WorldWideScience

Sample records for natural flake graphite

  1. Direct Preparation of Few Layer Graphene Epoxy Nanocomposites from Untreated Flake Graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Throckmorton, James; Palmese, Giuseppe

    2015-07-15

    The natural availability of flake graphite and the exceptional properties of graphene and graphene-polymer composites create a demand for simple, cost-effective, and scalable methods for top-down graphite exfoliation. This work presents a novel method of few layer graphite nanocomposite preparation directly from untreated flake graphite using a room temperature ionic liquid and laminar shear processing regimen. The ionic liquid serves both as a solvent and initiator for epoxy polymerization and is incorporated chemically into the matrix. This nanocomposite shows low electrical percolation (0.005 v/v) and low thickness (1-3 layers) graphite/graphene flakes by TEM. Additionally, the effect of processing conditions by rheometry and comparison with solvent-free conditions reveal the interactions between processing and matrix properties and provide insight into the theory of the chemical and physical exfoliation of graphite crystals and the resulting polymer matrix dispersion. An interaction model that correlates the interlayer shear physics of graphite flakes and processing parameters is proposed and tested.

  2. The Effects of Graphite Flakes in Soil on Terrestrial Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-09-01

    PAGES Graphite flakes Lethal and sublethal effect 26 Phytotoxicity Corn (Zea mays, L.) 16. PRICE CODE Cucumber ( Cucumis sativus , L.) 17. SECURITY...and cucumbers ( Cucumis sativus L., cv. Straight Eight). Corn and cucumber seeds were obtained from the Meyer Seed Company (Baltimore, MD) and sorted

  3. Environmental and health effects review for obscurant graphite flakes. Final report, 1991 July--1993 May

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Driver, C.J.; Ligotke, M.W.; Landis, W.G.; Downs, J.L.; Tiller, B.L.; Moore, E.B. Jr.; Cataldo, D.A.

    1993-07-01

    The health and environmental effects of obscurant graphite flakes were reviewed and compared to predicted levels of graphite flake material in the field during typical testing and training scenarios. Graphite flake dispersion and deposition for simulated mechanical and pyrotechnic releases were determined using a modified Gaussian atmospheric plume-dispersion model. The potential for wind resuspension of graphite flakes is controlled by weathering processes and incorporation rates in soil. Chemically, graphite flakes pose little risk to aquatic or terrestrial systems. Mechanical damage to plants and invertebrate and vertebrate organisms from the flakes is also minimal. In humans, the pathological and physiological response to inhaled graphite flake is similar to that induced by nuisance dusts and cause only transient pulmonary changes. Repeated exposure to very high concentrations (such as those near the source generator) may overwhelm the clearance mechanisms of the lung and result in pulmonary damage from the retained particles in unprotected individuals. However, these lesions either resolve with time or are of limited severity. Health effects of mixed aerosols of mixed aerosols of graphite and fog oil are similar to those produced by graphite flakes alone. Environmental impacts of fog oil-coated graphite flakes are not well known.

  4. Microwave absorption properties of graphite flakes-phenolic resin composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogoi, Jyoti P.; Gogoi, Pragyan J.; Bhattacharyya, Nidhi S.

    2013-01-01

    In the present investigation, microwave absorption properties of a conductor back single layer designed on graphite flakes (GF)-novolac phenolic resin (NPR) composites is studied. The complex permittivity of the developed composite enhance for higher GF percentages. The reflection loss(RL) measured using E8362C VNA shows a maximum RL values -25 dB at 9.8 GHz for 7 wt. % composition with -10 dB bandwidth of 0.3 GHz. The developed composites are being light weight and cost effective shows potential to be used as dielectric absorber.

  5. Ag-catalyzed InAs nanowires grown on transferable graphite flakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Holdt, Jakob; Kanne, Thomas; Sestoft, Joachim E.; Gejl, Aske; Zeng, Lunjie; Johnson, Erik; Olsson, Eva; Nygård, Jesper; Krogstrup, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Semiconducting nanowires grown by quasi-van-der-Waals epitaxy on graphite flakes are a new class of hybrid materials that hold promise for scalable nanostructured devices within opto-electronics. Here we report on high aspect ratio and stacking fault free Ag-seeded InAs nanowires grown on exfoliated graphite flakes by molecular beam epitaxy. Ag catalyzes the InAs nanowire growth selectively on the graphite flakes and not on the underlying InAs substrates. This allows for easy transfer of the flexible graphite flakes with as-grown nanowire ensembles to arbitrary substrates by a micro-needle manipulator. Besides the possibilities for fabricating novel nanostructure device designs, we show how this method is used to study the parasitic growth and bicrystal match between the graphite flake and the nanowires by transmission electron microscopy.

  6. Coating of graphite flakes with MgO/carbon nanocomposite via gas state reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharif, M., E-mail: Sharif_m@metaleng.iust.ac.i [Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Faghihi-Sani, M.A. [Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Golestani-Fard, F. [Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Saberi, A. [Tabriz University (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Soltani, Ali Khalife [Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-06-18

    Coating of graphite flakes with MgO/carbon nanocomposite was carried out via gaseous state reaction between mixture of Mg metal, CO gas and graphite flakes at 1000 {sup o}C. XRD and FE-SEM analysis of coating showed that the coating was comprised of MgO nano particles and amorphous carbon distributed smoothly and covered the graphite surface evenly. Thermodynamic calculations were employed to predict the reaction sequences as well as phase stability. The effect of coating on water wettability and oxidation resistance of graphite was studied using contact angle measurement and TG analysis, respectively. It was demonstrated that the reaction between Mg and CO could result in MgO/C nanocomposite deposition. The coating improved water wettability of graphite and also enhanced the oxidation resistance of graphite flakes significantly. Also the graphite coating showed significant phenolic resin-wettabilty owing to high surface area of such hydrophilic nano composite coating. The importance of graphite coating is explained with emphasis on its potential application in graphite containing refractories.

  7. Ag-catalyzed InAs nanowires grown on transferable graphite flakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer-Holdt, Jakob; Kanne, Thomas; Sestoft, Joachim E.;

    2016-01-01

    Semiconducting nanowires grown by quasi-van-der-Waals epitaxy on graphite flakes are a new class of hybrid materials that hold promise for scalable nanostructured devices within opto-electronics. Here we report on high aspect ratio and stacking fault free Ag-seeded InAs nanowires grown......-needle manipulator. Besides the possibilities for fabricating novel nanostructure device designs, we show how this method is used to study the parasitic growth and bicrystal match between the graphite flake and the nanowires by transmission electron microscopy....

  8. A Simple Transmission Electron Microscopy Method for Fast Thickness Characterization of Suspended Graphene and Graphite Flakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubino, Stefano; Akhtar, Sultan; Leifer, Klaus

    2016-02-01

    We present a simple, fast method for thickness characterization of suspended graphene/graphite flakes that is based on transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We derive an analytical expression for the intensity of the transmitted electron beam I 0(t), as a function of the specimen thickness t (tgraphene/graphite, the method we propose has the advantage of being simple and fast, requiring only the acquisition of bright-field images.

  9. Ex situ integration of iron oxide nanoparticles onto the exfoliated expanded graphite flakes in water suspension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jović Nataša

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid structures composed of exfoliated expanded graphite (EG and iron oxide nanocrystals have been produced by an ex situ process. The iron oxide nanoparticles coated with meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA, or poly(acrylic acid (PAA were integrated onto the exfoliated EG flakes by mixing their aqueous suspensions at room temperature under support of 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropylcarbodiimide (EDC and N-hydroxysuccin-nimide (NHS. EG flakes have been used both, naked and functionalized with branched polyethylenimine (PEI. Complete integration of two constituents has been achieved and mainteined stable for more than 12 months. No preferential spatial distribution of anchoring sites for attachement of iron oxide nanoparticles has been observed, regardless EG flakes have been used naked or functionalized with PEI molecules. The structural and physico-chemical characteristics of the exfoliated expanded graphite and its hybrids nanostructures has been investigated by SEM, TEM, FTIR and Raman techniques. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 45015

  10. Hydrothermal flake graphite mineralisation in Paleoproterozoic rocks of south-east Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosing-Schow, Nanna; Bagas, Leon; Kolb, Jochen; Balić-Žunić, Tonči; Korte, Christoph; Fiorentini, Marco L.

    2017-06-01

    Flake graphite mineralisation is hosted in the Kuummiut Terrane of the Paleoproterozoic Nagssugtoqidian Orogen, south-east Greenland. Eclogite-facies peak-metamorphic assemblages record temperatures of 640-830 °C and pressures of 22-25 kbar, and are retrogressed in the high-pressure amphibolite-facies during ca. 1870-1820 Ma. Graphite occurs as lenses along cleavage planes in breccia and as garnet-quartz-graphite veins in various metamorphic host rocks in the Tasiilaq area at Auppaluttoq, Kangikajik, and Nuuk-Ilinnera. Graphite contents reach >30 vol% in 0.2-4 × 20 m wide semi-massive mineralisation (Auppaluttoq, Kangikajik). Supergene alteration formed 1- to 2-m-thick and up to a 2.5 × 2.5 km wide loose limonitic gravel containing graphite flakes in places. The flake size ranges from 1 to 6 mm in diameter with an average of 3 mm. Liberation efficiency is at minimum 60%. Hydrothermal fluids at 600 °C, transporting carbon as CO2 and CH4, formed the mineralisation commonly hosted by shear zones, which acted as pathways for the mineralising fluids. The hydrothermal alteration assemblage is quartz-biotite-grunerite-edenite-pargasite-K-feldspar-titanite. The δ13C values of graphite, varying from -30 to -18‰ PDB, indicate that the carbon was derived from organic matter most likely from metasedimentary sources. Devolatilisation of marble may have contributed a minor amount of carbon by fluid mixing. Precipitation of graphite involved retrograde hydration reactions, depleting the fluid in H2O and causing graphite saturation. Although the high-grade mineralisation is small, it represents an excellent example of hydrothermal mineralisation in an eclogite-facies terrane during retrograde exhumation.

  11. Hydrothermal flake graphite mineralisation in Paleoproterozoic rocks of south-east Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosing-Schow, Nanna; Bagas, Leon; Kolb, Jochen; Balić-Žunić, Tonči; Korte, Christoph; Fiorentini, Marco L.

    2016-11-01

    Flake graphite mineralisation is hosted in the Kuummiut Terrane of the Paleoproterozoic Nagssugtoqidian Orogen, south-east Greenland. Eclogite-facies peak-metamorphic assemblages record temperatures of 640-830 °C and pressures of 22-25 kbar, and are retrogressed in the high-pressure amphibolite-facies during ca. 1870-1820 Ma. Graphite occurs as lenses along cleavage planes in breccia and as garnet-quartz-graphite veins in various metamorphic host rocks in the Tasiilaq area at Auppaluttoq, Kangikajik, and Nuuk-Ilinnera. Graphite contents reach >30 vol% in 0.2-4 × 20 m wide semi-massive mineralisation (Auppaluttoq, Kangikajik). Supergene alteration formed 1- to 2-m-thick and up to a 2.5 × 2.5 km wide loose limonitic gravel containing graphite flakes in places. The flake size ranges from 1 to 6 mm in diameter with an average of 3 mm. Liberation efficiency is at minimum 60%. Hydrothermal fluids at 600 °C, transporting carbon as CO2 and CH4, formed the mineralisation commonly hosted by shear zones, which acted as pathways for the mineralising fluids. The hydrothermal alteration assemblage is quartz-biotite-grunerite-edenite-pargasite-K-feldspar-titanite. The δ13C values of graphite, varying from -30 to -18‰ PDB, indicate that the carbon was derived from organic matter most likely from metasedimentary sources. Devolatilisation of marble may have contributed a minor amount of carbon by fluid mixing. Precipitation of graphite involved retrograde hydration reactions, depleting the fluid in H2O and causing graphite saturation. Although the high-grade mineralisation is small, it represents an excellent example of hydrothermal mineralisation in an eclogite-facies terrane during retrograde exhumation.

  12. Hydrothermal flake graphite mineralisation in Paleoproterozoic rocks of south-east Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosing-Schow, Nanna; Bagas, Leon; Kolb, Jochen

    2017-01-01

    Flake graphite mineralisation is hosted in the Kuummiut Terrane of the Paleoproterozoic Nagssugtoqidian Orogen, south-east Greenland. Eclogite-facies peak-metamorphic assemblages record temperatures of 640–830 °C and pressures of 22–25 kbar, and are retrogressed in the high-pressure amphibolite......-facies during ca. 1870–1820 Ma. Graphite occurs as lenses along cleavage planes in breccia and as garnet-quartzgraphite veins in various metamorphic host rocks in the Tasiilaq area at Auppaluttoq, Kangikajik, and Nuuk-Ilinnera. Graphite contents reach >30 vol% in 0.2–4 × 20mwide semimassive mineralisation...... (Auppaluttoq, Kangikajik). Supergene alteration formed 1- to 2-m-thick and up to a 2.5 × 2.5 km wide loose limonitic gravel containing graphite flakes in places. The flake size ranges from 1 to6mm in diameter with an average of ~3 mm. Liberation efficiency is at minimum 60%. Hydrothermal fluids at ~600 °C...

  13. Characteristics of flake graphite in Ni-Mn-Cu cast iron. Part 2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Janus

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper continues the article published by Archives of Foundry Engineering, vol. 9, issue 1/2009, pp. 185-290, that presented influence of chemical composition of hypo- and hypereutectic nickel-manganese-copper alloyed cast iron on properties of the contained flake graphite. In this second part of the research, effect of chemical composition of hypereutectic cast iron containing 3.5÷5.1% C, 1.7÷2.8% Si, 3.5÷10.5 %Ni, 2.0÷8.0% Mn, 0.1÷3.5% Cu, 0.14÷0.17% P and 0.02÷0.04% S on properties of flake graphite is determined. Evolution of graphite properties with changing eutecticity degree of the examined cast iron is presented. For selected castings, histograms of primary and eutectic graphite are presented, showing quantities of graphite precipitates in individual size ranges and their shape determined by the coefficient ξ defined as ratio of a precipitate area to square of its circumference. Moreover, presented are equations obtained by discriminant analysis to determine chemical composition of Ni-Mn-Cu cast iron which guarantee the most favourable distribution of A-type graphite from the point of view of castings properties.

  14. Natural graphite demand and supply - Implications for electric vehicle battery requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Donald W.; Virta, Robert L.; Mahdavi, Mahbood; Sangine, Elizabeth S.; Fortier, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Electric vehicles have been promoted to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and lessen U.S. dependence on petroleum for transportation. Growth in U.S. sales of electric vehicles has been hindered by technical difficulties and the high cost of the lithium-ion batteries used to power many electric vehicles (more than 50% of the vehicle cost). Groundbreaking has begun for a lithium-ion battery factory in Nevada that, at capacity, could manufacture enough batteries to power 500,000 electric vehicles of various types and provide economies of scale to reduce the cost of batteries. Currently, primary synthetic graphite derived from petroleum coke is used in the anode of most lithium-ion batteries. An alternate may be the use of natural flake graphite, which would result in estimated graphite cost reductions of more than US$400 per vehicle at 2013 prices. Most natural flake graphite is sourced from China, the world's leading graphite producer. Sourcing natural flake graphite from deposits in North America could reduce raw material transportation costs and, given China's growing internal demand for flake graphite for its industries and ongoing environmental, labor, and mining issues, may ensure a more reliable and environmentally conscious supply of graphite. North America has flake graphite resources, and Canada is currently a producer, but most new mining projects in the United States require more than 10 yr to reach production, and demand could exceed supplies of flake graphite. Natural flake graphite may serve only to supplement synthetic graphite, at least for the short-term outlook.

  15. Characteristics of flake graphite in Ni-Mn-Cu cast iron. Part 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Janus

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Relationship between chemical composition of cast iron and properties of flake graphite occurring in hypoeutectic and eutectic nickelmanganese-copper cast iron was determined. The research covered over 60 alloys of cast iron containing 1.6 to 4.1 % C, 1.3 to 2.8 % Si,2.4 to 10.5 % Ni, 0.2 to 8.2 % Mn, 0.1 to 3.5 % Cu, 0.14 to 0.17 % P and 0.02 to 0.04 % S. Evolution of graphite properties with changingeutecticity degree of the examined cast iron is presented. For selected castings, histograms of eutectic graphite colonies are presented, showing numbers of graphite precipitates in individual size ranges and their shape described by the coefficient

  16. Dynamic Response of Graphitic Flakes in Nematic Liquid Crystals: Confinement and Host Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Tie

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Electric field-induced reorientation of suspended graphitic (GP flakes and its relaxation back to the original state in a nematic liquid crystal (NLC host are of interest not only in academia, but also in industrial applications, such as polarizer-free and optical film-free displays, and electro-optic light modulators. As the phenomenon has been demonstrated by thorough observation, the detailed study of the physical properties of the host NLC (the magnitude of dielectric anisotropy, elastic constants, and rotational viscosity, the size of the GP flakes, and cell thickness, are urgently required to be explored and investigated. Here, we demonstrate that the response time of GP flakes reorientation associated with an NLC host can be effectively enhanced by controlling the physical properties. In a vertical field-on state, higher dielectric anisotropy and higher elasticity of NLC give rise to quicker reorientation of the GP flakes (switching from planar to vertical alignment due to the field-induced coupling effect of interfacial Maxwell-Wagner polarization and NLC reorientation. In a field off-state, lower rotational viscosity of NLC and lower cell thickness can help to reduce the decay time of GP flakes reoriented from vertical to planar alignment. This is mainly attributed to strong coupling between GP flakes and NLC originating from the strong π-π interaction between benzene rings in the honeycomb-like graphene structure and in NLC molecules. The high-uniformity of reoriented GP flakes exhibits a possibility of new light modulation with a relatively faster response time in the switching process and, thus, it can show potential application in field-induced memory and modulation devices.

  17. Stretchable and Flexible High-Strain Sensors Made Using Carbon Nanotubes and Graphite Films on Natural Rubber

    OpenAIRE

    Sreenivasulu Tadakaluru; Wiradej Thongsuwan; Pisith Singjai

    2014-01-01

    Conventional metallic strain sensors are flexible, but they can sustain maximum strains of only ∼5%, so there is a need for sensors that can bear high strains for multifunctional applications. In this study, we report stretchable and flexible high-strain sensors that consist of entangled and randomly distributed multiwall carbon nanotubes or graphite flakes on a natural rubber substrate. Carbon nanotubes/graphite flakes were sandwiched in natural rubber to produce these high-strain sensors. U...

  18. High-yield synthesis of few-layer graphene flakes through electrochemical expansion of graphite in propylene carbonate electrolyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junzhong; Manga, Kiran Kumar; Bao, Qiaoliang; Loh, Kian Ping

    2011-06-15

    High-yield production of few-layer graphene flakes from graphite is important for the scalable synthesis and industrial application of graphene. However, high-yield exfoliation of graphite to form graphene sheets without using any oxidation process or super-strong acid is challenging. Here we demonstrate a solution route inspired by the lithium rechargeable battery for the high-yield (>70%) exfoliation of graphite into highly conductive few-layer graphene flakes (average thickness electrolyte of Li salts and organic solvents under high current density and exfoliated efficiently into few-layer graphene sheets with the aid of sonication. The dispersible graphene can be ink-brushed to form highly conformal coatings of conductive films (15 ohm/square at a graphene loading of <1 mg/cm(2)) on commercial paper.

  19. Electrolytic exfoliation of graphite in water with multifunctional electrolytes: en route towards high quality, oxide-free graphene flakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munuera, J M; Paredes, J I; Villar-Rodil, S; Ayán-Varela, M; Martínez-Alonso, A; Tascón, J M D

    2016-02-07

    Electrolytic--usually referred to as electrochemical--exfoliation of graphite in water under anodic potential holds enormous promise as a simple, green and high-yield method for the mass production of graphene, but currently suffers from several drawbacks that hinder its widespread adoption, one of the most critical being the oxidation and subsequent structural degradation of the carbon lattice that is usually associated with such a production process. To overcome this and other limitations, we introduce and implement the concept of multifunctional electrolytes. The latter are amphiphilic anions (mostly polyaromatic hydrocarbons appended with sulfonate groups) that play different relevant roles as (1) an intercalating electrolyte to trigger exfoliation of graphite into graphene flakes, (2) a dispersant to afford stable aqueous colloidal suspensions of the flakes suitable for further use, (3) a sacrificial agent to prevent graphene oxidation during exfoliation and (4) a linker to promote nanoparticle anchoring on the graphene flakes, yielding functional hybrids. The implementation of this strategy with some selected amphiphiles even furnishes anodically exfoliated graphenes of a quality similar to that of flakes produced by direct, ultrasound- or shear-induced exfoliation of graphite in the liquid phase (i.e., almost oxide- and defect-free). These high quality materials were used for the preparation of catalytically efficient graphene-Pt nanoparticle hybrids, as demonstrated by model reactions (reduction of nitroarenes). The multifunctional performance of these electrolytes is also discussed and rationalized, and a mechanistic picture of their oxidation-preventing ability is proposed. Overall, the present results open the prospect of anodic exfoliation as a competitive method for the production of very high quality graphene flakes.

  20. Facile Synthesis of High Quality Graphene Oxide from Graphite Flakes Using Improved Hummer's Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Foo Wah; Lai, Chin Wei; Abd Hamid, Sharifah Bee

    2015-09-01

    Graphene is a promising candidate for making next-generation nanotechnology devices due to its outstanding properties in terms of physical, chemical, mechanical aspects. Based on the theoretical point of view, graphene is a two-dimensional (2D) crystal structure with sp2 hybridized carbon atoms arrangement and has attracted extensive attention in a considerable number of applications such as solar energy, sensor and energy storage, naming a few. Herein, graphene oxide (GO) is synthesized from graphite flakes using the Improved Hummer's method. The results demonstrated the comparison of synthesized GO samples based on stirred duration of 6 h and 72 h. The FTIR results proved that the 72 h GO sample was well-bonded with the C-O functional group, signifying the successful synthesis of GO under an extended stirred duration. The FESEM images showed that the synthesized GO was well-arranged in crystal lattice of graphene sheets whereas the EDX result showed that higher atomic % of Oxygen, O2 was obtained with a longer stirred duration due to the high opportunity for oxygenated bonded to occur on the C-C functional group.

  1. Electrolytic exfoliation of graphite in water with multifunctional electrolytes: en route towards high quality, oxide-free graphene flakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munuera, J. M.; Paredes, J. I.; Villar-Rodil, S.; Ayán-Varela, M.; Martínez-Alonso, A.; Tascón, J. M. D.

    2016-01-01

    Electrolytic - usually referred to as electrochemical - exfoliation of graphite in water under anodic potential holds enormous promise as a simple, green and high-yield method for the mass production of graphene, but currently suffers from several drawbacks that hinder its widespread adoption, one of the most critical being the oxidation and subsequent structural degradation of the carbon lattice that is usually associated with such a production process. To overcome this and other limitations, we introduce and implement the concept of multifunctional electrolytes. The latter are amphiphilic anions (mostly polyaromatic hydrocarbons appended with sulfonate groups) that play different relevant roles as (1) an intercalating electrolyte to trigger exfoliation of graphite into graphene flakes, (2) a dispersant to afford stable aqueous colloidal suspensions of the flakes suitable for further use, (3) a sacrificial agent to prevent graphene oxidation during exfoliation and (4) a linker to promote nanoparticle anchoring on the graphene flakes, yielding functional hybrids. The implementation of this strategy with some selected amphiphiles even furnishes anodically exfoliated graphenes of a quality similar to that of flakes produced by direct, ultrasound- or shear-induced exfoliation of graphite in the liquid phase (i.e., almost oxide- and defect-free). These high quality materials were used for the preparation of catalytically efficient graphene-Pt nanoparticle hybrids, as demonstrated by model reactions (reduction of nitroarenes). The multifunctional performance of these electrolytes is also discussed and rationalized, and a mechanistic picture of their oxidation-preventing ability is proposed. Overall, the present results open the prospect of anodic exfoliation as a competitive method for the production of very high quality graphene flakes.Electrolytic - usually referred to as electrochemical - exfoliation of graphite in water under anodic potential holds enormous promise

  2. Advanced rechargeable aluminium ion battery with a high-quality natural graphite cathode

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Di-Yan; Wei, Chuan-yu; Lin, Meng-Chang; Pan, Chun-Jern; Chou, Hung-Lung; Chen, Hsin-An; Gong, Ming; Wu, Yingpeng; Yuan, Chunze; Angell, Michael; Hsieh, Yu-Ju; Chen, Yu-Hsun; Wen, Cheng-Yen; Chen, Chun-Wei; Hwang, Bing-Joe

    2017-01-01

    Recently, interest in aluminium ion batteries with aluminium anodes, graphite cathodes and ionic liquid electrolytes has increased; however, much remains to be done to increase the cathode capacity and to understand details of the anion–graphite intercalation mechanism. Here, an aluminium ion battery cell made using pristine natural graphite flakes achieves a specific capacity of ∼110 mAh g−1 with Coulombic efficiency ∼98%, at a current density of 99 mA g−1 (0.9 C) with clear discharge voltag...

  3. An excellent performance anode of ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/flake graphite composite for lithium ion battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Lingmin [School of Physics and Telecommunication Engineering, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Engineering Research Center of Materials and Technology for Electrochemical Energy Storage (Ministry of Education), Guangzhou 510006 (China); Hou, Xianhua, E-mail: houxh@scnu.edu.cn [School of Physics and Telecommunication Engineering, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Engineering Research Center of Materials and Technology for Electrochemical Energy Storage (Ministry of Education), Guangzhou 510006 (China); Hu, Shejun; Tang, Xiaoqin [School of Physics and Telecommunication Engineering, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Engineering Research Center of Materials and Technology for Electrochemical Energy Storage (Ministry of Education), Guangzhou 510006 (China); Liu, Xiang [Institute of Advanced Materials, Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing 210009 (China); Ru, Qiang [School of Physics and Telecommunication Engineering, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Engineering Research Center of Materials and Technology for Electrochemical Energy Storage (Ministry of Education), Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2014-02-05

    Highlights: • ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/flake graphite composite was synthesized by hydrothermal method. • The ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} /flake graphite anode demonstrated high initial coulombic efficiency of 87.7%. • The initial discharge /charge capacity was 848 mA h g{sup −1} and 744 mA h g{sup −1}. • The high capacity retention of 98% was obtained for the ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/flake graphite anode. -- Abstract: An approach of hydrothermal reaction for lithium ion battery was adopted, by which ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/flake graphite composites with excellent performance could be prepared as anode materials for lithium ion batteries. With nano-sized ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} particles coating on the electrochemical active matrix of flake graphite, the special composites allowed improved electronic conductivity and constructed an expressway for the transport of charges and lithium ions. Thus the ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/flake graphite anode became a compromise between capacity and cycle ability. The initial discharge–charge capacity was 848 mA h g{sup −1} and 744 mA h g{sup −1} at a constant current density of 100 mA g{sup −1}, respectively. As high as 87.7% of the initial coulombic efficiency was obtained. Additionally, the charge capacity maintained constantly in the range of 720–735 mA h g{sup −1} in following cycles. And a high reversible charge capacity of 730 mA h g{sup −1} could be attained after 100 cycles, with the reversible capacity retention of 98%.

  4. Stretchable and Flexible High-Strain Sensors Made Using Carbon Nanotubes and Graphite Films on Natural Rubber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreenivasulu Tadakaluru

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Conventional metallic strain sensors are flexible, but they can sustain maximum strains of only ~5%, so there is a need for sensors that can bear high strains for multifunctional applications. In this study, we report stretchable and flexible high-strain sensors that consist of entangled and randomly distributed multiwall carbon nanotubes or graphite flakes on a natural rubber substrate. Carbon nanotubes/graphite flakes were sandwiched in natural rubber to produce these high-strain sensors. Using field emission scanning electron microscopy, the morphology of the films for both the carbon nanotube and graphite sensors were assessed under different strain conditions (0% and 400% strain. As the strain was increased, the films fractured, resulting in an increase in the electrical resistance of the sensor; this change was reversible. Strains of up to 246% (graphite sensor and 620% (carbon nanotube sensor were measured; these values are respectively ~50 and ~120 times greater than those of conventional metallic strain sensors.

  5. Stretchable and flexible high-strain sensors made using carbon nanotubes and graphite films on natural rubber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadakaluru, Sreenivasulu; Thongsuwan, Wiradej; Singjai, Pisith

    2014-01-06

    Conventional metallic strain sensors are flexible, but they can sustain maximum strains of only ~5%, so there is a need for sensors that can bear high strains for multifunctional applications. In this study, we report stretchable and flexible high-strain sensors that consist of entangled and randomly distributed multiwall carbon nanotubes or graphite flakes on a natural rubber substrate. Carbon nanotubes/graphite flakes were sandwiched in natural rubber to produce these high-strain sensors. Using field emission scanning electron microscopy, the morphology of the films for both the carbon nanotube and graphite sensors were assessed under different strain conditions (0% and 400% strain). As the strain was increased, the films fractured, resulting in an increase in the electrical resistance of the sensor; this change was reversible. Strains of up to 246% (graphite sensor) and 620% (carbon nanotube sensor) were measured; these values are respectively ~50 and ~120 times greater than those of conventional metallic strain sensors.

  6. Constitutive model for flake graphite cast iron automotive brake discs: induced anisotropic damage model under complex loadings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustins, L.; Billardon, R.; Hild, F.

    2016-09-01

    The present paper details an elasto-viscoplastic constitutive model for automotive brake discs made of flake graphite cast iron. In a companion paper (Augustins et al. in Contin Mech Thermodyn, 2015), the authors proposed a one-dimensional setting appropriate for representing the complex behavior of the material (i.e., asymmetry between tensile and compressive loadings) under anisothermal conditions. The generalization of this 1D model to 3D cases on a volume element and the associated challenges are addressed. A direct transposition is not possible, and an alternative solution without unilateral conditions is first proposed. Induced anisotropic damage and associated constitutive laws are then introduced. The transition from the volume element to the real structure and the numerical implementation require a specific basis change. Brake disc simulations with this constitutive model show that unilateral conditions are needed for the friction bands. A damage deactivation procedure is therefore defined.

  7. Effect of particle size on lithium intercalation rates in natural graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaghib, K.; Brochu, F.; Guerfi, A.; Kinoshita, K.

    The intercalation rate of Li +-ions in flake natural graphite with particle size that ranged from 2 to 40 μm was investigated. The amount of Li +-ions that intercalate at different rates was determined from measurement of the reversible capacity during deintercalation in 1 M LiClO 4/1:1 (volume ratio) ethylene carbonate-dimethyl carbonate. The key issues in this study are the role of particle size and fraction of edge sites on the rate of intercalation and deintercalation of Li +-ions. At low specific current (15.5 mA/g carbon), the composition of lithiated graphite approaches the theoretical value, x=1 in Li xC 6, except for the natural graphite with the largest particle size. However, x decreases with an increase in specific current for all particle sizes. This trend suggests that slow solid-state diffusion of Li +-ions limits the intercalation capacity in graphite. The flake natural graphite with a particle size of 12 μm may provide the optimum combination of reversible capacity and irreversible capacity loss in the electrolyte and discharge rates used in this study.

  8. Study of the effect of solidification on graphite flakes microstructure and mechanical properties of an ASTM a-48 gray cast iron using steel molds

    OpenAIRE

    Ganwarich Pluphrach

    2010-01-01

    The analysis of heat conduction is a widely used technique for control of metallurgical process and solidified eutecticalloy investigation. The objectives of this research are studies about the effect of solidification on graphite flakes microstructureand mechanical properties of an ASTM A-48 gray cast iron using SKD 11 tool steel, S45C medium carbon steel andSS400 hot-rolled steel molds. These three steel molds are important for heat conduction and different from other works. Thisanalysis in...

  9. One-Pot Synthesis of Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic N-Doped Graphene Quantum Dots via Exfoliating and Disintegrating Graphite Flakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Na-Jung; Chen, Yu-Syuan; Wu, Chien-Wei; Huang, Chun-Yuan; Chan, Yang-Hsiang; Chen, I-Wen Peter

    2016-07-25

    Graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have drawn tremendous attention on account of their numerous alluring properties and a wide range of application potentials. Here, we report that hydrophilic and hydrophobic N-doped GQDs can be prepared via exfoliating and disintegrating graphite flakes. Various spectroscopic characterizations including TEM, AFM, FTIR, PL, XPS, and Raman spectroscopy demonstrated that the hydrophilic N-doped GQDs (IN-GQDs) and the hydrophobic N-doped GQDs (ON-GQDs) are mono-layered and multi-layered, respectively. In terms of practical aspects, the supercapacitor of an ON-GQDs/SWCNTs composite paper electrode was fabricated and exhibited an areal capacitance of 114 mF/cm(2), which is more than 250% higher than the best reported value to date for a GQDs/carbon nanotube hybrid composite. For IN-GQDs applications, bio-memristor devices of IN-GQDs-albumen combination exhibited on/off current ratios in excess of 10(4) accompanied by stable switching endurance of over 250 cycles. The resistance stability of the high resistance state and the low resistance state could be maintained for over 10(4) s. Moreover, the IN-GQDs exhibited a superior quantum yield (34%), excellent stability of cellular imaging, and no cytotoxicity. Hence, the solution-based method for synchronized production of IN-GQDs and ON-GQDs is a facile and processable route that will bring GQDs-based electronics and composites closer to actualization.

  10. Effect of particle morphology on lithium intercalation rates in natural graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaghib, K.; Song, X.; Guerfi, A.; Kostecki, R.; Kinoshita, K.

    The intercalation rate of Li +-ions in flake natural graphite (two-dimensional) with particle size from 2 to 40 μm and sphere-like graphite (three-dimensional), 12 to 40 μm in particle size, was investigated. The amount of Li + ions that intercalate at different rates was determined from measurement of the reversible capacity during de-intercalation in 1 M LiClO 4/1:1 (volume ratio) ethylene carbonate—dimethyl carbonate. The key issues in this study are the role of the particle size and fraction of edge sites on the rate of intercalation and de-intercalation of Li + ions. At low specific current (15.5 mA/g carbon), the composition of lithiated graphite approaches the theoretical value, x=1 in Li xC 6, except for the natural graphite with the largest particle size. However, x decreases with an increase in specific current for all particle sizes. This trend suggests that slow solid-state diffusion of Li + ions limits the intercalation capacity in graphite. The 3D natural graphite with a particle size of 12 μm may provide the optimum combination of reversible capacity and irreversible capacity loss in the electrolyte and discharge rates used in this study.

  11. Understanding the nature of "superhard graphite"

    CERN Document Server

    Boulfelfel, Salah Eddine; Leoni, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    Numerous experiments showed that on cold compression graphite transforms into a new superhard and transparent allotrope. Several structures with different topologies have been proposed for this phase. While experimental data are consistent with these models, the only way to solve this puzzle is to find which structure is kinetically easiest to form. Using state-of-the-art molecular-dynamics transition path sampling simulations, we investigate kinetic pathways of the pressure-induced transformation of graphite to various superhard candidate structures. Unlike hitherto applied methods for elucidating nature of superhard graphite, transition path sampling realistically models nucleation events necessary for physically meaningful transformation kinetics. We demonstrate that nucleation mechanism and kinetics lead to $M$-carbon as the final product. $W$-carbon, initially competitor to $M$-carbon, is ruled out by phase growth. Bct-C$_4$ structure is not expected to be produced by cold compression due to less probabl...

  12. Numerical Calculation of Infrared Extinction Performances of Graphite Flakes%鳞片石墨粒子红外消光性能数值计算

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    缪云坤; 刘海锋; 刘清海; 黎守云

    2015-01-01

    利用离散偶极子近似(DDA)方法计算了圆形鳞片石墨粒子对中远红外消光性能与波长、圆片直径和厚度等的关系,结果表明,片径3~4mm的圆形鳞片石墨粒子(厚度为直径的1/10)对中远红外的消光性能较好,散射作用大于吸收作用,圆片粒子的消光性能明显好于对应有效半径的球形粒子的消光性能,圆片厚度越薄,消光系数越大,并逐渐趋于最大值。%The infrared extinction performances of round graphite flakes are calculated with discrete dipole approximation(DDA)method. Results show that the round flakes with diameter of 3-4 micrometers and thickness of one-tenth of diameter have better extinction performances in the middle and far infrared wavelengths,and that the extinction is mainly due to scattering. The round flakes have better extinction performances than spheres with the same effective radius. The thinner the thickness of round flakes,the bigger the extinction coefficient,and it will tend gradually to the maximum.

  13. Advanced rechargeable aluminium ion battery with a high-quality natural graphite cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Di-Yan; Wei, Chuan-Yu; Lin, Meng-Chang; Pan, Chun-Jern; Chou, Hung-Lung; Chen, Hsin-An; Gong, Ming; Wu, Yingpeng; Yuan, Chunze; Angell, Michael; Hsieh, Yu-Ju; Chen, Yu-Hsun; Wen, Cheng-Yen; Chen, Chun-Wei; Hwang, Bing-Joe; Chen, Chia-Chun; Dai, Hongjie

    2017-02-01

    Recently, interest in aluminium ion batteries with aluminium anodes, graphite cathodes and ionic liquid electrolytes has increased; however, much remains to be done to increase the cathode capacity and to understand details of the anion-graphite intercalation mechanism. Here, an aluminium ion battery cell made using pristine natural graphite flakes achieves a specific capacity of ~110 mAh g-1 with Coulombic efficiency ~98%, at a current density of 99 mA g-1 (0.9 C) with clear discharge voltage plateaus (2.25-2.0 V and 1.9-1.5 V). The cell has a capacity of 60 mAh g-1 at 6 C, over 6,000 cycles with Coulombic efficiency ~ 99%. Raman spectroscopy shows two different intercalation processes involving chloroaluminate anions at the two discharging plateaus, while C-Cl bonding on the surface, or edges of natural graphite, is found using X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Finally, theoretical calculations are employed to investigate the intercalation behaviour of choloraluminate anions in the graphite electrode.

  14. Advanced rechargeable aluminium ion battery with a high-quality natural graphite cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Di-Yan; Wei, Chuan-Yu; Lin, Meng-Chang; Pan, Chun-Jern; Chou, Hung-Lung; Chen, Hsin-An; Gong, Ming; Wu, Yingpeng; Yuan, Chunze; Angell, Michael; Hsieh, Yu-Ju; Chen, Yu-Hsun; Wen, Cheng-Yen; Chen, Chun-Wei; Hwang, Bing-Joe; Chen, Chia-Chun; Dai, Hongjie

    2017-01-01

    Recently, interest in aluminium ion batteries with aluminium anodes, graphite cathodes and ionic liquid electrolytes has increased; however, much remains to be done to increase the cathode capacity and to understand details of the anion–graphite intercalation mechanism. Here, an aluminium ion battery cell made using pristine natural graphite flakes achieves a specific capacity of ∼110 mAh g−1 with Coulombic efficiency ∼98%, at a current density of 99 mA g−1 (0.9 C) with clear discharge voltage plateaus (2.25–2.0 V and 1.9–1.5 V). The cell has a capacity of 60 mAh g−1 at 6 C, over 6,000 cycles with Coulombic efficiency ∼ 99%. Raman spectroscopy shows two different intercalation processes involving chloroaluminate anions at the two discharging plateaus, while C–Cl bonding on the surface, or edges of natural graphite, is found using X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Finally, theoretical calculations are employed to investigate the intercalation behaviour of choloraluminate anions in the graphite electrode. PMID:28194027

  15. 羧甲基纤维素钠对鳞片石墨颗粒分散效果的影响%Effect of Carboxymethylcellulose Sodium on Dispersion of Flake Graphite Particles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王俊波; 裴植; 何丽明

    2013-01-01

    针对石墨具有天然的憎水性,单纯的石墨颗粒不易在水中分散,必须添加亲水性物质作为分散剂的问题,以羧甲基纤维素钠为分散剂,在相同的工艺条件下制备石墨-水系浆料,研究羧甲基纤维素钠用量及分散时间对鳞片石墨颗粒在水中分散效果的影响.结果表明,羧甲基纤维素钠的质量分数为1%,球磨分散时间为20 min,鳞片石墨颗粒在水中的分散效果最好.%Aiming at the natural hydrophobicity and poor dispersion in water of graphite particles,taking carboxymethylcellulose sodium as a dispersing agent,the graphite aqueous slurry was prepared under the same process conditions.The effect of the carboxymethylcellulose sodium dosage and dispersion time on dispersion of flake graphite particles was studied.The results show that the best mass fraction of carboxymethylcellulose sodium is 1%.The best dispersion time is 20 min.

  16. Characteristics of the absorption and the emission of hydrogen in palladium nanoparticles encapsulated into graphite at 1.0 MPa hydrogen pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Hirai, Nobumitsu; Takashima, Masayuki; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Hara, Shigeta

    2004-01-01

    Palladium nanoparticles encapsulated into graphite (Pd–graphite intercalation compound: Pd–GIC) were produced from two kinds of graphite, natural graphite (average flake size: 270 mm) and kish graphite (average flake size: 15 mm). Hydrogen storage properties of Pd– GIC have been investigated by means of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) between 473 and 573 K at 1.0 MPa hydrogen pressure. It is found from the DSC measurement that Pd–GIC can absorb and emit hydrogen.

  17. Stretchable and Flexible High-Strain Sensors Made Using Carbon Nanotubes and Graphite Films on Natural Rubber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadakaluru, Sreenivasulu; Thongsuwan, Wiradej; Singjai, Pisith

    2014-01-01

    Conventional metallic strain sensors are flexible, but they can sustain maximum strains of only ∼5%, so there is a need for sensors that can bear high strains for multifunctional applications. In this study, we report stretchable and flexible high-strain sensors that consist of entangled and randomly distributed multiwall carbon nanotubes or graphite flakes on a natural rubber substrate. Carbon nanotubes/graphite flakes were sandwiched in natural rubber to produce these high-strain sensors. Using field emission scanning electron microscopy, the morphology of the films for both the carbon nanotube and graphite sensors were assessed under different strain conditions (0% and 400% strain). As the strain was increased, the films fractured, resulting in an increase in the electrical resistance of the sensor; this change was reversible. Strains of up to 246% (graphite sensor) and 620% (carbon nanotube sensor) were measured; these values are respectively ∼50 and ∼120 times greater than those of conventional metallic strain sensors. PMID:24399158

  18. Graphite nanoplatelets produced by oxidation and thermal exfoliation of graphite and electrical conductivities of their epoxy composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raza, Mohsin Ali; Westwood, Aidan; Brown, Andy; Hondow, Nicole; Stirling, Chris

    2012-12-01

    Graphite nanoplatelets were produced by sonication of thermally reduced graphite oxide produced from three precursor graphites. The thicknesses of the resulting graphite nanoplatlets were measured by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The type and size of the precursor graphite plays an important role in the final graphite nanoplatelet quality. The thinnest graphite nanoplatelets (average thickness of 4-7 nm) were obtained from Sri Lankan powdered graphite (average particle size of 0.1-0.2 mm). Thicker graphite nanoplatelets (average thickness of 30-60 nm), were obtained from a Canadian graphite (with an average flake size of 0.5-2 mm). Graphite nanoplatelets obtained by acid intercalation of Sri Lankan graphite were much thicker (an average thickness of 150 nm). Graphite nanoplatelet/epoxy composites containing 4 wt.% graphite nanoplatelets derived from Canadian or Sri Lankan natural graphite have electrical conductivities significantly above the percolation conductivity threshold. In contrast, corresponding composites, produced with (4 wt.%) commercial graphite nanoplatelets, either as-received or re-exfoliated, were electrically insulating. This behaviour is attributed to the highly wrinkled morphology, folded edges and abundant surface functional groups of the commercial graphite nanoplatelets. Thermal reduction of graphite oxide produced from natural flake graphite is therefore a promising route for producing graphite nanoplatelets fillers for electrically-conducting polymer composites.

  19. Finite Element Analysis Of Epoxy-Graphite Powder, Epoxy-Ms Powder, Epoxy- Ms Lathe Scrap(Ms Flakes Filled In A Circular Hollow Aluminium Column

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr.M.AnandaRao

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Main objective of this paper is to prepare composite material filled hollow Al columns and test them for their compressive strengths and compare the results with Rankine’s columnar theory and Finite Element Analysis using Ansys 2014. The idea of filling the particulate polymer composite material in an aluminium tube is taken from a research paper presented at 14th international conference on computing in civil and building engineering in Moscow, Russia (27-29 June 2012 by Feng Zhou and Ben Young, in which they filled the Al tube with concrete and conducted Finite Elemental Analysis. The composites used in the project are Epoxy-graphite, Epoxy-MS powder, Epoxy-MS flakes, all these three samples are taken in a hollow Al CHS tube. Another two specimens were prepared by using epoxy-graphite powder and epoxy-MS powder without using Al tube. These specimens were subjected to crushing force and the readings obtained were compared with the results obtained by conducting Finite elemental analysis in ANSYS. The applications include columns in buildings, columns of bridges, and as columns in earthquake zones as the outer hollow metal has the capability to withstand heavy loads and dampens the vibrations.

  20. The dependence of natural graphite anode performance on electrode density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Joongpyo; Striebel, Kathryn A.

    2003-11-01

    The effect of electrode density for lithium intercalation and irreversible capacity loss on the natural graphite anode in lithium ion batteries was studied by electrochemical methods. Both the first-cycle reversible and irreversible capacities of the natural graphite anode decreased with an increase in the anode density though compression. The reduction in reversible capacity was attributed to a reduction in the chemical diffusion coefficient for lithium though partially agglomerated particles with a larger stress. For the natural graphite in this study the potentials for Li (de)insertion shifted between the first and second formation cycles and the extent of this shift was dependent on electrode density. The relation between this peak shift and the irreversible capacity loss are probably both due to the decrease in graphite surface area with compression.

  1. Modified natural graphite as anode material for lithium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y. P.; Jiang, C.; Wan, C.; Holze, R.

    A concentrated nitric acid solution was used as an oxidant to modify the electrochemical performance of natural graphite as anode material for lithium ion batteries. Results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, electron paramagnetic resonance, thermogravimmetry, differential thermal analysis, high resolution electron microscopy, and measurement of the reversible capacity suggest that the surface structure of natural graphite was changed, a fresh dense layer of oxides was formed. Some structural imperfections were removed, and the stability of the graphite structure increased. These changes impede decomposition of electrolyte solvent molecules, co-intercalation of solvated lithium ions and movement of graphene planes along the a-axis direction. Concomitantly, more micropores were introduced, and thus, lithium intercalation and deintercalation were favored and more sites were provided for lithium storage. Consequently, the reversible capacity and the cycling behavior of the modified natural graphite were much improved by the oxidation. Obviously, the liquid-solid oxidation is advantageous in controlling the uniformity of the products.

  2. Wear resistance and friction reduction in acrylo nitrile butadiene rubber through hybrid combination of graphite flakes and nano tungsten disulphide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agrawal, Neha, E-mail: neha87bhu@gmail.com [Defence Material Store Research Development and Establishment (DMSRDE), DRDO, GT Road, Kanpur 208013, U.P (India); Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400076, Maharashtra (India); Pandey, Akanksha; Parihar, A. S.; Mishra, A. K.; Mukhopadhyay, K.; Prasad, N. E. [Defence Material Store Research Development and Establishment (DMSRDE), DRDO, GT Road, Kanpur 208013, U.P (India); Gandhi, M. N.; Bhattacharyya, A. R. [Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400076, Maharashtra (India)

    2016-05-06

    Friction and wear have considerable role in the life span of two interacting parts. Incorporation of nanofillers in polymers/elastomers matrix causes commendable changes in its tribologicalproperties. The main purpose of this work is to reduce the coefficient of friction and wear rate of Acrylo Nitrile Butadiene rubber (NBR). To achieve such objective traditionally well knownlubricants graphite(G), tungsten disulphide (WS{sub 2}) and there hybrid combination was incorporated in NBR matrix. Effect of applied load (force) and concentration of fillers on tribological properties of NBR had been studied. The filler incorporation enhanced the hardnessby 8%, showed resistance to hydraulic oil and aging effect also got improved significantly. A particular optimized concentration of NBR with hybrid combination of 2% WS{sub 2} and 4% Graphite showed minimum coefficient of friction as well as wear rate. A hypothesis could be attributed that similar lamellar structure of WS{sub 2} and Graphite along with formation of a stable nanoscale disulfide tribofilmcould result in lowering of friction. These substantially improved properties of nanoreinforced rubber materials would definitely pave promising path for plethora of potential technological applications.

  3. Wear resistance and friction reduction in acrylo nitrile butadiene rubber through hybrid combination of graphite flakes and nano tungsten disulphide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Neha; Pandey, Akanksha; Parihar, A. S.; Mishra, A. K.; Gandhi, M. N.; Bhattacharyya, A. R.; Mukhopadhyay, K.; Prasad, N. E.

    2016-05-01

    Friction and wear have considerable role in the life span of two interacting parts. Incorporation of nanofillers in polymers/elastomers matrix causes commendable changes in its tribologicalproperties. The main purpose of this work is to reduce the coefficient of friction and wear rate of Acrylo Nitrile Butadiene rubber (NBR). To achieve such objective traditionally well knownlubricants graphite(G), tungsten disulphide (WS2) and there hybrid combination was incorporated in NBR matrix. Effect of applied load (force) and concentration of fillers on tribological properties of NBR had been studied. The filler incorporation enhanced the hardnessby 8%, showed resistance to hydraulic oil and aging effect also got improved significantly. A particular optimized concentration of NBR with hybrid combination of 2% WS2 and 4% Graphite showed minimum coefficient of friction as well as wear rate. A hypothesis could be attributed that similar lamellar structure of WS2 and Graphite along with formation of a stable nanoscale disulfide tribofilmcould result in lowering of friction. These substantially improved properties of nanoreinforced rubber materials would definitely pave promising path for plethora of potential technological applications.

  4. Study on the column floatation technology of fine flake graphite%某细鳞片石墨柱浮选新工艺研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘海营; 韩登峰

    2016-01-01

    黑龙江某细鳞片石墨矿采用浮选工艺进行选别,采用改进后的KYZB型浮选柱,对生产现场中不同浮选作业的矿浆,进行了充气量、给矿速度等不同浮选条件下的鳞片石墨柱浮选新工艺研究.研究结果表明,相比于浮选机,KYZB型浮选柱精矿回收率偏低,但是可以获得固定碳含量更高的浮选精矿.通过浮选柱产品的粒度筛析,查找了回收率偏低的原因和鳞片石墨柱浮选的重要影响因素.%Flotation technology was be used to process a fine flake graphite ore in Heilongjiang. Research is made on the different flotation pulp by improved KYZB flotation column with some factors such as aeration rate and feeding capacity etc.Test results show that the improved KYZB flotation column has superiority in concentrate grade compare to the flotation machine,with the lower recovery.The main factors that affect the recovery and column flotation are found by sieve analysis of the concentrate and tailings.

  5. A plum-pudding like mesoporous SiO2/flake graphite nanocomposite with superior rate performance for LIB anode materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huan-Huan; Zhang, Lin-Lin; Fan, Chao-Ying; Wang, Kang; Wu, Xing-Long; Sun, Hai-Zhu; Zhang, Jing-Ping

    2015-09-21

    A novel kind of plum-pudding like mesoporous SiO2 nanospheres (MSNs) and flake graphite (FG) nanocomposite (pp-MSNs/FG) was designed and fabricated via a facile and cost-effective hydrothermal method. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis showed that most of the MSNs were well anchored on FG. This special architecture has multiple advantages, including FG that offers a conductive framework and hinders the volume expansion effect. Moreover, the porous structure of MSNs could provide more available lithium storage sites and extra free space to accommodate the mechanical strain caused by the volume change during the repeated reversible reaction between Li(+) and active materials. Due to the synergetic effects of its unique plum-pudding structure, the obtained pp-MSNs/FG nanocomposite exhibited a decent reversible capacity of 702 mA h g(-1) (based on the weight of MSNs in the electrode material) after 100 cycles with high Coulombic efficiency above 99% under 100 mA g(-1) and a charge capacity of 239.6 mA h g(-1) could be obtained even under 5000 mA g(-1). Their high rate performance is among the best-reported performances of SiO2-based anode materials.

  6. Modified graphite filled natural rubber composites with good thermal conductivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junping Song; Lianxiang Ma; Yan He; Haiquan Yan; Zan Wu; Wei Li

    2015-01-01

    The rubber composites with good thermal conductivity contribute to heat dissipation of tires. Graphite filled natural rubber composites were developed in this study to provide good thermal conductivity. Graphite was coated with polyacrylate polymerized by monomers including methyl methacrylate, n-butyl acrylate and acrylic acid. The ratios between a filler and acrylate polymerization emulsion and those between monomers were varied. Eight types of surface modification formulas were experimentally investigated. Modification formula can affect coating results and composite properties greatly. The best coating type was achieved by a ratio of 1:1 between methyl methacrylate and n-butyl acrylate. The coating of graphite was thermal y stable in a running tire. Filled with modified graphite, the tire thermal conductivity reached up to 0.517–0.569 W·m-1·K-1. In addition, the mechanical performance was improved with increased crosslink density, extended scorch time and short vulcanization time.

  7. INFLUENCE OF FLAKE-LIKE GRAPHITE ON THE MICROTEXTURE OF MESOC ARBON MICROBEADS%鳞片石墨对中间相炭微球织构的影响(英文)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李同起; 王成扬; 刘秀军; 郑嘉明; 王慧

    2002-01-01

    Mesocarbon microbeads (MCMBs) were prepared from a coaltar pitch without or with flake-like graphite at 410℃ for 7h. The a s-received MCMBs were named MCB1 and MCB2 respectively and the MCB2 was divided into MCB2L and MCB2S according to the size of the flakes of graphite added. The surface and cross-section of MCMBs were studied using SEM and the microtexture was analyzed by XRD. The surface of the MCMBs was rough with some particles att ached and the beads are almost round. The microtexture of MCB1 (without graphite) was mainly of the parallel layer type, whereas the microtexture of MCB2 (with graphite) was complex. The large flakes of graphite added in the coal tar pitch were regarded as the centers of nucleation of MCMBs, resulting in hamburger type MCMBs (MCB2L), but the small ones could not act in this way in the reaction sys tem, resulting in a distorted microtexture (MCB2S). It was proposed that when th e nucleation occurred the large graphite flakes accumulated to form seed crystal sin which the pitch components with low molecular weight were enwrapped and the shape and size of the flakes and their aggregations decided the microtexure of MCMBs, while the small graphite flakes served only to disorder the microtexture. The XRD spectra show that the addition of graphite decreased the graphitization degree and crystal sizes.%以煤焦油沥青为原料,鳞片石墨为添加剂,在410℃温度下反应7h制得了中间相炭微球(MCMBs).在扫描电子显微镜下对它们的表面和断面进行了分析,并用X射线衍射对其结构进行了研究.结果表明:MCMBs的表面被接近球形的小颗粒所覆盖而呈现出粗糙不平.MCB1(未加石墨)的织构主要是平行层型,而MCB2(加石墨)的织构却是复杂的.加入煤焦油沥青中的大片石墨存在于MCMBs的中心而被认为是它们的核,而小片石墨却不能象大片石墨那样在反应体系内充当核的作用.认为在成核过程中,大片石墨聚集到一起而形成

  8. Analysis of Natural Graphite, Synthetic Graphite, and Thermosetting Resin Candidates for Use in Fuel Compact Matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trammell, Michael P [ORNL; Pappano, Peter J [ORNL

    2011-09-01

    The AGR-1 and AGR-2 compacting process involved overcoating TRISO particles and compacting them in a steel die. The overcoating step is the process of applying matrix to the OPyC layer of TRISO particles in a rotating drum in order to build up an overcoat layer of desired thickness. The matrix used in overcoating is a mixture of natural graphite, synthetic graphite, and thermosetting resin in the ratio, by weight, of 64:16:20. A wet mixing process was used for AGR-1 and AGR-2, in that the graphites and resin were mixed in the presence of ethyl alcohol. The goal of the wet mixing process was to 'resinate' the graphite particles, or coat each individual graphite particle with a thin layer of resin. This matrix production process was similar to the German, Chinese, Japanese, and South African methods, which also use various amount of solvent during mixing. See Appendix 1 for information on these countries matrix production techniques. The resin used for AGR-1 and AGR-2 was provided by Hexion, specifically Hexion grade Durite SC1008. Durite SC1008 is a solvated (liquid) resole phenolic resin. A resole resin does not typically have a hardening agent added. The major constituent of SC1008 is phenol, with minor amounts of formaldehyde. Durite SC1008 is high viscosity, so additional ethyl alcohol was added during matrix production in order to reduce its viscosity and enhance graphite particle resination. The current compacting scale up plan departs from a wet mixing process. The matrix production method specified in the scale up plan is a co-grinding jet mill process where powdered phenolic resin and graphite are all fed into a jet mill at the same time. Because of the change in matrix production style, SC1008 cannot be used in the jet milling process because it is a liquid. The jet milling/mixing process requires that a suite of solid or powdered resins be investigated. The synthetic graphite used in AGR-1 and AGR-2 was provided by SGL Carbon, grade KRB2000. KRB

  9. 片状石墨增强树脂基复合材料的耐激光烧蚀性能研究%Ablation Capability of Flake Graphite Reinforced Barium-phenolic Resin Composite under Long Pulse Laser Irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于庆春; 万红

    2012-01-01

    The carbon fiber reinforced phenolic resin composite is widely used as a thermal protection material because of its excellent thermal ablation. A novel flake graphite reinforced barium-phenolic resin composite was made by roller coating technology and its thermal ablation capability under long pulse laser irradiation was studied. The results show that the thermal ablation rate of the flake graphite reinforced barium-resin composite is 32.8 ug/J at 1700 W/cm2 irradiation power density, which is much lower than that of the carbon fiber reinforced barium-resin composite or barium-phenolic resin obviously. The anti-ablative mechanism of the flake graphite reinforced barium-phenolic resin composite is investigated by the observation of its microstructure and the calculation of the laser en-. Ergy coupling with the material. It is found that the flake graphite is arrayed homogeneous alignment as sandwich among the composite. When the laser radiation gets on the composite, the flake graphite plays as a mirror and reflects part of the laser, and then the laser radiation energy deposition on the composite is reduced. It is also found that the size of the flake graphite also affects the ablation capability. The composite with the flake graphite diameter of about 0.5 mm has the lowest thermal ablation rate.%采用刷涂的方法制备了一种新型的片状石墨增强钡酚醛树脂基复合材料,并采用重频激光辐照的方法,对其耐烧蚀性能进行了研究.研究结果表明:片状石墨增强钡酚醛树脂基复合材料在平均功率密度为1700 J/cm2的重频激光辐照下的热烧蚀率为32.8 μg/J,耐激光烧蚀性能明显高于碳纤维增强的钡酚醛树脂基复合材料和钡酚醛树脂;片状石墨增强钡酚醛树脂基复合材料中的片状石墨呈近平行的层状分布方式,在激光辐照过程中能对入射激光起到平面反射作用,从而有效地降低激光辐照的能量沉积;片状石墨的片型对复合材料

  10. Dependence of the thermal conductivity of two-dimensional graphite nanoplatelet-based composites on the nanoparticle size distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaobo; Ramesh, Palanisamy; Itkis, Mikhail E.; Bekyarova, Elena; Haddon, Robert C.

    2010-08-01

    We report the thermal conductivities of graphite nanoplatelet-epoxy composites prepared by exfoliation of natural graphite flakes of varying lateral sizes. We found that utilization of natural graphite flakes of the optimum lateral dimensions (~200-400 µm) as a starting material for exfoliation significantly enhanced the thermal conductivity of the composite. In order to understand this enhancement we developed a procedure for evaluation of the particle size distribution of graphite nanoplatelets and correlated the measured distributions with the resulting thermal conductivities. In order to expand the scope of our study we applied our statistical and thermal analysis to commercially available graphite nanoplatelet materials.

  11. Reduction mechanism of natural ilmenite with graphite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yu-ming; YUAN Zhang-fu; GUO Zhan-cheng; TAN Qiang-qiang; LI Zhao-yi; JIANG Wei-zhong

    2008-01-01

    Reduction of Bama ilmenite concentrate containing 49.78% TiO2 and 27.96% total Fe by graphite was studied using thermogravimetric analysis system under argon gas ambient from 850 to 1 400 ℃. The reduction degree of Bama ilmenite is enhanced with increasing temperature and the molar ratio of carbon to oxygen, and the reaction rate varies with temperature and reduction time simultaneously. The phase transformation, chemical composition, microstructure and morphology of reduced samples were investigated by using X-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy, and energy disperse spectroscopy, respectively. The high content of impurities in Bama ilmenite evidently bates the reduction of ilmenite. Forming the enrichment zone of manganese prevents complete reduction of Fe2+. The reduction products are mostly reduced iron, rutile, reduced rutiles, Ti3O5 and pseudobrookite solid solution. The reduction kinetics was also discussed. The results show that the reduction temperature is a key factor to control reaction rate.

  12. High-frequency electromagnetic properties of soft magnetic Nd2Co17 micron flakes fractured along c crystal plane with natural resonance frequency exceeding 10 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongbo; Wang, Peng; Ma, Tianyong; Wang, Ying; Qiao, Liang; Wang, Tao

    2016-02-01

    Planar anisotropy Nd2Co17 flakes fractured along c crystal plane were fabricated by surfactant-assisted high-energy ball milling technique. The magnetic flakes have a diameter range of 5-20 μm and a typical thickness of approximately 120 nm. The frequency dependence of complex permeability of Nd2Co17 epoxy resin composite has been investigated in the frequency range of 0.1-18 GHz. The measurement results show that the natural resonance frequency reaches 12.5 GHz while the initial permeability survives up to 2.26. The superior high frequency properties come from the large out-of-plane anisotropy field and the flake structure fractured along the c crystal plane of Nd2Co17. The planar anisotropic Nd2Co17 flakes have significant potential applications in the high-frequency devices working in the frequency beyond 10 GHz.

  13. Fabrication of conducting composite sheets using cost-effective graphite flakes and amorphous styrene acrylonitrile for enhanced thermistor, dielectric, and electromagnetic interference shielding properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panwar, Varij, E-mail: varijpanwarcertain@gmail.com [Electronics and Communication Engineering, Graphic Era University, Dehradun, Uttarakhand (India); Gill, Fateh Singh; Rathi, Vikas; Tewari, V.K. [Electronics and Communication Engineering, Graphic Era University, Dehradun, Uttarakhand (India); Mehra, R.M. [Sharda University, Greater Noida (India); Park, Jong-Oh, E-mail: jop@jnu.ac.kr [School of Mechanical Engineering, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sukho, E-mail: shpark12@dgist.ac.kr [Department of Robotics Engineering, Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-01

    The fabrication of strong conducting composite sheets (CCSs) using a simple technique with cost-effective materials is desirable for capacitor, decoupling capacitor, and electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding applications. Here, we used cost-effective graphite flakes (GFs) as a conducting filler and amorphous poly (styrene-co-acrylonitrile) (PSAN) as an insulating polymer to fabricate a CCS via a simple mechanical mixing and hot compression molding process in 2.5 h, with the aim to save time and avoid the use of toxic reagents, which are generally used in chemical methods. In the present method, the GFs are connected in diffusively adhere polymer matrix, controlled by temperature and pressure that generate the conduction in the CCSs. The resulting PSAN/GF CCSs were characterized by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and hardness tests. The GFs penetrated the interfacial region of PSAN, thus improving the thermistor and dielectric properties (dielectric constant, AC conductivity, and dissipation factor) of the PSAN/GF CCSs. Furthermore, the PSAN/GF CCSs showed enhanced hardness and EMI shielding effectiveness (SE) properties in the X-band frequency range (8.5–12.5 GHz). The percolation theory was implemented to DC and AC conductivity. To detect the transition of the dielectric properties, the dielectric constant of the CCSs was analyzed with increasing volume fraction of GFs in the radio frequency region. The improved dielectric constant, AC conductivity, and dissipation factor of the PSAN/GF CCS, indicated a significant improvement in their EMI shielding properties in the X-band frequency range, which were measured using the waveguide method. The ac conductivity of PSAN/GF CCS shows stable behavior in the higher frequency ranges. The EMISE of PSAN/GF CCS were found to increase with increasing GF content due to the absorbance mechanism. - Highlights: • Enhanced hardness and

  14. Surface modification of a natural graphite/phenol formaldehyde composite plate with expanded graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Dongjie; Wang, Yuxin; Xu, Li; Lu, Jun; Wu, Qian [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Engineering, Chemical Engineering Research Center, School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Weijin Road 92, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2008-09-01

    Natural graphite/phenol formaldehyde (NG/PF) resin composite plates modified with thin layers of expanded graphite (EG) are fabricated by mold compression to lower the contact resistance between the plates and gas diffusion layers (GDLs). The modification considerably reduces contact resistance versus bare NG/PF plates. The extent of the decrease in contact resistance is influenced by the expanded volume of EG used. A low contact resistance of 1.42 m{omega} cm{sup 2} persists for the EG (150 ml g{sup -1})-modified NG/PF plates despite the PF content, whereas that of bare plates increases from 3.62 to 17.01 m{omega} cm{sup 2} as PF content changes from 5 wt% to 30 wt%. With increasing EG thickness on the surface of NG/PF plates, contact resistance at first decreases and then approaches a constant value when the NG layer exceeds 40 {mu}m. More importantly, the total electrical resistance, as expressed by volume resistance, can be reduced by applying EG layers to NG/PF composite plates. The reduction of total resistance is more remarkable for the composite plates with high PF content because the bulk resistance of the EG layer can be well compensated by the decrease of contact resistance at a proper range of EG layer thickness. (author)

  15. Physical, electrochemical, and thermal properties of granulated natural graphite as anodes for Li-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Yong Nam; Park, Min-Sik; Kim, Jae-Hun; Kim, Young-Jun

    2013-05-01

    Two different types of granulated graphites were synthesized by blending and kneading of natural graphite with pitch followed by sintering methods. The electrochemical performances of granulated graphites were investigated as anode materials for use in Li-ion batteries. The blending type granulated graphite possesses a large amount of cavities and voids, while the kneading type granulated graphite has a relatively compact microstructure, which is responsible for a high tap density. Both granulated graphites show improved the initial coulombic efficiencies as a result of decrease of surface area by the granulations. In particular, the kneading type granulated graphite exhibits an excellent rate-capability without significant capacity loss. In addition, the thermal stabilities of both granulated graphites were also improved, which could be attributed to the decrease of active surface area due to pitch coating.

  16. Microfocus infrared ellipsometry characterization of air-exposed graphene flakes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weber, J. W.; Hinrichs, K.; Gensch, M.; M. C. M. van de Sanden,; Oates, T. W. H.

    2011-01-01

    Graphene and ultrathin graphite flakes prepared by exfoliation were characterized by microfocus synchrotron infrared mapping ellipsometry. The dielectric function of graphene in a dry-air atmosphere is determined and compared to that of ultrathin graphite, bulk graphite, and gold. The imaginary part

  17. Observations of Flaking of Co-deposited Layers in TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.A. Gentile; C.H. Skinner; K.M. Young

    1999-11-01

    Flaking of co-deposited layers in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) has been observed after the termination of plasma operations. This unexpected flaking affects approximately 15% of the tiles and appears on isotropic graphite tiles but not on carbon fiber composite tiles. Samples of tiles, flakes and dust were recently collected from the inside of the vacuum vessel and will be analyzed to better characterize the behavior of tritium on plasma facing components in DT fusion devices.

  18. A Novel Modification Approach for Natural Graphite Anode of Li-ion Batteries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Xiang-yang; LI Jie; LIU Hong-zhuan; LIU Ye-xiang

    2004-01-01

    To improve the rate capability and cyclability of natural graphite anode for Li-ion batteries,a novel modification approach was developed. The modification approach included two steps: ( a ) high-energy ball milling in a rotary autoclave containing alumina balls, H3 PO4 and ethanol; ( b ) coating with pyrolytic carbon from phenlic resin. The treated graphite shows obvious improvement compared with the original natural graphite in electrochemical properties such as cyclability and rate capability, especially at high current density. The primary reasons leading to the improvement in rate capability and cyclability are that the difiusion impedance of Li + in graphite is reduced due to the fact that P filtered into graphite layers can mildly increase interlayer distances, and the fact that the structural stability of graphite surface is enhanced since the coated pyrolytic carbon can depress the co-intercalation of solvtted lithium ion.

  19. Purification process of natural graphite as anode for Li-ion batteries: chemical versus thermal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaghib, K.; Song, X.; Guerfi, A.; Rioux, R.; Kinoshita, K.

    The intercalation of Li ions in natural graphite that was purified by chemical and thermal processes was investigated. A new chemical process was developed that involved a mixed aqueous solution containing 30% H 2SO 4 and 30% NH xF y heated to 90 °C. The results of this process are compared to those obtained by heating the natural graphite from 1500 to 2400 °C in an inert environment (thermal process). The first-cycle coulombic efficiency of the purified natural graphite obtained by the chemical process is 91 and 84% after the thermal process at 2400 °C. Grinding the natural graphite before or after purification had no significant effect on electrochemical performance at low currents. However, grinding to a very small particle size before purification permitted optimization of the size distribution of the particles, which gives rise to a more homogenous electrode. The impurities in the graphite play a role as microabrasion agents during grinding which enhances its hardness and improves its mechanical properties. Grinding also modifies the particle morphology from a 2- to a 3-D structure (similar in shape to a potato). This potato-shaped natural graphite shows high reversible capacity at high current densities (about 90% at 1 C rate). Our analysis suggests that thermal processing is considerably more expensive than the chemical process to obtain purified natural graphite.

  20. Chemically reduced graphene contains inherent metallic impurities present in parent natural and synthetic graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosi, Adriano; Chua, Chun Kiang; Khezri, Bahareh; Sofer, Zdeněk; Webster, Richard D; Pumera, Martin

    2012-08-07

    Graphene-related materials are in the forefront of nanomaterial research. One of the most common ways to prepare graphenes is to oxidize graphite (natural or synthetic) to graphite oxide and exfoliate it to graphene oxide with consequent chemical reduction to chemically reduced graphene. Here, we show that both natural and synthetic graphite contain a large amount of metallic impurities that persist in the samples of graphite oxide after the oxidative treatment, and chemically reduced graphene after the chemical reduction. We demonstrate that, despite a substantial elimination during the oxidative treatment of graphite samples, a significant amount of impurities associated to the chemically reduced graphene materials still remain and alter their electrochemical properties dramatically. We propose a method for the purification of graphenes based on thermal treatment at 1,000 °C in chlorine atmosphere to reduce the effect of such impurities on the electrochemical properties. Our findings have important implications on the whole field of graphene research.

  1. Chemically reduced graphene contains inherent metallic impurities present in parent natural and synthetic graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosi, Adriano; Chua, Chun Kiang; Khezri, Bahareh; Sofer, Zdeněk; Webster, Richard D.; Pumera, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Graphene-related materials are in the forefront of nanomaterial research. One of the most common ways to prepare graphenes is to oxidize graphite (natural or synthetic) to graphite oxide and exfoliate it to graphene oxide with consequent chemical reduction to chemically reduced graphene. Here, we show that both natural and synthetic graphite contain a large amount of metallic impurities that persist in the samples of graphite oxide after the oxidative treatment, and chemically reduced graphene after the chemical reduction. We demonstrate that, despite a substantial elimination during the oxidative treatment of graphite samples, a significant amount of impurities associated to the chemically reduced graphene materials still remain and alter their electrochemical properties dramatically. We propose a method for the purification of graphenes based on thermal treatment at 1,000 °C in chlorine atmosphere to reduce the effect of such impurities on the electrochemical properties. Our findings have important implications on the whole field of graphene research. PMID:22826262

  2. The Effect of Graphite Particle Size on Properties of Low Carbon MgO-C Composite Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Lin; HONG Yanruo; SUN Jialin; OUYANG Junhua; HE Zhiyong; YU Li

    2004-01-01

    The effects of graphite granularity on the properties of low carbon MgO-C based materials have been investigated in the work. Large crystal fused magnesia, natural flake graphite with different particle sizes and anti-oxidant were adopted as raw material for preparation of specimens.However, the results show that the physical properties,oxidation resistance and thermal shock resistance of low carbon MgO- C materials with content of 4.0 wt % graphite are improved obviously through the use of special and suitable size graphite. The excellent performance achieved was considered as a result of microstructure modification of MgO-C materials. Therefore, it is suggested that both fine and micro grade natural flake graphite used for production of low carbon MgO- C bricks.

  3. Enhancement of the ferromagnetic order of graphite after sulphuric acid treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Barzola-Quiquia, J.; Böhlmann, W.; Esquinazi, P.; Schadewitz, A.; Ballestar, A.; Dusari, S.; Schultze-Nobre, L.; Kersting, B.

    2011-01-01

    We have studied the changes in the ferromagnetic behavior of graphite powder and graphite flakes after treatment with diluted sulphuric acid. We show that this kind of acid treatment enhances substantially the ferromagnetic magnetization of virgin graphite micrometer size powder as well as in graphite flakes. The anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) amplitude at 300 K measured in a micrometer size thin graphite flake after acid treatment reaches values comparable to polycrystalline cobalt.

  4. Elaboration of aluminum oxide-based graphite containing castables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ningsheng

    The aim of this work was set to develop effective and practicable new methods to incorporate natural flake graphite (FG) into the Al2O 3 based castables for iron and steel making applications. Three approaches, viz. micro-pelletized graphite (PG), crushed briquette of Al2O3-graphite (BAG) and TiO2 coated graphite (CFG), have been developed to insert flake graphite into Al2O 3 rich Al2O3-SiC based and Al2O 3-MgO based castables. These approaches were put into effect as countermeasures against the problems caused by FG in order: (1) to agglomerate the FG powders so as to decrease the specific surface area; (2) to diminish the density difference by using crushed carbon bonded compact of oxide-FG mixture; (3) to modify the surface of the flake graphite by forming hydrophilic coating; (4) to control the dispersion state of the graphite in the castable to maintain enough bonding strength; and (5) to use appropriate antioxidants to inhibit the oxidation of FG. The whole work was divided into two stages. In stage one, Al2O 3-SiC-C castables were dealt with to compare 4 modes of inserting graphite, i.e., by PG, BAG, CFG and FG. Overall properties were measured, all in correlation with graphite amount and incorporating mode. In stage two, efforts were made to reduce water demand in the Al2O3-MgO castables system. For this purpose, the matrix portion of the castable mixes was extracted and a coaxial double cylinder viscometer was adopted to investigate rheological characteristics of the matrix slurries vs. 4 kinds of deflocculants, through which the best deflocculant and its appropriate amount were found. Efforts were then made to add up to 30% MgO into the castables, using a limited amount of powders (UMI.)

  5. Fabrication and Excellent Dielectric Performance of Exfoliated Graphite Sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girish M. Joshi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present investigation, exfoliated graphite sheets were obtained from the thermo-chemical treatment of natural graphite flakes. In this process, the graphite expands almost 300-350 times of its original volume and takes the shape of worms. These worms can be pressed or rolled into any desired shape without any binder. The exfoliated graphite sheets show excellent electrical properties i.e. high dielectric constant (ε  6.374  107 and comparatively low dielectric loss (tanδ  138 across the frequency in the range 50 Hz to 30 MHz and temperature in the range 40-300 C. The products developed from exfoliated graphite can have very good sealing applications in industrial areas, especially for gaskets in the automobile industries.

  6. Thermal Charging Study of Compressed Expanded Natural Graphite/Phase Change Material Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallow, Anne M [ORNL; Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL; Graham, Samuel [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta

    2016-01-01

    The thermal charging performance of phase change materials, specifically paraffin wax, combined with compressed expanded natural graphite foam is studied under constant heat flux and constant temperature conditions. By varying the heat flux between 0.39 W/cm2 and 1.55 W/cm2 or maintaining a boundary temperature of 60 C for four graphite foam bulk densities, the impact on the rate of thermal energy storage is discussed. Thermal charging experiments indicate that thermal conductivity of the composite is an insufficient metric to compare the influence of graphite foam on the rate of thermal energy storage of the PCM composite. By dividing the latent heat of the composite by the time to melt for various boundary conditions and graphite foam bulk densities, it is determined that bulk density selection is dependent on the applied boundary condition. A greater bulk density is advantageous for samples exposed to a constant temperature near the melting temperature as compared to constant heat flux conditions where a lower bulk density is adequate. Furthermore, the anisotropic nature of graphite foam bulk densities greater than 50 kg/m3 is shown to have an insignificant impact on the rate of thermal charging. These experimental results are used to validate a computational model for future use in the design of thermal batteries for waste heat recovery.

  7. The effect of compression on natural graphite anode performance and matrix conductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Striebel, K.A.; Sierra, A.; Shim, J.; Wang, C.-W.; Sastry, A.M.

    2004-03-11

    Anodes for lithium-ion cells were constructed from three types of natural graphite, two coated spherical and one flaky. Anode samples were compressed from 0 to 300 kg/cm2 and studied in half-cells to study the relations between anode density, SEI formation and anode cyclability. The C/25 formation of the SEI layer was found to depend on the nature of the graphite and the anode density. Compression of the uncoated graphite lead to an increased conductivity, but only slight improvements in the efficiency of the formation process. Compression of the anodes made from the amorphous-carbon-coated graphites greatly improved both the reversible capacity and first-cycle efficiency. In addition, the fraction of the irreversible charge associated with the surface of the graphite increased with compression, from both an increase in the electrolyte contact as well as compression of the amorphous layer. The cyclability of all of the anodes tended to improve with compression. This suggests that it is the improvement in the conductivity of the anode plays more of a role in the improvement in the cyclability than the formation process.

  8. Synthesis of graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide by needle platy natural vein graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathnayake, R. M. N. M.; Wijayasinghe, H. W. M. A. C.; Pitawala, H. M. T. G. A.; Yoshimura, Masamichi; Huang, Hsin-Hui

    2017-01-01

    Among natural graphite varieties, needle platy vein graphite (NPG) has very high purity. Therefore, it is readily used to prepare graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO). In this study, GO and rGO were prepared using chemical oxidation and reduction process, respectively. The synthesized materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. XRD studies confirmed the increase of the interlayer spacing of GO and rGO in between 3.35 to 8.66 A°. AFM studies showed the layer height of rGO to be 1.05 nm after the reduction process. TEM micrographs clearly illustrated that the prepared GO has more than 25 layers, while the rGO has only less than 15 layers. Furthermore, the effect of chemical oxidation and reduction processes on surface morphology of graphite were clearly observed in FESEM micrographs. The calculated RO/C of GO and rGO using XPS analysis are 5.37% and 1.77%, respectively. The present study revealed the successful and cost effective nature of the chemical oxidation, and the reduction processes for the production of GO and rGO out of natural vein graphite.

  9. LiFePO4/polymer/natural graphite: low cost Li-ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaghib, K. [Institut de Recherche d' Hydro-Quebec (IREQ), 1800 Lionel-Boulet, Varennes, QC, J3X 1S1 (Canada)]. E-mail: karimz@ireq.ca; Striebel, K. [Environmental Energy Technologies Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Guerfi, A. [Institut de Recherche d' Hydro-Quebec (IREQ), 1800 Lionel-Boulet, Varennes, QC, J3X 1S1 (Canada); Shim, J. [Environmental Energy Technologies Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Armand, M. [Joint International Lab. CNRS/UdM UMR 2289 Departement de Chimie, Universite de Montereal, P.O. Box 6128, QC, H3C 3J7 (Canada); Gauthier, M [Joint International Lab. CNRS/UdM UMR 2289 Departement de Chimie, Universite de Montereal, P.O. Box 6128, QC, H3C 3J7 (Canada)

    2004-11-30

    The aging and performance of natural graphite/PEO-based gel electrolyte/LiFePO{sub 4} cells are reported. The gel polymer electrolytes were produced by electron-beam irradiation and then soaked in a liquid electrolyte. The natural graphite anode in gel electrolyte containing LiBF4-EC/GBL exhibited high reversible capacity (345 mAh/g) and high coulombic efficiency (91%). The LiFePO{sub 4} cathode in the same gel-polymer exhibited a reversible capacity of 160 mAh/g and 93% coulombic efficiency. Better performance was obtained at high-rate discharge with 6% carbon additive in the cathode, however the graphite anode performance suffers at high rate. The Li-ion gel polymer battery shows a capacity fade of 13% after 180 cycles and has poor performance at low temperature due to low diffusion of the lithium to the graphite in the GBL system. The LiFePO{sub 4}/gel/Li system has an excellent rate capacity. LiFePO{sub 4} cathode material is suitable for HEV application.

  10. LiFePO{sub 4}/polymer/natural graphite: low cost Li-ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaghib, K.; Guerfi, A. [Institut de Recherche d' Hydro-Quebec, Varennes (Canada); Striebel, K.; Shim, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Div.; Armand, M.; Gauthier, M. [Universite de Montreal (Canada). Joint International Lab.

    2004-11-30

    The aging and performance of natural graphite/PEO-based gel electrolyte/LiFePO{sub 4} cells are reported. The gel polymer electrolytes were produced by electron-beam irradiation and then soaked in a liquid electrolyte. The natural graphite anode in gel electrolyte containing LiBF4-EC/GBL exhibited high reversible capacity (345 mAh/g) and high coulombic efficiency (91%). The LiFePO4 cathode in the same gel-polymer exhibited a reversible capacity of 160 mAh/g and 93% coulombic efficiency. Better performance was obtained at high-rate discharge with 6% carbon additive in the cathode, however the graphite anode performance suffers at high rate. The Li-ion gel polymer battery shows a capacity fade of 13% after 180 cycles and has poor performance at low temperature due to low diffusion of the lithium to the graphite in the GBL system. The LiFePO{sub 4}/gel/Li system has an excellent rate capacity. LiFePO{sub 4} cathode material is suitable for HEV application. (author)

  11. Research of Thermally Conductive Composites Based on Flake Graphite Filled in Polyamide 6/Polypropylene%鳞片石墨填充聚酰胺/聚丙烯导热复合材料的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐华根; 彭新涛; 周军杰; 陈晓东; 刘引烽

    2015-01-01

    为了降低聚合物基导热复合材料中填料的含量,用聚酰胺6(PA6)/聚丙烯(PP)两相聚合物作为基体,研究了PA6/PP/鳞片石墨(FG)和PA6/FG复合材料的热导率随FG含量的变化规律。PA6/FG复合材料中FG质量分数为30%时,复合材料的热导率为1.85 W/(m·K),而PA6/PP/FG复合材料热导率达到1.88 W/(m·K)时,FG的质量分数仅需20%,说明PP作为体积排除相,优化了FG在PA6中的分布。以PA6/PP作为基体,达到与PA6单一基体相近的热导率时可以降低FG的填充量,改善导热复合材料的加工性能和力学性能。同时研究了不同FG含量下两种复合材料的电阻率,结果发现,在FG质量分数为30%时,PA6/PP/FG复合材料的体积电阻率比PA6/FG的体积电阻率低两个数量级,间接证实PP的加入改变了FG在PA6中的分布。用扫描电子显微镜对FG在PA6/PP/FG复合材料中的分布进行了研究,结果表明,当FG质量分数超过30%时,FG相互之间的接触增多。%Polyamide 6(PA6)/polypropylene(PP) as a two-phase polymer matrix was used to reduce the filler content of thermally conductive composites based on polymer materials. Thermal conductivities of both PA6/PP/flake graphite(FG) and PA6/FG composites with different FG content were studied. Thermal conductivity of PA6/FG composite is 1.85 W/(m·K) when FG content is 30%;while thermal conductivity of PA6/PP/FG composite could reached to 1.88 W/(m·K) as long as FG content is 20%. This implies that PP as a size-exclusion phase could optimize the distribution of FG in PA6. FG content could be reduced when thermal conductivities of PA6/PP/FG composites reach to the same value as PA6/FG composites, thus could improve the processing performance and mechanical properties of thermally conductive composites. Electrical resistivities of PA6/PP/FG and PA6/FG composites were also studied. The results show that the volume electrical resistivity

  12. A TEM Study on the Microstructure of Fine Flaky Graphite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moumeni, Elham; Tiedje, Niels Skat; Horsewell, Andy

    In this investigation the microstructure of the graphite flakes in titanium alloyed cast iron is studied using electron microscopy techniques. Based on this information, growth models for the platelets in the fine graphite flakes in cast iron are considered. Detailed crystallographic analysis of ...... of the defects observed such as multiple twin boundaries and possible spiral growth configurations are required...

  13. Characterization of Exfoliated Graphite Prepared with the Method of Secondary Intervening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Shengtao

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Exfoliated graphite was prepared with the method of secondary intervening. The results showed that the optimum conditions for the procedure were as follows: mass ratio of nature flake graphite: sulfuric acid: nitric acid: potassium permanganate =1:9:3:0.44 and immersing time in formic acid was 150 minutes. Exfoliated graphite with 300 mL/g exfoliation volume at 900C was obtained. The prepared sample in the best process condition was characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM, thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis (TGA-DTA, infrared ray spectrum (IR and X-ray diffraction (XRD. After secondary intervening, the layer distance of expandable graphite was enlarged and the boundary layers were broken. Exfoliated graphite was worm-like and graphite layers were held together at their edges, and the expanded domain had a multilayer structure with many diamond-shaped pores. Sulfuric acid, nitric acid and formic acid were intercalated into graphite, and the decomposition of exfoliated graphite at 900C was mostly derived from graphite intercalation. Crystalline of graphite was damaged because of oxidation intercalation, but the C-C bond was not undermined. Furthermore, oxidation intercalation process and mechanism were discussed.

  14. Combination Carbon Nanotubes with Graphene Modified Natural Graphite and Its Electrochemical Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DENG Ling-feng

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The CNTs/rGO/NG composite lithiumion battery anode material was synthesized by thermal reducing, using graphene oxide (GO and carbon nanotubes (CNTs as precursors for a 5 ∶ 3 proportion. The morphology, structure, and electrochemical performance of the composite were characterized by scanning electron microscopy(SEM, X-ray diffractometry(XRD, Fourier transform infrared spectra (FTIR and electrochemical measurements. The results show that reduced graphene oxide and carbon nanotubes form a perfect three-dimensional network structure on the surface of natural graphite. CNTs/rGO/NG composite has good rate performance and cycle life,compared with pure natural graphite.The initial discharge capacity of designed anode is 479mAh/g at 0.1C, the reversible capacity up to 473mAh/g after 100 cycles,the capacity is still 439.5mAh/g, the capacity retention rate is 92%,and the capacity is 457, 433, 394mAh/g at 0.5, 1, 5C, respectively.

  15. Graphite nanoreinforcements in polymer nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Hiroyuki

    Nanocomposites composed of polymer matrices with clay reinforcements of less than 100 nm in size, are being considered for applications such as interior and exterior accessories for automobiles, structural components for portable electronic devices, and films for food packaging. While most nanocomposite research has focused on exfoliated clay platelets, the same nanoreinforcement concept can be applied to another layered material, graphite, to produce nanoplatelets and nanocomposites. Graphite is the stiffest material found in nature (Young's Modulus = 1060 GPa), having a modulus several times that of clay, but also with excellent electrical and thermal conductivity. The key to utilizing graphite as a platelet nanoreinforcement is in the ability to exfoliate this material. Also, if the appropriate surface treatment can be found for graphite, its exfoliation and dispersion in a polymer matrix will result in a composite with not only excellent mechanical properties but electrical properties as well, opening up many new structural applications as well as non-structural ones where electromagnetic shielding and high thermal conductivity are requirements. In this research, a new process to fabricate exfoliated nano-scale graphite platelets was established (Patent pending). The size of the resulted graphite platelets was less than 1 um in diameter and 10 nm in thickness, and the surface area of the material was around 100 m2/g. The reduction of size showed positive effect on mechanical properties of composites because of the increased edge area and more functional groups attached with it. Also various surface treatment techniques were applied to the graphite nanoplatelets to improve the surface condition. As a result, acrylamide grafting treatment was found to enhance the dispersion and adhesion of graphite flakes in epoxy matrices. The resulted composites showed better mechanical properties than those with commercially available carbon fibers, vapor grown carbon fibers

  16. An Investigation of Reverse Flotation Separation of Sericite from Graphite by Using a Surfactant: MF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangshuai Qiu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a surfactant, atlox4862 (formaldehyde condensate of methyl naphthalene sulfonic sodium salt (MF, was introduced as a depressant for reverse flotation separation of sericite from graphite. Natural flake graphite has a strong hydrophobic property. After interacting with MF, the graphite became moderately hydrophilic. The flotation results showed that MF had a depressing ability for both sericite and graphite and that the flotation separation of sericite from graphite was attributed to the different declining levels of recovery between graphite and sericite with increased MF concentration. For a pulp pH of 8 and a MF concentration of 250 mg/L, the recovery rates of sericite and graphite were 89.7% and 11.3%, respectively. The results of the FTIR spectra and zeta potential measurements demonstrated that the interaction of MF with graphite and sericite is mainly through electrostatic attraction. MF was preferred to adsorb on the surface of graphite, decreasing its zeta potential and improving its hydrophilicity more than that of sericite.

  17. LiFePO 4/gel/natural graphite cells for the BATT program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striebel, K.; Guerfi, A.; Shim, J.; Armand, M.; Gauthier, M.; Zaghib, K.

    LiFePO 4/gel/natural graphite (NG) cells have been prepared and cycled under a fixed protocol for cycle and calendar life determination. Cell compression of 68 kPa was found to represent an optimal balance between cell impedance and the first cycle losses on the individual electrodes with the gel electrolyte. Cells with a Li anode showed capacities of 160 and 78 mAh/g LiFePO 4 for C/25 and 2 C discharge rates, respectively. Rapid capacity and power fade were observed in the LiFePO 4/gel/NG cells during cycling and calendar life studies. Diagnostic evaluations point to the consumption of cycleable Li though a side reaction as the reason for performance fade with minimal degradation of the individual electrodes.

  18. LiFePO{sub 4}/gel/natural graphite cells for the BATT program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Striebel, K.; Guerfi, A.; Shim, J.; Armand, M.; Gauthier, M.; Zaghib, K.

    2002-10-29

    LiFePO{sub 4}/gel/natural graphite (NG) cells have been prepared and cycled under a fixed protocol for cycle and calendar life determination. Cell compression of 10 psi was found to represent an optimal balance between cell impedance and the first cycle losses on the individual electrodes with the gel electrolyte. Cells with a Li anode showed capacities of 160 and 78 mAh/g-LiFePO{sub 4} for C/25 and 2C discharge rates, respectively. Rapid capacity and power fade were observed in the LiFePO{sub 4}/gel/NG cells during cycling and calendar life studies. Diagnostic evaluations point to the consumption of cycleable Li though a side reaction as the reason for performance fade with minimal degradation of the individual electrodes.

  19. Recompressed exfoliated graphite articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhamu, Aruna; Shi, Jinjun; Guo, Jiusheng; Jang, Bor Z

    2013-08-06

    This invention provides an electrically conductive, less anisotropic, recompressed exfoliated graphite article comprising a mixture of (a) expanded or exfoliated graphite flakes; and (b) particles of non-expandable graphite or carbon, wherein the non-expandable graphite or carbon particles are in the amount of between about 3% and about 70% by weight based on the total weight of the particles and the expanded graphite flakes combined; wherein the mixture is compressed to form the article having an apparent bulk density of from about 0.1 g/cm.sup.3 to about 2.0 g/cm.sup.3. The article exhibits a thickness-direction conductivity typically greater than 50 S/cm, more typically greater than 100 S/cm, and most typically greater than 200 S/cm. The article, when used in a thin foil or sheet form, can be a useful component in a sheet molding compound plate used as a fuel cell separator or flow field plate. The article may also be used as a current collector for a battery, supercapacitor, or any other electrochemical cell.

  20. Thermodynamic Analysis of Cast Irons Solidification With Various Types of Graphite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elbel T.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The contribution summarises the results of oxygen activity determinations, which were measured and registered continuously in castings from cast irons with various types of graphite. The results were used to find the relationship between two variables: natural logarithm of oxygen activities and reverse value of thermodynamic temperature 1 /T. Obtained regression lines were used to calculate oxygen activity at different temperatures, to calculate Gibbs free energy ΔG at the different temperatures and to calculate the single ΔG value for significant temperature of the graphite solidification. The results were processed by a statistical analysis of data files for the different types of graphite with flake, vermicular and spheroidal graphite. Each material has its proper typical oxygen activities range and individual temperature function of Gibbs free energy for analysing and governing casting quality.

  1. Towards to Extraction of Nanodispersed Noble Metals From Natural Black Graphite Shales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena A. Mikhailenko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A theoretical approach based on the density functional theory and the pseudopotential method was applied to consider diffusion and accumulation of Au, Pt, and Pd in graphite. It is shown that Pt atoms migrate easily inside graphite. They can stop at structure defects and accumulate there, attracting each other and forming plate clusters. Atoms of gold do not penetrate into graphite but link with edge atoms of broken graphite crystallites, forming three-dimensional metallic particles. Palladium behavior is intermediate between platinum and gold. Addition of silicon into graphite can promote the extraction of noble metals because Si atoms force out Pt, Pd, and Au atoms from their bonded states. Last effect can be used as a mechanism of striking off metals from graphite and their extraction from shales

  2. Surface Modification of Exfoliated Graphite Nano-Reinforcements Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Nano forms of graphite and carbon, such as flakes, worms, and tubes, can significantly modify the properties of polymers when used as reinforcements. Challenges...

  3. Graphite Formation in Cast Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanescu, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    In the first phase of the project it was proven that by changing the ratio between the thermal gradient and the growth rate for commercial cast iron samples solidifying in a Bridgman type furnace, it is possible to produce all types of graphite structures, from flake to spheroidal, and all types of matrices, from ferritic to white at a certain given level of cerium. KC-135 flight experiments have shown that in a low-gravity environment, no flotation occurs even in spheroidal graphite cast irons with carbon equivalent as high as 5%, while extensive graphite flotation occurred in both flake and spheroidal graphite cast irons, in high carbon samples solidified in a high gravity environment. This opens the way for production of iron-carbon composite materials, with high carbon content (e.g., 10%) in a low gravity environment. By using KC-135 flights, the influence of some basic elements on the solidification of cast iron will be studied. The mechanism of flake to spheroidal graphite transition will be studied, by using quenching experiments at both low and one gravity for different G/R ratios.

  4. Influence of shape anisotropy on microwave complex permeability in carbonyl iron flakes/epoxy resin composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen Fu-Sheng; Qiao Liang; Zhou Dong; Zuo Wen-Liang; Yi Hai-Bo; Li Fa-Shen

    2008-01-01

    To explore the mechanism of carbonyl iron flake composites for microwave complex permeability, this paper investigates the feature of the flakes. The shape anisotropy was certified by the results of the magnetization hysteresis loops and the Mossbauer spectra. Furthermore, the shape anisotropy was used to explain the origin of composite microwave performance, and the calculated results agree with the experiment. It is believed that the shape anisotropy dominates microwave complex permeability, and the natural resonance plays main role in flake.

  5. A study on the physicochemical properties of hydroalcoholic solutions to improve the direct exfoliation of natural graphite down to few-layers graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedi, Filippo; Miglietta, Maria Lucia; Polichetti, Tiziana; Ricciardella, Filiberto; Massera, Ettore; Ninno, Domenico; Di Francia, Girolamo

    2015-03-01

    Straightforward methods to produce pristine graphene flakes in large quantities are based on the liquid-phase exfoliation processes. These one-step physical transformations of graphite into graphene offer many unique advantages. To date, a large number of liquids have been employed as exfoliation media exploiting their thermodynamic and chemical features as compared to those of graphene. Here, we pursued the goal of realizing water based mixtures to exfoliate graphite and disperse graphene without the aid of surfactants. To this aim, aqueous mixtures with suitable values of surface tension and Hansen solubility parameters (HSPs), were specifically designed and used. The very high water surface tension was decreased by the addition of solvents with lower surface tensions such as alcohols, obtaining, in this way, more favourable HSP distances. The specific role of each of these thermodynamic features was finally investigated. The results showed that the designed hydroalcoholic solutions were effective in both the graphite exfoliation and dispersion without the addition of any surfactants or other stabilizing agents. Stable graphene suspensions were obtained at concentration comparable to those produced with low-boiling solvents and water/surfactants.

  6. Graphite Nodule and Cell Count in Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Fraś

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a model is proposed for heterogeneous nucleation on substrates whose size distribution can be described by the Weibull statistics. It is found that the nuclei density, Nnuc can be given in terms of the maximum undercooling, ΔTm by Nnuc = Ns exp(-b/ΔTm; where Ns is the density of nucleation sites in the melt and b is the nucleation coefficient (b > 0 . When nucleation occurs on all the possible substrates, the graphite nodule density, NV,n or eutectic cell density NV after solidification equals Ns. In this work, measurements of NV,n and NV values were carried out on experimental nodular and flake graphite iron castings processed under various inoculation conditions. The volumetric nodule NV,,n or graphite eutectic cell NV count, were estimated from the area nodule count, NA,n or eutectic cell count NA on polished cast iron surface sections by stereological means. In addition, maximum undercoolings, ΔTm were measured using thermal analysis. The experimental outcome indicates that volumetric nodule NV,n or graphite eutectic cell NV count can be properly described by the proposed expression NV,,n = NV = Ns exp(-b/ΔTm. Moreover, the Ns and b values were experimentally determined. In particular, the proposed model suggests that the size distribution of nucleation sites is exponential in nature.

  7. Influence of Particle Size on Properties of Expanded Graphite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurajica, S

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Expanded graphite has been applied widely in thermal insulation, adsorption, vibration damping, gasketing, electromagnetic interference shielding etc. It is made by intercalation of natural flake graphite followed by thermal expansion. Intercalation is a process whereby an intercalant material is inserted between the graphene layers of a graphite crystal. Exfoliation, a huge unidirectional expansion of the starting intercalated flakes, occurs when the graphene layers are forced apart by the sudden decomposition and vaporization of the intercalated species by thermal shock. Along with production methodologies, such as the intercalation process and heat treatment, the raw material characteristics, especially particle size, strongly influence the properties of the final product.This report evaluates the influence of the particle size of the raw material on the intercalation and expansion processes and consequently the properties of the exfoliated graphite. Natural crystalline flake graphite with wide particle diameter distribution (between dp = 80 and 425 µm was divided into four size-range portions by sieving. Graphite was intercalated via perchloric acid, glacial acetic acid and potassium dichromate oxidation and intercalation procedure. 5.0 g of graphite, 7.0 g of perchloric acid, 4.0 g of glacial acetic acid and 2.0 g of potassium dichromate were placed in glass reactor. The mixture was stirred with n = 200 min–1 at temperature of 45 °C during 60 min. Then it was filtered and washed with distilled water until pH~6 and dried at 60 °C during 24 h. Expansion was accomplished by thermal shock at 1000 °C for 1 min. The prepared samples were characterized by means of exfoliation volume measurements, simultaneous differential thermal analysis and thermo-gravimetry (DTA/TGA, X-ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, BET measurements and scanning electron microscopy (SEM.X-ray diffraction indicated a change of distance

  8. Influence of the binder types on the electrochemical characteristics of natural graphite electrode in room-temperature ionic liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ui, Koichi; Towada, Jun; Agatsuma, Sho; Kumagai, Naoaki; Yamamoto, Keigo; Haruyama, Hiroshi; Takeuchi, Ken; Koura, Nobuyuki

    To improve the electrochemical characteristics of the natural graphite (NG-3) negative electrode in the LiCl saturated AlCl 3-1-ethyl-3-methylimizadolium chloride + thionyl chloride (SOCl 2) melt as the electrolyte for non-flammable lithium-ion batteries, we examined the influence of the binder types on its electrochemical characteristics. The cyclic voltammograms showed that the reduction current at 1.2-3.2 V vs. Li/Li(I) was repressed using polyacrylic acid (PAA) as the binder. The charge-discharge tests showed that the discharge capacity and the charge-discharge efficiency of the NG-3 electrode coated with the PAA binder at the 1st cycle were 322.8 mAh g -1 and 65.6%, respectively. Compared with the NG-3 electrode using the conventional poly(vinylidene fluoride) binder, it showed considerably a better cyclability with the discharge capacity of 302.1 mAh g -1 at the 50th cycle. Li(I) ion intercalation into the graphite layers could be improved because the NG-3 electrode coated with the PAA binder changed to a golden-yellow color after the 1st charging, and the formation of first stage LiC 6 was demonstrated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurement. In addition, the XRD and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicated that one of the side reactions during charging was the formation of LiCl on the graphite surface regardless of the binder types.

  9. Graphene: powder, flakes, ribbons, and sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Dustin K; Tour, James M

    2013-10-15

    Graphene's unique physical and electrical properties (high tensile strength, Young's modulus, electron mobility, and thermal conductivity) have led to its nickname of "super carbon." Graphene research involves the study of several different physical forms of the material: powders, flakes, ribbons, and sheets and others not yet named or imagined. Within those forms, graphene can include a single layer, two layers, or ≤10 sheets of sp² carbon atoms. The chemistry and applications available with graphene depend on both the physical form of the graphene and the number of layers in the material. Therefore the available permutations of graphene are numerous, and we will discuss a subset of this work, covering some of our research on the synthesis and use of many of the different physical and layered forms of graphene. Initially, we worked with commercially available graphite, with which we extended diazonium chemistry developed to functionalize single-walled carbon nanotubes to produce graphitic materials. These structures were soluble in common organic solvents and were better dispersed in composites. We developed an improved synthesis of graphene oxide (GO) and explored how the workup protocol for the synthesis of GO can change the electronic structure and chemical functionality of the GO product. We also developed a method to remove graphene layers one-by-one from flakes. These powders and sheets of GO can serve as fluid loss prevention additives in drilling fluids for the oil industry. Graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) combine small width with long length, producing valuable electronic and physical properties. We developed two complementary syntheses of GNRs from multiwalled carbon nanotubes: one simple oxidative method that produces GNRs with some defects and one reductive method that produces GNRs that are less defective and more electrically conductive. These GNRs can be used in low-loss, high permittivity composites, as conductive reinforcement coatings on Kevlar

  10. Electrochemical and impedance investigation of the effect of lithium malonate on the performance of natural graphite electrodes in lithium-ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Xiao-Guang; Dai, Sheng [Chemical Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, One Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2010-07-01

    Lithium malonate (LM) was coated on the surface of a natural graphite (NG) electrode, which was then tested as the negative electrode in the electrolytes of 0.9 M LiPF{sub 6}/EC-PC-DMC (1/1/3, w/w/w) and 1.0 M LiBF{sub 4}/EC-PC-DMC (1/1/3, w/w/w) under a current density of 0.075 mA cm{sup -2}. LM was also used as an additive to the electrolyte of 1.0 M LiPF{sub 6}/EC-DMC-DEC (1/1/1, v/v/v) and tested on a bare graphite electrode. It was found that both the surface coating and the additive approach were effective in improving first charge-discharge capacity and coulomb efficiency. Electrochemical impedance spectra showed that the decreased interfacial impedance was coupled with improved coulomb efficiency of the cells using coated graphite electrodes. Cyclic voltammograms (CVs) on fresh bare and coated natural graphite electrodes confirmed that all the improvement in the half-cell performance was due to the suppression of the solvent decomposition through the surface modification with LM. The CV data also showed that the carbonate electrolyte with LM as the additive was not stable against oxidation, which resulted in lower capacity of the full cell with commercial graphite and LiCoO{sub 2} electrodes. (author)

  11. Electrochemical and impedance investigation of the effect of lithium malonate on the performance of natural graphite electrodes in lithium-ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Xiao-Guang [ORNL; Dai, Sheng [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    Lithium malonate (LM) was coated on the surface of a natural graphite (NG) electrode, which was then tested as the negative electrode in the electrolytes of 0.9 M LiPF6/EC-PC-DMC (1/1/3, by weight) and 1.0 M LiBF4/EC-PC-DMC (1/1/3, by weight) under a current density of 0.075 mA cm-2. LM was also used as an additive to the electrolyte of 1.0 M LiPF6/EC-DMC-DEC (1/1/1, by volume) and tested on a bare graphite electrode. It was found that both the surface coating and the additive approach were effective in improving first charge discharge capacity and coulomb efficiency. Electrochemical impedance spectra showed that the decreased interfacial impedance was coupled with improved coulomb efficiency of the cells using coated graphite electrodes. Cyclic voltammograms (CVs) on fresh bare and coated natural graphite electrodes confirmed that all the improvement in the half-cell performance was due to the suppression of the solvent decomposition through the surface modification with LM. The CV data also showed that the carbonate electrolyte with LM as the additive was not stable against oxidation, which resulted in lower capacity of the full cell with commercial graphite and LiCoO2 electrodes.

  12. Optical alignment of oval graphene flakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobini, E.; Rahimzadegan, A.; Alaee, R.; Rockstuhl, C.

    2017-03-01

    Patterned graphene, as an atomically thin layer, supports localized surface plasmon-polaritons (LSPPs) at mid-infrared or far-infrared frequencies. This provides a pronounced optical force/torque in addition to large optical cross sections and will make it an ideal candidate for optical manipulation. Here, we study the optical force and torque exerted by a linearly polarized plane wave on circular and oval graphene flakes. Whereas the torque vanishes for circular flakes, the finite torque allows rotating and orienting oval flakes relative to the electric field polarization. Depending on the wavelength, the alignment is either perpendicular or parallel. In our contribution, we rely on full-wave numerical simulation but also on an analytical model that treats the graphene flakes in dipole approximation. The presented results reveal a good level of control on the spatial alignment of graphene flakes subjected to far-infrared illumination.

  13. Improvement of electrochemical characteristics of natural graphite negative electrode coated with polyacrylic acid in pure propylene carbonate electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ui, Koichi; Kikuchi, Shinei; Mikami, Fuminobu; Kadoma, Yoshihiro; Kumagai, Naoaki

    In order to improve the negative electrode characteristics of a graphite electrode in a propylene carbonate (PC)-containing electrolyte, we have prepared a graphite negative electrode coated with a water-soluble anionic polymer as a binder for composite graphite electrodes. The electrochemical characteristics of the coated graphite were evaluated by cyclic voltammetry and charge-discharge cycle tests. The coated graphite negative electrode showed a stable Li + ion intercalation/deintercalation reaction without the exfoliation of the graphene layers caused by the co-intercalation of the PC solvent in the LiClO 4/PC solution. The charge-discharge characteristic of the coated graphite negative electrode in a PC-containing electrolyte was almost the same as that in ethylene carbonate-based electrolyte.

  14. X-ray natural linear dichroism of graphitic materials across the carbon K-edge: Correction for perturbing high-order harmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansing, C.; Mertins, H. C.; Gaupp, A.; Sokolov, A.; Gilbert, M. C.; Wahab, H.; Timmers, H.

    2016-05-01

    Reflectivity measurements on graphitic materials such as graphene at energies across the carbon K-edge are frustrated by significant intensity loss due to adventitious carbon on beamline mirrors. Such intensity reduction enhances effects due to perturbing high-order harmonics in the beam. These effects distort the actual structure of the reflectance curve. In order to overcome this limitation, a correction technique has been developed and demonstrated first with measurements for highly ordered pyrolytic graphite. The same approach may be applied to other graphitic materials such as graphene and it may be used with other synchrotron beamlines. The fraction of high-order harmonics was determined by passing the incident beam through a 87 nm thin silicon nitride absorber that can be well modeled. Using the corrected measurements the x-ray natural linear dichroism of the sample has been determined.

  15. Preparation of Sulfur-Free Exfoliated Graphite by a Two-Step Intercalation Process and Its Application for Adsorption of Oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun He

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The sulfur-free exfoliated graphite (EG was prepared by a two-step chemical oxidation process, using natural flake graphite (NFG as the precursor. The first chemical intercalation process was carried out at a temperature of 30°C for 50 min, with the optimum addition of NFG, potassium permanganate, and perchloric acid in a weight ratio of 1 : 0.4 : 10.56. Then, in the secondary intercalation step, dipotassium phosphate was employed as the intercalating agent to further increase the exfoliated volume (EV of EG. NFG, graphite intercalation compound (GIC, and EG were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM, energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS, X-ray diffractometer (XRD, Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR, BET surface area, and porosity analyzer. Also, the uptakes of crude oil, diesel oil, and gasoline by EG were determined. Results show that perchloric acid and hydrogen phosphate are validated to enter into the interlayer of graphite flake. The obtained EG possesses a large exfoliated volume (EV and has an excellent affinity to oils; thus, the material has rapid adsorption rates and high adsorption capacities for crude oil, diesel oil, and gasoline.

  16. GRAPHITIZATION OF METASEDIMENTARY ROCKS IN THE WESTERN KONYA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüseyin KURT

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The Paleozoic-Mesozoic metasedimentary rocks in the study area are metacarbonate, metachert, metapelite, metasandstone and metaconglomerate. Graphite layers are 1cm to 2m thick, extend laterally for tens of meters and are intercalated with metasedimentary rocks. Generally, the graphite is black in color, with a well developed cleavage which is concordant with the cleavage of the host rocks. In addition, the crystal and flake graphites formed in metasedimentary rocks are mostly aligned parallel to the cleavage planes. These metamorphic rocks are subjected to shearing and granulation providing structural control for the development of graphite. It was probably this phenomenon that first led to emphasize the relationship between graphite and metasedimentary rocks. Graphite mineralization has been controlled by bedding, microfractures and granulations. Briefly, the metamorphism has converted carbonaceous matter into graphite .

  17. Warm compaction behaviors of iron-based powder lubricated by different kinds of graphite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖志瑜; 李元元; 倪东惠; 郭国文; 陈维平

    2003-01-01

    Warm compaction behaviors and their affecting factors such as compaction temperature, compaction pressure and lubricant concentration were studied. Effect of die wall lubrication on the powders warm compaction behavior was also studied. The use of smaller size colloidal graphite investigated can give a higher compact density and lesser spring-back effect than the use of flake graphite.

  18. Flake tantalum powder for manufacturing electrolytic capacitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Jilin; YANG Guoqi; PAN Luntao; LIU Hongdong; BAO Xifang

    2008-01-01

    The FTP200 flake tantalum powder was introduced.The microstructures of the powder with leaf-like primary particles having an average flakiness of 2 to 20 and porous agglomerated particles were observed.The chemical composition,physical properties,and electrical properties of the FTP200 powder were compared with those of the FTW300 nodular powder.The FTP200 powder is more sinter-resistant,and the surface area of the flake tantalum powder under sintering at high temperature has less loss than that of the nodular tantalum powder.The specific capacitance of the flake tantalum powder is higher than that of the nodular tantalum powder with the same surface area when anodized at high voltage,Thus,the flake tantalum powder is suitable for manufacturing tantalum solid electrolytic capacitors in the range of median and high (20-63 V) voltages.

  19. Colloidal graphite/graphene nanostructures using collagen showing enhanced thermal conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Soumya; Dhar, Purbarun; Das, Sarit K; Ganguly, Ranjan; Webster, Thomas J; Nayar, Suprabha

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, the exfoliation of natural graphite (GR) directly to colloidal GR/graphene (G) nanostructures using collagen (CL) was studied as a safe and scalable process, akin to numerous natural processes and hence can be termed “biomimetic”. Although the exfoliation and functionalization takes place in just 1 day, it takes about 7 days for the nano GR/G flakes to stabilize. The predominantly aromatic residues of the triple helical CL forms its own special micro and nanoarchitecture in acetic acid dispersions. This, with the help of hydrophobic and electrostatic forces, interacts with GR and breaks it down to nanostructures, forming a stable colloidal dispersion. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, photoluminescence, fluorescence, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of the colloid show the interaction between GR and CL on day 1 and 7. Differential interference contrast images in the liquid state clearly reveal how the GR flakes are entrapped in the CL fibrils, with a corresponding fluorescence image showing the intercalation of CL within GR. Atomic force microscopy of graphene-collagen coated on glass substrates shows an average flake size of 350 nm, and the hexagonal diffraction pattern and thickness contours of the G flakes from transmission electron microscopy confirm ≤ five layers of G. Thermal conductivity of the colloid shows an approximate 17% enhancement for a volume fraction of less than approximately 0.00005 of G. Thus, through the use of CL, this new material and process may improve the use of G in terms of biocompatibility for numerous medical applications that currently employ G, such as internally controlled drug-delivery assisted thermal ablation of carcinoma cells. PMID:24648728

  20. Simple Technique of Exfoliation and Dispersion of Multilayer Graphene from Natural Graphite by Ozone-Assisted Sonication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zaw; Karthik, Paneer Selvam; Hada, Masaki; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Hayashi, Yasuhiko

    2017-05-27

    Owing to its unique properties, graphene has attracted tremendous attention in many research fields. There is a great space to develop graphene synthesis techniques by an efficient and environmentally friendly approach. In this paper, we report a facile method to synthesize well-dispersed multilayer graphene (MLG) without using any chemical reagents or organic solvents. This was achieved by the ozone-assisted sonication of the natural graphite in a water medium. The frequency or number of ozone treatments plays an important role for the dispersion in the process. The possible mechanism of graphene exfoliation and the introduction of functional groups have been postulated. The experimental setup is unique for ozone treatment and enables the elimination of ozone off-gas. The heat generated by the dissipation of ultrasonic waves was used as it is, and no additional heat was supplied. The graphene dispersion was stable, and no evidence of aggregation was observed---even after several months. The characterization results show that well-dispersed MLG was successfully synthesized without any significant damage to the overall structure. The graphene obtained by this method has potential applications in composite materials, conductive coatings, energy storage, and electronic devices.

  1. Simple Technique of Exfoliation and Dispersion of Multilayer Graphene from Natural Graphite by Ozone-Assisted Sonication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaw Lin

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Owing to its unique properties, graphene has attracted tremendous attention in many research fields. There is a great space to develop graphene synthesis techniques by an efficient and environmentally friendly approach. In this paper, we report a facile method to synthesize well-dispersed multilayer graphene (MLG without using any chemical reagents or organic solvents. This was achieved by the ozone-assisted sonication of the natural graphite in a water medium. The frequency or number of ozone treatments plays an important role for the dispersion in the process. The possible mechanism of graphene exfoliation and the introduction of functional groups have been postulated. The experimental setup is unique for ozone treatment and enables the elimination of ozone off-gas. The heat generated by the dissipation of ultrasonic waves was used as it is, and no additional heat was supplied. The graphene dispersion was stable, and no evidence of aggregation was observed---even after several months. The characterization results show that well-dispersed MLG was successfully synthesized without any significant damage to the overall structure. The graphene obtained by this method has potential applications in composite materials, conductive coatings, energy storage, and electronic devices.

  2. Multirack foldable solar dryer for Mango flakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. H. Sengar

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Foldable solar dryer developed and evaluated for Mango flakes drying. Mango fruits were selected as drying material. Time required for reducing the moisture content up to 10 per cent as a safe storage for solar dryer was observed for Mango flakes. Overall collection efficiency was found to be 0.97 %, whereas where pickup efficiency was found to be 15 per cent. Evaluation parameters were collection efficiency, system drying efficiency, pick-up efficiency, moisture ratio and drying rate.

  3. Influence of the Surfactant Nature on the Occurrence of Self-Assembly between Rubber Particles and Thermally Reduced Graphite Oxide during the Preparation of Natural Rubber Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Aguilar-Bolados

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The natural rubber (NR latex consists of polymer particles charged negatively due to the adsorbed phospholipids and proteins molecules. The addition of stable aqueous suspension of thermally reduced graphite oxide (TRGO stabilized by ionic surfactants to NR latex can favor the occurrence of interaction between the stabilized TRGO and NR particles. Herein, the use of two surfactants of different nature, namely, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS and dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB, for the preparation of (TRGO/NR nanocomposites, is reported. Zeta potential and particle size measurements indicated that the use of DTAB as cationic surfactant results in the flocculation of NR particles and promoted the formation of ion-pair interactions between TRGO and the proteins and/or phospholipids present on the NR surface. This indicates that the use of DTAB can promote a self-assembly phenomenon between TRGO with adsorbed DTAB molecules and NR particles. The occurrence of self-assembly phenomenon allows obtaining homogenous dispersion of TRGO particles in the polymer matrix. The TRGO/NR nanocomposites prepared by the use of DTAB exhibited superior mechanical properties and excellent electrical conductivities reaching values of stress at 500% strain of 3.02 MPa and 10−4 S/cm, respectively.

  4. Facile Method to Fabricate Highly Thermally Conductive Graphite/PP Composite with Network Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Changping; Ni, Haiying; Chen, Jun; Yang, Wei

    2016-08-03

    Thermally conductive polymer composites have aroused significant academic and industrial interest for several decades. Herein, we report a novel fabrication method of graphite/polypropylene (PP) composites with high thermal conductivity in which graphite flakes construct a continuous thermally conductive network. The thermal conductivity coefficient of the graphite/PP composites is markedly improved to be 5.4 W/mK at a graphite loading of 21.2 vol %. Such a great improvement of the thermal conductivity is ascribed to the occurrence of orientations of crystalline graphite flakes with large particles around PP resin particles and the formation of a perfect thermally conductive network. The model of Hashin-Shtrikman (HS) is adopted to interpret the outstanding thermally conductive property of the graphite/PP composites. This work provides a guideline for the easy fabrication of thermally conductive composites with network structures.

  5. Exfoliation of non-oxidized graphene flakes for scalable conductive film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kwang Hyun; Kim, Bo Hyun; Song, Sung Ho; Kwon, Jiyoung; Kong, Byung Seon; Kang, Kisuk; Jeon, Seokwoo

    2012-06-13

    The increasing demand for graphene has required a new route for its mass production without causing extreme damages. Here we demonstrate a simple and cost-effective intercalation based exfoliation method for preparing high quality graphene flakes, which form a stable dispersion in organic solvents without any functionalization and surfactant. Successful intercalation of alkali metal between graphite interlayers through liquid-state diffusion from ternary KCl-NaCl-ZnCl(2) eutectic system is confirmed by X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectric spectroscopy. Chemical composition and morphology analyses prove that the graphene flakes preserve their intrinsic properties without any degradation. The graphene flakes remain dispersed in a mixture of pyridine and salts for more than 6 months. We apply these results to produce transparent conducting (∼930 Ω/□ at ∼75% transmission) graphene films using the modified Langmuir-Blodgett method. The overall results suggest that our method can be a scalable (>1 g/batch) and economical route for the synthesis of nonoxidized graphene flakes.

  6. Tribology of alumina-graphite composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chih-Yuan

    Alumina-graphite composites, which combine high wear resistance and self-lubricity, are a potential and promising candidate for advanced tribological applications. The processing, mechanical properties and tribology of alumina-graphite composites are discussed. Full density is difficult to achieve by a pressureless sintering route. Porosity of the composites increases with graphite content which causes the strength, modulus of elasticity, and hardness of the composites to decrease. The increased porosity does cause the fracture toughness to slightly increases. Tribology of alumina-graphite composites was studied with a pin-on-disk tribometer with emphasis on the following aspects: the graphite content in both pin and disk, the graphite flake size and the orientation of the graphite flakes. Scan electronic microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction are utilized to examine and characterize the wear debris and the worn surface. Results confirmed that it is necessary to optimize the structure and the supply of lubricant to improve the tribological behavior and that the arrangements of sliding couples also affect the tribology of self-lubricated ceramic composites. Continuous measurements of the friction coefficients were collected at high frequency in an attempt to correlate the tribology of alumina-graphite composites to vibrations introduced by friction. While these measurements indicate that the time frequency behavior of tribology is an important area of study, conclusions regarding the frequency response of different sliding couples could not be definitively stated. Finally, a new concept connecting instantaneous wear coefficient and instantaneous contact stress is proposed for prediction of wear behavior of brittle materials.

  7. GRAPHITE EXTRUSIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benziger, T.M.

    1959-01-20

    A new lubricant for graphite extrusion is described. In the past, graphite extrusion mixtures have bcen composed of coke or carbon black, together with a carbonaceous binder such as coal tar pitch, and a lubricant such as petrolatum or a colloidal suspension of graphite in glycerin or oil. Sinee sueh a lubricant is not soluble in, or compatible with the biiider liquid, such mixtures were difficult to extrude, and thc formed pieees lacked strength. This patent teaches tbe use of fatty acids as graphite extrusion lubricants and definite improvemcnts are realized thereby since the fatty acids are soluble in the binder liquid.

  8. Some economic aspects of natural uranium graphite gas reactor types. Present status and trends of costs in France; Quelques aspects economiques de la filiere uranium naturel - Graphite - gaz. Etat actuel et tendance des couts en France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaussens, J.; Tanguy, P. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Leo, B. [Electricite de France (EDF), 75 - Paris (France)

    1964-07-01

    The first part of this report defines the economic advantages of natural uranium fuels, which are as follows: the restricted number and relatively simple fabrication processes of the fuel elements, the low cost per kWh of the finished product and the reasonable capital investments involved in this type of fuel cycle as compared to that of enriched uranium. All these factors combine to reduce the arbitrary nature of cost estimates, which is particularly marked in the case of enriched uranium due to the complexity of its cycle and the uncertainties of plutonium prices). Finally, the wide availability of yellowcake, as opposed to the present day virtual monopoly of isotope separation, and the low cost of natural uranium stockpiling, offer appreciable guarantees in the way of security of supply and economic and political independence as compared with the use of enriched uranium. As far as overall capital investments are concerned, it is shown that, although graphite-gas reactor costs are higher than those of light water reactors in certain capacity ranges, the situation becomes far less clear when we start taking into account, in the interest of national independence, the cost of nuclear fuel production equipment in the case of each of these types of reactor. Finally, the marginal cost of the power capacity of a graphite-gas reactor is low and its technological limitations have receded (owing particularly to the use of prestressed concrete). It is a well known fact that the trend is now towards larger power station units, which means that the rentability of natural uranium graphite reactors as compared to other types of reactors will become more and more pronounced. The second section aims at presenting a realistic short and medium term view of the fuel, running, and investment costs of French natural uranium graphite gas, reactors. Finally, the economic goals which this type of reactor can reach in the very near future are given. It is thus shown that considerable

  9. Rheology of Alumina-Based Graphite-Containing Castables

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Fangbao; M. Rigaud; LIU Xinhong; ZHONG Xiangchong

    2005-01-01

    In this work, the rheological behavior of ultra-low cement alumina-based castables with addition of flake graphite and extruded graphite pellets has been investigated by using IBB rheometer. Emphasis has been laid on the influence of the type and amount of carbon addition on rheological properties of the alumina-based castables and the results are compared with corresponding alumina castable samples without any carbon addition. It is found that alumina-based castables with extruded graphite pellets have good rheological behavior and flowability with lower water demand ( < 6. 3% )and no segregation during the shearing of castable.

  10. Effects of flake size on mode-locking behavior for flake-graphene saturable absorber mirrors

    CERN Document Server

    Hussain, M I; Booth, L S; Petrasiunas, M J; Brown, C L; Kielpinski, D

    2016-01-01

    After advent of graphene as a saturable absorber many experiments have been conducted to produce short pulse duration pulses. Here, we have measured the properties of flake-graphene saturable absorber mirrors of various flake sizes dependent on fabrication technique. These mirrors enabled us to obtain a large mode-locking bandwidth of 16nm in an erbium-doped fiber laser. Mirrors with large flake size and multi-layered thickness induce strong pulse shaping and reflect mode-locked train of pulses with very large bandwidths.

  11. Star polymer unimicelles on graphene oxide flakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ikjun; Kulkarni, Dhaval D; Xu, Weinan; Tsitsilianis, Constantinos; Tsukruk, Vladimir V

    2013-08-06

    We report the interfacial assembly of amphiphilic heteroarm star copolymers (PSnP2VPn and PSn(P2VP-b-PtBA)n (n = 28 arms)) on graphene oxide flakes at the air-water interface. Adsorption, spreading, and ordering of star polymer micelles on the surface of the basal plane and edge of monolayer graphene oxide sheets were investigated on a Langmuir trough. This interface-mediated assembly resulted in micelle-decorated graphene oxide sheets with uniform spacing and organized morphology. We found that the surface activity of solvated graphene oxide sheets enables star polymer surfactants to subsequently adsorb on the presuspended graphene oxide sheets, thereby producing a bilayer complex. The positively charged heterocyclic pyridine-containing star polymers exhibited strong affinity onto the basal plane and edge of graphene oxide, leading to a well-organized and long-range ordered discrete micelle assembly. The preferred binding can be related to the increased conformational entropy due to the reduction of interarm repulsion. The extent of coverage was tuned by controlling assembly parameters such as concentration and solvent polarity. The polymer micelles on the basal plane remained incompressible under lateral compression in contrast to ones on the water surface due to strongly repulsive confined arms on the polar surface of graphene oxide and a preventive barrier in the form of the sheet edges. The densely packed biphasic tile-like morphology was evident, suggesting the high interfacial stability and mechanically stiff nature of graphene oxide sheets decorated with star polymer micelles. This noncovalent assembly represents a facile route for the control and fabrication of graphene oxide-inclusive ultrathin hybrid films applicable for layered nanocomposites.

  12. Electrically actuatable doped polymer flakes and electrically addressable optical devices using suspensions of doped polymer flakes in a fluid host

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trajkovska-Petkoska, Anka; Jacobs, Stephen D.; Marshall, Kenneth L.; Kosc, Tanya Z.

    2010-05-11

    Doped electrically actuatable (electrically addressable or switchable) polymer flakes have enhanced and controllable electric field induced motion by virtue of doping a polymer material that functions as the base flake matrix with either a distribution of insoluble dopant particles or a dopant material that is completely soluble in the base flake matrix. The base flake matrix may be a polymer liquid crystal material, and the dopants generally have higher dielectric permittivity and/or conductivity than the electrically actuatable polymer base flake matrix. The dopant distribution within the base flake matrix may be either homogeneous or non-homogeneous. In the latter case, the non-homogeneous distribution of dopant provides a dielectric permittivity and/or conductivity gradient within the body of the flakes. The dopant can also be a carbon-containing material (either soluble or insoluble in the base flake matrix) that absorbs light so as to reduce the unpolarized scattered light component reflected from the flakes, thereby enhancing the effective intensity of circularly polarized light reflected from the flakes when the flakes are oriented into a light reflecting state. Electro-optic devices contain these doped flakes suspended in a host fluid can be addressed with an applied electric field, thus controlling the orientation of the flakes between a bright reflecting state and a non-reflecting dark state.

  13. Sensitivity of graphene flakes and nanorings to impurities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konobeeva, N.N., E-mail: yana_nn@volsu.ru [Volgograd State University, University Avenue 100, Volgograd 400062 (Russian Federation); Belonenko, M.B. [Volgograd State University, University Avenue 100, Volgograd 400062 (Russian Federation); Volgograd Institute of Business, Uzhno-Ukrainskaya Str., Volgograd 400048 (Russian Federation)

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we consider the influence of impurity on the graphene flakes and nanorings conductance. Based on the jumping Hamiltonian for graphene electrons with its direct diagonalization, we obtain the density of states. Further, the tunneling current is calculated for the following contacts: graphene flake-metal, graphene flake-quantum dots, graphene nanoring-quantum dots. We analyze the effect of the flake dimensions and the positions of the adsorbed molecule of impurity on the characteristic properties of the tunneling current.

  14. Experiments on Graphitization of Diamond in the Presence of Water: Implications for Exhumation of Ultrahigh Pressure Metamorphic Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Bannon, E. F.; Xia, G.; Green, H. W.; Wirth, R.; Dobrzhinetskaya, L.

    2012-12-01

    Diamond and graphite occur in the mantle, and crustal ultrahigh pressure metamorphic (UHPM) rocks. The stability fields of carbon are well studied experimentally, but the mechanisms of phase transformation are not well understood. Observations on natural samples from UHPM terranes show that graphitization of diamond is accompanied by the formation of disordered graphite containing nanometric fluid inclusions. Since the structures of diamond and graphite are very dissimilar, it is unlikely that a direct phase transformation would occur during the graphitization process. Such an assumption is also supported by higher enthalpy (1.897) and lower entropy (2.38) of C-diamond with respect of those of C-graphite (enthalpy = 0, entropy=5.74). At least three different mechanisms of diamond-to-graphite transformation have been proposed. To constrain this process we conducted a series of anhydrous and hydrous experiments in a piston-cylinder apparatus and a hydrous experiment in a multianvil apparatus using 20-40 micron size virgin diamonds as the starting material. The piston-cylinder experiments were conducted at P=1 GPa and T=1300oC. In the hydrous experiments 1.15 wt.%. Mg(OH)2 was added to the starting material as the H2O supply according to the breakdown reaction: Mg(OH)2 = MgO + H2O. The multianvil experiment was conducted at P=6GPa and T=1300oC with 1 wt.%. distilled water added to the starting diamonds. Run products were studied with SEM, FIB assisted TEM, and SEM-Raman. The anhydrous experiments show that diamond crystals are "integrated" together producing deformed polycrystallites with complicated textural patterns occurring at the grain boundaries. The hydrous experiments show the formation of metastable nanometric spheroidal carbon particles which were distributed on the surface and between the corners of the diamonds. The metastable phase existed for ~6 months before it decomposed into graphite flakes. The graphite flakes have a disordered structure which was

  15. Electrochemical cell studies on fluorinated natural graphite in propylene carbonate electrolyte with difluoromethyl acetate (MFA) additive for low temperature lithium battery application

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Chandrasekaran; M Koh; Y Ozhawa; H Aaoyoma; T Nakajima

    2009-05-01

    Electrochemical cell performances of fluorinated natural graphite (abbreviated as FNG) electrode material was studied by using 1M of LiClO4- EC : DEC : PC (1 : 1 : 1 v%) electrolyte solution with and without 0.15% v/v fluorinated carboxylic ester additive difluoromethyl acetate-CHF2COOCH3 (MFA) at -10°C. The electrochemical cell performances were studied by cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge-discharge and impedance analysis. The additive has proven its positive role with the electrolyte system and has shown the improved characterization over the blank electrolyte system.

  16. Effect of Temperature and Graphite Immersion Method on Carbothermic Reduction of Fayalite Slag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrašinović, Aleksandar

    2017-09-01

    In this work, graphite flakes were used to reduce fayalite slag originated from the pyrometallurgical copper extraction process. Experiments were conducted with a significantly different contact area between graphite and slag at two temperatures, 1300°C and 1400°C. The process was continuously monitored via the concentration change of CO and CO2 in off-gas. Reduction rate values in experiments where 150-micron-diameter graphite flakes were submerged into the slag and left to float slowly to the top are about four times higher compared with when graphite flakes were dispersed at the top surface of liquid slag. The activation energy for instigating reduction was 302.61 kJ mol-1 and 306.67 kJ mol-1 in the case where graphite flakes were submerged into the slag and dispersed at the surface, respectively. The reduction process is characterized by two distinctive periods: an initial steep increase in the concentration of CO and CO2 controlled by the Boudouard reaction and a subsequent slow decrease of CO and CO2 concentrations in the off-gas controlled by mass transfer of reducible oxides from bulk to the gas-slag interface.

  17. Cryotribology of diamond and graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwasa, Yukikazu; Ashaboglu, A.F.; Rabinowicz, E.R. [Francis Bitter Magnet Lab., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    An experimental study was carried out on the tribological behavior of materials of interest in cryogenic applications, focusing on diamond and graphite. Both natural diamond (referred in the text as diamond) and chemical-vapor-deposition (CVD) diamond (CVD-diamond) were used. The experiment was carried out using a pin-on-disk tribometer capable of operating at cryogenic temperatures, from 4.2 to 293 K. Two basic scenarios of testing were used: (1) frictional coefficient ({mu}) vs velocity (v) characteristics at constant temperatures; (2) {mu} vs temperature (T) behavior at fixed sliding speeds. For diamond/CVD-diamond, graphite/CVD-diamond, stainless steel/CVD-diamond pairs, {mu}`s are virtually velocity independent. For each of diamond/graphite, alumina/graphite, and graphite/graphite pairs, the {partial_derivative}{mu}/{partial_derivative}v characteristic is favorable, i.e., positive. For diamond/CVD-diamond and graphite/CVD-diamond pairs, {mu}`s are nearly temperature independent between in the range 77 - 293 K. Each {mu} vs T plot for pin materials sliding on graphite disks has a peak at a temperature in the range 100 - 200 K.

  18. Graphite furnace and hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometric determination of cadmium, lead, and tin traces in natural surface waters: study of preconcentration technique performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsogas, George Z; Giokas, Dimosthenis L; Vlessidis, Athanasios G

    2009-04-30

    In this study three major types of preconcentration methods based upon different principles (cation exchange, physical absorption and hydrophobic extraction) were evaluated and optimized for the extraction and determination of three highly toxic heavy metals namely Cd, Pb and Sn by graphite furnace and hybrid generation atomic absorption spectrometry in real samples. The optimum analytical conditions were examined and the analytical features of each method were revealed and compared. Detection limits as low as 0.003-0.025 microg L(-1) for Cd(2+), 0.05-0.10 microg L(-1) for Pb(2+) and 0.1-0.25 microg L(-1) for Sn(4+) depending on the extraction method were obtained with RSD values between 3.08% and 6.11%. A preliminary assessment of the pollution status of three important natural ecosystems in Epirus region (NW Greece) was performed and some early conclusions were drawn and discussed.

  19. Expansion and exfoliation of graphite to form graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Patole, Shashikan P.

    2017-07-27

    Graphene production methods are described based on subjecting non- covalent graphite intercalated compounds, such as graphite bisulfate, to expansion conditions such as shocks of heat and/or microwaves followed by turbulence-assisted exfoliation to produce few-layer, high quality graphene flakes. Depending on the approach selected for the exfoliation step, free-flowing graphene powder, graphene slurry, or an aqueous graphene mixture can be obtained. Surfactants can aid in dispersion, and graphene inks can be formed. The parameters of the process are simple, efficient and low-cost enabling therefore the scale- up of production. Applications include electrodes and energy storage devices.

  20. Magneto-electrical orientation of lipid-coated graphitic micro-particles in solution

    CERN Document Server

    Nguyen, Johnny; Garcia, Isabel Llorente

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate, for the first time, confinement of the orientation of micron-sized graphitic flakes to a well-defined plane. We orient and rotationally trap lipid-coated highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) micro-flakes in aqueous solution using a combination of uniform magnetic and AC electric fields and exploiting the anisotropic diamagnetic and electrical properties of HOPG. Measuring the rotational Brownian fluctuations of individual oriented particles in rotational traps, we quantitatively determine the rotational trap stiffness, maximum applied torque and polarization anisotropy of the micro-flakes, as well as their dependency on the electric field frequency. Additionally, we quantify interactions of the micro-particles with adjacent glass surfaces with various surface treatments. We outline the various applications of this work, including torque sensing in biological systems.

  1. Graphite Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Draine, B T

    2016-01-01

    Laboratory measurements are used to constrain the dielectric tensor for graphite, from microwave to X-ray frequencies. The dielectric tensor is strongly anisotropic even at X-ray energies. The discrete dipole approximation is employed for accurate calculations of absorption and scattering by single-crystal graphite spheres and spheroids. For randomly-oriented single-crystal grains, the so-called 1/3 - 2/3 approximation for calculating absorption and scattering cross sections is exact in the limit a/lambda -> 0, provides better than ~10% accuracy in the optical and UV even when a/lambda is not small, but becomes increasingly inaccurate at infrared wavelengths, with errors as large as ~40% at lambda = 10 micron. For turbostratic graphite grains, the Bruggeman and Maxwell Garnett treatments yield similar cross sections in the optical and ultraviolet, but diverge in the infrared, with predicted cross sections differing by over an order of magnitude in the far-infrared. It is argued that the Maxwell Garnett estima...

  2. Colloidal graphite/graphene nanostructures using collagen showing enhanced thermal conductivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhattacharya S

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Soumya Bhattacharya,1 Purbarun Dhar,2 Sarit K Das,2 Ranjan Ganguly,3 Thomas J Webster,4,5 Suprabha Nayar1 1Biomaterials Group, Materials Science and Technology Division, CSIR-National Metallurgical Laboratory, Jamshedpur, 2Nanofluids, Microfluidics and Bio-MEMS Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology-Madras, Chennai, 3Advanced Materials Research and Applications Laboratory, Department of Power Engineering, Jadavpur University, Kolkata, India; 4Department of Chemical Engineering and Program in Bioengineering, Northeastern University, Boston, MA, USA; 5Center of Excellence for Advanced Materials Research, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia Abstract: In the present study, the exfoliation of natural graphite (GR directly to colloidal GR/graphene (G nanostructures using collagen (CL was studied as a safe and scalable process, akin to numerous natural processes and hence can be termed “biomimetic”. Although the exfoliation and functionalization takes place in just 1 day, it takes about 7 days for the nano GR/G flakes to stabilize. The predominantly aromatic residues of the triple helical CL forms its own special micro and nanoarchitecture in acetic acid dispersions. This, with the help of hydrophobic and electrostatic forces, interacts with GR and breaks it down to nanostructures, forming a stable colloidal dispersion. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, photoluminescence, fluorescence, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of the colloid show the interaction between GR and CL on day 1 and 7. Differential interference contrast images in the liquid state clearly reveal how the GR flakes are entrapped in the CL fibrils, with a corresponding fluorescence image showing the intercalation of CL within GR. Atomic force microscopy of graphene-collagen coated on glass substrates shows an average flake size of 350 nm, and the hexagonal diffraction pattern and thickness contours of the

  3. Thermally exfoliated graphite oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prud'Homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Abdala, Ahmed (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A modified graphite oxide material contains a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 sq m/g to 2600 sq m/g, wherein the thermally exfoliated graphite oxide displays no signature of the original graphite and/or graphite oxide, as determined by X-ray diffraction.

  4. Spatial design and control of graphene flake motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbanfekr-Kalashami, H.; Peeters, F. M.; Novoselov, K. S.; Neek-Amal, M.

    2017-08-01

    The force between a sharp scanning probe tip and a surface can drive a graphene flake over crystalline substrates. The recent design of particular patterns of structural defects on a graphene surface allows us to propose an alternative approach for controlling the motion of a graphene flake over a graphene substrate. The thermally induced motion of a graphene flake is controlled by engineering topological defects in the substrate. Such defect regions lead to an inhomogeneous energy landscape and are energetically unfavorable for the motion of the flake, and will invert and scatter graphene flakes when they are moving toward the defect line. Engineering the distribution of these energy barriers results in a controllable trajectory for the thermal motion of the flake without using any external force. We predict superlubricity of the graphene flake for motion along and between particular defect lines. This Rapid Communication provides insights into the frictional forces of interfaces and opens a route to the engineering of the stochastic motion of a graphene flake over any crystalline substrate.

  5. Flake storage effects on properties of laboratory-made flakeboards

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. G. Carll

    1998-01-01

    Aspen (Populus gradidentata) and loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) flakes were prepared with tangential-grain and radial-grain faces on a laboratory disk flaker. These were gently dried in a steam-heated rotary drum dryer. Approximately 1 week after drying, surface wettability was measured on a large sample of flakes using an aqueous dye solution. Three replicate boards of...

  6. Synthesis Method and Absorption Application of Nanocrystalline Alloy Flakes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pei-Heng Zhou; Long-Jiang Deng

    2007-01-01

    The soft magnetic FeSiB nanocrystalline/amorphous flakes were fabricated by ball milling from the elemental powders and annealing the amorphous precursor, respectively. The microstructure, magnetic and microwave properties were evaluated by different synthesis methods. By computation, ballmilled Fe78Si13B9 flakes demonstrated potential application in absorption.

  7. 9 CFR 590.546 - Albumen flake process drying facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Albumen flake process drying facilities. 590.546 Section 590.546 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE... INSPECTION ACT) Sanitary, Processing, and Facility Requirements § 590.546 Albumen flake process...

  8. 9 CFR 590.547 - Albumen flake process drying operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Albumen flake process drying operations. 590.547 Section 590.547 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE... INSPECTION ACT) Sanitary, Processing, and Facility Requirements § 590.547 Albumen flake process...

  9. Directional solidification of flake and nodular cast iron during KC-135 low-g maneuvers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curreri, P. A.; Stefanescu, D. M.; Hendrix, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    Alloys solidified in a low-gravity environment can, due to the elimination of sedimentation and convection, form unique and often desirable microstructures. One method of studying the effects of low-gravity (low-g) on alloy solidification was the use of the NASA KC-135 aircraft flying repetitive low-g maneuvers. Each maneuver gives from 20 to 30 seconds of low-g which is between about 0.1 and 0.001 gravity. A directional solidification furnace was used to study the behavior of off eutectic composition case irons in a low-g environment. The solidification interface of hypereutectic flake and spheroidal graphite case irons was slowly advanced through a rod sample, 5 mm in diameter. Controlled solidification was continued through a number of aircraft parabolas. The known solidification rate of the sample was then correlated with accelerometer data to determine the gravity level during solidification for any location of the sample. The thermal gradient and solidification rate were controlled independently. Samples run on the KC-135 aircraft exhibited bands of coarser graphite or of larger nodules usually corresponding to the regions solidified under low-g. Samples containing high phosphorous (used in order to determine the eutectic cell) exhibited larger eutectic cells in the low-g zone, followed by a band of coarser graphite.

  10. Bridged graphite oxide materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Alonso, Margarita (Inventor); McAllister, Michael J. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Prud'homme, Robert K. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Bridged graphite oxide material comprising graphite sheets bridged by at least one diamine bridging group. The bridged graphite oxide material may be incorporated in polymer composites or used in adsorption media.

  11. Electrochemical Ultracapacitors Using Graphitic Nanostacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marotta, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Electrochemical ultracapacitors (ECs) have been developed using graphitic nanostacks as the electrode material. The advantages of this technology will be the reduction of device size due to superior power densities and relative powers compared to traditional activated carbon electrodes. External testing showed that these materials display reduced discharge response times compared to state-of-the-art materials. Such applications are advantageous for pulsed power applications such as burst communications (satellites, cell phones), electromechanical actuators, and battery load leveling in electric vehicles. These carbon nanostructures are highly conductive and offer an ordered mesopore network. These attributes will provide more complete electrolyte wetting, and faster release of stored charge compared to activated carbon. Electrochemical capacitor (EC) electrode materials were developed using commercially available nanomaterials and modifying them to exploit their energy storage properties. These materials would be an improvement over current ECs that employ activated carbon as the electrode material. Commercially available graphite nanofibers (GNFs) are used as precursor materials for the synthesis of graphitic nanostacks (GNSs). These materials offer much greater surface area than graphite flakes. Additionally, these materials offer a superior electrical conductivity and a greater average pore size compared to activated carbon electrodes. The state of the art in EC development uses activated carbon (AC) as the electrode material. AC has a high surface area, but its small average pore size inhibits electrolyte ingress/egress. Additionally, AC has a higher resistivity, which generates parasitic heating in high-power applications. This work focuses on fabricating EC from carbon that has a very different structure by increasing the surface area of the GNF by intercalation or exfoliation of the graphitic basal planes. Additionally, various functionalities to the GNS

  12. Direct laser planting of hybrid Au-Ag/C nanostructures - nanoparticles, flakes and flowers

    CERN Document Server

    Manshina, Alina; Bashouti, Muhammad; Povolotskiy, Alexey; Petrov, Yuriy; Koshevoy, Igor; Christiansen, Silke; Tunik, Sergey; Leuchs, Gerd

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a new approach for forming hybrid metal/carbonaceous nanostructures in a controlled direct laser planting process. Au-Ag nanoclusters in amorphous or crystalline carbonaceous matrices are formed with different morphology: nanoparticles, nanoflakes, and nanoflowers. In contrast to other generation techniques our approach is simple, involving only a single laser-induced process transforming supramolecular complexes dissolved in solvent such as acetone, acetophenone, or dichloroethane into hybrid nanostructures in the laser-affected area of the substrate. The morphology of the hybrid nanostructures can be steered by controlling the deposition parameters, the composition of the liquid phase and the type of substrate, amorphous or crystalline. The carbonaceous phase of the hybrid nanostructures consists of hydrogenated amorphous carbon in the case of nanoparticles and of crystalline orthorhombic graphite of nanoscale thickness in the case of flakes and flowers. To the best of our knowledge this is t...

  13. An asymmetric dimer in a periodic potential: a minimal model for friction of graphene flakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hens, Remco; Fasolino, Annalisa

    2016-07-01

    We discuss the friction and motion of a model of a dimer with asymmetric interactions with a substrate potential. Starting from the consideration that a rigid dimer with spacing equal to half of the period of the potential has exactly zero static friction like the infinite incommensurate Frenkel Kontorova model, we show how stick-slip behaviour and friction arise as a function of asymmetry. We argue that this model can yield a simple yet insightful description of the frictional behaviour of graphene flakes on graphite and of superlubricity. The results can also be of interest for diatomic molecules on surfaces. Supplementary material in the form of three mp4 files available from the Journal web page at http://dx.doi.org/10.1140/epjb/e2016-70273-5

  14. Crossed BiOI flake array solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Kewei; Jia, Falong; Zhang, Lizhi [Key Laboratory of Pesticide and Chemical Biology of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Central China Normal University, Wuhan (China); Zheng, Zhi [Institute of Surface Micro and Nano Materials, Xuchang University (China)

    2010-12-15

    We report a new kind of solar cell based on crossed flake-like BiOI arrays for the first time. The BiOI flake arrays were fabricated on an FTO glass with a TiO{sub 2} block layer at room temperature by successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method. The resulting BiOI flake array solar cell exhibited enhanced photovoltaic performance under solar illumination. This work provides an attractive and new solar cell system and a facile route to fabricate low cost and non-toxic solar cell. (author)

  15. Flotation studies on low grade graphite ore from eastern India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vasumathi N.; Vijaya Kumar T.V.; Ratchambigai S.; Subba Rao S.; Bhaskar Raju G

    2015-01-01

    A low grade graphite ore from eastern India was beneficiated by flotation to improve its quality. The ore was composed of 87.80%ash and 8.59%fixed carbon. Primary coarse wet grinding (d80:186 lm) followed by rougher flotation in Denver flotation cell using diesel as collector and pine oil as frother yielded a rougher concentrate. Regrinding (d80:144 lm) of this rougher concentrate was opted for further libera-tion of graphite. It was followed by cleaning in laboratory flotation column. This combined process of relatively coarse primary grinding followed by regrinding and cleaning in flotation column resulted in final concentrate of 7.44% yield with 89.65% fixed carbon and 6.00% ash. This approach of two-stage grinding to recover the flake graphite at the coarsest possible grind can help to minimize grinding energy costs. A conceptual flow sheet which is cost effective was developed based on this methodology.

  16. Electronic shell and supershell structure in graphene flakes

    CERN Document Server

    Manninen, M; Akola, J

    2008-01-01

    We use a simple tight-binding (TB) model to study electronic properties of free graphene flakes. Valence electrons of triangular graphene flakes show a shell and supershell structure which follows an analytical expression derived from the solution of the wave equation for triangular cavity. However, the solution has different selection rules for triangles with armchair and zigzag edges, and roughly 40000 atoms are needed to see clearly the first supershell oscillation. In the case of spherical flakes, the edge states of the zigzag regions dominate the shell structure which is thus sensitive to the flake diameter and center. A potential well that is made with external gates cannot have true bound states in graphene due to the zero energy band gap. However, it can cause strong resonances in the conduction band.

  17. Dating simple flakes: Early Bronze Age flake production technology on the Middle Euphrates Steppe, Syria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiro Nishiaki

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aceramic flint scatters, comprising very crude cores or flakes and no formalised tools, are frequently found on the Middle Euphrates steppe of northern Syria. Previous studies suggest that many of them are residues of short-term activities by the nomads or shepherds of the Early Bronze Age. In order to verify this interpretation, a more precise chronological framework needs to be established for the Early Bronze Age lithic industry. This paper analyses stratified flake assemblages of the Early Bronze Age at Tell Ghanem al-Ali, a securely radiocarbon-dated settlement on the Middle Euphrates, and examines which occupation level yields assemblages most similar to those of the steppe. Results demonstrate that the lithic industry of this period underwent significant diachronic changes in terms of core reduction technology. Based on the chronological framework developed at Tell Ghanem al-Ali, the steppe assemblages in question can be assigned to different phases of the Early Bronze Age. This finding will help identify processes at the beginning of the extensive exploitation of the steppe, which is regarded as one of the most important socioeconomic changes that occurred among Early Bronze Age communities of the Middle Euphrates.

  18. How similar are nut-cracking and stone-flaking? A functional approach to percussive technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bril, Blandine; Parry, Ross; Dietrich, Gilles

    2015-11-19

    Various authors have suggested similarities between tool use in early hominins and chimpanzees. This has been particularly evident in studies of nut-cracking which is considered to be the most complex skill exhibited by wild apes, and has also been interpreted as a precursor of more complex stone-flaking abilities. It has been argued that there is no major qualitative difference between what the chimpanzee does when he cracks a nut and what early hominins did when they detached a flake from a core. In this paper, similarities and differences between skills involved in stone-flaking and nut-cracking are explored through an experimental protocol with human subjects performing both tasks. We suggest that a 'functional' approach to percussive action, based on the distinction between functional parameters that characterize each task and parameters that characterize the agent's actions and movements, is a fruitful method for understanding those constraints which need to be mastered to perform each task successfully, and subsequently, the nature of skill involved in both tasks.

  19. Evaluation of the lake model FLake over a coastal lagoon during the THAUMEX field campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Le Moigne

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The THAUMEX measurement campaign, carried out during the summer of 2011 in Thau, a coastal lagoon in southern France, focused on episodes of marine breezes. During the campaign, three intensive observation periods (IOPs were conducted and a large amount of data were collected. Subsequently, standalone modelling using the FLake lake model was used, first to assess the surface temperature and the surface energy balance, and second to determine the energy budget of the water column at the measurement site. Surface fluxes were validated against in situ measurements, and it was determined that heat exchanges are dominated by evaporation. We also demonstrated that the model was sensitive to the light extinction coefficient at Thau, due to its shallowness and clarity nature. A heat balance was calculated, and the inclusion of a radiative temperature has improved it, especially by reducing the nocturnal evaporation. The FLake lake model was then evaluated in three-dimensional numerical simulations performed with the Meso-NH mesoscale model, in order to assess the changing structure of the boundary layer above the lagoon during the IOPs more accurately. We highlighted the first time ever when Meso-NH and FLake were coupled and proved the ability of the coupled system to forecast a complex phenomenon but also the importance of the use of the FLake model was pointed out. We demonstrated the impact of the lagoon and more precisely the Lido, a sandy strip of land between the lagoon and the Mediterranean Sea, on the vertical distribution of turbulent kinetic energy, evidence of the turbulence induced by the breeze. This study showed the complementarities between standalone and coupled simulations.

  20. Textured Nd2Fe14B flakes with enhanced coercivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, BZ; Zheng, LY; Marinescu, M; Liu, JF; Hadjipanayis, GC

    2012-04-01

    Morphology, structure, and magnetic properties of the [001] textured Nd2Fe14B nanocrystalline flakes prepared by surfactant-assisted high energy ball milling (HEBM) and subsequent annealing were studied. These flakes have a thickness of 80-200 nm, a length of 0.5-10 mu m, and an average grain size of 10-14nm. The addition of some amount of Dy, Nd70Cu30 alloy, and an appropriate post annealing increased the coercivity H-i(c) of the Nd2Fe14B flakes. iHc was 3.7, 4.3, and 5.7 kOe for the Nd15.5Fe78.5B6, Nd14Dy1.5Fe78.5B6 and 83.3wt.% Nd14Dy1.5Fe78.5B6+16.7 wt.% Nd70Cu30 flakes prepared by HEBM for 5 h in heptane with 20 wt.% oleylamine, respectively. After annealing at 450 degrees C for 0.5h, their iHc increased to 5.1, 6.2, and 7.0 kOe, respectively. Anisotropic magnetic behavior was found in all of the as-milled and annealed flakes. Both, the thickening of Nd-rich phase at grain boundaries via diffusion of Nd70Cu30 and the surface modification of the Nd2Fe14B flake could be the main reasons for the coercivity enhancement in the as-milled and annealed Nd70Cu30-added Nd2Fe14B flakes. (C) 2012 American Institute of Physics. [doi: 10.1063/1.3679425

  1. Graphite Technology Development Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. Windes; T. Burchell; M.Carroll

    2010-10-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will be a helium-cooled High Temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR) with a large graphite core. Graphite physically contains the fuel and comprises the majority of the core volume. Graphite has been used effectively as a structural and moderator material in both research and commercial high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. This development has resulted in graphite being established as a viable structural material for HTGRs. While the general characteristics necessary for producing nuclear grade graphite are understood, historical “nuclear” grades no longer exist. New grades must be fabricated, characterized, and irradiated to demonstrate that current grades of graphite exhibit acceptable non-irradiated and irradiated properties upon which the thermomechanical design of the structural graphite in NGNP is based. This Technology Development Plan outlines the research and development (R&D) activities and associated rationale necessary to qualify nuclear grade graphite for use within the NGNP reactor.

  2. Characteristics of flake graphite in Ni-Mn-Cu cast iron. Part 2

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    A. Janus

    2010-01-01

    .... In this second part of the research, effect of chemical composition of hypereutectic cast iron containing 3.5÷5.1% C, 1.7÷2.8% Si, 3.5÷10.5 %Ni, 2.0÷8.0% Mn, 0.1÷3.5% Cu, 0.14÷0.17% P and 0.02÷0.04...

  3. Research on graphite powders used for HTR-PM fuel elements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Hongsheng; LIANG Tongxiang; ZHANG Jie; LI Ziqiang; TANG Chunhe

    2006-01-01

    Different batches of natural graphite powders and electrographite powders were characterized by impurity, degree of graphitization, particle size distribution, specific surface area, and shape characteristics. The graphite balls consist of proper mix-ratio of natural graphite, electrographite and phenolic resin were manufactured and characterized by thermal conductivity, anisotropy of thermal expansion, crush strength, and drop strength. Results show that some types of graphite powders possess very high purity, degree of graphitization, and sound size distribution and apparent density, which can serve for matrix graphite of HTR-PM. The graphite balls manufactured with reasonable mix-ratio of graphite powders and process method show very good properties. It is indicated that the properties of graphite balls can meet the design criterion of HTR-PM. We can provide a powerful candidate material for the future manufacture of HTR-PM fuel elements.

  4. Computational Studies of Novel phenomena on the surface of Graphite

    OpenAIRE

    Moaied, Mohammed Salah Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    Tesis Doctoral inédita leída en la Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Facultad de Ciencias, Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada. Fecha de lectura: 17-02-2014 Using a first-principle calculation within Density Functional Theory, we investigate the effect of external static charge on the graphite flakes structure. As a result, the charges relocate and repulsive forces are generated, in compliance with classical theories. Even more remarkable is that the Coulomb repulsion ex...

  5. Blistering and flaking of amorphous alloys bombarded with He ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The blistering and flaking behavior of many kinds of amorphous al loys under helium ion bombardment at room temperature was investigated. Helium ions with energies of 40keV and 60keV were implanted within the fluence range (1.0~4.0)×1018ions/cm2. The surface topography of samples after irradiation was observed by using a scanning electron microscope. The diameter of blister and the thickness of exfoliated blister lids were measured. The results showed that many kinds of surface topography characteristics appeared for different fluences, energies and amorphous alloys, such as flaking, blistering, exfoliation, blister rupture, secondgeneration blistering and porous structure. The dependdence of surface damage modesand the critical fluence for the onset of blistering and flaking on the sort of materials and ion energy was discussed.

  6. Radiation damage in graphite

    CERN Document Server

    Simmons, John Harry Walrond

    1965-01-01

    Nuclear Energy, Volume 102: Radiation Damage in Graphite provides a general account of the effects of irradiation on graphite. This book presents valuable work on the structure of the defects produced in graphite crystals by irradiation. Organized into eight chapters, this volume begins with an overview of the description of the methods of manufacturing graphite and of its physical properties. This text then presents details of the method of setting up a scale of irradiation dose. Other chapters consider the effect of irradiation at a given temperature on a physical property of graphite. This

  7. Antimicrobial activity of thin metallic silver flakes, waste products of a manufacturing process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Manuela Anzano; Alessandra Tosti; Marina Lasagni; Alfredo Campiglio; Demetrio Pitea; Elena Collina*

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the research was to develop new products and processes from a manufacturing waste from an Italian metallurgic company.The company produced thin silver metallic films and the production scraps were silver flakes.The possibility to use the silver flakes in water disinfection processes was studied.The antimicrobial activity of the flakes was investigated in batch using Escherichia coli as Gram-negative microorganism model.The flakes did not show any antimicrobial activity,so they were activated with two different processes:thermal activation in reducing atmosphere and chemical activation,obtaining,respectively,reduced flakes (RF) and chemical flakes (CF).The flakes,activated with either treatment,showed antimicrobial activity against E.coli.The kill rate was dependent on the type of activated flakes.The chemical flakes were more efficient than reduced flakes.The kill rate determined for 1 g of CF,1.0 ± 0.2min-1,was greater than the kill rate determined for 1 g of RF,0.069 + 0.004 min-1.This was confirmed also by the minimum inhibitory concentration values.It was demonstrated that the antimicrobial capability was dependent on flakes amount and on the type of aqueous medium.Furthermore,the flakes maintained their properties also when used a second time.Finally,the antimicrobial activities of flakes were tested in an effluent of a wastewater treatment plant where a variety of heterotrophic bacteria were present.

  8. MODIFICATION OF FLAKE REINFORCED FRICTION BRAKE COMPOSITE MATERIAL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    According to the recent development trend and need of the friction brake material, the flake reinforced friction brake material has been made out by adjusting the recipe and techniques. The two-dimensional flake vermiculite is selected as the reinforced stuffing of the material; the modified resin is used as the basal bed of the material. The tests manifest that the properties of mechanics are high, the friction coefficients are suitable and stable,and especially in high temperatures the wear is low. It is an excellent friction brake material.

  9. Thermal diffusivity of in-situ exfoliated graphite intercalated compound/polyamide and graphite/polyamide composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. Kim

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The thermal diffusivity of graphite intercalated compound (GIC/polyamides (PA6, PA66 and PA12 and graphite/polyamides composites were investigated. The polyamides/GIC composites were prepared by an in-situ exfoliation melting process and thermal diffusivity of the composites was measured by a laser flash method. The surface chemistry of the GIC and graphite was investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, the fracture morphology of the composites was observed by field emission scanning electron microscopy. The thermal diffusivity of the in-situ exfoliation processed PA/GIC composites showed a significant improvement over those of PA/expanded graphite intercalated compound composites and PA/graphite composites. We suggest that the larger flake size and high expansion ratio of the GIC during the in-situ exfoliation process leads to 3-dimensional conductive pathways and high thermal diffusivity. Thermal diffusivity of the polyamides/GIC (20 vol% composites was increased approximately 18 times compared to that of pure polyamides.

  10. Directed self-assembled crystalline oligomer domains on graphene and graphite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balzer, Frank; Henrichsen, Henrik Hartmann; Klarskov, Mikkel Buster

    2014-01-01

    We observe the formation of thin films of fibre-like aggregates from the prototypical organic semiconductor molecule para-hexaphenylene (p-6P) on graphite thin flakes and on monolayer graphene. Using atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, polarized fluorescence...... microscopy, and bireflectance microscopy, the molecular orientations on the surface are deduced and correlated to both the morphology as well as to the high-symmetry directions of the graphitic surface: the molecules align with their long axis at ±11° with respect to a high-symmetry direction. The results...

  11. Analysis of Graphite Morphology of Gray Cast Iron in Pulse Magnetic Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Qiu-shu; LIU Li-qiang; ZHAI Qi-jie

    2005-01-01

    By self-made pulse electrical source and strong magnetic field solidification tester,the effect of strong pulse magnetic field on graphite morphology and solidification structure of gray cast iron was studied.The results show that the structure is remarkably refined after treated by pulse magnetic field,and the width of graphite flakes is decreased while the length is increased after a slight decrease.The solidification temperature and eutectic temperature are increased and the undercooling degree of eutectic transformation is decreased by magnetic field.

  12. Influence of electromagnetic field parameters on the morphology of graphite in grey cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Szajnar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available One way to improve the unification of the casting structure may be the application of forced convection of liquid metal during thecrystallization in the form or continuous casting mould. This paper presents the results describing the influence of selected parameters of rotating electromagnetic field enforcing the movement of liquid metal in the form on the morphology of graphite in grey cast iron. The results were fragmented graphite flakes in conditions of regulating the rate of cooling in the range of temperature TZAL

  13. Electrode Surface Composition of Dual-Intercalation, All-Graphite Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Dyatkin

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Dual-intercalation batteries implement graphite electrodes as both cathodes and anodes and offer high specific energy, inexpensive and environmentally sustainable materials, and high operating voltages. Our research investigated the influence of surface composition on capacities and cycling efficiencies of chemically functionalized all-graphite battery electrodes. We subjected coreshell spherical particles and synthetic graphite flakes to high-temperature air oxidation, and hydrogenation to introduce, respectively, –OH, and –H surface functional groups. We identified noticeable influences of electrode surface chemistry on first-cycle efficiencies and charge storage densities of anion and cation intercalation into graphite electrodes. We matched oxidized cathodes and hydrogenated anodes in dual-ion batteries and improved their overall performance. Our approach provides novel fundamental insight into the anion intercalation process and suggests inexpensive and environmentally sustainable methods to improve performance of these grid-scale energy storage systems

  14. Influence of graphite particle size and its shape on performance of carbon composite bipolar plate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Bipolar plates for proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) where polymer is used as binder and graphite is used as electric filler were prepared by means of compression molding technology. Study on the effects of graphite particle size and shape on the bipolar plate performance, such as electrical conductivity, strength, etc. showed that with decrease of graphite particle size, bulk electrical conductivity and thermometric conductivity decreased, but that flexural strength was enhanced. After spherical graphite occurrence in flake-like form, the flexural strength of the bipolar plate was enhanced, electrical conductivity increased but thermal conductivity decreased in direction paralleling pressure direction, and both electrical conductivity and thermometric conductivity reduced in direction perpendicular to pressure direction.

  15. Tungsten(VI) Oxide Flake-Wall Film Electrodes for Photoelectrochemical Oxygen Evolution from Water

    OpenAIRE

    Amano, Fumiaki; Li, Ding; Ohtani, Bunsho

    2010-01-01

    A vertically arrayed flake film, "flake-wall film", of monoclinic tungsten(VI) oxide (WO3) was prepared on a transparent conductive glass. The WO3 flake-wall film exhibited superior performance for photoelectrochemical water oxidation under visible-light irradiation compared to that of a film consisting of horizontally laminated WO3 flakes. The small difference between photocurrent densities under front-side irradiation and back-side irradiation indicates the excellent electron transport prop...

  16. The performance of FLake in the Met Office Unified Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Gerard Rooney

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We present results from the coupling of FLake to the Met Office Unified Model (MetUM. The coupling and initialisation are first described, and the results of testing the coupled model in local and global model configurations are presented. These show that FLake has a small statistical impact on screen temperature, but has the potential to modify the weather in the vicinity of areas of significant inland water. Examination of FLake lake ice has revealed that the behaviour of lakes in the coupled model is unrealistic in some areas of significant sub-grid orography. Tests of various modifications to ameliorate this behaviour are presented. The results indicate which of the possible model changes best improve the annual cycle of lake ice. As FLake has been developed and tuned entirely outside the Unified Model system, these results can be interpreted as a useful objective measure of the performance of the Unified Model in terms of its near-surface characteristics.

  17. A graphite nanoeraser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Ze; Bøggild, Peter; Yang, Jia-rui;

    2011-01-01

    We present here a method for cleaning intermediate-size (up to 50 nm) contamination from highly oriented pyrolytic graphite and graphene. Electron-beam-induced deposition of carbonaceous material on graphene and graphite surfaces inside a scanning electron microscope, which is difficult to remove...... by conventional techniques, can be removed by direct mechanical wiping using a graphite nanoeraser, thus drastically reducing the amount of contamination. We discuss potential applications of this cleaning procedure....

  18. Graphitic Carbons and Biosignatures

    OpenAIRE

    Bernard, S.; Papineau, D

    2014-01-01

    The unambiguous identification of graphitic carbons as remains of life in ancient rocks is challenging because fossilized biogenic molecules are inevitably altered and degraded during diagenesis and metamorphism of the host rocks. Yet, recent studies have highlighted the possible preservation of biosignatures carried by some of the oldest graphitic carbons. Laboratory simulations are increasingly being used to better constrain the transformations of organic molecules into graphitic carbons in...

  19. Oxidation Resistant Graphite Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. Windes; R. Smith

    2014-07-01

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Graphite Research and Development Program is investigating doped nuclear graphite grades exhibiting oxidation resistance. During a oxygen ingress accident the oxidation rates of the high temperature graphite core region would be extremely high resulting in significant structural damage to the core. Reducing the oxidation rate of the graphite core material would reduce the structural effects and keep the core integrity intact during any air-ingress accident. Oxidation testing of graphite doped with oxidation resistant material is being conducted to determine the extent of oxidation rate reduction. Nuclear grade graphite doped with varying levels of Boron-Carbide (B4C) was oxidized in air at nominal 740°C at 10/90% (air/He) and 100% air. The oxidation rates of the boronated and unboronated graphite grade were compared. With increasing boron-carbide content (up to 6 vol%) the oxidation rate was observed to have a 20 fold reduction from unboronated graphite. Visual inspection and uniformity of oxidation across the surface of the specimens were conducted. Future work to determine the remaining mechanical strength as well as graphite grades with SiC doped material are discussed.

  20. A natural topological insulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehring, P; Benia, H M; Weng, Y; Dinnebier, R; Ast, C R; Burghard, M; Kern, K

    2013-03-13

    The earth's crust and outer space are rich sources of technologically relevant materials which have found application in a wide range of fields. Well-established examples are diamond, one of the hardest known materials, or graphite as a suitable precursor of graphene. The ongoing drive to discover novel materials useful for (opto)electronic applications has recently drawn strong attention to topological insulators. Here, we report that Kawazulite, a mineral with the approximate composition Bi2(Te,Se)2(Se,S), represents a naturally occurring topological insulator whose electronic properties compete well with those of its synthetic counterparts. Kawazulite flakes with a thickness of a few tens of nanometers were prepared by mechanical exfoliation. They exhibit a low intrinsic bulk doping level and correspondingly a sizable mobility of surface state carriers of more than 1000 cm(2)/(V s) at low temperature. Based on these findings, further minerals which due to their minimized defect densities display even better electronic characteristics may be identified in the future.

  1. Feasibility of intercalated graphite railgun armatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaier, James R.; Gooden, Clarence E.; Yashan, Doreen; Naud, Steven

    1990-01-01

    Graphite intercalation compounds may provide an excellent material for the fabrication of electro-magnetic railgun armatures. As a pulse of power is fed into the armature the intercalate could be excited into the plasma state around the edges of the armature, while the bulk of the current would be carried through the graphite block. Such an armature would have the desirable characteristics of both diffuse plasma armatures and bulk conduction armatures. In addition, the highly anisotropic nature of these materials could enable the electrical and thermal conductivity to be tailored to meet the specific requirements of electromagnetic railgun armatures. Preliminary investigations were performed in an attempt to determine the feasibility of using graphite intercalation compounds as railgun armatures. Issues of fabrication, resistivity, stability, and electrical current spreading are addressed for the case of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite.

  2. Magnesium alloy-graphite composites with tailored heat conduction properties for hydrogen storage applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pohlmann, Carsten; Kalinichenka, Siarhei [Institute for Materials Science, Dresden University of Technology, Helmholtzstr. 7, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Roentzsch, Lars; Hutsch, Thomas [Fraunhofer Institute for Manufacturing Technology and Applied Materials Research, Winterbergstr. 28, 01277 Dresden (Germany); Kieback, Bernd [Institute for Materials Science, Dresden University of Technology, Helmholtzstr. 7, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Fraunhofer Institute for Manufacturing Technology and Applied Materials Research, Winterbergstr. 28, 01277 Dresden (Germany)

    2010-12-15

    Melt-spun magnesium alloys that contain catalytically active constituents have become attractive hydrogen storage materials due to their ultra-fine and homogeneous microstructure and their excellent (de-)hydrogenation characteristics. However, their heat conduction properties have to be improved for practical applications. For this purpose, composites of melt-spun magnesium alloys and expanded natural graphite (ENG) were examined in this work. Melt-spun flakes were mixed with different amounts of up to 25.5 wt.% ENG. These mixtures were compacted to cylindrical pellets using compaction pressures up to 600 MPa. For comparison, pellets of pure magnesium hydride and ENG were equally processed. All sets of specimens were investigated regarding their thermal conductivities in radial and axial direction, their microstructure and phase fractions. It was found that the heat transfer characteristics can be tailored in a wide range, e.g. the thermal conductivity of magnesium alloy-ENG compacts were tuned from 1 up to 47 W m{sup -1} K{sup -1}. For the system MgH{sub 2}-ENG, the thermal conductivity can be adjusted from 1 up to 43 W m{sup -1} K{sup -1}. Therefore, a hydrogen storage material with homogeneous heat transfer properties can be anticipated which only slightly depend on the hydrogenated fraction. (author)

  3. Primary structural dynamics in graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, Sascha; Liang Wenxi; Zewail, Ahmed H, E-mail: zewail@caltech.edu [Physical Biology Center for Ultrafast Science and Technology, Arthur Amos Noyes Laboratory of Chemical Physics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2011-06-15

    The structural dynamics of graphite and graphene are unique, because of the selective coupling between electron and lattice motions and hence the limit on electric and electro-optic properties. Here, we report on the femtosecond probing of graphite films (1-3 nm) using ultrafast electron crystallography in the transmission mode. Two time scales are observed for the dynamics: a 700 fs initial decrease in diffraction intensity due to lattice phonons in optically dark regions of the Brillouin zone, followed by a 12 ps decrease due to phonon thermalization near the {Gamma} and K regions. These results indicate the non-equilibrium distortion of the unit cells at early time and the subsequent role of long-wavelength atomic motions in the thermalization process. Theory and experiment are now in agreement regarding the nature of nuclear motions, but the results suggest that potential change plays a role in the lateral dynamics of the lattice.

  4. Synthesis of soluble graphite and graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, K F; Billups, W E

    2013-01-15

    Because of graphene's anticipated applications in electronics and its thermal, mechanical, and optical properties, many scientists and engineers are interested in this material. Graphene is an isolated layer of the π-stacked hexagonal allotrope of carbon known as graphite. The interlayer cohesive energy of graphite, or exfoliation energy, that results from van der Waals attractions over the interlayer spacing distance of 3.34 Å (61 meV/C atom) is many times weaker than the intralayer covalent bonding. Since graphene itself does not occur naturally, scientists and engineers are still learning how to isolate and manipulate individual layers of graphene. Some researchers have relied on the physical separation of the sheets, a process that can sometimes be as simple as peeling of sheets from crystalline graphite using Scotch tape. Other researchers have taken an ensemble approach, where they exploit the chemical conversion of graphite to the individual layers. The typical intermediary state is graphite oxide, which is often produced using strong oxidants under acidic conditions. Structurally, researchers hypothesize that acidic functional groups functionalize the oxidized material at the edges and a network of epoxy groups cover the sp(2)-bonded carbon network. The exfoliated material formed under these conditions can be used to form dispersions that are usually unstable. However, more importantly, irreversible defects form in the basal plane during oxidation and remain even after reduction of graphite oxide back to graphene-like material. As part of our interest in the dissolution of carbon nanomaterials, we have explored the derivatization of graphite following the same procedures that preserve the sp(2) bonding and the associated unique physical and electronic properties in the chemical processing of single-walled carbon nanotubes. In this Account, we describe efficient routes to exfoliate graphite either into graphitic nanoparticles or into graphene without

  5. Method for producing dustless graphite spheres from waste graphite fines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappano, Peter J [Oak Ridge, TN; Rogers, Michael R [Clinton, TN

    2012-05-08

    A method for producing graphite spheres from graphite fines by charging a quantity of spherical media into a rotatable cylindrical overcoater, charging a quantity of graphite fines into the overcoater thereby forming a first mixture of spherical media and graphite fines, rotating the overcoater at a speed such that the first mixture climbs the wall of the overcoater before rolling back down to the bottom thereby forming a second mixture of spherical media, graphite fines, and graphite spheres, removing the second mixture from the overcoater, sieving the second mixture to separate graphite spheres, charging the first mixture back into the overcoater, charging an additional quantity of graphite fines into the overcoater, adjusting processing parameters like overcoater dimensions, graphite fines charge, overcoater rotation speed, overcoater angle of rotation, and overcoater time of rotation, before repeating the steps until graphite fines are converted to graphite spheres.

  6. Terahertz generation from graphite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramakrishnan, G.; Chakkittakandy, R.; Planken, P.C.M.

    2009-01-01

    Generation of subpicosecond terahertz pulses is observed when graphite surfaces are illuminated with femtosecond near-infrared laser pulses. The nonlinear optical generation of THz pulses from graphite is unexpected since, in principle, the material possesses a centre of inversion symmetry.

  7. Study on flaking of wet corn by heating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Mingming; WANG Defu

    2007-01-01

    Flaking on high-moisture corn (wet corn) by hot-air heating was studied in the paper. The wet-heating approach was beneficial to improve corn gelatinization by experimental results. By the experiments, a set of optimal parameters was obtained: hot-air temperature 120-130 ℃, heating duration 70 min, gap between rollers 0.5-1.0 mm, 150-200 r·min-1 for rotational speed of rollers.

  8. Flake tools stratified below paleo-Indian artifacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reagan, M J; Rowlett, R M; Garrison, E G; Dort, W; Bryant, V M; Johannsen, C J

    1978-06-16

    In northwest Missouri, Lithic stage flake tools struck from prepared cores have been excavated underlying a Paleo-Indian fluted point assemblage. These assemblages were in two different loesses of the last glaciation. Thermoluminescent analysis of stone tools dates the Paleo-Indian occupations at 8690 +/- 1000 B.C. and 12,855 +/- 1500 B.C.; the Lithic stage occupations must be older than 13,000 B.C. on the basis of geologic correlation, lithic analysis, and cultural stratigraphy.

  9. Photon-assisted transport in bilayer graphene flakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambrano, D.; Rosales, L.; Latgé, A.; Pacheco, M.; Orellana, P. A.

    2017-01-01

    The electronic conductance of graphene-based bilayer flake systems reveals different quantum interference effects, such as Fabry-Pérot resonances and sharp Fano antiresonances on account of competing electronic paths through the device. These properties may be exploited to obtain spin-polarized currents when the same nanostructure is deposited above a ferromagnetic insulator. Here, we study how the spin-dependent conductance is affected when a time-dependent gate potential is applied to the bilayer flake. Following a Tien-Gordon formalism, we explore how to modulate the transport properties of such systems via appropriate choices of the ac-field gate parameters. The presence of an oscillating field opens the possibility of tuning the original antiresonances for a large set of field parameters. We show that interference patterns can be partially or fully removed by the time-dependent gate voltage. The results are reflected in the corresponding weighted spin polarization, which can reach maximum values for a given spin component. We found that differential conductance maps as functions of bias and gate potentials show interference patterns for different ac-field parameter configurations. The proposed bilayer graphene flake systems may be used as a frequency detector in the THz range.

  10. Supercurrent reversal in Josephson junctions based on bilayer graphene flakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rameshti, Babak Zare; Zareyan, Malek; Moghaddam, Ali G.

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the Josephson effect in a bilayer graphene flake contacted by two monolayer sheets deposited by superconducting electrodes. It is found that when the electrodes are attached to the different layers of the bilayer, the Josephson current is in a π state, if the bilayer region is undoped and there is no vertical bias. Applying doping or bias to the junction reveals π -0 transitions which can be controlled by varying the temperature and the junction length. The supercurrent reversal here is very different from the ferromagnetic Josephson junctions where the spin degree of freedom plays the key role. We argue that the scattering processes accompanied by layer and sublattice index change give rise to the scattering phases, the effect of which varies with doping and bias. Such scattering phases are responsible for the π -0 transitions. On the other hand, if both of the electrodes are coupled to the same layer of the flake or the flake has AA stacking instead of common AB, the junction will be always in 0 state since the layer or sublattice index is not changed.

  11. Asymptomatic Intracorneal Graphite Deposits following Graphite Pencil Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Swetha Sara Philip; Deepa John; Sheeja Susan John

    2012-01-01

    Reports of graphite pencil lead injuries to the eye are rare. Although graphite is considered to remain inert in the eye, it has been known to cause severe inflammation and damage to ocular structures. We report a case of a 12-year-old girl with intracorneal graphite foreign bodies following a graphite pencil injury.

  12. Powder, paper and foam of few-layer graphene prepared in high yield by electrochemical intercalation exfoliation of expanded graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Liqiong; Li, Weiwei; Li, Peng; Liao, Shutian; Qiu, Shengqiang; Chen, Mingliang; Guo, Yufen; Li, Qi; Zhu, Chao; Liu, Liwei

    2014-04-09

    A facile and high-yield approach to the preparation of few-layer graphene (FLG) by electrochemical intercalation exfoliation (EIE) of expanded graphite in sulfuric acid electrolyte is reported. Stage-1 H2SO4-graphite intercalation compound is used as a key intermediate in EIE to realize the efficient exfoliation. The yield of the FLG sheets (graphene structures. Flexible and freestanding graphene papers made of the FLG flakes retain excellent conductivity (≈24,500 S m(-1)). Three-dimensional (3D) graphene foams with light weight are fabricated from the FLG flakes by the use of Ni foams as self-sacrifice templates. Furthermore, 3D graphene/Ni foams without any binders, which are used as supercapacitor electrodes in aqueous electrolyte, provide the specific capacitance of 113.2 F g(-1) at a current density of 0.5 A g(-1), retaining 90% capacitance after 1000 cycles.

  13. First-principles determination of the Raman fingerprint of rhombohedral graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torche, Abderrezak; Mauri, Francesco; Charlier, Jean-Christophe; Calandra, Matteo

    2017-09-01

    Multilayer graphene with rhombohedral stacking is a promising carbon phase possibly displaying correlated states like magnetism or superconductivity due to the occurrence of a flat surface band at the Fermi level. Recently, flakes of thickness up to 17 layers were tentatively attributed to ABC sequences although the Raman fingerprint of rhombohedral multilayer graphene is currently unknown and the 2D resonant Raman spectrum of Bernal graphite is not understood. We provide a first principles description of the 2D Raman peak in three and four layers graphene (all stackings) as well as in Bernal, rhombohedral, and an alternation of Bernal and rhombohedral graphite. We give practical prescriptions to identify long range sequences of ABC multilayer graphene. Our work is a prerequisite to experimental nondestructive identification and synthesis of rhombohedral graphite.

  14. Ground and low-lying excited electronic states of graphene flakes: a density functional theory study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tachikawa, Hiroto; Kawabata, Hiroshi, E-mail: hiroto@eng.hokudai.ac.jp [Division of Materials Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan)

    2011-10-28

    Structures and electronic states of graphene flakes (finite and small sized graphenes) have been investigated by means of the density functional theory method. Sizes of graphene flakes examined in this study were n = 7, 10, 14, 19, 29 and 44, where n is the number of benzene rings in the graphene flake. The excitation energies of graphene flakes decreased gradually as a function of the number of the ring (n). The orbitals of the highest occupied and lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals (HOMO and LUMO) are localized in the edge region of the graphene flake. It was found that the edge region can react with a water molecule and H{sub 2}O is dissociated into OH radical and hydrogen atom (H) without an activation barrier. A lithium ion can bind strongly to the edge region. The ability of the edge region in the graphene flakes was discussed on the basis of theoretical results.

  15. High-yield production and transfer of graphene flakes obtained by anodic bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldt, Thomas; Eckmann, Axel; Klar, Philipp; Morozov, Sergey V; Zhukov, Alexander A; Novoselov, Kostya S; Casiraghi, Cinzia

    2011-10-25

    We report large-yield production of graphene flakes on glass by anodic bonding. Under optimum conditions, we counted several tens of flakes with lateral size around 20-30 μm and a few tens of flakes with larger size. About 60-70% of the flakes have a negligible D peak. We show that it is possible to easily transfer the flakes by the wedging technique. The transfer on silicon does not damage graphene and lowers the doping. The charge mobility of the transferred flakes on silicon is on the order of 6000 cm(2)/V s (at a carrier concentration of 10(12) cm(-2)), which is typical for devices prepared on this substrate with exfoliated graphene.

  16. Graphite Technology Development Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. Windes; T. Burchell; R. Bratton

    2007-09-01

    This technology development plan is designed to provide a clear understanding of the research and development direction necessary for the qualification of nuclear grade graphite for use within the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) reactor. The NGNP will be a helium gas cooled Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) with a large graphite core. Graphite physically contains the fuel and comprises the majority of the core volume. Considerable effort will be required to ensure that the graphite performance is not compromised during operation. Based upon the perceived requirements the major data needs are outlined and justified from the perspective of reactor design, reatcor performance, or the reactor safety case. The path forward for technology development can then be easily determined for each data need. How the data will be obtained and the inter-relationships between the experimental and modeling activities will define the technology development for graphite R&D. Finally, the variables affecting this R&D program are discussed from a general perspective. Factors that can significantly affect the R&D program such as funding, schedules, available resources, multiple reactor designs, and graphite acquisition are analyzed.

  17. Determination of total selenium content in sediments and natural water by graphite furnace-atomic absorption spectroscopy after collection as a selenium(IV) complex on activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, T; Suzuki, K; Okutani, T

    1995-07-01

    A trace level of Se was collected on activated carbon (AC) as the Se(IV)-3-phenyl-5-mercapto-1,3,4-thiadiazole-2(3H)-thione (Bismuthiol II) complex. The AC was directly introduced as an AC-suspension into the graphite tube atomizer and the Se concentration was determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy (T. Okutani, T. Kubota, N. Sugiyama and Y. Turuta, Nippon Kagaku Kaishi, (1991) 375). The amount of Se in heavily contaminated samples including sediment, lake water and seawater was determined using this method. The sediments were digested with HNO(3)HClO(4)HF and the interference from AlF(3) was removed using H(3)BO(3)HClO(4). Lake water and seawater were acidified with H(2)SO(4) and digested with KMnO(4). The Se concentrations of these samples were determined by this method with satisfactory results. The above method is simple, rapid and applicable to heavily contaminated samples.

  18. Calculation of High Frequency Complex Permeability of Carbonyl Iron Flakes in a Nomagnetic Matrix

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEN Fu-Sheng; QIAO Liang; YI Hai-Bo; ZHOU Dong; LI Fa-Shen

    2008-01-01

    The carbonyl iron flakes are fabricated by high-energy ball milling.The effective permeability is measured and calculated for the composite consisting of flakes embedded in a nonmagnetic matrix.The magnetic flakes with a shape anisotropy and random spatial distribution of normal direction are considered to calculate the complex permeability of magnetic flake materials.Its analytical model is derived from the Landau-Lifshitz- Gilbert equation and Bruggeman's effective medium theory.The calculated results agree well with the experiment.

  19. Radical coupling of maleic anhydride onto graphite to fabricate oxidized graphene nanolayers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fatemeh Samadaei; Mehdi Salami-Kalajahi; Hossein Roghani-Mamaqani

    2016-02-01

    Radical coupling was used to modify graphite with maleic anhydride (MAH). Azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as radical generator activated MAH radically and it was reacted with defects at the surface of nanolayers. A set of batches with different reaction times (24, 48 and 72 h) were performed to obtain fully-modified nanolayers (GMA1, GMA2 and GMA3, respectively). Fourier transform infrared results approved the synthesis of MAHgrafted graphite. Thermogravimetric analysis showed that 5.9, 11.1 and 13.2 wt% of MAH was grafted onto the surface of GMA1, GMA2 and GMA3, respectively, and that was approved by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results. Also, X-ray diffraction patterns showed that $d$-spacing increased from 0.34 nm for graphite to 1.00 nm for all modified samples. However, GMA1 showed a weak peak related to graphite structure that disappeared when reaction time was increased. After modification with MAH, lamella flake structure of graphite was retained whereas the edges of sheets became distinguishable as depicted by scanning electron microscopy images. According to Raman spectra, modification progression resulted in more disorder structure of nanolayers due to grafting of MAH. Also, transmission electron microscopy images showed graphite as transparent layers while after modification, surface of nanolayers became folded due to the opposite effects of $\\pi$-conjugated domains and electrostatic repulsion of oxygen-containing groups.

  20. Magnetostrain-driven quantum engine on a graphene flake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, Francisco J.; Muñoz, Enrique

    2015-05-01

    We propose an alternative conceptual design for a graphene-based quantum engine, driven by a superposition of mechanical strain and an external magnetic field. Engineering of strain in a nanoscale graphene flake creates a gauge field with an associated uniform pseudomagnetic field. The strain-induced pseudomagnetic field can be combined with a real magnetic field, leading to the emergence of discrete relativistic Landau levels within the single-particle picture. The interlevel distance and hence their statistical population can be modulated by quasistatically tuning the magnetic field along a sequence of reversible transformations that constitute a quantum mechanical analog of the classical Otto cycle.

  1. Magneto-strain driven quantum engine on a graphene flake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, E.; Peña, F. J.

    2016-10-01

    A novel proof of principle prototype for a quantum heat engine is proposed, based on the quasi-static tuning of an external magnetic field, in combination with controlled mechanical strain applied to a single graphene flake. The "working fluid" of this engine is composed by a statistical ensemble of Dirac quasiparticles in Landau levels. The cyclic operation of the engine, whose intermediate states are described through a density matrix, is discussed in detail, and its thermodynamic efficiency is calculated in the quasi-static limit.

  2. Preparation on pitch-based carbon coated natural graphite as an anode material for lithium-ion batteries%沥青炭涂覆天然石墨用作锂离子电池负极材料的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王茜; 柯昌美; 崔正威; 从野; 董志军; 袁观明; 李轩科

    2014-01-01

    将改质沥青浆料与球形天然石墨粉末混合,然后在氩气气氛保护下经过不同温度热处理制备沥青炭涂覆天然石墨负极材料。利用X射线衍射(XRD)、电镜扫描(SEM)、偏光显微镜(PLM)及充放电测试等分析测试技术对所制得材料的结构、形貌和电化学性能进行了表征。结果表明,沥青涂覆处理后石墨材料的电化学性能得到显著改善,经950°C热处理的11%的沥青涂覆改性的天然石墨负极材料具有更高的可逆容量和更好的循环性能。%The pitch-based carbon coated spherical natural graphite particles, as an anode material for lithium-ion battery, were prepared by mixing a modified pitch grout with spherical natural graphite particles and subsequent heat-treatment at various temper-atures. The structure and properties of the prepared products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, polarized light microscopy and electrochemical performance tests. The results show that the electrochemical performance of pitch-coated natural graphite is improved significantly. After 950 °C heat-treatment, the spherical natural graphite particles coated by 11%pitch possess much higher reversible capacity and rate property than those of spherical natural graphite.

  3. Characterization of Deposited Platinum Contacts onto Discrete Graphene Flakes for Electrical Devices

    KAUST Repository

    Holguin Lerma, Jorge A.

    2016-05-03

    For years, electron beam induced deposition has been used to fabricate electrical contacts for micro and nanostructures. The role of the contact resistance is key to achieve high performance and efficiency in electrical devices. The present thesis reports on the electrical, structural and chemical characterization of electron beam deposited platinum electrodes that are exposed to different steps of thermal annealing and how they are used in four-probe devices of ultrathin graphite (uG) flakes (<100nm thickness). The device integration of liquid phase exfoliated uG is demonstrated, and its performance compared to devices made with analogous mechanically exfoliated uG. For both devices, similar contact resistances of ~2kΩ were obtained. The electrical measurements confirm a 99.5% reduction in contact resistance after vacuum thermal annealing at 300 °C. Parallel to this, Raman characterization confirms the formation of a nanocrystalline carbon structure over the electrode. While this could suggest an enhancement of the electrical transport in the device, an additional thermal annealing step in air at 300 °C, promoted the oxidation and removal of the carbon shell and confirmed that the contact resistance remained the same. Overall this shows that the carbon shell along the electrode has no significant role in the contact resistance. Finally, the challenges based on topographical analysis of the deposited electrodes are discussed. Reduction of the electrode’s height down to one-third of the initial value, increased surface roughness, formation of voids along the electrodes and the onset of platinum nanoparticles near the area of deposition, represent a challenge for future work.

  4. Effect of ZnO loading technique on textural characteristic and methyl blue removal capacity of exfoliated graphite/ZnO composites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Xueqing Yue; Wenyan Duan; Yan Lu; Fucheng Zhang; Ruijun Zhang

    2011-12-01

    Two exfoliated graphite/ZnO composites, marked as EG/ZnO-1 and EG/ZnO-2, were prepared by heating a mixture of expandable graphite and Zn(OH)2 or a mixture of expanded graphite (EG) and Zn(OH)2, respectively. The composites were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and nitrogen adsorption. Under UV irradiation, the composites were used for removing methyl blue (MB) from aqueous solution. For the composites made from expandable graphite (EG/ZnO-1), the micronsized ZnO particle agglomerates (1–20 m) heterogeneously distributed at the surface of graphite flakes, while for the composites made from EG (EG/ZnO-2), the submicron-sized ZnO particle masses (0.2–0.5 m) almost homogeneously located both at the surface and interior of graphite flakes. In the presence of UV irradiation, the composites had the adsorption capacity of EG and the photocatalysis capacity of ZnO at the same time. Compared with EG/ZnO-1, EG/ZnO-2 was more effective in removing MB. After 2 h of UV irradiation, MB could be completely removed by using the EG/ZnO-2 containing 45% ZnO, and the decomposition efficiency of the ZnO was the primary cause for the removal of MB.

  5. Antibacterial Activity of Neat Chitosan Powder and Flakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardila, Nury; Daigle, France; Heuzey, Marie-Claude; Ajji, Abdellah

    2017-01-06

    This study investigates the antibacterial activity of neat chitosan powder and flakes against three different bacterial species, Escherichia coli, Listeria innocua and Staphylococcus aureus, which are frequent causes of food spoilage. The effect of chitosan concentration and purity, as well as the influence of temperature, ionic strength (salt) and impact of a solid physical support in the medium are examined. Results show that the antibacterial activity of neat chitosan: (i) requires partial solubilisation; (ii) can be promoted by environmental factors such as adequate temperature range, ionic strength and the presence of a solid physical support that may facilitate the attachment of bacteria; (iii) depends on bacterial species, with a sensitivity order of E. coli > L. innocua > S. aureus; and (iv) increases with chitosan concentration, up to a critical point above which this effect decreases. The latter may be due to remaining proteins in chitosan acting as nutrients for bacteria therefore limiting its antibacterial activity. These results on the direct use of chitosan powder and flakes as potential antimicrobial agents for food protection at pH values lower than the chitosan pKa (6.2-6.7) are promising.

  6. Sorption isotherms for oat flakes (Avena sativa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Edgar Zapata M.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Moisture sorption isotherms of oat flakes were determined at temperatures of 5, 25 and 37°C, using a gravimetric technique in an a w range of between 0.107 and 0.855. These curves were modeled using six equations commonly applied in food. The quality of the fit was assessed with the regression coefficient (r² and the mean relative percentage error (MRPE. The best fit were obtained with the Caurie model with r² of 0.996, 0.901 and 0.870, and MRPE of 7.190, 17.878 and 16.206, at 5, 25 and 37°C, respectively. The equilibrium moisture presented a dependence on temperature in the studied a w range, as did the security moisture (X S. These results suggest that the recommended storage conditions of oat flakes include: a relative air humidity of 50% between 5 and 25°C and of 38% up to 37°C.

  7. 40 CFR 417.60 - Applicability; description of the manufacture of soap flakes and powders subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... manufacture of soap flakes and powders subcategory. 417.60 Section 417.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS SOAP AND DETERGENT MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Manufacture of Soap Flakes and Powders Subcategory § 417.60...

  8. Inclusion of various amounts of steam-flaked soybeans in lactating dairy cattle diets

    Science.gov (United States)

    While most soybean feedstuffs have been extensively investigated for use in ruminant diets, there is a lack of information regarding steam-flaked soybeans. This research evaluated various inclusion rates of steam-flaked soybeans (SFSB) in lactating dairy cattle diets. Twelve multiparous Holstein cow...

  9. Flake Orientation Effects On Physical and Mechanical Properties of Sweetgum Flakeboard

    Science.gov (United States)

    T.F. Shupe; Chung-Yun Hse; E.W. Price

    2001-01-01

    Research was initiated to determine the effect of flake orientation on the physical and mechanical properties offlakeboard. The panel fabrication techniques investigated were single-layer panels with random and oriented flake distribution, three-layer, five-layer, and seven-layer panels. Single-layer oriented panels had panel directional property ratios of 11.8 and 12....

  10. Electronic structure of triangular, hexagonal and round graphene flakes near the Fermi level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiskanen, H. P.; Manninen, M.; Akola, J.

    2008-10-01

    The electronic shell structure of triangular, hexagonal and round graphene quantum dots (flakes) near the Fermi level has been studied using a tight-binding method. The results show that close to the Fermi level the shell structure of a triangular flake is that of free massless particles, and that triangles with an armchair edge show an additional sequence of levels ('ghost states'). These levels result from the graphene band structure and the plane wave solution of the wave equation, and they are absent for triangles with a zigzag edge. All zigzag triangles exhibit a prominent edge state at epsilonF, and few low-energy conduction electron states occur both in triangular and hexagonal flakes due to symmetry reasons. Armchair triangles can be used as building blocks for other types of flakes that support the ghost states. Edge roughness has only a small effect on the level structure of the triangular flakes, but the effect is considerably enhanced in the other types of flakes. In round flakes, the states near the Fermi level depend strongly on the flake radius, and they are always localized on the zigzag parts of the edge.

  11. Atomically Thin Mica Flakes and Their Application as Ultrathin Insulating Substrates for Graphene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castellanos-Gomez, Andres; Wojtaszek, Magdalena; Tombros, Nikolaos; Agrait, Nicolas; van Wees, Bart J.; Rubio-Bollinger, Gabino; Agraït, Nicolás

    2011-01-01

    By mechanical exfoliation, it is possible to deposit atomically thin mica flakes down to single-monolayer thickness on SiO(2)/Si wafers. The optical contrast of these mica flakes on top of a SiO(2)/Si substrate depends on their thickness, the illumination wavelength, and the SiO(2) substrate thickne

  12. Electronic structure of triangular, hexagonal and round graphene flakes near the Fermi level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiskanen, H P; Manninen, M; Akola, J [Nanoscience Center, Department of Physics, PO Box 35, FI-40014 University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland)], E-mail: matti.manninen@jyu.fi

    2008-10-15

    The electronic shell structure of triangular, hexagonal and round graphene quantum dots (flakes) near the Fermi level has been studied using a tight-binding method. The results show that close to the Fermi level the shell structure of a triangular flake is that of free massless particles, and that triangles with an armchair edge show an additional sequence of levels ('ghost states'). These levels result from the graphene band structure and the plane wave solution of the wave equation, and they are absent for triangles with a zigzag edge. All zigzag triangles exhibit a prominent edge state at {epsilon}{sub F}, and few low-energy conduction electron states occur both in triangular and hexagonal flakes due to symmetry reasons. Armchair triangles can be used as building blocks for other types of flakes that support the ghost states. Edge roughness has only a small effect on the level structure of the triangular flakes, but the effect is considerably enhanced in the other types of flakes. In round flakes, the states near the Fermi level depend strongly on the flake radius, and they are always localized on the zigzag parts of the edge.

  13. Fabrication and electromagnetic properties of flake ferrite particles based on diatomite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Deyuan [Bionic and Micro/Nano/Bio Manufacturing Technology Research Center, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Zhang Wenqiang, E-mail: zwqzwqzwqzwq@126.com [Bionic and Micro/Nano/Bio Manufacturing Technology Research Center, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Cai Jun, E-mail: jun_cai@buaa.edu.cn [Bionic and Micro/Nano/Bio Manufacturing Technology Research Center, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2011-09-15

    Hexagonal ferrite BaZn{sub 1.1}Co{sub 0.9}Fe{sub 16}O{sub 27} coated surfaces of diatomite flakes of low density were synthesized by a sol-gel method. The phase structures, morphologies, particle size and chemical compositions of the composites were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The results show that hexagonal ferrite coated diatomite flakes can be achieved, and that the coating consisted of BaZn{sub 1.1}Co{sub 0.9}Fe{sub 16}O{sub 27} nanoparticles. The vibranting sample magnetometer results reveal that the flake ferrite particles have static magnetic properties. The complex permeability and permittivity of the composites were measured in the frequency range of 1-18 GHz. The microwave absorption properties of these ferrite particles are discussed. The results indicate that the flake ferrites have the potential to be used as a lightweight broad band microwave absorber. - Highlights: > We synthesize the flake ferrite particles using diatomite as a template. > Flake ferrite particles' coating layers are constituted by BaZn{sub 1.1}Co{sub 0.9}Fe{sub 16}O{sub 27} nanoparticles. > Flake ferrite particles have good static magnetic properties. > Flake ferrites are a kind lightweight broad band microwave absorber.

  14. Cesium diffusion in graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, R.B. III; Davis, W. Jr.; Sutton, A.L. Jr.

    1980-05-01

    Experiments on diffusion of /sup 137/Cs in five types of graphite were performed. The document provides a completion of the report that was started and includes a presentation of all of the diffusion data, previously unpublished. Except for data on mass transfer of /sup 137/Cs in the Hawker-Siddeley graphite, analyses of experimental results were initiated but not completed. The mass transfer process of cesium in HS-1-1 graphite at 600 to 1000/sup 0/C in a helium atmosphere is essentially pure diffusion wherein values of (E/epsilon) and ..delta..E of the equation D/epsilon = (D/epsilon)/sub 0/ exp (-..delta..E/RT) are about 4 x 10/sup -2/ cm/sup 2//s and 30 kcal/mole, respectively.

  15. Irradiation Creep in Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ubic, Rick; Butt, Darryl; Windes, William

    2014-03-13

    An understanding of the underlying mechanisms of irradiation creep in graphite material is required to correctly interpret experimental data, explain micromechanical modeling results, and predict whole-core behavior. This project will focus on experimental microscopic data to demonstrate the mechanism of irradiation creep. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy should be able to image both the dislocations in graphite and the irradiation-induced interstitial clusters that pin those dislocations. The team will first prepare and characterize nanoscale samples of virgin nuclear graphite in a transmission electron microscope. Additional samples will be irradiated to varying degrees at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) facility and similarly characterized. Researchers will record microstructures and crystal defects and suggest a mechanism for irradiation creep based on the results. In addition, the purchase of a tensile holder for a transmission electron microscope will allow, for the first time, in situ observation of creep behavior on the microstructure and crystallographic defects.

  16. Lithium-Graphite Secondary Battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-12-01

    Used in the experiment that studied the effect of operating current. 6. Li/LiClO 4, PC (0.9M)/Graphite + Graphite glue on carbon cloth. 7. Li/ LiBF4 ...DMSU (1.0M)/Graphite + Graphite glue on carbon cloth. 8. Li/ LiBF4 , PC (1.5M)/Graphite + Graphite glue on carbon cloth. 9. Li/LiClO4, DMSU (2.1M)/Pt. 10... LiBF4 , PC(1.5 M)/Graphite + Graphite glue on carbon cloth. Cycles 1 and 2 51 24. Same as 23. Cycle no. 3, 1-6.3 mA, Q n=2.17 mEq 52 25. Typical

  17. Alloying of steel and graphite by hydrogen in nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasikov, E.

    2017-02-01

    In traditional power engineering hydrogen may be one of the first primary source of equipment damage. This problem has high actuality for both nuclear and thermonuclear power engineering. Study of radiation-hydrogen embrittlement of the steel raises the question concerning the unknown source of hydrogen in reactors. Later unexpectedly high hydrogen concentrations were detected in irradiated graphite. It is necessary to look for this source of hydrogen especially because hydrogen flakes were detected in reactor vessels of Belgian NPPs. As a possible initial hypothesis about the enigmatical source of hydrogen one can propose protons generation during beta-decay of free neutrons поскольку inasmuch as protons detected by researches at nuclear reactors as witness of beta-decay of free neutrons.

  18. Research on metal-plated cellulose nitrate flakes and their infrared / millimeter wave characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Shu-qin; Zhu, Chen-guang; Wang, Li-hong; Ou'yang, De-hua; Pan, Gong-pei

    2016-10-01

    Copper-plated and silver-plated cellulose nitrate flakes, which were prepared by using chemical plating technology, were used to jam infrared detector and millimeter-wave radar. It was tested for the conductivity and infrared jamming performance of plating and also the RCS (Radar Cross Section) performance of millimeter-wave radar. Test results showed that the prepared metal-plated cellulose nitrate flakes have obvious conductivity, and infrared total radiation energy of silver plating and copper plating had approximately increased 32% and 21% respectively. Through determination, the millimeter-wave reflecting property and RCS of silver-plated cellulose nitrate flakes were higher than that of copper-plated cellulose nitrate flakes. Therefore, silver-plated cellulose nitrate flakes can be used as an effective infrared / millimeter wave composite jamming material.

  19. Presence and growth of Bacillus cereus in dehydrated potato flakes and hot-held, ready-to-eat potato products purchased in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Nicola J; Whyte, Rosemary; Hudson, J Andrew; Kaltovei, Susan L

    2006-05-01

    Potato products prepared from dehydrated potato flakes have been implicated in foodborne illness incidents involving Bacillus cereus intoxications. B. cereus can survive as spores in potato flakes and can germinate and multiply in the rehydrated product. This study assessed the frequency and concentration of B. cereus in dehydrated potato flakes and hot-held, ready-to-eat mashed potato products. Of 50 packets of potato flakes tested, eight contained greater than 100 CFU/g B. cereus (maximum 370 CFU/g). The temperature of the potato portion of 44 hot-held food products was measured immediately after purchase, and 86% were below the safe hot-holding temperature of 60 degrees C. The potato portions were subsequently tested for B. cereus. Only two of the potato portions contained B. cereus at greater than 100 CFU/g, a potato-topped pastry (1000 CFU/g) and a container of potato and gravy (120 CFU/g). To assess multiplication of B. cereus in this food, we held rehydrated potato flakes with naturally occurring B. cereus at 37, 42, and 50 degrees C and tested them over 6 h. By 6 h, the number of B. cereus in potato stored at 37 degrees C had exceeded 10(3) CFU/g, was greater than 10(4) CFU/g at 50 degrees C, and was close to 10(6) CFU/g at 42 degrees C. Growth data were compared to predictions from the U.S. Department of Agriculture Pathogen Modeling Program (PMP 7.0). The PMP predictions were found to simulate the measured growth better at 42 degrees C than at 37 degrees C. Hot-held potato products should be safe for consumption if held at 60 degrees C or above or discarded within 2 h.

  20. Tribological behaviour of graphite powders at nano- and macroscopic scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, M.; Bistac, S.; Jradi, K.

    2007-04-01

    With its high resistance, good hardness and electrical conductibility in the basal plans, graphite is used for many years in various tribological fields such as seals, bearings or electrical motor brushes, and also for applications needing excellent lubrication and wearreducing properties. But thanks to its low density, graphite is at the moment destined for technologies which need a reducing of the weight combined with an enhancement of the efficiency, as it is the case in aeronautical industry. In this contexte, the friction and wear of natural (named graphite A) and synthetic (called graphites B and C) powders were evaluated, first at the macroscopic scale when sliding against steel counterfaces, under various applied normal loads. Scanning Electron Microscopy and AFM in tapping mode were used to observe the morphological modifications of the graphites. It is noticed that an enlargement of the applied normal load leads to an increase of the friction coefficient for graphites A and C; but for the graphite B, it seems that a ''limit'' load can induce a complete change of the tribological behaviour. At the same time, the nano-friction properties of these powders were evaluated by AFM measurements in contact mode, at different contact loads. As it was the case at the macroscopic scale, an increase of the nano-contact load induces higher friction coefficients. The determining of the friction and wear mechanisms of the graphite powders, as a function of both their intrinsic characteristics and the applied normal load, is then possible.

  1. The ablation of graphitic materials in the sublimation regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundell, J. H.; Dickey, R. R.

    1972-01-01

    A large variety of graphitic materials have been tested in an arc heated air stream at a surface pressure of 4.3 atm and a nominal surface temperature of 3925 K. Included were commercial and developmental grades of artificial graphites, both two and three dimensional carbon-carbon composites, composites seeded with refractory compounds, and several special materials such as pyrolytic graphite, mesophase graphite, glassy carbon, and natural graphite. ATJ graphite was used as a control material. Except for the seeded materials which had poor performance, the mass loss rate for all the man-made graphitic materials fell within the range of 17 per cent less to 30 per cent more than the rate for ATJ. Thus it is concluded that wide variations in constituents, processing, fabrication and structure have relatively little effect on the ablation performance of graphitic materials, at least under the conditions of the present tests. Particulate mass loss was observed for all the materials tested and is the dominant mechanism for mass removal at the present test conditions. It is suggested that this mechanism results from physical failure, primarily by compressive thermal stress.

  2. Graphite-based photovoltaic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagally, Max; Liu, Feng

    2010-12-28

    The present invention uses lithographically patterned graphite stacks as the basic building elements of an efficient and economical photovoltaic cell. The basic design of the graphite-based photovoltaic cells includes a plurality of spatially separated graphite stacks, each comprising a plurality of vertically stacked, semiconducting graphene sheets (carbon nanoribbons) bridging electrically conductive contacts.

  3. Synthesis of few-layered, high-purity graphene oxide sheets from different graphite sources for biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasim, Dhifaf A.; Lozano, Neus; Kostarelos, Kostas

    2016-03-01

    This work aimed to interrogate the role that the starting graphitic material played on the physicochemical properties of graphene oxide (GO) sheets and their impact on mammalian cell viability following exposure to those flakes. Three different GO thin sheets were synthesised from three starting graphite material: flakes (GO-f), ground (GO-g) and powder (GO-p) using a modified Hummers’ method. The synthetic yield of this methodology was found to differ according to type of starting material, with GO-p resulting in most efficient yields. Structural and morphological comparison of the three GO sheet types were carried out using transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Optical properties were measured using UV/visible and fluorescence spectroscopy. Surface characteristics and chemistry were determined using a battery of techniques. Exposure to human cells was studied using the human A549 lung epithelial cultures. Our results revealed that all three GO samples were composed of few-layer sheets with similar physicochemical and surface characteristics. However, significant differences were observed in terms of their lateral dimensions with GO-p, prepared from graphite powder, being the largest among the GOs. No cytotoxicity was detected for any of the GO samples following exposure onto A549 cells up to 48 h. In conclusion, the form and type of the starting graphite material is shown to be an important factor that can determine the synthetic yield and the structural characteristics of the resulting GO sheets.

  4. Conduction mechanisms in some graphite - polymer composites: the effect of a direct-current electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celzard, A.; McRae, E.; Furdin, G.; Marêché, J. F.

    1997-03-01

    This paper deals with the possible conduction mechanisms in highly anisotropic composites comprising 0 - 10 vol% graphite flakes within a polymer host. Conductivity measurements as a function of DC electric field have been made. In most cases, a non-linear behaviour of the current - voltage relationships is observed. A number of theoretical models are considered and we show that none of them is, by itself, able to explain our results. We further develop several arguments which lead us to consider the existence of a combined tunnelling effect and ionic conduction mechanism.

  5. Dynamics of magnetic nano-flake vortices in Newtonian fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazazzadeh, Nasim; Mohseni, Seyed Majid; Khavasi, Amin; Zibaii, Mohammad Ismail; Movahed, S. M. S.; Jafari, G. R.

    2016-12-01

    We study the rotational motion of nano-flake ferromagnetic disks suspended in a Newtonian fluid, as a potential material owing the vortex-like magnetic configuration. Using analytical expressions for hydrodynamic, magnetic and Brownian torques, the stochastic angular momentum equation is determined in the dilute limit conditions under applied magnetic field. Results are compared against experimental ones and excellent agreement is observed. We also estimate the uncertainty in the orientation of the disks due to the Brownian torque when an external magnetic field aligns them. Interestingly, this uncertainty is roughly proportional to the ratio of thermal energy of fluid to the magnetic energy stored in the disks. Our approach can be implemented in many practical applications including biotechnology and multi-functional fluidics.

  6. Magnetostrain-driven quantum engine on a grapheme flake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Enrique; Pena, Francisco

    The concept of a quantum heat engine (QHE) has been discussed as an alternative to efficiently recover, on a nanoscale device, thermal energy in the form of useful work. In a QHEN the working substance is in a mixed quantum state determined by a density matrix. Interesting examples of this concept are constituted by photosynthesis in plants as well as human-designed photocells. In this work, we propose a graphene-based quantum engine, driven by a superposition of mechanical strain and an external magnetic field. Engineering of strain in a nanoscale graphene flake creates a gauge field with an associated uniform pseudo-magnetic field. The combination leads to the emergence of discrete relativistic Landau levels. The inter-level distance and hence their statistical population can be modulated by quasi-statically tuning the imposed magnetic field along a sequence of reversible transformations that constitute a quantum mechanical analog of the classical Otto cycle. References Financial support from Fondecyt 1141146.

  7. (Irradiation creep of graphite)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, C.R.

    1990-12-21

    The traveler attended the Conference, International Symposium on Carbon, to present an invited paper, Irradiation Creep of Graphite,'' and chair one of the technical sessions. There were many papers of particular interest to ORNL and HTGR technology presented by the Japanese since they do not have a particular technology embargo and are quite open in describing their work and results. In particular, a paper describing the failure of Minor's law to predict the fatigue life of graphite was presented. Although the conference had an international flavor, it was dominated by the Japanese. This was primarily a result of geography; however, the work presented by the Japanese illustrated an internal program that is very comprehensive. This conference, a result of this program, was better than all other carbon conferences attended by the traveler. This conference emphasizes the need for US participation in international conferences in order to stay abreast of the rapidly expanding HTGR and graphite technology throughout the world. The United States is no longer a leader in some emerging technologies. The traveler was surprised by the Japanese position in their HTGR development. Their reactor is licensed and the major problem in their graphite program is how to eliminate it with the least perturbation now that most of the work has been done.

  8. Graphite technology development plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1986-07-01

    This document presents the plan for the graphite technology development required to support the design of the 350 MW(t) Modular HTGR within the US National Gas-Cooled Reactor Program. Besides descriptions of the required technology development, cost estimates, and schedules, the plan also includes the associated design functions and design requirements.

  9. Anisotropy in thermal conductivity of graphite flakes–SiC{sub p}/matrix composites: Implications in heat sinking design for thermal management applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molina, J.M., E-mail: jmmj@ua.es [Instituto Universitario de Materiales de Alicante, Universidad de Alicante, Ap. 99, E-03080 Alicante (Spain); Departamento de Física Aplicada, Universidad de Alicante, Ap. 99, E-03080 Alicante (Spain); Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Universidad de Alicante, Ap. 99, | E-03080 Alicante (Spain); Louis, E. [Instituto Universitario de Materiales de Alicante, Universidad de Alicante, Ap. 99, E-03080 Alicante (Spain); Departamento de Física Aplicada, Universidad de Alicante, Ap. 99, E-03080 Alicante (Spain); Unidad Asociada del Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Universidad de Alicante, Ap. 99, | E-03080 Alicante (Spain)

    2015-11-15

    Within the frame of heat dissipation for electronics, a very interesting family of anisotropic composite materials, fabricated by liquid infiltration of a matrix into preforms of oriented graphite flakes and SiC particles, has been recently proposed. Aiming to investigate the implications of the inherent anisotropy of these composites on their thermal conductivity, and hence on their potential applications, materials with matrices of Al–12 wt.% Si alloy and epoxy polymer have been fabricated. Samples have been cut at a variable angle with respect to the flakes plane and thermal conductivity has been measured by means of two standard techniques, namely, steady state technique and laser flash method. Experimental results are presented and discussed in terms of current models, from which important technological implications for heat sinking design can be derived. - Highlights: • Anisotropy in thermal conductivity of graphite flakes-based composites is evaluated. • Samples are cut in a direction forming a variable angle with the oriented flakes. • For angles 0° and 90°, thermal conductivity does not depend on sample geometry. • For intermediate angles, thermal conductivity strongly depends on sample geometry. • “Thin” samples must be thicker than 600 μm, “thick” samples must be encapsulated.

  10. Prediction and measurement of thermal transport across interfaces between isotropic solids and graphitic materials.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norris, Pamela M.; Smoyer, Justin L.; Duda, John Charles.; Hopkins, Patrick E.

    2010-06-01

    Due to the high intrinsic thermal conductivity of carbon allotropes, there have been many attempts to incorporate such structures into existing thermal abatement technologies. In particular, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphitic materials (i.e., graphite and graphene flakes or stacks) have garnered much interest due to the combination of both their thermal and mechanical properties. However, the introduction of these carbon-based nanostructures into thermal abatement technologies greatly increases the number of interfaces per unit length within the resulting composite systems. Consequently, thermal transport in these systems is governed as much by the interfaces between the constituent materials as it is by the materials themselves. This paper reports the behavior of phononic thermal transport across interfaces between isotropic thin films and graphite substrates. Elastic and inelastic diffusive transport models are formulated to aid in the prediction of conductance at a metal-graphite interface. The temperature dependence of the thermal conductance at Au-graphite interfaces is measured via transient thermoreflectance from 78 to 400 K. It is found that different substrate surface preparations prior to thin film deposition have a significant effect on the conductance of the interface between film and substrate.

  11. Co/graphite based light weight microwave absorber for electromagnetic shielding and stealth applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Azizurrahaman; Jaleel Akhtar, Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    The magnetic, thermal, thermo-mechanical, electromagnetic and microwave absorption properties of Co/graphite loaded polystyrene composites prepared by melt blending and injection molding techniques are studied in X-band (8.4–12.4 GHz) for seeking their usage as efficient light weight microwave absorbers. For profound understanding of electromagnetic absorption process at micro level, the advanced SEM and x-ray diffraction testing of the composites are carried out. The magnetic properties of the prepared Co/graphite loaded polystyrene composites are studied using the vibrating sample magnetometer. The thermal stability and thermo-mechanical properties of the prepared composites are analyzed by thermo gravimetric analysis and dynamic mechanical and thermal analysis, respectively. The complex permittivity and permeability values of the prepared composite samples in X-band of microwave frequency are extracted from the scattering data recorded during the vector network analyzer measurements. The minimum reflection loss (maximum absorption loss) of  ‑32.02 dB (99.94%) is achieved at 10.13 GHz for Co/graphite loaded polystyrene composite with the excess loading of graphite flakes for sample thickness of 1.8 mm. High absorption loss, light weight and low thickness of the proposed multicomponent Co/graphite loaded polystyrene composites make them promising candidates for electromagnetic shielding and stealth applications.

  12. Magnetic frustration of graphite oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dongwook; Seo, Jiwon

    2017-01-01

    Delocalized π electrons in aromatic ring structures generally induce diamagnetism. In graphite oxide, however, π electrons develop ferromagnetism due to the unique structure of the material. The π electrons are only mobile in the graphitic regions of graphite oxide, which are dispersed and surrounded by sp3-hybridized carbon atoms. The spin-glass behavior of graphite oxide is corroborated by the frequency dependence of its AC susceptibility. The magnetic susceptibility data exhibit a negative Curie temperature, field irreversibility, and slow relaxation. The overall results indicate that magnetic moments in graphite oxide slowly interact and develop magnetic frustration. PMID:28327606

  13. Reinforcement of poly(methyl methacrylate) denture base with glass flake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Paul; Wood, David J; Bubb, Nigel L

    2005-04-01

    Since the introduction of poly(methyl methacrylate) as a denture base material, it has suffered from having relatively poor mechanical properties. Many methods of improving its strength and toughness have been investigated. Most of these have not been adopted due to: increased cost, the need for specialist processing equipment or increased laboratory time due to more complicated procedures. Glass flake has been used as a reinforcing agent in many industrial polymers, but is as yet untested with denture base acrylic materials. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of adding glass flake to denture base acrylic powder on the fracture toughness of the set material. Glass flake was added in 5, 10 or 20% w/w to Trevalon denture base powder. The material was mixed, flasked, packed and processed in a manner typical for a denture base material. Fracture toughness was determined using a double torsion test technique. The addition of glass flake gave up to a 69% increase in fracture toughness compared to plain Trevalon material. The addition of 5% glass flake lead to an improvement in fracture toughness that was statistically significant compared to both plain Trevalon and the 10 and 20% groups. The significant improvement in fracture toughness of a denture base acrylic material using glass flake is an extremely promising result. Other mechanical properties will require testing before glass flake can be recommended as a reinforcing agent for denture base acrylic materials.

  14. Documenting Differences between Early Stone Age Flake Production Systems: An Experimental Model and Archaeological Verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presnyakova, Darya; Archer, Will; Braun, David R; Flear, Wesley

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates morphological differences between flakes produced via "core and flake" technologies and those resulting from bifacial shaping strategies. We investigate systematic variation between two technological groups of flakes using experimentally produced assemblages, and then apply the experimental model to the Cutting 10 Mid -Pleistocene archaeological collection from Elandsfontein, South Africa. We argue that a specific set of independent variables--and their interactions--including external platform angle, platform depth, measures of thickness variance and flake curvature should distinguish between these two technological groups. The role of these variables in technological group separation was further investigated using the Generalized Linear Model as well as Linear Discriminant Analysis. The Discriminant model was used to classify archaeological flakes from the Cutting 10 locality in terms of their probability of association, within either experimentally developed technological group. The results indicate that the selected independent variables play a central role in separating core and flake from bifacial technologies. Thickness evenness and curvature had the greatest effect sizes in both the Generalized Linear and Discriminant models. Interestingly the interaction between thickness evenness and platform depth was significant and played an important role in influencing technological group membership. The identified interaction emphasizes the complexity in attempting to distinguish flake production strategies based on flake morphological attributes. The results of the discriminant function analysis demonstrate that the majority of flakes at the Cutting 10 locality were not associated with the production of the numerous Large Cutting Tools found at the site, which corresponds with previous suggestions regarding technological behaviors reflected in this assemblage.

  15. Highly conductive bridges between graphite spheres to improve the cycle performance of a graphite anode in lithium-ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hongyu [IM and T Ltd., Advanced Research Center, Saga University, Yoga-machi 1341, Saga 840-0047 (Japan); Umeno, Tatsuo; Mizuma, Koutarou [Research Center, Mitsui Mining Co. Ltd., Hibiki-machi 1-3, Wakamatsu-ku, Kitakyushu 808-0021 (Japan); Yoshio, Masaki [Advanced Research Center, Saga University, Yoga-machi 1341, Saga 840-0047 (Japan)

    2008-01-10

    Spherical carbon-coated natural graphite (SCCNG) is a promising anode material for lithium-ion batteries, but the smooth surface of graphite spheres is difficult to wet with an aqueous binder solution, and lacks electrical contacts. As a result, the cycle performance of such a graphite anode material is not satisfactory. An effective method has been introduced to tightly connect adjacent SCCNG particles by a highly conductive binder, viz. acetylene black bridges. The effect of the conductive bridges on the cyclability of SCCNG electrode has been investigated. (author)

  16. Fracture mechanics of PGX graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, F.H.; Vollman, R.E.; Cull, A.D.

    1981-03-01

    Fracture mechanics tests were performed on grade PGX graphite. A compact tension specimen configuration which yields consistent values of the opening mode critical stress intensity factor K/sub IC/, was designed. For the calculation of the fracture toughness and crack growth rate the concept of the effective crack length is used. It corresponds to the crack length of a machined notched specimen with the same compliance. Fracture toughness testing was performed in two environments, air and helium, both at room temperature. The critical stress intensity factor, K/sub IC/, is calculated based on the maximum load and the effective crack length. The fatigue crack growth test was performed in air only. A break-in period was observed for the machined notch to develop into a naturally occurring crack path. Half of the fatigue life was spent in this period.

  17. INVESTIGATION OF THE INFLUENCE OF PROCESS CONDITIONS AND PROPERTIES OF THE MEDIUM ON THE KINETICS OF THE SWELLING OF GREEN BUCKWHEAT FLAKES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. E. Glagoleva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The chemical composition of green buckwheat flakes, especially swelling of the flakes at different process conditions. The process of swelling depends on the nature of the high molecular compound, temperature, composition and pH of the absorbing liquid and can flow unrestricted and restricted. With a limited degree of swelling of the swelling reaches the limit and is no longer changing. As a result of limited swelling formed jelly. If the limit value of the degree of swelling in contact with a further high-molecular compound and a solvent is reduced, there is an unlimited swelling. In this case, the swelling of the first stage of dissolution. Unlimited swell polymers with weak intermolecular bonds. Character of the process has an impact on quality indicators and semi-finished products. The resulting kinetic curves indicate limited swelling main components of green buckwheat flakes in all test solutions. In the alkaline pH range, partial dissolution occurred certain components, but the general nature of the process is not appreciably affected. The paper identified the maximum degree and the rate constant swelling green buckwheat flakes in solutions with different pH. To quantify the extent and limit of the rate constant swelling high-molecular compound at different process conditions (type of solvent, temperature, pH determine the degree of swelling at specified intervals and construct the kinetic curve swelling. The acidity of the medium affects mainly on swelling polyampholytes, which are the proteins that make up most of the swell components flakes green buckwheat. Depending on the pH of the protein macromolecule adopt different conformations. The minimum degree of swelling of the protein corresponds to its isoelectric point at which stipulates equality of positive and negative charges in the macromolecule and it rolled into a ball or globule, which hinders the penetration of solvent molecules into the matrix of high-molecular compound

  18. Recommendation of a triaxial failure theory for graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, P.Y.

    1979-05-01

    An extensive literature search has been conducted on the application of triaxial failure theories to an anisotropic brittle solid. This study leads to the conclusion that the strength tensor theory of Tsai and Wu appears most promising for HTGR structural graphites. The reduction of this theory to model the transversely isotropic nature of HTGR structural graphites is presented. The extensions to the ongoing biaxial stress experimental program, needed to provide the additional data required to verify this theory, are defined.

  19. Graphitized silicon carbide microbeams: wafer-level, self-aligned graphene on silicon wafers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunning, Benjamin V; Ahmed, Mohsin; Mishra, Neeraj; Kermany, Atieh Ranjbar; Wood, Barry; Iacopi, Francesca

    2014-08-15

    Currently proven methods that are used to obtain devices with high-quality graphene on silicon wafers involve the transfer of graphene flakes from a growth substrate, resulting in fundamental limitations for large-scale device fabrication. Moreover, the complex three-dimensional structures of interest for microelectromechanical and nanoelectromechanical systems are hardly compatible with such transfer processes. Here, we introduce a methodology for obtaining thousands of microbeams, made of graphitized silicon carbide on silicon, through a site-selective and wafer-scale approach. A Ni-Cu alloy catalyst mediates a self-aligned graphitization on prepatterned SiC microstructures at a temperature that is compatible with silicon technologies. The graphene nanocoating leads to a dramatically enhanced electrical conductivity, which elevates this approach to an ideal method for the replacement of conductive metal films in silicon carbide-based MEMS and NEMS devices.

  20. Total phenolics, flavonoids, antioxidant activity, crude fibre and digestibility in non-traditional wheat flakes and muesli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumczynski, Daniela; Bubelova, Zuzana; Sneyd, Jan; Erb-Weber, Susanne; Mlcek, Jiri

    2015-05-01

    The five different types of muesli composed of non-traditional wheat flakes were prepared and analysed. Dickkopf wheat, red wheat, kamut and spelt were compared with commercial wheat flakes. Wheat flakes and muesli were assessed for basic analyses (dry matter, ash, protein, starch and fat content), total phenolic and flavonoid content, antioxidant activity (ABTS and DPPH assays), crude fibre content and in vitro digestibility. Furthermore, sensory evaluation of muesli involving scale and ranking preference tests was provided. Flakes and muesli made from Dickkopf wheat and red wheat showed the highest total phenolic and flavonoid content and, consequently, the highest antioxidant activity. Moreover, these cereals were high in crude fibre and thus were less digestible. On the other hand, the lowest total phenolic and flavonoid contents and antioxidant activity were determined in commercial flakes and muesli produced from these flakes. The flakes made from non-traditional wheat were sensorially comparable to commercial products.

  1. Graphite-bearing CO 2-fluid inclusions in granulites: Insights on graphite precipitation and carbon isotope evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satish-Kumar, Madhusoodhan

    2005-08-01

    Graphite in deep crustal enderbitic (orthopyroxene + garnet + plagioclase + quartz) granulites (740°C, 8.9 kb) of Nilgiri hills, southern India were investigated for their spectroscopic and isotopic characteristics. Four types of graphite crystals were identified. The first type (Gr I), which is interstitial to other mineral grains, can be grouped into two subtypes, Gr IA and Gr IB. Gr IA is either irregular in shape or deformed, and rough textured with average δ 13C values of -12.7 ± 0.4‰ ( n = 3). A later generation of interstitial graphite (Gr IB) shows polygonal crystal shapes and highly reflecting smooth surface features. These graphite grains are more common and have δ 13C values of -11.9 ± 0.3‰ ( n = 14). Both subtypes show well-defined Raman shifts suggesting a highly crystalline nature. Cores of interstitial graphite grains have, on average, lower δ 13C values by ˜0.5‰ compared to that of the rim. The second type of graphite (Gr II) occurs as solid inclusions in silicate minerals, commonly forming regular hexagonal crystals with a slightly disordered structure. The third type of graphite (Gr III) is associated with solid inclusions (up to 100 μm) that have decrepitation halos of numerous small (pure CO 2 with varying density (1.105 to 0.75 g/cm 3). The fourth type of graphite (Gr IV) is found as daughter crystals within primary type CO 2-fluid inclusions in garnet and quartz. These fluid inclusions have a range of densities (1.05 to 0.90 g/cm 3), but in general are significantly less dense than graphite-free primary, pure CO 2 fluid inclusions (1.12 g/cm 3). Raman spectral characteristics of graphite inside fluid inclusions suggest graphite crystallization at low temperature (˜ 500°C). The precipitation of graphite probably occurred during the isobaric cooling of CO 2-rich peak metamorphic fluid as a result of oxyexsolution of oxide phases. The oxyexsolution process is evidenced by the magnetite-ilmenite granular exsolution textures and the

  2. Shear Assisted Electrochemical Exfoliation of Graphite to Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinde, Dhanraj B; Brenker, Jason; Easton, Christopher D; Tabor, Rico F; Neild, Adrian; Majumder, Mainak

    2016-04-12

    The exfoliation characteristics of graphite as a function of applied anodic potential (1-10 V) in combination with shear field (400-74 400 s(-1)) have been studied in a custom-designed microfluidic reactor. Systematic investigation by atomic force microscopy (AFM) indicates that at higher potentials thicker and more fragmented graphene sheets are obtained, while at potentials as low as 1 V, pronounced exfoliation is triggered by the influence of shear. The shear-assisted electrochemical exfoliation process yields large (∼10 μm) graphene flakes with a high proportion of single, bilayer, and trilayer graphene and small ID/IG ratio (0.21-0.32) with only a small contribution from carbon-oxygen species as demonstrated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements. This method comprises intercalation of sulfate ions followed by exfoliation using shear induced by a flowing electrolyte. Our findings on the crucial role of hydrodynamics in accentuating the exfoliation efficiency suggest a safer, greener, and more automated method for production of high quality graphene from graphite.

  3. Study of Al/cast iron interface and graphite behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akbarifar M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The interface characteristics of aluminum/cast iron bimetals produced by compound casting were investigated. Aluminum melt was poured into molds, at 700°C and 750°C, around cylindrical cast iron bars having melt-to-solid volume ratios (Vm/Vs of 3, 5 and 8, respectively. Microscopic observations showed that a reaction layer may form at the interface. This layer is composed of Fe2Al5 intermetallic which has been formed initially at the notches of the insert’s surface after making contact with the molten metal. The thickness of the interaction layer varied from 5μm, for the sample produced at 700°C and 3 Vm/Vs, up to 20μm for the sample poured at 750°C and 8 Vm/Vs. Microstructural analysis showed that increasing of the temperature and the melt-to-solid (m/s volume ratio leads to the formation of a thicker and more uniform intermetallic layer. Microhardness of the Fe2Al5 compound was measured 824 HV. A mechanism is suggested for the nucleation and growth of this intermetallic layer and also encapsulation of the flake graphite at the interface of two metals. It seems that the thermal and chemical situation at the interface of two metals, leads to an acceptable wettability of the graphite by molten aluminum.

  4. Bromine intercalated graphite for lightweight composite conductors

    KAUST Repository

    Amassian, Aram

    2017-07-20

    A method of fabricating a bromine-graphite/metal composite includes intercalating bromine within layers of graphite via liquid-phase bromination to create brominated-graphite and consolidating the brominated-graphite with a metal nanopowder via a mechanical pressing operation to generate a bromine-graphite/metal composite material.

  5. Qualitative comparison of polyethylene terephthalate flakes from various collection systems in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell, H; Nassour, A; Nelles, M

    2017-02-01

    In 2003, a deposit system for one-way packaging was introduced in Germany. Since that time, polyethylene terephthalate beverage packaging is collected through various collection systems, a deposit system, a reusable packaging system and the 'Green Dot' (the dual system) with the yellow bag. The manner of collection had a decisive influence on the quality of the generated recycled materials. The research at hand shows for the first time how the quality of polyethylene terephthalate flakes depends on the type of collection system. The results are based on a 14-year time frame, during which the quality of the polyethylene terephthalate flakes was examined using the different collection systems. The criterion used was the amount of contamination of polyethylene terephthalate flakes with various polymers, metals and other substances. Grain size and bulk density were also compared. The outcome shows that material from the deposit systems resulted in a better quality of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) flakes.

  6. Graphite/Epoxy Deicing Heater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh; Dillehay, Michael E.; Stahl, Mark

    1988-01-01

    Heat applied close to surface protected. One ply of highly electrically- and thermally-conductive brominated-graphite fiber composite laminated between two plies of electrically-insulating composite material, with michel foil making contact with end portions of graphite fibers. Part of foil exposed beyond composite to serve as electrical contact. Graphite/Epoxy composite heater developed to prevent and reverse formation of ice on advanced composite surfaces of aircraft.

  7. Highly flexible and electroforming free resistive switching behavior of tungsten disulfide flakes fabricated through advanced printing technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muqeet Rehman, Muhammad; Uddin Siddiqui, Ghayas; Doh, Yang Hoi; Choi, Kyung Hyun

    2017-09-01

    Tungsten disulfide (WS2) is a transition metal dichalcogenide that differs from other 2D materials such as graphene owing to its distinctive semiconducting nature and tunable band gap. In this study, we have reported the structural, electrical, physical, and mechanical properties of exfoliated WS2 flakes and used them as the functional layer of a rewritable bipolar memory device. We demonstrate this concept by sandwiching few-layered WS2 flakes between two silver (Ag) electrodes on a flexible and transparent PET substrate. The entire device fabrication was carried out through all-printing technology such as reverse offset printing for patterning bottom electrodes, electrohydrodynamic (EHD) atomization for depositing functional thin film and EHD patterning for depositing the top electrode respectively. The memory device was further encapsulated with an atomically thin layer of aluminum oxide (Al2O3), deposited through a spatial atmospheric atomic layer deposition system to protect it against a humid environment. Remarkable resistive switching results were obtained, such as nonvolatile bipolar behavior, a high switching ratio (∼103), a long retention time (∼105 s), high endurance (1500 voltage sweeps), a low operating voltage (∼2 V), low current compliance (50 μA), mechanical robustness (1500 cycles) and unique repeatability at ambient conditions. Ag/WS2/Ag-based memory devices offer a new possibility for integration in flexible electronic devices.

  8. Growth of lenticular bubbles in relation to blistering and flaking mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamada, Kohji; Higashida, Yutaka

    Consequences of a theory, which is based on a model of ductile extension of a crack in a material, is presented that explains blistering and flaking which appear after high energy ion bombardment. Distinction in mechanisms between blistering and flaking is clarified theoretically. Comparisons between the theory and experiments show very good correlations with respect to blister size. The relation between blister cover thickness and local bubble swelling is given theoretically, explaining the observations made by transmission electron microscopy.

  9. Growth of lenticular bubbles in relation to blistering and flaking mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamada, K.; Higashida, Y. (Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Inst. of Plasma Physics)

    1982-03-01

    Consequences of a theory, which is based on a model of ductile extension of a crack in a material, is presented that explains blistering and flaking which appear after high energy ion bombardment. Distinction in mechanisms between blistering and flaking is clarified theoretically. Comparisons between the theory and experiments show very good correlations with respect to blister size. The relation between blister cover thickness and local bubble swelling is given theoretically, explaining the observations made by transmission electron microscopy.

  10. Dynamics of magnetic nano-flake vortices in Newtonian fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazazzadeh, Nasim, E-mail: n.bazazzadeh@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Evin, Tehran 19839 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mohseni, Seyed Majid, E-mail: m-mohseni@sbu.ac.ir [Department of Physics, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Evin, Tehran 19839 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khavasi, Amin, E-mail: khavasi@sharif.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran 11555-4363 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zibaii, Mohammad Ismail, E-mail: mizibaye@gmail.com [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Evin, Tehran 19839 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Movahed, S.M.S., E-mail: m_movahed@sbu.ac.ir [Department of Physics, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Evin, Tehran 19839 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jafari, G.R., E-mail: gjafari@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Evin, Tehran 19839 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-12-01

    We study the rotational motion of nano-flake ferromagnetic disks suspended in a Newtonian fluid, as a potential material owing the vortex-like magnetic configuration. Using analytical expressions for hydrodynamic, magnetic and Brownian torques, the stochastic angular momentum equation is determined in the dilute limit conditions under applied magnetic field. Results are compared against experimental ones and excellent agreement is observed. We also estimate the uncertainty in the orientation of the disks due to the Brownian torque when an external magnetic field aligns them. Interestingly, this uncertainty is roughly proportional to the ratio of thermal energy of fluid to the magnetic energy stored in the disks. Our approach can be implemented in many practical applications including biotechnology and multi-functional fluidics. - Highlights: • The rotational motion of magnetic-vortex microdiscs in a Newtonian fluid is studied. • Results are compared against experimental ones and excellent agreement is observed. • The uncertainty in the orientation of the microdiscs is analytically derived.

  11. Heat exchanger using graphite foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campagna, Michael Joseph; Callas, James John

    2012-09-25

    A heat exchanger is disclosed. The heat exchanger may have an inlet configured to receive a first fluid and an outlet configured to discharge the first fluid. The heat exchanger may further have at least one passageway configured to conduct the first fluid from the inlet to the outlet. The at least one passageway may be composed of a graphite foam and a layer of graphite material on the exterior of the graphite foam. The layer of graphite material may form at least a partial barrier between the first fluid and a second fluid external to the at least one passageway.

  12. Glycemic index and quality evaluation of little millet (Panicum miliare) flakes with enhanced shelf life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Kavita B; Chimmad, Bharati V; Itagi, Sunanda

    2015-09-01

    Little millet is a minor cereal crop contains several nutraceutical components. Ready To Cook (RTC) flakes of the millet exhibited higher total dietary fiber content (22.40 %) compared to dehulled grain (15.80 %). One serving (30 g) of RTC flakes provided 2.25 g of protein, 0.13 g of fat, 0.13 g of total minerals, 9.67 mg of iron and zero trans fats. The flakes possessed a medium Glycemic Index (GI) of 52.11 ranging from 41.57 to 61.80 among normal volunteers. Glycemic Load (GL) of the flakes was a low of 9.24. The RTC flakes exhibited an acceptability index of 81.11. The flakes possessed a shelf life of more than 6 months with an acceptability index of 67.55, moisture content of 11.82 per cent and Free fatty acid content of 18.02 per cent at the end of sixth month of storage period.

  13. The preliminary feasibility of intercalated graphite railgun armatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaier, James R.; Gooden, Clarence E.; Yashan, Doreen; Naud, Steve

    1991-01-01

    Graphite intercalation compounds may provide an excellent material for the fabrication of electromagnetic railgun armatures. As a pulse of power is fed into the armature the intercalate could be excited into the plasma state around the edges of the armature, while the bulk of the current would be carried through the graphite block. Such an armature would have both diffuse plasma armatures and bulk conduction armatures. In addition, the highly anisotropic nature of these materials could enable the electrical and thermal conductivity to be tailored to meet the specific requirements of electromagnetic railgun armatures. Preliminary investigations have been performed in an attempt to determine the feasibility of using graphite intercalation compounds as railgun armatures. Issues of fabrication, resistivity, stability, and electrical current spreading have been addressed for the case of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite.

  14. Graphene-graphite oxide field-effect transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standley, Brian; Mendez, Anthony; Schmidgall, Emma; Bockrath, Marc

    2012-03-14

    Graphene's high mobility and two-dimensional nature make it an attractive material for field-effect transistors. Previous efforts in this area have used bulk gate dielectric materials such as SiO(2) or HfO(2). In contrast, we have studied the use of an ultrathin layered material, graphene's insulating analogue, graphite oxide. We have fabricated transistors comprising single or bilayer graphene channels, graphite oxide gate insulators, and metal top-gates. The graphite oxide layers show relatively minimal leakage at room temperature. The breakdown electric field of graphite oxide was found to be comparable to SiO(2), typically ~1-3 × 10(8) V/m, while its dielectric constant is slightly higher, κ ≈ 4.3.

  15. The preliminary feasibility of intercalated graphite railgun armatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaier, James R.; Gooden, Clarence E.; Yashan, Doreen; Naud, Steve

    1991-01-01

    Graphite intercalation compounds may provide an excellent material for the fabrication of electromagnetic railgun armatures. As a pulse of power is fed into the armature the intercalate could be excited into the plasma state around the edges of the armature, while the bulk of the current would be carried through the graphite block. Such an armature would have both diffuse plasma armatures and bulk conduction armatures. In addition, the highly anisotropic nature of these materials could enable the electrical and thermal conductivity to be tailored to meet the specific requirements of electromagnetic railgun armatures. Preliminary investigations have been performed in an attempt to determine the feasibility of using graphite intercalation compounds as railgun armatures. Issues of fabrication, resistivity, stability, and electrical current spreading have been addressed for the case of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite.

  16. Effect of processing techniques on color and active components amount of sweet potato (Ipomoea Batatas l) flakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmawati, Y.; Mahmudatussa'adah, A.; Yogha, S.

    2016-04-01

    Sweet potato processing is limited, such as flour, snacks, cystic, or chips. Flakes as pre-cooked meals are made through the stages of making pasta and drying. The purpose of this study was to optimize the production of sweet potato flakes at the stage of making pasta and drying. Making the pasta is done through techniques steamed or baked. Pasta drying using tools a drum dryer or cabinet dryer. As an indicator of optimization is the total of monomeric anthocyanins, β-carotene and color the resulting flakes. The results showed that the amount of anthocyanin monomeric flakes by using steam, and drum dryer (3.83 ± 0.03 mg CYE/g db), flakes by the technique of steam, and cabinet dryer (3.03 ± 0.02 mg CYE/g db), flakes with techniques bake, drum dryer (2.49 ± 0.05 CYE mg/g db), flakes with bake technique, cabinet dryer (1.98 ± 0.03 mg CYE/g db). The Color of purple sweet potato flakes produced through steamed techniques bright purple, while the color purple sweet potato flakes produced through techniques roast give a brownish purple color. The amount of β-carotene yellow flakes sweet potato with stages of cooking steamed, drum dryer (152±0.5 mg/Kg db), grilled drum dryer (136±0.4 mg/Kg db), flakes of yellow sweet potato with stages of roasted and cabinet dryer (140±0.8 mg/Kg db), and grilled stage with cabinet dryer (122±0.3 mg/Kg db). In conclusion sweet potato flakes production techniques through the stages of steam process, and used drum dryers have a number of anthocyanins or β-carotene bigger and brighter colors than the baked flakes techniques and used cabinet dryer.

  17. Flexible PVC flame retarded with expandable graphite

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Focke, WW

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available by the polymer matrix and the exfoliating graphite prevents the formation of a flammable air fuel mixture. Keywords: Expandable graphite; graphite oxide; graphite intercalation compound; exfoliation; thermal analysis ________________ *Corresponding author: Tel... char residue [6] and this contributes to the mechanisms of flame retardant action [5]. Expandable graphite (EG) is a partially oxidized form of graphite containing intercalated guest species (e.g., sulfuric acid anions) in-between the stacked...

  18. Graphite in Science and Nuclear Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Zhmurikov, E. I.; Bubnenkov, I. A.; Dremov, V. V.; Samarin, S. I.; Pokrovsky, A. S.; Harkov, D. V.

    2013-01-01

    The monograph is devoted to the application of graphite and graphite composites in science and technology. The structure and electrical properties, the technological aspects of production of high-strength synthetic graphites, the dynamics of the graphite destruction, traditionally used in the nuclear industry are discussed. It is focuses on the characteristics of graphitization and properties of graphite composites based on carbon isotope 13C. The book is based, generally, on the original res...

  19. Beneficiation of low grade graphite ore of eastern India by two-stage grinding and flotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasumathi N.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A low grade graphite run-of-mine (r.o.m ore from eastern India was studied for its amenability to beneficiation by flotation technique. The petrography studies indicate that the ore primarily consists of quartz and graphite with minor quantity of mica. It analyzed 89.89% ash and 8.59% fixed carbon. The ore was crushed in stages followed by primary coarse wet grinding to 212 μm (d80. Rougher flotation was carried out in Denver flotation cell to eliminate gangue as much as possible in the form of primary tailings with minimal loss of carbon. Diesel & pine oil were used as collector and frother respectively. Regrinding of rougher concentrate to150 μm (d80 was resorted to further liberate the graphite values and was followed by multi-stage cleaning. This two-stage grinding approach involving a primary coarse grinding and regrinding of rougher float followed by its multi-stage cleaning was found to yield required grade of concentrate for applications such as refractories, batteries and high temperature lubricants. This approach is supposed to retain the flake size of coarse, free and liberated graphite, if available, during primary coarse grinding and rougher flotation stage with minimal grinding energy costs as against the usual practice of single stage grinding in the case of many ores. A final concentrate of 8.97% weight recovery with 5.80% ash and 92.13% fixed carbon could be achieved.

  20. Evaluation of cutting force and surface roughness in high-speed milling of compacted graphite iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azlan Suhaimi Mohd

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Compacted Graphite Iron, (CGI is known to have outstanding mechanical strength and weight-to-strength ratio as compared to conventional grey cast iron, (CI. The outstanding characteristics of CGI is due to its graphite particle shape, which is presented as compacted vermicular particle. The graphite is interconnected with random orientation and round edges, which results in higher mechanical strength. Whereas, graphite in the CI consists of a smooth-surfaced flakes that easily propagates cracks which results in weaker and brittle properties as compared to CGI. Owing to its improved properties, CGI is considered as the best candidate material in substituting grey cast iron that has been used in engine block applications for years. However, the smooth implementation of replacing CI with CGI has been hindered due to the poor machinability of CGI especially at high cutting speed. The tool life is decreased by 20 times when comparing CGI with CI under the same cutting condition. This study investigates the effect of using cryogenic cooling and minimum quantity lubrication (MQL during high-speed milling of CGI (grade 450. Results showed that, the combination of internal cryogenic cooling and enhanced MQL improved the tool life, cutting force and surface quality as compared to the conventional flood coolant strategy during high-speed milling of CGI.

  1. Graphitic packing removal tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyers, K.E.; Kolsun, G.J.

    1996-12-31

    Graphitic packing removal tools are described for removal of the seal rings in one piece from valves and pumps. The packing removal tool has a cylindrical base ring the same size as the packing ring with a surface finish, perforations, knurling or threads for adhesion to the seal ring. Elongated leg shanks are mounted axially along the circumferential center. A slit or slits permit insertion around shafts. A removal tool follower stabilizes the upper portion of the legs to allow a spanner wrench to be used for insertion and removal.

  2. Preparation and Application as the Filler for Elastomers of Flake-Shaped Cellulose Particles and Nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagatani, Asahiro; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Endo, Takashi; Tanaka, Tatsuya

    Fibrous cellulose made from wood pulp was mechanically milled into flake-shaped cellulose particles(FS-CPs) using a planetary ball mill with additives under several conditions. The average particle diameter of the FS-CPs was ca. 15μm, and the particles were available in a variety of thicknesses by changing the kind of the additives used in the milling process. FS-CPs-reinforced olefinic thermoplastic elastomer composites were prepared under melt mixing and passed through an open roll to orient the particles. The tensile modulus of the composites with a compatibilizer increased with increasing the particle content. The damping properties of the composites improved, compared to the neat elastomer. On the other hand, the fibrous cellulose was suspended in water, followed by wet disk-milled to prepare cellulose nanofibers(CNFs). The wet ground products showed nanoscopic fine morphology. CNFs-reinforced natural rubber(NR) composites were prepared by mixing the water suspension of CNFs with NR latex using a homogenizer. Then, it was dried in an oven and mixed again with vulcanizing ingredients of rubber using an open roll. The tensile properties of the composites improved remarkably by the addition of small amount of CNFs.

  3. Layering-induced Superlubricity: Gold on Graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanossi, Andrea; Guerra, Roberto; Tosatti, Erio; Nanofriction Group Sissa Team

    2015-03-01

    By means of realistic MD simulations, we explore the static friction trend as a function of the true contact area and the model dimensionality for 2D gold nanoislands and 3D gold nanoclusters deposited on graphite, interesting tribological systems whose slow and fast dynamics have been previously investigated. For increasing island size, because of the relative gold-graphite lattice mismatch, the interface stress energy has the chance to pile up by forming frustrated unmatched (i.e., incommensurate) regions and to develop a continuous solitonic pathway, foreshadowing a possible condition for the occurrence of ultra-low friction regimes. The significant reduction of the depinning threshold, towards superlubricity, with the system dimensionality can be ascribed to a layering-induced effective stiffness of the interface contact, favoring the natural Au-C lattice incommensurability. Partly sponsored under SNSF Sinergia Grant CRSII2 136287/1, EU ERC Grant No. 320796 MODPHYSFRICT, EU COST Action MP1303.

  4. PS—EG插层复合物制备及其改性聚苯乙烯的研究%Preparation of Polystyrene-expanded Graphite Intercalated Complex and Its Modification on Polystyrene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯桂香; 姚少巍; 桑晓明; 唐鹏; 蒋丽

    2012-01-01

    通过化学氧化、高温处理将天然鳞片石墨制成膨胀石墨(EG),采用原位聚合法制备了聚苯乙烯-膨胀石墨(PS-EG)插层复合物,并将PS-EG复合物与PS进行熔融共混,研究了PS-EG复合物含量对Ps结构及性能的影响。结果表明,PS-EG的加入,使得PS的冲击强度和热性能提高,而拉伸强度下降;当PS-EG含量为9%(质量分数,下同)时,PS的冲击强度提高了63.4%;EG在复合材料中呈蠕虫状分布;PS-EG复合物的存在增加了复合材料的界面效应,冲击断面呈现孔洞式结构。%Expandable graphite was prepared from natural flake graphite via chemical oxidation and high temperature processing. Via in-situ polymerization of styrene in presence of expanded graphite polystyrene-expanded graphite (PS-EG) composites were obtained. Melt blending PS-EG with neat polystyrene leaded to polystyrene/polystyrene-expanded (PS/PS-EG) composites. The mechanical properties, thermal stability, and the microstructure of the composites were studied. The impact strength, and thermal stability were improved with the adding of PS-EG. Compared with the neat polystyrene, the impact strength of PS/PS-EG composites was improved 63. 4 %, when the content of PS-EG was 9 %, however the tensile strength showed a large decreasing. Micro-analysis showed that expanded graphite dispersed homogeneously in the form of vermiculate in the composites, and the existence of PS-EG increased the interface effect of PS/PS-EG composite, the cross section of the composites displayed a pinhole structure.

  5. Synthesis of α-MoO3 nano-flakes by dry oxidation of RF sputtered Mo thin films and their application in gas sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Priyanka; Dhanekar, Saakshi; Das, Samaresh

    2016-11-01

    Synthesis of orthorhombic (α) MoO3 nano-flakes by dry oxidation of RF sputtered Mo thin film is presented. The influence of Mo thickness variation, oxidation temperature and time on the crystallographic structure, surface morphology and roughness of MoO3 thin films was studied using SEM, AFM, XRD and Raman spectroscopy. A structural study shows that MoO3 is polycrystalline in nature with an α phase. It was noticed that oxidation temperature plays an important role in the formation of nano-flakes. The synthesis technique proposed is simple and suitable for large scale productions. The synthesis parameters were optimized for the fabrication of sensors. Chrome gold-based IDE (interdigitated electrodes) structures were patterned for the electrical detection of organic vapors. Sensors were exposed to wide range 5-100 ppm of organic vapors like ethanol, acetone, IPA (isopropanol alcohol) and water vapors. α-MoO3 nano-flakes have demonstrated selective sensing to acetone in the range of 10-100 ppm at 150 °C. The morphology of such nanostructures has potential in applications such as sensor devices due to their high surface area and thermal stability.

  6. Mesoporous MnCo2O4 with a flake-like structure as advanced electrode materials for lithium-ion batteries and supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Anjon Kumar; Su, Dawei; Chen, Shuangqiang; Ung, Alison; Kim, Hyun-Soo; Wang, Guoxiu

    2015-01-19

    A mesoporous flake-like manganese-cobalt composite oxide (MnCo2O4) is synthesized successfully through the hydrothermal method. The crystalline phase and morphology of the materials are characterized by X-ray diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller methods. The flake-like MnCo2O4 is evaluated as the anode material for lithium-ion batteries. Owing to its mesoporous nature, it exhibits a high reversible capacity of 1066 mA h g(-1), good rate capability, and superior cycling stability. As an electrode material for supercapacitors, the flake-like MnCo2O4 also demonstrates a high supercapacitance of 1487 F g(-1) at a current density of 1 A g(-1), and an exceptional cycling performance over 2000 charge/discharge cycles. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Effect of flake graphite orientation on thermal conductivity of flake graphite/polypropylene, flake graphite/nylon66 composites%鳞片石墨取向对鳞片石墨/聚丙烯、鳞片石墨/尼龙66复合材料导热性能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘科; 刘颖; 吴大鸣; 庄俭; 许红; 唐胜德

    2014-01-01

    为了研究鳞片石墨在基体中的取向对复合材料导热性能特别是不同方向导热性能的影响,通过双螺杆挤出混合及注射成型制备了鳞片石墨/聚丙烯(PP)、鳞片石墨/尼龙66(PA66)导热复合材料,并利用扫描电子显微镜和超声波测试对制备的样品进行了分析.结果表明:鳞片石墨的粒径越小,平面取向度越高,平面与垂直方向的热导率差值越大.加工中双螺杆挤出机的过度剪切会破坏鳞片石墨的片层结构,影响鳞片石墨导热网络的形成,降低复合材料的热导率,但提高了材料导热的各向均匀性.适度的剪切可以打开鳞片石墨的片层结构,提高复合材料的热导率,注射成型更多影响到制品导热的各向异性.

  8. Flake-by-flake ZnCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} as a high capacity anode material for lithium-ion battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Xiong [School of Physics and Telecommunication Engineering, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Engineering Research Center of Materials and Technology for Electrochemical Energy Storage (Ministry of Education), Guangzhou 510006 (China); Ru, Qiang, E-mail: rq7702@yeah.net [School of Physics and Telecommunication Engineering, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Engineering Research Center of Materials and Technology for Electrochemical Energy Storage (Ministry of Education), Guangzhou 510006 (China); Laboratory of Quantum Information Technology, School of Physics and Telecommunication Engineering, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Zhang, Beibei; Hu, Shejun; An, Bonan [School of Physics and Telecommunication Engineering, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Engineering Research Center of Materials and Technology for Electrochemical Energy Storage (Ministry of Education), Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2014-02-05

    Highlights: • The ZnCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} with porous structure was prepared by co-precipitation method. • Flake-by-flake used in ZnCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} was studied for the first time. • The as-prepared ZCO shows excellent electrochemical performances. • The preparation method has mild experiment conditions and high production rate. -- Abstract: A novel flake-by-flake ZnCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} (ZCO) with porous nanostructure is prepared by a typical and facile co-precipitation method using oxalic acid as complex agent. XRD, SEM, and TEM analyses show the as-prepared ZCO nanoparticles have a high purity and a good crystallinity, and the ZCO nanoflakes with a thickness of 30–80 nm are composed of uniform ZCO nanocrystals with a diameter of 20–40 nm. The novel structure with enough free space is beneficial to improving the electrochemical performance. The as-prepared ZCO used as an anode material for lithium-ion batteries exhibits a high specific capacity of 1275 mA h/g at a current rate of 100 mA/g after 50 cycles, as well as a high power capability at elevated current rates, i.e., 1130 and 730 mA h/g at current rates of 500 and 3000 mA/g, respectively. It has a great prospect for the application of anode materials for lithium-ion batteries.

  9. Graphite intercalation compounds and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Enoki, Toshiaki; Endo, Morinobu

    2003-01-01

    1. Introduction. 2. Synthesis and Intercalation Chemistry. 3. Structures and Phase Transitions. 4. Lattice Dynamics. 5. Electronic Structures. 6. Electron Transport Properties. 7. Magnetic Properties. 8. Surface Properties and Gas Adsorption. 9. GICs and Batteries. 10. Highly Conductive Graphite Fibers. 11. Exfoliated Graphite Formed by Intercalation. 12. Intercalated Fullerenes and Carbon Nanotubes. Index

  10. Preparation of an aqueous graphitic ink for thermal drop-on-demand inkjet printing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romagnoli, Marcello; Lassinantti Gualtieri, Magdalena, E-mail: magdalena.gualtieri@unimore.it; Cannio, Maria; Barbieri, Francesco; Giovanardi, Roberto

    2016-10-01

    A graphitic ink for thermal DOD inkjet printing was developed. Challenges to be met were related to the small size of the getting nozzle (20 μm), demanding high dispersion stability of submicron particles, as well as to the physical requirements of the printer. In addition, solvents potentially hazardous to human health were excluded a priori. These necessities led to the development of a ternary aqueous solvent system based on 2-propanol and monoethylene glycol, offering an environmental-friendly alternative to conventional graphene solvents. In addition, high flexibility in terms of physical properties (e.g. surface tension, viscosity, density) important for jetting is obtained. Size reduction and exfoliation, accomplished by wet-grinding of graphite in the presence of a surfactant, were followed by laser diffraction and XRD line broadening analyses, respectively. The separated graphitic colloids used for preparation of inks were composed of ca 30 layers of AB–stacked graphene flakes, as determined by line broadening analyses (XRD data). Jetting of an ink with a solid content of 0.3 mg/mL gave a thickness increase of ca. 25 nm/pass, as determined by FESEM. Electrical characterization evidenced the need to remove residual organic molecules to regain the electrical properties of the graphitic particles. - Highlights: • A non-hazardous graphitic ink for thermal DOD inkjet printing was developed. • The ternary mixture water/ethylene glycol/2-propanol is suitable as solvent. • Physical properties important for jetting is tailored by solvent composition. • Surfactant-aided grinding gives exfoliation of graphite without inflicting microstrain.

  11. 磁性多孔纳米片微波磁导率的微磁学研究∗%Micromagnetics simulation on the microwave p ermeability of magnetic p orous nano-flakes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    涂宽; 韩满贵

    2015-01-01

    Many modern electronic devices are operated on a frequency above 1 GHz. Frequencies of electromagnetic noises coming from these devices are usually larger than 10 GHz. High-frequency magnetic losses in the natural resonance mechanism can be used to dissipate the energy of electromagnetic noises. Ferromagnetic nanostructural materials (nano flakes or nanowires) in strong shape anisotropy fields are one of the promising anti electromagnetic interference (EMI) materials due to their large high-frequency magnetic losses. Application of EMI requires that the electromagnetic wave absorbing materials should be lightweight and have a wide absorbing bandwidth. However, most electromagnetic wave absorbing materials reported do not have these features. To meet these demands, the microwave magnetic properties of porous α-Fe nano flakes (length × width × thickness: 300 nm × 100 nm × 10 nm) have been simulated based on micromagnetics theory. Compared to the nano flakes without nano pores, simulation results reveal that the demagnetization fields will be altered if a nano flake contains several pores. Effect of nano pores (diameter =15 nm) in different arrangements (rows × columns: 2 × 10; 2 × 5; 2 × 2; 4 × 5) on the high-frequency magnetic properties is investigated in this paper. It is found that nano flakes can alter the configurations of magnetic domains. More domains in small sizes in an inhomogeneous localized magnetic anisotropic field have been achieved. Consequently, more high-frequency magnetic loss peaks can be found. Overlapping of magnetic loss peaks implies that it potentially enables to widen the bandwidth of electromagnetic absorption within 10—30 GHz. Furthermore, simulations reveal that the quantity, magnitude and resonance frequencies of the loss peaks are strongly dependent on the quantity and the arrangement of nano pores. Besides, the existence of multi magnetic loss peaks has been studied for ellipsoid objects from the perspective of

  12. Manipulation and Quantification of Graphene Oxide Flake Size: Photoluminescence and Cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Brian R; Knight, Timothy; Gies, Valerie; Jakubek, Zygmunt J; Zou, Shan

    2017-08-30

    Single-layered graphene oxide (GO) has exhibited great promise in the areas of sensing, membrane filtration, supercapacitors, bioimaging, and therapeutic carriers because of its biocompatibility, large surface area, and electrochemical, photoluminescent, and optical properties. To elucidate how the physical dimensions of GO affect its intrinsic properties, we employed sonication to produce more than 130 different sizes of GO in aqueous dispersion and implemented new approaches to characterize various GO properties as a function of the average flake size. New protocols were developed to determine and compare the flake size of GO dispersions sonicated with energies up to 20 MJ/g by using dynamic light scattering and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The relationship between the average flake size and sonication energy per unit mass of GO was observed to follow a power law. AFM height measurements showed that the sonication of GO yielded monolayered flakes. Photoluminescence of GO was characterized as a function of the sonication energy (or the average flake size which is the monotonic function of the sonication energy), excitation wavelength, and pH of the dispersion. The strong dependence of the photoluminescence intensity on pH control and the variation of the photoluminescence intensity with different flake sizes were observed. An intense photoluminescence signal, likely related to the separation of the oxidative debris from the GO framework, was found at the highest sonication energies (E ≳ 15 MJ/g) or under extremely alkaline conditions (pH ≳ 11). The cytotoxicity of GO was studied with various flake sizes. Size- and concentration-dependent cytotoxicity was observed for cell lines NIH 3T3 and A549. The NIH 3T3 cell line also demonstrated time-dependent cytotoxicity.

  13. {sup 36}Cl and {sup 14}C behaviour in UNGG graphite during leaching experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pichon, C.; Guy, C.; Comte, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique - C.E.A., Laboratoire d' Analyses Radiochimiques et Chimiques (L.A.R.C.) 13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France)

    2008-07-01

    Graphite has been used as a moderator in Natural Uranium Graphite Gas reactors. Among the radionuclides, the long-lived activation product {sup 36}Cl and {sup 14}C, which are abundant in graphite after irradiation can be the main contributors to the dose during disposal. This paper deals with the first results obtained on irradiated graphite from French G2 reactor. Both leaching and diffusion experiments have been performed in order to understand and quantify the radionuclides behaviour. Chlorine leaching seems to be controlled by diffusion transport through graphite matrix. On the contrary {sup 14}C leaching is very low, probably because after irradiation, the remaining {sup 14}C was produced from {sup 13}C activation in the crystalline structure of graphite. (authors)

  14. Role of graphite layers in gravitational deformation of pelitic schist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Shintaro

    2016-04-01

    We examined microscopic textures in drillcore samples obtained from landslide masses of pelitic schist, a rock type that is known to be susceptible to deep-seated gravitational slope deformation. We performed simple shear tests on artificial rock samples both with and without graphite layers placed between pre-cut shear surfaces under normal stresses up to 800 kPa (equivalent to 32 m depth of burial) and on similar samples with graphite sheets embedded along the uncut shear plane under normal stresses up to 200 kPa (equivalent to 8 m depth). Pelitic schist commonly contains black layers of millimeters to centimeters thickness that are typically weaker than neighboring whitish layers. Ductile gravitational shearing commonly occurs along the black layers and is accompanied by brittle fracture in the whitish layers. The color of the black layers reflects the presence of microscopic grains of graphite, a known solid lubricant. The coefficients of friction for samples with graphite layers embedded in the artificial rock samples (0.30) were much lower than those without graphite layers on the pre-cut surface (0.85). The shear strength of the artificial rocks with embedded layers of graphite decreased abruptly with increasing areal extent of the graphite layer along the shear surface, from which it can be inferred that the continuity of a graphite layer in natural pelitic schist has a considerable effect on shear resistance. A coefficient of friction of 0.30 is equal to a friction angle of 16.7°, suggesting that such a gentle dip of schistosity of pelitic schist could initiate microscopic slip along the black layers. If the schistosity is downslope, slip would be more likely to occur.

  15. Reduced graphite oxide in supercapacitor electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobato, Belén; Vretenár, Viliam; Kotrusz, Peter; Hulman, Martin; Centeno, Teresa A

    2015-05-15

    The current energy needs have put the focus on highly efficient energy storage systems such as supercapacitors. At present, much attention focuses on graphene-like materials as promising supercapacitor electrodes. Here we show that reduced graphite oxide offers a very interesting potential. Materials obtained by oxidation of natural graphite and subsequent sonication and reduction by hydrazine achieve specific capacitances as high as 170 F/g in H2SO4 and 84F/g in (C2H5)4NBF4/acetonitrile. Although the particle size of the raw graphite has no significant effect on the physico-chemical characteristics of the reduced materials, that exfoliated from smaller particles (<75 μm) result more advantageous for the release of the stored electrical energy. This effect is particularly evident in the aqueous electrolyte. Graphene-like materials may suffer from a drop in their specific surface area upon fabrication of electrodes with features of the existing commercial devices. This should be taken into account for a reliable interpretation of their performance in supercapacitors.

  16. Computational prediction of dust production in graphite moderated pebble bed reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostamian, Maziar

    wear rate is obtained. The nonlinear wear law proposed in this study serves as a model to predict the effect of changing surface topology on the wear behavior of graphite. This tribological model is valid for applications where mass removal is in the form of powder formation rather than flake or chip formation. Dust explosion tests performed by Poulsen, University of Idaho, under the same project, have revealed that the smallest amount of graphite dust mass that can lead to explosions is three orders of magnitudes larger than the maximum amount predicted to be generated in the present work. Therefore, it is concluded that pebble-pebble frictional contact is not a plausible source of dust generation and subsequent explosion hazard under normal operating conditions or even accident scenarios. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  17. An evaluation on fatigue crack growth in a fine-grained isotropic graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Hongtao; Sun Libin [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Li Chenfeng [College of Engineering, Swansea University, Singleton Park, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); Shi Li [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Wang Haitao, E-mail: wanght@tsinghua.edu.cn [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The propagation of micro- and macro-fatigue cracks in IG-11 graphite was studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The curves of the fatigue crack growth rate versus the SIF range show three stages. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fatigue microcrack propagation is very sensitive to graphite's microstructures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Graphite's microstructures have no significant impact on fatigue macrocrack growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fatigue fracture surface indicates the fracture mechanism of the IG-11 graphite. - Abstract: The aim of this paper is to investigate the mechanism of fatigue crack propagation in IG-11 graphite, and determine the crack growth rate in relation to the stress level. Experimental studies were performed at both micro and macro scales. For fatigue microcrack propagation, single-edge-notch specimens were chosen for testing and the fatigue crack growth was measured in situ with a scanning electron microscope. For fatigue macrocrack propagation, CT specimens were used and the fatigue crack growth was measured with a high-accuracy optic microscope. Combining the two groups of experimental results, the following conclusions are derived: (1) The heterogeneous microstructures of the graphite material have significant impact on the fatigue microcrack growth, while their influence on fatigue macrocrack growth is very limited. (2) The relationship between the fatigue crack growth rate and the crack-tip stress intensity factor range can be expressed in the form of Paris formulae, which contains three stages: an initial rising part with a small slope, an abrupt rise with a very large acceleration, and a short final part with a small slope. (3) The fatigue fracture surface of the graphite material contains considerable sliding of leaf-shape graphite flakes combined with small cotton-shape plastic deformations. These sliding traces are approximately aligned at 45 Degree-Sign , showing the

  18. Mechanism of the Forming of Nodular Graphite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    This article presents a theory about the growth mechanism of bubble-screw dislocation of nodular graphite. Normally speaking, the crystallizing procedure of most nodular graphite is as follows: firstly, graphite generates nuclei on bubbles and fills them (mainly in the way of screw dislocation) forming the complete nuclei of nodular graphite-graphite bubble nuclei. Then, graphite grows up in the way of screw dislocation. Two important conditions concerning the production of nodular graphite are: (a) there is a relatively big interfacial energy between ferro liquid and graphite, and the one between ferro liquid and graphite prismatic plane is bigger than that between ferro liquid and graphite basal plane; (b) there are a certain amount of micro-bubbles in the melt.

  19. Nanoporous silicon flakes as anode active material for lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-You; Lee, Jeong-Hwa; Kim, Han-Jung

    2017-01-01

    Nanoporous-silicon (np-Si) flakes were prepared using a combination of an electrochemical etching process and an ultra-sonication treatment and the electrochemical properties were studied as an anode active material for rechargeable lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). This fabrication method is a simple, reproducible, and cost effective way to make high-performance Si-based anode active materials in LIBs. The anode based on np-Si flakes exhibited a higher performances (lower capacity fade rate, stability and excellent rate capability at high C-rate) than the anode based on Si nanowires. The excellent performance of the np-Si flake anode was attributed to the hollowness (nanoporous structure) of the anode active material, which allowed it to accommodate a large volume change during cycling.

  20. Electrohydrodynamic printing for scalable MoS2 flake coating: application to gas sensing device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sooman; Cho, Byungjin; Bae, Jaehyun; Kim, Ah Ra; Lee, Kyu Hwan; Kim, Se Hyun; Hahm, Myung Gwan; Nam, Jaewook

    2016-10-01

    Scalable sub-micrometer molybdenum disulfide ({{MoS}}2) flake films with highly uniform coverage were created using a systematic approach. An electrohydrodynamic (EHD) printing process realized a remarkably uniform distribution of exfoliated {{MoS}}2 flakes on desired substrates. In combination with a fast evaporating dispersion medium and an optimal choice of operating parameters, the EHD printing can produce a film rapidly on a substrate without excessive agglomeration or cluster formation, which can be problems in previously reported liquid-based continuous film methods. The printing of exfoliated {{MoS}}2 flakes enabled the fabrication of a gas sensor with high performance and reproducibility for {{NO}}2 and {{NH}}3.

  1. Electronic structure and field emission properties of nitrogen doped graphene nano-flakes (GNFs:N) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs:N)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, Sekhar C., E-mail: Raysc@unisa.ac.za [Department of Physics, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, University of South Africa, Private Bag X6, Florida, 1710, Science Campus, Christiaan de Wet and Pioneer Avenue, Florida Park, Johannesburg (South Africa); Pong, W.F. [Department of Physics, Tamkang University, Tamsui 251, New Taipei City, Taiwan (China); Papakonstantinou, P. [Nanotechnology and Integrated Bio-Engineering Centre, University of Ulster, Shore Road, Newtownabbey BT37 0QB (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-01

    Highlights: • Nitrogen doped graphene nano-flakes (GNFs:N) and carbon nano-tubes (CNTs:N) are used to study the electronic/bonding structure along with their defects state. • The I{sub D}/I{sub G} ratio obtained from Raman spectroscopy used for the study of the defects states of CNTs:N than GNFs:N. • The electron field emission result shows that the turn on electric field is lower in case of CNTs:N than GNFs:N. • All results are good agreement with XANES and the results obtained from Raman spectra. - Abstract: Substitution of hetero-atom doping is a promising route to modulate the outstanding material properties of carbon nanotubes and graphene for customized applications. Nitrogen-doping has been introduced to ensure tunable work-function, enhanced n-type carrier concentration, diminished surface energy, and manageable polarization. Along with the promising assessment of N-doping effects, research on the N-doped carbon based composite structures is emerging for the synergistic integration with various functional materials. Nitrogen undoped/doped graphene nano-flakes (GNFs/GNFs:N) and multiwall carbon nano-tubes (MWCNTs/MWCNTs:N) are used for comparative study of their electronic/bonding structure along with their defects state. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy shows that the GNFs:N produce mainly pyridine like structure; whereas MWCNTs:N shows graphitic nitrogen atoms are attached with the carbon lattice. The I{sub D}/I{sub G} ratio obtained from Raman spectroscopy shows that the defects is higher in MWCNTs:N than GNFs:N. The electron field emission result shows that the turn on electric field is lower (higher electron emission current) in case of MWCNTs:N than GNFs:N and are good agreement with XANES and the results obtained from Raman spectra.

  2. Supersonically blown nylon-6 nanofibers entangled with graphene flakes for water purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Gun; Kim, Do-Yeon; Mali, Mukund G.; Al-Deyab, Salem S.; Swihart, Mark T.; Yoon, Sam S.

    2015-11-01

    Water purification membranes, capable of purifying a few to tens of milliliters of aqueous methylene blue solution in a minute, were produced by supersonically blowing graphene flakes with a nylon-6 polymeric solution. The solution-blown nylon-6 nanofibers became entangled with graphene flakes thereby locking the graphene flakes within the frame of the bendable two-dimensional film structure. This method, which yielded a 5 × 7 cm2-sized membrane in less than 10 seconds, is commercially viable owing to fast fabrication and scalability. We show that our water purification device allows a flow rate range of 0.3-4 L h-1 with a membrane area of just 5 cm2, under a pressure difference of 0.5-3.5 bar. If the membrane were scaled up to 0.5 m2, it could provide 300-4000 L h-1 flow rate, an ample supply for home use.Water purification membranes, capable of purifying a few to tens of milliliters of aqueous methylene blue solution in a minute, were produced by supersonically blowing graphene flakes with a nylon-6 polymeric solution. The solution-blown nylon-6 nanofibers became entangled with graphene flakes thereby locking the graphene flakes within the frame of the bendable two-dimensional film structure. This method, which yielded a 5 × 7 cm2-sized membrane in less than 10 seconds, is commercially viable owing to fast fabrication and scalability. We show that our water purification device allows a flow rate range of 0.3-4 L h-1 with a membrane area of just 5 cm2, under a pressure difference of 0.5-3.5 bar. If the membrane were scaled up to 0.5 m2, it could provide 300-4000 L h-1 flow rate, an ample supply for home use. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06549f

  3. Physical and sensory properties of corn flakes with added dry residue of wild oregano distillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Košutić Milenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the modern nutritionist opinions, cereal products such as flakes and snacks are the most common foods in the daily diet. Extrusion technology makes it possible to apply different sources of ingredients for the enrichment of cereal-based flakes or snack products. Substances with strong antioxidant properties such as wild oregano have a positive impact on human health. Therefore, they attract the attention of scientists, consumers and food industry experts. This paper investigates the effects of the simultaneous addition of dry residue from wild oregano distillation (0.5 g / 100g of sample and 1 g / 100g of sample, on the physical-textural and color properties of corn flakes in order to create a new product with improved nutritional properties. The addition of dry residue of wild oregano positively influenced physical characteristics (decreased bulk density 30.2 %, increased expansion rate 44.9 %, as well as texture hardness and the work of compression, 38.1 % and 40.3 %, respectively. Also, oregano significantly changed the color of flakes. Tukey’s HSD test showed statistically significant differences between most of the mean values of physical-textural, color and sensory attributes in the oregano-added corn flakes compared to the control sample. Principal component analysis has been applied to classify the samples according to differences in the studied parameters. The data pointed out that investigated corn flakes with the addition of wild oregano are new food products with good physical-textural and sensory properties due to a higher level of antioxidant activity. Moreover, it may contribute to the valorization of edible industrial waste in food production. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 46005 i br. TR 31027

  4. Intercalated hybrid graphite fiber composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaier, James R. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    The invention is directed to a highly conductive lightweight hybrid material and methods of producing the same. The hybrid composite is obtained by weaving strands of a high strength carbon or graphite fiber into a fabric-like structure, depositing a layer of carbon onto the structure, heat treating the structure to graphitize the carbon layer, and intercalating the graphitic carbon layer structure. A laminate composite material useful for protection against lightning strikes comprises at least one layer of the hybrid material over at least one layer of high strength carbon or graphite fibers. The composite material of the present invention is compatible with matrix compounds, has a coefficient of thermal expansion which is the same as underlying fiber layers, and is resistant to galvanic corrosion in addition to being highly conductive. These materials are useful in the aerospace industry, in particular as lightning strike protection for airplanes.

  5. 蠕铁生产的过程控制%Process Control for the Production of Compacted Graphite Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    史帝文·道森; 启明

    2012-01-01

    A thermal analysis-based measurement and process control system of compacted graphite iron (CGI) production was described. This system prevents flake graphite formation by simulating magnesium fade and thereafter conducting an on-line correction of the molten iron. This measurement and correclion control strategy can minimize process fluctuation and eliminate the risk associated with CGI production.%描述了基于热分析手段的蠕铁生产过程控制系统.该系统通过测量镁的损耗,以及在线调整铁液状态来防止片状石墨的产生.这种测量、调整的在线控制手段使生产蠕铁过程中的波动性降到最低,从根本上消除了蠕铁生产所带来的质量风险.

  6. Formation of water-soluble soybean polysaccharides from spent flakes by hydrogen peroxide treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pierce, Brian; Wichmann, Jesper; Tran, Tam H.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we propose a novel chemical process for the generation of water-soluble polysaccharides from soy spent flake, a by-product of the soy food industry. This process entails treatment of spent flake with hydrogen peroxide at an elevated temperature, resulting in the release of more than...... 70% of the original insoluble material as high molar mass soluble polysaccharides. A design of experiment was used to quantify the effects of pH, reaction time, and hydrogen peroxide concentration on the reaction yield, average molar mass, and free monosaccharides generated. The resulting product...

  7. Chemically exfoliated large-area two-dimensional flakes of molybdenum disulfide for device applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Pachauri

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A solution-based exfoliation method for obtaining large-area two-dimensional flakes of molybdenum disulfide, followed by the fabrication of electrical devices is presented in this manuscript. The exfoliation method is based on the use of an aprotic solvent, namely, acetonitrile under mild sonication steps. In order to fabricate devices, a dielectrophoresis technique is used for transferring MoS2 flakes site-specifically on to the electrode pairs pre-written on the glass chips. The devices fabricated thus can be operated as chemical sensor in liquids while investigations under photo illumination indicate that such devices can also efficiently function as photodetectors.

  8. Titanium Carbide-Graphite Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-11-08

    titanium carbide , titanium carbide with free graphite, titanium carbide /vanadium carbide alloy with free graphite, and titanium carbide with...from melts. The test pins were drawn across hot pressed titanium carbide wear plates with 5 newtons of normal force. The lowest friction coefficient at...22 C was 0.12 obtained with pure titanium carbide . The lowest friction coefficient at 900 C was 0.19 obtained with titanium carbide with boron and

  9. Influences of different graphite carbon sources on properties of MgO-C castables%不同石墨碳源对MgO-C浇注料性能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王冠; 张三华; 张新; 韦祎

    2012-01-01

    MgO-C castables with about 5 mass% (similarly hereinafter) carbon were prepared using fused magnesia and four graphite carbon sources including graphite pellets (PG) with about 35% carbon made from fused magnesia and flake graphite, coke graphite (CG) with 98.34% carbon, electrode graphite (EG) with 99.08% carbon and waste magnesia carbon bricks (MC). Influences of different graphite carbon sources on physical properties,oxidation resistance and slag resistance of the castables were studied. The results show that adding a proper amount of graphite carbon can significantly improve slag penetration resistance of magnesia based castables;the castables containing PG,CG and EG have lower apparent porosity,higher strength and better oxidation resistance than the castables containing MC;PG and MC containing flake graphite are more helpful to slag resistance of the castables than CG and EG with low graphitization degree,meanwhile,the uniform distribution of graphite in the form of small flake is very beneficial to slag resistance.%分别以电熔镁砂和4种石墨碳源——用电熔镁砂和鳞片石墨制成的w(C)≈35%的造粒石墨(PG)、w(C) =98.34%的焦炭石墨(CG)、w(C) =99.08%的电极石墨(EG)、废镁碳砖(MC)为原料,制备了碳含量均为5%(w)左右的MgO-C浇注料,研究了不同石墨碳源对浇注料物理性能、抗氧化性能和抗渣性能的影响.结果表明:加入适量石墨碳源可以显著提高镁质浇注料的抗渣渗透性;含PG、CG和EG的MgO-C浇注料比含MC的显气孔率低,强度更高,抗氧化性更好;与石墨化程度较低的CG、EG相比,含鳞片石墨的PG、MC更有利于MgO-C浇注料抗渣性能的提高,并且石墨以细小鳞片状的形式在基质中均匀分布对抗渣性非常有利.

  10. A contrastive study of three graphite anodes in the piperidinium based electrolytes for lithium ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Xiao-Tao; Wang, Chen-Yi; Gao, Kun, E-mail: gaokun0451@163.com; Niu, Li-Li; Li, Shu-Dan, E-mail: lishudan0451@163.com

    2016-02-15

    Graphical abstract: The fitting results of R{sub sei} and R{sub ct} of three graphite/Li cells. Besides three graphite/Li cells show the similar R{sub sei}, the NG198/Li cell demonstrates a higher R{sub ct} value in all test temperatures. Especially, the R{sub ct} at 333 K is even up to 355.8 Ω cm{sup 2}. Obviously, the narrow distribution of edge plane for NG198 caused this result, and then greatly restricts its cell capacity. By contrast, CMB with bigger specific surface area and more Li{sup +} insertion points shows lower resistance at room temperature, which should help to improve its capacity. - Highlights: • SEI film is closely related to graphite structures and formation temperature. • The graphite with bigger surface area and more Li{sup +} insertion points behaves better. • The graphite with narrow edge plane is uncompetitive for ionic liquid electrolyte. - Abstract: The electrochemical behaviors of natural graphite (NG198), artificial graphite (AG360) and carbon microbeads (CMB) in an ionic liquid based electrolyte are investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV). The surface and structure of three graphite materials are characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) before and after cycling. It is found that solid electrolyte interface (SEI) is closely related to graphite structure. Benefiting from larger specific surface area and more dispersed Li{sup +} insertion points, CMB shows a better Li{sup +} insertion/de-insertion behavior than NG198 and AG360. Furthermore, electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS) prove that the SEI of different graphite electrodes has different intrinsic resistance and Li{sup +} penetrability. By comparison, CMB behaves better cell performances than AG360, while the narrow edge plane makes NG198 uncompetitive as a potential anode for the ionic liquids (ILs)-type Li-ion battery.

  11. Controlled graphitization as a potential option for improving wear resistance of unalloyed white irons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patwardhan, A. K.; Kumar, S.; Singh, Prakash

    1998-08-01

    Effect of heat treatment on the microstructure and resistance to abrasive wear has been studied in an unalloyed white iron used for manufacturing cylindrical pebbles used as grinding media by the cement and other industries. Heat treatment comprised holding at 800 °C, 850 °C, 900 °C, and 950 °C for 30, 60, 90, 120, and 180 minutes followed by oil quenching. Heat treatment in general improved the wear resistance over that in the as-cast (as-received) state. The extent of maximum improvement differed with temperature and in the decreasing order occurred at (1) 180 minutes, 800 °C, OQ; (2) 30 minutes, 950 °C, OQ; (3) 90 minutes, 900 °C, OQ; and (4) 180 minutes, 850 °C, OQ. From the point of view of commercial application, the heat treatment at (2) is most favored. Microstructural changes occurring during heat treating comprised (1) changes in matrix microstructure; (2) a reduction in volume fraction of massive carbides due to its part graphitization/destabilization; and (3) changes in graphite morphology, size, and distribution. Amongst the aforesaid changes, graphitization has emerged as the key parameter in improving wear resistance. Graphite morphology in a near-nodular form of optimum size and distribution was found to be most effective. Upon increasing the heat-treating temperature, the tendency of nodules to develop spikes increased. Similarly, interlinking of graphite flakes was also observed. These features and the possible formation of free ferrite adversely affected wear resistance. The role of other beneficial changes in the microstructure, e.g., globularization of carbides, possible retention of austenite, and formation of optimum volume fraction of martensite, have been duly considered while optimizing microstructure(s). The key feature of the present study is that, despite its fundamental significance, it has a well-focused application potential.

  12. FORMULASI FLAKES PATI GARUT DAN TEPUNG IKAN LELE DUMBO (Clarias gariepinus SEBAGAI PANGAN KAYA ENERGI PROTEIN DAN MINERAL UNTUK LANSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firda Amalia

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTThe objective of this study was to produce arrowroot starch flakes with dumbo catfish (Clarias gariepinus flour, as a rich energy, protein, and mineral food for elderly. Design of this study was complete randomized design with four formulas and each combination was replicated two times. A selected formula was determined based on semi trained panelists preference. Acceptance of selected flakes formula was examined by elderly using hedonic test. Flakes by addition of 33.00% of dumbo catfish flour was the selected formula. The chemical properties for selected flakes were as follows 4.00% of water, 4.84% ash, 16.90% protein, 5.21% fat, 69.06% carbohydrate, 14.48% calcium, and 8.61% phosphor. The selected flakes contain 391 kcals energy per 100 g. The selected flakes had contributed more than 20.00% of energy, protein, calcium, and phosphor for elderly people so it can be claimed as a food product rich in energy, protein and minerals.Keywords: arrowroot starch, dumbo catfish flour, flakes, mineral, proteinABSTRAKTujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk menghasilkan flakes pati garut dan tepung ikan lele dumbo (Clarias gariepinus sebagai pangan kaya energi, protein, dan mineral untuk lansia. Desain penelitian menggunakan Rancangan Acak Lengkap dengan empat formula dan setiap kombinasi diulang dua kali. Formula terpilih ditentukan berdasarkan preferensi panelis agak terlatih. Penerimaan flakes terpilih oleh lansia dilakukan dengan menggunakan uji hedonik. Flakes dengan penambahan tepung ikan lele dumbo sebanyak 33.00% merupakan formula terpilih. Sifat kimia flakes terpilih yaitu 4.00% kadar air, 4.84% abu, 16.90% protein, 5.21% lemak, 69.06% karbohidrat, 14.48% kalsium, dan 8.61% fosfor. Flakes terpilih mengandung 391 kkal energi per 100 g. Flakes terpilih memiliki kontribusi lebih dari 20.00% untuk energi, protein, mineral kalsium, dan fosfor untuk lansia sehingga dapat diklaim sebagai produk makanan yang kaya energi, protein, dan mineral.Kata kunci

  13. Effects of temperature on internal friction of Graphit-iC graphite-like carbon coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhi-yong; Shi, Wen; Wan, Zi; Yuan, Jun-feng; Li, Xiao

    2013-12-01

    Graphit-iC graphite-like carbon coatings were deposited on SDC90 cold work die steel by using an unbalanced magnetron sputtering technology. Effects of the temperature on microstructure and internal friction of the carbon coatings were characterized by Raman spectroscopy (Raman) and a low-frequency mechanical analyzer (LMA-1) testing system. The results indicate that the internal friction of the two-side deposited carbon coatings is small (2.17×10-4), being higher than one of the substrate (1.63×10-4), and increases with temperature. However, there is an internal friction peak at 250°C accompanied with partial sp3 transferred to sp2 and increasing the intensity ratio ID/IG. There is gradual graphitization tendency of the carbon coatings as temperatures increase from 25°C to 350 °C. This would be progressive transformation from amorphous to crystalline.

  14. Possible room temperature superconductivity in conductors obtained by bringing alkanes into contact with a graphite surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasushi Kawashima

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Electrical resistances of conductors obtained by bringing alkanes into contact with a graphite surface have been investigated at room temperatures. Ring current in a ring-shaped container into which n-octane-soaked thin graphite flakes were compressed did not decay for 50 days at room temperature. After two HOPG plates were immersed into n-heptane and n-octane at room temperature, changes in resistances of the two samples were measured by four terminal technique. The measurement showed that the resistances of these samples decrease to less than the smallest resistance that can be measured with a high resolution digital voltmeter (0.1μV. The observation of persistent currents in the ring-shaped container suggests that the HOPG plates immersed in n-heptane and n-octane really entered zero-resistance state at room temperature. These results suggest that room temperature superconductor may be obtained by bringing alkanes into contact with a graphite surface.

  15. MODERN TECHNOLOGIES FOR APPLYING THE THERMAL INSULATIONS BASED ON CELLULOSE FLAKES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela FIAT

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents cellulose thermal insulations based on cellulose flakes applied "in situ", by blowoutunder pressure. This mechanized method is using pneumatic systems with complex adjustments in order toobtain different densities and flow rates, when spraying the cellulose fibbers into the spaces to be insulated.

  16. Use of crude glycerin in steam-flaked corn-based growing diets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Three experiments were conducted to evaluate the use of crude glycerin in steam-flaked corn (SFC) based beef cattle growing diets. Experiment 1 utilized 50 crossbred steers (initial body weight (BW) = 282 +/- 2 kg) to determine the effects glycerin concentration (0.0, 2.5, 5.0, 7.5, and 10.0% dry ma...

  17. Erosion and Soil Contamination Control Using Coconut Flakes And Plantation Of Centella Asiatica And Chrysopogon Zizanioides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roslan, Rasyikin; Che Omar, Rohayu; Nor Zuliana Baharuddin, Intan; Zulkarnain, M. S.; Hanafiah, M. I. M.

    2016-11-01

    Land degradation in Malaysia due to water erosion and water logging cause of loss of organic matter, biodiversity and slope instability but also land are contaminated with heavy metals. Various alternative such as physical remediation are use but it not showing the sustainability in term of environmental sustainable. Due to that, erosion and soil contamination control using coconut flakes and plantation of Centella asiatica and Chrysopogon zizanioides are use as alternative approach for aid of sophisticated green technology known as phytoremediation and mycoremediation. Soil from cabonaceous phyllite located near to Equine Park, Sri Kembangan are use for monitoring the effect of phytoremediation and mycoremediation in reducing soil contamination and biotechnology for erosion control. Five laboratory scale prototypes were designed to monitor the effect of different proportion of coconut flakes i.e. 10%, 25%, 50% & 100% and plantation of Centella asiatica and Chrysopogon zizanioides to reduce the top soil from eroding and reduce the soil contamination. Prototype have been observe started from first week and ends after 12 weeks. Centella asiatica planted on 10% coconut flakes with 90% soil and Chrysopogon zizanioides planted on 25% coconut flakes with 75% soil are selected proportion to be used as phytoremediation and mycoremediation in reducing soil contamination and biotechnology for erosion control.

  18. Post-extraction algal residue in steam-flaked corn-based diets for beef cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of post-extraction algal residue (PEAR) as N source 23 in steam-flaked corn-based (SFC) beef cattle finishing diets on intake, duodenal flow, digestion, ruminal microbial efficiency, ruminal parameters, and blood constituents were evaluated. Ruminally and duodenally cannulated steers (BW...

  19. Electromagnetic properties of flake-shaped Fe–Si alloy particles prepared by ball milling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Lei [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Jiang, Jian-Tang [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Department of Physics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Wang, Zeng-Quan [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Gong, Yuan-Xun [Department of Physics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Aerospace Research Institute of Special Material and Processing Technology, Beijing 100074 (China); Liu, Chao [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Zhen, Liang, E-mail: lzhen@hit.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); MOE Key Laboratory of Micro-system and Micro-structures Manufacturing, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150080 (China)

    2014-11-15

    Flake-shaped Fe–Si alloy particles with high aspect ratios were fabricated by ball milling commercially available Fe–Si powder, aiming to fabricate high-performance microwave absorbing fillers for coatings applied in 1–4 GHz range. To compare with spherical particles, higher permittivity and permeability was observed by using flaky particles as fillers. High aspect ratios contributed to an enhanced dielectric relaxation in the 1–4 GHz band, resulting in an increased permittivity. The thin thickness together with the high resistivity of Fe–Si flakes was believed to be helpful for suppressing the effect of eddy current and thus lead to an increase in the permeability. The electromagnetic wave absorbing (EMA) performances were observed to be enhanced. With a thin thickness of 2 mm, a wide absorption band with a minimum reflection loss of −12 dB was achieved in 1–4 GHz range, when using 75 wt% of flaky Fe–Si particles as fillers. The study indicated that flake-shaped Fe–Si particles were a promising candidate for EMA materials in L and S bands. - Highlights: • Flaky Fe–Si alloy particles were prepared in large scale via a simple ball milling method. • Coatings containing flakes Fe–Si particles present excellent EMA performance in L–S band. • The high shape anisotropy and the thin thickness contribute to the excellent EM property.

  20. METABOLIC AND BIOCHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF PROBIOTIC CULTURE IN MILK SUPPLEMENTED WITH RYE FLAKES AND MALT EXTRACT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Bărăscu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Rye flakes and malt extract were added to milk in order to stimulate growth and fermentative activity of probioticbacteria and to obtain a probiotic product with pleasant sensory attributes. Probiotic culture used in this study containsbifidobacteria, Lb. acidophilus, Lactobacilus lactis and Streptococcus thermophilus.Rye flakes have a stimulating effect more pronounced than malt extract on acidification capacity of the probioticculture, and to achieve an increase of the milk acidity of 7g lactic acid /dm3 (in 6h at 39oC the two ingredients must beadded in concentration of 2% and, respectively, 0.2%..The probiotic culture reach the greatest proteolytic activity when rye flakes are added in the proportion of 3% andmalt extract in the proportion of 0.1% and the amino acids released rate was 764.6 μg%. The lactose bioconversionrate was greater in the milk supplemented with rye flakes 3% and malt extract 0.1% and residual lactose was 3.84%.

  1. effectof extrusion conditions on aflatoxin content of corn–peanut flakes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aynadis

    ... operating conditions on the reduction of total and individual aflatoxins ... cereals, flakes, breading crumbs and animal feeds. .... rotating twin screw food extruder (model. Clextral, BC-21 .... accepted at 0.05 level of probability. (p<0.05). .... The collective action of the ... monostea rate on the extrusion behavior of maize grits ...

  2. Influence of particle structure on electrochemical character of composite graphite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The natural graphite has been used as the anode material for Lithium-Ion batteries, because of its low cost, chemical stability and excellent reversibility for Li+ insertion. However, the slow diffusion rate of lithium ion and poor compatibility with electrolyte solutions make it difficult to use in some conditions. In order to solve these problems, an epoxy-coke/graphite composite has been manufactured. The particle of composite carbonaceous material coated on non-graphitizable (hard) carbon matrix. Due to the disordered structure,the diffusion rate of lithium species in the non-graphitzable carbon is remarkably fast and less anisotropic. The process for preparing a composite carbon powder provides a promising new anode material with superior electrochemical properties for Li-ion batteries. The unique structure of epoxy-coke/graphite composite electrodes results in much better kinetics, also better recharge ability and initial charge/discharge efficiency.

  3. An Facile High-Density Polyethylene - Exfoliated Graphite - Aluminium Hydroxide Composite: Manufacture, Morphology, Structure, Antistatic and Fireproof Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihui LI

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Graphite intercalation compounds (GIC and exfoliated graphite (EG as raw materials were prepared with flake graphite, concentrated sulphuric acid (H2SO4, potassium bichromate (K2Cr2O7 and peracetic acid (CH3CO3H and characterized. Then, high-density polyethylene-exfoliated graphite (HDPE-EG composites were fabricated with HDPE and EG via in situ synthesis technique in the different mass ratio, and their resistivity values (ohms/sq were measured. Based on the resistivity values, it was discovered that HDPE-EG composite with the antistatic property could be fabricated while the mass ratio was 5.00 : 0.30. Last, HDPE-EG-aluminium hydroxide (HDPE-EG-Al(OH3 composites were manufactured with HDPE, GIC and Al(OH3 via the in situ synthesis-thermal expansion technique, and their resistivity values and limiting oxygen index (LOI values were measured. Based on the resistivity values and LOI values, it was discovered that HDPE-EG-Al(OH3 composite with the antistatic and fireproof property could be manufactured while HDPE, GICs and Al(OH3 of mass ratio was 5.00 : 0.30 : 1.00. Otherwise, the petal-like morphology and structure of HDPE-EG-Al(OH3 composite were characterized, which consisted of EG, HDPE and Al(OH3. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.20.3.4275

  4. 石墨填充聚丙烯导热复合材料%Polypropylene/Graphite Composite with Thermal Conductivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    燕莎; 苑会林; 刘颖; 吴大鸣; 侯立军

    2012-01-01

    PP/graphite composite was prepared by twin-screw extrusion. The study of the relation of thermal conductivity of composite and graphite content showed that the thermal conductivity of composite increased with the increase of the graphite content. Compared to that of low carbon graphite filled polypropylene, the thermal conductivity of high carbon graphite filled polypropylene was increased by 10. 9 % under the same graphite content. Compared small size particles of graphite with big size particles, thermal conductivity of the small particles composite was increased by 19 % . After treatment with Titanate coupling agent TM-38S,the compatibility of graphite and polypropylene and the thermal conductivity of composite could be improved,when the coupling agent content was 1 phr, thermal conductivity increased by 12 % , and adding the expanded graphite in the flake graphite could also improve the thermal conductivity of composite.%聚丙烯(PP)与石墨通过双螺杆共混挤出制备了导热复合材料.研究表明:复合材料的热导率随石墨含量的增加而增加;在相同石墨含量下,高碳石墨填充聚丙烯比低碳石墨填充聚丙烯的热导率提高了10.9%;采用小粒径的石墨比大粒径石墨将复合材料的热导率提高了19%;钛酸酯偶联剂可以改善石墨与聚丙烯的相容性并提高复合材料的热导率,当偶联剂含量为1份时,热导率提高了12%;同时在鳞片石墨中复合添加膨胀石墨也可以提高复合材料的热导率;导热通路形成会伴随着聚合物熔体流动性能的降低.

  5. Thermal Pyrolytic Graphite Enhanced Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardesty, Robert E. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A thermally conductive composite material, a thermal transfer device made of the material, and a method for making the material are disclosed. Apertures or depressions are formed in aluminum or aluminum alloy. Plugs are formed of thermal pyrolytic graphite. An amount of silicon sufficient for liquid interface diffusion bonding is applied, for example by vapor deposition or use of aluminum silicon alloy foil. The plugs are inserted in the apertures or depressions. Bonding energy is applied, for example by applying pressure and heat using a hot isostatic press. The thermal pyrolytic graphite, aluminum or aluminum alloy and silicon form a eutectic alloy. As a result, the plugs are bonded into the apertures or depressions. The composite material can be machined to produce finished devices such as the thermal transfer device. Thermally conductive planes of the thermal pyrolytic graphite plugs may be aligned in parallel to present a thermal conduction path.

  6. Dust particle formation due to interaction between graphite and helicon deuterium plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwashita, Shinya, E-mail: shinya.iwashita@rub.de [Department of Electronics, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Nishiyama, Katsushi; Uchida, Giichiro; Seo, Hyunwoong; Itagaki, Naho; Koga, Kazunori [Department of Electronics, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Shiratani, Masaharu, E-mail: siratani@ed.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Electronics, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan)

    2013-01-15

    The collection of dust particles using divertor simulation helicon plasmas has been carried out to examine dust formation due to the interaction between a graphite target and deuterium plasmas, which are planned to operate in the large helical device (LHD) at the Japanese National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS). The collected dust particles are classified into three types: (i) small spherical particles below 400 nm in size, (ii) agglomerates whose primary particles have a size of about 10 nm, and (iii) large flakes above 1 {mu}m in size. These features are quite similar to those obtained through hydrogen plasma operation, indicating that the dust formation mechanisms due to the interaction between a carbon wall and a plasma of deuterium, which is the isotope of hydrogen, is probably similar to those of hydrogen.

  7. Friction anisotropy in boronated graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, N., E-mail: niranjan@igcar.gov.in [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Radhika, R. [Crystal Growth Centre, Anna University, Chennai (India); Kozakov, A.T. [Research Institute of Physics, Southern Federal University, Rostov-on-Don (Russian Federation); Pandian, R. [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Chakravarty, S. [UGC-DAE CSR, Kalpakkam (India); Ravindran, T.R.; Dash, S.; Tyagi, A.K. [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Friction anisotropy in boronated graphite is observed in macroscopic sliding condition. • Low friction coefficient is observed in basal plane and becomes high in prismatic direction. • 3D phase of boronated graphite transformed into 2D structure after friction test. • Chemical activity is high in prismatic plane forming strong bonds between the sliding interfaces. - Abstract: Anisotropic friction behavior in macroscopic scale was observed in boronated graphite. Depending upon sliding speed and normal loads, this value was found to be in the range 0.1–0.35 in the direction of basal plane and becomes high 0.2–0.8 in prismatic face. Grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction analysis shows prominent reflection of (0 0 2) plane at basal and prismatic directions of boronated graphite. However, in both the wear tracks (1 1 0) plane become prominent and this transformation is induced by frictional energy. The structural transformation in wear tracks is supported by micro-Raman analysis which revealed that 3D phase of boronated graphite converted into a disordered 2D lattice structure. Thus, the structural aspect of disorder is similar in both the wear tracks and graphite transfer layers. Therefore, the crystallographic aspect is not adequate to explain anisotropic friction behavior. Results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy shows weak signature of oxygen complexes and functional groups in wear track of basal plane while these species dominate in prismatic direction. Abundance of these functional groups in prismatic plane indicates availability of chemically active sites tends to forming strong bonds between the sliding interfaces which eventually increases friction coefficient.

  8. Method of Joining Graphite Fibers to a Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beringer, Durwood M. (Inventor); Caron, Mark E. (Inventor); Taddey, Edmund P. (Inventor); Gleason, Brian P. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A method of assembling a metallic-graphite structure includes forming a wetted graphite subassembly by arranging one or more layers of graphite fiber material including a plurality of graphite fibers and applying a layer of metallization material to ends of the plurality of graphite fibers. At least one metallic substrate is secured to the wetted graphite subassembly via the layer of metallization material.

  9. Raman characterization of bulk ferromagnetic nanostructured graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pardo, Helena, E-mail: hpardo@fq.edu.uy [Centro NanoMat, Polo Tecnologico de Pando, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad de la Republica, Cno. Aparicio Saravia s/n, 91000, Pando, Canelones (Uruguay); Crystallography, Solid State and Materials Laboratory (Cryssmat-Lab), DETEMA, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad de la Republica, Gral. Flores 2124, P.O. Box 1157, Montevideo (Uruguay); Divine Khan, Ngwashi [Mantfort University, Leicester (United Kingdom); Faccio, Ricardo [Centro NanoMat, Polo Tecnologico de Pando, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad de la Republica, Cno. Aparicio Saravia s/n, 91000, Pando, Canelones (Uruguay); Crystallography, Solid State and Materials Laboratory (Cryssmat-Lab), DETEMA, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad de la Republica, Gral. Flores 2124, P.O. Box 1157, Montevideo (Uruguay); Araujo-Moreira, F.M. [Grupo de Materiais e Dispositivos-CMDMC, Departamento de Fisica e Engenharia Fisica, UFSCar, Caixa Postal 676, 13565-905, Sao Carlos SP (Brazil); Fernandez-Werner, Luciana [Centro NanoMat, Polo Tecnologico de Pando, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad de la Republica, Cno. Aparicio Saravia s/n, 91000, Pando, Canelones (Uruguay); Crystallography, Solid State and Materials Laboratory (Cryssmat-Lab), DETEMA, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad de la Republica, Gral. Flores 2124, P.O. Box 1157, Montevideo (Uruguay)

    2012-08-15

    Raman spectroscopy was used to characterize bulk ferromagnetic graphite samples prepared by controlled oxidation of commercial pristine graphite powder. The G:D band intensity ratio, the shape and position of the 2D band and the presence of a band around 2950 cm{sup -1} showed a high degree of disorder in the modified graphite sample, with a significant presence of exposed edges of graphitic planes as well as a high degree of attached hydrogen atoms.

  10. Fabrication of Graphene by Cleaving Graphite Chemically

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Shu-hua; ZHAO Xiao-ting; FAN Hou-gang; YANG Li-li; ZHANG Yong-jun; YANG Jing-hai

    2011-01-01

    Graphite was chemically cleaved to graphene by Billups Reaction,and the morphologies and microstructures of graphene were characterized by SEM,Raman and AFM.The results show that the graphite was first functionalized by l-iodododecane,which led to the cleavage of the graphene layer in the graphite.The second decoration cleaved the graphite further and graphene was obtained.The heights of the graphene layer were larger than 1 nm due to the organic decoration.

  11. Photoemission study of K on graphite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bennich, P.; Puglia, C.; Brühwiler, P.A.; Nilsson, A.; Sandell, A.; Mårtensson, N.; Rudolf, P.

    1999-01-01

    The physical and electronic structure of the dispersed and (2×2) phases of K/graphite have been characterized by valence and core-level photoemission. Charge transfer from K to graphite is found to occur at all coverages, and includes transfer of charge to the second graphite layer. A rigid band

  12. Separation medium containing thermally exfoliated graphite oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prud'homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Herrera-Alonso, Margarita (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A separation medium, such as a chromatography filling or packing, containing a modified graphite oxide material, which is a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 m.sup.2/g to 2600 m.sup.2/g, wherein the thermally exfoliated graphite oxide has a surface that has been at least partially functionalized.

  13. Electronic structure and field emission properties of nitrogen doped graphene nano-flakes (GNFs:N) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs:N)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Sekhar C.; Pong, W. F.; Papakonstantinou, P.

    2016-09-01

    Substitution of hetero-atom doping is a promising route to modulate the outstanding material properties of carbon nanotubes and graphene for customized applications. Nitrogen-doping has been introduced to ensure tunable work-function, enhanced n-type carrier concentration, diminished surface energy, and manageable polarization. Along with the promising assessment of N-doping effects, research on the N-doped carbon based composite structures is emerging for the synergistic integration with various functional materials. Nitrogen undoped/doped graphene nano-flakes (GNFs/GNFs:N) and multiwall carbon nano-tubes (MWCNTs/MWCNTs:N) are used for comparative study of their electronic/bonding structure along with their defects state. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy shows that the GNFs:N produce mainly pyridine like structure; whereas MWCNTs:N shows graphitic nitrogen atoms are attached with the carbon lattice. The ID/IG ratio obtained from Raman spectroscopy shows that the defects is higher in MWCNTs:N than GNFs:N. The electron field emission result shows that the turn on electric field is lower (higher electron emission current) in case of MWCNTs:N than GNFs:N and are good agreement with XANES and the results obtained from Raman spectra.

  14. Anisotropic growth of single-crystal graphite plates by nickel-assisted microwave-plasma chemical-vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badzian, Teresa; Badzian, Andrzej; Roy, Rustum; Cheng, Shang-Cong

    2000-02-01

    Growth of single-crystal graphite free-standing plates has been achieved by a microwavehydrogen-plasma etching of graphite powder and nickel mesh. The plates resemble a knife blade and grow in the direction with long crystals exceeding 100 μm. Hexagonal growth features at the edges and electron diffraction patterns confirm the single-crystal nature of these ultrathin plates. Electron microprobe and Raman spectroscopy indicate the presence of graphite. Diamond crystals nucleate on these plates and they grow simultaneously. We suggest that the paradoxical growth of graphite in a hydrogen plasma, under conditions in which graphite is usually etched away, is possible because of a protective coating by a Ni-C-H phase. This thin coating allows for transport of carbon atoms from the gas phase to the growing graphite surface.

  15. Decontamination of nuclear graphite by thermal processing; Dekontamination von Nukleargraphit durch thermische Behandlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Florjan, Monika W.

    2010-04-15

    The main problem in view of the direct disposal of the nuclear graphite is its large volume. This waste contains long-lived and short-lived radionuclides which determine the waste strategy. The irradiated graphite possess high amount of the {sup 14}C isotope. The main object of the present work was the selective separation of {sup 14}C isotope from the isotope {sup 12}C by thermal treatment (pyrolysis, partial oxidation). A successful separation could reduce the radiotoxicity and offer a different disposal strategy. Three different graphite types were investigated. The samples originate from the reflector and from the flaking of spherical fuel elements of the high-temperature reactor (AVR) Juelich. The samples from the thermal column of the research reactor (Merlin, Juelich) were also investigated. The maximum tritium releases were obtained both in inert gas atmosphere (N{sub 2}) and under water vapour-oxidizing conditions at 1280 C and 900 C. Furthermore it could be shown that 28% of {sup 14}C could be released under inert gas conditions at a 1280 C. By additive of oxidizing agent such as water vapour and oxygen the {sup 14}C release could be increased. Under water vapour-oxidizing conditions at a temperature of 1280 C up to 93% of the {sup 14}C was separated from the graphite. The matrix corrosion of 5.4% was obtained. The selective separation of the {sup 14}C is possible, because a substantial part of the radiocarbon is bound near the grain boundary surfaces. (orig.)

  16. Superconductivity in graphite intercalation compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Robert P. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Weller, Thomas E.; Howard, Christopher A. [Department of Physics & Astronomy, University College of London, Gower Street, London WCIE 6BT (United Kingdom); Dean, Mark P.M. [Department of Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Rahnejat, Kaveh C. [Department of Physics & Astronomy, University College of London, Gower Street, London WCIE 6BT (United Kingdom); Saxena, Siddharth S. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Ellerby, Mark, E-mail: mark.ellerby@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Physics & Astronomy, University College of London, Gower Street, London WCIE 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Historical background of graphite intercalates. • Superconductivity in graphite intercalates and its place in the field of superconductivity. • Recent developments. • Relevant modeling of superconductivity in graphite intercalates. • Interpretations that pertain and questions that remain. - Abstract: The field of superconductivity in the class of materials known as graphite intercalation compounds has a history dating back to the 1960s (Dresselhaus and Dresselhaus, 1981; Enoki et al., 2003). This paper recontextualizes the field in light of the discovery of superconductivity in CaC{sub 6} and YbC{sub 6} in 2005. In what follows, we outline the crystal structure and electronic structure of these and related compounds. We go on to experiments addressing the superconducting energy gap, lattice dynamics, pressure dependence, and how these relate to theoretical studies. The bulk of the evidence strongly supports a BCS superconducting state. However, important questions remain regarding which electronic states and phonon modes are most important for superconductivity, and whether current theoretical techniques can fully describe the dependence of the superconducting transition temperature on pressure and chemical composition.

  17. Graphite oral tattoo: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Renata Mendonça; Gouvêa Lima, Gabriela de Morais; Guilhermino, Marinaldo; Vieira, Mayana Soares; Carvalho, Yasmin Rodarte; Anbinder, Ana Lia

    2015-10-16

    Pigmented oral lesions compose a large number of pathological entities, including exogenous pigmentat oral tattoos, such as amalgam and graphite tattoos. We report a rare case of a graphite tattoo on the palate of a 62-year-old patient with a history of pencil injury, compare it with amalgam tattoos, and determine the prevalence of oral tattoos in our Oral Pathology Service. We also compare the clinical and histological findings of grafite and amalgam tattoos. Oral tattoos affect women more frequently in the region of the alveolar ridge. Graphite tattoos occur in younger patients when compared with the amalgam type. Histologically, amalgam lesions represent impregnation of the reticular fibers of vessels and nerves with silver, whereas in cases of graphite tattoos, this impregnation is not observed, but it is common to observe a granulomatous inflammatory response, less evident in cases of amalgam tattoos. Both types of lesions require no treatment, but in some cases a biopsy may be done to rule out melanocytic lesions.

  18. Formation of water-soluble soybean polysaccharides from spent flakes by hydrogen peroxide treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Brian C; Wichmann, Jesper; Tran, Tam H; Cheetamun, Roshan; Bacic, Antony; Meyer, Anne S

    2016-06-25

    In this paper we propose a novel chemical process for the generation of water-soluble polysaccharides from soy spent flake, a by-product of the soy food industry. This process entails treatment of spent flake with hydrogen peroxide at an elevated temperature, resulting in the release of more than 70% of the original insoluble material as high molar mass soluble polysaccharides. A design of experiment was used to quantify the effects of pH, reaction time, and hydrogen peroxide concentration on the reaction yield, average molar mass, and free monosaccharides generated. The resulting product is low in protein, fat, and minerals and contains predominantly water-soluble polysaccharides of high molar mass, including arabinan, type I arabinogalactan, homogalacturonan, xyloglucan, rhamnogalacturonan, and (glucurono)arabinoxylan. This treatment provides a straightforward approach for generation of soluble soy polysaccharides and opens a new range of opportunities for this abundant and underutilized material in future research and industrial applications.

  19. Tannic acid assisted synthesis of flake-like hydroxyapatite nanostructures at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, Maricela Santana; Estevez, O.; Ascencio-Aguirre, F.; Mendoza-Cruz, R.; Bazán-Díaz, L.; Zorrila, C.; Herrera-Becerra, R.

    2016-09-01

    A simple and non-expensive procedure was performed to synthesize hydroxyapatite (HAp) flake-like nanostructures, by using a co-precipitation method with tannic acid as stabilizing agent at room temperature and freeze drying. Samples were synthesized with two different salts, Ca(NO3)2 and CaCl2. X-ray diffraction analysis, Raman spectroscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy characterizations reveal Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2 HAp particles with hexagonal structure and P63/m space group in both cases. In addition, the particle size was smaller than 20 nm. The advantage of this method over the works reported to date lies in the ease for obtaining HAp particles with a single morphology (flakes), in high yield. This opens the possibility of expanding the view to the designing of new composite materials based on the HAp synthesized at room temperature.

  20. [Book review] Waterfowl ecology and management: selected readings, by J. T. Ratti, L. D. Flake and W. A. Wentz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krapu, G.L.

    1983-01-01

    Review of: Waterfowl ecology and management: Selected readings. J. T. Ratti, L. D. Flake, and W. A. Wentz (Compilers). 1982. Bethesda, Maryland, The Wildlife Society, Inc. 1,328 pp. Paperbound. $20.00.

  1. Comparative adsorption of metal and dye on flake- and bead-types of chitosans prepared from fishery wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, F C; Tseng, R L; Juang, R S

    2000-03-13

    The adsorption capacities and rates of Cu(II) and a commercial reactive dye RR222 on flake- and bead-types of chitosans prepared from three fishery wastes (shrimp, crab, and lobster shells) were compared at 30 degrees C. It was shown that all equilibrium isotherms could be well fitted by the Langmuir equation. The adsorption capacity of Cu(II) on flake- and bead-types of chitosans appeared to be comparable, but the adsorption capacity of RR222 on bead type was much larger than that on flake type by a factor of 2. 0-3.8. The rates of dye adsorption on both types of chitosans indicated different controlling mechanisms. In addition, the bead type of chitosans exhibited a greater rate compared to the flake type.

  2. Graphite Surface Modification by Heterogeneous Nucleation Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Ran; LI Hongxia

    2006-01-01

    Flaky graphite particles were coated by ZrOCl2·8H2O as precursors by heterogeneous nucleation process.The effects of factors such as pH values (2.4-5.1),concentration of the precursor solution (0.005-0.1 mol·L-1 ) , mixing method of graphite and precursor solution on the surface modification of graphite were studied. Result shows that: 1) the preferable technical process for heterogeneous nucleation modified graphite is to mix the graphite suspension and precursor solution with concentration 0. 025 mol·L -1 and then drip ammonia water to adjust the pH value to 3.6; 2)By surface modification, the ZrO2 particles are evenly coated on graphite surface and therefore improve oxidation resistance and dispersion ability of graphite.

  3. AGC-2 Graphite Preirradiation Data Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Swank; Joseph Lord; David Rohrbaugh; William Windes

    2012-10-01

    The NGNP Graphite R&D program is currently establishing the safe operating envelope of graphite core components for a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design. The program is generating quantitative data necessary for predicting the behavior and operating performance of the new nuclear graphite grades. To determine the in-service behavior of the graphite for pebble bed and prismatic designs, the Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) experiment is underway. This experiment is examining the properties and behavior of nuclear grade graphite over a large spectrum of temperatures, neutron fluences and compressive loads. Each experiment consists of over 400 graphite specimens that are characterized prior to irradiation and following irradiation. Six experiments are planned with the first, AGC-1, currently being irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and pre-irradiation characterization of the second, AGC-2, completed. This data package establishes the readiness of 512 specimens for assembly into the AGC-2 capsule.

  4. Microstructure transformation of carbon nanofibers during graphitization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yong; TANG Yuan-hong; LIN Liang-wu; ZHANG En-lei

    2008-01-01

    The mierostructures of vapor-grown carbon nanofibers(CNFs) before and after graphitization process were analyzed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy(HRTEM), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometry(XRD), near-edge-X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy(NEXAFS) and thermogravimetric analysis(TGA). The results indicate that although non-graphitized CNFs have the characteristics of higher disorder, a transformation is found in the inner layer of tube wall where graphite sheets become stiff, which demonstrates the characteristics of higher graphitization of graphitized CNFs. The defects in outer tube wall disappear because the amorphous carbon changes to perfect crystalline carbon after annealing treatment at about 2 800 ℃. TGA analysis in air indicates that graphitized CNFs have excellent oxidation resistance up to 857 ℃. And the graphitization mechanism including four stages was also proposed.

  5. Effect of Flake Thickness on Coercivity of Nanocrystalline SmCo5 Bulk Prepared from Anisotropic Nanoflake Powder (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-23

    milling parameter of ball-to-powder weight ratio. XRD analysis revealed that as-milled flake powders possessed nanocrystalline grains with no observable...ball-to-powder weight ratio. XRD anal- ysis revealed that as-milled flake powders possessed nanocrystalline grains with no observable oxide peaks. The...grinded down to the designated particle size. The starting powder was milled in a stainless steel vial on a SPEX 8000 mill. Milling balls with

  6. Ductile extension of a lenticular bubble under high-energy ion bombardment with relation to blistering and flaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamada, K.; Higashida, Y.

    1981-09-01

    A theory is given which is based on a model of the ductile extension of a crack in a material and is capable of explaining the whole process of surface exfoliation phenomena under high-energy ion bombardment, including both blistering and flaking, on the same ground, starting from a very small nucleus of a lenticular bubbble. Further, the distinction between blistering and flaking is clarified, and the relation of the exfoliation phenomeon with local swelling due to bubble formation is presented.

  7. natural

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elías Gómez Macías

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Partiendo de óxido de magnesio comercial se preparó una suspensión acuosa, la cual se secó y calcinó para conferirle estabilidad térmica. El material, tanto fresco como usado, se caracterizó mediante DRX, área superficial BET y SEM-EPMA. El catalizador mostró una matriz de MgO tipo periclasa con CaO en la superficie. Las pruebas de actividad catalítica se efectuaron en lecho fijo empacado con partículas obtenidas mediante prensado, trituración y clasificación del material. El flujo de reactivos consistió en mezclas gas natural-aire por debajo del límite inferior de inflamabilidad. Para diferentes flujos y temperaturas de entrada de la mezcla reactiva, se midieron las concentraciones de CH4, CO2 y CO en los gases de combustión con un analizador de gases tipo infrarrojo no dispersivo (NDIR. Para alcanzar conversión total de metano se requirió aumentar la temperatura de entrada al lecho a medida que se incrementó el flujo de gases reaccionantes. Los resultados obtenidos permiten desarrollar un sistema de combustión catalítica de bajo costo con un material térmicamente estable, que promueva la alta eficiencia en la combustión de gas natural y elimine los problemas de estabilidad, seguridad y de impacto ambiental negativo inherentes a los procesos de combustión térmica convencional.

  8. Bioremediating oil spills in nutrient poor ocean waters using fertilized clay mineral flakes: some experimental constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warr, Laurence N; Friese, André; Schwarz, Florian; Schauer, Frieder; Portier, Ralph J; Basirico, Laura M; Olson, Gregory M

    2013-01-01

    Much oil spill research has focused on fertilizing hydrocarbon oxidising bacteria, but a primary limitation is the rapid dilution of additives in open waters. A new technique is presented for bioremediation by adding nutrient amendments to the oil spill using thin filmed minerals comprised largely of Fullers Earth clay. Together with adsorbed N and P fertilizers, filming additives, and organoclay, clay flakes can be engineered to float on seawater, attach to the oil, and slowly release contained nutrients. Our laboratory experiments of microbial activity on weathered source oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill in the Gulf of Mexico show fertilized clay treatment significantly enhanced bacterial respiration and consumption of alkanes compared to untreated oil-in-water conditions and reacted faster than straight fertilization. Whereas a major portion (up to 98%) of the alkane content was removed during the 1 month period of experimentation by fertilized clay flake interaction; the reduced concentration of polyaromatic hydrocarbons was not significantly different from the non-clay bearing samples. Such clay flake treatment could offer a way to more effectively apply the fertilizer to the spill in open nutrient poor waters and thus significantly reduce the extent and duration of marine oil spills, but this method is not expected to impact hydrocarbon toxicity.

  9. Undrained dynamical behavior of Nanjing flake-shaped fine sand under cyclic loading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈国兴; 刘雪珠; 战吉艳

    2008-01-01

    A series of dynamic behavior tests on Nanjing flake-shaped fine sand were performed by using the WFI cyclic triaxial apparatus made in England. The dynamic behaviors of Nanjing flake-shaped fine sand under different static deviator stress levels and cyclic stress ratios were studied. Through comparing the effective stress path under cyclic loading with static loading, the processes of liquefaction of saturated Nanjing flake-shaped fine sand with development of dynamic pore-water pressure, including the initial compact state, compression state and dilative state, were investigated. The variation of the shear stiffness with the number of cycles and cyclic strain was investigated by analyzing the secant shear modulus in each unload-reload loop of dynamic stress-strain relationship. And by means of the exponential function, the empirical equations of the relationship between secant shear modulus Gsec, shear modulus ratio Gsec/Gmax and cyclic strain ε were established based on series of test results. The results show that according to different combinations of static deviator stress and cyclic stress, two kinds of failure patterns with deviator stress reversal or no deviator stress reversal are observed in the samples tested in this series, including cyclic mobility and the failure of accumulation residual strain. In addition, the degradation of dynamic shear modulus is due to the development of vibration pore-water pressure and it is observed that the shear modulus reduces with the progressive number of cycles.

  10. Preparation of thalidomide nano-flakes by supercritical antisolvent with enhanced mass transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Heyang Jin; Melinda Hemingway; Ram B.Gupta; Fei Xia; Yaping Zhao

    2012-01-01

    Thalidomide treats multiple myeloma and protracts life-span of patient,but its bioavailability is limited as it is poorly water soluble.Thalidomide nano-flakes are produced to improve the drug dissolution rate.Two nanoflake production methods are utilized for a comparative study:a supercritical antisolvent (SAS) method and a supercritical antisolvent with enhanced mass transfer (SAS-EM).SAS-EM utilizes ultrasonication to improve dispersion upon injection within the supercritical carbon dioxide.Comparative study of SAS and SAS-EM thalidomide confirmed that the application of ultrasonication improved the micro/nano particles produced by SAS.The effects of ultrasound power on the formation of thalidomide particles are examined.The particle size and morphology were characterized by SEM.The thalidomide nano-flakes produced by SAS-EM were smaller than the particles produced by SAS.Dissolution rates of the produced particles,evaluated by HPLC,demonstrated an increase in the thalidomide dissolution rate for the SAS-EM produced particles.The polymorphs and crystallinity of thalidomide particles (flakes) were observed by FTIR and XRD.In this research,the supercritical processing significantly modified the crystal formation of thalidomide from an original state of a β-polymorph to the amorphous state α-polymorph after supercritical processing.

  11. Bioremediating Oil Spills in Nutrient Poor Ocean Waters Using Fertilized Clay Mineral Flakes: Some Experimental Constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence N. Warr

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Much oil spill research has focused on fertilizing hydrocarbon oxidising bacteria, but a primary limitation is the rapid dilution of additives in open waters. A new technique is presented for bioremediation by adding nutrient amendments to the oil spill using thin filmed minerals comprised largely of Fullers Earth clay. Together with adsorbed N and P fertilizers, filming additives, and organoclay, clay flakes can be engineered to float on seawater, attach to the oil, and slowly release contained nutrients. Our laboratory experiments of microbial activity on weathered source oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill in the Gulf of Mexico show fertilized clay treatment significantly enhanced bacterial respiration and consumption of alkanes compared to untreated oil-in-water conditions and reacted faster than straight fertilization. Whereas a major portion (up to 98% of the alkane content was removed during the 1 month period of experimentation by fertilized clay flake interaction; the reduced concentration of polyaromatic hydrocarbons was not significantly different from the non-clay bearing samples. Such clay flake treatment could offer a way to more effectively apply the fertilizer to the spill in open nutrient poor waters and thus significantly reduce the extent and duration of marine oil spills, but this method is not expected to impact hydrocarbon toxicity.

  12. Voronoi-Tessellated Graphite Produced by Low-Temperature Catalytic Graphitization from Renewable Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Leyi; Zhao, Xiuyun; Burke, Luke T; Bennett, J Craig; Dunlap, Richard A; Obrovac, Mark N

    2017-09-11

    A highly crystalline graphite powder was prepared from the low temperature (800-1000 °C) graphitization of renewable hard carbon precursors using a magnesium catalyst. The resulting graphite particles are composed of Voronoi-tessellated regions comprising irregular sheets; each Voronoi-tessellated region having a small "seed" particle located near their centroid on the surface. This suggests nucleated outward growth of graphitic carbon, which has not been previously observed. Each seed particle consists of a spheroidal graphite shell on the inside of which hexagonal graphite platelets are perpendicularly affixed. This results in a unique high surface area graphite with a high degree of graphitization that is made with renewable feedstocks at temperatures far below that conventionally used for artificial graphites. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. An examination of the possibility of lowering the glycemic index of oat and barley flakes by minimal processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granfeldt, Y; Eliasson, A C; Björck, I

    2000-09-01

    Differences in glycemic responses to various starchy foods are related to differences in the rate of starch digestion and absorption. In this study, the importance of the degree of gelatinization and the product thickness for postprandial glycemic and insulinemic responses to rolled oats and barley were studied in healthy subjects (5 men and 5 women). Thick (1.0 mm) rolled oats were made from raw or preheated (roasted or steamed) kernels. In addition, thin (0.5 mm) rolled oats were made from roasted or roasted and steamed (processed under conditions simulating commercial production) oat kernels. Finally, steamed rolled barley kernels (0.5 or 1.0 mm) were prepared. All thin flakes elicited high glucose and insulin responses [glycemic index (GI), 88-118; insulinemic index (II), 84-102], not significantly different from white wheat bread (P: > 0.05). In contrast, all varieties of thick oat flakes gave significantly lower metabolic responses (GI, 70-78; II, 58-77) than the reference bread (P: oat flakes. We conclude that minimal processing of oat and barley flakes had a relatively minor effect on GI features compared with the more extensive commercial processing. One exception was thick oat flakes, which in contrast to the corresponding barley flakes, had a low GI.

  14. Aceitabilidade de flocos desidratados de abóbora Dehydrated pumpkin flakes acceptability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmem Lygia Burgos Ambrósio

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a aceitabilidade de flocos desidratados de abóbora, uma vez que tal produto pode constituir uma alternativa no combate à hipovitaminose A. MÉTODOS: Os flocos foram avaliados quanto às características microbiológicas, por meio das análises de coliformes a 45ºC, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonela sp, contagem de bolores e leveduras, e características físico-químicas, por meio da análise de umidade, proteínas, lipídios, cinzas, fibra alimentar, carboidratos, carotenóides, estabilidade ao longo do tempo de armazenamento e aceitabilidade dos flocos adicionados ao feijão e ao pirão de 188 adultos e 67 crianças, respectivamente. RESULTADOS: Os flocos estavam adequados quanto às características microbiológicas e físico-químicas e os percentuais de aceitação de 95,21% para os adultos e 95,52% para as crianças. CONCLUSÃO: Os flocos desidratados de abóbora podem ser utilizados em larga escala para o estudo do efeito deste produto no combate à hipovitaminose A.OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to evaluate the acceptability of flakes since this product can be an alternative in the fight against hypovitaminosis A. METHODS: The flakes were evaluated through analyses of coliforms at 45ºC, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonela sp; counting of yeasts and molds; analysis of moisture, proteins, lipids, ash, dietary fibers, carbohydrates and carotenoids; storage stability; and acceptability of flakes added to beans and "pirão" (a widely consumed Brazilian dish consisting of meat and vegetable broth and cassava flour by 188 adults and 67 children. RESULTS: The microbiological and physical-chemical characteristics of the flakes were adequate and the acceptability percentages were 95.21% for adults and 95.52% for children. CONCLUSION: Dehydrated pumpkin flakes can be used in large scale to determine its effectiveness in the fight against hypovitaminosis A.

  15. Automated sorting of polymer flakes: fluorescence labeling and development of a measurement system prototype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, S; Fomin, P; Kargel, Ch

    2015-04-01

    The extensive demand and use of plastics in modern life is associated with a significant economical impact and a serious ecological footprint. The production of plastics involves a high energy consumption and CO2 emission as well as the large need for (limited) fossil resources. Due to the high durability of plastics, large amounts of plastic garbage is mounting in overflowing landfills (plus 9.6 million tons in Europe in the year 2012) and plastic debris is floating in the world oceans or waste-to-energy combustion releases even more CO2 plus toxic substances (dioxins, heavy metals) to the atmosphere. The recycling of plastic products after their life cycle can obviously contribute a great deal to the reduction of the environmental and economical impacts. In order to produce high-quality recycling products, mono-fractional compositions of waste polymers are required. However, existing measurement technologies such as near infrared spectroscopy show limitations in the sorting of complex mixtures and different grades of polymers, especially when black plastics are involved. More recently invented technologies based on mid-infrared, Raman spectroscopy or laser-aided spectroscopy are still under development and expected to be rather expensive. A promising approach to put high sorting purities into practice is to label plastic resins with unique combinations of fluorescence markers (tracers). These are incorporated into virgin resins during the manufacturing process at the ppm (or sub ppm) concentration level, just large enough that the fluorescence emissions can be detected with sensitive instrumentation but neither affect the visual appearance nor the mechanical properties of the polymers. In this paper we present the prototype of a measurement and classification system that identifies polymer flakes (mill material of a few millimeters size) located on a conveyor belt in real time based on the emitted fluorescence of incorporated markers. Classification performance

  16. Influence of Ultra-Fine B4C and Nano-SiO2 on the Properties of Alumina-Graphite Refractories

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xianfeng; WANG Jinxiang; YANG Bin

    2004-01-01

    The role of nano-SiO2 and ultra-fine boron carbide on the properties of alumina-graphite materials was investigated.The study showed that the ultra-fine boron carbide added modified the microstructure of residual carbon and promoted the chemical bond between residual carbon from phenolic resin and flake graphite. The carbon white could strengthen the residual carbon from phenolic resin.These two additives improved the mechanical properties of AG refractories at both room temperature and high temperature,and thermal shock resistance was improved noticeably.When the two additives were doped together,carbon white could retard the evaporation of B2O3.Thermal shock resistance was guaranteed with a smaller amount of ultrafine boron carbide.

  17. Large scale production of highly-qualified graphene by ultrasonic exfoliation of expanded graphite under the promotion of (NH4)2CO3 decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunwei; Tong, Xili; Guo, Xiaoning; Wang, Yingyong; Jin, Guoqiang; Guo, Xiangyun

    2013-11-29

    Highly-qualified graphene was prepared by the ultrasonic exfoliation of commercial expanded graphite (EG) under the promotion of (NH4)2CO3 decomposition. The yield of graphene from the first exfoliation is 7 wt%, and it can be increased to more than 65 wt% by repeated exfoliations. Atomic force microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman analysis show that the as-prepared graphene only has a few defects or oxides, and more than 95% of the graphene flakes have a thickness of ~1 nm. The electrochemical performance of the as-prepared graphene is comparable to reduced graphene oxide in the determination of dopamine (DA) from the mixed solution of ascorbic acid, uric acid and DA. These results show that the decomposition of (NH4)2CO3 molecules in the EG layers under ultrasonication promotes the exfoliation of graphite and provides a low-priced route for large scale production of highly-quality graphene.

  18. AGC-3 Graphite Preirradiation Data Analysis Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William Windes; David Swank; David Rohrbaugh; Joseph Lord

    2013-09-01

    This report describes the specimen loading order and documents all pre-irradiation examination material property measurement data for the graphite specimens contained within the third Advanced Graphite Capsule (AGC-3) irradiation capsule. The AGC-3 capsule is third in six planned irradiation capsules comprising the Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) test series. The AGC test series is used to irradiate graphite specimens allowing quantitative data necessary for predicting the irradiation behavior and operating performance of new nuclear graphite grades to be generated which will ascertain the in-service behavior of the graphite for pebble bed and prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) designs. The general design of AGC-3 test capsule is similar to the AGC-2 test capsule, material property tests were conducted on graphite specimens prior to loading into the AGC-3 irradiation assembly. However the 6 major nuclear graphite grades in AGC-2 were modified; two previous graphite grades (IG-430 and H-451) were eliminated and one was added (Mersen’s 2114 was added). Specimen testing from three graphite grades (PCEA, 2114, and NBG-17) was conducted at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and specimen testing for two grades (IG-110 and NBG-18) were conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from May 2011 to July 2013. This report also details the specimen loading methodology for the graphite specimens inside the AGC-3 irradiation capsule. The AGC-3 capsule design requires "matched pair" creep specimens that have similar dose levels above and below the neutron flux profile mid-plane to provide similar specimens with and without an applied load. This document utilized the neutron flux profile calculated for the AGC-3 capsule design, the capsule dimensions, and the size (length) of the selected graphite and silicon carbide samples to create a stacking order that can produce "matched pairs" of graphite samples above and below the AGC-3 capsule elevation mid-point to

  19. Fission Product Sorptivity in Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tompson, Jr., Robert V. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Loyalka, Sudarshan [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Ghosh, Tushar [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Viswanath, Dabir [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Walton, Kyle [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Haffner, Robert [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Both adsorption and absorption (sorption) of fission product (FP) gases on/into graphite are issues of interest in very high temperature reactors (VHTRs). In the original proposal, we proposed to use packed beds of graphite particles to measure sorption at a variety of temperatures and to use an electrodynamic balance (EDB) to measure sorption onto single graphite particles (a few μm in diameter) at room temperature. The use of packed beds at elevated temperature is not an issue. However, the TPOC requested revision of this initial proposal to included single particle measurements at elevated temperatures up to 1100 °C. To accommodate the desire of NEUP to extend the single particle EDB measurements to elevated temperatures it was necessary to significantly revise the plan and the budget. These revisions were approved. In the EDB method, we levitate a single graphite particle (the size, surface characteristics, morphology, purity, and composition of the particle can be varied) or agglomerate in the balance and measure the sorption of species by observing the changes in mass. This process involves the use of an electron stepping technique to measure the total charge on a particle which, in conjunction with the measured suspension voltages for the particle, allows for determinations of mass and, hence, of mass changes which then correspond to measurements of sorption. Accommodating elevated temperatures with this type of system required a significant system redesign and required additional time that ultimately was not available. These constraints also meant that the grant had to focus on fewer species as a result. Overall, the extension of the original proposed single particle work to elevated temperatures added greatly to the complexity of the proposed project and added greatly to the time that would eventually be required as well. This means that the bulk of the experimental progress was made using the packed bed sorption systems. Only being able to recruit one

  20. 2D layered transport properties from topological insulator Bi2Se3 single crystals and micro flakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiatti, Olivio; Riha, Christian; Lawrenz, Dominic; Busch, Marco; Dusari, Srujana; Sánchez-Barriga, Jaime; Mogilatenko, Anna; Yashina, Lada V; Valencia, Sergio; Ünal, Akin A; Rader, Oliver; Fischer, Saskia F

    2016-06-07

    Low-field magnetotransport measurements of topological insulators such as Bi2Se3 are important for revealing the nature of topological surface states by quantum corrections to the conductivity, such as weak-antilocalization. Recently, a rich variety of high-field magnetotransport properties in the regime of high electron densities (∼10(19) cm(-3)) were reported, which can be related to additional two-dimensional layered conductivity, hampering the identification of the topological surface states. Here, we report that quantum corrections to the electronic conduction are dominated by the surface states for a semiconducting case, which can be analyzed by the Hikami-Larkin-Nagaoka model for two coupled surfaces in the case of strong spin-orbit interaction. However, in the metallic-like case this analysis fails and additional two-dimensional contributions need to be accounted for. Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations and quantized Hall resistance prove as strong indications for the two-dimensional layered metallic behavior. Temperature-dependent magnetotransport properties of high-quality Bi2Se3 single crystalline exfoliated macro and micro flakes are combined with high resolution transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, confirming the structure and stoichiometry. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy proves a single-Dirac-cone surface state and a well-defined bulk band gap in topological insulating state. Spatially resolved core-level photoelectron microscopy demonstrates the surface stability.

  1. Preparation of reduced graphene oxide/flake carbonyl iron powders/polyaniline composites and their enhanced microwave absorption properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Yang [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212000 (China); Luo, Juhua, E-mail: luojuhua@163.com [School of Material Science and Engineering, Yancheng Institute of Technology, Yancheng 224051 (China); Yao, Wei; Xu, Jianguang [School of Material Science and Engineering, Yancheng Institute of Technology, Yancheng 224051 (China); Li, Tao [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212000 (China)

    2015-07-05

    Highlights: • A novel composite of R-GO/F-CIP/PANI was prepared. • The formation mechanism of R-GO/F-CIP/PANI composites was discussed. • R-GO/F-CIP/PANI composites possessed excellent microwave absorption properties. - Abstract: The composites of reduced graphene/flake carbonyl iron powders/polyaniline (R-GO/F-CIP/PANI) were synthesized via two-step method, a green chemical route which was based on the reductive nature of the iron ion in first step and followed by the in situ polymerization of PANI on the surface of R-GO/F-CIP. The structures and morphologies were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), and Raman spectroscopy. The results revealed that the core–shell structure of the composites of R-GO/F-CIP/PANI was successfully prepared and the shape of F-CIP had a great influence on the magnetic properties of the composites. The composites possessed the excellent microwave absorption properties in 2–18 GHz and the best microwave absorption property was obtained in 11.8 GHz with the minimum reflection loss of −38.8 dB at the thickness of 2.0 mm.

  2. Negative refraction at deep-ultraviolet frequency in monocrystalline graphite

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Jingbo; Zhou, Ji; Kang, Lei; Wang, Rui; Meng, Xianguo; Li, Bo; Kang, Feiyu; Li, Longtu

    2010-01-01

    Negative refraction is such a prominent electromagnetic phenomenon that most researchers believe it can only occur in artificially engineered metamaterials. In this article, we report negative refraction for all incident angles for the first time in a naturally existing material. Using ellipsometry measurement of the equifrequency contour in the deep-ultraviolet frequency region (typically 254 nm), obvious negative refraction was demonstrated in monocrystalline graphite for incident angles ra...

  3. Contribution to the study of internal friction in graphites; Contribution a l'etude du frottement interieur des graphites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merlin, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-03-01

    A study has been made of the internal friction in different graphites between -180 C and +500 C using a torsion pendulum; the graphites had been previously treated thermo-mechanically, by neutron irradiation and subjected to partial annealings. It has been shown that there occurs: a hysteretic type dissipation of energy, connected with interactions between dislocations and other defects in the matrix; a dissipation having a partially hysteretic character which can be interpreted by a Granato-Luke type formalism and which is connected with the presence of an 'ultra-micro porosity'; a dissipation by a relaxation mechanism after a small dose of irradiation; this is attributed to the reorientation of bi-interstitials; a dissipation having the characteristics of a solid state transformation, this during an annealing after irradiation. It is attributed to the reorganization of interstitial defects. Some information has thus been obtained concerning graphites, in particular: their behaviour at low mechanical stresses, the nature of irradiation defects and their behaviour during annealing, the structural changes occurring during graphitization, the relationship between internal friction and macroscopic mechanical properties. (author) [French] L'etude du coefficient de frottement interieur au moyen d'un pendule de torsion entre -180 C et +500 C a ete realisee pour differents graphites apres des traitements thermo-mecaniques, des irradiations neutroniques et des guerisons partielles. Il a ete mis en evidence: une dissipation d'energie a caractere hysteretique, reliee aux interactions des dislocations avec les autres defauts de la matrice; une dissipation a caractere partiellement hysteretique, interpretable par un formalisme type Granato-Lucke et reliee a la presence d'une ''ultra-microporosite''; une dissipation par un mecanisme de relaxation, apres irradiation a faible dose, attribuee a la reorientation de di

  4. Geometric phases in graphitic cones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furtado, Claudio [Departamento de Fisica, CCEN, Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Cidade Universitaria, 58051-970 Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil)], E-mail: furtado@fisica.ufpb.br; Moraes, Fernando [Departamento de Fisica, CCEN, Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Cidade Universitaria, 58051-970 Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Carvalho, A.M. de M [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Estadual de Feira de Santana, BR116-Norte, Km 3, 44031-460 Feira de Santana, BA (Brazil)

    2008-08-04

    In this Letter we use a geometric approach to study geometric phases in graphitic cones. The spinor that describes the low energy states near the Fermi energy acquires a phase when transported around the apex of the cone, as found by a holonomy transformation. This topological result can be viewed as an analogue of the Aharonov-Bohm effect. The topological analysis is extended to a system with n cones, whose resulting configuration is described by an effective defect00.

  5. Environmentally benign graphite intercalation compound composition for exfoliated graphite, flexible graphite, and nano-scaled graphene platelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhamu, Aruna; Jang, Bor Z.

    2014-06-17

    A carboxylic-intercalated graphite compound composition for the production of exfoliated graphite, flexible graphite, or nano-scaled graphene platelets. The composition comprises a layered graphite with interlayer spaces or interstices and a carboxylic acid residing in at least one of the interstices, wherein the composition is prepared by a chemical oxidation reaction which uses a combination of a carboxylic acid and hydrogen peroxide as an intercalate source. Alternatively, the composition may be prepared by an electrochemical reaction, which uses a carboxylic acid as both an electrolyte and an intercalate source. Exfoliation of the invented composition does not release undesirable chemical contaminants into air or drainage.

  6. Uranium Oxide Aerosol Transport in Porous Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchard, Jeremy; Gerlach, David C.; Scheele, Randall D.; Stewart, Mark L.; Reid, Bruce D.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Bagaasen, Larry M.; Brown, Charles C.; Iovin, Cristian; Delegard, Calvin H.; Zelenyuk, Alla; Buck, Edgar C.; Riley, Brian J.; Burns, Carolyn A.

    2012-01-23

    The objective of this paper is to investigate the transport of uranium oxide particles that may be present in carbon dioxide (CO2) gas coolant, into the graphite blocks of gas-cooled, graphite moderated reactors. The transport of uranium oxide in the coolant system, and subsequent deposition of this material in the graphite, of such reactors is of interest because it has the potential to influence the application of the Graphite Isotope Ratio Method (GIRM). The GIRM is a technology that has been developed to validate the declared operation of graphite moderated reactors. GIRM exploits isotopic ratio changes that occur in the impurity elements present in the graphite to infer cumulative exposure and hence the reactor’s lifetime cumulative plutonium production. Reference Gesh, et. al., for a more complete discussion on the GIRM technology.

  7. Tribology of Graphite-Filled Polystyrene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Gilardi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Self-lubricating polymer compounds are currently used for a wide range of applications such as bearings, gears, and water meters. Under severe conditions such as high pressure, high velocity, and/or high temperatures, the material fails (PV limit. In this study, we investigated the effect of graphite on the tribological properties of polystyrene (PS with “ball-on-three-plates” tests. Graphite-filled PS plates were produced via an internal mixer and compression molding. Unhardened steel (1.4401 and nylon (PA66 balls were used for the tribological tests. Our results indicate that graphite loading, graphite type, and particle size have a big influence on the friction coefficient, the wear resistance, and the PV limit of PS both against steel and PA66. In particular, primary synthetic graphite performs better than secondary synthetic graphite due to the higher degree of crystallinity.

  8. Single-crystal and textured polycrystalline Nd2Fe14B flakes with a submicron or nanosize thickness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, BZ; Zheng, LY; Li, WF; Liu, JF; Hadjipanayis, GC

    2012-02-01

    This paper reports on the fabrication, structure and magnetic property optimization of Nd2Fe14B single-crystal and [0 0 1] textured poly-nanocrystalline flakes prepared by surfactant-assisted high-energy ball milling (HEBM). Single-crystal Nd2Fe14B flakes first with micron and then with submicron thicknesses were formed via continuous basal cleavage along the (1 1 0) planes of the irregularly shaped single-crystal microparticles during the early stage of HEBM. With further milling, [0 0 1] textured polycrystalline submicron Nd2Fe14B flakes were formed. Finally, crystallographically anisotropic polycrystalline Nd2Fe14B nanoflakes were formed after milling for 5-6 h. Anisotropic magnetic behavior was found in all of the flake samples. Nd2Fe14B flakes prepared with either oleic acid (OA) or oleylamine (OY) as the surfactant exhibited similar morphology, structure and magnetic properties. Both the addition of some low-melting-point eutectic Nd70Cu30 alloy and an appropriate post-annealing can increase the coercivity of the Nd2Fe14B flakes. The coercivity of Nd2Fe14B nanoflakes with an addition of 16.7 wt.% Nd70Cu30 by milling for 5 h in heptane with 20 wt.% OY increased from 3.7 to 6.8 kOe after annealing at 450 degrees C for 0.5 h. The mechanism for formation and coercivity enhancement of Nd2Fe14B single-crystal and textured poly-nanocrystalline flakes with a submicron or nanosize thickness was discussed. (C) 2011 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Modification on graphite due to helium ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, N.J.; Mohanty, S.R., E-mail: smrutirm@yahoo.com; Buzarbaruah, N.

    2016-07-29

    This paper studies the influence of helium ion irradiation on morphological and structural properties of graphite samples. The helium ions emanated from a plasma focus device have been used to irradiate graphite samples by varying the number of ion pulses. The effect of radiation induced changes in morphology and structure are examined by using optical microscopy, atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy along with selected area electron diffraction and x-ray diffraction. A distinct change in the surface topography is marked in the case of the ion irradiated samples when viewed under the optical microscope. The micrographs of the ion irradiated samples confirm mostly rounded and sparely elongated type of structures arising due to intense melting and local ablation accompanied with ejection of graphite melts that depends upon the ion fluence. The atomic force microscopy images also reveal the formation of globules having sizes ∼50–200 nm which are the agglomeration of small individual clusters. Transmission electron micrographs of the ion irradiated samples furnish that the diameter of these individual small clusters are ∼10.4 nm. Moreover, selected area electron diffraction patterns corroborate that the ion irradiated sample retains its crystalline nature, even after exposure to larger helium ion pulses. It is noticed from the x-ray diffraction patterns that some new phases are developed in the case of ion irradiated sample. - Highlights: • Used an ingenious helium ion source to study irradiation induced transformation on graphite. • OM, AFM and TEM analyses confirm the formation mostly rounded structures. • SAED patterns confirm the retention of crystallinity of graphite even after exposure to larger helium ion fluences. • XRD patterns confirm the development of new peaks that indicate structural rearrangement.

  10. Removal of carbon-14 from irradiated graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunzik-Gougar, Mary Lou; Smith, Tara E.

    2014-08-01

    Approximately 250,000 tonnes of irradiated graphite waste exists worldwide and that quantity is expected to increase with decommissioning of Generation II reactors and deployment of Generation IV gas-cooled, graphite moderated reactors. This situation indicates the need for a graphite waste management strategy. On of the isotopes of great concern for long-term disposal of irradiated graphite is carbon-14 (14C), with a half-life of 5730 years. Study of irradiated graphite from some nuclear reactors indicates 14C is concentrated on the outer 5 mm of the graphite structure. The aim of the research presented here is to develop a practical method by which 14C can be removed. In parallel with these efforts, the same irradiated graphite material is being characterized to identify the chemical form of 14C in irradiated graphite. A nuclear-grade graphite, NBG-18, and a high-surface-area graphite foam, POCOFoam®, were exposed to liquid nitrogen (to increase the quantity of 14C precursor) and neutron-irradiated (1013 neutrons/cm2/s). During post-irradiation thermal treatment, graphite samples were heated in the presence of an inert carrier gas (with or without the addition of an oxidant gas), which carries off gaseous products released during treatment. Graphite gasification occurs via interaction with adsorbed oxygen complexes. Experiments in argon only were performed at 900 °C and 1400 °C to evaluate the selective removal of 14C. Thermal treatment also was performed with the addition of 3 and 5 vol% oxygen at temperatures 700 °C and 1400 °C. Thermal treatment experiments were evaluated for the effective selective removal of 14C. Lower temperatures and oxygen levels correlated to more efficient 14C removal.

  11. Oxidation performance of graphite material in reactors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaowei LUO; Xinli YU; Suyuan YU

    2008-01-01

    Graphite is used as a structural material and moderator for high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR). When a reactor is in operation, graphite oxida-tion influences the safety and operation of the reactor because of the impurities in the coolant and/or the acci-dent conditions, such as water ingress and air ingress. In this paper, the graphite oxidation process is introduced, factors influencing graphite oxidation are analyzed and discussed, and some new directions for further study are pointed out.

  12. Low temperature vapor phase digestion of graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Robert A.

    2017-04-18

    A method for digestion and gasification of graphite for removal from an underlying surface is described. The method can be utilized to remove graphite remnants of a formation process from the formed metal piece in a cleaning process. The method can be particularly beneficial in cleaning castings formed with graphite molding materials. The method can utilize vaporous nitric acid (HNO.sub.3) or vaporous HNO.sub.3 with air/oxygen to digest the graphite at conditions that can avoid damage to the underlying surface.

  13. The Fracture Toughness of Nuclear Graphites Grades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burchell, Timothy D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Erdman, III, Donald L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lowden, Rick R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hunter, James A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hannel, Cara C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-04-01

    New measurements of graphite mode I critical stress intensity factor, KIc (commonly referred to as the fracture toughness) and the mode II critical shear stress intensity, KIIc, are reported and compared with prior data for KIc and KIIc. The new data are for graphite grades PCEA, IG-110 and 2114. Variations of KIc and acoustic emission (AE) data with graphite texture are reported and discussed. The Codes and Standards applications of fracture toughness, KIc, data are also discussed. A specified minimum value for nuclear graphite KIc is recommended.

  14. AC induction field heating of graphite foam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klett, James W.; Rios, Orlando; Kisner, Roger

    2017-08-22

    A magneto-energy apparatus includes an electromagnetic field source for generating a time-varying electromagnetic field. A graphite foam conductor is disposed within the electromagnetic field. The graphite foam when exposed to the time-varying electromagnetic field conducts an induced electric current, the electric current heating the graphite foam. An energy conversion device utilizes heat energy from the heated graphite foam to perform a heat energy consuming function. A device for heating a fluid and a method of converting energy are also disclosed.

  15. Nickel coated graphite fiber conductive composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, R.E.; Hall, D.E.; Luxon, B.A.

    1986-07-01

    Nickel coated graphite (NCG) fiber, consisting of a thin continuous plating of high purity nickel over an aerospace-grade graphite core, offers performance added features by combining the lightweight and high structural reinforcement of graphite fiber with the thermal and electrical conductivity of nickel. These NCG filaments, which are composite constructions in their own right, can be processed and impregnated with thermosetting or thermoplastic resins in the same manner that graphite fiber tows are processed and impregnated to produce roving, tape or fabric prepreg. Therefore, NCG fibers can be readily integrated into structural laminate assemblies using established composites-manufacturing practices.

  16. Enhancing thermal conductivity of fluids with graphite nanoparticles and carbon nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiqiang; Lockwood, Frances E.

    2008-03-25

    A fluid media such as oil or water, and a selected effective amount of carbon nanomaterials necessary to enhance the thermal conductivity of the fluid. One of the preferred carbon nanomaterials is a high thermal conductivity graphite, exceeding that of the neat fluid to be dispersed therein in thermal conductivity, and ground, milled, or naturally prepared with mean particle size less than 500 nm, and preferably less than 200 nm, and most preferably less than 100 nm. The graphite is dispersed in the fluid by one or more of various methods, including ultrasonication, milling, and chemical dispersion. Carbon nanotubes with graphitic structure is another preferred source of carbon nanomaterial, although other carbon nanomaterials are acceptable. To confer long term stability, the use of one or more chemical dispersants is preferred. The thermal conductivity enhancement, compared to the fluid without carbon nanomaterial, is proportional to the amount of carbon nanomaterials (carbon nanotubes and/or graphite) added.

  17. HIGH SPEED MILLING OF GRAPHITE ELECTRODE WITH ENDMILL OF SMALL DIAMETER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Chengyong; ZHOU Li; FU Hao; HU Zhouling

    2007-01-01

    Graphite becomes the prevailing electrode material in electrical discharging machining (EDM) currently. Orthogonal cutting experiments are carried out to study the characteristics of graph ite chip formation process. High speed milling experiments are conducted to study tool wear and cutting forces. The results show that depth of cut has great influence on graphite chip formation. The removal process of graphite in high speed milling is the mutual result of cutting and grinding process. Graphite is prone to cause severe abrasion wear to coated carbide endmills due to its high abrasiveness nature. The major patterns of tool wear are flank wear, rake wear, micro-chipping and breakage. Cutting forces can be reduced by adoption of higher cutting speed, moderate feed per tooth, smaller radial and axial depths of cut, and up cutting.

  18. Ordered water structure at hydrophobic graphite interfaces observed by 4D, ultrafast electron crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ding-Shyue; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2009-01-01

    Interfacial water has unique properties in various functions. Here, using 4-dimensional (4D), ultrafast electron crystallography with atomic-scale spatial and temporal resolution, we report study of structure and dynamics of interfacial water assembly on a hydrophobic surface. Structurally, vertically stacked bilayers on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite surface were determined to be ordered, contrary to the expectation that the strong hydrogen bonding of water on hydrophobic surfaces would dominate with suppressed interfacial order. Because of its terrace morphology, graphite plays the role of a template. The dynamics is also surprising. After the excitation of graphite by an ultrafast infrared pulse, the interfacial ice structure undergoes nonequilibrium “phase transformation” identified in the hydrogen-bond network through the observation of structural isosbestic point. We provide the time scales involved, the nature of ice-graphite structural dynamics, and relevance to properties related to confined water. PMID:19246378

  19. Safety-related considerations for reactor pressure vessels in consideration of hydrogen flaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dugan, S.; Herter, K.H.; Schuler, X.; Silcher, H. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). MPA

    2013-07-01

    During non-destructive inspection of the reactor pressure vessels in the Belgian nuclear power plants Doel 3 and Tihange 2, a large number of crack-like indications located in the base metal of the core shells were found. As part of the evaluation of these indications, which were identified as flake-like separations (hydrogen flakes), questions arise as to their cause, possible operational growth and the impact on the continued safe operation of the plant. In addition to the operational load cases, possible accidental and beyond design load cases are also of importance. Within the scope of the ''Research Project Component Safety'' (Forschungsvorhaben Komponentensicherheit - FKS) in the time frame mid-1970s to mid-1990s, numerous R and D activities on the material mechanics behavior and qualification of RPV materials were performed at MPA University of Stuttgart. The objectives of these investigations were focused on material mechanical issues related to the integrity of components and included standard material testing as well as component-like large scale specimen tests. Another major objective was the evaluation of non-destructive testing (NDT) methods with respect to their detection capabilities for such defects which developed during the manufacturing process. The investigations also included a study of the conditions favorable for formation or prevention of hydrogen flaking. In the context of this paper, the results from these R and D activities are presented in view of the current issues and in relation to the integrity concept for German RPVs. Ultrasonic testing (UT) techniques applied during manufacturing and during in-service inspections of German RPVs will also be discussed.

  20. The binding of phosphonic acids at aluminium oxide surfaces and correlation with passivation of aluminium flake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Rachel J; Camp, Philip J; Henderson, David K; Lovatt, Paul A; Nation, David A; Richards, Stuart; Tasker, Peter A

    2007-04-07

    Measurements of adsorption isotherms of a series of thirteen mono- and di-phosphonic acids have shown that these bind strongly to the surface of high surface area aluminium trihydroxide. The incorporation of such phosphonates into a suspension of aluminium flake in an aqueous medium, modelling the continuous phase of a water-based paint, greatly suppresses the evolution of hydrogen. Whilst strong binding of the phosphonate to aluminium oxides is an essential criterion for good passivation, other factors such as the hydrophobicity of the ligand are also important in suppressing hydrogen-evolution.

  1. Many flaked particles generated by electric field stress working as an impulsive force in mass-production plasma etching equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasashima, Yuji; Uesugi, Fumihiko

    2015-09-01

    Particles generated in plasma etching significantly lower production yield. In plasma etching, etching reaction products adhere to the inner chamber walls, gradually forming films, and particles are generated by flaking of the deposited films due to electric field stress that acts boundary between the inner wall and the film. In this study, we have investigated the mechanism of instantaneous generation of many flaked particles using the mass-production reactive ion etching equipment. Particles, which flake off from the films on the ground electrode, are detected by the in-situ particle monitoring system using a sheet-shaped laser beam. The results indicate that the deposited films are severely damaged and flake off as numerous particles when the floating potential at the inner wall suddenly changes. This is because the rapid change in floating potential, observed when unusual wafer movement and micro-arc discharge occur, causes electric field stress working as an impulsive force. The films are easily detached by the impulsive force and many flaked particles are instantaneously generated. This mechanism can occur on not only a ground electrode but a chamber walls, and cause serious contamination in mass-production line. This work was partially supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number B 26870903.

  2. Electronic structure of graphite; Elektronische Struktur von Graphit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alsheimer, W.

    2000-07-01

    In an all-electron calculation ab initio the electronic properties of graphite in the ground state were self-consistently determined by means of the MAPW procedure in warped-muffin-tin approximation. many- particle effects were regarded in the framework of the density- functional theory in the parametrization of the local density approximation of Hedin and Lundqvist. Starting from the determined self-consistent one-particle potential via the Fourier transformed of the Bloch wave functions the electronic momentum densities perpendicular and parallel to the layer-planes of all occupied states of graphite were calculated and compared with newer experimental and theoretical values. The special approach of the MAPW mehtod guarantees continuousness of the wave function and its first derivative in the whole Wigner-Seitz cell and by this a fast decreasement of the Fourier coefficients. This fact was used for the calculation of the easily accessible Compton profiles, which represent an integration over all components of the momentum density in the crystal direction of interest. These results, especially the anisotropic Compton profile, were also compared with experimental works and other calculations.

  3. Graphite materials prepared by HTT of unburned carbon from coal combustion fly ashes: Performance as anodes in lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameán, Ignacio; Garcia, Ana B.

    2011-05-01

    The behaviour as the potential negative electrode in lithium-ion batteries of graphite-like materials that were prepared by high temperature treatment of unburned carbon concentrates from coal combustion fly ashes was investigated by galvanostatic cycling. Emphasis was placed on the relation between the structural/morphological and electrochemical characteristics of the materials. In addition, since good electrode capacity retention on cycling is an important requirement for the manufacturing of the lithium-ion batteries, the reversible capacity provided by the materials prepared on prolonged cycling (50 cycles) was studied and the results were compared with those of petroleum-based graphite which is commercialized as anodic material for lithium-ion batteries. The graphite-like materials prepared lead to battery reversible capacities up to ∼310 mA hg-1 after 50 cycles, these values were similar to those of the reference graphite. Moreover, they showed a remarkable stable capacity along cycling and low irreversible capacity. Apparently, both the high degree of crystallinity and the irregular particle shape with no flakes appear to contribute to the good anodic performance in lithium-ion batteries of these materials, thus making feasible their utilization to this end.

  4. Analysis of Wigner energy release process in graphite stack of shut-down uranium-graphite reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Bespala, E. V.; Pavliuk, A. O.; Kotlyarevskiy, S. G.

    2015-01-01

    Data, which finding during thermal differential analysis of sampled irradiated graphite are presented. Results of computational modeling of Winger energy release process from irradiated graphite staking are demonstrated. It's shown, that spontaneous combustion of graphite possible only in adiabatic case.

  5. LIMITED OXIDATION OF IRRADIATED GRAPHITE WASTE TO REMOVE SURFACE CARBON-14

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TARA E. SMITH

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Large quantities of irradiated graphite waste from graphite-moderated nuclear reactors exist and are expected to increase in the case of High Temperature Reactor (HTR deployment [1,2]. This situation indicates the need for a graphite waste management strategy. Of greatest concern for long-term disposal of irradiated graphite is carbon-14 (14C, with a half-life of 5730 years. Fachinger et al. [2] have demonstrated that thermal treatment of irradiated graphite removes a significant fraction of the 14C, which tends to be concentrated on the graphite surface. During thermal treatment, graphite surface carbon atoms interact with naturally adsorbed oxygen complexes to create COx gases, i.e. “gasify” graphite. The effectiveness of this process is highly dependent on the availability of adsorbed oxygen compounds. The quantity and form of adsorbed oxygen complexes in pre- and post-irradiated graphite were studied using Time of Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS in an effort to better understand the gasification process and to apply that understanding to process optimization. Adsorbed oxygen fragments were detected on both irradiated and unirradiated graphite; however, carbon-oxygen bonds were identified only on the irradiated material. This difference is likely due to a large number of carbon active sites associated with the higher lattice disorder resulting from irradiation. Results of XPS analysis also indicated the potential bonding structures of the oxygen fragments removed during surface impingement. Ester- and carboxyl- like structures were predominant among the identified oxygen-containing fragments. The indicated structures are consistent with those characterized by Fanning and Vannice [3] and later incorporated into an oxidation kinetics model by El-Genk and Tournier [4]. Based on the predicted desorption mechanisms of carbon oxides from the identified compounds, it is expected that a

  6. Significance of primary irradiation creep in graphite

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Erasmus, C

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally primary irradiation creep is introduced into graphite analysis by applying the appropriate amount of creep strain to the model at the initial time-step. This is valid for graphite components that are subjected to high fast neutron flux...

  7. Structure-Property Relationships in Intercalated Graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-07-10

    and . vermicular graphite host materials. Detailed TEM results show that the glassy phase is induced by the electron beam irradiation through a...sample thickness could be related to the observation of a glass phase, experiments were carried out using both kish and vermicular graphite host materials

  8. Tire containing thermally exfoliated graphite oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prud'homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A tire, tire lining or inner tube, containing a polymer composite, made of at least one rubber and/or at least one elastomer and a modified graphite oxide material, which is a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 sq m/g to 2600 sq m/g.

  9. Inhibition of Oxidation in Nuclear Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phil Winston; James W. Sterbentz; William E. Windes

    2013-10-01

    Graphite is a fundamental material of high temperature gas cooled nuclear reactors, providing both structure and neutron moderation. Its high thermal conductivity, chemical inertness, thermal heat capacity, and high thermal structural stability under normal and off normal conditions contribute to the inherent safety of these reactor designs. One of the primary safety issues for a high temperature graphite reactor core is the possibility of rapid oxidation of the carbon structure during an off normal design basis event where an oxidizing atmosphere (air ingress) can be introduced to the hot core. Although the current Generation IV high temperature reactor designs attempt to mitigate any damage caused by a postualed air ingress event, the use of graphite components that inhibit oxidation is a logical step to increase the safety of these reactors. Recent experimental studies of graphite containing between 5.5 and 7 wt% boron carbide (B4C) indicate that oxidation is dramatically reduced even at prolonged exposures at temperatures up to 900°C. The proposed addition of B4C to graphite components in the nuclear core would necessarily be enriched in B-11 isotope in order to minimize B-10 neutron absorption and graphite swelling. The enriched boron can be added to the graphite during billet fabrication. Experimental oxidation rate results and potential applications for borated graphite in nuclear reactor components will be discussed.

  10. Oxidative cleavage and hydrolytic boosting of cellulose in soybean spent flakes by Trichoderma reesei Cel61A lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Brian C; Agger, Jane Wittrup; Wichmann, Jesper; Meyer, Anne S

    2017-03-01

    The auxiliary activity family 9 (AA9) copper-dependent lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase (LPMO) from Trichoderma reesei (EG4; TrCel61A) was investigated for its ability to oxidize the complex polysaccharides from soybean. The substrate specificity of the enzyme was assessed against a variety of substrates, including both soy spent flake, a by-product of the soy food industry, and soy spent flake pretreated with sodium hydroxide. Products from enzymatic treatments were analyzed using mass spectrometry and high performance anion exchange chromatography. We demonstrate that TrCel61A is capable of oxidizing cellulose from both pretreated soy spent flake and phosphoric acid swollen cellulose, oxidizing at both the C1 and C4 positions. In addition, we show that the oxidative activity of TrCel61A displays a synergistic effect capable of boosting endoglucanase activity, and thereby substrate depolymerization of soy cellulose, by 27%. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Hydrogen storage in graphite nanofibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, C.; Tan, C.D.; Hidalgo, R.; Baker, R.T.K.; Rodriguez, N.M. [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States). Chemistry Dept.

    1998-08-01

    Graphite nanofibers (GNF) are a type of material that is produced by the decomposition of carbon containing gases over metal catalyst particles at temperatures around 600 C. These molecularly engineered structures consist of graphene sheets perfectly arranged in a parallel, perpendicular or at angle orientation with respect to the fiber axis. The most important feature of the material is that only edges are exposed. Such an arrangement imparts the material with unique properties for gas adsorption because the evenly separated layers constitute the most ordered set of nanopores that can accommodate an adsorbate in the most efficient manner. In addition, the non-rigid pore walls can also expand so as to accommodate hydrogen in a multilayer conformation. Of the many varieties of structures that can be produced the authors have discovered that when gram quantities of a selected number of GNF are exposed to hydrogen at pressures of {approximately} 2,000 psi, they are capable of adsorbing and storing up to 40 wt% of hydrogen. It is believed that a strong interaction is established between hydrogen and the delocalized p-electrons present in the graphite layers and therefore a new type of chemistry is occurring within these confined structures.

  12. Fiber release characteristics of graphite hybrid composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henshaw, J.

    1980-01-01

    The paper considers different material concepts that can be fabricated of hybridized composites which demonstrate improved graphite fiber retention capability in a severe fire without significant reduction to the composite properties. More than 30 panels were fabricated for mechanical and fire tests, the details and results of which are presented. Methods of composite hybridization investigated included the addition of oxidation resistant fillers to the resin, mechanically interlocking the graphite fibers by the use of woven fabrics, and the addition of glass fibers and glass additives designed to melt and fuse the graphite fibers together. It is concluded that a woven fabric with a serving of glass around each graphite tow is by far the superior of those evaluated: not only is there a coalescing effect in each graphite layer, but there is also a definite adhesion of each layer to its neighbor.

  13. Significance of primary irradiation creep in graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erasmus, Christiaan, E-mail: christiaan.erasmus@gmail.com [Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (Proprietary) Limited, PO Box 9396, Centurion 0046 (South Africa); Kok, Schalk [Advanced Mathematical Modelling, CSIR Modelling and Digital Science, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa); Hindley, Michael P. [Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (Proprietary) Limited, PO Box 9396, Centurion 0046 (South Africa)

    2013-05-15

    Traditionally primary irradiation creep is introduced into graphite analysis by applying the appropriate amount of creep strain to the model at the initial time-step. This is valid for graphite components that are subjected to high fast neutron flux fields and constant stress fields, but it does not allow for the effect of movement of stress locations around a graphite component during life, nor does it allow primary creep to be applied rate-dependently to graphite components subject to lower fast neutron flux. This paper shows that a differential form of primary irradiation creep in graphite combined with the secondary creep formulation proposed by Kennedy et al. performs well when predicting creep behaviour in experimental samples. The significance of primary irradiation creep in particular in regions with lower flux is investigated. It is shown that in low flux regions with a realistic operating lifetime primary irradiation creep is significant and is larger than secondary irradiation creep.

  14. Damping behavior of synthetic graphite beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Cláudio Pardini

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this work was to obtain the damping factor (xi as well as the elasticity modulus (E of two kinds of synthetic graphite (HLM and ATJ, using the modal analysis technique. Prismatic beams of square section (~ 11 x 11 mm and length over thickness ratio (L/t of about 22.7 were tested in the free - free boundary condition. The first four modes of vibration were taken into account in the non-destructive evaluation of the materials. In addition, numerical simulations were also carried out in this investigation. The agreement between the theoretical and the experimental results was quite good. The average values of E and xi for the HLM graphite were 20% and 90% higher, respectively, than those presented by the ATJ graphite, indicating that the HLM graphite has, proportionally, more damping mechanisms than the ATJ graphite.

  15. Optimization of corn-stalk skin flake-wood shaving composite technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haixiang Lu; Xianquan Zhang; Bo Yu

    2015-01-01

    We focused on the optimization of corn-stalk skin flake-wood shaving composite technology. We studied the effects of material-mixture ratio, glue content, hot-pressing temperature, and hot-pressing time on the appear-ance, physical, and mechanical properties of the composite by the orthogonal experiment method. Our findings yielded highly significant results in all three cases:the effects of the material-mixture ratio on 2 h of thickness swelling (2hTS) and the modulus of rupture (MOR);the effects of glue con-tent on 2hTS, internal bond strength, and modulus of elas-ticity (MOE);and the effects of hot-pressing temperature on MOR and MOE. Product optimization is achieved when the ratio of corn stalk skin flake to wood shaving is 3:7, the glue content is 12%, the hot-pressing temperature is 150 ?C, and the hot-pressing time is 4.5 min.

  16. Combustion of Shock-Dispersed Flake Aluminum - High-Speed Visualization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuwald, P; Reichenbach, H; Kuhl, A

    2006-06-19

    Charges of 0.5 g PETN were used to disperse 1 g of flake aluminum in a rectangular test chamber of 4 liter inner volume and inner dimensions of approximately 10 cm x 10 cm x 40 cm. The subsequent combustion of the flake aluminum with the ambient air in the chamber gave rise to a highly luminous flame. The evolution of the luminous region was studied by means of high-speed cinematography. The high-speed camera is responsive to a broad spectral range in the visible and near infra-red. For a number of tests this response range was narrowed down by means of a band-pass filter with a center wavelength of 488 nm and a half-width of 23 nm. The corresponding images were expected to have a stronger temperature dependence than images obtained without the filter, thus providing better capability to highlight hot-spots. Emission in the range of the pass-band of the filter can be due to continuous thermal radiation from hot Al and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles or to molecular band emission from gaseous AlO. A time-resolving spectrometer was improvised to inspect this topic. The results suggest that AlO emission occurs, but that the continuous spectrum is the dominating effect in our experiments.

  17. Treatment of biodiesel wastewater by adsorption with commercial chitosan flakes: parameter optimization and process kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitakpoolsil, Wipawan; Hunsom, Mali

    2014-01-15

    The possibility of using commercial chitosan flakes as an adsorbent for the removal of pollutants from biodiesel wastewater was evaluated. The effect of varying the adsorption time (0.5-5 h), initial wastewater pH (2-8), adsorbent dose (0.5-5.5 g/L) and mixing rate (120-350 rpm) on the efficiency of pollutant removal was explored by univariate analysis. Under the derived optimal conditions, greater than 59.3%, 87.9% and 66.2% of the biological oxygen demand (BOD), chemical oxygen demand (COD) and oil & grease, respectively, was removed by a single adsorption. Nevertheless, the remaining BOD, COD and oil & grease were still higher than the acceptable Thai government limits for discharge into the environment. When the treatment was repeated, a greater than 93.6%, 97.6% and 95.8% removal of the BOD, COD and oil & grease, respectively, was obtained. The reusability of commercial chitosan following NaOH washing (0.05-0.2 M) was not suitable, with less than 40% efficiency after just one recycling and declining rapidly thereafter. The adsorption kinetics of all pollutant types by the commercial chitosan flakes was controlled by a mixed process of diffusion and adsorption of the pollutants during the early treatment period (0-1.5 h) and then solely controlled by adsorption after 2 h. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Gate-tunable phase transitions in thin flakes of 1T-TaS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yijun; Yang, Fangyuan; Lu, Xiu Fang; Yan, Ya Jun; Cho, Yong-Heum; Ma, Liguo; Niu, Xiaohai; Kim, Sejoong; Son, Young-Woo; Feng, Donglai; Li, Shiyan; Cheong, Sang-Wook; Chen, Xian Hui; Zhang, Yuanbo

    2015-03-01

    The ability to tune material properties using gating by electric fields is at the heart of modern electronic technology. It is also a driving force behind recent advances in two-dimensional systems, such as the observation of gate electric-field-induced superconductivity and metal-insulator transitions. Here, we describe an ionic field-effect transistor (termed an iFET), in which gate-controlled Li ion intercalation modulates the material properties of layered crystals of 1T-TaS2. The strong charge doping induced by the tunable ion intercalation alters the energetics of various charge-ordered states in 1T-TaS2 and produces a series of phase transitions in thin-flake samples with reduced dimensionality. We find that the charge-density wave states in 1T-TaS2 collapse in the two-dimensional limit at critical thicknesses. Meanwhile, at low temperatures, the ionic gating induces multiple phase transitions from Mott-insulator to metal in 1T-TaS2 thin flakes, with five orders of magnitude modulation in resistance, and superconductivity emerges in a textured charge-density wave state induced by ionic gating. Our method of gate-controlled intercalation opens up possibilities in searching for novel states of matter in the extreme charge-carrier-concentration limit.

  19. Determine Minimum Silver Flake Addition to GCM for Iodine Loaded AgZ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garino, Terry J.; Nenoff, Tina M.; Rodriguez, Mark A.

    2014-04-01

    The minimum amount of silver flake required to prevent loss of I{sub 2} during sintering in air for a SNL Glass Composite Material (GCM) Waste Form containing AgI-MOR (ORNL, 8.7 wt%) was determined to be 1.1 wt% Ag. The final GCM composition prior to sintering was 20 wt% AgI-MOR, 1.1 wt% Ag, and 80 wt% Bi-Si oxide glass. The amount of silver flake needed to suppress iodine loss was determined using thermo gravimetric analysis with mass spectroscopic off-gas analysis. These studies found that the ratio of silver to AgI-MOR required is lower in the presence of the glass than without it. Therefore an additional benefit of the GCM is that it serves to inhibit some iodine loss during processing. Alternatively, heating the AgI-MOR in inert atmosphere instead of air allowed for densified GCM formation without I{sub 2} loss, and no necessity for the addition of Ag. The cause of this behavior is found to be related to the oxidation of the metallic Ag to Ag{sup +} when heated to above ~300{degrees}C in air. Heating rate, iodine loading levels and atmosphere are the important variables that determine AgI migration and results suggest that AgI may be completely incorporated into the mordenite structure by the 550{degrees}C sintering temperature.

  20. Modeling Fission Product Sorption in Graphite Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szlufarska, Izabela [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Morgan, Dane [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Allen, Todd [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2013-04-08

    The goal of this project is to determine changes in adsorption and desorption of fission products to/from nuclear-grade graphite in response to a changing chemical environment. First, the project team will employ principle calculations and thermodynamic analysis to predict stability of fission products on graphite in the presence of structural defects commonly observed in very high- temperature reactor (VHTR) graphites. Desorption rates will be determined as a function of partial pressure of oxygen and iodine, relative humidity, and temperature. They will then carry out experimental characterization to determine the statistical distribution of structural features. This structural information will yield distributions of binding sites to be used as an input for a sorption model. Sorption isotherms calculated under this project will contribute to understanding of the physical bases of the source terms that are used in higher-level codes that model fission product transport and retention in graphite. The project will include the following tasks: Perform structural characterization of the VHTR graphite to determine crystallographic phases, defect structures and their distribution, volume fraction of coke, and amount of sp2 versus sp3 bonding. This information will be used as guidance for ab initio modeling and as input for sorptivity models; Perform ab initio calculations of binding energies to determine stability of fission products on the different sorption sites present in nuclear graphite microstructures. The project will use density functional theory (DFT) methods to calculate binding energies in vacuum and in oxidizing environments. The team will also calculate stability of iodine complexes with fission products on graphite sorption sites; Model graphite sorption isotherms to quantify concentration of fission products in graphite. The binding energies will be combined with a Langmuir isotherm statistical model to predict the sorbed concentration of fission

  1. AGC-2 Graphite Preirradiation Data Analysis Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William Windes; W. David Swank; David Rohrbaugh; Joseph Lord

    2013-08-01

    This report described the specimen loading order and documents all pre-irradiation examination material property measurement data for the graphite specimens contained within the second Advanced Graphite Capsule (AGC-2) irradiation capsule. The AGC-2 capsule is the second in six planned irradiation capsules comprising the Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) test series. The AGC test series is used to irradiate graphite specimens allowing quantitative data necessary for predicting the irradiation behavior and operating performance of new nuclear graphite grades to be generated which will ascertain the in-service behavior of the graphite for pebble bed and prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) designs. Similar to the AGC-1 specimen pre-irradiation examination report, material property tests were conducted on specimens from 18 nuclear graphite types but on an increased number of specimens (512) prior to loading into the AGC-2 irradiation assembly. All AGC-2 specimen testing was conducted at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) from October 2009 to August 2010. This report also details the specimen loading methodology for the graphite specimens inside the AGC-2 irradiation capsule. The AGC-2 capsule design requires “matched pair” creep specimens that have similar dose levels above and below the neutron flux profile mid-plane to provide similar specimens with and without an applied load. This document utilized the neutron flux profile calculated for the AGC-2 capsule design, the capsule dimensions, and the size (length) of the selected graphite and silicon carbide samples to create a stacking order that can produce “matched pairs” of graphite samples above and below the AGC-2 capsule elevation mid-point to provide specimens with similar neutron dose levels.

  2. Low-loss flake-graphene saturable absorber mirror for laser mode-locking at sub-200-fs pulse duration

    CERN Document Server

    Cunning, B V; Kielpinski, D

    2011-01-01

    Saturable absorbers are a key component for mode-locking femtosecond lasers. Polymer films containing graphene flakes have recently been used in transmission as laser mode-lockers, but suffer from high nonsaturable loss, limiting their application in low-gain lasers. Here we present a saturable absorber mirror based on a film of pure graphene flakes. The device is used to mode lock an erbium-doped fiber laser, generating pulses with state-of-the-art, sub-200-fs duration. The laser characteristic indicate that the film exhibits low nonsaturable loss (13% per pass) and large absorption modulation depth (45% of low-power absorption).

  3. Atomically resolved graphitic surfaces in air by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wastl, Daniel S; Weymouth, Alfred J; Giessibl, Franz J

    2014-05-27

    Imaging at the atomic scale using atomic force microscopy in biocompatible environments is an ongoing challenge. We demonstrate atomic resolution of graphite and hydrogen-intercalated graphene on SiC in air. The main challenges arise from the overall surface cleanliness and the water layers which form on almost all surfaces. To further investigate the influence of the water layers, we compare data taken with a hydrophilic bulk-silicon tip to a hydrophobic bulk-sapphire tip. While atomic resolution can be achieved with both tip materials at moderate interaction forces, there are strong differences in force versus distance spectra which relate to the water layers on the tips and samples. Imaging at very low tip-sample interaction forces results in the observation of large terraces of a naturally occurring stripe structure on the hydrogen-intercalated graphene. This structure has been previously reported on graphitic surfaces that are not covered with disordered adsorbates in ambient conditions (i.e., on graphite and bilayer graphene on SiC, but not on monolayer graphene on SiC). Both these observations indicate that hydrogen-intercalated graphene is close to an ideal graphene sample in ambient environments.

  4. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) Volume 5: Graphite PIRTs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL; Bratton, Rob [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Marsden, Barry [University of Manchester, UK; Srinivasan, Makuteswara [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission; Penfield, Scott [Technology Insights; Mitchell, Mark [PBMR (Pty) Ltd.; Windes, Will [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

    2008-03-01

    ) concepts, such as the NGNP, it is fully expected that the behavior of these graphites will conform to the recognized trends for near isotropic nuclear graphite. Thus, much of the data needed is confirmatory in nature. Theories that can explain graphite behavior have been postulated and, in many cases, shown to represent experimental data well. However, these theories need to be tested against data for the new graphites and extended to higher neutron doses and temperatures pertinent to the new Gen IV reactor concepts. It is anticipated that current and planned future graphite irradiation experiments will provide the data needed to validate many of the currently accepted models, as well as providing the needed data for design confirmation.

  5. Catalytic Graphitization of Phenolic Resin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mu Zhao; Huaihe Song

    2011-01-01

    The catalytic graphitization of thermal plastic phenolic-formaldehyde resin with the aid of ferric nitrate (FN) was studied in detail. The morphologies and structural features of the products including onion-like carbon nanoparticles and bamboo-shaped carbon nanotubes were investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy measurements. It was found that with the changes of loading content of FN and residence time at 1000℃, the products exhibited various morphologies. The TEM images showed that bamboo-shaped carbon nanotube consisted of tens of bamboo sticks and onion-like carbon nanoparticle was made up of quasi-spherically concentrically closed carbon nanocages.

  6. Preparation and Structure Regulation of Silicon Carbide-Derived Carbon/Spherical Natural Graphite Composites%碳化硅衍生碳/球形天然石墨复合材料的制备及其结构调控

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜雪莲; 丛野; 姜露; 李轩科; 崔正威; 董志军; 袁观明; 张江

    2015-01-01

    To meet the requirements of the energy storage materials for high energy density and high power density, porous silicon carbide/derived carbon-spherical natural graphite (SiC-CDCs@NG) composites were prepared. The composites were composed of tailored porous carbide-derived carbon and graphitized carbon with excel ent conductivity and a high energy storage capacity. The composition, structure, morphology, pore structure, and specific surface area of the composites were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy, and N2 adsorption/desorption analysis. The composites exhibited a high and adjustable specific surface area and micro-pore volume, with a micro-pore size of between 0.5 and 0.7 nm. Varying the molar ratio of NG and Si al owed optimization of the micro-pore volume, pore size distribution, specific surface area, and composition and content of the CDCs shel and NG core.%为满足储能领域对于材料兼具高能量密度和高功率密度的需求,本文旨在将具有特殊孔隙结构的碳化物衍生碳与具有高导电性和高能量存储密度的石墨化碳(球形天然石墨)相复合,制备得到一种多孔碳化硅衍生碳/球形天然石墨(SiC-CDCs@NG)复合材料.采用X射线衍射(XRD)、扫描电子显微镜(SEM)、透射电子显微镜(TEM)、拉曼光谱、N2吸/脱附等方法对材料的组成、结构、形貌、孔结构和比表面积等进行了表征.结果表明, SiC-CDCs@NG材料具有较大的且可调节的比表面积和微孔体积,微孔孔径集中在0.5-0.7 nm范围内;通过改变NG/Si摩尔比,可以有效调控CDCs壳和NG核在复合材料中的组成分布、CDCs微孔的体积、孔径分布和比表面积.

  7. Status of Chronic Oxidation Studies of Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contescu, Cristian I. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mee, Robert W. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Graphite will undergo extremely slow, but continuous oxidation by traces of moisture that will be present, albeit at very low levels, in the helium coolant of HTGR. This chronic oxidation may cause degradation of mechanical strength and thermal properties of graphite components if a porous oxidation layer penetrates deep enough in the bulk of graphite components during the lifetime of the reactor. The current research on graphite chronic oxidation is motivated by the acute need to understand the behavior of each graphite grade during prolonged exposure to high temperature chemical attack by moisture. The goal is to provide the elements needed to develop predictive models for long-time oxidation behavior of graphite components in the cooling helium of HTGR. The tasks derived from this goal are: (1) Oxidation rate measurements in order to determine and validate a comprehensive kinetic model suitable for prediction of intrinsic oxidation rates as a function of temperature and oxidant gas composition; (2) Characterization of effective diffusivity of water vapor in the graphite pore system in order to account for the in-pore transport of moisture; and (3) Development and validation of a predictive model for the penetration depth of the oxidized layer, in order to assess the risk of oxidation caused damage of particular graphite grades after prolonged exposure to the environment of helium coolant in HTGR. The most important and most time consuming of these tasks is the measurement of oxidation rates in accelerated oxidation tests (but still under kinetic control) and the development of a reliable kinetic model. This report summarizes the status of chronic oxidation studies on graphite, and then focuses on model development activities, progress of kinetic measurements, validation of results, and improvement of the kinetic models. Analysis of current and past results obtained with three grades of showed that the classical Langmuir-Hinshelwood model cannot reproduce all

  8. Crystal Structure of Cold Compressed Graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amsler, Maximilian; Flores-Livas, José A.; Lehtovaara, Lauri; Balima, Felix; Ghasemi, S. Alireza; Machon, Denis; Pailhès, Stéphane; Willand, Alexander; Caliste, Damien; Botti, Silvana; San Miguel, Alfonso; Goedecker, Stefan; Marques, Miguel A. L.

    2012-02-01

    Through a systematic structural search we found an allotrope of carbon with Cmmm symmetry which we predict to be more stable than graphite for pressures above 10 GPa. This material, which we refer to as Z-carbon, is formed by pure sp3 bonds and it provides an explanation to several features in experimental x-ray diffraction and Raman spectra of graphite under pressure. The transition from graphite to Z-carbon can occur through simple sliding and buckling of graphene sheets. Our calculations predict that Z-carbon is a transparent wide band-gap semiconductor with a hardness comparable to diamond.

  9. Interface structure between tetraglyme and graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minato, Taketoshi; Araki, Yuki; Umeda, Kenichi; Yamanaka, Toshiro; Okazaki, Ken-ichi; Onishi, Hiroshi; Abe, Takeshi; Ogumi, Zempachi

    2017-09-01

    Clarification of the details of the interface structure between liquids and solids is crucial for understanding the fundamental processes of physical functions. Herein, we investigate the structure of the interface between tetraglyme and graphite and propose a model for the interface structure based on the observation of frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy in liquids. The ordering and distorted adsorption of tetraglyme on graphite were observed. It is found that tetraglyme stably adsorbs on graphite. Density functional theory calculations supported the adsorption structure. In the liquid phase, there is a layered structure of the molecular distribution with an average distance of 0.60 nm between layers.

  10. Adsorption of lead over graphite oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olanipekun, Opeyemi; Oyefusi, Adebola; Neelgund, Gururaj M; Oki, Aderemi

    2014-01-24

    The adsorption efficiency and kinetics of removal of lead in presence of graphite oxide (GO) was determined using the Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer (AAS). The GO was prepared by the chemical oxidation of graphite and characterized using FTIR, SEM, TGA and XRD. The adsorption efficiency of GO for the solution containing 50, 100 and 150 ppm of Pb(2+) was found to be 98%, 91% and 71% respectively. The adsorption ability of GO was found to be higher than graphite. Therefore, the oxidation of activated carbon in removal of heavy metals may be a viable option to reduce pollution in portable water. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Effect of graphite content on electrochemical performance of Sn-SnSb/graphite composite powders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Sn-SnSb alloy was synthesized by reducing a aqueous solution containing Sn( Ⅱ ) and Sb(Ⅲ) salts with NaBH4 in the presence of sodium citrate. The product was characterized by X-ray diffractometry(XRD) and scanning electron microscopy(SEM).Sn-SnSb/graphite composite powders were prepared by mechanical milling and the mass fraction of graphite was increased from20% to 50%. The effect of graphite content on the electrochemical performance of Sn-SnSb/graphite composite electrode was investigated. The results show the increase of graphite content is in favor of enhancing the first charge-discharge efficiency and improving the cycle performance, but the capacity of the composite electrode decreases with increasing content of graphite.

  12. Electrochemical intercalation of potassium into graphite in KF melt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Dongren [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Central South University, South Lushan Road, Changsha 410083, Hunan (China); Department of Chemical and Environmental engineering, Jiaozuo University, JiaoZuo 454003, Henan (China); Yang Zhanhong, E-mail: zhyang@mail.csu.edu.c [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Central South University, South Lushan Road, Changsha 410083, Hunan (China); Li Wangxing; Qiu Shilin; Luo Yingtao [Zhengzhou Research Institute of Chalco, Zhengzhou 450041, Henan (China)

    2010-01-01

    Electrochemical intercalation of potassium into graphite in molten potassium fluoride at 1163 K was investigated by means of cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic electrolysis and open-circuit potential measurements. It was found that potassium intercalated into graphite solely between graphite layers. In addition, the intercalation compound formed in graphite bulk in molten KF was quite unstable and decomposed very fast. X-ray diffraction measurements indicate that a very dilute potassium-graphite intercalation compound was formed in graphite matrix in the fluoride melt. Analysis with scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope shows that graphite was exfoliated to sheets and tubes due to lattice expansion caused by intercalation of potassium in molten KF.

  13. Loss characterization of Mo-doped FeNi flake for DC-to-DC converter and MHz frequency applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Y; Kou, XM; Mu, MK; McLaughlin, BM; Chen, X; Parsons, PE; Zhu, H; Ji, A; Lee, FC; Xiao, JQ

    2012-04-01

    Magnetic core materials with low loss, high magnetic induction, large permeability, and high working frequencies above 1 MHz are in high demand in the next generation of miniaturized power electronic devices. Magnetic flake based composite materials have been developed to take advantage of high operating frequency ranges, low eddy current losses, high magnetic induction, and low cost fabrication methods. In this study, Mo-doped FeNi flakes with thicknesses of 0.4 +/- 0.2 mu m to 1.6 +/- 0.5 mu m have been successfully fabricated with high energy ball milling. The lateral size of the flake is around 100 mu m. After being hot-pressed with polymers, all of the samples show initial permeability higher than 40 in the frequency range up to 10 MHz and a loss tangent lower than 0.1. At high excitations, the composite materials show core losses 5 times lower than that of Fe flakes at 800 kHz. (C) 2012 American Institute of Physics. [doi:10.1063/1.3677310

  14. Manufacture and characterization of a yogurt-like beverage made with oat flakes fermented by selected lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luana, Nionelli; Rossana, Coda; Curiel, José Antonio; Kaisa, Poutanen; Marco, Gobbetti; Rizzello, Carlo Giuseppe

    2014-08-18

    This study aimed at investigating the suitability of oat flakes for making functional beverages. Different technological options were assayed, including the amount of flakes, the inoculum of the starter and the addition of enzyme preparations. The beverage containing 25% (wt/wt) of oat flakes and fermented with L. plantarum LP09 was considered optimal on the basis of sensory and technological properties. The enzyme addition favored the growth of the starter, shortened the time needed to reach pH4.2 to ca. 8h, and favored a decrease of the quotient of fermentation. Fermentation increased the polyphenols availability and the antioxidant activity (25 and 70% higher, respectively) and decreased the hydrolysis index in vitro. Sensory analyses showed that fermented oat flakes beverage had the typical features of a yogurt-like beverage, enhancing the overall intensity of odor and flavor compared to the non-fermented control. Selection of proper processing and fermentation condition allowed the obtainment of a beverage with better nutritional and sensory properties.

  15. Nickel oxide crystalline nano flakes: synthesis, characterization and their use as anode in lithium-ion batteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmadi, Majid; Younesi, Reza; Vegge, Tejs

    2014-01-01

    Nickel oxide crystalline nano flakes (NONFs)—only about 10 nm wide—were produced using a simple and inexpensive chemistry method followed by a short annealing in ambient air. In a first step, Ni(OH)2 sheets were synthesized by adding sodium hydroxide (NaOH) drop-wise in a Ni(NO3)2 aqueous solutio...

  16. Performance of AC/graphite capacitors at high weight ratios of AC/graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hongyu [IM and T Ltd., Advanced Research Center, Saga University, 1341 Yoga-machi, Saga 840-0047 (Japan); Yoshio, Masaki [Advanced Research Center, Department of Applied Chemistry, Saga University, 1341 Yoga-machi, Saga 840-0047 (Japan)

    2008-03-01

    The effect of negative to positive electrode materials' weight ratio on the electrochemical performance of both activated carbon (AC)/AC and AC/graphite capacitors has been investigated, especially in the terms of capacity and cycle-ability. The limited capacity charge mode has been proposed to improve the cycle performance of AC/graphite capacitors at high weight ratios of AC/graphite. (author)

  17. Few layer graphene to graphitic films: infrared photoconductive versus bolometric response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurra, Narendra; Bhadram, Venkata Srinu; Narayana, Chandrabhas; Kulkarni, Giridhar U.

    2012-12-01

    We report a comparative study of the performance of infrared (IR) photoconductive and bolometric detectors fabricated from few layer graphene (FLG) to graphitic films obtained by different methods. FLG films grown directly on insulating substrates with the aid of residual hydrocarbons and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) carbon sources show an IR photoresponse of 73% which is far higher compared to the FLG films (6-14%) obtained by CVD and Scotch tape methods. The photoconductive nature of FLG films is due to generation of photoexcited charge carriers. On the other hand, the photoresponse of the bulk graphitic films is bolometric in nature where the resistance changes are due to thermal effects. The IR photoresponse from these graphitic films is correlated with the Raman peak intensities which are very sensitive to the nature of the FLG.We report a comparative study of the performance of infrared (IR) photoconductive and bolometric detectors fabricated from few layer graphene (FLG) to graphitic films obtained by different methods. FLG films grown directly on insulating substrates with the aid of residual hydrocarbons and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) carbon sources show an IR photoresponse of 73% which is far higher compared to the FLG films (6-14%) obtained by CVD and Scotch tape methods. The photoconductive nature of FLG films is due to generation of photoexcited charge carriers. On the other hand, the photoresponse of the bulk graphitic films is bolometric in nature where the resistance changes are due to thermal effects. The IR photoresponse from these graphitic films is correlated with the Raman peak intensities which are very sensitive to the nature of the FLG. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: The Raman spectrum of the FLG on the Ni surface (before etching) is shown in Fig. S1. The thickness and mobility of the FLG films are provided in Fig. S2 and S3 respectively. The sensitivity of the RHC-FLG towards the IR radiation emitted by an

  18. Printable elastic conductors by in situ formation of silver nanoparticles from silver flakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuhisa, Naoji; Inoue, Daishi; Zalar, Peter; Jin, Hanbit; Matsuba, Yorishige; Itoh, Akira; Yokota, Tomoyuki; Hashizume, Daisuke; Someya, Takao

    2017-08-01

    Printable elastic conductors promise large-area stretchable sensor/actuator networks for healthcare, wearables and robotics. Elastomers with metal nanoparticles are one of the best approaches to achieve high performance, but large-area utilization is limited by difficulties in their processability. Here we report a printable elastic conductor containing Ag nanoparticles that are formed in situ, solely by mixing micrometre-sized Ag flakes, fluorine rubbers, and surfactant. Our printable elastic composites exhibit conductivity higher than 4,000 S cm-1 (highest value: 6,168 S cm-1) at 0% strain, and 935 S cm-1 when stretched up to 400%. Ag nanoparticle formation is influenced by the surfactant, heating processes, and elastomer molecular weight, resulting in a drastic improvement of conductivity. Fully printed sensor networks for stretchable robots are demonstrated, sensing pressure and temperature accurately, even when stretched over 250%.

  19. High-performance memory device using graphene oxide flakes sandwiched polymethylmethacrylate layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valanarasu, S; Kulandaisamy, I; Kathalingam, A; Rhee, Jin-Koo; Vijayan, T A; Chandramohan, R

    2013-10-01

    Organic bistable devices (OBDs) using graphene oxide (GO) flakes sandwiched polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) films were fabricated. These devices exhibited two accessible conducting states, that is, a low-conductivity (OFF) state and a high-conductivity (ON) state. The devices can be switched to ON state under a negative electrical sweep; it can also be reset to the initial OFF state by a reverse (positive) electrical sweep. Detailed I-V measurements have shown that in ITO/PMMA/GO/PMMA/Al sandwiches the resistive switching originates from the formation and rupture of conducting filaments. The ON/OFF ratio of the OBDs was approximately 5 x 10(3), reproducibility of more than 10(5) cycles, and retention time of 10(4) s. These properties show that the device is promising for high-density, low-cost memory application.

  20. A Highly Ion-Selective Zeolite Flake Layer on Porous Membranes for Flow Battery Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zhizhang; Zhu, Xiangxue; Li, Mingrun; Lu, Wenjing; Li, Xianfeng; Zhang, Huamin

    2016-02-24

    Zeolites are crystalline microporous aluminosilicates with periodic arrangements of cages and well-defined channels, which make them very suitable for separating ions of different sizes, and thus also for use in battery applications. Herein, an ultra-thin ZSM-35 zeolite flake was introduced onto a poly(ether sulfone) based porous membrane. The pore size of the zeolite (ca. 0.5 nm) is intermediary between that of hydrated vanadium ions (>0.6 nm) and protons (membrane can thus be used to perfectly separate vanadium ions and protons, making this technology useful in vanadium flow batteries (VFB). A VFB with a zeolite-coated membrane exhibits a columbic efficiency of >99 % and an energy efficiency of >81 % at 200 mA cm(-2), which is by far the highest value ever reported. These convincing results indicate that zeolite-coated membranes are promising in battery applications.

  1. Pretreatment of cottonseed flakes with proteases and an amylase for higher oil yields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassanein, Minar M.

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of enzymatic pretreatment of cottonseed flakes on oil extractability was studied. The enzymes investigated included bacterial protease (Bp, papain (Pa, savinase (S, termamyl (T, pectinase (Pe and cellulase (C. The variables studied during the enzymatic hydrolysis experiments were: enzyme concentration, moisture: cottonseed flakes ratio, and time of hydrolysis. Enzymatic hydrolysis experiments were first carried out with a single enzyme, then with enzyme mixtures formulated according to the results of single enzyme treatments. Results were evaluated based on the relative increase in oil extractability, and some oil characteristics in comparison with untreated cottonseed flakes (control. Pretreatment with enzyme mixtures resulted in a relative increase in oil extractability that was higher than single enzyme pretreatment and the control. Statistical analysis showed a significant difference (at 5% level between the control and all enzymatically treated oils as well as among different enzymatically treated oils. The relative increase in oil extractability due to pretreatment with enzyme mixtures were in the following order: S: Pe: Bp>S: P>S: C: Pe>S: Bp>S:T>S: C >S: Pa with values 44.9%, 38.9%, 37.1%, 34.9%, 30.1%, 28.9%, respectively. Enzymatic pretreatment of cottonseed flakes resulted in oils with fatty acid composition, acid value, iodine value and peroxide values that were generally comparable to the control.En este trabajo se estudió el efecto del pretratamiento con enzimas sobre la extractabilidad del aceite en hojuelas de semilla de algodón. Las enzimas que se investigaron fueron proteasa bacteriana (Bp, papaína (Pa, savinasa (S, temamil (T, pectinasa (Pe y celulasa (C. Las variables estudiadas durante los experimentos de hidrólisis enzimática fueron: concentración de la enzima, ratio humedad:cantidad de hojuelas y tiempo de hidrólisis. Estos experimentos se realizaron primeramente con una sola enzima y posteriormente con

  2. Experimental Analysis of Open, Simple and Modified Greenhouse Dryers for Drying Potato Flakes Under Forced Convection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanuj Kumar Sahu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Drying using burning of fossil fuels and open sun drying are traditional way to dry crops, fruits, vegetables etc. But there are some disadvantages associated with them such as crops are affected by dirt and other impurities. To overcome the problems associated with open sun drying and drying using burning of fossil fuels, solar greenhouse drying is found out to be the best alternative. In present work the performance of simple and modified greenhouse dryer is evaluated and effort is made to increase the drying rate of greenhouse dryer which has been achieved in modified greenhouse dryer with inclined roof. Total weight of potato flakes was reduced by 80.1 % in modified greenhouse dryer in just 5 hours whereas it took 6 hours in simple greenhouse dryer for achieving nearly same values.

  3. Process Optimization for Solid Extraction, Flavor Improvement and Fat Removal in the Production of Soymilk From Full Fat Soy Flakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanley Prawiradjaja

    2003-05-31

    Traditionally soymilk has been made with whole soybeans; however, there are other alternative raw ingredients for making soymilk, such as soy flour or full-fat soy flakes. US markets prefer soymilk with little or no beany flavor. modifying the process or using lipoxygenase-free soybeans can be used to achieve this. Unlike the dairy industry, fat reduction in soymilk has been done through formula modification instead of by conventional fat removal (skimming). This project reports the process optimization for solids and protein extraction, flavor improvement and fat removal in the production of 5, 8 and 12 {sup o}Brix soymilk from full fat soy flakes and whole soybeans using the Takai soymilk machine. Proximate analyses, and color measurement were conducted in 5, 8 and 12 {sup o}Brix soymilk. Descriptive analyses with trained panelists (n = 9) were conducted using 8 and 12 {sup o}Brix lipoxygenase-free and high protein blend soy flake soymilks. Rehydration of soy flakes is necessary to prevent agglomeration during processing and increase extractability. As the rehydration temperature increases from 15 to 50 to 85 C, the hexanal concentration was reduced. Enzyme inactivation in soy flakes milk production (measured by hexanal levels) is similar to previous reports with whole soybeans milk production; however, shorter rehydration times can be achieved with soy flakes (5 to 10 minutes) compared to whole beans (8 to 12 hours). Optimum rehydration conditions for a 5, 8 and 12 {sup o}Brix soymilk are 50 C for 5 minutes, 85 C for 5 minutes and 85 C for 10 minutes, respectively. In the flavor improvement study of soymilk, the hexanal date showed differences between undeodorized HPSF in contrast to triple null soymilk and no differences between deodorized HPSF in contrast to deodorized triple null. The panelists could not differentiate between the beany, cereal, and painty flavors. However, the panelists responded that the overall aroma of deodorized 8 {sup o}Brix triple null

  4. Process Optimization for Solid Extraction, Flavor Improvement and Fat Removal in the Production of Soymilk From Full Fat Soy Flakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prawiradjaja, Stanley [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Traditionally soymilk has been made with whole soybeans; however, there are other alternative raw ingredients for making soymilk, such as soy flour or full-fat soy flakes. US markets prefer soymilk with little or no beany flavor. modifying the process or using lipoxygenase-free soybeans can be used to achieve this. Unlike the dairy industry, fat reduction in soymilk has been done through formula modification instead of by conventional fat removal (skimming). This project reports the process optimization for solids and protein extraction, flavor improvement and fat removal in the production of 5, 8 and 12 °Brix soymilk from full fat soy flakes and whole soybeans using the Takai soymilk machine. Proximate analyses, and color measurement were conducted in 5, 8 and 12 °Brix soymilk. Descriptive analyses with trained panelists (n = 9) were conducted using 8 and 12 °Brix lipoxygenase-free and high protein blend soy flake soymilks. Rehydration of soy flakes is necessary to prevent agglomeration during processing and increase extractability. As the rehydration temperature increases from 15 to 50 to 85 C, the hexanal concentration was reduced. Enzyme inactivation in soy flakes milk production (measured by hexanal levels) is similar to previous reports with whole soybeans milk production; however, shorter rehydration times can be achieved with soy flakes (5 to 10 minutes) compared to whole beans (8 to 12 hours). Optimum rehydration conditions for a 5, 8 and 12 °Brix soymilk are 50 C for 5 minutes, 85 C for 5 minutes and 85 C for 10 minutes, respectively. In the flavor improvement study of soymilk, the hexanal date showed differences between undeodorized HPSF in contrast to triple null soymilk and no differences between deodorized HPSF in contrast to deodorized triple null. The panelists could not differentiate between the beany, cereal, and painty flavors. However, the panelists responded that the overall aroma of deodorized 8 °Brix triple null and HPSF soymilk are

  5. Influence of Electropulsing Pretreatment on Solid-State Graphitization of Spherical Graphite Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Qing-chun; LI Ren-xing; LIN Da-shuai; CHANG Guo-wei; ZHAI Qi-jie

    2012-01-01

    The solid-state graphitization process of spherical graphite iron after electropulsing pretreatment was ob- served in-situ by using a high-temperature confocal scanning laser microscope (HTCSLM). The influence of electro- pulsing pretreatment on the decomposition of cementite and the formation of graphite during the solid-state graphiti- zation was studied. The result indicates that the electropulsing pretreatment can accelerate the decomposition of ce mentite, and make more neonatal graphite in small size be formed near the cementite. The neonatal graphite nucle ates and grows chiefly at the temperature range of 800 to 850 ℃, and the average growth rate of neonatal graphite is 0. 034 μm2/s during the heating process. For the spherical graphite iron after normal and electropulsing pretreat- ment, the decomposition rate of cementite during the heating process is 0.16 and 0.24 μm2/s, respectively. Analy- sis shows that the electropulsing pretreatment promotes the dislocation accumulation near the cementite, conse- quently, the decomposition of cementite and the formation of neonatal graphite is accelerated during the solid-state graphitization.

  6. Synthesis of Carbon Nanotube-Reinforced Al2024 Matrix Nanocomposite Using Flake Powder Metallurgy Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rikhtegar, F.; Shabestari, S. G.; Saghafian, H.

    2016-12-01

    In current work, the flake powder metallurgy method was applied to achieve the uniform dispersion of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) within the Al2024 powder. For this purpose, the flake morphology of Al2024 powder with suitable diameter-to-thickness ratio ( D/ t = 85) was obtained after ball milling for 4 hours at 250 rpm and ball-to-powder ratio = 10. Then, the surface of matrix was modified by a hydrophilic polymer [polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)] to obtain the sufficient -OH group on its surface. Additionally, the refluxing of CNTs in nitric acid was performed at 393 K (120 °C) for 6 hours to functionalize the reinforcement by -COOH agent. After preparation of initial materials, the Al2024-1.5 wt pct CNTs suspension was stirred in a slurry at pH 3 until the color was changed in steady state from ink-like to transparent at pH 5. The hydrogen bonding was formed between the -OH groups of PVA coated Al2024 and -COOH groups of functionalized MWCNTs during the mixing step. Also, the temporary polarity could be considered between H+ and {{{C}}_{12}}{{{H}}_{25}}{{SO}}_4^ - ions on the surface of constituents, which led to improvement in the CNT distribution due to the changing of suspension pH. Consequently, the homogenous dispersion of CNTs in Al2024 flaky powders resulted in a chemical reaction of constituents without any destructive effects of mechanical forces. The morphological changes of Al2024 powders were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and surface treatments were evaluated by Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopies. The dispersion of nanocomposite powder was investigated through field emission SEM. Also, X-ray diffraction analysis was used to investigate the initial Al2024 powder and formed phases after the ball milling process.

  7. Reduction of Ochratoxin A in Oat Flakes by Twin-Screw Extrusion Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun Jung; Dahal, Samjhana; Perez, Enrique Garcia; Kowalski, Ryan Joseph; Ganjyal, Girish M; Ryu, Dojin

    2017-10-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is one of the most important mycotoxins owing to its widespread occurrence and toxicity, including nephrotoxicity and potential carcinogenicity to humans. OTA has been detected in a wide range of agricultural commodities, including cereal grains and their processed products. In particular, oat-based products show a higher incidence and level of contamination. Extrusion cooking is widely used in the manufacturing of breakfast cereals and snacks and may reduce mycotoxins to varying degrees. Hence, the effects of extrusion cooking on the stability of OTA in spiked (100 μg/kg) oat flake was investigated by using a laboratory-scale twin-screw extruder with a central composite design. Factors examined were moisture content (20, 25, and 30% dry weight basis), temperature (140, 160, and 180°C), screw speed (150, 200, and 250 rpm), and die size (1.5, 2, and 3 mm). Both nonextruded and extruded samples were analyzed for reductions of OTA by high-performance liquid chromatography, coupled with fluorescence detection. The percentage of reductions in OTA in the contaminated oat flakes upon extrusion processing were in the range of 0 to 28%. OTA was partially stable during extrusion, with only screw speed and die size having significant effect on reduction (P < 0.005). The highest reduction of 28% was achieved at 180°C, 20% moisture, 250 rpm screw speed, and a 3-mm die with 193 kJ/kg specific mechanical energy. According to the central composite design analyses, up to 28% of OTA can be reduced by a combination of 162°C, 30% moisture, and 221 rpm, with a 3-mm die.

  8. Analysis of picosecond pulsed laser melted graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinbeck, J.; Braunstein, G.; Speck, J.; Dresselhaus, M.S.; Huang, C.Y.; Malvezzi, A.M.; Bloembergen, N.

    1986-01-01

    A Raman microprobe and high resolution TEM have been used to analyze the resolidified region of liquid carbon generated by picosecond pulse laser radiation. From the relative intensities of the zone center Raman-allowed mode for graphite at 1582 cm/sup -1/ and the disorder-induced mode at 1360 cm/sup -1/, the average graphite crystallite size in the resolidified region is determined as a function of position. By comparison with Rutherford backscattering spectra and Raman spectra from nonosecond pulsed laser melting experiments, the disorder depth for picosecond pulsed laser melted graphite is determined as a function of irradiating energy density. Comparisons of TEM micrographs for nanosecond and picosecond pulsed laser melting experiments show that the structure of the laser disordered regions in graphite are similar and exhibit similar behavior with increasing laser pulse fluence.

  9. Analysis of Picosecond Pulsed Laser Melted Graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbeck, J.; Braunstein, G.; Speck, J.; Dresselhaus, M. S.; Huang, C. Y.; Malvezzi, A. M.; Bloembergen, N.

    1986-12-01

    A Raman microprobe and high resolution TEM have been used to analyze the resolidified region of liquid carbon generated by picosecond pulse laser radiation. From the relative intensities of the zone center Raman-allowed mode for graphite at 1582 cm{sup -1} and the disorder-induced mode at 1360 cm{sup -1}, the average graphite crystallite size in the resolidified region is determined as a function of position. By comparison with Rutherford backscattering spectra and Raman spectra from nanosecond pulsed laser melting experiments, the disorder depth for picosecond pulsed laser melted graphite is determined as a function of irradiating energy density. Comparisons of TEM micrographs for nanosecond and picosecond pulsed laser melting experiments show that the structure of the laser disordered regions in graphite are similar and exhibit similar behavior with increasing laser pulse fluence.

  10. Burned Microporous Alumina-Graphite Brick

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ 1 Scope This standard specifies the definition,classifica-tion,technical requirements,test methods,inspection rules,marking,packing,transportation and quality certificate of burned microporous alumina-graphite brick.

  11. Graphite Oxide and Aromatic Amines : Size Matters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spyrou, Konstantinos; Calvaresi, Matteo; Diamanti, Evmorfi A. K.; Tsoufis, Theodoros; Gournis, Dimitrios; Rudolf, Petra; Zerbetto, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies are performed in order to illuminate, for first time, the intercalation mechanism of polycyclic aromatic molecules into graphite oxide. Two representative molecules of this family, aniline and naphthalene amine are investigated. After intercalation, aniline

  12. Graphitic nanocapsules: design, synthesis and bioanalytical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Ding; Xu, Yiting; Zou, Yuxiu; Chen, Long; Chen, Zhuo; Tan, Weihong

    2017-08-03

    Graphitic nanocapsules are emerging nanomaterials which are gaining popularity along with the development of carbon nanomaterials. Their unique physical and chemical properties, as well as good biocompatibility, make them desirable agents for biomedical and bioanalytical applications. Through rational design, integrating graphitic nanocapsules with other materials provides them with additional properties which make them versatile nanoplatforms for bioanalysis. In this feature article, we present the use and performance of graphitic nanocapsules in a variety of bioanalytical applications. Based on their chemical properties, the specific merits and limitations of magnetic, hollow, and noble metal encapsulated graphitic nanocapsules are discussed. Detection, multi-modal imaging, and therapeutic applications are included. Future directions and potential solutions for further biomedical applications are also suggested.

  13. Graphite Oxide and Aromatic Amines : Size Matters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spyrou, Konstantinos; Calvaresi, Matteo; Diamanti, Evmorfi A. K.; Tsoufis, Theodoros; Gournis, Dimitrios; Rudolf, Petra; Zerbetto, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies are performed in order to illuminate, for first time, the intercalation mechanism of polycyclic aromatic molecules into graphite oxide. Two representative molecules of this family, aniline and naphthalene amine are investigated. After intercalation, aniline molec

  14. Immobilization of Rocky Flats Graphite Fines Residue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudisill, T.S.

    1999-04-06

    The development of the immobilization process for graphite fines has proceeded through a series of experimental programs. The experimental procedures and results from each series of experiments are discussed in this report.

  15. Upgrading graphite by flotation at Bogala Mines in Sri Lanka

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Graphite is naturally floatable due to its hydrophobic property and also soft and smears on other gangue particles, rendering the gangue more or less floatable too. Due to this reason it is important to concentrate on areas such as suitable flotation reagents, depression agents, pH modifiers, and particle size to be fed during the process, The paper surveys and analyses the suitable particle size to be fed to achieve high-grade concentrate. According to the work carried out the author suggested the ideal cost effective flotation flow sheet for improved results at Bogala Mines in Sri Lanka.

  16. Effect of structural disorder on quantum oscillations in graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camargo, B. C., E-mail: b.c-camargo@yahoo.com.br; Kopelevich, Y. [Instituto de Fisica Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Unicamp 13083-970, Campinas, São Paulo (Brazil); Usher, A.; Hubbard, S. B. [School of Physics, University of Exeter, Stocker Road, Exeter EX4 4QL (United Kingdom)

    2016-01-18

    We have studied the effect of structural disorder on the de Haas van Alphen and Shubnikov de Haas quantum oscillations measured in natural, Kish, and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite samples at temperatures down to 30 mK and at magnetic fields up to 14 T. The measurements were performed on different samples characterized by means of x-ray diffractometry, transmission electron microscopy, and atomic-force microscopy techniques. Our results reveal a correlation between the amplitude of quantum oscillations and the sample surface roughness.

  17. Structure-Property Relationships in Intercalated Graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-10-15

    2% 293 (1984). 45. "Raman Microprobe Studies of the Structure of SbCls-Graphite Intercalation Compounds’, L.E. McNeil, J. Steinbeck , L. Salamanca-Riba...Using the Rutherford Backscattering-Channeling Teachnique’, G. Braunstein, B. Elman, J. Steinbeck , M.S. Dresseihaus, T. Venkatesan and B. Wilkens, to be...8217Razuan Mcroprobe Observation of Intercalate Contraction In Graphite Inter- calation Compounds’, L.E. McNeil, J. Steinbeck , L. Salamancar-Riba, and G

  18. Algorithm for Realistic Modeling of Graphitic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Khomenko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An algorithm for molecular dynamics simulations of graphitic systems using realistic semiempirical interaction potentials of carbon atoms taking into account both short-range and long-range contributions is proposed. Results of the use of the algorithm for a graphite sample are presented. The scalability of the algorithm depending on the system size and the number of processor cores involved in the calculations is analyzed.

  19. Structure and functionality of bromine doped graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, Rashid; Kemper, A F; Cao, Chao; Cheng, H P

    2013-04-28

    First-principles calculations are used to study the enhanced in-plane conductivity observed experimentally in Br-doped graphite, and to study the effect of external stress on the structure and functionality of such systems. The model used in the numerical calculations is that of stage two doped graphite. The band structure near the Fermi surface of the doped systems with different bromine concentrations is compared to that of pure graphite, and the charge transfer between carbon and bromine atoms is analyzed to understand the conductivity change along different high symmetry directions. Our calculations show that, for large interlayer separation between doped graphite layers, bromine is stable in the molecular form (Br2). However, with increased compression (decreased layer-layer separation) Br2 molecules tend to dissociate. While in both forms, bromine is an electron acceptor. The charge exchange between the graphite layers and Br atoms is higher than that with Br2 molecules. Electron transfer to the Br atoms increases the number of hole carriers in the graphite sheets, resulting in an increase of conductivity.

  20. Graphite Composite Panel Polishing Fixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagopian, John; Strojny, Carl; Budinoff, Jason

    2011-01-01

    The use of high-strength, lightweight composites for the fixture is the novel feature of this innovation. The main advantage is the light weight and high stiffness-to-mass ratio relative to aluminum. Meter-class optics require support during the grinding/polishing process with large tools. The use of aluminum as a polishing fixture is standard, with pitch providing a compliant layer to allow support without deformation. Unfortunately, with meter-scale optics, a meter-scale fixture weighs over 120 lb (.55 kg) and may distort the optics being fabricated by loading the mirror and/or tool used in fabrication. The use of composite structures that are lightweight yet stiff allows standard techniques to be used while providing for a decrease in fixture weight by almost 70 percent. Mounts classically used to support large mirrors during fabrication are especially heavy and difficult to handle. The mount must be especially stiff to avoid deformation during the optical fabrication process, where a very large and heavy lap often can distort the mount and optic being fabricated. If the optic is placed on top of the lapping tool, the weight of the optic and the fixture can distort the lap. Fixtures to support the mirror during fabrication are often very large plates of aluminum, often 2 in. (.5 cm) or more in thickness and weight upwards of 150 lb (68 kg). With the addition of a backing material such as pitch and the mirror itself, the assembly can often weigh over 250 lb (.113 kg) for a meter-class optic. This innovation is the use of a lightweight graphite panel with an aluminum honeycomb core for use as the polishing fixture. These materials have been used in the aerospace industry as structural members due to their light weight and high stiffness. The grinding polishing fixture consists of the graphite composite panel, fittings, and fixtures to allow interface to the polishing machine, and introduction of pitch buttons to support the optic under fabrication. In its

  1. Preparation of oriented graphite/polymer composite sheets with high thermal conductivities by tape casting%流延法制备高热导率定向石墨/高分子复合片层材料

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周绍鑫; 祝渊; 杜鸿达; 李宝华; 康飞宇

    2012-01-01

    Oriented graphite/polymer composite sheets were prepared using natural,crystalline flake graphites as raw materials,polyvinyl butyral as binders,polyethylene glycol and dibutyl phthalate as plasticizers by a tape-casting method at room temperature.The dependences of the binder contents and the blade heights on the orientation of the composite sheets were studied,and the effect of the orientation on the thermal conductivity was investigated.X-ray diffraction patterns and scanning electron microscope images showed that as-prepared samples showed different degrees of orientation.The thermal conductivity increased with the degree of orientation.The highest thermal conductivity of 490 W/( m· K) could be achieved by optimizing the binder contents and the blade heights.%以天然鳞片石墨为原料,PVB为黏结剂,PEG和DBP混合物为增塑剂,通过流延工艺在室温下制备了定向排列的石墨/聚合物片层复合材料.系统分析了不同黏结剂用量和流延刀口高度下复合片层材料的定向排列状况,并探讨了定向排列程度对其热导率的影响.XRD和SEM的结果表明,石墨/聚合物复合片层材料显示了不同程度的定向排列.热导率测试结果表明,片层复合材料的热导率随着定向排列程度的提高而增大.通过优化黏结剂的用量和流延刀口高度制备了具有较高热导率的片层复合材料,其热导率最高可达490 W/(m·K).

  2. Application of nanotechnology in a silver/graphite contact material and optimization of its physical and mechanical properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Haifeng; LEI Jingxuan; MA Xueming; ZHU Lihui; LU Yao; XIANG Jing; WENG Wei

    2004-01-01

    By applying nanotechnology, a new type of silver/graphite (AgC) electrical contact was fabricated and characterized. The AgC coating powders were obtained through high-energy ball milling and reducer liquid spraying-coating method. The as-prepared powders were examined by transmission electron microscope (TEM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results show that the thickness of graphite flakes milled for 10 h is about 50-60 nm and the AgC coating powders exhibit flocculent structure with quite fine and homogeneous internal rnicropores.XRD implies that the average crystalline size of silver in coating powders is about 50 nm. The mechanical and physical properties of this newly developed AgC contact made from the above-mentioned nanocrystalline powders by traditional powder metallurgy technique were measured. Compared with its counterparts made from other techniques, the properties of this new AgC contact have been optimized. High sm-face energy and high-energy interfaces of the nanocrystalline AgC coating powders provide powerful driving force for sintering densification. Moreover, the flocculent structure of the powders is also an important factor to acquire fine density ratio.

  3. Simultaneous determination of the isomers of Ponceau 4R and Amaranth using an expanded graphite paste electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Wang, Meiling; Shentu, Chao; Wang, Wenchang; Chen, Zhidong

    2014-10-01

    A sensitive and convenient electrochemical method was developed for the simultaneous determination of the isomers of Ponceau 4R and Amaranth by an expanded graphite paste electrode (EGPE). The EGPE was prepared by mixing EG with solid paraffin. Compared with flake graphite paste and carbon paste electrodes, the EGPE showed higher electrocatalytic activity towards the oxidization of Ponceau 4R and Amaranth. Under optimal experimental conditions, the EGPE exhibited wide linear responses to Ponceau 4R and Amaranth ranging from 6×10(-8) to 4×10(-6) mol/L and 8×10(-8) to 4×10(-6)mol/L, respectively, and the detection limits for Ponceau 4R and Amaranth were 2 and 36 nmol/L, respectively, at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. The EGPE showed good reproducibility, stability and reusability. The proposed method was successfully applied in the detection of Ponceau 4R and Amaranth in grape juice samples.

  4. Glucose biosensor based on functionalized ZnO nanowire/graphite films dispersed on a Pt electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallay, P.; Tosi, E.; Madrid, R.; Tirado, M.; Comedi, D.

    2016-10-01

    We present a glucose biosensor based on ZnO nanowire self-sustained films grown on compacted graphite flakes by the vapor transport method. Nanowire/graphite films were fragmented in water, filtered to form a colloidal suspension, subsequently functionalized with glucose oxidase and finally transferred to a metal electrode (Pt). The obtained devices were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry. The electrochemical responses of the devices were determined in buffer solutions with successive glucose aggregates using a tripolar electrode system. The nanostructured biosensors showed excellent analytical performance, with linear response to glucose concentrations, high sensitivity of up to ≈17 μA cm-2 mM-1 in the 0.03-1.52 mM glucose concentration range, relatively low Michaelis-Menten constant, excellent reproducibility and a fast response. The detection limits are more than an order of magnitude lower than those achievable in commercial biosensors for glucose control, which is promising for the development of glucose monitoring methods that do not require blood extraction from potentially diabetic patients. The strong detection enhancements provided by the functionalized nanostructures are much larger than the electrode surface-area increase and are discussed in terms of the physical and chemical mechanisms involved in the detection and transduction processes.

  5. Voltammetric Detection of Urea on an Ag-Modified Zeolite- Expanded Graphite-Epoxy Composite Electrode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manea, F.; Pop, A.; Radovan, C.; Malchev, P.G.; Bebeselea, A.; Burtica, G.; Picken, S.J.; Schoonman, J.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, a modified expanded graphite composite electrode based on natural zeolitic volcanic tuff modified with silver (EG-Ag-Z-Epoxy) was developed. Cyclic voltammetry measurements revealed a reasonably fast electron transfer and a good stability of the electrode in 0.1 M NaOH supporting elec

  6. Sorption Behaviours of Exfoliated Graphite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴光泽; 伍川辉

    2002-01-01

    Exfoliated graphite (EG) is selected as a new kind of sorbent to sorb heavy oil spilled. In order to make use of EG more effectively, some basic experiments are performed to investigate its sorption properties,i.e., specific sorption, height of saturation layer, sorption time constant. In the present experiments, A-grade heavy oil is employed as a standard sorbate. It is concluded that 1) under the condition that the area of solid (filter bottom)-liquid (heavy oil) interface is a constant, specific sorption usually decreases when the amount of EG filled or the apparent bulk density increase; however, the specific sorption initially increases when the apparent bulk density is too low and the amount of EG filled is too much; 2) under the condition that the apparent bulk density of EG filled is a constant, the sorption time constant tends to increase when the amount of EG filled increases; however, for a constant amount of EG filled, the sorption time constant will decrease when the apparent bulk density increases.

  7. Comparison of tribological properties for graphite coatings used for remanufacturing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Yu-ling

    2005-01-01

    To improve the solid lubricity on the worn surface of frictional-pairs, a convenient and simple brushpainting technique was utilized to prepare the solid lubrication graphite coatings. The bonding between the coatings and substrate is good. To examine the influence of the different graphite contents on the tribological properties of the graphite coatings, the comparison experiments were carried out on the ring-on-block friction tester. The tribological results show a change law of saddle-shape between the tribological properties of graphite coatings and graphite content. When the amount of graphite is up to 28 g, the tribological properties of graphite coating are the best.The excellent anti-friction of the graphite coating is associated with the close-packed hexagonal crystal structure of graphite.

  8. Graphitic Surface Attachment by Single-Stranded DNA and Metal Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somers, Luke

    Graphene and carbon nanotubes are extreme mechanical and electronic materials which have been the subjects of intense study and development since their discoveries. While many of their intrinsic properties have been discovered, their interactions with other materials are only beginning to be explored. The noncovalent binding of single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides to carbon nanotubes and graphene has been seen to give rise to effective gas sensors. We examine similar systems to each of these in turn, imaging carbon nanotubes decorated with single-stranded DNA in Transmission Electron Microscope, and performing X-ray reflectivity of a single-stranded DNA film on graphite. The TEM study shows that the DNA bunches up along tubes but does not tend to clump on single tubes. Helical wrapping is not seen on single tubes. X-ray reflectivity shows that DNA on a graphite surface forms an inhomogeneous layer around 1.6 nm thick. The differences between the various thicknesses of few-layer graphene are substantial though often underappreciated. These differences are highlighted in the system of several-nanometer metal particles on few-layer graphene flakes. We formed such particles by evaporation and annealing, then examined them in Scanning Electron Microscope. We found that gold nanoparticles were circular and experienced limited growth, with the radius varying as the number of layers to the 1/3 power. A theoretical explanation is given for this observation, based on an electrostatic interaction. This theory is also consistent with observations for titanium and silver nanoparticles. Ytterbium nanoparticles on graphene form instead into filaments. A related theory is presented showing that the same electrostatic interaction is capable of overcoming surface tension to deform particles from circularity.

  9. Production of nuclear graphite in France; Production de graphite nucleaire en France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legendre, P.; Mondet, L. [Societe Pechiney, 74 - Chedde (France); Arragon, Ph.; Cornuault, P.; Gueron, J.; Hering, H. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1955-07-01

    The graphite intended for the construction of the reactors is obtained by the usual process: confection of a cake from coke of oil and tar, cooked (in a electric oven) then the product of cook is graphitized, also by electric heating. The use of the air transportation and the control of conditions cooking and graphitization have permitted to increase the nuclear graphite production as well as to better control their physical and mechanical properties and to reduce to the minimum the unwanted stains. (M.B.) [French] Le graphite destine a la construction des reacteurs est obtenu par le procede usuel: confection d'une pate a partir de coke de petrole et de brai, cuisson de cette pate (au four electrique) puis graphitation du produit cuit, egalement par chauffage electrique. L'usage du transport pneumatique et le controle des conditions cuisson et de graphitation ont permit d'augmenter la production de graphite nucleaire ainsi que de mieux controler ses proprietes physiques et mecaniques et de reduire au minimum les souillures accidentelles. (M.B.)

  10. Graphite waste management in Japan; Gestion des dechets de graphite au Japon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macias, R.M

    2004-07-01

    This report indicates the origin (reactor and reflectors) and the quantity of graphite wastes, describes the extraction process, and then, the various ways of graphite waste processing implemented in Japan by different companies. These processes are: direct storage, incineration and isotopic separation, uranium carbide coating, impregnation. The report also mentions some emerging technologies and Japanese patents for incineration, isotopic separation, and other processes.

  11. Versatile Wafer-Scale Technique for the Formation of Ultrasmooth and Thickness-Controlled Graphene Oxide Films Based on Very Large Flakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Joël; Campidelli, Stéphane; He, Delong; Cornut, Renaud; Bertucchi, Michael; Sorgues, Sébastien; Benattar, Jean-Jacques; Colbeau-Justin, Christophe; Derycke, Vincent

    2015-09-30

    We present a new strategy to form thickness-adjusted and ultrasmooth films of very large and unwrinkled graphene oxide (GO) flakes through the transfer of both hemispherical and vertical water films stabilized by surfactants. With its versatility in terms of substrate type (including flexible organic substrates) and in terms of flake density (from isolated flakes to continuous and multilayer films), this wafer-scale assembly technique is adapted to a broad range of experiments involving GO and rGO (reduced graphene oxide). We illustrate its use through the evaluation of transparent rGO electrodes.

  12. Method of producing exfoliated graphite, flexible graphite, and nano-scaled graphene platelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhamu, Aruna; Shi, Jinjun; Guo, Jiusheng; Jang, Bor Z.

    2010-11-02

    The present invention provides a method of exfoliating a layered material (e.g., graphite and graphite oxide) to produce nano-scaled platelets having a thickness smaller than 100 nm, typically smaller than 10 nm. The method comprises (a) dispersing particles of graphite, graphite oxide, or a non-graphite laminar compound in a liquid medium containing therein a surfactant or dispersing agent to obtain a stable suspension or slurry; and (b) exposing the suspension or slurry to ultrasonic waves at an energy level for a sufficient length of time to produce separated nano-scaled platelets. The nano-scaled platelets are candidate reinforcement fillers for polymer nanocomposites. Nano-scaled graphene platelets are much lower-cost alternatives to carbon nano-tubes or carbon nano-fibers.

  13. Graphite matrix materials for nuclear waste isolation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, W.C.

    1981-06-01

    At low temperatures, graphites are chemically inert to all but the strongest oxidizing agents. The raw materials from which artificial graphites are produced are plentiful and inexpensive. Morover, the physical properties of artificial graphites can be varied over a very wide range by the choice of raw materials and manufacturing processes. Manufacturing processes are reviewed herein, with primary emphasis on those processes which might be used to produce a graphite matrix for the waste forms. The approach, recommended herein, involves the low-temperature compaction of a finely ground powder produced from graphitized petroleum coke. The resultant compacts should have fairly good strength, low permeability to both liquids and gases, and anisotropic physical properties. In particular, the anisotropy of the thermal expansion coefficients and the thermal conductivity should be advantageous for this application. With two possible exceptions, the graphite matrix appears to be superior to the metal alloy matrices which have been recommended in prior studies. The two possible exceptions are the requirements on strength and permeability; both requirements will be strongly influenced by the containment design, including the choice of materials and the waste form, of the multibarrier package. Various methods for increasing the strength, and for decreasing the permeability of the matrix, are reviewed and discussed in the sections in Incorporation of Other Materials and Elimination of Porosity. However, it would be premature to recommend a particular process until the overall multi-barrier design is better defined. It is recommended that increased emphasis be placed on further development of the low-temperature compacted graphite matrix concept.

  14. A micrographic and gravimetric study of intercalation and deintercalation of graphite fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, C. C.

    1985-01-01

    Intercalation and deintercalation of Union Carbide P-100 graphite fibers with liquid and vaporous bromine was studied gravimetrically and microscopically. The mass of the bromine intercalated fibers was found to be 17 to 20 percent greater than their pristine counterpart. This variation decreased to 17 to 18 percent after heating in air for 3 days at 200 C and to 14.5 to 18 percent after 6 days of 260 C heating. The fiber length did not change throughout the experiment. The fiber diameter increased during intercalation and decreased slightly upon deintercalation but was not affected by heating to 260 C for 3 days in air. Comparing the mass and volume data to those with highly oriented pyrolitic graphite or natural single crystal graphite suggested the possibility that the intercalated P-100 fibers could be mostly stage 4.

  15. Scalable synthesis of silicon-nanolayer-embedded graphite for high-energy lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Minseong; Chae, Sujong; Ma, Jiyoung; Kim, Namhyung; Lee, Hyun-Wook; Cui, Yi; Cho, Jaephil

    2016-09-01

    Existing anode technologies are approaching their limits, and silicon is recognized as a potential alternative due to its high specific capacity and abundance. However, to date the commercial use of silicon has not satisfied electrode calendering with limited binder content comparable to commercial graphite anodes for high energy density. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of a next-generation hybrid anode using silicon-nanolayer-embedded graphite/carbon. This architecture allows compatibility between silicon and natural graphite and addresses the issues of severe side reactions caused by structural failure of crumbled graphite dust and uncombined residue of silicon particles by conventional mechanical milling. This structure shows a high first-cycle Coulombic efficiency (92%) and a rapid increase of the Coulombic efficiency to 99.5% after only 6 cycles with a capacity retention of 96% after 100 cycles, with an industrial electrode density of >1.6 g cm-3, areal capacity loading of >3.3 mAh cm-2, and <4 wt% binding materials in a slurry. As a result, a full cell using LiCoO2 has demonstrated a higher energy density (1,043 Wh l-1) than with standard commercial graphite electrodes.

  16. Structure, orientation, and surface interaction of Alzheimer amyloid-β peptides on the graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiang; Wang, Qiuming; Lin, Yinan; Zhao, Jun; Zhao, Chao; Zheng, Jie

    2012-04-24

    The misfolding and aggregation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides into amyloid fibrils in solution and on the cell membrane has been linked to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Although it is well-known that the presence of different surfaces can accelerate the aggregation of Aβ peptides into fibrils, surface-induced conformation, orientation, aggregation, and adsorption of Aβ peptides have not been well understood at the atomic level. Here, we perform all-atom explicit-water molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study the orientation change, conformational dynamics, surface interaction of small Aβ aggregates with different sizes (monomer to tetramer), and conformations (α-helix and β-hairpin) upon adsorption on the graphite surface, in comparison with Aβ structures in bulk solution. Simulation results show that hydrophobic graphite induces the quick adsorption of Aβ peptides regardless of their initial conformations and sizes. Upon the adsorption, Aβ prefers to adopt random structure for monomers and to remain β-rich-structure for small oligomers, but not helical structures. More importantly, due to the amphiphilic sequence of Aβ and the hydrophobic nature of graphite, hydrophobic C-terminal residues of higher-order Aβ oligomers appear to have preferential interactions with the graphite surface for facilitating Aβ fibril formation and fibril growth. In combination of atomic force microscopy (AFM) images and MD simulation results, a postulated mechanism is proposed to describe the structure and kinetics of Aβ aggregation from aqueous solution to the graphite surface, providing parallel insights into Aβ aggregation on biological cell membranes.

  17. Differences in interfacial bond strengths of graphite fiber-epoxy resin composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needles, H. L.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of epoxy-size and degree of cure on the interfacial bonding of an epoxy-amine-graphite fiber composite system is examined. The role of the fiber-resin interface in determining the overall mechanical properties of composites is poorly understood. A good interfacial adhesive bond is required to achieve maximum stress transfer to the fibers in composites, but at the same time some form of energy absorbing interfacial interaction is needed to achieve high fracture toughening. The incompatibility of these two processes makes it important to understand the nature and basic factors involved at the fiber-resin interface as stress is applied. The mechanical properties including interlaminar shear values for graphite fiber-resin composites are low compared to glass and boron-resin composites. These differences have been attributed to poor fiber-matrix adhesion. Graphite fibers are commonly subjected to post-treatments including application of organic sizing in order to improve their compatibility with the resin matrix and to protect the fiber tow from damage during processing and lay-up. In such processes, sized graphite fiber tow is impregnated with epoxy resin and then layed-up i nto the appropriate configuration. Following an extended ambient temperature cure, the graphite-resin composite structure is cured at elevated temperature using a programmed temperature sequence to cure and then cool the product.

  18. Exfoliated graphite/titanium dioxide nanocomposites for photodegradation of eosin yellow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ndlovu, Thabile, E-mail: atkuvarega@gmail.com [University of Swaziland, Department of Chemistry, Private Bag 4, Kwaluseni (Swaziland); Kuvarega, Alex T.; Arotiba, Omotayo A. [University of Johannesburg, Department of Applied Chemistry, P.O. Box 17011, Doornfontein 2028, Johannesburg (South Africa); Sampath, Srinivasan [Indian Institute of Science, Department of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Bangalore 560012 (India); Krause, Rui W. [Rhodes University, Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 94, Grahamstown 6140 South Africa (South Africa); Mamba, Bhekie B., E-mail: bmamba@uj.ac.za [University of Johannesburg, Department of Applied Chemistry, P.O. Box 17011, Doornfontein 2028, Johannesburg (South Africa)

    2014-05-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Preparation of exfoliated graphite (EG) from natural graphite. • Sol–gel anchoring of TiO{sub 2} on exfoliated graphite. • High adsorption and photoactivity was observed for the EG-TiO{sub 2} nanocomposite. • Mechanism of enhancement was proposed. - Abstract: An improved photocatalyst consisting of a nanocomposite of exfoliated graphite and titanium dioxide (EG-TiO{sub 2}) was prepared. SEM and TEM micrographs showed that the spherical TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were evenly distributed on the surface of the EG sheets. A four times photocatalytic enhancement was observed for this floating nanocomposite compared to TiO{sub 2} and EG alone for the degradation of eosin yellow. For all the materials, the reactions followed first order kinetics where for EG-TiO{sub 2}, the rate constant was much higher than for EG and TiO{sub 2} under visible light irradiation. The enhanced photocatalytic activity of EG-TiO{sub 2} was ascribed to the capability of graphitic layers to accept and transport electrons from the excited TiO{sub 2}, promoting charge separation. This indicates that carbon, a cheap and abundant material, can be a good candidate as an electron attracting reservoir for photocatalytic organic pollutant degradation.

  19. Nanosecond formation of diamond and lonsdaleite by shock compression of graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, D.; Ravasio, A.; Gauthier, M.; Gericke, D. O.; Vorberger, J.; Frydrych, S.; Helfrich, J.; Fletcher, L. B.; Schaumann, G.; Nagler, B.; Barbrel, B.; Bachmann, B.; Gamboa, E. J.; Göde, S.; Granados, E.; Gregori, G.; Lee, H. J.; Neumayer, P.; Schumaker, W.; Döppner, T.; Falcone, R. W.; Glenzer, S. H.; Roth, M.

    2016-01-01

    The shock-induced transition from graphite to diamond has been of great scientific and technological interest since the discovery of microscopic diamonds in remnants of explosively driven graphite. Furthermore, shock synthesis of diamond and lonsdaleite, a speculative hexagonal carbon polymorph with unique hardness, is expected to happen during violent meteor impacts. Here, we show unprecedented in situ X-ray diffraction measurements of diamond formation on nanosecond timescales by shock compression of pyrolytic as well as polycrystalline graphite to pressures from 19 GPa up to 228 GPa. While we observe the transition to diamond starting at 50 GPa for both pyrolytic and polycrystalline graphite, we also record the direct formation of lonsdaleite above 170 GPa for pyrolytic samples only. Our experiment provides new insights into the processes of the shock-induced transition from graphite to diamond and uniquely resolves the dynamics that explain the main natural occurrence of the lonsdaleite crystal structure being close to meteor impact sites. PMID:26972122

  20. Influence of Metal-Coated Graphite Powders on Microstructure and Properties of the Bronze-Matrix/Graphite Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian-hua; Li, Pu; Tang, Qi; Zhang, Yan-qing; He, Jian-sheng; He, Ke

    2017-02-01

    In this study, the bronze-matrix/x-graphite (x = 0, 1, 3 and 5%) composites were fabricated by powder metallurgy route by using Cu-coated graphite, Ni-coated graphite and pure graphite, respectively. The microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosive behaviors of bronze/Cu-coated-graphite (BCG), bronze/Ni-coated-graphite (BNG) and bronze/pure-graphite (BPG) were characterized and investigated. Results show that the Cu-coated and Ni-coated graphite could definitely increase the bonding quality between the bronze matrix and graphite. In general, with the increase in graphite content in bronze-matrix/graphite composites, the friction coefficients, ultimate density and wear rates of BPG, BCG and BNG composites all went down. However, the Vickers microhardness of the BNG composite would increase as the graphite content increased, which was contrary to the BPG and BCG composites. When the graphite content was 3%, the friction coefficient of BNG composite was more stable than that of BCG and BPG composites, indicating that BNG composite had a better tribological performance than the others. Under all the values of applied loads (10, 20, 40 and 60N), the BCG and BNG composites exhibited a lower wear rate than BPG composite. What is more, the existence of nickel in graphite powders could effectively improve the corrosion resistance of the BNG composite.

  1. Influence of Metal-Coated Graphite Powders on Microstructure and Properties of the Bronze-Matrix/Graphite Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian-hua; Li, Pu; Tang, Qi; Zhang, Yan-qing; He, Jian-sheng; He, Ke

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the bronze-matrix/x-graphite (x = 0, 1, 3 and 5%) composites were fabricated by powder metallurgy route by using Cu-coated graphite, Ni-coated graphite and pure graphite, respectively. The microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosive behaviors of bronze/Cu-coated-graphite (BCG), bronze/Ni-coated-graphite (BNG) and bronze/pure-graphite (BPG) were characterized and investigated. Results show that the Cu-coated and Ni-coated graphite could definitely increase the bonding quality between the bronze matrix and graphite. In general, with the increase in graphite content in bronze-matrix/graphite composites, the friction coefficients, ultimate density and wear rates of BPG, BCG and BNG composites all went down. However, the Vickers microhardness of the BNG composite would increase as the graphite content increased, which was contrary to the BPG and BCG composites. When the graphite content was 3%, the friction coefficient of BNG composite was more stable than that of BCG and BPG composites, indicating that BNG composite had a better tribological performance than the others. Under all the values of applied loads (10, 20, 40 and 60N), the BCG and BNG composites exhibited a lower wear rate than BPG composite. What is more, the existence of nickel in graphite powders could effectively improve the corrosion resistance of the BNG composite.

  2. Neutron and photon transport uncertainties of deep penetration in graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jatuff, Fabian E. [INVAP S.E., San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina)

    1996-07-01

    We describe the results obtained for the characterization of neutron and photon fields of the graphite thermal column of a 10-MW MTR-type research reactor, together with the mandatory Verification and Validation (V and V) procedure. The graphite thermal column exhibits a relatively small cross sectional are (50 cm X 50 cm) and a large depth ({approx}140cm), representing a difficult deep-penetration problem. The calculation line relied on estimations made the Monte Carlo MCNP-4.2 code. The Validation and Verification (V and V) procedure required: mandatory norms and an auditable path; ANISN/VITAMIN-C (deterministic) calculations for comparison with MCNP; identification of all approximations used, together with the method of justification; explicit statement of parameters for comparison, and statement of the areas of applicability; parametric studies concerning impurities and transverse leakage effects; statement of biases and uncertainties. The results showed a restricted range of applicability ({approx}60 cm) for fast and epithermal neutron fluxes, therefore needing a careful extrapolation to deeper locations. The transverse leakage of neutrons has a greater effect on the diffusion of thermal neutrons when compared to impurities of up to 5 ppm of natural boron. In addition, it is discussed the nature of the biases and uncertainty bands calculated. (author)

  3. BioGraphene: Direct Exfoliation of Graphite in a Kitchen Blender for Enzymology Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, C V; Pattammattel, A

    2016-01-01

    A high yielding method for the aqueous exfoliation of graphite crystals to produce high quality graphene nanosheets in a kitchen blender is described here. Bovine serum albumin (BSA), β-lactoglobulin, ovalbumin, lysozyme, and hemoglobin as well as calf serum were used for the exfoliation of graphene. Among these, BSA gave the maximum exfoliation efficiency, exceeding 4mgmL(-1)h(-1) of graphene. Quality of graphene produced was examined by Raman spectroscopy, which indicated 3-5 layer graphene of very high quality and very low levels of defects. Transmission electron microscopy indicated an average size of ~0.5μm flakes. The graphene/BSA dispersions were stable over pH 3.0-11, and at 5°C or 50°C, for more than 2 months. Current approach gave higher rates of BSA/graphene (BioGraphene) in better yields than other methods. Calf serum, when used in place of BSA, also gave high yields of good quality BioGraphene and these preparations may be of direct use for cell culture studies. A simple example of BioGraphene preparation is described that can be adapted in most laboratories, and graphene-adsorbed glucose oxidase is nearly as active as the free enzyme. Current approach may facilitate large-scale production of graphene in most laboratories around the world and it may open new opportunities for biological applications of graphene.

  4. PMR Graphite Engine Duct Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stotler, C. L.; Yokel, S. A.

    1989-01-01

    The objective was to demonstrate the cost and weight advantages that could be obtained by utilizing the graphite/PMR15 material system to replace titanium in selected turbofan engine applications. The first component to be selected as a basis for evaluation was the outer bypass duct of the General Electric F404 engine. The operating environment of this duct was defined and then an extensive mechanical and physical property test program was conducted using material made by processing techniques which were also established by this program. Based on these properties, design concepts to fabricate a composite version of the duct were established and two complete ducts fabricated. One of these ducts was proof pressure tested and then run successfully on a factory test engine for over 1900 hours. The second duct was static tested to 210 percent design limit load without failure. An improved design was then developed which utilized integral composite end flanges. A complete duct was fabricated and successfully proof pressure tested. The net results of this effort showed that a composite version of the outer duct would be 14 percent lighter and 30 percent less expensive that the titanium duct. The other type of structure chosen for investigation was the F404 fan stator assembly, including the fan stator vanes. It was concluded that it was feasible to utilize composite materials for this type structure but that the requirements imposed by replacing an existing metal design resulted in an inefficient composite design. It was concluded that if composites were to be effectively used in this type structure, the design must be tailored for composite application from the outset.

  5. Glassy carbon coated graphite for nuclear applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delpeux, S.; Cacciaguerra, T.; Duclaux, L. [Orleans Univ., CRMD, CNRS, 45 (France)

    2005-07-01

    Taking into account the problems caused by the treatment of nuclear wastes, the molten salts breeder reactors are expected to a great development. They use a molten fluorinated salt (mixture of LiF, BeF{sub 2}, ThF{sub 4}, and UF{sub 4}) as fuel and coolant. The reactor core, made of graphite, is used as a neutrons moderator. Despite of its compatibility with nuclear environment, it appears crucial to improve the stability and inertness of graphite against the diffusion of chemicals species leading to its corrosion. One way is to cover the graphite surface by a protective impermeable deposit made of glassy carbon obtained by the pyrolysis of phenolic resin [1,2] or polyvinyl chloride [3] precursors. The main difficulty in the synthesis of glassy carbon is to create exclusively, in the primary pyrolysis product, a micro-porosity of about twenty Angstroms which closes later at higher temperature. Therefore, the evacuation of the volatile products occurring mainly between 330 and 600 C, must progress slowly to avoid the material to crack. In this study, the optimal parameters for the synthesis of glassy carbon as well as glassy carbon deposits on nuclear-type graphite pieces are discussed. Both thermal treatment of phenolic and PVC resins have been performed. The structure and micro-texture of glassy carbon have been investigated by X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopies and helium pycno-metry. Glassy carbon samples (obtained at 1200 C) show densities ranging from 1.3 to 1.55 g/cm{sup 3} and closed pores with nano-metric size ({approx} 5 to 10 nm) appear clearly on the TEM micrographs. Then, a thermal treatment to 2700 C leads to the shrinkage of the entangled graphene ribbons (Fig 1), in good agreement with the proposed texture model for glassy carbon (Fig 2) [4]. Glassy carbon deposits on nuclear graphite have been developed by an impregnation method. The uniformity of the deposit depends clearly on the surface texture and the chemistry

  6. Glassy carbon coated graphite for nuclear applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delpeux S; Cacciaguerra T; Duclaux L [CRMD, CNRS-University of Orleans, 1B rue de la Ferollerie 45071 Orleans Cedex 2, (France)

    2005-07-01

    Taking into account the problems caused by the treatment of nuclear wastes, the molten salts breeder reactors are expected to a great development. They use a molten fluorinated salt (mixture of LiF, BeF{sub 2}, ThF{sub 4}, and UF{sub 4}) as fuel and coolant. The reactor core, made of graphite, is used as a neutrons moderator. Despite of its compatibility with nuclear environment, it appears crucial to improve the stability and inertness of graphite against the diffusion of chemicals species leading to its corrosion. One way is to cover the graphite surface by a protective impermeable deposit made of glassy carbon obtained by the pyrolysis of phenolic resin or polyvinyl chloride precursors. The main difficulty in the synthesis of glassy carbon is to create exclusively, in the primary pyrolysis product, a micro-porosity of about twenty Angstroms which closes later at higher temperature. Therefore, the evacuation of the volatile products occurring mainly between 330 and 600 C, must progress slowly to avoid the material to crack. In this study, the optimal parameters for the synthesis of glassy carbon as well as glassy carbon deposits on nuclear-type graphite pieces are discussed. Both thermal treatment of phenolic and PVC resins have been performed. The structure and micro-texture of glassy carbon have been investigated by X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopies and helium pycno-metry. Glassy carbon samples (obtained at 1200 C) show densities ranging from 1.3 to 1.55 g/cm{sup 3} and closed pores with nano-metric size ({approx} 5 to 10 nm) appear clearly on the TEM micrographs. Then, a thermal treatment to 2700 C leads to the shrinkage of the entangled graphene ribbons, in good agreement with the proposed texture model for glassy carbon. Glassy carbon deposits on nuclear graphite have been developed by an impregnation method. The uniformity of the deposit depends clearly on the surface texture and the chemistry of the graphite substrate. The

  7. Review: BNL graphite blanket design concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fillo, J.A.; Powell, J.R.

    1976-03-01

    A review of the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) minimum activity graphite blanket designs is made. Three designs are identified and discussed in the context of an experimental power reactor (EPR) and commercial power reactor. Basically, the three designs employ a thick graphite screen (typically 30 cm or greater, depending on type as well as application-experimental power reactor or commercial reactor). Bremsstrahlung energy is deposited on the graphite surface and re-radiated away as thermal radiation. Fast neutrons are slowed down in the graphite, depositing most of their energy. This energy is then either radiated to a secondary blanket with coolant tubes, as in types A and B, or is removed by intermittent direct gas cooling (type C). In types A and B, radiation damage to the structural material of the coolant tubes in the secondary blanket is reduced by one or two orders of magnitude by the graphite screen, while in type C, the blanket is only cooled when the reactor is shut down, so that coolant cannot quench the plasma, whatever the degree of radiation damage.

  8. Vertically aligned cobalt hydroxide nano-flake coated electro-etched carbon fiber cloth electrodes for supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Qian; Tang, Jie; Zhang, Han; Qin, Lu-Chang

    2014-11-01

    We describe preparation and characterization of nanostructured electrodes using Co(OH)2 nano-flakes and carbon fiber cloth for supercapacitors. Nanostructured Co(OH)2 flakes are produced by electrodeposition and they are coated onto the electro-etched carbon fiber cloth. A highest specific capacitance of 3404.8 F g-1 and an area-normalized specific capacitance of 3.3 F cm-2 have been obtained from such electrodes. Morphology and structure of the nanostructured electrodes have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The electrochemical properties have been studied by cyclic voltammetry (CV), constant-current charge and discharge, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and long-time cycling.

  9. High frequency complex permeability of flake-shaped Fe74Cr2Mo2Sn2P10Si4B4C2 particle composite material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A composite consisting of flake-shaped Fe74Cr2Mo2Sn2P10Si4B4C2 particles was prepared.The flake-shaped particles included in the composite were prepared by planetary ball milling.The complex permeability of the composite material was measured at frequency range from 10 MHz to 8.5 GHz.The permeability of the composite containing flake-shaped particles was much higher than that of the spherical particles.The permeability of particles was improved by means of heat-treatment.In contrast to the random-spatial-distributed flake-shaped particle composites,the oriented-distributed ones had a higher effective permeability.A model was proposed considering the orientation ratio,and our calculation agreed well with the experimental data.

  10. Starch gelatinization and physical quality of pea flakes in canine dinners as affected by soaking, steam treatment and infrared radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, S C; Zandstra, T; van der Poel, A F B

    2008-06-01

    Cleaned, whole smooth green peas (Pisum sativum L.) were reconstituted by soaking in tap water of 40 degrees C (15, 20 or 25 min) and subsequently either toasted (100 degrees C during 1.5 min) and infrared (IR) radiated or just IR radiated. For IR radiation, a small-scale, propane-fired IR radiation plant was used with average residence times of 58 and 92 s respectively. After exiting the conveyor belt, peas were held for a pre-determined period (holding: 0, 15 or 30 min respectively) in a well-insulated container. Finally, all radiated peas were flaked (roll distance 0.75 mm) in a flaking mill located posterior to the IR plant and analysed for chemical and physical properties. Initial pea starch gelatinization degree (SGD) was 10.1% at a total starch content of 410.1 g/kg. Infrared processing during 92 s significantly improved the SGD (from 10.1% to 32.8%) of pea flakes compared to treatment during 58 s (SGD of 18.6%). The SGD was further improved with steam treatment of peas, prior to IR. For all determined parameters, no effect of holding time could be observed. Starch gelatinization degree can be improved by soaking, toasting and IR processing. The substantial improvement of SGD, however can be only obtained by a longer IR residence time as well as through toasting, prior to the IR processing. The improvements in SGD, however are paralleled by a lower durability of flakes (range 34.9% to 87.4%).

  11. Effects of annealing on the structure and magnetic properties of Fe–Si–Cr flakes and composite sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Pyungwoo, E-mail: pwjang@cju.ac.kr [College of Science and Engineering, Cheongju University, Cheongju 360-764 (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Sujin [College of Science and Engineering, Cheongju University, Cheongju 360-764 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Dongwoo; Lee, Kyungsub [Changsung Corp., Pyeongtaek 451-831 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-01

    Gas atomized Fe–Si–Cr powder was used in the application of a bypass sheet in near field communication. The powder was ball-milled, annealed at different temperatures and then manufactured to the sheet. Changes in microstructure and magnetic properties were investigated by XRD, VSM and an impedance analyzer. The as-milled Fe–Si–Cr flake consisted mainly of disordered A2 and ordered B2 phases while the atomized powder consisted of A2, B2 and DO{sub 3} phases. Increases in the annealing temperature caused the formation of a DO{sub 3} phase. At temperatures higher than 923 K, the final flake consisted of only A2 and DO{sub 3} phases. Grain size increased abruptly from 823 K, while the size of the DO{sub 3} phase increased rapidly from 623 K. Coercivity of the flake decreased after annealing, with the lowest coercivity obtained after 923 K annealing while saturation magnetization showed a minimum value of 928 kA/m after 523 K annealing. Sputtered Fe–12%Si films showed a highest electrical resistivity value of 191 μΩ·cm after 623 K annealing while the resistivity of Fe–4%Si sputtered films decreased almost linearly with annealing temperature. Therefore it could be concluded that high permeability of the 623 K sheet at 13.56 MHz and low permeability of the 923 K sheet at 80 MHz were due to the high resistivity as well as nanostructure of the 623 K flake. - Highlights: • Phase analysis in the atomized, milled and annealed powder by XRD. • Relationship between permeability and microstructure. • Variation of resistivity of Fe–Si films with annealing temperature.

  12. Cluster Ion Implantation in Graphite and Diamond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popok, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Cluster ion beam technique is a versatile tool which can be used for controllable formation of nanosize objects as well as modification and processing of surfaces and shallow layers on an atomic scale. The current paper present an overview and analysis of data obtained on a few sets of graphite a...... implantation. Implantation of cobalt and argon clusters into two different allotropic forms of carbon, namely, graphite and diamond is analysed and compared in order to approach universal theory of cluster stopping in matter....... and diamond samples implanted by keV-energy size-selected cobalt and argon clusters. One of the emphases is put on pinning of metal clusters on graphite with a possibility of following selective etching of graphene layers. The other topic of concern is related to the development of scaling law for cluster...

  13. Reactivity of lithium exposed graphite surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harilal, S.S., E-mail: sharilal@purdue.edu [Purdue University, School of Nuclear Engineering, 400 Central Dr., West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Allain, J.P.; Hassanein, A. [Purdue University, School of Nuclear Engineering, 400 Central Dr., West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Hendricks, M.R. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Nieto-Perez, M. [CICATA-IPN, Cerro Blanco 141 Cimatario, Queretaro QRO 76090 (Mexico)

    2009-07-30

    Lithium as a plasma-facing component has many attractive features in fusion devices. We investigated chemical properties of the lithiated graphite surfaces during deposition using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and low-energy ion scattering spectroscopy. In this study we try to address some of the known issues during lithium deposition, viz., the chemical state of lithium on graphite substrate, oxide layer formation mechanisms, Li passivation effects over time, and chemical change during exposure of the sample to ambient air. X-ray photoelectron studies indicate changes in the chemical composition with various thickness of lithium on graphite during deposition. An oxide layer formation is noticed during lithium deposition even though all the experiments were performed in ultrahigh vacuum. The metal oxide is immediately transformed into carbonate when the deposited sample is exposed to air.

  14. Electrostatic Manipulation of Graphene On Graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Untiedt, Carlos; Rubio-Verdu, Carmen; Saenz-Arce, Giovanni; Martinez-Asencio, Jesús; Milan, David C.; Moaied, Mohamed; Palacios, Juan J.; Caturla, Maria Jose

    2015-03-01

    Here we report the use of a Scanning Tunneling Microscope (STM) under ambient and vacuum conditions to study the controlled exfoliation of the last layer of a graphite surface when an electrostatic force is applied from a STM tip. In this work we have focused on the study of two parameters: the applied voltage needed to compensate the graphite interlayer attractive force and the one needed to break atomic bonds to produce folded structures. Additionally, we have studied the influence of edge structure in the breaking geometry. Independently of the edge orientation the graphite layer is found to tear through the zig-zag direction and the lifled layer shows a zig-zag folding direction. Molecular Dinamics simulations and DFT calculations have been performed to understand our results, showing a strong correlation with the experiments. Comunidad Valenciana through Prometeo project.

  15. Preparation of Conductive Polymer Graphite (PG) Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munirah Abdullah, Nur; Saddam Kamarudin, M.; Rus, Anika Zafiah M.; Abdullah, M. F. L.

    2017-08-01

    The preparation of conductive polymer graphite (PG) composites thin film is described. The thickness of the PG composites due to slip casting method was set approximately ~0.1 mm. The optical microscope (OM) and fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR) has been operated to distinguish the structure-property relationships scheme of PG composites. It shows that the graphite is homogenously dispersed in polymer matrix composites. The electrical characteristics of the PG composite were measured at room temperature and the electrical conductivity (σ) was discovered with respect of its resistivity (Ω). By achieving conductivity of 103 S/m, it is proven that at certain graphite weight loading (PG20, PG25 and PG30) attributes to electron pathway in PG composites.

  16. Graphite oxidation modeling for application in MELCOR.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelbard, Fred

    2009-01-01

    The Arrhenius parameters for graphite oxidation in air are reviewed and compared. One-dimensional models of graphite oxidation coupled with mass transfer of oxidant are presented in dimensionless form for rectangular and spherical geometries. A single dimensionless group is shown to encapsulate the coupled phenomena, and is used to determine the effective reaction rate when mass transfer can impede the oxidation process. For integer reaction order kinetics, analytical expressions are presented for the effective reaction rate. For noninteger reaction orders, a numerical solution is developed and compared to data for oxidation of a graphite sphere in air. Very good agreement is obtained with the data without any adjustable parameters. An analytical model for surface burn-off is also presented, and results from the model are within an order of magnitude of the measurements of burn-off in air and in steam.

  17. Amorphous soft magnetic composite-cores with various orientations of the powder-flakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Y.Y.; Wang, Y.G., E-mail: yingang.wang@nuaa.edu.cn; Xia, G.T.

    2015-12-15

    Fe{sub 78}Si{sub 9}B{sub 13} amorphous powder cores were prepared by cold pressing the amorphous powders crushed from amorphous ribbons and orientated with an external magnetic field. Three orientations of magnetic powder cores were obtained: (i) the disorderedly orientated amorphous magnetic powder core (DOAMP), (ii) the circularly orientated amorphous magnetic powder core (COAMP), and (iii) the radially orientated amorphous magnetic powder core (ROAMP). The effect of the shape anisotropy of the flake powders on the magnetic properties of the powder cores was investigated. The powders parallel to external magnetic field is beneficial for achieving the excellent performance of the cores. Below 100 kHz the product of the effective permeability and the quality factor of COAMP core increases by 9.1% and 21.2% compared to that of the DOAMP and the ROAMP cores, respectively, while the coercive field and the magnetic induction intensity keep almost the same. Pressing magnetic powders under a magnetic field to form preferred orientation is suitable for optimal design of soft magnetic cores toward practical applications. - Highlights: • The powders can be orientated to form ordered structure along the magnetic lines. • Circular orientation of the powders improves soft magnetic properties of cores. • Reduction of the demagnetizing field within the powders can increase the µ{sub e}. • Structural ordering can be used for optimal design of magnetic composite materials.

  18. Effect of functionalization of boron nitride flakes by main group metal clusters on their optoelectronic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Debdutta; Chattaraj, Pratim Kumar

    2017-10-01

    The possibility of functionalizing boron nitride flakes (BNFs) with some selected main group metal clusters, viz. OLi4, NLi5, CLi6, BLI7 and Al12Be, has been analyzed with the aid of density functional theory (DFT) based computations. Thermochemical as well as energetic considerations suggest that all the metal clusters interact with the BNF moiety in a favorable fashion. As a result of functionalization, the static (first) hyperpolarizability (β ) values of the metal cluster supported BNF moieties increase quite significantly as compared to that in the case of pristine BNF. Time dependent DFT analysis reveals that the metal clusters can lower the transition energies associated with the dominant electronic transitions quite significantly thereby enabling the metal cluster supported BNF moieties to exhibit significant non-linear optical activity. Moreover, the studied systems demonstrate broad band absorption capability spanning the UV–visible as well as infra-red domains. Energy decomposition analysis reveals that the electrostatic interactions principally stabilize the metal cluster supported BNF moieties.

  19. Emission properties of Ga2O3 nano-flakes: effect of excitation density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozina, G.; Forsberg, M.; Kaliteevski, M. A.; Hemmingsson, C.

    2017-02-01

    In the quest of developing high performance electronic and optical devices and more cost effective fabrication processes of monoclinic β-Ga2O3, new growth techniques and fundamental electronic and optical properties of defects have to be explored. By heating of dissolved metallic Ga in HCl in a NH3 and N2 atmosphere, nano-flake films of monoclinic β-phase Ga2O3 were grown as confirmed by XRD. From optical measurements, we observe two strong emissions. A red band peaking at ~2.0 eV and a UV band at ~3.8 eV. The band at ~2.0 eV is attributed to donor-acceptor pair recombination where the donor and acceptor level is suggested to be related to VO and nitrogen, respectively. By studying the dependence of the intensity of the UV band at 3.8 eV versus excitation density, a model is suggested. In the model, it is assumed that local potential fluctuations forming minima (maxima), where the carriers would be localized with a summarized band offset for conduction and valence band of 1 eV. The origin of the fluctuations is tentatively suggested to be related to micro-inclusions of different phases in the film.

  20. Unsteady self-sustained detonation waves in flake aluminum dust/air mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Qingming; Zhang, Yunming; Li, Shuzhuan

    2015-01-01

    Self-sustained detonation waves in flake aluminum dust/air mixtures have been studied in a tube of diameter 199 mm and length 32.4 m. A pressure sensor array of 32 sensors mounted around certain circumferences of the tube was used to measure the shape of the detonation front in the circumferential direction and pressure histories of the detonation wave. A two-head spin detonation wave front was observed for the aluminum dust/air mixtures, and the cellular structure resulting from the spinning movement of the triple point was analyzed. The variations in velocity and overpressure of the detonation wave with propagation distance in a cell were studied. The interactions of waves in triple-point configurations were analyzed and the flow-field parameters were calculated. Three types of triple-point configuration exist in the wave front of the detonation wave of an aluminum dust/air mixture. Both strong and weak transverse waves exist in the unstable self-sustained detonation wave.

  1. Assessment of Tree Leaves Flakes Mixed with Crude Glycerol as a Bioenergy Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Hilal-AlNaqbi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The gasification and combustion of dry tree leaves and the cogasification of dry tree leaves soaking crude glycerol were studied experimentally. An updraft fixed bed gasification and combustion system was built. The operation was conducted at different air to fuel ratios. Results show more stable combustion and more effective heat transfer to furnace walls for the cases when tree leaves flakes are mixed with 20 percent (on mass basis of crude glycerol, as compared with the case when only dry tree leaves are used as fuel. TGA analysis was also conducted for the two fuels used under both air and nitrogen environments. For the crude glycerol, four phases of pyrolysis and gasification were noticed under either of the two surrounding gaseous media (air or nitrogen. For the dry tree leaves, the pyrolysis under nitrogen shows only a simple smooth pyrolysis and gasification curve without showing the different distinct phases that were otherwise identified when the pyrolysis is conducted under air environment. Moreover, the air TGA results lead to more gasification due to the char oxidation at high temperatures. DTG results are also presented and discussed.

  2. Assessment of Tree Leaves Flakes Mixed with Crude Glycerol as a Bioenergy Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilal-AlNaqbi, Ali; Al-Omari, Salah B; Selim, Mohamed Y E

    2016-01-01

    The gasification and combustion of dry tree leaves and the cogasification of dry tree leaves soaking crude glycerol were studied experimentally. An updraft fixed bed gasification and combustion system was built. The operation was conducted at different air to fuel ratios. Results show more stable combustion and more effective heat transfer to furnace walls for the cases when tree leaves flakes are mixed with 20 percent (on mass basis) of crude glycerol, as compared with the case when only dry tree leaves are used as fuel. TGA analysis was also conducted for the two fuels used under both air and nitrogen environments. For the crude glycerol, four phases of pyrolysis and gasification were noticed under either of the two surrounding gaseous media (air or nitrogen). For the dry tree leaves, the pyrolysis under nitrogen shows only a simple smooth pyrolysis and gasification curve without showing the different distinct phases that were otherwise identified when the pyrolysis is conducted under air environment. Moreover, the air TGA results lead to more gasification due to the char oxidation at high temperatures. DTG results are also presented and discussed.

  3. A comparative study on the activity of fungal lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases for the depolymerization of cellulose in soybean spent flakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Brian C; Agger, Jane Wittrup; Zhang, Zhenghong; Wichmann, Jesper; Meyer, Anne S

    2017-09-08

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are copper-dependent enzymes capable of the oxidative breakdown of polysaccharides. They are of industrial interest due to their ability to enhance the enzymatic depolymerization of recalcitrant substrates by glycoside hydrolases. In this paper, twenty-four lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) expressed in Trichoderma reesei were evaluated for their ability to oxidize the complex polysaccharides in soybean spent flakes, an abundant and industrially relevant substrate. TrCel61A, a soy-polysaccharide-active AA9 LPMO from T. reesei, was used as a benchmark in this evaluation. In total, seven LPMOs demonstrated activity on pretreated soy spent flakes, with the products from enzymatic treatments evaluated using mass spectrometry and high performance anion exchange chromatography. The hydrolytic boosting effect of the top-performing enzymes was evaluated in combination with endoglucanase and beta-glucosidase. Two enzymes (TrCel61A and Aspte6) showed the ability to release more than 36% of the pretreated soy spent flake glucose - a greater than 75% increase over the same treatment without LPMO addition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Enhanced and broadband microwave absorption of flake-shaped Fe and FeNi composite with Ba ferrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wangchang; Lv, Junjun; Zhou, Xiang; Zheng, Jingwu; Ying, Yao; Qiao, Liang; Yu, Jing; Che, Shenglei

    2017-03-01

    In order to achieve a broad bandwidth absorber at high frequency, the composites of M-type ferrite BaCo1.0Ti1.0Fe10O19 (BaM) with flaked carbonyl iron powders (CIP) and flaked Fe50Ni50 were prepared to optimize the surface impedance in broadband frequency, respectively. The diameter of the flaked carbonyl iron powders (CIP) and Fe50Ni50 is in the range of 5-10 μm and 10-20 μm and the thickness of the CIP and Fe50Ni50 is close to 200 nm and 400 nm, respectively. The complex permeability and permittivity show that the addition of BaM obviously reduces the values of real part of permittivity and imaginary part of the permeability which can enhance the matched-wave-impedance. The absorption bands less than -10 dB of CIP-BaM and FeNi-BaM absorber approach to 5.5 GHz (5.7-11.2 GHz) and 7 GHz (11-18 GHz) at 1.5 mm. However, the bands of CIP and FeNi are only 1.9 GHz (4.7-6.6 GHz) and 2.1 GHz (4.0-6.1 GHz). Hence, the electromagnetic match property is greatly improved by BaM ferrites, and this composite shows a broaden absorption band.

  5. Degradation mechanisms of organic rubber and glass flake/vinyl ester linings in flue gas desulphurization plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, R. [Allianz-Centre for Technology GmbH, Ismaning (Germany)

    1996-12-01

    In recent years, there have been reports in numerous publications about damage to rubber and glass flake coatings in flue gas desulphurization plants. The pattern of damage has been described and attempts have frequently been made to determine and explain the cause of the damage. Oxidation/hydrolytic changes were generally observed as the damage mechanisms. In addition, blistering occurs in both the chloroprene coatings in the absorbers and in the glass flake coatings in clean gas ducts. This blistering may be considered as the end of the useful life and leads to cost-intensive and time-intensive repair and restoration measures. The present state of knowledge suggests that the blistering is mainly due to osmotic processes preceded by permeation processes and with permeation processes superimposed on them. Among other things, the reports describe the permeation behaviour of water and other flue gas constituents; the blistering in chloroprene rubber coatings and glass flake coatings is explained by means of the knowledge gained. (au) 16 refs.

  6. Water desorption from nanostructured graphite surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens, Anna; Hellberg, Lars; Grönbeck, Henrik; Chakarov, Dinko

    2013-12-21

    Water interaction with nanostructured graphite surfaces is strongly dependent on the surface morphology. In this work, temperature programmed desorption (TPD) in combination with quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS) has been used to study water ice desorption from a nanostructured graphite surface. This model surface was fabricated by hole-mask colloidal lithography (HCL) along with oxygen plasma etching and consists of a rough carbon surface covered by well defined structures of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). The results are compared with those from pristine HOPG and a rough (oxygen plasma etched) carbon surface without graphite nanostructures. The samples were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The TPD experiments were conducted for H2O coverages obtained after exposures between 0.2 and 55 langmuir (L) and reveal a complex desorption behaviour. The spectra from the nanostructured surface show additional, coverage dependent desorption peaks. They are assigned to water bound in two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) hydrogen-bonded networks, defect-bound water, and to water intercalated into the graphite structures. The intercalation is more pronounced for the nanostructured graphite surface in comparison to HOPG surfaces because of a higher concentration of intersheet openings. From the TPD spectra, the desorption energies for water bound in 2D and 3D (multilayer) networks were determined to be 0.32 ± 0.06 and 0.41 ± 0.03 eV per molecule, respectively. An upper limit for the desorption energy for defect-bound water was estimated to be 1 eV per molecule.

  7. Corrosion of Refractory Alumina-Graphite and Alumina-Graphite-Zirconia in Slag Containing Titania

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Yuan; LIU Qing-cai; BAI Chen-guang; CHEN Deng-fu; Joseph W Newkirk

    2004-01-01

    The corrosion of refractory alumina-graphite and alumina-graphite-zirconia in the slag containing titania was studied by immersion tests (quasi-static and dynamic tests). Combining direct observation with microscopic investigations, a mechanism for corrosion was proposed based on the oxidation of graphite and the dissolution of refractory components. During the corrosion process, there are some special phenomena and laws that can be explained by the relation between the corrosion rate and the TiO2 mass percent, the rotational refractory velocity and the morphology of the deteriorated layer.

  8. Studies on POM/graphite/Ekonol composites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chun-Guang Long; Wen-Xian Liu; Xia-Yu Wang

    2003-10-01

    POM/graphite/Ekonol composites were prepared by the Torque Rheometer mixing and compression molding, and their hardness, compressive and impact strengths have been tested. The tribology behaviour was also investigated by the friction and wear experiment. The worn surface of the composite was studied by SEM technique, and on its basis, the wear mechanism was analysed. Results show that it was possible to prepare POM/graphite/Ekonol composites of high tribology performance and good mechanical properties by the Torque Rheometer mixing and compression molding. With the rise of Ekonol content, the wear mechanism was changed from adhesion plus plough to fatigue wear plus abrasive wear.

  9. Adsorption of CCl4 on graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Peter W.; Huth, Martin F.

    1985-08-01

    We have performed a comprehensive x-ray scattering study of CCl4 adsorbed on exfoliated graphite. We observe the following features. At low coverages, there is an incommensurate triangular monolayer solid, with a gas-liquid-solid triple point at 195 K. Below a temperature of 215 K the graphite is partially wet by only one monolayer. The monolayer solid has a maximum melting temperature of ~246 K. A two-layer solid phase, which melts at 236 K, does not have a simple triangular structure. There is a liquid prewetting film of at least ten layers thickness at 246 K, 4 K below the bulk CCl4 triple point.

  10. Large Scale Reduction of Graphite Oxide Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Carlos; Mackey, Paul; Falker, John; Zeitlin, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    This project seeks to develop an optical method to reduce graphite oxide into graphene efficiently and in larger formats than currently available. Current reduction methods are expensive, time-consuming or restricted to small, limited formats. Graphene has potential uses in ultracapacitors, energy storage, solar cells, flexible and light-weight circuits, touch screens, and chemical sensors. In addition, graphite oxide is a sustainable material that can be produced from any form of carbon, making this method environmentally friendly and adaptable for in-situ reduction.

  11. Interphase tailoring in graphite-epoxy composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, R. V.; Sanadi, A. R.; Crasto, A. S.

    1988-01-01

    The fiber-matrix interphase in graphite fiber-epoxy matrix composites is presently modified through the electrodeposition of a coating of the polymer poly(styrene-comaleic anhydride), or 'SMA' on the graphite fibers; optimum conditions have been established for the achievement of the requisite thin, uniform coatings, as verified by SEM. A single-fiber composite test has shown the SMA coating to result in an interfacial shear strength to improve by 50 percent over commercially treated fibers without sacrifice in impact strength. It is suggested that the epoxy resin's superior penetration into the SMA interphase results in a tougher fiber/matrix interface which possesses intrinsic energy-absorbing mechanisms.

  12. Thermal Properties of G-348 Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McEligot, Donald M. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Swank, W. David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cottle, David L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Valentin, Francisco I. [City Univ. (CUNY), NY (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Fundamental measurements have been obtained in the INL Graphite Characterization Laboratory to deduce the temperature dependence of thermal conductivity for G-348 isotropic graphite, which has been used by City College of New York in thermal experiments related to gas-cooled nuclear reactors. Measurements of thermal diffusivity, mass, volume and thermal expansion were converted to thermal conductivity in accordance with ASTM Standard Practice C781-08 (R-2014). Data are tabulated and a preliminary correlation for the thermal conductivity is presented as a function of temperature from laboratory temperature to 1000C.

  13. STS Observations of Landau Levels at Graphite Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Matsui, T.; Kambara, H.; Niimi, Y.; Tagami, K.; Tsukada, M; Fukuyama, Hiroshi

    2004-01-01

    Scanning tunneling spectroscopy measurements were made on surfaces of two different kinds of graphite samples, Kish graphite and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), at very low temperatures and in high magnetic fields. We observed a series of peaks in the tunnel spectra, which grow with increasing field, both at positive and negative bias voltages. These are associated with Landau quantization of the quasi two-dimensional electrons and holes in graphite in magnetic fields perpendicular...

  14. Porous graphite electrodes for rechargeable ion-transfer batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novak, P.; Scheifele, W.; Haas, O. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    The influence of preparation pressure and pore-forming additives on the properties of graphite-based, Li{sup +}-intercalating electrodes for ion-transfer batteries have been investigated. The electrochemical performance of graphite electrodes could be improved by adjusting the porosity. Specific charge of >300 Ah/kg (with respect to the graphite mass) could be achieved. (author) 4 figs., 2 refs.

  15. Flame speed enhancement of solid nitrocellulose monopropellant coupled with graphite at microscales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, S.; Yehia, O.; Qiao, L.

    2016-03-01

    The flame-speed-enhancement phenomenon of a solid monopropellant (nitrocellulose) using a highly conductive thermal base (graphite sheet) was demonstrated and studied both experimentally and theoretically. A propellant layer ranging from 20 μm to 170 μm was deposited on the top of a 20-μm thick graphite sheet. Self-propagating oscillatory combustion waves were observed, with average flame speed enhancements up to 14 times the bulk value. The ratio of the fuel-to-graphite layer thickness affects not only the average reaction front velocities but also the period and the amplitude of the combustion wave oscillations. To better understand the flame-speed enhancement and the oscillatory nature of the combustion waves, the coupled nitrocellulose-graphite system was modeled using one-dimensional energy conservation equations along with simple one-step chemistry. The period and the amplitude of the oscillatory combustion waves were predicted as a function of the ratio of the fuel-to-graphite thickness (R), the ratio of the graphite-to-fuel thermal diffusivity (α0), and the non-dimensional inverse adiabatic temperature rise (β). The predicted flame speeds and the characteristics of the oscillations agree well with the experimental data. The new concept of using a highly conductive thermal base such as carbon-based nano- and microstructures to enhance flame propagation speed or burning rate of propellants and fuels could lead to improved performance of solid and liquid rocket motors, as well as of the alternative energy conversion microelectromechanical devices.

  16. Ultrafast Multiphoton Thermionic Photoemission from Graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Shijing; Argondizzo, Adam; Wang, Cong; Cui, Xuefeng; Petek, Hrvoje

    2017-01-01

    Electronic heating of cold crystal lattices in nonlinear multiphoton excitation can transiently alter their physical and chemical properties. In metals where free electron densities are high and the relative fraction of photoexcited hot electrons is low, the effects are small, but in semimetals, where the free electron densities are low and the photoexcited densities can overwhelm them, the intense femtosecond laser excitation can induce profound changes. In semimetal graphite and its derivatives, strong optical absorption, weak screening of the Coulomb potential, and high cohesive energy enable extreme hot electron generation and thermalization to be realized under femtosecond laser excitation. We investigate the nonlinear interactions within a hot electron gas in graphite through multiphoton-induced thermionic emission. Unlike the conventional photoelectric effect, within about 25 fs, the memory of the excitation process, where resonant dipole transitions absorb up to eight quanta of light, is erased to produce statistical Boltzmann electron distributions with temperatures exceeding 5000 K; this ultrafast electronic heating causes thermionic emission to occur from the interlayer band of graphite. The nearly instantaneous thermalization of the photoexcited carriers through Coulomb scattering to extreme electronic temperatures characterized by separate electron and hole chemical potentials can enhance hot electron surface femtochemistry, photovoltaic energy conversion, and incandescence, and drive graphite-to-diamond electronic phase transition.

  17. Fractal Model of the Spheroidal Graphite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Z.Y.HE; K.Z.HWANG

    1996-01-01

    In this paper,a fractal model about the microstructure of spheroidal-graphite is presented through the research on the surface form and the analysis to microregion.The fractal dimension is calculated and the forming mechanism is also discussed.

  18. Graphite friction coefficient for various conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The friction coefficient the graphite used in the Tsinghua University 10MW High Tem-perature Gas-Cooled Reactor was analyzed for various conditions. The variation of the graphitefriction coefficient was measured for various sliding velocities, sliding distances, normal loads, en-vironments and temperatures. A scanning elector microscope (SEM) was used to analyze the fric-tion surfaces.

  19. Growth of nano hexagon-like flake arrays cerium carbonate created with PAH as the substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, M., E-mail: limei@imust.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Engineering, Department of Materials, Beijing 100029 (China); School of Materials and Metallurgy, Inner Mongolia University of Science and Technology, Department of Inorganic and Metalloid Materials, Key Laboratory of New Technologies of Modern Metallurgy and Application of Rare Materials, Baotou 014010 (China); Hu, Y.H., E-mail: bthyh@163.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Engineering, Department of Materials, Beijing 100029 (China); School of Materials and Metallurgy, Inner Mongolia University of Science and Technology, Department of Inorganic and Metalloid Materials, Key Laboratory of New Technologies of Modern Metallurgy and Application of Rare Materials, Baotou 014010 (China); Liu, Z.G.; Wang, X.F.; Wang, M.T. [School of Materials and Metallurgy, Inner Mongolia University of Science and Technology, Department of Inorganic and Metalloid Materials, Key Laboratory of New Technologies of Modern Metallurgy and Application of Rare Materials, Baotou 014010 (China)

    2015-01-15

    Petals-like Ce{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} on Ce{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} nano hexagon-like flake arrays have been precipitatingly fabricated using PAH substrates. By changing the way of feeding, PAH concentration and aging time, petals-like Ce{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} was created best when adding PAH into the Ce(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} solution, joined (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}CO{sub 3} solution along with mixing, PAH concentration is 0.9 g/L, aging time is 4 h. A growth mechanism was proposed to account for the growth of the petals-like Ce{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} with PAH as the substrate. Poly allylamine hydrochloride (PAH) is as template agent which forms π-allyl complex with Ce{sup 3+} and controls the morphology of Ce{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} particle. PAH and Ce{sup 3+} form π-allyl complex, and then induce the formation of Ce{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} crystal nucleus. And infrared spectrum analysis verified. XRD show that after adding PAH which is adsorbed on the crystal plane, the growth of Ce{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} crystal is inhibited on (2 4 2), the growth is promoted on (2 0 2) which is differentiated into the new (1 5 1), (2 2 2) is unchanged, Ce{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} crystal is accumulated petals shape by hexagon-like flake. UV absorption spectra show that CeO{sub 2} as prepared precursor Ce{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} after calcinations in air at high temperatures, the petal-like CeO{sub 2} has strong UV absorption and reflection effects, and absorption interval changed significantly by the move to UVA from UVB. - Graphical abstract: Each Ce-atom connects three Cl-atoms and three allyls in three dimensional spaces. To take the plane as a reference plane which is arrayed with three Ce-atom as equilateral triangle. The triangular each vertex is Ce-atom, the triangular center place is Cl-atom, the equilateral triangle which is mutually perpendicular with Ce-triangle surface and the inclined angle is 60° is made up with three Cl-atoms. - Highlights: • Petals

  20. Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics Simulation of Micro-Cup-Extrusion Using a Graphit-ic Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Shi-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Microextrusion is becoming increasingly important for the manufacturing of microcomponents. However, this reduction in scale to a microlevel means that the influence of friction and the need for suitable lubrication are greatly increased. This study therefore looks at the use of a low-friction and highly wear resistant Graphit-ic coating on the mold-forming section of a microextrusion mold, this coating being applied by a closed-field unbalanced magnetron sputter ion plating technique. A microcup of CuZn33 brass alloy was then extruded, with a wall thickness of 0.45 mm, outside diameter of 2.9 mm, and an internal diameter of 2 mm. The experimental results in which extrusion uses the mold coating with Graphit-ic film are compared against the experimental results in which extrusion uses the mold uncoating with Graphit-ic film. This showed that the load was decreased a lot and the self-lubricating solid coating facilitates a smooth extrusion process. As the extrusion rate was quite high, smoothed particle hydrodynamics method simulations of the extrusion process were conducted, these being then compared with the experimental results. These result showed that the SPH simulation can be applied to show the deformation of materials and predict the load trend.

  1. Preparation of graphite dispersed copper composite with intruding graphite particles in copper plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Abdul Muizz Mohd; Ishikawa, Yoshikazu; Yokoyama, Seiji

    2017-01-01

    In this study, it was attempted that copper-graphite composite was prepared locally on the surface of a copper plate with using a spot welding machine. Experiments were carried out with changing the compressive load, the repetition number of the compression and the electrical current in order to study the effect of them on carbon content and Vickers hardness on the copper plate surface. When the graphite was pushed into copper plate only with the compressive load, the composite was mainly hardened by the work hardening. The Vickers hardness increased linearly with an increase in the carbon content. When an electrical current was energized through the composite at the compression, the copper around the graphite particles were heated to the temperature above approximately 2100 K and melted. The graphite particles partially or entirely dissolved into the melt. The graphite particles were precipitated from the melt under solidification. In addition, this high temperature caused the improvement of wetting of copper to graphite. This high temperature caused the annealing, and reduced the Vickers hardness. Even in this case, the Vickers hardness increased with an increase in the carbon content. This resulted from the dispersion hardening.

  2. Nuclear graphite wear properties and estimation of graphite dust production in HTR-10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Xiaowei, E-mail: xwluo@tsinghua.edu.cn; Wang, Xiaoxin; Shi, Li; Yu, Xiaoyu; Yu, Suyuan

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Graphite dust. • The wear properties of graphite. • Pebble bed. • High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor. • Fuel element. - Abstract: The issue of the graphite dust has been a research focus for the safety of High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGRs), especially for the pebble bed reactors. Most of the graphite dust is produced from the wear of fuel elements during cycling of fuel elements. However, due to the complexity of the motion of the fuel elements in the pebble bed, there is no systematic method developed to predict the amount the graphite dust in a pebble bed reactor. In this paper, the study of the flow of the fuel elements in the pebble bed was carried out. Both theoretical calculation and numerical analysis by Discrete Element Method (DEM) software PFC3D were conducted to obtain the normal forces and sliding distances of the fuel elements in pebble bed. The wearing theory was then integrated with PFC3D to estimate the amount of the graphite dust in a pebble bed reactor, 10 MW High Temperature gas-cooled test Reactor (HTR-10).

  3. Quantifying microstructural dynamics and electrochemical activity of graphite and silicon-graphite lithium ion battery anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietsch, Patrick; Westhoff, Daniel; Feinauer, Julian; Eller, Jens; Marone, Federica; Stampanoni, Marco; Schmidt, Volker; Wood, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    Despite numerous studies presenting advances in tomographic imaging and analysis of lithium ion batteries, graphite-based anodes have received little attention. Weak X-ray attenuation of graphite and, as a result, poor contrast between graphite and the other carbon-based components in an electrode pore space renders data analysis challenging. Here we demonstrate operando tomography of weakly attenuating electrodes during electrochemical (de)lithiation. We use propagation-based phase contrast tomography to facilitate the differentiation between weakly attenuating materials and apply digital volume correlation to capture the dynamics of the electrodes during operation. After validating that we can quantify the local electrochemical activity and microstructural changes throughout graphite electrodes, we apply our technique to graphite-silicon composite electrodes. We show that microstructural changes that occur during (de)lithiation of a pure graphite electrode are of the same order of magnitude as spatial inhomogeneities within it, while strain in composite electrodes is locally pronounced and introduces significant microstructural changes. PMID:27671269

  4. Size-Tuning of WSe2 Flakes for High Efficiency Inverted Organic Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakavelakis, George; Del Rio Castillo, Antonio Esau; Pellegrini, Vittorio; Ansaldo, Alberto; Tzourmpakis, Pavlos; Brescia, Rosaria; Prato, Mirko; Stratakis, Emmanuel; Kymakis, Emmanuel; Bonaccorso, Francesco

    2017-04-25

    The development of large-scale production methods of two-dimensional (2D) crystals, with on-demand control of the area and thickness, is mandatory to fulfill the potential applications of such materials for photovoltaics. Inverted bulk heterojunction (BHJ) organic solar cell (OSC), which exploits a polymer-fullerene binary blend as the active material, is one potentially important application area for 2D crystals. A large ongoing effort is indeed currently devoted to the introduction of 2D crystals in the binary blend to improve the charge transport properties. While it is expected that the nanoscale domains size of the different components of the blend will significantly impact the performance of the OSC, to date, there is no evidence of quantitative information on the interplay between 2D crystals and fullerene domains size. Here, we demonstrate that by matching the size of WSe2 few-layer 2D crystals, produced by liquid-phase exfoliation, with that of the PC71BM fullerene domain in BHJ OSCs, we obtain power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) of ∼9.3%, reaching a 15% improvement with respect to standard binary devices (PCE = 8.10%), i.e., without the addition of WSe2 flakes. This is the highest ever reported PCE for 2D material-based OSCs, obtained thanks to the enhanced exciton generation and exciton dissociation at the WSe2-fullerene interface and also electron extraction to the back metal contact as a consequence of a balanced charge carriers mobility. These results push forward the implementation of transition-metal dichalcogenides to boost the performance of BHJ OSCs.

  5. Graphite Oxidation Simulation in HTR Accident Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Genk, Mohamed

    2012-10-19

    Massive air and water ingress, following a pipe break or leak in steam-generator tubes, is a design-basis accident for high-temperature reactors (HTRs). Analysis of these accidents in both prismatic and pebble bed HTRs requires state-of-the-art capability for predictions of: 1) oxidation kinetics, 2) air helium gas mixture stratification and diffusion into the core following the depressurization, 3) transport of multi-species gas mixture, and 4) graphite corrosion. This project will develop a multi-dimensional, comprehensive oxidation kinetics model of graphite in HTRs, with diverse capabilities for handling different flow regimes. The chemical kinetics/multi-species transport model for graphite burning and oxidation will account for temperature-related changes in the properties of graphite, oxidants (O2, H2O, CO), reaction products (CO, CO2, H2, CH4) and other gases in the mixture (He and N2). The model will treat the oxidation and corrosion of graphite in geometries representative of HTR core component at temperatures of 900°C or higher. The developed chemical reaction kinetics model will be user-friendly for coupling to full core analysis codes such as MELCOR and RELAP, as well as computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes such as CD-adapco. The research team will solve governing equations for the multi-dimensional flow and the chemical reactions and kinetics using Simulink, an extension of the MATLAB solver, and will validate and benchmark the model's predictions using reported experimental data. Researchers will develop an interface to couple the validated model to a commercially available CFD fluid flow and thermal-hydraulic model of the reactor , and will perform a simulation of a pipe break in a prismatic core HTR, with the potential for future application to a pebble-bed type HTR.

  6. Percolation Model of Graphite-modified Asphalt Concrete

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MO Liantong; WU Shaopeng; LIU Xiaoming; CHEN Zheng

    2005-01-01

    The addition of graphite powder in conventional asphalt mixture can produced asphalt concrete with excellent electrical performance. Percolation theory was employed to discuss the relation between the conductivity and graphite content of graphite-modified asphalt concrete. It was found that the results of percolation model are consistent with experimental values. The percolation threshold of graphite-modified asphalt concrete is 10.94% graphite content account for the total volume of the binder phase consisting of asphalt and graphite. The critical exponent is 3.16, beyond the range of 1.6-2.1 for the standard lattice continuous percolation problem. Its reason is that the tunnel conduction mechanism originates near the critical percent content, which causes this system to be not universal. Tunnel mechanism is demonstrated by the nonlinear voltage-current characteristic near percolation threshold.The percolation model is able to well predict the formation and development of conductive network in graphite-modified asphalt concrete.

  7. Ion irradiated graphite exposed to fusion-relevant deuterium plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deslandes, Alec, E-mail: acd@ansto.gov.au [Institute of Materials Engineering, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Sydney (Australia); Institute for Environmental Research, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Sydney (Australia); Guenette, Mathew C. [Institute of Materials Engineering, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Sydney (Australia); Corr, Cormac S. [Plasma Research Laboratory, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra 0200 (Australia); Karatchevtseva, Inna [Institute of Materials Engineering, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Sydney (Australia); Thomsen, Lars [Australian Synchrotron, 800 Blackburn Road, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia); Ionescu, Mihail [Institute for Environmental Research, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Sydney (Australia); Lumpkin, Gregory R.; Riley, Daniel P. [Institute of Materials Engineering, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Sydney (Australia)

    2014-12-01

    Graphite samples were irradiated with 5 MeV carbon ions to simulate the damage caused by collision cascades from neutron irradiation in a fusion environment. The ion irradiated graphite samples were then exposed to a deuterium plasma in the linear plasma device, MAGPIE, for a total ion fluence of ∼1 × 10{sup 24} ions m{sup −2}. Raman and near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy were used to characterize modifications to the graphitic structure. Ion irradiation was observed to decrease the graphitic content and induce disorder in the graphite. Subsequent plasma exposure decreased the graphitic content further. Structural and surface chemistry changes were observed to be greatest for the sample irradiated with the greatest fluence of MeV ions. D retention was measured using elastic recoil detection analysis and showed that ion irradiation increased the amount of retained deuterium in graphite by a factor of four.

  8. AGC-2 Graphite Pre-irradiation Data Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Swank; Joseph Lord; David Rohrbaugh; William Windes

    2010-08-01

    The NGNP Graphite R&D program is currently establishing the safe operating envelope of graphite core components for a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design. The program is generating quantitative data necessary for predicting the behavior and operating performance of the new nuclear graphite grades. To determine the in-service behavior of the graphite for pebble bed and prismatic designs, the Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) experiment is underway. This experiment is examining the properties and behavior of nuclear grade graphite over a large spectrum of temperatures, neutron fluences and compressive loads. Each experiment consists of over 400 graphite specimens that are characterized prior to irradiation and following irradiation. Six experiments are planned with the first, AGC-1, currently being irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and pre-irradiation characterization of the second, AGC-2, completed. This data package establishes the readiness of 512 specimens for assembly into the AGC-2 capsule.

  9. Consumers Preferences to Sweet Potato Flakes (Spf from Sweet Potato Pasta as A Raw Material, with Enrichment Mung Bean Flour as Source Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noveria Sjafrina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sweet potato flakes as an alternative food and a source of carbohydrates as breakfast cereals food. To meet the nutritional needs of sweet potato flakes contained in the primarily source of protein. The purpose of the research was a source of enrichment of protein contained in sweet potato flakes (SPF with the addition of mung bean flour.  And to get an optimal result of consumer preferences with the addition of mung bean flour optimal still be accepted by consumers based on organoleptic test. This study consists of several stages, namely the stage of making sweet potato pasta base material, formulation, manufacture flakes and organoleptic product. Experimental design using a completely randomized design, 5 treatment composition of sweet potato pasta and mung bean flour were (95 : 5%, (90 : 10%,(85 : 15%,(80: 20% and(75: 25% with 3 replications. The best formula will be determined by organoleptic and physical and chemical analysis. Data were collected for chroma color, moisture content, proximat, crispness (texture and resistance crisp during the presentation of the milk solution. Sweet potato flakes was getting a balanced nutritional content and better nutrional content after enrichment with mung bean flour protein content  Sweet potato flakes which become water content 5.6713% - 6.2435%, ash content 2.7501% - 3.0858%, 4.4765% protein content up to 9,0908%, carbohydrate content of 80.2744% - 85.7119%. The level of enrichment of proteins by the addition of mung bean flour to sweet potato flakes most preferred and acceptable panelists as consumer to the addition of 10% mung bean flour.

  10. Large-scale synthesis of hierarchical-structured weissite (Cu{sub 2−x}Te) flake arrays and their catalytic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Xinjiang [State Key Laboratory of Bioelectronics (Chien-Shiung Wu Lab), School of Biological Science and Medical Engineering, Southeast University, Si Pai Lou 2#, Nanjing 210096 (China); Yan, Shancheng [School of Geography and Biological Information, Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Nanjing 210046 (China); Ortiz, Lazarus Santiago; Liang, Gaofeng; Sun, Bo; Huang, Ningping [State Key Laboratory of Bioelectronics (Chien-Shiung Wu Lab), School of Biological Science and Medical Engineering, Southeast University, Si Pai Lou 2#, Nanjing 210096 (China); Xiao, Zhongdang, E-mail: zdxiao@seu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Bioelectronics (Chien-Shiung Wu Lab), School of Biological Science and Medical Engineering, Southeast University, Si Pai Lou 2#, Nanjing 210096 (China)

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Large-scale Cu{sub 2−x}Te flake arrays grown on copper foam were synthesized. • They possess superior catalytic efficiency on methylene blue with the assistance of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. • The effects of preparing conditions on the growth of Cu{sub 2−x}Te flake arrays were investigated. - Abstract: Large-scale weissite (Cu{sub 2−x}Te) flake arrays with three-dimensional (3D) hierarchical structure have been successfully fabricated via a facile one-step solution-phase strategy through the reaction of tellurium powder and copper foam. At the end of the reaction Cu{sub 2−x}Te flakes were distributed evenly on the surface of a porous solid copper substrate. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis showed the abundance of flakes grown on the 3D porous copper architecture, while X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectra (EDS) were used to determine the crystal structure and phase composition of these products. A series of experiments discovered that the size and morphology of the products could be affected by some reactive parameters including the reaction time, synthesis temperature and volume ratio of absolute ethanol/deionized water. Catalysis experiments using the in situ synthesized of Cu{sub 2−x}Te flakes to catalyze the degradation of methylene blue (MB) demonstrated the strong catalytic ability of these flakes.

  11. 石墨及其改性产物研究进展%Development of Graphite and Its Derivatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨永清; 齐暑华; 张翼; 李珺鹏

    2011-01-01

    天然石墨是具有片层结构的含碳无机材料,层间由范德华力连接,可用物理或化学方法将其它分子、原子、离子甚至原子团插入其层间,生成石墨层间化合物(GIC);GIC经高温膨胀可得到体积为其几百倍的膨胀石墨(EG);在超声粉碎时,膨胀石墨上的石墨微片剥离,得到纳米石墨微片(NanoG).近年来,富勒烯(Fullerence)、碳纳米管(CNT)、石墨烯(Graphene)的先后开发,为石墨家族注入新的活力,并为其应用开辟了新的空间.系统论述了天然石墨及其改性产物如EG、NanoG、Graphene、CNT、Fullerence的结构、制备方法、性质及用途.%Natural graphite is a carbon based inorganic material with a multilayered structure and can be interconnected by van der Waals force between its layers. This special structure decides that graphite can be intercalated by many things such as molecules, atoms, ions and atomic groups by using chemical or physical methods and get another new material, that is, graphite intercalation compounds (G1C). By rapidly thermal treatment, GIC can be expanded several hundreds times the volume of its original and get expanded graphite (EG) which has a worm-like structure. When treated with ultrasonication in an aqueous alcohol solution, the nanosheets of EG can be exfoliated and changed into nanosheets graphite(NanoG). In recent years, other carbon based materials such as fullerence, carbon nanotube (CNT) and graphene were developed one by one which inject new vitality into the graphite family and open a new applied space for the graphite. The structure, methods of preparation, properties and functions of the natural graphite (NG) and its derivatives such as expanded graphiteCEG), graphite nanosheet(NanoG), graphene, carbon nano-tube (CNT) and fullerence are discussed systemically.

  12. Suppression of electrochemical decomposition of propylene carbonate (PC) on a graphite anode in PC base electrolyte with catechol carbonate; Catechol carbonate tenka denkaieki deno graphite fukyokujo ni okeru propylene carbonate no bunseki yokusei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Congxiao; Nakamura, H. [Saga Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Science and Engineering; Noguchi, H.; Yoshio, M.; Yoshitake, H. [Ube Industries Ltd. (Japan)

    1998-03-05

    In this study, 0.5-2.0 wt.% of catechol carbonates were added to a 1MLiPF6/propylene carbonate (PC) - diethyl carbonate (DEC) electrolyte, and this addition could suppress the decomposition of PC on MCMB6-28 (graphitized meso-phase carbon manufactured by the Osaka, Gas Co., Ltd.). The catechol carbonate-added electrolyte proved effective in suppressing the decomposition of PC even on graphite, such as NG-7 (manufactured by the Kansai Netsu Kagaku Co, Ltd.), natural graphite produced in China and natural graphite produced in Madagascar. It is highly possible that catechol carbonates act as radical scavengers. It could be ascertained that, when this electrolyte was used for a LiCoO2/MCMB6-28 lithium ion secondary battery, the capacity was substantially the same as the calculated one, and a PC-based electrolyte can be used for a lithium ion secondary battery using a negative electrode of graphite. 13 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. ZnO/graphite composites and its antibacterial activity at different conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dědková, Kateřina; Janíková, Barbora; Matějová, Kateřina; Čabanová, Kristina; Váňa, Rostislav; Kalup, Aleš; Hundáková, Marianna; Kukutschová, Jana

    2015-10-01

    The paper reports laboratory preparation, characterization and in vitro evaluation of antibacterial activity of ZnO/graphite nanocomposites. Zinc chloride and sodium carbonate served as precursors for synthesis of zinc oxide, while micromilled and natural graphite were used as the matrix for ZnO nanoparticles anchoring. During the reaction of ZnCl2 with saturated aqueous solution of Na2CO3a new compound is created. During the calcination at the temperature of 500 °C this new precursors decomposes and ZnO nanoparticles are formed. Composites ZnO/graphite with 50 wt.% of ZnO particles were prepared. X-ray powder diffraction and Raman microspectroscopy served as phase-analytical methods. Scanning electron microscopy technique was used for morphology characterization of the prepared samples and EDS mapping for visualization of elemental distribution. A developed modification of the standard microdilution test was used for in vitro evaluation of daylight induced antibacterial activity and antibacterial activity at dark conditions. Common human pathogens served as microorganism for antibacterial assay. Antibacterial activity of ZnO/graphite composites could be based on photocatalytic reaction; however there is a role of Zn(2+) ions on the resulting antibacterial activity which proved the experiments in dark condition. There is synergistic effect between Zn(2+) caused and reactive oxygen species caused antibacterial activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparison of Material Behavior of Matrix Graphite for HTGR Fuel Elements upon Irradiation: A literature Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young-Woo; Yeo, Seunghwan; Cho, Moon Sung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The fuel elements for the HTGRs (i.e., spherical fuel element in pebble-bed type core design and fuel compact in prismatic core design) consists of coated fuel particles dispersed and bonded in a closely packed array within a carbonaceous matrix. This matrix is generally made by mixing fully graphitized natural and needle- or pitchcoke originated powders admixed with a binder material (pitch or phenolic resin), The resulting resinated graphite powder mixture, when compacted, may influence a number of material properties as well as its behavior under neutron irradiation during reactor operation. In the fabrication routes of these two different fuel element forms, different consolidation methods are employed; a quasi-isostatic pressing method is generally adopted to make pebbles while fuel compacts are fabricated by uni-axial pressing mode. The result showed that the hardness values obtained from the two directions showed an anisotropic behavior: The values obtained from the perpendicular section showed much higher micro hardness (176.6±10.5MPa in average) than from the parallel section ((125.6±MPa in average). This anisotropic behavior was concluded to be related to the microstructure of the matrix graphite. This may imply that the uni-axial pressing method to make compacts influence the microstructure of the matrix and hence the material properties of the matrix graphite.

  15. Response of lactating dairy cows to degree of steam-flaked barley grain in low-forage diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safaei, Kh; Ghorbani, G R; Alikhani, M; Sadeghi-Sefidmazgi, A; Yang, W Z

    2017-10-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of processing method (grinding vs. steam flaking) and increasing densities of steam-flaked barley grain on dry matter intake (DMI), rumen pH and fermentation characteristics, digestibility of dry matter in the total digestive tract (DDTT), and milk production of dairy cows. Eight multiparous mid-lactation Holstein cows averaging 103 ± 24 DIM, 44.5 ± 4.7 kg milk/day and weighing 611 ± 43 kg at the start of the experiment were used in a replicated 4 × 4 Latin square design with 21-day periods. Cows were fed diets consisting of (DM basis) 23.8% corn silage, 13.5% chopped alfalfa hay and 62.7% concentrate. The dietary treatments were either ground barley (GB) using a hammer mill or steam-flaked barley (SFB) - varying density at 390, 340 or 290 g/l. Processing method (GB vs. SFB) did not affect DMI (23.6 kg/day on average), DDTT (71.0% on average), milk yield (43.4 kg/day on average), milk components, rumen pH and molar proportions of acetate, propionate, butyrate and sorting activity. Ruminal isovalerate concentration tended (p = 0.06) to be higher for cows fed GB than those fed SFB-based diets. Decreasing the density of SFB from 390, 340 to 290 g/l tended to linearly increase DMI (p = 0.09), decrease total solids percentage of milk (p = 0.10) and linearly decreased milk urea nitrogen (12.8, 12.4 and 12.1 mg/dl; p = 0.04); also, the sorting index (SI) of the particles retained on the 19.0-mm sieve without affecting the SI of the particles retained on 8.0-mm, 1.18-mm or passed through 1.18-mm sieve (p = 0.05). These results indicated the limited effects of processing method (grinding vs. steam flaking) and densities of SFB (390, 290 or 290 g/l) on cows' performance and feed utilization for dairy cows fed low-forage diets. Therefore, both processing methods could be recommended under current feeding conditions of dairy cows. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2016 Blackwell

  16. Digestion during continuous culture fermentation when replacing perennial ryegrass with barley and steam-flaked corn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wales, W J; Kolver, E S; Egan, A R

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to quantify the optimal inclusion rate of grain required to maximize nutrient digestion of a diet based on highly digestible pasture. It was hypothesized that maximum digestion would occur at a rate of grain inclusion that resulted in a culture pH of 6.0, reflecting the pH below which fiber digestion would be expected to be compromised. Four dual-flow continuous culture fermenters were used to establish the effects on digestion of replacing freeze-dried, highly digestible ryegrass with 0, 15, 30, and 45% of dry matter as 60% barley, 35% steam-flaked corn, and 5% molasses mix. The respective composite diets were fed twice daily to mimic intake patterns observed in dairy cows offered supplements during milking and offered half their daily allowance of pasture after each milking. Digesta samples were collected during the last 3 d of each of four 9-d experimental periods. Average daily culture pH decreased linearly as proportion of cereal grain in the diet increased, with average daily pH ranging from 6.29 to 5.74. Concentrations of neutral detergent fiber and total fatty acids decreased linearly with increasing proportion of cereal grain in the diet. Digestion of organic matter (OM) was maximized at an interpolated value of 24% grain inclusion and culture pH of 6.0, but the difference in the OM digestibility over the range of grain treatments from 0 to 45% was small (3 percentage units) despite pH changes over a range of 6.3 to 5.7. The relatively small change in OM digestibility was explained by reduced fiber and crude protein digestibilities being balanced by an increased digestion of nonstructural carbohydrate. Although different relationships between ruminal pH and digestibility appear to exist when cows are fed pasture alone compared with a total mixed ration, when starch supplements are included in pasture diets, the relationships associated with feeding a total mixed ration may then be more likely to apply.

  17. Production and exchange during the Portuguese Chalcolitic: the case of bifacial flaked stone industries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forenbaher, Stašo

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the economic organization of bifacial flaked stone industries of the Late Neolithic/Chalcolithic Portugal. It is often claimed that social hierarchies first appeared in Western Iberia during this period (ca. 3500-2500 BC. The specific research goals are: determining the production repertoire at lithic production sites, examining the possibility of craft specialization (with particular regard to artifact standardization, and investigating the geographic distribution of artifacts, in order to detect evidence of centralization. The analyses show that the organization of economy differed markedly between different artifact classes. Production of subsistence-related lithics was decentralized and they circulated through local exchange networks, although some of them could enter long-distance exchange. Prestige-related items were exchanged over large distances and apparently were produced by specialists. The level of specialization and its importance for the economy remained modest. There is no evidence for large-scale sociopolitical integration.

    Este estudio se centra en la organización económica de las industrias líticas de talla bifacial del Neolítico Final/ Calcolítico en Portugal. Se ha defendido a menudo que las jerarquías sociales aparecieron por primera vez en el occidente de la Península Ibérica durante este periodo (ca. 3500-2500 AC. Los objetivos específicos de la investigación son: determinar el repertorio de la producción en los talleres líticos, examinar la posibilidad de una especialización artesanal (prestando particular atención a la estandarización artefactual, e investigar la distribución geográfica de los artefactos para detectar las evidencias de centralización. Los análisis muestran que la organización de la economía difiere de forma notable entre las distintas clases de artefactos. La producción de los instrumentos conectados con la subsistencia era descentralizada. Los útiles

  18. Characterization of graphite dust produced by pneumatic lift

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Ke [Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Thermal Management Engineering and Materials, Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen 518055, Guangdong (China); Peng, Wei; Liu, Bing [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University, Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology Cooperation Innovation Center, The Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Engineering and Safety, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China); Kang, Feiyu [Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Thermal Management Engineering and Materials, Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen 518055, Guangdong (China); Yang, Xiaoyong; Li, Weihua [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University, Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology Cooperation Innovation Center, The Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Engineering and Safety, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China); Yu, Suyuan, E-mail: suyuan@tsinghua.edu.cn [Center for Combustion Energy, The Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering, Ministry of Educations, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Generation of graphite dust by pneumatic lift. • Determination of morphology and particle size distribution of graphite dust. • The size of graphite dust in this study is compared to AVR and THTR-300 results. • Graphite dust originates from both filler and binder of the matrix graphite. - Abstract: Graphite dust is an important safety concern of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTR). The graphite dust could adsorb fission products, and the radioactive dust is transported by the coolant gas and deposited on the surface of the primary loop. The simulation of coagulation, aggregation, deposition, and resuspension behavior of graphite dust requires parameters such as particle size distribution and particle shape, but currently very limited data on graphite dust is available. The only data we have are from AVR and THTR-300, however, the AVR result is likely to be prejudiced by the oil ingress. In pebble-bed HTR, graphite dust is generally produced by mechanical abrasion, in particular, by the abrasion of graphite pebbles in the lifting pipe of the fuel handling system. Here we demonstrate the generation and characterization of graphite dust that were produced by pneumatic lift. This graphite dust could substitute the real dust in HTR for characterization. The dust, exhibiting a lamellar morphology, showed a number-weighted average particle size of 2.38 μm and a volume-weighted average size of 14.62 μm. These two sizes were larger than the AVR and THTR results. The discrepancy is possibly due to the irradiation effect and prejudice caused by the oil ingress accident. It is also confirmed by the Raman spectrum that both the filler particle and binder contribute to the dust generation.

  19. Actinides in irradiated graphite of RBMK-1500 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plukienė, R., E-mail: rita@ar.fi.lt; Plukis, A.; Barkauskas, V.; Gudelis, A.; Gvozdaitė, R.; Duškesas, G.; Remeikis, V.

    2014-10-01

    Highlights: • Activation of actinides in the graphite of the RBMK-1500 reactor was analyzed. • Numerical modeling using SCALE 6.1 and MCNPX was used for actinide calculation. • Measurements of the irradiated graphite sample were used for model validation. • Results are important for further decommissioning process of the RBMK type reactors. - Abstract: The activation of graphite in the nuclear power plants is the problem of high importance related with later graphite reprocessing or disposal. The activation of actinide impurities in graphite due to their toxicity determines a particular long term risk to waste management. In this work the activation of actinides in the graphite constructions of the RBMK-1500 reactor is determined by nuclear spectrometry measurements of the irradiated graphite sample from the Ignalina NPP Unit I and by means of numerical modeling using two independent codes SCALE 6.1 (using TRITON-VI sequence) and MCNPX (v2.7 with CINDER). Both models take into account the 3D RBMK-1500 reactor core fragment with explicit graphite construction including a stack and a sleeve but with a different simplification level concerning surrounding graphite and construction of control roads. The verification of the model has been performed by comparing calculated and measured isotope ratios of actinides. Also good prediction capabilities of the actinide activation in the irradiated graphite have been found for both calculation approaches. The initial U impurity concentration in the graphite model has been adjusted taking into account the experimental results. The specific activities of actinides in the irradiated RBMK-1500 graphite constructions have been obtained and differences between numerical simulation results, different structural parts (sleeve and stack) as well as comparison with previous results (Ancius et al., 2005) have been discussed. The obtained results are important for further decommissioning process of the Ignalina NPP and other RBMK

  20. Graphite thermal expansion reference for high temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaal, P. S.

    1974-01-01

    The design requirements of the aerospace and high-temperature nuclear reactor industries necessitate reliable thermal expansion data for graphite and other carbonaceous materials. The feasibility of an acceptable reference for calibration of expansion measuring systems that operate in carbon-rich atmospheres at temperatures ranging to 2500 C is the prime subject of this work. Present-day graphite technology provides acceptable materials for stable, reproducible references, as reflected by some of the candidate materials. The repeatability for a single specimen in a given expansion measuring system was found to be plus or minus 1%, while the combined results of several tests made on a number of samples fell within a plus or minus 2.5% band.

  1. The core structure of presolar graphite onions

    CERN Document Server

    Fraundorf, P B; Wackenhut, Martin

    2002-01-01

    Of the ``presolar particles'' extracted from carbonaceous chondrite dissolution residues, i.e. of those particles which show isotopic evidence of solidification in the neighborhood of other stars prior to the origin of our solar system, one subset has an interesting concentric graphite-rim/graphene-core structure. We show here that single graphene sheet defects in the onion cores (e.g. cyclopentane loops) may be observable edge-on by HREM. This could allow a closer look at models for their formation, and in particular strengthen the possibility that growth of these assemblages proceeds atom-by-atom with the aid of such in-plane defects, under conditions of growth (e.g. radiation fluxes or grain temperature) which discourage the graphite layering that dominates subsequent formation of the rim.

  2. Scattering by interstellar graphite dust analog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Gazi A.; Gogoi, Ankur

    2014-10-01

    The analysis of optical scattering data of interstellar carbonaceous graphite dust analog at 543.5 nm, 594.5 nm and 632.8 nm laser wavelengths by using an original laboratory light scattering setup is presented. The setup primarily consisted of a laser source, optical units, aerosol sprayer, data acquisition system and associated instrumentation. The instrument measured scattered light signals from 10° to 170° in steps of 1°. The results of the measurements of the volume scattering function β(θ) and degree of linear polarization P(θ) of the carbonaceous graphite dust particles that were sprayed in front of the laser beam by using an aerosol sprayer were subsequently compared with theoretically generated Mie plots with estimated parameters.

  3. Graphite moderated {sup 252}Cf source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sajo B, L.; Barros, H.; Greaves, E. D. [Universidad Simon Bolivar, Nuclear Physics Laboratory, Apdo. 89000, 1080A Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Vega C, H. R., E-mail: fermineutron@yahoo.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2014-08-15

    The thorium molten salt reactor is an attractive and affordable nuclear power option for developing countries with insufficient infrastructure and limited technological capability. In the aim of personnel training and experience gathering at the Universidad Simon Bolivar there is in progress a project of developing a subcritical thorium liquid fuel reactor. The neutron source to run this subcritical reactor is a {sup 252}Cf source and the reactor will use high-purity graphite as moderator. Using the MCNP5 code the neutron spectra of the {sup 252}Cf in the center of the graphite moderator has been estimated along the channel where the liquid thorium salt will be inserted; also the ambient dose equivalent due to the source has been determined around the moderator. (Author)

  4. Milk production, nutrient digestibility and nitrogen balance in lactating cows fed total mixed ration silages containing steam-flaked brown rice as substitute for steam-flaked corn, and wet food by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyaji, Makoto; Matsuyama, Hiroki; Hosoda, Kenji; Nonaka, Kazuhisa

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of substituting brown rice grain for corn grain in total mixed ration (TMR) silage containing food by-products on the milk production, whole-tract nutrient digestibility and nitrogen balance in dairy cows. Six multiparous Holstein cows were used in a crossover design with two dietary treatments: a diet containing 30.9% steam-flaked corn (corn TMR) or 30.9% steam-flaked brown rice (rice TMR) with wet soybean curd residue and wet soy sauce cake. Dietary treatment did not affect the dry matter intake, milk yield and compositions in dairy cows. The dry matter and starch digestibility were higher, and the neutral detergent fiber digestibility was lower for rice TMR than for corn TMR. The urinary nitrogen (N) excretion as a proportion of the N intake was lower for rice TMR than for corn TMR with no dietary effect on N secretion in milk and fecal N excretion. These results indicated that the replacement of corn with brown rice in TMR silage relatively reduced urinary N loss without adverse effects on feed intake and milk production, when food by-products such as soybean curd residue were included in the TMR silage as dietary crude protein sources. © 2013 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  5. Cooling of weapons with graphite foam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klett, James W.; Trammell, Michael P.

    2016-12-27

    Disclosed are examples of an apparatus for cooling a barrel 12 of a firearm 10 and examples of a cooled barrel assembly 32 for installation into an existing firearm 10. When assembled with the barrel 12, a contact surface 16 of a shell 14 is proximate to, and in thermal communication with, the outer surface of the barrel 18. The shell 14 is formed of commercially available or modified graphite foam.

  6. Cooling of weapons with graphite foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klett, James W.; Trammell, Michael P.

    2016-12-27

    Disclosed are examples of an apparatus for cooling a barrel 12 of a firearm 10 and examples of a cooled barrel assembly 32 for installation into an existing firearm 10. When assembled with the barrel 12, a contact surface 16 of a shell 14 is proximate to, and in thermal communication with, the outer surface of the barrel 18. The shell 14 is formed of commercially available or modified graphite foam.

  7. Piezoresistive effect in epoxy–graphite composites

    OpenAIRE

    Serra, N.; Maeder, T.; Ryser, P.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we investigate the piezoresistive response of epoxy–graphite composites. A resistive thick-film Wheatstone bridge is deposited by screen-printing onto a beam, a weight is then applied on the tip of the beam and the resulting electrical signal response is recorded, allowing the calculation of the gauge factor. The characterization was made at room temperature, 65 and 100 °C for different matrixes (epoxies with different glass transition temperatures, Tg), substrates (alumina and ...

  8. Electron oxidation of graphite by fluorospecies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenthal, G.L.

    1984-09-01

    The fluoride-ion affinity (A/sub F/sup -//) of phosphorus pentafluoride was determined to be 100 kcal/mole from the heats of reaction of the Lewis bases SF/sub 4/ and ClO/sub 2/F with PF/sub 5/ near room temperature. The fluoride-ion affinity of boron trifluoride was determined to be 92 kcal/mole from the heat of reaction of ClO/sub 2/F with BF/sub 3/. The crystal structure of ClO/sub 2/BF/sub 4/ was determined and a precise lattice energy was calculated from this structure and used to determined A/sub F/sup -//. Both PF/sub 5/ and BF/sub 3/ were found to react with graphite in the presence of fluorine gas to yield a variety of non-stoichiometric compounds. The fluoride-ion affinity of silicon tetrafluoride is not known, but it does not react with graphite and F/sub 2/ except at high pressures. These and previous results suggested a threshold in oxidizing power of intercalating species below which the oxidative intercalation reaction would not occur. The reduction of C/sub x/PF/sub 6/ by PF/sub 3/ proved that the reaction is thermodynamically controlled to some extent. The displacement of PF/sub 5/ in C/sub x/PF/sub 6/ by BF/sub 3/ (with a smaller A/sub F/sup -//) suggested that two BF/sub 3/ molecules may have a larger fluoride-ion affinity than one PF/sub 5/ and that B/sub 2/F/sub 7//sup -/ may be a stable anion in graphite. Conductivity studies of PF/sub x/ and BF/sub y/ salts showed that a large drop in conductivity when the reaction reaches first stage is due in the most part to direct fluorination of carbon in graphite.

  9. Atomic resolution images of graphite in air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigg, D.A.; Shedd, G.M.; Griffis, D.; Russell, P.E.

    1988-12-01

    One sample used for proof of operation for atomic resolution in STM is highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). This sample has been imaged with many different STM`s obtaining similar results. Atomic resolution images of HOPG have now been obtained using an STM designed and built at the Precision Engineering Center. This paper discusses the theoretical predictions and experimental results obtained in imaging of HOPG.

  10. Removal of iron from impure graphites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Growcock, F.B.; Heiser, J.

    1979-01-01

    Iron-impregnated and ash-rich graphites have been purified by leaching with gaseous I/sub 2/ at 900/sup 0/C. With addition of H/sub 2/, the rate of removal of impurity iron can be markedly increased and becomes comparable to that obtained with Cl/sub 2/. I/sub 2/ has an advantage in that it can also volatilize Ca and perhaps Ba and Sr.

  11. A probabilisitic based failure model for components fabricated from anisotropic graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Chengfeng

    invariants, known as an integrity basis, was developed for a non-linear elastic constitutive model. This integrity basis allowed the non-linear constitutive model to exhibit different behavior in tension and compression and moreover, the integrity basis was amenable to being augmented and extended to anisotropic behavior. This integrity basis served as the starting point in developing both an isotropic reliability model and a reliability model for transversely isotropic materials. At the heart of the reliability models is a failure function very similar in nature to the yield functions found in classic plasticity theory. The failure function is derived and presented in the context of a multiaxial stress space. States of stress inside the failure envelope denote safe operating states. States of stress on or outside the failure envelope denote failure. The phenomenological strength parameters associated with the failure function are treated as random variables. There is a wealth of failure data in the literature that supports this notion. The mathematical integration of a joint probability density function that is dependent on the random strength variables over the safe operating domain defined by the failure function provides a way to compute the reliability of a state of stress in a graphite core component fabricated from graphite. The evaluation of the integral providing the reliability associated with an operational stress state can only be carried out using a numerical method. Monte Carlo simulation with importance sampling was selected to make these calculations. The derivation of the isotropic reliability model and the extension of the reliability model to anisotropy are provided in full detail. Model parameters are cast in terms of strength parameters that can (and have been) characterized by multiaxial failure tests. Comparisons of model predictions with failure data is made and a brief comparison is made to reliability predictions called for in the ASME Boiler and

  12. Effects of nanometer flakes on lubricating properties of green lubricant%层片状纳米粒子对绿色润滑油润滑特性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石琛; 梁根; 毛大恒

    2015-01-01

    针对绿色植物油高温润滑性能差的问题,通过四球摩擦实验研究了层片状纳米粒子(纳米 WS2、纳米 MoS2和纳米石墨)在不同工况(温度、负载和速度)下对菜籽油润滑特性的影响。结果表明:层片状纳米粒子可有效提高菜籽油的极压性能和各工况下的抗磨减摩性能,可显著减轻高温下摩擦表面的磨损,改善磨损表面形貌,使磨损表面粗糙度降低75.5%~87.1%,从而延长菜籽油的服役寿命和摩擦副的使用寿命;其中纳米 WS2的改善效果最佳,可使最大无卡咬负荷和烧结载荷分别提高13.4%和66.7%,使菜籽油的磨斑直径和摩擦因数在常温(25℃)下分别减小25.8%和8.3%,在高温(250℃)下分别减小48.3%和21.9%,并且含纳米 WS2润滑油的抗磨减摩性能随温度、负载和速度的变化幅度最小,这主要缘于纳米 WS2具有比纳米石墨更高的金属表面吸附能力,并具有比纳米 MoS2更好的耐高温性能。%In view of the poor lubricating properties of green vegetable oil at high temperature,effects of nanometer flakes on lu-bricating properties of rapeseed oil under different working conditions were studied through four-ball friction experiments.The results show that nanometer flakes improve lubricating properties of rapeseed oil effectively and alleviate abrasion of friction sur-face,which reduces the surface roughness by 75.5%-87.1%.Thereinto,the improvement effect of nano-WS2 exceeds that of nano-MoS2 and nano-graphite,and nano-WS2 improves the maximum non-seizure load of rapeseed oil by 13.4% and weld load by 66.7%,and reduces the wear scar diameter and friction coefficient by 25.8%,8.3% at 25 ℃ and by 48.3%,21.9% at 250 ℃respectively.In addition,the variation of nano-WS2 oil’s lubricating properties with temperature,load,speed is the smallest.All of these result from the nano-WS2 ’s stronger adsorbability than nano-graphite

  13. Resistivity of Rotated Graphite-Graphene Contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chari, Tarun; Ribeiro-Palau, Rebeca; Dean, Cory R; Shepard, Kenneth

    2016-07-13

    Robust electrical contact of bulk conductors to two-dimensional (2D) material, such as graphene, is critical to the use of these 2D materials in practical electronic devices. Typical metallic contacts to graphene, whether edge or areal, yield a resistivity of no better than 100 Ω μm but are typically >10 kΩ μm. In this Letter, we employ single-crystal graphite for the bulk contact to graphene instead of conventional metals. The graphite contacts exhibit a transfer length up to four-times longer than in conventional metallic contacts. Furthermore, we are able to drive the contact resistivity to as little as 6.6 Ω μm(2) by tuning the relative orientation of the graphite and graphene crystals. We find that the contact resistivity exhibits a 60° periodicity corresponding to crystal symmetry with additional sharp decreases around 22° and 39°, which are among the commensurate angles of twisted bilayer graphene.

  14. Nondestructive Evaluation of Nuclear-Grade Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dennis C. Kunerth; Timothy R. McJunkin

    2011-07-01

    Nondestructive Evaluation of Nuclear Grade Graphite Dennis C. Kunerth and Timothy R. McJunkin Idaho National Laboratory Idaho Falls, ID, 83415 This paper discusses the nondestructive evaluation of nuclear grade graphite performed at the Idaho National Laboratory. Graphite is a composite material highly dependent on the base material and manufacturing methods. As a result, material variations are expected within individual billets as well billet to billet and lot to lot. Several methods of evaluating the material have been explored. Particular technologies each provide a subset of information about the material. This paper focuses on techniques that are applicable to in-service inspection of nuclear energy plant components. Eddy current examination of the available surfaces provides information on potential near surface structural defects and although limited, ultrasonics can be utilized in conventional volumetric inspection. Material condition (e.g. micro-cracking and porosity induced by radiation and stress) can be derived from backscatter or acousto-ultrasound (AU) methods. Novel approaches utilizing phased array ultrasonics have been attempted to expand the abilities of AU techniques. By combining variable placement of apertures, angle and depth of focus, the techniques provide the potential to obtain parameters at various depths in the material. Initial results of the study and possible procedures for application of the techniques are discussed.

  15. Rational and practical exfoliation of graphite using well-defined poly(3-hexylthiophene) for the preparation of conductive polymer/graphene composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iguchi, Hiroki; Higashi, Chisato; Funasaki, Yuichi; Fujita, Keisuke; Mori, Atsunori; Nakasuga, Akira; Maruyama, Tatsuo

    2017-01-06

    Processing and manipulation of highly conductive pristine graphene in large quantities are still major challenges in the practical application of graphene for electric device. In the present study, we report the liquid-phase exfoliation of graphite in toluene using well-defined poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) to produce a P3HT/graphene composite. We synthesize and use regioregular P3HT with controlled molecular weights as conductive dispersants for graphene. Simple ultrasonication of graphite flakes with the P3HT successfully produces single-layer and few-layer graphene sheets dispersed in toluene. The produced P3HT/graphene composite can be used as conductive graphene ink, indicating that the P3HT/graphene composite has high electrical conductivity owing to the high conductivity of P3HT and graphene. The P3HT/graphene composite also works as an oxidation-resistant and conductive film for a copper substrate, which is due to the high gas-barrier property of graphene.

  16. Rational and practical exfoliation of graphite using well-defined poly(3-hexylthiophene) for the preparation of conductive polymer/graphene composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iguchi, Hiroki; Higashi, Chisato; Funasaki, Yuichi; Fujita, Keisuke; Mori, Atsunori; Nakasuga, Akira; Maruyama, Tatsuo

    2017-01-01

    Processing and manipulation of highly conductive pristine graphene in large quantities are still major challenges in the practical application of graphene for electric device. In the present study, we report the liquid-phase exfoliation of graphite in toluene using well-defined poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) to produce a P3HT/graphene composite. We synthesize and use regioregular P3HT with controlled molecular weights as conductive dispersants for graphene. Simple ultrasonication of graphite flakes with the P3HT successfully produces single-layer and few-layer graphene sheets dispersed in toluene. The produced P3HT/graphene composite can be used as conductive graphene ink, indicating that the P3HT/graphene composite has high electrical conductivity owing to the high conductivity of P3HT and graphene. The P3HT/graphene composite also works as an oxidation-resistant and conductive film for a copper substrate, which is due to the high gas-barrier property of graphene.

  17. Comparison between the Strength Levels of Baseline Nuclear-Grade Graphite and Graphite Irradiated in AGC-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carroll, Mark Christopher [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-07-01

    This report details the initial comparison of mechanical strength properties between the cylindrical nuclear-grade graphite specimens irradiated in the second Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC-2) experiment with the established baseline, or unirradiated, mechanical properties compiled in the Baseline Graphite Characterization program. The overall comparative analysis will describe the development of an appropriate test protocol for irradiated specimens, the execution of the mechanical tests on the AGC-2 sample population, and will further discuss the data in terms of developing an accurate irradiated property distribution in the limited amount of irradiated data by leveraging the considerably larger property datasets being captured in the Baseline Graphite Characterization program. Integrating information on the inherent variability in nuclear-grade graphite with more complete datasets is one of the goals of the VHTR Graphite Materials program. Between “sister” specimens, or specimens with the same geometry machined from the same sub-block of graphite from which the irradiated AGC specimens were extracted, and the Baseline datasets, a comprehensive body of data will exist that can provide both a direct and indirect indication of the full irradiated property distributions that can be expected of irradiated nuclear-grade graphite while in service in a VHTR system. While the most critical data will remain the actual irradiated property measurements, expansion of this data into accurate distributions based on the inherent variability in graphite properties will be a crucial step in qualifying graphite for nuclear use as a structural material in a VHTR environment.

  18. 78 FR 14964 - Small Diameter Graphite Electrodes From the People's Republic of China: Preliminary Results of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-08

    ... International Trade Administration Small Diameter Graphite Electrodes From the People's Republic of China... graphite electrodes (graphite electrodes) from the People's Republic of China (PRC), covering the period... graphite electrodes with a nominal or actual diameter of 400 millimeters (16 inches) or less and graphite...

  19. Water as a lubricant for graphite: a computer simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pertsin, Alexander; Grunze, Michael

    2006-09-21

    The phase state and shear behavior of water confined between parallel graphite sheets are studied using the grand canonical Monte Carlo technique and TIP4P model for water. In describing the water-graphite interaction, two orientation-dependent potentials are tried. Both potentials are fitted to many-body polarizable model predictions for the binding energy and the equilibrium conformation of the water-graphite complex [K. Karapetian and K. D. Jordan in Water in Confining Geometries, edited by V. Buch and J. P. Devlin (Springer, Berlin, 2003), pp. 139-150]. Based on the simulation results, the property of water to serve as a lubricant between the rubbing surfaces of graphitic particles is associated, first, with the capillary condensation of water occurring in graphitic pores of monolayer width and, second, with the fact that the water monolayer compressed between graphite particles retains a liquidlike structure and offers only slight resistance to shear.

  20. Friction and wear of metals in contact with pyrolytic graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, D. H.; Brainard, W. A.

    1975-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with gold, iron, and tantalum single crystals sliding on prismatic and basal orientations of pyrolytic graphite in various environments, including vacuum, oxygen, water vapor, nitrogen, and hydrogen bromide. Surfaces were examined in the clean state and with various adsorbates present on the graphite surfaces. Auger and LEED spectroscopy, SEM, and EDXA were used to characterize the graphite surfaces. Results indicate that the prismatic and basal orientations do not contain nor do they chemisorb oxygen, water vapor, acetylene, or hydrogen bromide. All three metals exhibited higher friction on the prismatic than on the basal orientation and these metals transferred to the atomically clean prismatic orientation of pyrolytic graphite. No metal transfer to the graphite was observed in the presence of adsorbates at 760 torr. Ion bombardment of the graphite surface with nitrogen ions resulted in the adherence of nitrogen to the surface.