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Sample records for natural fluoride concentrations

  1. The prevalence of fluorosis in children is associated with naturally occurring water fluoride concentration in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariño, Rodrigo

    2013-09-01

    Fluorosis and dental caries in Mexican schoolchildren residing in areas with different water fluoride concentrations and receiving fluoridated salt. Garcia-Perez A, Irigoyen-Carnacho ME, Borges-Yanez A. Caries Res 2013;47(4):299-308. Rodrigo Mariño Is there an association between the presence of dental fluorosis and fluoride concentration in drinking water? and Is there an association between the severity of fluorosis and dental caries experience in schoolchildren residing in two rural towns in Mexico (with water fluoride concentrations of 0.70 and 1.50 ppm) that also receive fluoridated salt? Government: National Council of Science and Technology (Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnologia, CONACYT) Other: Autonomous University, Xochimilco (Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, UAM-X) TYPE OF STUDY/DESIGN: Cross-sectional Level 3: Other evidence Not applicable. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Fluoride Concentration of Drinking-Water of Qom, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Reza Yari

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Fluoride is a natural element essential for human nutrition due to its benefits for dental enamel. It is well-documented that standard amounts of fluoride in drinkingwater can decrease the rate of dental caries. This study was conducted with the aim of measuring fluoride concentration of drinking-water supplies and urban distribution system in Qom, Iran. Materials and Methods: Results were subsequently compared against national and international standards. All sources of drinking-water of rural and urban areas were examined. To measure fluoride, the standard SPADNS method and a DR/4000s spectrophotometer were used. Results: Results showed that the mean of fluoride concentration in rural areas, mainly supplied with groundwater sources, was 0.41 mg/L, that of the urban distribution system 0.82 mg/L, that of Ali-Abad station 0.11 mg/L, and that of the private water desalination system 0.24 mg/L. Due to the hot climate of Qom, fluoride concentration means of all sources were lower than the permissible standards set by Iranian Standards and the WHO guidelines (except those of some of the groundwater sources and urban distribution systems. Conclusion: It seems that in most of the drinking-water sources the average fluoride concentration is not enough to prevent dental caries or strengthen dental enamel. It is concluded that Qom’s drinkingwater would require at least 0.4 mg/L to reach the minimum desirable standard.

  3. Adsorption of fluoride ions onto naturally occurring earth materials ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Batch sorption system using two naturally occurring earth materials (EM) as adsorbents was investigated to remove fluoride ions from aqueous solution. The system variables studied include initial concentration of the sorbate, agitation time, adsorbent dose, pH, co-ions and temperature. The experimental data fitted well to ...

  4. Effects of different amine fluoride concentrations on enamel remineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumova, E A; Niemann, N; Aretz, L; Arnold, W H

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of decreasing fluoride concentrations on repeated demineralizing challenges on human enamel. In 24 teeth, 3mm×3mm windows were prepared on the buccal and lingual sides and treated in a cycling demineralization-remineralization model. Remineralization was achieved with 100, 10 and 0.1 ppm fluoride from anime fluoride. Coronal sections were cut through the artificial lesions, and three sections per tooth were investigated using polarized light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy with quantitative element analysis. The morphology of the lesions was studied, and the extensions of the superficial layer and the body of the lesion were measured. Using element analysis, the Ca, P and F content were determined. The body of the lesion appeared remineralized after application of 100 ppm fluoride, while remineralization of the lesion was less successful after application of 10 and 0.1 ppm fluoride. The thickness of the superficial layer increased with decreasing fluoride concentrations, and also the extension of the body of the lesion increased. Ca and P content increased with increasing fluoride concentrations. The effectiveness of fluoride in enamel remineralization increased with increasing fluoride concentration. A consistently higher level of fluoride in saliva should be a goal in caries prevention. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Influence of the method of fluoride administration on toxicity and fluoride concentrations in Japanese quail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, W.J.; Schuler, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    Young Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) were administered NaF for 16 d either in their diet or by esophageal intubation. Based on the total fluoride ion (Emg F-) intake over the l6-d experimental period, fluoride administered by intubation was at least six times more toxic than that fed in the diet. Dietary concentrations of 1,000 ppm F- (Emg F- for 16 d = approx. 144) produced no mortality, whereas intubated doses produced 73% or greater mortality in all groups administered 54 mg F- /kg/d or more (Emg F- for 16 d _ approx. 23 mg). GraphIc companson of the regression of log F- ppm in femurs/mg F- intake showed that fluoride levels in the femurs of quail administered fluoride by intubation were higher than in those administered fluoride in the diet.

  6. Fluoride removal studies in water using natural materials : technical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Excess fluoride in water causes health hazards to the natural environment. The removal of fluoride was attempted using natural materials such as red soil, charcoal, brick, fly-ash and serpentine. Each material was set up in a column for a known volume and the defluoridation capacities of these materials were studied with ...

  7. Fluoride concentration in urine after silver diamine fluoride application on tooth enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, D. L.; Bahar, A.; Gunawan, H. A.; Adiatman, M.; Rahardjo, A.; Maharani, D. A.; Toptanci, I. R.; Yavuz, I.

    2017-08-01

    Silver Diammine Fluoride (SDF), which contains fluoride, is known to inhibit tooth enamel demineralization and increase fluoride concentrations in saliva and urine. The aim of this study is to analyze the fluoride concentration in urine after application of SDF on tooth enamel. Urine from four subjects was collected prior to, 30 minutes after, and two and three hours after the application of SDF, and an ion-selective electrode was used to measure the fluoride concentrations. There was no significant difference between time 1 and time 2, time 1 and time 3, time 1 and time 4, time 2 and 3 (p > 0.05), and there was a significant difference between time 2 and time 4 as well as time 3 and time 4 (p < 0.05). There was a decrease in the concentration of fluoride ions in urine from the baseline to 30 minutes after application, and an increase from baseline to two and three hours after the application of SDF.

  8. Evaluation of the precision in fluoride determination in uranium concentrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmieri, Helena E. Leonhardt; Rocha, Zildete; Mata, Maria Olivia Cintra

    1995-01-01

    The fluoride in uranium concentrate is previously separated by steam distillation and then determined by direct potentiometric with an ion-select electrode. The potential of all ion-specific electrodes is a logarithmic function of the concentration of the ion to which the electrode in question responds. This relationship is expressed by the Nernst equation. A calibration curve, potential (mV) versus standard fluoride concentration is established and then the sample concentration is determined by interpolation. A least squares curve-fitting procedure has been used to determine the parameters of this calibration curve equation. Using these parameters are determined the standard deviation, the confidence limits and the precision of the fluoride concentrations. (author). 3 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  9. Preparation of rare earth fluorides from apatite concentrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulyarchuk, I.F.; Voloshchenko, M.V.; Zen'kovich, E.G.; Sumenkova, V.V.; AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev. Inst. Problem Lit'ya)

    1980-01-01

    The processes of preparation of the rare earths element sum from apatite concentrate of the Khibins, connected with preliminary extraction of rare earth phosphates from nitric acid extract using solvent extraction or direct precipitation from the extract by solution of potassium and ammonium fluorides. The sequence of the processes of the first variant is the following: solvent extraction of rare earths by tributylphosphate from clarified nitric acid extract of apatite with subsequent reextraction of rare earths with water and precipitation of rare earth phosphates from aqueous solution during neutralization by ammonia. In case of fluoride preparation from rare earth phosphate the main attention is paid to precipitation and filtration of fluorides. Technological scheme and cost price of industry for the production of 1800 t of rare earth trifluorides a year are calculated. When taking account of TBP losses according to its solubility the industry cost price is 1O times lower the modern cost of rare earth fluorides

  10. Factors affecting fluoride and natural organic matter (NOM) removal from natural waters in Tanzania by nanofiltration/reverse osmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Junjie; Schäfer, Andrea I

    2015-09-15

    This study examined the feasibility of nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO) in treating challenging natural tropical waters containing high fluoride and natural organic matter (NOM). A total of 166 water samples were collected from 120 sources within northern Tanzania over a period of 16 months. Chemical analysis showed that 81% of the samples have fluoride levels exceeding the WHO drinking guideline of 1.5mg/L. The highest fluoride levels were detected in waters characterized by high ionic strength, high inorganic carbon and on some occasions high total organic carbon (TOC) concentrations. Bench-scale experiments with 22 representative waters (selected based on fluoride concentration, salinity, origin and in some instances organic matter) and 6 NF/RO membranes revealed that ionic strength and recovery affected fluoride retention and permeate flux. This is predominantly due to osmotic pressure and hence the variation of diffusion/convection contributes to fluoride transport. Different membranes had distinct fluoride removal capacities, showing different raw water concentration treatability limits regarding the WHO guideline compliance. BW30, BW30-LE and NF90 membranes had a feed concentration limit of 30-40 mg/L at 50% recovery. NOM retention was independent of water matrices but is governed predominantly by size exclusion. NOM was observed to have a positive impact on fluoride removal. Several mechanisms could contribute but further studies are required before a conclusion could be drawn. In summary, NF/RO membranes were proved to remove both fluoride and NOM reliably even from the most challenging Tanzanian waters, increasing the available drinking water sources. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Comparative Analysis of Fluoride Concentrations in Groundwaters in Northern and Southern Ghana: Implications for the Contaminant Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunkari, Emmanuel Daanoba; Zango, Musah Saeed; Korboe, Harriet Mateko

    2018-04-01

    Bongo and Sekyere South districts, both in the northern and southern parts of Ghana, respectively, have high populations living in rural areas and most of them use groundwater for drinking purposes. The groundwater in these areas is prone to contamination from natural and/or artificial sources. Therefore this study aims; (1) to present a comparative analysis of the fluoride concentration in groundwater samples from Bongo and Sekyere South districts and the associated groundwater-rock interaction that may be the cause for the varied fluoride concentrations, (2) to determine the leaching potential of fluoride from the host rocks as the possible mechanism for groundwater contamination. Sixty (60) groundwater samples from active pumping wells and twelve (12) rock samples from outcrops were collected from various communities in the two districts for fluoride concentration and mineralogical analysis. Based on the variations in fluoride concentration, fluoride spatial distribution maps were prepared using empirical Bayesian kriging interpolation method and analysed by means of hierarchical cluster analysis. The fluoride concentration in Bongo district varies between 1.71 and 4.0 mg/L, whereas that in Sekyere South district changes from 0.3 to 0.8 mg/L. From the mineralogical studies, biotite has the highest percentage in the Bongo district and has positive correlation with fluoride concentration in the analysed water samples than in the Sekyere South district. The elevated fluoride concentration in the Bongo district relative to the Sekyere South district is due to the dissolution of biotite in the groundwater and the sufficient groundwater-rock interaction since the water samples are mainly sourced from deeper boreholes. This high fluoride concentration has resulted in a plethora of reported cases of dental fluorosis and other health-related issues in Bongo.

  12. Mus musculus bone fluoride concentration as a useful biomarker for risk assessment of skeletal fluorosis in volcanic areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linhares, Diana; Camarinho, Ricardo; Garcia, Patrícia Ventura; Rodrigues, Armindo Dos Santos

    2018-08-01

    Fluoride is often found in elevated concentrations in volcanic areas due to the release of magmatic fluorine as hydrogen fluorine through volcanic degassing. The exposure to high levels of fluoride can affect the processes of bone formation and resorption causing skeletal fluorosis, a pathology that can easily be mistaken for other skeletal diseases. In this study, we aimed to determine if fluoride concentration in the femoral bone of wild populations of the house mouse (Mus musculus) is a good biomarker of exposure to active volcanic environments naturally enriched in fluoride, allowing their use in biomonitoring programs. The fluoride concentration of the whole femoral bone of 9 mice from Furnas (5 males and 4 females) and 33 mice from Rabo de Peixe (16 males and 17 females) was measured by the potentiometric method with a fluoride ion selective electrode. Fluoride in bones was significantly higher in the mice from Furnas when compared with the mice from Rabo de Peixe (616.5 ± 129.3 μg F/g vs. 253.8 ± 10.5 μg F/g). Accumulation rates were also significantly higher in the mice collected in Furnas when compared with Rabo de Peixe individuals (3.84 ± 0.52 μg F/day vs. 1.22 ± 0.06 μg F/day). The results demonstrate a significant association between exposure to fluoride in the active volcanic environment and fluoride content in bone, revealing that bone fluoride concentration is a suitable biomarker of chronic environmental exposure to fluoride. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Data on fluoride concentration level in villages of Asara (Alborz, Iran) and daily fluoride intake based on drinking water consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhavan, Giti; Dobaradaran, Sina; Borazjani, Jaleh Mohajeri

    2016-12-01

    In the present data article, fluoride concentration levels of drinking water (with spring or groundwater sources) in 10 villages of Asara area located in Alborz province were determined by the standard SPADNS method using a spectrophotometer (DR/2000 Spectrophotometer, USA). Daily fluoride intakes were also calculated based on daily drinking water consumption. The fluoride content were compared with EPA and WHO guidelines for drinking water.

  14. The occurrence and geochemistry of fluoride in some natural waters of Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaciri, S. J.; Davies, T. C.

    1993-03-01

    In recent years the acquisition of considerable additional data on the hydrogeochemical behaviour of fluoride in natural waters of Kenya has been made possible by extensive surface-water and groundwater sampling campaigns as well as by improvements in analytical techniques. Ultimately, the principal source of fluoride relates to emissions from volcanic activity associated with the East African Rift System. Through various intermediate steps, but also directly, fluoride passes into the natural water system and components of the food chain. Ingestion by man is mainly through drinking water and other beverages. River waters in Kenya generally have a fluoride concentration lower than the recommended level (1.3 ppm) for potable water, thus promoting susceptibility to dental caries. Groundwaters and lake waters show considerably higher fluoride contents, resulting in the widespread incidence of fluorosis in areas where groundwater is the major source of drinking water, and lake fish is a regular component of the diet. This paper presents a synthesis of the data so far obtained on the sources and distribution of fluoride in the hydrological system of Kenya, examines the extent of fluorine toxicity and puts forward recommendations to combat or minimise the problem.

  15. Liquid Fluoride Salt Experimentation Using a Small Natural Circulation Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoder Jr, Graydon L [ORNL; Heatherly, Dennis Wayne [ORNL; Williams, David F [ORNL; Elkassabgi, Yousri M. [Texas A& M University, Kingsville; Caja, Joseph [Electrochemical Systems, Inc.; Caja, Mario [ORNL; Jordan, John [Texas A& M University, Kingsville; Salinas, Roberto [Texas A& M University, Kingsville

    2014-04-01

    A small molten fluoride salt experiment has been constructed and tested to develop experimental techniques for application in liquid fluoride salt systems. There were five major objectives in developing this test apparatus: Allow visual observation of the salt during testing (how can lighting be introduced, how can pictures be taken, what can be seen) Determine if IR photography can be used to examine components submerged in the salt Determine if the experimental configuration provides salt velocity sufficient for collection of corrosion data for future experimentation Determine if a laser Doppler velocimeter can be used to quantify salt velocities. Acquire natural circulation heat transfer data in fluoride salt at temperatures up to 700oC All of these objectives were successfully achieved during testing with the exception of the fourth: acquiring velocity data using the laser Doppler velocimeter. This paper describes the experiment and experimental techniques used, and presents data taken during natural circulation testing.

  16. Assessment of Fluoride Concentration of Soil and Vegetables in Vicinity of Zinc Smelter, Debari, Udaipur, Rajasthan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Nagesh; Jain, Sandeep; Asawa, Kailash; Tak, Mridula; Shinde, Kushal; Singh, Anukriti; Gandhi, Neha; Gupta, Vivek Vardhan

    2015-10-01

    As of late, natural contamination has stimulated as a reaction of mechanical and other human exercises. In India, with the expanding industrialization, numerous unsafe substances are utilized or are discharged amid generation as cleans, exhaust, vapours and gasses. These substances at last are blended in the earth and causes health hazards. To determine concentration of fluoride in soils and vegetables grown in the vicinity of Zinc Smelter, Debari, Udaipur, Rajasthan. Samples of vegetables and soil were collected from areas situated at 0, 1, 2, 5, and 10 km distance from the zinc smelter, Debari. Three samples of vegetables (i.e. Cabbage, Onion and Tomato) and 3 samples of soil {one sample from the upper layer of soil (i.e. 0 to 20 cm) and one from the deep layer (i.e. 20 - 40 cm)} at each distance were collected. The soil and vegetable samples were sealed in clean polythene bags and transported to the laboratory for analysis. One sample each of water and fertilizer from each distance were also collected. The mean fluoride concentration in the vegetables grown varied between 0.36 ± 0.69 to 0.71 ± 0.90 ppm. The fluoride concentration in fertilizer and water sample from various distances was found to be in the range of 1.4 - 1.5 ppm and 1.8 - 1.9 ppm respectively. The fluoride content of soil and vegetables was found to be higher in places near to the zinc smelter.

  17. Fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opalescence® ... Fluoride is used to prevent tooth decay. It is taken up by teeth and helps to strengthen ... and block the cavity-forming action of bacteria. Fluoride usually is prescribed for children and adults whose ...

  18. Probability of foliar injury for Acer sp. based on foliar fluoride concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonough, Andrew M; Dixon, Murray J; Terry, Debbie T; Todd, Aaron K; Luciani, Michael A; Williamson, Michele L; Roszak, Danuta S; Farias, Kim A

    2016-12-01

    Fluoride is considered one of the most phytotoxic elements to plants, and indicative fluoride injury has been associated over a wide range of foliar fluoride concentrations. The aim of this study was to determine the probability of indicative foliar fluoride injury based on Acer sp. foliar fluoride concentrations using a logistic regression model. Foliage from Acer nedundo, Acer saccharinum, Acer saccharum and Acer platanoides was collected along a distance gradient from three separate brick manufacturing facilities in southern Ontario as part of a long-term monitoring programme between 1995 and 2014. Hydrogen fluoride is the major emission source associated with the manufacturing facilities resulting with highly elevated foliar fluoride close to the facilities and decreasing with distance. Consistent with other studies, indicative fluoride injury was observed over a wide range of foliar concentrations (9.9-480.0 μg F -  g -1 ). The logistic regression model was statistically significant for the Acer sp. group, A. negundo and A. saccharinum; consequently, A. negundo being the most sensitive species among the group. In addition, A. saccharum and A. platanoides were not statistically significant within the model. We are unaware of published foliar fluoride values for Acer sp. within Canada, and this research provides policy maker and scientist with probabilities of indicative foliar injury for common urban Acer sp. trees that can help guide decisions about emissions controls. Further research should focus on mechanisms driving indicative fluoride injury over wide ranging foliar fluoride concentrations and help determine foliar fluoride thresholds for damage.

  19. An in situ caries study on the interplay between fluoride dose and concentration in milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippert, F; Martinez-Mier, E A; Zero, D T

    2014-07-01

    This randomized, cross-over in situ study investigated the impact of sodium fluoride dose and concentration in milk on caries lesion rehardening, fluoridation and acid resistance. Twenty-eight subjects wore two gauze-covered enamel specimens with preformed lesions placed buccally on their mandibular partial dentures for three weeks. Participants used fluoride-free dentifrice throughout the study and consumed once daily one of the five study treatments: no fluoride in 200 ml milk (0F-200), 1.5 or 3 mg fluoride in either 100 (1.5F-100; 3F-100) or 200 ml milk (1.5F-200; 3F-200). After three weeks, specimens were retrieved. Knoop hardness was used to determine rehardening and resistance to a secondary acid challenge. Enamel fluoride uptake (EFU) was determined using a microbiopsy technique. A linear fluoride dose-response was observed for all study variables which exhibited similar overall patterns. All the treatments resulted in rehardening, with 0F-200 inducing the least and 3F-100 the most. Apart from 1.5F-200, all the treatments resulted in statistically significantly more rehardening compared to 0F-200. The fluoride doses delivered in 100 ml provided directionally although not statistically significantly more rehardening than those delivered in 200 ml milk. EFU data exhibited better differentiation between treatments: all fluoridated milk treatments delivered more fluoride to lesions than 0F-200; fluoride in 100 ml demonstrated statistically significantly higher EFU than fluoride in 200 ml milk. Findings for acid resistance were also more discerning than rehardening data. The present study has provided further evidence for the anti-caries benefits of fluoridated milk. Both fluoride dose and concentration appear to impact the cariostatic properties of fluoride in milk. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The Effect of Carbon Source and Fluoride Concentrations in the "Streptococcus Mutans" Biofilm Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulino, Tony P.; Andrade, Ricardo O.; Bruschi-Thedei, Giuliana C. M.; Thedei, Geraldo, Jr.; Ciancaglini, Pietro

    2004-01-01

    The main objective of this class experiment is to show the influence of carbon source and of different fluoride concentrations on the biofilm formation by the bacterium "Streptococcus mutans." The observation of different biofilm morphology as a function of carbon source and fluoride concentration allows an interesting discussion regarding the…

  1. Fluoride concentration level in rural area in Poldasht city and daily fluoride intake based on drinking water consumption with temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Ali Akbar; Yousefi, Mahmood; Mahvi, Amir Hossein

    2017-08-01

    Long-term exposure to high level of fluoride can caused several adverse effects on human health including dental and skeletal fluorosis. We investigated all the drinking water source located in rural areas of Poldasht city, west Azerbaijan Province, North West Iran between 2014 and 2015. Fluoride concentration of water samples was measured by SPADNS method. We found that in the villages of Poldasht the average of fluoride concentration in drinking water sources (well, and the river) was in the range mg/l 0.28-10.23. The average daily received per 2 l of drinking water is in the range mg/l 0.7-16.6 per day per person. Drinking water demands cause fluorosis in the villages around the area residents and based on the findings of this study writers are announced suggestions below in order to take care of the health of area residents.

  2. Fluoride Concentration in Water, Cow Milk and Cow Urine from Smallholder Dairy Farms in Kiambu- Kenya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gikunju, J.K.; Maitho, T.E.; Kyule, M.N.; Mitema, E.S.; Mugera, G.M.

    1999-01-01

    Kiambu district is situated in central part of Kenya. most of the available land is suitable for agricultural use. majority of the farmers are small scale or subsistence farmers and they are involve in a variety of livestock activities e.g. dairy production, pig production and others in combination or as separate operations. excessive fluoride ingestion can cause specific dental and skeletal lesions and in severe cases adversely influence the health and productivity performance of domestic animals.therefore a study was designed to investigate the levels of flouride in urine, milk and water samples from small scale dairy farms in Kiambu. Water, cow urine and milk samples were collected in clean plastic containers from 84 small scale farms belonging to 6 dairy farmers co-operative societies (DFCs). The DFCs in this study were Kiambaa, Lari, Nderi, Kikuyu, Chania and Limuru. The fluoride concentration in water milk and urine were analysed using the potentiometric method of fluoride ion specific electrode. overall urine contained the highest fluoride concentration while milk contained the lowest fluoride levels. Fluoride levels in water, milk and urine were significantly different, (P>0.05). The mean fluoride concentration in water from all societies was 0.29 ppm while the mean fluoride concentration in milk 0.05 ppm. urine samples had the highest fluoride concentration, (1.5 ppm). The cooperative specific mean fluoride concentrations arranged in descending order were as follow: Nderi (2.8 ppm), Kikuyu (2.4 ppm), Kiambaa(1.9 ppm), Chania (1.6 ppm), Limuru (1.3 ppm) and Lari (1.0 ppm). The maximum fluoride concentration encountered in water in this study was 3.4 ppm, however adverse productivity has been reported in dairy animals consuming as low as 2.15 ppm in drinking water. The mean milk production in in kilograms per day per cow ranged from 2.5 to 6.9 when all six dairy co-operative societies were taken into consideration. this is far below the expected production

  3. Proximal renal tubular injury in rats sub-chronically exposed to low fluoride concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cárdenas-González, Mariana C.; Del Razo, Luz M. [Departmento de Toxicología, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional (CINVESTAV-IPN), México, D. F., México (Mexico); Barrera-Chimal, Jonatan [Unidad de Fisiología Molecular, Instituto de Investigaciones Biomédicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México and Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán, México, D. F., México (Mexico); Jacobo-Estrada, Tania [Departmento de Toxicología, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional (CINVESTAV-IPN), México, D. F., México (Mexico); López-Bayghen, Esther [Departamento de Genética y Biología Molecular, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional (CINVESTAV-IPN), México, D. F., México (Mexico); and others

    2013-11-01

    Fluoride is usually found in groundwater at a very wide range of concentration between 0.5 and 25 ppm. At present, few studies have assessed the renal effects of fluoride at environmentally relevant concentrations. Furthermore, most of these studies have used insensitive and nonspecific biomarkers of kidney injury. The aim of this study was to use early and sensitive biomarkers to evaluate kidney injury after fluoride exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations. Recently weaned male Wistar rats were exposed to low (15 ppm) and high (50 ppm) fluoride concentrations in drinking water for a period of 40 days. At the end of the exposure period, kidney injury biomarkers were measured in urine and renal mRNA expression levels were assessed by real time RT-PCR. Our results showed that the urinary kidney injury molecule (Kim-1), clusterin (Clu), osteopontin (OPN) and heat shock protein 72 excretion rate significantly increased in the group exposed to the high fluoride concentration. Accordingly, fluoride exposure increased renal Kim-1, Clu and OPN mRNA expression levels. Moreover, there was a significant dose-dependent increase in urinary β-2-microglobulin and cystatin-C excretion rate. Additionally, a tendency towards a dose dependent increase of tubular damage in the histopathological light microscopy findings confirmed the preferential impact of fluoride on the tubular structure. All of these changes occurred at early stages in which, the renal function was not altered. In conclusion using early and sensitive biomarkers of kidney injury, we were able to found proximal tubular alterations in rats sub-chronically exposed to fluoride. - Highlights: • Exposure to low concentrations of fluoride induced proximal tubular injury • Increase in urinary Kim-1, Clu, OPN and Hsp72 in 50 ppm fluoride-exposed group • Increase in urinary B2M and CysC in 15 and 50 ppm fluoride-exposed groups • Fluoride exposure increased renal Kim, Clu and OPN mRNA expression levels.

  4. Enhancement of Saharan groundwater quality by reducing its fluoride concentration using different materials

    KAUST Repository

    Ramdani, Amina; Taleb, Safia; Benghalem, Abderazzak; Deratani, André ; Ghaffour, NorEddine

    2014-01-01

    According to the environmental protection regulations, fluoride concentration is considered as a substance of priority for assessment of drinking water quality to determine their impacts on the environment and public health. Saharan groundwater

  5. The impact of aluminium smelter shut-down on the concentration of fluoride in vegetation and soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brougham, Kate M.; Roberts, Stephen R.; Davison, Alan W.; Port, Gordon R.

    2013-01-01

    Although a great deal is known about the deposition of fluoride on vegetation, and the hazards associated with uptake by grazing herbivores, little is known about what happens to the concentration of fluoride in vegetation and soil at polluted sites once deposition ceases. The closure of Anglesey Aluminium Metals Ltd smelter, in September 2009, provided a unique opportunity to study fluoride loading once deposition stopped. Fluoride was monitored in plants and soil within 1 km of the former emission source. Fluoride concentrations in a range of plant material had decreased to background levels of 10 mg F kg −1 after 36 weeks. Concentrations of fluoride in mineral-rich soils decreased steadily demonstrating their limited potential to act as contaminating sources of fluoride for forage uptake. There were significant differences in the rate of decline of fluoride concentrations between plant species. -- Highlights: •The impact of aluminium smelter closure on fluoride concentrations was investigated. •Concentrations in forage decreased rapidly to safe levels for livestock grazing. •The concentrations in some species declined to background levels within a year. •Significant interspecies differences in fluoride decline are described. •Mineral-rich soils have limited potential as contaminating sources for forage. -- Fluoride is hazardous to grazing herbivores, but when deposition stops, F-levels in plants and soil fall rapidly, some returning to background concentrations within a year

  6. Enhancement of Saharan groundwater quality by reducing its fluoride concentration using different materials

    KAUST Repository

    Ramdani, Amina

    2014-04-15

    According to the environmental protection regulations, fluoride concentration is considered as a substance of priority for assessment of drinking water quality to determine their impacts on the environment and public health. Saharan groundwater (Algeria) contains an excess of fluoride ions. Regular consumption of this water by the population of the region may cause endemic fluorosis. To solve this problem, we propose to treat this water by adsorption on different materials, such as activated alumina (AA), sodium clay (SC), and hydroxyapatite (HAP) in order to enhance its quality by reducing its fluoride concentration. The maximum adsorption is achieved with an adsorption capacity of the order of 0.9, 0.667, and 0.370 mg/g and with a percentage of 90, 83.4, and 73.95% for AA, HAP, and SC, respectively. Indeed, the acidity and alkalinity of the medium significantly affect the adsorption of fluoride ions. Results deduced from the curves of adsorption isotherms of fluoride ions showed that the retention is predictable from these isotherms in agreement with the Langmuir model. The low removal of fluoride ions was observed in presence of (Formula presented.), (Formula presented.), and (Formula presented.) ions. Finally, AA material proved to be the best adsorbent for fluoride ions removal. © 2014 © 2014 Balaban Desalination Publications. All rights reserved.

  7. Thermoluminescence studies of natural and doped calcium fluoride phosphors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Kolaly, M.A.

    1977-01-01

    The various aspects of thermoluminescence (TL) of calcium fluoride phosphors obtained both from natural and laboratory-grown CaF 2 crystals have been investigated in the temperature range from room temperature to 750 deg C. Dopants used in these studies were Mn, Y and lanthanide series rare earths. The aspects which have been investigated are : (1) effect of single and double doping on TL glow curves and TL emission spectra after gamma irradiation, (2) TL traps : their kinetics including evaluation of the activation energy using different techniques, their decay kinetics and their behaviour under partially filled conditions, and (3) effect of temperature on emission of intensity of X-ray induced luminescence and TL. During the course of these investigations, a new glow peak was observed at 650 deg C in natural CaF 2 . It was found that this peak could also be produced in synthetic CaF 2 doped with (Y + Sm). A new model for the TL trap has also been proposed. (M.G.B.)

  8. Estimation of fluoride concentration in drinking water and common beverages in United Arab Emirates (UAE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walia, Tarun; Abu Fanas, Salem; Akbar, Madiha; Eddin, Jamal; Adnan, Mohamad

    2017-07-01

    To assess fluoride concentration in drinking water which include tap water of 4 emirates - Abu Dhabi, Dubai, Sharjah and Ajman plus bottled water, commonly available soft drinks & juices in United Arab Emirates. Five different samples of tap water collected from each of the four emirates of UAE: Ajman, Sharjah, Abu Dhabi and Dubai; twenty-two brands of bottled water and fifteen brands of popular cold beverages, purchased from different supermarkets in U.A.E were tested using ion selective electrode method and the fluoride concentration was determined. The mean fluoride content of tap water samples was 0.14 mg F/L with a range of 0.04-0.3 mg F/L; with Ajman tap water samples showing the highest mean fluoride content of 0.3 mg F/L. The mean fluoride content for both bottled drinking water and beverages was 0.07 mg F/L with a range of 0.02-0.50 mg F/L and 0.04-0.1 mg F/L respectively. Majority (68.2%) of the bottled water are produced locally within U.A.E while a few (31.8%) are imported. The tap water, bottled water and beverages available in U.A.E show varying concentrations of fluoride, however none showed the optimal level necessary to prevent dental caries. Dental professionals in U.A.E should be aware of the fluoride concentrations before prescribing fluoride supplements to children.

  9. An Investigation of Fluoride Concentration in Drinking Water of Sanganer Tehsil, Jaipur District, Rajasthan, India and Defluoridation from Plant Material

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    Mohammed Arif

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Forty water samples of 20 villages of Sanganer tehsil, Jaipur district were analyzed for determining fluoride ion concentrations. High fluoride containing regions were identified on the basis of fluoride levels of the water samples and also on the prevalence rate of dental and skeletal fluorosis of the study area. Fluoride maps, which distinguish the regions containing the water sources of different ranges of fluoride ion concentrations, were also prepared by isopleth’s technique, a statistical method. Water samples containing high fluoride levels were defluoridated with low-cost materials prepared from plant byproducts. These materials successfully decrease the fluoride ions concentration to an acceptable limit (from 0.5 to 1.5 mg/L without disturbing drinking water quality standards.

  10. Data on fluoride concentration levels in semi-arid region of Medak, Telangana, South India

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    Adimalla Narsimha

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available According to the World Health Organization recommendation, the optimal fluoride concentration levels in drinking water have to be in the range of 0.5 and 1.5 mg/L since this permissible range is essential for normal mineralization of bones and teeth as well as for dental enamel formation in human's body Bell and budwig, 1970; Adimalla and Venkatayogi, 2017; Narsimha and Sudarshan, 2013, 2016; 2017 [1,2,4,5,6]. If continues intake of high fluoride (>1.5 water can severely cause dental and skeletal fluorosis. The investigated area people majorly depend on groundwater for drinking purposes and fluoride concentration ranged from 0.2 to 7.4 mg/L with mean concentration of 2.7 mg/L and data was compared with WHO guidelines for drinking purposes. Overall, data reveals that the 57% of groundwater samples data was not safe for drinking purposes. Therefore, distribution of fluoride in the groundwater of Medak region in Telangana was suggested to intake drinking water, which are below level of fluoride concentration in the groundwater and take care about health implications.

  11. Fluoride ions sorption of the water using natural and modified hematite with aluminium hydroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teutli S, E. A.

    2011-01-01

    Fluorine is a mineral known for its dental benefits, but fluoride ions can cause fluoro sis in excessive quantities. There are many epidemiological studies on possible adverse effects resulting from prolonged ingestion of fluoride through drinking water. These studies demonstrate that fluoride mainly affects the bone tissue (bones and teeth), may produce an adverse effect on tooth enamel and can cause mild dental fluoro sis at concentrations from 0.9 to 1.2 mg/L in drinking water. In several states of Mexico, water contaminated with fluoride ions can be found, such as Aguascalientes, Chihuahua, Coahuila, Durango, Guanajuato, Sonora, Zacatecas, San Luis Potosi and Jalisco, where the fluoride ions levels are higher than 1.5 mg/L, established by the Mexican Official Standard (NOM-127-Ssa-2000) which sets the permissible limits of water for human use and consumption. Currently, several technologies have been proposed to remove fluoride ions from water such as precipitation methods which are based on the addition of chemicals to water and sorption methods to removed fluoride ions by sorption or ion exchange reactions by some suitable substrate capable of regenerate and reuse. In this work, the sorption of fluoride ions using unmodified and modified hematite with aluminum hydroxide to remove fluoride ions from water by bath experiments was studied. The hematite was modified by treating it with aluminum hydroxide, NaOH and Al 2 (SO 4 ) 3 solutions. The characterization of hematite before and after modification with aluminum hydroxide was studied by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, EDS and Bet. The effect of ph, contact time, concentration of fluoride ions, and the dose of sorbent on the sorption of fluoride ions by the modified hematite were studied. Equilibrium was reached within 48 hours of contact time and the maximum sorption of fluoride ions were in the range pH eq between 2.3 and 6.2. Sorption capacities of fluoride ions as a function of dose of

  12. Physiologic Conditions Affect Toxicity of Ingested Industrial Fluoride

    OpenAIRE

    Richard Sauerheber

    2013-01-01

    The effects of calcium ion and broad pH ranges on free fluoride ion aqueous concentrations were measured directly and computed theoretically. Solubility calculations indicate that blood fluoride concentrations that occur in lethal poisonings would decrease calcium below prevailing levels. Acute lethal poisoning and also many of the chronic effects of fluoride involve alterations in the chemical activity of calcium by the fluoride ion. Natural calcium fluoride with low solubility and toxicity ...

  13. Measurement of the deuterium concentration in water samples using a CW chemical deuterium fluoride laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trautmann, M.

    1979-10-01

    In this study a new method for the determination of the deuterium content in water samples is described. The absorption of the radiation of a CW deuterium fluoride laser by the isotope HDO in the water vapor of the sample is measured by means of an optoacoustic detector (spectrophone). Thereby advantage is taken of the fact that H 2 O hardly absorbs the laser radiation and that D 2 O only exists in negligible concentrations. The isotope ratio of hydrogen can be calculated from the measured relative concentration of HDO. In the course of this investigation the relative absorption cross sections of HDO for the different laser lines were determined. It was thereby established that there exists a very good coincidence of an HDO absorption line with the 2P2 laser line. Using a very sensitive nonresonant spectrophone the relative concentration of HDO in natural water samples could be determined with an accuracy of about 10%. The experiments also demonstrated that with appropriate improvements made to the apparatus and using a second spectrophone as a reference it should be possible to increase this accuracy to 0,1%. (orig.)

  14. Study of the thermoluminescence properties and kinetics of local natural calcium fluoride in Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarie, K.A.

    2006-01-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL) characteristics of local natural calcium fluoride that show light yellowish appearance obtained from a fluoride mine west of Saudi Arabia have been studied. TL glow peaks were observed at 160, 260 and 334 degree C. Thermal treatment and fading effects had been studied. The TL response was observed to increase with increasing dose, as expected, over the dose range used. The kinetic parameters were calculated to satisfy the feasibility of using the present sample as gamma -ray dosimetry

  15. Estimating concentration of fluoride in edible leaves locally grown around Raipur, Chhattisgarh

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    Anubhuti Jain

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Fluorine is the 13th most abundant element in the earth crust and is available in various environmental, clinical, and food samples in varied concentrations. Aim: To estimate concentration of fluoride in five medicinal and five nonmedicinal edible leaves locally grown around Raipur, Chhattisgarh, India. Materials and Methods: Samples of ten medicinal and nonmedicinal edible leaves, namely, spinach (Spinacia oleracea, coriander leaves (Coriandrum sativum, chawli bhaji (Amaranthus spinach, lal bhaji (Alternanthera bettzickiana, mooli bhaji (Raphanus sativus, neem (Azadirachta indica, tulsi (Ocimum tenuiflorum, mint leaves (Mentha longifolia, betel leaves (Piper betle, and bael leaves (Aegle marmelos were collected in the clean polyethene bags. After thorough washing with water, leaves were left to dry in ambient temperature and crushed into powder using a mixer grinder. One gram of each of the powdered samples was taken and analyzed for fluoride concentration using a 2-(4-sulfophenylazo 1,8-dihydroxy-3,6-naphthalenedisulfonic acid trisodium salt spectrophotometric method. Results: The presence of fluoride in varied concentrations in locally grown edible leaves were analyzed. The highest concentration of fluoride was reported in tulsi (6.0 μg/g and lowest in mint leaves (1.1 μg/g. Two edible leaves, neem and bael, showed fluoride concentration below detection limit. Conclusion: Knowledge regarding the importance of edible leaves may be lost in the near future unless efforts are made to educate younger generations about their importance. Hence, the time has come to make good use of centuries-old knowledge through modern approaches for their better economic and therapeutic utilization.

  16. [Comparison of fluoride concentrations in human, dog, fox and raccoon dog bones from northwestern Poland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palczewska-Komsa, Mirona

    2015-01-01

    Since the beginning of the XXth there has been a constant increase in fluoride (F-) emissions into the environment, mainly due to the development of industry, the fluoridation of drinking water, and the widespread use of toothpaste containing fluoride. All these factors have resulted in an intensive accumulation of F- in the bodies of vertebrates, mainly in their bones. It is therefore reasonable to estimate the F- concentration in humans and other long-lived mammals. Accordingly, ecotoxicologists worldwide have looked for mammalian species that may serve as good bioindicators of environmental fluoride pollution. In contrast to ungulates, long-lived domestic mammals and wild carnivores have rarely been used for this purpose (including the dog, fox and raccoon dog). The main aims of this study were to: 1) investigate F- concentrations in bones obtained from humans, dog, fox and raccoon dog from northwestern Poland, 2) perform intra- and inter-specific comparisons of F- concentrations in the studied mammalian bones against the background of environmental and living conditions, 3) examine the relationship between concentrations of F- in bones and the age or age category of the studied mammals. The study material comprised bones of the hip joint obtained from 36 patients who underwent hip replacement in Szczecin, 43 dogs from Szczecin veterinary clinics, 32 foxes and 18 raccoon dogs provided by hunters, with the whole test material consisting of 129 samples. The indications of F- (using potentiometry with Thermo Orion ion-selective electrodes) were performed in triplicate. The F- concentration was expressed on a dry weight basis. Interspecific analysis showed that the largest number of differences in the concentrations of F- were between the fox and raccoon, and then between the dog and fox, and then between the dog and the wild canids (foxes and raccoon dogs together). Close statistically significant differences were also found between the samples from humans and the

  17. [The effect of alternating administration of aluminum chloride and sodium fluoride in drinking water on the concentration of fluoride in serum and its content in bones of rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubkowska, Anna; Chlubek, Dariusz; Machoy-Mokrzyniska, Anna

    2006-01-01

    Fluorine and aluminum remain a very interesting research topic due to equivocal and relatively unknown toxic action, role in the etiology of various diseases, and interactions of both elements. Fluorine and aluminum compounds are absorbed by organisms through the gastric and respiratory systems, although the latter route operates only at very high concentrations in air. Chronic exposure to fluorine and aluminum leads to accumulation of both elements, especially in bones and teeth, but also in lung, brain, kidney, and liver. Organisms excrete these elements with urine, faeces, and to a minor extent with sweat and bile. In the light of reports suggesting that aluminum has protective properties against fluorine toxicity during exposure to both elements, we decided to examine the effect of alternating doses of aluminum fluoride and sodium fluoride in drinking water on rats. Four female groups received: I--100 ppm fluorine ions during one month; II--100 ppm fluorine ions alternating every two days with 300 ppm aluminum ions during one month; III--100 ppm fluoride ions during four months; IV--100 ppm fluorine ions alternating every two days with 300 ppm aluminum ions during four months. The respective male groups called IA, IIA, IIIA, and IVA were treated identically. Subsequently, the animals were anesthetized and sacrificed. Blood was sampled from the heart and the right femur was removed for fluorine determination. Fluorine content in the femur and serum was determined with an ion-selective electrode (Orion). The results were analyzed statistically (Statistica 6). We observed higher fluoride concentrations in serum as compared with control values in all groups of female and male rats exposed to sodium fluoride only. Longer exposure time (4 months) did not result in further increase in serum fluoride concentration. However, longer exposure increased fluoride accumulation in the femur (p Fluorine content in the femur of rats exposed to NaF and AlCI3 for four months was

  18. THE USE OF FLUORIDE AND ITS EFFECT ON HEALTH

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    Domen Kanduti

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Appropriate oral health care is fundamental for any individual’s health. Dental caries is still one of the major public health problems. The most effective way of caries prevention is the use of fluoride. Fluoride occurs naturally in our environment and is always present in our lives. However, the concentration differs from area to area. Exposure can occur through diet, respiration and fluoride supplements. During pregnancy, the placenta acts as a barrier. The fluoride, therefore, crosses the placenta in low concentrations. Drinking water in Slovenia is not fluoridated; the amount of naturally present fluoride is very low. Fluoride can be toxic in extremely high concentrations. The most important effect of fluoride on caries incidence is through its role in the process of remineralisation and demineralisation of tooth enamel. The European Academy of Paediatric Dentistry (EAPD recommends a preventive topical use of fluoride supplements because of their cariostatic effect. 

  19. Studies on the method for determination of fluoride concentration in rat hard tissues by neutron activation analysis using 20F

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakakura, Tadao

    1991-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis method (non disruptive analysis, short time period measurement) has been recognized as a high precision analysis of fluoride concentration in hard tissue. Heat neutron irradiation analysis using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) method was used to investigate 20 F concentration. Results were as follows. F concentration in a dried material of hard tissue using INAA method can be fixed by measuring the 20 F's energy peak for 10 seconds after neutron irradiation under 1 x 10 n/cm 2 ·s for 10 seconds. Non responding time that is caused by short half reduction time of 20 F can be recovered enough by a revise calculation. Reproducibility of measured fluoride concentration using INAA method was well stabilized. Rat hard tissue which takes no fluoride can be determined fluoride concentration without sodium restriction. Femur fluoride concentrations using INAA method had significant correlation with conventional microdiffusion analysis method (r=0.997, regression line: Y=1.13X + 2.98). Increase of fluoride density in dentine of rat molars under growing period according to fluoride intake was 1/3 of femurs and mandibles. (author)

  20. Physiologic Conditions Affect Toxicity of Ingested Industrial Fluoride

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    Richard Sauerheber

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of calcium ion and broad pH ranges on free fluoride ion aqueous concentrations were measured directly and computed theoretically. Solubility calculations indicate that blood fluoride concentrations that occur in lethal poisonings would decrease calcium below prevailing levels. Acute lethal poisoning and also many of the chronic effects of fluoride involve alterations in the chemical activity of calcium by the fluoride ion. Natural calcium fluoride with low solubility and toxicity from ingestion is distinct from fully soluble toxic industrial fluorides. The toxicity of fluoride is determined by environmental conditions and the positive cations present. At a pH typical of gastric juice, fluoride is largely protonated as hydrofluoric acid HF. Industrial fluoride ingested from treated water enters saliva at levels too low to affect dental caries. Blood levels during lifelong consumption can harm heart, bone, brain, and even developing teeth enamel. The widespread policy known as water fluoridation is discussed in light of these findings.

  1. Physiologic conditions affect toxicity of ingested industrial fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauerheber, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The effects of calcium ion and broad pH ranges on free fluoride ion aqueous concentrations were measured directly and computed theoretically. Solubility calculations indicate that blood fluoride concentrations that occur in lethal poisonings would decrease calcium below prevailing levels. Acute lethal poisoning and also many of the chronic effects of fluoride involve alterations in the chemical activity of calcium by the fluoride ion. Natural calcium fluoride with low solubility and toxicity from ingestion is distinct from fully soluble toxic industrial fluorides. The toxicity of fluoride is determined by environmental conditions and the positive cations present. At a pH typical of gastric juice, fluoride is largely protonated as hydrofluoric acid HF. Industrial fluoride ingested from treated water enters saliva at levels too low to affect dental caries. Blood levels during lifelong consumption can harm heart, bone, brain, and even developing teeth enamel. The widespread policy known as water fluoridation is discussed in light of these findings.

  2. The concentration data of fluoride and health risk assessment in drinking water in the Ardakan city of Yazd province, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzabeygi Rad Fard, Majid; Yousefi, Mahmood; Soleimani, Hamed; Mohammadi, Ali Akbar; Mahvi, Amir Hossein; Abbasnia, Abbas

    2018-06-01

    According to the World Health Organization (WHO) reports, Iran is located in the global fluoride belts, so that is why carrying out extended research on this contaminant anion in water supplies must be considered. Due to the various industries in the Ardakan city, this region is severely suffering from fluoride contamination. This study was designed to investigate the fluoride concentration and its distribution pattern as well as related health risk assessment in groundwater resources of 28 villages of the Ardakan city in Yazd province using SPADNS method according to standard instructions. Our results show that, the average concentration of fluoride was 2.92 mg/l (range: 0.9-6 mg/l), also in half of the villages, the concentration range of this element was over than standard level (1.5 mg/l) given by WHO rules. In addition, risk assessment results showed that HQ value is higher than 1 in 46.4% of samples of groundwater resources in age groups of infants, children, teenagers and adults. Therefore, it is necessary to take measures to reduce fluoride concentration in drinking water in order to control resultant fluorosis. Actions should be implemented to enhance monitoring of fluoride levels to avoid the potential risk of high Fluoride concentration.

  3. [Corrosion resistance of casted titanium by compound treatments in the artificial saliva with different fluoride concentrations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xian-li; Guo, Tian-wen

    2012-09-01

    To study the corrosion resistance of casted titanium by plasma nitriding and TiN-coated compound treatments in the artificial saliva with different fluoride concentrations and to investigate whether compound treatments can increase the corrosion resistance of casted titanium. Potentiodynamic polarization technique was used to depict polarization curve and to measured the current density of corrosion (Icorr) and the electric potential of corrosion (Ecorr) of casted titanium (Group A) and casted titanium by compound treatments (Group B) in the artificial saliva with different fluoride concentrations. After electrochemical experiment, the microstructure was observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The Icorrs of Group A and B in the artificial saliva of different fluoride concentrations were (1530.23 ± 340.12), (2290.36 ± 320.10), (4130.52 ± 230.17) nA and (2.62 ± 0.64), (7.37 ± 3.59), (10.76 ± 6.05) nA, respectively. The Ecorrs were (-0.93 ± 0.10), (-0.89 ± 0.21), (-0.57 ± 0.09) V and (-0.21 ± 0.04), (-0.17 ± 0.03), (-0.22 ± 0.03) V, respectively.The Icorrs of Group B were significantly lower (P compound treatments can significantly increase the corrosion resistance of casted titanium.

  4. Ecophysiological, anatomical and ultrastructural characteristics of Vitex polygama Cham. (Verbenaceae submitted to different concentrations of fluoride

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    Zélia Terezinha Teixeira Rossi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Fluorides released during the manufacture of aluminum, fertilizers, glass and ceramics are considered to be highly toxic to plants, causing damages in relatively small concentrations. This study aimed to evaluate fluoride (F accumulation and its effects on Vitex polygama Cham. (Verbenaceae exposed to simulated rain containing potassium fluoride in concentrations of 5, 10, 15 and 20 mg L-1. Vitex polygama presented no visual symptoms of foliar injury and accumulated a relatively small amount of F-, significant only for the treatments with higher concentrations of the pollutant.  F- promoted an increase in non-photochemical quenching (qN and in the coefficient due to non-photochemical extinction (NPQ, which indicates higher dissipation of radiant energy in the heat form. Damages in the chloroplast structure, in cellular membranes and in epicuticular waxes, besides cytoplasm granulation and irregularities in the epidermal cell walls were also detected in plants exposed to the pollutant. The results show a considerable resistance of Vitex polygama to F and reinforce the prognostic value of physiological, anatomical and ultrastructural analysis in the detection of damages caused by the pollutant in the leaf structure of this species.

  5. Estimation of Fluoride Concentration of Various Citrus and Non-Citrus Fruits Commonly Consumed and Commercially Available in Mathura City

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    Navin Anand Ingle

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Since fluoride is available from various sources, the total ingestion of fluoride by a person should be estimated taking into consideration the fluoride consumed from all the sources including fruits. There are very few epidemiological studies carried out associated with fluoride estimation in fruit samplesand especially in the Indian scenario Objective: To estimate and compare the fluoride concentration of different commercially available citrus and non-citrus fruits in Mathura city. Materials & Method: Fifteen different types of fruits commercially available and consumed by people ofMathura City were collected. Out of the 15 fruit samples 5 were citrus fruits and 10 were non-citrus fruits. The fluoride estimation of fruit samples was done at Central Laboratory,Lucknow. Juices of all 15 fruit samples were prepared, from each sample 10 ml of juice was measured and fluoride testing of each sample was carried out by using Orion 4 star -ion electrode analyzer. The collected data was analyzed using the statistical software program SPSS, version 17. Results: The fluoride concentration in citrus fruits ranged from 0.04ppm (Orange to 0.08 ppm (Tomato while in non-citrus fruits it ranged from 0.04ppm (chikoo to 0.18 ppm (Guava. No significant difference was observed between the mean fluoride concentration of citrus and non citrus fruits. Conclusions: Both citrus and non citrus fruits have fluorides. Guava was found to have the maximumamount of fluoridecontent (0.18 ppm among both the citrus and non citrus fruits.

  6. Fluoride concentrations in soils, vegetation samples and soil fauna in the direct vicinity of a pollution source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, J.; Ottow, J.C.G.; Breimer, R.F.

    1989-01-01

    Fluoride analyses CF t = total F; F w = water soluble F and F HCI HCI-extractable F) of different soils, vegetation samples and soil fauna (Helix pomatia, Lumbricus spp., arthropodes) in a locally polluted area (for nearly 65 years) clearly revealed an F-accumulation in top soil, vegetation and animals. Based on 1N HCI-extractable fluoride, two contamination zones around the emitting industry could be identified. In the calcareous soils, leaching of fluoride seems to be insignificant because of a strong immobilization as CaF 2 . A highly significant correlation between the F HCI content of soils and Lumbricus spp. (with and without gut content) or Helix pomatia shells was found. Fluoride concentrations in washed leaves of Hedera helix and in decaying grass reached levels of 306 and 997 μgF/g respectively. Saprophagous soil arthropods contained high fluoride levels, up to 732 μgF/g in Armadillidium vulgare. (orig.)

  7. Loss on drying, calcium concentration and pH of fluoride dentifrices

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    Arella Cristina Muniz Brito

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Fluoride dentifrices containing calcium carbonate have advantages such as control of dental plaque and progression of dental caries, also contributing to oral hygiene, represent most dentifrices marketed in Brazil. Aim: To evaluate the physicochemical properties of seven fluoride dentifrices containing calcium carbonate in relation to hydrogen potential (pH, loss on drying and calcium concentration. Materials and Methods: Data collection was performed using the potentiometric method for pH ranges, gravimetric analysis for loss on drying and atomic absorption spectrometry for the concentration of calcium ions. All tests were performed in triplicate and the analysis was performed entirely at random according to one-way analysis of variance at 5% significance level. Results: The pH values were alkaline and ranged from 8.67 (Oral-B 123® to 10.03 (Colgate Mαxima Proteηγo Anticαries® . The results of loss on drying ranged from 33.81% (Oral-B 123® to 61.13% (Close Up® , with significant differences between brands tested. In relation to the calcium content, the highest and lowest concentrations were found in dentifrices Even® (155.55 g/kg and Colgate Ultra Branco® (129 g/kg, respectively, with significant difference (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Fluoride dentifrices analyzed showed alkaline pH and high levels of loss on drying and calcium concentration. However, these physicochemical characteristics differed according to the different brands tested.

  8. [Effect of fluoride concentration on the corrosion behavior of cobalt-chromium alloy fabricated by two different technology processes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiuxia, Yang; Ying, Yang; Han, Xu; Di, Wu; Ke, Guo

    2016-02-01

    This study aims to determine the effect of fluoride concentration on the corrosion behavior of cobalt-chromium alloy fabricated by two different technology processes in a simulated oral environment. A total of 15 specimens were employed with selective laser melting (SLM) and another 15 for traditional casting (Cast) in cobalt-chromium alloy powders and blocks with the same material composition. The corrosion behavior of the specimens was studied by potentiodynamic polarization test under different oral environments with varying solubilities of fluorine (0, 0.05%, and 0.20% for each) in acid artificial saliva (pH = 5.0). The specimens were soaked in fluorine for 24 h, and the surface microstructure was observed under a field emission scanning electron microscope after immersing the specimens in the test solution at constant temperature. The corrosion potential (Ecorr) value of the cobalt-chromium alloy cast decreased with increasing fluoride concentration in acidic artificial saliva. The Ecorr, Icorr, and Rp values of the cobalt-chromium alloy fabricated by two different technology processes changed significantly when the fluoride concentration was 0.20% (P technology processes exhibited a statistically significant difference. The Icorr value of the cobalt-chromium alloy cast was higher than that in the SLM group cobalt-chromium alloy when the fluoride concentration was 0.20% (P technology processes. The corrosion resistance of the cobalt-chromium alloy cast was worse than that of the SLM group cobalt-chromium alloy when the fluoride concentration was 0.20%.

  9. The effects of fluoride concentration and the level of cariogenic challenge on caries development in desalivated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabchoury, C M; Holt, T; Pearson, S K; Bowen, W H

    1998-12-01

    Dental caries is an infectious and transmissible disease that continues to affect the majority of people. The presence of carbohydrate, mainly sucrose in the diet, is an important factor in its occurrence. The amount of fluoride required for optimal protective effect where there is a high caries challenge is unclear. Differences in the intensity of cariogenic challenge, for whatever reason, may play a part in determining fluctuations in the effectiveness of fluoride. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of different concentrations of fluoride on the development of caries and explore the cariostatic effect of fluoride under various levels of cariogenic challenge. The study comprises two experiments. In experiment I, 60 desalivated Sprague Dawley rats infected with Streptococcus sobrinus were offered the following to drink for 21 days: group (1), sterile distilled water (SDW); (2) 10 parts/10(6) F SDW; (3) 20 parts/10(6) F SDW; (4) 30 parts/10(6) F SDW; (5) 40 parts/10(6) F SDW. In experiment II, eight groups of 9 rats were placed in a König Höfer programmed feeder and were exposed to different levels of cariogenic challenge through varying frequency of eating and offered water containing 10 parts/10(6) F. In experiment I, exposure to 20, 30 and 40 parts/10(6) F reduced caries development significantly: fluoride, at 10 parts/10(6), reduced the severity of the carious lesions. In this model of severe cariogenic challenge, the results suggest that elevated concentrations of fluoride might be effective in patients at high caries risk. In experiment II, fluoride reduced the incidence and severity of smooth-surface caries in all groups. The protective effect of fluoride decreased as the number of exposures to sugar increased. It is concluded that the effectiveness of fluoride is influenced by the level of cariogenic challenge and that consideration should be given to adjusting the level of fluoride exposure based on perceived caries risk, and that there

  10. Arsenic, Boron, and Fluoride Concentrations in Ground Water in and Near Diabase Intrusions, Newark Basin, Southeastern Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senior, Lisa A.; Sloto, Ronald A.

    2006-01-01

    During an investigation in 2000 by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) of possible contaminant releases from an industrial facility on Congo Road near Gilbertsville in Berks and Montgomery Counties, southeastern Pennsylvania, concentrations of arsenic and fluoride above USEPA drinking-water standards of 10 ?g/L and 4 mg/L, respectively, and of boron above the USEPA health advisory level of 600 ?g/L were measured in ground water in an area along the northwestern edge of the Newark Basin. In 2003, the USEPA requested technical assistance from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to help identify sources of arsenic, boron, and fluoride in the ground water in the Congo Road area, which included possible anthropogenic releases and naturally occurring mineralization in the local bedrock aquifer, and to identify other areas in the Newark Basin of southeastern Pennsylvania with similarly elevated concentrations of these constituents. The USGS reviewed available data and collected additional ground-water samples in the Congo Road area and four similar hydrogeologic settings. The Newark Basin is the largest of the 13 major exposed Mesozoic rift basins that stretch from Nova Scotia to South Carolina. Rocks in the Newark Basin include Triassic through Jurassic-age sedimentary sequences of sandstones and shales that were intruded by diabase. Mineral deposits of hydrothermal origin are associated with alteration zones bordering intrusions of diabase and also occur as strata-bound replacement deposits of copper and zinc in sedimentary rocks. The USGS review of data available in 2003 showed that water from about 10 percent of wells throughout the Newark Basin of southeastern Pennsylvania had concentrations of arsenic greater than the USEPA maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 10 ?g/L; the highest reported arsenic concentration was at about 70 ?g/L. Few data on boron were available, and the highest reported boron concentration in well-water samples was 60 ?g/L in contrast

  11. Comparative study of fluoride concentration in human serum and drinking water in fluorinated endemic and non endemic areas of pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qayyum, M.; Ahmad, B.; Ahmad, M.

    2013-01-01

    For comparing the human blood serum and drinking water fluoride levels of subjects with dental fluorosis and bony deformities, this study is carried out with individuals ranging 8-17 age group fluorinated Sham Ki Bhatiyan, Punjab (endemic) and Queens Road, Lahore, Punjab (non-endemic) areas. Fluoride concentrations were determined using ion selective electrode methodology and statistically compared. Both the groups showed a significant difference (p < 0.05). Subjects from fluorotic area showed high concentration of fluoride in water and blood serum samples (mean value: 135.587+-77.435 and 2.765+-0.469 micro molL/sup -1/ in water and blood serum samples respectively) as compared to controls (mean value: 19.509+-2.432 and 2.364+- 0.667 micro molL -1). These findings indicate that serum and water fluoride concentrations have a significant positive dose response relationship with the prevalence of dental fluorosis in an area associated with high fluoride level in drinking water. (author)

  12. Effect of high fluoride concentration in drinking water on children’s intelligence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seraj B

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Human and animal studies linking fluoride with diminished intelligence have been published. Although adverse effects of high intake of fluoride on intelligence and mental acuity continue to be reported, they are still controversial. The aim of this research was to investigate the relationship between fluoride in drinking water and children's intelligence. Materials and Methods: In this cross sectional study, 41 children were selected from the high fluoride area with 2.5mg/l (ppm fluoride in the drinking water and 85 children were selected from low fluoride area with 0.4mg/l (ppm fluoride in the drinking water. The intelligence quotient (IQ of each child was measured by the Raven's test. The history of illnesses affecting the nervous system, head trauma, birth weight (2.5kg or  2.5kg, residental history, age and sex of children were investigated by questionnaires completed by the children's parents. Data were analyzed by Chi-Square test with p<0.05 as the limit of significance. Results: In the high fluoride area the mean IQ of children (87.911 was significantly lower than in the low fluoride area (98.912.9 (P=0.025. Conclusion: Based on the findings of this study, exposure of children to high levels of fluoride may carry the risk of impaired development of intelligence.

  13. A Study on the T L-Properties and Kinetics of Local Natural Calcium Fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Saleh, F.S.

    2006-01-01

    Thermoluminescence characteristics of local natural calcium fluoride which is obtained from a flouride mine in the west of saudi arabia (shows a light purple appearance) have been studied. T L glow peaks are observed at 100,177,238 and 300 C.Thermal treatment and fading effects had been studied . the T L response is observed to increase with increasing dose, as expected, over the used dose range. the kinetic parameters were calculated to satisfy the feasibility of using the present sample as γ -ray dosimetry

  14. Adverse Effects of High Concentrations of Fluoride on Characteristics of the Ovary and Mature Oocyte of Mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Songna; Song, Chao; Wu, Haibo; Chen, Xin; Zhang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Reproductive toxicity has been an exciting topic of research in reproductive biology in recent years. Soluble fluoride salts are toxic at high concentrations; their reproductive toxicity was assessed in this study by administering different fluoride salt concentrations to mice. Continuous feeding for five weeks resulted in damage to the histological architecture of ovaries. The expression of genes, including Dazl, Stra8, Nobox, Sohlh1, and ZP3 gene, associated with oocyte formation were much lower in the experimental group as compared with the control group. The number of in vitro fertilization of mature oocytes were also much lower in the experimental group as compared with control. Moreover, the fertility of female mice, as assessed by mating with normal male mice, was also lower in experimental compared with control groups. The expression of the oocyte-specific genes: Bmp15, Gdf9, H1oo, and ZP2, which are involved in oocyte growth and the induction of the acrosome reaction, decreased with the fluoride administration. DNA methylation and histone acetylation (H3K18ac and H3K9ac) are indispensable for germline development and genomic imprinting in mammals, and fluoride administration resulted in reduced levels of H3K9ac and H3K18ac in the experimental group as compared with the control group, as detected by immunostaining. Our results indicate that the administration of high concentrations of fluoride to female mice significantly reduced the number of mature oocytes and hampered their development and fertilization. Thus, this study lays a foundation for future studies on fluoride-induced reproductive disorders in women. PMID:26053026

  15. Adverse Effects of High Concentrations of Fluoride on Characteristics of the Ovary and Mature Oocyte of Mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songna Yin

    Full Text Available Reproductive toxicity has been an exciting topic of research in reproductive biology in recent years. Soluble fluoride salts are toxic at high concentrations; their reproductive toxicity was assessed in this study by administering different fluoride salt concentrations to mice. Continuous feeding for five weeks resulted in damage to the histological architecture of ovaries. The expression of genes, including Dazl, Stra8, Nobox, Sohlh1, and ZP3 gene, associated with oocyte formation were much lower in the experimental group as compared with the control group. The number of in vitro fertilization of mature oocytes were also much lower in the experimental group as compared with control. Moreover, the fertility of female mice, as assessed by mating with normal male mice, was also lower in experimental compared with control groups. The expression of the oocyte-specific genes: Bmp15, Gdf9, H1oo, and ZP2, which are involved in oocyte growth and the induction of the acrosome reaction, decreased with the fluoride administration. DNA methylation and histone acetylation (H3K18ac and H3K9ac are indispensable for germline development and genomic imprinting in mammals, and fluoride administration resulted in reduced levels of H3K9ac and H3K18ac in the experimental group as compared with the control group, as detected by immunostaining. Our results indicate that the administration of high concentrations of fluoride to female mice significantly reduced the number of mature oocytes and hampered their development and fertilization. Thus, this study lays a foundation for future studies on fluoride-induced reproductive disorders in women.

  16. Fluoride absorption: independence from plasma fluoride levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitford, G.M.; Williams, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    The concept that there are physiologic mechanisms to homeostatically regulate plasma fluoride concentrations has been supported by results in the literature suggesting an inverse relationship between plasma fluoride levels and the absorption of the ion from the gastrointestinal tract of the rat. The validity of the relationship was questioned because of possible problems in the experimental design. The present work used four different methods to evaluate the effect of plasma fluoride levels on the absorption of the ion in rats: (i) the percentage of the daily fluoride intake that was excreted in the urine; (ii) the concentration of fluoride in femur epiphyses; (iii) the net areas under the time-plasma fluoride concentration curves after intragastric fluoride doses; and (iv) the residual amounts or fluoride in the gastrointestinal tracts after the intragastric fluoride doses. None of these methods indicated that plasma fluoride levels influence the rate or the degree or fluoride absorption. It was concluded that, unless extremely high plasma fluoride levels are involved (pharmacologic or toxic doses), the absorption of the ion is independent of plasma levels. The results provide further evidence that plasma fluoride concentrations are not homeostatically regulated

  17. Effect of different concentrations of fluoride on the chloroplast pigments of poplar, elder and lilac occurring in the field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gronebaum-Turck, K; Mathe, P

    1975-01-01

    The concentrations of the chlorophylls a and b and of the carotinoids in leaves of Populus canadensis Moe., Sambucus nigra L., and Syringa vulgaris were measured. When affected by fluoride-ions the leaves of P. canadensis show significant loss of the three pigments. The two other species seem to be more resistant. 7 references.

  18. Histopathological Effects of Varied Fluoride Concentration on Cerebrum in Albino Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajad Hamid

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Fluorides have been a cause of concern for scientists and environmentalists for the long because of their harmful effects on the human and animal life but the problem was highlighted during the twentieth century because of great increase in the human population and industrialization. Since fluorides accumulate in calcified and hard tissues of the body such as bone and teeth and can be detected easily in these tissues, so most of the previous studies focused on the effects of fluorides on these tissues. However, during the past decade researchers all over the world have felt that there is a need to study the effects of fluorides on various other tissues of the body including CNS as fluoride intake for prolonged period is known to cause abnormal behavioural pattern, grave implications for Alzheimer’s Disease, Dementia, Attention deficit disorder and reduced I.Q in children as the fluorides are known to cross blood brain barrier. Hence the present study has thrown light on the involvement of brain in chronic fluoride toxicity. The target organ of studied was cerebrum. In the Study, albino rats were exposed to 30 or 100 ppm fluoride (asNaF in drinking water for 3 months. Rats exposed to 30 ppm fluoride did not show any notable alterations in brain histology, whereas rats exposed to 100 ppm fluoride showed significant neurodegenerative changes in lhe motor cortex.Changes included decrease in size and number of neurons in all the regions, signs of chromatolysis and gliosis in the motor cortex. These histological changes suggest a toxic effect of high-fluoride intake & on chronic use. [J Interdiscipl Histopathol 2012; 1(1.000: 30-34

  19. Spatial and temporal variability of fluoride concentrations in groundwater resources of Larestan and Gerash regions in Iran from 2003 to 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Hassan; Haghighat, Gholam Ali; Yunesian, Masud; Nabizadeh, Ramin; Mahvi, Amir Hossein; Dehghani, Mohammad Hadi; Davani, Rahim; Aminian, Abd-Rasool; Shamsipour, Mansour; Hassanzadeh, Naser; Faramarzi, Hossein; Mesdaghinia, Alireza

    2016-02-01

    There is discrepancy about intervals of fluoride monitoring in groundwater resources by Iranian authorities. Spatial and temporal variability of fluoride in groundwater resources of Larestan and Gerash regions in Iran were analyzed from 2003 to 2010 using a geospatial information system and the Mann-Kendall trend test. The mean concentrations of fluoride for the 8-year period in the eight cities and 31 villages were 1.6 and 2.0 mg/l, respectively; the maximum values were 2.4 and 3.8 mg/l, respectively. Spatial, temporal, and spatiotemporal variability of fluoride in overall groundwater resources were relatively constant over the years. However, results of the Mann-Kendall trend test revealed a monotonic trend in the time series of one city and 11 villages for the 8-year period. Specifically, one city and three villages showed positive significant Kendall's Tau values, suggesting an upward trend in fluoride concentrations over the 8-year period. In contrast, seven villages displayed negative significant Kendall's Tau values, arguing for a downward trend in fluoride concentrations over the years. From 2003 to 2010, approximately 52 % of the Larestan and Gerash areas have had fluoride concentrations above the maximum permissible Iranian drinking water standard fluoride level (1.4 mg/l), and about 116,000 people were exposed to such excess amounts. Therefore, our study supports for a close monitoring of fluoride concentrations from health authorities in monthly intervals, especially in villages and cities that showed positive trend in fluoride concentrations. Moreover, we recommend simultaneous implementation of cost-effective protective measures or interventions until a standard fluoride level is achieved.

  20. FLUORIDE: A REVIEW OF USE AND EFFECTS ON HEALTH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanduti, Domen; Sterbenk, Petra; Artnik, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    Appropriate oral health care is fundamental for any individual's health. Dental caries is still one of the major public health problems. The most effective way of caries prevention is the use of fluoride. The aim of our research was to review the literature about fluoride toxicity and to inform physicians, dentists and public health specialists whether fluoride use is expedient and safe. Data we used in our review were systematically searched and collected from web pages and documents published from different international institutions. Fluoride occurs naturally in our environment but we consume it in small amounts. Exposure can occur through dietary intake, respiration and fluoride supplements. The most important factor for fluoride presence in alimentation is fluoridated water. Methods, which led to greater fluoride exposure and lowered caries prevalence, are considered to be one of the greatest accomplishments in the 20th century`s public dental health. During pregnancy, the placenta acts as a barrier. The fluoride, therefore, crosses the placenta in low concentrations. Fluoride can be transmitted through the plasma into the mother's milk; however, the concentration is low. The most important action of fluoride is topical, when it is present in the saliva in the appropriate concentration. The most important effect of fluoride on caries incidence is through its role in the process of remineralization and demineralization of tooth enamel. Acute toxicity can occur after ingesting one or more doses of fluoride over a short time period which then leads to poisoning. Today, poisoning is mainly due to unsupervised ingestion of products for dental and oral hygiene and over-fluoridated water. Even though fluoride can be toxic in extremely high concentrations, it`s topical use is safe. The European Academy of Paediatric Dentistry (EAPD) recommends a preventive topical use of fluoride supplements because of their cariostatic effect.

  1. Biomonitoring Equivalents for interpretation of urinary fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aylward, L L; Hays, S M; Vezina, A; Deveau, M; St-Amand, A; Nong, A

    2015-06-01

    Exposure to fluoride is widespread due to its natural occurrence in the environment and addition to drinking water and dental products for the prevention of dental caries. The potential health risks of excess fluoride exposure include aesthetically unacceptable dental fluorosis (tooth mottling) and increased skeletal fragility. Numerous organizations have conducted risk assessments and set guidance values to represent maximum recommended exposure levels as well as recommended adequate intake levels based on potential public health benefits of fluoride exposure. Biomonitoring Equivalents (BEs) are estimates of the average biomarker concentrations corresponding to such exposure guidance values. The literature on daily urinary fluoride excretion rates as a function of daily fluoride exposure was reviewed and BE values corresponding to the available US and Canadian exposure guidance values were derived for fluoride in urine. The derived BE values range from 1.1 to 2.1mg/L (1.2-2.5μg/g creatinine). Concentrations of fluoride in single urinary spot samples from individuals, even under exposure conditions consistent with the exposure guidance values, may vary from the predicted average concentrations by several-fold due to within- and across-individual variation in urinary flow and creatinine excretion rates and due to the rapid elimination kinetics of fluoride. Thus, the BE values are most appropriately applied to screen population central tendency estimates for biomarker concentrations rather than interpretation of individual spot sample concentrations. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Effect of Sodium Fluoride Ingestion on Malondialdehyde Concentration and the Activity of Antioxidant Enzymes in Rat Erythrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A. Morales-González

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Fluoride intoxication has been shown to produce diverse deleterious metabolic alterations within the cell. To determine the effects of sodium fluoride (NaF treatment on malondialdehyde (MDA levels and on the activity of antioxidant enzymes in rat erythrocytes, Male Wistar rats were treated with 50 ppm of NaF or were untreated as controls. Erythrocytes were obtained from rats sacrificed weekly for up to eight weeks and the concentration of MDA in erythrocyte membrane was determined. In addition, the activity of the enzymes superoxide, dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase were determined. Treatment with NaF produces an increase in the concentration of malondialdehyde in the erythrocyte membrane only after the eight weeks of treatment. On the other hand, antioxidant enzyme activity was observed to increase after the fourth week of NaF treatment. In conclusion, intake of NaF produces alterations in the erythrocyte of the male rat, which indicates induction of oxidative stress.

  3. Determination of natural occurring radionuclides concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stajic, J.; Markovic, V.; Krstic, D.; Nikezic, D.

    2011-01-01

    Tobacco smoke contains certain concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides from radioactive chains of uranium and thorium - 214 Pb, 214 Bi, 228 Ac, 208 Tl, 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K. Inhaling of tobacco smoke leads to internal exposure of man. In order to estimate absorbed dose of irradiation it is necessary to determine concentrations of radionuclides present in the tobacco leaves. In this paper specific activities of naturally occurring radionuclides were measured in tobacco samples from cigarettes which are used in Serbia. [sr

  4. Natural radiation and radon concentration in buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Kazuo; Asano, Kenji

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this subject is to investigate the actual conditions of natural radiation levels in various types of buildings. This study is indispensable for the accurate evaluation of population dose of external and internal exposures from natural radiation. Concentrations of K-40, Ra-226 and Th-232 in building materials such as Portland cement, gypsum boards and its raw materials were measured with Ge gamma spectrometer. (author)

  5. Natural radionuclides concentration in underground mine materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, T.O.; Rocha, Z.; Taveira, N.F.; Takahashi, L.C.; Pineiro, M.M., E-mail: talitaolsantos@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: rochaz@cdtn.br, E-mail: mayarapinheiroduarte@gmail.com, E-mail: lauratakahashi@hotmail.com, E-mail: natyfontaveira@hotmail.com [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Borges, P.F.; Cruz, P.; Gouvea, V.A.; Siqueira, J.B., E-mail: vgouvea@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: flavia.borges@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: pcruz@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: jbsiquei@cnen.gov.br [Comissão Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Natural Radionuclides are present in earth's environment since its origin. The main radionuclides present are {sup 40}K, as well as, {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th with their decay products. These radionuclides occur in minerals in different activity concentration associated with geological and geochemical conditions, appearing at different levels from point to point in the world. Underground mines may present a high natural background radiation which is due to the presence of these radiogenic heavy minerals. To address this concern, this work outlines on the characterization of the natural radionuclides presence in underground mines in Brazil which are located in many cases on higher radiation levels bed rocks. The radon concentration was measured by using E-PERM Electrets Ion Chamber, AlphaGUARD and CR-39 track etch detectors. The radon progeny was determined by using DOSEman detector. Radon concentration measurement in groundwater was performed by using RAD7 detector. The {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th activity concentration in ore and soil samples were determined by using Neutron Activation Analysis using TRIGA MARK I IPR-R1 Reactor. Gamma spectrometry was used to determine {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra and {sup 40}K activity concentrations. The results show that the natural radioactivity varies considerably from mine to mine and that there are not risks of radiological damage for exposed workers in these cases. Based on these data, recommendations for Brazilian regulatory standards are presented. (author)

  6. Natural radionuclides concentration in underground mine materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, T.O.; Rocha, Z.; Taveira, N.F.; Takahashi, L.C.; Pineiro, M.M.; Borges, P.F.; Cruz, P.; Gouvea, V.A.; Siqueira, J.B.

    2017-01-01

    Natural Radionuclides are present in earth's environment since its origin. The main radionuclides present are 40 K, as well as, 238 U and 232 Th with their decay products. These radionuclides occur in minerals in different activity concentration associated with geological and geochemical conditions, appearing at different levels from point to point in the world. Underground mines may present a high natural background radiation which is due to the presence of these radiogenic heavy minerals. To address this concern, this work outlines on the characterization of the natural radionuclides presence in underground mines in Brazil which are located in many cases on higher radiation levels bed rocks. The radon concentration was measured by using E-PERM Electrets Ion Chamber, AlphaGUARD and CR-39 track etch detectors. The radon progeny was determined by using DOSEman detector. Radon concentration measurement in groundwater was performed by using RAD7 detector. The 238 U and 232 Th activity concentration in ore and soil samples were determined by using Neutron Activation Analysis using TRIGA MARK I IPR-R1 Reactor. Gamma spectrometry was used to determine 226 Ra, 228 Ra and 40 K activity concentrations. The results show that the natural radioactivity varies considerably from mine to mine and that there are not risks of radiological damage for exposed workers in these cases. Based on these data, recommendations for Brazilian regulatory standards are presented. (author)

  7. On elevated fluoride and boron concentrations in groundwaters associated with the Lake Saint-Martin impact structure, Manitoba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desbarats, Alexandre J.

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogeological investigations conducted by the Geological Survey of Canada in the Lake Saint-Martin region of Manitoba have confirmed earlier reports of naturally elevated F - and B concentrations in local groundwaters. Fluoride and B concentrations are highly correlated (r 2 = 0.905) and reach 15.1 mg/L and 8.5 mg/L, respectively. Virtually all groundwaters with F - concentrations greater than the drinking water limit of 1.5 mg/L are from wells within the Lake Saint-Martin impact structure, a 208 Ma complex crater 23 km in diameter underlying a large part of the study area. The high-F - groundwaters can be classified into two groups according to their anionic and isotopic compositions. Group I samples consist of Na-mixed anion groundwaters, with Cl greater than 100 mg/L and highly depleted 18 O compositions indicative of recharge under much cooler climatic conditions than at present. Samples belonging to this group exhibit a striking relationship to crater morphology, and are found in an arcuate belt within the southern rim of the impact structure. Group II high-F - samples consist of Na-HCO 3 -SO 4 groundwaters, with little Cl, and less depleted 18 O compositions. Samples belonging to this group are associated with groundwaters recharged locally, on a low ridge within the impact structure. This paper traces the probable source of high-F - groundwaters to phosphatic pellets in shales of the Winnipeg Formation, a regional basal clastic unit which sub-crops at shallow depth beneath the crater rim as a result of more than 200 m of structural uplift associated with the impact event. This extensive aquifer is known elsewhere in southern Manitoba for its naturally-softened groundwaters and locally elevated F - concentrations. Group I groundwaters are interpreted as discharge from the Winnipeg Formation where it abuts against crater-fill deposits. Group II high-F - groundwaters are interpreted as modern recharge from within the impact structure, displacing Group I

  8. Identification of an operon involved in fluoride resistance in Enterobacter cloacae FRM

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Xiaoqing; Tian, Jian; Liu, Lihui; Zhu, Tao; Yu, Xiaoxia; Chu, Xiaoyu; Yao, Bin; Wu, Ningfeng; Fan, Yunliu

    2017-01-01

    Fluorine is ubiquitous and the most active non-metal element in nature. While many microorganisms have developed fluoride resistance as a result of the widespread and prolonged application of oral hygiene products, the mechanisms used by these organisms to overcome fluoride toxicity are incompletely understood. In this study, a fluoride-resistant strain, Enterobacter cloacae FRM, was identified which could grow well at a fluoride concentration of 4,000?mg/L. According to comparative genomics,...

  9. Determination of fluoride content in UO2F2 and ADUF solution by ion selective electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samanta, Papu; Kumar, Pradeep; Bagchi, A.C.

    2017-01-01

    During production of uranium metal powder, liquid solution UO 2 F 2 and ADUF containing high content of fluoride gets generated. Fluoride being corrosive in nature, fluorides concentration needs to determined. Ion selective electrode, LaF 3 (Eu) crystal, has been used. Uranium was found to interfere with fluoride analysis. Study was carried out to selectively remove uranium by solvent extraction employing D2EHPA+Cyanex 923 and TBP in dodecane. The TBP was found effective to remove uranium. (author)

  10. Measurements of natural 41Ca concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhof, A.

    1989-05-01

    Atomic mass spectroscopic examinations on 41 Ca were carried out in the UNILAC accelerator. A sensitivity of about 10 -15 was achieved. This would allow the measurement of present natural 41 Ca concentrations as soon as the problem of the transmission determination is solved. In this respect suggestions were worked out and their feasibility discussed. The detection of 41 Ca-ions is especially free of background when high UNILAC-energies are applied. An estimation showed a background level corresponding with a 41 Ca concentration of less then 10 -17 referred to 40 Ca. Besides an independent concept for the electromagnetic concentration of 41 Ca with variable concentration factors was developed. After being concentrated up to 50 respectively 25 times the initial concentration in the GSI mass separator, the 41 Ca concentration of three recent deer bones found in the Odenwald was measured by atomic mass spectroscopy in the 14UD-Pelletron Tandem in Rehovot (Israel). The measured 41 Ca concentrations ranged between 10 -14 to 10 -13 with consideration of the concentration factor. A theoretical study of the 41 Ca production in the earth's surface based on cosmic radiation illustrates the influence of trace elements on the neutron flux and thus on the 41 Ca production. This influence might be a possible explanation for the observed amplitude of variation of the 41 Ca concentration in recent bones which are of decisive importance for the feasibility of 41 Ca-related dating. In this work a method is suggested that does not depend on the amplitude of variation mentioned above and which would allow the determination of the erosion rate of rocks by its 41 Ca concentrations. (orig./HP) [de

  11. Fluoride metabolism in plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, R; Shorthouse, M

    1964-04-04

    Grass seedlings exposed to inorganic fluoride solutions do not take up appreciable amounts of fluoride until concentrations of more than 1.0 mM (19 p.p.m.) are used. No formation of organic fluoride has been found, even with exposure to 15.75 mM fluoride, indicating that there is no formation of fluoroacetate or similar compounds. 8 references, 2 tables.

  12. Water fluoridation in 40 Brazilian cities: 7 year analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzely Adas Saliba MOIMAZ

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives Fluoride levels in the public water supplies of 40 Brazilian cities were analyzed and classified on the basis of risk/benefit balance. Material and Methods Samples were collected monthly over a seven-year period from three sites for each water supply source. The samples were analyzed in duplicate in the laboratory of the Center for Research in Public Health - UNESP using an ion analyzer coupled to a fluoride-specific electrode. Results A total of 19,533 samples were analyzed, of which 18,847 were artificially fluoridated and 686 were not artificially fluoridated. In samples from cities performing water fluoridation, 51.57% (n=9,720 had fluoride levels in the range of 0.55 to 0.84 mg F/L; 30.53% (n=5,754 were below 0.55 mg F/L and 17.90% (n=3,373 were above 0.84 mg F/L (maximum concentration=6.96 mg F/L. Most of the cities performing fluoridation that had a majority of samples with fluoride levels above the recommended parameter had deep wells and more than one source of water supply. There was some variability in the fluoride levels of samples from the same site and between collection sites in the same city. Conclusions The majority of samples from cities performing fluoridation had fluoride levels within the range that provides the best combination of risks and benefits, minimizing the risk of dental fluorosis while preventing dental caries. The conduction of studies about water distribution systems is suggested in cities with high natural fluoride concentrations in order to optimize the use of natural fluoride for fluoridation costs and avoid the risk of dental fluorosis.

  13. Effect of different concentrations of fluoride varnish on enamel surface microhardness: An in vitro randomized controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya Subramaniam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dental caries occurs as a result of demineralization-remineralization phases occurring alternately at the tooth surface. Fluoride varnishes have a caries-inhibiting effect on teeth through remineralization. The resulting enamel is resistant to acid dissolution. Aim: The aim of this study is to assess enamel surface microhardness (SMH following varnish application with different fluoride concentrations. Materials and Methods: Ninety freshly extracted, caries-free premolar teeth were used. Teeth were sectioned to obtain enamel blocks from the buccal surface of crown. The blocks were serially polished and flattened, embedded in acrylic blocks and smoothened to achieve a flat surface. The samples were divided into three groups, namely, A, B, and C consisting of 30 enamel blocks each. In Group A, Fluor Protector® varnish and in Group B, Bi-Fluorid 10® varnish was applied. Group C served as controls. All samples were subjected to a demineralization-remineralization cycle for 7 days. The SMH of enamel was measured. Data obtained was subjected to statistical analysis using the Student's t-test and one-way ANOVA. Results: The mean values of enamel SMH of Groups A and B were 496.99 ± 4.81 and 449.47 ± 7.37 Vickers Hardness Number, respectively. Conclusion: Fluor Protector varnish showed significantly higher enamel SMH than that of the other two groups (P < 0.05.

  14. Renewable energy powered membrane technology: Impact of pH and ionic strength on fluoride and natural organic matter removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owusu-Agyeman, Isaac; Shen, Junjie; Schäfer, Andrea Iris

    2018-04-15

    Real water pH and ionic strength vary greatly, which influences the performance of membrane processes such as nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO). Systematic variation of pH (3-12) and ionic strength (2-10g/L as total dissolved solids (TDS)) was undertaken with a real Tanzanian water to investigate how water quality affects retention mechanisms of fluoride (F) and natural organic matter (NOM). An autonomous solar powered NF/RO system driven by a solar array simulator was supplied with constant power from a generator. An open NF (NF270) and a brackish water RO (BW30) membrane were used. A surface water with a very high F (59.7mg/L) and NOM (110mgC/L) was used. Retention of F by NF270 was 80% at pH4, and about 99% at pH >5, due to the smaller pore size and hence a more dominant size exclusion. In consequence, only little impact of ionic strength increase was observed for BW30. The concentration of NOM in permeates of both NF270 and BW30 were typically energy fluctuations, this research emphasises on feed water quality that affects system performance and may alter due to a number of environmental factors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Dental fluorosis and urinary fluoride in 10-12 years old adolescents of Bushehr port

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giti Javan

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fluoride increases tooth resistance to dental caries, but mild toxicity due to excessive ingestion of fluoride can cause dental fluorosis. Drinking water naturally contains fluoride and is a major source of fluoride. In Bushehr port, drinking water is supplied from limestone springs with normal fluoride levels but dental fluorosis is observed. Methods: A total of 95 native school children (between the ages of 10-12 years old were randomly selected from four Bushehr port regions. Dental fluorosis, height and weight were examined. Probable attributing factors of dental fluorosis were also questioned. A 16 to 18 hours urinary fluoride concentration was measured with a fluoride ion selective electrode. Results: Dental fluorosis in four upper incisors was apparent in 52.6 % of the subjects. The urinary fluoride concentration was 2.18 mg/lit. Fluoride concentration in drinking water of schools ranged from 0.41 to 0.58 mg/lit. Forty percent of subjects were caries free. Conclusion: In spite of the normal range of fluoride concentration in the drinking water of Bushehr, dental fluorosis and urinary fluoride concentration are higher than the recommended ranges. Therefore, it is necessary to further investigate the amount and effects of fluoride ingestion in residents of Bushehr province.

  16. Comparison of concentrations of drugs between blood samples with and without fluoride additive-important findings for Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol and amphetamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedfeld, Christopher; Krueger, Julia; Skopp, Gisela; Musshoff, Frank

    2018-02-17

    Fluoride is a common stabilizing agent in forensic toxicology to avoid the frequent problem of degradation of drugs in blood samples especially described for cocaine. In cases only samples with addition of fluoride are available, it is a crucial question if also concentrations of common drugs other than cocaine (amphetamines, opiates and cannabinoids) are affected by fluoride. So far, there are only rare literature data available on discrepant results especially for Δ 9 -tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). In this study, comparative analysis of positive tested paired routine plasma/serum samples (n = 375), collected at the same time point (one device with and one without fluoride), was carried out with special focus on cannabinoids. Samples were measured with validated routine liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry methods for THC, 11-hydroxy-THC (THC-OH), 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THC-COOH), cocaine, benzoylecgonine, ecgonine methyl ester, morphine, codeine, amphetamine, methamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine, and 3,4-methylenedioxyethylamphetamine, and results were statistically evaluated. Beside the expected stabilization effect on cocaine and the consequently reduced concentration of ecgonine methyl ester in fluoride samples, benzoylecgonine was elevated compared to respective samples without fluoride. Most importantly, new findings were significantly reduced mean concentrations of THC (- 17%), THC-OH (- 17%), and THC-COOH (- 22%) in fluoride samples. Mean amphetamine concentration was significantly higher in samples with the additive (+ 6%). For the other amphetamine type of drugs as well as for morphine and codeine, no significant differences could be seen. Whenever specified thresholds have been set, such as in most European countries, the use of different blood sample systems may result in a motorist being differently charged or prosecuted. The findings will support forensic toxicologists at the

  17. Fluoridated Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics Services Directory Cancer Prevention Overview Research Fluoridated Water On This Page What is fluoride, and where is it found? What is water fluoridation? When did water fluoridation begin in the ...

  18. Environmental natural radioactivity concentrations of Tekirdag

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yarar, Y.; Kam, E.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: In this study, the environmental natural radioactivity concentrations of Tekirdag, a city in the region of Marmara in Turkey, have been measured. Gamma spectrometric analysis of the soil samples collected from 40 points of Tekirdag was performed by using an HPGe detector and the radionuclide concentrations of the decay products of 238 U and 232 Th series, 40K and 137 Cs were determined. Gross alpha and gross beta activities of the water samples taken from municipal supplies, springs, wells and fountains were performed by using the Berthold, LB770-PC 10, a gas-flow proportional counter. Gamma exposure dose rates were measured by using an Eberline Smart Portable scintillation detector and the annual effective dose equivalents caused by exposure gamma dose rates were calculated

  19. Dental fluorosis and urinary fluoride concentration as a reflection of fluoride exposure and its impact on IQ level and BMI of children of Laxmisagar, Simlapal Block of Bankura District, W.B., India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Kousik; Mondal, Naba Kumar

    2016-04-01

    There has been growing public concern about intellectual performance of children at high levels of fluoride exposure. A cross-sectional study was conducted in Simlapal Block of Bankura District, West Bengal, to find out the relationship between fluoride (F) exposure as exposure dose (ED) with dental fluorosis (DF), urinary fluoride concentration (UF), intelligence quotient (IQ) and body mass index (BMI). Fifty groundwater samples were collected from the target area. One hundred forty-nine children belonging to age group 6 to 18 years were considered for this study. Experimental results reveal that mean F(-) concentration of that area is 2.11 mg/L (±SD 1.64). On the basis of F concentration in groundwater and water consumption pattern, ED was calculated to explore the impact of F(-) on DF, UF, IQ, and BMI. Paired t test results suggest that exposure rate of F does not show any significant differences ( severe > mild > very mild > questionable > normal conditions. The highest UF concentration was recorded as 17 mg/L, but the status of DF in the affected children was recorded as moderate. The results also reveal that ED has a positive correlation with DF (r = 0.299, P fluoride toxicity.

  20. Determination of fluorine concentrations using wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence (WDXRF) spectrometry to analyze fluoride precipitates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H. A.; Lee, J.; Kwon, E.; Kim, D.; Yoon, H. O.

    2015-12-01

    In recent times, fluorine has been receiving increasing attention due to the possibility for chemical (HF) leakage accidents and its high toxicity to human and environment. In this respect, a novel approach for the determination of fluorine concentrations in water samples using wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence (WDXRF) spectrometry was investigated in this study. The main disadvantage of WDXRF technique for fluorine analysis is low analytical sensitivity for light elements with atomic number (Z) less than 15. To overcome this problem, we employed the precipitation reaction which fluoride is reacted with cation such as Al3+ and/or Ca2+ prior to WDXRF analysis because of their high analytical sensitivity. The cation was added in fluoride solutions to form precipitate (AlF3 and/or CaF2) and then the solution was filtered through Whatman filter. After drying at 60 °C for 5 min, the filter was coated with X-ray film and directly analyzed using WDXRF spectrometry. Consequently, we analyzed the cation on filter and subsequently fluorine concentration was calculated inversely based on chemical form of precipitate. This method can improve the analytical sensitivity of WDXRF technique for fluorine analysis and be applicable to various elements that can make precipitate.

  1. Purifying fluoride-contaminated water by a novel forward osmosis design with enhanced flux under reduced concentration polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Madhubonti; Chakrabortty, Sankha; Pal, Parimal; Linnanen, Lassi

    2015-08-01

    For purifying fluoride-contaminated water, a new forward osmosis scheme in horizontal flat-sheet cross flow module was designed and investigated. Effects of pressure, cross flow rate, draw solution and alignment of membrane module on separation and flux were studied. Concentration polarization and reverse salt diffusion got significantly reduced in the new hydrodynamic regime. This resulted in less membrane fouling, better solute separation and higher pure water flux than in a conventional module. The entire scheme was completed in two stages-an upstream forward osmosis for separating pure water from contaminated water and a downstream nanofiltration operation for continuous recovery and recycle of draw solute. Synchronization of these two stages of operation resulted in a continuous, steady-state process. From a set of commercial membranes, two polyamide composite membranes were screened out for the upstream and downstream filtrations. A 0.3-M NaCl solution was found to be the best one for forward osmosis draw solution. Potable water with less than 1% residual fluoride could be produced at a high flux of 60-62 L m(-2) h(-1) whereas more than 99% draw solute could be recovered and recycled in the downstream nanofiltration stage from where flux was 62-65 L m(-2) h(-1).

  2. Studies on Pu(IV)/(III)-oxalate precipitation from nitric acid containing high concentration of calcium and fluoride ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalsi, P.K.; Pawar, S.M.; Ghadse, D.R.; Joshi, A.R.; Ramakrishna, V.V.; Vaidya, V.N.; Venugopal, V.

    2003-01-01

    Plutonium (IV)/(III) oxalate precipitation from nitric acid solution, containing large amount of calcium and fluoride ions was investigated. It was observed that direct precipitation of Pu (IV) oxalate from nitric acid containing large amount of calcium and fluoride ions did not give good decontamination of Pu from calcium and fluoride impurities. However, incorporation of hydroxide precipitation using ammonium hydroxide prior to Pu (IV) oxalate precipitation results into PuO 2 with much less calcium and fluoride impurities. Whereas, good decontamination from calcium and fluoride impurities could be obtained by employing Pu (III) oxalate precipitation directly from nitric acid containing large amount of calcium and fluoride ions. A method was also developed to recover Pu from the oxalate waste containing calcium and fluoride ions. (author)

  3. Nutritional status and dental fluorosis among schoolchildren in communities with different drinking water fluoride concentrations in a central region in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irigoyen-Camacho, M E; García Pérez, A; Mejía González, A; Huizar Alvarez, R

    2016-01-15

    Poor water quality and under nutrition are important factors affecting the health of many communities in developing countries. The aims of this study were: i) to describe the fluoride water concentration and the hydrogeological conditions in a region of a state located in the central in Mexico ii) to measure the association between undernutrition and dental fluorosis in children living in communities with different drinking water fluoride concentrations in a state located in the central region of Mexico. Field work was performed in the region to identify the prevailing groundwater flow characteristics and water wells were sampled to analyze water fluoride concentration. Children were selected from three communities that had different drinking water fluoride concentrations (i.e., 0.56, 0.70 and 1.60 mg/l). Fluoridated salt was available in these communities. The Thylstrup-Fejerskov Index (TFI) was used to assess dental fluorosis. Categories four or higher of this index involve changes in the entire tooth surface (ITF ≥ 4). The weight and height of the children were measured. The assessment of undernutrition was based on the World Health Organization criteria: children were classified as being at risk of low-height (Height-for-Age Z score water captured by the wells is the result of a reaction with volcanic materials. The water fluoride concentration in the region ranged from 0.2 to 1.6 mg/l. A total of 734 schoolchildren participated in the study. The percentage of children in fluorosis categories (ITF ≥ 4) was 15.9%, 21.1% of the children were at risk of low height-for-age, and 8.0% had low height-for-age. The percentage of children with fluorosis (ITF ≥ 4) was 6.3%, 9.1% and 31.9% (p ˂ 0.001) and low high-for-age was 2.9%, 2.5% and 8.4% (p ˂ 0.001), for the communities with F concentrations of 0.56 mg/l, 0.70 mg/l and 1.6 mg/l, respectively. The logistic regression model showed an association between dental fluorosis (TFI ≥ 4) and low height-for-age (OR

  4. Influência de diferentes concentrações de flúor na água em indicadores epidemiológicos de saúde/doença bucal Influence of different concentrations of fluoride in the water on epidemiologic indicators of oral health/disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Baroni de Carvalho

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar o acesso a fontes de fluoreto e as condições de saúde bucal de 237 escolares de nove a dezesseis anos, de três localidades com diferentes concentrações de fluoreto na água. O teor de flúor na água de cada região foi analisado pela técnica do eletrodo seletivo para o íon flúor e a foi avaliada prevalência de cárie e fluorose, respectivamente, pelo índice CPOD e TSIF, apresentando diferença estatisticamente significante (ANOVA; p The scope of this study was to evaluate access to fluoride sources and oral health hygiene of 237 schoolchildren aged nine to sixteen, from three locations with different fluoride concentrations in the water. The fluoride level in the water of each area was analyzed by the selective electrode technique for the fluoride ion and the prevalence of dental caries and fluorosis were evaluated, respectively, by the DMFT and TSIF index, revealing a statistically significant difference (ANOVA; p <0,05 in the three locations: area without artificial fluoridation (DMTF 5.32 ± 3.49 and 16% of dental fluorosis; area with artificial fluoridation of 0.8 ppmF (DMTF 1.88 ± 2.22 and 94% of dental fluorosis; area with natural fluoridation of 2.54 ppmF (DMTF 3.96 ± 2.38 and 100% of dental fluorosis. The findings suggest that the epidemiologic indicators of oral health/disease are influenced by the presence of fluoride in the water supply and that supervision and orientation are fundamental in the correct use of fluoridated compositions, taking advantage of the maximum benefit in the control of dental caries with minimum risk of the occurrence of dental fluorosis.

  5. Fluoride ions sorption of the water using natural and modified hematite with aluminium hydroxide; Sorcion de iones fluoruro del agua utilizando hematita natural y hematita acondicionada con hidroxido de aluminio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teutli S, E. A.

    2011-07-01

    Fluorine is a mineral known for its dental benefits, but fluoride ions can cause fluoro sis in excessive quantities. There are many epidemiological studies on possible adverse effects resulting from prolonged ingestion of fluoride through drinking water. These studies demonstrate that fluoride mainly affects the bone tissue (bones and teeth), may produce an adverse effect on tooth enamel and can cause mild dental fluoro sis at concentrations from 0.9 to 1.2 mg/L in drinking water. In several states of Mexico, water contaminated with fluoride ions can be found, such as Aguascalientes, Chihuahua, Coahuila, Durango, Guanajuato, Sonora, Zacatecas, San Luis Potosi and Jalisco, where the fluoride ions levels are higher than 1.5 mg/L, established by the Mexican Official Standard (NOM-127-Ssa-2000) which sets the permissible limits of water for human use and consumption. Currently, several technologies have been proposed to remove fluoride ions from water such as precipitation methods which are based on the addition of chemicals to water and sorption methods to removed fluoride ions by sorption or ion exchange reactions by some suitable substrate capable of regenerate and reuse. In this work, the sorption of fluoride ions using unmodified and modified hematite with aluminum hydroxide to remove fluoride ions from water by bath experiments was studied. The hematite was modified by treating it with aluminum hydroxide, NaOH and Al{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3} solutions. The characterization of hematite before and after modification with aluminum hydroxide was studied by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, EDS and Bet. The effect of ph, contact time, concentration of fluoride ions, and the dose of sorbent on the sorption of fluoride ions by the modified hematite were studied. Equilibrium was reached within 48 hours of contact time and the maximum sorption of fluoride ions were in the range pH{sub eq} between 2.3 and 6.2. Sorption capacities of fluoride ions as a

  6. Changes in the Concentration of Ions in Saliva and Dental Plaque after Application of CPP-ACP with and without Fluoride among 6-9 Year Old Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poureslami H

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: The casein phospho peptide-amorphous calcium phosphate with or without fluoride (CPP-ACPF and CPP-ACP respectively are of considerably new materials which are highly recommended for prevention of dental caries. However, there is a shortage in literature on how they affect the ion concentration of saliva or dental plaque. Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the concentration of calcium, phosphate and fluoride in the plaque and saliva of children with Early Childhood Caries (ECC after applying the CPP-ACP paste in comparison with the use of CPP- ACPF paste. Materials and Methods: One ml of un-stimulated saliva of 25 preschool children was collected and then 1 mg of the plaque sample was collected from the buccal surfaces of the two first primary molars on the upper jaw. CPP-ACP as well as CPP- ACPF pastes were applied on the tooth surfaces in two separate steps. In steps, plaque and saliva sampling was performed after 60 minutes. The amount of calcium ions was measured by Atomic Absorption Device and the amount of phosphate and fluoride ions was measured by Ion Chromatography instrument. Data were analyzed using Repeated Measurements ANOVA at a p < 0.05 level of significance. Results: Application of both CPP-ACPF and CPP-ACP significantly increased the concentration of calcium, phosphate, and fluoride in both saliva and dental plaque. Moreover, significantly higher salivary fluoride concentration was seen after application of CPP-ACPF compared to CPP-ACP. No other significant difference was observed between these two materials. Conclusions: CPP-ACPF can be more useful than CPP-ACP in protecting the primary teeth against caries process, especially when there is poor hygiene.

  7. Changes in the Concentration of Ions in Saliva and Dental Plaque after Application of CPP-ACP with and without Fluoride among 6-9 Year Old Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poureslami, H; Hoseinifar, Ra; Khazaeli, P; Hoseinifar, Re; Sharifi, H; Poureslami, P

    2017-03-01

    The casein phospho peptide-amorphous calcium phosphate with or without fluoride (CPP-ACPF and CPP-ACP respectively) are of considerably new materials which are highly recommended for prevention of dental caries. However, there is a shortage in literature on how they affect the ion concentration of saliva or dental plaque. The aim of this study was to evaluate the concentration of calcium, phosphate and fluoride in the plaque and saliva of children with Early Childhood Caries (ECC) after applying the CPP-ACP paste in comparison with the use of CPP-ACPF paste. One ml of un-stimulated saliva of 25 preschool children was collected and then 1 mg of the plaque sample was collected from the buccal surfaces of the two first primary molars on the upper jaw. CPP-ACP as well as CPP-ACPF pastes were applied on the tooth surfaces in two separate steps. In steps, plaque and saliva sampling was performed after 60 minutes. The amount of calcium ions was measured by Atomic Absorption Device and the amount of phosphate and fluoride ions was measured by Ion Chromatography instrument. Data were analyzed using Repeated Measurements ANOVA at a p Application of both CPP-ACPF and CPP-ACP significantly increased the concentration of calcium, phosphate, and fluoride in both saliva and dental plaque. Moreover, significantly higher salivary fluoride concentration was seen after application of CPP-ACPF compared to CPP-ACP. No other significant difference was observed between these two materials. CPP-ACPF can be more useful than CPP-ACP in protecting the primary teeth against caries process, especially when there is poor hygiene.

  8. Fluoride and Oral Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mullane, D M; Baez, R J; Jones, S; Lennon, M A; Petersen, P E; Rugg-Gunn, A J; Whelton, H; Whitford, G M

    2016-06-01

    The discovery during the first half of the 20th century of the link between natural fluoride, adjusted fluoride levels in drinking water and reduced dental caries prevalence proved to be a stimulus for worldwide on-going research into the role of fluoride in improving oral health. Epidemiological studies of fluoridation programmes have confirmed their safety and their effectiveness in controlling dental caries. Major advances in our knowledge of how fluoride impacts the caries process have led to the development, assessment of effectiveness and promotion of other fluoride vehicles including salt, milk, tablets, toothpaste, gels and varnishes. In 1993, the World Health Organization convened an Expert Committee to provide authoritative information on the role of fluorides in the promotion of oral health throughout the world (WHO TRS 846, 1994). This present publication is a revision of the original 1994 document, again using the expertise of researchers from the extensive fields of knowledge required to successfully implement complex interventions such as the use of fluorides to improve dental and oral health. Financial support for research into the development of these new fluoride strategies has come from many sources including government health departments as well as international and national grant agencies. In addition, the unique role which industry has played in the development, formulation, assessment of effectiveness and promotion of the various fluoride vehicles and strategies is noteworthy. This updated version of 'Fluoride and Oral Health' has adopted an evidence-based approach to its commentary on the different fluoride vehicles and strategies and also to its recommendations. In this regard, full account is taken of the many recent systematic reviews published in peer reviewed literature.

  9. Natural convection between two concentric spheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blondel-Roux, Marie

    1983-01-01

    After an overview of researches on natural convection in a confined or semi-confined environment, this research thesis reports the use of the Caltagirone and Mojtabi numerical model and the study of its validity for different values of the Rayleigh and Prandtl numbers. Results obtained with this model are compared with experimental ones. Thermal transfer curves are presented and discussed, as well as the different temperature fields numerically obtained, flow function fields, velocities in the fluid layer, and temperature profiles with respect to the Rayleigh number [fr

  10. Concentração de fluoreto em arroz, feijão e alimentos infantis industrializados Fluoride concentrations in typical Brazilian foods and in infant foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato C V Casarin

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Determinar a concentração de fluoreto na refeição brasileira típica (arroz e feijão e em alimentos infantis industrializados e estimar suas contribuições para fluorose dental. MÉTODOS: Os alimentos foram adquiridos de supermercados das cidades de Piracicaba e Campinas, SP, Brasil. Os alimentos infantis industrializados foram comprados em 2001 e o arroz e feijão em 2003, e imediatamente analisados. Foram analisadas três marcas de arroz, três de feijão e 36 amostras de alimentos infantis divididos em cinco grupos: prontos para o consumo; mingaus; alimentos formulados; leites em pó e outros alimentos. No arroz e feijão, foram determinadas as concentrações de fluoreto nas sementes "in natura" e após cozimento com água destilada ou fluoretada (0,7 ppm. Todas as análises de fluoreto foram feitas com eletrodo específico. Considerou-se 0,07 mg/kg/dia como a dose limite de exposição a fluoreto para risco de fluorose. RESULTADOS: A concentração de fluoreto encontrada nos grãos de arroz e feijão foi baixa. Porém, a concentração aumentou 100-200 vezes após cozimento em água fluoretada e mesmo assim, foi menor que a encontrada em alguns alimentos industrializados. Uma refeição com arroz e feijão preparada com água fluoretada seria responsável por 29% da dose limite de ingestão de fluoreto em termos de fluorose aceitável; a contribuição de alguns alimentos industrializados atingiria 45%. CONCLUSÕES: A alimentação típica brasileira, mesmo preparada com água fluoretada, é mais segura em termos de risco de fluorose dental que alguns alimentos infantis industrializados.OBJECTIVE: To determine fluoride concentrations in the typical Brazilian meal (rice with beans and in processed infant foods, and to estimate their contribution towards dental fluorosis. METHODS: The foods were purchased at supermarkets in the cities of Piracicaba and Campinas, Southeastern Brazil. The processed infant foods were bought in

  11. Evaluation and modeling of the parameters affecting fluoride toxicity level in aquatic environments by bioassay method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Reza Shamsollahi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fluoride exists in various forms in nature and water resources. , The rising level of fluoride in water resources due to discharge of industrial effluents can cause toxicity in aquatic organisms. To prevent toxicity, it is necessary to determine maximum fluoride toxicity as well as effluent discharge limits. The aim of this study was to determine the maximum fluoride toxicity and the factors affecting fluoride toxicity to provide a model in order to determine the effluent discharge limits. Methods: Daphnia magna bioassay in the absence of confounding factors was used to determine the maximum level of fluoride toxicity. Then, bioassay was repeated in the presence of the confounding factors (hardness, temperature and exposure time to determine their effects. Results: In the absence of intervening factors, fluoride LC50 levels determined after 24, 48 and 72 hours exposure were 4.9, 46.5 and 38.7 mg/l, respectively.. Also, the influence of confounding factors on LC50 values was reported significant by Minitab software. Conclusion: Increasing the water hardness reduced fluoride toxicity, and increasing the water temperature and exposure time increased fluoride toxicity in aquatic environments. Therefore, while determining the wastewater discharge limit in terms of fluoride concentration, it is essential to take the effect of confounding factors on fluoride toxicity into account in order to prevent toxicity in the open water resources.

  12. Fluoride retention by kaolin clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kau, P. M. H.; Smith, D. W.; Binning, Philip John

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the potential effectiveness of kaolin clay liners in storage of fluoride contaminated waste, an experimental study of the sorption and desorption behaviour of fluoride in kaolin clay was conducted. The degree of fluoride sorption by kaolin was found to depend on solution p......H and available fluoride concentration with equilibrium being achieved within 24 h. A site activation process involving the uptake of fluoride was also observed at the initial stages of sorption. This behaviour was attributed to a layer expansion process of the clay during sorption. The maximum fluoride sorption...... capacity was found to be 18.3 meq/100 g at pH 6 and 8.6 meq/100 g at pH 7. A competitive Langmuir sorption isotherm where sorption is dependant on both pH and fluoride concentration is employed to characterise the experimental sorption and desorption data. The sorption and desorption isotherms revealed...

  13. A health risk assessment for fluoride in Central Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fordyce, F M; Vrana, K; Zhovinsky, E; Povoroznuk, V; Toth, G; Hope, B C; Iljinsky, U; Baker, J

    2007-04-01

    Like many elements, fluorine (which generally occurs in nature as fluoride) is beneficial to human health in trace amounts, but can be toxic in excess. The links between low intakes of fluoride and dental protection are well known; however, fluoride is a powerful calcium-seeking element and can interfere with the calcified structure of bones and teeth in the human body at higher concentrations causing dental or skeletal fluorosis. One of the main exposure routes is via drinking water and the World Health Organisation currently sets water quality guidelines for the element. In Central Europe, groundwater resources that exceed the guideline value of 1.5 mg l-1 are widespread and effects on health of high fluoride in water have been reported. The aim of the current project was to develop a geographic information system (GIS) to aid the identification of areas where high-fluoride waters and fluorosis may be a problem; hence, where water treatment technologies should be targeted. The development of the GIS was based upon the collation and digitisation of existing information relevant to fluoride risk in Ukraine, Moldova, Hungary and Slovakia assembled for the first time in a readily accessible form. In addition, geochemistry and health studies to examine in more detail the relationships between high-fluoride drinking waters and health effects in the population were carried out in Moldova and Ukraine demonstrating dental fluorosis prevalence rates of 60-90% in adolescents consuming water containing 2-7 mg l-1 fluoride.

  14. Distribution and health risk assessment of natural fluoride of drinking groundwater resources of Isfahan, Iran, using GIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghapour, Saba; Bina, Bijan; Tarrahi, Mohammad Javad; Amiri, Fahimeh; Ebrahimi, Afshin

    2018-02-13

    Fluoride (F) contamination in groundwater can be problematic to human health. This study evaluated the concentration of fluoride in groundwater resources of Isfahan Province, the central plateau of Iran, and its related health issues to the inhabitant populations. For this purpose, 573 drinking groundwater samples were analyzed in 2016 by using the spectrophotometric method. Non-carcinogenic health risks due to F exposure through consumption of drinking water were assessed using the US EPA method. In addition, the associated zoning maps of the obtained results were presented using geographic information system (GIS). The results indicated that F content in drinking water ranged from 0.02 to 2.8 mg/L. The F contents were less than 0.50 mg/L in 63% of the drinking groundwater samples, 0.51-1.5 mg/L in 33.15%, and higher than 1.5 mg/L in 3.85% (Iran and World Health Organization guidelines) of the drinking groundwater samples. The F levels in the west and the south groundwater resources of the study areas were lower than 0.5 mg/L, which is within the recommended values for controlling dental caries (0.50-1.0 mg/L). Therefore, these places require more attention and more research is needed to increase F intake for health benefit. The HQ index for children, teens and male and female adults had health hazards (HQ > 1) in 51, 17, 28, and 18 of samples, respectively. Groundwater resources having a risk of more than one were located in the counties of Nayin, Natanz, and Ardestan. So, in these areas, there are potential risks of dental fluorosis. The most vulnerable groups were children. The F levels must be reduced in this region to decrease endemic fluorosis.

  15. Magnetic interactions through fluoride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kasper Steen; Sigrist, Marc; Weihe, Høgni

    2014-01-01

    support the parameter values and resolve |E| ≈ 0.04 cm(-1). The exchange coupling constant (J) is 1 order of magnitude smaller than that found in comparable systems with linear oxide bridging but comparable to typical magnitudes through cyanide, thus underlining the potential of fluoride complexes......The nature of the magnetic interaction through fluoride in a simple, dinuclear manganese(III) complex (1), bridged by a single fluoride ion in a perfectly linear fashion, is established by experiment and density functional theory. The magnitude of the antiferromagnetic exchange interaction...

  16. Small molecule fluoride toxicity agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, James W; Plummer, Mark S; Blount, Kenneth F; Ames, Tyler D; Breaker, Ronald R

    2015-04-23

    Fluoride is a ubiquitous anion that inhibits a wide variety of metabolic processes. Here, we report the identification of a series of compounds that enhance fluoride toxicity in Escherichia coli and Streptococcus mutans. These molecules were isolated by using a high-throughput screen (HTS) for compounds that increase intracellular fluoride levels as determined via a fluoride riboswitch reporter fusion construct. A series of derivatives were synthesized to examine structure-activity relationships, leading to the identification of compounds with improved activity. Thus, we demonstrate that small molecule fluoride toxicity agonists can be identified by HTS from existing chemical libraries by exploiting a natural fluoride riboswitch. In addition, our findings suggest that some molecules might be further optimized to function as binary antibacterial agents when combined with fluoride. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. HOUSEHOLD PURIFICATION OF FLUORIDE CONTAMINATED MAGADI (TRONA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Joan Maj; Dahi, Elian

    1997-01-01

    Purification of fluoride contaminated magadi is studied using bone char sorption and calcium precipitation. The bone char treatment is found to be workable both in columns and in batches where the magadi is dissolved in water prior to treatment. The concentrations in the solutions were 89 g magadi....../L and 95 and 400 mg F/L respectively in natural and synthetic solutions. The fluoride removal capacities observed were 4.6 mg F/g bone char for the column system and 2.7 mg F/g bone char for the batch system in case of synthetic magadi solution. It is however concluded that the batch system is the best...... treatment method. A procedure for purification of fluoride contaminated magadi at household level is described....

  18. Nature of suspended particulate matter and concentrations of heavy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The concentrations of metals in bottom sediment in the Tanzanian waters of Lake Victoria and the nature of suspended particulate matter (SPM) were analysed. The objective of the study was to compare levels of metals in sediment from different locations and to establish their sources. Metal concentrations were higher in ...

  19. Fluoride caused thyroid endocrine disruption in male zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jianjie, Chen; Wenjuan, Xue; Jinling, Cao; Jie, Song; Ruhui, Jia; Meiyan, Li

    2016-02-01

    Excessive fluoride in natural water ecosystem has the potential to detrimentally affect thyroid endocrine system, but little is known of such effects or underlying mechanisms in fish. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of fluoride on growth performance, thyroid histopathology, thyroid hormone levels, and gene expressions in the HPT axis in male zebrafish (Danio rerio) exposed to different determined concentrations of 0.1, 0.9, 2.0 and 4.1 M of fluoride to investigate the effects of fluoride on thyroid endocrine system and the potential toxic mechanisms caused by fluoride. The results indicated that the growth of the male zebrafish used in the experiments was significantly inhibited, the thyroid microtrastructure was changed, and the levels of T3 and T4 were disturbed in fluoride-exposed male fish. In addition, the expressional profiles of genes in HPT axis displayed alteration. The expressions of all studied genes were significantly increased in all fluoride-exposed male fish after exposure for 45 days. The transcriptional levels of corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), thyroglobulin (TG), sodium iodide symporter (NIS), iodothyronine I (DIO1), and thyroid hormone receptor alpha (TRα) were also elevated in all fluoride-exposed male fish after 90 days of exposure, while the inconsistent expressions were found in the mRNA of iodothyronineⅡ (DIO2), UDP glucuronosyltransferase 1 family a, b (UGT1ab), transthyretin (TTR), and thyroid hormone receptor beta (TRβ). These results demonstrated that fluoride could notably inhibit the growth of zebrafish, and significantly affect thyroid endocrine system by changing the microtrastructure of thyroid, altering thyroid hormone levels and endocrine-related gene expressions in male zebrafish. All above indicated that fluoride could pose a great threat to thyroid endocrine system, thus detrimentally affected the normal function of thyroid of male zebrafish. Copyright © 2015

  20. Frequency dependence of electrical properties of polyvinylidene fluoride/graphite electrode waste/natural carbon black composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insiyanda, D. R.; Indayaningsih, N.; Prihandoko, B.; Subhan, A.; Khaerudini, D. S.; Widodo, H.; Destyorini, F.; Chaer, A.

    2018-03-01

    Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVdF) is a semi-crystalline thermoplastic material with remarkably high piezoelectric coefficient and an attractive polymer matrix for micro-composite with superior mechanical and electrical properties. The conductive filler is obtained from Graphite Electrode Waste (GEW) and Natural Carbon Black (NCB). The variation of composite content (%) of PVdF/NCB/GEW were 100/0/0, 95/5/0, 95/0/5, 95/2.5/2.5. This experiment employed dry dispersion method for material mixing. The materials were then moulded using hot press machine with compression parameters of P = 5.5 MPa, T = 150 °C, t = 60 minutes, A = 5×5×(0.2 - 0.4) cm3. The electrical conductivity properties of pure PVdF, as well as PVdF/GEW, PVdF/NCB, and PVdF/NCB/GEW composites were investigated in a frequency range of 100 to 100000 Hz. The PVdF/GEW sample obtained the highest electrical conductivity. It is concluded that GEW and NCB can be incorporated into PVdF as a conductive filler to increase the conductivity of conductive material composite without solvent.

  1. No Calcium-Fluoride-Like Deposits Detected in Plaque Shortly after a Sodium Fluoride Mouthrinse

    OpenAIRE

    Vogel, G.L.; Tenuta, L.M.A.; Schumacher, G.E.; Chow, L.C.

    2010-01-01

    Plaque ‘calcium-fluoride-like’ (CaF2-like) and fluoride deposits held by biological/bacterial calcium fluoride (Ca-F) bonds appear to be the source of cariostatic concentrations of fluoride in plaque fluid. The aim of this study was to quantify the amounts of plaque fluoride held in these reservoirs after a sodium fluoride rinse. 30 and 60 min after a 228 μg/g fluoride rinse, plaque samples were collected from 11 volunteers. Each sample was homogenized, split into 2 aliquots (aliquots 1 and 2...

  2. Fluoride in groundwater: toxicological exposure and remedies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, S K; Singh, R K; Damodaran, T; Mishra, V K; Sharma, D K; Rai, Deepak

    2013-01-01

    Fluoride is a chemical element that is found most frequently in groundwater and has become one of the most important toxicological environmental hazards globally. The occurrence of fluoride in groundwater is due to weathering and leaching of fluoride-bearing minerals from rocks and sediments. Fluoride when ingested in small quantities (dental health by reducing dental caries, whereas higher concentrations (>1.5 mg/L) may cause fluorosis. It is estimated that about 200 million people, from among 25 nations the world over, may suffer from fluorosis and the causes have been ascribed to fluoride contamination in groundwater including India. High fluoride occurrence in groundwaters is expected from sodium bicarbonate-type water, which is calcium deficient. The alkalinity of water also helps in mobilizing fluoride from fluorite (CaF2). Fluoride exposure in humans is related to (1) fluoride concentration in drinking water, (2) duration of consumption, and (3) climate of the area. In hotter climates where water consumption is greater, exposure doses of fluoride need to be modified based on mean fluoride intake. Various cost-effective and simple procedures for water defluoridation techniques are already known, but the benefits of such techniques have not reached the rural affected population due to limitations. Therefore, there is a need to develop workable strategies to provide fluoride-safe drinking water to rural communities. The study investigated the geochemistry and occurrence of fluoride and its contamination in groundwater, human exposure, various adverse health effects, and possible remedial measures from fluoride toxicity effects.

  3. Gramicidin D enhances the antibacterial activity of fluoride

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, James W.; Zhou, Zhiyuan; Breaker, Ronald R.

    2014-01-01

    Fluoride is a toxic anion found in many natural environments. One of the major bacterial defenses against fluoride is the cell envelope, which limits passage of the membrane-impermeant fluoride anion. Accordingly, compounds that enhance the permeability of bacterial membranes to fluoride should also enhance fluoride toxicity. In this study, we demonstrate that the pore-forming antibiotic gramicidin D increases fluoride uptake in B. subtilis and that the antibacterial activity of this compound...

  4. Niobium electrodeposition from molten fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sartori, A.F.

    1987-01-01

    Niobium electrodeposition from molten alkali fluorides has been studied aiming the application of this technic to the processes of electrorefining and galvanotechnic of this metal. The effects of current density, temperature, niobium concentration in the bath, electrolysis time, substrate nature, ratio between anodic and cathodic areas, electrodes separation and the purity of anodes were investigated in relation to the cathodic current efficiency, electrorefining, electroplating and properties of the deposit and the electrolytic solution. The work also gives the results of the conctruction and operation of a pilot plant for refractory metals electrodeposition and shows the electrorefining and electroplating compared to those obtained at the laboratory scale. (author) [pt

  5. Natural variability in the surface ocean carbonate ion concentration

    OpenAIRE

    N. S. Lovenduski; M. C. Long; K. Lindsay

    2015-01-01

    We investigate variability in the surface ocean carbonate ion concentration ([CO32−]) on the basis of a long control simulation with a fully-coupled Earth System Model. The simulation is run with a prescribed, pre-industrial atmospheric CO2 concentration for 1000 years, permitting investigation of natural [CO32−] variability on interannual to multi-decadal timescales. We find high interannual variability in surface [CO32−] in the tropical...

  6. Natural variability in the surface ocean carbonate ion concentration

    OpenAIRE

    Lovenduski, N. S.; Long, M. C.; Lindsay, K.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate variability in the surface ocean carbonate ion concentration ([CO32−]) on the basis of a~long control simulation with an Earth System Model. The simulation is run with a prescribed, pre-industrial atmospheric CO2 concentration for 1000 years, permitting investigation of natural [CO32−] variability on interannual to multi-decadal timescales. We find high interannual variability in surface [CO32−] in the tropical Pacific and ...

  7. Fluoride analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, C S

    1963-01-01

    The methods and procedures for the detection and estimation of fluoride are varied and numerous. The problems of sampling, contamination, and loss in sampling waters, plant and animal tissues and atmospheres are discussed, along with brief descriptors of methods most commonly used. Techniques for separating fluorides from matrixes are discussed, as well as gravimetric, calorimetric, and spectrophotometric analytical techniques.

  8. Assessment of fluoride contaminations in groundwater of hard rock aquifers in Madurai district, Tamil Nadu (India)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thivya, C.; Chidambaram, S.; Rao, M. S.; Thilagavathi, R.; Prasanna, M. V.; Manikandan, S.

    2017-05-01

    The fluoride contamination in drinking water is already gone to the alarming level and it needs the immediate involvement and attention of all people to solve this problem. Fluoride problem is higher in hard rock terrains in worldwide and Madurai is such type of hard rock region. Totally 54 samples were collected from the Madurai district of Tamilnadu with respect to lithology. The samples collected were analysed for major cations and anions using standard procedures. The higher concentration of fluoride is noted in the Charnockite rock types of northern part of the study area. 20 % of samples are below 0.5 ppm and 6 % of samples are above 1.5 ppm exceeding the permissible limit. The affinity between the pH and fluoride ions in groundwater suggests that dissolution of fluoride bearing minerals in groundwater. The higher concentration of fluoride ions are observed in the lower EC concentration. The isotopic study suggests that fluoride is geogenic in nature. In factor scores, fluoride is noted in association with pH which indicates the dissolution process.

  9. Radius ratio effects on natural heat transfer in concentric annulus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alipour, M.; Hosseini, R.; Kolaei, Alireza Rezania

    2013-01-01

    This paper studies natural convection heat transfer in vertical and electrically heated annulus. The metallic cylinders mounted concentrically in a parallel tube. Measurements are carried out for four input electric powers and three radius ratios with an apparatus immersed in stagnant air...

  10. Lyophilization and Reconstitution of Reverse Osmosis Concentrated Natural Organic Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disinfection by-product (DBP) research can be complicated by difficulties in shipping large water quantities and changing natural organic matter (NOM) characteristics over time. To overcome these issues, it is advantageous to have a reliable method for concentrating and preservin...

  11. High concentrations of natural rubber latex allergens in gloves used ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. Gloves made of natural rubber latex (NRL) are commonly used by healthcare workers because of their good qualities. However, allergic reactions to latex allergens are still commonly reported. Objective. To measure the concentrations of Hev b 1, Hev b 3, Hev b 5 and Hev b 6.02 allergens in gloves used by a ...

  12. Research of CO2 concentration in naturally ventilated lecture room

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laska, Marta; Dudkiewicz, Edyta

    2017-11-01

    Naturally ventilated buildings especially dedicated for educational purposes need to be design to achieve required level of thermal comfort and indoor air quality. It is crucial in terms of both: health and productivity of the room users. Higher requirements of indoor environment are important due to the level of students concentration, their ability to acquire new knowledge and willingness to interact with the lecturer. The article presents the results of experimental study and surveys undertaken in naturally ventilated lecture room. The data is analysed in terms of CO2 concentration and its possible influence on users. Furthermore the outcome of the research is compared with the CO2 concentration models available in the literature.

  13. Radon concentration and natural radioactivity evaluation in the Vysehrad casemates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berka, Z.; Thinova, L.; Stepan, M.

    2004-01-01

    The Vysehrad casemates formed a part of Prague's defense system in the middle ages. The casemates consist of a large system of underground corridors (which are in direct contact with subsoils) that run around the whole Vysehrad hill. The corridors are covered by an artificially made-up ground. Although there are many vents and embrasures in the casemates, investigation of radon accumulation in the casemates is of interest. A comprehensive radon and natural radioactivity survey has been carried out on the Vysehrad hill as part of special scientific programme for secondary school students. No extreme radon concentration or extremely high natural radioactivity has been observed. The highest radon concentration were measured in the blind parts of corridors that are normally unused. The radon concentrations found can be described as health-safe

  14. Fluoride Intake through Consumption of Tap Water and Bottled Water in Belgium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herman van Oyen

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available There is a tendency to align higher levels of fluoride in natural mineral water with the existing higher levels in tap water. Treatment of natural mineral waters could harm the preservation of their natural character. In this study fluoride intake through bottled and tap water consumption in the Belgian adult population was assessed, taking into account regional differences. A deterministic approach was used whereby consumption quantities of tap water and different brands of bottled water were linked with their respective fluoride concentrations. Data from the national food consumption survey (2004 were used and the Nusser methodology was applied to obtain usual intake estimates. Mean intake of fluoride through total water consumption in Flanders was 1.4±0.7 mg/day (97.5th percentile: 3.1 mg/day, while in the Walloon region it was on average 0.9±0.6 mg/day (97.5th percentile: 2.4 mg/day. The probability of exceeding the UL of 7 mg per day via a normal diet was estimated to be low. Consequently, there is no need to revise the existing norms, but higher fluoride concentrations should be more clearly indicated on the labels. Reliable data about total dietary fluoride intake in children, including intake of fluoride via tooth paste and food supplements, are needed.

  15. Development of chitosan supported zirconium(IV) tungstophosphate composite for fluoride removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viswanathan, Natrayasamy, E-mail: natrayasamy_viswanathan@rediffmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Anna University Tiruchirappalli - Dindigul Campus, Dindigul 624622, Tamil Nadu (India); Meenakshi, S., E-mail: drs_meena@rediffmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Gandhigram Rural University, Gandhigram 624302, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2010-04-15

    A new biocomposite was prepared by incorporating inorganic ion exchanger namely zirconium(IV) tungstophosphate (ZrWP) into the chitosan biopolymeric matrix. The sorption behaviour of fluoride from aqueous solutions by this ZrWP/chitosan (ZrWPCs) composite has been investigated by batch technique. The fluoride sorption was studied as a function of contact time, pH, initial fluoride concentration, competing co-ions and temperature. The defluoridation capacity (DC) of the adsorbent was found to be 2025 mgF{sup -} kg{sup -1}. The composite was characterized using FTIR and SEM with EDAX analysis. The equilibrium sorption data were fitted to Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms. The kinetics of sorption was found to follow pseudo-second-order and intraparticle diffusion models. The values of thermodynamic parameters indicate the nature of sorption is spontaneous and endothermic. The biocomposite was successfully used for the removal of fluoride from the field water taken in a nearby fluoride endemic village.

  16. Evaluation of toxic action of fluorides on agricultural plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Grishko

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The toxicity of potassium fluoride, sodium fluoride and ammonium fluoride for pea, maize, oat and onion was studied. It was found that the level of the toxic influence had grown with increase of fluoride concentration in the media of growth (from 5 to 100 mg of F–/l. By increase of the toxic influence the agricultural crops are disposed in the following row: oat < onion < maize < pea. Ammonium fluoride demonstrates lesser toxicity, than potassium and sodium fluorides. Under low concentrations of fluoride compounds (5 and 10 mg of F–/l stimulation of roots growth is noted only for the oat.

  17. Fluoridation Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... return on investment for community water fluoridation (including productivity losses) ranged from $4 in small communities of ... National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Email Recommend Tweet YouTube Instagram Listen Watch RSS ...

  18. Eukaryotic resistance to fluoride toxicity mediated by a widespread family of fluoride export proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sanshu; Smith, Kathryn D; Davis, Jared H; Gordon, Patricia B; Breaker, Ronald R; Strobel, Scott A

    2013-11-19

    Fluorine is an abundant element and is toxic to organisms from bacteria to humans, but the mechanisms by which eukaryotes resist fluoride toxicity are unknown. The Escherichia coli gene crcB was recently shown to be regulated by a fluoride-responsive riboswitch, implicating it in fluoride response. There are >8,000 crcB homologs across all domains of life, indicating that it has an important role in biology. Here we demonstrate that eukaryotic homologs [renamed FEX (fluoride exporter)] function in fluoride export. FEX KOs in three eukaryotic model organisms, Neurospora crassa, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Candida albicans, are highly sensitized to fluoride (>200-fold) but not to other halides. Some of these KO strains are unable to grow in fluoride concentrations found in tap water. Using the radioactive isotope of fluoride, (18)F, we developed an assay to measure the intracellular fluoride concentration and show that the FEX deletion strains accumulate fluoride in excess of the external concentration, providing direct evidence of FEX function in fluoride efflux. In addition, they are more sensitive to lower pH in the presence of fluoride. These results demonstrate that eukaryotic FEX genes encode a previously unrecognized class of fluoride exporter necessary for survival in standard environmental conditions.

  19. Molecular mechanisms of fluoride toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbier, Olivier; Arreola-Mendoza, Laura; Del Razo, Luz María

    2010-11-05

    Halfway through the twentieth century, fluoride piqued the interest of toxicologists due to its deleterious effects at high concentrations in human populations suffering from fluorosis and in in vivo experimental models. Until the 1990s, the toxicity of fluoride was largely ignored due to its "good reputation" for preventing caries via topical application and in dental toothpastes. However, in the last decade, interest in its undesirable effects has resurfaced due to the awareness that this element interacts with cellular systems even at low doses. In recent years, several investigations demonstrated that fluoride can induce oxidative stress and modulate intracellular redox homeostasis, lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyl content, as well as alter gene expression and cause apoptosis. Genes modulated by fluoride include those related to the stress response, metabolic enzymes, the cell cycle, cell-cell communications and signal transduction. The primary purpose of this review is to examine recent findings from our group and others that focus on the molecular mechanisms of the action of inorganic fluoride in several cellular processes with respect to potential physiological and toxicological implications. This review presents an overview of the current research on the molecular aspects of fluoride exposure with emphasis on biological targets and their possible mechanisms of involvement in fluoride cytotoxicity. The goal of this review is to enhance understanding of the mechanisms by which fluoride affects cells, with an emphasis on tissue-specific events in humans. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Natural radioactivity concentration of peanuts in Osmaniye-Turkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akkurt, Iskender; Guenoglu, Kadir; Mavi, Betuel; Kara, Ayhan [Suleyman Demirel University Isparta (Turkey); Amasya University Amasya (Turkey); Osmaniye Korkut Ata University Osmaniye (Turkey)

    2012-09-06

    The peanut is grown in Osmaniye where located in southern Turkey. Due to it is grown underground, the measurements of natural radioactivity of peanuts become important. For this reason some peanut samples have been collected from different places of Osmaniye and the measurements of natural activity concentrations for {sup 40}K, {sup 226}Ra and {sup 232}Th in some peanuts samples have been carried out using a NaI(Tl) gamma-ray spectrometer. Activity of {sup 40}K was measured from its intensive line at 1460 keV, for {sup 226}Ra activity peak from {sup 214}Bi at 1760 keV and {sup 232}Th activity, peak from {sup 208}Tl at energy of 2610 keV was used.

  1. Determinação do índice de fluoreto em águas de abastecimento público em municípios da região centro-sul do Paraná / Determination of the fluoride concentration in public supply waters in the mid-south region of Paraná, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeferson Egner de Moraes

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available ResumoEste trabalho teve como objetivo monitorar e avaliar as concentrações de fluoreto em águas de abastecimento público de seis municípios da Região Centro-Sul do Paraná nos meses de julho, agosto e setembro de 2006. Avaliaram-se 21 9 amostras, sendo 36 de águas naturais, sem tratamento convencional, coletadas na zona rural, e 183 de águas de abastecimento público tratadas. A concentração de fluoreto, presente nas amostras de água, foi determinada pelo método colorimétrico. Os resultados obtidos foram submetidos a um tratamento estatístico para análise das componentes principais (ACP. A concentração de fluoreto, observada nos diferentes meses de coleta, variou entre o limite de detecção e 1,77 mg/L. Cerca de 68% das amostras foram classificadas como aceitáveis dentro dos limites estabelecidos para fluoreto no estado do Paraná.AbstractThe research for this paper focused on monitoring and evaluating fluoride concentration in public supplying waters from six cities at the mid-South region of Paraná state, during the months of July, August, and September 2006. 219 water samples were evaluated, including 36 natural water samples without treatment collected in the countryside, and 183 treated water samples from the public supply. The fluoride concentration of the water samples was determined by the colorimetric method. The data was submitted to a statistical treatment for Principal Component Analysis (PCA. The fluoride concentration observed during the different months of collection varied from the limit detection to 1,77 mg/L. About 68% of the samples were classified as acceptable, according to Parana State fluoride standards.

  2. Qualidade da água para consumo humano e concentração de fluoreto Calidad del agua para consumo humano y concentración de fluoruro Drinking water quality and fluoride concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Frazão

    2011-10-01

    clima típicamente tropical se debe revisar el Documento Público 635/75, relacionado con el fluoruro adicionado a las aguas de abastecimiento público.This paper aimed to analyze the fluoride concentration in drinking water, taking into account the balance between the benefits and risks to health, in order to produce scientific backing for the updating of the Brazilian legislation. Systematic reviews studies, official documents and meteorological data were examined. The temperatures in Brazilian state capitals indicate that fluoride levels should be between 0.6 and 0.9 mg F/l in order to prevent dental caries. Natural fluoride concentration of 1.5 mg F/l is tolerated for consumption in Brazil if there is no technology with an acceptable cost-benefit ratio for adjusting/removing the excess. Daily intake of water with a fluoride concentration > 0.9 mg F/l presents a risk to the dentition among children under the age of eight years, and consumers should be explicitly informed of this risk. In view of the expansion of the Brazilian water fluoridation program to regions with a typically tropical climate, Ordinance 635/75 relating to fluoride added to the public water supply should be revised.

  3. Water fluoridation for the prevention of dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iheozor-Ejiofor, Zipporah; Worthington, Helen V; Walsh, Tanya; O'Malley, Lucy; Clarkson, Jan E; Macey, Richard; Alam, Rahul; Tugwell, Peter; Welch, Vivian; Glenny, Anne-Marie

    2015-06-18

    Dental caries is a major public health problem in most industrialised countries, affecting 60% to 90% of school children. Community water fluoridation was initiated in the USA in 1945 and is currently practised in about 25 countries around the world; health authorities consider it to be a key strategy for preventing dental caries. Given the continued interest in this topic from health professionals, policy makers and the public, it is important to update and maintain a systematic review that reflects contemporary evidence. To evaluate the effects of water fluoridation (artificial or natural) on the prevention of dental caries.To evaluate the effects of water fluoridation (artificial or natural) on dental fluorosis. We searched the following electronic databases: The Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register (to 19 February 2015); The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; Issue 1, 2015); MEDLINE via OVID (1946 to 19 February 2015); EMBASE via OVID (1980 to 19 February 2015); Proquest (to 19 February 2015); Web of Science Conference Proceedings (1990 to 19 February 2015); ZETOC Conference Proceedings (1993 to 19 February 2015). We searched the US National Institutes of Health Trials Registry (ClinicalTrials.gov) and the World Health Organization's WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform for ongoing trials. There were no restrictions on language of publication or publication status in the searches of the electronic databases. For caries data, we included only prospective studies with a concurrent control that compared at least two populations - one receiving fluoridated water and the other non-fluoridated water - with outcome(s) evaluated at at least two points in time. For the assessment of fluorosis, we included any type of study design, with concurrent control, that compared populations exposed to different water fluoride concentrations. We included populations of all ages that received fluoridated water (naturally or artificially

  4. Scandium fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melnikov, P.; Nalin, M.; Messaddeq, Y.

    1997-01-01

    A new modification of scandium fluoride has been synthesised. The compound is deficient in fluorine, with the composition ScF 2.76 . It belongs to the tetragonal system, lattice parameters being a=3.792 and c=6.740 A and may be obtained at low temperatures by the decomposition of the precursor NH 4 ScF 4 . The reaction is topotactic, tetragonal parameters of the precursor are a=4.021 and c=6.744 A. Structural relationships with various fluorides and ammonium aminofluorides are discussed. This synthesis route with IR-assisted decomposition should be considered as a soft-chemistry approach. (orig.)

  5. Role of natural dissolved organic compounds in determining the concentrations of americium in natural waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, D.M.; Orlandini, K.A.

    1985-01-01

    Concentrations of 241 Am, both in solution and bound to suspended particulate matter, have been measured in several North American lakes. Dissolved concentrations vary from 0.4 μBq/L to 85 μBq/L. The 241 Am in these lakes originated solely from global fallout and hence entered all lakes in the same physiocochemical form. The observed differences in solubility behavior must, therefore, be attributable to chemical and/or hydrological differences among the lakes. Concentrations of dissolved 241 Am are highly correlated with the corresponding concentrations of /sup 239, 240/Pu(III,IV), suggesting that a common factor is responsible for maintaining both in solution. The K/sub D/ values for 241 Am and /sup 239, 240/Pu(III,IV) are highly correlated with the concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the waters, suggesting that the common factor is the formation of soluble complexes with natural DOC for both elements. This hypothesis was tested in a series of laboratory experiments in which the DOC from several of the lakes was isolated by ultrafiltration. Plots of K/sub D/, as a function of DOC concentration, show K/sub D/ to be very high (approx.10 6 ) at low DOC concentrations. Above critical concentrations (a few mg/L DOC) the K/sub D/ values begin a progressive decrease with increasing DOC. We conclude that in most surface waters, the dissolved 241 Am concentration is regulated by an adsorption/desorption equilibrium with the sediments (and suspended solids) and the value of K/sub D/ that characterizes this equilibrium is largely determined by the concentration of natural DOC in the water. 11 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  6. Experimental and natural warming elevates mercury concentrations in estuarine fish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A Dijkstra

    Full Text Available Marine food webs are the most important link between the global contaminant, methylmercury (MeHg, and human exposure through consumption of seafood. Warming temperatures may increase human exposure to MeHg, a potent neurotoxin, by increasing MeHg production as well as bioaccumulation and trophic transfer through marine food webs. Studies of the effects of temperature on MeHg bioaccumulation are rare and no study has specifically related temperature to MeHg fate by linking laboratory experiments with natural field manipulations in coastal ecosystems. We performed laboratory and field experiments on MeHg accumulation under varying temperature regimes using the killifish, Fundulus heteroclitus. Temperature treatments were established in salt pools on a coastal salt marsh using a natural temperature gradient where killifish fed on natural food sources. Temperatures were manipulated across a wider range in laboratory experiments with killifish exposed to MeHg enriched food. In both laboratory microcosms and field mesocosms, MeHg concentrations in killifish significantly increased at elevated temperatures. Moreover, in field experiments, other ancillary variables (salinity, MeHg in sediment, etc. did not relate to MeHg bioaccumulation. Modeling of laboratory experimental results suggested increases in metabolic rate as a driving factor. The elevated temperatures we tested are consistent with predicted trends in climate warming, and indicate that in the absence of confounding factors, warmer sea surface temperatures could result in greater in bioaccumulation of MeHg in fish, and consequently, increased human exposure.

  7. Modified zirconium-eriochrome cyanine R determination of fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thatcher, L.L.

    1957-01-01

    The Eriochrome Cyanine R method for determining fluoride in natural water has been modified to provide a single, stable reagent solution, eliminate interference from oxidizing agents, extend the concentration range to 3 p.p.m., and extend the phosphate tolerance. Temperature effect was minimized; sulfate error was eliminated by precipitation. The procedure is sufficiently tolerant to interferences found in natural and polluted waters to permit the elimination of prior distillation for most samples. The method has been applied to 500 samples.

  8. Domestic gas contribution to natural radon concentration in Paraguay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coronel, G.; Sajo B, L.

    1996-01-01

    The technique for measuring the concentration of radon in gas sold commercially for domestic use is presented. It is shown that the contribution is not significant, 5.5±1.4 (Bq/m 3 ), nevertheless it could reach in some cases significant values of intervention (200 Bq/m 3 ). The results indicate that the additional dose to which the population is exposed is approximately 26% of the natural background calculated in approximately 0,28 mSv/year. By assuming a lineal proportionality between dose and risk, the increase of the possibility of catching lethal leukemia or cancer is 16 cases for every million of population. (authors). 8 refs., 1 fig

  9. Fluoride ions vs removal technologies: A study

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Jagvir; Singh, Prashant; Singh, Anuradha

    2016-01-01

    Literature reported that drinking water is a precious and scarce resource and it has to be protected and kept free from any kind of contamination. Further, it has to be used carefully without wasting. Literature also reported that fluoride bearing rocks are abundant in India, as a result, fluoride leaches out and contaminates the adjacent water and soil resources. A high concentration of fluoride ions in ground water increases up to more than 30 mg/L. This high concentration of fluoride ions ...

  10. Oral fluoride levels 1 h after use of a sodium fluoride rinse: effect of sodium lauryl sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Gerald L; Schumacher, Gary E; Chow, Laurence C; Tenuta, Livia M A

    2015-01-01

    Increasing the concentration of free fluoride in oral fluids is an important goal in the use of topical fluoride agents. Although sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) is a common dentifrice ingredient, the influence of this ion on plaque fluid and salivary fluid fluoride has not been examined. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of SLS on these parameters and to examine the effect of this ion on total (or whole) plaque fluoride, an important source of plaque fluid fluoride after a sufficient interval following fluoride administration, and on total salivary fluoride, a parameter often used as a surrogate measure of salivary fluid fluoride. Ten subjects accumulated plaque for 48 h before rinsing with a 12 mmol/l NaF (228 µg/g F) rinse containing or not containing 0.5% (w/w) SLS. SLS had no statistically significant effect on total plaque and total saliva fluoride but significantly increased salivary fluid and plaque fluid fluoride (by 147 and 205%, respectively). These results suggest that the nonfluoride components of topical agents can be manipulated to improve the fluoride release characteristics from oral fluoride reservoirs and that statistically significant change may be observed in plaque fluid and salivary fluid fluoride concentrations that may not be observed in total plaque and total saliva fluoride concentrations.

  11. Groundwater fluoride enrichment in an active rift setting: Central Kenya Rift case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olaka, Lydia A., E-mail: lydiaolaka@gmail.com [Department of Geology, University of Nairobi, P.O Box 30197, Nairobi (Kenya); Wilke, Franziska D.H. [Geoforschungs Zentrum, Telegrafenberg, 14473 Potsdam (Germany); Olago, Daniel O.; Odada, Eric O. [Department of Geology, University of Nairobi, P.O Box 30197, Nairobi (Kenya); Mulch, Andreas [Senckenberg Biodiversity and Climate Research Centre, Senckenberganlage 25, 60325 Frankfurt (Germany); Institut für Geowissenschaften, Goethe Universität Frankfurt, Altenhöferallee 1, 60438 Frankfurt (Germany); Musolff, Andreas [UFZ-Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Hydrogeology, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany)

    2016-03-01

    Groundwater is used extensively in the Central Kenya Rift for domestic and agricultural demands. In these active rift settings groundwater can exhibit high fluoride levels. In order to address water security and reduce human exposure to high fluoride in drinking water, knowledge of the source and geochemical processes of enrichment are required. A study was therefore carried out within the Naivasha catchment (Kenya) to understand the genesis, enrichment and seasonal variations of fluoride in the groundwater. Rocks, rain, surface and groundwater sources were sampled for hydrogeochemical and isotopic investigations, the data was statistically and geospatially analyzed. Water sources have variable fluoride concentrations between 0.02–75 mg/L. 73% exceed the health limit (1.5 mg/L) in both dry and wet seasons. F{sup −} concentrations in rivers are lower (0.2–9.2 mg/L) than groundwater (0.09 to 43.6 mg/L) while saline lake waters have the highest concentrations (0.27–75 mg/L). The higher values are confined to elevations below 2000 masl. Oxygen (δ{sup 18}O) and hydrogen (δD) isotopic values range from − 6.2 to + 5.8‰ and − 31.3 to + 33.3‰, respectively, they are also highly variable in the rift floor where they attain maximum values. Fluoride base levels in the precursor vitreous volcanic rocks are higher (between 3750–6000 ppm) in minerals such as cordierite and muscovite while secondary minerals like illite and kaolinite have lower remnant fluoride (< 1000 ppm). Thus, geochemical F{sup −} enrichment in regional groundwater is mainly due to a) rock alteration, i.e. through long residence times and natural discharge and/or enhanced leakages of deep seated geothermal water reservoirs, b) secondary concentration fortification of natural reservoirs through evaporation, through reduced recharge and/or enhanced abstraction and c) through additional enrichment of fluoride after volcanic emissions. The findings are useful to help improve water management

  12. Natural variability in the surface ocean carbonate ion concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Lovenduski

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigate variability in the surface ocean carbonate ion concentration ([CO32−] on the basis of a~long control simulation with an Earth System Model. The simulation is run with a prescribed, pre-industrial atmospheric CO2 concentration for 1000 years, permitting investigation of natural [CO32−] variability on interannual to multi-decadal timescales. We find high interannual variability in surface [CO32−] in the tropical Pacific and at the boundaries between the subtropical and subpolar gyres in the Northern Hemisphere, and relatively low interannual variability in the centers of the subtropical gyres and in the Southern Ocean. Statistical analysis of modeled [CO32−] variance and autocorrelation suggests that significant anthropogenic trends in the saturation state of aragonite (Ωaragonite are already or nearly detectable at the sustained, open-ocean time series sites, whereas several decades of observations are required to detect anthropogenic trends in Ωaragonite in the tropical Pacific, North Pacific, and North Atlantic. The detection timescale for anthropogenic trends in pH is shorter than that for Ωaragonite, due to smaller noise-to-signal ratios and lower autocorrelation in pH. In the tropical Pacific, the leading mode of surface [CO32−] variability is primarily driven by variations in the vertical advection of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC in association with El Niño–Southern Oscillation. In the North Pacific, surface [CO32−] variability is caused by circulation-driven variations in surface DIC and strongly correlated with the Pacific Decadal Oscillation, with peak spectral power at 20–30-year periods. North Atlantic [CO32−] variability is also driven by variations in surface DIC, and exhibits weak correlations with both the North Atlantic Oscillation and the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation. As the scientific community seeks to detect the anthropogenic influence on ocean carbonate chemistry, these results

  13. Natural variability in the surface ocean carbonate ion concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovenduski, N. S.; Long, M. C.; Lindsay, K.

    2015-11-01

    We investigate variability in the surface ocean carbonate ion concentration ([CO32-]) on the basis of a~long control simulation with an Earth System Model. The simulation is run with a prescribed, pre-industrial atmospheric CO2 concentration for 1000 years, permitting investigation of natural [CO32-] variability on interannual to multi-decadal timescales. We find high interannual variability in surface [CO32-] in the tropical Pacific and at the boundaries between the subtropical and subpolar gyres in the Northern Hemisphere, and relatively low interannual variability in the centers of the subtropical gyres and in the Southern Ocean. Statistical analysis of modeled [CO32-] variance and autocorrelation suggests that significant anthropogenic trends in the saturation state of aragonite (Ωaragonite) are already or nearly detectable at the sustained, open-ocean time series sites, whereas several decades of observations are required to detect anthropogenic trends in Ωaragonite in the tropical Pacific, North Pacific, and North Atlantic. The detection timescale for anthropogenic trends in pH is shorter than that for Ωaragonite, due to smaller noise-to-signal ratios and lower autocorrelation in pH. In the tropical Pacific, the leading mode of surface [CO32-] variability is primarily driven by variations in the vertical advection of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in association with El Niño-Southern Oscillation. In the North Pacific, surface [CO32-] variability is caused by circulation-driven variations in surface DIC and strongly correlated with the Pacific Decadal Oscillation, with peak spectral power at 20-30-year periods. North Atlantic [CO32-] variability is also driven by variations in surface DIC, and exhibits weak correlations with both the North Atlantic Oscillation and the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation. As the scientific community seeks to detect the anthropogenic influence on ocean carbonate chemistry, these results will aid the interpretation of trends

  14. Bottled Water and Fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Private Wells Infant Formula Fluorosis Public Health Service Recommendation Water Operators & Engineers Water Fluoridation Additives Shortages of Fluoridation Additives Drinking Water Pipe Systems CDC-Sponsored Water Fluoridation Training Links to Other ...

  15. Other Fluoride Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Private Wells Infant Formula Fluorosis Public Health Service Recommendation Water Operators & Engineers Water Fluoridation Additives Shortages of Fluoridation Additives Drinking Water Pipe Systems CDC-Sponsored Water Fluoridation Training Links to Other ...

  16. Eukaryotic resistance to fluoride toxicity mediated by a widespread family of fluoride export proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Sanshu; Smith, Kathryn D.; Davis, Jared H.; Gordon, Patricia B.; Breaker, Ronald R.; Strobel, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    Although fluoride is plentiful in the environment and is commonly used at high concentrations in oral hygiene products, little has been known about how biological systems overcome the toxic effects of this anion. We demonstrate that a protein called FEX in many fungi is essential for cell survival in the presence of high fluoride concentrations. The protein is required for the rapid expulsion of cytoplasmic fluoride, indicating that many eukaryotic species that carry FEX genes likely avoid fl...

  17. Preparation of novel alginate based anion exchanger from Ulva japonica and its application for the removal of trace concentrations of fluoride from water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paudyal, Hari; Pangeni, Bimala; Inoue, Katsutoshi; Kawakita, Hidetaka; Ohto, Keisuke; Ghimire, Kedar Nath; Alam, Shafiq

    2013-11-01

    A green seaweed, Ulva japonica, was modified by loading multivalent metal ions such as Zr(IV) and La(III) after CaCl2 cross-linking to produce metal loaded cross-linked seaweed (M-CSW) adsorbents, which were characterized by elemental analysis, functional groups identification, and metal content determination. Maximum sorption potential for fluoride was drastically increased after La(III) and Zr(IV) loading, which were evaluated as 0.58 and 0.95 mmol/g, respectively. Loaded fluoride was quantitatively desorbed by using dilute alkaline solution for its regeneration. Mechanism of fluoride adsorption was inferred in terms of ligand exchange reaction between hydroxyl ion on co-ordination sphere of the loaded metal ions of M-CSW and fluoride ion in aqueous solution. Application of M-CSW for the treatment of actual waste plating solution exhibited successful removal of fluoride to clear the effluent and environmental standards in Japan, suggesting high possibility of its application for the treatment of fluoride rich waste water. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Correlation among fluoride and metals in irrigation water and soils of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Correlation among fluoride and metals in irrigation water and soils of Ethiopian Rift Valley. ... The fluoride concentrations in water samples were found in the range of 0.14-8.0 mg/L which is below the WHO limit of fluoride concentration for irrigation (less than 10 mg/L). ... KEY WORDS: Fluoride, Metals, Water, Soil, Ethiopia.

  19. Fluoride, boron and nitrate toxicity in ground water of northwest Rajasthan, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Veena; Kumar, Mukesh; Sharma, Mukesh; Yadav, B S

    2010-02-01

    The study was carried out to access the fluoride, boron, and nitrate concentrations in ground water samples of different villages in Indira Gandhi, Bhakra, and Gang canal catchment area of northwest Rajasthan, India. Rural population, in the study site, is using groundwater for drinking and irrigation purposes, without any quality test of water. All water samples (including canal water) were contaminated with fluoride. Fluoride, boron, and nitrate were observed in the ranges of 0.50-8.50, 0.0-7.73, and 0.0-278.68 mg/l, respectively. Most of the water samples were in the categories of fluoride 1.50 mg/l, of boron 2.0-4.0 mg/l, and of nitrate availability of these compounds in groundwater was due to natural reasons and by the use of chemical fertilizers.

  20. Widespread genetic switches and toxicity resistance proteins for fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Jenny L; Sudarsan, Narasimhan; Weinberg, Zasha; Roth, Adam; Stockbridge, Randy B; Breaker, Ronald R

    2012-01-13

    Most riboswitches are metabolite-binding RNA structures located in bacterial messenger RNAs where they control gene expression. We have discovered a riboswitch class in many bacterial and archaeal species whose members are selectively triggered by fluoride but reject other small anions, including chloride. These fluoride riboswitches activate expression of genes that encode putative fluoride transporters, enzymes that are known to be inhibited by fluoride, and additional proteins of unknown function. Our findings indicate that most organisms are naturally exposed to toxic levels of fluoride and that many species use fluoride-sensing RNAs to control the expression of proteins that alleviate the deleterious effects of this anion.

  1. Urinary fluoride output in children following the use of a dual-fluoride varnish formulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Polido Kaneshiro Olympio

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the bioavailability of fluoride after topical application of a dual-fluoride varnish commercially available in Brazil, when compared to DuraphatTM. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The urinary fluoride output was evaluated in seven 5-year-old children after application of the fluoride varnishes, in two different phases. In the first phase (I, children received topical application of the fluoride varnish Duofluorid XII (2.92% fluorine, calcium fluoride + 2.71% fluorine, sodium fluoride, FGM TM. After 1-month interval (phase II, the same amount (0.2 mL of the fluoride varnish Duraphat (2.26% fluorine, sodium fluoride, ColgateTM was applied. Before each application all the volunteers brushed their teeth with placebo dentifrice for 7 days. Urinary collections were carried out 24 h prior up to 48 h after the applications. Fluoride intake from the diet was also estimated. Fluoride concentration in diet samples and urine was analyzed with the fluoride ion-specific electrode and a miniature calomel reference electrode coupled to a potentiometer. Data were tested by ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test (p<0.05. RESULTS: There were significant differences in the urinary fluoride output between phases I and II. The use of Duofluorid XII did not significantly increase the urinary fluoride output, when compared to baseline levels. The application of Duraphat caused a transitory increase in the urinary fluoride output, returning to baseline levels 48 h after its use. CONCLUSIONS: The tested varnish formulation, which has been shown to be effective in in vitro studies, also can be considered safe.

  2. Tamarind (Tamarindus indica) fruit shell carbon: A calcium-rich promising adsorbent for fluoride removal from groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivasankar, V.; Rajkumar, S.; Murugesh, S.; Darchen, A.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The carbonization of Tamarind fruit shell improved its defluoridation efficiency. ► Calcium carbonate particles were involved in the defluoridation process. ► Adsorbent dose, pH, and fluoride concentration showed significant effects. ► Maximum adsorption of fluoride was achieved at pH 7–8. ► Prepared carbons were efficient in treating three natural waters. - Abstract: Tamarindus indica fruit shells (TIFSs) are naturally calcium rich compounds. They were impregnated with ammonium carbonate and then carbonized, leading to ammonium carbonate activated ACA-TIFS carbon. The resulting materials and carbon arising from virgin fruit shells V-TIFS were characterized and assayed as adsorbent for the removal of fluoride anions from groundwater. The fluoride scavenging ability of TIFS carbons was due to naturally dispersed calcium compounds. X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed that TIFS carbon contained a mixture of calcium oxalate and calcium carbonate. Batch studies on the fluoride removal efficiency of TIFS carbons with respect to contact time, pH, initial fluoride concentration, and co-ion interference were conducted. Applicability of various kinetic models (viz., pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, intra-particle diffusion and Elovich) and sorption isotherms were tested for batch techniques. The fluoride removal capacity of TIFS carbons was found to be 91% and 83% at a pH of 7.05 for V-TIFS and ACA-TIFS carbons, respectively. The practical applicability of TIFS carbons using groundwater samples was approved. The fluoride removal was greater in groundwater without hydrogen carbonate ions than those containing these ions. The characterizations of fluoride unloaded and loaded TIFS carbons were done by SEM and XRD studies.

  3. Effects of hydrogen fluoride on plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamazoe, F

    1970-07-15

    Symptoms of fluorosis in plants are chlorotic markings around the tip or edges of young leaves. Examples of damage to plants and livestock by fluorides are listed, including the retarded growth of silkworms fed on mulberry leaves polluted by more than 30 ppm fluorides. Plants can be classified into six groups according to their resistance to hydrogen fluoride. Threshold values of the fluoride concentration range from 5-10 ppb for the plants. Gladiolus is normally employed as a plant indicator for hydrogen fluoride and silkworms as indicator insects. The relationship between plant damage by fluorides and exposure time, density, soil, fertilizer, meteorology and location are examined. Several preventive measures are listed, including the spraying of water or lime on plant leaves. It is concluded that the establishment of an environmental standard is difficult because of the extremely high sensitivity of the plants to the gas. 8 references.

  4. The natural radionuclide concentration and radon exhalation rate of Turkish natural stones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasar, O.; Yaprak, G.; Guer, F.

    2006-01-01

    Geological materials usually contaminated with naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) have become a focus great attention. These NORM under certain conditions can reach hazardous contamination levels. Some contamination levels may be sufficiently severe that precautions must be taken. The Turkey has very important natural stones potential with over 5 billion m 3 marble reserves. According to 2002 giving data the number of Turkish stones export is 303 million US Dollars. In this regards, the present study deals with 120 Turkish natural stones. The studied samples were analyzed and the concentrations in Bq/kg dry weight of radioisotopes were determined by gamma-ray spectrometry using HPGe defector in Bq/kg dry weight. For the measurement of the radon exhalation rate, the 'can technique' using sensitive alpha sensitive LR-115 type II plastic defectors were used. The radium equivalent activity varied from 285 Bq/kg to 325 Bq/kg for granite samples and from 2 Bq/kg to 32 Bq/kg for marble samples. The value of radon exhalation rate ranged from 0.06 Bq/m 2 h - 1 to 0.46 Bq/m 2 h - 1 for garnite samples and from 0.006 Bq/m 2 h - 1 to 0.011 Bq/m 2 h - 1 for marble samples. According to the recommended values and the calculated external hazard index values the samples are acceptable for use as building materials and decoration

  5. Fluoride ions vs removal technologies: A study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagvir Singh

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Literature reported that drinking water is a precious and scarce resource and it has to be protected and kept free from any kind of contamination. Further, it has to be used carefully without wasting. Literature also reported that fluoride bearing rocks are abundant in India, as a result, fluoride leaches out and contaminates the adjacent water and soil resources. A high concentration of fluoride ions in ground water increases up to more than 30 mg/L. This high concentration of fluoride ions causes many harmful and dangerous effects on our datum. Fluoride ions in larger quantities i.e. 20–80 mg/day taken over a period of 10–20 years result in crippling and skeletal fluorosis, severely damaging the bone. In the present scenario, there is a continuously increasing worldwide concern for the development of fluoride treatment technologies. Possibilities of reducing the high fluorine content in groundwater are by defluorination process/dilution with the surface water which is a very simple technique but the addition of Ca2+ ions to a solution in contact with fluorite when experimented in distilled water caused an appreciable decrease in fluoride concentration. In this review article, we emphasized the relationship between high concentrations of fluoride ions and their compounds and their health impact.

  6. Fluoride removal from aqueous solution by pumice: case study on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The fluoride removal from synthetic water by pumice was studied at batch experiments in this study. The effect of pH, contact time, fluoride concentration and adsorbent dose on the fluoride sequestration was investigated. The optimum conditions were studied on Kuhbonan water as a case study. The results showed that ...

  7. Implementing a geographical information system to assess endemic fluoride areas in Lamphun, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theerawasttanasiri, Nonthaphat; Taneepanichskul, Surasak; Pingchai, Wichain; Nimchareon, Yuwaree; Sriwichai, Sangworn

    2018-01-01

    Many studies have shown that fluoride can cross the placenta and that exposure to high fluoride during pregnancy may result in premature birth and/or a low birth weight. Lamphun is one of six provinces in Thailand where natural water fluoride (WF) concentrations >10.0 mg/L were found, and it was also found that >50% of households used water with high fluoride levels. Nevertheless, geographical information system (GIS) and maps of endemic fluoride areas are lacking. We aimed to measure the fluoride level of village water supplies to assess endemic fluoride areas and present GIS with maps in Google Maps. A cross-sectional survey was conducted from July 2016 to January 2017. Purpose sampling was used to identify villages of districts with WF >10.0 mg/L in the Mueang Lamphun, Pasang, and Ban Thi districts. Water samples were collected with the geolocation measured by Smart System Info. Fluoride was analyzed with an ion-selective electrode instrument using a total ionic strength adjustment buffer. WF >0.70 mg/L was used to identify unsafe drinking water and areas with high endemic fluoride levels. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the findings, and MS Excel was used to create the GIS database. Maps were created in Google Earth and presented in Google Maps. We found that WF concentrations ranged between 0.10-13.60 mg/L. Forty-four percent (n=439) of samples were at unsafe levels (>0.70 mg/L), and. 54% (n=303) of villages and 46% (n=79,807) of households used the unsafe drinking water. Fifty percent (n=26) of subdistricts were classified as being endemic fluoride areas. Five subdistricts were endemic fluoride areas, and in those, there were two subdistricts in which every household used unsafe drinking water. These findings show the distribution of endemic fluoride areas and unsafe drinking water in Lamphun. This is useful for health policy authorities, local governments, and villagers and enables collaboration to resolve these issues. The GIS data are

  8. Acute toxicity of ingested fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitford, Gary Milton

    2011-01-01

    This chapter discusses the characteristics and treatment of acute fluoride toxicity as well as the most common sources of overexposure, the doses that cause acute toxicity, and factors that can influence the clinical outcome. Cases of serious systemic toxicity and fatalities due to acute exposures are now rare, but overexposures causing toxic signs and symptoms are not. The clinical course of systemic toxicity from ingested fluoride begins with gastric signs and symptoms, and can develop with alarming rapidity. Treatment involves minimizing absorption by administering a solution containing calcium, monitoring and managing plasma calcium and potassium concentrations, acid-base status, and supporting vital functions. Approximately 30,000 calls to US poison control centers concerning acute exposures in children are made each year, most of which involve temporary gastrointestinal effects, but others require medical treatment. The most common sources of acute overexposures today are dental products - particularly dentifrices because of their relatively high fluoride concentrations, pleasant flavors, and their presence in non-secure locations in most homes. For example, ingestion of only 1.8 ounces of a standard fluoridated dentifrice (900-1,100 mg/kg) by a 10-kg child delivers enough fluoride to reach the 'probably toxic dose' (5 mg/kg body weight). Factors that may influence the clinical course of an overexposure include the chemical compound (e.g. NaF, MFP, etc.), the age and acid-base status of the individual, and the elapsed time between exposure and the initiation of treatment. While fluoride has well-established beneficial dental effects and cases of serious toxicity are now rare, the potential for toxicity requires that fluoride-containing materials be handled and stored with the respect they deserve. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Fluoride remediation using floating macrophytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naba Kumar Mondal

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Six aquatic macrophytes, such as Pistia stratiotes, Ceratophyllum demersum, Nymphoides indica, Lemna major, Azolla pinnata,and Eichhornia crassipes were considered for remove fluoride from aqueous solution. Five different concentrations (10, 30, 50, and 100 ppm of fluoride solution were taken in 1 L plastic container. Fixed weight (20 g of macrophytes along with 500 ml fluoride solution was taken in each plastic container for 72 hours observation. Results demonstrated all the macrophytes show highest fluoride removal during 24 h to 48 h, but after 72 h their efficiency reduced drastically. The species N. indica showed better removal efficiency than other experimental macrophytes. In general, pigment measurement data indicated higher concentration at 72 h. However, Pistia sp. showed higher concentration of pigmentation at intermediate time interval (48 h. Higher level of dry weight to fresh weight ratio was recorded for L. major and A. pinnata at all concentrations, excepting at 10 ppm. In addition, all macrophytes showed lower RGR at higher concentration. Isotherm study indicated that macrophyte C. demersum is a good fitted with Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm whereas L. major with Langmuir isotherm during 24 hours.

  10. The removal of fluoride from aqueous solution by a lateritic soil adsorption: Kinetic and equilibrium studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iriel, Analia; Bruneel, Stijn P; Schenone, Nahuel; Cirelli, Alicia Fernández

    2018-03-01

    The use of natural sorbents to remove fluoride from drinking water is a promising alternative because of its low-cost and easy implementation. In this article, fluoride adsorption on a latosol soil from Misiones province (Argentina) was studied regarding kinetic and equilibrium aspects. Experiments were conducted in batch at room temperature under controlled conditions of pH 4-8) and ionic strength (1-10mM KNO 3 ). Experimental data indicated that adsorption processes followed a PSO kinetic where initial rates have showed to be influenced by pH solution. The necessary time to reach an equilibrium state had resulted approximately 30min. Equilibrium adsorption studies were performed at pH 8 which is similar to the natural groundwater. For that, fluoride adsorption data were successfully adjusted to Dubinin-Ataskhov model determining that the fluoride adsorption onto soil particles mainly followed a physical mechanism with a removal capacity of 0.48mgg -1 . Finally, a natural groundwater was tested with laterite obtaining a reduction close to 30% from initial concentration and without changing significantly the physicochemical properties of the natural water. Therefore, it was concluded that the use of lateritic soils for fluoride removal is very promising on a domestic scale. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Unsustainability of water resources in the Upper Laja River Basin, Mexico: Social-hydrology interactions in a regional overexploited aquifer with increasing concentrations of fluoride, arsenic and sodium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, A.

    2013-05-01

    The Upper Laja River Basin, also known as the Independence Basin (IB), with an area of 7,000 km2 and a population near to 500,000 inhabitants is part of the regional Lerma-Chapala Basin in Central Mexico. Groundwater is the main source for drinking water supply, agriculture and industrial uses. Total groundwater extraction is in the order of 1,000 million of m3/a, through near to 3,000 wells in the basin, from which about 85% is for agriculture production, mainly for exportation. Historical hydrologic information in the basin showed the existence of numerous streams, rivers and lakes within the catchments in addition to thousands of springs in the discharge area. At present there is not permanent runoff in the main river and most of the springs and associated ecosystems have disappeared. Water table in the aquifer is between 100 and 200 m depth with decreasing rates between 2 m/a and 10 m/a, while 60 years ago water tables was near ground surface. Dissolved concentration of arsenic and fluoride in groundwater is increasing with time, causing severe health effects in rural villages and more recently in the main urban centers. Increasing concentration of sodium is affecting soil productivity and plant grow, where several hectares of land are been abandoned. There are several pieces of evidence that show the unsustainability of water resources in the IB creating complex social-hydrology interactions: Human actions are impairing the long-term renewability of freshwater stocks and flows. Basic water requirement are not been guaranteed to all inhabitants to maintain human health, neither to restore nor to maintain the remaining ecosystems. Water quality does not meet certain minimum standards in most of the basin. Water-planning and decision making are not democratic, the COTAS, a representation of water users is controlled by farmers with political power; therefore, limiting the participation of other parties and fostering direct participation of affected interests

  12. Gramicidin D enhances the antibacterial activity of fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, James W; Zhou, Zhiyuan; Breaker, Ronald R

    2014-07-01

    Fluoride is a toxic anion found in many natural environments. One of the major bacterial defenses against fluoride is the cell envelope, which limits passage of the membrane-impermeant fluoride anion. Accordingly, compounds that enhance the permeability of bacterial membranes to fluoride should also enhance fluoride toxicity. In this study, we demonstrate that the pore-forming antibiotic gramicidin D increases fluoride uptake in Bacillus subtilis and that the antibacterial activity of this compound is potentiated by fluoride. Polymyxin B, another membrane-targeting antibiotic with a different mechanism of action, shows no such improvement. These results, along with previous findings, indicate that certain compounds that destabilize bacterial cell envelopes can enhance the toxicity of fluoride. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Use of 15N Natural Abundance and N Species Concentrations to Assess N-Cycling in Constructed and Natural Coastal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aelion, W.C.M.; Engle, M.R.; Aelion, W.C.M.; Ma, H.

    2010-01-01

    Natural abundance of N stable isotopes used in combination with concentrations may be useful indicators of N-cycling in wetlands. Concentrations and 15 N signatures of NO 3 -, NH 4 and sediment organic nitrogen (SON) were measured in two impacted coastal golf course retention ponds and two natural marshes. Limited NO 3 was detected in natural site surface water or pore water, but both isotopic signature and concentrations of NO 3 - in surface water of impacted sites indicated anthropogenic inputs. In natural sites, NH 4 concentrations were greatest in deeper pore water and least in surface water, suggesting diffusion predominates. The natural sites had greater % SON, and 15 N indicated that the natural sites also had greater NH 4 + released from SON mineralization than impacted sites. In NO 3 --limited systems, neither concentrations nor 15 N natural abundance was able to provide information on N-cycling, while processes associated with NH 4 + were better elucidated by using both concentrations and 15 N natural abundance

  14. Use of N Natural Abundance and N Species Concentrations to Assess N-Cycling in Constructed and Natural Coastal Wetlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Marjorie Aelion

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural abundance of N stable isotopes used in combination with concentrations may be useful indicators of N-cycling in wetlands. Concentrations and N signatures of NO3−, NH4+, and sediment organic nitrogen (SON were measured in two impacted coastal golf course retention ponds and two natural marshes. Limited NO3− was detected in natural site surface water or pore water, but both isotopic signature and concentrations of NO3− in surface water of impacted sites indicated anthropogenic inputs. In natural sites, NH4+ concentrations were greatest in deeper pore water and least in surface water, suggesting diffusion predominates. The natural sites had greater %SON, and N indicated that the natural sites also had greater NH4+ released from SON mineralization than impacted sites. In NO3−-limited systems, neither concentrations nor N natural abundance was able to provide information on N-cycling, while processes associated with NH4+ were better elucidated by using both concentrations and N natural abundance.

  15. Daily Fluoride Intake from Iranian Green Tea: Evaluation of Various Flavorings on Fluoride Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshin Maleki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available With increased awareness of the health benefits of the compounds in green tea, especially polyphenols, its consumption is rising. The main purpose of this study is to determine the effect of different additives on the released fluoride into tea liquor and also daily fluoride intake. The concentrations of fluoride, nitrate, sulfate, and chloride were measured in 15 different flavored green teas (Refah-Lahijan. The fluoride and other anion concentrations were measured by ion chromatography method. The data were analyzed with Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 16.0. The results showed that the minimum and maximum concentrations of fluoride in the green tea infusions were 0.162 mg/L (cinnamon-flavored green tea and 3.29 mg/L (bagged peach-flavored green tea, respectively. The mean concentration of fluoride in the green tea leaves was 52 mg/kg, and approximately 89% of the fluoride was released from the green tea leaves into the infusions after brewing. The fluoride concentrations varied significantly among the examined green teas ( P 0.05. Finally, drinking of the studied green teas cannot make a significant contribution to the daily dietary intake of F for consumers.

  16. Lithological Influences on Occurrence of High-Fluoride Waters in The Central Kenya Rift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaka, L. A.; Musolff, A.; Mulch, A.; Olago, D.; Odada, E. O.

    2013-12-01

    Within the East African rift, groundwater recharge results from the complex interplay of geology, land cover, geomorphology, climate and on going volcano-tectonic processes across a broad range of spatial and temporal scales. The interrelationships between these factors create complex patterns of water availability, reliability and quality. The hydrochemical evolution of the waters is further complex due to the different climatic regimes and geothermal processes going on in this area. High fluoridic waters within the rift have been reported by few studies, while dental fluorosis is high among the inhabitants of the rift. The natural sources of fluoride in waters can be from weathering of fluorine bearing minerals in rocks, volcanic or fumarolic activities. Fluoride concentration in water depends on a number of factors including pH, temperature, time of water-rock formation contact and geochemical processes. Knowledge of the sources and dispersion of fluoride in both surface and groundwaters within the central Kenya rift and seasonal variations between wet and dry seasons is still poor. The Central Kenya rift is marked by active tectonics, volcanic activity and fumarolic activity, the rocks are majorly volcanics: rhyolites, tuffs, basalts, phonolites, ashes and agglomerates some are highly fractured. Major NW-SE faults bound the rift escarpment while the rift floor is marked by N-S striking faults We combine petrographic, hydrochemistry and structural information to determine the sources and enrichment pathways of high fluoridic waters within the Naivasha catchment. A total of 120 water samples for both the dry season (January-February2012) and after wet season (June-July 2013) from springs, rivers, lakes, hand dug wells, fumaroles and boreholes within the Naivasha catchment are collected and analysed for fluoride, physicochemical parameters and stable isotopes (δ2 H, δ18 O) in order to determine the origin and evolution of the waters. Additionally, 30 soil and

  17. Health effects of fluoride pollution caused by coal burning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, M.; Tadano, M.; Yamamoto, S.; Tamura, K.; Chen, X. [Regional Environment Division, National Institute for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, 305-0083 Ibaraki (Japan); Asanuma, S. [Japan Institute of Rural Medicine, Usuda, Nagano (Japan); Watanabe, T. [Saku Central Hospital, Usuda, Nagano (Japan); Kondo, T. [Matsumoto Dental College, Shiojiri, Nagano (Japan); Sakurai, S. [Otsuma Women' s University, Tama, Tokyo (Japan); Ji, R.; Liang, C.; Cao, S. [Institute of Environmental Health and Engineering, Beijing (China); Hong, Z. [Shanxi Maternity and Children' s Hospital, Taiyuan (China)

    2001-04-23

    Recently a huge amount of fluoride in coal has been released into indoor environments by the combustion of coal and fluoride pollution seems to be increasing in some rural areas in China. Combustion of coal and coal bricks is the primary source of gaseous and aerosol fluoride and these forms of fluoride can easily enter exposed food products and the human respiratory tract. Major human fluoride exposure was caused by consumption of fluoride contaminated food, such as corn, chilies and potatoes. For each diagnostic syndrome of dental fluorosis, a log-normal distribution was observed on the logarithm of urinary fluoride concentration in students in China. Urinary fluoride content was found to be a primary health indicator of the prevalence of dental fluorosis in the community. In the fluorosis areas, osteosclerosis in skeletal fluorosis patients was observed with a high prevalence. A biochemical marker of bone resorption, urinary deoxypyridinoline content was much higher in residents in China than in residents in Japan. It was suggested that bone resorption was stimulated to a greater extent in residents in China and fluoride may stimulate both bone resorption and bone formation. Renal function especially glomerular filtration rate was very sensitive to fluoride exposure. Inorganic phosphate concentrations in urine were significantly lower in the residents in fluorosis areas in China than in non-fluorosis area in China and Japan. Since airborne fluoride from the combustion of coal pollutes extensively both the living environment and food, it is necessary to reduce fluoride pollution caused by coal burning.

  18. Application of Titanium Compounds to Reduce Fluoride Ion in Water Resources with High Fluoride Ion Contents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariborz Riahi

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The present work describes studies on the sorption of fluoride ions from water by titanium compounds used in water treatment to reduce fluoride content in water resources. There are different methods of reducing fluoride ion in water, each associated with specific problems such as secondary contamination, environmental contamination, high costs, or the need for primary and secondary treatment. In this study, application of titanium sulfate and Metatitanic acid produced from titanium ore concentrate (ileminite is investigated in the removal of fluoride ion and the possibility of complete purification of fluorine containing wastewater is examined to determine the optimal conditions. Metatitanic acid has a great sorption property for fluoride ion. Also titanium sulfate is a suitable and more effective material for this purpose. Efficiency of this material in reducing fluoride ion content is 99.9% and it is possible to refresh sorbet material for reuse without problems arising from Ti+4 ion contamination.

  19. Plutonium separation and the measurement of its concentration in natural waters (1963); Separation du plutonium et mesure de sa concentration dans les eaux naturelles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheidhauer, J; Messainguiral, L; Meiraneisio, A M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Centre de Production de Plutonium, Marcoule (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1963-07-01

    After concentration by chemisorption on a calcium fluoride suspension, the plutonium is purified and isolated by xylene extraction of the complex formed with T.T.A. The radioelement is measured by counting with a ZnS (Ag) scintillator after evaporation or electrolysis. (authors) [French] Apres concentration par chimisorption sur une suspension de fluorure de calcium, le plutonium est purifie et isole par extraction au xylene du complexe forme avec la T.T.A. La mesure du radioelement est effectuee par comptage au scintillateur S Zn (Ag) apres evaporation ou electrolyse. (auteurs)

  20. Fluoride varnish or fluoride mouth rinse?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, M K; Klausen, BJ; Twetman, S

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In many Danish communities, school-based fluoride programs are offered to children with high caries risk in adjunct to tooth brushing. The purpose of this field trial was to compare the caries-preventive effectiveness of two different fluoride programs in 6-12 year olds. BASIC RESEARCH...... different schools were enrolled after informed consent and their class unit was randomly allocated to one of two fluoride programs. INTERVENTIONS: One group received a semi-annual fluoride varnish applications (FV) and the other group continued with an existing program with fluoride mouth rinses once per...... in caries development over two years among children participating in a school-based fluoride varnish or mouth rinse program....

  1. Municipalities in Western Norway concentrate on natural gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Only one percent of the natural gas from the Norwegian gas fields is currently used in Norway and it is a national goal that 10 percent of the gas produced shall be used for domestic purposes. Western Norway should pioneer this development, as this is where the gas is brought on land. ''Vestlandsroeret AS'' is a project in which sixteen municipalities - including the city Bergen - and eleven companies plan to develop infrastructure which will provide for transport of the gas to customers and markets in Western Norway. The article also discusses environmental considerations, public opinion, the utilization of waste heat and extensive development of cod culture

  2. Effects of fluorides on plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamazoe, F

    1975-11-01

    Fluorine compounds known to be air pollutants, such as hydrogen fluoride and silicon tetrachloride, are highly poisonous to plants even at ppm - ppb levels. As solid microparticles, acidic sodium fluoride and cryolite cause problems by adhering to plant leaves and absorbing into plant bodies. Plants are classified by their susceptibility to hydrogen fluoride: gladiolus, apricot, buckwheat, turnip and Vaccinium vitis-idaea are most susceptible showing slight injury at less than 5 ppb for 7-9 days; maize, pepper, and dahlia are fairly susceptible, followed by azalea, rose, lilac, and alfalfa, then by oak and tomato. Gladiolus is used as an indicator plant. The exposure factor for one species was known. The symptoms of plants exposed to gaseous fluorine compounds are described in detail at various concentrations. The causal mechanism of the injuries due to fluorine compounds is described in detail, with the method of determining the fluorine content of plant parts. 7 references.

  3. No calcium-fluoride-like deposits detected in plaque shortly after a sodium fluoride mouthrinse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, G L; Tenuta, L M A; Schumacher, G E; Chow, L C

    2010-01-01

    Plaque 'calcium-fluoride-like' (CaF(2)-like) and fluoride deposits held by biological/bacterial calcium fluoride (Ca-F) bonds appear to be the source of cariostatic concentrations of fluoride in plaque fluid. The aim of this study was to quantify the amounts of plaque fluoride held in these reservoirs after a sodium fluoride rinse. 30 and 60 min after a 228 microg/g fluoride rinse, plaque samples were collected from 11 volunteers. Each sample was homogenized, split into 2 aliquots (aliquots 1 and 2), centrifuged, and the recovered plaque fluid combined and analyzed using microelectrodes. The plaque mass from aliquot 1 was retained. The plaque mass from aliquot 2 was extracted several times with a solution having the same fluoride, calcium and pH as the plaque fluid in order to extract the plaque CaF(2)-like deposits. The total fluoride in both aliquots was then determined. In a second experiment, the extraction completeness was examined by applying the above procedure to in vitro precipitates containing known amounts of CaF(2)-like deposits. Nearly identical fluoride concentrations were found in both plaque aliquots. The extraction of the CaF(2)-like precipitates formed in vitro removed more than 80% of these deposits. The results suggest that either CaF(2)-like deposits were not formed in plaque or, if these deposits had been formed, they were rapidly lost. The inability to form persistent amounts of CaF(2)-like deposits in plaque may account for the relatively rapid loss of plaque fluid fluoride after the use of conventional fluoride dentifrices or rinses. (c) 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Fluoride releasing and enamel demineralization around orthodontic brackets by fluoride-releasing composite containing nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Mary A S; Morais, Weslanny A; Passos, Vanara F; Lima, Juliana P M; Rodrigues, Lidiany K A

    2014-05-01

    Fluoride-containing materials have been suggested to control enamel demineralization around orthodontic brackets during the treatment with fixed appliances. The improvement of their properties has been made through innovations, such as the application of nanotechnology by incorporation of nanofillers. This in vitro study evaluated the capacity of fluoride releasing and enamel demineralization inhibition of fluoride-releasing nanofilled cement around orthodontic brackets using an artificial caries biofilm model. Forty bovine enamel discs were selected by evaluating surface microhardness and randomized into four groups (n = 10): non-fluoride-releasing microfilled composite, fluoride-releasing microfilled composite, resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGI), and fluoride-releasing nanofilled composite (FN). After brackets bonding in each disc, the specimens were subjected to a cariogenic challenge through a Streptococcus mutans biofilm model. After the experimental period, the biofilm formed around the brackets was collected for fluoride analysis and the mineral loss around the brackets was determined by integrated demineralization via cross-sectional microhardness measurement at 20 and 70 μm from the bracket margin. Additionally, samples of each group were subjected to energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analysis examined under a scanning electron microscopy (SEM). ANOVA followed by Tukey test were applied for fluoride concentration and mineral loss data, respectively. At both distances, only RMGI statistically differed from the other groups presenting the lowest demineralization, although there was a trend to a lower demineralization of enamel around brackets in FN group. Similar condition was found to fluoride concentration and EDX/SEM analysis. Under the cariogenic exposure condition of this study, the fluoride-releasing nanofilled material had similar performance to fluoride-releasing microfilled materials. The presence of nanofillers in the fluoride

  5. Effect of fluoride on the cell viability, cell organelle potential, and photosynthetic capacity of freshwater and soil algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Yooeun; Kim, Dokyung; An, Youn-Joo

    2016-12-01

    Although fluoride occurs naturally in the environment, excessive amounts of fluoride in freshwater and terrestrial ecosystems can be harmful. We evaluated the toxicity of fluoride compounds on the growth, viability, and photosynthetic capacity of freshwater (Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata) and terrestrial (Chlorococcum infusionum) algae. To measure algal growth inhibition, a flow cytometric method was adopted (i.e., cell size, granularity, and auto-fluorescence measurements), and algal yield was calculated to assess cell viability. Rhodamine123 and fluorescein diacetate were used to evaluate mitochondrial membrane potential (MMA, ΔΨ m ) and cell permeability. Nine parameters related to the photosynthetic capacity of algae were also evaluated. The results indicated that high concentrations of fluoride compounds affected cell viability, cell organelle potential, and photosynthetic functions. The cell viability measurements of the three algal species decreased, but apoptosis was only observed in C. infusionum. The MMA (ΔΨ m ) of cells exposed to fluoride varied among species, and the cell permeability of the three species generally decreased. The decrease in the photosynthetic activity of algae may be attributable to the combination of fluoride ions (F - ) with magnesium ions (Mg 2+ ) in chlorophyll. Our results therefore provide strong evidence for the potential risks of fluoride compounds to microflora and microfauna in freshwater and terrestrial ecosystems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Determination of Fluoride in Different Toothpaste Formulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamau, N.G.; Njoroge, M.; Njau, M.

    1998-01-01

    Fluoride ion selective electrode was used to determine fluoride ion concentrations in seven brands of toothpaste. These were the only available formulations found in Kenya. The brands were classified into three groups-fluoridated, non fluoridated or not indicated. However, there was no independent indication of their quantitative composition. The analysed brands had fluoride content between 0.0033% and 0.096%. These values compared favourably with those obtained elsewhere. The calculated lowest limit of detection (LLD) was 0.01 ppmF- . The mean calibration curve gave a slope of of -50.0mV. which was not significantly different from the theoretical value of 5.88mV at 23 degrees celsius at 95% confidence level

  7. Calcium fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, C.W.; Nestor, O.H.

    1989-01-01

    A new process for producing large, single, oriented crystals of calcium fluoride (CaF 2 ) has been developed which overcomes the limitations of current growing methods. This process has been reduced to practice and has yielded oriented crystals 17.5 x 17.5 x 5 cm 3 . Currently nearing completion is a system for producing 35 x 35 x 7.5 cm 3 single crystals. A scale up to one-meter-square is considered feasible. This crystal growing process makes possible the fabrication of very large CaF 2 windows. Suitability for very high power lasers, however, requires attention to properties beyond mere size. A process to generate higher purity growth stock (starting material) was also developed. The additional purification of the growth stock contributes to lower bulk absorption, the absence of color centers and increased radiation hardness. Also identified were several specific impurities which correlate with radiation hardness. A correlation was found between color centers induced by laser radiation and ionizing radiation. Other CaF 2 crystal properties such as tensile strength, absorption and laser damage thresholds were studied and are discussed

  8. Uranium concentrations in natural waters, South Park, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharp, R.R. Jr.; Aamodt, P.L.

    1976-08-01

    During the summer of 1975, 464 water samples from 149 locations in South Park, Colorado, were taken for the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory in order to test the field sampling and analytical methodologies proposed for the NURE Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance for uranium in the Rocky Mountain states and Alaska. The study showed, in the South Park area, that the analytical results do not vary significantly between samples which were untreated, filtered and acidified, filtered only, or acidified only. Furthermore, the analytical methods of fluorometry and delayed-neutron counting, as developed at the LASL for the reconnaissance work, provide fast, adequately precise, and complementary procedures for analyzing a broad range of uranium in natural waters. The data generated using this methodology does appear to identify uraniferous areas, and when applied using sound geochemical, geological, and hydrological principles, should prove a valuable tool in reconnaissance surveying to delineate new districts or areas of interest for uranium exploration

  9. Story of Fluoridation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Info Health Topics Fluoride Share The Story of Fluoridation It started as an observation, that ... this time using photospectrographic analysis, a more sophisticated technology than that used by McKay. Churchill asked an ...

  10. Fluoride in diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diet - fluoride ... bones and teeth. Too much fluoride in the diet is very rare. Rarely, infants who get too ... of essential vitamins is to eat a balanced diet that contains a variety of foods from the ...

  11. Natural conditions and administrative settings for concentrating photovoltaics in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Ling; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Leutz, Ralf

    2012-10-01

    It is an inevitable trend for China to develop green technologies to help the country to produce cleaner energy and to consume it more efficiently, under the pressure of energy security concern, the nation's emissions trajectory and sustainable economic development. The abundant solar resources in West China provide a big potential to utilize the solar energy. Under the promotion of key incentive policies including both feed-in-tariff (FIT) mechanisms and government rebate programs, China has become a major global solar force in photovoltaic (PV) industry both in manufacturing and in the installation of flat-plate products, with 16 GW production and 2.75 GW installation achieved in the year 2011. As a branch of PV technology, concentrating photovoltaics (CPV) technology with several years' development history in China is presently moving from pilot facilities to commercial-scale applications. Several MW-CPV power plants have been installed by both domestic and western companies in China, factories with several hundred-MW production capacity are being planned or built. Sustainable performance and reliability improvement of CPV modules, a vertical integration of supply chain in CPV industry aiming at a cost reduction, a sufficient grid infrastructure for facilitating the West-East and North-South electricity transmission will promote Chinese CPV market to actually initiate, develop and mature.

  12. Evaluation and modeling of the parameters affecting fluoride toxicity level in aquatic environments by bioassay method

    OpenAIRE

    Hamid Reza Shamsollahi; Hadi asady; Amir Hossein Mahvi; Zahra zolghadr

    2014-01-01

    Background: Fluoride exists in various forms in nature and water resources. , The rising level of fluoride in water resources due to discharge of industrial effluents can cause toxicity in aquatic organisms. To prevent toxicity, it is necessary to determine maximum fluoride toxicity as well as effluent discharge limits. The aim of this study was to determine the maximum fluoride toxicity and the factors affecting fluoride toxicity to provide a model in order to determine the effluent discha...

  13. Dental fluorosis and urinary fluoride in 10-12 years old adolescents of Bushehr port

    OpenAIRE

    Giti Javan; Ehsan Mostaghni; Seyed Mojtaba Jafary; Batoul Amini; Bahram Hematinejad

    2006-01-01

    Background: Fluoride increases tooth resistance to dental caries, but mild toxicity due to excessive ingestion of fluoride can cause dental fluorosis. Drinking water naturally contains fluoride and is a major source of fluoride. In Bushehr port, drinking water is supplied from limestone springs with normal fluoride levels but dental fluorosis is observed. Methods: A total of 95 native school children (between the ages of 10-12 years old) were randomly selected from four Bushehr port regions. ...

  14. Arsenic and fluoride in the groundwater of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armienta, M A; Segovia, N

    2008-08-01

    Concentrations of arsenic and fluoride above Mexican drinking water standards have been detected in aquifers of various areas of Mexico. This contamination has been found to be mainly caused by natural sources. However, the specific processes releasing these toxic elements into groundwater have been determined in a few zones only. Many studies, focused on arsenic-related health effects, have been performed at Comarca Lagunera in northern México. High concentrations of fluoride in water were also found in this area. The origin of the arsenic there is still controversial. Groundwater in active mining areas has been polluted by both natural and anthropogenic sources. Arsenic-rich minerals contaminate the fractured limestone aquifer at Zimapán, Central México. Tailings and deposits smelter-rich fumes polluted the shallow granular aquifer. Arsenic contamination has also been reported in the San Antonio-El Triunfo mining zone, southern Baja California, and Santa María de la Paz, in San Luis Potosí state. Even in the absence of mining activities, hydrogeochemistry and statistical techniques showed that arsenopyrite oxidation may also contaminate water, as in the case of the Independencia aquifer in the Mexican Altiplano. High concentrations of arsenic have also been detected in geothermal areas like Los Azufres, Los Humeros, and Acoculco. Prevalence of dental fluorosis was revealed by epidemiological studies in Aguascalientes and San Luis Potosí states. Presence of fluoride in water results from dissolution of acid-volcanic rocks. In Mexico, groundwater supplies most drinking water. Current knowledge and the geology of Mexico indicate the need to include arsenic and fluoride determinations in groundwater on a routine basis, and to develop interdisciplinary studies to assess the contaminant's sources in all enriched areas.

  15. Exploring the short-term impact of community water fluoridation cessation on children's dental caries: a natural experiment in Alberta, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaren, L; Patterson, S; Thawer, S; Faris, P; McNeil, D; Potestio, M L; Shwart, L

    2017-05-01

    Dental caries (tooth decay) is common and can be serious. Dental caries is preventable, and community water fluoridation is one means of prevention. There is limited current research on the implications of fluoridation cessation for children's dental caries. Our objective was to explore the short-term impact of community water fluoridation cessation on children's dental caries, by examining change in caries experience in population-based samples of schoolchildren in two Canadian cities, one that discontinued community water fluoridation and one that retained it. We used a pre-post cross-sectional design. We examined dental caries indices (deft [number of decayed, extracted, or filled primary teeth] and DMFT [number of decayed, missing, or filled permanent teeth]) among grade 2 schoolchildren in 2004/05 and 2013/14 in two similar cities in the province of Alberta, Canada: Calgary (cessation of community water fluoridation in 2011) and Edmonton (still fluoridated). We compared change over time in the two cities. For Calgary only, we had a third data point from 2009/10, and we considered trends across the three points. We observed a worsening in primary tooth caries (deft) in Calgary and Edmonton, but changes in Edmonton were less consistent and smaller. This effect was robust to adjustment for covariates available in 2013/14 and was consistent with estimates of total fluoride intake from biomarkers from a subsample. This finding occurred despite indication that treatment activities appeared better in Calgary. The worsening was not observed for permanent teeth. For prevalence estimates only (% with >0 deft or DMFT), the three data points in Calgary suggest a trend that, though small, appears consistent with an adverse effect of fluoridation cessation. Our results suggest an increase in dental caries in primary teeth during a time period when community fluoridation was ceased. That we did not observe a worsening for permanent teeth in the comparative analysis could

  16. Simultaneous sorption of fluoride and arsenic ions (V) in a naturally occurring material modified with iron and aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez M, G.

    2016-01-01

    In this research, two materials, zeolite and pozzolans from the States of Oaxaca and Mexico, were used respectively, which were modified to evaluate their efficiencies to remove F and As(V) ions from solution and natural water. The materials were modified with iron and aluminum using an electrochemical cell, and with the hydroxides formed with iron and aluminum chloride solutions. The natural and modified materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy with energy X-ray disperse spectroscopy analysis, specific area and the point of zero charge (pHzpc). F- and As(V) adsorption properties of both materials were investigated. Experimental data on the sorption processes of F- ions by modified zeolite and pozzolans were adjusted to the kinetic models of pseudo-second-order (q e, 0408 mg /g K, 4.33 g / mg h) and Lagergen (q e, 0.807 mg/g K L, 1.83 1/min), respectively. Both materials showed the best fit to the Freundlich isotherm, Kf, 0.33 and 0.64 (mg/g) (L/mg) for pozzolans and zeolite respectively; suggesting a physical adsorption process on a heterogeneous material. Experimental adsorption capacities of pozzolans and modified zeolite for F ions were 0.36 and 0.83 mg/g respectively. The results of the kinetics of adsorption of As(V) were treated with the Largergren, pseudo-second-order and Elovich models; however the adsorption rate was high and consequently the rate constants could not be calculated. The isotherms data were fitted to the Freundlich model and the constants Kf were 6.24 and 11.15 (mg/g) (L/mg) for pozzolans and zeolite respectively. The thermodynamic parameters of the adsorption processes suggest endothermic adsorption for F- ions by both materials and for As(V) by the pozzolans. The free energy values ΔG indicate spontaneous processes and not spontaneous for F- ions by pozzolans. The adsorption of As (V) by the pozzolans presented an exothermic and spontaneous behavior. Finally, a study was performed in columns with

  17. Component resolved bleaching study in natural calcium fluoride using CW-OSL, LM-OSL and residual TL glow curves after bleaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angeli, Vasiliki; Polymeris, George S.; Sfampa, Ioanna K.; Tsirliganis, Nestor C.; Kitis, George

    2017-01-01

    Natural calcium fluoride has been commonly used as thermoluminescence (TL) dosimeter due to its high luminescence intensity. The aim of this work includes attempting a correlation between specific TL glow curves after bleaching and components of linearly modulated optically stimulated luminescence (LM-OSL) as well as continuous wave OSL (CW-OSL). A component resolved analysis was applied to both integrated intensity of the RTL glow curves and all OSL decay curves, by using a Computerized Glow-Curve De-convolution (CGCD) procedure. All CW-OSL and LM-OSL components are correlated to the decay components of the integrated RTL signal, apart from two RTL components which cannot be directly correlated with either LM-OSL or CW-OSL component. The unique, stringent criterion for this correlation deals with the value of the decay constant λ of each bleaching component. There is only one, unique bleaching component present in all three luminescence entities which were the subject of the present study, indicating that each TL trap yields at least three different bleaching components; different TL traps can indicate bleaching components with similar values. According to the data of the present work each RTL bleaching component receives electrons from at least two peaks. The results of the present study strongly suggest that the traps that contribute to TL and OSL are the same. - Highlights: • A component resolved bleaching study was attempted to CaF_2:N in terms of CW-OSL, LM-OSL and RTL. • Bleaching decay constants originating from different TL peaks yield overlapping values. • Three to five individual components were used in order to describe the bleaching behavior in all luminescence entities. • There is only one, unique bleaching component present in all three luminescence entities.

  18. Identification of V-type nerve agents in vapor samples using a field-portable capillary gas chromatography/membrane-interfaced electron ionization quadrupole mass spectrometry instrument with Tri-Bed concentrator and fluoridating conversion tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohrui, Y; Nagoya, T; Kurimata, N; Sodeyama, M; Seto, Y

    2017-07-01

    A field-portable gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) system (Hapsite ER) was evaluated for the detection of nonvolatile V-type nerve agents (VX and Russian VX (RVX)) in the vapor phase. The Hapsite ER system consists of a Tri-Bed concentrator gas sampler, a nonpolar low thermal-mass capillary GC column and a hydrophobic membrane-interfaced electron ionization quadrupole mass spectrometer evacuated by a non-evaporative getter pump. The GC-MS system was attached to a VX-G fluoridating conversion tube containing silver nitrate and potassium fluoride. Sample vapors of VX and RVX were converted into O-ethyl methylphosphonofluoridate (EtGB) and O-isobutyl methylphosphonofluoridate (iBuGB), respectively. These fluoridated derivatives were detected within 10 min. No compounds were detected when the VX and RVX samples were analyzed without the conversion tube. A vapor sample of tabun (GA) was analyzed, in which GA and O-ethyl N,N-dimethylphosphoramidofluoridate were detected. The molar recovery percentages of EtGB and iBuGB from VX and RVX vapors varied from 0.3 to 17%, which was attributed to variations in the vaporization efficiency of the glass vapor container. The conversion efficiencies of the VX-G conversion tube for VX and RVX to their phosphonate derivatives were estimated to be 40%. VX and RVX vapors were detected at concentrations as low as 0.3 mg m -3 . Gasoline vapor was found to interfere with the analyses of VX and RVX. In the presence of 160 mg m -3 gasoline, the detection limits of VX and RVX vapor were increased to 20 mg m -3 . Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Fluoride glass fiber optics

    CERN Document Server

    Aggarwal, Ishwar D

    1991-01-01

    Fluoride Glass Fiber Optics reviews the fundamental aspects of fluoride glasses. This book is divided into nine chapters. Chapter 1 discusses the wide range of fluoride glasses with an emphasis on fluorozirconate-based compositions. The structure of simple fluoride systems, such as BaF2 binary glass is elaborated in Chapter 2. The third chapter covers the intrinsic transparency of fluoride glasses from the UV to the IR, with particular emphasis on the multiphonon edge and electronic edge. The next three chapters are devoted to ultra-low loss optical fibers, reviewing methods for purifying and

  20. DISSOLUTION OF LANTHANUM FLUORIDE PRECIPITATES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, B.A.

    1959-11-10

    A plutonium separatory ore concentration procedure involving the use of a fluoride type of carrier is presented. An improvement is given in the derivation step in the process for plutonium recovery by carrier precipitation of plutonium values from solution with a lanthanum fluoride carrier precipitate and subsequent derivation from the resulting plutonium bearing carrier precipitate of an aqueous acidic plutonium-containing solution. The carrier precipitate is contacted with a concentrated aqueous solution of potassium carbonate to effect dissolution therein of at least a part of the precipitate, including the plutonium values. Any remaining precipitate is separated from the resulting solution and dissolves in an aqueous solution containing at least 20% by weight of potassium carbonate. The reacting solutions are combined, and an alkali metal hydroxide added to a concentration of at least 2N to precipitate lanthanum hydroxide concomitantly carrying plutonium values.

  1. FLUORIDE CONTENT OF COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE SOY MILK PRODUCTS IN THAILAND.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rirattanapong, Opas; Rirattanapong, Praphasri

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. In Thailand, the consumption of soy milk products is common but there is limited data about their fluoride content. The purpose of this study was to es- timate the fluoride content of soy milk products available in Thailand. Fluoride content was determined for 76 brands of soy milk using a F-ion-specific electrode. The fluoride concentrations ranged from 0.01 to 3.78 μg/ml. The fluoride content was not related to sugar content, soy bean content or the sterilization process. Among 3 brands of soy milk containing tea powder extract, the fluoride content was high (1.25 to 3.78 μg/ml). Most brands of soy milk tested in our study had fluoride content below the optimal daily intake but brands containing tea powder extract if consumed by children may increase their risk for fluorosis.

  2. The Effect of Calcium Pre-Rinse on Salivary Fluoride After 900 ppm Fluoride Mouthwash: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid Ramazani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Calcium fluoride deposit during fluoride application. Uptake and retention of fluoride by saliva depends generally on the concentration of calcium. In this study, the ef-fect of calcium pre-rinse on salivary fluoride concentration after a 900 ppm fluoride mouthwash was investigated.Materials and Methods: This cross-over double-blind randomized clinical trial was con-ducted in a girls' dormitory in Zahedan University of Medical Sciences, southeast Iran. In this study, 42 female dental students were chosen using simple randomization. During the first phase, 21 subjects (group A used fluoride rinse (F regimen and the remaining (group B used calcium pre-rinse followed immediately by fluoride rinse (Ca + F regi-men. In the second phase, participants rinsed using the mouthwashes not previously used. Prior to each phase prophylaxis was performed and no fluoridated product was used dur-ing a two-week interval between the phases. Salivary samples were taken immediately be-fore (baseline, 1 and 12 hours after rinsing. The salivary fluoride concentration was de-termined using fluoride sensitive electrode. Repeated measures ANOVA was used for sta-tistical analysis and the significance level was set at P<0.05.Results: There was significant difference between fluoride concentrations at different time points (P< 0.001. Significant differences were observed when the different time points of two regimens were examined. In contrast to this, the baseline before using F regimen and the baseline before using Ca + F regimen did not show any significance (P= 0.070.Conclusion: Pre-rinsing with calcium before fluoride is recommended because of signifi-cant increases in salivary fluoride concentration.

  3. Urban Concentration and Spatial Allocation of Rents from natural resources. A Zipf's Curve Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomaz Ponce Dentinho

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at demonstrating how countries' dependency on natural resources plays a crucial role in urban concentration. The Zipf's Curve Elasticity is estimated for a group of countries and related to a set of indicators of unilateral transferences. Results show that in comparison to others, countries with higher urban concentration explained by higher Zipf's Curve Elasticity have a higher percentage of income coming from natural resources and education expenditures whereas public spending in health and outflow of Foreign Direct Investment seem to have spatial redistribution effects. Summing up, there are signs that the spatial allocation of property rights over natural resources and related rents influences urban concentration.

  4. Absorption, distribution and excretion of inhaled hydrogen fluoride in the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, J.B.

    1979-01-01

    Rats were subjected to whole body HF exposure for 6 hrs or to nose-only HF exposure for 1 hr. Total and/or ionic fluoride concentrations in selected tissues were determined at various times following exposure. In rats sacrificed 6 hrs after whole body exposure, dose-dependent increases in lung, plasma, and kidney total and ionic fluoride concentration occurred. Rats excreted more fluoride in the urine after whole body exposure than could be explained by the amount of HF inhaled. Considerable evidence suggests that airborne HF deposits on fur and is then ingested due to preening activity. Urinary fluoride excretion was increased by nose-only exposure. The urinary fluoride excretion accounted for approximately twice the fluoride estimated to be inhaled during exposure. Tissue fluoride concentrations were elevated immediately after nose-only exposure. Fluoride concentrations in lung and kidney returned to control levels within 12 hrs. Plasma fluoride concentration was slightly elevated 24 hrs after the start of the 1 hr exposure but was at control levels at 96 hrs. Immediately following nose-only exposure, lung ionic fluoride concentrations were less than plasma ionic fluoride concentrations suggesting that the fluoride in the lung had reached that site via plasma transport rather than by inhalation. A dose-dependent increase in plasma ionic fluoride concentration occurred after upper respiratory tract HF exposure providing strong evidence that fluoride is absorbed systemically from that site. The plasma ionic fluoride concentration after upper respiratory tract exposure was of sufficient magnitude to account for the plasma fluoride concentrations observed in intact nose-only exposed rats. (ERB)

  5. Environmental evaluation of fluoride in drinking water at "Los Altos de Jalisco," in the central Mexico region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado, Roberto; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge

    Naturally occurring fluoride has been detected and quantified in drinking water in several cities of the "Los Altos de Jalisco" (LAJ) region. LAJ is located in the northeastern part of the state of Jalisco-Mexico, covering an area of 16,410 km2 with a population of 696,318 in 20 municipalities. Drinking water comes mainly from groundwater aquifers, located in the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt, which is a volcanic region characterized by hydrothermal activity. Results indicated that water supply from 42% of the municipalities had a fluoride concentration over the Mexican standards of 1.5 mg/L. It is important to notice that there are three cities, Lagos de Moreno (1.66-5.88 mg/L F(-)), Teocaltiche (3.82-18.58 mg/L F(-)), and Encarnación de Díaz (2.58-4.40 mg/L F(-)) where all water samples resulted in fluoride concentration over the maximum contaminant level. The total population from these three cities is over 122,000 inhabitants. Another important city with high levels of fluoride in the water supply was Tepatitlán de Morelos (2 wells with 6.54 and 13.47 mg/L F(-)). In addition to water supply, 30 samples of brand-name bottled water were tested. Surprisingly, 8 samples (27%) demonstrated fluoride level over the standards, mainly Agua de Lagos with 5.27 mg/L. Fluoridated table salt (200-300 mg/kg F(-)) is another important source of fluoride. A large number of people living in the region, mainly school children, might be under adverse health risk because they are consuming contaminated drinking water. It is well known that long-term exposure to water with high levels of fluoride produces severe health problems.

  6. Silver diamine fluoride: a caries "silver-fluoride bullet".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblatt, A; Stamford, T C M; Niederman, R

    2009-02-01

    The antimicrobial use of silver compounds pivots on the 100-year-old application of silver nitrate, silver foil, and silver sutures for the prevention and treatment of ocular, surgical, and dental infections. Ag(+) kills pathogenic organisms at concentrations of linings, water purification systems, hospital gowns, and caries prevention. To distill the current best evidence relative to caries, this systematic review asked: Will silver diamine fluoride (SDF) more effectively prevent caries than fluoride varnish? A five-database search, reference review, and hand search identified 99 human clinical trials in three languages published between 1966 and 2006. Dual review for controlled clinical trials with the patient as the unit of observation, and excluding cross-sectional, animal, in vitro studies, and opinions, identified 2 studies meeting the inclusion criteria. The trials indicated that SDF's lowest prevented fractions for caries arrest and caries prevention were 96.1% and 70.3%, respectively. In contrast, fluoride varnish's highest prevented fractions for caries arrest and caries prevention were 21.3% and 55.7%, respectively. Similarly, SDF's highest numbers needed to treat for caries arrest and caries prevention were 0.8 (95% CI=0.5-1.0) and 0.9 (95% CI=0.4-1.1), respectively. For fluoride varnish, the lowest numbers needed to treat for caries arrest and prevention were 3.7 (95% CI=3.4-3.9) and 1.1 (95% CI=0.7-1.4), respectively. Adverse events were monitored, with no significant differences between control and experimental groups. These promising results suggest that SDF is more effective than fluoride varnish, and may be a valuable caries-preventive intervention. As well, the availability of a safe, effective, efficient, and equitable caries-preventive agent appears to meet the criteria of both the WHO Millennium Goals and the US Institute of Medicine's criteria for 21st century medical care.

  7. Behaviour of fluoride and dissolved silicon in Gouthami Godavari estuarine environment

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarma, V.V.; Sudhakar, U.; Varaprasad, S.J.D.

    The concentrations of fluoride and dissolved silicon in Gouthami-Godavari estuarine region (Andhra Pradesh, India) have been measured as a function of chlorinity during different seasons. Fluoride and dissolved silicon behave conservatively during...

  8. Toxicity of fluoride to microorganisms in biological wastewater treatment systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa-Herrera, Valeria; Banihani, Qais; León, Glendy; Khatri, Chandra; Field, James A; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes

    2009-07-01

    Fluoride is a common contaminant in a variety of industrial wastewaters. Available information on the potential toxicity of fluoride to microorganisms implicated in biological wastewater treatment is very limited. The objective of this study was to evaluate the inhibitory effect of fluoride towards the main microbial populations responsible for the removal of organic constituents and nutrients in wastewater treatment processes. The results of short-term batch bioassays indicated that the toxicity of sodium fluoride varied widely depending on the microbial population. Anaerobic microorganisms involved in various metabolic steps of anaerobic digestion processes were found to be very sensitive to the presence of fluoride. The concentrations of fluoride causing 50% metabolic inhibition (IC(50)) of propionate- and butyrate-degrading microorganisms as well as mesophilic and thermophilic acetate-utilizing methanogens ranged from 18 to 43 mg/L. Fluoride was also inhibitory to nitrification, albeit at relatively high levels (IC(50)=149 mg/L). Nitrifying bacteria appeared to adapt rapidly to fluoride, and a near complete recovery of their metabolic activity was observed after only 4d of exposure to high fluoride levels (up to 500 mg/L). All other microbial populations evaluated in this study, i.e., glucose fermenters, aerobic glucose-degrading heterotrophs, denitrifying bacteria, and H(2)-utilizing methanogens, tolerated fluoride at very high concentrations (>500 mg/L).

  9. Fluoride removal from water by nano filtration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bejaoui, Imen; Mnif, Amine; Hamrouni, Bechir

    2009-01-01

    As any oligo element, fluoride is necessary and beneficial for human health to low concentrations, but an excess amount of fluoride ions in drinking water has been known to cause undesirable effects, especially tooth and bones fluoro sis. The maximum acceptable concentration of fluoride in drinking water was fixed by the World Health Organization according to the climate in the range of 1 mg.L -1 to 1,2 mg.L -1 . Many methods have been used to remove fluoride from water such as precipitation, adsorption, electrocoagulation and membrane processes. Technologies using membrane processes are being used in many applications, particularly for brackish water desalination. Nano filtration seems to be the best process for a good selective defluorination of fluorinated waters. The main objective of this work was to investigate the retention of fluoride anions by nano filtration. The first part of this study deals with the characterisation of the NF HL2514TF membrane. The influence of various experimental parameters such as initial fluoride content, feed pressure, permeate flux, ionic strength, type of cation associated to fluoride and pH were studied in the second part. Results show that the retention order for the salts tested was TR(Na 2 SO 4 ) > TR(CaCl 2 ) > TR(NaCl), showing a retention sequence inversely proportional to the salt diffusion coefficients in water. It was also shown that charge effects could not be neglected, and a titration experiments confirmed that the NF membrane carry a surplus of negatively charged groups. Fluoride retention exceeds 60 pour cent, and increases with increasing concentration, where the rejection mechanism is related to the dielectric effects. Speigler-Kedem model was applied to experimental results in the aim to determine phenomenological parametersσand P s respectively, the reflexion coefficient of the membrane and the solute permeability of ions. The convective and diffusive parts of the mass transfer were quantified with

  10. High Fluoride Dentifrices for Elderly and Vulnerable Adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekstrand, Kim Rud

    2016-01-01

    The primary aim of this work is to present the available evidence that toothpastes containing >1,500 ppm fluoride (2,500-2,800 and 5,000 ppm F) provide an additional caries preventive effect on root caries lesions in elderly patients compared to traditional dentifrices (1,000-1,450 ppm F......). The secondary aim of this paper is to discuss why high fluoride dentifrices in general should perform better than traditional F-containing toothpaste. When examining the few studies that have considered the preventive benefits of high fluoride products on root caries the relative risk appears to be around 0.......5, and the risk can thus be halved by exchanging traditional F-containing toothpaste for toothpaste containing 5,000 ppm F. There is reasonable evidence that high fluoride dentifrices significantly increase the fluoride concentration in saliva during the day and the fluoride concentration in plaque compared...

  11. Determination Of Natural Boron Concentration In Coffee Leaves, Using de Autobiography by Neutron Capture Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loria, L. G.; Jimenez, R.; Thellier, M.

    1999-01-01

    Determination of natural boron concentration in coffee leaves, using the autoradiography, by neutron capture technique. The boron absorption coefficient in young coffee leaves was measured using autoradiography by neutron capture. In two experiments carried out in April and November, 1996, it was found that the coefficient varies between 0.9 and 5.3 nmol/h. the concentration of natural boron in coffee leaves in regard to age, symptoms and treatment received was also studied, using the same technique. (Author) [es

  12. Fluoride release and recharge abilities of contemporary fluoride-containing restorative materials and dental adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionysopoulos, Dimitrios; Koliniotou-Koumpia, Eugenia; Helvatzoglou-Antoniades, Maria; Kotsanos, Nikolaos

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the fluoride release of five fluoride-releasing restorative materials and three dental adhesives, before and after NaF solution treatment. Five restorative materials (Fuji IX GP, GC Corp.; Ketac N100, 3M ESPE; Dyract Extra, Dentsply; Beautifil II, Shofu Inc.; Wave, SDI) and three dental adhesives (Stae, SDI; Fluorobond II - Shofu Inc.; Prime & Bond NT, Dentsply) were investigated before and after NaF solution treatment. A fluoride ion-selective electrode was to measure fluoride concentrations. During the 86-day period before NaF solution treatment, Fuji IX GP released the highest amount of fluoride among the restorative materials while Prime & Bond NT was the highest among the dental adhesives. After NaF solution treatment, Fuji IX GP again ranked the highest in fluoride release among the restorative materials while Fluorobond II ranked the highest among dental adhesives. It was concluded that the compositions and setting mechanisms of fluoride-containing dental materials influenced their fluoride release and recharge abilities.

  13. Effects of fluoridated milk on root dentin remineralization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang H Arnold

    Full Text Available The prevalence of root caries is increasing with greater life expectancy and number of retained teeth. Therefore, new preventive strategies should be developed to reduce the prevalence of root caries. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of fluoridated milk on the remineralization of root dentin and to compare these effects to those of sodium fluoride (NaF application without milk.Thirty extracted human molars were divided into 6 groups, and the root cementum was removed from each tooth. The dentin surface was demineralized and then incubated with one of the following six solutions: Sodium chloride NaCl, artificial saliva, milk, milk+2.5 ppm fluoride, milk+10 ppm fluoride and artificial saliva+10 ppm fluoride. Serial sections were cut through the lesions and investigated with polarized light microscopy and quantitative morphometry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS. The data were statistically evaluated using a one-way ANOVA for multiple comparisons.The depth of the lesion decreased with increasing fluoride concentration and was the smallest after incubation with artificial saliva+10 ppm fluoride. SEM analysis revealed a clearly demarcated superficial remineralized zone after incubation with milk+2.5 ppm fluoride, milk+10 ppm fluoride and artificial saliva+10 ppm fluoride. Ca content in this zone increased with increasing fluoride content and was highest after artificial saliva+10 ppm fluoride incubation. In the artificial saliva+10 ppm fluoride group, an additional crystalline layer was present on top of the lesion that contained elevated levels of F and Ca.Incubation of root dentin with fluoridated milk showed a clear effect on root dentin remineralization, and incubation with NaF dissolved in artificial saliva demonstrated a stronger effect.

  14. Multi-criteria assessment of community-based fluoride-removal technologies for rural Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterwalder, Lars; Johnson, C Annette; Yang, Hong; Johnston, Richard B

    2014-08-01

    Elevated concentrations of naturally-occurring fluoride in groundwater pose a serious health risk to millions of people living in the Ethiopian Rift Valley. In the absence of low-fluoride water resources of sufficient capacity, fluoride removal from drinking water is the accepted mitigation option. To date, five different community-level fluoride-removal technologies have been implemented in Ethiopia, although only a few units have been found in a functional state in the field. Which technology should be promoted and up-scaled is the subject of controversial debate amongst key stakeholders. This paper describes a multi-criteria decision analysis exercise, which was conducted with the participation of stakeholders in Ethiopia during a one-day workshop, to assess in an objective and transparent manner the available technology options. Criteria for technology comparison were selected and weighted, thus enabling the participants to assess the advantages and disadvantages of the different technologies and hear the views of other stakeholders. It was shown that there is no single most-preferable, technical solution for fluoride removal in Ethiopia. Selection of the most suitable solution depends on location-specific parameters and on the relative importance given to different criteria by the stakeholders involved. The data presented in this paper can be used as reference values for Ethiopia. © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Chemical mechanism of the fluoride-inhibition of fermentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warburg, O; Christian, W

    1941-08-01

    Among the fluoride-sensitive fermentation elements, enolase is the most sensitive. An investigation was made, quantitatively, of fluoride inhibition for chemically pure magnesium-enolase using an optical enolase test. Data show that the effective compound for fluoride inhibition is a complex magnesium-fluoro-phosphate and that the magnesium-fluoro-phosphate inhibits fermentation by combining proportionally to its concentration with the ferment-protein in a dissociating manner.

  16. Private Well Water and Fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Private Wells Infant Formula Fluorosis Public Health Service Recommendation Water Operators & Engineers Water Fluoridation Additives Shortages of Fluoridation Additives Drinking Water Pipe Systems CDC-Sponsored Water Fluoridation Training Links to Other ...

  17. Radon concentration, absorbed dose rate in air and concentration of natural radionuclides in soil in the Osaka district of Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megumi, K.; Matsunami, T.; Ishiyama, T.; Abe, M.; Kimura, S.; Yamazaki, K.; Tsujimoto, T.

    1992-01-01

    Radon concentrations in outdoor air at 18 sites in the Osaka district, in the central part of Japan's main island, were measured with electrostatic integrating radon monitors which were developed by Y Ikebe et al of the Osaka survey centre as part of a nationwide survey of radon indoors and outdoors in Japan conducted by the National Institute of Radiological Science. The mean radon concentration in outdoor air during 2-month periods was measured over a period of a year and a half. In addition, the absorbed dose rate in air and the concentration of natural radionuclides in soil were measured at 40 sites in Osaka Prefecture which is located in the central part of the Osaka district using thermoluminescence dosemeters and with gamma ray spectrometry, respectively. Radon concentration in outdoor air showed a seasonal pattern, reaching its maximum during the winter and its minimum during the summer, but this variation was not significant at the coastal sites. It was concluded that this variation is correlated with a seasonal wind which blows from the continental interior to the ocean in winter and in the opposite direction in summer, as well as with geographical factors. Radon concentration in outdoor air in the Osaka district ranged from 0.6 to 17.9 Bq.m -3 and mean annual radon concentration in outdoor air at the 18 sites ranged from 2.7 to 6.9 Bq.m -3 . It was discovered that radon concentration in outdoor air decreased with wind speed in both winter and summer. The absorbed dose rate in air ranged from 66 to 114 nGy.h -1 , and the concentration of 226 Ra in soil ranged from 20 to 60 Bq.kg -1 respectively. (author)

  18. Inventories and mobilization of unsaturated zone sulfate, fluoride, and chloride related to land use change in semiarid regions, southwestern United States and Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlon, Bridget R.; Stonestrom, David A.; Reedy, Robert C.; Leaney, Fred W.; Gates, John; Cresswell, Richard G.

    2009-01-01

    Unsaturated zone salt reservoirs are potentially mobilized by increased groundwater recharge as semiarid lands are cultivated. This study explores the amounts of pore water sulfate and fluoride relative to chloride in unsaturated zone profiles, evaluates their sources, estimates mobilization due to past land use change, and assesses the impacts on groundwater quality. Inventories of water‐extractable chloride, sulfate, and fluoride were determined from borehole samples of soils and sediments collected beneath natural ecosystems (N = 4), nonirrigated (“rain‐fed”) croplands (N = 18), and irrigated croplands (N = 6) in the southwestern United States and in the Murray Basin, Australia. Natural ecosystems contain generally large sulfate inventories (7800–120,000 kg/ha) and lower fluoride inventories (630–3900 kg/ha) relative to chloride inventories (6600–41,000 kg/ha). Order‐of‐magnitude higher chloride concentrations in precipitation and generally longer accumulation times result in much larger chloride inventories in the Murray Basin than in the southwestern United States. Atmospheric deposition during the current dry interglacial climatic regime accounts for most of the measured sulfate in both U.S. and Australian regions. Fluoride inventories are greater than can be accounted for by atmospheric deposition in most cases, suggesting that fluoride may accumulate across glacial/interglacial climatic cycles. Chemical modeling indicates that fluorite controls fluoride mobility and suggests that water‐extractable fluoride may include some fluoride from mineral dissolution. Increased groundwater drainage/recharge following land use change readily mobilized chloride. Sulfate displacement fronts matched or lagged chloride fronts by up to 4 m. In contrast, fluoride mobilization was minimal in all regions. Understanding linkages between salt inventories, increased recharge, and groundwater quality is important for quantifying impacts of anthropogenic

  19. Purification of Drinking Water from Fluorides by Reverse Osmosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksander A.

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: An important task in the sphere of sanitary and epidemiological welfare of the population of the Russian Federation is provision of drinking water. Tap water must not contain pathogenic bacteria and dangerous chemicals. Purification systems regulate the concentration of fluoride ions in drinking water. The aim of this paper is to study the possibility of purifying tap water from fluoride ions by reverse osmosis. Materials and Methods: We used the Alfa Laval PilotUnit 2.5 "RO/NF with a set of spiral-type membrane elements RO99-2517/48 to remove fluoride ions. We measured the concentration of fluoride ions by the potentiometric method using the Hanna HI 2211 (pH/mV/T. Fluoride-selective electrode ELIS 131 F was used as an indicator electrode and the standard chloride-silver electrode EVL-1M3 was used as a reference electrode. Both the calibration and buffer solutions were prepared from chemically pure reagents and A. R. purity for analysis reagents according to GOST 4386-89. Results: A single passage of water through the reverse osmosis membrane reduced the concentration of fluoride ions from 2.29 ± 0.02 to 0.240 ± 0.015 mg/l. Double passage of water reduced the concentration by a factor of two. As the concentration of fluoride ions increased in the retentate, the concentration in the filtrate slightly increased too. Purification of water reduced the concentration of fluoride ions from 20 mg/l, to 0.5 mg/l. Discussion and Conclusions: Thus, using the Alfa Laval PilotUnit 2.5" RO/NF with a set of spiral-type membrane elements RO99-2517/48 filters tap water of ions of fluoride to the maximum allowable concentration. This study opens the perspective of using reverse osmosis to purify tap water with high concentration of fluoride ions.

  20. Troubleshooting for the observed problems in processing latex concentrate from natural resource

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afreen, S; Haque, K R; Huda, M K

    2013-01-01

    Natural latex has special importance in the rubber industry for manufacturing different types of goods like gloves, balloons, male contraceptive and similar thin walled articles. This natural latex is much more sensitive a liquid to handle since it can easily become contaminated and thereby coagulated which makes it unfavourable for centrifuge and getting concentrate from it. Some other related measures also are included in consideration during the processing of concentrate latex from the natural raw latex. The problems that are being faced in a concentrate latex processing plant can be categorized in different groups like, problems related to the latex property, mechanical problems, electrical problems, handling and storage problems, transformation problems, problems related to environmental issues, etc. Among them, the most common and vital problems frequently observed in a concentrate latex processing plant are discussed here with a view to finding the measures for solution which will help to maintain the latex property in any latex processing plant.

  1. Measurements of natural uranium concentration in Caspian Sea and Persian Gulf water by laser fluorimetric method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garshasbi, H.; Karimi Diba, J.; Jahanbakhshian, M. H.; Asghari, S. K.; Heravi, G. H.

    2005-01-01

    Natural uranium exists in earth crust and seawater. The concentration of uranium might increase by human manipulation or geological changes. The aim of this study was to verify susceptibility of laser fluorimetry method to determine the uranium concentration in Caspian Sea and Persian Gulf water. Materials and Methods: Laser fluorimetric method was used to determine the uranium concentration in several samples prepared from Caspian Sea and Persian Gulf water. Biological and chemical substances were eliminated in samples for better evaluation of the method. Results: As the concentration of natural uranium in samples increases, the response of instrument (uranium analyzer) increases accordingly. The standard deviation also increased slightly and gradually. Conclusion: Results indicate that the laser fluorimetry method show a reliable and accurate response with uranium concentration up to 100 μg/L in samples after removal of biological and organic substances

  2. Chemico-therapeutic approach to prevention of dental caries. [using stannous fluoride gel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, I. L.

    1975-01-01

    The program of chemical preventive dentistry is based primarily upon the development of a procedure for stabilizing stannous fluoride in solution by forcing it into glycerin. New topical fluoride treatment concentrates, fluoride containing gels and prophylaxis pastes, as well as a completely stable stannous fluoride dentifrice are made possible by the development of a rather complicated heat application method to force stannous fluoride into solution in glycerin. That the stannous fluoride is clinically effective in such a preparation is demonstrated briefly on orthodontic patients.

  3. Effect of exercise on fluoride metabolism in adult humans: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    V Zohoori, Fatemeh; Innerd, Alison; Azevedo, Liane B; Whitford, Gary M; Maguire, Anne

    2015-11-19

    An understanding of all aspects of fluoride metabolism is critical to identify its biological effects and avoid fluoride toxicity in humans. Fluoride metabolism and subsequently its body retention may be affected by physiological responses to acute exercise. This pilot study investigated the effect of exercise on plasma fluoride concentration, urinary fluoride excretion and fluoride renal clearance following no exercise and three exercise intensity conditions in nine healthy adults after taking a 1-mg Fluoride tablet. After no, light, moderate and vigorous exercise, respectively, the mean (SD) baseline-adjusted i) plasma fluoride concentration was 9.6(6.3), 11.4(6.3), 15.6(7.7) and 14.9(10.0) ng/ml; ii) rate of urinary fluoride excretion over 0-8 h was 46(15), 44(22), 34(17) and 36(17) μg/h; and iii) rate of fluoride renal clearance was 26.5(9.0), 27.2(30.4), 13.1(20.4) and 18.3(34.9) ml/min. The observed trend of a rise in plasma fluoride concentration and decline in rate of fluoride renal clearance with increasing exercise intensity needs to be investigated in a larger trial. This study, which provides the first data on the effect of exercise with different intensities on fluoride metabolism in humans, informs sample size planning for any subsequent definitive trial, by providing a robust estimate of the variability of the effect.

  4. Groundwater fluoride contamination: A reappraisal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amlan Banerjee

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Dissolution of fluorite (CaF2 and/or fluorapatite (FAP [Ca5(PO43F], pulled by calcite precipitation, is thought to be the dominant mechanism responsible for groundwater fluoride (F− contamination. Here, one dimensional reactive–transport models are developed to test this mechanism using the published dissolution and precipitation rate kinetics for the mineral pair FAP and calcite. Simulation results correctly show positive correlation between the aqueous concentrations of F− and CO32− and negative correlation between F− and Ca2+. Results also show that precipitation of calcite, contrary to the present understanding, slows down the FAP dissolution by 106 orders of magnitude compared to the FAP dissolution by hydrolysis. For appreciable amount of fluoride contamination rock–water interaction time must be long and of order 106 years.

  5. Oral fluoride retention after professional topical application in children with caries activity: comparison between 1.23% fluoride foam and fluoride gel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecília Claudia Costa Ribeiro

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study evaluated fluoride retention in the saliva of children with caries activity after topical fluoride application in the form of gel and foam. Methods: A cross-sectional, blind and randomized study, conducted with ten caries-active children aged between 8 and 10 years, in two stage, with a washout interval of two weeks between them. The treatments consisted of: a application of 2mL acidulated phosphate fluoride of the gel type in a mold and b application of 2mL acidulated phosphate fluoride of the foam type in a mold. After the washout, the treatments were inverted. Non-stimulated saliva was collected from the children at the times of 5, 15, 30 and 60 minutes after topical fluoride application. For statistical analysis the Student’s-t test was used, with a level of significance of 5%. Results: Saliva analysis was performed using a fluoride-specific electrode (ISE25F/ Radiometer, Copenhagen, Denmark at the Aquatic Science Center of the Federal University of Marana, which revealed differences after 5 minutes (p=0.0055 and 15 minutes (p=0.0208. The topical application of fluoride in the gel form revealed a higher concentration of fluoride in the saliva. Conclusion: There were differences in the retention of fluoride in the saliva of children with caries activity after the topical application of fluoride gel and the topical application of fluoride foam after 5 and 15 minutes of their application. The topical application of fluoride foam is recommended, on the basis of the lower probability of toxicity during its use.

  6. Sulfochlorphenol S as reagent for direct photometric determination of fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzhashi, D.O.; Dedkova, V.P.; Savvin, S.B.

    1978-01-01

    The system of zirconium-sulfochlorphenol S-fluoride was studied by the spectrophotometry method. The effect of pH, temperature and time on the formation of zirconium complexes with sulfochlorphenol S was investigated. A comparison of the above method of determining fluorides with other methods (using alizarinecomplexonate, quinalizarincomplexonate, cerium chelates, lanthanum, arsenazo 3) is presented. The sensitivity of determining fluorides with arsenazo 3 is lower than that with sulfochlorphenol S. The molar absorption coefficient is 3x10 4 , the reaction of determining fluorides with the aid of sulfochlorphenol S is highly selective. The method was used to determine fluorides in the supply water, zirconium solutions and electrolyzer cell. The range of concentration determination for fluorides is 0-3 μg/25 ml

  7. Fluoride sorption using Cynodon dactylon based activated carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alagumuthu G.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study deals the application of Cynodon dactylon based thermally activated carbon for fluoride toxicity. The batch adsorption techniques was followed at neutral pH as the functions of contact time, adsorbent dose, adsorbate concentration, temperature and the effect of co-anions. The data indicate that the prepared adsorbent surface sites are heterogeneous in nature and that fits into a heterogeneous site-binding model. The present system followed the Redlich-Peterson isotherm as well as Langmuir adsorption isotherm model. Lagergren pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, intra particle diffusion and Elovich kinetics were modeled to describe the adsorption rate of fluoride and determined as this scheme followed pseudo-second-order kinetics. The calculated enthalpy change, ΔH°, and entropy change, ΔS°, for the adsorption process are +8.725 kJ/mol and +0.033 J/mol K respectively and shows endothermic experience. Instrumental analysis of XRD, FTIR and SEM gives the idea about the fluoride binding ability of adsorbent.

  8. Fluoride Rinses, Gels and Foams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Twetman, Svante; Keller, Mette K

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this conference paper was to systematically review the quality of evidence and summarize the findings of clinical trials published after 2002 using fluoride mouth rinses, fluoride gels or foams for the prevention of dental caries. METHODS: Relevant papers were selected after...... (6 on fluoride mouth rinse, 10 on fluoride gel and 3 on fluoride foam); 6 had a low risk of bias while 2 had a moderate risk. All fluoride measures appeared to be beneficial in preventing crown caries and reversing root caries, but the quality of evidence was graded as low for fluoride mouth rinse......, moderate for fluoride gel and very low for acidulated fluoride foam. No conclusions could be drawn on the cost-effectiveness. CONCLUSIONS: This review, covering the recent decade, has further substantiated the evidence for a caries-preventive effect of fluoride mouth rinse, fluoride gel and foam...

  9. Fluoride loaded polymeric nanoparticles for dental delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Sanko; Escudero, Carlos; Sediqi, Nadia; Smistad, Gro; Hiorth, Marianne

    2017-06-15

    The overall aim of the present paper was to develop fluoride loaded nanoparticles based on the biopolymers chitosan, pectin, and alginate, for use in dental delivery. First, the preparation of nanoparticles in the presence of sodium fluoride (NaF) as the active ingredient by ionic gelation was investigated followed by an evaluation of their drug entrapment and release properties. Chitosan formed stable, spherical, and monodisperse nanoparticles in the presence of NaF and tripolyphoshate as the crosslinker, whereas alginate and pectin were not able to form any definite nanostructures in similar conditions. The fluoride loading capacity was found to be 33-113ppm, and the entrapment efficiency 3.6-6.2% for chitosan nanoparticles prepared in 0.2-0.4% (w/w) NaF, respectively. A steady increase in the fluoride release was observed for chitosan nanoparticles prepared in 0.2% NaF both in pH5 and 7 until it reached a maximum at time point 4h and maintained at this level for at least 24h. Similar profiles were observed for formulations prepared in 0.4% NaF; however the fluoride was released at a higher level at pH5. The low concentration, but continuous delivery of fluoride from the chitosan nanoparticles, with possible expedited release in acidic environment, makes these formulations highly promising as dental delivery systems in the protection against caries development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Antibacterial Effect of Silver Diamine Fluoride on Cariogenic Organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Yali; Darvell, Brain W; Botelho, Michael G

    2018-05-01

    To screen the possible antimicrobial activity of a range of clinically used, silver-based compounds on cariogenic organisms: silver diamine fluoride (SDF), silver fluoride, and silver nitrate. Preliminary screening disk-diffusion susceptibility tests were conducted on Mueller-Hinton agar plates inoculated with Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacillus acidophilus, and Actinomyces naeslundii, organisms known to be cariogenic. In order to identify which component of the silver compounds was responsible for any antibacterial (AB) effect, and to provide controls, the following were also investigated at high and low concentrations: sodium fluoride, ammonium fluoride, ammonium chloride, sodium fluoride, sodium chloride, and sodium nitrate, as well as deionized water as control. A volume of 10 pL of a test solution was dispensed onto a paper disk resting on the inoculated agar surface, and the plate incubated anaerobically at 37°C for 48 hours. The zones of inhibition were then measured. Silver diamine fluoride, silver fluoride, silver nitrate, and ammonium fluoride had significant AB effect (p effect at low concentration; the remaining other compounds had no effect. Silver ions appear to be the principal AB agent at both high and low concentration; fluoride ions only have an AB effect at high concentration, while ammonium, nitrate, chloride and sodium ions have none. The anticaries effect of topical silver solutions appears restricted to that of the silver ions. Silver compounds, such as SDF, silver fluoride, and silver nitrate have AB effect against cariogenic organisms and these may have clinical impact in arresting or preventing dental decay. Sodium fluoride did not have AB effect under the conditions tested.

  11. Fluoride Removal from Water by Reverse Osmosis Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Namavar

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available As fluoride concentration in drinking water is one of the effective parameters in human health, finding the way to remove excess amount of fluoride from drinking water is very important in water supply projects. Today, with developing in technology and finding new methods, the use of membrane technology for producing fresh water get improved. In this study the efficiency of reverse osmosis method to remove fluoride from water was investigated. Initial concentration of fluoride, sulfate and electrical conductivity in feed water and the effect of associated cation with fluoride ion were studied. All tests adapted from “Standard Methods for Examination of Water and Wastewater”. Determination of fluoride concentration was done according the standard SPANDS method by using a spectrophotometer DR/5000. Obtain results show that with increasing in concentration of fluoride and sulfate and electrical conductivity in feed water the efficiency of RO membrane to remove fluoride reduced. In addition, this efficiency for CaF2 was higher than NaF.

  12. Controlling the fluoride dosage in a patient with compromised salivary function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichmiller, Frederick C; Eidelman, Naomi; Carey, Clifton M

    2005-01-01

    High-concentration topical fluorides are used commonly to with compromised salivary function due to irradiation and chemotherapy. The authors describe a 50-year-old man with previously treated cancer who was using tray-applied topical fluoride gel. He complained of gastric symptoms, difficulty in swallowing, leg muscle soreness and knee joint soreness. A computed tomographic scan revealed thickening of the esophageal walls. An upper endoscopy revealed abnormal motility. The motility test indicated high-amplitude peristalsis and hypertensive lower esophageal sphincter, and urine testing indicated high levels of systemic fluoride. The patient's fluoride regimen was altered, and within a short period his urinary fluoride levels returned to normal and his symptoms resolved. Clinicians prescribing home-applied high-concentration fluorides need to be cognizant of the symptoms of fluoride toxicity, carefully monitor the patient's compliance with the treatment regimen, and adjust the dosage or mode of application to control the total ingested dose of fluoride.

  13. Oxygen concentration diffusion analysis of lead-bismuth-cooled, natural-circulation reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Kei; Sakai, Takaaki

    2001-11-01

    The feasibility study on fast breeder reactors in Japan has been conducted at JNC and related organizations. The Phase-I study has finished in March, 2001. During the Phase-I activity, lead-bismuth eutectic coolant has been selected as one of the possible coolant options and a medium-scale plant, cooled by a lead-bismuth natural circulation flow was studied. On the other side, it is known that lead-bismuth eutectic has a problem of structural material corrosiveness. It was found that oxygen concentration control in the eutectic plays an important role on the corrosion protection. In this report, we have developed a concentration diffusion analysis code (COCOA: COncentration COntrol Analysis code) in order to carry out the oxygen concentration control analysis. This code solves a two-dimensional concentration diffusion equation by the finite differential method. It is possible to simulate reaction of oxygen and hydrogen by the code. We verified the basic performance of the code and carried out oxygen concentration diffusion analysis for the case of an oxygen increase by a refueling process in the natural circulation reactor. In addition, characteristics of the oxygen control system was discussed for a different type of the control system as well. It is concluded that the COCOA code can simulate diffusion of oxygen concentration in the reactor. By the analysis of a natural circulation medium-scale reactor, we make clear that the ON-OFF control and PID control can well control oxygen concentration by choosing an appropriate concentration measurement point. In addition, even when a trouble occurs in the oxygen emission or hydrogen emission system, it observes that control characteristic drops away. It is still possible, however, to control oxygen concentration in such case. (author)

  14. Concentration of arsenic in water, sediments and fish species from naturally contaminated rivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosso, Juan José; Schenone, Nahuel F; Pérez Carrera, Alejo; Fernández Cirelli, Alicia

    2013-04-01

    Arsenic (As) may occur in surface freshwater ecosystems as a consequence of both natural contamination and anthropogenic activities. In this paper, As concentrations in muscle samples of 10 fish species, sediments and surface water from three naturally contaminated rivers in a central region of Argentina are reported. The study area is one of the largest regions in the world with high As concentrations in groundwater. However, information of As in freshwater ecosystems and associated biota is scarce. An extensive spatial variability of As concentrations in water and sediments of sampled ecosystems was observed. Geochemical indices indicated that sediments ranged from mostly unpolluted to strongly polluted. The concentration of As in sediments averaged 6.58 μg/g ranging from 0.23 to 59.53 μg/g. Arsenic in sediments barely followed (r = 0.361; p = 0.118) the level of contamination of water. All rivers showed high concentrations of As in surface waters, ranging from 55 to 195 μg/L. The average concentration of As in fish was 1.76 μg/g. The level of contamination with As differed significantly between species. Moreover, the level of bioaccumulation of As in fish species related to the concentration of As in water and sediments also differed between species. Whilst some fish species seemed to be able to regulate the uptake of this metalloid, the concentration of As in the large catfish Rhamdia quelen mostly followed the concentration of As in abiotic compartments. The erratic pattern of As concentrations in fish and sediments regardless of the invariable high levels in surface waters suggests the existence of complex biogeochemical processes behind the distribution patterns of As in these naturally contaminated ecosystems.

  15. Natural radionuclides in food in an area with high concentrations of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, W.S.; Moraes, S.R.; Cavalcante, J.J.V.; Kelecom, A.; Silva, A.X. da; Lopez, J.M.; Filgueiras, R.; Carmo, A.S.

    2017-01-01

    Areas of high natural radiation expose the local population to doses greater than the world average. One of the routes of exposure is food intake. The activity concentration (AC) of 5 natural radionuclides in 7 types of foods was analyzed. The highest CA measured was 2.40 Bq.kg -1 for the U nat in the potato. The multivariate statistic identified two groups: (U nat e 232 Th) and [( 210 Pb and 228 Ra) and 226 Ra

  16. Fluoride removal from diluted solutions by Donnan dialysis using full factorial design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boubakri, Ali; Helali, Nawel; Tlili, Mohamed; Amor, Mohamed Ben [Center of Researches and Water Technologies, Soliman (Turkey)

    2014-03-15

    Excessive fluoride concentration in potable water can lead to fluorosis of teeth and bones. In the present study, Donnan dialysis (DD) is applied for the removal of fluoride ions from diluted sodium fluoride solutions. A four factor two level (2{sup 4}) full factorial design was used to investigate the influence of different physico-chemical parameters on fluoride removal efficiency (Y{sub F}) and fluoride flux (J{sub F}) through anion exchange membrane. The statistical design determines factors which have the important effects on Donnan dialysis performance and studies all interactions among the considered parameters. The four significant factors were initial fluoride concentration, feed flow rate, temperature and agitation speed. The experimental results and statistical analysis show that the temperature and agitation speed have positive effects on fluoride removal efficiency and the initial fluoride concentration has a negative effect. In the case of fluoride flux, feed flow rate and initial concentration are the main effect and all factors have a positive effect. The interaction between studied parameters was not negligible on two responses. A maximum fluoride removal of 75.52% was obtained under optimum conditions and the highest value of fluoride flux obtained was 2.4 mg/cm{sup 2}·h. Empirical regression models were also obtained and used to predict the flux and the fluoride removal profiles with satisfactory results.

  17. Natural U concentrations in soft tissues and bone of New York City residents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisenne, I.M.; Welford, G.A.

    1986-01-01

    Specimens of lung, liver, kidney and vertebrae from New York City autopsy cases were measured for naturally occurring U. An age dependency in U concentration was found in lung and vertebrae. The bone concentration was found to be a factor of 10 lower than previously reported for this tissue, thus the skeletal burden of U is estimated to be factor of 10 lower than that suggested in ICRP Publication 23

  18. Integrated Microanalytical System for Simultaneous Voltammetric Measurements of Free Metal Ion Concentrations in Natural Waters

    OpenAIRE

    Noël, Stéphane; Tercier-Waeber, Mary-Lou; Lin, Lin; Buffle, Jacques; Guenat, Olivier; Koudelka-Hep, Milena

    2007-01-01

    A complexing gel integrated microelectrode (CGIME) for direct measurements of free metal ion concentrations in natural waters has been developed. It is prepared by the successive deposition of microlayers of a chelating resin, an antifouling agarose gel and Hg on a 100-interconnected Ir-based microelectrode array. The trace metals of interest are in a first step accumulated on the chelating resin in proportion to their free ion concentration in solution, then released in acidic solution and d...

  19. Implementing a geographical information system to assess endemic fluoride areas in Lamphun, Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theerawasttanasiri N

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonthaphat Theerawasttanasiri,1,2 Surasak Taneepanichskul,1 Wichain Pingchai,3 Yuwaree Nimchareon,4 Sangworn Sriwichai5 1College of Public Health Sciences, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand; 2Department of Health, Health Promotion Center Region 1, Chiang Mai, Thailand; 3Mueang Lamphun District Public Health Office, 4Pasang District Public Health Office, 5Ban Thi District Public Health Office, Lamphun, Thailand Introduction: Many studies have shown that fluoride can cross the placenta and that exposure to high fluoride during pregnancy may result in premature birth and/or a low birth weight. Lamphun is one of six provinces in Thailand where natural water fluoride (WF concentrations >10.0 mg/L were found, and it was also found that >50% of households used water with high fluoride levels. Nevertheless, geographical information system (GIS and maps of endemic fluoride areas are lacking. We aimed to measure the fluoride level of village water supplies to assess endemic fluoride areas and present GIS with maps in Google Maps.Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted from July 2016 to January 2017. Purpose sampling was used to identify villages of districts with WF >10.0 mg/L in the Mueang Lamphun, Pasang, and Ban Thi districts. Water samples were collected with the geolocation measured by Smart System Info. Fluoride was analyzed with an ion-selective electrode instrument using a total ionic strength adjustment buffer. WF >0.70 mg/L was used to identify unsafe drinking water and areas with high endemic fluoride levels. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the findings, and MS Excel was used to create the GIS database. Maps were created in Google Earth and presented in Google Maps.Results: We found that WF concentrations ranged between 0.10–13.60 mg/L. Forty-four percent (n=439 of samples were at unsafe levels (>0.70 mg/L, and. 54% (n=303 of villages and 46% (n=79,807 of households used the unsafe drinking water. Fifty percent

  20. Concentration and bioavailability of fluoride in mouthrinses prepared in dispensing pharmacies Concentração e biodisponibilidade do fluoreto de enxagüatórios bucais preparados em farmácias de manipulação

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cínthia Pereira Machado Tabchoury

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Considering the importance of medication quality control and that mouthrinses for dental caries prevention have commonly been prepared in dispensing pharmacies, this study assessed formulations containing 0.05% NaF acquired from 6 dispensing pharmacies in the city of Piracicaba, S.P. The mouthrinse formulations were purchased in 3 separate periods and coded from A to F. Fluoride ion (F- concentration was determined in all formulations in the 3 periods, and in those acquired in the 3rd period, the bioavailability of fluoride with dental enamel with caries-like lesions and the pH of products were evaluated. A solution of 0.05% NaF and distilled deionized water were used, respectively, as positive and negative controls. In the bioavailability analysis, fluoride present in dental enamel was determined removing, by acid etching, two layers of enamel; fluoride in the acid extract was determined with a specific electrode. The mouthrinses prepared in 5 pharmacies presented a F- concentration close to the expected value, except for the product prepared in one of them, in which a mean of 0.01% NaF was found. All products were more efficient than the negative control (pConsiderando a importância do controle de qualidade de medicamentos e que os enxagüatórios bucais para prevenção da cárie dental tem sido comumente preparados em farmácias de manipulação, este estudo avaliou enxagüatórios contendo NaF 0,05% adquiridos em 6 farmácias de manipulação na cidade de Piracicaba, SP. Os enxagüatórios foram adquiridos em 3 períodos distintos e codificados de A a F. A concentração de fluoreto (F- foi determinada em todas as soluções nos 3 períodos, e naquelas adquiridas no 3º período, a biodisponibilidade do fluoreto com o esmalte dental com lesão de cárie artificial e o pH dos produtos foram avaliados. Uma solução de NaF 0,05% e água destilada deionizada atuaram, respectivamente, como controle positivo e negativo. Na análise de

  1. Fluoride varnishes and enamel caries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruyn, Hugo de

    1987-01-01

    Topical fluoride applications have the aim of increasing the fluoride uptake in enamel and consequently reducing caries. In the early ‘60s fluoride varnishes were introduced because they had a long contact period with the enamel which resulted in a higher fluoride uptake than from other topical

  2. Reference natural radionuclide concentrations in Australian soils and derived terrestrial air kerma rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinschmidt, R

    2017-06-01

    Sediment from drainage catchment outlets has been shown to be a useful means of sampling large land masses for soil composition. Naturally occurring radioactive material concentrations (uranium, thorium and potassium-40) in soil have been collated and converted to activity concentrations using data collected from the National Geochemistry Survey of Australia. Average terrestrial air kerma rate data are derived using the elemental concentration data, and is tabulated for Australia and states for use as baseline reference information. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of recharge and discharge on delta2H and delta18O composition and chloride concentration of high arsenic/fluoride groundwater from the Datong Basin, northern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xianjun; Wang, Yanxin; Su, Chunli; Duan, Mengyu

    2013-02-01

    To better understand the effects of recharge and discharge on the hydrogeochemistry of high levels of arsenic (As) and fluoride (F) in groundwater, environmental isotopic composition (delta2H and delta18O) and chloride (Cl) concentrations were analyzed in 29 groundwater samples collected from the Datong Basin. High arsenic groundwater samples (As > 50 micog/L) were found to be enriched in lighter isotopic composition that ranged from -92 to -78 per thousand for deuterium (delta2H) and from -12.5 to -9.9 per thousand for oxygen-18 (delta18O). High F-containing groundwater (F > 1 mg/L) was relatively enriched in heavier isotopic composition and varied from -90 to -57 per thousand and from -12.2 to -6.7 per thousand for delta2H and delta18O, respectively. High chloride concentrations and delta18O values were primarily measured in groundwater samples from the northern and southwestern portions of the study area, indicating the effect of evaporation on groundwater. The observation of relatively homogenized and low delta18O values and chloride concentrations in groundwater samples from central part of the Datong Basin might be a result of fast recharge by irrigation returns, which suggests that irrigation using arsenic-contaminated groundwater affected the occurrence of high arsenic-containing groundwater in the basin.

  4. Natural and anthropogenic radionuclide activity concentrations in the New Zealand diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Andrew J; Gaw, Sally; Hermanspahn, Nikolaus; Glover, Chris N

    2016-01-01

    To support New Zealand's food safety monitoring regime, a survey was undertaken to establish radionuclide activity concentrations across the New Zealand diet. This survey was undertaken to better understand the radioactivity content of the modern diet and also to assess the suitability of the current use of milk as a sentinel for dietary radionuclide trends. Thirteen radionuclides were analysed in 40 common food commodities, including animal products, fruits, vegetables, cereal grains and seafood. Activity was detected for (137)Caesium, (90)Strontium and (131)Iodine. No other anthropogenic radionuclides were detected. Activity concentrations of the three natural radionuclides of Uranium and the daughter radionuclide (210)Polonium were detected in the majority of food sampled, with a large variation in magnitude. The maximum activity concentrations were detected in shellfish for all these radionuclides. Based on the established activity concentrations and ranges, the New Zealand diet contains activity concentrations of anthropogenic radionuclides far below the Codex Alimentarius guideline levels. Activity concentrations obtained for milk support its continued use as a sentinel for monitoring fallout radionuclides in terrestrial agriculture. The significant levels of natural and anthropogenic radionuclide activity concentrations detected in finfish and molluscs support undertaking further research to identify a suitable sentinel for New Zealand seafood monitoring. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Fluoride content and labelling of toothpastes marketed in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakkar, V P; Rao, A; Rajesh, G; Shenoy, R; Pai, M

    2015-09-01

    To enumerate the fluoride content and labelling practices of toothpastes marketed in India and to determine if the content is in accordance with the information provided on the packaging. In vitro analysis of total and free available fluoride in 5 adult and 5 children's fluoride toothpastes in India using fluoride ion electrode. Information on the tube and carton was checked to assess the labelling. The mean Total Fluoride concentrations (TF) in the toothpastes labelled 1,000 ppm, 500ppm and 458 ppm were 1,000, 500 and 449mg/L (sd values 3, 5 and 4mg/L) respectively. The toothpastes' Total Soluble Fluoride (TSF) concentration was generally slightly less than the TF concentration. Overall mean percentage of TSF concentration was 94% sd 9%. The mean percentage of TSF concentration in SMFP (sodium monofluorophosphate)/CaCO3 (calcium carbonate) containing toothpastes was 86% sd 16% while that in NaF (sodium fluoride)/Si (silica) based toothpastes was 98% sd 1% and 95% sd 1% in the remaining toothpastes with unknown abrasive. NaF/Si based toothpastes had more TSF concentration than the others (plabelled following the guidelines of the regulatory body of India, 3 of the 10 failed to mention the abrasive present.

  6. 4-phenylbutyrate Mitigates Fluoride-Induced Cytotoxicity in ALC Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maiko Suzuki

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Chronic fluoride over-exposure during pre-eruptive enamel development can cause dental fluorosis. Severe dental fluorosis is characterized by porous, soft enamel that is vulnerable to erosion and decay. The prevalence of dental fluorosis among the population in the USA, India and China is increasing. Other than avoiding excessive intake, treatments to prevent dental fluorosis remain unknown. We previously reported that high-dose fluoride induces endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress and oxidative stress in ameloblasts. Cell stress induces gene repression, mitochondrial damage and apoptosis. An aromatic fatty acid, 4-phenylbutyrate (4PBA is a chemical chaperone that interacts with misfolded proteins to prevent ER stress. We hypothesized that 4PBA ameliorates fluoride-induced ER stress in ameloblasts. To determine whether 4PBA protects ameloblasts from fluoride toxicity, we analyzed gene expression of Tgf-β1, Bcl2/Bax ratio and cytochrome-c release in vitro. In vivo, we measured fluorosis levels, enamel hardness and fluoride concentration. Fluoride treated Ameloblast-lineage cells (ALC had decreased Tgf-β1 expression and this was reversed by 4PBA treatment. The anti-apoptotic Blc2/Bax ratio was significantly increased in ALC cells treated with fluoride/4PBA compared to fluoride treatment alone. Fluoride treatment induced cytochrome-c release from mitochondria into the cytosol and this was inhibited by 4PBA treatment. These results suggest that 4PBA mitigates fluoride-induced gene suppression, apoptosis and mitochondrial damage in vitro. In vivo, C57BL/6J mice were provided fluoridated water for six weeks with either fluoride free control-chow or 4PBA-containing chow (7 g/kg 4PBA. With few exceptions, enamel microhardness, fluorosis levels, and fluoride concentrations of bone and urine did not differ significantly between fluoride treated animals fed with control-chow or 4PBA-chow. Although 4PBA mitigated high-dose fluoride toxicity in vitro, a diet

  7. 4-phenylbutyrate Mitigates Fluoride-Induced Cytotoxicity in ALC Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Maiko; Everett, Eric T; Whitford, Gary M; Bartlett, John D

    2017-01-01

    Chronic fluoride over-exposure during pre-eruptive enamel development can cause dental fluorosis. Severe dental fluorosis is characterized by porous, soft enamel that is vulnerable to erosion and decay. The prevalence of dental fluorosis among the population in the USA, India and China is increasing. Other than avoiding excessive intake, treatments to prevent dental fluorosis remain unknown. We previously reported that high-dose fluoride induces endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and oxidative stress in ameloblasts. Cell stress induces gene repression, mitochondrial damage and apoptosis. An aromatic fatty acid, 4-phenylbutyrate (4PBA) is a chemical chaperone that interacts with misfolded proteins to prevent ER stress. We hypothesized that 4PBA ameliorates fluoride-induced ER stress in ameloblasts. To determine whether 4PBA protects ameloblasts from fluoride toxicity, we analyzed gene expression of Tgf -β 1, Bcl2 / Bax ratio and cytochrome-c release in vitro . In vivo , we measured fluorosis levels, enamel hardness and fluoride concentration. Fluoride treated Ameloblast-lineage cells (ALC) had decreased Tgf -β 1 expression and this was reversed by 4PBA treatment. The anti-apoptotic Blc2 / Bax ratio was significantly increased in ALC cells treated with fluoride/4PBA compared to fluoride treatment alone. Fluoride treatment induced cytochrome-c release from mitochondria into the cytosol and this was inhibited by 4PBA treatment. These results suggest that 4PBA mitigates fluoride-induced gene suppression, apoptosis and mitochondrial damage in vitro . In vivo , C57BL/6J mice were provided fluoridated water for six weeks with either fluoride free control-chow or 4PBA-containing chow (7 g/kg 4PBA). With few exceptions, enamel microhardness, fluorosis levels, and fluoride concentrations of bone and urine did not differ significantly between fluoride treated animals fed with control-chow or 4PBA-chow. Although 4PBA mitigated high-dose fluoride toxicity in vitro , a diet rich

  8. Lyophilization and Reconstitution of Reverse-Osmosis Concentrated Natural Organic Matter from a Drinking Water Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disinfection by-product (DBP) research can be complicated by difficulties in shipping large water quantities and changing natural organic matter (NOM) characteristics over time. To overcome these issues, it is advantageous to have a reliable method for concentrating NOM with min...

  9. Preconcentration of natural protactinium from thorium concentrate with subsequent determination using Gamma (γ) spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raja, Naine; Swain, Kallola; Kayasth, S.R.; Pathassarathy, R.; Mathur, P.K.; Anil Kumar, S.

    1999-01-01

    A simple and efficient method has been developed to preconcentrate natural protactinium ( 231 Pa) from large size of thorium concentrate (5.0-100.0g) on Dowex 1 X 8 in acid medium. Gamma spectrometry, a powerful determination technique, has been used for quantitative determination of protactinium

  10. Natural contamination of dietary rice straw with zearalenone and urinary zearalenone concentrations in a cattle herd

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hasunuma, H.; Takagi, M.; Kawamura, O.; Taniguchi, C.; Chuma, T.; Uno, S.; Kokushi, E.; Matsumoto, D.; Tshering, C.; Deguchi, E.; Fink-Gremmels, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/119949997

    2012-01-01

    The present study was conducted to 1) identify the natural source of feed contamination by zearalenone (ZEN), which was suspected to have caused persistently increased urinary ZEN concentrations in one of our experimental cattle herds, and 2) evaluate the effects of intervention against this source

  11. Fluorides in groundwater and its impact on health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shailaja, K; Johnson, Mary Esther Cynthia

    2007-04-01

    Fluoride is a naturally occurring toxic mineral present in drinking water and causes yellowing of teeth, tooth problems etc. Fluorspar, Cryolite and Fluorapatite are the naturally occurring minerals, from which fluoride finds its path to groundwater through infiltration. In the present study two groundwater samples, Station I and Station II at Hyderabad megacity, the capital of Andhra Pradesh were investigated for one year from January 2001 to December 2001. The average fluoride values were 1.37 mg/l at Station I and 0.91 mg/l at Station II. The permissible limit given by BIS (1983) 0.6-1.2 mg/l and WHO (1984) 1.5 mg/l for fluoride in drinking water. The groundwaters at Station I exceeded the limit while at Station II it was within the limits. The study indicated that fluoride content of 0.5 mg/l is sufficient to cause yellowing of teeth and dental problems.

  12. The cariostatic mechanisms of fluoride

    OpenAIRE

    Kata Rošin-Grget; Kristina Peroš; Ivana Šutej; Krešimir Bašić

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the possible cariostatic mechanisms of the action of fluoride. In the past, fluoride inhibition of caries was ascribed to reduced solubility of enamel due to incorporation of fluoride (F–) into the enamel minerals. The present evidence from clinical and laboratory studies suggests that the caries-preventive mode of action of fluoride is mainly topical. There is convincing evidence that fluoride has a major effect on demineralisation and remineralisation of dental hard t...

  13. Groundwater fluoride contamination and its possible health implications in Indi taluk of Vijayapura District (Karnataka State), India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugran, Vidyavati; Desai, Naveen N; Chakraborti, Dipankar; Masali, Kallappa A; Mantur, Prakash; Kulkarni, Shreepad; Deshmukh, Niranjan; Chadchan, Kailash S; Das, Swastika N; Tanksali, Anuradha S; Arwikar, Asha S; Guggarigoudar, Suresh P; Vallabha, Tejaswini; Patil, Shailaja S; Das, Kusal K

    2017-10-01

    Groundwater fluoride concentration and fluoride-related health problems were studied in twenty-two villages of Indi taluk of Vijayapura district, Karnataka, India. Present study (2015) was also used to compare groundwater fluoride concentration in same 22 villages with previous government report (2000). Groundwater fluoride concentrations of 62 bore wells of 22 villages were analyzed by using an ion-sensitive electrode. A total of 660 adults and 600 children were screened for fluorosis symptoms and signs. Sixty clinically suspected fluorosis patients' urine samples were further analyzed for fluoride. The mean value (1.22 ± 0.75 mg/L) of fluoride concentration of 62 bore wells and 54.83 % bore wells with ≥1.0 mg/L of fluoride concentrations in Indi taluk indicates higher than the permissible limit of drinking water fluoride concentration recommended for India. Clinical symptoms like arthritis, joint pains, gastrointestinal discomfort and lower limb deformities with high urinary fluoride concentrations in some subjects suggest fluorosis. Results also showed an increase in groundwater fluoride concentration of the same 22 villages between previous and present study. Preliminary arthritis symptom of the villagers could be due to drinking fluoride-contaminated water. Increase in fluoride concentration with time to the bore wells definitely indicates future danger.

  14. Fluoride Increase in Saliva and Dental Biofilm due to a Meal Prepared with Fluoridated Water or Salt: A Crossover Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Carolina V; Tenuta, Livia M A; Cury, Jaime A

    2018-06-07

    Knowledge about fluoride delivery to oral fluids from foods cooked with fluoridated water and salt is scarce, and no study has evaluated fluoride concentrations in saliva or biofilm during meal consumption. In this randomized double-blind crossover study, 12 volunteers ingested meals (rice, beans, meat, and legumes) prepared with nonfluoridated water and salt (control group), fluoridated water (0.70 mg F/L; water group), and fluoridated salt (183.7 mg F/kg; salt group). Whole saliva was collected before meal ingestion, during mastication, and up to 2 h after meal ingestion. Dental biofilm was collected before and immediately after meal ingestion. Fluoride concentrations in saliva and dental biofilm were determined by an ion-specific electrode. The mean (±standard deviation; n = 4) fluoride concentrations in meals prepared for the control, water, and salt groups were 0.039 ± 0.01, 0.43 ± 0.04, and 1.71 ± 0.32 μg F/g, respectively. The three groups had significantly different fluoride concentrations in saliva collected during mastication (p water > control). The fluoride concentration in saliva returned to baseline 30 min after meal ingestion in the water group but remained high for up to 2 h in the salt group (p = 0.002). The fluoride concentration in biofilm fluid differed only between the salt and control groups (p = 0.008). The mastication of foods cooked with fluoridated water and salt increases fluoride concentrations in oral fluids and may contribute to the local effect of these community-based fluoride interventions on caries control. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Cryoprotection effectiveness of low concentrations of natural and lyophilized LDL (low density lipoproteins on canine spermatozoa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. Neves

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of low concentrations of natural and lyophilized low density lipoprotein (LDL from hen's egg yolk for cryopreservation of canine semen. Different ammonium sulphate concentrations were tested to extract LDL from egg yolk. The yolk was centrifuged, and LDL was isolated using 10, 20, 40, 45, or 50% ammonium sulphate solution (ASS. The LDL-rich floating fraction was collected for chemical characterization. Dry matter content was lowest (P<0.05 in the LDL extracted with the 50% ASS. The purification of LDL increased in association with increasing ammonium sulphate concentrations. SDS-PAGE showed that the 50% ASS solution yielded a purer fraction of LDL from egg yolk. For semen cryopreservation, TRIS extender was used replacing 20% egg yolk (control by natural or lyophilized LDL using 1, 2, and 3% (w/v. Semen was centrifuged (755Xg for 7 min, diluted with one of the extenders, packed into 0.5mL straws (100x106 sperm/mL, and placed in a programmable cryopreservation machine. Thawed semen (37°C/ 30s was analyzed for sperm motility, morphology, and by the hypoosmotic and epifluorescence tests (CFDA/ PI. Natural LDL extracted with 50% ASS was as effective as whole egg yolk to preserve canine frozen sperm when using low concentrations. The lyophilized LDL, mainly in the two higher concentrations tested (2 and 3%, was unsuitable to maintain the effectiveness of the LDL cryoprotective effect on dog sperm.

  16. Measurement of trimethylamine concentration and evaluation of pig meat natural quality by a spectrophotometric method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammod Abdul HAMID,Xi WANG,Xiangdong DING,Chuduan WANG,Xingbo ZHAO

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Pig meat off-flavor is attributed to trimethylamine (TMA concentration, and it is considered as the precursor of the fishy off-flavor problems. In this study, TMA concentrations in pig meat were determined, and the interactions with breed and gender effects were discussed. In addition, the TMA threshold for meat off-flavor and pig meat natural quality was measured in relation to meat storage and movement, and the influential factors including the pig breed and storage time were discussed. The results indicated positive effects on the precursor of the fishy off-flavor and the TMA threshold. Native breeds were found to have lower TMA concentrations than European breeds (P<0.01, and females and castrated males had significantly lower TMA concentration than males (P<0.01, The threshold concentration of TMA when meat was classed as off-flavored was 25 μg·g-1, and this occurred after 35–38 h of storage. The natural qualities, such as appearance, flavor, color and overall acceptable scores declined significantly after 4 days in storage (P<0.01. It is concluded that pig meat off-flavor, breed and gender were essential factors affecting flavor for meat breeding programs, and storage time is important for pig meat natural quality.

  17. Natural radioactivity concentration in raw materials used for manufacturing refractory products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fathivand, A. A.; Amidi, J.; Hafezi, S.

    2007-01-01

    Some Particular areas contain natural radionuclide at levels much higher than those usually present in earth's crust. The radiological impact of the use of zirconium ore in zirconium industry is due to internal exposure of the lung by alpha particles and external exposure of the body by the gamma rays. The result of gamma spectrometry measurement of the concentrations of the natural radionuclide in zirconium industry is described. Materials and Methods: Gamma spectrometry system with a shielded high pure germanium (HPGe) detector connected to multi channel analyzer (MCA) was used to determine concentrations of natural radionuclide in about 45 samples of imported zirconium minerals, tiles, stone ware and waste sludge's of Iranian ceramic industry. Results: The 238 U concentration in the samples, ranging from 3000 to 10000 Bq Kg -1 , is higher than the concentration of both 232 Th (500-1800 Bq Kg -1 ), and 40 K (50-800 Bq Kg -1 ). The measured specific activities in the mineral showed that specific activity of baddeleyite is higher than that of zircon. The results of ceramic tiles show that the tiles usually contain small amount of zirconium compound. Conclusion: Due to relatively high concentration level of uranium in imported zirconium samples, specific regulations is necessary for zirconium compound used in ceramic industry

  18. Chemical concentration of a new natural spontaneously fissionable nuclide from solutions with low salt background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korotkin, Yu.S.; Ter-Akop'yan, G.M.; Popeko, A.G.; Drobina, T.P.; Zhuravleva, E.L.

    1982-01-01

    The results of experiments on further concentration of a new natural spontaneously fissionable nuclide, the concentrates of which form the Cheleken geothermal brines have been obtained, are presented. The conclusions are drown about the chemical nature of a new spontaneously fissionable nuclide. It is a chalcophile element which copreipitates with sulphides of copper, lead, arsenic and mercury from weakly acid solutions. The behaviour of the new nuclide in sulphide systems in many respects is similar to the behaviour of polonium, astatine and probably of bismuth. The most probable stable valence of the new nuclide varies from +1 up to +3. The data available on the chemical behaviour of the new nuclide as well as the analysis over contamination by spontaneously fissionable isotopes permit to state that the new natural spontaneously fissionable nuclide does not relate to the known isotopes

  19. Direct quantification of rare earth element concentrations in natural waters by ICP-MS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence, Michael G.; Greig, Alan; Collerson, Kenneth D.; Kamber, Balz S.

    2006-01-01

    A direct quadrupole ICP-MS technique has been developed for the analysis of the rare earth elements and yttrium in natural waters. The method has been validated by comparison of the results obtained for the river water reference material SLRS-4 with literature values. The detection limit of the technique was investigated by analysis of serial dilutions of SLRS-4 and revealed that single elements can be quantified at single-digit fg/g concentrations. A coherent normalised rare earth pattern was retained at concentrations two orders of magnitude below natural concentrations for SLRS-4, demonstrating the excellent inter-element accuracy and precision of the method. The technique was applied to the analysis of a diluted mid-salinity estuarine sample, which also displayed a coherent normalised rare earth element pattern, yielding the expected distinctive marine characteristics

  20. Concentration-mortality responses of Myzus persicae and natural enemies to selected insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacci, Leandro; Rosado, Jander F; Picanço, Marcelo C; Pereira, Eliseu J G; Silva, Gerson A; Martins, Júlio C

    2012-01-01

    The toxicity of six insecticides was determined for the peach-potato aphid, Myzus persicae (Hemiptera: Aphididae), and some of its natural enemies - the predatory beetles Cycloneda sanguinea (Coccinellidae) and Acanthinus sp. (Anthicidae), and the wasp parasitoid Diaeretiella rapae (Aphidiidae). Natural enemies from these groups are important natural biological control agents in a number of agroecosystems, and insecticides potentially safe to these non-target organisms should be identified using standardized tests. Thus, concentration-mortality bioassays were carried out with both the aphid and its natural enemies to assess the toxicity and selectivity of acephate, deltamethrin, dimethoate, methamidophos, methyl parathion, and pirimicarb. The latter insecticide was highly selective to all natural enemies tested, and its LC(90) for M. persicae was 14-fold lower than the field rate recommended for control of the aphid in brassica crops. Methyl parathion also showed selectivity to C. sanguinea and Acanthinus sp., but not to D. rapae. Acephate was the least potent insecticide against M. persicae and was equally or more toxic to the natural enemies relative to the aphid. Pirimicarb and methyl parathion were efficient against M. persicae and selective in favor of two of the natural enemies tested. Acanthinus sp. and C. sanguinea were more tolerant to the insecticides than was the parasitoid D. rapae. This study shows that there are selective insecticides that may be compatible with conservation of natural enemies in brassica crops, which is important practical information to improve integrated pest management systems in these crops.

  1. Preparation of bromine fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domange, Pr; Duflo, J.

    1958-05-01

    This note addresses the preparation of bromine fluoride. It indicates the implemented process for the reaction, used products (fluorine and bromine), and column characteristics. It describes the operating mode. Apparatus drawing is provided

  2. Measurement of fluoride in bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mernagh, J.R.; Harrision, J.E.; Hancock, R.; McNeill, K.G.

    1977-01-01

    The fluorine concentration in bone biopsy samples was measured by neutron activation analysis. The fluorine content was expressed in terms of the calcium content. Samples were irradiated in a reactor to induce the 19 F(n,γ) 20 F and 48 Ca(n,γ) 49 Ca reactions and after rapid transport from the reactor the resulting activities were measured with a Ge(Li) detector. Reproducibility was better than 10% for the F/Ca ratio. The detection limit for F is 50 μg. This nondestructive technique will be used to assess the effect of fluoride therapy on bone metabolism of patients with idiopathic osteoporosis. (author)

  3. Radioactivity in papers: the concentration and source of naturally occurring radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobashi, Asaya

    2005-01-01

    The radioactivities of naturally occurring radionuclides ( 226 Ra, 228 Ra, 228 Th and 40 K) in papers such as magazines, newspapers, and copying papers produced in Japan were determined by gamma-ray spectrometry to obtain information on radioactivity level of papers. The X-ray diffraction measurement of the samples was also carried out to elucidate the source of radionuclides contained in them. The average 226 Ra, 228 Ra, 228 Th, and 40 K contents of pocket-sized books were 6.4, 21.5, 23.7, and 18.8 Bq kg -1 , respectively, and those of other kinds of samples were near to or less than the values. The 228 Th content was generally somewhat higher than the 228 Ra content. Possibly 228 Ra was leached from the raw materials of the papers to water during their production in preference to 228 Th. The concentrations of the naturally occurring radionuclides were correlated to each other. The X-ray diffraction study showed that kaolinite, talc, and calcite were contained in the papers. The kaolinite content of the samples was correlated to the concentrations of the naturally occurring radionuclides, indicating that the naturally occurring radionuclides in the paper samples were mainly brought with kaolinite used as filler or coating pigment in the papers. The regression analysis of the data showed that the natural radioactivity content of filler kaolinite was higher than that of pigment kaolinite. (author)

  4. Alteration of natural (37)Ar activity concentration in the subsurface by gas transport and water infiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillon, Sophie; Sun, Yunwei; Purtschert, Roland; Raghoo, Lauren; Pili, Eric; Carrigan, Charles R

    2016-05-01

    High (37)Ar activity concentration in soil gas is proposed as a key evidence for the detection of underground nuclear explosion by the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty. However, such a detection is challenged by the natural background of (37)Ar in the subsurface, mainly due to Ca activation by cosmic rays. A better understanding and improved capability to predict (37)Ar activity concentration in the subsurface and its spatial and temporal variability is thus required. A numerical model integrating (37)Ar production and transport in the subsurface is developed, including variable soil water content and water infiltration at the surface. A parameterized equation for (37)Ar production in the first 15 m below the surface is studied, taking into account the major production reactions and the moderation effect of soil water content. Using sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification, a realistic and comprehensive probability distribution of natural (37)Ar activity concentrations in soil gas is proposed, including the effects of water infiltration. Site location and soil composition are identified as the parameters allowing for a most effective reduction of the possible range of (37)Ar activity concentrations. The influence of soil water content on (37)Ar production is shown to be negligible to first order, while (37)Ar activity concentration in soil gas and its temporal variability appear to be strongly influenced by transient water infiltration events. These results will be used as a basis for practical CTBTO concepts of operation during an OSI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Treatment of radioactive effluents by concentration in an installation with natural evaporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wormser, G.; Chauvet, P.

    1963-01-01

    This document reports natural evaporation tests performed in Cadarache, notably to adapt the equipment to the treatment of radioactive effluents. After a brief description of the apparatus principle and operation, the authors propose a summary of the first test campaign (test apparatus, results), indicate modifications brought to the apparatus by taking the first results into account, and propose a detailed discussion of results obtained during the second test campaign. They finally discuss the possibility of concentration of effluents by means of natural evaporation [fr

  6. Natural radionuclides concentration in agricultural products and water from the Monte Alegre region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gouvea, Vandir A.; Melo, Vicente P.; Binns, Donald A.C.; Santos, Pedro L. dos

    1997-01-01

    Measurements to determine the content of natural radionuclides were performed in agricultural products in the brazilian Central Amazon Basin Monte Alegre region, for the soil-plant transfer calculation. these measurements were concentrated in the Ingles de Souza agricultural settlement, were several uranium and thorium occurrences exist in geological formations called Monte Alegre and Faro. The values obtained in foodstuff cultivated in the anomalous region are 10 times higher than those ones observed in the Alenquer region, which is the chosen region due to its low level natural radioactivity and its proximity to the anomalous region. (author). 9 refs., 4 tabs

  7. Flow injection spectrophotometric determination of low concentrations of orthosphate in natural waters employing ion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pessenda, L.C.R.

    1981-01-01

    A simple and fast method for the determination of low concentrations of orthophosphate in natural waters is described. Ion exchange is incorporated into a flow injection system by usina a resin column in the sample loop of a proportion injector. Effects of sample aspiration rate, sampling time, eluting agent concentration, pumping rate of the sample carrier stream and interfaces, were investigated both using 32 PO 3- 4 or 31 PO 3- 4 with columns coupled to a gerger-muller detector and incorporated in a flow system with molybdenum blue colorinetry. (M.A.C.) [pt

  8. Preliminary concentration and determination of Sr-90 in natural and waste water of Kursk region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basargin, N.N.; Rozovskij, Yu.G.; Grebennikova, R.V.; Salikhov, V.D.

    2001-01-01

    Synthesis and study of cheating sorbents containing functional analytical ortho-oxy-aza-ortho'-sulfonyl group are presented. Physicochemical properties of sorbents and chemisorption of Sr and Sr 90 are studied. A rapid method of preliminary concentration with subsequent atomic absorption and radiometric determination of Sr in natural and waste water is proposed. Samples of aqua-objects of Kursk region were analyzed using developed method. The results of radiometric investigations into control of strontium-90 content in cooling systems of Kursk NPP, waste waters, waters of Sejm river testifies higher values of concentration in the april - september period [ru

  9. Hair cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone concentrations in naturally Taenia solium infected pigs in Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trevisan, Chiara; Montillo, Marta; Prandi, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure hair cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) concentrations in naturally Taenia solium infected and non-infected control pigs and assess the effect of an environmental change on the aforementioned parameters. Three hair patches were obtained from 13 T. solium...... infected and 15 non-infected controls sows, respectively corresponding to 3 time points (prior to, at and approximately two weeks after arrival at the research facility). Cortisol and DHEA were extracted using methanol and analysed by radio immune assay. Mean hair cortisol concentrations were significantly...

  10. Fluoride content in water in and around heavy water plant Manuguru colony

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohapatra, C.; Dubey, S.K.; Reddy, A.R.; Ravi Kumar, T.S.P.; Selvaraj, S.

    1996-01-01

    Fluoride concentration in water used for human consumption has significant importance with respect to its toxic effects. Hence there was a need for analysing fluoride concentration in drinking water primarily used at Heavy water Plant, Manuguru (HWP (M)) colony and its nearby villages. We found that at HWP (M) colony there is not much variation in the fluoride concentration. However, nearby villages are having wide variation from 0.79 to 5.1 ppm. (author). 5 refs., 1 tab

  11. Development and evaluation of two PVD-coated β-titanium orthodontic archwires for fluoride-induced corrosion protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Vinod; Krishnan, Anand; Remya, R; Ravikumar, K K; Nair, S Asha; Shibli, S M A; Varma, H K; Sukumaran, K; Kumar, K Jyothindra

    2011-04-01

    The present research was aimed at developing surface coatings on β titanium orthodontic archwires capable of protection against fluoride-induced corrosion. Cathodic arc physical vapor deposition PVD (CA-PVD) and magnetron sputtering were utilized to deposit thin films of titanium aluminium nitride (TiAlN) and tungsten carbide/carbon (WC/C) coatings on β titanium orthodontic archwires. Uncoated and coated specimens were immersed in a high fluoride ion concentration mouth rinse, following a specially designed cycle simulating daily use. All specimens thus obtained were subjected to critical evaluation of parameters such as electrochemical corrosion behaviour, surface analysis, mechanical testing, microstructure, element release, and toxicology. The results confirm previous research that β titanium archwires undergo a degradation process when in contact with fluoride mouth rinses. The study confirmed the superior nature of the TiAlN coating, evident as many fewer changes in properties after fluoride treatment when compared with the WC/C coating. Thus, coating with TiAlN is recommended in order to reduce the corrosive effects of fluorides on β titanium orthodontic archwires. Copyright © 2010 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Waterborne fluoride exposure changed the structure and the expressions of steroidogenic-related genes in gonads of adult zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, MeiYan; Cao, Jinling; Chen, Jianjie; Song, Jie; Zhou, Bingrui; Feng, Cuiping; Wang, Jundong

    2016-02-01

    Excessive fluoride in natural water ecosystem has been demonstrated to have adverse effects on reproductive system in humans and mammals, while the most vulnerable aquatic organisms were ignored. In this study, the effects of waterborne fluoride on growth performance, sex steroid hormone, histological structure, and the transcriptional profiles of sex steroid related genes were examined in both female and male zebrafish exposed to different concentrations of 0.79, 18.60, 36.83 mg L(-1) of fluoride for 30 and 60 d to investigate the effects of fluoride on reproductive system and the underlying toxic mechanisms caused by fluoride. The results showed that the body weight was remarkably decreased, the structure of ovary and testis were serious injured, and the T and E2 levels were significantly reduced in male zebrafish. The transcriptional profiles of steroidogenic related genes displayed phenomenal alterations, the expressions of pgr and cyp19a1a were significantly up-regulated, while the transcriptional levels of er, ar and hsd3β were decreased both in the ovary and testis, and hsd17β8 were down-regulated just in males. Taken together, these results demonstrated that fluoride could significantly inhibit the growth of zebrafish, and notably affect the reproductive system in both sex zebrafish by impairing the structure of ovary and testis, altering steroid hormone levels and steroidogenic genes expression related to the synthesis of sex hormones in zebrafish. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Natural and anthropogenic radionuclide activity concentrations in the New Zealand diet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearson, Andrew J.; Gaw, Sally; Hermanspahn, Nikolaus; Glover, Chris N.

    2016-01-01

    To support New Zealand's food safety monitoring regime, a survey was undertaken to establish radionuclide activity concentrations across the New Zealand diet. This survey was undertaken to better understand the radioactivity content of the modern diet and also to assess the suitability of the current use of milk as a sentinel for dietary radionuclide trends. Thirteen radionuclides were analysed in 40 common food commodities, including animal products, fruits, vegetables, cereal grains and seafood. Activity was detected for 137 Caesium, 90 Strontium and 131 Iodine. No other anthropogenic radionuclides were detected. Activity concentrations of the three natural radionuclides of Uranium and the daughter radionuclide 210 Polonium were detected in the majority of food sampled, with a large variation in magnitude. The maximum activity concentrations were detected in shellfish for all these radionuclides. Based on the established activity concentrations and ranges, the New Zealand diet contains activity concentrations of anthropogenic radionuclides far below the Codex Alimentarius guideline levels. Activity concentrations obtained for milk support its continued use as a sentinel for monitoring fallout radionuclides in terrestrial agriculture. The significant levels of natural and anthropogenic radionuclide activity concentrations detected in finfish and molluscs support undertaking further research to identify a suitable sentinel for New Zealand seafood monitoring. - Highlights: • A radionuclide monitoring program was undertaken across the New Zealand food supply. • 40 food types were analysed for 13 radionuclides. • 137 Cs was present in 15% of foods (range: 0.05–0.44Bq/kg). • Anthropogenic radionuclides displayed compliance with international limits. • 210 Po, 234 U and 238 U were present in most foods with large ranges of activities.

  14. Emissions of fluorides from welding processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szewczyńska, Małgorzata; Pągowska, Emilia; Pyrzyńska, Krystyna

    2015-11-01

    The levels of fluoride airborne particulates emitted from welding processes were investigated. They were sampled with the patented IOM Sampler, developed by J. H. Vincent and D. Mark at the Institute of Occupational Medicine (IOM), personal inhalable sampler for simultaneous collection of the inhalable and respirable size fractions. Ion chromatography with conductometric detection was used for quantitative analysis. The efficiency of fluoride extraction from the cellulose filter of the IOM sampler was examined using the standard sample of urban air particle matter SRM-1648a. The best results for extraction were obtained when water and the anionic surfactant N-Cetyl-N-N-N-trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) were used in an ultrasonic bath. The limits of detection and quantification for the whole procedure were 8μg/L and 24μg/L, respectively. The linear range of calibration was 0.01-10mg/L, which corresponds to 0.0001-0.1mg of fluorides per m(3) in collection of a 20L air sample. The concentration of fluorides in the respirable fraction of collected air samples was in the range of 0.20-1.82mg/m(3), while the inhalable fraction contained 0.23-1.96mg/m(3) of fluorides during an eight-hour working day in the welding room. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Determination of 226Ra and natural uranium concentration in Botafogo river

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nascimento, M.B. do; Amaral, R.S.; Khoury, H.J.; Andrade Lima, R. de

    1990-01-01

    In the Brazilian Northeast region at the coastal area from Pernambuco to Paraiba there is a 4 km wide strip deposit of phosphate rock. This phosphate is used to produce fertilizes by a factory located at the border of the Botafogo river, which cross this area. The phosphate is associated with uranium and no research has been conducted on the river radioactive contamination due the natural processes and to the fertizer factory the present investigation was undertaken to determine 226 Ra and natural uranium concentration in the river water, near the factory. Results show that the radionuclide concentration increases sharply in front of the place of the factory discharge and then decreases rapidly to the same levels found before the factory, 0,01 Bq/1. (author) [pt

  16. Aflatoxin B1 adsorption by the natural aluminosilicates - concentrate of montmorillonite and zeolite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marković Marija A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aflatoxin B1 adsorption by the concentrate of bentonite clay - montmorillonite and the natural zeolite - clinoptilolite and was investigated at the initial toxin concentration 4 ppm, with different amonunts of solid phase in suspension (10, 5, 2 and 1 mg/10 mL and different pH values - 3, 7 and 9. Results indicated that for both minerals, decreasing the amount of solid phase in suspension, decrease the amount of active sites relevant for adsorption of aflatoxin B1. Thus, for concentrate of montnorillonite, at the lowest level of solid phase in suspension (1 mg/10 mL, aflatoxin B1 adsorption indexes were 97% at pH 3, 88% at pH 7 and 82% at pH 9, while for the natural zeolite, adsorption of toxin was 9% at pH 3 and 7% at pH 7 and 9. Since inorganic cations in minerals are mainly responsible for aflatoxin B1 adsorption, even the natural zeolite - clinoptilite has much higher cation exchange capacity (the content of inorganic exchangeable cations compared to the concentrate of montmorillonite, adsorption of aflatoxin B1 by this mineral is much lower. Comparing the molecular dimensions of aflatoxin B1 molecule with the dimension of channels of clinoptilolite and interlamellar space of montmorillonite it is obvious that this toxin is adsorbed only at the external surface of clinoptilolite while in the montmorillonite all active sites are equally available for its adsorption. Thus, the concentrate of montmorillonite posess by higher adsorption capacity for aflatoxin B1. Results presented in this paper confirmed the fact the differences in the structure of minerals led to their different efficiency for adsorption of aflatoxin B1. Mineralogical and chemical composition, determination of cation exchange capacity, etc., are very important parameters influencing the effectiveness of minerals as aflatoxin B1 adsorbents. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 451-03-2802-IP Tip1/142, br. 172018 i br. 34013

  17. Water Fluoridation Statistics - Percent of PWS population receiving fluoridated water

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 2000-2014. Water Fluoridation Statistics is a biennial report of the percentage and number of people receiving fluoridated water from 2000 through 2014, originally...

  18. Water Fluoridation Statistics - Percent of PWS population receiving fluoridated water

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 2000-2014 Water Fluoridation Statistics is a biennial report of the percentage and number of people receiving fluoridated water from 2000 through 2014, originally...

  19. Effect of rotary inertia of concentrated masses on the natural vibration of fluid conveying pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Myeong Gie

    1999-01-01

    Effects of the rotary inertia of concentrated masses on the natural vibrations of fluid conveying pipes have been studied by theoretical modeling and computer simulation. For analysis, two boundary conditions for pipe ends, simply supported and clamped-clamped, are assumed and Galerkin's method is used for transformation of the governing equation to the eigenvalues problem and the natural frequencies and mode shapes for the system have been calculated by using the newly developed computer code. Moreover, the critical velocities related to a system instability have been investigated. The main conclusions for the present study are (1) rotary inertia gives much change on the higher natural frequencies and mode shapes and its effect is visible when it has small value, (2) The number and location of nodes can be changed by rotary inertia, (3) By introducing rotary inertia, the second natural frequency approaches to the first as the location of the concentrated mass approaches to the midspan of the pipe, and (4) The critical fluid velocities to initiate the system unstable are unchanged by introduction of rotary inertia and the first three velocities are π, 2π, and 3π for the simply supported pipe and 2π, 8.99 and 12.57 for the clamped-clamped pipe. (author). 16 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs

  20. Removal of fluoride, SDS, ammonia and turbidity from semiconductor wastewater by combined electrocoagulation-electroflotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoudj, S; Khelifa, A; Drouiche, N

    2017-08-01

    Semiconductor industry effluents contain organic and inorganic pollutants, such as sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), fluoride and ammonia, at high levels which consists a major environmental issue. A combined EC-EF process is proposed as a post-treatment after precipitation for simultaneous clarification and removal of pollutants. In EC step, a hybrid Fe-Al was used as the soluble anode in order to avoid supplementary EC step. EC-Fe is more suitable for SDS removal; EC-Al is more suitable for fluoride removal, while EC with hybrid Al-Fe makes a good compromise. Clarification and ammonia oxidation were achieved in the EF step. Effects of anodic material, initial pH, current, anion nature, chloride concentration and initial pollutant concentration were studied. The final concentrations may reach 0.27, 6.23 and 0.22 mg L -1 for SDS, fluoride and ammonia respectively. These concentrations are far lower than the correspondent discharge limits. Similarly, the final turbidity was found 4.35 NTU which is lower than 5NTU and the treated water does not need further filtration before discharge. Furthermore, the EC-EF process proves to be sufficiently energy-efficient with less soluble electrode consumption. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Measurement of natural and {sup 137}Cs radioactivity concentrations at Izmit Bay (Marmara Sea), Turkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Öksüz, İ., E-mail: ibrahim-ksz@yahoo.com; Güray, R. T., E-mail: tguray@kocaeli.edu.tr; Özkan, N., E-mail: nozkan@kocaeli.edu.tr; Yalçin, C., E-mail: caner.yalcin@kocaeli.edu.tr [Kocaeli University, Department of Physics, Umuttepe 41380, Kocaeli (Turkey); Ergül, H. A., E-mail: halim.ergul@kocaeli.edu.tr; Aksan, S., E-mail: serdar.aksan@kocaeli.edu.tr [Kocaeli University, Department of Biology, Umuttepe 41380, Kocaeli (Turkey)

    2016-03-25

    In order to determine the radioactivity level at Izmit Bay Marmara Sea, marine sediment samples were collected from five different locations. The radioactivity concentrations of naturally occurring {sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th and {sup 40}K isotopes and also that of an artificial isotope {sup 137}Cs were measured by using gamma-ray spectroscopy. Preliminary results show that the radioactivity concentrations of {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th isotopes are lower than the average worldwide values while the radioactivity concentrations of the {sup 40}K are higher than the average worldwide value. A small amount of {sup 137}Cs contamination, which might be caused by the Chernobyl accident, was also detected.

  2. Spatial distribution mapping of drinking water fluoride levels in Karnataka, India: fluoride-related health effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Chitta R; Shahnawaz, Khijmatgar; Kumari, Divya; Chowdhury, Avidyuti; Bedi, Raman; Lynch, Edward; Harding, Stewart; Grootveld, Martin

    2016-11-01

    (1) To estimate the concentrations of fluoride in drinking water throughout different zones and districts of the state of Karnataka. (2) To investigate the variation of fluoride concentration in drinking water from different sources, and its relationships to daily temperature and rainfall status in the regional districts. (3) To develop an updated fluoride concentration intensity map of the state of Karnataka, and to evaluate these data in the context of fluoride-related health effects such as fluorosis and their prevalence. Aqueous standard solutions of 10, 100 and 1,000 ppm fluoride (F - ) were prepared with analytical grade Na + /F - and a buffer; TISAB II was incorporated in both calibration standard and analysis solutions in order to remove the potentially interfering effects of trace metal ions. This analysis was performed using an ion-selective electrode (ISE), and mean determination readings for n = 5 samples collected at each Karnataka water source were recorded. The F - concentration in drinking water in Karnataka state was found to vary substantially, with the highest mean values recorded being in the north-eastern zone (1.61 ppm), and the lowest in the south-western one (only 0.41 ppm). Analysis of variance (ANOVA) demonstrated that there were very highly significant 'between-zone' and 'between-districts-within-zones' sources of variation (p water source F - levels within this state. The southern part of Karnataka has low levels of F - in its drinking water, and may require fluoridation treatment in order to mitigate for dental caries and further ailments related to fluoride deficiency. However, districts within the north-eastern region have contrastingly high levels of fluoride, an observation which has been linked to dental and skeletal fluorosis. This highlights a major requirement for interventional actions in order to ensure maintenance of the recommended range of fluoride concentrations (0.8-1.5 ppm) in Karnataka's drinking water

  3. The cariostatic mechanisms of fluoride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kata Rošin-Grget

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the possible cariostatic mechanisms of the action of fluoride. In the past, fluoride inhibition of caries was ascribed to reduced solubility of enamel due to incorporation of fluoride (F– into the enamel minerals. The present evidence from clinical and laboratory studies suggests that the caries-preventive mode of action of fluoride is mainly topical. There is convincing evidence that fluoride has a major effect on demineralisation and remineralisation of dental hard tissue. The source of this fluoride could either be fluorapatite (formed due to the incorporation of fluoride into enamel or calcium fluoride (CaF2-like precipitates, which are formed on the enamel and in the plaque after application of topical fluoride. Calcium fluoride deposits are protected from rapid dissolution by a phosphate –protein coating of salivary origin. At lower pH, the coating is lost and an increased dissolution rate of calcium fluoride occurs. The CaF2, therefore, act as an efficient source of free fluoride ions during the cariogenic challenge. The current evidence indicates that fluoride has a direct and indirect effect on bacterial cells, although the in vivo implications of this are still not clear. Conclusion. A better understanding of the mechanisms of the action of fluoride is very important for caries prevention and control. The effectiveness of fluoride as a cariostatic agent depends on the availability of free fluoride in plaque during cariogenic challenge, i.e. during acid production. Thus, a constant supply of low levels of fluoride in biofilm/saliva/dental interference is considered the most beneficial in preventing dental caries.

  4. The cariostatic mechanisms of fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rošin-Grget, Kata; Peroš, Kristina; Sutej, Ivana; Bašić, Krešimir

    2013-11-01

    This article discusses the possible cariostatic mechanisms of the action of fluoride. In the past, fluoride inhibition of caries was ascribed to reduced solubility of enamel due to incorporation of fluoride (F-) into the enamel minerals. The present evidence from clinical and laboratory studies suggests that the caries-preventive mode of action of fluoride is mainly topical. There is convincing evidence that fluoride has a major effect on demineralisation and remineralisation of dental hard tissue. The source of this fluoride could either be fluorapatite (formed due to the incorporation of fluoride into enamel) or calcium fluoride (CaF2)-like precipitates, which are formed on the enamel and in the plaque after application of topical fluoride. Calcium fluoride deposits are protected from rapid dissolution by a phosphate -protein coating of salivary origin. At lower pH, the coating is lost and an increased dissolution rate of calcium fluoride occurs. The CaF2, therefore, act as an efficient source of free fluoride ions during the cariogenic challenge. The current evidence indicates that fluoride has a direct and indirect effect on bacterial cells, although the in vivo implications of this are still not clear. A better understanding of the mechanisms of the action of fluoride is very important for caries prevention and control. The effectiveness of fluoride as a cariostatic agent depends on the availability of free fluoride in plaque during cariogenic challenge, i.e. during acid production. Thus, a constant supply of low levels of fluoride in biofilm/saliva/dental interference is considered the most beneficial in preventing dental caries. Copyright © 2013 by Academy of Sciences and Arts of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

  5. Effect of Fluoride and Bentonite on Biochemical Aspects of Oxidative Stress in Pisum sativum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martyna Śnioszek

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Fluoride is regarded as one of the strongest oxidants, which causes oxidative changes in cells of living organisms. It may both increase the content of reactive oxygen species and inhibit the activity of antioxidative enzyme. In recent years, many researchers successfully used the properties of clay minerals in the sorption of fluoride ion from water. This raises the question of the possibility of limiting the effect of fluorine on the negative changes in plants by adding bentonite to soil. A two-year pot experiment was carried out in the Greenhouse of West Pomeranian University of Technology in Szczecin, on loamy sand and sandy loam. Each sample of soil was mixed with three different concentrations of bentonite – 1, 5, 10% of dry weight (DW of the soil and then treated with 30 mmol of F- per 1 kg of dry weight of the soil in a form of NaF solution. A control series was prepared for each soil, to which no additives were added. The medium prepared in such way was transferred to plastic pots (3 kg each and seeded with 16 pea seeds of Pisum sativum. In three phases of pea development (4 leaves unfolded, flowering and development of fruit, fresh leaf samples were collected and the concentrations of ascorbic acid, reduced glutathione, total flavonoids and total polyphenols were measured. Sodium fluoride introduced to the soil changed the level of antioxidant parameters in the plant, which may suggest that fluoride is involved in the formation of reactive oxygen species, resulting in oxidative stress. Bentonite in a dosage of 10% reduced the toxic effects of fluoride on the oxidative balance and morphological changes in the plant, which was observed especially for loamy sand, naturally poor in clay minerals.

  6. Diffusion of fluoride in bovine enamel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flim, G.J.; Arends, J.; Kolar, Z.

    1976-01-01

    The uptake of 18 F and the penetration of both F and 18 F in bovine enamel was investigated. Sodium fluoride solutions buffered at pH 7 were employed. The uptake of 18 F was measured by a method described by R. Duckworth and M. Braden, Archs. Oral. Biol., 12(1967), pp. 217-230. The penetration concentration profiles of fluoride (F, 18 F) in the enamel were measured by a sectioning technique. The 18 F uptake in enamel was proportional to approximately tsup(3/4); t being the uptake time. The 18 F concentration as a function of the position in the enamel can be described by: c*(x,t) = c 0 *(t)exp[-α*(t)x]. After correction for the initial fluoride concentration in enamel, for unlabelled fluoride the same dependency is obtained. A model based on simultaneous diffusion and chemical reaction in the pores and diffusion into the hydroxyapatite crystallites will be presented. The results show that diffusion coefficients of the pores are approximately equal to 10 -10 cm 2 s -1 and in the apatite crystallites approximately equal to 10 -17 cm 2 s -1 . The limitations and the approximations of the model are discussed

  7. Fluoride and Water (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... risk of tooth decay" on the label. The Controversy Over Fluoride Opponents of water fluoridation have questioned ... Us Contact Us Partners Editorial Policy Permissions Guidelines Privacy Policy & Terms of Use Notice of Nondiscrimination Visit ...

  8. Streptozotocin Aggravated Osteopathology and Insulin Induced Osteogenesis Through Co-treatment with Fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chen; Zhang, Mengmeng; Li, Yagang; Wang, Yan; Mao, Weixian; Gao, Yuan; Xu, Hui

    2015-12-01

    The role of insulin in the mechanism underlying the excessive fluoride that causes skeletal lesion was studied. The in vitro bone marrow stem cells (BMSC) collected from Kunming mice were exposed to varying concentrations of fluoride with or without insulin. The cell viability and early differentiation of BMSC co-treated with fluoride and insulin were measured by using cell counting kit-8 and Gomori modified calcium-cobalt method, respectively. We further investigated the in vivo effects of varying dose of fluoride on rats co-treated with streptozotocin (STZ). Wistar rats were divided into six groups which included normal control, 10 mg fluoride/kg day group, 20 mg fluoride/kg day group, STZ control, STZ+10 mg fluoride/kg day group, and STZ+20 mg fluoride/kg day group. The rats were administered with sodium fluoride (NaF) by gavage with water at doses 10 and 20 mg fluoride/kg day for 2 months. In a period of one month, half of rats in every group were treated with streptozotocin (STZ) once through intraperitoneal injection at 52 mg/kg body weight. The serum glucose, HbA1c, and insulin were determined. Bone mineral content and insulin release were assessed. The results showed insulin combined with fluoride stimulated BMSC cell viability in vitro. The bone mineral content reduced in rats treated with higher dose of fluoride and decreased immensely in rat co-treated with fluoride and STZ. Similarly, a combination treatment of a high dose of fluoride and STZ decreased insulin sensitivity and activity. To sum up, these data indicated fluoride influenced insulin release, activity, and sensitivity. Furthermore, the insulin state in vivo interfered in the osteogenesis in turn and implied there was a close relation between insulin and bone pathogenesis in the mechanism of fluoride toxicity.

  9. Standard Test Method for Electrical Performance of Concentrator Terrestrial Photovoltaic Modules and Systems Under Natural Sunlight

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of the electrical performance of photovoltaic concentrator modules and systems under natural sunlight using a normal incidence pyrheliometer. 1.2 The test method is limited to module assemblies and systems where the geometric concentration ratio specified by the manufacturer is greater than 5. 1.3 This test method applies to concentrators that use passive cooling where the cell temperature is related to the air temperature. 1.4 Measurements under a variety of conditions are allowed; results are reported under a select set of concentrator reporting conditions to facilitate comparison of results. 1.5 This test method applies only to concentrator terrestrial modules and systems. 1.6 This test method assumes that the module or system electrical performance characteristics do not change during the period of test. 1.7 The performance rating determined by this test method applies only at the period of the test, and implies no past or future performance level. 1.8...

  10. Determination of natural in vivo noble-gas concentrations in human blood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yama Tomonaga

    Full Text Available Although the naturally occurring atmospheric noble gases He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe possess great potential as tracers for studying gas exchange in living beings, no direct analytical technique exists for simultaneously determining the absolute concentrations of these noble gases in body fluids in vivo. In this study, using human blood as an example, the absolute concentrations of all stable atmospheric noble gases were measured simultaneously by combining and adapting two analytical methods recently developed for geochemical research purposes. The partition coefficients determined between blood and air, and between blood plasma and red blood cells, agree with values from the literature. While the noble-gas concentrations in the plasma agree rather well with the expected solubility equilibrium concentrations for air-saturated water, the red blood cells are characterized by a distinct supersaturation pattern, in which the gas excess increases in proportion to the atomic mass of the noble-gas species, indicating adsorption on to the red blood cells. This study shows that the absolute concentrations of noble gases in body fluids can be easily measured using geochemical techniques that rely only on standard materials and equipment, and for which the underlying concepts are already well established in the field of noble-gas geochemistry.

  11. Teor de fluoretos em infusões de chá verde (Camellia sinensis Fluoride content in green tea infusions (Camellia sinensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Reto

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to study the influence of green tea consumption on fluoride ingestion. The extraction conditions of fluorides from green tea infusions were defined and nine brands of green tea available in Portugal were analyzed. The quantification of fluorides in the green tea was preceded by the implementation and validation of the potentiometric method (commercial fluoride selective electrode. The concentration of fluorides in the samples ranged from 0. 8 to 2. 0 mg L-1.

  12. Defluoridation of water using activated alumina in presence of natural organic matter via response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samarghandi, Mohammad Reza; Khiadani, Mehdi; Foroughi, Maryam; Zolghadr Nasab, Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Adsorption by activated alumina is considered to be one of the most practiced methods for defluoridation of freshwater. This study was conducted, therefore, to investigate the effect of natural organic matters (NOMs) on the removal of fluoride by activated alumina using response surface methodology. To the authors' knowledge, this has not been previously investigated. Physico-chemical characterization of the alumina was determined by scanning electron microscope (SEM), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), and X-ray diffractometer (XRD). Response surface methodology (RSM) was applied to evaluate the effect of single and combined parameters on the independent variables such as the initial concentration of fluoride, NOMs, and pH on the process. The results revealed that while presence of NOM and increase of pH enhance fluoride adsorption on the activated alumina, initial concentration of fluoride has an adverse effect on the efficiency. The experimental data were analyzed and found to be accurately and reliably fitted to a second-order polynomial model. Under optimum removal condition (fluoride concentration 20 mg/L, NOM concentration 20 mg/L, and pH 7) with a desirability value of 0.93 and fluoride removal efficiency of 80.6%, no significant difference was noticed with the previously reported sequence of the co-exiting ion affinity to activated alumina for fluoride removal. Moreover, aluminum residual was found to be below the recommended value by the guideline for drinking water. Also, the increase of fluoride adsorption on the activated alumina, as NOM concentrations increase, could be due to the complexation between fluoride and adsorbed NOM. Graphical abstract ᅟ.

  13. Natural Convection Heat Transfer in Concentric Horizontal Annuli Containing a Saturated Porous Medi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed F. Alfahaid, R.Y. Sakr

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Natural convection in horizontal annular porous media has become a subject receiving increasing attention due to its practical importance in the problem of insulators, such as ducting system in high temperature gas-cooled reactors, heating systems, thermal energy storage systems, under ground cable systems, etc. This paper presents a numerical study for steady state thermal convection in a fully saturated porous media bounded by two horizontal concentric cylinders, the cylinders are impermeable to fluid motion and maintained at different, uniform temperatures.  The solution scheme is based on two-dimensional model, which is governed by Darcy-Oberbeck-Boussinesq equations. The finite element method using Galerkin technique is developed and employed to solve the present problem. A numerical simulation is carried out to examine the parametric effects of Rayleigh number and radius ratio on the role played by natural convection heat transfer in the porous annuli. The numerical results obtained from the present model were compared with the available published results and good agreement is observed. The average Nusselt number at the heating surface of the inner cylinder is correlated to Rayleigh number and radius ratio.Keywords: Natural convection, numerical investigation, saturated porous media, finite element method, concentric horizontal annuli.

  14. Correlations between Natural Radionuclide Concentrations in Soil and Vine-Growth Potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modisane, T.G.D.

    2008-01-01

    Stellenbosch district is known as one of the best wine-producing regions in South Africa and lies 45 km east of Cape Town. It has a large number of estates, of which one of them was earmarked for vineyard development and is of much importance to this study. Soil plays an important role in the development of the vine and ultimately the grapes harvested from the vine. It is therefore important to characterise vineyard soils (quantitatively and qualitatively) and to study the impact of soil properties on the vine. These properties include among others and of importance to this study, the soil ph, concentrations of trace elements, clay content and natural radioactivity concentrations (1). In this study correlations between radiometric data and traditional chemical data in vineyard soils used to infer growth potential were studied. Discussed below are experimental techniques used in the determination of activity concentration of natural radionuclide ( 40 K, 232 Th and 238 U) in soil, data analysis, results and conclusions

  15. Fluoride resistance in Streptococcus mutans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liao, Ying

    2017-01-01

    Fluoride has been used as the most effective anti-caries agent for over five decades. It functions not only on the dental hard tissues, but also as an antimicrobial agent. It is known that oral bacteria are able to develop resistance to fluoride, which may affect the effectiveness of fluoride in

  16. Urinary fluoride as a monitoring tool for assessing successful intervention in the provision of safe drinking water supply in five fluoride-affected villages in Dhar district, Madhya Pradesh, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srikanth, R; Gautam, Anil; Jaiswal, Suresh Chandra; Singh, Pavitra

    2013-03-01

    Endemic fluorosis was detected in 31 villages in the Dhar district of Madhya Pradesh, Central India. Out of the 109 drinking water sources that were analyzed, about 67 % were found to contain high concentration of fluoride above the permissible level of 1.0 mg/l. Dental fluorosis among the primary school children in the age between 8 and 15 served as primary indicator for fluoride intoxication among the children. Urinary fluoride levels among the adults were found to be correlated with drinking water fluoride in 10 villages affected by fluoride. Intervention in the form of alternate safe water supply in five villages showed significant reduction in the urinary fluoride concentration when compared to the control village. Urinary fluoride serves as an excellent marker for assessing the effectiveness of intervention program in the fluoride-affected villages.

  17. Urinary fluoride excretion after application of fluoride varnish and use of fluoride toothpaste in young children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lockner, Frida; Twetman, Svante; Stecksén-Blicks, Christina

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The efficacy and safety of combined use of topical fluoride products are essential issues that must be monitored. AIM: To assess urinary excretion of fluoride after application of two different dental varnishes containing 2.26% fluoride in 3- to 4-year-old children and to compare...... the levels with and without parallel use of fluoride toothpaste. DESIGN: Fifteen healthy children were enrolled to a randomized crossover trial that was performed in two parts: Part I with twice-daily tooth brushing with fluoride toothpaste and Part II with twice-daily brushing with a non-fluoride toothpaste....... After a 1-week run-in period, 0.1 mL of the two fluoride varnishes (Duraphat and Profluorid Varnish) was topically applied in a randomized order. Baseline and experimental urine was collected during 6-h periods. The fluoride content was determined with an ion-sensitive electrode. RESULTS...

  18. Effects of atmospheric hydrogen fluoride upon Drosophila melanogaster. I. Differential genotyptic response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerdes, R A; Smith, J D; Applegate, H G

    1971-01-01

    Four inbred lines of Drosophila melanogaster were exposed to various concentrations of gaseous hydrogen fluoride for a period of six weeks. The effects upon the viability of these populations were predominantly linear with respect to fluoride concentration over the range tested. Differential responses of the inbred lines were interpreted to mean that tolerance to fluoride contamination is influenced by genotype. 4 references, 1 figure, 1 table.

  19. Native plant species suitable as bioindicators and biomonitors for airborne fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinstein, Leonard H.; Davison, Alan W.

    2003-01-01

    The strengths and limitations of techniques for biomonitoring and bioindicating fluorides are reviewed. - For 30-40 years airborne fluoride, usually in the form of HF or SiF 4 , was one of the most important and damaging air pollutants affecting forests, crops and natural vegetation. It is much more toxic than most other air pollutants such as O 3 or SO 2 because injury to the most sensitive species begins when they are exposed to a concentration below 1 ppb (ca. 0.8 μg m -3 ) for a 1- to 3-day period. The long-term threshold concentration is around 0.25-0.30 μg m -3 . Higher concentrations and longer durations of exposure induce much more rapid and extensive injury. However, there is a difference in sensitivity between the most and least sensitive species of around 2-3 orders of magnitude and most species possess a degree of resistance. Dramatic improvements in engineering technology have greatly reduced emissions but because of the high toxicity, cases of vegetation injury are still common, even in developed countries, and cases involving litigation still occur. Therefore there is a continuing need for bioindicators and biomonitoring of fluorides, so this paper reviews the subject, drawing attention to the strengths and limitations of the techniques. Visible symptoms are described and illustrated and tables of relative sensitivity are given and their limitations discussed. Finally, examples of biomonitoring in Europe and the USA are presented

  20. Fluoride release from fluoride varnishes under acidic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippert, F

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to investigate the in vitro fluoride release from fluoride varnishes under acidic conditions. Poly(methyl methacrylate) blocks (Perspex, n=3 per group) were painted with 80 ± 5 mg fluoride varnish (n=10) and placed into artificial saliva for 30 min. Then, blocks were placed into either 1% citric acid (pH 2.27) or 0.3% citric acid (pH 3.75) solutions (n=3 per solution and varnish) for 30 min with the solutions being replaced every 5 min. Saliva and acid solutions were analyzed for fluoride content. Data were analyzed using three-way ANOVA (varnish, solution, time). The three-way interaction was significant (p>0.0001). Fluoride release and release patterns varied considerably between varnishes. Fluoride release in saliva varied by a factor of more than 10 between varnishes. Some varnishes (CavityShield, Nupro, ProFluorid, Vanish) showed higher fluoride release in saliva than during the first 5 min of acid exposure, whereas other varnishes (Acclean, Enamel-Pro, MI Varnish, Vella) showed the opposite behavior. There was little difference between acidic solutions. Fluoride release from fluoride varnishes varies considerably and also depends on the dissolution medium. Bearing in mind the limitations of laboratory research, the consumption of acidic drinks after fluoride varnish application should be avoided to optimize the benefit/risk ratio.

  1. Effect of concentrated epoxidised natural rubber and silica masterbatch for tyre application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azira, A. A., E-mail: azira@lgm.gov.my; Kamal, M. M., E-mail: mazlina@lgm.gov.my [High Value Added Rubber Products and Nanostructured Materials, Stesen Penyelidikan RRIM, LGM 47000 Sungai Buloh, Selangor (Malaysia); Verasamy, D., E-mail: devaraj@lgm.gov.my [Environmental Technology & Sustainability, Technology & Engineering Division, Malaysian Rubber Board, Stesen Penyelidikan RRIM, LGM 47000 Sungai Buloh, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2016-07-06

    The availability of concentrated epoxidised natural rubber (ENR-LC) has provided a better opportunity for using epoxidised natural rubber (ENR) with silica to reinforce natural rubber for tyre application. ENR-LC mixed directly with silica to rubber by high speed stirrer without using any coupling agent. Some rubber compounds were prepared by mixing a large amount of precipitated amorphous white silica with natural rubber. The silica was prepared in aqueous dispersion and the filler was perfectly dispersed in the ENR-LC. The performance of the composites was evaluated in this work for the viability of ENR-LC/Si in tyre compounding. Compounding was carried out on a two roll mill, where the additives and curing agents was later mixed. Characterization of these composites was performed by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) for dispersion as well as mechanical testing. C-ENR/Si showed efficient as primary reinforcing filler in ENR with regard to modulus and tensile strength, resulting on an increase in the stiffness of the rubbers compared to ENR latex. Overall improvement in the mechanical properties for the ENR-LC over the control crosslinked rubber sample was probably due to synergisms of silica reinforcement and crosslinking of the polymeric matrix phase.

  2. Effect of concentrated epoxidised natural rubber and silica masterbatch for tyre application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azira, A. A.; Kamal, M. M.; Verasamy, D.

    2016-01-01

    The availability of concentrated epoxidised natural rubber (ENR-LC) has provided a better opportunity for using epoxidised natural rubber (ENR) with silica to reinforce natural rubber for tyre application. ENR-LC mixed directly with silica to rubber by high speed stirrer without using any coupling agent. Some rubber compounds were prepared by mixing a large amount of precipitated amorphous white silica with natural rubber. The silica was prepared in aqueous dispersion and the filler was perfectly dispersed in the ENR-LC. The performance of the composites was evaluated in this work for the viability of ENR-LC/Si in tyre compounding. Compounding was carried out on a two roll mill, where the additives and curing agents was later mixed. Characterization of these composites was performed by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) for dispersion as well as mechanical testing. C-ENR/Si showed efficient as primary reinforcing filler in ENR with regard to modulus and tensile strength, resulting on an increase in the stiffness of the rubbers compared to ENR latex. Overall improvement in the mechanical properties for the ENR-LC over the control crosslinked rubber sample was probably due to synergisms of silica reinforcement and crosslinking of the polymeric matrix phase.

  3. Hair cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone concentrations in naturally Taenia solium infected pigs in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisan, Chiara; Montillo, Marta; Prandi, Alberto; Mkupasi, Ernatus M; Ngowi, Helena A; Johansen, Maria V

    2017-05-15

    The aim of this study was to measure hair cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) concentrations in naturally Taenia solium infected and non-infected control pigs and assess the effect of an environmental change on the aforementioned parameters. Three hair patches were obtained from 13 T. solium infected and 15 non-infected controls sows, respectively corresponding to 3 time points (prior to, at and approximately two weeks after arrival at the research facility). Cortisol and DHEA were extracted using methanol and analysed by radio immune assay. Mean hair cortisol concentrations were significantly lower (psolium infected (4.7±3.0pg/mg) compared to control pigs (9.0±3.7pg/mg) prior to arrival at the research facility, however no significant difference was observed between the two groups at arrival and after approximately two weeks. Similar patterns were also observed for DHEA concentrations (infected pigs 253.9±82.3pg/mg, control pigs 387.7±116.4pg/mg) (p<0.001). Results showed that lean animals had significantly higher cortisol concentrations in both groups, infected and controls pigs, while DHEA was not significantly different between lean and normal animals. Results of this study have shown that an environmental change could have an effect on pigs' hormonal levels suggesting an undergoing adaptation process. After the pigs were kept under the same conditions, fed and watered ad libitum, no significant differences were observed between the groups, but a drop in DHEA concentrations was observed in all the pigs. Weight however had an effect on cortisol levels as lean animals had significantly higher cortisol concentrations in both groups, compared to normal pigs. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Quantifying local traffic contributions to NO2 and NH3 concentrations in natural habitats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gadsdon, Sally R.; Power, Sally A.

    2009-01-01

    NO 2 and NH 3 concentrations were measured across a Special Area for Conservation in southern England, at varying distances from the local road network. Exceedances of the critical levels for these pollutants were recorded at nearly all roadside locations, extending up to 20 m away from roads at some sites. Further, paired measurements of NH 3 and NO 2 concentrations revealed differences between ground and tree canopy levels. At 'background' sites, away from the direct influence of roads, concentrations were higher within tree canopies than at ground level; the reverse pattern was, however, seen at roadside locations. Calculations of pollutant deposition rates showed that nitrogen inputs are dominated by NH 3 at roadside sites. This study demonstrates that local traffic emissions contribute substantially to the exceedance of critical levels and critical loads, and suggests that on-site monitoring is needed for sites of nature conservation value which are in close proximity to local transport routes. - NO x and NH 3 concentrations exceed vegetation critical levels up to 20 m from roadsides, both at ground level and in tree canopies.

  5. Milk fluoridation for the prevention of dental caries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolán Bánóczy

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this review is to give an overview of 55 years experience of milk fluoridation and draw conclusions about the applicability of the method. Fluoridated milk was first investigated in the early 1950s, almost simultaneously in Switzerland, the USA and Japan. Stimulated by the favourable results obtained from these early studies, the establishment of The Borrow Dental Milk Foundation (subsequently The Borrow Foundation in England gave an excellent opportunity for further research, both clinical and non-clinical, and a productive collaboration with the World Health Organization which began in the early 1980s. Numerous peer-reviewed publications in international journals showed clearly the bioavailability of fluoride in various types of milk. Clinical trials were initiated in the 1980s – some of these can be classed as randomised controlled trials, while most of the clinical studies were community preventive programmes. Conclusion. These evaluations showed clearly that the optimal daily intake of fluoride in milk is effective in preventing dental caries. The amount of fluoride added to milk depends on background fluoride exposure and age of the children: commonly in the range 0.5 to 1.0 mg per day. An advantage of the method is that a precise amount of fluoride can be delivered under controlled conditions. The cost of milk fluoridation programmes is low, about € 2 to 3 per child per year. Fluoridation of milk can be recommended as a caries preventive measure where the fluoride concentration in drinking water is suboptimal, caries experience in children is significant, and there is an existing school milk programme.

  6. Fluoride-induced disruption of reproductive hormones in men

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz-Perez, Deogracias; Rodriguez-Martinez, Manuel; Martinez, Flavio; Borja-Aburto, V.H.; Castelo, Julio; Grimaldo, J.I.; Cruz, Esperanza de la; Carrizales, Leticia; Diaz-Barriga, Fernando

    2003-01-01

    Fluoride-induced reproductive effects have been reported in experimental models and in humans. However, these effects were found in heavily exposed scenarios. Therefore, in this work our objective was to study reproductive parameters in a population exposed to fluoride at doses of 3-27 mg/day (high-fluoride-exposed group--HFEG). Urinary fluoride levels, semen parameters, and reproductive hormones in serum (LH, FSH, estradiol, prolactin, inhibin-B, free and total testosterone) were measured. Results were compared with a group of individuals exposed to fluoride at lower doses: 2-13 mg/day (low-fluoride-exposed group-LFEG). A significant increase in FSH (P<0.05) and a reduction of inhibin-B, free testosterone, and prolactin in serum (P<0.05) were noticed in the HFEG. When HFEG was compared to LFEG, a decreased sensitivity was found in the FSH response to inhibin-B (P<0.05). A significant negative partial correlation was observed between urinary fluoride and serum levels of inhibin-B (r=-0.333, P=0.028) in LFEG. Furthermore, a significant partial correlation was observed between a chronic exposure index for fluoride and the serum concentrations of inhibin-B (r=-0.163, P=0.037) in HFEG. No abnormalities were found in the semen parameters studied in the present work, neither in the HFEG, nor in the LFEG. The results obtained indicate that a fluoride exposure of 3-27 mg/day induces a subclinical reproductive effect that can be explained by a fluoride-induced toxic effect in both Sertoli cells and gonadotrophs

  7. Milk fluoridation for the prevention of dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bánóczy, Jolán; Rugg-Gunn, Andrew; Woodward, Margaret

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this review is to give an overview of 55 years experience of milk fluoridation and draw conclusions about the applicability of the method. Fluoridated milk was first investigated in the early 1950s, almost simultaneously in Switzerland, the USA and Japan. Stimulated by the favourable results obtained from these early studies, the establishment of The Borrow Dental Milk Foundation (subsequently The Borrow Foundation) in England gave an excellent opportunity for further research, both clinical and non-clinical, and a productive collaboration with the World Health Organization which began in the early 1980s. Numerous peer-reviewed publications in international journals showed clearly the bioavailability of fluoride in various types of milk. Clinical trials were initiated in the 1980s - some of these can be classed as randomised controlled trials, while most of the clinical studies were community preventive programmes. These evaluations showed clearly that the optimal daily intake of fluoride in milk is effective in preventing dental caries. The amount of fluoride added to milk depends on background fluoride exposure and age of the children: commonly in the range 0.5 to 1.0 mg per day. An advantage of the method is that a precise amount of fluoride can be delivered under controlled conditions. The cost of milk fluoridation programmes is low, about € 2 to 3 per child per year. Fluoridation of milk can be recommended as a caries preventive measure where the fluoride concentration in drinking water is suboptimal, caries experience in children is significant, and there is an existing school milk programme. Copyright © 2013 by Academy of Sciences and Arts of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

  8. Development of an empirical model for fluoride removal from photovoltaic wastewater by electrocoagulation process

    KAUST Repository

    Drouiche, Nadjib

    2011-05-01

    Electrocoagulation experiments were conducted with bipolar aluminium electrodes to determine the optimum conditions for the fluoride removal from synthetic photovoltaic wastewater. A high fluoride concentration in community water supplies can cause fluorosis which has a detrimental effect on human health in particular on teeth and bones. A full 23 factorial design of experiments was used to obtain the best conditions of fluoride removal from water solutions. The three factors considered were initial fluoride concentration, applied potential, and supporting electrolyte dosage. Two levels for each factor were used; supporting electrolyte (0 and 100), applied potential (10 and 30 V), and initial fluoride concentration (20 and 25 mg/L). Results showed that the optimum conditions for fluoride removal from photovoltaic wastewater containing an initial fluoride concentration of 20 mg/L were a supporting electrolyte dose of 100 mg/L and an applied potential of 30 V. These gave a residual fluoride concentration of 8.6 mg/L which was below the standard discharge limit. A mathematical equation showing the relation between residual fluoride concentration and the effective variables was also developed. © 2011 Desalination Publications. All rights reserved.

  9. Development of an empirical model for fluoride removal from photovoltaic wastewater by electrocoagulation process

    KAUST Repository

    Drouiche, Nadjib; Aoudj, Salaheddine; Lounici, Hakim; Mahmoudi, Hacè ne; Ghaffour, NorEddine; Goosen, Mattheus F A

    2011-01-01

    Electrocoagulation experiments were conducted with bipolar aluminium electrodes to determine the optimum conditions for the fluoride removal from synthetic photovoltaic wastewater. A high fluoride concentration in community water supplies can cause fluorosis which has a detrimental effect on human health in particular on teeth and bones. A full 23 factorial design of experiments was used to obtain the best conditions of fluoride removal from water solutions. The three factors considered were initial fluoride concentration, applied potential, and supporting electrolyte dosage. Two levels for each factor were used; supporting electrolyte (0 and 100), applied potential (10 and 30 V), and initial fluoride concentration (20 and 25 mg/L). Results showed that the optimum conditions for fluoride removal from photovoltaic wastewater containing an initial fluoride concentration of 20 mg/L were a supporting electrolyte dose of 100 mg/L and an applied potential of 30 V. These gave a residual fluoride concentration of 8.6 mg/L which was below the standard discharge limit. A mathematical equation showing the relation between residual fluoride concentration and the effective variables was also developed. © 2011 Desalination Publications. All rights reserved.

  10. Association between Urine Fluoride and Dental Fluorosis as a Toxicity Factor in a Rural Community in the State of San Luis Potosi

    OpenAIRE

    Jarquín-Yañez, Lizet; Mejía-Saavedra, José de Jesús; Molina-Frechero, Nelly; Gaona, Enrique; Rocha-Amador, Diana Olivia; López-Guzmán, Olga Dania; Bologna-Molina, Ronell

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study is to investigate urine fluoride concentration as a toxicity factor in a rural community in the state of San Luis Potosi, Mexico. Materials and Methods. A sample of 111 children exposed to high concentrations of fluoride in drinking water (4.13?mg/L) was evaluated. Fluoride exposure was determined by measuring urine fluoride concentration using the potentiometric method with an ion selective electrode. The diagnosis of dental fluorosis was performed by clinica...

  11. Natural Elemental Concentrations and Fluxes: Their Use as Indicators of Repository Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Bill; Lind, Andy; Savage, Dave; Maul, Philip; Robinson, Peter

    2002-03-01

    The calculated post-closure performance of a radioactive waste repository is generally quantified in terms of radiological dose or risk to humans, with safety being determined by whether the calculated exposure values are consistent with predetermined target criteria which are deemed to represent acceptable radiological hazards. Despite their general acceptance, however, dose and risk are not perfect measures of repository safety because, in order to calculate them, gross assumptions must be made for future human behaviour patterns. Such predictions clearly become increasingly uncertain as forecasts are made further into the future. As a consequence, there has been a growing interest in developing other ways of assessing repository safety which do not require assumptions to be made for future human behaviour. One proposed assessment method is to use the distributions of naturally-occurring chemical species in the environment, expressed either as concentrations or fluxes of elements, radionuclides or radioactivity, as natural safety indicators which may be compared with the PA predictions of repository releases. Numerous comparisons are possible between the repository and natural systems. The primary objective is to use the natural system to provide context to the hazard presented by the repository releases. Put simply, if it can be demonstrated that the flux to the biosphere from the repository is not significant compared with the natural flux from the geosphere, then its radiological significance should not be of great or priority concern. Natural safety indicators may be quantified on a site specific basis, using information derived from a repository site characterisation programme, and can be compared to the outputs from the associated site specific PAs. Such calculations and comparisons may be very detailed and might examine, for example, the spatial and temporal variations in the distributions and fluxes of naturally-occurring chemical species arising from

  12. Determination of zirconium by fluoride ion selective electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahanty, B.N.; Sonar, V.R.; Gaikwad, R.; Raul, S.; Das, D.K.; Prakash, A.; Afzal, Md.; Panakkal, J.P.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Zirconium is used in a wide range of applications including nuclear clad, catalytic converters, surgical appliances, metallurgical furnaces, superconductors, ceramics, lamp filaments, anti corrosive alloys and photographical purposes. Irradiation testing of U-Zr and U-Pu-Zr fuel pins has also demonstrated their feasibility as fuel in liquid metal reactors. Different methods that are employed for the determination of zirconium are spectrophotometry, potentiometry, neutron activation analysis and mass spectrometry. Ion-selective electrode (ISE), selective to zirconium ion has been studied for the direct potentiometric measurements of zirconium ions in various samples. In the present work, an indirect method has been employed for the determination of zirconium in zirconium nitrate sample using fluoride ion selective electrode. This method is based on the addition of known excess amount of fluoride ion to react with the zirconium ion to produce zirconium tetra fluoride at about pH 2-3, followed by determination of residual fluoride ion selective electrode. The residual fluoride ion concentrations were determined from the electrode potential data using calibration plot. Subsequently, zirconium ion concentrations were determined from the concentration of consumed fluoride ions. A precision of about 2% (RSD) with the mean recovery of more than 94% has been achieved for the determination of zirconium at the concentration of 4.40 X 10 -3 moles lit -1

  13. Methane emission from naturally ventilated livestock buildings can be determined from gas concentration measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerg, B; Zhang, Guoqiang; Madsen, J

    2012-01-01

    Determination of emission of contaminant gases as ammonia, methane, or laughing gas from natural ventilated livestock buildings with large opening is a challenge due to the large variations in gas concentration and air velocity in the openings. The close relation between calculated animal heat pr...... to investigate the influence of feed composition on methane emission in a relative large number of operating cattle buildings and consequently it can support a development towards reduced greenhouse gas emission from cattle production.......Determination of emission of contaminant gases as ammonia, methane, or laughing gas from natural ventilated livestock buildings with large opening is a challenge due to the large variations in gas concentration and air velocity in the openings. The close relation between calculated animal heat...... ventilated, 150 milking cow building. The results showed that the methane emission can be determined with much higher precision than ammonia or laughing gas emissions, and, for methane, relatively precise estimations can be based on measure periods as short as 3 h. This result makes it feasible...

  14. Predictive Modelling of Concentration of Dispersed Natural Gas in a Single Room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulfatai JIMOH

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper aimed at developing a mathematical model equation to predict the concentration of natural gas in a single room. The model equation was developed by using theoretical method of predictive modelling. The model equation developed is as given in equation 28. The validity of the developed expression was tested through the simulation of experimental results using computer software called MathCAD Professional. Both experimental and simulated results were found to be in close agreement. The statistical analysis carried out through the correlation coefficients for the results of experiment 1, 2, 3 and 4 were found to be 0.9986, 1.0000, 0.9981 and 0.9999 respectively, which imply reasonable close fittings between the experimental and simulated concentrations of dispersed natural gas within the room. Thus, the model equation developed can be considered a good representation of the phenomena that occurred when there is a leakage or accidental release of such gas within the room.

  15. Fluoride and Oral Health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Mullane, D M; Baez, R J; Jones, S

    2016-01-01

    and strategies is noteworthy. This updated version of ‘Fluoride and Oral Health’ has adopted an evidence-based approach to its commentary on the different fl uoride vehicles and strategies and also to its recommendations. In this regard, full account is taken of the many recent systematic reviews published...

  16. Fluoride in the drinking water of Pakistan and the possible risk of crippling fluorosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Tahir

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available To explore the possibility of fluoride toxicity, 747 water samples were collected from surface water and groundwater sources of 16 major cities of Pakistan, adopting a uniform sampling design with distribution of samples: Lahore (79, Kasur (46, Faisalabad (30, Khushab (50, Chakwal (51, Mianwali (30, Jhelum (53, Bahawalpur (60, Karachi (60, Mirpur Khas (55, Peshawar (38, Risalpur (35, Quetta (81, Ziarat (21, Loralai (21, and Mastung (37. Comparison of analytical findings with WHO Guidelines of Drinking Water for Fluoride (i.e., 1.5 ppm has concluded that 16% of the monitored water sources have fluoride concentration beyond the permissible safe limit of 1.5 mg L−1 falling in the concentration range of 1.6–25 mg L−1. The highest fluoride contamination (22% is detected in the Balochistan province followed by 19% in Punjab province. Comparatively higher fluoride levels of > 20% in the groundwater sources like hand pumps supported the possibility of increased groundwater contamination as excessive fluoride concentrations are expected to come from calcium-poor aquifers and in areas where fluoride-bearing minerals are common or where cation exchange of sodium for calcium occurs. Field observations have also indicated the prevalence of fluoride-associated health implications in the study areas with excessive fluoride in water sources. Findings of this study have provided bidirectional vision for the epidemiological investigations as well as to mitigate the issues in the affected vicinities of fluoride-rich areas.

  17. Performance of novel hydroxyapatite nanowires in treatment of fluoride contaminated water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Junyong; Zhang, Kaisheng; Wu, Shibiao; Cai, Xingguo; Chen, Kai; Li, Yulian; Sun, Bai; Jia, Yong; Meng, Fanli; Jin, Zhen; Kong, Lingtao; Liu, Jinhuai

    2016-02-13

    Novel ultralong hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanowires were successfully prepared for fluoride removal for the first time. The fluoride adsorption on the HAP nanowires was studied on a batch mode. The results revealed that the adsorption data could be well described by the Freundlich model, and the adsorption kinetic followed the pseudo-second-order model. The maximum of adsorption capacity was 40.65 mg/g at pH 7.0 when the fluoride concentration is 200mg/L. The thermodynamic parameters suggested that the adsorption of fluoride was a spontaneous endothermic process. The FT-IR, XPS and Zeta potential analysis revealed that both anion exchange and electrostatic interactions were involved in the adsorption of fluoride. Furthermore, the HAP nanowires were made into HAP membrane through a simple process of suction filtration. Membrane filtration experiments revealed that the fluoride removal capabilities depended on the membrane thickness, flow rate and initial concentration of fluoride. The as-prepared membrane could remove fluoride efficiently through continues filtration. The filtered water amount could reach 350, 192, and 64 L/m(2) when the fluoride concentrations were 4, 5 and 8 ppm, respectively, using the HAP membrane with only 150 μm thickness. The as-synthesized ultralong HAP nanowires were thus demonstrated to be very effective and biocompatible adsorbents for fluoride removal from contaminated water. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Concentração de flúor em águas engarrafadas comercializadas no município de São Paulo Fluoride concentration in bottled water on the market in the municipality of São Paulo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Henrique da Costa Grec

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do estudo foi avaliar a concentração de flúor na água engarrafada comercializada, comparando-a aos valores impressos no rótulo da embalagem. Foram coletadas 229 amostras de água das 35 marcas disponíveis em diversos supermercados, mercearias e lanchonetes de grande circulação nas diferentes regiões do município de São Paulo, em 2006. A concentração de flúor foi determinada por análise em duplicata, utilizando o eletrodo íon-específico. A concentração de flúor variou entre 0,01 e 2,04 mg/l, com diferenças significantes entre os valores estipulados nos rótulos e os encontrados com a análise. Esses resultados reforçam a importância do controle dos níveis de flúor na água engarrafada por parte da vigilância sanitária.The objective of the study was to evaluate the fluoride concentration in bottled water available on the market, in comparison with the values printed on the bottle label. Two hundred and twenty-nine water samples were collected from 35 brands available in several supermarkets, grocery stores and snack bars with high turnover in different regions of the municipality of São Paulo, Southeastern Brazil, in 2006. Fluoride concentrations were determined by duplicate analysis using an ion-specific electrode. The fluoride concentrations ranged from 0.01 to 2.04 mg/l, with significant differences between the values stipulated on labels and those found in the analyses. These results emphasize the importance of controls over fluoride levels in bottled water enforced by the sanitary surveillance agency.

  19. Assement of the fluoride concentration and pH in different mouthrinses on the brazilian market Avaliação do teor de flúor e pH em diferentes soluções para bochechos no mercado nacional

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Carlos Botazzo Delbem

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the fluoride concentration and pH of 14 commercial brands of mouthrinses were assessed in order to compare them with the values expressed on the labels and with those established by the National Sanitary Surveillance Agency. Forty-two (42 products were obtained from three places, with different manufacturing batches. The fluoride concentration was determined in diluted solutions, using a combined specific electrode for fluoride ion (9609 BN Orion Research and ion analyzer (290 A Orion Research. The results showed that 50% of the solutions had statistically significant differences, with higher fluoride concentrations than those expressed on the labels, and the pH ranged from 4.23 to 7.34, but only one of the products registered the pH value on its label.No presente estudo, o teor de flúor e o pH de 14 marcas comerciais de soluções para bochechos foram avaliados a fim de comparar com os valores expressos nos rótulos e com aqueles determinados pela Agência Nacional de Vigilância Sanitária. Foram adquiridos 42 produtos em três localidades, com diferentes lotes de fabricação. A concentração de flúor foi determinada em soluções diluídas, utilizando-se eletrodo específico combinado para íon flúor (9609 BN Orion Research e analisador de íons (290 A Orion Research. Os resultados mostraram que 50% das soluções apresentaram diferenças estatisticamente significantes, com concentrações de flúor superiores àquelas expressas nos rótulos e o pH variou entre 4,23 a 7,34, mas apenas um dos produtos registrou o valor do pH em seu rótulo.

  20. Amelioration of Fluoride Toxicity with the Use of Indigenous Inputs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maitra A.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available An assessment was undertaken to study the efficacy of bacterial consortia isolated from different sources viz. rhizosphere of rice plant, oil spill sites of a petrol pump and from the sludge of a pharmaceutical waste water drain against the impact of fluoride. The experiments were conducted with two crops. In this mung bean experiment Vigna radiata was selected as a test crop. The seeds were sown in the field with bacterial consortia, compost and reduced dose (25% less nitrogen than recommended dose of chemical fertilizer. After 30days of seed sowing (DAS, plants were collected from the field and dipped into the sodium fluoride solution with different concentrations for 48 hours. Thereafter, the impact of fluoride on chlorophyll, sugar, proline and relative water content (% were evaluated. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM of the stem section was performed. SEM studies revealed that anatomical structure deformed with 1.5 mg/l sodium fluoride solution. It was observed that such treatment combination during the sowing of crops leads to combat the impact of lower doses of sodium fluoride (0.2 mg/l. Another experiment was also conducted within plastic pots with and without bacterial consortia isolated from rhizosphere of rice plant and oil spilled soil of petrol pump with the same field soil. Each pot was filled with 5 kg of soil + 2lt of water (on the basis of soil saturation. Oryza sativa seedlings were transplanted with different strength of sodium fluoride solution (25 mgNaF/kg, 50 mgNaF/kg, 100 mgNaF/kg and 500mgNaF/kg within the above pots. In second experiment, rice plants dried in all pots after 500 mgNaF/kg concentration of sodium fluoride. In this pot experiment bacterial strain are capable of reducing fluoride content in soil as noted by measuring fluoride in the pot soil after the experiment.

  1. Level of Fluoride in Soil, Grain and Water in Jalgaon District, Maharashtra, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Rahul Gaybarao; Dodamani, Arun Suresh; Vishwakarma, Prashanth; Jadhav, Harish Chaitram; Khairnar, Mahesh Ravindra; Deshmukh, Manjiri Abhay; Wadgave, Umesh

    2017-02-01

    Fluoride has an influence on both oral as well as systemic health. The major source of fluoride to body is through drinking water as well as through diet. Staple diet mainly depends on local environmental factors, food grains grown locally, its availability etc. Determination of fluoride level in these food grains is important. So, estimation of the amount of fluoride in grains and its relation to the sources of fluoride used for their cultivation viz., soil and water is important. To estimate the relation of fluoride concentration in grains (Jowar) with respect to that of soil and water used for their cultivation. Fifteen samples each of soil, water and grains were collected using standardized method from the same farm fields of randomly selected villages of Jalgaon district. Fluoride ion concentration was determined in laboratory using SPADNS technique. Mean difference in fluoride levels in between the groups were analyzed using ANOVA and Post-Hoc Tukey test. Linear regression method was applied to analyse the association of the fluoride content of grain with water and soil. There was a significant difference in between mean fluoride levels of soil and water (pwater and grain was found to be non significant (p=0.591). Also fluoride levels in all the three groups showed significant association with each other. Fluoride level of soil, grains and water should be adjusted to an optimum level. Soil has positive correlation with respect to uptake of fluoride by Jowar grains. So, Jowar grains with optimum fluoride content should be made available in the commercial markets so that oral and general health can be benefitted.

  2. Evaluation of dissolved oxygen and organic substances concentrations in water of the nature reserve Alluvium Zitavy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palaticka, A.; Noskovic, J.; Babosova, M.

    2007-01-01

    In 2006 concentrations of dissolved oxygen and organic substances were evaluated in water in the Nature Reserve Alluvium Zitavy (indirect method based on their oxidation by K 2 Cr 2 0 7 was used). The results are represented in mg of O 2 · dm -3 . Taking of samples took place in 6 sampling sites in regular month intervals. Based on obtained data and according to the standard STN 75 7221 (Water quality -The classification of the water surface quality) water in individual sampling sites was ranked into the classes of the .water surface quality. From the data it is clear that the concentrations of dissolved oxygen and organic substances in the Nature Reserve Alluvium Zitavy changed in dependence on sampling sites and time. The highest mean concentrations of dissolved oxygen in dependence on sampling time were found out in spring months and the lowest concentrations in summer months. They ranged from 1.6 mg 0 2 · dm -3 (July) to 9.0 mg O 2 · dm -3 (March). Falling dissolved oxygen values can be related to successive increase of water temperature, thus good conditions were created for decomposition of organic matter by microorganisms in water and sediments in which they use dissolved oxygen. In dependence on sampling place the highest mean concentration of dissolved oxygen was in sampling site No. 4 (6.0 mg 0 2 · dm -3 ) which is situated in the narrowest place in the NR. The lowest value was in sampling site No. 2 (3.6 mg 0 2 · dm -3 ) which is a typical wetland ecosystem. High mean values of COD Cr in dependence on sampling time were determined in summer months and low values during winter moths. Dependence of COD Cr values on sampling site was also manifested. The lowest mean value was obtained in sampling site No. 4 (59.5 mg · dm -3 ) and the highest value in sampling site No. 5 (97.1 mg · dm -3 ) which is also a typical wetland. Based on the results and according to the STN 75 7221 we ranked water in all sampling sites into the 5 th class of the water

  3. The nature of corporate governance and performance in the conditions of ownership concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leković Božidar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The central research question and purpose of this topic is oriented on the analysis of concentration scope of share capital ownership in Serbia, and their relation to corporate performance. The article also attempts to give a suitable reply to the question as to what extent the concentration of share capital ownership has changed in comparison to previous, which was formed at the beginning of the process of transition and privatisation of the public property, which was used as the foundation for forming the corporate sector. The answers to these questions will be used to point to the nature of the corporate sector in Serbia, and the degree of development of the securities market. Research methodology involves the use parametric procedures due to the characteristics of the selected variables and the number of observations in the sample. Univariate ANOVA procedures and Pearson's correlation coefficient will be used. The corporate sector in Serbia achieves positive results but does not receive adequate market verification due to extreme ownership concentration and the dominant influence of the majority, or several large shareholders. Due to the privileged position of a small number of privileged shareholders, such a situation results in the expropriation of small shareholders, who remain helpless due to underdeveloped mechanisms of legal and institutional protection.

  4. Estimation of natural potassium concentration in Romanian males by in vivo gamma-ray spectrometry measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirela Angela Saizu

    2012-01-01

    At the Whole Body Monitoring Laboratory, from IFIN-HH, Bucharest, Romania, there were performed in vivo gamma-ray spectrometry measurements on 108 Romanian males in order to evaluate the mineral natural potassium content in human body, as total value and concentration. The measurements were performed with a shadow shield whole body counter, tilted chair geometry, based on a shielded NaI(Tl) scintillation detector of 12.5 cm (diameter) x 10 cm (height) crystal size. The results revealed a calculated value of the mean total body potassium (TBK) of 135.03 ± 2.94 g and a value of 1.9 ± 0.022 g of potassium/kg of body weight for the mean body potassium concentration, for the measured males. These values are similar with the values declared for the Reference Man, in ICRP23. Correlations between total body potassium, potassium concentration and age, weight and Body Build Index were investigated and peculiar conclusions were resulted. (author)

  5. Density and surface tension of melts of zirconium and hafnium fluorides with lithium fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katyshev, S.F.; Artemov, V.V.; Desyatnik, V.N.

    1988-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the temperature dependence of the density and surface tension of melts of LiF-ZrF 4 and LiF-HfF 4 . Density and surface tension were determined by the method of maximum pressure in an argon bubble. On the basis of experimental data over the entire concentration range the molar volumes and their relative deviations from the additive molar volumes were calculated for 1100 0 K. The positive deviations of the molar volumes from additivity in the LiF-HfF 4 system (22.45%) were greater than in the LiF-ZrF 4 system (15.75%). This indicated that the reaction with lithium fluoride is intensified with the switch to the hafnium fluoride. Results also demonstrated that the fluorides are surface-active components in the molten mixtures

  6. Characterization of naturally occurring airborne diacetyl concentrations associated with the preparation and consumption of unflavored coffee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer S. Pierce

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diacetyl, a suspected cause of respiratory disorders in some food and flavorings manufacturing workers, is also a natural component of roasted coffee. We characterized diacetyl exposures that would plausibly occur in a small coffee shop during the preparation and consumption of unflavored coffee. Personal (long- and short-term and area (long-term samples were collected while a barista ground whole coffee beans, and brewed and poured coffee into cups. Simultaneously, long-term personal samples were collected as two participants, the customers, drank one cup of coffee each per h. Air sampling and analyses were conducted in accordance with OSHA Method 1012. Diacetyl was detected in all long-term samples. The long-term concentrations for the barista and area samples were similar, and ranged from 0.013–0.016 ppm; long-term concentrations for the customers were slightly lower and ranged from 0.010–0.014 ppm. Short-term concentrations ranged from below the limit of detection (<0.0047 ppm–0.016 ppm. Mean estimated 8 h time-weighted average (8 h TWA exposures for the barista ranged from 0.007–0.013 ppm; these values exceed recommended 8 h TWA occupational exposure limits (OELs for diacetyl and are comparable to long-term personal measurements collected in various food and beverage production facilities. The concentrations measured based on area sampling were comparable to those measured in the breathing zone of the barista, thus exceedances of the recommended OELs may also occur for coffee shop workers who do not personally prepare coffee (e.g., cashier, sanitation/maintenance. These findings suggest that the practicality and scientific basis of the recommended OELs for diacetyl merit further consideration.

  7. Urinary arsenic concentrations and speciation in residents living in an area with naturally contaminated soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fillol, Clemence, E-mail: c.fillol@invs.sante.fr [Universite Paris Descartes, Laboratoire Sante Publique et Environnement - EA 4064, Paris (France); Institut de veille sanitaire, Departement Sante environnement, Saint-Maurice (France); Dor, Frederic [Institut de veille sanitaire, Departement Sante environnement, Saint-Maurice (France); Labat, Laurence [CHRU de Lille, Laboratoire de Toxicologie et Genopathies, Lille (France); Boltz, Patricia [Centre antipoison et de toxicovigilance de Nancy (France); Le Bouard, Jerome [Direction Regionale des Affaires Sanitaires et Sociales, Meurthe-et-Moselle (France); Mantey, Karine [Cellule Interregionale d' epidemiologie de l' Est (France); Mannschott, Christian [Direction Departementale des Affaires Sanitaires et Sociales 54, Meurthe-et-Moselle (France); Puskarczyk, Emmanuel [Centre antipoison et de toxicovigilance de Nancy (France); Viller, Frederique [Cellule Interregionale d' epidemiologie de l' Est (France); Momas, Isabelle [Universite Paris Descartes, Laboratoire Sante Publique et Environnement - EA 4064, Paris (France); Seta, Nathalie [Universite Paris Descartes, Laboratoire Sante Publique et Environnement - EA 4064, Paris (France); AP-HP, Hopital Bichat, Biochimie, Paris (France)

    2010-02-01

    A cross sectional study was carried out to evaluate arsenic exposure of residents living in an area with a soil naturally rich in arsenic (As), through urinary measurements. During the summer of 2007, 322 people aged over 7 years and resident in the study area for at least 4 days prior to the investigation were recruited. The sum of urinary inorganic arsenic and metabolites (iAs + MMA + DMA) and speciation were determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry and high performance liquid chromatography coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, respectively. Geometric means levels of iAs + MMA + DMA were 3.6 {mu}g/L or 4.4 {mu}g/g creatinine. The percent of DMA, As(III) and MMA contribution to urinary arsenic concentrations was respectively 84.2%, 12% and 3.7%. We found significant associations between urinary arsenic concentrations and the consumption of seafood (p = 0.03), the consumption of wine (p = 0.03) and beer (p = 0.001), respectively 3 and 4 days before the investigation. When we focus on the various species, As(V) was rarely detected and DMA is the predominant metabolite composing the majority of measurable inorganic-related As in the urine. Considering the percent of DMA contribution to iAs + MMA + DMA urinary concentrations, almost half of the subjects had 100% of DMA contribution whatever the concentration of urinary As whereas the others had a lower DMA contribution, between 39 and 90%. Arsenic levels reported in this original study in France were between 2 and 4 times lower than in other studies dealing with iAs + MMA + DMA levels associated with soil arsenic exposure. Arsenic levels were similar to those observed in unexposed individuals in European countries, although 10% were above the French guideline values for the general population.

  8. Urinary arsenic concentrations and speciation in residents living in an area with naturally contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillol, Clemence; Dor, Frederic; Labat, Laurence; Boltz, Patricia; Le Bouard, Jerome; Mantey, Karine; Mannschott, Christian; Puskarczyk, Emmanuel; Viller, Frederique; Momas, Isabelle; Seta, Nathalie

    2010-01-01

    A cross sectional study was carried out to evaluate arsenic exposure of residents living in an area with a soil naturally rich in arsenic (As), through urinary measurements. During the summer of 2007, 322 people aged over 7 years and resident in the study area for at least 4 days prior to the investigation were recruited. The sum of urinary inorganic arsenic and metabolites (iAs + MMA + DMA) and speciation were determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry and high performance liquid chromatography coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, respectively. Geometric means levels of iAs + MMA + DMA were 3.6 μg/L or 4.4 μg/g creatinine. The percent of DMA, As(III) and MMA contribution to urinary arsenic concentrations was respectively 84.2%, 12% and 3.7%. We found significant associations between urinary arsenic concentrations and the consumption of seafood (p = 0.03), the consumption of wine (p = 0.03) and beer (p = 0.001), respectively 3 and 4 days before the investigation. When we focus on the various species, As(V) was rarely detected and DMA is the predominant metabolite composing the majority of measurable inorganic-related As in the urine. Considering the percent of DMA contribution to iAs + MMA + DMA urinary concentrations, almost half of the subjects had 100% of DMA contribution whatever the concentration of urinary As whereas the others had a lower DMA contribution, between 39 and 90%. Arsenic levels reported in this original study in France were between 2 and 4 times lower than in other studies dealing with iAs + MMA + DMA levels associated with soil arsenic exposure. Arsenic levels were similar to those observed in unexposed individuals in European countries, although 10% were above the French guideline values for the general population.

  9. Characterization of naturally occurring airborne diacetyl concentrations associated with the preparation and consumption of unflavored coffee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Jennifer S; Abelmann, Anders; Lotter, Jason T; Comerford, Chris; Keeton, Kara; Finley, Brent L

    2015-01-01

    Diacetyl, a suspected cause of respiratory disorders in some food and flavorings manufacturing workers, is also a natural component of roasted coffee. We characterized diacetyl exposures that would plausibly occur in a small coffee shop during the preparation and consumption of unflavored coffee. Personal (long- and short-term) and area (long-term) samples were collected while a barista ground whole coffee beans, and brewed and poured coffee into cups. Simultaneously, long-term personal samples were collected as two participants, the customers, drank one cup of coffee each per h. Air sampling and analyses were conducted in accordance with OSHA Method 1012. Diacetyl was detected in all long-term samples. The long-term concentrations for the barista and area samples were similar, and ranged from 0.013⿿0.016 ppm; long-term concentrations for the customers were slightly lower and ranged from 0.010⿿0.014 ppm. Short-term concentrations ranged from below the limit of detection (barista ranged from 0.007⿿0.013 ppm; these values exceed recommended 8 h TWA occupational exposure limits (OELs) for diacetyl and are comparable to long-term personal measurements collected in various food and beverage production facilities. The concentrations measured based on area sampling were comparable to those measured in the breathing zone of the barista, thus exceedances of the recommended OELs may also occur for coffee shop workers who do not personally prepare coffee (e.g., cashier, sanitation/maintenance). These findings suggest that the practicality and scientific basis of the recommended OELs for diacetyl merit further consideration.

  10. Fluoride injury symptoms in epiphytic lichens and mosses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leblanc, F; Comeau, G; Rao, D N

    1971-01-01

    This study was conducted in Arvida, Quebec, where volatile fluorides and HF are released into the atmosphere from an aluminum factory. Lichen and moss-bearing bark discs, cut out from trees in an unpolluted area, were fixed in groups of six in rectangular wooden boards. All discs were photographed in color as well as in black and white. Fifteen sites, in addition to a control site were selected in different directions from the factory. At each site two boards were fixed with nails in a vertical position at a height of 8-10 m on a tree. One board was removed after 4 months exposure and the other after 12 months. The lichens and mosses exposed in control and polluted areas were compared with respect to their color, external morphology, plasmolysis in algal cells, loss of green color, and nature of reactions towards neutral red and 2,3,5-triphenyl-2h-tetrazolium chloride (ttc), absorption spectra of chlorophyll, and fluoride concentration. Results indicate that f-pollution affects moisture balance, causes chlorophyll damage, and produces other symptoms of injury which could lead to ultimate death of these organisms.

  11. Solubility and fluoride release in ionomers and compomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertacchini, S M; Abate, P F; Blank, A; Baglieto, M F; Macchi, R L

    1999-03-01

    The degree of solubility and the fluoride release of glass-ionomer cements and "compomers" were determined as a function of time. Three conventional glass-ionomer cements, three hybrid ionomers, and two compomers were included in the study. Disk-shaped specimens were prepared and immersed in a lactic acid solution. Solubility was evaluated from determinations of loss of mass as a function of time. To evaluate fluoride release, similar specimens were immersed in 50 mL of deionized water to which 50 mL of buffer solution was added. A fluoride ion detector was used to read the concentration of fluoride ion in the overall solution at different times after immersion. Material and time factors had a significant influence on results. The compomers showed less corrosion and fluoride release than the ionomers. Some correlation was found between solubility and fluoride leakage values. Components of both the ionomers and compomers that were studied can dissolve in water. The materials leak fluoride ions in amounts that differ according to the characteristics of the individual products.

  12. Geogenic fluoride and arsenic contamination in the groundwater environments in Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Prosun; Lesafi, Fina; Filemon, Regina; Ligate, Fanuel; Ijumulana, Julian; Mtalo, Felix

    2016-04-01

    Adequate, safe and accessible drinking water is an important aspect to human health worldwide. Understanding this importance, the Tanzanian Government has initiated a number of programmes to ensure access to high quality water by the citizens. However, elevated concentration of geochemical pollutants in many drinking water sources pose a serious challenge to water suppliers and users in the country. Fluoride is a widespread drinking water contaminant of geogenic origin occuring in both surface- and groundwater around volcanic mountains and many parts within the East African Rift Valley in regions including Arusha (10 mg/L), Shinyanga (2.9 mg/L) and Singida (1.8 mg/L). An estimated 90% of the population living along the Rift Valley region are affected by dental or skeletal fluorosis and bone crippling because of long term exposure to very high levels of fluoride in drinking water sources. In the mining areas within Lake Victoria basin, groundwater wit elevated concentrations of arsenic has been discovered over an extended area. Most of these geochemical and naturally occurring drinking water pollutants are patchy with uncertainities in their spatial and temporal distribution patterns. The adverse health effects of skin disorder and cancer due to an elevated As concentration are reported from the North Mara gold and Geita mining areas in the Lake Victoria basin. About 30% of the water sources used for drinking in Tanzania exceed the WHO guideline values of fluoride (1.5 mg/L) and arsenic (10 μg/L). There is a scarcity of baseline information on the water quality data especially on geogenic contaminants in the groundwater and surface water as potable sources. This information is crucial in exploring sources of safe drinking water aquifers, associated human health risks of fluoride and arsenic pollution. using Laboratory based studies during the past two decades have shown promising results on the removal of fluoride and arsenic using locally available adsorbent

  13. Effects of water treatment processes used at waterworks on natural radionuclide concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haemaelaeinen, K.; Vesterbacka, P.; Maekelaeinen, I.; Arvela, H.

    2004-08-01

    The occurrence of uranium and other natural radionuclides in waters of waterworks and the effects of the conventional water treatment processes on radionuclide concentrations were investigated. Water samples were collected from 17 waterworks. Radionuclide concentrations of the collected samples were compared to the currently valid concentrations according to the Finnish regulation, ST guide 12.3. Similarly the measured concentrations were compared to the values presented in the 98/83/EC directive and in the Commission recommendation, 2001/928/Euratom. The guidelines based on chemical toxicity of uranium were also considered. This report presents a summary of the radionuclide concentrations in waters distributed by waterworks. Short-term and logn-term temporal variation of radionuclide levels in raw water were also investigated. Waterworks selected to this study used different kinds of raw water sources and a variety of water treatment processes. Water samples were collected from 46 water catchments which used groundwater in soil, artificial groundwater or groundwater in bedrock as a source of raw water. The most common water treatment used in these catchments was alkalization. Other treatment processes used were various types of filtrations (sand, anthracite, slow sand and membrane filtration) and aeration. Four of the catchments distributed water without treatment. Sampling was carried out in co-operation with local health inspectors and waterworks staff in spring 2002. Later that autumn, monitoring samples were collected from eight catchments. The maximum value for radon, presented in ST guide 12.3, was exceeded in three water catchments that used groundwater in bedrock as a source of raw water. No exceedings were found in those water catchments that use groundwater in soil or artificial groundwater. The limits of uranium and radium calculated from the total indicative dose (98/83/EC) were not exceeded but the guidelines for lead and polonium, given in the

  14. Fluoride concentration in water at the area supplied by the Water Treatment Station of Bauru, SP Concentração de fluoreto na água do setor abastecido pela Estação de Tratamento de Água de Bauru, SP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Simonetti Lodi

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to analyze the fluoride concentration in the public water supply at the area supplied by the Water Treatment Station of Bauru and classify the samples as acceptable or unacceptable according to the fluoride concentration. MATERIAL AND METHODS: samples were collected from 30 areas at two periods, October 2002 and March 2003. The fluoride concentration in the samples was determined in duplicate, using an ion sensitive electrode (Orion 9609 connected to a potentiometer (Procyon, model 720. Samples with fluoride concentration ranging from 0.55 to 0.84 mg F/L were considered acceptable, and those whose concentration was outside this range as unacceptable. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics. RESULTS: the fluoride concentration of the water samples varied between 0.31 and 2.01 mg F/L. Nearly 56% of the samples were classified as acceptable. CONCLUSION: the variations in fluoride concentration at the area supplied by the Water Treatment Station reinforce the need of constant monitoring for maintenance of adequate fluoride levels in the public water supply.OBJETIVO: Analisar a concentração de fluoreto da água de abastecimento público do setor abastecido pela Estação de Tratamento de Água de Bauru e classificar as amostras em aceitáveis ou inaceitáveis de acordo com a concentração de flúor. MATERIAL E MÉTODOS: Foram coletadas 238 amostras de 30 bairros em duas etapas, Outubro de 2002 e Março de 2003. A concentração de fluoreto presente nas amostras foi determinada em duplicata, utilizando-se o eletrodo íon sensível (Orion 9609, acoplado ao potenciômetro (Procyon, modelo 720. As amostras com concentração de flúor variando entre 0,55 e 0,84 mg F/L foram consideradas como aceitáveis e aquelas cuja concentração estava fora do intervalo, como inaceitáveis. Os dados foram analisados por meio de estatística descritiva. RESULTADOS: A concentração de fluoreto das amostras de água variou entre 0,31 e 2,01 mg F

  15. Performance of novel hydroxyapatite nanowires in treatment of fluoride contaminated water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Junyong; Zhang, Kaisheng [Nano-Materials and Environmental Detection Laboratory, Institute of Intelligent Machines, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Department of Chemistry, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Wu, Shibiao [Nano-Materials and Environmental Detection Laboratory, Institute of Intelligent Machines, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Cai, Xingguo; Chen, Kai; Li, Yulian [Nano-Materials and Environmental Detection Laboratory, Institute of Intelligent Machines, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Department of Chemistry, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Sun, Bai; Jia, Yong; Meng, Fanli; Jin, Zhen [Nano-Materials and Environmental Detection Laboratory, Institute of Intelligent Machines, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Kong, Lingtao, E-mail: ltkong@iim.ac.cn [Nano-Materials and Environmental Detection Laboratory, Institute of Intelligent Machines, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Liu, Jinhuai [Nano-Materials and Environmental Detection Laboratory, Institute of Intelligent Machines, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2016-02-13

    Highlights: • Novel ultralong hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanowires were developed for effective defluoridation. • High fluoride adsorption capacity, 40.65 mg/g at neutral pH. • The HAP nanowire membrane efficiently removed fluoride by dynamic adsorption. • The membrane could remove more than 98% fluoride, and filtered water amount reached 350 L/m{sup 2}. - Abstract: Novel ultralong hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanowires were successfully prepared for fluoride removal for the first time. The fluoride adsorption on the HAP nanowires was studied on a batch mode. The results revealed that the adsorption data could be well described by the Freundlich model, and the adsorption kinetic followed the pseudo-second-order model. The maximum of adsorption capacity was 40.65 mg/g at pH 7.0 when the fluoride concentration is 200 mg/L. The thermodynamic parameters suggested that the adsorption of fluoride was a spontaneous endothermic process. The FT-IR, XPS and Zeta potential analysis revealed that both anion exchange and electrostatic interactions were involved in the adsorption of fluoride. Furthermore, the HAP nanowires were made into HAP membrane through a simple process of suction filtration. Membrane filtration experiments revealed that the fluoride removal capabilities depended on the membrane thickness, flow rate and initial concentration of fluoride. The as-prepared membrane could remove fluoride efficiently through continues filtration. The filtered water amount could reach 350, 192, and 64 L/m{sup 2} when the fluoride concentrations were 4, 5 and 8 ppm, respectively, using the HAP membrane with only 150 μm thickness. The as-synthesized ultralong HAP nanowires were thus demonstrated to be very effective and biocompatible adsorbents for fluoride removal from contaminated water.

  16. Industrial fluoride pollution: chronic fluoride poisoning in Cornwall Island cattle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krook, L.; Maylin, G.A.

    1979-04-01

    An aluminum plant on the south bank of the St. Lawrence River, southwest of Cornwall Island, Ontario, Canada, has emitted 0.816 metric tons of fluoride daily since 1973. Considerably higher amounts were emitted from 1959 to 1973. The plant was designated as the major source of fluoride emissions impacting on Cornwall Island. Cattle located on this island showed signs of chronic fluoride poisoning. This poisoning was manifested clinically by stunted growth and dental fluorosis to a degree of severe interference with drinking and mastication. This Cornwall Island herds study indicates that the established tolerance level of fluoride for performance of dairy and beef cattle is not valid since the tolerance level was set based on experiments with healthy calves which were exposed to dietary fluoride from 3 to 4 months of age and not on cattle which were chronically exposed to fluoride from conception to death. 56 references.

  17. Determination of the stability constants of a number of metal fluoride complexes and their rates of formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammer, R.R.

    1979-08-01

    The stability constants of the fluoride complexes of Al +3 , H 3 BO 3 , Cr +3 , Cr +6 , Fe +3 , Gd +3 , Nb +5 , UO 2 +2 , and Zr +4 were determined in 0.96 and 2.88 M HNO 3 solutions in the temperature range 25 to 60 0 C with a fluoride specific ion electrode. These data can be used to calculate the concentration of chemical species in solution and will be used to correlate solution properties with solution composition. The solubilities of some fluoride precipitates were also measured in nitric acid solutions. The rates of formation of the fluoborates, aluminum fluoride, and zirconium fluoride complexes were measured with a fluoride specific ion electrode at 25, 35, and 45 0 C. The rates of formation of all complexes, except BF 4 - , AlF +2 , and a fluoride complex with aluminum containing more than three fluorides associated with it, were too fast to measure with the instrumentation used

  18. Assessment of natural radioactivity concentrations and gamma dose levels around Shorapur, Karnataka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajesh, S.; Avinash, P.; Kerur, B. R., E-mail: kerurpbk@rediffmail.com.com [Department of Physics, Gulbarga University Kalaburagi – 585 106 India (India); Anilkumar, S. [Radiation Safety Systems Division, BARC, Mumbai - 400 085 (India)

    2015-08-28

    This study assesses the level of background radiation around Shorapur. The study region locates the western part of the Yadgir district of Karnataka. Shorapur and Shahapur talukas are mostly composed of clay, shale sandstone, granite rock and part of study area is black soil. Thirty sample locations were selected along the length and breadth of Shorapur and Shahapur taluka. Natural radionuclide activity concentrations in soil samples were determined using 4'X4' NaI (Tl) gamma spectroscopy. Outdoor gamma dose measurements in air at 1 m above ground level were determined using Rad Eye PRD survey meter. Estimated dose values are compared with the survey meter values and found to be good agreement between them and also with the data obtained from different other areas of Karnataka and India. The average values were found to be slightly higher in the present investigation.

  19. Tissue distributions of fluoride and its toxicity in the gills of a freshwater teleost, Cyprinus carpio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jinling; Chen, Jianjie; Wang, Jundong; Wu, Xiangtian; Li, Yundong; Xie, Lingtian

    2013-04-15

    Fish take up fluoride directly from water and are susceptible to fluoride contamination of their environment. In this study, we examined the tissue distributions of fluoride and its toxicity in the gills of the common carp (Cyprinus carpio) chronically exposed to fluoride. Carp were exposed to a range of aqueous fluoride (35-124 mg/L) and sampled at 30, 60 and 90 days. The accumulation of fluoride in the tissues increased with the level and duration of exposure. Steady state was not achieved under the experimental conditions. The gills accumulated the highest levels of fluoride followed by the liver>brain>kidney>muscle>intestine. A dose-dependent inhibition was observed for the enzyme activities of Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase and Ca(2+)-ATPase in the gills after the fish were exposed for 90 days. Also, accumulation of fluoride was associated with the inhibition of superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities and a dose-dependent stimulation of malondialdehyde (MDA) levels in the gill tissues, suggesting that fluoride promoted oxidative stress in the fish. Microscopic examinations revealed injuries to gill tissues and chloride cells, with the severity of injury increasing with exposure concentration. These results suggest that chronic exposure to elevated concentrations of fluoride may induce toxicity in the common carp. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Modelling of fluoride removal via batch monopolar electrocoagulation process using aluminium electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amri, N.; Hashim, M. I.; Ismail, N.; Rohman, F. S.; Bashah, N. A. A.

    2017-09-01

    Electrocoagulation (EC) is a promising technology that extensively used to remove fluoride ions efficiently from industrial wastewater. However, it has received very little consideration and understanding on mechanism and factors that affecting the fluoride removal process. In order to determine the efficiency of fluoride removal in EC process, the effect of operating parameters such as voltage and electrolysis time were investigated in this study. A batch experiment with monopolar aluminium electrodes was conducted to identify the model of fluoride removal using empirical model equation. The EC process was investigated using several parameters which include voltage (3 - 12 V) and electrolysis time (0 - 60 minutes) at a constant initial fluoride concentration of 25 mg/L. The result shows that the fluoride removal efficiency increased steadily with increasing voltage and electrolysis time. The best fluoride removal efficiency was obtained with 94.8 % removal at 25 mg/L initial fluoride concentration, voltage of 12 V and 60 minutes electrolysis time. The results indicated that the rate constant, k and number of order, n decreased as the voltage increased. The rate of fluoride removal model was developed based on the empirical model equation using the correlation of k and n. Overall, the result showed that EC process can be considered as a potential alternative technology for fluoride removal in wastewater.

  1. Sustainable approach for recycling waste lamb and chicken bones for fluoride removal from water followed by reusing fluoride-bearing waste in concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Zainab Z; AbdelKareem, Hala N

    2015-11-01

    Sustainable management of waste materials is an attractive approach for modern societies. In this study, recycling of raw waste lamb and chicken bones for defluoridation of water has been estimated. The effects of several experimental parameters including contact time, pH, bone dose, fluoride initial concentration, bone grains size, agitation rate, and the effect of co-existing anions in actual samples of wastewater were studied for fluoride removal from aqueous solutions. Results indicated excellent fluoride removal efficiency up to 99.4% and 99.8% using lamb and chicken bones, respectively at fluoride initial concentration of 10 mg F/L and 120 min contact time. Maximum fluoride uptake was obtained at neutral pH range 6-7. Fluoride removal kinetic was well described by the pseudo-second order kinetic model. Both, Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models could fit the experimental data well with correlation coefficient values >0.99 suggesting favorable conditions of the process. Furthermore, for complete sustainable management of waste bones, the resulted fluoride-bearing sludge was reused in concrete mixes to partially replace sand. Tests of the mechanical properties of fluoride sludge-modified concrete mixes indicated a potential environmentally friendly approach to dispose fluoride sludge in concrete and simultaneously enhance concrete properties. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Natural Elemental Concentrations and Fluxes: Their Use as Indicators of Repository Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Bill; Lind, Andy; Savage, Dave; Maul, Philip; Robinson, Peter [EnvirosQuantisci, Melton Mowbray (United Kingdom)

    2002-03-01

    The calculated post-closure performance of a radioactive waste repository is generally quantified in terms of radiological dose or risk to humans, with safety being determined by whether the calculated exposure values are consistent with predetermined target criteria which are deemed to represent acceptable radiological hazards. Despite their general acceptance, however, dose and risk are not perfect measures of repository safety because, in order to calculate them, gross assumptions must be made for future human behaviour patterns. Such predictions clearly become increasingly uncertain as forecasts are made further into the future. As a consequence, there has been a growing interest in developing other ways of assessing repository safety which do not require assumptions to be made for future human behaviour. One proposed assessment method is to use the distributions of naturally-occurring chemical species in the environment, expressed either as concentrations or fluxes of elements, radionuclides or radioactivity, as natural safety indicators which may be compared with the PA predictions of repository releases. Numerous comparisons are possible between the repository and natural systems. The primary objective is to use the natural system to provide context to the hazard presented by the repository releases. Put simply, if it can be demonstrated that the flux to the biosphere from the repository is not significant compared with the natural flux from the geosphere, then its radiological significance should not be of great or priority concern. Natural safety indicators may be quantified on a site specific basis, using information derived from a repository site characterisation programme, and can be compared to the outputs from the associated site specific PAs. Such calculations and comparisons may be very detailed and might examine, for example, the spatial and temporal variations in the distributions and fluxes of naturally-occurring chemical species arising from

  3. A new scheme for biomonitoring heavy metal concentrations in semi-natural wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batzias, A F; Siontorou, C G

    2008-10-30

    This work introduces a semi-natural wetland biomonitoring framework for heavy metal concentrations based on a robust dynamic integration between biological assemblages and relevant biosensors. The cooperative/synergistic scheme developed minimizes uncertainty and monitoring costs and increases reliability of pollution control and abatement. Attention is given to establishing a fully functioning and reliable network approach for monitoring inflows and achieving dose-response relations and calibration of biomonitoring species. The biomonitoring network initially consists of both, biosensors and species, as a validation phase in each wetland of the surveillance area; once the species monitoring efficiency is verified by the biosensors, the biosensor network moves to the next wetland and so on, following a circular pattern until all area wetlands have a fully functional natural monitoring scheme. By means of species recalibration with periodic revisiting of the biosensors, the scheme progressively reaches a quasi steady-state (including seasonality), thus ensuring reliability and robustness. This framework, currently pilot-tested in Voiotia, Greece, for assessing chromium levels, has been built to cover short-, medium- and long-term monitoring requirements. The results gathered so far, support the employment of the proposed scheme in heavy metal monitoring, and, further, arise the need for volunteer involvement to achieve long-term viability.

  4. Sustainable Solution for Crude Oil and Natural Gas Separation using Concentrated Solar Power Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Piyush; Srivastava, Rakesh K.; Nath Mahendra, Som; Motahhir, Saad

    2017-08-01

    In today’s scenario to combat with climate change effects, there are a lot of reasons why we all should use renewable energy sources instead of fossil fuels. Solar energy is one of the best options based on features like good for the environment, independent of electricity prices, underutilized land, grid security, sustainable growth, etc. This concept paper is oriented primarily focused on the use of Solar Energy for the crude oil heating purpose besides other many prospective industrial applications to reduce cost, carbon footprint and moving towards a sustainable and ecologically friendly Oil & Gas Industry. Concentrated Solar Power technology based prototype system is proposed to substitute the presently used system based on natural gas burning method. The hybrid system which utilizes the solar energy in the oil and gas industry would strengthen the overall field working conditions, safety measures and environmental ecology. 40% reduction on natural gas with this hybrid system is estimated. A positive implication for an environment, working conditions and safety precautions is the additive advantage. There could also decrease air venting of CO2, CH4 and N2O by an average of 30-35%.

  5. Natural depuration rate and concentration of cesium-137 radionuclide in black SEA macro algae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topcuoglu, S.; Kuecuekcezzar, R.; Kut, D.; Esen, N.; Gueven, K.C.

    1996-01-01

    Cesium-137 concentrations in red, brown and green algae have been studied for the calculation of natural depuration rates. The algae species were collected from the same population of the Black Sea stations during the period of 1986-1995. The natural depuration rates are estimated as biological half-lives. The pattern of depuration results represented by a single component for each algae division. The biological half-lives of 137 Cs in red (Phyllophora nervosa), green (Chaetomorpha linum) and brown (cystoceira barbata) algae are estimated to be 18.5, 21.6 and 29.3 months, respectively. 137 Cs and 40 K activity levels and their ratios in algae species in two stations in Black Sea region of Turkey have been determined during the period of 1990-1995. The results showed that the Sinop region was more contaminated than the Sile region on the Black Sea coast of Turkey from the Chernobyl accident. (author). 10 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  6. Trace elements release from volcanic ash to seawater. Natural concentrations in Central Mediterranean sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randazzo, L. A.; Censi, P.; Saiano, F.; Zuddas, P.; Aricò, P.; Mazzola, S.

    2009-04-01

    Distributions and concentrations of many minor and trace elements in epicontinental basins, as Mediterranean Sea, are mainly driven to atmospheric fallout from surroundings. This mechanism supplies an estimated yearly flux of about 1000 kg km-2 of terrigenous matter of different nature on the whole Mediterranean basin. Dissolution of these materials and processes occurring at solid-liquid interface along the water column drive the distributions of many trace elements as V, Cr, Mn, Co, Cu, and Pb with contents ranging from pmol l-1 (Co, Cd, Pb) to nmol l-1 scale in Mediterranean seawater, with some local differences in the basin. The unwinding of an oceanographic cruise in the coastal waters of Ionian Sea during the Etna's eruptive activity in summer 2001 led to the almost unique chance to test the effects of large delivery of volcanic ash to a coastal sea water system through the analyses of distribution of selected trace elements along several seawater columns. The collection of these waters and their analyses about V, Cr, Mn, Co, Cu, and Pb contents evidenced trace element concentrations were always higher (about 1 order of magnitude at least) than those measured concentrations in the recent past in Mediterranean seawater, apart from Pb. Progressive increase of concentrations of some elements with depth, sometimes changing in a "conservative" behaviour without any clear reason and the observed higher concentrations required an investigation about interaction processes occurring at solid-liquid interface between volcanic ash and seawater along water columns. This investigation involving kinetic evaluation of trace element leaching to seawater, was carried out during a 6 months time period under laboratory conditions. X-ray investigations, SEM-EDS observations and analyses on freshly-erupted volcanic ash evidenced formation of alteration clay minerals onto glass fraction surfaces. Chemical analyses carried out on coexisting liquid phase demonstrated that trace

  7. CFD Calculation of Internal Natural Convection in the Annulus between Horizontal Concentric Cylinders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, N.D. Jr.; Itamura, M.T.; Webb, S.W.; James, D.L.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this heat transfer and fluid flow study is to assess the ability of a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code to reproduce the experimental results, numerical simulation results, and heat transfer correlation equations developed in the literature for natural convection heat transfer within the annulus of horizontal concentric cylinders. In the literature, a variety of heat transfer expressions have been developed to compute average equivalent thermal conductivities. However, the expressions have been primarily developed for very small inner and outer cylinder radii and gap-widths. In this comparative study, interest is primarily focused on large gap widths (on the order of half meter or greater) and large radius ratios. From the steady-state CFD analysis it is found that the concentric cylinder models for the larger geometries compare favorably to the results of the Kuehn and Goldstein correlations in the Rayleigh number range of about 10 5 to 10 8 (a range that encompasses the laminar to turbulent transition). For Rayleigh numbers greater than 10 8 , both numerical simulations and experimental data (from the literature) are consistent and result in slightly lower equivalent thermal conductivities than those obtained from the Kuehn and Goldstein correlations

  8. Natural radioelement concentrations in the soil of the Mila region of Algeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramki, Amina; Ramdhane, Mourad; Benrachi, Fatima

    2017-09-01

    In this study, the levels of the natural and artificial radioactivity in soil samples collected at various depths from Algerian agricultural region El-Athmania Mila was measured. Activity concentrations of the concerned radionuclides were determined by gamma-ray spectrometry using a high-purity germanium detector. The activity concentrations of 226Ra, 232Th and 40K were found unchanged as a function of depth and ranged from 23.72±2.37to 65.47±5.06 Bq.kg-1 for 226Ra, from 26.45±0.78 to 27.10±0.80 Bq.kg-1 for 232Th and from 220.80±10.01 to 260.70±8.24 Bq.kg-1 for 40K respectively. To evaluate the radiological hazard of radioactivity in samples, the radium equivalent activity (Raeq), the absorbed dose rate (D), the annual effective dose and the external (Hex) and internal hazard indices (Hin) were calculated. The mean of the excess lifetime cancer risk observed in this study are under the world's mean values.

  9. The concentration of natural radionuclides in various types of building materials in Slovakia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabanekova, H [Inst. of Peventive and Clinical Medicine, Bratislava (Slovakia)

    1996-12-31

    The concentration of the natural radionuclides in various types of building materials was determined by the gamma spectrometry analysis using 130 cm{sup 3} high purity germanium detector and MCA LIVIUS 2000. Radium-226 and thorium-232 was assessed through their progeny photo peaks. The specific activity of both nuclides as weighted average of their photo peaks was determined. Potassium-40 was measured directly via its 1460 keV peak. The radium equivalent activity was calculate from specific activities of radium-226, thorium-232 and potassium-40. All samples were measured in 4{sup p}i{sup g}eometry. The building materials and products were milled and screened with 2-3 mm sieve. After drying the samples were stored in 450 cm{sup 3} sealed polyethylene container for 30 days ingrowing period. The results of analysis are corrected to the background distribution and to the self absorption in the volume of the samples. The efficiency calibration is realized using the reference sources distributed by IAEA in Vienna and by the Institute for Radionuclide Production in Prague The measured activity concentrations of the buildings materials are given. There are shown the minimum and maximum values for different investigated materials. (J.K.) 4 tabs., 5 refs.

  10. Monitoring of fluoride in water samples using a smartphone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levin, Saurabh [Akvo Foundation (Netherlands); Krishnan, Sunderrajan [INREM Foundation (India); Rajkumar, Samuel; Halery, Nischal; Balkunde, Pradeep [Akvo Foundation (Netherlands)

    2016-05-01

    In several parts of India, groundwater is the only reliable, year round source for drinking water. Prevention of fluorosis, a chronic disease resulting from excess intake of fluoride, requires the screening of all groundwater sources for fluoride in endemic areas. In this paper, the authors present a field deployable colorimetric analyzer based on an inexpensive smartphone embedded with digital camera for taking photograph of the colored solution as well as an easy-fit, and compact sample chamber (Akvo Caddisfly). Phones marketed by different smartphone makers were used. Commercially available zirconium xylenol orange reagent was used for determining fluoride concentration. A software program was developed to use with the phone for recording and analyzing the RGB color of the picture. Linear range for fluoride estimation was 0–2 mg l{sup −1}. Around 200 samples, which consisted of laboratory prepared as well as field samples collected from different locations in Karnataka, India, were tested with Akvo Caddisfly. The results showed a significant positive correlation between Ion Selective Electrode (ISE) method and Akvo Caddisfly (Phones A, B and C), with correlation coefficient ranging between 0.9952 and 1.000. In addition, there was no significant difference in the mean fluoride content values between ISE and Phone B and C except for Phone A. Thus the smartphone method is economical and suited for groundwater fluoride analysis in the field. - Highlights: • Fluoride is an inorganic pollutant in ground water, affecting human health. • A colorimetric method for measurement of fluoride in drinking water with smartphone • Measurement is by mixing water with zirconyl xylenol orange complex reagent. • Results are comparable with laboratory-based ion selective fluoride electrode method.

  11. Monitoring of fluoride in water samples using a smartphone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, Saurabh; Krishnan, Sunderrajan; Rajkumar, Samuel; Halery, Nischal; Balkunde, Pradeep

    2016-01-01

    In several parts of India, groundwater is the only reliable, year round source for drinking water. Prevention of fluorosis, a chronic disease resulting from excess intake of fluoride, requires the screening of all groundwater sources for fluoride in endemic areas. In this paper, the authors present a field deployable colorimetric analyzer based on an inexpensive smartphone embedded with digital camera for taking photograph of the colored solution as well as an easy-fit, and compact sample chamber (Akvo Caddisfly). Phones marketed by different smartphone makers were used. Commercially available zirconium xylenol orange reagent was used for determining fluoride concentration. A software program was developed to use with the phone for recording and analyzing the RGB color of the picture. Linear range for fluoride estimation was 0–2 mg l"−"1. Around 200 samples, which consisted of laboratory prepared as well as field samples collected from different locations in Karnataka, India, were tested with Akvo Caddisfly. The results showed a significant positive correlation between Ion Selective Electrode (ISE) method and Akvo Caddisfly (Phones A, B and C), with correlation coefficient ranging between 0.9952 and 1.000. In addition, there was no significant difference in the mean fluoride content values between ISE and Phone B and C except for Phone A. Thus the smartphone method is economical and suited for groundwater fluoride analysis in the field. - Highlights: • Fluoride is an inorganic pollutant in ground water, affecting human health. • A colorimetric method for measurement of fluoride in drinking water with smartphone • Measurement is by mixing water with zirconyl xylenol orange complex reagent. • Results are comparable with laboratory-based ion selective fluoride electrode method.

  12. Physiology and toxicity of fluoride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhar Vineet

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluoride has been described as an essential element needed for normal development and growth of animals and extremely useful for human beings. Fluoride is abundant in the environment and the main source of fluoride to humans is drinking water. It has been proved to be beneficial in recommended doses, and at the same time its toxicity at higher levels has also been well established. Fluoride gets accumulated in hard tissues of the body and has been know to play an important role in mineralization of bone and teeth. At high levels it has been known to cause dental and skeletal fluorosis. There are suggested effects of very high levels of fluoride on various body organs and genetic material. The purpose of this paper is to review the various aspects of fluoride and its importance in human life.

  13. Physiology and toxicity of fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Vineet; Bhatnagar, Maheep

    2009-01-01

    Fluoride has been described as an essential element needed for normal development and growth of animals and extremely useful for human beings. Fluoride is abundant in the environment and the main source of fluoride to humans is drinking water. It has been proved to be beneficial in recommended doses, and at the same time its toxicity at higher levels has also been well established. Fluoride gets accumulated in hard tissues of the body and has been know to play an important role in mineralization of bone and teeth. At high levels it has been known to cause dental and skeletal fluorosis. There are suggested effects of very high levels of fluoride on various body organs and genetic material. The purpose of this paper is to review the various aspects of fluoride and its importance in human life.

  14. IMPACT OF FLUORIDE ON DENTAL HEALTH QUALITY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medjedovic, Eida; Medjedovic, Senad; Deljo, Dervis; Sukalo, Aziz

    2015-12-01

    Fluoride is natural element that strengthens teeth and prevents their decay. Experts believe that the best way to prevent cavities is the use of fluoride from multiple sources. Studies even show that in some cases, fluoride can stop already started damage of the teeth. In children younger than 6 years fluoride is incorporated into the enamel of permanent teeth, making the teeth more resistant to the action of bacterial and acids in food. The aim of this study is to determine the effects of improving the health status of teeth after six months treatment with the use of topical fluoridation 0.5% NaF, and the level and quality of the impact of treatment with chemical 0.5% NaF on the dental health of children at age from 8 to 15 years, in relation to gender and chronological age. This study included school children aged 8 to 15 years who visited health and dental services dependent in Mostar. It is obvious that after the implementation of treatment with 5% NaF by the method of topical fluoridation, health status of subjects from the experimental group significantly improved, so that at the final review 89.71% or 61 subjects of the experimental group had healthy (cured teeth), tooth with dental caries only 5.88% or 4 respondents tooth with dental caries and filling 4.41% or 3 respondents, extracted baby tooth 14.71% or 10 respondents, while for 13.24% of respondents was identified state with still unerupted teeth. Our findings are indirectly confirmed that the six-month treatment of fluoridation with 5% NaF, contributed to statistically significant improvement in overall oral health of the experimental group compared to the control group which was not treated by any dental treatment. It can be concluded that there is a statistically significant difference in the evaluated parameters of oral health of children in the control group compared to the studied parameters of oral health the experimental group of children at the final dental examination.

  15. An investigation of the pathophysiological mechanisms of hydrofluoric acid intoxication in rats and pigs. Interim report concerning the results of phase 2.1: The effect of sodium fluoride infusion on the plasma concentrations of lactate and magnesium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boink ABTJ; de Wildt DJ; de Jong Y; de Groot G; Vaessen HAMG; Meulenbelt J; van Dijk A; Vosmeer H

    1990-01-01

    From a previous study it was concluded that intravenous infusion of sodium fluoride (NaF) in rats is a suitable model to study the toxicity of hydrofluoric acid. In this supplementary study we investigated the effect of intravenous infusion of a high and low dose of NaF (120 and 25 mg.kg -1.hr

  16. Magnesium fluoride recovery method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, R.L.; McKenzie, D.E.

    1989-01-01

    A method of obtaining magnesium fluoride substantially free from radioactive uranium from a slag formed in the production of metallic uranium by the reduction of depleted uranium tetrafluoride with metallic magnesium in a retort wherein the slag contains the free metals magnesium and uranium and also oxides and fluorides of the metals. The slag having a radioactivity level of at least about 7,000 rhoCi/gm. The method comprises the steps of: grinding the slag to a median particle size of about 200 microns; contacting the ground slag in a reaction zone with an acid having a strength of from about 0.5 to 1.5 N for a time of from about 4 to about 20 hours in the presence of a catalytic amount of iron; removing the liquid product; treating the particulate solid product; repeating the last two steps at least one more time to produce a solid residue consisting essentially of magnesium fluoride substantially free of uranium and having a residual radioactivity level of less than about 1000 rhoCi/gm

  17. Exposure to Fluoride in Smelter Workers in a Primary Aluminum Industry in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AK Susheela

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fluoride is used increasingly in a variety of industries in India. Emission of fluoride dust and fumes from the smelters of primary aluminum producing industries is dissipated in the work environment and poses occupational health hazards. Objective: To study the prevalence of health complaints and its association with fluoride level in body fluids of smelter workers in a primary aluminum producing industry. Methods: In an aluminum industry, health status of 462 smelter workers, 60 supervisors working in the smelter unit, 62 non-smelter workers (control group 1 and 30 administration staff (control group 2 were assessed between 2007 and 2009. Their health complaints were recorded and categorized into 4 groups: 1 gastro-intestinal complaints; 2 non-skeletal manifestations; 3 skeletal symptoms; and (4 respiratory problems. Fluoride level in body fluids, nails, and drinking water was tested by an ion selective electrode; hemoglobin level was tested using HemoCue. Results: The total complaints reported by study groups were significantly higher than the control groups. Smelter workers had a significantly (p<0.001 higher urinary and serum fluoride level than non-smelter workers; the nail fluoride content was also higher in smelter workers than non-smelter workers (p<0.001. The smelter workers with higher hemoglobin level had a significantly (p<0.001 lower urinary fluoride concentration and complained less frequently of health problems. Only 1.4% of the smelter workers were consuming water with high fluoride concentrations. A high percentage of participants was using substances with high fluoride contents. Conclusions: Industrial emission of fluoride is not the only important sources of fluoride exposure—consumption of substance with high levels of fluoride is another important route of entry of fluoride into the body. Measurement of hemoglobin provides a reliable indicator for monitoring the health status of employees at risk of fluorosis.

  18. Distribution of naturally occurring radionuclides activity concentration in East Malaysian marine sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yii, M.W. [Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia), Bangi, 43000 Kajang (Malaysia)], E-mail: yii@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my; Zaharudin, A.; Abdul-Kadir, I. [Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia), Bangi, 43000 Kajang (Malaysia)

    2009-04-15

    Studies of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) distribution of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra and {sup 40}K in East Malaysia were carried out as part of a marine coastal environment project. The results of measurements will serve as baseline data and background reference level for Malaysia coastlines. Sediments from 21 coastal locations and 10 near shore locations were collected for analyses. The samples were dried, finely ground, sealed in a container and stored for a minimum of 30 days to establish secular equilibrium between {sup 226}Ra and {sup 228}Ra and their respective radioactive progenies. They were counted using a high-purity germanium (HPGe) spectrometer covering the respective progeny energy peak. For {sup 40}K, the presence of this was measured directly via its 1460 keV energy peak. The concentration of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra and {sup 40}K in samples obtained from coastal Sarawak ranged between 23 and 41 (mean 30{+-}2) Bq/kg, 27 and 45 (mean 39{+-}4) Bq/kg and 142 and 680 (mean 462{+-}59) Bq/kg, respectively. Meanwhile, the concentration of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra and {sup 40}K for samples obtained from coastal Sabah ranged between 16 and 30 (mean 23{+-}2) Bq/kg, 23 and 45 (mean 35{+-}4) Bq/kg and 402 and 842 (mean 577{+-}75) Bq/kg, respectively. For the Sarawak near shore stations, the concentration of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra and {sup 40}K ranged between 11 and 36 (mean 22{+-}2) Bq/kg, 21 and 65 (mean 39{+-}5) Bq/kg and 149 and 517 (mean 309{+-}41) Bq/kg, respectively. Meanwhile, the concentration of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra and {sup 40}K for samples obtained from Sabah ranged between 9 and 31 (mean 14{+-}2) Bq/kg, 10 and 48 (mean 21{+-}3) Bq/kg and 140 and 580 (mean 269{+-}36) Bq/kg, respectively. The calculated external hazard values of between 0.17 and 0.33 (less than unity) showed that there is little risk of external hazard to the workers handling the sediments.

  19. Short term serum pharmacokinetics of diammine silver fluoride after oral application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Elsa; Zegarra, Graciela; Chirinos, Edgar; Castillo, Jorge L; Taves, Donald R; Watson, Gene E; Dills, Russell; Mancl, Lloyd L; Milgrom, Peter

    2012-12-31

    There is growing interest in the use of diammine silver fluoride (DSF) as a topical agent to treat dentin hypersensitivity and dental caries as gauged by increasing published research from many parts of the world. While DSF has been available in various formulations for many years, most of its pharmacokinetic aspects within the therapeutic concentration range have never been fully characterized. This preliminary study determined the applied doses (3 teeth treated), maximum serum concentrations, and time to maximum serum concentration for fluoride and silver in 6 adults over 4 h. Fluoride was determined using the indirect diffusion method with a fluoride selective electrode, and silver was determined using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. The mean amount of DSF solution applied to the 3 teeth was 7.57 mg (6.04 μL). Over the 4 hour observation period, the mean maximum serum concentrations were 1.86 μmol/L for fluoride and 206 nmol/L for silver. These maximums were reached 3.0 h and 2.5 h for fluoride and silver, respectively. Fluoride exposure was below the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) oral reference dose. Silver exposure exceeded the EPA oral reference dose for cumulative daily exposure over a lifetime, but for occasional use was well below concentrations associated with toxicity. This preliminary study suggests that serum concentrations of fluoride and silver after topical application of DSF should pose little toxicity risk when used in adults. NCT01664871.

  20. The use of fluoride as a natural tracer in water and the relationship to geological features: Examples from the Animas River Watershed, San Juan Mountains, Silverton, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bove, D.J.; Walton-Day, K.; Kimball, B.A.

    2009-01-01

    Investigations within the Silverton caldera, in southwestern Colorado, used a combination of traditional geological mapping, alteration-assemblage mapping, and aqueous geochemical sampling that showed a relationship between geological and hydrologic features that may be used to better understand the provenance and evolution of the water. Veins containing fluorite, huebnerite, and elevated molybdenum concentrations are temporally and perhaps genetically associated with the emplacement of high-silica rhyolite intrusions. Both the rhyolites and the fluorite-bearing veins produce waters containing elevated concentrations of F-, K and Be. The identification of water samples with elevated F/Cl molar ratios (> 10) has also aided in the location of water draining F-rich sources, even after these waters have been diluted substantially. These unique aqueous geochemical signatures can be used to relate water chemistry to key geological features and mineralized source areas. Two examples that illustrate this relationship are: (1) surface-water samples containing elevated F-concentrations (> 1.8 mg/l) that closely bracket the extent of several small high-silica rhyolite intrusions; and (2) water samples containing elevated concentrations of F-(> 1.8 mg/ l) that spatially relate to mines or areas that contain late-stage fluorite/huebnerite veins. In two additional cases, the existence of high F-concentrations in water can be used to: (1) infer interaction of the water with mine waste derived from systems known to contain the fluorite/huebnerite association; and (2) relate changes in water quality over time at a high elevation mine tunnel to plugging of a lower elevation mine tunnel and the subsequent rise of the water table into mineralized areas containing fluorite/huebnerite veining. Thus, the unique geochemical signature of the water produced from fluorite veins indicates the location of high-silica rhyolites, mines, and mine waste containing the veins. Existence of high F-concentrations

  1. Physiology and toxicity of fluoride

    OpenAIRE

    Dhar Vineet; Bhatnagar Maheep

    2009-01-01

    Fluoride has been described as an essential element needed for normal development and growth of animals and extremely useful for human beings. Fluoride is abundant in the environment and the main source of fluoride to humans is drinking water. It has been proved to be beneficial in recommended doses, and at the same time its toxicity at higher levels has also been well established. Fluoride gets accumulated in hard tissues of the body and has been know to play an important role in mineralizat...

  2. Fluoride estimation and its correlation with other physicochemical parameters in drinking water of some areas of Balochistan, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandio, Tasawar Ali; Khan, Muhammad Nasiruddin; Sarwar, Anila

    2015-08-01

    The fluoride level in drinking water is an important parameter and has to be controlled in order to prevent dental and skeletal fluorosis. The objective of this study is to assess fluoride content and other water quality parameters in the samples taken from open wells, tube wells, and karezes of Mastung, Mangochar, and Pringabad areas of Balochistan province. A total number of 96 drinking water samples out of 150 were found unfit for human consumption. Area-wise analysis show that the samples from 39 sites from Mastung, 12 from Mangochar, and 13 from Pringabad were found in the risk of dental fluorosis of mild to severe nature. However, 12 sampling sites from Mastung, 8 from Mangochar, and 2 from Pringabad were identified as the risks of mottling and skeletal fluorosis or other bone abnormalities. The highest concentration of F(-) has been observed as 14 mg L(-1) in Mastung. Correlation analysis show that fluoride solubility in drinking water is pH dependent; and the salts of Ca(2+), Na(+), K(+), Cl(-), and SO4(2-) contribute to attain the favorable pH for dissolution of fluoride compounds in drinking water. Principal component analysis shows that the geochemical composition of the rocks is only responsible for groundwater contamination. On the basis of the results, defloridation of the identified sampling sites and continuous monitoring of drinking water at regular basis is recommended at government level to avoid further fluorosis risks.

  3. Terrestrial bryophytes as indicators of fluoride emission from a phosphorus plant, Long Harbour, Newfoundland, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, B.A.; Thompson, L.K.; Sidhu, S.S.

    1979-01-01

    A study of the effects of fluoride emissions (HF, SiF/sub 4/) on certain species of bryophytes was carried out in the vicinity of an industrial palnt producing elemental phosphorus at Long Harbour, Nfld. Damage symptoms varied from mild phyllid chlorosis (yellowing) to severe browning of up to 95% of the phyllids. Polytrichum commune Hedw. was the main bryophyte species used in the survey. Random collections from 45 sample sites were analysed for total fluoride. The fluoride concentrations in phyllid tissue ranged from a high of 6066 ppm (dry weight) at a distance of 1 km northeast of the emission source to 44 ppm (dry weight) 11.7 km northeast of the emission source in the direction of the prevailing wind. Control samples were obtained from similar sites in areas far removed from the industrial plant and contained, on average, 11.3 ppm (dry weight). The concentration of fluoride in the bryophyte phyllid tissue was inversely correlated with distance from the emission source, in the direction of the prevailing wind. The severity of acropetal scorching was found to be correlated with the concentration of fluoride in the bryophyte phyllid tissue, and in addition, samples high in fluoride had fewer sporophytes. Fluoride concentrations in bryophyte tissue are compared with concentrations of fluoride in the needles of balsam fir, Abies Balsamea I., in four damage zones, and also with available and total fluoride in soil humus and concentrations of fluoride in air. The total area affected by fluoride emissions was increased using bryophytes as the pollution indicator species, especially in areas far from the industrial plant.

  4. Ultrasound assisted extraction of natural dye from jackfruit's wood (Artocarpus heterophyllus): The effect of ethanol concentration as a solvent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Febriana, Ike Dayi; Gala, Selfina; Mahfud, Mahfud

    2017-05-01

    Azo dye are synthetic organic dyes which has an azo group (- N = N -) as chromophore. Azo dye is resistand to decomposition process and harmfull for the environment and human being. Natural dye can be used as substitution of azo dye at textile industry. Natural dye are eco - friendly and can be applied for dyeing of fibrous material. Natural dye can be obtained from natural origin such as leaves, wood, or roots. The wood of jackfruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus) can used as natural source of natural dye. Ultrasound assisted extraction (UAE) is a new method that can be used to extract natural dye from jackfruit's wood. The aim of this research are to study about influence of ethanol concentration as solvent and extraction kinetic. Jackfruit's wood dust from sawmill used for the experimentation were sifted by sieve 35 mesh. Ethanol 96% used as solvent of this experiment and varied the concentration in volume to volume ratio (v/v). Experiment were carried out from 20 to 50 minutes. The result of this experiment shows that ethanol concentration influenced yield of extraction from jackfruit's wood. Concentration of ethanol will be affected polarity of solvent. The Peleg model was used to describe about kinetic model of natural dye extraction. Value of k1 and k2 constant are 0.003835 and 0.04186 respectively.

  5. Concentração de fluoreto na vegetação próxima do pólo de fertilizantes de Cubatão, São Paulo, Brasil Fluoride concentration in the adjacent vegetation next to fertilizer industries of Cubatão, São Paulo State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscilla Torres Tagawa

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar se a poluição por fluoreto observada em 1996 em Cubatão (SP, utilizando a vegetação como biomarcador, teve alterações nos últimos dez anos. Folhas de Terminalia cattappa (chapéu do sol, localizadas na região das indústrias de fertilizantes e na área urbana municipal, foram coletadas em 1996 e 2006. As folhas foram desidratadas, pulverizadas e fluoreto extraído com água foi analisado com eletrodo específico. A concentração de fluoreto encontrada nas folhas das árvores localizadas ao redor do pólo de fertilizantes foi doze vezes maior do que a naquelas da área urbana, tanto em 1996 como 2006. Sugere-se que a poluição ambiental por fluoreto em Cubatão não apresentou melhoria em dez anos.The aim of this study was to evaluate if fluoride pollution found in 1996 in Cubatão, SP, Brazil, using the vegetation as biomarker, changed in the last ten years. Leaves of Terminalia cattappa located at the industrial area around the industries of fertilizers and in the urban area of the city were collected in 1996 and 2006. They were dried, powdered and fluoride water soluble extracted was analyzes with specific electrode. The fluoride concentration in the leaves around fertilizer industries was 12 times greater than that found in the urban area, either in 1996 or 2006, respectively. The data suggest that in the last ten years the environmental pollution by fluoride in Cubatão has not improved.

  6. AtHMA4 Drives Natural Variation in Leaf Zn Concentration of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zi-Ru; Kuang, Lu; Gao, Yi-Qun; Wang, Ya-Ling; Salt, David E.; Chao, Dai-Yin

    2018-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) is an essential element for plant growth and development, and Zn derived from crop plants in the diet is also important for human health. Here, we report that genetic variation in Heavy Metal-ATPase 4 (HMA4) controls natural variation in leaf Zn content. Investigation of the natural variation in leaf Zn content in a world-wide collection of 349 Arabidopsis thaliana wild collected accessions identified two accessions, Van-0 and Fab-2, which accumulate significantly lower Zn when compared with Col-0. Both quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis and bulked segregant analysis (BSA) identified HMA4 as a strong candidate accounting for this variation in leaf Zn concentration. Genetic complementation experiments confirmed this hypothesis. Sequence analysis revealed that a 1-bp deletion in the third exon of HMA4 from Fab-2 is responsible for the lose of function of HMA4 driving the low Zn observed in Fab-2. Unlike in Fab-2 polymorphisms in the promoter region were found to be responsible for the weak function of HMA4 in Van-0. This is supported by both an expression analysis of HMA4 in Van-0 and through a series of T-DNA insertion mutants which generate truncated HMA4 promoters in the Col-0 background. In addition, we also observed that Fab-2, Van-0 and the hma4-2 null mutant in the Col-0 background show enhanced resistance to a combination of high Zn and high Cd in the growth medium, raising the possibility that variation at HMA4 may play a role in environmental adaptation. PMID:29545819

  7. AtHMA4 Drives Natural Variation in Leaf Zn Concentration of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zi-Ru; Kuang, Lu; Gao, Yi-Qun; Wang, Ya-Ling; Salt, David E; Chao, Dai-Yin

    2018-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) is an essential element for plant growth and development, and Zn derived from crop plants in the diet is also important for human health. Here, we report that genetic variation in Heavy Metal-ATPase 4 ( HMA4 ) controls natural variation in leaf Zn content. Investigation of the natural variation in leaf Zn content in a world-wide collection of 349 Arabidopsis thaliana wild collected accessions identified two accessions, Van-0 and Fab-2, which accumulate significantly lower Zn when compared with Col-0. Both quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis and bulked segregant analysis (BSA) identified HMA4 as a strong candidate accounting for this variation in leaf Zn concentration. Genetic complementation experiments confirmed this hypothesis. Sequence analysis revealed that a 1-bp deletion in the third exon of HMA4 from Fab-2 is responsible for the lose of function of HMA4 driving the low Zn observed in Fab-2. Unlike in Fab-2 polymorphisms in the promoter region were found to be responsible for the weak function of HMA4 in Van-0. This is supported by both an expression analysis of HMA4 in Van-0 and through a series of T-DNA insertion mutants which generate truncated HMA4 promoters in the Col-0 background. In addition, we also observed that Fab-2, Van-0 and the hma4-2 null mutant in the Col-0 background show enhanced resistance to a combination of high Zn and high Cd in the growth medium, raising the possibility that variation at HMA4 may play a role in environmental adaptation.

  8. Rheological profiling of organogels prepared at critical gelling concentrations of natural waxes in a triacylglycerol solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ashok R; Babaahmadi, Mehrnoosh; Lesaffer, Ans; Dewettinck, Koen

    2015-05-20

    The aim of this study was to use a detailed rheological characterization to gain new insights into the gelation behavior of natural waxes. To make a comprehensive case, six natural waxes (differing in the relative proportion of chemical components: hydrocarbons, fatty alcohols, fatty acids, and wax esters) were selected as organogelators to gel high-oleic sunflower oil. Flow and dynamic rheological properties of organogels prepared at critical gelling concentrations (Cg) of waxes were studied and compared using drag (stress ramp and steady flow) and oscillatory shear (stress and frequency sweeps) tests. Although, none of the organogels satisfied the rheological definition of a "strong gel" (G″/G' (ω) ≤ 0.1), on comparing the samples, the strongest gel (highest critical stress and dynamic, apparent, and static yield stresses) was obtained not with wax containing the highest proportion of wax esters alone (sunflower wax, SFW) but with wax containing wax esters along with a higher proportion of fatty alcohols (carnauba wax, CRW) although at a comparatively higher Cg (4%wt for latter compared to 0.5%wt for former). As expected, gel formation by waxes containing a high proportion of lower melting fatty acids (berry, BW, and fruit wax, FW) required a comparatively higher Cg (6 and 7%wt, respectively), and in addition, these gels showed the lowest values for plateau elastic modulus (G'LVR) and a prominent crossover point at higher frequency. The gelation temperatures (TG'=G″) for all the studied gels were lower than room temperature, except for SFW and CRW. The yielding-type behavior of gels was evident, with most gels showing strong shear sensitivity and a weak thixotropic recovery. The rheological behavior was combined with the results of thermal analysis and microstructure studies (optical, polarized, and cryo-scanning electron microscopy) to explain the gelation properties of these waxes.

  9. Effects of soil properties on natural radio-nuclides concentration in arid environment: a case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khater, A.F.M.; Al-Sewaidan, H.A.I.; Al-Saif, A.S.; Diab, H.I.

    2008-01-01

    Soil samples were collected from an arid environment in the central region of Saudi Arabia, 28 samples from selected 14 locations in an agricultural farm. Two samples, one from cultivated land and the second from uncultivated land, of the same origin were collected from each location. This work aims at investigating the changes of soil properties due to dry-land use and its effects on naturally occurring radio-nuclides (NOR) concentration and distribution. The specific activity, in Bq/kg, of 226 Ra ( 238 U series), 228 gRa ( 232 Th series), 40 K and 137 Cs were measured using calibrated gamma-ray spectrometer. The soil physical and chemical properties [e.g. pH, EC, particle size distribution (clay, silt and sand percentages), CaCO 3 %, soluble cations (Ca, Mg, Na and K) and soluble anions (CO 3 , HCO 3 , Cl and SO 4 )] were determined. The radium equivalent activity, in Bq/kg, and absorbed dose rate one meter above the ground, in nGy/y, were calculated. Generally, there are not noticeable changes in soil properties due to agricultural activities or strong correlations between soil properties and NOR specific activities. That could be due to the sandy nature of the soil and the effects of adsorption-filtration processes on the behavior and the distribution pattern of NOR in arid environment. Therefore, the environmental impacts of different man-made activities on underground resources should be carefully considered due to the possible filtration behavior of different pollutants in dry-land environment. (author)(tk)

  10. Influence of mineralogical and heavy metal composition on natural radionuclide concentrations in the river sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suresh, G., E-mail: gsureshphy_1983@yahoo.co.in [Department of Physics Thiruvalluvar College of Engg and Tech, Ponnur hills, Vandavasi, Tamilnadu 604 505 (India); Ramasamy, V. [Department of Physics, Annamalai University, Tamilnadu (India); Meenakshisundaram, V. [Health and Safety Division, IGCAR, Kalpakkam, Tamilnadu (India); Venkatachalapathy, R. [CAS in Marine Biology, Faculty of Marine Sciences, Annamalai University, Tamilnadu (India); Ponnusamy, V. [Department of Physics, MIT Campus, Anna University Chennai, Tamilnadu (India)

    2011-10-15

    The natural radiation level has been determined for the sediment samples of the Ponnaiyar River with an aim of evaluating the radiation hazard. The mineralogical characterizations of the sediments have been carried out using the Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic technique. The relative distribution of major minerals is determined by calculating extinction coefficient. The concentration and spatial distribution of heavy metals (Pb, Cr, Cu, Zn and Ni) have been studied to understand the heavy metal contamination and its level of toxicity. To evaluate the potential toxicity, heavy metal concentrations are compared with different toxicological and geological reference values. The comparison results suggest that the present metals create an adverse effect on the aquatic ecosystems associated with this river. To assess the sediment contamination due to the studied heavy metals, the Pollution Load Index (PLI) is calculated. Multivariate Statistical analyses (Pearson Correlation, Cluster and Factor analysis) were carried out between the parameters obtained from radioactivity, mineralogical and geochemical analysis to know the existing relations. Obtained results showed that the effect of mineralogy on level of radioactivity should be significant. However, mineralogy effect on heavy metal composition in the sediments should be limited, indicating that other factors such as vicinity of the pollution sources are more important. Also, the influence of mineralogical characterization on level of radioactivity is significant, whereas the influence of the heavy metal composition on level of radioactivity should be limited. - Highlights: >Sediments radioactivity, mineralogical and heavy metal characterization have been analyzed. > Absorbed dose rate, PLI and kaolinite increase towards the river mouth. > Influence of minerals and heavy metals on level of radioactivity is assessed.

  11. Influence of mineralogical and heavy metal composition on natural radionuclide concentrations in the river sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suresh, G.; Ramasamy, V.; Meenakshisundaram, V.; Venkatachalapathy, R.; Ponnusamy, V.

    2011-01-01

    The natural radiation level has been determined for the sediment samples of the Ponnaiyar River with an aim of evaluating the radiation hazard. The mineralogical characterizations of the sediments have been carried out using the Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic technique. The relative distribution of major minerals is determined by calculating extinction coefficient. The concentration and spatial distribution of heavy metals (Pb, Cr, Cu, Zn and Ni) have been studied to understand the heavy metal contamination and its level of toxicity. To evaluate the potential toxicity, heavy metal concentrations are compared with different toxicological and geological reference values. The comparison results suggest that the present metals create an adverse effect on the aquatic ecosystems associated with this river. To assess the sediment contamination due to the studied heavy metals, the Pollution Load Index (PLI) is calculated. Multivariate Statistical analyses (Pearson Correlation, Cluster and Factor analysis) were carried out between the parameters obtained from radioactivity, mineralogical and geochemical analysis to know the existing relations. Obtained results showed that the effect of mineralogy on level of radioactivity should be significant. However, mineralogy effect on heavy metal composition in the sediments should be limited, indicating that other factors such as vicinity of the pollution sources are more important. Also, the influence of mineralogical characterization on level of radioactivity is significant, whereas the influence of the heavy metal composition on level of radioactivity should be limited. - Highlights: →Sediments radioactivity, mineralogical and heavy metal characterization have been analyzed. → Absorbed dose rate, PLI and kaolinite increase towards the river mouth. → Influence of minerals and heavy metals on level of radioactivity is assessed.

  12. Fluoride in weathered rock aquifers of southern India: Managed Aquifer Recharge for mitigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brindha, K; Jagadeshan, G; Kalpana, L; Elango, L

    2016-05-01

    Climatic condition, geology, and geochemical processes in an area play a major role on groundwater quality. Impact of these on the fluoride content of groundwater was studied in three regions-part of Nalgonda district in Telangana, Pambar River basin, and Vaniyar River basin in Tamil Nadu, southern India, which experience semi-arid climate and are predominantly made of Precambrian rocks. High concentration of fluoride in groundwater above 4 mg/l was recorded. Human exposure dose for fluoride through groundwater was higher in Nalgonda than the other areas. With evaporation and rainfall being one of the major contributors for high fluoride apart from the weathering of fluoride rich minerals from rocks, the effect of increase in groundwater level on fluoride concentration was studied. This study reveals that groundwater in shallow environment of all three regions shows dilution effect due to rainfall recharge. Suitable managed aquifer recharge (MAR) methods can be adopted to dilute the fluoride rich groundwater in such regions which is explained with two case studies. However, in deep groundwater, increase in fluoride concentration with increase in groundwater level due to leaching of fluoride rich salts from the unsaturated zone was observed. Occurrence of fluoride above 1.5 mg/l was more in areas with deeper groundwater environment. Hence, practicing MAR in these regions will increase the fluoride content in groundwater and so physical or chemical treatment has to be adopted. This study brought out the fact that MAR cannot be practiced in all regions for dilution of ions in groundwater and that it is essential to analyze the fluctuation in groundwater level and the fluoride content before suggesting it as a suitable solution. Also, this study emphasizes that long-term monitoring of these factors is an important criterion for choosing the recharge areas.

  13. Concentrations of Cadmium, Copper, and Zinc in Macrobrachium rosenbergii (Giant Freshwater Prawn) from Natural Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idrus, Farah Akmal; Basri, Masania Mohd; Rahim, Khairul Adha A; Rahim, Nur Syazwani Abd; Chong, Melissa Dennis

    2018-03-01

    This study analyzed the levels of cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), and zinc (Zn) by the flame atomic absorption spectrophotometer (FAAS), in the muscle tissues, exoskeletons, and gills from freshwater prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) (n = 20) harvested from natural habitat in Kerang River, Malaysia on 25th November 2015. Significant increase of the metals level in muscle tissue and gill (r > 0.70, p < 0.05) were observed with increase in length except for Cu in gills. No relationship was found between metals level in exoskeleton and length. The concentrations of Cd, Cu and Zn were significantly higher (p < 0.05) in males (muscle tissues and exoskeleton) except for Cd in exoskeleton. In gills, only Cu was significantly higher (p < 0.05) in female than male. All samples contained metals below the permissible limit for human consumption (i.e., Cd < 2.00 mg/kg; Cu < 30.00 mg/kg; Zn < 150 mg/kg). Annual metals monitoring in prawn and environmental samples is recommended to evaluate changes of metals bioaccumulation and cycling in the system, which is useful for resources management.

  14. Co-concentration effect of silane with natural extract on biodegradable polymeric films for food packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, Anbreen; Jabeen, Sehrish; Gull, Nafisa; Islam, Atif; Sultan, Misbah; Ghaffar, Abdul; Khan, Shahzad Maqsood; Iqbal, Sadia Sagar; Jamil, Tahir

    2018-01-01

    Novel biodegradable films were prepared by blending guar gum, chitosan and poly (vinyl alcohol) having mint (ME) and grapefruit peel (GE) extracts and crosslinked with nontoxic tetraethoxysilane (TEOS). The co-concentration effect of TEOS with natural extracts on the films was studied. FTIR analysis confirmed the presence of incorporated components and the developed interactions among the polymer chains. The surface morphology of the films by SEM showed the hydrophilic character due to porous network structure. The films having both ME and GE with maximum amount of crosslinker (100μL), showed maximum swelling (58g/g) and stability while the optical properties showed increased protection against UV light. This film sample showed compact network structure which enhanced the ultimate tensile strength (40.03MPa) and elongation at break (104.8%). ME/GE conferred the antioxidant properties determined by radical scavenging activity and total phenolic contents (TPC) as ME films have greater TPC compared to GE films. The soil burial test exhibited the degradation of films rapidly (6days) confirming their strong microbial activity in soil. The lower water vapour transmission rate and water vapour permeability showed better shelf life; hence, these biodegradable films are environmental friendly and have potential for food and other packaging. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Determination of fluoride source in ground water using petrographic studies in Dashtestan area, south of Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaleb-Looie, Sedigheh; Moore, Farid, ,, Dr.

    2010-05-01

    The groundwater occurs in Dashtestan area, contains a high level of fluoride. Since groundwater is vastly used for drinking and irrigation purposes, the local residents are at high risk of fluoride toxicity, as already evidenced by the occurrence of dental Fluorosis in many residents. 35 surface and groundwater samples were collected in September, 2009. The results show that in 23 samples the fluoride concentration is above the permissible level (1.5ppm). Petrographic study of lithological units in the catchment area indicates that mica minerals are the most probable source of fluoride content in the study area.

  16. Role of polyphenols and nonpolyphenols against toxicity induced by fluoride: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claudio, Samuel R; Handan, Bianca A; Gomes de Moura, Carolina F; Viana, Milena de Barros; Yamauchi, Liria Y; Aguiar, Odair; Oshima, Celina T F; Ribeiro, Daniel A

    2018-04-17

    Since its discovery as an antimicrobial agent, fluoride has been used in the control of dental caries. Many studies have shown that the chronic exposure of fluoride in high concentrations causes adverse effects in multiple organs; the use of bioactive compounds present in foods as a tool to mitigate the effects of fluoride could potentially be useful for populations in different parts of the world are exposed to fluoride in a chronic and systemic way. Thus, the aim of this comprehensive review is to present and discuss the published papers that focused on the use of polyphenols and nonpolyphenols that can mitigate the harmful activities promoted by fluoride exposure. Certainly, these data will contribute toward a better understanding of the role of food compounds in the pathological outcomes induced by fluoride. The new information will be added to that already available for regulatory purposes as a safe way to promote oral healthcare and prevent oral carcinogenesis.

  17. The impact of geology on the migration of fluorides in mineral waters of the Bukulja and Brajkovac pluton area, Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papić Petar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the hydrogeochemical parameters that classify groundwater as mineral water is the content of fluoride ions. Their concentration is both important and limited for bottled mineral waters. Hydrochemical research of mineral waters in the surrounding area of Bukulja and Brajkovac pluton, in central Serbia, was conducted in order to define the chemical composition and genesis of these waters. They are carbonated waters, with content of fluoride ranging from 0.2 up to 6.6 mg/L. Since hydrochemical analyses showed variations in the major water chemistry, it was obvious that, apart from hydrochemical research, some explorations of the structure of the regional terrain would be inevitable. For these purposes, some additional geological research was performed, creating an adequate basis for the interpretation of the genesis of these carbonated mineral waters. The results confirmed the significance of the application of hydrochemical methods in the research of mineral waters. The work tended to emphasize that “technological treatment” for decreasing the concentration of fluoride in mineral waters occurs in nature, indicating the existence of natural defluoridization. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 43004

  18. Non-thermal Production of Natural betalain Colorant Concentrate from Red Beet Extract by Using the Osmotic Distillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazanin Amirasgari

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Red beet extract concentrate can be used as a natural colorant in food products; however, destructive effects of thermal methods to produce juice concentrate decrease nutritional value in the final product. Materials and Methods: In this study, red beet extract was concentrated using osmotic distillation method, and the best pretreatment was evaluated to increase the efficiency of the concentration process. Also changes in some physicochemical properties such as betacyanins and betaxanthins contents, total phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity of red beet juice were evaluated by both the membrane and thermal concentration methods. Results: The results showed that the best concentration efficiency was obtained after pretreatment of the fresh juice with centrifugation at 1699 G for 17 min. Evaluation of the effect of both the membrane and thermal concentration processes on the physicochemical properties of juice showed that the membrane method did not change betacyanin and betaxanthin contents, total phenolic compounds, and antioxidant activity of the red beet extract. However, these properties decreased with the thermal concentration method by 26, 15, 11 and 13%, respectively. Conclusions: According to the results, osmotic distillation can produce red beet concentrate with more nutritional value than the concentrate produced with thermal method. Keywords: Membrane, Natural betalain colorant, Osmotic distillation, Red beet

  19. Effects of air conditioning, dehumidification and natural ventilation on indoor concentrations of 222Rn and 220Rn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Thomas K.C.; Yu, K.N.

    2000-01-01

    A bedroom was selected for detailed measurements on 220 Rn and 222 Rn concentrations and environmental parameters including CO 2 concentration, temperature and relative humidity. To simulate different sealing conditions, five conditions were artificially created in the sampling period of 25 consecutive days. It was concluded that natural ventilation is the most efficient way to lower the 222 Rn levels, while air conditioning is the next. Dehumidification provides only a marginal reduction of 222 Rn levels. The 220 Rn concentrations are not affected by natural ventilation, air conditioner or dehumidification, and were all around 10 Bq m -3 . There are no significant correlations between the 220 Rn and 222 Rn concentrations and environmental conditions such as CO 2 concentrations, temperature, relative humidity and pressure

  20. Fluoride Removal From Drinking Water by Electrocoagulation Using Iron and Aluminum Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takdastan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Existence of fluoride in drinking water above the permissible level causes human skeletal fluorosis. Objectives Electrocoagulation by iron and aluminum electrodes was proposed for removing fluoride from drinking water. Materials and Methods Effects of different operating conditions such as treatment time, initial pH, applied voltage, type and number of electrodes, the spaces between aluminum and iron electrodes, and energy consumption during electrocoagulation were investigated in the batch reactor. Variable concentrations of fluoride solution were prepared by mixing proper amounts of sodium fluoride with deionized water. Results Experimental results showed that aluminum electrode is more effective in fluoride removal than iron, as in 40 minutes and initial pH of 7.5 at 20 V, the fluoride removal process reached to 97.86%. The final recommendable limit of fluoride (1.5 mg/L was obtained in 10 minutes at 20 V with the aluminum electrode. Conclusions In electrocoagulation with iron and aluminum electrodes, increase of voltage, number of electrodes and reaction time as well as decrease of the spaces between electrodes, enhanced the fluoride removal efficiency from drinking water. In addition the effect of pH and initial concentration of fluoride varied with types of electrodes.

  1. Application of Electrocoagulation Process Using Iron and Aluminum Electrodes for Fluoride Removal from Aqueous Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edris Bazrafshan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluoride in drinking water above permissible level is responsible for human being affected by skeletal fluorosis. The present study was carried out to assess the ability of electrocoagulation process with iron and aluminum electrodes in order to removal of fluoride from aqueous solutions. Several working parameters, such as fluoride concentration, pH, applied voltage and reaction time were studied to achieve a higher removal capacity. Variable concentrations (1, 5 and 10 mg L-1 of fluoride solutions were prepared by mixing proper amount of sodium fluoride with deionized water. The varying pH of the initial solution (3, 7 and 10 was also studied to measure their effects on the fluoride removal efficiency. Results obtained with synthetic solution revealed that the most effective removal capacities of fluoride could be achieved at 40 V electrical potential. In addition, the increase of electrical potential, in the range of 10-40 V, enhanced the treatment rate. Also comparison of fluoride removal efficiency showed that removal efficiency is similar with iron and aluminum electrodes. Finally it can be concluded that the electrocoagulation process has the potential to be utilized for the cost-effective removal of fluoride from water and wastewater.

  2. Removal of fluoride from water using aluminium containing compounds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Karthikeyan; K. P. Elango

    2009-01-01

    Batch adsorption studies were undertaken to assess the suitability of aluminium titanate (AT) and bismuth aluminate (BA) to remove fluoride ions from water.The effect of pH,dose of adsorbent,contact time,initial concentration,co-ions and temperature on fluoride removal efficiency were studied.The amounts of fluoride ions adsorbed,at 30℃ from 4 mg/L of fluoride ion solution,by AT and BA are 0.85 and 1.55 mg/g,respectively.The experimental data fitted well to the Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms.Thermodynamic parameters such as △H~0,△S~0 and △G~0 indicated that the removal of fluoride ions by AT is exothermic and non-spontaneous while that by BA is endothermic and spontaneous.Furrier transform infrared (FT-IR) analysis and X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns of the adsorbent before and after adsorption indicated that fluoride ions are chemisorbed by these adsorbents.

  3. Risk assessment of fluoride exposure in drinking water of Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guissouma, Wiem; Hakami, Othman; Al-Rajab, Abdul Jabbar; Tarhouni, Jamila

    2017-06-01

    The presence of fluoride in drinking water is known to reduce dental cavities among consumers, but an excessive intake of this anion might leads to dental and skeletal fluorosis. This study reports a complete survey of the fluoridated tap water taken from 100 water consumption points in Tunisia. The fluoride concentrations in tap water were between 0 and 2.4 mg L -1 . Risk assessment of Fluoride exposure was assessed depending on the age of consumers using a four-step method: hazard identification, toxicity reference values selection (TRVs), daily exposure assessment, and risk characterization. Our findings suggest that approximately 75% of the Tunisian population is at risk for dental decay, 25% have a potential dental fluorosis risk, and 20% might have a skeletal fluorosis risk according to the limits of fluoride in drinking water recommended by WHO. More investigations are recommended to assess the exposure risk of fluoride in other sources of drinking water such as bottled water. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Sorption of fluoride using chemically modified Moringa oleifera leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, Shabnam; Chattree, Amit

    2018-05-01

    Contamination of drinking water due to fluoride is a severe health hazard problem. Excess of fluoride (> 1.5 mg/L) in drinking water is harmful to human health. Various treatment technologies for removing fluoride from groundwater have been investigated. The present study showed that the leaves of Moringa oleifera, a herbal plant is an effective adsorbent for the removal of fluoride from aqueous solution. Acid treated Moringa oleifera leaves powder showed good adsorption capacity than alkali treated Moringa oleifera leaves powder. Batch sorptive defluoridation was conducted under the variable experimental condition such as pH, contact time, adsorbent dose and initial fluoride ion concentration. Maximum defluoridation was achieved at pH 1. The percentage of fluoride removal increases with adsorbent dose. The equilibrium sorption data were fitted into Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin isotherms. Of the three adsorption isotherms, the R 2 value of Langmuir isotherm model was the highest. The maximum monolayer coverage ( Q max) from Langmuir isotherm model was determined to be 1.1441 mg/g, the separation factor indicating a favorable sorption experiment is 0.035. It was also discovered that the adsorption did not conform to the Freundlich adsorption isotherm. The heat of sorption process was estimated from Temkin Isotherm model to be - 0.042 J/mol which vividly proved that the adsorption experiment followed a physical process.

  5. Occurrence of fluoride in ground waters of Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabdulaaly, Abdulrahman I.; Al-Zarah, Abdullah I.; Khan, Mujahid A.

    2013-09-01

    The presence of elevated levels of fluoride in groundwater is considered a global problem. Fluoride in water derives mainly from dissolution of natural minerals in the rocks and soils with which water interacts. The most common fluorine-bearing minerals are fluorite, apatite and micas. Anthropogenic sources of fluoride include agricultural fertilizers and combustion of coal. In the present research, a survey of wells ( n = 1,060) was undertaken in all the 13 regions of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia to assess the contained fluoride (F) levels. The results indicated variation in fluoride levels from 0.10 to 5.4 mg/L as F throughout the kingdom. The average fluoride levels in milligrams per liter as F were as follows in descending order: 1.80 (Hadwood Shamalyah), 1.37 (Hail), 1.33 (Eastern Province), 1.16 (Al Jouf), 1.11 (Qassim), 1.01 (Riyadh), 0.90 (Madina Al Munnawara), 0.81 (Tabouk), 0.74 (Makkah Al- Mukaramma), 0.73 (Jizan), 0.66 (Asir), 0.64 (Najran), and 0.60 (Al Baha). The results indicated that fluoride levels exceeded the USEPA maximum contaminant limits for drinking water (4 mg/L) in several wells ( n = 7) in different regions of the kingdom and that 13.96 % of the wells exceeded the World Health Organization recommended levels (1.5 mg/L). The results were also compared with the secondary USEPA contaminant standards of 2.0 mg/L for fluorides.

  6. Geochemical evaluation of fluoride contamination of groundwater in the Thoothukudi District of Tamilnadu, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singaraja, C.; Chidambaram, S.; Anandhan, P.; Prasanna, M. V.; Thivya, C.; Thilagavathi, R.; Sarathidasan, J.

    2014-09-01

    Fluoride is a chemical element that has been shown to cause significant effects on human health through drinking water. Different forms of fluoride exposure are of importance and have shown to affect the body's fluoride content and thus increasing the risks of fluoride-prone diseases. Fluoride has beneficial effects on teeth; however, low concentrations of fluoride intensify the risk of tooth decay. Fluoride can also be quite detrimental at higher concentrations at skeletal fluorosis. The Thoothukudi District is a hard rock and alluvial plain marked as one of the Fluoride-increase area in Tamilnadu due to occurrence of various rock types including fluoride-bearing minerals. The F- content of groundwater can thus originate from the dissolution of Fluoride-bearing minerals in the bed rock. Hundred representative groundwater samples from Thoothukudi District were collected during two different seasons. Samples were analysed for F-, other major cations and anions. The study area is chiefly composed of hornblende biotite gneiss, charnockite, alluvio marine, fluvial marine and granite with small patches of quartzite and sandstone. Higher concentration of fluoride is observed during pre-monsoon (3.3 mg l-1) compared to the post-monsoon (2.4 mg l-1) due to the dilution effect. Spatial distribution and factor score show that higher concentrations of F- are noted in the north and central part of the study area owing to lithology. Bicarbonate is well correlated with F- which explains that both ions were derived from the weathering. While F- has a very weak correlation with pH which may be due to the increase of alkalinity resulting from the increase of carbonate and bicarbonate ions.

  7. A Comparison of Fluoride Uptake by Sound Enamel Following Application of Sodium Fluoride Mouthrinses and APF Gels Produced in Iran with Standardized Foreign Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Kowsari

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this investigation is to compare the extent of fluoride uptake by sound enamel following application of two commercial mouthrinses containing sodium fluoride (0.2% and a topical gel containing APF (1.23% produced in Iran with those of foreign standardized ones. Sixty extracted premolars were used. Each tooth was divided into two lingual and buccal halves, one half as control, the other one as experimental. Enamel biopsy technique (two- step acid etching was used to determine the concentration of fluoride and calcium in each sample. For data comparison and fluoride uptake estimation, the depths of layers with the use of linear regression analysis were standardized to 25 and 50um. The analysis showed that in Iranian mouthrinse no. 1, there is linear correlation between fluoride concentration and enamel depth, in both control and experimental group at the first and second layers, while, in other groups, this correlation was observed just at the first layer (superficial enamel layer. The greatest fluoride uptake was seen at Iranian mouthrinse no.2 and the least was seen at foreign mouthrinse no. 3. From among two APF gels, the greatest uptake was observed at gel no. 1 (Iranian. The results showed that all three Iranian products increase fluoride content of enamel, moreover the level of fluoride uptake, while applying Iranian products, in comparison with foreign ones, shows considerable increase.

  8. Association of lifetime exposure to fluoride and cognitive functions in Chinese children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, Anna L; Zhang, Ying; Sun, Guifan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A systematic review and meta-analysis of published studies on developmental fluoride neurotoxicity support the hypothesis that exposure to elevated concentrations of fluoride in water is neurotoxic during development. METHODS: We carried out a pilot study of 51 first-grade children in...

  9. Kinetics and equilibrium studies for removal of fluoride from underground water using cryptocrystalline magnesite

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Masindi, Vhahangwele

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available of competing ions. Optimum defluoridation conditions were observed to be 20 g/L magnesite, 2:100 solid:liquid ratio, 20 min of agitation and 60 mg/L fluoride concentration. Adsorption of fluoride by magnesite was observed to be independent of p...

  10. Environmental monitoring of fluoride emissions using precipitation, dust, plant and soil samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franzaring, J.; Hrenn, H.; Schumm, C.; Klumpp, A.; Fangmeier, A.

    2006-01-01

    A pollution gradient was observed in precipitation, plants and soils sampled at different locations around a fluoride producing chemical plant in Germany. In all samples the influence of emissions was discernible up to a distance of 500 m from the plant. However, fluoride concentrations in plant bioindicators (leaves of birch and black berry) and in bulk precipitation showed a more pronounced relationship with the distance from the source than fluoride concentrations in soil. Vegetables sampled in the vicinity of the plant also had elevated concentrations of fluoride, but only the consumption of larger quantities of this material would lead to exceedances of recommended daily F-intake. The present study did not indicate the existence of low phytotoxicity thresholds for fluoride in the plant species used in the study. Even at very high fluoride concentrations in leaf tissue (963 ppm) plants did not show injury due to HF. Dust sampling downwind of the chemical plant confirmed that particulate fluoride was of minor importance in the study area. - A pronounced pollution gradient was observed in precipitation, plants and soils sampled at different locations around a fluoride emitting chemical plant in Germany

  11. Determination of fluoride in spices using microwave induced oxygen combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuel Šucman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluorine is essential in human and/or animal nutrition; therefore, so it is important to know its concentration in a diet. One of the possible sources of fluorine for humans is spice, containing various amounts of this trace element. This work describes the method for fluoride determination in various kinds ofspices using microwave-supported sample preparation in high pressure oxygen atmosphere followed by potentiometry with a fluoride ion-selective electrode. Parameters of the microwave device for combustion procedure were checked and optimized in order to find settings ensuring complete sample combustion and/or absorption of the analyte in the absorption solution. For the ion-selective electrode measurement, the technique of standard straight line was chosen. Concentrations of fluorides in spices and spice blends under investigation ranged from 3.15 mg·kg-1 to 26.08 mg·kg-1. In order to check the accuracy of the method Certified Reference Material Fluoride in Vegetation NIST 2695 was used and a good agreement between certified and found values was found. The precision expressed as the relative standard deviation ranged from 0.6% to 5.0%. The method is fast, accurate and reliable for this kind of analysis. In recent literature data on fluoride concentrations in spices and/or spice blends have not been found.

  12. Removal of Fluoride Ion from Aqueous Solution by Nanocomposite Hydrogel Based on Starch/Sodium Acrylate/Nano Aluminum Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aboulfazl Barati

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Determination of fluoride in drinking water has received increasing interest, due to its beneficial and detrimental effects on health. Contamination of drinking water by fluoride can cause potential hazards to human health. In recent years, considerable attention has been given to different methods for the removal of fluoride from drinking and waste waters. The aim of this research was to investigate the effect of nano composite hydrogel based on starch/sodium acrylate/aluminum oxide in reduction of fluoride concentration in drinking water and industrial waste water. In a batch system, the dynamic and equilibrium adsorption of fluoride ions were studied with respect to changes in determining parameters such as pH, contact time, initial fluoride concentration, starch/acrylic acid weight ratio and weight percent of nano aluminum oxide. The obtained equilibrium adsorption data were fitted with Langmuir and Freundlich models, as well as the kinetic data with pseudo-first order and pseudo- second order models. The results showed that optimum pH was found to be in the range of 5 to 7. Removal efficiency of fluoride was increased with decreases in initial concentration of fluoride. Sixty percent of initial value of fluoride solution was removed by nano composite hydrogel (4 wt% of nano aluminum oxide at 240 min (initial fluoride concentration = 5 ppm, pH 6.8 and temperature = 25ºC. Under the same condition, the equilibrium adsorption of fluoride ions was 85% and 68% for initial solution concentration of 5 and 10 ppm, respectively. Adsorption isotherm data showed that the fluoride sorption followed the Langmuir model. Kinetics of sorption of fluoride onto nano composite hydrogel was described by pseudo-first order model.

  13. phisco-chemical studies concerning naturally occuring radiocuclides and heavy metal concentrations in groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Allah, A.A.A.

    2011-01-01

    The present work is a comprehensive of drinking water quality from various rural regions of Egypt. People are living in these rural regions have a problem of scarcely water resources. They mainly depend on groundwater resources for drinking. These water resources may be contaminated with both naturally and/or industrial pollutants unexpected. In this study, several groundwater samples are obtained from certain regions in Egypt; physical, chemical and radiological parameters are examined. Then, compared to the standard limits values of the world health organization. A new modified ion exchange resin was prepared in our laboratory with a high efficiency factor which may be used for reducing the heavy metals that are being found in groundwater samples. The removal of heavy metals such as, Pb (II), Co (II) and Mn (II) ions was carried out by the modified ion exchange resin using Batch sorption experiments. The optimum condition of the removal efficiency was conducted under different parameters such as; effect of ph, initial ion concentrations, weight loaded and contact time to determine the optimum conditions for the resin function. Kinetic studies are performed using first and second order kinetic equations. The sorption kinetic experiments are found to be agreeing well with the second order kinetic equation. The particle diffusion model was also studied. three isotherm equations are applied for sorption of the investigated elements at equilibrium are well described by the Freundlich isotherm equation indicating that sorption process of those elements are applied with heterogeneous adsorption reaction. Dubinin and Radushkevich (D-R) isotherm equation is also applied. The free energy of the adsorption process is also given in the range of the ion exchange reaction.

  14. 49 CFR 173.163 - Hydrogen fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hydrogen fluoride. 173.163 Section 173.163... Hydrogen fluoride. (a) Hydrogen fluoride (hydrofluoric acid, anhydrous) must be packaged as follows: (1) In... filling ratio of 0.84. (b) A cylinder removed from hydrogen fluoride service must be condemned in...

  15. Growth of fluoride treated Kalanchoe pinnata plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, H N; Applegate, H G

    1962-01-01

    Kalanchoe pinnata plants can absorb fluoride through roots. The absorption is related to the amount of fluoride applied to the soil. There appeared to be a relationship between the amount of fluoride adsorbed and the subsequent growth of the plants. Plants which adsorbed the largest amounts of fluoride had the greatest increase in growth.

  16. Cl/Br ratios and chlorine isotope evidences for groundwater salinization and its impact on groundwater arsenic, fluoride and iodine enrichment in the Datong basin, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Junxia; Wang, Yanxin, E-mail: yx.wang@cug.edu.cn; Xie, Xianjun

    2016-02-15

    In order to identify the salinization processes and its impact on arsenic, fluoride and iodine enrichment in groundwater, hydrogeochemical and environmental isotope studies have been conducted on groundwater from the Datong basin, China. The total dissolved solid (TDS) concentrations in groundwater ranged from 451 to 8250 mg/L, and 41% of all samples were identified as moderately saline groundwater with TDS of 3000–10,000 mg/L. The results of groundwater Cl concentrations, Cl/Br molar ratio and Cl isotope composition suggest that three processes including water-rock interaction, surface saline soil flushing, and evapotranspiration result in the groundwater salinization in the study area. The relatively higher Cl/Br molar ratio in groundwater from multiple screening wells indicates the contribution of halite dissolution from saline soil flushed by vertical infiltration to the groundwater salinization. However, the results of groundwater Cl/Br molar ratio model indicate that the effect of saline soil flushing practice is limited to account for the observed salinity variation in groundwater. The plots of groundwater Cl vs. Cl/Br molar ratio, and Cl vs δ{sup 37}Cl perform the dominant effects of evapotranspiration on groundwater salinization. Inverse geochemical modeling results show that evapotranspiration may cause approximately 66% loss of shallow groundwater to account for the observed hydrochemical pattern. Due to the redox condition fluctuation induced by irrigation activities and evapotranspiration, groundwater salinization processes have negative effects on groundwater arsenic enrichment. For groundwater iodine and fluoride enrichment, evapotranspiration partly accounts for their elevation in slightly saline water. However, too strong evapotranspiration would restrict groundwater fluoride concentration due to the limitation of fluorite solubility. - Highlights: • Natural high arsenic, fluoride and iodine groundwater co-occur with saline water.

  17. Cl/Br ratios and chlorine isotope evidences for groundwater salinization and its impact on groundwater arsenic, fluoride and iodine enrichment in the Datong basin, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Junxia; Wang, Yanxin; Xie, Xianjun

    2016-01-01

    In order to identify the salinization processes and its impact on arsenic, fluoride and iodine enrichment in groundwater, hydrogeochemical and environmental isotope studies have been conducted on groundwater from the Datong basin, China. The total dissolved solid (TDS) concentrations in groundwater ranged from 451 to 8250 mg/L, and 41% of all samples were identified as moderately saline groundwater with TDS of 3000–10,000 mg/L. The results of groundwater Cl concentrations, Cl/Br molar ratio and Cl isotope composition suggest that three processes including water-rock interaction, surface saline soil flushing, and evapotranspiration result in the groundwater salinization in the study area. The relatively higher Cl/Br molar ratio in groundwater from multiple screening wells indicates the contribution of halite dissolution from saline soil flushed by vertical infiltration to the groundwater salinization. However, the results of groundwater Cl/Br molar ratio model indicate that the effect of saline soil flushing practice is limited to account for the observed salinity variation in groundwater. The plots of groundwater Cl vs. Cl/Br molar ratio, and Cl vs δ"3"7Cl perform the dominant effects of evapotranspiration on groundwater salinization. Inverse geochemical modeling results show that evapotranspiration may cause approximately 66% loss of shallow groundwater to account for the observed hydrochemical pattern. Due to the redox condition fluctuation induced by irrigation activities and evapotranspiration, groundwater salinization processes have negative effects on groundwater arsenic enrichment. For groundwater iodine and fluoride enrichment, evapotranspiration partly accounts for their elevation in slightly saline water. However, too strong evapotranspiration would restrict groundwater fluoride concentration due to the limitation of fluorite solubility. - Highlights: • Natural high arsenic, fluoride and iodine groundwater co-occur with saline water. • Groundwater

  18. Analysis for average heat transfer empirical correlation of natural convection on the concentric vertical cylinder modelling of APWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daddy Setyawan

    2011-01-01

    There are several passive safety systems on APWR reactor design. One of the passive safety system is the cooling system with natural circulation air on the surface of concentric vertical cylinder containment wall. Since the natural circulation air performance in the Passive Containment Cooling System (PCCS) application is related to safety, the cooling characteristics of natural circulation air on concentric vertical cylinder containment wall should be studied experimentally. This paper focuses on the experimental study of the heat transfer coefficient of natural circulation air with heat flux level varied on the characteristics of APWR concentric vertical cylinder containment wall. The procedure of this experimental study is composed of 4 stages as follows: the design of APWR containment with scaling 1:40, the assembling of APWR containment with its instrumentation, calibration and experimentation. The experimentation was conducted in the transient and steady-state with the variation of heat flux, from 119 W/m 2 until 575 W/m 2 . From The experimentation result obtained average heat transfer empirical correlation of natural convection Nu L = 0,008(Ra * L ) 0,68 for the concentric vertical cylinder geometry modelling of APWR. (author)

  19. Fluoride-associated ultrastructural changes and apoptosis in human renal tubule: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quadri, J A; Sarwar, S; Sinha, A; Kalaivani, M; Dinda, A K; Bagga, A; Roy, T S; Das, T K; Shariff, A

    2018-01-01

    The susceptibility of the kidneys to fluoride toxicity can largely be attributed to its anatomy and function. As the filtrate moves along the complex tubular structure of each nephron, it is concentrated in the proximal and distal tubules and collecting duct. It has been frequently observed that the children suffering from renal impairments also have some symptoms of dental and skeletal fluorosis. The findings suggest that fluoride somehow interferes with renal anatomy and physiology, which may lead to renal pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the fluoride-associated nephrotoxicity. A total of 156 patients with childhood nephrotic syndrome were screened and it was observed that 32 of them had significantly high levels ( p ≤ 0.05) of fluoride in urine (4.01 ± 1.83 ppm) and serum (0.1 ± 0.013 ppm). On the basis of urinary fluoride concentration, patients were divided into two groups, namely group 1 (G-1) ( n = 32) containing normal urine fluoride (0.61 ± 0.17 ppm) and group 2 (G-2) ( n = 32) having high urine fluoride concentration (4.01 ± 1.83 ppm). Age-matched healthy subjects ( n = 33) having normal levels of urinary fluoride (0.56 ± 0.15 ppm) were included in the study as control (group 0 (G-0)). Kidney biopsies were taken from G-1 and G-2 only, who were subjected to ultrastructural (transmission electron microscopy) and apoptotic (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase deoxyuridine triphosphate nick end labeling) analysis. Various subcellular ultrastructural changes including nuclear disintegration, chromosome condensation, cytoplasmic ground substance lysis, and endoplasmic reticulum blebbing were observed. Increased levels of apoptosis were observed in high fluoride group (G-2) compared to normal fluoride group (G-1). Various degrees of fluoride-associated damages to the architecture of tubular epithelia, such as cell swelling and lysis, cytoplasmic vacuolation, nuclear condensation, apoptosis, and necrosis, were observed.

  20. CDOM fluorescence as a proxy of DOC concentration in natural waters : a comparison of four contrasting tropical systems

    OpenAIRE

    Rochelle Newall, Emma; Hulot, F. D.; Janeau, Jean-Louis; Merroune, A.

    2014-01-01

    Chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) fluorescence or absorption is often proposed as a rapid alternative to chemical methods for the estimation of bulk dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration in natural waters. However, the robustness of this method across a wide range of systems remains to be shown. We measured CDOM fluorescence and DOC concentration in four tropical freshwater and coastal environments (estuary and coastal, tropical shallow lakes, water from the freshwater lens ...

  1. Lichens as indicators of fluoride emission from a phosphorus plant, Long Harbour, Newfoundland, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, B.A.; Thompson, L.K.

    1980-01-01

    Fluoride concentrations in the terrestrial lichens Cladina rangiferina (L.) Harm. and Cladina stellaris (Opiz.) Brodo. were correlated inversely with distance from an industrial plant producing elemental phosphorus at Long Harbour, Nfld., in the direction (NE) of the prevailing wind. The fluoride concentrations ranged from 2830 ppm dry weight in a severely damaged area close to the emission source to 15.5 ppm (dry weight) 12 km NE of the industrial plant. Control samples from unpolluted areas had an average fluoride content of 6.4 ppm dry weight. The minimum observed damage symptoms occurred when these lichens had a fluoride content of 25 ppm dry weight. Damage symptoms included discolouration and structure loss. Discolouration effects were not as pronounced as observed on Abies balsamea (L.) Mill. or on Polytrichum commune (Hedw.) but combined with structure loss allowed the degree of damage to be readily identified in the field. Fluoride concentrations in these terrestrial lichens are compared with levels in soil humus, A. balsamea and some terrestrial bryophytes in four damage zones. The lichen tissue had, on average, twice as much fluoride as occurred in soil humus from the same site and about one half the amount of fluoride found in the terrestrial bryophyte P. commune. The effects of fluoride emissions on the epiphytic lichens Hypogymnia physodes (L.) W. Wats. and Alectoria sarmentosa (Ach.) Ach. in this area are also discussed.

  2. Natural radioelement concentrations in fertilizers and the soil of the Mila region of Algeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amina Bramki

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The addition of inorganic fertilizers to treat crop soil and increase its production has become a necessity and a tool used around the world. These fertilizers contain different quantities of uranium and thorium. Therefore, tons of radionuclides from natural radioactive series U238, U235 and T232h are dispersed in the environment due to a high use of fertilizer in agriculture. In this work, the radioactivity levels were determined in two fertilizers and in fertilized and unfertilized soil samples collected at various depths from the Algerian agricultural region of El-Athmania Mila, using high resolution gamma ray spectroscopy. The activity concentrations of R226a, T232h and K40 for fertilized and unfertilized soil samples were found unchanged as a function of depth and ranged from 23.72 ± 2.37 to 65.47 ± 5.06 Bq.Kg−1; 32.48 ± 9.84 to 49.83 ± 5.31 Bq.Kg−1 for 226Ra, from 26.45 ± 0.78 to 27.10 ± 0.80 Bq.Kg−1; 27.56 ± 0.75 to 28.70 ± 0.90 Bq.Kg−1 for T232h and from 220.80 ± 10.01 to 260.70 ± 8.24 Bq.Kg−1; 283.50 ± 8.41 to 290.10 ± 10.50 Bq.Kg−1 for K40 respectively. The presence of C137sis found in all measured samples and its average activity for all soil samples was 3.12 ± 0.13 Bq.Kg−1. To assess the radiological hazard, the radiation equivalent activity (Raeq, the representative level index (Iγr, the external hazard (Hex, the internal hazard (Hin and the absorbed dose rate due to three primordial radionuclides for soil samples were calculated. The measured values were compared with the published data in different countries and were found to be safe for the public and the environment.

  3. Chemisorption of uranium hexa-fluoride on sodium fluoride pellets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalburgi, A K; Sanyal, A; Puranik, V D; Bhattacharjee, B [Chemical Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    1994-06-01

    This paper comprises kinetics of chemical reaction or rather chemisorption of uranium hexafluoride gas on sodium fluoride pellets. The chemisorption is essentially irreversible at room temperature, while the process reverses at high temperature above 280 deg C. This chemisorption process was experimentally conducted in static condition at room temperature and its kinetics was studied. In the experiments, practically pure UF{sub 6} was used and the effects of gas pressure and weight of NaF pellets, were studied. In this heterogenous reaction, in which diffusion through ash layer is followed by chemical reaction, the reaction part is instantaneous and is first order with respect to gas concentration. Since the process of chemisorption is not only pure chemical reaction but also gas diffusion through ash layer, the rate constant depreciates with the percentage loading of UF{sub 6} on NaF pellets. The kinetic equation for the above process has been established for a particular size of NaF pellets and pellet porosity. (author). 5 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Reduced trace element concentrations in fast-growing juvenile Atlantic salmon in natural streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Darren M; Nislow, Keith H; Chen, Celia Y; Folt, Carol L

    2010-05-01

    To assess the effect of rapid individual growth on trace element concentrations in fish, we measured concentrations of seven trace elements (As, Cd, Cs, Hg, Pb, Se, Zn) in stream-dwelling Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) from 15 sites encompassing a 10-fold range in salmon growth. All salmon were hatched under uniform conditions, released into streams, and sampled approximately 120 days later for trace element analysis. For most elements, element concentrations in salmon tracked those in their prey. Fast-growing salmon had lower concentrations of all elements than slow growers, after accounting for prey concentrations. This pattern held for essential and nonessential elements, as well as elements that accumulate from food and those that can accumulate from water. At the sites with the fastest salmon growth, trace element concentrations in salmon were 37% (Cs) to 86% (Pb) lower than at sites where growth was suppressed. Given that concentrations were generally below levels harmful to salmon and that the pattern was consistent across all elements, we suggest that dilution of elements in larger biomass led to lower concentrations in fast-growing fish. Streams that foster rapid, efficient fish growth may produce fish with lower concentrations of elements potentially toxic for human and wildlife consumers.

  5. FLUORIDE TOXICITY – A HARSH REALITY

    OpenAIRE

    Bandlapalli Pavani; Mandava Ragini; David Banji; Otilia J F Banji; N Gouri Pratusha

    2011-01-01

    There are many incidents of fluoride toxicity whether it is acute or chronic. Fluoride toxicity is an environmental hazard which arises from the upper layers of geological crust and is dissolved in water. Prolonged drinking of such water causes chronic fluoride toxicity. Use of fluoride containing compounds for various purposes such as dental products, metal, glass, refrigerator and chemical industries act as a source of fluoride poisoning and increase the risk of toxicity. This review reflec...

  6. Measurement of Natural Radioactive Nuclide Concentrations and the Dose Estimation of Workers Originated from Radon in Manganese Ore Mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansour, N.A.; Hassan, N.M.; Blasy, M.R.

    2013-01-01

    Manganese ore is widely used in many industries. Such as ore contain natural radioactive nuclides at various concentrations. If this ore contain high concentrations of natural radioactive nuclides, workers handling them might be exposed to significant levels of radiation. Therefore it is important to determine the radioactive nuclides in this ore. Also the regulation of radon concentration at workplaces has gained an accentuated importance in all countries. Nevertheless, at this time there is no globally accepted workplace protocol that sets out safe radon concentration values. In this study the radon concentration measured by using an Alpha Guard radon monitor, the equilibrium factor which was greater than the value given in literature, effective radiation dose, which are necessary for the exact estimation of the radiation dose originating from radon. The regulation of radon concentration at workplaces has gained an accentuated importance in all countries. Approach: The natural radionuclides ( 238 U, 232 Th and 40 K) contents of manganese ore samples collected from Umm Bogma, southwest Sinai and from the mountain access Hamid South Eastern Desert, Egypt have been determined by low background spectroscopy using hyper-pure germanium (HPGe) detector. Results: The mean activities due to the three radionuclides ( 238 U, 232 Th and 40 K) were found to be 1500±65, 490±65 and 364±45 Bqkg -1 , respectively. The absorbed dose rate due to the natural radioactivity in samples under investigation ranged from 1522±45 → 1796±43 nGyh -1 . The radium equivalent activity varied from 3807±114→ 4446±133 Bqkg -1 .The representative external hazard index values for the corresponding samples are also estimated. Conclusion: The results of this assessment obtained by the gamma-ray spectroscopic analysis, have indicated that the levels of natural radioactivity were lower than the international recommended limits.

  7. Soil fluoride spiking effects on olive trees (Olea europaea L. cv. Chemlali).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zouari, M; Ben Ahmed, C; Fourati, R; Delmail, D; Ben Rouina, B; Labrousse, P; Ben Abdallah, F

    2014-10-01

    A pot experiment under open air conditions was carried out to investigate the uptake, accumulation and toxicity effects of fluoride in olive trees (Olea europaea L.) grown in a soil spiked with inorganic sodium fluoride (NaF). Six different levels (0, 20, 40, 60, 80 and 100mM NaF) of soil spiking were applied through NaF to irrigation water. At the end of the experiment, total fluoride content in soil was 20 and 1770mgFkg(-1) soil in control and 100mM NaF treatments, respectively. The comparative distribution of fluoride partitioning among the different olive tree parts showed that the roots accumulated the most fluoride and olive fruits were minimally affected by soil NaF spiking as they had the lowest fluoride content. In fact, total fluoride concentration varied between 12 and 1070µgFg(-1) in roots, between 9 and 570µgFg(-1) in shoots, between 12 and 290µgFg(-1) in leaves, and between 10 and 29µgFg(-1) in fruits, respectively for control and 100mM NaF treatments. Indeed, the fluoride accumulation pattern showed the following distribution: roots>shoots>leaves>fruits. On the other hand, fluoride toxicity symptoms such as leaf necrosis and leaf drop appeared only in highly spiked soils (60, 80 and 100mM NaF). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Molten fluoride fuel salt chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toth, L.M.; Del Cul, G.D.; Dai, S.; Metcalf, D.H.

    1995-01-01

    The chemistry of molten fluorides is traced from their development as fuels in the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment with important factors in their selection being discussed. Key chemical characteristics such as solubility, redox behavior, and chemical activity are explained as they relate to the behavior of molten fluoride fuel systems. Development requirements for fitting the current state of the chemistry to modern nuclear fuel system are described. It is concluded that while much is known about molten fluoride behavior which can be used effectively to reduce the amount of development required for future systems, some significant molten salt chemical questions must still be addressed. copyright American Institute of Physics 1995

  9. Strontium-90 fluoride data sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fullam, H.T.

    1981-06-01

    This report is a compilation of available data and appropriate literature references on the properties of strontium-90 fluoride and nonradioactive strontium fluoride. The objective of the document is to compile in a single source pertinent data to assist potential users in the development, licensing, and use of /sup 90/SrF/sub 2/-fueled radioisotope heat sources for terrestrial power conversion and thermal applications. The report is an update of the Strontium-90 Fluoride Data Sheet (BNWL-2284) originally issued in April 1977.

  10. Determination of fluoride in drainage by ion electrode method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terakado, Shigeru; Ochiai, Ken-ichi; Motoyama, Shigeji; Tsutsumi, Ken-ichi

    1975-01-01

    The fluoride ion selective electrode method for rapidly and precisely determining fluoride in drainage was studied. This method enables the analysis of the samples with fluoride concentration above 0.1 mg/l in about five minutes. Six buffer solutions were selected to compare the masking effect against aluminum. Solution A is TISAB made by dissolving 57 ml of gracial acetic acid and 10 g of sodium chloride in 500 ml of water, thereafter adjusting pH to 5.5 and diluting to 1 liter with water. Solution B is phosphoric acid solution (17 M/L). Solution C is 3 M ammonium phosphate dibasic aqueous solution. Solution D is 1 M sodium citrate aqueous solution adjusted to pH 6 with hydrochloric acid. Solution E is 0.5 M sodium phosphate dibasic aqueous solution. Solution F is 2 M ammonium phosphate monobasic aqueous solution. As a result of studying the effect of coexisting elements, the buffer solutions A,B,E and F were greatly influenced by the coexistence of aluminum, while C and D show remarkable masking effect against aluminum. The amount of interfering ions in normal drainage is so small that no problem is anticipated for D. When fluoride recovery treatment is performed, it is important in dilution measurement to confirm whether the measured values are accurate or not, because there are high and low concentrations of fluoride at the same potential. (Iwakiri, K.)

  11. Removal of fluoride ions from aqueous solution by waste mud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemer, Baris; Ozdes, Duygu; Gundogdu, Ali; Bulut, Volkan N.; Duran, Celal; Soylak, Mustafa

    2009-01-01

    The present study was carried out to assess the ability of original waste mud (o-WM) and different types of activated waste mud which are acid-activated (a-WM) and precipitated waste mud (p-WM), in order to remove excess of fluoride from aqueous solution by using batch technique. The p-WM exhibited greater performance than the others. Adsorption studies were conducted as a function of pH, contact time, initial fluoride concentration, adsorbent concentration, temperature, etc. Studies were also performed to understand the effect of some co-existing ions present in aqueous solutions. Adsorption process was found to be almost independent of pH for all types of waste mud. Among the kinetic models tested for p-WM, pseudo-second-order model fitted the kinetic data well with a perfect correlation coefficient value of 1.00. It was found that the adequate time for the adsorption equilibrium of fluoride was only 1 h. Thermodynamic parameters including the Gibbs free energy (ΔG o ), enthalpy (ΔH o ), and entropy (ΔS o ) revealed that adsorption of fluoride ions on the p-WM was feasible, spontaneous and endothermic in the temperature range of 0-40 deg. C. Experimental data showed a good fit with the Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm models. Results of this study demonstrated the effectiveness and feasibility of WM for removal of fluoride ions from aqueous solution.

  12. Removal of fluoride ions from aqueous solution by waste mud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemer, Baris; Ozdes, Duygu; Gundogdu, Ali; Bulut, Volkan N.; Duran, Celal [Karadeniz Technical University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Department of Chemistry, 61080 Trabzon (Turkey); Soylak, Mustafa, E-mail: soylak@erciyes.edu.tr [Erciyes University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Department of Chemistry, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey)

    2009-09-15

    The present study was carried out to assess the ability of original waste mud (o-WM) and different types of activated waste mud which are acid-activated (a-WM) and precipitated waste mud (p-WM), in order to remove excess of fluoride from aqueous solution by using batch technique. The p-WM exhibited greater performance than the others. Adsorption studies were conducted as a function of pH, contact time, initial fluoride concentration, adsorbent concentration, temperature, etc. Studies were also performed to understand the effect of some co-existing ions present in aqueous solutions. Adsorption process was found to be almost independent of pH for all types of waste mud. Among the kinetic models tested for p-WM, pseudo-second-order model fitted the kinetic data well with a perfect correlation coefficient value of 1.00. It was found that the adequate time for the adsorption equilibrium of fluoride was only 1 h. Thermodynamic parameters including the Gibbs free energy ({Delta}G{sup o}), enthalpy ({Delta}H{sup o}), and entropy ({Delta}S{sup o}) revealed that adsorption of fluoride ions on the p-WM was feasible, spontaneous and endothermic in the temperature range of 0-40 deg. C. Experimental data showed a good fit with the Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm models. Results of this study demonstrated the effectiveness and feasibility of WM for removal of fluoride ions from aqueous solution.

  13. Discrimination of fluoride and phosphate contamination in central Florida for analyses of environmental effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coker, A. E.; Marshall, R.; Thomson, F.

    1972-01-01

    A study was made of the spatial registration of fluoride and phosphate pollution parameters in central Florida by utilizing remote sensing techniques. Multispectral remote sensing data were collected over the area and processed to produce multispectral recognition maps. These processed data were used to map land areas and waters containing concentrations of fluoride and phosphate. Maps showing distribution of affected and unaffected vegetation were produced. In addition, the multispectral data were processed by single band radiometric slicing to produce radiometric maps used to delineate areas of high ultraviolet radiance, which indicates high fluoride concentrations. The multispectral parameter maps and radiometric maps in combination showed distinctive patterns, which are correlated with areas known to be affected by fluoride and phosphate contamination. These remote sensing techniques have the potential for regional use to assess the environmental impact of fluoride and phosphate wastes in central Florida.

  14. pH and the cytotoxicity of fluoride in an animal cell culture system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helgeland, K.; Leirskar, J.

    1976-01-01

    To investigate the mechanism for the toxicity of silicate cement as observed in a cell culture system, the effects of pH and fluoride were tested on human epithelial cells (NCTC 2544). At pH 7.3, fluoride concentrations from 15 to 25 μg/ml (0.79 to 1.3 mM) had a growth inhibitory effect. When the pH of the incubation medium was lowered to the range 7.0 to 6.4, an enhanced cytotoxic effect of fluoride was found, and even at 5 to 10 μg/ml growth inhibition occurred. Concomitant with the enhanced cytotoxicity of fluoride at low pH, there was an increased utilization of glucose and formation of lactate. Upon lowering the pH of the incubation medium from 7.4 to 6.7, a twofold increase in the intracellular concentration of fluoride was found. (author)

  15. Average daily and annual courses of 222Rn concentration in some natural medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holy, K.; Bohm, R.; Polaskova, A.; Stelina, J.; Sykora, I.; Hola, O.

    1996-01-01

    Simultaneous measurements of the 222 Rn concentration in the outdoor atmosphere of Bratislava and in the soil air over one year period have been made. Daily and seasonal variations of the 222 Rn concentration in both media were found. Some attributes of these variations as well as methods of measurements are presented in this work. (author). 17 refs., 6 figs

  16. Correlation of radon and thoron concentrations with natural radioactivity of soil in Zonguldak, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koray, Abdullah; Akkaya, Gizem; Kahraman, Ayşegül

    2017-02-01

    Radon and thoron gases are produced by the decay of the radioactive elements those are radium and thorium in the soil. In this study, the correlations between soil radon and thoron concentration with their parent nuclide (226Ra and 232Th) concentrations in collected soil samples from the same locations were evaluated. The result of the measurement shows that the distribution of radon and thoron in soil showed the same tendency as 226Ra and 232Th distribution. It was found a weak correlation between the radon and the 226Ra concentration (R =0.57), and between the thoron and the 232Th concentration (R=0.64). No strong correlation was observed between soil-gas radon and thoron concentration (R = 0.29).

  17. [Experimental study on the influence of natural and artificial ventilation on indoor radon concentration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remetti, R; Gigante, G E

    2010-01-01

    The study presents the results of a campaign of measurements on the daily radon concentration using a Genitron Alpha Guard spectrometer. All the measurements have been intended to highlight the radon concentration variability during the 24 hours of the day and trying to find correlations with other ambient parameters such as temperature and pressure or local conditions such as the presence or not of a forced ventilation system. The main part of the measurements have been carried in the area of the Nuclear Measurement Laboratory of the Department of Basic and Applied Sciences for Engineering of "Sapienza" University of Rome. Results show a rapid rise of radon concentration in the night, when the artificial ventilation system was off and with door and windows closed. In the morning, after the opening of door and windows, the concentration falls down abruptly. With artificial ventilation system in function concentration never reaches significant values.

  18. Transport Phenomena Projects: Natural Convection between Porous, Concentric Cylinders--A Method to Learn and to Innovate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saatadjian, Esteban; Lesage, Francois; Mota, Jose Paulo B.

    2013-01-01

    A project that involves the numerical simulation of transport phenomena is an excellent method to teach this subject to senior/graduate chemical engineering students. The subject presented here has been used in our senior/graduate course, it concerns the study of natural convection heat transfer between two concentric, horizontal, saturated porous…

  19. Natural convection heat transfer from a long heated vertical cylinder to an adjacent air gap of concentric and eccentric conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hosseini, R.; Kolaei, Alireza Rezania; Alipour, M.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, the natural convection heat transfer from a long vertical electrically heated cylinder to an adjacent air gap is experimentally studied. The aspect and diameter ratios of the cylinder are 55.56 and 6.33, respectively. The experimental measurements were obtained for a concentric cond...

  20. Determination of natural radioactivity and the concentration of elements in soil and plants at Krau Wildlife Reserve, Temerloh, Pahang

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hafiz Hadzori

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the natural radioactivity and the concentration of elements in soil and plants at Krau Wildlife Reserve, Pahang. Soil and plant samples collected were air dried and heated in the oven at temperature of 100 degree Celsius. Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass-Spectrometer (ICP-MS) was used to determine the natural radioactivity and elemental contents of each sample. Results showed that the concentration of U-238 and Th-232 varied from each sampling site. The concentration of Th-232 is higher than of U-238. For soil and plants samples, the natural radioactivity for both radionuclides were below 72 Bq/ kg. 15 elements present in both soil and plant samples, among other are Al, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Ca, Zn, Co, Cd and As. The concentration of each elements differs for every sampling site. The elements with higher concentration are Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mg and Mn. This study showed that monocotyledon taking up more Mg than dicotyledons whereas dicotyledon plants taking up more Al. (author)

  1. Investigation of the fluctuation range of activity concentrations of natural radionuclides in surface air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkler, R.; Hoetzl, H.

    1985-01-01

    Daily and seasonal concentration fluctuations of short-lived Rn fission products observed and the seasonal and long-term concentration fluctuations of Pb-210, Po-210, Ra-226, Ra-228, K-40 and Be-7 are discussed; the frequency distributions of the concentration values are illustrated. For a period of several years, the following mean values of activity concentrations were found (μBq/m 3 ): Pb-210: 600 Ra-226: 1.3 K-40: 13, Po-210: 33 Ra-228: 0.5 Be-7: 3700. In accordance with the origin from the soil, there is a significant correlation between the respective activity concentration and air-borne dust concentration for Ra-226, Ra-228, and K-40. The investigation revealed a most significant correlation between the Pb-210 concentration and the stagnancy index, the latter being a measure for the degree of blending of the surface layer of air. The resuspension factors found for Ra-226 and Pb-210 are discussed. (orig./HP) [de

  2. A survey of natural uranium concentrations in drinking water supplies in Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alirezazadeh, N.; Garshasbi, N.

    2003-01-01

    Background: Measurement of background concentration of uranium in drinking water is very important for many reasons, specially, for human health. The uranium concentration in drinking water in many countries is a matter of concern for clinical and radioactive poisoning. Materials and methods: The uranium concentration in drinking water is determined using laser fluorimetric uranium analyzer. For this purpose after sampling, sample handling and sample preserving, sample preparation and treatment for reduction of organic matter, the concentration of uranium is measured. Results: To determine the uranium concentrations in drinking water in Iran, nearly 200 water samples were collected from all sources supplying drinking water in 21 provincial centers in the country. The wells were found to be the main source for drinking water. Uranium in the samples was measured by a laser fluorimetry technique. According to results, the concentration values found in the wells ranged from 1.0 to 10.90 μgL -1 , while nearly 95 percent of the cities had uranium concentrations in the wells at less than 4.70 μgL -1 . Surface waters showed uranium concentrations in the range of 0.75 to 2.58 μgL -1 . The daily intake of uranium from drinking water was estimated to range from 2.04 to 21.80 μgd -1 , with the mean value of 5.44 μgd -1 . Conclusion: Highest uranium mean concentration of 10.9 μgL -1 was found in Ardabil area where more studies should be done in that province in the future

  3. Fluoride bioaccumulation and toxic effects on the survival and behavior of the endangered white-clawed crayfish Austropotamobius pallipes (Lereboullet).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre-Sierra, Arantxa; Alonso, Alvaro; Camargo, Julio A

    2013-08-01

    Laboratory experiments were performed to examine the toxic effects of fluoride (F(-)) on the survival and behavior of white-clawed crayfish (Austropotamobius pallipes). Body fluoride contents (bioaccumulation) of test crayfish were also examined. No significant differences between male and female crayfish regarding mortality, escape (tail-flip) response, and fluoride bioaccumulation were detected. For mortality, 48-, 72-, 96-, 120-, 144-, 168-, and 192-h median lethal concentrations (LC50) were estimated to be 93.0, 55.3, 42.7, 36.5, 32.9, 30.6, and 28.9 mg F(-)/l, respectively. For the escape response, 48-, 72-, 96-, 120-, 144-, 168- and 192-h median effective concentrations (EC50) were estimated to be 18.4, 11.1, 8.6, 7.4, 6.7, 6.2 and 5.9 mg F(-)/l, respectively. Average food consumption in test crayfish tended to decrease with increasing water fluoride concentration with a 192-h lowest-observed effect concentration of 10.7 mg F(-)/l. These results indicate that the escape response was the most sensitive end point to fluoride toxicity followed by food consumption and mortality. Fluoride bioaccumulation in test crayfish increased with increasing water fluoride concentration and exposure time. The exoskeleton accumulated more fluoride than muscle. A comparison of the obtained results with previous data for other freshwater invertebrates shows that white-clawed crayfish are relatively tolerant to fluoride toxicity. We conclude that fluoride pollution in freshwater ecosystems should not be viewed as an important risk factor contributing to the catastrophic decrease of A. pallipes in many European countries. Our results indicate that fluoride bioaccumulation in A. pallipes might be used as a bioindicator of fluoride pollution in freshwater ecosystems where it is present.

  4. Beryllium production using beryllium fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubler, Carlos Henrique

    1993-01-01

    This work presents the beryllium production by thermal decomposition of the ammonium beryllium fluoride, followed by magnesium reduction, obtained in the small pilot plant of the Brazilian National Nuclear Energy Commission - Nuclear Engineering Institute

  5. Lyophilization, Reconstitution, and DBP Formation in Reverse-Osmosis Concentrated Natural Organic Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drinking water treatment and disinfection byproduct (DBP) research can be complicated by natural organic matter (NOM) temporal variability. NOM preservation by lyophilization (freeze-drying) has been long practiced to address this issue; however, its applicability for drinking w...

  6. Chronic Fluoride Toxicity: Dental Fluorosis

    OpenAIRE

    DenBesten, Pamela; Li, Wu

    2011-01-01

    Dental fluorosis occurs as a result of excess fluoride ingestion during tooth formation. Enamel fluorosis and primary dentin fluorosis can only occur when teeth are forming, and therefore fluoride exposure (as it relates to dental fluorosis) occurs during childhood. In the permanent dentition, this would begin with the lower incisors, which complete mineralization at approximately 2–3 years of age, and end after mineralization of the third molars. The white opaque appearance of fluorosed enam...

  7. [Exposure to fluorides from drinking water in the city of Aguascalientes, Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trejo-Vázquez, R; Bonilla-Petriciolet, A

    2001-08-01

    Determine the fluoride content in all the wells that supply drinking water to the city of Aguascalientes, Mexico, in order to establish the population's degree of exposure. The fluoride content of the 126 wells that supply drinking water to the city of Aguascalientes was determined, using the SPADNS method, in accordance with two Mexican regulations, NMX-AA-77-1982 and NMX-014-SSAI-1993. Using that data, we created fluoride isopleth maps showing the distribution of fluoride concentrations in the water supplies for the city of Aguascalientes. We also estimated exposure doses for the city's inhabitants. The mean analysis uncertainty was 3.9%. Seventy-three wells had a fluoride concentration of" 1.5 mg/L, which was the maximum permissible value set by the Mexican standards then in effect. All the maximum exposure doses surpassed the minimum risk level set by Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) of the Department of Health and Human Services of the United States of America. In the children under 1 year of age, even the minimum does was slightly higher than the ATSDR risk level. From estimating the fluoride exposure doses caused by water consumption in the city of Aguascalientes and comparing those doses with ones from other states in Mexico, we concluded that the fluoride intake in Aguascalientes represents a potential risk for inhabitants' health. The fluoride content of the city's drinking water should be reduced to 0.69 mg/L.

  8. Electrorecovery of tantalum in molten fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinola, A.; Dutra, A.J.B.; Silva, F.T. da

    1988-01-01

    Considering the privileged situation of Brazil as a productor of tantaliferous minerals, the authors have in view the development of a technology for production of metallic tantalum via molten salts electrolysis; this has the advantage of improving the aggregate value of exportation products, additionally to tantalum oxide and tantalum concentrates. Having in view the preliminary determintion of better conditions of temperature, electrolyte composition and current density for this process, electrolysis were conducted with a solvent composed of an eutetic mixture of lithium, sodium and potassium fluoride for dipotassium fluotantalate and occasionally for tantalum oxide. Current efficiencies as high as 83% were obtained in favoured conditions. (author) [pt

  9. Natural uranium concentrations of native plants over a low-grade ore body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheppard, M.I.; Thibault, D.H.

    1984-01-01

    Plant uranium concentrations generally reflect soil or rock substrate concentrations in upland areas, but they may not in lowland areas where the rhizoids of Sphagnum spp. and rocks of Ledum groenlandicum may be in direct contact either continuously or on a seasonal basis with the groundwater. This study points out the importance of selecting plant species and collection sites where the true substrate can be well defined and sampled. Sphagnum spp. and Ledum groenlandicum best reflect the substrate uranium concentrations in lowland areas, Umbilicaria spp. and Cladonia spp. in rock outcrop, and Picea mariana and Betula papyrifera in upland locations. The study shows the best plant part to sample is the older tissue such as the stems, twigs, and wood. Since no systematic changes in plant tissue concentrations were found throughout the season, sampling can be carried out anytime. Expression of soil concentrations on an ash weight basis gave a considerably different result than those on a dry weight basis, particularly when comparisons were made between litter-enriched mineral soil and true organic soils. The amount of ash varied among plant organs, species, and taxonomic divisions, and a constant value cannot be used to convert plant ash concentrations on a dry weight basis

  10. Fluoride Consumption and Its Impact on Oral Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Fernando Jacinto-Alemán

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The purpose of this study was to evaluate caries and dental fluorosis among Mexican preschoolers and school-aged children in a non-endemic zone for fluorosis and to measure its biological indicators. Methods. DMFT, DMFS, dmft, dmfs, and CDI indexes were applied. Fluoride urinary excretion and fluoride concentrations in home water, table salt, bottled water, bottled drinks, and toothpaste were determined. Results. Schoolchildren presented fluorosis (CDI = 0.96 and dental caries (DMFT = 2.64 and DMFS = 3.97. Preschoolers presented dmft = 4.85 and dmfs = 8.80. DMFT and DMFS were lower in children with mild to moderate dental fluorosis (DF. Variable fluoride concentrations were found in the analyzed products (home water = 0.18–0.44 ppm F, table salt = 0–485 ppm F, bottled water = 0.18–0.47 ppm F, juices = 0.08–1.42 ppm F, nectars = 0.07–1.30 ppm F, bottled drinks = 0.10–1.70 ppm F, toothpaste = 0–2,053 ppm F. Mean daily fluoride excretion was 422 ± 176 µg/24 h for schoolchildren and 367 ± 150 µg/24 h for preschoolers. Conclusions. Data from our study show that, despite values of excretion within an optimal fluoride intake range, the prevalence of caries was significant in both groups, and 60% of the 11- to 12-year-old children presented with dental fluorosis. In addition, variable fluoride concentrations in products frequently consumed by children were found.

  11. Fluoride reactions with dental enamel following different forms of fluoride supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellstroem, I.; Ericsson, Y.

    1976-01-01

    The reactions with dental enamel of NaF as tablets dissolved in different beverages or supplied with NaCl, simulating domestic salt fluoridation, were studied in tests with enamel surfaces and enamel powder. It was confirmed that powdered enamel can react quite differently from enamel surfaces under certain conditions. Enamel surfaces took up much more fluoride (F) from orange juice than from water or milk, and neither the low pH nor the citrate content of the juice increased the formation of unstable CaF 2 in the enamel, as judged from a KOH leaching test. The F uptake by enamel surfaces from 0.25 mM NaF in 175 mM NaCl, corresponding to a dish prepared with salt containing 500 parts/10 6 F, was about 80 percent greater than from the same NaF concentration in water. This NaCl concentration did not increase the formation of CaF 2 in the enamel, as judged from the KOH test, while 350 mM NaCl caused a moderate increase. The investigations support the administration of NaF tablets with orange juice and the plans for domestic salt fluoridation. (author)

  12. Disinfection byproduct formation in reverse-osmosis concentrated and lyophilized natural organic matter from a drinking water source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressman, Jonathan G; McCurry, Daniel L; Parvez, Shahid; Rice, Glenn E; Teuschler, Linda K; Miltner, Richard J; Speth, Thomas F

    2012-10-15

    Drinking water treatment and disinfection byproduct (DBP) research can be complicated by natural organic matter (NOM) temporal variability. NOM preservation by lyophilization (freeze-drying) has been long practiced to address this issue; however, its applicability for drinking water research has been limited because the selected NOM sources are atypical of most drinking water sources. The purpose of this research was to demonstrate that reconstituted NOM from a lyophilized reverse-osmosis (RO) concentrate of a typical drinking water source closely represents DBP formation in the original NOM. A preliminary experiment assessed DBP formation kinetics and yields in concentrated NOM, which demonstrated that chlorine decays faster in concentrate, in some cases leading to altered DBP speciation. Potential changes in NOM reactivity caused by lyophilization were evaluated by chlorination of lyophilized and reconstituted NOM, its parent RO concentrate, and the source water. Bromide lost during RO concentration was replaced by adding potassium bromide prior to chlorination. Although total measured DBP formation tended to decrease slightly and unidentified halogenated organic formation tended to increase slightly as a result of RO concentration, the changes associated with lyophilization were minor. In lyophilized NOM reconstituted back to source water TOC levels and then chlorinated, the concentrations of 19 of 21 measured DBPs, constituting 96% of the total identified DBP mass, were statistically indistinguishable from those in the chlorinated source water. Furthermore, the concentrations of 16 of 21 DBPs in lyophilized NOM reconstituted back to the RO concentrate TOC levels, constituting 86% DBP mass, were statistically indistinguishable from those in the RO concentrate. This study suggests that lyophilization can be used to preserve concentrated NOM without substantially altering the precursors to DBP formation. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. modified bentonite clay for the removal of fluoride from aqueous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NICOLAAS

    reagents and Total Ionic Solution Buffer (TISAB-III) were .... Equation 3 and it is used to describe liquid–solid phase adsorp- .... 0 and 1 indicating adsorption process was favourable at room temperature for all the adsorbate concentrations tested. 3.2.3. .... Marathe, Arsenic and fluoride contaminated groundwaters: a review.

  14. Novel curcumin–based method of fluoride determination – the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fluoride concentrations above and below certain limits are deleterious to human health, having been implicated in diseases such as fluorosis, arthritis, caries, cancers etc. Better methods of its qualitative and quantitative determination are therefore necessary. A novel, less toxic and more environmentally friendly analytical ...

  15. Investigation of anti-Müllerian hormone concentrations in relation to natural conception rate and time to pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korsholm, Anne-Sofie; Petersen, Kathrine Birch; Bentzen, Janne Gasseholm; Hilsted, Linda Maria; Andersen, Anders Nyboe; Hvidman, Helene Westring

    2018-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate whether anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) concentrations can predict pregnancy rates and time to pregnancy (TTP) in women attempting to conceive naturally/having an unplanned conception, and whether there is a lower AMH threshold compatible with natural conception. This prospective cohort study included 260 women aged 25-42 years in two subcohorts: (A) healthcare workers at Rigshospitalet (2008-2010), and (B) women consulting the Fertility Assessment and Counselling Clinic (2011-2014), Rigshospitalet, Denmark. Pregnancy rates and TTP at 2-year follow-up were stratified into AMH groups: low: 33 pmol/l. Pregnancy rates increased with increasing AMH: 60.1% (low) versus 70.0% (intermediate) versus 78.3% (high) (P = 0.03). The highest pregnancy rate (84.1%) was seen in regular cycling women with high AMH. TTP was reduced in women with high AMH compared with intermediate or low AMH (stepwise trend test P = 0.01). Natural conceptions were observed with AMH concentrations down to 1.2 pmol/l. In conclusion, high AMH, especially in ovulatory women, was associated with higher pregnancy rates. Nonetheless, TTP reflected a large variation in fecundity within similar AMH concentrations and natural conceptions occurred with AMH down to 1.2 pmol/l. Copyright © 2018 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. CDOM fluorescence as a proxy of DOC concentration in natural waters: a comparison of four contrasting tropical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochelle-Newall, E; Hulot, F D; Janeau, J L; Merroune, A

    2014-01-01

    Chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) fluorescence or absorption is often proposed as a rapid alternative to chemical methods for the estimation of bulk dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration in natural waters. However, the robustness of this method across a wide range of systems remains to be shown. We measured CDOM fluorescence and DOC concentration in four tropical freshwater and coastal environments (estuary and coastal, tropical shallow lakes, water from the freshwater lens of two small islands, and soil leachates). We found that although this method can provide an estimation of DOC concentration in sites with low variability in DOC and CDOM sources in systems where the variability of DOC and CDOM sources are high, this method should not be used as it will lead to errors in the estimation of the bulk DOC concentration.

  17. Concentration of Naegleria fowleri in natural waters used for recreational purposes in Sonora, Mexico (November 2007-October 2008).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lares-Villa, Fernando; Hernández-Peña, Claudia

    2010-09-01

    A survey was designed to know the concentration of Naegleria fowleri in recreational areas in Hornos, Sonora, during a year. Samples were taken monthly at La Isleta and Las Palmas and the total amoeba counts were obtained by the most probable number method (MPN). The identification of N. fowleri was made by PCR. The maximum concentration of total thermophilic amoebae was 9175 MPN/L for La Isleta and 3477 MPN/L for Las Palmas. Thermophilic Naegleria were present mainly during summer and fall. October's concentrations were up to 201 MPN/L, at both places. The maximum concentrations of N. fowleri were 201 MPN/L and 18 MPN/L for La Isleta and Las Palmas respectively, and were isolated from August to October. The presence of N. fowleri in these particular natural bodies of water reinforces the need for adaptation of preventive measures to avoid cases of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. ANAEROBIC DIGESTION OF WASTEWATER WITH HIGH SULFATE CONCENTRATION USING MICRO-AERATION AND NATURAL ZEOLITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Montalvo

    Full Text Available Abstract The behavior of anaerobic digestion in batch and UASB reactors using a microaerobic process and natural zeolites was studied. Laboratory assays were carried out across 4 sets of variables: different COD/SO42- ratios, different airflow levels, with and without natural zeolites and room and mesophilic controlled temperatures. The microaerobic process demonstrated hydrogen sulfide removal levels exceeding 90% in most cases, while maintaining the flammable condition of the generated biogas. The level of COD removal exceeded 75% in UASB reactors despite their operation under very low hydraulic retention times (2.8-4.8 hours. The effectiveness of natural zeolites in accelerating UASB reactor startup was demonstrated. Results showing the positive influence of zeolites on the granulation process in UASB reactors were also achieved.

  19. Production and use of carrier-free 18F in studies on the effect of trace amounts of fluoride on the metabolism of the oral cariogenic bacterium Streptococcus mutans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Psarros, N.; Duschner, H.

    1988-01-01

    The utilization of carrier-free ionic 18 F is a convenient method for studying the effects of very low extracellular fluoride concentrations on the metabolism of the cariogenic bacterium Streptococcus mutans. A method was developed for the preparation of carrier-free aqueous solutions of ionic 18 F with high specific activity (about 70 7 Bq/ml). Fluoride distribution and fluoride binding experiments show that submicromolar fluoride concentrations had a negative effect on the metabolism of Streptococcus mutans. (author) 10 refs

  20. Influence of fluoride on aluminum toxicity to Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Steven J.; Haines, Terry A.

    1995-01-01

    Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) alevins were exposed to various aluminum (0–4700 μg/L) and four fluoride (0–500 μg/L) concentrations at two pH values (5.5 and 6.5) for 4- and 30-d periods. In the 4-d tests, aluminum with fluoride was less toxic at pH 6.5 than at pH 5.5, whereas without fluoride, pH had no effect. In the 30-d test, mortality in all treatments was 17–21% at pH 5.5, but only 3–7% at pH 6.5. Fish length and weight after 30 d were reduced in all fluoride–aluminum treatments at pH 5.5, but only in the 200-μg/L aluminum without fluoride treatment at pH 6.5. At pH 5.5 and 6.5 without aluminum, histomorphological examinations revealed no abnormalities in gill tissue. However, in aluminum exposure with no fluoride, gill filaments and secondary lamellae were swollen and thickened. Addition of fluoride at pH 6.5 alleviated some gill damage. At pH 5.5 and 200 μg/L aluminum, addition of 100 μg/L fluoride reduced swelling of gill lamellae, but 200 μg/L fluoride did not reduce swelling. Low fluoride concentrations (fluoride concentrations (> 100 μg/L) may not reduce aluminum-induced effects.

  1. Data on daily fluoride intake based on drinking water consumption prepared by household desalinators working by reverse osmosis process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbasdehi, Vahid Noroozi; Dobaradaran, Sina; Esmaili, Abdolhamid; Mirahmadi, Roghayeh; Ghasemi, Fatemeh Faraji; Keshtkar, Mozhgan

    2016-09-01

    In this data article, we evaluated the daily fluoride contents in 20 household desalinators working by reverse osmosis (RO) process in Bushehr, Iran. The concentration levels of fluoride in inlet and outlet waters were determined by the standard SPADNS method using a spectrophotometer (M501 Single Beam Scanning UV/VIS, UK). The fluoride content in outlet waters were compared with EPA and WHO guidelines for drinking water.

  2. Focus on Fluoride and Fluorosis by Studying the Ground Water Quality in some Villages of Nalgonda, Nalgonda District, Andhra Pradesh

    OpenAIRE

    , Ishrath Aish; , B.L.P. Babu; , K. Sreenu

    2011-01-01

    The fluoride content of ground water was determined in eight villages of Shalsher vagu, Nalgonda district, Andhra Pradesh, where it is the only source for drinking water. Various water quality parameters such as Hydrogen potential, Electrical conductivity, Total dissolved solids, Total hardness, Total Alkalies and Fluoride were determined. The results indicated considerable variations among the analysed samples with respect to the above parameters the concentration of Fluoride in groundwater ...

  3. Sedimentology models from activity concentration measurements: application to the 'Bay of Cadiz' Natural Park (SW Spain)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ligero, R.A.; Vidal, J.; Melendez, M.J.; Hamani, M.; Casas-Ruiz, M.

    2009-01-01

    A previous study on seabed sediments of the Bay of Cadiz (SW of Spain) enabled us to identify several relations between sedimentological variables and activity concentrations of environmental radionuclides such as 137 Cs, 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K. In this paper the study has been extended to a large neighbouring inter-tidal area in order to establish if the above mentioned models can be generalized. As a result we have determined that the measured activity concentrations are closely to the values predicted by the theoretical models (correlation coefficient range = 0.85-0.93). Furthermore, the proposal model for granulometric facies as a function of activity concentrations of the abovementioned radionuclides provides for the sediments distribution a representation which agrees with the values of the tidal energy distribution obtained using numeric models calibrated with experimental data from current meters and water level recorders

  4. Mie scattering in heavy-metal fluoride glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edgar, A.

    1996-01-01

    Heavy-metal fluoride glasses comprise mixtures of heavy-cation fluorides such as those of zirconium, barium, and lanthanum together with some stabilising fluorides such as AlF 3 . For particular relative proportions, the mixtures form a glass rather than a polycrystalline material when quenched from the melt. The particularly useful features of these glasses are the wide spectral region (∼200nm-8000nm) over which they are transparent, the low minimum attenuation at the centre of the spectral window, and the ease with which optically-active rare-earth ions can be incorporated, leading to potential applications in passive and active fibre optics. The minimal attenuation, which is potentially lower than for silica fibre, is generally limited by wavelength-independent scattering by particle and gas bubble inclusions. We have observed a new wavelength-dependent scattering effect in fluoride glass of the well-known composition ZLABN20. In this paper, we report on work in progress on the optical extinction and scattering spectrum of the fluoride glasses, and discuss the spectra in terms of Mie's scattering theory. The chemical nature of the scattering centres in these nominally 'pure' glasses is at present a puzzle, and relative merits of various possible models will be compared

  5. Effect of sodium fluoride on phytase activity during germination of Pisum sativum L. seeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauskrecht, I

    1972-01-01

    The effects of fluoride ion, in concentrations varying from 0 to 4 mM F/sup -/, on phytase activity in the course of germination of Pisum sativum L. seeds and in the course of incubation in vitro are reported. The fluoride ion in 1 mM concentration cause a significant 80% decrease of the phytase activity in the incubation medium and a 24% decrease in the course of germination. The inhibition of phytase, as well as its synthesis, by fluoride ion during germination may influence the metabolism of phosphorus at the initial stage of ontogenesis.

  6. El fluoruro en aguas de consumo y su asociación con variables geológicas y geográficas de Cuba Fluoride in drinking water in Cuba and its association with geological and geographical variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliam Cuéllar Luna

    2003-11-01

    . RESULTS: In 83.1% of the localities, the water samples were collected from wells and springs, and the remaining 16.9% came from dams and rivers. Of the 753 localities studied, 675 of them (89.6% had low or medium fluoride concentrations (under 0.7 mg/L. The eastern region of the country was the one most affected by high fluoride concentrations in the waters, followed by the central region of the country. The majority of the localities with high natural fluoride concentrations were in areas located on Cretaceous volcanic arc rocks. The presence of fluoride in the drinking waters was related to the alignments with the earth's crust, in rock complexes of volcanic-sedimentary origin and of intrusive origin and also in carbonate rocks. However, the highest fluoride concentrations generally coincided with rock complexes of volcanic-sedimentary origin and of intrusive origin. All the localities with high fluoride concentrations in the water were associated with wells. CONCLUSIONS: The fluoride concentration is low or medium in the drinking water sources for 89.6% of the Cuban localities with at least 1 000 inhabitants. Geological and geographical characteristics can help identify areas with optimal or high concentrations of the fluoride ion in the drinking water.

  7. Effect of HF concentration on the composition and distribution of Ge species in the framework of ITQ-13 and ITQ-17 zeolites

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Xiaolong

    2013-04-01

    Two germanosilicates with zeolitic structures, namely ITQ-13 and ITQ-17, have been synthesized from gels containing various amounts of hydrofluoric acid. Although both zeolites possess similar compositions, they differ not only by their pore size and framework topology but also by the nature of the cavities surrounding fluoride species in the structure. For ITQ-17, in which fluoride is almost exclusively located in D4R units, a decrease in HF concentration in the gel has no influence on the fluoride content in the zeolite. However, it favors the incorporation of germanium species in the framework, particularly in D4R units. Zeolites obtained at low HF concentrations are characterized by high Ge contents and Si/Ge atomic ratios close to 1 in D4R units. In the case of ITQ-13, the possibility for fluoride to reside not only in D4R units but also in the larger [415262] cages minimizes the influence of the HF concentration on the zeolite framework composition. Reducing the HF concentration in the gel has no effect on the Si/Ge ratio in the final zeolite but it decreases the fluoride content in the structure. At low HF concentration, fluoride is absent from [415262] cages and is almost exclusively present in all-silica D4R units. As the concentration increases, fluoride starts to occupy Ge-rich D4R and [415 262] cages, as clearly evidenced by 19F NMR. By contrast to ITQ-17, the amount of HF in the gel does not influence the distribution of Ge species in the framework. © 2012 Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. The Superstatistical Nature and Interoccurrence Time of Atmospheric Mercury Concentration Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    The probability density function (PDF) of the time intervals between subsequent extreme events in atmospheric Hg0 concentration data series from different latitudes has been investigated. The Hg0 dynamic possesses a long-term memory autocorrelation function. Above a fixed thresh...

  9. Radiocesium concentrations in wholebody homogenates and several body compartments of naturally contaminated white-tailed deer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brisbin, I.L. Jr.; Smith, M.H.

    1975-01-01

    Radiocesium concentrations were determined for various tissues, organs, and other body compartments of 17 white-tailed deer collected from contaminated habitats on the AEC Savannah River Plant. Highest levels of radiocesium concentration were found in skeletal muscle, feces, kidney, and adrenal tissue, which averaged between 50 to 70 pCi radiocesium/g (dry weight). Liver and bone showed the lowest average values. With the exception of feces and rumen contents, nearly all tissues and organ compartments showed significant positive linear correlations between their respective radiocesium levels. Analyses of whole-body homogenates indicated that the deer examined averaged 9.91 pCi radiocesium/g (whole-body wet weight). These values were best predicted from the radiocesium contents of skeletal muscle, using the relationship: pCi radiocesium/g dry whole-body weight = 3.33 + 0.60 (pCi/g dry skeletal muscle). Calculation of a weighted ''predictive index'' indicated that concentrations in skeletal muscle best predicted the overall pattern and levels of radiocesium distribution within all compartments of the deer body. Radiocesium concentrations in the brain, heart, and liver, respectively, followed muscle in order of predictive ability

  10. Matrix supported tailored polymer for solid phase extraction of fluoride from variety of aqueous streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakur, Neha; Kumar, Sanjukta A.; Wagh, D.N.; Das, Sadananda; Pandey, Ashok K.; Kumar, Sangita D.; Reddy, A.V.R.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Th complexed with poly (bis[2-(methacryloyloxy)-ethyl]phosphate) as tailored polymer membranes. ► Membranes offered high capacity and selectivity for fluoride in aqueous media. ► Quantitative uptake (80 ± 5%) of fluoride. ► Fast sorption kinetics. ► Reusability of polymer membranes. - Abstract: Fluoride related health hazards (fluorosis) are a major environmental problem in many regions of the world. It affects teeth; skeleton and its accumulation over a long period can lead to changes in the DNA structure. It is thus absolutely essential to bring down the fluoride levels to acceptable limits. Here, we present a new inorganic–organic hybrid polymer sorbent having tailored fixed-sites for fluoride sorption. The matrix supported poly (bis[2-(methacryloyloxy)-ethyl]phosphate) was prepared by photo-initiator induced graft-polymerization in fibrous and microporous (sheet) host poly(propylene) substrates. These substrates were conditioned for selective fluoride sorption by forming thorium complex with phosphate groups on bis[2-methacryloyloxy)-ethyl] phosphate (MEP). These tailored sorbents were studied for their selectivity towards fluoride in aqueous media having different chemical conditions. The fibrous sorbent was found to take up fluoride with a faster rate (15 min for ≈76% sorption) than the sheet sorbent. But, the fluoride loading capacity of sheet sorbent (4320 mg kg −1 ), was higher than fibrous and any other sorbent reported in the literature so far. The sorbent developed in the present work was found to be reusable after desorption of fluoride using NaOH solution. It was tested for solid phase extraction of fluoride from natural water samples.

  11. Origin of high ammonium, arsenic and boron concentrations in the proximity of a mine: Natural vs. anthropogenic processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheiber, Laura, E-mail: scheiber.ls@gmail.com [Institute of Environmental Assessment and Water Research, CSIC, Jordi Girona 18. E-08034 Barcelona (Spain); Ayora, Carlos; Vázquez-Suñé, Enric [Institute of Environmental Assessment and Water Research, CSIC, Jordi Girona 18. E-08034 Barcelona (Spain); Cendón, Dioni I. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2232 (Australia); School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences (BEES), University of New South Wales (UNSW), NSW 2052 (Australia); Soler, Albert [Departament de Cristallografia, Mineralogia i Dipòsits Minerals, Facultat de Geologia, Universitat de Barcelona, C/Martí Franquès, sn., Barcelona (Spain); Baquero, Juan Carlos [Cobre Las Cruces S.A., Carretera SE-3410 km 4, 41860 Gerena, Sevilla (Spain)

    2016-01-15

    High ammonium (NH{sub 4}), arsenic (As) and boron (B) concentrations are found in aquifers worldwide and are often related to human activities. However, natural processes can also lead to groundwater quality problems. High NH{sub 4}, As and B concentrations have been identified in the confined, deep portion of the Niebla-Posadas aquifer, which is near the Cobre Las Cruces (CLC) mining complex. The mine has implemented a Drainage and Reinjection System comprising two rings of wells around the open pit mine, were the internal ring drains and the external ring is used for water reinjection into the aquifer. Differentiating geogenic and anthropogenic sources and processes is therefore crucial to ensuring good management of groundwater in this sensitive area where groundwater is extensively used for agriculture, industry, mining and human supply. No NH{sub 4}, As and B are found in the recharge area, but their concentrations increase with depth, salinity and residence time of water in the aquifer. The increased salinity down-flow is interpreted as the result of natural mixing between infiltrated meteoric water and the remains of connate waters (up to 8%) trapped within the pores. Ammonium and boron are interpreted as the result of marine solid organic matter degradation by the sulfate dissolved in the recharge water. The light δ{sup 15}N{sub NH4} values confirm that its origin is linked to marine organic matter. High arsenic concentrations in groundwater are interpreted as being derived from reductive dissolution of As-bearing goethite by dissolved organic matter. The lack of correlation between dissolved Fe and As is explained by the massive precipitation of siderite, which is abundantly found in the mineralization. Therefore, the presence of high arsenic, ammonium and boron concentrations is attributed to natural processes. Ammonium, arsenic, boron and salinity define three zones of groundwater quality: the first zone is close to the recharge area and contains water

  12. Origin of high ammonium, arsenic and boron concentrations in the proximity of a mine: Natural vs. anthropogenic processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheiber, Laura; Ayora, Carlos; Vázquez-Suñé, Enric; Cendón, Dioni I.; Soler, Albert; Baquero, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    High ammonium (NH_4), arsenic (As) and boron (B) concentrations are found in aquifers worldwide and are often related to human activities. However, natural processes can also lead to groundwater quality problems. High NH_4, As and B concentrations have been identified in the confined, deep portion of the Niebla-Posadas aquifer, which is near the Cobre Las Cruces (CLC) mining complex. The mine has implemented a Drainage and Reinjection System comprising two rings of wells around the open pit mine, were the internal ring drains and the external ring is used for water reinjection into the aquifer. Differentiating geogenic and anthropogenic sources and processes is therefore crucial to ensuring good management of groundwater in this sensitive area where groundwater is extensively used for agriculture, industry, mining and human supply. No NH_4, As and B are found in the recharge area, but their concentrations increase with depth, salinity and residence time of water in the aquifer. The increased salinity down-flow is interpreted as the result of natural mixing between infiltrated meteoric water and the remains of connate waters (up to 8%) trapped within the pores. Ammonium and boron are interpreted as the result of marine solid organic matter degradation by the sulfate dissolved in the recharge water. The light δ"1"5N_N_H_4 values confirm that its origin is linked to marine organic matter. High arsenic concentrations in groundwater are interpreted as being derived from reductive dissolution of As-bearing goethite by dissolved organic matter. The lack of correlation between dissolved Fe and As is explained by the massive precipitation of siderite, which is abundantly found in the mineralization. Therefore, the presence of high arsenic, ammonium and boron concentrations is attributed to natural processes. Ammonium, arsenic, boron and salinity define three zones of groundwater quality: the first zone is close to the recharge area and contains water of sufficient quality

  13. Feasibility of Topical Applications of Natural High-Concentration Capsaicinoid Solutions in Patients with Peripheral Neuropathic Pain: A Retrospective Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanny Bauchy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Capsaicin, one of several capsaicinoid compounds, is a potent TRPV1 agonist. Topical application at high concentration (high concentration, >1% induces a reversible disappearance of epidermal free nerve endings and is used to treat peripheral neuropathic pain (PNP. While the benefit of low-concentration capsaicin remains controversial, the 8%-capsaicin patch (Qutenza®, 2010, Astellas, Netherlands has shown its effectiveness. This patch is, however, costly and natural high-concentration capsaicinoid solutions may represent a cheaper alternative to pure capsaicin. Methods. In this retrospective study, 149 patients were screened, 132 were included with a diagnosis of neuropathic pain, and eighty-four were retained in the final analyses (median age: 57.5 years [IQR25–75: 44.7–67.1], male/female: 30/54 with PNP who were treated with topical applications of natural high-concentration capsaicinoid solutions (total number of applications: 137. Indications were postsurgical PNP (85.7% and nonsurgical PNP (14.3% (posttraumatic, HIV-related, postherpetic, and radicular PNP. Objectives. To assess the feasibility of topical applications of natural high-concentration capsaicinoid solutions for the treatment of PNP. Results. The median treated area was 250 cm2 [IQR25–75: 144–531]. The median amount of capsaicinoids was 55.1 mg [IQR25–75: 28.7–76.5] per plaster and the median concentration was 172.3 μg/cm2 [IQR25–75: 127.6–255.2]. Most patients had local adverse effects on the day of treatment, such as mild to moderate burning pain and erythema. 13.6–19.4% of the patients experienced severe pain or erythema. Following treatment, 62.5% of patients reported a lower pain intensity or a smaller pain surface, and 35% reported a sustained pain relief lasting for at least 4 weeks. Conclusion. Analgesic topical treatment with natural high-concentration capsaicinoid is feasible and may represent a low cost alternative to alleviate

  14. Exposure to fluoride in smelter workers in a primary aluminum industry in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susheela, A K; Mondal, N K; Singh, A

    2013-04-01

    Fluoride is used increasingly in a variety of industries in India. Emission of fluoride dust and fumes from the smelters of primary aluminum producing industries is dissipated in the work environment and poses occupational health hazards. To study the prevalence of health complaints and its association with fluoride level in body fluids of smelter workers in a primary aluminum producing industry. In an aluminum industry, health status of 462 smelter workers, 60 supervisors working in the smelter unit, 62 non-smelter workers (control group 1) and 30 administration staff (control group 2) were assessed between 2007 and 2009. Their health complaints were recorded and categorized into 4 groups: 1) gastro-intestinal complaints; 2) non-skeletal manifestations; 3) skeletal symptoms; and (4) respiratory problems. Fluoride level in body fluids, nails, and drinking water was tested by an ion selective electrode; hemoglobin level was tested using HemoCue. The total complaints reported by study groups were significantly higher than the control groups. Smelter workers had a significantly (pworkers; the nail fluoride content was also higher in smelter workers than non-smelter workers (pworkers with higher hemoglobin level had a significantly (pworkers were consuming water with high fluoride concentrations. A high percentage of participants was using substances with high fluoride contents. Industrial emission of fluoride is not the only important sources of fluoride exposure--consumption of substance with high levels of fluoride is another important route of entry of fluoride into the body. Measurement of hemoglobin provides a reliable indicator for monitoring the health status of employees at risk of fluorosis.

  15. Treatability study of arsenic, fluoride and nitrate from drinking water by adsorption process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbas, N.; Irfan, M.; Butt, M.T.

    2014-01-01

    Natural contamination of nitrate, fluoride, arsenic and dissolved salts in ground water sources is the main health menace at present in different parts of Pakistan. The metalloids especially arsenic, fluoride and nitrate pose severe health hazards to human being. The present research work investigated the removal techniques for arsenic, fluoride and nitrate from drinking water by adsorption process. Ion exchange resins, activated carbon and activated alumina were used for removal of selected contaminants. These adsorbents were evaluated by comparing their removal efficiency as well as requisite operator skills. The result of activated alumina was found good as compared to activated carbon, mix bed resins and ion exchange resins (IRA-400) for maximum removal of arsenic, nitrate and fluoride. The removal efficiency of arsenic, fluoride and nitrate were found 96%, 99%, 98% respectively in case of activated alumina. The advantage of adsorption process is easy to use and relatively cheaper as compared to other treatment methodologies. (author)

  16. Chronic fluoride toxicity: dental fluorosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denbesten, Pamela; Li, Wu

    2011-01-01

    Dental fluorosis occurs as a result of excess fluoride ingestion during tooth formation. Enamel fluorosis and primary dentin fluorosis can only occur when teeth are forming, and therefore fluoride exposure (as it relates to dental fluorosis) occurs during childhood. In the permanent dentition, this would begin with the lower incisors, which complete mineralization at approximately 2-3 years of age, and end after mineralization of the third molars. The white opaque appearance of fluorosed enamel is caused by a hypomineralized enamel subsurface. With more severe dental fluorosis, pitting and a loss of the enamel surface occurs, leading to secondary staining (appearing as a brown color). Many of the changes caused by fluoride are related to cell/matrix interactions as the teeth are forming. At the early maturation stage, the relative quantity of amelogenin protein is increased in fluorosed enamel in a dose-related manner. This appears to result from a delay in the removal of amelogenins as the enamel matures. In vitro, when fluoride is incorporated into the mineral, more protein binds to the forming mineral, and protein removal by proteinases is delayed. This suggests that altered protein/mineral interactions are in part responsible for retention of amelogenins and the resultant hypomineralization that occurs in fluorosed enamel. Fluoride also appears to enhance mineral precipitation in forming teeth, resulting in hypermineralized bands of enamel, which are then followed by hypomineralized bands. Enhanced mineral precipitation with local increases in matrix acidity may affect maturation stage ameloblast modulation, potentially explaining the dose-related decrease in cycles of ameloblast modulation from ruffle-ended to smooth-ended cells that occur with fluoride exposure in rodents. Specific cellular effects of fluoride have been implicated, but more research is needed to determine which of these changes are relevant to the formation of fluorosed teeth. As further

  17. Considerations on fluorides anomalies in Botucatu-Piramboia aquifers system, Parana basin, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimmelmann, A.A.; Reboucas, A.C.; Reboucas, A.M.; Heine, C.A.

    1991-01-01

    Groundwater of a great number of deep wells dug to exploit the Botucatu-Piramboia aquifer system in the Parana Basin, Brazil, have high fluoride concentrations, over 1 ppm, that turns groundwater useless for human supply. Investigations being carried out a the Center for Groundwater Research (CEPAS) of the Institute of Geosciences at USP, Sao Paulo, indicate a relationship between fluoride concentration and groundwater age, dated with radiocarbon. (author)

  18. Measurement of natural and artificial radionuclide concentrations in meat consumed in Hong Kong

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao, S.Y.; Yu, K.N.

    1995-01-01

    Radionuclides in meat are determined using the EG and G ORTEC photon spectrometer system. Most of the naturally occurring radionuclides are found to have specific activities below the detectable limit. For our samples, 40 K is found to have values ranging from 295-407 Bq/kg, 172-423 Bq/kg and 172-282 Bq/kg for beef, pork and chicken meat samples, respectively, while 137 Cs has values from 0.19-2 Bq/kg, 0.34-0.71 Bq/kg and 0.12-0.53 Bq/kg, respectively. The estimated weighted committed dose equivalent due to the ingestion of natural radionuclides and 137 Cs in meat is 137 Cs in both sexes are less than the level recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. (author)

  19. Lipopolysaccharide and Lipoteichoic Acid Virulence Deactivation by Stannous Fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haught, Chris; Xie, Sancai; Circello, Ben; Tansky, Cheryl S; Khambe, Deepa; Klukowska, Malgorzata; Huggins, Tom; White, Donald J

    2016-09-01

    Oral bacterial pathogens promote gingivitis and periodontal disease. Bacterial endotoxins, also known as lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) and lipoteichoic acids (LTAs), are known to enhance bacterial pathogenicity through binding with Toll-like receptors (TLRs), a group of pattern recognition receptors critical to the activation of innate immunity, that are expressed on host cells. Both LPS and LTA contain lipophilic domains and anionic charges that may be susceptible to reactivity with stannous fluoride, a commonly used ingredient clinically proven for the treatment and prevention of gingivitis. This study examined the effects of stannous fluoride on Toll-like receptor activation in response to bacterially derived LPS and LTA in select cell lines and secretion of inflammatory cytokines from human primary peripheral monocytes likewise exposed to LPS. TLR4 and TLR2 transfected HEK293 cells and THP1-Dual™ cells were exposed to bacterial LPS and LTA in the presence of increasing concentrations of stannous fluoride. Gene expression was assessed by measurement of secreted embryonic alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) reporter gene for HEK293 cells and SEAP and luciferase for THP-1 cells. Cell viability was confirmed using PrestoBlue. Human primary monocytes were treated with LPS with various concentrations of supplemented stannous fluoride, and cytokine expression was directly measured. Stannous fluoride inhibited gene expression response of TLR4 and TLR2 in HEK293 cells and THP1-Dual™ cells in a dose response fashion, producing complete inhibition at micromolar concentrations. The addition of stannous fluoride suppressed production of TNF-a, IFN-g, IL12p70, IL10, IL-1b, IL2, and IL-6, and also increased secretion of Il-8 in dose response fashion. Viability assays confirmed no effects of LPS or stannous fluoride on viability of HEK293, THP-1, and primary human monocytes. These results support the potential for stannous fluoride to provide clinical gingivitis benefits by directly

  20. Elemental concentration in fruits and leaves of chicku and mango under natural environmental conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, S.R.

    1979-01-01

    A knowledge of the distribution patterns of stable elements in the environment is an essential pre-requisite for understanding the problems of radioactive pollution. In this paper the data obtained under natural conditions of the environment in the case of potassium, calcium, magnesium, iron, copper, zinc, cobalt, manganese, strontium, lithium and uranium are presented. A method for elimination of the interference from phosphate in the estimation of calcium and strontium in plant materials is also described. (auth.)

  1. Natural and man-made radionuclide concentrations in marine sediments of Gokova Bay, Aegean Turkish coast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanbay, A.U.; Yener, G.; Mulsow, S.; Fowler, S.W.; Duman, M.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to define a baseline study of selected radionuclides (natural and man made) on sediments collected along Goekova Bay. A total of six sediment cores (gravity corer) were collected, each sediment core was sliced in sections and 210 Po, 210 Pb, 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K and 137 Cs, 239,240 Pu, 238 Pu and 241 Am were determined for each layer of sediment

  2. Elevated radon and thoron concentrations from natural radioactivity in building materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.; Vivyurka, A.

    1980-01-01

    Radon levels in excess of 20 mWL were observed in an apartment building under construction in Elliot Lake. Tracer studies showed ventilation periods as long as 29 hours since the ventilation system of the building was not yet working. It was concluded that, once the contribution from thoron daughters was taken into account, the natural radioactivity of the concrete and other building materials was sufficient to produce the observed levels of radioactivity

  3. Estimations of natural variability between satellite measurements of trace species concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheese, P.; Walker, K. A.; Boone, C. D.; Degenstein, D. A.; Kolonjari, F.; Plummer, D. A.; von Clarmann, T.

    2017-12-01

    In order to validate satellite measurements of atmospheric states, it is necessary to understand the range of random and systematic errors inherent in the measurements. On occasions where the measurements do not agree within those errors, a common "go-to" explanation is that the unexplained difference can be chalked up to "natural variability". However, the expected natural variability is often left ambiguous and rarely quantified. This study will look to quantify the expected natural variability of both O3 and NO2 between two satellite instruments: ACE-FTS (Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment - Fourier Transform Spectrometer) and OSIRIS (Optical Spectrograph and Infrared Imaging System). By sampling the CMAM30 (30-year specified dynamics simulation of the Canadian Middle Atmosphere Model) climate chemistry model throughout the upper troposphere and stratosphere at times and geolocations of coincident ACE-FTS and OSIRIS measurements at varying coincidence criteria, height-dependent expected values of O3 and NO2 variability will be estimated and reported on. The results could also be used to better optimize the coincidence criteria used in satellite measurement validation studies.

  4. Circulating concentrations of insulin-like growth factor-1 in dogs with naturally occurring mitral regurgitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Henrik Duelund; Falk, Bo Torkel; Häggström, Jens

    2005-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), which mediates most effects of growth hormone, has effects on cardiac mass and function, and plays an important role in the regulation of vascular tone. In humans, an inverse relationship between degree of heart failure (HF) and circulating IGF-1 concentrations...... has been found in several studies. In dogs with HF, few studies have focused on IGF-1. We examined circulating IGF-1 concentrations in dogs with mitral regurgitation (MR) caused by myxomatous mitral valve disease. Study 1 included 88 Cavalier King Charles Spaniels (CKCSs) with a broad range...... of asymptomatic MR (median serum IGF-1: 76.7 µg/L; 25-75 percentile, 59.8-104.9 µg/L). As expected, standard body weight and percentage under- or overweight correlated directly with IGF-1. MR (assessed in 4 different ways) did not correlate with IGF-1. In study 2, 28 dogs with severe MR and stable, treated...

  5. Nature of the concentration thresholds of europium atom yield from the oxidized tungsten surface under electron stimulated desorption

    CERN Document Server

    Davydov, S Y

    2002-01-01

    The nature of the electron-stimulated desorption (ESD) of the europium atoms by the E sub e irradiating electrons energies, equal to 50 and 80 eV, as well as peculiarities of the Eu atoms yield dependence on their concentration on the oxidized tungsten surface are discussed. It is shown, that the ESD originates by the electron transition from the interval 5p- or 5s shell of the tungsten surface atom onto the oxygen external unfilled 2p-level

  6. Natural Radionuclides and 137Cs Concentrations in Rice in Jepara Residence and Internal Dose Estimation Intake by the People

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leli-Nirwani; Minarni; Buchari

    2001-01-01

    The measurement of natural radionuclides and 137 Cs concentration in rice in Jepara residence and internal dose estimation intake by people have been conducted. The aim of the research is to determine internal dose estimation of natural radionuclides and 137 Cs intake by people in Jepara residence. By knowing the natural radionuclides and 137 Cs concentrations in rice at Jepara residence, the dose coefficient for adult from ICRP No.72 and the annual intake consumption take from the Indonesian food balance published by BPS, the internal dose from natural radionuclides and 137 Cs intake from food can be calculate concentration of 228 Th, 226 Ra and 137 Cs were found in Bayuran, with the average value was (2.00±0.21) x 10 -5 Bq/kg, (0.09±0.25) x 10 -5 Bq/kg, (19.00±0.06) x 10 -5 Bq/kg respectively the highest 40 K concentration was found in Pandansili with the average was about (8.40 ± 0.34) x 10 -5 Bq/kg. The estimation of equivalent doses from intake of 228 Th, 226 Ra, 40 K, and 137 Cs in rice were the highest in Bayuran the value the average values, respectively, was 0.0039 x 10 -5 μ Sv/yr, 18.09 X 10 -5 μ Sv/yr, 1.63 x 10 -5 μ Sv/yr, 172.38 x 10 -5 μ Sv/yr. Result in this measurement lowest comparing by recommendation IAEA in Safety Series No. 115 in 1996. (author)

  7. Investigation of the factors influencing radiocesium concentrations of fish inhabiting natural aquatic ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jinks, S.M.

    1975-01-01

    Distributions of radioactive and stable cesium were determined in water, sediment, and biota from eight different aquatic ecosystems between 1971 and 1973. The ecosystems included four lakes, fresh and brackish water regions of the Hudson River estuary, and two coastal marine sites. In the Hudson River estuary, the distribution of radiocesium between suspended and dissolved phases in water was found to be a function of salinity. Mean rates of deposition of suspended radiocesium into bottom sediment are calculated from the temporal changes in concentrations of the media, and observed depth distributions in sediment are semi-quantitatively described. Desorption by salt water is identified as the major mechanism for transport of radiocesium from bottom sediment in the lower estuary, and half-times for removal by this mechanism are estimated to be 1.5 to 2.0 years. Suspended-dissolved distributions of radiocesium in water, and depth distributions in sediment are also presented for lake and marine systems. Accumulation of radiocesium by fish is examined in relation to radiocesium distributions in water, sediment, and other biota, and to the chemical characteristics of each ecosystem. Radiocesium dissolved in water was the primary source to the fish in all ecosystems. Sediment inventories of 137 Cs constituted a secondary source which provided as much as 50 percent of the radiocesium in benthic feeding fish in the Hudson River. Dietary intake of 137 Cs is shown to be inversely related to the potassium concentration in the ambient water, and results in an inverse proportionality between the concentration factor in fish and the potassium concentrations in the different freshwater and estuarine ecosystems

  8. Concentration and fractionation of hydrophobic organic acid constituents from natural waters by liquid chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurman, E.M.; Malcolm, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    A scheme is presented which used adsorption chromatography with pH gradient elution and size-exclusion chromatography to concentrate and separate hydrophobic organic acids from water. A review of chromatographic processes involved in the flow scheme is also presented. Organic analytes which appear in each aqueous fraction are quantified by dissolved organic carbon analysis. Hydrophobic organic acids in a water sample are concentrated on a porous acrylic resin. These acids usually constitute approximately 30-50 percent of the dissolved organic carbon in an unpolluted water sample and are eluted with an aqueous eluent (dilute base). The concentrate is then passed through a column of polyacryloylmorpholine gel, which separates the acids into high- and low-molecular-weight fractions. The high- and low-molecular-weight eluates are reconcentrated by adsorption chromatography, then are eluted with a pH gradient into strong acids (predominately carboxylic acids) and weak acids (predominately phenolic compounds). For standard compounds and samples of unpolluted waters, the scheme fractionates humic substances into strong and weak acid fractions that are separated from the low molecular weight acids. A new method utilizing conductivity is also presented to estimate the acidic components in the methanol fraction.

  9. Effects of sodium fluoride on MAPKs signaling pathway in the gills of a freshwater teleost, Cyprinus carpio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jinling; Chen, Jianjie; Wang, Jundong; Klerks, Paul; Xie, Lingtian

    2014-07-01

    Exposure to elevated levels of fluoride can cause a variety of adverse effects in fish. Previously we showed that fluoride causes injuries and apoptosis in the gills of Cyprinus carpio. In this study, the effects of fluoride on caspase-3 activity and on accumulation of proteins in the MAPKs pathways were evaluated using Western blotting and immunohistochemistry methods in vivo and in vitro. In vivo experiments showed that the caspase-3 activity increased with fluoride exposure level in a dose-dependent pattern Western blotting and immunohistochemistry results indicated that ERK relative activation tended to decrease as a function of fluoride exposure concentration. In contrast, relative activation of JNK increased with fluoride exposure level. Fluoride exposure did not appear to affect p38 activation. Furthermore, pretreatment of branchial cells with MAPK-specific inhibitors effectively prevented JNK induction and ERK inhibition, respectively, as well as reversed caspase-3 activity in fluoride-treated branchial cells. Our results indicate that activation of JNK and inactivation of ERK were caused by increased ROS and decreased antioxidant capacity in the gills of chronically exposed C. carpio described previously, which eventually caused the observed apoptosis in the fluoride-exposed gills and cells in C. carpio. JNK activation and ERK inactivation mechanism play a crucial role in gill impairment induced by chronic fluorosis. These findings contribute to a better understanding of the initial molecular and cellular events in the gill of fish chronically exposed to fluoride. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluation of exposure to fluoride in child population of North Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, René Antonio; Calatayud, Marta; Devesa, Vicenta; Vélez, Dinoraz

    2017-09-01

    Fluoride is an important element for humans. It inhibits initiation and progression of dental caries and stimulates bone formation. However, excessive intake may lead to the appearance of dental and/or skeletal fluorosis and a decrease in intellectual coefficient in child populations. This study evaluates exposure to fluoride in the child population of Chaco province (Argentina) by analysis of drinking water, food and its bioaccessible fraction (quantity of fluoride solubilised by gastrointestinal digestion and available for intestinal absorption) and urine as a biomarker of internal dose. The concentration of fluoride in drinking water varied between 0.050 and 4.6 mg L -1 , and 80% of the samples exceeded the WHO drinking-water guideline value (1.5 mg L -1 ). Fluoride concentrations in food ranged between 0.80 and 3.0 mg kg -1 fresh weight (fw), being lower in bioaccessible fraction (0.43-1.9 mg kg -1 , fw). On the basis of the consumption data declared for the young child population, fluoride intake varies between 4.1 and 6.5 mg day -1 , greater than the level recommended for this age group. Moreover, in some cases, concentrations of fluoride found in urine (0.62-8.9 mg L -1 ) exceeded those reported in areas with declared fluorosis. All data obtained show the worrying situation of child population in this area of Argentina.

  11. Tritium concentrations in natural waters in Japan before use of a large quantity of tritium on its fusion program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaji, Toshio; Momoshima, Noriyuki; Takashima, Yoshimasa.

    1989-01-01

    To clarify environmental tritium levels in Japan before use of a large quantity of tritium on its fusion program, the authors analyzed the tritium concentrations in various water samples, such as rain, river, lake, coastal sea and deep sea waters in Japan. The tritium concentrations in rain water were high at higher latitude. The definite differences of the tritium concentrations due to the weather conditions or seasons were not observed. The average tritium concentration in river water was 51.5 pCi/l in 1982 and that in lake water was 63.5 pCi/l in 1983. The vertical profiles of the tritium concentrations in the representative lakes were almost homogeneous except surface water. The average tritium concentrations in coastal seawater were about 20 pCi/l in both 1982 and 1983. The tendency of the increased tritium level with latitude as reported in literature was not observed by these experiments. Tritium levels in natural water in small isolated islands were lower than those at other places. In the Japan Sea, it was recognized that tritium was distributed down to around 2000 m in depth. This means that the more active vertical mixing of water masses than that in the Pacific Ocean is taking place. (author)

  12. Fluoride level in saliva after bonding orthodontic brackets with a fluoride containing adhesive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ogaard, B; Arends, J; Helseth, H; Dijkman, G; vanderKuijl, M

    The fluoride level in saliva is considered an important parameter in caries prevention. Elevation of the salivary fluoride level by a fluoride-releasing orthodontic bonding adhesive would most likely be beneficial in the prevention of enamel caries. In this study, the fluoride level in saliva was

  13. Urinary fluoride excretion in preschool children after intake of fluoridated milk and use of fluoride-containing toothpaste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norman, M; Twetman, S; Hultgren Talvilahti, A

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To assess the urinary fluoride excretion in preschool children after drinking fluoridated milk with 0.185 mg F and 0.375 mg F and to study the impact of use of fluoride toothpaste. Basic research design: Double-blind cross-over study. Participants: Nine healthy children, 2.5-4.5 years...

  14. Urinary fluoride excretion by children 4-6 years old in a south Texas community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon J. Baez

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated urinary fluoride excretion by school children 4-6 years old who were living in a south Texas rural community that had concentrations of fluoride in drinking water supplies generally around the optimal level. We took supervised collections of urine samples in the morning and afternoon at school, and parents of the participating students collected nocturnal samples. We recorded the beginning and end times of the three collection periods and then determined the urinary volume and urinary flow for each of the periods. We measured urinary fluoride concentrations and calculated the urinary excretion rate per hour. The children had breakfast and lunch provided at the school, where the drinking water contained 1.0-1.3 milligrams/liter (mg/L fluoride. Fluoride concentrations in the tested household water supplies, from wells, ranged from 0.1 to 3.2 mg/L fluoride. The children's average urinary fluoride concentrations found for the day were similar to those for the night, with means ranging from 1.26 mg/L to 1.42 mg/L. Average excretion was 36.4 µg/h in the morning, 45.6 µg/h in the afternoon, and 17.5 µg/h at night. The lower nocturnal excretion rates are easily explained by low urinary flow at night. Based on the 15 hours of urine collected, the extrapolated 24-hour fluoride excretion was 749 µg. In conjunction with similar studies, the data from this study will help in developing upper limits for urinary fluoride excretion that are appropriate for avoiding unsightly fluorosis while providing optimal protection against dental decay.

  15. Water Fluoridation Reporting System (Public Water Systems)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Water Fluoridation Reporting System (WFRS) has been developed to provide tools to assist states in managing fluoridation programs. WFRS is designed to track all...

  16. ADSORPTIVE REMOVAL OF FLUORIDE FROM WATER USING ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    Currently available treatment methods for removal of excess fluoride from water are broadly divided into three ... the application of nanoparticles as sorbents for fluoride removal. Sundaram [26] studied the ... Characterization of adsorbent.

  17. Concentration and distribution of natural radionuclides at Klipperaasen and Bjulebo, Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundblad, B.; Landstroem, O.; Axelsson, R.

    1985-01-01

    The recipient areas Klipperaasen and Bjulebo are completely different. Bjulebo is a coastal site at the Baltic where two types of recipients are identified: a brackish bay and a lake. Klipperaasen on the other hand is an inland site where lake and situated above a marked fracture zone in the bedrock. Gamma ray surveys, which covered representative soil types, gave average exposure rate values of about 18 μR/h for both sites. This corresponds to a radiation dose of about 1.5 mSv/y. Concentrations of Th and U were determined in rock, soil and plant samples and activities of Ra-226, Ra-228, Th-228, Cs-137 and K-40 in soil and plant samples. Average concentrations in Klipperaasen samples are for granite (dominating rock) 20.7 ppm, Th and 6.6 ppm U, for soil (upper zone) 5.6 ppm Th and 2.9 ppm U and for peat 1.8 ppm Th and 2.4 ppm U (dry weight). Fairly high concentrations were observed in some organic soil samples, 11.5 ppm Th and 13.1 ppm U. The nuclides in the U and Th decay chains are usually in disequilibrium, indicating different migration patterns for the radium, uranium and thorium isotopes. A much higher root uptake of radium isotopes as compared to uranium and thorium isotopes was observed. The water quality and the content of U, Ra-226 and Rn-222 in ground and surface water samples were determined. The Ra-226/U-238 activity ratio is in average 0.1 for the Bjulebo and 3.1 for the Klipperaasen water samples, i.e. the uranium content is roughly the same whereas the Ra-226 content is very low in the Bjulebo water samples. (author)

  18. Acute toxicity of uranium hexafluoride, uranyl fluoride and hydrogen fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Just, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    Uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) released into the atmosphere will react rapidly with moisture in the air to form the hydrolysis products uranyl fluoride (UO 2 F 2 ) and hydrogen fluoride (HF). Uranium compounds such as UF 6 and UO 2 F 2 exhibit both chemical toxicity and radiological effects, while HF exhibits only chemical toxicity. This paper describes the development of a methodology for assessing the human health consequences of a known acute exposure to a mixture of UF 6 , UO 2 F 2 , and HF. 4 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs

  19. Annotated bibliography on the effects of water containing fluorides on container-grown crops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1962-01-01

    Most of the literature on fluorine and plants relates to damage caused by atmospheric pollution, for example HF from aluminium works etc, which causes much greater damage than is possible with uptake through the roots. However a few papers do deal with uptake via the roots as follows: reviews of a general nature; uptake of fluorine and its effect on oxygen consumption; and fluoride induced chlorosis. The remainder deal with the effects of various concentrations of fluoride on container grown crops. One suggests that fluorine may be an essential trace element although its growth promoting action is not confirmed elsewhere. For the rest, the limits of fluorine tolerance are shown to be variable, related perhaps to the normal F content of the plant. No plant species however is recorded to have been damaged by concentrations of F below 10 ppM. The influence of nutrition on the appearance of symptoms of F toxicity, especially Ca nutrition but also N supply, is emphasized in two papers.

  20. Does arsenic in soil contribute to arsenic urinary concentrations in a French population living in a naturally arsenic contaminated area?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillol, Clemence; Dor, Frederic; Clozel, Blandine; Goria, Sarah; Seta, Nathalie

    2010-01-01

    A cross sectional study using environmental and biological samples was implemented to assess the association between arsenic (As) concentrations in the environment and urinary As levels of residents living in an area where the soil is naturally As rich. As was measured in drinking water, atmospheric particulate matter, and soil and a geographic information system was used to assign environmental concentrations closest to the participants' dwellings and the sum of inorganic As and metabolites in urine samples. The only potential source of As environmental contamination was from soil with a range of 13-131 mg As/kg of dry matter. As(V) was the only species present among As extracted from the analyzed soil samples. The chemical extraction showed a poor mobility of As soil. There was no difference between child and teenager, and adult urinary As concentrations, though men had higher urinary As concentrations than women (p < 0.001). Given the important differences in lifestyle between 7-18 year olds, men, and women, these groups were analyzed separately. Whilst we were unable to find a stable model for the 7-18 year old group, for the adult men group we found that seafood consumption in the 3 days prior to the investigation (p = 0.02), and beer (p = 0.03) and wine consumption in the 4 days before the study, were associated with As urinary levels (μg/L). In adult women, creatinine was the only variable significantly associated with As urinary concentration (μg/L). The concentrations we measured in soils were variable and although high, only moderately so and no link between As concentrations in the soil and urinary As concentrations could be found for either men or women. Some individual factors explained half of the variability of adult men urinary As levels. The unexplained part of the variability should be searched notably in As mobility in soil and uncharacterized human behavior.

  1. Does arsenic in soil contribute to arsenic urinary concentrations in a French population living in a naturally arsenic contaminated area?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fillol, Clemence, E-mail: c.fillol@invs.sante.fr [Universite Paris Descartes, Laboratoire Sante Publique et Environnement, EA 4064, Paris (France); Institut de Veille Sanitaire, Departement Sante Environnement, Saint-Maurice (France); Dor, Frederic [Institut de Veille Sanitaire, Departement Sante Environnement, Saint-Maurice (France); Clozel, Blandine [BRGM French Geological Survey, Service Geologique Regional Lorraine, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Goria, Sarah [Institut de Veille Sanitaire, Departement Sante Environnement, Saint-Maurice (France); Seta, Nathalie [Universite Paris Descartes, Laboratoire Sante Publique et Environnement, EA 4064, Paris (France); AP-HP, Hopital Bichat-Claude Bernard, Biochimie, Paris (France)

    2010-11-01

    A cross sectional study using environmental and biological samples was implemented to assess the association between arsenic (As) concentrations in the environment and urinary As levels of residents living in an area where the soil is naturally As rich. As was measured in drinking water, atmospheric particulate matter, and soil and a geographic information system was used to assign environmental concentrations closest to the participants' dwellings and the sum of inorganic As and metabolites in urine samples. The only potential source of As environmental contamination was from soil with a range of 13-131 mg As/kg of dry matter. As(V) was the only species present among As extracted from the analyzed soil samples. The chemical extraction showed a poor mobility of As soil. There was no difference between child and teenager, and adult urinary As concentrations, though men had higher urinary As concentrations than women (p < 0.001). Given the important differences in lifestyle between 7-18 year olds, men, and women, these groups were analyzed separately. Whilst we were unable to find a stable model for the 7-18 year old group, for the adult men group we found that seafood consumption in the 3 days prior to the investigation (p = 0.02), and beer (p = 0.03) and wine consumption in the 4 days before the study, were associated with As urinary levels ({mu}g/L). In adult women, creatinine was the only variable significantly associated with As urinary concentration ({mu}g/L). The concentrations we measured in soils were variable and although high, only moderately so and no link between As concentrations in the soil and urinary As concentrations could be found for either men or women. Some individual factors explained half of the variability of adult men urinary As levels. The unexplained part of the variability should be searched notably in As mobility in soil and uncharacterized human behavior.

  2. Simultaneous sorption of fluoride and arsenic ions (V) in a naturally occurring material modified with iron and aluminum; Sorcion simultanea de iones fluoruros y arsenico (V) en un material de origen natural modificado con hierro y aluminio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazquez M, G.

    2016-07-01

    In this research, two materials, zeolite and pozzolans from the States of Oaxaca and Mexico, were used respectively, which were modified to evaluate their efficiencies to remove F and As(V) ions from solution and natural water. The materials were modified with iron and aluminum using an electrochemical cell, and with the hydroxides formed with iron and aluminum chloride solutions. The natural and modified materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy with energy X-ray disperse spectroscopy analysis, specific area and the point of zero charge (pHzpc). F- and As(V) adsorption properties of both materials were investigated. Experimental data on the sorption processes of F- ions by modified zeolite and pozzolans were adjusted to the kinetic models of pseudo-second-order (q e, 0408 mg /g K, 4.33 g / mg h) and Lagergen (q e, 0.807 mg/g K L, 1.83 1/min), respectively. Both materials showed the best fit to the Freundlich isotherm, Kf, 0.33 and 0.64 (mg/g) (L/mg) for pozzolans and zeolite respectively; suggesting a physical adsorption process on a heterogeneous material. Experimental adsorption capacities of pozzolans and modified zeolite for F ions were 0.36 and 0.83 mg/g respectively. The results of the kinetics of adsorption of As(V) were treated with the Largergren, pseudo-second-order and Elovich models; however the adsorption rate was high and consequently the rate constants could not be calculated. The isotherms data were fitted to the Freundlich model and the constants Kf were 6.24 and 11.15 (mg/g) (L/mg) for pozzolans and zeolite respectively. The thermodynamic parameters of the adsorption processes suggest endothermic adsorption for F- ions by both materials and for As(V) by the pozzolans. The free energy values ΔG indicate spontaneous processes and not spontaneous for F- ions by pozzolans. The adsorption of As (V) by the pozzolans presented an exothermic and spontaneous behavior. Finally, a study was performed in columns with

  3. Origin of high ammonium, arsenic and boron concentrations in the proximity of a mine: Natural vs. anthropogenic processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheiber, Laura; Ayora, Carlos; Vázquez-Suñé, Enric; Cendón, Dioni I; Soler, Albert; Baquero, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-15

    High ammonium (NH4), arsenic (As) and boron (B) concentrations are found in aquifers worldwide and are often related to human activities. However, natural processes can also lead to groundwater quality problems. High NH4, As and B concentrations have been identified in the confined, deep portion of the Niebla-Posadas aquifer, which is near the Cobre Las Cruces (CLC) mining complex. The mine has implemented a Drainage and Reinjection System comprising two rings of wells around the open pit mine, were the internal ring drains and the external ring is used for water reinjection into the aquifer. Differentiating geogenic and anthropogenic sources and processes is therefore crucial to ensuring good management of groundwater in this sensitive area where groundwater is extensively used for agriculture, industry, mining and human supply. No NH4, As and B are found in the recharge area, but their concentrations increase with depth, salinity and residence time of water in the aquifer. The increased salinity down-flow is interpreted as the result of natural mixing between infiltrated meteoric water and the remains of connate waters (up to 8%) trapped within the pores. Ammonium and boron are interpreted as the result of marine solid organic matter degradation by the sulfate dissolved in the recharge water. The light δ(15)NNH4 values confirm that its origin is linked to marine organic matter. High arsenic concentrations in groundwater are interpreted as being derived from reductive dissolution of As-bearing goethite by dissolved organic matter. The lack of correlation between dissolved Fe and As is explained by the massive precipitation of siderite, which is abundantly found in the mineralization. Therefore, the presence of high arsenic, ammonium and boron concentrations is attributed to natural processes. Ammonium, arsenic, boron and salinity define three zones of groundwater quality: the first zone is close to the recharge area and contains water of sufficient quality for

  4. Uranium concentrations in natural waters, South Park, Colorado. [Part of National Uranium Resource Evaluation program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, R.R. Jr.; Aamodt, P.L.

    1976-08-01

    During the summer of 1975, 464 water samples from 149 locations in South Park, Colorado, were taken for the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory in order to test the field sampling and analytical methodologies proposed for the NURE Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance for uranium in the Rocky Mountain states and Alaska. The study showed, in the South Park area, that the analytical results do not vary significantly between samples which were untreated, filtered and acidified, filtered only, or acidified only. Furthermore, the analytical methods of fluorometry and delayed-neutron counting, as developed at the LASL for the reconnaissance work, provide fast, adequately precise, and complementary procedures for analyzing a broad range of uranium in natural waters. The data generated using this methodology does appear to identify uraniferous areas, and when applied using sound geochemical, geological, and hydrological principles, should prove a valuable tool in reconnaissance surveying to delineate new districts or areas of interest for uranium exploration.

  5. Photosynthesis of ammonium uranous fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Fekey, S.A.; Zaki, M.R.; Farah, M.Y.

    1975-01-01

    This study pertains to utilisation of solar energy for ethanol photosynthesis of ammonium uranous fluoride, that satisfies nuclear specifications needed for calcio- or magnesiothermy. Insolation in autumn using 4-10% ethanol in 5-20 g uranium/litre at initial pH 3.25 gave practically 99.8% yield in two hours, independant of 1.0 to 2.0 stoichiometric NH 4 F. With ultraviolet light, the yield varied between 30 and 60%, even after four hours irradiation. Stirring and heating to 60 0 C raised the tap density of the dried double fluorides from 1.48 at 30 0 C, to 1.85 g/cm 3 at 60 0 C. The texture increased also in fineness to 100% 50μ aggregates. The powders satisfy nuclear purity specifications. Thermograms indicated preferential decomposition of double fluoride at 375 0 C in controlled atmosphere to obtain nuclear pure anhydrous uranium tetrafluoride

  6. Anhydrous hydrogen fluoride electrolyte battery. [Patent application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Not Available

    1972-06-26

    It is an object of the invention to provide a primary cell or battery using ammonium fluoride--anhydrous hydrogen fluoride electrolyte having improved current and power production capabilities at low temperatures. It is operable at temperatures substantially above the boiling point of hydrogen fluoride. (GRA)

  7. Short term serum pharmacokinetics of diammine silver fluoride after oral application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasquez Elsa

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is growing interest in the use of diammine silver fluoride (DSF as a topical agent to treat dentin hypersensitivity and dental caries as gauged by increasing published research from many parts of the world. While DSF has been available in various formulations for many years, most of its pharmacokinetic aspects within the therapeutic concentration range have never been fully characterized. Methods This preliminary study determined the applied doses (3 teeth treated, maximum serum concentrations, and time to maximum serum concentration for fluoride and silver in 6 adults over 4 h. Fluoride was determined using the indirect diffusion method with a fluoride selective electrode, and silver was determined using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. The mean amount of DSF solution applied to the 3 teeth was 7.57 mg (6.04 μL. Results Over the 4 hour observation period, the mean maximum serum concentrations were 1.86 μmol/L for fluoride and 206 nmol/L for silver. These maximums were reached 3.0 h and 2.5 h for fluoride and silver, respectively. Conclusions Fluoride exposure was below the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA oral reference dose. Silver exposure exceeded the EPA oral reference dose for cumulative daily exposure over a lifetime, but for occasional use was well below concentrations associated with toxicity. This preliminary study suggests that serum concentrations of fluoride and silver after topical application of DSF should pose little toxicity risk when used in adults. Clinical trials registration NCT01664871.

  8. Inhibition of purified enolases from oral bacteria by fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha-Chowdhury, N; Clark, A G; Sissons, C H

    1997-04-01

    Enolase activity in strains of oral streptococci previously has been found to be inhibited by 50% (Ki) by fluoride concentrations ranging from 50 to 300 microM or more in the presence of 0.5 to 1.0 mM inorganic phosphate ions. In this study, enolase was extracted and partly purified by a two-step process from five oral bacterial species and the effect of fluoride on the kinetics of enolase examined. The molecular weight of the putative enolase proteins was 46-48 kDa. The Vmax values ranged from 20 to 323 IU/mg and K(m) for glycerate-2-phosphate from 0.22 to 0.74 mM. Enolase activity was inhibited competitively by fluoride, with Ki values ranging from 16 to 54 microM in the presence of 5 mM inorganic phosphate ions. Ki values for phosphate ranged from 2 to 8 mM. The enolase from Streptococcus sanguis ATCC 10556 was more sensitive to fluoride (Ki = 16 +/- 2) than was enolase from Streptococcus salivarius ATCC 10575 (Ki = 19 +/- 2) or Streptococcus mutans NCTC 10449 (Ki = 40 +/- 4) and all three streptococcal strains were more sensitive to fluoride than either Actinomyces naeslundii WVU 627 (Ki = 46 +/- 6) or Lactobacillus rhamnosus ATCC 7469 (Ki = 54 +/- 6) enolases. The levels of fluoride found to inhibit the streptococcal enolases in this study are much lower than previously reported and are likely to be present in plaque, especially during acidogenesis, and could exert an anti-glycolytic effect.

  9. SBIR-Long fluoride fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Raymond E.; Vacha, Lubos J.

    1987-08-01

    This report summarizes results obtained under a program aimed at developing new techniques for fabricating long lengths of heavy metal fluoride glass (HMFG) optical fiber. A new method for overcladding conventional HMFG preforms with a low melting oxide glass was developed, and improvements in the rotational casting method were made to increase preform length. The resulting composite glass canes consist of a fluoride glass overcoat layer to enhance strength and chemical durability. To show feasibility, prototype optical fiber preforms up to 1.6 cm in diameter with lengths of 22 cm were fabricated. These were drawn into optical fibers with lengths up to 900 meters.

  10. 226Ra concentration in the teeth of habitants of areas with high level of natural radioactivity in Ramsar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aghamiri, S. Mahmoud Reza; Ghorbani, Zahra; Darafsheh, Arash; Torabzadeh, Hasan; Fathivand, Ali Asghar; Minuchehr, Abdulhamid; Jalinoos, Alireza

    2006-01-01

    The level of natural radiation in some regions of Ramsar, a northern coastal city of Iran, is known to be among the highest levels of natural radiation in the world. 226 Ra existing in high concentrations in the soil of this region is washed by underground water and transferred to the surface. In this way, 226 Ra enters the food chain of residents and substitutes within the hard body tissues of humans. 226 Ra is one of the so-called bone seekers as its metabolic processes in the human body are similar to calcium and remains in hard tissues of body because of its long half-life, and being an α emitter causes dangerous effects on human health. The purpose of this study is to determine the concentration of 226 Ra in the teeth of residents of these high-level natural radiation areas, compared with a control group. Thirteen teeth in five groups were studied as the case group and thirteen teeth in five corresponding control groups were inspected. The mean values of the activity of 226 Ra in the case group and in the control group were 0.32 and 0.18 mBq g -1 , respectively

  11. Full scale experimental study of a small natural draft dry cooling tower for concentrating solar thermal power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xiaoxiao; Duniam, Sam; Gurgenci, Hal; Guan, Zhiqiang; Veeraragavan, Anand

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A 20 m high natural draft dry cooling tower is designed and tested. • The cooling tower model is refined and validated with the experimental data. • The performance of the cooling tower utilized in a CST power plant is investigated. • Ambient temperature effect on Rankine cycle and Brayton cycle is discussed. - Abstract: Concentrating solar thermal power system can provide low carbon, renewable energy resources in countries or regions with strong solar irradiation. For this kind of power plant which is likely to be located in the arid area, natural draft dry cooling tower is a promising choice. To develop the experimental studies on small cooling tower, a 20 m high natural draft dry cooling tower with fully instrumented measurement system was established by the Queensland Geothermal Energy Centre of Excellence. The performance of this cooling tower was measured with the constant heat input of 600 kW and 840 kW and with ambient temperature ranging from 20 °C to 32 °C. The cooling tower numerical model was refined and validated with the experimental data. The model of 1 MW concentrating solar thermal supercritical CO_2 power cycle was developed and integrated with the cooling tower model. The influences of changing ambient temperature and the performance of the cooling tower on efficiency of the power system were simulated. The differences of the mechanism of the ambient temperature effect on Rankine cycle and supercritical CO_2 Brayton cycle were analysed and discussed.

  12. Comparison of the toxicity of fluoridation compounds in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Julie R; Boyd, Windy A; Chandra, Dave; Smith, Marjolein V; Den Besten, Pamela K; Freedman, Jonathan H

    2014-01-01

    Fluorides are commonly added to drinking water in the United States to decrease the incidence of dental caries. Silicofluorides, such as sodium hexafluorosilicate (Na2 SiF6 ) and fluorosilicic acid (H2 SiF6 ), are mainly used for fluoridation, although fluoride salts such as sodium fluoride (NaF) are also used. Interestingly, only the toxicity of NaF has been examined and not that of the more often used silicofluorides. In the present study, the toxicities of NaF, Na2 SiF6 , and H2 SiF6 were compared. The toxicity of these fluorides on the growth, feeding, and reproduction in the alternative toxicological testing organism Caenorhabditis elegans was examined. Exposure to these compounds produced classic concentration-response toxicity profiles. Although the effects of the fluoride compounds varied among the 3 biological endpoints, no differences were found between the 3 compounds, relative to the fluoride ion concentration, in any of the assays. This suggests that silicofluorides have similar toxicity to NaF. © 2013 SETAC.

  13. Research on the reliability of measurement of natural radioactive nuclide concentration of U-238

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Seok Ki; Kim, Gee Hyun [Dept. of Nuclear engineering, Univ. of SeJong, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Joo, Sun Dong; Lee, Hoon [KoFONS, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Naturally occurred radioactive materials (NORM) can be found all around us and people are exposed to this no matter what they do or where they live. In this study, two indirect measurement methods of NORM U-238 has been reviewed; one that has used HPGe on the basis of the maintenance, and the other is disequilibrium theory of radioactive equilibrium relationships of mother and daughter nuclide at Decay-chain of NORM U-238. For this review, complicated pre-processing process (Breaking->Fusion->Chromatography->Electron deposit) has been used , and then carried out a comparative research with direct measurement method that makes use of and measures Alpha spectrometer. Through the experiment as above, we could infer the daughter nuclide whose radioactive equilibrium has been maintained with U-238. Therefore, we could find out that the daughter nuclide suitable to be applied to Gamma indirect measurement method was Th-234. Due to Pearson Correlation statistics, we could find out the reliability of the result value that has been analyzed by using Th-234.

  14. Determination of ultratrace concentrations of uranium and thorium in natural waters by x-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, J.H. Jr.; Brooksbank, R.D.

    1981-01-01

    An x-ray fluorescence method for the simultaneous determination of uranium and thorium at the less than 1 ppM level in natural waters is described. Uranium and thorium are coprecipitated with an internal standard, yttrium, and incorporated into an iron-aluminum hydroxide carrier. The hydroxide precipitate is filtered, and the filter disk is analyzed by the energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence technique. Matrix interferences caused by the presence of unpredictable anions and cations are compensated for by the internal standard. The U/Y and Th/Y ratios are linear over the 5- to 100-μg range of interest, and the detection limit of each element on the filter disk is 2 μg (3 sigma). Relative standard deviation was 17% at the 15-μg and 4% at the 100-μg level for thorium and 11% at the 11-μg and 2% at the 100-μg level for uranium. Analysis of spiked solutions showed a recovery of 19.6 +- 0.3 μg for uranium and 19.8 +- 0.3 μg for thorium at the 20-μg level, and the normal lower reporting limit is 5 μg. Fifty disks can be routinely measured during a normal working day

  15. Determination of fluoride ions in water by condutometric titration with lanthanum nitrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    An alternative method for determining fluoride ions in drinking water by condutometric titration using La(NO 3 ) 3 as titrant is presented. The method is based on previous separation of fluoride from sample by distillation at 135 0 C. The pH of the distillated is adjusted between 5,5 - 6,0; ethanol is adicioned in 50% titrating the resultant solution with La(NO 3 ) 3 . In these conditions, fluoride ions are determined with accuracy respectively, 5% and 4%. Natural samples of drinking water were analysed by this method and by the ion selective method, with agreement among the results. (author) [pt

  16. A rapid method for the determination on fluoride in geological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Josephson, M.; Cook, E.B.T.; Dixon, K.

    1977-01-01

    An account is given of a rapid procedure for the determination by use of the specific-ion electrode of fluoride in geological samples. The sample is fused with sodium hydroxide in a nickel crucible in a muffle furnace. The melt is leached with water, a buffer solution of ammonium citrate is added, and the fluoride activity is measured with a specific-ion electrode. All operations are carried out in the crucible, making possible approximately 100 determinations a day. The precision of the method is approximately 10 per cent at a fluoride concentration of 500 p.p.m., which is acceptable for geological-survey work [af

  17. Accumulation of fluoride by plants and vegetables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Njenga, L.W.; Kariuki, D.N.

    1994-01-01

    Fluoride in plant and vegetable samples has been determined using ion selective electrode. The analysis was carried out after ashing the sample on an open flame, adding perchloric acid and allowing the hydrogen fluoride to diffuse into sodium hydroxide layer.The results obtained show that kale and pumpkins can accumulate more than ten times their normal values of fluoride while plants were found to accumulate upto 100μg/g fluoride when exposed to highlevels of fluoride in water or soil. (author)

  18. Toxic effects of fluoride on organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Huan; Chen, Liang; Kong, Ming; Qiu, Lipeng; Lü, Peng; Wu, Peng; Yang, Yanhua; Chen, Keping

    2018-04-01

    Accumulation of excess fluoride in the environment poses serious health risks to plants, animals, and humans. This endangers human health, affects organism growth and development, and negatively impacts the food chain, thereby affecting ecological balance. In recent years, numerous studies focused on the molecular mechanisms associated with fluoride toxicity. These studies have demonstrated that fluoride can induce oxidative stress, regulate intracellular redox homeostasis, and lead to mitochondrial damage, endoplasmic reticulum stress and alter gene expression. This paper reviews the present research on the potential adverse effects of overdose fluoride on various organisms and aims to improve our understanding of