and characterization of centrosymmetric semiorganic nonlinear optical crystal: 4-dimethylaminopyridine potassium chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J.; Srineevasan, R.; Sivavishnu, D.

    2018-06-01

    Centrosymmetric semiorganic crystal 4-dimethylaminopyridine potassium chloride (4-DMAPKC) has been grown successfully by using slow evaporation solution growth technique. Powder x-ray diffraction shows the 4-DMAPKC crystal has good crystalline nature. Single crystal XRD shows that the grown 4-DMAPKC is cubic crystal system with cell parameters a = 3.09 Å, b = 3.09 Å, c = 3.09 Å. Investigation has been carried out to assign the Vibrational frequencies of the grown crystal by FTIR spectral studies. UVsbnd Visible NIR optical absorption spectral studies in the range of 200-1100 nm shows low absorption in UVsbnd Visible region with lower cutoff wave length at 261 nm and optical band gap energy was found as Eg = 5.52 eV. Optically transmittance spectral shows 4-DMAPKC crystal is very good transparency in UV-Visible NIR region. Thermogravimetry and differential thermal (TG-DTA) analysis were carried out. Dielectric studies of as grown crystal sample exhibit low dielectric constant and loss at higher frequencies and attests the nonlinear optical activity. Micro hardness studies of as grown crystal were discussed. Second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency of the 4-DMAPKC is 0.69 times as that of KDP.

  4. Synthesis and structural characterization of bulk Sb2Te3 single crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, Rabia; Gahtori, Bhasker; Meena, R. S.; Awana, V. P. S.

    2018-05-01

    We report the growth and characterization of bulk Sb2Te3 single crystal synthesized by the self flux method via solid state reaction route from high temperature melt (850˚C) and slow cooling (2˚C/hour) of constituent elements. The single crystal X-ray diffraction pattern showed the 00l alignment and the high crystalline nature of the resultant sample. The rietveld fitted room temperature powder XRD revealed the phase purity and rhombohedral structure of the synthesized crystal. The formation and analysis of unit cell structure further verified the rhombohedral structure composed of three quintuple layers stacked one over the other. The SEM image showed the layered directional growth of the synthesized crystal carried out using the ZEISS-EVOMA-10 scanning electron microscope The electrical resistivity measurement was carried out using the conventional four-probe method on a quantum design Physical Property Measurement System (PPMS). The temperature dependent electrical resistivity plot for studied Sb2Te3 single crystal depicts metallic behaviour in the absence of any applied magnetic field. The synthesis as well as the structural characterization of as grown Sb2Te3 single crystal is reported and discussed in the present letter.

  5. Liquid Crystal Gel Reduces Age Spots by Promoting Skin Turnover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina Musashi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Studies have shown that liquid crystals structurally resembling the intercellular lipids in the stratum corneum can beneficially affect the skin when applied topically by stimulating the skin’s natural regenerative functions and accelerating epidermal turnover. In the present study, the effects of applying low concentrations of a liquid crystal gel of our own creation were evaluated using epidermal thickening in mouse skin as an assay for effective stimulation of epidermal turnover. A liquid crystal gel was also applied topically to human facial skin, and analysis was conducted using before-and-after photographs of age spots, measurements of L* values that reflect degree of skin pigmentation, single-layer samples of the stratum corneum obtained via tape-stripping, and measurements of trans-epidermal water loss that reflect the status of the skin’s barrier function. The results suggested that cost-effective creams containing as low as 5% liquid crystal gel might be effective and safely sold as skin care products targeting age spots and other problems relating to uneven skin pigmentation.

  6. Characterisation of a natural quartz crystal as a reference material for microanalytical determination of Ti, Al, Li, Fe, Mn, Ga and Ge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audetat, Andreas; Garbe-Schonberg, Dieter; Kronz, Andreas; Pettke, Thomas; Rusk, Brian G.; Donovan, John J.; Lowers, Heather

    2015-01-01

    A natural smoky quartz crystal from Shandong province, China, was characterised by laser ablation ICP-MS, electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and solution ICP-MS to determine the concentration of twenty-four trace and ultra trace elements. Our main focus was on Ti quantification because of the increased use of this element for titanium-in-quartz (TitaniQ) thermobarometry. Pieces of a uniform growth zone of 9 mm thickness within the quartz crystal were analysed in four different LA-ICP-MS laboratories, three EPMA laboratories and one solution-ICP-MS laboratory. The results reveal reproducible concentrations of Ti (57 ± 4 μg g-1), Al (154 ± 15 μg g-1), Li (30 ± 2 μg g-1), Fe (2.2 ± 0.3 μg g-1), Mn (0.34 ± 0.04 μg g-1), Ge (1.7 ± 0.2 μg g-1) and Ga (0.020 ± 0.002 μg g-1) and detectable, but less reproducible, concentrations of Be, B, Na, Cu, Zr, Sn and Pb. Concentrations of K, Ca, Sr, Mo, Ag, Sb, Ba and Au were below the limits of detection of all three techniques. The uncertainties on the average concentration determinations by multiple techniques and laboratories for Ti, Al, Li, Fe, Mn, Ga and Ge are low; hence, this quartz can serve as a reference material or a secondary reference material for microanalytical applications involving the quantification of trace elements in quartz.

  7. Ordered macro-microporous metal-organic framework single crystals

    KAUST Repository

    Shen, Kui

    2018-01-16

    We constructed highly oriented and ordered macropores within metal-organic framework (MOF) single crystals, opening up the area of three-dimensional-ordered macro-microporous materials (that is, materials containing both macro- and micropores) in single-crystalline form. Our methodology relies on the strong shaping effects of a polystyrene nanosphere monolith template and a double-solvent-induced heterogeneous nucleation approach. This process synergistically enabled the in situ growth of MOFs within ordered voids, rendering a single crystal with oriented and ordered macro-microporous structure. The improved mass diffusion properties of such hierarchical frameworks, together with their robust single-crystalline nature, endow them with superior catalytic activity and recyclability for bulky-molecule reactions, as compared with conventional, polycrystalline hollow, and disordered macroporous ZIF-8.

  8. Ordered macro-microporous metal-organic framework single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Kui; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Xiaodong; Liu, Lingmei; Zhang, Daliang; Han, Yu; Chen, Junying; Long, Jilan; Luque, Rafael; Li, Yingwei; Chen, Banglin

    2018-01-01

    We constructed highly oriented and ordered macropores within metal-organic framework (MOF) single crystals, opening up the area of three-dimensional–ordered macro-microporous materials (that is, materials containing both macro- and micropores) in single-crystalline form. Our methodology relies on the strong shaping effects of a polystyrene nanosphere monolith template and a double-solvent–induced heterogeneous nucleation approach. This process synergistically enabled the in situ growth of MOFs within ordered voids, rendering a single crystal with oriented and ordered macro-microporous structure. The improved mass diffusion properties of such hierarchical frameworks, together with their robust single-crystalline nature, endow them with superior catalytic activity and recyclability for bulky-molecule reactions, as compared with conventional, polycrystalline hollow, and disordered macroporous ZIF-8.

  9. Ordered macro-microporous metal-organic framework single crystals

    KAUST Repository

    Shen, Kui; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Xiaodong; Liu, Lingmei; Zhang, Daliang; Han, Yu; Chen, Junying; Long, Jilan; Luque, Rafael; Li, Yingwei; Chen, Banglin

    2018-01-01

    We constructed highly oriented and ordered macropores within metal-organic framework (MOF) single crystals, opening up the area of three-dimensional-ordered macro-microporous materials (that is, materials containing both macro- and micropores) in single-crystalline form. Our methodology relies on the strong shaping effects of a polystyrene nanosphere monolith template and a double-solvent-induced heterogeneous nucleation approach. This process synergistically enabled the in situ growth of MOFs within ordered voids, rendering a single crystal with oriented and ordered macro-microporous structure. The improved mass diffusion properties of such hierarchical frameworks, together with their robust single-crystalline nature, endow them with superior catalytic activity and recyclability for bulky-molecule reactions, as compared with conventional, polycrystalline hollow, and disordered macroporous ZIF-8.

  10. Crystal growth and magnetic properties of equiatomic CeAl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Pranab Kumar; Thamizhavel, A.

    2015-03-01

    Single crystal of CeAl has been grown by flux method using Ce-Al self-flux. Several needle like single crystals were obtained and the length of the needle corresponds to the [001] crystallographic direction. Powder x-ray diffraction revealed that CeAl crystallizes in orthorhombic CrB-type structure with space group Cmcm (no. 63). The magnetic properties have been investigated by means of magnetic susceptibility, isothermal magnetization, electrical transport, and heat capacity measurements. CeAl is found to order antiferromagnetically with a Neel temperature TN = 10 K. The magnetization data below the ordering temperature reveals two metamagentic transitions for fields less than 20 kOe. From the inverse magnetic susceptibility an effective moment of 2.66 μB/Ce has been estimated, which indicates that Ce is in its trivalent state. Electrical resistivity data clearly shows a sharp drop at 10 K due to the reduction of spin disorder scattering of conduction electrons thus confirming the magnetic ordering. The estimated residual resistivity ratio (RRR) is 33, thus indicating a good quality of the single crystal. The bulk nature of the magnetic ordering is also confirmed by heat capacity data. From the Schottky anomaly of the heat capacity we have estimated the crystal field level splitting energies of the (2J + 1) degenerate ground state as 25 K and 175 K respectively for the fist and second excited states.

  11. The nature of hydrogen bonding in R-2(2)(8) crystal motifs - a computational exploration

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Deepa, Palanisamy; Solomon, R. V.; Vedha, S. A.; Kolandaivel, P.; Venuvanalingam, P.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 112, č. 24 (2014), s. 3195-3205 ISSN 0026-8976 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : NCI plot * hydrogen bonds * R-2(2)(8) motif * organic crystals * NBO * QTAIM analysis Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.720, year: 2014

  12. Formation rate of natural gas hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mork, Marit

    2002-07-01

    The rate of methane hydrate and natural gas hydrate formation was measured in a 9.5 litre stirred tank reactor of standard design. The experiments were performed to better understand the performance and scale-up of a reactor for continuous production of natural gas hydrates. The hydrate formation rate was measured at steady-state conditions at pressures between 70 and 90 bar and temperatures between 7 and 15 deg C. Between 44 and 56 % of the gas continuously supplied to the reactor was converted to hydrate. The experimental results show that the rate of hydrate formation is strongly influenced by gas injection rate and pressure. The effect of stirring rate is less significant and subcooling has no observable effect on the formation rate. Hydrate crystal concentration and gas composition do not influence the hydrate formation rate. Observations of produced hydrate crystals indicate that the crystals are elongated, about 5 micron in diameter and 10 micron long. Analysis of the results shows that the rate of hydrate formation is dominated by gas-liquid mass transfer. A mass transfer model, the bubble-to-crystal model, was developed for the hydrate formation rate in a continuous stirred tank reactor, given in terms of concentration driving force and an overall mass transfer coefficient. The driving force is the difference between the gas concentration at the gas-liquid interface and at the hydrate crystal surface. These concentrations correspond to the solubility of gas in water at experimental temperature and pressure and the solubility of gas at hydrate equilibrium temperature and experimental pressure, respectively. The overall mass transfer coefficient is expressed in terms of superficial gas velocity and impeller power consumption, parameters commonly used in study of stirred tank reactors. Experiments and modeling show that the stirred tank reactor has a considerable potential for increased production capacity. However, at higher hydrate production rates the

  13. Crystal growth and doping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paorici, C.

    1980-01-01

    Section 1 contains a self-consistent review of the basic growth features. After a short introduction concerning the driving force acting in a crystallization process, three main topics are broadly discussed: (i) interface kinetics; (ii) transport kinetics, and (iii) growth stability conditions. On point (i), after definition of the nature of interface, using Temkin's model, the growth mechanisms predicted by Burton, Cabrera and Frank (BCF) and bidimensional nucleation theories are fully developed. On points (ii) and (iii), the differential equations of the constitutional (concentration) and thermal fields are presented and discussed in terms of relevant approximations, suitable boundary conditions and limit values expected in order to have growth stability. Section 2 reports various experimental procedures for growing bulk crystals from the melt, from solutions and from the vapour phase. The basic concepts of Section 1 are amply employed for a critical discussion of possibilities, advantages and drawbacks of the methods described. Along the same lines, in Section 3 the principal epitaxial deposition procedures are highlighted. Section 4 contains a brief account of doping and of stoichiometry-defect control procedures. There is a long, carefully chosen list of bibliographical references. (author)

  14. MyCrystals - a simple visual data management program for laboratory-scale crystallization experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løvgreen, Monika Nøhr; Løvgreen, Mikkel; Christensen, Hans Erik Mølager

    2009-01-01

    MyCrystals is designed as a user-friendly program to display crystal images and list crystallization conditions. The crystallization conditions entry fields can be customized to suit the experiments. MyCrystals is also able to sort the images by the entered crystallization conditions, which...

  15. Structure of Profiled Crystals Based on Solid Solutions of Bi2Te3 and Their X-Ray Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronin, A. I.; Bublik, V. T.; Tabachkova, N. Yu.; Belov, Yu. M.

    2011-05-01

    In this work, we used x-ray structural diagnostic data to reveal the formation of structural regularities in profiled polycrystalline ingots based on Bi and Sb chalcogenide solid solutions. In Bi2Te3 lattice crystals, the solid phase grows such that the cleavage surfaces are perpendicular to the crystallization front. The crystallization singularity determines the nature of the growth texture. Because texture is an important factor determining the anisotropy of properties, which in turn determines the suitability of an ingot for production of modules and the possibility of figure of merit improvement, its diagnostics is an important issue for technology testing. Examples of texture analysis using the method of straight pole figure (SPF) construction for profiled crystals are provided. The structure of the surface layers in the profiled ingots was studied after electroerosion cutting. In addition, the method of estimation of the disturbed layer depth based on the nature of texture changes was used.

  16. Electrogyration and Faraday rotation in pure and Cr-doped lead germanate crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamenko, D; Klymiv, I; Vlokh, R; Vlokh, O; Duda, V M

    2008-01-01

    We present the results of studies on the temperature dependence of the electrogyration (EG) effect, Faraday rotation and natural optical activity in Pb 5 Ge 3 O 11 and Pb 5 Ge 3 O 11 :Cr crystals at the phase transition. A high EG coefficient is found for Pb 5 Ge 3 O 11 :Cr crystals. We demonstrate how the Curie-Weiss constant, the critical exponents of the order parameter and the dielectric permittivity in Pb 5 Ge 3 O 11 :Cr crystals, as well as the coefficients of thermodynamic potential, could be derived from the temperature dependences of optical activity and the EG coefficient. We also show that the increment of the Faraday rotation in Pb 5 Ge 3 O 11 and Pb 5 Ge 3 O 11 :Cr crystals appearing at the phase transition is caused by a combined magneto-electrooptic effect induced by spontaneous polarization. It is proportional to the square of spontaneous polarization. The phenomenon revealed by us corresponds to combined effects of crystal optics, which appear due to the common action of different fields

  17. Incorporation of Uranium into Hematite during Crystallization from Ferrihydrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Ferrihydrite was exposed to U(VI)-containing cement leachate (pH 10.5) and aged to induce crystallization of hematite. A combination of chemical extractions, TEM, and XAS techniques provided the first evidence that adsorbed U(VI) (≈3000 ppm) was incorporated into hematite during ferrihydrite aggregation and the early stages of crystallization, with continued uptake occurring during hematite ripening. Analysis of EXAFS and XANES data indicated that the U(VI) was incorporated into a distorted, octahedrally coordinated site replacing Fe(III). Fitting of the EXAFS showed the uranyl bonds lengthened from 1.81 to 1.87 Å, in contrast to previous studies that have suggested that the uranyl bond is lost altogether upon incorporation into hematite. The results of this study both provide a new mechanistic understanding of uranium incorporation into hematite and define the nature of the bonding environment of uranium within the mineral structure. Immobilization of U(VI) by incorporation into hematite has clear and important implications for limiting uranium migration in natural and engineered environments. PMID:24580024

  18. Crystal structure and magnetic susceptibility of UOSe single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaczorowski, D.; Muenster Univ.; Poettgen, R.; Jeitschko, W.; Gajek, Z.; Zygmunt, A.

    1993-01-01

    The crystal structure and magnetic susceptibility behaviour of UOSe single crystals have been studied. UOSe crystalizes in the tetragonal PbFC1-type structure (space group P4/nmm) with the lattice parameters: a = 390.38(5) pm and c = 698.05(9) pm. It orders antiferromagnetically at T N =100±2 K and exhibits a very strong anisotropy in the susceptibility vs temperature variation. The magnetic and thermodynamic properties of UOSe are successfully interpreted in the framework of a perturbative ab initio crystal field approach. (Author)

  19. Crystal structure and magnetic susceptibility of UOSe single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaczorowski, D. (Polish Academy of Sciences, Wroclaw (Poland). Inst. for Low Temperature and Structure Research Muenster Univ. (Germany). Anorganisch-Chemisches Inst.); Poettgen, R.; Jeitschko, W. (Muenster Univ. (Germany). Anorganisch-Chemisches Inst.); Gajek, Z.; Zygmunt, A. (Polish Academy of Sciences, Wroclaw (Poland). Inst. for Low Temperature and Structure Research)

    1993-01-01

    The crystal structure and magnetic susceptibility behaviour of UOSe single crystals have been studied. UOSe crystalizes in the tetragonal PbFC1-type structure (space group P4/nmm) with the lattice parameters: a = 390.38(5) pm and c = 698.05(9) pm. It orders antiferromagnetically at T[sub N]=100[+-]2 K and exhibits a very strong anisotropy in the susceptibility vs temperature variation. The magnetic and thermodynamic properties of UOSe are successfully interpreted in the framework of a perturbative ab initio crystal field approach. (Author).

  20. The cone phase of liquid crystals: Triangular lattice of double-tilt ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (figure 3) and analyse the mechanism which stabilizes it. Liquid crystals are soft ... There is no change in the smectic layer spacing along .... with the case of blue phases of cubic symmetry where the pitch of the helix provides a natural length ...

  1. Direct Photolithography on Molecular Crystals for High Performance Organic Optoelectronic Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yifan; Zhang, Lei; Leydecker, Tim; Samorì, Paolo

    2018-05-23

    Organic crystals are generated via the bottom-up self-assembly of molecular building blocks which are held together through weak noncovalent interactions. Although they revealed extraordinary charge transport characteristics, their labile nature represents a major drawback toward their integration in optoelectronic devices when the use of sophisticated patterning techniques is required. Here we have devised a radically new method to enable the use of photolithography directly on molecular crystals, with a spatial resolution below 300 nm, thereby allowing the precise wiring up of multiple crystals on demand. Two archetypal organic crystals, i.e., p-type 2,7-diphenyl[1]benzothieno[3,2- b][1]benzothiophene (Dph-BTBT) nanoflakes and n-type N, N'-dioctyl-3,4,9,10-perylenedicarboximide (PTCDI-C8) nanowires, have been exploited as active materials to realize high-performance top-contact organic field-effect transistors (OFETs), inverter and p-n heterojunction photovoltaic devices supported on plastic substrate. The compatibility of our direct photolithography technique with organic molecular crystals is key for exploiting the full potential of organic electronics for sophisticated large-area devices and logic circuitries, thus paving the way toward novel applications in plastic (opto)electronics.

  2. Model of coordination melting of crystals and anisotropy of physical and chemical properties of the surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokarev, Valery P.; Krasnikov, Gennady Ya

    2018-02-01

    Based on the evaluation of the properties of crystals, such as surface energy and its anisotropy, the surface melting temperature, the anisotropy of the work function of the electron, and the anisotropy of adsorption, were shown the advantages of the model of coordination melting (MCM) in calculating the surface properties of crystals. The model of coordination melting makes it possible to calculate with an acceptable accuracy the specific surface energy of the crystals, the anisotropy of the surface energy, the habit of the natural crystals, the temperature of surface melting of the crystal, the anisotropy of the electron work function and the anisotropy of the adhesive properties of single-crystal surfaces. The advantage of our model is the simplicity of evaluating the surface properties of the crystal based on the data given in the reference literature. In this case, there is no need for a complex mathematical tool, which is used in calculations using quantum chemistry or modeling by molecular dynamics.

  3. Manipulation of photons at the surface of three-dimensional photonic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizaki, Kenji; Noda, Susumu

    2009-07-16

    In three-dimensional (3D) photonic crystals, refractive-index variations with a periodicity comparable to the wavelength of the light passing through the crystal give rise to so-called photonic bandgaps, which are analogous to electronic bandgaps for electrons moving in the periodic electrostatic potential of a material's crystal structure. Such 3D photonic bandgap crystals are envisioned to become fundamental building blocks for the control and manipulation of photons in optical circuits. So far, such schemes have been pursued by embedding artificial defects and light emitters inside the crystals, making use of 3D bandgap directional effects. Here we show experimentally that photons can be controlled and manipulated even at the 'surface' of 3D photonic crystals, where 3D periodicity is terminated, establishing a new and versatile route for photon manipulation. By making use of an evanescent-mode coupling technique, we demonstrate that 3D photonic crystals possess two-dimensional surface states, and we map their band structure. We show that photons can be confined and propagate through these two-dimensional surface states, and we realize their localization at arbitrary surface points by designing artificial surface-defect structures through the formation of a surface-mode gap. Surprisingly, the quality factors of the surface-defect mode are the largest reported for 3D photonic crystal nanocavities (Q up to approximately 9,000). In addition to providing a new approach for photon manipulation by photonic crystals, our findings are relevant for the generation and control of plasmon-polaritons in metals and the related surface photon physics. The absorption-free nature of the 3D photonic crystal surface may enable new sensing applications and provide routes for the realization of efficient light-matter interactions.

  4. Modeling Textural Processes during Self-Assembly of Plant-Based Chiral-Nematic Liquid Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogesh K. Murugesan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Biological liquid crystalline polymers are found in cellulosic, chitin, and DNA based natural materials. Chiral nematic liquid crystalline orientational order is observed frozen-in in the solid state in plant cell walls and is known as a liquid crystal analogue characterized by a helicoidal plywood architecture. The emergence of the plywood architecture by directed chiral nematic liquid crystalline self assembly has been postulated as the mechanism that leads to optimal cellulose fibril organization. In natural systems, tissue growth and development takes place in the presence of inclusions and secondary phases leaving behind characteristic defects and textures, which provide a unique testing ground for the validity of the liquid crystal self-assembly postulate. In this work, a mathematical model, based on the Landau-de Gennes theory of liquid crystals, is used to simulate defect textures arising in the domain of self assembly, due to presence of secondary phases representing plant cells, lumens and pit canals. It is shown that the obtained defect patterns observed in some plant cell walls are those expected from a truly liquid crystalline phase. The analysis reveals the nature and magnitude of the viscoelastic material parameters that lead to observed patterns in plant-based helicoids through directed self-assembly. In addition, the results provide new guidance to develop biomimetic plywoods for structural and functional applications.

  5. Nanoparticles in liquid crystals, and liquid crystals in nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pablo, Juan

    2015-03-01

    Liquid crystals are remarkably sensitive to interfacial interactions. Small perturbations at a liquid crystal interface, for example, can be propagated over relatively long length scales, thereby providing the basis for a wide range of applications that rely on amplification of molecular events into macroscopic observables. Our recent research efforts have focused on the reverse phenomenon; that is, we have sought to manipulate the interfacial assembly of nanoparticles or the organization of surface active molecules by controlling the structure of a liquid crystal. This presentation will consist of a review of the basic principles that are responsible for liquid crystal-mediated interactions, followed by demonstrations of those principles in the context of two types of systems. In the first, a liquid crystal is used to direct the assembly of nanoparticles; through a combination of molecular and continuum models, it is found that minute changes in interfacial energy and particle size lead to liquid-crystal induced attractions that can span multiple orders of magnitude. Theoretical predictions are confirmed by experimental observations, which also suggest that LC-mediated assembly provides an effective means for fabrication of plasmonic devices. In the second type of system, the structure of a liquid crystal is controlled by confinement in submicron droplets. The morphology of the liquid crystal in a drop depends on a delicate balance between bulk and interfacial contributions to the free energy; that balance can be easily perturbed by adsorption of analytes or nanoparticles at the interface, thereby providing the basis for development of hierarchical assembly of responsive, anisotropic materials. Theoretical predictions also indicate that the three-dimensional order of a liquid crystal can be projected onto a two-dimensional interface, and give rise to novel nanostructures that are not found in simple isotropic fluids.

  6. Nanometric solid solutions of the fluorite and perovskite type crystal structures: Synthesis and properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snežana Bošković

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a short review of our results on the synthesis of nanosized CeO2, CaMnO3 and BaCeO3 solid solutions are presented. The nanopowders were prepared by two innovative methods: self propagating room temperature synthesis (SPRT and modified glycine/nitrate procedure (MGNP. Different types of solid solutions with rare earth dopants in concentrations ranging from 0–0.25 mol% were synthesized. The reactions forming solid solutions were studied. In addition, the characteristics of prepared nanopowders, phenomena during sintering and the properties of sintered samples are discussed.

  7. Properties of the Sodium Naproxen-Lactose-Tetrahydrate Co-Crystal upon Processing and Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sovago, Ioana; Wang, Wenbo; Qiu, Danwen

    2016-01-01

    naproxen-lactose-tetrahydrate co-crystal and the co-amorphous mixture of sodium, naproxen, and lactose was investigated. The structure of the co-crystal is described using single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The structural analysis revealed a monoclinic lattice, space group P21, with the asymmetric unit...... containing one molecule of lactose, one of naproxen, sodium, and four water molecules. Upon heating, it was observed that the co-crystal transforms into a co-amorphous system due to the loss of its crystalline bound water. Dehydration and co-amorphization were studied using synchrotron X-ray radiation...... and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Subsequently, different processing techniques (ball milling, spray drying, and dehydration) were used to prepare the co-amorphous mixture of sodium, naproxen, and lactose. X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) revealed the amorphous nature of the mixtures after preparation. Differential...

  8. Second crystal cooling on cryogenically cooled undulator and wiggler double crystal monochromators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knapp, G. S.

    1998-01-01

    Simple methods for the cooling of the second crystals of cryogenically cooled undulator and wiggler double crystal monochromators are described. Copper braids between the first and second crystals are used to cool the second crystals of the double crystal monochromators. The method has proved successful for an undulator monochromator and we describe a design for a wiggler monochromator

  9. Realisation of a novel crystal bender for a fast double crystal monochromator

    CERN Document Server

    Zaeper, R; Wollmann, R; Luetzenkirchen-Hecht, D; Frahm, R

    2001-01-01

    A novel crystal bender for an X-ray undulator beamline as part of a fast double crystal monochromator development for full EXAFS energy range was characterized. Rocking curves of the monochromator crystal system were recorded under different heat loads and bending forces of the indirectly cooled first Si(1 1 1) crystal. The monochromator development implements new piezo-driven tilt tables with wide angular range to adjust the crystals' Bragg angles and a high pressure actuated bender mechanism for the first crystal.

  10. A Test of Macromolecular Crystallization in Microgravity: Large, Well-Ordered Insulin Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgstahl, Gloria E. O.; Vahedi-Faridi, Ardeschir; Lovelace, Jeff; Bellamy, Henry D.; Snell, Edward H.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Crystals of insulin grown in microgravity on space shuttle mission STS-95 were extremely well-ordered and unusually large (many > 2 mm). The physical characteristics of six microgravity and six earth-grown crystals were examined by X-ray analysis employing superfine f slicing and unfocused synchrotron radiation. This experimental setup allowed hundreds of reflections to be precisely examined for each crystal in a short period of time. The microgravity crystals were on average 34 times larger, had 7 times lower mosaicity, had 54 times higher reflection peak heights and diffracted to significantly higher resolution than their earth grown counterparts. A single mosaic domain model could account for reflections in microgravity crystals whereas reflections from earth crystals required a model with multiple mosaic domains. This statistically significant and unbiased characterization indicates that the microgravity environment was useful for the improvement of crystal growth and resultant diffraction quality in insulin crystals and may be similarly useful for macromolecular crystals in general.

  11. Synthesis, spectral analysis, optical and thermal properties of new organic NLO crystal: N,N";-Diphenylguanidinium Nitrate (DPGN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravana Kumar, G.; Murugakoothan, P.

    2014-10-01

    A new organic NLO material N,N";-Diphenylguanidinium Nitrate (DPGN) single crystal was grown by slow evaporation technique using methanol as solvent. Single crystal X-ray diffraction and powder X-ray diffraction experiments were carried out in order to confirm the structure and crystalline nature of DPGN crystal. Wide band gap of 3.9 eV with transmittance of 57% up to 800 nm is observed for the grown crystal using UV-vis spectral analysis. The chemical bonding and presence of various functional groups were confirmed by the FT-IR and FT-Raman spectral studies. The thermal behavior of DPGN crystal was analyzed by simultaneous TG-DTA studies. The second harmonic generation (SHG) nonlinearity of the grown crystal was measured by Kurtz and Perry powder technique and was found to be comparable with that of the standard reference material potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystal.

  12. Emission from Crystals Irradiated with a Beam of Runaway Electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buranchenko, A. G.; Tarasenko, V. F.; Beloplotov, D. V.; Baksht, E. Kh.

    2018-01-01

    An investigation of the spectral and amplitude-temporal characteristics of emission from different crystals, promising in terms of their application as detectors of runaway electrons, is performed. This emission is excited by subnanosecond electron beams generated in a gas diode. It is found out that at the electron energies of tens-hundreds of kiloelectronvolts, the main contribution into the emission from CsI, ZnS, type IIa artificial and natural diamonds, sapphire, CaF2, ZrO2, Ga2O3, CaCO3, CdS, and ZnSe crystals comes from the cathodoluminescence; the radiation pulse duration depends on the crystal used and sufficiently exceeds the Cherenkov radiation pulse duration. It is demonstrated that the latter radiation exhibits low intensity and can be detected in the short-wave region of the spectrum in the cases where a monochromator and a high-sensitivity photomultiplier tube (PMT) are used.

  13. Photoluminescence characteristics of Pb-doped, molecular-beam-epitaxy grown ZnSe crystal layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mita, Yoh; Kuronuma, Ryoichi; Inoue, Masanori; Sasaki, Shoichiro; Miyamoto, Yoshinobu

    2004-01-01

    The characteristic green photoluminescence emission and related phenomena in Pb-doped, molecular-beam-epitaxy (MBE)-grown ZnSe crystal layers were investigated to explore the nature of the center responsible for the green emission. The intensity of the green emission showed a distinct nonlinear dependence on excitation intensity. Pb-diffused polycrystalline ZnSe was similarly examined for comparison. The characteristic green emission has been observed only in MBE-grown ZnSe crystal layers with moderate Pb doping. The results of the investigations on the growth conditions, luminescence, and related properties of the ZnSe crystal layers suggest that the green emission is due to isolated Pb replacing Zn and surrounded with regular ZnSe lattice with a high perfection

  14. The Use of Atomic-Force Microscopy for Studying the Crystallization Process of Amorphous Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmanov, G. N.; Ivanitskaya, E. A.; Dzhumaev, P. S.; Skrytniy, V. I.

    The crystallization process of amorphous alloys is accompanied by the volume changes as a result of structural phase transitions. This leads to changes in the surface topography, which was studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The changes of the surface topography, structure and phase composition during multistage crystallization process of the metallic glasses with composition Ni71,5Cr6,8Fe2,7B11,9Si7,1 and Ni63,4Cr7,4Fe4,3Mn0,8B15,6Si8,5 (AWS BNi2) has been investigated. The obtained results on changing of the surface topography in crystallization process are in good agreement with the data of X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD). The nature of redistribution of some alloy components in the crystallization process has been suggested.

  15. Protein Crystal Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    In order to rapidly and efficiently grow crystals, tools were needed to automatically identify and analyze the growing process of protein crystals. To meet this need, Diversified Scientific, Inc. (DSI), with the support of a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract from NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center, developed CrystalScore(trademark), the first automated image acquisition, analysis, and archiving system designed specifically for the macromolecular crystal growing community. It offers automated hardware control, image and data archiving, image processing, a searchable database, and surface plotting of experimental data. CrystalScore is currently being used by numerous pharmaceutical companies and academic and nonprofit research centers. DSI, located in Birmingham, Alabama, was awarded the patent Method for acquiring, storing, and analyzing crystal images on March 4, 2003. Another DSI product made possible by Marshall SBIR funding is VaporPro(trademark), a unique, comprehensive system that allows for the automated control of vapor diffusion for crystallization experiments.

  16. Design considerations for a Space Shuttle Main Engine turbine blade made of single crystal material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Aziz, A.; August, R.; Nagpal, V.

    1993-01-01

    Nonlinear finite-element structural analyses were performed on the first stage high-pressure fuel turbopump blade of the Space Shuttle Main Engine. The analyses examined the structural response and the dynamic characteristics at typical operating conditions. Single crystal material PWA-1480 was considered for the analyses. Structural response and the blade natural frequencies with respect to the crystal orientation were investigated. The analyses were conducted based on typical test stand engine cycle. Influence of combined thermal, aerodynamic, and centrifugal loadings was considered. Results obtained showed that the single crystal secondary orientation effects on the maximum principal stresses are not highly significant.

  17. Focusing Double Bent Crystal (DBC) diffractometer for medium-resolution small-angle. Neutron scattering (SANS) experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikula, P.; Wagner, V.; Scherm, R.

    1991-01-01

    A new modification of a focusing SANS instrument where at least the first crystal is set for diffraction in the asymmetric transmission geometry is presented. Unlike an earlier version which employed both crystals in the symmetric Bragg-case geometry, the new modification permits one simultaneously to exploit the effects of natural wavelength focusing and space condensation of the diffracted beam due to asymmetric diffraction. This DBC instrument seems to be suitable for use with beams with a large cross section at the first crystal and for SANS experiments on samples with a small width (few mm). (orig.)

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF RAPID TECHNIQUE FOR DETERMINATION OF THE TOTAL MINERALIZATION OF NATURAL WATERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Kuchmenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new approach has been proposed for rapid and easy evaluation of a indicator of quality and properties of natural water - soluble salt content (mineralization. The method of quartz crystal microbalance is employed at load of the mass-sensitive resonator electrode (BAW-type with investigated water. The degree of correlation between the various indicators related to the contents of salts and insoluble compounds and the level of mineralization obtained by the standard method (gravimetry has been studied. A procedure for salt weighing by single sensor at unilateral load with small sample of natural water has been developed. The optimal conditions for measurement is established using the design of experiment by model 23 . The possibilities of quartz crystal microbalance for determination of non-volatile compounds in the water are described. The calibration of piezosensor is produced by standard solution NaCl (c = 1.000 g / dm3 at optimal conditions of experiment. The adequacy and accuracy of proposed technique is assessed by the correlation between the results of quartz crystal microbalance and conductometry. The correlation between indicators of mineralization established by quartz crystal microbalance and gravimetry is found. It has been obtained an equation that can be used to calculate the standard indicator of the mineralization by the results of a quartz crystal microbalance using single sensor. The approaches to enhance the analytical capabilities of the developed technique for water with low and high mineralization are proposed. The metrological characteristics of quartz crystal microbalance of insoluble compounds in natural water are estimated. A new technique of determination of the mass concentration of the dry residue in water with a conductivity of 0.2 mS or above has been developed, which can be used for rapid analysis of the water at nonlaboratory conditions and in the laboratory for rapid obtaining the information about a sample.

  19. Preliminary laboratory studies of the optical scattering properties of the crystal clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Saunders

    Full Text Available Ice crystal clouds have an influence on the radiative budget of the earth; however, the exact size and nature of this influence has yet to be determined. A laboratory cloud chamber experiment has been set up to provide data on the optical scattering behaviour of ice crystals at a visible wavelength in order to gain information which can be used in climate models concerning the radiative characteristics of cirrus clouds. A PMS grey-scale probe is used to monitor simultaneously the cloud microphysical properties in order to correlate these closely with the observed radiative properties. Preliminary results show that ice crystals scatter considerably more at 90° than do water droplets, and that the halo effects are visible in a laboratory-generated cloud when the ice crystal concentration is sufficiently small to prevent masking from multiple scattering.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmosphere dynamics · Climatology · Radiative process · Atmospheric composition and structure · Cloud physics and chemistry

  20. Synthesis and Exfoliation of Discotic Zirconium Phosphates to Obtain Colloidal Liquid Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yi-Hsien; Wang, Xuezhen; Shinde, Abhijeet; Cheng, Zhengdong

    2016-01-01

    Due to their abundance in natural clay and potential applications in advanced materials, discotic nanoparticles are of interest to scientists and engineers. Growth of such anisotropic nanocrystals through a simple chemical method is a challenging task. In this study, we fabricate discotic nanodisks of zirconium phosphate [Zr(HPO4)2·H2O] as a model material using hydrothermal, reflux and microwave-assisted methods. Growth of crystals is controlled by duration time, temperature, and concentration of reacting species. The novelty of the adopted methods is that discotic crystals of size ranging from hundred nanometers to few micrometers can be obtained while keeping the polydispersity well within control. The layered discotic crystals are converted to monolayers by exfoliation with tetra-(n)-butyl ammonium hydroxide [(C4H9)4NOH, TBAOH]. Exfoliated disks show isotropic and nematic liquid crystal phases. Size and polydispersity of disk suspensions is highly important in deciding their phase behavior. PMID:27284765

  1. Evaluation of secondary crystallization effect in poly hydroxybutyrate and silanized coir dust composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mello, Carolina C. de; Costa, Marysilvia F. da; Thire, Rossana M.S.M.

    2011-01-01

    Polyhydroxybutyrate is a natural and biodegradable polyester, susceptible to secondary crystallization when it is stored at environment temperature. Coir dust is an agroindustrial waste which has good prospects for use as filler in composites. In this context, PHB-coir dust composites were produced. The compatibilization was made by coir dust silanization. The secondary crystallization evolution on materials was evaluated by x-ray diffraction. Its effect was verified by tension tests which presented that elastic modulus increases when crystallinity increases. (author)

  2. Photonic Crystal Fibers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kristiansen, Rene E

    2005-01-01

    This report results from a contract tasking Crystal Fibre A/S as follows: Crystal Fibre will conduct research and development of large mode area, dual clad multi-core Yb-doped photonic crystal fiber...

  3. A multi-step strategy to obtain crystals of the dengue virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase that diffract to high resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yap, Thai Leong; Chen, Yen Liang; Xu, Ting; Wen, Daying; Vasudevan, Subhash G.; Lescar, Julien

    2007-01-01

    Crystals of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase catalytic domain from the dengue virus NS5 protein have been obtained using a strategy that included expression screening of naturally occurring serotype variants of the protein, the addition of divalent metal ions and crystal dehydration. These crystals diffract to 1.85 Å resolution and are thus suitable for a structure-based drug-design program. Dengue virus, a member of the Flaviviridae genus, causes dengue fever, an important emerging disease with several million infections occurring annually for which no effective therapy exists. The viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase NS5 plays an important role in virus replication and represents an interesting target for the development of specific antiviral compounds. Crystals that diffract to 1.85 Å resolution that are suitable for three-dimensional structure determination and thus for a structure-based drug-design program have been obtained using a strategy that included expression screening of naturally occurring serotype variants of the protein, the addition of divalent metal ions and crystal dehydration

  4. A multi-step strategy to obtain crystals of the dengue virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase that diffract to high resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yap, Thai Leong [Novartis Institute for Tropical Diseases, 10 Biopolis Road, Chromos Building, Singapore 138670 (Singapore); School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 60 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637551 (Singapore); Chen, Yen Liang; Xu, Ting; Wen, Daying; Vasudevan, Subhash G. [Novartis Institute for Tropical Diseases, 10 Biopolis Road, Chromos Building, Singapore 138670 (Singapore); Lescar, Julien, E-mail: julien@ntu.edu.sg [Novartis Institute for Tropical Diseases, 10 Biopolis Road, Chromos Building, Singapore 138670 (Singapore); School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 60 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637551 (Singapore)

    2007-02-01

    Crystals of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase catalytic domain from the dengue virus NS5 protein have been obtained using a strategy that included expression screening of naturally occurring serotype variants of the protein, the addition of divalent metal ions and crystal dehydration. These crystals diffract to 1.85 Å resolution and are thus suitable for a structure-based drug-design program. Dengue virus, a member of the Flaviviridae genus, causes dengue fever, an important emerging disease with several million infections occurring annually for which no effective therapy exists. The viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase NS5 plays an important role in virus replication and represents an interesting target for the development of specific antiviral compounds. Crystals that diffract to 1.85 Å resolution that are suitable for three-dimensional structure determination and thus for a structure-based drug-design program have been obtained using a strategy that included expression screening of naturally occurring serotype variants of the protein, the addition of divalent metal ions and crystal dehydration.

  5. Thermoactivation processes in PbI2:Zr and PbI2 crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panasyuk, M.R.; Kapustyanik, V.B.; Tsibul's'kij, V.S.; Dubov, Yu.G.; Pasternak, R.M.

    2007-01-01

    The X-ray luminescence, thermal emission and thermally stimulated depolarisation spectra as well as the influence of IR-illumination on the thermal emission and thermally stimulated depolarisation spectra of the PbI 2 :Zr and PbI 2 crystals have been studied. There were found the hole traps in the PbI 2 :Zr crystals that are absent in PbI 2 . For the observed traps the activation energy has been calculated. The mechanisms describing the traps' nature and that of thermally stimulated depolarisation currents have been proposed

  6. Structural, mechanical, electrical and optical properties of a new lithium boro phthalate NLO crystal synthesized by a slow evaporation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanraj, K.; Balasubramanian, D.; Jhansi, N.

    2017-11-01

    A new non-linear optical (NLO) single crystal of lithium boro phthalate (LiBP) was grown by slow solvent evaporation technique. The powder sample was subjected to powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) to find its crystalline nature and the crystal structure of the grown crystal was determined using single crystal X-ray (SXRD) diffraction analysis. The Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrum was recorded for grown crystal to identify the various functional groups present in the compound. The mechanical property of the LiBP single crystal was studied using Vickers microhardness tester. The dielectric constant and dielectric loss measurements were carried out for the grown crystal at various temperatures. The grown crystal was subjected to UV-Visible Spectral Studies to analyze the linear optical behavior of the grown crystal. The Kurtz-Perry Powder technique was employed to measure the Second Harmonic Generation efficiency of the grown crystal.

  7. Solving crystal structures with the symmetry minimum function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estermann, M.A.

    1995-01-01

    Unravelling the Patterson function (the auto-correlation function of the crystal structure) (A.L. Patterson, Phys. Rev. 46 (1934) 372) can be the only way of solving crystal structures from neutron and incomplete diffraction data (e.g. powder data) when direct methods for phase determination fail. The negative scattering lengths of certain isotopes and the systematic loss of information caused by incomplete diffraction data invalidate the underlying statistical assumptions made in direct methods. In contrast, the Patterson function depends solely on the quality of the available diffraction data. Simpson et al. (P.G. Simpson et al., Acta Crystallogr. 18 (1965) 169) showed that solving a crystal structure with a particular superposition of origin-shifted Patterson functions, the symmetry minimum function, is advantageous over using the Patterson function alone, for single-crystal X-ray data.This paper describes the extension of the Patterson superposition approach to neutron data and powder data by (a) actively using the negative regions in the Patterson map caused by negative scattering lengths and (b) using maximum entropy Patterson maps (W.I.F. David, Nature 346 (1990) 731). Furthermore, prior chemical knowledge such as bond lengths and angles from known fragments have been included. Two successful structure solutions of a known and a previously unknown structure (M. Hofmann, J. Solid State Chem., in press) illustrate the potential of this new development. ((orig.))

  8. Cloning, purification and crystallization of Thermus thermophilus proline dehydrogenase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, Tommi A.; Tanner, John J.

    2005-01-01

    Cloning, purification and crystallization of T. thermophilus proline dehydrogenase is reported. The detergent n-octyl β-d-glucopyranoside was used to reduce polydispersity, which enabled crystallization. Nature recycles l-proline by converting it to l-glutamate. This four-electron oxidation process is catalyzed by the two enzymes: proline dehydrogenase (PRODH) and Δ 1 -pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase. This note reports the cloning, purification and crystallization of Thermus thermophilus PRODH, which is the prototype of a newly discovered superfamily of bacterial monofunctional PRODHs. The results presented here include production of a monodisperse protein solution through use of the detergent n-octyl β-d-glucopyranoside and the growth of native crystals that diffracted to 2.3 Å resolution at Advanced Light Source beamline 4.2.2. The space group is P2 1 2 1 2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 82.2, b = 89.6, c = 94.3 Å. The asymmetric unit is predicted to contain two protein molecules and 46% solvent. Molecular-replacement trials using a fragment of the PRODH domain of the multifunctional Escherichia coli PutA protein as the search model (24% amino-acid sequence identity) did not produce a satisfactory solution. Therefore, the structure of T. thermophilus PRODH will be determined by multiwavelength anomalous dispersion phasing using a selenomethionyl derivative

  9. Kinetics of barium sulphate reaction crystallization in crystallizers with internal circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Koralewska

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Kinetic calculation results describing the observed nucleation and growth rates of barium sulphate crystals precipitated in an integrated reaction-crystallization process in a barium sulphate-ammonium chloride-water system are presented and analyzed. The scope of experiments included two continuous model DTM-type crystallizers (Draft Tube Magma with internal circulation of the suspension forced by a liquid jet-pump device responsible for stable and intensive enough ascending/descending flow of BaSO4 crystal magma in a mixing chamber. For comparison purposes the experimental data corresponding to a continuous DT (Draft Tube crystallizer with propeller agitator are presented and discussed. The various types of laboratory crystallizers used were fed with concentrated water solution of barium chloride (of 10 or 24 mass % and - in a stoichiometric proportion - crystalline ammonium sulphate, assuming isothermal (348 K and hydrodynamic (average residence time of suspension in a crystallizer: 900 s process conditions. The observed nucleation and growth rates of barium sulphate crystals were estimated on the basis of crystal size distributions (CSDs using convenient calculation scheme derived for an MSMPR (Mixed Suspension Mixed Product Removal model approach. Considering the experimental population density distribution courses, a size-dependent growth (SDG phenomenon was taken into account in the kinetic calculations. Five SDG kinetic models recommended in the accessible literature were used for kinetic parameter values estimation. It was proved statistically, that Rojkowski’s two SDG models (hyperbolic and exponential best suit for our own experimental data description. The experimental data presented can be practically applied for improving the constructions of liquid jet-pump DTM crystallizers recommended for reaction crystallization of sparingly soluble inorganic salts (especially for high concentrations of reaction substrates in the modern

  10. Co-crystallization as a separation technology: controlling product concentrations by co-crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Urbanus, J.; Roelands, C.P.M.; Verdoes, D.; Jansens, P.J.; Horst, J.H. ter

    2010-01-01

    Co-crystallization is known as a product formulation technology, but it can also be used as a tool to solve crystallization problems. Product removal by co-crystallization in fermentations is used as a showcase to demonstrate the potential of co-crystallization as a separation technique. In

  11. Radiative recombination in doped indium phosphide crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negreskul, V.V.; Russu, E.V.; Radautsan, S.I.; Cheban, A.G.; AN Moldavskoj SSR, Kishinev. Inst. Prikladnoj Fiziki)

    1975-01-01

    Photoluminiscence spectra of nondoped n-InP and their change upon doping with silicon, cadmium, zinc and copper impurities were studied. The shortest wave band at 1.41 eV is connected with radiative electron transition from a shallow donor level (probably silicon) to valent zone, while the band with maximum at 1.37 - 1.39 eV is due to radiative electron transition to an acceptor level whose energy depends upon the nature and concentration of impurity implanted. The luminescence of Light-doped p-InP crystals enables to estimate the ionization energies of acceptor levels in cadmium (Esub(a)=0.043 eV) and zinc (Esub(a)=0.027 eV). Energies of acceptor levels (0.22 and 0.40 eV) due to copper impurity are determined. Intensity of edge emission in the specimens light-doped with silicon is higher than in the nondoped n-InP crystals

  12. Crystal growth, spectral and laser properties of Nd:LSAT single crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, P. C.; Yin, J. G.; Zhao, C. C.; Gong, J.; He, X. M.; Zhang, L. H.; Liang, X. Y.; Hang, Y.

    2011-10-01

    Nd:(La, Sr)(Al, Ta)O3 (Nd:LSAT) crystal was grown by the Czochralski method. The absorption and fluorescence spectra of Nd:LSAT crystal at room temperature were investigated. With a fiber-coupled diode laser as pump source, the continuous-wave (CW) laser action of Nd:LSAT crystal was demonstrated. The result of diode-pumped laser operation of Nd:LSAT crystal single crystal is reported for what is to our knowledge the first time. The maximum output power at 1064 nm was obtained to be 165 mW under the incident pump power of 3 W, with the slope efficiency 10.9%.

  13. Synthesis, growth, structural, optical, thermal, electrical and mechanical properties of hydrogen bonded organic salt crystal: Triethylammonium-3, 5-dinitrosalicylate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkumar, Madhu; Chandramohan, Angannan

    2017-04-01

    Triethylammonium-3, 5-dinitrosalicylate, an organic salt was synthesized and single crystals grown by slow solvent evaporation solution growth technique using methanol as a solvent. The presence of various functional groups and mode of vibrations has been confirmed by FT-IR spectroscopic technique. The UV-vis-NIR Spectrum was recorded in the range 200-1200 nm to find optical transmittance window and lower cut off wavelength of the title crystal. The formation of the salt and the molecular structure was confirmed by NMR spectroscopic technique. Crystal system, crystalline nature, cell parameters and hydrogen bonding interactions of the grown crystal were determined by single crystal x-ray diffraction analysis. The thermal characteristics of grown crystal were analyzed by thermo gravimetric and differential thermal analyses. Dielectric studies were carried out to study the distribution of charges within the crystal. The mechanical properties of the title crystal were studied by Vicker's microhardness technique.

  14. Crystal growth and properties of novel organic nonlinear optical crystals of 4-Nitrophenol urea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohan, M. Krishna, E-mail: krishnamohan.m@ktr.srmuniv.ac.in; Ponnusamy, S.; Muthamizhchelvan, C.

    2017-07-01

    Single crystals of 4-Nitrophenol urea have been grown from water using slow evaporation technique at constant temperature, with the vision to improve the properties of the crystals. The unit cell parameters of the grown crystals were determined by single crystal and powder X-Ray diffraction. FTIR studies reveals the presence of different vibrational bands. The Optical studies confirmed that the crystal is transparent up to 360 nm .TGA and DSC studies were carried out to understand the thermal behavior of crystals. The SHG studies show the suitability of the crystals for NLO applications. The etching studies were carried out to study the behavior of the crystals under different conditions.These studies reveal that the crystals of 4-Nitrophenol urea are suitable for device applications. - Highlights: • 4-Nitrophenol urea crystals of dimensions 14 mm × 1 mm were grown. • UV–Visible studies indicate the crystal is transparent in the region of 370–800 nm. • Thermal studies show the crystal starts decomposing at 170 °C. • SHG studies indicate that the crystals have NLO efficiency 3.5 times that of KDP.

  15. Electrogyration and Faraday rotation in pure and Cr-doped lead germanate crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamenko, D; Klymiv, I; Vlokh, R; Vlokh, O [Institute of Physical Optics, 23 Dragomanov Street, 79005 Lviv (Ukraine); Duda, V M [Dnipropetrovsk National University, 13 Naukova Street, Dnipropetrovsk (Ukraine)], E-mail: vlokh@ifo.lviv.ua

    2008-02-20

    We present the results of studies on the temperature dependence of the electrogyration (EG) effect, Faraday rotation and natural optical activity in Pb{sub 5}Ge{sub 3}O{sub 11} and Pb{sub 5}Ge{sub 3}O{sub 11}:Cr crystals at the phase transition. A high EG coefficient is found for Pb{sub 5}Ge{sub 3}O{sub 11}:Cr crystals. We demonstrate how the Curie-Weiss constant, the critical exponents of the order parameter and the dielectric permittivity in Pb{sub 5}Ge{sub 3}O{sub 11}:Cr crystals, as well as the coefficients of thermodynamic potential, could be derived from the temperature dependences of optical activity and the EG coefficient. We also show that the increment of the Faraday rotation in Pb{sub 5}Ge{sub 3}O{sub 11} and Pb{sub 5}Ge{sub 3}O{sub 11}:Cr crystals appearing at the phase transition is caused by a combined magneto-electrooptic effect induced by spontaneous polarization. It is proportional to the square of spontaneous polarization. The phenomenon revealed by us corresponds to combined effects of crystal optics, which appear due to the common action of different fields.

  16. Domain morphology controlled crystal habits in PbTiO{sub 3} nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudhe, C.M., E-mail: chandraguptadudhe@gmail.com; Khambadkar, S.J.

    2015-11-05

    Various crystal habits and associated domain structures in PbTiO{sub 3} nanocrystals synthesized by a modified sol–gel method have been studied. Structural and morphological characterizations of synthesized nanoparticles have been done by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It was found from the -z coordinates of O{sub 1} and O{sub 2} that the Ti–O{sub 6} octahedra were distorted slightly, favorable for the ferroelectric nature. TEM images show butterfly like, plate like, irregular sphere like and oval-shaped habits of the nanocrystals. 90° and 180° domain structures in these crystal habits were explored from their morphologies and appearance in the field of views. The mutual association between the crystal habit and the direction spontaneous polarization P{sub s} due to domain structures was explored. Domain wall energies of 90° and 180° domains were also estimated from the kinetic process of domain nucleation. - Highlights: • Various crystal habits of PbTiO{sub 3} nanoparticles were examined by TEM. • 90° and 180° domains were explored in the nanocrystal. • Crystal habits and domain structures were correlated. • Domain wall energies were estimated.

  17. Nacre biomineralisation: A review on the mechanisms of crystal nucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nudelman, Fabio

    2015-10-01

    The wide diversity of biogenic minerals that is found in nature, each with its own morphology, mechanical properties and composition, is remarkable. In order to produce minerals that are optimally adapted for their function, biomineralisation usually occurs under strict cellular control. This control is exerted by specialised proteins and polysaccharides that assemble into a 3-dimensional organic matrix framework, forming a microenvironment where mineral deposition takes place. Molluscs are unique in that they use a striking variety of structural motifs to build their shells, each made of crystals with different morphologies and different calcium carbonate polymorphs. Much of want is known about mollusc shell formation comes from studies on the nacreous layer, or mother-of-pearl. In this review, we discuss two existing models on the nucleation of aragonite crystals during nacre formation: heteroepitaxial nucleation and mineral bridges. The heteroepitaxial nucleation model is based on the identification of chemical functional groups and aragonite-nucleating proteins at the centre of crystal imprints. It proposes that during nacre formation, each aragonite tablet nucleates independently on a nucleation site that is formed by acidic proteins and/or glycoproteins adsorbed on the chitin scaffold. The mineral bridges model is based on the identification of physical connections between the crystals in a stack, which results in a large number of crystals across several layers sharing the same crystallographic orientation. These observations suggest that there is one nucleation event per stack of tablets. Once the first crystal nucleates and reaches the top interlamellar matrix, it continues growing through pores, giving rise to the next layer of nacre, subsequently propagating into a stack. We compare both models and propose that they work in concert to control crystal nucleation in nacre. De novo crystal nucleation has to occur at least once per stack of aligned crystals

  18. Numerical study on characteristic of two-dimensional metal/dielectric photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Yi-Xin; Xia, Jian-Bai; Wu, Hai-Bin

    2017-04-01

    An improved plan-wave expansion method is adopted to theoretically study the photonic band diagrams of two-dimensional (2D) metal/dielectric photonic crystals. Based on the photonic band structures, the dependence of flat bands and photonic bandgaps on two parameters (dielectric constant and filling factor) are investigated for two types of 2D metal/dielectric (M/D) photonic crystals, hole and cylinder photonic crystals. The simulation results show that band structures are affected greatly by these two parameters. Flat bands and bandgaps can be easily obtained by tuning these parameters and the bandgap width may reach to the maximum at certain parameters. It is worth noting that the hole-type photonic crystals show more bandgaps than the corresponding cylinder ones, and the frequency ranges of bandgaps also depend strongly on these parameters. Besides, the photonic crystals containing metallic medium can obtain more modulation of photonic bands, band gaps, and large effective refractive index, etc. than the dielectric/dielectric ones. According to the numerical results, the needs of optical devices for flat bands and bandgaps can be met by selecting the suitable geometry and material parameters. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CB922200) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 605210010).

  19. Layered van der Waals crystals with hyperbolic light dispersion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerding, Morten Niklas; Petersen, R.; Pedersen, T.G.

    2017-01-01

    candidates for Purcell factor control of emission from diamond nitrogen-vacancy centers.Natural hyperbolic materials retain the peculiar optical properties of traditional metamaterials whilst not requiring artificial structuring. Here, the authors perform a theoretical screening of a large class of natural......Compared to artificially structured hyperbolic metamaterials, whose performance is limited by the finite size of the metallic components, the sparse number of naturally hyperbolic materials recently discovered are promising candidates for the next generation of hyperbolic materials. Using first......-infrared to the ultraviolet. Combined with the emerging field of van der Waals heterostructuring, we demonstrate how the hyperbolic properties can be further controlled by stacking different two-dimensional crystals opening new perspectives for atomic-scale design of photonic metamaterials. As an application, we identify...

  20. Hydrogen bonding intermolecular effect on electro-optical response of doped 6PCH nematic liquid crystal with some azo dyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiani, S.; Zakerhamidi, M. S.; Tajalli, H.

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies on the electro-optical responses of dye-doped liquid crystal have shown that dopant material have a considerable effect on their electro-optical responses. Despite the studies carried out on electro-optical properties of dye-doped liquid crystal, no attention has been paid to study of the interaction and structural effects in this procedure. In this paper, linear dyes and with similar structure were selected as dopants. The only difference in used dyes is the functional groups in their tails. So, doping of these dyes into liquid crystals determines the influence of interaction type on electro-optical behaviours of the doped systems. Therefore, in this work, two aminoazobenzene (;A-dye;: hydrogen bond donor) and dimethyl-aminoazobenzene (;B-dye;) dyes with different compositional percentages in liquid crystal host were used. Electro-optical Kerr behaviour, the pre-transition temperature and third order nonlinear susceptibility were investigated. The obtained results effectively revealed that type of interactions between the dye and liquid crystal is determinative of behavioral difference of doped system, compared to pure liquid crystal. Also, pre-transitional behaviour and thereupon Kerr electro-optical responses were affected by formed interactions into doped systems. In other words, it will be shown that addition of any dopants in liquid crystal, regardless of the nature of interactions, cannot cause appropriate electro-optical responses. In fact, type of dye, nature of interactions between dopant and liquid crystalline host as well as concentration of dye are the key factors in selecting the appropriate liquid crystal and dopant dye.

  1. Pyrochlore as nuclear waste form. Actinide uptake and chemical stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finkeldei, Sarah Charlotte

    2015-07-01

    Radioactive waste is generated by many different technical and scientific applications. For the past decades, different waste disposal strategies have been considered. Several questions on the waste disposal strategy remain unanswered, particularly regarding the long-term radiotoxicity of minor actinides (Am, Cm, Np), plutonium and uranium. These radionuclides mainly arise from high level nuclear waste (HLW), specific waste streams or dismantled nuclear weapons. Although many countries have opted for the direct disposal of spent fuel, from a scientific and technical point of view it is imperative to pursue alternative waste management strategies. Apart from the vitrification, especially for trivalent actinides and Pu, crystalline ceramic waste forms are considered. In contrast to glasses, crystalline waste forms, which are chemically and physically highly stable, allow the retention of radionuclides on well-defined lattice positions within the crystal structure. Besides polyphase ceramics such as SYNROC, single phase ceramics are considered as tailor made host phases to embed a specific radionuclide or a specific group. Among oxidic single phase ceramics pyrochlores are known to have a high potential for this application. This work examines ZrO{sub 2} based pyrochlores as potential nuclear waste forms, which are known to show a high aqueous stability and a high tolerance towards radiation damage. This work contributes to (1) understand the phase stability field of pyrochlore and consequences of non-stoichiometry which leads to pyrochlores with mixed cationic sites. Mixed cationic occupancies are likely to occur in actinide-bearing pyrochlores. (2) The structural uptake of radionuclides themselves was studied. (3) The chemical stability and the effect of phase transition from pyrochlore to defect fluorite were probed. This phase transition is important, as it is the result of radiation damage in ZrO{sub 2} based pyrochlores. ZrO{sub 2} - Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} pellets

  2. Growth of dopamine crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patil, Vidya, E-mail: vidya.patil@ruparel.edu; Patki, Mugdha, E-mail: mugdha.patki@ruparel.edu [D. G. Ruparel College, Senapati Bapat Marg, Mahim, Mumbai – 400 016 (India)

    2016-05-06

    Many nonlinear optical (NLO) crystals have been identified as potential candidates in optical and electro-optical devices. Use of NLO organic crystals is expected in photonic applications. Hence organic nonlinear optical materials have been intensely investigated due to their potentially high nonlinearities, and rapid response in electro-optic effect compared to inorganic NLO materials. There are many methods to grow organic crystals such as vapor growth method, melt growth method and solution growth method. Out of these methods, solution growth method is useful in providing constraint free crystal. Single crystals of Dopamine have been grown by evaporating the solvents from aqueous solution. Crystals obtained were of the size of orders of mm. The crystal structure of dopamine was determined using XRD technique. Images of crystals were obtained using FEG SEM Quanta Series under high vacuum and low KV.

  3. Parity violation and parity conservation in unstirred crystallization: Effect of first crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szurgot, M. [Center of Mathematics and Physics, Technical University of Lodz (Poland)

    2012-02-15

    Statistics of nucleation of chiral forms was studied to establish the effect of the number of first crystals and their handedness on distributions of enantiomers. Various bimodal, trimodal and unimodal distributions are obtained in unstirred crystallization, depending on the number of initial crystals and growth conditions. The binomial distribution satisfactorily describes experimental distributions of enantiomeric excess and may be used to predict distributions and probabilities of nucleation of enantiomers. The first nucleated crystals determine the handedness of secondary crystals, and number of initial crystals governs statistics of chiral nucleation. According to the binomial distribution if single crystals nucleate as the first, the bimodal distributions result with D and L peaks. If LD, LL, and DD pairs are nucleated as first, trimodal distributions with D, R, and L peaks are created, and if groups of crystals of various handedness nucleate as the first the unimodal distributions of enantiomeric excess with racemate R peaks are formed. Chiral nucleation experiments on sodium bromate were the basis for the theoretical considerations and verifications of predictions resulting from binomial distributions on probabilities of the creation of L and D crystals, and racemates, and the presence of D, L, and R peaks in the distributions. Growth conditions affect the number of the first crystals and effectiveness of cloning, and as a result, the distributions of enantiomers. Formation of pure enantiomers and/or racemates proves that the conservation of chiral symmetry, and the breakage of chiral symmetry can occur in unstirred crystallization. (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  4. AFM studies on heavy ion irradiated YBCO single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakhani, Archana; Marhas, M.K.; Saravanan, P.; Ganesan, V.; Srinivasan, R.; Kanjilal, D.; Mehta, G.K.; Elizabeth, Suja; Bhat, H.L.

    2000-01-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is extensively used to characterise the surface morphology of high energy ion irradiated single crystals of high temperature superconductor - YBCO. Our earlier systematic studies on thin films of YBCO under high energy and heavy ion irradiation shows clear evidence of ion induced sputtering or erosion, even though the effect is more on the grain boundaries. These earlier results were supported by electrical resistance measurements. In order to understand more clearly, the nature of surface modification at these high energies, AFM studies were carried out on single crystals of YBCO. Single crystals were chosen in order to see the effect on crystallites alone without interference from grain boundaries. 200 MeV gold ions were used for investigation using the facilities available at Nuclear Science Centre, New Delhi. The type of ion and the range of energies were chosen to meet the threshold for electronically mediated defect production. The results are in conformity with our earlier studies and will be described in detail in the context of electronic energy loss mediated sputtering or erosion. (author)

  5. 3D electron tomography of biological photonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butz, Benjamin; Winter, Benjamin; Vieweg, Benito; Knoke, Isabel; Spallek, Stefanie; Spiecker, Erdmann [CENEM, Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany); Schroeder-Turk, Gerd; Mecke, Klaus [Theoretische Physik I, Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Photonic crystals, i.e. periodical nanostructures of materials with different dielectric constants, are highly interesting for applications in optics, optoelectronics, and sensing. By tailoring the geometrical parameters radically different and improved optical properties (e.g., optical band-gap structure, extreme refractive indices, or high anisotropy) can be achieved. Naturally occurring photonic crystals, like butterfly scales, exoskeletons of insects (chitin), or seashells (nacre), can serve as model systems for understanding the relationship between structure and optical properties. Butterfly scales are studied by TEM using a FEI Titan{sup 3} 80-300 instrument. An optimized FIB technique or ultramicrotome sectioning were used to prepare the sensitive specimens with desired thickness. Since the periodical structures have dimensions on the sub-{mu}m scale, HAADF-STEM tomography was employed for obtaining extended tilt series under conditions of atomic-number sensitive imaging. Since the solid crystal consists of chemically homogeneous chitin while the pores are unfilled, the distinct contrast in the images can easily be interpreted in terms of the local projected mass density allowing to reconstruct the chitin distribution within the optical unit cell of the scales with high 3D resolution.

  6. Plastic deformation of tubular crystals by dislocation glide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beller, Daniel A; Nelson, David R

    2016-09-01

    Tubular crystals, two-dimensional lattices wrapped into cylindrical topologies, arise in many contexts, including botany and biofilaments, and in physical systems such as carbon nanotubes. The geometrical principles of botanical phyllotaxis, describing the spiral packings on cylinders commonly found in nature, have found application in all these systems. Several recent studies have examined defects in tubular crystals associated with crystalline packings that must accommodate a fixed tube radius. Here we study the mechanics of tubular crystals with variable tube radius, with dislocations interposed between regions of different phyllotactic packings. Unbinding and separation of dislocation pairs with equal and opposite Burgers vectors allow the growth of one phyllotactic domain at the expense of another. In particular, glide separation of dislocations offers a low-energy mode for plastic deformations of solid tubes in response to external stresses, reconfiguring the lattice step by step. Through theory and simulation, we examine how the tube's radius and helicity affects, and is in turn altered by, the mechanics of dislocation glide. We also discuss how a sufficiently strong bending rigidity can alter or arrest the deformations of tubes with small radii.

  7. Dynamics of the Wigner crystal of composite particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Junren; Ji, Wencheng

    2018-03-01

    Conventional wisdom has long held that a composite particle behaves just like an ordinary Newtonian particle. In this paper, we derive the effective dynamics of a type-I Wigner crystal of composite particles directly from its microscopic wave function. It indicates that the composite particles are subjected to a Berry curvature in the momentum space as well as an emergent dissipationless viscosity. While the dissipationless viscosity is the Chern-Simons field counterpart for the Wigner crystal, the Berry curvature is a feature not presented in the conventional composite fermion theory. Hence, contrary to general belief, composite particles follow the more general Sundaram-Niu dynamics instead of the ordinary Newtonian one. We show that the presence of the Berry curvature is an inevitable feature for a dynamics conforming to the dipole picture of composite particles and Kohn's theorem. Based on the dynamics, we determine the dispersions of magnetophonon excitations numerically. We find an emergent magnetoroton mode which signifies the composite-particle nature of the Wigner crystal. It occurs at frequencies much lower than the magnetic cyclotron frequency and has a vanishing oscillator strength in the long-wavelength limit.

  8. Effects of packaging SrI{sub 2}(Eu) scintillator crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sturm, Benjamin W., E-mail: sturm1@llnl.gov [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Cherepy, Nerine J.; Drury, Owen B.; Thelin, Peter A.; Fisher, Scott E.; Payne, Stephen A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Burger, Arnold [Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37201 (United States); Boatner, Lynn A.; Ramey, Joanne O. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States); Shah, Kanai S.; Hawrami, Rastgo [Radiation Monitoring Devices, Watertown, MA 02472 (United States)

    2011-10-01

    Recent renewed emphasis placed on gamma-ray detectors for national security purposes has motivated researchers to identify and develop new scintillator materials capable of high energy resolution and growable to large sizes. We have discovered that SrI{sub 2}(Eu) has many desirable properties for gamma-ray detection and spectroscopy, including high light yield of {approx}90,000 photons/MeV and excellent light yield proportionality. We have measured <2.7% FWHM at 662 keV with small detectors (<1 cm{sup 3}) in direct contact with a photomultiplier tube, and {approx}3% resolution at 662 keV is obtained for 1 in.{sup 3} crystals. Due to the hygroscopic nature of SrI{sub 2}(Eu), similar to NaI(Tl), proper packaging is required for field use. This work describes a systematic study performed to determine the key factors in the packaging process to optimize performance. These factors include proper polishing of the surface, the geometry of the crystal, reflector materials and windows. A technique based on use of a collimated {sup 137}Cs source was developed to examine light collection uniformity. Employing this technique, we found that when the crystal is packaged properly, the variation in the pulse height at 662 keV from events near the bottom of the crystal compared to those near the top of the crystal could be reduced to <1%. This paper describes the design and engineering of our detector package in order to improve energy resolution of 1 in.{sup 3}-scale SrI{sub 2}(Eu) crystals.

  9. Comparative study of glycine single crystals with additive of potassium nitrate in different concentration ratios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gujarati, Vivek P., E-mail: vivekgujarati@gmail.com; Deshpande, M. P., E-mail: vishwadeshpande@yahoo.co.in; Patel, Kamakshi R.; Chaki, S. H. [Department of Physics, Sardar Patel University, Vallabh Vidyanagar, Gujarat (India)

    2016-05-06

    Semi-organic crystals of Glycine Potassium Nitrate (GPN) with potential applications in Non linear optics (NLO) were grown using slow evaporation technique. Glycine and Potassium Nitrate were taken in three different concentration ratios of 3:1, 2:1 and 1:1 respectively. We checked the solubility of the material in distilled water at different temperatures and could observe the growth of crystals in 7 weeks time. Purity of the grown crystals was confirmed by Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis (EDAX) and CHN analysis. GSN Powder X-ray diffraction pattern was recorded to confirm the crystalline nature. To confirm the applications of grown crystals in opto-electronics field, UV-Vis-NIR study was carried out. Dielectric properties of the samples were studied in between the frequency range 1Hz to 100 KHz.

  10. Molecular dynamics simulations of liquid crystals at interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shield, Mark

    2002-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of an atomistic model of 4-n-octyl-4'-cyanobiphenyl (8CB) were performed for thin films of 8CB on solid substrates (a pseudopotential representation of the molecular topography of the (100) crystal surface of polyethylene (PE), a highly ordered atomistic model of a pseudo-crystalline PE surface and an atomistic model of a partially orientated film of PE), free standing thin films of 8CB and 8CB droplets in a hexagonal pit. The systems showed strong homeotropic anchoring at the free volume interface and planar anchoring at the solid interface whose strength was dependent upon the surface present. The free volume interface also demonstrated weak signs of smectic wetting of the bulk. Simulations of thin free standing films of liquid crystals showed the ordered nature of the liquid crystals at the two free volume interfaces can be adopted by the region of liquid crystal molecules between the homeotropic layer at each interface only if there is a certain number of liquid crystal molecules present. The perpendicular anchoring imposed by the free volume interface and the solid interface for the thin films on the solid substrates resulted in some evidence for the liquid crystal director undergoing a continual rotation at low temperatures and a definite discontinuous change at higher temperatures. The liquid crystal alignment imparted by these substrates was found to depend upon the topography of the surface and not the direction of the polymer chains in the substrate. The liquid crystal was found to order via an epitaxy-like mechanism. The perpendicular anchoring results in a drop in the order - disorder transition temperature for the molecules in the region between the homeotropic layer at the free volume interface and the planar layers at the solid interface. An increase in the size of this region does not alter the transition temperature. The shape of the liquid crystal molecules is dependent upon the degree of order and thus the nematic

  11. Disorder–order phase transformation in a fluorite-related oxide thin film: In-situ X-ray diffraction and modelling of the residual stress effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaboriaud, R.J.; Paumier, F.; Lacroix, B.

    2016-01-01

    This work is focused on the transformation of the disordered fluorite cubic-F phase to the ordered cubic-C bixbyite phase, induced by isothermal annealing as a function of the residual stresses resulting from different concentrations of microstructural defects in the yttrium oxide, Y_2O_3. This transformation was studied using in-situ X-ray diffraction and was modelled using Kolmogorov–Johnson–Mehl–Avrami (KJMA) analysis. The degree of the disorder of the oxygen network was associated with the residual stress, which was a key parameter for the stability and the kinetics of the transition of the different phases that were present in the thin oxide film. When the degree of disorder/residual stress level is high, this transition, which occurs at a rather low temperature (300 °C), is interpreted as a transformation of phases that occurs by a complete recrystallization via the nucleation and growth of a new cubic-C structure. Using the KJMA model, we determined the activation energy of the transformation process, which indicates that this transition occurs via a one-dimensional diffusion process. Thus, we present the analysis and modelling of the stress state. When the disorder/residual stress level was low, a transition to the quasi-perfect ordered cubic-C structure of the yttrium oxide appeared at a rather high temperature (800 °C), which is interpreted as a classic recovery mechanism of the cubic-C structure. - Highlights: • Rare earth oxide thin films • XRD analysis • Phase transformation modelling • Residual stress effects • Crystallographic phase stability

  12. Disorder–order phase transformation in a fluorite-related oxide thin film: In-situ X-ray diffraction and modelling of the residual stress effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaboriaud, R.J.; Paumier, F. [Institut Pprime, Department of Material Sciences, CNRS-University of Poitiers SP2MI-BP 30179, 86962 Futuroscope-Chasseneuil cedex (France); Lacroix, B. [CSIC, Institut de Ciencia de Materiales, University of Sevilla, Avenida Américo Vespucio, 49, 41092 Sevilla (Spain)

    2016-02-29

    This work is focused on the transformation of the disordered fluorite cubic-F phase to the ordered cubic-C bixbyite phase, induced by isothermal annealing as a function of the residual stresses resulting from different concentrations of microstructural defects in the yttrium oxide, Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}. This transformation was studied using in-situ X-ray diffraction and was modelled using Kolmogorov–Johnson–Mehl–Avrami (KJMA) analysis. The degree of the disorder of the oxygen network was associated with the residual stress, which was a key parameter for the stability and the kinetics of the transition of the different phases that were present in the thin oxide film. When the degree of disorder/residual stress level is high, this transition, which occurs at a rather low temperature (300 °C), is interpreted as a transformation of phases that occurs by a complete recrystallization via the nucleation and growth of a new cubic-C structure. Using the KJMA model, we determined the activation energy of the transformation process, which indicates that this transition occurs via a one-dimensional diffusion process. Thus, we present the analysis and modelling of the stress state. When the disorder/residual stress level was low, a transition to the quasi-perfect ordered cubic-C structure of the yttrium oxide appeared at a rather high temperature (800 °C), which is interpreted as a classic recovery mechanism of the cubic-C structure. - Highlights: • Rare earth oxide thin films • XRD analysis • Phase transformation modelling • Residual stress effects • Crystallographic phase stability.

  13. Amelogenin as a promoter of nucleation and crystal growth of apatite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uskoković, Vuk; Li, Wu; Habelitz, Stefan

    2011-02-01

    Human dental enamel forms over a period of 2-4 years by substituting the enamel matrix, a protein gel mostly composed of a single protein, amelogenin with fibrous apatite nanocrystals. Self-assembly of amelogenin and the products of its selective proteolytic digestion are presumed to direct the growth of apatite fibers and their organization into bundles that eventually comprise the mature enamel, the hardest tissue in the mammalian body. This work aimed to establish the physicochemical and biochemical conditions for the growth of apatite crystals under the control of a recombinant amelogenin matrix (rH174) in combination with a programmable titration system. The growth of apatite substrates was initiated in the presence of self-assembling amelogenin particles. A series of constant titration rate experiments was performed that allowed for a gradual increase of the calcium and/or phosphate concentrations in the protein suspensions. We observed a significant amount of apatite crystals formed on the substrates following the titration of rH174 sols that comprised the initial supersaturation ratio equal to zero. The protein layers adsorbed onto the substrate apatite crystals were shown to act as promoters of nucleation and growth of calcium phosphates subsequently formed on the substrate surface. Nucleation lag time experiments have showed that rH174 tends to accelerate precipitation from metastable calcium phosphate solutions in proportion to its concentration. Despite their mainly hydrophobic nature, amelogenin nanospheres, the size and surface charge properties of which were analyzed using dynamic light scattering, acted as a nucleating agent for the crystallization of apatite. The biomimetic experimental setting applied in this study proves as convenient for gaining insight into the fundamental nature of the process of amelogenesis.

  14. Dielectric Losses and Charge Transfer in Antimony-Doped TlGaS2 Single Crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadov, S. M.; Mustafaeva, S. N.

    2018-03-01

    Effect of semimetallic antimony (0.5 mol % Sb) on the dielectric properties and ac-conductivity of TlGaS2-based single crystals grown by the Bridgman-Stockbarger method has been studied. The experimental results on the frequency dispersion of dielectric coefficients and the conductivity of TlGa0.995Sb0.005S2 single crystals allowed the revealing of the dielectric loss nature, the charge transfer mechanism, and the estimation of the parameters of the states localized in the energy gap. The antimony-doping of the TlGaS2 single crystal leads to an increase in the density of states near the Fermi level and a decrease in the average time and average distance of hopes.

  15. Equivalence of the Boson Peak in Glasses to the Transverse Acoustic van Hove Singularity in Crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chumakov, A. I.; Monaco, G.; Monaco, A.; Crichton, W. A.; Bosak, A.; Rueffer, R.; Meyer, A.; Kargl, F.; Comez, L.; Fioretto, D.; Giefers, H.; Roitsch, S.; Wortmann, G.; Manghnani, M. H.; Hushur, A.; Balogh, J.; Williams, Q.; Parlinski, K.; Jochym, P.; Piekarz, P.

    2011-01-01

    We compare the atomic dynamics of the glass to that of the relevant crystal. In the spectra of inelastic scattering, the boson peak of the glass appears higher than the transverse acoustic (TA) singularity of the crystal. However, the density of states shows that they have the same number of states. Increasing pressure causes the transformation of the boson peak of the glass towards the TA singularity of the crystal. Once corrected for the difference in the elastic medium, the boson peak matches the TA singularity in energy and height. This suggests the identical nature of the two features.

  16. Morphology of growth of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indenbom, M. V.; van der Beek, C. J.; Berseth, V.; Wolf, Th.; Berger, H.; Benoit, W.

    1996-12-01

    A good correlation of twins on the basal surface of flux-grown Bi2Sr2CaCu2Ox (BSCCO) single crystals with surface. growth steps is observed, the b-axis being perpendicular to the steps and, thus, parallel to the growth direction. It is found that mono-twin BSCCO single crystals produced by the travelling solvent floating zone method also grow preferentially along b, i.e. nearly perpendicularly to the boule axis, contrary to the common belief. This new understanding of the morphology of growth explains the nature of major defects in these crystals, which considerably change their measured superconducting properties, in a different way.

  17. Bulk crystal growth and electronic characterization of the 3D Dirac semimetal Na3Bi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satya K. Kushwaha

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available High quality hexagon plate-like Na3Bi crystals with large (001 plane surfaces were grown from a molten Na flux. The freshly cleaved crystals were analyzed by low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, allowing for the characterization of the three-dimensional (3D Dirac semimetal (TDS behavior and the observation of the topological surface states. Landau levels were observed, and the energy-momentum relations exhibited a linear dispersion relationship, characteristic of the 3D TDS nature of Na3Bi. In transport measurements on Na3Bi crystals, the linear magnetoresistance and Shubnikov-de Haas quantum oscillations are observed for the first time.

  18. Crystallization Pathways in Biomineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Steve; Addadi, Lia

    2011-08-01

    A crystallization pathway describes the movement of ions from their source to the final product. Cells are intimately involved in biological crystallization pathways. In many pathways the cells utilize a unique strategy: They temporarily concentrate ions in intracellular membrane-bound vesicles in the form of a highly disordered solid phase. This phase is then transported to the final mineralization site, where it is destabilized and crystallizes. We present four case studies, each of which demonstrates specific aspects of biological crystallization pathways: seawater uptake by foraminifera, calcite spicule formation by sea urchin larvae, goethite formation in the teeth of limpets, and guanine crystal formation in fish skin and spider cuticles. Three representative crystallization pathways are described, and aspects of the different stages of crystallization are discussed. An in-depth understanding of these complex processes can lead to new ideas for synthetic crystallization processes of interest to materials science.

  19. Conceptual process synthesis for recovery of natural products from plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malwade, Chandrakant R.; Qu, Haiyan; Rong, Ben-Guang

    2013-01-01

    ) and purification of target compound(s) from the crude extract. Process analytical technology (PAT) is used in each step to understand the nature of material systems and separation characteristics of each separation method. In the present work, this methodology is applied to generate process flow sheet for recovery......A systematic method of conceptual process synthesis for recovery of natural products from their biological sources is presented. This methodology divides the task into two major subtasks namely, isolation of target compound from a chemically complex solid matrix of biological source (crude extract...... in individual unit operations of maceration, flash column chromatography, and crystallization are 90.0%, 87.1, and 47.6%, respectively. Results showed that the crystallization step is dominant to the overall yield of the process which was 37.3%....

  20. Anisotropic frictional heating and defect generation in cyclotrimethylene-trinitramine molecular crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajak, Pankaj; Mishra, Ankit; Sheng, Chunyang; Tiwari, Subodh; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya

    2018-05-01

    Anisotropic frictional response and corresponding heating in cyclotrimethylene-trinitramine molecular crystals are studied using molecular dynamics simulations. The nature of damage and temperature rise due to frictional forces is monitored along different sliding directions on the primary slip plane, (010), and on non-slip planes, (100) and (001). Correlations between the friction coefficient, deformation, and frictional heating are established. We find that the friction coefficients on slip planes are smaller than those on non-slip planes. In response to sliding on a slip plane, the crystal deforms easily via dislocation generation and shows less heating. On non-slip planes, due to the inability of the crystal to deform via dislocation generation, a large damage zone is formed just below the contact area, accompanied by the change in the molecular ring conformation from chair to boat/half-boat. This in turn leads to a large temperature rise below the contact area.

  1. Research and Development of Crystal Purification for Product of Uranium Crystallization Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yano, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency - JAEA (Japan)

    2009-06-15

    Uranium crystallization has been developed as a part of advanced aqueous reprocessing for FBR spent fuel. Although the purity of uranyl nitrate hexahydrate (UNH) crystal from the crystallization process is supposed to meet a specification of FBR blanket fuel, an improvement of its purity is able to reduce the cost of fuel fabrication and storage (in case interim storage of recovered uranium is required). In this work, UNH crystal purification was developed as additional process after crystallization. Contamination of the crystal is caused by mother solution and solid state impurities. They are inseparable by washing and filtration. Mother solution on the surface of UNH crystals is removable by washing, but it is difficult to remove that in an obstructed part of crystalline aggregate by washing. Major elements of solid state impurities are cesium and barium. Cesium precipitates with tetravalent plutonium as a double nitrate, Cs{sub 2}Pu(NO{sub 3}){sub 6}. Barium crystallizes as Ba(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} because of its low solubility in nitric acid solution. It is difficult to separate their particle from UNH crystal by solid-liquid separation such as simple filtration. As a kind of crystal purification, there are some methods using sweating. Sweating is a phenomenon that a crystal melts partly below its melting point and it is caused by depression of freezing point due to impurity. It is considerably applicable for removal of mother solution. Concerning the solid state impurities, which has higher melting point than that of UNH crystal, it is supposed that they are separable by melting UNH crystal and filtration. The behaviors of impurities and applicability of sweating and melting-filtration operations to the purification for UNH crystal were investigated experimentally on a beaker and an engineering scale. With regard to behaviors of impurities, the conditions of cesium and barium precipitation were surveyed and it was clarified that there were most impurities on the

  2. Resistance: a threat to the insecticidal crystal proteins of Bacillus thuringiensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leah S. Bauer

    1995-01-01

    Insecticidal crystal proteins (also known as d-endotoxins) synthesized by the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner (Bt) are the active ingredient of various environmentally friendly insecticides that are 1) highly compatible with natural enemies and other nontarget organisms due to narrow host specificity, 2) harmless to vertebrates, 3) biodegradable in the...

  3. The assessment of crystals derived from Aloe spp. for potential use ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dagginess predisposes sheep to breech strike and can be controlled with management practices (e.g. mulesing, crutching) or by treating the animal with an anthelmintic. The effect of regular treatment with crystals derived from Aloe spp as a natural anthelmintic was assessed in yearling Merino progeny born in 2004 (Trial ...

  4. Theobromine inhibits uric acid crystallization. A potential application in the treatment of uric acid nephrolithiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grases, Felix; Rodriguez, Adrian; Costa-Bauza, Antonia

    2014-01-01

    To assess the capacity of methylxanthines (caffeine, theophylline, theobromine and paraxanthine) to inhibit uric acid crystallization, and to evaluate their potential application in the treatment of uric acid nephrolithiasis. The ability of methylxathines to inhibit uric acid nucleation was assayed turbidimetrically. Crystal morphology and its modification due to the effect of theobromine were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The ability of theobromine to inhibit uric acid crystal growth on calculi fragments resulting from extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) was evaluated using a flow system. The turbidimetric assay showed that among the studied methylxanthines, theobromine could markedly inhibit uric acid nucleation. SEM images showed that the presence of theobromine resulted in thinner uric acid crystals. Furthermore, in a flow system theobromine blocked the regrowth of post-ESWL uric acid calculi fragments. Theobromine, a natural dimethylxanthine present in high amounts in cocoa, acts as an inhibitor of nucleation and crystal growth of uric acid. Therefore, theobromine may be clinically useful in the treatment of uric acid nephrolithiasis.

  5. Crystallization and diffraction patterns of the oxy and cyano forms of the Lucina pectinata haemoglobins complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz-Martínez, Carlos R.; Nieves-Marrero, Carlos A.; Estremera-Andújar, Rafael A.; Gavira, José A.; González-Ramírez, Luis A.; López-Garriga, Juan; García-Ruiz, Juan M.

    2008-01-01

    The native oxygen-carrier haemoglobins complex (HbII–III) is composed of haemoglobin II (HbII) and haemoglobin III (HbIII), which are found in the ctenidia tissue of the bivalve mollusc Lucina pectinata. This protein complex was isolated and purified from its natural source and crystallized using the vapour-diffusion and capillary counter-diffusion methods. The native oxygen-carrier haemoglobins complex (HbII–III) is composed of haemoglobin II (HbII) and haemoglobin III (HbIII), which are found in the ctenidia tissue of the bivalve mollusc Lucina pectinata. This protein complex was isolated and purified from its natural source and crystallized using the vapour-diffusion and capillary counter-diffusion methods. Oxy and cyano derivatives of the complex crystallized using several conditions, but the best crystals in terms of quality and size were obtained from sodium formate pH 5 using the counter-diffusion method in a single capillary. Crystals of the oxy and cyano complexes, which showed a ruby-red colour and nonsingular prismatic shapes, scattered X-rays to resolution limits of 2.15 and 2.20 Å, respectively, using a 0.886 Å synchrotron-radiation source. The crystals belonged to the tetragonal system, space group P4 2 2 1 2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 74.07, c = 152.07 and a = b = 73.83, c = 152.49 Å for the oxy and cyano complexes, respectively. The asymmetric unit of both crystals is composed of a single copy of the heterodimer, with Matthew coefficients (V M ) of 3.08 and 3.06 Å 3 Da −1 for the oxy and cyano complexes, respectively, which correspond to a solvent content of approximately 60.0% by volume

  6. Growth of single crystals of BaFe12O19 by solid state crystal growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, John G.; Sun, Hengyang; Kook, Young-Geun; Kim, Joon-Seong; Le, Phan Gia

    2016-01-01

    Single crystals of BaFe 12 O 19 are grown for the first time by solid state crystal growth. Seed crystals of BaFe 12 O 19 are buried in BaFe 12 O 19 +1 wt% BaCO 3 powder, which are then pressed into pellets containing the seed crystals. During sintering, single crystals of BaFe 12 O 19 up to ∼130 μm thick in the c-axis direction grow on the seed crystals by consuming grains from the surrounding polycrystalline matrix. Scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis shows that the single crystal and the surrounding polycrystalline matrix have the same chemical composition. Micro-Raman scattering shows the single crystal to have the BaFe 12 O 19 structure. The optimum growth temperature is found to be 1200 °C. The single crystal growth behavior is explained using the mixed control theory of grain growth. - Highlights: • Single crystals of BaFe 12 O 19 are grown by solid state crystal growth. • A single crystal up to ∼130 μm thick (c-axis direction) grows on the seed crystal. • The single crystal and surrounding ceramic matrix have similar composition. • Micro-Raman scattering shows the single crystal has the BaFe 12 O 19 structure.

  7. Crystals in the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2012-01-01

    Bent crystals can be used to deflect charged particle beams. Their use in high-energy accelerators has been investigated for almost 40 years. Recently, a bent crystal was irradiated for the first time in the HiRadMat facility with an extreme particle flux, which crystals would have to withstand in the LHC. The results were very encouraging and confirmed that this technology could play a major role in increasing the beam collimation performance in future upgrades of the machine.   UA9 bent crystal tested with a laser. Charged particles interacting with a bent crystal can be trapped in channelling states and deflected by the atomic planes of the crystal lattice (see box). The use of bent crystals for beam manipulation in particle accelerators is a concept that has been well-assessed. Over the last three decades, a large number of experimental findings have contributed to furthering our knowledge and improving our ability to control crystal-particle interactions. In modern hadron colliders, su...

  8. A salt diapir-related Mississippi Valley-type deposit: The Bou Jaber Pb-Zn-Ba-F deposit, Tunisia: Fluid inclusion and isotope study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhlel, Salah; Leach, David; Johnson, Craig A.; Marsh, Erin; Salmi-Laouar, Sihem; Banks, David A.

    2016-01-01

    The Bou Jaber Ba-F-Pb-Zn deposit is located at the edge of the Bou Jaber Triassic salt diapir in the Tunisia Salt Diapir Province. The ores are unconformity and fault-controlled and occur as subvertical column-shaped bodies developed in dissolution-collapse breccias and in cavities within the Late Aptian platform carbonate rocks, which are covered unconformably by impermeable shales and marls of the Fahdene Formation (Late Albian–Cenomanian age). The host rock is hydrothermally altered to ankerite proximal to and within the ore bodies. Quartz, as fine-grained bipyramidal crystals, formed during hydrothermal alteration of the host rocks. The ore mineral assemblage is composed of barite, fluorite, sphalerite, and galena in decreasing abundance. The ore zones outline distinct depositional events: sphalerite-galena, barite-ankerite, and fluorite. Fluid inclusions, commonly oil-rich, have distinct fluid salinities and homogenization temperatures for each of these events: sphalerite-galena (17 to 24 wt% NaCl eq., and Th from 112 to 136 °C); ankerite-barite (11 to 17 wt% NaCl eq., and Th from 100 to 130 °C); fluorite (19 to 21 wt% NaCl eq., Th from 140 to 165 °C). The mean temperature of the ore fluids decreased from sphalerite (125 °C) to barite (115 °C) and increased during fluorite deposition (152 °C); then decreased to ∼110 °C during late calcite precipitation. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) analyses of fluid inclusions in fluorite are metal rich (hundreds to thousands ppm Pb, Zn, Cu, Fe) but the inclusions in barite are deficient in Pb, Zn, Cu, Fe. Inclusions in fluorite have Cl/Br and Na/Br ratios of several thousand, consistent with dissolution of halite while the inclusions analysed in barite have values lower than seawater which are indicative of a Br-enriched brine derived from evaporation plus a component of halite dissolution. The salinity of the barite-hosted fluid inclusions is less than obtained

  9. The facile and low temperature synthesis of nanophase hydroxyapatite crystals using wet chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhand, Vivek; Rhee, K.Y.; Park, Soo-Jin

    2014-01-01

    A simple and facile wet chemistry route was used to synthesize nanophase hydroxyapatite (HaP) crystals at low temperature. The synthesis was carried out at a pH of 11.0 and at a temperature of 37 °C. The resulting samples were washed several times and subjected to further analysis. XRD studies revealed that the HaP crystals were polycrystalline in nature with a crystallite size of ∼ 15–60 ± 5 nm. SEM-EDXA images confirmed the presence of calcium (Ca), phosphorous (P), and oxygen (O) peaks. Likewise, FTIR confirmed the presence of characteristic phosphate and hydroxyl peaks in samples. Lastly, HRTEM images clearly showed distinctive lattice fringes positioned in the 100 and 002 planes. TGA analysis shows that HaP crystals can withstand higher calcination temperatures and are thermally stable. - Highlights: • Facile and low temperature nanophase HaP crystals synthesized at pH 11 and 37 °C • Electron microscopy image of HaP shows characteristic rice grain like morphology. • FTIR results show the characteristic and fingerprint functional groups of HaP. • Thermal stability of HaP crystals up to 500 °C • Growth of Hap crystals occur parallel to c-axis and a possible mechanism proposed

  10. Evanescent Field Enhancement in Liquid Crystal Optical Fibers: A Field Characteristics Based Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. K. Choudhury

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the analysis of the electromagnetic wave propagation through liquid crystal optical fibers (LCOFs of two different types—conventional guides loaded with liquid crystals (addressed as LCOFs and those with additional twists due to conducting helical windings (addressed as HCLCOFs. More precisely, the three-layer optical waveguide structures are considered along with its outermost region being loaded with radially anisotropic liquid crystal material and the inner regions being made of usual silica, as used in conventional optical fibers. In addition to that, LCOF with twists introduced in the form of conducting helical windings at the interface of the silica core and the liquid crystal clad is also taken into account. Emphasis has been put on the power confinements by the lower-order TE modes sustained in the different sections of the LCOF structure. The results demonstrate useful applications of these guides in integrated optics as the power sustained in the liquid crystal section by the excited TE modes remains very high. In the case of twisted clad liquid crystal guides, descriptions are limited to the nature of dispersion relation only under the TE mode excitation, and corresponding to the cases of helix orientations being parallel and perpendicular to the optical axis.

  11. Systematic Modelling and Crystal Size Distribution Control for Batch Crystallization Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdul Samad, Noor Asma Fazli; Singh, Ravendra; Sin, Gürkan

    Crystallization processes form an important class of separation methods that are frequently used in the chemical, the pharmaceutical and the food industry. The specifications of the crystal product are usually given in terms of crystal size, shape and purity. In order to predict the desired cryst...

  12. Automation in biological crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Patrick Shaw; Mueller-Dieckmann, Jochen

    2014-06-01

    Crystallization remains the bottleneck in the crystallographic process leading from a gene to a three-dimensional model of the encoded protein or RNA. Automation of the individual steps of a crystallization experiment, from the preparation of crystallization cocktails for initial or optimization screens to the imaging of the experiments, has been the response to address this issue. Today, large high-throughput crystallization facilities, many of them open to the general user community, are capable of setting up thousands of crystallization trials per day. It is thus possible to test multiple constructs of each target for their ability to form crystals on a production-line basis. This has improved success rates and made crystallization much more convenient. High-throughput crystallization, however, cannot relieve users of the task of producing samples of high quality. Moreover, the time gained from eliminating manual preparations must now be invested in the careful evaluation of the increased number of experiments. The latter requires a sophisticated data and laboratory information-management system. A review of the current state of automation at the individual steps of crystallization with specific attention to the automation of optimization is given.

  13. Pressure cryocooling protein crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chae Un [Ithaca, NY; Gruner, Sol M [Ithaca, NY

    2011-10-04

    Preparation of cryocooled protein crystal is provided by use of helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal allowing collection of high resolution data and by heavier noble gas (krypton or xenon) binding followed by helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal for collection of high resolution data and SAD phasing simultaneously. The helium pressurizing is carried out on crystal coated to prevent dehydration or on crystal grown in aqueous solution in a capillary.

  14. Bioinspired co-crystals of Imatinib providing enhanced kinetic solubility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reggane, Maude; Wiest, Johannes; Saedtler, Marco; Harlacher, Cornelius; Gutmann, Marcus; Zottnick, Sven H; Piechon, Philippe; Dix, Ina; Müller-Buschbaum, Klaus; Holzgrabe, Ulrike; Meinel, Lorenz; Galli, Bruno

    2018-05-04

    Realizing the full potential of co-crystals enhanced kinetic solubility demands a comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms of dissolution, phase conversion, nucleation and crystal growth, and of the complex interplay between the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), the coformer and co-existing forms in aqueous media. One blueprint provided by nature to keep poorly water-soluble bases in solution is the complexation with phenolic acids. Consequently, we followed a bioinspired strategy for the engineering of co-crystals of a poorly water-soluble molecule - Imatinib - with a phenolic acid, syringic acid (SYA). The dynamics of dissolution and solution-mediated phase transformations were monitored by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, providing mechanistic insights into the 60 fold-increased long lasting concentrations achieved by the syringate co-crystals as compared to Imatinib base and Imatinib mesylate. This lasting effect was linked to SYA's ability to delay the formation and nucleation of Imatinib hydrate - the thermodynamically stable form in aqueous media - through a metastable association of SYA with Imatinib in solution. Results from permeability studies evidenced that SYA did not impact Imatinib's permeability across membranes while suggesting improved bioavailability through higher kinetic solubility at the biological barriers. These results reflect that some degree of hydrophobicity of the coformer might be key to extend the kinetic solubility of co-crystals with hydrophobic APIs. Understanding how kinetic supersaturation can be shaped by the selection of an interactive coformer may help achieving the needed performance of new forms of poorly water-soluble, slowly dissolving APIs. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Crystal Compton Camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziock, Klaus-Peter [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Braverman, Joshua B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Harrison, Mark J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hornback, Donald Eric [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Fabris, Lorenzo [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Newby, Jason [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2013-09-26

    Stand-off detection is one of the most important radiation detection capabilities for arms control and the control of illicit nuclear materials. For long range passive detection one requires a large detector and a means of “seeing through” the naturally occurring and varying background radiation, i.e. imaging. Arguably, Compton imaging is the best approach over much of the emission band suitable for long range detection. It provides not only imaging, but more information about the direction of incidence of each detected gamma-ray than the alternate approach of coded-aperture imaging. The directional information allows one to reduce the background and hence improve the sensitivity of a measurement. However, to make an efficient Compton imager requires localizing and measuring the simultaneous energy depositions when gamma-rays Compton scatter and are subsequently captured within a single, large detector volume. This concept has been demonstrated in semi-conductor detectors (HPGe, CZT, Si) but at ~ $1k/cm3 these materials are too expensive to build the large systems needed for standoff detection. Scintillator detectors, such as NaI(Tl), are two orders of magnitude less expensive and possess the energy resolution required to make such an imager. However, they do not currently have the ability to localize closely spaced, simultaneous energy depositions in a single large crystal. In this project we are applying a new technique that should, for the first time ever, allow cubic-millimeter event localization in a bulk scintillator crystal.

  16. Crystallization In Multicomponent Glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, A.A.; Hrma, P.R.

    2009-01-01

    In glass processing situations involving glass crystallization, various crystalline forms nucleate, grow, and dissolve, typically in a nonuniform temperature field of molten glass subjected to convection. Nuclear waste glasses are remarkable examples of multicomponent vitrified mixtures involving partial crystallization. In the glass melter, crystals form and dissolve during batch-to-glass conversion, melter processing, and product cooling. Crystals often agglomerate and sink, and they may settle at the melter bottom. Within the body of cooling glass, multiple phases crystallize in a non-uniform time-dependent temperature field. Self-organizing periodic distribution (the Liesegnang effect) is common. Various crystallization phenomena that occur in glass making are reviewed.

  17. CRYSTALLIZATION IN MULTICOMPONENT GLASSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KRUGER AA; HRMA PR

    2009-10-08

    In glass processing situations involving glass crystallization, various crystalline forms nucleate, grow, and dissolve, typically in a nonuniform temperature field of molten glass subjected to convection. Nuclear waste glasses are remarkable examples of multicomponent vitrified mixtures involving partial crystallization. In the glass melter, crystals form and dissolve during batch-to-glass conversion, melter processing, and product cooling. Crystals often agglomerate and sink, and they may settle at the melter bottom. Within the body of cooling glass, multiple phases crystallize in a non-uniform time-dependent temperature field. Self-organizing periodic distribution (the Liesegnang effect) is common. Various crystallization phenomena that occur in glass making are reviewed.

  18. Investigation of lactose crystallization process during condensed milk cooling using native vacuum-crystallizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Dobriyan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most general defects of condensed milk with sugar is its consistency heterogeneity – “candying”. The mentioned defect is conditioned by the presence of lactose big crystals in the product. Lactose crystals size up to 10 µm is not organoleptically felt. The bigger crystals impart heterogeneity to the consistency which can be evaluated as “floury”, “sandy”, “crunch on tooth”. Big crystals form crystalline deposit on the can or industrial package bottom in the form of thick layer. Industrial processing of the product with the defective process of crystallization results in the expensive equipment damage of the equipment at the confectionary plant accompanied with heavy losses. One of the factors influencing significantly lactose crystallization is the product cooling rate. Vacuum cooling is the necessary condition for provision of the product consistency homogeneity. For this purpose the vacuum crystallizers of “Vigand” company, Germany, are used. But their production in the last years has been stopped. All-Russian dairy research institute has developed “The references for development of the native vacuum crystallizer” according to which the industrial model has been manufactured. The produced vacuum – crystallizer test on the line for condensed milk with sugar production showed that the product cooling on the native vacuum-crystallizer guarantees production of the finished product with microstructure meeting the requirements of State standard 53436–2009 “Canned Milk. Milk and condensed cream with sugar”. The carried out investigations evidences that the average lactose crystals size in the condensed milk with sugar cooled at the native crystallizer makes up 6,78 µm. The granulometric composition of the product crystalline phase cooled at the newly developed vacuum-crystallizer is completely identical to granulometric composition of the product cooled at “Vigand” vacuum-crystallizer.

  19. Synthesis of NaCl Single Crystals with Defined Morphologies as Templates for Fabricating Hollow Nano/micro-structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, B.B.; Jin, P.; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2015-01-01

    . These naturally abundant NaCl single crystal templates are water-soluble, environmentally-friendly and uniform in both geometry and size, and hence are ideal for preparing high quality hollow nano/micro structures. The new approach may have the potential to replace the conventional hard or soft template...... approaches. Furthermore, this work has revealed the formation mechanism of nano/micron NaCl crystals with different sizes and geometries....

  20. High-quality bulk hybrid perovskite single crystals within minutes by inverse temperature crystallization

    KAUST Repository

    Saidaminov, Makhsud I.

    2015-07-06

    Single crystals of methylammonium lead trihalide perovskites (MAPbX3; MA=CH3NH3+, X=Br− or I−) have shown remarkably low trap density and charge transport properties; however, growth of such high-quality semiconductors is a time-consuming process. Here we present a rapid crystal growth process to obtain MAPbX3 single crystals, an order of magnitude faster than previous reports. The process is based on our observation of the substantial decrease of MAPbX3 solubility, in certain solvents, at elevated temperatures. The crystals can be both size- and shape-controlled by manipulating the different crystallization parameters. Despite the rapidity of the method, the grown crystals exhibit transport properties and trap densities comparable to the highest quality MAPbX3 reported to date. The phenomenon of inverse or retrograde solubility and its correlated inverse temperature crystallization strategy present a major step forward for advancing the field on perovskite crystallization.

  1. Forced and thermocapillary convection in silicon Czochralski crystal growth in semispherical crucible

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokhtari, F; Bouabdallah, A; Zizi, M; Hanchi, S; Alemany, A

    2010-01-01

    In order to understand the influence of a semispherical crucible geometry combined with different convection modes as a thermocapillary convection, natural convection and forced convection, induced by crystal rotation, on melt flow pattern in silicon Czochralski crystal growth process, a set of numerical simulations are conducted using Fluent Software. We solve the system of equations of heat and momentum transfer in classical geometry as cylindrical and modified crystal growth process geometry as cylindro-spherical. In addition, we adopt hypothesis adapted to boundary conditions near the interface and calculations are executed to determine temperature, pressure and velocity fields versus Grashof and Reynolds numbers. The analysis of the obtained results led to conclude that there is advantage to modify geometry in comparison with the traditional one. The absence of the stagnation regions of fluid in the hemispherical crucible corner and the possibility to control the melt flow using the crystal rotation enhances the quality of the process comparatively to the cylindrical one. The pressure field is strongly related to the swirl velocity.

  2. Forced and thermocapillary convection in silicon Czochralski crystal growth in semispherical crucible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokhtari, F [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, University of Mouloud Mammeri, Tizi Ouzou (Algeria); Bouabdallah, A; Zizi, M [LTSE Laboratory, University of Science and Technology USTHB. BP 32 Elalia, Babezzouar, Algiers (Algeria); Hanchi, S [UER Mecanique/ E.M.P B.P 17, Bordj El Bahri, Algiers (Algeria); Alemany, A, E-mail: abouab2002@yahoo.f [Laboratoire EPM, CNRS, Grenoble (France)

    2010-03-01

    In order to understand the influence of a semispherical crucible geometry combined with different convection modes as a thermocapillary convection, natural convection and forced convection, induced by crystal rotation, on melt flow pattern in silicon Czochralski crystal growth process, a set of numerical simulations are conducted using Fluent Software. We solve the system of equations of heat and momentum transfer in classical geometry as cylindrical and modified crystal growth process geometry as cylindro-spherical. In addition, we adopt hypothesis adapted to boundary conditions near the interface and calculations are executed to determine temperature, pressure and velocity fields versus Grashof and Reynolds numbers. The analysis of the obtained results led to conclude that there is advantage to modify geometry in comparison with the traditional one. The absence of the stagnation regions of fluid in the hemispherical crucible corner and the possibility to control the melt flow using the crystal rotation enhances the quality of the process comparatively to the cylindrical one. The pressure field is strongly related to the swirl velocity.

  3. Capillary crystallization and molecular-replacement solution of haemoglobin II from the clam Lucina pectinata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavira, José A.; Jesus, Walleska de; Camara-Artigas, Ana; López-Garriga, Juan; García-Ruiz, Juan M.

    2006-01-01

    The haemoglobin II from the clam L. pectinata has been crystallized using counter-diffusion in single capillary in the presence of agarose to improve crystal quality. Initial phases have been obtained by molecular replacement. Haemoglobin II is one of three haemoglobins present in the cytoplasm of the Lucina pectinata mollusc that inhabits the Caribbean coast. Using HBII purified from its natural source, crystallization screening was performed using the counter-diffusion method with capillaries of 0.2 mm inner diameter. Crystals of HbII suitable for data collection and structure determination were grown in the presence of agarose at 0.1%(w/v) in order to improve their quality. The crystals belong to the tetragonal space group P4 2 2 1 2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 73.92, c = 152.35 Å, and diffracted X-rays to a resolution of better than 2.0 Å. The asymmetric unit is a homodimer with a corresponding Matthews coefficient (V M ) of 3.15 Å 3 Da −1 and a solvent content of 61% by volume

  4. Photonic crystal light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, James G [Albuquerque, NM; Lin, Shawn-Yu [Albuquerque, NM; Bur, James A [Corrales, NM

    2004-07-27

    A light source is provided by a photonic crystal having an enhanced photonic density-of-states over a band of frequencies and wherein at least one of the dielectric materials of the photonic crystal has a complex dielectric constant, thereby producing enhanced light emission at the band of frequencies when the photonic crystal is heated. The dielectric material can be a metal, such as tungsten. The spectral properties of the light source can be easily tuned by modification of the photonic crystal structure and materials. The photonic crystal light source can be heated electrically or other heating means. The light source can further include additional photonic crystals that exhibit enhanced light emission at a different band of frequencies to provide for color mixing. The photonic crystal light source may have applications in optical telecommunications, information displays, energy conversion, sensors, and other optical applications.

  5. Investigation on nonlinear optical and dielectric properties of L-arginine doped ZTC crystal to explore photonic device applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anis Mohd

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study is focused to explore the photonic device applications of L-arginine doped ZTC (LA-ZTC crystals using nonlinear optical (NLO and dielectric studies. The LA-ZTC crystals have been grown by slow evaporation solution technique. The chemical composition and surface of LA-ZTC crystal have been analyzed by means of energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS and surface scanning electron microscopy (SEM techniques. The Vicker’s microhardness study has been carried out to determine the hardness, work hardening index, yield strength and elastic stiffness of LA-ZTC crystal. The enhanced SHG efficiency of LA-ZTC crystal has been ascertained using the Kurtz-Perry powder SHG test. The closed-and-open aperture Z-scan technique has been employed to confirm the third order nonlinear optical nature of LA-ZTC crystal. The Z-scan transmittance data has been utilized to calculate the superior cubic susceptibility, nonlinear refractive index, nonlinear absorption coefficient and figure of merit of LA-ZTC crystal. The behavior of dielectric constant and dielectric loss of LA-ZTC crystal at different temperatures has been investigated using the dielectric analysis.

  6. Cloning, purification and crystallization of Thermus thermophilus proline dehydrogenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Tommi A.; Tanner, John J., E-mail: tannerjj@missouri.edu [Departments of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, Missouri 65211 (United States)

    2005-08-01

    Cloning, purification and crystallization of T. thermophilus proline dehydrogenase is reported. The detergent n-octyl β-d-glucopyranoside was used to reduce polydispersity, which enabled crystallization. Nature recycles l-proline by converting it to l-glutamate. This four-electron oxidation process is catalyzed by the two enzymes: proline dehydrogenase (PRODH) and Δ{sup 1}-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase. This note reports the cloning, purification and crystallization of Thermus thermophilus PRODH, which is the prototype of a newly discovered superfamily of bacterial monofunctional PRODHs. The results presented here include production of a monodisperse protein solution through use of the detergent n-octyl β-d-glucopyranoside and the growth of native crystals that diffracted to 2.3 Å resolution at Advanced Light Source beamline 4.2.2. The space group is P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 82.2, b = 89.6, c = 94.3 Å. The asymmetric unit is predicted to contain two protein molecules and 46% solvent. Molecular-replacement trials using a fragment of the PRODH domain of the multifunctional Escherichia coli PutA protein as the search model (24% amino-acid sequence identity) did not produce a satisfactory solution. Therefore, the structure of T. thermophilus PRODH will be determined by multiwavelength anomalous dispersion phasing using a selenomethionyl derivative.

  7. single crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2018-05-18

    May 18, 2018 ... Abstract. 4-Nitrobenzoic acid (4-NBA) single crystals were studied for their linear and nonlinear optical ... studies on the proper growth, linear and nonlinear optical ..... between the optic axes and optic sign of the biaxial crystal.

  8. Macromolecular crystallization in microgravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snell, Edward H; Helliwell, John R

    2005-01-01

    Density difference fluid flows and sedimentation of growing crystals are greatly reduced when crystallization takes place in a reduced gravity environment. In the case of macromolecular crystallography a crystal of a biological macromolecule is used for diffraction experiments (x-ray or neutron) so as to determine the three-dimensional structure of the macromolecule. The better the internal order of the crystal then the greater the molecular structure detail that can be extracted. It is this structural information that enables an understanding of how the molecule functions. This knowledge is changing the biological and chemical sciences, with major potential in understanding disease pathologies. In this review, we examine the use of microgravity as an environment to grow macromolecular crystals. We describe the crystallization procedures used on the ground, how the resulting crystals are studied and the knowledge obtained from those crystals. We address the features desired in an ordered crystal and the techniques used to evaluate those features in detail. We then introduce the microgravity environment, the techniques to access that environment and the theory and evidence behind the use of microgravity for crystallization experiments. We describe how ground-based laboratory techniques have been adapted to microgravity flights and look at some of the methods used to analyse the resulting data. Several case studies illustrate the physical crystal quality improvements and the macromolecular structural advances. Finally, limitations and alternatives to microgravity and future directions for this research are covered. Macromolecular structural crystallography in general is a remarkable field where physics, biology, chemistry and mathematics meet to enable insight to the fundamentals of life. As the reader will see, there is a great deal of physics involved when the microgravity environment is applied to crystallization, some of it known, and undoubtedly much yet to

  9. Defect-induced local variation of crystal phase transition temperature in metal-halide perovskites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrovolsky, Alexander; Merdasa, Aboma; Unger, Eva L; Yartsev, Arkady; Scheblykin, Ivan G

    2017-06-26

    Solution-processed organometal halide perovskites are hybrid crystalline semiconductors highly interesting for low-cost and efficient optoelectronics. Their properties are dependent on the crystal structure. Literature shows a variety of crystal phase transition temperatures and often a spread of the transition over tens of degrees Kelvin. We explain this inconsistency by demonstrating that the temperature of the tetragonal-to-orthorhombic phase transition in methylammonium lead triiodide depends on the concentration and nature of local defects. Phase transition in individual nanowires was studied by photoluminescence microspectroscopy and super-resolution imaging. We propose that upon cooling from 160 to 140 K, domains of the crystal containing fewer defects stay in the tetragonal phase longer than highly defected domains that readily transform to the high bandgap orthorhombic phase at higher temperatures. The existence of relatively pure tetragonal domains during the phase transition leads to drastic photoluminescence enhancement, which is inhomogeneously distributed across perovskite microcrystals.Understanding crystal phase transition in materials is of fundamental importance. Using luminescence spectroscopy and super-resolution imaging, Dobrovolsky et al. study the transition from the tetragonal to orthorhombic crystal phase in methylammonium lead triiodide nanowires at low temperature.

  10. Crystal plasticity study of single crystal tungsten by indentation tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Weizhi

    2012-01-01

    Owing to its favorable material properties, tungsten (W) has been studied as a plasma-facing material in fusion reactors. Experiments on W heating in plasma sources and electron beam facilities have shown an intense micro-crack formation at the heated surface and sub-surface. The cracks go deep inside the irradiated sample, and often large distorted areas caused by local plastic deformation are present around the cracks. To interpret the crack-induced microscopic damage evolution process in W, one needs firstly to understand its plasticity on a single grain level, which is referred to as crystal plasticity. In this thesis, the crystal plasticity of single crystal tungsten (SCW) has been studied by spherical and Berkovich indentation tests and the finite element method with a crystal plasticity model. Appropriate values of the material parameters included in the crystal plasticity model are determined by fitting measured load-displacement curves and pile-up profiles with simulated counterparts for spherical indentation. The numerical simulations reveal excellent agreement with experiment. While the load-displacement curves and the deduced indentation hardness exhibit little sensitivity to the indented plane at small indentation depths, the orientation of slip directions within the crystals governs the development of deformation hillocks at the surface. It is found that several factors like friction, indentation depth, active slip systems, misoriented crystal orientation, misoriented sample surface and azimuthal orientation of the indenter can affect the indentation behavior of SCW. The Berkovich indentation test was also used to study the crystal plasticity of SCW after deuterium irradiation. The critical load (pop-in load) for triggering plastic deformation under the indenter is found to depend on the crystallographic orientation. The pop-in loads decrease dramatically after deuterium plasma irradiation for all three investigated crystallographic planes.

  11. Phase-field crystal simulation facet and branch crystal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhi; Wang, Zhaoyang; Gu, Xinrui; Chen, Yufei; Hao, Limei; de Wit, Jos; Jin, Kexin

    2018-05-01

    Phase-field crystal model with one mode is introduced to describe morphological transition. The relationship between growth morphology and smooth density distribution was investigated. The results indicate that the pattern selection of dendrite growth is caused by the competition between interface energy anisotropy and interface kinetic anisotropy based on the 2D phase diagram. When the calculation time increases, the crystal grows to secondary dendrite at the dimensionless undercooling equal to - 0.4. Moreover, when noise is introduced in the growth progress, the symmetry is broken in the growth mode, and there becomes irregular fractal-like growth morphology. Furthermore, the single crystal shape develops into polycrystalline when the noise amplitude is large enough. When the dimensionless undercooling is less than - 0.3, the noise has a significant effect on the growth shape. In addition, the growth velocity of crystal near to liquid phase line is slow, while the shape far away from the liquid adapts to fast growth. Based on the simulation results, the method was proved to be effective, and it can easily obtain different crystal shapes by choosing the different points in 2D phase diagram.

  12. Implication of Crystal Water Molecules in Inhibitor Binding at ALR2 Active Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hymavati

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Water molecules play a crucial role in mediating the interaction between a ligand and a macromolecule. The solvent environment around such biomolecule controls their structure and plays important role in protein-ligand interactions. An understanding of the nature and role of these water molecules in the active site of a protein could greatly increase the efficiency of rational drug design approaches. We have performed the comparative crystal structure analysis of aldose reductase to understand the role of crystal water in protein-ligand interaction. Molecular dynamics simulation has shown the versatile nature of water molecules in bridge H bonding during interaction. Occupancy and life time of water molecules depend on the type of cocrystallized ligand present in the structure. The information may be useful in rational approach to customize the ligand, and thereby longer occupancy and life time for bridge H-bonding.

  13. Changes in copper sulfate crystal habit during cooling crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giulietti, M.; Seckler, M. M.; Derenzo, S.; Valarelli, J. V.

    1996-09-01

    The morphology of technical grade copper(II) sulfate pentahydrate crystals produced from batch cooling experiments in the temperature range of 70 to 30°C is described and correlated with the process conditions. A slow linear cooling rate (batch time of 90 min) predominantly caused the appearance of well-formed crystals. Exponential cooling (120 min) resulted in the additional formation of agglomerates and twins. The presence of seeds for both cooling modes led to round crystals, agglomerates and twins. Fast linear cooling (15 min) gave rise to a mixture of the former types. Broken crystals and adhering fragments were often found. Growth zoning was pronounced in seeded and linear cooling experiments. Fluid inclusions were always found and were more pronounced for larger particles. The occurrence of twinning, zoning and fluid inclusions was qualitatively explained in terms of fundamental principles.

  14. Crystals in light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahr, Bart; Freudenthal, John; Gunn, Erica

    2010-05-18

    We have made images of crystals illuminated with polarized light for almost two decades. Early on, we abandoned photosensitive chemicals in favor of digital electrophotometry with all of the attendant advantages of quantitative intensity data. Accurate intensities are a boon because they can be used to analytically discriminate small effects in the presence of larger ones. The change in the form of our data followed camera technology that transformed picture taking the world over. Ironically, exposures in early photographs were presumed to correlate simply with light intensity, raising the hope that photography would replace sensorial interpretation with mechanical objectivity and supplant the art of visual photometry. This was only true in part. Quantitative imaging accurate enough to render the separation of crystalloptical quantities had to await the invention of the solid-state camera. Many pioneers in crystal optics were also major figures in the early history of photography. We draw out the union of optical crystallography and photography because the tree that connects the inventors of photography is a structure unmatched for organizing our work during the past 20 years, not to mention that silver halide crystallites used in chemical photography are among the most consequential "crystals in light", underscoring our title. We emphasize crystals that have acquired optical properties such as linear birefringence, linear dichroism, circular birefringence, and circular dichroism, during growth from solution. Other crystalloptical effects were discovered that are unique to curiously dissymmetric crystals containing embedded oscillators. In the aggregate, dyed crystals constitute a generalization of single crystal matrix isolation. Simple crystals provided kinetic stability to include guests such as proteins or molecules in excited states. Molecular lifetimes were extended for the preparation of laser gain media and for the study of the photodynamics of single

  15. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray characterization of the eukaryotic replication terminator Reb1-Ter DNA complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Rahul; Singh, Samarendra K; Bastia, Deepak; Escalante, Carlos R

    2015-04-01

    The Reb1 protein from Schizosaccharomyces pombe is a member of a family of proteins that control programmed replication termination and/or transcription termination in eukaryotic cells. These events occur at naturally occurring replication fork barriers (RFBs), where Reb1 binds to termination (Ter) DNA sites and coordinates the polar arrest of replication forks and transcription approaching in opposite directions. The Reb1 DNA-binding and replication-termination domain was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized in complex with a 26-mer DNA Ter site. Batch crystallization under oil was required to produce crystals of good quality for data collection. Crystals grew in space group P2₁, with unit-cell parameters a = 68.9, b = 162.9, c = 71.1 Å, β = 94.7°. The crystals diffracted to a resolution of 3.0 Å. The crystals were mosaic and required two or three cycles of annealing. This study is the first to yield structural information about this important family of proteins and will provide insights into the mechanism of replication and transcription termination.

  16. The Use Of Scanning Probe Microscopy To Investigate Crystal-Fluid Interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orme, C A; Giocondi, J L

    2007-01-01

    Over the past decade there has been a natural drive to extend the investigation of dynamic surfaces in fluid environments to higher resolution characterization tools. Various aspects of solution crystal growth have been directly visualized for the first time. These include island nucleation and growth using transmission electron microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy; elemental step motion using scanning probe microscopy; and the time evolution of interfacial atomic structure using various diffraction techniques. In this lecture we will discuss the use of one such in situ method, scanning probe microscopy, as a means of measuring surface dynamics during crystal growth and dissolution. We will cover both practical aspects of imaging such as environmental control, fluid flow, and electrochemical manipulation, as well as the types of physical measurements that can be made. Measurements such as step motion, critical lengths, nucleation density, and step fluctuations, will be put in context of the information they provide about mechanistic processes at surfaces using examples from metal and mineral crystal growth

  17. Custom synthesized diamond crystals as state of the art radiation dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keddy, R.J.; Nam, T.L.; Fallon, P.J.

    1991-01-01

    The fact that as a radiation detector, diamond is a stable, non-toxic and tissue equivalent (Z = 6) material makes it an ideal candidate for in vivo radiation dosimetry or the dosimetry of general radiation fields in environmental monitoring. Natural diamond crystals, however, have the disadvantage that no two crystals can be guaranteed to have the same response characteristics. This disadvantage can be overcome by synthesizing the crystals under controlled conditions and by using very selective chemistry. Such synthetic diamonds can be used as thermoluminescence dosimeters where they exhibit characteristics comparable to presently available commercial TLD's or they can be used as ionization chambers to produce either ionization currents or pulses where the small physical size of the diamond (1 mm 3 ) and possibilities of digital circuitry makes miniaturization an extremely attractive possibility. It has also been found that they can perform as scintillation detectors. Aspects of the performance characteristics of such diamonds in all three modes are described

  18. Custom synthesized diamond crystals as state of the art radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keddy, R.J.; Nam, T.L.; Fallon, P.J.

    1990-01-01

    The fact that as a radiation detector, diamond is a stable, non-toxic and tissue equivalent (Z=6) material, makes it an ideal candidate for in vivo radiation dosimetry or the dosimetry of general radiation fields in environmental monitoring. Natural diamond crystals have the disadvantage, however, that no two crystals can be guaranteed to have the same response characteristics. This disadvantage can be overcome by synthesizing the crystals under controlled conditions and by using very selective chemistry. Such synthetic diamonds can be used as thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs) where they exhibit characteristics comparable to presently available commercial TLDs or they can be used as ionization chambers to produce either ionization currents or pulses where the small physical size of the diamond (1 mm 3 ) and possibilities of digital circuitry makes miniaturization an extremely attractive possibility. It has also been found that they can perform as scintillation detectors. This contribution describes aspects of the performance characteristics of such diamonds in all three modes. 24 refs., 14 figs

  19. Redistribution of erbium during the crystallization of buried amorphous silicon layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleksandrov, O.V.; Nikolaev, Yu.A.; Sobolev, N.A.; Sakharov, V.I.; Serenkov, I.T.; Kudryavtsev, Yu.A.

    1999-01-01

    The redistribution of Er during its implantation in silicon at doses close to the amorphization threshold and its subsequent solid-phase epitaxial (SPE) crystallization is investigated. The formation of a buried amorphous (a) layer is discovered at Er doses equal to 5x10 13 and 1x10 14 cm -2 using Rutherford backscattering. The segregation of Er in this case takes place inwardly from the two directions corresponding to the upper and lower boundaries of the buried αlayer and leads to the formation of a concentration peak at the meeting place of the two crystallization fronts. A method for calculating the coordinate dependence of the segregation coefficient k from the distribution profiles of the erbium impurity before and after annealing is proposed. The k(x) curve exhibits a drop, whose width increases with decreasing Er implantation dose. Its appearance is attributed to the nonequilibrium nature of the segregation process at the beginning of SPE crystallization

  20. Towards true 3D textural analysis; using your crystal mush wisely.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerram, D. A.; Morgan, D. J.; Pankhurst, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    The crystal cargo that is found in volcanic and plutonic rocks contains a wealth of information about magmatic mush processes, crystallisation history, crystal entrainment and recycling. Phenocryst populations predominantly record episodes of growth/nucleation and bulk geochemical changes within an evolving crystal-melt body. Ante- and xeno-crysts provide useful clues to the nature of mush interaction with wall rock and with principal magma(s). Furthermore, crystal evolutions (core to rim) record pathways through pressure, temperature and compositional space. These can often illustrate complex recycling within systems, describing the plumbing architecture. Understanding this architecture underpins our knowledge of how igneous systems can interact with the crust, grow, freeze, re-mobilise and prime for eruption. Initially, 2D studies produced corrected 3D crystal size distributions to help provide information about nucleation and residence times. It immediately became clear that crystal shape is an important factor in determining the confidence placed upon 3D reconstructions of 2D data. Additionally studies utilised serial sections of medium- to coarse-grain-size populations which allowed 3D reconstruction using modelling software to be improved, since size and shape etc. can be directly constrained. Finally the advent of textural studies using X-ray tomography has revolutionised the way in which we can inspect the crystal cargo in mushy systems, allowing us to image in great detail crystal packing arrangements, 3D CSDs, shapes and orientations etc. The latest most innovative studies use X-ray micro-computed tomography to rapidly characterise chemical populations within the crystal cargo, adding a further dimension to this approach, and implies the ability to untangle magmatic chemical components to better understand their individual and combined evolution. In this contribution key examples of the different types of textural analysis techniques in 2D and 3D