WorldWideScience

Sample records for natural disturbance lead

  1. Modelling natural disturbances in forest ecosystems: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Seidl, Rupert; Fernandes, Paulo M.; Fonseca, Teresa F.; Gillet, François; Jönsson, Anna Maria; Merganičová, Katarína; Netherer, Sigrid; Arpaci, Alexander; Bontemps, Jean-Daniel; Bugmann, Harald

    2011-01-01

    Natural disturbances play a key role in ecosystem dynamics and are important factors for sustainable forest ecosystem management. Quantitative models are frequently employed to tackle the complexities associated with disturbance processes. Here we review the wide variety of approaches to modelling natural disturbances in forest ecosystems, addressing the full spectrum of disturbance modelling from single events to integrated disturbance regimes. We applied a general, process-based framework f...

  2. Finland's leading natural gas company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2000-01-01

    The ownership structure of Finland's leading natural gas company, Gasum, changed fundamentally in 1999, and the company is now no longer a subsidiary of Fortum Corporation. 'Our new strong and broad ownership base will enable us to develop the natural gas business and pipeline network in Finland in response to the requirements of our Finnish customers', says Antero Jaennes, Gasum's Chairman and CEO, who stresses that Gasum is committed to remaining the leading developer of the Finnish natural gas market and the number-one gas supplier. Natural gas usage in Finland in 1999 totalled 3.9 billion m 3 (38.7 TWh), unchanged from 1998. Natural gas accounted for 11% of Finland's total primary energy need, as it did in 1998. The proportion of natural gas used in district heating rose by 2% to 36%, and moved down 2% in power generation to 10%. Industry's use of natural gas fell 1% to 17%. 75% of natural gas was used in combined heat and power (CHP) generation in industry and district heating. In 2000, Gasum expects to sell 4 billion m 3 of natural gas (40 TWh)

  3. Natural disturbance and stand development principles for ecological forestry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerry F. Franklin; Robert J. Mitchell; Brian J. Palik

    2007-01-01

    Foresters use natural disturbances and stand development processes as models for silvicultural practices in broad conceptual ways. Incorporating an understanding of natural disturbance and stand development processes more fully into silvicultural practice is the basis for an ecological forestry approach. Such an approach must include 1) understanding the importance of...

  4. Modelling natural disturbances in forest ecosystems: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seidl, R.; Fernandes, P.M.; Fonseca, T.F.; Gillet, F.; Jöhnsson, A.M.; Merganičová, K.; Netherer, S.; Arpaci, A.; Bontemps, J.D.; Bugmann, H.; González-Olabarria, J.R.; Lasch, P.; Meredieu, C.; Moreira, F.; Schelhaas, M.; Mohren, G.M.J.

    2011-01-01

    Natural disturbances play a key role in ecosystem dynamics and are important factors for sustainable forest ecosystem management. Quantitative models are frequently employed to tackle the complexities associated with disturbance processes. Here we review the wide variety of approaches to modelling

  5. Natural disturbance impacts on Canada's forest carbon budget

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurz, W.

    2004-01-01

    Wildfire and insect outbreaks are major determinants of forest dynamics in Canada, transferring carbon within the ecosystem, releasing carbon into the atmosphere and influencing post-disturbance carbon dynamics. This paper discusses the impacts of global climate change on natural disturbances. Higher temperatures and drier conditions are likely to increase burned areas in Canada and will also increase the impacts of insects, allowing for an expanded range and stressing their host species. Long-term changes in disturbance regimes have already affected Canada's forest age-class structure. Statistics of lower disturbance periods and carbon production were compared with periods of higher disturbance. Scenario analyses were conducted for the period of 1996 to 2032, assuming that annual insect and fire disturbance rates in timber-productive forests were 20 per cent higher and carbon production 20 per cent lower than base scenarios using average disturbance rates. It was concluded that these conditions could cause carbon stocks in Canada's forests to decline. The future carbon balance of Canada's forests will be affected by the rate of natural and human-induced disturbances. 4 refs

  6. Climate change and the future of natural disturbances in the central hardwood region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dale, Virginia H [ORNL; Hughes, M. Joseph [University of Tennessee (UT); Hayes, Daniel J [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    The spatial patterns and ecological processes of the southeastern upland hardwood forests have evolved to reflect past climatic conditions and natural disturbance regimes. Changes in climate can lead to disturbances that exceed their natural range of variation, and the impacts of these changes will depend on the vulnerability or resiliency of these ecosystems. Global Circulation Models generally project annual increases in temperature across the southeastern United States over the coming decades, but changes in precipitation are less consistent. Even more unclear is how climate change might affect future trends in the severity and frequency of natural disturbances, such as severe storms, fires, droughts, floods, and insect outbreaks. Here, we use a time-series satellite data record to map the spatial pattern and severity of broad classes of natural disturbances the southeast region. The data derived from this map allow analysis of regional-scale trends in natural and anthropogenic disturbances in the region over the last three decades. Throughout the region, between 5% and 25% of forest land is affected by some sort of disturbance each year since 1985. The time series reveals periodic droughts that themselves are widespread and of low severity but are associated with more localized, high-severity disturbances such as fire and insect outbreaks. The map also reveals extensive anthropogenic disturbance across the region in the form of forest conversion related to resource extraction and urban and residential development. We discuss how changes in climate and disturbance regimes might affect southeastern forests in the future via altering the exposure, sensitivity and adaptive capacity of these ecosystems. Changes in climate are highly likely to expose southeastern forests to more frequent and severe disturbances, but ultimately how vulnerable or resilient southeastern forests are to these changes will depend on their sensitivity and capacity to adapt to these novel

  7. Similar effects of bottom trawling and natural disturbance on composition and function of benthic communities across habitats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Denderen, van Daniel; Bolam, Stefan G.; Hiddink, Jan Geert; Jennings, Simon; Kenny, Andrew; Rijnsdorp, Adriaan D.; Kooten, Van Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Bottom trawl fishing has widespread impacts on benthic habitats and communities. The benthic response to trawling seems to be smaller or absent in areas exposed to high natural disturbance, leading to the hypothesis that natural and trawl disturbance affect benthic communities in a similar way.

  8. Incorporating effects of natural disturbances in managed ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    John T. Rotenberry; Robert J. Cooper; Joseph M. Wunderle; Kimberley G. Smith

    1993-01-01

    We briefly review the effects of climate (particularly drought and hurricanes), insect outbreaks, and fire on populations of migrant birds. An important feature of all of these natural disturbances is that they occur over a variety of spatial and temporal scales, thus precluding any simple generalization of their effects or of methods for mitigating those effects. We...

  9. Sensitivity of climate mitigation strategies to natural disturbances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Page, Y; Hurtt, G; Thomson, A M; Bond-Lamberty, B; Patel, P; Wise, M; Calvin, K; Kyle, P; Clarke, L; Edmonds, J; Janetos, A

    2013-01-01

    The present and future concentration of atmospheric carbon dioxide depends on both anthropogenic and natural sources and sinks of carbon. Most proposed climate mitigation strategies rely on a progressive transition to carbon-efficient technologies to reduce industrial emissions, substantially supported by policies to maintain or enhance the terrestrial carbon stock in forests and other ecosystems. This strategy may be challenged if terrestrial sequestration capacity is affected by future climate feedbacks, but how and to what extent is little understood. Here, we show that climate mitigation strategies are highly sensitive to future natural disturbance rates (e.g. fires, hurricanes, droughts), because of the potential effect of disturbances on the terrestrial carbon balance. Generally, altered disturbance rates affect the pace of societal and technological transitions required to achieve the mitigation target, with substantial consequences on the energy sector and the global economy. An understanding of the future dynamics and consequences of natural disturbances on terrestrial carbon balance is thus essential for developing robust climate mitigation strategies and policies. (letter)

  10. Animal responses to natural disturbance and climate extremes: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergio, Fabrizio; Blas, Julio; Hiraldo, Fernando

    2018-02-01

    Natural disturbances, such as droughts, fires or hurricanes, are key drivers of ecological heterogeneity and ecosystem function. The frequency and severity of these episodes is unequivocally expected to increase in the coming decades, through the concerted action of climate change and anthropogenic pressures. This will impose severe challenges for many biota through exposure to rapidly changing conditions never experienced in the preceding millennia. Thus, it is urgently needed to gain a thorough understanding of animal responses and adaptations to disturbances in order to better estimate potential future impacts. Here, we review such adjustments and find that animals may respond to disturbances through changes in: (1) behaviour, such as altered mobility, emigration, resource-switching, refuge use, suspended animation, or biotic interactions; (2) life history traits, such as survival, aging, longevity, recruitment, reproductive restraint, breeding output, phenology and bet-hedging tactics; (3) morphology, such as rapid evolution through size-dependent mortality or facultative metamorphosis; (4) physiology, such as altered body condition, pathogen prevalence and transmission, or adrenocortical modulation of stress responses to emergency conditions; (5) genetic structure, such as changes in frequency of polymorphic variants or diversity-modulation through mortality bottlenecks. Individual-level responses scale up to population and community responses, such as altered density, population dynamics, distribution, local extinction and colonization, or assemblage structure and diversity. Overall, disturbances have pervasive effects on individuals, populations and communities of vertebrates and invertebrates of all realms, biomes, continents and ecosystems. Their rapidly increasing incidence and severity will bring unique study opportunities for researchers and novel, unpredictable challenges for managers, while demanding tougher choices and more proactive crisis

  11. Record of Anthropocene pollution sources of lead in disturbed peatlands from Southern Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiałkiewicz-Kozieł, Barbara; De Vleeschouwer, François; Mattielli, Nadine; Fagel, Nathalie; Palowski, Bernard; Pazdur, Anna; Smieja-Król, Beata

    2018-04-01

    The importance of human impacts on Earth has led to the proposal of a new geologic epoch called the Anthropocene. However markers, recognizable in all records, are required to define this period. Here we combine elemental geochemistry with stable lead (Pb) isotopes and mineralogical analyses to decipher the sources of lead in two exploited ombrotrophic peat bogs (Puścizna Mała and Puścizna Krauszowska) from Southern Poland. The most disturbed parts of the cores, distinguished using bulk density and age-depth models (22-45 cm in PM and 22-46 cm in PK), were excluded from the interpretation. The two studied cores record ca. 2000 years of variations in lead accumulation rates and isotopic compositions. In the lowest part of the cores (2nd to 4th century AD for Puścizna Mała and 2nd century BC to 2nd century AD for Puścizna Krauszowska), the 206Pb/207Pb ratios (1.188) are consistent with natural supplies from the erosion of the nearby Tatra Mountains. From the 9th to the 19th century AD, 206Pb/207Pb ratios (1.176-1.179) are similar to the signatures obtained from Polish galena ores. The highest Pb accumulation rates are found around 1950 AD and reflect the primary influence of bituminous coal combustion together with the secondary influence of leaded gasoline. This result agrees with the occurrence and abundance of spheroidal aluminosilicates, an unambiguous marker of human industrial activity and coal burning as well as with the acceleration of Zn, Cd and Fe accumulation rate. Our results provide evidence that similar geochemical patterns exist in both analysed cores despite differences in the history of peatland exploitation. Therefore, given that extra care is taken to identify the disturbed peat layers, exploited peatlands can be used to record past changes in lead isotopic signature during the Anthropocene.

  12. Natural disturbance reduces disease risk in endangered rainforest frog populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roznik, Elizabeth A; Sapsford, Sarah J; Pike, David A; Schwarzkopf, Lin; Alford, Ross A

    2015-08-21

    Natural disturbances can drive disease dynamics in animal populations by altering the microclimates experienced by hosts and their pathogens. Many pathogens are highly sensitive to temperature and moisture, and therefore small changes in habitat structure can alter the microclimate in ways that increase or decrease infection prevalence and intensity in host populations. Here we show that a reduction of rainforest canopy cover caused by a severe tropical cyclone decreased the risk of endangered rainforest frogs (Litoria rheocola) becoming infected by a fungal pathogen (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis). Reductions in canopy cover increased the temperatures and rates of evaporative water loss in frog microhabitats, which reduced B. dendrobatidis infection risk in frogs by an average of 11-28% in cyclone-damaged areas, relative to unaffected areas. Natural disturbances to the rainforest canopy can therefore provide an immediate benefit to frogs by altering the microclimate in ways that reduce infection risk. This could increase host survival and reduce the probability of epidemic disease outbreaks. For amphibian populations under immediate threat from this pathogen, targeted manipulation of canopy cover could increase the availability of warmer, drier microclimates and therefore tip the balance from host extinction to coexistence.

  13. Perceptions of natural disturbance in Tatra National Park, Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Švajda Juraj

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the last decades, natural disturbances in forests including protected areas have intensified. They have the potential to impact visual quality and safety of visitors as well as spread beyond protected area boundaries. While economic and ecological impacts are well studied, there is still a lack of work focused on human dimensions and social aspects. This study examines visitor perceptions towards bark beetle infestation in Tatra National Park, Poland. The findings, based on visitor surveys collected during the summer of 2014, indicate the significance of different factors influencing visitor attitudes towards the bark beetle. Age of visitors and importance of the bark beetle issue for them (based on subjective ratings of importance of bark beetle issue for respondents are the most prominent variables. Also place of origin and environmental worldview were recognized as significantly important variables in accordance with similar studies. Results suggest management implications for park authorities including public relations and environmental education in order to increase knowledge and support for natural disturbance and ecological integrity policies in the national park.

  14. Natural convection in enclosures containing lead-bismuth and lead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzodzo, M.; Cuckovic-Dzodzo, D.

    2001-01-01

    The design of liquid metal reactors such as Encapsulated Nuclear Heat Source (ENHS) which are based predominantly on the flow generated by natural convection effects demands knowledge of velocity and temperature fields, distribution of the local Nusselt numbers and values of the average Nusselt numbers for small coolant velocity regimes. Laminar natural convection in rectangular enclosures with different aspect ratios, containing lead-bismuth and lead is studied numerically in this paper. The numerical model takes into account variable properties of the liquid metals. The developed correlation for average Nusselt numbers is presented. It is concluded that average Nusselt numbers are lower than in 'normal' fluids (air, water and glycerol) for the same values of Rayleigh numbers. However, the heat flux, which can be achieved, is greater due to the high thermal conductivity of liquid metals. Some specific features of the flow fields generated by natural convection in liquid metals are presented. Their consequences on the design of heat exchangers for liquid metals are discussed. An application of the obtained results to the design of a new type of steam generator, which integrates the intermediate heat exchanger and secondary pool functions of the ENHS reactor, is presented. (authors)

  15. Comparison of silvicultural and natural disturbance effects on terrestrial salamanders in northern hardwood forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel J. Hocking; Kimberly J. Babbitt; Mariko. Yamasaki

    2013-01-01

    In forested ecosystems timber harvesting has the potential to emulate natural disturbances, thereby maintaining the natural communities adapted to particular disturbances. We compared the effects of even-aged (clearcut and patch cut) and uneven-aged (group cut, single-tree selection) timber management techniques with natural ice-storm damage and unmanipulated reference...

  16. Forest economics, natural disturbances and the new ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas P. Holmes; Robert J. Huggett; John M. Pye

    2008-01-01

    The major thesis of this chapter is that the economic analysis of forest disturbances will be enhanced by linking economic and ecologic models. Although we only review a limited number of concepts drawn generally from mathematical and empirical ecology, the overarching theme we present is that ecological models of forest disturbance processes are complex and not...

  17. Effects of spatial scale on the perception and assessment of risk of natural disturbance in forested ecosystems: examples from northeastern Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. James Barbour; Miles Hemstrom; Alan Ager; Jane L. Hayes

    2005-01-01

    The perception and measurement of the risk of natural disturbances often varies depending on the spatial and temporal scales over which information is collected or analyzed. This can lead to conflicting conclusions about severity of current or past disturbances or the risk of future ones. Failure to look across scales also complicates local implementation of policies...

  18. Forward and backward evolution of the Calhoun CZO: the effect of natural and anthropogenic disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonetti, S.; Porporato, A. M.

    2017-12-01

    The time evolution of a landscape topography through erosional and depositional mechanisms is modified by both human and natural disturbances. This is particularly evident in the Calhoun Critical Zone Observatory, where decades of land-use resulted in a distinct topography with gullies, interfluves, hillslopes and significantly eroded areas. Understanding the role of different geomorphological processes that led to these conditions is crucial to reconstruct sediment and soil carbon fluxes, predict critical conditions of landscape degradation, and implement strategies of land recovery. To model these dynamics, an analytical theory of the drainage area (which represents a surrogate for water surface runoff responsible for fluvial incision) is used to evolve ridge and valley lines. Furthermore, the coupled dynamics of surface water runoff and landscape evolution is analyzed theoretically and numerically to detect thresholds leading to either stable landscape configurations or critical conditions of land erosion. Observed erosional cycles due to vegetation disturbances are explored and used to predict future evolutions under various levels of anthropogenic disturbance.

  19. Potential increases in natural disturbance rates could offset forest management impacts on ecosystem carbon stocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John B. Bradford; Nicholas R. Jensen; Grant M. Domke; Anthony W. D' Amato

    2013-01-01

    Forested ecosystems contain the majority of the world’s terrestrial carbon, and forest management has implications for regional and global carbon cycling. Carbon stored in forests changes with stand age and is affected by natural disturbance and timber harvesting. We examined how harvesting and disturbance interact to influence forest carbon stocks over the Superior...

  20. Natural disturbances in the European forests in the 19th and 20th centuries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schelhaas, M.J.; Nabuurs, G.J.; Schuck, A.

    2003-01-01

    This paper, based on a literature review, presents a quantitative overview of the role of natural disturbances in European forests from 1850 to 2000. Such an overview provides a basis for modelling the possible impacts of climate change and enables one to assess trends in disturbance regimes in

  1. Impacts of aerosol lead to natural ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murozumi, Masayo; Nakamura, Seiji; Yoshida, Katsumi

    1982-01-01

    Impacts of aerosol lead have changed the concentration and isotopic ratios of the element circulating in remote ecosystems in the Hidaka and Tarumae mountains. Concentrations of lead in successive each 10 years ring veneer of Cercidiphyllum Japonica show that amount of the element residing on the bark and supwood layers has increased by a factor of 2 or more in comparison with that of the core part. The isotopic ratios of lead in the basement rocks and soils under the ecosystems converge to a certain narrow spot along the isochron Iine of the element, and distinguish their geochronogical characteristics from other leads of different sources. In these ecosystems, however, the lead isotopic ratios of materials exposed to the atmosphere are similar to those of foreign and anthropogenic aerosol lead but are evidently dissimilar to those of the rocks and soils. Furthermore, the lead isotopic ratios in yearly ring veneers of Ceridiphyllum Japonica and Ostrya Japonica show a certain differentiation towards the bark from the core, i.e., an approach to those of anthropogenic aerosol lead from those of the basement rocks and soils, as listed in Table 7. The lead burden per hectare in these remote ecosystems has increased to 4 g by the impact of 2 g of aerosol lead. (author)

  2. Introduction to natural disturbances and historic range of variation: type, frequency, severity, and post-disturbance structure in central hardwood forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katie Greenberg; Beverly S. Collins; Henry McNab; Douglas K. Miller; Gary R. Wein

    2015-01-01

    EXCERPT FROM: Natural Disturbances and Historic Range Variation 2015. Throughout the history of upland hardwood forests of the Central Hardwood Region, natural disturbances have been integral to shaping forest structure and composition, and essential in maintaining diverse biotic...

  3. Disturbed sensorimotor and electrophysiological patterns in lead intoxicated rats during development are restored by curcumin I.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hind Benammi

    Full Text Available Lead poisoning is one of the most significant health problem of environmental origin. It is known to cause different damages in the central and peripheral nervous system which could be represented by several neurophysiological and behavioral symptoms. In this study we firstly investigated the effect of lead prenatal exposure in rats to (3g/L, from neonatal to young age, on the motor/sensory performances, excitability of the spinal cord and gaits during development. Then we evaluated neuroprotective effects of curcumin I (Cur I against lead neurotoxicity, by means of grasping and cliff avoidance tests to reveal the impairment of the sensorimotor functions in neonatal rats exposed prenatally to lead. In addition, extracellular recordings of motor output in spinal cord revealed an hyper-excitability of spinal networks in lead treated rats. The frequency of induced fictive locomotion was also increased in treated rats. At the young age, rats exhibited an impaired locomotor gait. All those abnormalities were attenuated by Cur I treatment at a dose of 16g/kg. Based on our finding, Cur I has shown features of a potent chemical compound able to restore the neuronal and the relative locomotor behaviors disturbances induced by lead intoxication. Therefore, this chemical can be recommended as a new therapeutic trial against lead induced neurotoxicity.

  4. Potential increases in natural disturbance rates could offset forest management impacts on ecosystem carbon stocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, John B.; Jensen, Nicholas R.; Domke, Grant M.; D’Amato, Anthony W.

    2013-01-01

    Forested ecosystems contain the majority of the world’s terrestrial carbon, and forest management has implications for regional and global carbon cycling. Carbon stored in forests changes with stand age and is affected by natural disturbance and timber harvesting. We examined how harvesting and disturbance interact to influence forest carbon stocks over the Superior National Forest, in northern Minnesota. Forest inventory data from the USDA Forest Service, Forest Inventory and Analysis program were used to characterize current forest age structure and quantify the relationship between age and carbon stocks for eight forest types. Using these findings, we simulated the impact of alternative management scenarios and natural disturbance rates on forest-wide terrestrial carbon stocks over a 100-year horizon. Under low natural mortality, forest-wide total ecosystem carbon stocks increased when 0% or 40% of planned harvests were implemented; however, the majority of forest-wide carbon stocks decreased with greater harvest levels and elevated disturbance rates. Our results suggest that natural disturbance has the potential to exert stronger influence on forest carbon stocks than timber harvesting activities and that maintaining carbon stocks over the long-term may prove difficult if disturbance frequency increases in response to climate change.

  5. Tourist Activities-Disturbance Factors of Natural Environment in Ciucaș Massif

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luminița Costina SĂFTOIU

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The study outlines how tourism activities can disturb the natural environment in Ciucaș Massif. Methods used are based on bibliographic research and GIS analysis of morphometric features. Results show that the Ciucaș Massif, as one of the most important mountain in central Romania, is made of conglomerates, which lend specific features to topography. Having several natural sights (The Old Ladies Council, The Sphinx of Bratocea, Zăganului Ridge this massif is declared a protected natural area. The geomorphologic processes: compactions, mudflows, the deepening of tourist paths, rills and gully erosion have a negative impact on the landscape and even on the entire environment, causing erosion and loss of soil and vegetation. Also, the increased number of tourist accommodation facilities and 21 marked tourist trails have resulted in shrinking of forest areas, hayfields and pastures.These numerous changes which occur in this mountain area, lead, in time, to radical, irreversible changes and can affect the local economic development.

  6. Natural radiation environment III. [Lead Abstract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gesell, T.F.; Lowder, W.M. (eds.)

    1980-01-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 52 research papers presented at this symposium in April 1978. The major topics in this volume deal with penetrating radiation measurements, radiation surveys and population exposure, radioactivity in the indoor environment, and technologically enhanced natural radioactivity. (KRM)

  7. Using Landsat time series for characterizing forest disturbance dynamics in the coupled human and natural systems of Central Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senf, Cornelius; Pflugmacher, Dirk; Hostert, Patrick; Seidl, Rupert

    2017-08-01

    Remote sensing is a key information source for improving the spatiotemporal understanding of forest ecosystem dynamics. Yet, the mapping and attribution of forest change remains challenging, particularly in areas where a number of interacting disturbance agents simultaneously affect forest development. The forest ecosystems of Central Europe are coupled human and natural systems, with natural and human disturbances affecting forests both individually and in combination. To better understand the complex forest disturbance dynamics in such systems, we utilize 32-year Landsat time series to map forest disturbances in five sites across Austria, the Czech Republic, Germany, Poland, and Slovakia. All sites consisted of a National Park and the surrounding forests, reflecting three management zones of different levels of human influence (managed, protected, strictly protected). This allowed for a comparison of spectral, temporal, and spatial disturbance patterns across a gradient from natural to coupled human and natural disturbances. Disturbance maps achieved overall accuracies ranging from 81% to 93%. Disturbance patches were generally small, with 95% of the disturbances being smaller than 10 ha. Disturbance rates ranged from 0.29% yr -1 to 0.95% yr -1 , and differed substantially among management zones and study sites. Natural disturbances in strictly protected areas were longer in duration (median of 8 years) and slightly less variable in magnitude compared to human-dominated disturbances in managed forests (median duration of 1 year). However, temporal dynamics between natural and human-dominated disturbances showed strong synchrony, suggesting that disturbance peaks are driven by natural events affecting managed and unmanaged areas simultaneously. Our study demonstrates the potential of remote sensing for mapping forest disturbances in coupled human and natural systems, such as the forests of Central Europe. Yet, we also highlight the complexity of such systems in

  8. Performance assessment of static lead-lag feedforward controllers for disturbance rejection in PID control loops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhenpeng; Wang, Jiandong

    2016-09-01

    This paper assesses the performance of feedforward controllers for disturbance rejection in univariate feedback plus feedforward control loops. The structures of feedback and feedforward controllers are confined to proportional-integral-derivative and static-lead-lag forms, respectively, and the effects of feedback controllers are not considered. The integral squared error (ISE) and total squared variation (TSV) are used as performance metrics. A performance index is formulated by comparing the current ISE and TSV metrics to their own lower bounds as performance benchmarks. A controller performance assessment (CPA) method is proposed to calculate the performance index from measurements. The proposed CPA method resolves two critical limitations in the existing CPA methods, in order to be consistent with industrial scenarios. Numerical and experimental examples illustrate the effectiveness of the obtained results. Copyright © 2016 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Discriminating Natural Variation from Legacies of Disturbance in Semi-Arid Forests, Southwestern USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swetnam, T. L.; Lynch, A. M.; Falk, D. A.; Yool, S. R.; Guertin, D. P.

    2014-12-01

    Characterizing differences in existing vegetation driven by natural variation versus disturbance legacies could become a critical component of applied forest management practice with important implications for monitoring ecologic succession and eco-hydrological interactions within the critical zone. Here we characterize variations in aerial LiDAR derived forest structure at individual tree scale in Arizona and New Mexico. Differences in structure result from both topographic and climatological variations and from natural and human related disturbances. We chose a priori undisturbed and disturbed sites that included preservation, development, logging and wildfire as exemplars. We compare two topographic indices, the topographic position index (TPI) and topographic wetness index (TWI), to two local indicators of spatial association (LISA): the Getis-Ord Gi and Anselin's Moran I. We found TPI and TWI correlate well to positive z-scores (tall trees in tall neighborhoods) in undisturbed areas and that disturbed areas are clearly defined by negative z-scores, in some cases better than what is visible from traditional orthophotography and existing GIS maps. These LISA methods also serve as a robust technique for creating like-clustered stands, i.e. common stands used in forest inventory monitoring. This research provides a significant advancement in the ability to (1) quantity variation in forest structure across topographically complex landscapes, (2) identify and map previously unrecorded disturbance locations, and (3) quantify the different impacts of disturbance within the perimeter of a stand or event at ecologically relevant scale.

  10. Size and frequency of natural forest disturbances and the Amazon forest carbon balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    F.D.B. Espirito-Santo; M. Gloor; M. Keller; Y. Malhi; S. Saatchi; B. Nelson; R.C. Oliveira Junior; C. Pereira; J. Lloyd; S. Frolking; M. Palace; Y.E. Shimabukuro; V. Duarte; A. Monteagudo Mendoza; G. Lopez-Gonzalez; T.R. Baker; T.R. Feldpausch; R.J.W. Brienen; G.P. Asner; D.S. Boyd; O.L. Phillips

    2014-01-01

    Forest inventory studies in the Amazon indicate a large terrestrial carbon sink. However, field plots may fail to represent forest mortality processes at landscape-scales of tropical forests. Here we characterize the frequency distribution of disturbance events in natural forests from 0.01 ha to 2,651 ha size throughout Amazonia using a novel...

  11. Restoration of Central-European mountain Norway spruce forest 15 years after natural and anthropogenic disturbance

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nováková, M. H.; Edwards-Jonášová, Magda

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 144, 15 May (2015), s. 120-130 ISSN 0378-1127 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0073 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : Picea abies forest * disturbance * bark beetle * salvage logging * natural regeneration * Herb-layer vegetation Subject RIV: GK - Forestry Impact factor: 2.826, year: 2015

  12. Disturbing forest disturbances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volney, W.J.A.; Hirsch, K.G. [Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Service, Northern Forestry Centre, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2005-10-01

    This paper described the role that disturbances play in maintaining the ecological integrity of Canadian boreal forests. Potential adaptation options to address the challenges that these disturbances present were also examined. Many forest ecosystems need fire for regeneration, while other forests rely on a cool, wet disintegration process driven by insects and commensal fungi feeding on trees to effect renewal. While there are characteristic natural, temporal and spatial patterns to these disturbances, recent work has demonstrated that the disturbances are being perturbed by climatic change that has been compounded by anthropogenic disturbances in forests. Fire influences species composition and age structure, regulates forest insects and diseases, affects nutrient cycling and energy fluxes, and maintains the productivity of different habitats. Longer fire seasons as a result of climatic change will lead to higher intensity fires that may more easily evade initial attacks and become problematic. Fire regimes elevated beyond the range of natural variation will have a dramatic effect on the regional distribution and functioning of forest ecosystems and pose a threat to the safety and prosperity of people. While it was acknowledged that if insect outbreaks were to be controlled on the entire forest estate, the productivity represented by dead wood would be lost, it was suggested that insects such as the forest tent caterpillar and the spruce bud worm may also pose a greater threat as the climate gets warmer and drier. Together with fungal associates, saproxylic arthropods are active in nutrient cycling and ultimately determine the fertility of forest sites. It was suggested that the production of an age class structure and forest mosaic would render the forest landscape less vulnerable to the more negative aspects of climate change on vegetation response. It was concluded that novel management design paradigms are needed to successfully reduce the risk from threats

  13. Peeking at ecosystem stability: making use of a natural disturbance experiment to analyze resistance and resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruelheide, Helge; Luginbühl, Ute

    2009-05-01

    To determine which factors contribute most to the stability of species composition in a beech forest after profound disturbance, we made use of a natural experiment caused by a severe windthrow that occurred at a permanent monitoring site in an old beech forest in Lower Saxony (Germany). The floristic composition was recorded for the succeeding five years after the disturbance and used to derive measures of resistance and resilience for plots as well as for individual species. Due to the existence of previously established randomly distributed permanent plots, we had precise information of the pre-disturbance state, including initial cover of the herb layer, species richness, and species composition. Variables describing the floristic change, resistance, and resilience were derived from correspondence analysis allowing for partitioning the effects of variation among plots from those of temporal change. We asked to which degree these variables could be predicted by pre-disturbance state and disturbance intensity. We found that both the pre-disturbance state and the disturbance intensity were good predictors for floristic change and resistance, while they failed to predict resilience. Among the descriptors of the pre-disturbance state the initial cover of the herb layer turned out to be a useful predictor, which is explained by a high vegetation cover buffering against losses and preventing establishment of newcomers. In contrast, species number neither showed a relationship to floristic change nor to resistance. Putative positive effects of species number on stability according to the insurance hypothesis might have been counterbalanced by a disruption of niche complementarity in species-rich communities. Among the descriptors of disturbance intensity, the loss in canopy cover and the change in photosynthetically active radiation after the storm were equally good predictors for the change in floristic composition and resistance. The analysis of the responses of

  14. Human Disturbance during Early Life Impairs Nestling Growth in Birds Inhabiting a Nature Recreation Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remacha, Carolina; Delgado, Juan Antonio; Bulaic, Mateja; Pérez-Tris, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Nature recreation conflicts with conservation, but its impacts on wildlife are not fully understood. Where recreation is not regulated, visitors to natural areas may gather in large numbers on weekends and holidays. This may increase variance in fitness in wild populations, if individuals whose critical life cycle stages coincide with periods of high human disturbance are at a disadvantage. We studied nestling development of blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus) in a natural area where recreation activities intensify during weekends and other public holidays at picnic and leisure facilities, but not in the surrounding woods. In nests located near recreation facilities, blue tit nestlings that hatched during holidays developed slowly, and fledged with low body mass and poor body condition. However, nestlings that hatched outside of holidays and weekends in these nest boxes developed normally, eventually attaining similar phenotypes as those hatching in the surrounding woods. Within-brood variance in body mass was also higher in broods that began growing during holidays in disturbed areas. Our results show that early disturbance events may have negative consequences for wild birds if they overlap with critical stages of development, unveiling otherwise cryptic impacts of human activities. These new findings may help managers better regulate nature recreation.

  15. Human Disturbance during Early Life Impairs Nestling Growth in Birds Inhabiting a Nature Recreation Area.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Remacha

    Full Text Available Nature recreation conflicts with conservation, but its impacts on wildlife are not fully understood. Where recreation is not regulated, visitors to natural areas may gather in large numbers on weekends and holidays. This may increase variance in fitness in wild populations, if individuals whose critical life cycle stages coincide with periods of high human disturbance are at a disadvantage. We studied nestling development of blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus in a natural area where recreation activities intensify during weekends and other public holidays at picnic and leisure facilities, but not in the surrounding woods. In nests located near recreation facilities, blue tit nestlings that hatched during holidays developed slowly, and fledged with low body mass and poor body condition. However, nestlings that hatched outside of holidays and weekends in these nest boxes developed normally, eventually attaining similar phenotypes as those hatching in the surrounding woods. Within-brood variance in body mass was also higher in broods that began growing during holidays in disturbed areas. Our results show that early disturbance events may have negative consequences for wild birds if they overlap with critical stages of development, unveiling otherwise cryptic impacts of human activities. These new findings may help managers better regulate nature recreation.

  16. Modeling silviculture after natural disturbance to sustain biodiversity in the longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) ecosystem : balancing complexity and implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian J. Palik; Robert J. Mitchell; J. Kevin Hiers

    2002-01-01

    Modeling silviculture after natural disturbance to maintain biodiversity is a popular concept, yet its application remains elusive. We discuss difficulties inherent to this idea, and suggest approaches to facilitate implementation, using longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) as an example. Natural disturbance regimes are spatially and temporally variable. Variability...

  17. The effect of natural disturbances on the risk from hydrogeomorphic hazards under climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheidl, Christian; Thaler, Thomas; Seidl, Rupert; Rammer, Werner; Kohl, Bernhard; Markart, Gerhard

    2017-04-01

    Recent storm events in Austria show once more how floods, sediment transport processes and debris flows constitute a major threat in alpine regions with a high density of population and an increasing spatial development. As protection forests have a major control function on runoff and erosion, they directly affect the risk from such hydrogeomorphic processes. However, research on future climate conditions, with an expected increase of the global average surface temperature of 3-5°C by 2100, compared to the first decade of the 20th century, raises a number of open questions for a sustainable and improved hazard management in mountain forests. For Europe, for instance, a climate-induced increase in forest disturbances like wildfire, wind, and insect's outbreaks is highly likely for the coming decades. Especially in protection forests, future scenarios of such climate induced natural disturbances and their impact on the protective effect remain an unresolved issue. Combining methods from forestry, hydrology and geotechnical engineering our project uses an integral approach to simulate possible effects of natural disturbances on hydrogeomorphic hazards in the perspective of future protection forest developments. With the individual-based forest landscape and disturbance model (iLand) we conduct an ensemble of forest landscape simulations, assessing the impact of future changes in natural disturbance regimes in four selected torrential catchments. These catchments are situated in two different forest growth areas. Drainage rate simulations are based on the conceptual hydrological model (ZEMOKOST), whereas simulations of the effect of forest disturbances on hillslope erosion processes are conducted by the Distributed Hydrology Soil Vegetation Model (DHSVM). Beside process based simulations, we also emphasis to identify the risk perception and adaptive capacity to mitigate a probable loss of protection functions in forests. For this reason, a postal survey among

  18. Similar effects of bottom trawling and natural disturbance on composition and function of benthic communities across habitats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Denderen, Pieter Daniël; Bolam, S.G.; Hiddink, J.G.

    2015-01-01

    communities in similar ways. Both sources of disturbance caused declines in long-living, hard-bodied (exoskeleton) and suspension-feeding organisms. Given these similar impacts, there was no detectable trawling effect on communities exposed to high natural disturbance. Conversely, in 3 out of 5 areas with low...

  19. Emulating natural disturbances for declining late-successional species: A case study of the consequences for Cerulean Warblers (Setophaga cerulea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boves, Than J.; Buehler, David A.; Sheehan, James; Wood, Petra Bohall; Rodewald, Amanda D.; Larkin, Jeffrey L.; Keyser, Patrick D.; Newell, Felicity L.; George, Gregory A.; Bakermans, Marja H.; Evans, Andrea; Beachy, Tiffany A.; McDermott, Molly E.; Perkins, Kelly A.; White, Matthew; Wigley, T. Bently

    2013-01-01

    Forest cover in the eastern United States has increased over the past century and while some late-successional species have benefited from this process as expected, others have experienced population declines. These declines may be in part related to contemporary reductions in small-scale forest interior disturbances such as fire, windthrow, and treefalls. To mitigate the negative impacts of disturbance alteration and suppression on some late-successional species, strategies that emulate natural disturbance regimes are often advocated, but large-scale evaluations of these practices are rare. Here, we assessed the consequences of experimental disturbance (using partial timber harvest) on a severely declining late-successional species, the cerulean warbler (Setophaga cerulea), across the core of its breeding range in the Appalachian Mountains. We measured numerical (density), physiological (body condition), and demographic (age structure and reproduction) responses to three levels of disturbance and explored the potential impacts of disturbance on source-sink dynamics. Breeding densities of warblers increased one to four years after all canopy disturbances (vs. controls) and males occupying territories on treatment plots were in better condition than those on control plots. However, these beneficial effects of disturbance did not correspond to improvements in reproduction; nest success was lower on all treatment plots than on control plots in the southern region and marginally lower on light disturbance plots in the northern region. Our data suggest that only habitats in the southern region acted as sources, and interior disturbances in this region have the potential to create ecological traps at a local scale, but sources when viewed at broader scales. Thus, cerulean warblers would likely benefit from management that strikes a landscape-level balance between emulating natural disturbances in order to attract individuals into areas where current structure is

  20. Wintering Waterbirds and Recreationists in Natural Areas: A Sociological Approach to the Awareness of Bird Disturbance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Corre, Nicolas; Peuziat, Ingrid; Brigand, Louis; Gélinaud, Guillaume; Meur-Férec, Catherine

    2013-10-01

    Disturbance to wintering birds by human recreational activities has become a major concern for managers of many natural areas. Few studies have examined how recreationists perceive their effects on birds, although this impacts their behavior on natural areas. We surveyed 312 users on two coastal ornithological sites in Brittany, France, to investigate their perception of the effects of human activities on wintering birds. The results show that the awareness of environmental issues and knowledge of bird disturbance depends on the socioeconomic characteristics of each user group, both between the two sites and within each site. Results also indicate that, whatever the site and the user group, the vast majority of the respondents (77.6 %) believed that their own presence had no adverse effects on the local bird population. Various arguments were put forward to justify the users' own harmlessness. Objective information on recreationists' awareness of environmental issues, and particularly on their own impact on birds, is important to guide managers in their choice of the most appropriate visitor educational programs. We recommend developing global but also specific educational information for each type of user to raise awareness of their own impact on birds.

  1. Understanding the Spatio-Temporal Response of Coral Reef Fish Communities to Natural Disturbances: Insights from Beta-Diversity Decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamy, Thomas; Legendre, Pierre; Chancerelle, Yannick; Siu, Gilles; Claudet, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how communities respond to natural disturbances is fundamental to assess the mechanisms of ecosystem resistance and resilience. However, ecosystem responses to natural disturbances are rarely monitored both through space and time, while the factors promoting ecosystem stability act at various temporal and spatial scales. Hence, assessing both the spatial and temporal variations in species composition is important to comprehensively explore the effects of natural disturbances. Here, we suggest a framework to better scrutinize the mechanisms underlying community responses to disturbances through both time and space. Our analytical approach is based on beta diversity decomposition into two components, replacement and biomass difference. We illustrate this approach using a 9-year monitoring of coral reef fish communities off Moorea Island (French Polynesia), which encompassed two severe natural disturbances: a crown-of-thorns starfish outbreak and a hurricane. These disturbances triggered a fast logistic decline in coral cover, which suffered a 90% decrease on all reefs. However, we found that the coral reef fish composition remained largely stable through time and space whereas compensatory changes in biomass among species were responsible for most of the temporal fluctuations, as outlined by the overall high contribution of the replacement component to total beta diversity. This suggests that, despite the severity of the two disturbances, fish communities exhibited high resistance and the ability to reorganize their compositions to maintain the same level of total community biomass as before the disturbances. We further investigated the spatial congruence of this pattern and showed that temporal dynamics involved different species across sites; yet, herbivores controlling the proliferation of algae that compete with coral communities were consistently favored. These results suggest that compensatory changes in biomass among species and spatial

  2. The role of natural vegetative disturbance in determining stream reach characteristics in central Idaho and western Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roper, B.B.; Jarvis, B.; Kershner, J.L.

    2007-01-01

    We evaluated the relationship between natural vegetative disturbance and changes in stream habitat and macroinvertebrate metrics within 33 randomly selected minimally managed watersheds in central Idaho and western Montana. Changes in stream reach conditions were related to vegetative disturbance for the time periods from 1985 to 1993 and 1993 to 2000, respectively, at the following three spatial scales; within the stream buffer and less than 1 km from the evaluated reach, within the watershed and within 1 km of the stream reach, and within the watershed. Data for stream reaches were based on field surveys and vegetative disturbance was generated for the watershed above the sampled reach using remotely sensed data and geographical information systems. Large scale (>100 ha) vegetative disturbance was common within the study area. Even though natural vegetative disturbance rates were high, we found that few of the measured attributes were related to the magnitude of vegetative disturbance. The three physical habitat attributes that changed significantly were sinuosity, median particle size, and percentage of undercut bank; each was related to the disturbance in the earlier (1985-1993) time frame. There was a significant relationship between changes in two macroinvertebrate metrics, abundance and percent collectors/filterers, and the magnitude of disturbance during the more recent time period (1993-2000). We did not find a consistent relationship between the location of the disturbance within the watershed and changes in stream conditions. Our findings suggest that natural vegetative disturbance within the northern Rocky Mountains is complex but likely does not result in substantial short-term changes in the characteristics of most stream reaches. ?? 2007 by the Northwest Scientific Association. All rights reserved.

  3. Could Reward-disturbances caused by antipsychotic medication lead to weight gain?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette Ødegaard; Rostrup, Egill; Nørbak-Emig, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND The reward system is known to be central to the regulation of appetite. Further, disturbances of the brain reward system are suggested to play an important role in the development of central psychopathological symptoms in schizophrenia. Antipsychotic medication partly acts by modulating...... the reward system and most antipsychotics cause some degree of weight gain. Recently, a relation between weight gain caused by one week of olanzapine treatment and change in reward signalling was found in healthy volunteers1. To our knowledge there are no previous studies examining how the effect...... of antipsychotic treatment on the reward system relate to weight gain in patients. METHODS 50 antipsychotic-naïve first-episode patients with schizophrenia and 40 healthy controls were included in the study at baseline. 38 patients and 31 healthy controls were re-examined after six weeks where patients were...

  4. Maternal obesity caused by overnutrition exposure leads to reversal learning deficits and striatal disturbance in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Wu

    Full Text Available Maternal obesity caused by overnutrition during pregnancy increases susceptibility to metabolic risks in adulthood, such as obesity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes; however, whether and how it affects the cognitive system associated with the brain remains elusive. Here, we report that pregnant obesity induced by exposure to excessive high fatty or highly palatable food specifically impaired reversal learning, a kind of adaptive behavior, while leaving serum metabolic metrics intact in the offspring of rats, suggesting a much earlier functional and structural defects possibly occurred in the central nervous system than in the metabolic system in the offspring born in unfavorable intrauterine nutritional environment. Mechanically, we found that above mentioned cognitive inflexibility might be associated with significant striatal disturbance including impaired dopamine homeostasis and disrupted leptin signaling in the adult offspring. These collective data add a novel perspective of understanding the adverse postnatal sequelae in central nervous system induced by developmental programming and the related molecular mechanism through which priming of risk for developmental disorders may occur during early life.

  5. Disturbances and structural development of natural forest ecosystems with silvicultural implications, using Douglas-fir forests as an example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.F. Franklin; T.A. Spies; R.V. Pelt; A.B. Carey; D.A. Thornburgh; D.R. Berg; D.B. Lindenmayer; M.E. Harmon; W.S. Keeton; D.C. Shaw; K. Bible; J. Chen

    2002-01-01

    Forest managers need a comprehensive scientific understanding of natural stand development processes when designing silvicultural systems that integrate ecological and economic objectives, including a better appreciation of the nature of disturbance regimes and the biological legacies, such as live trees, snags, and logs, that they leave behind. Most conceptual forest...

  6. An evaluation of neutron nuclear data for natural lead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Gonggui; Zhou Yiming; Wang Shiming

    1990-04-01

    Complete neutron nuclear data for natural lead were evaluated based on both experimental data measured up to December 1985 and theoretical data calculated with program MUP2. The experimental data evaluation is mainly based on CENDL-1, except (n, 2n) cross section, for which there are newly measured data available. The data, in the neutron energy from 10 -5 eV to 20 MeV, contain cross section, angular distributions and energy spectra of secondary neutrons, and are in ENDF/B-4 format

  7. Lead (II) removal from natural soils by enhanced electrokinetic remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altin, Ahmet; Degirmenci, Mustafa

    2005-01-20

    Electrokinetic remediation is a very effective method to remove metal from fine-grained soils having low adsorption and buffering capacity. However, remediation of soil having high alkali and adsorption capacity via the electrokinetic method is a very difficult process. Therefore, enhancement techniques are required for use in these soil types. In this study, the effect of the presence of minerals having high alkali and cation exchange capacity in natural soil polluted with lead (II) was investigated by means of the efficiency of electrokinetic remediation method. Natural soil samples containing clinoptilolite, gypsum and calcite minerals were used in experimental studies. Moreover, a sample containing kaolinite minerals was studied to compare with the results obtained from other samples. Best results for soils bearing alkali and high sorption capacity minerals were obtained upon addition of 3 mol AcH and application of 20 V constant potential after a remediation period of 220 h. In these test conditions, lead (II) removal efficiencies for these samples varied between 60% and 70% up to 0.55 normalized distance. Under the same conditions, removal efficiencies in kaolinite sample varied between 50% and 95% up to 0.9 normalized distance.

  8. Changing Forest Disturbance Regimes and Risk Perceptions in Homer, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney G. F1int

    2007-01-01

    Forest disturbances caused by insects can lead to other disturbances, risks, and changes across landscapes. Evaluating the human dimensions of such disturbances furthers understanding of integrated changes in natural and social systems. This article examines the effects of changing forest disturbance regimes on local risk perceptions and attitudes in Homer, Alaska....

  9. Analysis of natural radionuclides and lead in foods and diets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bueno, Luciana

    1999-01-01

    The main purpose of the present study was to determine the lead-210, polonium-210 and lead concentrations in foods and diets. Consumption of food is generally the main route by which radionuclides can enter the human organism. Precision and accuracy of the methods developed were verifies by the analysis of reference materials from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The method for polonium-210 analysis consisted of sample dissolution by using a microwave digester (open system) employing concentrated nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide, evaporation almost dryness, addition of hydrochloric acid, polonium deposition onto silver disc for six hours and counting by alpha spectrometry. Lead was analysed by atomic absorption technique. After sample dissolution in a microwave digester (using concentrated nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide) and dilution to 50 ml, 20μl of the sample was injected in a pyrolytic graphite furnace - atomic absorption spectrophotometer equipped with Zeeman background correction. The assessment of the contaminants in foods and diets allowed to estimate the intake of these elements and for the radionuclides were also evaluated the radiation doses that the individuals selected were exposed by the food consumption. The effective dose for lead-210 by diets intake ranged from 1.3 to 4.3 μSv/year, corresponding to 25% of the resulting from polonium-210 intake. The dose due to the both natural radionuclides varied from 6.8 to 23.0 μSv/year. These values are in good agreement with the literature data. The value estimated by the United Nations Scientific Committee on Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR, 1993) that is 60 μSv and lower than the dose of 0.02 Sv, limit established by ICRP, 1980. The lead levels found in the majority of the Brazilian foods are in good agreement with the values published by CONAT and FAO/WHO. However, some foods such as bean, potato, papaya, apple and rice present levels above of the recommended values by the Public

  10. Investigation of lead and nickel contaminated natural biofilms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroepfl, K.; Zaray, Gy.; Acs, E.

    2003-01-01

    Total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometric method was developed for elemental analysis of lead and nickel contaminated natural biofilms grown on polycarbonate substrates. The biofilms were grown in the Lake of Velence for 4 weeks and then in the laboratory in contaminated lake water for other 2 weeks. It was established that the accumulation of these bivalent cations were practically the same and in their presence the accumulation of zinc decreased by approximately 20% while the other elements (Ca, K, Fe, Mn, Sr, Ti, Rb) showed smaller changes within the statistical interval. From biological point of view, these two bivalent cations reduced the abundance of the algae, to a similar extent; however, the total biomass production was significantly hampered only by nickel (14%)

  11. Temporal variability of fish larvae assemblages: influence of natural and anthropogenic disturbances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Reynalte-Tataje

    Full Text Available Natural and induced disturbances greatly influence the temporal distribution of ichthyoplankton abundance. This study assesses and compares the temporal variability of fish larvae assemblages in controlled and free environments to determine the influence of environment variables on the main taxa in these systems. The study was conducted at the Chapecó (without dam impact and Ligeiro (with dam impact river mouths, which are located in the upper Uruguay River. Samples were made between October 2001 and March 2004 during three reproductive periods. The larvae assemblages were composed of small and medium-sized Characiformes and Siluriformes. The variation in the distribution of larvae was mainly temporal (>85%. When the three reproductive periods were compared, it was observed in the second period, characterized by a larger water flow and a lower temperature, that there was a reduction in abundance, a lower number of taxa, an absence of stages in post-flexion and a high dissimilarity in larvae assemblage structure. In general, the environmental variables of water flow and temperature most influenced the distribution of egg and larvae abundance. In the studied area, a smaller temporal variability was observed in the structure of larvae assemblages at the sampling sites in the Chapecó River mouth than in in the Ligeiro River mouth under the influence of dams.

  12. Ionospheric disturbances generated by different natural processes and by human activity in Earth plasma environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Blecki

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere subsystem is strongly coupled via the electric field, particle precipitation, heat flows and small scale interaction. Satellites in situ measurements and ground based complex diagnostics can provide comprehensive coverage of both time and geomagnetic place effects. Human activity also can perturb Earth s environment, but few are connected with controlled experiments in the ionosphere and are transient. Most of them are related to industrial activity and have increased in recent years. The most important power sources are broadcasting transmitters, power stations, power lines and heavy industry. At ionospheric altitude some disturbances and physical processes are related to seismic activity, thunderstorm activity and some global changes in the Earth environment such as ozone holes. Various natural and artificial indicators can affect satellite telecommunication quality. The aim of this presentation is to report progress in understanding the physical processes in the ionosphere described above and to assess the application of these considerations to the study of plasma effects on Earth-space and satellite-to-satellite communication.

  13. Integrating natural disturbances and management activities to examine risks and opportunities in the central Oregon landscape analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles A. Hemstrom; James Merzenich; Theresa Burcsu; Janet Ohmann; Ryan Singleton

    2010-01-01

    We used state and transition models to integrate natural disturbances and management activities for a 275 000-ha landscape in the central Oregon Cascades. The landscape consists of a diverse mix of land ownerships, land use allocations, and environments. Three different management scenarios were developed from public input: (1) no management except wildfire suppression...

  14. Natural Products as Leads in Schistosome Drug Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno J. Neves

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis is a neglected parasitic tropical disease that claims around 200,000 human lives every year. Praziquantel (PZQ, the only drug recommended by the World Health Organization for the treatment and control of human schistosomiasis, is now facing the threat of drug resistance, indicating the urgent need for new effective compounds to treat this disease. Therefore, globally, there is renewed interest in natural products (NPs as a starting point for drug discovery and development for schistosomiasis. Recent advances in genomics, proteomics, bioinformatics, and cheminformatics have brought about unprecedented opportunities for the rapid and more cost-effective discovery of new bioactive compounds against neglected tropical diseases. This review highlights the main contributions that NP drug discovery and development have made in the treatment of schistosomiasis and it discusses how integration with virtual screening (VS strategies may contribute to accelerating the development of new schistosomidal leads, especially through the identification of unexplored, biologically active chemical scaffolds and structural optimization of NPs with previously established activity.

  15. Cross-border forest disturbance and the role of natural rubber in mainland Southeast Asia using annual Landsat time series

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grogan, Kenneth; Pflugmacher, Dirk; Hostert, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    ) are there cross border differences in frontier and non-frontier forest disturbance rates between Cambodia and Vietnam, 3) what proportion of disturbances in frontier and non-frontier forests can be accounted for by the impact of rubber plantations, and 4) is there a relationship between global market prices...... rates related to rubber plantation expansion and price fluctuations of natural rubber. This suggests links between localized land cover/use change and international market forces, irrespective of differing political and socioeconomic backgrounds. Our study underlines the value of using dense Landsat...... that this approach can provide accurate forest disturbance maps but that accuracy is affected by forest type. Highest accuracies were found in evergreen forest (90%), with lower accuracies in mixed (80%) and dry-deciduous forest types (83%). Our final map considering all forest types yielded an overall accuracy...

  16. Drop amalgam voltammetric study of lead complexation by natural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study of inorganic complexation of lead using drop amalgam voltammetry is described. The study has been carried out in simulated salt lake water and at ionic strength of 7.35 M, the predetermined ionic strength of Lake Katwe. The complexation of lead with the simple ligands (Cl-, CO32-) created anodic waves and the ...

  17. Neutronic design for a 100MWth Small modular natural circulation lead or lead-alloy cooled fast reactors core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Zhang, H.; Chen, Z.; Zeng, Q.

    2015-01-01

    Lead or lead-alloy cooled fast reactor with good fuel proliferation and nuclear waste transmutation capability, as well as high security and economy, is a great potential for the development of fourth-generation nuclear energy systems. Small natural circulation reactor is an important technical route lead cooled fast reactors industrial applications, which has been chosen as one of the three reference technical for solution lead or lead-alloy cooled fast reactors by GIF lead-cooled fast reactor steering committee. The School of Nuclear Science and Technology of USTC proposed a small 100MW th natural circulation lead cooled fast reactor concept called SNCLFR-100 based realistic technology. This article describes the SNCLFR-100 reactor of the overall technical program, core physics calculation and analysis. The results show that: SNCLFR-100 with good neutronic and safety performance and relevant design parameters meet the security requirements with feasibility. (author)

  18. Effects of Climate and Ecosystem Disturbances on Biogeochemical Cycling in a Semi-Natural Terrestrial Ecosystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beier, Claus; Schmidt, Inger Kappel; Kristensen, Hanne Lakkenborg

    2004-01-01

    The effects of increased temperature and potential ecosystem disturbances on biogeochemical cycling were investigated by manipulation of temperature in a mixed Calluna/grass heathland in Denmark. A reflective curtain covered the vegetation during the night to reduce the heat loss of IR radiation from the ecosystem to the atmosphere. This 'night time warming' was done for 3 years and warmed the air and soil by 1.1 deg. C. Warming was combined with ecosystem disturbances, including infestation by Calluna heather beetles (Lochmaea suturalis Thompson) causing complete defoliation of Calluna leaves during the summer 2000, and subsequent harvesting of all aboveground biomass during the autumn. Small increases in mineralisation rates were induced by warming and resulted in increased leaching of nitrogen from the organic soil layer. The increased nitrogen leaching from the organic soil layer was re-immobilised in the mineral soil layer as warming stimulated plant growth and thereby increased nitrogen immobilisation. Contradictory to the generally moderate effects of warming, the heather beetle infestation had very strong effects on mineralisation rates and the plant community. The grasses completely out-competed the Calluna plants which had not re-established two years after the infestation, probably due to combined effects of increased nutrient availability and the defoliation of Calluna. On the short term, ecosystem disturbances may have very strong effects on internal ecosystem processes and plant community structure compared to the more long-term effects of climate change

  19. Effects of intermediate-scale wind disturbance on composition, structure, and succession in Quercus stands: Implications for natural disturbance-based silviculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    M.M. Cowden; J.L. Hart; C.J. Schweitzer; D.C. Dey

    2014-01-01

    Forest disturbances are discrete events in space and time that disrupt the biophysical environment and impart lasting legacies on forest composition and structure. Disturbances are often classified along a gradient of spatial extent and magnitude that ranges from catastrophic events where most of the overstory is removed to gap-scale events that modify local...

  20. Natural variation in stomatal response to closing stimuli among Arabidopsis thaliana accessions after exposure to lowe VPD as a tool to recognize the mechanism of disturbed stomatal functioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ali Niaei Fard, S.; Meeteren, van U.

    2014-01-01

    Stomatal responses to closing stimuli are disturbed after long-term exposure of plants to low vapour pressure deficit (VPD). The mechanism behind this disturbance is not fully understood. Genetic variation between naturally occurring ecotypes can be helpful to elucidate the mechanism controlling

  1. Disturbance in boreal forest ecosystems: human impacts and natural processes. Proceedings of the International Boreal Forest Research Association 1997 annual meeting; 1997 August 4-7; Duluth, Minnesota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    The papers in these proceedings cover a wide range of topics related to human and natural disturbance processes in forests of the boreal zone in North America and Eurasia. Topics include historic and predicted landscape change; forest management; disturbance by insects, fire, air pollution, severe weather, and global climate change; and carbon cycling.

  2. Power Disturbances Close to Hydrodynamic Instability in Natural Circulation Two-Phase Flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathisen, R.P.; Eklind, O.

    1967-07-01

    In certain boiling reactor designs high positive void coefficients could exist and under certain circumstances cause instability. Control systems may therefore be desired. In such a controlled reactor there could remain superimposed low frequency power oscillations of some magnitude. The object of the current experiments in SKALVAN was to examine whether or not such slow oscillations could influence the hydrodynamic stability limit of the individual boiling channels. While operating the loop close to the threshold of hydrodynamic instability, the power was pulsed in the boiling channel. The pulse widths had a lower limit of 0.65 sec due to the contactor time constant. The square wave power oscillation amplitude ΔQ/Q was 12.2 %, and the interval T between the pulses was varied in the range 0 0 /T 0 was the mass flow oscillation period. The corresponding mass flow oscillations remained damped for all disturbance periods which were examined. With minimum test section inlet restrictions the power level at instability was much lower than that at burnout conditions. At higher restrictions these phenomena occurred at approximately equivalent power levels. The experiments with minimum inlet restrictions were also performed beyond the instability threshold. In this case it was possible to exceed the nominal burnout point temporarily by 5 per cent or more for periods of the order of magnitude 1 second. Even now the boiling channel conditions were not so severely affected that the burnout detectors tripped, and the power disturbances caused low frequency modulated wave trains

  3. Managed aquifer recharge: rediscovering nature as a leading edge technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, P; Toze, S; Page, D; Vanderzalm, J; Bekele, E; Sidhu, J; Rinck-Pfeiffer, S

    2010-01-01

    Use of Managed Aquifer Recharge (MAR) has rapidly increased in Australia, USA, and Europe in recent years as an efficient means of recycling stormwater or treated sewage effluent for non-potable and indirect potable reuse in urban and rural areas. Yet aquifers have been relied on knowingly for water storage and unwittingly for water treatment for millennia. Hence if 'leading edge' is defined as 'the foremost part of a trend; a vanguard', it would be misleading to claim managed aquifer recharge as a leading edge technology. However it has taken a significant investment in scientific research in recent years to demonstrate the effectiveness of aquifers as sustainable treatment systems to enable managed aquifer recharge to be recognised along side engineered treatment systems in water recycling. It is a 'cross-over' technology that is applicable to water and wastewater treatment and makes use of passive low energy processes to spectacularly reduce the energy requirements for water supply. It is robust within limits, has low cost, is suitable from village to city scale supplies, and offers as yet almost untapped opportunities for producing safe drinking water supplies where they do not yet exist. It will have an increasingly valued role in securing water supplies to sustain cities affected by climate change and population growth. However it is not a universal panacea and relies on the presence of suitable aquifers and sources of water together with effective governance to ensure human health and environment protection and water resources planning and management. This paper describes managed aquifer recharge, illustrates its use in Australia, outlining economics, guidelines and policies, and presents some of the knowledge about aquifer treatment processes that are revealing the latent value of aquifers as urban water infrastructure and provide a driver to improving our understanding of urban hydrogeology.

  4. Fire helps restore natural disturbance regime to benefit rare and endangered marsh birds endemic to the Colorado River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Courtney J; Nadeau, Christopher P; Piest, Linden

    2010-10-01

    Large flood events were part of the historical disturbance regime within the lower basin of most large river systems around the world. Large flood events are now rare in the lower basins of most large river systems due to flood control structures. Endemic organisms that are adapted to this historical disturbance regime have become less abundant due to these dramatic changes in the hydrology and the resultant changes in vegetation structure. The Yuma Clapper Rail is a federally endangered bird that breeds in emergent marshes within the lower Colorado River basin in the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico. We evaluated whether prescribed fire could be used as a surrogate disturbance event to help restore historical conditions for the benefit of Yuma Clapper Rails and four sympatric marsh-dependent birds. We conducted call-broadcast surveys for marsh birds within burned and unburned (control) plots both pre- and post-burn. Fire increased the numbers of Yuma Clapper Rails and Virginia Rails, and did not affect the numbers of Black Rails, Soras, and Least Bitterns. We found no evidence that detection probability of any of the five species differed between burn and control plots. Our results suggest that prescribed fire can be used to set back succession of emergent marshlands and help mimic the natural disturbance regime in the lower Colorado River basin. Hence, prescribed fire can be used to help increase Yuma Clapper Rail populations without adversely affecting sympatric species. Implementing a coordinated long-term fire management plan within marshes of the lower Colorado River may allow regulatory agencies to remove the Yuma Clapper Rail from the endangered species list.

  5. Differential flight responses of spring staging Teal Anas crecca and Wigeon A. penelope to human vs. natural disturbance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnballe, Thomas; Speich, Charlotte; Horsten, Anders

    2017-01-01

    (anglers, cyclists, farming activity) on the flight responses and displacement distances of ducks within uniform habitat along a public path were compared with the birds’ reaction to natural stimuli such as mammals or birds of prey. Excluding the controlled disturbance by a pedestrian, undertaken as part...... of the study, the main cause of flushing in Wigeon was a response to the movements of birds of prey and other birds, especially Lapwings Vanellus vanellus performing flight displays. For Teal, birds of prey accounted for around half of the flushes, with other birds accounting for one third of the flushes....... Wigeon and Teal were displaced significantly farther by human activities than by natural causes. We tested whether the ducks reacted differently to natural disturbances shortly after disturbance by a pedestrian by comparing response patterns to natural stimuli within the first hour following disturbance...

  6. Interplay of anthropogenic and natural disturbance impacts on the hyporheic ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, N.; Brancelj, A.; Simčič, T.; Lukančič, S.

    2009-04-01

    The hyporheic invertebrate community from the pre-alpine river (W Slovenia) was studied in order to analyze the impacts of high discharge and in-stream gravel extraction. Two distinct river reaches were sampled from June 2004 to May 2005. At impacted site, where gravel extraction was carried out, the response of hyporheic community to the anthropogenic disturbance was studied. Physical and chemical parameters, together with the amounts organic matter and activity of the biofilm were measured. Invertebrates were sampled by Bou-Rouch pumping method. Discharge of the Bača River varied from 108 m3s-1 in October 2004 to 1.6 m3s-1 in March 2005. Streambed sediments at both sites were composed of heterogeneous mixture of boulders, cobbles, pebbles, gravel, sand and silt. Oxygen saturation was close to 100 %, indicating good sediment permeability. A total of 75 invertebrate taxa were identified, 40 of which belonged to the occasional hyporheos, 26 to the permanent hyporheos and 9 were stygobites. At both sites, fauna was dominated numerically by juveniles of Cyclopoida and early stages of Leuctra larvae (Plecoptera). Chironomidae (Diptera) contributed significantly to the total invertebrate density at reference site and Baetoidea (Ephemeroptera) to the total density at impacted site. At both sites a decrease in density occurred immediately after disturbance. The recovery was relatively fast (two and a half months). The CCA analysis revealed the importance of fine sediment amounts for hyporheic invertebrate distribution. The results indicated that discharge play an important role in shaping hyporheic invertebrate community in the Bača River and that the removal of sediments due to gravel extraction led to the impoverishment of the structural characteristics of the hyporheic community.

  7. Power Disturbances Close to Hydrodynamic Instability in Natural Circulation Two-Phase Flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathisen, R P; Eklind, O

    1967-07-15

    In certain boiling reactor designs high positive void coefficients could exist and under certain circumstances cause instability. Control systems may therefore be desired. In such a controlled reactor there could remain superimposed low frequency power oscillations of some magnitude. The object of the current experiments in SKALVAN was to examine whether or not such slow oscillations could influence the hydrodynamic stability limit of the individual boiling channels. While operating the loop close to the threshold of hydrodynamic instability, the power was pulsed in the boiling channel. The pulse widths had a lower limit of 0.65 sec due to the contactor time constant. The square wave power oscillation amplitude {delta}Q/Q was 12.2 %, and the interval T between the pulses was varied in the range 0 < T{sub 0}/T < 0. 5 where T{sub 0} was the mass flow oscillation period. The corresponding mass flow oscillations remained damped for all disturbance periods which were examined. With minimum test section inlet restrictions the power level at instability was much lower than that at burnout conditions. At higher restrictions these phenomena occurred at approximately equivalent power levels. The experiments with minimum inlet restrictions were also performed beyond the instability threshold. In this case it was possible to exceed the nominal burnout point temporarily by 5 per cent or more for periods of the order of magnitude 1 second. Even now the boiling channel conditions were not so severely affected that the burnout detectors tripped, and the power disturbances caused low frequency modulated wave trains.

  8. Study of core flow distribution for small modular natural circulation lead or lead-alloy cooled fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Zhao; Zhao, Pengcheng; Zhou, Guangming; Chen, Hongli

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A core flow distribution calculation code for natural circulation LFRs was developed. • The comparison study between the channel method and the CFD method was conducted. • The core flow distribution analysis and optimization design for a 10MW natural circulation LFR was conducted. - Abstract: Small modular natural circulation lead or lead-alloy cooled fast reactor (LFR) is a potential candidate for LFR development. It has many attractive advantages such as reduced capital costs and inherent safety. The core flow distribution calculation is an important issue for nuclear reactor design, which will provide important input parameters to thermal-hydraulic analysis and safety analysis. The core flow distribution calculation of a natural circulation LFR is different from that of a forced circulation reactor. In a forced circulation reactor, the core flow distribution can be controlled and adjusted by the pump power and the flow distributor, while in a natural circulation reactor, the core flow distribution is automatically adjusted according to the relationship between the local power and the local resistance feature. In this paper, a non-uniform heated parallel channel flow distribution calculation code was developed and the comparison study between the channel method and the CFD method was carried out to assess the exactness of the developed code. The core flow distribution analysis and optimization design for a 10MW natural circulation LFR was conducted using the developed code. A core flow distribution optimization design scheme for a 10MW natural circulation LFR was proposed according to the optimization analysis results

  9. Trace elements studies on Karachi populations, part III: blood copper, zinc, magnesium and lead levels in psychiatric patients with disturbed behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manser, W.T.

    1989-01-01

    Blood levels of copper, zinc, magnesium and lead were determined in 29 males and 15 females suffering from disturbed behavior. As far as we could ascertain they were under no medication and belong to low income groups. Male patients had significantly higher levels than female patients for zinc but there was no sexual difference for magnesium or cooper. In patients copper and lead levels were higher than for normals, but no difference could be found for Mg and Zn. At least one metal abnormality was observed in 19 of the males and 9 (60.0%) of the female patients. (author)

  10. Natural disturbance shapes benthic intertidal macroinvertebrate communities of high latitude river deltas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchwell, Roy T.; Kendall, Steve J.; Blanchard, Amy L.; Dunton, Kenneth H.; Powell, Abby N.

    2016-01-01

    Unlike lower latitude coastlines, the estuarine nearshore zones of the Alaskan Beaufort Sea are icebound and frozen up to 9 months annually. This annual freezing event represents a dramatic physical disturbance to fauna living within intertidal sediments. The main objectives of this study were to describe the benthic communities of Beaufort Sea deltas, including temporal changes and trophic structure. Understanding benthic invertebrate communities provided a baseline for concurrent research on shorebird foraging ecology at these sites. We found that despite continuous year-to-year episodes of annual freezing, these estuarine deltas are populated by a range of invertebrates that represent both marine and freshwater assemblages. Freshwater organisms like Diptera and Oligochaeta not only survive this extreme event, but a marine invasion of infaunal organisms such as Amphipoda and Polychaeta rapidly recolonizes the delta mudflats following ice ablation. These delta sediments of sand, silt, and clay are fine in structure compared to sediments of other Beaufort Sea coastal intertidal habitats. The relatively depauperate invertebrate community that ultimately develops is composed of marine and freshwater benthic invertebrates. The composition of the infauna also reflects two strategies that make life on Beaufort Sea deltas possible: a migration of marine organisms from deeper lagoons to the intertidal and freshwater biota that survive the 9-month ice-covered period in frozen sediments. Stable isotopic analyses reveal that both infaunal assemblages assimilate marine and terrestrial sources of organic carbon. These results provide some of the first quantitative information on the infaunal food resources of shallow arctic estuarine systems and the long-term persistence of these invertebrate assemblages. Our data help explain the presence of large numbers of shorebirds in these habitats during the brief summer open-water period and their trophic importance to migrating

  11. Stand structure influences nekton community composition and provides protection from natural disturbance in Micronesian mangroves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard A. MacKenzie; Nicole Cormier

    2012-01-01

    Structurally complex mangrove roots are thought to provide foraging habitat, predation refugia, and typhoon protection for resident fish, shrimp, and crabs. The spatially compact nature of Micronesian mangroves results in model ecosystems to test these ideas. Tidal creek nekton assemblages were compared among mangrove forests impacted by Typhoon Sudal and differing in...

  12. Omaha Soil Mixing Study: Redistribution of Lead in Remediated Residential Soils Due to Excavation or Homeowner Disturbance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban soils within the Omaha Lead Superfund Site have been contaminated with lead (Pb) from atmospheric deposition of particulate materials from lead smelting and recycling activities. In May of 2009 the Final Record of Decision stated that any residential soil exceeding the pre...

  13. Disturbed Placental Imprinting in Preeclampsia Leads to Altered Expression of DLX5, a Human-Specific Early Trophoblast Marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadora, Julianna; Singh, Manvendra; Herse, Florian; Przybyl, Lukasz; Haase, Nadine; Golic, Michaela; Yung, Hong Wa; Huppertz, Berthold; Cartwright, Judith E; Whitley, Guy; Johnsen, Guro M; Levi, Giovanni; Isbruch, Annette; Schulz, Herbert; Luft, Friedrich C; Müller, Dominik N; Staff, Anne Cathrine; Hurst, Laurence D; Dechend, Ralf; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna

    2017-11-07

    Preeclampsia is a complex and common human-specific pregnancy syndrome associated with placental pathology. The human specificity provides both intellectual and methodological challenges, lacking a robust model system. Given the role of imprinted genes in human placentation and the vulnerability of imprinted genes to loss of imprinting changes, there has been extensive speculation, but no robust evidence, that imprinted genes are involved in preeclampsia. Our study aims to investigate whether disturbed imprinting contributes to preeclampsia. We first aimed to confirm that preeclampsia is a disease of the placenta by generating and analyzing genome-wide molecular data on well-characterized patient material. We performed high-throughput transcriptome analyses of multiple placenta samples from healthy controls and patients with preeclampsia. Next, we identified differentially expressed genes in preeclamptic placentas and intersected them with the list of human imprinted genes. We used bioinformatics/statistical analyses to confirm association between imprinting and preeclampsia and to predict biological processes affected in preeclampsia. Validation included epigenetic and cellular assays. In terms of human specificity, we established an in vitro invasion-differentiation trophoblast model. Our comparative phylogenetic analysis involved single-cell transcriptome data of human, macaque, and mouse preimplantation embryogenesis. We found disturbed placental imprinting in preeclampsia and revealed potential candidates, including GATA3 and DLX5 , with poorly explored imprinted status and no prior association with preeclampsia. As a result of loss of imprinting, DLX5 was upregulated in 69% of preeclamptic placentas. Levels of DLX5 correlated with classic preeclampsia markers. DLX5 is expressed in human but not in murine trophoblast. The DLX5 high phenotype resulted in reduced proliferation, increased metabolism, and endoplasmic reticulum stress-response activation in

  14. Post-disturbance plant community dynamics following a rare natural-origin fire in a Tsuga canadensis forest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan D Murray

    Full Text Available Opportunities to directly study infrequent forest disturbance events often lead to valuable information about vegetation dynamics. In mesic temperate forests of North America, stand-replacing crown fire occurs infrequently, with a return interval of 2000-3000 years. Rare chance events, however, may have profound impacts on the developmental trajectories of forest ecosystems. For example, it has been postulated that stand-replacing fire may have been an important factor in the establishment of eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis stands in the northern Great Lakes region. Nevertheless, experimental evidence linking hemlock regeneration to non-anthropogenic fire is limited. To clarify this potential relationship, we monitored vegetation dynamics following a rare lightning-origin crown fire in a Wisconsin hemlock-hardwood forest. We also studied vegetation in bulldozer-created fire breaks and adjacent undisturbed forest. Our results indicate that hemlock establishment was rare in the burned area but moderately common in the scarified bulldozer lines compared to the reference area. Early-successional, non-arboreal species including Rubus spp., Vaccinium angustifolium, sedges (Carex spp., grasses, Epilobium ciliatum, and Pteridium aquilinium were the most abundant post-fire species. Collectively, our results suggest that competing vegetation and moisture stress resulting from drought may reduce the efficacy of scarification treatments as well as the usefulness of fire for preparing a suitable seedbed for hemlock. The increasing prevalence of growing-season drought suggests that silvicultural strategies based on historic disturbance regimes may need to be reevaluated for mesic species.

  15. STRUCTURE OF NATURAL REGENERATION IN RELATION TO SOIL PROPERTIES AND DISTURBANCE IN TWO SWAMP FORESTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marly Antonielle Ávila

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Veredas (palm swamps is a type of vegetation associated with watercourses, characterized by the presence of Mauritia flexuosa palm trees. These systems are not well understood and suffer from high anthropogenic pressure. The aims of this study were to describe the natural regeneration of two swamp forests in vereda systems with different anthropogenic impacts and investigate if the variation in these plant communities are associated to edaphic conditions. The study was performed in preserved and impacted sites located in the Environmental Protection Area of the Pandeiros River in northern Minas Gerais. At each site, one hundred 25 m2 plots were established for surveying regenerating shrubs and trees (≥1 cm diameter at the base of the stem and < 3 cm diameter at breast height. Vegetation structure was evaluated by phytosociological parameters, similarity index, and size distribution of individuals. Regenerating strata was correlated with chemical and physical soil analyses. The vegetation at the preserved site was characterized by a higher number of individuals and a lower diversity but contained species that were typical of flooded areas. The results also showed differences in soil nutrient availability between sites that influenced the distribution of species at the two study sites.

  16. Flow characteristics of natural circulation in a lead-bismuth eutectic loop

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen-Chong Yue; Liu-Li Chen; Ke-Feng Lyu; Yang Li; Sheng Gao; Yue-Jing Liu; Qun-Ying Huang

    2017-01-01

    Lead and lead-alloys are proposed in future advanced nuclear system as coolant and spallation target.To test the natural circulation and gas-lift and obtain thermal-hydraulics data for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and system code validation,a lead-bismuth eutectic rectangular loop,the KYLIN-Ⅱ Thermal Hydraulic natural circulation test loop,has been designed and constructed by the FDS team.In this paper,theoretical analysis on natural circulation thermal-hydraulic performance is described and the steady-state natural circulation experiment is performed.The results indicated that the natural circulation capability depends on the loop resistance and the temperature and center height differences between the hot and cold legs.The theoretical analysis results agree well with,while the CFD deviate from,the experimental results.

  17. Defective Connective Tissue Remodeling in Smad3 Mice Leads to Accelerated Aneurysmal Growth Through Disturbed Downstream TGF-β Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. van der Pluijm, PhD

    2016-10-01

    Smad3 deficiency leads to imbalanced activation of downstream genes, no activation of MMPs in VSMCs, and immune responses resulting in rapid aortic wall dilatation and rupture. Our findings uncover new possibilities for treatment of SMAD3 patients; instead of targeting TGF-β signaling, immune suppression may be more beneficial.

  18. Osteoporosis in lambs in a lead mining area. I. A study of the naturally occurring disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, E J; Nisbet, D I; Robertson, J M

    1957-01-01

    An osteoporotic condition of young lambs which has occurred regularly for many years in an old lead mining area in Southern Scotland is described. The principal feature of the disease is an excessive fragility of the bones due to osteoporosis. This is responsible for a variety of locomotor disturbances ranging from a stiff gait to complete posterior paralysis. The lead content of the soil and pasture and the blood, liver, kidneys and bones was unusually high. Unusually high values were also obtained for the zinc content of the blood and tissues of affected lambs. The possible involvement of these elements and chelating metabolites in the etiology of the disease is discussed. 59 references, 4 tables.

  19. Removal of lead from aqueous solutions by using the natural and Fe(III)-modified zeolite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kragović, Milan; Daković, Aleksandra; Sekulić, Živko; Trgo, Marina; Ugrina, Marin; Perić, Jelena; Gatta, G. Diego

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, the sorption of lead by the natural and Fe(III)-modified zeolite (clinoptilolite) is described. The characterization of the natural zeolite-rich rock and the Fe(III)-modified form was performed by chemical analysis, point of the zero charge (pH pzc ), X-ray powder diffraction, applying the Rietveld/RIR method for the quantitative phase analysis, and scanning electron microscopy. The effects of sorbents dose and the initial lead concentrations on its sorption by two sorbents were investigated. For both sorbents, it was determined that at lower initial concentrations of lead, ion exchange of inorganic cations in zeolites with lead, together with uptake of hydrogen dominated, while at higher initial lead concentrations beside these processes, chemisorption of lead occurred. Significantly higher sorption of lead was achieved with Fe(III)-modified zeolite. From sorption isotherms, maximum sorbed amounts of lead, under the applied experimental conditions, were 66 mg/g for the natural and 133 mg/g for Fe(III)-modified zeolite. The best fit of experimental data was achieved with the Freundlich model (R 2 ≥ 0.94).

  20. Resources or landmarks: which factors drive homing success in Tetragonula carbonaria foraging in natural and disturbed landscapes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhardt, Sara D; Kaluza, Benjamin F; Wallace, Helen; Heard, Tim A

    2016-10-01

    To date, no study has investigated how landscape structural (visual) alterations affect navigation and thus homing success in stingless bees. We addressed this question in the Australian stingless bee Tetragonula carbonaria by performing marking, release and re-capture experiments in landscapes differing in habitat homogeneity (i.e., the proportion of elongated ground features typically considered prominent visual landmarks). We investigated how landscape affected the proportion of bees and nectar foragers returning to their hives as well as the earliest time bees and foragers returned. Undisturbed landscapes with few landmarks (that are conspicuous to the human eye) and large proportions of vegetation cover (natural forests) were classified visually/structurally homogeneous, and disturbed landscapes with many landmarks and fragmented or no extensive vegetation cover (gardens and plantations) visually/structurally heterogeneous. We found that proportions of successfully returning nectar foragers and earliest times first bees and foragers returned did not differ between landscapes. However, most bees returned in the visually/structurally most (forest) and least (garden) homogeneous landscape, suggesting that they use other than elongated ground features for navigation and that return speed is primarily driven by resource availability in a landscape.

  1. The bending stiffness of shoes is beneficial to running energetics if it does not disturb the natural MTP joint flexion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Keonyoung; Park, Sukyung

    2017-02-28

    A local minimum for running energetics has been reported for a specific bending stiffness, implying that shoe stiffness assists in running propulsion. However, the determinant of the metabolic optimum remains unknown. Highly stiff shoes significantly increase the moment arm of the ground reaction force (GRF) and reduce the leverage effect of joint torque at ground push-off. Inspired by previous findings, we hypothesized that the restriction of the natural metatarsophalangeal (MTP) flexion caused by stiffened shoes and the corresponding joint torque changes may reduce the benefit of shoe bending stiffness to running energetics. We proposed the critical stiffness, k cr , which is defined as the ratio of the MTP joint (MTPJ) torque to the maximal MTPJ flexion angle, as a possible threshold of the elastic benefit of shoe stiffness. 19 subjects participated in a running test while wearing insoles with five different bending stiffness levels. Joint angles, GRFs, and metabolic costs were measured and analyzed as functions of the shoe stiffness. No significant changes were found in the take-off velocity of the center of mass (CoM), but the horizontal ground push-offs were significantly reduced at different shoe stiffness levels, indicating that complementary changes in the lower-limb joint torques were introduced to maintain steady running. Slight increases in the ankle, knee, and hip joint angular impulses were observed at stiffness levels exceeding the critical stiffness, whereas the angular impulse at the MTPJ was significantly reduced. These results indicate that the shoe bending stiffness is beneficial to running energetics if it does not disturb the natural MTPJ flexion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaluating small mammal response to natural disturbance and restoration in oak ecosystems in the Mississippi alluvial valley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith Carl G; Hamel Paul B; Fuzaro Gullo, Manoelle

    2010-01-01

    Oak species form a conspicuous and often dominant component of bottom land forests of the Mississippi Alluvial Valley. The extent of these forests has been drastically reduced as a result of clearing for agriculture in the past two centuries. Patterns of clearing have reduced the distribution of remaining forest patches to a much more flood-prone subset of the landscape than was historically the case, reducing the diversity of oak species currently present on the landscape. Intensive harvesting has further changed the composition of the remaining stands. Small remnant patches of primary forest continue to exist as Research Natural Areas on the Delta National Forest in Sharkey County, Mississippi. In particular, the Over cup Oak (Quercus lyrata) and Redgum (Liquidambar styraciflua) Research Natural Areas pres ent substantial components of the trees for which the areas were named, as well as Quercus nuttallii and smaller components of other species. Recent interest in afforestation has produced a resurgence of interest in restoration of oak forest to abandoned farmland in the region. We have studied small mammal response to restoration on an extensive experiment near the Delta National Forest since 1995. We have also examined small mammal response to a tornado that disturbed approximately half of the Over cup Oak Research Natural Area in 2008. We use these studies to demonstrate how population estimates of small mammals can be obtained from capture-recapture studies, employing different designs, and utilizing Program Capture for population estimation. Small mammal communities in these stands are more species-rich in early succession than in primary forest. The study of response to tornado damage to the Over cup Oak Research Natural Area is complicated by the fact that this particular forest type is very flood-prone, creating obstacles to colonization by small mammals. Analysis of capture-recapture data with robust methods illustrated in this study permits extraction

  3. MAL Overexpression Leads to Disturbed Expression of Genes That Influence Cytoskeletal Organization and Differentiation of Schwann Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Schmid

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In the developing peripheral nervous system, a coordinated reciprocal signaling between Schwann cells and axons is crucial for accurate myelination. The myelin and lymphocyte protein MAL is a component of lipid rafts that is important for targeting proteins and lipids to distinct domains. MAL overexpression impedes peripheral myelinogenesis, which is evident by a delayed onset of myelination and reduced expression of the myelin protein zero (Mpz/P0 and the low-affinity neurotrophin receptor p75NTR . This study shows that MAL overexpression leads to a significant reduction of Mpz and p75NTR expression in primary mouse Schwann cell cultures, which was already evident before differentiation, implicating an effect of MAL in early Schwann cell development. Their transcription was robustly reduced, despite normal expression of essential transcription factors and receptors. Further, the cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB and phosphoinositide 3-kinase signaling pathways important for Schwann cell differentiation were correctly induced, highlighting that other so far unknown rate limiting factors do exist. We identified novel genes expressed by Schwann cells in a MAL-dependent manner in vivo and in vitro. A number of those, including S100a4, RhoU and Krt23, are implicated in cytoskeletal organization and plasma membrane dynamics. We showed that S100a4 is predominantly expressed by nonmyelinating Schwann cells, whereas RhoU was localized within myelin membranes, and Krt23 was detected in nonmyelinating as well as in myelinating Schwann cells. Their differential expression during early peripheral nerve development further underlines their possible role in influencing Schwann cell differentiation and myelination.

  4. Remediation of lead-contaminated soil with non-toxic biodegradable natural ligands extracted from soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong-Woo; Kim, Chulsung

    2012-01-01

    Bench-scale soil washing studies were performed to evaluate the potential application of non-toxic, biodegradable extracted soybean-complexing ligands for the remediation of lead-contaminated soils. Results showed that, with extracted soybean-complexing ligands, lead solubility extensively increased when pH of the solution was higher than 6, and approximately 10% (500 mg/kg) of lead was removed from a rifle range soil. Two potential primary factors controlling the effectiveness of lead extraction from lead-contaminated soils with natural ligands are adsorption of extracted aqueous lead ions onto the ground soybean and the pH of the extraction solution. More complexing ligands were extracted from the ground soybean as the reaction pH increased. As a result, significantly higher lead extraction efficiency was observed under basic environments. In addition, less adsorption onto soybean was observed when the pH of the solution was higher than 7. Among two available Lewis base functional groups in the extracted soybean-complexing ligands such as carboxylate and the alpha-amino functional groups, the non-protonated alpha-amino functional groups may play an important role for the dissolution of lead from lead-contaminated soil through the formation of soluble lead--ligand complexes.

  5. Host-symbiont recombination versus natural selection in the response of coral-dinoflagellate symbioses to environmental disturbance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaJeunesse, Todd C; Smith, Robin; Walther, Mariana; Pinzón, Jorge; Pettay, Daniel T; McGinley, Michael; Aschaffenburg, Matthew; Medina-Rosas, Pedro; Cupul-Magaña, Amilcar L; Pérez, Andrés López; Reyes-Bonilla, Hector; Warner, Mark E

    2010-10-07

    Mutualisms between reef-building corals and endosymbiotic dinoflagellates are particularly sensitive to environmental stress, yet the ecosystems they construct have endured major oscillations in global climate. During the winter of 2008, an extreme cold-water event occurred in the Gulf of California that bleached corals in the genus Pocillopora harbouring a thermally 'sensitive' symbiont, designated Symbiodinium C1b-c, while colonies possessing Symbiodinium D1 were mostly unaffected. Certain bleached colonies recovered quickly while others suffered partial or complete mortality. In most colonies, no appreciable change was observed in the identity of the original symbiont, indicating that these partnerships are stable. During the initial phases of recovery, a third species of symbiont B1(Aiptasia), genetically identical to that harboured by the invasive anemone, Aiptasia sp., grew opportunistically and was visible as light-yellow patches on the branch tips of several colonies. However, this symbiont did not persist and was displaced in all cases by C1b-c several months later. Colonies with D1 were abundant at inshore habitats along the continental eastern Pacific, where seasonal turbidity is high relative to offshore islands. Environmental conditions of the central and southern coasts of Mexico were not sufficient to explain the exclusivity of D1 Pocillopora in these regions. It is possible that mass mortalities associated with major thermal disturbances during the 1997-1998 El Niño Southern Oscillation eliminated C1b-c holobionts from these locations. The differential loss of Pocillopora holobionts in response to thermal stress suggests that natural selection on existing variation can cause rapid and significant shifts in the frequency of particular coral-algal partnerships. However, coral populations may take decades to recover following episodes of severe selection, thereby raising considerable uncertainty about the long-term viability of these communities.

  6. Host–symbiont recombination versus natural selection in the response of coral–dinoflagellate symbioses to environmental disturbance

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaJeunesse, Todd C.; Smith, Robin; Walther, Mariana; Pinzón, Jorge; Pettay, Daniel T.; McGinley, Michael; Aschaffenburg, Matthew; Medina-Rosas, Pedro; Cupul-Magaña, Amilcar L.; Pérez, Andrés López; Reyes-Bonilla, Hector; Warner, Mark E.

    2010-01-01

    Mutualisms between reef-building corals and endosymbiotic dinoflagellates are particularly sensitive to environmental stress, yet the ecosystems they construct have endured major oscillations in global climate. During the winter of 2008, an extreme cold-water event occurred in the Gulf of California that bleached corals in the genus Pocillopora harbouring a thermally ‘sensitive’ symbiont, designated Symbiodinium C1b-c, while colonies possessing Symbiodinium D1 were mostly unaffected. Certain bleached colonies recovered quickly while others suffered partial or complete mortality. In most colonies, no appreciable change was observed in the identity of the original symbiont, indicating that these partnerships are stable. During the initial phases of recovery, a third species of symbiont B1Aiptasia, genetically identical to that harboured by the invasive anemone, Aiptasia sp., grew opportunistically and was visible as light-yellow patches on the branch tips of several colonies. However, this symbiont did not persist and was displaced in all cases by C1b-c several months later. Colonies with D1 were abundant at inshore habitats along the continental eastern Pacific, where seasonal turbidity is high relative to offshore islands. Environmental conditions of the central and southern coasts of Mexico were not sufficient to explain the exclusivity of D1 Pocillopora in these regions. It is possible that mass mortalities associated with major thermal disturbances during the 1997–1998 El Niño Southern Oscillation eliminated C1b-c holobionts from these locations. The differential loss of Pocillopora holobionts in response to thermal stress suggests that natural selection on existing variation can cause rapid and significant shifts in the frequency of particular coral–algal partnerships. However, coral populations may take decades to recover following episodes of severe selection, thereby raising considerable uncertainty about the long-term viability of these communities

  7. Retention of habitat complexity minimizes disassembly of reef fish communities following disturbance: a large-scale natural experiment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Emslie

    Full Text Available High biodiversity ecosystems are commonly associated with complex habitats. Coral reefs are highly diverse ecosystems, but are under increasing pressure from numerous stressors, many of which reduce live coral cover and habitat complexity with concomitant effects on other organisms such as reef fishes. While previous studies have highlighted the importance of habitat complexity in structuring reef fish communities, they employed gradient or meta-analyses which lacked a controlled experimental design over broad spatial scales to explicitly separate the influence of live coral cover from overall habitat complexity. Here a natural experiment using a long term (20 year, spatially extensive (∼ 115,000 kms(2 dataset from the Great Barrier Reef revealed the fundamental importance of overall habitat complexity for reef fishes. Reductions of both live coral cover and habitat complexity had substantial impacts on fish communities compared to relatively minor impacts after major reductions in coral cover but not habitat complexity. Where habitat complexity was substantially reduced, species abundances broadly declined and a far greater number of fish species were locally extirpated, including economically important fishes. This resulted in decreased species richness and a loss of diversity within functional groups. Our results suggest that the retention of habitat complexity following disturbances can ameliorate the impacts of coral declines on reef fishes, so preserving their capacity to perform important functional roles essential to reef resilience. These results add to a growing body of evidence about the importance of habitat complexity for reef fishes, and represent the first large-scale examination of this question on the Great Barrier Reef.

  8. Performance Recovery of Natural Draft Dry Cooling Systems by Combined Air Leading Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weijia Wang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The cooling efficiency of natural draft dry cooling system (NDDCS are vulnerable to ambient winds, so the implementation of measures against the wind effects is of great importance. This work presents the combined air leading strategies to recover the flow and heat transfer performances of NDDCS. Following the energy balance among the exhaust steam, circulating water, and cooling air, numerical models of natural draft dry cooling systems with the combined air leading strategies are developed. The cooling air streamlines, volume effectiveness, thermal efficiency and outlet water temperature for each cooling delta of the large-scale heat exchanger are obtained. The overall volume effectiveness, average outlet water temperature of NDDCS and steam turbine back pressure are calculated. The results show that with the air leading strategies inside or outside the dry-cooling tower, the thermo-flow performances of natural draft dry cooling system are improved under all wind conditions. The combined inner and outer air leading strategies are superior to other single strategy in the performance recovery, thus can be recommended for NDDCS in power generating units.

  9. The remediation of the lead-polluted garden soil by natural zeolite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hua; Shi, Wei-yu; Shao, Hong-bo; Shao, Ming-an

    2009-09-30

    The current study investigated the remediation effect of lead-polluted garden soil by natural zeolite in terms of soil properties, Pb fraction of sequential extraction in soil and distribution of Pb in different parts of rape. Natural zeolite was added to artificially polluted garden soil to immobilize and limit the uptake of lead by rape through changing soil physical and chemical properties in the pot experiment under greenhouse conditions. Results indicated that the addition of natural zeolite could increase soil pH, CEC, content of soil organic matter and promote formation of soil aggregate. The application of zeolite decreased the available fraction of Pb in the garden soil by adjusting soil pH rather than CEC, and restrained the Pb uptake by rape. Data obtained suggested that the application of a dose of zeolite was adequate (>or=10 g kg(-1)) to reduce soluble lead significantly, even if lead pollution is severe in garden soil (>or=1000 mg kg(-1)). An appropriate dose of zeolite (20 g kg(-1)) could reduce the Pb concentration in the edible part (shoots) of rape up to 30% of Pb in the seriously polluted soil (2000 mg kg(-1)).

  10. Accounting for regional variation in both natural environment and human disturbance to improve performance of multimetric indices of lotic benthic diatoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Tao; Stevenson, R Jan; Infante, Dana M

    2016-10-15

    Regional variation in both natural environment and human disturbance can influence performance of ecological assessments. In this study we calculated 5 types of benthic diatom multimetric indices (MMIs) with 3 different approaches to account for variation in ecological assessments. We used: site groups defined by ecoregions or diatom typologies; the same or different sets of metrics among site groups; and unmodeled or modeled MMIs, where models accounted for natural variation in metrics within site groups by calculating an expected reference condition for each metric and each site. We used data from the USEPA's National Rivers and Streams Assessment to calculate the MMIs and evaluate changes in MMI performance. MMI performance was evaluated with indices of precision, bias, responsiveness, sensitivity and relevancy which were respectively measured as MMI variation among reference sites, effects of natural variables on MMIs, difference between MMIs at reference and highly disturbed sites, percent of highly disturbed sites properly classified, and relation of MMIs to human disturbance and stressors. All 5 types of MMIs showed considerable discrimination ability. Using different metrics among ecoregions sometimes reduced precision, but it consistently increased responsiveness, sensitivity, and relevancy. Site specific metric modeling reduced bias and increased responsiveness. Combined use of different metrics among site groups and site specific modeling significantly improved MMI performance irrespective of site grouping approach. Compared to ecoregion site classification, grouping sites based on diatom typologies improved precision, but did not improve overall performance of MMIs if we accounted for natural variation in metrics with site specific models. We conclude that using different metrics among ecoregions and site specific metric modeling improve MMI performance, particularly when used together. Applications of these MMI approaches in ecological assessments

  11. Recreational drug discovery: natural products as lead structures for the synthesis of smart drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appendino, Giovanni; Minassi, Alberto; Taglialatela-Scafati, Orazio

    2014-07-01

    Covering: up to December 2013. Over the past decade, there has been a growing transition in recreational drugs from natural materials (marijuana, hashish, opium), natural products (morphine, cocaine), or their simple derivatives (heroin), to synthetic agents more potent than their natural prototypes, which are sometimes less harmful in the short term, or that combine properties from different classes of recreational prototypes. These agents have been named smart drugs, and have become popular both for personal consumption and for collective intoxication at rave parties. The reasons for this transition are varied, but are mainly regulatory and commercial. New analogues of known illegal intoxicants are invisible to most forensic detection techniques, while the alleged natural status and the lack of avert acute toxicity make them appealing to a wide range of users. On the other hand, the advent of the internet has made possible the quick dispersal of information among users and the on-line purchase of these agents and/or the precursors for their synthesis. Unlike their natural products chemotypes (ephedrine, mescaline, cathinone, psilocybin, THC), most new drugs of abuse are largely unfamiliar to the organic chemistry community as well as to health care providers. To raise awareness of the growing plague of smart drugs we have surveyed, in a medicinal chemistry fashion, their development from natural products leads, their current methods of production, and the role that clandestine home laboratories and underground chemists have played in the surge of popularity of these drugs.

  12. Neutronic design for a 100MW{sub th} Small modular natural circulation lead or lead-alloy cooled fast reactors core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Zhang, H.; Chen, Z.; Zeng, Q., E-mail: shchshch@ustc.edu.cn, E-mail: hlchen1@ustc.edu.cn, E-mail: kulah@mail.ustc.edu.cn, E-mail: zchen214@mail.ustc.edu.cn, E-mail: zengqin@ustc.edu.cn [Univ. of Science and Technology of China, School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Hefei, Anhui (China)

    2015-07-01

    Lead or lead-alloy cooled fast reactor with good fuel proliferation and nuclear waste transmutation capability, as well as high security and economy, is a great potential for the development of fourth-generation nuclear energy systems. Small natural circulation reactor is an important technical route lead cooled fast reactors industrial applications, which has been chosen as one of the three reference technical for solution lead or lead-alloy cooled fast reactors by GIF lead-cooled fast reactor steering committee. The School of Nuclear Science and Technology of USTC proposed a small 100MW{sub th} natural circulation lead cooled fast reactor concept called SNCLFR-100 based realistic technology. This article describes the SNCLFR-100 reactor of the overall technical program, core physics calculation and analysis. The results show that: SNCLFR-100 with good neutronic and safety performance and relevant design parameters meet the security requirements with feasibility. (author)

  13. Lead zirconate (PbZrO3 embedded in natural rubber as electroactive elastomer composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuvat Sirivat

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Perovskite lead zirconate (PbZrO3 was synthesized in an orthorhombic form at a temperature below the Curie temperature, TC. The orthorhombic form is a noncentrosymmetric structure which is capable of spontaneous polarization. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectra and X-ray diffraction (XRD patterns confirm the successful synthesis of the lead zirconate; and scanning electron microscopy (SEM micrographs indicate that PbZrO3 particles are moderately dispersed in the natural rubber (NR matrix. Without an electrical field, the particles merely act as a ferroelectric filler, which can absorb and store additional stress. Under an electrical field, particle-induced dipole moments are generated, leading to interparticle interaction and a substantial increase in the storage modulus. At a small amount of lead zirconate particulates present in the natural rubber matrix, at a volume fraction of 0.007306, the electrical conductivity increases dramatically by nearly two orders of magnitude at the electrical frequency of 500 kHz.

  14. The lead-lag relationships between spot and futures prices of natural gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yahui; Liu, Li

    2018-01-01

    The lead-lag relationships between spot and futures markets are of great interest for academics. Previous studies neglect the possibility of nonlinear behaviors which may be caused by asymmetry or persistence. To fill this gap, this paper uses the MF-DCCA method and the linear and nonlinear causality tests to explore the causal relationships between natural gas spot and futures prices in the New York Mercantile Exchange. We find that spot and futures prices are positive cross-correlated, the natural gas futures can linearly Granger cause spot price, and there are bidirectional nonlinear causality relationships between natural gas spot and futures prices. Further, we explore the sources of nonlinear causality relationships, and find that the volatility spillover can partly explain the nonlinear causality and affect their cross-correlations.

  15. The effects of natural disturbances, reef state, and herbivorous fish densities on ciguatera poisoning in Rarotonga, southern Cook Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rongo, Teina; van Woesik, Robert

    2013-03-15

    Ciguatera poisoning is a critical public-health issue among Pacific island nations. Accurately predicting ciguatera outbreaks has become a priority, particularly in Rarotonga in the southern Cook Islands, which has reported the highest incidence of ciguatera poisoning globally. Since 2006, however, cases of ciguatera poisoning have declined, and in 2011 ciguatera cases were the lowest in nearly 20 years. Here we examined the relationships between cases of ciguatera poisoning, from 1994 to 2011, and: (i) coral cover, used as a proxy of reef state, (ii) the densities of herbivorous fishes, and (iii) reef disturbances. We found that coral cover was not a good predictor of cases of ciguatera poisoning, but high densities of the herbivorous fish Ctenochaetus striatus and reef disturbances were both strong predictors of ciguatera poisoning. Yet these two predictors were correlated, because the densities of C. striatus increased only after major cyclones had disturbed the reefs. Since 2006, the number of cyclones has decreased considerably in Rarotonga, because of the climatic shift toward the negative phase of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation. We suggest that fewer cyclones have led to decreases in both the densities of C. striatus and of the number of reported cases of ciguatera poisoning in Rarotonga. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Experiments on natural circulation of lead-bismuth in the TALL test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, W.M.; Karbojian, A.; Sehgal, B.R.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) is a potential candidate coolant for next generation liquid metal reactors due to its favorable properties such as being chemical inert and low melting point, in comparison with sodium and lead considered as coolants in FBRs. Having a high atomic number of LBE allows it be well suited as a spallation target for accelerator-driven systems (ADS) which have been proposed for the transmutation of nuclear waste. Due to its strong buoyancy, the LBE-cooled system should also have significant natural circulation, which is desirable for so-called Generation IV nuclear reactors, which like to employ passive safety and reliability. But so far, very little experimental data have been published on the natural circulation thermal-hydraulics of LBE-cooled systems. Motivated by the increasing interest in LBE-cooled fast reactors and ADS, a test facility called Thermal-hydraulic ADS Lead-bismuth Loop (TALL) was designed and constructed at KTH to investigate the thermalhydraulic characteristics of liquid LBE. The facility consists of a primary loop (LBE loop) and a secondary loop (oil loop). The LBE loop consists of sump tank, core tank, expansion tank, heat exchanger, EM pump, EM flowmeter, electric heaters and instrumentation. The heating of LBE in the core tank and its cooling in the heat exchanger allows natural convection flows as should occur in the prototypic vessel. Recently, our experimental study on natural circulation was performed on the TALL test facility. This paper will present the experimental results and analysis. The facility is of 6.8 m height which is comparable to the full height of the LBE heat exchange circuit in the ANSALDO ADS reactor vessel design, and has been scaled for prototypic (power/volume) ratio to represent the main components. Their LBE volume, flow velocity and heating rates correspond to one tube of the heat exchanger design chosen. During the experiments, the main adjustable

  17. Oxygen concentration diffusion analysis of lead-bismuth-cooled, natural-circulation reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Kei; Sakai, Takaaki

    2001-11-01

    The feasibility study on fast breeder reactors in Japan has been conducted at JNC and related organizations. The Phase-I study has finished in March, 2001. During the Phase-I activity, lead-bismuth eutectic coolant has been selected as one of the possible coolant options and a medium-scale plant, cooled by a lead-bismuth natural circulation flow was studied. On the other side, it is known that lead-bismuth eutectic has a problem of structural material corrosiveness. It was found that oxygen concentration control in the eutectic plays an important role on the corrosion protection. In this report, we have developed a concentration diffusion analysis code (COCOA: COncentration COntrol Analysis code) in order to carry out the oxygen concentration control analysis. This code solves a two-dimensional concentration diffusion equation by the finite differential method. It is possible to simulate reaction of oxygen and hydrogen by the code. We verified the basic performance of the code and carried out oxygen concentration diffusion analysis for the case of an oxygen increase by a refueling process in the natural circulation reactor. In addition, characteristics of the oxygen control system was discussed for a different type of the control system as well. It is concluded that the COCOA code can simulate diffusion of oxygen concentration in the reactor. By the analysis of a natural circulation medium-scale reactor, we make clear that the ON-OFF control and PID control can well control oxygen concentration by choosing an appropriate concentration measurement point. In addition, even when a trouble occurs in the oxygen emission or hydrogen emission system, it observes that control characteristic drops away. It is still possible, however, to control oxygen concentration in such case. (author)

  18. The nature of dynamic disorder in lead halide perovskite crystals (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaffe, Omer; Guo, Yinsheng; Hull, Trevor; Stoumpos, Costas; Tan, Liang Z.; Egger, David A.; Zheng, Fan; Szpak, Guilherme; Semonin, Octavi E.; Beecher, Alexander N.; Heinz, Tony F.; Kronik, Leeor; Rappe, Andrew M.; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.; Owen, Jonathan S.; Pimenta, Marcos A.; Brus, Louis E.

    2016-09-01

    We combine low frequency Raman scattering measurements with first-principles molecular dynamics (MD) to study the nature of dynamic disorder in hybrid lead-halide perovskite crystals. We conduct a comparative study between a hybrid (CH3NH3PbBr3) and an all-inorganic lead-halide perovskite (CsPbBr3). Both are of the general ABX3 perovskite formula, and have a similar band gap and structural phase sequence, orthorhombic at low temperature, changing first to tetragonal and then to cubic symmetry as temperature increases. In the high temperature phases, we find that both compounds show a pronounced Raman quasi-elastic central peak, indicating that both are dynamically disordered.

  19. Lead-Users vs. Emergent Nature Consumers for Marketing Co-Creation: Are They Really Different?

    OpenAIRE

    Vernette, Eric; Hamdi-Kidar, Linda

    2014-01-01

    This research extends Hoffman et al (2010)'s work on the relationship between two key targets for co-creation: Emergent-Nature Consumers (ENC) and Lead-Users (LU). These authors have shown that an ENC - who can innovate in any domain, could be more effective than a LU- who innovates in one specific-domain, for the development of new product concepts. We show that these two innovating users have common conceptual roots and that ENC character trait corresponds to an extension of LU characterist...

  20. Nature of dislocation hysteresis losses and nonlinear effect in lead at high vibration amplitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lomakin, V.V.; Pal-Val, L.N.; Platkov, V.Y.; Roshchupkin, A.M.

    1982-01-01

    The nature of the dislocation hysteresis was established and changes in this hysteresis were determined by investigating the dependence of the dislocation-induced absorption of ultrasound (coefficient α) on the amplitude of ultrasound epsilon-c 0 in single crystals of pure lead and of lead containing Tl and Sn impurities. The investigation was carried out in a wide range of epsilon-c 0 under superconducting transition conditions. In the superconducting (s) state both pure Pb and that doped with T1 exhibited a maximum in the dependence α(epsilon-c 0 ) at high values of epsilon-c 0 ; on transition to the normal (n) state this maximum changed to a plateau. This provided a direct proof of a change in the static nature of the dislocation hysteresis to the dynamic process because of an increase in the coefficient of the electron drag of dislocations. Estimates were obtained of the range of lengths of dislocation loops: 2.4 x 10 - 4 cm - 4 cm. In the case of lead containing Sn the dynamic hysteresis occurred both in the normal and superconducting states. In the range of amplitudes above that of the maximum and at the beginning of the plateau all single crystals exhibited a rise of α on increase of epsilon-c 0 in the superconducting and normal states; this rise was due to nonlinear effects observed in the case of strong bending of L/sub N/ loops. An analysis was made of the amplitude dependence of the losses associated with this effect. The results were in good agreement with the experimental data

  1. Natural Attenuation of Arsenic, Cadmium, Lead, and Zinc Using Hydrograph Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, J. E.; Peters, S. C.

    2009-12-01

    Strategies for remediating contaminated sites range from complete removal of the contaminated soil to in-situ monitored natural attenuation. The decision to let a property naturally attenuate is partially based on the estimated time it will take to return to ambient conditions. The Lehigh Gap Wildlife Refuge at Palmerton, PA was historically contaminated with arsenic, cadmium, lead, and zinc from a zinc smelting operation that ceased emissions twenty-nine years ago. This property provides an opportunity to assess whether the length of time required for the natural attenuation of metals in soil has been achieved using a watershed mass balance approach, focusing particularly on perturbations observed in the concentration-discharge relationships of contaminants compared to the conservative tracers sodium and chloride, and silicon as an indicator of rock-water interactions. Water samples were collected from 3 springs in the Wildlife Refuge for approximately 4 days following the onset of storm events and analyzed for cation and anion concentrations. Preliminary results show that while the concentrations of arsenic and lead were below detection limits, the fluxes of zinc and cadmium increase corresponding with the peak in the hydrograph relative to the fluxes of the tracers, indicating the solutes are being released from adsorption sites located in an unsaturated zone that is temporarily inundated during storm events. In comparison, the flux of the tracers remains constant, indicative of a steady-state leakage of the solutes from their respective reservoirs in the soil. Along with flux, the concentrations of zinc and cadmium also increase following the rise in discharge after storm events, further suggesting that these contaminants are being mobilized out of the soil profile.

  2. Drugs from the Oceans: Marine Natural Products as Leads for Drug Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altmann, Karl-Heinz

    2017-10-25

    The marine environment harbors a vast number of species that are the source of a wide array of structurally diverse bioactive secondary metabolites. At this point in time, roughly 27'000 marine natural products are known, of which eight are (were) at the origin of seven marketed drugs, mostly for the treatment of cancer. The majority of these drugs and also of drug candidates currently undergoing clinical evaluation (excluding antibody-drug conjugates) are unmodified natural products, but synthetic chemistry has played a central role in the discovery and/or development of all but one of the approved marine-derived drugs. More than 1000 new marine natural products have been isolated per year over the last decade, but the pool of new and unique structures is far from exhausted. To fully leverage the potential offered by the structural diversity of marine-produced secondary metabolites for drug discovery will require their broad assessment for different bioactivities and the productive interplay between new fermentation technologies, synthetic organic chemistry, and medicinal chemistry, in order to secure compound supply and enable lead optimization.

  3. Direct-Indirect Nature of the Bandgap in Lead-Free Perovskite Nanocrystals

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Yuhai

    2017-06-23

    With record efficiencies achieved in lead halide perovskite-based photovoltaics, urgency has shifted toward finding alternative materials that are stable and less toxic. Bismuth-based perovskite materials are currently one of the most promising candidates among those alternatives. However, the band structures of these materials, including the nature of the bandgaps, remain elusive due to extremely low photoluminescence quantum yield (PLQY) and scattering issues in their thin-film form. Here, we reveal the specific nature of the material\\'s electronic transitions by realizing monodisperse colloidal nanocrystals (NCs) of hexagonal-phase Cs3Bi2X9 perovskites, which afford well-resolved PL features. Interestingly, the PL profile exhibits a dual-spectral feature at room temperature with comparable intensities, based on which we propose an exciton recombination process involving both indirect and direct transitions simultaneously-an observation further supported by temperature-dependent and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Our findings provide experimental and theoretical insights into the nature of the bandgaps in bismuth halide materials-essential information for assessing their viability in solar cells and optoelectronics.

  4. Do canopy disturbances drive forest plantations into more natural conditions? — A case study from Can Gio Biosphere Reserve, Viet Nam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Juliane; Kautz, Markus; Fontalvo Herazo, Martha Liliana; Triet, Tran; Walther, Denny; Saint-Paul, Ulrich; Diele, Karen; Berger, Uta

    2013-11-01

    Large areas of mangrove forests were devastated in South Viet Nam during the second Indochina war. After its end in 1975, extensive reforestation with monocultures took place. Can Gio, one of the biggest replanted sites with about 20,000 ha of mangroves mainly Rhizophora apiculata, was declared a biosphere reserve by the UNESCO in 2000. Although this status now enables progressive forest dynamics, there are still drawbacks resulting from the unnatural character of the plantations. For example, the homogeneous size and age structure as well as the regular arrangement of the planted trees make larger forest stands more vulnerable to synchronized collapsing which can be triggered by stronger winds and storms. A transformation into a more natural forest characterized by a heterogeneous age and size structure and a mixed species composition is of urgent need to avoid a synchronized dieback. In this study we test the capability of natural canopy disturbances (e.g. lightning strikes) to facilitate this transformation.Canopy gaps created by lightning strikes were detected and quantified by remote sensing techniques. SPOT satellite images from the years 2003, 2005 and 2007 provided information about the spatial distribution, size, shape, and formation frequency of the gaps. Lightning strike gaps were identified based on their shape and size. They form small openings (mean: 0.025 ha) and their yearly probability of occurrence was determined to be approximately 0.012 per hectare. Selected gaps were surveyed in the field in 2008 to complement the remote sensing data and to provide information upon forest structure and regeneration.Simulation experiments were carried out with the individual-based KiWi mangrove model for quantifying the influence of different lightning regimes on the vertical and horizontal structure of the R. apiculata plantation. In addition, we conducted simulations with a natural and thus randomly generated forest to compare the structure of the two

  5. Characteristics of lead(II) adsorption onto "Natural Red Earth" in simulated environmental conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahatantila, K.; Vithanage, M. S.; Seike, Y.; Okumura, M.

    2011-12-01

    Lead is considered as a non-biodegradable and potentially toxic heavy metal and it is found as a common environmental pollutant. Adsorption characteristics of Pb(II) onto natural iron and aluminum coated sand, which is called Natural Red Earth (NRE), have been studied to ascertain the effect of pH, ionic strength, initial sorbate concentrations, temperature and time. Lead(II) adsorption achieved its maximum adsorption of nearly 100% at neutral to slightly acidic conditions. The optimum pH was nearly 5.5 and 6.5 for 2.41 and 24.1 μmol/L initial Pb(II) concentrations, respectively. Lead(II) adsorption was independent of 100 fold variation of ionic strength (0.001 - 0.1), indirectly evidencing dominance of an inner-sphere surface complexation mechanism for 10 fold variation of initial Pb(II) concentrations (2.41 and 24.1 μmol/L). Adsorption edges were quantified with a 2pK generalized diffuse double layer model considering two site types, >FeOH and >AlOH, for Pb(II) binding. The modeling results better fit with the mixture of monodentate and bidentated binding of Pb(II) onto >FeOH site and bidentate binding of Pb(II) onto >AlOH site. The intrinsic constants obtained were log KFeOPb=13.93, log K(FeO)2Pb=11.88 and log K(AlO)2Pb=13.21. Time required to reach the equilibrium was also increase from 15 min to 1hr with increasing Pb(II) concentrations from 2.41 to 24.1 μmol/L. Kinetic data fitted better to pseudo second order kinetic model. Lead(II) adsorption onto NRE was better explained by Two-site Langmuir isotherm with sorption maximum of 1.39x10-2 and 2.30x10-3 mol/kg for two sites with different affinities. Negative Gibbs free energy values indicated spontaneity of Pb(II) adsorption onto NRE, and entropy and enthalpy of adsorption were 124.04 J/K mol and 17.71 KJ/mol, respectively. These results suggested that the NRE could be effectively used as a low cost candidate for removal of Pb(II) from environmental water, since use of low cost materials to treat

  6. EFFECTIVE SPECIFIC ACTIVITY OF NATURAL RADIONUCLIDES FOR THE NORM BELONGED TO 238U AND 232TH SERIES BEING IN THE STATE OF DISTURBED RADIOACTIVE EQUILIBRIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. P. Stamat

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In the Sanitary Rules SR 2.6.1.1292-03 and SR 2.6.6.1169-02 classification of the industrial waste containing naturally occurring radioactive materials is adopted in accordance to the values of their effective specific activity Aeff. In a case of the disturbed equilibrium in 238U and 232Th series it is necessary to take into consideration actual contribution of the separate natural radionuclides of the mentioned series into the value of gamma dose rate of the waste. This will permit to avoid unjustified overestimating or understating of the waste category which prevents as unjustified expenditures on their treating so undertaking of the necessary measures providing radiation safety.

  7. Application of granulated lead-zinc slag in concrete as an opportunity to save natural resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alwaeli, Mohamed

    2013-02-01

    The last decades marked a period of growth and prosperity in construction industry which involves the use of natural resources. This growth is jeopardized by the lack of natural resources that are available. On the other hand there has been rapid increase in the industrial waste production. Most of the waste do not find any effective use and cause a waste disposal crisis, thereby contributing to health and environmental problems. Recycling of industrial waste as aggregate is thus a logical option to manage this problem. The paper reports on some experimental results obtained from the production of concretes containing granulated slag of lead and zinc industry as sand replacement mixed in different proportions. Granulated slag is substituted for raw sand, partly or totally. Ratios of 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% by weight of sand are used. The effects of granulated lead-zinc slag (GLZS) as sand replacement material on the compressive strength and gamma radiation attenuation properties of concrete are investigated and analyzed. Then, these properties are compared with those of ordinary concrete. The results showed that replacement material have some effects on the compressive strength and gamma radiation properties of the concrete. The experimental results indicate that, the concrete mixed with GLZS as a sand replacement have better strength. Concerning the absorption properties for gamma radiation the data show that the addition of GLZS resulted in an increase of the attenuation of gamma radiation. Consequently, these concretes could be used for construction of shields protecting personnel who work in laboratories where radiation is used. Additionally, the thickness of the concrete with GLZS was calculated and compared with ordinary concrete.

  8. Temperature control characteristics analysis of lead-cooled fast reactor with natural circulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Minghan; Song, Yong; Wang, Jianye; Xu, Peng; Zhang, Guangyu

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The LFR temperature control system are analyzed with frequency domain method. • The temperature control compensator is designed according to the frequency analysis. • Dynamic simulation is performed by SIMULINK and RELAP5-HD. - Abstract: Lead-cooled Fast Reactor (LFR) with natural circulation in primary system is among the highlights in advance nuclear reactor research, due to its great superiority in reactor safety and reliability. In this work, a transfer function matrix describing coolant temperature dynamic process, obtained by Laplace transform of the one-dimensional system dynamic model is developed in order to investigate the temperature control characteristics of LFR. Based on the transfer function matrix, a close-loop coolant temperature control system without compensator is built. The frequency domain analysis indicates that the stability and steady-state of the temperature control system needs to be improved. Accordingly, a temperature compensator based on Proportion–Integration and feed-forward is designed. The dynamic simulation of the whole system with the temperature compensator for core power step change is performed with SIMULINK and RELAP5-HD. The result shows that the temperature compensator can provide superior coolant temperature control capabilities in LFR with natural circulation due to the efficiency of the frequency domain analysis method.

  9. Computational Breakthrough of Natural Lead Hits from the Genus of Arisaema against Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant, Kamal; Lal, Uma Ranjan; Ghosh, Manik

    2018-01-01

    To date, efforts for the prevention and treatment of human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection have been still vain, and there is no safe and effective clinical accepted vaccine. Arisaema genus has claimed for various traditional bioactivities, but scientific assessments are quite limited. This encouraged us to carry out our present study on around 60 phytoconstituents of different Arisaema species as a natural inhibitor against the human RSV. Selected 60 phytochemical entities were evaluated on the docking behavior of human RSV receptor (PDB: 4UCC) using Maestro 9.3 (Schrödinger, LLC, Cambridge, USA). Furthermore, kinetic properties and toxicity nature of top graded ligands were analyzed through QikProp and ProTox tools. Notably, rutin (glide score: -8.49), schaftoside (glide score: -8.18) and apigenin-6,8-di-C-β-D-galactoside (glide score - 7.29) have resulted in hopeful natural lead hits with an ideal range of kinetic descriptors values. ProTox tool (oral rodent toxicity) has resulted in likely toxicity targets of apex-graded tested ligands. Finally, the whole efforts can be explored further as a model to confirm its anti-human RSV potential with wet laboratory experiments. Rutin, schaftoside, and apigenin-6,8-di-C-β-D-galactoside showed promising top hits docking profile against human respiratory syncytial virusMoreover, absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion properties (QikProp) of top hits resulted within an ideal range of kinetic descriptorsProTox tool highlighted toxicity class ranges, LD 50 values, and possible toxicity targets of apex-graded tested ligands. Abbreviations used: RSV: Respiratory syncytial virus, PRRSV: Porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus, ADME-T: Absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity.

  10. Polonium-210 and Lead-210 in marine biota from a coastal region with high natural radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zafrul Kabir, M.; Deeba, Farah; Hossain, Sushmita; Fharim, Massoud; Md Moniruzzaman; Carvalho, Fernando P.; Oliveira, João M.; Malta, M.; Silva, L.

    2013-01-01

    Coastal sediments and marine fish from a region with high natural radioactivity in Cox Bazar Bangladesh, were analyzed in order to investigate the levels of naturally occurring radionuclides. Sediment from the sea shore in high ambient radiation dose rate areas contained naturally occurring radionuclides at high concentrations. These sediments displayed 226 Ra, 232 Th and 235 U activity concentrations of 2184 ± 88 Bq kg -1 dry weight (d.w.), 3808 ± 200 Bq kg -1 (d.w.) and 123 ± 15 Bq kg -1 (d.w.), respectively. In contrast with these high values, radionuclide concentrations in sand from other areas of the Cox's Bazar coast were as low as 42 ± 3, 70 ± 4 and < 8 Bq kg -1 (d.w.) for the same radionuclides, respectively, which are comparable to concentrations determined in many coastal areas elsewhere. The presence of sand deposits with high concentration of uranium series radionuclides could potentially originate high accumulation of alpha emitting radionuclides such as 210 Po in marine biota, and food chain transfer to man. 210 Po is a major contributor to the radiation dose both in marine organisms and sea food consumers. Determination of 210 Po in marine fish and shrimp from the area lead to concentration values ranging from 4.5±0.3 to 124±3 Bq kg -1 (d.w.) in fish and 82.9±1.6 Bq kg -1 (d.w.) in shrimp. Similar concentrations are commonly reported in marine biota from several regions. Therefore, in spite of the deposits of heavy mineral sands containing high concentrations of radionuclides such as 210 Pb and 210 Po no significant raise in the accumulation of these radionuclides in biota seems to occur, which suggests that radionuclides are tightly bound in sediment grains and are not significantly bioavailable. (author)

  11. Factors Leading to the Loss of Natural Elite Control of HIV-1 Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernas, María; Tarancón-Diez, Laura; Rodríguez-Gallego, Esther; Gómez, Josep; Prado, Julia G; Casado, Concepción; Dominguez-Molina, Beatriz; Olivares, Isabel; Coiras, Maite; León, Agathe; Rodriguez, Carmen; Benito, Jose Miguel; Rallón, Norma; Plana, Montserrat; Martinez-Madrid, Onofre; Dapena, Marta; Iribarren, Jose Antonio; Del Romero, Jorge; García, Felipe; Alcamí, José; Muñoz-Fernández, M Ángeles; Vidal, Francisco; Leal, Manuel; Lopez-Galindez, Cecilio; Ruiz-Mateos, Ezequiel

    2017-12-06

    HIV-1 elite controllers (EC) maintain undetectable viral load (VL) in the absence of antiretroviral treatment. However, these subjects have heterogeneous clinical outcomes including a proportion loosing HIV-1 control over time. In this work we compared, in a longitudinal design, transient EC, analyzed before and after the loss of virological control, versus persistent EC. The aim was to identify factors leading to the loss of natural virological control of HIV-1-infection with a longitudinal retrospective study design. Gag-specific T-cell response was assessed by in vitro intracellular poly-cytokine production quantified by flow cytometry. Viral diversity and sequence-dating were performed in proviral DNA by PCR amplification at limiting dilution in env and gag genes. The expression profile of 70 serum cytokines and chemokines was assessed by multiplex immunoassays. We identified transient EC as subjects with low Gag-specific T-cell polyfunctionality, high viral diversity and high proinflammatory cytokines levels before the loss of control. Gag-specific T-cell polyfunctionality was inversely associated with viral diversity in transient controllers before the loss of control (r=-0.8; p =0.02). RANTES was a potential biomarker of transient control. This study identified, virological and immunological factors including inflammatory biomarkers associated with two different phenotypes within EC. These results may allow a more accurate definition of EC, which could help in a better clinical management of these individuals and in the development of future curative approaches. IMPORTANCE There is a rare group of HIV-infected patients who have the extraordinary capacity to maintain undetectable viral load levels in the absence of antiretroviral treatment, the so called HIV-1 elite controllers (EC). However, there is a proportion within these subjects that eventually loses this capability. In this work we found differences in virological and immune factors including soluble

  12. Defining Disturbance for Microbial Ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, Craig J

    2017-08-01

    Disturbance can profoundly modify the structure of natural communities. However, microbial ecologists' concept of "disturbance" has often deviated from conventional practice. Definitions (or implicit usage) have frequently included climate change and other forms of chronic environmental stress, which contradict the macrobiologist's notion of disturbance as a discrete event that removes biomass. Physical constraints and disparate biological characteristics were compared to ask whether disturbances fundamentally differ in microbial and macroorganismal communities. A definition of "disturbance" for microbial ecologists is proposed that distinguishes from "stress" and other competing terms, and that is in accord with definitions accepted by plant and animal ecologists.

  13. Core Power Limits For A Lead-Bismuth Natural Circulation Actinide Burner Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Cliff Bybee; Kim, D.; Todreas, N. E.; Mujid S. Kazimi

    2002-04-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory and Massachusetts Institute of Technology are investigating the suitability of lead-bismuth cooled fast reactors for producing low-cost electricity as well as for actinide burning. The design being considered here is a pool type reactor that burns actinides and utilizes natural circulation of the primary coolant, a conventional steam power conversion cycle, and a passive decay heat removal system. Thermal-hydraulic evaluations of the actinide burner reactor were performed to determine allowable core power ratings that maintain cladding temperatures below corrosion-established temperature limits during normal operation and following a loss-of-feedwater transient. An economic evaluation was performed to optimize various design parameters by minimizing capital cost. The transient power limit was initially much more restrictive than the steady-state limit. However, enhancements to the reactor vessel auxiliary cooling system for transient decay heat removal resulted in an increased power limit of 1040 MWt, which was close to the steady-state limit. An economic evaluation was performed to estimate the capital cost of the reactor and its sensitivity to the transient power limit. For the 1040 MWt power level, the capital cost estimate was 49 mills per kWhe based on 1999 dollars.

  14. Natural variation in stomatal response to closing stimuli among Arabidopsis thaliana accessions after exposure to low VPD as a tool to recognize the mechanism of disturbed stomatal functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliniaeifard, Sasan; van Meeteren, Uulke

    2014-12-01

    Stomatal responses to closing stimuli are disturbed after long-term exposure of plants to low vapour pressure deficit (VPD). The mechanism behind this disturbance is not fully understood. Genetic variation between naturally occurring ecotypes can be helpful to elucidate the mechanism controlling stomatal movements in different environments. We characterized the stomatal responses of 41 natural accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana to closing stimuli (ABA and desiccation) after they had been exposed for 4 days to moderate VPD (1.17 kPa) or low VPD (0.23 kPa). A fast screening system was used to test stomatal response to ABA using chlorophyll fluorescence imaging under low O2 concentrations of leaf discs floating on ABA solutions. In all accessions stomatal conductance (gs) was increased after prior exposure to low VPD. After exposure to low VPD, stomata of 39 out of 41 of the accessions showed a diminished ABA closing response; only stomata of low VPD-exposed Map-42 and C24 were as responsive to ABA as moderate VPD-exposed plants. In response to desiccation, most of the accessions showed a normal stomata closing response following low VPD exposure. Only low VPD-exposed Cvi-0 and Rrs-7 showed significantly less stomatal closure compared with moderate VPD-exposed plants. Using principle component analysis (PCA), accessions could be categorized to very sensitive, moderately sensitive, and less sensitive to closing stimuli. In conclusion, we present evidence for different stomatal responses to closing stimuli after long-term exposure to low VPD across Arabidopsis accessions. The variation can be a useful tool for finding the mechanism of stomatal malfunctioning. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  15. Sex differences in amino acids lost via sweating could lead to differential susceptibilities to disturbances in nitrogen balance and collagen turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunstan, R H; Sparkes, D L; Dascombe, B J; Stevens, C J; Murphy, G R; Macdonald, M M; Gottfries, J; Gottfries, C-G; Roberts, T K

    2017-08-01

    Fluid collected during sweating is enriched with amino acids derived from the skin's natural moisturising factors and has been termed "faux" sweat. Little is known about sex differences in sweat amino acid composition or whether faux sweat amino acid losses affect nitrogen balance. Faux sweat collected by healthy adults (n = 47) after exercise, and at rest by chronic fatigue patients, was analysed for amino acid composition. Healthy females had higher total amino acid concentrations in sweat (10.5 ± 1.2 mM) compared with healthy males (6.9 ± 0.9 mM). Females had higher levels of 13 amino acids in sweat including serine, alanine and glycine. Higher hydroxyproline and proline levels suggested greater collagen turnover in females. Modelling indicated that with conservative levels of exercise, amino acid losses in females via faux sweat were triple than those predicted for urine, whereas in males they were double. It was concluded that females were more susceptible to key amino acid loss during exercise and/or hot conditions. Females reporting chronic fatigue had higher levels of methionine in faux sweat than healthy females. Males reporting chronic fatigue had higher levels of numerous amino acids in faux sweat compared to healthy males. Higher amino acid loss in faux sweat associated with chronic fatigue could contribute to a hypometabolic state. Depending on activity levels, climatic conditions and gender, amino acid losses in sweat and skin leachate could influence daily protein turnover where periods of continuously high turnover could lead to a negative net nitrogen balance.

  16. Climate change and human disturbance can lead to local extinction of Alpine rock ptarmigan: new insight from the western Italian Alps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Imperio

    Full Text Available Alpine grouses are particularly vulnerable to climate change due to their adaptation to extreme conditions and to their relict distributions in the Alps where global warming has been particularly marked in the last half century. Grouses are also currently threatened by habitat modification and human disturbance, and an assessment of the impact of multiple stressors is needed to predict the fate of Alpine populations of these birds in the next decades. We estimated the effect of climate change and human disturbance on a rock ptarmigan population living in the western Italian Alps by combining an empirical population modelling approach and stochastic simulations of the population dynamics under the a1B climate scenario and two different disturbance scenarios, represented by the development of a ski resort, through 2050.The early appearance of snow-free ground in the previous spring had a favorable effect on the rock ptarmigan population, probably through a higher reproductive success. On the contrary, delayed snowfall in autumn had a negative effect possibly due to a mismatch in time to molt to white winter plumage which increases predation risk. The regional climate model PROTHEUS does not foresee any significant change in snowmelt date in the study area, while the start date of continuous snow cover is expected to be significantly delayed. The net effect in the stochastic projections is a more or less pronounced (depending on the model used decline in the studied population. The addition of extra-mortality due to collision with ski-lift wires led the population to fatal consequences in most projections. Should these results be confirmed by larger studies the conservation of Alpine populations would deserve more attention. To counterbalance the effects of climate change, the reduction of all causes of death should be pursued, through a strict preservation of the habitats in the present area of occurrence.

  17. Human herpesvirus-8 infection leads to expansion of the preimmune/natural effector B cell compartment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Della Bella

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8 is the etiological agent of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS and of some lymphoproliferative disorders of B cells. Most malignancies develop after long-lasting viral dormancy, and a preventing role for both humoral and cellular immune control is suggested by the high frequency of these pathologies in immunosuppressed patients. B cells, macrophages and dendritic cells of peripheral lymphoid organs and blood represent the major reservoir of HHV-8. Due to the dual role of B cells in HHV-8 infection, both as virus reservoir and as agents of humoral immune control, we analyzed the subset distribution and the functional state of peripheral blood B cells in HHV-8-infected individuals with and without cKS. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Circulating B cells and their subsets were analyzed by 6-color flow cytometry in the following groups: 1- patients HHV-8 positive with classic KS (cKS (n = 47; 2- subjects HHV-8 positive and cKS negative (HSP (n = 10; 3- healthy controls, HHV-8 negative and cKS negative (HC (n = 43. The number of B cells belonging to the preimmune/natural effector compartment, including transitional, pre-naïve, naïve and MZ-like subsets, was significantly higher among HHV-8 positive subjects, with or without cKS, while was comparable to healthy controls in the antigen-experienced T-cell dependent compartment. The increased number of preimmune/natural effector B cells was associated with increased resistance to spontaneous apoptosis, while it did not correlate with HHV-8 viral load. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results indicate that long-lasting HHV-8 infection promotes an imbalance in peripheral B cell subsets, perturbing the equilibrium between earlier and later steps of maturation and activation processes. This observation may broaden our understanding of the complex interplay between viral and immune factors leading HHV-8-infected individuals to develop HHV-8-associated malignancies.

  18. State-and-transition simulation modeling to compare outcomes of alternative management scenarios under two natural disturbance regimes in a forested landscape in northeastern Wisconsin, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Swearingen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Comparisons of the potential outcomes of multiple land management strategies and an understanding of the influence of potential increases in climate-related disturbances on these outcomes are essential for long term land management and conservation planning. To provide these insights, we developed an approach that uses collaborative scenario development and state-and-transition simulation modeling to provide land managers and conservation practitioners with a comparison of potential landscapes resulting from alternative management scenarios and climate conditions, and we have applied this approach in the Wild Rivers Legacy Forest (WRLF area in northeastern Wisconsin. Three management scenarios were developed with input from local land managers, scientists, and conservation practitioners: 1 continuation of current management, 2 expanded working forest conservation easements, and 3 cooperative ecological forestry. Scenarios were modeled under current climate with contemporary probabilities of natural disturbance and under increased probability of windthrow and wildfire that may result from climate change in this region. All scenarios were modeled for 100 years using the VDDT/TELSA modeling suite. Results showed that landscape composition and configuration were relatively similar among scenarios, and that management had a stronger effect than increased probability of windthrow and wildfire. These findings suggest that the scale of the landscape analysis used here and the lack of differences in predominant management strategies between ownerships in this region play significant roles in scenario outcomes. The approach used here does not rely on complex mechanistic modeling of uncertain dynamics and can therefore be used as starting point for planning and further analysis.

  19. Evaluation of the potentiality of a Mexican natural zeolite chabazite-type in the lead removal in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarado I, J.; Sotelo L, M.; Meza F, D.; Paz M, F. A.; Maubert F, M.

    2013-01-01

    The intention of this paper is to present the characterization of a natural zeolite, chabazite-type, from the Mexican reservoir La Palma, at Divisaderos, Sonora, where their potential use as ion exchange material to remove lead in water is assessed. The chabazite was characterized through X-ray diffraction, Icp-OES, Icp-Ms, EDX, Bet and TG/TGD. The results indicate the presence of Ba(1930 ppm) and Sr(1220 ppm), which are characteristic of aluminium rich phases. A chabazite modification treatment is proposed by using solutions of NaOH (0.1 M) and NH 4 NO 3 (1 M). The lead removal kinetics both in natural zeolite as in their chemically modified forms was obtained by using the ion exchange process in a batch reactor. The results show how unnecessary natural zeolite homo ionization is for the removal of lead, thereby obtaining the equilibrium concentration of unmodified zeolite for plotting the adsorption isotherm, which was adjusted to Langmuir model. The Langmuir isotherm has a good fit of the results at equilibrium (R 2 =0.92), which demonstrates that natural zeolites studied, in its natural form, contains exchangeable cations required (Ca +2 , Mg 2+ and Na + ) for potentially be used as an adsorbent material/ion exchanger for water treatment impacted by lead. (Author)

  20. Isotope Mixes, Corresponding Nuclear Properties and Reactor Design Implications of Naturally Occurring Lead Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    than LBE 14,3 W/(m*K)) (data at 500 °C) + Slag formation First tests do not show slag formation in Pb + Dust formation Strongly reduced + Corrosion...12] R. S. Cannon, Jr. and A. P. Pierce, “Lead Isotope Guides For Mississippi Valley Lead- Zinc Exploration,” U.S. department of the Interior

  1. Finding disturbances in on-farm biogas production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonio, Pereira-Querol Marco; Laura, Seppänen

    2012-01-01

    When implementing innovations, disturbances are very likely to take place. Disturbances are undesirable because they can lead to unwanted outcomes, such as economic losses and work overload to workers. However, they can be powerful opportunities for learning and re-designing innovations. Here, we will present activity theoretical tools for analyzing disturbances in a way that they could be used as learning opportunities. We illustrate the proposed tools by analyzing a disturbance that took place during the implementation of a project of biogas production. By interpreting the disturbance process with a network of activity systems, we found that on-farm disturbances were formed as ruptures, innovations and asynchronies originated in other activity systems. This finding suggests that disturbances are outcomes of the functioning of networks, rather than simple results of failure of individuals or technical devices. The proposed tools could be used in interventions to help practitioners and ergonomists to recognize the systemic and networked nature of problems, and therefore, realize that they may require the collaboration of actors from different activities. In this sense, disturbances may be turned into opportunities for learning and developing innovations. We conclude by discussing how the method could be used in ergonomic design and intervention.

  2. Disturbance hydrology: Preparing for an increasingly disturbed future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirus, Benjamin B.; Ebel, Brian A.; Mohr, Christian H.; Zegre, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    This special issue is the result of several fruitful conference sessions on disturbance hydrology, which started at the 2013 AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco and have continued every year since. The stimulating presentations and discussions surrounding those sessions have focused on understanding both the disruption of hydrologic functioning following discrete disturbances, as well as the subsequent recovery or change within the affected watershed system. Whereas some hydrologic disturbances are directly linked to anthropogenic activities, such as resource extraction, the contributions to this special issue focus primarily on those with indirect or less pronounced human involvement, such as bark-beetle infestation, wildfire, and other natural hazards. However, human activities are enhancing the severity and frequency of these seemingly natural disturbances, thereby contributing to acute hydrologic problems and hazards. Major research challenges for our increasingly disturbed planet include the lack of continuous pre- and post-disturbance monitoring, hydrologic impacts that vary spatially and temporally based on environmental and hydroclimatic conditions, and the preponderance of overlapping or compounding disturbance sequences. In addition, a conceptual framework for characterizing commonalities and differences among hydrologic disturbances is still in its infancy. In this introduction to the special issue, we advance the fusion of concepts and terminology from ecology and hydrology to begin filling this gap. We briefly explore some preliminary approaches for comparing different disturbances and their hydrologic impacts, which provides a starting point for further dialogue and research progress.

  3. The Nature of the Learning Experiences of Leadership Coaches That Lead to Coaching Competencies: A Phenomenological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backus, Clark R.

    2018-01-01

    This qualitative, phenomenological study addressed the research question: What is the nature of the learning experiences of leadership coaches that lead to coaching competency? With the increasing recognition of leadership coaching as a meaningful leadership development experience (Allen & Hartman, 2008; Maltbia, Marsick, & Ghosh, 2014;…

  4. Chemical sensors in natural water: peculiarities of behaviour of chalcogenide glass electrodes for determination of copper, lead and cadmium ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seleznev, B.L.; Legin, A.V.; Vlasov, Yu.G.

    1996-01-01

    Specific features of chemical sensors (chalcogenide glass and crystal ion-selective electrodes) behaviour have been studied to determine copper (2), lead, cadmium and fluorine in the course of in situ measurements, including long-term uninterrupted testing, for solving the problem of inspection over natural water contamination. 16 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  5. Comparative in-flight and wind tunnel investigation of the development of natural and controlled disturbances in the laminar boundary layer of an airfoil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peltzer, Inken [Technical University of Berlin, Institute for Aeronautics and Astronautics, Berlin (Germany)

    2008-06-15

    This paper describes in-flight and wind tunnel research into laminar-turbulent transition. Measurements were carried out with a laminar wing glove for a glider (Twin II Grob G103), which could also be used in the large laminar wind tunnel at the Institute for Aerodynamics and Gasdynamics in Stuttgart. The central aspect of the investigation was the survey of the temporal-spatial development and propagation of natural as well as controlled generated waves. For the experiments performed, varied sensor arrays were used which allowed the two-dimensional acquisition of flow information on the glove (surface hot-wire and piezo foil sensors). Thus the amplification and the spatial distribution of the disturbances could be measured and compared in flight as well as in the wind tunnel, beginning with the very early linear amplification stage to the early non-linear stage of transition. For the investigation of controlled transition, multiple spanwise adjacent harmonic point sources were used which were operated independently. (orig.)

  6. The interplay between climate change, forests, and disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virginia H. Dale; Linda A. Joyce; Steve McNulty; Ronald P. Neilson

    2000-01-01

    Climate change affects forests both directly and indirectly through disturbances. Disturbances are a natural and integral part of forest ecosystems, and climate change can alter these natural interactions. When disturbances exceed their natural range of variation, the change in forest structure and function may be extreme. Each disturbance affects forests differently....

  7. Evaluation of natural clay Brasgel as adsorbent in removal of lead in synthetic waste water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, W.S.; Rodrigues, M.G.F.; Mota, M.F.; Patricio, A.C.L.; Silva, M.M.

    2012-01-01

    The smectite clays have high adsorption capacity and cation exchange. Due to its chemical and physical characteristics, they can be effectively used as adsorbent of pollutants (such as metal ions). The initial objective of this study was to characterize the clay Brasgel through the techniques of X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), X-Ray Spectrometry by Energy Dispersive (EDX) and nitrogen adsorption (BET method), seeking its use in removing lead (Pb 2+ ) from synthetic effluents. System was used in finite bath to assess the potential removal of lead (Pb 2+ ), following a 2 2 factorial experimental design with three center point experiments, taking as input variables: pH and initial concentrations of lead (Pb 2+ ). The clay has Brasgel clay in its composition that characterize it as a smectite clay. By having a large surface area, this clay showed great potential on the adsorption of metal ions. (author)

  8. Modified natural diatomite and its enhanced immobilization of lead, copper and cadmium in simulated contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye, Xinxin; Kang, Shenghong; Wang, Huimin; Li, Hongying; Zhang, Yunxia; Wang, Guozhong; Zhao, Huijun

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We modify natural diatomite using the facile acid treatment and ultrasonication. • Modification add pore volume, surface area and electronegativity of natural diatomite. • Modified diatomite is superior to natural diatomite in soil heavy metal remediation. • Modified diatomite can be promising for in-situ immobilization of heavy metal in soil. - Abstract: Natural diatomite was modified through facile acid treatment and ultrasonication, which increased its electronegativity, and the pore volume and surface area achieved to 0.211 cm 3 g −1 and 76.9 m 2 g −1 , respectively. Modified diatomite was investigated to immobilize the potential toxic elements (PTEs) of Pb, Cu and Cd in simulated contaminated soil comparing to natural diatomite. When incubated with contaminated soils at rates of 2.5% and 5.0% by weight for 90 days, modified diatomite was more effective in immobilizing Pb, Cu and Cd than natural diatomite. After treated with 5.0% modified diatomite for 90 days, the contaminated soils showed 69.7%, 49.7% and 23.7% reductions in Pb, Cu and Cd concentrations after 0.01 M CaCl 2 extraction, respectively. The concentrations of Pb, Cu and Cd were reduced by 66.7%, 47.2% and 33.1% in the leaching procedure, respectively. The surface complexation played an important role in the immobilization of PTEs in soils. The decreased extractable metal content of soil was accompanied by improved microbial activity which significantly increased (P < 0.05) in 5.0% modified diatomite-amended soils. These results suggested that modified diatomite with micro/nanostructured characteristics increased the immobilization of PTEs in contaminated soil and had great potential as green and low-cost amendments

  9. Modified natural diatomite and its enhanced immobilization of lead, copper and cadmium in simulated contaminated soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Xinxin, E-mail: xxye@issp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Centre for Environmental and Energy Nanomaterials, Anhui Key Laboratory of Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Kang, Shenghong; Wang, Huimin [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Centre for Environmental and Energy Nanomaterials, Anhui Key Laboratory of Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Li, Hongying [Institute of Soil and Fertilizer, Anhui Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Zhang, Yunxia [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Centre for Environmental and Energy Nanomaterials, Anhui Key Laboratory of Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Wang, Guozhong, E-mail: gzhwang@issp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Centre for Environmental and Energy Nanomaterials, Anhui Key Laboratory of Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Zhao, Huijun [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Centre for Environmental and Energy Nanomaterials, Anhui Key Laboratory of Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Centre for Clean Environment and Energy, Gold Coast Campus, Griffith University, Queensland 4222 (Australia)

    2015-05-30

    Highlights: • We modify natural diatomite using the facile acid treatment and ultrasonication. • Modification add pore volume, surface area and electronegativity of natural diatomite. • Modified diatomite is superior to natural diatomite in soil heavy metal remediation. • Modified diatomite can be promising for in-situ immobilization of heavy metal in soil. - Abstract: Natural diatomite was modified through facile acid treatment and ultrasonication, which increased its electronegativity, and the pore volume and surface area achieved to 0.211 cm{sup 3} g{sup −1} and 76.9 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}, respectively. Modified diatomite was investigated to immobilize the potential toxic elements (PTEs) of Pb, Cu and Cd in simulated contaminated soil comparing to natural diatomite. When incubated with contaminated soils at rates of 2.5% and 5.0% by weight for 90 days, modified diatomite was more effective in immobilizing Pb, Cu and Cd than natural diatomite. After treated with 5.0% modified diatomite for 90 days, the contaminated soils showed 69.7%, 49.7% and 23.7% reductions in Pb, Cu and Cd concentrations after 0.01 M CaCl{sub 2} extraction, respectively. The concentrations of Pb, Cu and Cd were reduced by 66.7%, 47.2% and 33.1% in the leaching procedure, respectively. The surface complexation played an important role in the immobilization of PTEs in soils. The decreased extractable metal content of soil was accompanied by improved microbial activity which significantly increased (P < 0.05) in 5.0% modified diatomite-amended soils. These results suggested that modified diatomite with micro/nanostructured characteristics increased the immobilization of PTEs in contaminated soil and had great potential as green and low-cost amendments.

  10. Magnitudes and sources of precipitation and dry deposition fluxes of industrial and natural leads to the North Pacific at Enewetak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Settle, D.M.; Patterson, C.C.

    1982-01-01

    A total atmospheric PB input flux of 7 ng Pb cm - 2 yr - 1 was measured in the North Pacific Easterlies at Enewetak. Parameters used to measure this flux were ratio of dry deposition flux to precipitation flux; Pb/ 210 Pb in precipitation and seawater; 210 Pb flux; washout factor; and Pb concentrations in air, rain, and dry deposition deposits. Relations among these parameters estabilished at Enewetak were used to recompute and comfirm previous estimates of lead fluxes to the oceans (ng Pb cm - 2 yr - 1 ) at the following locations: North Altantic Westerlies, 170; North Pacific Westerlies, 50; and South Pacific Easterlies, 3. Prehistoric lead output fluxes to sediments (ng Pb cm - 2 yr - 1 ) at these locations have been previously measured and were 4 (Enewetak); 30 North Atlantic Westerlies; 3 North Pacific Westerlies; 4 South Pacific Easterlies. These data show that the rates of atmospheric imputs of lead to the oceans vary directly with variations in rates of upwind emission of industrial lead from urban complexes on land. In the North Pacific and North Atlantic, present rates of atmospheric lead inputs are 10-fold greater than prehistoric outputs. In equatorial regions, present inputs and past outputs are more nearly equal. These observations disclose the effects of intense industrial atmospheric emissions of lead in the northern hemisphere westerlies which have overwhelmed prehistoric natural fluxes of lead to the oceans. The average concentration of lead in marine air at Enewetak is 170n pg m - 3 and varies less than a factor of 2 from that mean. One to 15% of this lead comes from seaspray, while the remainder comes from sources on land. About 90% of the seaspray lead is industrial, while 80 to 99% of that originating from land sources is industrial. Concentrations of lead in rain at Enewetak range from 6 to 63 pg/g with a mean value of 28

  11. BREST-OD-300 Reactor as a prototype of the future commercial lead cooled fast reactor of natural safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlov, V.V.; Smirnov, V.S.; Filin, A.I.; Glazov, A.G. [N.A. Dollezhal Institute ' NIKIET' , PO Box 788, Moscow, 101000 (Russian Federation)

    2006-07-01

    This paper briefly describes the physical and design features of a demonstration 300 MWe fast reactor with uranium-plutonium nitride fuel and lead coolant, BREST-OD-300, under development in Russia. This reactor is regarded as a prototype of future commercial reactors, which may form a foundation for large-scale growth of nuclear power in this new century. It is demonstrated that the natural properties of the lead coolant and nitride fuel combined with the physical and design features specific to fast reactors ensure natural safety of BREST and, with any credible initiating events, allow deterministic exclusion of accidents with large radioactive releases requiring evacuation of local residents. The paper identifies the ways and means of attaining natural safety, which rule out prompt criticality excursion, loss of cooling and fuel failure through use of a small reactivity margin, commensurable with {beta}{sub eff}, low pressure in the circuit, large margins to temperature limits, high natural circulation, passive decay heat removal by air unlimited in time, high heat accumulating capability of lead-filled circuit, stabilizing temperature and coolant flow rate feedbacks, etc. (authors)

  12. BREST-OD-300 Reactor as a prototype of the future commercial lead cooled fast reactor of natural safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlov, V.V.; Smirnov, V.S.; Filin, A.I.; Glazov, A.G.

    2006-01-01

    This paper briefly describes the physical and design features of a demonstration 300 MWe fast reactor with uranium-plutonium nitride fuel and lead coolant, BREST-OD-300, under development in Russia. This reactor is regarded as a prototype of future commercial reactors, which may form a foundation for large-scale growth of nuclear power in this new century. It is demonstrated that the natural properties of the lead coolant and nitride fuel combined with the physical and design features specific to fast reactors ensure natural safety of BREST and, with any credible initiating events, allow deterministic exclusion of accidents with large radioactive releases requiring evacuation of local residents. The paper identifies the ways and means of attaining natural safety, which rule out prompt criticality excursion, loss of cooling and fuel failure through use of a small reactivity margin, commensurable with β eff , low pressure in the circuit, large margins to temperature limits, high natural circulation, passive decay heat removal by air unlimited in time, high heat accumulating capability of lead-filled circuit, stabilizing temperature and coolant flow rate feedbacks, etc. (authors)

  13. Disturbance Hydrology: Preparing for an Increasingly Disturbed Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirus, Benjamin B.; Ebel, Brian A.; Mohr, Christian H.; Zegre, Nicolas

    2017-12-01

    This special issue is the result of several fruitful conference sessions on disturbance hydrology, which started at the 2013 AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco and have continued every year since. The stimulating presentations and discussions surrounding those sessions have focused on understanding both the disruption of hydrologic functioning following discrete disturbances, as well as the subsequent recovery or change within the affected watershed system. Whereas some hydrologic disturbances are directly linked to anthropogenic activities, such as resource extraction, the contributions to this special issue focus primarily on those with indirect or less pronounced human involvement, such as bark-beetle infestation, wildfire, and other natural hazards. However, human activities are enhancing the severity and frequency of these seemingly natural disturbances, thereby contributing to acute hydrologic problems and hazards. Major research challenges for our increasingly disturbed planet include the lack of continuous pre and postdisturbance monitoring, hydrologic impacts that vary spatially and temporally based on environmental and hydroclimatic conditions, and the preponderance of overlapping or compounding disturbance sequences. In addition, a conceptual framework for characterizing commonalities and differences among hydrologic disturbances is still in its infancy. In this introduction to the special issue, we advance the fusion of concepts and terminology from ecology and hydrology to begin filling this gap. We briefly explore some preliminary approaches for comparing different disturbances and their hydrologic impacts, which provides a starting point for further dialogue and research progress.

  14. Modified natural diatomite and its enhanced immobilization of lead, copper and cadmium in simulated contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xinxin; Kang, Shenghong; Wang, Huimin; Li, Hongying; Zhang, Yunxia; Wang, Guozhong; Zhao, Huijun

    2015-05-30

    Natural diatomite was modified through facile acid treatment and ultrasonication, which increased its electronegativity, and the pore volume and surface area achieved to 0.211 cm(3) g(-1) and 76.9 m(2) g(-1), respectively. Modified diatomite was investigated to immobilize the potential toxic elements (PTEs) of Pb, Cu and Cd in simulated contaminated soil comparing to natural diatomite. When incubated with contaminated soils at rates of 2.5% and 5.0% by weight for 90 days, modified diatomite was more effective in immobilizing Pb, Cu and Cd than natural diatomite. After treated with 5.0% modified diatomite for 90 days, the contaminated soils showed 69.7%, 49.7% and 23.7% reductions in Pb, Cu and Cd concentrations after 0.01 M CaCl2 extraction, respectively. The concentrations of Pb, Cu and Cd were reduced by 66.7%, 47.2% and 33.1% in the leaching procedure, respectively. The surface complexation played an important role in the immobilization of PTEs in soils. The decreased extractable metal content of soil was accompanied by improved microbial activity which significantly increased (Psoils. These results suggested that modified diatomite with micro/nanostructured characteristics increased the immobilization of PTEs in contaminated soil and had great potential as green and low-cost amendments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparison of the key mechanisms leading to rollovers in Liquefied Natural Gas using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubert, Antoine; Dadonau, Maksim; Dembele, Siaka; Denissenko, Petr; Wen, Jennifer

    2017-11-01

    Growing demand for the LNG fosters growth of the number of production sites with varying composition and density. Combining different sources of LNG may result in a stably stratified system, in which heat and mass transfer between the layers is limited. Heating of the LNG due to wall thermal conductivity leads to formation of convection cells confined within the layers. While the upper layer can release the extra energy via preferential methane boil-off, the bottom layer cannot and hence becomes superheated. Gradual density equilibration reduces stratification and may eventually lead to a sudden mixing event called ``rollover'', accompanied by violent evaporation of the superheated LNG. Three phenomena are potentially responsible for density equilibration. The first is the growing difference in thermal expansion of the layers due to the reduced ability of the bottom layer to reject heat. The second is the penetration of the heated near-wall boundary layer into the upper layer. The third is the ``entrainment mixing'' occurring at the contact surface between the two layers. The present study uses CFD to compare these mechanisms. Boussinesq approximation and an extended version of the k- ɛ model is used. The code is validated by comparison with a large-scale LNG rollover experiment.

  16. Natural fibre high-density polyethylene and lead oxide composites for radiation shielding

    CERN Document Server

    El-Sayed, A; Ismail, M R

    2003-01-01

    Study has been made of the radiation shielding provided by recycled agricultural fibre and industrial plastic wastes produced as composite materials. Fast neutron and gamma-ray spectra behind composites of fibre-plastic (rho = 1.373 g cm sup - sup 3) and fibre-plastic-lead (rho = 2.756 g cm sup - sup 3) have been measured using a collimated reactor beam and neutron-gamma spectrometer with a stilbene scintillator. The pulse shape discriminating technique based on the zero-cross-over method was used to discriminate between neutron and gamma-ray pulses. Slow neutron fluxes have been measured using a collimated reactor beam and BF sub 3 counter, leading to determination of the macroscopic cross-section (SIGMA). The removal cross-sections (SIGMA sub R) of fast neutrons have been determined from measured results and elemental composition of the composites. For gamma-rays, total linear attenuation coefficients (mu) and total mass attenuation coefficients (mu/rho) have been determined from use of the XCOM code and me...

  17. Compound extremes of summer temperature and precipitation leading to intensified departures from natural variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahony, C. R.; Cannon, A. J.

    2017-12-01

    Climate change can drive local climates outside the range of their historical year-to-year variability, straining the adaptive capacity of ecological and human communities. We demonstrate that interactions between climate variables can produce larger and earlier departures from natural variability than is detectable in individual variables. For example, summer temperature (Tx) and precipitation (Pr) are negatively correlated in most terrestrial regions, such that interannual variability lies along an axis from warm-and-dry to cool-and-wet conditions. A climate change trend perpendicular to this axis, towards warmer-wetter conditions, can depart more quickly from the range of natural variability than a warmer-drier trend. This multivariate "departure intensification" effect is evident in all six CMIP5 models that we examined: 23% (9-34%) of the land area of each model exhibits a pronounced increase in 2σ extremesin the Tx-Pr regime relative to Tx or Pr alone. Observational data suggest that Tx-Pr correlations are sufficient to produce departure intensification in distinct regions on all continents. Departures from the historical Tx-Pr regime may produce ecological disruptions, such as in plant-pathogen interactions and human diseases, that could offset the drought mitigation benefits of increased precipitation. Our study alerts researchers and adaptation practitioners to the presence of multivariate climate change signals and compound extremes that are not detectable in individual climate variables.

  18. ISAba1 and Tn6168 acquisition by natural transformation leads to third-generation cephalosporins resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingues, Sara; Rosário, Natasha; Ben Cheikh, Hadhemi; Da Silva, Gabriela Jorge

    2018-05-15

    Acinetobacter baumannii has intrinsic beta-lactamase genes, namely ampC and bla OXA-51 -like, which are only strongly expressed when the ISAba1 insertion sequence is upstream the 5' end of the genes. A second ampC gene has also been identified in some clinical A. baumannii strains. The increased expression of these genes leads to resistance to beta-lactams, including third-generation cephalosporins and/or carbapenems. The aim of this work was to assess the involvement of natural transformation in the transfer of chromosomal ampC-associated mobile elements, and related changes in the resistance profile of recipient cells. Natural transformation assays with the naturally competent A. baumannii A118 clinical isolate as recipient cell and the multidrug resistant A. baumannii Ab51 clinical isolate as the source of donor DNA produced transformants. All tested transformants showed integration of the ISAba1 close to the ampC gene. In two transformants, the ISAba1 was acquired by transposition and inserted between the usual folE and the ampC genes. The remaining transformants acquired the ISAba1 adjacent to a second ampC gene, as part of Tn6168, likely by homologous recombination. Our study demonstrates that natural transformation can contribute to the widespread of beta-lactams resistance, and acquisition of non-resistant determinants can lead to changes in the susceptibility profile of A. baumannii strains. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Naturally Inspired Peptide Leads: Alanine Scanning Reveals an Actin-Targeting Thiazole Analogue of Bisebromoamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Heather J; Boys, Sarah K; Makda, Ashraff; Carragher, Neil O; Hulme, Alison N

    2016-09-02

    Systematic alanine scanning of the linear peptide bisebromoamide (BBA), isolated from a marine cyanobacterium, was enabled by solid-phase peptide synthesis of thiazole analogues. The analogues have comparable cytotoxicity (nanomolar) to that of BBA, and cellular morphology assays indicated that they target the actin cytoskeleton. Pathway inhibition in human colon tumour (HCT116) cells was explored by reverse phase protein array (RPPA) analysis, which showed a dose-dependent response in IRS-1 expression. Alanine scanning reveals a structural dependence to the cytotoxicity, actin targeting and pathway inhibition, and allows a new readily synthesised lead to be proposed. © 2016 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  20. The nature of the scientific evidence leading to drug withdrawals for pharmacovigilance reasons in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivier, Pascale; Montastruc, Jean-Louis

    2006-11-01

    Because of design, objectives and number of included subjects, clinical studies are insufficient to assess the safety of new drugs. Sometimes, serious adverse drug reactions (ADRs) led to withdrawal of the drug from the market after their approval. The objective of our study was to determine the scientific evidences leading to drug withdrawal for pharmacovigilance reasons in France. Data coming from French Health Products Safety Agency, literature and Toulouse Pharmacovigilance Center allowed to identify all drugs withdrawn from the French market for pharmacovigilance reasons from 1998 to 2004. We classified data according to their study design (Randomized Clinical Trial [RCT], case serie or case report, case-control study, cohort study, observational study, animal study), the organ/system affected and the type of ADR. A total of 21 drugs were withdrawn for safety reasons between 1998 and 2004 in France. The most frequent ADRs were hepatic (n = 7), cardiovascular (n = 4) or neurological (n = 3) ones. Eleven withdrawals were due to type-B ('unexpected') reactions (52%). For 19 out of 21 drugs, scientific evidence leading to drug withdrawal came from spontaneous case reports (or case series). Among these, case reports were the sole evidence in 12 cases. Withdrawals were based on evidence from case reports in combination with case-control or cohort study in four cases, in combination with observational study in two cases or in combination with animal study in two other cases. In only one case, a RCT supported the decision. This study underlines the importance of spontaneous case reports in detecting signals and supporting withdrawal of drug for pharmacovigilance reasons in France. Health authorities suffer from lack of comparative data resource. In this perspective, a pharmaco-epidemiological population-based database could represent a helpful tool to both generate and test safety hypotheses.

  1. A naturally-occurring new lead-based halocuprate(I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, Mark D.; Rumsey, Michael S. [Department of Earth Sciences, Natural History Museum, London SW7 5BD (United Kingdom); Kleppe, Annette K. [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-15

    natural halocuprate(I) Pb{sub 2}Cu(OH){sub 2}I{sub 3} showing the chequerboard alternation of cubane-like [Pb{sub 4}(OH){sub 4}]{sup 4+} and non-polymerised [Cu{sub 2}I{sub 6}]{sup 4−} groups. Pb atoms are black spheres, oxygen atoms are red spheres, iodine atoms are mauve spheres and Cu{sub 2}I{sub 6} groups are shown as paired edge-sharing blue tetrahedra. Display Omitted - Highlights: • A naturally-occurring new inorganic halocuprate(I). • The first natural halocuprate(I). • New structure topology based upon [Pb{sub 4}(OH){sub 4}]{sup 4+} and [Cu{sub 2}I{sub 6}]{sup 4−} groups. • Comparison with synthetic halocuprates suggests tailoring of topology via halogen composition.

  2. Embedding ecosystem services in coastal planning leads to better outcomes for people and nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkema, Katie K; Verutes, Gregory M; Wood, Spencer A; Clarke-Samuels, Chantalle; Rosado, Samir; Canto, Maritza; Rosenthal, Amy; Ruckelshaus, Mary; Guannel, Gregory; Toft, Jodie; Faries, Joe; Silver, Jessica M; Griffin, Robert; Guerry, Anne D

    2015-06-16

    Recent calls for ocean planning envision informed management of social and ecological systems to sustain delivery of ecosystem services to people. However, until now, no coastal and marine planning process has applied an ecosystem-services framework to understand how human activities affect the flow of benefits, to create scenarios, and to design a management plan. We developed models that quantify services provided by corals, mangroves, and seagrasses. We used these models within an extensive engagement process to design a national spatial plan for Belize's coastal zone. Through iteration of modeling and stakeholder engagement, we developed a preferred plan, currently under formal consideration by the Belizean government. Our results suggest that the preferred plan will lead to greater returns from coastal protection and tourism than outcomes from scenarios oriented toward achieving either conservation or development goals. The plan will also reduce impacts to coastal habitat and increase revenues from lobster fishing relative to current management. By accounting for spatial variation in the impacts of coastal and ocean activities on benefits that ecosystems provide to people, our models allowed stakeholders and policymakers to refine zones of human use. The final version of the preferred plan improved expected coastal protection by >25% and more than doubled the revenue from fishing, compared with earlier versions based on stakeholder preferences alone. Including outcomes in terms of ecosystem-service supply and value allowed for explicit consideration of multiple benefits from oceans and coasts that typically are evaluated separately in management decisions.

  3. Search for Antiprotozoal Activity in Herbal Medicinal Preparations; New Natural Leads against Neglected Tropical Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Núria Llurba Montesino

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Sleeping sickness, Chagas disease, Leishmaniasis, and Malaria are infectious diseases caused by unicellular eukaryotic parasites (“protozoans”. The three first mentioned are classified as Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs by the World Health Organization and together threaten more than one billion lives worldwide. Due to the lack of research interest and the high increase of resistance against the existing treatments, the search for effective and safe new therapies is urgently required. In view of the large tradition of natural products as sources against infectious diseases [1,2], the aim of the present study is to investigate the potential of legally approved and marketed herbal medicinal products (HMPs as antiprotozoal agents. Fifty-eight extracts from 53 HMPs on the German market were tested by a Multiple-Target-Screening (MTS against parasites of the genera Leishmania, Trypanosoma, and Plasmodium. Sixteen HMPs showed in vitro activity against at least one of the pathogens (IC50 < 10 µg/mL. Six extracts from preparations of Salvia, Valeriana, Hypericum, Silybum, Arnica, and Curcuma exhibited high activity (IC50 < 2.5 µg/mL. They were analytically characterized by UHPLC/ESI-QqTOF-MSMS and the activity-guided fractionation of the extracts with the aim to isolate and identify the active compounds is in progress.

  4. Natural Products as Lead Compounds for Sodium Glucose Cotransporter (SGLT) Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaschek, Wolfgang

    2017-08-01

    Glucose homeostasis is maintained by antagonistic hormones such as insulin and glucagon as well as by regulation of glucose absorption, gluconeogenesis, biosynthesis and mobilization of glycogen, glucose consumption in all tissues and glomerular filtration, and reabsorption of glucose in the kidneys. Glucose enters or leaves cells mainly with the help of two membrane integrated transporters belonging either to the family of facilitative glucose transporters (GLUTs) or to the family of sodium glucose cotransporters (SGLTs). The intestinal glucose absorption by endothelial cells is managed by SGLT1, the transfer from them to the blood by GLUT2. In the kidney SGLT2 and SGLT1 are responsible for reabsorption of filtered glucose from the primary urine, and GLUT2 and GLUT1 enable the transport of glucose from epithelial cells back into the blood stream.The flavonoid phlorizin was isolated from the bark of apple trees and shown to cause glucosuria. Phlorizin is an inhibitor of SGLT1 and SGLT2. With phlorizin as lead compound, specific inhibitors of SGLT2 were developed in the last decade and some of them have been approved for treatment mainly of type 2 diabetes. Inhibition of SGLT2 eliminates excess glucose via the urine. In recent times, the dual SGLT1/SGLT2 inhibitory activity of phlorizin has served as a model for the development and testing of new drugs exhibiting both activities.Besides phlorizin, also some other flavonoids and especially flavonoid enriched plant extracts have been investigated for their potency to reduce postprandial blood glucose levels which can be helpful in the prevention and supplementary treatment especially of type 2 diabetes. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. A plant taxonomic survey of the Uranium City region, Lake Athabasca north shore, emphasizing the naturally colonizing plants on uranium mine and mill wastes and other human-disturbed sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harms, V.L.

    1982-07-01

    A goal of this study was to acquire more complete baseline data on the existing flora of the Uranium City region, both in natural and human-disturbed sites. Emphasis was given to determining which plant species were naturally revegetating various abandoned uranium mine and mill waste disposal areas, other human-disturbed sites, and ecologically analogous sites. Another goal was to document the occurrence and distribution in the study region of rare and possibly endangered species. A further objective was to suggest regionally-occurring species with potential value for revegetating uranium mine and mill waste sites. Field investigations were carried out in the Uranium City region during August, 1981. During this time 1412 plant collections were made; a total of 366 plant species - trees, shrubs, forbs, graminoids, lichens, and bryophytes were recorded. The report includes an annotated checklist of plant species of the Uranium City region and a reference index of plant taxa indicating species that have high revegetation potential

  6. Lead Poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lead is a metal that occurs naturally in the earth's crust. Lead can be found in all parts of our ... from human activities such as mining and manufacturing. Lead used to be in paint; older houses may ...

  7. Multi-metals column adsorption of lead(II), cadmium(II) and manganese(II) onto natural bentonite clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Jock Asanja; Surajudeen, Abdulsalam; Aliyu, El-Nafaty Usman; Omeiza, Aroke Umar; Zaini, Muhammad Abbas Ahmad

    2017-10-01

    The present work was aimed at evaluating the multi-metals column adsorption of lead(II), cadmium(II) and manganese(II) ions onto natural bentonite. The bentonite clay adsorbent was characterized for physical and chemical properties using X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area and cation exchange capacity. The column performance was evaluated using adsorbent bed height of 5.0 cm, with varying influent concentrations (10 mg/L and 50 mg/L) and flow rates (1.4 mL/min and 2.4 mL/min). The result shows that the breakthrough time for all metal ions ranged from 50 to 480 minutes. The maximum adsorption capacity was obtained at initial concentration of 10 mg/L and flow rate of 1.4 mL/min, with 2.22 mg/g of lead(II), 1.71 mg/g of cadmium(II) and 0.37 mg/g of manganese(II). The order of metal ions removal by natural bentonite is lead(II) > cadmium(II) > manganese(II). The sorption performance and the dynamic behaviour of the column were predicted using Adams-Bohart, Thomas, and Yoon-Nelson models. The linear regression analysis demonstrated that the Thomas and Yoon-Nelson models fitted well with the column adsorption data for all metal ions. The natural bentonite was effective for the treatment of wastewater laden with multi-metals, and the process parameters obtained from this work can be used at the industrial scale.

  8. Optimisation of the flow path in a conceptual pool type reactor under natural circulation with lead coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiele, R.; Anglart, H.

    2014-01-01

    This contribution investigates the effects of a bypass flow blocking bottom plate and the influence of the heat transfer between the hot and cold leg in a small pool type reactor cooled through natural convection with lead coolant. The computations are carried out using 3D computational fluid dynamics, where small-detail parts, such as the core and heat exchangers are modeled using a porous media approach. The introduction of full conjugate heat transfer shows that the heat transfer between the hot and cold leg can deteriorate flow in the cold leg and lead to recirculation zones. These zones become even more pronounced with the introduction of a bottom plate, which on the other hand also increases the flow through the core and lowers the maximum temperature in the core by approximately 150 K. Based on the results, redesign suggestions for the bottom plate and the internal wall are made. (author)

  9. Soil fauna responses to natural disturbances, invasive species, and global climate change: Current state of the science and a call to action

    Science.gov (United States)

    David R. Coyle; Uma J. Nagendra; Melanie K. Taylor; J. Holly Campbell; Chelsea E. Cunard; Aaron H. Joslin; Abha Mundepi; Carly A. Phillips; Mac A. Callaham

    2017-01-01

    Environmental disturbances seem to be increasing in frequency and impact, yet we have little understanding of the belowground impacts of these events. Soil fauna, while widely acknowledged to be important drivers of biogeochemical function, soil structure and sustainability, and trophic interactions, are understudied compared to other belowground organisms such as...

  10. Planum sphenoidale meningioma leading to visual disturbance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutwak, Nancy; Dill, Curt; Wieczorek, Rosemary

    2011-08-31

    A 60-year-old male presented with complaints of dizziness, which worsened with fatigue and a sense his balance was 'off'. Initial physical examination was negative and the laboratory testing was unremarkable. Within weeks, the patient developed bilateral visual field deficits. MRI revealed an extra-axial mass which extended into the pituitary fossa and caused compression of the pituitary gland. The pituitary stalk was displaced posteriorly and the optic chiasm was compressed with displacement superiorly and posteriorly. The patient underwent a surgical resection. Diabetes insipidus developed postoperatively requiring a vasopressin drip. He also developed hypopituitarism after the resection with hypothyroidism, hypoadrenalism and hypogonadism. The patient requires testosterone, levothyroxine and hydrocortisone replacement and has mild residual bitemporal hemianopsia.

  11. Natural levels of lead-210, polonium-210 and radium-226 in humans and biota of the Arctic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holtzman, R B

    1966-06-11

    Relatively high concentrations of some fission products in humans and biota from Lapland and Alaska have been reported. These have been attributed to the continual accumulation of those products on the long-lived, slow-growing Arctic lichens and sedges. Such plants are an important source of forage for reindeer and caribou, the meat of which, in turn, constitutes a substantial portion of the diets of Laplanders and Eskimos. These high levels of fall-out suggest, together with the proposed mechanism of uptake and the similarities to strontium-90 in atmospheric distribution and biochemistry, that in Arctic biota, the naturally occurring airborne nuclides lead-210 and its decay product, polonium-210, may also be present in high concentration. These naturally occurring fall-out activities are of special interest in studies of aerosol precipitation mechanisms because their levels are independent of bomb tests and consequently they have been constant over the years. Because of this constancy and the high energy of the particles emitted by the lead-210 series (a 5.3-MeV ..cap alpha..-particle from polonium-210 and a 0.4-MeV (average energy) ..beta..-particle from bismuth-210 compared with ..beta..-rays with average energies of 0.4 MeV from cesium-137 and 1.1 MeV from strontium-90 (yttrium-90)), the radiation dose to Arctic biota from this source may be quite significant relative to that from artificial ones. 24 references.

  12. Plant-Derived Antimalarial Agents: New Leads and Efficient Phytomedicines. Part II. Non-Alkaloidal Natural Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaíde Braga de Oliveira

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is still the most destructive and dangerous parasitic infection in many tropical and subtropical countries. The burden of this disease is getting worse, mainly due to the increasing resistance of Plasmodium falciparum against the widely available antimalarial drugs. There is an urgent need for new, more affordable and accessible antimalarial agents possessing original modes of action. Natural products have played a dominant role in the discovery of leads for the development of drugs to treat human diseases, and this fact anticipates that new antimalarial leads may certainly emerge from tropical plant sources. This present review covers most of the recently-published non-alkaloidal natural compounds from plants with antiplasmodial and antimalarial properties, belonging to the classes of terpenes, limonoids, flavonoids, chromones, xanthones, anthraquinones, miscellaneous and related compounds, besides the majority of papers describing antiplasmodial crude extracts published in the last five years not reviewed before. In addition, some perspectives and remarks on the development of new drugs and phytomedicines for malaria are succinctly discussed.

  13. CFD Analysis of the Primary Cooling System for the Small Modular Natural Circulation Lead Cooled Fast Reactor SNRLFR-100

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengcheng Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Small modular reactor (SMR has drawn wide attention in the past decades, and Lead cooled fast reactor (LFR is one of the most promising advanced reactors which are able to meet the safety economic goals of Gen-IV nuclear energy systems. A small modular natural circulation lead cooled fast reactor-100 MWth (SNRLFR-100 is being developed by University of Science and Technology of China (USTC. In the present work, a 3D CFD model, primary heat exchanger model, fuel pin model, and point kinetic model were established based on some reasonable simplifications and assumptions, the steady-state natural circulation characteristics of SNCLFR-100 primary cooling system were discussed and illustrated, and some reasonable suggestions were proposed for the reactor’s thermal-hydraulic and structural design. Moreover, in order to have a first evaluation of the system behavior in accident conditions, an unprotected loss of heat sink (ULOHS transient simulation at beginning of the reactor cycle (BOC has been analyzed and discussed based on the steady-state simulation results. The key temperatures of the reactor core are all under the safety limits at transient state; the reactor has excellent thermal-hydraulic performance.

  14. Coacervative extraction of trace lead from natural waters prior to its determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagarová, Ingrid, E-mail: hagarova@fns.uniba.sk; Bujdoš, Marek; Matúš, Peter; Kubová, Jana

    2013-10-01

    In this work, a relatively simple and sensitive method for separation/preconcentration of trace lead from natural waters prior to its determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry has been proposed. The method is based on the extraction of Pb–dithizone chelate with coacervates made up of lauric acid in the presence of potassium ions and methanol. Several important factors affecting extraction efficiency such as pH, concentration of lauric acid and dithizone, ionic strength, incubation and centrifugation time were investigated and optimized. After separation of aqueous bulk solution from surfactant-rich phase, the final extract was redissolved by using 500 μl of methanol acidified with 0.2 mol l{sup −1} HNO{sub 3}. Under the optimized conditions (using initial sample volume of 10 ml), enrichment factor of 17.0, detection limit of 0.12 μg l{sup −1}, quantification limit of 0.38 μg l{sup −1}, relative standard deviation of 4.2% (for 2 μg l{sup −1} of Pb; n = 26), linearity of the calibration graph in the range of 0.5–4.0 μg l{sup −1} (with correlation coefficient better than 0.995) were achieved. The method was validated by the analysis of certified reference material (TMDA-61). Extraction recoveries for the CRM, spiked model solutions and spiked natural water samples were in the range of 91–96%. Finally, the method was applied to the separation/preconcentration and determination of trace lead in natural waters. - Highlights: • The potential of coacervates for the extraction of metal ions is examined. • No difficulties in coupling of ETAAS with the proposed CAE are observed. • Achieved preconcentration factor results in enhanced sensitivity. • Analytical performance is confirmed by the reliable determination of trace Pb. • The proposed CAE is ecofriendly and efficient.

  15. 300 Area Disturbance Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LL Hale; MK Wright; NA Cadoret

    1999-01-07

    The objective of this study was to define areas of previous disturbance in the 300 Area of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site to eliminate these areas from the cultural resource review process, reduce cultural resource monitoring costs, and allow cultural resource specialists to focus on areas where subsurface disturbance is minimal or nonexistent. Research into available sources suggests that impacts from excavations have been significant wherever the following construction activities have occurred: building basements and pits, waste ponds, burial grounds, trenches, installation of subsurface pipelines, power poles, water hydrants, and well construction. Beyond the areas just mentioned, substrates in the' 300 Area consist of a complex, multidimen- sional mosaic composed of undisturbed stratigraphy, backfill, and disturbed sediments; Four Geographic Information System (GIS) maps were created to display known areas of disturbance in the 300 Area. These maps contain information gleaned from a variety of sources, but the primary sources include the Hanford GIS database system, engineer drawings, and historic maps. In addition to these maps, several assumptions can be made about areas of disturbance in the 300 Area as a result of this study: o o Buried pipelines are not always located where they are mapped. As a result, cultural resource monitors or specialists should not depend on maps depicting subsurface pipelines for accurate locations of previous disturbance. Temporary roads built in the early 1940s were placed on layers of sand and gravel 8 to 12 in. thick. Given this information, it is likely that substrates beneath these early roads are only minimally disturbed. Building foundations ranged from concrete slabs no more than 6 to 8 in. thick to deeply excavated pits and basements. Buildings constructed with slab foundations are more numerous than may be expected, and minimally disturbed substrates may be expected in these locations. Historic

  16. Highly effective, regiospecific reduction of chalcone by cyanobacteria leads to the formation of dihydrochalcone: two steps towards natural sweetness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żyszka, Beata; Anioł, Mirosław; Lipok, Jacek

    2017-08-04

    Chalcones are the biogenetic precursors of all known flavonoids, which play an essential role in various metabolic processes in photosynthesizing organisms. The use of whole cyanobacteria cells in a two-step, light-catalysed regioselective bio-reduction of chalcone, leading to the formation of the corresponding dihydrochalcone, is reported. The prokaryotic microalgae cyanobacteria are known to produce phenolic compounds, including flavonoids, as natural components of cells. It seems logical that organisms producing such compounds possess a suitable "enzymatic apparatus" to carry out their biotransformation. Therefore, determination of the ability of whole cells of selected cyanobacteria to carry out biocatalytic transformations of chalcone, the biogenetic precursor of all known flavonoids, was the aim of our study. Chalcone was found to be converted to dihydrochalcone by all examined cyanobacterial strains; however, the effectiveness of this process depends on the strain with biotransformation yields ranging from 3% to >99%. The most effective biocatalysts are Anabaena laxa, Aphanizomenon klebahnii, Nodularia moravica, Synechocystis aquatilis (>99% yield) and Merismopedia glauca (92% yield). The strains Anabaena sp. and Chroococcus minutus transformed chalcone in more than one way, forming a few products; however, dihydrochalcone was the dominant product. The course of biotransformation shed light on the pathway of chalcone conversion, indicating that the process proceeds through the intermediate cis-chalcone. The scaled-up process, conducted on a preparative scale and by using a mini-pilot photobioreactor, fully confirmed the high effectiveness of this bioconversion. Moreover, in the case of the mini-pilot photobioreactor batch cultures, the optimization of culturing conditions allowed the shortening of the process conducted by A. klebahnii by 50% (from 8 to 4 days), maintaining its >99% yield. This is the first report related to the use of whole cells of

  17. Scaled Facility Design Approach for Pool-Type Lead-Bismuth Eutectic Cooled Small Modular Reactor Utilizing Natural Circulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sangrok; Shin, Yong-Hoon; Lee, Jueun; Hwang, Il Soon [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In low carbon era, nuclear energy is the most prominent energy source of electricity. For steady ecofriendly nuclear energy supply, Generation IV reactors which are future nuclear reactor require safety, sustainability, economics and non-proliferation as four criteria. Lead cooled fast reactor (LFR) is one of these reactor type and Generation IV international forum (GIF) adapted three reference LFR systems which are a small and movable systems with long life without refueling, intermediate size and huge electricity generation system for power grid. NUTRECK (Nuclear Transmutation Energy Center of Korea) has been designed reactor called URANUS (Ubiquitous, Rugged, Accident-forgiving, Non-proliferating, and Ultra-lasting Sustainer) which is small modular reactor and using lead-bismuth eutectic coolant. To prove natural circulation capability of URANUS and analyze design based accidents, scaling mock-up experiment facility will be constructed. In this paper, simple specifications of URANUS will be presented. Then based on this feature, scaling law and scaled facility design results are presented. To validate safety feature and thermodynamics characteristic of URANUS, scaled mockup facility of URANUS is designed based on the scaling law. This mockup adapts two area scale factors, core and lower parts of mock-up are scaled for 3D flow experiment. Upper parts are scaled different size to reduce electricity power and LBE tonnage. This hybrid scaling method could distort some thermal-hydraulic parameters, however, key parameters for experiment will be matched for up-scaling. Detailed design of mock-up will be determined through iteration for design optimization.

  18. Flotation-Separation of the Pollutant Species of Chromium, Cadmium and Lead from aqueous Solutions and Natural Waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghazy, S.E.; Kabil, M.A.; Shallaby, A.M.; Ammar, N.S.

    1999-01-01

    This work aims to present simple, rapid and accurate procedures to recover the pollutant species of chromium, cadmium and lead from different types of water using the flotation technique. To achieve this goal, precipitate flotation was the method of choice for this investigation using oleic acid (HOL) as a surfactant. Cr(III) as its hydroxide and Cr(VI) as Ag 2 CrO 4 or Ag 2 Cr 2 O 7 are removed in 6.5±0.2 and 6-75 ph range, respectively. 2,4,6-Tri(2-pyridyl)-1,3,5-triazine (TPTA), in the presence of KI, is a good collector for quantitative separation of trace amounts of Cd(II) in the ph range 6-7.5. Chloranilic acid (CAA) is found to be the most effective complexing agent for the flotation of trace amounts of Pb(II) over the ph range 4-7. The effects of surfactant and analyte concentrations, foreign ions and temperature have been examined. The application of this procedure to recover these analytes added to natural samples has been investigated. Also, a procedure for sective separation of Cr(III) from Cr(VI) either in aqueous solutions or in saline water is proposed. Moreover, a mechanism of flotation is suggested

  19. Investigation of the isotopic composition of lead and of trace elements concentrations in natural uranium materials as a signature in nuclear forensics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svedkauskaite-LeGore, J. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Karlsruhe (Germany). Inst. for Transuranium Elements; Institute of Physics, Vilnius (Lithuania); Mayer, K.; Millet, S.; Nicholl, A.; Rasmussen, G. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Karlsruhe (Germany). Inst. for Transuranium Elements; Baltrunas, D. [Institute of Physics, Vilnius (Lithuania)

    2007-07-01

    Lead is contained as trace element in uranium ores and propagates throughout the production process to intermediate products like yellow cake or uranium oxide. The lead isotopes in such material originate from two sources: natural lead and radiogenic lead. The variability of the isotopic composition of lead in ores and yellow cakes was studied and the applicability of this parameter for nuclear forensic investigations was investigated. Furthermore, the chemical impurities contained in these materials were measured in order to identify characteristic differences between materials from different mines. For the samples investigated, it could be shown, that the lead isotopic composition varies largely from mine to mine and it may be used as one of the parameters to distinguish between materials of different origins. Some of the chemical impurities show a similar pattern and support the conclusions drawn from the lead isotope data. (orig.)

  20. Isotopic identification of natural vs. anthropogenic lead sources in marine sediments from the inner Ria de Vigo (NW Spain)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez-Iglesias, P., E-mail: palvarez@uvigo.es [Department of Marine Geosciences and Land Use Management, Faculty of Marine Sciences, University of Vigo (Spain); Laboratorio de Analisis Quimico Instrumental, C.A.C.T.I., Universidad de Vigo (Spain); Rubio, B., E-mail: brubio@uvigo.es [Department of Marine Geosciences and Land Use Management, Faculty of Marine Sciences, University of Vigo (Spain); Millos, J., E-mail: jmillos@uvigo.es [Laboratorio de Analisis Quimico Instrumental, C.A.C.T.I., Universidad de Vigo (Spain)

    2012-10-15

    San Simon Bay, the inner part of the Ria de Vigo (NW Spain), an area previously identified as highly polluted by Pb, was selected for the application of Pb stable isotope ratios as a fingerprinting tool in subtidal and intertidal sediment cores. Lead isotopic ratios were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry on extracts from bulk samples after total acid digestion. Depth-wise profiles of {sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb, {sup 206}Pb/{sup 204}Pb, {sup 207}Pb/{sup 204}Pb, {sup 208}Pb/{sup 204}Pb and {sup 208}Pb/{sup 207}Pb ratios showed, in general, an upward decrease for both intertidal and subtidal sediments as a consequence of the anthropogenic activities over the last century, or centuries. Waste channel samples from a nearby ceramic factory showed characteristic Pb stable isotope ratios different from those typical of coal and petrol. Natural isotope ratios from non-polluted samples were established for the study area, differentiating sediments from granitic or schist-gneiss sources. A binary mixing model employed on the polluted samples allowed estimating the anthropogenic inputs to the bay. These inputs represented between 25 and 98% of Pb inputs in intertidal samples, and 9-84% in subtidal samples, their contributions varying with time. Anthropogenic sources were apportioned according to a three-source model. Coal combustion-related emissions were the main anthropogenic source Pb to the bay (60-70%) before the establishment of the ceramic factory in the area (in the 1970s) which has since constituted the main source (95-100%), followed by petrol-related emissions. The Pb inputs history for the intertidal area was determined for the 20th century, and, for the subtidal area, the 19th and 20th centuries. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pb stable isotope ratios were applied to study Pb sources in coastal sediments. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pb isotopic ratios were determined for pre-pollution and for industrial samples. Black

  1. Chemical and natural stressors combined:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gergs, André; Zenker, Armin; Grimm, Volker

    2013-01-01

    In addition to natural stressors, populations are increasingly exposed to chemical pollutants released into the environment. We experimentally demonstrate the loss of resilience for Daphnia magna populations that are exposed to a combination of natural and chemical stressors even though effects...... demonstrates that population size can be a poor endpoint for risk assessments of chemicals and that ignoring disturbance interactions can lead to severe underestimation of extinction risk...

  2. Influence of disturbance on temperate forest productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Emily B.; Wythers, Kirk R.; Bradford, John B.; Reich, Peter B.

    2013-01-01

    Climate, tree species traits, and soil fertility are key controls on forest productivity. However, in most forest ecosystems, natural and human disturbances, such as wind throw, fire, and harvest, can also exert important and lasting direct and indirect influence over productivity. We used an ecosystem model, PnET-CN, to examine how disturbance type, intensity, and frequency influence net primary production (NPP) across a range of forest types from Minnesota and Wisconsin, USA. We assessed the importance of past disturbances on NPP, net N mineralization, foliar N, and leaf area index at 107 forest stands of differing types (aspen, jack pine, northern hardwood, black spruce) and disturbance history (fire, harvest) by comparing model simulations with observations. The model reasonably predicted differences among forest types in productivity, foliar N, leaf area index, and net N mineralization. Model simulations that included past disturbances minimally improved predictions compared to simulations without disturbance, suggesting the legacy of past disturbances played a minor role in influencing current forest productivity rates. Modeled NPP was more sensitive to the intensity of soil removal during a disturbance than the fraction of stand mortality or wood removal. Increasing crown fire frequency resulted in lower NPP, particularly for conifer forest types with longer leaf life spans and longer recovery times. These findings suggest that, over long time periods, moderate frequency disturbances are a relatively less important control on productivity than climate, soil, and species traits.

  3. Lead-210, bismuth-210, polonium-210. Natural activity, internal dosimetry, and dose factors for ingestion and inhalation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobi, W.

    1979-02-01

    Starting with a comprehensive review of the normal, natural activity of 210 Pb and 210 Po in the environment and in the tissues of the human body, a model of the activity and dose distributions of this nuclides in the human body is developed. Dose factors for ingestion with food and for inhalation are derived from this model, related to the intake rate unit. This 'natural exposure model' can be used for an estimation of the population exposure due to normal natural radiation as well as to man-made sourcess of these nuclides, e.g. coal-fired power plants. (orig.) [de

  4. Genome-Wide Gene Expression Disturbance by Single A1/C1 Chromosome Substitution in Brassica rapa Restituted From Natural B. napus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Zhu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Alien chromosome substitution (CS lines are treated as vital germplasms for breeding and genetic mapping. Previously, a whole set of nine Brassica rapa-oleracea monosonic alien addition lines (MAALs, C1-C9 was established in the background of natural B. napus genotype “Oro,” after the restituted B. rapa (RBR for Oro was realized. Herein, a monosomic substitution line with one alien C1 chromosome (Cs1 in the RBR complement was selected in the progenies of MAAL C1 and RBR, by the PCR amplification of specific gene markers and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Cs1 exhibited the whole plant morphology similar to RBR except for the defective stamens without fertile pollen grains, but it produced some seeds and progeny plants carrying the C1 chromosome at high rate besides those without the alien chromosome after pollinated by RBR. The viability of the substitution and its progeny for the RBR diploid further elucidated the functional compensation between the chromosome pairs with high homoeology. To reveal the impact of such aneuploidy on genome-wide gene expression, the transcriptomes of MAAL C1, Cs1 and euploid RBR were analyzed. Compared to RBR, Cs1 had sharply reduced gene expression level across chromosome A1, demonstrating the loss of one copy of A1 chromosome. Both additional chromosome C1 in MAAL and substitutional chromosome C1 in Cs1 caused not only cis-effect but also prevalent trans-effect differentially expressed genes. A dominant gene dosage effects prevailed among low expressed genes across chromosome A1 in Cs1, and moreover, dosage effects for some genes potentially contributed to the phenotype deviations. Our results provided novel insights into the transcriptomic perturbation and gene dosage effects on phenotype in CS related to one naturally evolved allopolyploid.

  5. Highly porous carbon from a natural cellulose fiber as high efficiency sorbent for lead in waste water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilangovan, Manikandan; Guna, Vijaykumar; Olivera, Sharon; Ravi, Ashwini; Muralidhara, H B; Santosh, M S; Reddy, Narendra

    2017-12-01

    The persistence of hollow centre in the carbon obtained from milkweed floss provides exceptional sorption characteristics, not seen in common biomasses or their derivatives. A considerably high sorption of 320mg of lead per gram of milkweed carbon was achieved without any chemical modification to the biomass. In this research, we have carbonized milkweed floss and used the carbon as a sorbent for lead in waste water. A high surface area of 170m 2 g -1 and pore volume of 1.07cm 3 g -1 was seen in the carbon. Almost complete removal (>99% efficiency) of lead could be achieved within 5min when the concentration of lead in the solution was 100ppm, close to that prevailing in industrial waste water. SEM images showed that the carbon was hollow and confocal images confirmed that the sorbate could penetrate inside the hollow tube. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Isotherms and kinetics of lead and cadmium uptake from the waste leachate by natural and modified clinoptilolite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Faraji

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: The modified zeolite with surfactant can be used as an appropriate adsorbent for the separation of heavy metals from waste Leachate. Lead and cadmium were absorbed in a single layer on the surface of the modified zeolite with surfactant, comparing different isoterm models, indicated that the capacity of the modified zeolite for lead adsorption was more than cadmium adsorption, but cadmium was absorbed with higher energy.

  7. Co-remediation of the lead-polluted garden soil by exogenous natural zeolite and humic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wei-yu; Shao, Hong-bo; Li, Hua; Shao, Ming-an; Du, Sheng

    2009-08-15

    The current study reported the co-remediation effect on the lead-polluted garden soil by zeolite and humic acids (HA), which was from comparing with the remediation of single zeolite in term of the lead fraction of sequential extraction in the soil and the distribution of lead in different parts of rape. Mixed treatment (zeolite and HA) and single treatment (zeolite) were, respectively, applied to the artificially polluted garden soil to examine the difference of their remediation effects in pot experiment. Results indicated that the co-remediation led to significantly greater (plead concentration in plants than by singly adding to zeolite. The co-application of zeolite and HA reduced the available fraction of lead compounds, but slightly increased (plead compounds in the garden soil, compared with the application of single zeolite, especially in the severe lead-polluted soil (> or =1000 mg kg(-1)). This method might be an efficient way to remediate the lead-polluted soils on a large scale, although zeolite is a kind of hazardous material.

  8. Riparian vegetation response to altered disturbance and stress regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafroth, P.B.; Stromberg, J.C.; Patten, D.T.

    2002-01-01

    Management of terrestrial carbon fluxes is being proposed as a means of increasing the amount of carbon sequestered in the terrestrial biosphere. This approach is generally viewed only as an interim strategy for the coming decades while other longer-term strategies are developed and implemented — the most important being the direct reduction of carbon emissions. We are concerned that the potential for rapid, disturbance-induced losses may be much greater than is currently appreciated, especially by the decision-making community. Here we wish to: (1) highlight the complex and threshold-like nature of disturbances — such as fire and drought, as well as the erosion associated with each — that could lead to carbon losses; (2) note the global extent of ecosystems that are at risk of such disturbance-induced carbon losses; and (3) call for increased consideration of and research on the mechanisms by which large, rapid disturbance-induced losses of terrestrial carbon could occur. Our lack of ability as a scientific community to predict such ecosystem dynamics is precluding the effective consideration of these processes into strategies and policies related to carbon management and sequestration. Consequently, scientists need to do more to improve quantification of these potential losses and to integrate them into sound, sustainable policy options.

  9. Evaluation of the potentiality of a Mexican natural zeolite chabazite-type in the lead removal in water; Evaluacion de la potencialidad de una chabasita natural mexicana en la remocion de plomo en agua

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarado I, J.; Sotelo L, M.; Meza F, D.; Paz M, F. A. [Universidad de Sonora, Blvd. Luis Encinas y Rosales s/n, Col. Centro, Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Maubert F, M., E-mail: msotelo@guaymas.uson.mx [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Azcapotzalco, Av. San Pablo 180, Col. Reynosa-Tamaulipas, 02200 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2013-06-01

    The intention of this paper is to present the characterization of a natural zeolite, chabazite-type, from the Mexican reservoir La Palma, at Divisaderos, Sonora, where their potential use as ion exchange material to remove lead in water is assessed. The chabazite was characterized through X-ray diffraction, Icp-OES, Icp-Ms, EDX, Bet and TG/TGD. The results indicate the presence of Ba(1930 ppm) and Sr(1220 ppm), which are characteristic of aluminium rich phases. A chabazite modification treatment is proposed by using solutions of NaOH (0.1 M) and NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} (1 M). The lead removal kinetics both in natural zeolite as in their chemically modified forms was obtained by using the ion exchange process in a batch reactor. The results show how unnecessary natural zeolite homo ionization is for the removal of lead, thereby obtaining the equilibrium concentration of unmodified zeolite for plotting the adsorption isotherm, which was adjusted to Langmuir model. The Langmuir isotherm has a good fit of the results at equilibrium (R{sup 2}=0.92), which demonstrates that natural zeolites studied, in its natural form, contains exchangeable cations required (Ca{sup +2}, Mg{sup 2+} and Na{sup +}) for potentially be used as an adsorbent material/ion exchanger for water treatment impacted by lead. (Author)

  10. Restoration of heterogeneous disturbance regimes for the preservation of endangered species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven D. Warren; Reiner Buttner

    2014-01-01

    Disturbance is a natural component of ecosystems. All species, including threatened and endangered species, evolved in the presence of, and are adapted to natural disturbance regimes that vary in the kind, frequency, severity, and duration of disturbance. We investigated the relationship between the level of visible soil disturbance and the density of four endangered...

  11. Research and development regarding the retaining mechanism of lead ions in industrial wastewaters using natural matter with remarkable properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pop, A.; Iepure, G.

    2017-05-01

    The paper shows the studying of the retaining mechanism of lead ions in industrial wastewaters through static and dynamic ion exchange mechanisms. In the experimental determinations of the lead metallic ion retention, metallurgical industry wastewaters have been used on samples of volcanic zeolite tuff (from Barsana, Maramures), samples that show a high concentration of lead ions and an acidic pH. The results showed that both the static and the dynamic ion exchanges ended with good results and they were consistent with other studies conducted on clinoptilolite zeolite tuff. Knowing that the industrial sector is an important source of environment pollution and degradation and being aware of what a serious threat the heavy metal pollution is, due to their high toxicity and stability, the experiment may find applicability in different aspects, both in the Maramures mining basing as well as in the worldwide controlling and directing of the polluting processes.

  12. Exciplexes and conical intersections lead to fluorescence quenching in π-stacked dimers of 2-aminopurine with natural purine nucleobases†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, JingXin; Nguyen, Quynh L.; Matsika, Spiridoula

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescent analogues of the natural DNA bases are useful in the study of nucleic acids’ structure and dynamics. 2-Aminopurine (2AP) is a widely used analogue with environmentally sensitive fluorescence behavior. The quantum yield of 2AP has been found to be significantly decreased when engaged in π-stacking interactions with the native bases. We present a theoretical study on fluorescence quenching mechanisms in dimers of 2AP π-stacked with adenine or guanine as in natural DNA. Relaxation pathways on the potential energy surfaces of the first excited states have been computed and reveal the importance of exciplexes and conical intersections in the fluorescence quenching process. PMID:23625036

  13. The "natural" aversion: the FDA's reluctance to define a leading food-industry marketing claim, and the pressing need for a workable rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farris, April L

    2010-01-01

    As of 2009, the "natural foods" industry has become a 22.3 billion dollar giant and "all-natural" is the second-leading marketing claim for all new food products. Even in such a flourishing market, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has never defined the term "natural" through rulemaking. FDA and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) have instead created separate, non-identical policy statements governing the use of the term "natural," and FDA has abandoned efforts to define "natural" through rulemaking in the face of more pressing priorities. In absence of any governing federal standard, consumer advocacy groups and warring food industries have attempted to define "natural" to fit their preferences through high-stakes litigation of state law claims, leaving courts free to apply diverging standards without the expertise of FDA. Recent case law from federal district courts and the Supreme Court leaves little hope that FDA's current policy statement will preempt state law causes of action. To prevent a potential patchwork of definitions varying by state, and to create a legitimate standard resting on informed scientific expertise rather than consumer whims, FDA should engage in rulemaking to define the term "natural." This paper concludes by sketching potential formulations for such a rule based on FDA's previous successful rule-making ventures and standards used by natural foods retailers.

  14. Epidemiological studies on disturbances of human fetal development in areas with various doses of natural background radiation. I. Relationship between incidences of Down's syndrome or visible malformation and gonad dose equivalent rate of natural background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ujeno, Y.

    1985-01-01

    The relationship between environmental radiation to the gonads and incidences of Down's syndrome and visible malformation was analyzed using Kendall's rank correlation method. The subjects, studied during a 3-yr period (1979-1981), were inhabitants of 46 prefectures in Japan that had various dose rates of natural background ionizing radiation. Results showed that the natural background very low-dose radiation rate was not a predominant factor responsible for inducing Down's syndrome or other visible malformations

  15. Recent advances in discovery and development of natural products as source for anti-Parkinson's disease lead compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongjia; Bai, Lan; He, Jun; Zhong, Lei; Duan, Xingmei; Ouyang, Liang; Zhu, Yuxuan; Wang, Ting; Zhang, Yiwen; Shi, Jianyou

    2017-12-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common chronic degenerative disease of the central nervous system. Although the cause remains unknown, several pathological processes and central factors such as oxidative stress, mitochondrial injury, inflammatory reactions, abnormal deposition of α-synuclein, and cell apoptosis have been reported. Currently, anti-PD drugs are classified into two major groups: drugs that affect dopaminergic neurons and anti-cholinergic drugs. Unfortunately, the existing conventional strategies against PD are with numerous side effects, and cannot fundamentally improve the degenerative process of dopaminergic neurons. Therefore, novel therapeutic approaches which have a novel structure, high efficiency, and fewer side effects are needed. For many years, natural products have provided an efficient resource for the discovery of potential therapeutic agents. Among them, many natural products possess anti-PD properties as a result of not only their wellrecognized anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory activities but also their inhibitory roles regarding protein misfolding and the regulatory effects of PD related pathways. Indeed, with the steady improvement in the technologies for the isolation and purification of natural products and the in-depth studies on the pathogenic mechanisms of PD, many monomer components of natural products that have anti-PD effects have been gradually discovered. In this article, we reviewed the research status of 37 natural products that have been discovered to have significant anti-PD effects as well as their mode of action. Overall, this review may guide the design of novel therapeutic drugs in PD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Method for evaluation of doses from ingestion of polonium, bismuth and lead as natural radioactive material(NORM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pena, Vanessa; Puerta, Anselmo; Morales, Javier

    2013-01-01

    In this work was carried out an evaluation of dose from ingestion of radioactive daughters of radon (lead, bismuth and polonium), taking into account ages from three months up to adult men, using the new model of the human alimentary tract HATM and methodology of calculating doses proposed by the ICRP publication 103, which allows the estimation of dose based on the concentration of the radionuclide present in the diet or in the water of consumption

  17. A Study on Electric Power Smoothing System for Lead-Acid Battery of Stand-Alone Natural Energy Power System Using EDLC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yan; Shibata, Ryosuke; Yamamura, Naoki; Ishida, Muneaki

    To resolve energy shortage and global warming problem, renewable natural resource and its power system has been gradually generalizing. However, the power fluctuation suppressing in short period and the balance control of consumption and supply in long period are two of main problems that need to be resolved urgently in natural energy power system. In Stand-alone Natural Energy Power System (SNEPS) with power energy storage devices, power fluctuation in short period is one of the main reasons that recharge cycle times increase and lead-acid battery early failure. Hence, to prolong the service life of lead-acid battery and improve power quality through suppressing the power fluctuation, we proposed a method of electric power smoothing for lead-acid battery of SNEPS using bi-directional Buck/Boost converter and Electric Double Layer Capacitor (EDLC) in this paper. According to the test data of existing SNEPS, a power fluctuation condition is selected and as an example to analyze the validity of the proposed method. The analysis of frequency characteristics indicates the power fluctuation is suppressed a desired range in the target frequency region. The experimental results of confirmed the feasibility of the proposed system and the results well satisfy the requirement of system design.

  18. Uranium-lead systematics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wickman, F.E.

    1983-01-01

    The method of Levchenkov and Shukolyukov for calculating age and time disturbance of minerals without correction for original lead is generalized to include the cases when (1) original lead and radiogenic lead leach differently, and (2) the crystals studied consist of a core and a mantle. It is also shown that a straight line obtained from the solution of the equations is the locus of the isotopic composition of original lead. (Auth.)

  19. Myostatin and carbohydrate disturbances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assyov, Yavor S; Velikova, Tsvetelina V; Kamenov, Zdravko A

    2017-05-01

    Purpose/aim of the study: Myostatin is a myokine that has been shown to inhibit muscle growth and to have potentially deleterious effects on metabolism. The aim of the current study was to compare its circulating serum levels in subjects from the whole spectrum of carbohydrate disturbances leading to diabetes. A total of 159 age-, sex-, and BMI-matched subjects participated in the study - 50 had normal glucose tolerance (NGT), 60 had prediabetes (PreDM), and 49 had type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D). Oral glucose tolerance testing was used to determine glucose tolerance. Serum myostatin was quantified by means of ELISA. Circulating serum myostatin levels were highest in patients with T2D, lower in subjects with prediabetes, and lowest in subjects with normoglycemia (all p Myostatin was shown to be positively associated with fasting plasma glucose, HOMA-IR, hepatic enzymes, uric acid, and FINDRISC questionnaire scores in both sexes. ROC analyses determined circulating myostatin levels to be of value for differentiating subjects with T2D (AUC = 0.72, p = 0.002 in men; AUC = 0.70, p = 0.004 in women) in the study population. After adjustment for potential confounders, in a multiple binary logistic regression model, serum myostatin added further information to traditional risk estimates in distinguishing subjects with T2D. Serum myostatin levels are higher with deterioration of carbohydrate tolerance. Furthermore, circulating myostatin is positively associated with traditional biochemical estimates of poor metabolic health. These data add to evidence of the involvement of this myokine in the pathogenesis of T2D.

  20. Sudden Ionospheric Disturbances (SID)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Sudden ionospheric disturbances (SID) are caused by solar flare enhanced X-rays in the 1 to 10 angstrom range. Solar flares can produce large increases of ionization...

  1. Depression Disturbs Germany

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The suicide of Robert Enke,the goalkeeper of the Germany national football team who had battled depression for years,stunned the country and cast depression into the national spotlight as a disturbing disease.

  2. Analysis of disturbance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciala-Wein, H.; Stegmaier, W.

    1977-12-01

    The analyses of disturbances are the supposition for the development of processes and plants. They are very important in the field of nuclear testing plants. In this report are described the possibilities to register the circumstances of the disturbance in a pilot waste processing facility and a computer programme to interpret them. This is a first scheme and it will be necessary to complete it. (orig.) [de

  3. Natural and anthropogenic lead in soils and vegetables around Guiyang city, southwest China: A Pb isotopic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Fei-Li; Liu, Cong-Qiang; Yang, Yuan-Gen; Bi, Xiang-Yang; Liu, Tao-Ze; Zhao, Zhi-Qi

    2012-01-01

    Soils, vegetables and rainwaters from three vegetable production bases in the Guiyang area, southwest China, were analyzed for Pb concentrations and isotope compositions to trace its sources in the vegetables and soils. Lead isotopic compositions were not distinguishable between yellow soils and calcareous soils, but distinguishable among sampling sites. The highest 207 Pb/ 206 Pb and 208 Pb/ 206 Pb ratios were found for rainwaters (0.8547–0.8593 and 2.098–2.109, respectively), and the lowest for soils (0.7173–0.8246 and 1.766–2.048, respectively). The 207 Pb/ 206 Pb and 208 Pb/ 206 Pb ratios increased in vegetables in the order of roots 207 Pb/ 206 Pb ratios versus the 208 Pb/ 206 Pb ratios from all samples formed a straight line and supported a binary end-member mixing model for Pb in vegetables. Using deep soils and rainwaters as geogenic and anthropogenic end members in the mixing model, it was estimated that atmospheric Pb contributed 30–77% to total Pb for vegetable roots, 43–71% for stems, 72–85% for leaves, and 90% for capsicum fruits, whereas 10–70% of Pb in all vegetable parts was derived from soils. This research supports that heavy metal contamination in vegetables can result mainly from atmospheric deposition, and Pb isotope technique is useful for tracing the sources of Pb contamination in vegetables.

  4. Small Molecules from Nature Targeting G-Protein Coupled Cannabinoid Receptors: Potential Leads for Drug Discovery and Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charu Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The cannabinoid molecules are derived from Cannabis sativa plant which acts on the cannabinoid receptors types 1 and 2 (CB1 and CB2 which have been explored as potential therapeutic targets for drug discovery and development. Currently, there are numerous cannabinoid based synthetic drugs used in clinical practice like the popular ones such as nabilone, dronabinol, and Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol mediates its action through CB1/CB2 receptors. However, these synthetic based Cannabis derived compounds are known to exert adverse psychiatric effect and have also been exploited for drug abuse. This encourages us to find out an alternative and safe drug with the least psychiatric adverse effects. In recent years, many phytocannabinoids have been isolated from plants other than Cannabis. Several studies have shown that these phytocannabinoids show affinity, potency, selectivity, and efficacy towards cannabinoid receptors and inhibit endocannabinoid metabolizing enzymes, thus reducing hyperactivity of endocannabinoid systems. Also, these naturally derived molecules possess the least adverse effects opposed to the synthetically derived cannabinoids. Therefore, the plant based cannabinoid molecules proved to be promising and emerging therapeutic alternative. The present review provides an overview of therapeutic potential of ligands and plants modulating cannabinoid receptors that may be of interest to pharmaceutical industry in search of new and safer drug discovery and development for future therapeutics.

  5. Intravenous administration of stabilized antisense lipid particles (SALP) leads to activation and expansion of liver natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramson, J L; Bodner, C A; Johnson, J; Semple, S; Hope, M J

    2000-06-01

    Stabilized antisense lipid particles (SALP) have been developed for the systemic delivery of oligonucleotides. The impact of intravenous SALP administration was measured with respect to activation of natural killer (NK) and NK1.1+ T (NKT) cells in the livers of immunocompetent mice. Treatment with a SALP containing a highly mitogenic oligonucleotide (INX-6295) generated an increase in NK cytolytic activity and cell number within the liver but did not appear to affect the number of hepatic NKT cells or their cytolytic activity. The same results were observed after intravenous administration of the mitogenic oligonucleotide alone. Interestingly, treatment with a SALP containing a weakly mitogenic oligonucleotide (INX-6300) also activated the liver NK cells, whereas the oligonucleotide alone was unable to elicit these effects. The NK stimulatory activity of a SALP containing INX-6300 required both lipid and oligonucleotide components. These results demonstrate that in addition to modifying the pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of intravenously administered oligonucleotides, SALP possess immunostimulatory activity independent of oligonucleotide mitogenicity, which can serve as an adjuvant to antisense therapies for cancer.

  6. natural

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elías Gómez Macías

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Partiendo de óxido de magnesio comercial se preparó una suspensión acuosa, la cual se secó y calcinó para conferirle estabilidad térmica. El material, tanto fresco como usado, se caracterizó mediante DRX, área superficial BET y SEM-EPMA. El catalizador mostró una matriz de MgO tipo periclasa con CaO en la superficie. Las pruebas de actividad catalítica se efectuaron en lecho fijo empacado con partículas obtenidas mediante prensado, trituración y clasificación del material. El flujo de reactivos consistió en mezclas gas natural-aire por debajo del límite inferior de inflamabilidad. Para diferentes flujos y temperaturas de entrada de la mezcla reactiva, se midieron las concentraciones de CH4, CO2 y CO en los gases de combustión con un analizador de gases tipo infrarrojo no dispersivo (NDIR. Para alcanzar conversión total de metano se requirió aumentar la temperatura de entrada al lecho a medida que se incrementó el flujo de gases reaccionantes. Los resultados obtenidos permiten desarrollar un sistema de combustión catalítica de bajo costo con un material térmicamente estable, que promueva la alta eficiencia en la combustión de gas natural y elimine los problemas de estabilidad, seguridad y de impacto ambiental negativo inherentes a los procesos de combustión térmica convencional.

  7. Natural and anthropogenic lead in soils and vegetables around Guiyang city, southwest China: A Pb isotopic approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Fei-Li [College of Biological and Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310032 (China); Liu, Cong-Qiang, E-mail: liucongqiang@vip.skleg.cn [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Geochemistry, Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guiyang 550002 (China); Yang, Yuan-Gen [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Geochemistry, Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guiyang 550002 (China); Bi, Xiang-Yang [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Liu, Tao-Ze; Zhao, Zhi-Qi [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Geochemistry, Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guiyang 550002 (China)

    2012-08-01

    Soils, vegetables and rainwaters from three vegetable production bases in the Guiyang area, southwest China, were analyzed for Pb concentrations and isotope compositions to trace its sources in the vegetables and soils. Lead isotopic compositions were not distinguishable between yellow soils and calcareous soils, but distinguishable among sampling sites. The highest {sup 207}Pb/{sup 206}Pb and {sup 208}Pb/{sup 206}Pb ratios were found for rainwaters (0.8547-0.8593 and 2.098-2.109, respectively), and the lowest for soils (0.7173-0.8246 and 1.766-2.048, respectively). The {sup 207}Pb/{sup 206}Pb and {sup 208}Pb/{sup 206}Pb ratios increased in vegetables in the order of roots < stems < leaves < fruits. Plots of the {sup 207}Pb/{sup 206}Pb ratios versus the {sup 208}Pb/{sup 206}Pb ratios from all samples formed a straight line and supported a binary end-member mixing model for Pb in vegetables. Using deep soils and rainwaters as geogenic and anthropogenic end members in the mixing model, it was estimated that atmospheric Pb contributed 30-77% to total Pb for vegetable roots, 43-71% for stems, 72-85% for leaves, and 90% for capsicum fruits, whereas 10-70% of Pb in all vegetable parts was derived from soils. This research supports that heavy metal contamination in vegetables can result mainly from atmospheric deposition, and Pb isotope technique is useful for tracing the sources of Pb contamination in vegetables.

  8. The influence of experimental wind disturbance on forest fuels and fire characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery B. Cannon; Joseph J. O' Brien; Louise Loudermilk; Matthew Dickinson; Chris J. Peterson

    2014-01-01

    Current theory in disturbance ecology predicts that extreme disturbances in rapid succession can lead to dramatic changes in species composition or ecosystem processes due to interactions among disturbances. However, the extent to which less catastrophic, yet chronic, disturbances such as wind damage and fire interact is not well studied. In this study, we simulated...

  9. Disturbance recording system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandra, A.K.; Deshpande, S.V.; Mayya, A.; Vaidya, U.W.; Premraj, M.K.; Patil, N.B.

    1994-01-01

    A computerized system for disturbance monitoring, recording and display has been developed for use in nuclear power plants and is versatile enough to be used where ever a large number of parameters need to be recorded, e.g. conventional power plants, chemical industry etc. The Disturbance Recording System (DRS) has been designed to continuously monitor a process plant and record crucial parameters. The DRS provides a centralized facility to monitor and continuously record 64 process parameters scanned every 1 sec for 5 days. The system also provides facility for storage of 64 parameters scanned every 200 msec during 2 minutes prior to and 3 minutes after a disturbance. In addition the system can initiate, on demand, the recording of 8 parameters at a fast rate of every 5 msec for a period of 5 sec. and thus act as a visicorder. All this data is recorded in non-volatile memory and can be displayed, printed/plotted and used for subsequent analysis. Since data can be stored densely on floppy disks, the volume of space required for archival storage is also low. As a disturbance recorder, the DRS allows the operator to view the state of the plant prior to occurrence of the disturbance and helps in identifying the root cause. (author). 10 refs., 7 figs

  10. A study of radionuclides, metals and stable lead isotope ratios in sediments and soils in the vicinity of natural U-mineralisation areas in the Northern Territory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frostick, A.; Bollhoefer, A.; Parry, D.

    2011-01-01

    Australian guidelines recommend that tailings materials from uranium (U) mining and milling be contained without any detrimental impact on the environment for at least 1000 years. Natural analogue sites are being investigated to determine if they can provide data on the rates of natural erosion processes which occur over these timescales, for input into predictive geomorphic computer models. This paper presents radionuclide, metal and stable lead (Pb) isotope data from sediment cores and surface soils in the vicinity of two mineralised areas in the Alligator Rivers Region. Surface scrapes from the natural Anomaly no. 2, south of the Ranger mineral lease, exhibit radiogenic 206 Pb/ 207 Pb and 208 Pb/ 207 Pb ratios, and elevated U and metal concentrations typical for a near surface U anomaly. In contrast, samples taken from the Koongarra mineral lease (KML) show radionuclide activity and metal concentrations similar to natural areas elsewhere in the Alligator Rivers Region and Pb isotope ratios are closer to present day average crustal ratios (PDAC), as the orebodies at KML are covered by surficial sand. A sediment core collected from Anbangbang Billabong, downstream of KML, exhibits small variations in Pb isotope ratios that indicate that approximately 1% of the upper sediments in the sediment core may be derived from material originating from the U anomaly at Koongarra.

  11. A study of radionuclides, metals and stable lead isotope ratios in sediments and soils in the vicinity of natural U-mineralisation areas in the Northern Territory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frostick, A., E-mail: Alison.Frostick@cdu.edu.au [Charles Darwin University, School of Environment and Life Sciences, Darwin NT 0909 (Australia); ERISS, GPO Box 461, Darwin NT 0801 (Australia); Bollhoefer, A. [ERISS, GPO Box 461, Darwin NT 0801 (Australia); Parry, D. [AIMS, PO Box 41775, Casuarina NT 0811 (Australia)

    2011-10-15

    Australian guidelines recommend that tailings materials from uranium (U) mining and milling be contained without any detrimental impact on the environment for at least 1000 years. Natural analogue sites are being investigated to determine if they can provide data on the rates of natural erosion processes which occur over these timescales, for input into predictive geomorphic computer models. This paper presents radionuclide, metal and stable lead (Pb) isotope data from sediment cores and surface soils in the vicinity of two mineralised areas in the Alligator Rivers Region. Surface scrapes from the natural Anomaly no. 2, south of the Ranger mineral lease, exhibit radiogenic {sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb and {sup 208}Pb/{sup 207}Pb ratios, and elevated U and metal concentrations typical for a near surface U anomaly. In contrast, samples taken from the Koongarra mineral lease (KML) show radionuclide activity and metal concentrations similar to natural areas elsewhere in the Alligator Rivers Region and Pb isotope ratios are closer to present day average crustal ratios (PDAC), as the orebodies at KML are covered by surficial sand. A sediment core collected from Anbangbang Billabong, downstream of KML, exhibits small variations in Pb isotope ratios that indicate that approximately 1% of the upper sediments in the sediment core may be derived from material originating from the U anomaly at Koongarra.

  12. Sleep disturbances in Parkinsonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askenasy, J J M

    2003-02-01

    The present article is meant to suggest an approach to the guidelines for the therapy of sleep disturbances in Parkinson's Disease (PD) patients.The factors affecting the quality of life in PD patients are depression, sleep disturbances and dependence. A large review of the literature on sleep disturbances in PD patients, provided the basis for the following classification of the sleep-arousal disturbances in PD patients. We suggest a model based on 3 steps in the treatment of sleep disturbances in PD patients. This model allowing the patient, the spouse or the caregiver a quiet sleep at night, may postpone the retirement and the institutionalization of the PD patient. I. Correct diagnosis of sleep disorders based on detailed anamnesis of the patient and of the spouse or of the caregiver. One week recording on a symptom diary (log) by the patient or the caregiver. Correct diagnosis of sleep disorders co morbidities. Selection of the most appropriate sleep test among: polysomnography (PSG), multiple sleep latency test (MSLT), multiple wake latency test (MWLT), Epworth Sleepiness Scale, actigraphy or video-PSG. II. The nonspecific therapeutic approach consists in: a) Checking the sleep effect on motor performance, is it beneficial, worse or neutral. b) Psycho-physical assistance. c) Dopaminergic adjustment is necessary owing to the progression of the nigrostriatal degeneration and the increased sensitivity of the terminals, which alter the normal modulator mechanisms of the motor centers in PD patients. Among the many neurotransmitters of the nigro-striatal pathway one can distinguish two with a major influence on REM and NonREM sleep. REM sleep corresponds to an increased cholinergic receptor activity and a decreased dopaminergic activity. This is the reason why REM sleep deprivation by suppressing cholinergic receptor activity ameliorates PD motor symptoms. L-Dopa and its agonists by suppressing cholinergic receptors suppress REM sleep. The permanent adjustment

  13. Disturbance History,Spatial Variability, and Patterns of Biodiversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendix, J.; Wiley, J. J.; Commons, M.

    2012-12-01

    The intermediate disturbance hypothesis predicts that species diversity will be maximized in environments experiencing intermediate intensity disturbance, after an intermediate timespan. Because many landscapes comprise mosaics with complex disturbance histories, the theory implies that each patch in those mosaics should have a distinct level of diversity reflecting combined impact of the magnitude of disturbance and the time since it occurred. We modeled the changing patterns of species richness across a landscape experiencing varied scenarios of simulated disturbance. Model outputs show that individual landscape patches have highly variable species richness through time, with the details reflecting the timing, intensity and sequence of their disturbance history. When the results are mapped across the landscape, the resulting temporal and spatial complexity illustrates both the contingent nature of diversity and the danger of generalizing about the impacts of disturbance.

  14. Alternative drugs go global: possible lead and/ or mercury intoxication from imported natural health products and a need for scientifically evaluated poisoning monitoring from environmental exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budnik, Lygia Therese; Baur, Xaver; Harth, Volker; Hahn, Axel

    2016-01-01

    With increases in globalization, cultural remedies from Chinese, Ayurvedic, Arab and other traditions have become more available to international consumers, offering unfamiliar "Natural Health Products" (NHP), used as alternative medicine or supplementary medicine. Contamination with toxic ingredients including lead, mercury, arsenic, and other toxic elements has been documented in several of these products from various parts of the globe, particularly from some parts of Asia and the Orient. We have been following this development in the last 6 years and have analyzed n  = 20 such products (60 analyses) from patients with intoxication symptoms in a pilot study, showing alarming high concentrations of mercury and/or lead (the first one in "therapeutic" doses). 82 % of the studied NHP contained lead concentrations above the EU limit for dietary supplements. 62 % of the samples exceeded the limit values for mercury. Elevated blood lead and mercury levels in patients along with clinical intoxication symptoms corroborate the causal assumption of intoxication (s). We present one detailed clinical case report of severe lead and mercury intoxications and give an overview about blood concentration related symptoms and signs of n  = 41 case reports of mercury intoxications of the German monitoring BfR-DocCenter. For NHP there is evidence on a distinct toxicological risk with alarming low awareness for a possible intoxication which prevents potentially life-saving diagnostic steps in affected cases. In many cases patients do not communicate the events to their physicians or the local health authority so that case reports (e.g. the BfR-DocCentre) are missing. Thus, there is an urgent need to raise awareness and to initiate more suitable monitory systems (e.g. National Monitoring of Poisonings) and control practice protecting the public.

  15. Concepts and Challenges in Disturbance Hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebel, B. A.; Mirus, B. B.

    2016-12-01

    Landscape disturbances are increasing, often promoted and enhanced by climate shifts and human activities. Insect infestations, wildfires, earthquakes, urban development, forest harvest, mineral and petroleum resource extraction, and hurricanes are common landscape disturbances that can have profound hydrologic consequences. These cause relatively abrupt changes in the landscape, which alter local processes on plots and hillslopes in addition to coarser-scale processes across watersheds through cross-scale interactions. Shifts in soil properties and cover of vegetation and leaf litter change the water storage or buffering capacity as well as the hydrologic functional connectivity across multiple scales. These changes increase the risk of catastrophic flooding, erosion, and mass movements that degrade water resources, ecosystem services, and protection from hydrologically driven natural hazards. Although it is imperative that we understand the hydrologic effects of these disturbances, several major barriers exist. Four challenges are: (i) overlapping disturbances in space and time with unknown recovery trajectories, (ii) a paucity of long-term recovery records (>5 years duration), (iii) inefficacy of traditional modeling and parameterization approaches, and (iv) lack of pre-disturbance characterization. Examples of these challenges will be presented along with proposed opportunities for improved mechanistic understanding of processes and thresholds in disturbance hydrology.

  16. Nutritional disturbances by adolescent

    OpenAIRE

    Stassart, Martine

    2011-01-01

    The nutritional disturbances are frequent by adolescents. That is a psychological defense against dependance toward the mother but also a middle to remain in a childish position i.e. either as a fat baby - in the fall of obesity- or as the ideal pre- or bisexual great child - in the case of anorexia.

  17. Emotional Disturbance. NICHCY Disability Fact Sheet #5

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The mental health of our children is a natural and important concern for us all. The fact is, many mental disorders have their beginnings in childhood or adolescence, yet may go undiagnosed and untreated for years. "Umbrella" terms such as emotional disturbance, behavioral disorders, or mental illness are used to refer to mental…

  18. Analysis of natural radionuclides and lead in foods and diets; Analise de radionuclideos naturais e chumbo em produtos alimenticios e dietas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bueno, Luciana

    1999-07-01

    The main purpose of the present study was to determine the lead-210, polonium-210 and lead concentrations in foods and diets. Consumption of food is generally the main route by which radionuclides can enter the human organism. Precision and accuracy of the methods developed were verifies by the analysis of reference materials from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The method for polonium-210 analysis consisted of sample dissolution by using a microwave digester (open system) employing concentrated nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide, evaporation almost dryness, addition of hydrochloric acid, polonium deposition onto silver disc for six hours and counting by alpha spectrometry. Lead was analysed by atomic absorption technique. After sample dissolution in a microwave digester (using concentrated nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide) and dilution to 50 ml, 20{mu}l of the sample was injected in a pyrolytic graphite furnace - atomic absorption spectrophotometer equipped with Zeeman background correction. The assessment of the contaminants in foods and diets allowed to estimate the intake of these elements and for the radionuclides were also evaluated the radiation doses that the individuals selected were exposed by the food consumption. The effective dose for lead-210 by diets intake ranged from 1.3 to 4.3 {mu}Sv/year, corresponding to 25% of the resulting from polonium-210 intake. The dose due to the both natural radionuclides varied from 6.8 to 23.0 {mu}Sv/year. These values are in good agreement with the literature data. The value estimated by the United Nations Scientific Committee on Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR, 1993) that is 60 {mu}Sv and lower than the dose of 0.02 Sv, limit established by ICRP, 1980. The lead levels found in the majority of the Brazilian foods are in good agreement with the values published by CONAT and FAO/WHO. However, some foods such as bean, potato, papaya, apple and rice present levels above of the recommended values by the

  19. Using the methods of radiospectroscopy (EPR, NMR) to study the nature of the defect structure of solid solutions based on lead zirconate titanate (PZT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bykov, Igor; Zagorodniy, Yuriy; Yurchenko, Lesya; Korduban, Alexander; Nejezchleb, Karel; Trachevsky, Vladimir; Dimza, Vilnis; Jastrabik, Lubomir; Dejneka, Alexander

    2014-08-01

    The nature of intrinsic and impurity point defects in lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramics has been explored. Using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) methods, several impurity sites have been identified in the materials, including the Fe(3+)-oxygen vacancy (VO) complex and Pb ions. Both of these centers are incorporated into the PZT lattice. The Fe(3+) –VО paramagnetic complex serves as a sensitive probe of the local crystal field in the ceramic; the symmetry of this defect roughly correlates with PZT phase diagram as the composition is varied from PbTiO3 to PbZrO3. NMR spectra (207)Pb in PbTiO3, PbZrO3, and PZT with iron content from 0 to 0.4 wt% showed that increasing the iron concentration leads to a distortion of the crystal structure and to improvement of the electrophysical parameters of the piezoceramics. This is due to the formation of a phase which has a higher symmetry, but at high concentrations of iron (>0.4 wt%), it leads to sharp degradation of electrophysical parameters.

  20. Ecotoxicology: Lead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuhammer, A.M.; Beyer, W.N.; Schmitt, C.J.; Jorgensen, Sven Erik; Fath, Brian D.

    2008-01-01

    Lead (Pb) is a naturally occurring metallic element; trace concentrations are found in all environmental media and in all living things. However, certain human activities, especially base metal mining and smelting; combustion of leaded gasoline; the use of Pb in hunting, target shooting, and recreational angling; the use of Pb-based paints; and the uncontrolled disposal of Pb-containing products such as old vehicle batteries and electronic devices have resulted in increased environmental levels of Pb, and have created risks for Pb exposure and toxicity in invertebrates, fish, and wildlife in some ecosystems.

  1. Lead-210, polonium-210, and stable lead in the food-chain lichen, reindeer and man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, B.R.

    1972-01-01

    The measurements of stable lead and the natural fallout radionuclides lead-210 and polonium-210 in communities of lichen (Cladonia alpestris) in central Sweden from 1961 to 1970 indicate a quite constant level. The average lead-210 content per unit area in lichen carpets was found to be 15 +- 2 nCi m -2 , the average lead-210 activity concentration 6.7 +- 0.9 nCi per kg dry weight and the lead-210 specific activity 630 +- 60 nCi per g of stable lead. The polonium-210/lead-210 activity ratio was about 0.9 +- 0.1. The vertical distribution of lead-210 in the lichen carpet showed a maximum concentration in the top layer. The distribution was similar during 1967 and 1968 but the low amount of precipitation during 1968 and 1969 disturbed the distribution pattern in 1969 and 1970. The transfer of lead-210, polonium-210 and stable lead through the food chain: lichen, reindeer, and man was characterized. The absorbed dose rate in Lapps due to polonium-210 was estimated to be about 6 to 8 mrad per year in gonads and 8 to 20 mrad per year in bone tissues. This is about ten percent of their entire absorbed dose contribution from all natural radiation sources. (U.S.)

  2. Development of a plant dynamics computer code for analysis of a supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle energy converter coupled to a natural circulation lead-cooled fast reactor.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moisseytsev, A.; Sienicki, J. J.

    2007-03-08

    STAR-LM is a lead-cooled pool-type fast reactor concept operating under natural circulation of the coolant. The reactor core power is 400 MWt. The open-lattice core consists of fuel pins attached to the core support plate, (the does not consist of removable fuel assemblies). The coolant flows outside of the fuel pins. The fuel is transuranic nitride, fabricated from reprocessed LWR spent fuel. The cladding material is HT-9 stainless steel; the steady-state peak cladding temperature is 650 C. The coolant is single-phase liquid lead under atmospheric pressure; the core inlet and outlet temperatures are 438 C and 578 C, respectively. (The Pb coolant freezing and boiling temperatures are 327 C and 1749 C, respectively). The coolant is contained inside of a reactor vessel. The vessel material is Type 316 stainless steel. The reactor is autonomous meaning that the reactor power is self-regulated based on inherent reactivity feedbacks and no external power control (through control rods) is utilized. The shutdown (scram) control rods are used for startup and shutdown and to stop the fission reaction in case of an emergency. The heat from the reactor is transferred to the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle in in-reactor heat exchangers (IRHX) located inside the reactor vessel. The IRHXs are shell-and-tube type heat exchangers with lead flowing downwards on the shell side and CO{sub 2} flowing upwards on the tube side. No intermediate circuit is utilized. The guard vessel surrounds the reactor vessel to contain the coolant, in the very unlikely event of reactor vessel failure. The Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System (RVACS) implementing the natural circulation of air flowing upwards over the guard vessel is used to cool the reactor, in the case of loss of normal heat removal through the IRHXs. The RVACS is always in operation. The gap between the vessels is filled with liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) to enhance the heat removal by air by significantly reducing the thermal

  3. Visitor attitudes towards fire and wind disturbances in wilderness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert G. Dvorak; Erin D. Small

    2011-01-01

    This study examines visitor attitudes across the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness regarding the effects of natural disturbances on visitor planning and wilderness conditions. Visitors were intercepted at entry points and permit distribution locations during 2007. Results suggest that respondents were aware of recent wind and fire disturbances. Few respondents...

  4. Impacts of geo-physical factors and human disturbance on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We examined vegetation-disturbance-environment relationships in the Xiaomengyang Section of Xishuangbanna Nature Reserve (XNR) using multivariate analysis to understand the impacts of geo-physical factors and human disturbance on vegetation along the highway corridor. We found that native forests were the best ...

  5. Postoperative circadian disturbances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gögenur, Ismail

    2010-01-01

    ) in urine the first night after both minor and major surgery. This delay after major surgery was correlated to the duration of surgery. The amplitude in the melatonin rhythm was unchanged the first night but increased in the second night after major surgery. The amplitude in AMT6s was reduced the first...... night after minimally invasive surgery. The core body temperature rhythm was disturbed after both major and minor surgery. There was a change in the sleep wake cycle with a significantly increased duration of REM-sleep in the day and evening time after major surgery compared with preoperatively....... There was also a shift in the autonomic nervous balance after major surgery with a significantly increased number of myocardial ischaemic episodes during the nighttime period. The circadian activity rhythm was also disturbed after both minor and major surgery. The daytime AMT6s excretion in urine after major...

  6. Rehabilitation of disturbed land

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, L.C. [Australian Centre for Minesite Rehabilitation Research, Kenmore, Qld. (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    This chapter discusses the objectives of rehabilitation of lands in Australian disturbed by mining. It gives advice on rehabilitation planning and outlines the factors influencing post-mining land use and rehabilitation strategies, including climate, topography, hydrology, properties of soils, overburden and mineral processing wastes, flora and fauna and social considerations. Finally, the key elements of a rehabilitation plan are discussed, namely: landscape reconstruction; selective handling of overburden; and establishment and maintenance of a vegetative cover. 12 figs., 1 tab.

  7. The significance of lead-210, polonium-210 and protactinium-231 in emissions from coal-fired power stations: a comparison with natural environmental sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corbett, J.O.

    1981-04-01

    Recently published calculations have suggested that a hypothetical individual may receive an effective radiation dose equivalent of 23 mrem/y from coal-fired power station emissions through the ingestion of lead-210, polonium-210 and protactinium-231. It is shown that the model used in those calculations is over-pessimistic by one or two orders of magnitude when applied to the deposition of Pb-210 and Po-210 derived from the decay of radon naturally present in the atmosphere. A more recent assessment of metabolic data for Pa-231 suggests that estimated doses from this nuclide also can be reduced by about a factor of twenty. It is concluded that the maximum effective dose equivalent from power station emissions probably does not exceed 1-2 mrem/y. (author)

  8. Differences in the Nature of Body Image Disturbances between Female Obese Individuals with versus without a Comorbid Binge Eating Disorder: An Exploratory Study Including Static and Dynamic Aspects of Body Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legenbauer, Tanja; Vocks, Silja; Betz, Sabrina; Puigcerver, Maria Jose Baguena; Benecke, Andrea; Troje, Nikolaus F.; Ruddel, Heinz

    2011-01-01

    Various components of body image were measured to assess body image disturbances in patients with obesity. To overcome limitations of previous studies, a photo distortion technique and a biological motion distortion device were included to assess static and dynamic aspects of body image. Questionnaires assessed cognitive-affective aspects, bodily…

  9. Climate change and forest disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virginia H. Dale; Linda A. Joyce; Steve McNulty; Ronald P. Neilson; Matthew P. Ayres; Michael D. Flannigan; Paul J. Hanson; Lloyd C. Irland; Ariel E. Lugo; Chris J. Peterson; Daniel Simberloff; Frederick J. Swanson; Brian J. Stocks; Michael Wotton

    2001-01-01

    This article examines how eight disturbances influence forest structure, composition, and function, and how climate change may influence the severity, frequency, and magnitude of disturbances to forests. We focus on examples from the United States, although these influences occur worldwide. We also consider options for coping with disturbance under changing climate....

  10. Ursodeoxycholic Acid (UDCA) Exerts Anti-Atherogenic Effects by Inhibiting Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) Stress Induced by Disturbed Flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jihwa; Kim, Kyoung Hwa; Lee, Seok Cheol; An, Shung Hyun; Kwon, Kihwan

    2015-10-01

    Disturbed blood flow with low-oscillatory shear stress (OSS) is a predominant atherogenic factor leading to dysfunctional endothelial cells (ECs). Recently, it was found that disturbed flow can directly induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in ECs, thereby playing a critical role in the development and progression of atherosclerosis. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), a naturally occurring bile acid, has long been used to treat chronic cholestatic liver disease and is known to alleviate endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress at the cellular level. However, its role in atherosclerosis remains unexplored. In this study, we demonstrated the anti-atherogenic activity of UDCA via inhibition of disturbed flow-induced ER stress in atherosclerosis. UDCA effectively reduced ER stress, resulting in a reduction in expression of X-box binding protein-1 (XBP-1) and CEBP-homologous protein (CHOP) in ECs. UDCA also inhibits the disturbed flow-induced inflammatory responses such as increases in adhesion molecules, monocyte adhesion to ECs, and apoptosis of ECs. In a mouse model of disturbed flow-induced atherosclerosis, UDCA inhibits atheromatous plaque formation through the alleviation of ER stress and a decrease in adhesion molecules. Taken together, our results revealed that UDCA exerts anti-atherogenic activity in disturbed flow-induced atherosclerosis by inhibiting ER stress and the inflammatory response. This study suggests that UDCA may be a therapeutic agent for prevention or treatment of atherosclerosis.

  11. Disturbance by optimal discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakubo, Ryûitirô; Koike, Tatsuhiko

    2018-03-01

    We discuss the disturbance by measurements which unambiguously discriminate between given candidate states. We prove that such an optimal measurement necessarily changes distinguishable states indistinguishable when the inconclusive outcome is obtained. The result was previously shown by Chefles [Phys. Lett. A 239, 339 (1998), 10.1016/S0375-9601(98)00064-4] under restrictions on the class of quantum measurements and on the definition of optimality. Our theorems remove these restrictions and are also applicable to infinitely many candidate states. Combining with our previous results, one can obtain concrete mathematical conditions for the resulting states. The method may have a wide variety of applications in contexts other than state discrimination.

  12. Sleep Disturbances in Neurodevelopmental Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson-Shelton, Althea; Malow, Beth A

    2016-01-01

    Sleep disturbances are extremely prevalent in children with neurodevelopmental disorders compared to typically developing children. The diagnostic criteria for many neurodevelopmental disorders include sleep disturbances. Sleep disturbance in this population is often multifactorial and caused by the interplay of genetic, neurobiological and environmental overlap. These disturbances often present either as insomnia or hypersomnia. Different sleep disorders present with these complaints and based on the clinical history and findings from diagnostic tests, an appropriate diagnosis can be made. This review aims to provide an overview of causes, diagnosis, and treatment of sleep disturbances in neurodevelopmental disorders that present primarily with symptoms of hypersomnia and/or insomnia.

  13. Latitudinal profile of the ionospheric disturbance dynamo magnetic signature: comparison with the DP2 magnetic disturbance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Z. Zaka

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available During magnetic storms, the auroral electrojets intensification affects the thermospheric circulation on a global scale. This process which leads to electric field and current disturbance at middle and low latitudes, on the quiet day after the end of a storm, has been attributed to the ionospheric disturbance dynamo (Ddyn. The magnetic field disturbance observed as a result of this process is the reduction of the H component amplitude in the equatorial region which constitutes the main characteristic of the ionospheric disturbance dynamo process, associated with a westward electric current flow. The latitudinal profile of the Ddyn disturbance dynamo magnetic signature exhibits an eastward current at mid latitudes and a westward one at low latitudes with a substantial amplification at the magnetic equator. Such current flow reveals an "anti-Sq" system established between the mid latitudes and the equatorial region and opposes the normal Sq current vortex. However, the localization of the eastward current and consequently the position and the extent of the "anti-Sq" current vortex changes from one storm to another. Indeed, for a strong magnetic storm, the eastward current is well established at mid latitudes about 45° N and for a weak magnetic storm, the eastward current is established toward the high latitudes (about 60° N, near the Joule heating region, resulting in a large "anti-Sq" current cell. The latitudinal profile of the Ddyn disturbance as well as the magnetic disturbance DP2 generated by the mechanism of prompt penetration of the magnetospheric convection electric field in general, show a weak disturbance at the low latitudes with a substantial amplification at the magnetic equator. Due to the intensity of the storm, the magnitude of the DP2 appears higher than the Ddyn over the American and Asian sector contrary to the African sector.

  14. Behaviourally mediated phenotypic selection in a disturbed coral reef environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark I McCormick

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Natural and anthropogenic disturbances are leading to changes in the nature of many habitats globally, and the magnitude and frequency of these perturbations are predicted to increase under climate change. Globally coral reefs are one of the most vulnerable ecosystems to climate change. Fishes often show relatively rapid declines in abundance when corals become stressed and die, but the processes responsible are largely unknown. This study explored the mechanism by which coral bleaching may influence the levels and selective nature of mortality on a juvenile damselfish, Pomacentrus amboinensis, which associates with hard coral. Recently settled fish had a low propensity to migrate small distances (40 cm between habitat patches, even when densities were elevated to their natural maximum. Intraspecific interactions and space use differ among three habitats: live hard coral, bleached coral and dead algal-covered coral. Large fish pushed smaller fish further from the shelter of bleached and dead coral thereby exposing smaller fish to higher mortality than experienced on healthy coral. Small recruits suffered higher mortality than large recruits on bleached and dead coral. Mortality was not size selective on live coral. Survival was 3 times as high on live coral as on either bleached or dead coral. Subtle behavioural interactions between fish and their habitats influence the fundamental link between life history stages, the distribution of phenotypic traits in the local population and potentially the evolution of life history strategies.

  15. LEADING WITH LEADING INDICATORS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PREVETTE, S.S.

    2005-01-01

    This paper documents Fluor Hanford's use of Leading Indicators, management leadership, and statistical methodology in order to improve safe performance of work. By applying these methods, Fluor Hanford achieved a significant reduction in injury rates in 2003 and 2004, and the improvement continues today. The integration of data, leadership, and teamwork pays off with improved safety performance and credibility with the customer. The use of Statistical Process Control, Pareto Charts, and Systems Thinking and their effect on management decisions and employee involvement are discussed. Included are practical examples of choosing leading indicators. A statistically based color coded dashboard presentation system methodology is provided. These tools, management theories and methods, coupled with involved leadership and employee efforts, directly led to significant improvements in worker safety and health, and environmental protection and restoration at one of the nation's largest nuclear cleanup sites

  16. Seasonal variations in the sources of natural and anthropogenic lead deposited at the East Rongbuk Glacier in the high-altitude Himalayas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burn-Nunes, Laurie; Vallelonga, Paul; Lee, Khanghyun; Hong, Sungmin; Burton, Graeme; Hou, Shugui; Moy, Andrew; Edwards, Ross; Loss, Robert; Rosman, Kevin

    2014-07-15

    Lead (Pb) isotopic compositions and concentrations, and barium (Ba) and indium (In) concentrations have been analysed at sub-annual resolution in three sections from a snow pit samples dated to 2004/2005, recovered from the East Rongbuk Glacier in the high-altitude Himalayas. Ice core sections indicate that atmospheric chemistry prior to ~1,953 was controlled by mineral dust inputs, with no discernible volcanic or anthropogenic contributions. Eighteenth century monsoon ice core chemistry is indicative of dominant contributions from local Himalayan sources; non-monsoon ice core chemistry is linked to contributions from local (Himalayan), regional (Indian/Thar Desert) and long-range (North Africa, Central Asia) sources. Twentieth century monsoon and non-monsoon ice core data demonstrate similar seasonal sources of mineral dust, however with a transition to less-radiogenic isotopic signatures that suggests local and regional climate/environmental change. The snow pit record demonstrates natural and anthropogenic contributions during both seasons, with increased anthropogenic influence during non-monsoon times. Monsoon anthropogenic inputs are most likely sourced to South/South-East Asia and/or India, whereas non-monsoon anthropogenic inputs are most likely sourced to India and Central Asia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Health and Safety Laboratory environmental quarterly, March 1--June 1, 1976. [Fallout, natural radioactivity, and lead in environmental samples from USA, India, and Taiwan during 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, E.P. Jr.

    1976-07-01

    This report presents current data from the HASL environmental programs, the Air Monitoring Section of the Bhabha Atomic Research Center in India, the Health Physics Section of the Institute of Nuclear Science in Taiwan and the Radiological and Environmental Research Division at Argonne National Laboratory. The initial section consists of interpretive reports and notes on the history of long-range fallout, cesium-137 in Bombay milk, natural and fallout radioactivity in Indian diet, reporting results of radioactivity measurements at near zero levels of sample activity and background, plutonium in soil northeast of the Nevada Test Site, radon levels at the Lloyd, NY regional station, strontium-90 in New York and San Francisco diets through 1975, plutonium-239, 240 in 1974 diet, up-dating stratospheric radionuclide inventories to July 1975 and a revised table of radionuclides. Subsequent sections include tabulations of radionuclide levels in stratospheric air; lead and radionuclides in surface air; strontium-90 in deposition, milk, diet, tap water, and human bone; cesium-137 in Chicago foods in April 1976; and environmental radioactivity surveys for nuclear power plants in North Taiwan. A bibliography of recent publications related to environmental studies is also presented.

  18. Update on endocrine disturbances in anorexia nervosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Støving, R K; Hangaard, J; Hagen, C

    2001-01-01

    The marked endocrine changes that occur in anorexia nervosa have aroused a great deal of interest, and over the last decade much research has been conducted in this field. The endocrine disturbances are not specific to this disorder, as they also occur in starvation states secondary to other causes...... of the large body of literature concerning endocrine aspects of anorexia nervosa with the main focus on the latest results, which provide leads for potential etiological theories....

  19. Earthworms – good indicators for forest disturbance

    OpenAIRE

    YAHYA KOOCH; KATAYOUN HAGHVERDI

    2014-01-01

    In temperate forests, formation of canopy gaps by windthrow is a characteristic natural disturbance event. Little work has been done on the effects of canopy gaps on soil properties and fauna, especially earthworms as ecosystem engineers. We conducted a study to examine the reaction of earthworms (density/biomass) and different soil properties (i.e., soil moisture, pH, organic matter, total N, and available Ca) to different canopy gap areas in 25-ha areas of Liresar district beech forest loca...

  20. Interaction of species traits and environmental disturbance predicts invasion success of aquatic microorganisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvira Mächler

    Full Text Available Factors such as increased mobility of humans, global trade and climate change are affecting the range of many species, and cause large-scale translocations of species beyond their native range. Many introduced species have a strong negative influence on the new local environment and lead to high economic costs. There is a strong interest to understand why some species are successful in invading new environments and others not. Most of our understanding and generalizations thereof, however, are based on studies of plants and animals, and little is known on invasion processes of microorganisms. We conducted a microcosm experiment to understand factors promoting the success of biological invasions of aquatic microorganisms. In a controlled lab experiment, protist and rotifer species originally isolated in North America invaded into a natural, field-collected community of microorganisms of European origin. To identify the importance of environmental disturbances on invasion success, we either repeatedly disturbed the local patches, or kept them as undisturbed controls. We measured both short-term establishment and long-term invasion success, and correlated it with species-specific life-history traits. We found that environmental disturbances significantly affected invasion success. Depending on the invading species' identity, disturbances were either promoting or decreasing invasion success. The interaction between habitat disturbance and species identity was especially pronounced for long-term invasion success. Growth rate was the most important trait promoting invasion success, especially when the species invaded into a disturbed local community. We conclude that neither species traits nor environmental factors alone conclusively predict invasion success, but an integration of both of them is necessary.

  1. An Optimization-Based System Model of Disturbance-Generated Forest Biomass Utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Guy L.; Coulson, Robert N.; Gan, Jianbang; Tchakerian, Maria D.; Smith, C. Tattersall

    2008-01-01

    Disturbance-generated biomass results from endogenous and exogenous natural and cultural disturbances that affect the health and productivity of forest ecosystems. These disturbances can create large quantities of plant biomass on predictable cycles. A systems analysis model has been developed to quantify aspects of system capacities (harvest,…

  2. Performance trade-offs in disturbance feedforward compensation of active hard-mounted vibration isolators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beijen, M.A.; Heertjes, M.F.; Butler, H.; Steinbuch, M.

    2015-01-01

    With disturbance feedforward compensation (DFC), input disturbances are measured and compensated to cancel the effect of the disturbance. Perfect cancellation is not possible in practice due to the causal nature of DFC, in which the compensation generally comes too late. Therefore, non-perfect plant

  3. Does an ant-dispersed plant, Viola reichenbachiana, suffer from reduced seed dispersal under inundation disturbances?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prinzing, A.; Dauber, J.; Hammer, E.; Hammouti, N.; Bohning-Gaese, K.

    2008-01-01

    Many plant species use ants as seed dispersers. This dispersal mode is considered to be susceptible to disturbances, but the effect of natural, small-scale disturbances is still unknown. We investigated how small-scale disturbances due to inundation affect seed dispersal in Viola reichenbachiana, a

  4. The importance of rapid, disturbance-induced losses in carbon management and sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breshears, D.D.; Allen, Craig D.

    2002-01-01

    Management of terrestrial carbon fluxes is being proposed as a means of increasing the amount of carbon sequestered in the terrestrial biosphere. This approach is generally viewed only as an interim strategy for the coming decades while other longer-term strategies are developed and implemented — the most important being the direct reduction of carbon emissions. We are concerned that the potential for rapid, disturbance-induced losses may be much greater than is currently appreciated, especially by the decision-making community. Here we wish to: (1) highlight the complex and threshold-like nature of disturbances — such as fire and drought, as well as the erosion associated with each — that could lead to carbon losses; (2) note the global extent of ecosystems that are at risk of such disturbance-induced carbon losses; and (3) call for increased consideration of and research on the mechanisms by which large, rapid disturbance-induced losses of terrestrial carbon could occur. Our lack of ability as a scientific community to predict such ecosystem dynamics is precluding the effective consideration of these processes into strategies and policies related to carbon management and sequestration. Consequently, scientists need to do more to improve quantification of these potential losses and to integrate them into sound, sustainable policy options.

  5. Sleep Disturbances in Mood Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumble, Meredith E; White, Kaitlin Hanley; Benca, Ruth M

    2015-12-01

    The article provides an overview of common and differentiating self-reported and objective sleep disturbances seen in mood-disordered populations. The importance of considering sleep disturbances in the context of mood disorders is emphasized, because a large body of evidence supports the notion that sleep disturbances are a risk factor for onset, exacerbation, and relapse of mood disorders. In addition, potential mechanisms for sleep disturbance in depression, other primary sleep disorders that often occur with mood disorders, effects of antidepressant and mood-stabilizing drugs on sleep, and the adjunctive effect of treating sleep in patients with mood disorders are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Simultaneous Ablation of Uterine Natural Killer Cells and Uterine Mast Cells in Mice Leads to Poor Vascularization and Abnormal Doppler Measurements That Compromise Fetal Well-being

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Meyer

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR is a serious pregnancy complication with short- and long-term health consequences. The mechanisms underlying this condition are not well understood. Animal models are the basis for understanding the causes of IUGR and for developing useful therapeutic strategies. Here, we aimed to ascertain the in utero growth of fetuses from NK (natural killer cells/MC (mast cells-deficient mothers that give birth to growth-restricted pups and to determine the time point at which IUGR starts. We used high frequency ultrasound imaging to follow-up fetal and placenta size and employed Doppler measurements to document blood supply to the fetus in females that were deficient for NK cells and MCs. In mice lacking NKs and MCs, we observed significantly reduced implantation sizes from mid gestation onward, which was further associated with smaller placentas. Additionally, NK/MC-deficiency was associated with absent and reversed end diastolic flow in umbilical arteries of the fetuses and an increased systolic/diastolic ratio as well as an elevated resistance index. Together, our results indicate that NKs/MCs promote blood flow, placental growth, and subsequent fetal development. The results of this study offer new insights as to how fetal growth is affected in vivo in NK/MC-deficient mice, whose pups are growth restricted at birth. The use of IUGR models and modern technologies enabling the in vivo follow-up of fetal development are important tools for understanding mechanisms behind pregnancy complications that in the future may lead to the development of effective therapies.

  7. Seasonal variations in the sources of natural and anthropogenic lead deposited at the East Rongbuk Glacier in the high-altitude Himalayas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burn-Nunes, Laurie; Vallelonga, Paul; Lee, Khanghyun; Hong, Sungmin; Burton, Graeme; Hou, Shugui; Moy, Andrew; Edwards, Ross; Loss, Robert; Rosman, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Lead (Pb) isotopic compositions and concentrations, and barium (Ba) and indium (In) concentrations have been analysed at sub-annual resolution in three sections from a < 110 m ice core dated to the 18th and 20th centuries, as well as snow pit samples dated to 2004/2005, recovered from the East Rongbuk Glacier in the high-altitude Himalayas. Ice core sections indicate that atmospheric chemistry prior to ∼ 1953 was controlled by mineral dust inputs, with no discernible volcanic or anthropogenic contributions. Eighteenth century monsoon ice core chemistry is indicative of dominant contributions from local Himalayan sources; non-monsoon ice core chemistry is linked to contributions from local (Himalayan), regional (Indian/Thar Desert) and long-range (North Africa, Central Asia) sources. Twentieth century monsoon and non-monsoon ice core data demonstrate similar seasonal sources of mineral dust, however with a transition to less-radiogenic isotopic signatures that suggests local and regional climate/environmental change. The snow pit record demonstrates natural and anthropogenic contributions during both seasons, with increased anthropogenic influence during non-monsoon times. Monsoon anthropogenic inputs are most likely sourced to South/South-East Asia and/or India, whereas non-monsoon anthropogenic inputs are most likely sourced to India and Central Asia. - Highlights: • Pb isotopes in ice and snow show seasonality in Mt Everest atmospheric chemistry. • Local (Himalayan) mineral dust inputs are present year round. • Regional and long-range mineral dust inputs are evident during non-monsoon times. • Snow samples indicate increased anthropogenic inputs during non-monsoon times. • Anthropogenic inputs are linked with Indian, South Asian and Central Asian sources

  8. Seasonal variations in the sources of natural and anthropogenic lead deposited at the East Rongbuk Glacier in the high-altitude Himalayas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burn-Nunes, Laurie, E-mail: L.Nunes@curtin.edu.au [Department of Imaging and Applied Physics, Curtin University, GPO Box U 1987, Perth 6845, Western Australia (Australia); Vallelonga, Paul [Centre for Ice and Climate, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø (Denmark); Lee, Khanghyun [Environmental Measurement and Analysis Center, National Institute of Environmental Research, Environmental Research Complex, Kyungseo-dong, Seo-gu, Incheon 404-170 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Sungmin [Department of Ocean Sciences, Inha University, 100 Inha-ro, Nam-gu, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of); Burton, Graeme [Department of Imaging and Applied Physics, Curtin University, GPO Box U 1987, Perth 6845, Western Australia (Australia); Hou, Shugui [Key Laboratory of Coast and Island development of Ministry of Education, School of Geographic and Oceanographic Sciences, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Moy, Andrew [Department of the Environment, Australian Antarctic Division, Channel Highway, Kingston 7050, Tasmania (Australia); Antarctic Climate and Ecosystems Cooperative Research Centre, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 80, Hobart 7001, Tasmania (Australia); Edwards, Ross; Loss, Robert; Rosman, Kevin [Department of Imaging and Applied Physics, Curtin University, GPO Box U 1987, Perth 6845, Western Australia (Australia)

    2014-07-01

    Lead (Pb) isotopic compositions and concentrations, and barium (Ba) and indium (In) concentrations have been analysed at sub-annual resolution in three sections from a < 110 m ice core dated to the 18th and 20th centuries, as well as snow pit samples dated to 2004/2005, recovered from the East Rongbuk Glacier in the high-altitude Himalayas. Ice core sections indicate that atmospheric chemistry prior to ∼ 1953 was controlled by mineral dust inputs, with no discernible volcanic or anthropogenic contributions. Eighteenth century monsoon ice core chemistry is indicative of dominant contributions from local Himalayan sources; non-monsoon ice core chemistry is linked to contributions from local (Himalayan), regional (Indian/Thar Desert) and long-range (North Africa, Central Asia) sources. Twentieth century monsoon and non-monsoon ice core data demonstrate similar seasonal sources of mineral dust, however with a transition to less-radiogenic isotopic signatures that suggests local and regional climate/environmental change. The snow pit record demonstrates natural and anthropogenic contributions during both seasons, with increased anthropogenic influence during non-monsoon times. Monsoon anthropogenic inputs are most likely sourced to South/South-East Asia and/or India, whereas non-monsoon anthropogenic inputs are most likely sourced to India and Central Asia. - Highlights: • Pb isotopes in ice and snow show seasonality in Mt Everest atmospheric chemistry. • Local (Himalayan) mineral dust inputs are present year round. • Regional and long-range mineral dust inputs are evident during non-monsoon times. • Snow samples indicate increased anthropogenic inputs during non-monsoon times. • Anthropogenic inputs are linked with Indian, South Asian and Central Asian sources.

  9. Model reduction of nonlinear systems subject to input disturbances

    KAUST Repository

    Ndoye, Ibrahima

    2017-07-10

    The method of convex optimization is used as a tool for model reduction of a class of nonlinear systems in the presence of disturbances. It is shown that under some conditions the nonlinear disturbed system can be approximated by a reduced order nonlinear system with similar disturbance-output properties to the original plant. The proposed model reduction strategy preserves the nonlinearity and the input disturbance nature of the model. It guarantees a sufficiently small error between the outputs of the original and the reduced-order systems, and also maintains the properties of input-to-state stability. The matrices of the reduced order system are given in terms of a set of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs). The paper concludes with a demonstration of the proposed approach on model reduction of a nonlinear electronic circuit with additive disturbances.

  10. Forest disturbance by an ecosystem engineer: beaver in boreal forest landscapes

    OpenAIRE

    Nummi, Petri; Kuuluvainen, Timo

    2013-01-01

    Natural disturbances are important for forest ecosystem dynamics and maintenance of biodiversity. In the boreal forest, large-scale disturbances such as wildfires and windstorms have been emphasized, while disturbance agents acting at smaller scales have received less attention. Especially in Europe beavers have long been neglected as forest disturbance agents because they were extirpated from most of their range centuries ago. However, now they are returning to many parts of their former dis...

  11. Ionospheric disturbance dynamo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanc, M.; Richmond, A.D.

    1980-01-01

    A numerical simulation study of the thermospheric winds produced by auroral heating during magnetic storms, and of their global dynamo effects, establishes the main features of the ionospheric disturbanc dynamo. Driven by auroral heating, a Hadley cell is created with equatorward winds blowing above about 120 km at mid-latitudes. The transport of angular momentum by these winds produces a subrotation of the midlatitude thermosphere, or westward motion with respect to the earth. The westward winds in turn drive equatorward Pedersen currents which accumulate charge toward the equator, resulting in the generation of a poleward electric field, a westward E x B drift, and an eastward current. When realistic local time conductivity variations are simulated, the eastward mid-latitude current is found to close partly via lower latitudes, resulting in an 'anti-Sq' type of current vortex. Both electric field and current at low latitudes thus vary in opposition to their normal quiet-day behavior. This total pattern of distrubance winds, electric fields, and currents is superimposed upon the background quiet-day pattern. When the neutral winds are artificially confined on the nightside, the basic pattern of predominantly westward E x B plasma drifts still prevails on the nightside but no longer extends into the dayside. Considerable observational evidence exists, suggesting that the ionospheric disturbance dynamo has an appreciable influence on storm-time ionospheric electric fields at middle and low latitudes

  12. RHYTHM DISTURBANCES DURING COLONOSCOPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Jordanov

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study is to assess the risk of inducing rhythm disturbances of the heart during colonoscopy.Patients and methods used: 80 patients had undergone colonoscopyper formed by two experienced specialists of endoscopy for the period from March to December 2011. The endoscopies were performed without premedication and sedation. Holter was placed on each patient one hour before the endoscopic examination, and the record continued one hour after the manipulation. The blood pressure was measured before, during and after the procedure.Results: During colonoscopy 25 patients (31,25% manifested rhythm disorders. In 15 patients (18,75% sinus tachycardia occurred. In 7 patients (8,75% suptraventricular extra systoles were observed and in 3 patients (3,75% - ventricular extra systoles. No ST-T changes were found. Highest values of the blood pressure were measured before and during the endoscopy, but the values did not exceed 160/105 mmHg. In 10 patients (12,5% a hypotensive reaction was observed, bur the values were not lower than 80/ 50. In 2 patients there was a short bradycardia with a heart frequency 50-55 /min.Conclusions: Our results showed that the rhythm disorders during lower colonoscopy occur in approximately 1/3 of the examined patients, there is an increase or decrease of the blood pressure in some patients, but that doesn’t require physician’s aid and the examination can be carried out safely without monitoring.

  13. Sleep disturbances and glucose homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barf, R. Paulien; Scheurink, Anton J.W.

    2011-01-01

    Sleep disturbances, induced by either lifestyle, shift work or sleeping disorders, have become more prevalent in our 24/7 Western society. Sleep disturbances are associated with impaired health including metabolic diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes. The question remains whether there is a

  14. Associations of sleep disturbance with ADHD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvolby, A.

    2015-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is commonly associated with disordered or disturbed sleep. The relationships of ADHD with sleep problems, psychiatric comorbidities and medications are complex and multidirectional. Evidence from published studies comparing sleep in individuals......, difficulty with morning awakenings, sleep onset difficulties, sleep-disordered breathing, night awakenings and daytime sleepiness in subjective studies. ADHD is also frequently coincident with sleep disorders (obstructive sleep apnea, peripheral limb movement disorder, restless legs syndrome and circadian......-rhythm sleep disorders). Psychostimulant medications are associated with disrupted or disturbed sleep, but also 'paradoxically' calm some patients with ADHD for sleep by alleviating their symptoms. Long-acting formulations may have insufficient duration of action, leading to symptom rebound at bedtime. Current...

  15. [The participation of ethanol in induction of carbohydrates metabolism disturbances].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orywal, Karolina; Jelski, Wojciech; Szmitkowski, Maciej

    2009-07-01

    Alcohol and products of its metabolism lead to impairment of many organs functions, what cause systemic and local carbohydrates metabolism disturbances. Abusing of alcohol induces changes in pancreatic digestive enzymes secretion, what contributes to development of chronic alcoholic pancreatitis. Alcohol can cause secondary diabetes, what is result of pancreatic beta-cells damage and is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes. Alcohol cause liver cells degeneration and induction of many metabolic disturbances especially carbohydrates.

  16. Decay heat removal analyses in heavy-liquid-metal-cooled fast breeding reactors. Development of the thermal-hydraulic analysis method for lead-bismuth-cooled, natural-circulation reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, Takaaki; Enuma, Yasuhiro [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center; Iwasaki, Takashi [Nuclear Energy System Inc., Tokyo (Japan); Ohyama, Kazuhiro [Advanced Reactor Technology Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-05-01

    The feasibility study on future commercial fast breeder reactors in Japan has been conducted at JNC, in which various plant design options with all the possible coolant and fuel types are investigated to determine the conditions for the future detailed study. Lead-bismuth eutectic coolant has been selected as one of the possible coolant options. During the phase-I activity of the feasibility study in FY1999 and FY2000, several plant concepts, which were cooled by the heavy liquid metal coolant, were examined to evaluate the feasibility mainly with respect to economical competitiveness with other coolant reactors. A medium-scale (300 - 550 MWe) plant, cooled by a lead-bismuth natural circulation flow in a pool type vessel, was selected as the most possible plant concept for the heavy liquid metal coolant. Thus, a conceptual design study for a lead-bismuth-cooled, natural-circulation reactor of 400 MWe has been performed at JNC to identify remaining difficulties in technological aspect and its construction cost evaluation. In this report, a thermal-hydraulic analysis method for lead-bismuth-cooled, natural-circulation reactors is described. A Multi-dimensional Steam Generator analysis code (MSG) was applied to evaluate the natural circulation plant by combination with a flow-network-type, plant dynamics code (Super-COPD). By using this combined multi-dimensional plant dynamics code, decay heat removals, ULOHS and UTOP accidents were evaluated for the 100 MWe STAR-LM concept designed by ANL. In addition, decay heat removal by the Primary Reactor Auxiliary Cooling System (PRACS) in the 400 MWe lead-bismuth-cooled, natural-circulation reactor, being studied at JNC, was analyzed. In conclusion, it becomes clear that the combined multi-dimensional plant dynamics code is suitably applicable to analyses of lead-bismuth-cooled, natural-circulation reactors to evaluate thermal-hydraulic phenomena during steady-state and transient conditions. (author)

  17. The gravel sand transition in a disturbed catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knighton, A. David

    1999-03-01

    More than 40 million cubic metres of mining waste were supplied to the Ringarooma River between 1875 and 1984, leading to successive phases of aggradation and degradation. The natural bed material is gravel but, given the volume of introduced load and the fact that much of the input was less than 5 mm in diameter, the size composition of the bed changed from gravel to sand during the phase of downstream progressive aggradation. A very sharp gravel-sand transition developed in which median grain size decreased from over 30 mm to under 3 mm in less than 500 m. With upstream supplies of mining debris becoming depleted first, degradation followed the same downstream progressive pattern as aggradation, causing the transition to migrate downstream. By 1984, the river could be regarded as a series of zones, each characterized by a particular bed condition: a natural cobble-gravel bed, unaffected by mining inputs (0-32 km); pre-disturbance bed re-exposed by degradation over 35-40 years (32-53 km); sandy substrate with a gravel armour produced by differential transport during degradation (53-65 km); sand dominated but with developing surface patches of coarser material (65-75 km); sandy bed reflecting the size composition of the original mining input (75-118 km). Although the gravel-sand transition itself is sharp, the transitional zone is lengthy (53-75 km). As degradation continues, the gravel-sand transition is expected to progress downstream but it has remained in a stable position for 12 years. Indeed, two major floods during the period released large quantities of sand from the sub-armour layer and newly-formed banks of mine tailings, causing fining both above and below the transition. Surface grain size is an adjustable component in the transitional zone as the river strives to recover from a major anthropogenic disturbance.

  18. Adsorption Study on Moringa Oleifera Seeds and Musa Cavendish as Natural Water Purification Agents for Removal of Lead, Nickel and Cadmium from Drinking Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, N. A. A.; Jayasuriya, N.; Fan, L.

    2016-07-01

    The effectiveness of plant based materials Moringa oleifera (Moringa) seeds and Musa cavendish (banana peel) for removing heavy metals namely lead (Pb), nickel (Ni) and cadmium (Cd) from contaminated groundwater was studied. Tests were carried out with individual and combined biomass at neutral pH condition on synthetic groundwater samples. The optimum biomass doses were determined as 200 mg/L for single biomass and 400 mg/L (in the ratio of 200 mg/L: 200 mg/L) for combined biomasses and used for adsorption isotherm studies with contact time of 30 minutes. Results showed that combined biomasses was able to met the Pb, Ni and Cd WHO standards from higher Pb, Ni and Cd initial concentrations which were up to 40 µg/L, 50 µg/L 9 µg/L, respectively compared to individual biomass of Moringa seed and banana peel. Moringa seeds exhibited the highest removal of Pb (81%) while the combined biomasses was most effective in removing Ni (74%) and Cd (97%) over wider their initial concentration ranges. The experimental data were linearized with Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm models. Freundlich model described the Pb adsorption better than the Langmuir model for all the tested biomasses. However, the Langmuir model fit better with the experimental data of Ni adsorption by Moringa seeds. Both models showed negligible differences in the coefficient of determination (R2) when applied for Ni and Cd adsorption on banana peel and combined biomasses, suggesting that there were multiple layers on the biomass interacting with the metals. Chemisorption is suggested to be involved in Pb adsorption for all tested biomasses as the value of nF calculated was lower than one. This type of adsorption could explain the phenomenon of different behavior of Pb removal and the higher Pb adsorption capacity (represented by KF values) compared to Ni and Cd. The study demonstrates that Moringa seeds, banana peel and their combination have the potential to be used as a natural alternative

  19. A 500 year sediment lake record of anthropogenic and natural inputs to Windermere (English Lake District) using double-spike lead isotopes, radiochronology, and sediment microanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Helen; Croudace, Ian W; Bull, Jonathan M; Cotterill, Carol J; Dix, Justin K; Taylor, Rex N

    2014-07-01

    A high-resolution record of pollution is preserved in recent sediments from Windermere, the largest lake in the English Lake District. Data derived from X-ray core scanning (validated against wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence), radiochronological techniques ((210)Pb and (137)Cs) and ultrahigh precision, double-spike mass spectrometry for lead isotopes are combined to decipher the anthropogenic inputs to the lake. The sediment record suggests that while most element concentrations have been stable, there has been a significant increase in lead, zinc, and copper concentrations since the 1930s. Lead isotope down-core variations identify three major contributory sources of anthropogenic (industrial) lead, comprising gasoline lead, coal combustion lead (most likely source is coal-fired steam ships), and lead derived from Carboniferous Pb-Zn mineralization (mining activities). Periods of metal workings do not correlate with peaks in heavy metals due to the trapping efficiency of up-system lakes in the catchment. Heavy metal increases could be due to flood-induced metal inwash after the cessation of mining and the weathering of bedrock in the catchment. The combination of sediment analysis techniques used provides new insights into the pollutant depositional history of Windermere and could be similarly applied to other lake systems to determine the timing and scale of anthropogenic inputs.

  20. Age structure and disturbance legacy of North American forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Pan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Most forests of the world are recovering from a past disturbance. It is well known that forest disturbances profoundly affect carbon stocks and fluxes in forest ecosystems, yet it has been a great challenge to assess disturbance impacts in estimates of forest carbon budgets. Net sequestration or loss of CO2 by forests after disturbance follows a predictable pattern with forest recovery. Forest age, which is related to time since disturbance, is a useful surrogate variable for analyses of the impact of disturbance on forest carbon. In this study, we compiled the first continental forest age map of North America by combining forest inventory data, historical fire data, optical satellite data and the dataset from NASA's Landsat Ecosystem Disturbance Adaptive Processing System (LEDAPS project. A companion map of the standard deviations for age estimates was developed for quantifying uncertainty. We discuss the significance of the disturbance legacy from the past, as represented by current forest age structure in different regions of the US and Canada, by analyzing the causes of disturbances from land management and nature over centuries and at various scales. We also show how such information can be used with inventory data for analyzing carbon management opportunities. By combining geographic information about forest age with estimated C dynamics by forest type, it is possible to conduct a simple but powerful analysis of the net CO2 uptake by forests, and the potential for increasing (or decreasing this rate as a result of direct human intervention in the disturbance/age status. Finally, we describe how the forest age data can be used in large-scale carbon modeling, both for land-based biogeochemistry models and atmosphere-based inversion models, in order to improve the spatial accuracy of carbon cycle simulations.

  1. Lead poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... drinking water in homes containing pipes that were connected with lead solder . Although new building codes require ... lead in their bodies when they put lead objects in their mouths, especially if they swallow those ...

  2. Earthworms – good indicators for forest disturbance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YAHYA KOOCH

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In temperate forests, formation of canopy gaps by windthrow is a characteristic natural disturbance event. Little work has been done on the effects of canopy gaps on soil properties and fauna, especially earthworms as ecosystem engineers. We conducted a study to examine the reaction of earthworms (density/biomass and different soil properties (i.e., soil moisture, pH, organic matter, total N, and available Ca to different canopy gap areas in 25-ha areas of Liresar district beech forest located in a temperate forest of Mazandaran province in the north of Iran. Soil samples were taken at 0-15, 15-30 and 30-45 cm depths from gap center, gap edge and closed canopy using core soil sampler with 81 cm2 cross section. The earthworms were collected simultaneously with the soil sampling by hand sorting method. Our study supports that the canopy gap will create a mosaic of environmental conditions. Earthworm's density and biomass tended to be higher in small canopy gaps compared with the other canopy gap areas. Earthworm's population showed decreasing trend from closed canopy to disturbed sites (gap edge and gap center. The top soil was more appropriate to presence of earthworms although ecological groups have occupied different soil layers. As a conclusion, earthworms can be introduced as good bio-indicator of environmental changes that occur by disturbance.

  3. On the centrality of disturbance rejection in automatic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhiqiang

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, it is shown that the problem of automatic control is, in essence, that of disturbance rejection, with the notion of disturbance generalized to symbolize the uncertainties, both internal and external to the plant. A novel, unifying concept of disturbance rejector is proposed to compliment the traditional notion of controller. The new controller-rejector pair is shown to be a powerful organizing principle in the realm of automatic control, leading to a Copernican moment where the model-centric design philosophy is replaced by the one that is control-centric in the following sense: the controller is designed for a canonical model and is fixed; the difference between the plant and the canonical model is deemed as disturbance and rejected. © 2013 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A QSAR approach for virtual screening of lead-like molecules en route to antitumor and antibiotic drugs from marine and microbial natural products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florbela Pereira

    2014-05-01

    Figure 1. The unreported 15 lead antibiotic MNPs and MbNPs from AntiMarin database, using the best Rfs antibiotic model with a probability of being antibiotic greater than or equal to 0.8. Figure 2. The selected 4 lead antitumor MNPs and MbNPs from the AntiMarin database, using the best Rfs antitumor model with a probability of being antitumor greater than or equal to 0.8. The present work corroborates by one side the results of our previous work6 and enables the presentation of a new set of possible lead like bioactive compounds. Additionally, it is shown the usefulness of quantum-chemical descriptors in the discrimination of biological active and inactive compounds. The use of the εHOMO quantum-chemical descriptor in the discrimination of large scale data sets of lead-like or drug-like compounds has never been reported. This approach results in the reduction, in great extent, of the number of compounds used in real screens, and it reinforces the results of our previous work. Furthermore, besides the virtual screening, the computational methods can be very useful to build appropriate databases, allowing for effective shortcuts of NP extracts dereplication procedures, which will certainly result in increasing the efficiency of drug discovery.

  5. Using the methods of radiospectroscopy (EPR, NMR) to study the nature of the defect structure of solid solutions based on lead zirconate titanate (PZT)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bykov, I. P.; Zagorodniy, A.Y.; Yurchenko, L.P.; Korduban, A.M.; Nejezchleb, K.; Trachevsky, V.V.; Dimza, V.; Jastrabík, Lubomír; Dejneka, Alexandr

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 8 (2014), 1379-1385 ISSN 0885-3010 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA01010517; GA ČR GAP108/12/1941 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : lead zirconate titanate ( PZT ) * EPR * NMR * XPS spectroscopy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.512, year: 2014

  6. Gender-disturbed males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, S B

    1993-01-01

    Adolescent and adult cross-dressing or "transvestism" is the most common antecedent behavioral pattern among those who request sex reassignment surgery. Transvestites are actually a diverse group of men who differ in their gender identities, orientation, and intention. They do, however, have in common a soothing image of themselves as women. Because of this, whether cross-dressing occurs among masculine or feminine males or heterosexuals, homosexuals, bisexuals, or asexuals, or among those with paraphilia, the behavior should be considered the expression of their consciously felt femininity. The confusing differences among cross-dressing males may be explained by their diversity along three dimensions: 1) the ambition for heterosexual intercourse; 2) the natural history of their sexual arousal to female clothing; 3) their current capacity to integrate their masculine and feminine strivings into separate compartments. When cross-dressers give up all vestiges of male gender role behaviors and successfully live and work full time as women, the appropriate descriptive term for them becomes "transsexual."

  7. A large-amplitude traveling ionospheric disturbance excited by the space shuttle during launch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noble, S.T.

    1990-01-01

    The ionosphere was monitored during the fourth space shuttle (STS 4) launch in June 1982 by the Arecibo incoherent scatter radar. A long-lived, large-amplitude, traveling ionospheric disturbance with dominant wave moles of ∼ 15 and 75 min was observed shortly after the launch. The disturbance wave train is likely the product of a variety of wave modes. The disturbance front traveled with an average group speed of >628 m/s. Such speeds are typical of fast moving shock waves and ducted gravity waves. Either one or both could be responsible for the signatures observed near the leading edge of the STS 4 wave train. Later arriving waves, with their inherently lower propagation speeds, are attributed to additional gravity wave modes. These waves, however, were not explicitly identified in this study. Although atmospheric waves are excited along the entire flight path, the most intense region of excitation is located along a relatively short flight segment (∼70 km) near the launch site where all primary thrusters are firing and over 70% of the propellants are expended. Not since the nuclear bomb tests of the late 1950s and early 1960s has an artificial source of atmospheric gravity waves been more available for upper atmospheric studies. The routine launching of high thrust vehicles provides an excellent opportunity to observe the propagation characteristics of atmospheric waves under controlled conditions and to acquire information on the nature of the upper atmosphere

  8. Virtual screening of natural inhibitors to the predicted HBx protein structure of Hepatitis B Virus using molecular docking for identification of potential lead molecules for liver cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Rajesh Kumar; Baunthiyal, Mamta; Taj, Gohar; Kumar, Anil

    2014-01-01

    The HBx protein in Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) is a potential target for anti-liver cancer molecules. Therefore, it is of interest to screen known natural compounds against the HBx protein using molecular docking. However, the structure of HBx is not yet known. Therefore, the predicted structure of HBx using threading in LOMET was used for docking against plant derived natural compounds (curcumin, oleanolic acid, resveratrol, bilobetin, luteoline, ellagic acid, betulinic acid and rutin) by Molegro Virtual Docker. The screening identified rutin with binding energy of -161.65 Kcal/mol. Thus, twenty derivatives of rutin were further designed and screened against HBx. These in silico experiments identified compounds rutin01 (-163.16 Kcal/mol) and rutin08 (- 165.76 Kcal/mol) for further consideration and downstream validation. PMID:25187683

  9. Lead poisoning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beijers, J A

    1952-01-01

    Three cases of acute lead poisoning of cattle herds via ingestion are reported, and reference is made to several other incidents of lead in both humans and animals. The quantity of lead which was found in the livers of the dead cows varied from 6.5 to 19 mg/kg, while 1160 mg/kg of lead in the liver was found for a young cow which was poisoned experimentally with 5 gms of lead acetate per day; hence, there appears to be great variability in the amounts deposited that can lead to intoxication and death. No evidence was found for a lead seam around the teeth, prophyrinuria, or basophil granules in the erythrocytes during acute or chronic lead poisoning of cattle or horses examined. Reference is made to attempts of finding the boundary line between increased lead absorption and lead intoxication in humans, and an examination of 60 laborers in an offset-printing office containing a great deal of inhalable lead (0.16 to 1.9 mg/cu m air) is reviewed. Physical deviation, basophylic granulation of erythrocytes, increased lead content of the urine, and porphyrinuria only indicate an increased absorption of lead; the use of the term intoxication is justified if, in addition, there are complaints of lack of appetite, constipation, fatigue, abdominal pain, and emaciation.

  10. Computer aided analysis of disturbances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldeweg, F.; Lindner, A.

    1986-01-01

    Computer aided analysis of disturbances and the prevention of failures (diagnosis and therapy control) in technological plants belong to the most important tasks of process control. Research in this field is very intensive due to increasing requirements to security and economy of process control and due to a remarkable increase of the efficiency of digital electronics. This publication concerns with analysis of disturbances in complex technological plants, especially in so called high risk processes. The presentation emphasizes theoretical concept of diagnosis and therapy control, modelling of the disturbance behaviour of the technological process and the man-machine-communication integrating artificial intelligence methods, e.g., expert system approach. Application is given for nuclear power plants. (author)

  11. Managing Sleep Disturbances in Cirrhosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xun Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sleep disturbances, particularly daytime sleepiness and insomnia, are common problems reported by patients suffering from liver cirrhosis. Poor sleep negatively impacts patients’ quality of life and cognitive functions and increases mortality. Although sleep disturbances can be an early sign of hepatic encephalopathy (HE, many patients without HE still complain of poor quality sleep. The pathophysiology of these disturbances is not fully understood but is believed to be linked to impaired hepatic melatonin metabolism. This paper provides an overview for the clinician of common comorbidities contributing to poor sleep in patients with liver disease, mainly restless leg syndrome and obstructive sleep apnea. It discusses nondrug and pharmacologic treatment options in these patients, such as the use of light therapy and histamine (H1 blockers.

  12. Climate change amplifies the interactions between wind and bark beetle disturbances in forest landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidl, Rupert; Rammer, Werner

    2017-07-01

    Growing evidence suggests that climate change could substantially alter forest disturbances. Interactions between individual disturbance agents are a major component of disturbance regimes, yet how interactions contribute to their climate sensitivity remains largely unknown. Here, our aim was to assess the climate sensitivity of disturbance interactions, focusing on wind and bark beetle disturbances. We developed a process-based model of bark beetle disturbance, integrated into the dynamic forest landscape model iLand (already including a detailed model of wind disturbance). We evaluated the integrated model against observations from three wind events and a subsequent bark beetle outbreak, affecting 530.2 ha (3.8 %) of a mountain forest landscape in Austria between 2007 and 2014. Subsequently, we conducted a factorial experiment determining the effect of changes in climate variables on the area disturbed by wind and bark beetles separately and in combination. iLand was well able to reproduce observations with regard to area, temporal sequence, and spatial pattern of disturbance. The observed disturbance dynamics was strongly driven by interactions, with 64.3 % of the area disturbed attributed to interaction effects. A +4 °C warming increased the disturbed area by +264.7 % and the area-weighted mean patch size by +1794.3 %. Interactions were found to have a ten times higher sensitivity to temperature changes than main effects, considerably amplifying the climate sensitivity of the disturbance regime. Disturbance interactions are a key component of the forest disturbance regime. Neglecting interaction effects can lead to a substantial underestimation of the climate change sensitivity of disturbance regimes.

  13. Lead Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... o Do not use glazed ceramics, home remedies, cosmetics, or leaded-crystal glassware unless you know that they are lead safe. o If you live near an industry, mine, or waste site that may have contaminated ...

  14. Relational Leading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Mette Vinther; Rasmussen, Jørgen Gulddahl

    2015-01-01

    This first chapter presents the exploratory and curious approach to leading as relational processes – an approach that pervades the entire book. We explore leading from a perspective that emphasises the unpredictable challenges and triviality of everyday life, which we consider an interesting......, relevant and realistic way to examine leading. The chapter brings up a number of concepts and contexts as formulated by researchers within the field, and in this way seeks to construct a first understanding of relational leading....

  15. Lead Poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Menu Topics Environment & Health Healthy Living Pollution Reduce, Reuse, Recycle Science – How It Works The Natural World Games ... Lessons Topics Expand Environment & Health Healthy Living Pollution Reduce, Reuse, Recycle Science – How It Works The Natural World Games ...

  16. The Disturbing Student and the Judicial Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragle, John D.; Paine, Gage E.

    2009-01-01

    The Assessment-Intervention of Student Problems (AISP) model is a useful tool for preparing student affairs professionals to assess the problems of disturbed, disturbing, or disturbed/disturbing students and to make appropriate referrals. It is particularly useful because it emphasizes the necessity of developing an integrated system for this…

  17. Evaluation of natural clay Brasgel as adsorbent in removal of lead in synthetic waste water; Avaliacao da argila Brasgel natural como adsorvente na remocao de chumbo de efluentes sinteticos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, W.S.; Rodrigues, M.G.F.; Mota, M.F.; Patricio, A.C.L.; Silva, M.M., E-mail: wsl_20@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (LABNOV/UFCG), PB (Brazil). Unidade Academica de Engenharia Quimica. Lab. de Desenvolvimento de Novos Materiais

    2012-07-01

    The smectite clays have high adsorption capacity and cation exchange. Due to its chemical and physical characteristics, they can be effectively used as adsorbent of pollutants (such as metal ions). The initial objective of this study was to characterize the clay Brasgel through the techniques of X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), X-Ray Spectrometry by Energy Dispersive (EDX) and nitrogen adsorption (BET method), seeking its use in removing lead (Pb{sup 2+}) from synthetic effluents. System was used in finite bath to assess the potential removal of lead (Pb{sup 2+}), following a 2{sup 2} factorial experimental design with three center point experiments, taking as input variables: pH and initial concentrations of lead (Pb{sup 2+}). The clay has Brasgel clay in its composition that characterize it as a smectite clay. By having a large surface area, this clay showed great potential on the adsorption of metal ions. (author)

  18. Lead Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to do renovation and repair projects using lead-safe work practices to avoid creating more lead dust or ... in a dangerous area? Yes. If you are working in a potentially harmful environment with exposure to lead dust or fumes: Wash ...

  19. Structure of magnetic field disturbances under development of disruptive instability in the ''Tokamak-6''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merezhkin, V.G.

    1978-01-01

    The structure and dynamics of disturbances of a poloidal field during the development of the breakaway instability in the Tokamak-6 are investigated. The behaviour of the symmetric and dipole field component, and the peculiarities of the structure of screw disturbances in a minor and major breakaways are analyzed. It was established that the structure of screw disturbances in minor breakaways is unchangeable and that the rearrangement in major breakaways is of a discrete nature. The relationship between the symmetric and screw components of disturbances of the poloidal field at the forward front of the disturbance increase was revealed. Data on the increments, scales and structure of screw disturbances, the ratios between the symmetric and screw components of field disturbances, and also on the magnitude of energy losses in typical breakaways are given

  20. A Disturbed Galactic Duo

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    variety, classified as a Type Ia, is thought to occur when a dense, hot star called a white dwarf - a remnant of medium-sized stars like our Sun - gravitationally sucks gas away from a nearby companion star. This added fuel eventually causes the whole star to explode in a runaway fusion reaction. The new image presented here of a remarkable galactic dynamic duo is based on data selected by Igor Chekalin for ESO's Hidden Treasures 2010 astrophotography competition. Chekalin won the first overall prize and this image received the second highest ranking of the nearly 100 contest entries [2]. Notes [1] Other much more noticeable points of light, such as the one toward the left end of the spiral arm running underneath of NGC 3169's core, are stars within the Milky Way that happen to fall by chance very close to the line of sight between our telescopes and the galaxies. [2] ESO's Hidden Treasures 2010 competition gave amateur astronomers the opportunity to search through ESO's vast archives of astronomical data, hoping to find a well-hidden gem that needed polishing by the entrants. To find out more about Hidden Treasures, visit http://www.eso.org/public/outreach/hiddentreasures/. More information ESO, the European Southern Observatory, is the foremost intergovernmental astronomy organisation in Europe and the world's most productive astronomical observatory. It is supported by 15 countries: Austria, Belgium, Brazil, the Czech Republic, Denmark, France, Finland, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom. ESO carries out an ambitious programme focused on the design, construction and operation of powerful ground-based observing facilities enabling astronomers to make important scientific discoveries. ESO also plays a leading role in promoting and organising cooperation in astronomical research. ESO operates three unique world-class observing sites in Chile: La Silla, Paranal and Chajnantor. At Paranal, ESO operates the Very Large

  1. Timing is everything: priority effects alter community invasibility after disturbance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symons, Celia C; Arnott, Shelley E

    2014-02-01

    Theory suggests that communities should be more open to the establishment of regional species following disturbance because disturbance may make more resources available to dispersers. However, after an initial period of high invasibility, growth of the resident community may lead to the monopolization of local resources and decreased probability of successful colonist establishment. During press disturbances (i.e., directional environmental change), it remains unclear what effect regional dispersal will have on local community structure if the establishment of later arriving species is affected by early arriving species (i.e., if priority effects are important). To determine the relationship between time-since-disturbance and invasibility, we conducted a fully factorial field mesocosm experiment that exposed tundra zooplankton communities to two emerging stressors - nutrient and salt addition, and manipulated the arrival timing of regional dispersers. Our results demonstrate that invasibility decreases with increasing time-since-disturbance as abundance (nutrient treatments) or species richness (salt treatments) increases in the resident community. Results suggest that the relative timing of dispersal and environmental change will modify the importance of priority effects in determining species composition after a press disturbance.

  2. Non disturbing characterization and quantification of natural organic matter (NOM) contained in clay rock pore water by mass spectrometry using electro-spray and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huclier-Markai, S.; Landesman, C.; Grambow, B.; Rogniaux, H.; Monteau, F.; Vinsot, A.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The Callovo-Oxfordian formation (COx) rock may contain up to 1% w/w of organic Carbon. Most of the Organic Matter (OM) is attached to the mineral particles whereas a small portion is present as Dissolved Organic Matter (DOM) in the pore water. In environmental studies, Natural Organic Matter (NOM) plays a key role on the bioavailability and the toxicity of metallic compounds. It is necessary to know the structure of any organic substance in order to assess which chemical and biological reactions occur under environmentally relevant conditions. The 150 Myears solid-bound organic matter of the COx (kerogen) has been already investigated in several studies and originates from a mixture of marine and terrestrial sources. In addition to this, the CCl 4 soluble organic fraction (bitumen) has been already characterized by liquid and gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. It allows proportion and distribution of biological markers to be determined as polar compounds with aromatic and saturated hydrocarbons. DOM was extracted from a crushed clay rock of the COx formation with a high rock/water ratio of about 1500 g/L. Part of the OM from the COx is known to be sensitive to air oxidation which can significantly modify the nature of the bitumen by an overall shift towards lower molecular weight compounds. Therefore, the characteristics of the DOM must be determined in in-situ like conditions if one wants to assess the mobility of DOM in the clay pore space and to evaluate the mobility of heavy metals/ radionuclides. Due to their high binding capacity with metal ions and their colloidal sizes in natural waters, these macromolecules, through complexation reactions, might either enhance the mobility of trace elements, or reduce their migration rates by sorption processes in relation with their size and that of the porous medium. Consequently, the characterization of DOM in anoxic pore water samples from the COx

  3. Forest disturbances under climate change

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Seidl, R.; Thom, D.; Kautz, M.; Martin-Benito, D.; Peltoniemi, M.; Vacchiano, G.; Wild, Jan; Ascoli, D.; Petr, M.; Honkaniemi, J.; Lexer, M. J.; Trotsiuk, V.; Mairota, P.; Svoboda, M.; Fabrika, M.; Nagel, T.A.; Reyer, C. P. O.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 6 (2017), s. 395-402 ISSN 1758-678X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD15158 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : climate change * disturbance * forest Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour OBOR OECD: Ecology Impact factor: 19.304, year: 2016

  4. Gastrointestinal disturbances in marathon runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddoch, C; Trinick, T

    1988-06-01

    The purpose of this survey was to investigate the prevalence of running-induced gastrointestinal (GI) disturbances in marathon runners. A questionnaire was completed by 471 of the estimated 1,750 competitors in the 1986 Belfast City Marathon. Eighty-three per cent of respondents indicated that they occasionally or frequently suffered one or more GI disturbances during or immediately after running. The urge to have a bowel movement (53%) and diarrhoea (38%) were the most common symptoms, especially among female runners (74% and 68% respectively). Upper GI tract symptoms were experienced more by women than men (p less than 0.05) and more by younger runners than older runners (p less than 0.01). Women also suffered more lower GI tract symptoms than men (p less than 0.05) with younger runners showing a similar trend. Both upper and lower tract symptoms were more common during a "hard" run than an "easy" run (p less than 0.01) and were equally as common both during and after running. Of those runners who suffered GI disturbances, 72% thought that running was the cause and 29% believed their performance to be adversely affected. There was no consensus among sufferers as to the causes of symptoms and a wide variety of "remedies" were suggested. GI disturbances are common amongst long-distance runners and their aetiology is unknown. Medical practitioners should be aware of this when dealing with patients who run.

  5. Landscape level analysis of disturbance regimes in protected areas ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G B Pant Institute of Himalayan Environment and Development, Almora 263 643, Uttarakhand, India. ... level assessment of fragmentation and disturbance index in protected areas of Rajasthan using remote ..... anthropogenic/natural forces on the landscape was ..... Environmental Research, Engineering and Management.

  6. Soil respiration response to experimental disturbances over 3 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amy Concilio; Siyan Ma; Soung-Ryoul Ryu; Malcolm North; Jiquan Chen

    2006-01-01

    Soil respiration is a major pathway for carbon cycling in terrestrial ecosystems yet little is known about its response to natural and anthropogenic disturbances. This study examined soil respiration response to prescribed burning and thinning treatments in an old-growth, mixed-conifer forest on the western slope of the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Experimental treatments...

  7. The disturbance-diversity relationship: integrating biodiversity conservation and resource management in anthropogenic landscapes

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Lila Nath

    2016-01-01

    Disturbance, natural or anthropogenic, is ubiquitous to forest and grassland ecosystems across the globe. Many of these ecosystems have evolved alongside centuries old anthropogenic disturbance regimes. Understanding how disturbance impacts biodiversity and ecosystem service delivery is a topic of paramount importance as high biodiversity is likely to provide a wide array of ecosystem goods and services to an ever-growing human population. There is a general consensus that dist...

  8. Biological soil crusts across disturbance-recovery scenarios: effect of grazing regime on community dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concostrina-Zubiri, L.; Huber-Sannwald, E.; Martínez, I.; Flores Flores, J. L.; Reyes-Agüero, J. A.; Escudero, A.; Belnap, Jayne

    2014-01-01

    Grazing represents one of the most common disturbances in drylands worldwide, affecting both ecosystem structure and functioning. Despite the efforts to understand the nature and magnitude of grazing effects on ecosystem components and processes, contrasting results continue to arise. This is particularly remarkable for the biological soil crust (BSC) communities (i.e., cyanobacteria, lichens, and bryophytes), which play an important role in soil dynamics. Here we evaluated simultaneously the effect of grazing impact on BSC communities (resistance) and recovery after livestock exclusion (resilience) in a semiarid grassland of Central Mexico. In particular, we examined BSC species distribution, species richness, taxonomical group cover (i.e., cyanobacteria, lichen, bryophyte), and composition along a disturbance gradient with different grazing regimes (low, medium, high impact) and along a recovery gradient with differently aged livestock exclosures (short-, medium-, long-term exclusion). Differences in grazing impact and time of recovery from grazing both resulted in slight changes in species richness; however, there were pronounced shifts in species composition and group cover. We found we could distinguish four highly diverse and dynamic BSC species groups: (1) species with high resistance and resilience to grazing, (2) species with high resistance but low resilience, (3) species with low resistance but high resilience, and (4) species with low resistance and resilience. While disturbance resulted in a novel diversity configuration, which may profoundly affect ecosystem functioning, we observed that 10 years of disturbance removal did not lead to the ecosystem structure found after 27 years of recovery. These findings are an important contribution to our understanding of BCS dynamics from a species and community perspective placed in a land use change context.

  9. Extraction of Some Divalent Metal Ions (Cadmium, Nickel and Lead from Different Tea and Rice Samples Using Ghezeljeh Nanoclay (Geleh-Sar-Shoor as a New Natural Sorbent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Hassanzadeh Siahpoosh

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the method of extraction-preconcentration of Lead, Cadmium, and Nickel ions from food samples using the Ghezeljeh montmorillonite nanoclay (Geleh-Sar-Shoor as a new native adsorbent in batch single component systems. The extraction-preconcentration of heavy metals were carried out by applying the solid phase extraction (SPE method followed by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS, and inductively coupled with plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES. The Ghezeljeh nanoclay was characterized by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, Scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectrometer operating (SEM-EDS, X-ray diffractometry (XRD, X-ray fluorescence (XRF, Cation Exchange Capacity (CEC measurements, BET specific surface area and Zeta potential. According to BET theory, the specific surface areas of the Ghezeljeh nanoclay was calculated to be 19.8 m2 g-1 whereas the cation exchange capacity was measured to be 150 meq/100 g. The results of XRD, XRF, FT-IR, Zeta potential and BET surface area of the nanoclay confirmed that montmorillonite was the dominant mineral phase. Based on SEM images of this clay, it can be seen that the distance between the plates is nm level. For all three ions, the detection and quantification limits, dynamic linear range, preconcentration factor, and adsorption capacity were obtained. The effect of various interfering ions was studied. The experimental method was successfully applied for the extraction of heavy metals in different tea and rice samples.

  10. Lattice constant changes leading to significant changes of the spin-gapless features and physical nature in a inverse Heusler compound Zr2MnGa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaotian; Cheng, Zhenxiang; Khenata, Rabah; Wu, Yang; Wang, Liying; Liu, Guodong

    2017-12-01

    The spin-gapless semiconductors with parabolic energy dispersions [1-3] have been recently proposed as a new class of materials for potential applications in spintronic devices. In this work, according to the Slater-Pauling rule, we report the fully-compensated ferrimagnetic (FCF) behavior and spin-gapless semiconducting (SGS) properties for a new inverse Heusler compound Zr2MnGa by means of the plane-wave pseudo-potential method based on density functional theory. With the help of GGA-PBE, the electronic structures and the magnetism of Zr2MnGa compound at its equilibrium and strained lattice constants are systematically studied. The calculated results show that the Zr2MnGa is a new SGS at its equilibrium lattice constant: there is an energy gap between the conduction and valence bands for both the majority and minority electrons, while there is no gap between the majority electrons in the valence band and the minority electrons in the conduction band. Remarkably, not only a diverse physical nature transition, but also different types of spin-gapless features can be observed with the change of the lattice constants. Our calculated results of Zr2MnGa compound indicate that this material has great application potential in spintronic devices.

  11. Leading Democratically

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookfield, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Democracy is the most venerated of American ideas, the one for which wars are fought and people die. So most people would probably agree that leaders should be able to lead well in a democratic society. Yet, genuinely democratic leadership is a relative rarity. Leading democratically means viewing leadership as a function or process, rather than…

  12. Disturbances of Haemostasis in Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed A. Fattah

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is associated with disturbances in haemostasis that could contribute to the development of thrombotic complications.The present study was undertaken to determine the behavior of coagulation variables and fibrinolytic system in diabetes mellitus. Forty five diabetic patients and forty five matched controls were evaluated by doing the following haemostatic parameter, prothrombin time, partial thromboplastin time, thrombin time, coagulation factors assay II, VII, IX, & plasma fibrinogen, ADP-induced platelet aggregation, protein C, a2- antiplasmin, PAI and FDPs. Generally diabetic patients have high levels of fibrinogen, a2- antiplasmin, & PAI and lower level of protein C. Other haemostatic parameters did not show statistically significant difference between diabetic patients and control group. Significantally elevated levels of PAI, a2- antiplasmin together with low protein C level in diabetic patients may result in the disturbance of haemostatic balance favoring thrombotic events. Conclusion: High levels of plasma fibrinogen, a2A- antiplasmin with low plasma protein C activity could lead to a prothrombotic tendency in insulin dependent diabetic patients. Moreover, in non-insulin dependent diabetic patients, the above mentioned parameters together with high levels of ADP-induced platelet aggregation and plasminogen activator inhibitor may increase the risk of thrombotic complications. Obesity can be considered as an additional risk factor for development of thrombosis in diabetic patients.

  13. Circles Disturbed The Interplay of Mathematics and Narrative

    CERN Document Server

    Doxiadis, Apostolos

    2012-01-01

    Circles Disturbed brings together important thinkers in mathematics, history, and philosophy to explore the relationship between mathematics and narrative. The book's title recalls the last words of the great Greek mathematician Archimedes before he was slain by a Roman soldier--"Don't disturb my circles"--words that seem to refer to two radically different concerns: that of the practical person living in the concrete world of reality, and that of the theoretician lost in a world of abstraction. Stories and theorems are, in a sense, the natural languages of these two worlds--stories represent

  14. Probabilistic risk models for multiple disturbances: an example of forest insects and wildfires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haiganoush K. Preisler; Alan A. Ager; Jane L. Hayes

    2010-01-01

    Building probabilistic risk models for highly random forest disturbances like wildfire and forest insect outbreaks is a challenging. Modeling the interactions among natural disturbances is even more difficult. In the case of wildfire and forest insects, we looked at the probability of a large fire given an insect outbreak and also the incidence of insect outbreaks...

  15. Disturbance and coastal forests: a strategic approach to forest management in hurricane impact zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    John A. Stanturf; Scott L. Goodrick; Kenneth W. Outcalt

    2007-01-01

    The Indian Ocean Tsunami focused world attention on societal responses to environmental hazards and the potential of natural systems to moderate disturbance effects. Coastal areas are critical to the welfare of up to 50% of the world's population. Coastal systems in the southern United States are adapted to specific disturbance regimes of tropical cyclones (...

  16. Disturbances in small bowel motility.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quigley, E M

    2012-02-03

    Recently, the small intestine has become the focus of investigation as a potential site of dysmotility in the irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). A number of motor abnormalities have been defined in some studies, and include \\'clustered\\' contractions, exaggerated post-prandial motor response and disturbances in intestinal transit. The significance of these findings remains unclear. The interpretation of available studies is complicated by differences in subject selection, the direct influence of certain symptoms, such as diarrhoea and constipation, and the interference of compounding factors, such as stress and psychopathology. Dysmotility could also reflect autonomic dysfunction, disturbed CNS control and the response to heightened visceral sensation or central perception. While motor abnormalities may not explain all symptoms in IBS, sensorimotor interactions may be important in symptom pathogenesis and deserve further study.

  17. Acid drainage at the inactive Santa Lucia mine, western Cuba: Natural attenuation of arsenic, barium and lead, and geochemical behavior of rare earth elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, Francisco Martin, E-mail: fmrch@geologia.unam.mx [Instituto de Geologia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Ciudad Universitaria, Delegacion Coyoacan, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Prol-Ledesma, Rosa Maria; Canet, Carles [Instituto de Geofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Ciudad Universitaria, Delegacion Coyoacan, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Alvares, Laura Nunez; Perez-Vazquez, Ramon [Facultad de Geologia y Mecanica, Universidad de Pinar del Rio (Cuba)

    2010-05-15

    A detailed geochemical study was conducted at the inactive Zn-Pb mine of Santa Lucia, in western Cuba. The studied mine-wastes are characterized by high total concentrations of potentially toxic elements (PTE), with average values of 17.4% Fe, 5.47% Ba, 2.27% Pb, 0.83% Zn, 1724 mg/kg As and 811 mg/kg Cu. Oxidation of sulfide minerals in mine-waste dumps and in the open pit produces acid mine effluents (pH = 2.5-2.6) enriched in dissolved SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} (up to 6754 mg/L), Fe (up to 4620 mg/L) and Zn (up to 2090 mg/L). Low pH values (2.5-2.8) and high dissolved concentrations of the same PTE were found in surface waters, up to 1500 m downstream from the mine. Nevertheless, concentrations of As, Ba and Pb in acid mine effluents and impacted surface waters are relatively low: 0.01-0.3 mg/L As, 0.002-0.03 mg/L Ba and 0.3-4.3 mg/L Pb. Analysis by X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy revealed the occurrence of lead-bearing barite and beudantite and the more common solid phases, reported elsewhere in similar environments including Fe-oxyhydroxides, jarosite, anglesite and plumbojarosite. Because the reported solubilities for barite and beudantite are very low under acidic conditions, these minerals may serve as the most important control in the mobility of As, Ba and Pb. In contrast, Fe-oxyhydroxides are relatively soluble under acidic conditions and, therefore, they may have a less significant role in PTE on-site immobilization. Mine-wastes and stream sediments show a light REE (LREE) and middle REE (MREE) enrichment relative to heavy REE (HREE). In contrast, acid mine effluents and surface waters are enriched in HREE relative to LREE. These results suggest that the LREE released during the oxidation of sulfides are captured by secondary (weathering) minerals, while the MREE are removed from the altered rocks. The low concentrations of LREE in acid stream water suggest that these elements can be retained in the sediments more strongly than HREE and MREE. One

  18. Postradiation disturbances of neuroendocrinal interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dedov, V.I.

    1980-01-01

    Analysis of data on the disturbances induced by ionizing irradiation in endocrine organs is given on the basis of experimental material. Mechanism and dynamics of the radiation pathology of such organs of endocrine system as hypothalamus, hypophysis, adrenal glands, thyroid, gonads are considered. Necessity of the determination of criteria of injury significance and study of delayed effects of ionizing radiation in perspective investigation of the problems of endocrine radiation pathology is pointed out

  19. Mechanical disturbances in superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Makoto

    1990-03-01

    The stress distribution in a small epoxy-impregnated Nb 3 Sn coil was calculated by the finite element method. Mechanical disturbances due to the electromagnetic force in the magnet are discussed. The coil stability in relation with the stress distribution is also discussed by using the experimental results. To evaluate such stresses, a calculation model was investigated. It was found that the model, which removed the internal bore element in the model magnet, gave a reasonable condition to estimate to stress. A quench mechanism due to mechanical disturbances in superconducting magnets is discussed. According to this mechanism, an internal slit was assumed as the reason for the mechanical disturbance. The internal slit is generated at the boundary between the superconductor and the bore element by the thermally induced stress. When charging a magnet, the induced electromagnetic force results in a stress concentration at the slit, and hence to an enlargement of it. During the enlargement of the internal slit, heat is generated at the top of it. Such heat generation from a mechanical disturbance can induce a quench. Through these investigations, the following coil manufacturing method can be proposed to reduce such stresses: the magnet should be manufactured to separate the bore element from the superconductor and this separation technique can reduce the boundary stress during cool-down. Actually, a thin teflon film at the boundary between the superconductor and the bore element can be used as a separator. Another separation technique is a teflon coating on the internal bore element. The separation technique should result in a stable epoxy-impregnated superconducting magnet. (J.P.N.)

  20. Neurobiological basis of parenting disturbance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Louise K; Harris, Melissa; Allen, Joanne

    2011-02-01

    It has been proposed that early attachment relationships shape the structure and reactivity of social brain structures that underlie later social capacities. We provide a review of the literature surrounding the development of neurological regulatory systems during infancy and outline recent research suggesting these systems go on to underlie adaptive parental responses. We review evidence in the peer-reviewed psychiatric literature including (i) observational human literature on the neurobiological and social sequelae of early parenting experiences, (ii) experimental animal literature on the effects of early maternal care on neurological development, (iii) experimental animal literature on the neurobiological underpinnings of parenting behaviours, (iv) observational and fMRI evidence on the neurobiological correlates of parenting behaviours, (v) functional and volumetric imaging studies on adults affected by borderline personality disorder. The development of infant regulatory systems is influenced by early parenting experiences. These frontolimbic regulatory systems are also heavily implicated in normal parental responses to infant cues. These frontolimbic disturbances are also observed in studies of borderline personality disorder; a disorder associated with poor emotional regulation, early trauma and disturbed parenting. While the current literature is limited to animal models of abnormal care giving, existing disorders associated with deficits in regulatory capacity and abnormal frontolimbic functioning may yet provide a human model of the neurobiology of parenting disturbance.

  1. Metabolic disturbances connecting obesity and depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecile eHryhorczuk

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Obesity markedly increases the odds of developing depression. Depressed mood not only impairs motivation, quality of life and overall functioning but also increases the risks of obesity complications. Abdominal obesity is a better predictor of depression and anxiety risk than overall adipose mass. A growing amount of research suggests that metabolic abnormalities stemming from central obesity that lead to metabolic disease may also responsible for the increased incidence of depression in obesity. As reviewed here, a higher mass of dysfunctional adipose tissue is associated with several metabolic disturbances that are either directly or indirectly implicated in the control of emotions and mood. To better comprehend the development of depression in obesity, this review pulls together select findings addressing the link between adiposity, diet and negative emotional states and discusses the evidence that alterations in glucocorticoids, adipose-derived hormones and inflammatory signalling that are characteristic of central obesity may be involved.

  2. [Ecotourism disturbances to non-human primates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Peng-Lai; Xiang, Zuo-Fu

    2013-02-01

    In tandem with economic growth and rising living conditions, ecotourism has increasingly gained popularity among the Chinese public. Non-human primates, as charismatic animals and the closest relatives of human beings, have shown a strong affinity in attracting the general public and raising money, and for that reason a variety of monkey parks, valleys, and islands are becoming increasingly popular in China. Though successful in raising a substantial sum of money for the managing agency of a nature reserve, there may be negative impacts on monkey groups used in ecotourism. Here, to establish effective guards for non-human primates involved in ecotourism, we present a review on tourism disturbance and summarize the negative impacts on behavioral patterns, reproduction, and health condition of animals.

  3. Leading change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-27

    In response to feedback from nursing, midwifery and other care staff who wanted to understand better how the Leading Change, Adding Value framework applies to them, NHS England has updated its webpage to include practice examples.

  4. Lead and Drinking Water from Private Wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... type=”submit” value=”Submit” /> Healthy Water Home Lead and Drinking Water from Private Wells Recommend on ... remove lead from my drinking water? What is lead? Lead is a naturally occurring bluish-gray metal ...

  5. Information-disturbance tradeoff in quantum measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maccone, Lorenzo

    2006-01-01

    We present a simple information-disturbance tradeoff relation valid for any general measurement apparatus: The disturbance between input and output states is lower bounded by the information the apparatus provides in distinguishing these two states

  6. Post-disturbance sediment recovery: Implications for watershed resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathburn, Sara L.; Shahverdian, Scott M.; Ryan, Sandra E.

    2018-03-01

    Sediment recovery following disturbances is a measure of the time required to attain pre-disturbance sediment fluxes. Insight into the controls on recovery processes and pathways builds understanding of geomorphic resilience. We assess post-disturbance sediment recovery in three small (1.5-100 km2), largely unaltered watersheds within the northern Colorado Rocky Mountains affected by wildfires, floods, and debris flows. Disturbance regimes span 102 (floods, debris flows) to 103 years (wildfires). For all case studies, event sediment recovery followed a nonlinear pattern: initial high sediment flux during single precipitation events or high annual snowmelt runoff followed by decreasing sediment fluxes over time. Disturbance interactions were evaluated after a high-severity fire within the South Fork Cache la Poudre basin was followed by an extreme flood one year post-fire. This compound disturbance hastened suspended sediment recovery to pre-fire concentrations 3 years after the fire. Wildfires over the last 1900 YBP in the South Fork basin indicate fire recurrence intervals of 600 years. Debris flows within the upper Colorado River basin over the last two centuries have shifted the baseline of sediment recovery caused by anthropogenic activities that increased debris flow frequency. An extreme flood on North St. Vrain Creek with an impounding reservoir resulted in extreme sedimentation that led to a physical state change. We introduce an index of resilience as sediment recovery/disturbance recurrence interval, providing a relative comparison between sites. Sediment recovery and channel form resilience may be inversely related because of high or low physical complexity in streams. We propose management guidelines to enhance geomorphic resilience by promoting natural processes that maintain physical complexity. Finally, sediment connectivity within watersheds is an additional factor to consider when establishing restoration treatment priorities.

  7. Bioactive Natural Product and Superacid Chemistry for Lead Compound Identification: A Case Study of Selective hCA III and L-Type Ca2+ Current Inhibitors for Hypotensive Agent Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélène Carreyre

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Dodoneine (Ddn is one of the active compounds identified from Agelanthus dodoneifolius, which is a medicinal plant used in African pharmacopeia and traditional medicine for the treatment of hypertension. In the context of a scientific program aiming at discovering new hypotensive agents through the original combination of natural product discovery and superacid chemistry diversification, and after evidencing dodoneine’s vasorelaxant effect on rat aorta, superacid modifications allowed us to generate original analogues which showed selective human carbonic anhydrase III (hCA III and L-type Ca2+ current inhibition. These derivatives can now be considered as new lead compounds for vasorelaxant therapeutics targeting these two proteins.

  8. Disturbance Decoupling of Switched Linear Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yurtseven, E.; Heemels, W.P.M.H.; Camlibel, M.K.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we consider disturbance decoupling problems for switched linear systems. We will provide necessary and sufficient conditions for three different versions of disturbance decoupling, which differ based on which signals are considered to be the disturbance. In the first version the

  9. Remote sensing of forest insect disturbances: Current state and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senf, Cornelius; Seidl, Rupert; Hostert, Patrick

    2017-08-01

    Insect disturbance are important agents of change in forest ecosystems around the globe, yet their spatial and temporal distribution and dynamics are not well understood. Remote sensing has gained much attention in mapping and understanding insect outbreak dynamics. Consequently, we here review the current literature on the remote sensing of insect disturbances. We suggest to group studies into three insect types: bark beetles, broadleaved defoliators, and coniferous defoliators. By so doing, we systematically compare the sensors and methods used for mapping insect disturbances within and across insect types. Results suggest that there are substantial differences between methods used for mapping bark beetles and defoliators, and between methods used for mapping broadleaved and coniferous defoliators. Following from this, we highlight approaches that are particularly suited for each insect type. Finally, we conclude by highlighting future research directions for remote sensing of insect disturbances. In particular, we suggest to: 1) Separate insect disturbances from other agents; 2) Extend the spatial and temporal domain of analysis; 3) Make use of dense time series; 4) Operationalize near-real time monitoring of insect disturbances; 5) Identify insect disturbances in the context of coupled human-natural systems; and 6) Improve reference data for assessing insect disturbances. Since the remote sensing of insect disturbances has gained much interest beyond the remote sensing community recently, the future developments identified here will help integrating remote sensing products into operational forest management. Furthermore, an improved spatiotemporal quantification of insect disturbances will support an inclusion of these processes into regional to global ecosystem models.

  10. Discrete-Roughness-Element-Enhanced Swept-Wing Natural Laminar Flow at High Reynolds Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Mujeeb; Liao, Wei; Li, Fei; Choudhari, Meelan

    2015-01-01

    Nonlinear parabolized stability equations and secondary-instability analyses are used to provide a computational assessment of the potential use of the discrete-roughness-element technology for extending swept-wing natural laminar flow at chord Reynolds numbers relevant to transport aircraft. Computations performed for the boundary layer on a natural-laminar-flow airfoil with a leading-edge sweep angle of 34.6 deg, freestream Mach number of 0.75, and chord Reynolds numbers of 17 × 10(exp 6), 24 × 10(exp 6), and 30 × 10(exp 6) suggest that discrete roughness elements could delay laminar-turbulent transition by about 20% when transition is caused by stationary crossflow disturbances. Computations show that the introduction of small-wavelength stationary crossflow disturbances (i.e., discrete roughness element) also suppresses the growth of most amplified traveling crossflow disturbances.

  11. DRE-Enhanced Swept-Wing Natural Laminar Flow at High Reynolds Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Mujeeb; Liao, Wei; Li, Fe; Choudhari, Meelan

    2013-01-01

    Nonlinear parabolized stability equations and secondary instability analyses are used to provide a computational assessment of the potential use of the discrete roughness elements (DRE) technology for extending swept-wing natural laminar flow at chord Reynolds numbers relevant to transport aircraft. Computations performed for the boundary layer on a natural laminar flow airfoil with a leading-edge sweep angle of 34.6deg, free-stream Mach number of 0.75 and chord Reynolds numbers of 17 x 10(exp 6), 24 x 10(exp 6) and 30 x 10(exp 6) suggest that DRE could delay laminar-turbulent transition by about 20% when transition is caused by stationary crossflow disturbances. Computations show that the introduction of small wavelength stationary crossflow disturbances (i.e., DRE) also suppresses the growth of most amplified traveling crossflow disturbances.

  12. Leading men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bekker-Nielsen, Tønnes

    2016-01-01

    Through a systematic comparison of c. 50 careers leading to the koinarchate or high priesthood of Asia, Bithynia, Galatia, Lycia, Macedonia and coastal Pontus, as described in funeral or honorary inscriptions of individual koinarchs, it is possible to identify common denominators but also disting...

  13. Landscape anthropogenic disturbance in the Mediterranean ecosystem: is the current landscape sustainable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biondi, Guido; D'Andrea, Mirko; Fiorucci, Paolo; Franciosi, Chiara; Lima, Marco

    2013-04-01

    Mediterranean landscape during the last centuries has been subject to strong anthropogenic disturbances who shifted natural vegetation cover in a cultural landscape. Most of the natural forest were destroyed in order to allow cultivation and grazing activities. In the last century, fast growing conifer plantations were introduced in order to increase timber production replacing slow growing natural forests. In addition, after the Second World War most of the grazing areas were changed in unmanaged mediterranean conifer forest frequently spread by fires. In the last decades radical socio economic changes lead to a dramatic abandonment of the cultural landscape. One of the most relevant result of these human disturbances, and in particular the replacement of deciduous forests with coniferous forests, has been the increasing in the number of forest fires, mainly human caused. The presence of conifers and shrubs, more prone to fire, triggered a feedback mechanism that makes difficult to return to the stage of potential vegetation causing huge economic, social and environmental damages. The aim of this work is to investigate the sustainability of the current landscape. A future landscape scenario has been simulated considering the natural succession in absence of human intervention assuming the current fire regime will be unaltered. To this end, a new model has been defined, implementing an ecological succession model coupled with a simply Forest Fire Model. The ecological succession model simulates the vegetation dynamics using a rule-based approach discrete in space and time. In this model Plant Functional Types (PFTs) are used to describe the landscape. Wildfires are randomly ignited on the landscape, and their propagation is simulated using a stochastic cellular automata model. The results show that the success of the natural succession toward a potential vegetation cover is prevented by the frequency of fire spreading. The actual landscape is then unsustainable

  14. Implications of recurrent disturbance for genetic diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Ian D; Cary, Geoffrey J; Landguth, Erin L; Lindenmayer, David B; Banks, Sam C

    2016-02-01

    Exploring interactions between ecological disturbance, species' abundances and community composition provides critical insights for ecological dynamics. While disturbance is also potentially an important driver of landscape genetic patterns, the mechanisms by which these patterns may arise by selective and neutral processes are not well-understood. We used simulation to evaluate the relative importance of disturbance regime components, and their interaction with demographic and dispersal processes, on the distribution of genetic diversity across landscapes. We investigated genetic impacts of variation in key components of disturbance regimes and spatial patterns that are likely to respond to climate change and land management, including disturbance size, frequency, and severity. The influence of disturbance was mediated by dispersal distance and, to a limited extent, by birth rate. Nevertheless, all three disturbance regime components strongly influenced spatial and temporal patterns of genetic diversity within subpopulations, and were associated with changes in genetic structure. Furthermore, disturbance-induced changes in temporal population dynamics and the spatial distribution of populations across the landscape resulted in disrupted isolation by distance patterns among populations. Our results show that forecast changes in disturbance regimes have the potential to cause major changes to the distribution of genetic diversity within and among populations. We highlight likely scenarios under which future changes to disturbance size, severity, or frequency will have the strongest impacts on population genetic patterns. In addition, our results have implications for the inference of biological processes from genetic data, because the effects of dispersal on genetic patterns were strongly mediated by disturbance regimes.

  15. What does natural selection lead to?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Changes in the course of time (within the same lineage, ancestors and descendants are seen to belong to different species). Diversity (lineages begin to diverge).

  16. Effect of simulated sampling disturbance on creep behaviour of rock salt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guessous, Z.; Gill, D. E.; Ladanyi, B.

    1987-10-01

    This article presents the results of an experimental study of creep behaviour of a rock salt under uniaxial compression as a function of prestrain, simulating sampling disturbance. The prestrain was produced by radial compressive loading of the specimens prior to creep testing. The tests were conducted on an artifical salt to avoid excessive scattering of the results. The results obtained from several series of single-stage creep tests show that, at short-term, the creep response of salt is strongly affected by the preloading history of samples. The nature of this effect depends upon the intensity of radial compressive preloading, and its magnitude is a function of the creep stress level. The effect, however, decreases with increasing plastic deformation, indicating that large creep strains may eventually lead to a complete loss of preloading memory.

  17. Looking Without Landing—Using Remote Piloted Aircraft to Monitor Fur Seal Populations Without Disturbance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca R. McIntosh

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Technical advances in monitoring devices, specifically drones, are allowing managers and scientists to obtain quality information on ecosystem health with minimal disturbance to ecosystems and the wildlife they support. Temporal and spatial indicators of ecosystem health, such as population size and/or abundance estimates of marine mammals are the basis for our understanding and prediction of ecosystem change. This is critical for the achievement of conservation goals and sustainable natural resources use. Performing surveys to obtain abundance estimates can be logistically demanding and expensive particularly in offshore marine environments, and can cause significant disturbance to wildlife. These constraints may lead to sub-optimal monitoring programs that reduce the frequency and/or precision of surveys at the cost of data quality and confidence in the resulting analyses. Using Remote Piloted Aircraft (RPA can be a solution to this challenge. With appropriate testing and ethical consideration; for many situations, RPAs can perform surveys with increased frequency, higher data resolution and less disturbance than typical methods that involve people being present on the ground, thereby enabling more robust programs for monitoring. We demonstrate the process of testing images from RPAs for estimating the abundance of Australian fur seals (Arctocephalus pusillus doriferus at one of their largest colonies on Seal Rocks, Australia. Two sizes of multirotor (1,400 and 350 mm with different imaging equipment were tested at 40, 60, and 80 m altitude above sea level. We assessed wildlife disturbance levels and optimized a methodology for effective and economical monitoring of this site. We employed commercially available and open-source software for programming survey flights (Drone Deploy, image processing (Agisoft Photoscan and Autopano Giga, data collation and analyses (R and Python. An online portal “SealSpotter” was developed to facilitate data

  18. Who Leads China's Leading Universities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Futao

    2017-01-01

    This study attempts to identify the major characteristics of two different groups of institutional leaders in China's leading universities. The study begins with a review of relevant literature and theory. Then, there is a brief introduction to the selection of party secretaries, deputy secretaries, presidents and vice presidents in leading…

  19. Shock disturbance of the I-Xe system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caffee, M.W.; Hohenberg, C.M.; Podosek, F.A.; Swindle, T.D.

    1982-01-01

    Three separate samples of the meteorite Bjurbole were artificially shocked at pressures of 70 kb, 200 kb, and 400 kb. Analysis of xenon released in stepwise heating shows that the I-Xe system of the 400 kb sample is substantially altered by the shock loading, and it is no longer possible to infer an age or trapped xenon composition for that sample. The 200-kb and 70-kb samples display isotopic structures progressively less altered demonstrating the gradations in shock disturbance likely to be found in natural systems. Interpretations of the I-Xe and Ar-40-Ar-39 systems for several naturally shocked meteorites are also presented. New data for Arapahoe do not confirm the previously reported age and trapped xenon composition, demonstrating instead that its I-Xe structure has been strongly disturbed by shock

  20. Lead in the environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattee, Oliver H.; Pain, Deborah J.; Hoffman, David J.; Rattner, Barnett A.; Burton, G. Allen; Cairns, John

    2003-01-01

    Anthropogenic uses of lead have probably altered its availability and environmental distribution more than any other toxic element. Consequently, lead concentrations in many living organisms may be approaching thresholds of toxicity for the adverse effects of lead. Such thresholds are difficult to define, as they vary with the chemical and physical form of lead, exposure regime, other elements present and also vary both within and between species. The technological capability to accurately quantify low lead concentrations has increased over the last decade, and physiological and behavioral effects have been measured in wildlife with tissue lead concentrations below those previously considered safe for humans.s.236 Consequently. lead criteria for the protection of wildlife and human health are frequently under review, and 'thresholds' of lead toxicity are being reconsidered. Proposed lead criteria for the protection of natural resources have been reviewed by Eisler. Uptake of lead by plants is limited by its generally low availability in soils and sediments, and toxicity may be limited by storage mechanisms and its apparently limited translocation within most plants. Lead does not generally accumulate within the foliar parts of plants, which limits its transfer to higher trophic levels. Although lead may concentrate in plant and animal tissues, no evidence of biomagnification exists. Acid deposition onto surface waters and soils with low buffering capacity may influence the availability of lead for uptake by plants and animals, and this may merit investigation at susceptible sites. The biological significance of chronic low-level lead exposure to wildlife is sometimes difficult to quantify. Animals living in urban environments or near point sources of lead emission are inevitably subject to greater exposure to lead and enhanced risk of lead poisoning. Increasingly strict controls on lead emissions in many countries have reduced exposure to lead from some sources

  1. Identifying functional groups for response to disturbance in an abandoned pasture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavorel, Sandra; Touzard, Blaise; Lebreton, Jean-Dominique; Clément, Bernard

    1998-06-01

    In an abandoned pasture in Brittany, we compared artificial small-scale disturbances to natural disturbances by wild boar and undisturbed vegetation. We developed a multivariate statistical approach which analyses how species biological attributes explain the response of community composition to disturbances. This technique, which reconciles the inductive and deductive approaches for functional classifications, identifies groups of species with similar responses to disturbance and characterizes their biological profiles. After 5 months of recolonization, artificial disturbances had a greater species richness than undisturbed vegetation as a result of recruitment of new species without the exclusion of pre-existing matrix species. Species morphology, described by canopy structure, canopy height and lateral spread, explained a large part (16 %) of community response to disturbance. Regeneration strategies, described by life history, seed mass, dispersal agent, dormancy and the existence of vegetative multiplication, explained a smaller part of community response to disturbance (8 %). Artificial disturbances were characterized by therophyte and compact rosettes with moderately dormant seeds, including a number of Asteraceae and other early successional species. Natural disturbances were colonized by leafy guerrilla species without seed dormancy. Few species were tightly related to undisturbed vegetation and were essentially grasses with a phalanx rosette morphology. The functional classification obtained is consistent with the classification of the community into fugitives, regenerators and persistors. These groups are structured according to Grubb's model for temperate grasslands, with regenerators and persistors in the matrix and fugitives taking advantage of gaps open by small-scale disturbances. The conjunction of functional diversity and species diversity within functional groups is the key to resilience to disturbance, an important ecosystem function.

  2. Observation and simulation of the ionosphere disturbance waves triggered by rocket exhausts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Charles C. H.; Chen, Chia-Hung; Matsumura, Mitsuru; Lin, Jia-Ting; Kakinami, Yoshihiro

    2017-08-01

    Observations and theoretical modeling of the ionospheric disturbance waves generated by rocket launches are investigated. During the rocket passage, time rate change of total electron content (rTEC) enhancement with the V-shape shock wave signature is commonly observed, followed by acoustic wave disturbances and region of negative rTEC centered along the trajectory. Ten to fifteen min after the rocket passage, delayed disturbance waves appeared and propagated along direction normal to the V-shape wavefronts. These observation features appeared most prominently in the 2016 North Korea rocket launch showing a very distinct V-shape rTEC enhancement over enormous areas along the southeast flight trajectory despite that it was also appeared in the 2009 North Korea rocket launch with the eastward flight trajectory. Numerical simulations using the physical-based nonlinear and nonhydrostatic coupled model of neutral atmosphere and ionosphere reproduce promised results in qualitative agreement with the characteristics of ionospheric disturbance waves observed in the 2009 event by considering the released energy of the rocket exhaust as the disturbance source. Simulations reproduce the shock wave signature of electron density enhancement, acoustic wave disturbances, the electron density depletion due to the rocket-induced pressure bulge, and the delayed disturbance waves. The pressure bulge results in outward neutral wind flows carrying neutrals and plasma away from it and leading to electron density depletions. Simulations further show, for the first time, that the delayed disturbance waves are produced by the surface reflection of the earlier arrival acoustic wave disturbances.

  3. Composite control for raymond mill based on model predictive control and disturbance observer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Niu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the raymond mill grinding process, precise control of operating load is vital for the high product quality. However, strong external disturbances, such as variations of ore size and ore hardness, usually cause great performance degradation. It is not easy to control the current of raymond mill constant. Several control strategies have been proposed. However, most of them (such as proportional–integral–derivative and model predictive control reject disturbances just through feedback regulation, which may lead to poor control performance in the presence of strong disturbances. For improving disturbance rejection, a control method based on model predictive control and disturbance observer is put forward in this article. The scheme employs disturbance observer as feedforward compensation and model predictive control controller as feedback regulation. The test results illustrate that compared with model predictive control method, the proposed disturbance observer–model predictive control method can obtain significant superiority in disturbance rejection, such as shorter settling time and smaller peak overshoot under strong disturbances.

  4. A framework to assess biogeochemical response to ecosystem disturbance using nutrient partitioning ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranabetter, J. Marty; McLauchlan, Kendra K.; Enders, Sara K.; Fraterrigo, Jennifer M.; Higuera, Philip E.; Morris, Jesse L.; Rastetter, Edward B.; Barnes, Rebecca; Buma, Brian; Gavin, Daniel G.; Gerhart, Laci M.; Gillson, Lindsey; Hietz, Peter; Mack, Michelle C.; McNeil, Brenden; Perakis, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Disturbances affect almost all terrestrial ecosystems, but it has been difficult to identify general principles regarding these influences. To improve our understanding of the long-term consequences of disturbance on terrestrial ecosystems, we present a conceptual framework that analyzes disturbances by their biogeochemical impacts. We posit that the ratio of soil and plant nutrient stocks in mature ecosystems represents a characteristic site property. Focusing on nitrogen (N), we hypothesize that this partitioning ratio (soil N: plant N) will undergo a predictable trajectory after disturbance. We investigate the nature of this partitioning ratio with three approaches: (1) nutrient stock data from forested ecosystems in North America, (2) a process-based ecosystem model, and (3) conceptual shifts in site nutrient availability with altered disturbance frequency. Partitioning ratios could be applied to a variety of ecosystems and successional states, allowing for improved temporal scaling of disturbance events. The generally short-term empirical evidence for recovery trajectories of nutrient stocks and partitioning ratios suggests two areas for future research. First, we need to recognize and quantify how disturbance effects can be accreting or depleting, depending on whether their net effect is to increase or decrease ecosystem nutrient stocks. Second, we need to test how altered disturbance frequencies from the present state may be constructive or destructive in their effects on biogeochemical cycling and nutrient availability. Long-term studies, with repeated sampling of soils and vegetation, will be essential in further developing this framework of biogeochemical response to disturbance.

  5. Disturbance maintains alternative biome states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantas, Vinícius de L; Hirota, Marina; Oliveira, Rafael S; Pausas, Juli G

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms controlling the distribution of biomes remains a challenge. Although tropical biome distribution has traditionally been explained by climate and soil, contrasting vegetation types often occur as mosaics with sharp boundaries under very similar environmental conditions. While evidence suggests that these biomes are alternative states, empirical broad-scale support to this hypothesis is still lacking. Using community-level field data and a novel resource-niche overlap approach, we show that, for a wide range of environmental conditions, fire feedbacks maintain savannas and forests as alternative biome states in both the Neotropics and the Afrotropics. In addition, wooded grasslands and savannas occurred as alternative grassy states in the Afrotropics, depending on the relative importance of fire and herbivory feedbacks. These results are consistent with landscape scale evidence and suggest that disturbance is a general factor driving and maintaining alternative biome states and vegetation mosaics in the tropics. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  6. Tracking a major interplanetary disturbance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tappin, S.J.; Hewish, A.; Gapper, G.R.

    1983-01-01

    The severe geomagnetic storm which occurred during 27-29 August 1978 was remarkable because it arrived unexpectedly and was not related to a solar flare or long-lived coronal hole. Observations on 900 celestial radio sources show that the storm was associated with a large-scale region causing enhanced interplanetary scintillation which enveloped the Earth at the same time. The disturbance was first detected on 26 August, when the outer boundary had reached a distance of about 0.8 a.u. from the Sun and it was tracked until 30 August. The enhancement was followed by a fast solar wind stream and its shape suggests that it was a compression zone caused by the birth of the stream. (author)

  7. Identifying community thresholds for lotic benthic diatoms in response to human disturbance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Tao; Tang, Ting; Tan, Lu; Gu, Yuan; Jiang, Wanxiang; Cai, Qinghua

    2017-06-23

    Although human disturbance indirectly influences lotic assemblages through modifying physical and chemical conditions, identifying thresholds of human disturbance would provide direct evidence for preventing anthropogenic degradation of biological conditions. In the present study, we used data obtained from tributaries of the Three Gorges Reservoir in China to detect effects of human disturbance on streams and to identify disturbance thresholds for benthic diatoms. Diatom species composition was significantly affected by three in-stream stressors including TP, TN and pH. Diatoms were also influenced by watershed % farmland and natural environmental variables. Considering three in-stream stressors, TP was positively influenced by % farmland and % impervious surface area (ISA). In contrast, TN and pH were principally affected by natural environmental variables. Among measured natural environmental variables, average annual air temperature, average annual precipitation, and topsoil % CaCO 3 , % gravel, and total exchangeable bases had significant effects on study streams. When effects of natural variables were accounted for, substantial compositional changes in diatoms occurred when farmland or ISA land use exceeded 25% or 0.3%, respectively. Our study demonstrated the rationale for identifying thresholds of human disturbance for lotic assemblages and addressed the importance of accounting for effects of natural factors for accurate disturbance thresholds.

  8. Developmental immunotoxicology of lead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietert, Rodney R.; Lee, Ji-Eun; Hussain, Irshad; Piepenbrink, Michael

    2004-01-01

    The heavy metal, lead, is a known developmental immunotoxicant that has been shown to produce immune alterations in humans as well as other species. Unlike many compounds that exert adverse immune effects, lead exposure at low to moderate levels does not produce widespread loss of immune cells. In contrast, changes resulting from lead exposure are subtle at the immune cell population level but, nevertheless, can be functionally dramatic. A hallmark of lead-induced immunotoxicity is a pronounced shift in the balance in T helper cell function toward T helper 2 responses at the expense of T helper 1 functions. This bias alters the nature and range of immune responses that can be produced thereby influencing host susceptibility to various diseases. Immunotoxic responses to lead appear to differ across life stages not only quantitatively with regard to dose response, but also qualitatively in terms of the spectrum of immune alterations. Experimental studies in several lab animal species suggest the latter stages of gestation are a period of considerable sensitivity for lead-induced immunotoxicity. This review describes the basic characteristics of lead-induced immunotoxicity emphasizing experimental animal results. It also provides a framework for the consideration of toxicant exposure effects across life stages. The existence of and probable basis for developmental windows of immune hyper-susceptibility are presented. Finally, the potential for lead to serve as a perinatal risk factor for childhood asthma as well as other diseases is considered

  9. Soil disturbance as a grassland restoration measure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schnoor, Tim; Bruun, Hans Henrik; Olsson, Pål Axel

    2015-01-01

    Soil disturbance is recognized as an important driver of biodiversity in dry grasslands, and can therefore be implemented as a restoration measure. However, because community re-assembly following disturbance includes stochastic processes, a focus only on species richness or establishment success...... to experimental disturbance treatments (ploughing or rotavation), and the vegetation was surveyed during four subsequent years of succession. Treated plots were compared with control plots representing untreated grassland, as well as nearby plots characterized by plant communities representing the restoration...

  10. Biomarker responses of mussels exposed to earthquake disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandurvelan, Rathishri; Marsden, Islay D.; Glover, Chris N.; Gaw, Sally

    2016-12-01

    The green-lipped mussel, Perna canaliculus is recognised as a bioindicator of coastal contamination in New Zealand (NZ). Mussels (shell length 60-80 mm) were collected from three intertidal areas of Canterbury in the South Island of NZ prior to extreme earthquake disturbances on 22nd February 2011, and 9 months later in October 2011. Trace elements, including arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), lead (Pb), nickel (Ni), and zinc (Zn), were measured in the gills, digestive gland, foot and mantle. Metal levels in tissues were site specific, and mostly unaffected by earthquake disturbances. Physiological biomarkers were negatively affected by earthquake disturbances and mussels from the Port of Lyttelton had higher negative scope for growth post-earthquake. Metallothionein-like protein in the digestive gland correlated with metal content of tissues, as did catalase activity in the gill and lipid peroxidation values for the digestive gland. This research demonstrates that physiological and other biomarkers are effective at detecting the effects of multiple stressors following seismic disturbances.

  11. Transfer of the human NKG2D ligands UL16 binding proteins (ULBP) 1-3 is related to lytic granule release and leads to ligand retransfer and killing of ULBP-recipient natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Cobo, Sheila; Romera-Cárdenas, Gema; García-Cuesta, Eva M; Reyburn, Hugh T; Valés-Gómez, Mar

    2015-09-01

    After immune interactions, membrane fragments can be transferred between cells. This fast transfer of molecules is transient and shows selectivity for certain proteins; however, the constraints underlying acquisition of a protein are unknown. To characterize the mechanism and functional consequences of this process in natural killer (NK) cells, we have compared the transfer of different NKG2D ligands. We show that human NKG2D ligands can be acquired by NK cells with different efficiencies. The main findings are that NKG2D ligand transfer is related to immune activation and receptor-ligand interaction and that NK cells acquire these proteins during interactions with target cells that lead to degranulation. Our results further demonstrate that NK cells that have acquired NKG2D ligands can stimulate activation of autologous NK cells. Surprisingly, NK cells can also re-transfer the acquired molecule to autologous effector cells during this immune recognition that leads to their death. These data demonstrate that transfer of molecules occurs as a consequence of immune recognition and imply that this process might play a role in homeostatic tuning-down of the immune response or be used as marker of interaction. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Long-term consequences of disturbances on reproductive strategies of the rare epiphytic lichen Lobaria pulmonaria: clonality a gift and a curse

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Garima; Dal Grande, Francesco; Werth, Silke; Scheidegger, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    The effect of disturbance on symbiotic organisms such as lichens is particularly severe. In case of heterothallic lichen-forming fungi, disturbances may lead to unbalanced gene frequency and patchy distribution of mating types, thus inhibiting sexual reproduction and imposing clonality. The impact of disturbance on reproductive strategies and genetic diversity of clonal systems has so far received little attention. To infer the effects of disturbances on mating-type allele frequencies and pop...

  13. Pollen, wind and fire: how to investigate genetic effects of disturbance-induced change in forest trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacles, Cecile F E

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the consequences of habitat disturbance on mating patterns although pollen and seed dispersal in forest trees has been a long-standing theme of forest and conservation genetics. Forest ecosystems face global environmental pressures from timber exploitation to genetic pollution and climate change, and it is therefore essential to comprehend how disturbances may alter the dispersal of genes and their establishment in tree populations in order to formulate relevant recommendations for sustainable resource management practices and realistic predictions of potential adaptation to climate change by means of range shift or expansion (Kremer et al. 2012). However, obtaining reliable evidence of disturbance-induced effects on gene dispersal processes from empirical evaluation of forest tree populations is difficult. Indeed, tree species share characteristics such as high longevity, long generation time and large reproductive population size, which may impede the experimenter's ability to assess parameters at the spatial and time scales at which any change may occur (Petit and Hampe 2006). It has been suggested that appropriate study designs should encompass comparison of populations before and after disturbance as well as account for demonstrated variation in conspecific density, that is, the spatial distribution of mates, and forest density, including all species and relating to alteration in landscape openness (Bacles & Jump 2011). However, more often than not, empirical studies aiming to assess the consequences of habitat disturbance on genetic processes in tree populations assume rather than quantify a change in tree densities in forests under disturbance and generally fail to account for population history, which may lead to inappropriate interpretation of a causal relationship between population genetic structure and habitat disturbance due to effects of unmonitored confounding variables (Gauzere et al. 2013). In this issue, Shohami and Nathan (2014

  14. Lead pollution sources and Impacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Haggar, S.M.; Saad, S.G.; Saleh, S.K.; El-Kady, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    Despite the medical awareness of lead toxicity, and despite legislation designed to reduce environmental contamination, lead is one of the most widely used heavy metals. Significant human exposure occurs from automobile exhaust fumes, cigarette smoking, lead-based paints and plumbing systems lead spread in the environment can take place in several ways, the most important of which is through the lead compounds released in automobile exhaust as a direct result of the addition of tetraethyl or tetraethyl lead to gasoline as octane boosting agents. Of special is the effect of lead pollution on children, which affects their behavioral and educational attributes considerably. The major channel through through which lead is absorbed is through inhalation of lead compounds in the atmosphere. Lead is a heavy metal characterized its malleability, ductility and poor conduction of electricity. So, it has a wide range of applications ranging from battery manufacturing to glazing ceramics. It is rarely found free in nature but is present in several minerals and compounds. The aim of this paper is to discuss natural and anthropogenic sources of lead together with its distribution and trends with emphasis on egypt. The effects of lead pollution on human health, vegetation and welfare are also presented. It could be concluded that, the excessive release of lead into the environment, especially through the atmosphere, can produce many detrimental and sometimes fatal effects on human, agriculture and zoological life. Besides, it is very plain that there is a serious problem of pollution lead in egypt and specially in cairo. 7 figs

  15. Is it safe to disturb the vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hut, P.

    1984-01-01

    Ultra-relativistic U 238 -U 238 collisions, which are now being envisioned for the next generation of heavy ion accelerators, do not occur in large quantities anywhere in the universe at present. Nor have they ever occurred abundantly in the past. When U 238 nuclei were first synthesized the universe had grown already for too cold. This raises the question whether such a novel type of experiment could trigger a catastrophic phase transition of the vacuum to a lower energy state, a possibility naturally occurring in many spontaneously broken quantum field theories. Theoretical calculations of the collisionally induced nucleation rate of critical bubbles precipitating such phase transitions are not yet available, and nothing is known about the parameters describing the barrier separating our vacuum from a possibly lower energy state. Fortunately, available cosmic ray evidence suggests that sporadic individual U 238 -U 238 collisions have indeed occurred at ultra-relativistic energies inside our past light cone, which would imply that the proposed experiments do not tread potentially dangerous new ground. Direct confirmation of the predicted small abundance of U 238 and other actinides in cosmic rays at energies in the interesting range 10 13 -10 15 eV, corresponding to 40 GeV/n-4 TeV/n, is not feasible at present. Nevertheless, even indirect detection of at least some ultra-heavy nuclei in the actinide group (Z>88) in this energy range would more affirmatively answer the question: 'Do we dare disturb the vacuum. (orig.)

  16. Harmonic disturbance location by applying Bayesian inference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ye, G.; Xiang, Y.; Cuk, V.; Cobben, J.F.G.

    2016-01-01

    Harmonic pollution is one of the most important power quality issues in electric power systems. Correct location of the main harmonic disturbance source is a key step to solve the problem. This paper presents a method to detect the location of harmonic disturbance source in low voltage network

  17. A Full Disturbance Model for Reaction Wheels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le, M.P.; Ellenbroek, Marcellinus Hermannus Maria; Seiler, R; van Put, P.; Cottaar, E.J.E.

    2014-01-01

    Reaction wheels are rotating devices used for the attitude control of spacecraft. However, reaction wheels also generate undesired disturbances in the form of vibrations, which may have an adverse effect on the pointing accuracy and stability of spacecraft (optical) payloads. A disturbance model for

  18. Nonunity gain minimal-disturbance measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabuncu, Metin; Mišta, L.; Fiurášek, J.

    2007-01-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate an optimal nonunity gain Gaussian scheme for partial measurement of an unknown coherent state that causes minimal disturbance of the state. The information gain and the state disturbance are quantified by the noise added to the measurement outcomes...

  19. The Dimensionality of Body Image Disturbance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galgan, Richard J.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Examined personality variables in 75 male and 75 female college students. Found two dimensions underlying body image disturbance variables, one loading on body image dissatisfaction and one loading on body image disturbance. Low negative correlation between two factors suggests that distortion and dissatisfaction are fairly distinct and that body…

  20. Instrumentation for Power System Disturbance Monitoring, Data ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, the level of instrumentation for power system disturbance monitoring, data acquisition and control in Nigerian Electric Power System; National Electric Power Authority (NEPA) is presented. The need for accurate power system disturbance monitoring is highlighted. A feature of an adequate monitoring, data ...

  1. Patterns of plant species diversity during succession under different disturbance regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denslow, Julie Sloan

    1980-07-01

    I suggest that between-community variations in diversity patterns during succession in plant communities are due to the effects of selection on life history strategies under different disturbance regimes. Natural disturbances to plant communities are simultaneously a source of mortality for some individuals and a source of establishment sites for others. The plant community consists of a mosaic of disturbance patches (gaps) of different environmental conditions. The composition of the mosaic is described by the size-frequency distribution of the gaps and is dependent on the rates and scales of disturbance. The life-history strategies of plant species dependent on some form of disturbance for establishment of propagules should reflect this size-frequency distribution of disturbance patches. An extension of island biogeographic theory to encompass relative habitat area predicts that a community should be most rich in species adapted to growth and establishment in the spatially most common patch types. Changes in species diversity during succession following large scale disturbance reflect the prevalent life history patterns under historically common disturbance regimes. Communities in which the greatest patch area is in large-scale clearings (e.g. following fire) are most diverse in species establishing seedlings in xeric, high light conditions. Species diversity decreases during succession. Communities in which such large patches are rare are characterized by a large number of species that reach the canopy through small gaps and realtively few which regenerate in the large clearings. Diversity increases during succession following a large scale disturbance.Evidence from communities characterized by different disturbance regimes is summarized from the literature. This hypothesis provides an evolutionary mechanism with which to examine the changes in plant community structure during succession. Diversity peaks occurring at "intermediate levels" of disturbance as

  2. Attaching Copper Wires to Magnetic-Reed-Switch Leads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamila, Rudolf

    1987-01-01

    Bonding method reliably joins copper wires to short iron-alloy leads from glass-encased dry magnetic-reed switch without disturbing integrity of glass-to-metal seal. Joint resistant to high temperatures and has low electrical resistance.

  3. Least Disturbed Condition for European Mediterranean rivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feio, M J; Aguiar, F C; Almeida, S F P; Ferreira, J; Ferreira, M T; Elias, C; Serra, S R Q; Buffagni, A; Cambra, J; Chauvin, C; Delmas, F; Dörflinger, G; Erba, S; Flor, N; Ferréol, M; Germ, M; Mancini, L; Manolaki, P; Marcheggiani, S; Minciardi, M R; Munné, A; Papastergiadou, E; Prat, N; Puccinelli, C; Rosebery, J; Sabater, S; Ciadamidaro, S; Tornés, E; Tziortzis, I; Urbanič, G; Vieira, C

    2014-04-01

    The present report describes a three-step approach that was used to characterize and define thresholds for the Least Disturbed Condition in Mediterranean streams of four different types, regarding organic pollution and nutrients, hydrological and morphological alterations, and land use. For this purpose, a common database composed of national reference sites (929 records) from seven countries, sampled for invertebrates, diatoms and macrophytes was used. The analyses of reference sites showed that small (catchment rivers were the most affected by stressors: 25-43% of the samples showed at least slight alterations regarding channelization, connectivity, upstream dam influence, hydropeaking and degradation of riparian vegetation. Temporary streams were the least affected by hydromorphological changes, but they were nevertheless affected by alterations in riparian vegetation. There were no major differences between all permanent stream types regarding water quality, but temporary streams showed lower values for oxygenation (DO) and wider ranges for other variables, such as nitrates. A lower threshold value for DO (60%) was determined for this stream type and can be attributed to the streams' natural characteristics. For all other river types, common limits were found for the remaining variables (ammonium, nitrate, phosphate, total P, % of artificial areas, % of intensive and extensive agriculture, % of semi-natural areas in the catchment). These values were then used to select the list of reference sites. The biological communities were characterized, revealing the existence of nine groups of Mediterranean invertebrate communities, six for diatoms and five for macrophytes: each group was characterized by specific indicator taxa that highlighted the differences between groups. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Transience after disturbance: Obligate species recovery dynamics depend on disturbance duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Alexander; Johst, Karin

    2017-06-01

    After a disturbance event, population recovery becomes an important species response that drives ecosystem dynamics. Yet, it is unclear how interspecific interactions impact species recovery from a disturbance and which role the disturbance duration (pulse or press) plays. Here, we analytically derive conditions that govern the transient recovery dynamics from disturbance of a host and its obligately dependent partner in a two-species metapopulation model. We find that, after disturbance, species recovery dynamics depend on the species' role (i.e. host or obligately dependent species) as well as the duration of disturbance. Host recovery starts immediately after the disturbance. In contrast, for obligate species, recovery depends on disturbance duration. After press disturbance, which allows dynamics to equilibrate during disturbance, obligate species immediately start to recover. Yet, after pulse disturbance, obligate species continue declining although their hosts have already begun to increase. Effectively, obligate species recovery is delayed until a necessary host threshold occupancy is reached. Obligates' delayed recovery arises solely from interspecific interactions independent of dispersal limitations, which contests previous explanations. Delayed recovery exerts a two-fold negative effect, because populations continue declining to even smaller population sizes and the phase of increased risk from demographic stochastic extinction in small populations is prolonged. We argue that delayed recovery and its determinants -species interactions and disturbance duration - have to be considered in biodiversity management. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Disturbing, Disordered or Disturbed? Perspectives on the Definition of Problem Behavior in Educational Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Frank H., Ed.; Lakin, K. Charlie, Ed.

    The book contains five papers presented at a 1979 topical conference on the definition of emotional disturbance and behavioral disorders in educational settings. The first paper, by F. Wood, is titled "Defining Disturbing, Disordered, and Disturbed Behavior." Topics covered include ambivalence about defining deviant behavior by special educators,…

  6. Sensory disturbance, CT, and somatosensory evoked potentials in thalamic hemorrhages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koga, Hisanobu; Miyazaki, Takayoshi; Miyazaki, Hisaya

    1985-01-01

    Thalamic hemorrhages often lead to sensory disturbances. However, no effective method for the evaluation of their prognoses has yet been clinically utilized. The somatosensory evoked potential (SEP) has been reported as an effective method, but it remains controversial. A CT scan is eminently suitable for determining the size and position of the hemorrhage. However, the correlation between the localization of the hematoma on the CT scan and the sensory distrubance has not been investigated fully. The authors selected 20 cases with the chronic stage of a thalamic hemorrhage. Each one was clinically evaluated as to sensory disturbance; they were then classified into the following five groups: Group 1: no sensory deficit (3 cases); Group 2: complete recovery from initial deficit (2 cases); Group 3: mild hypesthesia (5 cases); Group 4: severe hypesthesia (5 cases), and Group 5: paresthesia or dysesthesia (5 cases). Also, the CT scan was investigated with regard to the localization of the hematoma and the SEP. We could thus find a characteristic pattern in each group. The results may be summarized as follows. 1. The correlation between the degree of the sensory disturbance and the size and expansion of the hematoma was clearly detected. Especially, the most severe sensory disturbance was found in the hematoma extending to the lateral nuclear and ventral nuclear regions. 2. In Group 1 and 2, each SEP component (N 1 N 2 N 3 ) was shown to be normal. In Group 3, SEP components could be detected, but not completely. In Group 4, no components at all could be found. 3. In Group 5, all cases were small hematoma localized in the lateral nuclear region of the thalamus, while the N 3 components were prolonged on the SEP findings. The authors demonstrate the results and discuss the correlation between the sensory disturbance and the CT or SEP findings. (author)

  7. Predicting the cumulative effect of multiple disturbances on seagrass connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grech, Alana; Hanert, Emmanuel; McKenzie, Len; Rasheed, Michael; Thomas, Christopher; Tol, Samantha; Wang, Mingzhu; Waycott, Michelle; Wolter, Jolan; Coles, Rob

    2018-03-15

    The rate of exchange, or connectivity, among populations effects their ability to recover after disturbance events. However, there is limited information on the extent to which populations are connected or how multiple disturbances affect connectivity, especially in coastal and marine ecosystems. We used network analysis and the outputs of a biophysical model to measure potential functional connectivity and predict the impact of multiple disturbances on seagrasses in the central Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area (GBRWHA), Australia. The seagrass networks were densely connected, indicating that seagrasses are resilient to the random loss of meadows. Our analysis identified discrete meadows that are important sources of seagrass propagules and that serve as stepping stones connecting various different parts of the network. Several of these meadows were close to urban areas or ports and likely to be at risk from coastal development. Deep water meadows were highly connected to coastal meadows and may function as a refuge, but only for non-foundation species. We evaluated changes to the structure and functioning of the seagrass networks when one or more discrete meadows were removed due to multiple disturbance events. The scale of disturbance required to disconnect the seagrass networks into two or more components was on average >245 km, about half the length of the metapopulation. The densely connected seagrass meadows of the central GBRWHA are not limited by the supply of propagules; therefore, management should focus on improving environmental conditions that support natural seagrass recruitment and recovery processes. Our study provides a new framework for assessing the impact of global change on the connectivity and persistence of coastal and marine ecosystems. Without this knowledge, management actions, including coastal restoration, may prove unnecessary and be unsuccessful. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Different Recovery Processes of Soil Ammonia Oxidizers from Flooding Disturbance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Fei; Ma, Mao-Hua; Op den Camp, Huub J M; Chatzinotas, Antonis; Li, Lei; Lv, Ming-Quan; Wu, Sheng-Jun; Wang, Yu

    2018-04-11

    Understanding how microorganisms respond to environmental disturbance is one of the key focuses in microbial ecology. Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and archaea (AOA) are responsible for ammonia oxidation which is a crucial step in the nitrogen cycle. Although the physiology, distribution, and activity of AOA and AOB in soil have been extensively investigated, their recovery from a natural disturbance remains largely unknown. To assess the recovery capacities, including resistance and resilience, of AOA and AOB, soil samples were taken from a reservoir riparian zone which experienced periodically water flooding. The samples were classified into three groups (flooding, recovery, and control) for a high-throughput sequencing and quantitative PCR analysis. We used a relative quantitative index of both the resistance (RS) and resilience (RL) to assess the variation of gene abundance, alpha-diversity, and community composition. The AOA generally demonstrated a better recovery capability after the flooding disturbance compared to AOB. In particular, AOA were more resilient after the flooding disturbance. Taxa within the AOA and AOB showed different RS and RL values, with the most abundant taxa showing in general the highest RS indices. Soil NH 4 + and Fe 2+ /Fe 3+ were the main variables controlling the key taxa of AOA and AOB and probably influenced the resistance and resilience properties of AOA and AOB communities. The distinct mechanisms of AOA and AOB in maintaining community stability against the flooding disturbance might be linked to the different life-history strategies: the AOA community was more likely to represent r-strategists in contrast to the AOB community following a K-life strategy. Our results indicated that the AOA may play a vital role in ammonia oxidation in a fluctuating habitat and contribute to the stability of riparian ecosystem.

  9. Influence of Disturbance on Soil Respiration in Biologically Crusted Soil during the Dry Season

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Feng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil respiration (Rs is a major pathway for carbon cycling and is a complex process involving abiotic and biotic factors. Biological soil crusts (BSCs are a key biotic component of desert ecosystems worldwide. In desert ecosystems, soils are protected from surface disturbance by BSCs, but it is unknown whether Rs is affected by disturbance of this crust layer. We measured Rs in three types of disturbed and undisturbed crusted soils (algae, lichen, and moss, as well as bare land from April to August, 2010, in Mu Us desert, northwest China. Rs was similar among undisturbed soils but increased significantly in disturbed moss and algae crusted soils. The variation of Rs in undisturbed and disturbed soil was related to soil bulk density. Disturbance also led to changes in soil organic carbon and fine particles contents, including declines of 60–70% in surface soil C and N, relative to predisturbance values. Once BSCs were disturbed, Q10 increased. Our findings indicate that a loss of BSCs cover will lead to greater soil C loss through respiration. Given these results, understanding the disturbance sensitivity impact on Rs could be helpful to modify soil management practices which promote carbon sequestration.

  10. Most-Critical Transient Disturbances in an Incompressible Flat-Plate Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monschke, Jason; White, Edward

    2015-11-01

    Transient growth is a linear disturbance growth mechanism that plays a key role in roughness-induced boundary-layer transition. It occurs when superposed stable, non-orthogonal continuous spectrum modes experience algebraic disturbance growth followed by exponential decay. Algebraic disturbance growth can modify the basic state making it susceptible to secondary instabilities rapidly leading to transition. Optimal disturbance theory was developed to model the most-dangerous disturbances. However, evidence suggests roughness-induced transient growth is sub-optimal yet leads to transition earlier than optimal theory suggests. This research computes initial disturbances most unstable to secondary instabilities to further develop the applicability of transient growth theory to surface roughness. The main approach is using nonlinear adjoint optimization with solutions of the parabolized Navier-Stokes and BiGlobal stability equations. Two objective functions were considered: disturbance kinetic energy growth and sinuous instability growth rate. The first objective function was used as validation of the optimization method. Counter-rotating streamwise vortices located low in the boundary layer maximize the sinuous instability growth rate. The authors would like to acknowledge NASA and the AFOSR for funding this work through AFOSR Grant FA9550-09-1-0341.

  11. Sleep and inflammatory bowel disease: exploring the relationship between sleep disturbances and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnucan, Jami A; Rubin, David T; Ali, Tauseef

    2013-11-01

    Sleep disturbances are associated with a greater risk of serious adverse health events, economic consequences, and, most importantly, increased all-cause mortality. Several studies support the associations among sleep, immune function, and inflammation. The relationship between sleep disturbances and inflammatory conditions is complex and not completely understood. Sleep deprivation can lead to increased levels of inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-1β IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α and C-reactive protein, which can lead to further activation of the inflammatory cascade. The relevance of sleep in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), a chronic immune-mediated inflammatory disease of the gastrointestinal tract, has recently received more attention. Several studies have shown that patients with both inactive and active IBD have self-reported sleep disturbances. Here, we present a concise review of sleep and its association with the immune system and the process of inflammation. We discuss the studies that have evaluated sleep in patients with IBD as well as possible treatment options for those patients with sleep disturbances. An algorithm for evaluating sleep disturbances in the IBD population is also proposed. Further research is still needed to better characterize sleep disturbances in the IBD population as well as to assess the effects of various therapeutic interventions to improve sleep quality. It is possible that the diagnosis and treatment of sleep disturbances in this population may provide an opportunity to alter disease outcomes.

  12. Disturbance analysis in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sillamaa, M.A.

    Disturbance analysis is any systematic procedure that helps an operator determine what has failed. This paper describes the typical information currently provided in CANDU power plants to help the operator respond to a disturbance. It presents a simplified model of how an operator could get into trouble, and briefly reviews development work on computerized disturbance analysis systems for nuclear power plants being done in various countries including Canada. Disturbance analysis systems promise to be useful tools in helping operators improve their response to complex situations. However, the originality and complexity of the work for a disturbance analysis system and the need to develop operator confidence and management support require a 'walk before you run' approach

  13. Understanding the Spatio-Temporal Pattern of Fire Disturbance in the Eastern Mongolia Using Modis Product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurihan; Zhang, H.; Zhang, Z.; Guo, X.; Zhao, J.; Duwala; Shan, Y.; Hongying

    2018-04-01

    Fire disturbance plays an important role in maintaining ecological balance, biodiversity and self-renewal. In this paper, the spatio-temporal pattern of fire disturbances in eastern Mongolia are studied by using the ArcGIS spatial analysis method, using the MCD45A1 data of MODIS fire products with long time series. It provides scientific basis and reference for the regional ecological environment security construction and international ecological security. Research indicates: (1) The fire disturbance in eastern Mongolia has obvious high and low peak interleaving phenomenon in the year, and the seasonal change is obvious. (2) The distribution pattern of fire disturbance in eastern Mongolia is aggregated, which indicates that the fire disturbance is not random and it is caused by certain influence. (3) Fire disturbance is mainly distributed in the eastern province of Mongolia, the border between China and Mongolia and the northern forest area of Sukhbaatar province. (4) The fire disturbance in the eastern part of the study area is strong and the southwest is weaker. The spreading regularity of fire disturbances in eastern Mongolia is closer to the natural level of ecosystem.

  14. UNDERSTANDING THE SPATIO-TEMPORAL PATTERN OF FIRE DISTURBANCE IN THE EASTERN MONGOLIA USING MODIS PRODUCT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wurihan

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Fire disturbance plays an important role in maintaining ecological balance, biodiversity and self-renewal. In this paper, the spatio-temporal pattern of fire disturbances in eastern Mongolia are studied by using the ArcGIS spatial analysis method, using the MCD45A1 data of MODIS fire products with long time series. It provides scientific basis and reference for the regional ecological environment security construction and international ecological security. Research indicates: (1 The fire disturbance in eastern Mongolia has obvious high and low peak interleaving phenomenon in the year, and the seasonal change is obvious. (2 The distribution pattern of fire disturbance in eastern Mongolia is aggregated, which indicates that the fire disturbance is not random and it is caused by certain influence. (3 Fire disturbance is mainly distributed in the eastern province of Mongolia, the border between China and Mongolia and the northern forest area of Sukhbaatar province. (4 The fire disturbance in the eastern part of the study area is strong and the southwest is weaker. The spreading regularity of fire disturbances in eastern Mongolia is closer to the natural level of ecosystem.

  15. A walk on the wild side: Disturbance dynamics and the conservation and management of European mountain forest ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulakowski, Dominik; Seidl, Rupert; Holeksa, Jan; Kuuluvainen, Timo; Nagel, Thomas A; Panayotov, Momchil; Svoboda, Miroslav; Thorn, Simon; Vacchiano, Giorgio; Whitlock, Cathy; Wohlgemuth, Thomas; Bebi, Peter

    2017-03-15

    Mountain forests are among the most important ecosystems in Europe as they support numerous ecological, hydrological, climatic, social, and economic functions. They are unique relatively natural ecosystems consisting of long-lived species in an otherwise densely populated human landscape. Despite this, centuries of intensive forest management in many of these forests have eclipsed evidence of natural processes, especially the role of disturbances in long-term forest dynamics. Recent trends of land abandonment and establishment of protected forests have coincided with a growing interest in managing forests in more natural states. At the same time, the importance of past disturbances highlighted in an emerging body of literature, and recent increasing disturbances due to climate change are challenging long-held views of dynamics in these ecosystems. Here, we synthesize aspects of this Special Issue on the ecology of mountain forest ecosystems in Europe in the context of broader discussions in the field, to present a new perspective on these ecosystems and their natural disturbance regimes. Most mountain forests in Europe, for which long-term data are available, show a strong and long-term effect of not only human land use but also of natural disturbances that vary by orders of magnitude in size and frequency. Although these disturbances may kill many trees, the forests themselves have not been threatened. The relative importance of natural disturbances, land use, and climate change for ecosystem dynamics varies across space and time. Across the continent, changing climate and land use are altering forest cover, forest structure, tree demography, and natural disturbances, including fires, insect outbreaks, avalanches, and wind disturbances. Projected continued increases in forest area and biomass along with continued warming are likely to further promote forest disturbances. Episodic disturbances may foster ecosystem adaptation to the effects of ongoing and future

  16. Long Short-Term Memory Neural Networks for Online Disturbance Detection in Satellite Image Time Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Long Kong

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A satellite image time series (SITS contains a significant amount of temporal information. By analysing this type of data, the pattern of the changes in the object of concern can be explored. The natural change in the Earth’s surface is relatively slow and exhibits a pronounced pattern. Some natural events (for example, fires, floods, plant diseases, and insect pests and human activities (for example, deforestation and urbanisation will disturb this pattern and cause a relatively profound change on the Earth’s surface. These events are usually referred to as disturbances. However, disturbances in ecosystems are not easy to detect from SITS data, because SITS contain combined information on disturbances, phenological variations and noise in remote sensing data. In this paper, a novel framework is proposed for online disturbance detection from SITS. The framework is based on long short-term memory (LSTM networks. First, LSTM networks are trained by historical SITS. The trained LSTM networks are then used to predict new time series data. Last, the predicted data are compared with real data, and the noticeable deviations reveal disturbances. Experimental results using 16-day compositions of the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MOD13Q1 illustrate the effectiveness and stability of the proposed approach for online disturbance detection.

  17. Recovery of lotic macroinvertebrate communities from disturbance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, J. Bruce

    1990-09-01

    Ecosystem disturbances produce changes in macrobenthic community structure (abundances, biomass, and production) that persist for a few weeks to many decades. Examples of disturbances with extremely long-term effects on benthic communities include contamination by persistent toxic agents, physical changes in habitats, and altered energy inputs. Stream size, retention, and local geomorphology may ameliorate the influence of disturbances on invertebrates. Disturbances can alter food webs and may select for favorable genotypes (e.g., insecticidal resistance). Introductions of pesticides into lotic ecosystems, which do not result in major physical changes within habitats, illustrate several factors that influence invertebrate recovery time from disturbance. These include: (1) magnitude of original contamination, toxicity, and extent of continued use; (2) spatial scale of the disturbance; (3) persistence of the pesticide; (4) timing of the contamination in relation to the life history stages of the organisms; (5) vagility of populations influenced by pesticides; and (6) position within the drainage network. The ability of macroinvertebrates to recolonize denuded stream habitats may vary greatly depending on regional life histories, dispersal abilities, and position within the stream network (e.g., headwaters vs larger rivers). Although downstream drift is the most frequently cited mechanism of invertebrate recolonization following disturbance in middle- and larger-order streams, evidence is presented that shows aerial recolonization to be potentially important in headwater streams. There is an apparent stochastic element operating for aerial recolonization, depending on the timing of disturbance and flight periods of various taxa. Available evidence indicates that recolonization of invertebrate taxa without an aerial adult stage requires longer periods of time than for those that possess winged, terrestrial adult stages (i.e., most insects). Innovative, manipulative

  18. Sleep disturbances after fast-track hip and knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, L; Jennum, P; Kehlet, H

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: /st>Major surgery is followed by pronounced sleep disturbances after traditional perioperative care potentially leading to prolonged recovery. The aim was to evaluate the rapid eye movement (REM) sleep duration and sleep architecture before and after fast-track hip and knee replacement......, and on the fourth postoperative night at home. Sleep staging was performed according to the American Academy of Sleep Medicine manual. Opioid use, pain, and inflammatory response (C-reactive protein) were also evaluated. RESULTS: /st>The mean LOS was 1.5 (1-2) days. The mean REM sleep time decreased from a mean...... on the fourth postoperative night. There was no association between opioid use, pain scores, and inflammatory response with a disturbed sleep pattern. CONCLUSIONS: /st>Despite ultra-short LOS and provision of spinal anaesthesia with multimodal opioid-sparing analgesia, REM sleep was almost eliminated...

  19. A test method for analysing disturbed ethernet data streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreitlow, M.; Sabath, F.; Garbe, H.

    2015-11-01

    Ethernet connections, which are widely used in many computer networks, can suffer from electromagnetic interference. Typically, a degradation of the data transmission rate can be perceived as electromagnetic disturbances lead to corruption of data frames on the network media. In this paper a software-based measuring method is presented, which allows a direct assessment of the effects on the link layer. The results can directly be linked to the physical interaction without the influence of software related effects on higher protocol layers. This gives a simple tool for a quantitative analysis of the disturbance of an Ethernet connection based on time domain data. An example is shown, how the data can be used for further investigation of mechanisms and detection of intentional electromagnetic attacks.

  20. Temporal naturalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolin, Lee

    2015-11-01

    Two people may claim both to be naturalists, but have divergent conceptions of basic elements of the natural world which lead them to mean different things when they talk about laws of nature, or states, or the role of mathematics in physics. These disagreements do not much affect the ordinary practice of science which is about small subsystems of the universe, described or explained against a background, idealized to be fixed. But these issues become crucial when we consider including the whole universe within our system, for then there is no fixed background to reference observables to. I argue here that the key issue responsible for divergent versions of naturalism and divergent approaches to cosmology is the conception of time. One version, which I call temporal naturalism, holds that time, in the sense of the succession of present moments, is real, and that laws of nature evolve in that time. This is contrasted with timeless naturalism, which holds that laws are immutable and the present moment and its passage are illusions. I argue that temporal naturalism is empirically more adequate than the alternatives, because it offers testable explanations for puzzles its rivals cannot address, and is likely a better basis for solving major puzzles that presently face cosmology and physics. This essay also addresses the problem of qualia and experience within naturalism and argues that only temporal naturalism can make a place for qualia as intrinsic qualities of matter.

  1. Sleep and Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Exploring the Relationship Between Sleep Disturbances and Inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Kinnucan, Jami A.; Rubin, David T.; Ali, Tauseef

    2013-01-01

    Sleep disturbances are associated with a greater risk of serious adverse health events, economic consequences, and, most importantly, increased all-cause mortality. Several studies support the associations among sleep, immune function, and inflammation. The relationship between sleep disturbances and inflammatory conditions is complex and not completely understood. Sleep deprivation can lead to increased levels of inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-1β IL-6, tumor necrosis fact...

  2. ROLE OF ECOLOGICAL DISTURBANCES IN EMERGENCE OF SYLVATIC ZOONOSES AND NIDAL DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivaji Bhattacharya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Influence of human civilization and disturbance of ecology has an important role on the evolution and emergence of new sylvatic zoonoses as well as nidal diseases.Proper study of different causes and mechanisms of escape of disease agents from their natural boundaries of niche and taking of suitable biosecurity measures for those diseases should be ensured prior to any developmental and welfare activities of human which are responsible for any kind of ecological disturbance.

  3. Multi-scale location analysis of vulnerabilities and their link to disturbances within digital ecosystems

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    As computer networks evolve, so too does the techniques used by attackers to exploit new vulnerabilities. Natural ecosystems already have resistant and resilient properties that help protect them from unwanted disturbances despite the existence of different vulnerabilities. Computer networks and their environments can be considered as digital ecosystems with different vulnerabilities, and security attacks can be considered as unwanted disturbances. Analysis of vulnerabilities and attacks from...

  4. Source/sink patterns of disturbance and cross-scale mismatches in a panarchy of social-ecological landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicola Zaccarelli; Irene Petrosillo; Giovanni Zurlini; Kurt H. Riitters

    2008-01-01

    Land-use change is one of the major factors affecting global environmental change and represents a primary human effect on natural systems. Taking into account the scales and patterns of human land uses as source/sink disturbance systems, we describe a framework to characterize and interpret the spatial patterns of disturbances along a continuum of scales in a panarchy...

  5. Altered structural development and accelerated succession from intermediate-scale wind disturbance in Quercus stands on the Cumberland Plateau, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen D White; Justin L. Hart; Callie J. Schweitzer; Daniel C. Dey

    2015-01-01

    Natural disturbances play important roles in shaping the structure and composition of all forest ecosystems and can be used to inform silvicultural practices. Canopy disturbances are often classified along a gradient ranging from highly localized, gap-scale events to stand-replacing events. Wind storms such as downbursts, derechos, and low intensity tornadoes typically...

  6. Up-regulation of miR-200 and let-7 by natural agents leads to the reversal of epithelial-mesenchymal transition in gemcitabine-resistant pancreatic cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yiwei; VandenBoom, Timothy G.; Kong, Dejuan; Wang, Zhiwei; Ali, Shadan; Philip, Philip A.; Sarkar, Fazlul H.

    2009-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is the fourth most common cause of cancer death in the United States and the aggressiveness of PC is in part due to its intrinsic and extrinsic drug resistance characteristics, which is also associated with the acquisition of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Emerging evidence also suggest that the processes of EMT is regulated by the expression status of many microRNAs (miRNAs), which are believed to function as key regulators of various biological and pathological processes during tumor development and progression. In the present study, we compared the expression of miRNAs between gemcitabine-sensitive and gemcitabine-resistant PC cells, and investigated whether the treatment of cells with “natural agents” [3,3′-diinodolylmethane (DIM) or isoflavone] could affect the expression of miRNAs. We found that the expression of miR-200b, miR-200c, let-7b, let-7c, let-7d, and let-7e was significantly down-regulated in gemcitabine-resistant cells that showed EMT characteristics such as elongated fibroblastoid morphology, lower expression of epithelial marker E-cadherin, and higher expression of mesenchymal markers such as vimentin and ZEB1. Moreover, we found that re-expression of miR-200 by transfection studies or treatment of gemcitabine-resistant cells with either DIM or isoflavone resulted in the down-regulation of ZEB1, slug, and vimentin, which was consistent with morphological reversal of EMT phenotype leading to epithelial morphology. These results provide experimental evidence, for the first time, that DIM and isoflavone could function as miRNA regulators leading to the reversal of EMT phenotype, which is likely to be important for designing novel therapies for PC. PMID:19654291

  7. Differentiating Social Maladjustment from Emotional Disturbance: An Analysis of Case Law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Amanda L.; Sadeh, Shanna S.

    2014-01-01

    For more than 30 years, scholars and practitioners have debated how to distinguish emotional disturbance (ED) from social maladjustment (SM) when determining special education eligibility and need. Scholarship on the nature of ED and SM has paid little attention to the legal parameters of practice despite the fundamentally legalistic nature of…

  8. Effects of climate change and anthropogenic modification on a disturbance-dependent species in a large riverine system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeigler, Sara; Catlin, Daniel H.; Bomberger Brown, M.; Fraser, J.D.; Dinan, Lauren R.; Hunt, Kelsi L.; Jorgensen, Joel G.; Karpanty, Sarah M.

    2017-01-01

    Humans have altered nearly every natural disturbance regime on the planet through climate and land-use change, and in many instances, these processes may have interacting effects. For example, projected shifts in temperature and precipitation will likely influence disturbance regimes already affected by anthropogenic fire suppression or river impoundments. Understanding how disturbance-dependent species respond to complex and interacting environmental changes is important for conservation efforts. Using field-based demographic and movement rates, we conducted a metapopulation viability analysis for piping plovers (Charadrius melodus), a threatened disturbance-dependent species, along the Missouri and Platte rivers in the Great Plains of North America. Our aim was to better understand current and projected future metapopulation dynamics given that natural disturbances (flooding or high-flow events) have been greatly reduced by river impoundments and that climate change could further alter the disturbance regime. Although metapopulation abundance has been substantially reduced under the current suppressed disturbance regime (high-flow return interval ~ 20 yr), it could grow if the frequency of high-flow events increases as predicted under likely climate change scenarios. We found that a four-year return interval would maximize metapopulation abundance, and all subpopulations in the metapopulation would act as sources at a return interval of 15 yr or less. Regardless of disturbance frequency, the presence of even a small, stable source subpopulation buffered the metapopulation and sustained a low metapopulation extinction risk. Therefore, climate change could have positive effects in ecosystems where disturbances have been anthropogenically suppressed when climatic shifts move disturbance regimes toward more historical patterns. Furthermore, stable source populations, even if unintentionally maintained through anthropogenic activities, may be critical for the

  9. Legacy effects of no-analogue disturbances alter plant community diversity and composition in semi-arid sagebrush steppe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripplinger, Julie; Franklin, Janet; Edwards, Thomas C.

    2015-01-01

    Questions(i) What role does the type of managed disturbance play in structuring sagebrush steppe plant communities? (ii) How does the composition of post-disturbance plant communities change with time since disturbance? (iii) Does plant community diversity change over time following managed disturbance?LocationField study within the sagebrush steppe ecosystem. Rich County, Utah, USA.MethodsWe developed a chronosequence spanning up to 50 yrs post-treatment to study sagebrush steppe vegetation dynamics. Direct ordination was used to examine plant community composition by managed disturbance type and time since disturbance, and factorial analysis of covariance was used to examine diversity dynamics following disturbance. Indicator species values were calculated in order to identify characteristic species for each disturbance type.ResultsPlant communities experienced a shift toward distinct community composition for each of the three managed disturbance types, and gave no indication of returning to untreated community composition or diversity. Small post-disturbance increases in the number of non-native grass species were observed in the treatments relative to reference, with native forb species making the largest contribution to altered composition. On fire- and chemically-treated sites the proportional native forb species richness increased over time since disturbance, while the proportional contribution of non-native forbs to total species richness decreased. For all three treatment types, native grasses contributed less on average to total richness than on reference sites, while non-native grasses made up a higher proportion of total richness.ConclusionsCommon shrubland management techniques have legacy effects on the composition and diversity of sagebrush steppe plant communities, and no-analogue disturbances, such as chemical or mechanical treatments, have more pronounced legacy effects than treatments similar to natural disturbance regimes (fire). This study

  10. Modeling aircraft noise induced sleep disturbance

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Sarah M.

    occurrence of rapid eye movements, sleep spindles, and slow wave sleep. Using these features an approach for classifying sleep stages every one second during the night was developed. From observation of the results of the sleep stage classification, it was determined how to add faster dynamics to the nonlinear dynamic model. Slow and fast REM activity are modeled separately and the activity in the gamma frequency band of the EEG signal is used to model both spontaneous and noise-induced awakenings. The nonlinear model predicts changes in sleep structure similar to those found by other researchers and reported in the sleep literature and similar to those found in obtained survey data. To compare sleep disturbance model predictions, flight operations data from US airports were obtained and sleep disturbance in communities was predicted for different operations scenarios using the modified Markov model, the nonlinear dynamic model, and other aircraft noise awakening models. Similarities and differences in model predictions were evaluated in order to determine if the use of the developed sleep structure model leads to improved predictions of the impact of nighttime noise on communities.

  11. Blood lead and lead-210 origins in residents of Toulouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Servant, J.; Delapart, M.

    1981-01-01

    Blood lead and lead-210 analyses were performed on blood samples from non-smoking residents of Toulouse (city of 400,000 inhabitants). Simultaneous surface soil lead content determinations were carried out by the same procedure on rural zone samples of southwestern France. The observed isotopic ratios were compared in order to evaluate food chain contamination. For an average of 19.7 +- 5.8 μg 100 cc -1 of lead in blood, atmospheric contamination amounts to 20%, estimated as follows: 6% from direct inhalation and 14% from dry deposits on vegetation absorbed as food. The natural levels carried over by the food chain reach 14.9 μg 100 cc -1 and have a 210 Pb/Pb concentration ratio of 0.055 dpmμg -1 . These results lead to a maximum value of 15 μg 100 cc -1 for natural lead in human blood according to the ICRP model. (author)

  12. Hydrological disturbance diminishes predator control in wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorn, Nathan J; Cook, Mark I

    2015-11-01

    Effects of predators on prey populations can be especially strong in aquatic ecosystems, but disturbances may mediate the strength of predator limitation and even allow outbreaks of some prey populations. In a two-year study we investigated the numerical responses of crayfish (Procambarus fallax) and small fishes (Poeciliidae and Fundulidae) to a brief hydrological disturbance in replicated freshwater wetlands with an experimental drying and large predatory fish reduction. The experiment and an in situ predation assay tested the component of the consumer stress model positing that disturbances release prey from predator limitation. In the disturbed wetlands, abundances of large predatory fish were seasonally reduced, similar to dynamics in the Everglades (southern Florida). Densities of small fish were unaffected by the disturbance, but crayfish densities, which were similar across all wetlands before drying, increased almost threefold in the year after the disturbance. Upon re-flooding, juvenile crayfish survival was inversely related to the abundance of large fish across wetlands, but we found no evidence for enhanced algal food quality. At a larger landscape scale (500 km2 of the Everglades), crayfish densities over eight years were positively correlated with the severity of local dry disturbances (up to 99 days dry) during the preceding dry season. In contrast, densities of small-bodied fishes in the same wetlands were seasonally depressed by dry disturbances. The results from our experimental wetland drought and the observations of crayfish densities in the Everglades represent a large-scale example of prey population release following a hydrological disturbance in a freshwater ecosystem. The conditions producing crayfish pulses in the Everglades appear consistent with the mechanics of the consumer stress model, and we suggest crayfish pulses may influence the number of nesting wading birds in the Everglades.

  13. Speech and Language Disturbances in Neurology Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oğuz Tanrıdağ

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite the well-known facts discerned from interesting cases of speech and language disturbances over thousands of years, the scientific background and the limitless discussions for nearly 150 years, this field has been considered one of the least important subjects in neurological sciences. In this review, we first analyze the possible causes for this “stepchild” attitude towards this subject and we then summarize the practical aspects concerning speech and language disturbances. Our underlying expectation with this review is to explain the facts concerning those disturbances that might offer us opportunities to better understand the nervous system and the affected patients

  14. Is coral richness related to community resistance to and recovery from disturbance?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacy Y. Zhang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available More diverse communities are thought to be more stable—the diversity–stability hypothesis—due to increased resistance to and recovery from disturbances. For example, high diversity can make the presence of resilient or fast growing species and key facilitations among species more likely. How natural, geographic biodiversity patterns and changes in biodiversity due to human activities mediate community-level disturbance dynamics is largely unknown, especially in diverse systems. For example, few studies have explored the role of diversity in tropical marine communities, especially at large scales. We tested the diversity–stability hypothesis by asking whether coral richness is related to resistance to and recovery from disturbances including storms, predator outbreaks, and coral bleaching on tropical coral reefs. We synthesized the results of 41 field studies conducted on 82 reefs, documenting changes in coral cover due to disturbance, across a global gradient of coral richness. Our results indicate that coral reefs in more species-rich regions were marginally less resistant to disturbance and did not recover more quickly. Coral community resistance was also highly dependent on pre-disturbance coral cover, probably due in part to the sensitivity of fast-growing and often dominant plating acroporid corals to disturbance. Our results suggest that coral communities in biodiverse regions, such as the western Pacific, may not be more resistant and resilient to natural and anthropogenic disturbances. Further analyses controlling for disturbance intensity and other drivers of coral loss and recovery could improve our understanding of the influence of diversity on community stability in coral reef ecosystems.

  15. Is coral richness related to community resistance to and recovery from disturbance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Stacy Y; Speare, Kelly E; Long, Zachary T; McKeever, Kimberly A; Gyoerkoe, Megan; Ramus, Aaron P; Mohorn, Zach; Akins, Kelsey L; Hambridge, Sarah M; Graham, Nicholas A J; Nash, Kirsty L; Selig, Elizabeth R; Bruno, John F

    2014-01-01

    More diverse communities are thought to be more stable-the diversity-stability hypothesis-due to increased resistance to and recovery from disturbances. For example, high diversity can make the presence of resilient or fast growing species and key facilitations among species more likely. How natural, geographic biodiversity patterns and changes in biodiversity due to human activities mediate community-level disturbance dynamics is largely unknown, especially in diverse systems. For example, few studies have explored the role of diversity in tropical marine communities, especially at large scales. We tested the diversity-stability hypothesis by asking whether coral richness is related to resistance to and recovery from disturbances including storms, predator outbreaks, and coral bleaching on tropical coral reefs. We synthesized the results of 41 field studies conducted on 82 reefs, documenting changes in coral cover due to disturbance, across a global gradient of coral richness. Our results indicate that coral reefs in more species-rich regions were marginally less resistant to disturbance and did not recover more quickly. Coral community resistance was also highly dependent on pre-disturbance coral cover, probably due in part to the sensitivity of fast-growing and often dominant plating acroporid corals to disturbance. Our results suggest that coral communities in biodiverse regions, such as the western Pacific, may not be more resistant and resilient to natural and anthropogenic disturbances. Further analyses controlling for disturbance intensity and other drivers of coral loss and recovery could improve our understanding of the influence of diversity on community stability in coral reef ecosystems.

  16. Determining the size of a complete disturbance landscape: multi-scale, continental analysis of forest change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buma, Brian; Costanza, Jennifer K; Riitters, Kurt

    2017-11-21

    The scale of investigation for disturbance-influenced processes plays a critical role in theoretical assumptions about stability, variance, and equilibrium, as well as conservation reserve and long-term monitoring program design. Critical consideration of scale is required for robust planning designs, especially when anticipating future disturbances whose exact locations are unknown. This research quantified disturbance proportion and pattern (as contagion) at multiple scales across North America. This pattern of scale-associated variability can guide selection of study and management extents, for example, to minimize variance (measured as standard deviation) between any landscapes within an ecoregion. We identified the proportion and pattern of forest disturbance (30 m grain size) across multiple landscape extents up to 180 km 2 . We explored the variance in proportion of disturbed area and the pattern of that disturbance between landscapes (within an ecoregion) as a function of the landscape extent. In many ecoregions, variance between landscapes within an ecoregion was minimal at broad landscape extents (low standard deviation). Gap-dominated regions showed the least variance, while fire-dominated showed the largest. Intensively managed ecoregions displayed unique patterns. A majority of the ecoregions showed low variance between landscapes at some scale, indicating an appropriate extent for incorporating natural regimes and unknown future disturbances was identified. The quantification of the scales of disturbance at the ecoregion level provides guidance for individuals interested in anticipating future disturbances which will occur in unknown spatial locations. Information on the extents required to incorporate disturbance patterns into planning is crucial for that process.

  17. Disturbance estimation of nuclear power plant by using reduced-order model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tashima, Shin-ichi; Wakabayashi, Jiro

    1983-01-01

    An estimation method is proposed of multiplex disturbances which occur in a nuclear power plant. The method is composed of two parts: (i) the identification of a simplified model of multi-input and multi-output to describe the related system response, and (ii) the design of a Kalman filter to estimate the multiplex disturbance. Concerning the simplified model, several observed signals are firstly selected as output variables which can well represent the system response caused by the disturbances. A reduced-order model is utilized for designing the disturbance estimator. This is based on the following two considerations. The first is that the disturbance is assumed to be of a quasistatic nature. The other is based on the intuition that there exist a few dominant modes between the disturbances and the selected observed signals and that most of the non-dominant modes which remain may not affect the accuracy of the disturbance estimator. The reduced-order model is furtherly transformed to a single-output model using a linear combination of the output signals, where the standard procedure of the structural identification is evaded. The parameters of the model thus transformed are calculated by the generalized least square method. As for the multiplex disturbance estimator, the Kalman filtering method is applied by compromising the following three items : (a) quick response to disturbance, (b) reduction of estimation error in the presence of observation noises, and (c) the elimination of cross-interference between the disturbances to the plant and the estimates from the Kalman filter. The effectiveness of the proposed method is verified through some computer experiments using a BWR plant simulator. (author)

  18. Niveles de plomo en sangre en niños de 8 a 10 años y su relación con la alteración en el sistema visomotor y del equilibrio Relationship of blood lead levels with visual-motor and equilibrium disturbances in children aged 8 to 10 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Isabel Azcona-Cruz

    2000-08-01

    equilibrio. CONCLUSIONES: La relación negativa entre el plomo y la habilidad visomotora concuerda con los resultados encontrados en niños en otros países. Al parecer las concentraciones de plomo en sangre, que son comunes en los niños de Oaxaca, son suficientes para ocasionar una limitación visomotora de naturaleza sutil. Los resultados de este estudio señalan la necesidad de reforzar la iniciativa de reducir la exposición de los niños a las fuentes de exposición conocidas, en especial barro vidriado y, por lo tanto, reducir los niveles poblacionales de plomo en sangre.OBJECTIVE: To assess the association betwen blood lead concentrations and visual-motor coordination and equilibrium in school age children. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In November-December 1998, a cross-sectional study was conducted among 255 children aged 8-10, who attended public schools in Sector 1 of the Oaxaca State Public Education Institute. Data were collected using the Frostig Evaluation of Visual Perception test and the equilibrium subscale of the Frostig Movement Skills Test Battery. A blood sample was taken to measure lead levels by atomic absorption spectrometry. Socioeconomic data and health histories were collected for use as control variables. Statistical analysis consisted of multiple regression models to test the relationship between blood lead level and the visual-motor and equilibrium tests. We assessed the efect of lead within the model using 1 000 Montecarlo simulations. RESULTS: The geometric mean of blood lead concentrations was 11.5 µg/dl (geometric standard deviation +6.3, -5.2. After adjusting for control variables, the visual-motor integration subscale was significantly related to blood lead concentration (p> 0.042. The visual-motor integration value decreased 1.78 (95% CI -3.51, -0.06 points for each 10 µg/dl increase in blood lead concentration. Among the four sub-tests comprising the visual-motor integration subscale, only eye-hand coordination (p=0.045 and spatial relations

  19. Highways Disturbance Detection with the Use of Open Source Code Geographic Information Systems, Mobile and Web Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabah, L.; Şimşek, M.

    2017-11-01

    Road disturbances are occurring in our country due to the highway-weighted transportation. These disturbances are caused by human and natural causes. Disturbances in the roads have a negative effect on human life as well as damage to the vehicles. Regardless of how it occurs, it is important to quickly detect and eliminate roadside disturbances. The use of mobile devices has become widespread with developing technologies. Today, many sensors such as GPS and accelerometer are used to detect road disturbances on mobile devices. In this context, it is important to use mobile applications for fast and in-situ detection. In this study, it is investigated the use of mobile devices' location data received from GPS sensors with special mobile interfaces in gathering road data for road disturbances.

  20. Not all forests are disturbed equally: Population dynamics and resource selection of black-backed woodpeckers in the Black Hills, South Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher Thomas Rota

    2013-01-01

    Western North American forests are shaped by natural disturbances, which are an important driver of habitat heterogeneity and species diversity. Wildfire and bark beetle infestations are of particular interest to resource managers because of their widespread occurrence and potential economic impacts. These naturally occurring disturbances create habitat for numerous...

  1. Wind Power Prediction Considering Nonlinear Atmospheric Disturbances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yagang Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers the effect of nonlinear atmospheric disturbances on wind power prediction. A Lorenz system is introduced as an atmospheric disturbance model. Three new improved wind forecasting models combined with a Lorenz comprehensive disturbance are put forward in this study. Firstly, we define the form of the Lorenz disturbance variable and the wind speed perturbation formula. Then, different artificial neural network models are used to verify the new idea and obtain better wind speed predictions. Finally we separately use the original and improved wind speed series to predict the related wind power. This proves that the corrected wind speed provides higher precision wind power predictions. This research presents a totally new direction in the wind prediction field and has profound theoretical research value and practical guiding significance.

  2. Anthropogenic disturbance on the vegetation in makurunge

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mgina

    landscape in Tanzania that has been severely affected by anthropogenic disturbance ... Fragmentation of habitats formed patches that have reduced plant species population sizes, and ... by the movement of the Inter-Tropical ..... of pollinators.

  3. Sleep disturbances after non-cardiac surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, Jacob

    2001-01-01

    . The sleep disturbances seem to be related to the magnitude of trauma and thereby to the surgical stress response and/or post-operative opioid administration. Post-operative sleep disturbances may contribute to the development of early post-operative fatigue, episodic hypoxaemia, haemodynamic instability......After major non-cardiac surgery sleep pattern is usually disturbed with initial suppression of rapid eye movement sleep with a subsequent rebound during the first post-operative week. Deep sleep is also suppressed for several days after the operation and subjective sleep quality is impaired...... and altered mental status, all with a potential negative effect on post-operative outcome. Minimizing surgical trauma and avoiding or minimizing use of opioids for pain relief may prevent or reduce post-operative sleep disturbances. Post-operative sleep pattern represents an important research field, since...

  4. Sleep disturbance associated factors in menopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Haghani

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sleep is necessary in life and approximately 1/3 of human life is devoted to sleep. One of the most common problems in menopausal women is sleep disturbance. The aim of this study was to determine frequency of sleep disorders and its related factors in 50 – 60 years old women Methods: A cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted on 200 eligible women who referred to selected health centers of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS. Demographic form, ten-point slide to review sexual satisfaction and Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index Questioner (PSQI were used for data collection. Data was analyzed using ANOVA, t-test, and Pearson correlation tests.Results: The mean age of women was 53.6±3.6 year, menopause age 47.8±4, number of children 4.76±2 and partner age was 57.99±6.6. 34.5% of women were satisfied from their sexual relationship and their score was 8-10. Rate of sleep disturbances in this group was about 70%. The results showed that between four variables: economical status, occupation, partner occupation and educational status were significantly associated with sleep disturbance (P=0.002. There was not significant difference between other demographic information and sleep disturbance.Conclusion: The results show high prevalence of sleep disturbance symptoms among menopausal women. According to the relationship between some personal characters and sleep disturbance, health care providers need to consider these variables.

  5. Disturbance-specific social responses in long-finned pilot whales, Globicephala melas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Fleur; Curé, Charlotte; Kvadsheim, Petter H.; Lam, Frans-Peter A.; Tyack, Peter L.; Miller, Patrick J. O.

    2016-06-01

    Social interactions among animals can influence their response to disturbance. We investigated responses of long-finned pilot whales to killer whale sound playbacks and two anthropogenic sources of disturbance: tagging effort and naval sonar exposure. The acoustic scene and diving behaviour of tagged individuals were recorded along with the social behaviour of their groups. All three disturbance types resulted in larger group sizes, increasing social cohesion during disturbance. However, the nature and magnitude of other responses differed between disturbance types. Tagging effort resulted in a clear increase in synchrony and a tendency to reduce surface logging and to become silent (21% of cases), whereas pilot whales increased surface resting during sonar exposure. Killer whale sounds elicited increased calling rates and the aggregation of multiple groups, which approached the sound source together. This behaviour appears to represent a mobbing response, a likely adaptive social defence against predators or competitors. All observed response-tactics would reduce risk of loss of group coordination, suggesting that, in social pilot whales, this could drive behavioural responses to disturbance. However, the behavioural means used to achieve social coordination depends upon other considerations, which are disturbance-specific.

  6. The intermediate disturbance hypothesis applies to tropical forests, but disturbance contributes little to tree diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongers, Frans; Poorter, Lourens; Hawthorne, William D; Sheil, Douglas

    2009-08-01

    The intermediate disturbance hypothesis (IDH) predicts local species diversity to be maximal at an intermediate level of disturbance. Developed to explain species maintenance and diversity patterns in species-rich ecosystems such as tropical forests, tests of IDH in tropical forest remain scarce, small-scale and contentious. We use an unprecedented large-scale dataset (2504 one-hectare plots and 331,567 trees) to examine whether IDH explains tree diversity variation within wet, moist and dry tropical forests, and we analyse the underlying mechanism by determining responses within functional species groups. We find that disturbance explains more variation in diversity of dry than wet tropical forests. Pioneer species numbers increase with disturbance, shade-tolerant species decrease and intermediate species are indifferent. While diversity indeed peaks at intermediate disturbance levels little variation is explained outside dry forests, and disturbance is less important for species richness patterns in wet tropical rain forests than previously thought.

  7. Interactive effects of three pervasive marine stressors in a post-disturbance coral reef

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Michael A.; Goldenberg, Silvan U.; Ly Thai Bach, Anne; Mills, Suzanne C.; Claudet, Joachim

    2016-12-01

    Ecosystems are commonly affected by natural, episodic disturbances that can abruptly and drastically alter communities. Although it has been shown that resilient ecosystems can eventually recover to pre-disturbed states, the extent to which communities in early stages of recovery could be affected by multiple anthropogenic stressors is poorly understood. Pervasive and rising anthropogenic stressors in coastal marine systems that could interactively affect the recovery of these systems following natural disturbances include high sedimentation, nutrient enrichment, and overfishing. Using a 6-month field experiment, we examined the effects of all combinations of these three stressors on key functional groups in the benthic community growing on simulated, post-disturbance reef patches within a system recovering from large-scale natural disturbances (corallivorous seastar outbreak and cyclone). Our study revealed that sedimentation, nutrient enrichment, and overfishing (simulated using exclusion cages) interactively affected coral survival and algal growth, with taxon-specific effects at multiple scales. First, our treatments affected corals and algae differently, with sedimentation being more detrimental to macroalgal growth but less detrimental to coral ( Porites rus) survival in caged plots, driving significant interactions between sedimentation and caging for both taxa. We also observed distinct responses between coral species and between algal functional groups, with the most extensive responses from algal turf biomass, for which sedimentation suppressed the synergistic (positive) combined effect of nutrient enrichment and caging. Our findings suggest that different combinations of ubiquitous anthropogenic stressors, related to either sea- or land-based activities, interactively influence community recovery from disturbance and may alter species compositions in the resulting community. Our findings further suggest that anthropogenic stressors could promote further

  8. Anthropogenic disturbances jeopardize biodiversity conservation within tropical rainforest reserves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Ramos, Miguel; Ortiz-Rodríguez, Iván A; Piñero, Daniel; Dirzo, Rodolfo; Sarukhán, José

    2016-05-10

    Anthropogenic disturbances affecting tropical forest reserves have been documented, but their ecological long-term cumulative effects are poorly understood. Habitat fragmentation and defaunation are two major anthropogenic threats to the integrity of tropical reserves. Based on a long-term (four decades) study, we document how these disturbances synergistically disrupt ecological processes and imperil biodiversity conservation and ecosystem functioning at Los Tuxtlas, the northernmost tropical rainforest reserve in the Americas. Deforestation around this reserve has reduced the reserve to a medium-sized fragment (640 ha), leading to an increased frequency of canopy-gap formation. In addition, hunting and habitat loss have caused the decline or local extinction of medium and large herbivores. Combining empirical, experimental, and modeling approaches, we support the hypothesis that such disturbances produced a demographic explosion of the long-lived (≈120 y old, maximum height of 7 m) understory palm Astrocaryum mexicanum, whose population has increased from 1,243-4,058 adult individuals per hectare in only 39 y (annual growth rate of ca 3%). Faster gap formation increased understory light availability, enhancing seed production and the growth of immature palms, whereas release from mammalian herbivory and trampling increased survival of seedlings and juveniles. In turn, the palm's demographic explosion was followed by a reduction of tree species diversity, changing forest composition, altering the relative contribution of trees to forest biomass, and disrupting litterfall dynamics. We highlight how indirect anthropogenic disturbances (e.g., palm proliferation) on otherwise protected areas threaten tropical conservation, a phenomenon that is currently eroding the planet's richest repositories of biodiversity.

  9. Disturbance-mediated facilitation by an intertidal ecosystem engineer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Jeffrey T; Gribben, Paul E

    2017-09-01

    Ecosystem engineers facilitate communities by providing a structural habitat that reduces abiotic stress or predation pressure for associated species. However, disturbance may damage or move the engineer to a more stressful environment, possibly increasing the importance of facilitation for associated communities. In this study, we determined how disturbance to intertidal boulders (i.e., flipping) and the subsequent movement of a structural ecosystem engineer, the tube-forming serpulid worm Galeolaria caespitosa, from the bottom (natural state, low abiotic stress) to the top (disturbed state, high abiotic stress) surface of boulders influenced the importance of facilitation for intertidal communities across two intertidal zones. Theory predicts stronger relative facilitation should occur in the harsher environments of the top of boulders and the high intertidal zone. To test this prediction, we experimentally positioned boulders with the serpulids either face up or face down for 12 months in low and high zones in an intertidal boulder field. There were very different communities associated with the different boulders and serpulids had the strongest facilitative effects on the more stressful top surface of boulders with approximately double the species richness compared to boulders lacking serpulids. Moreover, within the serpulid matrix itself there was also approximately double the species richness (both zones) and abundance (high zone only) of small invertebrates on the top of boulders compared to the bottom. The high relative facilitation on the top of boulders reflected a large reduction in temperature by the serpulid matrix on that surface (up to 10°C) highlighting a key role for modification of the abiotic environment in determining the community-wide facilitation. This study has demonstrated that disturbance and subsequent movement of an ecosystem engineer to a more stressful environment increased the importance of facilitation and allowed species to

  10. Flight tests of a supersonic natural laminar flow airfoil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frederick, M A; Banks, D W; Garzon, G A; Matisheck, J R

    2015-01-01

    A flight test campaign of a supersonic natural laminar flow airfoil has been recently completed. The test surface was an 80 inch (203 cm) chord and 40 inch (102 cm) span article mounted on the centerline store location of an F-15B airplane. The test article was designed with a leading edge sweep of effectively 0° to minimize boundary layer crossflow. The test article surface was coated with an insulating material to avoid significant heat transfer to and from the test article structure to maintain a quasi-adiabatic wall. An aircraft-mounted infrared camera system was used to determine boundary layer transition and the extent of laminar flow. The tests were flown up to Mach 2.0 and chord Reynolds numbers in excess of 30 million. The objectives of the tests were to determine the extent of laminar flow at high Reynolds numbers and to determine the sensitivity of the flow to disturbances. Both discrete (trip dots) and 2D disturbances (forward-facing steps) were tested. A series of oblique shocks, of yet unknown origin, appeared on the surface, which generated sufficient crossflow to affect transition. Despite the unwanted crossflow, the airfoil performed well. The results indicate that the sensitivity of the flow to the disturbances, which can translate into manufacturing tolerances, was similar to that of subsonic natural laminar flow wings. (paper)

  11. Structural Decoupling and Disturbance Rejection in a Distillation Column

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahar, Mehrdad; Jantzen, Jan; Commault, C.

    1996-01-01

    Introduction, distillation column model, input-output decoupling, disturbance rejection, concluding remarks, references.......Introduction, distillation column model, input-output decoupling, disturbance rejection, concluding remarks, references....

  12. Design of a 2-DOF Control and Disturbance Estimator for a Magnetic Levitation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pati

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This work proposes a systematic two-degree freedom control scheme to improve the reference input tracking and load disturbance rejection for an unstable magnetic levitation system. The proposed control strategy is a two-step design process. Firstly, a proportional derivative controller is introduced purposely to get the desired set-point response of the magnetic levitation system and then, an integral square error (ISE performance specification is used for designing a set-point tracking controller. Secondly, a disturbance estimator is designed using the desired closed loop complimentary sensitivity function for the rejection of load disturbances. This leads to the decoupling of the nominal set-point response from the load disturbance response similar to an open loop control manner. Thus, it is convenient to optimize both controllers simultaneously as well as separately. The effectiveness of the proposed control strategy is validated through simulation.

  13. Sliding mode disturbance observer-enhanced adaptive control for the air-breathing hypersonic flight vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Hao; Wang, Changhong; Fidan, Baris

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents a backstepping procedure to design an adaptive controller for the air-breathing hypersonic flight vehicle (AHFV) subject to external disturbances and actuator saturations. In each step, a sliding mode exact disturbance observer (SMEDO) is exploited to exactly estimate the lumped disturbance in finite time. Specific dynamics are introduced to handle the possible actuator saturations. Based on SMEDO and introduced dynamics, an adaptive control law is designed, along with the consideration on ;explosion of complexity; in backstepping design. The developed controller is equipped with fast disturbance rejection and great capability to accommodate the saturated actuators, which also lead to a wider application scope. A simulation study is provided to show the effectiveness and superiority of the proposed controller.

  14. Disturbance and Plant Succession in the Mojave and Sonoran Deserts of the American Southwest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott R. Abella

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Disturbances such as fire, land clearing, and road building remove vegetation and can have major influences on public health through effects on air quality, aesthetics, recreational opportunities, natural resource availability, and economics. Plant recovery and succession following disturbance are poorly understood in arid lands relative to more temperate regions. This study quantitatively reviewed vegetation reestablishment following a variety of disturbances in the Mojave and Sonoran Deserts of southwestern North America. A total of 47 studies met inclusion criteria for the review. The time estimated by 29 individual studies for full reestablishment of total perennial plant cover was 76 years. Although long, this time was shorter than an estimated 215 years (among 31 individual studies required for the recovery of species composition typical of undisturbed areas, assuming that recovery remains linear following the longest time since disturbance measurement made by the studies.

  15. Challenges in Modeling Disturbance Regimes and Their Impacts in Arctic and Boreal Ecosystems (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, A. D.; Rupp, T. S.; Kurz, W.

    2013-12-01

    lead to loss of forest cover through transitions of forested peatland plateaus to thermokarst lakes and to collapse scar fens and bogs. Major challenges to predicting thermokarst disturbance include (1) quantifying the area of land susceptible to thermokarst disturbance and quantifying how thermokarst is initiated and expands in response to a changing climate. Besides the challenges involved in modeling changes in different types of disturbance regimes, an important additional challenge is to understand interactions among changes in disturbance regimes, for example, the degree to which fire disturbance may be affected because of trees killed by insect outbreaks. Our comparison of what is known about the drivers and impacts of these disturbance regimes indicates that the accurate prediction of fire regimes in arctic and boreal regions is nearest a maturity stage for incorporation into Earth System Models. Rapid progress is needed in modeling changes in other disturbance types and their impacts to facilitate their incorporation into Earth System Models.

  16. Harnessing landscape heterogeneity for managing future disturbance risks in forest ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidl, Rupert; Albrich, Katharina; Thom, Dominik; Rammer, Werner

    2018-01-01

    In order to prevent irreversible impacts of climate change on the biosphere it is imperative to phase out the use of fossil fuels. Consequently, the provisioning of renewable resources such as timber and biomass from forests is an ecosystem service of increasing importance. However, risk factors such as changing disturbance regimes are challenging the continuous provisioning of ecosystem services, and are thus a key concern in forest management. We here used simulation modeling to study different risk management strategies in the context of timber production under changing climate and disturbance regimes, focusing on a 8127 ha forest landscape in the Northern Front Range of the Alps in Austria. We show that under a continuation of historical management, disturbances from wind and bark beetles increase by +39.5% on average over 200 years in response to future climate change. Promoting mixed forests and climate-adapted tree species as well as increasing management intensity effectively reduced future disturbance risk. Analyzing the spatial patterns of disturbance on the landscape, we found a highly uneven distribution of risk among stands (Gini coefficients up to 0.466), but also a spatially variable effectiveness of silvicultural risk reduction measures. This spatial variability in the contribution to and control of risk can be used to inform disturbance management: Stands which have a high leverage on overall risk and for which risks can effectively be reduced (24.4% of the stands in our simulations) should be a priority for risk mitigation measures. In contrast, management should embrace natural disturbances for their beneficial effects on biodiversity in areas which neither contribute strongly to landscape-scale risk nor respond positively to risk mitigation measures (16.9% of stands). We here illustrate how spatial heterogeneity in forest landscapes can be harnessed to address both positive and negative effects of changing natural disturbance regimes in

  17. [A novel proposal explaining sleep disturbance of children in Japan--asynchronization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohyama, Jun

    2008-07-01

    It has been reported that more than half of the children in Japan suffer from daytime sleepiness. In contrast, about one quarter of junior high-school students in Japan complain of insomnia. According to the International Classification of Sleep Disorders (Second edition), these children could be diagnosed as having behaviorally-induced insufficient sleep syndrome due to inadequate sleeping habits. Getting on adequate amount of sleep should solve such problems;however, such a therapeutic approach often fails. Although social factors are involved in these sleep disturbances, I feel that a novel notion - asynchronization - leads to an understanding of the pathophysiology of disturbances in these children. Further, it could contribute to resolve their problems. The essence of asynchronization is a disturbance of various aspects (e.g., cycle, amplitude, phase, and interrelationship) of the biological rhythms that normally exhibits circadian oscillation. The main cause of asynchronization is hypothesized to be the combination of light exposure during night and the lack of light exposure in the morning. Asynchronization results in the disturbance of variable systems. Thus, symptoms of asynchronization include disturbances of the autonomic nervous system (sleepiness, insomnia, disturbance of hormonal excretion, gastrointestinal problems, etc.) and higher brain function (disorientation, loss of sociality, loss of will or motivation, impaired alertness and performance, etc.). Neurological (attention deficit, aggression, impulsiveness, hyperactivity, etc.), psychiatric (depressive disorders, personality disorders, anxiety disorders, etc.) and somatic (tiredness, fatigue, etc.) disturbances could also be symptoms of asynchronization. At the initial phase of asynchronization, disturbances are functional and can be resolved relatively easily, such as by the establishment of a regular sleep-wakefulness cycle;however, without adequate intervention the disturbances could gradually

  18. An assessment of microbial communities associated with surface mining-disturbed overburden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poncelet, Dominique M; Cavender, Nicole; Cutright, Teresa J; Senko, John M

    2014-03-01

    To assess the microbiological changes that occur during the maturation of overburden that has been disturbed by surface mining of coal, a surface mining-disturbed overburden unit in southeastern Ohio, USA was characterized. Overburden from the same unit that had been disturbed for 37 and 16 years were compared to undisturbed soil from the same region. Overburden and soil samples were collected as shallow subsurface cores from each subregion of the mined area (i.e., land 16 years and 37 years post-mining, and unmined land). Chemical and mineralogical characteristics of overburden samples were determined, as were microbial respiration rates. The composition of microbial communities associated with overburden and soil were determined using culture-independent, nucleic acid-based approaches. Chemical and mineralogical evaluation of overburden suggested that weathering of disturbed overburden gave rise to a setting with lower pH and more oxidized chemical constituents. Overburden-associated microbial biomass and respiration rates increased with time after overburden disturbance. Evaluation of 16S rRNA gene libraries that were produced by "next-generation" sequencing technology revealed that recently disturbed overburden contained an abundance of phylotypes attributable to sulfur-oxidizing Limnobacter spp., but with increasing time post-disturbance, overburden-associated microbial communities developed a structure similar to that of undisturbed soil, but retained characteristics of more recently disturbed overburden. Our results indicate that over time, the biogeochemical weathering of disturbed overburden leads to the development of geochemical conditions and microbial communities that approximate those of undisturbed soil, but that this transition is incomplete after 37 years of overburden maturation.

  19. Chronic periodontitis as an etiology of sleep disturbances and premenstrual syndrome (PMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haryono Utomo

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available It is obvious that sleep disturbances may induced by acute pulpal or periodontal pain. Other causes of sleep disturbances which also termed as sleep dysfunction, or insomnia, according to the patient has to be treated by physician. Nevertheless, in a case report, surprisingly, periodontal treatment relieved sleep disturbances and premenstrual syndrome (PMS. Coincidentally, women also more vulnerable to sleep disturbances and periodontal disease. It is also interesting that the exact etiology of PMS is still unknown, and 80% women who suffered from PMS also experience sleep disturbances. Recently, there has been increasing numbers of literatures and evidence-based cases linking periodontal disease to systemic diseases. However, systemic effects of periodontal disease that lead to PMS which associated with sleep disturbances are rarely discussed. Several mechanisms had been proposed to involve in these symptoms: female sexual hormonal imbalance, stimulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA-axis and neurogenic switching mechanism. In addition, as estrogen makes women more susceptible to stress, it worsen the symptoms. The glucocorticoid hormones synthesized upon stimulation of the HPA-axis, either by stress or pro-inflammatory cytokines, may disrupt the sleep-wake cycle; and also create estrogen dominance. The aim of this study is to propose the etiopathogenesis of PMS which associated with sleep disturbances that may be related to chronic periodontitis. Since in this case report scaling and curettage resulted in the disappearing of PMS and sleep disturbances; the conclusion is that chronic periodontal disease may act as one of the etiologies of PMS and sleep disturbance.

  20. Tree species diversity mitigates disturbance impacts on the forest carbon cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva Pedro, Mariana; Rammer, Werner; Seidl, Rupert

    2015-03-01

    Biodiversity fosters the functioning and stability of forest ecosystems and, consequently, the provision of crucial ecosystem services that support human well-being and quality of life. In particular, it has been suggested that tree species diversity buffers ecosystems against the impacts of disturbances, a relationship known as the "insurance hypothesis". Natural disturbances have increased across Europe in recent decades and climate change is expected to amplify the frequency and severity of disturbance events. In this context, mitigating disturbance impacts and increasing the resilience of forest ecosystems is of growing importance. We have tested how tree species diversity modulates the impact of disturbance on net primary production and the total carbon stored in living biomass for a temperate forest landscape in Central Europe. Using the simulation model iLand to study the effect of different disturbance regimes on landscapes with varying levels of tree species richness, we found that increasing diversity generally reduces the disturbance impact on carbon storage and uptake, but that this effect weakens or even reverses with successional development. Our simulations indicate a clear positive relationship between diversity and resilience, with more diverse systems experiencing lower disturbance-induced variability in their trajectories of ecosystem functioning. We found that positive effects of tree species diversity are mainly driven by an increase in functional diversity and a modulation of traits related to recolonization and resource usage. The results of our study suggest that increasing tree species diversity could mitigate the effects of intensifying disturbance regimes on ecosystem functioning and improve the robustness of forest carbon storage and the role of forests in climate change mitigation.

  1. Dietary exposure to lead in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boon PE; te Biesebeek JD; van Donkersgoed G; VVH; V&Z

    2017-01-01

    Uptake from the soil is the main route by which lead ends up in food. Lead in soil has its origin in both natural and anthropogenic sources. The lead concentration in food has decreased over the last decennia by the use of unleaded petrol and paint, and the replacement of lead water pipes.

  2. Active disturbance rejection controller for chemical reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Both, Roxana; Dulf, Eva H.; Muresan, Cristina I.

    2015-01-01

    In the petrochemical industry, the synthesis of 2 ethyl-hexanol-oxo-alcohols (plasticizers alcohol) is of high importance, being achieved through hydrogenation of 2 ethyl-hexenal inside catalytic trickle bed three-phase reactors. For this type of processes the use of advanced control strategies is suitable due to their nonlinear behavior and extreme sensitivity to load changes and other disturbances. Due to the complexity of the mathematical model an approach was to use a simple linear model of the process in combination with an advanced control algorithm which takes into account the model uncertainties, the disturbances and command signal limitations like robust control. However the resulting controller is complex, involving cost effective hardware. This paper proposes a simple integer-order control scheme using a linear model of the process, based on active disturbance rejection method. By treating the model dynamics as a common disturbance and actively rejecting it, active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) can achieve the desired response. Simulation results are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method

  3. Active disturbance rejection controller for chemical reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Both, Roxana; Dulf, Eva H.; Muresan, Cristina I., E-mail: roxana.both@aut.utcluj.ro [Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, 400114 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2015-03-10

    In the petrochemical industry, the synthesis of 2 ethyl-hexanol-oxo-alcohols (plasticizers alcohol) is of high importance, being achieved through hydrogenation of 2 ethyl-hexenal inside catalytic trickle bed three-phase reactors. For this type of processes the use of advanced control strategies is suitable due to their nonlinear behavior and extreme sensitivity to load changes and other disturbances. Due to the complexity of the mathematical model an approach was to use a simple linear model of the process in combination with an advanced control algorithm which takes into account the model uncertainties, the disturbances and command signal limitations like robust control. However the resulting controller is complex, involving cost effective hardware. This paper proposes a simple integer-order control scheme using a linear model of the process, based on active disturbance rejection method. By treating the model dynamics as a common disturbance and actively rejecting it, active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) can achieve the desired response. Simulation results are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  4. The intermediate disturbance hypothesis applies to tropical forests, but disturbance contributes little to tree diversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongers, F.; Poorter, L.; Hawthorne, W.D.; Sheil, D.

    2009-01-01

    The intermediate disturbance hypothesis (IDH) predicts local species diversity to be maximal at an intermediate level of disturbance. Developed to explain species maintenance and diversity patterns in species-rich ecosystems such as tropical forests, tests of IDH in tropical forest remain scarce,

  5. Visually Determined Soil Disturbance Classes Used as Indices of Forest Harvesting Disturbance

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. Michael Aust; James A. Burger; Emily A. Carter; David P. Preston; Steven C. Patterson

    1998-01-01

    Visual estimates of soil and site disturbances are used by foresters, soil scientists, logging supervisors. and machinery operators to minimize harvest disturbances to forest sites, to evaluate compliance with forestry Best Management Practices (BMPs), and to determine the need for ameliorative practices such as tnechanical site preparation. Although estimates are...

  6. Psychopathy and a Model for Disturbed Affective Consciousness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khetrapal, Neha

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the interaction of emotion and consciousness. It focuses on the perception of fearful stimuli and how such a perception can have implications for psychopathy. Amygdala has been found to be lesioned in the disorder and this compromise of integrity leads to deficits in fear perception, moral socialization and curtailing of aggression. This in turn leads to deficits in adaptive behavior as amygdala is responsible for influencing motor and perceptual responses in response to a fearful stimulus. Amygdala also plays an important role in bringing a fearful stimulus, detected at the attentional periphery, to the focus of attention and awareness so that it can receive enhanced processing which is found to be eficient in psychopathy. This role is supported by its connectivity to different cortical and subcortical areas. Hence this article provides an emphasis on the disturbed affective consciousness of psychopathy and its role in adaptive behavior deficits

  7. Language disturbances from mesencephalo-thalamic infarcts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazzarino, L.G.; Nicolai, A.; Valassi, F.; Biasizzo, E.

    1991-01-01

    The authors report the cases of two patients with CT-documented paramedian mesencephalo-thalamic infarcts, showing language disturbances. The first patient showed a non fluent, transcortical motor-like aphasia, the other had a fluent but severely paraphasic language disorder. The CT study disclosed that it was the dorso-median thalamic nucleus that was mostly involved in both cases. These findings agree with a few previous pathological studies suggesting that the paramedian thalamic nuclei, particlularly the dorso-median nucleus may play some role in language disturbances. However the anatomical basis for thalamic aphasia remains speculative, taking into account the importantce of cortical connections in the origin of subcortical neuropsychological disturbances. (orig.)

  8. Handling process disturbances in petroleum production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sten, T; Bodsberg, L; Ingstad, O; Ulleberg, T

    1988-06-01

    Factors of importance in successful handling of major disturbances and crisis situations in petroleum production are discussed. Case studies based on interviews, questionnaires and systematic observations have been undertaken to identify critical factors in human computer design, in operator competence and attitudes and in work organization. It is shown that certain features of the humancomputer interaction become critical when serious disturbances are encountered. Likewise focusing on requirements during disturbances in particular has highlighted some new aspects of operator competence and of the work organization. The results are considered to be useful input to safety management in petroleum process plants, in formation of design specifications and in identifying need for further research regarding safety in offshore production.

  9. Diagnostic orientation in control of disturbance situations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hukki, K.; Norros, L.

    1993-01-01

    The object of the study is diagnostic judgement in the control of dynamic processes. The starting point was the known difficulty process operators have in utilizing knowledge of process dynamics in disturbance situations that require both diagnostic and prognostic actions. A model of the diagnostic judgement process as a construction of coherent interpretation of the situation is outlined, and comprehensive data from simulated disturbance handling by 6 crews of a PWR type nuclear power plant was analysed. The phase of analysis included evaluation of the adequacy of task performance, utilization of available process information, and evaluation of the interpretation of disturbance situations. The results suggest that a functional orientation towards task performance allows a more coherent and comprehensive interpretation of the situation and more adequate task performance. Coherence of interpretation seems to be reflected in a higher subjective certainty compared with crews with an incoherent interpretation. (author). 15 refs, 2 figs, 2 tabs

  10. Psychopathology and hormonal disturbances in eating disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierpaola D’Arista

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available

    Background: Our aim was to study the relationship between hormonal disturbances and psychopathology in Eating Disorders (ED.

    Methods: Forty-nine women diagnosed as Eating Disorders according to DSM-IV were subjected to control plasma levels of TSH, FT3, FT4, LH, FSH, 17beta-estradiol, prolactin, cortisol, DHEAS, GH and IGF-1. They were also administered by SCL-90R, BAT, DES II questionnaires. We applied multivariate regression models.

    Results: Our results highlight a statistically significant relation between LH, FSH and prolactin decreased levels, mood and thought disturbances (subscales 3, 5, 7, 8 and 9 of SCL-90r which are associated to Body Attitude ( BAT total scale and Dissociative Experiences (DES II total scale.

    Conclusions: Decreased sexual hormones levels could have a role in ED psychological disturbances, not inquired yet

  11. Ionospheric irregularities in periods of meteorological disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchevkina, O. P.; Karpov, I. V.

    2017-09-01

    The results of observations of the total electron content (TEC) in periods of storm disturbances of meteorological situation are presented in the paper. The observational results have shown that a passage of a meteorological storm is accompanied by a substantial decrease in values of TEC and critical frequencies of the ionospheric F2 region. The decreases in values of these ionospheric parameters reach 50% and up to 30% in TEC and critical frequency of the F2 layer, respectively, as compared to meteorologically quiet days. Based on qualitative analysis, it is found that the processes related to formation of local regions of thermospheric heating due to a dissipation of AGW coming into the upper atmosphere from the region of the meteorological disturbance in the lower atmosphere are a possible cause of these ionospheric disturbances.

  12. Thermoluminescent Signals Caused by Disturbing Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    German, U.; Weinstein, M.; Ben-Shachar, B.

    1999-01-01

    One of the major sources of uncertainty in the measurement of low radiation doses by means of thermoluminescence dosemeters is the presence of disturbing thermoluminescence signals, especially luminescence caused by visible light, and by materials attached to the heated areas. Glow curves of thermoluminescence dosemeters contain useful information that can improve the accuracy and the reliability of the thermoluminescent measurements. The influence of the various disturbing effects can be recognised in the shape of the glow curves and can sometimes be separated from the exposure. Some examples are presented of signals arising from the two disturbing effects mentioned above, the signal contributed by Teflon used in the TLD-100 cards of Bicron/Harshaw and some abnormal glow curves due to dirt attached to the cards. Subtraction of the contributions due to these effects is suggested to obtain the net exposure signal. (author)

  13. Work Time Control and Sleep Disturbances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salo, Paula; Ala-Mursula, Leena; Rod, Naja Hulvej

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Employee control over work times has been associated with favorable psychosocial and health-related outcomes, but the evidence regarding sleep quality remains inconclusive. We examined cross-sectional and prospective associations between work time control and sleep disturbances...... in a large working population, taking into account total hours worked. METHODS: The data were from a full-panel longitudinal cohort study of Finnish public sector employees who responded to questions on work time control and sleep disturbances in years 2000-2001, 2004-2005, 2008-2009, and 2012. The analysis....... RESULTS: Consistently in both cross-sectional and longitudinal models, less control over work time was associated with greater sleep disturbances in the total population and among those working normal 40-hour weeks. Among participants working more than 40 hours a week, work time that was both very high...

  14. Geomagnetic response to solar and interplanetary disturbances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maris Georgeta

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The space weather discipline involves different physical scenarios, which are characterised by very different physical conditions, ranging from the Sun to the terrestrial magnetosphere and ionosphere. Thanks to the great modelling effort made during the last years, a few Sun-to-ionosphere/thermosphere physics-based numerical codes have been developed. However, the success of the prediction is still far from achieving the desirable results and much more progress is needed. Some aspects involved in this progress concern both the technical progress (developing and validating tools to forecast, selecting the optimal parameters as inputs for the tools, improving accuracy in prediction with short lead time, etc. and the scientific development, i.e., deeper understanding of the energy transfer process from the solar wind to the coupled magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere system. The purpose of this paper is to collect the most relevant results related to these topics obtained during the COST Action ES0803. In an end-to-end forecasting scheme that uses an artificial neural network, we show that the forecasting results improve when gathering certain parameters, such as X-ray solar flares, Type II and/or Type IV radio emission and solar energetic particles enhancements as inputs for the algorithm. Regarding the solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere interaction topic, the geomagnetic responses at high and low latitudes are considered separately. At low latitudes, we present new insights into temporal evolution of the ring current, as seen by Burton’s equation, in both main and recovery phases of the storm. At high latitudes, the PCC index appears as an achievement in modelling the coupling between the upper atmosphere and the solar wind, with a great potential for forecasting purposes. We also address the important role of small-scale field-aligned currents in Joule heating of the ionosphere even under non-disturbed conditions. Our scientific results in

  15. DSMC Simulations of Disturbance Torque to ISS During Airlock Depressurization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumpkin, F. E., III; Stewart, B. S.

    2015-01-01

    The primary attitude control system on the International Space Station (ISS) is part of the United States On-orbit Segment (USOS) and uses Control Moment Gyroscopes (CMG). The secondary system is part of the Russian On orbit Segment (RSOS) and uses a combination of gyroscopes and thrusters. Historically, events with significant disturbances such as the airlock depressurizations associated with extra-vehicular activity (EVA) have been performed using the RSOS attitude control system. This avoids excessive propulsive "de-saturations" of the CMGs. However, transfer of attitude control is labor intensive and requires significant propellant. Predictions employing NASA's DSMC Analysis Code (DAC) of the disturbance torque to the ISS for depressurization of the Pirs airlock on the RSOS will be presented [1]. These predictions were performed to assess the feasibility of using USOS control during these events. The ISS Pirs airlock is vented using a device known as a "T-vent" as shown in the inset in figure 1. By orienting two equal streams of gas in opposite directions, this device is intended to have no propulsive effect. However, disturbance force and torque to the ISS do occur due to plume impingement. The disturbance torque resulting from the Pirs depressurization during EVAs is estimated by using a loosely coupled CFD/DSMC technique [2]. CFD is used to simulate the flow field in the nozzle and the near field plume. DSMC is used to simulate the remaining flow field using the CFD results to create an in flow boundary to the DSMC simulation. Due to the highly continuum nature of flow field near the T-vent, two loosely coupled DSMC domains are employed. An 88.2 cubic meter inner domain contains the Pirs airlock and the T-vent. Inner domain results are used to create an in flow boundary for an outer domain containing the remaining portions of the ISS. Several orientations of the ISS solar arrays and radiators have been investigated to find cases that result in minimal

  16. North American forest disturbance mapped from a decadal Landsat record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey G. Masek; Chengquan Huang; Robert Wolfe; Warren Cohen; Forrest Hall; Jonathan Kutler; Peder. Nelson

    2008-01-01

    Forest disturbance and recovery are critical ecosystem processes, but the spatial pattern of disturbance has never been mapped across North America. The LEDAPS (Landsat Ecosystem Disturbance Adaptive Processing System) project has assembled a wall-to-wall record of stand-clearing disturbance (clearcut harvest, fire) for the United States and Canada for the period 1990-...

  17. Age structure and disturbance legacy of North American forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Y. Pan; J.M. Chen; R. Birdsey; K. McCullough; L. He; F. Deng

    2011-01-01

    Most forests of the world are recovering from a past disturbance. It is well known that forest disturbances profoundly affect carbon stocks and fluxes in forest ecosystems, yet it has been a great challenge to assess disturbance impacts in estimates of forest carbon budgets. Net sequestration or loss of CO2 by forests after disturbance follows a...

  18. Disturbance ecology and forest management: A review of the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul Rogers

    1996-01-01

    This review of the disturbance ecology literature, and how it pertains to forest management, is a resource for forest managers and researchers interested in disturbance theory, specific disturbance agents, their interactions, and appropriate methods of inquiry for specific geographic regions. Implications for the future of disturbance ecology-based management are...

  19. Using measurement-induced disturbance to characterize correlations as classical or quantum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Shunlong

    2008-01-01

    In contrast to the seminal entanglement-separability paradigm widely used in quantum information theory, we introduce a quantum-classical dichotomy in order to classify and quantify statistical correlations in bipartite states. This is based on the idea that while in the classical description of nature measurements can be carried out without disturbance, in the quantum description, generic measurements often disturb the system and the disturbance can be exploited to quantify the quantumness of correlations therein. It turns out that certain separable states still possess correlations of a quantum nature and indicates that quantum correlations are more general than entanglement. The results are illustrated in the Werner states and the isotropic states, and are applied to quantify the quantum advantage of the model of quantum computation proposed by Knill and Laflamme [Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 5672 (1998)

  20. Automated recognition system for power quality disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelgalil, Tarek

    The application of deregulation policies in electric power systems has resulted in the necessity to quantify the quality of electric power. This fact highlights the need for a new monitoring strategy which is capable of tracking, detecting, classifying power quality disturbances, and then identifying the source of the disturbance. The objective of this work is to design an efficient and reliable power quality monitoring strategy that uses the advances in signal processing and pattern recognition to overcome the deficiencies that exist in power quality monitoring devices. The purposed monitoring strategy has two stages. The first stage is to detect, track, and classify any power quality violation by the use of on-line measurements. In the second stage, the source of the classified power quality disturbance must be identified. In the first stage, an adaptive linear combiner is used to detect power quality disturbances. Then, the Teager Energy Operator and Hilbert Transform are utilized for power quality event tracking. After the Fourier, Wavelet, and Walsh Transforms are employed for the feature extraction, two approaches are then exploited to classify the different power quality disturbances. The first approach depends on comparing the disturbance to be classified with a stored set of signatures for different power quality disturbances. The comparison is developed by using Hidden Markov Models and Dynamic Time Warping. The second approach depends on employing an inductive inference to generate the classification rules directly from the data. In the second stage of the new monitoring strategy, only the problem of identifying the location of the switched capacitor which initiates the transients is investigated. The Total Least Square-Estimation of Signal Parameters via Rotational Invariance Technique is adopted to estimate the amplitudes and frequencies of the various modes contained in the voltage signal measured at the facility entrance. After extracting the

  1. PID control with robust disturbance feedback control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kawai, Fukiko; Vinther, Kasper; Andersen, Palle

    2015-01-01

    Disturbance Feedback Control (DFC) is a technique, originally proposed by Fuji Electric, for augmenting existing control systems with an extra feedback for attenuation of disturbances and model errors. In this work, we analyze the robustness and performance of a PID-based control system with DFC...... and performance (if such gains exist). Finally, two different simulation case studies are evaluated and compared. Our numerical studies indicate that better performance can be achieved with the proposed method compared with a conservatively tuned PID controller and comparable performance can be achieved when...... compared with an H-infinity controller....

  2. Response diversity can increase ecological resilience to disturbance in coral reefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskett, Marissa L; Fabina, Nicholas S; Gross, Kevin

    2014-08-01

    Community-level resilience depends on the interaction between multiple populations that vary in individual responses to disturbance. For example, in tropical reefs, some corals can survive higher stress (resistance) while others exhibit faster recovery (engineering resilience) following disturbances such as thermal stress. While each type will negatively affect the other through competition, each might also benefit the other by reducing the potential for an additional competitor such as macroalgae to invade after a disturbance. To determine how community composition affects ecological resilience, we modeled coral-macroalgae interactions given either a resistant coral, a resilient coral, or both together. Having both coral types (i.e., response diversity) can lead to observable enhanced ecological resilience if (1) the resilient coral is not a superior competitor and (2) disturbance levels are high enough such that the resilient coral would collapse when considered alone. This enhanced resilience occurs through competitor-enabled rescue where each coral increases the potential for the other to recover from disturbance through external recruitment, such that both corals benefit from the presence of each other in terms of total cover and resilience. Therefore, conservation management aimed at protecting resilience under global change requires consideration of both diversity and connectivity between sites experiencing differential disturbance.

  3. Sleep disturbances predict prospective declines in resident physicians’ psychological well-being

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice A. Min

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medical residency can be a time of increased psychological stress and sleep disturbance. We examine the prospective associations between self-reported sleep quality and resident wellness across a single training year. Methods: Sixty-nine (N=69 resident physicians completed the Brief Resident Wellness Profile (M=17.66, standard deviation [SD]=3.45, range: 0–17 and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (M=6.22, SD=2.86, range: 12–25 at multiple occasions in a single training year. We examined the 1-month lagged effect of sleep disturbances on residents’ self-reported wellness. Results: Accounting for residents’ overall level of sleep disturbance across the entire study period, both the concurrent (within-person within-occasion effect of sleep disturbance (B=−0.20, standard error [SE]=0.06, p=0.003, 95% confidence interval [CI]: −0.33, −0.07 and the lagged within-person effect of resident sleep disturbance (B=−0.15, SE=0.07, p=0.037, 95% CI: −0.29, −0.009 were significant predictors of decreased resident wellness. Increases in sleep disturbances are a leading indicator of resident wellness, predicting decreased well-being 1 month later. Conclusions: Sleep quality exerts a significant effect on self-reported resident wellness. Periodic evaluation of sleep quality may alert program leadership and the residents themselves to impending decreases in psychological well-being.

  4. Human disturbance alters endocrine and immune responses in the Galapagos marine iguana (Amblyrhynchus cristatus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Susannah S; DeNardo, Dale F.; Greives, Timothy J.; Strand, Christine R.; Demas, Gregory E.

    2010-01-01

    Anthropogenic disturbance is a relevant and widespread facilitator of environmental change and there is clear evidence that it impacts natural populations. While population-level responses to major anthropogenic changes have been well studied, individual physiological responses to mild disturbance can be equally critical to the long-term survival of a species, yet they remain largely unexamined. The current study investigated the impact of seemingly low-level anthropogenic disturbance (ecotourism) on stress responsiveness and specific fitness-related immune measures in different breeding stages of the marine iguana (Amblyrhynchus cristatus). Specifically, we found stress-induced elevations in plasma corticosterone among tourist-exposed populations relative to undisturbed populations. We also found changes in multiple immunological responses associated with stress-related effects of human disturbance, including bacterial killing ability, cutaneous wound healing, and hemolytic complement activity, and the responses varied according to reproductive state. By identifying health-related consequences of human disturbance, this study provides critical insight into the conservation of a well-known species that has a very distinct ecology. The study also broadens the foundation of knowledge needed to understand the global significance of various levels of human disturbance. PMID:20708010

  5. Human disturbance alters endocrine and immune responses in the Galapagos marine iguana (Amblyrhynchus cristatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Susannah S; DeNardo, Dale F; Greives, Timothy J; Strand, Christine R; Demas, Gregory E

    2010-11-01

    Anthropogenic disturbance is a relevant and widespread facilitator of environmental change and there is clear evidence that it impacts natural populations. While population-level responses to major anthropogenic changes have been well studied, individual physiological responses to mild disturbance can be equally critical to the long-term survival of a species, yet they remain largely unexamined. The current study investigated the impact of seemingly low-level anthropogenic disturbance (ecotourism) on stress responsiveness and specific fitness-related immune measures in different breeding stages of the marine iguana (Amblyrhynchus cristatus). Specifically, we found stress-induced elevations in plasma corticosterone among tourist-exposed populations relative to undisturbed populations. We also found changes in multiple immunological responses associated with stress-related effects of human disturbance, including bacterial killing ability, cutaneous wound healing, and hemolytic complement activity, and the responses varied according to reproductive state. By identifying health-related consequences of human disturbance, this study provides critical insight into the conservation of a well-known species that has a very distinct ecology. The study also broadens the foundation of knowledge needed to understand the global significance of various levels of human disturbance. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparison of Conventional Closed-Loop Controller with an Adaptive Controller for a Disturbed Thermodynamic System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alphinas, Robert A.; Hansen, Hans Henrik; Tambo, Torben

    2017-01-01

    Non-adaptive proportional controllers suffer from the ability to handle a system disturbance leading to a large steady-state error and undesired transient behavior. On the other hand, they are easy to implement and tune. This article examines whether an adaptive controller based on the MIT...

  7. Disturbed Desmoglein-2 in the intercalated disc of pediatric patients with dilated cardiomyopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kessler, Elise L.; Nikkels, Peter GJ; van Veen, Toon AB

    2017-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) leads to disturbed contraction and force transduction, and is associated with substantial mortality in all age groups. Involvement of a disrupted composition of the intercalated disc (ID) has been reported. However, in children, little is established about such

  8. Sleep habits and sleep disturbances in Dutch children: a population-based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Litsenburg, R.R.L.; Waumans, R.C.; van den Berg, G.; Gemke, R.J.B.J.

    2010-01-01

    Sleep disorders can lead to significant morbidity. Information on sleep in healthy children is necessary to evaluate sleep disorders in clinical practice, but data from different societies cannot be simply generalized. The aims of this study were to (1) assess the prevalence of sleep disturbances in

  9. Self-tuning disturbance feedforward control with drift prevention for air mount systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beijen, M.A.; Heertjes, M.F.; Butler, H.

    2015-01-01

    A MIMO disturbance feedforward control strategy is presented to isolate an industrial active vibration isolation system with air mounts from broadband floor vibrations. The feedforward controller compensates for the static damping and stiffness of the air mount suspension, leading to significant

  10. Sleep Quality and Body Mass Index in College Students: The Role of Sleep Disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Perla A.; Flores, Melissa; Robles, Elias

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Obesity and its comorbidities have emerged as a leading public health concern. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and sleep patterns, including duration and disturbances. Methods: A convenience sample of 515 college students completed an online survey consisting of the Pittsburgh Sleep…

  11. Disturbance rejection performance analyses of closed loop control systems by reference to disturbance ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alagoz, Baris Baykant; Deniz, Furkan Nur; Keles, Cemal; Tan, Nusret

    2015-03-01

    This study investigates disturbance rejection capacity of closed loop control systems by means of reference to disturbance ratio (RDR). The RDR analysis calculates the ratio of reference signal energy to disturbance signal energy at the system output and provides a quantitative evaluation of disturbance rejection performance of control systems on the bases of communication channel limitations. Essentially, RDR provides a straightforward analytical method for the comparison and improvement of implicit disturbance rejection capacity of closed loop control systems. Theoretical analyses demonstrate us that RDR of the negative feedback closed loop control systems are determined by energy spectral density of controller transfer function. In this manner, authors derived design criteria for specifications of disturbance rejection performances of PID and fractional order PID (FOPID) controller structures. RDR spectra are calculated for investigation of frequency dependence of disturbance rejection capacity and spectral RDR analyses are carried out for PID and FOPID controllers. For the validation of theoretical results, simulation examples are presented. Copyright © 2014 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Solar Development on Contaminated and Disturbed Lands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macknick, Jordan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Lee, Courtney [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Mosey, Gail [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Melius, Jenny [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Land classified as contaminated and disturbed across the United States has the potential to host developments of utility-scale solar power. This report examines the prospect of developing utility- and commercial-scale concentrated solar power (CSP) and solar photovoltaics (PV) technologies on degraded and environmentally contaminated lands. The potential for solar development on contaminated anddisturbed lands was assessed, and for the largest and highest solar resource sites, the economic impacts and feasibility were evaluated. Developing solar power on contaminated and disturbed lands can help create jobs and revitalize local and state economies, and selecting these sites over greenfield sites can potentially have permitting and environmental mitigation advantages. The U.S.Department of Energy (DOE) SunShot goals call for 632 GW of PV and 83 GW of CSP to be deployed by 2050. Conservative land-use estimates of this study (10 acres per megawatt) show that there are disturbed and environmentally contaminated lands throughout the country that could be suitable for utility-scale solar power, and, that there is sufficient land area to meet SunShot solar deployment goals. The purpose of this assessment is to improve the understanding of these sites and facilitate solar developers' selection of contaminated and disturbed sites for development.

  13. Visuospatial Attention Disturbance in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Moura, Maria Clara Drummond Soares; do Valle, Luiz Eduardo Ribeiro; Resende, Maria Bernadete Dutra; Pinto, Katia Osternack

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The cognitive deficits present in the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) are not yet well characterized. Attention, considered to be the brain mechanism responsible for the selection of sensory stimuli, could be disturbed in DMD, contributing, at least partially, to the observed global cognitive deficit. The aim of this study was to…

  14. Disturbing Practices: Training Workers to Be Lean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasukawa, Keiko; Brown, Tony; Black, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the possibilities for expansive learning during organisational change. It considers the introduction of "lean production" as a disturbance to the existing work practices. Design/methodology/approach: The paper considers two case studies of "lean production" training with…

  15. Types and Treatment of Pediatric Sleep Disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Gloria J.

    2009-01-01

    This article provides an overview of pediatric sleep disturbances with emphases on types and treatments. Relationships between sleep disorders and comorbid conditions function to exacerbate and maintain both disorders. An estimated 20% of teenagers experience chronic partial sleep deprivation, resulting in problems with memory, attention, and…

  16. Time Perspective, Mood Disturbance, and Suicide Liberation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennings, C. J.

    1994-01-01

    Assessed 238 university students and 159 high school students on temporal and personality measures. Found that temporal extension, temporal attitude, and impulsivity had comparatively little effect on suicide ideation after controlling effects of mood disturbance. However, negative temporal attitudes appeared to have significant impact on suicide…

  17. Body representation disturbances in anorexia nervosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keizer, A.

    2014-01-01

    One of the main symptoms of anorexia nervosa (AN) is a disturbed experience of body size and shape. Although patients are underweight, they experience their body as bigger than it in reality is. Previous studies were mainly conducted by (clinical) psychologists and psychiatrists, and almost

  18. Combine material against electromagnetic pulse disturbance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yan

    2004-01-01

    A novel combined material is introduced, which is hard against electromagnetic pulse disturbance, The attenuation characteristics and the penetration probability of the combine material is discussed in detail. The penetration probability of electromagnetic wave is calculated approximately and the characteristic curve is measured for this material. (authors)

  19. Unusual metaphyseal disturbance in two kittens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunn-Moore, D.A.; Hagard, G.; Turner, C.; Duncan, A.W.; Barr, F.J.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the presenting features, radiographic changes, biochemical alterations and clinical progress of two kittens, from separate litters, which were found to have a growth plate disturbance initially diagnosed and treated as vitamin D3-dependent rickets, but subsequently suspected to be a metaphyseal chondrodysplasia

  20. Effectiveness of carnosine on disturbed electrolytes homeostasis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We aimed to assess the effect of well known antioxidant carnosine on disturbed plasma and intraerythrocytes electrolytes and Na+-K+-ATPase activity by cisplatin. 24 male albino Wistar rats were selected and divided into 4 groups: Group I = untreated control; Group II = cisplatin control (received cisplatin at a dose of 3 mg/ ...

  1. Influence of gap-scale disturbance on developmental and successional pathways in Quercus-Pinus stands

    Science.gov (United States)

    T.A. Weber; J.L. Hart; C. Schweitzer; D.C. Dey

    2014-01-01

    Quercus-Pinus forests of the eastern USA cover millions of hectares and span a variety of ecoregions. Understanding the influence of natural disturbance on developmental and successional pathways is important for managers that wish to sustain Pinus spp. in these mixtures. Quantifying developmental and successional patterns in this...

  2. Impact of Market-Based Disturbance on the Composition of West Virginia's Forest Resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    William G. Luppold; John E. Baumgras; John E. Baumgras

    2000-01-01

    The eastern hardwood resource has been shaped by a combination of human and natural disturbances. This impact on the forest resources of West Virginia has been especially dramatic. This resource has changed from a virgin forest dominated white oak, chestnut, spruce, white pine, and hemlock in the late 19th century, to one dominated by red oak in the 1950's, to...

  3. Public acceptance of disturbance-based forest management: factors influencing support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christine S. Olsen; Angela L. Mallon; Bruce A. Shindler

    2012-01-01

    Growing emphasis on ecosystem and landscape-level forest management across North America has spurred an examination of alternative management strategies which focus on emulating dynamic natural disturbance processes, particularly those associated with forest fire regimes. This topic is the cornerstone of research in the Blue River Landscape Study (BRLS) on the...

  4. Changes in geotechnical properties of sediments from the Central Indian Basin induced by disturbance experiment

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khadge, N.H.

    -grained sediments from the study area showed change in geotechnical properties induced due to the disturbance. Marginal increase in natural water content and significant reduction in undrained shear strength at the 0-5 cm sediment layer of cores from the tow zone...

  5. Effects of intermediate-severity disturbance on composition and structure in mixed Pinus-hardwood stands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin Trammell; Justin Hart; Callie Schweitzer; Daniel C. Dey; Michael Steinberg

    2017-01-01

    Increasingly, forest managers intend to create or maintain mixed Pinus-hardwood stands. This stand assemblage may be driven by a variety of objectives but is often motivated by the desire to enhance native forest diversity and promote resilience to perturbations. Documenting the effects of natural disturbances on species composition and stand...

  6. Public reaction to invasive plant species in a disturbed Colorado landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael T. Daab; Courtney G. Flint

    2010-01-01

    Invasive plant species degrade ecosystems in many ways. Controlling invasive plants is costly for government agencies, businesses, and individuals. North central Colorado is currently experiencing large-scale disturbance, and millions of acres are vulnerable to invasion because of natural and socioeconomic processes. Mountain pine beetles typically endemic to this...

  7. Tolerance of frugivorous birds to habitat disturbance in a tropical cloud forest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gomes, L.G.L.; Oostra, V.; Nijman, V.; Cleef, A.M.; Kappelle, M.

    2008-01-01

    In view of the continued decline in tropical forest cover around the globe, forest restoration has become a key tool in tropical rainforest conservation. One of the main - and least expensive - restoration strategies is natural forest regeneration. By aiding forest seed influx both into disturbed

  8. Ground-nesting marine birds and potential for human disturbance in Glacier Bay National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimitsu, Mayumi L.; Romano, Marc D.; Piatt, John F.; Piatt, John F.; Gende, S.M.

    2004-01-01

    Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve contains a diverse assemblage of marine birds that use the area for nesting, foraging and molting. The abundance and diversity of marine bird species in Glacier Bay is unmatched in the region, due in part to the geomorphic and successional characteristics that result in a wide array of habitat types (Robards and others, 2003). The opportunity for proactive management of these species is unique in Glacier Bay National Park because much of the suitable marine bird nesting habitat occurs in areas designated as wilderness. Ground-nesting marine birds are vulnerable to human disturbance wherever visitors can access nest sites during the breeding season. Human disturbance of nest sites can be significant because intense parental care is required for egg and hatchling survival, and repeated disturbance can result in reduced productivity (Leseberg and others, 2000). Temporary nest desertion by breeding birds in disturbed areas can lead to increased predation on eggs and hatchlings by conspecifics or other predators (Bolduc and Guillemette, 2003). Human disturbance of ground-nesting birds may also affect incubation time and adult foraging success, which in turn can alter breeding success (Verhulst and others, 2001). Furthermore, human activity can potentially cause colony failure when disturbance prevents the initiation of nesting (Hatch, 2002). There is management concern about the susceptibility of breeding birds to disturbance from human activities, but little historical data has been collected on the distribution of ground-nesting marine birds in Glacier Bay. This report summarizes results obtained during two years of a three-year study to determine the distribution of ground-nesting marine birds in Glacier Bay, and the potential for human disturbance of those nesting birds.

  9. Searching for resilience: addressing the impacts of changing disturbance regimes on forest ecosystem services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidl, Rupert; Spies, Thomas A.; Peterson, David L.; Stephens, Scott L.; Hicke, Jeffrey A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary 1. The provisioning of ecosystem services to society is increasingly under pressure from global change. Changing disturbance regimes are of particular concern in this context due to their high potential impact on ecosystem structure, function and composition. Resilience-based stewardship is advocated to address these changes in ecosystem management, but its operational implementation has remained challenging. 2. We review observed and expected changes in disturbance regimes and their potential impacts on provisioning, regulating, cultural and supporting ecosystem services, concentrating on temperate and boreal forests. Subsequently, we focus on resilience as a powerful concept to quantify and address these changes and their impacts, and present an approach towards its operational application using established methods from disturbance ecology. 3. We suggest using the range of variability concept – characterizing and bounding the long-term behaviour of ecosystems – to locate and delineate the basins of attraction of a system. System recovery in relation to its range of variability can be used to measure resilience of ecosystems, allowing inferences on both engineering resilience (recovery rate) and monitoring for regime shifts (directionality of recovery trajectory). 4. It is important to consider the dynamic nature of these properties in ecosystem analysis and management decision-making, as both disturbance processes and mechanisms of resilience will be subject to changes in the future. Furthermore, because ecosystem services are at the interface between natural and human systems, the social dimension of resilience (social adaptive capacity and range of variability) requires consideration in responding to changing disturbance regimes in forests. 5. Synthesis and applications. Based on examples from temperate and boreal forests we synthesize principles and pathways for fostering resilience to changing disturbance regimes in ecosystem management. We

  10. Changes of forest cover and disturbance regimes in the mountain forests of the Alps☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebi, P.; Seidl, R.; Motta, R.; Fuhr, M.; Firm, D.; Krumm, F.; Conedera, M.; Ginzler, C.; Wohlgemuth, T.; Kulakowski, D.

    2017-01-01

    Natural disturbances, such as avalanches, snow breakage, insect outbreaks, windthrow or fires shape mountain forests globally. However, in many regions over the past centuries human activities have strongly influenced forest dynamics, especially following natural disturbances, thus limiting our understanding of natural ecological processes, particularly in densely-settled regions. In this contribution we briefly review the current understanding of changes in forest cover, forest structure, and disturbance regimes in the mountain forests across the European Alps over the past millennia. We also quantify changes in forest cover across the entire Alps based on inventory data over the past century. Finally, using the Swiss Alps as an example, we analyze in-depth changes in forest cover and forest structure and their effect on patterns of fire and wind disturbances, based on digital historic maps from 1880, modern forest cover maps, inventory data on current forest structure, topographical data, and spatially explicit data on disturbances. This multifaceted approach presents a long-term and detailed picture of the dynamics of mountain forest ecosystems in the Alps. During pre-industrial times, natural disturbances were reduced by fire suppression and land-use, which included extraction of large amounts of biomass that decreased total forest cover. More recently, forest cover has increased again across the entire Alps (on average +4% per decade over the past 25–115 years). Live tree volume (+10% per decade) and dead tree volume (mean +59% per decade) have increased over the last 15–40 years in all regions for which data were available. In the Swiss Alps secondary forests that established after 1880 constitute approximately 43% of the forest cover. Compared to forests established previously, post-1880 forests are situated primarily on steep slopes (>30°), have lower biomass, a more aggregated forest structure (primarily stem-exclusion stage), and have been more

  11. Body image disturbance and skin bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Christopher A D; McLean, Shua-Kym

    2017-11-01

    This study looks at body image disturbance among Jamaicans who bleach their skin. The hypothesis states that there is a positive relationship between skin bleaching and body image disturbance. The study used a convenience sample of 160 participants with a skin bleaching group (n = 80) and a non-bleaching comparison group (n = 80). The instrument included demographic questions, the body image disturbance questionnaire (BIDQ), and questions about skin bleaching. The results of a t-test revealed that the skin bleaching group (M = 1.5255, SD = 0.42169) was not significantly different from the non-bleaching group (M = 1.4938, SD = 0.74217) in terms of body image disturbance, t(158) = 0.333, p = .740. The participants who bleached did not suffer from body image disturbance. Self-reports revealed that they bleached to acquire beauty, attract a partner, elude the police, and market skin bleaching products. The practice was fashionable and popular and it made some participants feel good, while others were fans of a popular musical artiste who bleached his skin. The majority of participants bleached because of the perceived personal, social, and entrepreneurial benefits of the practice and not because they suffered emotional distress, anxiety, and functional impairment because of their skin colour. However, there was some level of BID among the minority of participants who argued that they bleached because they wanted to be pretty so they were emotionally distressed about there body image and experienced functional impairment. © 2017 The British Psychological Society.

  12. Lead levels - blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blood lead levels ... is used to screen people at risk for lead poisoning. This may include industrial workers and children ... also used to measure how well treatment for lead poisoning is working. Lead is common in the ...

  13. Lead Poisoning Prevention Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or removed safely. How are children exposed to lead? Lead-based paint and lead contaminated dust are ... What can be done to prevent exposure to lead? It is important to determine the construction year ...

  14. Overview of the excavation disturbance experiment at the Kamaishi mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, Hiroya; Sato, Toshinori; Sugihara, Kozo; Kikuchi, Tadashi

    1999-01-01

    Excavation of an underground drift disturbs the rock mass around the opening by each of the following processes: Fracturing in the vicinity of opening induced by the excavation work and stress concentration. Changes in the apertures of existing fractures due to stress redistribution. Changes in water pressure around the opening due to water inflow and chemical changes due to the increased oxygen supply to the rock and such phenomena as degassing of groundwater. All of these mechanical, hydrological, and chemical changes to the rock mass are termed excavation disturbance and the affected area is called the 'Excavation Disturbed Zone (EDZ)'. The portion of the EDZ in which the rock mass is fractured due to excavation is called the Excavation Damaged Zone'. This experiment is focused on the mechanical and hydrological property changes caused by excavation, the degree and extend of which is important for the design, excavation and support of underground openings. The relevance of the EDZ for the geological isolation of nuclear waste disposal may be summarized as: 1) Relevance to near-field performance assessment. The EDZ is of importance for near-field performance assessment, as the development of new fractures and the opening of existing fractures due to excavation may create preferential pathways for mass transport from the engineered barrier system to natural transmissive flowpaths. 2) Relevance to the design, excavation and sealing of a repository. The excavation method affects the properties and the extend of the excavation damaged zone. The shape and the scale of the underground opening, and whether the underground opening is backfilled after excavation, will affect the final stress state. It is important to understand the EDZ for the design, excavation and sealing of a repository. 3) Initial and boundary conditions of in situ experiments. Information about the EDZ is necessary for the design and interpretation of certain in situ experiments. (author)

  15. Long-term disturbance dynamics and resilience of tropical peat swamp forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Lydia E S; Bhagwat, Shonil A; Willis, Katherine J

    2015-01-01

    1. The coastal peat swamp forests of Sarawak, Malaysian Borneo, are undergoing rapid conversion, predominantly into oil palm plantations. This wetland ecosystem is assumed to have experienced insignificant disturbance in the past, persisting under a single ecologically-stable regime. However, there is limited knowledge of the past disturbance regime, long-term functioning and fundamentally the resilience of this ecosystem to changing natural and anthropogenic perturbations through time. 2. In this study, long-term ecological data sets from three degraded peatlands in Sarawak were collected to shed light on peat swamp forest dynamics. Fossil pollen and charcoal were counted in each sedimentary sequence to reconstruct vegetation and investigate responses to past environmental disturbance, both natural and anthropogenic. 3. Results demonstrate that peat swamp forest taxa have dominated these vegetation profiles throughout the last c . 2000-year period despite the presence of various drivers of disturbance. Evidence for episodes of climatic variability, predominantly linked to ENSO events, and wildfires is present throughout. However, in the last c . 500 years, burning and indicators of human disturbance have elevated beyond past levels at these sites, concurrent with a reduction in peat swamp forest pollen. 4. Two key insights have been gained through this palaeoecological analysis: (i) peat swamp forest vegetation has demonstrated resilience to disturbance caused by burning and climatic variability in Sarawak in the late Holocene, however (ii) coincident with increased fire combined with human impact c . 500 years ago, these communities started to decline. 5. Synthesis . Sarawak's coastal peat swamps have demonstrated resilience to past natural disturbances, with forest vegetation persisting through episodes of fire and climatic variability. However, palaeoecological data presented here suggest that recent, anthropogenic disturbances are of a greater magnitude

  16. How low can you go? Impacts of a low-flow disturbance on aquatic insect communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Annika W; Post, David M

    2011-01-01

    The natural hydrology of streams and rivers is being extensively modified by human activities. Water diversion, dam construction, and climate change have the potential to increase the frequency and intensity of low-flow events. Flow is a dominant force structuring stream aquatic insect communities, but the impacts of water diversion are poorly understood. Here we report results of an experimental stream flow diversion designed to test how aquatic insect communities respond to a low-flow disturbance. We diverted 40% to 80% of the water in three replicate streams for three summers, leading to summer flow exceedance probabilities of up to 99.9%. Shifts in habitat availability appeared to be a major driver of aquatic insect community responses. Responses also varied by habitat type: total insect density decreased in riffle habitats, but there was no change in pool habitats. Overall, the total biomass of aquatic insects decreased sharply with lowered flow. Collector-filterers, collector-gatherers, and scrapers were especially susceptible, while predatory insects were more resistant. Despite extremely low flow levels, there was no shift in aquatic insect family richness. The experimental water withdrawal did not increase water temperature or decrease water quality, and some wetted habitat was always maintained, which likely prevented more severe impacts on aquatic insect communities.

  17. The Storm Time Evolution of the Ionospheric Disturbance Plasma Drifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruilong; Liu, Libo; Le, Huijun; Chen, Yiding; Kuai, Jiawei

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, we use the C/NOFS and ROCSAT-1 satellites observations to analyze the storm time evolution of the disturbance plasma drifts in a 24 h local time scale during three magnetic storms driven by long-lasting southward IMF Bz. The disturbance plasma drifts during the three storms present some common features in the periods dominated by the disturbance dynamo. The newly formed disturbance plasma drifts are upward and westward at night, and downward and eastward during daytime. Further, the disturbance plasma drifts are gradually evolved to present significant local time shifts. The westward disturbance plasma drifts gradually migrate from nightside to dayside. Meanwhile, the dayside downward disturbance plasma drifts become enhanced and shift to later local time. The local time shifts in disturbance plasma drifts are suggested to be mainly attributed to the evolution of the disturbance winds. The strong disturbance winds arisen around midnight can constantly corotate to later local time. At dayside the westward and equatorward disturbance winds can drive the F region dynamo to produce the poleward and westward polarization electric fields (or the westward and downward disturbance drifts). The present results indicate that the disturbance winds corotated to later local time can affect the local time features of the disturbance dynamo electric field.

  18. Interaction of historical and nonhistorical disturbances maintains native plant communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, K W; Svejcar, T J; Bates, J D

    2009-09-01

    Historical disturbance regimes are often considered a critical element in maintaining native plant communities. However, the response of plant communities to disturbance may be fundamentally altered as a consequence of invasive plants, climate change, or prior disturbances. The appropriateness of historical disturbance patterns under modern conditions and the interactions among disturbances are issues that ecologists must address to protect and restore native plant communities. We evaluated the response of Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis (Beetle & A. Young) S.L. Welsh plant communities to their historical disturbance regime compared to other disturbance regimes. The historical disturbance regime of these plant communities was periodic fires with minimal grazing by large herbivores. We also investigated the influence of prior disturbance (grazing) on the response of these communities to subsequent disturbance (burning). Treatments were: (1) ungrazed (livestock grazing excluded since 1936) and unburned, (2) grazed and unburned, (3) ungrazed and burned (burned in 1993), and (4) grazed and burned. The ungrazed-burned treatment emulated the historical disturbance regime. Vegetation cover, density, and biomass production were measured the 12th, 13th, and 14th year post-burning. Prior to burning the presence of Bromus tectorum L., an exotic annual grass, was minimal (resilience to more severe disturbances. Modern deviations from historical conditions can alter ecosystem response to disturbances, thus restoring the historical disturbance regime may not be an appropriate strategy for all ecosystems.

  19. Influence of lead tetraethyl on the growth of Funaria hygrometrica L. and Marchantia polymorpha L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Krupińska

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of various lead tetraethyl concentrations (mixture added to petrol as antiknock agent on the growth and development of Funaria hygrometrica L. spores and of Marchantia polymorpha L. gemmulae was investigated. An inhibitory effect of the concentration applied was noted on germination and growth of spores and gemmulae development. Lead tetraethyl produces disturbances In the development of these plants, gradual degeneration of chloroplasts occurs and inhibition of growth leading to profusely branched "dwarf" forms. The disturbances are largely reversible.

  20. Associations between sleep disturbance and mental health status: a longitudinal study of Japanese junior high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneita, Yoshitaka; Yokoyama, Eise; Harano, Satoru; Tamaki, Tetsuo; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Munezawa, Takeshi; Nakajima, Hiromi; Asai, Takami; Ohida, Takashi

    2009-08-01

    A limited number of longitudinal studies have addressed the association between sleep disturbance and mental health status among adolescents. To examine whether each of these is a risk factor for the onset of the other, we conducted a prospective longitudinal study of Japanese adolescents. In 2004, we performed a baseline study of students attending three private junior high schools in Tokyo, and in 2006, a follow-up study was performed on the same population. The mean age of the subjects was 13 years. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index was used to evaluate sleep disturbance, and the 12-item General Health Questionnaire was used to evaluate mental health status. The subjects were 698 students, of whom 516 were suitable for analysis. The incidence of newly developed poor mental health status during the 2 years leading to the follow-up study was 35.1%. New onset of poor mental health status was significantly associated with new onset of sleep disturbance and lasting sleep disturbance. The incidence of sleep disturbance during the 2 years leading to the follow-up study was 33.3%. New onset of sleep disturbance was significantly associated with new onset of poor mental health status and lasting poor mental health status. Sleep disturbance and poor mental health status increase each other's onset risk.

  1. Immediate response of meio and macrobenthos to disturbance caused by a benthic disturber

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ingole, B.S.; Ansari, Z.A.; Matondkar, S.G.P.; Rodrigues, N.

    The probable impact of nodule mining on benthic biota was studied by creating a benthic disturbance. During the predisturbance study in the Central Indian Basin, box core samples were analyzed for the distribution, composition and abundance...

  2. ENHANCEMENT OF A SUNSPOT LIGHT WALL WITH EXTERNAL DISTURBANCES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Shuhong; Zhang, Jun [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Erdélyi, Robert, E-mail: shuhongyang@nao.cas.cn [Solar Physics and Space Plasma Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Sheffield, Hicks Building, Hounsfield Road, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom)

    2016-12-20

    Based on the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph observations, we study the response of a solar sunspot light wall to external disturbances. A flare occurrence near the light wall caused material to erupt from the lower solar atmosphere into the corona. Some material falls back to the solar surface and hits the light bridge (i.e., the base of the light wall), then sudden brightenings appear at the wall base followed by the rise of wall top, leading to an increase of the wall height. Once the brightness of the wall base fades, the height of the light wall begins to decrease. Five hours later, another nearby flare takes place, and a bright channel is formed that extends from the flare toward the light bridge. Although no obvious material flow along the bright channel is found, some ejected material is conjectured to reach the light bridge. Subsequently, the wall base brightens and the wall height begins to increase again. Once more, when the brightness of the wall base decays, the wall top fluctuates to lower heights. We suggest, based on the observed cases, that the interaction of falling material and ejected flare material with the light wall results in the brightenings of wall base and causes the height of the light wall to increase. Our results reveal that the light wall can be not only powered by the linkage of p -mode from below the photosphere, but may also be enhanced by external disturbances, such as falling material.

  3. Gastroesophageal reflux disease and vocal disturbances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Aparecida Coelho de Arruda Henry

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a chronic disease in which gastroduodenal contents reflux into the esophagus. The clinical picture of gastroesophageal reflux disease is usually composed by heartburn and regurgitation (typical manifestations. Atypical manifestations (vocal disturbances and asthma may also be complaint. OBJECTIVE: To analyse the clinical, endoscopic, manometric and pHmetric aspects of patients suffering from gastroesophageal reflux disease associated with vocal disturbances. METHODS: Fifty patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease were studied, including 25 with vocal disturbances (group 1 - G1 and 25 without these symptoms (group 2 - G2. All patients were submitted to endoscopy, manometry and esophageal pHmetry (2 probes. The group 1 patients were submitted to videolaryngoscopy. RESULTS: Endoscopic findings: non-erosive reflux disease was observed in 95% of G1 patients and 88% of G2. Videolaryngoscopy: vocal fold congestion, asymmetry, nodules and polyps were observed in G1 patients. Manometric findings: pressure in the lower esophageal sphincter (mm Hg: 11.6 ± 5.2 in G1 and 14.0 ± 6.2 in G2 (P = 0.14; pressure in the upper esophageal sphincter (mm Hg: 58.4 ± 15.9 in G1 and 69.5 ± 30.7 in the controls. pHmetric findings: De Meester index: 34.0 ± 20.9 in G1 and 15.4 ± 9.4 in G2 (P<0.001; number of reflux episodes in distal probe: 43.0 ± 20.4 in G1 and 26.4 ± 17.2 in G2 (P = 0.003; percentage of time with esophageal pH value lower than 4 units (distal sensor: 9.0% ± 6.4% in G1 and 3.4% ± 2.1% in G2 (P<0.001; number of reflux episodes in proximal probe: 7.5 ± 10.9 in G1 and 5.3 ± 5.7 in G2 (P = 0.38; percentage of time with esophageal pH values lower than 4 units (Proximal probe: 1.2 ± 2.7 in G1 and 0.5 ± 0.7 in G2 (P = 0.21. CONCLUSIONS: 1 The clinical, endoscopic, and manometric findings observed in patients with vocal disturbance do not differ from those without these symptoms; 2 gastroesophageal

  4. Space-use and habitat associations of Black-backed Woodpeckers (Picoides arcticus) occupying recently disturbed forests in the Black Hills, South Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher T. Rota; Mark A. Rumble; Joshua J. Millspaugh; Chadwick P. Lehman; Dylan C. Kesler

    2014-01-01

    Black-backed Woodpeckers (Picoides arcticus) are a disturbance-dependent species that occupy recently burned forest and mountain pine beetle (MPB) infestations. Forest management practices that reduce the amount of disturbed forest may lead to habitat loss for Black-backed Woodpeckers, which have recently been petitioned for listing under the Endangered Species Act. We...

  5. The interaction of land-use legacies and hurricane disturbance in subtropical wet forest: twenty-one years of change

    OpenAIRE

    Hogan, James Aaron; Zimmerman, Jess K.; Thompson, Jill; Nytch, Christopher J.; Uriarte, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Disturbance shapes plant communities over a wide variety of spatial and temporal scales. How natural and anthropogenic disturbance interact to shape ecological communities is highly variable and begs a greater understanding. We used five censuses spanning the years 1990–2011 from the 16-ha Luquillo Forest Dynamics Plot (LFDP) in northeast Puerto Rico to investigate the interplay of human land-use legacies dating to the early 20th century and two recent hurricanes (Hugo, 1989 and Georges, 1998...

  6. Lead isotope analyses of standard rock samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koide, Yoshiyuki; Nakamura, Eizo

    1990-01-01

    New results on lead isotope compositions of standard rock samples and their analytical procedures are reported. Bromide form anion exchange chromatography technique was adopted for the chemical separation lead from rock samples. The lead contamination during whole analytical procedure was low enough to determine lead isotope composition of common natural rocks. Silica-gel activator method was applied for emission of lead ions in the mass spectrometer. Using the data reduction of 'unfractionated ratios', we obtained good reproducibility, precision and accuracy on lead isotope compositions of NBS SRM. Here we present new reliable lead isotope compositions of GSJ standard rock samples and USGS standard rock, BCR-1. (author)

  7. Interannual Variations in Synoptic-Scale Disturbances over the Western North Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xingyan; Lu, Riyu; Chen, Guanghua; Wu, Liang

    2018-05-01

    The present study investigates the interannual variation of June-November synoptic disturbance activity over the western North Pacific (WNP) and its relationship with large-scale circulation for the period 1958-2014. Two leading modes of eddy kinetic energy for the disturbance variability over the WNP are obtained by EOF analysis, characterized by anomalous eddy kinetic energy over the subtropical WNP and around the Philippines, respectively. These modes explain a large portion of the interannual variance of synoptic disturbance activity over the WNP. Both are associated with lower-level cyclonic anomalies, but with different locations: over the subtropical WNP for the first mode and over the South China Sea for the second mode. Considering the impact of ENSO on synoptic disturbance activity over the WNP, we repeat the analyses after removing the effect of ENSO, which is simply defined as the components linearly regressed onto the Niño3.4 index, and find similar results, suggesting that the leading modes and their relationships with large-scale circulation exist without SST effects. Further analyses suggest that the meridional shear of zonal winds caused by cyclonic anomalies is crucial for maintaining the leading modes through barotropic conversion.

  8. Reaction Wheel Disturbance Model Extraction Software - RWDMES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaurock, Carl

    2009-01-01

    The RWDMES is a tool for modeling the disturbances imparted on spacecraft by spinning reaction wheels. Reaction wheels are usually the largest disturbance source on a precision pointing spacecraft, and can be the dominating source of pointing error. Accurate knowledge of the disturbance environment is critical to accurate prediction of the pointing performance. In the past, it has been difficult to extract an accurate wheel disturbance model since the forcing mechanisms are difficult to model physically, and the forcing amplitudes are filtered by the dynamics of the reaction wheel. RWDMES captures the wheel-induced disturbances using a hybrid physical/empirical model that is extracted directly from measured forcing data. The empirical models capture the tonal forces that occur at harmonics of the spin rate, and the broadband forces that arise from random effects. The empirical forcing functions are filtered by a physical model of the wheel structure that includes spin-rate-dependent moments (gyroscopic terms). The resulting hybrid model creates a highly accurate prediction of wheel-induced forces. It accounts for variation in disturbance frequency, as well as the shifts in structural amplification by the whirl modes, as the spin rate changes. This software provides a point-and-click environment for producing accurate models with minimal user effort. Where conventional approaches may take weeks to produce a model of variable quality, RWDMES can create a demonstrably high accuracy model in two hours. The software consists of a graphical user interface (GUI) that enables the user to specify all analysis parameters, to evaluate analysis results and to iteratively refine the model. Underlying algorithms automatically extract disturbance harmonics, initialize and tune harmonic models, and initialize and tune broadband noise models. The component steps are described in the RWDMES user s guide and include: converting time domain data to waterfall PSDs (power spectral

  9. An artificial intelligence approach towards disturbance analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiedler, U.; Lindner, A.; Baldeweg, F.; Klebau, J.

    1986-01-01

    Scale and degree of sophistication of technological plants, e.g. nuclear power plants, have been essentially increased during the last decades. Conventional disturbance analysis systems have proved to work successfully in well-known situations. But in cases of emergencies, the operator needs more advanced assistance in realizing diagnosis and therapy control. The significance of introducing artificial intelligence (AI) methods in nuclear power technology is emphasized. Main features of the on-line disturbance analysis system SAAP-2 are reported about. It is being developed for application to nuclear power plants. Problems related to man-machine communication will be gone into more detail, because their solution will influence end-user acceptance considerably. (author)

  10. Parkinson's Disease and Sleep/Wake Disturbances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd J. Swick

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD has traditionally been characterized by its cardinal motor symptoms of bradykinesia, rigidity, resting tremor, and postural instability. However, PD is increasingly being recognized as a multidimensional disease associated with myriad nonmotor symptoms including autonomic dysfunction, mood disorders, cognitive impairment, pain, gastrointestinal disturbance, impaired olfaction, psychosis, and sleep disorders. Sleep disturbances, which include sleep fragmentation, daytime somnolence, sleep-disordered breathing, restless legs syndrome (RLS, nightmares, and rapid eye movement (REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD, are estimated to occur in 60% to 98% of patients with PD. For years nonmotor symptoms received little attention from clinicians and researchers, but now these symptoms are known to be significant predictors of morbidity in determining quality of life, costs of disease, and rates of institutionalization. A discussion of the clinical aspects, pathophysiology, evaluation techniques, and treatment options for the sleep disorders that are encountered with PD is presented.

  11. Memory and learning disturbances in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izquierdo, Guillermo; Mir, Jordi; Gonzalez, Manuel; Martinez-Parra, Carlos; Campoy, Francisco Jr

    1991-01-01

    Thirty-five patients with definite multiple sclerosis (MS) were studied. They underwent neuropsychological testing and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The MRI findings at different brain areas levels were compared with the neuropsychological findings. A quantitative system was used to measure MRI-MS lesions. In this series, a positive correlation was established between memory and learning disturbances measured by Battery 144, and the lesions measured by MRI (total, hemispheric and , particularly, periventricular lesions). MRI can detect MS lesions, and this study shows that a correlation between MRI and neuropsychological findings is possible if quantitative methods are used to distinguish different MS involvement areas in relation to neuropsychological tasks. These findings suggest that hemispheric lesions in MS produce cognitive disturbances and MRI could be a useful tool in predicting memory and learning impairment. (author). 20 refs.; 1 fig.; 2 tabs

  12. [Alienation: Differential Psychopathology of Ego-Disturbances].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodatsch, M; Kuhn, J

    2016-11-01

    Alienation, i. e. disorders of the inner experience of integrity, continuity, and agency, represents a feature of both psychotic and non-psychotic disorders. Thereby, ego disturbances are thought to be specific for schizophrenia. Depersonalisation, in contrast, has been reported in schizophrenia as well as a neurotic, probably distinct syndrome. The differentiation of psychotic vs. non-psychotic alienation is often all but trivial. The present paper provides an overview of the historical roots and the psychopathological conceptualizations of alienation. Clinically relevant features of psychotic alienation are highlighted. Experience of passivity, loss of authenticity and disturbances of striving and volition appear as psychotic characteristics. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Sleep disturbances in myotonic dystrophy type 2

    OpenAIRE

    Shepard, Paul; Lam, Erek M.; St. Louis, Erik K.; Dominik, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    Sleep disorders in myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) are common and include sleep disordered breathing (SDB), hypersomnia, and fatigue. Little is known regarding the occurrence of sleep disturbance in myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2). We hypothesized that DM2 patients may frequently harbor sleep disorders. We reviewed medical records of all genetically confirmed cases of DM2 seen at our sleep center between 1997 and 2010 for demographic, laboratory, overnight oximetry, and polysomnography (PSG) ...

  14. Interceptive management of eruption disturbances: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozza, Paola; Marino, Alessandra; Lagana, Giuseppina

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the present report is to describe a case of a patient with eruption disturbances of an ankylosed lower primary second molar, delayed development of a maxillary permanent canine associated with an odontoma and a class III dental malocclusion. In such a case the objectives of treatment are: to prevent impaction of the lower second premolar and tipping of the lower first molar; to establish correct anterior overbite and overjet and to control the development of the permanent upper canine.

  15. Sleep disturbances in restless legs syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jović Jasmina

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Resteless legs syndrome (RLS is chronical neurological disorder characterized by urge to move legs that is usually accompanied by unpleasant sensations in the lower extremities. Sleep disturbance is one of the main accompanying symptoms of RLS which exists in approximatelly 90% of patients. Impairment of sleep is related to daily sleepiness, depressive and anxiety disorders. The aim of this study was to detect frequency and characterisitics of sleep-related symptoms in patients with RLS, and its impairrment to daily sleepiness, fatique, anxiety and depression. Methods. We have examinated 94 patients with RLS. The diagnose of RLS was based on questionnaire with 4 specific questions according to the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group (IRLSSG criteria updated in 2003. Severity of symptoms was astimated with IRLSSG Rating Scale, depression and anxiety with Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS and Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HARS and sleepiness with Epworth Sleepiness scale (ESS. We astimated sleep characteristics and disturbances with specific questionnaire. Results. In our study 79.9% of patients had sleep-related symptoms. Average sleep duration was 6.50 ± 1.42 hours, with average frequency of awakening 2.34 ± 1.69 times per night. Average ESS score was 5.12 ± 4.08 (0–17. Patients with more severe symptoms had higher degree of sleepiness (p = 0.005. Patients with higher symptoms frequency, significantly more often had sleep disturbance (p = 0.016, tiredness and daily sleepiness (p = 0.001. Daily sleepiness (ESS also significantly correlates with depression (p < 0.05 and anxiety (p = 0.012. Conclusion. Our results confirm that sleep disturbances are one of the key accompanying symptoms of RLS which cause daily sleepiness, tiredness, depression and anxiety. Therefore, their early recognition and appropriate treatment must be a priority in RLS patients.

  16. The role of natural zeolite and of zeolite modified with ammnonium ions to reduce the uptake of lead, zinc, copper and iron ions in Hieracium aurantium and Rumex acetosella grown on tailing ponds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anca PETER

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research is to determine if zeolite modified with ammonium ions has a higher capacity than natural zeolite to protect Hieracium aurantium and Rumex acetosella growing on tailing ponds, by reducing the quantity of metal ions these plants would accumulate in their roots and leaves. The influence of the amount of zeolite in the substrate (5% and 10% mass percentage was also studied. The experiments were carried out in laboratory and the concentration of the ions of heavy metal in roots and leaves, after 38 days of growth was established by Flame Atomic Adsorption Spectroscopy. The pH, conductivity and redox potential for each of the substrate considered were measured. The results were statistically processed using the one-way analysis of variance (one-way ANOVA. FTIR analyses were performed to establish the structural differences between the natural and modified zeolite. Hieracium aurantium and Rumex acetosella accumulate a smaller quantity of metal ions in roots and leaves in the presence of zeolite modified with ammonium ions than in the presence of natural zeolite. Laboratory tests showed that Hieracium aurantium is more tolerant to ions of heavy metals than Rumex acetosella, as demonstrated by their translocation factors.In terms of reducing the uptake of ions of heavy metals, only the zeolite modified with ammonium has a significant protective effecton Hieracium aurantium, while both natural zeolite and zeolite modified demonstrate a significant role for Rumex acetosella, asrevealed by statistical tests.

  17. Conservation of wildlife populations: factoring in incremental disturbance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Abbie; Komers, Petr E

    2017-06-01

    Progressive anthropogenic disturbance can alter ecosystem organization potentially causing shifts from one stable state to another. This potential for ecosystem shifts must be considered when establishing targets and objectives for conservation. We ask whether a predator-prey system response to incremental anthropogenic disturbance might shift along a disturbance gradient and, if it does, whether any disturbance thresholds are evident for this system. Development of linear corridors in forested areas increases wolf predation effectiveness, while high density of development provides a safe-haven for their prey. If wolves limit moose population growth, then wolves and moose should respond inversely to land cover disturbance. Using general linear model analysis, we test how the rate of change in moose ( Alces alces ) density and wolf ( Canis lupus ) harvest density are influenced by the rate of change in land cover and proportion of land cover disturbed within a 300,000 km 2 area in the boreal forest of Alberta, Canada. Using logistic regression, we test how the direction of change in moose density is influenced by measures of land cover change. In response to incremental land cover disturbance, moose declines occurred where 43% of land cover was disturbed and wolf density declined. Wolves and moose appeared to respond inversely to incremental disturbance with the balance between moose decline and wolf increase shifting at about 43% of land cover disturbed. Conservation decisions require quantification of disturbance rates and their relationships to predator-prey systems because ecosystem responses to anthropogenic disturbance shift across disturbance gradients.

  18. Dystrophin deficiency leads to disturbance of LAMP1-vesicle-associated protein secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duguez, S.; Duddy, W.; Johnston, H.

    2013-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy results from loss of the protein dystrophin, which links the intracellular cytoskeletal network with the extracellular matrix, but deficiency in this function does not fully explain the onset or progression of the disease. While some intracellular events involved...... in the degeneration of dystrophin-deficient muscle fibers have been well characterized, changes in their secretory profile are undescribed. To analyze the secretome profile of mdx myotubes independently of myonecrosis, we labeled the proteins of mdx and wild-type myotubes with stable isotope-labeled amino acids...

  19. Acid sphingomyelinase (aSMase) deficiency leads to abnormal microglia behavior and disturbed retinal function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dannhausen, Katharina; Karlstetter, Marcus; Caramoy, Albert [Laboratory for Experimental Immunology of the Eye, Department of Ophthalmology, University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany); Volz, Cornelia; Jägle, Herbert [Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospital Regensburg, Regensburg (Germany); Liebisch, Gerhard [Institute for Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, University Hospital Regensburg, Regensburg (Germany); Utermöhlen, Olaf [Institute for Medical Microbiology, Immunology and Hygiene and Center for Molecular Medicine Cologne, University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany); Langmann, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.langmann@uk-koeln.de [Laboratory for Experimental Immunology of the Eye, Department of Ophthalmology, University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany)

    2015-08-21

    Mutations in the acid sphingomyelinase (aSMase) coding gene sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase 1 (SMPD1) cause Niemann-Pick disease (NPD) type A and B. Sphingomyelin storage in cells of the mononuclear phagocyte system cause hepatosplenomegaly and severe neurodegeneration in the brain of NPD patients. However, the effects of aSMase deficiency on retinal structure and microglial behavior have not been addressed in detail yet. Here, we demonstrate that retinas of aSMase{sup −/−} mice did not display overt neuronal degeneration but showed significantly reduced scotopic and photopic responses in electroretinography. In vivo fundus imaging of aSMase{sup −/−} mice showed many hyperreflective spots and staining for the retinal microglia marker Iba1 revealed massive proliferation of retinal microglia that had significantly enlarged somata. Nile red staining detected prominent phospholipid inclusions in microglia and lipid analysis showed significantly increased sphingomyelin levels in retinas of aSMase{sup −/−} mice. In conclusion, the aSMase-deficient mouse is the first example in which microglial lipid inclusions are directly related to a loss of retinal function. - Highlights: • aSMase-deficient mice show impaired retinal function and reactive microgliosis. • aSMase-deficient microglia express pro-inflammatory transcripts. • aSMase-deficient microglia proliferate and have increased cell body size. • In vivo imaging shows hyperreflective spots in the fundus of aSMase-deficient mice. • aSMase-deficient microglia accumulate sphingolipid-rich intracellular deposits.

  20. Sleep disturbances in myotonic dystrophy type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, Paul; Lam, Erek M; St Louis, Erik K; Dominik, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    Sleep disorders in myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) are common and include sleep-disordered breathing, hypersomnia, and fatigue. Little is known regarding the occurrence of sleep disturbance in myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2). We hypothesized that DM2 patients may frequently harbor sleep disorders. We reviewed medical records of all genetically confirmed cases of DM2 seen at our sleep center between 1997 and 2010 for demographic, laboratory, overnight oximetry, and polysomnography (PSG) data. Eight patients (5 women, 3 men) with DM2 were identified. Excessive daytime sleepiness was seen in 6 patients (75%), insomnia in 5 (62.5%), and excessive fatigue in 4 (50%). Obstructive sleep apnea was diagnosed in 3 of 5 patients (60%) studied with PSG. Respiratory muscle weakness was present in all 6 patients (100%) who received pulmonary function testing. Four of 8 (50%) met criteria for diagnosis of restless legs syndrome. The clinical spectrum of DM2 may include a wide range of sleep disturbances. Although respiratory muscle weakness was frequent, sustained sleep-related hypoxia suggestive of hypoventilation was not seen in our patients. Further prospective studies are needed to examine the frequency and scope of sleep disturbances in DM2. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Sleep disturbance in older ICU patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sterniczuk R

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Roxanne Sterniczuk,1–3 Benjamin Rusak,1,2 Kenneth Rockwood31Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, 2Department of Psychiatry, Dalhousie University, Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Centre, Halifax, NS, 3Division of Geriatric Medicine, Department of Medicine, Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Centre, Halifax, NS, CanadaAbstract: Maintaining a stable and adequate sleeping pattern is associated with good health and disease prevention. As a restorative process, sleep is important for supporting immune function and aiding the body in healing and recovery. Aging is associated with characteristic changes to sleep quantity and quality, which make it more difficult to adjust sleep–wake rhythms to changing environmental conditions. Sleep disturbance and abnormal sleep–wake cycles are commonly reported in seriously ill older patients in the intensive care unit (ICU. A combination of intrinsic and extrinsic factors appears to contribute to these disruptions. Little is known regarding the effect that sleep disturbance has on health status in the oldest of old (80+, a group, who with diminishing physiological reserve and increasing prevalence of frailty, is at a greater risk of adverse health outcomes, such as cognitive decline and mortality. Here we review how sleep is altered in the ICU, with particular attention to older patients, especially those aged ≥80 years. Further work is required to understand what impact sleep disturbance has on frailty levels and poor outcomes in older critically ill patients.Keywords: intensive care unit, sleep–wake rhythm, aging, frailty

  2. Wetland restoration, flood pulsing, and disturbance dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Beth A.

    1999-01-01

    While it is generally accepted that flood pulsing and disturbance dynamics are critical to wetland viability, there is as yet no consensus among those responsible for wetland restoration about how best to plan for those phenomena or even whether it is really necessary to do so at all. In this groundbreaking book, Dr. Beth Middleton draws upon the latest research from around the world to build a strong case for making flood pulsing and disturbance dynamics integral to the wetland restoration planning process.While the initial chapters of the book are devoted to laying the conceptual foundations, most of the coverage is concerned with demonstrating the practical implications for wetland restoration and management of the latest ecological theory and research. It includes a fascinating case history section in which Dr. Middleton explores the restoration models used in five major North American, European, Australian, African, and Asian wetland projects, and analyzes their relative success from the perspective of flood pulsing and disturbance dynamics planning.Wetland Restoration also features a wealth of practical information useful to all those involved in wetland restoration and management, including: * A compendium of water level tolerances, seed germination, seedling recruitment, adult survival rates, and other key traits of wetland plant species * A bibliography of 1,200 articles and monographs covering all aspects of wetland restoration * A comprehensive directory of wetland restoration ftp sites worldwide * An extensive glossary of essential terms

  3. Disturbed oscillatory brain dynamics in subcortical ischemic vascular dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Straaten Elisabeth CW

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background White matter hyperintensities (WMH can lead to dementia but the underlying physiological mechanisms are unclear. We compared relative oscillatory power from electroencephalographic studies (EEGs of 17 patients with subcortical ischemic vascular dementia, based on extensive white matter hyperintensities (SIVD-WMH with 17 controls to investigate physiological changes underlying this diagnosis. Results Differences between the groups were large, with a decrease of relative power of fast activity in patients (alpha power 0.25 ± 0.12 versus 0.38 ± 0.13, p = 0.01; beta power 0.08 ± 0.04 versus 0.19 ± 0.07; p Conclusions This pattern of disturbance in oscillatory brain activity indicate loss of connections between neurons, providing a first step in the understanding of cognitive dysfunction in SIVD-WMH.

  4. What Happens in the Burn Zone Doesn't Stay in the Burn Zone: How Markets Distribute Disturbances Across the Landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloggy, M. R.; Plantinga, A.; Latta, G.

    2017-12-01

    The goal of this study is to examine how the interaction between human systems and land systems influences the extent and severity of forest disturbances. We show that human adaptation to forest disturbance has both long term and short term effects on future timber harvest patterns. We utilize a novel economic model of the forest sector which can be coupled to the Community Land Model (CLM). By simulating both pine beetle outbreaks and wildfires, we are able to model the forest sector's response to these disturbances. We then quantify and report the degree to which natural forest disturbance induces additional disturbances through timber harvest. We find that in the short run, a scarcity of forest products from the affected area increases prices which stimulate harvests in other regions not affected by the disturbance. In the long-run, we find that permanent effects that the natural disturbances have on the forest sector are translated into permanent effects on the pattern of timber harvest. The effects of forest disturbances are not localized, but instead can be distributed across the landscape by their interaction with the human system. Not accounting for this affect could mean a significant underestimation of the forest disturbance attributable to natural disturbance events. Furthermore, our novel economic model can be used with CLM to explore how this feedback may affect other aspects of the environmental system. The results from this study show the importance of accounting for how markets interact with the landscape, and how those results can be used to improve our understanding of both the natural impacts and social impacts of forest disturbance.

  5. Disturbance Observer-Based Backstepping Control of PMSM for the Mine Traction Electric Locomotive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiande Yan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available For the Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor (PMSM control system of the Mine Traction Electric Locomotive (MTEL, the fluctuation of the load will lead to the resonance of the velocity of the MTEL. In addition, the speed sensor is easy to be damaged due to the moisture, dust, and vibration. To solve the above problems, a disturbance observer-based (DOB backstepping control of PMSM for the MTEL is proposed in this paper. First, a full-dimensional Luenberger observer for PMSM is designed and the asymptotically stability of the observer is proved. Next, through the designing of the virtual control input that includes the reconstruction disturbances and using backstepping control strategy, the DOB controller is proposed. The obtained controller can achieve high precision speed tracking and disturbance rejection. Finally, the effectiveness and feasibility of the designed system are verified by Matlab simulation and experiment results.

  6. How development and disturbance of biological soil crust do affect runoff and erosion in drylands?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chamizo, S.; Canton, Y.; Afana, A.; Lazaro, R.; Domingo, F.; Sole-Benet, A.

    2009-07-01

    Deserts and semiarid ecosystems (shrub lands and grasslands) are the largest terrestrial biome, covering more than 40% of the Earth's terrestrial surface and Biological Soil Crusts (BSCs) are the predominant surface type in most of those ecosystems covering up to 70% of its surface. BSCs have been demonstrated to be very vulnerable to disturbance due to human activities and their loss has been implicated as a factor leading to accelerate soil erosion and other forms of land degradation. Incorporation of the response of different type of soil crusts and the effects of the their disturbance is likely to improve the prediction of runoff and water erosion models in arid and semi-arid catchments. The aim of this work is to analyse the influence of crust disturbance on infiltration and erosion. Extreme rainfall simulations at micro plots scale were performed in two semiarid ecosystems with different lithology and conditions of occurrence of BSCs: El Cautivo and Amoladeras. (Author) 10 refs.

  7. Sleep disturbances in critically ill patients in ICU: how much do we know?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyko, Y.; Ording, H.; Jennum, Poul

    2012-01-01

    the underlying literature. There are no studies of level 1 evidence proving the positive impact of the tested interventions on the critically ill patients sleep pattern. Thus, disturbed sleep in critically ill patients with all the severe consequences remains an unresolved problem and needs further investigation.......Sleep disturbances in the intensive care unit (ICU) seem to lead to development of delirium, prolonged ICU stay, and increased mortality. That is why sufficient sleep is important for good outcome and recovery in critically ill patients. A variety of small studies reveal pathological sleep patterns...... in critically ill patients including abnormal circadian rhythm, high arousal and awakening index, reduced Slow Wave Sleep, and Rapid Eye Movement sleep. The purpose of this study is to summarise different aspects of sleep-awake disturbances, causes and handling methods in critically ill patients by reviewing...

  8. How development and disturbance of biological soil crust do affect runoff and erosion in drylands?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamizo, S.; Canton, Y.; Afana, A.; Lazaro, R.; Domingo, F.; Sole-Benet, A.

    2009-01-01

    Deserts and semiarid ecosystems (shrub lands and grasslands) are the largest terrestrial biome, covering more than 40% of the Earth's terrestrial surface and Biological Soil Crusts (BSCs) are the predominant surface type in most of those ecosystems covering up to 70% of its surface. BSCs have been demonstrated to be very vulnerable to disturbance due to human activities and their loss has been implicated as a factor leading to accelerate soil erosion and other forms of land degradation. Incorporation of the response of different type of soil crusts and the effects of the their disturbance is likely to improve the prediction of runoff and water erosion models in arid and semi-arid catchments. The aim of this work is to analyse the influence of crust disturbance on infiltration and erosion. Extreme rainfall simulations at micro plots scale were performed in two semiarid ecosystems with different lithology and conditions of occurrence of BSCs: El Cautivo and Amoladeras. (Author) 10 refs.

  9. Post-operative sleep disturbance: causes, factors and effects on outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, J; Rosenberg-Adamsen, S; Kehlet, H

    1995-01-01

    Post-operative sleep disturbance, with suppression of rapid eye movement sleep and slow wave sleep followed by a subsequent rebound, seems to be related to the magnitude of trauma and thereby to the surgical stress response. In this context, cortisol, autonomic stimulation, and certain cytokines...... may lead to abnormal sleep. Furthermore, the environment, pain and the administration of analgesics seem to be important factors in the precipitation of sleep abnormalities. Post-operative sleep disturbance may contribute to the development of episodic hypoxaemia, haemodynamic instability and altered...... mental status, all of which have an influence on post-operative morbidity and mortality. Prevention or reduction of the post-operative sleep disturbance may be achieved by minimizing surgical trauma, changing the conventional nursing procedures, avoiding opioids and treating pain with non...

  10. Disturbance effect of music on processing of verbal and spatial memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanaga, Makoto; Ito, Takako

    2002-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the disturbance effect of music on performances of memory tasks. Subjects performed a verbal memory task and a spatial memory task in 4 sound conditions, including the presence of vocal music, instrumental music, a natural sound (murmurings of a stream), and no music. 47 undergraduate volunteers were randomly assigned to perform tasks under each condition. Perceived disturbance was highest under the vocal music condition regardless of the type of task. A disturbance in performance by music was observed only with the verbal memory task under the vocal and the instrumental music conditions. These findings were discussed from the perspectives of the working memory hypothesis and the changing state model.

  11. Therapeutic strategies for circadian rhythm and sleep disturbances in Huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wamelen, Daniel J; Roos, Raymund Ac; Aziz, Nasir A

    2015-12-01

    Aside from the well-known motor, cognitive and psychiatric signs and symptoms, Huntington disease (HD) is also frequently complicated by circadian rhythm and sleep disturbances. Despite the observation that these disturbances often precede motor onset and have a high prevalence, no studies are available in HD patients which assess potential treatments. In this review, we will briefly outline the nature of circadian rhythm and sleep disturbances in HD and subsequently focus on potential treatments based on findings in other neurodegenerative diseases with similarities to HD, such as Parkinson and Alzheimer disease. The most promising treatment options to date for circadian rhythm and sleep disruption in HD include melatonin (agonists) and bright light therapy, although further corroboration in clinical trials is warranted.

  12. Application of Kalman Filter for Estimating a Process Disturbance in a Building Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deuk-Woo Kim

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses an application of the Kalman filter for estimating a time-varying process disturbance in a building space. The process disturbance means a synthetic composite of heat gains and losses caused by internal heat sources e.g., people, lights, equipment, and airflows. It is difficult to measure and quantify the internal heat sources and airflows due to their dynamic nature and time-lag impact on indoor environment. To address this issue, a Kalman filter estimation method was used in this study. The Kalman filtering is well suited for situations when state variables of interest cannot be measured. Based on virtual and real experiments conducted in this study, it was found that the Kalman filter can be used to estimate the time-varying process disturbance in a building space.

  13. Sleep Disturbances in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis | Abbasi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sleep Disturbances in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis. ... that insomnia, pain and disease intensity were the most important factors that ... that sleep disturbances are frequent in patients with RA and may contribute to disease severity.

  14. Role of Physical Attractiveness in Peer Attribution of Psychological Disturbance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cash, Thomas F.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    The physical attractiveness stereotype was examined as it pertains to the attribution of psychological disturbance among peers. Consistent with the stereotype, attractive interviewees were judged as less disturbed with better prognosis than unattractive interviewees. (Author)

  15. Clinical implications of glycometabolic disturbances in acute coronary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmer, Jorik Rudolf

    2005-01-01

    Prevalence of glycometabolic disturbances in patients with a suspected acute coronary syndrome is high. One in three patients has signs of disturbed glucose metabolism and this condition is associated with previous or newly diagnosed coronary artery disease. Zie: Summary

  16. Disturbances catalyze the adaptation of forest ecosystems to changing climate conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thom, Dominik; Rammer, Werner; Seidl, Rupert

    2017-01-01

    The rates of anthropogenic climate change substantially exceed those at which forest ecosystems - dominated by immobile, long-lived organisms - are able to adapt. The resulting maladaptation of forests has potentially detrimental effects on ecosystem functioning. Furthermore, as many forest-dwelling species are highly dependent on the prevailing tree species, a delayed response of the latter to a changing climate can contribute to an extinction debt and mask climate-induced biodiversity loss. However, climate change will likely also intensify forest disturbances. Here, we tested the hypothesis that disturbances foster the reorganization of ecosystems and catalyze the adaptation of forest composition to climate change. Our specific objectives were (i) to quantify the rate of autonomous forest adaptation to climate change, (ii) examine the role of disturbance in the adaptation process, and (iii) investigate spatial differences in climate-induced species turnover in an unmanaged mountain forest landscape (Kalkalpen National Park, Austria). Simulations with a process-based forest landscape model were performed for 36 unique combinations of climate and disturbance scenarios over 1000 years. We found that climate change strongly favored European beech and oak species (currently prevailing in mid- to low-elevation areas), with novel species associations emerging on the landscape. Yet, it took between 357 and 706 years before the landscape attained a dynamic equilibrium with the climate system. Disturbances generally catalyzed adaptation and decreased the time needed to attain equilibrium by up to 211 years. However, while increasing disturbance frequency and severity accelerated adaptation, increasing disturbance size had the opposite effect. Spatial analyses suggest that particularly the lowest and highest elevation areas will be hotspots of future species change. We conclude that the growing maladaptation of forests to climate and the long lead times of autonomous

  17. Re-establishment of hummock topography promotes tree regeneration on highly disturbed moderate-rich fens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieffers, Victor J; Caners, Richard T; Ge, Hangfei

    2017-07-15

    Winter exploration of oil sands deposits underlying wooded fens mostly eliminates the hummock-hollow topography on drilling pads and the ice roads leading to them, after their abandonment in spring. Recovery of black spruce (Picea mariana (P. Mill.) B.S.P.) and tamarack (Larix laricina (Du Roi) K. Koch) on these disturbed peatlands is thought to depend on the recovery of hummock topography. In late winter, numerous large blocks of frozen peat (1.5 × 1.5 m) were lifted out of the flattened drilling pads and positioned beside their excavated hollows; this was done on six temporary pads. Four years later, the condition of the mounds and the regeneration of conifers from natural seed dispersal were assessed on these elevated mounds compared to adjacent flattened areas of the pads. Then, conifer seedling density was more than five times higher on elevated spots than the mostly flat, flood-prone areas between them, and seedling density was positively related to mound height and strength of seed source. Higher mounds tended to have larger seedlings. Mounds on some of the pads were heavily eroded down; these pads had peat with higher humification, and operationally these pads were also treated in late winter when peat was thawing and fractured into pieces during mound construction. Developing a large volume of elevated substrate that persists until natural hummock-forming mosses can establish is thought necessary for tree recruitment and the recovery of the habitat for the threatened woodland caribou of this region. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Method for evaluation of doses from ingestion of polonium, bismuth and lead as natural radioactive material(NORM); Metodo de evaluacion de dosis por ingestion de polonio, bismuto y plomo como materiales radiactivos naturales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pena, Vanessa; Puerta, Anselmo; Morales, Javier, E-mail: vpenam@ullal.edu.co, E-mail: japuerta@unal.edu.co, E-mail: jmorales@unal.cdu.co [Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Medellin (Colombia). Grupo de Fisica Radiologica

    2013-07-01

    In this work was carried out an evaluation of dose from ingestion of radioactive daughters of radon (lead, bismuth and polonium), taking into account ages from three months up to adult men, using the new model of the human alimentary tract HATM and methodology of calculating doses proposed by the ICRP publication 103, which allows the estimation of dose based on the concentration of the radionuclide present in the diet or in the water of consumption.

  19. Lead (Pb) Air Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Regional Offices Labs and Research Centers Lead (Pb) Air Pollution Contact Us Share As a result of EPA's ... and protect aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. Lead (Pb) Air Pollution Basic Information How does lead get in the ...

  20. Impulsive Flocking of Dynamical Multiagent Systems with External Disturbances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujun Han

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Flocking motion of multiagent systems is influenced by various external disturbances in complex environment. By applying disturbance observer, flocking of multiagent systems with exogenous disturbances is studied. Based on the robust features of impulsive control, a distributed impulsive control protocol is presented with disturbance observer, and flocking motion of multiagent systems is analyzed. Moreover, a sufficient condition is obtained to ensure the flocking motion of multiagent systems following a leader. Finally, simulation results show the validity of the theoretical conclusion.

  1. Evolution Of The Cloud Field And Wind Structure Of Ntb Disturbance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrado-Izagirre, Naiara; Pérez-Hoyos, S.; García-Melendo, E.; Sánchez-Lavega, A.

    2009-09-01

    The banded visual aspect of cloud patterns in Jupiter hides markedly turbulent areas visible in high resolution images. The North Temperate Belt (NTB) at 21° N planetocentric latitude where the most intense Jovian jet resides (with speeds of 160 - 180 m/s) is a region of particular interest because it is known to suffer almost every 15 years an eruption or disturbance which dramatically changes its appearance. This phenomenon is known as NTB Disturbance (NTBD). The last one of such disturbances happened in 2007 and was captured by the Hubble Space Telescope and with lower resolution by the "International Outer Planet Watch” (IOPW) network [Sánchez-Lavega et al., 2008. Depth of a strong Jovian jet from a planetary-scale disturbance driven by storms, Nature 451.]. In this work we make use of these observations to characterize the morphology of the disturbed cloud field in the wake of the plumes which originated the perturbation. This is done mostly in terms of the brightness spectral distribution in order to characterize the typical spatial frequency of the perturbation and its wavy and turbulent nature. In addition we make a comparison of the jet profile in the NTB just after the disturbance ended (June 2007) with one obtained year later (July 2008). It shows that a change occurred in its anticyclonic side producing a reinforced westward jet at 17°N with a speed change of 30 m/s. Acknowledgments: This work has been funded by Spanish MEC AYA2006-07735 with FEDER support and Grupos Gobierno Vasco IT-464-07

  2. Vulnerability of high-latitude soil organic carbon in North America to disturbance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse, Guido; Harden, Jennifer W.; Turetsky, Merritt; McGuire, A. David; Camill, Philip; Tarnocai, Charles; Frolking, Steve; Schuur, Edward A.G.; Jorgenson, Torre; Marchenko, Sergei; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Wickland, Kimberly P.; French, Nancy; Waldrop, Mark P.; Bourgeau-Chavez, Laura L.; Striegl, Robert G.

    2011-01-01

    This synthesis addresses the vulnerability of the North American high-latitude soil organic carbon (SOC) pool to climate change. Disturbances caused by climate warming in arctic, subarctic, and boreal environments can result in significant redistribution of C among major reservoirs with potential global impacts. We divide the current northern high-latitude SOC pools into (1) near-surface soils where SOC is affected by seasonal freeze-thaw processes and changes in moisture status, and (2) deeper permafrost and peatland strata down to several tens of meters depth where SOC is usually not affected by short-term changes. We address key factors (permafrost, vegetation, hydrology, paleoenvironmental history) and processes (C input, storage, decomposition, and output) responsible for the formation of the large high-latitude SOC pool in North America and highlight how climate-related disturbances could alter this pool's character and size. Press disturbances of relatively slow but persistent nature such as top-down thawing of permafrost, and changes in hydrology, microbiological communities, pedological processes, and vegetation types, as well as pulse disturbances of relatively rapid and local nature such as wildfires and thermokarst, could substantially impact SOC stocks. Ongoing climate warming in the North American high-latitude region could result in crossing environmental thresholds, thereby accelerating press disturbances and increasingly triggering pulse disturbances and eventually affecting the C source/sink net character of northern high-latitude soils. Finally, we assess postdisturbance feedbacks, models, and predictions for the northern high-latitude SOC pool, and discuss data and research gaps to be addressed by future research.

  3. How disturbance, competition, and dispersal interact to prevent tree range boundaries from keeping pace with climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yu; Duveneck, Matthew J; Gustafson, Eric J; Serra-Diaz, Josep M; Thompson, Jonathan R

    2018-01-01

    Climate change is expected to cause geographic shifts in tree species' ranges, but such shifts may not keep pace with climate changes because seed dispersal distances are often limited and competition-induced changes in community composition can be relatively slow. Disturbances may speed changes in community composition, but the interactions among climate change, disturbance and competitive interactions to produce range shifts are poorly understood. We used a physiologically based mechanistic landscape model to study these interactions in the northeastern United States. We designed a series of disturbance scenarios to represent varied disturbance regimes in terms of both disturbance extent and intensity. We simulated forest succession by incorporating climate change under a high-emissions future, disturbances, seed dispersal, and competition using the landscape model parameterized with forest inventory data. Tree species range boundary shifts in the next century were quantified as the change in the location of the 5th (the trailing edge) and 95th (the leading edge) percentiles of the spatial distribution of simulated species. Simulated tree species range boundary shifts in New England over the next century were far below (usually change (usually more than 110 km over 100 years) under a high-emissions scenario. Simulated species` ranges shifted northward at both the leading edge (northern boundary) and trailing edge (southern boundary). Disturbances may expedite species' recruitment into new sites, but they had little effect on the velocity of simulated range boundary shifts. Range shifts at the trailing edge tended to be associated with photosynthetic capacity, competitive ability for light and seed dispersal ability, whereas shifts at the leading edge were associated only with photosynthetic capacity and competition for light. This study underscores the importance of understanding the role of interspecific competition and disturbance when studying tree range

  4. Association between Sleep Disturbances and Leisure Activities in the Elderly: A Comparison between Men and Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellström, Amanda; Hellström, Patrik; Willman, Ania; Fagerström, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    It has been suggested that physical or social activity is associated with fewer sleep disturbances among elderly people. Women report more sleep disturbances than men, which could indicate a variation in activity patterns between the genders. The aim of this study was to investigate associations between sleep disturbances and leisure activities in men and women (n = 945) aged ≥60 years in a Swedish population. Sleep disturbances were measured using eight dichotomous questions and seventeen variables, covering a wide range of leisure activities. Few leisure activities were found to be associated with sleep disturbances and their importance decreased when the models were adjusted for confounders and gender interactions. After clustering the leisure activities and investigating individual activities, sociointellectual activities were shown to be significant for sleep. However, following adjustment for confounders and gender interactions, home maintenance was the only activity significant for sleep. Being a female increased the effect of home maintenance. Besides those leisure activities, poor/fair self-rated health (OR 7.50, CI: 4.27-11.81) and being female (OR 4.86, CI: 2.75-8.61) were found to have the highest association with poor sleep. Leisure activities pursued by elderly people should focus on activities of a sociointellectual nature, especially among women, to promote sleep.

  5. Association between Sleep Disturbances and Leisure Activities in the Elderly: A Comparison between Men and Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Hellström

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that physical or social activity is associated with fewer sleep disturbances among elderly people. Women report more sleep disturbances than men, which could indicate a variation in activity patterns between the genders. The aim of this study was to investigate associations between sleep disturbances and leisure activities in men and women (n = 945 aged ≥60 years in a Swedish population. Sleep disturbances were measured using eight dichotomous questions and seventeen variables, covering a wide range of leisure activities. Few leisure activities were found to be associated with sleep disturbances and their importance decreased when the models were adjusted for confounders and gender interactions. After clustering the leisure activities and investigating individual activities, sociointellectual activities were shown to be significant for sleep. However, following adjustment for confounders and gender interactions, home maintenance was the only activity significant for sleep. Being a female increased the effect of home maintenance. Besides those leisure activities, poor/fair self-rated health (OR 7.50, CI: 4.27–11.81 and being female (OR 4.86, CI: 2.75–8.61 were found to have the highest association with poor sleep. Leisure activities pursued by elderly people should focus on activities of a sociointellectual nature, especially among women, to promote sleep.

  6. Macroinvertebrate community responses to a dewatering disturbance gradient in a restored stream

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. Muehlbauer

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Dewatering disturbances are common in aquatic systems and represent a relatively untapped field of disturbance ecology, yet studying dewatering events along gradients in non-dichotomous (i.e. wet/dry terms is often difficult. Because many stream restorations can essentially be perceived as planned hydrologic manipulations, such systems can make ideal test-cases for understanding processes of hydrological disturbance. In this study we used an experimental drawdown in a 440 ha stream/wetland restoration site to assess aquatic macroinvertebrate community responses to dewatering and subsequent rewetting. The geomorphic nature of the site and the design of the restoration allowed dewatering to occur predictably along a gradient and decoupled the hydrologic response from any geomorphic (i.e. habitat heterogeneity effects. In the absence of such heterogeneous habitat refugia, reach-scale wetted perimeter and depth conditions exerted a strong control on community structure. The community exhibited an incremental response to dewatering severity over the course of this disturbance, which was made manifest not as a change in community means but as an increase in community variability, or dispersion, at each site. The dewatering also affected inter-species abundance and distributional patterns, as dewatering and rewetting promoted alternate species groups with divergent habitat tolerances. Finally, our results indicate that rapid rewetting – analogous to a hurricane breaking a summer drought – may represent a recovery process rather than an additional disturbance and that such processes, even in newly restored systems, may be rapid.

  7. Forest Disturbance Across the Conterminous United States from 1985-2012: The Emerging Dominance of Forest Decline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Warren B.; Yang, Zhiqiang; Stehman, Stephen; Schroeder, Todd; Bell, David M.; Masek, Jeffrey; Huang, Chengquan; Meigs, Garrett W.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence of shifting dominance among major forest disturbance agent classes regionally to globally has been emerging in the literature. For example, climate-related stress and secondary stressors on forests (e.g., insect and disease, fire) have dramatically increased since the turn of the century globally, while harvest rates in the western US and elsewhere have declined. For shifts to be quantified, accurate historical forest disturbance estimates are required as a baseline for examining current trends. We report annual disturbance rates (with uncertainties) in the aggregate and by major change causal agent class for the conterminous US and five geographic subregions between 1985 and 2012. Results are based on human interpretations of Landsat time series from a probability sample of 7200 plots (30 m) distributed throughout the study area. Forest disturbance information was recorded with a Landsat time series visualization and data collection tool that incorporates ancillary high-resolution data. National rates of disturbance varied between 1.5% and 4.5% of forest area per year, with trends being strongly affected by shifting dominance among specific disturbance agent influences at the regional scale. Throughout the time series, national harvest disturbance rates varied between one and two percent, and were largely a function of harvest in the more heavily forested regions of the US (Mountain West, Northeast, and Southeast). During the first part of the time series, national disturbance rates largely reflected trends in harvest disturbance. Beginning in the mid-90s, forest decline-related disturbances associated with diminishing forest health (e.g., physiological stress leading to tree canopy cover loss, increases in tree mortality above background levels), especially in the Mountain West and Lowland West regions of the US, increased dramatically. Consequently, national disturbance rates greatly increased by 2000, and remained high for much of the decade. Decline

  8. Mapping forest canopy disturbance in the Upper Great Lakes, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    James D. Garner; Mark D. Nelson; Brian G. Tavernia; Charles H. (Hobie) Perry; Ian W. Housman

    2015-01-01

    A map of forest canopy disturbance was generated for Michigan, Wisconsin, and most of Minnesota using 42 Landsat time series stacks (LTSS) and a vegetation change tracker (VCTw) algorithm. Corresponding winter imagery was used to reduce commission errors of forest disturbance by identifying areas of persistent snow cover. The resulting disturbance age map was classed...

  9. Conservation of disturbance-dependent birds in eastern North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    William C. Hunter; David A. Buehler; Ronald A. Canterbury; John L. Confer; Paul B. Hamel

    2001-01-01

    Populations of most bird species associated with grassland, shrub-scrub habitats, and disturbed areas in forested habitats (hereafter all referred to as disturbance-dependent species) have declined steeply. However, a widespread perception exists that disturbance-dependent species are merely returning to population levels likely found by the first European explorers...

  10. Changes in Soil Fungal Community Structure with Increasing Disturbance Frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyunjun; Kim, Mincheol; Tripathi, Binu; Adams, Jonathan

    2017-07-01

    Although disturbance is thought to be important in many ecological processes, responses of fungal communities to soil disturbance have been little studied experimentally. We subjected a soil microcosm to physical disturbance, at a range of frequencies designed to simulate ecological disturbance events. We analyzed the fungal community structure using Illumina HiSeq sequencing of the ITS1 region. Fungal diversity was found to decline with the increasing disturbance frequencies, with no sign of the "humpback" pattern found in many studies of larger sedentary organisms. There is thus no evidence of an effect of release from competition resulting from moderate disturbance-which suggests that competition and niche overlap may not be important in limiting soil fungal diversity. Changing disturbance frequency also led to consistent differences in community composition. There were clear differences in OTU-level composition, with different disturbance treatments each having distinct fungal communities. The functional profile of fungal groups (guilds) was changed by the level of disturbance frequency. These predictable differences in community composition suggest that soil fungi can possess different niches in relation to disturbance frequency, or time since last disturbance. Fungi appear to be most abundant relative to bacteria at intermediate disturbance frequencies, on the time scale we studied here.

  11. Development of a Scale To Assess Emotional Disturbance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Michael H.; Cullinan, Douglas; Ryser, Gail; Pearson, Nils

    2002-01-01

    This study reports on the standardization of the Scale for Assessing Emotional Disturbance. Data collected on 2,266 typical students (ages 5- 18) and 1,371 students with emotional disturbances led to the identification of six behavioral problem factors that correspond to the federal definition of emotional disturbance and were highly internally…

  12. Effects of climate change on ecological disturbances [Chapter 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielle M. Malesky; Barbara J. Bentz; Gary R. Brown; Andrea R. Brunelle; John M. Buffington; Linda M. Chappell; R. Justin DeRose; John C. Guyon; Carl L. Jorgensen; Rachel A. Loehman; Laura L. Lowrey; Ann M. Lynch; Marek Matyjasik; Joel D. McMillin; Javier E. Mercado; Jesse L. Morris; Jose F. Negron; Wayne G. Padgett; Robert A. Progar; Carol B. Randall

    2018-01-01

    This chapter describes disturbance regimes in the Intermountain Adaptation Partnership (IAP) region, and potential shifts in these regimes as a consequence of observed and projected climate change. The term "disturbance regime" describes the general temporal and spatial characteristics of a disturbance agent (e.g., insects, disease, fire, weather, human...

  13. Suppressing non-periodically repeating disturbances in mechanical servo systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tousain, R.L.; Boissy, J.C.; Norg, M.L.; Steinbuch, M.; Bosgra, O.H.

    1998-01-01

    Non-periodically repeating (NPR) disturbances are fixed-shape disturbances that occur randomly in time. We can provide a control system with the capability to suppress this type of disturbance by adding in parallel to the input of the nominal feedback controller a learning look-up-table based

  14. A neurological and biochemical study of early lead poisoning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashby, J A.S.

    1980-05-01

    Motor nerve conduction velocities in 194 workers exposed to lead in a battery factory were compared with those of 94 age-matched controls. Changes in nerve conduction velocities of the 94 lead workers were found to have occurred. All mean maximum motor nerve conducting velocities measured were significantly lower in the lead-exposed group than in the control group. There was no statistically significant correlation to indicate that progressive slowing of nerve conduction was associated with increasing exposure to lead or with the commonly measured biochemical changes associated with disturbed haemopoiesis in lead exposure. Results suggest that the onset of nerve conduction changes occurs within two years.

  15. Thermospheric/ionospheric disturbances under quiet and magneto-perturbed conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharov, Ivan G.; Mozgovaya, O. L.

    2003-04-01

    The basic mechanisms of ionospheric storms (IS) are investigated sufficiently full. Despite of it a quantitative forecast of ionospheric disturbance is not always satisfactory. One of the possible causes can be related to the insufficient account of a background ionospheric. In particualr using electron concentration Ne in the peak of F2-region and total electron content are shown, that the amplitude of a IS positive phase for similar magnetic storms can differ by ~1,5 times. Hence a cause of distinction can be variations in the thermosphere conditions, not reflected by known activity indices. For further research we used the incoherent scatter radar data of the Institute of ionosphere in height range 200-1000 km in the very quiet periods coming to the geomagnetic disturbance. A steady periodic disturbance in Ne during quiet conditions in all heights is established, which can be identified as tidal moda m=6. The amplitude of wave is ~15%, the phase changes with a height. The storm onset leads to an increase of the amplitudes approximately twice without a change in the phase. An ionospheric disturbance in very quiet conditions can lead to additional complicating an ionosphere reaction to magnetic storm.

  16. Identification of Individuals with Serious Emotional Disturbance Using the Draw a Person: Screening Procedure for Emotional Disturbance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeish, Timothy J.; Naglieri, Jack A.

    1993-01-01

    Regular education students (n=81) and students with serious emotional disturbance (n=81,) were matched on age (7-13), gender, race, and intelligence. They completed drawings which were scored using the "Draw a Person: Screening Procedure for Emotional Disturbance." Students with emotional disturbance scored significantly higher than did…

  17. Time properties of ionospheric wave disturbances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaliev, M.Z.; Krasnikov, I.M.; Litvinov, Yu.G.; Chakenov, B.D.; Yakovets, A.F.

    1989-01-01

    Records of Doppler frequency shifts of an ionospheric signal, taken in separate observation posts in the vicinity of Alma-Ata in 1986-1987, are analyzed. It is shown that the coherent parts of Doppler shift oscillations are wave disturbance trains in the ionospheric F region. The relation between the train duration and its central frequency is established. With the frequency decrease the mean train length increases, while the maximum train length, determined in the experiment, is about 6h. The probabilities of train detection in the low and high-frequency ranges are nearly the same, and moreover, they are equal in day time and at night

  18. Neurological and Sleep Disturbances in Bronchiectasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Seng Phua

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Bronchiectasis unrelated to cystic fibrosis is a chronic lung disease that is increasingly recognised worldwide. While other common chronic lung conditions such as chronic obstructive lung disease have been associated with cardiovascular disease, there is a paucity of data on the relationship between bronchiectasis and cardiovascular risks such as stroke and sleep disturbance. Furthermore, it is unclear whether other neuropsychological aspects are affected, such as cognition, cerebral infection, anxiety and depression. In this review, we aim to highlight neurological and sleep issues in relation to bronchiectasis and their importance to patient care.

  19. [Natural factors influencing sleep].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurkowski, Marek K; Bobek-Billewicz, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Sleep is a universal phenomenon of human and animal lives, although the importance of sleep for homeo-stasis is still unknown. Sleep disturbances influence many behavioral and physiologic processes, leading to health complications including death. On the other hand, sleep improvement can beneficially influence the course of healing of many disorders and can be a prognostic of health recovery. The factors influencing sleep have different biological and chemical origins. They are classical hormones, hypothalamic releasing and inhibitory hormones, neuropeptides, peptides and others as cytokines, prostaglandins, oleamid, adenosine, nitric oxide. These factors regulate most physiologic processes and are likely elements integrating sleep with physiology and physiology with sleep in health and disorders.

  20. Cryogenic current leads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zizek, F.

    1982-01-01

    Theoretical, technical and design questions are examined of cryogenic current leads for SP of magnetic systems. Simplified mathematical models are presented for the current leads. To illustrate modeling, the calculation is made of the real current leads for 500 A and three variants of current leads for 1500 A for the enterprise ''Shkoda.''