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Sample records for natural fibers biopolymers

  1. Biopolymers from Composted Biowaste as Stabilizers for the Synthesis of Spherical and Homogeneously Sized Silver Nanoparticles for Textile Applications on Natural Fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisticò, Roberto; Barrasso, Marco; Carrillo Le Roux, Galo Antonio; Seckler, Marcelo Martins; Sousa, Walter; Malandrino, Mery; Magnacca, Giuliana

    2015-12-21

    The use of bio-based substances (BBS) obtained from composted biowaste as stabilizers for the production of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in substitution to citrate is investigated herein, evaluating the functionalization of natural fibers for textile antibacterial applications. The results obtained evidenced that BBS can substitute citrate as reducing/stabilizing agent in the synthesis, inducing a geometrical control (in shape and size) of the AgNPs. Two different substrates were selected (wool and cotton) and two dip-coating deposition techniques investigated. The release of AgNPs from the supports in water was evaluated under two different experimental conditions: 1) soaking (static conditions) for 7 and 15 days, simulating the contact with sweat, and 2) centrifugation (dynamic conditions), simulating a washing machine treatment. A wide physicochemical characterization was carried out to evaluate the effects of BBS on the morphology and stability of AgNPs suspensions as well as the functionalization effectiveness.

  2. Fabrication of Porous Materials from Natural/Synthetic Biopolymers and Their Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Udeni Gunathilake T.M. Sampath; Yern Chee Ching; Cheng Hock Chuah; Johari J. Sabariah; Pai-Chen Lin

    2016-01-01

    Biopolymers and their applications have been widely studied in recent years. Replacing the oil based polymer materials with biopolymers in a sustainable manner might give not only a competitive advantage but, in addition, they possess unique properties which cannot be emulated by conventional polymers. This review covers the fabrication of porous materials from natural biopolymers (cellulose, chitosan, collagen), synthetic biopolymers (poly(lactic acid), poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)) and the...

  3. Quercetin as natural stabilizing agent for bio-polymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morici, Elisabetta [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica, Gestionale, Informatica, Meccanica, Università di Palermo, 90128 Palermo (Italy); Arrigo, Rossella; Dintcheva, Nadka Tzankova [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, Ambientale, Aerospaziale, dei Materiali, Università di Palermo, 90128 Palermo (Italy)

    2014-05-15

    The introduction of antioxidants in polymers is the main way to prevent or delay the degradation process. In particular natural antioxidants receive attention in the food industry also because of their presumed safety. In this work bio-polymers, i.e. a commercial starch-based polymer (Mater-Bi®) and a bio-polyester (PLA), and a bio-polyether (PEO) were additivated with quercetin, a natural flavonoid antioxidants, in order to formulate bio-based films for ecosustainable packaging and outdoor applications. The photo-oxidation behavior of unstabilized and quercetin stabilized films was analyzed and compared with the behavior of films additivated with a commercial synthetic light stabilizer. The quercetin is able to slow down the photo-degradation rate of all bio-polymeric films investigated in similar way to the synthetic stabilizer.

  4. Quercetin as natural stabilizing agent for bio-polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morici, Elisabetta; Arrigo, Rossella; Dintcheva, Nadka Tzankova

    2014-05-01

    The introduction of antioxidants in polymers is the main way to prevent or delay the degradation process. In particular natural antioxidants receive attention in the food industry also because of their presumed safety. In this work bio-polymers, i.e. a commercial starch-based polymer (Mater-Bi®) and a bio-polyester (PLA), and a bio-polyether (PEO) were additivated with quercetin, a natural flavonoid antioxidants, in order to formulate bio-based films for ecosustainable packaging and outdoor applications. The photo-oxidation behavior of unstabilized and quercetin stabilized films was analyzed and compared with the behavior of films additivated with a commercial synthetic light stabilizer. The quercetin is able to slow down the photo-degradation rate of all bio-polymeric films investigated in similar way to the synthetic stabilizer.

  5. Carbohydrate nanotechnology: hierarchical assembly using nature's other information carrying biopolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xu; Zheng, Yeting; Munro, Catherine J; Ji, Yiwen; Braunschweig, Adam B

    2015-08-01

    Despite their central role in directing some of the most complex biological processes, carbohydrates--nature's other information carrying biopolymer--have been largely ignored as building blocks for synthetic hierarchical assemblies. The non-stoichiometric binding and astronomical diversity characteristic of carbohydrates could lead to tantalizingly complex assembly algorithms, but these attributes simultaneously increase the difficulty of preparing carbohydrate assemblies and anticipating their behavior. Convergences in biotechnology, nanotechnology, polymer chemistry, surface science, and supramolecular chemistry have led to many recent important breakthroughs in glycan microarrays and synthetic carbohydrate receptors, where the idiosyncrasies of carbohydrate structure and binding are increasingly considered. We hope to inspire more researchers to consider carbohydrate structure, diversity, and binding as attractive tools for constructing synthetic hierarchical assemblies.

  6. Spider Silk: From Protein-Rich Gland Fluids to Diverse Biopolymer Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-06

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0036 Spider Silk : From Protein-rich Gland Fluids to Diverse Biopolymer Fibers Gregory Holland ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY 660 S...3.  DATES COVERED (From - To)      01-12-2013 to 30-11-2015 4.  TITLE AND SUBTITLE Spider Silk : From Protein-rich Gland Fluids to Diverse Biopolymer...research is to elucidate the interactions, mechanisms and biochemistry of the spider silk producing process at the molecular level. Our primary focus is to

  7. Electrospinning of oriented and nonoriented ultrafine fibers of biopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, David

    2005-07-01

    Chitosan has long been known as a biocompatible and biodegradable material suitable for tissue engineering applications. Unfortunately, conventional chitosan solutions cannot be used for electrospinning due to their high conductivity, viscosity and surface tension. We have developed a method to produce clear chitosan solutions with conductivities, surface tension and viscosities that facilitate their processing into micron and submicron fibers via electrospinning. Acetic acid, carbon dioxide and organic solvents are key ingredients in preparing the chitosan solutions. Oriented and non oriented chitosan fibers were produced with the ultimate goal of designing a suitable tissue engineering scaffold. Circularly oriented, continuous, and aligned nanofibers were produced via this technique in the form of a thin membrane or fibrous "mat". Chitosan fiber diameters ranged from 5 micrometers down to 100 nanometers. The structure and mechanical properties of oriented and randomly aligned chitosan fiber deposits could potentially be exploited for cartilage tissue engineering. Ultrafine fibers of starch acetate (SA) also were prepared by the electrospinning process. In this study, solvent mixtures based on DMF, DMSO, pyrindine, acetic acid, acetone, THF, DMC, chloroform were used. A two-solvent formulation was used to study the effect of viscosity, surface tension, and conductivity to the fiber diameter. Also, water and ethanol were used to decrease the boiling point of the solvent, and to make bundled fibers. Several techniques such as scanning electron microscopy, conductmetry, viscometry, and tensiometry were used in this study. The results showed that the combined effects of viscosity, surface tension, and conductivity are of great importance in controlling the diameter of the fibers. We were able to produce SA fibers that was less than 40 nm in diameter. The dependence of fiber diameter on flow-rate, electric field and solvents also was investigated. A rotating disk and a

  8. Fabrication of Porous Materials from Natural/Synthetic Biopolymers and Their Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udeni Gunathilake T.M. Sampath

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Biopolymers and their applications have been widely studied in recent years. Replacing the oil based polymer materials with biopolymers in a sustainable manner might give not only a competitive advantage but, in addition, they possess unique properties which cannot be emulated by conventional polymers. This review covers the fabrication of porous materials from natural biopolymers (cellulose, chitosan, collagen, synthetic biopolymers (poly(lactic acid, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid and their composite materials. Properties of biopolymers strongly depend on the polymer structure and are of great importance when fabricating the polymer into intended applications. Biopolymers find a large spectrum of application in the medical field. Other fields such as packaging, technical, environmental, agricultural and food are also gaining importance. The introduction of porosity into a biomaterial broadens the scope of applications. There are many techniques used to fabricate porous polymers. Fabrication methods, including the basic and conventional techniques to the more recent ones, are reviewed. Advantages and limitations of each method are discussed in detail. Special emphasis is placed on the pore characteristics of biomaterials used for various applications. This review can aid in furthering our understanding of the fabrication methods and about controlling the porosity and microarchitecture of porous biopolymer materials.

  9. Fabrication of Porous Materials from Natural/Synthetic Biopolymers and Their Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampath, Udeni Gunathilake T M; Ching, Yern Chee; Chuah, Cheng Hock; Sabariah, Johari J; Lin, Pai-Chen

    2016-12-07

    Biopolymers and their applications have been widely studied in recent years. Replacing the oil based polymer materials with biopolymers in a sustainable manner might give not only a competitive advantage but, in addition, they possess unique properties which cannot be emulated by conventional polymers. This review covers the fabrication of porous materials from natural biopolymers (cellulose, chitosan, collagen), synthetic biopolymers (poly(lactic acid), poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)) and their composite materials. Properties of biopolymers strongly depend on the polymer structure and are of great importance when fabricating the polymer into intended applications. Biopolymers find a large spectrum of application in the medical field. Other fields such as packaging, technical, environmental, agricultural and food are also gaining importance. The introduction of porosity into a biomaterial broadens the scope of applications. There are many techniques used to fabricate porous polymers. Fabrication methods, including the basic and conventional techniques to the more recent ones, are reviewed. Advantages and limitations of each method are discussed in detail. Special emphasis is placed on the pore characteristics of biomaterials used for various applications. This review can aid in furthering our understanding of the fabrication methods and about controlling the porosity and microarchitecture of porous biopolymer materials.

  10. Electrospun fibers of layered double hydroxide/biopolymer nanocomposites as effective drug delivery systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Yue-E.; Zhu Hong; Chen Dan; Wang Ruiyu [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Engineering of Polymers, Department of Macromolecular Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Tjiu, Weng Weei [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, A-STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research), 3 Research Link, Singapore 117602 (Singapore); Liu Tianxi, E-mail: txliu@fudan.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Engineering of Polymers, Department of Macromolecular Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2012-06-15

    Ibuprofen intercalated layered double hydroxide (LDH-IBU)/polycaprolactone (PCL) and LDH-IBU/polylactide (PLA) nanocomposite fibers are electrospun based on a combination of LDH-IBU with two kinds of biopolymers (i.e. PCL and PLA), to act as effective drug delivery systems. Ibuprofen (IBU) is chosen as a model drug, which is intercalated in MgAl-LDH by coprecipitation. Poly(oxyethylene-b-oxypropylene-b-oxyethylene) (Pluronic) is also added into PLA-based fibers as hydrophilicity enhancer and release modulator. LDH-IBU nanoparticles are uniformly dispersed throughout the nanocomposite fibers, as evidenced by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations. In vitro drug release studies show that initial IBU liberation from LDH-IBU/PCL composite fibers is remarkably slower than that from IBU/PCL fibers due to the sustained release property of LDH-IBU and heterogeneous nucleation effect of LDH-IBU on PCL chain segments. Surprisingly, the initial IBU release from LDH-IBU/PLA and LDH-IBU/PLA/Pluronic composite fibers is faster than that from the corresponding IBU/PLA and IBU/PLA/Pluronic fibers. This effect can be attributed to the strong interaction between alkyl groups in IBU molecules and methyl substituent groups of PLA as well as the hydrophilicity of LDH-IBU, which lead to an easier diffusion of water with a faster release of IBU from LDH-IBU/PLA and LDH-IBU/PLA/Pluronic composite fibers. - Graphical abstract: Ibuprofen intercalated layered double hydroxide (LDH-IBU)/polycaprolactone (PCL) and LDH-IBU/polylactide (PLA) nanocomposite fibers are electrospun based on the combination of LDHs with two kinds of biopolymers (i.e. PCL and PLA). LDH-IBU nanoparticles are uniformly dispersed throughout all the electrospun nanocomposite fibers even at a high loading level of 5 wt%. By combining the tunable drug release property of LDHs and electrospinning technique, the new drug delivery system is anticipated for effective loading and sustained release of drugs

  11. Highly Stable, Functional Hairy Nanoparticles and Biopolymers from Wood Fibers: Towards Sustainable Nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikhi, Amir; Yang, Han; Alam, Md Nur; van de Ven, Theo G M

    2016-07-20

    Nanoparticles, as one of the key materials in nanotechnology and nanomedicine, have gained significant importance during the past decade. While metal-based nanoparticles are associated with synthetic and environmental hassles, cellulose introduces a green, sustainable alternative for nanoparticle synthesis. Here, we present the chemical synthesis and separation procedures to produce new classes of hairy nanoparticles (bearing both amorphous and crystalline regions) and biopolymers based on wood fibers. Through periodate oxidation of soft wood pulp, the glucose ring of cellulose is opened at the C2-C3 bond to form 2,3-dialdehyde groups. Further heating of the partially oxidized fibers (e.g., T = 80 °C) results in three products, namely fibrous oxidized cellulose, sterically stabilized nanocrystalline cellulose (SNCC), and dissolved dialdehyde modified cellulose (DAMC), which are well separated by intermittent centrifugation and co-solvent addition. The partially oxidized fibers (without heating) were used as a highly reactive intermediate to react with chlorite for converting almost all aldehyde to carboxyl groups. Co-solvent precipitation and centrifugation resulted in electrosterically stabilized nanocrystalline cellulose (ENCC) and dicarboxylated cellulose (DCC). The aldehyde content of SNCC and consequently surface charge of ENCC (carboxyl content) were precisely controlled by controlling the periodate oxidation reaction time, resulting in highly stable nanoparticles bearing more than 7 mmol functional groups per gram of nanoparticles (e.g., as compared to conventional NCC bearing < 1 mmol functional group/g). Atomic force microscopy (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) attested to the rod-like morphology. Conductometric titration, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), dynamic light scattering (DLS), electrokinetic-sonic-amplitude (ESA) and acoustic attenuation

  12. Microtubule-based nanomaterials: Exploiting nature's dynamic biopolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachand, George D; Spoerke, Erik D; Stevens, Mark J

    2015-06-01

    For more than a decade now, biomolecular systems have served as an inspiration for the development of synthetic nanomaterials and systems that are capable of reproducing many of unique and emergent behaviors of living systems. One intriguing element of such systems may be found in a specialized class of proteins known as biomolecular motors that are capable of performing useful work across multiple length scales through the efficient conversion of chemical energy. Microtubule (MT) filaments may be considered within this context as their dynamic assembly and disassembly dissipate energy, and perform work within the cell. MTs are one of three cytoskeletal filaments in eukaryotic cells, and play critical roles in a range of cellular processes including mitosis and vesicular trafficking. Based on their function, physical attributes, and unique dynamics, MTs also serve as a powerful archetype of a supramolecular filament that underlies and drives multiscale emergent behaviors. In this review, we briefly summarize recent efforts to generate hybrid and composite nanomaterials using MTs as biomolecular scaffolds, as well as computational and synthetic approaches to develop synthetic one-dimensional nanostructures that display the enviable attributes of the natural filaments.

  13. Soft Tissue Regeneration under the Effect of Wound Coating Based on Chitosan (Natural Biopolymer).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladkova, E V; Babushkina, I V; Norkin, I A; Mamonova, I A; Puchin'yan, D M; Konyuchenko, E A

    2016-03-01

    We developed wound coating based on natural biopolymer chitosan with additional components (ceruloplasmin, L-asparaginic acid, and glycerol). Experiments on albino male rats demonstrated its regeneratory, antioxidant, and antibacterial effects on wounds involving all layers of the skin. Due to chemical composition and buffer component, the biodegraded wound coating optimizes all phases of the wound process, accelerates by 22-28% the reparative regeneration, and leads to anatomic and functional restoration of injured sites. High absorption capacity recommends its use in the treatment of wounds with profuse exudation.

  14. Natural Minerals Coated by Biopolymer Chitosan: Synthesis, Physicochemical, and Adsorption Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budnyak, T. M.; Yanovska, E. S.; Kichkiruk, O. Yu.; Sternik, D.; Tertykh, V. A.

    2016-11-01

    Natural minerals are widely used in treatment technologies as mineral fertilizer, food additive in animal husbandry, and cosmetics because they combine valuable ion-exchanging and adsorption properties together with unique physicochemical and medical properties. Saponite (saponite clay) of the Ukrainian Podillya refers to the class of bentonites, a subclass of layered magnesium silicate montmorillonite. Clinoptilolits are aluminosilicates with carcase structure. In our work, we have coated biopolymer chitosan on the surfaces of natural minerals of Ukrainian origin — Podilsky saponite and Sokyrnitsky clinoptilolite. Chitosan mineral composites have been obtained by crosslinking of adsorbed biopolymer on saponite and clinoptilolite surface with glutaraldehyde. The obtained composites have been characterized by the physicochemical methods such as thermogravimetric/differential thermal analyses (DTA, DTG, TG), differential scanning calorimetry, mass analysis, nitrogen adsorption/desorption isotherms, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to determine possible interactions between the silica and chitosan molecule. The adsorption of microquantities of cations Cu(II), Zn(II), Fe(III), Cd(II), and Pb(II) by the obtained composites and the initial natural minerals has been studied from aqueous solutions. The sorption capacities and kinetic adsorption characteristics of the adsorbents were estimated. It was found that the obtained results have shown that the ability of chitosan to coordinate heavy metal ions Zn(II), Cu(II), Cd(II), and Fe(III) is less or equal to the ability to retain ions of these metals in the pores of minerals without forming chemical bonds.

  15. Influence of Temperature on Mechanical Properties of Jute/Biopolymer Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løvdal, Alexandra Liv Vest; Laursen, Louise Løcke; Løgstrup Andersen, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Biopolymers and natural fibers are receiving wide attention for the potential to have good performance composites with low environmental impact. A current limitation of most biopolymers is however their change in mechanical properties at elevated temperatures. This study investigates the mechanic...... and composites. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc....

  16. Facile fabrication processes for hydrogel-based microfluidic devices made of natural biopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yajima, Yuya; Yamada, Masumi; Yamada, Emi; Iwase, Masaki; Seki, Minoru

    2014-01-01

    We present facile strategies for the fabrication of two types of microfluidic devices made of hydrogels using the natural biopolymers, alginate, and gelatin as substrates. The processes presented include the molding-based preparation of hydrogel plates and their chemical bonding. To prepare calcium-alginate hydrogel microdevices, we suppressed the volume shrinkage of the alginate solution during gelation using propylene glycol alginate in the precursor solution along with sodium alginate. In addition, a chemical bonding method was developed using a polyelectrolyte membrane of poly-L-lysine as the electrostatic glue. To prepare gelatin-based microdevices, we used microbial transglutaminase to bond hydrogel plates chemically and to cross-link and stabilize the hydrogel matrix. As an application, mammalian cells (fibroblasts and vascular endothelial cells) were cultivated on the microchannel surface to form three-dimensional capillary-embedding tissue models for biological research and tissue engineering. PMID:24803964

  17. Feasibility study of prestressed natural fiber-reinforced polylactic acid (pla) composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinchcliffe, Sean A.

    The feasibility of manufacturing prestressed natural-fiber reinforced biopolymer composites is demonstrated in this work. The objective of this study was to illustrate that the specific mechanical properties of biopolymers can be enhanced by leveraging a combination of additive manufacturing (3D printing) and post-tensioning of continuous natural fiber reinforcement. Tensile and flexural PLA specimens were 3D-printed with and without post-tensioning ducts. The mechanical properties of reinforcing fibers jute and flax were characterized prior to post-tensioning. The effect of matrix cross-sectional geometry and post-tensioning on the specific mechanical properties of PLA were investigated using mechanical testing. Numerical and analytical models were developed to predict the experimental results, which confirm that 3D-printed matrices improve the specific mechanical properties of PLA composites and are further improved via initial fiber prestressing. The results suggest that both additive manufacturing and fiber prestressing represent viable new methods for improving the mechanical performance of natural fiber-reinforced polymeric composites.

  18. Biodegradation of a blended starch/natural rubber foam biopolymer and rubber gloves by Streptomyces coelicolor CH13

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Background: The growing problem of environmental pollution caused by synthetic plastics has led to the search for alternative materials such as biodegradable plastics. Of the biopolymers presently under development, starch/natural rubber is one promising alternative. Several species of bacteria and fungi are capable of degrading natural rubber and many can degrade starch. Results: Streptomyces coelicolor CH13 was isolated from soil according to its ability to produce translucent halos on a mi...

  19. Tribology of natural fiber polymer composites

    CERN Document Server

    Chand, N

    2008-01-01

    Environmental concerns are driving demand for bio-degradable materials such as plant-based natural fiber reinforced polymer composites. These composites are fast replacing conventional materials in many applications, especially in automobiles, where tribology (friction, lubrication and wear) is important. This book covers the availability and processing of natural fiber polymer composites and their structural, thermal, mechanical and, in particular, tribological properties.Chapter 1 discusses sources of natural fibers, their extraction and surface modification. It also reviews the ther

  20. Natural additives and agricultural wastes in biopolymer formulations for food packaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arantzazu eValdés

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The main directions in food packaging research are targeted towards improvements in food quality and food safety. For this purpose, food packaging providing longer product shelf-life, as well as the monitoring of safety and quality based upon international standards, is desirable. New active packaging strategies represent a key area of development in new multifunctional materials where the use of natural additives and/or agricultural wastes is getting increasing interest. The development of new materials, and particularly innovative biopolymer formulations, can help to address these requirements and also with other packaging functions such as: food protection and preservation, marketing and smart communication to consumers. The use of biocomposites for active food packaging is one of the most studied approaches in the last years on materials in contact with food. Applications of these innovative biocomposites could help to provide new food packaging materials with improved mechanical, barrier, antioxidant and antimicrobial properties. From the food industry standpoint, concerns such as the safety and risk associated with these new additives, migration properties and possible human ingestion and regulations need to be considered. The latest innovations in the use of these innovative formulations to obtain biocomposites are reported in this review. Legislative issues related to the use of natural additives and agricultural wastes in food packaging systems are also discussed.

  1. Natural additives and agricultural wastes in biopolymer formulations for food packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés, Arantzazu; Mellinas, Ana Cristina; Ramos, Marina; Garrigós, María Carmen; Jiménez, Alfonso

    2014-01-01

    The main directions in food packaging research are targeted toward improvements in food quality and food safety. For this purpose, food packaging providing longer product shelf-life, as well as the monitoring of safety and quality based upon international standards, is desirable. New active packaging strategies represent a key area of development in new multifunctional materials where the use of natural additives and/or agricultural wastes is getting increasing interest. The development of new materials, and particularly innovative biopolymer formulations, can help to address these requirements and also with other packaging functions such as: food protection and preservation, marketing and smart communication to consumers. The use of biocomposites for active food packaging is one of the most studied approaches in the last years on materials in contact with food. Applications of these innovative biocomposites could help to provide new food packaging materials with improved mechanical, barrier, antioxidant, and antimicrobial properties. From the food industry standpoint, concerns such as the safety and risk associated with these new additives, migration properties and possible human ingestion and regulations need to be considered. The latest innovations in the use of these innovative formulations to obtain biocomposites are reported in this review. Legislative issues related to the use of natural additives and agricultural wastes in food packaging systems are also discussed.

  2. Natural additives and agricultural wastes in biopolymer formulations for food packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés, Arantzazu; Mellinas, Ana Cristina; Ramos, Marina; Garrigós, María Carmen; Jiménez, Alfonso

    2014-02-01

    The main directions in food packaging research are targeted towards improvements in food quality and food safety. For this purpose, food packaging providing longer product shelf-life, as well as the monitoring of safety and quality based upon international standards, is desirable. New active packaging strategies represent a key area of development in new multifunctional materials where the use of natural additives and/or agricultural wastes is getting increasing interest. The development of new materials, and particularly innovative biopolymer formulations, can help to address these requirements and also with other packaging functions such as: food protection and preservation, marketing and smart communication to consumers. The use of biocomposites for active food packaging is one of the most studied approaches in the last years on materials in contact with food. Applications of these innovative biocomposites could help to provide new food packaging materials with improved mechanical, barrier, antioxidant and antimicrobial properties. From the food industry standpoint, concerns such as the safety and risk associated with these new additives, migration properties and possible human ingestion and regulations need to be considered. The latest innovations in the use of these innovative formulations to obtain biocomposites are reported in this review. Legislative issues related to the use of natural additives and agricultural wastes in food packaging systems are also discussed.

  3. Physical-biopolymer characterization of polyhydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate (PHBV) blended with natural rubber latex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuntanoo, K., E-mail: thip-kk@hotmail.com [Graduate School of Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, 40002 Thailand (Thailand); Promkotra, S., E-mail: sarunya@kku.ac.th [Department of Geotechnology, Faculty of Technology, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 Thailand (Thailand); Kaewkannetra, P., E-mail: paknar@kku.ac.th [Department of Biotechnology, Faculty of Technology, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 Thailand (Thailand)

    2015-03-30

    A biopolymer of polyhydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate (PHBV) is blended with bio-based materials, natural rubber latex, to improve their microstructures. The various ratios between PHBV and natural rubber latex are examined to develop their mechanical properties. In general, physical properties of PHBV are hard, brittle and low flexible while natural rubber (NR) is presented itself as high elastic materials. Concentrations of the PHBV solution are constituted at 1%, 2% and 3% (w/v). The mixtures of their PHBV solutions to natural rubber latex are produced the blended films in three different ratios of 4:6, 5:5 and 6:4, respectively. They are characterized by appearance analyses which are the scanning electron microscope (SEM), universal testing machine (UTM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The SEM photomicrographs of the blended films and the controlled PHBV can provide the void distribution in the range of 12-14% and 19-21%, respectively. For mechanical properties of the blended films, the various elastic moduli of 1%, 2% and 3% (w/v) PHBV are the average of 773, 956 and 1,007 kPa, respectively. The tensile strengths of the blends increase with the increased concentrations of PHBV, similarly trend to the elastic modulus. The crystallization and melting behavior of unmixed PHBV and the blends are determined by DSC. Melting transition temperatures (T{sub m}) of the unmixed PHBV are stated two melting peak at 154°C and 173°C. Besides, the melting peaks of the blends alter in the range of 152-156°C and 168-171°C, respectively. According to morphology of the blends, the void distribution decreases twice compared to the unmixed PHBV. The results of mechanical properties and thermal analysis indicate that the blended PHBV can be developed their properties by more resilient and wide range of temperature than usual.

  4. Physical-biopolymer characterization of polyhydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate (PHBV) blended with natural rubber latex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntanoo, K.; Promkotra, S.; Kaewkannetra, P.

    2015-03-01

    A biopolymer of polyhydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate (PHBV) is blended with bio-based materials, natural rubber latex, to improve their microstructures. The various ratios between PHBV and natural rubber latex are examined to develop their mechanical properties. In general, physical properties of PHBV are hard, brittle and low flexible while natural rubber (NR) is presented itself as high elastic materials. Concentrations of the PHBV solution are constituted at 1%, 2% and 3% (w/v). The mixtures of their PHBV solutions to natural rubber latex are produced the blended films in three different ratios of 4:6, 5:5 and 6:4, respectively. They are characterized by appearance analyses which are the scanning electron microscope (SEM), universal testing machine (UTM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The SEM photomicrographs of the blended films and the controlled PHBV can provide the void distribution in the range of 12-14% and 19-21%, respectively. For mechanical properties of the blended films, the various elastic moduli of 1%, 2% and 3% (w/v) PHBV are the average of 773, 956 and 1,007 kPa, respectively. The tensile strengths of the blends increase with the increased concentrations of PHBV, similarly trend to the elastic modulus. The crystallization and melting behavior of unmixed PHBV and the blends are determined by DSC. Melting transition temperatures (Tm) of the unmixed PHBV are stated two melting peak at 154°C and 173°C. Besides, the melting peaks of the blends alter in the range of 152-156°C and 168-171°C, respectively. According to morphology of the blends, the void distribution decreases twice compared to the unmixed PHBV. The results of mechanical properties and thermal analysis indicate that the blended PHBV can be developed their properties by more resilient and wide range of temperature than usual.

  5. Acoustic Absorption of Natural Fiber Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasina Mamtaz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The current study is a bibliographic observation on prevailing tendencies in the development of acoustic absorption by natural fiber composites. Despite having less detrimental environmental effects and thorough availability, natural fibers are still unsuitable for wide implementation in industrial purposes. Some shortcomings such as the presence of moisture contents, thicker diameter, and lower antifungus quality hold up the progress of natural fiber composites in staying competitive with synthetic composites. The review indicates the importance of the pretreatment of fresh natural fiber to overcome these shortcomings. However, the pretreatment of natural fiber causes the removal of moisture contents which results in the decrease of its acoustic absorption performance. Incorporation of granular materials in treated fiber composite is expected to play a significant role as a replacement for moisture contents. This review aims to investigate the acoustic absorption behavior of natural fiber composites due to the incorporation of granular materials. It is intended that this review will provide an overview of the analytical approaches for the modeling of acoustic wave propagation through the natural fiber composites. The possible influential factors of fibers and grains were described in this study for the enhancement of low frequency acoustic absorption of the composites.

  6. Optical fibers and RF a natural combination

    CERN Document Server

    Romeiser, Malcolm

    2004-01-01

    The optical fiber industry has experienced a period of consolidation and reorganization and is now poised for a new surge in growth. To take advantage of that growth, and to respond to the demand to use fiber more efficiently, designers need a better understanding of fiber optics. Taking the approach that optical fibers are an extension of RF-based communications, the author explains basic optical concepts, applications, and systems; the nature and performance characteristics of optical fibers; and optical sources, connectors and splices. Subsequent chapters explore current applications of fib

  7. Natural Fiber Filament Wound Composites: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Ansari Suriyati

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent development, natural fibers have attracted the interest of engineers, researchers, professionals and scientists all over the world as an alternative reinforcement for fiber reinforced polymer composites. This is due to its superior properties such as high specific strength, low weight, low cost, fairly good mechanical properties, non-abrasive, eco-friendly and bio-degradable characteristics. In this point of view, natural fiber-polymer composites (NFPCs are becoming increasingly utilized in a wide variety of applications because they represent an ecological and inexpensive alternative to conventional petroleum-derived materials. On the other hand, considerable amounts of organic waste and residue from the industrial and agricultural processes are still underutilized as low-value energy sources. This is a comprehensive review discussing about natural fiber reinforced composite produced by filament winding technique.

  8. Electrospun fish protein fibers as a biopolymer-based carrier – implications for oral protein delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boutrup Stephansen, Karen; García-Díaz, María; Jessen, Flemming

    2014-01-01

    . The electrospinning process did not affect the functionality of the encapsulated insulin and it provided controlled release kinetics. The epithelial permeability enhancing effect and biocompatibility of the FSP fibers provide evidence for further investigating protein-based electrospun nanofibers for delivery...

  9. Biopolymer nano-particles and natural nano-carriers for nano-encapsulation of phenolic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faridi Esfanjani, Afshin; Jafari, Seid Mahdi

    2016-10-01

    Phenolic compounds are major micronutrients in our diet,(1) and evidence for their role in the prevention of degenerative diseases such as cancer, inflammation and neurodegenerative diseases is emerging. The easily destruction against environment stresses and low bioavailability of phenolics are main limitations of their application. Therefore, nano-encapsulated phenolics as a fine delivery system can solve their restrictions. Polymeric nanoparticles and natural nano-carriers are one of the most effective and industrial techniques which can be used for protection and delivery of phenolics. In this review, preparation, application and characterization of polymeric based nano-capsules and natural nano-carriers for phenolics have been considered and discussed including polymeric nanoparticles, polymeric complex nanoparticles, cyclodextrins, nano-caseins, nanocrystals, electrospun nano-fibers, electro-sprayed nano-particles, and nano-spray dried particles. Our main goal was to cover the relevant recent studies in the past few years. Although a number of different types of polymeric and natural based nano-scale delivery systems have been developed, there are relatively poor quantitative understanding of their in vivo absorption, permeation and release. Also, performing toxicity experiments, residual solvent analysis and studying their biological fate during digestion, absorption, and excretion of polymeric nanoparticle and natural nano-carriers containing phenolics should be considered in future researches. In addition, future investigations could focus on application of phenolic nano-scale delivery systems in pharmaceuticals and functional foods.

  10. Formation and stabilization of nanoemulsion-based vitamin E delivery systems using natural biopolymers: Whey protein isolate and gum arabic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Bengu; Argin, Sanem; Ozilgen, Mustafa; McClements, David Julian

    2015-12-01

    Natural biopolymers, whey protein isolate (WPI) and gum arabic (GA), were used to fabricate emulsion-based delivery systems for vitamin E-acetate. Stable delivery systems could be formed when vitamin E-acetate was mixed with sufficient orange oil prior to high pressure homogenization. WPI (d32=0.11 μm, 1% emulsifier) was better than GA (d32=0.38 μm, 10% emulsifier) at producing small droplets at low emulsifier concentrations. However, WPI-stabilized nanoemulsions were unstable to flocculation near the protein isoelectric point (pH 5.0), at high ionic strength (>100mM), and at elevated temperatures (>60 °C), whereas GA-stabilized emulsions were stable. This difference was attributed to differences in emulsifier stabilization mechanisms: WPI by electrostatic repulsion; GA by steric repulsion. These results provide useful information about the emulsifying and stabilizing capacities of natural biopolymers for forming food-grade vitamin-enriched delivery systems.

  11. Cationic inulin: a plant based natural biopolymer for algal biomass harvesting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahul, Rahul; Kumar, Sunil; Jha, Usha; Sen, Gautam

    2015-01-01

    The synthesis of cationic inulin (CI) and its application in algal biomass harvesting have been investigated. (3-chloro-2-hydroxypropyl) trimethylammonium chloride (CHPTAC) was used as the etherifying reagent to introduce quaternary amine groups onto the backbone of the biopolymer. The resulting cationized adduct was characterized by various physicochemical techniques such as intrinsic viscosity measurement, elemental analysis (C, H, N and O), FTIR spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies. The algal flocculation efficacy of the synthesized product was studied through standard jar test procedure. High removal efficiency of 88.61% within 15 min was achieved at the optimal flocculant dosage (60 mg/L), for fresh water green algae, viz., Botryococcus sp.

  12. Associative polymers and physical gels derived from natural biopolymers; Polymeres associes et gels physiques derives de biopolymeres naturels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muller, G.; Huguet, J.; Merle, L.; Grisel, M.; Picton, L.; Bataille, I.; Charpentier, D.; Glinel, K. [CNRS, Polymeres, Biopolymeres et Membranes, Universite de Rouen, 76 - Mont-Saint-Aignan (France)

    1997-04-01

    Polymers are largely used in oil-field operations where the control of rheology of aqueous phases ids of primary importance. Polymers systems showing high viscosity present many advantages as candidates for drilling muds. Associating polymers, i.e. polymers the hydrophilic main chains of which have been properly modified by introducing hydrophobic groups and weak physical ges are good examples of such systems. The different systems chosen to be studied are derived from natural biopolymers. They are: Alkyl derivatives issued from neutral (HEC) and ionic (CMC) cellulosic ether derivatives; alkyl and fluoro alkyl derivatives from neutral (Pull) and ionic (CMP) bacterial polysaccharide pullulane; weak physical gels resulting from complex formation between borate ions and the neutral fungal polysaccharide schizophyllan. The different results are given in tables and figures. (N.C.)

  13. Opportunities and threats to natural fibers in technical applications

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Anandjiwala, RD

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Natural fibers, such as flax, hemp, kenaf, coir, sisal and jute, are gaining increasing importance in automotive, aerospace, packaging, fiber-reinforced composites and other technical and industrial applications. This is due to the fact that natural...

  14. 2nd International Conference on Natural Fibers

    CERN Document Server

    Rana, Sohel

    2016-01-01

    This book collects selected high quality articles submitted to the 2nd International Conference on Natural Fibers (ICNF2015). A wide range of topics is covered related to various aspects of natural fibres such as agriculture, extraction and processing, surface modification and functionalization, advanced structures, nano fibres, composites and nanocomposites, design and product development, applications, market potential, and environmental impact. Divided into separate sections on these various topics, the book presents the latest high quality research work addressing different approaches and techniques to improve processing, performance, functionalities and cost-effectiveness of natural fibre and natural based products, in order to promote their applications in various advanced technical sectors. This book is a useful source of information for materials scientists, teachers and students from various disciplines as well as for R& D staff in industries using natural fibre based materials. .

  15. Textile composites based on natural fibers

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Li, Yan

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available BASED ON NATURAL FIBERS Yan LI School of Aerospace Engineering and Applied Mechanics, Key Laboratory of Advanced Civil Engineering Materials, Ministry of Education, Tongji University, Shanghai, 200092, P.R.China M. S. SREEKALA Department... of Polymer Science and Rubber Technology, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Cochin-22, Kerala, India - 682 022 Maya JACOB School of Chemical Sciences, Mahatma Gandhi University, Priyadarshini Hills P.O., Kottayam, Kerala, India - 686 560 1...

  16. Sound absorption performance of natural fibers and their composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG WeiDong; LI Yan

    2012-01-01

    This research aimed to study the sound absorption properties of natural fibers and their reinforced composites.Sound absorption coefficients of three types of natural fibers,i.e.,ramie,flax and jute fibers and their composites were measured by the two-microphone transfer function technique in the impedance tube.The results were compared with synthetic fibers and their composites.It was found that both natural fibers and their composites had superior capability of noise reduction.The multi-scale and hollow lumen structures of natural fibers contributed to the high sound absorption performance.Moreover,the sound absorption properties of these natural fibers were also calculated by the Delany-Bazley and Garai-Pompoli models.They showed good agreement with the experimental data.It was concluded that multi-functional composite materials can be made by natural fibers so that both the mechanical and acoustical functions can be achieved.

  17. Development of natural fiber reinforced polylactide-based biocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias Herrera, Andrea Marcela

    Polylactide or PLA is a biodegradable polymer that can be produced from renewable resources. This aliphatic polyester exhibits good mechanical properties similar to those of polyethylene terephthalate (PET). Since 2003, bio-based high molecular weight PLA is produced on an industrial scale and commercialized under amorphous and semicrystalline grades for various applications. Enhancement of PLA crystallization kinetics is crucial for the competitiveness of this biopolymer as a commodity material able to replace petroleum-based plastics. On the other hand, the combination of natural fibers with polymer matrices made from renewable resources, to produce fully biobased and biodegradable polymer composite materials, has been a strong trend in research activities during the last decade. Nevertheless, the differences related to the chemical structure, clearly observed in the marked hydrophilic/hydrophobic character of the fibers and the thermoplastic matrix, respectively, represent a major drawback for promoting strong fiber/matrix interactions. The aim of the present study was to investigate the intrinsic fiber/matrix interactions of PLAbased natural fiber composites prepared by melt-compounding. Short flax fibers presenting a nominal length of ˜1 mm were selected as reinforcement and biocomposites containing low to moderate fiber loading were processed by melt-mixing. Fiber bundle breakage during processing led to important reductions in length and diameter. The mean aspect ratio was decreased by about 50%. Quiescent crystallization kinetics of PLA and biocomposite systems was examined under isothermal and non-isothermal conditions. The nucleating nature of the flax fibers was demonstrated and PLA crystallization was effectively accelerated as the natural reinforcement content increased. Such improvement was controlled by the temperature at which crystallization took place, the liquid-to-solid transition being thermodynamically promoted by the degree of supercooling

  18. Natural emulsifiers - Biosurfactants, phospholipids, biopolymers, and colloidal particles: Molecular and physicochemical basis of functional performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClements, David Julian; Gumus, Cansu Ekin

    2016-08-01

    There is increasing consumer pressure for commercial products that are more natural, sustainable, and environmentally friendly, including foods, cosmetics, detergents, and personal care products. Industry has responded by trying to identify natural alternatives to synthetic functional ingredients within these products. The focus of this review article is on the replacement of synthetic surfactants with natural emulsifiers, such as amphiphilic proteins, polysaccharides, biosurfactants, phospholipids, and bioparticles. In particular, the physicochemical basis of emulsion formation and stabilization by natural emulsifiers is discussed, and the benefits and limitations of different natural emulsifiers are compared. Surface-active polysaccharides typically have to be used at relatively high levels to produce small droplets, but the droplets formed are highly resistant to environmental changes. Conversely, surface-active proteins are typically utilized at low levels, but the droplets formed are highly sensitive to changes in pH, ionic strength, and temperature. Certain phospholipids are capable of producing small oil droplets during homogenization, but again the droplets formed are highly sensitive to changes in environmental conditions. Biosurfactants (saponins) can be utilized at low levels to form fine oil droplets that remain stable over a range of environmental conditions. Some nature-derived nanoparticles (e.g., cellulose, chitosan, and starch) are effective at stabilizing emulsions containing relatively large oil droplets. Future research is encouraged to identify, isolate, purify, and characterize new types of natural emulsifier, and to test their efficacy in food, cosmetic, detergent, personal care, and other products.

  19. Natural Minerals Coated by Biopolymer Chitosan: Synthesis, Physicochemical, and Adsorption Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Budnyak, T. M.; Yanovska, E. S.; Kichkiruk, O. Yu.; Sternik, D.; Tertykh, V. A.

    2016-01-01

    Natural minerals are widely used in treatment technologies as mineral fertilizer, food additive in animal husbandry, and cosmetics because they combine valuable ion-exchanging and adsorption properties together with unique physicochemical and medical properties. Saponite (saponite clay) of the Ukrainian Podillya refers to the class of bentonites, a subclass of layered magnesium silicate montmorillonite. Clinoptilolits are aluminosilicates with carcase structure. In our work, we have coated bi...

  20. Natural Lignocellulosic Fibers as Engineering Materials—An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Sergio Neves; Lopes, Felipe Perissé Duarte; Barbosa, Anderson Paula; Bevitori, Alice Barreto; Silva, Isabela Leão Amaral Da; Costa, Lucas Lopes Da

    2011-10-01

    Recent investigations on the tensile properties of natural cellulose-based fibers revealed an increasing potential as engineering materials. This is particularly the case of very thin fibers of some species such as sisal, ramie, and curaua. However, several other commonly used fibers such as flax, jute, hemp, coir, cotton, and bamboo as well as less known bagasse, piassava, sponge gourde, and buriti display tensile properties that could qualify them as engineering materials. An overview of the strength limits attained by these fibers is presented. Based on a tensile strength vs density chart, it is shown that natural fibers stand out as a relevant class of engineering materials.

  1. Use of Natural Antimicrobial Peptides and Bacterial Biopolymers for Cultured Pearl Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon-Colin, Christelle; Gueguen, Yannick; Bachere, Evelyne; Kouzayha, Achraf; Saulnier, Denis; Gayet, Nicolas; Guezennec, Jean

    2015-06-11

    Cultured pearls are the product of grafting and rearing of Pinctada margaritifera pearl oysters in their natural environment. Nucleus rejections and oyster mortality appear to result from bacterial infections or from an inappropriate grafting practice. To reduce the impact of bacterial infections, synthetic antibiotics have been applied during the grafting practice. However, the use of such antibiotics presents a number of problems associated with their incomplete biodegradability, limited efficacy in some cases, and an increased risk of selecting for antimicrobial resistant bacteria. We investigated the application of a marine antimicrobial peptide, tachyplesin, which is present in the Japanese horseshoe crab Tachypleus tridentatus, in combination with two marine bacterial exopolymers as alternative treatment agents. In field studies, the combination treatment resulted in a significant reduction in graft failures vs. untreated controls. The combination of tachyplesin (73 mg/L) with two bacterial exopolysaccharides (0.5% w/w) acting as filming agents, reduces graft-associated bacterial contamination. The survival data were similar to that reported for antibiotic treatments. These data suggest that non-antibiotic treatments of pearl oysters may provide an effective means of improving oyster survival following grafting procedures.

  2. Use of Natural Antimicrobial Peptides and Bacterial Biopolymers for Cultured Pearl Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon-Colin, Christelle; Gueguen, Yannick; Bachere, Evelyne; Kouzayha, Achraf; Saulnier, Denis; Gayet, Nicolas; Guezennec, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Cultured pearls are the product of grafting and rearing of Pinctada margaritifera pearl oysters in their natural environment. Nucleus rejections and oyster mortality appear to result from bacterial infections or from an inappropriate grafting practice. To reduce the impact of bacterial infections, synthetic antibiotics have been applied during the grafting practice. However, the use of such antibiotics presents a number of problems associated with their incomplete biodegradability, limited efficacy in some cases, and an increased risk of selecting for antimicrobial resistant bacteria. We investigated the application of a marine antimicrobial peptide, tachyplesin, which is present in the Japanese horseshoe crab Tachypleus tridentatus, in combination with two marine bacterial exopolymers as alternative treatment agents. In field studies, the combination treatment resulted in a significant reduction in graft failures vs. untreated controls. The combination of tachyplesin (73 mg/L) with two bacterial exopolysaccharides (0.5% w/w) acting as filming agents, reduces graft-associated bacterial contamination. The survival data were similar to that reported for antibiotic treatments. These data suggest that non-antibiotic treatments of pearl oysters may provide an effective means of improving oyster survival following grafting procedures. PMID:26110895

  3. Use of Natural Antimicrobial Peptides and Bacterial Biopolymers for Cultured Pearl Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christelle Simon-Colin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cultured pearls are the product of grafting and rearing of Pinctada margaritifera pearl oysters in their natural environment. Nucleus rejections and oyster mortality appear to result from bacterial infections or from an inappropriate grafting practice. To reduce the impact of bacterial infections, synthetic antibiotics have been applied during the grafting practice. However, the use of such antibiotics presents a number of problems associated with their incomplete biodegradability, limited efficacy in some cases, and an increased risk of selecting for antimicrobial resistant bacteria. We investigated the application of a marine antimicrobial peptide, tachyplesin, which is present in the Japanese horseshoe crab Tachypleus tridentatus, in combination with two marine bacterial exopolymers as alternative treatment agents. In field studies, the combination treatment resulted in a significant reduction in graft failures vs. untreated controls. The combination of tachyplesin (73 mg/L with two bacterial exopolysaccharides (0.5% w/w acting as filming agents, reduces graft-associated bacterial contamination. The survival data were similar to that reported for antibiotic treatments. These data suggest that non-antibiotic treatments of pearl oysters may provide an effective means of improving oyster survival following grafting procedures.

  4. Studies on natural fiber reinforced polymer matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, R. H.; Kapatel, P. M.; Machchhar, A. D.; Kapatel, Y. A.

    2016-05-01

    Natural fiber reinforced composites show increasing importance in day to days applications because of their low cost, lightweight, easy availability, non-toxicity, biodegradability and environment friendly nature. But these fibers are hydrophilic in nature. Thus they have very low reactivity and poor compatibility with polymers. To overcome these limitations chemical modifications of the fibers have been carried out. Therefore, in the present work jute fibers have chemically modified by treating with sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solutions. These treated jute fibers have been used to fabricate jute fiber reinforced epoxy composites. Mechanical properties like tensile strength, flexural strength and impact strength have been found out. Alkali treated composites show better properties compare to untreated composites.

  5. The Revival of the Usage of Natural Fibers and Natural Dyes in Indonesian Textile

    OpenAIRE

    Dian Widiawati

    2009-01-01

    Indonesia is known to possess abundant natural resources as well as a diverse textile tradition. Some examples of traditional textile materials are those made from indigenous natural fibers, such as silk, cotton, ramie, pineapple fibers, and banana frond fibers, which make use of natural dyes. The specific natural back ground and unique cultural tradition of a region strongly influence the creative process of local textile artisans and the visual form of textile works. After the invention of ...

  6. Molecular entanglement and electrospinnability of biopolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Lingyan; Ziegler, Gregory R

    2014-09-03

    Electrospinning is a fascinating technique to fabricate micro- to nano-scale fibers from a wide variety of materials. For biopolymers, molecular entanglement of the constituent polymers in the spinning dope was found to be an essential prerequisite for successful electrospinning. Rheology is a powerful tool to probe the molecular conformation and interaction of biopolymers. In this report, we demonstrate the protocol for utilizing rheology to evaluate the electrospinnability of two biopolymers, starch and pullulan, from their dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)/water dispersions. Well-formed starch and pullulan fibers with average diameters in the submicron to micron range were obtained. Electrospinnability was evaluated by visual and microscopic observation of the fibers formed. By correlating the rheological properties of the dispersions to their electrospinnability, we demonstrate that molecular conformation, molecular entanglement, and shear viscosity all affect electrospinning. Rheology is not only useful in solvent system selection and process optimization, but also in understanding the mechanism of fiber formation on a molecular level.

  7. Antimicrobial assays of natural extracts and their inhibitory effect against Listeria innocua and fish spoilage bacteria, after incorporation into biopolymer edible films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iturriaga, L; Olabarrieta, I; de Marañón, I Martínez

    2012-08-01

    The antimicrobial activity of twelve natural extracts was tested against two fish spoilage bacteria (Pseudomonas fluorescens and Aeromonas hydrophila/caviae) and Listeria innocua, in order to assess their potential utilization in the preservation and safety of minimally processed fish products. After a screening of the active extracts by agar diffusion and vapour diffusion methods, oregano and thyme essential oils and citrus extract were selected. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the selected extracts was determined by disc diffusion method against target bacteria and at two temperatures: bacteria's optimal growth temperature (30 °C or 37 °C) and refrigeration temperature (4 °C). Due to its better solubility, lack of odour and greater inhibitory effect obtained against L. innocua at refrigerated temperature, citrus extract was selected and incorporated at 1% (v/v) into different biopolymer film forming solutions (gelatin, methyl cellulose and their blend 50:50 w/w). The antimicrobial activity of the developed films was then evaluated, just after preparation of the films and after one month of storage at 43±3% relative humidity and 24±3 °C. Regardless of the biopolymer matrix, all the developed films showed antimicrobial activity against the target bacteria. The most sensitive bacterium towards active films was L. innocua while P. fluorescens appeared as the most resistant one, in accordance with the previously performed antimicrobial tests for pure extracts. The differences in activity of the films between the tested two temperatures were not significant except for L. innocua, for which three times higher inhibition diameters were observed at refrigerated temperature. The inhibitory effectiveness of the films against the tested strains was maintained regardless of the biopolymer matrix for at least one month. Therefore, these edible films show potential for their future use in fresh fish fillets preservation.

  8. Characterization of new natural cellulosic fiber from Cissus quadrangularis stem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indran, S; Raj, R Edwin

    2015-03-01

    Polymer composite has contributed tremendously for energy efficient technologies in automotive and aero industries. Environmental and health concerns related to the carcinogenic nature of artificial fiber in polymer composite needs a retrofit. Eco friendly natural cellulosic fiber extract from the stem of Cissus quadrangularis plant is extensively characterized to consider as a viable alternative for man-made hazardous fibers. Anatomical study, chemical analysis, physical analysis, FTIR, XRD, SEM analysis and thermo gravimetric analysis were done to establish the certainty of using them as reinforcement fiber. Its light weight and the presence of high cellulose content (82.73%) with very little wax (0.18%) provide high specific strength and good bonding properties in composite manufacturing. The flaky honeycomb outer surface revealed through electron microscopy contributes for high modulus in CQ stem fiber and thermo gravimetric analysis ensures thermal stability up to 270 °C, which is within the polymerization process temperature.

  9. Nanoparticles based on naturally-occurring biopolymers as versatile delivery platforms for delicate bioactive molecules: an application for ocular gene silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parraga, Jenny E; Zorzi, Giovanni K; Diebold, Yolanda; Seijo, Begoña; Sanchez, Alejandro

    2014-12-30

    Nanoparticles based on naturally-occurring biopolymers, most of them endogenous macromolecules, were designed as a versatile generation of delivery platforms for delicate bioactive molecules. The design of these nanosystems was specifically based on our recent finding about the ability of endogenous polyamine spermine (SPM) to interact with anionic biopolymers (ABs) generating ionically cross-linked nanosystems. The initial first generation of these delivery platforms, based on glycosaminoglycans and other polysaccharides, showed a very high association capacity for some delicate bioactive proteins such as growth factors, but a limited capacity to associate negatively charged molecules, such as pDNA and siRNA. However, the versatility of these nanosystems in terms of composition allowed us to customise the association of active ingredients and their physicochemical characteristics. Concretely, we prepared and incorporated gelatine cationized with spermine (CGsp) to their composition. The resulting modified formulations were characterised by a nanometric size (150-340 nm) and offer the possibility to modulate their zeta potential (from -35 to 28 mV), providing an efficient association of nucleic acids. The biological evaluation of these optimised nanosystems revealed that they are able to be internalised in vivo into corneal and conjunctival tissues and also to provide a significant siRNA gene silencing effect.

  10. Semiflexible Biopolymers in Bundled Arrangements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Schnauß

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Bundles and networks of semiflexible biopolymers are key elements in cells, lending them mechanical integrity while also enabling dynamic functions. Networks have been the subject of many studies, revealing a variety of fundamental characteristics often determined via bulk measurements. Although bundles are equally important in biological systems, they have garnered much less scientific attention since they have to be probed on the mesoscopic scale. Here, we review theoretical as well as experimental approaches, which mainly employ the naturally occurring biopolymer actin, to highlight the principles behind these structures on the single bundle level.

  11. A Natural Based Method for Hydrophobic Treatment of Natural Fiber Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kick, Thomas; Grethe, Thomas; Mahltig, Boris

    2017-06-01

    A treatment for hydrophobic functionalization of natural fiber materials is developed. This hydrophobic treatment is based mainly on natural products. As hydrophobic component the natural Tung Oil is used, which is originally a compound used for wood conservation purposes. The application on textile is done in a padding process under presence of an oxidative agent. For the current investigations a fiber felt from linen was used. The hydrophobic effect is determined by the concentration of Tung Oil and the duration of a thermal drying process. The hydrophobic effect is investigated by capillary rise tests and contact angle measurements. Scanning electron microscopy SEM is used to investigate the surface topography of the fiber material and the deposited hydrophobic material. Altogether, an interesting and promising method for hydrophobisation of natural fibers is developed, which could especially be used as part of a production process of a fiber reinforced composite material, mainly based on natural products.

  12. Finite Element Analysis of a Natural Fiber (Maize Composite Beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Saravana Bavan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural fiber composites are termed as biocomposites or green composites. These fibers are green, biodegradable, and recyclable and have good properties such as low density and low cost when compared to synthetic fibers. The present work is investigated on the finite element analysis of the natural fiber (maize composite beam, processed by means of hand lay-up method. Composite beam material is composed of stalk-based fiber of maize and unsaturated polyester resin polymer as matrix with methyl ethyl ketone peroxide (MEKP as a catalyst and Cobalt Octoate as a promoter. The material was modeled and resembled as a structural beam using suitable assumption and analyzed by means of finite element method using ANSYS software for determining the deflection and stress properties. Morphological analysis and X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis for the fiber were examined by means of scanning electron microscope (SEM and X-ray diffractometer. From the results, it has been found that the finite element values are acceptable with proper assumptions, and the prepared natural fiber composite beam material can be used for structural engineering applications.

  13. Natural Kenaf Fiber Reinforced Composites as Engineered Structural Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittenber, David B.

    The objective of this work was to provide a comprehensive evaluation of natural fiber reinforced polymer (NFRP)'s ability to act as a structural material. As a chemical treatment, aligned kenaf fibers were treated with sodium hydroxide (alkalization) in different concentrations and durations and then manufactured into kenaf fiber / vinyl ester composite plates. Single fiber tensile properties and composite flexural properties, both in dry and saturated environments, were assessed. Based on ASTM standard testing, a comparison of flexural, tensile, compressive, and shear mechanical properties was also made between an untreated kenaf fiber reinforced composite, a chemically treated kenaf fiber reinforced composite, a glass fiber reinforced composite, and oriented strand board (OSB). The mechanical properties were evaluated for dry samples, samples immersed in water for 50 hours, and samples immersed in water until saturation (~2700 hours). Since NFRPs are more vulnerable to environmental effects than synthetic fiber composites, a series of weathering and environmental tests were conducted on the kenaf fiber composites. The environmental conditions studied include real-time outdoor weathering, elevated temperatures, immersion in different pH solutions, and UV exposure. In all of these tests, degradation was found to be more pronounced in the NFRPs than in the glass FRPs; however, in nearly every case the degradation was less than 50% of the flexural strength or stiffness. Using a method of overlapping and meshing discontinuous fiber ends, large mats of fiber bundles were manufactured into composite facesheets for structural insulated panels (SIPs). The polyisocyanurate foam cores proved to be poorly matched to the strength and stiffness of the NFRP facesheets, leading to premature core shear or delamination failures in both flexure and compressive testing. The NFRPs were found to match well with the theoretical stiffness prediction methods of classical lamination

  14. Interface interactions of natural rubber and protein/fiber aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechanical properties of natural rubber are improved with a renewable filler for rubber applications. Aggregates of protein and fiber that constitute soy protein concentrate were shear-reduced and used to enhance the tensile modulus of the natural rubber. The aqueous dispersion of the shear-reduced ...

  15. Disposable Natural Scrubber from Sisal and Bamboo Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Rasigha

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Medical Textiles describes a textile structure that has been designed and produced for use in any of a variety of medical applications. The medical textiles include a vast range of applications, viz, adhesive tapes, bandages, beddings, blankets, castings, diapers, dressings, eye pads, gauzes, protective clothing’s, sutures, surgical covers, surgical clothing’s, swabs, supports, sanitary products, hospital gowns, etc. Consumers have become more aware about the repercussions of leading an unhygienic lifestyle, which has lead to the increase in the number of hygiene conscious people. This has lead to the smart take off of the medical textiles which enables the common man in prevention and treatment of diseases and maintain health and hygiene. A range of natural fibers and biodegradable polymers is being utilized for developing new products in medical textiles. Medical textiles adding a more serious dimension to the textile domain, they are required to undergo stringent testing and hygienic criteria. This has led to innovative use of a variety of natural unconventional fibers and a lot of developments are taking place in this area. One of such unconventional fibers finding good application in the medical textile is Sisal (Agave sisalana. Agave sisalana, consisting a rosette of sword-shaped leaves has been used to extract fibers. Fibers have been extracted by decortication process. The extracted fibers have been cleaned with Sapindus Mukorossi, an herbal cleaning agent which is also hypo allergenic. The cleaned fibers have been softened using various methods, one with alkali treatment and another with citric acid. The various stages of fibers namely raw, cleaned, alkali treated and citric acid treated fibers have been tested for their absorbency and anti-microbial activity. Agave sisalana fiber has been found to have better antimicrobial properties which make it suitable for medical textile application.

  16. Natural-fiber-reinforced polymer composites in automotive applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbery, James; Houston, Dan

    2006-11-01

    In the past decade, natural-fiber composites with thermoplastic and thermoset matrices have been embraced by European car manufacturers and suppliers for door panels, seat backs, headliners, package trays, dashboards, and interior parts. Natural fibers such as kenaf, hemp, flax, jute, and sisal offer such benefits as reductions in weight, cost, and CO2, less reliance on foreign oil sources, and recyclability. However, several major technical considerations must be addressed before the engineering, scientific, and commercial communities gain the confidence to enable wide-scale acceptance, particularly in exterior parts where a Class A surface finish is required. Challenges include the homogenization of the fiber's properties and a full understanding of the degree of polymerization and crystallization, adhesion between the fiber and matrix, moisture repellence, and flame-retardant properties, to name but a few.

  17. Conformational changes in biopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Vassili

    2005-12-01

    Biopolymer conformational changes are involved in many biological processes. This thesis summarizes some theoretical and experimental approaches which I have taken at UCLA to explore conformational changes in biopolymers. The reversible thermal denaturation of the DNA double helix is, perhaps, the simplest example of biopolymer conformational change. I have developed a statistical mechanics model of DNA melting with reduced degrees of freedom, which allows base stacking interaction to be taken into account and treat base pairing and stacking separately. Unlike previous models, this model describes both the unpairing and unstacking parts of the experimental melting curves and explains the observed temperature dependence of the effective thermodynamic parameters used in models of the nearest neighbor type. I developed a basic kinetic model for irreversible thermal denaturation of F-actin, which incorporates depolymerization of F-actin from the ends and breaking of F-actin fiber in the middle. The model explains the cooperativity of F-actin thermal denaturation observed by D. Pavlov et al. in differential calorimetry measurements. CG-rich DNA sequences form left-handed Z-DNA at high ionic strength or upon binding of polyvalent ions and some proteins. I studied experimentally the B-to-Z transition of the (CG)6 dodecamer. Improvement of the locally linearized model used to interpret the data gives evidence for an intermediate state in the B-to-Z transition of DNA, contrary to previous research on this subject. In the past 15 years it has become possible to study the conformational changes of biomolecules using single-molecule techniques. In collaboration with other lab members I performed a single-molecule experiment, where we monitored the displacement of a micrometer-size bead tethered to a surface by a DNA probe undergoing the conformational change. This technique allows probing of conformational changes with subnanometer accuracy. We applied the method to detect

  18. Biomechanics of Natural Fiber Green Composites as Internal Bone Plate rafted

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashim Ahmed M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this paper was to introduce a new series of green composites as a plate for bone fracture applications. These green composites offer many advantages over traditional composites and biocomposites based on synthetic polymers. In current work, the new green composites bone plate based on two types of biopolymers involves biopolymethylmethacrylate thermoplastic material and bioepoxy thermosetting material reinforced with randomly oriented corn natural fibers at different weight fractions (5, 10, 15, and 20% were fabricated by hand lay–up technique. Four forms of green composites ; treated and untreated corn biopolymethylmethacrylate groups A and B respectively, treated and untreated corn bioepoxy groups C and D respectively were investigated. The mechanical properties were tested (tensile, compression, and compact tension under a flow of phosphate buffered saline PBS at 37 °C has been reported. The experimental results showed that the green composites group A have the best mechanical properties than other groups under PBS condition while the green composites group D have the weak mechanical properties due to plastization by immersion in PBS solution. Also, the analysis of femur bone fracture plates carried out by applying finite element method FEM using the ANSYS 16 software package.

  19. DNA analysis of natural fiber rope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, Mignon; Murphy, Terence M

    2009-01-01

    When rope is found at a crime scene, the type of fiber is currently identified through its microscopic characteristics. However, these characteristics may not always unambiguously distinguish some types of rope from others. If rope samples contain cells from the plants of origin, then DNA analysis may prove to be a better way to identify the type of rope obtained from a crime scene. The objective of this project was to develop techniques of DNA analysis that can be used to differentiate between ropes made from Cannabis sativa L. (hemp), Agave sisalana Perrine (sisal), Musa textilis Née (abaca, "Manila hemp"), Linum usitatissimum L. (flax), and Corchorus olitorus L. (jute). The procedures included extracting the DNA from the rope, performing polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using the extracted DNA as a template, and analyzing the DNA products. A primer pair for PCR, chosen from within a chloroplast gene for the large subunit of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase, was designed to be specific for plant DNA and complementary to the genes from all five plants. The resulting PCR fragments were approximately 771 base pairs long. The PCR fragments, distinguished through base sequence analysis or restriction enzyme analysis, could be used to identify the five different rope types. The procedure provides a useful addition to visual methods of comparing rope samples.

  20. Biopolymer colloids for controlling and templating inorganic synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura C. Preiss

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Biopolymers and biopolymer colloids can act as controlling agents and templates not only in many processes in nature, but also in a wide range of synthetic approaches. Inorganic materials can be either synthesized ex situ and later incorporated into a biopolymer structuring matrix or grown in situ in the presence of biopolymers. In this review, we focus mainly on the latter case and distinguish between the following possibilities: (i biopolymers as controlling agents of nucleation and growth of inorganic materials; (ii biopolymers as supports, either as molecular supports or as carrier particles acting as cores of core–shell structures; and (iii so-called “soft templates”, which include on one hand stabilized droplets, micelles, and vesicles, and on the other hand continuous scaffolds generated by gelling biopolymers.

  1. The Revival of the Usage of Natural Fibers and Natural Dyes in Indonesian Textile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dian Widiawati

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia is known to possess abundant natural resources as well as a diverse textile tradition. Some examples of traditional textile materials are those made from indigenous natural fibers, such as silk, cotton, ramie, pineapple fibers, and banana frond fibers, which make use of natural dyes. The specific natural back ground and unique cultural tradition of a region strongly influence the creative process of local textile artisans and the visual form of textile works. After the invention of synthetic dyes, the usage of natural dyes has gradually decreased. However, the optimism in using traditional dyes recently emerges in the textile world in Indonesia. This tendency grows along with the issues of awareness of nature and the soaring popularity of back-to-nature lifestyle. This study attempts to identify the relations between the usage of natural dyes in the past and its relevance to contemporary contexts. This study focuses on several topics, firstly the past role of natural dyes and the invention of synthetic dyes which outgrow natural dyes. Then, this study aims to explain why natural dyes are recently being reused in textile, which leads to identifying the contemporary position or role of natural dyes, besides the existence of synthetic dyes which technically possess various advantages. This study also aspires to identify the advantages and shortcomings of natural dyes based on the consumers’ acceptance and certain contexts. The method used in this study is the qualitative descriptive method through interdisciplinary approaches.

  2. Effect of Different Purification Techniques on the Characteristics of Heteropolysaccharide-Protein Biopolymer from Durian (Durio zibethinus Seed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Mirhosseini

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Natural biopolymers from plant sources contain many impurities (e.g., fat, protein, fiber, natural pigment and endogenous enzymes, therefore, an efficient purification process is recommended to minimize these impurities and consequently improve the functional properties of the biopolymer. The main objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of different purification techniques on the yield, protein content, solubility, water- and oil-holding capacity of a heteropolysaccharide-protein biopolymer obtained from durian seed. Four different purification methods using different chemicals and solvents (i.e., A (isopropanol and ethanol, B (isopropanol and acetone, C (saturated barium hydroxide, and D (Fehling solution] to liberate the purified biopolymer from its crude form were compared. In most cases, the purification process significantly (p < 0.05 improved the physicochemical properties of heteropolysaccharide-protein biopolymer from durian fruit seed. The present work showed that the precipitation using isopropanol and acetone (Method B resulted in the highest purification yield among all the tested purification techniques. The precipitation using saturated barium hydroxide (Method C led to induce the highest solubility and relatively high capacity of water absorption. The current study reveals that the precipitation using Fehling solution (Method D most efficiently eliminates the protein fraction, thus providing more pure biopolymer suitable for biological applications.

  3. A temperature responsive biopolymer for mercury remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostal, Jan; Mulchandani, Ashok; Gropp, Katie E; Chen, Wilfred

    2003-10-01

    Tunable biopolymers based on elastin-like polypeptides (ELP) were engineered for the selective removal of mercury. ELP undergoes a reversible thermal precipitation within a wide range of temperatures and was exploited to enable easy recovery of the sequestered mercury. A bacterial metalloregulatory protein, MerR, which binds mercury with an unusually high affinity and selectivity, was fused to the ELP to provide the highly selective nature of the biopolymers. Selective binding of mercury was demonstrated at an expected ratio of 0.5 mercury/biopolymer, and minimal binding of competing heavy metals (cadmium, nickel, and zinc), even at 100-fold excess, was observed. The sequestered mercury was extracted easily, enabling continuous reuse of the biopolymers. In repeating cycles, mercury concentration was reduced to ppb levels, satisfying even drinking water limits. Utility of the biopolymers with mercury-contaminated Lake Elsinore water was demonstrated with no decrease in efficiency. The nanoscale biopolymers reported here using metalloregulatory proteins represent a "green" technology for environmentally benign mercury removal. As nature offers a wide selection of specific metalloregulatory proteins, this technology offers promising solutions to remediation of other important pollutants such as arsenic or chromium.

  4. Production of Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) fibers with encapsulated natural deep eutectic solvent (NADES) using electrospinning

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Functionalized electrospun fibers are of great interest for biomedical applications such as in the design of drug delivery systems. Nevertheless, in some cases the molecules of interest have poor solubility in water or have high melting temperatures. These drawbacks can be overcome using deep eutectic solvents. In this work, poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), a common biodegradable biopolymer, was used to produce new functionalized fibers with the eutectic mixture choline chloride:citric acid in a mo...

  5. Recent advances in biopolymers and biopolymer-based nanocomposites for food packaging materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, X Z; Kumar, P; Alavi, S; Sandeep, K P

    2012-01-01

    Plastic packaging for food and non-food applications is non-biodegradable, and also uses up valuable and scarce non-renewable resources like petroleum. With the current focus on exploring alternatives to petroleum and emphasis on reduced environmental impact, research is increasingly being directed at development of biodegradable food packaging from biopolymer-based materials. The proposed paper will present a review of recent developments in biopolymer-based food packaging materials including natural biopolymers (such as starches and proteins), synthetic biopolymers (such as poly lactic acid), biopolymer blends, and nanocomposites based on natural and synthetic biopolymers. The paper will discuss the various techniques that have been used for developing cost-effective biodegradable packaging materials with optimum mechanical strength and oxygen and moisture barrier properties. This is a timely review as there has been a recent renewed interest in research studies, both in the industry and academia, towards development of a new generation of biopolymer-based food packaging materials with possible applications in other areas.

  6. Green nanotechnology: a short cut to beneficiation of natural fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahmy, Tamer Y A; Mobarak, Fardous

    2011-01-01

    For the first time worldwide, it is shown that our novel nanocomposite produced from natural fibers vaccinated with glucose--by fully green nanotechnology--possesses surprising reactivity towards urea. Magic super absorbent carbamated nanocomposite cotton fabrics having remarkable distinguished properties were obtained in few minutes. It is well established that carbamates possess antibacterial effects. The produced magic nanocomposite fabrics, we discovered for the first time worldwide, find their use as woven or nonwoven hygienic pads, bandages or paper nanocomposites.

  7. Staple fiber processing of biopolymers opens doors to new markets%生物高分子短纤维加工走向新市场

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S.Ramaswamy; S.Ray; M.A.Raina; T.Gries; 王倩妮

    2011-01-01

    Research and innovation on the development of raw materials and energy sources based on the use to renew- able resources have now become a world priority. Application of biopolymers in textile based products need to be increased to make a step towards sustainable and green development. The paper presents a state of the art and also discusses the envisaged applications for biopolymers in textile based products. To gather some basic idea about the technology for biopolymer staple spinning with minimum expense of resources the appli- cation of theory of solving inventive problems (TRIZ) is discussed.%原材料发展和以再生资源为主的能源方面的研究和创新现已成为世界关注的焦点。生物高分子在纺织产品上的应用应进一步朝着可持续和绿色的方向发展。介绍了目前生物高分子发展水平,讨论了生物高分子材料在纺织品上的应用预测。创新问题解决理论(TRIZ)的应用是讨论以最少的资源为代价开发一些生物高分子纤维纺纱技术的基本思路。

  8. APPLICATION OF FLUORESCENCE SPECTROSCOPIC TECHNIQUES AND PROBES TO THE DETECTION OF BIOPOLYMER DEGRADATION IN NATURAL ENVIRONMENTS. (R825159)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The activities and substrate specificities of extracellular enzymes in natural systems are not well understood, despite their critical role in microbial remineralization of organic carbon. These enzymes initiate organic carbon degradation by selectively hydrolyzing high molecular...

  9. Natural Fiber-Reinforced Hybrid Polymer Nanocomposites: Effect of Fiber Mixing and Nanoclay on Physical, Mechanical, and Biodegradable Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Saiful Islam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Combining two kinds of fibers is a potential way to improve the essential properties of natural fiber-reinforced hybrid polymer composites. Biocomposites produced from natural resources are experiencing an increase in interest due to their high demand in the market for manufacturing, in addition to environmental and sustainability issues. In this study, natural fiber-reinforced hybrid polymer nanocomposites were prepared from coir fiber, wood fiber, polypropylene, and montmorillonite nanoclay using a hot press technique. The effects of fiber mixing and montmorillonite on their physico-mechanical and biodegradable properties were subsequently investigated. Before being used, both the wood and the coir fibers were alkali-treated to reduce their hydrophilicity. The mechanical properties of the fabricated composites were measured using a universal tensile testing machine and found to be enhanced after fiber mixing and nanoclay incorporation. Fourier transform infrared spectra indicated that the characteristic peaks of the composites shifted after fiber mixing. A new peak around 470 cm-1 was observed in the case of the nanocomposites, which confirmed the interaction between the fiber, polymer, and montmorillonite (MMT. Scanning electron microscopic analysis revealed that MMT strongly improved the adhesion and compatibility between the fiber and polymer matrix. The combining of fibers improved the biodegradability and water absorption properties, while MMT addition had the reverse effect on the same properties of the composites.

  10. A novel use of bio-based natural fibers, polymers, and rubbers for composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Sunny Jitendra

    The composites, materials, and packaging industries are searching for alternative materials to attain environmental sustainability. Bio-plastics are highly desired and current microbially-derived bio-plastics, such as PHA (poly-(hydroxy alkanoate)), PHB (poly-(hydroxybutyrate)), and PHBV (poly-(beta-hydroxy butyrate-co-valerate)) could be engineered to have similar properties to conventional thermoplastics. Poly-(hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) is a bio-degradable aliphatic polyester that is produced by a wide range of microorganisms. Basic PHB has relatively high glass transition and melting temperatures. To improve flexibility for potential packaging applications, PHB is synthesized with various co-polymers such as Poly-(3-hydroxyvalerate) (HV) to decrease the glass and melting temperatures and, since there is improved melt stability at lower processing temperatures, broaden the processing window. However, previous work has shown that this polymer is too brittle, temperature-sensitive, and hydrophilic to meet packaging material physical requirements. Therefore, the proposed work focuses on addressing the needs for bio-derived and bio-degradable materials by creating a range of composite materials using natural fibers as reinforcement agents in bio-polymers and bio- plastic-rubber matrices. The new materials should possess properties lacking in PHBV and broaden the processing capabilities, elasticity, and improve the mechanical properties. The first approach was to create novel composites using poly-(beta-hydroxy butyrate-co-valerate) (PHBV) combined with fibers from invasive plants such as common reed (Phragmites australis), reed canary grass (Phalaris arundinacea), and water celery ( Vallisneria americana). The composites were manufactured using traditional processing techniques of extrusion compounding followed by injection molding of ASTM type I parts. The effects of each bio-fiber at 2, 5, and 10% loading on the mechanical, morphological, rheological, and thermal

  11. The Nature of Accelerating Modes in PBG Fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noble, TRobert J.; /SLAC

    2011-05-19

    Transverse magnetic (TM) modes with phase velocities at or just below the speed of light, c, are intended to accelerate relativistic particles in hollow-core, photonic band gap (PBG) fibers. These are so-called 'surface defect modes', being lattice modes perturbed by the defect to have their frequencies shifted into the band gap, and they can have any phase velocity. PBG fibers also support so-called 'core defect modes' which are characterized as having phase velocities always greater than c and never cross the light line. In this paper we explore the nature of these two classes of accelerating modes and compare their properties.

  12. Molecular Entanglement and Electrospinnability of Biopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Lingyan; Ziegler, Gregory R.

    2014-01-01

    Electrospinning is a fascinating technique to fabricate micro- to nano-scale fibers from a wide variety of materials. For biopolymers, molecular entanglement of the constituent polymers in the spinning dope was found to be an essential prerequisite for successful electrospinning. Rheology is a powerful tool to probe the molecular conformation and interaction of biopolymers. In this report, we demonstrate the protocol for utilizing rheology to evaluate the electrospinnability of two biopolymers, starch and pullulan, from their dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)/water dispersions. Well-formed starch and pullulan fibers with average diameters in the submicron to micron range were obtained. Electrospinnability was evaluated by visual and microscopic observation of the fibers formed. By correlating the rheological properties of the dispersions to their electrospinnability, we demonstrate that molecular conformation, molecular entanglement, and shear viscosity all affect electrospinning. Rheology is not only useful in solvent system selection and process optimization, but also in understanding the mechanism of fiber formation on a molecular level. PMID:25226274

  13. Genetic Linkage Analysis of the Natural Colored Fiber and Fuzzless Traits in Cotton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Fu-zhen; QIU Xin-mian; WANG Ju-qin; LU Yan-tin; BAO Li-sheng

    2008-01-01

    @@ Genetic linkage relationship of the natural colored fiber and six fuzzless seed germplasms in obsolete backgrounds of Gossypium hirsutum (AD genome) and G.barbadense were analyzed in the past two years.Three lines of natural brown fiber that were controlled by single dominant genes and two lines of green fiber controlled by another single dominant gene.

  14. Impact test on natural fiber reinforced polymer composite materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Chandramohan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this research, natural fibers like Sisal (Agave sisalana, Banana (Musa sepientum & Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa , Sisal and banana (hybrid , Roselle and banana (hybrid and Roselle and sisal (hybrid are fabricated with bio epoxy resin using molding method. In this work, impact strength of Sisal and banana (hybrid, Roselle and banana (hybridand Roselle and sisal (hybrid composite at dry and wet conditions were studied. Impact test were conducted izod impact testing machine. In this work micro structure of the specimens are scanned by the Scanning Electron Microscope.

  15. The Potential of Silk and Silk-Like Proteins as Natural Mucoadhesive Biopolymers for Controlled Drug Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Amanda E.

    2015-01-01

    Drug delivery across mucus membranes is a particularly effective route of administration due to the large surface area. However, the unique environment present at the mucosa necessitates altered drug formulations designed to (1) deliver sensitive biologic molecules, (2) promote intimate contact between the mucosa and the drug, and (3) prolong the drug's local residence time. Thus, the pharmaceutical industry has an interest in drug delivery systems formulated around the use of mucoadhesive polymers. Mucoadhesive polymers, both synthetic and biological, have a history of use in local drug delivery. Prominently featured in the literature are chitosan, alginate, and cellulose derivatives. More recently, silk and silk-like derivatives have been explored for their potential as mucoadhesive polymers. Both silkworms and spiders produce sticky silk-like glue substances, sericin and aggregate silk respectively, that may prove an effective, natural matrix for drug delivery to the mucosa. This mini review will explore the potential of silk and silk-like derivatives as a biocompatible mucoadhesive polymer matrix for local controlled drug delivery. PMID:26636069

  16. The potential of silk and silk-like proteins as natural mucoadhesive biopolymers for controlled drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda E Brooks

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Drug delivery across mucus membranes is a particularly effective route of administration due to the large surface area. However, the unique environment present at the mucosa necessitates altered drug formulations designed to (1 deliver sensitive biologic molecules, (2 promote intimate contact between the mucosa and the drug, and (3 prolong the drug’s local residence time. Thus, the pharmaceutical industry has an interest in drug delivery systems formulated around the use of mucoadhesive polymers. Mucoadhesive polymers, both synthetic and biological, have a history of use in local drug delivery. Prominently featured in the literature are chitosan, alginate, and cellulose derivatives. More recently, silk and silk-like derivatives have been explored for their potential as mucoadhesive polymers. Both silkworms and spiders produce sticky silk-like glue substances, sericin and aggregate silk respectively, that may prove an effective, natural matrix for drug delivery to the mucosa. This mini review will explore the potential of silk and silk-like derivatives as a biocompatible mucoadhesive polymer matrix for local controlled drug delivery.

  17. THRUST FORCE AND TORQUE IN DRILLING THE NATURAL FIBER REINFORCED POLYMER COMPOSITE MATERIALS AND EVALUATION OF DELAMINATION FACTOR FOR BONE GRAFT SUBSTITUTES -A WORK OF FICTION APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. CHANDRAMOHAN

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses about the Natural Fiber Reinforced Composite Materials contribution as bone implants. Biomaterial science is an interdisciplinary field that represents one of the most sophisticated trends in worldwide medical practice. In the last decades, researchers have developed new materials to improve the quality of human life. Owing to the frequent occurrence of bone fractures, it is important to develop a plate material for fixation on the fractured bone. These plate materials have to be lightweight, allow stiffness, and be biocompatible with humans. Drilling is the most frequently employed operation of secondary machining for fiber-reinforced materials, owing to the need for joining fractured bone by means of plate material in the field of orthopedics. An effort to utilize theadvantages offered by renewable resources for the development of biocomposite materials based on biopolymers and natural fibers has been made through fabrication of Natural fiber powdered material (Sisal (Agave sisalana, Banana (Musa sepientum, and Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa reinforced polymer composite plate material by using bio epoxy resin Grade 3554A and Hardner 3554B. Instead of orthopedics alloys such as Titanium, Cobalt chrome, Stainless steel, and Zirconium, this plate material can be used for internal fixationand aso external fixation on human body for fractured bone. The present work focuses on the prediction of thrust force and torque of the natural fiber reinforced polymer composite materials, and the values, compared with the Regression model and the Scheme of Delamination factor / zone using machine vision system, also discussed with the help of Scanning Electron Microscope [SEM].

  18. An experimental investigation of electrical conductivities in biopolymers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    H Mallick; A Sarkar

    2000-08-01

    Gum arabica obtained from acacia plant is a conducting biopolymer. Experiments are carried out on this natural gum arabica. In the present study TGA, ion transference number, transient ionic current, thermal analysis, frequency and temperature variation of a.c. conductivity, Arrhenius plot and volt–ampere characteristics of specimens are carried out. The total electrical conductivity of these biopolymers are comparable to that of synthetic polymers doped with inorganic salts. The ion transference number of these biopolymers show their superionic nature of electrical conduction. The overall conduction mechanism seems to be protonic in nature rather than electronic one.

  19. 我国生物质非织造材料的研究进展%Development of biopolymer nonwoven materials of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈燕; 靳向煜

    2013-01-01

    为替代日趋紧缺的石油、煤、天然气等石化资源,应积极推进可再生、可降解的生物质资源和生物化工新材料的发展。概述了生物质纤维的种类,介绍了我国生物质非织造材料的相关研究现状以及进展。%Renewable , biodegradable biopolymer resources and biochemical new materials should be promoted actively, as alternatives to the dying petrochemical resources like oil , coal, natural gas, etc.Species of biopolymer fibers were summarized and the present research status and progresses of Chinese biopolymer nonwoven materials were introduced .

  20. The Chemical Nature of the Fiber/resin Interface in Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diefendorf, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    Carbon fiber/epoxy resin composites are considered. The nature of the fiber structure and the interaction that occurs at the interface between fiber and matrix are emphasized. Composite toughness can be improved by increased axial tensile and compressive strengths in the fibers. The structure of carbon fibers indicates that the fiber itself can fail transversely, and different transverse microstructures could provide better transverse strengths. The higher surface roughness of lower modulus and surface-treated carbon fibers provides better mechanical interlocking between the fiber and matrix. The chemical nature of the fiber surface was determined, and adsorption of species on this surface can be used to promote wetting and adhesion. Finally, the magnitude of the interfacial bond strength should be controlled such that a range of composites can be made with properties varying from relatively brittle and high interlaminar shear strength to tougher but lower interlaminar shear strength.

  1. Tensile Strength of Natural Fiber Reinforced Polyester Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Al Emran; Awang, Muhd. Khairudin; Sa'at, Mohd Hisham

    2007-05-01

    Nowadays, increasing awareness of replacing synthetic fiber such as glass fiber has emerged due to environmental problems and pollutions. Automotive manufacturers also seek new material especially biodegradable material to be non-load bearing application parts. This present work discussed on the effect of silane treatment on coir fiber reinforced composites. From the results of tensile tests, fibers treated with silane have attained maximum material stiffness. However, to achieve maximum ultimate tensile strength and strain at failure performances, untreated fibers work very well through fiber bridging and internal friction between fiber and polymeric matrix. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations have coincided with these results.

  2. Biopolymer organization upon confinement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marenduzzo, D [SUPA, School of Physics, University of Edinburgh, Mayfield Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom); Micheletti, C [SISSA, International School for Advanced Studies, CNR-INFM Democritos and Italian Institute of Technology, SISSA Unit via Bonomea, 265, Trieste (Italy); Orlandini, E [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Padova and Sezione INFN Padova, Via Marzolo 8, 35131, Padova (Italy)

    2010-07-21

    Biopolymers in vivo are typically subject to spatial restraints, either as a result of molecular crowding in the cellular medium or of direct spatial confinement. DNA in living organisms provides a prototypical example of a confined biopolymer. Confinement prompts a number of biophysics questions. For instance, how can the high level of packing be compatible with the necessity to access and process the genomic material? What mechanisms can be adopted in vivo to avoid the excessive geometrical and topological entanglement of dense phases of biopolymers? These and other fundamental questions have been addressed in recent years by both experimental and theoretical means. A review of the results, particularly of those obtained by numerical studies, is presented here. The review is mostly devoted to DNA packaging inside bacteriophages, which is the best studied example both experimentally and theoretically. Recent selected biophysical studies of the bacterial genome organization and of chromosome segregation in eukaryotes are also covered. (topical review)

  3. 3D-Printed Biopolymers for Tissue Engineering Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoming Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available 3D printing technology has recently gained substantial interest for potential applications in tissue engineering due to the ability of making a three-dimensional object of virtually any shape from a digital model. 3D-printed biopolymers, which combine the 3D printing technology and biopolymers, have shown great potential in tissue engineering applications and are receiving significant attention, which has resulted in the development of numerous research programs regarding the material systems which are available for 3D printing. This review focuses on recent advances in the development of biopolymer materials, including natural biopolymer-based materials and synthetic biopolymer-based materials prepared using 3D printing technology, and some future challenges and applications of this technology are discussed.

  4. Improving the dimensional stability of natural fibers with the fiber polymer penetrant and electron beam method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Sean R.

    Cellulose-based material absorbs or releases moisture in relation to atmospheric conditions. This research looks to minimize dimensional change with the use of low molecular weight (LMW) monomers polymerized by electron beam (EB) ionizing radiation. Sisal, jute, coir, and hemp natural fibers with average natural swelling of 26.55%, 29.46%, 9.06%, and 32.69%, respectively, and glass fiber as control were used for analysis. Three LMW bulk monomers, hydroxyethyl acrylate (HEA), hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA), and polyethylene glycol diacrylate (EGDA), as well as an encapsulating agent, isodecyl acrylate, and cross-linker, ethoxylated trimethylolpropane triacrylate, were evaluated for resin formulation. In total, 1015 specimens were measured for swelling. Moisture uptake characteristics of the specimens were analyzed. A new method of measuring specimen dimensional changes by a light microscope and image analysis software was used. Results indicate dimensional stability improvement of 39.34% - 91.46% for hemp with HEA and cross-linker, and sisal with HEMA and cross-linker respectively.

  5. Processing and characterization of natural cellulose fibers/thermoset polymer composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Vijay Kumar; Thakur, Manju Kumari

    2014-08-30

    Recently natural cellulose fibers from different biorenewable resources have attracted the considerable attraction of research community all around the globe owing to their unique intrinsic properties such as biodegradability, easy availability, environmental friendliness, flexibility, easy processing and impressive physico-mechanical properties. Natural cellulose fibers based materials are finding their applications in a number of fields ranging from automotive to biomedical. Natural cellulose fibers have been frequently used as the reinforcement component in polymers to add the specific properties in the final product. A variety of cellulose fibers based polymer composite materials have been developed using various synthetic strategies. Seeing the immense advantages of cellulose fibers, in this article we discuss the processing of biorenewable natural cellulose fibers; chemical functionalization of cellulose fibers; synthesis of polymer resins; different strategies to prepare cellulose based green polymer composites, and diverse applications of natural cellulose fibers/polymer composite materials. The article provides an in depth analysis and comprehensive knowledge to the beginners in the field of natural cellulose fibers/polymer composites. The prime aim of this review article is to demonstrate the recent development and emerging applications of natural cellulose fibers and their polymer materials.

  6. Time Effects on Morphology and Bonding Ability in Mercerized Natural Fibers for Composite Reinforcement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Williams

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Properties of cellulose-derived fibers are extremely sensitive to surface treatment. Many studies have investigated the effects of varying surface treatment parameters in natural fibers to improve fiber-matrix bonding; however, work is still needed to assist with developing better quality control methods to use these fibers in more load-bearing composites. Kenaf fibers were alkali treated, and the surface and morphology were analyzed to determine how treatment time affected the bonding sites in natural fibers. The mechanical behavior was also characterized, and tensile testing reported a 61% increase in strength and a 25% increase in modulus in fibers treated for 16 hours. The increase in tensile properties was assumed to result from increased intermolecular interaction and increased crystallinity in cellulose, which was supported by XRD. On the other hand, FTIR spectroscopy and XPS showed that the amount of hydroxyl groups needed for fiber-matrix bonding decreased at longer treatment times.

  7. Experimental Study of Fiber Length and Orientation in Injection Molded Natural Fiber/Starch Acetate Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi Peltola

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Composite compounds based on triethyl citrate plasticized starch acetate and hemp and flax fibers were prepared by melt processing. Plasticizer contents from 20 to 35 wt% and fiber contents of 10 and 40 wt% were used. The compounded composites were injection molded to tensile test specimens. The effect of processing, melt viscosity and fiber type on the fiber length was investigated. The lengths of fully processed fibers were determined by dissolving the matrix and measuring the length of the remaining fibers by microscope analysis. A clear reductive effect of the processing on the fiber length was noticed. A reduction of fiber length along the increasing fiber content and the decreasing plasticizer content was also detected. This reduction originated from the increasing shear forces during compounding, which again depended on the increased viscosity of the material. Hemp fibers were shown to remain longer and fibrillate more than flax fibers, leading to higher aspect ratio. Thus, the reinforcement efficiency of hemp fibers by the processing was improved, in contrast with flax fibers. In addition, the analysis of fiber dispersion and orientation showed a good dispersion of fibers in the matrix, and a predominant orientation of the fibers in the melt flow direction.

  8. Experimental Study of Fiber Length and Orientation in Injection Molded Natural Fiber/Starch Acetate Composites

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Composite compounds based on triethyl citrate plasticized starch acetate and hemp and flax fibers were prepared by melt processing. Plasticizer contents from 20 to 35 wt% and fiber contents of 10 and 40 wt% were used. The compounded composites were injection molded to tensile test specimens. The effect of processing, melt viscosity and fiber type on the fiber length was investigated. The lengths of fully processed fibers were determined by dissolving the matrix and measuring the length of the...

  9. Coupled biopolymer networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, J. M.; Zhang, Tao

    2015-03-01

    The actin cytoskeleton provides the cell with structural integrity and allows it to change shape to crawl along a surface, for example. The actin cytoskeleton can be modeled as a semiflexible biopolymer network that modifies its morphology in response to both external and internal stimuli. Just inside the inner nuclear membrane of a cell exists a network of filamentous lamin that presumably protects the heart of the cell nucleus--the DNA. Lamins are intermediate filaments that can also be modeled as semiflexible biopolymers. It turns out that the actin cytoskeletal biopolymer network and the lamin biopolymer network are coupled via a sequence of proteins that bridge the outer and inner nuclear membranes. We, therefore, probe the consequences of such a coupling via numerical simulations to understand the resulting deformations in the lamin network in response to perturbations in the cytoskeletal network. Such study could have implications for mechanical mechanisms of the regulation of transcription, since DNA--yet another semiflexible polymer--contains lamin-binding domains, and, thus, widen the field of epigenetics.

  10. A note on the effect of the fiber curvature on the micromechanical behavior of natural fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Escalante-Solis

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available To better understand the role of the fiber curvature on the tensile properties of short-natural-fiber reinforced composites, a photoelastic model and a finite element analysis were performed in a well characterized henequen fiber-high density polyethylene composite material. It was hypothesized that the angle of orientation of the inclusion and the principal material orientation with respect to the applied load was very important in the reinforcement mechanics. From the photoelastic and finite element analysis it was found that the stress distribution around the fiber inclusion was different on the concave side from that observed on the convex side and an efficient length of stress transfer was estimated to be approximately equal to one third the average fiber length. This approach was used to predict the short-natural-fiber reinforced composite mechanical properties using probabilistic functions modifications of the rule of mixtures models developed by Fukuda-Chow and the Fukuda-Kawata. Recognizing the inherent flexibility that curves the natural fibers during processing, the consideration of a length of one third of the average length l should improve the accuracy of the calculations of the mechanical properties using theoretical models.

  11. A Comparative Study of Natural Fiber and Glass Fiber Fabrics Properties with Metal or Oxide Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusis, Andrej; Pentjuss, Evalds; Bajars, Gunars; Sidorovicha, Uljana; Strazds, Guntis

    2015-03-01

    Rapidly growing global demand for technical textiles industries is stimulated to develop new materials based on hybrid materials (yarns, fabrics) made from natural and glass fibres. The influence of moisture on the electrical properties of metal and metal oxide coated bast (flax, hemp) fibre and glass fibre fabrics are studied by electrical impedance spectroscopy and thermogravimetry. The bast fibre and glass fiber fabrics are characterized with electrical sheet resistance. The method for description of electrical sheet resistance of the metal and metal oxide coated technical textile is discussed. The method can be used by designers to estimate the influence of moisture on technical data of new metal coated hybrid technical textile materials and products.

  12. A Novel Evaluation Tool for Enhancing the Selection of Natural Fibers for Polymeric Composites Based on Fiber Moisture Content Criterion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faris M. AL-Oqla

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A systematic evaluation tool for natural fibers’ capabilities based on moisture content criterion (MCC was developed and introduced as a new evaluation method. This MCC evaluation tool is designed to predict the behavior of the available natural fibers regarding distinctive desirable characteristics under the effect of the moisture absorption phenomenon. Here, the capabilities of different natural fiber types commonly used in industry, in addition to date palm fibers, were systematically investigated based on MCC. The results demonstrated that MCC is capable of predicting the relative reduction of fiber performance regarding a particular beneficial property because of the effect of moisture absorption. The strong agreements between the predicted values of MCC and results reported in the literature verify its usefulness as an evaluation tool and demonstrate its added value steps in predicting the relative behavior of fibers with a minimal range of errors compared with experimental measurements. Therefore, MCC is capable of better evaluating natural fibers regarding distinctive criteria in a systematic manner, leading to more realistic decisions about their capabilities and therefore enhancing the selection process for both better sustainable design possibilities and industrial product development.

  13. Analysis of the Influence of the Fiber Type in Polymer Matrix/Fiber Bond Using Natural Organic Polymer Stabilizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Rivera-Gómez

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This research study compares the effect of polypropylene and wool fibers on the mechanical properties of natural polymer based stabilized soils. Biocomposites are becoming increasingly prevalent and this growth is expected to continue within a number of sectors including building materials. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of different fiber reinforced natural polymer stabilized soils with regards to mechanical properties and fiber adhesion characteristics. The polymer includes alginate, which is used in a wide range of applications but has not been commonly used within engineering and construction applications. In recent years, natural fibers have started to be used as an ecological friendly alternative for soil reinforcement within a variety of construction applications. Test results in this study have compared the effects of adding natural and synthetic fibers to clay soils and discussed the importance of an optimum soil specification. A correlation between the micro structural analysis using scanning electron microscope (SEM, fiber typology, fiber–matrix bonds and the mechanical properties of the stabilized soils is also discussed.

  14. A Review on Natural Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composite and Its Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Layth Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural fibers are getting attention from researchers and academician to utilize in polymer composites due to their ecofriendly nature and sustainability. The aim of this review article is to provide a comprehensive review of the foremost appropriate as well as widely used natural fiber reinforced polymer composites (NFPCs and their applications. In addition, it presents summary of various surface treatments applied to natural fibers and their effect on NFPCs properties. The properties of NFPCs vary with fiber type and fiber source as well as fiber structure. The effects of various chemical treatments on the mechanical and thermal properties of natural fibers reinforcements thermosetting and thermoplastics composites were studied. A number of drawbacks of NFPCs like higher water absorption, inferior fire resistance, and lower mechanical properties limited its applications. Impacts of chemical treatment on the water absorption, tribology, viscoelastic behavior, relaxation behavior, energy absorption flames retardancy, and biodegradability properties of NFPCs were also highlighted. The applications of NFPCs in automobile and construction industry and other applications are demonstrated. It concluded that chemical treatment of the natural fiber improved adhesion between the fiber surface and the polymer matrix which ultimately enhanced physicomechanical and thermochemical properties of the NFPCs.

  15. Numerical Investigation of Characteristic of Anisotropic Thermal Conductivity of Natural Fiber Bundle with Numbered Lumens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guan-Yu Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural fiber bundle like hemp fiber bundle usually includes many small lumens embedded in solid region; thus, it can present lower thermal conduction than that of conventional fibers. In the paper, characteristic of anisotropic transverse thermal conductivity of unidirectional natural hemp fiber bundle was numerically studied to determine the dependence of overall thermal property of the fiber bundle on that of the solid region phase. In order to efficiently predict its thermal property, the fiber bundle was embedded into an imaginary matrix to form a unit composite cell consisting of the matrix and the fiber bundle. Equally, another unit composite cell including an equivalent solid fiber was established to present the homogenization of the fiber bundle. Next, finite element thermal analysis implemented by ABAQUS was conducted in the two established composite cells by applying proper thermal boundary conditions along the boundary of unit cell, and influences of the solid region phase and the equivalent solid fiber on the composites were investigated, respectively. Subsequently, an optional relationship of thermal conductivities of the natural fiber bundle and the solid region was obtained by curve fitting technique. Finally, numerical results from the obtained fitted curves were compared with the analytic Hasselman-Johnson’s results and others to verify the present numerical model.

  16. Mechanical behavior of glass fiber polyester hybrid composite filled with natural fillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, G.; Gupta, A.; Dhanola, A.; Raturi, A.

    2016-09-01

    Now-a-days, the natural fibers and fillers from renewable natural resources offer the potential to act as a reinforcing material for polymer composite material alternative to the use of synthetic fiber like as; glass, carbon and other man-made fibers. Among various natural fibers and fillers like banana, wheat straw, rice husk, wood powder, sisal, jute, hemp etc. are the most widely used natural fibers and fillers due to its advantages like easy availability, low density, low production cost and reasonable physical and mechanical properties This research work presents the effect of natural fillers loading with 5%, 10% and 15% on mechanical behavior of polyester based hybrid composites. The result of test depicted that hybrid composite has far better properties than single fibre glass reinforced composite under impact and flexural loads. However it is found that the hybrid composite have better strength as compared to single glass fibre composites.

  17. Study on structure and wetting characteristic of cattail fibers as natural materials for oil sorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Shengbin; Dong, Ting; Xu, Guangbiao; Wang, Fumei

    2016-12-01

    Cattail fiber is considered as one of the biomasses for oil sorption purposes. In this work, the unique structure and wetting characteristic, as well as the basic mechanisms governing oil uptake of cattail fibers were investigated. Cattail fibers grow in tufts with down-like structure consisting of root, stem, seed and several fibers. A single cattail fiber was bamboo-shaped exhibiting 4-dimensional open spaces with fineness varying between 10 and 17.5 μm, average length at 7.9 ± 1.2 mm. The skeleton of the fiber consists of lignocellulose coated by a hydrophobic wax coating with 45.41% of crystallinity. The exceptional chemical, physical and microstructural properties enable the cattail fiber to be highly hydrophobic and oleophilic. The water droplets could stand on the fibers' surfaces with the contact angles more than 130°, while oil droplets disappear quickly from the fibers' surfaces within several seconds. When used as the sorbent for oil, cattail fibers were found to absorb about 12 g of oil per gram of fibers and retained over 88% of absorbed oil even after 24 h dripping. The unique structure of cattail fibers played an important role in oil sorption. The result proposed that cattail fibers are a promising natural source for the production of oil absorbents.

  18. Development and Characterization of Polymer Eco-Composites Based on Natural Rubber Reinforced with Natural Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria-Daniela Stelescu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Natural rubber composites filled with short natural fibers (flax and sawdust were prepared by blending procedure and the elastomer cross-linking was carried out using benzoyl peroxide. The microbial degradation of composites was carried out by incubating with Aspergillus niger recognized for the ability to grow and degrade a broad range of substrates. The extent of biodegradation was evaluated by weight loss and cross-linking degree study of composites after 2 months incubation in pure shake culture conditions. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR have proved to be precious and valuable instruments for morphological as well as structural characterization of the composites before and after incubation with Aspergillus niger.

  19. Chemical Composition of Natural Fibers and its Influence on their Mechanical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komuraiah, A.; Kumar, N. Shyam; Prasad, B. Durga

    2014-07-01

    The conventional composites are replacing such well-established structural materials as steel, iron, and aluminum very fast. The conventional composites are not easily disposable. To overcome the problems of disposability and pollution, the focus is on the fabrication of natural composite materials. The natural composite materials are made from natural fibers and natural resins. Various natural fibers, such as jute, hemp, coir, cotton, and others are used in industry to fabricate natural composite materials. The fibers are load-carrying members in the composites. The main constituents of the fibers are cellulose, hemicelluloses, lignin, pectin, and wax. The composition of fibers depends on the geographic location where the plants are grown up. The peculiarity is the fact that all the fibers have the same constituents, but with different composition, which makes the fibers to behave differently. In this work, the Pearson rank correlation coefficients are found between the composition and properties of the fibers, and the corresponding equations of regression lines are obtained.

  20. Manufacturing of robust natural fiber preforms utilizing bacterial cellulose as binder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Koon-Yang; Shamsuddin, Siti Rosminah; Fortea-Verdejo, Marta; Bismarck, Alexander

    2014-05-22

    A novel method of manufacturing rigid and robust natural fiber preforms is presented here. This method is based on a papermaking process, whereby loose and short sisal fibers are dispersed into a water suspension containing bacterial cellulose. The fiber and nanocellulose suspension is then filtered (using vacuum or gravity) and the wet filter cake pressed to squeeze out any excess water, followed by a drying step. This will result in the hornification of the bacterial cellulose network, holding the loose natural fibers together. Our method is specially suited for the manufacturing of rigid and robust preforms of hydrophilic fibers. The porous and hydrophilic nature of such fibers results in significant water uptake, drawing in the bacterial cellulose dispersed in the suspension. The bacterial cellulose will then be filtered against the surface of these fibers, forming a bacterial cellulose coating. When the loose fiber-bacterial cellulose suspension is filtered and dried, the adjacent bacterial cellulose forms a network and hornified to hold the otherwise loose fibers together. The introduction of bacterial cellulose into the preform resulted in a significant increase of the mechanical properties of the fiber preforms. This can be attributed to the high stiffness and strength of the bacterial cellulose network. With this preform, renewable high performance hierarchical composites can also be manufactured by using conventional composite production methods, such as resin film infusion (RFI) or resin transfer molding (RTM). Here, we also describe the manufacturing of renewable hierarchical composites using double bag vacuum assisted resin infusion.

  1. Extraction and characterization of natural cellulose fibers from maize tassel

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Maepa, CE

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available treatment. FT-IR spectroscopic analysis of maize tassel fibers confirmed that this chemical treatment also shows the way to partial elimination of hemicelluloses and lignin from the structure of the maize tassel fibers. X-ray diffraction results indicated...

  2. Biopolymers and supramolecular polymers as biomaterials for biomedical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Freeman, Ronit; Boekhoven, Job; Dickerson, Matthew B.; Naik, Rajesh R.; Stupp, Samuel I.

    2015-01-01

    Protein- and peptide-based structural biopolymers are abundant building blocks of biological systems. Either in their natural forms, such as collagen, silk or fibronectin, or as related synthetic materials they can be used in various technologies. An emerging area is that of biomimetic materials inspired by protein-based biopolymers, which are made up of small molecules rather than macromolecules and can therefore be described as supramolecular polymers. These materials are very useful in bio...

  3. Rheology of Biopolymer Solutions and Gels

    OpenAIRE

    David R. Picout; Ross-Murphy, Simon B.

    2003-01-01

    Rheological techniques and methods have been employed for many decades in the characterization of polymers. Originally developed and used on synthetic polymers, rheology has then found much interest in the field of natural (bio) polymers. This review concentrates on introducing the fundamentals of rheology and on discussing the rheological aspects and properties of the two major classes of biopolymers: polysaccharides and proteins. An overview of both their solution properties (dilute to semi...

  4. Rheology of Biopolymer Solutions and Gels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R. Picout

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheological techniques and methods have been employed for many decades in the characterization of polymers. Originally developed and used on synthetic polymers, rheology has then found much interest in the field of natural (bio polymers. This review concentrates on introducing the fundamentals of rheology and on discussing the rheological aspects and properties of the two major classes of biopolymers: polysaccharides and proteins. An overview of both their solution properties (dilute to semi-dilute and gel properties is described.

  5. Experimental Study of Fiber Length and Orientation in Injection Molded Natural Fiber/Starch Acetate Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peltola, Heidi; Madsen, Bo; Joffe, Roberts

    2011-01-01

    Composite compounds based on triethyl citrate plasticized starch acetate and hemp and flax fibers were prepared by melt processing. Plasticizer contents from 20 to 35 wt% and fiber contents of 10 and 40 wt% were used. The compounded composites were injection molded to tensile test specimens...

  6. Reactive processing of textile-natural fiber reinforced anionic polyamide-6 composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kan, Ze; Chen, Peng; Liu, Zhengying; Feng, Jianmin; Yang, Mingbo [College of Polymer Science and Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Polymer Materials Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065, Sichuan (China)

    2015-05-22

    Nowadays natural fiber, used in reinforced composites, is widely concerned. However, no natural fiber reinforced reactive thermoplastic polymer grades had been prepared so far. Through our studies, it was demonstrated that there was a severe retardation and discoloration occurred in the reactive processing between anionic polyamide-6 (APA-6) and natural fiber, which result in incomplete polymerization when put together. In order to solve the problem, two methods were adopted in this paper, which are fiber pretreatment and usage of a new-style initiator called caprolactam magnesium bromide. The former is to remove sizing agent and impurities on the surface of fiber, and the latter is to weaken the side reactions between APA-6 and natural fiber by the nature of its lower reactivity and weaker alkaline. In cooperation with both methods, the severe retardation and discoloration had been improved significantly, so that the polymerization of APA-6 in natural fiber was occurred smoothly. Following textile-natural fiber reinforced APA-6 composites with an average thickness of 2.5 mm and a fiber volume content of 50% was prepared by vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM). The soxhlet extraction, dilute solution viscometry and differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) measurements respectively suggested the degree of conversion, viscosity-average molar mass and crystallization of composites was up to 94%, 11.3×104 and 50%. Remarkable improvement of mechanical properties were achieved through dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), tensile and three-point bending test. Favorable interfacial adhesion and wettability were revealed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation. Therefore, all of the above good performance make this new-style and environmentally friendly composites have broad application prospects.

  7. The Mechanism of Negative-ion Generation of Natural Fiber Fabrics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BI Peng-yu; CHEN Yue-hua; LI Ru-qin

    2007-01-01

    Generally there are three kinds of substances used as negative-ion generator in textiles, natural silicate minerals (ceramic/tourmaline), natural rare-earth minerals and natural sediment with ultra-fine pores. Based on different additive, the mechanism of negative-ion generation is largely divided into three kinds, the piezoelectricity and pyroelectricity of tourmaline crystal, air ionization caused by low-level radiation and breaking up of the clusters of moisture in air when going through the ultra-fine pores of natural sediment. In this paper, the negative-ion generating properties of natural fiber fabrics-cotton, wool, silk and linen were first proposed. By some kind of physical stimulation, rubbing or vibrating, natural fiber fabrics without any additive could also emit negative ions. Considering that the piezoelectric effect was observed in wool fibers, silk fibers and cellulose fibers, the piezoelectricity was studied as a mechanism of negative-ion generation of natural fiber fabrics. Another possible mechanism was the triboelectricity produced by the sense of rubbing or vibrating and tip discharge of hairiness. The final experiment results verified that the latter would be the main reason, and the electrolytic dissociation of moisture was also ontributing to negative-ion generation.

  8. A Novel Approach for Entrapment of Biopolymers in Silica Matrix by Sol-gel Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu.Shchipunov

    2007-01-01

    1 Results The entrapment of biopolymers into silica by the sol-gel technique meets with incompatibility of inorganic and bioorganic components. The aim was to develop a compatible procedure biomimicking the biomineralization processes in the living nature. A suggested solution in Ref.[1-2] for the biopolymer entrapment into silica matrix is based on a novel silica precursor. The developed approach is distinguished from the common technique for fabrication of hybrid biopolymer-silica nanocomposite materi...

  9. Production of novel microbial biopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microorganisms are well known to produce a wide variety of biobased polymers. These biopolymers have found a wide range of commercial uses, including food, feed, and consumer and industrial products. The production and possible uses of several novel biopolymers from both bacteria and fungi will be d...

  10. Populus seed fibers as a natural source for production of oil super absorbents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likon, Marko; Remškar, Maja; Ducman, Vilma; Švegl, Franc

    2013-01-15

    The genus Populus, which includes poplars, cottonwoods and aspen trees, represents a huge natural source of fibers with exceptional physical properties. In this study, the oil absorption properties of poplar seed hair fibers obtained from Populus nigra italica when tested with high-density motor oil and diesel fuel are reported. Poplar seed hair fibers are hollow hydrophobic microtubes with an external diameter between 3 and 12 μm, an average length of 4±1 mm and average tube wall thickness of 400±100 nm. The solid skeleton of the hollow fibers consists of lignocellulosic material coated by a hydrophobic waxy coating. The exceptional chemical, physical and microstructural properties of poplar seed hair fibers enable super-absorbent behavior with high absorption capacity for heavy motor oil and diesel fuel. The absorption values of 182-211 g heavy oil/g fiber and 55-60 g heavy oil/g fiber for packing densities of 0.005 g/cm(3) and 0.02 g/cm(3), respectively, surpass all known natural absorbents. Thus, poplar seed hair fibers obtained from Populus nigra italica and other trees of the genus Populus are an extremely promising natural source for the production of oil super absorbents.

  11. Manufacturing and Structural Feasibility of Natural Fiber Reinforced Polymeric Structural Insulated Panels for Panelized Construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasim Uddin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural fibers are emerging in the fields of automobile and aerospace industries to replace the parts such as body panels, seats, and other parts subjected to higher bending strength. In the construction industries, they have the potential to replace the wood and oriented strand boards (OSB laminates in the structural insulated panels (SIPs. They possess numerous advantages over traditional OSB SIPs such as being environmental friendly, recyclable, energy efficient, inherently flood resistant, and having higher strength and wind resistance. This paper mainly focuses on the manufacturing feasibility and structural characterization of natural fiber reinforced structural insulated panels (NSIPs using natural fiber reinforced polymeric (NFRP laminates as skin. To account for the use of natural fibers, the pretreatments are required on natural fibers prior to use in NFRP laminates, and, to address this issue properly, the natural fibers were given bleaching pretreatments. To this end, flexure test and low-velocity impact (LVI tests were carried out on NSIPs in order to evaluate the response of NSIPs under sudden impact loading and uniform bending conditions typical of residential construction. The paper also includes a comparison of mechanical properties of NSIPs with OSB SIPs and G/PP SIPs. The results showed significant increase in the mechanical properties of resulting NSIP panels mainly a 53% increase in load-carrying capacity compared to OSB SIPs. The bending modulus of NSIPs is 190% higher than OSB SIPs and 70% weight reduction compared to OSB SIPs.

  12. Mechanical Properties of Natural Jute Fabric/Jute Mat Fiber Reinforced Polymer Matrix Hybrid Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsayed A. Elbadry

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recycled needle punched jute fiber mats as a first natural fiber reinforcement system and these jute mats used as a core needle punched with recycled jute fabric cloths as skin layers as a second natural fiber reinforcement system were used for unsaturated polyester matrix composites via modifying the hand lay-up technique with resin preimpregnation into the jute fiber in vacuum. The effect of skin jute fabric on the tensile and bending properties of jute mat composites was investigated for different fiber weight contents. Moreover, the notch sensitivity of these composites was also compared by using the characteristic distance do calculated by Finite Element Method (FEM. The results showed that the tensile and flexural properties of jute mat composites increased by increasing the fiber weight content and by adding the jute fabric as skin layers. On the other hand, by adding the skins, the characteristic distance decreased and, therefore, the notch sensitivity of the composites increased. The fracture behavior investigated by SEM showed that extensive fiber pull-out mechanism was revealed at the tension side of jute mat composites under the bending load and by adding the jute cloth, the failure mode of jute mat was changed to fiber bridge mechanism.

  13. Hybrid boron nitride-natural fiber composites for enhanced thermal conductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Changlei; Garcia, Andres C; Shi, Sheldon Q; Qiu, Ying; Warner, Nathaniel; Wu, Yingji; Cai, Liping; Rizvi, Hussain R; D'Souza, Nandika A; Nie, Xu

    2016-10-05

    Thermal conductivity was dramatically increased after adding natural fiber into hexagonal boron nitride (hBN)/epoxy composites. Although natural fiber does not show high-thermal conductivity itself, this study found that the synergy of natural fiber with hBN could significantly improve thermal conductivity, compared with that solely using hBN. A design of mixtures approach using constant fibers with increasing volume fractions of hBN was examined and compared. The thermal conductivity of the composite containing 43.6% hBN, 26.3% kenaf fiber and 30.1% epoxy reached 6.418 W m(-1) K(-1), which was 72.3% higher than that (3.600 W m(-1) K(-1)) of the 69.0% hBN and 31.0% epoxy composite. Using the scanning electron microscope (SEM) and micro computed tomography (micro-CT), it was observed that the hBN powders were well distributed and ordered on the fiber surfaces enhancing the ceramic filler's interconnection, which may be the reason for the increase in thermal conductivity. Additionally, the results from mechanical and dynamic mechanical tests showed that performances dramatically improved after adding kenaf fibers into the hBN/epoxy composite, potentially benefiting the composite's use as an engineered material.

  14. Hybrid boron nitride-natural fiber composites for enhanced thermal conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Changlei; Garcia, Andres C.; Shi, Sheldon Q.; Qiu, Ying; Warner, Nathaniel; Wu, Yingji; Cai, Liping; Rizvi, Hussain R.; D’Souza, Nandika A.; Nie, Xu

    2016-10-01

    Thermal conductivity was dramatically increased after adding natural fiber into hexagonal boron nitride (hBN)/epoxy composites. Although natural fiber does not show high-thermal conductivity itself, this study found that the synergy of natural fiber with hBN could significantly improve thermal conductivity, compared with that solely using hBN. A design of mixtures approach using constant fibers with increasing volume fractions of hBN was examined and compared. The thermal conductivity of the composite containing 43.6% hBN, 26.3% kenaf fiber and 30.1% epoxy reached 6.418 W m‑1 K‑1, which was 72.3% higher than that (3.600 W m‑1 K‑1) of the 69.0% hBN and 31.0% epoxy composite. Using the scanning electron microscope (SEM) and micro computed tomography (micro-CT), it was observed that the hBN powders were well distributed and ordered on the fiber surfaces enhancing the ceramic filler’s interconnection, which may be the reason for the increase in thermal conductivity. Additionally, the results from mechanical and dynamic mechanical tests showed that performances dramatically improved after adding kenaf fibers into the hBN/epoxy composite, potentially benefiting the composite’s use as an engineered material.

  15. Abiotic origin of biopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oro, J.; Stephen-Sherwood, E.

    1976-01-01

    A variety of methods have been investigated in different laboratories for the polymerization of amino acids and nucleotides under abiotic conditions. They include (1) thermal polymerization; (2) direct polymerization of certain amino acid nitriles, amides, or esters; (3) polymerization using polyphosphate esters; (4) polymerization under aqueous or drying conditions at moderate temperatures using a variety of simple catalysts or condensing agents like cyanamide, dicyandiamide, or imidazole; and (5) polymerization under similar mild conditions but employing activated monomers or abiotically synthesized high-energy compounds such as adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP). The role and significance of these methods for the synthesis of oligopeptides and oligonucleotides under possible primitive-earth conditions is evaluated. It is concluded that the more recent approach involving chemical processes similar to those used by contemporary living organisms appears to offer a reasonable solution to the prebiotic synthesis of these biopolymers.

  16. Processes for xanthomonas biopolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelskirchen, K.; Stein, W.; Bahn, M.; Schieferstein, L.; Schindler, J.

    1984-03-27

    A process is described for producing xanthan gum in which the use of a stable, water-in-oil emulsion in the fermentation medium markedly lowers the viscosity of the medium, resulting in lower energy requirements for the process, and also resulting in enhanced yields of the biopolymer. In such an emulsion, the aqueous fermentation phase, with its microbial growth and metabolic processes, takes place in a finely dispersed homogeneous oil phase. The viscosity increase in each droplet of the aqueous nutrient solution will not noticeably affect this mixture in the fermenter because the viscosity of the reaction mixture in the fermenter is determined primarily by the viscosity of the oil phase. 45 claims

  17. Chemical modeling of acid-base properties of soluble biopolymers derived from municipal waste treatment materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabasso, Silvia; Berto, Silvia; Rosato, Roberta; Marinos, Janeth Alicia Tafur; Ginepro, Marco; Zelano, Vincenzo; Daniele, Pier Giuseppe; Montoneri, Enzo

    2015-02-04

    This work reports a study of the proton-binding capacity of biopolymers obtained from different materials supplied by a municipal biowaste treatment plant located in Northern Italy. One material was the anaerobic fermentation digestate of the urban wastes organic humid fraction. The others were the compost of home and public gardening residues and the compost of the mix of the above residues, digestate and sewage sludge. These materials were hydrolyzed under alkaline conditions to yield the biopolymers by saponification. The biopolymers were characterized by 13C NMR spectroscopy, elemental analysis and potentiometric titration. The titration data were elaborated to attain chemical models for interpretation of the proton-binding capacity of the biopolymers obtaining the acidic sites concentrations and their protonation constants. The results obtained with the models and by NMR spectroscopy were elaborated together in order to better characterize the nature of the macromolecules. The chemical nature of the biopolymers was found dependent upon the nature of the sourcing materials.

  18. Modulus enhancement of natural rubber through the dispersion size reduction of protein/fiber aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Improved mechanical properties of natural rubber are required for various rubber applications. Aggregates of protein and fiber that constitute soy protein concentrate were shear-reduced and used to enhance the tensile modulus of natural rubber. The aqueous dispersion of the shear-reduced aggregates ...

  19. Molecularly Designed Stabilized Asymmetric Hollow Fiber Membranes for Aggressive Natural Gas Separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gongping; Li, Nanwen; Miller, Stephen J; Kim, Danny; Yi, Shouliang; Labreche, Ying; Koros, William J

    2016-10-24

    New rigid polyimides with bulky CF3 groups were synthesized and engineered into high-performance hollow fiber membranes. The enhanced rotational barrier provided by properly positioned CF3 side groups prohibited fiber transition layer collapse during cross-linking, thereby greatly improving CO2 /CH4 separation performance compared to conventional materials for aggressive natural gas feeds. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Biopolymers and supramolecular polymers as biomaterials for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Ronit; Boekhoven, Job; Dickerson, Matthew B; Naik, Rajesh R; Stupp, Samuel I

    2015-12-01

    Protein- and peptide-based structural biopolymers are abundant building blocks of biological systems. Either in their natural forms, such as collagen, silk or fibronectin, or as related synthetic materials they can be used in various technologies. An emerging area is that of biomimetic materials inspired by protein-based biopolymers, which are made up of small molecules rather than macromolecules and can therefore be described as supramolecular polymers. These materials are very useful in biomedical applications because of their ability to imitate the extracellular matrix both in architecture and their capacity to signal cells. This article describes important features of the natural extracellular matrix and highlight how these features are being incorporated into biomaterials composed of biopolymers and supramolecular polymers. We particularly focus on the structures, properties, and functions of collagen, fibronectin, silk, and the supramolecular polymers inspired by them as biomaterials for regenerative medicine.

  1. Microscopic anthropogenic litter in terrestrial birds from Shanghai, China: Not only plastics but also natural fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shiye; Zhu, Lixin; Li, Daoji

    2016-04-15

    The level of contamination by microscopic anthropogenic litter (0.5-5mm) in terrestrial ecosystems is not well understood. After chemical digestion in 10% KOH, microscopic anthropogenic litter from the gastrointestinal tracts of 17 terrestrial birds was identified and categorized under a stereomicroscope based on its physical properties and melting tests. In total, 364 items from 16 birds were identified as microscopic anthropogenic litter, ranging in size from 0.5 to 8.5mm. No relationship between plastic load and body condition was found. Natural fibers, plastic fibers and fragmented plastics represented, respectively, 37.4% (136 items), 54.9% (200 items) and 7.7% (28 items) of total litter items. Small sample sizes limited our ability to draw strong conclusions about the metabolism of natural fibers, but the decline in the proportion of natural fibers from the esophagus to stomach to intestine suggested that they may be digestible. Particles smaller than 5mm represented more than 90% of the total number of pollutant items. Particles with colors in the mid-tones and fibrous shapes were overwhelmingly common particles. The results reflect pollution by microscopic anthropogenic litter in the terrestrial ecosystem of the study area. Microscopic natural fibers, which may disperse and adsorb chemical pollutants differently from microplastic and may pose an even greater risk, are in urgent need of further research.

  2. A Review on Potentiality of Nano Filler/Natural Fiber Filled Polymer Hybrid Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naheed Saba

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The increasing demand for greener and biodegradable materials leading to the satisfaction of society requires a compelling towards the advancement of nano-materials science. The polymeric matrix materials with suitable and proper filler, better filler/matrix interaction together with advanced and new methods or approaches are able to develop polymeric composites which shows great prospective applications in constructions and buildings, automotive, aerospace and packaging industries. The biodegradability of the natural fibers is considered as the most important and interesting aspects of their utilization in polymeric materials. Nanocomposite shows considerable applications in different fields because of larger surface area, and greater aspect ratio, with fascinating properties. Being environmentally friendly, applications of nanocomposites offer new technology and business opportunities for several sectors, such as aerospace, automotive, electronics, and biotechnology industries. Hybrid bio-based composites that exploit the synergy between natural fibers in a nano-reinforced bio-based polymer can lead to improved properties along with maintaining environmental appeal. This review article intended to present information about diverse classes of natural fibers, nanofiller, cellulosic fiber based composite, nanocomposite, and natural fiber/nanofiller-based hybrid composite with specific concern to their applications. It will also provide summary of the emerging new aspects of nanotechnology for development of hybrid composites for the sustainable and greener environment.

  3. Sustainably Sourced, Thermally Resistant, Radiation Hard Biopolymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugel, Diane

    2011-01-01

    This material represents a breakthrough in the production, manufacturing, and application of thermal protection system (TPS) materials and radiation shielding, as this represents the first effort to develop a non-metallic, non-ceramic, biomaterial-based, sustainable TPS with the capability to also act as radiation shielding. Until now, the standing philosophy for radiation shielding involved carrying the shielding at liftoff or utilizing onboard water sources. This shielding material could be grown onboard and applied as needed prior to different radiation landscapes (commonly seen during missions involving gravitational assists). The material is a bioplastic material. Bioplastics are any combination of a biopolymer and a plasticizer. In this case, the biopolymer is a starch-based material and a commonly accessible plasticizer. Starch molecules are composed of two major polymers: amylase and amylopectin. The biopolymer phenolic compounds are common to the ablative thermal protection system family of materials. With similar constituents come similar chemical ablation processes, with the potential to have comparable, if not better, ablation characteristics. It can also be used as a flame-resistant barrier for commercial applications in buildings, homes, cars, and heater firewall material. The biopolymer is observed to undergo chemical transformations (oxidative and structural degradation) at radiation doses that are 1,000 times the maximum dose of an unmanned mission (10-25 Mrad), indicating that it would be a viable candidate for robust radiation shielding. As a comparison, the total integrated radiation dose for a three-year manned mission to Mars is 0.1 krad, far below the radiation limit at which starch molecules degrade. For electron radiation, the biopolymer starches show minimal deterioration when exposed to energies greater than 180 keV. This flame-resistant, thermal-insulating material is non-hazardous and may be sustainably sourced. It poses no hazardous

  4. Physical and Degradable Properties of Mulching Films Prepared from Natural Fibers and Biodegradable Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijian Tan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The use of plastic film in agriculture has the serious drawback of producing vast quantities of waste. In this work, films were prepared from natural fibers and biodegradable polymers as potential substitutes for the conventional non-biodegradable plastic film used as mulching material in agricultural production. The physical properties (e.g., mechanical properties, heat preservation, water permeability, and photopermeability and degradation characteristics (evaluated by micro-organic culture testing and soil burial testing of the films were studied in both laboratory and field tests. The experimental results indicated that these fiber/polymer films exhibited favorable physical properties that were sufficient for use in mulching film applications. Moreover, the degradation degree of the three tested films decreased in the following order: fiber/starch (ST film > fiber/poly(vinyl alcohol (PVA film > fiber/polyacrylate (PA film. The fiber/starch and fiber/PVA films were made from completely biodegradable materials and demonstrated the potential to substitute non-biodegradable films.

  5. Natural fiber composite design and characterization for limit stress prediction in multiaxial stress state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher C. Ihueze

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the design of natural fiber composites and analysis of multiaxial stresses in relation to yield limit stresses of composites loaded off the fibers axis. ASTM D638-10 standard for tensile test was used to design and compose composites of plantain fiber reinforced polyester (PFRP. While the rule of mixtures was used in the evaluation of properties of composites in the fiber direction the evaluation of properties perpendicular or transverse to the fiber direction was done based on the value of the orthogonal stresses evaluated using ANSYS finite element software, the application of the Brintrup equation and Halpin–Tai equation. The yield strength for the plantain empty fruit bunch fiber reinforced polyester resin (PEFBFRP was estimated as 33.69 MPa while the yield strength of plantain pseudo stem fiber reinforced polyester resin (PPSFRP was estimated as 29.24 MPa. Above all, the PEFBFRP with average light absorbance peak of 45.47 was found to have better mechanical properties than the PPSFRP with average light absorbance peak of 45.77.

  6. Experimental evaluation and simulation of volumetric shrinkage and warpage on polymeric composite reinforced with short natural fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Jonnathan D.; Fajardo, Jorge I.; Cuji, Alvaro R.; García, Jaime A.; Garzón, Luis E.; López, Luis M.

    2015-09-01

    A polymeric natural fiber-reinforced composite is developed by extrusion and injection molding process. The shrinkage and warpage of high-density polyethylene reinforced with short natural fibers of Guadua angustifolia Kunth are analyzed by experimental measurements and computer simulations. Autodesk Moldflow® and Solid Works® are employed to simulate both volumetric shrinkage and warpage of injected parts at different configurations: 0 wt.%, 20 wt.%, 30 wt.% and 40 wt.% reinforcing on shrinkage and warpage behavior of polymer composite. Become evident the restrictive effect of reinforcing on the volumetric shrinkage and warpage of injected parts. The results indicate that volumetric shrinkage of natural composite is reduced up to 58% with fiber increasing, whereas the warpage shows a reduction form 79% to 86% with major fiber content. These results suggest that it is a highly beneficial use of natural fibers to improve the assembly properties of polymeric natural fiber-reinforced composites.

  7. Proton conduction in biopolymer exopolysaccharide succinoglycan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kweon, Jin Jung [Department of Physics, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32310 (United States); Lee, Kyu Won; Kim, Hyojung; Lee, Cheol Eui, E-mail: rscel@korea.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Seunho [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology and UBITA, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Chanho [Naraebio Research Laboratories, 177 Dangha-ri, Bongdam-eup, Hawseong-si 445-892 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-07

    Protonic currents play a vital role in electrical signalling in living systems. It has been suggested that succinoglycan plays a specific role in alfalfa root nodule development, presumably acting as the signaling molecules. In this regard, charge transport and proton dynamics in the biopolymer exopolysaccharide succinoglycan have been studied by means of electrical measurements and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In particular, a dielectric dispersion in the system has revealed that the electrical conduction is protonic rather electronic. Besides, our laboratory- and rotating-frame {sup 1}H NMR measurements have elucidated the nature of the protonic conduction, activation of the protonic motion being associated with a glass transition.

  8. Proton conduction in biopolymer exopolysaccharide succinoglycan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kweon, Jin Jung; Lee, Kyu Won; Kim, Hyojung; Lee, Cheol Eui; Jung, Seunho; Kwon, Chanho

    2014-07-01

    Protonic currents play a vital role in electrical signalling in living systems. It has been suggested that succinoglycan plays a specific role in alfalfa root nodule development, presumably acting as the signaling molecules. In this regard, charge transport and proton dynamics in the biopolymer exopolysaccharide succinoglycan have been studied by means of electrical measurements and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In particular, a dielectric dispersion in the system has revealed that the electrical conduction is protonic rather electronic. Besides, our laboratory- and rotating-frame 1H NMR measurements have elucidated the nature of the protonic conduction, activation of the protonic motion being associated with a glass transition.

  9. Click chemistry modification of natural keratin fibers for sustained shrink-resist performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dan; Cai, Jackie Y; Church, Jeffrey S; Wang, Lijing

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces a novel chemical treatment for achieving sustained shrink-resist performance on natural keratin fibers. The new treatment involves the controlled reduction of keratin in the cuticle region of the fiber, and the application of a water soluble diacrylate, namely glycerol 1,3-diglycerolate diacrylate (GDA), on the reduced keratin substrate. The acrylate groups of the GDA react with cysteine residues in the reduced keratin through thiol-ene click reactions at room temperature, leading to GDA grafting and the formation of GDA crosslinks in the keratin structure. The modified substrates were characterized by infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy, and assessed for its shrink-resistance and wet burst strength. This chemical modification has shown to alter the fiber surface morphology and hydrophilicity, resulting in substantially improved shrink-resistance with good fiber strength retention. Possible shrink-resistance mechanisms were also discussed.

  10. Natural Mallow Fiber-Reinforced Epoxy Composite for Ballistic Armor Against Class III-A Ammunition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Lucio Fabio Cassiano; Holanda, Luane Isquerdo Ferreira; Louro, Luis Henrique Leme; Monteiro, Sergio Neves; Gomes, Alaelson Vieira; Lima, Édio Pereira

    2017-10-01

    Epoxy matrix composites reinforced with up to 30 vol pct of continuous and aligned natural mallow fibers were for the first time ballistic tested as personal armor against class III-A 9 mm FMJ ammunition. The ballistic efficiency of these composites was assessed by measuring the dissipated energy and residual velocity after the bullet perforation. The results were compared to those in similar tests of aramid fabric (Kevlar™) commonly used in vests for personal protections. Visual inspection and scanning electron microscopy analysis of impact-fractured samples revealed failure mechanisms associated with fiber pullout and rupture as well as epoxy cracking. As compared to Kevlar™, the mallow fiber composite displayed practically the same ballistic efficiency. However, there is a reduction in both weight and cost, which makes the mallow fiber composites a promising material for personal ballistic protection.

  11. Comparing Various Type of Natural Fibers as Filler in TPU: Mechanical Properties, Morphological and Oil Absorption Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahad Nor Azwin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The idea of using natural fibers as filler in various polymers has been extensively studied. Various types of natural fibers and polymers have been identified and it can be varied according to the particular application and the two main composite materials will have advantages and disadvantages of each. However, natural fibers are usually selected as filler because it is readily available and environmentally friendly, inexpensive, non-toxic, biodegradable and still have good characteristics for a variety of uses. In this study, four types of natural fiber have been used which; coconut shell, coconut fiber, corn cob, and pineapple skin, as fillers in thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU. The mixing process conducted through melt mixing techniques. The percentage of TPU and natural fibers are 100/0, 95/5, 90/10 and 85/15. Different type of fiber will affect the mechanical properties of the composites and have been studied through tensile testing. It showed that the result for pineapple fiber at 5% was the highest and can also be related to the characterizations of this composite that have been studied via the SEM morphology. Swelling testing is also having been done to prove the absorbency ability by natural fiber composites in cooking oil and engine oil. Then it concluded that the pineapple fiber absorbed large amount of both oil compared to others.

  12. Biopolymers as transdermal drug delivery systems in dermatology therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basavaraj, K H; Johnsy, George; Navya, M A; Rashmi, R; Siddaramaiah

    2010-01-01

    The skin is considered a complex organ for drug delivery because of its structure. Drug delivery systems are designed for the controlled release of drugs through the skin into the systemic circulation, maintaining consistent efficacy and reducing the dose of the drugs and their related side effects. Transdermal drug delivery represents one of the most rapidly advancing areas of novel drug delivery. The excellent impervious nature of the skin is the greatest challenge that must be overcome for successful drug delivery. Today, polymers have been proven to be successful for long-term drug delivery applications as no single polymer can satisfy all of the requirements. Biopolymers in the field of dermal application are rare and the mechanisms that affect skin absorption are almost unknown. Biopolymers are widely used as drug delivery systems, but as such the use of biopolymers as drug delivery systems in dermatologic therapy is still in progress. Commonly used biopolymers include hydrocolloids, alginates, hydrogels, polyurethane, collagen, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid), chitosan, proteins and peptides, pectin, siRNAs, and hyaluronic acid. These new and exciting methods for drug delivery are already increasing the number and quality of dermal and transdermal therapies. This article reviews current research on biopolymers and focuses on their potential as drug carriers, particularly in relation to the dermatologic aspects of their use.

  13. Continuous microcellular foaming of polylactic acid/natural fiber composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Acosta, Carlos A.

    Poly(lactic acid) (PLA), a biodegradable thermoplastic derived from renewable resources, stands out as a substitute to petroleum-based plastics. In spite of its excellent properties, commercial applications are limited because PLA is more expensive and more brittle than traditional petroleum-based resins. PLA can be blended with cellulosic fibers to reduce material cost. However, the lowered cost comes at the expense of flexibility and impact strength, which can be enhanced through the production of microcellular structures in the composite. Microcellular foaming uses inert gases (e.g., carbon dioxide) as physical blowing agents to make cellular structures with bubble sizes of less than 10 microm and cell-population densities (number of bubbles per unit volume) greater than 109 cells/cm³. These unique characteristics result in a significant increase in toughness and elongation at break (ductility) compared with unfoamed parts because the presence of small bubbles can blunt the crack-tips increasing the energy needed to propagate the crack. Microcellular foams have been produced through a two step batch process. First, large amounts of gas are dissolved in the solid plastic under high pressure (sorption process) to form a single-phase solution. Second, a thermodynamic instability (sudden drop in solubility) triggers cell nucleation and growth as the gas diffuses out of the plastic. Batch production of microcellular PLA has addressed some of the drawbacks of PLA. Unfortunately, the batch foaming process is not likely to be implemented in the industrial production of foams because it is not cost-effective. This study investigated the continuous microcellular foaming process of PLA and PLA/wood-fiber composites. The effects of the processing temperature and material compositions on the melt viscosity, pressure drop rate, and cell-population density were examined in order to understand the nucleation mechanisms in neat and filled PLA foams. The results indicated that

  14. Precision biopolymers from protein precursors for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuan, Seah Ling; Wu, Yuzhou; Weil, Tanja

    2013-03-12

    The synthesis of biohybrid materials with tailored functional properties represents a topic of emerging interest. Combining proteins as natural, macromolecular building blocks, and synthetic polymers opens access to giant brush-like biopolymers of high structural definition. The properties of these precision polypeptide copolymers can be tailored through various chemical modifications along their polypeptide backbone, which expands the repertoire of known protein-based materials to address biomedical applications. In this article, the synthetic strategies for the design of precision biopolymers from proteins through amino acid specific conjugation reagents are highlighted and the different functionalization strategies, their characterization, and applications are discussed.

  15. Effects of weathering on color loss of natural fiber : thermoplastic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert H. Falk; Colin. Felton; Thomas. Lundin

    2000-01-01

    The technology currently exists to manufacture natural fiber-thermoplastic composites from recycled materials. Development of commodity building products from these composites would open huge markets for waste-based materials in the United States. To date, the construction industry has only accepted wood-thermoplastic composite lumber and only for limited applications...

  16. Effects of weathering on color loss of natural fiber thermoplastic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    R.H. Falk; C. Felton; T. Lundin

    2001-01-01

    The technology currently exists to manufacture natural fiber thermoplastic composites from recycled materials. Development of commodity-building products from these composites would open up huge markets for waste-based materials in the US. To date, the construction industry has only accepted wood thermoplastic composite lumber (and only for limited applications). In...

  17. Polymer Selection Approach for Commonly and Uncommonly Used Natural Fibers Under Uncertainty Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    AL-Oqla, Faris M.; Sapuan, S. M.

    2015-07-01

    Factors like awareness of the scarcity of non-renewable natural resources, high petroleum prices, and demands for environmental sustainability, as well as reducing the amount of environmental pollution, have led to a renewed interest in natural fiber reinforced polymer composites as a potential bio-based material type. The best polymer matrix type in view of the wide range of conflicting criteria to form a polymeric-based composite material suitable for sustainable industry under an uncertainty environment has still not been sufficiently determined. This work introduces a selection model to evaluate the available polymers for natural fibers to enhance the industrial sustainability theme. The model built was developed to evaluate various polymer types and to determine their relative merits taking account of various conflicting criteria for both commonly used and uncommonly used natural fibers utilizing the analytical hierarchy process technique. It was found that the choice of the best polymer type for a certain fiber type depends strongly on the polymers' intrinsic desirable conflicting characteristics. Polymers evaluations are illustrated for different technical criteria in order to facilitate the polymer selection process for various industrial applications with high confidence levels.

  18. Lignin biopolymer based triboelectric nanogenerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yukai; Wang, Ruoxing; Lu, Yunmei; Wu, Wenzhuo

    2017-07-01

    Ongoing research in triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs) focuses on increasing power generation, but obstacles concerning economical and eco-friendly utilization of TENGs continue to prevail. Being the second most abundant biopolymer on earth, lignin offers a valuable opportunity for low-cost TENG applications in biomedical devices, benefitting from its biodegradability and biocompatibility. Here, we develop for the first time a lignin biopolymer based TENGs for harvesting mechanical energy in the environment, which shows great potential for self-powered biomedical devices among other applications and opens doors to new technologies that utilize otherwise wasted materials for economically feasible and ecologically friendly production of energy devices.

  19. Improved biomass degradation using fungal glucuronoyl-esterases-hydrolysis of natural corn fiber substrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    d'Errico, Clotilde; Börjesson, Johan; Ding, Hanshu

    2016-01-01

    between glucuronic acids in xylans and lignin alcohols. By means of synthesized complex LCC model substrates we provide kinetic data suggesting a preference of fungal GEs for esters of bulky arylalkyl alcohols such as ester LCCs. Furthermore, using natural corn fiber substrate we report the first examples...... of improved degradation of lignocellulosic biomass by the use of GEs. Improved C5 sugar, glucose and glucuronic acid release was observed when heat pretreated corn fiber was incubated in the presence of GEs from Cerrena unicolor and Trichoderma reesei on top of different commercial cellulase...

  20. Natural and synthetic poly(malic acid)-based derivates: a family of versatile biopolymers for the design of drug nanocarriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyer, Pascal; Cammas-Marion, Sandrine

    2014-08-01

    The field of specific drug delivery is an expanding research domain. Besides the use of liposomes formed from various lipids, natural and synthetic polymers have been developed to prepare more efficient drug delivery systems either under macromolecular prodrugs or under particulate nanovectors. To ameliorate the biocompatibility of such nanocarriers, degradable natural or synthetic polymers have attracted the interest of many researchers. In this context, poly(malic acid) (PMLA) extracted from microorganisms or synthesized from malic or aspartic acid was used to prepare water-soluble drug carriers or nanoparticles. Within this review, both the preparation and the applications of PMLA derivatives are described emphasizing the in vitro and in vivo assays. The results obtained by several groups highlight the interest of such polyesters in the field of drug delivery.

  1. Evaluation of mechanical properties of natural hybrid fibers, reinforced polyester composite materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kasiviswanathan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The composite materials are replacing the traditional materials, because of its superior properties such as high tensile strength, low thermal expansion, high strength to weight ratio. The developments of new materials are on the anvil and are growing day by day. In this work the effect of glass fibre hybridization with the randomly oriented natural fibers has been evaluated. The sisal (S, banana (B, E-glass synthetic fibers were chopped and reinforced with polyester matrix. Six layers were prepared in the following stacking sequence of S/B/G, S/G/B, G/S/B, G/S/B/G/S/B/G, S/G/B//S/G/B, B/G/S/B/G/S. The mechanical properties like impact strength, flexural strength and tensile strength were investigated and compared. It was observed that the addition of two and three layer of glass fiber can improve the mechanical properties like tensile, Flexural and impact strength.

  2. Nanocelluloses from jute fibers and their nanocomposites with natural rubber: Preparation and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Martin George; Abraham, Eldho; Jyotishkumar, P; Maria, Hanna J; Pothen, Laly A; Thomas, Sabu

    2015-11-01

    Nanocellulose fibers having an average diameter of 50nm were isolated from raw jute fibers by steam explosion process. The isolation of nanocellulose from jute fibers by this extraction process is proved by SEM, XRD, FTIR, birefringence and TEM characterizations. This nanocellulose was used as the reinforcing agent in natural rubber (NR) latex along with crosslinking agents to prepare crosslinked nanocomposite films. The effects of nanocellulose loading on the morphology and mechanics of the nanocomposites have been carefully analyzed. Significant improvements in the Young's modulus and tensile strength of the nanocomposite were observed because of the reinforcing ability of the nanocellulose in the rubber matrix. A mechanism is suggested for the formation of the Zn-cellulose complex. The three-dimensional network of cellulose nanofibers (cellulose/cellulose network and Zn/cellulose network) in the NR matrix plays a major role in improving the properties of the crosslinked nanocomposites.

  3. COPPER/CARBON CORE SHELL NANOPARTICLES AS ADDITIVE FOR NATURAL FIBER/WOOD PLASTIC BLENDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinglin Wu,

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Copper/carbon core/shell nanoparticles (CCCSNs recently have been introduced as an industrial material. In this paper, composites based on high density polyethylene (HDPE, bamboo fiber, CCCSNs, and coupling agent (MAPE were prepared by melt compounding. The influence of CCCSN content on the resulting composites’ mechanical, biological resistance, and thermal properties was investigated. It was found that CCCSNs within the carbon black matrix were processed well with bamboo fiber-plastic blends through mixing and injection molding. The materials enhanced composite strength and modulus-related properties. Composites with CCCSNs and natural fibers reduced heat capacity and thermal diffusivity. Composites with CCCSN materials also enhanced termite and mold performance. Thus, the material can be used as additive for plastics and other polymers to modify strength properties, biological resistance (e.g., mold and stain, and thermal conductivity properties.

  4. Design and realization a skiff racing boat hull made of natural fibers reinforced composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collotta, M.; Solazzi, L.; Pandini, S.; Tomasoni, G.; Alberti, M.; Donzella, G.

    2016-05-01

    This paper discusses the development of a racing boat with an hull made of a composite material reinforced by natural fibers. In particular, we report here the design and realization of the boat hull, the assessment of its mechanical performance by means of a computer assisted simulation, and the cost analysis to assess the economic sustainability of the new composite developed. The results have shown that the new composite has a performance comparable with conventional glass fiber reinforced composites employed for the realization of this type of boat, accordingly to the technology employed and the lamination sequence adopted. Moreover, the FEM analysis performed over the skiff of the designed and constructed boat has demonstrated a successful choice of the material for real application, as it was later confirmed by the good performance of the boat in water. Finally, the cost analysis highlighted the economic sustainability of the new composite, allowing a cost saving of over 28% with respect to carbon fiber composites.

  5. Flexural retrofitting of reinforced concrete structures using Green Natural Fiber Reinforced Polymer plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes, Ignacio

    An experimental study will be carried out to determine the suitability of Green Natural Fiber Reinforced Polymer plates (GNFRP) manufactured with hemp fibers, with the purpose of using them as structural materials for the flexural strengthening of reinforced concrete (RC) beams. Four identical RC beams, 96 inches long, are tested for the investigation, three control beams and one test beam. The first three beams are used as references; one unreinforced, one with one layer of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP), one with two layers of CFRP, and one with n layers of the proposed, environmental-friendly, GNFRP plates. The goal is to determine the number of GNFRP layers needed to match the strength reached with one layer of CFRP and once matched, assess if the system is less expensive than CFRP strengthening, if this is the case, this strengthening system could be an alternative to the currently used, expensive CFRP systems.

  6. On the suppression of superconducting phase formation in YBCO materials by templated synthesis in the presence of a sulfated biopolymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Elliott; Schnepp, Zoe [Centre for Organized Matter Chemistry, School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Cantock' s Close, Bristol BS8 1TS (United Kingdom); Wimbush, Stuart C. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom); Hall, Simon R. [Centre for Organized Matter Chemistry, School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Cantock' s Close, Bristol BS8 1TS (United Kingdom)], E-mail: simon.hall@bristol.ac.uk

    2008-11-15

    The use of biopolymers as templates to control superconductor crystallization is a recent phenomenon and is generating a lot of interest both from the superconductor community and in materials chemistry circles. This work represents a critical finding in the use of such biopolymers, in particular the contraindicatory nature of sulfur when attempting to affect a morphologically controlled synthesis. Synthesis of superconducting nanoparticles was attempted using carrageenan as a morphological template. Reactive sulfate groups on the biopolymer prevent this, producing instead significant quantities of barium sulfate nanotapes. By substituting the biopolymer for structurally analogous, non-sulfated agar, we show that superconducting nanoparticles could be successfully synthesized.

  7. Dynamics of forced biopolymer translocation

    CERN Document Server

    Lehtola, V V; Kaski, K; 10.1209/0295-5075/85/58006

    2009-01-01

    We present results from our simulations of biopolymer translocation in a solvent which explain the main experimental findings. The forced translocation can be described by simple force balance arguments for the relevant range of pore potentials in experiments and biological systems. Scaling of translocation time with polymer length varies with pore force and friction. Hydrodynamics affects this scaling and significantly reduces translocation times.

  8. Combination of natural fiber Boehmeria nivea (ramie) with matrix epoxide for bullet proof vest body armor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anggoro, Didi Dwi, E-mail: anggorophd@gmail.com; Kristiana, Nunung, E-mail: nuna.c631@gmail.com [Master of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Diponegoro University Jln. Prof. Sudharto, Tembalang, Semarang, 50239 (Indonesia)

    2015-12-29

    Ballistic protection equipment, such as a bulletproof vest, is a soldier’s most important means of preserving life and survivability in extreme combat conditions. The bulletproof vests are designed to protect the user’s chest from injury without disturbing the ability to perform his duties. Aromatic polyamide or aramid fibers known under the trade name Kevlar, Trawon and so is synthetic fiber materials commonly used in the manufacture of bulletproof vests. This synthetic fibers have high tensile strength and ductility. Kevlar is expensive and imported material. In this study, will introduce local natural raw materials, ramie fiber (Boehmeria nivea) which is cheaper and environmentally friendly. It has enough tenacity and tensile strength as a bulletproof vest. This experiment uses two panels, there are Panel A as front surface of Panel B. Panel A is a combination of ramie and epoxide matrix, while panel B is only ramie. From several variations of experimental combinations between Panel A and Panel B, optimal combination obtained with 16 layers of panel A and 31-34 layers of panel B which is able to protect againts cal. 7.65 mm × 17 mm (.32 ACP) bullet fired through pistol .32 Pindad from a distance of 20 meters. Panel with a size of 20 cm × 20 cm has a total thickness between 12,922 to13,745 mm and a total weight between 506,26 to 520,926gram. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations indicated that the porosity and surface area of the ramie fiber is smooth, fiber surfaces showed topography with micropores. SEM also showed well-arranged structure of fibers bonding. Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis indicated 100 % carbon contents in ramie fiber. Test result indicates that panel from composite ramie-epoxide can reach the level 1of International Standard of NIJ - 010104. Compared to panel from polyester fiber, the panel from composite ramie-epoxide (0,50-0,52 kg) is lighter weight than panel polyester fiber (1,642 kg)

  9. Combination of natural fiber Boehmeria nivea (ramie) with matrix epoxide for bullet proof vest body armor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anggoro, Didi Dwi; Kristiana, Nunung

    2015-12-01

    Ballistic protection equipment, such as a bulletproof vest, is a soldier's most important means of preserving life and survivability in extreme combat conditions. The bulletproof vests are designed to protect the user's chest from injury without disturbing the ability to perform his duties. Aromatic polyamide or aramid fibers known under the trade name Kevlar, Trawon and so is synthetic fiber materials commonly used in the manufacture of bulletproof vests. This synthetic fibers have high tensile strength and ductility. Kevlar is expensive and imported material. In this study, will introduce local natural raw materials, ramie fiber (Boehmeria nivea) which is cheaper and environmentally friendly. It has enough tenacity and tensile strength as a bulletproof vest. This experiment uses two panels, there are Panel A as front surface of Panel B. Panel A is a combination of ramie and epoxide matrix, while panel B is only ramie. From several variations of experimental combinations between Panel A and Panel B, optimal combination obtained with 16 layers of panel A and 31-34 layers of panel B which is able to protect againts cal. 7.65 mm × 17 mm (.32 ACP) bullet fired through pistol .32 Pindad from a distance of 20 meters. Panel with a size of 20 cm × 20 cm has a total thickness between 12,922 to13,745 mm and a total weight between 506,26 to 520,926gram. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations indicated that the porosity and surface area of the ramie fiber is smooth, fiber surfaces showed topography with micropores. SEM also showed well-arranged structure of fibers bonding. Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis indicated 100 % carbon contents in ramie fiber. Test result indicates that panel from composite ramie-epoxide can reach the level 1of International Standard of NIJ - 010104. Compared to panel from polyester fiber, the panel from composite ramie-epoxide (0,50-0,52 kg) is lighter weight than panel polyester fiber (1,642 kg).

  10. Fabrication and characterization of regenerated silk scaffolds reinforced with natural silk fibers for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobini, Sahba; Hoyer, Birgit; Solati-Hashjin, Mehran; Lode, Anja; Nosoudi, Nasim; Samadikuchaksaraei, Ali; Gelinsky, Michael

    2013-08-01

    We introduce a novel Bombyx mori silk-based composite material developed for bone tissue engineering. Three-dimensional scaffolds were fabricated by embedding of natural degummed silk fibers in a matrix of regenerated fibroin, followed by freeze-drying. Different ratios of fibers to fibroin were investigated with respect to their influence on mechanical and biological properties. For all scaffold types, an interconnected porous structure suitable for cell penetration was proven by scanning electron microscopy. Compressive tests, carried out in static and cyclic mode under dry as well as wet conditions, revealed a strong impact of fiber reinforcement on compressive modulus and compressive stress. Cell culture experiments with human mesenchymal stem cells demonstrated that the fiber/fibroin composite scaffolds support cell attachment, proliferation, as well as differentiation along the osteoblastic lineage. Considering the excellent mechanical and biological properties, novel fiber/fibroin scaffolds appear to be an interesting structure for prospect studies in bone tissue engineering. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Identification of natural red and purple dyes on textiles by Fiber-optics Reflectance Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynez-Rojas, M. A.; Casanova-González, E.; Ruvalcaba-Sil, J. L.

    2017-05-01

    Understanding dye chemistry and dye processes is an important issue for studies of cultural heritage collections and science conservation. Fiber Optics Reflectance Spectroscopy (FORS) is a powerful technique, which allows preliminary dye identification, causing no damage or mechanical stress on the artworks subjected to analysis. Some information related to specific light scattering and absorption can be obtained in the UV-visible and infrared range (300-1400 nm) and it is possible to discriminate the kind of support fiber in the near infrared region (1000-2500 nm). The main spectral features of natural dye fibers samples, such as reflection maxima, inflection points and reflection minima, can be used in the differentiation of various red natural dyes. In this work, a set of dyed references were manufactured following Mexican recipes with red dyes (cochineal and brazilwood) in order to determine the characteristic FORS spectral features of fresh and aged dyed fibers for their identification in historical pieces. Based on these results, twenty-nine indigenous textiles belonging to the National Commission for the Development of Indigenous People of Mexico were studied. Cochineal and brazilwood were successfully identified by FORS in several pieces, as well as the mixture of cochineal and indigo for purple color.

  12. Preparation and characterization of regenerated cellulose membranes from natural cotton fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanjuan CAO

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A series of organic solutions with different cellulose concentrations are prepared by dissolving natural cotton fibers in lithium chloride/dimethyl acetamide (LiCl/DMAC solvent system after the activation of cotton fibers. Under different coagulating bath, the regenerated cellulose membranes are formed in two kinds of coagulation baths, and two coating methods including high-speed spin technique (KW-4A spin coating machine and low-speed scraping (AFA-Ⅱ Film Applicator are selected in this paper. The macromolecular structure, mechanical properties, crystallinity, thermal stability and wetting property of the regenerated cellulose membrane are characterized by Scanning Electron Microscope(SEM, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR,X-ray diffraction (XRD, Thermogravimetric analysis (TG and contacting angle tester. The effects of mass fraction, coagulation bath type, membrane forming process on the regenerated membrane properties are investigated. Experimental results show that the performance of regenerated cellulose membrane is relatively excellent under the condition of using the KW-4A high-speed spin method, water coagulation bath, and when mass fraction of cellulose is 3.5%. The crystallinity of the regenerated cellulose membrane changes a lot compared with natural cotton fibers. The variation trend of thermal stability is similar with that of cotton fiber. But thermal stability is reduced to some degree, while the wetting ability is improved obviously.

  13. Identification of natural red and purple dyes on textiles by Fiber-optics Reflectance Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynez-Rojas, M A; Casanova-González, E; Ruvalcaba-Sil, J L

    2017-02-09

    Understanding dye chemistry and dye processes is an important issue for studies of cultural heritage collections and science conservation. Fiber Optics Reflectance Spectroscopy (FORS) is a powerful technique, which allows preliminary dye identification, causing no damage or mechanical stress on the artworks subjected to analysis. Some information related to specific light scattering and absorption can be obtained in the UV-visible and infrared range (300-1400nm) and it is possible to discriminate the kind of support fiber in the near infrared region (1000-2500nm). The main spectral features of natural dye fibers samples, such as reflection maxima, inflection points and reflection minima, can be used in the differentiation of various red natural dyes. In this work, a set of dyed references were manufactured following Mexican recipes with red dyes (cochineal and brazilwood) in order to determine the characteristic FORS spectral features of fresh and aged dyed fibers for their identification in historical pieces. Based on these results, twenty-nine indigenous textiles belonging to the National Commission for the Development of Indigenous People of Mexico were studied. Cochineal and brazilwood were successfully identified by FORS in several pieces, as well as the mixture of cochineal and indigo for purple color.

  14. A Review of Natural Fiber Reinforced Poly(Vinyl Alcohol Based Composites: Application and Opportunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boon Khoon Tan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Natural fibers are fine examples of renewable resources that play an important role in the composites industry, which produces superior strength comparable to synthetic fibers. Poly(vinyl alcohol (PVA composites in particular have attracted enormous interest in view of their satisfactory performance, properties and biodegradability. Their performance in many applications such as consumer, biomedical, and agriculture is well defined and promising. This paper reviews the utilization of natural fibers from macro to nanoscale as reinforcement in PVA composites. An overview on the properties, processing methods, biodegradability, and applications of these composites is presented. The advantages arising from chemical and physical modifications of fibers or composites are discussed in terms of improved properties and performance. In addition, proper arrangement of nanocellulose in composites helps to prevent agglomeration and results in a better dispersion. The limitations and challenges of the composites and future works of these bio-composites are also discussed. This review concludes that PVA composites have potential for use in numerous applications. However, issues on technological feasibility, environmental effectiveness, and economic affordability should be considered.

  15. Dielectric Behaviour of Some Woven Fabrics on the Basis of Natural Cellulosic Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florin St. C. Mustata

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The electrical permittivity of the weaves obtained from natural cellulosic yarns or mixed with synthetic fibers was established with capacitor method. The highest value of relative electrical permittivity in case of the woven fabric from natural cellulosic fibers has been observed at the weave made of pure hemp (13.55 and the lowest at the weave obtained from the pure jute—weave packing (1.87. Electrical permittivity value of the pure jute weave packing is comparable to that of the permittivity for the glass thread, when the work conditions are as follows: temperature 25°C and air humidity 35%. The relative electrical permittivity of the weave is depending on the degree of crimping yarns especially in the weft direction, technological density in direction of the warp and weft, and surface mass of the weave.

  16. Space maintainer using fiber-reinforced composite and natural tooth--a non-invasive technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayab, Tabassum; Vizhi, Kayal; Srinivasan, Ila

    2011-04-01

    Dental traumatic injuries are widespread in the population and are a frequent pathology among children and teenagers. Dentists and especially pediatric dentists are commonly confronted with managing dental crown root fractures on a regular basis. Fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) have been used as an alternative to conventional space maintainers in pediatric dentistry. We present here a case of a 11-year-old boy with oblique crown root fracture, treated by placing extracted natural crown with FRC as space maintainer.

  17. Physical and Degradable Properties of Mulching Films Prepared from Natural Fibers and Biodegradable Polymers

    OpenAIRE

    Zhijian Tan; Yongjian Yi; Hongying Wang; Wanlai Zhou; Yuanru Yang; Chaoyun Wang

    2016-01-01

    The use of plastic film in agriculture has the serious drawback of producing vast quantities of waste. In this work, films were prepared from natural fibers and biodegradable polymers as potential substitutes for the conventional non-biodegradable plastic film used as mulching material in agricultural production. The physical properties (e.g., mechanical properties, heat preservation, water permeability, and photopermeability) and degradation characteristics (evaluated by micro-organic cultur...

  18. The Determination of the Optimal Material Proportion in Natural Fiber-Cement Composites Using Design of Mixture Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aramphongphun Chuckaphun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to determine the optimal material proportion in a natural fiber-cement composite as an alternative to an asbestos fibercement composite while the materials cost is minimized and the properties still comply with Thai Industrial Standard (TIS for applications of profile sheet roof tiles. Two experimental sets were studied in this research. First, a three-component mixture of (i virgin natural fiber, (ii synthetic fiber and (iii cement was studied while the proportion of calcium carbonate was kept constant. Second, an additional material, recycled natural fiber from recycled paper, was used in the mixture. The four-component mixture was then studied. Constrained mixture design was applied to design the two experimental sets above. The experimental data were then analyzed to build the mixture model. In addition, the cost of each material was used to build the materials cost model. These two mathematical models were then employed to optimize the material proportion of the natural fiber-cement composites. In the three-component mixture, it was found that the optimal material proportion was as follows: 3.14% virgin natural fiber, 1.20% synthetic fiber and 75.67% cement while the materials cost was reduced by 12%. In the four-component mixture, it was found that the optimal material proportion was as follows: 3.00% virgin natural fiber, 0.50% recycled natural fiber, 1.08% synthetic fiber, and 75.42% cement. The materials cost was reduced by 14%. The confirmation runs of 30 experiments were also analyzed statistically to verify the results.

  19. Effect of carbon nanotube on physical and mechanical properties of natural fiber/glass fiber/cement composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hamed Younesi Kordkheili; Shokouh Etedali Shehni; Ghorban Niyatzade

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to introduce a cement-based composite of higher quality. For this purpose new hybrid nanocomposite from bagasse fiber, glass fiber and multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were manufactured. The physical and mechanical proper-ties of the manufactured composites were measured according to standard methods. The properties of the manufactured hybrid nanocomposites were dramatically better than traditional composites. Also all the reinforced composites with carbon nanotube, glass fiber or bagasse fiber exhibited better properties rather than neat cement. The results indicated that bagasse fiber proved suitable for substitution of glass fiber as a reinforcing agent in the cement composites. The hybrid nanocomposite containing 10%glass fiber, 10%bagasse fiber and 1.5%MWCNTs was selected as the best compound.

  20. Osteoblast biocompatibility of pre-mineralized, hexamethylene-1,6-diaminocarboxysulphonate crosslinked chitosan fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Kiechel, Marjorie A.; Beringer, Laura T.; Donius, Amalie E.; Komiya, Yuko; Habas, Raymond; Wegst, Ulrike G.K.; Schauer, Caroline L.

    2015-01-01

    Biopolymer-ceramic composites are thought to be particularly promising materials for bone tissue engineering as they more closely mimic natural bone. Here, we demonstrate the fabrication by electrospinning of fibrous chitosan-hydroxyapatite composite scaffolds with low (1 wt%) and high (10 wt%) mineral contents. Scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and unidirectional tensile testing were performed to determine fiber surface morphology, elemental compositi...

  1. Effect of natural convection heat transfer during polymer optical fiber drawing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeve, Hayden Matane

    The quality of polymer optical fiber is dependent on the diametral uniformity of the fiber and the applied drawing force. In this study, the force required to draw a polymer preform into optical fiber is predicted and measured as it is heated in an enclosed cylindrical furnace. The draw force is a function of the highly temperature dependent polymer viscosity. Therefore accurate prediction of the drawing force requires a detailed investigation of the heat transfer within the furnace. In this investigation, the full axi-symmetric conjugate problem (including both natural convection and thermal radiation) was solved. In addition, the location of the polymer/air interface was solved for as part of the problem and was not prescribed beforehand. Numerical results compared well with the experimentally measured draw tension and neck-down profiles for several preform diameters, draw speeds, and furnace temperatures. The experimental investigation also found that as the buoyant potential of the air within the furnace was increased the natural convection transitioned from time-invariant to oscillatory, and finally, to chaotic flow. The time-varying heating caused by the oscillatory and chaotic regimes alters the rheology of the elongating polymer preform, causing detrimental variations in the fiber diameter. When subjected to oscillatory and chaotic natural convection the standard deviation of the fiber diameter variations was up to 2.5 to 10 times greater, respectively, than that measured under time-invariant heating conditions. Experimental visualization of the unsteady natural convection flow indicates that the instability occurs at the interface between two counter-rotating cells. Numerical simulations of natural convection within a tall non-isothermal axi-symmetric annular cavity with an aspect ratio of 10 and a radius ratio of 0.6 predicted unsteady phenomena. At low Rayleigh numbers a steady bi-cellular flow was predicted. As the Rayleigh number was increased the

  2. Crosslinking biopolymers for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Narendra; Reddy, Roopa; Jiang, Qiuran

    2015-06-01

    Biomaterials made from proteins, polysaccharides, and synthetic biopolymers are preferred but lack the mechanical properties and stability in aqueous environments necessary for medical applications. Crosslinking improves the properties of the biomaterials, but most crosslinkers either cause undesirable changes to the functionality of the biopolymers or result in cytotoxicity. Glutaraldehyde, the most widely used crosslinking agent, is difficult to handle and contradictory views have been presented on the cytotoxicity of glutaraldehyde-crosslinked materials. Recently, poly(carboxylic acids) that can crosslink in both dry and wet conditions have been shown to provide the desired improvements in tensile properties, increase in stability under aqueous conditions, and also promote cell attachment and proliferation. Green chemicals and newer crosslinking approaches are necessary to obtain biopolymeric materials with properties desired for medical applications.

  3. A knittable fiber-shaped supercapacitor based on natural cotton thread for wearable electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qianlong; Jia, Chunyang; Ye, Xingke; Tang, Zhonghua; Wan, Zhongquan

    2016-09-01

    At present, the topic of building high-performance, miniaturized and mechanically flexible energy storage modules which can be directly integrated into textile based wearable electronics is a hotspot in the wearable technology field. In this paper, we reported a highly flexible fiber-shaped electrode fabricated through a one-step convenient hydrothermal process. The prepared graphene hydrogels/multi-walled carbon nanotubes-cotton thread derived from natural cotton thread is electrochemically active and mechanically strong. Fiber-shaped supercapacitor based on the prepared fiber electrodes and polyvinyl alcohol-H3PO4 gel electrolyte exhibits good capacitive performance (97.73 μF cm-1 at scan rate of 2 mV s-1), long cycle life (95.51% capacitance retention after 8000 charge-discharge cycles) and considerable stability (90.75% capacitance retention after 500 continuous bending cycles). Due to its good mechanical and electrochemical properties, the graphene hydrogels/multi-walled carbon nanotubes-cotton thread based all-solid fiber-shaped supercapacitor can be directly knitted into fabrics and maintain its original capacitive performance. Such a low-cost textile thread based versatile energy storage device may hold great potential for future wearable electronics applications.

  4. Characterization of a novel natural cellulosic fiber from Prosopis juliflora bark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravanakumar, S S; Kumaravel, A; Nagarajan, T; Sudhakar, P; Baskaran, R

    2013-02-15

    Natural fibers from plants are ideal choice for producing polymer composites. Bark fibers of Prosopis juliflora (PJ), an evergreen plant have not been utilized for making polymer composites yet. Hence, a study was undertaken to evaluate their suitability as a novel reinforcement for composite structures. PJ fiber (PJF) was analyzed extensively to understand its chemical and physical properties. The PJF belonged to gelatinous or mucilaginous type. Its lignin content (17.11%) and density (580 kg/m(3)) were relatively higher and lower, respectively in comparison to bark fibers of other plants. The free chemical groups on it were studied by FTIR and XRD. It had a tensile strength of 558±13.4 MPa with an average strain rate of 1.77±0.04% and microfibril angle of 10.64°±0.45°. Thermal analyses (TG and DTG) showed that it started degrading at a temperature of 217 °C with kinetic activation energy of 76.72 kJ/mol.

  5. Brazilian natural fiber (jute as raw material for activated carbon production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CARLA F.S. ROMBALDO

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Jute fiber is the second most common natural cellulose fiber worldwide, especially in recent years, due to its excellent physical, chemical and structural properties. The objective of this paper was to investigate: the thermal degradation of in natura jute fiber, and the production and characterization of the generated activated carbon. The production consisted of carbonization of the jute fiber and activation with steam. During the activation step the amorphous carbon produced in the initial carbonization step reacted with oxidizing gas, forming new pores and opening closed pores, which enhanced the adsorptive capacity of the activated carbon. N2 gas adsorption at 77K was used in order to evaluate the effect of the carbonization and activation steps. The results of the adsorption indicate the possibility of producing a porous material with a combination of microporous and mesoporous structure, depending on the parameters used in the processes, with resulting specific surface area around 470 m2.g–1. The thermal analysis indicates that above 600°C there is no significant mass loss.

  6. Biocompatibility of plasma nanostructured biopolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slepičková Kasálková, N. [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Slepička, P., E-mail: petr.slepicka@vscht.cz [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Bačáková, L. [Institute of Physiology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic 142 20 Prague (Czech Republic); Sajdl, P. [Department of Power Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Švorčík, V. [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2013-07-15

    Many areas of medicine such as tissue engineering requires not only mastery of modification techniques but also thorough knowledge of the interaction of cells with solid state substrates. Plasma treatment can be used to effective modification, nanostructuring and therefore can significantly change properties of materials. In this work the biocompatibility of the plasma nanostructured biopolymers substrates was studied. Changes in surface chemical structure were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The morphology pristine and modified samples were determined using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The surface wettability was determined by goniometry from contact angle. Biocompatibility was determined by in vitro tests, the rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) were cultivated on the pristine and plasma modified biopolymer substrates. Their adhesion, proliferation, spreading and homogeneous distribution on polymers was monitored. It was found that the plasma treatment leads to rapid decrease of contact angle for all samples. Contact angle decreased with increasing time of modification. XPS measurements showed that plasma treatment leads to changes in ratio of polar and non-polar groups. Plasma modification was accompanied by a change of surface morphology. Biological tests found that plasma treatment have positive effect on cells adhesion and proliferation cells and affects the size of cell’s adhesion area. Changes in plasma power or in exposure time influences the number of adhered and proliferated cells and their distribution on biopolymer surface.

  7. Theme--Achieving 2020. Goal 3: All Students Are Conversationally Literate in Agriculture, Food, Fiber, and Natural Resource Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trexler, Cary, Ed.

    2000-01-01

    Nine theme articles focus on the need for students to be conversationally literate about agriculture, food, fiber, and natural resources systems. Discusses the definition of conversational literacy, the human and institutional resources needed, and exemplary models for promoting literacy. (JOW)

  8. Dual production of biopolymers from bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukan, Artun; Roy, Ipsita; Keshavarz, Tajalli

    2015-08-01

    Rapid depletion of natural resources with continued demands of an increasing population and high consumption rates of today's world will cause serious problems in the future. This, along with environmental concerns, has directed research towards finding alternatives in variety of sectors including sustainable and environmentally friendly consumer goods. Biopolymers of bacterial origin, with their vast range of applications, biodegradability and eco-friendly manufacturing processes, are one of the alternatives for a more sustainable future. However, the cost of their production is a drawback. Simultaneous production processes have always been an option for researchers in order to reduce cost, but the variable requirements of microorganisms to produce both different and valuable products are a hindering factor. This review will look at some examples and identify ideas towards developing a successful strategy for simultaneous production of bio-products. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Biopolymers as a flexible resource for nanochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnepp, Zoe

    2013-01-21

    Biomass is an abundant source of chemically diverse macromolecules, including polysaccharides, polypeptides, and polyaromatics. Many of these biological polymers (biopolymers) are highly evolved for specific functions through optimized chain length, functionalization, and monomer sequence. As biopolymers are a chemical resource, much current effort is focused on the breakdown of these molecules into fuels or platform chemicals. However there is growing interest in using biopolymers directly to create functional materials. This Minireview uses recent examples to show how biopolymers are providing new directions in the synthesis of nanostructured materials.

  10. Effects of CO 2 on a High Performance Hollow-Fiber Membrane for Natural Gas Purification

    KAUST Repository

    Omole, Imona C.

    2010-05-19

    A 6FDA-based, cross-linkable polyimide was characterized in the form of a defect-free asymmetric hollow-fiber membrane. The novel membrane was cross-linked at various temperatures and tested for natural gas purification in the presence of high CO2 partial pressures. The cross-linked membrane material shows high intrinsic separation performance for CO2 and CH4 (selectivity ∼49, CO2 permeability ∼161 barrer, with a feed at 65 psia, 35 °C, and 10% CO2). Cross-linked asymmetric hollow-fiber membranes made from the material show good resistance to CO2-induced plasticization. Carbon dioxide partial pressures as high as ∼400 psia were employed, and the membrane was shown to be promisingly stable under these aggressive conditions. The performance of the membrane was also analyzed using the dual-mode sorption/transport model. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  11. The Effect of Adding Different Types of Natural Fibers on Mechanical Properties and Impact Resistance of Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarmed Fadhil

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of natural fibers: sisal and palm fibers on the different properties of concrete have been investigated through a number of tests. The properties investigated include compressive strength, flexural strength, splitting tensile strength and impact resistance of concrete. Sisal fiber has been used at three percentages of total mixture volume (0.6, 1.20 and 1.8%, respectively, while the palm fiber has been added in (2.5, 5.0 and 7.5%, respectively by volume. The results of this study show that the concrete is reinforced with sisal and palm fibers improvement in flexural strength and in splitting tensile strength while no significant alteration in the compressive strength has occurred. The results also show improvements in the impact resistance of concrete by the addition of sisal and palm fibers which give maximum increase 114.3 and 285.7%, respectively for 1.8% sisal fiber and 7.5% palm fiber, respectively. The addition of sisal and palm fibres to the plain precast concrete slabs enhances the impact resistance and compensates for the decrease in depth for (500×500×40 mm. The important visual observation is that the predominant mode of failure in all fibers which has reinforced concrete slabs is fiber pull-out. Besides, it has been figured out that the slabs remain together in one piece. They are broken; though. The plain concrete slabs have been totally disintegrated and shattered.

  12. In-Depth Analysis of the Structure and Properties of Two Varieties of Natural Luffa Sponge Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuxia; Su, Na; Zhang, Kaiting; Zhu, Shiliu; Zhao, Lei; Fang, Fei; Ren, Linyan; Guo, Yong

    2017-01-01

    The advancement in science and technology has led to luffa sponge (LS) being widely used as a natural material in industrial application because of its polyporous structure and light texture. To enhance the utility of LS fibers as the reinforcement of lightweight composite materials, the current study investigates their water absorption, mechanical properties, anatomical characteristics and thermal performance. Hence, moisture regain and tensile properties of LS fiber bundles were measured in accordance with American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards while their structural characteristics were investigated via microscopic observation. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to observe the surface morphology and fractured surface of fiber bundles. The test results show that the special structure where the phloem tissues degenerate to cavities had a significant influence on the mechanical properties of LS fiber bundles. Additionally, the transverse sectional area occupied by fibers in a fiber bundle (SF), wall thickness, ratio of wall to lumen of fiber cell, and crystallinity of cellulose had substantial impact on the mechanical properties of LS fiber bundles. Furthermore, the density of fiber bundles of LS ranged within 385.46–468.70 kg/m3, significantly less than that of jute (1360.40 kg/m3) and Arenga engleri (950.20 kg/m3). However, LS fiber bundles demonstrated superior specific modulus than Arenga engleri. PMID:28772838

  13. Effect of natural fibers and bio-resins on mechanical properties in hybrid and non-hybrid composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragassa, Cristiano

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the present experimental investigation was to perform a comparative analysis concerning the influence on mechanical properties of natural fibers and/or bio-resins in reinforced thermoset composites. Flax and basalt fibers were selected as natural reinforcements, as single constituents or in hybrid combination. Glass synthetic fibers were used for comparison. Eco-friendly matrixes, both epoxy or vinylester, were considered and compared with composites based on traditional resins. Samples were fabricated by hand lay-up and resin infusion techniques. Cures were accelerated and controlled by applying heat and pressure in autoclave. Tensile, flexural and impact tests were carried out according to ASTM standards.

  14. Biopolymers Versus Synthetic Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florentina Adriana Cziple

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper present an overview of important synthetic and natural polymers with emphasis on polymer structure, the chemistry of polymer formation. an introduction to polymer characterization. The biodegradation process can take place aerobically and anaerobically with or without the presence of light. These factors allow for biodegradation even in landfill conditions which are normally inconducive to any degradation. The sheeting used to make these packages differs significantly from other “degradable plastics” in the market as it does not attempt to replace the current popular materials but instead enhances them by rendering them biodegradable.

  15. Soil Improvement Using MICP and Biopolymers: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohail Ashraf, Muhammad; Baharom Azahar, Syed; Zulaikha Yusof, Nur

    2017-08-01

    Ground improvement techniques provide strong natural platforms for construction activities and save the need for designing more resistant structures which would have been necessary on weak ground. This paper discusses the biogeotechnical techniques for improving the resistance of unsaturated sand dunes against surficial erosion by natural processes of wave actions and storm surges. Mechanism of microbially induced calcite precipitation (MICP) and its optimization by utilizing sea water and minimal urea usage is discussed. Common factors affecting the MICP process are briefly discussed. Biomineralization using biopolymers is also described along with the soil strengthening mechanisms. Geotechnical applications of some commonly available biopolymers are described briefly. Advantages and limitations in both these mineralization methods are analyzed and some research opportunities are pointed out for future research.

  16. Interaction between polymer constituents and the structure of biopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rein, R.

    1974-01-01

    The paper reviews the current status of methods for calculating intermolecular interactions between biopolymer units. The nature of forces contributing to the various domains of intermolecular separations is investigated, and various approximations applicable in the respective regions are examined. The predictive value of current theory is tested by establishing a connection with macroscopic properties and comparing the theoretical predicted values with those derived from experimental data. This has led to the introduction of a statistical model describing DNA.

  17. Quantum effective potential, electron transport and conformons in biopolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dandoloff, Rossen [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique et Modelisation, Universite de Cergy-Pontoise, F-95302 Cergy-Pontoise (France); Balakrishnan, Radha [The Institute of Mathematical Sciences, Chennai 600113 (India)

    2005-07-08

    In the Kirchhoff model of a biopolymer, conformation dynamics can be described in terms of solitary waves, for certain special cross-section asymmetries. Applying this to the problem of electron transport, we show that the quantum effective potential arising due to the bends and twists of the polymer enables us to formalize and quantify the concept of a conformon that has been hypothesized in biology. Its connection to the soliton solution of the cubic nonlinear Schroedinger equation emerges in a natural fashion.

  18. Investigation of biopolymer networks by means of AFM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keresztes, Z.; Rigó, T.; Telegdi, J.; Kálmán, E.

    Natural hydrogel alginate was investigated by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM) to gain microscale information on the morphological and rheological properties of the biopolymer network cross-linked by various cations. Local rheological properties of the gels measured by force spectroscopy gave correlation between increasing ion selectivity and increasing polymer elasticity. Adhesive forces acting between the surface of the gel and the probe, and also the intrinsic rheological properties of bulk polymers affect the microscopical image formation.

  19. Fabrication and Mechanical Characterization of Water-Soluble Resin-Coated Natural Fiber Green Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manabe, Ken-Ichi; Hayakawa, Tomoyuki

    In this study, water-soluble biodegradable resin was introduced as a coating agent to improve the interfacial strength and then to fabricate a high-performance green composite with polylactic acid (PLA) and hemp yarn. Dip coating was carried out for hemp yarn and the green composites were fabricated by hot processing. The coated green composite achieves a high tensile strength of 117 MPa even though the fiber volume fraction is less than 30%. Interfacial shear strength (IFSS) was measured by a single fiber pull-out test, and the effect of water-soluble resin on the tensile properties of the composites was evaluated. As a result, when using coated natural bundles, the IFSS value is smaller than when using noncoated natural bundles. On the basis of observations of the fractured surface of composites and initial yarns using a scanning electron microscope (SEM), the effect of the impregnation of water-soluble resin into the natural bundles on the tensile strength is discussed in detail. It is found that water-soluble resin is effective in improving the mechanical properties of the composite, although the interfacial strength between PLA and water-soluble resin was decreased, and as a result, the tensile strength of green composites increases by almost 20%.

  20. Genotoxicity of clays with potential use in biopolymers for food packaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharma, Anoop Kumar; Mortensen, Alicja; Hadrup, Niels

    Genotoxicity of clays with potential use in biopolymers for food packaging Plastics produced from biopolymers are of commercial interest as they are manufactured from renewable resources such as agricultural crop wastes and have the potential to meet environmental and health requirements....... Biopolymers that are strengthened using reinforcing nano-scale fillers may improve the packaging quality by increasing barrier function and heat-resistance. Toxicological data on clays containing a nano-fraction and organo-modified clays remain very limited. The aim of this study is to investigate...... the genotoxic potential of clays that can be used in biopolymers for food contact materials. Two clays were tested in the comet assay using Caco-2 cells (a human colon cancer cell line); a natural montmorillonite (Cloisite®Na+) and an organo-modified montmorillonite (Cloisite®30B). Both clays were tested...

  1. Hybrid Aluminum and Natural Fiber Composite Structure for Crash Safety Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helaili, S.; Chafra, M.; Chevalier, Y.

    There is a growing interest on pedestrian's protection in automotive safety standards. Pedestrians head impact is one of the most important tests. In this paper, a hybrid composite structure made from natural fiber and aluminum, which improve the head protection when impact is taken place, is presented. The structure is made from a honeycomb composite made from unidirectional and woven composites and a thin aluminum layer. A head impact model is developed. The number of hexagonal layers is fixed and the thickness of the aluminum layer of the honeycomb structure is varied. The specific absorption energy is then calculated.

  2. Corrosion Protection Performance of Polyester-Melamine Coating with Natural Wood Fiber Using EIS Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, PyongHwa; Shon, MinYoung [Pukyong National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Jo, DuHwan [POSCO, Gwangyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    In the present study, polyester-melamine coating systems with natural wood fiber (NWF) were prepared and the effects of NWF on the corrosion protectiveness of the polyester-melamine coating were examined using EIS analysis. From the results, higher average surface roughness was observed with increase of NWF content. Water diffusivity and water uptake into the polyester-melamine coatings with NWF were much higher than that into the pure polyester-melamine coating. The decrease in the impedance modulus |Z| was associated with the localized corrosion on carbon steel, confirming that corrosion protection of the polyester-melamine coatings with NWF well agrees with its water transport behavior.

  3. Population genetic structure in natural and reintroduced beaver (Castor fiber populations in Central Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kautenburger, R.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Castor fiber Linnaeus, 1758 is the only indigenous species of the genus Castor in Europe and Asia. Due to extensive hunting until the beginning of the 20th century, the distribution of the formerly widespread Eurasian beaver was dramatically reduced. Only a few populations remained and these were in isolated locations, such as the region of the German Elbe River. The loss of genetic diversity in small or captive populations throughgenetic drift and inbreeding is a severe conservation problem. However, the reintroduction of beaver populations from several regions in Europe has shown high viability and populations today are growing fast. In the present study we analysed the population genetic structure of a natural and two reintroduced beaver populations in Germany and Austria. Furthermore, we studied the genetic differentiation between two beaver species, C. fiber and the American beaver (C. canadensis, using RAPD (Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA as a genetic marker. The reintroduced beaver populations of different origins and the autochthonous population of the Elbe River showed a similar low genetic heterogeneity. There was an overall high genetic similarity in the species C. fiber, and no evidence was found for a clear subspecific structure in the populations studied.

  4. Back to Natural Fiber: Wool Color Influences Its Sensitivity to Enzymatic Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amro A. Amara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There are many missed biotechnological opportunities in the developmental countries. Wool quality improvement is one of them. This study is concerning with improving the wool quality using technical enzymes. White wool proves to be more susceptible to the enzymatic treatment than blackish brown wool. This proves that the enzymatic reaction is sensitive to the natural color differences between wool fibers. A simple enzymatic method has been used to improve the wool quality as well as to investigate the changes happened in the wool fibers. Geobacillus stearothermophilus has been used under mesophilic and static cultivation conditions using wool as the main carbon source. These conditions prove to be more suitable for maintaining the fiber structure, less expensive, and reliable as an in-house biotechnological process that can be adapted everywhere. The enzyme activity in case of white wool was 4 Units/ml and for blackish brown wool was 1.5 Units/ml. Electron microscope has been used to evaluate the end result. By following the process included in this paper using probable microbial strain(s, the wool quality improvement can be applied globally and can add another value to the economy of the developmental countries.

  5. Back to Natural Fiber: Wool Color Influences Its Sensitivity to Enzymatic Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amara, Amro A.

    2012-01-01

    There are many missed biotechnological opportunities in the developmental countries. Wool quality improvement is one of them. This study is concerning with improving the wool quality using technical enzymes. White wool proves to be more susceptible to the enzymatic treatment than blackish brown wool. This proves that the enzymatic reaction is sensitive to the natural color differences between wool fibers. A simple enzymatic method has been used to improve the wool quality as well as to investigate the changes happened in the wool fibers. Geobacillus stearothermophilus has been used under mesophilic and static cultivation conditions using wool as the main carbon source. These conditions prove to be more suitable for maintaining the fiber structure, less expensive, and reliable as an in-house biotechnological process that can be adapted everywhere. The enzyme activity in case of white wool was 4 Units/ml and for blackish brown wool was 1.5 Units/ml. Electron microscope has been used to evaluate the end result. By following the process included in this paper using probable microbial strain(s), the wool quality improvement can be applied globally and can add another value to the economy of the developmental countries. PMID:22629141

  6. 生物质纤维材料的研究进展及发展前景%Recent Advances in the Research of Biopolymer Fiber and the Prospect of Its Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈丽嫚; 汪涛

    2014-01-01

    本文主要介绍了生物质能的概念及优点,详述了生物质再生纤维、生物质合成纤维主要品种的发展进程及生物质纤维的发展前景。%T he article briefly introduces the concept of biomass energy and its advantages , and gives a detailed description of the recent development of biomass regenerated fiber and bio-mass synthetic fiber .It show s that biomass fiber has broad application prospects .

  7. Study on the Genetics and Development of Fiber Pigments and Color Deviation After Wetting Process of Naturally Colored Cotton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIU Xin-mian; ZHOU Wen-long

    2003-01-01

    The genetic control of fiber pigment color in naturally colored cotton was studied. The expres-sion of brown and green fiber color was controlled by incompletely dominant single genes and incompletelydominant major genes, respectively. Production and accumulation of the fiber pigment were related to specialexpression of enzymatic genes for pigment synthesis in fiber cells. At the stage of fiber lengthening, naturallycolored cotton, like white cotton, appeared purely white. But when fiber cell walls entered the thickeningstage, pigment appeared by degrees. When the fiber was completely matured (on boll dehiscence), the colorreached its darkest level. After wetting process treatment, the hues of the fiber pigment changed in regularpatterns. The hue circle for brown and green cotton changed in the opposite direction with wetting processtreatment. In general, the treated cotton color and luster became dark and vivid, and this trend provided the possibili-ty for enhancing the fiber quality by suitable enviromnental friendly finishing. The analysis showed that the color andluster of the cotton may be controlled by a series of pigments which show different chemical performance.

  8. [Magnetic nanoparticles and intracellular delivery of biopolymers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornev, A A; Dubina, M V

    2014-03-01

    The basic methods of intracellular delivery of biopolymers are present in this review. The structure and synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles, their stabilizing surfactants are described. The examples of the interaction of nanoparticles with biopolymers such as nucleic acids and proteins are considered. The final part of the review is devoted to problems physiology and biocompatibility of magnetic nanoparticles.

  9. Supramolecular self-assembly of biopolymers with carbon nanotubes for biomimetic and bio-inspired sensing and actuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Luhua; Chen, Wei

    2011-06-01

    Biopolymers are important natural multifunctional macromolecules for biomimetic and bio-inspired advanced functional material design. They are not only simple dispersants for carbon nanotube stabilization as they have been found to have specific interactions with carbon nanotubes. Their molecular activity, orientation and crystallization are influenced by the CNTs, which endow their composites with a variety of novel sensing and actuation performances. This review focuses on the progress in supramolecular self-assembly of biopolymers with carbon nanotubes, and their advances in sensing and actuation. To promote the development of advanced biopolymer/CNT functional materials, new electromechanical characteristics of biopolymer/CNT composites are discussed in detail based on the relationship between the microscopic biopolymer structures and the macroscopic composite properties.

  10. PROPERTIES OF PREPARATIONS FUNCTIONAL BIOPOLYMERS OF A FISH ORIGIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Antipova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of theoretical and practical bases of technology of biocompatible materials of a domestic production on the basis of the natural polymeric systems allocated from raw materials of an animal, fish and a phytogenesis is actual in interests of development of science, health care, ecology. Now practically there are no domestic materials on the basis of products of modification of biopolymers for production of biocompatible materials with adjustable physical and chemical and biological properties. In this regard the special importance is gained by works on studying of functional properties of natural biopolymers, in particular collagen, elastin, hyaluronic acid. Interest of researchers to biopolymers of the proteinaceous nature is quite reasonable as they possess sufficient permeability, a big specific surface and sorption capacity, possibility of receiving convenient in technological forms, a low immunogenicity, possibility of regulation лизиса. Data on possible ways of use are presented in article secondary the collagenic wastes - skins of fishes of internal reservoirs of Russia. Innovative processing methods of processing of secondary raw materials with receiving functional biopolymers of a wide range of application are developed. With application of modern methods of researches their characteristics and property are defined. On a complex of organoleptic, physical and chemical indicators, indexes of biological activity the received preparations hyaluronic acid and collagen can find broad application in medicine, cosmetology. The resource-saving technology of receiving tanning semi-finished products easily giving in to further processing for the purpose of receiving leather haberdashery and textile production is developed. Thus, scientific new approaches in processing of skins of pond fishes on the basis of their deep processing are proved.

  11. Shape-memory biopolymers based on β-sheet structures of polyalanine segments inspired by spider silks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huahua; Hu, Jinlian; Zhu, Yong

    2013-02-01

    The molecular structural design learned from natural materials enables synthetic polymers with desirable and unique features to be fabricated. Inspired by spider silks, short-chain polyalanine (PA) is introduced into multiblock biopolymers with poly(ε-caprolactone) segments via a coupling reaction. As a result, PA segments in biopolymers form similar β-sheet crystals to that of natural spidroins. These new biopolymers are found to exhibit nearly complete shape recovery and high shape fixity, along with significantly improved thermal stability due to the strong β-sheet structures as netpoints. This work provides new insight for the design of novel shape-memory polymers with potential use in biomedical applications.

  12. Influence of Incorporation of Natural Fibers on the Physical, Mechanical, and Thermal Properties of Composites LDPE-Al Reinforced with Fique Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A. Hidalgo-Salazar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study shows the effect of the incorporation of natural fique fibers in a matrix formed by low-density polyethylene and aluminum (LDPE-Al obtained in the recycling process of long-life Tetra Pak packaging. The reinforcement content was 10, 20, and 30% fibers, manufactured by hot-press compression molding of composite boards (LDPE-Al/fique. From the thermogravimetric analysis (TGA it was determined that the proportions of the LDPE-Al were 75 : 25 w/w. Likewise, it was found that the aluminum particles increased the rigidity of the LDPE-Al, reducing the impact strength compared to LDPE recycled from Tetra Pak without aluminum; besides this, the crystallinity in the LDPE-Al increased with the presence of aluminum, which was observed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. The maximum strength and Young’s modulus to tensile and flexural properties increased with the incorporation of the fibers, this increase being a direct function of the amount of reinforcement contained in the material. Finally, a reduction in the density of the compound by the generation of voids at the interface between the LDPE-Al and fique fibers was identified, and there was also a greater water absorption due to weak interphase fiber-matrix and the hydrophilic fibers contained in the material.

  13. Remote monitoring of a natural gas pipeline using fiber optic sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cauchi, Sam; Morison, William Donald [Fiber Optic Systems Technology Inc. (FOX-TEK), Bedford, Nova Scotia (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    The pipeline network referred to herein transports natural gas from the NE part of British Columbia through Western Canada into the US Mid-West. Across over 2000 km of the operator's large diameter transmission pipeline system are numerous river crossings and other geotechnical hazards that are continuously identified and risk ranked using a variety of methods, including in line inspection and geotechnical surveys. One particular section of the operator's mainline near Edmonton, Alberta, where railway tracks have recently been installed overtop this vital natural gas transport pipeline, will be the focus of this paper. In order to protect the pipeline from soil stresses to be imposed by heavy cyclic loading during construction of the railway tracks and when trains begin passing overtop, protective concrete structures were constructed around the pipeline within the vicinity of the tracks. While these structures assist in maintaining the integrity of the pipeline in the presence of heavy loading forces, they simultaneously prevent any subsequent access to the pipeline for general inspection and repair. As a result, prior to the construction of the protective concrete structures, the operator made multiple modifications to the pipeline's integrity system within the area of the proposed tracks. This included the enhancement of the cathodic protection to further prevent external corrosion, and the installation of fiber optic strain gauges at multiple sites to ensure that strain levels remain within tolerable limits under the inaccessible area. Background information on operator's pipeline and the layout of the protective concrete structures and railways will be presented in addition to field data obtained using the fiber optic strain monitoring system. An introduction to fiber optic strain gauges will be given, followed by a discussion on the design and installation of the sensors themselves. The particular method used to analyze the strain data is

  14. Biopolymer chitin: extraction and characterization; Biopolimero quitina: extracao e caracterizacao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    The biopolymers are materials made from renewable sources such as soybean, corn, cane sugar, cellulose and chitin. Chitin is the most abundant biopolymer found in nature, after cellulose. The chemical structure of chitin is distinguished by the hydroxyl group, of structure from cellulose, located at position C-2, which in the chitin is replaced by acetamine group. The objective of this study was to develop the chitin from exoskeletons of Litopenaeus vannamei shrimp, which are discarded as waste, causing pollutions, environmental problems and thus obtain better utilization of these raw materials. It also, show the extraction process and deacetylation of chitosan. The extraction of chitin followed steps of demineralization, desproteinization and deodorization. Chitin and chitosan were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the thermals properties were analyzed by thermogravimetry (TG/DTG). (author)

  15. The Force-Velocity Relation for Growing Biopolymers

    CERN Document Server

    Carlsson, A E

    2000-01-01

    The process of force generation by the growth of biopolymers is simulated via a Langevin-dynamics approach. The interaction forces are taken to have simple forms that favor the growth of straight fibers from solution. The force-velocity relation is obtained from the simulations for two versions of the monomer-monomer force field. It is found that the growth rate drops off more rapidly with applied force than expected from the simplest theories based on thermal motion of the obstacle. The discrepancies amount to a factor of three or more when the applied force exceeds 2.5kT/a, where a is the step size for the polymer growth. These results are explained on the basis of restricted diffusion of monomers near the fiber tip. It is also found that the mobility of the obstacle has little effect on the growth rate, over a broad range.

  16. Adsorption of Cu(II), Hg(II), and Ni(II) ions by modified natural wool chelating fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monier, M; Ayad, D M; Sarhan, A A

    2010-04-15

    The graft copolymerization of ethyl acrylate (EA) onto natural wool fibers initiated by potassium persulphate and Mohr's salt redox initiator system in limited aqueous medium was carried out in heterogeneous media. Ester groups of the grafted copolymers were partially converted into hydrazide function groups followed by hydrazone formation through reaction with isatin. Also the application of the modified fibers for metal ion uptake was studied using Cu(II), Hg(II) and Ni(II). The modified chelating fibers were characterized using FTIR spectroscopy, SEM and X-ray diffraction.

  17. Adsorption of Cu(II), Hg(II), and Ni(II) ions by modified natural wool chelating fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monier, M., E-mail: monierchem@yahoo.com [Chemistry Department, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Mansoura University, Mansoura (Egypt); Ayad, D.M.; Sarhan, A.A. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Mansoura University, Mansoura (Egypt)

    2010-04-15

    The graft copolymerization of ethyl acrylate (EA) onto natural wool fibers initiated by potassium persulphate and Mohr's salt redox initiator system in limited aqueous medium was carried out in heterogeneous media. Ester groups of the grafted copolymers were partially converted into hydrazide function groups followed by hydrazone formation through reaction with isatin. Also the application of the modified fibers for metal ion uptake was studied using Cu(II), Hg(II) and Ni(II). The modified chelating fibers were characterized using FTIR spectroscopy, SEM and X-ray diffraction.

  18. Preliminary Design and Experimental Investigation of a Novel Pneumatic Conveying Method to Disperse Natural Fibers in Thermoset Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahi Fahimian

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Natural fibers can be attractive reinforcing materials in thermosetting polymers due to their low density and high specific mechanical properties. Although the research effort in this area has grown substantially over the last 20 years, manufacturing technologies to make use of short natural fibers in high volume fraction composites; are still limited. Natural fibers, after retting and preprocessing, are discontinuous and easily form entangled bundles. Dispersion and mixing these short fibers with resin to manufacture high quality, high volume fraction composites presents a significant challenge. In this paper, a novel pneumatic design for dispersion of natural fibers in their original discontinuous form is described. In this design, compressed air is used to create vacuum to feed and convey fibres while breaking down fibre clumps and dispersing them in an aerosolized resin stream. Model composite materials, made using proof-of-concept prototype equipment, were imaged with both optical and X-ray tomography to evaluate fibre and resin dispersion. The images indicated that the system was capable of providing an intimate mixture of resin and detangled fibres for two different resin viscosities. The new pneumatic process could serve as the basis of a system to produce well-dispersed high-volume fraction composites containing discontinuous natural fibres drawn directly from a loosely packed source.

  19. The use of a pH-dependent and Non pH-dependent Natural Hydrophobic Biopolymer (Landolphia owariensis latex as Capsule Coating Agents in in vitro Controlled Release of Metronidazole for Possible Colon Targeted Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N C Obitte

    2010-03-01

    : Landolphia owariensis latex is an ignored part of the climber tree. It can be cultivated and tapped to commercial scale as in rubber. There is presently a patent based on colon targeted technology which adopted  capsule coating approach. The dip method of coating employed in this article is a common technology in capsule manufacture; therefore coating of the capsules with our natural biopolymer and Eudragit L-100 is not going to be tasking. This double hydrophobic coating technique prolongs drug release enough to convey the capsule to the colon with greatest quantity of the drug intact. This makes colon drug targeting an attractive drug delivery approach for the rare oral delivery of protein/biotech products, etc. Insulin is commonly presented as an injectable with its attendant problem of patient compliance and frequent puncturing of the skin. With capsule filling machines having coating accessories attached to them large scale manufacture can be embarked upon.

  20. Preparation of Biopolymer Aerogels Using Green Solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subrahmanyam, Raman; Gurikov, Pavel; Meissner, Imke; Smirnova, Irina

    2016-01-01

    Although the first reports on aerogels made by Kistler1 in the 1930s dealt with aerogels from both inorganic oxides (silica and others) and biopolymers (gelatin, agar, cellulose), only recently have biomasses been recognized as an abundant source of chemically diverse macromolecules for functional aerogel materials. Biopolymer aerogels (pectin, alginate, chitosan, cellulose, etc.) exhibit both specific inheritable functions of starting biopolymers and distinctive features of aerogels (80-99% porosity and specific surface up to 800 m2/g). This synergy of properties makes biopolymer aerogels promising candidates for a wide gamut of applications such as thermal insulation, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, drug delivery systems, functional foods, catalysts, adsorbents and sensors. This work demonstrates the use of pressurized carbon dioxide (5 MPa) for the ionic cross linking of amidated pectin into hydrogels. Initially a biopolymer/salt dispersion is prepared in water. Under pressurized CO2 conditions, the pH of the biopolymer solution is lowered to 3 which releases the crosslinking cations from the salt to bind with the biopolymer yielding hydrogels. Solvent exchange to ethanol and further supercritical CO2 drying (10 - 12 MPa) yield aerogels. Obtained aerogels are ultra-porous with low density (as low as 0.02 g/cm3), high specific surface area (350 - 500 m2/g) and pore volume (3 - 7 cm3/g for pore sizes less than 150 nm). PMID:27403649

  1. Effect of Silane Treatment on Hybridized Use of Short Cellulose Fibers and Silica Particles for Natural Rubber Reinforcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopattananon, Natinee; Jitkalong, Dolmalik; Seadan, Manus; Sakai, Tadamoto

    Processability, swelling and tensile properties of natural-rubber-based hybrid composites prepared by mixing short cellulose fibers and fine silica particles of equal contents with total loading of 20 phr using a two-roll mill were analyzed. Their properties were compared with those of natural rubber reinforced with single filler (silica or cellulose fiber) and corresponding unfilled natural rubber. The tensile test showed the reinforcing effect of both single filler system and hybrid filler system in relation to natural rubber. The tensile modulus and tensile strength of hybrid composites generally laid between those of fiber-reinforced and silica-reinforced natural rubber composites, whereas the elongation at break of hybrid composites was equal to that of single filler reinforcement system. The Mooney viscosity of silica-filled compound was much higher than that of unfilled natural rubber and short fiber-filled compounds, and was significantly reduced when hybridized fillers were used. Furthermore, a silane coupling agent, Si 69, was used to modify the surface properties of cellulose fibers and silica particles. Three microscopic evaluation techniques, that is, elemental X-ray mapping (EDX), 3D microfocus X-ray scanning, and N-ARC methods were applied to investigate the filler dispersion/mixing effects. It was found that both of the fillers were more homogeneously dispersed in the hybrid composites, and the affinity between the fillers and natural rubber was improved after the silane treatment. The results from this work suggested that the better dispersion of short cellulose fiber/silica hybrid fillers had great advantages in rubber processing, and allowed for equal or higher composite strength compared to a simply silica-filled composite system.

  2. Equilibrium & Nonequilibrium Fluctuation Effects in Biopolymer Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachan, Devin Michael

    Fluctuation-induced interactions are an important organizing principle in a variety of soft matter systems. In this dissertation, I explore the role of both thermal and active fluctuations within cross-linked polymer networks. The systems I study are in large part inspired by the amazing physics found within the cytoskeleton of eukaryotic cells. I first predict and verify the existence of a thermal Casimir force between cross-linkers bound to a semi-flexible polymer. The calculation is complicated by the appearance of second order derivatives in the bending Hamiltonian for such polymers, which requires a careful evaluation of the the path integral formulation of the partition function in order to arrive at the physically correct continuum limit and properly address ultraviolet divergences. I find that cross linkers interact along a filament with an attractive logarithmic potential proportional to thermal energy. The proportionality constant depends on whether and how the cross linkers constrain the relative angle between the two filaments to which they are bound. The interaction has important implications for the synthesis of biopolymer bundles within cells. I model the cross-linkers as existing in two phases: bound to the bundle and free in solution. When the cross-linkers are bound, they behave as a one-dimensional gas of particles interacting with the Casimir force, while the free phase is a simple ideal gas. Demanding equilibrium between the two phases, I find a discontinuous transition between a sparsely and a densely bound bundle. This discontinuous condensation transition induced by the long-ranged nature of the Casimir interaction allows for a similarly abrupt structural transition in semiflexible filament networks between a low cross linker density isotropic phase and a higher cross link density bundle network. This work is supported by the results of finite element Brownian dynamics simulations of semiflexible filaments and transient cross-linkers. I

  3. Autonomous valve for detection of biopolymer degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Stephan Urs; Noeth, Nadine-Nicole; Fetz, Stefanie

    2009-01-01

    We present a polymer microvalve that allows the detection of biopolymer degradation without the need of external energy. The valve is based on a polymer container filled with a colored marker solution and closed by a thin lid. This structure is covered by a film of poly(L-lactide) and degradation...... of the biopolymer triggers the release of the color which is detected visually. The autonomous valve has potential for the fast testing of biopolymer degradation under various environmental conditions or by specific enzymes....

  4. An analysis of the abaca natural fiber in reinforcing concrete composites as a construction material in developing countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magdamo, R.V.

    1988-01-01

    This study analyzed the flexural and splitting tensile strengths and the ductility of abaca fiber-reinforced concrete composites. Abaca fibers are natural fibers of vegetable origin from the abaca plant native to the Philippine Islands. The purpose was to investigate how various volume-fractions of the abaca fiber could affect the mechanical properties of the concrete matrix. A concrete design mix containing a volume ratio of 1.0 part Type I Portland cement and 3.0 parts sand was used in the preparation of laboratory test samples. Abaca fibers were 1 to 1.5 inches long and randomly mixed with the concrete at 0.2% and 0.4% volume fractions. The fibers were not chemically treated and no admixtures were used. Samples were cast into concrete cylinders and flexural beams. Standard ASTM procedures in casting of flexural beams and concrete cylinders and the curing of 28-day concrete samples were followed. The center-point loading method of the flexural test and the splitting tensile test was utilized. Addition of abaca fibers decreased the mean flexural and splitting tensile strengths of the concrete matrices. However, ductility of the matrices increased with the addition of abaca fibers at 0.2% and 0.4% volume-fractions. The Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) micrographs revealed that increasing the fiber volume-fraction influenced the growth rate of dehydration precipitates as CH (calcium hydroxide) crystals. At the 0.2% volume-fraction, smaller density of precipitates grew into large crystals, while at the 0.4% volume-fraction, the dehydration precipitates were much more dense, which were made up of small sized crystals. Abaca fibers in the concrete mix decreased the mean flexural and splitting tensile strengths, increased the modulus of elasticity, improved the ductility, and acted as a medium to slow down and stop the propagation of cracks.

  5. Application of Polymeric Nanocomposites and Carbon Fiber Composites in the Production of Natural Gas Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto João Pavani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This research work is about the experimental analysis of the mechanical behavior of reservoirs for storage of compressed natural gas (CNG consisting of a nanopolymeric liner coated with carbon fiber preimpregnated with epoxy resin applied by filament winding (FW. It addresses technical solutions adopted to optimize the reservoir as reinforcement with fiber, the process of healing and thermal analysis, as well as the hydrostatic testing to verify its resistance to the pressure required for CNG storage. Different nanoclays were incorporated to the polymer aiming to increase the strength of the liner and to reduce the thickness of its wall and the final weight of the reservoir as well as decreasing gas permeability. The obtained results were the basis for proposing an adaptation of the equation traditionally used for the dimensioning of the wall thickness of metallic pressure vessels to determine the number of layers needed to endure any internal pressure to which the reservoir is subjected. They indicate that the used methodology enables the production of pressure vessels for the storage of CNG, according to the ISO 11439:2013 Standard.

  6. Improved biomass degradation using fungal glucuronoyl-esterases-hydrolysis of natural corn fiber substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Errico, Clotilde; Börjesson, Johan; Ding, Hanshu; Krogh, Kristian B R M; Spodsberg, Nikolaj; Madsen, Robert; Monrad, Rune Nygaard

    2016-02-10

    Lignin-carbohydrate complexes (LCCs) are in part responsible for the recalcitrance of lignocellulosics in relation to industrial utilization of biomass for biofuels. Glucuronoyl esterases (GEs) belonging to the carbohydrate esterase family 15 have been proposed to be able to degrade ester LCCs between glucuronic acids in xylans and lignin alcohols. By means of synthesized complex LCC model substrates we provide kinetic data suggesting a preference of fungal GEs for esters of bulky arylalkyl alcohols such as ester LCCs. Furthermore, using natural corn fiber substrate we report the first examples of improved degradation of lignocellulosic biomass by the use of GEs. Improved C5 sugar, glucose and glucuronic acid release was observed when heat pretreated corn fiber was incubated in the presence of GEs from Cerrena unicolor and Trichoderma reesei on top of different commercial cellulase/hemicellulase preparations. These results emphasize the potential of GEs for delignification of biomass thereby improving the overall yield of fermentable sugars for biofuel production. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Epoxy Resins Toughened with Surface Modified Epoxidized Natural Rubber Fibers by One-Step Electrospinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joo Ran; Kim, Jung J

    2017-04-27

    Epoxidized natural rubber fibers (ERFs) are developed through one-step electrospinning and directly deposited into epoxy resins without collecting and distributing of fibers. The shape of ERFs shows rough surface due to different evaporation rate of solvent mixture consisting of chloroform and dichloromethane and the average diameter of ERFs is 6.2 µm. The increase of ERFs loading from 0 to 20 wt % into the epoxy resin increases the fracture strain significantly from 1.2% to 13% and toughness from 0.3 MPa to 1.9 MPa by a factor of 7. However, the tensile strength and Young's modulus decrease about 34% from 58 MPa to 34 MPa and from 1.4 GPa to 0.9 GPa, respectively. Due to the crosslinking reactions between oxirane groups of ERFs and amine groups in the resin, surface roughness and the high aspect ratio of ERFs, ERFs result in more effective toughening effect with the minimum loss of tensile properties in epoxy resins.

  8. Topology and geometry of biopolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janse Van Rensburg, E.J. [York Univ., Downsview, Ontario (Canada); Orlandini, E.; Tesi, M.C. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    This paper is concerned with some simple lattice models of the entanglement complexity of polymers in dilute solution, with special reference to biopolymers such as DNA. We review a number of rigorous results about the asymptotic behavior of the knot probability, the entanglement complexity and the writhe of a lattice polygon (as a model of a ring polymer) and discuss Monte Carlo results for intermediate length polygons. In addition we discuss how this model can be augmented to include the effect of solvent quality and ionic strength. We also describe a lattice ribbon model which is able to capture the main properties of an oriented ribbon-like molecule (such as duplex DNA). 47 refs., 1 fig.

  9. Chemical Modeling of Acid-Base Properties of Soluble Biopolymers Derived from Municipal Waste Treatment Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabasso, Silvia; Berto, Silvia; Rosato, Roberta; Tafur Marinos, Janeth Alicia; Ginepro, Marco; Zelano, Vincenzo; Daniele, Pier Giuseppe; Montoneri, Enzo

    2015-01-01

    This work reports a study of the proton-binding capacity of biopolymers obtained from different materials supplied by a municipal biowaste treatment plant located in Northern Italy. One material was the anaerobic fermentation digestate of the urban wastes organic humid fraction. The others were the compost of home and public gardening residues and the compost of the mix of the above residues, digestate and sewage sludge. These materials were hydrolyzed under alkaline conditions to yield the biopolymers by saponification. The biopolymers were characterized by 13C NMR spectroscopy, elemental analysis and potentiometric titration. The titration data were elaborated to attain chemical models for interpretation of the proton-binding capacity of the biopolymers obtaining the acidic sites concentrations and their protonation constants. The results obtained with the models and by NMR spectroscopy were elaborated together in order to better characterize the nature of the macromolecules. The chemical nature of the biopolymers was found dependent upon the nature of the sourcing materials. PMID:25658795

  10. Chemical Modeling of Acid-Base Properties of Soluble Biopolymers Derived from Municipal Waste Treatment Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Tabasso

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This work reports a study of the proton-binding capacity of biopolymers obtained from different materials supplied by a municipal biowaste treatment plant located in Northern Italy. One material was the anaerobic fermentation digestate of the urban wastes organic humid fraction. The others were the compost of home and public gardening residues and the compost of the mix of the above residues, digestate and sewage sludge. These materials were hydrolyzed under alkaline conditions to yield the biopolymers by saponification. The biopolymers were characterized by 13C NMR spectroscopy, elemental analysis and potentiometric titration. The titration data were elaborated to attain chemical models for interpretation of the proton-binding capacity of the biopolymers obtaining the acidic sites concentrations and their protonation constants. The results obtained with the models and by NMR spectroscopy were elaborated together in order to better characterize the nature of the macromolecules. The chemical nature of the biopolymers was found dependent upon the nature of the sourcing materials.

  11. Production of natural fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites through the use of polyhydroxybutyrate-rich biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coats, Erik R; Loge, Frank J; Wolcott, Michael P; Englund, Karl; McDonald, Armando G

    2008-05-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that production of natural fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites (NFRTCs) utilizing bacterially-derived pure polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) does not yield a product that is cost competitive with synthetic plastic-based NFRTCs. Moreover, the commercial production of pure PHB is not without environmental impacts. To address these issues, we integrated unpurified PHB in NFRTC construction, thereby eliminating a significant energy and cost sink (ca. 30-40%) while concurrently yielding a fully biologically based commodity. PHB-rich biomass synthesized with the microorganism Azotobacter vinelandii UWD was utilized to manufacture NFRTCs with wood flour. Resulting composites exhibited statistically similar bending strength properties despite relatively different PHB contents. Moreover, the presence of microbial cell debris allowed for NFRTC processing at significantly reduced polymer content, relative to pure PHB-based NFRTCs. Results further indicate that current commercial PHB production yields are sufficiently high to produce composites comparable to those manufactured with purified PHB.

  12. Use of irradiation technique for obtaining and modification of biopolymers; Zastosowanie techniki radiacyjnej do otrzymywania i modyfikacji biopolimerow. Praca pogladowa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewandowska-Szumiel, M. [Akademia Medyczna, Warsaw (Poland); Kaluska, I. [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw (Poland)

    1994-12-31

    A review of papers concerning application of radiation techniques to the biopolymers production is presented. The nature of electron and gamma irradiation influence on polymers is outlined. Advantages of the method from the point of view of biocompatibility and biofunctionality of biopolymers are underlined. Among them the most important are the following: chemical purity of products, high efficiency of the method, expanded influence on polymers` structure, usefulness in the graft copolymerization, ability of avoiding enhanced temperature during polymerization and sterility of products. Examples of biopolymers obtained or modified by means of irradiation techniques are gathered. (author). 35 refs.

  13. Mixed Biopolymer Systems Based on Starch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Noda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A binary mixture of starch–starch or starch with other biopolymers such as protein and non-starch polysaccharides could provide a new approach in producing starch-based food products. In the context of food processing, a specific adjustment in the rheological properties plays an important role in regulating production processing and optimizing the applicability, stability, and sensory of the final food products. This review examines various biopolymer mixtures based on starch and the influence of their interaction on physicochemical and rheological properties of the starch-based foods. It is evident that the physicochemical and rheological characteristics of the biopolymers mixture are highly dependent on the type of starch and other biopolymers that make them up mixing ratios, mixing procedure and presence of other food ingredients in the mixture. Understanding these properties will lead to improve the formulation of starch–based foods and minimize the need to resort to chemically modified starch.

  14. Identification of Important Process Variables for Fiber Spinning of Protein Nanotubes Generated from Waste Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-11

    fibers, identification of important spin dope processing and fiber spinning parameters for further opti Fibers, biopolymer , sustainable materials...engineering without disrupting their integrity 19-23, 27, 30. Due to these properties, TMV and M13 are particularly interesting scaffolds for developing...thinning along the fiber were recorded. Under polarizing light, birefringence, which is used to evaluate molecular alignment of the biopolymer chains

  15. The Effects of the Substitution of Wood Fiberwith Agro-based Fiber (Barley Straw on the Properties of Natural Fiber/Polypropylene Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyvärinen Marko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ecological concerns and the impending depletion of fossil fuels are driving the development of new bio-based, green products. Natural fibers are used increasingly as a filler or reinforcement in commercial thermoplastics due to their low cost, high specific properties and renewable nature. Agricultural byproducts and wastes are excellent alternative materials to supplement or substitute wood material as a reinforcement in composites.This comparative study focuses on the effects of the substitution of wood fiber with agro-basedfiber (barley straw on the mechanical and physical properties of natural fiber/polypropylene composites. The studied mechanical properties are flexural strength and modulus, Brinell hardness and Charpy impact strength. Water absorption and thickness swelling are studied as physical properties. Generally, the research resultsindicate that almost all the studied properties weakened significantlyas woodwas substituted with barley straw.Ofmechanical properties, the major decrease wasobserved in hardness.However, the use of barley straw slightlyimproved impact strength.The moisture-related properties, water absorption and thickness swelling,which have a great impact on the durability of a composite material, weakened significantly.

  16. On the nature of interface of carbon nanotube coated carbon fibers with different polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh Bedi, Harpreet; Padhee, Srikant S.; Agnihotri, Prabhat K.

    2016-07-01

    Experimental investigations are carried out to analyse the wetting behaviour of carbon nanotube (CNT) coated carbon fiber to determine their suitability to process carbon nanotube coated carbon fiber/polymer multiscale composites for structural applications. To overcome the problem of agglomeration, CNTs are grown directly on the surface of carbon fibers as well as fabric using thermal chemical vapour deposition (CVD) technique. The term multiscale is used because different reinforcement mechanisms operate at the scale of long fibers and CNTs which are of few micrometers in length. The load carrying capacity of these multiscale composites critically depends on the efficiency and extent of load transfer from low strength matrix to high strength fiber which in turn depends on the interfacial strength between CNT coated carbon fiber and polymer matrix. A systematic analysis of wetting behaviour of CNT coated carbon fiber with epoxy and polyester matrix is carried out in this study. It is shown that CNT coated carbon fibers as well as fabric show better wettability with epoxy matrix as compared to polyester matrix. This results in stronger interface of CNT coated carbon fiber with epoxy as compared to polyester in multiscale composite system. A similar observation is made in nanoindentation testing of single fiber multiscale composites processed with epoxy and polyester matrix. In addition, it is observed that wettability, interfacial strength and average properties of CNT coated carbon fiber/polymer composites are a function of CNT density on the surface of carbon fibers.

  17. Bending strength and fracture surface topography of natural fiber-reinforced shell for investment casting process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Lu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the properties of silica sol shell for investment casting process, various contents of cattail fibers were added into the slurry to prepare a fiber-reinforced shell in the present study. The bending strength of fiber-reinforced shell was investigated and the fracture surfaces of shell specimens were observed using SEM. It is found that the bending strength increases with the increase of fiber content, and the bending strength of a green shell with 1.0 wt.% fiber addition increases by 44% compared to the fiber-free shell. The failure of specimens of the fiber-reinforced green shell results from fiber rupture and debonding between the interface of fibers and adhesive under the bending load. The micro-crack propagation in the matrix is inhibited by the micro-holes for ablation of fibers in specimens of the fiber-reinforced shell during the stage of being fired. As a result, the bending strength of specimens of the fired shell had no significant drop. Particularly, the bending strength of specimens of the fired shell reinforced with 0.6wt.% fiber reached the maximum value of 4.6 MPa.

  18. Control of fibroin conformation: Toward the development of a biomimetic spinning process for silk fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Kimberly Ann Trabbic

    1999-09-01

    Nature has shown that silks are sophisticated structural materials with remarkable mechanical properties; however, they are produced using far milder conditions than high-performance synthetic polymer fibers. While recent advances in molecular biotechnology have taken great strides toward the production of proteinaceous biopolymers, little is known about the processing conditions needed to spin fibers with the correct microstructures and mechanical properties. It is the purpose of this research to gain a fundamental understanding about how processing conditions affect the molecular structure of a model protein biopolymer, Bombyx mori silkworm fibroin, the structural protein of cocoon silk. Fibers of B. mori fibroin were wet spun from 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol (HFIP) into a methanol coagulation bath. X-ray fiber diffraction and quantitative Raman spectroscopy were used to determine that both naturally- and synthetically-spun fibers contain a high degree of beta-sheet (~50%). Fibers subjected to a post-spinning draw exhibited a preferential molecular alignment parallel to the fiber axis resulting in increased strength, stiffness, and extensibility. Fibers with microstructures and mechanical properties most similar to those of naturally-spun fibers were reproduced in synthetically-spun fibers with a draw ratio of 3.5. The transformation of helical fibroin in HFIP to beta-sheet sheet fibroin in synthetically-spun fibers was determined to be caused by the methanol coagulation bath. The kinetics beta-sheet fibroin crystallization from aqueous solution was investigated by monitoring the sigmoidal progression of gel formation using turbidity and Raman spectroscopy. Gelation kinetics were evaluated by measuring lag time, maximum gelation rate, and optical density to determine the effects of protein concentration, detergent concentration (nucleating agent), headgroup chemistry, ionic strength, pH, and temperature. An optimal molar ratio between SDS and fibroin (100

  19. Sisal natural fiber reinforcement influenced with experimental and numerical investigation onto vibration and mechanical properties of composite plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZamanAbudAlmalikAbud Ali

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study interested in preparation of composite material specimen by using natural fibers sisal and polyester resin. The specimens were pretreated in different of volume fraction of sisal and resins which are were (05-35 % sisal, respectively. Specimen model fabricated had plate shape, where, can be applying vibration test and tensile test. Specimens were tested by using tensile properties test. Results reveal that the best specimen had mechanical properties was (A which are (35-65 % sisal-resin, where, specimen appeared best modulus elasticity in longitudinal fibers E1 (5.925 Gpa so lower value modulus elasticity in transverse fibers E2 (4.860 Gpa for same specimen. (A specimen gives stronger material compared with at each of specimens, which indicates high toughness and strength of materials because reinforcement of sisal fibers use of a higher percentage of fiber 35%. Specimen were tested vibration test as types of fixations of specimen, result reveal the natural frequency high at clamped supported four edges (CCCC, (202.73Hz compared at each of another specimens, because (CCCC specimen had high volume fraction of plant fiber sisal and less volume fraction of polyester resin (35-65 % sisal-polyester. Natural frequency was obtained by using numerical analyzing at running ANSYS program (VER.14. the results finding, there are similarity between behavior of composite material samples from where, natural frequency and volume fraction , results reveal that numerical analyzing of plate composite materials was little better from experimental work but both of tests in simulation and experimental test appear same of final results which (CCCC specimen was better at of each specimens to apply strength of materials and whenever increasing volume fraction of sisal obtained high strength of material.

  20. Natural and synthetic prion structure from X-ray fiber diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wille, Holger; Bian, Wen; McDonald, Michele; Kendall, Amy; Colby, David W.; Bloch, Lillian; Ollesch, Julian; Borovinskiy, Alexander L.; Cohen, Fred E.; Prusiner, Stanley B.; Stubbs, Gerald; (Vanderbilt); (UCSF)

    2009-10-21

    A conformational isoform of the mammalian prion protein (PrP{sup Sc}) is the sole component of the infectious pathogen that causes the prion diseases. We have obtained X-ray fiber diffraction patterns from infectious prions that show cross-{beta} diffraction: meridional intensity at 4.8 {angstrom} resolution, indicating the presence of {beta} strands running approximately at right angles to the filament axis and characteristic of amyloid structure. Some of the patterns also indicated the presence of a repeating unit along the fiber axis, corresponding to four {beta}-strands. We found that recombinant (rec) PrP amyloid differs substantially from highly infectious brain-derived prions, both in structure as demonstrated by the diffraction data, and in heterogeneity as shown by electron microscopy. In addition to the strong 4.8 {angstrom} meridional reflection, the recPrP amyloid diffraction is characterized by strong equatorial intensity at approximately 10.5 {angstrom}, absent from brain-derived prions, and indicating the presence of stacked {beta}-sheets. Synthetic prions recovered from transgenic mice inoculated with recPrP amyloid displayed structural characteristics and homogeneity similar to those of naturally occurring prions. The relationship between the structural differences and prion infectivity is uncertain, but might be explained by any of several hypotheses: only a minority of recPrP amyloid possesses a replication-competent conformation, the majority of recPrP amyloid has to undergo a conformational maturation to acquire replication competency, or inhibitory forms of recPrP amyloid interfere with replication during the initial transmission.

  1. Natural fiber composites with EMI shielding function fabricated using VARTM and Cu film magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Changlei [Department of Mechanical and Energy Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203 (United States); Ren, Han [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203 (United States); Shi, Sheldon Q., E-mail: Sheldon.Shi@unt.edu [Department of Mechanical and Energy Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203 (United States); Zhang, Hualiang [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203 (United States); Cheng, Jiangtao [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Cai, Liping [Department of Mechanical and Energy Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203 (United States); Chen, Kathleen; Tan, Hwa-Shen [Texas Academy of Mathematics and Science, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203 (United States)

    2016-01-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Natural-fiber-reinforced composites with electromagnetic shielding were fabricated. • Copper magnetron sputtering was applied on the composite surfaces. • The highest electromagnetic interference shielding effective reached 48.3 dB. • The water contact angle changed from 49.6° to 129.5° after 0.5-h sputtering. - Abstract: To fabricate kenaf fiber composites with electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding function, the technique of vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) and Cu film magnetron sputtering were employed. The EMI shielding effectiveness (SE) and composite surface characteristics were examined with PNA Network Analyzer, Quanta 200 environmental scanning electron microscope and OCA20 contact angle meter. After being Cu-sputter coated for 0.5 h, 1 h, 2 h, and 3 h, the EMI SE values were increased to be 23.8 dB, 32.5 dB, 43.3 dB, and 48.3 dB, which denoted 99.5799%, 99.9437%, 99.9953%, or 99.9985% incident signal was blocked, respectively. The SEM observations revealed that the smoother surface of the composites was obtained by longer time sputtering, resulting in the SE improvement. The contact angle increased from 49.6° to 129.5° after 0.5 h sputtering, which indicated that the coated Cu film dramatically improved the hydrophobic property of composite. When the coating time increased to 3 h, the contact angle decreased to 51.0° because the composite surface roughness decreased with the increase in coating time.

  2. Collagen mimetic peptide discs promote assembly of a broad range of natural protein fibers through hydrophobic interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuinness, Kenneth; Nanda, Vikas

    2017-07-19

    Collagen mimetic peptides that alone formed two-dimensional nanoscale discs driven by hydrophobic interactions were shown in electron microscopy studies to also co-assemble with natural fibrous proteins to produce discs-on-a-string (DoS) nanostructures. In most cases, peptide discs also facilitated bundling of the protein fibers. This provides insight into how synthetic and natural proteins may be combined to develop multicomponent, multi-dimensional architectures at the nanoscale.

  3. Hybrid Polymer/UiO-66(Zr) and Polymer/NaY Fiber Sorbents for Mercaptan Removal from Natural Gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Grace; Koros, William J; Jones, Christopher W

    2016-04-20

    Zeolite NaY and metal organic frameworks MIL-53(Al) and UiO-66(Zr) are spun with cellulose acetate (CA) polymer to create hybrid porous composite fibers for the selective adsorption of sulfur odorant compounds from pipeline natural gas. Odorant removal is desirable to limit corrosion associated with sulfur oxide production, thereby increasing lifetime in gas turbines used for electricity generation. In line with these goals, the performance of the hybrid fibers is evaluated on the basis of sulfur sorption capacity and selectivity, as well as fiber stability and regenerability, compared to their polymer-free sorbent counterparts. The capacities of the powder sorbents are also measured using various desorption temperatures to evaluate the potential for lower temperature, energy, and cost-efficient system operation. Both NaY/CA and UiO-66(Zr)/CA hybrid fibers are prepared with high sorbent loadings, and both have high capacities and selectivities for t-butyl mercaptan (TBM) odorant sorption from a model natural gas (NG), while being stable to multiple regeneration cycles. The different advantages and disadvantages of both types of fibers relative are discussed, with both offering the potential advantages of low pressure drop, rapid heat and mass transfer, and low energy requirements over traditional sulfur removal technologies such as hydrodesulfurization (HDS) or adsorption in a pellet packed beds.

  4. Cell patterning with mucin biopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouzier, T.; Jang, H.; Ahn, J.; Stocker, R.; Ribbeck, K.

    2014-01-01

    The precise spatial control of cell adhesion to surfaces is an endeavor that has enabled discoveries in cell biology and new possibilities in tissue engineering. The generation of cell-repellent surfaces currently requires advanced chemistry techniques and could be simplified. Here we show that mucins, glycoproteins of high structural and chemical complexity, spontaneously adsorb on hydrophobic substrates to form coatings that prevent the surface adhesion of mammalian epithelial cells, fibroblasts, and myoblasts. These mucin coatings can be patterned with micrometer precision using a microfluidic device, and are stable enough to support myoblast differentiation over seven days. Moreover, our data indicate that the cell-repellent effect is dependent on mucin-associated glycans because their removal results in a loss of effective cell-repulsion. Last, we show that a critical surface density of mucins, which is required to achieve cell-repulsion, is efficiently obtained on hydrophobic surfaces, but not on hydrophilic glass surfaces. However, this limitation can be overcome by coating glass with hydrophobic fluorosilane. We conclude that mucin biopolymers are attractive candidates to control cell adhesion on surfaces. PMID:23980712

  5. Biophysical and biochemical characteristics of cutin, a plant barrier biopolymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heredia, Antonio

    2003-03-17

    Cutin is a support biopolyester involved in waterproofing the leaves and fruits of higher plants, regulating the flow of nutrients among various plant cells and organs, and minimizing the deleterious impact of pathogens. Despite the complexity and intractable nature of this biopolymer, significant progress in chemical composition, molecular architecture and, more recently, biosynthesis have been made in the past 10 years. This review is focused in the description of these advances and their physiological impacts to improve our knowledge on plant cutin, an unusual topic in most plant physiology and biochemistry books and reviews.

  6. Restoring Esthetics after Anterior Tooth Loss for a Five-Year-Old Child: Natural Tooth Pontic Fiber Reinforced Prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhirja Goel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The loss of anterior teeth can be hurtful to the patient both psychologically and socially. As the children are becoming more aware these days, they have also become conscious about their looks. Early loss of deciduous anterior teeth has a psychological effect on many children. In such young patients, paper replacement of the teeth can minimize these concerns. Many approaches have been described for this temporary replacement. This article describes the technique to use extracted natural teeth as pontics bonded to adjacent teeth with fiber reinforced resin. A fiber reinforced temporary replacement of missing teeth provides adequate strength and esthetic requirements in such cases.

  7. [Binding of Volatile Organic Compounds to Edible Biopolymers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misharina, T A; Terenina, M B; Krikunova, N I; Medvedeva, I B

    2016-01-01

    Capillary gas chromatography was used to study the influence of the composition and structure of different edible polymers (polysaccharides, vegetable fibers, and animal protein gelatin) on the binding of essential oil components. The retention of volatile organic compounds on biopolymers was shown to depend on their molecule structure and the presence, type, and position of a functional group. The maximum extent of the binding was observed for nonpolar terpene and sesquiterpene hydrocarbons, and the minimum extent was observed for alcohols. The components of essential oils were adsorbed due mostly to hydrophobic interactions. It was shown that the composition and structure of a compound, its physico-chemical state, and the presence of functional groups influence the binding. Gum arabic and guar gum were found to bind nonpolar compounds to a maximum and minimum extent, respectively. It was demonstrated the minimum adsorption ability of locust bean gum with respect to all studied compounds.

  8. Measurement of Cadmium Ion in the Presence of Metal-Binding Biopolymers in Aqueous Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Jian; Fukushi, Kensuke

    2013-01-01

    In aqueous environment, water-soluble polymers are effectively used to separate free metal ions from metal-polymer complexes. The feasibilities of four different analytical techniques, cadmium ion-selective electrode, dialysis sack, chelate disk cartridge, and ultrafiltration, in distinguishing biopolymer-bound and nonbound cadmium in aqueous samples were investigated. And two different biopolymers were used, including bovine serum albumin (BSA) and biopolymer solution extracted from cultivated activated sludge (ASBP). The ISE method requires relatively large amount of sample and contaminates sample during the pretreatment. After the long reaction time of dialysis, the equilibrium of cadmium in the dialysis sack would be shifted. Due to the sample nature, chelate disk cartridge could not filter within recommended time, which makes it unavailable for biopolymer use. Ultrafiltration method would not experience the difficulties mentioned above. Ultrafiltration method measuring both weakly and strongly bound cadmium was included in nominally biopolymer-cadmium complex. It had significant correlation with the Ion-selective electrode (ISE) method (R2 = 0.989 for BSA, 0.985 for ASBP). PMID:24194678

  9. Measurement of Cadmium Ion in the Presence of Metal-Binding Biopolymers in Aqueous Sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Pu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In aqueous environment, water-soluble polymers are effectively used to separate free metal ions from metal-polymer complexes. The feasibilities of four different analytical techniques, cadmium ion-selective electrode, dialysis sack, chelate disk cartridge, and ultrafiltration, in distinguishing biopolymer-bound and nonbound cadmium in aqueous samples were investigated. And two different biopolymers were used, including bovine serum albumin (BSA and biopolymer solution extracted from cultivated activated sludge (ASBP. The ISE method requires relatively large amount of sample and contaminates sample during the pretreatment. After the long reaction time of dialysis, the equilibrium of cadmium in the dialysis sack would be shifted. Due to the sample nature, chelate disk cartridge could not filter within recommended time, which makes it unavailable for biopolymer use. Ultrafiltration method would not experience the difficulties mentioned above. Ultrafiltration method measuring both weakly and strongly bound cadmium was included in nominally biopolymer-cadmium complex. It had significant correlation with the Ion-selective electrode (ISE method (R2=0.989 for BSA, 0.985 for ASBP.

  10. PREPARATION AND PROPERTIES OF EXTRACELLULAR BIOPOLYMER FLOCCULANT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The biopolymer flocculant (named PS-2) producing by Pseudomonas fluorescens was investigated. The PS-2 had high efficiency with small dosage, when dealing with kaolin suspension, formed larger floc, with big sedimentation rate, over a wide range of temperatures. Distributing of flocculating activity test showed that the biopolymer flocculant was an extracellular product. The composition analysis of purified biopolymer flocculant showed that it composed mainly of polysaccharide and nucleic acid. The content of polysaccharide was 86.7%, which determined by using phenol-vitriol method, and the content of nucleic acid was 7.8%, which determined by UV absorption method. The biopolymer flocculant as a powder form showed much better stability than that as a supernatant. The character of biopolymer flocculant was stable even it was heated to 100℃ when it in acidic condition. The optimal conditions to flocculate kaolin suspension were as follows: pH 8~12, flocculant dosage 1mL/L, and Ca2+ as the optimal cation.

  11. PREPARATION AND PROPERTIES OF EXTRACELLULAR BIOPOLYMER FLOCCULANT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Chunxiang; LIU Binbin; XIONG Jinshui; YAN Jingchun

    2007-01-01

    The biopolymer flocculant (named PS-2) producing by Pseudomonas fluorescens was investigated. The PS-2 had high efficiency with small dosage, when dealing with kaolin suspension,formed larger floc, with big sedimentation rate, over a wide range of temperatures. Distributing of flocculating activity test showed that the biopolymer flocculant was an extracellular product. The composition analysis of purified biopolymer flocculant showed that it composed mainly of polysaccharide and nucleic acid. The content of polysaccharide was 86.7%, which determined by using phenol-vitriol method, and the content of nucleic acid was 7.8%, which determined by UV absorption method. The biopolymer flocculant as a powder form showed much better stability than that as a supernatant. The character of biopolymer flocculant was stable even it was heated to 100 ℃ when it in acidic condition. The optimal conditions to flocculate kaolin suspension were as follows:pH 8~12, flocculant dosage 1mL/L, and Ca2+ as the optimal cation.

  12. Natural sisal fibers derived hierarchical porous activated carbon as capacitive material in lithium ion capacitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhewei; Guo, Huajun; Li, Xinhai; Wang, Zhixing; Yan, Zhiliang; Wang, Yansen

    2016-10-01

    Lithium-ion capacitor (LIC) is a novel advanced electrochemical energy storage (EES) system bridging gap between lithium ion battery (LIB) and electrochemical capacitor (ECC). In this work, we report that sisal fiber activated carbon (SFAC) was synthesized by hydrothermal treatment followed by KOH activation and served as capacitive material in LIC for the first time. Different particle structure, morphology, specific surface area and heteroatoms affected the electrochemical performance of as-prepared materials and corresponding LICs. When the mass ratio of KOH to char precursor was 2, hierarchical porous structured SFAC-2 was prepared and exhibited moderate specific capacitance (103 F g-1 at 0.1 A g-1), superior rate capability and cyclic stability (88% capacity retention after 5000 cycles at 1 A g-1). The corresponding assembled LIC (LIC-SC2) with optimal comprehensive electrochemical performance, displayed the energy density of 83 Wh kg-1, the power density of 5718 W kg-1 and superior cyclic stability (92% energy density retention after 1000 cycles at 0.5 A g-1). It is worthwhile that the source for activated carbon is a natural and renewable one and the synthesis method is eco-friendly, which facilitate that hierarchical porous activated carbon has potential applications in the field of LIC and other energy storage systems.

  13. Protective effect of natural flavonoids on rat peritoneal macrophages injury caused by asbestos fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostyuk, V A; Potapovich, A I; Speransky, S D; Maslova, G T

    1996-01-01

    Exposure of macrophages to asbestos fibers resulted in enhancement of the production of oxygen radicals, determined by a lucigenin enhanced chemiluminescence (LEC) assay, a formation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), a LDH release into the incubation mixture, and a rapid lysis of the cells. Rutin (Rut) and quercetin (Qr) were effective in inhibiting LEC, TBARS formation, and reducing peritoneal macrophages injury caused by asbestos. The concentrations pre-treatment of antioxidants that were required to prevent the injury of peritoneal macrophages caused by asbestos by 50% (IC50) were 90 microM and 290 microM for Qr and Rut, respectively. Both flavonoids were found to be oxidized during exposure of peritoneal macrophages to asbestos and the oxidation was SOD sensitive. The efficacy of flavonoids as antioxidant agents as well as superoxide ion scavengers was also evaluated using appropriate model systems, and both quercetin and rutin were found to be effective in scavenging O2.-. These findings indicate that flavonoids are able to prevent the respiratory burst in rat peritoneal macrophages exposed to asbestos at the stage of activated oxygen species generation, mainly as superoxide scavengers. On the basis of this study it was concluded that natural flavonoids quercetin and rutin would be promising drug candidates for a prophylactic asbestos-induced disease.

  14. Photoinduced graft-copolymer synthesis and characterization of methacrylic acid onto natural biodegradable lignocellulose fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Ferdous

    2004-01-01

    UV radiation induced graft copolymerization of methacrylic acid onto natural lignocellulose (jute) fiber was carried out both by "simultaneous irradiation and grafting" and by preirradiation methods using 1-hydroxycyclohexyl-phenyl ketone as a photoinitiator. In the "simultaneous irradiation and grafting" method, the variation of graft weight with UV-radiation time, monomer concentration, and the concentration of photoinitiator was investigated. In the case of the preirradiation method, the incorporation of 2-methyl-2-propene 1-sulfonic acid, sodium salt, into the grafting reaction solution played a most important role in suppressing the homopolymer/gel formation and facilitating graft copolymerization. The optimum value of the reaction parameters on the percentage of grafting was evaluated. In comparison, results showed that the method of graft-copolymer synthesis has significant influence on graft weight. The study on the mechanical and thermal properties of grafted samples was conducted. The results showed that the percentage of grafting has a significant effect on the mechanical and thermal properties in the case of grafted samples. Considering the water absorption property, the jute-poly(methacrylic acid)-grafted sample showed a maximum up to 42% increase in hydrophilicity with respect to that of the "as received" sample. Attenuated total reflection infrared studies indicate that the estimation of the degree of grafting could be achieved by correlating band intensities with the percent graft weight.

  15. Kinetics of Wet Air Oxidation of Wastewater from Natural Fiber Web Desizing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    This work described the application of wet air oxidation (WAO) to the treatment of desizing wastewater from natural fiber processing. A two-liter autoclave batch reactor was used for the experiments. The range of operating temperature examined was between 150 and 290℃, and partial pressure of oxygen ranged from 0.375 to 2.25 MPa standardized at 25℃. Variations in Chemical Oxygen Demand(COD) and Total Organic Carbon(TOC) were monitored during each experiment and used to assess the performance of the process. Experimental results showed that WAO can be an efficient method for the treatment of desizing wnstewater. Furthermore, Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation (CWAO) was applied to reduce the reaction temperature and pressure in WAO process. A higher COD removal ratio was achieved under more mild reaction condition with the aid of CWAO. A mathematical model was also proposed to simulate the WAO process of desizing wastewater, in which three distinct kinetics steps were considered to describe the degradation of starch. The model simulations were in well agreement with the experimental data.

  16. Biopolymer chitosan: Properties, interactions and its use in the treatment of textiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jocić Dragan

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The biopolymer chitosan is obtained by the deacetylation of chitin, the second most abundant polysaccharide in nature, after cellulose. It is becoming an increasingly important biopolymer because it offers unique physico-chemical and biological properties. Due to its solubility, chitosan allows processing from aqueous solutions. This review provides information on important chitosan properties, as well as on some interactions that are of special interest for chitosan application. It summarizes some of the most important developments in the use of chitosan in the treatment of textile materials. Special emphasis is given to improved dyeing properties of the textile material treated with chitosan.

  17. Response to fire, thermal insulation and acoustic performance of rigid polyurethane agglomerates with addition of natural fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Vinicius Rizzo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to reuse rigid polyurethane waste in the preparation of composites with the addition of banana fibers and cellulose in order to qualify the acoustic performance, thermal insulation and reaction to fire the material with the addition of 7% of polysulfone. Agglomerated with 100% of polyurethane and either with 20% of banana fiber or 20% of cellulose were characterized in the sound transmission loss, thermal conductivity and reaction to fire, take into account variations in the granulometry of the solid polyurethane and type of pressing. Natural fiber composites had lower thermal conductivity, higher acoustic insulation in medium frequencies and the addition of polysulfone delayed the total time of firing the material.

  18. Characterization of natural fiber from agricultural-industrial residues; Caracterizacao de fibras naturais provenientes de residuos agroindustriais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prado, Karen S.; Spinace, Marcia A.S., E-mail: marcia.spinace@ufabc.edu.br [Centro de Ciencias Naturais e Humanas, CCNH, Universidade Federal do ABC - UFABC, Campus de Santo Andre, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Natural fibers show great potential for application in polymer composites. However, instead of the production of inputs for this purpose, an alternative that can also minimize solid waste generation is the use of agro-industrial waste for this purpose, such as waste-fiber textiles, rice husks residues and pineapple crowns. In this work the characterization of these three residues and evaluate their properties in order to direct the application of polymer composites. Was analyzed the moisture, density, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric analysis of the fibers. The results show that the use of these wastes is feasible both from an environmental standpoint and because its properties suitable for this application. (author)

  19. Integrity breaches in a hollow fiber nanofilter - Effects on natural organic matter and virus-like particle removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidén, Angelica; Lavonen, Elin; Persson, Kenneth M; Larson, Magnus

    2016-11-15

    Ultrafiltration and nanofiltration have become common methods to treat surface water for drinking water purposes. Common aims of a membrane step are removal of natural organic matter (NOM), softening or adding an extra microbiological or chemical barrier. In most cases, the membrane is considered a good disinfection step; commonly the viral removal is at least 4-log. To ensure a working disinfection, reliable integrity tests are required. In the present pilot study with a hollow fiber nanofilter, the membrane achieved a high NOM reduction, and the difference in parameters related to NOM quality before and after treatment proved to be useful indicators of integrity breaches. Changes in total organic carbon (TOC) concentration, UV-absorbance at 254 nm (UVA254) and fluorescence derived parameters in the permeate flow were related to leaking fibers. On average, UVA254 in the permeate was 3 times higher for a membrane with compromised fibers (0.041 cm(-1)) compared to an intact membrane (0.013 cm(-1)), while TOC was less than 2 times as high on average. Thus, this membrane had a higher reduction of UVA254 than TOC and the sensitivity for changes from leakage was higher. Therefore, it is suggested that UVA254 could be used as an indicator for membrane integrity. Additionally, there is a significant (P < 0.01) difference in fluorescence derived parameters between a leaking and an intact fiber, showing that fluorescence also has potential to be applied for online monitoring of membrane processes. During fiber failure, around 2% of the permeate flow passes through one single leaking fiber. The transport depends on the distance between the inflow and the leak, which in most cases are similar and most likely close to the middle of the fiber.

  20. A review of experimental and modeling techniques to determine properties of biopolymer-based nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    The nonbiodegradable and nonrenewable nature of plastic packaging has led to a renewed interest in packaging materials based on bio-nanocomposites (biopolymer matrix reinforced with nanoparticles such as layered silicates). One of the reasons for unique properties of bio-nanocomposites is the differ...

  1. TOPICAL REVIEW: Biopolymer organization upon confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marenduzzo, D.; Micheletti, C.; Orlandini, E.

    2010-07-01

    Biopolymers in vivo are typically subject to spatial restraints, either as a result of molecular crowding in the cellular medium or of direct spatial confinement. DNA in living organisms provides a prototypical example of a confined biopolymer. Confinement prompts a number of biophysics questions. For instance, how can the high level of packing be compatible with the necessity to access and process the genomic material? What mechanisms can be adopted in vivo to avoid the excessive geometrical and topological entanglement of dense phases of biopolymers? These and other fundamental questions have been addressed in recent years by both experimental and theoretical means. A review of the results, particularly of those obtained by numerical studies, is presented here. The review is mostly devoted to DNA packaging inside bacteriophages, which is the best studied example both experimentally and theoretically. Recent selected biophysical studies of the bacterial genome organization and of chromosome segregation in eukaryotes are also covered.

  2. Separation of biopolymer from fermentation broths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffith, W.L.; Compere, A.L.; Westmoreland, C.G.; Johnson, J.S. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Application of recent developments in filtration separations have been applied to separation of biopolymers from fermentation broths. More economical production of biopolymers near the site of use would be especially attractive for use in micellar flood programs for enhanced oil recovery. Solutions of the organisms Sclerotium rolfsii producing scleroglucans were used for the tests because the organisms are genetically more stable than the organisms that produce xanthan gums and because their more acid broths are less apt to become contaminated. Three types of filtration, axial filtration, pleated ultrafiltration module, and microscreens were tested on the broth. Filtration results are reported for broths with various preparation histories. An economic comparison is presented for processing of a ton of biopolymer per day, and the microscreening process is shown to be the most efficient, but a polishing step would have to be added. (BLM)

  3. Cobalt (II) removal from aqueous solutions by natural hemp fibers: Batch and fixed-bed column studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tofan, Lavinia; Teodosiu, Carmen; Paduraru, Carmen; Wenkert, Rodica

    2013-11-01

    Natural hemp fibers were explored as sorbent for the removal of Co(II) ions from aqueous solutions in batch and dynamic conditions. The batch Co(II) sorption capacity increased up to pH 5, reached the maximum (7.5-7.8 mg/g) over the initial pH of 4.5-5. As the initial concentration of metal ion increased (in the range of 25-200 mg/L), the cobalt uptake was enhanced, but the Co(II) removal efficiency decreased. The batch sorption of Co(II) on the tested hemp follows a pseudo-second order model, which relies on the assumption that the chemisorptions may be the rate-controlling step. The Langmuir model better described the Co(II) sorption process on the natural hemp fibers in comparison with the Freundlich model. This finding complies with the results of fixed-bed studies which emphasize that the optimal solution for describing the behavior of the investigated hemp bed column is provided by the Thomas model. The sorption capacity of the hemp fibers column (15.44 mg/g) performed better than that of the Co(II)-hemp batch system (13.58 mg/g). The possibility to use hemp fibers as an alternative in the Co(II) wastewater treatment should be studied under pilot scale applications, so as to complete the studies concerning the removal efficiencies with technical and economic factors that influence process scale-up.

  4. Obtention of gelatin biopolymers by ionizing radiation; Obtencao de biopolimeros de gelatina por radiacao ionizante

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takinami, Patricia Yoko Inamura

    2014-07-01

    The gelatin (Gel) is a biocompatible and biodegradable biopolymer, which naturally forms semi-solid colloids or hydrogels in aqueous solutions. As a hydrophilic polymer, the Gel has structural and physico-mechanical properties that distinguish it from synthetic hydrophilic polymers. The study of these properties led to the development of the present work. Thus, Gel-based films and hydrogels were developed using ionizing radiation technology by different techniques: irradiation with {sup 60}Co, electron beam (EB) and/or pulsed EB. The Gel based-films enriched with different additives, such as glycerol (GLY), polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), acrylamide and/or vegetal fiber, were irradiated with doses from 10 to 60 kGy, depending on the additive; some parameters like mechanical properties, color, and water absorption were analyzed. In the radio-induced synthesis of GEL nanohydrogels, polyethylene glycol (PEG) and the mixture (MIX) of additives, PEG and GEL, the size, molar mass and surface morphology of the nanohydrogels were analyzed. There was a significant increase of gel fraction with increase of the radiation dose for the GEL/fiber samples. The GEL based-films with 10% PVA irradiated at 20 kGy showed the highest puncture strength. The addition of antioxidant BHT affected on some GEL based-films properties on applied conditions. Regarding the nanohydrogels, there was a decrease of hydrodynamic radius of MIX irradiated with {sup 60}Co from 68 ± 25 nm (2 kGy) to 35 ± 4 nm (5 kGy). The radiation proved to be a convenient tool in the modification of polymeric materials for both, GEL films and hydrogels. (author)

  5. How the first biopolymers could have evolved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abkevich, V I; Gutin, A M; Shakhnovich, E I

    1996-01-01

    In this work, we discuss a possible origin of the first biopolymers with stable unique structures. We suggest that at the prebiotic stage of evolution, long organic polymers had to be compact to avoid hydrolysis and had to be soluble and thus must not be exceedingly hydrophobic. We present an algorithm that generates such sequences for model proteins. The evolved sequences turn out to have a stable unique structure, into which they quickly fold. This result illustrates the idea that the unique three-dimensional native structures of first biopolymers could have evolved as a side effect of nonspecific physicochemical factors acting at the prebiotic stage of evolution. PMID:8570645

  6. Microrheology of Biopolymer-Membrane Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfer, E.; Harlepp, S.; Bourdieu, L.; Robert, J.; Mackintosh, F. C.; Chatenay, D.

    2000-07-01

    We create tailored microstructures, consisting of complexes of lipid membranes with self-assembled biopolymer shells, to study the fundamental properties and interactions of these basic components of living cells. We measure the mechanical response of these artificial structures at the micrometer scale, using optical tweezers and single-particle tracking. These systems exhibit rich dynamics that illustrate the viscoelastic character of the quasi-two-dimensional biopolymer network. We present a theoretical model relating the rheological properties of these membranes to the observed dynamics.

  7. Spider Gland Fluids: From Protein-Rich Isotropic Liquid to Insoluble Super Fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-17

    highest performance fibers and has the potential for numerous military applications ranging from protective clothing to biological scaffolding and...Dragline Spider Silk Motifs to Produce Tunable Synthetic Biopolymer Fibers” Biopolymers 2012, 97, 418-431. 17) B. An, M.B. Hinman, G.P. Holland, J.L...Jeffery L. Yarger, “ Biopolymers Stretched to the Limit” Dynamic Phenomena Under Extremes, UT Austin, January (2011). 6) Jeffery L. Yarger, “NMR of Silk

  8. The addition of oat fiber and natural alternative sweeteners in the manufacture of plain yogurt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-García, E; McGregor, J U; Traylor, S

    1998-03-01

    Calorie-reduced yogurts that were fortified with 1.32% oat fiber were prepared from lactose-hydrolyzed milk, alone and supplemented with 2 and 4% sucrose or with 1.6, 3.6, and 5.5% fructose. Treated samples were compared with unsweetened yogurt and with yogurts sweetened with 2, 4, and 6% sucrose. Addition of 5.5% fructose increased fermentation time by 60%, slowing down the production of lactic, pyruvic, acetic, and propionic acids and the consumption of hippuric and orotic acids. Lactose hydrolysis had an inhibitory effect on starter activity at the beginning of fermentation and a stimulatory effect at the end of fermentation. Fiber addition led to increases in concentrations of acetic and propionic acid. Lactobacilli counts were lower in samples treated with fructose. The use of hydrolyzed milk had a stimulatory effect on total bacteria and lactobacilli counts throughout the cold storage period. After 28 d of storage, lactobacilli counts were consistently higher in fiber-fortified yogurts, but total bacteria counts were lower. Apparent viscosity increased with the addition of sweetener and fiber. Lactose-hydrolyzed and fructose yogurts had the highest viscosity values. Samples sweetened with sucrose received the highest scores for flavor. Fiber addition decreased overall flavor quality. The lactose-hydrolyzed yogurts received the highest flavor scores, independent of fiber fortification. Fiber addition improved the body and texture of unsweetened yogurts but lowered overall scores for body and texture in yogurts sweetened with sucrose.

  9. Dispersion of cellulose nanofibers in biopolymer based nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bei

    The focus of this work was to understand the fundamental dispersion mechanism of cellulose based nanofibers in bionanocomposites. The cellulose nanofibers were extracted from soybean pod and hemp fibers by chemo-mechanical treatments. These are bundles of cellulose nanofibers with a diameter ranging between 50 to 100 nm and lengths of thousands of nanometers which results in very high aspect ratio. In combination with a suitable matrix polymer, cellulose nanofiber networks show considerable potential as an effective reinforcement for high quality specialty applications of bio-based nanocomposites. Cellulose fibrils have a high density of --OH groups on the surface, which have a tendency to form hydrogen bonds with adjacent fibrils, reducing interaction with the surrounding matrix. The use of nanofibers has been mostly restricted to water soluble polymers. This thesis is focused on synthesizing the nanocomposite using a solid phase matrix polypropylene (PP) or polyethylene (PE) by hot compression and poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA) in an aqueous phase by film casting. The mechanical properties of nanofiber reinforced PVA film demonstrated a 4-5 fold increase in tensile strength, as compared to the untreated fiber-blend-PVA film. It is necessary to reduce the entanglement of the fibrils and improve their dispersion in the matrix by surface modification of fibers without deteriorating their reinforcing capability. Inverse gas chromatography (IGC) was used to explore how various surface treatments would change the dispersion component of surface energy and acid-base character of cellulose nanofibers and the effect of the incorporation of these modified nanofibers into a biopolymer matrix on the properties of their nano-composites. Poly (lactic acid) (PLA) and polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) based nanocomposites using cellulose nanofibers were prepared by extrusion, injection molding and hot compression. The IGC results indicated that styrene maleic anhydride coated and ethylene

  10. Naturally Compatible: Starch Acetate/Cellulosic Fiber Composites. I. Processing and Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nättinen, Kalle; Hyvärinen, Sari; Joffe, Roberts;

    2010-01-01

    Composite compounds based on hemp and flax fibers in triethyl citrate plasticized starch acetate were prepared by melt processing. For better properties and processability, compounds with plasticizer contents in the range 20-35 wt% were screened. Composites were prepared with fiber contents up...... to 50 wt%. The composite mechanical properties were measured from injection molded test specimens. A Young's modulus of 8.3 GPa and stress at maximum load of 51 MPa were obtained with 40 wt% flax fiber in a plasticized starch acetate with 20 wt% triethyl citrate. Decreasing the plasticizer...

  11. Variation of mechanical and thermal properties of the thermoplastics reinforced with natural fibers by electron beam processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sok Won; Oh, Seungmin; Lee, Kyuse

    2007-11-01

    With restrictions for environmental protection being strengthened, the thermoplastics reinforced with natural fibers (NFs) such as jute, kenaf, flax, etc., appeared as an automobile interior material instead of the chemical plastics. Regardless of many advantages, one shortcoming is the deformation after being formed in high temperature of about 200 °C, caused by the poor adhesion between the natural fibers and thermoplastics. Also, the energy saving in connection with car air-conditioning becomes very important. In this study, the thermal conductivity, tensile strength, and deformation of several kinds of thermoplastic composites composing of 50% polypropylene (PP) and 50% natural fiber irradiated by the electron beam (energy: 0.5 MeV, dose: 0-20 kGy) were measured. The length and thickness of PP and NF are 80±10 mm and 40-120 μm, respectively. The results show that the thermal conductivity and the tensile strength changed and became minimum when the dose of electron beam is 10 kGy, and the deformation after the thermal cycle were reduced by the electron beam.

  12. Studies on amendment of different biopolymers in sandy loam and their effect on germination, seedling growth of Gossypium herbaceum L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Satish Vitthalrao; Salunke, B K; Patil, C D; Salunkhe, R B

    2011-03-01

    Different biopolymers, agar, cellulose, alginate, psyllium gaur gum, and bacterial exopolysaccharide (EPS) powders were amended to check their efficacy in enhancing maximum water holding capacity (MWHC), permanent wilting point (PWP), and germination and seedling growth of the Gossypium herbaceum in a laboratory scale. The efficacy of all biopolymers for enhancement of MWHC, PWP, and growth was also analyzed by measuring organic carbon, organic matter, total nitrogen, respiration rate, and microflora in amended and control sandy loams. The range of concentrations (0.2-2%) of all biopolymers was incorporated in sandy loam containing pots. The soil without polymer was considered as control. The psyllium (0.6%) and bacterial EPS (1%) amended soil has 242 and 233% increase in MWHC and thus delaying in the permanent wilting point by 108 and 84 h at 37 °C, respectively, as compared to control. All biopolymers found to increase more or less MWHC, organic matter, total nitrogen, microflora, and PWP as compared to control. The psyllium and bacterial EPS show the highest increase organic matter, biomass, and microflora. The highest reduction in MWHC after 12 weeks were observed in cellulose, gaur gum, and alginate; besides, psyllium, bacterial EPS, and agar showed comparatively less reduction MWHC, i.e., 24% and 14.5%, respectively. The toxicity studies of biopolymer were carried out on earthworm (Eisenia foetida). It revealed their nontoxic nature. The biopolymer amendment in sandy loam can be an effective strategy to improved soil texture, fertility, and thereby crop yield.

  13. Exploring Modifications of Cotton with Biopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biopolymers including starch, alginate, and chitosan were grafted on to both nonwoven and woven cotton fabrics to examine their hemostatic and antimcrobial properties. The development of cotton-based health care fabrics that promote blood clotting and prevent microbial growth have wide applicability...

  14. [Conformation theory of polymers and biopolymers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkenstein, M V

    1977-01-01

    A short review is given of the Soviet investigations in the field of physics of polymers and biopolymers based on the concept of conformational motility of macromolecules. It is shown that the ideas originally used for the treatment of the properties of the synthetic polymers and, in particular, of the rubber elasticity, have found broad applications in molecular biophysics.

  15. Fabrication of biopolymer cantilevers using nanoimprint lithography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Stephan Sylvest; Feidenhans'l, Nikolaj Agentoft; Fisker-Bødker, Nis

    2011-01-01

    The biodegradable polymer poly(l-lactide) (PLLA) was introduced for the fabrication of micromechanical devices. For this purpose, thin biopolymer films with thickness around 10 μm were spin-coated on silicon substrates. Patterning of microcantilevers is achieved by nanoimprint lithography. A major...

  16. The GhTT2_A07 gene is linked to the brown color and natural flame retardancy phenotypes of Lc1 cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Some naturally-colored brown cotton fibers from accessions of Gossypium hirsutum L. can be used to make textiles with enhanced flame retardancy (FR). Several independent brown fiber loci have been identified and mapped to chromosomes, but the underlying genes have not yet been identified, and the me...

  17. Tin anode for sodium-ion batteries using natural wood fiber as a mechanical buffer and electrolyte reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongli; Jia, Zheng; Chen, Yuchen; Weadock, Nicholas; Wan, Jiayu; Vaaland, Oeyvind; Han, Xiaogang; Li, Teng; Hu, Liangbing

    2013-07-10

    Sodium (Na)-ion batteries offer an attractive option for low cost grid scale storage due to the abundance of Na. Tin (Sn) is touted as a high capacity anode for Na-ion batteries with a high theoretical capacity of 847 mAh/g, but it has several limitations such as large volume expansion with cycling, slow kinetics, and unstable solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) formation. In this article, we demonstrate that an anode consisting of a Sn thin film deposited on a hierarchical wood fiber substrate simultaneously addresses all the challenges associated with Sn anodes. The soft nature of wood fibers effectively releases the mechanical stresses associated with the sodiation process, and the mesoporous structure functions as an electrolyte reservoir that allows for ion transport through the outer and inner surface of the fiber. These properties are confirmed experimentally and computationally. A stable cycling performance of 400 cycles with an initial capacity of 339 mAh/g is demonstrated; a significant improvement over other reported Sn nanostructures. The soft and mesoporous wood fiber substrate can be utilized as a new platform for low cost Na-ion batteries.

  18. Effects of Thermal and Humidity Aging on the Interfacial Adhesion of Polyketone Fiber Reinforced Natural Rubber Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Ki Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyketone fiber is considered as a reinforcement of the mechanical rubber goods (MRG such as tires, automobile hoses, and belts because of its high strength and modulus. In order to apply it to those purposes, the high adhesion of fiber/rubber interface and good sustainability to aging conditions are very important. In this study, polyketone fiber reinforced natural rubber composites were prepared and they were subjected to thermal and humidity aging, to assess the changes of the interfacial adhesion and material properties. Also, the effect of adhesive primer treatment, based on the resorcinol formaldehyde resin and latex (RFL, of polyketone fiber for high interfacial adhesion was evaluated. Morphological and property changes of the rubber composites were analyzed by using various instrumental analyses. As a result, the rubber composite was aged largely by thermal aging at high temperature rather than humidity aging condition. Interfacial adhesion of the polyketone/NR composites was improved by the primer treatment and its effect was maintained in aging conditions.

  19. Overview of biopolymers as carriers of antiphlogistic agents for treatment of diverse ocular inflammations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anil Kumar; Arya, Amit; Sahoo, Pravat Kumar; Majumdar, Dipak Kanti

    2016-10-01

    Inflammation of the eye is a usual clinical condition that can implicate any part of the eye. The nomenclature of variety of such inflammations is based on the ocular part involved. These diseases may jeopardize normal functioning of the eye on progression. In general, corticosteroids, antihistamines, mast cell stabilizers and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are used to treat inflammatory diseases/disorders of the eye. There have been several attempts via different approaches of drug delivery to overcome the low ocular bioavailability resulting from shorter ocular residence time. The features like safety, ease of elimination and ability to sustain drug release have led to application of biopolymers in ocular therapeutics. Numerous polymers of natural origin such as gelatin, collagen, chitosan, albumin, hyaluronic acid, alginates etc. have been successfully employed for preparation of different ocular dosage forms. Chitosan is the most explored biopolymer amongst natural biopolymers because of its inherent characteristics. The emergence of synthetic biopolymers (like PVP, PACA, PCL, POE, polyanhydrides, PLA, PGA and PLGA) has also added new dimensions to the drug delivery strategies meant for treatment of ophthalmic inflammations. The current review is an endeavor to describe the utility of a variety of biomaterials/polymers based drug delivery systems as carrier for anti-inflammatory drugs in ophthalmic therapeutics.

  20. Synthesis of 9-oxononanoic acid, a precursor for biopolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otte, Konrad B; Kirtz, Marko; Nestl, Bettina M; Hauer, Bernhard

    2013-11-01

    Polymers based on renewable resources have become increasingly important. The natural functionalization of fats and oils enables an easy access to interesting monomeric building blocks, which in turn transform the derivative biopolymers into high-performance materials. Unfortunately, interesting building blocks of medium-chain length are difficult to obtain by traditional chemical means. Herein, a biotechnological pathway is established that could provide an environmentally suitable and sustainable alternative. A multiple enzyme two-step one-pot process efficiently catalyzed by a coupled 9S-lipoxygenase (St-LOX1, Solanum tuberosum) and 9/13-hydroperoxide lyase (Cm-9/13HPL, Cucumis melo) cascade reaction is proposed as a potential route for the conversion of linoleic acid into 9-oxononanoic acid, which is a precursor for biopolymers. Lipoxygenase catalyzes the insertion of oxygen into linoleic acid through a radical mechanism to give 9S-hydroperoxy-octadecadienoic acid (9S-HPODE) as a cascade intermediate, which is subsequently cleaved by the action of Cm-9/13HPL. This one-pot process afforded a yield of 73 % combined with high selectivity. The best reaction performance was achieved when lipoxygenase and hydroperoxide lyase were applied in a successive rather than a simultaneous manner. Green leaf volatiles, which are desired flavor and fragrance products, are formed as by-products in this reaction cascade. Furthermore, we have investigated the enantioselectivity of 9/13-HPLs, which exhibited a strong preference for 9S-HPODE over 9R-HPODE.

  1. Structure and Properties of Polysaccharide Based BioPolymer Gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prud'Homme, Robert K.

    2000-03-01

    Nature uses the pyranose ring as the basic building unit for a wideclass of biopolymers. Because of their biological origin these biopolymers naturally find application as food additives, rheology modifiers. These polymers range from being rigid skeletal material, such as cellulose that resist dissolution in water, to water soluble polymers, such as guar or carrageenan. The flexibility of the basic pyranose ring structure to provide materials with such a wide range of properties comes from the specific interactions that can be engineered by nature into the structure. We will present several examples of specific interactions for these systems: hydrogen bonding, hydrophobic interactions, and specific ion interactions. The relationship between molecular interations and rheology will be emphasized. Hydrogen bonding mediated by steric interference is used to control of solubility of starch and the rheology of guar gels. A more interesting example is the hydrogen bonding induced by chemical modification in konjac glucomannan that results in a gel that melts upon cooling. Hydrogen bonding interactions in xanthan lead to gel formation at very low polymer concentrations which is a result of the fine tuning of the polymer persistence length and total contour length. Given the function of xanthan in nature its molecular architecture has been optimized. Hydrophobic interactions in methylcellulose show a reverse temperature dependence arising from solution entropy. Carrageenan gelation upon the addition of specific cations will be addressed to show the interplay of polymer secondary structure on chemical reactivity. And finally the cis-hydroxyls on galactomannans permit crosslinking by a variety of metal ions some of which lead to "living gels" and some of which lead to permanently crosslinked networks.

  2. Processing and characterization of natural fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites using micro-braiding technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Satoshi; Ogihara, Shinji

    In the present study, we investigate fatigue properties of green composites. A hemp fiber yarn reinforced poly(lactic acid) composite was selected as a green composite. Unidirectional (UD) and textile (Textile) composites were fabricated using micro-braiding technique. Fatigue tests results indicated that fatigue damages in UD composites was splitting which occurred just before the final fracture, while matrix crack and debonding between matrix and fiber yarn occurred and accumulated stably in Textile composites. These results were consistent with modulus reduction and acoustic emission measurement during fatigue tests.

  3. Effect of natural fiber types and sodium silicate coated on natural fiber mat/PLA composites: Tensile properties and rate of fire propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thongpin, C.; Srimuk, J.; hipkam, N.; Wachirapong, P.

    2015-07-01

    In this study, 3 types of natural fibres, i.e. jute, sisal and abaca, were plain weaved to fibre mat. Before weaving, the fibres were treated with 5% NaOH to remove hemi cellulose and lignin. The weaving was performed by hand using square wooden block fit with nails for weaving using one and two types of natural fibres as weft and warp fibre to produce natural fibre mat. The fibre mat was also impregnated in sodium silicate solution extracted from rich husk ash. The pH of the solution was adjusted to pH 7 using H2SO4 before impregnation. After predetermined time, sodium silicate was gelled and deposited on the mat. The fabric mat and sodium silicate coated mat were then impregnated with PLA solution to produce prepreg. Dried pepreg was laminated with PLA sheet using compressing moulding machine to obtain natural fibre mat/PLA composite. The composite containing abaca aligned in longitudinal direction with respect to tension force enhanced Young's modulus more than 300%. Fibre mat composites with abaca aligned in longitudinal direction also showed tensile strength enhancement nearly 400% higher than neat PLA. After coating with sodium silicate, the tensile modulus of the composites was found slightly increased. The silicate coating was disadvantage on tensile strength of the composite due to the effect of sodium hydroxide solution that was used as solvent for silicate extraction from rice husk ash. However, sodium silicate could retard rate of fire propagation about 50%compare to neat PLA and about 10% reduction compared to fibre mat composites without sodium silicate coated fibre mat.

  4. Effect of liquid epoxidized natural rubber (LENR) on mechanical properties and morphology of natural rubber/high density polyethylene/mengkuang fiber (NR/HDPE/MK) bio-composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piah, Mohd Razi Mat; Baharum, Azizah

    2016-11-01

    The use of mengkuang fiber (MK) fibers in NR/HDPE (40/60) blend was studied via surface modification of fiber. The MK fiber was pre-washed with 5%wt/v sodium hydroxide solution prior to treatment with liquid epoxidized natural rubber (LENR). The concentration of LENR were varied from 5%-20%wt in toluene. The effects of LENR concentrations were studied in terms of mechanical properties and morphology formed. Melt-blending was performed using an internal mixer (Haake Rheomix 600). The processing parameters identified were 135°C temperature, 45 rpm rotor speed, 12 minutes processing time and at 20%wt MK fiber loading. The optimum LENR treatment concentration was obtained at 5%wt with tensile strength, tensile modulus, and impact strength of 10.3 MPa, 414.2 MPa and 14.4 kJ/m2 respectively. The tensile modulus of LENR-treated MK fiber filled NR/HDPE bio-composite has shown enhancement up to 16.7% higher than untreated MK fiber. The tensile and impact strength were decreased with increasing LENR concentration due to the broken of MK fibers to smaller particles and adhered to each other. FESEM micrographs confirmed the formation of fiber-fiber agglomeration in NR/HDPE blends. The optical microscope analysis shows MK fibers is shorter than original fiber lengths after NaOH-LENR surface modification. The internal bonding forces of MK fiber seems to be weaker than external force exerted on it, therefore, the MK fiber has broken to smaller particles and reduced the mechanical properties of NR/HDPE/MK(20%) bio-composite.

  5. Characterization of Thermally Cross-Linkable Hollow Fiber Membranes for Natural Gas Separation

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Chien-Chiang

    2013-01-23

    The performance of thermally cross-linkable hollow fiber membranes for CO2/CH4 separation and the membrane stability against CO2 plasticization was investigated. The fiber membranes were thermally cross-linked at various conditions. Cross-linking temperature was found to have a significant effect, while shorter soak time and the presence of trace oxidizer (O2 or N2O) had a negligible effect. The cross-linked fibers were tested using high CO2 content feeds (50-70% CO2) at a variety of feed pressures (up to 1000 psia), temperatures, and permeate pressures (up to 100 psia) to evaluate membrane performance under various realistic operating conditions. The results demonstrated that cross-linking improves membrane selectivity and effectively eliminates swelling-induced hydrocarbon loss at high pressures. Excellent stability under aggressive feeds (with CO2 partial pressure up to 700 psia) suggests that cross-linked hollow fiber membranes have great potential for use in diverse aggressive applications, even beyond the CO2/CH4 example explored in this work. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  6. Natural volcanic rock fibers%天然火山岩纤维

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    D. Pico; C. Wilms; G. Seide; T. Gries; 湛烂瑜(译); 行兰(校)

    2012-01-01

    一种新型化学纤维已于2011年进入市场。纤维化的玄武岩是一种创新的产品,面向介于特殊玻璃纤维和碳纤维之间的产业用纤维市场。玄武岩纤维的工业生产始于俄罗斯和乌克兰,其具有竞争力的价格和性质相结合,引起了西欧公司和研究院所的兴趣。%A new type of man-made fiber has reached the market in the last years. Fiberized basalt is an innovative product that is facing the commercial sector of technical fibers between special glasses and carbon fibers. Their commercial production started in Russia and Ukraine but the competitive price combined with their properties has attracted new west European companies and research institutes.

  7. Influence of Coating with Some Natural Based Materials on the Erosion Wear Behavior of Glass Fiber Reinforced Epoxy Resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aseel Basim Abdul Hussein

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, composites were prepared by Hand lay-up molding. The composites constituents were epoxy resin as a matrix, 6% volume fractions of glass fibers (G.F as reinforcement and 3%, 6% volume fractions of preparation natural material (Rice Husk Ash, Carrot Powder, and Sawdust as filler. Studied the erosion wear behavior and coating by natural wastes (Rice Husk Ash with epoxy resin after erosion. The results showed the non – reinforced epoxy have lower resistance erosion than natural based material composites and the specimen (Epoxy+6%glass fiber+6%RHA has higher resistance erosion than composites reinforced with carrot powder and sawdust at 30cm , angle 60°, grin size of sand 425µm , temperature 30Ċ , 300 gm salt content in 2liter of water and 15 hour. Coating specimen with mixed epoxy resin -RHA with particles size in the range (1.4-4.2 µm improves erosion wear resistance characteristics of the coated specimen, coating thickness was (16 ± 1 μm and after erosion at (15 hour the thickness was (10 μm .

  8. Biopolymers Regulate Silver Nanoparticle under Microwave Irradiation for Effective Antibacterial and Antibiofilm Activities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palaniyandi Velusamy

    Full Text Available In the current study, facile synthesis of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC and sodium alginate capped silver nanoparticles (AgNPs was examined using microwave radiation and aniline as a reducing agent. The biopolymer matrix embedded nanoparticles were synthesized under various experimental conditions using different concentrations of biopolymer (0.5, 1, 1.5, 2%, volumes of reducing agent (50, 100, 150 μL, and duration of heat treatment (30 s to 240 s. The synthesized nanoparticles were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy for identification of AgNPs synthesis, crystal nature, shape, size, and type of capping action. In addition, the significant antibacterial efficacy and antibiofilm activity of biopolymer capped AgNPs were demonstrated against different bacterial strains, Staphylococcus aureus MTCC 740 and Escherichia coli MTCC 9492. These results confirmed the potential for production of biopolymer capped AgNPs grown under microwave irradiation, which can be used for industrial and biomedical applications.

  9. Biopolymers Regulate Silver Nanoparticle under Microwave Irradiation for Effective Antibacterial and Antibiofilm Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velusamy, Palaniyandi; Su, Chia-Hung; Venkat Kumar, Govindarajan; Adhikary, Shritama; Pandian, Kannaiyan; Gopinath, Subash C B; Chen, Yeng; Anbu, Periasamy

    2016-01-01

    In the current study, facile synthesis of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) and sodium alginate capped silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) was examined using microwave radiation and aniline as a reducing agent. The biopolymer matrix embedded nanoparticles were synthesized under various experimental conditions using different concentrations of biopolymer (0.5, 1, 1.5, 2%), volumes of reducing agent (50, 100, 150 μL), and duration of heat treatment (30 s to 240 s). The synthesized nanoparticles were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy for identification of AgNPs synthesis, crystal nature, shape, size, and type of capping action. In addition, the significant antibacterial efficacy and antibiofilm activity of biopolymer capped AgNPs were demonstrated against different bacterial strains, Staphylococcus aureus MTCC 740 and Escherichia coli MTCC 9492. These results confirmed the potential for production of biopolymer capped AgNPs grown under microwave irradiation, which can be used for industrial and biomedical applications.

  10. Biopolymer-Based Nanoparticles for Drug/Gene Delivery and Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiji Numata

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There has been a great interest in application of nanoparticles as biomaterials for delivery of therapeutic molecules such as drugs and genes, and for tissue engineering. In particular, biopolymers are suitable materials as nanoparticles for clinical application due to their versatile traits, including biocompatibility, biodegradability and low immunogenicity. Biopolymers are polymers that are produced from living organisms, which are classified in three groups: polysaccharides, proteins and nucleic acids. It is important to control particle size, charge, morphology of surface and release rate of loaded molecules to use biopolymer-based nanoparticles as drug/gene delivery carriers. To obtain a nano-carrier for therapeutic purposes, a variety of materials and preparation process has been attempted. This review focuses on fabrication of biocompatible nanoparticles consisting of biopolymers such as protein (silk, collagen, gelatin, β-casein, zein and albumin, protein-mimicked polypeptides and polysaccharides (chitosan, alginate, pullulan, starch and heparin. The effects of the nature of the materials and the fabrication process on the characteristics of the nanoparticles are described. In addition, their application as delivery carriers of therapeutic drugs and genes and biomaterials for tissue engineering are also reviewed.

  11. Enzymes as Biodevelopers for Nano- And Micropatterned Bicomponent Biopolymer Thin Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niegelhell, Katrin; Süßenbacher, Michael; Jammernegg, Katrin; Ganner, Thomas; Schwendenwein, Daniel; Schwab, Helmut; Stelzer, Franz; Plank, Harald; Spirk, Stefan

    2016-11-14

    The creation of nano- and micropatterned polymer films is a crucial step for innumerous applications in science and technology. However, there are several problems associated with environmental aspects concerning the polymer synthesis itself, cross-linkers to induce the patterns as well as toxic solvents used for the preparation and even more important development of the films (e.g., chlorobenzene). In this paper, we present a facile method to produce micro- and nanopatterned biopolymer thin films using enzymes as so-called biodevelopers. Instead of synthetic polymers, naturally derived ones are employed, namely, poly-3-hydroxybutyrate and a cellulose derivative, which are dissolved in a common solvent in different ratios and subjected to spin coating. Consequently, the two biopolymers undergo microphase separation and different domain sizes are formed depending on the ratio of the biopolymers. The development step proceeds via addition of the appropriate enzyme (either PHB-depolymerase or cellulase), whereas one of the two biopolymers is selectively degraded, while the other one remains on the surface. In order to highlight the enzymatic development of the films, video AFM studies have been performed in real time to image the development process in situ as well as surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy to determine the kinetics. These studies may pave the way for the use of enzymes in patterning processes, particularly for materials intended to be used in a physiological environment.

  12. The Effect of Sodium Hydroxide on Drag Reduction using a Biopolymer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Harvin Kaur A/P Gurchran

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Drag reduction is observed as reduced frictional pressure losses under turbulent flow conditions and hence, substantially increases the flowrate of the fluid. Practical application includes water flooding system, pipeline transport and drainage system. Drag reduction agent, such as polymers, can be introduced to increase the flowrate of water flowing, reducing the water accumulation in the system and subsequently lesser possibility of heavy flooding. Currently used polymer as drag reduction agents is carboxymethylcellulose, to name one. This is a synthetic polymer which will seep into the ground and further harm our environment in excessive use of accumulation. A more environmentally-friendly drag reduction agent, such as the polymer derived from natural sources or biopolymer, is then required for such purpose. As opposed to the synthetic polymers, the potential of biopolymers as drag reduction agents, especially those derived from a local plant source, are not extensively explored. The drag reduction of a polymer produced from a local plant source within the turbulent regime will be explored and assessed in this study using a rheometer where a reduced a torque produced can be perceived as a reduction of drag. The cellulose powder was converted to carboxymethylcellulose (CMC by etherification process using sodium monochloroacetate and sodium hydroxide. The carboxymethylation reaction then was optimized against concentration of NaOH. The research is structured to focus on producing the biopolymer and also assess the drag reduction ability of the biopolymer produced against concentration of sodium hydroxide.

  13. Active biopolymers confer fast reorganization kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Douglas; Wingreen, Ned S

    2011-11-18

    Many cytoskeletal biopolymers are "active," consuming energy in large quantities. In this Letter, we identify a fundamental difference between active polymers and passive, equilibrium polymers: for equal mean lengths, active polymers can reorganize faster than equilibrium polymers. We show that equilibrium polymers are intrinsically limited to linear scaling between mean lifetime (or mean first-passage time, or MFPT) and mean length, MFPT∼, by analogy to 1D Potts models. By contrast, we present a simple active-polymer model that improves upon this scaling, such that MFPT∼(1/2). Since, to be biologically useful, structural biopolymers must typically be many monomers long yet respond dynamically to the needs of the cell, the difference in reorganization kinetics may help to justify the active polymers' greater energy cost.

  14. Scleroglucan biopolymer production, properties, and economics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Compere, A. L.; Griffith, W. L.

    1980-01-01

    Production and solution properties which may make scleroglucan polysaccharide economically advantageous for onsite production and use in tertiary oil recovery were investigated. Scleroglucan, which is similar in viscosity and shear thinning to xanthan, can be produced in a 3-day batch or 12 h continuous fermentation. Yield is nearly 50% based on input glucose. Gross biopolymer-biomass separation may be effected using microscreening, a low energy process, followed by polish filtration. Polymer flux may be improved by hydrolysis with an endolaminarinase from Rhizopus arrhizius QM 1032. Simple feedstock requirements and low growth pH, together with the difficulty of resuspending dried polymer, may encourage field biopolymer fermentation and use of purified culture broth.

  15. Biopolymer elasticity: Mechanics and thermal fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Supurna; Samuel, Joseph

    2012-04-01

    We present an analytical study of the role of thermal fluctuations in shaping molecular elastic properties of semiflexible polymers. Our study interpolates between mechanics and statistical mechanics in a controlled way and shows how thermal fluctuations modify the elastic properties of biopolymers. We present a study of the minimum-energy configurations with explicit expressions for their energy and writhe and plots of the extension versus link for these configurations and a study of fluctuations around the local minima of energy and approximate analytical formulas for the free energy of stretched twisted polymers. The central result of our study is a closed-form expression for the leading thermal fluctuation correction to the free energy around the nonperturbative writhing family solution for the configuration of a biopolymer. From the derived formulas, the predictions of the wormlike chain model for molecular elasticity can be worked out for a comparison against numerical simulations and experiments.

  16. "Practical" Electrospinning of Biopolymers in Ionic Liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamshina, Julia L; Zavgorodnya, Oleksandra; Bonner, Jonathan R; Gurau, Gabriela; Di Nardo, Thomas; Rogers, Robin D

    2017-01-10

    To address the need to scale up technologies for electrospinning of biopolymers from ionic liquids to practical volumes, a setup for the multi-needle electrospinning of chitin using the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate, [C2 mim]-[OAc], was designed, built, and demonstrated. Materials with controllable and high surface area were prepared at the nanoscale using ionic-liquid solutions of high-molecular-weight chitin extracted with the same ionic liquid directly from shrimp shells.

  17. Binding capacity: cooperativity and buffering in biopolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Cera, E; Gill, S J; Wyman, J

    1988-01-01

    The group of linkage potentials resulting from the energy of a physicochemical system expressed per mol of a reference component, say a polyfunctional macromolecule, leads to the concept of binding capacity. This concept applies equally to both chemical and physical ligands and opens the way to consideration of higher-order linkage relationships. It provides a means of exploring the consequences of thermodynamic stability on generalized binding phenomena in biopolymers. PMID:3422436

  18. THE NATURE COMPOSITE OF VETIVER FIBER AND THE WASTE OF POWDER SAWN AS AN SOUND ABSORPTION MATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purwanto Purwanto

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The increasing use of composites in all fields is engineered materials that many people do to obtain the new alternative materials, one of the materials such as natural vetiver fiber (SAW which is strong and lightweight and powder sawn (SGK, which is waste material. In this research, manufacturing the composite of  SAW and SGK then testing acoustic/absorption power by measuring the absorption coefficient of the sound and the observation of microstructure. The method used in the study is an experiment in the laboratory to make composites based on the ratio of the weight fraction between SAW and SGK from 1: 5, 2: 5, 3: 5, 4: 5 and 5: 5. Having formed the composites, then the specimen has made by an acoustic test that compatible to ASTM E-1050-98 standard with B & K 4206 Small Tube Set test instrument. Furthermore, to determine the composition of fibers in the composites, there do the micro observation. From the results of the show the composites produced the sound absorption ability for the low frequency (1000 Hz with an absorption coefficient (α of 0.25 occurred in comparative fraction of 2: 5 (SAW20, SGK50. While at high frequency (5000 Hz has a value of coefficient (α of 0.41 occurred in the ratio of 1: 5 (SAW10, SGK50. The number of composition number fiber influence the composite tensile strength and micro observations occurred in the composition ratio of 5: 5 its highest strength.

  19. Overcoming interfacial affinity issues in natural fiber reinforced polylactide biocomposites by surface adsorption of amphiphilic block copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magniez, Kevin; Voda, Andreea S; Kafi, Abdullah A; Fichini, Audrey; Guo, Qipeng; Fox, Bronwyn L

    2013-01-23

    This work demonstrates that the interfacial properties in a natural fiber reinforced polylactide bio-composite can be tailored through surface adsorption of amphiphilic and biodegradable poly (ethylene glycol)-b-poly(l-lactide) (PEG-PLLA) block copolymers. The deposition from solvent solution of PEG-PLLA copolymers onto the fibrous substrate induced distinct mechanisms of molecular organization at the cellulosic interface, which are correlated to the hydrophobic/hydrophilic ratios and the type of solvent used. The findings of the study evidenced that the performance of the corresponding biocomposites with polylactide were effectively enhanced by using these copolymers as interfacial coupling agents. During the fabrication stage, diffusion of the polylactide in the melt induced a change in the environment surrounding block copolymers which became hydrophobic. It is proposed that molecular reorganization of the block copolymers at the interface occurred, which favored the interactions with both the hydrophilic fibers and hydrophobic polylactide matrix. The strong interactions such as intra- and intermolecular hydrogen bonds formed across the fiber-matrix interface can be accounted for the enhancement in properties displayed by the biocomposites. Although the results reported here are confined, this concept is unique as it shows that by tuning the amphiphilicity and the type of building blocks, it is possible to control the surface properties of the substrate by self-assembly and disassembly of the amphiphiles for functional materials.

  20. The glass transition process in humid biopolymers. DSC study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grunina, N A; Belopolskaya, T V; Tsereteli, G I [V.A. Fock Research Institute for Physics of Saint-Petersburg State University, 198504, Petrodvorets (Russian Federation)

    2006-05-15

    Thermal properties of native and denatured biopolymers with quite different chemical and steric structure (globular and fibrillar proteins, DNA, starches) were studied by means of differential scanning calorimetry in a wide range of temperatures and concentrations of water. It was shown that both native and denatured humid biopolymers are glassy systems. The glass transition temperature of these systems strongly depends on percentage of water, with water being simultaneously an intrinsic element of systems' ordered structure and a plasticizer of its amorphous state. On the base of the absolute values of heat capacities for biopolymer-water systems as a whole, heat capacities for biopolymers themselves were calculated as functions on water concentration at fixed temperatures. The S-shaped change of heat capacity observed on diagrams of state both for native and denatured biopolymers is the manifestation of biopolymers' passing through the vitrification region, as it occurs for denatured samples at heating.

  1. Insoluble, nonhydrolyzable highly aliphatic biopolymers from algal cell walls and vascular plant cuticles and barks as sources of N-alkanes in crude oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tegelaar, E.W.; De Leeuw, J.E.; Horsfield, B.

    1989-03-01

    Recently discovered insoluble, nonhydrolyzable highly aliphatic biopolymers occurring in cell walls of several extant algae and in cuticles and barks of vascular plants are selectively preserved during diagenesis and represent as such, or in a slightly altered form, a considerable part of kerogens. Thermal simulation experiments performed with these isolated biopolymers of extant organisms yield series of n-alkanes with carbon number distribution patterns very similar to those of n-alkanes in natural crude oils.

  2. Hydrogels from biopolymer hybrid for biomedical, food, and functional food applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hybrid hydrogels from biopolymers have been applied for various indications across a wide range of biomedical, pharmaceutical, and functional food industries. In particular, hybrid hydrogels synthesized from two biopolymers have attracted increasing attention. The inclusion of a second biopolymer st...

  3. Effect of size of man-made and natural mineral fibers on chemiluminescent response in human monocyte-derived macrophages.

    OpenAIRE

    2001-01-01

    Fiber size is an important factor in the tumorigenicity of various mineral fibers and asbestos fibers in animal experiments. We examined the time course of the ability to induce lucigenin-dependent chemiluminescence (CL) from human monocyte-derived macrophages exposed to Japan Fibrous Material standard reference samples (glass wool, rock wool, micro glass fiber, two types of refractory ceramic fiber, refractory mullite fiber, potassium titanium whisker, silicon carbide whisker, titanium oxide...

  4. Significance of collective motions in biopolymers and neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Go, Nobuhiro [Kyoto Univ. (Japan)

    1996-05-01

    Importance of collective variable description of conformational dynamics of biopolymers and the vital role that neutron inelastic scattering phenomena would play in its experimental determination are discussed. (author)

  5. Preparation and characterization of chelating fibers based on natural wool for removal of Hg(II), Cu(II) and Co(II) metal ions from aqueous solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monier, M., E-mail: monierchem@yahoo.com [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Mansoura University, 35516 (Egypt); Nawar, N., E-mail: nnawar@mans.edu.eg [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Mansoura University, 35516 (Egypt); Abdel-Latif, D.A. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Mansoura University, 35516 (Egypt)

    2010-12-15

    The graft copolymerization of acrylonitrile (AN) onto natural wool fibers initiated by KMnO{sub 4} and oxalic acid combined redox initiator system in limited aqueous medium was carried out in heterogeneous media. Moreover, modification of the grafted wool fibers was done by changing the nitrile group (-CN) into cyano-acetic acid {alpha}-amino-acrylic-hydrazide through the reaction with hydrazine hydrate followed by ethylcyanoacetate which eventually produce wool-grafted-poly(cyano-acetic acid {alpha}-amino-acrylic-hydrazide) (wool-g-PCAH) chelating fibers. The application of the modified fibers for metal ion uptake was studied using Hg{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+} and Co{sup 2+}. The modified chelating fibers were characterized using FTIR spectroscopy, SEM and X-ray diffraction.

  6. Neutron scattering studies of the dynamics of biopolymer-water systems using pulsed-source spectrometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Middendorf, H.D. [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom); Miller, A. [Stirling Univ., Stirling (United Kingdom)

    1994-12-31

    Energy-resolving neutron scattering techniques provide spatiotemporal data suitable for testing and refining analytical models or computer simulations of a variety of dynamical processes in biomolecular systems. This paper reviews experimental work on hydrated biopolymers at ISIS, the UK Pulsed Neutron Facility. Following an outline of basic concepts and a summary of the new instrumental capabilities, the progress made is illustrated by results from recent experiments in two areas: quasi- elastic scattering from highly hydrated polysaccharide gels (agarose and hyaluronate), and inelastic scattering from vibrational modes of slightly hydrated collagen fibers.

  7. Decomposition and transformation of cutin and cutan biopolymers in soils: effect on their sorptive capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shechter, M.; Chefetz, B.

    2009-04-01

    Plant cuticle materials, especially the highly aliphatic biopolymers cutin and cutan, have been reported as highly efficient natural sorbents. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of decomposition on their sorption behavior with naphthol and phenanthrene. The level of cutin and cutan was reduced by 15 and 27% respectively during the first 3 mo of incubation. From that point, the level of the cutan did not change, while the level of the cutin continued to decrease up to 32% after 20 mo. 13C NMR analysis suggested transformation of cutan mainly within its alkyl-C structure which are assigned as crystalline moieties. Cutin, however, did not exhibit significant structure changes with time. The level of humic-like substances increased due to cutin decomposition but was not influenced in the cutan system after 20 mo of incubation. This indicates that the cutin biopolymer has been decomposed and transformed into humic-like substances, whereas the cutan was less subject to transformation. Decomposition affected sorption properties in similar trends for both cutin and cutan. The Freundlich capacity coefficients (KFOC) of naphthol were much lower than phenanthrene and were less influenced by the decomposition, whereas with phenanthrene KFOC values increased significantly with time. Naphthol exhibited non-linear isotherms; and nonlinearity was decreased with incubation time. In contrast, phenanthrene isotherms were more linear and showed only moderate change with time. The decrease in the linearity of naphthol isotherms might relate to the transformation of the sorption sites due to structural changes in the biopolymers. However, with phenanthrene, these changes did not affect sorption linearity but increased sorption affinities mainly for cutan. This is probably due to decomposition of the rigid alkyl-C moieties in the cutan biopolymer. Our data suggest that both biopolymers were relatively stable in the soil for 20 mo. Cutan is less degradable than cutin

  8. ''Green'' Biopolymers for Improved Decontamination of Metals from Surfaces: Sorptive Characterization and Coating Properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davison, Brian H.; Kuritz, Tanya

    2000-06-01

    The proposed research aims to develop a fundamental understanding of important biological and physical chemical parameters for effective decontamination of metal surfaces using environmentally benign aqueous-based biopolymer solutions. Understanding how heavy metal-chelating biopolymers coat and interact with contaminated surfaces will benefit the development of novel, safe, easy-to-apply decontamination methodologies for removal of radionuclides and heavy metals. The benefits of these methodologies will include the following: (1) decreased exposure hazards for workers; (2) decreased secondary waste generation; (3) increased efficiency of decontamination; (4) positive public appeal and development of novel, nature-friendly business opportunities; and (5) lower cost of cleanup to the government. We propose to use aqueous biopolymer solutions to coat a contaminated metal surface (i.e., steel), solubilize the heavy metals (e.g., uranium) from the surface, and bind the heavy metals into the biopolymer. The biopolymer coating (containing the immobilized hazardous metal contaminants) will then be removed as a viscous film, as a dry powder, or by washing. This ''apply, wait, and remove'' procedure will reduce the amount of worker time spent in decontamination activities.

  9. ''Green'' Biopolymers for Improved Decontamination of Metals from Surfaces: Sorptive Characterization and Coating Properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davison, Brian H.; Kurtiz,Tanya

    1999-06-01

    The proposed research aims to develop a fundamental understanding of important biological and physical chemical parameters for effective decontamination of metal surfaces using environmentally benign aqueous-based biopolymer solutions. Understanding how heavy metal-chelating biopolymers coat and interact with contaminated surfaces will benefit the development of novel, safe, easy-to-apply decontamination methodologies for removal of radionuclides and heavy metals. The benefits of these methodologies will include the following: (1) decreased exposure hazards for workers; (2) decreased secondary waste generation; (3) increased efficiency of decontamination; (4) positive public appeal and development of novel, nature-friendly business opportunities; and (5) lower cost of cleanup to the government. We propose to use aqueous biopolymer solutions to coat a contaminated metal surface (i.e., steel), solubilize the heavy metals (e.g., uranium) from the surface, and bind the heavy metals into the biopolymer. The biopolymer coating (containing the immobilized hazardous metal contaminants) will then be removed as a viscous film, as a dry powder, or by washing. This ''apply, wait, and remove'' procedure will reduce the amount of worker time spent in decontamination activities.

  10. ''Green'' Biopolymers for Improved Decontamination of Metals from Surfaces: Sorptive Characterization and Coating Properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davison, Brian H.

    2002-04-30

    The proposed research aimed to develop a fundamental understanding of important biological and physical chemical parameters for effective decontamination of metal surfaces using environmentally benign aqueous-based biopolymer solutions. Understanding how heavy metal-chelating biopolymers coat and interact with contaminated surfaces will benefit the development of novel, safe, easy-to-apply decontamination methodologies for removal of radionuclides and heavy metals. The benefits of these methodologies include the following: decreased exposure hazards for workers; decreased secondary waste generation; increased efficiency of decontamination; positive public appeal and development of novel, nature-friendly business opportunities; and lower cost of cleanup to the government. We proposed to use aqueous biopolymer solutions to coat a contaminated metal surface (i.e., steel), solubilize the heavy metals (e.g., uranium) from the surface, and bind the heavy metals into the biopolymer. The biopolymer coating (containing the immobilized hazardous metal contaminants) was to be removed as a viscous film, as a dry powder, or by washing. This ''apply, wait, and remove'' procedure will reduce the amount of worker time spent in decontamination activities.

  11. Lipid functionalized biopolymers: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qurat-Ul-Ain; Zia, Khalid Mahmood; Zia, Fatima; Ali, Muhammad; Rehman, Saima; Zuber, Mohammad

    2016-12-01

    Lipids are the main source of energy and widely used for various applications. In this review, the modification of lipids by using them in combination with other biomaterials like natural and synthetic polymers is elaborated. These new blends have characteristic features of both polymers and are characterized by different techniques (NMR, DSC, TGA, IR and Raman spectroscopy etc.) to understand their structure, properties and functional behavior. Lipids are hydrophobic, have anti-oxidant and anti-bacterial properties and thus impart hydrophobicity and flexibility to the polymers. While the polymers, on the other hand, make the lipids tougher. Properties of few polymers such as starch, polyethylene protein and chitosan that have brittleness, low combustion rate and hydrophobicity, are improved by incorporation of lipids ultimately increased their flexibility, combustion rate and hydrophobicity respectively. This review article is also focused on emerging fields for the applications of these composite materials. The most notable application of composite materials are in the field of paint industry.

  12. Morphological and chemical nature of fiber strands of oil palm empty-fruit-bunch (OPEFB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Rosli Wan Daud

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work we examined the morphological and chemical characteristics of the fibrous strands of oil palm empty-fruit-bunch which were left behind after being stripped of their fruits used for oil production. The empty-fruit-bunches were mechanically loosened to yield the fibrous strands, which can be used in paper and board making. We found that the fibrous strands had unique structure by having several large-diameter, long vessel elements in their core region, surrounded by vascular fibers. They had numerous silica-bodies attached to craters on their surfaces; the craters were perforated at the bottom. Many other minerals were also present in the strands. Our microscopic observations suggested that the silica-bodies are connected to a network of siliceous pathway within the fibrous matrix, and minerals tend to concentrate adjacent to the silica-bodies. Our findings could be useful in identifying suitable techniques for processing the oil palm fiber strands into value-added products.

  13. Water Fibers

    CERN Document Server

    Douvidzon, Mark L; Martin, Leopoldo L; Carmon, Tal

    2016-01-01

    Fibers constitute the backbone of modern communication and are used in laser surgeries; fibers also genarate coherent X-ray, guided-sound and supercontinuum. In contrast, fibers for capillary oscillations, which are unique to liquids, were rarely considered in optofluidics. Here we fabricate fibers by water bridging an optical tapered-coupler to a microlensed coupler. Our water fibers are held in air and their length can be longer than a millimeter. These hybrid fibers co-confine two important oscillations in nature: capillary- and electromagnetic-. We optically record vibrations in the water fiber, including an audio-rate fundamental and its 3 overtones in a harmonic series, that one can hear in soundtracks attached. Transforming Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems [MEMS] to Micro-Electro-Capillary-Systems [MECS], boosts the device softness by a million to accordingly improve its response to minute forces. Furthermore, MECS are compatible with water, which is a most important liquid in our world.

  14. A biopolymer-like metal enabled hybrid material with exceptional mechanical prowess

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junsong; Cui, Lishan; Jiang, Daqiang; Liu, Yinong; Hao, Shijie; Ren, Yang; Han, Xiaodong; Liu, Zhenyang; Wang, Yunzhi; Yu, Cun; Huan, Yong; Zhao, Xinqing; Zheng, Yanjun; Xu, Huibin; Ren, Xiaobing; Li, Xiaodong

    2015-02-01

    The design principles for naturally occurring biological materials have inspired us to develop next-generation engineering materials with remarkable performance. Nacre, commonly referred to as nature's armor, is renowned for its unusual combination of strength and toughness. Nature's wisdom in nacre resides in its elaborate structural design and the judicious placement of a unique organic biopolymer with intelligent deformation features. However, up to now, it is still a challenge to transcribe the biopolymer's deformation attributes into a stronger substitute in the design of new materials. In this study, we propose a new design strategy that employs shape memory alloy to transcribe the ``J-curve'' mechanical response and uniform molecular/atomic level deformation of the organic biopolymer in the design of high-performance hybrid materials. This design strategy is verified in a TiNi-Ti3Sn model material system. The model material demonstrates an exceptional combination of mechanical properties that are superior to other high-performance metal-based lamellar composites known to date. Our design strategy creates new opportunities for the development of high-performance bio-inspired materials.

  15. Cadmium removal from contaminated soil by tunable biopolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhukumar, Giridhar; Matsumoto, Mark; Mulchandani, Ashok; Chen, Wilfred

    2004-06-01

    An elastin-like polypeptide (ELP) composed of a polyhistidine tail (ELPH12) was exploited as a tunable, metal-binding biopolymer with high affinity toward cadmium. By taking advantage of the property of ELPH12 to undergo a reversible thermal precipitation, easy recovery of the sequestered cadmium from contaminated water was demonstrated as the result of a simple temperature change. In this study, batch soil washing experiments were performed to evaluate the feasibility of using ELPH12 as an environmentally benign strategy for removing cadmium from contaminated soil. The stability constant (log KL) for the cadmium-ELPH12 complex was determined to be 6.8, a value similar to that reported for the biosurfactant rhamnolipid. Two washings with 1.25 mg/mL of ELPH12 were able to remove more than 55% of the bound cadmium as compared to only 8% removal with ELP containing no histidine tail or 21% removal using the same concentration of EDTA. Unlike rhamnolipid from Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 9027, which adsorbs extensively to soil, less than 10% of ELPH12 was adsorbed under all soil washing conditions. As a result, a significantly lower concentration of ELPH12 (0.036 mM as compared to 5-10 mM of biosurfactants) was required to achieve similar extraction efficiencies. However, cadmium recovery by simple precipitation was incomplete due to the displacement of bound cadmium by zinc ions present in soil. Owing to its benign nature, ease of production, and selective tailoring of the metal binding domain toward any target metals of interest, ELP biopolymers may find utility as an effective extractant for heavy metal removal from contaminated soil or ore processing.

  16. Load sharing in the growth of bundled biopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruizhe; Carlsson, A. E.

    2014-01-01

    To elucidate the nature of load sharing in the growth of multiple biopolymers, we perform stochastic simulations of the growth of biopolymer bundles against obstacles under a broad range of conditions and varying assumptions. The obstacle motion due to thermal fluctuations is treated explicitly. We assume the “Perfect Brownian Ratchet” (PBR) model, in which the polymerization rate equals the free-filament rate as soon as the filament-obstacle distance exceeds the monomer size. Accurate closed-form formulas are obtained for the case of a rapidly moving obstacle. We find the following: (1) load sharing is usually sub-perfect in the sense that polymerization is slower than for a single filament carrying the same average force; (2) the sub-perfect behavior becomes significant at a total force proportional to the logarithm or the square root of the number of filaments, depending on the alignment of the filaments; (3) for the special case of slow barrier diffusion and low opposing force, an enhanced obstacle velocity for an increasing number of filaments is possible; (4) the obstacle velocity is very sensitive to the alignment of the filaments in the bundle, with a staggered alignment being an order of magnitude faster than an unstaggered one at forces of only 0.5 pN per filament for 20 filaments; (5) for large numbers of filaments, the power is maximized at a force well below 1 pN per filament; (6) for intermediate values of the obstacle diffusion coefficient, the shape of the force velocity relation is very similar to that for rapid obstacle diffusion. PMID:25489273

  17. Nanocomposite Apatite-biopolymer Materials and Coatings for Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.F. Sukhodub

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The microoverview paper describes synthesis and characterization of novel third generation composite biomaterials and coatings which correspond to the second structural level of human bone tissue (HBT organization obtained at Sumy state university “Bionanocomposite” laboratory. To obtain such composites an animal collagen is usually used, which is not potentially safe for medical applications. That is why investigations were started using some other biopolymers to obtain composites close to the second level in the structural hierarchy of HBT. Proposed natural polymers (Na alginate, chitosan are the most perspective because they have bacteriostatic properties for a vast number of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, high biocompatibility towards the connective tissue, low toxicity, an ability to improve regenerative processes during wounds healing, degradation ability with the creation of chemotaxic activity towards fibroblasts and osteoblasts. The formation of nanosized (25-75 nm calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (cdHA particles in the polymer scaffold approaches the derived material to the biogenic bone tissue, which can provide its more effective implantation. The influence of the imposition of static magnetic field on brushite (CaHPO4·2H2O crystallization was also investigated. It was shown that changing the magnetic field configuration could greatly affect crystallinity and texture of the derived particles. To increase the biocompatibility of existing medical implants (Ti–6Al 4V, Ti Ni, Mg the technology for obtaining bioactive coatings with corresponding mechanical, structural and morphology characteristics is developed in our laboratory. In this direction coatings based on cdHA in combination with biopolymer matrices (Na alginate, chitosan, are obtained in “soft” conditions using a thermal substrate technology. This technology was proposed by Japan scientists [1] and was sufficiently improved by us [2] in order to obtain coatings in

  18. Natural fiber templated TiO2 microtubes via a double soaking sol-gel route and their photocatalytic performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li; Li, Xu; Wang, Ziru; Shen, Yun; Liu, Ming

    2017-10-01

    TiO2 microtubes with a yam-like surface were prepared for the first time through a simple and efficient double soaking sol-gel route by utilizing Platanus acerifolia seed fibers as bio-templates. The physicochemical properties of the samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Brunauer Emmett Teller (BET) surface analysis and Ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy (UV-vis). The results showed that the obtained TiO2 microtubes had an anatase phase and were composed of a smooth internal wall and a rough yam-like external wall with an average diameter of 24 μm and the wall thickness of 2 μm. The surface area and pore volume of the as-prepared TiO2 microtubes reached 128.271 m2/g and 0.149 cm3/g, respectively. The UV-vis analysis displayed a favorable extension of light absorption capacity of TiO2 microtubes. The synthetic mechanism was preliminarily discussed as well. The moisture in the natural fiber templates facilitated the mild hydrolysis of titanium sol, leaving a prime layer on the surface of the fibers, and subsequently assisted in the successful preparation of TiO2 microtubes with a yam-like surface without requiring specific control of hydrolysis. Photocatalytic experiments indicated that the as-obtained TiO2 microtubes exhibited a higher efficiency than commercial P25 in the degradation of tetracycline hydrochloride.

  19. Fine Structure of Starch-Clay Composites as Biopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midsol 50 wheat starch and 5% Cloisite clay with or without the addition of glycerin were used to prepare biopolymers in a twin-screw extruder. Early trials of sectioning the unembedded biopolymer resulted in the immediate absorption of water and subsequent dissolution of the sample due to the the ...

  20. Formulation of indomethacin emulsion using biopolymer of Prunus avium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Shivangi; Dabral, Prashant; Rana, Vinod; Upadhaya, Kumud; Bhardwaj

    2012-03-01

    The aim of the investigation was to formulate Indomethacin Emulsion using Bio-polymer as Emulsifier. Different batches of emulsions were prepared by varying concentration of biopolymer prunus avium. Based evaluation of the prepared polymers, a conclusion can be drawn that in the Prunus avium bio-material can serve as a promising film forming agent for formulating various drug.

  1. Formulation of indomethacin emulsion using biopolymer of Prunus avium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivangi Verma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigation was to formulate Indomethacin Emulsion using Bio-polymer as Emulsifier. Different batches of emulsions were prepared by varying concentration of biopolymer prunus avium. Based evaluation of the prepared polymers, a conclusion can be drawn that in the Prunus avium bio-material can serve as a promising film forming agent for formulating various drug.

  2. Sugar and polyol solutions as effective solvent for biopolymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sman, van der R.G.M.

    2016-01-01

    Ternary mixtures of biopolymers, sugars or polyols and water can be treated as a pseudo binary system with respect to melting of the biopolymer. Sugar and polyol solutions can be treated as an effective solvent, characterized by the density of hydroxyl groups available for intermolecular hydrogen

  3. Ideal-Chain Collapse in Biopolymers

    CERN Document Server

    Neumann, R M

    2000-01-01

    A conceptual difficulty in the Hooke's-law description of ideal Gaussian polymer-chain elasticity is sometimes apparent in analyses of experimental data or in physical models designed to simulate the behavior of biopolymers. The problem, the tendency of a chain to collapse in the absence of external forces, is examined in the following examples: DNA-stretching experiments, gel electrophoresis, and protein folding. We demonstrate that the application of a statistical-mechanically derived repulsive force, acting between the chain ends, whose magnitude is proportional to the absolute temperature and inversely proportional to the scalar end separation removes this difficulty.

  4. Mathematical methods of analysis of biopolymer sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Gindikin, S G

    1992-01-01

    This collection contains papers by participants in the seminar on mathematical methods in molecular biology who worked for several years at the Laboratory of Molecular Biology and Bioorganic Chemistry (now the Institute of Physical and Chemical Problems in Biology) at Moscow State University. The seminar united mathematicians and biologists around the problems of biological sequences. The collection includes original results as well as expository material and spans a range of perspectives, from purely mathematical problems to algorithms and their computer realizations. For this reason, the book is of interest to mathematicians, statisticians, biologists, and computational scientists who work with biopolymer sequences.

  5. Toluene impurity effects on CO2 separation using a hollow fiber membrane for natural gas

    KAUST Repository

    Omole, Imona C.

    2011-03-01

    The performance of defect-free cross-linkable polyimide asymmetric hollow fiber membranes was characterized using an aggressive feed stream containing up to 1000ppm toluene. The membrane was shown to be stable against toluene-induced plasticization compared with analogs made from Matrimid®, a commercial polyimide. Permeation and sorption analysis suggest that the introduction of toluene vapors in the feed subjects the membrane to antiplasticization, as the permeance decreases significantly (to less than 30%) under the most aggressive conditions tested. Separation efficiencies reflected by permselectivities were less affected. The effect of the toluene on the membrane was shown to be reversible when the toluene was removed. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  6. Experimental data on the properties of natural fiber particle reinforced polymer composite material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Chandramohan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental study on the development of polymer bio-composites. The powdered coconut shell, walnut shells and Rice husk are used as reinforcements with bio epoxy resin to form hybrid composite specimens. The fiber compositions in each specimen are 1:1 while the resin and hardener composition 10:1 respectively. The fabricated composites were tested as per ASTM standards to evaluate mechanical properties such as tensile strength, flexural strength, shear strength and impact strength are evaluated in both with moisture and without moisture. The result of test shows that hybrid composite has far better properties than single fibre glass reinforced composite under mechanical loads. However it is found that the incorporation of walnut shell and coconut shell fibre can improve the properties.

  7. Fundamental studies on the nature and properties of ceramic fiber insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, J. I.; Whittemore, O. J., Jr.; Scott, W. D.; Miller, A. D.; Smiser, L. W.; Leiser, D. B.

    1975-01-01

    Silica and mullite fibers used to fabricate reusable surface insulation (RSI) for the space shuttle orbiter may devitrify/recrystallize within the temperature range anticipated upon reentry. This is shown to be dependent upon impurity level, temperature, and time at temperature. It is determined that the effects of the material improvement and optimization program are positive. The degree of crystallinity is shown to have a predominant effect upon the strength of fabricated RSI tile, and limits are determined. Models are developed to predict tensile strengths and shrinkage rates of silica tile based upon readily measurable parameters. Thermal cycling which simulates reentry results in an increase in the crystallinity and in the porosity of tile coatings.

  8. Biopolymer-Based Delivery Systems: Challenges and Opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joye, Iris J; McClements, D Julian

    2016-01-01

    Biopolymer-based nanostructures or microstructures can be fabricated with different compositions, structures, and properties so that colloidal delivery systems can be tailored for specific applications. These structures can be assembled using various approaches, including electrospinning, coacervation, nanoprecipitation, injection, layer-by-layer deposition, and/or gelation. A major application of biopolymer-based particles is to encapsulate, protect, and release active molecules in the agricultural, food, supplements, personal care, and pharmaceutical sectors. The inherent variability and complexity of biopolymers (proteins and polysaccharides) often makes it challenging to produce particles with well-defined physicochemical and functional attributes. In this review, we discuss the properties of biopolymers, common particle fabrication methods, and some of the major challenges and opportunities associated with developing biopolymer-based particles for application as food-grade delivery systems.

  9. Recent advances in microbial biopolymer production and purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreyenschulte, Dirk; Krull, Rainer; Margaritis, Argyrios

    2014-03-01

    Over the past decades a large amount of biopolymers originating from various types of microorganisms have been reported. With ongoing research the number of possible applications has increased rapidly, ranging from use as food additives and biomedical agents to biodegradable plastics from renewable resources. In spite of the plethora of applications, the large-scale introduction of biopolymers into the market has often been forestalled by high production costs mainly due to complex or inefficient downstream processing. In this article, state-of-the-art methods and recent advances in the separation and purification of microbial polymers are reviewed, with special focus on the biopolymers, γ-polyglutamic acid and xanthan gum. Furthermore, a study of the general factors affecting production and purification is presented, including biopolymer rheology, enzymatic degradation and production of biopolymer mixtures.

  10. An applied investigation of corn-based distillers dried grains with solubles in the production of natural fiber-plastic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Hugo Eudosio

    The main objective of this research was to examine uses for distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS), a coproduct of ethanol production plant, in the fiber-reinforced plastic composites industry. Initially the effort intended to take advantage of the DDGS components, using chemical reactions, to produce coupling agents to improve the physical properties of the composite. Four different chemicals plus water were used to convert proteins into soluble amino acids. The results were not as expected, and appeared to show an early pyrolysis of DDGS components. This may be due to regeneration of proteins when pH of solutions is neutralized. Procedures were then investigated to utilize DDGS for different markets. Considering that oils and proteins of DDGS can thermally decompose, it seemed important to separate the major components and work with DDGS fiber alone. A procedure to extract oil from DDGS using ethanol and then to hydrolyze proteins with ethanol diluted with water, acid and sodium sulfite, was developed. The resulting DDGS fiber or residual material, with a low content of oil and proteins, was used as filler in a propylene matrix with a lubricant and coupling agent to make natural fiber plastic composites (NFPC). Composites containing wood flour (WPC) were prepared simultaneously with those of DDGS fiber to compare tensile properties and fracture surfaces of the specimens by scanning electron microscope (SEM). This study demonstrates that DDGS fiber can replace wood fiber as a filler in NFPC.

  11. Antibacterial Properties of Tough and Strong Electrospun PMMA/PEO Fiber Mats Filled with Lanasol—A Naturally Occurring Brominated Substance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard L. Andersson

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A new type of antimicrobial, biocompatible and toughness enhanced ultra-thin fiber mats for biomedical applications is presented. The tough and porous fiber mats were obtained by electrospinning solution-blended poly (methyl methacrylate (PMMA and polyethylene oxide (PEO, filled with up to 25 wt % of Lanasol—a naturally occurring brominated cyclic compound that can be extracted from red sea algae. Antibacterial effectiveness was tested following the industrial Standard JIS L 1902 and under agitated medium (ASTM E2149. Even at the lowest concentrations of Lanasol, 4 wt %, a significant bactericidal effect was seen with a 4-log (99.99% reduction in bacterial viability against S. aureus, which is one of the leading causes of hospital-acquired (nosocomial infections in the world. The mechanical fiber toughness was insignificantly altered up to the maximum Lanasol concentration tested, and was for all fiber mats orders of magnitudes higher than electrospun fibers based on solely PMMA. This antimicrobial fiber system, relying on a dissolved antimicrobial agent (demonstrated by X-ray diffraction and Infrared (IR-spectroscopy rather than a dispersed and “mixed-in” solid antibacterial particle phase, presents a new concept which opens the door to tougher, stronger and more ductile antimicrobial fibers.

  12. Keratin Protein-Catalyzed Nitroaldol (Henry Reaction and Comparison with Other Biopolymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marleen Häring

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Here we describe a preliminary investigation on the ability of natural keratin to catalyze the nitroaldol (Henry reaction between aldehydes and nitroalkanes. Both aromatic and heteroaromatic aldehydes bearing strong or moderate electron-withdrawing groups were converted into the corresponding β-nitroalcohol products in both DMSO and in water in the presence of tetrabutylammonium bromide (TBAB as a phase transfer catalyst. Negligible background reactions (i.e., negative control experiment in the absence of keratin protein were observed in these solvent systems. Aromatic aldehydes bearing electron-donating groups and aliphatic aldehydes showed poor or no conversion, respectively. In general, the reactions in water/TBAB required twice the amount of time than in DMSO to achieve similar conversions. Moreover, comparison of the kinetics of the keratin-mediated nitroaldol (Henry reaction with other biopolymers revealed slower rates for the former and the possibility of fine-tuning the kinetics by appropriate selection of the biopolymer and solvent.

  13. Keratin Protein-Catalyzed Nitroaldol (Henry) Reaction and Comparison with Other Biopolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häring, Marleen; Pettignano, Asja; Quignard, Françoise; Tanchoux, Nathalie; Díaz Díaz, David

    2016-08-25

    Here we describe a preliminary investigation on the ability of natural keratin to catalyze the nitroaldol (Henry) reaction between aldehydes and nitroalkanes. Both aromatic and heteroaromatic aldehydes bearing strong or moderate electron-withdrawing groups were converted into the corresponding β-nitroalcohol products in both DMSO and in water in the presence of tetrabutylammonium bromide (TBAB) as a phase transfer catalyst. Negligible background reactions (i.e., negative control experiment in the absence of keratin protein) were observed in these solvent systems. Aromatic aldehydes bearing electron-donating groups and aliphatic aldehydes showed poor or no conversion, respectively. In general, the reactions in water/TBAB required twice the amount of time than in DMSO to achieve similar conversions. Moreover, comparison of the kinetics of the keratin-mediated nitroaldol (Henry) reaction with other biopolymers revealed slower rates for the former and the possibility of fine-tuning the kinetics by appropriate selection of the biopolymer and solvent.

  14. How new biopolymers can improve muds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dino, D.; Lindblad, D.E.; Moorhouse, R. (Rhoene-Poulenc Inc. (France))

    1993-11-01

    Xantham gum was introduced as a drilling-fluid component in the mid-1960s, but its use has risen noticeably since 1970, as prevalence of inhibitive polymeric drilling fluids has increased. Xanthan is known for its ability to build viscosity in both fresh water and salt solutions, its exceptional shear-thinning properties, and its tolerance to pH, all without environmental problems. Although biopolymers like xanthan typically represent only 0.25--1.5 lb/bbl of a drilling fluid, they are critical in building rheology, from spudding to the special demands of angled drilling and well completion. They add properties to muds which expand their use across a variety of formations and over a wide temperature range. Beyond xanthan, another useful class of biopolymers are the guar gums. Just as muds incorporating xanthan have been in the mainstay in rheology building over the years for many muds, fluids incorporating guar have long been the backbone of fracturing fluids. Guar and its derivatives are extremely versatile as rheology modifiers, particularly when used in conjunction with xanthans. In fact, xanthan/guar combinations have already been enhancing the effectiveness of muds at drill sites in the US. This paper reviews the performance of mixed xantham/guar additives to obtain an even better mud control system.

  15. Biopolymer from microbial assisted in situ hydrolysis of triglycerides and dimerization of fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavitha, V; Radhakrishnan, N; Madhavacharyulu, E; Sailakshmi, G; Sekaran, G; Reddy, B S R; Rajkumar, G Suseela; Gnanamani, Arumugam

    2010-01-01

    The present study demonstrates biopolymer production by in situ bio-based dimerization of fatty acids by microorganism isolated from marine sediments. Microbial isolate grown in Zobell medium in the presence of triglycerides for the period of 24-240 h at 37 degrees C, hydrolyze the applied triglycerides and sequentially dimerized the hydrolyzed products and subsequently polymerized and transformed to a biopolymer having appreciable adhesive properties. Physical (nature, odour, stickyness and tensile strength), chemical (instrumentation) and biochemical (cell free broth) methods of analyses carried out provided the hypotheses involved in the formation of the product as well as the nature of the product formed. Results revealed, lipolytic enzymes released during initial period of growth and the biosurfactant production during later period, respectively, hydrolyze the applied triglycerides and initiate the dimerization and further accelerated when the incubation period extended. The existence and the non-existence of in situ hydrolysis of various triglycerides followed by dimerization and polymerization and the mechanism of transformation of triglycerides to biopolymer are discussed in detail.

  16. Molecular Biodynamers: Dynamic Covalent Analogues of Biopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Conspectus Constitutional dynamic chemistry (CDC) features the use of reversible linkages at both molecular and supramolecular levels, including reversible covalent bonds (dynamic covalent chemistry, DCC) and noncovalent interactions (dynamic noncovalent chemistry, DNCC). Due to its inherent reversibility and stimuli-responsiveness, CDC has been widely utilized as a powerful tool for the screening of bioactive compounds, the exploitation of receptors or substrates driven by molecular recognition, and the fabrication of constitutionally dynamic materials. Implementation of CDC in biopolymer science leads to the generation of constitutionally dynamic analogues of biopolymers, biodynamers, at the molecular level (molecular biodynamers) through DCC or at the supramolecular level (supramolecular biodynamers) via DNCC. Therefore, biodynamers are prepared by reversible covalent polymerization or noncovalent polyassociation of biorelevant monomers. In particular, molecular biodynamers, biodynamers of the covalent type whose monomeric units are connected by reversible covalent bonds, are generated by reversible polymerization of bio-based monomers and can be seen as a combination of biopolymers with DCC. Owing to the reversible covalent bonds used in DCC, molecular biodynamers can undergo continuous and spontaneous constitutional modifications via incorporation/decorporation and exchange of biorelevant monomers in response to internal or external stimuli. As a result, they behave as adaptive materials with novel properties, such as self-healing, stimuli-responsiveness, and tunable mechanical and optical character. More specifically, molecular biodynamers combine the biorelevant characters (e.g., biocompatibility, biodegradability, biofunctionality) of bioactive monomers with the dynamic features of reversible covalent bonds (e.g., changeable, tunable, controllable, self-healing, and stimuli-responsive capacities), to realize synergistic properties in one system. In addition

  17. Molecular Biodynamers: Dynamic Covalent Analogues of Biopolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun; Lehn, Jean-Marie; Hirsch, Anna K H

    2017-02-21

    Constitutional dynamic chemistry (CDC) features the use of reversible linkages at both molecular and supramolecular levels, including reversible covalent bonds (dynamic covalent chemistry, DCC) and noncovalent interactions (dynamic noncovalent chemistry, DNCC). Due to its inherent reversibility and stimuli-responsiveness, CDC has been widely utilized as a powerful tool for the screening of bioactive compounds, the exploitation of receptors or substrates driven by molecular recognition, and the fabrication of constitutionally dynamic materials. Implementation of CDC in biopolymer science leads to the generation of constitutionally dynamic analogues of biopolymers, biodynamers, at the molecular level (molecular biodynamers) through DCC or at the supramolecular level (supramolecular biodynamers) via DNCC. Therefore, biodynamers are prepared by reversible covalent polymerization or noncovalent polyassociation of biorelevant monomers. In particular, molecular biodynamers, biodynamers of the covalent type whose monomeric units are connected by reversible covalent bonds, are generated by reversible polymerization of bio-based monomers and can be seen as a combination of biopolymers with DCC. Owing to the reversible covalent bonds used in DCC, molecular biodynamers can undergo continuous and spontaneous constitutional modifications via incorporation/decorporation and exchange of biorelevant monomers in response to internal or external stimuli. As a result, they behave as adaptive materials with novel properties, such as self-healing, stimuli-responsiveness, and tunable mechanical and optical character. More specifically, molecular biodynamers combine the biorelevant characters (e.g., biocompatibility, biodegradability, biofunctionality) of bioactive monomers with the dynamic features of reversible covalent bonds (e.g., changeable, tunable, controllable, self-healing, and stimuli-responsive capacities), to realize synergistic properties in one system. In addition, molecular

  18. Strategies to improve the mechanical properties of starch-based materials: plasticization and natural fibers reinforcement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Lopez-Gil

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Biodegradable polymers are starting to be introduced as raw materials in the food-packaging market. Nevertheless, their price is very high. Starch, a fully biodegradable and bioderived polymer is a very interesting alternative due to its very low price. However, the use of starch as the polymer matrix for the production of rigid food packaging, such as trays, is limited due to its poor mechanical properties, high hidrophilicity and high density. This work presents two strategies to overcome the poor mechanical properties of starch. First, the plasticization of starch with several amounts of glycerol to produce thermoplastic starch (TPS and second, the production of biocomposites by reinforcing TPS with promising fibers, such as barley straw and grape waste. The mechanical properties obtained are compared with the values predicted by models used in the field of composites; law of mixtures, Kerner-Nielsen and Halpin-Tsai. To evaluate if the materials developed are suitable for the production of food-packaging trays, the TPS-based materials with better mechanical properties were compared with commercial grades of oil-based polymers, polypropylene (PP and polyethylene-terphthalate (PET, and a biodegradable polymer, polylactic acid (PLA.

  19. Smart Natural Fiber Reinforced Plastic (NFRP) Composites Based On Recycled Polypropylene in The Presence Kaolin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suharty, N. S.; Ismail, H.; Diharjo, K.; Handayani, D. S.; Lestari, W. A.

    2017-07-01

    Composites contain double filler material which act as reinforcement and flame retardants of recycled polypropylene (rPP)/kaolin(Kao)/palm oil empty bunch fiber (PEBF) have been succesfully prepared. The composites were synthesized through reactively solution method, using coupling agent PP-g-AA and compatibilizer DVB. The effect of double filler [Kao/PEBF] were investigated flexural strength (FS), inflammability, and morphology. Mechanical testing result in accordance to ASTM D790, the FS of rPP/DVB/PP-g-AA/Kao+ZB/PEBF composite was 48% higher than that of rPP matrix. Moreover, flexural modulus (FM) was significantly improved by 56% as compared to that of rPP matrix. The scanning electron images (SEM) shown good dispersion of [Ka/PEBF] and good filler-matrix interaction. The inflammability testing result which is tested using ASTM D635, showed that the flame resistance of rPP/DVB/PP-g-AA/Kao+ZB/PEBF composite was improve by increasing of time to ignition (TTI) about 857% and burning rate (BR) decreasing to 66% compared to the raw material rPP matrix. In the same time, the addition of 20% (w/w) PEBF as a second filler to form rPP/DVB/PP-g-AA/Kao+ZB/PEBF composites (F5) is able to increase: the FS by 17.5%, the FM by 19%, the TTI by 7.6% and the BR by 3.7% compared to the composite without PEBF (F2).

  20. Natural fiber composites with EMI shielding function fabricated using VARTM and Cu film magnetron sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Changlei; Ren, Han; Shi, Sheldon Q.; Zhang, Hualiang; Cheng, Jiangtao; Cai, Liping; Chen, Kathleen; Tan, Hwa-Shen

    2016-01-01

    To fabricate kenaf fiber composites with electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding function, the technique of vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) and Cu film magnetron sputtering were employed. The EMI shielding effectiveness (SE) and composite surface characteristics were examined with PNA Network Analyzer, Quanta 200 environmental scanning electron microscope and OCA20 contact angle meter. After being Cu-sputter coated for 0.5 h, 1 h, 2 h, and 3 h, the EMI SE values were increased to be 23.8 dB, 32.5 dB, 43.3 dB, and 48.3 dB, which denoted 99.5799%, 99.9437%, 99.9953%, or 99.9985% incident signal was blocked, respectively. The SEM observations revealed that the smoother surface of the composites was obtained by longer time sputtering, resulting in the SE improvement. The contact angle increased from 49.6° to 129.5° after 0.5 h sputtering, which indicated that the coated Cu film dramatically improved the hydrophobic property of composite. When the coating time increased to 3 h, the contact angle decreased to 51.0° because the composite surface roughness decreased with the increase in coating time.

  1. Overview of biopolymers as carriers of antiphlogistic agents for treatment of diverse ocular inflammations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Anil Kumar, E-mail: sharmarahul2004@gmail.com [Delhi Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Research, Formerly College of Pharmacy, University of Delhi, Pushp Vihar, Sector III, New Delhi 110017,India (India); Arya, Amit; Sahoo, Pravat Kumar [Delhi Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Research, Formerly College of Pharmacy, University of Delhi, Pushp Vihar, Sector III, New Delhi 110017,India (India); Majumdar, Dipak Kanti [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Apeejay Stya University, Sohna-Palwal Road, Gurgaon 122103 (India)

    2016-10-01

    Inflammation of the eye is a usual clinical condition that can implicate any part of the eye. The nomenclature of variety of such inflammations is based on the ocular part involved. These diseases may jeopardize normal functioning of the eye on progression. In general, corticosteroids, antihistamines, mast cell stabilizers and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are used to treat inflammatory diseases/disorders of the eye. There have been several attempts via different approaches of drug delivery to overcome the low ocular bioavailability resulting from shorter ocular residence time. The features like safety, ease of elimination and ability to sustain drug release have led to application of biopolymers in ocular therapeutics. Numerous polymers of natural origin such as gelatin, collagen, chitosan, albumin, hyaluronic acid, alginates etc. have been successfully employed for preparation of different ocular dosage forms. Chitosan is the most explored biopolymer amongst natural biopolymers because of its inherent characteristics. The emergence of synthetic biopolymers (like PVP, PACA, PCL, POE, polyanhydrides, PLA, PGA and PLGA) has also added new dimensions to the drug delivery strategies meant for treatment of ophthalmic inflammations. The current review is an endeavor to describe the utility of a variety of biomaterials/polymers based drug delivery systems as carrier for anti-inflammatory drugs in ophthalmic therapeutics. - Highlights: • Numerous eye inflammations pose troubles in vision functions. • Low bioavailability by conventional drug delivery systems due to eye constraints • Drug carriers ensuring improved bioavailability to the eye are need of the hour. • Chitosan - most explored amongst all biomaterials for ocular delivery. • Emergence of novel synthetic carriers in ophthalmology.

  2. STUDY OF RASPBERRY EXTRACT APPLICATIONS AS TEXTILE COLORANT ON NATURAL FIBERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    COMAN Diana

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study deals with the biomordant assisted application of natural extracts obtained from red raspberry (Rubus idaeus L. fruits onto two different cellulosic supports – flax and bamboo. The study relies on the improvement of multifunctionalities such as colour fastness, washing and rubbing fastness, due to the synergism provided by the co-assistance of both a biomordant, and the complex resulted by inclusion of the pigment molecule, in the cavity of MCT-β-CD; it is well known that natural dye molecule have a good selectivity binding to the hydrophobic monochloro-triazynil-cyclodextrin’s (MCT-β-CD cavity to form inclusion complexes. An investigation system provided the characterization of the composites: FT-IR spectroscopy stressed the main chemical bonds created between MCT-β-CD as host molecule and guest molecule represented by natural colorant molecule; Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET Surface Area Analysis completes the analysis, proving the positive contribution of MCT-β-cyclodextrin grafting. Dyeing fastness and colour modifications were conclusive for this research. Samples of bamboo knitting are less colorful than those of the flax fabric in terms of high absorption capacity and stability / durability of natural dye applied by inclusion within cyclodextrin’s inner. The results of analysis revealed improvement of washing and rubbing fastness (1-1.5 points. Colour modifications noticed due to the colorant deposition were quantified from up to 3 points.

  3. Smart Dressings Based on Nanostructured Fibers Containing Natural Origin Antimicrobial, Anti-Inflammatory, and Regenerative Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanesa Andreu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A fast and effective wound healing process would substantially decrease medical costs, wound care supplies, and hospitalization significantly improving the patients’ quality of life. The search for effective therapeutic approaches seems to be imperative in order to avoid the aggravation of chronic wounds. In spite of all the efforts that have been made during the recent years towards the development of artificial wound dressings, none of the currently available options combine all the requirements necessary for quick and optimal cutaneous regeneration. Therefore, technological advances in the area of temporary and permanent smart dressings for wound care are required. The development of nanoscience and nanotechnology can improve the materials and designs used in topical wound care in order to efficiently release antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory and regenerative compounds speeding up the endogenous healing process. Nanostructured dressings can overcome the limitations of the current coverings and, separately, natural origin components can also overcome the drawbacks of current antibiotics and antiseptics (mainly cytotoxicity, antibiotic resistance, and allergies. The combination of natural origin components with demonstrated antibiotic, regenerative, or anti-inflammatory properties together with nanostructured materials is a promising approach to fulfil all the requirements needed for the next generation of bioactive wound dressings. Microbially compromised wounds have been treated with different essential oils, honey, cationic peptides, aloe vera, plant extracts, and other natural origin occurring antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, and regenerative components but the available evidence is limited and insufficient to be able to draw reliable conclusions and to extrapolate those findings to the clinical practice. The evidence and some promising preliminary results indicate that future comparative studies are justified but instead of talking about

  4. Microfiltration of different surface waters with/without coagulation: clear correlations between membrane fouling and hydrophilic biopolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Katsuki; Tanaka, Ken; Watanabe, Yoshimasa

    2014-02-01

    Although low-pressure membranes (microfiltration (MF) or ultrafiltration (UF)) have become viable options for drinking water treatment, problems caused by membrane fouling must still be addressed. The objective of this study was to compare five different surface waters and to identify a relevant index of water quality that can be used for prediction of the fouling potential of the water. Bench-scale filtration tests were carried out with commercially available hollow-fiber MF membranes. Fairly long-term (a few days) filtrations in the constant-flow mode were carried out with automatic backwash. Membrane fouling in this study was shown to be irreversible as a result of the periodic backwash carried out throughout of the operation. Easily accessible indexes of water quality including dissolved organic carbon (DOC), UV absorbance, Ca concentration and turbidity could not explain the degree of fouling encountered in the filtration tests. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) could provide information on the presence of protein-like substances in water, and peaks for protein showed some correlation with the membrane fouling. Biopolymer (characterized by high molecular weights and insensitivity to UV light absorption) concentrations in the five waters determined by liquid chromatography with organic carbon detection (LC-OCD) exhibited an excellent correlation with the fouling rates. Coagulation with polyaluminum chloride could mitigate membrane fouling in all cases. The extent of fouling seen with coagulated waters was also correlated with biopolymer concentrations. The relationship between biopolymer concentrations and the fouling rates established for the raw waters could also be applied to the coagulated waters. These results suggested that the contribution of biopolymers to membrane fouling in the present study was significant, an observation that was supported by the analysis of foulants extracted at the termination of each test. Biopolymer concentrations

  5. Use of Natural-Fiber Bio-Composites in Construction versus Traditional Solutions: Operational and Embodied Energy Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Galan-Marin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available During the last decades natural polymers have become more and more frequent to replace traditional inorganic stabilizers in building materials. The purpose of this research is to establish a comparison between the most conventional building material solutions for load-bearing walls and a type of biomaterial. This comparison will focus on load-bearing walls as used in a widespread type of twentieth century dwelling construction in Europe and still used in developing countries nowadays. To carry out this analysis, the structural and thermal insulation characteristics of different construction solutions are balanced. The tool used for this evaluation is the life cycle assessment throughout the whole lifespan of these buildings. This research aims to examine the environmental performance of each material assessed: fired clay brick masonry walls (BW, concrete block masonry walls (CW, and stabilized soil block masonry walls (SW stabilized with natural fibers and alginates. These conventional and new materials are evaluated from the point of view of both operational and embodied energy.

  6. Use of Natural-Fiber Bio-Composites in Construction versus Traditional Solutions: Operational and Embodied Energy Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galan-Marin, Carmen; Rivera-Gomez, Carlos; Garcia-Martinez, Antonio

    2016-06-13

    During the last decades natural polymers have become more and more frequent to replace traditional inorganic stabilizers in building materials. The purpose of this research is to establish a comparison between the most conventional building material solutions for load-bearing walls and a type of biomaterial. This comparison will focus on load-bearing walls as used in a widespread type of twentieth century dwelling construction in Europe and still used in developing countries nowadays. To carry out this analysis, the structural and thermal insulation characteristics of different construction solutions are balanced. The tool used for this evaluation is the life cycle assessment throughout the whole lifespan of these buildings. This research aims to examine the environmental performance of each material assessed: fired clay brick masonry walls (BW), concrete block masonry walls (CW), and stabilized soil block masonry walls (SW) stabilized with natural fibers and alginates. These conventional and new materials are evaluated from the point of view of both operational and embodied energy.

  7. Distinct Difference in Absorption Pattern in Pigs of Betaine Provided as a Supplement or Present Naturally in Cereal Dietary Fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedemann, Mette Skou; Theil, Peter Kappel; Lærke, Helle Nygaard

    2015-01-01

    high-fiber breads differing in amount and source of dietary fiber (two experiments, n = 6 pigs each). Plasma betaine peaked after 30 min when betaine was fed as a supplement, whereas it peaked after 120–180 min when high-fiber breads were fed. Plasma betaine showed no diet × time interaction after...... feeding with high-fiber breads, indicating that the absorption kinetic did not differ between fiber sources. The net absorption of choline was not affected by the experimental diets. In conclusion, betaine in cereal sources has to be liberated from the matrix prior to absorption, causing delayed...

  8. Optical properties of DNA-CTMA biopolymers and applications in metal-biopolymer-metal photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bin; Kim, Sung Jin; Bartsch, Carrie M.; Heckman, Emily M.; Ouchen, Fahima; Cartwright, Alexander N.

    2011-09-01

    The potential of using a DNA biopolymer in an electro-optic device is presented. A complex of DNA with the cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium-chloride (CTMA) was used to obtain an organic-soluble DNA material (DNA-CTMA). Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) was added to the DNACTMA to increase the electrical conductivity of the biopolymer. The CW absorbance and time-resolved photoluminescence of the resulting DNA-CTMA and DNA-CTMA-PEDOT:PSS were investigated. Both DNA materials have absorbance peaks at ~260 nm and a broad, Stokes shifted, photoluminescence peak around 470nm. The photoluminescence lifetime of the materials was observed to decrease with increasing UV excitation. Specifically, excitation with a high power ultrafast (~150fs) UV (266nm) laser pulse resulted in a drastic decrease in the photoluminescence lifetime decreases after a few minutes. Moreover, the observed decrease was faster in an air ambient than in a nitrogen ambient. This is most likely due to photo-oxidation that degrades the polymer surface resulting in an increase in the non-radiative recombination. In order to investigate the photoconductivity of these two materials, metal-biopolymer-metal (MBM) ultraviolet photodetectors with interdigitated electrodes were fabricated and characterized. The photoresponsivity of these devices was limited by the transport dynamics within the film. The prospects for the use of these materials in optical devices will be discussed.

  9. Elastin-like polypeptides: biomedical applications of tunable biopolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacEwan, Sarah R; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2010-01-01

    Artificial repetitive polypeptides have grown in popularity as a bioinspired alternative to synthetic polymers. The genetically encoded synthesis, monodispersity, potential lack of toxicity, and biocompatibility are attractive features of these biopolymers for biological applications. Elastin-like polypeptides (ELPs) are one such class of biopolymers that are of particular interest because of their "smart"-stimuli responsive-properties. Herein, we discuss the genetically encoded design and recombinant synthesis of ELPs that enable precise control of their physicochemical properties and which have led to a wide range of biomedical applications of these biopolymers in the last decade.

  10. Thermal Behavior of Tacca leontopetaloides Starch-Based Biopolymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurul Shuhada Mohd Makhtar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Starch is used whenever there is a need for natural elastic properties combined with low cost of production. However, the hydrophilic properties in structural starch will decrease the thermal performance of formulated starch polymer. Therefore, the effect of glycerol, palm olein, and crude palm oil (CPO, as plasticizers, on the thermal behavior of Tacca leontopetaloides starch incorporated with natural rubber in biopolymer production was investigated in this paper. Four different formulations were performed and represented by TPE1, TPE2, TPE3, and TPE4. The compositions were produced by using two-roll mill compounding. The sheets obtained were cut into small sizes prior to thermal testing. The addition of glycerol shows higher enthalpy of diffusion in which made the material easily can be degraded, leaving to an amount of 6.6% of residue. Blending of CPO with starch (TPE3 had a higher thermal resistance towards high temperature up to 310°C and the thermal behavior of TPE2 only gave a moderate performance compared with other TPEs.

  11. Manipulating Biopolymer Dynamics by Anisotropic Nanoconfinement

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Shao-Qing

    2007-01-01

    How the geometry of nano-sized confinement affects dynamics of biomaterials is interesting yet poorly understood. An elucidation of structural details upon nano-sized confinement may benefit manufacturing pharmaceuticals in biomaterial sciences and medicine. The behavior of biopolymers in nano-sized confinement is investigated using coarse-grained models and molecular simulations. Particularly, we address the effects of shapes of a confinement on protein folding dynamics by measuring folding rates and dissecting structural properties of the transition states in nano-sized spheres and ellipsoids. We find that when the form of a confinement resembles the geometrical properties of the transition states, the rates of folding kinetics are most enhanced. This knowledge of shape selectivity in identifying optimal conditions for reactions will have a broad impact in nanotechnology and pharmaceutical sciences.

  12. Fermentable sugars from biopolymers of bagasse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramachandran, K.; Das, K.; Sharma, D.K.

    1987-11-01

    Ethanol can replace oil as a fuel and its use would help in the conservation of the meagre oil reserves in India. The article indicates some convenient and cost-effective processes for the production of ethanol from biopolymers available in bagasse, an agricultural residue. A two-stage acid hydrolysis process produced a maximum of fermentable sugars at 35%. Calcium chloride used as a promoter enhanced production by 3.5%. Other promoters are under investigation. Agitation had a significant effect on production, complete hydrolysis being possible between 10-45 minutes depending on temperature. The fermentable sugars obtained, xylose and glucose, can then be fermented to ethanol in an integrated three-stage process. 11 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. High-performance liquid chromatography of biopolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regnier, F.E.

    1983-10-21

    The ability to separate biological macromolecules with good resolution on liquid chromatographic columns has depended on the development of suitable packing materials. In size exclusion chromatography, molecules are separated by size on the basis of differential permeation of the packing. Ion exchange, hydrophobic interaction (or reversed-phase), and affinity chromatography are all surface-mediated separation methods, although they depend on different retention mechanisms. High-performance liquid chromatographic columns designed for biopolymers offer major advantages over conventional columns in both speed and resolving power. The exponential growth of literature on the high-performance separation of peptides and proteins in particular indicates that the techniques will become the dominant form of column liquid chromatography. 92 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Biolubricant induced phase inversion and superhydrophobicity in rubber-toughened biopolymer/organoclay nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, Ilker S.; Steele, Adam; Martorana, Philip; Loth, Eric; Robinson, Scott J.; Stevenson, Darren

    2009-08-01

    We present a simple technique to fabricate rubber-toughened biopolymer/organoclay nanocomposite coatings with highly water repellent surface wetting characteristics and strong adhesion to metal surfaces. The technique combines the principles of phase inversion and atomization of multicomponent polymer/organoclay suspensions containing a biolubricant as the nonsolvent. The biolubricant was a blend of cyclomethicone/dimethiconol oil with fruit kernel oils. The ternary system of cellulose nitrate/solvent/biolubricant was blended with rubber dispersed organoclay nanofluids. Natural, synthetic, and fluoroacrylic latex rubbers were used for the purpose. Self-cleaning superhydrophobic coatings were obtained from synthetic and fluoroacrylic rubbers whereas natural rubber containing formulations resulted in sticky superhydrophobic coatings.

  15. Terrestiral plant biopolymers in marine sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gough, M.A.; Fauzi, R.; Mantoura, C. (Plymouth Marine Lab. (United Kingdom)); Preston, M. (Univ. of Liverpool (United Kingdom))

    1993-03-01

    The vascular land plant biopolymers lignin and cutin were surveyed in the surface sediments of coastal and open ocean waters by controlled alkaline CuO oxidation/reaction. Two contrasting oceanic regimes were studied: the northwest Mediterranean (NWM) Sea, which receives significant particulate terrigenous debris through riverine discharge; and the northeast Atlantic (NEA) Ocean, with poorly characterized terrestrial carbon inputs. In the NWM products of lignin and cutin co-occurred at all stations, elevated levels (ca. 0.5-3.0 mg lignin phenols/100 mg organic carbon; ca. 0.01-0.09 mg cutin acids/100 mg organic carbon) were observed for near-shore deltaic and shelf sediments. The influence of terrestrial land plant inputs extended across the shelf and through the slope to the abyssal plain, providing molecular evidence for advective offshore transfer of terrestrial carbon. Mass balance estimates for the basin suggest riverine inputs account for the majority of surface sedimentary ligin/cutin, most of which (>90%) is deposited on the shelf. Products of CuO oxidation of lignin and cutin were also detected in NEA surface sediments, at levels comparable to those observed for the NWM continental slope, and were detectable at low concentrations in the sediments of the abyssal plains (>4,000 m depth). While atmospheric deposition of lignin/cutin-derived material cannot be discounted in this open ocean system, lateral advective transfer of enriched shelf sediments is inferred as a possible transport process. A progressive enrichment in cutin-derived material relative to lignin was observed offshore, with evidence of an increase in the degree of oxidative alteration of lignin residues. Preliminary mass balance calculations applied to the global ocean margin suggest riverine sources of both particulate lignin and cutin are important and that most (>95%) deposition of recognizable land plant biopolymers occurs in shelf seas. 74 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. Its preferential interactions with biopolymers account for diverse observed effects of trehalose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jiang; Gierasch, Lila M; Liu, Zhicheng

    2015-07-07

    Biopolymer homeostasis underlies the health of organisms, and protective osmolytes have emerged as one strategy used by Nature to preserve biopolymer homeostasis. However, a great deal remains unknown about the mechanism of action of osmolytes. Trehalose, as a prominent example, stabilizes proteins against denaturation by extreme temperature and denaturants, preserves membrane integrity upon freezing or in dry conditions, inhibits polyQ-mediated protein aggregation, and suppresses the aggregation of denatured proteins. The underlying thermodynamic mechanisms of such diverse effects of trehalose remain unclear or controversial. In this study, we applied the surface-additive method developed in the Record laboratory to attack this issue. We characterized the key features of trehalose-biopolymer preferential interactions and found that trehalose has strong unfavorable interactions with aliphatic carbon and significant favorable interactions with amide/anionic oxygen. This dissection has allowed us to elucidate the diverse effects of trehalose and to identify the crucial functional group(s) responsible for its effects. With (semi)quantitative thermodynamic analysis, we discovered that 1) the unfavorable interaction of trehalose with hydrophobic surfaces is the dominant factor in its effect on protein stability, 2) the favorable interaction of trehalose with polar amides enables it to inhibit polyQ-mediated protein aggregation and the aggregation of denatured protein in general, and 3) the favorable interaction of trehalose with phosphate oxygens, together with its unfavorable interaction with aliphatic carbons, enables trehalose to preserve membrane integrity in aqueous solution. These results provide a basis for a full understanding of the role of trehalose in biopolymer homeostasis and the reason behind its evolutionary selection as an osmolyte, as well as for a better application of trehalose as a chemical chaperone.

  17. Its Preferential Interactions with Biopolymers Account for Diverse Observed Effects of Trehalose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jiang; Gierasch, Lila M.; Liu, Zhicheng

    2015-01-01

    Biopolymer homeostasis underlies the health of organisms, and protective osmolytes have emerged as one strategy used by Nature to preserve biopolymer homeostasis. However, a great deal remains unknown about the mechanism of action of osmolytes. Trehalose, as a prominent example, stabilizes proteins against denaturation by extreme temperature and denaturants, preserves membrane integrity upon freezing or in dry conditions, inhibits polyQ-mediated protein aggregation, and suppresses the aggregation of denatured proteins. The underlying thermodynamic mechanisms of such diverse effects of trehalose remain unclear or controversial. In this study, we applied the surface-additive method developed in the Record laboratory to attack this issue. We characterized the key features of trehalose-biopolymer preferential interactions and found that trehalose has strong unfavorable interactions with aliphatic carbon and significant favorable interactions with amide/anionic oxygen. This dissection has allowed us to elucidate the diverse effects of trehalose and to identify the crucial functional group(s) responsible for its effects. With (semi)quantitative thermodynamic analysis, we discovered that 1) the unfavorable interaction of trehalose with hydrophobic surfaces is the dominant factor in its effect on protein stability, 2) the favorable interaction of trehalose with polar amides enables it to inhibit polyQ-mediated protein aggregation and the aggregation of denatured protein in general, and 3) the favorable interaction of trehalose with phosphate oxygens, together with its unfavorable interaction with aliphatic carbons, enables trehalose to preserve membrane integrity in aqueous solution. These results provide a basis for a full understanding of the role of trehalose in biopolymer homeostasis and the reason behind its evolutionary selection as an osmolyte, as well as for a better application of trehalose as a chemical chaperone. PMID:26153711

  18. End-of-life of starch-polyvinyl alcohol biopolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, M; Stuckey, D C; Murphy, R J

    2013-01-01

    This study presents a life cycle assessment (LCA) model comparing the waste management options for starch-polyvinyl alcohol (PVOH) biopolymers including landfill, anaerobic digestion (AD), industrial composting and home composting. The ranking of biological treatment routes for starch-PVOH biopolymer wastes depended on their chemical compositions. AD represents the optimum choice for starch-PVOH biopolymer containing N and S elements in global warming potential (GWP(100)), acidification and eutrophication but not on the remaining impact categories, where home composting was shown to be a better option due to its low energy and resource inputs. For those starch-PVOH biopolymers with zero N and S contents home composting delivered the best environmental performance amongst biological treatment routes in most impact categories (except for GWP(100)). The landfill scenario performed generally well due largely to the 100-year time horizon and efficient energy recovery system modeled but this good performance is highly sensitive to assumptions adopted in landfill model.

  19. Sequence-Dependent Effects on the Properties of Semiflexible Biopolymers

    CERN Document Server

    Zicong, Bela

    2008-01-01

    Using path integral technique, we show exactly that for a semiflexible biopolymer in constant extension ensemble, no matter how long the polymer and how large the external force, the effects of short range correlations in the sequence-dependent spontaneous curvatures and torsions can be incorporated into a model with well-defined mean spontaneous curvature and torsion as well as a renormalized persistence length. Moreover, for a long biopolymer with large mean persistence length, the sequence-dependent persistence lengths can be replaced by their mean. However, for a short biopolymer or for a biopolymer with small persistence lengths, inhomogeneity in persistence lengths tends to make physical observables very sensitive to details and therefore less predictable.

  20. Dynamic Mechanical Properties of Bio-Polymer Graphite Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saddam Kamarudin, M.; Rus, Anika Zafiah M.; Munirah Abdullah, Nur; Abdullah, M. F. L.

    2017-08-01

    Waste cooking oil is used as the main substances in producing graphite biopolymer thin films. Biopolymer is produce from the reaction of bio-monomer and cross linker with the ratio of 2:1 and addition of graphite with an increment of 2% through a slip casting method. The morphological surface properties of the samples are observed by using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). It is shown that the graphite particle is well mixed and homogenously dispersed in biopolymer matrix. Meanwhile, the mechanical response of materials by monitoring the change in the material properties in terms of frequency and temperature of the samples were determined using Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA). The calculated cross-linked density of biopolymer composites revealed the increment of graphite particle loading at 8% gives highest results with 260.012 x 103 M/m3.

  1. Laser-induced periodic surface structuring of biopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Susana; Rebollar, Esther; Oujja, Mohamed; Martín, Margarita; Castillejo, Marta

    2013-03-01

    We report here on a systematic study about the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on biopolymers. Self-standing films of the biopolymers chitosan, starch and the blend of chitosan with the synthetic polymer poly (vinyl pyrrolidone), PVP, were irradiated in air with linearly polarized laser beams at 193, 213 and 266 nm, with pulse durations in the range of 6-17 ns. The laser-induced periodic surface structures were topographically characterized by atomic force microscopy and the chemical modifications induced by laser irradiation were inspected via Raman spectroscopy. Formation of LIPSS parallel to the laser polarization direction, with periods similar to the laser wavelength, was observed at efficiently absorbed wavelengths in the case of the amorphous biopolymer chitosan and its blend with PVP, while formation of LIPSS is prevented in the crystalline starch biopolymer.

  2. Validation of an SPME method, using PDMS, PA, PDMS-DVB, and CW-DVB SPME fiber coatings, for analysis of organophosphorus insecticides in natural waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambropoulou, D A; Sakkas, V A; Albanis, T A

    2002-11-01

    Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) has been optimized and applied to the determination of the organophosphorus insecticides diazinon, dichlofenthion, parathion methyl, malathion, fenitrothion, fenthion, parathion ethyl, bromophos methyl, bromophos ethyl, and ethion in natural waters. Four types of SPME fiber coated with different stationary phases (PDMS, PA, PDMS-DVB, and CW-DVB) were used to examine their extraction efficiencies for the compounds tested. Conditions that might affect the SPME procedure, such as extraction time and salt content, were investigated to determine the analytical performance of these fiber coatings for organophosphorus insecticides. The optimized procedure was applied to natural waters - tap, sea, river, and lake water - spiked in the concentration range 0.5 to 50 micro g L(-1) to obtain the analytical characteristics. Recoveries were relatively high - >80% for all types of aqueous sample matrix - and the calibration plots were reproducible and linear (R(2)>0.982) for all analytes with all the fibers tested. The limits of detection ranged from 2 to 90 ng L(-1), depending on the detector and the compound investigated, with relative standard deviations in the range 3-15% at all the concentration levels tested. The SPME partition coefficients (K(f)) of the organophosphorus insecticides were calculated experimentally for all the polymer coatings. The effect of organic matter such as humic acids on extraction efficiency was also studied. The analytical performance of the SPME procedure using all the fibers in the tested natural waters proved effective for the compounds.

  3. Natural biopolymer for preservation of microorganisms during sampling and storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorokulova, Iryna; Watt, James; Olsen, Eric; Globa, Ludmila; Moore, Timothy; Barbaree, James; Vodyanoy, Vitaly

    2012-01-01

    Stability of microbial cultures during sampling and storage is a vital issue in various fields of medicine, biotechnology, food science, and forensics. We have developed a unique bacterial preservation process involving a non-toxic, water-soluble acacia gum polymer that eliminates the need for refrigerated storage of samples. The main goal of this study is to characterize the efficacy of acacia gum polymer for preservation of pathogenic bacteria (Bacillus anthracis and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus-MRSA) on different materials, used for swabbing and filtration: cotton, wool, polyester, rayon, charcoal cloth, and Whatman paper. Acacia gum polymer used for preservation of two pathogens has been shown to significantly protect bacteria during dehydration and storage in all tested samples at the range of temperatures (5-45°C for MRSA and 40-90°C for B. anthracis). Our results showed higher recovery as well as higher viability during the storage of both bacteria in all materials with acacia gum. Addition of acacia gum polymer to swabbing materials or filters will increase efficacy of sample collection and identification of pathogenic bacteria from locations such as hospitals or the environment. Proposed approach can also be used for long-term storage of culture collections, since acacia gum contributes to viability and stability of bacterial cultures. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Sporopollenin, the least known yet toughest natural biopolymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grahame eMackenzie

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Sporopollenin is highly cross-linked polymer composed of carbon, hydrogen and oxygen that is extraordinarily stable and has been found chemically intact in sedimentary rocks some 500 million year old. It is the outer shell (exine of plant spores and pollen and when extracted it is in the form of an empty exine or microcapsule. The exines resemble the spores and pollen from which they are extracted, in size and morphology. Also, from any one plant such characteristics are incredible uniform. The exines can be used is microcapsules or simply as micron-sized particles due to the variety of functional groups on their surfaces. The loading of the exine microcapsules into their cavities is via multi-directional nano-diameter sized channels. The exines can be filled with a variety of polar and non-polar materials. Such as enzymes can be encapsulated within the shells and still remain active. In vivo studies in humans have shown that an encapsulated active substance can have a substantially increased bioavailability than if it is taken alone. The sporopollenin exine surface possesses phenolic, alkane, alkene, ketone, lactone and carboxylic acid groups. Therefore it can be derivatised in a number of ways, which has given rise to its having been used for, such as, solid supported for peptide synthesis, catalysis and ion-exchange chromatography. Also, the presence of the phenolic groups on sporopollenin endows it with antioxidant activity.

  5. Sporopollenin, the least known yet toughest natural biopolymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Grahame; Boa, Andrew; Taboada, Alberto; Atkin, Stephen; Sathyapalan, Thozhukat

    2015-10-01

    Sporopollenin is highly cross-linked polymer composed of carbon, hydrogen and oxygen that is extraordinarily stable and has been found chemically intact in sedimentary rocks some 500 million year old. It is the outer shell (exine) of plant spores and pollen and when extracted it is in the form of an empty exine or microcapsule. The exines resemble the spores and pollen from which they are extracted, in size and morphology. Also, from any one plant such characteristics are incredible uniform. The exines can be used is microcapsules or simply as micron-sized particles due to the variety of functional groups on their surfaces. The loading of the exine microcapsules into their cavities is via multi-directional nano-diameter sized channels. The exines can be filled with a variety of polar and non-polar materials. Such as enzymes can be encapsulated within the shells and still remain active. In vivo studies in humans have shown that an encapsulated active substance can have a substantially increased bioavailability than if it is taken alone. The sporopollenin exine surface possesses phenolic, alkane, alkene, ketone, lactone and carboxylic acid groups. Therefore it can be derivatised in a number of ways, which has given rise to its having been used for, such as, solid supported for peptide synthesis, catalysis and ion-exchange chromatography. Also, the presence of the phenolic groups on sporopollenin endows it with antioxidant activity.

  6. Using biopolymers to remove heavy metals from soil and water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnamurthy, S.; Frederick, R.M.

    1993-11-19

    Chemical remediation of soil may involve the use of harsh chemicals that generate waste streams, which may adversely affect the soil's integrity and ability to support vegetation. This article reviews the potential use of benign reagents, such as biopolymers, to extract heavy metals. The biopolymers discussed are chitin and chitosan, modified starch, cellulose, and polymer-containing algae. (Copyright (c) Remediation 1994.)

  7. POSS-Modified Cellulose for Improved Biopolymer Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-30

    E7(/(3+21(180%(5 ,QFOXGHDUHDFRGH 09-30-2011 Final Technical 07-01-2010 to 06-30-2011 POSS-Modified Cellulose for Improved Biopolymer ... Biopolymer Performance” (AFOSR-DURIP Grant #FA9550-10-1-0323) DATE: September 30, 2011 Summary Funding for this project was used to purchase...promise in biomedical applications, such as medical implants, surgical sutures, and tissue scaffolding . To improve the low impact strength, poor

  8. Applications of biopolymers and synthetic polymers blends: literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Lady Joana Rodríguez Sepúlveda; Carlos Eduardo Orrego Alzate

    2016-01-01

    Biopolymers are biodegradable commonly, fragile, hydrophilic and have low thermal resistance, which has limited its commercial application. In contrast, synthetic polymers or derived from non-renewable resources generally lower cost and limited or minimal biodegradability, have good mechanical and thermal characteristics. The blend of biopolymers and synthetic polymers provides materials with properties and reasonable costs for certain applications. This article is a literature review on the ...

  9. Use of Natural Neural Scaffolds Consisting of Engineered Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Immobilized on Ordered Collagen Fibers Filled in a Collagen Tube for Peripheral Nerve Regeneration in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fukai Ma

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The search for effective strategies for peripheral nerve regeneration has attracted much attention in recent years. In this study, ordered collagen fibers were used as intraluminal fibers after nerve injury in rats. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF plays an important role in nerve regeneration, but its very fast initial burst of activity within a short time has largely limited its clinical use. For the stable binding of VEGF to ordered collagen fibers, we fused a collagen-binding domain (CBD to VEGF through recombinant DNA technology. Then, we filled the ordered collagen fibers-CBD-VEGF targeting delivery system in a collagen tube to construct natural neural scaffolds, which were then used to bridge transected nerve stumps in a rat sciatic nerve transection model. After transplantation, the natural neural scaffolds showed minimal foreign body reactions and good integration into the host tissue. Oriented collagen fibers in the collagen tube could guide regenerating axons in an oriented manner to the distal, degenerating nerve segment, maximizing the chance of target reinnervation. Functional and histological analyses indicated that the recovery of nerve function in the natural neural scaffolds-treated group was superior to the other grafted groups. The guiding of oriented axonal regeneration and effective delivery systems surmounting the otherwise rapid and short-lived diffusion of growth factors in body fluids are two important strategies in promoting peripheral nerve regeneration. The natural neural scaffolds described take advantage of these two aspects and may produce synergistic effects. These properties qualified the artificial nerve conduits as a putative candidate system for the fabrication of peripheral nerve reconstruction devices.

  10. Use of natural neural scaffolds consisting of engineered vascular endothelial growth factor immobilized on ordered collagen fibers filled in a collagen tube for peripheral nerve regeneration in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Fukai; Xiao, Zhifeng; Meng, Danqing; Hou, Xianglin; Zhu, Jianhong; Dai, Jianwu; Xu, Ruxiang

    2014-10-15

    The search for effective strategies for peripheral nerve regeneration has attracted much attention in recent years. In this study, ordered collagen fibers were used as intraluminal fibers after nerve injury in rats. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays an important role in nerve regeneration, but its very fast initial burst of activity within a short time has largely limited its clinical use. For the stable binding of VEGF to ordered collagen fibers, we fused a collagen-binding domain (CBD) to VEGF through recombinant DNA technology. Then, we filled the ordered collagen fibers-CBD-VEGF targeting delivery system in a collagen tube to construct natural neural scaffolds, which were then used to bridge transected nerve stumps in a rat sciatic nerve transection model. After transplantation, the natural neural scaffolds showed minimal foreign body reactions and good integration into the host tissue. Oriented collagen fibers in the collagen tube could guide regenerating axons in an oriented manner to the distal, degenerating nerve segment, maximizing the chance of target reinnervation. Functional and histological analyses indicated that the recovery of nerve function in the natural neural scaffolds-treated group was superior to the other grafted groups. The guiding of oriented axonal regeneration and effective delivery systems surmounting the otherwise rapid and short-lived diffusion of growth factors in body fluids are two important strategies in promoting peripheral nerve regeneration. The natural neural scaffolds described take advantage of these two aspects and may produce synergistic effects. These properties qualified the artificial nerve conduits as a putative candidate system for the fabrication of peripheral nerve reconstruction devices.

  11. Effect of ozone on biopolymers in biofiltration and ultrafiltration processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siembida-Lösch, Barbara; Anderson, William B; Wang, Yulang Michael; Bonsteel, Jane; Huck, Peter M

    2015-03-01

    The focus of this full-scale study was to determine the effect of ozone on biopolymer concentrations in biofiltration and ultrafiltration (UF) processes treating surface water from Lake Ontario. Ozonation was out of service for maintenance for 9 months, hence, it was possible to investigate ozone's action on biologically active carbon contactors (BACCs) and UF, in terms of biopolymer removal. Given the importance of biopolymers for fouling, this fraction was quantified using a chromatographic technique. Ozone pre-treatment was observed to positively impact the active biomass in biofilters. However, since an increase of the active biomass did not result in higher biopolymer removal, active biomass concentration cannot be a surrogate for biofiltration performance. It was evident that increasing empty bed contact time (EBCT) from 4 to 19 min only had a positive effect on biopolymer removal through BACCs when ozone was out of service. However, as a mass balance experiment showed, ozone-free operation resulted in higher deposition of biopolymers on a UF membrane and slight deterioration in its performance.

  12. Experimental study on influence of dimples on lubrication performance of glass fiber-epoxy resin composite under natural seawater lubrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shaofeng; Gao, Dianrong; Liang, Yingna; Chen, Bo

    2017-01-01

    Bionic non-smooth surface is widely applied in metal and ceramics materials. In order to introduce this technology to high pressure seawater pump, the influence of bionic non-smooth surface on the engineering plastics used in pump should be investigated. The comparative tests are carried out with a ring-on-disc configuration under 800, 1000, 1200 and 1400 r/min in order to research the influence of the bionic non-smooth surface on glass fiber-epoxy resin composite(GF/EPR) under natural seawater lubrication. The disc surfaces are textured with five kinds of pits, which are semi-spherical, conical, cone-cylinder combined, cylindrical pits and through holes, respectively. A smooth surface is tested as reference. The results show that the lubrication performance of dimpled GF/EPR sample is much better than that of the smooth sample under all rotational speeds. The semi-spherical pits surface has more obvious friction reduction than the others, which shows that the least reduction is approximately 43.29% of smooth surface under 1200 r/min. However, the wear level is only marginally influenced by dimples. The surface morphology investigations disclose severe modifications caused by abrasive wear primarily. The results are helpful to vary friction properties of GF/EPR by non-smooth surface, or provide references to the design of non-smooth surfaces under certain condition.

  13. Experimental study on influence of dimples on lubrication performance of glass fiber-epoxy resin composite under natural seawater lubrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shaofeng; Gao, Dianrong; Liang, Yingna; Chen, Bo

    2016-08-01

    Bionic non-smooth surface is widely applied in metal and ceramics materials. In order to introduce this technology to high pressure seawater pump, the influence of bionic non-smooth surface on the engineering plastics used in pump should be investigated. The comparative tests are carried out with a ring-on-disc configuration under 800, 1000, 1200 and 1400 r/min in order to research the influence of the bionic non-smooth surface on glass fiber-epoxy resin composite(GF/EPR) under natural seawater lubrication. The disc surfaces are textured with five kinds of pits, which are semi-spherical, conical, cone-cylinder combined, cylindrical pits and through holes, respectively. A smooth surface is tested as reference. The results show that the lubrication performance of dimpled GF/EPR sample is much better than that of the smooth sample under all rotational speeds. The semi-spherical pits surface has more obvious friction reduction than the others, which shows that the least reduction is approximately 43.29% of smooth surface under 1200 r/min. However, the wear level is only marginally influenced by dimples. The surface morphology investigations disclose severe modifications caused by abrasive wear primarily. The results are helpful to vary friction properties of GF/EPR by non-smooth surface, or provide references to the design of non-smooth surfaces under certain condition.

  14. Bifunctional carbohydrate biopolymers entrapped lipase as catalyst for the two consecutive conversions of α-pinene to oxy-derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudorache, Madalina; Gheorghe, Andreea; Negoi, Alina; Enache, Madalin; Maria, Gabriel-Mihai; Parvulescu, Vasile I

    2016-11-01

    Bifunctional catalysts designed as carbohydrate biopolymers entrapping lipase have been investigated for the biotransformation of a natural compound (α-pinene) to oxy-derivatives. Lipases assisted the epoxidation of α-pinene using H2O2 as oxidation reagent and ethyl acetate as both acetate-supplier and solvent affording α-pinene oxide as the main product. Further, the biopolymer promoted the isomerization of α-pinene oxide to campholenic aldehyde and trans-carenol. In this case, the biopolymers played double roles of the support and also active part of the bifunctional catalyst. Screening of enzymes and their entrapping in a biopolymeric matrix (e.g. Ca-alginate and κ-carrageenan) indicated the lipase extracted from Aspergillus niger as the most efficient. In addition, the presence of biopolymers enhanced the catalytic activity of the immobilized lipase (i.e. 13.39×10(3), 19.76×10(3)and 26.46×10(3) for the free lipase, lipase-carrageenan and lipase-alginate, respectively). The catalysts stability and reusability were confirmed in eight consecutively reaction runs.

  15. Oriented functionalization of natural hollow kapok fiber for highly efficient removal of toxic Hg(II from aqueous solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng eWang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Due to hollow and tubular structure, a natural kapok fiber (KF was used as the support and orientation matrix to control the polymerization of ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA and N-vinylimidazole (VIM along its inherent axial surface via a facile in situ rapid polymerization reaction in air atmosphere. The as-formed KF@VIM/EGDMA composite is featured with porous surface and rich N-containing functional groups for potential application as a highly efficient adsorbent for removal of toxic Hg(II from aqueous solution. The variables affecting the adsorption capacity were studied, including monomer ratio, external pH values, contact time, and initial Hg(II concentration. The pseudo-second-order equation and two adsorption isotherms including Langmuir and Freundlich equations were applied to determine the adsorption kinetics and adsorption capacity. The results show that the as-prepared KF@VIM/EGDMA composite has a maximum adsorption capacity of 697 mg/g to Hg(II, while no appreciable adsorption capacity can be found for KF itself. Given its intrinsic large lumen, faster adsorption kinetics (45 min are also expected and observed for KF@VIM/EGDMA. After a simple filtration, this adsorbent can be directly separated from the aqueous solution and then be regenerated for multi-cyclable utilization. During the adsorption process, the chemical complexing represents the main adsorption mechanism. As a naturally renewable KF, such a simple preparation method opens a new avenue to develop highly efficient and economically viable adsorbent for removal of toxic heavy metal from aqueous solution.

  16. Mesoscopic Dynamics of Biopolymers and Protein Molecular Machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapral, Raymond

    2013-03-01

    The dynamics of biopolymers in solution and in crowded molecular environments, which mimic some features of the interior of a biochemical cell, will be discussed. In particular, the dynamics of protein machines that utilize chemical energy to effect cyclic conformational changes to carry out their catalytic functions will be described. The investigation of the dynamics of such complex systems requires knowledge of the time evolution on physically relevant long distance and time scales. This often necessitates a coarse grained or mesoscopic treatment of the dynamics. A hybrid particle-based mesoscopic dynamical method, which combines molecular dynamics for a coarse-grain model of the proteins with multiparticle collision dynamics for the solvent, will be described and utilized to study the dynamics of such systems. See, C. Echeverria, Y. Togashi, A. S. Mikhailov, and R. Kapral, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys 13, 10527 (2011); C. Echeverria and R. Kapral, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 14, 6755 (2012); J. M. Schofield, P. Inder and R. Kapral, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 205101 (2012). Work was supported in part by a grant from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada.

  17. Structure and morphology of regenerated silk nano-fibers produced by electrospinning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarkoob, Shahrzad

    The impressive physical and mechanical properties of natural silk fiberssp1 and the possibility of producing these proteins using biotechnology,sp2 have provided the impetus for recent efforts in both the biosynthesissp{3,4} and the spinning of these protein based biopolymers.sp{5,6,7} The question still remains: whether fibers spun from solutions with similar chemical makeup can produce fibers with similar structures and therefore with the possibility of improved properties. Since genetically engineered silk solutions were not readily available, the first objective of this project was to completely dissolve the Bombyx mori cocoon and the Nephila clavipes dragline silk while maintaining the molecular weight integrity of the polymer. The second objective was to develop a system for re-spinning from very small amount of the resulting silk solutions by the process of electrospinning. The third objective was, to produce regenerated silk fibers with diameters that are several orders of magnitude smaller than the original fibers, suitable for direct observation and analysis by transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction. And finally, to compare these results to structural information obtained from natural (as spun by the organism) fibers to see if the regenerated solutions are able to form the same structure as the original fibers. Both types of silk fibers were successfully dissolved while maintaining the polymer integrity. Small quantities (25-50 mul) of these solutions were used to electrospin fibers with diameters ranging from 8nm-200nm. The fibers were observed by optical, scanning electron, and transmission electron microscopy. These nano fibers showed optical retardation, appeared to have a circular cross-section, and were dimensionally stable at temperatures above 280sp°C. Electron diffraction patterns of annealed electrospun fibers of B. mori and N. clavipes showed reflections, demonstrating orientational and semicrystalline order in the material

  18. In situ enzyme aided adsorption of soluble xylan biopolymers onto cellulosic material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimphango, Annie F A; Görgens, J F; van Zyl, W H

    2016-06-05

    The functional properties of cellulose fibers can be modified by adsorption of xylan biopolymers. The adsorption is improved when the degree of biopolymers substitution with arabinose and 4-O-methyl-glucuronic acid (MeGlcA) side groups, is reduced. α-l-Arabinofuranosidase (AbfB) and α-d-glucuronidase (AguA) enzymes were applied for side group removal, to increase adsorption of xylan from sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L) bagasse (BH), bamboo (Bambusa balcooa) (BM), Pinus patula (PP) and Eucalyptus grandis (EH) onto cotton lint. The AguA treatment increased the adsorption of all xylans by up to 334%, whereas, the AbfB increased the adsorption of the BM and PP by 31% and 44%, respectively. A combination of AguA and AbfB treatment increased the adsorption, but to a lesser extent than achieved with AguA treatment. This indicated that the removal of the glucuronic acid side groups provided the most significant increase in xylan adsorption to cellulose, in particular through enzymatic treatment.

  19. All Green Composites from Fully Renewable Biopolymers: Chitosan-Starch Reinforced with Keratin from Feathers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia G. Flores-Hernández

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The performance as reinforcement of a fibrillar protein such as feather keratin fiber over a biopolymeric matrix composed of polysaccharides was evaluated in this paper. Three different kinds of keratin reinforcement were used: short and long biofibers and rachis particles. These were added separately at 5, 10, 15 and 20 wt% to the chitosan-starch matrix and the composites were processed by a casting/solvent evaporation method. The morphological characteristics, mechanical and thermal properties of the matrix and composites were studied by scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry and dynamic mechanical analysis. The thermal results indicated that the addition of keratin enhanced the thermal stability of the composites compared to pure matrix. This was corroborated with dynamic mechanical analysis as the results revealed that the storage modulus of the composites increased with respect to the pure matrix. The morphology, evaluated by scanning electron microscopy, indicated a uniform dispersion of keratin in the chitosan-starch matrix as a result of good compatibility between these biopolymers, also corroborated by FTIR. These results demonstrate that chicken feathers can be useful to obtain novel keratin reinforcements and develop new green composites providing better properties, than the original biopolymer matrix.

  20. Distinct difference in absorption pattern in pigs of betaine provided as a supplement or present naturally in cereal dietary fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedemann, Mette Skou; Theil, Peter Kappel; Lærke, Helle Nygaard; Bach Knudsen, Knud Erik

    2015-03-18

    The net absorption of betaine and choline was determined for 4 h after the first meal of the day in three experiments with porto-arterial catheterized pigs in which betaine was added as a supplement to a low-betaine diet (n=4 pigs) and compared to the net absorption of betaine and choline from high-fiber breads differing in amount and source of dietary fiber (two experiments, n=6 pigs each). Plasma betaine peaked after 30 min when betaine was fed as a supplement, whereas it peaked after 120-180 min when high-fiber breads were fed. Plasma betaine showed no diet×time interaction after feeding with high-fiber breads, indicating that the absorption kinetic did not differ between fiber sources. The net absorption of choline was not affected by the experimental diets. In conclusion, betaine in cereal sources has to be liberated from the matrix prior to absorption, causing delayed absorption.

  1. Conversion of lignin precursors to carbon fibers with nanoscale graphitic domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterjee, Sabornie [ORNL; Jones, Eric B [ORNL; Clingenpeel, Amy [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (Magnet Lab), Florida; McKenna, Amy [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (Magnet Lab), Florida; Rios, Orlando [ORNL; McNutt, Nicholas W [ORNL; Keffer, David J. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Johs, Alexander [ORNL

    2014-08-04

    Lignin is one of the most abundant and inexpensive natural biopolymers. It can be efficiently converted to low cost carbon fiber, monolithic structures or powders that could be used directly in the production of anodes for lithium-ion batteries. In this work, we report processing parameters relevant for the conversion of lignin precursors into electrochemically active carbon fibers, the impact of lignin precursor modification on melt processing and the microstructure of the final carbon material. The conversion process encompasses melt spinning of the lignin precursor, oxidative stabilization and a low temperature carbonization step in a nitrogen/hydrogen atmosphere. To assess electrochemical performance, we determined resistivities of individual carbon fiber samples and characterized the microstructure by scanning electron microscopy and neutron diffraction. The chemical modification and subsequent thermomechanical processing methods reported here are effective for conversion into carbon fibers while preserving the macromolecular backbone structure of lignin. Modification of softwood lignin produced functionalities and rheological properties that more closely resemble hardwood lignin thereby enabling the melt processing of softwood lignin in oxidative atmospheres (air). Structural characterization of the carbonized fibers reveals nanoscale graphitic domains that are linked to enhanced electrochemical performance.

  2. Formatting and ligating biopolymers using adjustable nanoconfinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berard, Daniel J.; Shayegan, Marjan; Michaud, Francois; Henkin, Gil; Scott, Shane; Leslie, Sabrina

    2016-07-01

    Sensitive visualization and conformational control of long, delicate biopolymers present critical challenges to emerging biotechnologies and biophysical studies. Next-generation nanofluidic manipulation platforms strive to maintain the structural integrity of genomic DNA prior to analysis but can face challenges in device clogging, molecular breakage, and single-label detection. We address these challenges by integrating the Convex Lens-induced Confinement (CLiC) technique with a suite of nanotopographies embedded within thin-glass nanofluidic chambers. We gently load DNA polymers into open-face nanogrooves in linear, concentric circular, and ring array formats and perform imaging with single-fluorophore sensitivity. We use ring-shaped nanogrooves to access and visualize confinement-enhanced self-ligation of long DNA polymers. We use concentric circular nanogrooves to enable hour-long observations of polymers at constant confinement in a geometry which eliminates the confinement gradient which causes drift and can alter molecular conformations and interactions. Taken together, this work opens doors to myriad biophysical studies and biotechnologies which operate on the nanoscale.

  3. Rotational molding of bio-polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Antonio; Maffezzoli, Alfonso; Forleo, Stefania

    2014-05-01

    This paper is aimed to study the suitability of bio-polymers, including poly-lactic acid (PLLA) and Mater-Bi, for the production of hollow components by rotational molding. In order to reduce the brittleness of PLLA, the material was mixed with two different plasticizers, bis-ethyl-hexyl-phthalate (DEHP) and poly-ethylene-glycol (PEG). The materials were characterized in terms of sinterability. To this purpose, thermomechanical (TMA) analysis was performed at different heating rates, in order to identify the endset temperatures of densification and the onset temperatures of degradation. Results obtained indicated that the materials are characterized by a very fast sintering process, occurring just above the melting temperature, and an adequately high onset of degradation. The difference between the onset of degradation and the endset of sintering, defined as the processing window of the polymer, is sufficiently wide, indicating that the polymers can be efficiently processed by rotational molding. Therefore, a laboratory scale apparatus was used for the production of PLLA and Mater-Bi prototypes. The materials were processed using very similar conditions to those used for LLDPE. The production of void-free samples of uniform wall thickness was considered as an indication of the potentiality of the process for the production of biodegradable containers.

  4. Customizable Biopolymers for Heavy Metal Remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostal, Jan; Prabhukumar, Giridhar; Lao, U. Loi; Chen Alin; Matsumoto, Mark; Mulchandani, Ashok; Chen, Wilfred [University of California, Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering (United States)], E-mail: wilfred@engr.ucr.edu

    2005-10-15

    Nanoscale materials have been gaining increasing interest in the area of environmental remediation because of their unique physical, chemical and biological properties. One emerging area of research has been the development of novel materials with increased affinity, capacity, and selectivity for heavy metals because conventional technologies are often inadequate to reduce concentrations in wastewater to acceptable regulatory standards. Genetic and protein engineering have emerged as the latest tools for the construction of nanoscale materials that can be controlled precisely at the molecular level. With the advent of recombinant DNA techniques, it is now possible to create 'artificial' protein polymers with fundamentally new molecular organization. The most significant feature of these nanoscale biopolymers is that they are specifically pre-programmed within a synthetic gene template and can be controlled precisely in terms of sizes, compositions and functions at the molecular level. In this review, the use of specifically designed protein-based nano-biomaterials with both metal-binding and tunable properties for heavy metal removal is summarized. Several different strategies for the selective removal of heavy metals such as cadmium and mercury are highlighted.

  5. Eco-Friendly Extraction of Biopolymer Chitin and Carotenoids from Shrimp Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prameela, K.; Venkatesh, K.; Divya vani, K.; Sudesh Kumar, E.; Mohan, CH Murali

    2017-08-01

    Astaxanthin a nutraceutical and chitin a natural biopolymer present in shrimp waste. In current chemical extraction methods HCl and NaOH are used for extraction and these chemicals are introduced into aquatic ecosystems are spoiling aquatic flora and fauna, pollute the environment and destroy astaxanthin. Lactobacillus species were isolated from gut of Solenocera melantho and characterized phenotypically and genotypically. Initial screening experiments have shown to be an effective and identified as Lactobacillus plantaram based on morphological, biochemical characteristics and molecular analysis. Efficiency of fermentation has shown with good yield of astaxanthin and recovery of chitin. Hence this alternative microbial process is having advantage than existing hazardous, non-economical chemical process.

  6. Comparative evaluation of in vivo biocompatibility and biodegradability of regenerated silk scaffolds reinforced with/without natural silk fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobini, Sahba; Taghizadeh-Jahed, Masoud; Khanmohammadi, Manijeh; Moshiri, Ali; Naderi, Mohammad-Mehdi; Heidari-Vala, Hamed; Ashrafi Helan, Javad; Khanjani, Sayeh; Springer, Armin; Akhondi, Mohammad-Mehdi; Kazemnejad, Somaieh

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, exceptional advantages of silk fibroin over synthetic and natural polymers have impelled the scientists to application of this biomaterial for tissue engineering purposes. Recently, we showed that embedding natural degummed silk fibers in regenerated Bombyx mori silk-based scaffold significantly increases the mechanical stiffness, while the porosity of the scaffolds remains the same. In the present study, we evaluated degradation rate, biocompatibility and regenerative properties of the regenerated 2% and 4% wt silk-based composite scaffolds with or without embedded natural degummed silk fibers within 90 days in both athymic nude and wild-type C57BL/6 mice through subcutaneous implantation. In all scaffolds, a suitable interconnected porous structure for cell penetration was seen under scanning electron microscopy. Compressive tests revealed a functional relationship between fiber reinforcement and compressive modulus. In addition, the fiber/fibroin composite scaffolds support cell attachment and proliferation. On days 30 to 90 after subcutaneous implantation, the retrieved tissues were examined via gross morphology, histopathology, immunofluorescence staining and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction as shown in Figure 1. Results showed that embedding the silk fibers within the matrix enhances the biodegradability of the matrix resulting in replacement of the composite scaffolds with the fresh connective tissue. Fortification of the composites with degummed fibers not only regulates the degradation profile but also increases the mechanical performance of the scaffolds. This report also confirmed that pore size and structure play an important role in the degradation rate. In conclusion, the findings of the present study narrate key role of additional surface area in improving in vitro and in vivo biological properties of the scaffolds and suggest the potential ability of these fabricated composite scaffolds for connective tissue regeneration

  7. 应用超声波技术染天然纤维%Study on the application of ultrasonic technology in dyeing of natural fibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张海燕; 袁学会

    2014-01-01

    The characteristics, development and application on natural fibers of ultrasound technology were introduced. The future development of ultrasonic technology was put forward.%介绍了超声波技术染色的特点、超声波技术的发展情况及在天然纤维上的应用,并对超声波的发展进行了展望。

  8. 聚烯烃/天然纤维复合材料的研究%Study on Properties of Polyolefin/Natural Fiber Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李学锋; 闫晗; 胡波

    2011-01-01

    Polyolefin/natural fiber composites were prepared by use of wood flour, rice bran, straw and bagasse by pretreat-ment with HDPE and PP. The mechanical properties, distortion temperature and morphology in the composites were investigated. The results showed that the wood flour composites had the best mechanical properties, followed by bagasse, and straw and rice bran composites were slightly less. Microscopy tests indicated that the natural fibers in the composites were uniform distributed by appropriate pretreatment. Manufacturing the novel composites was an availability method to use natural fiber.%利用经过预处理的木粉、稻糠、稻草和甘蔗渣与高密度聚乙烯、聚丙烯制备了聚烯烃/天然纤维复合材料,并研究了其力学性能、热变形温度与相态结构.结果表明,木粉复合材料力学性能最高,甘蔗渣复合材料次之,稻草复合材料和稻糠复合材料稍差;显微成像表明经合适预处理的纤维在树脂中分布均匀.该法制备的新型复合材料是应用天然纤维的一种有效方法.

  9. Conformon-driven biopolymer shape changes in cell modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Sungchul; Ciobanu, Gabriel

    2003-07-01

    Conceptual models of the atom preceded the mathematical model of the hydrogen atom in physics in the second decade of the 20th century. The computer modeling of the living cell in the 21st century may follow a similar course of development. A conceptual model of the cell called the Bhopalator was formulated in the mid-1980s, along with its twin theories known as the conformon theory of molecular machines and the cell language theory of biopolymer interactions [Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci. 227 (1974) 211; BioSystems 44 (1997) 17; Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci. 870 (1999a) 411; BioSystems 54 (2000) 107; Semiotica 138 (1-4) (2002a) 15; Fundamenta Informaticae 49 (2002b) 147]. The conformon theory accounts for the reversible actions of individual biopolymers coupled to irreversible chemical reactions, while the cell language theory provides a theoretical framework for understanding the complex networks of dynamic interactions among biopolymers in the cell. These two theories are reviewed and further elaborated for the benefit of both computational biologists and computer scientists who are interested in modeling the living cell and its functions. One of the critical components of the mechanisms of cell communication and cell computing has been postulated to be space- and time-organized teleonomic (i.e. goal-directed) shape changes of biopolymers that are driven by exergonic (free energy-releasing) chemical reactions. The generalized Franck-Condon principle is suggested to be essential in resolving the apparent paradox arising when one attempts to couple endergonic (free energy-requiring) biopolymer shape changes to the exergonic chemical reactions that are catalyzed by biopolymer shape changes themselves. Conformons, defined as sequence-specific mechanical strains of biopolymers first invoked three decades ago to account for energy coupling in mitochondria, have been identified as shape changers, the agents that cause shape changes in biopolymers. Given a set of space- and time

  10. Permeability Modification Using a Reactive Alkaline-Soluble Biopolymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snadra L. Fox; X. Xie; K. D. Schaller; E. P. Robertson; G. A. Bala

    2003-10-01

    Polymer injection has been used in reservoirs to alleviate contrasting permeability zones. Current technology relies on the use of cross-linking agents to initiate gelation. The use of biological polymers are advantageous in that they can block high permeability areas, are environmentally friendly, and have potential to form reversible gels without the use of hazardous cross-linkers. Recent efforts at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) have produced a reactive alkaline-soluble biopolymer from Agrobacterium sp. ATCC no. 31749 that gels upon decreasing the pH of the polymeric solution. The focus of this study was to determine the impact an alkaline-soluble biopolymer can have on sandstone permeability. Permeability modification was investigated by injecting solubilized biopolymer into Berea sandstone cores and defining the contribution of pH, salt, temperature, and Schuricht crude oil on biopolymer gelation. The biopolymer was soluble in KOH at a pH greater than 11.4 and gelled when the pH dropped below 10.8. The Berea sandstone core buffered the biopolymer solution, decreasing the pH sufficiently to form a gel, which subsequently decreased the permeability. The effluent pH of the control cores injected with 0.01 {und M} KOH (pH 12.0) and 0.10{und M} KOH (pH 13.0) decreased to 10.6 and 12.7, respectively. The permeability of the sandstone core injected with biopolymer was decreased to greater than 95% of the original permeability at 25 C in the presence of 2% NaCl, and Schuricht crude oil; however, the permeability increased when the temperature of the core was increased to 60 C. Residual resistance factors as high as 792 were seen in Berea cores treated with biopolymer. The buffering capacity of sandstone has been demonstrated to reduce the pH of a biopolymer solution sufficiently to cause the polymer to form a stable in-situ gel. This finding could potentially lead to alternate technology for permeability modification, thus

  11. A comparative study of biopolymers and alum in the separation and recovery of pulp fibres from paper mill effluent by flocculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sumona; Mukhopadhyay, Soumyadeep; Pariatamby, Agamuthu; Ali Hashim, Mohd; Sahu, Jaya Narayan; Sen Gupta, Bhaskar

    2014-09-01

    Recovery of cellulose fibres from paper mill effluent has been studied using common polysaccharides or biopolymers such as Guar gum, Xanthan gum and Locust bean gum as flocculent. Guar gum is commonly used in sizing paper and routinely used in paper making. The results have been compared with the performance of alum, which is a common coagulant and a key ingredient of the paper industry. Guar gum recovered about 3.86mg/L of fibre and was most effective among the biopolymers. Settling velocity distribution curves demonstrated that Guar gum was able to settle the fibres faster than the other biopolymers; however, alum displayed the highest particle removal rate than all the biopolymers at any of the settling velocities. Alum, Guar gum, Xanthan gum and Locust bean gum removed 97.46%, 94.68%, 92.39% and 92.46% turbidity of raw effluent at a settling velocity of 0.5cm/min, respectively. The conditions for obtaining the lowest sludge volume index such as pH, dose and mixing speed were optimised for guar gum which was the most effective among the biopolymers. Response surface methodology was used to design all experiments, and an optimum operational setting was proposed. The test results indicate similar performance of alum and Guar gum in terms of floc settling velocities and sludge volume index. Since Guar gum is a plant derived natural substance, it is environmentally benign and offers a green treatment option to the paper mills for pulp recycling.

  12. Coupled actin-lamin biopolymer networks and protecting DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Rocklin, D. Zeb; Mao, Xiaoming; Schwarz, J. M.

    The mechanical properties of cells are largely determined by networks of semiflexible biopolymers forming the cytoskeleton. Similarly, the mechanical properties of cell nuclei are also largely determined by networks of semiflexible biopolymers forming the nuclear cytoskeleton. In particular, a network of filamentous lamin sits just inside the inner nuclear membrane to presumably protect the heart of the cell nucleus--the DNA. It has been demonstrated over the past decade that the actin cytoskeletal biopolymer network and the lamin biopolymer network are coupled via a sequence of proteins bridging the outer and inner nuclear membranes, known as the LINC complex. We, therefore, probe the consequences of such a coupling in a model biopolymer network system via numerical simulations to understand the resulting deformations in the lamin network in response to perturbations in the actin cytoskeletal network. We find, for example, that the force transmission across the coupled system can depend sensitively on the concentration of LINC complexes. Such study could have implications for mechanical mechanisms of the regulation of transcription since DNA couples to lamin via lamin-binding domains so that deformations in the lamin network may result in deformations in the DNA.

  13. Force spectroscopy of complex biopolymers with heterogeneous elasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdman, David; Lopez, Benjamin J.

    2013-01-01

    Cellular biopolymers can exhibit significant compositional heterogeneities as a result of the non-uniform binding of associated proteins, the formation of microstructural defects during filament assembly, or the imperfect bundling of filaments into composite structures of variable diameter. These can lead to significant variations in the local mechanical properties of biopolymers along their length. Existing spectral analysis methods assume filament homogeneity and therefore report only a single average stiffness for the entire filament. However, understanding how local effects modulate biopolymer mechanics in a spatially resolved manner is essential to understanding how binding and bundling proteins regulate biopolymer stiffness and function in cellular contexts. Here, we present a new method to determine the spatially varying material properties of individual complex biopolymers from the observation of passive thermal fluctuations of the filament conformation. We develop new statistical mechanics-based approaches for heterogeneous filaments that estimate local bending elasticities as a function of the filament arc-length. We validate this methodology using simulated polymers with known stiffness distributions, and find excellent agreement between derived and expected values. We then determine the bending elasticity of microtubule filaments of variable composition generated by repeated rounds of tubulin polymerization using either GTP or GMPCPP, a nonhydrolyzable GTP analog. Again, we find excellent agreement between mechanical and compositional heterogeneities. PMID:24049545

  14. Quantitative analysis of biopolymers by matrix-assisted laser desorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, K.; Allman, S.L.; Jones, R.B.; Chen, C.H. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1993-08-01

    During the past few years, major efforts have been made to use mass spectrometry to measure biopolymers because of the great potential benefit to biological and medical research. Although the theoretical details of laser desorption and ionization mechanisms of MALDI are not yet fully understood, several models have been presented to explain the production of large biopolymer ions. In brief, it is very difficult to obtain reliable measurements of the absolute quantity of analytes by MALDI. If MALDI is going to become a routine analytical tool, it is obvious that quantitative measurement capability must be pursued. Oligonucleotides and protein samples used in this work were purchased from commercial sources. Nicotinic acid was used as matrix for both types of biopolymers. From this experiment, it is seen that it is difficult to obtain absolute quantitative measurements of biopolymers using MALDI. However, internal calibration with molecules having similar chemical properties can be used to resolve these difficulties. Chemical reactions between biopolymers must be avoided to prevent the destruction of the analyte materials. 10 refs., 8 figs.

  15. Biopolymer-based thermoplastic mixture for producing solid biodegradable shaped bodies and its photo degradation stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulong, Nurulsaidatulsyida; Rus, Anika Zafiah M.

    2013-12-01

    In recent years, biopolymers with controllable lifetimes have become increasingly important for many applications in the areas of agriculture, biomedical implants and drug release, forestry, wild life conservation and waste management. Natural oils are considered to be the most important class of renewable sources. They can be obtained from naturally occurring plants, such as sunflower, cotton, linseed and palm oil. In Malaysia, palm oil is an inexpensive and commodity material. Biopolymer produced from palm oil (Bio-VOP) is a naturally occurring biodegradable polymer and readily available from agriculture. For packaging use however, Bio-VOP is not thermoplastic and its granular form is unsuitable for most uses in the plastics industry, mainly due to processing difficulties during extrusion or injection moulding. Thus, research workers have developed several methods to blend Bio-VOP appropriately for industrial uses. In particular, injections moulding processes, graft copolymerisation, and preparation of blends with thermoplastic polymers have been studied to produce solid biodegradable shaped bodies. HDPE was chosen as commercial thermoplastic materials and was added with 10% Bio-VOP for the preparation of solid biodegradable shaped bodies named as HD-VOP. The UV light exposure of HD-VOP at 12 minutes upon gives the highest strength of this material that is 17.6 MPa. The morphological structure of HD-VOP shows dwi structure surface fracture which is brittle and ductile properties.

  16. Construction of new biopolymer (chitosan)-based pincer-type Pd(II) complex and its catalytic application in Suzuki cross coupling reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, Talat; Menteş, Ayfer

    2017-04-01

    In this paper we described the fabrication, characterization and application of a new biopolymer (chitosan)-based pincer-type Pd(II) catalyst in Suzuki cross coupling reactions using a non-toxic, cheap, eco-friendly and practical method. The catalytic activity tests showed remarkable product yields as well as TON (19800) and TOF (330000) values with a small catalyst loading. In addition, the catalyst indicated good recyclability in the Suzuki C-C reaction. This biopolymer supported catalyst can be used with various catalyst systems due to its unique properties, such as being inert, green in nature, low cost and chemically durable.

  17. The nature of the structural gradient in epoxy curing at a glass fiber/epoxy matrix interface using FTIR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Benito, J

    2003-11-15

    The curing process of an epoxide system was studied at the interface formed between a silane-coated glass fiber and an epoxy matrix. The gradient in the structure of the epoxy resin as a result of the cure process at the fiber/matrix interfacial region was monitored by FTIR imaging. For comparison, the epoxy curing at the interface formed between the epoxy resin and (a) an uncoated glass fiber and (b) a polyorganosiloxane (obtained from the silane used for the glass-fiber coating) were also monitored. Chemically specific images of the OH and the H-N-H groups near the interface region were obtained. These images suggest that there is a chemical gradient in the structure of the matrix from the fiber surface to the polymer bulk due to different conversions. The basis of the different kinetics of the curing reactions is a result of amino group inactivation at the interface. This deactivation translates into an off-stoichiometry of the reaction mixture, which is a function of the distance from the surface of the glass fiber.

  18. Variability of Fiber Elastic Moduli in Composite Random Fiber Networks Makes the Network Softer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, Ehsan; Picu, Catalin

    2015-03-01

    Athermal fiber networks are assemblies of beams or trusses. They have been used to model mechanics of fibrous materials such as biopolymer gels and synthetic nonwovens. Elasticity of these networks has been studied in terms of various microstructural parameters such as the stiffness of their constituent fibers. In this work we investigate the elasticity of composite fiber networks made from fibers with moduli sampled from a distribution function. We use finite elements simulations to study networks made by 3D Voronoi and Delaunay tessellations. The resulting data collapse to power laws showing that variability in fiber stiffness makes fiber networks softer. We also support the findings by analytical arguments. Finally, we apply these results to a network with curved fibers to explain the dependence of the network's modulus on the variation of its structural parameters.

  19. Biopolymers for sample collection, protection, and preservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorokulova, Iryna; Olsen, Eric; Vodyanoy, Vitaly

    2015-07-01

    One of the principal challenges in the collection of biological samples from air, water, and soil matrices is that the target agents are not stable enough to be transferred from the collection point to the laboratory of choice without experiencing significant degradation and loss of viability. At present, there is no method to transport biological samples over considerable distances safely, efficiently, and cost-effectively without the use of ice or refrigeration. Current techniques of protection and preservation of biological materials have serious drawbacks. Many known techniques of preservation cause structural damages, so that biological materials lose their structural integrity and viability. We review applications of a novel bacterial preservation process, which is nontoxic and water soluble and allows for the storage of samples without refrigeration. The method is capable of protecting the biological sample from the effects of environment for extended periods of time and then allows for the easy release of these collected biological materials from the protective medium without structural or DNA damage. Strategies for sample collection, preservation, and shipment of bacterial, viral samples are described. The water-soluble polymer is used to immobilize the biological material by replacing the water molecules within the sample with molecules of the biopolymer. The cured polymer results in a solid protective film that is stable to many organic solvents, but quickly removed by the application of the water-based solution. The process of immobilization does not require the use of any additives, accelerators, or plastifiers and does not involve high temperature or radiation to promote polymerization.

  20. Synthetic and Biopolymer Gels - Similarities and Difference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horkay, Ferenc

    2006-03-01

    Ion exchange plays a central role in a variety of physiological processes, such as nerve excitation, muscle contraction and cell locomotion. Hydrogels can be used as model systems for identifying fundamental chemical and physical interactions that govern structure formation, phase transition, etc. in biopolymer systems. Polyelectrolyte gels are particularly well-suited to study ion-polymer interactions because their structure and physical-chemical properties (charge density, crosslink density, etc) can be carefully controlled. They are sensitive to different external stimuli such as temperature, ionic composition and pH. Surprisingly few investigations have been made on polyelectrolyte gels in salt solutions containing both monovalent and multivalent cations. We have developed an experimental approach that combines small angle neutron scattering and osmotic swelling pressure measurements. The osmotic pressure exerted on a macroscopic scale is a consequence of changes occurring at a molecular level. The intensity of the neutron scattering signal, which provides structural information as a function of spatial resolution, is directly related to the osmotic pressure. We have found a striking similarity in the scattering and osmotic behavior of polyacrylic acid gels and DNA gels swollen in nearly physiological salt solutions. Addition of calcium ions to both systems causes a sudden volume change. This volume transition, which occurs when the majority of the sodium counterions are replaced by calcium ions, is reversible. Such reversibility implies that the calcium ions are not strongly bound by the polyanion, but are free to move along the polymer chain, which allows these ions to form temporary bridges between negative charges on adjacent chains. Mechanical measurements reveal that the elastic modulus is practically unchanged in the calcium-containing gels, i.e., ion bridging is qualitatively different from covalent crosslinks.

  1. Recovery of copper and cobalt by biopolymer gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, L K; Lopez, S L; Eastman, S L; Pryfogle, P

    1991-02-05

    The recovery of copper from synthetic aqueous media circulating in a loop fluidized bed reactor operated batchwise was investigated by using the following biopolymer systems: (1) a viscous solution of sodium alginate (from kelp) dispensed directly into the reactor fluid containing dissolved copper (sulfate salt) at initial concentrations of 60-200 ppm, (2) partially coagulated calcium alginate spheres for absorbing dissolved copper at initial concentrations of 10-40 ppm, and (3) a mixture of green algae Microcystis and sodium alginate dispensed directly into the reactor fluid. The recovery of copper and cobalt, a strategic metal, from cobalt ore leachate was achieved by a two-step approach: direct dispensing of sodium alginate to absorb the bulk of metals followed by the addition of partially coagulated calcium alginate spheres to "polish" the leachate. Metal binding capacity and conditional stability constant of each biopolymer system as well as the effective diffusivity of cupric ion in the matrix of biopolymer gels are reported.

  2. Applications of biopolymers and synthetic polymers blends: literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lady Joana Rodríguez Sepúlveda

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Biopolymers are biodegradable commonly, fragile, hydrophilic and have low thermal resistance, which has limited its commercial application. In contrast, synthetic polymers or derived from non-renewable resources generally lower cost and limited or minimal biodegradability, have good mechanical and thermal characteristics. The blend of biopolymers and synthetic polymers provides materials with properties and reasonable costs for certain applications. This article is a literature review on the main applications recently reported for the most important blends of biopolymers and biodegradable synthetic polymers. The literature search was performed with the "Tree of Science" tool and narratively. The results showed that mixtures of aliphatic and polysaccharide polymers are the most used in engineering applications biological tissues, control drug delivery and packaging industry.

  3. Optically controlled multiple switching operations of DNA biopolymer devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hung, Chao-You; Tu, Waan-Ting; Lin, Yi-Tzu [Institute of Photonics Technologies, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Fruk, Ljiljana [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3RA (United Kingdom); Hung, Yu-Chueh, E-mail: ychung@ee.nthu.edu.tw [Institute of Photonics Technologies, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Department of Electrical Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2015-12-21

    We present optically tunable operations of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) biopolymer devices, where a single high-resistance state, write-once read-many-times memory state, write-read-erase memory state, and single low-resistance state can be achieved by controlling UV irradiation time. The device is a simple sandwich structure with a spin-coated DNA biopolymer layer sandwiched by two electrodes. Upon irradiation, the electrical properties of the device are adjusted owing to a phototriggered synthesis of silver nanoparticles in DNA biopolymer, giving rise to multiple switching scenarios. This technique, distinct from the strategy of doping of pre-formed nanoparticles, enables a post-film fabrication process for achieving optically controlled memory device operations, which provides a more versatile platform to fabricate organic memory and optoelectronic devices.

  4. Conducting and non-conducting biopolymer composites produced by particle bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this report, we introduce two types of processes for the production of biopolymer composites: one is fabricated by bonding biopolymers with corn protein or wheat protein and the other by bonding starch with a synthetic polymer. These two types of biopolymer composites make use of the strong bon...

  5. Models of the solvent-accessible surface of biopolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, R.E.

    1996-09-01

    Many biopolymers such as proteins, DNA, and RNA have been studied because they have important biomedical roles and may be good targets for therapeutic action in treating diseases. This report describes how plastic models of the solvent-accessible surface of biopolymers were made. Computer files containing sets of triangles were calculated, then used on a stereolithography machine to make the models. Small (2 in.) models were made to test whether the computer calculations were done correctly. Also, files of the type (.stl) required by any ISO 9001 rapid prototyping machine were written onto a CD-ROM for distribution to American companies.

  6. The surface properties of biopolymer-coated fruit: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Cristina Moncayo Martinez

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Environmental conservation concerns have led to research and development regarding biodegradable materials from biopolymers, leading to new formulations for edible films and coatings for preserving the quality of fresh fruit and vegetables. Determining fruit skin surface properties for a given coating solution has led to predicting coating efficiency. Wetting was studied by considering spreading, adhesion and cohesion and measuring the contact angle, thus optimising the coating formulation in terms of biopolymer, plasticiser, surfactant, antimicrobial and antioxidant concentration. This work reviews the equations for determining fruit surface properties by using polar and dispersive interaction calculations and by determining the contact angle.

  7. Length regulation of active biopolymers by molecular motors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johann, Denis; Erlenkämper, Christoph; Kruse, Karsten

    2012-06-22

    For biopolymers like cytoskeletal actin filaments and microtubules, assembly and disassembly are inherently dissipative processes. Molecular motors can affect the rates of subunit removal at filament ends. We introduce a driven lattice-gas model to study the effects of motor-induced depolymerization on the length of active biopolymers and find that increasing motor activity sharpens unimodal steady-state length distributions. Furthermore, for sufficiently fast moving motors, the relative width of the length distribution is determined only by the attachment rate of motors. Our results show how established molecular processes can be used to robustly regulate the size of cytoskeletal structures like mitotic spindles.

  8. Nonlinearities of biopolymer gels increase the range of force transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xinpeng; Safran, Samuel A.

    2015-09-01

    We present a model of biopolymer gels that includes two types of elastic nonlinearities, stiffening under extension and softening (due to buckling) under compression, to predict the elastic anisotropy induced by both external as well as internal (e.g., due to cell contractility) stresses in biopolymer gels. We show how the stretch-induced anisotropy and the strain-stiffening nonlinearity increase both the amplitude and power-law range of transmission of internal, contractile, cellular forces, and relate this to recent experiments.

  9. Solid state NMR of biopolymers and synthetic polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jelinski, Lynn W. [Cornell Univ., Geneva, NY (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Solid state NMR has been invaluable in evaluating the structure, phase separation, and dynamics of polymers. Because polymers are generally used in the solid state, solid state NMR is especially powerful because it provides information about the materials in their native state. This review gives a general overview of solid state NMR, concentrating on solid state {sup 13} C and {sup 2} H NMR. It then focuses on two examples: the biopolymer spider silka and the engineering material polyurethane. It illustrates how solid state NMR can provide new information about synthetic and bio-polymers. (author) 11 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Micromechanical sensors for the measurement of biopolymer degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Stephan Sylvest; Gammelgaard, Lene; Jensen, M P

    2011-01-01

    We present microcantilever-based sensors for the characterization of biopolymer degradation by enzymes. Thin films of Poly(L-lactide) (PLLA) were spray-coated onto SU-8 cantilevers with well-known material properties and dimensions. The micromechanical sensors were immersed in solutions of protei......We present microcantilever-based sensors for the characterization of biopolymer degradation by enzymes. Thin films of Poly(L-lactide) (PLLA) were spray-coated onto SU-8 cantilevers with well-known material properties and dimensions. The micromechanical sensors were immersed in solutions...

  11. Development of Seaweed-based Biopolymers for Edible Films and Lectins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praseptiangga, D.

    2017-04-01

    Marine macroalgae (seaweeds) as one of important groups of biopolymers play an important role in human life. Biopolymers have been studied regarding their film-forming properties to produce edible films intended as food packaging and active ingredient carriers. Edible film, a thin layer or which is an integral part of food and can be eaten together with, have been used to avoid food quality deterioration due to physico-chemical changes, texture changes, or chemical reactions. Film-forming materials can be utilized individually or as mixed composite blends. Proteins and polysaccharides used for their mechanical and structural properties, and hydrophobic substances (lipids, essential oils, and emulsifiers) to provide good moisture barrier properties. In addition, bioactive substances from marine natural products, including seaweeds, have been explored for being used in the fields of medicine, food science, pharmaceutical science, biochemistry, and glycobiology. Among them, lectins or carbohydrate-binding proteins from seaweeds have recently been remarked. Lectins (hemagglutinins) are widely distributed in nature and also good candidates in such prospecting of seaweeds. They are useful as convenient tools to discriminate differences in carbohydrate structures and reveal various biological activities through binding and interacting to carbohydrates, suggesting that they are promising candidates for medicinal and clinical application.

  12. Kenaf/recycled Jute Natural Fibers Unsaturated Polyester Composites: Water Absorption/dimensional Stability and Mechanical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Ekhlas A.; Vakhguelt, Anatoli; Sbarski, Igor; Mutasher, Saad A.

    2012-03-01

    Effects of water absorption on the flexural properties of kenaf-unsaturated polyester composites and kenaf/recycled jute-unsaturated polyester composites were investigated. In the hybrid composites, the total fiber content was fixed to 20 wt%. In this 20 wt%, the addition of jute fiber varied from 0 to 75%, with increment of 25%. The result demonstrates the water absorption and the thickness swelling increased with increase in immersion time. Effects of water absorption on flexural properties of kenaf fiber composites can be reduced significantly with incorporation of recycled jute in composites formulation. The process of absorption of water was found to approach Fickian diffusion behavior for both kenaf composites and hybrid composites.

  13. Particle designs for the stabilization and controlled-delivery of protein drugs by biopolymers: a case study on insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hui-Peng; Tey, Beng-Ti; Chan, Eng-Seng

    2014-07-28

    Natural biopolymers have attracted considerable interest for the development of delivery systems for protein drugs owing to their biocompatibility, non-toxicity, renewability and mild processing conditions. This paper offers an overview of the current status and future perspectives of particle designs using biopolymers for the stabilization and controlled-delivery of a model protein drug--insulin. We first describe the design criteria for polymeric encapsulation and subsequently classify the basic principles of particle fabrication as well as the existing particle designs for oral insulin encapsulation. The performances of these existing particle designs in terms of insulin stability and in vitro release behavior in acidic and alkaline media, as well as their in vivo performance are compared and reviewed. This review forms the basis for future works on the optimization of particle design and material formulation for the development of an improved oral delivery system for protein drugs.

  14. In-situ modification, regeneration, and application of keratin biopolymer for arsenic removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khosa, Muhammad A.; Ullah, Aman, E-mail: amanullah@ualberta.ca

    2014-08-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • In-situ chemical modification of keratin based material was carried out. • Characterization techniques such as SEM, FTIR, XRD, and DSC were employed. • TGA data was elaborated for its complete thermal and kinetic study. • Sorption of As(III) using modified material was experimentally studied. • Thermodynamics and Isotherm study was made for elucidation of adsorption data. - Abstract: Chemical modification of chicken feathers (CF) and their subsequent role in arsenic removal from water is presented in this paper. The ground CF were chemically treated with four selective dopants such as poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) diglycidyl ether, poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM), allyl alcohol (AA) and TrisilanolCyclohexyl POSS. After modification, the solubilized keratin was regenerated by precipitation at acidic pH. The structural changes and properties of modified biopolymer were compared with untreated CF and confirmed by different characterization techniques such as SEM, FTIR, XRD, and DSC. The TGA data was used to discuss thermal decomposition and kinetic behavior of modified biopolymer exhaustively. The modified biopolymers were further investigated as biosorbents for their application in As(III) removal from water. The AA and POSS supported biosorbents executed high removal capacity for As(III) up to 11.5 × 10{sup −2}and 11.0 × 10{sup −2} mg/g from 100 ml arsenic polluted water solution respectively. Thermodynamic parameters such as ΔG{sup 0}, ΔH{sup 0}, ΔS{sup 0} were also evaluated with the finding that overall sorption process was endothermic and spontaneous in nature. Based on linear and non-linear regression analysis, Freundlich Isotherm model showed good fit for obtained sorption data apart from high linear regression values supporting Langmuir isotherm model in sorption of As(III)

  15. Aliphatic and aromatic plant biopolymer dynamics in soil particles isolated from sequential density fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, B.; Filley, T.; Sollins, P.; Lajtha, K.; Swanston, C.; Kleber, M.; Kramer, M.

    2007-12-01

    A recent multi-layer-based soil organic matter-mineral interaction mechanistic model to describe the nature of soil organic matter-mineral surface mechanism for soil organic matter stabilization predicts that proteinaceous and aliphatic materials establish the core of strong binding-interactions upon which other organic matter is layered. A key methodology providing data underpinning this hypothesis is sequential density fractionation where soil is partitioned into particles of increasing density with the assumption that a partial control on organic matter distribution through density series is the thickness of its layering. Four soils of varying mineralogy and texture were investigated for their biopolymer, isotopic, and mineralogical properties. Light fractions (cutin and suberin while heavier fractions, 1.8-2.6 g/cm3, exhibited a progressive decrease in concentration in plant derived biopolymers with density. Extractable lignin phenols exhibited a progressive oxidation state with density. The concentration of biopolymers roughly mirrored the C:N ratio of soil particles which dropped consistently with increasing particle density. Although, in all soils, both lignin phenols and SFA concentration generally decreased with increasing density the ratio SFA/lignin varied with density and depending upon the soil. All soils, except the oxisol, exhibited an increase in SFA with respect to lignin suggesting a selective stabilization of those material with respect to lignin. In the oxisol, which showed little variation in its hematite dominated mineralogy across density, SFA/lignin remained constant, potentially indicating a greater capacity to stabilize lignin in that system. Interestingly, the lignin oxidation state increased with density in the oxisol. Given the variation in soil character, the consistency in these trends it suggests a general phenomenon of progressive decay in plant derived material with thinness of mineral coating but an overall relative increase in

  16. Sugar Based Biopolymers in Nanomedicine; New Emerging Era for Cancer Imaging and Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eroglu, Mehmet S; Oner, Ebru Toksoy; Mutlu, Esra Cansever; Bostan, Muge Sennaroglu

    2017-01-01

    Since last decade, sugar based biopolymers are recognized in nanomedicine as promising materials for cancer imaging and therapy. Their durable, biocompatible and adhesive properties enable the fine tuning of their molecular weights (MW) and their miscellaneous nature makes the molecules acquire various conformations. These in turn provide effective endocytosis by cancer cell membranes that have already been programmed for internalization of different kinds of sugars. Therefore, biocompatible sugar based nanoparticles (SBNPs) are suitable for both cell-selective delivery of drugs and imaging through the human body. Recently, well known sugar-based markers have displayed superior performance to overcome tumor metastasis. Thereby, targeting strategies for cancer cells have been broadened to sugar-based markers as noticed in various clinic phases. In these studies, biopolymers such as chitosan, hyaluronic acid, mannan, dextran, levan, pectin, cyclodextrin, chondroitin sulphate, alginates, amylose and heparin are chemically functionalized and structurally designed as new biocompatible nanoparticles (NPs). The future cancer treatment strategies will mainly comprise of these multifunctional sugar based nanoparticles which combine the therapeutic agents with imaging technologies with the aim of rapid monitoring response to therapies. While each individual imaging and treatment step requires a long time period in effective treatment of diseases, these multifunctional sugar based nanoparticles will have the advantage of rapid detection, right drug efficiency evaluation and immediate interfere opportunity to some important diseases, especially rapidly progressing cancers. In this article, we evaluated synthesis, characterization and applications of main sugar based biopolymers and discussed their great promise in nano-formulations for cancer imaging and therapy. However much should be done and optimized prior to clinical applications of these nano-formulations for an

  17. Multimodal CARS microscopy of structured carbohydrate biopolymers

    OpenAIRE

    Slepkov, Aaron D.; Ridsdale, Andrew; Pegoraro, Adrian F.; Moffatt, Douglas J.; Stolow, Albert

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate the utility of multimodal coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy for the study of structured condensed carbohydrate systems. Simultaneous second-harmonic generation (SHG) and spectrally-scanned CARS microscopy was used to elucidate structure, alignment, and density in cellulose cotton fibers and in starch grains undergoing rapid heat-moisture swelling. Our results suggest that CARS response of the O-H stretch region (3000 cm−1–3400 cm−1), together with the comm...

  18. Semiflexible biopolymers: Microrheology and single filament condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnurr, Bernhard

    Polymers and their elementary subunits, called monomers, come in an immense variety of structures and sizes, and are of great importance for their material properties as well as a multitude of biological functions. The emphasis here is on semiflexible polymers, which are identified by their intermediate degree of stiffness. Their individual as well as their collective properties when assembled into entangled networks is a topic of great interest to polymer physics, materials science, and biology. Some of the most important semiflexible polymers are biopolymers, with such prominent examples as DNA, F-actin, and microtubules. Their functions range from their use as structural elements in the cytoskeleton of most plant and animal cells, to their role as transport tracks for molecular motors, and the storage of genetic information in their linear sequence. The two parts of this experimental and theoretical thesis address single filament aspects as well as network properties of solutions of semiflexible polymers. In the first part, we describe an optical technique for measuring the bulk properties of soft materials at the local scale. We apply it to a solution of entangled, filamentous actin, a particularly difficult material to characterize with conventional techniques. Beyond a description of measurements and apparatus, we also discuss, from a theoretical point of view, the interpretation and fundamental limitations of this and other microrheological techniques. In the second part, we describe the condensation dynamics of a single, semiflexible filament, induced by changing solvent conditions. A biologically important example of this phenomenon is the condensation of DNA into toroidal structures, which occurs, for instance, in viral capsids. Our observations of a molecular simulation motivate an unexpected pathway of collapse via a series of metastable intermediates we call ``racquet'' states. The analysis of the conformational energies of these structures in the

  19. Osteoblast biocompatibility of pre-mineralized, hexamethylene-1,6-diaminocarboxysulphonate crosslinked chitosan fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiechel, Marjorie A.; Beringer, Laura T.; Donius, Amalie E.; Komiya, Yuko; Habas, Raymond; Wegst, Ulrike G. K.; Schauer, Caroline L.

    2015-01-01

    Biopolymer-ceramic composites are thought to be particularly promising materials for bone tissue engineering as they more closely mimic natural bone. Here, we demonstrate the fabrication by electrospinning of fibrous chitosan-hydroxyapatite composite scaffolds with low (1 wt%) and high (10 wt%) mineral contents. Scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and unidirectional tensile testing were performed to determine fiber surface morphology, elemental composition, and tensile Young’s modulus (E) and ultimate tensile strength (σUTS), respectively. EDS scans of the scaffolds indicated that the fibers, crosslinked with either hexamethylene-1,6-diaminocarboxysulfonate (HDACS) or genipin, have a crystalline hydroxyapatite mineral content at 10 wt% additive. Moreover, FESEM micrographs showed that all electrospun fibers have diameters (122 – 249 nm), which fall within the range of those of fibrous collagen found in the extracellular matrix of bone. Young’s modulus and ultimate tensile strength of the various crosslinked composite compositions were in the range of 116 – 329 MPa and 2 – 15 MPa, respectively. Osteocytes seeded onto the mineralized fibers were able to demonstrate good biocompatibility enhancing the potential use for this material in future bone tissue engineering applications. PMID:25771925

  20. Osteoblast biocompatibility of premineralized, hexamethylene-1,6-diaminocarboxysulfonate crosslinked chitosan fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiechel, Marjorie A; Beringer, Laura T; Donius, Amalie E; Komiya, Yuko; Habas, Raymond; Wegst, Ulrike G K; Schauer, Caroline L

    2015-10-01

    Biopolymer-ceramic composites are thought to be particularly promising materials for bone tissue engineering as they more closely mimic natural bone. Here, we demonstrate the fabrication by electrospinning of fibrous chitosan-hydroxyapatite composite scaffolds with low (1 wt %) and high (10 wt %) mineral contents. Scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and unidirectional tensile testing were performed to determine fiber surface morphology, elemental composition, and tensile Young's modulus (E) and ultimate tensile strength (σUTS ), respectively. EDS scans of the scaffolds indicated that the fibers, crosslinked with either hexamethylene-1,6-diaminocarboxysulfonate (HDACS) or genipin, have a crystalline hydroxyapatite mineral content at 10 wt % additive. Moreover, FESEM micrographs showed that all electrospun fibers have diameters (122-249 nm), which fall within the range of those of fibrous collagen found in the extracellular matrix of bone. Young's modulus and ultimate tensile strength of the various crosslinked composite compositions were in the range of 116-329 MPa and 2-15 MPa, respectively. Osteocytes seeded onto the mineralized fibers were able to demonstrate good biocompatibility enhancing the potential use for this material in future bone tissue engineering applications.

  1. [Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) and biopolymer systems on the basis of this polyester].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonartsev, A P; Bonartseva, G A; Shaĭtan, K V; Kirpichnikov, M P

    2011-01-01

    Biodegradable biopolymers attract much attention in biology and medicine due to its wide application. The present review is designed to be a comprehensive source for research of biodegradable and biocompatible bacterial polymer, poly(3-hydroxybutyrate). This paper focuses on basic properties of biopolymer: biodegradability and biocompatibility, as well as on biopolymer systems: various materials, devices and compositions on the basis of biopolymer. Application of biopolymer systems based on poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) in medicine as surgical implants, in bioengineering as scaffold for cell cultures, and in pharmacy as drug dosage forms and drug systems is observed in the present review.

  2. Strength of anisotropic wood and synthetic materials. [plywood, laminated wood plastics, glass fiber reinforced plastics, polymeric film, and natural wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashkenazi, Y. K.

    1981-01-01

    The possibility of using general formulas for determining the strength of different anisotropic materials is considered, and theoretical formulas are applied and confirmed by results of tests on various nonmetallic materials. Data are cited on the strength of wood, plywood, laminated wood plastics, fiber glass-reinforced plastics and directed polymer films.

  3. Sensory evaluation and nutritional value of balady flat bread supplemented with banana peels as a natural source of dietary fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nareman S. Eshak

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of two different concentrations of banana peels BP (5% and 10% as a partial replacement for wheat flour on physicochemical and sensory properties of Egyptian balady flat bread. The peel powder (0.50 mm size from banana was prepared from their dried peel. The bread was prepared by replacing 5% and 10% of wheat flour with a banana peel. The bread prepared was designated as B1 and B2 respectively. They were tested for moisture, ash, protein, fat, crude fiber as per the standard methods. The physicochemical and sensory parameters of these two test bread were compared with a control bread 100% wheat flour designated as B0. Results showed that BP flour was owing 11.20% crude fiber which is higher than the wheat flour 1.21%. Also, BP flour has high potassium, calcium, sodium, iron and manganese compared with wheat flour. The protein and fiber content of B2 and B1 bread were higher (12.52% and 11.79% protein and 2.18% and 1.97% fiber as compared to the control bread (10.79 protein and 1.42% fiber. B1 and B2 had the highest K, Na, Ca, Fe, Mg and Zn content compared with control bread. The water holding capacity (WHC and oil holding capacity (OHC of bread with BP flour were higher as compared to the bread control. The bread prepared by replacing 5% and 10% of BP (B2 is found to be sensorially acceptable. Our results showed that the nutritionally and sensory accepted bread can be prepared by replacing at most 10% of flour.

  4. Mechanical Reinforcement of Wool Fiber through Polyelectrolyte Complexation with Chitosan and Gellan Gum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khairul Anuar Mat Amin

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The formation of polyelectrolyte complex (PEC wool fibers formed by dipping chitosan or gellan gum-treated wool fibers into biopolymer solutions of opposite charge is reported. Treating wool fibers with chitosan (CH and gellan gum (GG solutions containing food dyes resulted in improved mechanical characteristics compared to wool fibers. In contrast, pH modification of the solutions resulted in the opposite effect. The mechanical characteristics of PEC-treated fibers were affected by the order of addition, i.e., dipping GG-treated fibers into chitosan resulted in mechanical reinforcement, whereas the reverse-order process did not.

  5. Thermal Degradation and Damping Characteristic of UV Irradiated Biopolymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anika Zafiah M. Rus

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Biopolymer made from renewable material is one of the most important groups of polymer because of its versatility in application. In this study, biopolymers based on waste vegetable oil were synthesized and cross-link with commercial polymethane polyphenyl isocyanate (known as BF. The BF was compressed by using hot compression moulding technique at 90°C based on the evaporation of volatile matter, known as compress biopolymer (CB. Treatment with titanium dioxide (TiO2 was found to affect the physical property of compressed biopolymer composite (CBC. The characterization of thermal degradation, activation energy, morphology structure, density, vibration, and damping of CB were determined after UV irradiation exposure. This is to evaluate the photo- and thermal stability of the treated CB or CBC. The vibration and damping characteristic of CBC samples is significantly increased with the increasing of UV irradiation time, lowest thickness, and percentages of TiO2 loading at the frequency range of 15–25 Hz due to the potential of the sample to dissipate energy during the oscillation harmonic system. The damping property of CBC was improved markedly upon prolonged exposure to UV irradiation.

  6. Segregative phase separation in aqueous mixtures of polydisperse biopolymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edelman, M.W.

    2003-01-01

    Keywords: biopolymer, gelatine, dextran, PEO, phase separation, polydispersity, molar mass distribution, SEC-MALLS, CSLM The temperature-composition phase diagram of aqueous solutions of gelatine and dextran, which show liquid/liquid phase segregation, were explored at temperatures above the gelatio

  7. Biopolymers produced from gelatin and other sustainable resources using polyphenols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Several researchers have recently demonstrated the feasibility of producing biopolymers from the reaction of polyphenolics with gelatin in combination with other proteins (e.g. whey) or with carbohydrates (e.g. chitosan and pectin). These combinations would take advantage of the unique properties o...

  8. Biopolymers in controlled release devices for agricultural applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The use of biopolymers such as starch for agricultural applications including controlled release devices is growing due the environmental benefits. Recently, concerns have grown about the worldwide spread of parasitic mites (Varroa destructor) that infect colonies of honey bees (Apis mellifera L.). ...

  9. Production of Degradable Biopolymer Composites by Particle-bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conventionally, polymer composites had been manufactured by mixing the component materials in the extruder at high temperature. Agricultural biopolymers are usually mixtures of many types of compounds; when used as raw materials, however, high-temperature process causes unwanted consequences such a...

  10. USING BIOPOLYMERS TO REMOVE HEAVY METALS FROM SOIL AND WATER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemical remediation of soil may involve the use of harsh chemicals that generate waste streams, which may adversely affect the soil's integrity and ability to support vegetation. This article reviews the potential use of benign reagents, such as biopolymers, to extract heavy me...

  11. Physicochemical Characterization of Alginate Beads Containing Sugars and Biopolymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Aguirre Calvo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Alginate hydrogels are suitable for the encapsulation of a great variety of biomolecules. Several alternatives to the conventional alginate formulation are being studied for a broad range of biotechnological applications; among them the addition of sugars and biopolymers arises as a good and economic strategy. Sugars (trehalose and β-cyclodextrin, a cationic biopolymer (chitosan, an anionic biopolymer (pectin, and neutral gums (Arabic, guar, espina corona, and vinal gums provided different characteristics to the beads. Here we discuss the influence of beads composition on several physicochemical properties, such as size and shape, analyzed through digital image analysis besides both water content and activity. The results showed that the addition of a second biopolymer, β-CD, or trehalose provoked more compact beads, but the fact that they were compact not necessarily implies a concomitant increase in their circularity. Espina corona beads showed the highest circularity value, being useful for applications which require a controlled and high circularity, assuring quality control. Beads with trehalose showed lower water content than the rest of the system, followed by those containing galactomannans (espina corona, vinal, and guar gums, revealing polymer structure effects. A complete characterization of the beads was performed by FT-IR, assigning the characteristics bands to each individual component.

  12. Associative Interactions in Crowded Solutions of Biopolymers Counteract Depletion Effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, Joost; Foschepoth, David; te Brinke, Esra; Boersma, Arnold J; Imamura, Hiromi; Rivas, Germán; Heus, Hans A; Huck, Wilhelm T S

    2015-01-01

    The cytosol of Escherichia coli is an extremely crowded environment, containing high concentrations of biopolymers which occupy 20-30% of the available volume. Such conditions are expected to yield depletion forces, which strongly promote macromolecular complexation. However, crowded macromolecule s

  13. Corrosion Inhibition of High Speed Steel by Biopolymer HPMC Derivatives

    OpenAIRE

    Shih-Chen Shi; Chieh-Chang Su

    2016-01-01

    The corrosion inhibition characteristics of the derivatives of biopolymer hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC), hydroxypropyl methylcellulose phthalate (HPMCP), and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose acetate succinate (HPMCAS) film are investigated. Based on electrochemical impedance spectroscopic measurements and potentiodynamic polarization, the corrosion inhibition performance of high speed steel coated with HPMC derivatives is evaluated. The Nyquist plot and Tafel polarization demonstrate prom...

  14. Production of a Biopolymer at Reactor Scale: A Laboratory Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genc, Rukan; Rodriguez-Couto, Susana

    2011-01-01

    Undergraduate students of biotechnology became familiar with several aspects of bioreactor operation via the production of xanthan gum, an industrially relevant biopolymer, by "Xanthomonas campestris" bacteria. The xanthan gum was extracted from the fermentation broth and the yield coefficient and productivity were calculated. (Contains 2 figures.)

  15. Effect of temperature on the AC impedance of protein and carbohydrate biopolymers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Muthulakshmi; S Iyyapushpam; D Pathinettam Padiyan

    2014-12-01

    The influence of temperature on the electrical behaviour of protein biopolymer papain and carbohydrate biopolymers like gum acacia, gum tragacanth and guar gum has been investigated using AC impedance technique. The observed semi-circles represent the material’s bulk electrical property that indicate the single relaxation process in the biopolymers. An increase in bulk electrical conductivity in the biopolymers with temperature is due to the hopping of charge carriers between the trapped sites. The depression parameter reveals the electrical equivalent circuit for the biopolymers. The AC electrical conductivity in the biopolymers follows the universal power law. From this, it is observed that the AC conductivity is frequency dependent and the biopolymer papain obeys large polaron tunnelling model, gum acacia and gum guar obey ion or electron tunnelling model, and gum tragacanth obeys the correlated barrier hopping model of conduction mechanisms.

  16. Esophageal muscle cell interaction with biopolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz, Mevlit; Yakut, Tahsin; Narci, Adnan; Güvenç, B Haluk; Güilten, Tuna; Yağmurca, Murat; Yiğit, Barbaros; Bilir, Ayhan

    2007-02-01

    The in vitro interactions of esophageal smooth muscle cells (SMCs) with synthetic absorbable polymers were tested and artificial muscle tissues harvested from subcutaneous implantation were examined. Esophageal tissue samples from adult and fetal (25-day gestational age) rabbits were cut into small pieces and cultured in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum. Growing cells were identified as SMCs by immunostaining for anti-actin and anti-myosin antibodies. Equal volumes of agar gel and medium were mixed and used for 3-D culture. 5x10(5) cells and 1 mg polyglycolic acid (PGA) and poly-lactide-co-glycolide acid (PLGA) fibers were seeded in six-well tissue culture plates. On days 2 and 7 growing cells were counted by a hemocytometer and cell-polymer interactions were evaluated with light microscopy. Adult and fetal SMCs were seeded onto the PGA and PLGA scaffolds, cultivated for two weeks, and implanted subcutaneously on the backs of the rabbits. Cell-polymer implants were retrieved after four weeks and muscle formation was evaluated histologically and immunohistochemically. Growing cells stained positive for actin and myosin proteins. Cell-polymer interactions were poor after 24 hours, whereas intensive attachment to the fibers was detected 48 hours following cultivation. Both fiber materials supported cell proliferation. PLGA scaffolds improved muscle formation more efficiently than PGA, and fetal and adult SMCs showed similar mass quality. Scaffolds are important as cell-carrying vehicles, and material-cell interactions should be tested before application. A 3-D culture prepared with agar gel and medium is practical for testing material toxicity.

  17. Multimodal CARS microscopy of structured carbohydrate biopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slepkov, Aaron D.; Ridsdale, Andrew; Pegoraro, Adrian F.; Moffatt, Douglas J.; Stolow, Albert

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate the utility of multimodal coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy for the study of structured condensed carbohydrate systems. Simultaneous second-harmonic generation (SHG) and spectrally-scanned CARS microscopy was used to elucidate structure, alignment, and density in cellulose cotton fibers and in starch grains undergoing rapid heat-moisture swelling. Our results suggest that CARS response of the O-H stretch region (3000 cm−1–3400 cm−1), together with the commonly-measured C-H stretch (2750 cm−1–2970 cm−1) and SHG provide potentially important structural information and contrast in these materials. PMID:21258555

  18. Multimodal CARS microscopy of structured carbohydrate biopolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slepkov, Aaron D; Ridsdale, Andrew; Pegoraro, Adrian F; Moffatt, Douglas J; Stolow, Albert

    2010-11-08

    We demonstrate the utility of multimodal coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy for the study of structured condensed carbohydrate systems. Simultaneous second-harmonic generation (SHG) and spectrally-scanned CARS microscopy was used to elucidate structure, alignment, and density in cellulose cotton fibers and in starch grains undergoing rapid heat-moisture swelling. Our results suggest that CARS response of the O-H stretch region (3000 cm(-1)-3400 cm(-1)), together with the commonly-measured C-H stretch (2750 cm(-1)-2970 cm(-1)) and SHG provide potentially important structural information and contrast in these materials.

  19. Comparison of thermal behavior of natural and hot-washed sisal fibers based on their main components: Cellulose, xylan and lignin. TG-FTIR analysis of volatile products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benítez-Guerrero, Mónica, E-mail: monica_benitez_guerrero@yahoo.es [Departamento de Ingeniería Civil, Materiales y Fabricación, Universidad de Málaga, Escuela de Ingenierías, C/ Dr. Ortiz Ramos s/n, Campus Teatinos, 29071 Málaga (Spain); López-Beceiro, Jorge [Departamento de Ingeniería Industrial II, Escola Politécnica Superior, Universidade da Coruña, Avda. Mendizábal, 15403 Ferrol (Spain); Sánchez-Jiménez, Pedro E. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla, CSIC-Universidad de Sevilla, C/ Américo Vespucio 49, 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Pascual-Cosp, José [Departamento de Ingeniería Civil, Materiales y Fabricación, Universidad de Málaga, Escuela de Ingenierías, C/ Dr. Ortiz Ramos s/n, Campus Teatinos, 29071 Málaga (Spain)

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • Thermal decomposition of sisal fibers has been discussed. • Decompositions of lignocellulosic components and sisal are compared by TXRD and TG-FTIR. • Hot washing reduces the temperature range in which sisal decomposition occurs. • Sisal cellulose decomposition goes by an alternative route to levoglucosan generation. - Abstract: This paper presents in a comprehensive way the thermal behavior of natural and hot-washed sisal fibers, based on the fundamental components of lignocellulosic materials: cellulose, xylan and lignin. The research highlights the influence exerted on the thermal stability of sisal fibers by other constituents such as non-cellulosic polysaccharides (NCP) and mineral matter. Thermal changes were investigated by thermal X-ray diffraction (TXRD), analyzing the crystallinity index (%Ic) of cellulosic samples, and by simultaneous thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis coupled with Fourier-transformed infrared spectrometry (TG/DTA-FTIR), which allowed to examine the evolution of the main volatile compounds evolved during the degradation under inert and oxidizing atmospheres. The work demonstrates the potential of this technique to elucidate different steps during the thermal decomposition of sisal, providing extensible results to other lignocellulosic fibers, through the analysis of the evolution of CO{sub 2}, CO, H{sub 2}O, CH{sub 4}, acetic acid, formic acid, methanol, formaldehyde and 2-butanone, and comparing it with the volatile products from pyrolysis of the biomass components. The hydroxyacetaldehyde detected during pyrolysis of sisal is indicative of an alternative route to that of levoglucosan, generated during cellulose pyrolysis. Hot-washing at 75 °C mostly extracts non-cellulosic components of low decomposition temperature, and reduces the range of temperature in which sisal decomposition occurs, causing a retard in the pyrolysis stage and increasing Tb{sub NCP} and Tb{sub CEL}, temperatures at the

  20. Green synthesis of silver nanoparticles using biopolymers, carboxymethylated-curdlan and fucoidan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, Thomas Chun-Yiu; Wong, Chung Kai [Program of Nano Science and Technology, Department of Biology, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Xie Yong, E-mail: boyxie@ust.hk [Program of Nano Science and Technology, Department of Biology, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2010-06-01

    There is a growing need in developing a reliable and eco-friendly methodology for the synthesis of metallic nanoparticles, which may be applied for many nanotechnological applications. Natural compounds such as biopolymers are one of the resources which could be used for this purpose. The present study involves the development of a simple, ecological and user-friendly method in synthesizing silver nanoparticles by using carboxymethylated-curdlan or fucoidan as reducing and stabilizing agents. Reduction of silver ions by these biopolymers occurred when heating at 100 deg. C, led to the formation of silver nanoparticles in the range of 40-80 nm in dimensions. The silver nanoparticles were formed readily within 10-15 min. Morphological observation and characterization of the silver nanoparticles were performed by using dynamic light scattering (DLS), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and UV-vis absorption spectrophotometer. The size of silver nanoparticles can be controlled by using different concentrations of carboxymethylated-curdlan, fucoidan or silver nitrate. This way of silver nanoparticles preparation is easy, fast, user-friendly and suitable for large-scale production.

  1. The stability and degradation kinetics of Sulforaphene in microcapsules based on several biopolymers via spray drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Guifang; Li, Yuan; Yuan, Qipeng; Cheng, Li; Kuang, Pengqun; Tang, Pingwah

    2015-05-20

    Sulforaphene (SFE) was extracted from the radish seeds and the purity of SFE extracted by our laboratory was 95%. It is well known that SFE can prevent cancers. It is also known that SFE is unstable to heat. To overcome the problem, SFE microcapsules using natural biopolymers were prepared by spray drying. The results indicated that SFE microcapsules using hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD), maltodextrin (MD) and isolated soybean protein (SPI) as wall materials could effectively improve its stability against heat, especially SFE-loaded HP-β-CD and MD microcapsules. The amount of SFE in the microcapsules was found 20% higher than that of the non-encapsulated SFE under 90 °C in 168 h. Our finding suggested that the rate of degradation of the non-encapsulated and encapsulated SFE with HP-β-CD, MD and SPI followed the first-order kinetics. The speed of the degradation of the encapsulated SFE in biopolymers increased from SFE with HP-β-CD, to SFE with MD, and to SFE-SPI. The non-encapsulated SFE degrades fastest.

  2. Active biopolymers in green non-conventional media: a sustainable tool for developing clean chemical processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, Pedro; Bernal, Juana M; Nieto, Susana; Gomez, Celia; Garcia-Verdugo, Eduardo; Luis, Santiago V

    2015-12-21

    The greenness of chemical processes turns around two main axes: the selectivity of catalytic transformations, and the separation of pure products. The transfer of the exquisite catalytic efficiency shown by enzymes in nature to chemical processes is an important challenge. By using appropriate reaction systems, the combination of biopolymers with supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) and ionic liquids (ILs) resulted in synergetic and outstanding platforms for developing (multi)catalytic green chemical processes, even under flow conditions. The stabilization of biocatalysts, together with the design of straightforward approaches for separation of pure products including the full recovery and reuse of enzymes/ILs systems, are essential elements for developing clean chemical processes. By understanding structure-function relationships of biopolymers in ILs, as well as for ILs themselves (e.g. sponge-like ionic liquids, SLILs; supported ionic liquids-like phases, SILLPs, etc.), several integral green chemical processes of (bio)catalytic transformation and pure product separation are pointed out (e.g. the biocatalytic production of biodiesel in SLILs, etc.). Other developments based on DNA/ILs systems, as pathfinder studies for further technological applications in the near future, are also considered.

  3. Surface Modification of Polypropylene Membrane Using Biopolymers with Potential Applications for Metal Ion Removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Alberto Hernández-Aguirre

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work aims to present the modification of polypropylene (PP membranes using three different biopolymers, chitosan (CHI, potato starch (PS, and cellulose (CEL, in order to obtain three new materials. The modified membranes may be degraded easier than polypropylene ones and could be used as selective membranes for metal ions removal, among other applications. For this purpose, the UV energy induced graft copolymerization reaction among polypropylene membrane, acrylic acid, benzophenone (as photoinitiator, and the biopolymer (CHI, PS, or CEL was conducted. The results of FT-IR-ATR, XRD, TGA, DSC, SEM, BET, and AFM analyses and mechanical properties clearly indicate the successful modification of the membrane surface. The change of surface wettability was monitored by contact angle. The grafting reaction depends on natural polymer, reaction time, and concentration. In order to prove the potential application of the modified membranes, a preliminary study of sorption of metal ion was carried out. For this purpose, the PP-CHI membrane was chosen because of the high hydrophilicity, proportionate to -OH and NH2; these groups could act as ligands of metal ions, provoking the interaction between PP-CHI and M+ (PP-CHI-M+ and therefore the metal ion removal from water.

  4. Scalable Fabrication of Natural-Fiber Reinforced Composites with Electromagnetic Interference Shielding Properties by Incorporating Powdered Activated Carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changlei Xia

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Kenaf fiber—polyester composites incorporated with powdered activated carbon (PAC were prepared using the vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM process. The product demonstrates the electromagnetic interference (EMI shielding function. The kenaf fibers were retted in a pressured reactor to remove the lignin and extractives in the fiber. The PAC was loaded into the freshly retted fibers in water. The PAC loading effectiveness was determined using the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET specific surface area analysis. A higher BET value was obtained with a higher PAC loading. The transmission energies of the composites were measured by exposing the samples to the irradiation of electromagnetic waves with a variable frequency from 8 GHz to 12 GHz. As the PAC content increased from 0% to 10.0%, 20.5% and 28.9%, the EMI shielding effectiveness increased from 41.4% to 76.0%, 87.9% and 93.0%, respectively. Additionally, the EMI absorption increased from 21.2% to 31.7%, 44.7% and 64.0%, respectively. The ratio of EMI absorption/shielding of the composite at 28.9% of PAC loading was increased significantly by 37.1% as compared with the control sample. It was indicated that the incorporation of PAC into the composites was very effective for absorbing electromagnetic waves, which resulted in a decrease in secondary electromagnetic pollution.

  5. Electrospinning of Nanodiamond-Modified Polysaccharide Nanofibers with Physico-Mechanical Properties Close to Natural Skins

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Electrospinning of biopolymers has gained significant interest for the fabrication of fibrous mats for potential applications in tissue engineering, particularly for wound dressing and skin regeneration. In this study, for the first time, we report successful electrospinning of chitosan-based biopolymers containing bacterial cellulous (33 wt %) and medical grade nanodiamonds (MND) (3 nm; up to 3 wt %). Morphological studies by scanning electron microscopy showed that long and uniform fibers w...

  6. Engineered biosealant producing inorganic and organic biopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microbiologically induced calcium carbonate precipitation (MICCP) is a naturally occurring biological process that has shown its potential in remediation of a wide range of structural damages including concrete cracks. MICCP involves sequential microbiological and chemical reactions, such as urea h...

  7. Film forming microbial biopolymers for commercial applications--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayendra, S V N; Shamala, T R

    2014-12-01

    Microorganisms synthesize intracellular, structural and extracellular polymers also referred to as biopolymers for their function and survival. These biopolymers play specific roles as energy reserve materials, protective agents, aid in cell functioning, the establishment of symbiosis, osmotic adaptation and support the microbial genera to function, adapt, multiply and survive efficiently under changing environmental conditions. Viscosifying, gelling and film forming properties of these have been exploited for specific significant applications in food and allied industries. Intensive research activities and recent achievements in relevant and important research fields of global interest regarding film forming microbial biopolymers is the subject of this review. Microbial polymers such as pullulan, kefiran, bacterial cellulose (BC), gellan and levan are placed under the category of exopolysaccharides (EPS) and have several other functional properties including film formation, which can be used for various applications in food and allied industries. In addition to EPS, innumerable bacterial genera are found to synthesis carbon energy reserves in their cells known as polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs), microbial polyesters, which can be extruded into films with excellent moisture and oxygen barrier properties. Blow moldable biopolymers like PHA along with polylactic acid (PLA) synthesized chemically in vitro using lactic acid (LA), which is produced by LA bacteria through fermentation, are projected as biodegradable polymers of the future for packaging applications. Designing and creating of new property based on requirements through controlled synthesis can lead to improvement in properties of existing polysaccharides and create novel biopolymers of great commercial interest and value for wider applications. Incorporation of antimicrobials such as bacteriocins or silver and copper nanoparticles can enhance the functionality of polymer films especially in food packaging

  8. Mucin biopolymers as broad-spectrum antiviral agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieleg, Oliver; Lieleg, Corinna; Bloom, Jesse; Buck, Christopher B.; Ribbeck, Katharina

    2012-01-01

    Mucus is a porous biopolymer matrix that coats all wet epithelia in the human body and serves as the first line of defense against many pathogenic bacteria and viruses. However, under certain conditions viruses are able to penetrate this infection barrier, which compromises the protective function of native mucus. Here, we find that isolated porcine gastric mucin polymers, key structural components of native mucus, can protect an underlying cell layer from infection by small viruses such as human papillomavirus (HPV), Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV), or a strain of influenza A virus. Single particle analysis of virus mobility inside the mucin barrier reveals that this shielding effect is in part based on a retardation of virus diffusion inside the biopolymer matrix. Our findings suggest that purified mucins may be used as a broad-range antiviral supplement to personal hygiene products, baby formula or lubricants to support our immune system. PMID:22475261

  9. Field experience with floodwater diversion by complexed biopolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdo, M.K.; Chung, M.S.; Klaric, T.M.; Phelps, C.H.

    1984-04-01

    Due to preferential flow of the injected water through the most permeable zones, waterflooding of stratified reservoirs is generally inefficient. A process for improving the performance of waterfloods in such reservoirs has been developed; it is based on complexing biopolymers with multivalent cations to form gels for selective blocking of water-thief zones, thereby diverting the trailing floodwater to previously under-invaded reservoir regions to recover by-passed oil. This polymeric modification of stratification and of water injection profile leads to increased volumetric sweep of the reservoir by the floodwater and, in turn, to improved oil production. This paper summarizes Mobil's experience in its first seven field projects in Oklahoma using this process. A total of two hundred and five injection wells were treated with complexed biopolymers, resulting in substantial alteration of water flow patterns and in significant incremental oil recovery.

  10. Corrosion Inhibition of High Speed Steel by Biopolymer HPMC Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Chen Shi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion inhibition characteristics of the derivatives of biopolymer hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose phthalate (HPMCP, and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose acetate succinate (HPMCAS film are investigated. Based on electrochemical impedance spectroscopic measurements and potentiodynamic polarization, the corrosion inhibition performance of high speed steel coated with HPMC derivatives is evaluated. The Nyquist plot and Tafel polarization demonstrate promising anti-corrosion performance of HPMC and HPMCP. With increasing film thickness, both materials reveal improvement in corrosion inhibition. Moreover, because of a hydrophobic surface and lower moisture content, HPMCP shows better anti-corrosion performance than HPMCAS. The study is of certain importance for designing green corrosion inhibitors of high speed steel surfaces by the use of biopolymer derivatives.

  11. Mobility Enhancement of Red Blood Cells with Biopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahara, Daiki; Oikawa, Noriko; Kurita, Rei

    2016-03-01

    Adhesion of red blood cells (RBC) to substrates are one of crucial problems for a blood clot. Here we investigate the mobility of RBC between two glass substrates in saline with polymer systems. We find that RBCs are adhered to the glass substrate with PEG, however the mobility steeply increases with fibrinogen and dextran, which are biopolymers. We also find that the mobility affects an aggregation dynamics of RBCs, which is related with diseases such as influenza, blood clot and so on. The Brownian motion helps to increase probability of contact with each other and to find a more stable condition of the aggregation. Thus the biopolymers play important roles not only for preventing the adhesion but also for the aggregation.

  12. Production of biopolymers by Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from marine source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazia Jamil

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Two bacterial strains, Pseudomonas aeruginosa CMG607w and CMG1421 produce commercially important biopolymers. CMG607w isolated from the sediments of Lyari outfall to Arabian Sea synthesize the mcl-polyhydroxyalkanoates from various carbon sources. The production of PHAs was directly proportional to the incubation periods. Other strain CMG1421, a dry soil isolate, produced high viscous water absorbing extracellular acidic polysaccharide when it was grown aerobically in the minimal medium containing glucose or fructose or sucrose as sole source of carbon. The biopolymer had the ability to absorb water 400 times more than its dry weight. This property was superior to that of currently used non-degradable synthetic water absorbents. It acted as salt filter and had rheological and stabilizing activity as well.

  13. Application of Raman spectroscopy method for analysis of biopolymer materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timchenko, Elena V.; Timchenko, Pavel E.; Volchkov, S. E.; Mahortova, Alexsandra O.; Asadova, Anna A.; Kornilin, Dmitriy V.

    2016-10-01

    This work presents the results of spectral analysis of biopolymer materials that are implemented in medical sphere. Polymer samples containing polycaprolactone and iron oxides of different valence were used in the studies. Raman spectroscopy method was used as a main control method. Relative content of iron and polycaprolactone in studied materials was assessed using ratio of RS intensities values at 604 cm-1 and 1726 cm-1 wavenumbers to intensity value of 1440 cm-1 line.

  14. Performance of the Bean-protein Fiber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩光亭; 杜宁; 孙亚宁

    2003-01-01

    The methods in testing the bean-protein fiber and the standards used were simply introduced. The fiber's mechanical and chemical performances were further analyzed. And the correlative performance of the bean-protein fibers and other natural fibers have been compared, then full knowledge of the fiber's performance was concluded.

  15. Light-activated ionic gelation of common biopolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javvaji, Vishal; Baradwaj, Aditya G; Payne, Gregory F; Raghavan, Srinivasa R

    2011-10-18

    Biopolymers such as alginate and pectin are well known for their ability to undergo gelation upon addition of multivalent cations such as calcium (Ca(2+)). Here, we report a simple way to activate such ionic gelation by UV irradiation. Our approach involves combining an insoluble salt of the cation (e.g., calcium carbonate, CaCO(3)) with an aqueous solution of the polymer (e.g., alginate) along with a third component, a photoacid generator (PAG). Upon UV irradiation, the PAG dissociates to release H(+) ions, which react with the CaCO(3) to generate free Ca(2+). In turn, the Ca(2+) ions cross-link the alginate chains into a physical network, thereby resulting in a hydrogel. Dynamic rheological experiments confirm the elastic character of the alginate gel, and the gel modulus is shown to be tunable via the irradiation time as well as the PAG and alginate concentrations. The above approach is easily extended to other biopolymers such as pectin. Using this approach, a photoresponse can be imparted to conventional biopolymers without the need for any chemical modification of the molecules. Photoresponsive alginate gels may be useful in creating biomaterials or tissue mimics. As a step toward potential applications, we demonstrate the ability to photopattern a thin film of alginate gel onto a glass substrate under mild conditions.

  16. Biodegradation study of some food packaging biopolymers based on PVA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Elisabeta Tanase

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Polymers are a common choice as protective materials since they combine flexibility, variable sizes and shapes, relatively light weight, stability, resistance to breaking, barrier properties and perceived high-quality image with cost-effectiveness. Currently, mainly non-biodegradable petroleum-based synthetic polymers are used as packaging materials for foods, because of their availability, low cost and functionality. However, biopolymers can be made from renewable resources without the environmental issues of petroleum-based polymers and with the additional advantage of being available from renewable sources or as by-products or waste-products from the food and agriculture industries. The aim of this study was to test some food packaging biopolymers based on PVA. In this respect, some biopolymers for food packaging applications were subjected to biodegradation tests by covering the tested samples with soil. The samples were incubated in known temperature and humidity conditions. The experiment lasted 45 days, after that the samples were washed, weighed and the biodegradation degree was calculated. The obtained results shows that PVA is a promising material for food packaging usage, as it is made from renewable resources and it is environmentally friendly.

  17. Characterization of functional biopolymers under various external stimuli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maleki, Atoosa

    2008-07-01

    Polymers are large molecules composed of repeating structural units connected by covalent chemical bonds. Biopolymers are a class of polymers produced by living organisms, which exhibit both biocompatible and biodegradable properties. The behavior of a biopolymer in solution is strongly dependent on the chemical and physical structure of the polymer chain, as well as external environmental conditions. To improve biopolymers in the direction of higher performance and better functionality, understanding of their physicochemical behavior and their response to external stimuli are of great importance. Rheology, rheo-small angle light scattering, dynamic light scattering, small angle neutron scattering, and asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation were utilized in this thesis to investigate the properties of hydroxyethyl cellulose and its hydrophobically modified analogue, as well as dextran, hyaluronan, and mucin under different conditions such as temperature, solvent, mechanical stress and strain, and radiation. Different novel hydrogels were prepared by using various chemical cross-linking agents. Specific features of these macromolecules provide them to be used as 'functional' materials, e.g., sensors, actuators, personal care products, enhanced oil recovery, and controlled drug delivery systems (author)

  18. Investigation on the biomimetic influence of biopolymers on calcium phosphate precipitation-Part 1: Alginate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira de Lima, Daniel; Gomes Aimoli, Cassiano [Faculdade de Engenharia Quimica, Unicamp, CP6066 CEP13083-970, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Beppu, Marisa Masumi, E-mail: beppu@feq.unicamp.br [Faculdade de Engenharia Quimica, Unicamp, CP6066 CEP13083-970, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2009-05-05

    The understanding of how macromocules act in precipitation of inorganic phases is the key knowledge that is needed to establish the foundation to mimic nature and produce materials with high mechanical modulus besides outstanding optical and thermal properties. This study investigated how addition of small amounts of alginate (7-70 ppm), that presents many carboxylic groups, affects phase distribution and morphology of calcium phosphates, obtained through precipitation and further submitted to calcination and sintering. The results lead to the conclusion that alginate action is dynamic, where alginate molecules act as templates to nucleation, and most of the biopolymer remains in solution even when all calcium phosphate has precipitated. However, despite the effect on phase composition being mainly related to the system's kinetics, alginate does present thermodynamic interaction with the precipitates. It is probable that it acts by reducing the free energy of nucleation, as in heterogeneous nucleation processes.

  19. A review of semi-synthetic biopolymer complexes: modified polysaccharide nano-carriers for enhancement of oral drug bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sithole, Mduduzi N; Choonara, Yahya E; du Toit, Lisa C; Kumar, Pradeep; Pillay, Viness

    2017-03-01

    Semi-synthetic biopolymer complexes (SSBCs) have potential as nano-carriers for oral drug delivery due to their exceptional properties obtained by merging the properties of synthetic (e.g. good thermal and mechanical properties) with natural polymers (e.g. biocompatibility); thus, forming a new class of biopolymer materials incorporating the best of both worlds. Despite development in drug delivery systems, oral administration of therapeutic agent is still preferred. Several nano-polymeric systems has been prepared and characterized based on both synthetic polymers and natural polymers, each with its limitations and advantages. Among natural polymers, alginate, chitosan, and hyaluronic acid (HA) have been studied broadly for the fabrication of nanoparticles systems. This review discusses a newly investigated class of polymer called SSBCs as oral drug nano-carriers. It also discusses certain significant structural and functional attributes or effects which are essential to be taken into consideration when an oral drug delivery system is developed. The review is aimed at describing complexation of few natural polymers (e.g. polysaccharides) with selected synthetic polymers or synthetic chemicals to indicate some of the factors that influence preparation, solubility, formation, and stability of these SSBCs.

  20. The effect of gamma-radiation on biodegradability of natural FIBER/PP-HMSPP foams: A study of thermal stability and biodegradability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardoso, Elizabeth C.L.; Scagliusi, Sandra R.; Lugao, Ademar B., E-mail: eclcardo@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    This research was carried out to evaluate how gamma-radiation affected PP/HMSPP structural foams reinforced with sugarcane bagasse, in terms of thermal properties, biodegradability and infrared spectrum. Polymers are used in various applications and in different industrial areas providing enormous quantities of wastes in environment, contributing with 20 to 30% of total volume of solid residues. Besides, shortage of plastics resins obtained from oil and natural gas is addressing research and development toward alternative materials; environmental concerning in litter reduction is being directed to renewable polymers for manufacturing of polymeric foams. Biodegradable polymers, a new generation of polymers produced from various natural resources, environmentally safe and friendly, can contribute for pollution reduction, at a low cost. High density structural foams are specially used in civil construction, in replacement of metals, woods and concrete, but contribute for environmental pollution, due to components nature. In this study, it was incorporated sugarcane bagasse in PP/HMSPP polymeric matrix blends. Gamma radiation applied at 50, 100, 150, 200 and 500 kGy doses showed effective for biodegradability induction. TGA analyses pointed toward stability around 205 deg C; decomposition of both cellulose and hemicellulose took place at 310 deg C and above, whereas the degradation of reinforced fibers composites took place above 430 deg C. Infrared spectrum of foams were studied using FTIR, showing no sensitivity to the presence of C = C and C =O functional groups. (author)

  1. natural

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elías Gómez Macías

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Partiendo de óxido de magnesio comercial se preparó una suspensión acuosa, la cual se secó y calcinó para conferirle estabilidad térmica. El material, tanto fresco como usado, se caracterizó mediante DRX, área superficial BET y SEM-EPMA. El catalizador mostró una matriz de MgO tipo periclasa con CaO en la superficie. Las pruebas de actividad catalítica se efectuaron en lecho fijo empacado con partículas obtenidas mediante prensado, trituración y clasificación del material. El flujo de reactivos consistió en mezclas gas natural-aire por debajo del límite inferior de inflamabilidad. Para diferentes flujos y temperaturas de entrada de la mezcla reactiva, se midieron las concentraciones de CH4, CO2 y CO en los gases de combustión con un analizador de gases tipo infrarrojo no dispersivo (NDIR. Para alcanzar conversión total de metano se requirió aumentar la temperatura de entrada al lecho a medida que se incrementó el flujo de gases reaccionantes. Los resultados obtenidos permiten desarrollar un sistema de combustión catalítica de bajo costo con un material térmicamente estable, que promueva la alta eficiencia en la combustión de gas natural y elimine los problemas de estabilidad, seguridad y de impacto ambiental negativo inherentes a los procesos de combustión térmica convencional.

  2. NATURAL POLYMERS: CELLULOSE, CHITIN, CHITOSAN, GELATIN, STARCH, CARRAGEENAN, XYLAN AND DEXTRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Zohra Benabid

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Biopolymers have been investigated for drug fields. They are widely being studied because of their non-toxic and biocompatible in nature. Biopolymers are used in industries as diverse as paper, plastics, food, textiles, pharmaceuticals, and cosmetics.This review covers different natural polymers, recent techniques applied in their processing and characterization. Advanced applications of natural polymers, including chitin, chitosan, alginate, etc., are discussed.

  3. Introduction of soft X-ray spectromicroscopy as an advanced technique for plant biopolymers research.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chithra Karunakaran

    Full Text Available Soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy coupled with nano-scale microscopy has been widely used in material science, environmental science, and physical sciences. In this work, the advantages of soft X-ray absorption spectromicroscopy for plant biopolymer research were demonstrated by determining the chemical sensitivity of the technique to identify common plant biopolymers and to map the distributions of biopolymers in plant samples. The chemical sensitivity of soft X-ray spectroscopy to study biopolymers was determined by recording the spectra of common plant biopolymers using soft X-ray and Fourier Transform mid Infrared (FT-IR spectroscopy techniques. The soft X-ray spectra of lignin, cellulose, and polygalacturonic acid have distinct spectral features. However, there were no distinct differences between cellulose and hemicellulose spectra. Mid infrared spectra of all biopolymers were unique and there were differences between the spectra of water soluble and insoluble xylans. The advantage of nano-scale spatial resolution exploited using soft X-ray spectromicroscopy for plant biopolymer research was demonstrated by mapping plant cell wall biopolymers in a lentil stem section and compared with the FT-IR spectromicroscopy data from the same sample. The soft X-ray spectromicroscopy enables mapping of biopolymers at the sub-cellular (~30 nm resolution whereas, the limited spatial resolution in the micron scale range in the FT-IR spectromicroscopy made it difficult to identify the localized distribution of biopolymers. The advantages and limitations of soft X-ray and FT-IR spectromicroscopy techniques for biopolymer research are also discussed.

  4. Introduction of soft X-ray spectromicroscopy as an advanced technique for plant biopolymers research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunakaran, Chithra; Christensen, Colleen R; Gaillard, Cedric; Lahlali, Rachid; Blair, Lisa M; Perumal, Vijayan; Miller, Shea S; Hitchcock, Adam P

    2015-01-01

    Soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy coupled with nano-scale microscopy has been widely used in material science, environmental science, and physical sciences. In this work, the advantages of soft X-ray absorption spectromicroscopy for plant biopolymer research were demonstrated by determining the chemical sensitivity of the technique to identify common plant biopolymers and to map the distributions of biopolymers in plant samples. The chemical sensitivity of soft X-ray spectroscopy to study biopolymers was determined by recording the spectra of common plant biopolymers using soft X-ray and Fourier Transform mid Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy techniques. The soft X-ray spectra of lignin, cellulose, and polygalacturonic acid have distinct spectral features. However, there were no distinct differences between cellulose and hemicellulose spectra. Mid infrared spectra of all biopolymers were unique and there were differences between the spectra of water soluble and insoluble xylans. The advantage of nano-scale spatial resolution exploited using soft X-ray spectromicroscopy for plant biopolymer research was demonstrated by mapping plant cell wall biopolymers in a lentil stem section and compared with the FT-IR spectromicroscopy data from the same sample. The soft X-ray spectromicroscopy enables mapping of biopolymers at the sub-cellular (~30 nm) resolution whereas, the limited spatial resolution in the micron scale range in the FT-IR spectromicroscopy made it difficult to identify the localized distribution of biopolymers. The advantages and limitations of soft X-ray and FT-IR spectromicroscopy techniques for biopolymer research are also discussed.

  5. Introduction of Soft X-Ray Spectromicroscopy as an Advanced Technique for Plant Biopolymers Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunakaran, Chithra; Christensen, Colleen R.; Gaillard, Cedric; Lahlali, Rachid; Blair, Lisa M.; Perumal, Vijayan; Miller, Shea S.; Hitchcock, Adam P.

    2015-01-01

    Soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy coupled with nano-scale microscopy has been widely used in material science, environmental science, and physical sciences. In this work, the advantages of soft X-ray absorption spectromicroscopy for plant biopolymer research were demonstrated by determining the chemical sensitivity of the technique to identify common plant biopolymers and to map the distributions of biopolymers in plant samples. The chemical sensitivity of soft X-ray spectroscopy to study biopolymers was determined by recording the spectra of common plant biopolymers using soft X-ray and Fourier Transform mid Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy techniques. The soft X-ray spectra of lignin, cellulose, and polygalacturonic acid have distinct spectral features. However, there were no distinct differences between cellulose and hemicellulose spectra. Mid infrared spectra of all biopolymers were unique and there were differences between the spectra of water soluble and insoluble xylans. The advantage of nano-scale spatial resolution exploited using soft X-ray spectromicroscopy for plant biopolymer research was demonstrated by mapping plant cell wall biopolymers in a lentil stem section and compared with the FT-IR spectromicroscopy data from the same sample. The soft X-ray spectromicroscopy enables mapping of biopolymers at the sub-cellular (~30 nm) resolution whereas, the limited spatial resolution in the micron scale range in the FT-IR spectromicroscopy made it difficult to identify the localized distribution of biopolymers. The advantages and limitations of soft X-ray and FT-IR spectromicroscopy techniques for biopolymer research are also discussed. PMID:25811457

  6. ''Green'' Biopolymers for Improved Decontamination of Metals from Surfaces: Sorptive Characterization and Coating Properties.. Annual report to be submitted to DOE Program Managers for posting on web page.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davison, BH

    2001-06-15

    The proposed research aims to develop a fundamental understanding of important biological and physical chemical parameters for effective decontamination of metal surfaces using environmentally benign aqueous-based biopolymer solutions. Understanding how heavy metal-chelating biopolymers coat and interact with contaminated surfaces will benefit the development of novel, safe, easy-to-apply decontamination methodologies for removal of radionuclides and heavy metals. The benefits of these methodologies will include the following: decreased exposure hazards for workers; decreased secondary waste generation; increased efficiency of decontamination; positive public appeal and development of novel, nature-friendly business opportunities; and lower cost of cleanup to the government.

  7. Chemical composition and molecular structure of polysaccharide-protein biopolymer from Durio zibethinus seed: extraction and purification process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amid Bahareh

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The biological functions of natural biopolymers from plant sources depend on their chemical composition and molecular structure. In addition, the extraction and further processing conditions significantly influence the chemical and molecular structure of the plant biopolymer. The main objective of the present study was to characterize the chemical and molecular structure of a natural biopolymer from Durio zibethinus seed. A size-exclusion chromatography coupled to multi angle laser light-scattering (SEC-MALS was applied to analyze the molecular weight (Mw, number average molecular weight (Mn, and polydispersity index (Mw/Mn. Results The most abundant monosaccharide in the carbohydrate composition of durian seed gum were galactose (48.6-59.9%, glucose (37.1-45.1%, arabinose (0.58-3.41%, and xylose (0.3-3.21%. The predominant fatty acid of the lipid fraction from the durian seed gum were palmitic acid (C16:0, palmitoleic acid (C16:1, stearic acid (C18:0, oleic acid (C18:1, linoleic acid (C18:2, and linolenic acid (C18:2. The most abundant amino acids of durian seed gum were: leucine (30.9-37.3%, lysine (6.04-8.36%, aspartic acid (6.10-7.19%, glycine (6.07-7.42%, alanine (5.24-6.14%, glutamic acid (5.57-7.09%, valine (4.5-5.50%, proline (3.87-4.81%, serine (4.39-5.18%, threonine (3.44-6.50%, isoleucine (3.30-4.07%, and phenylalanine (3.11-9.04%. Conclusion The presence of essential amino acids in the chemical structure of durian seed gum reinforces its nutritional value.

  8. Soft matter strategies for controlling food texture: formation of hydrogel particles by biopolymer complex coacervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bi-cheng; Degner, Brian; McClements, David Julian

    2014-11-19

    Soft matter physics principles can be used to address important problems in the food industry. Starch granules are widely used in foods to create desirable textural attributes, but high levels of digestible starch may pose a risk of diabetes. Consequently, there is a need to find healthier replacements for starch granules. The objective of this research was to create hydrogel particles from protein and dietary fiber with similar dimensions and functional attributes as starch granules. Hydrogel particles were formed by mixing gelatin (0.5 wt%) with pectin (0 to 0.2 wt%) at pH values above the isoelectric point of the gelatin (pH 9, 30 °C). When the pH was adjusted to pH 5, the biopolymer mixture spontaneously formed micron-sized particles due to electrostatic attraction of cationic gelatin with anionic pectin through complex coacervation. Differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy showed that the hydrogel particles were translucent and spheroid, and that their dimensions were determined by pectin concentration. At 0.01 wt% pectin, hydrogel particles with similar dimensions to swollen starch granules (D3,2 ≈ 23 µm) were formed. The resulting hydrogel suspensions had similar appearances to starch pastes and could be made to have similar textural attributes (yield stress and shear viscosity) by adjusting the effective hydrogel particle concentration. These hydrogel particles may therefore be used to improve the texture of reduced-calorie foods and thereby help tackle obesity and diabetes.

  9. The Impact of Invasive Earthworm Activity on Biopolymer Character of ýDecayed Litter ý

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filley, T.; Crow, S.; Johnston, C.; McCormick, M.; Szlavecz, K.

    2007-12-01

    Over the last 400-500 years invasive European earthworm populations have ýmoved steadily into North American forests either previously devoid of ýearthworms or that contained their own native populations. This has profound ýimpacts upon litter decay and soil organic matter dynamics. To determine the ýimpact of earthworm activity on the biopolymer and stable isotope chemistry of ýlitter residues and the nature of organic carbon moved to the soil profile we ýanalyzed tulip poplar leaves from a multi-year addition experiment in open ýsurface decay litter and litter bag decay experiments, as well as the associated ýsoils among forest plots that varied in non-native earthworm density and ýbiomass. The chemical alteration of biopolymers was tracked with FTIR ýspectroscopy, 13C-TMAH thermochemolysis, alkaline CuO extraction, and stable ýisotope mass spectrometry. Earthworm activity resulted in residues and soil ýparticulate organic matter depleted in cuticular aliphatic components and ýpolyphenols but highly enriched in ether-linked lignin with respect to initial litter ýmaterial. Decay in low earthworm abundance plots, as well as all experiments ýwith earthworm-excluding litter bags, resulted in enrichment in cutin aliphatics ýand only minor increases in ether linked lignin phenols which was also reflected ýin the soils below the amendments. Additionally, the stable carbon and nitrogen ýisotope composition of tulip poplar residues became isotopically distinct. The ýresults from litter bag decays were only reflective of the chemistry at sites with ývery low earthworm abundances. ý

  10. Helix-like biopolymers can act as dampers of force for bacteria in flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakrisson, Johan; Wiklund, Krister; Axner, Ove; Andersson, Magnus

    2012-06-01

    Biopolymers are vital structures for many living organisms; for a variety of bacteria, adhesion polymers play a crucial role for the initiation of colonization. Some bacteria express, on their surface, attachment organelles (pili) that comprise subunits formed into stiff helix-like structures that possess unique biomechanical properties. These helix-like structures possess a high degree of flexibility that gives the biopolymers a unique extendibility. This has been considered beneficial for piliated bacteria adhering to host surfaces in the presence of a fluid flow. We show in this work that helix-like pili have the ability to act as efficient dampers of force that can, for a limited time, lower the load on the force-mediating adhesin-receptor bond on the tip of an individual pilus. The model presented is applied to bacteria adhering with a single pilus of either of the two most common types expressed by uropathogenic Escherichia coli, P or type 1 pili, subjected to realistic flows. The results indicate that for moderate flows (~25 mm/s) the force experienced by the adhesin-receptor interaction at the tip of the pilus can be reduced by a factor of ~6 and ~4, respectively. The uncoiling ability provides a bacterium with a "go with the flow" possibility that acts as a damping. It is surmised that this can be an important factor for the initial part of the adhesion process, in particular in turbulent flows, and thereby be of use for bacteria in their striving to survive a natural defense such as fluid rinsing actions.

  11. The wear of two orthopaedic biopolymers against each other.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, T J

    2005-01-01

    The potential for all-polymer prostheses has not been widely investigated. It might be expected that the wear of such biomaterial combinations would be excessive, but an in vivo study of all polymer knee prostheses reported that there were no failures due to wear, even after ten years of clinical use. This design of knee prosthesis used polyacetal and ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) as the biopolymers. Similarly, an earlier in vitro study of polyacetal and UHMWPE hip prostheses indicated lower wear than for a cobalt chrome and UHMWPE combination. Therefore this study set out to test the poly-acetal and UHMWPE combination in a wear screening rig which had previously been validated against clinical data for artificial hip joints. Two different motion conditions were applied to the test samples and each biopolymer was tested as both pin and plate. Interestingly it was found that, whatever the contribution from pin or plate, the total mean wear factors were 1.5 10 -6 mm 3/Nm under reciprocation-only, and 4.1 10 -6 mm 3 /Nm under multi-directional motion. These wear factors were greater than those found when a conventional metal-on-UHMWPE couple was tested under the same loading, motion and lu-bricant conditions. A comparison was also undertaken with the wear of other orthopaedic biopolymer combinations, namely cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) against itself, and UHMWPE against itself. The XLPE pairing showed somewhat lower wear than the polyacetal and UHMWPE couple, while the UHMWPE pairing showed the highest wear of all, approximately an or-der of magnitude greater than the polyacetal and UHMWPE combination.

  12. Patterning surface by site selective capture of biopolymer hydrogel beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyomard-Lack, Aurélie; Moreau, Céline; Delorme, Nicolas; Marquis, Mélanie; Fang, Aiping; Bardeau, Jean-François; Cathala, Bernard

    2012-06-01

    This communication describes the fabrication of microstructured biopolymer surfaces by the site-selective capture of pectin hydrogel beads. A positively charged surface consisting of poly-L-lysine (PLL) was subjected to site-selective enzymatic degradation using patterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stamps covalently modified with trypsin, according to the recently described method. The patterned surface was used to capture ionically cross-linked pectin beads. The desired patterning of the hydrogel surfaces was generated by site-selective immobilization of these pectin beads. The ability of the hydrogels to be dried and swollen in water was assessed.

  13. Quantized biopolymer translocation through nanopores: departure from simple scaling

    CERN Document Server

    Melchionna, Simone; Fyta, Maria; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Succi, Sauro

    2009-01-01

    We discuss multiscale simulations of long biopolymer translocation through wide nanopores that can accommodate multiple polymer strands. The simulations provide clear evidence of folding quantization, namely, the translocation proceeds through multi-folded configurations characterized by a well-defined integer number of folds. As a consequence, the translocation time acquires a dependence on the average folding number, which results in a deviation from the single-exponent power-law characterizing single-file translocation through narrow pores. The mechanism of folding quantization allows polymers above a threshold length (approximately $1,000$ persistence lengths for double-stranded DNA) to exhibit cooperative behavior and as a result to translocate noticeably faster.

  14. Peptide-based Biopolymers in Biomedicine and Biotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Dominic; Nunalee, Michelle L.; Lim, Dong Woo; Simnick, Andrew J.; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2008-01-01

    Peptides are emerging as a new class of biomaterials due to their unique chemical, physical, and biological properties. The development of peptide-based biomaterials is driven by the convergence of protein engineering and macromolecular self-assembly. This review covers the basic principles, applications, and prospects of peptide-based biomaterials. We focus on both chemically synthesized and genetically encoded peptides, including poly-amino acids, elastin-like polypeptides, silk-like polymers and other biopolymers based on repetitive peptide motifs. Applications of these engineered biomolecules in protein purification, controlled drug delivery, tissue engineering, and biosurface engineering are discussed. PMID:19122836

  15. Fiber degradation potential of natural co-cultures of Neocallimastix frontalis and Methanobrevibacter ruminantium isolated from yaks (Bos grunniens) grazing on the Qinghai Tibetan Plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ya-Qin; Long, Rui-Jun; Yang, Hui; Yang, Hong-Jian; Shen, Xi-Hui; Shi, Rui-Fang; Wang, Zhi-Ye; Du, Jun-Guo; Qi, Xiao-Jin; Ye, Qian-Hong

    2016-06-01

    Several natural anaerobic fungus-methanogen co-cultures have been isolated from rumen and feces source of herbivores with strong fiber degrading ability. In this study, we isolated 7 Neocallimastix with methanogen co-cultures from the rumen of yaks grazing on the Qinghai Tibetan Plateau. Based on morphological characteristics and internal transcribed spacer 1 sequences (ITS1), all the fungi were identified as Neocallimastix frontalis. The co-cultures were confirmed as the one fungus - one methanogen pattern by the PCR-denatured gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) assay. All the methanogens were identified as Methanobrevibacter ruminantium by 16s rRNA gene sequencing. We investigated the biodegrading capacity of the co-culture (N. frontalis + M. ruminantium) Yaktz1 on wheat straw, corn stalk and rice straw in a 7 days-incubation. The in vitro dry matter digestibility (IVDMD), acid detergent fiber digestibility (ADFD) and neural detergent fiber digestibility (NDFD) values of the substrates in the co-culture were significantly higher than those in the mono-culture N. frontalis Yaktz1. The co-culture exhibited high polysaccharide hydrolase (xylanase and FPase) and esterase activities. The xylanase in the co-culture reached the highest activity of 12500 mU/ml on wheat straw at the day 3 of the incubation. At the end of the incubation, 3.00 mmol-3.29 mmol/g dry matter of methane were produced by the co-culture. The co-culture also produced high level of acetate (40.00 mM-45.98 mM) as the end-product during the biodegradation. Interestingly, the N. frontalis Yaktz1 mono-culture produced large amount of lactate (8.27 mM-11.60 mM) and ethanol (163.11 mM-242.14 mM), many times more than those recorded in the previously reported anaerobic fungi. Our data suggests that the (N. frontalis + M. ruminantium) Yaktz1 co-culture and the N. frontalis Yaktz1 mono-culture both have great potentials for different industrial use.

  16. Analysis of the gamma radiation effects in the composite of polyurethane derived from castor oil and natural fibers; Analise dos efeitos da radiacao gama no composito de poliuretano derivado de mamona com serragem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kienen, Victor D.; Todt, Matheus L.; Capellari, Giovanni S.; Azevedo, Elaine C. [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Neto, Salvador C. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IQSC/USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Composite of Polyurethane derived from castor oil and natural fibers are obtained from renewable raw material, low cost, and for not assaulting nature. This paper analyzes the effects of gamma radiation on composite polyurethane derived from castor with sawdust irradiated with gamma radiation of 25 kGy . It was held from 3 tips bending tests and micrograph by scanning electron microscopy. The results indicate that gamma radiation decreases the breakdown voltage and the micrograph of the fracture indicates brittle fracture occurred. (author)

  17. Simulating microbiologically influenced corrosion by depositing extracellular biopolymers on mild steel surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roe, F.L.; Lewandowski, Z.; Funk, T. [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States). Center for Biofilm Engineering

    1996-10-01

    Electrochemical properties of corroding mild steel (MS) surfaces were measured in real time using three closely spaced microelectrodes. Dissolved oxygen, pH, and ion currents were mapped simultaneously and noninvasively above a MS coupon partially coated with biopolymer gels. Calcium alginate (Ca-Alg [an extracellular biopolymer containing carboxylate functional groups]) and agarose (one without carboxylate functional groups) were tested. Corrosion occurred at approximately the same rate under the two biopolymer spots on the same coupon. Corrosion rates under these biopolymers were {approx} 4 mpy in a weak saline solution. Results suggested corrosion was not influenced by chemical properties of the biopolymer but possibly was controlled by oxygen reduction in noncoated regions of the coupon (i.e., a differential aeration cell).

  18. Microfluidic generation and selective degradation of biopolymer-based Janus microbeads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquis, Mélanie; Renard, Denis; Cathala, Bernard

    2012-04-09

    We describe a microfluidic approach for generating Janus microbeads from biopolymer hydrogels. A flow-focusing device was used to emulsify the coflow of aqueous solutions of one or two different biopolymers in an organic phase to synthesize homo or hetero Janus microbeads. Biopolymer gelation was initiated, in the chip, by diffusion-controlled ionic cross-linking of the biopolymers. Pectin-pectin (homo Janus) and, for the first time, pectin-alginate (hetero Janus) microbeads were produced. The efficiency of separation of the two hemispheres, which reflected mixing and convection phenomena, was investigated by confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM) of previously labeled biopolymers. The interface of the hetero Janus structure was clearly defined, whereas that of the homo Janus microbeads was poorly defined. The Janus structure was confirmed by subjecting each microbead hemisphere to specific enzymatic degradation. These new and original microbeads from renewable resources will open up opportunities for studying relationships between combined enzymatic hydrolysis and active compound release.

  19. Agave Americana Leaf Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Hulle

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The growing environmental problems, the problem of waste disposal and the depletion of non-renewable resources have stimulated the use of green materials compatible with the environment to reduce environmental impacts. Therefore, there is a need to design products by using natural resources. Natural fibers seem to be a good alternative since they are abundantly available and there are a number of possibilities to use all the components of a fiber-yielding crop; one such fiber-yielding plant is Agave Americana. The leaves of this plant yield fibers and all the parts of this plant can be utilized in many applications. The “zero-waste” utilization of the plant would enable its production and processing to be translated into a viable and sustainable industry. Agave Americana fibers are characterized by low density, high tenacity and high moisture absorbency in comparison with other leaf fibers. These fibers are long and biodegradable. Therefore, we can look this fiber as a sustainable resource for manufacturing and technical applications. Detailed discussion is carried out on extraction, characterization and applications of Agave Americana fiber in this paper.

  20. 天然纤维增强不饱和聚酯复合材料的界面研究进展%INTERFACIAL RESEARCH DEVELOPMENT OF NATURAL FIBER REINFORCED UNSATURATED POLYESTER COMPOSITES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张慧慧; 崔益华; 王鑫鑫; 谢博

    2011-01-01

    天然纤维具有强度高、环境友好、密度小、成本低等优点,可替代玻璃纤维或碳纤维作为不饱和聚酯树脂的增强材料.由于天然纤维与不饱和聚酯的界面结合较差,复合材料的机械性能不高,通常采取物理或化学的方法对其进行预处理,以提高纤维与基体之间的界面结合强度.本文总结了天然纤维常用的几种表面改性方法及其对不饱和聚酯树脂的增强效果.%Natural fibers have the advantages of high strength, eco-friendly, low density and low cost, which could replace glass fiber or carbon fiber as reinforcement for unsaturated polyester resin (UPR). Because of the weak interface combination between fiber and UPR, the mechanical properties of such composites are not high. The physical and chemical methods are applied to improve the interface combination strength. Some treatments of natural fiber and modification effects for unsaturated polyester resin are reviewed in this study.

  1. Fiber diffraction without fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, H-C; Schwander, P; Uddin, M; Saldin, D K

    2013-06-28

    Postprocessing of diffraction patterns of completely randomly oriented helical particles, as measured, for example, in so-called "diffract-and-destroy" experiments with an x-ray free electron laser can yield "fiber diffraction" patterns expected of fibrous bundles of the particles. This will allow "single-axis alignment" to be performed computationally, thus obviating the need to do this by experimental means such as forming fibers and laser or flow alignment. The structure of such particles may then be found by either iterative phasing methods or standard methods of fiber diffraction.

  2. The influence of Rice Husk Fiber on The Properties of Epoxidized Natural Rubber/Rice Husk Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dahham Omar S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, curing characteristics, tensile and physical properties of epoxidized natural rubber/rice husk (ENR-50/RH compounds were investigated. Different RH loading (10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 Phr and size (fine size at 100-300 μm and coarse size at 5-10 mm were prepared and used. Results indicated that the scorch time (t2 and cure time (t90 became shorter with increasing RH content. In contrast, minimum torque (ML and maximum torque (MH increased with increasing RH content in the rubber compounds. Hardness and crosslink density showed improvement with increasing RH content. Tensile strength (Ts and elongation at break (Eb decreased slightly as RH content increased. However, the fine size of RH recorded better overall properties compared to the RH coarse size at same loading the rubber compound.

  3. Nonlinear viscoelasticity and generalized failure criterion for biopolymer gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divoux, Thibaut; Keshavarz, Bavand; Manneville, Sébastien; McKinley, Gareth

    2016-11-01

    Biopolymer gels display a multiscale microstructure that is responsible for their solid-like properties. Upon external deformation, these soft viscoelastic solids exhibit a generic nonlinear mechanical response characterized by pronounced stress- or strain-stiffening prior to irreversible damage and failure, most often through macroscopic fractures. Here we show on a model acid-induced protein gel that the nonlinear viscoelastic properties of the gel can be described in terms of a 'damping function' which predicts the gel mechanical response quantitatively up to the onset of macroscopic failure. Using a nonlinear integral constitutive equation built upon the experimentally-measured damping function in conjunction with power-law linear viscoelastic response, we derive the form of the stress growth in the gel following the start up of steady shear. We also couple the shear stress response with Bailey's durability criteria for brittle solids in order to predict the critical values of the stress σc and strain γc for failure of the gel, and how they scale with the applied shear rate. This provides a generalized failure criterion for biopolymer gels in a range of different deformation histories. This work was funded by the MIT-France seed fund and by the CNRS PICS-USA scheme (#36939). BK acknowledges financial support from Axalta Coating Systems.

  4. Associative Interactions in Crowded Solutions of Biopolymers Counteract Depletion Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groen, Joost; Foschepoth, David; te Brinke, Esra; Boersma, Arnold J; Imamura, Hiromi; Rivas, Germán; Heus, Hans A; Huck, Wilhelm T S

    2015-10-14

    The cytosol of Escherichia coli is an extremely crowded environment, containing high concentrations of biopolymers which occupy 20-30% of the available volume. Such conditions are expected to yield depletion forces, which strongly promote macromolecular complexation. However, crowded macromolecule solutions, like the cytosol, are very prone to nonspecific associative interactions that can potentially counteract depletion. It remains unclear how the cytosol balances these opposing interactions. We used a FRET-based probe to systematically study depletion in vitro in different crowded environments, including a cytosolic mimic, E. coli lysate. We also studied bundle formation of FtsZ protofilaments under identical crowded conditions as a probe for depletion interactions at much larger overlap volumes of the probe molecule. The FRET probe showed a more compact conformation in synthetic crowding agents, suggesting strong depletion interactions. However, depletion was completely negated in cell lysate and other protein crowding agents, where the FRET probe even occupied slightly more volume. In contrast, bundle formation of FtsZ protofilaments proceeded as readily in E. coli lysate and other protein solutions as in synthetic crowding agents. Our experimental results and model suggest that, in crowded biopolymer solutions, associative interactions counterbalance depletion forces for small macromolecules. Furthermore, the net effects of macromolecular crowding will be dependent on both the size of the macromolecule and its associative interactions with the crowded background.

  5. Assessment of respiration activity and ecotoxicity of composts containing biopolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopeć, Michał; Gondek, Krzysztof; Baran, Agnieszka

    2013-03-01

    The research was conducted to determine if introducing biodegradable polymer materials to the composting process would affect selected biological properties of mature compost. Determination of biological properties of composts composed of testing their respiration activity and toxicity. Respiration activity was measured in material from the composting process by means of OxiTop Control measuring system. The ecotoxicity of composts was estimated by means of a set of biotests composed of three microbiotests using five test organisms. Introduction of polymer materials caused a decrease in respiration activity of mature compost. Similar dependencies as in the case of mass loss were registered. Compost to which a biodegradable polymer with the highest content of starch was added revealed the smallest difference in comparison with organic material composted without polymers. Lower content of starch in a polymer caused lower respiration activity of composts, whereas microorganism vaccine might have accelerated maturing of composts, thus contributing to the smallest respiration of compost. In composts containing biopolymers the following were observed: an increase in germination inhibition--2.5 times, roots growth inhibition--1.8 times, growth inhibition of Heterocypris incongruens--four times and luminescence inhibition of Vibrio fischeri--1.6 times in comparison with the control (compost K1). Composts containing biopolymers were classified as toxicity class III, whereas the compost without polymer addition as class II.

  6. DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION OF PIROXICAM LOADED BIOPOLYMER BASED TRANSDERMAL FILM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulkarni Parthasarathi Keshavarao

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to formulate biopolymer based transdermal film loaded with Piroxicam (PX. Transdermal films were prepared by using sodium locust bean gum (LBG and Sodium alginate (SA as biopolymers by varying the blend ratios by solution casting method. The drug loaded membranes were evaluated for thickness, tensile behaviours, content uniformity; transdermal permeation of PX through rat abdominal skin was determined by Franz diffusion cell. In vitro skin permeation profile of optimized formulation was compared with that of PX conventional gel. Carrageen induced rat paw edema model was used to investigate the in vivo performances. Menthol (3% and glycerin (3% are used as permeation enhancer and plasticizer, respectively. PX was found to be compatible and stable with the prepared formulation as confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and Differential Scanning Calorimetric (DSC, studies. In-vitro release studies revels effectiveness after 24 h when compared with the conventional gel. The film does not show any signs of edema, erythema or ulceration. From the in-vitro skin permeation and anti inflammatory activity data it can be concluded that the developed optimized formulation (F3 has good potential to achieve the transdermal drug delivery of PX for effective therapy.

  7. Permeability Modification Using a Reactive Alkaline-Soluble Biopolymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandra L. Fox; Xina Xie; Greg Bala

    2004-11-01

    Polymer injection has been used in reservoirs to alleviate contrasting permeability zones to enhance oil recovery (EOR). Polymer technology relies mainly on the use of polyacrylamides cross-linked by a hazardous metal or organic. Contemporary polymer plugging has investigated the stimulation of in-situ microorganisms to produce polymers (Jenneman et. al., 2000) and the use of biocatalysts to trigger gelling (Bailey et. al., 2000). The use of biological polymers are advantageous in that they can block high permeability areas, are environmentally friendly, and have potential to form reversible gels without the use of hazardous cross-linkers. Recent efforts have produced a reactive alkaline-soluble biopolymer from Agrobacterium species ATCC # 31749 that gels upon decreasing the pH of the polymeric solution. Microbial polymers are of interest due to their potential cost savings, compared to conventional use of synthetic chemical polymers. Numerous microorganisms are known to produce extracellular polysaccharides. One microbiological polymer of interest is curdlan, â - (1, 3) glucan, which has demonstrated gelling properties by a reduction in pH. The focus of this study was to determine the impact an alkaline-soluble biopolymer can have on sandstone permeability.

  8. The Effect of Modification Methods on the Performance Characteristics of Composites Based on a Linear Low-Density Polyethylene and Natural Hemp Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajaks, J.; Zelca, Z.; Kukle, S.

    2015-11-01

    Influence of the content of hemp fibers (harvested in 2012) and their modification methods (treatment with boiling water, sodium hydroxide, and acetic anhydride) and addition of an interfacial modifier, maleated polyethylene (MAPE), on the performance characteristics (tensile strength, modulus, elongation at break, microhardness, and water resistance) of composites based on a linear low-density polyethylene (LLDPE) was investigated. The results obtained are compared with data found earlier for the same type of hemp fibers, but harvested in 2011. It is shown that optimum content of untreated hemp fibers in the LLDPE matrix is 30 wt.% and optimum length of the fibers is less than 1 mm. An increase in the content of hemp fibers (to 30 wt.%) raised the tensile strength and modulus of the composites, but reduced their elasticity and deformation ability. Simultaneously, the microhardness of the composite materials grew. Pretreating the fibers with sodium hydroxide improved the mechanical properties of the composites only slightly, but treating with acetic anhydride allowed us to elevate the content of the fibers up to 40 and 50 wt.%. The best results were achieved by addition of 50 wt.% MAPE, when the tensile modulus increased by about 47% and the tensile strength by 27% as compared with those of composites with fibers pretreated by other methods. To estimate the processing possibilities of the composites, the melt flow index (MFI) was determined. It is established that the pretreatment of the fibers significantly affects the numerical values of MFI. For example, upon treatment with acetic anhydride, a sufficiently high fluidity of the composites was retained even at a 50 wt.% content of fibers. The lowest fluidity was observed for composites with alkali-pretreated hemp fibers. The surface microhardness decreased upon their chemical pretreatment. The highest microhardness showed composites with 30 wt.% untreated fibers. The chemical pretreatment considerably raised the

  9. Plant Growth and Water Purification of Porous Vegetation Concrete Formed of Blast Furnace Slag, Natural Jute Fiber and Styrene Butadiene Latex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwang-Hee Kim

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to investigate porous vegetation concrete formed using the industrial by-products blast furnace slag powder and blast furnace slag aggregates. We investigated the void ratio, compressive strength, freeze–thaw resistance, plant growth and water purification properties using concretes containing these by-products, natural jute fiber and latex. The target performance was a compressive strength of ≥12 MPa, a void ratio of ≥25% and a residual compressive strength of ≥80% following 100 freeze–thaw cycles. Using these target performance metrics and test results for plant growth and water purification, an optimal mixing ratio was identified. The study characterized the physical and mechanical properties of the optimal mix, and found that the compressive strength decreased compared with the default mix, but that the void ratio and the freeze–thaw resistance increased. When latex was used, the compressive strength, void ratio and freeze–thaw resistance all improved, satisfying the target performance metrics. Vegetation growth tests showed that plant growth was more active when the blast furnace slag aggregate was used. Furthermore, the use of latex was also found to promote vegetation growth, which is attributed to the latex forming a film coating that suppresses leaching of toxic components from the cement. Water purification tests showed no so significant differences between different mixing ratios; however, a comparison of mixes with and without vegetation indicated improved water purification in terms of the total phosphorus content when vegetation had been allowed to grow.

  10. Introduction of Microbial Biopolymers in Soil Treatment for Future Environmentally-Friendly and Sustainable Geotechnical Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilhan Chang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Soil treatment and improvement is commonly performed in the field of geotechnical engineering. Methods and materials to achieve this such as soil stabilization and mixing with cementitious binders have been utilized in engineered soil applications since the beginning of human civilization. Demand for environment-friendly and sustainable alternatives is currently rising. Since cement, the most commonly applied and effective soil treatment material, is responsible for heavy greenhouse gas emissions, alternatives such as geosynthetics, chemical polymers, geopolymers, microbial induction, and biopolymers are being actively studied. This study provides an overall review of the recent applications of biopolymers in geotechnical engineering. Biopolymers are microbially induced polymers that are high-tensile, innocuous, and eco-friendly. Soil–biopolymer interactions and related soil strengthening mechanisms are discussed in the context of recent experimental and microscopic studies. In addition, the economic feasibility of biopolymer implementation in the field is analyzed in comparison to ordinary cement, from environmental perspectives. Findings from this study demonstrate that biopolymers have strong potential to replace cement as a soil treatment material within the context of environment-friendly construction and development. Moreover, continuing research is suggested to ensure performance in terms of practical implementation, reliability, and durability of in situ biopolymer applications for geotechnical engineering purposes.

  11. Influence of non-smooth surface on tribological properties of glass fiber-epoxy resin composite sliding against stainless steel under natural seawater lubrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shaofeng; Gao, Dianrong; Liang, Yingna; Chen, Bo

    2015-11-01

    With the development of bionics, the bionic non-smooth surfaces are introduced to the field of tribology. Although non-smooth surface has been studied widely, the studies of non-smooth surface under the natural seawater lubrication are still very fewer, especially experimental research. The influences of smooth and non-smooth surface on the frictional properties of the glass fiber-epoxy resin composite (GF/EPR) coupled with stainless steel 316L are investigated under natural seawater lubrication in this paper. The tested non-smooth surfaces include the surfaces with semi-spherical pits, the conical pits, the cone-cylinder combined pits, the cylindrical pits and through holes. The friction and wear tests are performed using a ring-on-disc test rig under 60 N load and 1000 r/min rotational speed. The tests results show that GF/EPR with bionic non-smooth surface has quite lower friction coefficient and better wear resistance than GF/EPR with smooth surface without pits. The average friction coefficient of GF/EPR with semi-spherical pits is 0.088, which shows the largest reduction is approximately 63.18% of GF/EPR with smooth surface. In addition, the wear debris on the worn surfaces of GF/EPR are observed by a confocal scanning laser microscope. It is shown that the primary wear mechanism is the abrasive wear. The research results provide some design parameters for non-smooth surface, and the experiment results can serve as a beneficial supplement to non-smooth surface study.

  12. Influence of Non-smooth Surface on Tribological Properties of Glass Fiber-epoxy Resin Composite Sliding against Stainless Steel under Natural Seawater Lubrication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Shaofeng; GAO Dianrong; LIANG Yingna; CHEN Bo

    2015-01-01

    With the development of bionics, the bionic non-smooth surfaces are introduced to the field of tribology. Although non-smooth surface has been studied widely, the studies of non-smooth surface under the natural seawater lubrication are still very fewer, especially experimental research. The influences of smooth and non-smooth surface on the frictional properties of the glass fiber-epoxy resin composite (GF/EPR) coupled with stainless steel 316L are investigated under natural seawater lubrication in this paper. The tested non-smooth surfaces include the surfaces with semi-spherical pits, the conical pits, the cone-cylinder combined pits, the cylindrical pits and through holes. The friction and wear tests are performed using a ring-on-disc test rig under 60 N load and 1000 r/min rotational speed. The tests results show that GF/EPR with bionic non-smooth surface has quite lower friction coefficient and better wear resistance than GF/EPR with smooth surface without pits. The average friction coefficient of GF/EPR with semi-spherical pits is 0.088, which shows the largest reduction is approximately 63.18% of GF/EPR with smooth surface. In addition, the wear debris on the worn surfaces of GF/EPR are observed by a confocal scanning laser microscope. It is shown that the primary wear mechanism is the abrasive wear. The research results provide some design parameters for non-smooth surface, and the experiment results can serve as a beneficial supplement to non-smooth surface study.

  13. 西南桦次生天然林应力木纤维形态分析%Study on Fiber Morphology of Reaction Wood Grown in Secondary Forests of Natural Bethla alnoides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    聂梅凤; 邱坚; 王敏

    2011-01-01

    The Key fiber morphological features including the fiber length, fiber width, cell wall thickness, ratio of length to width, and ratio of cell wall thickness to lumen diameter of reaction wood in secondary Bethla alnoides natural forest stands were determined and analyzed. The results showed that the fiber length of the tension wood was longer than that of the oppression wood, while the fiber width, cell wall thickness and the ratio of cell wall thickness to lumen diameter of the tension wood was smaller than those of the oppression wood. There were great differences in the fiber morphology between the two categories of wood. The fiber length in the two areas of reaction wood was longer, whoae ratio of length to width was larger than 35 while the ratio of ceU wall thickness to lumen diameter was smaller than 1, indicating all of these categories of wood were superior for papermaking.%对西南桦次生天然林中应力木拉应力区和压应力区的纤维长度、纤维宽度、纤维壁厚和壁腔比等纤维形态特征进行测试.结果表明,拉应力区纤维长度大于压应力区,纤维宽度、壁厚、腔径比均小于压应力区,纤维形态差异较大;但拉应力区、压应力区纤维长度均较长,长宽比大于35,腔径比小于1,均属于造纸优等原料.

  14. Applications of micro-SAXS/WAXS to study polymer fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riekel, C. E-mail: riekel@esrf.fr

    2003-01-01

    Instrumentation and selected applications for X-ray microdiffraction experiments on polymer and biopolymer fibers at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) microfocus beamline are reviewed. Combined SAXS/WAXS experiments can be performed on single fibers with a beam size down to about 5 {mu}m. WAXS experiments can be performed down to about 2 {mu}m and in exceptional cases down to 0.1 {mu}m beam size. The instrumental possibilities are demonstrated for the production line of spider silk.

  15. A differential vapor-pressure equipment for investigations of biopolymer interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kim B; Koga, Y.; Westh, Peter

    2002-01-01

    , particularly a "gas-phase titration" routine for changing the cell composition, makes it effective for the investigations of several types of biopolymer interactions. These include isothermal studies of net affinities such as the adsorption of water to proteins or membranes, the preferential interaction...... of biopolymers with the components of a mixed solvent. the partitioning of solutes between a membrane and the aqueous bulk and the weak. specific binding of ligands to macromolecules. Furthermore, a temperature-scanning mode allows real-time elucidation of such interactions at thermally induced conformational...... changes in biopolymers. Selected examples of these applications are presented and discussed....

  16. Biomedical Biopolymers, their Origin and Evolution in Biomedical Sciences: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Preeti; Yadav, Harsh; Shah, Veena Gowri; Shah, Gaurav; Dhaka, Gaurav

    2015-09-01

    Biopolymers provide a plethora of applications in the pharmaceutical and medical applications. A material that can be used for biomedical applications like wound healing, drug delivery and tissue engineering should possess certain properties like biocompatibility, biodegradation to non-toxic products, low antigenicity, high bio-activity, processability to complicated shapes with appropriate porosity, ability to support cell growth and proliferation and appropriate mechanical properties, as well as maintaining mechanical strength. This paper reviews biodegradable biopolymers focusing on their potential in biomedical applications. Biopolymers most commonly used and most abundantly available have been described with focus on the properties relevant to biomedical importance.

  17. A natural fiber composite in a pelagic limestone-chert sequence. The importance of mechanical stratigraphy for fracture type development in carbonate anticlines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petracchini, Lorenzo; Antonellini, Marco; Scrocca, Davide; Billi, Andrea

    2013-04-01

    Thrust fault-related folds in carbonate rocks are characterized by deformation accommodated by different kinds of structures, such as joints, faults, pressure solution seams (PSSs), and deformation bands, which may form at various stages during the folding process. Defining the distribution, orientation, and the type of fold-related structures and understanding the relationships between folding and fracturing is significant both for theoretical and practical purposes. Furthermore, as the deformation related to the folding process influences fluid flow through rocks, identifying the types of structures formed during folding is as important as predicting their geometries. To unravel the relationship between mechanical stratigraphy and folding process, the well-exposed Cingoli anticline (Northern Apennines), has been studied in detail. The Upper Cretaceous-Middle Eocene stratigraphy of the Cingoli anticline is characterized by a pelagic multilayer made up of fine-grained pelagic limestones and, marly limestones, in places alternated with thin continuous chert layers. The presence of several outcrops located in different structural positions of the anticline makes the Cingoli anticline an excellent natural laboratory to investigate relationships between folding, fracturing, and mechanical stratigraphy relative to the structural setting of the fold. The field data collected show that high angle to bedding PSSs, which formed before tilting and during the first stage of folding, are not homogeneously distributed in the pelagic limestones. Generally, high angle to bedding PSSs form in the marly pelagic limestones and they have been observed in several outcrops and in different structural positions except where the marly limestones are inter-bedded with stiffer chert layers. In order to analyse theoretically what observed in the field, we compared the deformation of limestones and chert layers with the deformation acting on fiber composites. In the mechanics of materials

  18. Functional finishing of aminated polyester using biopolymer-based polyelectrolyte microgels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glampedaki, Pelagia; Dutschk, Victoria; Jocic, Dragan; Warmoeskerken, Marijn M C G

    2011-10-01

    This study focuses on a microgel-based functionalization method applicable to polyester textiles for improving their hydrophilicity and/or moisture-management properties, eventually enhancing wear comfort. The method proposed aims at achieving pH-/temperature-controlled wettability of polyester within a physiological pH/temperature range. First, primary amine groups are created on polyester surfaces using ethylenediamine; second, biopolymer-based polyelectrolyte microgels are incorporated using the natural cross-linker genipin. The microgels consist of the pH-responsive natural polysaccharide chitosan and pH/thermoresponsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylic acid) microparticles. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed the microgel presence on polyester surfaces. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed nitrogen concentration, supporting increased microscopy results. Electrokinetic analysis showed that functionalized polyester surfaces have a zero-charge point at pH 6.5, close to the microgel isoelectric point. Dynamic wetting measurements revealed that functionalized polyester has shorter total water absorption time than the reference. This absorption time is also pH dependent, based on dynamic contact angle and micro-roughness measurements, which indicated microgel swelling at different pH values. Furthermore, at 40 °C functionalized polyester has higher vapor transmission rates than the reference, even at high relative humidity. This was attributed to the microgel thermoresponsiveness, which was confirmed through the almost 50% decrease in microparticle size between 20 and 40 °C, as determined by dynamic light scattering measurements.

  19. Recovery of oil from oil-in-water emulsion using biopolymers by adsorptive method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elanchezhiyan, S Sd; Sivasurian, N; Meenakshi, Sankaran

    2014-09-01

    In the present study, it is aimed to identify, a low cost sorbent for the recovery of oil from oil-in-water emulsion using biopolymers such as chitin and chitosan. Chitin has the greater adsorption capacity than chitosan due to its hydrophobic nature. The characterizations of chitin and chitosan were done using FTIR, SEM, EDAX, XRD, TGA and DSC techniques. Under batch equilibrium mode, a systematic study was performed to optimize the various equilibrium parameters viz., contact time, pH, dosage, initial concentration of oil, and temperature. The adsorption process reached equilibrium at 40 min of contact time and the percentage removal of oil was found to be higher (90%) in the acidic medium. The Freundlich and Langmuir models were applied to describe the equilibrium isotherms and the isotherm constants were calculated. Thermodynamic parameters such as ΔG°, ΔH° and ΔS° were calculated to find out the nature of the sorption mechanism. The kinetic studies were investigated with reaction-based and diffusion-based models. The suitable mechanism for the removal of oil has been established.

  20. Current Status and New Perspectives on Chitin and Chitosan as Functional Biopolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philibert, Tuyishime; Lee, Byong H; Fabien, Nsanzabera

    2017-04-01

    The natural biopolymer chitin and its deacetylated product chitosan are found abundantly in nature as structural building blocks and are used in all sectors of human activities like materials science, nutrition, health care, and energy. Far from being fully recognized, these polymers are able to open opportunities for completely novel applications due to their exceptional properties which an economic value is intrinsically entrapped. On a commercial scale, chitosan is mainly obtained from crustacean shells rather than from the fungal and insect sources. Significant efforts have been devoted to commercialize chitosan extracted from fungal and insect sources to completely replace crustacean-derived chitosan. However, the traditional chitin extraction processes are laden with many disadvantages. The present review discusses the potential bioextraction of chitosan from fungal, insect, and crustacean as well as its superior physico-chemical properties. The different aspects of fungal, insects, and crustacean chitosan extraction methods and various parameters having an effect on the yield of chitin and chitosan are discussed in detail. In addition, this review also deals with essential attributes of chitosan for high value-added applications in different fields and highlighted new perspectives on the production of chitin and deacetylated chitosan from different sources with the concomitant reduction of the environmental impact.

  1. Could glutaric acid (GA) replace glutaraldehyde in the preparation of biocompatible biopolymers with high mechanical and thermal properties?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tapas Mitra; G Sailakshmi; A Gnanamani

    2014-01-01

    In the field of natural and/or synthetic polymer preparation and stabilization, glutaraldehyde is the most commonly used cross-linker. Glutaraldehyde is focused by several scientists due its ease of cross-linking ability through the formation of Schiff base type of compound. Though glutaraldehyde cross-linked product has several advantages, the main drawback lies with the toxicity and poor mechanical stability. The poor mechanical strength of glutaraldehyde cross-linked product is due to the bonding pattern (-C=N-) between glutaraldehyde and amine group containing compound, where, there is a large energy barrier to rotation associated with groups joined by double bond. This is the time to search for an alternative cross-linker which will provide a non-toxic and mechanically stable biopolymer material. In order to achieve the requisite property, in the present study, we have chosen glutaric acid (oxidized form of glutaraldehyde) and studied its interaction with chitosan and type-I collagen. The chemistry behind the interaction and the characteristics of the biopolymer material obtained upon cross-linking suggests that non-covalent interactions play a major role in deciding the property of the said materials and its suitability for biomedical applications.

  2. Relevant insight of surface characterization techniques to study covalent grafting of a biopolymer to titanium implant and its acidic resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Almeida, Mélanie; Amalric, Julien; Brunon, Céline; Grosgogeat, Brigitte; Toury, Bérangère

    2015-02-01

    Peri-implant bacterial infections are the main cause of complications in dentistry. Our group has previously proposed the attachment of chitosan on titanium implants via a covalent bond to improve its antibacterial properties while maintaining its biocompatibility. A better knowledge of the coating preparation process allows a better understanding of the bioactive coating in biological conditions. In this work, several relevant characterization techniques were used to assess an implant device during its production phase and its resistance in natural media at different pH. The titanium surface was functionalized with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) followed by grafting of an organic coupling agent; succinic anhydride, able to form two covalent links, with the substrate through a Ti-O-Si bond and the biopolymer through a peptide bond. Each step of the coating synthesis as well as the presence confirmation of the biopolymer on titanium after saliva immersion was followed by FTIR-ATR, SEM, EDS, 3D profilometry, XPS and ToF-SIMS analyses. Results allowed to highlight the efficiency of each step of the process, and to propose a mechanism occurring during the chitosan coating degradation in saliva media at pH 5 and at pH 3.

  3. Xanthan Exopolysaccharide: Cu(2+) Complexes Affected from the pH-Dependent Conformational State; Implications for Environmentally Relevant Biopolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Causse, Benjamin; Spadini, Lorenzo; Sarret, Géraldine; Faure, Adeline; Travelet, Christophe; Madern, Dominique; Delolme, Cécile

    2016-04-05

    The conformational impact of environmental biopolymers on metal sorption was studied through Cu sorption on xanthan. The apparent Cu(2+) complexation constant (logK; Cu(2+) + L(-) ↔ CuL(+)) decreased from 2.9 ± 0.1 at pH 3.5 to 2.5 ± 0.1 at pH 5.5 (ionic strength I = 0.1). This behavior is in apparent contradiction with basic thermodynamics, as usually the higher the pH the more cations bind. Our combined titration, circular dichroism and dynamic light scattering study indicated that the change observed in Cu bond strength relates to a conformational change of the structure of xanthan, which generates more chelating sites at pH 3.5 than at pH 5.5. This hypothesis was validated by the fact that the Cu sorption constants on xanthan were always higher than those measured on a mixture of pyruvic and glucuronic acids (logK = 2.2), which are the two constitutive ligands present in the xanthan monomer. This study shows the role of the structural conformation of natural biopolymers in metal bond strength. This finding may help to better predict the fate of Cu and other metals in acidic environmental settings such as aquatic media affected by acid mine drainage, as well as peats and acidic soils, and to better define optimal conditions for bioremediation processes.

  4. Hemostatic, antibacterial biopolymers from Acacia arabica (Lam.) Willd. and Moringa oleifera (Lam.) as potential wound dressing materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, Monica; Parwani, Laxmi; Sharma, Vinay; Ganguli, Jhuma; Bhatnagar, Ashish

    2013-10-01

    Acacia arabica and Moringa oleifera are credited with a number of medicinal properties. Traditionally gum of Acacia plant is used in the treatment of skin disorders to soothe skin rashes, soreness, inflammation and burns while Moringa seed extracts are known to have antibacterial activity. In the present study the potential of the polymeric component of aqueous extracts of gum acacia (GA) and the seeds of M. oleifera (MSP) in wound management was evaluated. The results revealed that both biopolymers were hemostatic and hasten blood coagulation. They showed shortening of activated partial thromboplastin time and prothrombin time and were non-cytotoxic in nature. Both showed antibacterial activity against organisms known to be involved in wound infections with MIC ranging from 500-600 microg mL(-1) for GA and 300-700 microg mL(-1) for MSP. They were biodegradable and exhibited water absorption capacity in the range of 415 to 935%. The hemostatic character coupled to these properties envisions their potential in preparation of dressings for bleeding and profusely exuding wounds. The biopolymers have been further analysed for their composition by Gas chromatography.

  5. A facile method for processing lignin reinforced chitosan biopolymer microfibres: optimising the fibre mechanical properties through lignin type and concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, K.; Loo, L. S.; Goh, K. L.

    2016-03-01

    A chitosan biopolymer microfibre—reinforced by lignin—has been processed by a wet-spinning method. To optimise the fibre mechanical and structural properties two types of lignin, with molecular weights 28 000 g mol-1 and 60 000 g mol-1, were examined and the chitosan fibre was blended with the respective lignin type at 1, 3, 5, 7 and 8 wt% lignin concentrations. The main effects of lignin type and concentration, as well as the interaction between the two parameters, on the fibre tensile stiffness, extensibility, strength and toughness were evaluated using the two-factor analysis of variance. Significant variations in the respective mechanical properties were observed with varying lignin concentrations (P results were related to the dispersion of lignin in the fibre and the nature of the bonds between lignin and chitosan, based on findings from scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. This new method for the fabrication of chitosan biopolymer microfibre is inexpensive and versatile and could lend itself to the production of high performance biocomposite structures.

  6. Solid-State (13)C NMR Delineates the Architectural Design of Biopolymers in Native and Genetically Altered Tomato Fruit Cuticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Subhasish; Matas, Antonio J; Isaacson, Tal; Kehlet, Cindie; Rose, Jocelyn K C; Stark, Ruth E

    2016-01-11

    Plant cuticles on outer fruit and leaf surfaces are natural macromolecular composites of waxes and polyesters that ensure mechanical integrity and mitigate environmental challenges. They also provide renewable raw materials for cosmetics, packaging, and coatings. To delineate the structural framework and flexibility underlying the versatile functions of cutin biopolymers associated with polysaccharide-rich cell-wall matrices, solid-state NMR spectra and spin relaxation times were measured in a tomato fruit model system, including different developmental stages and surface phenotypes. The hydrophilic-hydrophobic balance of the cutin ensures compatibility with the underlying polysaccharide cell walls; the hydroxy fatty acid structures of outer epidermal cutin also support deposition of hydrophobic waxes and aromatic moieties while promoting the formation of cell-wall cross-links that rigidify and strengthen the cuticle composite during fruit development. Fruit cutin-deficient tomato mutants with compromised microbial resistance exhibit less efficient local and collective biopolymer motions, stiffening their cuticular surfaces and increasing their susceptibility to fracture.

  7. Detecting the Biopolymer Behavior of Graphene Nanoribbons in Aqueous Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijeratne, Sithara S.; Penev, Evgeni S.; Lu, Wei; Li, Jingqiang; Duque, Amanda L.; Yakobson, Boris I.; Tour, James M.; Kiang, Ching-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Graphene nanoribbons (GNR), can be prepared in bulk quantities for large-area applications by reducing the product from the lengthwise oxidative unzipping of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNT). Recently, the biomaterials application of GNR has been explored, for example, in the pore to be used for DNA sequencing. Therefore, understanding the polymer behavior of GNR in solution is essential in predicting GNR interaction with biomaterials. Here, we report experimental studies of the solution-based mechanical properties of GNR and their parent products, graphene oxide nanoribbons (GONR). We used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to study their mechanical properties in solution and showed that GNR and GONR have similar force-extension behavior as in biopolymers such as proteins and DNA. The rigidity increases with reducing chemical functionalities. The similarities in rigidity and tunability between nanoribbons and biomolecules might enable the design and fabrication of GNR-biomimetic interfaces. PMID:27503635

  8. Reconstruction of cellular forces in fibrous biopolymer network

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yunsong; Heizler, Shay; Levine, Herbert

    2016-01-01

    How cells move through 3d extracellular matrix (ECM) is of increasing interest in attempts to understand important biological processes such as cancer metastasis. Just as in motion on 2d surfaces, it is expected that experimental measurements of cell-generated forces will provide valuable information for uncovering the mechanisms of cell migration. Here, we use a lattice-based mechanical model of ECM to study the cellular force reconstruction issue. We conceptually propose an efficient computational scheme to reconstruct cellular forces from the deformation and explore the performance of our scheme in presence of noise, varying marker bead distribution, varying bond stiffnesses and changing cell morphology. Our results show that micromechanical information, rather than merely the bulk rheology of the biopolymer networks, is essential for a precise recovery of cellular forces.

  9. Conjugates of a photoactivated rhodamine with biopolymers for cell staining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitsev, Sergei Yu; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail N; Solovyeva, Daria O; Solovyeva, Valeria V; Rizvanov, Albert A

    2014-01-01

    Conjugates of the photoactivated rhodamine dyes with biopolymers (proteins, polysaccharides, and nucleic acids) are important tools for microscopic investigation of biological tissue. In this study, a precursor of the photoactivated fluorescent dye (PFD) has been successfully used for staining of numerous mammalian cells lines and for conjugate formation with chitosan ("Chitosan-PFD") and histone H1 ("Histone H1.3-PFD"). The intensive fluorescence has been observed after photoactivation of these conjugates inside cells (A431, HaCaT, HEK239, HBL-100, and MDCK). Developed procedures and obtained data are important for further application of novel precursors of fluorescent dyes ("caged" dyes) for microscopic probing of biological objects. Thus, the synthesized "Chitosan-PFD" and "Histone H1-PFD" have been successfully applied in this study for intracellular transport visualization by fluorescent microscopy.

  10. Parallel multiscale modeling of biopolymer dynamics with hydrodynamic correlations

    CERN Document Server

    Fyta, Maria; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Melchionna, Simone; Bernaschi, Massimo; Succi, Sauro

    2007-01-01

    We employ a multiscale approach to model the translocation of biopolymers through nanometer size pores. Our computational scheme combines microscopic Molecular Dynamics (MD) with a mesoscopic Lattice Boltzmann (LB) method for the solvent dynamics, explicitly taking into account the interactions of the molecule with the surrounding fluid. We describe an efficient parallel implementation of the method which exhibits excellent scalability on the Blue Gene platform. We investigate both dynamical and statistical aspects of the translocation process by simulating polymers of various initial configurations and lengths. For a representative molecule size, we explore the effects of important parameters that enter in the simulation, paying particular attention to the strength of the molecule-solvent coupling and of the external electric field which drives the translocation process. Finally, we explore the connection between the generic polymers modeled in the simulation and DNA, for which interesting recent experimenta...

  11. Detecting the Biopolymer Behavior of Graphene Nanoribbons in Aqueous Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijeratne, Sithara S.; Penev, Evgeni S.; Lu, Wei; Li, Jingqiang; Duque, Amanda L.; Yakobson, Boris I.; Tour, James M.; Kiang, Ching-Hwa

    2016-08-01

    Graphene nanoribbons (GNR), can be prepared in bulk quantities for large-area applications by reducing the product from the lengthwise oxidative unzipping of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNT). Recently, the biomaterials application of GNR has been explored, for example, in the pore to be used for DNA sequencing. Therefore, understanding the polymer behavior of GNR in solution is essential in predicting GNR interaction with biomaterials. Here, we report experimental studies of the solution-based mechanical properties of GNR and their parent products, graphene oxide nanoribbons (GONR). We used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to study their mechanical properties in solution and showed that GNR and GONR have similar force-extension behavior as in biopolymers such as proteins and DNA. The rigidity increases with reducing chemical functionalities. The similarities in rigidity and tunability between nanoribbons and biomolecules might enable the design and fabrication of GNR-biomimetic interfaces.

  12. Evolutionary optimization of biopolymers and sequence structure maps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reidys, C.M.; Kopp, S.; Schuster, P. [Institut fuer Molekulare Biotechnologie, Jena (Germany)

    1996-06-01

    Searching for biopolymers having a predefined function is a core problem of biotechnology, biochemistry and pharmacy. On the level of RNA sequences and their corresponding secondary structures we show that this problem can be analyzed mathematically. The strategy will be to study the properties of the RNA sequence to secondary structure mapping that is essential for the understanding of the search process. We show that to each secondary structure s there exists a neutral network consisting of all sequences folding into s. This network can be modeled as a random graph and has the following generic properties: it is dense and has a giant component within the graph of compatible sequences. The neutral network percolates sequence space and any two neutral nets come close in terms of Hamming distance. We investigate the distribution of the orders of neutral nets and show that above a certain threshold the topology of neutral nets allows to find practically all frequent secondary structures.

  13. Stiffening of semiflexible biopolymers and cross-linked networks

    CERN Document Server

    Van Dillen, T; Van der Giessen, E

    2006-01-01

    We study the mechanical stiffening behavior in two-dimensional (2D) cross-linked networks of semiflexible biopolymer filaments under simple shear. Filamental constituents immersed in a fluid undergo thermally excited bending motions. Pulling out these undulations results in an increase in the axial stiffness. We analyze this stiffening behavior of 2D semiflexible filaments in detail: we first investigate the average, {static} force-extension relation by considering the initially present undulated configuration that is pulled straight under a tensile force, and compare this result with the average response in which undulation dynamics is allowed during pulling, as derived earlier by MacKintosh and coworkers. We will show that the resulting mechanical behavior is rather similar, but with the axial stiffness being a factor 2 to 4 larger in the dynamic model. Furthermore, we study the stretching contribution in case of extensible filaments and show that, for 2D filaments, the mechanical response is dominated by {...

  14. LassoProt: server to analyze biopolymers with lassos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabrowski-Tumanski, Pawel; Niemyska, Wanda; Pasznik, Pawel; Sulkowska, Joanna I

    2016-07-01

    The LassoProt server, http://lassoprot.cent.uw.edu.pl/, enables analysis of biopolymers with entangled configurations called lassos. The server offers various ways of visualizing lasso configurations, as well as their time trajectories, with all the results and plots downloadable. Broad spectrum of applications makes LassoProt a useful tool for biologists, biophysicists, chemists, polymer physicists and mathematicians. The server and our methods have been validated on the whole PDB, and the results constitute the database of proteins with complex lassos, supported with basic biological data. This database can serve as a source of information about protein geometry and entanglement-function correlations, as a reference set in protein modeling, and for many other purposes.

  15. Conjugates of a Photoactivated Rhodamine with Biopolymers for Cell Staining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitsev, Sergei Yu.; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail N.; Solovyeva, Daria O.; Solovyeva, Valeria V.; Rizvanov, Albert A.

    2014-01-01

    Conjugates of the photoactivated rhodamine dyes with biopolymers (proteins, polysaccharides, and nucleic acids) are important tools for microscopic investigation of biological tissue. In this study, a precursor of the photoactivated fluorescent dye (PFD) has been successfully used for staining of numerous mammalian cells lines and for conjugate formation with chitosan (“Chitosan-PFD”) and histone H1 (“Histone H1.3-PFD”). The intensive fluorescence has been observed after photoactivation of these conjugates inside cells (A431, HaCaT, HEK239, HBL-100, and MDCK). Developed procedures and obtained data are important for further application of novel precursors of fluorescent dyes (“caged” dyes) for microscopic probing of biological objects. Thus, the synthesized “Chitosan-PFD” and “Histone H1-PFD” have been successfully applied in this study for intracellular transport visualization by fluorescent microscopy. PMID:25383365

  16. Multiscale modeling of biopolymer translocation through a nanopore

    CERN Document Server

    Fyta, M G; Kaxiras, E; Succi, S; Fyta, Maria; Melchionna, Simone; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Succi, Sauro

    2007-01-01

    We employ a multiscale approach to model the translocation of biopolymers through nanometer size pores. Our computational scheme combines microscopic Langevin molecular dynamics (MD) with a mesoscopic lattice Boltzmann (LB) method for the solvent dynamics, explicitly taking into account the interactions of the molecule with the surrounding fluid. Both dynamical and statistical aspects of the translocation process were investigated, by simulating polymers of various initial configurations and lengths. For a representative molecule size, we explore the effects of important parameters that enter in the simulation, paying particular attention to the strength of the molecule-solvent coupling and of the external electric field which drives the translocation process. Finally, we explore the connection between the generic polymers modeled in the simulation and DNA, for which interesting recent experimental results are available.

  17. Topologically ordered magnesium-biopolymer hybrid composite structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosterbeek, Reece N; Seal, Christopher K; Staiger, Mark P; Hyland, Margaret M

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium and its alloys are intriguing as possible biodegradable biomaterials due to their unique combination of biodegradability and high specific mechanical properties. However, uncontrolled biodegradation of magnesium during implantation remains a major challenge in spite of the use of alloying and protective coatings. In this study, a hybrid composite structure of magnesium metal and a biopolymer was fabricated as an alternative approach to control the corrosion rate of magnesium. A multistep process that combines metal foam production and injection molding was developed to create a hybrid composite structure that is topologically ordered in all three dimensions. Preliminary investigations of the mechanical properties and corrosion behavior exhibited by the hybrid Mg-polymer composite structures suggest a new potential approach to the development of Mg-based biomedical devices.

  18. Conjugates of a Photoactivated Rhodamine with Biopolymers for Cell Staining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergei Yu. Zaitsev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Conjugates of the photoactivated rhodamine dyes with biopolymers (proteins, polysaccharides, and nucleic acids are important tools for microscopic investigation of biological tissue. In this study, a precursor of the photoactivated fluorescent dye (PFD has been successfully used for staining of numerous mammalian cells lines and for conjugate formation with chitosan (“Chitosan-PFD” and histone H1 (“Histone H1.3-PFD”. The intensive fluorescence has been observed after photoactivation of these conjugates inside cells (A431, HaCaT, HEK239, HBL-100, and MDCK. Developed procedures and obtained data are important for further application of novel precursors of fluorescent dyes (“caged” dyes for microscopic probing of biological objects. Thus, the synthesized “Chitosan-PFD” and “Histone H1-PFD” have been successfully applied in this study for intracellular transport visualization by fluorescent microscopy.

  19. Rotating magnetic particle microrheometry in biopolymer fluid dynamics: mucus microrheology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besseris, George J; Yeates, Donovan B

    2007-09-14

    The polymer properties of canine mucus were investigated through the method of rotating magnetic particle microrheometry. Mucus is visualized as a physically entangled biopolymer of low polydispersity in a water-based solution. Mucus was modeled according to the constitutive law of a Doi-Edwards fluid. The magnetic-particle equation of rotational motion is analytically solved in the linear viscoelastic limit rendering theoretical flow profiles which are used to fit the experimental trace signals of the particle remanent-magnetic-field decay. The zero-shear-rate viscosity was found to be 18,000 P and the relaxation time at about 42 s. The molecular weight between entanglements for mucins was estimated at 1.7 MDa rendering an estimation of about seven physical cross-links per molecule. Rheological investigations were extended also to diluted and concentrated rations of the normal mucus simulating the conditions found in more physiological extremes.

  20. Interpretation of fluorescence correlation spectra of biopolymer solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillies, George D J

    2016-05-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is regularly used to study diffusion in non-dilute "crowded" biopolymer solutions, including the interior of living cells. For fluorophores in dilute solution, the relationship between the FCS spectrum G(t) and the diffusion coefficient D is well-established. However, the dilute-solution relationship between G(t) and D has sometimes been used to interpret FCS spectra of fluorophores in non-dilute solutions. Unfortunately, the relationship used to interpret FCS spectra in dilute solutions relies on an assumption that is not always correct in non-dilute solutions. This paper obtains the correct form for interpreting FCS spectra of non-dilute solutions, writing G(t) in terms of the statistical properties of the fluorophore motions. Approaches for applying this form are discussed.